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Pioneer Review, October 3, 2013

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$
1
00
Includes Tax
End of Day 9/30/13
12 Pro Winter Wheat ........$6.49
14 Pro Spring Wheat ........$6.49
Milo ....................................$3.37
Corn ...................................$3.55
Millet..................................$6.00
SFS Birdseed ..................$16.50
West River Lyman-Jones
Rural Water Systems
Proceedings
* * * *
Haakon School DIstrict
Proceedings
* * * *
Haakon County Commission
Special Meeting
10
Quad County
Relay For Life 12
Olson SDAHO
president-elect 2
Philip, South Dakota 57567 Thursday, October 3, 2013 www. pioneer-review.com
No. 6, Vol. 108
MARKETS
LEGALS
Inside
this week
October is Public Notices Month in South Dakota, an oppor-
tunity to highlight the importance that public notices play in
the everyday lives of the state’s citizens.
A public notice informs citizens about government and gov-
ernment-related activities. Public notices are required at all lev-
els of government, from the local level such as towns and
townships to the state and federal level.
Typically, public notices are published in a local newspaper
designated by a government entity as the official publication of
record. For example, every municipality, county and public
school district in South Dakota is required to have an official
newspaper for publication of its required notices and meeting
minutes.
There are hundreds of public notices required by law. They
include everything from the published minutes of the local
school board or city council to the advertisement of bids for the
repair of a state highway.
“The members of South Dakota Newspaper Association want to
focus this month on why public notices are important in a
democracy,” said Pierre Capital Journal Publisher Steve Baker,
who also serves as president of SDNA.
“Government at all levels works best when its citizens are in-
formed and involved,” Baker said. “Public notices are vital to
making that happen.
“We are highlighting this Public Notices Month with a VIP
theme. Public notices published in the local newspaper are ver-
ifiable, independent and permanent, all traits that are impor-
tant to protecting the integrity of public notices.”
Baker added that the publication of public notices in the local
newspaper also creates a permanent historical record of a gov-
ernment entity’s official actions and proceedings, something
that often proves valuable in research and legal considerations.
Surveys conducted through the years on behalf of SDNA
demonstrate that South Dakotans read local public notices reg-
ularly. The latest statewide survey conducted on SDNA’s be-
half in 2011 indicated that 50 percent of South Dakotans read
public notices in the local newspaper either frequently or at
least sometimes.
The same survey showed that three-fourths of South
Dakotans believe public notices should continue to be published
in newspapers.
You can learn more about public notices by visiting with the
staff of your local newspaper and through promotional material
that your local newspaper will be publishing during the month
of October. You can also learn more at www.facebook.com/Pub-
licNotices.
South Dakota Newspaper Association, founded in 1882 and
based in Brookings, represents the state’s 130 weekly and daily
newspapers with total readership of more than 600,000.
October designated as first-ever Public Notices Month
Football for all ages 8
“With a smile that lights up the room and a strength
of spirit that refuses to back down in the face of those
who don’t understand the power of libraries to change
lives, we are honored tonight to recognize and thank this
year’s South Dakota Librarian of the Year, Haakon
County librarian – Annie Brunskill.”
These words and a standing ovation from the more
than 500 librarians attending the Mountain Plains Li-
brary Association meeting in Sioux Falls, September 26,
confirmed to a very surprised and appreciative Brunskill,
the high regard her peers have for her as a person and
as a librarian. A librarian who cares deeply about the
people of her community and strives every day to make
libraries a place of learning and growing for patrons of
all ages.
Brunskill came to Philip because of love and her ongo-
ing love of learning and her desire to help others learn
and discover the world through books led her to become
a librarian. First, with the responsibilities of a young
widowed mother of four, and then, as the married mother
of eight in a blended family, Brunskill never let go of her
dream to become a librarian.
She took courses one by one at the Ellsworth nontra-
ditional campus for many years when her children were
young, then, as they grew more independent, she at-
tended Black Hills State University and received her de-
gree in library science in 2001. Brunskill’s first
professional librarian position was as a reference/re-
search librarian at the South Dakota State Library.
As she did during the years spent getting her educa-
tion, Annie commuted between Pierre and Philip while
working at the state library. She never let distance be an
excuse to not move forward, serving all who asked for her
guidance and assistance. While working full time in
Pierre, she completed a masters degree in 2004, and
began working with her home community of Philip to-
ward an enhanced Haakon County library.
For nearly six years, Brunskill has served as the
Haakon County librarian. In that position, she has
spearheaded additional fundraising efforts, initiated new
and expanded library programs, obtained grants to pur-
chase additional library resources and worked tirelessly to educate the community on the
importance and value of a high quality, accessible community library. During the past
three years she also provided leadership to the South Dakota Library Association, includ-
ing a a term as president in 2012.
Brunskill honored by peers as librarian of year
by Nancy Haigh
Joining the crew at Golden Vet-
erinary Services in Milesville is
Flandreau native M.J. Ziebarth.
Ziebarth grew up around live-
stock and received her veterinary
technology degree from Globe Uni-
versity, Sioux Falls last spring.
She did her internship at Dakota
Hills Veterinary Clinic in Rapid
City.
Growing up around animals,
Ziebarth knew she wanted a ca-
reer that would allow her to be
around them. Her family raised
cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. She
said the only crop they raised was
hay.
Ziebarth said the job at Golden
Vet is ideal for her as she prefers
working with large animals which
is the majority of the practice’s
business. Being more of a cattle
person, she said, she is more re-
laxed and has more fun around
them over smaller animals.
Since she started at the clinic
September 16 she has had time to
experience a variety of jobs. So far
it has mostly been preg checking
heifers and cows, she said.
She likes the prairie around
Milesville as well as the people
she has gotten to meet. She said
she is comfortable being in the
open spaces which are unlike the
area around where she grew up.
Ziebarth said she hopes to gain
more knowledge of the veterinary
field as well as the Milesville area.
Ziebarth joins Milesville vet clinic
The groundbreaking for the new cemetery lot identity building at the Ma-
sonic Cemetery northeast of Philip was held Wednesday, September 25.
Don Haynes, representing the Modern Woodmen, presented a matching
check for $500 to the AARP/Retired Teachers Association. The foundation
for the three-sided building was then poured. The old plot identification
board can be seen in the background. The bench will be moved to fit in
with the new structure, which will match as closely as possible with the ce-
mentery entranceway. Its back wall will be 12 foot long, the front opening
19 foot long, and the side walls angled outward. The sloped roof will be
cement. Donated bulletproof glass will house the large-print history of the
cemetery and the plot map. The structure is being built so no maintanence
should ever be required. Funds are still needed. Shown are, from left, Doug
West, Don Haynes, Mike West and Nels Crowser.
Del Bartels
All of these efforts and more were acknowledged in
the many nominations by her peers that together re-
sulted in her selection as librarian of the year. In her
announcement of Brunskill’s selection, Ronelle Thomp-
son, director, Mikkelson Library, Augustana College
and mistress of ceremonies at the awards banquet,
stated, “Regardless of the library environments in which
Annie has worked, her focus has always been on the pa-
trons, making them feel welcome and helping them nav-
igate the library resources and programs.”
To add just a little more excitement and honor to
Brunskill’s selection as South Dakota librarian of the
year, her husband, Obie, and several of her children and
grandchildren surprised her by coming forward with
hugs and flowers as her selection was announced. For
Brunskill, who loves and is dedicated to her family and
her profession, it was a special night to savor this honor.
For her colleagues, family and friends, it was a night to
recognize and celebrate a lifetime of achievement by one
very special lady.
Instituted in 1972, the South Dakota Library Asso-
ciation librarian of the year award was created to rec-
ognize librarians who have made significant
contributions to effective and improved library service
in a South Dakota community.
Candidates for this award must be SDLA members
who have had more than 10 years of service in the li-
brary profession, including at least six years of service
within the state and have shown evidence of profes-
sional achievement, as well as of initiative and creativ-
ity; contributed to and participated in the library
profession and related fields; focused attention on the
status of the librarian in the community; promoted co-
operation between types of libraries and their librari-
ans; and actively participated in local affairs. In
addition, they must be currently actively involved in li-
brarianship.
Brunskill’s nomination was made by Jan Brue En-
right. She also received support letters from Jennifer
Henrie – president of the Haakon County library board
of trustees, Crystal Deal who works with Head Start
and helps with the summer reading program, Daria Bossman, South Dakota State Li-
brarian, and Vickie Mix, South Dakota State University government documents librarian.
Brunskill was chosen in part because of her outstanding contributions to South Dakota
libraries and her willingness to go above and beyond the call of duty. Brunskill is a leader
in the library community.
Cemetery project groundbreaking
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The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
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October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 2
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Lookin’ Around|Syd Iwan
This is the time of year when
hornets like to sit on doorknobs
and catch you unaware. There is
no good reason for them to be
there, but they are. I suspect it is
just so you can offend them which
gives them a good excuse to sting
you before flying off in righteous
indignation. I have been stung
several times just trying to get
into the house on a warm fall day
in past years, but most of the time
I see the nasty yellow and black
things beforehand and shoo them
away. Alternately, I feel some-
thing wiggle in my hand and let
go very quickly. Still, sometimes
you get stung.
This is just one example of the
many hazards we have to watch
for and try to avoid in life. In this
state, ice can be a problem. Most
winters we have a spell of cold
some time or other with slippery
surfaces underfoot. One year I ba-
sically fell under the pickup just
trying to get out of it. Luckily, I
was well padded with thick winter
clothing so mostly it was my pride
that was injured and not my body.
That isn’t always the case. A
young friend of ours told us he
had fallen on the ice the same
week I did, but he had a good rea-
son for it. According to him, he
had “self-induced balance prob-
lems” at the time. In other words,
he had lingered a little too long at
the bar before walking home.
Our country roads have been
known to be hazardous as well. I
don’t know how many times over
the years I’ve crept down our
steep creek hill in a pickup to
avoid slipping over the edge due
to either mud or ice. When the
roads are like that, I prefer to just
stay at home, but that isn’t al-
ways completely possible. Occa-
sionally you have to take your
heart in your hands and risk it. It
isn’t much fun, but I haven’t ever
actually had a wreck in the
process. I have gotten stuck and
had to walk home or for help, but
at least the vehicle and I have al-
ways both stayed in one piece.
Other things to be on the look-
out for around here might include
rattlesnakes, spiders, blizzards,
tornados, and bats. With snakes
you soon learn to look where
you’re going in warm weather
when they are out and about.
Don’t walk quickly through tall
grass and that sort of thing, and
kick stumps over before picking
them up. I’ve had enough close
calls in the past to keep me watch-
ful. There is still a danger no mat-
ter how careful you are as my
neighbor found out this summer.
She was just weeding a flower
patch when she felt pain in her
hand and then saw a rattler that
had slithered out of its hiding
place in some cement blocks and
bitten her. She, in consequence,
had to make a hurried trip to the
doctor and a stay in the hospital
for a few days. Bats, by the way,
are generally not something that
give you any trouble. I just hate
them and like to stay out of their
way.
Almost anywhere you live, you
will find risks of some sort or
other. The main one in California
as far as I can tell is driving on
freeways. Those people are crazy
drivers and like to go at full speed,
bumper to bumper, and then sud-
denly screech to a halt. This took
a little getting used to, and I
never did care much for it. Some
areas of the cities should also be
avoided if at all possible or driven
through only with fully locked
doors.
In New Orleans, I also avoided
walking down dark alleys at night
when I had a room in the French
Quarter. It wasn’t a dreadfully
scary place, but you should keep
your eyes open. I know radio an-
tennas were not worth replacing
because they routinely got broken
off. Certain people there must
have a fetish about antennas
since you could never keep one on
your car for very long. It also was
best to leave your car unlocked at
night since then no one would
bother your vehicle. If you locked
it, they figured there was some-
thing worthwhile inside so they’d
break in. The car thing is not so
much a peril. It’s just sympto-
matic of the kind of people you’re
dealing with. Personally, I prefer
living here where critters and
weather pose the main problems
and not other people.
Anyway, there are certain haz-
ards around us that we need to be
aware of so we can avoid them.
Fortunately, I don’t expect much
danger any more today since I’m
not going anywhere or doing
much. I probably should avoid
eating anything that will give me
indigestion or add any poundage
where I don’t need it. Other than
that, I should be fairly safe. Nev-
ertheless, I’ll try to keep my wits
about me and stay out of trouble.
Luckily, my Lord constantly looks
after me and helps me out. That
takes a lot of worry out of the
whole business and gives me
peace of mind. I’m very thankful
for that.
E-MAIL ADDRESSES: ADS: ads@pioneer-review.com • NEWS: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Philip, SD
U.S.P.S. 433-780
Hazards
LADIES’ PRAYER BREAKFAST … will be held Monday, Octo-
ber 7, at 7:00 a.m. in the Senechal Apts. lobby. All ladies welcome!
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Country Praises|Del Bartels
South Dakota seems to be the
land of extremes. And, residents
like myself love to exaggerate sto-
ries about it.
The weather goes from cooking
an egg on the sidewalk to side-
ways sleet. Weather forecasters
can’t help but be wrong so often
that being wrong is the pre-
dictable norm; thus when they do
get it right it’s grounds for dis-
missal. It’s not uncommon to look
up into what seems to be a sunny
patch of sky, only to get rained on.
A black pickup with leather seats
is almost begging for 100 plus
heat. A white car with a newly re-
paired air conditioner will draw
snow like a magnet. You can’t win
for losing. If you like the weather,
don’t look in your rear view mir-
ror. If you don’t like the weather,
what are you going to do about it?
A bumper crop of sweet corn
also means a bumper crop of
racoons. A wandering flock of
lambs is simply a rancher’s way of
trolling for coyotes. It’s unexplain-
able how surrounding neighbors’
cows always have twin calves,
while your cows seem to be calf-
less. As a matter of fact, yes, some
livestock are born looking for a
place to die. Pasture rotation is
simply playing mind games with
critters that think the grass is al-
ways greener on the other side.
The bigger and better the bull, the
easier it is for him to ignore
fences. A good fence is like the
weather, don’t turn you back.
South Dakota has one represen-
tative in Washington, D.C. That
way wrong is wrong. We have two
senators. That way if one ever is
right, the other cancels them out.
Our state congress members are
only part time – that should be
self explanatory. In reality, they
are just like me and are trying to
do their best; and that should
scare the begeebers out of every-
one.
Out in the country, we all are
about one step from being profes-
sional at whatever we do. Gravel
roads are practice grounds for dirt
track racing. Some people think
that the best marksmen can see a
stop sign from a mile away. Ever
see a guy put his arm outside his
open pickup window and press it
against the side of the door so he
looks like a weight lifter? Barbed
wire fences are either hurdles for
Olympic wannabes, or for the tres-
passer who didn’t notice the bull.
Out here we realize that some
things are simple. You stop
partiers from skinny dipping in
your stock pond by putting a snap-
ping turtle in it. To slow down
traffic you don’t put up a speed
limit sign; you put up a “bridge
out” sign. You don’t complain
about the neighbor’s noisy hot rod;
you mention that concerned
neighbors are offering to take up
a collection to help him during
hard times to afford a muffler.
You don’t have to try hard to get
the word out about something,
just tell it to people like it’s a se-
cret and everyone will soon know
about it. If you want to feel like
you’re really alive, every morning
check the obituaries for your
name.
Tall tales or not, look around to
see amazing extremes. A storm
does bring a rainbow. A wet, blind,
bag of flesh does become a furry,
wobbling, bouncing, licking
puppy. One way or another, with
a good slap on the back, anyone
can stand a whole lot straighter.
Extremes
law enforcement_______________________
6-20-13: Speeding: Michael Hudgeons, Rapid City; fined $125.
6-28-13: Speeding: Novonyl E. Ogar, Gaithersburg, MO; fined
$145. Animal Disturbing Peace: Jerry L. Tucker, Philip. Disposi-
tion: Convicted at trial. Plea: Not guilty.
7-3-13: Fail to Stop at Weigh Station: Kevin Rollins, Conroe,
TX; fined $170.
7-8-13: Speeding: Joel R. Jensen, Aberdeen; fined $105.
7-24-13: Speeding: Jacob A. Ames, Rapid City; fined $125.
8-7-13: Speeding on Other Roadways: Carsten Doeren, S. St.
Paul, MN; fined $105.
8-12-13: Fishing w/o License, Resident: Shanen D. Ainsworth,
Rapid City; fined $120.
8-14-13: Speeding on Other Roadways: Marrill R. Bales, Pierre;
fined $125.
8-16-13: Speeding: Susan L. Stockinger, Hermantown, MN; fined
$125. Seat Belt Violation: Trevor J. Fitch, Milesville; fined $25.
Speeding: Dale D. Reis, Watertown; fined $105. Speeding on Other
Roadways: Bradley D. Reinke, Pierre; fined $125.
8-20-13: Speeding: Lowell E. Schmitz, Rapid City; fined $105.
Speeding: Edward F. Fogarty, III, Bismarck, ND: fined $125.
8-21-13: Fishing w/o License, Non-Resident: Britt A. Morris,
Casa Grande, AZ; fined $170.
8-26-13: Speeding: Jennifer Hakey, Ames, IA; fined $105. Speed-
ing: Karen Gouze, Paso Robles, CA; fined $125.
8-28-13: Speeding: Gavin L. Snook, Midland; fined $105. Seat
Belt Violation: Gavin L. Snook; fined $25 Seat Belt Violation:
Jerry P. Jones, Midland; fined $25. Speeding: Stacy L. Bartlett,
Pierre; fined $105.
9-3-13: Speeding: Gena Boren, Ft. Pierre; fined $105.
9-6-13: Speeding: Ruth A. Young, Tacoma, WA; fined $145. Brian
M. Lee, Pierre; fined $105.
9-9-13: Speeding: Gary Weidenbach, Peola, KS: fined $105.
Overwt. on Axle: Niall Sean McLoughlin, LaCrosse, KS; fined $232.
Overwt. on Axle: Domanall B. McCarthy, Rush Center, KS; fined
$212. Overwt. on Axle: Padraig J. Brosnan, Rush Center, KS; fined
$642. Overwt. on Axle: Thomas F. Scott, Chambers, NE; fined $222.
9-10-13: Speeding on Other Roadways: Brian Johnson, Water-
town; fined $105. Speeding: Gregory A. Vogel, Pierre; fined $105.
Overwt. on Axle: Larry Swift, Philip; fined $170.
9-11-13: Speeding: Joanna Lawler, Pierre; fined $105.
Kent Olson, administrator/chief
of operations of Philip Health
Services, Inc., was elected chair-
man-elect at the annual business
meeting of the South Dakota As-
sociation of Healthcare Organiza-
tions (SDAHO).
Olson served the last year as
secretary/treasurer of SDAHO. A
native of Fargo, N.D., Olson re-
ceived his undergraduate degree
from Moorhead State University,
Moorhead, Minn., and a masters
in business administration from
University of Phoenix. He has
been the administrator/chief of op-
erations of PHSI since 2006 and
has served on the SDAHO board
of trustees since 2009.
Olson will become the chair of
the SDAHO board of trustees at
next year’s SDAHO convention,
September 24-26, in Rapid City.
Over 800 health care providers
attended the convention repre-
senting administration, gover-
nance and 18 affiliated health
care professional membership so-
cieties. SDAHO represents 54 hos-
pitals and 33 long term care
facilities across the state.
At the convention, numerous
health care issues were discussed,
including quality of care initia-
tives, health reform, leadership,
reimbursement and the future of
health care. Health care profes-
sionals attending the convention
included administrative staff,
board members, auxilians, and
members of the hospital, home
health, and nursing home man-
agement teams.
Olson new SDAHO chairman-elect
Kent Olson – PHSI CEO
by Del Bartels
The Philip chapters of AARP
and the Retired Teachers Associ-
aiton clarified details on current
projects, during their Monday,
September 30, soup supper meet-
ing in the Bad River Senior Citi-
zens’ Center.
The cemetery lot identity build-
ing project has begun. Blueprints
were explained and projected
funding requirements were dis-
cussed. The eventual cost is esti-
mated at $8,000 to $10,000, but no
maintanence should ever be
needed. Modern Woodmen,
through representative Don
Haynes, has donated $500 toward
the structure.
Mike West said that the dona-
tions so far are more from people
living outside of Philip who have
family and friends buried at the
cemetery. “We know the money is
there, it’s in our pockets,” said
West about where the balance of
the building funds will come from.
The FFA, under the direction of
Doug Hauk, has cleared away
dead plants from the Lasting
Legacy area.
A Smart Driver Class will be
held in December. “It’s all things
we know; just a reminder of what
to do and not to do,” said West.
The food pantry based out of
Wall is in desperate need of mon-
etary and food donation. The food-
pantry is for everyone who may
need it, while the commodity pro-
grams through there are based on
household income. According to
West, all government commodities
have been suspended for approxi-
mately four months. Even with
everything being extremely short,
the backpack program will con-
tinue to be supported. Currently
12 Philip students and 16 Wall
students are receiving food for
weekends. While their parents are
working, young people will have
food that is ready to eat or needs
just a microwave for preparation.
The next AARP/RTA meeting
will be Monday, October 28, start-
ing at 6:00 p.m.
AARP/RTA cemetery project
by Nancy Haigh
A total operating budget of
$2,297,104 was approved by the
Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners for the 2014 fiscal year.
The board gave their approval
to the figures at a special meeting
September 24.
The general fund budget is set
at $1,261,103, up $53,659 from
2013. The general fund includes
all county offices (except the high-
way department and emergency
management) public safety,
health and welfare conservation
and other uses such as the opt out
funds. The opt out funds, desig-
nated at $250,000 are then trans-
fered to the road and bridge fund.
The road and bridge fund is set
at $953,909, up $149,033 from
2013. This figure does not in-
cluded the opt out funds.
The 911, emergency manage-
County budget approved for 2014
Golden West Telecommunica-
tions held its 61st annual meet-
ing, Saturday, September 28, in
Wall. More than 300 members at-
tended. Jeff Nielsen, president of
the board of directors, welcomed
the members and recognized
Robert Hansen, Howes, who re-
tired after sitting on the board for
24 years.
Denny Law, general manager
and chief of operations, reiterated
Robert Hansen’s contributions
and years of commitment to the
cooperative. He also laid out the
many ways that Golden West con-
tinues to invest in its members.
From expansion of its toll-free
calling, which began in June 2013,
the Golden West scholarship and
economic development programs,
the video programming access to
state high school events and colle-
giate sports, Golden West contin-
ues to invest in its members.
Law stated that Golden West
has constructed just over 500
miles of fiber optic cable connect-
ing approximately 1,000 homes
and businesses. In 2013, it will
construct close to 900 miles of
fiber optic cable, which extends its
capacity for future applications
and boosts its Internet speeds.
Law also touched on the Federal
Communications Commission’s
recent rulings that affect local
service rates, future infrastruc-
ture and future technology. “We
will continue to fight until policy-
makers understand the impor-
tance of ensuring that advanced
telecommunications remain a cor-
nerstone investment in rural
America,” stated Law.
Three of the four board mem-
bers up for election were incum-
bents. They each ran unopposed.
Reelected to four-year terms were
Bart Birkeland to District VII,
Dale Guptill to District VI and
Kenneth Zickrick Jr., to District
IV. Also serving a four-year term
will be Jade Hlavka who ran un-
opposed in District I, the district
that Robert Hansen previously
represented.
During the meeting, several
members won door prizes. The
grand prize of $500 went to Mary
Lou Claussen, Martin.
The next annual meeting will be
September 27, 2014.
Golden
West
meeting
ment, domestic abuse, courthouse
building fund, 24/7 and modern-
ization and preservation funds
total $82,092 for 2014, down by
$3,788 from 2013.
