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Pioneer Review, Thurs., April 18, 2013

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 34
Volume 107
April 18, 2013
Pioneer review
Market Report
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Midland
Education
Fair
9
Philip
Live-
stock
Auction
8
Snow
report
2
by Del Bartels
As of Monday, April 8, Zach
Thomsen, is the new Haakon
County and northern Jackson
County wildlife conservation officer
with the South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks.
“In layman’s terms, from the
White River to the Cheyenne
River,” said Thomsen about the
area he covers within the two coun-
ties. “Obviously, I can’t meet every-
body in one week. I will try my
hardest to get out there and meet
landowners. I’m looking forward to
meeting people and working in the
area,” said Thomsen.
A 2005 graduate from Brandon
Valley High School, he earned his
bachelors degree in wildlife and
fisheries science from South
Dakota State University in 2009.
During college, he held two intern
positions with the GF&P in Sioux
Falls, and after graduation worked
two seasonal positions; all four as a
wildlife damage technician in
depredation control. The beginning
of 2012 he was working full time as
a regional program assistant.
“When I applied the academy, I
applied for Philip specific,” said
Thomsen. “The job for Philip came
open, and I knew I would not mind
coming here. It’s a good station;
I’ve heard nothing bad. The people
are great. It’ll be a good district to
work in.”
The South Dakota Law Enforce-
ment Academy in Pierre is 13
weeks of training required for all
law enforcement personnel, police
departments, sheriff offices, high-
way patrol troopers and conserva-
tion officers. Thomsen then did
three weeks of post academy learn-
ing in Pierre. Then he went
through four months of field train-
ing; eight weeks in the Chamber-
lain area followed by seven weeks
in the Spearfish area.
“It was kinda nice. I got to make
contacts in the prairie and the
hills, nice to meet in the middle on
these,” said Thomsen.
Though raised in the city, he
spent a lot of time on the farm. His
grandparents had a farm in south-
eastern South Dakota, and his
uncle and aunt also have a farm
there. He also did some work on a
farm outside Brandon.
“The reason I got involved with
this kind of job was I grew up hunt-
ing and fishing,” said Thomsen.
This was mostly with his dad. “I’ve
always wanted to be a game war-
den. I love the outdoors. I like
working with landowners, giving a
helping hand in trying to conserve
the habitat and providing the
youth with as much hunting as I
enjoyed when I was their age.”
“A nice thing about my job is it’s
not all about law enforcement. I do
a lot with landowners, and with
habitat, wildlife and fisheries man-
agement,” he said.
“I like this, you don’t get that
anywhere else. Small town atmos-
phere; really big in my part. Defi-
nitely different than the big city,”
said Thomsen. “It’s awesome, I
don’t know how else to say it.”
His first day was mostly spent
getting his equipment and working
with Brian Meiers, wildlife conser-
vation officer supervisor for the
GF&P out of Rapid City. Thomsen
still took care of local business by
taking a barn owl, wounded when
getting caught in a fence, to the
raptor center in Rapid City.
“I have been watching Zach
progress through the law enforce-
ment academy and am very
pleased with his performance,”
stated Mike Kintigh, regional su-
pervisor for Region 1, S.D. GF&P.
“I’m also familiar with his prior
work experience and interactions
with public and coworkers. All this
leads me to believe we are develop-
ing a fine young officer for the
Philip district.” For the last few
years, the district had been in-
cluded in the responsibilities of Of-
ficer Josh Brainard out of the Wall
office.
Thomsen is new conservation officer
Zach Thomsen is the new Haakon County and northern Jackson County Wildlife
Conservation Officer for the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks. Photo-Bartels
by Del Bartels
The Midland Drama Club will
perform this year’s comedy “War-
ren’s Peace” Friday and Saturday,
April 26-27, at 7:00 p.m., and Sun-
day, April 28, at 2:00 p.m.
Written by Marc and Kathy Hol-
land, this situational comedy has
dialogue that could come from any
small town community. The barbs,
insults and zingers seem almost
too natural and believable. The
conflicts are between a married
couple, a long-forlorn ex-boyfriend
who lost his high school sweet-
heart, and two ladies who seem-
ingly hate each other’s guts ... and
they’re sisters.
The first of two acts lights the
wick that could set off a 20-year-old
powder keg of animosity between
the five characters. The poor dupe
who holds the match is a National
Guard representative sent to put
up a banner, stage some public re-
lations photos and maybe give a
short, halfhearted speech on World
Peace Day.
An unprecedented year of peace
prompts the government to hold a
small ceremony at each place
where its armed forces have ever
been deployed. Long ago, the speck
of a town called Crickwater actu-
ally threatened to leave the Union
and join with Canada. This almost
missed footnote in the records be-
comes a public relations nightmare
for officer Warren, who is stuck
with the drab task since he missed
his division’s trip to Germany and
a prolonged party.
Matthew Jones plays the part of
the poor slacker. He walks into a
love triangle that has been simmer-
ing to blow since three former
classmates’ senior year. The town’s
mayor, played by Lawrence Strop-
pel, parades around his trophy
wife, played by Brenda Jensen, just
to dig the knife deeper into her
high school sweetheart, played by
Dennis Sinkey, who is the town’s
pubic works director. All the while,
the characters played by Audrey
Jones and Rayma Reimann have
absolutely nothing good to say
about each other. The zingers are
exceedingly comical, yes, though
unrelenting. This terrible peace
will eventually resolve itself into
war.
The action takes place in a court-
house room where half is the public
library and, across an imaginary
line in the carpet, is the city hall.
For your own sake, do not let that
line waver. Somehow the embar-
rassing history has been let out of
the bag, and reporters are crowded
outside the courthouse. Even the
impromptu political speech is up-
roarious. The big question is, will
there be cake?
Directed by Jensen, the cast
makes the banter and volatile situ-
ations flow toward the play’s cli-
max. The audience had better be-
ware not only the flying barbs, but
may itself become cannon fodder.
Midland comedy “Warren’s Peace”
The slack-off National Guardsman is warned about the former Army Ranger who
“can kill a man with pocket lint.” The mayor and librarian are more interested in
the show than in the visitor’s safety. You could say the poor guy is saved by a
dead deer on the road into town. Shown, from left, are actors Dennis Sinkey,
Matthew Jones, Lawrence Stroppel and Audrey Jones. Photos by Del Bartels
“Are you keeping something from me?” “Usually!” ... “I’ve got a feeling you’re mak-
ing fun of me!” “Well, go with that feeling!” ... “You treat strangers better than
me, and you don’t treat them nice either.” ... “Around here we try not to judge a
man by the color of
his neck.” ... “You
think some day
we can look back
on all this and not
puke?” ... “Believe
me, you put the
“F” “U” in FUN!” ...
“I’d be honored, if
I were an idiot.”
Actors Rayma
Reimann, left, and
Audrey Jones play
the part of small
town sisters.
Come to the Mid-
land play and
watch the long-
brewing war break
out into “Warren’s
Peace.”
by Del Bartels
The Haakon School District
Board of Education came out of an
executive session during its April
15 meeting to vote to give one-time
$300 bonuses to all its certified,
classified and administrative per-
sonnel.
The 2013 South Dakota legisla-
ture had allocated certain amount
of one-time money to the state’s
school systems. The Haakon sys-
tem received $13,500. The local
board decided that the funds would
be best used if awarded to the 45
full time personnel who are in one
of these three categories.
In other business, the board de-
cided to offer contracts to its certi-
fied and classified employees for
next school year. Contracts will be
offered at the current salary and
terms, in an effort to determine any
movement and hiring needs. Also,
contracts were offered now because
the school year will be over by the
time the board meets again in May.
After negotiations are completed,
contracts will be reissued with any
new fiscal year 2014 changes. As
far as the administrative contracts,
all have been signed and returned.
Those salaries and terms will also
be negotiated at a later date.
Steve Leithauser, Cottonwood,
has been hired as the new mainte-
nance director and custodial super-
visor. He will finish out the fiscal
year, then at the beginning of July
will be under full contract.
For the month of March, pay for
an equivalent of 27 days of substi-
tutes came to a total of $1,860.
Hourly wages for 2,072.2 hours to-
taled over $22,607.
The board approved a valuation
study that is required every three
years. The study is supposed to
identify the cost of other post em-
ployment health benefits offered to
retirees. The last such study was
done in fiscal year 2010 at a cost of
$2,000. Business Manager Britni
Ross said that not having the valu-
ation done would be similar to a
person having a very bad mark on
their credit report.
Elementary, high school and
staff handbooks have been ap-
proved for next school year. The
special education Title program
section has been completely up-
dated, but otherwise only two
changes of note have been imple-
mented. The prom has been specif-
ically included on the list of extra
curricular activities that a student
may not participate in if their
grades dictate that the student is
ineligible. Also, instead of the
school district footing the bill, stu-
dents will now be responsible for
the cost of taking most make up
courses in the alternative educa-
tion program.
“We’re enabling them is what we
are doing,” said Superintendent
Keven Morehart. “We are trying to
hold the kids accountable.” The al-
ternative education program is for
students to work at their own pace
to make up a failed class. It is
mostly for students who have failed
a semester and need the full credit
in order to graduate.
Secondary Principal Mike Baer
said, “The course might be offered,
but not where it can fit their sched-
ule. And, we don’t want a senior in
a freshman class.” He added, “If
they were struggling, and they are
working and getting help, they will
pass.” He said, “Biggest thing is the
student paying for it.”
Baer’s principal’s report began
with, “Keep your eyes on the calen-
dar because there have been a lot
of changes.” As Morehart’s super-
intendent’s report echoed, the re-
cent snow storm has canceled or
postponed many spring sports
events, and some things have been
shifted to accommodate.
Scottie Fest will be Thursday,
April 18, as will the local elemen-
tary spelling bee. April 22 will be
the annual preschool screening.
Also on April 22, the National
Honor Society will hold its induc-
tion ceremony. Baer said they are
changing the event to make it more
of a big deal. Jerry Rhodes will be
the guest speaker.
This year’s freshman core safety
event (mock traffic accident) will be
held at Douglas on April 24. Work
is being done to try to get the event
to again be more local and include
Wall, Kadoka Area and Philip as it
has been in previous years.
The second annual Science Day
will be April 25. This began last
year in place of the track and field
day for the elementary students.
“We’ve got some pretty good people
lined up,” said Morehart of the dif-
ferent stations that the kids will at-
tend.
The regional elementary spelling
bee will be April 29.
An awards banquet will be held
May 9 in the Fine Arts Building.
The intention is to make the event
a little nicer and recognize all the
students in one spot. The coaches
and advisors are not to rehash the
entire season. As a connected side
note, Baer said that the various
coaches will have monthly meet-
ings for networking and mentoring,
and to try to get a team atmos-
phere for all coaching.
May 11 will be the high school
graduation, with the eighth grade
graduation on May 14.
As of the February 22 petition
deadline, only one incumbent,
Doug Thorson, had filed for his seat
for a three-year term. A new filer,
Brad Kuchenbecker, will fill a seat,
also for a three-year term. Vonda
Hamill and Mark Nelson did not
file for their seats, which will leave
a seat open. That seat will be filled
with a one-year appointment made
by the remaining board members
at the annual meeting in July.
The next regular meeting for the
Haakon School District 27-1 Board
of Education will be at 7:00 p.m.,
Monday, May 20.
Bonuses given by school board
All of Jessica Wheeler’s third grade students got to watch Miles Wheeler dissect
a cow eye. Then, if the students were brave enough, they got to hold the lens and
see how it magnified words on paper, pick up and touch all of the parts of the
eye, find the optic nerve on the back, and look at the muscles to see how they
helped move the eye. “I was the only one who was not brave enough to pick up
or touch the eye,” admitted J. Wheeler. The hands-on materials for this part of
the class’s unit on the senses were donated by Philip Custom Meats so the kids
could learn about the parts of the eye. Shown, from left are Addie Johnson, Brin
Heltzel, Reghan Bloomquist, Allison Williams, Copper Lurz and Alec Crowser.
Courtesy photo
And the eyes have it
The trophy wife from high school days,
played by Brenda Jensen, catches the
eye of the public works director, played
by Dennis Sinkey. The mayor, played by
Lawrence Stroppel, watches and
gloats over his former buddy’s loss of
his high school sweetheart. Mean-
while the poor slacker, played by
Matthew Jones, comes in to try to
make peace. He will need to use the
cannon he brought.
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The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
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Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
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land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
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Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
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Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Overcast with a chance of snow. High
of 28F with a windchill as low as 9F. Breezy.
Winds from the NNW at 20 to 25 mph
with gusts to 30 mph. Chance of snow
20%. Thursday Night: Clear. Fog overnight.
Low of 12F. Winds from the NW at 5 to 20 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Fog early. High of
37F with a windchill as low as 3F.
Winds from the WSW at 10 to 15
mph. Friday Night: Mostly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 27F with a windchill as
low as 18F. Winds from the SW at 10 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Overcast with a chance of rain.
Fog early. High of 48F. Winds from the
South at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain
20%. Sunday Night: Partly cloudy with a
chance of rain. Low of 32F. Winds from the NNW at 10
to 15 mph. Chance of rain 20%.
Saturday: Overcast with a chance of
rain. Fog early. High of 52F. Winds
from the West at 5 to 10 mph shifting
to the North in the afternoon. Chance
of rain 20%. Saturday Night: Mostly
cloudy. Fog overnight. Low of 32F. Winds from the
East at 10 to 15 mph.
Get your
complete &
up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
Not all oranges are created
equal. I learned this early in life
since my mother thought I should
start each day with a glass of fresh-
squeezed orange juice. She figured
it would be helpful in promoting
my health and well-being or some
such thing. Most days this was
fine. Other days, not so much.
For one thing, not all oranges
are naturally sweet and tasty.
Some are a bit sour or dull. Then
there are those that have so much
pulp you almost need to eat the
juice with a spoon instead of drink-
ing it. Others have so many of
those tiny little seeds that you are
unlikely to get them all out short of
using a strainer. This hasn’t
changed much over the years, and
buying oranges is still a tricky
business. You’re never quite sure
what you’re getting.
That situation is similar in buy-
ing lots of other things. Apples are
easier than oranges, but you still
occasionally get “lemons.” Ba-
nanas, though, seem to all be fairly
much the same. One is pretty
much like another although eating
them at just the right degree of
ripeness can be hard to schedule.
Meat, though, is often tough, liter-
ally, and hard to figure out. One
knows that round steak is always
going to need good strong teeth if
you don’t cook it a long time, but
other steaks vary a lot concerning
tenderness and flavor.
That’s one of the difficult things
about life – trying to make wise de-
cisions. This not only applies to
things you buy, but to what you do
to support yourself, what friends to
have, and lots of other things. I
didn’t have much trouble choosing
an occupation since I was raised on
a ranch and was the only son. My
dad basically wanted me to take
over when I grew up, and that was
fine with me. I did have a chance
to go on and make a career as an
officer in the Navy since, to keep
me from leaving when my time
was up, they dangled a tasty carrot
in front of me. This had to do with
the promise of being assigned to
the staff of a really weird admiral
who was considered the father of
the modern nuclear navy. It would
probably have been a real plus in
my record and a stepping stone to
higher rank. Weighing that
against ranching wasn’t much of a
contest though. The rural life was
what I wanted and what I chose. I
have no regrets about that.
I guess I never really set out to
choose good friends. I was just nat-
urally drawn to those who had in-
terests similar to mine. Since I
wasn’t exactly a party animal, nei-
ther were my friends. They just
were those I somehow came to
know and like.
Relatives, of course, you can’t
choose randomly. You’re just born
with them. In some cases, that is
just fine. Take my Aunt Bessie, for
example. She was my mom’s sister
from California and a real sweet-
heart. We got on extremely well to-
gether, and I even stayed with her
for several months when I was sta-
tioned in California during my
time in the Navy. Other relatives
were mostly okay although a few
were marginal. You couldn’t dis-
own them, exactly, but you could
choose how much to associate with
them.
Choosing business associates is
also tricky. I have taken in cattle
for people who just plain drove me
nuts. They were never quite satis-
fied with your care of their live-
stock. If there wasn’t anything re-
ally wrong, they’d complain that
the salt licks were getting low al-
though they hadn’t really run out
yet. Other guys would never quite
live up to their part of the deal con-
cerning payment for services ren-
dered etc. Then there are those
who just never give you any trou-
ble and work out great. The latter
is what we currently have, thank
goodness.
But, you know, we can only do
our best. If we do that, we are apt
to have few regrets. We can look at
products or situations, think about
them, maybe do a bit of research,
give ourselves some time and not
rush, pray a little, and hope for the
best. I recently did some of that
concerning the purchase of a bag of
oranges. They looked and felt okay,
were moderately priced, and sub-
sequently came home with me.
Now is crunch time. Guess I’ll go
squeeze one or two and have some
orange juice. It may be great or
less so, but at least it will remind
me of my dear old mama who
squeezed a lot of oranges in her life
for love of little old me. That’s
worth quite a lot.
DUE TO WEATHER …the Garden Club has changed its Senechal
Park clean-up date to Saturday, May 4, at 9:00 a.m. We apologize
for any inconvenience. Volunteers are appreciated.
PHILIP AREA AARP/RTA … meets Monday, April 29, at 6:00
p.m. at the Bad river Senior Citizen’s Center with a soup supper,
meeting and program, which will be Guy Paulson’s “Building A
Dream,” the Moorhead Stave Church. Guy Paulson is a Philip High
School alumni. Anyone is invited.
AA & ALANON MEETINGS …will be held Monday nights at 8:00
p.m. at the Alano Club in Philip.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge. PLEASE KEEP IN MIND,
if you charge for an event, we must charge you for an ad!
law enforcement–––––––––––––––––––––––
3-7-13: Speeding: Anthony A. Thompson, Eden Prairie, MN;
fined $165.
1-30-13: Speeding: Lynette D. Gwin, Eagle Butte; fined $125.
Failure to Maintain Financial Reponsibility: Lynette D. Gwin;
dismissed - motion by prosecutor.
1-30-13: Fail to Report Accident to Police Officer: Steven D.
Miller, Sidney, NE; fined $270.
2-27-13: Speeding: David W. Mattke, Huron; fined $105.
3-6-13: No Driver’s License: Marilyn Yellow Robe, Wanblee;
fined $174. Conditions: Pay the fine & costs by 3-6-13.
2-27-13: Speeding: Robert A. Houdek, Spearfish; fined $105.
Plea Date: 5-14-10: Disp. Date: 1-23-13: No Peddlers Li-
cense: Sam Boyd, Rapid City; fined $110.
Spring snow ... by Del Bartels
I think it took a little while for most of us to recall what the white
stuff was. Though it’s been too little this year, it did slowly came back
to our memories that it is the winter moisture that our farm and ranch
lands so desperately need. It took just a little bit longer to remember
that snow can be fun.
I tried to shovel the walkway, knowing that I was simply spreading
out my labor as it continued snowing, instead of doing all the work after
the storm was over. No matter which way I turned, the wind
kept drilling cold snow into my face. Yet, when the storm was over
there was snow piled smartly on top of deck railings as if there had
been almost no wind at all.
I was moaning the cold when I noticed a black lump in the middle of
the yard. My son was laying there in his snow pants, boots, coat and
hat. He was watching the floating, swirling flakes hover down. They
didn’t last long against his body heat, but at only a foot or two above
ground level were getting just below the wind to hang above his face
where he could see the individual flakes. If shoveling was not his style,
at least not right then, then it wasn’t mine either.
School was canceled. It didn’t matter that Friday would make up for
the snow day. Today was what mattered; popcorn, a hot drink, some
TV, a board game, and periodically going back out in the snow. Some
families had hot chili for supper. Some found that baking was a rather
cozy way to heat the kitchen.
After the storm, some people told of driving like maniacs through
drifts. Even older drivers were having a blast. A coworker had a mas-
sive snowball fight with his dog; they both won. I actually saw a path
on one sidewalk that had to have been made by a bicycle. Now that
could have been interesting. I suppose that the city crews quickly tired
of clearing the roads, but it appeared to me that, to begin with, moving
the snow might have been fun. Before it disappeared, my son had to
climb to the top of the snow pile in the courthouse parking lot. I should
have joined him. There were paths on the hill by the school steps where
sleds had been used.
The springtime snow fascinated me. Paths as wide as a snow shovel
that had been quickly made were soon actually dry, with snow still on
both sides. Plodding over what appeared to be just snow, still somehow
got your boots muddy. Only one day and I didn’t have to clear snow off
of my car. Only one day and my dog then wanted to lay on the front
step, watching the world go by. But, there was only about one day
where the snow was good for winter activities.
Voices seem to carry easier over snow. Greeting neighbors had a clar-
ity to it that was kind of nice. I did have quite a number of drivers,
though, give me looks ranging from disbelief to laughter to threatening
when I reached for snow and started packing snowballs.
A gardening seminar, featuring
Gary Phillips, was held Thursday,
April 11, in the Haakon County
Courthouse community room.
Hosted by the Haakon County
Public Library, Phillips of Gary’s
Open Door Greenhouse in Philip,
spoke on container gardening and
greenhouse gardening, among
other gardening subjects.
As an experienced gardener and
former agronomy specialist,
Phillips is a good source for infor-
mation when it comes to container
gardening. Attendees were given
suggestions and heard experiences
from his own local business. All au-
dience members were offered a free
heirloom tomato plant for their
gardens this season. Phillips dis-
cussed tomato plants, heirlooms in
particular.
The smallest container a person
should use when planting tomato
plants in containers is a five gallon
bucket, he said. Determinate bush
type tomato plants are better
suited for containers than the inde-
terminate variety, which produces
all season long. Larger containers
will hold more water, however, and
tomatoes benefit from being
planted deep in trenches because
they will root all along the buried
portion which helps them during
times of heavy production.
Due to tight spacing, container
gardening offers a maximum of
gardening capabilities with mini-
mal space and maintenance re-
quirements. Beets can be planted
in a box six feet long and one and
one-half feet wide, and may be re-
planted right after harvest to re-
utilize the soil. A small box with a
minimum depth of 12 inches will be
adequate for lettuce, radishes and
spinach, which can be started in a
semi-heated garage (any place that
won’t freeze). If planting onions, be
sure that they receive full sun dur-
ing the heat of the summer when
bulbs form and keep them in light
and fluffy soil for the largest bulbs
possible.
Top container plants for sun in-
clude sweet potato vine, geranium,
purple fountain grass, lobelia,
petunia and herbs. Shade selec-
tions include pansies, coleus and
impatiens.
