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Pioneer Review, October 4, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 6
Volume 107
October 4, 2012
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........$8.31
Any Pro..............................$7.51
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.38
Milo .......................................$6.87
Corn.......................................$7.02
Millet...................................$28.75
Sunflower Seeds................$25.50
Midland
Apprecia-
tion Day
9
Football
8
Fridge
Door
12
Volleyball
8
The region of Haakon, Jackson
and eastern Pennington counties
has been selected as one of two in
the state of South Dakota to be a
part of the Stronger Economies To-
gether (SET) program.
A brief meeting about this pro-
gram will be at the beginning of the
Philip Chamber of Commerce
meeting, Monday, October 8, at
7:00 p.m. at The Steakhouse.
The SET program is sponsored
by the United States Department
of Agriculture Rural Development,
in partnership with South Dakota
State University Extension and the
Regional Rural Development Cen-
ters. It is designed to strengthen
the capacity of rural communities
and counties to work together in
developing and implementing re-
gional economic development
plans. Building on the current and
emerging economic strengths of the
region, the group will collaborate to
produce a plan that benefits the en-
tire region.
Ideally, 15 to 20 participants per
county are sought to participate in
this new regional team. Training
and technical assistance will be de-
livered by a core team of Extension
and Rural Development staff, as
well as statewide resource pro-
viders. The October 8 informa-
tional meeting will cover the pro-
gram in detail.
Mary Burnett, Philip, applied for
the grant, and was recently noti-
fied that her grant application had
New economic program October 8
More than 400 members at-
tended the 60th annual meeting of
the Golden West Telecommunica-
tions Cooperative at the Wall Com-
munity Center, Saturday, Septem-
ber 22.
People attending the event voted
in four board members, heard
about the challenges and opportu-
nities facing the cooperative, won
several door prizes and listened to
the Itty Bitty Opry Band.
One newcomer and three incum-
bents were elected to the board of
directors for Golden West his year.
The board members elected were
Rod Renner, Wall, who ran unop-
posed for a four-year term to repre-
sent District II. Lee Briggs, Mid-
land, ran unopposed for a four-year
term to represent District III.
Stewart Marty, Hot Springs, was
elected to a four-year term to rep-
resent District V. He will replace
Harold Wyatt, who did not seek re-
election. Jeff Nielsen, Canistota,
ran unopposed for a four-year term
to represent District IX.
Board President Rod Renner
began the presentations by speak-
ing about the commitment of
Golden West employees and board
members. He summarized Golden
West’s 60 years of service to its
members and thanked Wyatt for
his nearly 25 years of dedication
and service to the cooperative.
Golden West General Manager
Denny Law also recognized Wyatt’s
service and talked about Golden
West building one of the most ro-
bust telecommunications networks
in the state including the introduc-
tion of cable TV and Internet ac-
cess. Law then announced the
availability of faster Internet speed
options for both residential and
business customers. The new
speeds range from 6x1, 15x1, 25x2
to 30x5 and will soon be offered in
designated areas.
Law also addressed how the Fed-
eral Communications Commis-
sion’s regulatory policy changes
will affect rural companies like
Golden West in their ability to plan
to invest in future technology and
infrastructure upgrades. He talked
about how the FCC is mandating
federal guidelines on local service
rates and the resulting penalties if
companies choose not to follow the
guidelines. Law said Golden West
is working to make certain the in-
terests of rural customers are un-
derstood at the FCC. “Now more
than ever before we need to make
the case that our rural communi-
ties deserve to have the same ac-
cess to advance technology as our
urban neighbors,” stated Law.
The Itty Bitty Opry Band of
Rapid City entertained the crowd
with a variety of 1950s songs,
Larry Cohen, Martin, won the $500
grand prize drawing. Next year’s
Golden West annual meeting will
be held on September 28, 2013.
Golden West annual meeting
Golden West
Telecommunica-
tions Co-op mem-
bers elected four
board members at
their annual meet-
ingl. Show above,
from left, are Jeff
Nielsen, Canistota
(District IX), Stew-
art Marty, Hot
Springs (District V),
Rod Renner, Wall
(District II), and Lee
Briggs, Midland
(District III).
At right, retiring
board member
Harold Wyatt, left,
congratulates
Stewart Marty on
winning the elec-
tion for District V.
Courtesy photos
by Del Bartels
During its Monday, October 1,
meeting, the Philip City Council
discussed establishing a rail au-
thority.
Personnel from the Canadian
Pacific Railroad are looking into
historical data on when the trestles
southeast of Philip were filled
under with culverts. Canadian Pa-
cific did not own the line at that
time – the Dakota, Minnesota and
Eastern Railroad did.
Finance Officer Monna Van Lint
pointed out that Dakota Mill and
Grain does not quite understand
how the railroad trestle, and possi-
ble flooding backflow because of it,
is Dakota Mill and Grain’s prob-
lem. The proposed expansion of the
company site in Philip would be a
boon to the local economy. For legal
purposes, a rail authority is re-
quired in overseeing the altering of
any railroad line, especially the ad-
dition of a new siding in city limits.
The original Haakon County Re-
gional Railroad Authority has been
inactive for years. It was made up
of Midland and Haakon County
representatives. The authority cre-
ated in 2002 that included Philip
was never filed with the state, thus
does not currently legally exist.
The city council wondered if the
county should initiate the creation
of a new, active rail authority.
Van Lint suggested holding a
public meeting where all concerned
parties could voice their opinions.
The Dakota Mill and Grain expan-
sion is one issue. The railroad sid-
ing is another issue. Van Lint be-
lieves that there is a large, though
somewhat silent, group that is wor-
ried about damages from any fu-
ture flooding. None-the-less, all
these issues are connected. She be-
lieves that there is a solution that
works for everybody; it just has to
be found.
In regular business, the council
approved the payment of the
monthly salaries and bills, which
totaled $129,592,99. The council
approved the second reading of Or-
dinance #2012-16, 2013 Appropria-
tions. Also approved is an adden-
dum to the engineering agreement
with Schmucker, Paul, Nohr and
Associates for the bidding/negotia-
tion and construction phase of the
Wood/Walden Ave. Project. The of-
ficial closing date for the SRF San-
itary Sewer Loan is October 9, and
the mayor’s signature has been au-
thorized on the loan documents.
Building permits have been ap-
proved for Dakota Mill and Grain
to do tree removal and the demoli-
tion of a house and quonset. Burjes
and Cheryl Fitch will be putting on
an addition. Lee Ike Neville re-
newed a sewer line replacement
permit. Lary Osburn plans to re-
place a front step. Hazel Rowcliffe
is having a wheelchair ramp in-
stalled.
The pool bathhouse exterior re-
pairs have been completed.
The lift station wet well is in
need of repairs, for which the esti-
mate is $68,000. Public works di-
rector Matt Reckling said the walls
of the 10’x12’x14’ deep building are
deteriorating pretty fast. The same
work was done approximately 10
years ago. He said that pressure is
applied to blow the scum off of the
walls, he could see an inch into the
walls. Repairs should take about
three and a half days from start to
finish. The council will look into the
City seeks solution: R.R. siding vs. flooding concerns
Philip Livestock Auction held its annual Bad River Fall Extravaganza Horse Sale,
Saturday, September 22. The catalog and open consignment sale concluded with
auctioneers Lynn Weishaar and Seth Weishaar calling 461 head. The auction re-
port stated that catalog horses far out sold the non-catalog horses, and gentle
ranch horses were in high demand. Selling range was topped at $13,500 for a
chestnut colt (Heading Away x Dash Ta Fame, at right) going to Tena Spencer,
Russelville, Ark. The selling range bottomed out with one horse selling for $17.
Bad River Extravaganza
Horse Sale a success
Scotchman Industries, Inc. held an open house, Tuesday, September 18, to cel-
ebrate its 45 years of manufacturing its hydraulic ironworker products. Live
demonstrations were presented of the various machines and their many func-
tions. In 1967, Arthur A. Kroetch, founder of Scotchman Industries, began what
is now one of the largest employers in Haakon County and is one of the largest
ironworker manufacturing plants in the world. Above, Al Kochersberger is operat-
ing a stamping machine that can create custom holes in industrial-thick steel.
Below, J.R. Snyder is operating a machine that can uniformly bend heavy metal
to precise measurements. Photos by Del Bartels
Scotchman Industries
45 year celebration
been approved. “The bottom line is
we can do more together, then by
ourselves,” said Burnett.
The second region selected for
the grant in South Dakota is the
James River Valley region, com-
prised of Beadle, Hand, Jerauld,
Kingsbury, Spink and Clark coun-
ties.
For questions contact Christine
Sorensen, USDA RD coordinator at
christine.sorensen@sd.usda.gov or
605-224-8870, Ext. 123 or Kari
O’Neill, SDSU Extension commu-
nity development at kari.oheill@sd-
state.edu or 605-685-6972.
situation.
A bidding on leasing the unusedd
airport grounds for farming ended
in a two between to bidders. The
bid will be re-advertised and re-
opened to all possible bidders.
Work has begun at the Philip
airport. The anticipated completion
date is November 1. The new bea-
con will be delivered on that date,
and the old beacon will remain up
and running until then.
The council approved sur-
plussing and disposing of a Dell
370 computer purchased in 2004
for $1,755.10.
Police Officer David Butler will
attend an AR15/M16 armorer
school, October 4-5, in Spearfish.
The police department has two
such rifles.
The finance office will be closed
on Friday, October 5. Van Lint and
Deputy Finance Officer Brittany
Smith will be attending the South
Dakota Municipal League annual
conference October 3-5.
The next regular meeting for the
Philip City Council will be Monday,
November 5, at 7:00 p.m. in the
Haakon County community room.
The open house during parent-teacher conferences, September 25-26, included school tours, a parent survey, student work and awards, school report cards, meet
the new staff, information on the new Homework Opportunity Time and guided study hall programs, and even free child care. Parents heard about their children’s
grades, about the newly implemented benchmark testing and school accountability model, and the new meal standards for school meals. Above are Aaron and
Angela Doolittle talking with instructor Kory Foss. Below is Holly Schaack, left, looking over information with new staff member Karmen Powell. Photos by D.Bartels
Haakon School District parent-teacher conferences
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Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
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story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the right to edit any offensive ma-
terial and also to edit to fill the allotted space. We also reserve the right to reject any or all
letters.
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ions. It is not meant to replace advertising as a means of reaching people.
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comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Partly cloudy.
High of 52F. Winds from
the NNW at 10 to 15
mph.
Thursday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 25F. Winds
from the East at 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy with a chance of snow and rain
showers, then a chance of rain in the afternoon. High of
54F. Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph shifting to
the NE in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation 60% .
Friday Night: Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain in the
evening, then clear. Low of 16F. Winds from the West at 5 to 10 mph
shifting to the NNW after midnight. Chance of rain 20%.
Saturday: Clear.
High of 57F. Winds
less than 5 mph.
Saturday Night:
Clear. Low of 18F.
Winds from the SSW
at 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy.
High of 61F. Winds from
the WNW at 10 to 15
mph.
Sunday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 32F. Winds
from the WSW at 5 to 15 mph.
Get your complete &
up-to-the minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Monday: Mostly cloudy. High
of 70F. Breezy. Winds from
the NW at 20 to 25 mph.
Monday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 34F. Winds
from the North at 5 to 15 mph
shifting to the East after midnight.
The prairie is currently giving
its last “Hurrah!” before winter,
and it’s putting on quite a nice
show. The cottonwoods along the
river, anyway, catch your eye with
a good assortment of yellows and
oranges. The trees in the draws
and creeks have more variety since
there are more kinds of trees there
than along the river. Elm trees, of
course, have no sense of time. They
seldom turn a pretty color. They in-
stead prefer to wait until a hard
frost turns the leaves brown after
which they slowly drop them. Ash
trees, though, like to adorn them-
selves with bright yellow before
going naked over a short span of
time and settling in for dormancy.
Some of my favorite fall foliage is
on those trees and plants that turn
red. We don’t have many actual
trees which do that, and I think
you may have to go to New Eng-
land or some other remote place to
see a lot of it. We do, however, have
ivy that climbs trees and whatnot
and turns a brilliant red in the fall.
It does that quite early in the sea-
son and seems to be a red-flag sig-
nal for all the other plants that
winter is coming and it’s time to
get ready. There are some smaller
shrubs in the draws that also turn
red although most of those have a
rusty hew and not the scarlet or
flat-out red. I am not much of an
authority on brushy plants that
don’t produce edible fruit, but my
dad used to call some of them
skunkberries. I have no idea if that
is a proper name for those short
bushes, but that’s what I call them.
They have berries, sure enough,
but you’d have to be nutty to sam-
ple them. Wild critters don’t eat
them which gives you some idea of
their worth as food.
The late-season prairie flowers
are also hanging in there although
they are somewhat stunted in this
dry old year. I notice sunflowers, of
course, that haven’t quite given it
up yet, but yellow gumweeds give
no indication that they are in any
way lacking moisture. Looking at
them might give you the idea that
we’ve had recent rains. We haven’t,
but you wouldn’t know it by in-
specting gumweeds. I especially
noticed how they line the highways
the other day after bees started
smashing against my windshield. I
had seen the hives by the road and
wondered where on earth the bees
were finding anything to interest
them. I scanned the prairie and
saw nothing but brown. There cer-
tainly was no clover or alfalfa that
was still green. Then I saw the
gumweeds all along the road. “Ah,”
I thought. “That’s where the bees
are going.” According to beekeeper
friend, Chris, gumweeds do not
make ideal honey, but I suppose
they do provide good enough food
for the bees themselves which can’t
be all bad.
The other normal fall flowers are
around too. There are those clumps
of white posies which I call asters
although I’m not sure that is accu-
rate. Most of them are stunted but
still trying. The goldenrod seems
particularly brilliant this year. I
was stomping down a draw the
other day to get rid of a couple of
pails of stuff I’d cleaned out of the
freezer above the refrigerator.
That contraption had quit working
properly and thawed everything
out. Most of it should have been
tossed a while ago, but you know
how that goes with freezers. Still,
although it didn’t smell bad, I no
longer trusted it and decided to
throw it out. Anyway, on the way
back to the house, I saw this big,
although short, clump of golden-
rod. It was eye-catching to say the
least. I was almost glad I’d had to
make the disposal run down the
draw so I didn’t miss that flower
patch. I didn’t stop to smell them
since they’ve been known to make
people sneeze, but they were nice
to look at.
Then we come to yucca plants.
They, too, show no signs of
drought. They are about the only
green dotting the landscape, and,
since we have tons of them on the
hills of our rolling ranch, they do
give you hope. Yuccas, in fact,
seem to do better in dry years than
wet. They flourish. They even
flower more heavily in dry springs
than wet. I guess you have to be a
cactus to enjoy drought.
So, the prairie is telling us that
winter cometh. I suppose I’d better
get ready. Shoot! That can wait a
bit. Instead, I think I’ll go down to
the creek or spring and find me a
log to sit on under the canopy of
colorful leaves. There I’ll just enjoy
my golden world and bask in its
brilliance. There’s no point in wor-
rying when you can instead sur-
render yourself to beauty.
Postscript: Got some rain on
Sunday. Nice!
Make your opinion known … write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410 or e-mail with your
phone number to: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Does it matter ? ... by Del Bartels
Columbus Day, Discovery Day, Native American Day, or just October
8 .. it is not worth the argument.
First, supposedly all humans are related by way of our common an-
cestors Adam and Eve and Noah and his wife. Though I am mostly Ger-
man, I am related to Hu Jintao – leader of the People’s Republic of
China, to Dilma Vana Rousseff – president of Brazil, and to Robert Mu-
gabe – president of Zimbabwe.
Second, I was born in America. My father was born in America. I am
an American, you could even say a native American.
Third, we citizens born in America are all native Americans, or none
of us are. People labeled as Indians are probably descended from trav-
elers originally coming eastward across the Bering Strait. That icy pas-
sageway is a 53 mile wide sea strait between Russia and the United
States, with islands in between. It has been crossed by people in ships,
kayaks, dogsleds, skis, sea-doos, a Land Rover and on foot.
Fourth, other claims for who actually discovered the New World are
made by Vikings, Orientals and Africans. Columbus was simply the
first to return to his native continent to advertise the possibility of a
lucrative trade route. Columbus did not prove the earth was round;
learned people already knew that. He wanted to find an overseas route
to the Orient because land trade was too costly and risky.
Fifth, because of one people meeting another, both discovered pros
and cons from the meeting. The Europeans brought horses, cattle, pigs
and gunpowder. They returned with corn, potatoes, tomatoes, tobacco
and syphilis. Both groups already had the concepts of complicated
math, textiles, metalwork, religion, slavery and war.
Sixth, some people could not care less for the reason, just as long as
they get a paid day off from work in October. Some other people, such
as farmers and ranchers and other independent businessmen, could
not care less because they don’t really get any day off from work. At
least near Christmas people might wish you a Merry Christmas. When
was the last time someone wished you a pleasant Columbus Day? No,
someone bellyaching to you about the name of the day is not them wish-
ing you a pleasant day.
Seventh, the second Monday in October is not the date Columbus ac-
tually set sail, or landed, or returned home, or his birthday, or his death
day or his kindergarten graduation day. The exact date is immaterial.
Argue about the celebration, if you even bother with any celebrating,
on some other day.
Columbus Day can exist or not; either on the second of October or
not. I refuse to argue it. I do, though, in my own quiet thoughts, cele-
brate the guts it takes to take a chance, to set sail for a theory, to try
something new. I celebrate meeting different people, whether they
come to me or I to them. I hope they celebrate that, too.
HuntSafe course graduates
Midland farmer’s
market season end
The Midland farmer’s market concluded its 2012 season Fri-
day, September 28, and the season was deemed a success.
The final gathering had a western theme and was held in the
Midland American Legion Hall. It included a large selection
of the final produce from Cedar Creek Gardens. There were
two first-time vendors ; Kayla Anderson sold Paparazzi jew-
elry and Georganna Addison had “blinged” hats, belts and
purses. There were also vendors who have been to the mar-
ket all year; Clarice Roghair, Jessie Dale Root, Carolyn
Manke, Jennifer Blye and Julie Schwalm. Beth Flom served
up a chuckwagon supper. People tried their voices at
karaoke. According to organizer Julie Schwalm, all in all it
was a pleasant ending to a pleasant summer. Shown clock-
wise from above are Addison, Roghair, and David and Beth
Flom. Courtesy photos
Fifteen family members, ages three to 59, competed in the
Run Crazy Horse races, September 29-30. The eight
youngest, Beckham, Drew and Layton Terkildsen, Trey and
Rehgan Larson and Baylor, Creston and Wakely Burns, par-
ticipated in the kids’ 1K on Saturday. Dilyn Terkildsen and
Craig and Heidi Burns competed in the 5K on Saturday.
Competing in the half marathon on Sunday, were Trisha
Larson (1:43:51), Colt Terkildsen (1:44:25), Jenny Terkild-
sen (2:11:12) and Kerry Burns (2:31:38). Nine of Kerry's
grandkids were cheering her on near the finish line. Also
competing from Philip were: 5K – Josie, Amber and D.J.
Rush and half marathon – Terry Henrie (2:14:52). Pictured
above, back row, from left: Kerry Burns, Trisha Larson,
Heidi Burns, Beckham Terkildsen, Jenny Terkildsen, Colt
Terkildsen and Craig Burns. Front: Trey Larson, Wakely
Burns, Layton Terkildsen, Dilyn Terkildsen, Rehgan Larson,
Creston Burns, Baylor Burns and Drew Terkildsen.
Courtesy photos
A family that runs together ...
The annual
Midland
Merchants’
Appreciation
Day was held
Saturday,
September
22. It in-
cluded a
hammering
contest,
amoung
other games
and activi-
ties. More on
page 11.
Left, the Midland pa-
rade was traditional,
and was also rambunc-
tious. Above all, it was
fun. Per capita, it could
be argued as being
one of the largest in
the state.
The annual HuntSafe class was held in Midland, Saturday, September 29. Tom Parquet, who led the class, said,
We had 23 students this year and everyone passed. They received their card, cap, safety glasses, gun lock,
action plug and ear plugs. Cam Meinzer and I taught the class. The class went very well and we think that as a
class they had the highest percentage of 100 percent on the written test of any of the classes we’ve taught.
Courtesy photo
Controlling Prairie Dogs
Although prairie dogs currently
inhabit a small percentage of their
original range, they can severely re-
duce the available grazing in areas
where they are established. The re-
duction in grazing becomes particu-
larly noticeable in dry years, as grass
production is significantly less than
years with good rainfall.
There are biological, cultural and
mechanical methods of control that
can be used to help manage prairie
dogs, but producers generally rely
most heavily on chemical (baits and
fumigants) control methods. Zinc
phosphide has been the bait control
option for many years, with alu-
minum phosphide and gas cartridges
providing the fumigant options.
Rozol was approved for a brief time
in South Dakota, and after being re-
moved from the registered products
for prairie dog control, will again be
allowed beginning October 1, 2012.
If you are planning to apply Rozol,
it’s important to know that there are
some key label changes from the pre-
vious period when it was registered
in South Dakota. The treatment pe-
riod is now October 1 to March 15,
with no mention of “spring green-
up”. According to the current label,
the applicator must return to the site
within four days after the bait appli-
cation, and at one- to two-day inter-
vals to collect and properly dispose of
any bait or dead and dying prairie
dogs found on the surface. These in-
spections must continue for at least
two weeks, but longer if carcasses
are still being found. The label out-
lines specific requirements for con-
ducting the inspections and dispos-
ing of the bait and dead or dying
prairie dogs and other information.
The Rozol label must be included
when buying the product, and can be
accessed online at: http://www.cdms.
net/LDat/ld98B010.pdf.
South Dakota’s Rank in
United States Agriculture
The USDA National Ag Statistics
Service reports that in 2011, South
Dakota ranked first in alfalfa hay,
all hay, bison and sunflower seed
production. The sunflower seed pro-
duction ranking may be temporary,
as North Dakota’s acreage was down
substantially in 2011 because of wet
planting conditions.
South Dakota also ranked third in
flaxseed, honey, and proso millet
production, as well as lambs born.
The Rushmore state came in fourth
in oat and sorghum for grain produc-
tion, and fifth for beef cows that have
calved and land in farms and
ranches. Included in the sixth place
ranking were all sheep and lambs,
all wheat production, calves born,
corn for grain, durum wheat, heifers
500 lbs and over, market sheep and
lambs, other spring wheat produc-
tion and winter wheat production.