Kenny Neville, highway super-
intendent, updated the board with
semi tractor issues. Two semis are
down, one from an accident. They
discussed the possible replace-
ment, but are waiting for an in-
surance report.
Soil Sampling and
Fertilizer Rates
Twenty-five short years ago,
producers were asking about the
value of fertilizing wheat planted
back on wheat stubble, and fertil-
izing wheat planted on fallow was
virtually unheard of. Due to years
of removing fertilizer nutrients,
no-till farming practices, continu-
ous cropping and the pursuit of
higher yields, most crops receive
one or more forms of commercial
fertilizer.
There are many philosophy’s
used to decide if producers need
to apply fertilizer, and if so, what
nutrient, what product(s) and
how much. These may range from
a seat of the pants approach like
applying what the neighbor does
up to more sound approaches. Al-
though neither soil testing nor
fertilizing is an exact science, soil
testing is the best way to evaluate
the fertility status of a field or of
areas within a field.
If you are going to base fertil-
izer rates on soil test results, it
pays to follow recommended prac-
tices. When you send a sample off
to the laboratory for plant-avail-
able nutrient analysis, a good soil
sample that adequately repre-
sents your field or area gives you
good results. A poor sample will
only lead to an analysis of limited
value and be a waste of your time
and money.
Testing soils even every second
or third year is much better than
not testing at all, and allows you
to identify trends in fertility lev-
els. For more information on soil
sampling, ask for factsheet
FS935, “Recommended Soil Sam-
pling Methods for South Dakota”,
at your Regional Extension Cen-
ter or access it online at:
http://pubstorage.sdstate.edu/Ag
Bio_Publications/articles/FS935.p
df.
Drought Risk
Management Workshops
South Dakota ranchers who re-
ceived good rainfall in 2013 know
it’s only a matter of time before
they’re dealing with drought
again. SDSU Extension will host
four Drought Risk Management
Workshops for cattle, sheep and
other livestock producers in Hot
Springs October 8, in Lemmon
October 9, in Gettysburg October
10 and in Winner October 11.
These workshops are designed
to help ranchers develop and
write drought management and
mitigation plans for their own op-
erations. Ranchers will receive
the tools they need to create a
drought plan that fits their own
needs and goals.
The one-day hands-on work-
shops will focus on many aspects
of drought risk management, in-
cluding: why you need a written
drought plan, and how to do it;
weather and climate monitoring;
measuring grassland productiv-
ity; using pasture, rangeland, for-
age – rainfall index insurance; SD
Drought Tool and efficiency of soil
infiltration; and best manage-
ment practices for range manage-
ment.
For more information or to reg-
ister online, visit: http://igrow.org/
events/drought-risk-manage-
ment-on-the-ranch-workshop-
winner-sd/.
Calendar
10/8/2013 – Drought Risk Man-
agement Workshop, 9:00 MT, The
Nature Conservancy’s Whitney
Preserve, Hot Springs
10/9/2013 – Drought Risk Man-
agement Workshop, 9:00 MT,
SDSU Extension Center, Lem-
mon
Extension
Bob Fanning. Field Specialist
Winner Regional Extension Center
www.pioneer-
review.com
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October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 3
Thursday: Overcast with a chance of a thun-
derstorm and rain. Fog early. High of 57F.
Breezy. Winds from the NNW at 10 to 20
mph. Chance of rain 50%. Thursday Night:
Overcast with a chance of rain. Low of 45F.
Breezy. Winds from the North at 20 to 25 mph. Chance
of rain 60% with rainfall amounts near 0.7 in. possible.
Friday: Mostly cloudy with a chance of
rain. High of 55F. Windy. Winds from the
North at 30 to 35 mph. Chance of rain
70% with rainfall amounts near 0.4 in.
possible. Friday Night: Mostly cloudy with
a chance of rain. Low of 32F. Breezy. Winds from the
NW at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of rain 20%.
Saturday: Clear. High
of 57F. Winds from
the WNW at 10 to
15 mph. Saturday
Night: Partly cloudy.
Low of 39F. Winds from the
SSW at 10 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Clear. High of 75F.
Breezy. Winds from the
SW at 10 to 20 mph. Sun-
day Night: Partly cloudy.
Low of 43F. Breezy. Winds
from the SW at 10 to 20 mph shifting
to the WNW after midnight.
Monday: Partly
cloudy. High of 68F.
Winds from the
NW at 10 to 15
mph. Monday
Night: Partly cloudy. Low of
37F. Winds less than 5 mph.
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& up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
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Though kept somewhat
secret, the none-the-less
famous snapping turtle of
Lake Waggoner has again
shown himself, this time
to someone carrying a
camera.
Val Williams spotted
the monster last Thurs-
day afternoon, September
26, in a grassy area near
the dam’s spillway. Her
dog circled the turtle, but
did not seem to be too
upset. The turtle was not
upset in the least.
Williams reported that
the main body of the tur-
tle was not quite as big
around as a manhole
cover (approximately 34
inches in diameter).
Williams said that the
turtle’s shell was all beat
up, mostly toward the
back, where chunks were
missing. She guessed that
this might be from boat propellors.
The shell was covered in moss.
Williams guessed that the ani-
mal’s weight might be more than
60 pounds.
Kenny Neville, who works with
Williams, reported that he has
seen the turtle several times –
once was when its foot was
snagged on a fishing line. It easily
broke the line. “When it decided to
go, he just left,” said Neville. His
decription of the turtle’s size was
that its head is bigger than a good
sized orange.
Neville said that years ago his
son had caught a huge snapping
turtle out of the Bad River. Before
releasing it, they had weighed it
at 45 pounds. The Lake Waggoner
turtle is larger than that one.
Williams and Neville, as do
many people who have seen the
monster turtle, wish it well and
want to continue bragging about
seeing it. “I sure wouldn’t want to
get in the water with him,” said
Neville. “It you knew he was
there, it’d be okay. They don’t
need to be killed. They don’t hurt
anything.”
The average South Dakota
snapper weighs around 12 pounds
and has a shell that is 12 inches
long. According to the Game, Fish
and Parks Department, the record
weight for a snapper caught in
South Dakota is 44 pounds. The
biggest common snapping turtle
recorded in the United States
weighed in at 62 pounds.
General information about
snapping turtles includes that
they have a large head, powerful
jaws and long tail, which is saw-
toothed along the top. Any large or
small, permanent body of fresh
water is a potential home for a
snapper. Largely nocturnal, they
spend most of their time underwa-
ter, lying on the bottom.
They are omnivorous, eat-
ing various small aquatic
invertebrates, crayfish,
snails, fish, frogs, toads,
snakes, bird eggs, small
mammals and carrion.
About a third of their diet
is plants. Snapping tur-
tles become more seden-
tary as they age and can
live to 60 years old.
Snapping turtles can't
pull themselves into their
shells for protection. In-
stead, their best defense
is a strong offense. They
are very aggressive and
threatening when con-
fronted on land. They are
reptiles and, thus, are
cold-blooded. Snappers
rarely bask on land as
most other turtles do, but
may bask on the water
surface. They survive the
winters by hibernating,
first being less and less active,
until finally burrowing into the
mud at the bottom of ponds.
Lake Waggoner snapping turtle
Record sized snapping turtle. The best kept secret of
Lake Waggoner.
Courtesy photo of the Lake Waggoner snapping turtle
Representative Kristi Noem is
accepting applications for spring
internships in her Washington,
D.C. office, as well as in her offices
in Sioux Falls, Rapid City and
Watertown.
Student interns in Noem’s office
will assist staff with various con-
stituent service and communica-
tions projects, as well as assist
with legislative research. Both
South Dakota and Washington,
D.C. internships provide students
with first-hand knowledge of the
legislative process and the count-
less other functions of a congres-
sional office.
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in any of
Noem’s offices should submit a re-
sume, cover letter and references
to Christiana.Frazee@ mail.house
.gov by November 8.
Senator John Thune (R-SD) is
currently seeking intelligent,
hard-working college students to
serve as spring interns in his of-
fice in Washington, D.C., as well
as in his offices in Aberdeen,
Rapid City, and Sioux Falls.
Interns in Thune’s state offices
will participate in constituent
service and state outreach activi-
ties, while students in the Wash-
ington, D.C., office will have the
opportunity to witness the legisla-
tive process, give Capitol tours,
and attend Senate votes and hear-
ings. Both in-state and Washing-
ton, D.C., internships will allow
students to work closely with con-
stituents, hone their research and
writing skills, and learn a multi-
tude of valuable office skills.
“Interning in a Senate office
provides students with an excel-
lent opportunity to experience
democracy in action,” said Thune.
“Interns gain valuable knowledge
about both state and national is-
sues and an understanding of the
inner workings of a Senate office.
I encourage all students to con-
sider applying for this rewarding
experience.”
Senator Thune is a member of
the Senate Committees on Agri-
culture, Nutrition, and Forestry;
Commerce, Science, and Trans-
portation; and Finance.
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in Thune’s
Washington, D.C., office should
submit a resume and cover letter,
by October 31, to Senator John
Thune, Attn: Allie Ryan, 511
Dirksen Senate Office Building,
Washington, D.C. 20510
Or they can fax to 202-228-5429
or email to Allie_Ryan@thune
.senate.gov
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in Senator
Thune’s Sioux Falls, Rapid City,
or Aberdeen offices should submit
a resume and cover letter, by Oc-
tober 31, 2013, to Senator John
Thune, Attn: Robin Long, 320
North Main Avenue, Suite B,
Sioux Falls, SD 57104
Or they can email to robin_long
@thune.senate.gov.
Noem, Thune seeking interns
by Senator John Thune
Hunting and fishing are a way
of life in South Dakota. Like many
across the state, I have great
memories of heading out to the
stock dam with my dad, rod in
hand, working hard to land a big-
ger fish than him. Sometimes we
caught our limit, sometimes we
went home empty-handed – but
we always had a great time.
While I don’t make it out fishing
much anymore, pheasant hunting
is a different story. Nothing beats
the feeling of knocking down the
first pheasant on opening day,
walking the field with old friends,
and ending the evening telling
embellished stories of the “shot of
day.”
South Dakotans have a great
appreciation for the outdoors and
for the sporting traditions that not
only provide endless hours of en-
tertainment, but also provide sig-
nificant economic benefits to our
state.
However, potential Environ-
ment Protection Agency (EPA)
regulations could dramatically
change the availability of hunting
ammunition and fishing tackle for
sportsmen and women throughout
the country. Some in the environ-
mental community want the EPA
to ban traditional lead in hunting
ammunition and fishing tackle,
increasing the cost, and pricing
some sportsmen and women out of
the market. According to industry
experts, metallic nontraditional
ammunition makes up only one
percent of the market share.
In response to these regula-
tions, I introduced legislation
along with Senator Amy
Klobuchar (D-MN) that would
protect ammunition and fishing
tackle from unnecessary EPA reg-
ulation by excluding it from the
Toxic Substances Control Act. Our
bill, the Hunting, Fishing, and
Recreational Shooting Protection
Act, would instead leave the regu-
lation of these items up to the
agencies that currently regulate
both ammunition and tackle. Our
bill is supported by the National
Rifle Association, Safari Club,
Congressional Sportsmen’s Foun-
dation, Wildlife Forever, and
other hunting and fishing groups.
As co-chair of the Congressional
Sportsmen’s Caucus and as an
avid outdoorsman, I will continue
to work with my colleagues in
Congress to put an end to the
EPA’s far-reaching and burden-
some regulations, and to help en-
sure that future generations of
South Dakotans are not unneces-
sarily restricted from hunting,
fishing, and enjoying the great
outdoors
Defending hunting, fishing traditions
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Oct. 3: Baked Po-
tato Bar, Tossed Salad, Fruit.
Friday, Oct. 4: Lemon Pepper
Tilapia, Twice Baked Mashed Po-
tatoes, Biscayne, Roll, Peaches.
Monday, Oct. 7: Shrimp Burg-
ers, Pasta Salad, Rosy Pears.
Tuesday, Oct. 8: Grilled
Chicken, Primavera Veggies,
Cranberry Velvet Dessert.
Wednesday, Oct. 9: Oktober-
fest – Sauerbraten, Spaetzle,
Fried Cabbage, Bavarian Cream
Pastries.
***
Friday, September 20, 2013, at
Somerset Court, we had cooking
with Sandi. Fred was there to run
the mixer and the recipe was for
zucchini brownies. I hear that
they were very good. My neighbor
at Philip, Darlene Baye, told me
that it is very handy to grind up
zucchini when it is in full produc-
tion and freeze it in plastic bags
for using in the winter.
September 21 was the fall equi-
nox. It was time to stand an egg
on end. I borrowed an egg from
the Somerset Court kitchen, be-
cause sometimes the powers start
on the day before the calendar
says it is the equinox. The equinox
is the day in the fall, usually Sep-
tember 21, and in the spring, usu-
ally March 21, when the days and
nights are the same length. From
September 21 on, the days will be
shorter by one minute or two,
until the winter solstice, when the
days are the shortest. The winter
solstice is around December 21
and then the days start to
lengthen, the cold begins to
strengthen. And, “When the days
begin to shorten, the heat begins
to hotten!” Sure enough, the egg
stood on its end on September 20,
2013.
September 19, 2013, the Rapid
City Journal had a leaflet about
the South Dakota Festival of
Books which was held at Dead-
wood. Several authors, who live in
the Black Hills area, were there to
speak about their books. Some of
them were: Lori Armstrong, Eliz-
abeth Cook-Lynn, Merlyn Mag-
ner, Joseph Bottum, Sandra
Brannan, Kent Meyers and Craig
Johnson. I phoned the Rapid City
library to ask to borrow some
books by Kent Meyers and Craig
Johnson. Meyers taught at Black
Hills State University. Johnson
has a ranch at Ucross, Wyo., but
writes all over the world. His
books are intriguing titles like:
“The Dark Horse,” “Another Man’s
Moccasins,” and “Junkyard Dogs.”
Saturday, September 21, fall
equinox, at my apartment the egg
was still standing from yesterday.
And in the Somerset Court
kitchen, a broom stood on end!
The Saturday movie at Somer-
set Court was “The Strange Life of
Timothy Green.” It was strange
alright, for had leaves sprouting
out of his ankles.
During the past week in Sep-
tember, 2013, at the Stratosphere
Bowl, just south of Rapid City,
balloons were sent up. The “Stra-
toBowl” is the launch location of a
balloon that went over Cotton-
wood in November, 1935. A bunch
of us Cottonwood High School kids
got to see the balloon as it drifted
over Cottonwood. It landed on the
Nebraska border. It achieved a
record height of 72,395 feet, being
the first manned flight to go so
high. We didn’t know that history
was being made. The original gon-
dola is on view at the National Air
and Space Museum in Washing-
ton, D.C. Much information about
the StratoBowl is to be found on
the computer and in old National
Geographic magazines.
The Philip Pioneer Review for
September 19, 2013, had two arti-
cles by cross country coach Ralph
Kroetch about Philip school’s cross
country teams. He is good about
reporting individual progress and
personal endeavors and develop-
ment. I like cross country better
than contact sports.
West Central Electric’s maga-
zine for October listed the board of
directors. I think that they are an
impressive group of reliable and
dedicated men. The annual meet-
ing of members of the cooperative
will be held October 2, 2013 at
5:00 p.m. at the Kadoka City Au-
ditorium.
Monday, September 23, at Som-
erset Court, we had an activity of
crafts with Amy. Sandi was there
too. Thank you for this entertain-
ing project, Amy and Sandi. We
made Johnny Appleseed hanging
figures with legs made out of
paper chain loops. Johnny Apple-
seed was a true character who
traveled over a great territory of
wilderness in the United States of
America, planting apple seeds. He
was born in 1774. Many genera-
tions later, people are still enjoy-
ing the fruits of his labors!
Conservation drifted around to
picking up rocks out of fields, es-
pecially in eastern South Dakota,
where the rocks were left by the
glaciers. Fred Smith mentioned a
stone boat on wheels. An ordinary
stone boat would be pulled like a
sled with wooden runners on the
ground. The stones were used to
rip-rap dam faces or added to
fence lines. The stones had to be
picked up year after year as they
worked their way up with the
freezing and thawing of the earth.
Just at the time of art class, it
started to rain with the rain com-
ing down sort of sideways and
making mystical patterns on the
window glass. The view was dis-
torted like when the TV is break-
ing up.
September 23, at Somerset
Court, we had a Wii bowling tour-
nament. I heard that there were
several scores over 200.
My son, Wayne, and his wife,
Gwynn, came over for lunch Sep-
tember 24. Wayne had been fish-
ing out in Wyoming. He said that
it would be interesting to watch
the draining of Canyon Lake. It is
to be drained and dredged, and a
new spillway built.
Gwynn said that she had been
to a quilting party. One of their ac-
tivities was show and tell. One of
the quilters brought her twin
granddaughters, two-months-old,
and all the ladies enjoyed holding
them. Gwynn stayed and played
scrabble with me and she had a
score of over 300. Let’s say that
my score was over 200! We
dredged up a new word, oyez or a
cry used to announce the opening
of a court of law. It is a derived
from the words, hear you.
At Somerset Court on Septem-
ber 24, we had bingo with Sandi
calling the numbers and Shawn
and Amy helping with hospitality.
Right after bingo, we had our
birthday bash. Amber baked a big,
light yellow cake and frosted it
with chocolate icing and decorated
it with fall colors in a random de-
sign. It was served with vanilla ice
cream. We sang “Happy Birthday,
God Bless You,” to those residents
having September birthdays.
Those birthdays were Helen Lar-
son, September 22, Eleanor
Holmes, September 28, and Doris
Wellman, September 30. We also
celebrated Somerset Court’s staff
birthdays, Peggy Little. Septem-
ber 18, Robert Hayes and Hannah
Naber, September 20, and Sandi
Davis, September 26. Thank you
for a pleasant party.
Lucille Huether had company
during bingo, her minister. Eileen
Tenold had visitors September 24
also, her sister, Carol Tishmack,
Bismarck, N.D., and her niece,
Dorey Hanson, Watertown. Dorey
treated the group to lunch out.
Somerset Court has sent invita-
tions to all residents to come to
their eighth anniversary party. It
will be a fabulous 50s party with
a gathering in the activity garden
and dinner following. We are to let
Kammi at the front desk know
what we prefer. The menu will be
burgers, hot dogs and fries and a
sock hop in the evening on second
floor.
continued on 5
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in celebrating the marriage oI
Marla Kelly & Tate Guptill
at a Wedding Dance
Friday, October 4th at 8 p.m.
Wall Community Center
Everyone Welcome'
60 MIIes 60
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6 years Cancer-Free
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Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 818, Philip, SD 57567
My birthday for 80 years of liv-
ing from September 22, 1933, to
September 22, 2013, was a cele-
bration I started out on Septem-
ber 20 having birthday dinners
and parties and ended up with an
open house on September 28
hosted by my son, Marvin, and
daughter-in-law, Vicki, and
grandchildren, Christa and Trevor
Fitch, Brayden, Colby, Jensen,
Rayler and Aven; Carla Eide,
Kiley and Taegan, with the ample
help of Rita Ramsey.
Family present were my
brother, Rich Smith; nephews,
Vernon and Arna Montgomery,
and their daughter, Kerry, and
her son, Thomas, Sundance, Wyo.,
nephews, Larry Smith and his
grandkids, Randen and Londen
Wishard, Melvin and Beth Smith,
Kieth and Debbie Smith; nieces,
Judy and Mike Melvin, Sioux
Falls, Janet Lurz, Wall, and her
grandchildren Cylver, Copper, Dy-
mond and Christopher Lurz; Deb-
bie Brown, and daughter-in-law,
Brandi, Faith; Janice Williams
and her kids of Philip and Janice’s
mom, Norma Oldenberg; Debbie
Morris and her mother, Maryann
Hlavka, Sundance, Wyo.; Brittany
Smith, Sawyer and Taryn, Philip;
special friends, Arnold and Evelyn
Lewison, Kimball Neb., and
Gretchen Rausch, Wasta. Both
Arnold and Gretchen practically
lived at our house through the
years. I hope I didn’t miss anyone,
sure could be easy to do. Christa
Fitch took the guest list home
with her as she is putting together
a special book with names and
photos of old and new ones taken
the day of the open house.
So many of my family weren’t
able to come due to sickness and
funerals. My niece, Vina Beth
(Montgomery) Morris is down
with a back problem and her hus-
band, Ben, has been having sev-
eral strokes, plus he came down
with a bad cold. Vina called Satur-
day morning, September 28, and
explained why they wouldn’t be
here.
Vicki, Christa and Carla and
family decorated and they chose a
fall scene in autumn colors and
Christa made centerpieces using
pint jars filled with seeds from
their farm with a mixture of au-
tumn colored candles on top of
each one. They were centered
among fall leaves on the tables
covered with yellow tablecloths. It
was so pretty! Several bouquets of
flowers arrived from family and
friends and they fit in great with
the other decorations. They also
had the pictures of old and new all
in black frames scattered around
on each table. The pictures told
the story of my life. It was really a
terrific day that went too fast. I
didn’t have enough time to visit
with all those who attended. But,
I was so glad to see everyone. A
lunch of punch, coffee and tea was
served, along with some very
beautifully decorated cakes. It
was great, but I told the kids that
was the last party I wanted, even
if lived to be 90. Anyway, nothing
could top this one!
It is Monday, September 30,
and the mailbox was full of cards,
again. Bill Gottsleben stopped in
for a short visit and brought a
card for me. They had been in
Brookings over the weekend, as
both of their daughters are going
to college there. Just doesn’t seem
like all these neighbor kids can be
that old, but whose talking – it
doesn’t seem like I could be 80 ei-
ther!
Larry Lewison called this morn-
ing wishing me a happy birthday
from all of their family at Hurley.
He said that he was still doctoring
at the VA in Sioux Falls and while
there they ran into Sonny Baye’s
son who was working there. Larry
said that with all the medicine
that he has been taking they have
ruined his teeth so was getting
them repaired. He said that his
wife, Susan (Williams), was also
having some health problems and
had to do some doctoring. He had
visited his sister, Bonnie Poss,
and she reported that her daugh-
ter, Becky (Poss) Wiebelhaus,
Rapid City, was doing well and is
cancer free at this time. Becky
grew up in this neighborhood and
attended Deadman School. She is
the daughter of Jack and Bonnie
Poss.
Larry told that they were com-
bining beets and also beans, but
due to the drought there he said
that they had to go slow as they
were not very tall and had to go
down low to pick them up. His sis-
ter, Cheryl Baker, had called
them and was having some health
problems. She is jus a year
younger than I am. She was 79 in
June of 2013.
I had an interesting call from
Louise (Morrsett) Flack who lives
in Rapid City. She called to ask if
I was Roy and Norma Smith’s
daughter, Mary? When she saw
my picture in the paper she
thought she would take a chance
and call as she thought I looked so
much like my mother. Louise was
in the fourth grade and I was in
the eighth when we attended
school at Bullflats. Her folks were
Bill and Margaret and her brother
was Everett “Punch.” They lived
about two miles south of us. Bill
was an uncle of Terry Pinney,
Philip.
I have known this family for
years and used to go with Bill and
Margaret down to near Norris
where they used to live and pick
plums every year. What good
memories. Her name is Flack now
and they own and operate Flack
Trucking out of Rapid City. Their
son is in the trucking business
with them, so it is a family busi-
ness. Punch also lives in Rapid
City. Later years, my mom and
Margaret worked in the Mica
house together and later Margaret
cooked at the Custer hospital for
several years. Mom and Margaret
Grindstone News|Mary Eide • 859-2188
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One
meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the
second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.); 6:30 p.m.
(Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
UNITED CHURCH
OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 6:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
According to the old adage, “A leopard never changes
its spots.” That leopard does not know God. A
relationship with God is life-changing. The more you
learn about God, the closer you grow to Him and the
more you change. Old thoughts give way to new ones,
and you become a better person.
Ancient wisdom for modern life
But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto
his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye
have suffered a while, make you perfect,
stablish, strengthen, settle you.
1 Peter 5:10 KJV)
Obituaries
Send obituaries, engagement & wedding write-ups to:
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Church
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 5
Uatho|ìcs Peturnìng Pome
5acred Peart Parìsh, Phì|ìp
wì|| conduct an
ongoìng serìes ca||ed
"Uatho|ìcs Peturnìng
Pome" on sìx
consecutìve Monday
evenìngs at 7:00 p.m.
ìn the church basement
begìnnìng 0ctober 14.
1hese sessìons are for nonpractìcìng
Uatho|ìcs who are seekìng answers to
questìons about returnìng to the Uhurch.
1here wì|| be ìnforma| sharìng and an update
of the Uatho|ìc faìth.
Ior more detaì|s, ca||
Uoordìnator Marìanne Ireìn · 859-2312
Brian R. Hackerott, age 50,
Smith Center, Kan., formerly of
Midland, S.D., passed away Sep-
tember 22, 2013, in Kearney,
Neb., after a battle with cancer.
Brian Ray Hackerott was born
January 13, 1963, to Jim and
Eleanor (Fisher) Hackerott in Os-
borne, Kan. He was raised in
Alton, Kan., until the family
moved to Osborne when he was in
the seventh grade. He continued
his education at Osborne High
School until 1982.
He had a passion for cars since
his childhood, so he moved to
Salina, Kan., for two years to at-
tend vocational technical school
for auto mechanics. After school,
he worked at a family owned gas
station for awhile. Then he tired
his hand at a couple other jobs,
but his car passion took him back
to mechanics.
He loved rebuilding and fixing
up cars, so he joined a car club in
Osborne called the “Hole in the
Wall Gang.” He was a member for
several years and many of the peo-
ple he met there ended up being
lifelong friends. He had purchased
a 1969 Firebird and spent count-
less hours rebuilding it to perfec-
tion. It was his pride and joy, until
he met Lisa Hunt. They moved to
South Dakota and were married
in 1993.
In 1994, Brian moved to Mid-
land where he worked at Ivan’s
Repair as a mechanic and doing
tire repair. Later, he worked for
Carl Mathews, doing mechanic
work, before starting to work for
Grossenburg Implement in Philip.
In 2007, he moved to Smith Cen-
ter, Kan., and was employed at
Landmark Implement.
Brian was diagnosed with can-
cer in August 2013.
Survivors include his wife, Lisa;
daughters, Deidra Hackerott of
Smith Center and Courtney
(Cody) McFarland of Kemmerer,
Wyo.; sons, Blake and Stuart,
both of Smith Center; sisters, Tina
Hageman of Norton, Kan., and
Eleanor Hackerott of Osborne;
brothers, Daniel and Anthony
Hackerott, both of Norton; and the
soon-to-arrive grandchild of
Courtney and Cody McFarland.
Services were held September
25, 2013, at Clark-Gashaw Chapel
in Osborne with Rev. Darrell
Boston officiating.
Music was provided by Merrie
Boucher. Honorary casket bearers
were Todd Boxum, Larry Hage-
man, Carl Sutter, Eric Bristol,
Scott Nuzum, Brad Wilcoxson and
Ron Wilcoxson.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to Brian Hackerott Chil-
dren Education Fund.
Brian R. Hackerott______________________________
Peter “Leo” Quinn, 85, of
Goodyear, Ariz., and Rapid City,
S.D., passed away peacefully on
Sunday, September 15, 2013, at
his Arizona home with his wife of
60 years and his two youngest
daughters at his bedside.
He was born on May 31, 1928,
at Ottumwa, the son of Peter and
Charlotte (Phalen) Quinn. Leo
graduated from Rapid City High
School in 1947. He served in the
U.S. Army during the Korean War
from September 1950 to June
1952.
He married Joyce Berner on
October 3, 1953, at the Immacu-
late Conception Church in Rapid
City.
As a young man, Leo assisted
on the family farm, served as a
volunteer with the Rapid City Po-
lice Auxiliary, was employed for a
time with James Motors, Auto
Parts and Motive Parts & Supply
and retired after 26 years with
Montana Dakota Utilities.
Leo was a member of the
Knights of Columbus at St.
Therese, was a trustee of the
Rapid Valley Sanitary District for
26 years, was a life member of the
VFW and was also a member of
the Military Order of the Cooties.
He was also a charter member of
the Wine Club and was a member
of the Gold Dust Antique Car
Club, Dakota Territory Dance
Club and the Moose Lodge.
No matter where he went, he
knew no strangers. He enjoyed
sharing coffee and breakfast with
other MDU retirees at the Mill-
stone Restaurant and McDonald’s.
Leo also enjoyed spending time in
his shop, repairing anything that
needed attention. Following re-
tirement he enjoyed spending win-
ters in Arizona. Leo loved hunting
and taking part in "deer camp" at
Deerfield.
Survivors include his wife,
Joyce, Goodyear, Ariz., and Rapid
City; five children, Delores “Dee”
(Glen) Kummer, Ethan, Gerald
(Tami) Quinn, Rapid City, Ray-
mond (Gaylene) Quinn, Bellevue,
Neb., Nancy (Mark) Black,
Goodyear, and Diane (Roy) Quinn,
Rapid City; a sister, Elizabeth
Berry, St. Cloud, Minn.; 12 grand-
children; five stepgrandchildren;
two great-grandchildren; and six
stepgreat-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by
his parents; two sons, Michael and
Thomas; two brothers, Jack and
Anthony; a sister, Margaret; and
a grandson, Jeffrey.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Monday, September
23, at the Church of St. Therese,
the Little Flower, in Rapid City,
with the Rev. William Zandri pre-
siding.
Interment with military honors
provided by Rushmore VFW Post
1273 and the South Dakota Na-
tional Guard, were at the Black
Hills National Cemetery near
Sturgis.
A memorial has been estab-
lished for Alzheimer's Research.
Friends may sign the online
guest register at www.osheim-
schmidt.com.
Peter “Leo” Quinn______________________________
(con’t. from 4)
were good friends. Bill lost his life
while working on a car that fell off
of a jack while he was working on
it. He was a good mechanic and
could fix most anything.
Bennetts are here to combine
our millet, but it has too much
moisture as we did have another
half an inch of rain this week. I
was in Philip and it never rained
there, but it rained on and off all
day here at home. Marvin and
Vicki brought the cows home from
the Miller Scott pasture Thursday
and gave them their fall shots,
sprayed them for flies, and turned
them out on 2-19-15 where he has
some hay grazer planted. Boy are
they eating that off fast. He had
another field that he can turn
them out on if they get that field
ate off, before he is ready to sell
them. Those here helping work
cattle were Casey Slovek, Kalvin
Eisenbraun, and Kieth, Lincoln
and Tucker Smith.
I was also visiting with one of
our neighbors and he and his wife
said that they were so busy doctor-
ing their cattle herd for pinkeye. I
stated that I didn’t think they
would have any when they didn’t
have any white faced cattle any-
more and it seemed that made no
difference. They said it was a big
problem at their place.
Mike and Judy Melvin, Sioux
Falls, are spending some time at
the home of Judy’s brother and his
wife, Jim and Norma Oldenberg,
this week. They plan to leave for
home Thursday or Friday.
As I was so busy with birthday
stuff and family that was here I
didn’t get people called for their
news. So will bring this to a close.
Life is a beautiful garden
made of our days and years.
It is always growing and chang-
ing
As each birthday appears.
And so in this beautiful garden
brightened by sunshine above
May you go through the years
and gather
Its blossoms of joy and love.
Erle D. Parker
Grindstone News|Mary Eide • 859-2188
Senator John Thune (R-SD) is-
sued a statement September 27 on
his vote to defund Obamacare dur-
ing the Senate’s consideration of
the House-passed continuing res-
olution (CR):
“It is disappointing that Senate
Democrats chose to stand with
their party bosses rather than de-
fend middle-class families, work-
ers and employers who are being
crushed by Obamacare.
“Health care premiums con-
tinue to increase, more and more
Americans are losing their health
care, and businesses are cutting
hours or not hiring – hitting
lower-income and middle-class
families the hardest. It’s time to
give families and the economy a
break from Obamacare by perma-
nently delaying the law for all
Americans.”
The House-passed continuing
resolution included language to
keep the government operating
through December 15, while also
defunding the president’s signa-
ture legislation.
During Senate consideration of
the House-passed CR, the Democ-
rat majority forced a vote on an
amendment to reinsert funding
for Obamacare, making every
member choose between support-
ing the president’s disastrous
health care law or standing with
the majority of Americans who op-
pose this legislation. Thune voted
against this amendment, which
marks his 32nd vote to repeal or
defund Obamacare either par-
tially or in its entirety since this
law was enacted.
Thune votes to defund Obamacare
Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland School Lunch
Monday, Oct. 7: Pancakes, veg-
gie, fruit and milk.
Tuesday, Oct. 8: BBQ meat-
balls, bun, veggie, fruit and milk.
Wednesday, Oct. 9: Beef
stroganoff, veggie, fruit and milk.
Thursday, Oct. 10: Chicken
noodle soup, veggie, fruit and
milk.
***
Woke up to 42˚ temperatures
this Monday morning and at 12:00
noon the temperature was 80˚ and
rising. Had 34˚ to 36˚ tempera-
tures a couple of mornings this
past week with cooler days, so I
guess that means fall is in the air.
Another sign of fall are the chang-
ing colors of tree leaves to yellows,
reds and oranges. With those
leaves beginning to turn, it will
soon be a Kodak moment of awe-
some colors! Fall is one of my most
favorite seasons. For a farmer the
busy time of summer is coming to
a close making life a little less hec-
tic. But, this year is an exception
to the rule because of more fall
crops having been planted – there
are still those fall crops to get har-
vested. For most, the millet crops
have been harvested, leaving
farmers waiting for those milo and
sunflower crops to be ready for
harvest. Makes one wonder if our
West River lands have shifted to
East River! It truly has been a
most unusual summer, with no
harvest crews scattered through-
out the town of Midland, due to
lack of winter wheat crops. It’s as
if we’re still waiting. But, the cal-
endar says we are into fall with to-
morrow being October 1. All in all,
it’s been a good summer! Spring
started out cool and then temper-
atures began to warm, but not as
hot as we’ve had some summers,
and the wind didn’t seem to blow
day after day. Temperatures
began to heat up the middle of Au-
gust, letting us know it still can.
With the rains we had, I was sur-
prised we didn’t have much trou-
ble with mosquitoes, not here
anyway. With all the bales of hay,
this year makes one wonder what
winter will bring. The oldtimers
used to predict, lots of hay, meant
a tough winter. Time will tell on
that one!
Over time, I’ve come to realize
there’s a whole lot to be learned
from folks like our ancestors, our
parents, older folks, and those his-
tory books filled with the lives of
those from yester-year. They were
hard working people with inter-
esting stories to tell. Stories of
their life experiences! When we’re
young, we don’t think to ask those
questions, that in later years, we
wish we had.
There are folks like Bill Kunkle
and Vivian Hansen who, no mat-
ter their age, continue to be inter-
ested in life and find life
interesting. That is a gift! As
many of you know, Bill is a fine
photographer and I liked a com-
ment he made in his editorial in
last week’s Pioneer Review. “As a
photographer,” Bill said, “I find
peace in a quiet moment any-
where.” For anyone who has seen
some of his pictures in the Pioneer
Review, of a vacated old building,
a landmark on the prairie, or a
cemetery – there is just a sense of
peace in that moment. A fine pic-
ture, tells a story, without words!
Though Bill has not lived in South
Dakota for many years, Midland –
Nowlin – Philip of West Central
South Dakota holds a very special
place in his heart.
And, Vivian! She taught school
for many, many years and contin-
ues to write her weekly new’s col-
umn, “Hit and Miss” for the
Pioneer Review. Most of us re-
member Vivian’s late husband,
Virgil “Dobbie” Hansen. He made
many a sign for Wall Drug of Wall,
South Dakota. Wall Drug is
known for their signs across the
State of South Dakota and many
other states, as well. When I
worked at 1880 Town, tourists
would often ask about Wall Drug,
because of course, when traveling
down the road, they saw those
signs. In visiting by phone with
Marty Hansen, about his aunt, Vi-
vian, he told that she is one of
those people with a whole lot of in-
teresting stories.
And, Sylvia Snook, she too was
one of those people, who no matter
her age, she continued to be inter-
ested in life and found life inter-
esting. When I had an issue on
how to word something without
getting too wordy, I would call,
Sylvia. She always had the an-
swer I needed. She was an amaz-
ing lady!
Friday, September 20, Julie
Daly headed for Minneapolis,
Minn., to the home of her cousin,
Amy (Wilson) Wolberg, her hus-
band and three children. Septem-
ber 22, Julie and Amy
participated in the Iron Girl
Duathlon in Minneapolis. They
rode their bikes 22.8 miles and
ran four miles. Both received a
medal for completing the race.
Julie headed back home following
the race getting home late Sunday
evening. Congratulations to both
Julie and Amy! It may be just me,
but it seems as though more and
more folks are doing races,
marathons, 5Ks etc. That’s a good
thing, good exercise!
Tuesday, those going to Smith
Center, Kan., for the funeral serv-
ice for Brian Hackerott were Jan
Tolton, Jenna and Keenan Tolton,
and Teresa Palmer, Murdo, Roy
and Carol Hunt, Roger and Peg
Johnson, Pierre, and Barry Hunt,
Battle Mountain, Nev. Christine
Niedan, Michelle Meinzer, Shari
Estep and Courtney McFarland
were already there as they had
gone to Smith Center Sunday to
be with Lisa (Hunt) Hackerott,
after they learned late Saturday
evening that Lisa’s husband,
Brian Hackerott, had passed
away. Keith Hunt was unable to
go as he was scheduled for foot
surgery at Ft. Meade in Sturgis.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday. Seventy-five football
players with their football jerseys
on and the coaches of the football
teams came as a group in two
buses for the funeral service of
Brian Hackerott, the father of two
of their teammates, seventh
grader Stuart Hackerott and
sophomore Blake Hackerott.
Thirty-one co-workers dressed in
their green work shirts of Land-
mark Implement, where Brian
worked and Lisa does cleaning,
were there in a group, as well. A
retired minister, who is a friend of
Brian’s sister and family, had a
meaningful message at the fu-
neral service. Another neat thing
that happened was a stack of
cards written on and given to Stu-
art from his classmates. Blake
also got cards from classmates. A
delicious meal followed the serv-
ice. Family reported it was an im-
pressive service with the groups of
football players, the co-workers of
Brian’s and the message at the fu-
neral. Lisa and the kids plan to
stay at Smith Center, the kids are
involved in the school there, Lisa
likes her job at the Family Dollar
Store, and Deidra, who is a fresh-
man in college this year, is only an
hour an a half from home, plus a
number of her classmates from
Smith Center, also go to that col-
lege.
Lisa’s classmate and good
friend, Brenda (Dale) Jensen, and
her husband, Clint, weren’t able
to make it for the funeral, but on
Thursday they headed for Smith
Center, spending some time with
Lisa, coming back to Midland
Sunday. Anyone wishing to send
Lisa and her family a card, her ad-
dress is: Lisa Hackerott, 113 S.
Monroe St., Smith Center, Kansas
66967.
Friday, September 27, Clint
and Prerry Saucerman and Mar-
lin Evans left for Rapid City mak-
ing a stop at the home of Tel and
Ellie (Nemec) Saucerman having
a chance to play with the grand-
kids and helped Ellie do up some
apples. In the evening, they at-
tended Rapid City Christian’s
homecoming and football game,
Jadd Evans plays on the football
team. Rapid City Christian lost to
Faith. Jadd’s parents, Jack and
Jill (Martin) Evans, and his sister,
Jaya Evans, were also there.
Clint, Prerry and Marlin headed
for home Friday evening.
Saturday, Clint and Prerry
Saucerman, Wilma Saucerman,
and Roy and Carol Hunt went to
the home of Terry and Linda
Schofield for the birthday party of
twins Cara and Shelby Schofield’s
fourth birthday for supper. Cara
and Shelby are the daughters of
Ted and Michelle Schofield, who
were there along with the girl’s
siblings, Tanner and Kaitlyn. Oth-
ers at the party were of course,
grandparents, Terry and Linda,
Kristina Schofield and girls,
Murdo, Trent and Robert Maneke,
Murdo, Anthony Ellis, his wife
and kids, Midland, Tim and Lori
Nemec and family, Dustin and
C.J. Vollmer and Addalyn. Every-
one enjoyed supper, cake and ice
cream and watching the girls open
their gifts. Happy birthday wishes
to both girls. Hard to believe they
are already four-years-old.
Susanne Clemens and friend
Peter arrived at Reuben and Pat
Vollmer’s Friday and will be
spending the week visiting and
sightseeing. Susanne was Reuben
and Pat's foreign exchange stu-
dent from Germany in 1998-99.
She also returned in 2000 to grad-
uate with the class. Steven and
Bridget (Vollmer) Schofield and
family came out from Pierre Sat-
urday returning Sunday. Bridget
and Susanne were in the same
class.
Sunday dinner guests of
Reuben and Pat Vollmer were Su-
sanne Clemens and friend Peter,
Bridget, Elizabeth and Greyson
Schofield, Dustin, C.J., and Adda-
lyn Vollmer, and Clint and Prerry
Saucerman. Judy Kieffer stopped
for a short visit before returning
back to Rapid. She had flown out
to attend a wedding in the Black
Hills.
Sig and Carisa Martin are the
proud parents of a baby girl, Syd-
ney Crea, born at Rapid City Sep-
tember 30, 2013, weighing 8lbs. 5
oz. and 20 1/2 inches long. Sydney
has a two and a half year old sis-
ter, Caeley Joya. Grandparents
are Scott and Susie Martin and
Debbie Hanrahan. Congratula-
tions!
Gene and Audrey Jones have
had two very busy weekends. Free
Day weekend Lisa Foley, Wagner,
and children, Levi and Samantha
Geiman, along with one of Sam's
friends, Paula Jones and Julie
Jones-Whitcher, and little Walt
from Rapid City, spent the week-
end at Gene and Audrey’s. Friday
evening, Paula Jones attended a
get-together with her high school
classmates for a 10-year reunion.
Their class made a float for the pa-
rade. Saturday morning, Edna
Dale and Lisa Foley held a baby
shower for Julie and Walt at St.
William Church Hall, with many
in attendance. That afternoon,
everyone took part in town activi-
ties, enjoying the parade and
games, etc. Sunday after attend-
ing Mass and having lunch, all re-
turned to their homes. Polly and
Bill Bruce joined the Joneses for
Sunday dinner, so got to visit with
their nieces and kids.
Audrey Jones reported on the
sister weekend. The eight remain-
ing Nemec sisters, daughters of
the late Ed and Elizabeth Nemec,
enjoyed their annual weekend
sleepover this past weekend with
Betty and Winnie as hostesses.
They met in the home of the eldest
sister, Betty VanderMay, in
Kadoka. Others present were
Frances Terkildsen, Kadoka, Win-
nie Bergeson, Ft. Pierre, Polly
Bruce, Hayes, Christine Ryan,
Tolna, N.D., Audrey Jones, Mid-
land, Bernadette Knox, Highmore,
and Rita Foreng, Sioux Falls. The
girls all arrived in time for supper
Friday, and things were kept
lively and active throughout the
weekend. They enjoyed visiting,
reminiscing, games, prizes, jigsaw
puzzles, gifts, and most impor-
tantly, an abundance of delicious
food. After attending Mass Sun-
day and sharing lunch at the local
restaurant, all departed and went
their separate ways, with plans to
meet again in the fall of 2014.
While the girls were partying,
Gene Jones and Gary Ryan were
also having a good time. They
traveled to Rapid City and at-
tended a rodeo along with Jer and
Julie-Jones Whitcher and Walt
and Paula Jones. After spending
the night with Julie and Jer, they
traveled to Hill City and visited
and spent Saturday night with
Mark and Glenda Nemec. They
arrived back in Kadoka in time for
Mass and dinner with the girls.
Also joining the sisters for Sunday
dinner were Joe Handrahan and a
friend, and Chuck and Janet Van-
derMay.
Making my hamburger hot
dish and cool whip salad, Jerry
and I headed for Ivan Schanzen-
bach’s Sunday. We had an enjoy-
able visit and I showed him one of
Bridget Schofield’s, wife of Lucas,
scrapbooks she had made up for
the Fosheim/Schofield reunion. In
that scrapbook was a beautiful
picture of Esther Schanzenbach
that I had never seen before and
neither had Ivan. There were so
many wonderful pictures in that
scrapbook. Just fun to see family
pictures from over the years of
grandparents, Thor and Gjertina
Fosheim, and their siblings, along
with so many other pictures. Brid-
get truly did an awesome job on
those many scrapbooks of the Fos-
heims and the Schofields.
As I close my column for an-
other week, I send greetings from
Arvid and Adeline Myhrwold of
Minnesota. I had sent Adeline the
copy of the Pioneer Review with
my article on the story of the Im-
maculate Lutheran Church. They
were happy to see the picture of
the church and of Barbra (Boe)
Godfrey and Deloris (Nordin)
Iversen, who they remembered
from when Pastor Myhrwold had
services at that church. Adeline
writes that Arvid’s memory is re-
ally short, but says he is happy,
and they do get to church, Bible
study, and the gathering at their
church, which is for caregivers. A
session for both of us, Adeline
writes, each in separate groups,
which she finds comfort in attend-
ing. Being a caregiver, it’s nice
when you can share with others
who are also caregivers.
As I finish my column for an-
other week, I wish to share part of
an email I got from a friend that I
felt worth sharing. “The song of a
meadowlark, the sound of thunder
rolling across the sky, the sun
shining brightly, the miracle of a
life being born, is a reminder that
God is always around us in the lit-
tle and simple things we take for
granted.” Have a God blessed
week!
Midland News
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 6
Annual Lutesk
& Roast Beef Supper
with Bazaar to Follow!
Wednesday, October 16th
Trinity Lutheran Church, Midland
Serving starts at 5 p.m. (MST)
Adults: $10
Children 10 & Under: $3
The Annual Meeting of the
Midland Community
Fire Protection District
will be held
Monday, October 7
th
at 7:00 p.m.
in the Midland Fire Hall
FALL POST
& GATE SALE
CASH & CARRY
HURRY IN ~ ENDS SOON!!
WHEELER CUNAP TREATED
3”x6’6”.......................................$5.41 unit
3
1
⁄2”x6’6” ...........$7.88 ea...........$7.25 unit
4”x6’6”..............$9.05 ea...........$8.33 unit
4”x7’ ...........................................$9.03 unit
4”x8’.................$11.57 ea........$10.64 unit
5”x8’.................$15.57 ea........$14.32 unit
6”x8’.................$22.80 ea........$20.98 unit
7”x8’ .........................................$27.67 unit
5”x10’...............$21.86 ea ........$20.11 unit
6”x10’...............$30.44 ea........$28.00 unit
7”x10’...............$39.89 ea........$36.70 unit
5”x12’...............$27.26 ea........$25.08 unit
6”x12’...............$36.13 ea........$33.24 unit
7”x12’...............$48.41 ea........$44.54 unit
8”x12’...............$75.49 ea........$69.45 unit
5”x14’ .........................................$36.66 ea.
6”x14’ .........................................$52.17 ea.