Phillips also recommended refur-
bishing container soil each season,
which gives plants the best possible
growing conditions for optimal re-
sults – highly desirable for South
Dakota gardeners. He likes mixing
his own soil to get the best possible
product, but warns that gardeners
should not use sand as part of the
one-third, one-third, one-third –
sand, peat and native soil combo,
since heavy clay and sand com-
bines into concrete. Locals are bet-
ter off replacing sand with vermic-
ulite.
Another helpful ingredient for a
successful container or raised bed
is manure. Generally, all manures
should be used after having been
aged for at least one year or more.
Fresh manure is typically too “hot”
and will burn plants, with the ex-
ception of rabbit manure which
also happens to be the number one
choice. Following in order are
chicken, sheep, horse and cattle
manures.
To recap, containers and raised
beds have come into their own in
recent years for city and country
dwellers alike. As an aging popula-
tion moves into tighter quarters,
they can still get their hands dirty
by using raised beds with sitting
ledges, custom built to a person's
most comfortable gardening height
and even use portable handrails.
Installing T-handles on tools allows
for better leverage for aging backs
and waning strength. Containers of
all sizes will allow soil to warm
quicker, smaller amounts of water
usage is a boon, weeding and
mulching chores are minimized
and installation of casters makes
moving plants in and out of optimal
growing conditions a breeze.
Phillips enjoys experimenting
with new plants and is open to new
ideas and suggestions. Stop in for
some personal gardening advice.
Gardening seminar by Gary Phillips
A statewide tornado drill will be
conducted for South Dakota by the
National Weather Service between
9:00 a.m. and 9:30 am MDT,
Wednesday, April 24.
Because the exercise is used to
ensure communications and warn-
ing systems are functioning prop-
erly before storm season, people
will see and hear the actual alerts
used for tornadoes.
Outdoor warning sirens will be
sounded in many towns. The sirens
may not be heard inside homes and
office buildings, as they are in-
tended to alert people who are out-
doors away from radio or TV.
The drill will also include activa-
tion of the Emergency Alert Sys-
tem, which will interrupt local
media broadcasts. The public
should be aware that the scroll on
broadcast television and cable TV
channels will look like a real warn-
ing, while the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration
Weather Radio and broadcast
audio will be identified as a test.
Local emergency response agen-
cies may practice their response
procedures and many schools will
conduct safety drills for their stu-
dents.
Individuals do not need to take
any action during the drill, but
they are encouraged to make plans
to protect themselves and their
families before storms develop. Do
not wait until the storm is headed
toward you, as there will not be
time.
Information about storm safety
is available from county emergency
management offices, or visit the
following web sites: the Rapid City
National Weather Service at
www.weather.gov/rapidcity, Black
Hills Chapter of the American Red
Cross at www.blackhillsredcross
.org, and the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Health at www.bReady
SD.com.
Tornado
warnings
systems
test to be
April 24
The annual spring hunter safety
course put on by Kit Graham will
be held Saturday, May 4, at the
Philip Ambulance Service building
at 100 S. Larimer Avenue.
The course will run from 8:00
a.m. to approximately 5:00 p.m. It
is sponsored by the South Dakota
Game, Fish and Parks department.
Lunch will be provided by Branch
85 of National Mutual Benefit.
Parents can get more informa-
tion and register their children by
contacting Graham in person at his
office in the Haakon County Court-
house or by calling 859-2850 or
859-2325. Signed permission slips
must be turned in before the class
begins. Parents are not required to
stay while their sons or daughters
attend the course.
Assisting Graham this year will
be the area’s new GF&P conserva-
tion officer, Zach Thomsen. He may
be contacted at 859-3006. “Please
come join us on May 4,” stated
Thomsen. For more information of
this course or others, phone these
individuals or view the GF&P web-
site www.gfp.sd.gov and look under
outdoor learning and then hunter
education.
The course is for youngsters ages
12 or older, but the course will ac-
cept 11 year olds if their birthday
is before the end of this year.
Adults are more than welcome to
also attend.
Upon successfully completing
the course that day, attendees will
receive a hunters safety card.
Other items will be distributed,
such as orange hunter’s caps, upon
the discretion of the S.D. GF&P.
Successful completion of a
Hunter Safety Course is required
by law of every person under the
age of 16 who wishes to hunt in
South Dakota.
The hunter safety course will be
provided only twice in Haakon
County this year – this spring in
Philip and again this fall in Mid-
land. The course teaches the safe
handling of firearms, proper hunt-
ing ethics and introduction into
wildlife management and hunting
laws.
Hunter safety class May 19
The snow had to go someplace. At the high school, it piled up on the downwind
side just outside the windows. The sidewalk was soon not only bare of snow, but
was very quickly dry. Photos by Del Bartels
Snow welcomed to area
The Philip airport automated
weather station recorded 0.91
inches of moisture during the last
snow storm. The total so far this
year is 2.18 inches, which is still
0.30 inches below normal, but well
above what it had a year ago, 0.75
inches.
Milesville had 13 inches of snow
with 1.12 inces of moisture; 2.11
inches so far this year; normal year
to date is 2.88 inches.
Kirley had seven inches of snow
and 0.94 inches of moisture
through the afternoon of April 9.
There may have had more later,
but not reported as of yet. There
has been 2.19 inches this year with
a normal of 2.99.
Cottonwood had 19.3 inches of
snow with 1.75 inches of moisture;
3.47 inches this year; normal is
2.65 inches.
Wind gusts during the snow
storm were reported up to 40 miles
per hour.
This information is from Susan
Sanders, warning coordination me-
teorologist, National Weather
Service, Rapid City.
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 3
Rural Livin’
Cropping Choices and Water
Use Relationships
The precipitation from the re-
cent snow storm provided welcome
relief in terms of soil moisture.
Standing stubble certainly showed
its value as fields with stubble
caught a uniform layer of snow
that will help replenish dry soils
with an inch or more of valuable
moisture.
Depending on what moisture is
received over the next month or so,
farmers may be wise to consider
the water/yield relationship for
various crops as they are making
planting decisions this spring. The
USDA-Agricultural Research
Service has conducted research ex-
ploring the moisture needed to
produce the first bushel of grain
and the bushels per inch of mois-
ture for various crops. This infor-
mation can be highly valuable
when making cropping decisions
when moisture is limited.
Corn is very efficient in using
water as it can produce just over
10 bushels per additional acre
inch, but also requires just over
nine inches of water to produce the
first bushel. Grain sorghum, or
milo, is also relatively efficient in
producing bushels once the initial
requirement is met, at nine
bushels per additional acre inch,
but takes only 6.5 inches to pro-
duce the first bushel. That is why
grain sorghum has historically
been a popular crop in marginal
rainfall areas. Grain sorghum lost
some popularity in the 1990’s, par-
tially due to a volcano eruption
that resulted in cool summers for
several years, above average rain-
fall during the same period of time
(which favored corn production),
and improved drought tolerance in
corn hybrids. Summer tempera-
tures have returned to higher lev-
els in more recent years, and the
uncertainty of rainfall may bring
resurgence in the interest in
sorghum.
Sunflower requires slightly
more water to produce the first
bushel/pound of grain than
sorghum at 6.9 inches, and fewer
equivalent bushels (6.3) per inch of
additional water. Sunflower is
marketed on a different price per
unit structure than corn and
sorghum, so it’s not directly com-
parable on a bushel/pound basis
regarding yield.
Wheat, millet and soybean are
fairly similar in both their water
requirement to produce initial
grain yield and efficiency in
bushels per additional acre inch of
water. To produce the first unit of
grain, wheat requires 5.2 inches,
millet 3.5 inches, and soybean 3.7
inches. With each additional inch
of moisture, wheat will produce
about 4.7 bushels, millet 4.2
bushels, and soybean 3 bushels.
Again, the price per bushel of each
crop varies, and if one were to eval-
uate each crop fairly regarding
water use efficiency, this would
need to be taken into account.
According to this research, field
peas are a remarkable crop in that
they require less than 1 inch of
water to produce grain. They can
produce three bushels of grain for
each additional inch of moisture.
These numbers are not exact
and each crop will perform best if
moisture is available at the right
time and suffer if it is short at a
critical time, like corn at pollina-
tion and soybeans at flowering.
This information could prove
valuable as producers are making
cropping plans while they watch
the skies and weather reports for
more precipitation, which will be
necessary for a successful growing
season.
Calendar
4/24: Drought Management We-
binar, 10:00 a.m. CST, SD Re-
gional Extension Centers
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
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by Laurie Hindman
Taylor Mohnen joined the Crew
Agency Ltd crop insurance agency
located at Cactus Flat on April 1.
Taylor is currently studying to be-
come a crop insurance agent. He
joins a team of six other agents,
Rusty Olney, Maurice Handcock,
Tanner Handcock, Heidi Porch,
and Grady and Bernice Crew.
Taylor grew up near Parkston on
a farm. He graduated from Park-
ston High School, and attended
Mitchell Technical Institute, grad-
uating in 2003 with a Telecommu-
nications degree. Mohnen pre- vi-
ously worked at Golden West
Telecommunications in Wall and
the Parkston grain elevator as an
agronomist.
Taylor serves on the Wall Cele-
bration Committee and assists
with Wall AAU wrestling.
“When Crew Agency approached
me about coming to work for them
I jumped at the opportunity,” said
Mohnen. “I enjoy getting out visit-
ing with farmers and also am ex-
cited to get back into the ag com-
munity.”
Grady Crew, along with his wife,
Bernice, established Crew Agency
in 1984 and have expanded the
crop insurance business to include
partners, Rusty Olney, Maurice
Handcock and Tanner Handock as
well as Business Manager Heidi
Porch.
“We are very proud to bring Tay-
lor into our team,” said Grady
Crew. “We feel his ag and business
background will make him a good
fit working with farmers and
ranchers in western South Dakota.
We know Taylor with his caring,
common sense personality will pro-
vide great service and knowledge of
the ever-changing crop insurance
rules and regulations.”
Mohnen joins Crew Agency
South Dakota Farm Bureau
hosted a meeting Wednesday, April
3, in the Wall Community Center
meeting room, about the changes
that are taking place in the agricul-
tural land productivity valuation
and commodity prices assessments.
Michael Houdyshell, director,
property and special taxes division
from South Dakota Department of
Revenue, was on hand to inform
farmers and ranchers about how
their land values will now be based
upon its productivity value starting
in the 2011 tax payable year.
In front of a crowd of about 50
people, he stated, “The Department
of Revenue contracts with the eco-
nomics department of South
Dakota State University to produce
the “productivity value” or the “for-
mula value” for the productivity
valuation system. This value is the
starting point for valuing all agri-
cultural land in the state. This
starting value is adjusted by the
county director of equalization to
ensure uniform and fair valua-
tions.”
The productivity formula is
where they begin in figuring the
gross revenue per acre. This
process uses an eight-year period
from data that was collected by the
United States Department of Agri-
culture’s National Agricultural
Statistics Service to figure the
gross revenue per acre in each
county. The 2011 tax payable year
would use values from the year
2001 to 2008.
With cropland, the productivity
value is established by each
county’s information based on
USDA/NASS. According to the
South Dakota Department of Rev-
enue “this price is weighted based
upon the quantity of the commod-
ity sold each month during the
marketing year; actual production
of each crop is multiplied by the
commodity price for the crop to de-
termine the gross revenue for the
crop. The gross revenue of all of the
crops is added together and divided
by the number of acres, to get the
gross revenue per acre in the
county.” The prices also do not in-
clude deficiency payments, Com-
modity Credit Corporation loans
outstanding, or purchases by the
government.
Cash rents are used to figure the
gross revenue with noncropland
also using the eight year average.
The USDA/NASS determined cash
rents in counties across South
Dakota from the years 2001
through 2007 by using a survey.
They had hoped to have enough re-
sponses to publish the cash rents
from every county by 2008, but
they did not get enough responses
from every county. They used past
cash rent prices and rent from sur-
rounding counties to help establish
the cash rent for the counties with-
out a published 2008 number. Lis-
teners were told that the depart-
ment is currently working to find
an alternative to get the cash rent
data.
Houdyshell also reminded every-
one that “the transition to produc-
tivity valuation does not change
the appeal rights of property own-
ers. In South Dakota, property can-
not be assessed for more than its
market value and must be assessed
equitably in relation to other prop-
erty in the county. If you disagree
with the assessment of your prop-
erty, you can appeal the valuation
the same way you would have ap-
pealed a valuation based upon the
market.” The farmer or rancher
should first contract the county di-
rector of equalization. He or she
will be able to explain the new sys-
tem along with showing similar
valued property, and recent sales of
similar property.
Although the statewide amount
of agricultural value in the produc-
tivity system is the same as that
from the old valuation system, in-
dividual counties increase or de-
crease significantly, stated the De-
partment of Revenue. To prevent
sudden large shifts in values, and
to ensure they had time to address
any unanticipated problems, the
Legislature limited increases or de-
creases to 10 percent a year.”
South Dakota Farm Bureau is a
grassroots agriculture organization
representing more than 13,000
member families across the state.
Founded in 1917, it works to repre-
sent, uphold and improve our
state’s number one industry – agri-
culture.
Changes in ag land productivity valuation
Michael Houdyshell, director, property
and special taxes division, South
Dakota Department of Revenue.
Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) ex-
pressed deep concern about the Air
Force’s decision to ground B-1B
Lancer bombers at Ellsworth Air
Force Base for the remainder of the
federal fiscal year due to the deep
defense cuts in President Obama’s
sequester.
In a recent statement, Ellsworth
officials cited that the across-the-
board spending cuts have forced
the Air Force to cut 45,000 training
hours from its operations, ground-
ing the aircrafts through Septem-
ber.
“One of my greatest concerns
with the president’s sequester plan
and its disproportionate cuts to the
Department of Defense was the im-
pact it would have on our military,
which is why I have supported leg-
islation in the Senate to replace the
sequester with smarter cuts else-
where in the budget,” said Thune.
“I have reached out to Air Force
leadership requesting additional
information on this unprecedented
move and the impact it will have on
our combat readiness. The B-1s
and their crews stationed at
Ellsworth have played a significant
role in the nation's ability to project
power and have provided vital sup-
port in Iraq, Afghanistan, and
Libya. The men and women at
Ellsworth have proven themselves
time and time again as the best we
have to offer and we should be sup-
porting them, not making it more
difficult for them to do their jobs.”
The Continuing Resolution (H.R.
933), which funded the government
for the remainder of the 2013 fiscal
year, included the 2013 Depart-
ment of Defense appropriations
bill, which restored $10 billion to
the DoD’s operations and mainte-
nance budget. Thune is a cosponsor
of the Down Payment to Protect
National Security Act of 2013 (S.
263) which would replace the se-
quester with a reduction in the fed-
eral workforce through attrition.
Thune also voted for S. 16, which
would have given DoD more flexi-
bility to make spending cuts with-
out hurting military readiness.
Thune expresses concern
over Air Force B-1 plan
The South Dakota Farm Bureau
reminds everyone that the deadline
is approaching quickly for the En-
vironmental Protection Agency’s oil
spill prevention, control and coun-
termeasure (SPCC) program,
which requires compliance by May
10.
Rebecca Perrin, EPA Region 8
agriculture advisor, Denver,
stated, “Although EPA can’t begin
enforcement of the SPCC rule for
farms, as defined in the statute,
until after October 1, 2013, it is im-
portant for farmers to remember
that the deadline for SPCC compli-
ance is still May 10.”
According to the United States
EPA, farms or ranches that store
more than 1,320 total United
States gallons of oil or oil products
in above ground containers sized
55 gallons or larger, or more than
42,000 gallons in completely buried
containers, and could be reason-
ably expected to discharge oil to
waters of the United States, are re-
quired to have an SPCC plan in
place. May 10 is the newly
amended compliance date by which
farms must prepare or amend and
implement their SPCC plan.
If a farm was in operation before
August 16, 2002, and the
owners/operators do not already
have a plan, they must prepare and
implement a plan as soon as possi-
ble. For more information on com-
pliance with the SPCC program,
visit http://www.epa.gov/emergen-
cies/content/spcc/spcc_ag.htm.
“EPA is committed to working
with the agricultural community to
find efficient and practical solu-
tions to environmental challenges,”
said Perrin. “Every farm or live-
stock operation is required to deter-
mine if they need an SPCC plan in
place to reduce the risks, and costs,
associated with potential oil spills.
EPA is offering assistance to make
sure that those who need a plan are
taking appropriate steps to meet
these requirements. We encourage
producers to call us directly with
any questions.”
Oil spill plan deadline May 10
Hit & Miss
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, April 18: Roast
Beef, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy,
Carrots, Roll, Lemon Cake.
Friday, April 19: Potato En-
crusted Cod, Twice Baked Pota-
toes, Key Biscayne Veggies, Roll,
Diced Peaches.
Monday, April 22: Beef
Rouladen, Red Mashed Potatoes,
Fried Cabbage, Roll, Fruit.
Tuesday, April 23: Roast
Turkey, Mashed Potatoes and
Gravy, Green Bean Casserole, Bis-
cuit, Apple Pie.
Wednesday, April 24: Cheese-
burgers, French Fries, Tossed
Salad, Fruit.
***
Saturday, April 6, 2013, at Som-
erset Court, we had a good turnout
for morning exercises and we re-
ceived liberal Somerset bucks for
showing up. A few of us played
quiddler till lunch time, Addie,
Mary Lou, Susan and Vivian. Mil-
dred Young’s daughter, Carol, took
Mildred out shopping and sightsee-
ing. Addie Rorvig bought a pretty
gell well card and let a bunch of us
at Somerset Court sign it for
Eleanor Holmes (Somerset Court
resident) who is in the hospital
with pneumonia.
We had an excellent lunch of
spaghetti and meatballs, and won-
derful pound cake for dessert.
Susan brought out materials for
residents to make Easter and
springtime wall hangings. A group
of residents gathered around and
had a good time while they created
individual art work.
In the afternoon, we were
treated to the movie “Dances With
Wolves.” Some of you will remem-
ber this 1990 movie that was all
filmed in South Dakota, some of it
at the Houck buffalo ranch north of
Pierre. The wide open prairie
scenes at the Houck ranch with
herds of buffalo were made possible
by my son, David Hansen, and his
crew who removed miles of fence so
that there could be a greater scope
of hills and valleys. Many of the
regular herds of bison were thrown
together for the powerful thunder-
ing migration scenes. My son, M.R.
Hansen, and workers also helped
prepare scenes. There was one
where they moved a tree so the
light would be right on “The Girl!”
They had to make it look like it had
never been moved. It involved
spades and wheelbarrows, done by
night so it would be ready to shoot
in the morning.
“Dances With Wolves” is a movie
one can see over and over. There
was some good work done to bring
in some actual Lakota language. It
is dear to me, because I had the
privilege of walking right into the
sod shanty made for the movie. You
would swear it was native sod, but
it was plastic with plastic grass
sticking out.
On Saturday, I felt lucky to re-
ceive four letters. One from Emery
Gibson, who lives at Hansen Court
in Philip, one from my niece, Alma
(Hulett) Schilling, Redfield, who
sent a sheaf of Rosa Parks com-
memorative stamps. Thank you,
Alma. Her husband, Harry, is hav-
ing his staples removed from his
recent hernia surgery.
My great-granddaughter,
Melissa Snively, Gillette, sent a
note and a page of tiny darling
handprints and footprints of my
two-year-old great, great-grand-
daughter, Teagan Snively. They
are made with finger paint, just
cornstarch, food coloring and
water. Thank you.
My son, David K. Hansen, Ft.
Pierre, sent a wonderful letter writ-
ten with a calligraphy pen he had
received from Janet. It is so read-
able and neat. It happens to be red
ink. Well, sort of red. Reminds us
of the national debt. David even in-
cluded some crisp Gregg short-
hand, which I could recognize,
though I haven’t used any for years
and years. He said that he had
seen a blue heron. I revel in his
bird sightings. Meadowlarks
abound and killdeers are about.
Lark buntings like to return
around the 10th of May.
My daughter, Delores Denke,
Pavillion, Wyo., sent a lovely card
just to let us know that she was
glad her brothers, David and M.R.,
came out to visit and make fence.
On another trial, the South
Dakota School of Mines and Tech-
nology concrete airplane was air-
borne momentarily. A slightly
windy day would give it a better
take off. Remember Thomas A.
Edison, who realized that good
things may require many trials?
My nephew, Leonard Meyer,
Greenfield, Ind., sent an article
from the Indianapolis Sunday Star
about Gene Stratton-Porter, one of
my mother’s favorite authors. Gene
Stratton-Porter lived for nearly 20
years near the Limberlost forest
and swamp in northern Indiana.
Leonard and his wife, Jean, took
my niece, Wanda, and me to see
one of the lovely woodsy homes of
Gene Stratton-Porter. It had a wall
of windows, lined with luxurious
flowering plants. This author wrote
extensively about the area, its
woods, plants, birds, moths and
herbs. I have a collection of her
books including “Laddie,” “Her Fa-
ther’s Daughter,” “A Girl of the
Limberlost,” “Jesus of the Emer-
ald,” and “Tales You Won’t Be-
lieve.”
Saturday evening, April 8, at
Somerset Court, we had a roast
turkey dinner with mashed pota-
toes and mixed vegetables, salad
bar, pineapple upside down cake.
Sunday was Lad Burgr’s birth-
day. Happy birthday, Lad.
Sunday afternoon, we had
church with Terry Pulse and his
wife, Ardis. Jack Humke was there
to play piano for hymn singing.
Sorry, no talk by Steve. He was
gone to Denver to a wedding. We
sang, “There Shall Be Showers of
Blessings,” “Up From the Grave He
Arose,” and a couple others that I
failed to record. Thank you, Jack
and Terry. Those who attended
were Lucille Huether, Irene McK-
night, Marilyn Butts, Don Stens-
gaard, Floy Olson, Connie Stevens,
Blanche Harmon, Shirley Hudg-
son, Annette Hansen, Marjorie
Gaffin, Irma Brandt, Mary Carrier,
and Vivian Hansen.
Terry said that the resurrection
blessing is “Peace be with you.” He
suggests reading John: 20-21 and
Rev. 21:21-22, describing some of
the glories of heaven as it is
recorded by ancient historians.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble.
Some of the SDSM&T students
have returned from the regional
concrete canoe and steel bridge
competition in Logan, Utah, and
they reported that SDSM&T took
third place in the steel bridge con-
test and second in the concrete
canoe contest.
Monday, April 8, 2013, we had
crafts with Amy. Pretty little um-
brellas with flowers hanging down
were fashioned by a group of resi-
dents. Amy also put out new word
search puzzles and rewarded with
Somerset bucks to all of us who did
last week’s puzzles. Thank you,
Amy.
