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Pioneer Review, October 31 2013

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$2,200 or more because of strong
calf prices.
Some ranchers might look out of
state for calves to rebuild herds.
Richter, 45, figures the storm
cost his family $300,000 to
$350,000.
One of the poignant aspects of
the situation is how it brings out
the best in people. Richter says
he’s appreciated the help from
friends and neighbors. “We’ve
been awful fortunate to have some
awful good neighbors,” he says.
“There hasn’t been a day yet that
I haven’t been on
the phone with
all of them, once
or twice a day,
wondering who
can help who
where. That’s
what’ll get a per-
son through a
deal like this —
your friends and
your neighbors.”
The Richters
sold calves in
Philip. The calves
averaged 560
pounds and
brought $1.88 per
pound — an ex-
cellent price. He
says his family
will be meeting
soon to figure out
the next step, fi-
nancially. The
Richters have five
children, includ-
ing two in college
at South Dakota
State University
in Brookings, so
there are lots of things to figure
out.
Struggling together. The Pa-
pouseks have a lot invested in
their herd, and in the area. The
family has lived here since 1949.
Papousek and a brother, Duane,
split a partnership about 15 years
ago. Richard started his current
herd of Angus. He prefers the
$
1
00
Includes Tax
End of Day 10/28/13
12 Pro Winter Wheat ........$6.58
14 Pro Spring Wheat ........$6.67
Milo ....................................$3.31
Corn....................................$3.41
Millet ..................................$7.75
SFS Birdseed ..................$16.60
New Crop, 2014
12 Pro Winter Wheat ........$6.40
14 Pro Spring Wheat ........$6.68
Haakon School Board
Regular Meeting
* * * *
Notice to Creditors
* * * *
Town of Midland
Wine License Hearing
11
Philip, South Dakota 57567 Thursday, October 31, 2013 www. pioneer-review.com
No. 10, Vol. 108
MARKETS
LEGALS
Local
Newspaper association board members meet with governor
Public Notices Month in South
Dakota wrapped up in October
when South Dakota Newspaper
Association Board members met
with Gov. Dennis Daugaard at the
state capitol in Pierre.
SDNA President Steve Baker
presented Daugaard with a Public
Notices Month "VIP All-access
badge," signifying the public
awareness campaign for public no-
tices that newspapers have been
promoting in October.
Public notices published in the
local newspaper are verifiable, in-
dependent and permanent, all
traits important to protecting the
integrity of public notices," Baker
said.
The SDNA president added:
"We are grateful for the opportu-
nity to meet with Gov. Daugaard
and convey the significance that
public notices have in informing
the public about the business of
government."
You can learn more about public
notices by visiting with the staff of
your local newspaper or by going
online at www.facebook. com/Pub-
licNotices.
Other members of the SDNA
board include Paul Buum, pub-
lisher of The Alcester Union &
Hudsonite; John Suhr, publisher
of the Reporter & Farmer at Web-
ster; Jan Kittelson, of the Miller
Press, Wessington Times Enter-
prise and Wolsey News; Shannon
Brinker, publisher of the Rapid
City Journal; Becky Tycz, pub-
lisher of the Scotland Journal,
Tyndall Tribune & Register and
Springfield Times; and Charley
Najacht, publisher of the Custer
County Chronicle, Hill City Pre-
vailer and Winner Advocate.
South Dakota Newspaper As-
sociation, founded in 1882 and
based in Brookings, represents
the state's 130 weekly and daily
newspapers with total readership
of more than 600,000.
South Dakota Newspaper Association Board members met with Gov. Dennis Daugaard at the state capitol on
Oct. 25 as part of the Public Notices Month observance in the state. From left: SDNA board members Jan Kittelson
of Miller, Shannon Brinker of Rapid City, John Suhr of Webster, Gov. Daugaard, Steve Baker of Pierre, Charley
Najacht of Custer and Becky Tycz of Tyndall.
Blood donors now have the
ability to complete their dona-
tion interview online the same
day of their blood donation ap-
pointment.
“Whenever we survey donors
about how we can make their
experience better, they usually
say that the interview process
should be simplified, shortened
or automated,” said Jennifer
Bredahl, regional donor recruit-
ment director for United Blood
Services. “We took these sugges-
tions to heart and now are
happy to provide this new,
shortened interview process for
our dedicated donors.”
With this new service, United
Blood Services can reduce the
length of interviews at the dona-
tion site to only essential follow-
up questions. Donors can visit
the United Blood Services web-
site, access the interview and
print out a barcoded fast track
donation ticket that they must
bring with them to their ap-
pointment.
United Blood Services encour-
ages donors to give the online
health history questionnaire a
try for their next donation at the
upcoming blood drive, Tuesday,
November 12, at Philip High
School’s Fine Arts Building
from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Po-
tential donors can make an ap-
pointment to give at
www.united bloodservices.org
or by callin Maureen Palecek at
859-2655.
There are some important
guidelines to note, especially
that donors must complete the
questionnaire the same day as
their donation. Donors still have
the option to have one of the
United Blood Services staff
members ask the health history
questions, like usual.
Instructions can be found on-
line at the United Blood Serv-
ices website by clicking the
“health history questionnaire”
link on the left. Answers cannot
be saved, so donors must com-
plete the 10-15 minute inter-
view in one sitting. Donor data
is stored only in the barcoded
“fast track donation ticket” that
a donor will print following the
computer interview, so a login is
not required.
People who are 16 or older,
weigh at least 110 pounds and
are in good health are eligible to
donate blood. Additional height
and weight requirements apply
to donors 22 and younger.
Donors who are 16 must have
assigned permission from a par-
ent or guardian.
November
blood drive
The Haakon County Public
Library will hold its annual
scholastic book fair Tuesday
through Friday, November 5-8.
The fair will be open from 11:30
a.m. to 5:30 each day.
Book fair
The Brand New Day Yoga studio in downtown Philip
will be holding an open house.
“Come enjoy a glass of wine and familiarize yourself
with the studio,” said owner and instructor Christine
Andrus. “Take the opportunity to ask questions about
what to expect, and relax in the newly renovated yoga
studio.” Andrus is a registered yoga teacher with the
Yoga Alliance.
Andrus stated that yoga is for everyone. The studio
will be specializing in yoga for the “brand new to yoga”
student. All classes are appropriate for the first time
yoga practitioner. Options are given for all levels of ex-
perience and flexibility. This yoga studio is designed
with our whole community in mind, said Andrus.
According to her, yoga is a form of gentle exercise that
uses meditation, or simply said, an increased aware-
ness of the connection between breath and purposeful
movement. Classes are being developed to suit the
needs of the participants. All classes are between 60
and 90 minutes, unless otherwise specified.
“There’s no disputing that yoga is therapeutic,” said
Andrus. “Just get started and you’ll get better as you
go along.” She added that the medical community sug-
gests such things as yoga for stress relief, increased
flexibility, stamina and balance. Football players are
taking up yoga to work on specific muscle groups and
healing. Yoga is no-impact anaerobics.
The studio will offer Vinyasa and Hatha classes to get the ball rolling, and add more
Andrus opens Brand New Day yoga studio
specialized and specific classes as feedback dictates.
Some additional classes in the works are yoga for chil-
dren, yoga for teens, restorative yoga and power yoga.
For specific class descriptions and times, call Andrus,
visit the website or “like us on facebook.” For more in-
formation about the open house, see the related adver-
tisement.
The studio is located in the east side of the main
floor of the Waddell Building, across from the Senechal
Apartments. Remodeling has included a changing room,
new floor tiling and cascading curtains for the windows.
Andrus said that she bought the building in 2009
with the dream of bringing life back to an all-but aban-
doned building in the heart of downtown Philip. Used
for years as a storage facility for Kennedy Implement
on the main floor and as a clinic upstairs, the building
itself was neglected but sturdy. Although the possibili-
ties for such a beautiful and historically important
building in the community are endless, the cost of ren-
ovation was prohibitive and after a few stalled ideas,
Andrus decided to open a yoga studio on one side of the
main level.
Christine’s father, Pete Metz did the lion’s share of
the work, bringing the building up to habitable condi-
tions. With hopes of slowly continuing the renovation
over time to include the west side of the main floor and
the upstairs, Andrus is very happy to be able to use the building for something she feels
passionate about, bringing yoga to the people of Philip and the surrounding areas.
by Mikkel Pates
Preprinted with permission
from Agweek
Richard Papousek says the im-
pact of the early October 4 bliz-
zard on his cattle ranch in
Pennington County, still hasn’t
been completely realized.
It’s been slow to sink in.
Papousek ranches with his wife,
Lorayna, who works with the farm
and ranch, but also is a school
teacher in a one-room school-
house. Besides the cattle, they
raise wheat, corn and millet.
“I didn’t think that storm was
that bad when it was going on,”
Papousek says, remembering the
blizzard that ran October 3 to 5
and blasted western South
Dakota, and southwest North
Dakota. “You could see quite a
ways during the storm, but that
snow was so wet — just heavy,
heavy wet snow.”
Adnan Akyuz, North Dakota
state climatologist, doesn’t think
the region ever had a blizzard “of
this intensity this early in the sea-
son. Usually it’s well into Novem-
ber before we get one this bad,” he
says. “This was unusually early
with unusually large amounts of
snow.”
Some areas in the Dakotas re-
ceived nearly as much snow in one
day as they normally receive in an
entire winter, he says. He blames
a weather system in which
southerly flow carrying moisture
collided with a northerly flow
bearing cold.
“This system was just so un-
usual,” he says. “There were just
incredible snowfall totals.”
Papousek’s pastures are in
three general locations. He typi-
cally runs about 450 head of
mother cows. They also handle
350 to 500 head of yearlings a
year, depending on the availabil-
ity of pasture. The standard plan
is to sell bred heifers in Philip
every January. This fall, they
were holding about 100 of their
own bred heifers as replacements
to rebuild the herd. They had
about 230 bred heifers to sell.
The day before the blizzard,
they’d taken precautions, moving
animals into protected areas, but
to no avail
“Now we have 137 of them left,”
Papousek says.
Sickening reality. The tragedy
began to sink in hard on October
5 and 6 when Papousek finally got
to a set of yearlings south of
Quinn and they had all perished.
They had become disoriented in
the snow, and drifted about five
miles south to
Interstate 90
and up to three
miles east.
Some crossed
Interstate 90.
“You get
down there and
see that and you
almost get sick
to your stomach
— I did any-
how.” There
were 75 dead
yearlings along
I-90.
Even more
grisly was a sec-
ond herd on
pasture along
the famous
“wall of the
Badlands,” near
the town of
Wall. Now it’s
death valley —
ravines filled
with the car-
casses of dozens
of his cows.
They’d been
placed on the lowlands, presum-
ably protected by the wall. But the
animals found a way up a ravine
and onto the plateau above, and
then got lost, disoriented, and
wandered back over to the
precipice to their death.
Luckily, one had survived and a
farm employee, Mike Luedeman,
found and saved it. It was a rare
positive outcome.
Helping hands. The emotional
impact is blatant. Papousek says
the cattle are kind of like family.
They’re not children, of course, but
the rancher does everything he
can to keep them alive and pros-
pering. “They’re your livelihood;
you’ve got to treat them good,” he
says.
Financially, the storm has been
devastating. “I told my wife that
at 60 years old, I’m not so sure I
want to rebuild this thing. I was
thinking about maybe retiring in-
stead of working for the rest of my
living days.”
Neighbors Troy and Dawn
Richter often have 300 to 320
pregnant mother cows this time of
year. The storm probably reduced
the herd by 100 head. Last year,
the mother cows were worth about
$1,500 to $1,800, but this year,
Troy thinks they could go up to
Sinking In
Richard Papousek, 60, of Quinn, says 110 cows and 88 calves died drifting
away from the “wall of the Badlands” where they became disoriented and
plummeted to their deaths. It took until October 10 to discover all of the
losses. Elsewhere he lost 86 bred heifers.
Courtesy photo
lighter, 1,200-pound cows, in part
because they eat less grass in the
dry years.
Richard has a stepson, Evan,
who teaches agriculture in Wag-
ner. He’s helped during the crisis
and at other times, but has
asthma and isn’t likely to farm
full time. Daughter, Lissa, is a
junior in college in Chadron, Neb.,
and would like to teach school and
run the ranch on the side some-
day.
On October 15, Papousek says
he should be weaning calves now,
but it’s so muddy he’s not doing it
for fear of pneumonia and because
of the inconvenience of hauling in
feed. “I suppose we’re going to
have to wait until it freezes up to
bring in the cattle to the lots and
feed them,” he says.
Instead, he was helping Richter
haul home some stray cows that
had been accumulated at the Pa-
pousek place on October 9, but
couldn’t immediately be moved, in
part because of high water near
the Richter place.
Papousek says the losses are
hard to figure out. “I’m pretty sure
they ‘drowned’ standing up,” he
says of his cattle, but these insur-
ance companies “do not want to
define drowning,” Papousek says.
“They think drowning happens in
a dam. I’ve talked to professionals,
veterinarians that say that isn’t
necessarily the definition of
drowning.” He’s talking with
lawyers, but isn’t sure how it’ll
end.
“I was planning on kind of cut-
ting back in about five years, not
being in the center of a refinance
deal,” Papousek says, adding that
he’d been planning on doing more
hunting and fishing. He has a boat
at Pierre, on the Missouri River.
Other than breaking a leg and
ankle in a fall from a ladder in
March 2012, he’s in good health.
But the future is uncertain. The
only bright side for sure is that the
extra moisture this year will mean
the surviving cattle will eat well
in the spring.
Classes will be held in the east wing of the Waddell Building. The open
house will include an informal survey to determine the direction of various
classes. “The benefits of yoga are the same if you stretch far or little,” said
instructor Christine Andrus. Classes can be geared for youngsters, working
adults, seniors and all in between.
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Lookin’ Around|Syd Iwan
On Friday, we took a dead-cow
tour of our river ranch. We lost
some cattle, you see, in the recent
blizzard, and those in the know
say those losses should be verified
by a third party and pictures
should be taken. This is in case
there are disaster payments later
on. There might be some of those
if they ever pass a farm bill, if it
contains a disaster clause, and
various other ifs. Nevertheless, it
is good to be prepared in case
something useful happens. As a
result, Ted, Jim and I from the
ranch and neighbors Kenny and
Wade loaded up in the five-seater
pickup and took a drive.
Ted was our driver, and he
headed up the main road to the
border of our land. Then we went
along the railroad, through a gate,
and back into our pasture. There
was a road going easily down to
the bottom, but we didn’t take
that. Instead we went down a dim
trail along the fence line and rail-
road a ways. From there we
crossed a very steep draw that
might give the normal driver
pause. It didn’t faze Ted so down
and up we went. From there we
followed ridges and such, noting
dead critters along the way. Fi-
nally we arrived down on the river
bottom where most of the de-
ceased cows and calves were,
along the bluffs and another fence
line. We counted and took pic-
tures all along the way. Then we
hit a somewhat better trail that
wound around here and there be-
fore getting back to the main road
for our return to where we
started.
Our route for this little junket
was by no means smooth. If Ted
hadn’t lived on the place for over
half a century, I might have been
a bit nervous. As it was, I trusted
that he knew where he was going
and what he was doing so I stayed
fairly calm. He knew where the
rough spots were, where he
should speed up in case the
ground was soft and so on. He did
mention that his four-wheeler
was loaded in the back of the
pickup in case we got stuck some-
where, but that didn’t happen.
There were no problems whatso-
ever. It was even a pleasant day
with sunshine and comfortable
temperatures.
Ranch tours are nothing new to
me. Dad took me on many of them
when I was a kid, and I’ve driven
people around the place myself.
With Dad, he sometimes drove on
side hills that seemed a little
tippy to me. We never tipped over
so I guess he knew what he was
doing. He also drove fairly fast
and occasionally bounced into a
hole or over a rough spot of some
sort. He often gave rides to visit-
ing relatives and friends when
they wanted to see the ranch.
More than a few times, those folks
were getting into more than they
bargained for and returned home
with a certain amount of relief. As
I said, Dad was a competent
driver, but some of his routes
could make a person nervous. I
never actually saw any visitors
get out of the pickup when they
got back home and kiss the
ground in relief, but some may
have felt like doing so.
One time, I made an older lady
fairly nervous. She had lived in
the area as a girl and had some
association with a sod house that
was still standing out south sev-
eral miles. It was in our neigh-
bor’s pasture, but he didn’t mind
us looking at it. Anyway, to get to
the soddy, there was a fairly steep
draw that had to be navigated.
When I got to the brink of the
drop-off, my lady passenger said
in some alarm, “You aren’t driving
down that hill are you?” “Yep,” I
replied and did so. She held on
pretty tightly to the armrest but
came through the ordeal quite
well. She then enjoyed touring the
soddy which brought back many
pleasant memories of times past.
I think in the end she thought it
was worth the scare of navigating
steep hills to see what she remem-
bered from her youth, but the poor
gal did have some tense moments.
I still smile at the couple that
decided to go cross country in a
pickup from our home place to
Horseshoe Butte which is some
five or more miles away. There
are long and easy ways to get
there, but this fellow knew of
some short abandoned trail he
wanted to use. It involved steep
hills, nasty inclines, a creek, and
other perils. Nevertheless, he
made it across okay and seemed
quite pleased with himself. His
gal was not as excited about the
trip as he was. I asked her if she
would like to make that same
journey another day some time in
the future. “Not in this lifetime!”
she replied with a shudder.
So, if you want to see some
pretty country, I’ll be glad to give
you a tour of the ranch. There’s a
lot of interesting stuff to see. I’ll
try to drive carefully and not scare
the wits out of you, but there are
no guarantees. If you feel particu-
larly brave some day, come for a
tour. It might be an outing you
won’t soon forget. You can tell
your grandkids about it.
Ranch Tours
Country Praises by Del Bartels
Have you ever laughed so hard
that you end up holding your ribs
because it hurt? That kind of pain
should come far more often!
A gentle shoulder rub is one
thing, but an exhaustive, muscle
rending massage is a body-racking
rhapsody of pain. Bring it on!
The preceeding deep, sporadic
and tentative breathes are an ag-
gravation, until the wall shatter-
ing sneeze finally lets loose. Some
people are quiet, dainty and polite
sneezers. Instead of reversing
everything into where my brain
used to be, I prefer to let the
sneeze go forward and out – I’ll
patch the wallboard later.
Then there is the sobering sort
of pain. Crying is usually a sign of
sadness, but can be an outlet for
extreme joy. Either way, when a
person has not felt a tear for too
long of a time, the stinging around
the eyes is undeniable.
An over-exuberant handshake
from a friend is a good thing, and
feels good a second time when the
blood flow returns to your fingers.
A slap on the back, if meant well,
might rattle your teeth fillings,
but is a good pain. And it also feels
good when you can share the con-
gratulations by slapping your
friend’s back in return.
The first day of practice for a
sport season, or of a physically de-
manding chore or line of work, is
a certain punishment to the body.
The real pain comes the next
morning, as muscles, tendons,
joints and calloused skin gang up
to remind you of the day before
and the joy of getting to do it all
over again. That is one of the
harsher ways of proving to your-
self that you are alive.
Pain is relative. Shotgun prac-
tice might bruise your shoulder
and create a dread of the next
shot. Yet, the same poundings
made during the first day of
pheasant season don’t even regis-
ter through the exhilaration of
good times and good people.
Hook marks, chapped hands,
sunburn, eyes tired from water
glare ... still it was a great day
fishing. Frosted and rope-worn
hands, semi-blind vision from
snow glare, feet begging for a hot
bath, neck and wrists red from
melting snow ... still it was a great
day sledding. Sore ribs, hoarse
throat from yelling, joints twisted
as far as they can go without med-
ical attention ... but the afternoon
game of “tag” football was great.
Some pain adds personality. Old
injuries sometimes forecast wet or
cold weather. Old scars are identi-
fying marks, as well as starting
points to regale better and better
stories of how they were gotten.
Ever arm wrestle someone who
can lock their wrist because of an
old injury? Ever throw something
at someone who is continually
cracking their knuckles, suppos-
edly because of joint wear or in-
juries? Ever burn your hand
grabbing something hot that
someone else barely notices be-
cause of their callouses? Ever get
reminded of the time you spanked
a child who had something in
their hip pocket, thus making
“this will hurt me more than it
will you” too literal?
A mother’s childbirthing pain is
overshadowed when holding the
child. A father’s pain of a child
growing up is overshadowed when
the child says, “I love you.”
Life can be full of pain. In many
Hurts so good
Nancy Haigh
A group of students opted to take a HuntSafe course, taught by Matt Donnelly, that was offered through the Philip school system. The group were at
the shooting range west of Philip practicing Tuesday of last week. Pictured from left are Bosten Morehart, who was assisted by Donnelly, Zach Thomsen
with the S.D. Game Fish & Parks, Tom Parquet helping Jet Jones, Cody Donnelly, Jesse Hostutler helping Colby Fitch with his eye protection, Victor
Dennis and Reece Heltzel. Those involved with the class were thankful for the support of the school and the school board for the opportunity to offer
the class this way.
Fall HuntSafe course held through local school
Vehicle crash in Philip
Some time approximately between 2:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m. Sunday, Oc-
tober 27, a 2013 Toyota Scion car rolled at least once, coming to rest on
its front bumper against the chain-link and barbed wire security fence of
the Western Area Power Administration building in Philip. The vehicle was
going east on Highway 14 before it left the road. A phone call reporting
the crashed vehicle was received by Philip Police Chief Kit Graham at
around 7:30 a.m. South Dakota Highway Patrol Trooper Ben Filipiak con-
firmed the SDHP’s release that, “The driver had left the scene of the crash
and was later found at home. He had been consuming alcohol and was
charged accordingly. A passenger was injured and had to be treated at
the hospital for serious non-life threatening injuries.” Filipiak said that
there was only one passenger. The investigation is ongoing.
Don Ravellette
Bob Young, his two sons, Robby
and Matthew, and their three
households donated a black-baldy
heifer for a roll-over auction at
Philip Livestock Auction.
The October 19 sale brought
$12,806 to go to the South Dakota
Ranchers’ Relief Fund.
“We were one of the very fortu-
nate ones (after the storm),” said
B. Young. “I have some neighbors
who lost a fourth to half to 60 per-
cent of their livestock production.
We decided to give back and help
out. PLA has always been sup-
portive of my family.”
Other roll-over auctions have
been held at different places since
this roll-over auction. “It was an
ice-breaker, and it’s getting
started everywhere,” said B.
Young.
Cow roll-over for S.D.
Ranchers’ Relief Fund
Following the tragic loss many
of South Dakota's livestock pro-
ducers have suffered during the
October blizzard, community
gatherings have been scheduled to
begin the process of rebuilding
and assisting our producers.
Each event will offer a free meal
and information about resources
available as ranch families look to
rebuild their ranch operations in
the wake of the blizzard. Re-
sources and information will be
available from the South Dakota
Animal Industry Board, the South
Dakota Department of Agricul-
ture, South Dakota State Univer-
sity Extension, other federal and
state agencies, bank and loan offi-
cers, insurance agents, agricul-
tural industry organizations, and
mental health professionals.
These gatherings are a joint ef-
fort by South Dakota Cattlemen's
Association, South Dakota Farm
Bureau, South Dakota Farmers
Union, and South Dakota Stock-
growers Association with the sup-
port of other industry groups and
local businesses.
Community gatherings have
been held in Union Center, Faith,
New Underwood, Belle Fourche,
and Custer and Fall River County.
A community gathering is
slated for Philip, Saturday,
November 2, in the Bad River
Senior Citizen’s Center, from
5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
The gatherings feature a mini
trade show where groups can set
up tables with information and re-
sources available to our ranchers.
If you wish to have a table at the
events, contact Mike Traxinger.
His contact information is listed
below. Be sure to include your
name, contact information, the
events you are able to attend, and
a short synopsis of who you are
and what you will be providing for
information and resources.
The gatherings will feature a
free meal for producers and fami-
lies in the area. Mike Traxinger is
currently collecting donations for
the meals, which will be catered
by local community members.
Each gathering will have a
short presentation to provide a big
picture overview of what re-
sources are available to ranchers.
Silvia Christen is the program or-
ganizer. She and Silvia Christen
will co-emcee the gatherings.
A program will be developed for
each event that will include a list
of the information and resources
available, and a list of sponsors.