POINTED POST
3”x6’6”.......................................$6.05 unit
3
1
⁄2”x6’6” ....................................$7.89 unit
4”x6’6” ..............$10.11 ea ........$9.30 unit
4”x7’.........................................$10.00 unit
5”x8’.........................................$15.94 unit
6”x8’ ..................$25.15 ea......$23.14 unit
WHEELER TREATED PLANKS
2x6-16’........................................$24.33 ea.
2x8-16’........................................$32.43 ea.
2x10-16’......................................$42.79 ea.
2x12-16’......................................$55.91 ea.
SIOUX MINERAL FEEDERS
1 or 2.........................................$270.48 ea.
3 or more .................................$243.43 ea.
SIOUX BALE FEEDERS
1 or 2.........................................$284.28 ea.
3 or more .................................$255.85 ea.
DOUBLE SLANT FEEDER
$455.40 ea.
SIOUX BULL BALE FEEDER
$519.80
2”X6-BAR STEEL GATES
20’.............$358.80 12’.........$218.96
18’.............$323.84 10’.........$199.64
16’.............$283.36 8’...........$182.16
14’.............$245.64 6’...........$165.60
4’...........$140.76
2”X7-BAR STEEL GATES
18’.............$383.64 10’.........$232.76
16’.............$336.72 8’...........$198.72
14’.............$299.00 6’...........$172.04
12’.............$253.00 4’...........$148.12
1.66”X6-BAR STEEL GATES
18’.............$257.60 10’.........$159.16
16’.............$228.16 8’...........$135.24
14’.............$205.16 6’ ...........$113.16
12’.............$177.56 4’.............$92.92
RED BRAND STEEL POSTS
1.33# with 5 clips ea.
5
1
⁄2’ Bdl. of 5..................................$4.48 ea.
Unit of 200............................$4.39 ea.
6’ Bdl. of 5..................................$4.86 ea.
Unit of 200............................$4.76 ea.
RED BRAND BARBED WIRE
1 Roll ..........................................$63.99 ea.
Unit of 27 rolls..........................$62.99 ea.
Annual Roast Beef
Feed ~ Oct. 12th
11:30 to 2:00
Tyler & Angel welcome you to
join them at their annual
Roast Beef Feed & Giveaways!
84 Years Ago
October 3, 1929
According to the latest railroad
talk, the extension of the North-
western line will not stop at Wood
but the line will be extended to
White River and from there on
through to their line north of here,
joining the north line somewhere
near Nowlin, which would route
the road either through or very
close to Belvidere.
Grindstone News … with killing
frost holding off and early fall
rains plentiful, some unusual crop
conditions are found this fall.
Much alfalfa is still green and at
Gee’s and some other places it is
nearly high enough to cut. Flax
combining is about at a standstill,
some fields that appeared ripe
now being quite green and covered
with blossom. Rains this week
have sprouted the winter wheat
that is in the ground, and assured
moisture for fall plowing.
J.N. Dean has been in Philip re-
cently working in the new build-
ing being put up there to house
the electric light plant.
Local News … A son was born to
Mr. and Mrs. Pat Foley of Hilland
on Saturday, September 28th. He
has been named James Patrick.
75 Years Ago
October 6, 1939
Heavy users of the city water
supply in Philip will be called
upon to pay a higher rent rate as
the result of action taken by the
city council Monday night in ap-
proving an amendment to the or-
dinance governing water rates.
Action of the council does away
with the clause that gave a 15-
cent rate for all water used in ex-
cess of 9,500 gallons, substituting
the clause that all water used in
excess of 6,000 gallons shall cost
25 cents per 1,000 gallons.
***
Chas. Basler and Cecil Urban of
Rapid City escaped serious injury
when an automobile owned by the
former and driven by Urban
struck and killed two horses on
the highway eight miles north of
Midland Sunday night. Urban
who formerly lived in Philip, suf-
fered minor bruises and cuts.
Moenville News … The north-
ern lights Tuesday night again
displayed their beautiful splendor
as the numerous colored darting
rays seemed to form a crown in
the high heavens and cast their
beams to all parts of the sky.
Bright red color was most visible
with the usual white which
lighted up the earth like a full
moon.
Ottumwa News … Mr. and Mrs.
Otis Foland and sons attended the
Corn Palace in Mitchell last week.
While there Vern was stricken
with appendicitis. An emergency
operation was performed at the
Methodist hospital.
Mrs. Mary Hovey left Sunday to
spend the winter with her chil-
dren in Washington. She was ac-
companied by Ilo Smith.
Lucille Dean visited Dorothy
Hazen.
Joe Rausch returned from Illi-
nois.
Bob Kennedy got his ribs hurt,
possibly broken in a football game
Friday. Sports have been a round
of accidents for the Kennedy boys
of late. A week or so before, Bryce
got one arm broken in football,
and some time before that
Howard got a thumb broken in
baseball.
Local Briefs … A group of 30 rel-
atives gathered at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. A.F. Lindgren Sunday
for a surprise on Mr. Lindgren,
who observed his 79th birthday,
September 28.
Blast from the Past
Mason Parker
Son of Brian & Misti Hostutler
Born: September 16, 2013 • 7:55 a.m. • 7 lbs., 4 oz. • 19.5” long
Paternal Grandparents: Glen & Joyce Hostutler
Maternal Grandparents: Larry & Julie McLaughlin
Paternal Great-Grandparents:
The late Fannie & Glen Hostutler
Ruth & the late Oscar Milligan
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
Teresa & the late Raymond “Mac” McLaughlin
The late Pauline & Hank Schofield
This feature sponsored by the proud grandparents!
Community
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 7
continued on 14
At a seemingly young 89 years of age, Frank has decided to retire and sell this
choice farm and ranch land that has remained in his family since before he was born,
and includes his father’s own original “Homestead Quarter”. is choice farmland
has never before been oered for sale to the public and will now be sold on the day
of auction regardless of price. A very large portion of this choice land is Class 3 soils
and has produced untold bushels of winter wheat through the years on a crop-rota-
tion basis of farming methods. Other than the hayland and pasture, the cropland
found on this farm is now in fallow and will be ready to the successful buyer(s) for
planting of spring crops in 2014. At this time, until future plans are made, Frank will
retain a Life Estate enabling him to remain in the home at the headquarters. Please
check all of the les listed on the website concerning tracts, soils, complete terms,
etc.
Tract 1: ±160 Ac. – NE1/4, Sec. 10. e headquarters tract and includes the mod-
est ranch home, a separate mobile home, a nice Behlen Quonset bldg., (11) grain
bins with approx. 33,000 bushel of grain storage, older livestock corrals and shelters
all found within a mature shelter belt encompassing approx. 20 acres. Rural water is
to the property feeding 4 hydrants within Section 10 and includes 2 shallow water
wells. e productive cropland consists of approx. 70% Class 3 soils with the Pro-
ductivity Index averaging around 60, with the remainder being Class 4. Unfenced
along west edge of this tract.
Tract 2: ±160 Ac. – SE1/4, Sec. 10. e “south pasture” tract and consists at this
time of entirely native grass pasture with an approx. 2-1/2 acre lake near the northern
edge. A good portion of this tract is tillable. Unfenced along the west side.
Tract 3: ±320 Ac. – W1/2, Sec. 10. Access is o Anderson Hill Rd. along the
north. Consists of approx. 84 acres of productive hayland, a few acres of drainage to
the center of the tract, approx. 85 acres of native grass pasture with the balance of
the remaining approx. 140 acres being very productive cropland of which over 70%
are Class 3 soils with the Productivity Index running mostly from 52-77. Extra tillable
acres are included in the pasture area if desired. Unfenced along the entire east side
and one shallow water well is located on this tract.
Tract 4: ±80 Ac. – N1/2NE1/4, Sec. 9. A very picturesque tract fronted on two
sides by Anderson Hill Road, this choice tract would make a great ranchette property,
or would add well to any existing operation. Includes an approx. 1.5 acre well-fed
stock dam with a scattering of mature trees in the drainage areas, an approx. 10 acre
portion of hayland and approx. 45 acres of productive mostly Class 3 soils.
Tract 5: ±320 Ac. – N1/2, Sec. 11. Lies to the east of Cedar Butte Rd. directly
across from the Headquarters Tract 1 consisting of Class 3 soils of the Blackpipe-
Wortman complex and loams for nearly 70% of this productive tract. ere are four
small dams/dugouts dispersed within the eld area with an overall slope of 0 to 3%.
An extremely nice farm tract.
Tract 6: ±160 Ac. – SW1/4, Sec. 34. e old original Anderson Homestead tract,
this parcels joins 229th Street one-half mi. west of Cedar Butte Rd. Currently, there
is approx. 54 acres of productive hayland, approx. 93 acres of mostly very productive
Class 3 farmland with a portion of that being Class 2 soils, (2) shallow water wells
and an approx. 1 acre livestock dam located in the very northeast corner. Completely
fenced tract.
Entire Unit: ±1,200 Ac. e entire unit consisting of Tracts 1 through 6 and in-
cludes all of the features spoken herein above. An ideal-sized unit within this area
within which to raise a family and/or to add to an existing operation. Water includes
rural water, 5 water wells (4 hydrants & auto waterer), 4 livestock dams and 7
dugouts. is aordable unit has amply supported Frank and his wife Bernice and
allowed them the pleasure to raise four grown adult children. Completely fenced.
We urge you to consider the purchase of the entire Frank Anderson farm operation.
You will never be disappointed.
Auctioneer’s Note ~ As many of you are aware, excellent farmland and agland in
general within this area is closely-held to say the least, and rarely ever comes onto
the market. is is a rare opportunity for anyone to invest in prime land, in a prime
location, that has never before been oered for sale. Do no miss this opportunity.
PROPERTY LOCATION: At I-90 Exit 107 (Cedar Butte Rd
Exit) just west of WaII, SD, traveI north on paved
Cedar Butte Rd. 3 miIes to the farm headquarters.
AUCTION LOCATION:
WaII Community Center, Main St., WaII, SD.
IPANK 0. AN0LP50N
"PLNNINU10N U0UN1Y ULN1UPY IAPM", Wa||, 50
AB80L01E LAN0 A0c1l0N
±1,200 Pennìngton Uounty, 50 Acres
very near Wa||, 50 on Uedar ßutte Pd.
0IILPL0 IN 1 UNI1 & 6 1PAU15 Irom 80 to 320 Acres
WE0., 0c1. 16, 2013 - 10:30 AM
PROPERTY INSPECTION: Auctioneer/Broker onsite at the
Headquarters on Wed., Oct. 2nd & Wed., Oct. 9th from 10:00 AM
until 12:00 noon each day OR inspect at your leisure, brochures
onsite and tract boundaries will be clearly marked. Broker/Auc-
tioneer represents Seller. Broker participation invited. Please view
more photos, FSA maps, etc. on www.martinjurisch.com
AUCTIONEER/BROKER
Martin Jurisch
CAI, GPPA, #4300
2I0K0 LAN05, L10.
FARM LAN0 A0c1l0N
±280.03 Jackson Uounty, 50 Acres very near ße|vedere, 50
0IILPL0 IN 1 UNI1 & 2 1PAU15
1R0R8., 0c1. 17, 2013 - 10:30 AM
PROPERTY LOCATION:
At I-90 (BeIvidere Exit) Exit 163. Both tracts are adjacent to I-90 on
the south side. Tract 1 straddIes oId Hwy 16 on each side approx.
1 mi. east of BeIvidere. Tract 2 is just adjacent to BeIvidere itseIf on
the western edge and aIso straddIes oId Hwy 16. Signs on each tract.
AUCTION LOCATION:
Kadoka Fire HaII, 810 Main St., Kadoka, SD.
AUCTIONEER/BROKER
Martin Jurisch
CAI, GPPA, #4300
This prime farmland was originally purchased by Dave Heaton in the early
1940s and has remained in the family (Donna Zidko is Dave`s daughter) all
of these past years and has never before been offered for sale in those 70+
years. Tract 1 (SE1/4, Sec. 28), the Heaton Quarter just east of Belvidere
consists of ±133.29 acres of which approx. 125.83 acres are tillable. Of these
acres, all are classified as Class 3 soils with 110 of these acres having a pro-
ductivity index of 58 and the remaining a productivity index of 71. This is a
very desirable and productive tract. Tract 2 (SW1/4, Sec. 29 & Outlot F & G,
Sec. 32) consists of ±146.74 total acres and is located on the western edge
of town. Most of these acres are tillable land with the exception of a dam and
drainage area in the northeast corner and consists mostly of Class 4 soils
with a productivity index avg. about 50. These two tracts will be offered indi-
vidually, and as one unit, selling in the manner realizing the greater return.
Make plans to attend and be in attendance.
PROPERTY INSPECTION: Brochures onsite, or Auctioneer/
Broker onsite on Tract 1 on Wed. Oct. 9th from 1:00 PM untiI 3:00 PM.
Broker/Auctioneer represents SeIIer. Broker participation invited.
PIease caII for a brochure, or view photos, maps and terms for this
Iand auction on www.martinjurisch.com
2OO4 ºOFP 5×F|OF5F ×|l
LOADED, LOW MÌLES, NEW TÌRES!
869-2744
686-3068
Phlllp
Twin girls were born on Sep-
tember 23 in Fargo, N.D., to Dar-
ren and Karen Gebes, Horace,
N.D. The little girls, Kiara Ad-
abelle and Brigid Johnelle
weighed 6 lb. 4 oz. and 4 lb. 12 oz.
Their older siblings are Blaise,
Stephen, Cormac, Brech and Gi-
anna. They were born on Brech's
fifth birthday. Congratulations to
Darren and Karen, the grandpar-
ents, Mike and Linda, and the rest
of the family! Aunt Courtney
Gebes of Sturgis is spending this
week helping out at Darren and
Karen's.
Congratulations to Cain Rad-
way and Kristin Dirks, Hinton,
Iowa, who were married Septem-
ber 13. Cain's parents are Tom
and Marie Radway and grandpar-
ents are Jeanne Radway and Al
and Lenore Brucklacher all of
Philip. Cain is a lineman for West-
ern Area Power Administration
and Kristin works in Sioux City as
an interior designer.
St. Mary's Catholic Church in
Milesville has completed the ma-
jority of the building improvement
project that was initiated over a
year ago. Painting was done, win-
dows were reglazed, and the roof
has been replaced, including a
major improvement to the bell
tower. The parishioners want the
entire community to help cele-
brate the beauty of God's church.
Everyone is invited to a commu-
nity dinner at the Milesville Hall
Friday, October 11, at 5:30 p.m.
Father Kevin Achbach will be the
chef for the main dish, Norcina.
There will be plenty of food, in-
cluding dessert. There will be a
free will offering to go for church
repairs, followed by an auction of
gifted items, and concluding with
a dance with music provided by
Mike Seager. Make plans to enjoy
a fun evening of excellent food,
auction, dance, and the great com-
pany of your fellow neighbor!
Lana Elshere and Theresa
Deuchar spent the weekend in the
Miles City area. Lana visited her
daughter, Misti Anderson, and
family. Theresa attended a South-
eastern Montana Museum meet-
ing in Terry, Mont., where they
honored her late mother, Mary
Haughian. Theresa, four of her
sisters, two nieces, and a brother
each wrote a tribute to their
mother focusing on how she has
kept the history alive in that area.
Another niece played and sang
several oldtime favorites. At the
meeting it was also announced
that Mary has been inducted into
the Montana Cowboy Hall of
Fame with the ceremonies to be
held next February.
Trevor and Christa Fitch and
boys attended Mary Eide's 80th
birthday party open house in
Philip Saturday. Others from
Milesville at the party were Paul,
Donna and Tina Staben. Happy
birthday, Mary!
Saturday afternoon, Jessi Drury
and Ethan Hudson were married
in Spearfish. Jessi is the daughter
of Neal and Becky (Hanrahan)
Drury and grandaughter of Phyl-
lis Hanrahan. Attending the out-
door ceremony from our area were
Mark and Pat Hanrahan, Kalie
Hanrahan, Tracie Erdmann,
Chad and Kathy Hanrahan and
Preston, and Cody and Jamie
Hanrahan and son, Conlin. Con-
gratulations, Jessi and Ethan!
Last Wednesday the Philip
High School FFA competed in a
judging contest in Wall. Philip
came out on top in range manage-
ment judging. Local boys who
placed were Jade Berry, who got
fourth place overall and Ben Stan-
gle getting fifth place overall. Con-
gratulations, guys! The team will
be going to Oklahoma City in the
spring.
George Fitzgerald is a patient in
the Rapid City hospital. He is
scheduled for surgery on Friday.
We wish you the best, George.
Joy Elshere was dismissed from
the hospital in Rochester last
week after her heart surgery. She
is recovering at home. We hope
your recovery goes well, Joy.
Bryan and Sharon Olivier,
along with Kieth and Deb Smith
and Sonja Karp drove to Huron
Thursday for the funeral of 73-
year-old Larry Brink, Bryan, Deb
and Sonja's uncle. Larry was diag-
nosed with leukemia about five
weeks ago. He is the brother of
Donna Olivier.
Saturday evening, Sharon
Olivier joined Elaine Staben of
Bozeman, Mont., and her daugh-
ters, Carol Burroughs, also of
Bozeman, Rhonda Harshbarger
and a friend of Denver, and Joan
and Wes Enders, Kadoka. Also
from Milesville were Charles
Staben and Jeff and Terri Staben.
Earlier in the day, most of them
attended a baby shower in Kadoka
for Joan's grandaughter, Presley
James Carlson, whose parents are
Geri and Luke Carlson.
Bryan Olivier enjoyed a family
brunch Sunday morning at his
parents' home, Don and Donna
Olivier. Steve and Molly Olivier,
Faith and Levi, Cold Spring,
Minn., were passing through after
participating in the buffalo
roundup in the Black Hills during
the week.
Last Friday, Gayla Piroutek
and Kay (Piroutek) Turvey
headed east, stopping in Mitchell
for lunch with Gayla's mom, Bon-
nie Peterson. In Sioux Falls, they
drove by the home that Gayla's
daughter, Amy and Joe Hogue re-
cently purchased. They continued
on to Worthington, Minn., where
Kay was met by one of her friends
who returned her to her home in
LeSueur, Minn. Kay had spent
two weeks in Milesville. Gayla
spent the night in Sioux Falls with
Joe Hogue and his son, Jacob.
They have an apartment in Sioux
Falls as Joe has begun his new
job. Amy and son, Eli, are still in
Michigan, as she needs to finish
her contract there before joining
her family in Sioux Falls. Some-
time in December they should all
be together in their new home and
both Joe and Amy with their new
jobs.
The Steve Pekron family spent
the weekend in Winona, Minn.,
visiting Zane Pekron at college.
This was family weekend at St.
Mary's University, and many fun
activites were planned.
Tuesday, Barb Howe came from
Texas to help her parents, Leo and
Joan Patton, on the ranch. Satur-
day, Janet Penland arrived from
Minnesota. Coming Sunday were
Kendra Kern and four friends,
Lindsay Hannarlund, Kris Brat-
ten, Lois Suedbeck and Erin Clark
and her two horses. They are here
until Wednesday helping out and
enjoying the country. Bob, April
and Kaitlyn Knight and Marge
Heard, all of Rapid City, visited
and did some hunting Saturday.
Miles and Erin Hovland, Con-
nor and Mackenzie, joined family
members for dinner at the home of
the late Mary Ellen Schofield Sun-
day. Others there were Peggy
Garoutte, Idaho, Lawrence and
Ronda Schofield, Vincent and
Mary Schofield, Tom and Cecelia
Kotilnek, Rita Anker, Debbie
Prouty, Mary Hengstler, Roger
Kelly and Andrew, and Brennen
and John Daly.
Visiting at Bill and Connie Par-
sons Thursday were Dianne Par-
sons and daughter Chelsea and
A.J. Taylor and their daughter,
Eliza, Grand Island, Neb.
Abby Carley and son, Wace,
Spearfish, and her sister, Andrea
Carley, and daughter, Millie,
Philip, spent the weekend with
their parents, Phil and Karen Car-
ley.
The Bruce Dunker family, Wall,
were weekend visitors at Donnie
and Bobette Schofield's home.
Coming for breakfast on Sunday
morning were Jeff and Crystal
Schofield and family.
Danielle Piroutek arrived
Thursday by plane from her
school at Catholic University of
America in Washington, D.C. Sat-
urday, she sold two horses at the
sale in Philip and did very well.
Her sister, Anna, bought a horse
at the sale with the same blood
line as Danielle's horses. Maybe in
a few years Anna will have some
to sell. Danielle returned to Wash-
ington Sunday morning.
Several community club mem-
bers and guests gathered at Mar-
cia Eymer's home Tuesday. The
afternoon was spent painting
Christmas tree ornaments for the
courthouse tree.
Bart and I rode to Philip with
Donnie and Marcia Eymer Sun-
day morning to attend the 40th
anniversary celebration at the
Community Evangelical Free
Church. A special program began
at 10:30 a.m. followed by a dinner.
It was fun to visit with the former
pastors and their wives who came
back. Then, we had a few pitch
games at Donnie and Marcia's
when we got home.
September weather informa-
tion: Total precipitation was .57”.
Average high was 82˚ with the
highest temperature on the 22nd
of 97˚. There were five days in the
90s. Average low was 54˚. It got
down to 36˚ on the 20th for the low
temperature of the month. On the
28th it dipped to 39˚. There were
seven days the low got in to the
40s. We had three days of fog.
Milesville News|Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Greetings from sunny, calm,
cool northeast Haakon County. It
is one of those mornings when
jeans and a sweatshirt feel pretty
good! And probably by mid-day,
I'll be opting for a t-shirt and
shorts. However, by the weekend,
it sounds like I might be searching
for even warmer clothes, as the
temperature is supposed to take
quite a dip. Maybe the cold
weather will help get rid of some
of the flies, wasps and mosquitoes
that have been buzzing around!
Garden news is drying up – lit-
erally. It seems that the tomatoes
ripen faster when the soil gets
dry, so I haven't been watering
them. The cucumbers and beans
are looking exhausted, which is
okay. It is time. I've been harvest-
ing leeks, green beans, carrots,
zucchini, cucumbers, butternut
squash, and onions. I've also been
picking some of the apples – turn-
ing them into apple pies for use
later this winter. I'm trying to get
most of the veggies out of the gar-
den before the frost that is pre-
dicted for later this week. As much
as I love the garden, I am ready to
be done with it for this season.
News is a bit short this week,
and I'm blaming it on the nice
weather. This is a busy time of
year, with everyone trying to har-
vest crops, move hay, working cat-
tle, and just generally trying to get
all the fall work done. Plus, it was
such a gorgeous day yesterday,
there may have been some folks
who were just enjoying being out-
doors!
Nels and Dorothy Paulson have
been busy with the usual fall jobs,
but Dorothy did send a word of
warning. She said the rattlesnakes
are on the move. Last Wednesday,
as she and Nels were walking to
the shop, Dorothy found a rat-
tlesnake right in the middle of the
path. Nels was walking ahead of
Dorothy, so he must have stepped
right over it! Dorothy said she did
her "rattlesnake shuffle" (as she
called it), complete with some
screaming. Nels dispersed the
snake, thank goodness. So every-
one, please pay attention – don't
want anyone to be bitten! Friday
evening, Dorothy's great-nephew,
Ryan Petersen, and his friend,
Paul Mayer, Mitchell, came ante-
lope hunting. Right off the bat,
about 25 minutes into the hunt,
they got their antelope. Since the
hunting was out of the way, they
asked Nels if they could help him
do anything, so they all hauled in
some bales. Nels and Dorothy
were thankful for their help. The
hunters left for their homes Sun-
day morning, and Dorothy went to
church. Monday found Nels and
Dorothy headed to Flandreau to
harvest some sweet corn. Nels
loves sweet corn meal for use in
his pancakes, so each year they
search for mature sweet corn to
harvest. Nels then dries the corn,
shells it, washes it, dries it again,
and then grinds it and puts it in
the freezer to keep it fresh. That is
definitely a labor of love! The trip
to Flandreau also gave them a
chance to visit with family. En
route to Flandreau, they stopped
in Woonsocket to pick up two
nieces and proceeded on to meet
up with Dorothy's two brothers.