My son, Wayne, arrived back in
Rapid City April 8. I told him the
snow had been reserved for his ar-
rival. (Because we had very little
snow all winter!) Wayne’s wife,
Gwynn, may be back to Rapid City
in a couple weeks. They like to
spend the winter in California.
Wayne and M.R. came for supper
at Somerset Court Monday
evening.
Did I tell you that one of my
amaryllis lilies went to seed. I have
sent a few seeds to my daughter,
Delores, my great-granddaughter,
Melissa, and my son, David. I was
so surprised when the big lumpy
seed pods grew after the big red
flowers had dried up. Another ad-
venture I had with my plants today
was that a big branch of the kalan-
choe plant that Hans gave me, had
broken part way off. I was trying to
see if I could bind it up, when I saw
that it had started two sets of
whisker-like roots on the broken
stalk. I broke it off and potted it in
with my basil. It will be interesting
to see if those roots will take root.
This morning from 3:00 to 5:00
a.m.. I started putting together a
little lap robe. It will have five inch
squares. There will be a square of
light blue, a pieced square, a
square of light green, a pieced
square and so on. There is no new
baby in sight in the family, and I
have one quilt on hand waiting, but
there is so much fabric, and so
many bags of quilt scrapes.
Thank you to my nephew,
Leonard Meyer, who sent a sweet
story about a doctor who works in
Africa. I printed it off so Somerset
Court residents can read it in the
scrapbook on the coffee table by the
fireplace. The story brings out the
Bible verse from Isaiah 65:24. “Be-
fore they call, I will answer.”
Tuesday, April 9, the big topic of
conversation was the snow. It was
a pretty good little snow. Schools
were closed, including SDSM&T.
Professors were there for student
consultation, although no classes
were scheduled. At Somerset
Court, Shawn and Sandi were
snowed in at home, so we had some
changes in our program. Geri su-
pervised morning exercises and
Ryan called bingo.
My daughter, Carol Vogan,
emailed from Colorado Springs
that the wind was blowing 60 miles
per hour and the tumble weeds
were piling up in the shelterbelt.
And to think, it was 72˚ there on
Monday.
My son, Leslie Hansen, Bend,
Ore., sent a friendly letter philoso-
phizing on our trade off from say-
ing what we think, to getting along
comfortably. Comfortable wins
most of the time.
A new resident at Somerset
Court is Stella Hicks from Martin.
We visited and I learned that her
son married Janell (Herber) Frink.
Janella was my darling first grader
at Weta School in 1964. (Weta was
down in the Badlands. There was
only the school left there in 1964.
Further back, there used to be a
village of Weta, and the train ran
through there. There was good rock
hunting in the Weta “Iron Beds.”)
At Tuesday bingo, the prizes
were Somerset Court bucks. Start-
ing at $1,000 and going up to
$5,000. Winners were Lucille
Huether, Connie, Marilyn Oyler,
twice, Floy Olson, Helen Amund-
son, Fred Smith, and Jim Hilton.
Snack and chat treats were
pretty little rhubarb-strawberry
tarts, crimped like pies.
Irene Cox, Mary Lou Peters,
Margaret Jacobs, and Vivian
Hansen played rummi-cube. M.R.
Hansen came for scrabble.
Well there is some pretty deep
snow out in the courtyard at Som-
erset Court, looks like a foot or
more! Now I wonder if there is any
water in it? We miss our activity di-
rectors who are snowed in at
home. Residents are trying to
amuse themselves with pool and
cards. Marilyn Butts and Marge
Self were joined by Marjorie Gaffin
for three games or so. Mary Lou Pe-
ters, Lucille Huether, Addie
Rorvig, Margaret Jacobs and Irene
Arbach played or kibitzed a bit of
quiddler. I sewed quilt blocks to-
gether and ironed seams. I used my
mother’s iron. You know that iron
is a little old, for my mother, Effie
Palmer, died in 1955.
Tony Kulesa, SDSM&T student,
who went on the March 2-9,
SDSM&T trip to Bogota, Columbia
South America, sent a trip report.
I plan to put a copy of the paper in
the Somerset Court scrapbook. It
tells about some of the projects that
may be organized between
SDSM&T and villages around Bo-
gota, to help out with improve-
ments in some of the rural areas.
There is need to conserve rain
water. There is need to upgrade
housing in some areas. The report
contains excellent photos to illus-
trate possible ideas to work at.
M.R. and Barbara Hansen went on
that trip as advisors.
By afternoon, on April 10, there
was a lot of thawing going on. Som-
erset Court received U.S. mail.
I saw Mike Kilmer in Somerset
Court and told him to tell his
mother, Maxine, a Somerset Court
resident, “Hi, we miss you!” Maxine
is in the hospital.
Total snow of this April 9-10
2013, snowstorm is said to be 19
inches at the Rapid City airport
and 18 inches in downtown Rapid
City.
April 10, 2013, an adult couple
with plastic sleds made us some de-
lightful tracks on the steep hill on
the undeveloped south side of Som-
erset Court. Marilyn Butts and
Marge Self saw the people out
there from the overpass on Somer-
set Court’s third floor, where we
walk our laps.
The Rapid City Journal for April
11, 2013, carried the obituary of
Ronald Bailie. He recently became
a resident of Somerset Court. We
extend sympathy to Marilyn Bailie,
who is still a resident at Somerset
Court, and to their relatives and
friends.
Somerset Court Wii bowling
scores for April 11 are as follows:
Irene McKnight, 181, Lila Fiest,
151, Marge Self, 159, Irene Cox,
139, Bert Schneider, 162, Marilyn
Butts, 163, Eileen Tenold, 117,
Addie Rorvig, 180, Fred, 150, Mil-
dred Kraemer, 156, Mary Lou Pe-
ters, 163, and Susan, 198. It is good
to see more residents interested in
Wii bowling.
Thursday bingo winners were
Mildred Young, Irene Cox, Dwight
Mann, Alvin Ellerton, Marilyn
Oyler, Irene McKnight, Floy Olson,
Sherman Ellerton, and Vivian
Hansen.
For snack and chat following
bowling we were served plates of
assorted sliced meats, cheeses, and
crackers. We could also have hot
coffee.
Sandi was here to call numbers
and Shawn and Susan were here to
provide hospitality, to read cards,
and to bring prizes and snacks.
Thank you. We missed you on the
snow days.
The April 11, 2013, Rapid City
Journal gave us a list of the Rapid
City airport’s snowiest days – April
9, 2013, 20”, April 22, 2001, 18”,
April 18, 1970, 15.6”. This came
from the National Weather Serv-
ice, 1942 to 2013.
We like to remember the big bliz-
zard of 1949. It may not have had
record levels of snow, but it sure
tied things up over a large part of
western South Dakota with spec-
tacular drifts. There was a hopeful
bit of news in the April 11, 2013,
Rapid City Journal, telling that the
U.S. Postal Service is to keep the
six-day service.
Friday, April 12, 2013, at Somer-
set Court, we had the activity of
wheel of fortune. Each team won
big bucks. Susan, Sandi, and
Shawn charted up the puzzles,
passed the spinner and kept score.
Thank you. Some puzzles were
shocking development, weekend
weather forecast, Alcatraz Island
and faster than greased lightning.
On the evening of April 11, a
group of Red Hatters, “Rockin’
Roustabouts” Red Hat Society
Chapter of Rapid City and Dead-
wood used the Somerset Court ac-
tivity garden for a meeting place.
They were busy making evening
bags for an upcoming meeting with
other Red Hat Societies. They
thanked Somerset Court for the
use of their meeting place.
Thank you to my niece, Wanda
Meyer Artz, and her husband, Ed,
who sent a pretty letter with a se-
lection of various stamps, and
pretty flowered stationery and en-
velopes. It was so cheery on a day
when everybody was aching with
the low barometer. “Pansies are for
Thoughts!” says the envelope.
When Wanda’s niece, Karen
Meyer, Tacoma, Wash., visited
them for a week recently, they vis-
ited relatives and friends. They
went to De Smet and visited the
tree we had planted in year 2000 in
honor of my parents, Rolla and
Effie Palmer’s 100th wedding an-
niversary. They were married
there in the Kingsbury County
Courthouse on October 30, 1900.
The tree, a red maple, is big now.
At 3:30, at Somerset Court, we
were entertained by Skeeter Boyer
and Alan Biesman with their
singing and guitar playing. Thank
you. Some songs sang were “South
of the Border,” “Tennessee Waltz,”
“Silver Threads and Golden Nee-
dles,” “Will the Circle Be Unbro-
ken?.” “Clementine,” “King of the
Road,” “Your Cheatin’ Heart,” and
“I Come to the Garden.” I heard
Sandi ask Skeeter to come and sing
at Somerset Court’s fish fry on May
22.
Fred Smith plans to spend the
weekend in Las Vegas. Have fun,
Fred.
Rapid City Journal said that the
the recent snows have given us
over an inch of water.
The family of
Louise Miller
is requesting a Card Shower
for her 80th Birthday
on April 20, 2013
Cards may be sent to Louise at:
PO Box 556, Philip, SD 57567
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
April 19-20-21-22:
GI Joe: Retaliation
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
April 26-27-28-29:
The Host (PG-13)
continued on page 7
Please join her loving family in a
Card Shower
to celebrate
Marie Lamm’s
85th Birthday
on April 22,
2013.
Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 186
Philip, SD 57567
Jesus Loves Me Preschool
– Friday –
April 19th
10 a.m.–Noon
at
Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church
in Philip
All money
raised will go
towards
classroom
supplies!!
Thanks for
your support!!
Congratulations to the Philip
Livestock Auction on the purchase
of the Belle Fource Livestock Ex-
change as reported in the Rapid
City Journal. That will be a great
addition.
Monday arrived with fog and
drizzle, a welcome sight. Tony
Harty picked up his mail and went
out for coffee, then stopped at our
place to give me his news. He let
our cat out and the cat door was
locked, so when I got home after a
run with the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation van there
was one wet, cold cat waiting to get
in. While I was in Philip, I visited
Dean and Mary Parsons. The
evening brought freezing rain,
which turned to snow.
Most things ground to a stop
Monday night with treacherous
roads all around. The road crews
were busy clearing away snow and
I-90 was closed to traffic due to ac-
cidents and blowing snow. The
local café didn’t open up for two
days, that meant Bill was at the
mercy of my cooking breakfast.
But, as the day wore on Tuesday
and it was time for cards in Philip
out came the four-wheel drive and
off went Bill. He got home and
cleared away some of our snow-
drifts and the drive with the snow-
plow. Bowling was canceled both
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Not much news this week other
than the weather – but sometimes
the weather can be the biggest
highlight of the week. The big snow
storm materialized as the weather
folks predicted Tuesday,
April 9 and 10. Enough snow to
make a difference in the soil mois-
ture and maybe even the dams.
Don and Vi Moody's Rapid Valley
place received about 15" and it ap-
pears the ranch south of Philip got
around 25" or maybe a little less.
The wind blew so hard and put a
lot of the snow into drifts, so was a
hard to tell.
Tuesday was the heaviest snow
in the Sturgis area and Ralph
Fiedler took Cathy to work because
of the parking situation. They got
between 18 and 20 inches of snow.
Don and Vi Moody spent the
week close to home moving snow
around the headquarters to even
get to the mailbox. Vi said it was a
good time to get caught up on
housework and other house stuff.
She enjoyed her birthday cards and
her birthday, close to home, with
Don presenting her a fancy cup-
cake with a lighted candle and
chocolates plus the rest of the dec-
orated cupcakes. She vowed she
would share them with Don. She
got a birthday card from her friend,
Raynae, from Alabama – which
stated as you get older you misin-
terpret a lot of things such as "you
stare at a can of orange juice be-
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
Church & Community Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the
other meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00
p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June,
Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Bcìng lhcn madc
lrcc lrom sìn, yc
bccamc lhc scrvanls
ol rìghlcousncss.
Romans 6:18 (K)V)
\e're uíí servíng someone, u boss, u purent, u íríend. ßut ín the
bíg reuím oí thíngs, vhom ure you servíng: Sutun und sín or Cod
und ríghteousness: \hích oí the tvo ure you servíng:
Ancíent vísdom íor modern íííe
Obituaries
More obituaries on page 12
Gary’s Open Door Greenhouse
306 N. Larimer Ave. • Philip
Open House
Tuesday, April 23rd
9 a.m. to
4 p.m.
Join us for
specials on
Fresh & Artificial Flowers,
Live Plants, Containers, Gifts, Etc.
Treats & Fun are FREE
Cabin Fever
Floral
Downtown
Philip
Prairie Designs
Floral Studio
304 Philip Ave.
Philip
Linda Kramer, age 67, of Philip,
S.D., formerly Burlington, Iowa,
died Saturday, April 6, 2013, at St.
Joseph Hospital in Tucson, Ariz.
She was born September 25,
1945 to Orville “Tim” and Mathilda
“Tillie” Long. She was raised on a
farm near Philip and confirmed at
Our Redeemer Lutheran Church in
Philip. As a young girl, she looked
forward to finishing her daily
chores so she could spend time with
her sister, Sally, swim in the stock
dams, fish and visit her many
cousins. After graduating from
Philip High School, she attended
the American Business College in
Rapid City and earned a degree in
business administration.
She married John “Jack” Still in
1967, who passed away in a plane
crash in 1968. In June 1970, she
married Danny Kramer in Daven-
port. During their careers, they
had the opportunity to reside in a
number of states, including Illinois,
Iowa, Michigan, Washington and
California. During her career,
Linda achieved significant success
in both banking and mortgage in-
dustries.
Following retirement, Linda and
Danny moved from Moorpark,
Calif., to Burlington, Iowa. In 2007,
they purchased a motor home so
they could spend more time visit-
ing family and friends around the
country. In June 2012, they sold
their home in Burlington to follow
their dream of becoming fulltime
RV’ers. In her retirement, Linda
enjoyed reading, golfing, geneal-
ogy, water aerobics and coin col-
lecting, but most of all she relished
spending time with her five grand-
children, and as she put it, “making
memories.”
Grateful for having shared
Linda’s life include her husband,
Danny Kramer of Philip; her two
sons, John (Tonya) Kramer of
Philip and Jason (Penelope)
Kramer of Corona, Calif.; five
grandchildren, Coy, Corbin and
Colden of Philip, and Kaylee and
Zachery of Corona; a sister, Sally
(Arthur) Campbell of Port Wash-
ington, Wisc.; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; a brother, Arnold; and
her first husband.
According to her wishes, her
body has been cremated and me-
morials will follow in Iowa and
South Dakota.
Linda Kramer___________________
John Nels Geisler, age 83, Val-
ley Springs, S.D., formerly of
Murdo, passed away Monday, April
8, 2013 at the Veteran's Adminis-
tration Hospital in Sioux Falls.
He was born in Pasadena, Calif.,
November 25, 1929, to Arthur John
"Dick" Geisler and Vivian Chris-
tine (Petersen) Geisler.
He lived with his parents and
younger siblings, Roma and David,
in Bell, Calif., where A.J. ran a feed
store. During his childhood in Bell,
John began a lifelong love of
movies at the three local theaters
where admission cost a dime.
In February 1942, the metal ra-
tioning of World War II led to the
closing of the store in Bell which
had transitioned into selling the
latest modern appliances. Leaving
the land of sun and palm trees, the
family moved to a farm in Blunt
during a blizzard. In 1945, the
Geisler family moved to Murdo to
operate the John Deere and
Chevrolet dealerships, the first of
many businesses.
For his high school education,
John boarded at Northwestern
Lutheran Academy in Mobridge.
His college education was inter-
rupted when he served his country
as a cryptographer in Korea in the
Army 1903rd Engineer/Aviation
Battalion.
After his honorable discharge
from the Army in 1953, John col-
lected antique cars from across the
Midwest. His father told him,
“John, you have to do something
with those cars,” and in 1954 John,
his father, Dick, and brother, Dave,
opened the Pioneer Auto Museum
with 25 cars on display in a single
building.
John eventually received his
bachelor's degree from Concordia
College in Seward, Neb. He held
many jobs during his lifetime: serv-
ice station attendant, copper mine
employee, elementary school
teacher, social worker, Pinkerton
security guard, postal worker, pilot
car driver and antique dealer. He
most enjoyed his time in the Army
and the years he spent exploring
the Midwest on trips to locate an-
tique cars for the museum.
John married Betty (Fortier)
Queen November 9, 1965, and
gained a daughter, Cathie. Their
daughter, Johanna, was born in
November 1966. After attending
graduate school at the University
of Minnesota, John, Betty and the
two girls moved to Murdo to be
near family and the Pioneer Auto
Museum.
For many years, the family trav-
eled around the United States.
John was always on the lookout for
antique cars and collectibles to add
to the Pioneer Auto collection. In
1985, John and Betty returned to
Murdo to live. John loved all sorts
of entertainment and public exhibi-
tions, attending canvas tent cir-
cuses and state fairs and concerts.
He loved a good meal; any road trip
would be planned around restau-
rants that could be visited along
the way. John had a companion
Beagle by his side for the last 35
years, the most recent being named
Martin Luther.
In 2002, John and Betty moved
to Sioux Falls and later Valley
Springs to be near their daughters
and grandsons, and to have access
to advanced medical care. Both
John and Betty faced a number of
health issues in the last decade.
Starting in 2009, John went
through several rounds of treat-
ment for thyroid cancer. After a
brief, acute illness in late Decem-
ber 2012, John entered the hospital
and then the hospice program at
the Veteran's Administration Hos-
pital in Sioux Falls. His family is
grateful for the excellent care he
received there. He passed away the
morning of Monday, April 8, 2013.
John had a strong, but quiet,
lifetime relationship with his Lord
and Savior. He was a member of
Messiah Lutheran Church in
Murdo and attended First
Lutheran in Valley Springs.
John is preceded in death by his
parents, Arthur John "Dick"
Geisler and Vivian Christine (Pe-
tersen) Geisler.
John is survived by his wife of 47
years, Betty (Fortier) Geisler;
daughters, Cathie (Johnnie) Littles
of Sioux Falls, Johanna (Mark
Dykstra) Geisler; grandsons, Cor-
win and Rune Dykstra of Valley
Springs and Lee Littles of Sioux
Falls; a sister, Roma Bunch, of
Irvine, Calif.; a brother, David A.
(Leila) Geisler of Murdo; nieces, Vi-
vian (Jeff) Sonder, Patty (Donald)
Tyus, Jennifer (Bryan) Kaiser, Lisa
(Larry) Williams; and nephews,
Eric (Janet) Staudenbaur and
David M. (Ann) Geisler.
Funeral services will be held at
10:30 a.m. (CT) on Saturday, April
27, at Messiah Lutheran Church,
Murdo followed by interment at the
Murdo Cemetery and lunch at Mes-
siah Lutheran.
John Nels Geisler_________________
Claire Norman, age 85, of Ab-
erdeen, S.D., formerly of Quinn
and Wall, died April 11, 2013, at
the Aberdeen Health and Rehab
Center.
Claire R. Zimmerly was born
July 15, 1927, in a ranch house on
the prairie near Wayside, Neb., the
daughter of Roland and Margaret
(Nixon) Zimmerly. She was raised
on a ranch near Oelrichs, graduat-
ing from Oelrichs High School. She
then attended Chadron State Uni-
versity.
Claire was the data processing
manager for Golden West Tele-
phone Cooperative for 26 years, re-
tiring in the late 1980s. Claire
made Quinn her retirement home,
and was involved in various com-
munity groups in the Quinn and
Wall area.
Claire was a member of the Em-
manuel Episcopal Church in Rapid
City.
In 2005, due to health reasons,
Claire moved to Aberdeen, where
she has since resided.
Survivors include her son, Ross
Norman and his wife, Tracy, of Ab-
erdeen; three grandchildren, Tim
Norman of Rapid City, Katie
Steever and her husband, Ryan, of
Rapid City, and Scott Norman and
his wife, Jessica, of Aberdeen; three
great-grandchildren, Leighton and
Taylor Steever and Tyleigh Nor-
man; one sister, Eileen Miller, and
her husband, Paul, of Montrose,
Colo.; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
Claire was preceded in death by
her parents, and a brother, Robert,
in infancy.
Visitation will be held one hour
prior to the service.
Funeral services will be held at
10:00 a.m. Saturday, April 20, at
the Emmanuel Episcopal Church
(717 Quincy St.) in Rapid City,
with Rev. Richard Ressler officiat-
ing.
Graveside services will be held
2:00 p.m. on Saturday, at the
Greenwood Cemetery in Chadron,
Neb., with Rev. William Graham
officiating.
Cards and memorials may be
sent to Ross Norman, 715 22nd
Ave. NE Aberdeen, SD 57401.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Claire Norman___________________
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2003 Ford F-350
7.3L diesel engine, long box
Lariat, automatic
Check out our entire selection at
www.philipmotor.com
Stop in & see Ryan today!!
Loren and Rose Kiel went to
Rapid City Monday, April 8, to
begin Rose’s cancer radiation treat-
ments at the cancer treatment
wing of the Rapid City Regional
Hospital. Knowing the weather
predictions, they went prepared to
stay in a motel. They were
stranded two days in the motel
without any treatments because of
closure of the cancer center Tues-
day and Wednesday. She did re-
ceive the first two treatments
Thursday and Friday. She has
been scheduled for four treatments
per week for four weeks. The
streets and roads had been cleared
by Thursday for them to check out
of the motel and they were guests
of Rose’s nephew and his wife,
Matt and Brenda Pates, at Pied-
mont Meadows Thursday night
and during the forenoon Friday.
Loren said that the delay in treat-
ments and extra expense was well
worth the good moisture we re-
ceived.
Loren and Rose went to church
services at First Lutheran Church
Sunday, and stayed in town to con-
duct the afternoon worship services
at the nursing home. Even though
Easter Sunday is past, they played
some Easter music with Loren
playing first the violin and then the
trombone with Rose accompanying
him on the piano. They were happy
to see extra guests attending the
worship. They were Gayle Rush,
Kay Ainslie, and Esther Knutson.
There were eight of the nursing
home residents out for worship. Be-
fore going home, Rose stopped in to
see Carrol Foland at her swing-bed
room in the hospital.
I wonder how many people re-
member John Cowen who home-
steaded in township 2N-20E, Sec.
30, 120acres and 40 acres in Sec.
31, 2N-20E, not to far east of here
about three miles and a half mile
across country from our place. I live
in 2-19 Sec. 17. I remember the
first time I saw John was when I
was about 13 or 14 years old and
was spending the summer down
here with relatives and my uncle,
Netse Carstensen, took me over
there. We pulled up in front of
what looked like a car body buried
in the ground. I was kind of wor-
ried as my uncle got out of the
pickup and yelled and a person
came up out of there. He was sort
of humped over and when he got all
the way out and straightened up,
he was a tall rawboned man with
about a two days growth of
whiskers. They visited for awhile
and then we went back home. My
uncle filled me in about John and
said he was a very honest and good
man.
