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Pioneer Review, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
by Del Bartels The Rush Funeral Home’s main chapel will be moving from 203 W. Pine Street to 165 East Highway 14, in Philip. The new building should be completed by this fall. “Gayle and I have lived in a funeral home, or next to one, most of our married life,” said Jack Rush. This move of the funeral home, and the conversion of the current site to a traditional home, will change that. “This was actually built as a funeral home, but has been added on to three times,” said Rush. Jack and Gayle met in 1967 and married in 1968, while Jack was completing his apprenticeship in Madison. He had graduated from the Wisconsin Institute of Mortuary Science in Milwaukee. Originally, Jack had become interested in the funeral profession after a neighbor boy was killed and Jack was one of the pallbearers. In that era, the work of the funeral director could include being the county coroner as well as running the ambulance. The hearse, actually a “combination unit,” converted into an ambulance when needed. That is only one way the funeral home business has changed over the years. It used to include digging the graves, making the surface vaults, performing the “full funeral service, then changing clothes and filling in the grave,” said Jack. Today, there are specific gravediggers and the vaults are brought in from suppliers. The Rushes moved to Chamberlain for a short time, where Jack’s duties still included ambulance work. In 1969, now in the big city of Sioux City, Iowa, he no longer had to do the ambulance part or the cemetery work. In 1977, they moved to Sioux Falls, where he worked as a funeral director until moving to Philip in December 1983. “I was 37, and my goal in life was to own my own funeral home. I thought, if I’m going to work that many hours, I might as well work for myself,” said Jack. He had previously held a high school summer job at the Wall Drug Store. So, when he heard from a supply sales-
Rush Funeral Home moving Kennedy Implement earns Dealership of the Year
Pioneer review
Number 48 Volume 106 July 26, 2012
From left: Jack, Gayle, Margaret and D.J. Rush. man that the funeral home owned by W.E. “Woody” and Ruth Woodall was for sale, he investigated. In 1983, the Rushes moved to Philip to operate the funeral home, as well as the visitation chapels in Wall and in Kadoka. Robert “Bob” Coyle stayed on and became Jack’s right-hand man. “He was always there and willing to help, and Sharon, Bob’s wife, answered the phone,” said Jack. “After Bob died (July 4, 2000), Gayle came aboard and has worked faithfully ever since; a real asset to the funeral home. Someone has to be able to answer the phones 24/7, know what is going on and able to answer questions,” said Jack. Gayle graduated from Mount Marty College with a degree in social work. “I’ve never had a social work job in my life, but I use social work every day of my life,” said Gayle. Jack’s sister has also come on board this year to shoulder some of the office load. Jack joked, “Maybe this place will be a bed and breakfast; I’m going to sleep here and Gayle’s going to feed me?” The Rushes have raised three
Photo by Del Bartels
children, Lisa Moon, Creighton, Bridgett Stark, Breese, Ill., and Daniel John (D.J.), Philip. D.J. is now the second half of the ownership/management of Rush Funeral Home. “I grew up here, in this house, and around it (the business), so I knew it was definitely what I did not want to do!” said D.J. Only after three years in the Army, and then earning an economics degree from South Dakota State University, did he consider entering into the funeral home business. By January 2001, D.J. had completed his mortuary science degree at the University of Minnesota and his apprenticeship in Brookings. His mortuary graduating class started with around 30 students, with half not continuing. “The attrition rate isn’t very good,” said D.J. Now, he is part of the business. “You know just about everybody and it’s worked out well, most of the time. The work environment is okay. There are tough days in whatever you are doing.” continued on page
Kennedy Implement employees, from left: Charlie Dale, James Mansfield, Milke Miller, Dave Walker, Roger Williams, Rudy Roth, Brad Gebes, Darin Naescher and Kent Buchholz, with Mark Buchholz in front. Not pictured: Theo Fitch and Becky Brech. Photos by Del Bartels Kennedy Implement, Philip, has been chosen as the 2012 Dealership of the Year by Farm Equipment magazine. Farm Equipment presents its Dealership of the Year awards annually to farm machinery dealers in two categories. One is for those with annual sales revenues of under $50 million and the other for dealers with more than $50 million in annual sales revenues. Kennedy Implement earned the distinction in the under $50 million in annual sales revenue category this year, not only for its outstanding financial and operating performance that has seen significant growth over the past three years, but also for its demonstrated commitment to employee training and community involvement, as well as its renowned customer service. Kennedy Implement is a New Holland and McCormick dealer. It also carries Woods, Westfield, Wheatheart, Brandt, Walinga, SnoBlast/ TeamCo, Grass-hopper, and Vermeer, along with other lines available through distribution. The dealership was chosen for the award by a panel of renowned farm equipment experts. In their selection of Kennedy Implement as Farm Equipment’s Dealership of the Year for 2012, the judges noted, “The staff consists of 11 employees who really produce. The dealership had the highest ‘dollars generated per employee’ at $1,247,532. This is a very strong number when you consider the smaller staff size. Their return on assests was the highest of all nominees at 22 percent. They had the highest market share and their absorption rate was also the highest of all nominees in the small dealership category. The staff believes in a team concept ... ‘If one fails, we all fail.’ This concept helped them receive the number one market share in South Dakota for ag tractors and hay tools. The judges unanimously agreed that Kennedy Implement was deserving of the 2012 first place award in the small dealership category.” The judging panel included Dr. W. David Downey, director, Center for Agricultural Business, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.; David L. Kahler, retired chief executive officer of the Ohio-Michigan Equipment Dealers Association, Dublin, Ohio; and Charles Glass, president, Glass Management Group, Arlington, Texas. Originally founded in 1943, Kennedy Implement has seen significant changes in all aspects of the dealership over the last five years. Mark Buchholz took over management of the dealership in 2008, and then purchased it from the previous owner, Denny Kennedy, in 2010. This change has brought on a new direction in the day-to-day operations. Since Buchholz purchased the dealership, they have added Grasshopper, Woods, Brandt and Vermeer to the already continued on page
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Livestock feeding and management strategies altered during drought
by Nancy Haigh Producers need to be aware of toxicity factors in water and grains they plan to feed to animals as the drought has caused concentrated levels of sulfates in waters and nitrogens in grains and corn. Adele Harty, Extension cow/calf specialist at the Rapid City Regional Extension Center, noted that test results are showing both. She said 80 percent of the water samples brought into local offices are above thresholds that require further testing. Of those, she said, 50 percent are coming back high in sulfates. “There are some pretty serious concerns out there,” she said. Along with chance of high sulfates, is that the drought is concentrating nitrogen levels in the grains. Harty urges producers to have nitrate levels checked prior to harvesting the crops. Oats and barley recently tested showed levels from just below the toxic level to a point three times past the toxic level. “Grazing could possibly be a better option for drought-stressed corn, as the highest concentration tends to be in the bottom third of the stalk, with the leaves having lower nitrates,” Harty said. She did warn that the leaves could be higher in prussic acid, which also inhibits the uptake of oxygen by the cells. Milesville veterinarian Jim Stangle cautioned producers who choose to graze their corn, to remove the livestock before they start eating the stalks. He said they will eat the ears and leaves first, and with careful monitoring, the cattle will be fine. Some producers are looking at chopping their corn for silage. Beware, said Harty, for silage does
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Winter wheat harvest good – other crops succumbing to 2012 drought
by Nancy Haigh With temperatures topping the 100 degree mark for several days crops and rangeland that were already in trouble are taking a hit they can’t afford. Lack of fall rains, an open winter and few good soaking rains have created a less than ideal growing season. But, the one shining moment in all of this, said John Rickertson, South Dakota State University agronomy field specialist, Rapid City, is that the winter wheat yields are coming in at 40 bushels, with good protein levels too. Duke Westerberg, Farm Service Agency director for Haakon County said some producers were bringing in 20 bushel wheat in those areas of the county which received heavy hail. The rest are bringing in the 40 bushel range, which is normal said Lukas Mayfield, Midwest Cooperatives, elevator manager. Rickertson said, the season was two weeks ahead of normal and the rains that western South Dakota did receive came at just the right time for the wheat. The cool weather in May and June also helped the wheat crop, he said. The test weights for winter wheat are coming in at 62 to 63 pounds, which is very good. “We expected the test weights to be the opposite,” he said. Protein levels are staying up at the 12.5 to 13 range, which is right at normal, said Les Pearson, manager at Dakota Mill & Grain in Philip. He said the wheat that was harvested was good, but the low quality fields were baled. Rickertson noted that prices for wheat continue to rise, which may be a boone to the producer, especially during a year in which they may not get anything else. Short alfalfa and pasture grasses have producers concerned for the coming winter months. Some producers have gone ahead and hayed their grain fields. While some producers have tried to cut and bale their alfalfa, others are grazing it now, or plan to later. Some area producers who hayed their alfalfa said they got one bale off of about 20 acres of land. Grasses are topping out at about six to eight inches. Which could possibly lead to producers feeding more hay this fall. The corn production was going well until the temps turned into the 100 plus range. Rickertson, noted this was the absolute worst time for that to happen. Corn fields were starting to tassel and pollinate, heat stress does affect the success of pollination. But that could be the least of the worries as some corn fields are quickly dying under the hot sun. Rickertson stated a fully grown corn plant can take up to one-quarter inch of water a day. Rickertson noted that in wet years, corn will readily produce 100 bushels per acre. Producers this year are looking at possibly cutting the corn for silage. Rickertson warned producers to test for nitrate levels before cutting the corn. Westerberg noted that he had received notice a couple of weeks ago that Haakon County had been rejected for the Emergency Conservation Program. The reason, too much moisture in the previous four months. He said the rainfall had to be 40 percent below normal and the area was only at 24 percent. In early June Cottonwood Range and Livestock Research Station, one of the five reporting points, had received a 2.80 inch rain. The other weather reporting points are at Midland, Kirley, Milesville and Philip, some which also had some heavy rains. Westerberg also stated that until a couple of weeks ago, Haakon County was considered not in the drought area, although all the surrounding counties were. He said according to rain totals taken from October 1, 2011, to today, the area is almost 7.5 inches below normal precipitation. Haakon County recently went from a D0 status to D2. Haying Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land has also been discussed. Earlier this week Westerberg was notified that CRP lands were approved for emergency haying and grazing under certain guidelines. Westerberg reminded producers they must stop in and sign a request form before they hay continued on page
Producers are looking for alternate feeding and nutrition sources during this year’s drought. Producers need to be watchful of high sulfates in dam waters and nitrates in field grain to prevent livestock losses. Photo by Don Ravellette not completely dilute the nitrogen levels, Harty said, as the entire plant is still used. If the cutting bar could be raise to take less of the stalk, that could help somewhat. Harty said she is aware that producers are looking for supplemental feed sources as many of the pastures’ plants stopped at about six to eight inches. “A lot of the cool season grasses did not head out,” she said. “As to quality, cattle seem to be doing okay.” She added, “But it is going downhill rapidly.” Depending on the producer’s grazing practices and the grass’s protein levels, some producers may need to provide a protein supplement. She said some producers are already speaking about providing hay to their cattle. She noted that she have an article on iGrow.org that gives producers a some options on where to look to for feed lists. Another concern with the dry conditions is dust pneumonia and anthrax, Harty said. Veterinarian Alice Harty and Stangle said some dust pneumonia is being reported. Stangle said the majority of cases have been up around the Red Owl, Enning and Marcus area. An area Harty said is seeing a lot of problems with high sulfate water issues. Anthrax has not been an issue as of yet, noted the veterinarians. Cattle, in most cases, are not grazing next to the ground where they pick up the spores. Stangle noted a lot of producers have grazed their alfalfa fields, trying to extend life of their pastures. In his travels, he has seen a lot of wheat put up for winter feed, continued on page
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Market Report
Iron chef contest 8
4-H art class 9
Hot Summer Nights 9
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........................$8.38 Winter Wheat, Any Pro ..........................$7.58 Spring Wheat, 14 Pro ...........................$8.86 Milo ........................................................$7.11 Corn .......................................................$7.06 Millet ...................................................$20.75 Sunflowers...........................................$27.00
Opinion
Thursday, July 26, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •
funeral, which includes the six percent sales tax for materials and services. The site explains what funeral directors do, different aspects and options of funeral arrangements, and how the directors can help the family. The new building will eventually be 4,917 square feet, with a 36x36 garage. It will be Occupational Safety and Health Administration compliant; including the air exchange unit in the embalming room set to exchange the air 14 times per hour. The layout of the viewing room will be for easier visiting of the attendees. Actual funeral services will still be held in churches or other family chosen places. “We’re only assuming by more room, D.J. can do his mass communication, website, videos ... he can do more. That is where the funeral home business is changing. You have to be capable of supplying both the old and the new. We are here to do what a family wants and when they want it,” said Jack.