Falling into the seventh place cat-
egory was harvested acreage of prin-
cipal crops, and steers 500 pounds
and over, while the eighth place in-
cluded all cattle and calves, cattle
and calves on feed, and soybean pro-
duction. Finally, South Dakota
ranked ninth in all other hay produc-
tion and pigs born.
For more information, visit:
http://www.nass.usda.gov/sd/.
Calendar
10/16-18: SDSU Extension An-
nual Conference, Brookings
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
FLY CONTROL
–Dust Bags
–Sprays
–Pour ons
–Golden Malrin Fly Bait
COLD
BEER
Sunbody
Straw
Hats
Rural Living
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
www.RavellettePublications.com
Just Two Words
You are probably aware of these
two words. Because of these two
words being uttered by an FDA offi-
cial, seven hundred people lost their
jobs, the price of hamburger went up
fifteen cents per pound and 100,000
steers had a bullet put in there head
and pushed into a landfill, and
48,000 acres of corn were plowed
under.
Those two words are “Pink Slime.”
BPI, the company that extracts
the bit of meat that clings to the
bone after trimming with a knife,
had to lay off seven hundred employ-
ees after the smear campaign they
were subjected to after their product
was called “Pink Slime.” Their prod-
uct, lean finely textured beef, was
extracted off bone and added back to
hamburger, making hamburger
cheaper. Since those two words only
affected the price of hamburger, poor
people were most affected; raising
prices at least $.15/lb.
ABC news, the agency most re-
sponsible for promoting those two
words, did not go out and shoot
100,000 fat steers, but BPI lost 3
million pounds of business per week
since April. Three million pounds
per week since April is the equiva-
lent of 100,000 steers. Just one steer
is the enough to feed a family of four
for a whole year if they eat a lot of
beef. So enough meat to feed at least
100,000 families for one year was
wasted.
How many of those steers started
out as baby calves pulled out of snow
banks, treated for hypothermia and
then given back to their mothers?
How many were sick and dying of
pneumonia, but were given life-sav-
ing antibiotics and nursed back to
health? How many were given life-
saving fluids when they came down
with diarrhea? There are dozens of
other husbandry issues such as giv-
ing an old mother cow a little extra
grain to help her raise her calf (kind
of like food stamps).
I do not know the actual number
but the answer is in the 10’s of thou-
sands of head.
And what of all the wasted corn
that went into raising those 100,000
steers. That’s roughly 3.6 million
pounds of corn or 48,000 acres of
farm ground that was tilled, planted,
tended and harvested for nothing!
The farmers and ranchers that I
know do not take care of their land
and livestock, just so some anti-beef
reporters can slander them in a neg-
ative campaign.
Fortunately, BPI is suing ABC
news for $1 billion for behaving like
National Enquirer in continuing to
report on “Pink Slime” even after
they were given the facts. The fact is
BPI has been creating a wholesome
product that we all have been eating
for thirty years without a single per-
son being hospitalized. Let’s hope
BPI wins!
ABC news probably used the in-
ternet to get their “facts”. The sad
truth is if the answer to a question
has a political, economical, or envi-
ronmental component to it, you have
to know the correct answer before
you go looking for it. And the first
answer that pops up is usually the
wrong one.
In My Opinion
James D. Stangle DVM
The United States Department
of Agriculture is accepting applica-
tions for technical assistance
grants to develop domestic and mi-
grant farm labor housing.
“These grants will help commu-
nities submit quality applications
to increase their chances of getting
funding to build much needed af-
fordable housing for farm workers,”
said Agriculture Secretary
Tom Vilsack. “Increasing the sup-
ply of affordable housing in rural
communities not only helps the res-
idents, it helps the entire commu-
nity.”
Grants are available to organiza-
tions that will help housing author-
ities, state and local governments,
non-profit organizations, and com-
munity- and faith-based groups
apply for loans and grants to build
farmworker housing. The purpose
of the grants is to increase the
number of high quality applica-
tions USDA receives. Vilsack an-
nounced on July 18 the Notice of
Funding Availability for loans and
grants to build or preserve afford-
able rental farm worker housing.
This technical assistance funding
is to organizations that assist po-
tential borrowers under that
NOFA.
Technical assistance grantees
must have the knowledge, ability,
expertise or practical experience
necessary to develop and package
farm labor housing loan and grant
applications. They also will be re-
quired to submit a minimum num-
ber of applications to USDA, based
on their location.
For more information, see page
54877 of the September 6 Federal
Register, http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/
pkg/FR-2012-09-06/html/2012-
21885.htm. The deadline for appli-
cations is November 5.
USDA grants to improve
housing for farm workers
West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water Systems, Inc.
23rd Annual
Meeting
Wednesday, October 10
Wall Community Center
Main Street • Wall, SD
Registration: 2:00 p.m (MT)
Business Meeting: 2:30 p.m. (MT)
Each membership will receive a
$10 water certificate at registration.
Appetizers and refreshments
will be served.
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
You’ll KNOW when you’re getting GREAT
CUSTOMER SERVICE from your bank …
it STARTS with LIVE HUMAN BEINGS
ANSWERING THE PHONE and ABLE TO
HELP YOU without putting you on hold
for … who knows how long.
WE WILL BE CLOSED
Monday, October 8th
in observance of Native American
Day / Columbus Day.
We have trucks
available for on
farm pickup or if you
are a trucker call
us for loads.
SPECIALTY
CROP GROWERS!
Now buying
Bird Food, Oil Sunflower Seeds,
Green & Yellow Peas, Flax, Millet,
Safflower, and Milo
Contact:
Lee Klocke (605) 350-7486
email: lklocke@sunbird-inc.com
SUNFLOWER
GROWERS!
Now buying
Large Oil, Con Oil and Confection
Sunflowers for the edible and
de hulling market.
Contact:
Jarrid Graff at (605) 350-0188
email: jarrid@advancedsunflower.com or
Danny Dale at (605) 412-0129
email: danny@advancedsunflower.com
Call for current prices and
new crop sunflower prices.
APARTMENTS AVAILAbLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For application
& information:
PRO/Rental
Management
1113 Sherman St.
Sturgis, SD 57785
605-347-3077 or
1-800-244-2826
www.prorental
management.com
www.freerenters
guide.com
On May 29, South Dakota Farm
Service Agency received approval
from Secretary of Agriculture Tom
Vilsack to proceed with the imple-
mentation of the county office con-
solidation plan which included four
county offices in South Dakota. The
closed offices are Kadoka, Mound
City, Buffalo and Wessington
Springs.
The Natural Resources Conser-
vation Service (NRCS) offices in
these four locations remain open
and committed to serving all con-
servation needs.
“Over the past few years many
agencies have faced budget con-
straints and had to make budget-
related changes, such as the ones
FSA had to make,” said Jeff Zim-
prich, state conservationist with
the NRCS. “We wanted to get the
word out that the NRCS will re-
main in the four mentioned offices,
and conduct business as usual.”
The NRCS and conservation
partners are still located in the
USDA Service Centers. The NRCS
will continue to follow the estab-
lished model of providing conserva-
tion assistance to the landowner-
operator from the county (service
center) where the land is located.
For more information about tech-
nical or financial assistance, please
contact the NRCS staff in your
local USDA Service Center.
Kadoka FSA office closed
Drought conditions continue to
worsen across the state according
to the September 27 United States
Drought Monitor. This week’s map
increases drought status in several
places in the state because of the
continuing dry conditions
statewide, said State Climatologist
Dennis Todey.
“Several degradations occurred
for the week,” Todey said. These in-
cluded downgrading the abnor-
mally dry area in the north central
to moderate drought, downgrading
parts of east central South Dakota
from moderate drought to severe
drought and downgrading parts of
south central South Dakota from
extreme drought (D3) to extreme
drought (D4) – the highest drought
category.
Todey said these changes reflect
current dryness and ongoing pre-
cipitation deficits from the sum-
mer. “The lack of precipitation
going into the fall continues to limit
the recovery in the state,” Todey
said.
Much of the northwest received
no precipitation over the last 30
days. Most of the rest of the state
has received totals of less than an
inch. This leaves the state at much
less than 50 percent of average pre-
cipitation totals during that time.
“Most of the major impacts of the
summer have come and gone with
the damage done to crops,” said
SDSU Extension Climate Field
Specialist Laura Edwards. “There
are some current concerns with
planting winter wheat.”
She said other issues include low
streamflows and limited water for
non-agricultural purposes. Ed-
wards said the main ongoing issue
in the state is the soil moisture and
lack of recovery in soil moisture.
“Without changes to improve soil
moisture conditions across the
state, we will be at higher risk for
dryness impacts next year,” Ed-
wards said. “Some time to recover
exists this fall. But time is running
out climatologically to get much
precipitation.”
SDSU Extension will provide
weekly drought briefings through-
out the 2012 growing season. To
keep up to date on how the drought
is impacting South Dakota's agri-
culture industry, visit iGrow.org.
Drought continues to worsen
Hit & Miss
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Oct. 4: Tuscan
Chicken, Duchess Potatoes,
Caribbean Veggies, Biscuit, Lemon
Cake.
Friday, Oct. 5: Spaghetti Bolog-
nese, Prince Edward Veggies, Gar-
lic Bread, Tiramisu.
Monday, Oct. 8: Cheesy Meat-
loaf, Baby Bakers, Green Beans,
Roll, Spiced Apples.
Tuesday, Oct. 9: Voo-Doo Ribs,
Red Mashed Potatoes, Cream
Cheese Corn, Roll, Peachy Gelatin.
Wednesday, Oct. 10: Fried
Chicken, Mashed Potatoes and
Gravy, Green Beans, Biscuit,
Dutch Apple Pie.
***
Saturday, September 22, fall
began, so says the Somerset Court
schedule. I think the equinox and
its pull that helps an egg stand on
end, was really September 20. Any-
way, I borrowed an egg from the
Somerset Court kitchen on Sep-
tember 21 and it wouldn’t stand
up. Thanks anyway.
On Friday, September 21, at
Somerset Court, Sandy and Susan
helped us play a game of phase 10.
We had not played it before, so we
were glad for their help and in-
struction. Jim and Eleanor
Holmes, Eileen Tenold, Anne
Brink, Vivian Hansen and Mar-
garet Jacobs were playing. Later a
game of pinochle was played by
Floy, Addie, Mildred K. and Violet.
The September 20, 2012, Philip
Pioneer Review said that a couple
from the old Grindstone country,
my old home neighborhood, will be
moving to Somerset Court, Mr. and
Mrs. George Craft. She was Doris
Carstensen, Jack and Lucille
Carstensen’s daughter.
I lent Irene Cox a red hat to wear
to a red hat luncheon at the Alpine
Inn at Hill City with a group from
New Underwood.
My daughter, Delores Denke,
Pavilion, Wyo., sent a letter and
photos which showed a good crop of
alfalfa that was able to produce
three cuttings this rather dry sum-
mer. The bales look close together
and wonderfully green. Don, De-
lores and their son, Richard, have
worked diligently and irrigated
with the allotted water. There is
much hauling of bales to be done.
Richard not only hauls for his fam-
ily but for some neighbors which
need help, too. Delores also sent
photos that she took of smoke from
the north Wind River fires, where
it had been burning for over a
month. Newspaper clippings about
the Wyoming fires were also en-
closed with her letter. For joy, she
sent a lovely photo of a big butter-
fly on a rosy flower. There was also
one of a junior age sheep dog, who
was helpful this summer. Thank
you for the great letter and photos,
Delores.
On Saturday at Somerset Court,
it was a nice day for sitting out-
doors for Anne and Blanche. My
granddaughter, Sheridan, and son
Tiger, four, and daughter Cecelia,
two, came over for lunch and we
walked outside around Somerset
Court castle, twice. Then we came
in and Cecelia knocked on the door
at Ben and Dannie’s and gave them
a couple of gumweed blossoms.
Sheridan reported that the United
Way workers, including some Na-
tional Guard members, worked at
painting her front doorstep and
raking weeds. It is so good to hear
of kind, positive action.
Somerset Court resident Myron
White had company at supper Fri-
day, his daughter and her hus-
band, Pam and Barry Ploog.
Some of the Somerset Court staff
were gone on a trip to Florida, as
guests of the headquarters at
Minot. This trip was awarded for
their efficiency.
The Somerset Court movie Fri-
day, “Grumpy Old Men,” kept us
laughing.
The new Pioneer Review paper
said that Joy Klima, Philip, is mov-
ing to an assisted living facility in
Rapid City. I have known Joy since
1970 when I taught her six-year-
old son, Tim, at the Belvidere
school. Much more recently, Joy
would hold oil painting classes in
her home in Philip. We had some
good times there.
I also read in the September 20,
Philip Pioneer Review that Mid-
land’s annual free day was to be
held Saturday, September 22.
What a great day for the festivities.
Seems like one year we had snow
already when it was Midland’s free
day. And one time I rode my motor-
cycle over to their free day.
Saturday at Somerset Court, we
had morning exercises with bonus
Somerset bucks for attendance.
There was a foursome for whist in
the afternoon, with Irene Arbach,
Margaret Jacobs, Ina Oerlline and
Susan. Violet, Addie and Vivian
played bananagrams. M.R. Hansen
came for scrabble. Our new word
was die, plural for duo.
M.R. Hansen has made a scrap-
book for residents and staff of Som-
erset Court. It is to be found on the
coffee table by the fireplace in the
front lobby at Somerset Court.
Please bring photos, clippings,
jokes, riddles, limericks, Bible
verses, poems, or other memora-
bilia you would like to share and
put them in the scrapbook, or give
them to me and I will tape or glue
them into the blank pages.
Sunday morning, Eileen Tenold
played hymns on the piano in the
activity garden and I went to sing
along with her.
Irene McKnight had her daugh-
ters, Gloria and Beverly, and
granddaughter, Sierra, as guests at
lunch on Sunday at Somerset
Court.
Agnes Tastad entertained a cou-
ple of her church friends at lunch
Sunday.
Sunday at Somerset Court, we
had church with Rev. Richardson.
Jack Humke played piano for us to
sing with. There was one hymn
that specifically prays for rain.
Those who attended were Eileen
Tenold, Edna Mae Moss, Marilyn
Butts, Don Stensgaard, Charlie
and Joanne Hathaway, Connie
Stevens and daughter Teri, Mari-
lyn Oyler, Floy Olson, Blanche
Harmon and Vivian Hansen. Rev.
Richardson quoted from the 23rd
Psalm, which he said is his most fa-
vorite verse in the Bible. “Surely,
goodness and mercy will follow me
all the days of my life.” He recently
drove across Wyoming and he
prays that they could receive rain.
He hoped we realized that the
Bible is ready and waiting to help
us figure out what we are supposed
to do. My own sermon is that God
gave us the world and all the power
we could ever use. He gives us sun-
shine and wind and ocean motion.
We are a little short of brains. We
had to burn all the wood first, then
the coal and then fight over the oil.
If we fan our brains and try to de-
velop them, maybe we will figure
out how to use the sun, wind, and
ocean power.
Sunday evening, Wayne and
Gwynn Hansen invited me over for
grilled steaks and all the fixings.
We enjoyed being out on their deck.
Thanks, kids. Clay Hansen
brought me back to Somerset
Court. Thanks, Clay.
Sunday at Somerset Court, we
were entertained by the Coull
Band. There were two guitars, a
mandolin, a violin, a banjo and four
singers. We were encouraged to
sing along. We loved such oldies as
“Wabash Cannonball.” It was espe-
cially enjoyable because there was
no amplification. The band mem-
bers are all associated with Rapid
City Christian at Quincy and Mt.
Rushmore Road.
Band member Lynn Greff is
Somerset Court resident Grace Tu-
illery’s son. Other Somerset Court
residents who are members of that
church are Dutch and Billy Stevens
as well as Mary Carrier. The band
played “He Touched Me” for Dutch
and Billy. Some other songs played
were “Help is on the Way,” “I’ll Fly
Away,” “I Saw the Light,” “I Want
to Stroll in Heaven With You,” and
many others. Several of the band
members signed my journal book.
Thank you all for playing for us.
And thanks to Sandy and Susan
who arranged seating and provided
hospitality and refreshments.
Monday at Somerset Court, we
had a good turnout for morning ex-
ercises and for crafts with Amy. At
crafts we did scratch-off kites, air-
planes, rainbows and hot air bal-
loons. Bright and colorful. Res-
idents who attended this activity
were Addie, Eileen, Mildred Young
and her helper, Kay, Floy, Marge
Self and Vivian. Others were play-
ing rummi-cube.
The Somerset Court Monday
movie was “The Other Side of the
Mountain.” There was some beau-
tiful scenery and photos of a pere-
grine falcon. There was this lad
who ventured out alone into the
mountains in Quebec to study
algae. He was a serious student
and also kept a journal. He man-
aged to live alone very well.
Sunday, September 23, 2012,
Rapid City Journal had photos of
Kadoka’s homecoming royalty,
king Clint Stout and queen Marti
Herber. Those family names are fa-
miliar old names in the Kadoka
and Weta areas. The ones who I
knew in about 1966 were the
Bernard Herbers. Mrs. Bernard
Herber was Barbara Stout. M.R.
Hansen came for scrabble and our
new word was sext meaning one of
seven canonical daily prayers and
devotions.
Tuesday, September 25, 2012, at
Somerset Court, Sandy and Susan
gave us the activity of bean bag
toss. It was an ideal day, warm but
not hot nor windy. We played out-
doors in the Somerset Court court-
yard. A fair group came to play.
Those playing were Mildred Young
and helper Kay, Eileen Tenold,
Jeannie Alvarson, Violet Jenison,
Irene McKnight, Fred Smith, Floy
Olson, Marilynn Butts, Jim
Holmes, Irene Arbach, Addie
Rorvig, Marcella, Marge Self, Lu-
cille Huether and Vivian Hansen.
Irene McKnight won the first game
and Irene and Vivian tied for the
second game. We all received gen-
erous Somerset bucks.
Tuesday afternoon, we had Som-
erset Court bingo with Sandy call-
ing numbers and Susan and Amy
helping with hospitality. There was
a good turnout for bingo. There
were a number of colorful, clever
new prizes, some with a Halloween
motif.
After bingo, we had the celebra-
tion of the birthdays of residents
whose birthdays are in September.
Delvin Whipple, September 1, but
he has moved away, LaVerne With,
7th, Eleanor Holmes, 28th, and
Doris Wellman, 30th. Jack Humke
led us in singing “Happy Birthday,
God Bless You.” The Somerset
Court kitchen staff had made a
huge chocolate cake with thick
chocolate frosting. We also had
vanilla ice cream, hot coffee and ice
water.
The Rapid City Journal had a
nice thank you letter to the man-
ager of a restaurant in Spearfish
for hosting a fundraiser for March
of Dimes. Ted Schilling had pro-
vided the use of his facility and fed
all the volunteers. The item was of
special interest to me as Ted is my
niece’s son.
Wednesday, September 26, our
Somerset Court bus took a load of
residents for a picnic in the park. It
was a nice day for a picnic. The
leaves are starting to change colors
and with the pines for contrast,
Rapid City has beautiful fall
scenes.
Chuck and Bonnie McCauley
came for the regularly scheduled
Bible study at Somerset Court
Wednesday afternoon.
Attendance has been increasing
at fully fit. It is an afternoon exer-
cise class that is usually scheduled
for 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday. It pro-
vides some much neglected
stretches, as well as strength exer-
cises with weights. You may start
with no weights and work up to one
pound or two pounds.
Marge Self, Marilynn Butts and
Vivian Hansen played cut throat
pool until Lu Yeager came so we
could play two on two. Marge and
Marilynn played Lu and Vivian.
Sandy coached. Thanks Sandy.
M.R. Hansen came over for
scrabble. He brought several pears
from their tree and we gave one to
each of the ladies playing pool, and
also Sandy.
I walked around outside of the
Somerset Court building Wednes-
day. It was just comfortablly warm.
My son, David K. Hansen, Ft.
Pierre, emailed and reminded me
that there has beena givvous moon
the last few nights. If you wonder
about the term gibbous, look it up
in the dictionary!
A recent item in the Rapid City
Journal told of research at Rapid
City’s South Dakota School of
Mines that has developed inks
which may be used to combat coun-
terfeiters.
This is a great time of the year to
see the autumn colors in Spearfish
Canyon and throughout the Black
Hills.
If you have a news item for the
Philip Socials column that you
would like to submit and can’t
get ahold of Vivian, please
e-mail it to:
betty@pioneer-review.com
or call 859-2516.
We will be more than happy to
take your news over the phone!
continued on page 11
At the Badlands Bar
Robbie & Molly Lytle,
together with our parents,
Byron & Peggy Parsons,
are celebrating our
Wedding Anniversaries.
Saturday, October 6th
Food & Fun 6:30 p.m.
Dance to Badger Horse
at 9 p.m.
OCTOBER 5-6-7-8:
Hope Springs
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
OCTOBER 12-13-14-15:
The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG)
OCTOBER 19-20-21-22:
Lawless (R)
OCTOBER 28-29-30-31:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
It’s A Girl! It’s A Girl!
Harley Lynn Iwan
Daughter of
Emily Schofield & Anthony Iwan, Philip, SD
Born: August 29, 2012 • 6 lbs., 7.4 oz. • 19
1
⁄2 inches long
Maternal Grandparents:
Jason & Lisa Schofield, Philip
Paternal Grandparents:
Karen Iwan, Philip; Harold Iwan, Presho
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
Alvin & Ruby Pearson, Philip
Paternal Great-Grandparents:
Ervin & Ruth Wiedemeier, St. Germain, WI
Harold Floyd & Jane Iwan, Midland
This feature sponsored by Grandpa & Grandma Schofield
William Morrison
for Haakon County Sheriff
Remember to vote on
Tuesday, November 6th!
Paid for by William Morrison.
If you would like to go and see
Spearfish Canyon and are not able
to go for some reason here is an al-
ternative. Go south to the elevator
and take the dump ground road
and continue west past Jeff Konst’s
business and on north where you
cross the highway and go past Bill
Buhls’ and Marvin Denke’s. Then
east past Todd O’Connor’s back to
the highway, you will see some
beautiful fall colors. From my
house I can see the tops of the trees
along our creek, but due to the dry-
ness, I don’t go there with my
pickup.
Sheila Olson went to Rapid City
a few times lately for checkups
after her recent surgery. Her sister,
Pam, returned to her home Satur-
day, September 22.
Vickie Eide attended the football
game at Wall to watch grandson
Keagan play. She also enjoyed vis-
iting with several other spectators.