Contact Information
South Dakota Cattlemen's Asso-
ciation, Jodie Anderson – execu-
tive director, 605-280-9190 or
executive@sdcattlemen.org
Community gatherings to start rebuild and
assist process after storm
South Dakota Farm Bureau,
Lowell Mesman – organizational
director, 605-280-1319 or Low-
ell@sdfbf.org
South Dakota Farmers Union,
Mike Traxinger – legislative direc-
tor, 605-377-4110 or mtraxinger@
sdfu.org
South Dakota Stockgrowers As-
sociation, Silvia Christen – execu-
tive director, 660-626-6634 or
silvia.sdsga@midconetwork.com.
Extension
Bob Fanning. Field Specialist
Winner Regional Extension Center
Rural Livin’
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 3
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High
of 55F. Breezy. Winds from
the WNW at 15 to 20 mph.
Thursday Night: Mostly
cloudy in the evening, then
overcast. Low of 36F. Breezy. Winds
from the WNW at 10 to 25 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy with
a chance of rain. High of
54F. Windy. Winds from
the NW at 20 to 30
mph. Friday Night:
Partly cloudy. Low of 36F. Winds
from the WNW at 10 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Clear. High of
54F. Winds from the
West at 5 to 10 mph
shifting to the South in
the afternoon. Saturday
Night: Clear. Low of 36F. Winds
from the SE at 10 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. High
of 54F. Breezy. Winds from
the NW at 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 36F with a
windchill as low as 28F. Winds from
the NW at 5 to 10 mph.
Monday: Partly
cloudy. High of 46F.
Winds from the NW
at 10 to 15 mph.
Monday Night:
Partly cloudy. Low of 28F. Winds
from the NNW at 5 to 10 mph.
Get your complete
& up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Visit us online
www.pioneer-
review.com
& like us on
Facebook!
CÞLw AGLNCY, L1O.
Crop Insurance Specialists Since 1984.
0lve us a calll
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0fflce (606) 433-6411
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Crew Agency is an equal opportunity provider.
The term, “out of the box” can
refer to different things, but there
can be similarities. A product that
is “out of the box” is considered
new, or at least unused. When
someone refers to thinking “out of
the box”, they generally mean
new ideas, or approaching things
in a new or innovative way. New
ideas are sometimes welcomed,
but often met with resistance,
which can be a good thing.
Obviously, not all new ideas are
good ones, and not worth pursu-
ing. Mankind has not progressed
to the point where we are today,
however, by doing things like
they’ve always been done. Since
the dawn of time, human beings
have relentlessly been searching
for better, quicker, simpler, eas-
ier, more cost effective, etc., etc.
ways of getting things done.
At the recent SDSU Extension
Conference, a co-worker related
his experience upon returning
from college to propose the idea of
initiating no-till farming practices
on the family farm. This being
20+ years ago, the suggestion was
met with resistance, but he was
given the blessing to experiment
on a small portion of the farm. It
must have proven beneficial as
the entire farm is managed no-till
today.
Two different people, farms, or-
ganizations, businesses, etc. can
try to implement the same gen-
eral idea, and one might succeed
while the other fails. There are
certainly no guarantees, which
keep life interesting.
Most people cannot afford to al-
ways be the innovator, whether
due to finances, time, talent, cre-
ativity, or whatever reason. There
will always be someone who is the
visionary, and the majority of the
time, the rest of us can take ad-
vantage of their innovation to
make our lives better, quicker,
easier, etc.
As not everyone can be the in-
novator, not everyone will adopt
every idea into their life, farm,
etc. We weren’t cut out of the
same mold, and a given practice
may not fit everyone, or at least in
the same way. At the same time
new ideas are being tested to see
if they will work, yesterday’s ideas
are being evaluated by people to
decide if they should be adopted.
Specific to farming, equipment
manufacturers, chemical compa-
nies, seed companies, University
Experiment Stations and Exten-
sion Services, farmers themselves
and others are continually testing
new ways of doing things. Farm-
ers who are considering adopting
these new practices, pieces of
equipment, chemicals, seed vari-
eties, etc. also need to think “out
of the box” to be open to trying
them.
If you are having a problem
with some aspect of your farming
operation, or believe there could
be a better way to do something,
the first step might be to do what
researchers do, find out if anyone
else has worked on this. Good
sources of information can be your
local Extension Service, agrono-
mist, implement dealer, etc. Proof
that a new idea worked for some-
one else may be enough to con-
vince you to try it. Keeping an
open mind is an important key to
success, along with enough resist-
ance to require evidence.
Calendar
12-3-4: Ag Horizons Conference,
Ramkota Inn, Pierre
Out of the Box
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
Get ready
for Winter
Boggs
Shirts
Boots
Caps
Coats
Gloves
Preconditioning
Shots & Supplies
First
NationaI Bank
PhiIip, SD Faith, SD
605-859-2525 605-967-2191
www.fnbphiIip.com
Member FDIC
The contractor removing live-
stock carcasses from state high-
way rights of way completed that
operation on October 23.
The blizzard that struck west-
ern South Dakota on October 4
dumped record amounts of snow
in some areas and resulted in the
deaths of thousands of cattle and
other livestock. The state con-
tracted with Dakota Rendering,
Inc., of Freeman, to remove car-
casses from state rights of way.
Several of the 15 storm-im-
pacted counties also have been
working to remove carcasses from
their road rights of way, and indi-
vidual producers are dealing with
the task of handling the carcasses
found on private property.
For producers still dealing with
the process of removing carcasses
from their property, the South
Dakota Animal Industry Board
and the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Environment and Natural
Resources have prepared guide-
lines on how to properly dispose of
dead livestock. A copy of those
guidelines may be accessed at
www.aib.sd.gov.
On Monday, October 28, teams
of local, state and Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency offi-
cials will begin assessing storm
damage to public infrastructure
and property of private, nonprofit
entities such as rural electric co-
operatives in the 15-county area.
Gov. Dennis Daugaard will use
the information from those PDAs
to prepare a request to the Presi-
dent for a disaster declaration. If
a declaration is granted, the fed-
eral government would reimburse
up to 75 percent of the cost of
damage to public property.
Counties included in the prelim-
inary damage assessments in-
clude Haakon County. The other
counties are Butte, Meade,
Perkins, Lawrence, Pennington,
Custer, Corson, Dewey, Ziebach,
Harding, Jackson, Mellette, Fall
River and Shannon.
State rights of way
carcass removal over
Cattle semitrailers all in a row
Sale day, Tuesday, October 22, at the Philip Livestock Auction was an extra packed day. Semis full of livestock
waited in long lines to unload. There were over 12,000 head of cattle sold during that sale.
Del Bartels
by Ruby Gabriel
The dry summer leading up to
the disastrous winter of 1888
brought thousands of cattle to
West River. Cattle were trailed in
from Wyoming, Montana and
other areas of Dakota Territory.
The summer proceeding the
winter of 1888 was a dry one
which increased the hardships of
southern cattle struggling with
their first Dakota winter. They en-
tered the winter in poor condition
and died like flies. Severe winters
had been seen many times in West
River, but none with such an enor-
mous loss as the one of 1888. The
cattle that did not perish in draws
or die from starvation drifted far
from their home territory.
The spring round-up of that
year was the most unique in the
annuals of West River. It covered
more territory, employed more
riders, more saddle horses, more
wagons, and covered more square
miles for the number of cattle
gathered than any in the history
of the business. A scant 3,000
head of cattle were found alive.
Historically during this round-up
more than 100,000 head of cattle
might be gathered. This area in-
cluded the entire northwestern
part of Dakota Territory.
May 4, 1905 began as a typical
spring day, with a pleasant rain in
the forenoon. James Braddock,
who lived on the south side of the
Cheyenne River, in present day
Haakon County, was making
plans for preparing his haying
equipment when some of his
neighbors rode in. One of them
asked, “What are you planning on
feeding that hay to?”
Around noon the rain turned to
snow, and one of the best-known
blizzards took place. Braddock
and his hired man rode out; lake
beds, draws, creeks, and dams
were filled with dead cattle and
horses. He lost 1,400 head of
three-year-old steers. That fall he
found 88 steers and shipped them
to Chicago.
He stopped in Ft. Pierre on his
return trip and gave the check to
his banker. Braddock told his
banker, “All I have left is four
cows, six horses and a thousand
ton of hay.” The banker replied,
“As long as you have a checkbook
you should go to Texas and buy
some cattle to eat that hay.”
Braddock took the train to
Texas and had purchased 13 train
loads of cattle, each train had be-
tween 12 and 15 cars, when he re-
ceived a wire from the banker that
he better cut the buying trip short
and come home.
Corbin Morse lost 11,000 head
of fat steers, worth $500,000,
which drifted over the Badlands
wall, in this same storm.
October 3, 2013, began with a
heavy rain – shortly after dinner
the temperature dropped, snow
began to fall and the wind grew
strong. Livestock were troubled!
Cows and calves were in search of
each other, but couldn’t find their
way. As blizzard conditions en-
hanced; cattle in search of safety,
became tangled in barbed wire
fence, suffocated in the snow
drifts, drowned from drifting into
dams, or froze to death – they
were chilled from the earlier rain.
Thousands of cattle mark the
West River roads and pastures
with this loss!
A few days ago, I heard two men
visiting about this storm. One of
them said to the other, “Yes, I lost
a few head of cattle, but I can do it
again. God helped me the first
time.”
South Dakota blizzards
continued on 5
Hit & Miss
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 4
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Oct. 31: Roast Beef,
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy,
Corn, Roll, Fruit.
Friday, Nov. 1: Crispy Tuscan
Chicken, Duchess Potatoes,
Brunswick Veggies, Garlic Ched-
dar Biscuit, Fruit.
Monday, Nov. 4: Beef
Stroganoff, Buttered Noodles,
Glazed Carrots, Spiced Apples.
Tuesday, Nov. 5: Grilled
Reuben, Potato Salad, Peachy
Gelatin.
Wednesday, Nov. 6: Fried
Chicken, Macaroni and Cheese,
Green Beans, Fruit.
***
Isabelle Sampson and Sherry
Block stopped to see Blanche
Dolezal at the Silverleaf Assisted
Living Center Saturday after-
noon.
Saturday, October 19, Somerset
Court resident Lucille Huether
went downtown with her daugh-
ter and her sister, Phyllis Reub.
Marilyn Butts was gone at break-
fast and lunch. Her church (As-
sembly of God) was having a
breakfast and bazaar. The com-
puter was in a holding pattern
and Stephanie, our afternoon
medic, knew how to get it back
working. Thank you, Stephanie.
Susan had us in for an art class
in the afternoon. Thank you,
Susan. We made carefree little
garden girls using paintbrushes
for their hair and body, felt wraps
and deco of buttons and a few
pumpkins and a jolly little crow.
Come see her standing in a flower
pot among the leaves. It is worth
a trip up every hallway to see the
cute, pretty, clever and beautiful
Halloween decorations.
My daughter-in-law, Gwynn
Hansen, came over to bring my
sewing machine back. She had
taken it to the shop for a new nee-
dle, cleaning, oiling and adjust-
ment. Thank you, Gwynn. She
stayed for supper and we had a
game of scrabble. Gwynn made
the word nevermore. Quite a sea-
sonal word considering Poe’s
raven. Gwynn also brought a quilt
to show me. It is a really comfort-
able outing flannel. It is a rag
quilt. Maybe that is not the name
of it, but it is shaggy with cut fab-
ric. It is in a hunting motif for a
certain friend who will be taking
naps during his recovery.
My daughter, Delores, Pavil-
lion, Wyo., wrote that they have
had a sticky time of potato digging
and that their glorious alfalfa is
ruined with two feet of snow and
everlasting rain.
My daughter, Vinnie, wrote that
her husband, Danny, had sold
some paintings at his open studio.
She sent newspaper clippings of
monarch butterflies which are
congregating now at a park near
Santa Cruz. One time when I was
at Santa Cruz, Vinnie took me to
see them in clusters.
Sunday, October 20, 2013, at
Somerset, it was a calm, gray day.
I went out looking for something
cheery. Right outside my door,
Gwynn’s croton (big foliage plant)
is putting forth three tiny new
leaves.
Small comfort in the Sunday,
October 20, 2013, USA Today’s
best selling book list, all the titles
seem violent, hateful and scary. In
first place, “The Heros of Olym-
pus: The House of Hades,” by Rick
Jordan. In second place, “Killing
Jesus,” by Bill O’Reilly and Mar-
tin Dugard. Number three on the
list was “Storm Front” by John
Sanford. Fourth, “My Story,” by
Elizabeth Smart with Chris Stew-
art. Fifth: “The Longest Ride,” by
Nicholas Sparks. Sometimes I get
so tired of reading scary, exciting
and shocking books, so I go back to
reading the calm, beautiful books
of Gene Stratton-Porter.
Eileen Tenold entertained with
piano hymns and singing in the
activity garden Sunday. Thank
you, Eileen.
October 20, 2013, Terry and
Ardith Pulse came to Somerset
Court for the noon meal and for
church services in the afternoon.
Thank you, Terry and Ardith.
My son, Wayne, and his wife,
Gwynn, came to Somerset Court
for lunch Sunday and we enjoyed
visiting for a while after lunch.
They brought me a persimmon.
Probably the first I had ever seen.
It is shaped like a tomato, but it is
heavier. It is partly green, just
starting to turn pink on the bot-
tom. They had brought it back
from California. It will be sweeter
and softer as it ripens. They grow
on a tree. Some persimmon trees
are big, but some are of a size suit-
able for dooryards.
For the upcoming 50th anniver-
sary of the assassination on No-
vember 22, 1963, of John
Fitzgerald Kennedy, the Sunday
Rapid City Journal offered sug-
gestions of where to find J.F.K.
history. I remember the day. I was
teaching at the Highway School
two miles west of Cottonwood. The
neighbors across the road, the
Harry Johannesens, came over to
tell us at the school. I went out in
the anteroom and cried briefly,
then went to calm my pupils.
Sandi and a bunch of residents
went to a new shopping center
and Sandi got me a pack of elastic
to fix old pants. Thank you, Sandi.
My dear son, Leslie Hansen,
Bend, Ore., sent a new folder of
word puzzles, neatly typed and
inked in colors. These have to do
with numbers and knight moves
(as in a chess game) and with the
nursery rhyme of Humpty
Dumpty. Thank you, Leslie. These
pages are beautifully done. I am
sorry I don’t understand their sig-
nificance.
My dear niece, Alma Schilling,
Redfield, sent the July/August
issue of the Upper Room maga-
zine. Thank you, Alma. Some of
you are familiar with that maga-
zine. In some ways it is as baffling
as Leslie’s number puzzles. We
run along, most of the time secure
in our belief that the sun will come
up in the morning, at an ap-
pointed time, and most everything
runs according to what we think is
a plan. If you plant a potato, you
will possibly grow a potato. You do
not expect to grow a carrot. You
expect October’s bright blue
weather, not a blizzard.
Alma Gruenig’s son from
Chadron, Neb., is coming to visit
her tonight, Tuesday. He is in
Rapid City for a business meeting.
Lucille Huether’s minister from
Wall was at Somerset Court to
visit her on Tuesday, October 22,
2013.
We miss Anne’s big dieffen-
bachia on third floor. I believe that
Becky, former Somerset Court
housekeeping, has taken it to her
home to care for it. It was hatch-
ing a new leaf. And it was inter-
esting to observe it everyday.
My daughter, Carol, Colorado
Springs, babysits her great-
grands and has a deep bag of ideas
to amuse and educate them. They
have been decorating balloons to
serve as pumpkins, to represent
jack-o-lanterns. They use some
green Easter hay for hair, and
buttons and such. That might be
an idea we can use here at Somer-
set Court.
October 23 at Somerset Court,
we had the activity of stair climb-
ing. The purpose of practicing
stair climbing is so we know we
can climb them in case of routing
evacuation or in case of emer-
gency. We are also rewarded with
Somerset bucks.
Our new resident on third floor
is Ruth Sichterman. Marilyn
Butts is acquainted with her, as
they attend the same church.
Grace Tillery had a visit from
her son, Lynn Greff, Wednesday,
October 23. Lynn is a pharmacist.
Marge Self has been gone to
North Dakota to visit relatives
and to also celebrate her birthday.
She expects to be back Sunday
night.
Zona Hairgrove and her friend’s
grandson made a jack-o-lantern
and set it on her window. Then
they went down in the courtyard
to see if they could see it from
there.
Sandi, Marge Gaffin, Marilyn
Butts and Vivian Hansen had a
couple good games of pool. Thank
you for having ice water and
lemonade for us, Sandi.
Lora Hubbel, Sioux Falls, has
declared her candidacy for gover-
nor of South Dakota. She spoke
downtown in Rapid City Tuesday,
October 21 and outlined some of
her views.
In Rapid City, curbside cleanup
of debris has started and it is
hoped that it will be finished by
Christmas, 2013.
On October 24, at Somerset
Court, residents were entertained
by Joyful Guys and Gals – delight-
ful as ever and we had a social af-
terward.
October 25, I am in the Rapid
City Regional Hospital with stom-
ach problems. They are trying to
relieve pressure. Since I have been
here in Rapid City Regional, I
have found all the requirements
for hospital gowns. 1) They must
be ugly. 2) They must provide ac-
cess to all body parts. 3) They
must be breezy! 4) They must be
made of sturdy material with no
nameable design.
by Vivian Hansen
vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-
review.com
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
Nov. 1-2-3-4 &
Nov. 8-9-10-11
Free Birds
(PG)
Saturday is
Half Price
Movie Night!
Sponsored by
National
Mutual Benet
Nov. 15-16-17-18
Captain Phillips
(PG-13)
Some time ago Esther Knutson
sent a picture out of this commu-
nity that was taken several years
ago. It looked like Mary Agnes
Gottsleben was about five or six
years old in it. Esther wondered if
Rich Smith could identify some of
the ladies in the picture.
Sunday morning, I called Rich
and asked if he would be home
and if I could bring the picture
over to see if he could possibly
identify some of them. Arlie
Smith, who was there visiting his
dad, had gleaned his garden and
brought some of his garden pro-
duce with him. He had made a big
stew and asked me to come over
and have dinner with them.
I thought this would also serve
the purpose for me, as I had some
of my folks’ old pictures and was
not sure who some of them were.
Rich could probably tell me who
they were, so I could write on the
back of the pictures. And if there
are still some he didn’t know then
I just as well get rid of them as
they would be on the Smith side.
Also, if they could be of interest to
shirt-tail relatives, I could give
them to them. Well, the stew was
really good and we had birthday
cake and ice cream for dessert.
Deb Smith had brought Rich a big
birthday cake and he had some of
that left.
All the men at Kieth’s were
down combining milo. Arlie and
Rich both went to watch them
after I left. Rich said it was a good
crop of milo.
Marvin has been busy moving
haystacks in. He said he had to be
careful where he went to get them
as it was soft and some places still
awful muddy. He hadn’t gotten
stuck yet! He has a big John Deere
with the dozer on front and can
push them off the spot if he has to,
so he can pull them on the mover
to load them. He hates to wait as
the weather can get worse and
stay wet. He doesn’t want to wait
as he wants the hay here at home
to feed if it is a bad winter. As he
calves here at home in March he
wants the hay nearby.
I have been trying to get every-
thing put away for winter. Mow-
ers and all the tools I use in the
summer and get the snowshovels
out and those I need for winter. I
just need a few more days which
sounds like I may get them end of
this next week. I am just now as
fast as I used to be and a half a
day is a full day now. Some ask
me if I have help. Yes I do. Marvin
and Vicki and the grandchildren
help whenever I ask them. I don’t
ask a lot, as I really need the ex-
ercise. It is cheaper than one of
those exercise machines just to do
the work that needs to be done.
Marvin weaned his replacement
heifers and one day something
spooked them and they went right
through the corral fence and he
had to go round them up again. So
when I go out to do something, I
try to be careful and not spook
them again, but the last few days
they seem more settled. We never
did know what set them off the
Grindstone News|Mary Eide • 859-2188
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
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Come & meet our little miracle,
Gideon Walker
(son of Angela Walker)
on Saturday, November 9th
from 2 to 4 p.m.
at Grandpa & Grandma Walker’s
house in Philip
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One
meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the
second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.); 6:30 p.m.
(Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
UNITED CHURCH
OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 6:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
According to the old adage, “A leopard never changes
its spots.” That leopard does not know God. A
relationship with God is life-changing. The more you
learn about God, the closer you grow to Him and the
more you change. Old thoughts give way to new ones,
and you become a better person.
Ancient wisdom for modern life
But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto
his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye
have suffered a while, make you perfect,
stablish, strengthen, settle you.
1 Peter 5:10 KJV)
Church October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 5
Obituaries
Dorothy M. Stahl, age 90, of
Philip, S.D., died Sunday, October
27, 2013, at the Hans P. Peterson
Memorial Hospital in Philip.
Dorothy M. Konst was born
June 7, 1923, in Philip, the daugh-
ter of Clem and Alice (Griswold)
Konst. Her early childhood years
were spent in the Powell area. At
the age of six, she moved with her
parents and family to the Nowlin
community where she grew up.
Dorothy graduated from Mid-
land High School and then at-
tended Black Hills State Teachers
College in Spearfish where she ob-
tainer her teaching certificate.
She then taught rural schools in
Haakon County as well as in the
Nowlin community.
Dorothy was united in mar-
riage to Paul J. Stahl on July 5,
1943, in Philip. They made their
home on Paul’s farm-ranch west of
the Ottumwa area, which they op-
erated until 1977, when they re-
tired and moved into Philip, but
continued to own the farm-ranch.
After Paul’s death on July 19,
1998, Dorothy continued to reside
in Philip. She later moved into the
Silverleaf Assisted Living Center,
and in July 2013, moved into the
Philip Nursing Home, where she
has since resided.
Dorothy was a member of the
Sacred Heart Catholic Church,
and a member of the church
evening guild, Tribe 1. She was
also a member of the Bad River
Senior Citizens Center, and was a
longtime secretary of the Haakon/
Philip Cancer Society, and was ac-
tive on the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital Auxiliary Board.
Survivors include her son,
William Stahl and his wife,
Penny, of Midland; one daughter,
Jeanne Stahl, of Phoenix, Ariz.;
two grandsons, Ryan Stahl of Key-
stone, and Eric Stahl of Loveland,
Colo.; two great-grandchildren,
Allison Stahl of Lemoore, Calif.,
and Trevor Stahl of Rapid City;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
In addition to her husband,
Paul, Dorothy was preceded in
death by her parents; one sister,
Doris Ballinger; and a brother,
Paul Konst.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Wednesday, October
30, at the Sacred Heart Catholic
Church with Father Kevin
Achbach as celebrant.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation, the Silver-
leaf Assisted Living Center, and
the Bad River Senior Citizens
Center, all of Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Dorothy Stahl__________________________________
Clara Belle Weller, age 79, of
Kadoka, S.D., died Friday morn-
ing, October 25, 2013, at the Hans
P. Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip.
Clara Belle Wilson was born
January 21, 1934, in Pierre, the
daughter of William Key and
Sarah Patience (Sutton) Wilson.
She grew up in Kadoka where she
graduated from Kadoka High
School in 1952. She then attended
South Dakota State College in
Brookings where she received her
home economics degree.
Clara Belle was united mar-
riage to Harold D. “Bud” Weller on
August 14, 1955, in Kadoka. In
1957, she taught one year at
Kadoka High School and 10 years
later she started to teach full time,
a position she held until retiring
after 25 years. Later she cooked at
the Kadoka Nursing Home and for
the meals at the senior citizens
center in Kadoka.
After retirement she continued
to reside on the ranch. Because of
health reasons, she moved into
the Kadoka Care Center in May
2013.
Clara Belle was a member of
the Presbyterian Church of
Kadoka and Quilters for Christ at
the senior citizens center.
Survivors include her husband,
Harold “Bud” Weller of Kadoka;
one son, Keith Weller and his
wife, Diane, of Mitchell; two
daughters, Katie M. Knutson and
her husband, Craig, of Spearfish,
and Terri D. Renfro and her hus-
band, Dan, of Macksville, Kan.; 10
grandchildren; one great-grand-
son; one sister, Lucy Freeman and
her husband, Glenn, of Kadoka; a
brother-in-law, Lester of Ab-
erdeen; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Clara Belle was preceded in
death by her parents; one brother,
Kenneth Wilson; and one sister,
Charlotte Clarke.
Services were held Monday, Oc-
tober 28, at the Presbyterian
Church in Kadoka, with Pastor
Gary McCubbin officiating.
Eulogy was given by Janet Van-
derMay. Music was provided by
Joyce Wheeler, pianist, and Bon-
nie Shoemaker, vocalist, with spe-
cial music by Clara Belle’s family.