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Rush Funeral Home
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The Galleria’s Summer Glam Camp
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“I think it is a good move; more space,” said D.J. “When I came here, I think he (Jack) had one desk. Now we have three computers and four printers. We just grew out of it.” D.J. believes the best thing about the funeral home business is the process. “You probably know the family. The next four to five days you are with them, you see the way they process grief. They are healing. You hope you’ve been a little part of that. Maybe that’s why you do it.” “The worst thing is personal scheduling. You can’t schedule anything, family vacations, etc., it doesn’t matter,” said D.J. Jack said, “One thing I didn’t want to do was be tied down like on the dairy farm I grew up on. We had to be there every morning and every evening. This is totally differ-
ent; we being a family owned and operated business – we are 24/7. We’ve survived from 1967 to today, 45 years of the funeral business. It has been a great move coming to western South Dakota and we have no regrets.” The new location was once the Park-Inn Cafe and gas station, before it became a Kingdom Hall of the Jehovah Witnesses. “When it was a cafe, I used to go up there and have coffee every day,” said Jack. Today, the public opinion of the funeral home business is leaning away from being unapproached until needed. Now coming in can include coffee while people discuss pre-planning and other more modern aspects of funeral homes. School student visits now occur, with funeral directors teaching students the different aspects of death and dying. The Rush Funeral Home website, www.rushfuneralhome. com, addresses the cost of a
Feeding, strategies altered for drought
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whether it had been hailed or not. He noted one case of death loss in a field that had been grazed in which there was some volunteer millet. The millet was high in nitrates, which caused the deaths. Producers are now making decisions to wean early, sell, buy hay, or other solutions. Producers who did not sell hay last year, may have enough to see them through the winter. Stangle said many producers are looking at early weaning strategies. A more intense culling of the
herds is also another strategy for the producers. A South Dakota State University publication notes that advantages to weaning early include a lower nutrient requirement by the cows, and the cow requires less feed intake, which increases the carrying capacity on the pasture. If the calves are not sold immediately they will need higher quality feeds to maintain their weight gains. Adele Harty and Ken Olson, Extension beef specialist, SDSU West River Ag Center, urged producers to call them or any of the Extension cow/calf specialists at
the regional centers. They can help producers formulate a feed plan for early weaning, and assist with other feed and nutrient decisions. Also, producers need to be aware of how over grazing pastures affect the plants. If the plant is grazed too low the plant growth bud could be destroyed, which allows invasive, plants to take root which could decrease future production of the pasture. If grasses are too short, they cannot catch and hold snow which acts as an insulator, protecting the plant from winterkill and also providing moisture when it melts. Also the plants help hold the rain from directly running off. SDSU’s www.igrow.org is a good resource for producers looking for help. The site has publications which can help answer producer’s questions regarding livestock feeding and management. Also is a link for the regional Extension centers, which list personnel with contact info or click on a name to email them.
Above, young ladies ages eight through 12. Back row, from left: Josie Rush, Taylor Seager and Payton Schoenhals. Third row: Gypsy Andrus, Joey O’Daniel, Cece O’Daniel and Madyson Morehart. Second row: Jenna Engbarth, Danessa Heltzel, Romy Andrus and and Katie O’Daniel. Katie Butler, Reghan Front: Bloomquist, Kelcey Butler, Alyssa Walker, Karlie Coyle and Rehgan Larson. Below, young ladies ages four through seven. From left: Taylor O'Connell, Zoe Philips, Hannah Thorson, Jessa Schofield, Evie Foss, Tara Schofield, Kendall O'Connell and Hanna Schofield. and walked the red carpet several times, improvising with duos and trios. This year’s helpers were Afton Burns, Mandy Burns and Kelsie Kroetch. They assisted as members of the glam squad, coaching and tutoring the girls. The camp began in 2008. “Every year gets better,” said Burns. “And, the girls look forward to it so much. It’s fun to see how the girls’ confidence develops from the time they start to when they leave. It’s so rewarding to have the girls come to it. Self esteem is so important. All these things make it so worth it, all the time and work. We’ll do it again next year. The little girls are already planning on what they are going to wear and how they want their nails done.”
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak Street in Philip, South Dakota. Phone: (605) 859-2516; FAX: (605) 859-2410; e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way reproduced from this publication, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the publisher. DEADLINES: Display & Classified Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT) Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Winter wheat, other crops
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Publisher: Don Ravellette Gen. Mgr. of Operations/ Established in 1906. Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid- Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub- Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc. Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
or graze the land. They cannot be in the fields until August 2, but producers can sign up now. Haying must be completed prior to August 31 and grazing can occur up to September 30. Typically the landowner will be assesed a payment reduction of 25 percent. For 2012 that has been reduced to 10 percent. It was also deemed that the landowner will not be restricted in what he charges for the hay, said Westerberg. Westerberg said the change resulted when it was decided to drop
the drought requirement from D2 to D0. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, about three percent of South Dakota is in severe drought with 47 percent listed as moderate drought. Haakon County declared a drought disaster at their June 5 meeting. Pennington, Hughes, and Butte counties have done so this month. Grasshoppers infestations are patchy, said Westerberg. Some areas have high numbers, other very low. “It is not countywide like 2009 and 2010,” he said.
The annual summer Glam Camp hosted by The Galleria was held in Philip, Tuesday, July 17. Tricia Burns and three aides helped girls four years old through seven years old from 8:30 a.m. to noon learn fashion, bearing and confidence. From 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., girls ages eight through 12 had their more detailed tutorial sessions concerning glamour. The girls’ beauty education included hair and nail care, make-up application and red carpet presentation. As part of the day’s activities, each girl received nail and hair care. After the sessions, the girls dressed their best for the public walkway show for an audience full of parents and other guests. The young ladies posed for photos,
Kennedy Implement
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Rains will come ... by Del Bartels
The drifting cloud of dust began from the hooves of the horses of the first wagon of the line. It grew hoof by hoof, wheel by wheel, until it could be seen for miles. The shade of the wagon covers was reserved for the children and some of the women. The others drove the wagons or walked alongside, easing the work for the draft horses and saddle horses. The few beef cattle and the fewer milk cows were ushered along. What remained of the water sloshed in the bottom of barrels. Bright heat beat down from the sky. Still, they plodded forward. When a stream would be found, some wagons would leave, foraging their own way to a parcel of land the families would claim as their own. The others would load up on water and continue on. Yes, it was heat, dryness and scathing wind, but it could be tamed just enough to make a livelihood work. The west was going to be their home. Let it be dry; the rains will come. Decades later, horse-drawn plows had been greatly replaced by tractors. The more you could plow, the more you could farm. But nature groaned that it was too much. The fields that stretched seemingly forever with no break began to blow away in the wind. No cover or shelterbelts remained to slow the dust devils. After years of dryness, the relentless winds now whirled the plowed soil into a rasping storm that was an evil mockery of any rainstorm. Wells went dry, became filled in with dust and were lost to memory. Root cellars became despairingly spacious. Banks faded, having no collections on loans and now no real collateral; they stood or fell with the farmer/rancher. Give up and work for someone else or for the government? Still, some of the people would not let go. Someday, moisture and ground cover and eventual crops would restore the land. The marriages of field and farmer, of pasture and rancher, would survive these trying times of careless insults and injuries, to become stronger unions ... someday. Families held together. The rains would come. Now, more decades later, leaves of crops curl and brown on the edges. Wide-cracked soil powders to the footstep. Stock dams and creeks grow a filminess that cries for fresh rain. Livestock moves little in the heat, except to swish tails at flies. Flurries of grasshoppers temporarily scatter from what areas are still green. Will the scant harvest of hay be enough until next year? Hardening eyes continuously scan the horizon for telltale smoke from any wildfire. Bank loans, possible cullings of the livestock, and economizing the thinning budget are the hushed discussions by country families. In turn, townsfolk feel the coming trials. Still, families hold on. Droughts have come before. Hard times have been survived. Wise landowners have been good to the land, and it will come back to one day be good to them. Here is the tie between the land and the farmer/rancher. This is the home of families. The rains will come.
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Major decisions, like whether to bale the grain for feed or to combine, can be based on rainfall amounts, lack of other forage for winter, or market price. Jim and Joan Cantrell decided the option for them was to put the grain up for winter feed. Photo by Nancy Haigh
“I can find WHATEVER you’re looking for!” –David Burnett, Owner
competitive lines in house. “Niche marketing has helped us find locations for used equipment to find homes elsewhere. This can be seen directly in our Internet sales,” Buchholz said. “In 2011, we were able to sell in 22 different states or provinces and had approximately 45 sight-unseen sales with no negative comebacks. This has allowed us to move equipment to satisfied customers in new areas. We are continually looking to improve our image in the community and nation.” Kent Buchholz added, “We’re doing enough now online, there is no real slow time.” In 2011 Kennedy Implement received the Top Market Share in South Dakota – Ag Tractors, and
Top Market Share in South Dakota – Haytools. “While these awards are presented to the dealerships, they are a true testament to our customers. They trust us enough to sell them a quality product because of our quality service,” M. Buchholz said. Kennedy Implement’s selection as 2012 Dealership of the Year is featured in the July/August issue of Farm Equipment, viewable at www.farm-equipment.com. Farm Equipment magazine, based in Brookfield, Wis., serves more than 12,000 farm equipment dealers, wholesalers and distributors throughout North America. It’s also the publisher of Rural Lifestyle Dealer magazine, Farm Catalog, Ag Equipment Intelligence, No-Till Farmer and the Conservation Tillage Product Guide.
Philip Masonic
• Goat Tying • Barrel Racing • Flag Racing • Mutton Bustin’ / Calf & Pony Riding
2005 Buick Terraza
heated leather, DVD player …
V-6, auto,
•Breakaway Roping •Pole Bending •Team Roping Entries: $5/event
the works!!
Saturday, August 4th
4:00 p.m. at the Philip Arena Contact: Doug Thorson • 859-3538
Sunday: Partly cloudy with a chance of rain. High of 102F. Winds from the ENE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 20%. Sunday Night: Partly cloudy. Low of 72F. Winds from the ESE at 5 to 10 mph.
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38 Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
Saturday: Partly cloudy with a chance of a thunderstorm. High of 104F with a heat index of 111F. Winds from the ESE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 20%. Saturday Night: Partly cloudy with a chance of a thunderstorm. Low of 70F. Breezy. Winds from the East at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 30%.
Thursday: High of 93F. Breezy. Winds from the WNW at 10 to 20 mph. Thursday Night: Clear. Low of 61F. Winds from the North at 5 to 20 mph shifting to the ENE after midnight.