After I got married and moved
down here, I got to know John a lot
better. Most people who did not
know him would think he was not
to well educated, but when we
would go to Nelse Carstensen’s for
a meal, John would at times be
there eating also, as he helped
Nelse a lot and would eat there.
Anyway, he knew all the kids
around the country and what their
names were and the date they were
born. It amazed me, as he knew
how old Marvin was and what the
weather was like the day that he
was born.
Through the years, I would meet
John coming or going into town
with his team and lumber wagon
with whatever supplies he went
after. At times he would be sitting
on the seat and other times he
would be on his knees driving his
team. He broke his horses and no
mustang was too tough for him to
handle. I never did see John ride a
horse, he may have but I never saw
him do it.
John liked to eat onions and aunt
Ethel’s apple pie. When I would be
down there, my aunt would have
me peel a big onion and at times I
would say, “This onion is pretty
stout.” She would say, “Never
mind, John will eat it like an apple
just the way it is, with a little salt
on it.” When he would be at
Carstensen’s he was very clean and
had good table manners. You
would hardly ever see John laugh,
but when he did, his eyes would
twinkle with delight over a joke or
something that happened that
amused him.
John never went to a doctor. He
did his own doctoring for things. He
froze his feet once and uncle Nelse
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
continued on page 12
It’s Monday. The difference be-
tween this Monday and last Mon-
day is we got that much needed
moisture in the form of snow. We
had a little rain, but mostly snow.
Many schools were closed giving
kids a chance to play in the snow.
Remember those days of building
snow forts, playing fox and goose,
and making snow angels in the
snow, and when snow was deep
enough, building igloos in that
snow. It was always quite cozy in
those igloos, away from the cold
wind. And don’t forget flying down
the hill on a sled. Going down was
fun, but then you had to pull the
sled back up the hill, so you could
go down again, over and over
again. I remember our kids and
kids in the neighborhood sledding
all the way from the Midland
school hill, on the street in front of
the Lutheran parsonage to Stub
and Edna Joy’s house down by
Main Street. At that time, we lived
next to that street. That’s one of
the nice things about living in a
small town. Folks were aware of
kids and their sledding route, so
were on the lookout for them. The
kids would come in rosy cheeked
and covered with snow. After
they’d taken off their overshoes, I
told them to put their clothes in the
bathtub, so the snow could melt be-
fore hanging them up to dry. Before
they were hardly dry they’d put
their snow clothes back on and off
they’d go. Sure beats sitting in the
house playing those Nintendo
games, don’t you think? Good exer-
cise and great fun. Kids made their
own fun. They didn’t feel the need
to be entertained. Technology is
good in a way, but in a way it has
more or less replaced those simple,
enjoyable, things in life. Guess I’m
aging myself, but picture this.
What sounds the most fun? Re-
membering those fun times playing
outdoors, or remembering those
times of staying indoors playing
Nintendo games? I rest my case.
Guess I got off on memory lane for
a bit there.
Sunday, Jerry and I attended
church and had dinner at a local
café in Kadoka and got to visiting
with a friendly couple, Bob and
Donna Kothe. They spend their
winters in Texas and were on their
way home to Custer. They asked
where we were from and when we
told them Midland, they asked if
Midland still had their tumbling
team. We told them they did, but
on a much smaller scale, that it is
now grade school kids. Larry Joy
started the tumbling team in 1971,
his first year of teaching, and that
first year being at the Midland
school. Many of us remember the
tumbling team and what a crowd
pleaser they were for many years.
Performing at State “B’ tourna-
ments and many other functions.
Good memories. Living in Custer,
they also knew Pee Wee Dennis
and his Mountain Music Show. As
many of you know, Pee Wee, who
grew up in Midland, passed away a
number of years ago, so his show is
no longer at Custer. People enjoyed
his mountain music, it was relax-
ing and full of fun. Bob and Donna
bought the 1880 Town history book
from me, and noticed the picture of
Pee Wee and his band in the book.
When the 14 sided barn was moved
from south of Draper to 1880 Town,
and the cement floor was finished
in the barn, the Hullingers had a
dance at that barn with Pee Wee
and his band playing for the first
dance in that barn and folks enjoy-
ing a time of dancing and music.
From Kadoka, we headed for Wall
Drug having their good homemade
doughnuts and something to drink.
On the way home, we stopped at
the Silverleaf Assisted Living Cen-
ter in Philip having a good visit
with Irene Brink. We have a lot of
good memories of Irene and her
late husband, Clifford. Jerry
hauled gas to their Texaco station
at Okaton for many years. They
ran the post office out of that sta-
tion and also had other things to
buy. Clifford liked rocks of all kinds
and had many rock items for sale
in his store. He had a rock polish-
ing machine for those rocks. After
they sold that station, they moved
to Arizona, enjoying those flea mar-
kets and buying more rocks at
those markets. That station is still
at Okaton, but is no longer in busi-
ness. They had two tables of card
players at the Silverleaf, so we also
had a bit of a visit with Marie An-
derson, Eleanor Kroetch, and
Blanche Dolezal, to name a few. It
is a beautiful facility. Vera Nelson,
Sadie Rae Hovland, Rae Crowser
and Norma Oldenburg, Irene’s sis-
ter, were there playing cards with
folks at the Silverleaf, so it was a
lively group. As we made the drive
from Kadoka, to Wall, to Philip,
and back home it was good to see
green grass and some green in
wheat fields from the snow we had
gotten. When the temperatures
warm up a bit that color green will
really start to take off. Looking for-
ward to that.
In calling folks for their news
they didn’t have a whole lot.
Their news was being thankful for
the moisture and staying close to
home looking after those baby
calves.
Chauncey, Wyatt and Emily
Trapp enjoyed spending those
school closing days due to weather
with their dad, Mike Trapp, and
their grandparents, Jerry and Joy
Jones.
Reminder: The Midland com-
munity play “Warren’s Peace” is in
full practice and will be at the Mid-
land Legion Hall April 26 and 27 at
7:00 p.m. and at 2:00 Sunday, the
28th. This would be Mountain
Time. So, come out and support
your local community play.
Due to the Midland play, Father
Kevin has changed the schedule for
Mass on that weekend. Milesville
will be on Saturday night at 7:30
and Midland will be 11:00 Sunday
morning.
Sylvia (Root) Huber, Rapid City,
is a first time great-grandmother.
Her late husband, Leroy, would be
happy about the great-grandchild.
Their son, Billy Huber, also of
Rapid City, is a first time grandpa.
Shelly Huber and Billy’s daughter,
Danica, had a baby boy April 9
weighing 7 ½ pounds and is named
Carter Cain. Little Carter’s dad is
Austin Salsauly and they all live in
Rapid City. Congratulations to
everyone.
Jody Block had thyroid surgery
this Monday at Avera McKinnon in
Sioux Falls. Reports are that the
surgery went well. I will never for-
get the year Jody helped me do
spring cleaning at 1880 Town.
What a worker. The days were
long, but getting along so well,
made it fun. Tired, but having to
laugh, we said the only time we sat
down was for our 15 to 20 minute
break for lunch and riding in the
golf cart back and forth to the laun-
dry room for hot water. The town
was squeaky clean when we were
down. Well, I guess that would be
a bit of an exaggeration, old build-
ings don’t get squeaky clean, but-
they were clean, for sure. Wishing
you God’s healing, Jody.
Clint and Prerry Saucerman
went to Aurora, Colo., March 25 to
spend time with their son, Ty,
Emily, Benjamin, Rebekah Saucer-
man and son, Talon and Christi
Saucerman for the week. Benjamin
and Rebekah didn’t have school for
a week as they were on spring
break. So, Clint and Prerry were
taken on a tour to Wings Over the
Rockies Aerial Museum and The
Lego Store with Emily as their
chauffer. Easter Sunday, they en-
joyed being able to attend church
services in which their grandchil-
dren, Benjamin and Rebekah, sang
in the children’s choir. Emily’s par-
ents, Harold and Vera Beneke, en-
tertained all of Clint and Prerry’s
Colorado family for Easter includ-
ing their nephew, Jace Evans, who
is the son of Jack and Jill Evans.
Jace is stationed at Peterson AFB
in Colorado Springs, Colo. Clint
and Prerry returned home April 1.
April 2, they attended the funeral
service for Edna Joy. Later in the
day, Prerry and her mom, Marlin
Evans, went to Rapid City spend-
ing the night at the home of Tel
and Ellie Saucerman. Early morn-
ing on April 3, they were to be at a
surgery center as Marlin was
scheduled for knee replacement
surgery. April 8, they headed back
to Philip where Marlin was a swing
bed patient for further recupera-
tion.
Mariah (Evans) Heaton visited
her sister and mom, Alaetra and
Clover, and Jamie and Neil Glenn
at Interior. From there she visited
her in-laws, Dennis and Sandy
Heaton, and spent the night.
Mariah also visited and spent a
night with Prerry and Clint.
Mariah and Prerry attended the
education fair at the Midland
School enjoying seeing the tum-
bling performance and a dance rou-
tine put on by the students. She
stayed at her grandma, Marlin’s,
apartment at the Senechal in
Philip visiting her grandma in
swing bed and Gaylord Saucerman
at the nursing home. Gaylord en-
joyed seeing her new little puppy,
Anni, a teacup terrier. When Mar-
lin was able to go back to her apart-
ment, Mariah cared for her, help-
ing do things around the apart-
ment. Wish you God’s healing as
you recover from your knee sur-
gery, Marlin.
The Midland School had their
annual education fair and book fair
at the school last Thursday. Stu-
dents take their moms and dads
and grandparents to the class-
rooms, showing what they have
done throughout the year. At the
school gym they put on a program.
The older kids, whose teacher is
Mary Parquet, did a physical edu-
cation dance routine with Nicki
Nelson as their advisor. Kinder-
gartin through third grade, whose
teacher is Renee Schofield, did a
routine based on the Gang Nam
Style type dance that has words to
go with it. The Midland student’s
performance was given the name
Music Vikings Style with Nicki and
Ashley Schofield, daughter of
Renee, working up the dance rou-
tine and words to go with it. Funny
and entertaining. Edna Dale has
worked with the grade school kids
for a number of years on a tum-
bling routine performance for the
education fair each year. This year
they ranged from three years old to
eighth grade. Folks always enjoy
their performance. Edna was a
tumbler during her school years, so
is doing her part to keep tumbling
a part of our school. She was pre-
sented with a bouquet of flowers by
the little tumblers for all her time
to work in. School cook Aimee
Block is just plum happy about the
whole thing. We much appreciate
the generosity of those folks who
came and to the family of Ida Hunt
who gave a $200 memorial in mem-
ory of their mom. You made it all
worthwhile. That’s a good thing.
As I close my column for an-
other week, my thoughts are on the
tragedy at the Boston Marathon. It
saddens me and makes me angry
that someone can take an event
that pulls people together in a pos-
itive way and turn it into a tragedy.
Having a son who has run a num-
ber of marathons, this bombing be-
comes more personal. It’s heart-
breaking. On that note, our prayers
and thoughts are with those peo-
ple, many whose lives are changed
forever. Be safe. And thank you
Lord for the moisture.
and work to keep Midland tum-
bling more then a memory. Thanks
Edna, for caring. This year,
LeeAnna Fitzgerald was Edna’s
helper. Jenna Finn and Katie Sam-
mons did their part to help. From
the sounds of things, the book fair
was a success, as well.
The Midland Community Li-
brary had their annual soup and
sandwich supper the night of the
education fair. We had a good
turnout and folks reported they
liked our soup. That’s always a
good thing. We much appreciate
the use of the school kitchen and
dining room. Since a year ago there
have been more improvements to
the kitchen. It now has new cup-
boards, new counter tops and a
dish washer. With the painting
they had done before and the new
additions, it is such a nice kitchen
Mark & Glenda Nemec
are celebrating their
40th Wedding
Anniversary
on April 28, 2013.
Help them celebrate
by sending a card to:
Mark & Glenda Nemec
12510 Old Hill City Road
Hill City, SD 57745
Greetings from sunny, calm,
beautiful northeast Haakon
County! We still have some mud
puddles and snow banks left from
last week's storm, and it is wonder-
ful to know that the moisture is
soaking into the parched soil. Ac-
cording to our local weather data
collector, Marge Briggs, we re-
ceived 1.42 inches of moisture from
last week's storm, and every drop
was welcome. It certainly isn't
enough moisture to end the
drought, but it will grow some
much needed grass. Today is start-
ing off clear and bright, but the
weather forecast calls for several
inches of snow beginning this
evening, and the snow will be ac-
companied by wind. One thing
about April snow – it won't be
around very long. We are expecting
temperatures in the 50s over the
weekend. It seems that we have
had more winter weather this
spring than we had all winter long
(if that makes any sense). Thank
goodness we didn't get the freezing
rain that southeast South Dakota
received last week. They lost a lot
of trees and many were without
power for several days. My
thoughts are with them as they
continue the clean up.
My thoughts are also with those
in the Boston area in the wake of
the bombing Monday. What a
senseless tragedy. From my little
corner of the world, it is difficult to
understand these acts of terrorism.
Do people have so much hate in
their hearts that they are bent on
causing as much pain and suffering
as possible? Why would anyone
subscribe to a religion that encour-
ages followers to perpetrate these
type of acts? That last statement is
a little unfair, because at this point
no one has claimed responsibility
for the bombing, and the investiga-
tion is continuing. But the point re-
mains, there are so many good
things people could be doing to help
their fellow man – why resort to
death and destruction? Maybe all
these hate-filled, radical people
should take up gardening – it re-
ally does sooth the soul. If they
want to declare war, they can de-
clare war on weeds and bugs, and
the end product will be wonderful
veggies and flowers! You know, I
may be on to something.
As the blizzard bore down on us
last week, I went into cooking
mode. I don't know why it is that I
think I need to have a bunch of food
prepared – maybe it is in anticipa-
tion of a power outage or some-
thing. Whatever the reason, there
are now several dozen cookies in
the freezer, ready for the upcoming
times when I don't have time (or in-
clination) to bake. As the snow
piled up, my urge to do spring
cleaning diminished. When the sun
starts shining again, hopefully the
urge will return – I still have lots
to do. But from the look of things,
the urge won't show up for the next
few days.
Now that the snow is melting,
the grass is beginning to green up
and the perennial plants continue
to grow. I can't do much in the yard
and garden yet, but I have been
busy taking care of my livestock –
a couple of bum calves and a couple
batches of kitties. Tis the season! I
love spring!
Time to get on with the news.
News was in rather short supply
this week, because the storm kept
most folks at home. I talked to sev-
eral people while gathering the
news, and not one person com-
plained about the snow or mud or
cold – they are just all very grateful
for the moisture.
Dick and Gene Hudson went to
Pierre a week ago Monday to be on
hand for medical appointments
Tuesday morning. They were able
to return home Tuesday afternoon
before the roads got too bad. They
were in Pierre again this Monday
for more appointments. Gene said
there was no church at Deep Creek
Sunday.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed also
had a quiet week at home. They
were scheduled to help with an auc-
tion sale last week up north, but
the sale was canceled due to snow.
Neighbor Lee Briggs stopped by for
coffee and a little visiting Friday.
T.J. and Jeanine Gabriel and
children were in the Caputa area
Sunday to attend a bull sale.
Duane and Lola Roseth spent
most of the week at home due to the
snow. Lola said she has been get-
ting some spring cleaning done –
hopefully when the weather gets
better, she'll have the cleaning ac-
complished and be able to get out-
side. Congratulations to Duane and
Lola's son, Thor, on the recent pur-
chase of the Belle Fourche Live-
stock Exchange. I wish him and his
partner the best of luck with this
new venture.
Laura Hand said that her hus-
band, David, continues to recover
from his recent heart issues. He is
currently traveling to Pierre sev-
eral times a week to take part in ca-
diac rehab. My best wishes go out
to Dave as he continues his recov-
ery!
Kevin Neuhauser said he spent
most of last week watching it snow.
His wife, Mary, was at the ranch
over the weekend.
Frank Halligan was in Pierre
Friday and took his father, Ken
Halligan, to Rocky Tibbs' annual
dinner at the feed store. Shirley
spent a quiet week at home follow-
ing her recent trip to Omaha.
Clark and Carmen Alleman
spent part of last week snowbound
in Rapid City. They were there for
a medical procedure, but it was can-
celed and rescheduled for this
week. And now that we have more
snow forecast, the procedure has
been rescheduled again!
Carmen said that prior to last
week's snow, she had raked her
yard and washed windows, hoping
the activities would cause it to rain.
Nothing worked, however, until she
took the snow tires off her car – and
then, of course, we got snow. As for
weather-makers, Marge Briggs
spent a couple of days watering her
garden spot in preparation for
spring planting, so she thought that
may have prompted some of the
moisture. Whatever precipitated
the precipitation – keep it up!
Nels and Dorothy Paulson spent
a lot of time last week watching it
snow. Dorothy said they even re-
ceived .30 of an inch of rain Sun-
day. When the snow was deep,
Dorothy had a little trouble making
her way to the shop to feed one of
her cats named King Tut. One day,
she made it to the shop, and Nels
gave her a ride back to the house,
getting stuck in the process. The
next day, Nels decided it was prob-
ably easier if he fed the cat himself,
rather than having to rescue
Dorothy from the snow! Nels and
Dorothy's brother-in-law lives in
Jamestown, N.D., and he has really
been dealing with a lot of snow. He
had foot surgery recently, so he is
pretty much house bound.
Bill and Polly Bruce had a quiet
week at the ranch, spending time
making rag rugs and working on
puzzles. Sunday, a large feed truck
slipped off their road and had to be
rescued. It made quite a mess of the
road, but thankfully the county
staff came with a maintainer to put
things right. It is wonderful to have
a county employee stationed in the
community! Monday, Bill and Polly
were in Pierre for appointments.
Jon and Connie Johnson and son
Noah were in Parkston Saturday to
attend a BB gun match. The local
club did very well, bringing home
26 awards – congratulations, kids!
Noah Johnson took 1st place aggre-
gate in his age group, as did Mattie
Jones. Luke Jones took 3rd place
aggregate, and Cadynce and Ella
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Community
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 7
I enjoy refinishing furniture,
something I got hooked on when I
was 15 and bought an old oak
dresser at a great-uncle’s auction.
Some things I’ve learned over
the years include a set of dental
picks are essential, green scrub-
bing pads work as well as steel
wool, and enamel paint is the bane
of amateur refinishers.
Enamel paint on furniture was
very popular in the 50s and 60s.
The stuff is nearly impenetrable to
stripping agents and a heat gun
will soften some of it and then
when it gives you end up gouging
the wood. My solution is get some
60 grit sandpaper and sand it off.
Yes, it does take a fair bit of sand-
paper, but it is a lot less frustrat-
ing. A lot of the mid-century furni-
ture was painted at the factory so
paint will be in the wood’s grain.
That can usually be cleaned up
with stripper.
One of my favorite pieces is a
dresser of that era. Since it was
painted, various types of wood
were used in its construction –
walnut, hickory, mahogany, and
oak. I applied an oil finish and
each of those woods now shine. I
use it in my craft room for storage.
If you have a piece of furniture
that you estimate to be 100 years
old or more, check the drawer
sides. If there are machined dove-
tail joints it was probably made
after the early 1890s when the
dovetail jig was coming into more
prominent use. The dovetails will
be exactly the same when a jig is
used. Handmade dovetails will
show slight size differences. Al-
though some fine cabinet makers
still did their own dovetails into
the 1900s. Most mass produced
furniture were made with the jigs.
A search for aging dovetail joints
on the Internet will help you find
samples.
Another indicator of value is
looking at the wood in the piece.
The secondary wood (wood that
forms drawer sides and bottoms,
rails, etc.) is a lesser valued wood
than the main wood. For example
a piece of furniture that has oak as
a secondary wood will have some-
thing like cherry, walnut, ma-
hogany, etc. as the main wood.
Other secondary woods include
pine, gum, and poplar.
I know older furniture is not for
everyone, but to me, it is so much
better built than most of what you
find in stores today. I personally
like the character of older pieces
as well. So what if it has a ding, or
gouge, or a piece missing. I’m not
a big fan of wood putty or trying to
fix a missing slice of wood. They
never seem to quite match for me
and standout worse than if the
piece was just left as is. If it isn’t
vital to the structure of the piece
then I don’t worry about the piece.
Now for the weather to warm up
so I can finish the table I started
working on last fall, and start on
the dresser with the ooey gooey
varnish from the turn of the 20th
century.
,.
We encourage our readers to
share their items of interest. Just
email nancy@pioneer-review.com,
drop your item off at our office or
mail it to the Pioneer Review, PO
Box 788, Philip, SD 57567.
We pass ideas along, but make no
guarantees to the reader.
cause it says concentrate." You also
remember juice or soup cans you
used to use as curlers in your hair.
“Still a valuable substitute if your
hair is long enough!” Vi also had a
good time reading all her hits for
her birthday on Facebook and
emails. "You can't lie about your
age though when your classmates
get together.” Vi had a phone call
and fun visiting with Lorraine
Newman Courtney from Ft. Worth,
Texas, Sunday afternoon. Lorraine
has many stories to remember
when they lived south and west of
Philip and also her recent travels
to many countries since they have
become somewhat retired. It's fun
to think of these adventures of
places and things to do with a little
more time to enjoy when one feels
the need for this style of getaway
for a bit of diversion.
Wednesday was a clean away
snow day and Tony Harty found
his hands could fit a snow shovel.
He worked a little and rested a lit-
tle, but did manage to get at least
into his van, then finally around to
the back and could sit in the back
to rest.
It was a surprise how much snow
lay on the ground. Wednesday, the
day was a bit milder and Bill
pushed snow, which was about 18”,
a total of around 24” in the two
days. He cleared away some and I
shoveled and we got the skid steer
out of the shop and I did some of
the close up work.
Thursday, Brian Koehn came
along and made a path for Tony
Harty so he could at least break
free from being homebound. Tony
picked up his mail and went out to
dinner, then stopped by our house
for a visit and found the TV on,
door open, and nobody was home!
A phone call or two found us.
Thursday morning early, Bill
and I were on the road to Philip to
see Dr. Mann about my major jaw
ache then on to Rapid for more ex-
tensive dental work.
Friday, Tony Harty was enjoying
the freedom of not being stuck at
home. After picking up his mail, he
had breakfast out then attended
the Kadoka Area play presenting
the “Wizard of Oz” at the audito-
rium in the evening.
Friday was the 44th wedding an-
niversary for Ralph and Cathy
Fiedler. (Congratulations you two.)