Ushers were Buster Peterson
and Chuck VanderMay. Pallbear-
ers were Sharon Knutson, Alyssa
Dawson, Joshua Knutson, Marc
Renfro, Samuel Weller, Andrew
Weller, Kristina Knutson, Rachel
Knutson, Kyla Knapp and Jenna
Renfro.
Interment was at the Kadoka
Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to the Kadoka Nursing
Home and the Presbyterian
Church in Kadoka.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Clara Belle Weller_______________________________
(continued from 4)
first time. They soon will be ready
to turn out on the 80 acres as the
cows don’t come in and cry for
their babies anymore. Then some
old cows can be put inwith them to
kind of hold them down.
I wonder how many of you re-
member Bert and Norma Hum-
bert. They were our neighbors and
also I knew them as a kid and we
would come down from Custer and
we would always spend a day at
their house. They had two daugh-
ters, Betty and Hope, and a son,
Dean. There was another Hum-
bert whose name was Forest. The
girls were good to me and would
keep me entertained. Betty mar-
ried Bus Anderson who lived
around Capa and their son, Tim,
lives in Rapid City. Tim would
stay at Bert and Norma’s a lot and
would come over here in the air-
plane with Bert when he was fly-
ing. Hope married Bill Steele
around Spearfish and I have lost
track of her family, but I think
some still live around Spearfish.
Bert was another neighbor who
Marvin enjoyed and learned a lot
from.
Marvin and Kenneth would go
up with Bert in his plane and
Marvin thought that this was the
best thing he got to do. Bert would
not let Marvin go up with him if
he had his gun along or was hunt-
ing coyotes, but would take him a
lot when he was just out flying.
One day lightning hit a stack of
hay and Bert flew over and by the
time got there with the TD6 Cat
Bert had kept the fire down and
Kenneth pushed a large portion of
the stack away and saved it. That
made Bert’s day.
It was two o’clock in the morn-
ing and it was Bert, he had been
to Sturgis and bought some cattle
and wanted Marvin and Kenneth
to come and help brand them. So
they got up and went over there
and they found Bert had the whole
place lit up and ready to go. They
got the job done. Marvin said he
would never forget that as it was
early morning when they returned
home and Marvin was so glad that
they had pleased his friend by
going over there.
Bert was one of the best flyers
in the country and he had lost an
eye earlier when a fence staple
glanced off and hit him in the eye.
This didn’t seem to matter, as he
could shoot a coyote on the dead
run from his plane. It was nothing
to see him fly in and land with
three or four coyotes in the plane.
One time he had a ski broke on
the plane and he reached out of
the plane with a snow scoop and
straightened the ski and landed it.
People at the Philip airport
thought it was going to be a crash,
but he landed safely.
One day, Marvin said to me,
“Grindstone News people don’t
read the paper anymore, they get
all the news on Facebook and the
network, as it is out so fast.” I
said, “I don’t write so much for the
young people as I do it for the
older people and those who don’t
have all the modern technology.
Or those who live away from here
who don’t get on Facebook with
those around here.” In my birth-
day cards I received from people
away from here, they said that
they received the paper and en-
joyed reading it, so I guess I will
continue for awhile. I think a lot
of news gets advertised and dis-
cussed at the coffee breaks and
gatherings in and around Philip,
so they don’t rely upon the paper
for news as they have Facebook
and Twitter.
Some people still have cattle
missing, so will be a long while yet
before all is over from the bad Oc-
tober blizzard.
Will bring this to a close and be
careful of all the spooks and
maybe you can bribe them if you
have some treats on hand for
them. Have a happy Halloween
and stay safe.
Live each season as it passes;
breath the air, drink the drink,
taste the fruit and resign yourself
to the influences of each. Let them
be your only diet, drink, and
botanical medicines. Henry David
Thoreau
Humane beings must be known
to love; but Divine beings must be
loved to be known. Blaise Pascal
Grindstone News|Mary Eide • 859-2188
Congratulations to Murdock
Arthur and Rachel Schull who
were married in Las Vegas Octo-
ber 19. Murdock's parents are
Beth and Zane Jeffries and Curt
Arthur, who also gained a little
four-year-old grandaughter,
Sadie. Murdock recently was
transferred from Enning to
Quinn, where they are making
their home.
Zach and Lariann (Smith)
Lanka had a baby boy born in
Rapid City October 26. Ridge
David weighed 7 lb. 5.6 oz and is
21 inches long. Ridge has a two-
year-old sister, Retta. Congratula-
tions to the parents, grandpar-
ents, Larry and Linda Smith,
great-grandma, Joy Klima, and
great-grandpa, Rich Smith.
The Hardingrove Church will
have their Harvest Festival No-
vember 10 with a potluck supper
beginning at 5:30. A group of mu-
sicians from the Wall area will
provide entertainment following
the meal. Everyone is welcome.
Last week, Linda Gebes was in
Horace, N.D., helping out at the
Darren and Karen Gebes’ home.
They have a busy household with
the addition of twin daughters
along with their five older sib-
lings.
Steve, Nina and Grace Pekron
and Nina's parents, Bob and
JoAnn Runner, Bowman, N.D., at-
tended the state cross country
meet in Rapid City Saturday to
watch Allison Pekron and the
Philip cross country team partici-
pate.
Amy Piroutek Hogue and her
two sons spent the weekend at
Dan and Gayla Piroutek's. They
all enjoyed the Halloween party in
Kadoka before Amy and her fam-
ily returned to Sioux Falls. Amy
had a weeks vacation, but will re-
turn to Michigan for four more
weeks before she can permanately
move to Sioux Falls.
Matt and Linette Donnelly,
Nick and Cody, Philip, came out to
Jim and Lana Elshere's Saturday.
They spent the day hunting
prairie dogs and coyotes. Sunday,
J.J. and Lindsay Elshere and five
boys came to Milesville to church
and a quick visit with Jim and
Lana. They went home with some
feed bunks for their calves.
Mark, Pat, Kathy and Preston
Hanrahan all attended the shower
Saturday for Sydney Martin,
daughter of Sig and Carissa Mar-
tin.
Vonda Hamill enjoyed lunch
and a visit with Peggy Staben in
Philip Wednesday.
Milesville News|Janice Parsons • 544-3315
continued on 13
The family of Wanna Young
invites you to an Open House
in celebration of her 90th Birthday
Sunday, November 10, 2013
from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the
Senior Citizens Center in Sturgis, SD.
No gifts please.
Everyone is invited
to a farewell breakfast
for the Kanable family
after the 8:30 worship service
Sunday, November 3rd • 10:00 a.m.
First Lutheran Church • Philip
(Don’t forget Daylight Savings time change)
The Philip Lutheran Youth Group
will be going door to door in Philip
October 30th from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.
for donations to the
Country Cupboard Food Pantry.
We appreciate your support!
F0lll¢ N0l0f, lß0.
Pr|||p, 30
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2013 Ford Escape SE
Eco Boost, Local Trade
Check out our entire selection at
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Midland News
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 6
What a difference from last
Monday to this Monday. There
was no full moon shining from a
deep blue sky this Monday morn-
ing and no awesome colored leaves
on Scott and Susie Martin’s trees.
It was overcast; the wind was
blowing, temperatures in the low
30s and those leaves on those cot-
tonwood trees in last week’s news
column are mostly on the ground.
There’s more then a nip in the air
– it is winter coat weather, to be
sure. Farmers are hoping to get
those fall crops harvested, but,
Mother Nature isn’t cooperating
at the moment. With all of the
moisture we’ve had the winter
wheat crops are off and running.
A year ago we couldn’t buy a drop
of rain – now we have moisture in
abundance. When Jerry and I
went for a drive in the country, we
saw a beautiful winter wheat
field, with a lake of water at one
end. When Jerry and I were rak-
ing leaves yesterday, I was kind of
grumbling at all those leaves and
the abundance of black walnuts on
the ground. And then, I thought,
those folks who lost trees in that
October blizzard would be happy
to be raking up leaves. And so, it
was time to stop grumbling and
being thankful for those trees. I
remember one fall, when working
in the yard, I happened to see a
squirrel running up the black wal-
nut tree and back down with a
walnut in its mouth. That squirrel
headed for a spot and with his
front feet he tapped that walnut in
the ground, and off he went, back
up the tree. Fascinated by this
busy little squirrel, I sat on the
deck watching his busy work. I
couldn’t help but chuckle as I
thought, ‘wonder if he has sticky
notes to write where he put all
those walnuts.’ A point of interest
was, he didn’t make a break in the
ground, where he packed them in.
Didn’t see but one squirrel this
fall, and he didn’t seem interested
in those black walnuts. They are
fascinating to watch! Time to get
at the news for this week!
Reminder: Midland Legion
Auxiliary will be having their an-
nual Halloween party at the Le-
gion Hall on October 31 from 4:00
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. This is for ages
babies to eighth grade, so dress up
in costume for a fun night of
treats, fish pond, cupcake/cookie
walk and pizza.
Reminder: The Legion Auxil-
iary ladies will be having a meet-
ing at the Legion Hall November
7 beginning at 7:00 p.m.
Reminder: Legion members are
having a veterans soup supper
Monday, November 11, with chili
and chicken noodle soup from 5:00
p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Midland
Legion Hall. They invite you to
please come and support the vet-
erans.
Ronnie and Emily Sammons
became great-grandparents again
with the birth of a baby girl, Car-
lie Marie Norman, the daughter of
Ty and Tara Norman and grand-
daughter of Mitch and Corinne
(Sammons) Norman. Little Carlie
was born Friday, October 4, 2013,
at Pierre. She joins a brother
whose name is Hayden. Congrat-
ulations to everyone on that new
baby girl. I do love babies – they
are truly one of God’s blessings.
Ronnie and Emily attended the
annual lutefisk supper and bazaar
at Deep Creek Saturday, October
26.
Wednesday, Prerry Saucerman
picked up her mom, Marlin
Evans, at the Senechal Apart-
ments in Philip, heading for Rapid
City where Marlin had a doctor’s
appointment. They had some in-
teresting passengers on this trip,
some bottle feed baby kittens. Be-
fore going to the doctor appoint-
ment they made a stop at the
home of Prerry’s son, Tel and Ellie
(Nemec) Saucerman. The purpose
of bringing those baby kittens was
to give Prerry’s granddaughter,
Raygen, a chance to enjoy those
kittens, along with her mom,
Ellie. Raygen’s siblings missed out
as they were at school. Getting
back to Philip, Prerry made a stop
to see her father-in-law, Gaylord
Saucerman, giving him a chance
to see those kittens. And then, it
was off to see Marie Lamm, who
lives at the Senechal Apartments,
giving her chance to pet those
baby kittens. Those baby kittens
are a bit like little kids, they bring
a lot of joy to folks.
Saturday, Judy Daly, Jody
Block and LaVonne Wheeler
headed for Rapid City for the
show Stomp at the civic center. It
was a show-in-motion with a vari-
ety of items used by the perform-
ers. Other then that, Judy said it’s
been a busy place at their farm,
trying to get fall crops harvested
and moving cattle home to winter
pasture.
Friday, Gene and Audrey
Jones traveled to Wagner to spend
the weekend with daughter, Lisa
and Matt Foley. That evening,
they helped Lisa and Matt serve
supper to the volleyball team,
which Jaycie plays on. It is the
custom for parents to take turns
hosting a meal before the home
games. They also enjoyed seeing
Levi Geiman, who is working in
Scotland, and Samantha Geiman,
who came home from Mitchell
where she is attending college, to
watch her sister, Jaycie, play. All
enjoyed watching the games that
evening. Saturday morning, they
traveled to Parkston to a tourna-
ment where Jaycie was again
playing. Lisa and Matt and Gene
and Audrey went out to supper
Saturday night. Sunday morning
after attending Mass in Wagner,
the Joneses returned home.
Barbara and Morris Jones had
a great weekend in Bismarck and
Mandan, N.D. They left Thursday
evening to attend the diocese of
Bismarck sponsored Thirst 2013
Eucharistic Conference held at
the Bismarck Civic Center, Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday. Many
thousands of Catholics attended
and were treated to world
renowned speakers, beautiful eu-
charistic celebrations and many
opportunities to grow closer to
God. They especially enjoyed
hearing Cardinal Timothy Dolan,
the archbishop of New York,
speak and author Scott Hawn
from Steubenville, Ohio. The
Joneses stayed with their daugh-
ter, Jill Sheldon, and family in
Mandan. While they were there,
they took in two basketball games
that grandchildren, Mya and Mal-
lory Sheldon, played in and en-
joyed the visit with Jill, Todd and
family.
* * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH ANNUAL TURKEY
DINNER, SUNDAY, NOV. 3.
DINNER AT NOON. EVERYONE
WELCOME. ADULTS: $8. CHIL-
DREN 6-12: $4; 5 & UNDER:
FREE.
* * *
October 20, the Mississippi
pheasant hunters took Jerry and
Joy Jones, Cody and Audrey
Jones, and the Mike Trapp family
out for supper at a local steak-
house in Pierre. Cassidy Trapp
was home for the weekend from
college at School of Mines in Rapid
City, so was able to have supper
with the group.
Saturday, Cassidy and Emily
Trapp looked after Cass and Cole
Finn while their parents, Shad
and Jenna Finn, attended the
Halloween costume party at the
Midland Legion Hall. Cody and
Audrey Jones were also at the
party. From the sounds of things
there was a good turnout and
some great costumes. I’m betting
Facebook was busy with those pic-
tures!
Jerry Jones and Mike and Deb
Trapp went to the lutefisk supper
and bazaar at the Deep Creek
Church Saturday night. Mike and
Deb’s boys, Wyatt and Chauncey,
were at home with walking pneu-
monia, so, Grandma Joy Jones
filled in as Florence Nightingale
giving their folks a chance to go to
the lutefisk supper and Cassidy
and Emily were babysitting.
Dorothy (Konst) Stahl passed
away at the age of 90 years old.
She and my aunt, Ida Hunt, were
classmates, graduating from Mid-
land High School the same year.
They remained good friends over
the years, always enjoying a time
of visiting. I remember well,
Dorothy’s mother, Alice Konst.
She and her husband, Clem, lived
in the house Christine Niedan
now lives in, here at Midland.
Times were tough; we had four
kids and not a whole lot of money.
Alice helped me make badly
needed winter coats for our girls,
Charlene and April. The material
for those coats was cut from coats
my mom, Olga Meyers, and Aunt
Virgie Nemec, no longer wore.
They were dress coats and were in
good condition. She reminded me
so much of my aunt, Esther
Schanzenbach, when it came to
making use of every stretch of ma-
terial when it came to cutting
those pieces for those coats. Didn’t
have a pattern, Alice, just knew
how to make them without that
pattern. We shared in the sewing
of those coats and when they were
sewn; Alice said she thought there
was enough material for a tam to
go with each coat. She said she
was going to take it home and see
what she could do. Got a phone
call the next day, it was Alice, she
said she was at Virgie’s (we al-
ways got together at Virgie’s) and
wondered if we could come over.
So, we did! With a huge smile on
her face she held up the two tams.
We have pictures of the girls in
those coats and tams. Those coats
were warm and made better then
most you could buy. And when I
took on the project of making suits
for our boys, Jim and Les, Alice
was a big help when I would find
myself in a bit of a pickle. She al-
ways knew what to do to make it
work. “Wouldn’t trade those mem-
ories for all the tea in China?” Be-
cause of people like Alice, Virgie,
and my mom, those tough times
didn’t seem so bad. You learned to
appreciate their gifts of kindness
and caring and those memories of
that time are with me to this day.
I remember sharing those memo-
ries with Dorothy. Our sympa-
thies to the family of Dorothy
(Konst) Stahl.
The Deep Creek lutefisk sup-
per and bazaar are now but a
memory for another year. Many of
us remember Lil Briggs and her
sons and families coming to those
suppers and bazaars. Lil helped
with those suppers, made things
for the bazaar, and always had a
good time. As some of you know,
Lil Briggs passed away recently.
Jerry and I were at the Deep
Creek event and some of us got to
talking of Lil and how she is an-
other one of those we will miss at
the annual lutefisk supper and
bazaar. I tend to be a bit nostalgic
when it comes to the Deep Creek
supper and bazaar, as I remember
all those family members and oth-
ers, who were such a part of those
evenings of getting together for
good food and fun bidding, for
those many items for auction. I re-
member Bob Schofield being the
auctioneer for a number of years.
And now, Billy Markwed and his
grandson, T.J. Gabriel, have
stepped into those shoes, making
for a time of lively bidding and
some things going a bit crazy, as
folks get caught up in that bid-
ding. T.J. always has a poem or
writing involving Norwegian
humor. I remember my aunt,
Clara Roseth, giving a bit of a
snort, as he shared humor of
stinky fish, etc. It was all in good
humor! Good times! This year he
had an Ole and Lena story to tell.
Love those Ole and Lena stories!
Uff Da! You betcha! As most of
you know, Billy’s parents, Bill and
Margaret Markwed, were a big
part of that church. Margaret
played the piano for church serv-
ices for many years. Christine
Niedan, Roy and Keith Hunt, Mid-
land, and Teresa Palmer, Murdo,
were there, as was sister, Peg
Johnson, and her husband, Roger,
Pierre. Roger is good with wood
working items and always makes
things for the bazaar, which bring
in a good amount. Peg had home-
made jellies which did real well,
too. And Cam Meinzer had made
a horseshoe cross which was a
good bidding item. Don Sandal,
Pierre, whose folks, Art and Mil-
dred Sandal, were such a part of
that church, was there. And, Ila
Roseth and a friend from Pierre
were also there. Ila’s folks were
Clarence and Marjorie Roseth, Ila
rarely misses those suppers and
bazaars. Sophie (Roseth) Foley
and her husband, Pat, were also
there from Midland. Sophie’s sib-
lings, Duane, Carmen, and Julian,
live in that area and were also
there. As many of you know their
folks were Roy and Clara Roseth
who were also very active mem-
bers of Deep Creek. Carmen plays
for church services much of the
time. I hesitate to mention names
as it’s easy to miss some who were
there, but most of these were fam-
ily members who had ties to that
church through their families who
grew up in the Deep Creek area.
That church held a special place in
my mom, Olga Meyers, heart all of
her life. Many of us have good
memories of that Deep Creek
Church on the hill!
Halloween is about here when all
the spooks and goblins will be on
the move that one night. Although
it seems that the festivities extend
longer than the actual evening of
October 31. Grandson Zack Seager
is wished a happy birthday that
day. You should see their house, it
is decorated from top to bottom
with scary things. Little Ryder
doesn’t pay much attention to it,
Cori is fine with it and little Raiden
could care less at a little over 4
months. Zack said for quite a few
years he thought folks dressed up
weird because it was his birthday.
Please be careful and safe as you go
about trick or treating – flash-
lights and such are good.
When we were little there
weren’t too many places to trick or
treat. There was Grandma Grace,
Hank Gebes’, Earl, Ella and
Gertrude Neumeister, and Jetters
seemed to be the places we went
and that was a drive of about 25
miles. I remember at the Jetters
one of them said to “get the gun”
and it didn’t take us long to run for
the car. No treats there, but it
seemed we did play a trick with
Dad’s help.
Monday it sprinkled rain off and
on. I worked on a shirt project most
all day and in the evening Bryan
Buxcell picked me up and I was a
substitute bowler for Shad’s Tow-
ing.
Monday, Tony Harty picked up
the mail then visited with L.D. and
Shirley Hair who were back in
town to get their furnace working.
George, Sandee and Roxie Git-
tings were in Rapid City Monday.
George kept an appointment about
his skin cancer and Sandee and
Roxie met with oncology at the
same time. Wade McGruder and
Jessica Gittings had supper with
George, Sandee, Roxie, Kinsey and
Kohen Gittings Monday evening.
Tuesday, October 22, I had an
early morning drive with the
Haakon County Prairie Trans-
portation van to Rapid City. We
took a drive between appointments
and looked over all the tree damage
around town and also took a drive
up Skyline Drive, then back into
town, getting a look on both sides
of the hill.
Ray Gibson and crew were busy
at Don and Vi Moody’s Tuesday
and Wednesday pouring the con-
crete deck out in front, which also
connects to the pole barn (garage),
for easier access and snow removal.
No more little varmits can get un-
derneath that deck.
Roxie returned to Eagan, Minn.,
Tuesday morning. Kinsey and
Kohen Gittings returned to Wood-
ward, Iowa, Tuesday afternoon.
Wednesday morning, Lila
Whidby and I bowled. Sue (Nelson)
Titus was in Philip visiting her
mother, Marion Nelson, and came
by the bowling alley to visit with
friends and classmates. Sue lives in
Westborough, Md., and said they
always have a room open for any-
body from Philip. Lila visited her
sister, Lola Hulce, while I did some
running around before we came
home. Susan Davidson was a caller
at our place in the afternoon.
Denise Perryman visited Sandee
Gittings Wednesday evening.
Cattle work took place at the
Moody ranch, Wednesday, Thurs-
day, and Friday, with the moving
and sorting of cattle preparing for
sales and pasture changes by those
renting pasture from Don and Vi.
It was a beautiful week for these
jobs to get accomplished and all
trucks and trailers could get
around easily as the roads and
trails around the ranch were get-
ting dried out fairly well.
George and Sandee Gittings
were in Midland on business
Thursday afternoon.
Thursday evening, Tony Harty
attended the football game here in
Kadoka. He said it was a sort of
one-sided game, but the opposing
team did play well.
Thursday morning, Terry
Buchert called Bill about helping
with an auger and possibly getting
some corn harvested. Bill was gone
like a shot headed north. I got an
interesting call from LaVona Kirk-
patrick from the Hayes area. She
had received an email from a friend
of a friend looking for information
on Grace Fairchild. It seems a little
fourth grader, Tanley Goebel, Ar-
lington, chose Grandma Grace as
her project on pioneer women and
was looking for more information.
LaVona remembered that I was a
Fairchild, so called. We had a very
nice visit, then after getting Tan-
ley’s address and my email address
to the parties who had contacted
her, we were off on an adventure to
see how this was all going to work
out. Tanley had the book “Frontier
Woman” already and that is what
inspired her to pick Grace. I just
got a note saying she would send
me pictures as she is dressed for
the part. Another little woman
from northeast Pennsylvania read
Grandma’s book about 1990 and
drove to the farm to see the old
homestead, after calling me. Vee
Lamb lectured on Grandma Grace
for several years in Pennsylvania
and New York and if there were
questions she wasn’t sure of, would
call me to find out more. Some-
times you learn more about your
family from another’s perspective.
Don and Vi Moody were in Philip
for parts and saw the multitude of
cattle trucks at the sale barn
Thursday. They continued on into
Rapid Valley for more cleanup in
the yards there and Friday after-
noon met friends for lunch at Dead-
wood and enjoyed a nice drive
through Boulder Canyon. They ran
into quite a few they knew up that
way as it was a nice afternoon and
some of the stress was kind of
wearing off after the really violent
storm in early October. The Octo-
ber 5, 2013, storm “Atlas” will be
one etched in the memories of those
who lived through it. Vi visited
with friends who used to live in
Rapid Valley and they bought
Betwixt Places| Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048
bilmar@gwtc.net
continued on 13
St. William
Catholic Church
of Midland
Annual Turkey Dinner
Sunday, November 3rd
Dinner starts at Noon
Everyone is welcome!  
Adults: $8.00
Children 6-12 Years: $4.00 • 5 & Under: Free
1997 John
Deere 7610
Low hours!!
859-2744
or 685-3068
Philip
Community October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 7
After the fierce October blizzard and with much
deliberation, we have cancelled our 24th
annual bred cow sale at the Philip Livestock
Auction. We plan on
selling young cows
again next year.
Please, join us in
helping those that
suffered devastating
loss.
Larry, Charlotte, Jeff and Heather Gabriel
* Legion Fun Night *
Saturday, November 2nd * 6:30 p.m. (Doors open at 6 p.m.)
American Legion Hall in Philip
Sponsored by Wheeler-Brooks American Legion Post #173
Proceeds to
help fund
Legion Hall
improvements
Bingo · Prizes
Games · Fun
Gift Certificates
Lunch available
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Tire Tanks
Vacuum
Excavation
Cobett Waters
Directional
Boring
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Those wishing to
send cards to
Monna Van Lint
may do so at:
University of Minnesota
Attn: Monna Van Lint
6A Neuroscience
500 Harvard St. SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Those wishing to send
cards to Erica Williams
may do so at:
University of Colorado
Anschutz Inpatient Division
Attn: Erica Williams
Room 1020
12605 E. 16th Ave.
Aurora, CO 80045-2545
by Mikkel Pates,
reprinted with permission
from Agweek
Some people in the throes of the
October 4 blizzard of 2013 took
note that the event finally made
the national broadcast news on
October 15.