Friday: Clear. High of 99F. Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph. Friday Night: Partly cloudy with a chance of a thunderstorm. Low of 64F. Winds from the SE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 40%.
Complete local forecast: pioneerreview.com
Rural Living
Thursday, July 26, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •
by Bob Fanning Field Specialist, Winner Regional Extension Center sis of the standing crop may be justified. The difficulty in getting a representative sample of standing crops should be recognized. A logical recommendation is to submit several plants from particularly poor areas and better looking areas separately, and have them analyzed as individual samples. If the nitrate levels are low enough that they can be utilized when mixed as part of the ration, baled forage should be sampled with a probe and analyzed for a more accurate assessment. Animals to be turned in to graze crops with some level of nitrate should be filled up with safe forages before doing so, and introduced to the crop gradually, one hour the first day, two to three the second day, etc. Livestock can adapt somewhat to moderate levels of nitrate in this manner. For more information, visit http://igrow.org/livestock/drought/ and/or http://igrow.org/agronomy/ drought/ or contact your Regional Extension Center. Calendar 7/26-27: IPM Field School for Agronomy Professionals, SE Research Farm, Beresford, SD 8/14: Tomato IPM webinar, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. CDT, Winner Regional Extension Center 8/16: Winter Wheat Meeting, 6:30 p.m. CDT, Auditorium, Draper, SD 8/21-23: DakotaFest, Mitchell
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Extension News
Nitrates in Drought-stressed Crops Commuting from the Kennebec area to the Winner Regional Extension Center most days means frequent trips to the gas pump, but provides a good opportunity for regular, windshield surveys of crop and pasture conditions. Unfortunately, the past few weeks have shown a steady decline in the state of both crops and rangeland. I often do more than a windshield survey, and pull into an approach for a closer look, which adds to the assessment. One striking difference is how no-till corn is holding on better than conventional-tilled fields. If the no-till fields don’t receive significant rain soon, they will suffer large yield reductions as well as the tilled ones, but are more likely to produce grain if rain falls; and will produce more forage if that is their destination. In listening to the market report this afternoon during a quick crop assessment, choosing between holding off for a grain crop and salvaging the crop as livestock feed can be important. Some corn fields have completed pollination, with relatively good success. If those fields receive rain soon, they may produce substantial income at current prices, even if yields are down. Scattered areas have received some rain, but as one producer who recently received just over 2” commented, “you wouldn’t know it.” As producers contemplate harvesting corn or other crops for livestock forage, the standard recommendation is, test for nitrates. An important piece of information for producers who receive rain on stressed crops, that moisture can affect nitrate levels in the plant. If the plant is/was stressed for moisture, and had accumulated nitrates, but wasn’t too far gone to respond to the rain, the nitrate level may spike for a brief period of time, and then distribute itself in the plant as it resumes growth, lowering the concentration. If the decision had already been made to harvest the crop as forage, it might be best to wait a few days for this process to take place before harvesting. Although some early nitrate tests have revealed potentially toxic levels, the ensiling process, which can reduce the nitrate level between 30-60%, will make most corn able to be utilized. If the crop was fertilized with high rates of nitrogen, and/or otherwise is believed to be high in nitrates, there may be reason to have a sample analyzed before harvesting. In most cases however, sampling after the ensiling process has completed may be the most practical. For crops intended to be baled, green chopped for immediate feeding or grazed, however, lab analy-
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
The biggest news around here is what’s going on with the fire watch. There are about 20 neighbors who man all the high hills when we have a lightning storm, so they can spot a fire when it first starts. They want to get to it as soon as they can and get it out before it can get too big. There are a lot of small fire sprayers in this area and they can do a lot of good if they can get there right away. The spare water tanks are all full and ready to move as soon as a fire is spotted in this neighborhood or the areas nearby. Vicki Eide went to Rapid City to meet Carla Eide and pick up granddaughter Kiley, so she could come and spend some more time with grandpa and grandma before school starts. This is her second home and she comes as often as she can. Her school doesn’t start till around Labor Day. Grandson Taegan will come for a couple weeks before school as he is in summer school now. Marvin Eide went up to Trevor Fitches while Vicki was in Rapid City. He had Trevor fix up some fire equipment for him. I rode along with him to visit with Christa and the kids. Aven is really growing and he smiled that day for me. He has a dimple in his left cheek. His hair seems to be a little different colored red than the other kids and he is starting to loose some of it. So, I wonder if it will be the same color when it comes back in? Al and Lenore Brucklacher had company this week. Al’s brother and his wife from near Freeman were here for a few days. Lenore and Al have both been doctoring. Lenore had fallen and was unable to get around and Al had some teeth pulled. So it was nice of them to come and help out. They brought Al and Lenore to church Sunday and both were doing better than when I was out to see them earlier in the week. Jim Gottsleben’s family was called home as Jim had gotten ill and was in the hospital in Rapid City. I stopped in to see him when he got back to Philip and his daughter, Sharon, and her husband were just leaving to return home to Colorado. He seemed to be doing well. Myrna said he had a good day that day. I also found Gladys Smith feeling better than she had the week prior. Was glad to see both Gladys and Jim doing better. I visited Wanda (Bowen) Heeb the same day and she seems to be doing very well. Thursday, I was in Philip and stopped in to visit with Norma Oldenburg. She had company, Les (Butch) Wintrode and LuAnn Johnson were there and Patricia Vollmer also stopped in for a while. Pat comes over to Philip on Thursdays to do some volunteer work at the nursing home. I have two neighbors who are crop watchers. They are out checking fields to see how the crops are doing in the Grindstone area. I ran into them on the cut across road to the Grindstone Hall, so you had not better brag or say you have less or they will catch you at it. They are considered experts on what crops are doing and what they will yield. I won’t mention any names, as they won’t be able to catch those who try to stretch the truth at coffee hour which would be to their delight if they could catch someone bragging. It is amazing what you see or find out when you just take a drive around here. I am glad for these two people as they see and are alert to strangers in the area or anything else that could be a hazard to our neighborhood. Colby Smith was the leader for church services at the United Church Sunday at Philip. She reported on her trip to Australia with her summer Campus Crusade group which she was a member of while in Spearfish attending college. She was chosen as one of the group to go to Australia and she had to go out and raise her own money to pay for the trip. She had a very interesting report. I sure learned a lot about that country and enjoyed her pictures, both of people and scenery. She said that she had some fears about being away so far from home for the first time but having others there from South Dakota helped. She made it through and was glad
Trees suffer during drought
smaller trees to a better location, alleviating compaction, or replacing moisture-draining lawn with a layer of mulch. A two- to threeinch layer of compost will help trees in maintaining moisture. Outlook The aftereffects of drought may last three to five years, with the strongest trees surviving. Trees have developed their own mechanisms for coping with these cycles, but some trees are on the brink of survival and could go either way. If it means the difference between keeping a tree around for your lifetime or losing it in the next five years," Andersen says, "it's worth doing something about." What can you do? A professional arborist can assess your landscape, provide information regarding the value potential of your trees and work with you to determine the best trees and shrubs to plant for your existing landscape. Contact the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA), a public and professional resource on trees and arboriculture since 1938. It has more than 2,000 member companies who recognize stringent safety and performance standards and who are required to carry liability insurance. TCIA has the nation's only Accreditation program that helps consumers find tree care companies that have been inspected and accredited based on: adherence to industry standards for quality and safety; maintenance of trained, professional staff; and dedication to ethics and quality in business practices. An easy way to find a tree care service provider in your area is to use the "Find Qualified Tree Care" program. You can use this service by calling 1-800-7332622 or by doing a ZIP code search on www.tcia.org.
for the experience. Colby made a lot of new friends both from the United States and other countries. I remember when Rev. Pierce’s son, Tim, went to Florida with the crusade. He is still there working with them today. So many people in the churches here in Philip go out and do work for their churches bringing the gospel to many here and overseas. Will close my news by reminding everyone to be watching for fires. We do have a great fire department in Philip, but if more than one fire gets started at a time, they need all the help they can get as it is so dry. Disks do a good job at fires also and most have theirs hooked up and ready to go. A list of words that are essential: right knowledge – to supply you with the tools necessary for your voyage; wisdom – to assure you that you are using the accumulated knowledge of the past in a manner that will best serve the discovery of your presence, your “now”; compassion – to help you accept others whose ways may be different than yours, with gentleness and understanding, as you move with them or through them or around them on your own way; harmony – to be able to accept the natural flow of life; creativity – to help you to realize and recognize new alternatives and uncharted paths along the way; strength – to stand up against fear and move forward in spite of uncertainty, without guarantee or payment; peace – keep it centered; joy – to keep you songful, and laughing and dancing all along the way; love – to be your continual guide towards the highest level of consciousness of which man is capable; unity – which brings us back to where we started – the place where we are at one with ourselves and with all things. Leo Buscaglia
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~ Brakes ~ Service 859-2901 • Philip
–Dust Bags –Sprays –Pour ons –Golden Malrin Fly Bait
FLY CONTROL
Happy Birthday to our favorite “Tractor Doctor” If your tractor is sick, Neil Jones is your man!! Come help celebrate Tuesday, July 31st at Grossenburg’s in Philip. Enjoy cake with Neil from 9:30 to noon!
From your family
With more than half of the continental United States in some stage of drought, what can homeowners do to keep their trees healthy during hotter, drier summer months? "While it's impossible to keep every tree in good health in times of severe drought, taking a proactive approach for a prized or sentimental tree can support its good health," recommends Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist with the Tree Care Industry Association. "A plan that is supported with good cultural practices, proactive monitoring for pests and disease, and response to warning signs is more likely to survive." Silent Suffering A tree’s first damage from drought occurs beneath the soil line in the form of root damage, long before any outward signs of trouble. After a tree’s unsuccessful attempts to conserve water by closing leaf stomates, feeder roots die back, sometimes so drastically that the tree is unable to take up enough water to support itself. In the worst case, drought stress will lead to tree death. More often, though, the signs of stress are much less dramatic. “Leaves are undersized and may wilt, yellow, curl or crinkle, will be marginally scorched or even turn brown and drop early,” explains Andersen. “Emergent shoots are short. In an effort to right the imbalance caused by root-loss, crown dieback or a general thinning of the canopy occurs.” Opportunistic Pests & Diseases That's when "opportunistic" pests make their move. Boring insects are thought to be drawn by the chemical and acoustic signals of stressed trees. The sound of water columns breaking cues the borer to invade the tree and lay eggs. Andersen recommends applying a three-inch layer of organic mulch or wood chips over the root
zone at least out to the drip line. This will hold moisture longer for stressed roots to access, and will provide a long-term nutritional source for the soil. Prized or important trees may be protected from wood-boring insects with spray or injection treatments Another danger to stressed trees are fungal pathogens. Andersen notes that when a chemical change in the tree signals a weakened state, certain pathogens penetrate the bark, wood and cambial zone, with fan-like, leathery clumps, cutting off the water supply to the tree. While all trees are at risk during long period of drought, some are more prone to its effects. New transplants are highly vulnerable to drought stress, and supplemental watering for the first few years of establishment is necessary, to the extent that it's allowed. But even mature trees are suffering. Watering trees deeply with soaker hoses or irrigation systems - as opposed to brief, surface watering - helps sustain trees. But it's very difficult to do much for a large tree because of the massive amounts of water it needs. With so many trees affected, Andersen recommends watering only those trees that you can help. How much water a home landscape needs depends upon its soil, sun and shade exposure, plant types, irrigation system and local climate. How much water trees require depends upon the type of tree. Applying the right amount of water, based on the local weather and the tree's actual need, is the key to using water efficiently. But homeowners often over-water their lawns, which in turn surpasses a tree's real needs. Drought exacerbates matters for trees already under stress, like those on dry slopes, surrounded by pavement, or improperly planted. In landscape situations, consider taking action, such as moving
Sunbody Straw Hats
Jones’
COLD BEER
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet Locally owned & operated 859-2482 • Philip
Get your finances RIGHT SIDE UP with a CONSOLIDATION LOAN FROM FIRST NATIONAL BANK IN PHILIP! Quick and easy to set up, low, low interest rates and a repayment schedule CUSTOMIZED to YOUR NEEDS.