They went over to Spearfish in the
afternoon, did some grocery shop-
ping, and then met the Eric Han-
son family and Don Klumb and
girls at Lynette’s work place that
night for a great supper, roses from
the family, and good conversation
with everyone. Found out that
Caitlin, Tessa and Elsie all made
the honor roll for high and middle
school. The two younger ones are
doing very well in school, too. After
some dessert, they all said their
goodbyes and left Lynette to her
job.
Jessica Gittings and Daniel were
at the George Gittings home Satur-
day. Jessica, Sandee and Daniel
helped George get cattle situated
and pulled a tractor out that was
stuck! Jessica and Daniel had din-
ner and supper with George and
Sandee.
Saturday, Tony Harty was happy
that Dale Koehn found some time
to clear out his drive. Tony visited
at our place in the afternoon and
that evening attended the grand
opening for the new fire hall at In-
terior and listened to the music be-
fore returning home.
Sunday, Tony Harty went to
church and out for dinner. He had
a nice visit with Darrel and Mari-
lyn Brooks and Don and Donna
Oliver, who stopped for dinner at
the same time. He visited at our
place in the evening and gave me
his news.
Grandson Eric Seager and family
experienced the loss of power dur-
ing the storm in Sioux Falls and six
days of learning how to cope. De-
pendence on electricity in all as-
pects of our lives isn’t realized until
you don’t have power. Friday night,
they abandoned the house and
begged for a sleepover at the home
of granddaughter Amanda and
Adam Claflin in Harrisburg. They
had escaped any lengthy power
outage. How great to have family
in a different power grid!
Saturday things were melting
around here and drying off since
the snow was cleared away. Con-
gratulation to Hogen’s Hardware
in the celebration of 67 years of
business. Bill and I were among
the many that attended the lunch-
eon served and picked up a few
needed things. Someone com-
mented they hadn’t seen so many
people downtown since the school
burned in 1950. I think that is a bit
of an exaggeration though, but the
town was full. Bill went to Philip
in the afternoon and a new refrig-
erator was delivered here, our 2001
refrigerator needed to be gone and
a new one to replace it. Personal
service is almost a thing of the past
and something the older genera-
tion really misses. Self-service is
fine for those who relish independ-
ence, however, to have that special
interest taken by the business is
much appreciated by so many. I
think of Mark Coyle and his “full
service” station, wonderful! As I
searched to get a refrigerator there
were a great many places that sold
them, some had them priced in the
range I wanted and with the things
we wanted, but it was cash and
carry. Finally, delivery and mer-
chandise came together, so while
Bill played cards all was taken care
of.
Sunday, I attended the play at
the auditorium in the afternoon.
What a good production with great
sound so you could hear well what
was being said which made for a
very enjoyable experience. I had a
nice visit with Ardis McCormick.
She’s looking forward to working
outside in her flower bed and gar-
den.
A journal of Mom’s, Ruth
Fairchild, tells about the snow in
1957, that was 56 years ago. Thurs-
day, March 28, sheep shearers ar-
rived in the evening, March 29,
began shearing about noon, March
30, light rain and snow but could
shear about noon (We had a big
sheep shed and when the sheep
were in there they steamed up and
dried off quite nicely.); Sunday
March 31, finished shearing this
morning. Shearers moved to Mor-
gan’s (Williams). Went to church,
got stuck twice. Looked like a
storm. Wayne got ready to go to
Newell with wool. Monday, April 1,
Wayne left and it started to storm
about 10 a.m. Marsha and I (Ruth)
got in the sheep and Wayne got
home about 4 p.m. Wednesday,
April 3, Nora Olson came home
from school. We are having a lot of
snow. Thursday, April 4, snow all
day – looks like it could count up.
Thursday, April 5, 20 inches of
snow – Wayne took Nora to school.
Postponed YCL at Milesville. Sat-
urday, April 6, postponed Share
the Fun night. Boys had to walk
from Jetters old place. Sunday,
April 7, boys went back to town –
Wayne and Marsha had to pull
them out and also got pickup Mar-
sha had stuck last Wednesday.
***
“If you think you have influence,
try ordering someone else’s dog
around.” Main Street Memories
Betwixt Places News
(continued from page 4)
What a difference a week
makes! We got moisture! The snow
started Monday evening and ended
Wednesday. Lots of schools were
canceled, along with many busi-
nesses. Here in Milesville the snow
total was 13 inches with one inch of
moisture. From the sixth until the
14th there was an additional .23”.
The storm was kind of hard on the
newborn calves, but the moisture
was badly needed. Sounds like
more is on the way.
Sunday morning, local kids
heading for Brookings to the State
FFA convention and competition
were Jade Berry, Casey Reder,
Brayden Fitch, Bailey Radway,
Bailey Anders and Nick Hamill.
They are expected back Tuesday
night.
The PHS drama kids presented
two one-act plays Thursday and
Friday nights last week. Local stu-
dents involved in the productions
were Sam Stangle, Josh Quinn,
James Fitzgerald, Rachel Parsons,
Cole Rothenberger, and Brock
Hanson. Many local families at-
tended one or both performances.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer en-
joyed dinner at the senior center in
Philip Sunday. Shirley Parsons
and Sharon Coyle joined them in
the afternoon for cards at Jerry and
Joy Neville's
Friday, Kara Parsons, Vonda
Hamill and Peggy Staben had
lunch together in Philip, followed
by birthday cake at Peggy's. Kara's
birthday was celebrated a few days
late.
Mark and Judith Radway drove
to Spearfish for the weekend for
the Black Hills Stampede. Their
son, Tanner, was a contestant in
the rodeo. They attended church
Saturday night in Sturgis. Father
Kari, formerly of Philip, sends
greetings to all.
Milesville School took advan-
tage of the snow Friday afternoon
when they had a sledding party.
They had fun on the river hill at
Jim and Lana Elshere's. At the end
of the afternoon, there were many
soaked and tired kids.
Jeff and Crystal Schofield and
family visited Donnie and Bobette
Schofield both Saturday and Sun-
day. Sunday, Jeff celebrated his
birthday.
Bill and Connie Parsons flew to
California Friday and back home
Monday. They visited with their
son, Brad and Wendy Parsons,
Hannah and Preston, Visalia. Pre-
ston, a high school senior, had the
lead role in a two-hour musical,
"42nd Street." The play received
several standing ovations and was
a great performance. Others going
were Marla Petersen, Brad's sister,
of Dazey, N.D., and Wendy's par-
ents, Terry and Kay Moore, Vivian,
and her sister, Julie, Sioux Falls.
Dan and Gayla Piroutek have
been busy traveling to bull sales,
and trying to get the farm auctions
in between the snow storms. They
guess it is a good problem to have.
Down at Corsica, they ran into
Clint Neumeister. He is a great-
nephew to the Neumeisters who
lived many years ago just north of
Golden Vet at Billsburg. He recog-
nized the Piroutek name from
Milesville, and enjoyed the visit,
but he had never visited the
Milesville area. I visited with Bob
Neville about the Neumeister fam-
ily, which included Earl, Gertie
and Ella, none of them married.
They lived east of where Bob and
Arlys lived (on the Bodkin place).
Bob relates a story Gertie told him
about the time she ran to Philip
and it took her only three and one-
half hours. Earl and his sisters put
stucco on the old Hardingrove
school, which sat where our house
is now. Earl put the stucco on and
Gertie and Ella would carry the
water to him in pails from our well,
running up and down the hill. I
don't believe they ever walked. At
one time, they owned the theaters
in Philip and Faith and Bob
thought another one, but wasn't
sure where. They moved to
Spearfish after retiring. Thanks,
Bob, for your information!
Last week, Bart and I were in
Rapid City helping out at Mike and
Melody's. Bailey, Carter and Lan-
don rode home with us Friday and
spent the weekend with Earl, Jodi
and girls.
Those helping Leo and Joan
Patton cut up hogs Saturday were
Gary Stephenson, Kay Ainslie,
Cheryl Behrend, the Jim Stangle
family and friend, Dakota, and
Barb Howe.
Milesville
News
by Janice Parsons
544-3315
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
School & Community
HAAKON SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHILD FIND/PRESCHOOL SCREENING
A free screening of preschool children age 3-5
within the Haakon School District will be Monday, April
22, in the Fine Arts Building. Letters have gone out to
eligible children that we have on file and have not been
screened in the past.
Any child in the age range of 3 through 5 will be
screened using the DIAL 4. Law enforcement will be
offering fingerprinting, Crystal Deal will be available
with information on Head Start, a nurse from Youth and
Family Services will be available to check vision, and
Heidi Burns, S.D. Dept. of Health, will be checking
height, weight, and immunizations. If you have a child
eligible for kindergarten next year, you may register
him or her at this time also.
If you have a child in the age range of 3 through 5
and would like to have her or him screened, please call
Pat in the elementary office, Monday through Thurs-
day, at 859-2001 to set up an appointment.
859-2744
or 685-3068
Philip
2008 Chrysler Sebring
67K miles, loaded, great gas mileage!
859-2430 • Philip
WEEKLY
SPECIAL:
French Dip
with Fries
* * * *
Closed Sundays
Lucky Strike
will be closed
–Monday–
April 29th
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Finals
Monday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar................................42-18
Shad’s Towing.....................35.5-24.5
Handrahan Const ...............33.5-26.5
Badland’s Auto..........................24-36
Rockers......................................23-37
Petersen’s..................................22-38
Hightlights:
Venessa Buxcel....9-10 split; 179/466
Andrew Reckling..........................237
Kim Petersen ...............................183
Bryan Buxcel ...............202 clean/571
Gail Reutter ..........................181/490
Jason Petersen......................224/557
Tena Slovek..................................477
Wendell Buxcel .....................200/554
Maralynn Burns...........................177
Vickie Petersen ............................172
Carl Brown...................................201
Clyde Schlim................................175
Karen Byrd........................3-6-7 split
Neal Petersen.....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service........44.5-15.5
Cristi’s Crew.......................36.5-23.5
Roy’s Repair ..............................33-27
Lee & the Ladies.......................32-28
King Pins...................................30-30
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Clay King ..............................214/560
Theresa Miller..............................198
Tanner Norman...3-10 split; 218/562
Cristi Ferguson.....................185/522
Duane Hand..........................201/528
Roy Miller........................5-6-10 split
Annette Hand.....................3-10 split
Eight seniors from Philip High
School’s music program began this
year’s annual trip to New York
City on April 3, by way of Washing-
ton, D.C.
The crew included Quade Slovek,
Gavin Snook, Tara Cantrell, Holly
Iwan, Sam Huston, Katelyn En-
ders, Lakin Boyd and Rachel
Kochersberger, along with music
director Barb Bowen and chaper-
ones Tina Kochersberger, Pat
Westerberg and Deb Snook.
The group first participated in a
walking tour of the monuments in
Washington, D.C. After a short
night, they began the next day
early with visits to the United
States Capitol and the Smithson-
ian Air and Space Museum.
They departed Union Center by
Amtrak train and arrived at Penn
Station in time to participate in a
walking tour of New York City’s
Times Square.
Early the next morning, the
Philip group took a boat tour of the
Hudson River, followed by a bus
tour of Lower Manhattan, and fin-
ished their day at the Ambassador
Theatre to take in the musical
“Chicago.”
Morning came early, with the
group at the NBC Today Show at
7:00 a.m. The rest of the morning
was filled with touring the Top of
the Rock Observation Deck, a bus
tour of Harlem and Uptown. After-
noon began with viewing the musi-
cal “Mamma Mia” at Winter Gar-
den Theatre. The day concluded
with Fifth Avenue shopping and
visiting Central Park.
Sunday was the return home.
“I definitely think that this trip
was an amazing experience. One
always sees all these monuments
and famous buildings on TV or in
books, but doesn’t realize how
amazing they really are until seen
in person,” said Slovek. “I have to
say my favorite part of the trip is
all the new experiences, like flying,
taking a train, the subway, visiting
the monuments and especially get-
ting to see how much New York dif-
fers from little Philip, S.D.”
“Probably the most moving and
memorable part of the trip was the
9-11 Memorial and Saint Paul’s
Chapel. I loved seeing those
things,” stated Cantrell. “One thing
that I started noticing after a few
days there, is there is absolutely no
privacy. There’s people every-
where. It was a fun trip.”
“Our East Coast trip allowed us
to see many memorials. My fa-
vorite was the 9-11 Memorial,” said
Iwan. “I also loved watching the
Broadway shows. Movies cannot
even compare to the shows. We all
loved the trip to Washington, D.C.
and New York, but by the end of
the day we all missed the dirt roads
of good old South Dakota, and took
a joy ride after arriving home.”
“My favorite part of the New
York trip was the 9-11 Memorial.
The feeling I experienced by being
there was incredible.” said Huston.
“My second favorite part was
‘Mama Mia.’ The actors are so tal-
ented! By going to New York, I re-
alized how lucky I am to live in the
community I do. New York is fun to
visit, but South Dakota is home!”
“My favorite part while we were
in Washington, D.C., was getting to
see the World War II (Memorial),”
said Enders. “When we were in
New York, my favorite thing was
the 9-11 Memorial and the Saint
Paul’s Chapel. I also liked the show
‘Mama Mia.’ Home sweet home.”
PHS music seniors’ tour of big cities
At the White House grounds. Back, from left, Katelyn Enders, Lakin Boyd, Sam
Huston, and Rachel Kochersberger. Front, Quade Slovek, Holly Iwan, Tara Cantrell
and Gavin Snook. Courtesy photos
While the music group visited the Vietnam Memorial, Gavin
Snook made a rubbing of the engraved name of his grand-
mother's, Dianna Marrington Dinsmore, first cousin, Craig
Marrington, who was killed in Vietnam in October, 1969.
The Philip music students had just visited the Hirshhorn Mu-
seum; this area is part of the sculpture garden. According to
chaperone Deb Snook, four of the eight students were
caught showing their joy and creativity by jumping in the air
after being inspired by the art in the museum. From left are
Tara Cantrell, Gavin Snook, Holly Iwan and Quade Slovek.
by Nancy Haigh
The Belle Fourche Livestock Ex-
change changed hands recently as
longtime owners Dean and Eileen
Strong passed the reins over to
Thor Roseth, Philip, and Jeff Long,
Enning.
The deal was announced prior to
the exchange’s weekly sale, Thurs-
day, April 11. Roseth and Long
were in charge of the following
week’s sale.
Roseth has owned and operated
Philip Livestock Auction for the
past seven years. Long is a well-
known western South Dakota auc-
tioneer.
Roseth said that the two sale
barns complement each other well.
The Philip auction’s weekly sale is
on Tuesdays with special auctions,
in season, on Saturdays. The Belle
Fourche market has special sales
on Fridays and some Mondays,
along with their weekly Thursday
sales.
Their trade areas have some
crossover, but mostly they serve
separate areas. The Belle Fourche
Livestock Exchange picks up a lot
of eastern Wyoming, southeastern
Montana and northwestern South
Dakota consignors. The Philip mar-
ket hits most of south central and
some of the western parts of South
Dakota.
Roseth and Long both stated
they are excited about the new ven-
ture and with working with the
personnel in Belle Fourche.
Rhonda Dreiske is the office man-
ager, Ray Pepin is yard foreman
and a fieldman and Brett Loughlin
is a manager and fieldman. Auc-
tioneers are Lynn Weishaar and
Doug Jaggers. Other fieldmen in-
clude Joe Vodicka, K.P Stevens,
Craigh Deveraux and Mike Gree-
nough.
Roseth said he and Long plan to
be at the exchange for the sales.
They will also be very busy getting
to know producers as well as work-
ing to bring in new consignors.
Long noted that the Strongs had
put together a tremendous live-
stock market with a lot of loyal con-
signors.
The Strongs purchased the sale
barn in 1977. They noted that it
was time to retire and let a new
generation take over.
Roseth and Long purchase livestock exchange
Passing the reins to a younger generation are Dean and Eileen Strong, left, former
owners of the Belle Fourche Livestock Exchange. New owners Jeff Long, right, and
Thor Roseth, second from right, are looking forward to working with producers
that utilize the sale barn as well as employees of the exchange.
Photo courtesy of Butte County Post
Gavin Snook, son of Gary and
Deborah Snook, Midland, is the re-
cipient of a $1,000 college scholar-
ship sponsored by the South
Dakota Agri-Business Association.
The scholarship is open to cus-
tomers, employees and family
members of companies that main-
tain a membership in SDABA. Ap-
plicants may be a high school sen-
ior or registered freshman, sopho-
more or junior at a South Dakota
university or technical school with
a major in agriculture.
Snook is eligible for the scholar-
ship since his family is a customer
of SDABA member Midwest Coop-
eratives in Philip. He plans to at-
tend South Dakota State Univer-
sity to pursue a degree in agron-
omy, and was selected to receive
this scholarship based on his
achievements, community involve-
ment and future goals in agricul-
ture.
“It’s fun to apply,” said Snook.
“Talking about yourself, you learn
more about yourself and what you
are going into as a profession.”
Snook plans on taking two majors
while in college, agronomy and
agriculture business.
The scholarship was presented to
Snook by Jim Kanable, current
board member and former presi-
dent of SDABA, and agronomy
manager at Midwest Cooperatives
in Philip.
The SDABA, a statewide associ-
ation with an office in Pierre, is an
organization of professionals that
promotes safe and value-added
crop production. It is South
Dakota’s unified voice for the pro-
motion of environmental steward-
ship and educational information
for the crop input industry.
Snook wins agri-businesss scholarship
Jim Kanable presenting Gavin Snook the certificate of a $1,000 college scholar-
ship sponsored by the South Dakota Agri-Business Association. Photo – Bartels
These elementary students are
Super Scotties for March 2013.
They have earned the
distinction through different
individual displays of good
character. Each teacher selects
at least one of their students at
the end of each month.
Super Scotties
Dylan Packard
Milesville
Taryn Ravellette
Kindergarten
Copper Lurz
3rd grade
Alec Schofield
5th grade
Carson Hamill
6th grade
Elementary Students of the Month
for March
Sarah Huston
1st grade
Jesse Fillingim
2nd grade
Noah Johnson
Deep Creek
Kelton Quinn
4th grade
Anna Piroutek
Milesville
by Devon Johnson
Reprinted, with permission,
from goumary.com website
The National Strength and Con-
ditioning Association announced
that University of Mary, Bismarck,
N.D., football player Troy Guptill
has received its annual All-Ameri-
can Strength and Conditioning
Athlete of the Year award.
For the past 34 years the award
has been given to student athletes
who display a commitment to
strength training and conditioning.
An outside linebacker from
Quinn, S.D., Guptill was one of 229
collegiate and high school athletes
from 98 schools to receive this
honor. The sophomore was nomi-
nated by U-Mary’s head strength
and conditioning coach, Michael
Silbernagel. Silbernagel described
Guptill as “the definition of a stu-
dent athlete.” He added, “Troy has
the ability to excel not only on the
field and in the weight room, but
also in the classroom where he
holds a 3.75 grade point average.”
A member of the All-Northern
Sun Academic Team, Guptill’s de-
votion to strength and condition
paid off in 2012 as he led the Ma-
rauders with 14.5 tackles for loss
and added five sacks. The 6’2”, 225
pound linebacker is currently par-
ticipating in spring workouts and
practices and will be a junior next
fall.
Boyd Epley, founder of the NSCA
cited that, “The advantages of
strength training and conditioning
cannot be denied in collegiate and
high school athletics. The NSCA is
pleased to recognize student ath-
Guptill receives NSCA all-American honors
letes that put forth an effort to im-
prove their performance through
strength and conditioning. They
are to be applauded for their hard
work and dedication.”
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Community
BUSINESS FOR SALE
Pizza Etc.
175 S. Center Ave. • Philip
•Great Family Business
•1 Year In Newly Remodeled Building
•Lots of Possibilities for Expansion
Contact
Kim or
Vickie
(605) 
859-2365
Midland Education Fair held April 11
The annual Midland Education Fair was held Thursday, April 11, in the Midland elementary school. The event was sponsored
by instructors, the booster club and the library. The classrooms were open to parents and the rest of the public. A book
share was held. Physical education students performed dance routines and the Midland Tumblers also performed. There
was also a soup supper. Shown above left, Logan Sammons and his mother, Katie, have fun with M&M probability. At right
is Carson Daly sorting M&Ms. Courtesy photos
The Midland Tumbers peformed during the Midland Education Fair, Thursday, April 11. Back row, from left: Eagan Fitzgerald,
Carson Daly, Kaelan Block, Mariah Dale, Miranda Dale, Brandon McLaughlin and Caylo McLaughlin. Middle row: Dane Daly,
Cass Finn, Ashley Hand, Logan Sammons, Kash Block, Kaitlyn Schofield and Cole Finn. Front: Shelby Schofield, Blaise Fur-
nival, Rydek Neilan, Karlee Block, Ellie Nemec, Ridge Furnival, Morgan Sammons, Cara Schofield and Aja Fitzgerald.
National Library Week is April 14-20. According to Annie Brunskill, library director,
the Haakon County Public Library has been distributing specially made “nifty,
cool” refrigerator magnets that are provided by the Friends of the Library. The
magnet is a replica of the library cards. They read, “Haakon County Public Library,
140 S. Howard Ave., P.O. Box 481, Philip, SD 57567, 859-2440, library@gwtc.net.
Stop in to get a magnet. Shown is Brunskill giving magnets to Missy Koester and
Lucas Butler. Courtesy photo
National Library Week
Philip junior high student
council state convention
Philip Junior High Student Council members attended the 2013 South Dakota
Student Council Middle School convention, March 24-26, in Pierre. Through a
three-point shoot fundraiser, Philip Junior High students donated at the conven-
tion $50 to Children's Miracle Network, and over $2,000 was raised across the
state by the middle school councils represented. One of the workshops had each
participant create a dream board using words and pictures cut from magazines
to show the dreams the student had for their future. Back row, from left: chaper-
one Tracey Hand, Trew DeJong and Riley Heltzel; Front, from left: Shay Hand,
Elise Wheeler, Peyton Kuchenbecker and Tia Guptill. Courtesy photo
With the swimming season al-
most here, the new Philip Swim for
Life program is accepting applica-
tions for free swimming lessons
and a summer pass to the Philip
swimming pool.
The program’s original idea and
seed funding comes from its
founder, Howard Pihlaja. He con-
siders this a lifesaving effort to
teach youth to swim and be safe
around water.
Under the auspices of the non-
profit Philip Charities organiza-
tion, the Swim for Life program is
offering scholarships, or as it calls
them “swimships,” to kida between
seven and 12 years of age.