The trip turned into a mini family
reunion! They enjoyed lunch at a
local café before going to harvest
the corn. While at the café, they
found out that the daughter of one
of the café staff is now working for
Dr. Jim Stangle at Milesville –
small world!
Ruth Neuhauser had a visit Fri-
day evening from her friend, Con-
nie Reichert, and Connie's
granddaughter, Lorena, Hereford.
The Reicherts were selling calves
in Ft. Pierre that day, so they took
the opportunity to visit with Ruth.
Dick and Gene Hudson were in
Philip Saturday. Gene attended
the craft fair, and Dick had coffee
with some of the guys. Gene said
there were some wonderful things
at the craft fair, and she came
home with some treasures. It
sounded like she is getting some of
her Christmas shopping out of the
way early! From Philip, they went
on to Wall to attend the Golden
West annual meeting. Monday,
Dick and Gene went to Pierre and
visited Alice Jeitz, taking her a
bunch of garden goodies.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed had
a quieter week last week. They
were in Philip Saturday for the
horse sale, and they helped with
an auction near Ft. Pierre Sun-
day. Billy is busy this time of year
going around the countryside
looking at cattle. The big, fall calf
sales are getting ready to start.
Raymond and Nancy
Neuhauser went to Rapid City
last week to attend the National
Cattlewomen meeting, as well as
the Stockgrowers meeting. They
went out to the cabin in the Black
Hills Saturday, then returned to
Pierre. Nancy said they took High-
way 40 on the return trip, and it
was a beautiful drive. Ray was
having some problems with one of
his legs, but he is feeling better
now.
Shirley Halligan said they have
made no news this week. She was
under the weather, suffering with
what she thought were seasonal
allergies. But now she has deter-
mined that she is fighting a nasty
cold – hope she feels better soon.
Carmen Alleman joined a group
from Pierre for a weekend get-
away to Chicago. They visited the
art institute, took architectural
tours, enjoyed a dinner theater,
and saw an off Broadway play.
Sunday, Clark and Carmen were
in Pierre to help their daughter,
Kelly, and her husband, Anthony,
celebrate their birthdays.
Max and Joyce Jones returned
last Wednesday evening from
their trip to Washington state.
They left September 19 and trav-
eled to a town near Yakima to at-
tend a memorial service for Max's
cousin, Lad, Charlie Jones' son.
They enjoyed seeing all the rela-
tives. Joyce said many of them are
very musical, and the memorial
service was a wonderful celebra-
tion of a life well lived. She said it
was like a Gospel-fest! Cousin Lad
had six children and lots of grand-
children and great-grandchildren.
On the way home, they spent a
day in Yellowstone. After travel-
ing 2,649 miles, they were very
glad to be home, especially since
they got home just ahead of the
cold and snow in the
Montana/Wyoming areas! Now,
they are busy preparing for Grand
Chapter of Eastern Star.
Lee and Mary Briggs attended
the Golden West annual meeting
Saturday. Mary said others from
our area who attended the meet-
ing were Dick and Gene Hudson,
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser, and
Francis and Robert Olson. Lee
stopped to visit his mother, Lil
Briggs, Sunday, and Mary visited
with Lil Monday – it sounds like
Lil is doing pretty well, which is
good news. Mary said her daugh-
ter, Rea Riggle, and family spent
Saturday watching German
Shorthair (aka Deutsch
Kurzhaar) dog trials. This in-
volved testing the participating
dogs on how well they responded
to locating and retrieving water
fowl. This took place at Tanner
Norman's and Hayes Lake Friday
and Saturday. The event was set
up by Tom and Vanita Skinner,
Moenville News|Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Sports
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 8
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Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers........................................11-5
Shad’s Towing.............................10-6
Handrahan Const .......................10-6
Dakota Bar....................................9-7
Badland’s Auto..............................8-8
Highlights:
Marsha Sumpter .5-10 split; 185/505
Andrew Reckling..........................533
Marlis Petersen............4-7 split; 180
Clyde Schlim......3-5-10 & 3-10 splits
Carl Brown .........................5-10 split
Jason Petersen ...................3-10 split
Matt Reckling.....................3-10 split
Connie Schlim......................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm..................................13-3
Bowling Belles ............................11-5
Cutting Edge Salon ......................9-7
Jolly Ranchers ..............................8-8
Little Orphans ............................6-10
Highlights:
Debbie Gartner .............187, 158/490
Charlene Kjerstad.................179/439
Marsha Sumpter..........................157
Deanna Fees.................................155
Donna King...........................5-6 split
Shirley O’Connor..................4-5 split
Jen Schriever.......5-6 & 2-5-10 splits
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar..................................10-6
Hildebrand Concrete ..................10-6
Chiefie’s Chicks ............................8-8
First National Bank .....................8-8
Morrison’s Haying ......................6-10
Pink Ribbons...............................6-10
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz........................181/523
Marlis Petersen............................182
Stacey Schulz................4-5 split; 174
Kathy Gittings .............................172
Ashley Reckling....................5-7 split
Andrea Carley ......................5-7 split
Sandee Gittings...............4-5-10 split
Tena Slovek ........................3-10 split
Val Schulz.............................2-7 split
Friday Nite
Cristi’s Crew.................................3-1
D’s Crew........................................1-3
In Forcer’s.....................................NA
Randy’s Spray Service..................NA
Hightlights:
Jeremiah Iron Moccisan.......205/516
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Scottie junior high undefeated
The Philip Scotties junior high football team hosted the Kadoka Kougars junior high team, Monday, September
30. The game ended 44-0 in Philip’s favor. The Scotties are undefeated so far this season.
Courtesy photo
Nancy Haigh
It wasn’t the best of nights to play ball, but Philip and Kadoka played on through some very heavy rain during
their matchup September 27 in Kadoka. Behind the other players, Philip quarterback Brody Jones hands the ball
off to Paul Guptill. The other players who can be indentified are Kadoka’s Logan Ammons, Philip’s Ryan Van
Tassel, Austin Pinney, Brayden Fitch, Kadoka’s Lane Patterson, Philip’s Jade Berry and Kadoka’s Gavin DeVries.
The Friday game was Kadoka’s Homecoming, and the Kougars won. The weather made keeping records by
sideline statisticans during play nearly an impossibility. The quarter by quarter breakdown was: first quarter –
Philip 0, Kadoka 6; second quarter – Philip 6, Kadoka 20; third quarter – Philip 6, Kadoka 26; end score –
Philip 18, Kadoka 34. Making touchdowns for Philip were Paul Guptill on a 65-yard rushing play, Rance Johnson
on a three-yard rush, and Brody Jones on a three-yard rush play.
Youth football wins continue
The Eagles Youth Football Teams had a great showing over the September 21-22 weekend at home in Wall. The
teams, made up of Wall, Philip and Kadoka youth, played the Vikings out of Rapid City. In the Mighty Mite age
division, the Eagles again shut-out their opponent, 35-0. In the Junior PeeWee division, they won a dog fight finally
defeating the Vikings 30-22. The PeeWee division game was also won by the Eagles, 34-6. Shown is the PeeWee
team running an offensive play with Zach Hout, Wall, taking the ball up the middle following lead blocker, Bridger
Amiotte. On September 28-29, the Eagles faced the Spearfish Buccaneers at the Black Hills State University field
in Spearfish. The games scheduled for Saturday, October 5, will be played in Philip.The Mighty Mites Eagles (first
and second grade division) will kick-off versus the Steelers at 2:00 p.m. The Junior Pee Wee Eagles (third and
Courtesy photos
Philip Scotties fall to Kougars
by coach Ralph Kroetch
The Scotties have performed
well over the first five weeks of
their cross country season. When
all 12 athletes competed at the
Western Great Plains Conference
meet in Philip, Wednesday, Sep-
tember 25, they repeated dual
championships from last year.
Temperatures were cool and
winds strong, and combine this
with the hilly Lake Waggoner Golf
Course – this gave the strongest
runners a definite advantage.
Garrett Snook and Nelson Hol-
man led the Scotties from the
start, as Holman topped the first
hill in third place and Snook in
fifth. Tristen Rush, able to race
for the first time this season, out
powered White River’s number
two runner on this hill to move
into 12th place. Sophomore Kee-
gan Burnett, who had been part of
last year’s conference champi-
onship team, and eighth grader
Conner Dekker, in this race for
the first time, gave Philip a full
team of five.
Midrace found four teams with
strong duos contending for the
win, but in the “B” division it is
often said a team is only as good
as its third runner. At this point,
Rapid City Christian has three in
position for a win.
A little magic by the Scotties in
the closing meters changed things,
as Holman broke up Wall’s one-
two punch by moving into second
place and an all-conference selec-
tion, with a time of 19:03. Snook
separated Rapid City Christian’s
second runner from their third
with a strong finish to place
eighth in a time of 19:46. Rush
ended a long sprint with a little
trickery of his own by stepping
past a Stanley County runner at
the wire to place ninth with a time
of 19:47.
Burnett pulled up alongside a
Rapid City Christian runner as he
sprinted to a 29th place spot with
a time of 23:34. Dekker finished
just ahead of Wall’s fourth runner
for 30th place with a time of 23:42.
Team scores were: Philip – 19,
Rapid City Christian – 24, Wall –
31, Stanley County – 32, White
River – 44, Lyman – 49, and New
Underwood – 52. This is the Philip
boys’ fourth straight conference
win.
The Lady Scotties had no illu-
sions about the day’s race, as they
faced the Lyman Raiders who
placed third in the 2012 state
cross country meet.
Ellie Coyle gave yet another
premium performance, leading
wire to wire. With no one in strik-
ing distance, Coyle cruised
through the last half mile, earning
her fifth straight individual var-
sity win for 2013.
Katlin Knutson found no such
luxury as she battled Lyman’s
Cedar Jandreau through the en-
tire race. In the final hundred me-
ters, Knutson made an
unmatchable move in the final
hundred meters, sprinting for
sixth place with a time of 17:30.
Both Coyle and Knutson earned
all-conference honors.
Seventh grader Jasmine Fergu-
son took on the role of Philip’s
third runner, as she pulled away
from White River’s lead runner
over the final half mile. She
earned the 11th place medal with
a time of 18:30. Shay Hand, de-
spite a recent hip injury, ran a
courageous race just seconds in
front of Jones County’s second
runner. She earned the 14th place
medal with a time of 19:08.
Senior Allison Pekron, in her
final high school conference race,
kept a Lyman runner behind her
as she set a personal best confer-
ence time of 19:33, a 48 second im-
provement, for 16th place. Hard
work and determination, not
smoke and mirrors, earned the
Scotties their second straight con-
ference title.
Team points were: Philip – 12,
Lyman – 13, Jones County – 24.
The day’s final Scottie perform-
ance came from Damian Bartels
and Khalen Martin in the boys’
junior varsity race. Martin ran
well, cutting an amazing 3:57
from his previous 4,000 meter ef-
fort to place third with a time of
16:22. Bartels outran a Lyman
runner to earn eighth place hon-
ors with a time of 17:52.
Scottie magic at WGPC meet
Boys’ top team for four years – back row, from left: Garrett Snook, Conner
Dekker and Keegan Burnett. Front: Tristen Rush, left, and Nelson Holman.
Del Bartels
Girls’ top team two years straight – back row, from left: Shay Hand, Allison
Pekron and Jasmine Ferguson. Front: Katlin Knutson, left, and Ellie Coyle.
The Philip Scotties boys’ junior varsity during the Western Great Plains Con-
ference Meet consisted of Damian Bartels, left, and Khalen Martin.
fourth grade division) will kick-off
against the Steelers Gold at 4:00 p.m.
The Pee Wee Eagless (fifth and sixth
grade division) will face the Steelers
starting at 6:00 p.m.
Sports
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 9
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The Philip Lady Scotties hosted
the Harding County Ranchers,
Thursday, September 26.
Though the Philip varsity team
took the first game, the next three
games and the match went to
Harding County. This puts the
Scotties at a seven win and five
loss season record
25-19, 16-25, 18-25, 22-25
Serving: 79/83 (10 aces) Leaders: Kaci
Olivier – 25/25 (4 aces), Ellie Coyle – 15/15 (1
ace), Madison Hand – 13/13 (2 aces), Peyton
DeJong – 8/8 (1 ace)
Receiving: 73/83
Setting: 103/110 (22 assists) Leaders:
Hand – 80/81 (19 assists), Tia Guptill – 22/23
(2 assists)
Hitting: 133/149 (30 kills) Leaders: Gup-
till – 31/34 (9 kills), Jordyn Dekker – 24/25 (8
kills), DeJong – 10/11 (4 kills)
Blocking: 4 kills Leaders: Dekker – 3
solos and 1 assist, Peyton Kuchenbecker – 1
solo and 1 assist
Digging: 92/142 Leaders: Olivier – 23,
Coyle – 19, Dekker – 15
The Philip junior varsity team
had a winning night. Although
they had to come back from a first
game loss, the ladies took the next
two games handily
19-25. 25-16, 15-11
Serving: 44/56 (11 aces) Leaders: Shay
Hand – 10/11 (3 aces), Guptill – 10/10 (2
aces), Courtney Bartlett – 9/14 (3 aces)
Receiving: 36/44 Leaders: S. Hand – 8/9,
Bartlett – 8/11, Guptill – 6/7
Setting: 54/56 (11 assists) Leaders: Ash-
ton Reedy – 24/24 (5 assists), Guptill – 24/25
(4 assists)
Hitting: 41/49 (12 kills) Leaders: Guptill –
9/9 (2 kills), Bartlett – 8/12 (4 kills), Kuchen-
becker – 9/11 (2 kills)
Digging: 23/30 Leaders: Reedy – 8/11,
Guptill – 6/6
The Philip “C” team faced a
challenge at first, winning the
first game by only a few points.
But, the second game was a walk-
away for the Lady Scotties who
took the win with ease.
25-22, 25-7
Serving: 37/44 (13 aces) Leaders: Libbi
Koester – 13/14 (8 aces), Elise Wheeler – 7/9,
(3 aces), Jaisa Snyder – 9/10 (1 ace)
Receiving: 29/30 Leaders: Wheeler – 8/8,
Cheyenne Pinney – 5/5, Kendal Hook – 4/4,
Koester – 4/4
Setting: 17/17 (4 assists) Leaders: Sny-
der – 5/5 (3 assists), Jada Jones – 7/7 (1 as-
sist)
Hitting: 24/26 (10 kills) Leaders: Sage
Bierle – 9/9 (3 kills), Hook – 6/7 (3 kills),
Jones – 4/4 (3 kills)
Digging: 7/7 Leader: Koester – 3/3
Lady Scotties slip to Ranchers
Peyton DeJong
Tia Guptill
Madison Hand and Jordyn Dekker
Peyton Kuchenbecker
and Tia Guptill
Shay Hand
Kaci Olivier
The Lady Scotties volleyball
team traveled to Faith to chal-
lenge the Lady Longhorns, Tues-
day, September 24.
The varsity, junior varsity and
“C” teams played the minimum
number of games to sweep the
tournament. The Philip varsity
teams now stands with a season
record of seven wins and four
losses.
25-22, 25-20, 25-14
Serving: 71/74 (7 aces) Leaders: Peyton
DeJong – 10/12 (4 aces), Ellie Coyle – 14/14
(2 aces), Tia Guptill – 13/13 (1 ace)
Receiving: 38/49 Leaders: Coyle – 16/20,
Kaci Olivier – 8/11, Jordyn Dekker – 7/9
Setting: 75/77 (19 assists) Leaders: Madi-
son Hand – 55/56 (12 assists), Guptill – 19/19
(6 assists)
Hitting: 85/96 (28 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 24/26 (10 kills), Olivier – 20/22 (6
kills), DeJong – 12/15 (5 kills)
Digging: 48 Leaders: Coyle – 13, Hand –
12, DeJong – 7, Guptill – 7
The junior varsity team cur-
rently holds a five win and one
loss season record.
25-8, 25-19
Serving: 41/50 (10 aces) Leaders: Gup-
till – 16/17 (3 aces), Ashton Reedy – 12/14 (4
aces), Tyana Gottsleben – 6/7 (1 ace)
Receiving: 32/37 Leaders: Reedy – 10/11,
Libbi Koester – 6/6, Guptill – 5/5
Setting: 38/40 (10 assists) Leaders: Gup-
till – 19/20 (5 assists), Reedy – 14/15 (5 as-
sists)
Hitting: 32/34 (12 kills) Leaders: Peyton
Kuchenbecker – 6/8 (2 kills), Courtney
Bartlett – 4/4 (1 kill), Kendal Hook – 5/6 (2
kills)
Digging: 18 Leaders: Bartlett – 4,
Cheyenne Pinney – 3
The “C” team’s season record so
far is two wins and two losses.
25-20, 25-22
Serving: 38/49 (11 aces), Leaders:
Koester – 12/14 (5 aces), Jada Jones – 9/10 (3
aces), Elise Wheeler – 9/11 (4 aces)
Receiving: 39/44 Leaders: Koester –
14/16, Wheeler – 6/7, Pinney – 5/5, Sammie
Schofield – 6/6
Setting: 33/36 (6 assists) Leaders: Jones –
12/13 (4 assists), Wheeler – 18/18 (1 assist)
Hitting: 24/35 (7 kills) Leaders: Sage
Bierle – 5/7 (2 kills), Wheeler – 6/6 (2 kills),
Hook – 6/11 (2 kills)
Digging: 14 Leaders: Pinney – 3,
Koester – 3, Bierle – 3
Lady Scotties rob the Longhorns
by coach Ralph Kroetch
Breezy and 55 degrees on what
will be this year’s state meet
course made for ideal conditions
for the cross country races at the
Rapid City Invitatioal meet, Fri-
day, September 27.
Three states and over 30 schools
were represented. The energy,
sounds and excitement, with hun-
dreds of athletes all driving for the
best start possible, is an experi-
ence for for athletes and specta-
tors.
One-quarter mile into the girls’
varsity race, this course made its
first left turn. Ellie Coyle found an
opening and emerged on the left
side and in the upper one-third of
this cluster of 115 runners. She
began working her way up the
long line of school colors. Coyle
was one of four runners to cross
the finish at 15:45, and earned the
21st place medal. She had im-
proved her course best by 38 sec-
onds. She was the first “B”
division girl across the line.
Katlin Knutson, in her first race
of 100 plus runners, gave no cons-
ession to this huge field of junior
varsity runners. Drawing on
strong training and an “I will” at-
titude, she emerged from the field
inside the top 25 and began her
assent. She ended alongside a
Gillette, Wyo., runner with a time
of 17:05, earning the 10th place
medal
Garrett Snook, Keegan Barnett
and Damian Bartels were part of
the 118 young men lined up for
the boys’ junior varsity 5,000
meter race. Snook led the Scotties
through an exciting race, starting
in the mid-30s, with Barnett near
mid-pack and Bartels working to
stay near his teammate.
Snook’s much improved running
form and endurance allowed him
to move up throughout the race.
But, a strong finish sprint, moving
around Aberdeen Central, Moor-
croft and Lead/Deadwood runners
in the final meters put the 18th
place medal in his hand at the fin-
ish. Snook’s time of 19:02 was a
huge 2:56 course improvement.
An ever improving Burnett ran
a strong race throughout and was
able to put a Rapid City Central
runner behind him at the finish
for 90th place. His time of 21:55
was a course best by 41 seconds.
Bartels, running this 5,000
meter course for the first time,
turned in another fine perform-
ance as he put a Buffalo, Wyo.,
runner behind him in the closing
meters to place 101st and setting
his course best at 22:53.
The girls’ junior high race began
in wind and rain, with seventh
grader Jasmine Ferguson starting
from box 18 of 35. The start line
was a least five deep across the
width of a football field. A very en-
thusiastic Ferguson led this field
of 190 runners in the early go,
and ran a great race. Her 3,000
meter time of 14:10 was a 26 sec-
ond improvement, placing her
75th.
The junior high race put eighth
grader Conner Dekker and sev-
enth grader Khalen Martin at the
start line with over 200 other shiv-
ering young men. Running with
the enthusiasm of youth, both had
great races. Dekker placed 50th
with a time of 12:28. Martin
placed 61st with a time of 12:44.
The next cross country meet for
the Philip Scotties was on the
Tomahawk Golf Course, 10 miles
south of Lead. Lead hosted this
meet Tuesday, October 1.
The following meet will be at
Highmore, Saturday, October 5,
starting at 9:00 a.m.
Philip runners do well at Elks
The Philip varsity volleyball
team fought old rivals as well as
less-played teams in the Belle
Fourche Volleyball Tournament,
Saturday, September 28.
In the first match, Philip broke
even on total points, but put those
points together nicely to win two
games and lose one against the
Douglas Patriots. The deciding
game went into extended play.
25-22, 20-25, 27-25
Serving: 66/70 (9 aces) Leaders: Tia Gup-
till – 21/22 (5 aces), Jordyn Dekker – 12/13 (2
aces), Madison Hand – 13/13
Receiving: 66/72 Leaders: Kaci Olivier –
32/32, Ellie Coyle – 20/22, Dekker – 7/7
Setting: 98/101 (25 assists) Leaders:
Hand – 66/67 (14 assists), Guptill – 22 of 22
(10 assists)
Hitting: 97/117 (30 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 25/25 (13 kills), Olivier – 17/18 (6
kills), Guptill – 13/18 (3 kills)
Blocking: 7 kills Leaders: Dekker – 3
solos and 1 assist, Guptill – 1 solo and 1 as-
sist, Peyton DeJong – 2 assists
Digging: 68/115 Leaders: Olivier – 12/15,
Coyle – 12/21, Hand – 10/15, Guptill – 10/17
For their second of five matches,
the Lady Scotties next faced the
Saint Thomas More Cavaliers.
Here, the opponents came on too
fast and hard for the Scotties to
match them. Philip lost the first
two games for the best out of
three.
19-25, 21-25
Serving: 38/42 (4 aces) Leaders: Hand –
10/10 (2 aces), Dekker – 11/11 (1 ace),
Olivier – 6/6 (1 ace)
Receiving: 36/40 Leaders: Guptill –
12/13, Olivier – 11/11, Coyle – 7/10
Setting: 63/67 (19 assists) Leader: Hand –
45/47 (16 assists)
Hitting: 66/78 (21 kills) Leaders: Guptill –
16/19 (6 kills), Dekker – 16/18 (5 kills),
Olivier – 10/13 (4 kills)
Blocking: 2 kills Leaders: Dekker – 1
solo, Olivier – 1 solo
Digging: 49/72 Leaders: Coyle – 14/20,
Olivier – 11/16, Guptill – 10/12
The Philip ladies came back
with a vengence in the third
match, devastating their Moor-
croft, Wyo., opponents by stealing
two games right off the bat.
25-15, 25-17
Serving: 44/52 (12 aces) Leaders: Coyle –
6/7 (3 aces), Hand – 8/9 (3 aces), Guptill – 8/9
(2 aces), DeJong – 7/7 (1 ace)
Receiving: 26/28 Leaders: Coyle – 10/11,
Olivier – 9/9, Guptill – 5/5
Setting: 38/41 (11 assists) Leaders:
Hand – 27/29 (7 assists), Guptill – 6/6 (2 as-
sists)
Hitting: 38/49 (16 kills) Leaders:
Olivier – 7/7 (5 kills), Guptill – 13/17 (4 kills),
Dekker – 4/5 (3 kills)
Blocking: 2 kills Leaders: Peyton
Kuchenbecker – 1 solo and 1 assist, Dekker –
1 assist
Digging: 20/28 Leaders: Olivier – 7/8,
Coyle – 6/8
The Philip team now kept up its
momentum by taking two of three
games against the Hot Springs
Tigers.