First National Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD Since 1906 www.fnbphilip.com
Member FDIC
Hit & Miss
Elderly Meals Thursday, July 26: BBQ Meatballs, Red Mashed Potatoes, Garden Veggies, Roll, Fresh Fruit. Friday, July 27: Apple Pork Chop, Delmonico Potatoes, Dilled Carrots, Corn Muffin, Gelatin Jewels. Monday, July 30: Honey Fried Chicken, Scalloped Potatoes, Peas, Biscuit, Apricot Halves. Tuesday, July 31: BBQ Meatloaf, Cheesy Potatoes, Fried Con, Roll, Fruit Salad. *** Friday, July 13, we had a fine lucky day! Never mind that there is a big, long word, paraskevidekraiphobia, that means fear of Friday the 13th. I Goggled the the word
by Vivian Hansen • grhansen@gwtc.net or betty@pioneer-review.com
wedding photos of Rolla and Effie and their four children, Evalynn and Harry Hulett, Cecil and Walter Meyer, Richard and Gertrude Palmer and Virgil and Vivian Hansen. There was also a photo of the four Palmer siblings. Thank you, Wayne. Gertrude (Doughty) Palmer was a sister of Lucille (Doughty) Huether. Ben Stone, Somerset Court resident, who was formerly a university professor, was planning to be on the Antiques Road Show Saturday night. It was having its show from Rapid City. One item that Ben was showing was a baseball that was signed by all the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1952. My grandson, Todd Allen, came for lunch and we had a good game of scrabble. Todd planned to go to Philip to see Chuck Allen and Etta Erdmann and then go on to Ft. Pierre to visit his uncle, David Hansen. He was then returning to his home in Bellevue, Neb., by Omaha. Sunday, July 15, we had church with Terry Pulse and Ardie and Steve. Jack Humke played the piano for hymn singing. Steve had had a big trip recently across Montana, visiting Yellowstone Park, and then through the Tetons and Jackson Hole, Lander, Riverton, Shoshone, and Wind River Canyon in Wyoming on his way back to Rapid City. He marveled at the stamina that would have been needed by our ancestors who made that trip. Of course there was a religious tint there. God was with them, even as God is still with us. Terry and Ardi had been to Wicksville July 15 to preach. Well, Wicksville is sort of a has-been town. And somehow there was no air conditioning in the church. So, they marveled at the stamina of our forbearers who had no air conditioning when they came west. They made their own trails, and there were no hospitals on the way. However, God was with them, and in them, just as the power of God is built into us. Terry’s talk was about pride and the fact that we should not go around puffed up about our good looks or our smarts or our money. On the other hand, we don’t want to go around doing things we are not proud of. It all boils down to caring about other people. We
Thursday, July 26, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •
area. He had lumberyards there. Wednesday, July 18, a bus load of Somerset Court residents took a trip to Spearfish and visited the fish hatchery. A picnic lunch was enjoyed by all. They saw lots of big beautiful trout of various species. Addie called her Spearfish friends and they came over to visit her. Fr. Dahms took a photo at a downtown Spearfish barber shop. Virginia Gray, Somerset Court resident, and Chris Trull, Somerset Court staff member, stopped by
Page 4
Engaged
Dave and Terry Holman of Philip are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Taylor, to Cody Espinoza, son of Wendi Mills of Heber City, Utah, and Richard and Lynnie Espinoza of Charleston, Utah. Taylor is a 2009 graduate of Philip High School and Cody is a 2007 graduate of Wasatch High School, Heber City. The couple plans to make their home in Arizona. A September 8, 2012, wedding in Salt Lake City, Utah, is being planned.
and it told me more than I ever wanted to know about fear of Friday the 13th. My daughter, Carol, Colorado Springs, passed on to me that bit of wisdom with the amazing fact that the wife of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow died when a dropped match ignited her enormous hoop skirt. Another bit of lore is that jell-o was used to color the horses in “A Horse of Another Color” in the Wizard of Oz. Darlene Baye, Philip, sent a long list of uses for dryer sheets. They repel ants, mice and mildew and dust. At Somerset Court on Friday, we had cooking with Sandy. We made some sort of strawberry dessert. Strawberries and sugar are in the bottom of a baking pan and cookie dough is crumbled over the top and baked. Skeeter Boyer and Mrs. Boyer came to sing for us. Well, mostly Skeeter. Mrs. Boyer’s only line was “mama sang tenor!” Skeeter sang, “I’m Sending You a Big Bouquet of Roses,” “Praise the Lord, I Saw the Light,” and lots of other old favorites. Thanks, Skeeter. My grandson, Todd Allen, Bellevue, Neb., came to visit. He and my son, Wayne, and wife Gwynn came over to Somerset Court for supper. Todd and I had a game of scrabble. He said he would come over Saturday for another game. He has a foster son, Kaleb, age four, who has a good color sense. Todd brought me some note cards made from some of Kaleb’s finger paintings. My daughter, Delores Denke, Pavilion, Wyo., phoned early in the morning. A pig roast is in the making in Pavilion, a graduation party for Angela, Mrs. Richard Denke, who just finished her studies in the medical field. It is also a family reunion for the Hansen family and the Krupps. Todd Allen came over for breakfast and then we played two games of scrabble. He had scores of over 300 for both games. He was to tour the Black Hills Saturday and stop by Somerset Court for lunch Sunday. I asked Lucille Huether to come to my apartment and see the collage my son, Wayne, made of a special window with little diamond shaped panes. It was from my old home, the Rolla and Effie Palmer homestead. Wayne had collected
We think 50 years of marriage is an event to celebrate!
We will be celebrating this milestone in our lives on Saturday, July 28, 2012, at the Legion Hall in Philip and we extend an invitation to all who would like to join us! There will be a potluck at 5:00 p.m., lots of reminiscing & a dance at 9:00 p.m.
(desserts, drinks, plates & serving utensils provided) LeRoy & Twila Dean Jim & Vonnie O’Dea Leo & Judy Gittings Bill & Karyl Sandal No gis, please! Ed & Bonnie Morgan Terry & Barbara Wentz
July 27-28-29-30:
The Amazing Spider-Man
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m. Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
August 3-4-5-6: Ice Age 4: Continental Drift (PG) August 10-11-2-13: The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13)
should weep with those who are weeping and enjoy with others who have good tidings. Sunday, Shawn and Sandy came in and gave us a party with ice cream on a brownie, plus coffee and ice water. This attracted a good share of Somerset Court residents, who were in no hurry to end the party and sat around and visited for a spell. Ina, Irene C., Irene A., and Vivian put in some quality time playing whist. Lila Betten is a new resident at Somerset Court. She has lived in Rapid City for about 30 years, but was originally from Redfield. We hope that you like it here. July 16, I received a family calendar from Eloyce Jensen, my niece, Effie Hulett Johnson’s, daughter. Thank you, Eloyce. It has a photo of each of Effie’s children in a volunteer activity (Kay, Fr. Lyle, Gary, Eloyce, Denise, Keith, Roger, Nita, Annette, Loretta, Todd, Cory and Heather). There were their children and their complete addresses. I am very happy to have this calendar. What a grand Johnson family. June 30, 2012, my niece, Wanda, and her husband, Ed Artz, entertained at their new house near Humboldt, a good share of the Johnson family and my other niece, Alma, and her husband, Harry Schilling. There was a boy named Ned. His hair was red. He knitted and purled it. He bleached and curled it. Now red hair is becoming to Ned. (The beginning was suggested by Pat Staley.) Let us have your limericks or suggested first lines. Pat and I plan to get together and doodle around with limericks. Join us at apartment #224 or in the activity garden. The Rapid City Boys Club came to Somerset Court July 17 for bingo. Thank you all for coming to call bingo and help us play and also for the bags of candy for prizes. It is always fun when the boys come to Somerset Court. My granddaughter, Crystal Denke Jackson, Huntington Beach, Calif., emailed that her son, Sean, who is a Marine, deployed to Afghanistan. She said that he is working very hard, 12 to 14 hours a day. Crystal’s daughter, Ariel Jackson, is planning to study in the University of Solerno, Italy, from September to December. She has a scholarship for tuition. However, she will not be permitted to be employed over there so she will need contributions. Crystal’s garden is blooming. She likes the peaches and cream brand of sweet corn and her sweet corn is about knee high. Grapefruit are grown in her area and the present crop is most all picked and little new ones are about the size of plums now. Thanks to Crystal for telling about a wild mama duck and her baby duck that lived in the apartment complex. When the baby duck is tired, he sits down and the mama sits on top of him. When he is rested they go on their way. They swim in the pool when there are kids in the pool. The maintenance man made a little ramp so the baby duck can get out of the pool. New resident at Somerset Court, Jim Hilton, has lived 45 years in Rapid City. Before that, he was from the Presho, Murdo, Vivian
and told me how much they enjoyed the Palmer window outside apartment #224. Wayne Hansen had saved the window with little diamond panes from the house I was born in, in 1919. Wednesday, I went over to the apartment of Pat Staley and we whipped up a few limericks. “There was a girl named Lucille, who ate a very good meal. She swam in a lake and came back to eat cake. She said, “Now see how hungry I feel.”