I stopped at Norma Oldenberg’s
Thursday and she had the door
locked, as she had a real bad cold
and didn’t want anyone to come in
and catch it. She sounded very bad
when I talked to her, so I never
bothered her for any news.
Marvin Eide has been putting in
some wheat and we wonder if it
will grow. There is so little mois-
ture in the ground, but it’s always
next year to farmers.
Tucker Smith finished planting
wheat on the 24th. I went by there
when he was planting and it looked
like a prairie fire was burning be-
hind him, as the dust was so high
in the air. He must believe in next
year too.
I asked Tucker what they had for
news and he stated that they had
just been staying home and were
getting cattle and feed ready for
fall and winter.
I visited with Marlin Evans and
she reported that she had really en-
joyed free day at Midland. She said
they had such a nice parade with
lots of decorated floats with many
great sayings that were well
thought out. Midland is like
Milesville, for a small community
everyone goes over the limit to
make it a great event.
Asta Amiotte visited with Marlin
when she was in Philip for a doc-
tor’s appointment. Asta is to have
some foot surgery done in Rapid
City this next week.
Al Brucklacher went to Pierre
this week to the dentist. Lenore is
doing some therapy on her shoul-
der in Philip. Otherwise, they have
been doing quite well. They are
looking forward to Janice and Mike
West Jr. coming in November for
hunting season and will be spend-
ing some time here.
Bob Thorson is glad to have his
fiancée, Jody, home. She enjoyed
being with her new granddaughter
while gone. Jody brought her par-
ents, Ed and Cleone Tangren, back
with her Saturday, September 29,
to spend some time with them.
Tuesday, Bob took them to the
nursing home to dance and enjoy
the music of Chuck and Ruth
Carstensen. They plan to go again
October 9 when Carstensens will
be playing again.
I remember when Bob’s mother
and dad, Phyllis and Leonard,
would go to Black Hills State Uni-
versity in Spearfish to watch Bob
play football. Bob was honored this
last week during Swarm Days in
Spearfish. Bob enjoys sports and
likes to attend as many as he can.
Gary and Julie Nixon didn’t have
any news this week. They said that
they were just staying close to
home getting fall work done to
ready for winter.
I heard several ranchers think-
ing it could be a hard winter, as
this is usually true after a dry and
shortage of hay year. Guess we will
just have to wait and see, the fore-
casters say it will be a mild winter.
But they miss it at times. We don’t
know as we don’t make the
weather, someone smarter and
wiser than we only knows what it
will be as He is the maker of it.
Bob Thorson and the Tangrens
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Church & Community Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass:
10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the
other meets on the second Wednesday at
1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.);
6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 8:00 a.m. • Children's Church:
8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Ancient wisdom Ior modern liIe
Everv mun uccordIng us Ie purposeLI In IIs IeurL, so
IeL IIm gIve; noL grudgIngIv, or oI necessILv: Ior God
IoveLI u cIeerIuI gIver. z CorInLIIuns ¤:;-8 (KJV)
WIen vou gIve, do vou do IL becuuse vou need Lo
or becuuse vou wunL Lo? God preIers LIe IuLLer.
WIen vou gIve Irom LIe IeurL, vou gIve wILIouL
regreL. ¡I vou were on LIe receIvIng end, wIIcI
kInd oI gIvIng wouId vou preIer?
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Send obituaries, engagements & wedding write-ups to:
ads@pioneer-review.com. There is no charge.
Our Lady of Victory
Catholic Church
will be holding their annual turkey dinner
Sunday, October 7th
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the church hall in Kadoka
Everyone
W
elcom
e!
Adults • $9.00
Child (4-10) • $4.00
3 & under free
Silent A
uction
Check it out!
As we all know, the
United States is in great
need of public prayer, re-
pentance and conversion. We
must ask God to save Amer-
ica through Rosary of His
Most Holy Mother.
Please join us
in praying for
our nation on
October 13, 2012
at 12:00 noon
Fire Hall Park
Philip
Contact Kay Williams at
859-3216 for more info.
Virginia Burns__________________________________
Virginia Burns, age 95 of Philip,
S.D., died Sunday, September 30,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Virginia Johnson was born Au-
gust 29, 1917, in Sioux City, Iowa,
the daughter of Knute Napoleon
and Effie Carolyn Johnson. She
grew up in Sioux City, and gradu-
ated from East High School in
1935. She then attended Morning-
side College in Sioux City, where
she earned her teacher’s certificate.
She taught third grade in Sioux
City. During World War II, Vir-
ginia was an aircraft communica-
tor for the Civil Service and worked
at the Philip Airport, assisting with
planes crossing the United States.
She then taught seventh grade, for
one semester at Philip School in
1945.
Virginia was united in marriage
to Sherman Burns on December
29, 1945, at Sioux City, Iowa. She
stayed home to raise her sons. In
1965 to 1970, she worked as deputy
auditor for Haakon County.
In 1970, she taught at Old Trail
Rural School north of Philip, and
during this time she returned to
summer school at Black Hills State
College, where she received her
bachelor of science degree in 1972.
She taught at Philip Elementary
from 1972 until 1992. After retiring
she volunteered at the grade school
until 1998.
During her lifetime, Virginia
was very active in the community.
Her memberships include First
Lutheran Church, where she was
on the church council and altar
guild, Sunday School superintend-
ent, teacher, and reader. She also
was a Girl Scout leader, and past
president of the hospital board, and
a judge for Junior Miss, 4-H, and
declam. She received the PTA Life-
time Award and the Teacher of the
Year at the Haakon School District
in 1984-1985. Virginia was also a
member of the Order of the East-
ern Star, where she served as sec-
retary and Worthy Matron.
Survivors include two sons,
Sherman Burns, Jr. of Sheridan,
Wyo., and Colin Burns and his
wife, Ruth, of Casper, Wyo.; three
grandsons, Craig, Kevin and Cory
Burns; four great-grandsons,
Adam, Brian, Bradley and Jordan;
three sisters-in-law, Shirley John-
son of Clintonville, Wis., Jean
Burns of Philip and Mary Martha
Burns of Rapid City; a special
friend, Kay Ainslie and her hus-
band, George, of Philip; and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Virginia was preceded in death
by her husband, Sherman Burns,
on July 22, 1968; her parents; and
two brothers, Bob and Edward
Johnson.
Services were held Wednesday,
October 3, at the American Legion
Hall in Philip, with Pastor Frezil
Westerlund officiating.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Marcus J. Peterson______________________________
Marcus Joseph Peterson, age 29
of Sioux Falls, S.D., passed away at
home from an apparent heart at-
tack on September 24, 2012.
Marcus was born on December
18, 1982, to Michael and Julie
(Forster) Peterson in Philip. He at-
tended Grandview Elementary
School in Rapid City. In 2001, Mar-
cus graduated from Sturgis Brown
High School. In 2004, he moved to
Sioux Falls and enrolled at South-
east Technical Institute. He gradu-
ated in 2006 from the Network Ad-
ministrator Program.
On June 18, 2005, Marcus mar-
ried the love of his life, Katie Scott,
in Jefferson. He deeply loved his
family and was blessed with two
beautiful daughters.
Marcus was employed with Lod-
genet of Sioux Falls and held the
position of lead supervisor. He was
a huge sports fan and was a mem-
ber of the Sports Car Club of Sioux-
land. He had a true passion for
working on cars, autocross racing
and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
Marcus was a very loving and giv-
ing person. He elected to be an
organ donor and continued to give
even after his passing.
Marcus is survived by his wife of
seven years, Katie; daughters, Con-
nelly “Nelly” and Cayenne; his
mother, Julie Forster (Dan Raap)
of Hartford; father, Michael Peter-
son (KJ) of Rapid City; mother-in-
law, Connie Scott of Jefferson;
step-sister, Erica Raap; step-
brother, Spencer Raap; and pater-
nal grandmother, Marilyn (War-
ren) Bergheim.
Marcus was preceded in death
by his maternal grandparents,
Harlan and Linda Forster; pater-
nal grandfather, Maurice (Pete) Pe-
terson; and his uncle, Bruce
Forster.
Mass of Christian burial was cel-
ebrated Saturday, September 29,
2012, at St. Michael's Catholic
Church in Sioux Falls.
Dorothy Seidler_________________________________
Dorothy Seidler, age 87, of Mid-
land, S.D., died October 1, 2012, at
the Maryhouse in Pierre.
Dorothy M. Dennis was born Oc-
tober 10, 1924, in Redfield, the
daughter of Archie “Tom” and
Marie (Fish) Dennis. Dorothy’s
mother died soon after Dorothy
was born. Grandparents Jess and
Kate Dennis brought Dorothy to
their home north of Midland when
she was five days old and she con-
tinued to live with them, attending
Liberty Country School for five
years.
She then moved to Midland
where Tom and Lillian, her step-
mother, were living and attended
school there for one year while Lil-
lian was teaching in the Midland
school. The family moved to the
Tom Dennis farm-ranch and
Dorothy attended Prairie Queen
School for two years. Then Lillian
taught the Twin Buttes School east
of home and she, Dorothy, and a
cousin, Olivia Dennis (now Per-
ovich), lived at the school during
the week and went home on week-
ends while Dorothy was in eighth
and ninth grades. She then at-
tended high school in Midland, liv-
ing in the girls’ dormitory, just
north of present day Open Bible
parsonage. She worked at the co-op
grocery store during high school
years. She graduated from Midland
High School in 1942 and went to
work at a chicken farm near Rapid
City.
Dorothy married Bob Seidler on
April 30, 1943, in Midland, and
went back to work at the co-op gro-
cery store while Bob managed the
Texaco station for Ray Schultz of
Murdo. Bob and Dorothy moved to
the Jess and Kate Dennis home to
help them with their farm work
until 1953. After Dorothy’s dad,
Tom Dennis, died she and Bob
moved to the Tom Dennis farm-
ranch west of Highway 14 where
they lived until retiring.
They moved to Midland in 2007.
They enjoyed living in their one
story home instead of the three sto-
ries on the farm, especially because
it was just across the street from
the Midland school playground
where they could see the kids play-
ing during recess and noon break.
Dorothy served on the Pheoba
School Board from many years.
Phoeba school, post office and store
all were named for her grandfa-
ther, Phoeba Richardson, who lived
northeast of the Jess Dennis farm.
Entertainment in the early years
was card parties at the homes of
the neighbors in the area east and
west of Highway 14. That pastime
was taken up again at the Midland
Senior Center after Dorothy and
Bob retired.
Another entertainment was tak-
ing long drives when the wind was
blowing so hard it made work on
the farm miserable. They some-
times got quite a distance from
home before turning back! The
Platte-Winner Bridge, Sisseton,
Lemmon, or even into Wyoming
were some of the places they
turned the car toward Midland
again after enjoying the scenery in
places they hadn’t been recently, if
ever.
While their girls were in high
school, they attended all school
events and followed MHS sports
teams. They “hauled” cheerleaders
for several years to out of town
events. They drove even to the far-
thest ‘away’ games or anywhere
the Midland Tumblers performed,
nearly always being first to arrive,
no matter how far away!
Survivors include her husband,
Robert “Bob” Seidler of Midland;
two daughters, Athellen Gibbs
Westerman of Pierre, and her son,
Allen (Tammy) Gibbs and their
son, Marcus; and Phyllis Nelsen
Wells of Worland, Wyo., and her
sons, Troy (Kelly) Nelsen and son,
Wyatt, of Worland, and Terry
(Angie) Nelsen and son, Caidon, of
Sioux Falls; and many nieces and
nephews.
Dorothy was preceded in death
by her parents, Archie and Marie
Dennis.
Visitation will be held from 3:00
to 5:00 p.m. Thursday, October 4,
at the Rush Funeral Home in
Philip, and one hour preceding the
services at the church on Friday.
Funeral services will begin at
10:00 a.m. MDT Friday, October 5,
at the Open Bible Church in Mid-
land, with Pastor Andy Blye offici-
ating.
Interment will be at the Midland
Cemetery.
Rush Funeral Home is in charge
of arrangements. Her online guest
book can be viewed at www.rush
funeralhome.com
www.RavellettePublications.com
Mary P.Rosheim_________________
Mary P. Rosheim, age 86, died
Tuesday, September 25, 2012, at
Avera Flandreau Medical Center,
Flandreau, S.D.
Mary was born July 24, 1926 at
Flandreau to Harry and Leona
(Fargen) Parsley. She graduated
from Egan High School in 1944 and
then received her teaching certifi-
cate from Madison Normal.
She taught country schools in
Moody County and was married to
Barton Rosheim on December 26,
1946, at Brookings. They farmed in
Moody County until 1978 when
they moved into Flandreau. She
worked as a clerk at Foodland in
Flandreau for more than 20 years.
Mary and Bart organized dances at
the Japanese Gardens for over 20
years. Bart preceded her in death
on November 15, 2003.
She was a member of Ss. Simon
and Jude Catholic Church, Altar
Society, Catholic Daughters and
the Pleasant Valley Club.
Mary is survived by six children,
Jane Kirsch, Colman, Terry,
Brookings, Tim (Debbi), St. Louis,
MO, Veronica Rosheim and Cindy
(Jerry) Hoss, both of Brookings,
Charlie (Lisa), Flandreau, 13
grandchildren, nine great-grand-
children, and a sister, Lucille
(Keith) Emerson, Philip.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, a daughter, Renee;
four brothers, Ralph, Wayne, Paul,
John, and two sisters, Mary Jane
Reed and Patricia O’Dell.
Mass of Christian burial was cel-
ebrated September 29, 2012, at Ss.
Simon and Jude Catholic Church,
Flandreau with burial at the
church cemetery.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
continued on page 12
We had a bit of rain Sunday
evening and a bit of rain during the
night. Though it wasn’t much,
there is hope, in that rain contin-
ues to be a possibility. There is
nothing like the fresh smell of rain.
Especially, when it seems forever
ago since one smelled that fresh
smell. The beauty of nature contin-
ues as the yellow leaves of fall turn
into leaves of gold. And as evening
falls and the full moon rises, it cov-
ers the earth with its own beauty.
And when snuggled under the cov-
ers at night and hearing the night
sounds of the prairie, of a coyotes
howl or the distant whistle of a
train, I always find it a bit lonely
and a bit comforting, as well. For
those blessed to live in rural Amer-
ica, U.S.A, it is a familiar sound.
Five of Gene and Audrey Jones’
six daughters were in Midland for
free day. Lisa Foley and her girls,
Sam and Jaycie, Edna Dale and
her kids, Brandon, Destiny, Mi-
randa and Mariah, Linda Giltner,
Julie and her husband, Jer
Whitcher, and Paula Jones. Linda's
class was celebrating their 20-year
class reunion. They planted a small
tree in the park as a class and in
memory of classmate, Michael
Schofield. Julie's class was cele-
brating a 10-year reunion and Au-
drey's class a 50-year school re-
union. All three entered a float in
the parade. Sunday, Linda Giltner
and Paula Jones enjoyed a mini va-
cation by driving through the Black
Hills.
Correction: Dave Calhoon was a
part of the 50th year class reunion
on Midland’s Appreciation Day. In
last week’s news, I mentioned
James Foster, Phil Meyers, Pat
Snook and Audrey Jones, but had
not mentioned Dave. The other
four were riding in the back of the
pickup in the parade, Dave was
driving the pickup, so I hadn’t seen
him. Goes to show a person needs
to double check on things before
putting things in the paper.
Going to Rapid City Friday were
Debbie (Jones) Trapp and son,
Wyatt, and Joy Jones. Wyatt had a
dental appointment. They took
Cassidy Trapp out for lunch and a
time of visiting. Cassidy is in her
first year at School of Mines in
Rapid City and is busy getting ad-
justed to college life.
Baxter Schrempp, Dupree, spent
the weekend with his grandpar-
ents, Joy and Jerry Jones. Baxter
is the son of Jodie (Jones) and Bob
Schrempp. Sunday, Joy and Baxter
met Jodie at the Kirley Road so he
could get back for school. Joy then
went on to the Deep Creek School
where she met up with her daugh-
ter, Cindy Sinkey, and son Zak. All
headed up to the Gene and Dick
Hudson home for a party of which
Connie (Hudson) Johnson is a
dealer.
Morrie and Barb Jones went to
the football game at Philip Satur-
day morning. Their grandson,
Brody Jones, was one of the players
in the football game. Following the
football game, Morrie and Barb
headed for the Black Hills for the
weekend. Took a drive through
Spearfish Canyon seeing all of the
beautiful fall colors, spent the
night at Deadwood, came back
through Hill City the next day, and
then on to Rapid City and then
home. Reports are they had a re-
laxing and enjoyable weekend.
Missionaries Mike and Cathy
Brandt spoke at the Open Bible
Church Sunday. They were origi-
nally from Rapid City, now live in
California near the Mexico border,
and are doing ministry work in Ti-
juana, Mexico. Mike and Cathy
spent Saturday night at the home
of Pastor Andy and Jennifer Blye.
For anyone wanting to hear their
message at the Open Bible Church
you can go to www.facebook.
com/midlandobc.
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church
south of Midland had their Mission
Festival service Sunday, Septem-
ber 30. Pastor Daniel Tews and his
wife and four little boys came from
Gettysburg and he gave the Mis-
sion Festival message. There was
supper in the church basement fol-
lowing the service. Karel Reiman
reported it was good to have so
many young ones at their church.
There were six young lads from
ages six and under with the four
boys from Gettysburg and Stetson
Jones and Judah Huber and then
there was little two-year-old Mesa
Jones. Little ones make for inter-
esting and lively times as they are
always busy little bees.
I enjoyed the story written and
great photos taken by Allison Jar-
rell in the Friday, September 28,
2012, newspaper edition in the
Pierre Capital Journal, Dakota Life
“Road to Capa Runs Back in Time.”
In the article, Allison writes about
the town of Capa and its lone resi-
dent, Philip O’Connor. She tells of
Philip and the vivid memories he
shares with those interested in lis-
tening. Allison goes on to write that
he paints a portrait so vibrant that
the echoes of a bustling town can
almost be heard. Speaking person-
ally, I like how she wrote that. It
makes for a human interest touch
to history. My absolute favorite
part of a story. Many of us in this
area know Philip O’Connor and his
knowledge of history. He has a
wealth of history stored in that
mind of his and when folks come
seeking some history of their fam-
ily who once lived in Capa – Philip
is the person to go, too.
And speaking of newspapers,
Jerry and I happened to be eating
at a local café in Murdo one
evening and got to visiting with
some folks. They were from Chin-
coteague, Va., were an interesting
couple and got to sharing some of
the points of interest of where they
live. Jerry told them they better
watch out that I was a local news
columnist and they might wind up
in my news column. We had a good
laugh as they shared how they also
have a local news column in the
newspaper where they live. She
gave me a website where I could
read about Chincoteague. It told
that the word Chincoteague is said
to be an Indian name meaning
“beautiful land across the water.”
And that Chincoteague Island, Vir-
ginia’s only resort island is perhaps
the most beautiful island on Vir-
ginia’s eastern shore. I enjoyed
reading about the island and I
never cease to be amazed at how in
visiting with folks, your horizons
are broadened, as you are taken off
to places you will never see.
Micaela reported her mom, Alice
(Donovan) Venner, has been feeling
well enough to go on some nature
trips. Alice and her husband,
Larry, spent a few days at Farm Is-
land. It went so well they decided
to load up the camper for an
overnight excursion to the Black
Hills for the buffalo round up. The
nice thing about a camper, you
have your bed with you, so when
you need to you can rest. I visited
with Alice by phone Saturday, she
was having a good day. We had
some good laughs and shared some
stories. It was a good visit. We
thank Micaela for the updates on
Caring Bridge. Our thoughts and
prayers continue to be with Alice
and Larry and their families.
Kristi and Tom have also been
keeping us updated on Mary Par-
quet. Jake, Kristi and little Rem-
ington visited with Kriti’s mom
over the weekend. Babies have a
way of bringing smiles to folks
without even trying, don’t they?
Mary and Tom’s good friend, Pam
Bryan, was going to spend a few
days with Mary. Mary and her
family continue to be in our prayers
as they deal with the day to day
things that occur following a kid-
ney transplant. We wish Mary
God’s speed in healing. Anyone
wishing to send her a card, the
apartment where she stays when
not in the hospital is: Mary Par-
quet, Laurel Oaks Apt., 4510
Prince of Peace Place, Apt. # 212,
Sioux Falls, SD 57103.
Cam Meinzer and Tom Parquet
held the hunter’s safety course in
Midland Saturday. There were 23
people who took the course coming
from Sioux Falls and Box Elder
and places in-between. Sophie
Foley said her grandson, Kendall
Larson, came for the course, he will
soon be 12 years old. Seems it was-
n’t that long ago he was just a little
boy, they do grow up fast.
Holly Nemec underwent neck
surgery Wednesday, the 26th of
September. She and Randy re-
turned home on the 27th to begin
her recuperation which will be ap-
proximately six weeks. Extra spe-
cial visitors at their home on Sat-
urday were Adam and Brittany
Nemec and their seven-week-old
son, Austin, Farmington, Minn.
All-in-all, Holly says she is doing
well. Our prayers are with Holly as
she recuperates from her surgery.
A birthday party was held in
Midland’s city park Saturday for
Austin, the son of Andy and Kerri
Schofield, and Cara and Shelby,
the daughters of Ted and Michele
Schofield. Others at the birthday
party were Clint and Prerry
Saucerman, Wilma Saucerman,
Roy and Carol Hunt, Terry and
Linda Schofield, Shelly McLaugh-
lin and boys, C.J. and Dustin
Vollmer, Christina Freeman and
girls and Anthony Songer. Happy
birthday wishes to all three kids.
Nowlin Circle entertained at the
Philip Nursing Home Friday after-
noon.
Gene and Audrey Jones have
been making a number of road
trips lately. Tuesday, they went to
the prayer service for Bill Knox at
Highmore. Dick Knox is married to
Bernadette (Nemec) Knox and Bill
was Dick’s dad. Thursday, Gene
and Audrey went to Spearfish for
the ceremony of those returning
from serving in Afghanistan as
their grandson, Dachery Geiman,
was one of those in the ceremony.
It was the annual sisters-week-
end for the daughters of Edward
and Elizabeth Nemec. This year it
was held at the home of Christine
(Nemec) and Gary Ryan at Tolna,
N.D. Gary Ryan, Dick Knox and
Gene Jones made a road trip to
Medora to see the oil fields while
the girls were having their sister
time. Betty VanderMay and Fran-
cis Terkildsen, Kadoka, and Polly
Bruce, Hayes, drove to the home of
Art and Winnie Bergesen at Hayes
and from there they headed for
Tolna with Winnie doing the driv-
ing. Audrey Jones, Midland, and
Rita Foreng, Sioux Falls, were
there, as was Bernadette Knox,
Highmore, and Christine Ryan, as
the two of them hosted the sisters
weekend at Christine’s home. From
the sounds of things, they had a
fun time playing games, sharing
memories, roasting hot dogs and
marshmallows and making smores.