25-16, 17-25, 25-21
Serving: 61/67 (10 aces) Leaders: Coyle –
16/16 (5 aces), Olivier – 14/14 (2 aces), Hand –
11/12 (1 ace)
Receiving: 43/51 Leaders: Olivier –
17/20, Coyle – 9/12, Dekker – 7/7
Setting: 74/81 (14 assists) Leaders:
Hand – 46/49 (9 assists), Guptill – 18/21 (3
assists)
Hitting: 72/85 (22 kills) Leaders: Guptill –
15/18 (5 kills), Dekker – 14/18 (5 kills),
Hand – 12/14 (3 kills)
Blocking: 3 kills Leaders: Guptill – 2
solos, Dekker – 1 assist, Olivier – 1 assist
Digging: 50/76 Leaders: Olivier – 14/17,
Coyle – 11/20 Hand – 6/10
The Lady Scotties finished the
tournament by going face to face
with a Bowman, N.D., team.
Philip took a close win on the first
game and a relative close loss on
the second game. The tournament
ended for the Scotties in an ex-
tended play final game that fa-
vored the opponents.
25-23, 19-25, 24-26
Serving: 61/67 (2 aces), Coyle – 21/21 (1
ace), Olivier – 12/13 (1 ace), Guptill – 8/9
Receiving: 61/70 Leaders: Olivier –
24/26, Coyle – 16/19, Guptill – 8/8
Setting: 85/87 (17 assists) Leaders:
Hand – 56/58 (9 assists), Guptill – 21/21 (6
assists)
Hitting: 114/127 (29 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 36/41 (12 kills), Olivier – 18/21 (5
kills), Kuchenbecker – 11/12 (4 kills)
Blocking: 2 kills Leaders: Kuchen-
becker – 1 solo, Guptill – 1 solo
Digging: 90/127 Leaders: Coyle – 23/30,
Guptill – 18/23, Olivier – 16/24
The next match for the Lady
Scotties will be at Lemmon
against the Cowgirls, Thursday,
October 3, starting at 5:30 p.m.
Battle at Belle
Shay Hand, left, and Kaci Olivier
Pioneer Review is a legal newspaper for the City of Philip, Haakon County, Haakon School Dist. 27-1, Town of Midland, West River Rural Water Development District.
Legal Notices
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 10
Proceedings of Haakon
School District 27-1
Board of Education
Regular Meeting Minutes
September 16, 2013
The Board of Education of the Haakon
School District 27-1 met in regular ses-
sion for its regular meeting on Septem-
ber 16, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. at the Philip
Armory, Room A-1. President Scott
Brech called the meeting to order with
the following members present: Jake
Fitzgerald, Scott Brech, Brad Kuchen-
becker, Mark Nelson, Anita Peterson,
Mark Radway and Doug Thorson. Also
present: Supt/Elementary Prin. Keven
Morehart, Business Manager Britni Ross,
Secondary Principal Cory Lambley, Lisa
Schofield, Gavin Brucklacher, Madison
Hand, Tanya McIlravy and Del Bartels.
All action taken in the following minutes
was by unanimous vote unless otherwise
specified.
14-34 Communications from the audi-
ence: None
14-35 Motion by Thorson, second by
Radway to approve the agenda with one
addition: Add offering contract to Robert
Fugate, Head Boys’ Basketball to 14-37:
Personnel.
14-36 Motion by Fitzgerald, second by
Nelson to approve the following items of
consent calendar.
Approved the minutes of the August
19, 2013, meeting.
Approved the unaudited financial re-
port of August 31, 2013, as follows:
Ultimate Team - JH Football Jerseys -
868.50, Universal Athletic - Volleyball
Standards System - 2,420.30, US Foods
- Kitchen Oven - 6,338.53, Walker Re-
fuse - Garbage Service - 830.50, West
Central Electric - Electricity - 2,906.81,
WRLJ Rural Water - Milesville/Chey Aug
13 Water - 60.00, TOTAL: 57,420.90.
SPED Claims Payable September 16,
2013: AFLAC - Insurance Premiums -
128.18, Avesis - Vision Insurance Premi-
ums - 28.06, Carley, Ruth - Isolation
Mileage - 88.80, Dearborn National - Life
Insurance Premiums - 4.20, Delta Dental
- Dental Insurance Premiums - 465.70,
Hand, Tracey - Mileage/Lunch - Work-
shop in Rapid City - 70.49, Ingram Hard-
ware - SPED Supplies - 27.99,
Petersen's Variety - SPED Supplies -
28.74, Volunteers of America - Residen-
tial Tuition - August - 3,579.26, Wellmark
Blue Cross - Health Insurance Premiums
- 501.48, Westerberg, Pat - Mileage -
Training in Rapid City - 60.68. TOTAL:
4,983.58. Food Service Claims
Payable September 16, 2013: AFLAC -
Insurance Premiums - 80.34, Bernard -
Food Purchases - 560.66, Coyle's Su-
perValu - Food Purchases - 25.72, Dean
Foods - Milk Purchases - 660.65, Earth-
grain Baking - Food Purchases - 35.00,
Ingram Hardware - Supplies - 38.91,
Reinhart - Food Purchases - 1,299.84,
Servall - Linen Care - 33.90, US Foods -
Food Purchases - 2,767.42. TOTAL:
5,502.44. Hourly wages for Month of
August 2013: 18,853.39. Gross
Salaries/Fringe for August 2013:
FUND 10: Instructional - 94,508.99, Ad-
ministration - 15,996.39, Support Serv-
ices - 6,265.83, Extra Curricular - 634.83;
FUND 22: SPED Gross Salaries/Fringe -
10,203.50.
1. For PROPERTY LOSS, replace-
ment cost coverage, $250,000,000.
2. For BOILER and MACHINERY cov-
erage, $50,000,000.
3. For AUTOMOBILE and SCHOOL
BUS coverage, $2,000,000 per occur-
rence/No annual aggregate.
4. For PERSONAL, BODILY INJURY,
and PROPERTY DAMAGE, $2,000,000
per occurrence/No annual aggregate.
5. For BLANKET SURETY BOND and
CRIME LOSS, $200,000.
6. For SCHOOL BOARD LEGAL LIA-
BILITY coverage, $2,000,000 per occur-
rence/No annual aggregate.
Total contribution for all coverages, in-
cluding loss fund, administrative fees,
loss control, and local agent commis-
sions, if applicable, under the Property
and Liability Fund Participation Agree-
ment is $21,841.00.
There is hereby delegated to the Super-
intendent the authority to carry out, or to
further delegate subject to his supervi-
sion and responsibility, the obligations of
the District identified in the Bylaws ap-
proved herein, the Participation Agree-
ment, and the Master Contracts provided
by the Trust Administrator. Finally, the
Board agrees to indemnify the Trust and
its members, pursuant to the process es-
tablished in the Bylaws approved herein,
the full amount of any assessment levied
by the Trust Board pursuant to the By-
laws and the full amount of any contribu-
tion agreed to in the current or
subsequent Participation Agreements
approved by the Board as submitted
upon proper vouchers.
14-43 Anita Peterson gave the BHSSC
report.
14-37 Motion by Thorson, second by Pe-
terson to approve the following personnel
action: Tayta West, Junior High Girls’
Basketball - $1,770.00; Kory Foss, Assis-
tant Football - $2,065.00; Offer contract
to Bob Fugate, Head Boys’ Basketball
Coach.
14-38 Received notification of the follow-
ing Public School Exemptions: HSA54-
14 (7th Grade), HSA55-14 (6th Grade),
HSA56-14 (5th Grade) and HSA57-14
(4th Grade).
14-39 Motion by Radway, second by Nel-
son to approve the following School-To-
Work Assignments: Gavin Brucklacher -
Hansen Hide & Fur; Jordyn Dekker -
Philip Elementary (Ms. Crary); Dustin
Hand - Hoag Diesel Service; Madison
Hand - Philip Jr/Sr High (Mrs. Bouman);
Katie Hostutler - Physical Therapy; Kaci
Olivier - Philip Jr/Sr High (Mr. Foss); Bai-
ley Radway - Philip Health (Radiology);
and Wyatt Schaack - Jones’ Bottle & Vet
(Leather Working).
14-40 After a brief discussion, a motion
was made by Radway, seconded by
Kuchenbecker to approve a Gymnastics
Cooperative with Wall and Kadoka as
long as there is no expense to the Dis-
trict. Parents will be responsible for trans-
porting their athletes to and from
practice.
14-41 Business Manager Britni Ross dis-
cussed the 2013-2014 budget. Motion by
Fitzgerald, second by Nelson to approve
the budget as presented.
14-42 Motion by Thorson, second by
Radway to approve the following motion:
Be it hereby moved and resolved by the
Haakon School Board of the Haakon
School District, acting pursuant to SDCL
1-24 and SDCL 13-10-3, 13-8-39, and
the general authority of SDCL Title 13,
and hereby adopts, approves, and rati-
fies the ASB Property and Liability Trust
Fund Participation Agreement, effective
as of the time of adoption of this Motion.
Be it further moved and resolved that ac-
tions taken under prior versions of the
Protective Trust Joint Powers Agreement
and Bylaws and the ASB Property and Li-
ability Trust Fund Participation Agree-
ment since the time and date the District
initially joined said Trust are hereby rati-
fied and approved to the same extent
and effect as if each amendment thereto
had been separately submitted and ap-
proved at the time of its adoption.
Be it further moved and resolved that the
Superintendent and Business Manager
are hereby authorized to execute, on be-
half of the District, the present ASB Prop-
erty and Liability Fund Participation
Agreement as it presently exists and may
from time to time be amended and ap-
proved pursuant to the Bylaws herein
adopted. Each succeeding Participation
Agreement changing the obligations aris-
ing under the Property and Liability Fund
shall be submitted to the Board for ap-
proval prior to execution by the Superin-
tendent and Business Manager.
It is further moved and resolved that cov-
erage provided in the ASB Property and
Liability Fund Participation Agreement
shall extend from 12:01 a.m. CST, July 1,
2013 to 12 midnight CST, June 30, 2014.
The contribution required for such cover-
age is:
14-44 Executive Session: None
14-45 Principal Cory Lambley reported
on the following items: (A) On the first
day of school we had 50 of 51 students
here for Junior High and 96 of 97 for High
School. (B) Homecoming week was fun
and very successful. (C) There are very
few discipline problems. (D) Fall Athletics
are in full swing.
14-46 Superintendent Keven Morehart
reported on the following items: (A) K-6
enrollment is 149. Overall district enroll-
ment is down by 2 students. (B) The fire
system was inspected. (C) The Highway
Patrol held PPCT training in our old
weight room. (D) Release Time has
begun.
Adjournment at 7:46 PM. Will meet in
regular session on October 14, 2013, at
7:00 PM.
_______________________________B
ritni Ross, Business Manager
_______________________________S
cott Brech, President
[Published October 3, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $130.52]
General Fund Claims Payable Sep-
tember 16, 2013: AFLAC - Insurance
Premium - 662.71, A&B Welding - VoAg
Supplies - 41.05, Action Mechanical -
Boiler Repairs - 1,959.49, Amazon -
Classroom Supplies - 35.12, ASBSD -
Joint Conference Dues - 655.00, Avesis
- Vision Insurance Premiums - 334.69,
Baye & Sons - Lift Rent - Insurance -
200.00, Black Hills Chemical - Janitorial
Supplies - 4.99, Blick Art - Art Supplies -
12.60, Brant's Electric - Replace Lights -
Milesville - 1,850.00, Cabin Fever Florals
- Science Supplies - 30.00, Cambium
Learning Group - Ticket to Read License
- 2,400.00, Casey Peterson & Associates
- 2013 Audit - Progress Bill - 7,200.00,
Century Business Products - Copier
Maintenance - 350.00, Coyle's Super-
Valu - FACS Supplies - 49.43, D&T Auto
Parts - Tractor Repairs - 14.29, D&T Auto
Parts - Tractor/Mower Repairs - 70.28,
Dearborn National - Life Insurance Pre-
miums - 33.60, Delta Dental - Dental In-
surance Premiums - 1,486.76,
Department of Revenue - Water Testing
- 76.00, Foss, Dani - Isolation Mileage -
142.82, GoldenWest Telecommunica-
tions - Telephone - 655.47, Gopher - PE
Supplies - 628.58, Grainger - Janitorial
Supplies/Boiler Repairs - 319.15, Hauff
Mid-America - Athletic Awards - 94.32,
Hauff Mid-America - Awards - 765.76,
Heartland Paper - Janitorial Supplies -
146.81, Hillyard - Janitorial Supplies -
67.80, Hometown Computer Services -
Technology Repair - 120.00, Houghton
Mifflin - Consumable Workbooks -
4,409.24, Ingram Hardware -
Janitorial/Maintenance Supplies -
400.62, IXL Learning - Site Licenses -
1,149.00, Kennedy Implement - Tractor
Repairs - 840.84, Knutson, Vicki -
Mileage - Reading Recovery - 57.35,
Konst Machine & Welding - Tractor Re-
pairs - 67.50, Kuchenbecker, Brad - Bas-
ketball Official - 80.00, Lakeshore
Learning - Classroom Supplies - 211.59,
Morrison's Pit Stop - Maintenance Fuel -
95.44, Moses Building Center - Mainte-
nance Supplies/ Shop Class Supplies -
199.83, Northwest Pipe Fittings - Main-
tenance Supplies - 84.03, Parsons, Jodi
- Mow/Clean Milesville - 400.00, Pearson
- Consumable Textbooks - 757.00, Pe-
tersen's Variety - Business Office Sup-
plies/UPS Shipping - 16.52, Petty Cash
Reimbursement - Postage - 50.25, Philip
Standard - Maintenance Fuel - 239.75,
Philip Trust and Agency - Imprest Reim-
bursement* - 683.37, Pioneer Review -
Publications/Letterhead - 434.56,
ProBuild - Consortium Supplies -
2,300.04, Ramada - Lodging - ASBSD
Conference - 399.80, School Specialty -
Classroom Supplies - 16.21, SDACTE -
Consortium Travel - 250.00, Vanway Tro-
phy - Engraving - 7.80, Ward's Science -
Science Supplies - 278.54, Wellmark
Blue Cross - Health Insurance Premiums
- 8,534.06, Westerberg, Pat - Reimburse
Classroom Supplies - 80.69. TOTAL:
42,450.75. Capital Outlay Claims
Payable September 16, 2013: 3XGear
Wrestling - Wrestling Scale - 689.00,
Brant's Electric - Wire Double Ovens -
4,426.80, Cenex - Boiler Fuel - 1,952.45,
Cenex - Fuel - 1,173.27, Century Busi-
ness Lease - Copier Lease - 410.34, City
of Philip - Water/Sewer/ Pool House
Lease - 1,146.15, First National Bank -
Sioux Falls - QZAB Payment -
17,931.44, Follett Education - Textbooks
- 11.20, Gibson Concrete - Concrete -
southwest side of Fine Arts - 13,615.84,
Houghton Mifflin - Textbooks - 1,962.50,
Morrison's Pit Stop - Bus Fuel - 677.27,
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
Special Session
September 24, 2013
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 4:03 PM on Tuesday, Sep-
tember 24, 2013. A quorum was
established with Chairman Stephen
Clements, Vice Chairman Tom Radway,
Gary Snook and Edward Briggs in atten-
dance. Commissioner Nicholas Konst re-
ported at 4:30 PM. Auditor Pat Freeman,
Deputy Auditor Carla Smith, Highway Su-
perintendent Kenny Neville, Highway Ad-
ministrative Secretary Val Williams and
Pioneer Review Representative Nancy
Haigh were also present.
The first order of business was to have a
final review of the 2014 Provisional
Budget to see if anything should be
changed before approval is given. Com-
missioner Ed Briggs made a motion to
adopt the provisional budget as the 2014
Annual Budget with no changes. Com-
missioner Gary Snook seconded the mo-
tion. Motion carried.
RESOLUTION 2013-14
ADOPTION OF ANNUAL
BUDGET FOR HAAKON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA
Whereas, (7-21-5 thru 13),
SDCL provides that the Board
of County Commissioners
shall each year prepare a Pro-
visional Budget of all contem-
plated expenditures and
revenues of the County and all
its institutions and agencies for
such fiscal year and,
Whereas, the Board of County
Commissioners did prepare a
Provisional Budget and cause
same to be published by law,
and
Whereas, due and legal no-
tice has been given to the
meeting of the Board of
County Commissioners for the
consideration of such Provi-
sional Budget and all changes,
eliminations and additions
have been made thereto.
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED, That such provi-
sional budget as amended
and all its purposes, sched-
ules, appropriations, amounts,
estimates and all matters
therein set forth, SHALL BE
APPROVED AND ADOPTED
AS THE ANNUAL BUDGET
OF THE APPROPRIATION
AND EXPENDITURES FOR
Haakon County, South Dakota
and all its institutions and
agencies for calendar year be-
ginning January 1, 2014, and
ending December 31, 2014,
and the same is approved and
adopted by the Board of
County Commissioners of
Haakon County, South
Dakota, the 24th day of Sep-
tember, 2013. The Annual
Budget so adopted is available
for public inspection during
normal business hours at the
office of the county auditor
Haakon County, South
Dakota. The accompanying
taxes are levied by Haakon
County for the year January 1,
2014 through December 31,
2014.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF
HAAKON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
Commissioner Stephen
Clements
Commissioner Tom Radway
Commissioner Nicholas
Konst
Commissioner Gary Snook
Commissioner Edward Briggs
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
met with the commission to discuss the
damage to the 2000 Freightliner and
gravel trailer due to an accident that hap-
pened while graveling Tornado Ranch
Road. The insurance adjuster has not
been out to estimate the damage yet. He
has been in contact with us and is com-
ing soon. He is waiting on the accident
report from the Sheriff’s Office. The 1993
International purchased in 2009 has the
pump out and will be approximately
$3,000/$4,000 to fix. It also uses oil and
antifreeze. More informative decisions
can be made when we hear from the in-
surance adjuster. There was discussion
on the bid process that has to be fol-
lowed if we are purchasing equipment
over $25,000. Any amount under that it
is not required to go through the bid
process. Hopefully by the October 1st,
2013, Regular Meeting there will be more
information. The commission was also
informed that the blade in Midland, SD,
needs to be sent to Rapid City, SD, for
repairs. It is now at the Milesville Shop.
It will be driven to the Philip Shop and
hauled to Rapid City, SD.
TF Luke & Sons are setting up to crush
gravel. It was decided that $100,000
would be crushed at the end of this year.
Auditor Freeman also informed the com-
mission that Custodian Nancy Neville re-
ported that the air conditioner was
running on one compressor and that
Ken’s Refrigeration felt that we should be
looking at replacing the unit. The unit was
purchased in 1974, which will make it 40
years old in 2014. This will be an issue
that will be addressed later on as winter
is upon us. He also stated that we should
be thinking about converting the fuel oil
heat to bottle gas for the very same rea-
son. The heating unit is very old and in-
efficient. Another issue that needs to be
solved is to find out what the pipes run-
ning through the courthouse are
wrapped in. There will need to be confir-
mation that it is not asbestos. The com-
mission brought up the possibility of
getting on to the geothermal line. Auditor
Freeman reminded the commission
when she applied for a grant for a new
heating system a few years back, there
were several million more dollars in re-
quests than money available. Haakon
did not receive the grant. The geothermal
issue was looked into at that time and we
were told that the system could not sup-
port anymore additions.
Auditor Freeman handed out statistics for
2012 VA Expenditures in South Dakota.
Haakon County has 160 veterans that
are reported as serviced.
The next Regular Meeting will be on
Tuesday, October 1, 2013, at 1:00 PM in
the Commissioner’s Room at the court-
house. The meeting was adjourned at
5:37 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMISSION
Stephen Clements, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published October 3, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $86.10]
Proceedings of
West River Water
Development District
August 15, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Of-
fice in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph
Hieb called the meeting to order at 10:30
A.M. (CT).
Roll Call was taken and Chairman
Hieb declared a quorum was present. Di-
rectors present were: Joseph Hieb,
Casey Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl
Prokop and Lorne Smith. Also present:
Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Kati Venard,
Sec./Bookkeeper.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the agenda. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the July 17, 2013, meeting were previ-
ously mailed to the Board for their review.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the July min-
utes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph
Hieb - $55.41, Casey Krogman - $55.41,
Marion Matt - $55.41, Veryl Prokop -
$55.41, Lorne Smith - $55.41, West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS - $1,000.00,
Kadoka Press - $100.64, Lyman County
Herald - $166.91, Murdo Coyote -
$118.22, Pennington County Courant -
$66.18, Pioneer Review - $35.20, Todd
County Tribune - $99.04, USGS -
$11,280.00 (previously approved). Mo-
tion by Director Smith, seconded by Di-
rector Matt to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the July Financial Re-
port is on file at the District office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Prokop, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the July Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his August report to
the Board. Motion by Director Matt, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the Manager’s Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
FY 2014 TAX LEVY: County evaluations
were not available from the Dept. of Rev-
enue to calculate individual county tax
levies for the 2014 Tax Resolution. The
Board approved the Resolution with the
amounts as the state has recommended.
Individual county levies will be provided
when evaluations are available. Motion
by Director Krogman, seconded by Di-
rector Matt to approve the 2014 Tax Res-
olution with the amounts as the state has
recommended. Motion carried unani-
mously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:38 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_____________________________
Casey Krogman, Vice Chairman
_____________________________
Kati Venard, Recording Secretary
[Published October 3, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $21.77]
Community
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 11
reprinted with permission
from Golden West
Telecommunications
“There’s no place like home,
there’s no place like home …” is a
famous line from the 1939 film, The
Wizard of Oz. After Dorothy’s es-
capades through the Land of Oz
trying to return home, she finally
realizes that it was within her
power all along to return home.
Dorothy’s adventures may have
only been a dream, but it taught
her the value of home and family.
On the other hand, it made most of
us who watched the show as a child,
deathly afraid of flying monkeys.
Trisha and Ron Larson also had
a dream of returning home. They
lived away from western South
Dakota for 13 years. Their dream of
raising their children in Trisha’s
hometown of Philip took more than
brains, a heart and courage.
It took two major things to spur
the Larsons into action, moving
them from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to
Philip, S.D. The first was when
Ron’s job at Rockwell Collins in the information
technology department was out-sourced. The
second was the desire to raise their children
close to family and friends.
Trisha, a software engineer, works for Rock-
well Collins. Rockwell Collins provides avionics
and information technology systems and serv-
ices to aircraft manufacturers and governmen-
tal agencies. Although Ron’s job was
out-sourced, Trisha’s employment was secure.
And security is hard to give up.
After long discussions about wanting to raise
their children near family and for their chil-
dren to experience the same type of sweet
childhood memories they had growing up in
Philip and Midland; they tapped their heals to-
gether three times and moved back to rural
South Dakota.
The move was possible because Trisha’s em-
ployer was open to her to work remotely and
the superior quality of Internet service Golden
West provides, allowing her access to Rockwell
Collins’ home office in Cedar Rapids. When
they arrived in Philip, Trisha set up and still
works in an office at her father’s car dealership.
Prior to the move, she worked remotely with
people from all around the world, so the con-
cept wasn’t new to her or Rockwell Collins. The
quality infrastructure Golden West provides al-
lowed her to return home and work in rural
South Dakota.
Initially, when they moved back Ron spent a
year remodeling their 1918 home, then he went
to work for his father-in-law at the automotive
dealership. Although cars and computers have
several things in common, Ron’s IT experience
was receiving some notice.