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
The dog days of summer are surely upon us. The heat dictates the activities of the day. Try to get work done early in the day on the shady side of the buildings and move with the sun. It works pretty well, but then there are those who can't work that way and have to figure out the best way to handle the heat. Soak clothing and have evaporation help keep you cooler or just plain keeping fluids up and shade on the head and long sleeves, all works to keep the sun from wreaking havoc on the body. I remember one time when I was haying in short sleeves and as the day got hotter my arms were burning up, so I decided to use the lake bed (an area where the earth forms a hard pan where water would not soak in (usually rough to drive through and you couldn't hay it but generally there was moisture there). I applied mud to my burning arms and oh what a relief it was for about 10 minutes. Then it dried and as it dried it pulled and cracked. My next stop was the dam where I jumped in and got that mud off. The heat is getting to me, I just dreamed I heard a snowplow going by the front of the house! George Gittings attended funeral services for Walter Van Tassel Monday of last week. I also joined the many folks at the services. Our sympathy to the family as they go through this time of loss. We received word that cousin Carrol (Fairchild) Ripley passed away in Bakersfield, Calif. Carrol was our last elder cousin (her dad was Fred Fairchild) and it was my privilege to have known her well. When we last talked, about a month ago, she was still working on her life's journeys through a writing class, I hope she got a lot written. Monday afternoon, Tony Harty stopped by our place and visited and played farkel with Judy DeWitt. Judy and L.T. Works were preparing to leave early Tuesday morning. Tony also visited Shirley Hair in the afternoon. Bill and I visited Dale and Cindy O'Connell Monday evening. It was hot, we recorded 110˚ and it didn't cool down in the evening like usual, so we are thankful for air conditioning. It was so hot that the cement on the exit ramps buckled on both sides at Exit 151. Traffic had to be stopped until the cement was pushed aside and the gap filled in with old black top. Luckily, nobody was injured. Tony Harty visited with Shirley Hair Tuesday as well as doing usual errands around Kadoka. Early Tuesday morning, L.T. Works and Judy DeWitt eased their home out of the yard and were on their way to Sioux Falls to get a little work done before continuing on to Knoxville, Iowa. Sure enough, they left before the electric bill arrived! Bill and I were in Rapid City early that morning so Bill could get a stress test done. After that, we visited Eric Seager, Chaciel, Eli and Chaciel's dad, Andy. We all had dinner at a new little restaurant on Fairmont Blvd and were surprised to see Kathy and Garland Kampfe, who also were trying out the new place. Then we went bowling. We had a nice visit with Darral and Marilyn Brooks and Jerry Morgan while there. Bill bowled for the first time in two years, and had a respectable game of 193, and beat all the rest of us. When we got home, we visited Dale and Cindy O'Connell, making a delivery of a shirt. Wednesday, Bill and I had breakfast out and were joined by Tony Harty. Tony spent the better part of the rest of the day at the courthouse, then went to Winner for a few days, returning home Thursday evening. He stopped at the little cafe by Draper for supper, but before that he saw evidence of what the winds that had just gone through had done. Two semi trucks were thrown off the interstate and a SUV with a camper had turned over. That area just east of the Draper turn-off is noted for bad roads in the winter, too. When Tony got home he visited with his niece, Kathy Brown, and found out Dale Koehn was in the hospital with an infection from a cut on his hand. Don and Vi Moody are still working with the water tanks having the winter automatic water system installed this week on the east creek. Vi writes that it has been hot and humid with very little rain south of Philip and everyone is watching the skies and hoping no lightning causes grass fires. The air conditioning has been running 24/7 now for almost a month it seems and the air smells of smoke from the many fires burning in the Black Hills. Bill and I were up and at ’em early Thursday morning getting the car serviced, then Bill kept two medical appointments. We hung out at the Eric Seager home and were entertained by great grandson Eli between appointments. We delivered Terry Buchert's semi on the return trip. When we got to Terrys all the neighbors and fire fighters from Philip, Milesville, and other surrounding communities were fighting a prairie fire that started somewhere north of the Hilland Road and burned a swath five miles long, ending at Hwy. 34. Friday, Tony Harty went out for breakfast, then had a nice visit with Carol Solon while at the post office. He visited Shirley Hair, then stayed in where it was cool since the temp was again over 100˚. Don and Vi Moody have been keeping in touch with their tenants at Rapid Valley. A good rain came through their place up there Friday night. Susan said it helped the evergreens and lawns a bunch. This was good news! Hope these clouds will get serious now and travel wide and broad across a multitude of states. Sixty percent of the nation experiencing drought and heatwaves is absolutely unreal! Bill and I were in Rapid for another procedure Friday morning early, where a drain tube was inserted to try to drain off an infection that was showing up. It was also a day to help Chaciel with packing a U-Haul. Eric left for two weeks of guard duty in Minnesota Thursday and that left a move up to those left behind. Bill rested and entertained Eli until the neighbor lady took him home with her, then Bill came home while I helped Chaciel and friends get the house emptied and spiffied up. I drove the UHaul to Kadoka and Chaciel followed. We had some winds to deal with along the way that evening, a little rain, but not much. However, north of Philip Terry Buchert said they got 1.5” of rain. Jody Gittings stopped out at the George Giittings home Saturday to get his tools that were here. Tony Harty stopped briefly by our place on his way to breakfast Saturday morning. He picked up his mail and visited Shirley Hair, then just stayed in where it was cool until evening. His sister-inlaw, Barbara Herber, called from Aberdeen to report that the Weta River Rats were doing pretty good
You’re invited to a Bridal Shower for Emilie Baxter
(fiancée of Tyler Hesby)
Saturday, July 28th ~ 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at the South Fork Hunting Lodge, Philip
Come relax, enjoy the fun & congratulate Emilie!
Tayta’s Tots Preschool
Only a few openings le! Ages 3-5 years old Classes start August 20th
For more information, call:
Tayta: 859-3160 or 441-9419
Pa m’s Pink Ladies Relay For Life Fundraiser
9 to 4 K-gee’s Bldg. & Senior Citizen’s Center
Downtown Philip
Tupperware Scentsy Princess House Pampered Chef Miche Bag Thirty-One Usborne Books Avon
Saturday, July 28th
Norwex Silpada Pink Ribbon Booth Milesvile Mardi Gras Bake Sale Trudy Hill Jewelry
Still Accepting Vendors with Crafts & Homemade Items
Contact Lindsy Reagle: 279-2153 or K alcy Triebwasser: 441-5774
continued on page 12
Church & Community
Thursday, July 26, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •
Page 5
Obituaries
Michael J. Chapell______________________________
Orleans, LA to Henry and Bernice (Goodsell) Chapell. Bernice and the kids later moved to South Dakota. He attended school in Wall, SD. He served in the U.S. Army from 1971 until he was honorably discharged on October 31, 1974. He married Sharon Hoag and they were blessed with two daughters, Alecia and Angela. Mike and Sharon later divorced. Mike met Carrie and they spent many happy years together. They were married on September 17, 2011. He is survived by his wife, Carrie; daughters, Alicia Stover and Kara Mahoney; two brothers, Donald (Sue) Goodsell of Lakewood, CO, and Henry (Nellie) Chapell of Gillette, WY; one sister, Esther (Chapell) Parks of Sturgis, SD; and nine grandchildren. He was preceded in death by an infant daughter Angela, and his parents. A memorial service was held at the Time Out Lounge on Friday, July 13, 2012. Inurnment will be held the Black Hills National Cemetery at a later date. Family and friends may sign Mike’s online guestbook at www.kirkfuneralhome.com Dennis Paul O’Dea, age 75, of Philip, died Tuesday, July 24, 2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospital in Philip. Dennis Paul O’Dea and his twin
Dennis Paul O’Dea______________________________
brother, Dean Patrick, were born July 30, 1936, in Philip, the son of John and Edna (Bennett) O’Dea. He attended the Empire and Fairplay rural schools and his mother, Edna, later home schooled the kids for a time. He then attended Philip High School. On October 17, 1956, he married Marlene Keyser at the Dowling Church located one mile south of her parents’ home on Ash Creek, and to this union were born three children. During his life, Dennis worked in various occupations including road construction, the gold mine in Lead, various ranches around Philip, operated the Mitchell sale barn, owned a ranch near Newell and later near Harrold, and owned and operated O’Dea Trucking and Central Diesel Repair in Ft. Pierre. He later worked for Altendorf Implement and retired from Moody Implement in Pierre. Dennis is survived by one daughter, Debbie Hapney and her husband, Randy, of Quinn, and their children, Rocky (Pam) of Floresville, Texas, Levi (Kyli) of Quinn, Jessie (Travis Sharp) of New Underwood, and Bailey of Quinn; one son, Mike O’Dea and his wife, Krista, and their boys, Nathan, Brandon and Austin of Philip; three great-grandchildren, Harley and Houston Hapney and Adyson Sharp; seven brothers, Jack O’Dea and his wife, Charlotte, of Midland, Dean O’Dea of Vale, Gene O’Dea of Hot Springs, Jim O’Dea and his wife, Vonnie, of Howes, Jerry O’Dea of Altoona, Iowa, Leo O’Dea of Vermillion and Richard O’Dea of Hot Springs; seven sisters, Maurine Hagler of Meridian, Idaho, Bonna Hagler of Nampa, Idaho, Phyllis Coleman and her husband, Marvin, of Quinn, Lillian DeKnikker and her husband, Eddie, of Gettysburg, Lorraine Smith of Emmett, Idaho, Mary Bauer of Rapid City, and Rosella O’Bryan and her husband, Tom, of Bagley, Minn. Dennis was preceded in death by Marlene O’Dea on June 5, 1998; an infant daughter, Tina; and his parents. Visitation will be held from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 26, at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Philip, with a vigil service at 7:00 p.m. Mass of Christian burial will be held 10:00 a.m. Friday, July 27, at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Philip, with Father Kevin Achbach as celebrant. Interment will be at the Masonic Cemetery in Philip. A memorial has been established. Arrangements are with the Rush Funeral Home of Philip. His online guestbook is available at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Michael J. Chapell, 58, Rapid City, passed away on Sunday, July 8, 2012 at his home. Michael Joseph Chapell was born on February 18, 1954 in New
Delbert R. “Gus” Gustafson________________________
aviation led him to take a civilian pilot training course. Delbert attended South Dakota State College for a time but enlisted in the Army Air Corps in July of 1942 to complete his Pilot training and during World War II, flew 25 combat missions in a B-26 Marauder while stationed in England, Belgium, France and Germany. He attained the rank of captain and was discharged in January of 1946, but continued to serve in the Air Force Reserves until September of 1957. While working with heavy equipment in the Philip area, he met Tish Sorensen and they were married on July 20, 1946, at Rapid City. They made their first home there, but lived in a trailer moving to many work sites from the Aberdeen area to Salem in eastern South Dakota and finally to Faith in 1952, raising their family there. Gus plowed many fireguards, built dams, dugouts, did land leveling, terracing as well as snow plowing in a wide area around Faith. He also worked for the State of S.D., many counties, the Soil Conservation Service and S.D. Game, Fish and Parks in their earth work needs. He received special recognition from the Soil Conservation Service for his many years of service. He sold the earth moving equipment in 1999, but in the meantime had purchased the Standard Oil Bulk dealership and was part owner of M&D Oil Co. He was always willing to give an honest day’s work and a little extra of himself to his customers. Gus enjoyed his memberships and community affiliations; Faith Chamber of Commerce, United Methodist Church, Faith Masonic Lodge & Order of the Eastern Star, VFW & American Legion and had served on the boards of the Faith School District and the City of Faith. He enjoyed reading and “tinkering” with equipment and helping anyone fix a broken down machine. The “dam builder” in Gus would always make him slow down when driving, so he could watch the huge machines working along the roads and highways. He also enjoyed baseball on television and especially his Atlanta Braves. Grateful for sharing his life are his wife, Tish; a son, Morris (Marlene) Gustafson of Faith; a daughter, Jean (Joel) Erickson of Plymouth, Minn.; grandchildren, Eric (Amber) Gustafson, Alex (Candace) Gustafson, Abby Gustafson, Philip Erickson, Matthew Erickson, Tom Palmer and Wayne Palmer; greatgrandchildren, Bryce Gustafson and Audrina Gustafson; a brother, Evon Gustafson of Ontario, Calif.; and a sister, Dolores Fagerstrom of Pelham, N.Y. He was preceded in death by his parents; a son, Gary; a sister, Edna Sittig; and a granddaughter, Hillary Gustafson. Delbert passed away early Monday morning, July 16, at the Belle Fourche Long Term Care Center where he had resided the past several months. A memorial has been established to the Faith Education Foundation.
Carrol Ripley___________________
the later years of her life Carrol kept her mind sharp by socializing with friends, family and neighbors, and by writing her memoir. Carrol prayed to receive Jesus Christ as her Savior, and knew His love. She was born Carrol Hazel Fairchild in 1919 in Milesville, S.D., to her father Fred L. Fairchild, and mother Ellenor Stobbs. She was raised in South Dakota on her family’s homestead. In 1938, they moved to Fresno, Calif., where Carrol met and married Walter Wayne Ripley in 1940. Walt and Carrol lived in Fresno for many years after Walt’s service in the Army during World War II. Later, she was a leader in the 4-H, Boy Scouts, PTA and the Garden Clubs of Fresno and Bakersfield. In 1982, they permanently relocated to Bakersfield, where they lived for many years. Carrol is preceded in passing by her beloved husband Walt, and survived by her children and their spouses, Sharon and Milo Ladwig, Glenn and Penny Ripley, Dale and Cheryl Ripley, 10 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Services were held at Greenlawn in Bakersfield. Graveside services were held Saturday, July 21.