They even had what Polly called a
rather humorous beauty contest in
which each of the contestants were
given a unique name, gave a
speech and did a talent perform-
ance. Hostesses, Christine and
Bernadette, were the judges and
sister Polly was crowned queen.
Congratulations Polly. All attended
Mass at McHenry Sunday and
after eating lunch at a local café to-
gether everyone headed out, some
went home and others had other
places to go. Reports are Gene and
Audrey headed for Wagner where
their daughter, Lisa Foley, lives, to
attend some sporting events of
grandkids.
As I close my column for this
week, I would like to share a piece
about aprons that Mary Lou (Fos-
ter) Wallner, Ramsey, Minn., gave
me when she and her husband,
Jerry, were in Midland for free day.
As I read it, I thought of my aunt,
Esther Schanzenbach, who always
seemed to have an apron on when
working around the house. Its prin-
ciple use was to protect the dress
underneath, but along with that it
often served as a potholder for re-
moving hot pans from the oven, for
gathering eggs, and when the
weather was cold they could be
used to wrap around your arms,
from the garden it carried in pro-
duce, and in the fall they were used
to bring in apples, and when unex-
pected company drove up the road,
it was surprising how much furni-
ture that old apron could dust in a
matter of seconds. It had other uses
as well. It will be a long time before
someone invents something that
will replace that “old time apron”
that served so many purposes.
Good memories. Have a good week,
be safe and continue to pray for
that much needed rain.
Fall 2012 PoSt & GateS Sale
WHeeler CunaP treated
Ea. Unit
3”x6’6” ......................................$5.06 ea.
3
1
⁄2”x6’6” ...............$7.68 ...........$7.04 ea.
4”x6’6”..................$8.82 ...........$8.09 ea.
4”x7’ ..........................................$8.80 ea.
4”x8’.....................$11.52.........$10.56 ea.
5”x8’.....................$15.42 ........$14.14 ea.
6”x8’.....................$22.50 ........$20.63 ea.
7”x8’ ........................................$26.40 ea.
5”x10’...................$20.40 ........$18.70 ea.
6”x10’...................$28.20 ........$25.85 ea.
7”x10’...................$34.80 ........$31.90 ea.
5”x12’...................$24.30 ........$22.28 ea.
6”x12’...................$32.40 ........$29.70 ea.
7”x12’...................$43.80 ........$40.15 ea.
8”x12’...................$72.00 ........$66.00 ea.
5”x14’...................$36.00
6”x14’...................$45.60
6”x16’...................$58.80
Pointed PoSt
Ea. Unit
3”x6’6” ......................................$5.72 ea.
3
1
⁄2”x6’6” ....................................$7.70 ea.
4”x6’6”..................$9.90 ...........$9.08 ea.
4”x7’ ..........................................$9.79 ea.
5”x8’ ........................................$15.79 ea.
6”x8’.....................$24.90 ........$22.83 ea.
WHeeler treated PlankS
2x6-16’ .....................................$22.56 ea.
2x8-16’ .....................................$30.07 ea.
2x10-16’ ...................................$39.67 ea.
2x12-16’ ...................................$51.84 ea.
Mineral FeederS
1 or 2......................................$262.00 ea.
3 or more ..............................$242.00 ea.
Bale FeederS
1 or 2......................................$269.00 ea.
3 or more ..............................$254.00 ea.
douBle Slant Feeder
$439.00 ea.
Hd 1” HinGe
$25.00
2”x6-Bar Steel GateS
20’.............$350.00 12’.........$213.00
18’.............$317.00 10’.........$195.00
16’.............$279.00 8’...........$179.00
14’.............$239.00 6’...........$164.00
4’...........$140.00
2”x7-Bar Steel GateS
18’.............$374.00 10’.........$227.00
16’.............$329.00 8’...........$194.00
14’.............$289.00 6’...........$170.00
12’.............$246.00 4’...........$148.00
1.66”x6-Bar Steel GateS
18’.............$256.00 10’.........$159.00
16’.............$225.00 8’...........$136.00
14’.............$203.00 6’ ...........$115.00
12’.............$176.00 4’.............$96.00
Steel PoStS
1.33# with 5 clips ea.
5
1
⁄2’ .........................Bdl. of 5....$4.99 ea.
Unit of 200 .......................$4.55 ea.
6’............................Bdl. of 5....$5.50 ea.
Unit of 200 .......................$5.06 ea.
BarBed Wire
1 Roll .....................................$80.50 ea.
Unit of 27 rolls .....................$73.80 ea.
CASH & CARRY. Sale runs September 4 to October 13, 2012.
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Join us for an Open House &
Appreciation Roast Beef Dinner
Saturday, October 13th
from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Annual
Lutefisk & Roast Beef Supper
Bazaar to follow
Wednesday, October 17th
Trini ty Lutheran Church Mid-
land
Serving starts
at 5 p.m. (MST)
Adults - $8.00
Children, 12 & under - $3.00
Greetings from sunny, breezy,
cooler, a little bit damp (no, that is
not a misprint) northeast Haakon
County. The temperature is sup-
posed to reach the mid-80s today,
but it sounds like a real cool down
later in the week. There is even
talk of the possibility of snow in the
Black Hills! It is amazing how fast
the seasons can change. We were
so thrilled and thankful on Sunday
to receive a couple of rain showers
totaling nearly a half inch of mois-
ture. We had a few puddles in the
yard, and the thick layer of dust
was washed off the grass and fo-
liage, making things seem just a
little bit brighter. The rain was by
no means a drought buster, but
every drop was welcome. The first
rain shower was preceded by some
lightning, and a fire started burn-
ing on some of Lee Briggs' land
near the old Emery Markwed
place. Fortunately, the neighbors
were being vigilant, and they were
able to put the fire out in short
order before it got out of control.
All of this dry weather we've had
has caused me to be a good cus-
tomer of the companies that make
hand and/or body lotion. Maybe
now that we have a little moisture
in the air, my skin will look less
like an alligator! (That is probably
TMI, as my children would say –
too much information!)
I was hoping that maybe because
of dry conditions we wouldn't have
any boxelder bugs this year. That
is not the case, however. They have
shown up, albeit in smaller num-
bers than some years. (Or maybe it
is just early in the boxelder bug
season.) Wasps are plentiful, too,
along with those pesky striped
winged flies. Maybe the freezing
temperatures predicted for later
this week will slow the bugs down
a bit. The birds have been plentiful
around here also, probably flocking
together to get ready to migrate.
One thing for sure, if I have clothes
drying on the clothesline, I need to
bring them inside as soon as they
are dry – otherwise, some bird is
sure to score a direct hit on the
clean clothes and I have to start all
over again!
Things have been busy at Billy
and Arlyne Markwed's place. The
electrician came and did the wiring
on their new cabin in the yard, and
the carpenters are waiting on sid-
ing and windows. Friday night,
Kim (Markwed) and Jeff Marso
came from their home in Missoula
to spend several days visiting.
They celebrated a belated birthday
with Kim's father, Billy, and an
early birthday with Jeff's mother,
Jackie. Kim's son, Trent, Aberdeen,
arrived Saturday to spend a couple
of days, and Kim's son, Todd, and a
friend from Fargo arrived Monday
night. Kim's son, Danny, and a
friend will arrive Thursday. T.J.
and Jeanine Gabriel and family
were supper guests over the week-
end, so they had a chance to visit
with the company also. Tuesday
(today) is going to be a big day for
the Markweds – Billy and Arlyne
will be selling calves – just like
they have for decades. This sale is
different, however. There is a
changing of the guard at their
ranch, as grandson T.J. Gabriel is
stepping up as the new owner. So
now the management decisions will
be T.J.'s instead of Billy's. Luckily,
Grandpa Billy will still be available
to offer advice and encouragement
and to help with some of the work,
and Grandma Arlyne will still be
the gracious hostess/babysitter/all-
around-helper she has always
been. Congratulations to Billy and
Arlyne as they reach this milestone
in their lives! I'm so happy their
children and some of the grandchil-
dren get to share this day with
them. Hope the cattle market is
good!
Lola Roseth held a rummage sale
at her mother's home in Philip Sat-
urday. She and Duane attended
church Sunday, and Lola provided
lunch. Sunday afternoon, Lola at-
tended a party at Gene Hudson's
home.
Bill and Polly Bruce are enjoying
the cooler temperatures, as we all
are. On the 20th, they went to
Pierre to keep appointments. They
attended the Merchant Apprecia-
tion Days in Midland on the 22nd.
Wednesday, the 26th, Bill and
Polly were in Highmore to attend
Bill Knox's funeral. Mr. Knox was
the father-in-law of Polly's sister,
Bernadette. While in Highmore,
Bill and Polly visited with their sis-
ter-in-law, Barbara Nemec, as well
as with Ruth Neuhauser. They en-
joyed supper in Pierre on their way
home. On the 28th, Polly joined her
sisters for their annual Sisters'
Weekend. The eight sisters have
been holding this special weekend
celebration for over 10 years now,
and they take turns hosting the
event. Polly joined her sisters Betty
and Frances of Kadoka at their sis-
ter, Winnie's, country home, and
the four ladies headed to the home
of their sister, Christine Ryan, near
Talna, N.D. They were joined by
sisters, Audrey, Midland,
Bernadette, Highmore, and Rita,
Sioux Falls. The weekend included
lots of visiting, laughing, great
food, gift exchanges, and general
silliness. (For example, Polly said
they had a queen pageant – she
was Miss Conduct, and her sisters
all had various titles to fit the
theme.) The ladies attended church
in McHenry Sunday and had din-
ner at a local restaurant before
heading back to their respective
homes. Polly said that sister Chris-
tine has a beautiful yard, with ex-
cellent soil that will grow most any-
thing! The growing season is
shorter there, so things had al-
ready been touched by frost. While
Polly was gone, the guys moved
cattle home from the south pas-
ture. Polly said this is the first cat-
tle drive she has missed at their
place. Fortunately, Vince's wife,
Katie, cooked a feast for the cow-
boys, so all was well.
It was cattle working time at
Clark and Carmen Alleman's last
week, which is a several day
process. Sunday afternoon follow-
ing church, Carmen attended a
party at Gene Hudson's home.
Monday, Clark and Carmen were
in Pierre.
Clint and Laura Alleman have
been staying busy with cattle work
and other fall activities. Of course,
having a toddler keeps things
pretty busy also! Clint, Laura and
Alivya were at Dick and Gene Hud-
son's Sunday afternoon.
Nancy Stirling Neuhauser spent
last week catching her breath,
since the past several weeks have
been so busy planning and prepar-
ing for the Sterling family memo-
rial ranch rodeo, which was held
September 22 in Ft. Pierre. This is
the 15th year for this event – it
started out as a team penning
event and became a ranch rodeo
about four years ago. The purpose
of the event is to raise money to
help families who are battling can-
cer. Over 14 years, they have
raised over $25,000 and helped
over 80 families. There was lots of
family on hand to help with the
work, and it sounds like the event
was a success. Ray and Nancy were
at the senior center for lunch
Thursday, and they joined some
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Good Luck, Scotties
at the Region 5 Cross Country Meet
Wednesday, October 10th • 12:00 p.m. at
Lake Waggoner Golf Course, north of Philip
The Scotties are proudly
supported by these fine
local businesses:
Brant’s
Electric
B&B
Sales
Coyle’s
SuperValu
Dr. Ron & Laurie
Mann & Staff
Ernie’s Bldg.
Center, LLC
Farm Bureau
Financial
First National
Agency
First National
Bank in Philip
Fitgerald
Oil Company
Gibson
Concrete Const.
Golden Willow
Seeds
Haakon County
Abstract
G&G
Excavation
Ingram
Hardware
Jones’ Saddlery
Bottle & Vet
Kennedy
Impl. & Auto
Grossenburg
Implement
Midwest Co-op
Cenex
Modern Woodmen
of America
Philip Health
Services, Inc.
Philip Livestock
Auction
Ravellette
Publications
Rush Funeral
Home
State Farm
Insurance
The Steakhouse
& Lounge
Philip Motor,
Inc.
Coyle’s
Standard
Scotties Cross Country team, back row, left to right, Coach Ralph
Kroetch, Keegan Burnett, Garrett Snook, Tristen Rush, Blake Martinez,
Nelson Holman, Student Mgr. Sam Stangle; front row, Conner Dekker,
Allison Pekron, Ellie Coyle, Holly Iwan, Shay Hand, Damian Bartels.
Photo by Deb Smith
PARTICIPATING TEAMS:
Philip ~ Bison ~ Crazy Horse ~ Dupree ~ Faith
Harding County ~ Jones County ~ Kadoka Area
Lemmon ~ New Underwood ~ Oelrichs
Rapid City Christian ~ Takini ~ Wall ~ White River
The State Meet is October 20th in Huron.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports
Help Philip Motor, in conjunction with Ford Motor
Company, raise $6,000 for the Philip VFD!!
Come in & test drive a Ford vehicle
(with no obligation to buy)
Friday, October 5th
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Philip Fire Hall
With each test drive, $20.00 will be donated
to the Philip Volunteer Fire Department!!!
Philip Motor, Inc.
859-2585 • Philip • www.philipmotor.com
FREE LuNCH
for all
test drivers!
Coffee &
lemonade too!!
WHY DO I AGE? GET SICK? GET DISEASES?
Scientists believe that free radicals are factors in nearly
every known disease and the aging process itself.
Join us to find out how you can reduce those free radicals by up to 70% simply and easily.
Health & Wellness Coach Nancy Volmer and her business partner,
Jesse Horst, will take us through the science and the solution.
Wednesday, October 10th • 7:00 p.m.
Senior Citizen’s Center ~ Philip
Everyone Welcome!
Powerful and Life Changing
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkLy SPECIAL:
Swiss Mushroom burger
& French Fries
SuNdAy SPECIAL:
Ham & Scalloped Potatoes
Salad Bar & Dessert
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers........................................10-6
Handrahan Const .........................9-7
Shad’s Towing...............................8-8
Dakota Bar....................................8-8
Petersen’s......................................8-8
Badland’s Auto............................5-11
Highlights:
Gail Reutier ...........5-7 split; 201/564
Andrew Reckling...................225/554
Brian Pearson .......................214/558
Tena Slovek...........................179/503
Trina Brown..........................181/495
Jason Petersen3-10 split x2; 202/541
Bryan Buxcel ................5-6 split; 537
Maralynn Burns....................171/472
Neal Petersen..................3-5-10 split
Vickie Petersen.....................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Invisibles.....................................12-4
Cutting Edge Salon ....................11-5
Bowling Belles ............................10-6
State Farm Ins..............................7-9
Jolly Ranchers ............................6-10
Ghost Team.................................2-14
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........................193/490
Beth Kennedy ..............................162
Audrey Jones.........................154/429
Debbie Gartner ............................154
Sandi Gittings..............................152
Sandra O’Connor..................5-7 split
Beth Stewart ........................2-7 split
Marti Kjerstad......................2-7 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Morrison’s Haying ......................11-5
Dakota Bar..................................11-5
Hildebrand Concrete ....................9-7
Dorothy’s Catering .......................9-7
First National Bank ...............8.5-7.5
Chiefie’s Chicks ......................7.5-8.5
Just Tammy’s..............................5-11
Wall Food Center........................3-13
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz...............................177
Val Schulz .............................174/492
Marlis Petersen.....................193/470
Amy Morrison ..............................478
Jackie Shull..................................180
Debbie Gartner ............................178
Cristi Ferguson............................176
Cindy VanderMay...........6-7-10 split
Beth Kennedy.......................5-7 split
Stacey Schulz......................5-10 split
Sandee Gittings..................2-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
King Pins...............................14.5-1.5
Cristi’s Crew...............................11-5
Roy’s Repair ............................9.5-6.5
Randy’s Spray Service..................5-7
Lee and the Ladies .......................4-8
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Aaron Richardsen .........212, 200/580
Kelly Fees..............................198/512
Cory Boyd..............................213/606
Brenda Grenz...............................180
Brian Pearson......3-10 split; 209/551
Bart Guptill..................................549
Alvin Pearson...............................537
Ed Morrison..........................5-6 split
Cristi Ferguson.....................5-6 split
The Philip Scotties football team
traveled to Fort Pierre, Friday,
September 28, to face the Stanley
County Buffaloes.
The first quarter put Philip in a
leading position when Tate DeJong
caught a Gavin Brucklacher pass
to score a 22-yard touchdown.
Though the extra point attempt
failed, the Scotties were on the
scoreboard 6-0. Teammates assist-
ing each other on tackles has come
to be a season trademark for the
Scotties, who kept Stanley County
off of the scoreboard for the first
quarter.
That changed in the second quar-
ter when Buffaloes’ quarterback
Herman Fennell got a pass to
Brady Washechek, who finished
the 58-yard play for a touchdown.
The two repeated their teamwork
to complete the two-point pass con-
version play to put the score at 6-8.
Later, Stanley County’s Wayde
Wieczorek pulled down an inter-
ception and ran the ball in for a 28-
yard touchdown. The extra point
attempt failed. The first half ended
with Philip down, 6-14.
In the third quarter, Philip’s
Paul Guptill finished a Scotties
drive to rush the ball in the final
three yards to score. The extra
point attempt failed. The third
quarter ended 12-14.
Trailing in the fourth quarter,
Philip had its kicker, Chaney
Burns, put a field goal through the
goal posts. Philip was now in the
lead 15-14, and stayed that way
until the final buzzer.
Philip earned 20 first downs.
Philip had two five-yard penalties
and four 10-yard penalties. Stanley
County earned 22 first downs. The
Buffaloes incurred two five-yard
penalties and two 10-yard penal-
ties. Philip punted six times, while
Stanley county punted twice.
Philip’s passing game saw
Brucklacher complete one of his
five throws, for a 22-yard gain,
which was a touchdown. He did
suffer two interceptions. DeJong
threw the ball twice, connecting
once for a four-yard gain.
The Philip rushing game saw 49
runs for a total of 210 yards gained.
Guptill carried the ball 18 times to
rack up a total of 82 yards. Ryan
Van Tassel rushed 12 times for a
total of 45 yards. DeJong added 43
yards through five carries. Cassidy
Schnabel used his five carries to
get 15 more yards for his team.
The Philip defensive leaders
were lead by Reed Johnson who got
one solo and 11 assisted tackles,
and a quarterback sack. Van Tas-
sel racked up two solos, seven as-
sists and three sacks. Jade Berry’s
10 assists included two sacks.
Schnabel added three solo and
seven assists. DeJong helped his
team with one solo, seven assists,
two sacks and two fumble recover-
ies.
The next challenge for the Philip
Scotties will be against the Lyman
Raiders in Philip, Friday, October
5, starting at 6:00 p.m.
Football victory over Stanley Co.
Paul Guptill took down this Stanley County player, with Jacob Kammerer coming
in for backup, during their matchup in Ft. Pierre last Friday. Guptill also rushed
for 82 yards on 18 carries, one of which was a touchdown in the third quarter.
Austin Pinney breaks the tackle attempt by this Stanley County player last Friday.
The Scotties came out with the win 15-14. Photos by Nancy Haigh
The Philip Lady Scotties trav-
eled to Dupree to challenge the
Tigers on their opponents’ home
volleyball court.
The Philip varsity team started
out with a fairly close 20-25 loss in
the first game. Then the Scotties
came back to earn an even closer
25-21 win. The third game of the
match was a 25-20 win for Philip.
The fourth game, the most lop-
sided game of the evening at 19-25,
was a loss for Philip. The games
stood 2-2, with the Lady Scotties
actually being two points down in
total points scored so far. The tie-
breaker ended as a game win of 15-
11, and a match win for the Scot-
ties.
Serving: 81 of 103 (25 aces). Leaders:
Madison Hand – 14 of 21 (7 aces), Peyton De-
Jong – 17 of 19 (5 aces), Krista Wells – 13 of
14 (2 aces).
Receiving: 73 of
86. Leaders: Wells –
35 of 40, Ellie
Coyle – 11 of 12,
Kaci Olivier – 14 of
17, Brett Carley –
12 of 14.
Setting: 107 of
111 (31 assists),
Leader: Hand – 89
of 92 (25 assists).
Hitting: 98 of
126 (39 kills). Lead-
ers: DeJong – 26 of
30 (13 kills), Car-
ley – 23 of 28, (12
kills), Courtney
Bartlett – 12 of 21
(4 kills).
Blocking: 5 kills.
Leaders: Hanna
Hostutler – 2 solos,
Carley – 1 solo and
1 assist, Olivier – 1
assist.
Digging: 81 of
111. Leaders:
Wells – 29 of 34,
Carley – 12 of 18,
Coyle – 11 of 15,
Hand – 13 of 18.
The junior
varsity team
showed little
effort in hand-
ily claiming
their first game
with a score of
25-13. The sec-
ond game,
though lasting
a bit longer,
still ended as a
Philip win,
ending 25-22.
Serving: 50 of 63
(21 aces). Leaders:
Olivier – 15 of 16 (9
aces), Coyle – 7 of 8
(4 aces), Bartlett – 6
Lady Scotties win at wire over Dupree
The Philip Lady Scotties hosted
the Lemmon Cowgirls, Thursday,
September 27.
The varsity team found that a
two game lead by the Cowgirls was
just too much to handle for a come-
back. The fourth game saw an
early lead by Philip, which faded
before game’s end. The varsity
team finished with game scores of
19-25, 18-25, 25-22 and 21-25.
Serving: 78 of 84 (13 aces). Leaders:
Hanna Hostutler – 15 of 15 (3 aces), Brett
Carley – 10 of 10 (2 aces), Peyton DeJong –
11 of 13 (2 aces).
Receiving: 53 of 72. Leaders: Krista
Wells – 21 of 24, Kaci Olivier – 10 of 12, Ellie
Coyle – 9 of 13.
Setting: 98 of 105 (13 assists). Leader:
Madison Hand – 65 of 69 (11 assists).
Hitting: 87 of 106 (12 kills). Leaders:
Courtney Bartlett – 14 of 16 (3 kills), Carley –
11 of 14 (2 kills), DeJong – 18 of 23 (2 kills).