Stories of the deepest areas of
snow north and east of the Black
Hills often involved high-profile
places such as Deadwood. But the
bulk of the cattle damage hap-
pened in places such as Haakon
and Butte counties — out on the
plains, where most of the cattle
are.
Nobody knows how many cattle
may have died because of the
storm that gripped much of the
western third of South Dakota for
three days. They may never know.
South Dakota State Veterinar-
ian Dustin Oedekoven estimated
October 17 that the number is be-
tween 15,000 and 30,000
statewide, adding that it will
climb.
Educated estimates range from
20,000 to 30,000 and up to
100,000 or more, says State Sena-
tor Gary Cammack, R-Union Cen-
ter, who ranches and runs
Cammack Livestock Supply at
Union Center.
Dennis Todey, South Dakota’s
climatologist at South Dakota
State University, says normally, a
30-inch snow would have three to
three and one-half inches of liquid.
This one saw five inches or more.
Ranchers are often rugged indi-
vidualists who find it easier to ab-
sorb losses than discuss them.
Bringing cattle into protected,
winter pastures is standard oper-
ating procedure. Losses are wildly
erratic and inexplicable. Some
would lose nearly everything, and
others next door might lose few.
Older producers will likely have
the financial strength to recover.
Younger ones that had been bor-
rowing money to get into the busi-
ness may be done.
“I don’t know how many we’ve
lost – nobody knows, with confi-
dence,” Cammack says. Some say
losses are in the tens of thou-
sands. Some will guess 100,000.
Somewhere in the middle is the
truth. I’m guessing it’s 20,000 to
30,000.”
From an economic standpoint, if
each was a cow-calf pair, a typical
value might be $1,500 to $2,000,
depending on how you count it. If
the total turned out to be 100,000,
that’d be a total of about $150 mil-
lion to $200 million. If the losses
are closer to 30,000 animals, the
impact might be $45 million.
That doesn’t include the eco-
nomics of the animal, even at the
end of the cow’s productive life ac-
tivity associated with livestock,
which has more “multiplier” effect
than does cropping. It doesn’t fully
count the future financial impact.
For individual producers, the
hidden loss is the 2014 calf crop,
and replacement animals for the
herd.
“That’s absolutely huge; the fac-
tory just burned down,” Cammack
says.
Dan Piroutek has auctioneered
at Philip Livestock Auction for 35
years, and also works sales at
Belle Fourche and Faith. Most of
the cattle at the sale barn come to
Philip from the west.
Piroutek says the hardest-hit
area might be from Sturgis to the
village of Howes. He thinks maybe
60,000 to 80,000 might be dead.
He expects the real figure to be
twice what is officially reported
“unless they come up with an in-
demnity where everybody turns in
their losses.”
Two sales in Philip have had
outstanding prices.
“I think we have more buyers
here today than we have sellers,”
Piroutek says, taking a break
from the October 15 sale. “That’s
almost unheard of. We would have
had record prices today if all of our
cattle came in.”
The outstanding demand is be-
cause people are optimistic about
the cattle business despite the
losses.
He says there are individuals
who have lost 400 head. The num-
bers are outstanding, but also the
sheer value. Many were cows that
were pregnant. The cow could be
worth $1,700 to $2,400, depending
on what she is. The calf might be
worth $1,100. Ranchers have all of
their expenses in the animals, so
they need the calf check.
“It’s catastrophic, the amount
that’s lost,” Piroutek says. He says
he hopes there is some federal in-
demnity, and that there won’t be
“too small a limit on it” so it offers
real help. Ranchers are in good
shape financially, but younger
people have a “major, major catas-
trophe.”
The ranchers gather in the auc-
tion café in Philip, prior to the sale
and conversation now centers
around the state of area ranchers
and their operations after the bliz-
zard. Kieth Smith of Quinn says
he lost about 15 percent of his
cows — 64 cows and 39 calves. In
one case, he helped collect 1,400
stragglers that were sorted by ear
tags for eight different owners.
“Nine four-wheelers showed up,
and I thought that was pretty
good to get them sorted in one
day,” by ear tag and cattle type.
“People are embarrassed to say
what they lost,” Smith says. “And
they’re independent. They don’t
think it’s anybody else’s business.”
He did his best with photograph-
ing ear tags and carcasses, but it’s
going to be difficult for everyone to
verify losses. “All you do is say
what you’ve got left,” he says.
A lot of forensic analysis is cen-
tered around how losses were so
high. Cattle in the region were in
some of the best shape they’ve
been in for several years, as a re-
sult of a good summer with good-
quality grass. Some veterinarians
in the area have determined there
is water in the lungs of cattle,
probably from “breathing in”
moisture-laden snow.
Cammack says it was the older
animals, the ones that might be
expected to be the strongest, that
appear to have had the biggest
losses. He theorizes that perhaps
the calves weren’t able to walk as
far in the deepest snow, or per-
haps they were able to nurse and
get some nourishment, which
drew down the cows’ strength, as
well. Calves are also protected in
a way, because they tend to walk
on the downwind side of the cows.
Cammack thinks the cattle did-
n’t freeze, but probably died from
hypothermia and exhaustion,
which is different. It’s like a
human dying from the same prob-
lem — exposure to wet cold, and
the inability to eat and generate
heat. Some of the cattle drifted
into water reservoirs and
drowned, but “At the time they
were dead and didn’t know it.
They might have ‘drowned’ but it
wasn’t the cause of death,” he
says.
The storm also killed horses –
sometimes entire herds of young
horses – and some sheep.
Chancy Wilson, who with his
parents Ronnie and Brenda, and
three brothers operate Wilson
Rodeo Co., headquartered near
Kyle, says his family lost some 50
to 60 horses. “Every day a snow-
drift disappears and you find a
few more,” Chancy says, nearly
two weeks after the snow.
The deaths are a small part of
their overall operation, which in-
cludes hundreds of horses, but it’s
a kick. “They were right in the cor-
rals,” Ronnie says. “We had wind-
breaks and everything. From
what I can understand, they must
have been so wet, with so much
moisture, they must have just
drowned.
“We damn hear lost every colt
on the place,” Chancy says.
Twenty-two recently weaned colts
that died in the corrals. It’s hard
to put a value on rodeo stock. The
ranch tries to develop them into
performers, some of which become
extremely valuable. Quarter-
horses and other horses died out
in the pastures and got caught in
the fence lines.
“A lot of them you can’t get to,
it’s been raining and snowing so
hard” since the storm.
Dion Van Well, one of the re-
gion’s largest sheep aggregators
and producers from Watertown,
had a flock of about 800 sheep in
the Faith area and had nearly no
losses.
“I was shocked, really shocked,”
Van Well says. “The only thing I
can think of is that they have
some wool, while cattle don’t have
their winter coats this early in the
year.”
Chris Veal of Bison says he lost
200 sheep. The bulk died in a feed-
lot, and most from asphyxiation as
they climbed on each other or
were covered by snow.
Ranchers had poor hay crops in
the 2012 drought, a very good hay
crop in 2013 with the return of
moisture, but now have their cat-
tle herds impacted by the storm.
People were in the process of try-
ing to rebuild.
“You think you held back re-
placement heifers, to replace the
ones you culled (because of
drought) and now you’ve got a big-
ger hole than before,” Cammack
says.
Piroutek remembers the 1966
blizzard, a three-day March bliz-
zard. “That killed a lot of cattle
but nothing comparable to this.
It’s so devastating to a lot of peo-
ple because they were going to get
a record price for their calves. A
lot were scheduled to sell last
week, this week,” he says.
There will be no pay day for
those animals, no future, and no
revenue for auction companies
and others. Piroutek says that —
with tax laws — farmers tend to
invest their money in their opera-
tions, so the economic “multiplier
effect” is higher than in most en-
terprises. The money turns over in
the economy several times.
Glen Haines, the mayor of
Faith, a town of 450 people, also
operates a livestock trucking busi-
ness with a son. He says the im-
pact will be big on businesses such
as the feed store and lumber yard.
“This city relies a lot on sales
tax dollars,” he says. “It’s going to
hurt.” He says it’s not just one
year, but a three- or four-year im-
pact.
Haines hopes there might be a
federal farm bill and that there
might be some kind of Livestock
Indemnity Program, but that will
take time with the Congressional
impasses over the farm bill. Often
these programs pay up to 60 per-
cent, with a maximum of $100,000
per producer, but the Livestock
Indemnity Program has expired.
“You’d hope there’s something
for these poor cattle people,” he
says. “There’s other programs out
there” for crops.
“One issue hampering the infor-
mation is the federal government
shutdown that has shuttered the
Farm Service Agency and other
federal offices,” Cammack says.
Congress voted October 16 to
end the shutdown, sending FSA
and Risk Management Agency
employees back to work. Farm bill
negotiations are expected to begin
the week of October 28.
Todey, the SDSU climatologist,
has spent a good portion of the
time since the initial storm in in-
formation sessions with state and
county officials. In the absence of
federal officials, the state was co-
ordinating livestock hotlines, get-
ting volunteers coordinated with
ranchers to help pick up animals.
Cammack, a former county com-
missioner before running for the
legislature, says county and state
governments have few tools to
help farmers, and are distracted
by storm-related infrastructure
needs. Meade County is providing
some assistance to help with car-
cass disposal. Pennington County
had dug pits to accommodate cat-
tle that were lost on county rights-
of-way. The pit south of Quinn
had about 150 cows in it on Octo-
ber 15.
“The best help to get these guys
going again is on the federal side
with a new farm program,” Cam-
mack says. “The Livestock Indem-
nity Program doesn’t exist, but
they’re working to make it work,
retroactively, in language passed
in both the House and the Senate
(farm bills).” Documentation of
losses is going to be important, es-
pecially now that the shutdown
has ended.
The FSA and other U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture agencies
make up the emergency commit-
tees that normally tally losses in
cases like this.
The factory burned down
Dan Piroutek has been an auctioneer at Philip Livestock Auction and other
locations for 35 years. He hasn’t seen anything to beat the historic Oc-
tober 4, 2013, snowstorm – both in cattle lost, but also in the high value.
Courtesy photo
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 8
Deb Smith
Scotties Football Team: Back row, left to right, Nick Donnelly, Phillip Leithauser, Jacob Kammerer, Grady Carley, Ben Stangle, Brody
Jones, Paul Guptill, Head Coach Keven Morehart. Middle row, Managers Mandy Burns and Bailey Radway, Jace Gianonatti, Chase Wright,
Brayden Fitch, Austin Pinney, Rance Johnson, Cooper West, Managers Katie Hostutler and Stratton Morehart. Front row, Seth Haigh,
Nick Hamill, Gavin Brucklacher, Ryan Van Tassel, Reed Johnson, Brian Pfeifle and Jade Berry.
Congratulations,
Philip Scotties,
on a great season!
We’re proud of you!
Brant’s
Electric
Coyle’s
SuperValu
Dr. Ron & Laurie
Mann & Staff
Ernie’s Bldg.
Center, LLC
Farm Bureau
Financial Services
First National
Agency
First National
BankMember FDIC
Fi tzgerald Oil
Company
Golden
Willow Seeds
Grossenburg
Implement
Ingram
Hardware
Jones’ Saddlery,
Bottle & Vet
Kennedy
Implement
Midwest
Cooperati ves
Modern Woodmen
of America
O’Connell
Construction
Philip
Chiropractic Clinic
Philip Heal th
Services, Inc.
Philip Li vestock
Auction
The Pioneer
Review
Rush Funeral
Home
State Farm
Insurance
The Steakhouse
& Lounge
District Volleyball October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 9
Scotties Volleyball Team: Left to right, Peyton Kuchenbecker, Tia Guptill, Courtney Bartlett, Ashton Reedy, Madison Hand, Jordyn Dekker,
Kaci Olivier, Peyton DeJong, Brett Carley, Ellie Coyle and Shay Hand. Deb Smith photo
Good Luck, Lady Scotties, at the
14B District Volleyball Tournament!!
Brant’s Electric
859-2566
Dr. Ron & Laurie Mann
& Staff • 859-2491
Ernie’s Bldg. Center,
LLC • 843-2871
Farm Bureau Financial
Services • 859-2902
First National Agency
859-2254
First National Bank
Member FDIC • 859-2525
Fitzgerald Oil Co.
859-2007
Golden Willow Seeds
843-2187
Grossenburg Impl.
859-2636
Ingram Hardware
859-2521
Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle
& Vet • 859-2482
Kennedy Implement
859-2568
Midwest Cooperatives
859-2382
Modern Woodmen of
America • 859-2778
Moses Bldg. Center
859-2100
O’Connell Construction
859-2020
Philip Chiropractic
Clinic • 859-2594
Philip Health Services,
Inc. • 859-2511
Philip Livestock
Auction • 859-2577
Philip Motor, Inc.
859-2585
Pioneer Review
859-2516
Rush Funeral Home
859-2400
State Farm Insurance
859-2559
The Steakhouse &
Lounge • 859-2774
Take a moment to thank these local sponsors …
November 5, 7 & 8
7:00 p.m. each night
Standings as of
Tuesday, October 29th
School & Sports October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 10
Annual Wild Game Feed!!
Friday, Nov. 15th
Everyone Welcome!!
Join us for
Friday Night Bingo
73– Saloon
859-2173 • DOWNTOWN PHILIP
Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................23-9
Shad’s Towing...........................20-12
Rockers......................................18-14
Badland’s Auto..........................18-14
Dakota Bar................................15-17
Highlights:
Joe Handrahan .....................208/522
Jason Petersen......................200/543
Jim Kujawa .................196 clean/536
Vickie Petersen ............................491
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ..........................20-10
State Farm................................21-11
Little Orphans ..........................17-15
Cutting Edge.............................17-15
Jolly Ranchers ..........................17-15
Highlights:
Marsha Sumpter...................173/456
Charlene Kjerstad........................165
Shirley Parsons............................153
Deanna Fees......................2-8-7 split
Judy Papousek ...................3-10 split
Kay Kroetch................3-10, 3-9-10 &
...........................................8-10 splits
Shirley O’Connor..................2-7 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
PHS ...............................................9-3
George’s Welding ..........................8-4
Peoples Mkt ..................................7-5
G&A Trenching.............................7-5
Philip Motor..................................6-6
Kennedy Imp.................................5-7
KTS................................................3-9
T&D Auto Parts............................3-9
Hightlights:
Colt Fitzgerald......................211/538
Terry Wentz .................................509
Jim Larson..............3-10 & 2-7 splits
Tony Gould .........................4-10 split
Dale O’Connell......................2-7 split
Alvin Pearson .......................5-4 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Hildebrand Concrete ..................23-9
Dakota Bar................................19-13
Morrison’s Haying ....................18-14
Chiefie’s Chicks ........................14-18
Pink Ribbons.............................12-20
First National Bank .................10-22
Highlights:
Heather Nelson............................156
Shar Moses...................................184
MaryLynn Crary ................5-10 split
Lindsey Hildebrand .............5-7 split
Lois Porch.............................2-7 split
Cheryl Behrend....................4-5 split
Deb Gartner..........................4-5 split
Annette Hand.......................4-5 split
Stacey Schulz......................3-10 split
Thursday Men
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................12-4
The Steakhouse ..........................11-5
A&M Laundry...............................9-7
McDonnell Farms .........................8-8
O’Connell Const ............................8-8
WEE BADD...................................7-9
Dakota Bar..................................5-11
West River Pioneer Tanks .........4-12
Highlights:
Don Carley ...................................208
DJ Rush ........................2-7 split; 565
Wendell Buxcel ............3-6-7-10 split
Randy Boyd ........................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew...............................12-4
Dee’s Crew ..................................10-6
Inforcer’s .......................................9-7
Randy’s Spray Service............6.5-9.5
Moos on the Loose.................5.5-10.5
Highlights:
Angel Nemec ...........................119 x3
Brian Pearson .......................201/532
Cristi Ferguson ..................185 clean
Alvin Pearson .........4-5 & 3-10 splits
Jerry Iron Moccison .............5-7 split
Deanna Fees.........................4-5 split
Kelly Fees ..........................3-10 split
859-2430
Hwy. 14 · PhiIip
Monday-Saturday
Open at 11 a.m.
- CIosed Sundays -
We have orders to go!
This excerpt is reprinted
with permission from
The Bismarck Tribune
by Cindy Peterson
University of Mary linebacker
Troy Guptill has emerged as one
of the top defenders in Northern
Sun football.
Guptill shined against one of
the better teams in the nation on
Saturday afternoon at the Com-
munity Bowl. The Marauders
dropped a 20-13 decision to the
No. 25-ranked St. Cloud State
Huskies.
The 6-foot-2, 225-pound junior
from Quinn, S.D., finished with
nine tackles — five were solo —
along with three quarterback
sacks for 28 yards and four tackles
for a loss for 30 yards.
Guptill entered the contest lead-
ing the NSIC in sacks, tackles for
a loss and forced fumbles.
“(Defensive coordinator John)
Kelling does a great job of calling
games,” Guptill said. “We’ve got
(linebacker Grant) Singer and (de-
fensive lineman) John (Oyloe).
They allow me to go free some-
times.
“When you see the quarterback,
you just go and don’t pay attention
to what happens.”
Guptill has earned the praises
of U-Mary coach Myron Schulz.
“He’s so explosive, so disciplined
and is a coachable young man,”
Schulz said. “He’s really emerg-
ing. He’s getting more confident.
He’s realizing, ‘I can do this’ and ‘I
am good.’”
Guptill credited experience in
helping him break through.
Schulz called Guptill’s season “un-
believable.”
“He’s the nicest kid you’ve ever
met in your life,” Schulz said.
“He’s in the weight room throwing
weights around. If you watch him
walk down the hall, you’d never
realize he’s a creature.
“He was able to do it against St.
Cloud. If you saw their offensive
tackles, they look like they are
hoisted up on Mount Rushmore.”
The defense finished with four
sacks, with Singer registering the
other one, and 12 tackles for a
loss.
St. Cloud State finished with
337 yards of offense with 174 com-
ing on the ground and 163
Guptill a force on U-Mary defense
through the air.
The defense faced a tough situ-
ation on the Huskies’ first touch-
down when a fumble recovery
brought the Huskies to U-Mary’s
“Our defense played so hard and
so well,” Schulz said. “Hats off to
coach Kelling, the defensive staff
and the defensive players.”
***
Additional stories on the Inter-
net note that Guptill has been
named player of the week differ-
ent times in the past years. The
most recent was October 21 from
the Northern Sun Intercollegiate
Conference following U-Mary’s
game against St. Cloud (Minn.)
State Univeristy. The story noted,
“Troy Guptill (LB, 6-2, 225, Jr.,
Quinn, S.D. / Philip) spent all af-
ternoon in the St. Cloud State
backfield, sacking the quarterback
three times and making four tack-
les for loss. He also had nine total
tackles, including five solo stops.
He tied his career-high for sacks
and set a personal mark in tackles
behind the line. The junior line-
backer leads the Northern Sun in
sacks (9.6), tackles for loss (15.5)
and forced fumbles (3) and is 15th
in total tackles (53).”
U-Mary’s football team can also
be followed on Facebook at www.
facebook.com/umaryfootball.
Chorus ready for all-state
The Philip High School all-state chorus consists of, back row, from left, Afton
Burns – alto and Peyton DeJong – soprano. Middle row: Damian Bartels –
tenor, Paige Slovek – alternate alto, Amanda McIlravy – alternate so-
prano, and Garrett Snook – bass. Front: Keegan Burnett – alternate bass.
Courtesy photo
The Philip Elementary School honor choir is directed by Barb Bowen, shown
in back. The choir consists of, front from left, Kiarra Moses, Gypsy Andrus,
Eathan Martin and Taryn Smith. The South Dakota Music Educators Asso-
ciation will host the elementary honor choir 2013 concert, Saturday, No-
vember 2, in the Sioux Falls Arena at 3:30 p.m. The guest conductor will
be Dr. Sean Burton, Briar Cliff University. Songs will include “I Hear the
Millwheel” arranged by Donald Patriquin, “When I am Silent” by Joan
Varner, “Spinning Song from Kashmir” by Mohana Raga, “Caledonian’s
Air” arranged by James Mulholland, and “Jai Bhavani” by Raga Bhairavi.
Courtesy photo
Over 1,000 of South Dakota's
best high school vocal and instru-
mental musicians will gather in
Sioux Falls for the 61st annual
South Dakota All-State Chorus
and Orchestra on Friday and Sat-
urday, November 1-2.
The all-state activities will cul-
minate with a grand concert at the
Sioux Falls Arena beginning at
7:00 p.m. (CT), Saturday evening,
November 2. The doors will open
at 5:30 p.m.
The vocalists who make up the
Philip High School all-state choir
are Peyton DeJong – soprano,
Afton Burns – alto, Damian Bar-
tels – tenor, Garrett Snook – bass,
Amanda McIlravy – alternate so-
prano, Paige Slovek – alternate
alto, and Keegan Burnett – alter-
nate bass.
The annual all-state chorus and
orchestra, sponsored by South
Dakota High School Activities As-
sociation, is the largest inter-
scholastic high school music
activity held in South Dakota.
This year, it includes 964 singers
representing 154 South Dakota
high schools. The all-state orches-
tra is comprised of 161 musicians
from 24 schools.
The guest chorus conductor this
year will be Dr. Joe Miller from
Westminster Choir College,
Princeton, N.J. The guest conduc-
tor for the orchesta will be David
Barg, Omaha, Neb.
During the concert, the South
Dakota Music Educators Associa-
tion will recognize several high
schools and individuals for their
contributions to music in South
Dakota.
This year’s chorus selection are
“Sanctus” by Lukas Zdenek, “O
Magnum Mysterium” by T.L. Vic-
toria (Hinshaw 960), “Peze Kafe”
arranged by Sten Kallman, “Lul-
laby” by Daniel Elder and “Ride in
the Chariot” by Brandon Waddles.
The combined chorus and ochestra
selections are “Star-Spangled
Banner” by Francis Scott Key and
John Stafford and arranged by
Dale Grotenhuis, “Requiem:
Confutatis and Lacrimosa” by
W.A. Mozart, and Humming Cho-
rus (Madama Butterfly)” by G.
Puccini (Oxford).
The concert can be watched live
on SDPB-TV or webcast.
Philip swamps White River
The Philip Scotties hosted their
last regular football game of the
2013 season, Thursday, October
24. They handily defeated the
White River Tigers 59-28.
The Scotties got on the score-
board at the very beginning of the
first quarter when the ball was
given to Paul Guptill, who ran the
remaining 17 yards to the goal
line. The attempt for extra points
failed. Later in the quarter, Gup-
till did a repeat performance, this
time from 10 yards out. Brody
Jones made the kick for the extra
point.
The second quarter clock was at
7:53 when Guptill was given an-
other chance, and he carried the
ball for an 11-yard touchdown.
The extra point attempt failed.
Philip’s next kick to White River
rifled at ground level, and the en-
suing fumble was recovered by
Philip at the 36-yard line. After
the team chewed up yardage going
down field, Austin Pinney plowed
through the last two yards to
score. This time Philip had Jones
kick for the successful extra point.
Quickly regaining possession of
the ball, the Scotties sent Guptill
40 yards for another six points.
Jones kicked for another extra
point. Possession did not stay with
the Tigers long, and exactly two
minutes later, Philip had Guptill
rush 29 yards for yet another
touchdown. The attempt for extra
points failed. The first half ended
with Philip at 39 and White River
held scoreless.
A minute and half of the second
half was all it took for Philip to
add to the scoreboard. Pinney
rushed 11 yards to the end zone.
The attempt for extra points
failed. Not until the clock showed
8:41 did White River finally light
their side of the scoreboard. The
Tigers got through the young Scot-
tie defense for a 60-yard rush and
six points. When White River next
gained possession, the Tigers shot
a long bomb down field for another
60-yard touchdown. The attempt
for extra points failed. With 1:07
left in the third quarter, White
River rushed into and through the
young Philip defense, getting a 12-
yard touchdown. The conversion
pass worked and the third quarter
ended 45-20.
Philip’s offense had enough, and
took a whole 14 seconds of the
fourth quarter to have Pinney
rush 38 yards to score. Jones fol-
lowed through with a kick to add
another point. At the 4:39 mark,
Pinney did a 22-yard touchdown
and Jones did another good kick.
White River left only a minute on
the clock when it sent a rusher 46
yards to the end zone. A successful
running conversion play ended
the game’s scoring at 59-28.