Funeral services for Delbert R. “Gus” Gustafson, 90, were held Friday, July 20, at the Faith United Methodist Church. Joel Erickson officiated with special music by Butch Samuelson. Eric, Alex and Abby Gustafson, Philip and Matt Erickson, Tom and Wayne Palmer and Kelly Daughters served as casketbearers. Military honors were afforded by the Faith VFW and Legion Posts. Interment was at Black Hills National Cemetery with honors provided by the Sturgis Veterans. Delbert Gustafson was born November 22, 1921, at rural Castlewood, S.D., to Rudolph and Anna Dora Ruth (Hofwolt) Gustafson, the oldest of four children. He grew up on the family farm and attended a rural school near his home, graduating from Brookings High School in 1939. As a teenager, he began working summers as a cook for his father on road repair crews and later began operating heavy equipment building dams. An interest in
Carrol Ripley passed away on July 16, 2012, at the age of 92. She brought great wisdom and grace to her family; and will be greatly missed, and fondly remembered. Carrol was an exceptional mother, grandmother, and great grandmother, as well as hostess, and homemaker. She was a joyous and social person and through this she touched many lives. Carrol was very artistic, and enjoyed gardening, oil painting, and pottery. Carrol had a great ability to bring humor to the situations of life. In
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Christoph D. “Chris” Reimann_______
Chris found great joy in serving his Lord, being with family, especially grandchildren, living in the country, traveling and working on genealogy. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, long time supporter and volunteer for the Boy Scouts of America, served proudly in the South Dakota National Guard and was an avid supporter of high school wrestling, especially for his boys and any activity in which his grandchildren participated. Survivors include his wife, JoAnn Reimann, Caputa; two sons, Kent Reimann, Caputa, and Larry Reimann and his wife, Kim, Casper, Wyo.; five grandchildren, Cole, Felecia, Gabrielle, Natalie and Curtis; his brother, Kendrick Reimann and his wife, Rayma, Midland; and his sister, Martha Ulrich and her husband, Marvin, Glendive, Mont.; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and parents-in-law, Robert and Tillie Pringle. Graveside services were held Friday, July 20, 2012 at Oakridge Cemetery near Deadwood with military honors. A memorial has been established to the Black Hills Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America.
Christoph D. “Chris” Reimann, 73, died Tuesday, July 17, 2012, at the Rapid City Hospice House. He was born November 16, 1938, in Midland, S.D., to Rudolph and Margaret (Gillaspie) Reimann. He grew up on the family farm southeast of Midland and attended rural schools through the eighth grade, graduating from Midland High School and received a B.S in Secondary Education from BHSU. On August 20, 1961, Chris was united in marriage to JoAnne Pringle in Lead. To this union were born two sons, Kent and Larry. He taught school in Mobridge, Ft. Pierre and Deadwood prior to his employment with the Homestake Mining Company, retiring in 1993.
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Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Philip Catechism ~ Recess ~ Worship ~ Group Activities ~ Water Fights Grade School - Junior High (Grades 1-8):
Monday, July 30 - Thurs., Aug. 2: 9 am to 2:30 pm
*Participants in these grades need to bring a sack lunch each day; a drink will be provided! A morning snack will also be provided.
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net Fr. Kevin Achbach Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m. Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m. Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m. (August) Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m. Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home ****** ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544 Fr. Kevin Achbach Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.) Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.) Confession: Before Mass ****** ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH Milesville – 859-2664 Fr. Kevin Achbach Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec) Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August) Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m. (Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov) Confession: Before Mass Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m. ****** FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH Pastor Frezil Westerlund 859-2336 • Philip E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m. 1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship First Lutheran Ladies Bible study. There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at 12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby. No Bible studies during June, July, & August. TRINITY LUTHERAN Pastor Frezil Westerlund Midland – 843-2538 SATURDAY WORSHIP: 7:00 p.m. Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m. Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m. Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.) ****** DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN Moenville – 843-2538 Pastor Frezil Westerlund SUNDAY WORSHIP: 1:30 p.m. (CT) ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m. ****** OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN Long Valley Pastor Frezil Westerlund SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:00 a.m. ****** DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH Every Sunday in July Services at 10:00 a.m. followed by potluck dinner
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CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH Pastor Art Weitschat Kadoka – 837-2390 SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m. ****** OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip (605) 669-2406 • Murdo Pastor Ray Greenseth Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m. ****** OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND Pastor Andy Blye 843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Worship Service: 10:30 a.m. Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m. Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30 ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH 10 miles SE of Midland Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169 Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT) Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT ****** PHILIP COMMUNITY EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841 Sunday School – 9:15 a.m. Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
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Last Sunday of the month – potluck dinner following church services Last Monday of the month – Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m. Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m. Everyone Welcome!! ****** HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip 859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com Worship Service: 8:00 a.m. • Children's Church: 8:30 a.m. Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m. Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m. ****** UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310 Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m. ****** FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF INTERIOR Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310 E-mail: chez@gwtc.net Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
Sunday, July 29 - Thurs., Aug. 2: 7:30 to 9:30 pm Parish Potluck Dinner: Wed., August 1st 6:00 p.m. at Fire Hall Park in Philip
**Registration is available in each of the three parishes (St. Mary’s, Milesville; St. William, Midland; & Sacred Heart, Philip) or call the parish office at 859-2664
High School - (Grades 9-12):
This space for rent! Call 859-2516 to have your message placed here!
Ronald G. Mann, DDS Dentist Philip, SD 859-2491
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Scotchman Industries
www.rushfuneralhome.com
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NEBRASKA SPECIAL OF THE MONTH
JD 8225R Tractor
JD 843 loader, tires 90%, hours 557, excellent looking tractor. SN# 8280 Cash Price
Call Local Store M-F 7:30am-5:30pm; Sat 7:30am- Call for local store closing hours.
Anniversary Celebration
THURS, AUG 16TH & FRI, AUG 17TH
Combines
Prices Reduced On Select Models! See details on web site.
AS LOW AS $175,000
JD 9770 & 9770 STS 10 TO CHOOSE FROM
With Loader @ $192,000 Without Loader @ $173,500
WINNER SPECIAL OF THE MONTH
2006 New Holland
28ft Twin Rake, SN# 7584, Cash Price,
$13,000
Winner, SD Toll Free: (800) 658-3440 Pierre, SD Toll Free: (800) 742-8110 Philip, SD Toll Free: (800) 416-7839 Bloomfield, NE Toll Free: (800) 658-3252 Hartington, NE Toll Free:(800) 624-7826 Laurel, NE Toll Free: (800) 365-6257 Wayne, NE Toll Free: (800) 343-3309
Windrowers - MoCos
2006 MacDon 9352 21 ft, Shiftable Draper head
& 16ft Auger head, 972 hrs ..............S# 8695 (W) $75,000
1999 MacDon 9300 16 ft. sickle Auger header, 1640 hrs ............................ S# 9323 (P) $39,500 2005 John Deere 4995 Tri-Lobe Condition, 16 Rotary, 1400 hrs #10397 ..........(W) $69,500 1981 John Deere 2420 18’ #10051 (W) $6,000 John Deere 2320, 18’ ........ #10408 (W) $5,500
(4) John Deere 9660 Corn/Bean, 2WD, Hydrostatic, AS LOW AS $100,000 (4) 2010 JD 9670 Corn/Bean 2WD Hydrostatic ........... .................................................AS LOW AS $270,000 1995 JD 9600 Corn/bean, Hydrostatic, 4000 hrs .......... ................................................. S#9875 (PR) $40,000 (3) John Deere 9760 ..............AS LOW AS $130,000
PHILIP SPECIAL OF THE MONTH
2004 Summers 1500 Sprayer
1500 gal. sprayer with 90ft booms, 3 way nozzles, clean rinse tank with sprayer wand, clean fill system, remote control, raven monitor system,stainless steel pump and plumbing S#8014
Tractors: Articulated 4WD
Sprayers
(3) JD 4930s 90 Booms, hours as low as 896 .............. ...................................................as low as $195,000 (5) Summers 1500 90’ Booms ...............as low as $17,850 Flexi-Coil 67XL 90’ Booms, 1500 gal ...S#9753 (P) $13,000 Tractors: Row Crop
2011 John Deere 9430
Cab, Powershift, Duals, 359 hrs, S# 10113 (W) ...........$245,000
1996 John Deere 8870 Cab, Collarshift, Duals, 7,740 hrs ............................................ S# 8184 (P) $78,000 1998 John Deere 9200 Cab, Synchro, Duals, 3 Pt Hitch, PTO, 9,000 hrs .............. S# 9606 (W) $87,500 2004 John Deere 9520 Cab, Powershift, Duals, 6,296 hrs ....................................... S# 9873 (PR) $109,000 1997 New Holland 9682 Cab, Collarshift, Duals, 3pt, 6,530 hrs ................................S# 10152 (P) $75,000 2006 New Holland TV145 Cab, Singles, 3 Pt Hitch, PTO,2,288 hrs ........................... S#9966 (P) $84,500
Balers 11 JD 567 Balers
Twine & Net Wrap Models as low as
$26,500
1994 John Deere 4960
Cab, MFWD, Powershift, 9,000 hrs S# 8795 (W)
$11,500
(3) JD 566 ...........................AS LOW AS $10,000 (11) JD 568 .........................AS LOW AS $17,500
PIERRE SPECIAL OF THE MONTH
1998 JD 9200 4WD
6244 hours, 4 remotes, bareback, 20.8R42 duals. Unit runs well and looks good. S#8535
$73,000
(2) 1997 John Deere 7810.......................... $75,000 (2) John Deere 7800 MFWD, as low as ....... $47,500 2004 JD 7820 MFWD, 4136 Hrs, JD 746 Loader ............ John Deere 4030 Cab, 2WD, Collarshift, Loader S#10350 (W) .............................................. $129,500 557 hrs .....................................S# 9713 (P) $24,000 2000 John Deere 8110 .S#10028 as low as $69,000 (2) John Deere 8100 ...................... (1) 2WD $48,500 1982 John Deere 4840 2wd, P-Shift, 3 SCVs, 1000 ......................................................(1) MFWD $75,000 PTO, 8822 hrs......................... S#38060 (W) $25,000 2005 CIH MX 285 ......................... S#9938 $115,000 1997 John Deere 8300 MFWD, 16 spd P-shift, 9844 hrs (3) John Deere 7730’s MFWD 2 w/loaders $92,000 9839 (P) ........................................................ $67,750
$58,000
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Community