Blocking: 12 kills. Leaders: Carley – 4
solos and 2 assists, Hostutler – 3 solos, 1 as-
sist.
Digging: 70 of 113. Leaders: Wells – 18 of
23, Carley – 10 of 17, Hand – 11 of 20.
The junior varsity team made a
quick 2-0 match win, with game
scores of 25-21 and 25-16.
Serving: 45 of 49 (5 aces). Leaders:
Olivier – 13 of 13 (2 aces). DeJong – 10 of 10
(2 aces), Hostutler – 7 of 8 (1 ace).
Receiving: 22 of 24. Leaders: Coyle – 7 of
7, Hostutler – 6 of 6.
Setting: 37 of 40 (3 assists). Leaders: Ash-
ton Reedy – 8 of 9 (1 assist), Olivier – 5 of 5
(1 assist).
Hitting: 30 of 42 (5 kills). Leaders: De-
Jong – 7 of 10 (2 kills), Olivier – 2 of 4 (1 kill),
Justina Cvach – 5 of 5.
Blocking: 2 kills. Leaders: DeJong – 1 solo,
Hostutler – 1 solo.
Digging: 34 of 41. Leaders: Olivier – 7 of 8,
Coyle – 6 of 8, Hostutler – 6 of 8.
Lady Scotties squeezed out by Lemmon
Katlin Knutson
Ashton Reedy
Courtney Bartlett
Pinney
chosen all-
tournament
A senior at Mobridge/Pollock High
School, Kady Pinney was recently
named all-tournament at the Mo-
bridge/Pollock volleyball tournament,
September 8. She was again named
all-tournament at the Big Dakota Con-
ference tournament in Mobridge, Sep-
tember 22. Pinney is the daughter of
Kevin and Kim Pinney, Philip, and the
granddaughter of Terry and Karen Pin-
ney, Philip. Courtesy photo
of 6 (1 ace).
Receiving: 31 of 43. Leaders: Coyle – 8 of
11, Afton Burns – 5 of 7, Carley – 4 of 6.
Setting: 47 of 51 (17 assists). Leaders: Ash-
ton Reedy – 25 of 27 (10 assists), Olivier – 18
of 19 (7 assists).
Hitting: 48 of 57 (19 kills). Leaders: Hos-
tutler – 15 of 16 (9 kills), Justina Cvach – 6
of 7 (3 kills), DeJong – 6 of 8 (2 kills).
Digging: 35 of 40. Leaders: Olivier – 7 of 9,
Coyle – 6 of 7.
The next contest for the Philip
Lady Scotties will be at Wall
against the Lady Eagles, Thurs-
day, October 4, starting at 6:00
p.m. The next meet will be a trian-
gular in Rapid City involving
Philip, New Underwood and Rapid
City Christian, Saturday, October
6, starting at 3:00 p.m. The Scotties
will be in Presho, Thursday, Octo-
ber 11, facing the Lyman Raiders,
starting at 5:30 p.m.
With Midland’s
parade theme
being “Weather,”
this storm chaser
entry and its
skeleton driver
were eye-catch-
ing. See more on
page 11.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports & Accomplishments
1st Annual 2-Man
Golf Scramble
Lake Waggoner Golf Course
2.5 mi. N & .5 mi. E of Philip
2-Man Alternate Shot
Golf Scramble
Saturday, October 6th
Shotgun start at 1:00 p.m.
$40 per team (includes green fees)
A portion of all proceeds will benefit the
Philip Volunteer Fire Department
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Tyler Hauk: 685-8869
Shawn Kerns: 430-2486
Philip Area Farmer’s Market
Fall Fest
Saturday, October 13th
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
K-gee’s Building • Downtown Philip
Baked Goods ~ Honey ~ Produce
Jewelry ~ Handcrafted Items
Greetings Cards
Hair Accessories ~ Plus More!!
Lunch will be available
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
by Coach Ralph Kroetch
The Wall Eagles traveled with
the Philip Scotties, Saturday, Sep-
tember 29, to compete against
many of the South Dakota best ath-
letes from both the “A” and “B” di-
visions at the Highmore cross coun-
try meet.
Philip’s senior Holly Iwan, junior
Allison Pekron and freshman Ellie
Coyle toed the starting line. They
were alongside Ipswich, the team
rated by the South Dakota coach’s
association as number one in the
“B” divison.
The field was lead early by Ip-
swich’s Tori Moore and Macy
Heinz, each a state champion in
the last two years. Iwan and Coyle
ran in the seventh and eighth
spots, with Ipswich’s Taylor Loken
in ninth. Pekron began deep in this
mix of over 40 girls. By mile two,
Coyle had moved to fourth place,
with Iwan in sixth. The girls’
course ran behind a tree grove and
out of sight. As they returned,
Moore was leading, then Mt. Ver-
non/Plankinton’s Savannah
Schmidt, and Philip’s Coyle finish-
ing third. Iwan finished directly be-
hind a pair of Ipswich girls in sev-
enth place. Pekron battled Ip-
swich’s Tory Makela across the fin-
ish line in 34th place. Their fin-
ishes, with Coyle’s time of 15:36,
Iwan’s 16:16 and Pekron’s 19:20,
gave the Scotties fourth place as a
team in an extraordinary team ef-
fort. Ipswich – 12 points, Potter
County – 31, James Valley Chris-
tian – 33, Philip – 41, Mt.
Vernon/Plankinton – 51, Lyman –
63, Jones County – 64,
Highmore/Harrold – 83, Sunshine
Bible Academy – 83.
With last year’s state champion
Jase Kraft of Wessington Springs
leading the boy’s varsity field, re-
laxed starts were not an option for
the Scotties. This pushed the boys
into the best team effort we have
had all year, and all five boys
turned in premium performances.
Nelson Holman lead the Scotties
through much of this race, out pac-
ing Miller’s Mason Breitling for
fifth place and a course best by
1:04. Tristen Rush, just five sec-
onds behind his teammate, took
the seventh place while bettering
his course best by 58 seconds at
18:38. Blake Martinez over took Ip-
swich’s Matthew Geditz in the final
yards to claim the 15th and final
place medal, in a time of 20:01.
Garrett Snook cut 1:27 from his
course best to place 18th at 20:29
and Keegan Burnett turned in eas-
ily his best race of the year placing
26th at 20:52.
The boys claimed Highmore
championship hardware for the
second straight year, with 20 team
points; Miller – 30, Mt.
Vernon/Plankinton – 30, Ipswich –
41, Stanley County – 42, High-
more/Harrold – 46, Wessington
Springs – 49.
Damian Bartels and Conner
Dekker chose the 4,000 junior var-
sity meter race, with both running
inspired races. Bartels improved
his course best by 30 seconds to
earn the 13th place medal at 18:04.
Dekker ran one of his best races to
date, placing 17th with a time of
20:32.
The next meets for the Scotties
will be them hosting the Philip
cross country meet, Saturday, Oc-
tober 6, starting at 10:00 a.m. The
next meet will be the Region 5B
Cross Country Meet, held in Philip,
Wednesday, October 10, starting at
noon. District 5B consists of Philip,
Bison, Crazy Horse, Dupree, Faith,
Harding County, Jones County,
Kadoka Area, Lemmon, New Un-
derwood, Oelrichs, Rapid City
Christian, Takini, Wall and White
River. The state meet will be in
Huron, Saturday, October 20.
Repeat champions at Highmore
Conner Dekker Damian Bartels
Allison Pekron. Courtesy photos
Indoor, outdoor, any season
The Shake-It-Up kids performed their dance number during halftime of the last Philip Scotties’ home football game. Photo
by Del Bartels
by Coach Ralph Kroetch
On Tuesday, September 25, the
Scotties’ cross country team trav-
eled to Lead to race on the mile
high Tomahawk Golf Course.
This course is rolling hills
around the base of Strawberry Hill.
With that, most spectators are able
to cheer their athletes only at the
beginning and the end of the race.
Clear skies and little breeze, and
our girls’ varsity team took on some
of the best “A” division teams in the
state. As the “A” division races re-
quire four-member teams in order
to count team points, Ellie Coyle,
Holly Iwan, Allison Pekron and
Shay Hand all ran varsity today.
The first three-eighths of a mile
is a long hill, and at the top our
leaders, Iwan and Coyle, ran just
inside the top 10. Hand was near
mid pack and Pekron was just a
few spots back of Hand.
The field returned to sight led by
two Spearfish runners at the one
and two positions. Coyle, with a
strong race, finished third at a time
of 16:19, and a huge 2:09 improve-
ment on her course best. Only Hot
Springs’ Leah Deering separated
Iwan from Coyle as Iwan ran this
course for her fifth time, earning
fifth place and a new course best of
16:48.
Hand, running this 4,000 meter
course for the first time, sprinted
past Douglas High School’s Sha-
trice Rugh to claim the 12th place
medal at 18:42. Pekron out ran Hot
Spring’s Grace Rickenbach for the
16th place. The Scotties finished
second behind the state number
one rated “A” division team of
Spearfish, and just two points in
front of third place Hot Springs.
Since these races run around
Strawberry Hill, the simplest way
to add 1,000 meters is back around
the hill and out of sight for the
start. When the boys’ varsity field
came into sight for the first time,
Tristen Rush was in 16th place
with Nelson Holman in 20th, Gar-
rett Snook in 22nd, Blake Martinez
in 24th, and Keegan Burnett in
30th.
Again, the long hill that the girls
started on gave our guys a chance
to overtake runners, with each
Scottie moving up as they climbed
this hill. As the field of runners re-
turned again to our sight, Rush
came up on Spearfish’s Joseph
Barnes, overtaking him in a long
sprint for eighth place. Holman
kept Douglas’ Jameson McClain
behind him to take the final place
medal at 15th place with a time of
20:14. Both of these men had run
this course for the first time. Mar-
tinez came from well behind Dou-
glas and Spearfish runners, over-
taking both in the final yards to
place 20th with a course best of
21:10. Snook placed 24th and im-
proved his previous course best by
an unbelievable 3:40. Burnett fin-
ished his race in 29th place and a
phenomenal improvement of 2:36.
It was a great run by the entire
team. The Scotties team placed
third, just two points behind
Lead/Deadwood. Spearfish was the
team champion.
Conner Dekker was our lone
3,000 meter junior high entrant,
making his way around the hill for
the first time. Dekker climbed the
same long hill early in the race,
running in mid pack as they went
out of sight. When we saw Dekker
next, he was working to keep Hill
City’s Austin Schmidt behind him
for the 12th place award with a
time of 15:53.
It is fun watching these Scotties
run as everyone works to make im-
provements each week.
Cross country Scotties run the Hills
Shay Hand. Courtesy photos
The FFA regional land and range
judging competition was held
Wednesday, September 26, in Wall.
More than 100 students competed
from western South Dakota schools
of Philip, Kadoka, Wall, Lemmon,
Buffalo, Sturgis, and Newell.
Philip missed the trip to the na-
tional range judging contest held in
Oklahoma by just one point in a
heart breaker. According to Philip
FFA advisor, Doug Hauk, the
scores were triple checked, but the
two points to put Philip on top just
could not be found. Philip does not
have any seniors on the team, so
Philip will return all of its FFA stu-
dents next year.
Team results were: Kadoka –
first place with 1,957 points,
Philip – second place with 1,956,
and Newell – third place with
1,844.
The top individual in range is
awarded $100 sponsored by Cathie
and Leroy Draine. The award cer-
tificate reads, “Being able to pro-
vide this scholarship represents a
good combination of three impor-
tant beliefs: first our respect for the
integrity of the land, our soils and
water; secondly, it is imperative to
provide educational opportunities
for understanding and the wise use
and care of the land; and third,
faith in the process of developing
knowledgeable custodians for the
future.” Individual placings for the
Philip FFA students saw Seth
Haigh and Ryan Van Tassel tied
for first place with 512 points each.
Avery Johnson – seventh with 498,
Rachel Parsons – 15th with 434,
and Ben Stangle – 18th.
The range evaluation contest
provides insight into the basic tools
that are used in land stewardship,
which is the application of ecologi-
cal principles and historically sig-
nificant disturbance such as graz-
ing. Contest objectives are to teach
participants principles of ecology,
including soil/plant relationships,
plant/animal relationships, and
plant succession as applied to man-
agement of the land resource. Beef
cattle and grouse have been chosen
to demonstrate the concept of habi-
tat evaluation. Both species are
ecologically and economically im-
portant and their relationship is
different.
The United States Department
of Agriculture Natural Resource
Conservation Service, their soil
scientists and range scientists
hosted and conducted the event.
FFA regional land and range
judging team takes second
Second place range team, from left: Avery Johnson, Seth Haigh, Ryan Van Tassel
and Rachel Parsons. Courtesy photo
Secretary of State Jason Gant
has announced the latest voter reg-
istration and absentee totals.
The following are voter registra-
tion totals:
Oct. 1, 2012 Sept. 1, 2012
Republican 239,205 237,798
Democrat 187,063 186,313
Libertarian 1,045 1,010
Constitution 330 325
Other 701 653
Independent 90,854 89,638
Total 519,198 515,737
Secretary Gant noted, “As of
today (October 1) nearly 5,000 ab-
sentee ballots have been returned,
while more than 15,000 requests
have been received. A new feature
this year is a daily update on ab-
sentee voting numbers on
sdsos.gov. In the 2010 general elec-
tion, 63,750 absentee ballots were
cast accounting for 20 percent of
the total votes cast. In the 2008
general election, 100,780 absentee
ballots were cast accounting for 26
percent of the total votes cast.”
Voter registration numbers
Legal Notlces
1hursdav, 0otober 4, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 10
ARSD 5:02:04:04
NOTICE OF
DEADLINE FOR
VOTER
REGISTRATION
Voter registration for the 2012 General
Election to be held on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 6, 2012 will close on Monday, October
22, 2012. Failure to register by this date
will cause forfeiture of voting rights for this
election. Ìf you are in doubt about whether
you are registered, check the Voter Ìnfor-
mation Portal at www.sdsos. gov or call
the county auditor at 605-859-2800.
Registration may be completed during
regular business hours at the county au-
ditor's office, municipal finance office,
secretary of state's office, and those loca-
tions which provide driver's licenses,
SNAP, TANF, WÌC, military recruitment,
and assistance to the disabled as pro-
vided by the Department of Human Serv-
ices. You may contact the county auditor
to request a mail-in registration form or
access a mail-in form at www.sdsos.gov.
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in voter registration, absentee
voting, or polling place accessibility.
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
[Published October 4 & 11, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $25.34]
NOTICE OF
DEADLINE FOR
VOTER
REGISTRATION
Voter registration for the Special Election
to be held on November 6, 2012, will
close on October 22, 2012. Failure to reg-
ister by this date will cause forfeiture of
voting rights for this election. If you are in
doubt about whether you are registered,
check the Voter Information Portal at
www.sdsos.gov or call the county auditor
at (605) 859-2800.
Registration may be completed during
regular business hours at the county au-
ditor's office, municipal finance office,
secretary of state's office, and those loca-
tions which provide driver's licenses,
SNAP, TANF, WIC, military recruitment,
and assistance to the disabled as pro-
vided by the Department of Human Serv-
ices. You may contact the county auditor
to request a mail-in registration form or
access a mail-in form at www.sdsos.gov.
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in voter registration, absentee
voting, or polling place accessibility.
Michelle M. Meinzer
Finance Officer
Town of Midland
[Published October 4 & 11, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $25.34]
Notice of Audit of the
FiscaI Affairs of the
Haakon SchooI
District No. 27-1
Notice is hereby given that the Haakon
School District No. 27-1, Philip, South
Dakota, has been audited by Casey Pe-
terson & Associates, Ltd., Certified Public
Accountants, for the year ended June 30,
2012. A detailed report thereon is avail-
able for public inspection, during normal
business hours, at the business office of
the School District, and also available at
the Department of Legislative Audit in
Pierre, South Dakota, or on the Depart-
ment of Legislative Audit website at
http://www.state.sd.us/legislativeaudit/re-
ports_all.htm.
The following findings and recommenda-
tions provide a brief description of mate-
rial weaknesses in internal control, legal
noncompliance and other matters that are
described in more detail in the audit re-
port.
Finding 2012-1
Condition: Lack of adequate con-
trols related to numerous account-
ing functions including the following
cycles/ processes: cash receipts
cycle, reconciliation of accounts, the
posting of general journal entries,
the cut-off and proper recognition of
revenues and expenses, and the
preparation of the financial state-
ments.
Auditor's Recommendation: Recon-
ciliations of accounts and journal
entries prepared by the Business
Manager should be reviewed by the
Superintendent or a Board member.
Ìn addition, procedures should be
developed to ensure proper cut-off
and recognition of revenues and ex-
penses. Ìt is the responsibility of
management and those charged
with governance to determine
whether to accept the risk associ-
ated with the District's auditors draft-
ing the financial statements,
because of cost or other considera-
tions. Ìf the District chooses not to
accept this risk, training should be
provided to those employees re-
sponsible for drafting the financial
statements.
The report does not contain other findings
and recommendations concerning less
significant deficiencies in internal control
at the District.
/s/Casey Peterson & Associates, Ltd.
Casey Peterson & Associates, Ltd.
Certified Public Accountants
Rapid City, South Dakota
September 17, 2012
[Published October 4, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $37.54]
Proceedings of
West River Water
DeveIopment District
August 14, 2012
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb
called the meeting to order at 10:32 a.m.
(CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Joseph
Hieb declared a quorum was present. Di-
rectors present were: Joseph Hieb,
Casey Krogman, Veryl Prokop and Lorne
Smith. Absent: Marion Matt. Also present:
Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Kati Venard,
Sec./Bookkeeper; Dave Larson, Larson
Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Smith, seconded by Director Krogman to
approve the agenda. Motion carried
unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the July 19, 2012, meeting were previ-
ously mailed to the Board for their review.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the July
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BÌLLS: Joseph Hieb
- $56.61, Casey Krogman - $56.61, Veryl
Prokop - $56.61, Lorne Smith - $56.61,
West River/Lyman-Jones RWS -
$1,000.00, Pennington County Courant -
$98.45, Lyman County Herald - $97.57,
Murdo Coyote - $99.81, Todd County
Tribune - $74.90, Pioneer Review -
$70.21, Kadoka Press - $72.56, Howalt-
McDowell Ìnsurance - $957.00, USGS -
$10,950.00 (previously approved). Motion
by Director Prokop, seconded by Director
Smith to approve the District bills. Motion
carried unanimously.
B. DÌSTRÌCT FÌNANCÌAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the July Financial Report
is on file at the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded
by Director Smith to approve the July Fi-
nancial Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his August report to
the Board. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the Manager's Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
SEPTEMBER BOARD MEETING: Mo-
tion by Director Prokop, seconded by Di-
rector Smith to hold the next monthly
board meeting via teleconference on
Thursday, September 20th, 2012, at 9:00
A.M. (CT). Motion carried unanimously.
FY 2013 TAX LEVY: County evaluations
were not available from the Dept. of Rev-
enue to calculate individual county tax
levies for the 2013 Tax Resolution. The
Board approved the Resolution with the
amounts as the state has recommended.
Ìndividual county levies will be provided
when evaluations are available. Motion
by Director Prokop, seconded by Director
Krogman to approve the 2013 Tax Reso-
lution with the amounts as the state has
recommended. Motion carried unani-
mously.
ADJOURNMENT: There being no further
business, the meeting was adjourned at
10:42 A.M. (CT).
ATTEST:
Kati Venard, Recording Secretary
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
[Published October 4, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $34.44]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
SPECIAL SESSION
September 25, 2012
The Haakon County Commissioner's
Meeting was called to order at 11:00 AM
on Tuesday, September 25, 2012. A quo-
rum was established with Chairman Ed-
ward Briggs, Vice Chairman Steve
Clements, Members Rita O'Connell and
Gary Snook in attendance. Nicholas
Konst was absent. Also present were Au-
ditor Pat Freeman, Deputy Auditor Carla
Smith, Highway Superintendent Kenny
Neville, Sheriff Fred Koester and Pioneer
Review Representative Nancy Haigh.
The purpose of this Special Meeting is to
finalize the 2013Annual budget. The only
change from the provisional is that $300
was reduced from the 101-141-426.00
Auditor's supplies and added to 101-511-
411.00 Librarian salaries. With this
change, a motion was made by Commis-
sioner Gary Snook, seconded with all in
agreement to approve the following Res-
olution 2012-8:
RESOLUTION 2012-8
ADOPTION OF ANNUAL
BUDGET FOR HAAKON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA
Whereas, (7-21-5 thru 13),
SDCL provides that the Board
of County Commissioners shall
each year prepare a Provi-
sional Budget of all contem-
plated expenditures and
revenues of the County and all
its institutions and agencies for
such fiscal year and,
Whereas, the Board of County
Commissioners did prepare a
Provisional Budget and cause
same to be published by law,
and
Whereas, due and legal notice
has been given to the meeting
of the Board of County Com-
missioners for the considera-
tion of such Provisional Budget
and all changes, elimination's
and additions have been made
thereto.
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RE-
SOLVED, That such provi-
sional budget as amended and
all its purposes, schedules, ap-
propriations, amounts, esti-
mates and all matters therein
set forth, SHALL BE AP-
PROVED AND ADOPTED AS
THE ANNUAL BUDGET OF
THE APPROPRÌATÌON AND
EXPENDÌTURES FOR
Haakon County, South Dakota
and all its institutions and
agencies for calendar year be-
ginning January 1, 2013, and
ending December 31, 2013,
and the same is approved and
adopted by the Board of
County Commissioners of
Haakon County, South Dakota,
the 25th day of September,
2012. The Annual Budget so
adopted is available for public
inspection during normal busi-
ness hours at the office of the
county auditor Haakon County,
South Dakota. The accompa-
nying taxes are levied by
Haakon County for the year
January 1, 2013, through De-
cember 31, 2013.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMÌSSÌONERS OF
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH
DAKOTA
Commissioner Edward Briggs
Commissioner Stephen
Clements
Commissioner Rita O'Connell
Commissioner Nicholas Konst
Commissioner Gary Snook
ATTEST:
County Auditor,
Patricia G. Freeman
Sheriff Fred Koester reported to the com-
mission that Deputy Mike Koffler resigned
as of the end of September 2012. Permis-
sion was requested and granted by the
commission to advertise for a new
deputy.
Superintendent Kenny Neville visited with
the commission about the progress being
made at the Robbs Flat Shop. Ìt sounds
like things will be in place by the end of
October. That will enable the county to
have a blade and an operator in that part
of the county all year long.
The meeting was adjourned at 12:10 PM.