Swimships may be applied for
based on family income guidelines
that follow those for the Haakon
School District’s free/reduced lunch
program. Reporting of household
income will be considered to be on
the honor system and applications
will be held confidential.
The program is asking, if a fam-
ily’s household income is within the
parameters and the intended chil-
dren are between seven and 12, for
the family to please fill out an ap-
plication for each child. Applica-
tions can be picked up at the First
National Bank in Philip and
Coyle’s SuperValu. Applications
must be returned by Wednesday,
May 15, to Swim for Life, P.O. Box
754, Philip, SD 57567 or emailed to
philipswim4life@yahoo.com.
Children who are chosen for the
swimships will receive free tuition
to the five day swimming lesson
Swimships offered by Swim for Life
Howard Pihlaja has founded the Swim
for Life program. Applications for
scholarships for swimming lessens
and then season pool passes are to
be turned in by May 15.
Thank you to Coyle’s
SuperValu for your
donation to the
post-prom party!
We appreciate it &
apologize for
inadvertently missing your
name in last week’s ad.
–PHS Seniors
School make
up day
The second make up day for
the snow storm of April 9-10
will be this Friday, April 20.
School will follow its regular
hours.
Mark your calendars for the next
Badlands/Bad River Region
Stronger Economies Together ses-
sion, rescheduled for Monday, April
22, at 5:00 p.m. at the Bad River
Senior Citizen’s Center downtown,
Philip.
Mary Cerney, longtime research
analyst for the Governor’s Office of
Economic Development, will pres-
ent data about the companies that
show interest in South Dakota, and
how that information is dissemi-
nated. She will talk about their
workforce development grants that
provide skills to potential employ-
ees. She’ll also talk about target in-
dustries and supporting industries
that might fit South Dakota, and
retention/expansion efforts.
Bernie Moran leads the South
Dakota Labor Market Information
Center in Aberdeen. She will focus
more on the employment aspects –
current jobs, potential jobs, charac-
teristics of our regional labor force,
as well as projections and opportu-
nities.
Everyone is welcome to attend
this meeting, even if they have not
been to previous meetings.
Stronger Economies Together
meeting reset to April 22
sessions provided over the summer
at the Philip swimming pool. Upon
completion of the child’s full partic-
ipation in the swimming lessons,
the child will earn a free swimming
pass to the Philip pool for the 2013
season. This is a combined scholar-
ship worth $70 per child. Families
accepted into the program will be
asked to select the best lesson time
and level for the child.
The number of accepted children
depends on the amount of con-
tributed funds available. Pihlaja
has seeded an original $1,000 to
the program.
“Go back eight years. I lost a
nephew,” said Pihlaja. The young
family man, Gary Hovi, was about
28 years old and lived in Grand
Rapids, Minn. He loved to hunt and
fish. One day, when he was fishing
alone, his small boat was found
empty. Several days later his body
was found. He had drowned. “That
is why,” said Pihlaja about his
founding the Swim for Life pro-
gram.
The program has strong support.
The Philip Charities is chaired by
Boyd Waara. The First National
Bank in Philip, through its presi-
dent, Ray Smith, is in full support
of the program. Swimming lessons
instructors, school employees, hos-
pital auxiliary members and others
have also offered support.
If needed because of a large num-
ber of applications, Pihlaja is will-
ing to put even more into the origi-
nal funding. “We are not going to
let this first one fold. Then we’ll see
if we have that many people inter-
ested, then we’ll get fundraisers
and donations,” said Pihlaja. He is
determined that the program will
continue next year and following
years.
Individuals, businesses and or-
ganizations may contribute to the
Swim for Life program through the
Philip Charities at the First Na-
tional Bank in Philip.
FOR SALE:
1998 Ford Expedition XLT 4x4
Cloth Seats, Good Tires
Power Windows & Locks
$3,750
Call 685-8155
UI1Y 0I PPILIP 5WIMMINU P00L
LIILUUAP05 NLL0L0 I0P 1PL 2013 5LA50N
LllL0uARU applioations are being aooepted for the
2013 summer season. ¥ou must be 15 years of age
and able to oertify as a lifeguard.
Applioations are available at City linanoe 0ffioe,
looated on the 4th lloor of the ¬aakon County
Courthouse between the hours of 8:00 to 12:00 and
1:00 to 5:00, Monday through lriday, or by oalling 859-
2175. Applioations will olose at 5:00 p.m. on MA¥ 1,
2013.
Lifeguard, CPR & lirst Aid olasses may be offered if
there is suffioient interest. Please oontaot the City
linanoe 0ffioe at 859-2175
if you are interested.
City of Philip is an Lqual
0pportunity Lmployer.
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, April 18, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 10
system for the courthouse, a lot of dollars
could be saved. Vice Chairman Radway
made a motion to add the water drip tap
to the estimates for the courthouse sprin-
kler system. Commissioner Konst sec-
onded the motion with all in agreement.
Her second request was to approve the
50/50 Horizons Raffle Fund Raiser at the
Matched Bronc Ride that is done every
year. Commissioner Briggs motioned to
approve the raffle and Commissioner
Snook seconded the motion. Motion car-
ried.
Fred Hoag presented a plat map to the
commission for approval. A motion was
made by Commissioner Snook to ap-
prove the plat and seconded by Commis-
sioner Briggs, with all in agreement.
The 1:30 PM scheduled hearing for on-
sale alcohol beverages served on Sun-
day was declared. No one was present
to object the following amended Resolu-
tion 2011-09:
RESOLUTION 2011-09
Amended ApriI 2, 2013
Haakon County Board of
Commissioners
PhiIip, South Dakota
WHEREAS, according to
SDCL 35-4-11.1 - County de-
termination of number of on-
sale licenses and amount of
fees, the Haakon County
Commissioners have deter-
mined the number of on-sale
licenses that can be issued in
Haakon County (outside incor-
porated municipalities of Mid-
land, SD, and Philip, SD) shall
be (4) four licenses. This num-
ber is restricted by population.
This shall be a continuing res-
olution, until such time that the
population, determined by
census, changes and is af-
fected by the re-calculations.
Added paragraph 04-02-13:
WHEREAS, the County Com-
mission determined that the
on-sale license holders may
sell, serve or allow alcoholic
beverages to be consumed on
Sunday. The Hearing was set
for the next Regular Commis-
sioners Meeting on April 2,
2013 at 1:15 PM. The Haakon
County Commissioners have
determined that T-34 Truck
Stop, Lake Waggoner Golf
Course, American Legion
Wheeler Brooks Post #173
and South Fork Ranch LLC
are eligible to apply for the op-
tion to serve, sell, or allow al-
coholic beverages to be
consumed on Sunday except
between the hours of two a.m.
and seven a.m. There will be
a fee charged of $100.
IT IS THEREFORE RE-
SOLVED that the County
Commission of Haakon
County hereby approves the
above number of licenses and
license holders who can serve
on-sale liquor on Sundays.
APPROVED this 2th day of
April, 2013, by the Haakon
County Commission in Regu-
lar Session at Philip, SD
57567.
BOARD OF HAAKON
COUNTY COMMÌSSÌONERS
Stephen Clements, Chairman
Tom Radway, Vice Chairman
Nicholas Konst, Member
Gary Snook, Member
Edward Briggs, Member
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
Trisha Larson met with the commission
to discuss a grant project that was being
planned called the Philip Community
Trail Plan. Ìt would require an 18.05%
match by the city. The draft plan proved
to be very interesting to the commission.
Ìt is still in the early stages and one of the
crucial items was obtaining easements
for the trail. There were several others to
get in contact with about the easements.
Having the easements before applying
for the grant was a requirement. The
question was asked about liability along
the trail. State's Attorney Tollefson stated
that the one responsible for liability would
be the one who holds the easements.
Commissioner Briggs made a motion to
allow the easements for the project con-
tingent to getting all other required ease-
ments. Commissioner Snook seconded
the motion with all in approval. State's At-
torney Tollefson will write up the ease-
ment for the county when needed.
Keystone Pipeline Representative Bud
Andersen met with the commission to
give them an update on the pipeline.
There is hope that it will be approved and
work can start in 2013. There will be a
letter of support sent in regards to the
pipeline during the public comment pe-
riod, which ends April 22, 2013. As far as
the taxes the pipeline would generate,
Andersen recommended talking to some
East River counties where the pipeline
has been completed.
Custodian Nancy Neville reported to the
commission that Lurz Plumbing would
not be able to give her an accurate quote
of the sprinkler system until the end of
April. Neville was advised to bring in the
quote as soon as she received it and that
a quote should include the drip line the
Horizon's asked for on the project honor-
ing Scotty Philip on county property.
Approval was given by the commission
by telephone on March 12, 2013, for 4
(four) administrative hours to be given to
the county employees as the Governor
gave the same to the State employees
on Good Friday afternoon. Chairman
Clements, Commissioner Konst and
Commissioner Radway gave their ap-
proval for the above request.
The commission was given copies of the
letter from our maintenance elevator
service company of Kone, Ìnc. and what
their rate increase would be beginning
April 1, 2013. The increase will be at
3.05%. This would amount to $7.02 per
month. Another letter was received from
the City of Philip informing the county
that they no longer felt they should pay
half of the State Radio Communications
bill in the amount of $2,250. Ìt was felt
that the city police did not utilize this serv-
ice and the expense could no longer be
justified. No apportionment was made in
the city's budget to compensate the
County for this service in 2013. Auditor
Freeman informed the commission that
the total amount is included in the Sher-
iff's budget in 2013.
Patricia Vollmer called for the Midland
Auxiliary to raffle off an afghan and two
beef certificates worth $50 and $100. A
motion was made by Commissioner
Briggs and seconded by Commissioner
Konst with all in agreement.
Richard Rockafellow requested a raffle
for the South Dakota Amateur Baseball
Association (SDABA) on an ATV or golf
cart and 2 (two) $1,000 bonds. A motion
was made to approve the raffle by Com-
missioner Snook and seconded by Com-
missioner Briggs with all in agreement.
The (SDACCO) South Dakota Associa-
tion of County Commissioners and
County Officials Spring Workshop will be
at the Ramkota in Pierre, SD, on May 15-
17, 2013. A motion was made by Com-
missioner Snook and seconded by
Commissioner Konst with all in agree-
ment to attend the workshop.
The (SDACCO) Deputy Workshop has
been scheduled for May 22-23, 2013 at
the Ramkota in Pierre, SD. A motion was
made by Commissioner Konst and sec-
onded by Commissioner Briggs with all
in agreement to approve travel and at-
tendance.
The commission was asked by SDACCO
to approve the following resolution:
RESOLUTION 2013-04
Haakon County Board of
Commissioners
PhiIip, South Dakota
Approved this 2nd Day of
April, 2013, by Haakon
County, South Dakota
Supporting Efforts to Maintain
the Tax-Exempt Status of Mu-
nicipal Bonds
WHEREAS, the tax-exempt
status of municipal bonds is
nearly a century old and is vital
to funding local infrastructure
and economic development;
and
WHEREAS, of the $1.65 tril-
lion of local infrastructure in-
vestment over the last decade
using tax-exempt bonds,
nearly all of it was in six cate-
gories: $514 billion for primary
and secondary schools; $288
billion for hospitals; $258 bil-
lion for water and sewer facili-
ties; $178 billion for roads,
highways and streets; $147
billion for public power proj-
ects; and $106 billion for mass
transit.
WHEREAS, any move to
change the current tax treat-
ment of local government
bonds would lead to higher
borrowing costs for local gov-
ernments; and
WHEREAS, without tax-ex-
empt financing much-needed
infrastructure improvements
would likely be delayed; and
WHEREAS, tax-exempt
bonds are a critical tool for
South Dakota counties to facil-
itate budgeting and financing
of long-term investments in the
infrastructure and facilities
necessary to meet public de-
mand for government serv-
ices; and
WHEREAS, at a time when in-
frastructure demands are
great, increasing the cost of
local government borrowing
could have serious impacts on
the national, state and local
economies; and
WHEREAS, without the tax-
exemption, the effectiveness
of the bond market would be
significantly dampened, creat-
ing higher borrowing costs for
county governments, less in-
vestment in infrastructure, and
fewer jobs.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED that Haakon
County does hereby support
maintaining the current tax-ex-
empt status of municipal
bonds.
BOARD OF HAAKON
COUNTY COMMÌSSÌONERS
Stephen Clements, Chairman
Tom Radway, Vice Chairman
Nicholas Konst, Member
Gary Snook, Member
Edward Briggs, Member
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
The motion was made by Commissioner
Snook and seconded by Commissioner
Briggs with all in agreement to approve
Resolution 2013-04.
The South Dakota Association of County
Commissioners (SDACC) has endorsed
the establishment of a Veteran's and Mil-
itary Affairs Committee. They asked for
any volunteers. Auditor Freeman re-
ported that she had visited with VSO
Terry Deuter and he had agreed to meet
with them to work on establishing this
committee. A motion was made by Com-
missioner Konst and seconded by Com-
missioner Radway to approve VSO
Deuter's participation. Motion carried.
Vice Chairman Tom Radway informed
the commission that Barb Sloat was ap-
pointed to the Library Board on March
12, 2013.
The following March 2013 fuel bids were
submitted:
NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids
will be received by the Board of Commis-
sioners of Haakon County, South Dakota
on May 7, 2013, at the office of the
County Auditor at Philip, South Dakota,
until the bid opening time as shown
below.
The bids will be opened and read at the
hours listed below for each of the follow-
ing items.
Bids to be opened at 1:45 PM MDT for
Concrete Bridge Decking, Box
Culverts, Round Culverts ÷
various sizes ÷ see specifica-
tions.
All products are to conform to
South Dakota Specifications.
All bids are to be firm to commence on
bid letting date and remain in force until
bid letting date in 2014, which will be no
later than May 1, 2014.
Proposals shall be submitted in a sealed
envelope clearly imprinted on the outside
with item bid, time and date of letting.
Bidders are reminded that the county is
not subject to the payment on federal ex-
cise tax or of state sales tax.
The Board of County Commissioners of
Haakon County reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any or all bids, or to accept
any bid which they believe to be in the
best interest of the County.
Specifications for supplies may be ob-
tained at the County Highway Office, Box
156, Philip, SD 57567, or at the County
Auditor's Office, Box 698, Philip SD,
57567.
Dated at Philip, Haakon County, South
Dakota, this 3rd day of April, 2013.
[Published April 18 & 25, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $38.99]
NOTICE OF
HEARING ON
PETITION
TO VACATE
PORTION OF ALLEY
Notice is hereby given that Golden West
Telecommunications Cooperation has
presented a Petition to the City of Philip,
South Dakota, requesting the vacation of
the following described portion of Alley:
ALLEY:
The Alley of an approximate
width of twenty feet (20') and
approximate length of one-
hundred forty feet (140') run-
ning east and west, located in
Block Two (2) of Original
Town. Said alley is bounded
on the North, by Lot Eleven R
(11R) and bounded on the
South, by Lot One (1), all lo-
cated in Block Two (2) of Orig-
inal Town, City of Philip,
Haakon County, South
Dakota.
Golden West Telecommunica-
tions Cooperation further peti-
tions that, if vacation is
approved, they be granted
possession and responsibility
for all vacated property as de-
scribed above (approximately
twenty feet (20') by one-hun-
dred forty feet (140')).
Said Petition will be heard on the 6th day
of May 2013 at 7:30 p.m. or as soon after
that hour as is practical, in the Commu-
nity Room of the Haakon County Court-
house. All interested persons may
appear at the public hearing and show
cause why the Petition should be ap-
proved or rejected.
Monna Van Lint,
City Finance Officer
[Published April 18 & 25, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $21.95]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
ApriI 2, 2013
The regular meeting of the Haakon
County Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at 1:00 PM. A
quorum was established at the meeting
with Chairman Stephen Clements, Vice
Chairman Tom Radway, Members
Nicholas Konst, Gary Snook and Edward
Briggs in attendance. States Attorney
Gay Tollefson, Auditor Pat Freeman,
Deputy Auditor Carla Smith, Highway Su-
perintendent Kenneth Neville, Custodian
Nancy Neville, Haakon County Sheriff
Fred Koester, WÌC/CHN Heidi Burns,
Trish Larson, Horizons Representative
Mary Burnett, County Weed Supervisor
Virgil Smith, Librarian Annie Brunskill,
Keystone Pipeline Representative Bud
Andersen, Aaron Swan & Associates
Land Surveyor Donald Jacobson, and Pi-
oneer Review Representative Nancy
Haigh were also present.
A motion was made by Commissioner
Snook and seconded by Vice Chairman
Radway to approve the April 2, 2013,
Regular Meeting agenda.
The March 5, 2013, Regular Meeting
Minutes were reviewed. Commissioner
Konst made a motion to approve the min-
utes. Commissioner Briggs seconded the
motion, with all in agreement.
Horizons Representative Mary Burnett
met with the commission to request a
water drip line over to the Horizons
Scotty Philip Project at the north end of
the parking lot. Ìt will have some plants
that would require watering and if the drip
line could be put on the new sprinkler
evaluation was tabled until the April 9,
2013, meeting.
The Auditor's Account with the
County Treasurer was presented as
taxes for the month of February 2013:
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...................................62,298.34
Cash Management Fund...1,005,101.91
Bank Balance..............................867.92
Checks & Cash on Hand........32,949.08
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for the month of March
2013:
Commissioners Wages ............2,820.00
Auditor's Office.........................4,841.29
Treasurer's Office.....................4,841.29
State's Attorney's Office ...........3,655.84
Director of Equalization............3,295.69
Register of Deeds ....................3,674.73
Janitor ......................................1,937.04
Veteran's Office...........................583.33
Sheriff's Office..........................5,480.87
Highway Department..............22,652.06
WÌC and Health Nurse Sec......1,075.20
Librarians .................................1,822.60
Extension Secretary....................991.20
Emergency Management ............993.02
Weed Supervisor.............................0.00
Wellmark Blue Cross
Blue Shield...........................8,913.54
BCBS Life....................................117.60
SCS Gap Ìns ............................1,435.67
AFLAC, premium.........................372.70
Colonial Life & Accident ..............124.60
SD Retirement System.............5,843.66
Delta Dental ................................752.92
Vision Service Plan .....................154.68
First National Bank,
SS & WH............................12,258.50
The vendor warrants and entity pay-
ments were presented for March 2013:
MONTHLY ENTITY PAYMENTS
Schools
Haakon School Dist #27-1, March 2013
Apportionment ...................88,450.38
Kadoka Area School Dist 35-2, March
2013 Apportionment ............9,351.98
97,802.36
Cities & Towns
City of Philip, March 2013 Apportion-
ment ..................................17,424.62
Town of Midland, March 2013 Appor-
tionment ...............................2,244.90
19,669.52
Water District
West River Water Develop Dist, March
2013 Apportionment ............1,429.34
1,429.34
Fire District
Midland Fire Protection Dist, March
2013 Apportionment ............1,164.13
Milesville Fire District, March 2013 Ap-
portionment ............................286.12
1,450.25
Total Checks ........................120,351.47
OTHER PAYMENTS
State Motor Vehicle
State Treasurer, State Motor Vehicle
(Monthly pymt to State) ......37,518.49
37,518.49
Auditor
SDACC, Registration Fee ..........200.00
200.00
State's Attorney
State Treasurer, Professional
Fees (Monthly blood draws) ......70.00
70.00
Mentally Ill
State Treasurer, Prof Services (Pmt to
Human Services in Yankton) ...552.44
552.44
Road & Bridge
SD Department of Revenue, License
Reassign Fee ...........................20.00
20.00
9-1-1
ESCC, 9-1-1 Winner Contract ....301.68
ESCC, 9-1-1 Winner
Contract ................................2,451.15
2,752.83
Birth & Death Fees
State Treasurer, Birth & Death Fees to
State .......................................670.00
670.00
Modern/Preservation
SDACO, M&P .............................102.00
102.00
Total Checks...........................41,885.76
VENDOR WARRRANTS
Commissioners
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Publishing...433.65
433.65
Auditor
Best Western Ramkota Ìnn,
Travel .....................................141.13
Carla Smith, Travel .......................64.38
Century Business Leasing, Ìnc., Maint -
Copier .....................................172.98
First National Bank, Transfer
Fee............................................10.00
Patricia G Freeman, Travel ..........82.88
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........183.67
Mary J Harrell, Salary .................188.79
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Supplies ......84.92
SDACO, Travel ...........................240.00
1,168.75
Treasurer
Century Business Leasing, Ìnc.,
Supplies ...................................95.50
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............72.49
SDACO Travel ............................240.00
407.99
State's Attorney
Philip Health Services, Professional
Fees .........................................70.00
Tollefson Law Office, Office
Rent.........................................150.00
Tollefson Law Office, Tele..............75.00
Tollefson Law Office, Misc/Postage/
Etc ............................................46.00
341.00
Courthouse
City of Philip, Utilities ....................71.00
Coyle's SuperValu, Supplies ........37.07
Office of Fire Marshal, Professional
Fees .........................................60.00
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies ........220.63
Kone Ìnc, Professional Fees ......230.03
Servall Uniform, Supplies ...........186.72
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........72.50
West Central Electric, Utilities ....992.60
1,870.55
Director of Equalization
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........132.30
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Publishing...144.76
Reliable Office Supplies,
Supplies ....................................41.45
Toni Rhodes, Supplies ...................8.29
Stamp Fulfillment Services,
Supplies .................................277.20
604.00
Register of Deeds
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............99.82
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies ...................................76.15
Microfilm Ìmaging Systems Ìnc,
Professional Fees ..................200.00
SDACO, Travel ...........................240.00
615.97
Veterans Service
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............41.58
41.58
Sheriff
AT&T Mobility, Utilities.................. 85.23
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....133.35
LexisNexis Matthew Bender,
Supplies .................................105.18
MG Oil Company, Repairs & Maint .4.34
MG Oil Company, Fuel ...............190.21
Morrison's Pit Stop, Fuel ............208.28
Sirchie Fingerprint Lab,
Supplies ..................................210.94
937.53
Jail
Winner Police Department, Jail
Expenses ............................3,233.40
3,233.40
Support of Poor
Comm Health Center of The BH, Prof
Services .................................100.75
Philip Health Services, Prof
Services .................................262.80
Wall Drug Store. Prof Services....170.75
534.30
Health Nurse
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Supplies ......39.40
39.40
Library
Junior Library Guild, Supplies ....171.00
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Supplies ......36.00
207.00
Extension Service
Carrie Weller, Travel ...................144.70
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............54.76
Reliable Office Supplies,
Supplies ....................................29.99
229.45
Weed Control
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Publishing ....37.69
Assn of SD Co W & P, Board Annual
Dues & Membership Fees ......150.00
187.69
Road & Bridge
3-D Specialties Ìnc, Supplies ......277.43
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................47.32
Black Hills Occupational Medic, Prof
Services ...................................48.00
Butler Machinery Co Ìnc,
Supplies ...................................88.32
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel ....4,205.91
D & T Auto Parts, Repairs &
Maint ...................................1,045.13
D & T Auto Parts, Supplies .........804.70
Deadwood Mountain Grand,
Travel ......................................114.00
Ernie's Building Center, Repairs &
Maint .......................................119.61
Ernie's Building Center Supplies...83.55
Farm Plan Corp, Supplies........1,644.20
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Supplies .........309.00
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Fuel ............1,898.56
George's Welding, Repairs &
Maint ........................................35.00
Godfrey Brake Service, Supplies ..87.50
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....251.58
Hoag Diesel Service, Repairs &
Maint ......................................422.48
Ìngram Hardware, Repairs &
Maint ........................................21.37
Kennedy Ìmplement & Auto Co,
Repairs & Maint ..........................4.17
Kings Ìnn, Hotel Travel ...............100.00
Konst Machine, Repairs &
Maint .......................................617.65
Konst Machine, Supplies...............76.88
Machinery Trader, Publishing......864.00
Town of Midland, Utilities...............22.00
Morrison's Pit Stop, Repairs &
Maint ........................................55.00
Morrison's Pit Stop, Supplies ......508.42
Moses Building Center Ìnc, Repairs
& Maint .......................................8.17
Kenny Neville, Travel .................213.80
Newman Traffic Signs,
Supplies ..................................434.62
Philip Clinic, Prof Services .........105.00
Rockmount Research & Alloys,
Supplies ...................................34.15
Sims Glass, Repairs & Maint .....280.00
True North Steel Dot/Cty Swap
Agreement Exp ...................5,807.00
Twilight First Aid Supply,
Supplies ....................................67.20
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........72.50
West Central Electric, Utilities ....452.24
West River Ìnternational, Repairs &
Maint ......................................863.66
Western Communications Ìnc,
Supplies ..................................211.50
West River Water Develop Dist,
Utilities ......................................62.50
22,364.12
9-1-1
Centurylink, 9-1-1 Phone ............115.10
Golden West Tele Co, 9-1-1
Phone .....................................487.19
602.29
Emergency & Disaster
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....101.74
101.74
Law Library
LexisNexis Matthew Bender, Law
Library ....................................115.47
115.47
Total Checks...........................34,035.88
One warrant concerning court appointed
attorney fees was tabled for more infor-
mation. A motion was made by Commis-
sioner Briggs, seconded by Vice
Chairman Radway with all in agreement
to pay the above warrants.