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Greetings from overcast, slightly cooler, muggy northeast Haakon County. It is amazing to me that the soil can be so dry and the air can be so wet, but I'm thankful for a little moisture of any kind. If there is moisture in the air, possibly it means that it could rain later today. It seems that our pattern lately has been miserably hot days, with thunderstorms brewing up in the late afternoon and evening. The thunderstorms the past couple of nights have been accompanied by quite a bit of lightning, which is a little scary given the parched condition of the grass in the area. The rains have been going north and south of us for the most part, but we still have hope! We did receive a couple of small showers late last week, and we were thankful for every drop. The fires that have been raging in the southern Black Hills and the Rosebud Reservation are closer to being contained, thank goodness. My heart goes out to the residents of those areas and also to the firefighters who are battling the fires in this horrible heat. I pray that they'll remain safe. There have been many prairie fires in areas south of here, but none in our community, thank goodness. I guess I should knock on wood when I say that! A friend of mine who lives in the Norris area said she is praying for snow, because the rain showers aren't keeping up with the lightning caused wildfires. News from the garden hasn't been so good, either. The plants have been struggling to come back after last month's hail storm, and they have been doing fairly well. I work to keep the plants watered, but they haven't been inclined to produce much yet. Even with plenty of moisture, they just seem to almost lay down during these hot days. The cucumbers have lots of blossoms, and the bees have been busy, but still no fresh cucumbers at our house. Maybe I am just being too impatient! We (or rather, I) have enjoyed a few zucchini, and the green beans will be ready to pick in a few days. The tomatoes continue to bloom and set fruit, but it will be awhile before we are enjoying tomatoes from this garden. I'll have to go to the farmers market, I guess. Some of the neighbors have reported large numbers of blister beetles eating their garden plants. Fortunately, I haven't had that problem yet – guess I'd better knock on wood again! And I haven't had to contend with grasshoppers in the garden yet, either. I am hoping that once the temperatures cool down a bit, the garden will be able to kick into gear. And while I'm on the subject of yards and gardens, I want to caution everyone to be on the lookout for snakes. I have heard of a couple people being bitten by rattlesnakes recently, and fortunately they were dry bites, meaning there was no venom injected. But the snakes are definitely on the move, looking for water. There is a garter snake that stays in my flower bed and vegetable garden – it gives me quite a start when I see it, but I've let it live because I know it eats bugs. And there is also a big bull snake that is generally around the barns, and we let it live because we know it also eats bugs and mice, and I've heard that bull snakes are a deterrent to rattlesnakes. Aside from the surprise factor that sets my heart racing when I see these snakes, I thought I had come to terms with having them around. However, the other night I had a dream that there were baby garter snakes all over the place, so maybe I have not come to terms with the snakes after all. As I've said before, we have been getting up and out very early these days, trying to get the outside work done before the extreme heat drives us indoors. With all the extra time being spent in the house, I am reminded again of how mind-numbing daytime television is. I have pretty much sworn off watching the news, because it is so depressing and repetitive. And these days, I'm thinking about boycotting the weather forecasts as well! I am a person who likes to be productive, and this time of year that generally means outdoor projects. For the past couple of weeks however, I've been looking for inside projects due to the heat. I've put new shelf liner in the kitchen cabinets, cleaned some drawers and closets, done some sewing, and I even found myself washing light fixtures the other day – all tasks that are generally reserved for the winter months! One of my neighbors said she has been washing walls to stay busy. Good grief! We need some relief from the heat, so we can get back to more seasonal tasks. I have noticed one outdoor task that awaits me – painting some fence and barn doors. I painted them last summer, but the hail storm beat them up, so I need to repaint them. In an effort to keep the house a bit cooler, I've been dredging up some seldom used crock pot recipes – that way the guys can have a hot meal without me using the oven. And I found a way to keep myself cooler also – cleaning out the refrigerator! I suppose defrosting and cleaning out the deep freezes would be another refreshingly cool chore, but I haven't gotten that desperate yet! Nels and Dorothy Paulson have stayed busy checking on cattle and working on their new deck. They are about half done with their deck renovation project. Nels and others responded to a fire in the Capa area Friday. Dorothy said they were blessed with an inch of rain last Friday evening, which was very welcome. Duane and Lola Roseth enjoyed a visit from their son, Thor, last Thursday. Friday, the Roseths were supper guests at the Sanftner home in Kadoka. Ruby Sanftner had fresh potatoes and zucchini from her garden, which were delicious. As emergency manager for Haakon County, Lola has been busy monitoring fire activity in the area. Thank goodness for neighbors with tractors and disks who helped stop the fire south of Highway 34 last week! I had a nice visit with Mary Anne (Beckwith) Stoner Monday. She and her husband, Leo, have moved from their ranch home east of Pierre to an apartment in Philip. They are doing well and getting used to town life. They got to meet their great-granddaughter, Mattie Amelia, recently. Mattie is the daughter of their granddaughter, Carrie (Hurley), and her husband, Ben. Carrie and Ben are teachers in Florida and they have spent some time in the Midwest this summer, visiting family and friends. Leo and Mary Anne's granddaughte Cassi and husband, John, Guernsey, Wyo., have also visited. Friends Mary and Terry Ness, Pierre, visited with Leo and Mary Anne recently also. Best wishes to Leo and Mary Anne as they continue to acclimate to their new home. Saturday, Adam and Jodi Roseth and boys joined Katie and Casey Sammons for a night of camping at Lily Park in Ft. Pierre. Ft. Pierre has done a wonderful job of renovating the Lily Park area, and it is a great facility for camping or family gatherings. Jodi said she had been spending a lot of time moving sprinklers around the yard. They have harvested some potatoes and cucumbers from their garden, but the bugs are wrecking the plants. Happy birthday to Arlyne Markwed! She said they have been staying close to home because of the extreme heat and dry conditions. They did receive over a half inch of rain Sunday night, which helped a bit. However, with temperatures well above 100˚, it doesn't take long for the moisture to disappear. But it is nice to see mud puddles, even if they don't stick around long. Arlyne said it has been so hot that the dog won't even go outside! T.J. and Jeanine Gabriel were in Spearfish last weekend visiting family in the area. Their son, Dylan, stayed in Spearfish at Grandma Cindy's, and he will be attending a football camp this week that is put on by Cindy's husband, Bruce Bressee. T.J. and Jea-
Thursday, July 26, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •
Page 7
Morrison’s garden enjoyed by many
Clark Morrison’s garden behind his home on W. Pine Street in Philip, is still doing okay, but he said it sure isn’t as good as it has been in past years. “The sun is getting terrible on it,” said Clark. His garden typically spills over into the alleys on the south and east side of his house. He plants everything, summer and winter squash, beets, parsnips, radishes, carrots, sweet corn, Swiss chard, beans, potatoes, tomatoes, pumpkins, and a few other things. He also has a strawberry patch under some trees. He has started apple and peach trees, also. The zucchini are doing especially well this year. He and family have been sharing the bounty with those they know. Clark said it has gotten hard for him to get down and plant, so he came up with a solution – a plastic pipe attached to a metal box. He can put the seeds in the box and feed them down the pipe. He has a larger version for potatoes. Clark also said he plants one radish with about five or six carrot seeds. “It seems to help get them up,” he said. He uses soaker hoses to water the numerous plants. He marks the plant hill with a stake so that he can make sure to get water to the roots as it is hard to see through the vines. Clark’s garden keeps him busy since he retired from the farming business; he plans to keep at it as long as he can. He is also fond of hollyhocks and has them bordering the garden and buildings. The wide variety of colors bring people by to admire them, although they are not liking the heat either this year. Photos by Nancy Haigh nine's daughter, Kori, is spending the week with Jeanine's parents in Spearfish. Frank and Shirley Halligan were in Ft. Pierre last Tuesday, attending a fundraiser for the local BB gun team. Monday, they were in Rapid City getting some fire fighting equipment and repairs. While in Rapid City, they visited their neighbor, Jerry Sylva, who is undergoing therapy there following a recent surgery. If all goes as planned, Jerry will be able to return to his home in Ft. Pierre Wednesday. Shirley said she had an email from Darla (Stapert) Pettis recently. Darla is the daughter of Bud and Joyce Stapert who lived in our area for many years. Bud and Joyce now live in Arkansas near Darla and her family, and they recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. Darla said that Bud and Joyce are doing well, and they thoroughly enjoyed hearing from so many family and friends. Max and Joyce Jones are among those who have been staying close to home due to heat and threats of fire. Their son, Todd, and his family attended the air show in Sioux Falls over the weekend, so Max and Joyce were in charge of caring for their dog as well as the bottle calf. They were very grateful to receive .80” of rain Friday. Kevin Neuhauser said there hasn't been much news at his house this week. Mary spent the weekend at the ranch, and when I talked to Kevin Monday afternoon, he was headed to Pierre to watch daughter Brianna play softball. The games last week were canceled due to heat. Marge Briggs reported that she hasn't been anywhere or done anything this week – just trying to stay cool. Marge has been dealing with some very sore, swollen hands, but she said the best relief comes from soaking them in cold water. I hope they improve soon! Evidently bugs are also raising havoc with her garden. She said her friend, Charlie Hack, contends that one of the best ways to kill grasshoppers is to spray the plants and pests with milk. Do you suppose that means that grasshoppers are lactose intolerant? Whatever the reason, it is good to have another tool for dealing with the darned things! Chase and Kelly Briggs gave their children a treat last weekend by taking them for an outing at the aquatic center in Pierre. The kids loved it and want to know when they can go again! These hot days, Kelly has had to be creative to find lots of indoor activities for the little folks, because it is just too warm to be outside for any length of time. Ray and Nancy Neuhauser had a visit from Nancy's daughter, Carrie, who lives in Sheridan, Wyo. Carrie arrived Thursday, then went on to Brookings for a couple of days, returning to Pierre Sunday. Carrie left Monday to return to her home in Wyoming. Other than that, Ray and Nancy have been attending activities at the senior center, and Ray has been joining his card groups. Ray's knee that has been giving him fits is improving, which is great news. Like the rest of us, Russ and Cindy Sinkey have been dealing with the hot, dry conditions. Cindy is on vacation this week, so she and their son traveled to the Sioux Falls zoo and then on to Minnesota. Russ remained here, keeping watch on the livestock and being alert in case of fire. The Neuhauser ranch is hot and dry, and we, like many others, are staying home, caring for livestock and watching for fires. Our parched corn crop is now in the silage pile, a full month ahead of when we cut silage last year. But we needed to salvage what was there, because it was going backwards every day. The custom crew that chopped our silage said they had lots of work lined up – many acres of corn will be going into silage piles this year. It is good to know that the silage is there to help feed the cattle this winter. Lee and Mary Briggs went on a gad-about last weekend. Their crew was gone for the weekend –
continued on page 12
Stop in & see Colt today!!
2003 Subaru Baja … All Wheel Drive
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585 (800) 859-5557
www.philipmotor.com
Presenting Tomorrow’s Leaders …
Tyler & Angel Nemec
and view Signature Home Style Products
See the new home of
from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. at 309 Dakota St. in Midland on Sunday, July 29, 2012
Derek, 7; Carson, 4. Children of Bob & Shandon Fugate, Philip.
Book for Sale
“Challenges and Love”
a true story about John Nemec,
written by himself.
$15.00 if picked up or $17 if mailed
Millie, 10 months. Daughter of Andrea Carley & Randy Clark. Taylor, 4; Kendall, 2. Children of Trace & Jennifer O’Connell, Philip. Fayth, 5; Layne, 2; Jaydon, 2. Children of Vance & Kristin Martin, Midland.
If interested contact John Nemec
Phone: (605) 843-2191 email: johnboyn@gwtc.net, or mail 25042 223rd. St. Midland, S.D. 57552
Mikayla, 12; Madison, 9; Megan, 6. Joseph, 8; Margaret, 5; Garrett, 2. Children of Danny & Mary Quinn, Children of Gerry & Kara Moriarty, Craig, Colorado. Anchorage, Alaska. Grandchildren of Joe & Kathy Gittings, Philip.