The next regular commissioner's meeting
will be on Tuesday, October 2, 2012, at
1:00 PM in the Commissioner's Room in
the courthouse.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMÌSSÌON Ed-
ward Briggs, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published October 4, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $68.55]
LegaI Advertising
DeadIine:
Fridays at Noon
ads@pioneer-review.com
(605) 859-2516
[Published October 4, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $337.90]
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 11
Community
continued on page 12
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2010 Dodge Ram 1500
Quad Cab, 5.7L Hemi, Auto, 4x4, Low Miles
Lots of options!
Good morning from Osborn, Mo.
I am scrambling to meet the dead-
line from an area where there isn’t
one Wi–Fi or Internet connection. I
may have to make a trip to St.
Joseph early.
Monday morning, Bill and I vis-
ited Dale and Cindy O’Connell and
delivered an early 70th birthday
present to Dale. We went to Philip
in the afternoon and had lunch out,
visited with Dean and Mary Par-
sons, then Bill kept an appoint-
ment with Dr. Mann. In the
evening, Gary and Linda Petras,
neighbors to the west of us, came
by for a visit. They are getting
ready to add on to their home and
checked out our additions.
Tony Harty had breakfast out
Monday and stopped to visit
Shirley Hair. He chatted with Dale
Koehn while out in the backyard,
catching up on news.
Vi Moody promised her news was
on the way Sunday evening, but
Monday I didn’t have email, so
guess I will have to wing it. Don
and Vi have been busy this week
getting things set up so they can
spend some time in their place in
Rapid Valley for appointments. Vi
is about like the TV commercial
where the woman is calling her cat
and a raccoon comes in the house.
Well, Vi was calling their dog and
there was a skunk heading for the
door! She slammed the door and
the skunk headed to other terri-
tory.
Tuesday, Bill and I made a trip
to Rapid City to get medical sup-
plies. We met grandson Zack Sea-
ger and great-grandson Ryder at
the bowling alley in Rapid City for
lunch. We were happy to see many
other folks we knew there as well.
Jerry Morgan and Don Keyser
were among the bowlers. Another
fellow at a table asked Don if he’d
been to rehab that week, I asked if
they were like the movie stars,
when they get into trouble they
check into a rehab center – they as-
sured me it was a cardiac rehab
center. Also having lunch there
were Mary Slovek, Alicia McQuirk
and Mary Parsons, who were ladies
in waiting to see how Dean Parsons
was after having surgery. I hear
the shoulder surgery was a success
but other complications have made
things plenty unpredictable. A
speedy recovery to Dean. That
evening, Bill and I were guests at
Linda and Gary Petra’s home and
got a tour of their place. As Bill
asked, “Why would anybody want
to change a thing with their dandy
home?” Supplies we needed weren’t
available so it meant another trip
for Bill on Wednesday.
Tuesday, Tony Harty had break-
fast out and then visited Shirley
Hair before he went home to do
some cooking. He had a beef tongue
to cook up and when he went to get
a replacement to have on hand he
discovered that at the local locker
plant they were no longer able to
sell to the public beef tongue, liver
or heart because it has to be in-
spected and an inspector isn’t al-
ways on hand. If a customer brings
in a critter, they can have those
things, but if they don’t want them,
it’s to the dump they go. What a
waste, tongue, heart and liver are
great inexpensive meats.
Wednesday morning, Bill and I
were breakfast guests at the home
of Dale and Cindy O’Connell. Pas-
tor Art and Doris Weischart came
by our home for a visit in the morn-
ing. Tony Harty did his usual
breakfast out and visited with
Shirley Hair before he visited at
our place in the evening to wish us
happy trails.
Roxie Gittings arrived at the
George Gittings home Wednesday
evening. She took George to Rapid
City Thursday where he had sur-
gery on some bothersome hernias.
Roxie had supper with Kaelyn Mc-
Sherry and family that night as
George was kept overnight. George
and Roxie arrived home Friday
evening. A speedy recovery for
George.
Thursday, Tony Harty saw us off
on the road early in the morning.
He visited Shirley Hair and also
checked in on Russ Hattel, who had
been a little under the weather
during the week.
Thursday, Bill and I, along with
Baby the cat, loaded in the mo-
torhome and were on the road
early, after breakfast out. It will be
our home away from home for
awhile. We made it to Sutton, Neb.,
to the home of Mike Rath and Shel-
ley Seager where we settled in for
a few days of visiting. Mike had a
neighbor who dropped the bean
pods behind the combine, so he
could bale them. He went out and
made sure they would be picked up
that evening, made three bales, as
well as shredded corn stalks where
the electric fence would be.
Work kept both Ralph and Cathy
Fiedler busy this week. Friday,
Cathy went to Rapid with Lynette
Klumb and girls so they could do
some school shopping. Grandma
Cathy found out it is hard to keep
up with two teenagers, but it was a
fun day. Saturday evening, Cathy
joined six other gals at a local pub
to say goodbye to one of the nurses
who has taken a different job, al-
ready the gals are missing her. It
has been a warm week in the Stur-
gis area, prompting the Fiedlers to
break down and turn the air condi-
tioner back on. Sunday afternoon,
there was enough rain to get the
street wet. At this point, anything
is appreciated.
Friday, Tony Harty visited with
Shirley Hair and also talked to
Dale Koehn during the day. He
talked to his sister, Theresa Hack-
senbary, at Valentine, who is tak-
ing cancer treatment. She seems to
be doing quite well and is taking
care of garden produce and getting
things ready for winter. He was
glad to hear her energy level was
up, since she has been having a
struggle.
Friday found us trying to keep
out of the way of Shelley and Mike
as they went about their work. The
cattle had been kept in so one could
be sold, water was put in a tank,
electric fence was checked (it was
working at the pole, for sure be-
cause Thursday night Shelley acci-
dentally touched the wire when we
were getting plugged in.) The cow
was hauled to the sale in Sutton,
four heifers were separated from
the herd, the rest went to the
wrong pasture, but things were
fixed so they could get to water and
be locked in the right pasture. Mike
baled all the rows and got 42 bales
for winter feed. Bill, Shelley and I
were busy changing a window
roller from a parts car to one they
were using. Bill was stiff and sore,
as we turned in. He wondered how
long we’d been there?
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
Mike West, shown left, received his plaque as an inductee from the South Dakota
Amateur Baseball Hall of Fame, Saturday, September 29, at the Lake Norden
Community Center. West said, “My baseball years from my youth, Basin League,
college and amateur have given me great memories. And, I am honored to be
chosen by my peers for the South Dakota Amateur Baseball Hall of Fame.” As
stated by the hall of fame, “West enjoyed an outstanding career at all levels of
baseball in South Dakota; VFW Teener, American Legion, college and amateur
baseball, and continued his services as a coach and umpire for numerous years.
Pictured with West is Richard Rockafellow, Philip, a former teammate and fellow
umpire with West. Rockafellow was an umpire inductee into the hall of fame in
1993 and a player inductee in 2003, and currently is the vice president of the
South Dakota Amateur Baseball Association. Courtesy photo
West in Hall of Fame
The annual Midland Merchants’ Appreciation Day was held Saturday, September
22. A five kilometer run/walk/ride “fun”-draiser was held to benefit the local Bad
River Buckaroos 4-H club. The Booster Club served lunch at the Midland Fire
Hall. The parade theme this year was “Weather.” Various games, starting with a
kids’ money scramble, included a hammering contest, three-legged race, gun-
nysack race, partnered water balloon toss, washer toss, and catching water bal-
lons tossed from a very tall cherry picker. For supper, the Midland Commercial
Club served a free roast beef meal at the fire hall. Afterward, the winners of the
many business-donated door prizes were announced. A public dance, featuring
Westbound, was sponsored by the Midland Commercial Club and the Midland
Fire Department. Photos by Del Bartels
Midland Merchants’ Appreciation Day
The sky is falling! But these youngsters were trying catch the water balloons as
they came down from about three stories up. The sun helped out, too.
In a gunny sack race, always get back up, because the people who passed you
while you were rolling on the ground will probably be trying to get back up when
you are passing them. Then the whole routine starts all over again.
Of the many floats, pickups, tractors, fire trucks, all terrain vehicles and others, the Midland Merchants’ Appreciation Day parade still has horses and wagons.
Coins hidden in hay is such a simple and fun idea. The youngsters scrambled to
find the coins, while parents and grandparents cheered them on.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 12
Community
visited Scott Jones and Abbie
Fitzgerald in Rapid City this week.
They are planning to leave for
Utah where hunting season opens
in a couple of weeks.
Was sorry to hear of Virginia
Burns’ death. She was a great
teacher and lady. She did some
special tutoring for our family
which helped a lot. I enjoyed her at
the nursing home while I was
working there. She kept very alert
and the last time that I visited with
her she remembered so many
things. Our sympathy goes out to
her family.
When I was up on the flat east of
Rich Smith’s house, there were
hundreds of hawks in the field east
of the road. Smiths said that they
are migrating and stopped to rest
and feed. They said that they were
hard on grouse and pheasants as
this is what they eat. I don’t think
I have ever seen that many hawks
in one place before. Sure won’t be
much wild game left on that flat.
Maybe they also eat small rodents,
too.
It has been very quite around my
place after the wild week last week.
I finally got rested up about Tues-
day. Now it sounds like this next
week might be another busy one.
Sunday night, September 30, we
had .20” of rain that settled the
dust and it smelled so fresh. It
washed my pickup and made it
bright red again. It has been a
dusty, dull red for so long and it
didn’t do any good to wash it as one
trip to town and it would be all cov-
ered with dust again. That fine
dust can find its way into the
smallest crack inside and out.
The fowl are leaving but some of
the geese will stay all winter. I al-
ways enjoy the geese, as I have a
dam just south of the house and I
could enjoy their young ones, but
this year it was dry. So I wasn’t
able to watch them and I sure
missed that. Although the dry
weather brought the deer and an-
telope in closer as they came in for
water in the stock tank.
We shall never be content until
each man makes his own weather
and keeps it to himself. – Jerome K.
Jerome
Grindstone News
(continued from page 4)
PLEASE JOIN US …in praying for our nation on Saturday, Oct.
13, at 12;00 p.m. at Philip Fire Hall Park.
AFTER 105 YEARS, SERVICES AT THE MILESVILLE POST
OFFICE ARE ENDING …with an “emergency suspension.” The
last day to do business was September 29. The Postal Service will
be trying to find a new plan to provide services in the Milesville
area, but the likely next step will be permanent closure.
AVAILABLE …Copies of the 2012 General Election Ballot Ques-
tion Pamphlet are available at the Haakon County Public Library.
WEAR GREEN FOR NATIONAL 4-H WEEK … Business own-
ers, employees and the general public are asked to wear green on
Monday, Oct. 8, to honor National 4-H Week, showing their support
for our local 4-H members.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Engaged
Brynn Coyle and Randy Crotteau, along with Randy’s children, Austin
and Brady, parents Rick and Rhonda Coyle of Philip and Rodney and
Diana Crotteau, are excited to announce their upcoming wedding on Oc-
tober 20, 2012. An intimate family wedding is planned at Roughlock Falls,
Spearfish Canyon.
The couple makes their home in Spearfish.
card players at the senior center
Saturday evening.
Max and Joyce Jones traveled to
Roseville, Minn., last Thursday to
attend the wedding of their niece,
Laura, the daughter of Joyce's
brother, Richard Roen. Also attend-
ing were Todd and Darcy Jones
and children and Dave and Kim
(Jones) Ferries and sons. Joyce
said it was a gorgeous ceremony,
beautiful venue, and perfect
weather. It was also 1,170 miles
round trip, so Joyce was glad to be
out of the car when they arrived
home Sunday afternoon. Mattie
Jones is now sporting earrings in
her newly pierced ears – a big
event in a young girl's life. It
sounds like she is taking good care
of them, too.
Adam and Jodi Roseth and chil-
dren joined family at T-34 Satur-
day to help put a new metal roof on
the building, replacing the one that
was damaged earlier this summer
by hail. Gordon and Trudy Flesner
are fortunate to have such a large
family – especially when tackling a
project like that roof!
Nick Neuhauser was at the
ranch Friday and Saturday helping
his father, Kevin, move cattle.
Mary Neuhauser was at the ranch
Saturday. Sunday she made a trip
to Polo to visit her parents, stop-
ping at Highmore to visit Ruth
Neuhauser.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson had a
visit from Clint and Alivya Alle-
man last Friday. Clint and Alivya
had been out checking cattle and
stopped by for a visit. Little Alivya
is quite a charmer, according to
Dorothy! Sunday, Dorothy had to
ask Nels "What's that smell?"
Turns out it was rain – over a quar-
ter of an inch! Praise the Lord!
Dorothy attended church at Deep
Creek Sunday afternoon.
Dick and Gene Hudson's main
project the past week or so has
been working to dry out their base-
ment. Gene said things had seemed
a little damp, which isn't entirely
unusual for a basement. But the
dampness was getting worse, and
upon investigation Gene found a
small water pipe that was in the
process of splitting. So, there has
been lots of sorting and tossing
going on, along with numerous
trips up the stairs to carry things
outside. Grandson Noah has been
a big help with the project – those
young knees make all the differ-
ence. Sunday, Gene hosted a
housewares party at her home,
with several neighbor ladies at-
tending.
Last Thursday, Connie Johnson
took her students from grades
three through seven to Ft. Pierre
for Starbase, a learning program
involving engineering activities. I
believe Starbase will continue for
the next few weeks. Sunday, Con-
nie was the consultant at the
housewares party at her parents'
home.
Lee and Mary Briggs went to Ab-
erdeen after work last Wednesday
for tractor parts, returning home
early Thursday morning. Friday,
Mary went to Sioux Falls with her
daughter, Rea Riggle, and grand-
daughter, Kinsey, returning home
that night. Sunday, Mary attended
the party at Gene Hudson's.
Marge Briggs said she hasn't
made much news, but she has been
busy making zucchini bread! She
submtted the following weather
data for September 2012: The high
temperature was 104˚ on the 1st.
We had two days with tempera-
tures over 100˚ in September,
bringing the total of 100˚ plus tem-
perature days to 21 for the sum-
mer. According to Marge, that is a
record. There were five days of 95˚
or above, and 19 days of 80˚ or
above. The lowest maximum tem-
perature for the month was 63˚ on
the 22nd.
The low temperature for the
month was 30˚ on the 22nd, and
four times 40˚ or below.
The average high for the month
was 81˚, and the average low was
49˚. The average temperature for
the month was 65˚.
Precipitation for the month was
zero until noon on Sunday, the
30th. Marge received .11” at noon
and another shower in the evening
brought an additional .32”, giving
her a total of .43” on the 30th. That
was the first measureable precipi-
tation since August 14.
Our year-to-date precipitation is
10.38”, normal is 14.46”, leaving us
4.08” below normal for the year.
We continue to be busy with fall
activities as well as elk hunters.
Friday, our daughter, Jennifer, and
her husband, Ross Tschetter,
joined us, and we went to Spearfish
to attend the wedding of my
nephew, Joe Brown, and his bride,
Becky. It was a beautiful outdoor
ceremony, and the weather was
perfect. We spent some time in
Spearfish visiting with our son and
daughter-in-law, Scott and Corry
Neuhauser, and grandkids, Marisa
and Austin, before returning to
Rapid City for the wedding recep-
tion. We spent the night in Rapid
City, and we visited with our
daughter, Chelsea, and her friend,
Mike Hoy. Mike had major knee
surgery Friday, so he is moving a
little slowly. We returned to the
ranch Saturday evening. Ross
headed back to his home in Salem
Sunday afternoon, and Jennifer is
spending a few days working from
the ranch before she heads to a con-
ference in Bismarck Wednesday.
Jennifer and I attended the party
at Gene Hudson's Sunday.
Today, I am grateful for the re-
cent rain. Although it wasn't
enough to make a huge difference
in our parched conditions, it was
enough to raise the spirits of every-
one I've spoken to. The weather-
man says there is the possibility of
more moisture later this week, so
I'm hoping he's right! Every drop is
a gift!
I hope you all enjoy the cooler
temperatures and the glorious fall
colors. And I hope you stay safe as
you go about your fall work! Oh –
one more bit of good news – it is
less than 40 days until the election!
Have a great week!
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Saturday, Tony Harty stopped at
L.D. and Shirley Hairs’. They were
putting another hitch on their
pickup and getting ready to take
their camper to another job site.
The Buffalo Stampede arena was
busy Saturday night with team
ropers getting in a little practice.
Back in Sutton on Saturday,
Mike, Bill and Shelley got the truck
ready to haul bales. Bill was the
trucker, Shelley was going ahead
and retying the bales and Mike
was bunching them in groups when
Bill got back. They made short
work of that job, I just rode along.
There was some leisure time. Shel-
ley and I made a trip to Sutton for
groceries, mail a letter, and pick up
apples in the afternoon. The lady
who had so many apples on the
ground said the tree was totally
white this spring with blossoms.
Sunday there was a crew helping
Don and Vi Moody work cattle.
They had a bit of excitement when
a rattlesnake was discovered in the
front yard. It was a little thing,
only about 10 inches long, but dis-
patched quite quickly. Even little
rattlers can carry a lot of venom
and ruin your day.
Sunday was a quiet day. Shelley
fixed a cake to take to a potluck
dinner over in York at the home of
Bonnie Moses and Dave Manwar-
ren. Mike’s mother, Janet Rath,
came by and we all rode together.
Bonnie was whipping up good food
inside and Dave had a big pot of
beans cooking over an open pit fire
as well as a smoker going with ham
roasts, chicken and even brats on
the outside. The weather was beau-
tiful, but flies drove many inside to
eat. Dave makes bows and arrows
as well as spears with the thrower.
I had to try my hand at hitting the
targets using the arrows Dave said
were for kids and old ladies! (He
did change that to youth and
women.) We got a tour of their
home that was from two houses
built together in the years 1904
and 1907. They are very cozy and
roomy now after remodeling was
done. Bonnie learned a lot while
working on making Champion mo-
bilehomes and it really shows.
Back in Sutton, Janet had another
engagement to attend and Shelley
and Mike had cattle to check, a bot-
tle calf to feed, and then it was
about turn in time because work on
Monday came early.
Sunday after church, Tony Harty
had dinner out. He said it was a
busy place at the local restaurant
and he enjoyed visiting with many
folks he doesn’t see regularly.
There was a trap shoot going on at
the target place east of town.
Our sympathy to the family of
Virginia Burns.
May your trials be small and
your blessings abundant until we
meet again.
Betwixt Places News
(continued from page 11)
www.pioneer-review.com
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2007 Chevy Silverado 1500
Fully Loaded, Low Miles, Tonneau Cover, Bedliner
Give Tyler a call today!
www.philipmotor.com
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursdav, 0otober 4, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 13
local dclivcry includcd, scni-
load lois, no nold or wccds,
largc rounds pui up rigIi. Call
Fol, 390-5535; CIarlcs, 390-
5506. P43-4ip
FOR SALE: Milo Iay lalcs, 650
ion availallc, safc niiraics and
good FFV, plasiic iwinc. Call
280-3835. P41-3ic
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Cci rcady for fall Iauling! 12-
ply, 235185116F. $155
nounicd (liniicd quaniiiics
availallci. Lcs' Dody SIop, 859-
2744, PIilip. P40-ifn
GARAGE SALES
HUGE GARAGE SALE: Tucs-
day, Oci. 16, 3 p.n. io 7 p.n.;
Wcd., Oci. 17, 8 a.n. io noon ai
110 Wood Avc., PbIIIp. Jclincl &
Fadway. Applianccs, furniiurc,
pool iallc, ncial gazclo, lcd-
ding, lois of Hallowccn & CIrisi-
nas dccoraiions, nucI nisc.
P43-2ip
MULTI-FAMILY RUMMAGE
SALE: Oci. 5, 3-8 p.n. ai Scnior
Ciiizcn's Ccnicr in PbIIIp. E×cr-
cisc cquipncni, crafi supplics,
IouscIold & cloiIing. Morc info,
call Paisy Fcrguson, 488-0294.
P43-1ic
RUMMAGE SALE: Daly cloiIcs,
ND-18 no., loys' & girls'; laly
swing, carscai, lounccr, iul,
cic., ioys & nisc. Monday, Oci.
8, 4-8 p.n. & Tucs., Oci. 9, 4-6
p.n. K-gcc's in PbIIIp. Iicns will
lc 112 pricc and sonc frcclics
Tucsday. P43-1ic
HELP WANTED
DEPUTY SHERIFF'S POSI-
TION: TIc Haalon Couniy
SIcriff's officc is acccpiing appli-
caiions for a full iinc Dcpuiy
SIcriff. Conpciiiivc wagcs and
an c×ccllcni lcncfiis paclagc.
TIis posiiion will lc opcn uniil
fillcd. Scnd siaic applicaiions
and1or rcsuncs io. Haalon
Couniy SIcriff, Do× 249, PIilip,
SD 57567. For norc infornaiion
coniaci SIcriff Frcd Kocsicr ai
859-2741. P43-ifn
POSITIONS OPEN: Kadola Arca
ScIool Disirici is looling for
coacIcs for iIc upconing winicr
sporis. Hcad girls' laslcilall
coacI; 5-6 girls' laslcilall
Kadola; 7-8 girls' laslcilall
Kadola; 5iI-8iI girls' laslcilall
Inicrior; Assisiani loys' laslci-
lall coacI; 5iI-6iI loys' laslci-
lall coacI Kadola; 7iI-8iI loys'
laslcilall coacI Kadola. If in-
icrcsicd scnd a lciicr of inicrcsi
and rcsunc io Kadola Arca
ScIool, Aiicniion Ccorgc Scilcr,
PO Do× 99, Kadola, SD 57543
or conplcic and sulnii a non-
ccriificd applicaiion iIai is avail-
allc on iIc wclsiic www.
ladola.l12.sd.us EOE.
K42-4ic
POSITION OPEN: Jaclson
Couniy HigIway Supcrinicndcni
posiiion. E×pcricncc in road 1
lridgc consiruciion 1 nainic-
nancc. Supcrvisory 1 adninis-
iraiivc c×pcricncc prcfcrrcd.
Posiiion opcn uniil fillcd. Infor-
naiion. 837-2410 or 837-2422;
Fa×. 837-2447, Kadola.
K42-3ic
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Piclup canpcr, Ias
Icai, air and laiIroon, clcan
and good condiiion. Call 279-
2415, Wall. PW42-2ip
FOR SALE: 4-pcrson Ioi iul.