Ron received several nudges before he decided
to go into his computer business full time. The
first prod was from Jesse Hansen, plant tech-
nician for Golden West in the Philip area. He
recognized Ron’s IT qualifications and the need
customers had once they connected to the In-
ternet. The Haakon County librarian, Anne
Brunskill, also nudged Ron and told him, “If
you live in small town and you have a talent,
you have an obligation to share that talent with
the community.”
Once the word was out about his expertise
with computers, Ron developed a
niche market in computer sales and
repair. In 2009, Ron went into busi-
ness full time and opened Home-
town Computer Services (HCS) and
he’s never looked back.
Providing hometown service, he
saves customers trips to the city and
provides face-to-face customer serv-
ice. His core service area is Murdo to
Philip, but he also travels as far as
Rapid City and Pierre. Some cus-
tomers even mail their laptops to
him from Gillette, Wyo., and parts of
North Dakota.
At any one time, Ron has 10 de-
vices running in his office. Keeping
10 devices running at once would be
a trick to some, but keeping them
connected without high-speed Inter-
net would be impossible. The 15M
Internet capacity he has from
Golden West exceeds his work ca-
pacity, since he can only work on so
many computers at one time.
Ron stated that people just don’t
realize the quality Golden West pro-
vides compared to other providers,
“The service here is so, so much better,” than
in other places.
The couple is involved in, and are assets to,
their community. Trisha sits on the city coun-
cil. Her greatest council task to date has been
the Philip community trail path, an organiza-
tion seeking to build a trail system. Ron is a
member of the Philip Chamber of Commerce
and over the past several years has held most
offices within the chamber.
The Larson’s children, Rehgan (9) and Trey
(7), go to school/day care Monday through
Thursday. Household chores are done before
and after “office” hours. Trisha’s telecommut-
ing advantage is that she can take her office
wherever she goes, as long as she has a fast In-
ternet connection.
There is no place like home for the Larsons.
Their return to rural South Dakota is a win-
win for the Larsons, the town of Philip and the
surrounding communities. Trisha and Ron are
delighted to be living and working in Philip;
they followed their dream and the yellow brick
Internet road leading home.
There’s no place like home
The Larson family – Trisha and Ron with children Rehgan and Trey
photo courtesy of Golden West Telecommunications
There was an interesting article
in the Sunday, September 29,
2013, Rapid City Journal where
scientists make plastic from cow
manure. It isn’t too complicated a
process. They ferment dairy ma-
nure in tanks, creating a slurry of
organic acids similar to vinegar
that is fed to a bacteria. The or-
ganisms feast on the fermented
slurry, bonding carbon molecules
inside their cells in the process.
Erik Coats, associate professor of
civil engineering at the University
of Idaho said the process is neither
labor intensive nor overly techni-
cal. So far it is a scale model that
is being used, but there is encour-
agement that it could produce a
vast amount of plastic. Do you
suppose disposable diapers could
be made with that plastic and let
the bacteria eat it up in the land-
fill?
Also in the same paper an arti-
cle, “Local aviators look to youth
to continue passion,” has Duane
Berke with his Aeronca Cham-
pion. Duane is a member of Chap-
ter 39 of the EAA and Young
Eagles flights are given to spark
that interest in flying among
youth 10-17 years of age. Lee
Vaughan, Philip, is also a member
of EAA and has participated in
Young Eagles flights.
George, Sandee and Roxie Git-
tings spent Sunday night with Leo
and Judie Gittings at their cabin
in the Black Hills before going to
Sandee's appointments in Rapid
City Monday.
Monday morning, Dorothy
Helmbrecht, Swanville, Minn.,
was on her way back home after
her visit with us. Bonnie Moses
and Mandie Mousseau, Exeter,
Neb., came to Kadoka and Mandie
went for a fly-over of the Badlands
with me. Bill was marooned in the
field south of Plainview when it
rained an inch and was too muddy
to get out. As things dried out he
worked on making the trail to the
field better for equipment to travel
on.
Jessica Gittings and Wade Mc-
Gruder had supper at the George
Gittings’ home Monday.
Don and Vi Moody arrived home
from Rapid City via Philip Tues-
day and got home to find their
garage door was open, so figured
it must have been a surge of elec-
tricity or something.
Tuesday, Carol Kroetch came by
in the afternoon to pick up sweat-
shirts for the Philip cross country
team.
Roxie Gittings returned to
Eagan, Minn., Tuesday.
Wednesday morning, Lila
Whidby picked up Cinty Wilmarth
and me for bowling. I will be a
member on her team I was busy
in the basement in the afternoon.
Bill got out of the field and arrived
home just about the same time
Shelley Seager pulled up. She
dropped off a birthday present for
her dad, then was on her way to
Rapid City for some time with the
Zack Seager family.
Wednesday afternoon, Ray Gib-
son and Nels Crowser arrived at
the Moody ranch to check on the
cement project of replacing the
deck and it’s cleared to go when
time allows. It was blowing a gale
that day. Don and Vi had a nice
week at the ranch getting lots of
small but important things done
and enjoying the fall weather.
Wednesday, Tony did some
things around the house, then got
produce from Peggy Martin.
Lottie (Kroetch) Walker and
Bud Fenton of the Auburn and
Renton, Wash., area arrived at
George and Sandee Gittings’
Wednesday afternoon. She is a sis-
ter to Chuck Kroetch and was vis-
iting family.
Thursday, Bill and I both were
headed to the field south of Plain-
view with the cat along. We got
there early afternoon and put
things in the motor home, then
Bill gave me instruction on the
grain cart and the combine, but
several tests in the afternoon
proved the millet was too wet to
combine, so we watched TV and
just relaxed
Thursday, Tony Harty made a
trip to Pierre to see Merlin Ben-
nett then ventured east along the
river to Lower Brule and had sup-
per before returning home.
Shelley Seager was in Rapid
having fun with grandsons, Ryder
and Raiden Seager. However,
Thursday night Bonnie Moses,
Mandie Mousseau, Exeter, Neb.,
Leanne Shoemaker, Rapid City,
and Shelley arrived in Custer
State Park in the evening and
spent the night in the car awaiting
the buffalo roundup the next
morning. It was a cold day, but
they had a great time gathering
with the people while the buffalo
were gathered.
Brad Jennings, Sioux Falls, and
Paul Miller, Tea, arrived at the
George and Sandee Gittings’ home
Thursday evening for antelope
hunting.
Don and Vi Moody left for Rapid
Friday by noon for an appoint-
ment to have a picture framed in
Rapid City. They also were look-
ing through various sports stores
for Don’s Christmas gift hoping to
find it early while there is a good
selection.
Tony Harty visited at our place
in the afternoon Friday and at-
tended the football game that
evening, being thankful he could
sit in his car and watch since it
was plenty cool and sprinkled
20/100s. He delivered mail to the
Hairs so it was there when they
arrived for the weekend. He also
went by the work site of road work
south of town.
Friday, Bill, the cat and I gave
up on combining and returned to
Kadoka. We had breakfast in
Philip on the way through. Bill
was in Philip for cards in the af-
ternoon. The Kadoka homecoming
was Friday, so there was a parade
with lots of school support even
though it was a blustery cold day.
The back part of our yard was
windrowed and Brian and Wen-
dell Buxcell got four big bales put
up.
Saturday was a much nicer day
in South Dakota and Shelley Sea-
ger, Cori Barber and Ryder and
Raiden met Lori Snellgrove and
family at the pumpkin patch on
Main Street Rapid City and the
kids had great fun. Then Shelley
and Ryder made the trip to
Kadoka for an overnight here with
us.
George Gittings worked the
horse sale Saturday. Sandee Git-
tings attended the Golden West
meeting in Wall Saturday.
I attended the Golden West tele-
phone meeting in Wall as did
many folks. Sandee Gittings and
Clark Morrision kept me company
while I ate and we caught up on
how things were going. Clark goes
back to Rochester soon for a check
up, but is feeling very good.
Sandee still has some treatments
to complete before surgery, but
lumps are gone for the most part.
Bob Hansen retired after 24 years
as a director for Golden West. It
just seems like yesterday he was
first voted in.
Saturday, Tony Harty visited
with L.D. and Shirley Hair. L.D.
was busy installing an engine in a
vehicle. Tony went to Quiver Hill
to see how the road work was
doing and visited with his niece,
Kathy Brown.
Sunday was a beautiful day for
a drive into the Black Hills and
there was quite a party going on
in Deadwood, Don and Vi Moody
discovered.
Don and Vi found a cute little
wind charm in their basket in
Rapid Valley from their neighbor/
tenants when they got back from
Deadwood. Vi is experiencing a
computer learning curve with a
new laptop. She also wrote, “What
do we do over the government
shutdown? Is that supposed to be
a holiday for everyone? Do we get
mail that day?”
Ed Morrison, Joe and Jody Git-
tings and Pee Wee Hook helped
vaccinate calves at the George
Gittings home Sunday. Ed had to
get to the field, but the rest stayed
for dinner.
Sunday morning after break-
fast, Shelley Seager was on her
way home, managing to stop a lit-
tle at a statewide garage sale
event in Nebraska. Ryder spent
the rest of the day with us. Bill,
and I, along with Zack Seager,
Cori Barber, Ryder and Raiden,
attended the “Taste of Elegance”
in Rapid that evening. We were
guests of Lester and Rosemary
Moeller. Lester is now president of
the board of the South Dakota
Pork Producers. Also at our table
were Matt and Karen Moeller,
nephew to Lester and Rosemary,
and their friends, Henry and
Ethel Cordes, Deadwood. The
taste of elegance is a competition
between chefs in the West River
area for the best prepared pork
dishes, the most attractive plate,
and also their station is judged by
the participants for eye appeal.
We enjoyed sampling eight differ-
ent dishes during the evening and
then awards were presented to the
chefs. Glenn Muller, a former
board member when I was serv-
ing, is now executive director for
the South Dakota Pork Producers.
When he came to visit with me at
our table, I was stumped to recog-
nize him – 20 years makes many
changes. The taste of elegance is a
grand event in Sioux Falls each
year and this year Lester said
there were close to 700 people in
attendance.
Sunday, Tony Harty visited
with L.D. and Shirley Hair before
they left for Oelrichs. He attended
church, then had a quiet afternoon
at home.
Bill and I think we may have to
move to Haakon County or Pen-
nington County. We got a notice
that our supplemental health in-
surance would no longer be avail-
able to us here in Jackson County.
Go figure!
There is also another deal that
has me more than a little put out
as well, and that is the unavail-
ability of regular unleaded gas. I
use that in the airplane and we
also use it in our old mowers and
tractor. It has been mandated that
all gas sold in the state contain 10
percent ethanol. The plan is to
make us less dependant on foreign
oil by utilizing more ethanol, how-
ever, they don’t mention that our
good fuel is being exported out of
the United States and we still im-
port foreign oil, so go figure. I put
in a call to Governor Dugaard sev-
eral months ago about the elimi-
nation of regular unleaded gas
and was not at all satisfied about
the response his associates gave,
in fact it seemed they didn’t ac-
knowledge any knowledge of it.
Again, legislators and politicians
do not understand that things
they mandate back to the public
create negative results.
“Fool proof systems don’t take
into account the ingenuity of fools.”
Main Street Memories.
“The trouble with most of us is
that we’d rather be ruined by
praise than saved by criticism.”
Norman Vincent Peale.
Betwixt Places| Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048
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Community
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 12
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The annual Quad County Relay
For Life fundraiser for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, this year held
in Wall, was Saturday and Sun-
day, September 14-15.
After months of preparation by
teams and organizers, and after
hours of set up the day of the
event, volunteers held opening
ceremonies at 7:00 p.m. The can-
cer awareness event had begun.
The theme was We Will Celebrate,
Remember and Fight Back.
Tents and motor homes lined
the boulevard. Official welcomers
were Relay For Life co-chairs
Kelly Lurz and Sue Peters. Open-
ing ceremonies included speakers
Kathy Swan, Wall, and Margee
Willey, Wasta.
The first circle walked along
South Boulevard by participants
was the cancer survivor lap.
Though people walked the route
continuously throughout the
night, specific laps were done each
hour on the hour.
The traditional luminaria cere-
mony involved the lighting of can-
dles placed inside decorated bags.
These glowing dedications to can-
cer survivors and those who
fought the good fight lined the
walk path. The luminaria cere-
mony speaker was Becky Drury,
Rapid City.
Sixteen teams participated in
the relay event, coming from Wall,
Philip, New Underwood, Midland,
Milesville, Wasta and Faith. A va-
riety of local entertainment per-
formed during the evening. Both a
silent auction and live auction
were held.
The closing ceremony at 5:00
a.m. was followed by the final lap.
The night included speakers, food,
activities, and music and other en-
tertainment. Over $50,000.00 was
raised from this event. All pro-
ceeds go to the American Cancer
Society in the fight against cancer.
Many people asked why this
year’s Quad County Relay For Life
went all night, when many com-
munities have been quitting at
midnight. It was stated that one of
the most important standards of
the relay is that it is an overnight
event. Being overnight means
from dusk to dawn, at least 12
hours in length. Not only does
cancer never sleep, but this is one
small way that participants can
show their support and empathy
for cancer survivors, caregivers
and those lost to cancer. The
nights for cancer patients and
caregivers are often the hardest
part of the cancer journey, when
the side effects of treatment are
the worst and the doubts that
plague them seem most intense.
This is why they relay overnight,
to gain just a bit of understanding
of cancer patients’ journey, to
show that volunteers can give just
one night of their lives each year
in solidarity. Not everyone was
able to participate that long, but
the event still had a fairly large
crowd at the closing ceremonies.
Quad County Relay For Life
Representing the Pam’s Pink Ladies team were Pam
Clements, left, and Val Schulz.
Rick and Marlis Doud. Marlis is one of the many cancer
survivors who attended the 2013 Relay For Life.
Sixteen teams and many unattached volunteers participated in this year’s Quad County Relay For Life. Shown
above are the Ladybugs, from left, Gayle Rush, Theresa Clements, Kay Ainslie, Marcia West and Phyllis Hajek.
Courtesy photos
The Community Evangelical
Free Church of Philip held it 40th
year anniversary celebration,
Sunday, September 29.
As part of the day’s events, six
men who were former leaders of
the church, the current pastor and
five of the original founders were
honored.
In the early part of 1973 several
people in the Philip community
were led of the Lord to start a new
church. On June 14, 1973, a first
service at Chester Peterson’s
home included Chester and Eve-
lyn Peterson, Morris and Helen
Sorenson, Herold and Edith
Clark, Melvin and Anite
Mensfield, Lyle and Sheson
Gugin, Kenneth and Doris Berry,
Clesence and Norme Bushby,
Robert Berry, Helen Parsons,
Ruth Elshere and Ruth Valient.
Chester Petersen led the service.
This group began holding
church services at an abandoned
church building in Cottonwood.
They met there from June 1973 to
August 1974. The first hymn sung
at the first service there was “To
God Be The Glory.”
The Community Evangelical
Free Church was organized Sep-
tember 16, 1973, in a meeting con-
ducted by Reverend Virgil Nyberg,
superintendent of the Rocky
Mountain District of the Evangel-
ical Free Church of America.
While the congregation met in
the Cottonwood building, the
“church mice” were often seen in
the ceiling and mice and birds
nests would fall down if the bell
was rung. The people tried to keep
warm on cold days with the one
potbelly stove in the back of the
church. Since this stove did not
work very well, it was necessary
to cover Valient with a blanket to
keep her warm. The first piano
cost $70 and was painted green,
but it worked well. The pulpit was
supplied mostly through lay
preachers from the First Evangel-
ical Free Church in Rapid City –
Alvin Morgan, Don Foley, Bruce
Damon and Larry Dolezal – until
the arrival of the first resident
pastor, Rev. Rudy Mason. Mason
was the pastor from February
1974 until the summer of 1980.
On May 16, 1974, the congrega-
tion purchased a former veteri-
nary clinic one mile west of Philip,
and remodeled it. When the re-
modeling was finished, the move
from the old building in Cotton-
wood was made in August 1974.
The refurbished building was ded-
icated by Nyberg, October 20,
1974. Later a Christian education
unit was added to the south side
of the original building.
Rev. Jack McCullough served as
pastor from August of 1980 until
August of 1982. He was followed
by Rev. Marion A. (Bud) Sechler
from March of 1983 until August
of 1991. He was followed by Rev.
Don Olson from March 1992 to
February 1995. Pastor Chuck
Maycroft served from March 1997
until May 1998. Pastor Gary Wahl
followed next, serving from Sep-
tember 1998 to the present time.
At the annual meeting of the
church in January of 1994, it was
decided to do a remodel of the
building by adding on an addition
to be the new sanctuary and use
the old sanctuary as the fellow-
ship room. The new sanctuary
was dedication on Easter Sunday,
March 27, 2005.
E. Free church 40th anniversary
Past and present pastors of the Community Evangelical Free Church of
Philip attended the 40th year anniversary of the founding of the church.
Back row, from left: Fred McDonald, Larry Dolezal, Bud Sechler, Jack
McCullough and John Kaiser. Front: current pastor Gary Wahl (14 years)
and Alvin Morgan.
Courtesy photo
Original founders able to attend the 40th anniversary included, back
row, from left: Helen Sorensen and Bob Berry. Front: Sharon Gugin, Deb
(Gugin) Knodel and Doris Berry.
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CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
ROUgH COUNTRY SPRAYINg:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHINg:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & RanCh
FOR SALE: Hens and pullets.
Call 859-2129. P43-2tp
FOR SALE: 2nd cutting alfalfa
hay, $130/ton. Hybrid pearl mil-
let hay, $70/ton. All big round
bales. Feed analysis available.
Located at Milesville. Call 544-
3275. P43-2tp
FOR SALE: (7) Vern’s deep 16’
feed bunks, like new. ALSO; 900’
windbreak. (320) 226-1038.
WP5-2tc
WANTED: 100-200 cows to
graze sudan grass in the Murdo
area. Have plenty of feed to win-
ter cows also. If interested, call
Mike Waldron, 280-3748 or 669-
2823. P42-2tp
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide Clas-
sifieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this
newspaper, 605-859-2516, or
800-658-3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
WANT TO BUY
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer , Elk/moose 7.50 lb.
Bleached 3.00 lb. cracked 1.00 lb.
Also need Porcupines, Rat-
tlesnakes, Elk Ivories ,Mt. Lion
skins. More info; 605-673-4345 /
clawantlerhide@hotmail.com.
Medical Assistant and Nurse Aide
positions available. We offer com-
petitive pay and excellent benefits.
New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-9418 for more informa-
tion or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
FOR SALE
FAMOUS CENTRAL SD BAKERY
available for purchase in Gettys-
burg. Established turnkey mix
bakery with both wholesale and
retail sales. Contact Kathleen at
ltgandt@yahoo.com or 240-461-
4779.
FOR SALE BY OWNER: 2009
Chevrolet Silverado, white, low
mileage, roll up topper. Call 605-
421-8526.
LOg HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneagleloghomes.
com.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
Business & Professional
Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
AUCTION
HARRIET AND TIP SISK ESTATE
AUCTION, 10:00 a.m. Oct. 12,
Miller, SD. Antiques, collectibles,
glass. See sale bill at www.sdauc-
tions.com. Midwestern Auction
Service, 605-870-1082.
HILL CITY, SD, ABSOLUTE LAND
AUCTION. Friday, October 18. 24
prime development acres within
city limits. Complete seclusion
amongst the pines! Marv Matkins,
owner. Details at
www.bradeenauction.com. 605-
673-2629.
LAND AUCTION: 428+/- acres,
Walworth County, Cropland,
Recreational, Investment, 6 miles
west of Bowdle, SD at the junction
of Hwy 12 and Hwy 47, October
30th, 2013. Call Dakota Proper-
ties, Todd Schuetzle, Auctioneer,
605-280-3115, www.DakotaProp-
erties.com.
EMPLOYMENT
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL,
Custer Clinic, Hot Springs Re-
gional Medical Clinic and Custer
Regional Senior Care have full-
time, part-time and PRN (as-
needed) RN, LPN, Licensed
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo · Philip, SÐ
Ior ull yoor concrete
constroction needs:
Classifieds
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 13
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS statewide for only
$150.00. Put the South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call this newspaper,
605-859-2516, or 800-658-3697 for details.
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The Pennington Co. Courant, as well as on our website: www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Printed only in the Pioneer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pioneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make
any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity basis.
FOR SALE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GaRaGe saLes
RUMMAgE SALE: Jennifer O’-
Connell Residence (511 E.
Dupree St) Philip, Tues., Oct.
10, 4-7 p.m. Name Brand Girls
clothes NB-6, baby bath, pink
bouncy seat, potty chair, ride-on
toy, toddler trike, toys, mini
fridge (used a few times), cooler,
Tupperware, garden hose, uni-
forms L-XL, women’s clothes L-
XL, men’s XXL. Jennifer
O’Connell & Janet Schofield
PR6-1tc
heLP WanTed
LOOKINg FOR: Finance Man-
ager & Sales Person. Contact
Colt at Philip Motor, 859-2585
or 685-4314. P43-tfn
HELP WANTED: Opening date
of Subway getting closer. Taking
applications for all shifts and po-
sitions. Apply on-line at
www.mysubwaycareer.com. Al-
ready applied? Please reapply.
Questions call 837-2400.
K42-2tc
HELP WANTED: Part-time cook
and/or part-time cashier,
evenings or weekend shifts
available. Would work well with
school hours for students or
adults. Applicantions are avail-
able at fuel desk at Discount
Fuel. K42-2tc
HELP WANTED: Full-time Jack-
son County Highway Depart-
ment worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained within
six months. Pre-employment
drug and alcohol screening re-
quired. Benefits package. Appli-
cations/resumés accepted.
Information: 837-2410 or 837-
2422. Fax: 837-2447. K41-3tc
CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tions. Benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Ruby at 837-2270,
Kadoka. K41-tfn
POSITIONS OPEN: The Kadoka
Area School District has the fol-
lowing coach positions open: jr.
high boys’, jr. high girls’, jr. var-
sity girls’ and varsity girls’ bas-
ketball. Applications are
available on the school’s website
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us and may
be submitted to: KASD, Attn.
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543. For more in-
formation contact Supt. Jamie
Hermann at 837-2175. K41-3tc
FULL- OR PART-TIME PRESS-
ROOM HELP WANTED: Monday
and Wednesday mornings (3-4
hours each day). Will train the
right person. Call Beau Ravel-
lette, 859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or
Colby Shuck for more informa-
tion: 837-2076. K33-tfn
HELP WANTED: Full-time posi-
tion at Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle &
Vet, Philip. 859-2482. PR52-tfn
AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping and laundry. Stop
in to apply or call Joseph at 279-
2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax re-
sumé to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
MisC. foR saLe
FOR SALE: 124 gal. propane
(pig) tank, new valves, $200.
545-3033, Wasta. PR6-1tp
POOL TABLE FOR SALE: Ask-
ing $450 or best offer. Call Cork
at 859-2515. PR6-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
ReCReaTion
FOR SALE: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
good shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, frig and large front stor-
age box. Stored inside off sea-
son. Call 279-2195 or 441-7049,
Wall, anytime. WP4-tfn
noTiCes/WanTed
NOW IS THE TIME … TO
THINK OF YOUR FAMILY &
FRIENDS! It’s not too early to be
compiling your Christmas or
end-of-the-year letter! You write
it, email it to us (ads@pioneer-
review.com) and we will print it
on beautiful holiday stationary.