1 2 3 4
Philip 13 39 45 59
White River 0 0 20 28
Rushing: Yards/Carries
Philip – 411/34 Leaders: Paul Guptill –
235/14, Austin Pinney – 151/14, Rance John-
son – 25/6
Passing: Compl./Att./Yds
Philip – 0/2/0 Leader: Gavin Brucklacher –
0/2/0
Tackles: Solo/Assists
Philip – 6/31 Leaders: Jace Giannonatti –
3/7, Jacob Kammerer – 1/7, Nick Donnelly
0/7, Grady Carley – 2/4, Johnson – 0/6
Interceptions/fumble recoveries
Philip – 1/0 Leader: Brody Jones – 1 inter-
ception
First Downs
Philip – 20 White River – 17
Punts
Philip – 0 White River – 2
Penalties
Philip – 15 yards; 1 15-yard
White River – 20; 1 5-yard, 1 15-yard
Philip’s Jacob Kammerer (#26) preps the ball as Scotties kicker Brody Jones
(#11) goes for the extra point.
Del Bartels
On Monday, October 28, the
Lady Scotties were in New Under-
wood playing against the Lady
Tigers.
The varsity team started out
tight, going into extended play be-
fore winning the first game. After
that, they needed only two more
relatively easy wins to win their
match of the best three of five
games.
26-24, 25-9, 25-15
Serving: 71/74 (7 aces) Leaders: Kaci
Olivier – 18/18 (2 aces), Ellie Coyle – 17/17 (1
ace, Peyton DeJong – 9/9 (1 ace)
Receiving: 35/44 Leaders: Coyle – 20/23,
Olivier – 5/7, Jordyn Dekker – 4/5, Tia Gup-
till – 4/5
Setting: 84/84 (22 assists) Leaders: Gup-
till – 39/39 (10 assists), Olivier – 32/32 (7 as-
sists)
Hitting: 96/110 (22 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 34/38 (14 kills), Oliver – 18/20 (3
kills), DeJong – 8/11 (3 kills)
Blocking: 2 kills Leader: Dekker – 2 solos
Digging: 71/91 Leaders: Coyle – 22/27,
Olivier – 12/14, Cheyenne Pinney – 8/10
Dekker – 9/14
The junior varsity needed only
two games to win their best of
three games, though the second
game was close enough to keep
the audience members on the edge
of their seats.
25-17, 25-23
Serving: 47/49 (14 aces) Leaders: De-
Jong – 13/13 (4 aces), Ashton Reedy – 10/11
(4 aces), Courtney Bartlett 6/6 (2 aces)
Receiving: 24/35 Leaders: Pinney –
10/14, Elise Wheeler – 4/5
Setting: 42/42 (10 assists) Leaders:
Reedy – 29/29 (6 assists)
Hitting: 44/52 (15 kills) Leaders:
Bartlett – 11/11 (6 kills), Peyton Kuchen-
becker – 4/5 (1 kill), Jada Jones – 2/2 (2 kills)
Blocking: 1 kills Leader: Tyana
Gottsleben – 1 solo
Digging: 26/34 Leaders: Reedy – 7/8, Pin-
ney – 7/7
The Lady Scotties will next com-
pete in the District 14B Volleyball
Tournament, Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday, November 5, 7 and 8.
The Region 7B competition will be
Tuesday, November 12. The State
B Volleyball Tournament is sched-
uled for Thursday through Satur-
day, November 21-23, at Huron.
Lady Scotties maul N.U. Tigers
School & Sports
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 11
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SS9-21?3 - DOWNTOWN PHILIP
BronkInst BonoIit Ior
Snndoo Gittings
PuncuLeo & Suuouge
Sundny, Novonbor 3rd
8:00 n.n. - 11:00 n.n.
Bnd Rivor Sonior Citizons` Contor, Philip
Froo Will OIIoring
Sponsorod by
Philip Aron Knights oI Colunbus
Philip 3rd at state cross country
Ellie Coyle – ninth place medalist.
Nelson Holman – ninth place.
Tristen Rush – 22nd place medalist.
by coach Ralph Kroetch
For the Philip Scotties, three be-
came a recurring number at the
South Dakota State “B” Cross
County Meet, held in Robbinsdale
Park, Rapid City, Saturday, Octo-
ber 25. The Scotties ran over 3,000
miles in preparation for the state
meet.
Schools with three to five boys
or girls are scored as a team.
Philip was one of just three “B”
teams to qualify full teams of five
for the boys and for the girls.
Individuals must finish in the
top 25 to medal. With 233 runners
competing for 50 medals, the Scot-
ties claimed three. Combined indi-
vidual scores from each school’s
top three runners determines that
school’s team score. Philip put
three boys in the top 32 of 112
runners, earning Philip’s third
trip to the team awards podium in
Philip’s history. With 48 schools
represented, the Philip boys’ team
placed third, making them the
highest placing West River “B”
team. Combination of the boys’
and girls’ team placings was 14,
which gave them the third com-
bined team placement. The Scot-
ties were the only West River
combined team.
Ellie Coyle, in her third state
competition, said that about a
third of the way through, she re-
marked to herself, “Okay, I guess
we are just going to sprint the
whole thing today!,” and, “Yes, I
was that fast!” Coyle led all of
western South Dakota as she set
up inside the top 10 runners early
and fought to stay there. Her time
of 16:22 earned her ninth of 121
runners, and her second consecu-
tive state medal.
A race of this magnitude can
easily swallow up the rookies, but
first-timers Katlin Knutson and
Jasmine Ferguson gave great per-
formances. Knutson, who had fin-
ished 11th in our region, was the
fifth girl from Region 5B to cross
the finish line. She placed 56th
with a time of 17:48. Ferguson
fought to the end, being one of five
girls to cross in a three-second
time frame. Her time of 18:19
earned 86th place. Freshman
The Lady Scotties’ road trip to
Martin last Friday to take on the
Bennett County Lady Warriors did
not pan out as planned as both the
varsity and junior varsity lost their
matches.
The varsity team took their
match to four games by winning
the third game.
21-25, 18-25, 25-15, 17-25
Serving: 77/86 (9 aces) Leaders: Peyton
DeJong – 17/18 (2 aces), Tia Guptill – 15/16
(2 aces), Kaci Olivier – 13/15 (1 ace)
Receiving: 75/83 Leaders: Jordyn
Dekker – 28/29, Olivier – 11/12, Peyton
Kuchenbecker – 10/11
Setting: 133/135 (25 assists) Leaders:
Guptill – 77/77 (14 assists), Olivier 35/35 (8
assists)
Hitting: 120/153 (32 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 34/47 (10 kills), Olivier 20/26 (6
kills), Guptill 24/29 (6 kills), Kuchenbecker –
21/23 (5 kills)
Blocking: 5 kills Leaders: Kuchen-
becker – 1 assist, 2 solo, Dekker 1 assist, 1
solo
Digging: 87/120 Leaders: Olivier – 18,
Dekker – 16, Guptill – 15
The junior varsity took the win
on the first game and lost the next
two in a very close battle.
26-24, 28-30, 14-16
Serving: 56/68 (10 aces) Leaders: Ashton
Reedy – 15/17 (3 aces), DeJong – 12/13 (3
aces), Elise Wheeler – 8/9 (3 aces)
Receiving: 47/59 Leaders: Courtney
Bartlett – 10/11, Cheyenne Pinney – 11/17,
Libbi Koester – 7/10
Setting: 79/84 (21 assists) Leader:
Reedy – 67/70 (15 assists)
Hitting: 77/87 (25 kills) Leaders: Sage
Bierle 7/8 (6 kills), DeJong – 17/21 (6 kills),
Bartlett – 10/11 (3 kills)
Digging: 54/73 Leaders: Reedy – 12/13,
Pinney – 11/17, Bartlett – 7/13
The C team easily won their
match in two games.
25-11, 25-13
Serving: 36/46 (10 aces) Leaders:
Koester – 6/9 (4 aces), Wheeler – 12/12 (3
aces), Bierle – 10/12 (1 ace)
Receiving: 10/16 Leader: Koester – 3/4
Setting: 19/19 (6 assists) Leader:
Wheeler – 12/12 (4 assists)
Hitting: 28/30 (7 kills) Leaders: Bierle –
7/7 (3 kills), Kendal Hook – 6/6 (2 kills),
Koester – 2/2 (2 kills)
Blocking: 2 kills Leader: Hook – 2 solos
Digging: 25/30 Leaders: Koester – 8/8,
Jada Jones – 6/7, Pinney – 5/8
Scotties fall to Warriors
The freshmen class of volleyball
players particpated in a tournment
in Lead, Saturday, October 26.
They picked up two wins and lost
one match.
Their first match of the day was
against Rapid City Stevens and
they scored a win.
11-21, 22-20, 19-17
Serving: 53/55 (9 aces) Leaders: Kendal
Hook – 10/10 (4 aces), Elise Wheeler – 12/12
(2 aces), Libbi Koester – 11/11 (2 aces)
Receiving: 42/58 Leaders: Koester –
12/17, Jada Jones – 9/10, Cheyenne Pinney _
8/13
Setting: 36/41 (13 assists) Leaders:
Jones – 11/12 (6 assists), Wheeler – 20/22 (2
assists)
Hitting: 56/67 (22 kills) Leaders: Jones –
16/16 (9 kills), Hook – 17/21 (4 kills), Sage
Bierle – 9/12 (4 kills)
Blocking: 1 kill Leader: Bierle – 1 solo
Digging: 39/62 Leaders: Pinney – 19/25,
Wheeler – 6/15
For their second match they
took on Lead-Deadwood and put
another mark in the win column.
21-17, 21-23, 16-14
Serving: 49/56 (10 aces) Leaders:
Koester – 16/17 (6 aces), Wheeler – 8/9 (2
aces), Hook – 10/11
Receiving: 36/45 Leaders: Pinney –
14/16, Wheeler – 6/6, Paige Slovek – 6/9
Setting: 45/51 (9 assists) Leaders:
Jones – 23/23 (7 assists), Wheeler – 20/25 (2
assists)
Hitting: 55/66 (12 kills) Leaders: Bierle –
21/25 (7 kills), Hook 12/16 (3 kills), Jones –
13/13 (2 kills)
Blocking: 1 kill Leader: Hook - 1 solo
Digging: 30/42 Leaders: Pinney – 10/11,
Koester – 7/10, Jones – 5/5
The last match of the day they
dropped to Custer.
12-21, 21-19, 4-15
Serving: 33/37 (2 aces) Leaders: Jones –
8/8, Wheeler – 7/7, Hook – 6/7 (1 ace)
Receiving: 35/42 Leaders: Pinney – 9/9,
Wheeler – 8/9, Bobbi Antonsen – 5/6,
Koester – 5/6
Setting: 48/48 (3 assists) Leaders: Jones –
39/39 (2 assists), Sammi Schofield – 4/4 (1 as-
sist)
Hitting: 41/57 (6 kills) Leaders: Bierle –
16/20 (3 kills), Hook – 9/13 (1 kill), Wheeler –
2/2 (1 kill)
Blocking: 1 kill: Leaders: Jones - 1 assist,
Hook – 1 assist
Digging: 39/61 Leaders: Pinney – 9/17,
Koester – 8/9, Jones – 8/11
Freshmen play at Lead
Youth to superbowl
The Eagles youth football played Saturday and Sunday, October 26-27, in
the playoffs. In the first round, the Eagles Junior PeeWees played the Bron-
cos from Rapid City, beating them 45-18. The Eagles PeeWee team played
the Rams Blue from Spearfish, winning by a score of 36-0 which advanced
them to the superbowl. On Sunday the Mighty Mites beat the Sturgis Buc-
caneers 35-0, and they also will play in the superbowl. The JPW faced a
tough opponent, Steelers Black, from Rapid City. They fought hard, putting
the first points on the board. The Steelers then came back to take the lead.
It was too much for the Junior PeeWee Eagles to overcome and they lost a
close one, 14-22. The superbowls will be played on Saturday, November
2, in Rapid City at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology sta-
dium. The PeeWee game against the Spearfish Rams Gold starts at 3:00
p.m. and the Mighty Mites play the Rapid City Vikings at 5:00 p.m. Shown
is Junior PeeWee Miles Clements breaking through the defense for a big
gain in the first round playoff game against the Broncos.
Courtesy photo
Philip High School junior
Ted’Dee Buffalo is one of this
year’s contestants for the Miss
South Dakota Teen USA® and
Miss South Dakota USA® compe-
tition.
Slated to begin at 4:00 p.m.,
Sunday, November 3, the pageant
will be held in the Brandon Valley
Performing Arts Center.
This year, over $1.3 million in
scholarships will be available at
the pageant, and 30 contestants
will be receiving college scholar-
ships. This year’s state title hold-
ers will each receive thousands of
dollars in prizes and awards. The
new Miss South Dakota USA®
and the new Miss South Dakota
Teen USA® will compete for the
national titles of Miss USA® and
Miss Teen USA®.
The competition consists of
three proportional segments –
evening gown, fitness/swimwear
and personality interview. Eligi-
ble women must be between the
ages of 13 and 26 and be unmar-
ried residents of South Dakota.
“We are overwhelmed by the re-
sponse and caliber of all the par-
ticipants from South Daklota,”
said Denise Wallace, executive
state co-director of Future Produc-
tions, state pageant producers for
the Miss Universe organization.
Buffalo is sponsored by family
and friends and One Fine Day,
Philip.
Buffalo in Miss South
Dakota USA competion
Shay Hand, trying to put the pain
of a nagging hip injury behind her,
ran the first half in the low 50s.
She finished a courageous race
with a time of 19:10. Allison
Pekron, in her final high school
cross country race, again dueled
with Jones County’s Skyler Green,
keeping her teammate, Hand, in
sight. She completed her third
state meet in 19:41. The ladies’
team total score was 96 to place
11th.
The injury-laden Scotties boys’
team had finished sixth in each of
the last two state meets. They
were determined to better that.
Nelson Holman, in his third state
meet, was in the top 20 at the first
mile. Garrett Snook began in the
late 20s. Four-year veteran Tris-
ten Rush, with only two in-season
races this year because of injuries,
started in the mid-30s. Khalen
Martin was one of just three indi-
vidual seventh graders to qualify
for this meet. Conner Dekker, in
his first state meet as well, was
one of 10 eighth graders.
As this race came down to the
final sprints, Holman ran in a
group of six fighting for ninth
place. Nelson won ninth place and
his second state medal, with a
time of 18:22. At the same game
point, Rush went into his final
sprint to move up four more
places. His time of 18:50 earned
him the 22nd spot and his second
state medal.
Snook placed 32nd, a 71 place
improvement over his 2012 finish.
His time of 19:05 clinched Philip’s
third team placing. Martin slipped
past a Lyman runner to place 95th
and Dekker put a Wall competitor
behind him to place 111th. Their
times of 20:45 and 21:44 gave
them nice starts to cross country
careers.
The Philip boys’ teams have put
together a third place in 2010,
sixth in 2011, sixth in 2012 and a
third in 2013.
The Philip chapter of Family,
Career and Community Leaders
of America will be going door to
door in the town of Philip, Thurs-
day, October 31. From 5:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m., they will “Trick or
Treating for Cystic Fibrosis.”
Their annual event, “Trick or
Treating for Cystic Fibrosis,” is to
help raise funds to go to the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation. Any amount
of cash or size of check is appreci-
ated. The youth have specially
designated buckets with the cystic
fibrosis logo.
If you are missed or live outside
of Philip and want to donate,
please leave your contribution at
the high school office or with
Brigitte Brucklacher, FCCLA ad-
visor.
This disease took the life of
FCCLA member and friend Jen-
nifer Nelson in 2007. All proceeds
will go to the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation.
Trick or treat against CF
Come to our
Annual
Halloween
Masquerade Party!
Friday, November 1st
Judging: 8-11 p.m.• Unmasking: 11:15 p.m.
Cash prizes for Best 3 Costumes!
Dance to 73– Saloon Band
73 – Saloon
859-2173 • Philip
Friday Night Steak-out
Friday Night Bingo
Community October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 12
A0c1l0N
5aturday, Nov. 9, 2013
10:00 AM M51
Mìd|and 50 · Io||ow the sìgns
Vehlcles
& Machlnery
• 1966 Chevy C10 custom 350
motor restored in 2000 (needs
a little minor work)
• 1985 F-150 4x4 300 6cyl
manual
2004 Dodge Stratus (colided
with a deer still runs & drives)
• 730 Case tractor w/Farmhand
F-11 loader
• 64 Chevy C10 pickup
(restorable)
• Ford pickup (salvage)
• Grass seed stripper
• 9 IH mower
• New Holland 951B 6 rotary
mower 3 pt
• Single 3pt bale fork
• 6x20 Kieer goosneck trailer
• 8x12 gooseneck atbed
w/utility boxes
• Rubber tired running gear
• Pickup box trailer
• Sprayer on 2-wheel trailer 24
boom and wand
• Jetco pto driven wire roller
0uns
• Howa model 1500 223
w/Simmons 3.5x10 scope
(synthetic stock)
• Ruger super black 44 mag (10.5
in barrel)
• 12 gauge pump shotgun 2 3/4
and 3 inch
• Cap-chur tranqulizer gun
1ack
• 2 seat buggy (surrey)
• Halters and lead ropes
• Bridles
• Complete pack saddle (saw buck
w/ box panards)
• Set of light driving harness
• Set of light work harness (11-15
hundred lb. horse)
• 4 Good collars
• Misc. Harness
• Homemade camp stove
1ools
• (2) Portable generators
• Portable air compresser
(110V)
• Chop saw
• Wire welder (110v)
• Acetylene gauges and hoses
• Vice
• Grinder
• 3/4 in. socket set
• Pipe cutter and threader (1/2,
3/4 & 1 in)
• Linclon stick welder
• Misc. hand tools
Llvestock Equlp.
• 14x20 calf shelter
• Double bale feeder
• Hog panels
• Portable panels
• Steel posts
• Windbreak steel
• Portable loading chute
• Covered pickup stockrack
• Turned tires
• Tank heaters
• Small oval galvanized water tank
• 8 poly tank
• Wood posts
• Telephone polls
• Rolls of wire (smooth woven and
barbed)
• Electric fencers
• 8x16 Timbers (various lengths)
• Hay moisture tester
• Used lumber
• 5 rolls 8 tall woven wire
Mlscellaneous
• Mounted bobcat
• (2) 16 Truck tarps
• Fiberglass topper
• Barrels
• Wheelbarrow
• Hydraulic cylinders
• Cement blocks
• Stihl chain saw (16 in bar)
• 2-Person kayak
• JD weedeater
• Yard Machine riding mower
• Yard Machine push mower
• Snowblower
• Folding extension ladder (16 )
• Step ladder
• (2) wooden ladders
• Cream cans
• Chain hoist
• Tractor Chains
• Traps
• Scrap Iron
• Shovels & forks
• Well pipe
• Skulls and antlers
• Old hammermill
• Complete lapidary equipment set
(saws & polishers)
• Agates and Bubblegum rock
(some polished some natural)
• Singer leather sewing machine
• Micky Woitte painting
• Plus Misc items to numerous to
mention
Rousehold
• (2) Kenmore propane ranges
• Whirlpool side by side
refrigerator-freezer
• GE refrigerator
• Maytag washer
• Whirlpool dryer
• Sears upright freezer
• Log bench
• Sofa recliner
• (2) dining room tables
• (2) Queen beds
• Ashley wood stove
• Electric re place
• Mirror
• Cowhide rug
• Pots pans and dishes
Lunch served by
MidIand American
Legion AuxiIiary
TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Cash or good check with proper ID day of auction. Nothing is to be removed untiI paid for.
Once an item is decIared soId it is your responsibiIity. AII items seII as is where is no warranties expressed or impIied.
Appropriate saIes tax wiII be charged, if you are tax exempt have your tax ID when registering for a bidder number. Announcements
day of auction take precidence over printed materiaI. Thank you in advance for attending this auction. Hope to see you there!
Eckert Auction
25721 237th St · Okaton SD 57562
605-843-2845 · CeII: 605-685-8715
For more information:
www.sdauctions.com
Ravellette Publications, Inc. - (605) 859-2516 - Philip, SD 57567-0788 (10/13)
AUCTION CONDUCTED BY:
Property of Wylie Schwalm
by Del Bartels
How Medicaid expansion and
the Affordable Care Act will affect
local residents was the presenta-
tion during the Philip AARP and
Retired Teachers Association
meeting, Monday, October 28, at
the Bad River Senor Citizen’s
Center.
Eric Nelson, associate state di-
rector for advocacy for AARP
South Dakota, explained that it is
now law that, like being required
to have car insurance, citizens will
have health insurance. Approxi-
mately 80 percent of the state’s
population has health insurance.
South Dakota has opted to have
the federal government run the
health insurance exchanges for
state residents. People who are
low income and uninsured may
choose through the insurance ex-
change one of about 35 different
health insurance plans. These are
offered through three main com-
panies – DakotaCare, Avera and
Sanford. The plans vary according
to being labeled bronze, silver,
gold or platinum – varying with
how much a person will pay up
front versus how much they will
after any medical situation.
If a person is a recipient of
Medicare, they do not have to do
anything. Medicare primarily
serves people over 65, requires a
20 percent co-pay, and is funded
by government trust funds which
those covered have paid into.
Medicaid serves low-income
people, has no co-pay, and is
funded through taxes. This is pri-
marily for people 18 to 64 in age.
Nelson said South Dakota is one
of the best states for managing the
Medicaid program in the state.
Starting in 2014, if South
Dakota decides to expand its Med-
icaid program, the income limits
would about $15,000 a year for an
individual and about $21,000 per
year for a couple.
Different states are choosing
and creating a variety of options
to expand or not expand their
Medicaid population. In South
Dakota, under Medicaid expan-
sion, over 48,500 residents would
become eligible for more coverage.
Governor Dennis Daugaard has
created a task force to study and
report on the issue.
According to Nelson, AARP sup-
ports Medicaid expansion – offer-
ing health care benefits to low
income South Dakota residents
who have lost their jobs, or work
but lack affordable health insur-
ance.
Nelson said issues that the up-
coming state legislature will be
asked to look into include Medi-
caid expansion, putting a cap on
payday lending, closing life insur-
ance loopholes, increasing con-
sumer protection and reforming
long-term care insurance.
In other local AARP business,
the South Dakota Lobby Day will
be January 28. Busses will pick up
Philip area residents to spend the
day in Pierre supporting issues
important to them. In previous
years, 35,000 to 40,000 people
wearing AARP red vests were in
the Capitol discussing issues with
legislators. Mike West, president
of the local AARP/RTA reminded
everyone that older people are the
ones who do the most voting, and
the state legislators know it.
The local food pantry is in need
of monetary and food donations,
especially meat, beans and canned
fruit.
Work on the cemetery lot iden-
tity building will continue next
spring. An estimated $7,000 is
needed before then. West reported
that the largest share of current
donations has come from people
living out of the area, but who
visit the cemetery when they come
here. The structure is planned so
it will never need upkeep.
The next meeting for the Philip
chapter of AARP/RTA will be at
6:00 p.m., Monday, January 27, in
the Bad River Senior Citizen’s
Center.
Medicaid, Affordable Care
Act explained at AARP/RTA
Philip High School cheerleaders stay warm
Warm or chilly, the weather doesn’t diminish the smiles and enthusiasm of the Philip Scotties’ cheerleaders. Hot
chocolate was welcome at the October 24 home game against White River, which Philip won 59-28. From left
are Jenny Johnston, Jaslyn Konst, Paige Slovek, Ted’Dee Buffalo, Peyton DeJong, Libbi Koester and Molly Coyle.
Greetings from cold, snowy, icy
northeast Haakon County. The
skies are gray, and it looks like
winter. There is a lot of ice this
morning, so we are having to re-
learn our "winter walking" strate-
gies. Otherwise, we could end up
on our backsides! We have com-
pany from upstate Washington,
and they live in an area where
they seldom have any snow. You
can imagine the fun their three-
year-old son is having today!
This wet snow has mostly halted
the harvest activities in our area
for a few days. The farmers have
been scrambling, trying to get the
grain out of the fields. Of course,
after all the rain we had earlier,
some of the low-lying areas in the
fields are still too muddy. It looks
like this may be one of those years
when folks will have to wait until
the ground is frozen before they
can finish the harvest. There are
also still a lot of bales that need to
be brought in for the winter, but
I'm guessing that activity will
have to wait, also.