Call 837-2459. K42-2ip
FOR SALE: WIiificld pcllci firc-
placc inscri; siccl roof and Ialf
windsIicld for Polaris 500 4×4,
ycar 2009. Call 798-2182 or
685-3934. WP4-2ic
FOR SALE: Fopc Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ropc, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED TO BUY: Uscd ircad-
nill. Call Sclna ai 859-2360,
cvcnings, lcavc ncssagc.
PF6-ifn
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday,
Novcnlcr 4, ai iIc Kadola Ciiy
Audiioriun. DooiIs availallc.
Call Fuly ai 837-2270. K43-2ic
WANTED: Old car and irucl
lodics and paris, 1920-1950s,
paying lciicr iIan scrap so
clcan oui iIc ircc linc or ncial
pilc for quicl $$. Call Dcn, 669-
2012, Murdo. P43-4ic
PETS/SUPPLIES
BARN CATS: E×ccllcni
nouscrs. Call 685-5327 for
norc info. P43-3ic
REAL ESTATE
2-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
SALE IN WALL: Ncw siccl roof,
ncw carpci, fcnccd in laclyard,
wood siovc, ccniral air & lois of
sIadc! Call 515-3496 or 279-
2259 for norc dciails.
PW43-2ip
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
Malc an offcr! 2 lcdroons, 1
laiI, dining roon, applianccs,
fcnccd laclyard. 859-2483 or
859-3095, lcavc ncssagc.
P42-ifn
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
1999 Fcdnan, 28'×72', 3 lcd-
roons, 2 laiIs, 150'×75' loi,
sIcd, doullc carpori, Midland.
$42,500 or $3501noniI rcni.
Call Paula, 441-6967. P41-4ic
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
RENTAL: Nicc iwo lcdroon, onc
laiI Iousc for rcni in PIilip.
Asling $5001noniI for rcni,
uiiliiics noi includcd. Firsi and
lasi noniI's rcni io novc in.
Plcasc coniaci Jay ai 441-1300,
plcasc lcavc a ncssagc if no an-
swcr. PF4-2ic
APARTMENTS: Spacious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or siop in iIc lolly and
picl up an applicaiion. Caicway
Aparincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc acccpi
rcsponsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc paid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi paid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is placcd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
Vc uunt to tIunI ou) nunu
])ícnds und ]unííu uIo )cncn-
Ic)cd E)níc du)íng Iís )cccnt ííí-
ncsss. Vc cn]oucd cuc)u cu)d,
pIonc cuíí, und uísít uIííc Ic
uus )ccouc)íng. TIunIs ]o) tIc
cundu und ícc c)cun tIut uus
scnt und tIc cnuíí. Most o] uíí
tIunI uou ]o) tIc p)uuc)s. Hc ís
]ccííng nucI Icttc).
Ou) cIííd)cn uc)c so Icíp]uí
und íouíng ut tIc Iospítuí und
uIcn uc uc)c uIíc to conc
Ionc. TIunI You to HoI und HoI
]o) nouíng und cícuníng up ou)
uu)d. Aíí o] uou ncun u íot to us.
E)níc ö Luu)cí Ncncc
I uouíd ííIc to tIunI cuc)uonc
]o) nuIíng nu ?5tI Ií)tIduu
uc)u ncno)uIíc! TIunIs ]o) uíí
tIc cu)ds, ]íouc)s, gí]ts und uc)-
Iuí uísIcs. TIunIs to uíí nu
]unííu ]o) uíuuus nuIíng su)c
tIut I Iuuc u good tínc.
God Hícss cucI ö
cuc)u onc o] uou!
Donnu Ncunun
TIunI uou cuc)uonc ]o) tIc
nunu cu)ds, ucíí uísIcs,
p)uuc)s, uísíts, t)cuts, ]íouc)s,
píunt und pIonc cuíís tIut I )c-
ccíucd ín tIc Iospítuí. TIunIs ]o)
tIc cxccíícnt cu)c o] tIc nu)scs
und docto).
TIunIs to Junct, Judu und
SIu)on ]o) Icípíng uítI tIc cous.
And to ]o) SIu)on stuuíng on to
Icíp nc uIííc ut Ionc. I un
doíng ]ínc und ]ccí so Iícsscd.
Joun Putton
TIunI uou ]o) uíí tIc Icst
uísIcs uc )cccíucd on ou) ?UtI
unníuc)su)u. VIut u pícusu)c to
sIu)c oíd tíncs uítI uou!
Aíso, u Iíg tIunI uou to ou)
cIííd)cn, Hííí J)., JoIn, Susun,
Guu und Duuc, uIo su)p)íscd us
uítI tIc notícc und uíuuus gíuc
us sucI ]ou.
Hííí ö Suíuíu Stonc
A Icu)t]cít tIunIs to uíí tIosc
uIo Icípcd nc ccícI)utc nu
9UtI! I t)cusu)c cucI g)cctíng ÷
tIcu uííí uíí Ic nu 2Ul2 Iccp-
suIcs!
Mu)íc Addíson
TIunI uou ísn`t cnougI ]o)
cuc)utIíng tIut Ius Iccn donc
]o) us síncc ou) ííucs uc)c
cIungcd on August 2?, 2Ul2.
To cucI und cuc)uonc uIo
Icípcd H)udcn ut tIc ]ootIuíí
gunc ín Vuíí und notícíng sonc-
tIíng uusn`t )ígIt uítI Iín. TIc
quícI )csponsc uou uíí díd ]o)
Iín nudc u sítuutíon so nucI
Icttc) tIun uIut ít couíd Iuuc
Iccn.
To Duuc VcII, PA, D). Kíoppc),
nu)scs, uídcs, íuI und x-)uu tccI-
nícíuns ut PIíííp HcuítI Sc)uíccs
]o) tIc cxccíícnt cu)c H)udcn got
du)íng tIc EH uísít und Iís stuu
ut tIc Iospítuí. Euc)uonc tIc)c
nudc su)c tIut H)udcn o) I Iud
cuc)utIíng nccdcd to nuIc tIc
stuu cusíc). Vc u)c uc)u íucIu to
Iuuc sucI u uondc)]uí, cu)íng ]u-
cííítu ín tIís snuíí toun.
TIunI uou to tIc PIíííp scIooí
]o) uíí tIcí) concc)ns uítI
H)udcn. TIc uísíts ])on tIc ]ucíí-
ítu, cíussnutcs und ]ootIuíí
tcunnutcs su)c nudc Iís duus
I)ígItc).
TIunIs to ScotcInun Indus-
t)ícs ]o) uííouíng nc to conccn-
t)utc on nu ]unííu und not
uo))uíng uIout uo)I. I un t)uíu
Iícsscd to uo)I ]o) sucI un un-
dc)stundíng conpunu!
TIunIs to uíí ou) ]unííu und
])ícnds uIo Icípcd ín unu uuu ÷
í] ít uus Icípíng uítI HíuIc und
H)odíc, to ncuís, p)uuc)s, pIonc
cuíís, tcxts, cnuíís o) Icípíng out
ín otIc) uuus so tIíngs uc)c u
ííttíc cusíc) ]o) us. You uííí ncuc)
Inou Iou nucI tIut ncunt to
us!
To unuonc císc I Iuuc ]o)got-
tcn, pícusc Inou I dídn`t ncun to
und I un t)uíu so))u. You) Icíp ín
unu uuu uus upp)ccíutcd!!
Lí]c ís ncuc) p)oníscd ít uouíd
Ic cusu, Iut uítI tIc Icíp o] otI-
c)s ít su)c cun nuIc u °Iunp¨ ín
tIc )oud so nucI cusíc)!!
Lucu PuIínun
Hcsídcnts o] tIc no)tI und
ucst OIuton connunítu u)c uc)u
g)utc]uí ]o) tIc nunu ]í)c t)ucIs
und tIcí) c)cus uIo cunc to
]ígIt tIc ]í)c und p)otcct ou)
Ioncs. Munu tIunIs u)c uíso
duc to otIc)s uIo Icípcd ín unu
uuu. Aíso to tIosc uIo cx-
p)csscd tIcí) concc)ns!
Stotts Funííu
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
1200 ACFE LAKE $29,900 clcar
waicr, c×ccllcni fisIing, largc
parccl w1 100' sIorc; Clacial
Lalcs rcgion NE SD. TIousand
Lalcs Fcaliy of Minncsoia. 866-
346-7006. www.1000
LalcsMN.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.i Call
iIis ncwspapcr or 800-658-
3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI, 33¢1
34¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456.1024,
joc«iliirucl.con.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2002 Ford Fangcr,
c×icndcd cal, 4 door, 4 wIccl
drivc, loadcd, 68K nilcs, auio.
Asling $9,500. Call 279-2913.
PW42-2ip
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Spccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV applicaiion. ALSO. prairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23ip
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iypcs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
ups, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52ip
BACKHOE AND TRENCHING:
Pcicrs E×cavaiion, Inc. E×cava-
iion worl of all iypcs. Call Drcni
Pcicrs, 837-2945 or 381-5568
(cclli. K3-ifn
GRAVEL: Scrccncd or rocl. Call
O'Conncll Consiruciion Inc.,
859-2020, PIilip. P51-ifn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iypcs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׫gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
SELLING: 10 Dlacl Angus con-
ncrical lrcd Icifcrs Saiurday,
Novcnlcr 3, ai PIilip (SDi Livc-
siocl Auciion. AI lrcd Angus io
DL Inccniivc 228 (EPDs DW 0,
WW 81, YW 133, M 28i. Pasiurc
lrcd io Crccn Mouniain Froni
Man (EPDs DW -.7, WW 61, YW
99 M 28i. TIcsc Icifcrs origi-
naicd oui of iIc 2012 DHSS pcn
of fivc. TIcsc vcry fancy lrcd
Icifcrs will wcigI 1,050 lls. and
arc lrcd io siari calving MarcI
10 for 45 days. Favcllciic Caiilc,
685-5147 or Ionc, 859-2969.
PF6-5ip
FOR SALE: 4-ycar-old gray
gclding, fuiuriiy prospcci going
rcally good on iIc larrcls. Has a
grcai foundaiion and siaricd
rigIi. Hc's lind, gcnilc and a
plcasurc io ridc in iIc opcn.
Uscd a loi io cIccl, gaiIcr and
sori cows. Was ialcn io a fcw
lrandings lasi spring. Wcll lrcd
and Ias sonc spccd. TIis is rc-
ally a nicc Iorsc. TIc girls Iavc
rodc a loi. Also sclling. vcry
cIunly Palonino narc. SIc Ias
lccn ny rancI Iorsc. SIc is
also iraincd wcll in larrcls and
polcs, jusi ncvcr Iaulcd, lcpi for
a laclup Iorsc. Call Dunny Dail
441-7026. WP6-2ic
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN. ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Oualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
AUCTION
FEAL ESTATE AUCTION, Saiur-
day, Oci. 20, 4 pn, Hovcn, SD,
Fay and Fosclyn Kaup, owncrs.
For norc infornaiion coniaci
Cary McCloud, Lic =13471, 605-
769-1181, 605-948-2333.
LAND AUCTION. 230+1- Acrcs
Crcgory Couniy, Cropland and
Crassland, 12 nilcs noriIwcsi
of Durlc, SD, Ociolcr 26iI ,
2012. Call Daloia Propcriics,
Todd ScIucizlc, Auciionccr,
605-280-3115, www.Daloia
Propcriics.con.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Capiiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs onlyi. Call Fus-
scll Spaid 605-280-1067.
BUYING GOLD/SILVER
CONVEFT YOUF COLD, silvcr,
plaiinun inio casI. Top pricc
paid, 24 Ir iurn around for nail
in. SD owncd lusincss. Visii
www.nidwcsigold-silvcr. con for
insiruciions or call 605 260
4653.
EMPLOYMENT
FULL-TIME PAFKS MAINTE-
NANCE. Ciiy of Canion, SD.
CDL & conncrcial pcsiicidc ap-
plicaior liccnsc rcquircd wiiIin
6 noniIs. Dcadlinc. Ociolcr
17iI. www.ciiyofcanionsd.con
or 605-987-2881. EOE.
POSITION OPEN. POLICE OFFI-
CEF (full-iinci. TIc Ciiy of
Plaiic, SD (populaiion 1,230i is
sccling full-iinc law cnforcc-
ncni officcr. Succcssful candi-
daic nusi lc willing and allc io
worl indcpcndcnily undcr iIc
dircciion of CIicf. Wagcs DOO &
DOE. Siaic-widc L.E.T. applica-
iions acccpicd. Inicrcsicd appli-
canis sIould call CIicf Drandon
Scnnlcr ai (605i 337-2144.
Plcasc scnd applicaiion and rc-
sunc io. Ciiy of Plaiic, PO Do×
236, Plaiic, SD 57369. Applica-
iions acccpicd fron Scpi. 19,
2012 iIrougI Oci. 10, 2012.
TIc Ciiy of Plaiic is an EOE.
SIauna Mcycrinl, Ciiy Financc
Officcr.
DOUCLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is ialing applicaiions for
full- iinc Douglas Couniy HigI-
way Supcrinicndcni. Musi Iavc
valid Class A Drivcr's Liccnsc.
E×pcricncc in road1lridgc con-
siruciion 1 nainicnancc prc-
fcrrcd. For applicaiion coniaci.
Douglas Couniy Audiior (605i
724-2423.
KTC CONSTFUCTION sccls cn-
ployccs, loiI pari-iinc and full-
iinc. E×ccllcni pay1lcncfiis!
Undcrground plunling, digging,
ircncIing, opcraiing cquipncni.
Willing io irain. Sulnii rcsuncs
i o
rodl«lcnnclcciclcpIonc.con.
Oucsiions, call 605-869-2220.
FOR SALE
2007 LEXUS FX 350. $22,500.
Dlacl wiiI lcaiIcr. 4 door spori
uiiliiy. 4 wIccl drivc. 6 cylindcr,
auionaiic. E×ccllcni condiiion.
74,000 nilcs. 605-484-0793.
HOUSING
SEAFCH STATE-WIDE APAFT-
MENT aparincni lisiings, soricd
ly rcni, locaiion and oiIcr op-
iions. www.sdIousing
scarcI.con SOUTH DAKOTA
HOUSINC DEVELOPMENT AU-
THOFITY.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rcprcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing
Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today for your
free estimate!!
Pioneer Review Ad DeadIine:
Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m.
****
CaII 859-2516
ads@pioneer-review.com
0IassItIed AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ pcr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu, tIc P)o]ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou)unt, as wcll as on our wclsiic.
www.pionccr-rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns, Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun for
firsi 20 words; 10¢ pcr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and
iniiial nusi lc counicd scparaicly. Includcd in iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc P)o]ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
pcr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial nusi lc counicd scp-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for loollccping and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 pcr colunn incI, includcd in iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc P)o]ít. $5.55 pcr colunn incI for iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic advcriiscd in iIis ncwspapcr is suljcci io iIc Fcdcral Fair
Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany prcfcrcncc, or discrininaiion on
racc, color, rcligion, sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io nalc any sucI prcfcrcncc, liniia-
iion, or discrininaiion."
TIis ncwspapcr will noi lnowingly acccpi any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a violaiion of
iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncwspapcr arc availallc
on an cqual opporiuniiy lasis.
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
CaII Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
PhiIip
Ior ull yoor
concrete
constroction
needs:
CONCRITI
CONSTRLCTION
S=n-¿1oo
Philip, SÐ
1hursdav, 0otober 4, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review ·Page 14
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCT. 9: SPECIAL FEEDER CATTLE & ALLBREEDS CALF
SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE. YEARLINGS 10:00 A.M. CALVES
11:00 A.M. MT EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 9000
HEAD.
YEARLINGS:
PETERSON RANCH 80 BLK STRS; HOME RAISED, NI ................................................750#
ROGHAIR 23 BLK OPEN HFRS ...................................................................................700750#
MANSFIELD 5 BLK STRS...............................................................................................750800#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
O’CONNOR 600 CHAR X CLVS; FS.............................................................................500650#
REINERT, JONES & SALT FORK RN 500 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...................450575#
MCPHERSON & MCPHERSON 500 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,
ALL HFRS IN TOWN.....................................................................................................350450#
BURNS 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS......................................................................................500575#
TRIPLE S LAND & LIVESTOCK 400 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI ...........................450575#
M. WILLIAMS 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS.................................................................................600#
ARNESON & ARNESON 300 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV...............................................450575#
HEATHERSHAW 300 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .....................................................................500525#
O’DEA 300 BLK, BWF & A FEW HERF CLVS; FS ....................................................475575#
BUCHERT & BUCHERT 285 RED CLVS; FS .............................................................500600#
WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK 270 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................450550#
WILLERT & WILLERT 250 CHAR X CLVS; FS.........................................................600650#
COLLINS 235 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................................................500600#
LONG 230 CHAR X & A FEW BLK STRS; FS,NI .......................................................500600#
RICARD 200 BLK, BWF, & RWF CLVS; FS .................................................................400450#
PIROUTEK 200 CHAR X CLVS; FS..............................................................................550650#
R. WILLIAMS 180 CHAR RED ANG X STRS; FS..............................................................650#
GABRIEL EST 180 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.............................................................500550#
JENSEN 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS.......................................................................................550#
MOODY 160 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS .............................................................................500550#
STABEN 150 RED & BLK CLVS; FS ..............................................................................550650#
GRUBL, WHITEHEAD & LAMPHERE 140 BLK & CHAR CLVS; FS,NI ............550600#
AMIOTTE 135 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI....................................................................500580#
BALDWIN 135 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................500600#
CARLBOM 130 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................................525#
STUCK 130 BLK, BWF & FEW CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI..............................................600650#
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS 125 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ..........................................500525#
KEARNS 125 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................475550#
BAKER & THOMPSON 120 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................450600#
MORELL LIVESTOCK CO 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI......................................400525#
WULF 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................................................450575#
KARP FAMILY 90 RED & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................500600#
POURIER 90 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS.............................................................................550600#
PETERSON & PETERSON 85 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,AN.................................500600#
URBANIK 80 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................................500575#
RANTAPAA 80 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................550600#
HUMPHREY & WOLF 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................................400500#
SHULL 70 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................................................500550#
SHARP 70 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................................................500#
HUNSAKER RANCH 60 BWF FIRST X CLVS; FS,NI,AN, ALL HFRS IN TOWN.....550#
ROVERE 60 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................................................450550#
HUNSAKER RANCH 60 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,AN..........................................500600#
PFIEFER 50 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................................450#
MCCORMICK 50 BLK CLVS; FS...................................................................................550600#
HOFFMAN 50 BLK & RED STRS; FS,NI .............................................................................500#
SWANSON 50 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................................525625#
SIMONS 40 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ................................................................................500600#
BEARHEELS 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................450500#
COUCH 30 CERT RED ANG STRS; FS,NI,ASV,WEANED.....................................500600#
SOLOMON INC 24 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................................550600#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE &
REGULAR CATTLE SALE. WEIGHUPS 10:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE 12:00 P.M.
MT EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
BRED HEIFERS:
SCOTT CUNY 70 FANCY BLK HOME RAISED HFRS; BRED:LBW BLK; CLV:325
FOR 60 DAYS
JERRY LANE JOHNSTON 27 BLK HFRS; BRED:LBW SHEARER BLK ANG; CLV:3
22 FOR 30 DAYS
STOCK COWS:
ALLEN HOCKENBARY “COMPLETE DIPSERSION” 20 BLK 3 YR OLD TO BRO
KEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLAIRE BROS; CLV: 310 FOR 60 DAYS
RICK KING & SONS “AGE DISPERSION” 190 BLK 8 YR OLD TO BROKEN
MOUTH COWS; BRED: LIM; CLV:41 RANCH TESTED
BUTCH & NEAL LIVERMONT 70 BLK YOUNG TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS;
BRED: BLK; CLV: 31 FOR 60 DAYS
LARRY VOLMER 45 BLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 31
DARREL STEFFES 40 BLK 5 TO 9 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 41 FOR 60
DAYS
GRANT SHEARER 30 BLK BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: SPEAR U BLK ANG;
CLV: 310
BONENBERGER RANCH 25 BLK SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 21 FOR 60 DAYS
JIM SILBERNAGEL 8 BLK & HERF 5 T0 8 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 41
ROBERT GRAV 5 BLK 7 TO 8 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 210
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 17: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6
WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PASTEURELLA, 7WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
& THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 25: NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 31, & NOV. 7.
CATTL£ R£PORT TU£S., OCT. 2, 2DJ2
A Iíg )un o] nostíu cuíucs ]o) ou) spccíuí ]ccdc) suíc. A
íu)gc c)oud o] Iuuc)s uítI no)c ]u)nc) ]ccdc)s on tIc
scuts. Mo)c uctíuítu und conpctítíon on tIc tIc cuíucs. Suíc
uus ouc) Iu b.l5 p.n., scíííng b,9UU Icud. 9,UUU cuíucs to
scíí Ic)c ncxt Tucsduu. Suíc tínc lU.UU AM. VcígI-up cut-
tíc on Vcdncsduus.