The next Special Meeting is scheduled
for Tuesday, April 9, 2013, to meet as the
Board of Equalization and then in Special
Session at 1:00 PM in the Commis-
sioner's Room at the courthouse. The
next Regular Meeting date was set for
Tuesday, May 7, 2013, at 1:00 PM in the
Commissioner's Room in the court-
house. The meeting was adjourned at
6:45 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMÌSSÌON
Stephen Clements, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published April 18, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $365.51]
FUEL BÌDS:
Courthouse: None
Highway Dept:
03-22-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.49 No. 2
03-22-13 Cenex...................$3.50 No. 2
03-27-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.65 No. 2
03-27-13 Cenex...................$3.69 No. 2
Good news was reported by Superin-
tendent Neville informing the commission
that the 2013 SWAP DOT/CTY Funds
have been received by the county in the
amount of $197,634.57. This amount will
be added to the current balance of
$100,861.11 which will give a balance of
$298,495.68 in the SWAP DOT/CTY
Fund balance.
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
gave his monthly report to the commis-
sion. He asked the commissioners about
surplusing the conveyer belt. Ìt was
moved back to the shop area. Also
Neville stated that some old bridge tim-
bers were being cleaned up. He is still
looking for a double mower. There is still
cement to be poured on the south side of
the Midland Shop. He will be getting
some quotes so this can get done. The
highway crew are pulling shoulders on
the Tornado Ranch Road and preparing
it for the gravel. The new blades should
be coming in around the middle of May.
While in Pierre for training, research was
done on the road up by R. Lee Smith's.
Ìt is not a private road and is still on the
county public system. The only way the
road can be vacated is to go through the
proper channels. The commissioners
would have to agree to vacate the road.
This road leads to the Army Corps of En-
gineers land which allows hunting and
this road provides the only access. The
road needs to be posted as a minimum
maintained road. The county is not re-
sponsible for maintaining the road.
Neville has gotten maps from the State
showing where the road goes and it is a
dead end.
The Lone Tree Road was discussed and
SWAP funds will be used to fix this road.
Superintendent Neville will be getting
bids for the repairs. The road past Agnes
Hariede's place, is a minimum main-
tained road and there are concerns
about access through there for fire, etc.
Neville said he would take a look at the
area before making any decisions.
Superintendent Neville discussed the
problem of blow dirt and how it should be
handled. Ìt was suggested that an ad
should be put in the paper, informing
those that had the problem, what the
South Dakota Codified Laws stated.
More discussion on this topic would be
held at a later date. The following two
codified laws were presented to the com-
mission.
SDCL 38-8A-22 Dust blowing and soil
erosion ÷ Owner or operator to prevent.
The owner or operator of real property in
this state shall prevent dust blowing and
soil erosion, as nearly as can be done,
by practices which will prevent or mini-
mize blowing dust and erosion of the soil.
Ìf dust blowing is evident, such practices
shall include, to the extent practicable,
leaving stubble residue on top of the soil.
SDCL 31-12-44 Repairs for wind and
water erosion assessed to private
landowner. Ìf any landowner fails to pre-
vent damage to the county's highway
system caused by severe and persistent
wind or water erosion on the landowner's
property, the county may repair the dam-
age and assess the cost of the repairs
against the landowner. Ìf the landowner
fails to pay the cost of the repairs before
the first day of November in the year in
which the repairs are performed, the cost
shall be assessed against the
landowner's property.
Sheriff Fred Koester gave his monthly re-
port to the commission. He stated that
the deputy was doing well at the acad-
emy but was looking forward to getting
home. He will be done on May 31, 2013.
Haakon County weed supervisor Virgil
Smith gave his quarterly report. Penning-
ton County put in for a Competitive Grant
which included Haakon County, for salt
cedar. Hopefully this will cover it all. Ìf
not, Smith will put in for a Competitive
Grant also. Smith asked if there were any
noxious weeds the commission would
like to add to the list. This is about the
time all the chemical is ordered. Ìt was
asked if they preferred to purchase it lo-
cally or go for the best price wherever or
should he bid it. The commission felt that
it should be purchased locally. Smith also
stated that the four-wheeler needed
some repairs before spraying season
began.
CHN Heidi Burns requested permission
to drop an Ìnternet access line down into
Nancy's office so that when the dietitian
comes to their office, she will be able to
use it. She also informed the commission
that CHN/WÌC Administrative Assistant
Kristin Martin would be going to training
next week and the office would be
closed. A motion was made by Commis-
sioner Konst and seconded by Vice
Chairman Radway with all in agreement
to allow the installation of the new com-
puter line.
Librarian Annie Brunskill informed the
commissioners that she had completed
the end of the year reports for the Philip
Library and the Midland Library. These
are very detailed reports and need to be
signed by the commission. The report
also helps make them eligible for grants.
Register of Deeds Traci Radway pro-
vided a written quarterly report for the
commission. She requested to surplus a
2002 Gateway E-400 Tower and E-V700
monitor originally used for state vital
records. Commissioner Briggs made a
motion to surplus these items and Vice
Chairman Radway seconded the motion.
Motion carried.
Auditor Patricia Freeman informed the
commission that cash needed to be
transferred into the 9-1-1 Fund. These
funds had been set aside in the 2013
budget. Commissioner Konst made the
motion to transfer $21,000 cash from the
(101) General Fund into the (207) 9-1-1
Surcharge Fund. Commissioner Snook
seconded with all in agreement.
Director of Equalization Toni Rhodes
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursday, April 18, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
WANTED: Sunncr ¡asiurc for
40-500 cow-calf ¡airs. PIonc
859-2889. P17-7ic
WANTED: Sunncr ¡asiurc for
50 io 150 Icad of cows. Call
Sicvc Pclron, 544-3202.
P12-ifn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED:
Looling io rcni ¡asiurc or con-
¡lcic rancI, sIori icrn or long
icrn. Also looling for Iay
ground. CasI, lcasc or sIarcs.
Call 798-2116 or 798-2002.
P10-ifn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED
for 40 io 200 ¡airs wiiIin 80
nilcs of PIili¡ or can lcasc wIolc
rancI. 685-9313 (ccll} or 859-
2059 (Ionc}. P7-ifn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-¡ly, 235/85/16F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIo¡, 859-
2744, PIili¡. P40-ifn
GARAGE SALES
RECKLING, SCHOFIELD &
FIT2GERALD MULTI-FAMILY
RUMMAGE SALE: Friday, A¡ril
26, 3 ¡.n. io 7 ¡.n., PIili¡ Firc
Hall. Cirls' cloiIcs, infani io sizc
7; loys' cloiIcs, 6 noniIs io sizc
8; woncn's cloiIcs, XL-2XL;
Craco car scai/sirollcr conlo;
Craco duo glidcr doullc sirollcr;
lid sizcd fooslall/ nulii-ganc
iallc; ioys; girls' drcss-u¡
cloiIcs/cusioncs. Lois of grcai
iicns in c×ccllcni condiiion.
P19-2ic
HELP WANTED
DAKOTA MILL & GRAIN, INC.
is looling for a full-iinc ¡crson
io add io our ican ai Wall. Jol
rcs¡onsililiiics includc irucl
driving (Class A CDL a ¡lus or
willing io oliain onc}, Iay grind-
ing, warcIousc loading/ unload-
ing, fcriilizcr s¡rcading, grain
o¡craiions, and various oiIcr
iasls io ialc carc of our cus-
ioncrs. Wagc DOE. Dcncfiis in-
cludcd. EOE. Call 279-2261 or
279-2255, Wall. PW18-2ic
HELP WANTED: Full iinc ¡osi-
iion availallc. Lurz Plunling,
685-3801 or 859-2204, PIili¡.
PF32-ifn
MANAGER NEEDED for lusy
rciail siorc in Wall, SD. Musi
Iavc salcs cסcricncc as wcll as
su¡crvisor cסcricncc. Salary
¡lus connission dc¡cnding on
cסcricncc. Call Jaclic, 348-
8108 or fa× rcsunc, 348-1524;
cnail jw¸lIgolddiggcrs.con
PF32-3i¡
LOOKING FOR HELP in iIc
HV/AC ficld. Musi lc sclf-noii-
vaicd wiiI a good worl ciIic.
Also, cncrgciic wiiI iIc dcsirc io
lcarn. If inicrcsicd, call Drian
Hanson, 441-6543. PF31-ifn
SUBWAY IN WALL is accc¡iing
a¡¡licaiions for full and ¡ari-
iinc ¡osiiions, scasonal and
ycar-round. O¡¡oriuniiics for
advanccncni io nanagcncni
¡osiiions for iIc rigIi a¡¡licani.
Picl u¡ a¡¡licaiion ai Sulway.
WP31-ifn
POSITION OPEN: Jaclson
Couniy is accc¡iing a¡¡licaiions
for full iinc Dirccior of Equaliza-
iion. Sclccicd a¡¡licani nusi
lcconc ccriificd as ¡cr SDCL.
Musi worl wcll wiiI iIc ¡ullic,
and Iavc clcrical and con¡uicr
slills. Jaclson Couniy lcncfiis
includc IcaliI insurancc, lifc in-
surancc, S.D. Fciircncni, ¡aid
Iolidays, vacaiion and sicl
lcavc. Salary ncgoiiallc. Posiiion
o¡cn uniil fillcd. A¡¡licaiions
arc availallc ai iIc Jaclson
Couniy Audiior's officc or scnd
rcsunc io Jaclson Couniy, PO
Do× 280, Kadola, SD 57543. PI.
605-837-2422.
K15-5ic
HELP WANTED: Scrvicc Advisor
¡osiiion o¡cn ai PIili¡ Moior.
Plcasc call Craig ai 685-3435 for
dciails. PF28-ifn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: DuicIcr ¡igs. Call
Tin Quinn, 544-3273.
PF33-2ic
FOR SALE: Fo¡c Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ro¡c, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
NOTICESJWANTED
NOTICE: Will iIc ¡crson wIo rc-
novcd iIc SD card fron ny
ganc cancra ¡lcasc dclcic iIc
¡Ioios of you and rciurn iIc
card io. Fayc Dryan, Wasia.
WP34-1i¡
WANTED: Casi iron cools and
lccr/winc iasicrs for iIc 1si An-
nual Fclay For Lifc Cool-off on
A¡ril 27iI ai iIc Wall Colf
Coursc. Coniaci Cindy, 685-
3767 or Kclly, 515-0244.
WP19-2ic
ANYONE INTERESTED in Iav-
ing a runnagc salc in PIili¡'s
Ciiywidc Funnagc Salc on
Junc 8iI nusi ¡lcasc coniaci
Driiincy or Sclna (lriiincy¸¡io-
nccr-rcvicw.con or sclna¸¡io-
nccr-rcvicw.con} ly May 10iI.
P18-ifn
WANTED TO BUY: Old farn
nacIincry and cars for crusI-
ing. 433-5443. PF32-4i¡
REAL ESTATE
2012 MOBILE HOME FOR
SALE: 16'×80', 3 lcdroons, 2
laiIs, lois of u¡gradcs, nusi
scc io a¡¡rcciaicd. Locaicd in
Kinlall. Call 685-3748 or 685-
3755. PW19-4ic
TWO STORY HOUSE FOR
SALE IN WALL: Asling
$32,500. Will considcr any rca-
sonallc offcr. Plcasc call 279-
2858. WP32-4ic
HOME FOR SALE: 317 6iI
Avc., Wall. 2100 sq. fi., 3 lcd-
roons, (1} full laiI, (1} 3/4
laiI, and (1} Ialf laiI, ncwcr
ncial roof, windows, siding and
30×30 garagc. $105,000 or offcr.
307-660-6595. PW17-3ic
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
2 lcdroons, downiown, fcnccd
yard. Malc an offcr. Call 859-
3095 or 859-2483. P10-ifn
RENTALS
FOR RENT IN PHILIP: 2-3 lcd-
roon Iousc. Ton Folcy, 859-
2975 or 685-8856. P19-2ic
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: S¡acious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or sio¡ in iIc lolly and
¡icl u¡ an a¡¡licaiion. Caicway
A¡arincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc accc¡i
rcs¡onsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc ¡aid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi ¡aid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is ¡laccd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
TIunI ¸ou to n¸ cIííd¡cn ¡o¡
tIc o¡cn Iousc ¡o¡ n¸ Ií¡tIdu¸.
TIunIs ¡o¡ uíí n¸ uondc¡¡uí
¡¡ícnds uIo cunc to sIu¡c n¸
du¸ ÷ ít uus uondc¡¡uí sccíng
¸ou uíí.
TIunI ¸ou ¡o¡ cu¡ds, ¡íouc¡s
und gí¡ts.
TIcínu Hcítzcí
TIunI ¸ou to cuc¡¸onc uIo
Ius Iccn u ¡u¡t o¡ tIc ¡ccouc¡¸ o¡
n¸ ¡cccnt Icu¡t uducntu¡cs. Fou¡
stínts íutc¡ und 2U du¸s ín tIc
Ios¡ítuí, I un good to go, I Io¡c.
TIunI ¸ou to tIc docto¡s,
nu¡scs, unIuíuncc c¡cus, o¡
Mídíund und o¡ PIííí¡ und uíí
uIo Icí¡cd ín un¸ uu¸. I uunt to
su¸ u s¡ccíuí tIunI ¸ou to ou¡
sons und tIcí¡ ¡unííícs.
TIunI ¸ou to cuc¡¸onc ¡o¡ uíí
tIc cu¡ds ¸ou scnt, ¡o¡ uíí tIc
cuíís ¸ou nudc, uíí uIo cunc to
uísít und uíí tIc ¡¡u¸c¡s. TIunIs
to tIc Hud Híuc¡ HucIu¡oos ¡o¡
tIc ¡ood ¸ou íc¡t ut ou¡ Iousc und
to Luní ¡o¡ tIc uondc¡¡uí cínnu-
non Hoíís . und tIosc uIo scnt
Iuííoons und ¡íouc¡s.
Vc ííuc ín u uondc¡¡uí connu-
nít¸. TIunI ¸ou.
Duuc Hund
TIunI ¸ou to cuc¡¸onc uIo
scnt cu¡ds, guuc gí¡ts ¡o¡ n¸ ?UtI
Ií¡tIdu¸. A s¡ccíuí °tIunI ¸ou¨
to n¸ ¡uníí¸ ¡o¡ tIc cu¡¡¸-ín su¡-
¡c¡ ¡o¡ us. You u¡c tIc g¡cutcst.
TIunI ¸ou, Ho¸, ¡o¡ nuIíng ít u
s¡ccíuí °?UtI¨ Ií¡tIdu¸ uítI tIc
cu¡d sIouc¡ ¸ou Iud donc.
It uus u g¡cut °?UtI¨ Icu¡íng
¡¡on so nun¸ o¡ ¸ou. TIunI ¸ou!
Cu¡oí Hunt
TIc PHS D¡unu ucto¡s und dí-
¡ccto¡ uouíd ííIc to tIunI ou¡ uu-
dícncc ncnIc¡s ¡o¡ un
outstundíng uttcnduncc to IotI
o¡ ou¡ ¡c¡¡o¡nunccs on A¡¡íí ll
und l2. Vc u¡¡¡ccíutc tIc con-
nunít¸ su¡¡o¡t und íooI ¡o¡uu¡d
to cntc¡tuíníng ¸ou ncxt ¸cu¡!
* * * *
TIunI ¸ou to PIííí¡ HcuítI
Sc¡uíccs ¡o¡ s¡onso¡íng tIc coío¡-
íng contcst und ¡o¡ tIc scootc¡
und Icínct I uon us u ¡csuít.
Puígc O`Conno¡, ugc 4
TIunI ¸ou to cuc¡¸onc uIo
scnt cu¡ds, sto¡¡cd I¸ o¡ cuíícd
¡o¡ n¸ SUtI Ií¡tIdu¸. It uus
g¡cut to Icu¡ ¡¡on uíí o¡ ¸ou.
Yuonnc Fc¡guson
TIunI ¸ou to tIc PIííí¡ A¡cu
IígI scIooí u¡cstíc¡s und
coucIcs ¡o¡ tIc g¡cut 2Ul2-2UlJ
scuson. Píucíng sccond ut tIc SD
Stutc H u¡cstííng tou¡nuncnt ís
no cus¸ ¡cut. So, cong¡uts Iíg
tínc!
Aíso, tIunIs to tIc u¡cstíc¡s,
coucIcs und ¡u¡cnts ¡o¡ ¸ou¡
consídc¡utíon und ¡o¡ ¡uttíng u¡
uítI nc IcIínd tIc uídco cun-
c¡u.
DuIc Vcstc¡Ic¡g
4455.
SMAFT SALES AND LEASE
sccls loollcc¡cr. Worl fron
Ionc. Hourly wagc lascd on c×-
¡cricncc. M-F 8-4, Dcgrcc/
nanagcncni cסcricncc a ¡lus.
Fcsunc, qucsiions. carccrs¸
snarisalcsandlcasc.con.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rc¡rcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.} Call
iIis ncws¡a¡cr or 800-658-
3697 for dciails.
SEAFCH STATE-WIDE APAFT-
MENT Lisiings, soricd ly rcni,
locaiion and oiIcr o¡iions.
www. sdIousi ngscarcI. con
SouiI Daloia Housing Dcvclo¡-
ncni AuiIoriiy.
REAL ESTATE
LAFAMIE FIVEF FANCH Lin-
iicd Parccls Lcfi! 35 acrc
rancIcs, Fron $695 ¡cr acrc.
Magnificcni Waicr and Moun-
iain Vicws. Low Down ÷ Cuaran-
iccd Financing. CALL TODAY! 1
- 888-411-7050. www.FancI-
LandWyoning.con.
VACATIONS
DLACK HILLS VACATIONS. Mys-
icry Mouniain Fcsori ÷ Calins,
TV siics & Can¡ing in iIc Pincs.
Visii. www.llaclIillsrcsoris.con
& www.facclool. con/nysicry-
nouniain or 800-658-2267.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
S3' TRAILER FOR SALE: E×ccl-
lcni sioragc irailcr or ovcr-iIc-
road irailcr, $3,950 FIFM. Call
279-2619. PW19-2ic
FOR SALE: 2004 Ford F-250
E×i. Cal, sIori lo×, Su¡cr Duiy,
4×4, XLT, loadcd, ncarly ncw 10-
¡ly iircs, iowing ¡lg., 98K nilcs,
c×ccllcni sIa¡c, undcr lool.
$11,900. 209-8639. PF32-ifn
FOR SALE: 2004 CIcvrolci
2500 HD, 4×4, LS, crcw cal,
sIori lo×, Durana× dicscl, Alli-
son, auio, rcd, gray cloiI inic-
rior, running loards, lo× nai,
Iidcaway gooscnccl lall,
58,900 nilcs, c×ccllcni, onc
owncr. 462-6138. P16-3ic
FOR SALE: 2000 CMC Yulon,
SLT, 4×4, fully loadcd, 102,800
nilcs, vcry nicc, scais 7. $7,500
ODO. 433-5342. P17-2ic
FOR SALE: 2004 Poniiac Crand
Pri× CT, gray wiiI gray inicrior,
107,300 nilcs, lools and runs
grcai. $7,000 is iIc asling ¡ricc,
lui I will considcr rcasonallc of-
fcrs. Call KciiI ai 454-3426 or
859-2039 for infornaiion or any
qucsiions. PF22-ifn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Eסcdi-
iion XLT 4×4, cloiI scais, ¡owcr
windows, locls & scais, good
iircs. Call 685-8155. PF10-ifn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O'CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Focl, Sand,
Cravcl (scrccncd or crusIcd}. Wc
can dclivcr. Dans, dugouis,
luilding siics. Our 37iI ycar.
Clcnn or Tracc, 859-2020.
PF11-ifn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iy¡cs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
u¡s, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52i¡
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iy¡cs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׸gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
WANTED: Pasiurc for 50 Icad of
ycarlings and 50-250 Icad of
cow/calf ¡airs. Call 685-8825.