Ranchers in our area are contin-
uing the process of moving cattle
home, weaning the calves, preg
testing the cows, either selling the
calves or putting them on feed,
and getting the livestock into win-
ter quarters. And as we go about
the process, I can't help but think
about our fellow ranchers who suf-
fered such a loss during the recent
blizzard. They would love to be
rounding up and working their
cattle, but unfortunately some are
still in the process of disposing of
the livestock that perished. My
thoughts and prayers are with
them as they determine how to
best deal with the devastation and
move forward.
The annual Deep Creek Church
supper and bazaar was held in our
community last Saturday night,
and as usual it was a wonderful af-
fair. The food was great, the con-
versation was spirited, and there
was a lot of good natured ribbing
going on. It is always so good to see
all the friends and neighbors gath-
ered together to share a meal and
raise money to support such an
important part of the community.
The kids were running in and out,
having a great time – their cheeks
were all rosy from the cool temper-
atures, but it didn't slow them up
much. There were people there
from all over the place, young and
old. Some came quite a distance
just to eat the lutefisk! Others
came to experience the church
bazaar – an event that was an im-
portant childhood memory. What-
ever the reason for coming, it was
a good turnout. And of course
there were many we missed see-
ing – many folks who have played
a big part in the church bazaar for
decades and are no longer able to
attend, either because they have
passed on or are in failing health.
The next generation is stepping up
and doing their part to ensure the
annual event continues, and I
guess that is the way it is sup-
posed to be!
Dorothy Paulson and her friend,
Myrna Hartmann, went to Sioux
Falls last Tuesday to see Dorothy's
sister, Wilma. Wilma resides in a
nursing home in Armour, but she
had been hospitalized in Sioux
Falls and wasn't doing so well.
Dorothy said Wilma's health has
improved, and she is now back in
the nursing home in Armour and
is doing well. Dorothy and Myrna
returned home Wednesday after-
noon. Dorothy was one of the peo-
ple in charge of the church bazaar
this year, so she was busy Satur-
day.
Ruth Neuhauser had visitors
last Wednesday. Hazel Rathbun,
Pierre, and Mildred Redden Clark
of Wyoming drove to Highmore to
spend time with Ruth. Both Hazel
and Mildred grew up in our area,
and Ruth went to school with
Hazel at Robbs Flat School. Ruth
said Hazel and her sister, Hattie,
used to drive a horse and buggy to
school, and the horse's name was
Ookie. (I don't know if I spelled it
correctly, but that was how the
word sounded.) The Neuhauser
kids also used a horse and buggy
to get to school in those days, and
their horse was named Pat. I think
I remember hearing about a barn
near the school for the horses.
Lola Roseth was in Philip last
Thursday. She visited her mother,
Joy Klima, at the nursing home.
Lola cut and fixed her mother's
hair, and she also decorated a
shadow box outside Joy's room.
I'm sure Joy appreciated it! Lola
then went on to Rapid City to at-
tend an EMT conference over the
weekend, returning home Sunday.
Lola also reported that she has a
new great-nephew. Her niece,
Lariann (Smith) Lanka, gave
birth to a son last Saturday
evening. His name is Ridge, and
he joins a sister Retta. Congrats to
the Lankas and also to the grand-
parents, Larry and Linda Smith.
Gene Hudson said her activity
this week mostly consisted of
preparing for the church bazaar.
She said most of her garden proj-
ects are finished, but she still has
some fall painting she would like
to get done. Hopefully we'll still
have a few nicer days this fall.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed were
in Pierre a week ago for Lil Briggs'
prayer service, and they also had
supper with their daughter, Kim
Marso, and her husband, Jeff. The
Marsos were visiting from their
home in Missoula. Tuesday and
Wednesday, Billy and Arlyne
helped with livestock sales in
Philip. Thursday, Bruce and
Cindy (Markwed) Bresee arrived
at the ranch, as did Kim Marso
and her son, Trent, who lives in
Aberdeen. Friday, Kim's son,
Danny, and his friend, Laura, ar-
rived from Aberdeen. Trent,
Danny and Laura left later on Fri-
day. Saturday, Billy worked the
sale in Philip, and Saturday
evening Billy, Arlyne and their
daughters and sons-in-law at-
tended the bazaar. Following the
bazaar, Arlyne's brother and his
wife, Ronnie and Emily Sammons,
spent some time at the Markwed's
visiting with the girls. Jeff and
Kim Marso, as well as Cindy and
Bruce Bresee, left Sunday, want-
ing to make it to their homes be-
fore bad weather set in. Billy and
Arlyne helped with a sale in Trail
City Monday, and it was a cold,
windy day! Hopefully things will
slow down a bit soon so Billy and
Arlyne can take a nap!
Bill and Polly Bruce were in
Pierre a week ago Monday to at-
tend the prayer service for Lil
Briggs. Tuesday, they were in Mo-
bridge so Bill could have a
checkup following his recent eye
surgery. Friday, all of Bill and
Polly's daughters (except for Mar-
cia) came to the ranch, picked up
Polly, and headed for Marcia's
home near Eagle Butte. The Bruce
daughters have adopted the tradi-
tion of having a "sisters week-
end" – a tradition that their
mother and her sisters started
years ago. The Bruce's celebration
was "sisters + mom," and they had
a wonderful time. The party had a
cowgirl/princess theme, so all the
gals dressed accordingly, showing
up in fancy dresses. Marcia had
prepared an abundance of won-
derful food, all decorated in keep-
ing with the theme, so they ate
well and had a wonderful time.
They returned to their homes
Sunday, and they are already
making plans for next year's gath-
ering. While Polly was gone, Bill
attended the Deep Creek bazaar,
as did Vince and Katie. Monday,
the Bruces had a visit from Hazel
Rathbun and Mildred (Redden)
Clark. Mildred grew up not far
from the Bruce place. Hazel said
her sister, Hattie, is in a nursing
home in Pierre and is not doing
very well.
Friday, Marie Sylva invited
Shirley Halligan to accompany
her to the hospital auxillary din-
Moenville News|Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
continued on 15
Public Notices October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 13
Legal Advertising
Deadline:
Fridays at Noon
Proceedings of Haakon
School District 27-1
Board of Education
Regular Meeting Minutes
October 14, 2013
The Board of Education of the Haakon
School District 27-1 met in regular ses-
sion for its regular meeting on October
14, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. at the Philip Ar-
mory, Room A-1. President Scott Brech
called the meeting to order with the fol-
lowing members present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Scott Brech, Anita Peterson, Mark
Radway and Doug Thorson. Also pres-
ent: Supt/Elementary Prin. Keven More-
hart, Business Manager Britni Ross,
Secondary Principal Cory Lambley, Lisa
Schofield, and Del Bartels. Absent: Brad
Kuchenbecker and Mark Nelson.
All action taken in the following minutes
was by unanimous vote unless otherwise
specified.
14-47 Communications from the audi-
ence: None
14-48 Motion by Peterson, second by
Radway to approve the agenda as pre-
sented.
14-49 Motion by Fitzgerald, second by
Peterson to approve the following items
on the consent calendar.
Approved the minutes of the Septem-
ber 16, 2013, meeting.
Approved the unaudited financial re-
port of September 30, 2013, as follows:
entific Inc - Janitorial Supplies - 218.78,
Morrison's Pit Stop - Maintenance Fuel -
63.47, Moses Building Center - Mainte-
nance Supplies/Shop Class Supplies -
90.00, Nelson, Mark - BOE Mileage -
233.10, Northwest Pipe Fittings - Main-
tenance Supplies - 176.96, Peterson,
Anita - BHSSC Meeting Mileage -
193.14, Peterson, Kathy - Mileage -
Rapid City for Campus Meeting - 60.68,
Petty Cash Reimbursement - Postage -
32.55, Philip FCCLA - Consortium Travel
- 117.99, Philip FFA - Consortium Travel
- 745.00, Philip Standard - Maintenance
Fuel - 127.00, Philip Trust and Agency -
Imprest Reimbursement* - 3,221.11,
PHS Volleyball - Reimburse Tournament
Shirts - 93.84, Radway, Mark - BOE
Mileage - 57.72, Rapid Fire Protection -
Sprinker/Alarm Inspection/Batteries -
1,150.10, Rockafellow, Richard - Football
Supplies - 35.00, Sam's Club - Annual
Membership Fee - 47.70, South Dakota
One Call - Locate Tickets - 13.65,
Swiftec, Inc - Fire Alarm Repairs -
719.39, Thorson, Doug - BOE Mileage -
37.74, Wellmark Blue Cross - Health In-
surance Premiums - 9,537.02, Western
Great Plains Conference - Conference
Dues - 630.00, Zeeb Pharmacy - Janito-
rial Supplies - 28.24. TOTAL: 30,869.13.
Capital Outlay Claims Payable Octo-
ber 14, 2013: Cenex - Town Propane -
3,606.21, Century Business Lease -
Copier Lease - 410.34, City of Philip -
Water/Sewer - 415.15, Hauff Mid-Amer-
ica - Chain System - Football - 636.85,
Houghton Mifflin - Textbooks - 453.00,
McGraw Hill - Textbooks - 415.84, Morri-
son's Pit Stop - Bus Fuel - 2,018.77,
Moses Building Center - Banquet Tables
14-50 Motion by Radway, second by
Thorson to approve the following person-
nel action: Bob Fugate, Head Boys Bas-
ketball Coach - $3,245.00.
14-51 Motion by Peterson, second by
Radway to approve the following items
as surplus: Pole Vault Pit, Kitchen Oven.
The pole vault pit was replaced by a
larger pit given to us by the School of
Mines & Technology and the kitchen
oven was replaced over the summer.
14-52 Motion by Radway, second by
Fitzgerald to approve a contribution to
school attorney Rodney Freeman for
$130.00 for his attendance at the Na-
tional Education Law Association Annual
Meeting.
14-53 Motion by Thorson, second by Pe-
terson to approve the following open en-
rollment request: OEA103-14 - 10th
grade from Kadoka Area.
14-54 Anita Peterson gave the BHSSC
report. Congratulations to Anita on her
new position as President of the BHSSC
board.
14-55 Executive Session: None
14-56 Principal Cory Lambley reported
on the following items: (A) Benchmark
testing is completed. (B) Parent/Teacher
conferences were held with an 80%
turnout. (C) We have two new students.
(D) The music department is receiving
the SDMEA High School Music Participa-
tion Award for the second year. (D) Re-
ceived a thank-you letter from United
- 288.00, Mytana - Drain Snake Machine
- 1,039.69, Universal Athletic - Volleyball
Jerseys - 139.90, Walker Refuse -
Garbage Service - 830.50, West Central
Electric - Electricity - 3,783.40, WRLJ
Rural Water - Milesville/Chey Sept. 13
Water - 62.50. TOTAL: 14100.15. SPED
Claims Payable October 14, 2013:
AFLAC - Insurance Premiums - 128.18,
Avesis - Vision Insurance Premiums -
28.06, Carley, Ruth - Isolation Mileage -
290.08, Children's Care - Residential Tu-
ition - July & August - 19,611.36, Class-
room Direct - SPED Supplies - 18.14,
Dearborn National - Life Insurance Pre-
miums - 4.20, Delta Dental - Dental In-
surance Premiums - 465.70, Pearson
Education - Testing Equipment - 890.40,
Petersen's Variety - SPED Supplies -
11.16, Volunteers of America - Residen-
tial Tuition - September - 3,544.95, Well-
mark Blue Cross - Health Insurance
Premiums - 501.48. TOTAL: 25,493.71.
Food Service Claims Payable October
14, 2013: AFLAC - Insurance Premiums
- 80.34, Child & Adult Nutrition - Com-
modity Purchases - 292.18, Coyle's Su-
perValu - Food Purchases - 19.82, Dean
Foods - Milk Purchases - 1,438.09,
Earthgrain Baking - Food Purchases -
49.80, Reinhart - Food Purchases -
3,635.13, Servall - Linen Care - 70.43,
US Foods - Food Purchases - 4,109.58.
TOTAL: 9,695.37, Hourly wages for
Month of September 2013: 26,496.10,
Gross Salaries/ ringe for September
2013: FUND 10: Instructional -
94,763.38, Administration - 16,000.59,
Support Services - 6,265.83, Extra Cur-
ricular - 2,517.17; FUND 22: SPED
Gross Salaries/Fringe - 5,388.97.
Blood Services. (E) 40-50 students will
be attending the Quiz Bowl in Stanley
County.
14-57 Superintendent Keven Morehart
reported on the following items: (A) A
committee has been assembled to work
on developing standard based report
cards. (B) Coach Kroetch has elemen-
tary cross country going twice a week
and they will run in the youth run on
10/12/13 and at regions on 10/16/13. (C)
Winners of our local Punt, Pass and Kick
will advance to the next round held at
Hollister Field in Pierre on 10/20/13. (D)
October 24th is the end of the 1st quar-
ter. (E) Picture retakes will be on October
28th. (F) We received a thank you from
SDSU for loaning busses for transporta-
tion out to the Cottonwood Research
Station. (G) HuntSafe will be held on Oc-
tober 21st and 22nd, and then during PE
in following years. (H) Due to weather
and recent events, the building tour will
be held before next month’s meeting. (I)
Mr. Morehart visited country schools last
Thursday. (J) Lights at the football field
will be fixed next week.
Adjournment at 7:34 p.m. Will meet in
regular session on November 18, 2013,
at 6:00 p.m.
________________________________
Britni Ross, Business Manager
________________________________
Scott Brech, President
[Published October 31, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $100.63]
General Fund Claims Payable October
14, 2013: AFLAC - Insurance Premium -
662.71, A&B Welding - VoAg Supplies -
44.07, A&B Welding - Consortium Equip-
ment - 2,794.57, Avesis - Vision Insur-
ance Premiums - 324.10, BHSU Stock
Market Game - Registration - 13 Teams
- 130.00, Brant's Electric - Replace Se-
curity Lights/Fuel Pump - 214.78, Brech,
Scott - BOE Mileage - 237.54, Bruck-
lacher, Brigitte - Consortium Travel -
229.56, Cambrium Learning - Ticket to
Read - 3,500.00, CDW-G - Technology
Supplies - 185.53, Century Business
Products - Copier Maintenance - 350.00,
Coyle's SuperValu - FACS Supplies -
139.51, Coyle's SuperValu - BOE/Janito-
rial/Science Supplies - 190.14, Dearborn
National - Life Insurance Premiums -
40.53, Delta Dental - Dental Insurance
Premiums - 1,561.62, Deuchar, Theresa
- Isolation Mileage - August & September
- 388.50, Elshere, Lana - Isolation
Mileage - 73.26, Fisher Science - Sci-
ence Supplies - 71.96, Foss, Dani - Iso-
lation Mileage - 231.62, Gabriel, TJ -
Mow at Deep Creek - 100.00, George's
Welding - Maintenance Supplies - 5.00,
GoldenWest Telecommunications - Tele-
phone - 648.52, Graupmann, Kenneth -
Mileage - To/From Kadoka to drive bus -
16.28, Haggerty's MusicWorks - Instru-
ment Repair - 98.50, Hauff Mid-America
- Awards/Football Supplies - 179.27,
Hometown Computer Services - Technol-
ogy Repair - 60.00, Ingram Hardware -
Janitorial/Maintenance Supplies - 24.50,
Kadoka FFA - Consortium Travel -
675.00, Kennedy Implement - Tractor
Repairs - 1.20, Knutson, Vicki - Mileage
- Reading Recovery - 60.68, Midland Sci-
Notice to Creditors
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
PRO. #13-9
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
ESTATE OF LARY P. OSBURN, De-
ceased.
Notice is given that on the 23rd day of Oc-
tober, 2013, James D. Osburn, whose ad-
dress is 4022 West St. Louis Street,
Rapid City, SD 57702, was appointed as
Personal Representative of the Estate of
Lary P. Osburn.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this Notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
/s/James D. Osburn
James D. Osburn
4022 West St. Louis Street
Rapid City, SD 57702
605-342-5393
Clerk of Courts
Haakon County Courthouse
PO Box 70
Philip, SD 57567
Ph: 605-859-2627
Kemnitz Law Offices
Ralph A. Kemnitz
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
Ph: 605-859-2540
[Published October 31, November 7 & 14,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$48.81]
Notice of Public
Hearing on
Application For
Retail (On-Off Sale)
Wine License
Notice is hereby given that a public hear-
ing will be held before the Midland Town
Board at its regular meeting on November
12, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. MT. This hearing
will be held in the Town Hall for the re-
newal of the retail on/off sale wine license
for the year beginning January 1, 2014.
Midland Food & Fuel, LLC,
Clint and Brenda Jensen, Lo-
cated Lot A2, S½ NE¼ Sec 6
Township 1 North of Range 25
Any interested person may appear and
will be given an opportunity to be heard
either for or against the above listed ap-
plicant.
Michelle Meinzer
City Finance Officer
Town of Midland
[Published October 31, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $11.55]
(continued from 5)
Mike Delahoyde and Brad Dana,
Spearfish, spent the weekend with
Jason and Vonda Hamill and boys.
Brice Hanson also spent a couple
nights at the Hamill’s. He and Car-
son tinkered on snowmobiles in an-
ticipation of snow that might be
coming. Sunday, Fred Romkema
stopped at the Hamill's on his way
back to the Black Hills. He had
been in the Pierre area participat-
ing in the Governor’s Hunt over the
weekend.
Lori Quinn and Linda Stangle
from the Milesville area were in
Rapid City over the weekend for
the South Dakota EMT Confer-
ence.
While in Rapid City for the week-
end, Tim and Lori Quinn helped
Tim's sister, Kathy Borkovec, cele-
brate her birthday. Also on Friday,
Tim and Lori attended the Stomp
concert. Kelton Quinn went to the
state cross country meet Saturday.
Jennifer and Sam Stangle spent
the weekend at home from college
at South Dakota State University.
Jennifer helped her dad with vet-
erinary business and Sam did the
chores.
Milesville Club met at Janice
Parsons' Thursday night. Rachel
Parsons gave an interesting pres-
entation and showed her pictures
of her trip to Europe last summer.
Club members attending were
Marcia Eymer, Donna Staben,
Tina Staben and Linda Gebes. Vis-
itors were Jodi, Rachel and Sarah
Parsons and Sharon Olivier.
Saturday, Donnie and Bobette
Schofield were in Sturgis for an
auction. Bruce and Lynn Dunker
and family of Wall spent the week-
end at the Schofields. Also helping
out with projects were Jeff and
Crystal Schofield. Bobette's
brother, Jim Murphy, stayed with
them Sunday night, returning to
Minnesota Monday.
Connie Parsons spent from
Wednesday through Friday with
daughter, Marla and Kyle Petersen
in Dazey, N.D. On her return trip
Saturday, she stopped in Miller
and spent the night there with her
brother, Ed and Bonnie Morgan.
Mike and Faye Piroutek and
John were in Bismarck, N.D., for
the weekend where they attended
a Catholic church conference.
Mike's niece, Becky Piroutek, came
out from Pierre to stay with the
younger children.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer spent
the weekend enjoying their
grandaughter, Brittany's, activi-
ties. Saturday, they were in Belle
Fourche for a volleyball tourna-
ment and Sunday she competed in
a Little Britches rodeo in Rapid
City.
Guests at Earl and Jodi Parsons'
home for dinner Sunday were Mike
and Betty McDonnell and Addie
and Tenley McDonnell, Highmore,
Mike and Melody Parsons and fam-
ily, Rapid City, Bryan and Sharon
Olivier and Bart and Janice Par-
sons. We celebrated Rachel's 17th
birthday.
It looks and feels like winter
again with snow and cold tempera-
tures. Maybe it won't stay long, as
the forecast is for warmer weather
later in the week. Some farmers
have started combining their corn.
Remember to set your clocks back
an hour Saturday night!
Milesville News|Janice Parsons • 544-3315
(continued from 6)
many stocker calves from them
from the Anderson feedlot. Don
and Vi and their folks had room for
about 75 head of calves they win-
tered in the Valley and trucked
them to the ranch in late April.
They would grind feed and fill
bunks in the corral and then the
calves could range out to feed on al-
falfa hay. It was the mini-ranch at
the time.
No report from Cathy and Ralph
Fiedler in the Sturgis area so sup-
pose they are enjoying the nice
weather while they can.
Friday, Bill was on the road to
combine corn in the Milesville area
and they had a pretty good day.
Tony Harty came by for a visit,
read the papers and we had a cou-
ple of games of farkel. I gave Phyl-
lis Word a ride to the Community
Action Program building then also
gave her a lift home. I visited Mary
Jane and Andy Hemmingson at
their apartment and shared a book
with Andy with illustrated draw-
ings, since he said he was quite an
artist in his early years.
I see by my journal that taxes
were due before November 1. Hope
you all got that out of the way in
good shape.
Saturday morning, Phyllis Word
and I visited at the Bud Weller
home and left a few things for the
family. Our condolences to the fam-
ily in the loss of Clara Belle.
On our way home, we also visited
Betty and Claude Allen Berry.
Meanwhile, Bill and Terry decided
it was time to get the motor home
out of the field. That decision will
haunt Bill for a few days anyway.
Bob Hansen loaned them a tractor
when the motor home sunk out of
sight, then I got a call to get a
wrecker! The wrecker got stuck too,
but thanks to Arlie and Gretchen
Radway’s tractor and their helper,
Matt Trask, the motor home arriv-
ing home that evening. If you really
need more information on this, call
Bill.
Sunday was a beautiful day and
I spent the afternoon getting mud
off the motor home, draining the
water and sort of getting things
lined up for the cold that was pre-
dicted to arrive Monday. Bill and
Terry combined corn the better
share of the day.
Don and Vi Moody returned to
the ranch Sunday afternoon. They
have quite a pile of limbs for the
tree service to dispose of at their
Rapid Valley place. Everything will
take time. Rome wasn't built in a
day either! The neighbors around
all were really in the Halloween
spirit. An antique Farmall tractor
is parked at their island turn en-
trance with pumpkins all around
it. Don and Vi have decorations up
and lights in the windows!!
Sunday, Tony Harty attended
church in the morning and in the
afternoon attended the visitation
for Clara Belle Weller at the Pres-
byterian church.
Sunday evening, Sandee Git-
tings had supper with Jessica Git-
tings and Wade McGruder, then
continued on to Rapid City to
spend the night with Charlie and
Diane Gittings for early Monday
morning appointments.
“Do your little bit of good where
you are; it’s those little bits of good
put together that overwhelm the
world.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu
Betwixt Places| Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048
bilmar@gwtc.net
autoMotive
FOR SALE: 2003 Ford F350
King Ranch. Loaded, new bat-
tery, fair tires, and topper. 859-
3552. P46-2tp
Business & seRviCe
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn, 441-1053, or leave a
message at 837-0112. K44-4tp
BUSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
Quad/Power shift tractor, Hours:
8290, Form: Sealed Bid, Deadline:
November 8th 2013, 5 pm, Bid
Opening: November 12th, 2013
7:00 p.m. Contact information:
Daryl Sieverding 605-661-5268,
Town of Humboldt, PO Box 72,
Humboldt, SD 57035.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneaglelog
homes.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide Clas-
sifieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this
newspaper, 605-859-2516, or
800-658-3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
email Dave.Cortney@edgemont.
k12.sd.us.
DENTAL ASSISTANT: Delta Den-
tal Dakota Smiles Mobile Dental
program is seeking a Dental Assis-
tant to join a dedicated team of
professionals in a mobile dentistry
environment. This program aims
to improve oral health for South
Dakotans in need of care. Respon-
sibilities will include: providing
chair side assistance, taking x-
rays, patient charting, and equip-
ment sterilization. In addition, the
dental assistant is responsible for
greeting patients, preparing for
treatment, and providing back-up
support to other staff when
needed. This position is based out
of the Pierre Delta Dental office
however the mobile staff is re-
quired to travel across the state
during the work week. Applicant
must have graduated from an ac-
credited dental assisting educa-
tion program or equivalent
training is preferred. Required
CPR & x-ray certification will be
provided if not already obtained.
Competitive salary and benefits
including health, dental, vision,
and 401k. Email cover letter, re-
sume and professional references
to summer.sporrer@deltaden-
talsd.com or for more information
please contact Carrie Mikkonen at
605-494-2549. You can also ac-
cess the job description and sub-
mit online at www.deltadentalsd.
com.
FOR SALE BY BID
SURPLUS PROPERTY FOR SALE:
1979 John Deere 4440
Business & Professional
Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
EMPLOYMENT
IMMEDIATE OPENING. Duties in-
clude but not limited to, bulk de-
livery of fuel. CDL, Hazmat
required. Will train. Farmers Oil
Company, Orient SD. Information,
Don, 392-2424.