CALVES:
GERAD & MEGAN JULSON - WALL
100.........................................DLK STFS 490=........$190.00
33...........................................DLK STFS 375=........$208.00
37 ..........................................DLK HFFS 381=........$170.75
LARRY SMITH - PHILIP
111.........................................DLK STFS 503=........$173.00
98...........................................DLK STFS 397=........$205.00
TODD O'CONNOR - PHILIP
95.........................................CHAF STFS 532=........$171.25
79.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 465=........$179.50
30.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 363=........$205.00
98 ........................................CHAF HFFS 530=........$160.75
112.....................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 441=........$158.00
13 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 328=........$168.00
CODY WEYER - HOWES
72...........................................DLK STFS 507=........$170.00
35...........................................DLK STFS 409=........$205.50
86 ..........................................DLK HFFS 472=........$158.00
32 ..........................................DLK HFFS 387=........$173.00
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL - QUINN
117 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 520=........$169.00
104 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 467=........$184.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF
100.........................................DLK STFS 478=........$181.25
93...........................................DLK STFS 402=........$210.25
124 ........................................DLK HFFS 440=........$166.00
68 ..........................................DLK HFFS 371=........$175.25
JIM LINT2 - HERMOSA
26...........................................DLK STFS 596=........$162.50
HOWARD & DELORIS KNUPPE-NEW UNDERWOOD
91 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 408=........$208.50
12 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 303=........$214.50
JERRY & MIKE MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
100 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 531=........$169.00
46...........................................DLK STFS 522=........$168.00
BILLY MARKWED - MIDLAND
43...........................................DLK STFS 544=........$167.25
7.............................................DLK STFS 442=........$186.00
43 ..........................................DLK HFFS 516=........$158.25
ROBERT BARRY - NEW UNDERWOOD
66 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 488=........$174.00
21 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 401=........$206.00
PAUL SCHNOSE - BUFFALO GAP
71...........................................DLK STFS 448=........$185.50
15...........................................DLK STFS 358=........$210.00
62 ..........................................DLK HFFS 398=........$168.50
REUBEN VOLLMER, JR - MIDLAND
24...........................................DLK STFS 551=........$169.25
TOM & SHELIA TRASK & FAMILY - WASTA
134 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 412=........$196.25
100.........................................DLK STFS 302=........$218.50
29...........................................DLK STFS 220=........$243.00
127..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 370=........$174.25
109 ........................................DLK HFFS 284=........$188.00
LU ROSETH - PHILIP
23 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 523=........$168.00
23 ..........................................DLK HFFS 500=........$158.00
JASON & PAUL PAULSEN - WALL
86 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 514=........$169.75
14...........................................DLK STFS 409=........$201.00
26 ..........................................DLK HFFS 449=........$158.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND - RED OWL
73...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 512=........$168.00
56...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 406=........$203.00
52 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 453=........$161.50
32 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 355=........$173.00
LARRY VOLMER - OWANKA
60...........................................DLK STFS 569=........$163.00
10...........................................DLK STFS 444=........$184.50
72................................DLK & DWF HFFS 537=........$153.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 435=........$160.75
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
46...........................................DLK STFS 548=........$165.00
EDDIE GRUBL - STURGIS
90 ................................FED & DLK STFS 518=........$164.75
34.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 436=........$189.50
97................................FED & DLK HFFS 491=........$155.00
45................................FED & DLK HFFS 438=........$158.50
TOM & MAX BOWEN - NEWELL
56 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 535=........$165.75
31 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 431=........$181.00
21................................DLK & DWF HFFS 482=........$153.00
12................................DLK & DWF HFFS 381=........$165.25
LARRY & CHASE GRAVATT - ELM SPRINGS
85 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 470=........$176.00
7.............................................DLK STFS 334=........$208.00
63 ..........................................DLK HFFS 439=........$159.50
JAMES WILSEY - OWANKA
48...........................................DLK STFS 519=........$168.00
11...........................................DLK STFS 410=........$199.00
33 ..........................................DLK HFFS 489=........$152.00
DARRELL STEFFES - VALE
47...........................................DLK STFS 505=........$167.75
44 ..........................................DLK HFFS 467=........$156.50
JT MOON - CREIGHTON
103.........................................DLK STFS 497=........$167.50
54...........................................DLK STFS 428=........$186.00
16...........................................DLK STFS 416=........$186.00
ROBERT & ERIC JONES - ENNING
104 ........................................FED STFS 495=........$167.50
113 ........................................FED STFS 418=........$191.25
107........................................FED HFFS 435=........$181.00
39..........................................FED HFFS 362=........$174.00
JARMAN RANCH - MIDLAND
95 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 589=........$159.25
48 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 487=........$172.75
72................................DLK & DWF HFFS 511=........$151.00
12................................DLK & DWF HFFS 412=........$163.00
TIM & PAULA SCHAACK - EDGEMONT
31...........................................DLK STFS 521=........$164.00
30 ..........................................DLK HFFS 471=........$157.00
GRANT SHEARER - WALL
57...........................................DLK STFS 480=........$173.50
22...........................................DLK STFS 415=........$202.50
43 ..........................................DLK HFFS 431=........$160.00
DALLIS BASEL & RYAN LAMONT - UNION CENTER
62 ..........................................FED STFS 507=........$163.25
19 ..........................................FED STFS 417=........$190.00
HLAVKA RANCH - HOWES
26...........................................DLK STFS 494=........$168.00
42 ..........................................DLK HFFS 435=........$160.25
BUNK WHITE - NEW UNDERWOOD
13...........................................DLK STFS 415=........$189.50
DAN & JOHN OLDENBERG - PHILIP
19 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 453=........$178.00
38 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 472=........$171.50
12...........................................DLK STFS 372=........$196.00
EUGENE & GLENDA HELMS - CREIGHTON
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 472=........$174.50
LAWRENCE & LORETTA SCHREIBER - QUINN
20...........................................DLK STFS 487=........$173.50
10 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 356=........$201.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 443=........$160.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 353=........$174.00
ROGER SHULL - WALL
21 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 579=........$156.75
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 518=........$150.00
GERALD MCFARLAND - RAPID CITY
42..DLK, FED & CHAF STFS; SPFINC SHOTS 484=........$166.50
10..DLK, FED & CHAF STFS; SPFINC SHOTS 419=........$180.50
27.DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS; SPFINC SHOTS 454=........$152.00
RYAN VIG & CHUCK VANSICKEL - OPAL
38................................FWF & DWF STFS 537=........$163.00
20................................FWF & DWF STFS 508=........$154.00
14 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 519=........$149.50
16 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 472=........$144.50
BUD IRELAND - BOX ELDER
16...........................................DLK STFS 534=........$161.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 498=........$152.00
MARK KIEFFER - RAPID CITY
80...........................................DLK STFS 626=........$157.75
80 ..........................................DLK HFFS 596=........$146.50
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 507=........$157.00
BEAU BENDIGO - HOWES
37.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 576=........$157.50
22 ................................FED & DLK STFS 432=........$184.00
41 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 428=........$153.75
12 ........................................CHAF HFFS 580=........$145.00
JIM SCULL - RAPID CITY
31...........................................DLK STFS 593=........$155.00
10...........................................DLK STFS 469=........$175.00
RONNIE TWISS - INTERIOR
20...........................................DLK STFS 621=........$154.25
22 ..........................................DLK HFFS 581=........$140.00
MARK SLOVEK - WANBLEE
31...........................................DLK STFS 557=........$153.25
11...........................................DLK STFS 433=........$182.50
12 ..........................................DLK HFFS 488=........$150.00
PAT COY - HILL CITY
18...........................................DLK STFS 628=........$150.50
10 ..........................................DLK HFFS 551=........$147.00
BILLY AMIOTTE - WANBLEE
12 ................................FED & DLK STFS 568=........$149.50
12................................FED & DLK HFFS 510=........$144.00
ROSS LAMPHERE - STURGIS
21...........................................DLK STFS 716=........$142.00
YEARLINGS:
KENNETH MCILRAVY - PHILIP
61 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 813=........$143.75
TABLE TOP RANCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
26 .........................................LH X STFS 610=........$126.00
46 .................................LH X SPAY HFFS 586=........$129.00
WISHARD & MANGUS - LANTRY
35........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 657=........$141.50
Lunch 8pec|a|s:
Honday-Fr|day
11:00 to 1:30
6a|| for
spec|a|s!
Regu|ar Henu
Ava||ab|e N|ght|y!
* * *
Fr|day ßuffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
0swa|swa l||||a
ktstrra||sas:
ääâ-tII1
~ Saturday, October 6 ~
Shrimp Special
~ Monday, Oct. 8 ~
1/2 lb. Cheeseburger
Basket
I|t ä|ta||sast k lsaart
êata 0a||r Msa¢ar ||ra äa|ar¢ar
8
a
|a
d
ß
a
r
A
v
a
||a
b
|e
a
t
L
u
n
c
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!
~ Tuesday, October 2 ~
Petite Ribeye
~ Wednesday, October 3 ~
Basket of Barbecued
Pork Ribs
~ Thursday, October 4 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Oct. 5 ~
Ground Sirloin
Chicken • Shrimp
A Inrgo group of frIonds gnfhorod
nf fho MIIosvIIIo HnII nnd fho posf
offIco Wodnosdnv fo wIsh CnvIn
IIroufok fho bosf on hor rofIromonf
from fho !nIfod Sfnfos IosfnI
SorvIco. Sho hns sorvod our com-
munIfv woII ns posfmnsfor for fho
pnsf 33 vonrs. Sho Is nof IonvIng
our communIfv, buf wo wIII mIss
fho vIsIfs whon sfoppIng bv fo do
busInoss wIfh fho posf offIco.
Ivorvono wonf homo wIfh n
"CnvIn's grnb bng gIff," IncIudIng
sovornI usofuI posfnI Ifoms. Hnppv
rofIromonf, CnvIn!
Tho MIIosvIIIo Iosf OffIco Is no
Iongor opon for busInoss ns of Ocfo-
bor l, 20l2. Tho oquIpmonf wns
hnuIod nwnv Insf Mondnv. Tho
fronf porch of fho IIroufok homo
hnd boon fho sIfo for fho posf offIco
for fho Insf 54 vonrs. Tho MIIosvIIIo
Iosf OffIco oponod Mnv 3, l90?,
wIfh JoromInh C. MIIos ns posf-
mnsfor. Ho nnd hIs son hnd buIIf n
cInIm shnck whoro fwo qunrfors of
Innd mof. In fhnf wnv, onch couId
homosfond l60 ncros. Thov hnd n
gonornI sforo nnd fho posf offIco. If
wns nbouf n hnIf mIIo soufh of fho
prosonf fown of MIIosvIIIo.
Tho posf offIco hns chnngod
buIIdIngs fIvo fImos, hnd sovon dIf-
foronf posfmnsfors, nnd wns In
busInoss for n fofnI of l05 vonrs.
JoromInh C. MIIos l90?-l908,
Jnmos McKInnov l908-l9l3 (who
nIso prInfod fho MIIosvIIIo Þowspn-
por), W.H. "Honrv" Korfzmnn
l9l3-l945 (gonornI sforo, cIofhIng,
fnrm ImpIomonfs, furnIfuro), AI-
borf Hnrvov l945-l946 (nIso n
sforo), !nndnII CoIIIns l94?-l958
(A fnrmor who Infor bocnmo n cIork
nf !npId CIfv Iosf OffIco. Ho hnd
workod 30 vonrs In fho posfnI sorv-
Ico whon ho rofIrod.), AIIon
IIroufok l958-l9?9 (n fnrmor nnd
CnvIn's fnfhor-In-Inw), nnd CnvIn
IIroufok l9?9-20l2
Tho MIIosvIIIo SchooI vIsIfod fho
MIIosvIIIo Iosf OffIco Insf wook.
Thoro nro l3 sfudonfs from kIndor-
gnrfon fhrough oIghfh grndo. Iosf-
mnsfor CnvIn IIroufok foId fhom
nbouf posfngo sfnmps nnd fho sorv-
Icos nvnIInbIo nf fho posf offIco.
Sfudonfs nIso rocoIvod n IIffIo hIs-
forv Iosson nbouf fho bogInnIng of
fho MIIosvIIIo Iosf OffIco. Thov Ioff
wIfh fronfs nnd ncfIvIfv books
nbouf sfnmp coIIocfIng.
Hugh nnd Ann Hnrfv sponf Insf
wook In YoIIowsfono nnd surround-
Ing nron on fhoIr honovmoon.
Thursdnv, fhoIr pInn wns fo vIsIf
OId InIfhfuI, nnd ns hopod, If
rnInod onough fho nIghf boforo fo
cIonr fho nIr of smoko. Thov snw
Iofs of pnrk nnImnIs IncIudIng n
woIf, bInck bonr, buffnIo, nnd oIk
cows. Thov onjovod goIng fhrough
fho IuffnIo IIII musoum nf Codv,
ns woII ns vIsIfIng Crog nnd Knfhv
Imorson nf IowoII, Wvo., nnd Iob
nnd Suo MnrrIngfon nf !Ivorfon.
!oconfIv, IhII nnd Knron CnrIov
woro gono fwo wooks on n hunfIng
frIp fo VornnI, !fnh. IhII gof n vorv
nIco buII oIk. Knron kopf busv dur-
Ing fhnf fImo cookIng for bofwoon
20 nnd 30 hunfors.
!nsf Wodnosdnv, Jonn Inffon ro-
furnod homo from hor hospIfnI sfnv
In IhIIIp. Sho wns hospIfnIIzod for
fwo wooks foIIowIng hor fnII from
fho fop of fhoIr pIckup. ThoIr
dnughfor, Shnron, Is hoIpIng ouf
whIIo Jonn confInuos hor rocovorv.
CIon nnd JnckIo !ndwnv sponf
sovornI dnvs In Ðonvor vIsIfIng
CIon's sIsfor, CIorIn JoIInok. HIgh-
IIghfs woro nffondIng n Cubs vor-
sus !ockIos gnmo nnd n Ironcos
gnmo. CIon nnd JnckIo woro In
IIorro ovor fho wookond for fho
bnpfIsm of AInsIov MnrIo !Ios,
dnughfor of ÐnrIn nnd !onh !Ios.
AIso comIng woro Cnrov nnd IrIn
!ndwnv, SIoux InIIs.
Snfurdnv, Inf Hnnrnhnn nnd hor
sIsfor, ÐInnno, nffondod fho !oso-
bud VnIIov InpfIsf Church fnII
womon's rnIIv nnd pnrfv. Thov mof
fhoIr mofhor, MIIdrod Johnson,
fhoro who nIso nffondod.
ÐonnIo nnd MnrcIn Ivmor woro
In SponrfIsh Thursdnv nnd IrIdnv
fo wnfch grnndnughfor IrIffnnv
pInv voIIovbnII nnd grnndson Iron-
don pInv foofbnII. AIso, whIIo fhoro
fhov snw fho woIcomo-homo pnrndo
honorIng fho 842nd IngInoor Com-
pnnv, who hnvo sponf fho Insf vonr
In AfghnnIsfnn. If wns vorv Impros-
sIvo.
JIm nnd !nnn IIshoro nnd Curf
Arfhur nffondod funornI sorvIcos
for !orI !ockhnrf Mondnv In
SmIfhwIck. !orI Is fhoIr dnughfor-
In-Inw, Sfncv IIshoro's mofhor.
!.S. AIr Iorco pIIof Anron Inr-
sons, son of Crnnf nnd Snndrn Inr-
sons, roconfIv rofurnod from hIs
dopIovmonf In fho nnfIon of Qnfnr
In wosforn AsIn. Ho Is now sInfod
fo fnko pnrf In n wnr gnmos oxcor-
cIso In AInskn wIfhIn fho noxf cou-
pIo of wooks. If Is osfImnfod fhnf ho
wIII bo gono for fhroo wooks. Thnnk
vou, Anron, for vour sorvIco fo our
gronf counfrv! Anron's grnndpnr-
onfs nro IIII nnd ConnIo Inrsons.
Crnndpn IIII nnd Crnndmn
KnrvI SnndnI hosfod n "sIumbor
pnrfv" IrIdnv nIghf for Snwvor nnd
!Ivors SnndnI (Mnff nnd AnIfn)
nnd Cngo nnd Tnrvn !nvoIofffo
(Ionu nnd Mnrv). Thov nII hnd n
good fImo.
InrIv Insf wook, Ðonn Inrsons
undorwonf shouIdor surgorv In
!npId CIfv. Thoro woro somo com-
pIIcnfIons, ns fho docfor dIscovorod
ho nIso noodod gnII bInddor sur-
gorv. Thnf surgorv hns boon schod-
uIod for Tuosdnv. HIs dnughfor,
Iofh JoffrIos, hns boon wIfh hIm
nnd hIs dnughfor, !ufh Iuffors,
CoIorndo, Is nIso fhoro, ns woII ns
hIs wIfo, Mnrv. Somo of fho fnmIIv
hns boon sfnvIng wIfh Jonnno Inr-
sons fhoro In !npId CIfv. VIsIfIng
on Snfurdnv woro Mnff Arfhur nnd
Inrf nnd JnnIco Inrsons.
Snfurdnv, JIm nnd !nnn IIshoro
wnfchod grnndsons Trov nnd
Cnrfor IIshoro pInv In fho foofbnII
jnmboroo In WnII. !nfor In fho
ovonIng, fhov wonf fo IhIIIp for
moro foofbnII, whoro Trov wns
pInvIng. InuI nnd Jov IIshoro nc-
compnnIod fhom fo fho IhIIIp
gnmo.
IIII nnd KnrvI SnndnI woro nIso
In WnII for fho foofbnII jnmboroo fo
soo grnndson Mnson pInv, nnd on fo
IhIIIp whoro gronf-grnndson Cngo
wns pInvIng.
Sundnv, IIII nnd KnrvI SnndnI
joInod fnmIIv for dInnor nf Ðon nnd
TnmI !nvoIIoffo's. Ofhors fhoro
woro Tonvn nnd Joo Krugor, Irnn-
don, nnd Tnrn !nvoIIoffo, VormII-
IIon.
Ivron nnd Ioggv Inrsons sponf
fho wookond nf IIkvIow Cnmp-
ground, oufsIdo of SfurgIs, nffond-
Ing fho InII !un. ThIs Is n group of
mosfIv IhIIIp poopIo fourIng fho
IInck HIIIs on moforcvcIos onjovIng
fho fnII coIors. Thov nffondod fho
woddIng of Ioggv's nophow In
CIIIoffo Snfurdnv nffornoon.
JIm, AdoIo, MoIIv nnd Owon
Hnrfv woro suppor guosfs Sundnv
nf Hugh nnd Ann Hnrfv's.
ÐusfI Iorrv sponf fho wookond
nf homo wIfh hor pnronfs, Ðnvo
nnd Tonvn Iorrv, Jndo nnd MIsfI.
KnfIo ÞoIson Cnrponfor nnd
!onI ÞoIson woro bofh homo for fho
wookond from jobs nnd schooI nnd
wIfh fhoIr pnronfs, Jorrv nnd Mnrv
ÞoIson, nffondod fho woddIng In
IIorro Snfurdnv of Mnrv's brofhor,
Sfovo Sprongor, nnd ÐoAnn !vnn.
TrnvIs hnd n coIIogo rodoo In ShorI-
dnn ovor fho wookond.
InrI, JodI, !nchoI nnd Snrnh
Inrsons mof JodI's pnronfs, MIko
nnd Ioffv McÐonnoII, for suppor In
IIorro IrIdnv nIghf.
JIm Iob nnd KnvIn Ivmor woro
In MIfchoII for fho wookond nnd nf-
fondod fho Snfurdnv woddIng of
KnvIn's cousIn, JImmv WIIIInms.
Among fhoso nf fho IMT moof-
Ing In IhIIIp Wodnosdnv nIghf
woro CnrIn SmIfh nnd KnrvI Snn-
dnI.
JudIfh !ndwnv nccompnnIod
Tonvn Krnmor for n wookond of
scrnpbookIng In HIII CIfv.
!oo ÞovIIIo nnd hIs bovs, !uko
nnd IrIc, onjovod fho wookond fIsh-
Ing nonr IIorro. !oo snId fhov dId-
n'f cnfch much, buf hnd n good fImo
nnvwnv.
Mondnv ovonIng, Ðonnn nnd
TInn Sfnbon nffondod fho 4-H
councII moofIng In IhIIIp.
Sopfombor wonfhor InformnfIon:
TofnI moIsfuro wns .05¨. Ior fho
vonr so fnr fho moIsfuro rocoIvod Is
9.38¨. Wo nro 5.62¨ boIow normnI
for moIsfuro. Avorngo hIgh wns 84´
wIfh fho hIghosf fompornfuro for
fho monfh on fho fIrsf wIfh l05´. If
wns l02´ on fho l0fh. Thoro woro
sIx dnvs In fho 90s nnd fwo dnvs
onIv In fho 60s. Avorngo Iow wns
48´. Tho Iowosf fompornfuro for fho
monfh wns 32´ on fho 22nd. IIvo
nIghfs If gof In fo fho 30s. Thnnk
vou, Sfnbon fnmIIv, for fhIs Infor-
mnfIon.
MIIesvIIIe News
by JanIce Parscns · S44-ßß1S
InfIuonzn hns boon dofocfod In
Soufh Ðnkofn, prompfIng n sfnfo
honIfh offIcInI fo urgo unIvorsnI
vnccInnfIon.
¨Wo hnvo nIrondv roporfod four
confIrmod cnsos of InfIuonzn, nII
chIIdron,¨ snId Ðr. !on KIghfIIngor,
sfnfo opIdomIoIogIsf for fho dopnrf-
monf. ¨IorfunnfoIv fho vnccIno Is
rondIIv nvnIInbIo fhIs vonr nnd now
Is n good fImo fo bo vnccInnfod.¨
KIghfIIngor nofod fhnf 5l.l por-
conf of Soufh Ðnkofnns ovor ngo sIx
monfhs woro vnccInnfod ngnInsf
fho fIu durIng fho 20ll-20l2 son-
son, fho hIghosf rnfo In fho nnfIon.
AnnunI fIu vnccInnfIon Is rocom-
mondod for ovorvono, buf somo
groups nro nf hIghor rIsk for com-
pIIcnfIons prognnnf womon, poo-
pIo ovor 50 vonrs nnd poopIo wIfh
chronIc modIcnI condIfIons. HonIfh-
cnro workors nnd housohoId con-
fncfs of hIgh rIsk popuInfIons such
ns fhoso wIfh voung Infnnfs In fho
housohoId shouId ospocInIIv bo vnc-
cInnfod.
KIghfIIngor oncourngod pnronfs
fo fnko ndvnnfngo of fho froo fIu
vnccIno fho sfnfo offors for kIds
from sIx monfhs fo l8 vonrs. KIds
nccounf for n sIgnIfIcnnf numbor of
fIu cnsos nnd hospIfnIIznfIons onch
vonr nnd nIso hoIp sprond fho III-
noss In fho communIfv. VnccInnf-
Ing chIIdron profocfs fhom nnd fho
poopIo nround fhom.
Soufh Ðnkofnns cnn nIso provonf
fho sprond of fho fIu bv prncfIcIng
fho common sonso monsuros of fho
dopnrfmonf's "SfoppIng fho fIu
sfnrfs wIfh vou" cnmpnIgn. Wnsh
vour hnnds offon wIfh sonp nnd
wnfor or uso nIcohoI-bnsod hnnd
goI If vou cnn`f wnsh. Covor vour
moufh whon vou cough or snoozo,
Ðon'f fouch vour ovos, noso or
moufh. Sfnv homo If vou'ro sIck.
InfIuonzn Is n vIrnI rospIrnforv
IIInoss mnrkod bv fho suddon onsof
of fovor, hondncho, oxfromo fIrod-
noss, drv cough, soro fhronf, runnv
or sfuffv noso nnd muscIo nchos. If
spronds whon nn Infocfod porson
coughs, snoozos or fnIks, sondIng
fho hIghIv confngIous vIrus Info fho
nIr.
lnfluenza vacclnatlons

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