PF34-2ic
PUREBRED BLACK ANGUS
BULLS FOR SALE: Privaic
Trcaiy. Dloodlincs includc In
Focus, Dando, Dlacl Coai,
Fronilinc, Fasi Moncy. Sonc
suiiallc for Icifcrs. Noi ovcrfcd.
Call Milc Harris, norning, ai
685-1053. P19-ifn
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN, ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
AUCTIONS
HANSEN PLUMDINC INC. &
Kirl Hanscn Esiaic, Saiurday,
A¡ril 27, 10.30CST, Cciiyslurg.
Dircciional Dorcr, VcIiclcs,
Trailcrs, Tools & Equi¡ncni.
For ¡iciurcs and full lisiing
www.¡cnrodauciion. con
FicIard D. Pcnrod Fcal Esiaic &
Auciion. 1-800-456-0741.
FAFMLAND AUCTION - 285
Acrcs, Sclly SD. sclling in 2
iracis. Saiurday A¡ril 20, 10
AM. Walz Esiaic, Sicvc Sinon
(agcni for scllcr} 605-380-8506.
www.sdauciions.con.
EMPLOYMENT
HOUSINC & NICHT MOTEL
Clcrl in Siurgis, SD. Non-snol-
ing/drinling & non-¡ci, 1-lcd-
roon a¡arincni fully furnisIcd
wiiI uiiliiics during o¡cn sca-
son. $650/noniI for closcd sca-
son. Enail www.
siar-liic¸siar-liicnoicl.con for
a¡¡licaiion.
STATES ATTOFNEY FOF
HugIcs Couniy, full iinc. O¡-
¡oriuniiy for organizcd, innova-
iivc, dcdicaicd, and sclf
noiivaicd aiiorncy io guidc
couniy Siaics Aiiorncy cfforis.
TIis is an a¡¡oinincni io an
clccicd ¡osiiion wiiI su¡crvisory
rcs¡onsililiiy. Salary fron
$68,400/yr DOQ. Coniaci your
local Dc¡i of Lalor or Karla
Piclard, 605-773-7477, HugIcs
Couniy CouriIousc. O¡cn uniil
fillcd. EOE.
CUSTEF FECIONAL HOSPITAL
Ias an c×ciiing full iinc o¡¡or-
iuniiy io worl wiiI a su¡¡oriivc
ican of ¡rofcssional iIcra¡isis
in iIc lcauiiful souiIcrn Dlacl
Hills of SD. Wc arc locaicd jusi a
sIori disiancc fron Mouni
FusInorc, Wind Cavc Naiional
Parl, Cusicr Siaic Parl, Jcwcl
Cavc Naiional Parl and nany
oiIcr ouidoor aiiraciions. Con-
¡ciiiivc salary and lcncfiis
availallc including sign on
lonus. Plcasc coniaci Jin Si-
nons, FcIal Scrviccs Dirccior,
ai 605-673-2229 c×i. 301or jsi-
nons¸rcgionalIcaliI. con for
norc infornaiion or go io
www.rcgionalIcaliI.con io
a¡¡ly. EOE.
WANTED. ELECTFICIAN wiiI
SouiI Daloia coniracior liccnsc
or aliliiy io gci coniracior li-
ccnsc. Fcs¡onsillc for siariu¡
and nanaging wiring dc¡ari-
ncni in noriI ccniral SouiI
Daloia. Dcncfii ¡aclagc, wagcs
ncgoiiallc. Call 605-426-6891
for norc dciails.
LAKE PFESTON SCHOOL Dis-
irici, PE-HcaliI-TccInology in-
sirucior, wiiI or wiiIoui
coacIing, o¡cncd 4-9-13, closcs
4-26-13, Coniaci. Tin Cas¡cr,
Su¡i, Lalc Prcsion ScIool Dis-
irici, 300 1si Si. NE.
iin.cas¡cr¸l12.sd.us, 605-847-
4455.
LAKE PFESTON SCHOOL Dis-
irici, Ag Ed insirucior, wiiI or
wiiIoui coacIing, o¡cncd 4-9-
13, closcs 4-26-13, Coniaci. Tin
Cas¡cr, Su¡i, Lalc Prcsion
ScIool Disirici, 300 1si Si. NE.
iin.cas¡cr¸l12.sd.us, 605-847-
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
Pioneer Review
CIassifieds
$6.50/week
. up to 20 words;
10¢ per word there-
after. FiII out the
form beIow & maiI
your cIassified and
payment to:
The Profit
PO Box 788
PhiIip, SD 57567
1) ________________
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19) _______________
20) _______________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
0IassItIed
AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nin-
inun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu, tIc P¡o¡ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou¡unt, as wcll
as on our wclsiic. www.¡ionccr-
rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns,
Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun
for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr word
iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial
nusi lc counicd sc¡araicly. In-
cludcd in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and
tIc P¡o¡ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc
and iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Pío-
ncc¡ Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for
loollcc¡ing and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 ¡cr
colunn incI, includcd in iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít.
$5.55 ¡cr colunn incI for iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic ad-
vcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr is suljcci io iIc
Fcdcral Fair Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI
nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany ¡rcfcrcncc,
or discrininaiion on racc, color, rcligion,
sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io
nalc any sucI ¡rcfcrcncc, liniiaiion, or
discrininaiion."
TIis ncws¡a¡cr will noi lnowingly accc¡i
any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a vi-
olaiion of iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd
iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a-
¡cr arc availallc on an cqual o¡¡oriuniiy
lasis.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups) Apartments
carpeted throughout, appliances
furnished, laundry facilities available.
SENECHAL APARTMENTS:
1 Bdr. This is Elderly 62+,
Disabled and Handicap Housing
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
VelroP|a|rs
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
metrop|a|ns
management.
com
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Ior ull yoor
concrete
constroction
needs:
CONCRITI
CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo
Philip, SÐ
Double J Horse Sales
All Breeds
Consignment Sale
Saturday, May 11, 2013
Stockmen’s Livestock
Exchange
Dickinson, ND
Ranch Horse Competition
7 am MDT
Sale 12 noon MDT
For a catalog or more info call
or log on:
Joe (701) 230-3044
John (701) 720-6674
www.doublejhorsesales.com
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE,
FEATUFINC DANCS VACCINATED FEPLACEMENT
HEIFEFS, DFED CATTLE & PAIF SALE & FOFTUNE'S
FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE .
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FORTUNE'S RAFTER U CROSS
ANGUS: 12 P.M. (MT} FEEDER CATTLE, BRED CATTLE &
PAIRS TO FOLLOW. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. EXPECTINC
3000 HEAD.
FEEDER CATTLE.FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL
NATUFAL, ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
PARSONS - 215 FANCY DWF & A FEW FWF F1 DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................800-900=
260 FANCY DWF & A FEW FWF STFS; FS,NI ..............850-950=
45 DWF & FWF HFFS; FS,NI .......................................750-850=
PORCH & PORCH - 250 FANCY HOME FAISED DLK ANC DV
FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ...................................................650-750=
KENNEDY'S H&S PART - 150 FANCY HOME FAISED DLK ANC
STFS; ALL NATUFAL,FS,NI..........................................600-650=
WILCOX & WILCOX - 100 DLK ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI700=
CONRY - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .............................650=
JOHNSTON - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..............550-600=
RADWAY - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ...................650-700=
STOUT - 75 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S
FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS} .................................................700=
MORTENSON RANCH - 75 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................700-750=
PARSONS - 70 DLK ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..........800-900=
NELSON - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,FFEEZE DFANDED
(SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS} ............700=
STOUT - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S
FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS} .................................................700=
CARLEY - 60 DLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................550-600=
MADSEN RANCH - 60 DLK & FED MOSTLY DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................600-650=
WILCOX - 50 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ......................................575-600=
GABRIEL & GABRIEL - 41 DLK MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI ...500-550=
LARSON FAMILY PART - 40 FANCY HOME FAISED DV FEPLC.
HFFS; FS,NI .......................................................................800=
MCDANIEL - 40 DLK STFS; FS,NI...................................700-800=
REEVES & REEVES - 40 DLK STFS; FS,NI............................550=
PAULSEN & PAULSEN - 35 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI......650=
MCDANIEL - 25 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .......................700=
HERBER - 25 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI ..........................550-600=
PERAULT RANCH - 25 MIXED X CLVS; FS,NI ................500-600=
JASPERS - 23 DLK STFS & HFFS; FS,NI ...............................600=
BISHOP - 20 DLK STFS; FS,NI........................................575-600=
CROWSER - 18 DLK CLVS; FS...............................................400=
BRENNAN - 15 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI.........................600=
EISENBRAUN - 9 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..............550-600=
PAIRS:
CAP RANCH - 100 DLK FIFST CALF HFFS PAIFS
JEFF NELSON - 40 DLK FIFST CALF HFF PAIFS; ALL SIFED DY
FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS; FFEEZE DFANDED &
FANCY
REUBEN VOLLMER - 17 DLK 4 TO 8 YF OLD COWS W/DLK
DULL CLVS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, DFED CATTLE &
PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS
ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MAY 21: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: APR1L Jt, 2DJS
A b1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups on o verg s1rong morKe1. L1gÞ1er run o]
]eeders, morKe1 uneven. A1so Þod CÞegenne CÞoro1o1s Bu11
So1e, o Horse So1e, & 1Þe PÞ111p FFA & FCCLA Peop1e Auo11on.
B1g so1e ne×1 ueeK se111ng Js1 oo1] Þe1]er po1rs, SDDD+ ]eeders
& For1une´s Ro]1er U Cross Bu11 So1e.
FEEDER CATTLE:
CARL BAUMAN - KADOKA
49 .....................................................CHAF HFFS 605=.................$143.00
WILLERT RANCH INC - BELVIDERE
16...........................................CHAF & FED HFFS 608=.................$141.50
13.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 624=.................$138.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST - HOWES
13 .............................................DLK & DWF STFS 600=.................$154.00
ROD KIRK - CODY, NE
23 .............................................DLK & DWF STFS 641=.................$155.00
75.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 712=.................$131.25
72.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 714=.................$128.75
45.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 650=.................$131.25
MCPHERSON ANGUS - STURGIS
29 .......................................................DLK HFFS 500=.................$151.25
9 ...............................................DLK & DWF STFS 674=.................$136.50
19........................................................DLK STFS 720=.................$131.00
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
6..........................................................DLK STFS 529=.................$168.00
8................................................FED & DLK STFS 681=.................$144.00
DILLON & JEREMIAH WHITCHER-RAPID CITY
30 .......................................................DLK HFFS 645=.................$133.25
FITCH FARMS - PHILIP
131...........................................DLK & DWF HFFS 803=.................$123.10
78.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 729=.................$126.50
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
57........................................................DLK STFS 1025=...............$120.50
67........................................................DLK STFS 960=.................$121.75
HAROLD FROMM - RAPID CITY
25..............................................FED & DLK STFS 648...................$144.25
13..............................................FED & DLK STFS 515...................$152.00
CHEYENNE CHAROLAIS - WASTA
DULLS AVC. ....................................................................................$3066.00
BRED CATTLE:
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
13......................FED & FWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1532= ............$1,450.00
11..................FED SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1550= ............$1,280.00
WEIGH-UPS:
RON TWISS - INTERIOR
1..........................................................FED COW 1510=.................$88.00
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
11......................................................DLK HFFTS 851=.................$114.00
MARLIN MAUDE - HERMOSA
1..........................................................FED COW 1440=.................$87.50
2 ........................................................FED COWS 1338=.................$83.50
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1288=.................$83.00
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
3 ........................................................FED COWS 1203=.................$90.00
6 ........................................................FED COWS 1483=.................$81.50
2 ........................................................FED COWS 1708=.................$80.00
A CONSIGNMENT
1..........................................................DLK DULL 2160=...............$108.50
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1575=.................$86.00
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1540=.................$85.00
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1945=...............$102.50
1..........................................................FED COW 1650=.................$84.00
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1535=.................$83.50
BERNARD HERBER - KADOKA
8 .............................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 899=.................$110.00
LANDON STOUT - KADOKA
1 ........................................................CHAF COW 1630=.................$86.00
CLIFF POSS - PHILIP
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1425=.................$86.50
FINN FARMS - MIDLAND
1 .........................................................FED DULL 2390=...............$106.00
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
1..........................................................DWF COW 1390=.................$84.00
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1305=.................$81.50
TINA HUDSON - WHITE OWL
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1360=.................$84.00
1..........................................................DWF COW 1350=.................$83.50
1....................................................DLK COWETTE 1065=.................$88.00
LARRY LABRIER - MURDO
4........................................................DLK HFFTS 913=.................$109.00
JAMES ROCK - LONG VALLEY
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1495=.................$83.50
1..........................................................DWF COW 1340=.................$80.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1285=.................$83.25
BRANDON ROCK - LONG VALLEY
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1565=.................$83.00
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 845=.................$107.00
2 ..................................................DLK COWETTES 1013=...............$100.50
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1640=.................$82.00
MIKE NELSON - PHILIP
1..........................................................FED COW 1530=.................$82.00
CREW CATTLE CO - PHILIP
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1365=.................$82.00
RON DOUD - MIDLAND
1..........................................................FED COW 1130=.................$82.00
1..........................................................DWF COW 1385=.................$80.50
1..........................................................DWF COW 1310=.................$78.50
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
4.......................................................HEFF COWS 1360=.................$81.75
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
1..........................................................DWF COW 1485=.................$81.50
BARBARA NARO2ONICK - OLYMPIA, WA
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1460=.................$81.00
PETE REINERT - HOWES
1..........................................................DWF COW 1185=.................$81.00
1.........................................................DWF HFFT 1050=.................$96.00
JIM JOHNSON - QUINN
6..............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1398=.................$80.00
JOHN NACHTIGALL - OWANKA
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1353=.................$80.00
DENNIS HALL - ENNING
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1315=.................$80.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1430=.................$80.00
7........................................................DLK HFFTS 1005=.................$96.50
1..........................................................DLK DULL 2025=.................$99.50
CASEY KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
4........................................................DLK HFFTS 905=.................$101.00
CASEY DOUD - MIDLAND
1.........................................................FED HFFT 830=.................$101.00
HOSTUTLER RANCHES INC - MIDLAND
2 .......................................................FWF HFFTS 908=.................$100.00
KIETH SMITH - QUINN
2 ..................................................DLK COWETTES 1045=.................$98.00
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
3........................................................DLK HFFTS 1012=.................$98.00
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 1195=.................$89.50
GRADY & BERNICE CREW - PHILIP
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 915=...................$96.00
BERNIE GREGG - FT. PIERRE
2 ..................................................DLK COWETTES 1023=.................$95.00
BRAD & JODY STOUT - KADOKA
2........................................................DLK HFFTS 918=...................$95.00
DALE JARMAN - MIDLAND
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 1110=.................$94.00
HAND BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1875=...............$100.00
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1850=.................$97.50
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1990=.................$94.50
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1820=.................$94.00
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
1 .........................................................FED DULL 2145=.................$99.00
Thursday, April 18, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 12
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, April 20 ~
Steak & Shrimp
~ Monday, April 22 ~
Rib
Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, April 16 ~
Ribeye Special
~ Wednesday, April 17 ~
Indian Taco
or Taco Salad
~ Thursday, April 18 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, April 19 ~
Ground Sirloin
Chicken • Shrimp
Hand as well as Cade Reeves also
brought home awards. The 10-11 year
old team took first place in their age
group. Avery Johnson took the ACT
Saturday. Sunday morning, Avery and
other FFA students from Philip trav-
eled to Brookings to attend the State
FFA Convention. Connie said there was
no school Tuesday or Wednesday at
Cheyenne School due to the weather,
and I think the same was true at Deep
Creek School.
Max Jones was in Pierre Friday to
take part in the free lunch put on by
Rocky Tibbs at his feed store. Max is
still dealing with quite a cough, but
after two trips to the doctor and several
medications, he seems to be getting bet-
ter. The weather kept Max and Joyce
home the rest of the week, and Joyce
has enjoyed getting caught up on some
reading.
Russ and Cindy Sinkey have been
watching the snow melt. Cindy works
in the Eagle Butte area, and she got
stuck in the snow one day last week.
Once again, the county maintainer
cleared the road, so travel was easier
the next day. Cindy said one of her co-
workers lives at Trail City, and they re-
ceived 24 inches of snow on top of freez-
ing rain over the past few days!
Mary Briggs worked from home
Tuesday and Wednesday of last week
because of the weather. She went to
Pierre Thursday for work, but the roads
were terrible on the way home due to
blowing snow, so she worked from home
again Friday. It is so nice that she has
the option of working from home – tech-
nology is wonderful! Lee and Mary's
daughter, Keva, works for the postal
service in the Black Hills, and she de-
livered mail every day last week, in
spite of the weather. I guess the old
adage is true – the mail must go
through!
We stayed home through last week's
snowstorm. Our son-in-law, Ross
Tschetter, spent a few days with us,
helping move snow, feed livestock,
check cattle, etc. The roads were closed
between here and his home in Salem, so
he stayed a little longer than he had an-
ticipated. We were thankful for his
help! His wife, (our daughter, Jennifer)
was working in Winner during the
snowstorm. The restaurants there were
closed during the storm, so she and her
team had to get a little creative regard-
ing meals. Fortunately, they made it to
the grocery store before it closed for sev-
eral days, so all was well. Both Jen and
Ross made it back to Salem about the
same time Thursday afternoon. Randy
and I were in Kadoka Saturday to visit
my mother and to be on hand for the
67th anniversary celebration at
Hogen's Hardware. It was wonderful to
see so many friends and relatives! We
delivered a vehicle to Pierre and then
returned home.
This week, I am grateful for the mois-
ture. It seems like the soil has kind of
plumped up over the past few days, and
I hope we continue to receive much
needed rain or snow. The wet, windy
conditions can be a little tough on the
newborn calves, but we just have to
keep a close eye on them. When the
weather warms up and the sun shines,
hopefully the grass will pop!
I hope you will all stay safe during
this next storm. And while you are at it,
take time to do something nice for
someone. Sometimes even a simple
smile can make someone's day!
Moenville
(continued from page 6)
Loren and Rose Kiel went to Rapid
City Monday, April 8, to begin Rose’s
cancer radiation treatments at the can-
cer treatment wing of the Rapid City
Regional Hospital. Knowing the
weather predictions, they went pre-
pared to stay in a motel. They were
stranded two days in the motel without
any treatments because of closure of the
cancer center Tuesday and Wednesday.
She did receive the first two treatments
Thursday and Friday. She has been
scheduled for four treatments per week
for four weeks. The streets and roads
had been cleared by Thursday for them
to check out of the motel and they were
guests of Rose’s nephew and his wife,
Matt and Brenda Pates, at Piedmont
Meadows Thursday night and during
the forenoon Friday. Loren said that
the delay in treatments and extra ex-
pense was well worth the good moisture
we received.
Loren and Rose went to church serv-
ices at First Lutheran Church Sunday,
and stayed in town to conduct the after-
noon worship services at the nursing
home. Even though Easter Sunday is
past, they played some Easter music
with Loren playing first the violin and
then the trombone with Rose accompa-
nying him on the piano. They were
happy to see extra guests attending the
worship. They were Gayle Rush, Kay
Ainslie, and Esther Knutson. There
were eight of the nursing home resi-
dents out for worship. Before going
home, Rose stopped in to see Carrol
Foland at her swing-bed room in the
hospital.
I wonder how many people remem-
ber John Cowen who homesteaded in
township 2N-20E, Sec. 30, 120acres and
40 acres in Sec. 31, 2N-20E, not to far
east of here about three miles and a
half mile across country from our place.
I live in 2-19 Sec. 17. I remember the
first time I saw John was when I was
about 13 or 14 years old and was spend-
ing the summer down here with rela-
tives and my uncle, Netse Carstensen,
took me over there. We pulled up in
front of what looked like a car body
buried in the ground. I was kind of wor-
ried as my uncle got out of the pickup
and yelled and a person came up out of
there. He was sort of humped over and
when he got all the way out and
straightened up, he was a tall raw-
boned man with about a two days
growth of whiskers. They visited for
awhile and then we went back home.
My uncle filled me in about John and
said he was a very honest and good
man.
After I got married and moved down
here, I got to know John a lot better.
Most people who did not know him
would think he was not to well edu-
cated, but when we would go to Nelse
Carstensen’s for a meal, John would at
times be there eating also, as he helped
Nelse a lot and would eat there. Any-
way, he knew all the kids around the
country and what their names were and
the date they were born. It amazed me,
as he knew how old Marvin was and
what the weather was like the day that
he was born.
Through the years, I would meet
John coming or going into town with his
team and lumber wagon with whatever
supplies he went after. At times he
would be sitting on the seat and other
times he would be on his knees driving
his team. He broke his horses and no
mustang was too tough for him to han-
dle. I never did see John ride a horse,
he may have but I never saw him do it.
John liked to eat onions and aunt
Ethel’s apple pie. When I would be
down there, my aunt would have me
peel a big onion and at times I would
say, “This onion is pretty stout.” She
would say, “Never mind, John will eat
it like an apple just the way it is, with
a little salt on it.” When he would be at
Carstensen’s he was very clean and had
good table manners. You would hardly
ever see John laugh, but when he did,
his eyes would twinkle with delight
over a joke or something that happened
that amused him.
John never went to a doctor. He did
his own doctoring for things. He froze
his feet once and uncle Nelse did get
him to go into the doctor. I heard a story
about John getting caught in a blizzard
and he stayed with a bunch of cows in
the blizzard to keep from freezing.
He had a sister who came out to see
him at times and she built a house over
on his homestead for him that he lived
in for several years. As he got older and
needed help, she came and got him and
took him home with her. Mick Mortel-
laro has the place and the last I was
over in that area he was using the old
house to store feed or cake in. That has
been several years ago.
Yes, John was a person that will al-
ways be remembered as the hermit who
lived west of Philip in a dugout and sur-
vived the hardships and the hard win-
ters and droughts that South Dakota
dished out over the years. But of us who
really took the time to know him, know
different. He was not a hermit, he was
a kind and honest man, and was intel-
ligent, like uncle Nelse described him
many years ago when he took me over
with him to visit John. I figured out
that John had to have been about 50
years old the first time I met him.
It seems we have had between 17 to
24 inches of snow, but not able to get
measured due to the high winds and
drifting. Some large drifts plus much on
the level. I have not heard anyone com-
plain as we need all the moisture we
can get. It sure was a nice wet snow.
Sunday, April 14, you can see some
water puddles and there is still a lot of
snow to melt. There seems to be a lot
left on the level ground of the prairie
and fields. It’s a good start anyway. The
forecast has promise of more to come, so
keep praying for moisture everyone. Re-
member there is a reason for everything
even if we don’t understand it right
now.
(continued next week)
Grindstone
(continued from page 5)

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