FULL TIME JACKSON COUNTY
HIGHWAY Department Worker.
Truck driver, heavy equipment op-
erator, light equipment operator.
Experience preferred, but will
train. CDL required, or to be ob-
tained in six months. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Benefits package. Appli-
cations / resumes accepted. Infor-
mation (605) 837-2410 or (605)
837 – 2422 Fax (605) 837-2447.
THE AWARD WINNING Chamber-
lain/Oacoma SUN has an imme-
diate opening for a full-time
reporter interested in covering
community news in the Chamber-
lain, South Dakota community.
Offering a competitive wage and
benefit package. Applicants quali-
fied in writing, and photography
should apply to publisher Lucy
Halverson at lucy@lcherald.com
or mail resume to PO BOX 518,
Presho, SD 57544.
HEAD COOK for Edgemont School
District. 9-month position, ap-
proximately 26 hours/ week. Four
day week. Benefits. Responsible
for inventory, menu planning,
record keeping and supervising
several employees. Computer
skills needed and some heavy lift-
ing will be required. Wages de-
pending on experience. Contact
Dave Cortney (605) 662-7254,
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Classifieds
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 14
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS statewide for only
$150.00. Put the South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call this newspaper,
605-859-2516, or 800-658-3697 for details.
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The Pennington Co. Courant, as well as on our website: www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Printed only in the Pioneer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pioneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make
any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity basis.
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & RanCh
HAY FOR SALE: Grass/alfalfa
mix, $150 a ton. Leroy Guptill,
Martin, 685-6752. PR10-5tp
HAY FOR SALE: Approx. 1250
tons, half hybrid Pearl millet and
half sorghum/sudan BMR.
Tested good, net wrapped, big
round, trucking available if
needed. Call Rick at 386-2375.
WP9-4tc
ATTENTION RANCHERS:
WANTED: Used oil and payment
if over 200 gallons. We also carry
new lubes and greases for the
care and maintenance of your
Heavy Equipment. Contact Gary
Perlebert, Red Giant Oil Sales,
Rapid City, SD, 605-877-4064,
www.redgiantoil.com. WP9-2tp
FOR SALE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
heLP Wanted
HELP WANTED: Philip Health
Services, Philip, SD, needs Med-
ical Technologist, to perform lab
procedures, maintain lab instru-
ments. Bachelor’s degree in
Medical Technology, AMT or
ASCP or equivalent certification.
Sent resumé to: HR, PO Box
790, Philip, SD 57567. PR10-tfn
HELP WANTED: Position for
Pharmacy Tech. Will train. In-
quire at Zeeb Pharmacy, Philip,
859-2833, ask for Milo. P47-1tc
RN/LPN POSITIONS: Seeking
loving and patient geriatric
nurses at the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Benefits available. Con-
tact Heidi or Ruby at 837-2270.
K46-tfn
KADOKA AREA SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT: is accepting applications
for an assistant janitor. Applica-
tions are available on the web-
site, www.kadoka.k12.sd.us and
submitted to KASD, Attn. Supt.
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543. For more in-
formation call 837-2175.
K46-2tc
DIETARY AIDE POSITION:
open at the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Full time with benefits.
Call Ruby or Cathy or 837-2270.
K46-2tc
FULL TIME JACKSON COUNTY
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
WORKER: Truck driver, heavy
equipment operator, light equip-
ment operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train. CDL
required, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumes accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422. Fax
837-2447. K45-5tc
FULL- OR PART-TIME PRESS-
ROOM HELP WANTED: Monday
and Wednesday mornings (3-4
hours each day). Will train the
right person. Call Beau Ravel-
lette, 859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or
Colby Shuck for more informa-
tion: 837-2076. K33-tfn
AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping and laundry. Stop
in to apply or call Joseph at 279-
2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Jackie at 348-
8108 or 391-7806, or fax re-
sumé to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
MisC. foR saLe
FOR SALE: 300 Magnum with
scope, 2506 with scope. Call
859-3552. P46-2tp
ELK MEAT FOR SALE: For de-
tails call 484-1898. P46-2tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notiCes/Wanted
SAVE THE DATE for the
Belvidere Christmas Fair, Satur-
day after Thanksgiving, Novem-
ber 30. M10-3tc
KADOKA LEGION AUXIIARY
MEMBERS: Please bring two
items or cash donation to Holi-
day Festival bake sale, Novem-
ber 3. K46-2tc
WANTED: Old Indian items,
beadwork, quillwork, old guns,
old painted buffalo hides, old
photographs. Cash paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802. F46-4tp
WANTED: Antlers. Looking to
buy deer, elk, and moose
antlers. Paying cash. 360-3749.
P46-3tp
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday,
November 3, 2013, Kadoka City
Auditorium. Booths available.
Call Ruby at 837-2270. K45-3tc
NOW IS THE TIME … TO
THINK OF YOUR FAMILY &
FRIENDS! It’s not too early to be
compiling your Christmas or
end-of-the-year letter! You write
it, email it to us (ads@pioneer-
review.com) and we will print it
on beautiful holiday stationary.
We can even put your full color
family picture with the letter. Let
us help you make the holiday
season special (and easier) this
year. Ravellette Publications,
Inc. Philip Office: 859-2516;
Wall Office: 279-2565; Kadoka
Office: 837-2259; Faith Office:
967-2161; Bison Office: 244-
7199; Murdo Office: 669-2271;
New Underwood Office: 754-
6466. P41-tfn
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm
machinery and junk cars for
crushing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
Pets
KITTENS/CATS AVAILABLE
that would make great barn or
house cats. They are excellent
mousers. Please call 685-5327
for more information. P47-2tp
ReaL estate
FOR SALE OR RENT: 2 to 3
bedroom house, Philip. Call Tom
Foley, 859-2975 or 685-8856.
PR10-1tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: Asking
$25,000. 406 Norris Street, Wall.
279-2825. PW46-3tp
HOME FOR SALE: 206 Myrtle
Ave., Philip. Double lot, 30x24
double garage, 30x24 concrete
pad in front of garage, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, 1,200 sq. ft. main
floor, full basement unfinished,
second floor - 430 sq. ft. room
remodel started, central air/
heat, 12x8 storage shed, 500
gal. propane tank, new 85 gal.
Marathon water heater, dish-
washer. Call Kanables at 859-
2957. P46-2tp
ReCReation
FOR SALE: 2008 Yamaha Griz-
zly 350, 4x4 excellent condition.
Call 280-0926. P47-2tc
FOR SALE: 2005 Polaris four
wheel drive, 300 Magnum four
wheeler. $3,500. Call 669-2165.
P46-2tp
FOR SALE: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
good shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, frig and large front stor-
age box. Stored inside off sea-
son. Call 279-2195 or 441-7049,
Wall, anytime. WP4-tfn
RentaLs
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLassified PoLiCy
PLEASE READ your classified ad
the first week it runs. If you see an
error, we will gladly re-run your ad
correctly. We accept responsibility
for the first incorrect insertion only.
Ravellette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of thanks be
paid for when ordered. A $2.00
billing charge will be added if ad is
not paid at the time the order is
placed. All phone numbers are with
an area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
thank yous
Thank you to you guys who
pulled a fast one on me for my
birthday! I got 37 cards plus one
with 50 signatures.
Howard Pihlaja
Paul and I have so many peo-
ple to thank for all their help dur-
ing the time of my surgery and
recovery. Thanks to all for the
cards, phone calls, visits, flowers
and food. Thank you, “kids,” for
“temporarily” taking over and
making decisions and for all the
help at home. Thank each of you
for all the prayers offered for me
during surgery and afterwards.
Our special thanks goes to Dr.
Klopper and the Philip Health
Services for their very kind and
efficient attention. We appreciate
our little corner of the world.
Paul & Joy Elshere
Thanks to the Friends of the Li-
brary, all who donated pies and
desserts, the Haakon County Li-
brary Board, Memphis Dreams,
Chris Wright and everyone who
attended the Elvis/Johnny Cash
show on October 19th! Your con-
tributions made the event a huge
success. It was truly a night to re-
member!
Jennifer Henrie &
Annie Brunskill
For all your
concrete
construction
needs:
Gibson
CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
859-3100
Philip, SD
We Are Here
Emily Wickstrom, Rural Advocate
for Missouri Shores Domestic
Violence Center, will be at the
Haakon Co. Courthouse on
~ TUESDAY ~
November 5th
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
For more information, call
1-800-696-7187
Domestic Violence, Sexual
Assault, Dating Violence
Emily is also available for
presentations to any group
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
1 and 2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups) Apartments
carpeted throughout, appliances
furnished, laundry facilities available.
Disabled and Handicap Housing
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
VelroP|a|rs
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
metrop|a|ns
management.
com
Community
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 15
(continued from 12)
ner at Avera St. Mary's. After-
ward, Shirley visited Ken Halli-
gan at Parkwood as he had been
in the hospital and had been re-
leased Thursday. Saturday, Frank
and Shirley attended the Deep
Creek Church bazaar in the
evening. Sunday, Frank and
Shirley's son, Murdock, his wife,
Lynn, and their boys came down
to visit in the morning, and
Frank's sister, Linda Gilbert,
stopped by in the afternoon on her
way back to Buffalo. Sunday
evening, Frank and Shirley were
invited to Don and Dodie Garrity's
for supper. Happy belated birth-
day to Shirley – her birthday was
Monday, and she spent the day
resting up from the big weekend.
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser had
most of the family home last
weekend. Brianna and Nick took
Friday off from their jobs and
helped trail cows home from sum-
mer pasture. Mary came out to the
ranch later that evening. Nick
stayed Saturday and Sunday to
help with fall harvest. They did
not get quite done before the snow
started, but Kevin said they are
closer to being done than they
would have been without the
extra help. Kevin, Mary and Nick
attended the church bazaar Satur-
day evening.
* * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH ANNUAL TURKEY
DINNER, SUNDAY, NOV. 3.
DINNER AT NOON. EVERYONE
WELCOME. ADULTS: $8. CHIL-
DREN 6-12: $4; 5 & UNDER:
FREE.
* * *
Mary Briggs said she forgot to
mention an item for last week's
news. October 17, Rea (Briggs)
and Kinsey Riggle and Mary at-
tended a fundraiser for Close Up,
a program at T.F. Riggs High
School where interested seniors
can sign up and raise money to-
ward a week-long visit to Wash-
ington, D.C., to learn about our
nation's history, government and
political system. Cattabrie Riggle
is one of those interested seniors,
and she gave a little speech on
why she wanted to go. Rick and
Nancy Riggle and Pam and Clay
Roberts also attended the
fundraiser. The warm weather of
this past weekend was a very wel-
come time to try some more har-
vesting. According to Mary, we
can bring on some more sunshine.
Grandson Zane and his classmate,
Chase Tieman, came out to the
ranch to do some bird hunting,
and they went back to Sturgis
Sunday.
This is some news that was too
late for last week's column. Clint
and Laura Alleman are busy
weaning calves and waiting for
drier weather so they can get into
the fields. Clint and Laura at-
tended a wedding in Houston re-
cently – close friend, Trace
Martin, married Courtney in a
beautiful Texas setting. Clint and
Laura were very blessed to have
the opportunity to go down this
time of year – it was a fun filled
weekend away. Daughter Alivya
stayed with the Yost grandpar-
ents. Clint and Laura also helped
Uncle Ben Stoeser celebrate his
90th birthday. Laura has also
been busy preparing for the Deep
Creek Church bazaar.
Max and Joyce Jones attended
Lil Briggs' funeral Tuesday, and
they attended the prayer service
for Doug Keller (son of Shirley
Sandal) in Highmore Thursday
evening. They have been combin-
ing every chance they get, just like
the rest of the farmers in the area.
Ray and Nancy Neuhauser at-
tended Lil Briggs' prayer service
last week. Nancy spent three days
on jury duty last week. Friday, she
joined her daughter, Julie, and
son-in-law, Rod, and the three of
them went to the family cabin in
the Black Hills. They had in-
tended to do some work on the
cabin, but Rod's brother had a
medical emergency late Friday, so
they returned from the cabin early
Saturday. Nancy said she has
cleaned up her flowerpots and
flower garden, so they are all set
for the winter.
Chase and Kelly Briggs at-
tended the prayer service and fu-
neral for Chase's grandmother, Lil
Briggs. They enjoyed visiting with
all the cousins and other relatives
who were home. Chase, Kelly and
kids attended the Deep Creek
bazaar Saturday evening.
Ron and Helen Beckwith have
been busy harvesting alfalfa seed
and canning tomatoes. Their
daughter, Lori, who lives in
Huron, is spending the week with
them. Dave Schaatz stopped by
last week with some wood – he
had cut down a tree at his
mother's place south of Eagle
Butte. Helen sent Dave home with
a box of tomatoes for his mother.
Our week was busy – trying to
harvest, moving cattle, and mak-
ing other preparations for winter.
I went to Rapid City Wednesday
to be with my mother while she
had a procedure at the hospital
there. She had some complica-
tions, so I ended up staying until
Friday night. Thankfully, she is
doing much better, and she was
able to return to her home Satur-
day evening. Sunday, Dan and
Barb Neuhauser arrived here
from their home in Olympia,
Wash., and Dan's son, Scott
Neuhauser, his wife, Kari, and
their son, Devon, are here also.
They will be spending the week
with us, visiting and helping with
some fall projects.
Today, I am grateful for peach
trees! I was surprised Saturday
morning when a pickup pulled in,
and the young man introduced
himself and said he had two peach
trees for me. The trees are a gift
from our children, and I'm so ex-
cited to see how soon they will
bear fruit. The trees are about
seven feet tall, so I'm hoping we'll
have peaches within the next year
or two. We now have apples,
pears, and peaches in our yard,
along with the chokecherries, cur-
rants, Nanking cherries and
whatever else is growing around
here. Life is good!
Please be careful of the ice this
week, and take time to go slow
with your projects. Better safe
than sorry! Now I'm going to go
enjoy our guests – have a great
week!
Moenville News|Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Due to extremely low invento-
ries and outages of propane prod-
ucts in South Dakota, Governor
Dennis Daugaard has signed an
executive order to assure expe-
dited commercial delivery of those
products.
“The continued transportation
of propane is essential for agricul-
tural operations in South Dakota,’’
Daugaard said. “We need to as-
sure that the supplies of propane
are maintained to enable our pro-
ducers to carry on normal opera-
tions.’’
The governor’s order declares a
state of emergency and exempts
delivery of propane from federal
motor carrier regulations on driv-
ers’ hours of service.
Although hours of service have
been temporarily suspended for
commercial deliveries, companies
may not require or allow fatigued
drivers to make deliveries, said
Daugaard.
The executive order expires at
midnight November 30.
Propane shortage
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567-3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman & AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985-5486
Ccll (605} 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544 3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347-0151
(605} 641-1042
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9 2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R CALF USA! R CALF USA
1s our vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1
U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng
1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o
d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to
our consignors, with questions about the
video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859 2577
PhiIip, SD
UPCOM1NG SAL£S:
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND
DFED HEIFEF SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL &
HFFT. SALE. WEIGH-UPS 9.00MT BRED CATTLE
12.00MT
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
DISPERSIONS:
JOE & LARAE CARLEY ºAGE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK
COMINC 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25
STEVE ISKE ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK & DWF
2 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-
20.
MIKE PIROUTEK ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 50 DLK &
DWF MOSTLY 5 YF OLDS COWS; DFED.CHAF; CLV. 3-15 FOF
65 DAYS
GALEN NIEDERWERDER ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 25
FANCY DLK AI'D 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FINAL ANSWEF;
CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. HEFF; CLV. 4-1; 10 FANCY DLK
AI'D HFFS; DFED. DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. DLK;
CLV. 4-1
RYON RYPKEMA ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 30 DLK 3 YF
OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV.2-28 FOF
45 DAYS
BEAU BENDIGO - 15 FED ANCUS COMINC 4 YF OLD
COWS; DFED. FED ANCUS & CHAF; CLV. 3-20
BRED HEIFERS:
MILLAR ANGUS - 80 FANCY DLK AI'D HFFS; DFED. SONS
OF FINAL ANSWEF; CLV. 2-18 FOF 2 DAYS; 40 FANCY DLK
DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL ANSWEF; CLV. 3-5
FOF 20 DAYS; 35 FANCY DLK DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS
OF FINAL ANSWEF; CLV.4-1 FOF 30 DAYS
STEVE MCDANIEL - 100 DLK ULTFASOUND AI'D HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-15 (SOFTED INTO CLVC CFOUPS}
BILLY MARTIN ÷ 93 FANCY ULTFASOUND DLK ANC HFFS;
DFED LDW SONS OF SAV DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-1 (SOFTED INTO
SHOFT CLVC PEFIODS}
MARK WELDON ÷ 75 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW SONS OF
FINAL ANSWEF; CLV. 2-20 FOF 45 DAYS
DANNY ARNESON - 70 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED
FIFST CALF HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS ANC; CLV. 3-10
(SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS}
MELVIN ARNESON ÷ 40 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED
FIFST CALF HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS ANC; CLV. 3-10
(SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS}
STOCK COWS:
ED MILLER - 30 DWF 5 TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FED
ANC; CLV. 4-1
MIKE & LORI JACOBSEN ÷ 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK DALANCEF; CLV. 3-1
DON RAVELLETTE- 11 FEC. DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-10 FOF 50 DAYS
BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
MILLAR ANGUS ÷ 35 FANCY DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS
(COMMEFICAL & FECISTEFED}; DFED. CONNEALLY SONS OF
FINAL PFODUCT; CLV. 3-1 FOF 60 DAYS
ED MILLER ÷ 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.FED
ANC; CLV. 4-1
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog.
Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE YEARLINGS
9.00MT CALVES 10.00MT
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: £ST1MAT1NG J2,DDD H£AD
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS,
AN÷ALL NATUFAL, ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RAPID CREEK RANCH - 1000 CEFTIFIED FED ANCUS STFS
& FEPL HFFS; FS,NI ..................................500-600=
PERAULT RANCH - 500 FANCY 1ST X DWF CLVS;
ALL HFFS IN TOWN; FS,NI ...........................500-500=
S. JOHNSTON - 500 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...425-550=
CUNY & SONS - 500 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..500-600=
T. THOMPSON, T. THOMPSON, & T. THOMPSON - 400 DLK
CLVS; FS,NI .................................................500-600=
HEATHERSHAW - 400 CHAF, LH X CLVS; FS,NI .......450=
T. O'CONNOR - 350 CHAF X CLVS; FS ...................600=
NELSON - 340 DLK CLVS; FS .........................400-500=
L. KJERSTAD & N. KJERSTAD - 320 FANCY DLK CLVS;
FS,NI .......................................................500-600=
BCR INC. - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS (200 STFS, 100 HFFS}
NI ...........................................................500-550=
HOSTUTLER RANCH - 275 CHAF X CLVS (2 LDS STFS & 1
LD HFFS};
FS ..................................................................600=
S. PORCH & M. PORCH - 270 FANCY DLK ANCUS STFS;
FS,NI ..............................................................600=
DAYCO LTD. - 250 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........550=
SHORB - 250 DLK CLVS; FS,NI
C. KJERSTAD - 250 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............500-550=
ENG - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............475-550=
S. RIGGINS - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS (ALL DWF HFFS IN
TOWN} FS,NI .............................................500-600=
HULM - 200 CHAF X CLVS; FS ..............................700=
PHILIPSEN & STOVER - 200 DLK CLVS (150 STFS,
50 HFFS}; FS,NI ...............................................550=
WEYER - 200 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........450-550=
BLAIR - 190 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............................600=
KIEFFER - 175 FANCY DLK STFS; FS ...............700-800=
TINES - 170 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .............500-550=
S. DALY & J. DALY - 165 DLK STFS; ASV,FS .........600=
PINNEY RANCH - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .550-600=
J. SAMPSON & T. SAMPSON - 150 DLK CLVS;
FS,NI .......................................................450-550=
SHEARER - 150 DLK CLVS; FS, HFFS-
NO IMPLANTS .............................................500-550=
2UCCARO - 150 FED ANCUS CLVS; FS,NI ................500=
PETERSON - 125 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .......550-575=
MADSEN RANCH - 125 DLK, DWF & FED CLVS;
FS,NI .......................................................475-525=
CUNY - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI ................................550=
HEEB - 110 DLK HFFS; FS ............................600-650=
HERRON - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........500-575=
KETELSEN & BEUG - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI .............550=
BRUNSON - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ..........................500=
DODSON - 100 DLK CLVS; AN,NI ...........................600=
BOOMER - 100 FED ANCUS STFS; FS,NI .................550=
2ELFER - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........400-500=
JULSON - 100 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI ...........500-525=
JENSEN - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........550-600=
AMIOTTE - 90 FED & DLK STFS; FS ...............550-580=
NEUHAUSER - 90 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .......500-550=
B. STOUT - 90 DLK STFS; FS,NI .....................550-600=
N. GEIGLE & J. GEIGLE - 85 DLK STFS; FS .....550-575=
GROPPER - 80 FED STFS; FS .........................600-700=
SAWVELL - 80 DLK CLVS; FS .................................550=
W. HOFFMAN - 80 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI .....450-550=
O'NEILL RANCH - 80 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN ..............700=
MCPHERSON - 80 DWF STFS; FS,NI .......................500=
SANDER - 75 DLK & DWF & FEW FED & CHAF STFS;
FS ..................................................................550=
FEES - 75 DLK CLVS; FS ...............................500-600=
MCDANIEL - 75 DLK STFS; FS ...............................575=
KARP FAMILY - 70 FED ANCUS CLVS (MOSTLY STFS};
FS,NI ..............................................................550=
CROSSVIEW RANCH - 70 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............600=
GARTNER - 65 DLK CLVS; FS .........................475-550=
KETELSEN - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS .............500-600=
WULF - 60 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI ................550-600=
DEDIC - 60 HEFF CLVS; FS ...........................450-550=
EISENBRAUN - 50 DLK STFS; FS,NI ........................600=
BULL BEAR - 50 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .........................500=
S. GARTNER - 50 DLK STFS; FS,NI ........................600=
R. GARTNER - 50 DLK STFS; FS,NI ........................600=
2. HOFFMAN - 50 FED CLVS; FS ....................450-550=
MACLEAY - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........550-600=
HANSON - 45 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .......................550-600=
NEUHAUSER - 44 DLK CLVS; FS ......................600-650=
R. GRUBL - 35 DLK & CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .....600-650=
B. & P. GRUBL - 35 DLK & CHAF X CLVS;
FS,NI .......................................................600-650=
SILBERNAGEL - 35 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI .....500-550=
HARRIS - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .......................550-600=
FOX - 30 FED CLVS; FS,NI ...........................500-600=
MICKELSON - 24 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .......500-575=
DEGEEST - 10 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN .......................500=
YEARLINGS:
HUGHES - 33 DLK STFS & EXPOSED HFFS .......850-900=
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog.
Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL &
HFFT. SALE. SALE TIME: 10.00MT
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13: WEICH-UP COW, DULL
& HEIFEFETTE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
WEANED CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC
SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE &
WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF
& STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
October 31, 2013 • Pioneer Review 16
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
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859 2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, OCT. 29, 2DJS
B1g run o] oo1ves ond geor11ngs. Lo1s o] bug-
ers. Snou ond ro1n 1n 1Þe oreo. MorKe1
sÞoued some vor1onoe on 1Þe oond111on o] 1Þe
oo1ves.