This feature is brought to you by the
Pioneer review
& Thompson Photographics
Youth
Thursday, July 26, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •
by Savannah Solon 1 10-oz. package of frozen sliced strawberries (or approximately 2 cups), 1/2 cup sugar, 2/3 cup heavy whipping cream. Combine frozen strawberries and sugar in blender. Process until fruit is roughly chopped. With the blender running slowly, pour the heavy cream in until fully incorporated. Serve immediately or freeze for up to one week. Serves four. Fast Fruit Tarts by Shaina Solon 6 tablespoons apricot preserves, 3 1/2 oz. prepared vanilla pudding, miniature graham cracker pie crusts, 1/3 cup sliced strawberries, 1/3 cup blueberries, 1/3 sliced, peeked kiwi fruits. Put the preserves in a small microwave safe bowl and microwave on high for 1 minute, or until melted. Spoon 2 tablespoonfuls of pudding into each crust and top each serving with fruit. Spoon 1 tablespoon of melted apricot preserves over each tart. Serves six. Patriotic Fruit Pizza by Elle Moon 1 package readymade sugar cookie dough (16.5 oz.), 2 8-oz. packages cream cheese softened, 1 cup white sugar, 2 tablespoons vanilla extract, 2 large bananas sliced, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 container fresh strawberries sliced, 1 container fresh blueberries, 1 container fresh raspberries. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spread cookie dough on ungreased 12x17 inch cookie sheet. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned. Allow to cool completely. Mix softened cream cheese with sugar and vanilla extract in a bowl until smooth and easy to spread. Spread the cream cheese filling evenly over the cookie dough. Slice the bananas into a bowl and toss gently with the lemon juice to prevent browning. Place the blueberries, strawberries, bananas and raspberries on top of the cream cheese filling in a decorative pattern. Keep refrigerated until served. Fourth of July Kabobs by Abby Moon Fresh strawberries, large marshmallows, blueberries, wooden kabob sticks. Wash and hull strawberries. Wash blueberries and remove any stems. Slice marshmallows in half. Grab a wooden kabob stick and slide on a strawberry, a white marshmallow, and a blueberry. Repeat pattern. Peanut Butter Banana Toast by Tagg Weller 1 slice toasted wheat bread, spread with peanut butter, slice and spread a banana and place on the peanut butter. Serve with a glass of cold milk for a healthy breakfast or snack. Strawberry Banana Smoothie by Gage Weller 3-oz package of strawberry flavored smoothie mix, 1 cup ice, 1/2 banana. Blend all ingredients together until This makes one smooth and creamy. smoothie that includes two daily servings of fruit. Patriotic Trifle by Dustin Enders 1 small package instant sugar-free vanilla pudding mix, 1 1/2 cups cold fat-free milk, 1 8-oz. tub of lite Cool Whip, 1 premade angel food cake cut into 1/2-inch cubes, 2 cups fresh sliced strawberries, 1 cup fresh blueberries. Beat pudding mix and milk together with a whisk for two minutes. Stir in 1 1/2 cups Cool Whip. In a glass bowl layer half of the angel food cake cubes, top with half of the strawberries and half of the blueberries. Next spread half of the pudding mixture over the top. Repeat layers. Top with remaining Cool Whip. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until served. Serves 16. Banana Berry Smoothies by McKenzie Stilwell 1 ripe banana sliced, 1/2 cup sliced strawberries, 1 cup vanilla yogurt, 1 cup cold milk, 1 cup orange juice, optional 1/2 cup orange sherbet. Place all ingredients into a blender and mix until smooth and creamy; may use fresh or frozen strawberries. For a creamier smoothie you may wish to use the sherbet.
Page 8
4-H Iron Chef – fruit challenge
Fruit was the chosen ingredient that 4-H members had to use in the third annual Iron Chef contest, July 12, in Philip. Contestants were given 90 minutes in which to prepare and serve their recipe to a panel of judges. They are judged on cooking skills, food safety and handling skills, kitchen clean up, and the nutritional knowledge for their dish. The youth must know how many servings their recipe makes, the amount of calories per serving, how the different ingredients fit into the food pyramid, as well as information on the fats and sugars in each serving.
Summer school completed
Shaina Solon, Sarah Parsons, Josie Rush and Savannah Solon. Courtesy photos
From left: Abby Moon, Elle Moon, Gage Weller, McKenzie Stilwell, Dustin Enders and Tagg Weller.
Parent Meeting for Football, Volleyball, and Cross Country on Sunday, August 5th.
Cross Country meeting at 5:30 p.m. in room A-3 Football meeting at 6:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Building Volleyball meeting at 6:00 p.m. in room A-1
JH/HS Class Registration
Monday, August 13th and Tuesday, August 14th
from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the HS/Guidance offices.
Please call 859-2003 with any questions.
Power Orange Smoothie by Josie Rush 2 cups fat free or low fat milk, 1 6-oz. can frozen orange juice concentrate, 1/2 cup powdered sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 4-6 extra large ice cubes In a blender combine the milk, frozen orange juice concentrate, powdered sugar and the vanilla. Cover and blend until smooth. With the blender still running, remove the center lid and add ice cubes one at a time; blending until smooth and frothy. Pour into tall glasses and serve immediately. This shake can also be poured into freezer pop containers for a dreamsicle snack. Serves four. Cherry Cream Crepes by Sarah Parsons Filling: 6 ounces of Neufchatel or cream cheese, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1/4 cup sour cream, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon. Crepes: 1/2 cup Bisquick mix, 1 egg, 1/2 cup of milk, 1/4 vanilla extract, softened butter. Topping: 1 can cherry pie filling. In a small mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese, sour cream, sugar and cinnamon until smooth; set aside. For the crepes, whisk the Bisquick mix, egg, milk and vanilla together in a small bowl. Grease an eight inch nonstick skillet with a small amount of softened butter. Pour two tablespoons of the batter into the center of the skillet. Lift and tilt pan to coat bottom evenly. Cook until top appears dry. Turn and cook for 15-20 seconds longer. Remove to wire rack. Repeat with remaining batter, adding butter to skillet as needed. Spoon two rounded tablespoonfuls of filling down the center of the crepe. Roll up. Heat the cherry pie filling over low heat in a small saucepan until warm. Pour on top of crepes. Five Minute Strawberry Ice Cream
Lessons were broken with recess during the morning and afternoon sessions of summer school held in the Philip elementary building, July 9-12 and July 16-19. Some students needed a refresher course, while others just didn’t want to get too used to being out of classes. The last day was celebrated with ice cream. Shown above in the morning class are, back row, from left instructor Barb Bowen, Luke Ferguson, Tanner Hajny and instructor MaryLynn Crary. Second row: Kiara Perkins and Copper Lurz. Front: Addy Johnson and Dymond Lurz. Not pictured: Jesse Fillingim and Sawyer Smith. In the afternoon class, shown below, are, from left Kaylor Pinney, Grace Pekron, Eryka Johnson, Matrix Noteboom, Jasmine Ferguson and Myles Clements. Not pictured: Cylver Lurz and Taryn Smith.
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Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company a top 50 performer
Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company, a company of Farm Bureau Financial Services, has been named to the Ward’s 50® Top Performing Life and Health Insurers list for 2012. According to local representative Glenn Parsons, the life company is a nationwide company while the property/casualty company covers 14 states. “It is nice to know when I sit across the table from people, I represent a company that will be there for the long haul,” said Parsons. “Farm Bureau is not the flashiest company out there, in fact it’s a pretty conservative company, but they have their ducks lined up and to me that is what matters.” Each year, Ward Group analyzes the financial performance of 800 life-health insurance companies domiciled in the United States and identifies the top performers in the industry. This marks the 13th time Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company has appeared on the list. The companies recognized were evaluated on a series of safety and consistency screens, and required to achieve superior performance from 2007 to 2011. Ward Group reported that as a group, the Ward’s 50 life-health insurance companies produced a 19 percent statutory return on average equity from 2007 to 2011, compared to 3.4 percent for the life-health industry overall. Through an exclusive, multistate agent force, the companies affiliated with the Farm Bureau Financial Services brand underwrite, market and distribute a broad range of financial services products, including life insurance, investments, annuities, property-casualty insurance products and services and more, to individuals and small businesses within a marketing territory that includes 14 states. For more information about products and services, visit www. fbfs.com.
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859-2744 685-3068 Philip
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Sports & Accomplishments Painting classes hosted by 4-H Hot Summer Nights
Thursday, July 26, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •
Page 9
The July event called Hot Summer Nights is put on every Thursday evening, sponsored by the Haakon County Young Women at the Kiddie Park in Philip. On July 19, along with the farmers market and musical entertainment, the HCYW offered walking tacos. The last Hot Summer Nights event for this year, July 26, will also include a community barbecue cook-off and a hot dog feed. Above, across the park from the music system, four gals danced to the song “YMCA.”At right, Layton Terkildsen getting with the beat on the high end of a teeter-totter. Photos by Bartels
Accident at Highways 14, 73 Closure prairie
dog shooting
Nebraska National Forests and Grasslands Deputy Supervisor, Steve Lenzo, has announced expansion of a 1998 shooting closure to include all black-footed ferret management areas located on the Wall Ranger District of Buffalo Gap National Grassland. The new additions are in three main areas: around Scenic, north of Badlands National Park; the Steer Pasture Complex north of Badlands National Park between Highway 240 and Forest System Road 7116; and the area west of Interior. The existing prairie dog shooting closure totals 60,670 acres. Today’s newly expanded closure adds 18,755 acres. The closure is immediately effective and will be enforced. Additionally, the Wall Ranger District has been selected as a scientific research area to develop an oral sylvatic plague vaccine. Prairie dog colonies selected for research will be closed to shooting throughout the field trial period.
A kids’ acrylic painting class, Let’s Paint Run-a-ways taught by Connie Buskohl-Barney, Sioux Falls, was held at the Philip American Legion hall, Thursday, July 19. The earlier session was for youth age seven through 11 years old. They worked on a monochromatic landscape, using the color blue in all its shades. The afternoon session included 12 year olds through adults. They worked on a horse running through a pasture, with each artist choosing the color and type of their horse. The classes, including the materials, were hosted by the Haakon and Jackson County 4-H offices, though participants did not have to belong to 4-H. Shown above, back row, from left: Mark Stangle, Connor Knuppe, Noah Johnson, Chance Derner and Lauren Fitz. Middle row: Sarah Parsons, Gracie Fitzgerald, Mallory Vetter, Dilyn Terkildsen and Josie Rush. Front: Keldon and Kade Fitzgerald, Brin Heltzel and Shelby Derner. Shown left, back row: Payton Schoenhals, Shaina Solon and Rachel Parsons. Front: Dixie Ehlers, Anna Belle McIlravy and Savannah Solon. Not pictured: Kari Kanable. Photos by Bartels
At 11:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 18, a 1991 4x4 Chevrolet pickup driven by Karch Foley, Philip, was going west on Highway 14. A 2000 Chevy pickup driven by Josh Tatum, Philip, was eastbound on Highway 14. Foley attempted to make a left hand turn to go south on Highway 73. The two vehicles collided, with the front of Tatum’s vehicle connecting with the passenger-side door of Foley’s vehicle. Though shaken and bruised, neither person involved was seriously hurt. Both vehicles were totaled. The speed limit for Highway 14, going through Philip is 45 miles per hour. The speed limit for Highway 73, going through Philip is 30 mph. Shown is Foley’s vehicle. Photo by Del Bartels
Guaranteed Prize Money 1st … $1,800 2nd … $1,000 3rd … $750 4th … $500
$100 bonus for the fastest time in each event!
Ranch Rodeo
Sunday, August 12th
Lower Brule, South Dakota
Rules Meeting: 12:30 p.m. (CST)
Lower Brule
Rodeo starts at 1:00 p.m. (CST)
Horse Races to Follow Rodeo
Free Admission! Concessions Available!
—Events—
4 4 4 4 4 Steer Tiedown Saddle Horse Relay Crazy Man’s Race Sort & Pen Bronc Ride from Chute with Stock Saddle
Entry Fee: $100 per 4-man Team Limited to 10 Teams
(Each entrant only allowed to be on one team)
To enter, you must call John McCauley Cell: (605) 734-1042 Home: (605) 473-5892
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