FEEDER CATTLE:
GERAD & MEGAN JULSON, WALL
96..............................DLK/DWF STFS 559=.....$200.00
CHARLES & LUKE VANDERMAY, KADOKA
95......................................DLK STFS 507=.....$201.50
92......................................DLK STFS 580=.....$191.00
A CONSIGNMENT OF -
124....................................DLK STFS 433=.....$223.00
302....................................DLK STFS 502=.....$194.00
99 ......................................DLK STFS 587=.....$180.75
LYNN FIELDS, ELM SPRINGS
11............................CHAF/FED STFS 433=.....$215.50
52.....................DLK/FED/CHAF STFS 530=.....$193.75
87....................................CHAF STFS 581=.....$185.75
97...................................CHAF HFFS 553=.....$177.75
17...................................CHAF HFFS 527=.....$175.00
WES & DUSTIN REEVES, OWANKA
95..............................DLK/DWF STFS 596=.....$186.00
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS, PHILIP
62.....................DLK/FED/CHAF STFS 488=.....$194.50
106...................DLK/FED/CHAF STFS 556=.....$187.25
85....................................CHAF STFS 664=.....$178.75
49...................................CHAF HFFS 504=.....$178.00
89...................................CHAF HFFS 617=.....$171.75
MICKEY DALY, MIDLAND
43......................................DLK STFS 576=.....$179.00
90......................................DLK STFS 656=.....$178.00
32 .....................................DLK HFFS 549=.....$164.00
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE, UNION CENTER
23..............................DLK/DWF STFS 460=.....$107.00
147............................DLK/DWF STFS 534=.....$197.50
100............................DLK/DWF STFS 600=.....$182.25
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH, BILLINGS, MT
19..............................DLK/DWF STFS 419=.....$208.00
99..............................DLK/DWF STFS 533=.....$190.25
TERRY & LEVI BUCHERT, PHILIP
90 .....................................FED STFS 634=.....$173.25
80 .....................................FED STFS 730=.....$170.25
40.....................................FED HFFS 640=.....$170.25
MARK WILLIAMS, KADOKA
86....................................CHAF STFS 603=.....$178.50
79....................................CHAF STFS 695=.....$175.00
86...................................CHAF HFFS 594.......$169.25
80...................................CHAF HFFS 670=.....$166.00
LIVERMONT RANCH, WANBLEE
66 .....................................DLK HFFS 401=.....$201.00
109 ...........................DLK/DWF HFFS 478=.....$183.00
RIATA HILLS LLC & LAMONT, QUINN
67......................................DLK STFS 489=.....$195.00
89..............................DLK/DWF STFS 554=.....$184.50
JAY VOGELGESANG, WANBLEE
29......................................DLK STFS 425=.....$211.00
54......................................DLK STFS 540=.....$188.00
13 .....................................DLK HFFS 402=.....$204.00
36 .....................................DLK HFFS 488=.... $179.50
DIAMOND S RANCH LLC, UNION CENTER
50..............................DLK/DWF STFS 461=.....$209.50
92..............................DLK/DWF STFS 567=.....$192.25
29 .............................DLK/DWF HFFS 522=.....$177.50
JAMES WILSEY, OWANKA
12......................................DLK STFS 434=.....$207.50
26......................................DLK STFS 578=.....$181.00
19 .....................................DLK HFFS 516.......$175.00
AARON & JAMES MANSFIELD, KADOKA
67......................................DLK STFS 460=.....$205.00
98......................................DLK STFS 535=.....$192.00
WISHARD & MANGUS, LANTRY
35..............................DLK/DWF STFS 447=.....$203.50
109............................DLK/DWF STFS 533=.....$195.75
44 ....................................DWF HFFS 498=.....$202.00
21 .....................................DLK HFFS 504=.....$170.50
LUCY & EDITH KNIGHT, DUPREE
52....................................CHAF STFS 542=.....$184.50
11......................................DLK STFS 437=.....$203.00
LYLE O'ROURKE, INTERIOR
64......................................DLK STFS 539=.....$183.50
16......................................DLK STFS 410=.....$201.00
24 .....................................DLK HFFS 477=.....$178.00
JOHN BRENNAN, MUD BUTTE
97......................................DLK STFS 580=.....$183.25
22......................................DLK STFS 490.......$199.25
70 .....................................DLK HFFS 476=.....$180.00
JERRY STOUT, KADOKA
22....................................CHAF STFS 505=.....$199.00
71....................................CHAF STFS 615=.....$181.50
67...................................CHAF HFFS 594=.....$168.75
RANDALL & KAREN DAVIS, HERMOSA
38......................................DLK STFS 616=.....$179.25
10......................................DLK STFS 466=.....$199.00
41 .....................................DLK HFFS 561=.....$170.00
WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK, MARCUS
23......................................DLK STFS 446=.....$198.50
80..............................DLK/DWF STFS 551=.....$185.00
10 .....................................DLK HFFS 411=.....$202.00
42 .....................................DLK HFFS 460=.....$182.00
KC BIELMAIER RANCH, WALL
89......................................DLK STFS 567=.....$181.00
16......................................DLK STFS 463=.....$197.50
14 .............................DLK/DWF HFFS 518=.....$174.00
10 .............................DLK/DWF HFFS 533=.....$166.50
DOUG DAHL, WALL
42..............................DLK/DWF STFS 578=.....$181.50
18......................................DLK STFS 494=.....$197.00
12 .............................DLK/DWF HFFS 490=.....$173.00
31 .....................................DLK HFFS 548=.....$170.00
IRWIN FERGUSON, KADOKA
19..............................DLK/DWF STFS 524=.....$196.75
57....................................HEFF STFS 548=.....$182.25
12 ....................................DWF HFFS 507=.....$201.00
20 ...................................HEFF HFFS 492=.....$172.00
A CONSIGNMENT -
86......................................DLK STFS 505=.....$196.75
93......................................DLK STFS 583=.....$182.50
PHIL & JOE CARLEY, MILESVILLE
48......................................DLK STFS 499=.... $196.50
89......................................DLK STFS 582=.....$182.25
35 .....................................DLK HFFS 442=.....$176.00
77 .....................................DLK HFFS 538=.....$164.50
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG, KADOKA
49..............................DLK/DWF STFS 575=.....$179.00
16..............................DLK/DWF STFS 468=.....$196.00
JIM & JOAN CANTRELL, PHILIP
61......................................DLK STFS 575=.....$182.25
14......................................DLK STFS 501=.....$196.00
35 .....................................DLK HFFS 496=.....$174.25
CARLSON & ROMERO, BELVIDERE
90......................................DLK STFS 550=.....$186.00
19......................................DLK STFS 452=.....$195.50
26 .....................................DLK HFFS 538=.....$173.00
JW CATTLE CO., BELVIDERE
89....................................CHAF STFS 606=.....$183.00
49.....................DLK/FED/CHAF STFS 506=.....$195.00
15.....................................FED HFFS 508=.....$181.00
94...................................CHAF HFFS 572=.....$170.75
KELLY RIGGINS, PHILIP
91......................................DLK STFS 502=.....$194.75
47 .....................................DLK HFFS 475=.....$183.75
ROB HUNSAKER, FAIRBURN
14......................................DLK STFS 510=.....$194.00
11.....................................DWF STFS 609=.....$176.50
10....................................HEFF STFS 568=.....$170.50
BRENT WEBER, LONG VALLEY
86..............................FED/DLK STFS 521=.....$193.00
90 ..............................FED/DLK STFS 609=.....$182.00
46 .............................FED/DLK HFFS 490=.....$173.50
ALBERT SHARP, ALLEN
30......................................DLK STFS 471=.....$195.00
31 ............................CHAF/DLK STFS 581=.....$173.75
20 .....................................DLK HFFS 439=.....$178.00
30 .....................................DLK HFFS 539=.....$170.00
ROBERT BARRY, NEW UNDERWOOD
56..............................DLK/DWF STFS 559=.....$185.75
20......................................DLK STFS 476=.....$192.75
BYRON DENKE, QUINN
49......................................DLK STFS 585=.....$184.50
14......................................DLK STFS 486=.....$191.00
MIKE & ANITA HEATHERSHAW, QUINN
98......................................DLK STFS 564=.....$189.00
JAKE JULSON, NEW UNDERWOOD
32......................................DLK STFS 580=.....$176.50
17 .....................................DLK HFFS 467=.....$180.00
JIGGS O'CONNELL, RAPID CITY
72......................................DLK STFS 577=.....$175.00
12 .....................................DLK HFFS 458=.....$177.00
29 .....................................DLK HFFS 529=.....$169.50
BURT DARTT, WALL
25......................................DLK STFS 546=.....$181.50
TOM BARRETT, CAPUTA
16..............................DLK/DWF STFS 508=.....$181.50
WILSON BROTHERS, ELM SPRINGS
19......................................DLK STFS 399=.....$207.00
46 .....................................DLK HFFS 486=.....$177.50
GERRY ECKERT, RAPID CITY
29......................................DLK STFS 623=.....$181.25
11 .....................................DLK HFFS 528=.....$170.00
22 .....................................DLK HFFS 603=.....$164.50
LARRY VOLMER, OWANKA
21......................................DLK STFS 617=.....$181.25
37 .....................................DLK HFFS 586=.....$173.50
ADAM ROSETH, MIDLAND
40......................................DLK STFS 628=.....$180.25
34 .....................................DLK HFFS 589=.....$168.50
ROY & MARGARET PFEIFER, PHILIP
27......................................DLK STFS 598=.....$180.00
15 .....................................DLK HFFS 519=.....$170.50
DOUG HAUK, PHILIP
14......................................DLK STFS 600=.....$179.00
10 .....................................DLK HFFS 600=.....$168.25
DARRELL ENNEN, RAPID CITY
54..............................DLK/DWF STFS 629=.....$178.75
WILLIAM DAVEY, RAPID CITY
16..............................FED/DLK STFS 518=.....$177.00
JERRY VANDEN BOS, RAPID CITY
17......................................DLK STFS 600=.....$175.50
24 .............................DLK/DWF HFFS 547=.....$163.00
MARK & KRIS SAMMONS, MIDLAND
32 .....................................FED STFS 651=.....$175.00
30.....................................FED HFFS 613=.....$176.00
C&T CATTLE, MIDLAND
37......................................DLK STFS 661=.....$174.75
A CONSIGNMENT OF -
70..............................DLK/DWF STFS 606=.....$172.50
23 .....................................DLK HFFS 539=.....$169.50
16 .............................DLK/DWF HFFS 566=.....$164.50
MIKE & EVELYN HUNSAKER, KEYSTONE
28..............................DLK/DWF STFS 625=.....$171.50
30 .............................FED/DLK HFFS 588=.....$160.50
CECIL REMINGTON, UNION CENTER
15......................................DLK STFS 559=.....$171.00
SHUCK BROTHERS, UNION CENTER
31..............................FED/DLK STFS 477=.....$187.00
YEARLINGS:
KENNETH MCILRAVY, PHILIP
66............................CHAF/FED STFS 909=.....$160.35
JOHN & DEDE LONG, UNION CENTER
211 ...........................DLK/DWF HFFS 842=.....$160.75
139 ...........................DLK/DWF HFFS 840=.....$160.25
JAMES BUCHANAN, RAPID CITY
20......................................DLK STFS 1028=...$150.75
BRUCH RANCH, STURGIS
35 .............................FED/DLK HFFS 862=.....$159.75
GARY E. PETERSON, FAITH
40 ....................................DWF HFFS 656=.....$167.75
VERYL PROKOP, KADOKA
12 .....................................DLK HFFS 755=.....$156.50
CLAYTON KJERSTAD FAMILY FARM, WALL
11......................................DLK STFS 639=.....$174.25
13 .............................FED/DLK HFFS 640=.....$151.00
(SEE CORRESPONDING AD FOR UPCOMING SALES)
CATTL£ R£PORT: SATURDAY, OCT. 2t, 2DJS
B1g run ]or our So1urdog speo1o1 u11Þ S49J
Þeod. MorKe1 good. Mong po11oods 1n 1Þe o]-
]er1ng.
FEEDER CATTLE:
LONG & SIMONS, ENNING
101...........................CHAF-STF 583.............$191.75
96 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 520.............$195.00
17 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 437.............$204.00
MAUREEN VIG, MUD BUTTE
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 468.............$191.50
103 .........................DLACK-STF 558.............$190.75
61...........................DLACK-HFF 500.............$175.50
BUTCH & NEAL LIVERMONT, INTERIOR
108 .........................DLACK-STF 519.............$199.50
29 ...........................DLACK-STF 439.............$212.00
TOM & SHELIA TRASK, WASTA
26 ...........................DLACK-STF 334.............$223.00
122 .........................DLACK-STF 429.............$213.00
98 ...........................DLACK-STF 513.............$188.00
12.....................FWF/HEFF-STF 424.............$187.00
BRADY WILLIAMS, FAITH
30 ...........................DLACK-STF 410.............$208.50
100 .........................DLACK-STF 492.............$194.75
34...........................DLACK-HFF 404.............$197.00
105.........................DLACK-HFF 480.............$177.50
ROD ANDERS, ELM SPRINGS
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 416.............$207.00
89 ...........................DLACK-STF 539.............$189.50
76...........................DLACK-HFF 509.............$172.00
JOHNSTON RANCH, BELVIDERE
51....................DK/FD/CH-STF 521.............$196.00
27....................DK/FD/CH-STF 450.............$192.50
25....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 419.............$179.00
42.....................CHAF/DLK-HFF 488.............$171.75
TODD J. & NANCY L. COLLINS, STURGIS
21.......................DLK/DWF-STF 524.............$187.00
95.......................DLK/DWF-STF 577.............$185.25
GRUBL & COBB, STURGIS
27 ..............................FED-STF 526.............$185.00
92 ..............................FED-STF 600.............$181.00
44..............................FED-HFF 517.............$179.50
HOVLAND HEREFORDS, MILESVILLE
50..............................DWF-STF 603.............$181.00
F LEE BALDWIN, ENNING
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 439.............$205.00
45 ...........................DLACK-STF 525.............$190.25
24...........................DLACK-HFF 450.............$186.00
GENE CROSBIE, NEW UNDERWOOD
21.......................DLK/DWF-STF 428.............$204.00
66.......................DLK/DWF-STF 509.............$192.50
25 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 361.............$192.50
65 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 476.............$182.00
SEAN & KADEN DEAL, CHERRY CREEK
30 ...........................DLACK-STF 407.............$219.50
122 .........................DLACK-STF 489.............$196.00
93 ...........................DLACK-STF 564.............$188.25
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 555.............$188.25
60...........................DLACK-HFF 415.............$197.00
122.........................DLACK-HFF 487.............$178.25
CARSON WILLIAMS, FAITH
49 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 434.............$207.00
102..................DK/FD/CH-STF 520.............$192.25
51.....................CHAF/DLK-HFF 421.............$188.00
108...................CHAF/DLK-HFF 502.............$171.75
CHARLOTTE GIBBONS, MANDERSON
12.......................DLK/DWF-STF 435.............$200.00
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 522.............$185.75
JOHN CAPP RANCH INC, FAITH
85.......................DLK/DWF-STF 468.............$195.25
GARY CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
40.......................DLK/DWF-STF 474.............$193.50
87.......................DLK/DWF-STF 628.............$175.75
80.......................DLK/DWF-STF 710.............$169.75
83...........................DLACK-HFF 508.............$170.00
BENNY BACHAND, STURGIS
18 ...........................DLACK-STF 447.............$193.00
29.......................DLK/DWF-STF 541.............$181.00
DALLIS BASEL, UNION CENTER
12.........................FD/DLK-STF 458.............$192.00
35.........................FD/DLK-STF 555.............$187.50
38 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 509.............$171.25
WADE O'DANIEL, OGLALA
19 ...........................DLACK-STF 426.............$191.50
65 ...........................DLACK-STF 551.............$178.00
KAREN TRUEBLOOD, BUFFALO GAP
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 449.............$191.00
55 ...........................DLACK-STF 556.............$189.25
16...........................DLACK-HFF 410.............$188.00
32...........................DLACK-HFF 509.............$170.00
JOEL DEERING, WASTA
53....................DK/FD/CH-STF 530.............$190.50
92....................DK/FD/CH-STF 623.............$179.75
90 ............................CHAF-HFF 561.............$168.25
MISTY HEBB, EAGLE BUTTE
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 537.............$188.50
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS, MIDLAND
69 ...........................DLACK-STF 552.............$187.50
JOYCE CHORD, WHITE OWL
35.........................FD/DLK-STF 547.............$187.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 492.............$169.50
RANDY KEFFELER, RED OWL
58 ...........................DLACK-STF 554.............$186.50
34...........................DLACK-HFF 519.............$175.75
JASON PAULSEN, WALL
28.......................DLK/DWF-STF 497.............$185.00
54 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 594.............$179.50
43 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 514.............$171.75
GEORGE BILLS FAMILY TRUST, NEW UNDERWOOD
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 532.............$184.00
18 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 537.............$184.00
41.............................CHAF-STF 645.............$171.75
32 ............................CHAF-HFF 604.............$163.00
DAVID MARLER, PIEDMONT
18 ...........................DLACK-STF 551.............$181.50
DANNY HALL, NEW UNDERWOOD
41.........................FD/DLK-STF 547.............$180.75
JUSTIN MARLER, PIEDMONT
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 526.............$180.50
32 ...........................DLACK-STF 627.............$171.25
KIM COE, VALE
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 587.............$179.50
38...........................DLACK-HFF 554.............$170.75
ROGER SHULL, WALL
26 ...........................DLACK-STF 570.............$179.25
16...........................DLACK-HFF 549.............$165.50
LONNIE & BRITANY BREWER, EAGLE BUTTE
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 557.............$179.00
RICHARD ALDREN JR, NEW UNDERWOOD
25 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 579.............$178.50
43.............................CHAF-STF 697.............$165.00
18.....................CHAF/DLK-HFF 570.............$164.00
56 ............................CHAF-HFF 664.............$158.50
DELINDA SIMMONS, ALLEN
24.......................DLK/DWF-STF 597.............$178.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 498.............$172.50
ED BECKWITH, KADOKA
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 614.............$176.00
JAMES L. (JIM) SCULL JR., RAPID CITY
28.......................DLK/DWF-STF 565.............$176.00
16 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 555.............$164.50
TED KNIFE JR, DUPREE
14.......................DLK/DWF-STF 533.............$176.00
13 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 429.............$186.00
11 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 511.............$161.00
JESSE TRUEBLOOD, BUFFALO GAP
22 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 600.............$175.00
KEVIN KOCH, OWANKA
37.......................DLK/DWF-STF 595.............$173.00
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567-3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman & AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985-5486
Ccll (605} 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544 3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347-0151
(605} 641-1042
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9 2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
~ Saturday, Nov. 2nd ~
Steak + Shrimp
~ Monday, Nov. 4th ~
1/2 lb. Cheeseburger Basket
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday ~ Downtown Philip
Salad Bar
Available at
Lunch!
~ Tuesday, Oct. 29th ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Oct. 30th ~
Indian Taco or
Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Oct. 31st ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Nov. 1st ~
Barbecued Pork Ribs
Chicken • Shrimp
Reservations:
859-2774
Package
Liquor &
Casino
Regular Menu Available Nightly!
Friday Buffet: 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Lunch Specials: Monday thru Friday • 11:00 to 1:30 ~ Call for specials!
Stop in &
Check out our
Newly Remodeled
Bar & Casino!
Under Secretary for Farm and
Foreign Agricultural Services
Michael Scuse has announced
that conservation assistance is
available from the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture for those af-
fected by the Atlas Blizzard that
swept through western South
Dakota earlier this month. Scuse
made the announcement in Rapid
City during a meeting with west-
ern South Dakota producers.
“This blizzard impacted lives
and livelihoods across the region
and USDA is committed to doing
all we can to help ranchers during
this difficult time,” Scuse said.
“Due to the lack of a new farm bill,
our means to help are limited, but
we will do all we can. This disaster
is a reminder of the unpredictable
nature of agriculture, and the
need for a strong farm safety net
that would be provided by a new
Food, Farm and Jobs Bill.”
USDA is offering a special
signup through the Natural Re-
sources Conservation Service's
(NRCS) Environmental Quality
Incentives Program (EQIP) to
help South Dakota producers ad-
dress the impacts of the storm. In
addition, Scuse encouraged pro-
ducers to submit forms to the
Farm Service Agency to document
their losses with the hope that
Congress will quickly pass a farm
bill to reauthorize the livestock
disaster assistance programs that
have expired.
The EQIP signup runs through
November 15, 2013. EQIP assis-
tance will help producers dispose
of livestock carcasses, replace de-
stroyed fencing and rebuild shel-
terbelts and other conservation
practices that were damaged by
the storm. USDA will begin pro-
viding assistance to producers as
soon as this week.
Scuse noted that NRCS is work-
ing in partnership with the state
of South Dakota to provide the
greatest possible amount of assis-
tance. NRCS is entering into an
agreement with the state to share
in the cost of deploying additional
state and local personnel into the
field to help producers perform
impact assessments on their oper-
ations and identify sites for car-
cass disposal. This additional
assistance will also help perform
outreach for the EQIP signup and
support producers with their ap-
plications. NRCS is also providing
the state government with techni-
cal information, such as soils in-
formation and technical practice
standards, and the state is using
this information to work directly
with agricultural partners and in-
dividual producers to provide as-
sistance.
USDA announces assistance
after Atlas Blizzard
Agricultural producers working
their way through Atlas Blizzard
recovery may find help through
the United States Department of
Agriculture.
This is according to Jeff Zim-
prich, state conservationist,
USDA Natural Resources Conser-
vation Service, Huron.
“We’re open and here to help.
Blizzard recovery is far greater
than any one organization or
agency. NRCS’ professional con-
servation services can help farm-
ers and ranchers pull through the
devastation caused by Atlas.”
The NRCS specialists offer free
on-site consultations for various
facets of grazing and livestock
management, explained Zimprich.
“We can help people survey
their needs related to soils infor-
mation and technical practice
standards for carcass disposal or
livestock burials to protect water
quality through our animal mor-
tality facility practice. We have
technical and financial assistance
to help producers to replace de-
stroyed fences, shelterbelts or
other conservation practices dam-
aged by the storm.”
“Technical assistance is free and
help is available right now for
South Dakota,” said Zimprich.
Disaster financial assistance
through the Environmental Qual-
ity Incentives Program (EQIP)
provides opportunity for early-
start waivers. The first step, Zim-
prich said, is to contact the NRCS
at their local USDA service center.
Producers need to sign an appli-
cation to be ready for the next
funding cut off and application
ranking date, which is November
15, 2013.
Zimprich said the NRCS’ EQIP
is their main Farm Bill conserva-
tion financial assistance program
that can help address needs. EQIP
is continuous signup and is instru-
mental in helping ranchers with
needs related to water quality and
quantity.
“In the Atlas situation, financial
assistance through EQIP can help
with conservation practices such
as new water development if the
current water source is becoming
contaminated or if a contaminated
water source must be fenced out to
prevent disease or other complica-
tions,” said Zimprich.
NRCS help
for blizzard
recovery
by Senator John Thune
This month, hundreds of thou-
sands of families throughout the
country began receiving notices
that their current health insur-
ance coverage would be canceled.
Despite the president’s repeated
promise during the 2009 debate
on health care, “If you like the
plan you have, you can keep it,”
families throughout the nation are
being forced to abandon their cur-
rent coverage. This has required
many of them, scrambling under
the weight of a looming individual
mandate deadline, to look to the
national health care exchanges for
help.
Unfortunately, the tool that
many had hoped would be a re-
source to aid them in their health
insurance search has proven to be
an epic failure. The October 1
launch of the national health care
exchange website, healthcare.gov,
was heralded by the administra-
tion as a critical component of
Obamacare that would increase
access to coverage and expand the
number of available options
through a user-friendly online
website.
Instead, the highly anticipated
launch was riddled with errors,
long wait times, and so-called
“glitches.” Despite the ongoing
problems with the website, the ad-
ministration continues to claim
that many of these “glitches” are
due to the overwhelming traffic on
the website. Yet they have refused
to say how many Americans have
actually enrolled in the exchanges
since the beginning of October.
In fact, in North Dakota, the ad-
ministration requested that the
state’s largest health insurer re-
frain from publicizing the low
number of people that have signed
up for health insurance through
the online exchange. The adminis-
tration’s blatant attempt to con-
ceal the number of online
applicants illustrates how poorly
both the website and the law were
designed.
Even the administration’s at-
tempts to “fix” the website have
resulted in misinformation and
confusion. CBS News reported
that one of the most recent “fixes”
to healthcare.gov gives the wrong
pricing information for those who
want to browse the prices before
signing up. Everyone 49 and
younger gets a quote for a 27 year-
old, while everyone 50 and older
gets a quote for a 50 year-old. This
poor planning and development is
a clear attempt to mislead people
before registering online.
The administration’s rollout of
healthcare.gov is symptomatic of
what we already knew about Oba-
macare, the law is not the solution
to our health care problems. Ac-
cording to a recent Washington
Post-ABC News poll, 56 percent of
Americans believe that the web-
site’s glitches reflect greater prob-
lems with Obamacare.
On October 23, the White House
announced that it would be delay-
ing the individual mandate for six
weeks in order to allow people
more time to comply with the law.
While the administration claims
that the delay is not on account of
the website glitches, it is clear
that the law, like the website, was
not ready for primetime and
should be permanently delayed for
all Americans.
Website glitches haunt Obamacare
Watch out for little
mummies and other
creatures on
Thursday!

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