We can even put your full color
family picture with the letter. Let
us help you make the holiday
season special (and easier) this
year. Ravellette Publications,
Inc. Philip Office: 859-2516;
Wall Office: 279-2565; Kadoka
Office: 837-2259; Faith Office:
967-2161; Bison Office: 244-
7199; Murdo Office: 669-2271;
New Underwood Office: 754-
6466. P41-tfn
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm
machinery and junk cars for
crushing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
ReaL esTaTe
FOR SALE: Nice three bedroom
home w/finished basement, two
baths, single car attached
garage and covered back deck.
All major appliances included.
514 Hone St., Philip, SD. Con-
tact Kit Graham at 859-2325 or
515-3926. PR6-tfn
FOR SALE: Jackson Co. prop-
erty, approx. 64 acres with (2)
dams, 14 miles west of Kadoka.
Newly remodeled doublewide,
detached garage with cement
floor, shed, barn, water and
sewer. Call 837-2643 or (cell)
488-0304. PR5-2tp
FOR SALE: 160 acres with rural
water. Call 515-1253. PW41-3tc
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
Approx. 1200 sq. ft., 3 bed-
rooms, 1.75 baths, detached 2-
car garage, fenced yard. $50,000
OBO. Contact Erin or Mike, 840-
2257. P40-4tc
RenTaLs
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLassified PoLiCy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
Thank yous
I wish to thank you for all the
prayers, visits, calls, cards, flow-
ers and thoughtfulness while I
was in the Rapid City and Philip
hospitals. I wish to give a special
thank you to my family for all
their loving care. It is great to be
in such a loving and caring com-
munity.
Myrna Gottsleben
HELP WANTED
Scotchman Ind. in Philip
is looking for a part-time custodian.
15-20 hrs. per week – evenings or early mornings.
Pre-employment drug & alcohol screening is required.
Call or stop for an application: 605-859-2542
LOOKING TO HIRE:
Finance Manager
& Sales Person
Contact Colt at Philip Motor
859-2585 or 685-4314
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Tire Tanks
Vacuum
Excavation
Cobett Waters
Directional
Boring
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
~ Saturday, Oct. 5th ~
New York Strip Special
~ Monday, Oct. 7th ~
1/2 lb. Cheeseburger
Basket
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday Downtown Philip
Salad Bar
Available at
Lunch!
~ Tuesday, Oct. 1st ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Oct. 2nd ~
Indian Taco
or Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Oct. 3rd ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Oct. 4th ~
Barbecued Pork Ribs
Chicken • Fish
Reservations:
859-2774
October 3, 2013 • Pioneer Review 14
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685 5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567 3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman & AuctIon-
eer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985 5486
Ccll (605} 515 0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866 4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544 3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441 1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347 0151
(605} 641 1042
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685 4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9 2S??
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. YEARLINGS: 11.00 A.M. CALVES: 12.00 P.M. EARLY
CONSIGNMENTS: 6500 HEAD.
YEARLINGS:
FAIRBANKS - 450 DLK STFS...................800 850= (7 LOADS SAME SOFT}
ROSETH CATTLE CO - 280 DLK, FED, & HEFF STFS (2 LDS DLK, 1 LD
FED ANC, & 1 LD HEFF} ...........................................................875 925=
SLOVEK - 140 DLK & FED TESTED OPEN HFFS .......................900 1000=
NELSON - 65 FWF STFS ..............................................................875 900=
RAPID CREEK RANCH - 46 FED ANC TESTED OPEN HFFS .......800 900=
CONSIGNMENT - 34 DLK SPAY HFFS & A FEW STFS ..................650 700=
RAINBOW END RN - 26 DLK STFS ..............................................750 950=
DOUBLE BAR ? - 26 DLK STFS ............................................................700
FROMM - 20 MIXED YFLCS ........................................................700 900=
WHITE - 8 DLK & CHAF X STFS & OPEN HFFS ...........................750 950=
CALVES: FS÷ FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
NELSON - 340 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................400 450=
YOUNG RANCH - 330 MOSTLY CHAF X, DLK & A FEW HEFF CLVS;
FS ............................................................................................550 650=
LEVIN & CASTEEL - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................500 575=
DALY - 250 DLK CLVS; FS ...........................................................550 600=
DEERING - 250 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .................................................600=
BRUNS - 225 DLK CLVS; FS .........................................................550 600=
WEYER - 200 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................450 550=
LIVERMONT RANCH - 200 FANCY DLK STFS; FS,NI ..........................500=
GRUBL - 200 CEFT FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI .........................................550=
VIG - 180 DLK & DWF CLVS;FS,NI ...............................................500 550=
STABEN - 150 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI .......................................500 550=
ALDREN - 150 CHAF X CLVS; FS ................................................500 570=
MCPHERSON - 150 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI .....................................450=
MCPHERSON - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............................450 500=
REINERT - 140 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500 600=
BOWEN & BOWEN - 140 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................550 600=
CUNY - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI .......................................................550 600=
GRAVATT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN .................................................550=
FREELAND - 100 DLK STFS; FS ..................................................625 650=
GOLDEN WILLOW RANCH - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................500 550=
KOCH - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................600=
LANTIS - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................400 450=
DEVRIES & PROKOP - 95 MOSTLY DLK & A FEW FED STFS;
FS,NI ........................................................................................500 525=
POURIER - 90 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .........................................................575=
NOVOTNY - 80 FED CLVS; FS,NI .................................................550 650=
SCHAACK - 80 FED CLVS; FS,NI .................................................525 550=
JP RANCH - 75 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS .........................................450 500=
VALLERY & MILLS - 75 DLK CLVS; FS ........................................400 500=
MCKAY - 65 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................500 575=
SHULL - 65 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................500=
HUNSACKER - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI,AN ...........................550 600=
NIXON - 55 DLK STFS; FS ..................................................................575=
MCCORMICK - 50 DLK CLVS; FS ................................................550 575=
BARKER - 50 DLK CLVS; FS ........................................................500 550=
COY - 50 DLK MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ...................................................600=
SCULL - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................550=
ELSHERE - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................................500 550=
HEADLEE - 40 DLK CLVS; FS .............................................................500=
RYPKEMA - 35 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................500 550=
SOLOMAN INC - 20 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................600 625=
JONES - 15 FED CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................550 600=
NIEDERWERDER - 15 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................450 475=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS SS9 2S?? OR tDS tSS SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: DFED COW SPECIAL & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH UPS: 10 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EARLY CONSIGN-
MENTS:
BRED CATTLE:
A CONSIGNMENT - 185 DLK & FED FUNNINC ACE COWS; DFED. DLK
& FED
BRYAN CUNY - 40 DLK EXPOSED COWS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS SS9 2S?? OR tDS tSS SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL DFED CATTLE SALE & WEICH UP
COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23. SPECIAL DFED CATTLE SALE & WEICH UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3. SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF & STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL
DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R CALF USA! R CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859 2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: OCT. J, 2DJS
We Þod o 11gÞ1 run o] geor11ngs & o good
run o] oo1ves & ue1gÞ ups. 11´s o good
morKe1!! Ne×1 ueeK, o b1g run o] oo1ves
& geor11ngs, e×peo11ng tSDD Þeod.
We1gÞ up & Bred Co111e So1e on Wednes-
dog. No ue1gÞ ups on Tuesdog.
CALVES:
BONENBERGER RANCH INC, BELVIDERE
82.......................DLK & DWF STF 655= .......$176.75
$1158 & HD
14..............................DLACK STF 538= .......$186.25
HOWARD & DELORES KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
34..............................DLACK STF 361= .......$229.50
70.......................DLK & DWF STF 445= .......$218.75
MIKE & MATT YACKLEY, RAPID CITY
102...............................FED STF 543= .......$193.00
42.................................FED STF 450= .......$219.00
51 ................................FED HFF 476= .......$219.00
18 ................................FED HFF 410= .......$206.00
GLENN, ROBERT & ERIC JONES, WHITE OWL
107.....................FED & DLK STF 477= .......$213.50
100.....................FED & DLK STF 544= .......$189.75
17.................................FED STF 371= .......$207.00
107 ..............................FED HFF 465= .......$213.00
38 ......................FED & DLK HFF 415= .......$203.00
THAD STOUT, KADOKA
42.......................DLK & DWF STF 491= .......$201.00
12..............................DLACK STF 406= .......$216.50
23 .............................DLACK HFF 477= .......$178.00
HENRY KARRELS, STURGIS
71.......................DLK & DWF STF 572= .......$185.00
5................................DLACK STF 432= .......$206.00
59 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 528= .......$181.50
LARRY E. GABRIEL, QUINN
100.....................DLK & DWF STF 563= .......$185.00
PATTON & STANGLE, MILESVILLE
91.......................DLK & DWF STF 567= .......$186.25
7.........................DLK & DWF STF 464= .......$197.00
5........................FWF & DWF STF 579= .......$180.25
42 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 515= .......$182.00
STEVE ISKE, NEW UNDERWOOD
48.................................DWF STF 565= .......$186.00
7................................DLACK STF 432= .......$221.00
32 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 528= .......$185.00
JOSEPH & PAT URBANIAK, UNION CENTER
39.......................DLK & DWF STF 562= .......$187.00
2................................DLACK STF 448= .......$218.00
JIM & BRENDA LINT2, HERMOSA
39..............................DLACK STF 593= .......$180.00
4.........................DLK & DWF STF 413= .......$195.00
33 .............................DLACK HFF 558= .......$171.00
3 ...............................DLACK HFF 412= .......$183.00
RON & CONNIE TWISS, INTERIOR
22..............................DLACK STF 634= .......$175.25
$1111 & HD
2................................DLACK STF 486= .......$204.00
CHUCK & MIKE CARLBOM, INTERIOR
63.......................DLK & DWF STF 527= .......$188.50
11.......................DLK & DWF STF 392= .......$207.00
45 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 460= .......$183.00
7........................DLK & DWF HFF 340= .......$186.00
HELEN PFEIFER, PHILIP
19..............................DLACK STF 453= .......$208.00
14 .............................DLACK HFF 469= .......$183.00
A CONSIGNMENT
10.........................FD & DLK STF 493= .......$201.00
4 ..........................FD & DLK STF 374= .......$211.00
10........................FD & DLK HFF 463= .......$178.00
CLARK WHITE, NEW UNDERWOOD
4................................DLACK STF 416= .......$193.00
BUNK WHITE, NEW UNDERWOOD
9................................DLACK STF 465= .......$181.00
12 .............................DLACK HFF 422= .......$171.00
YEARLINGS:
MIKE NOTEBOOM, PHILIP
7.........................DLK & DWF STF 626= .......$169.50
NICHOLS CASPERS, NEW UNDERWOOD
5................................DLACK STF 688= .......$161.50
SPENCER CORDES, CREIGHTON
3 ...............................DLACK HFF 632= .......$160.00
29 .............................DLACK HFF 899= .......$148.75
GLENDON SHEARER, WALL
60 .............................DLACK HFF 716= .......$159.75
HEATH & LARRY FREEMAN, OWANKA
19 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 748= .......$155.00
CARL & CASEY KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
18 .............................DLACK HFF 809= .......$151.25
CHARLES & ELEANOR 2UCCARO, MIDLAND
18......................FED & FWF HFF 869= .......$149.00
DEAN HEEB, MIDLAND
4 ...............................DLACK HFF 911= .......$145.00
JOHN L (JT) MOON III, CREIGHTON
14 .............................DLACK HFF 940= .......$144.25
GERALD & STEPHANIE SHARP, LONG VALLEY
8 ..................................FED HFF 981= .......$141.75
PHIL CARLEY, MILESVILLE
6 ...............................DLACK HFF 1,020= ....$138.75
THAD STOUT, KADOKA
9..........................FD & DLK HFF 762= .......$151.50
COWS:
MIKE YACKLEY, RAPID CITY
1 .................................FED COW 1,350= ......$90.00
1 .................................FED COW 1,560= ......$85.00
5 .................................FED COW 1,280= ......$80.00
CHARLES & ELEANOR 2UCCARO, MIDLAND
1 .................................FED COW 1,360= ......$87.50
LEO & JOANN PATTON, MILESVILLE
1...............................DLACK COW 1,285= ......$85.00
1...............................DLACK COW 1,215= ......$82.00
1...............................DLACK COW 1,240= ......$81.50
1...............................DLACK COW 1,260= ......$81.00
1...............................DLACK COW 1,495= ......$79.50
BOB CERNEY, PHILIP
1...............................DLACK COW 1,215= ......$82.50
1...............................DLACK COW 1,220= ......$80.00
CASEY KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
1...............................DLACK COW 1,210= ......$82.50
RICHARD PAPOUSEK, QUINN
1...............................DLACK COW 1,500= ......$82.50
BILL SLOVEK, PHILIP
1 .................................FED COW 1,225= ......$82.00
1 .................................FED COW 1,625= ......$81.50
1...............................DLACK COW 1,515= ......$79.50
DALE GOSSARD, UNION CENTER
1...............................DLACK COW 1,405= ......$81.50
CHRIS CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
2...............................DLACK COW 1,363= ......$79.50
LYLE O'BRYAN, BELVIDERE
1 .................................DWF COW 1,210= ......$79.50
REED CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
4...............................DLACK COW 1,389= ......$78.75
2...............................DLACK COW 1,271= ......$78.50
3...............................DLACK COW 1,542= ......$76.75
BULLS:
JOHN BRENNAN, MUD BUTTE
1.................................DWF DULL 1,995= ......$99.50
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,855= ......$99.00
LEO & JOANN PATTON, MILESVILLE
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,985= ......$98.75
MYRON WILLIAMS, WALL
1..............................DLACK DULL 2,095= ......$98.00
1..............................DLACK DULL 2,160= ......$97.50
BILL GIKLING, BOX ELDER
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,975= ......$96.50
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,950= ......$96.00
KELLY FEES, PHILIP
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,950= ......$96.00
GARY WILLIAMS, WALL
1..............................DLACK DULL 2,035= ......$95.50
HEIFERETTES & COWETTES:
RYAN CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
4..............................DLACK HFFT 949= .......$119.50
1..............................DLACK HFFT 1,010= ....$102.00
PATTY PRINCE, UNION CENTER
1 ................................DWF HFFT 915= .......$119.00
1..............................DLACK HFFT 1,035= ....$103.00
CHRIS CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
2..............................DLACK HFFT 988= .......$118.00
REED CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
4..............................DLACK HFFT 884= .......$115.50
GARY CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
7..............................DLACK HFFT 993= .......$115.00
ROBERT SCHOFIELD, PHILIP
1..............................DLACK HFFT 915= .......$115.00
BOB CERNEY, PHILIP
1..............................DLACK HFFT 985= .......$113.00
1..............................DLACK HFFT 980= .......$107.00
1 ........................DLACK COWETTE 1,085= ....$104.00
1 ........................DLACK COWETTE 1,050= ....$103.00
CHAD CERNEY, PHILIP
1.................................FED HFFT 1,030= ....$104.00
(continued from 7)
Pierre. The participating dogs
were from Wisconsin, Missouri,
Montana, and Watertown.
Lola Roseth was in Kennebec
and Miller Thursday attending to
emergency management duties.
Sunday, Lola was in Philip visit-
ing her mother, Joy Klima.
Our week was spent on the
usual seasonal activities – har-
vesting some corn, moving hay,
and checking on cattle. I was in
Pierre Saturday for supplies – a
necessary evil. It seems like this
time of year is busy trying to but-
ton up all the projects I wanted to
get accomplished this summer.
From the looks of things, I need at
least a couple more weeks of nice
weather!
Today, I am grateful for screens
on the windows. The pesky flies
are hanging around every door
and window, just looking for an
opportunity to get inside. What
must it have been like before
screens were available? With all
the canning and cooking going on
at this time of year, I imagine the
kitchen and dining areas were
swarming! I guess I can add fly
swatters to my list of things I am
grateful for, too!
I hope you'll have time to enjoy
this wonderful season. Get out
and see some of the autumn colors
if you have a chance. Mother Na-
ture really is quite an artist! And
while you are at it, be sure to be
safe! Enjoy your week.
Moenville News
F. John Hay
Extension educator – energy,
University of Nebraska
Lincoln, Department of
Biosystems Engineering
Lower octane gasoline is now
flowing up the pipelines to local
terminals. This “sub octane” fuel
will change the choices and prices
we see at the pump.
Previously gasoline in the
pipeline was about 87 octane.
Starting now gasoline in the
pipeline will be about 83-84 oc-
tane. This “sub octane” will need
to be blended with an octane en-
hancer to meet the 87 and above
octane ratings we see at the
pump.
This is where ethanol comes in,
as the lowest cost octane booster
(ethanol has an octane rating of
100). In recent years the choices
have been 91 premium, 89 “super”
with 10 percent ethanol, and 87
regular. Starting now there are
many choices for fuel stations, yet
of greatest interest to the public
will be the low cost option which
will change from the 89 “super”
with 10 percent ethanol to the 87
with 10 percent ethanol.
Don’t let the numbers confuse
you, octane rating is not energy,
and mileage per gallon will not
change between the old 89 “super”
and the new 87 with 10 percent
ethanol. Just to make things even
more confusing we are nearing the
time when we switch to winter
fuel which is more volatile and has
lower British thermal units (BTU)
per gallon than summer fuel
(more short hydrocarbon chains
thus lighter fuel).
Below are some potential op-
tions for fuel stations and gener-
ally how they could be priced
assuming premium fuel is highest
cost and ethanol trades at a dis-
count to gasoline. Note the list
below generally goes from lowest
cost to highest.
•87 with 10 percent ethanol
•89 with 10 percent ethanol
(mix of “sub octane,” premium and
ethanol)
•87 (made from “sub octane”
and premium)
•93 with 10 percent ethanol
(premium with ethanol)
•91 (premium)
This new “sub octane” will
shake things up for a while as fuel
stations figure out how to label,
price and market these new
blends.
Octane rating is not energy and
a car should get the same mileage
with 87 as 89 or even 91.
Cars with high compression en-
gines are the only cars that need
high octane fuel. Read your gas
cap and your manual (most cars
list a minimum octane such as
85). High compression engines are
more efficient, due to the compres-
sion ratio; not the fuel.
Fuel
changes
are here
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
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859-2577
PhiIip, SD
HORS£ R£PORT: S£PT£MB£R 2S, 2DJS
Bod R1ver Fo11 £×1rovogonzo Horse So1e
uos o Þuge suooess u11Þ SS4 Þeod. We Þod
over SDD reg1s1ered bugers, u11Þ Þorses so1d
1n1o JS s1o1es ond Conodo. Ruzso Quor1er
Horses oon11nue 1o be o Þ1gÞ11gÞ1 o] 1Þ1s so1e.
TÞe oroud uos Þuge ond s1oged o11 dog
1ong, u11Þ verg ]eu emp1g seo1s. We ]e11 1Þ1s
uos one o] 1Þe bes1 overo11 oons1gnmen1 so1es
ue´ve ever Þe1d. Horses u11Þ oond111on, ped1-
gree & some oo1or ore eosg 1o se11. BroKe
Þorses o] ong K1nd ond oo1or uere 1n Þ1gÞ de-
mond, espeo1o11g 1] 1Þeg uere gen11e ond ue11
broKe.
Ne×1 Horse So1e u111 be o]1er 1Þe ]1rs1 o] 1Þe
geor.
OVERALL CATALOG AVERAGE......$1603 J HEAD
TOP 5 HEAD AVC. .........................................$7660
TOP 10 HEAD AVC. .......................................$6840
TOP 20 HEAD AVC. .......................................$5365
RU2SA QUARTER HORSES - SELBY
LOT 26 ÷ DAY FOAN FILLY ............................$9,100.00
LOT 18 ÷ DFOWN FILLY ................................$8,750.00
LOT 11 ÷ SOFFEL MAFE ...............................$6,250.00
LOT 45 ÷ DAY FILLY .....................................$5,500.00
LOT 36 ÷ SOFFEL COLT ................................$5,000.00
LOT 9 ÷ FOAN FILLY.....................................$4,800.00
LOT 6 ÷ FOAN FILLY.....................................$4,400.00
LOT 47 ÷ DAY FILLY .....................................$4,200.00
LOT 3 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY...............................$4,000.00
LOT 14 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$3,900.00
LOT 37 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$3,900.00
LOT 30 ÷ DAY COLT .....................................$3,400.00
LOT 5 ÷ CFAY COLT .....................................$3,000.00
LOT 15 ÷ SOFFEL MAFE ...............................$3,000.00
LOT 25 ÷ SOFFEL COLT ................................$3,000.00
LOT 33 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$2,900.00
LOT 8 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY...............................$2,700.00
LOT 1 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT ...............................$2,300.00
LOT 4 ÷ SOFFEL COLT..................................$2,200.00
LOT 7 ÷ CFAY COLT .....................................$2,200.00
LOT 44 ÷ PALOMINO COLT .............................$2,100.00
LOT 23 ÷ DFOWN FILLY ................................$1,800.00
LOT 49 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT .............................$1,800.00
LOT 42 ÷ DLK/DFOWN FILLY .........................$1,700.00
LOT 34 ÷ DLK/DFOWN COLT .........................$1,400.00
LOT 41 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT .............................$1,400.00
LOT 50 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$1,400.00
LOT 10 ÷ DAY COLT .....................................$1,300.00
LOT 48 ÷ CFEMELLO COLT ............................$1,200.00
LOT 53 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY................................$1,100.00
LOT 46 ÷ SOFFEL COLT ................................$1,000.00
LOT 52 ÷ CFAY FILLY ......................................$950.00
LOT 17 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY................................$900.00
LOT 35 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$900.00
LOT 43 ÷ DFWN/CFAY FILLY ............................$900.00
LOT 2 ÷ FED FOAN COLT .................................$850.00
LOT 24 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$850.00
LOT 29 ÷ DAY COLT ........................................$850.00
LOT 20 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY................................$700.00
LOT 31 ÷ SOFFEL COLT...................................$700.00
LOT 54 ÷ PALOMINO COLT ................................$700.00
LOT 13 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$500.00
LOT 51 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$500.00
LOT 55 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT ................................$500.00
DANIELLE PIROUTEK - MILESVILLE
LOT 173 ÷ SOFFEL 6 YF OLD CELDINC...........$7,400.00
LOT 229 ÷ SOFFEL 4 YF OLD CELDINC ..........$5,900.00
TRAVIS & AMANDA FRINK - QUINN
LOT 88 ÷ DUCKSKIN 6 YF OLD CELDINC...........$6,800.00
SHAINA HUFFMAN - SELBY
LOT 57 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY................................$6,100.00
LOT 60 ÷ DAY STALLION................................$1,300.00
LOT 56 ÷ CHESTNUT FILLY ............................$1,000.00
DARREL HENRY - SILEX, MO
LOT 179 ÷ DAY 12 YF OLD MAFE ..................$6,100.00
LOT 176 ÷ DFOWN 13 YF OLD MAFE..............$5,300.00
LOT 177 ÷ CFAY 14 YF OLD MAFE ................$4,500.00
LOT 181 ÷ SOFFEL 8 YF OLD MAFE...............$4,100.00
LOT 180 ÷ SOFFEL 14 YF OLD MAFE.............$3,700.00
LOT 178 ÷ SOFFEL 10 YF OLD MAFE.............$2,700.00
LOT 174 ÷ SOFFEL 7 YF OLD MAFE...............$2,600.00
LOT 175 ÷ DAY 9 YF OLD MAFE....................$2,200.00
BUNKER LIVESTOCK - AMERICAN FORK, UT
LOT 230 ÷ CHESTNUT STALLION .....................$6,000.00
BILL WELLER - KADOKA
LOT 97 ÷ DUCKSKIN 8 YF OLD CELDINC..........$5,100.00
SETH WEISHAAR - BELLE FOURCHE
LOT 108 ÷ SOFFEL 9 YF OLD CELDINC...........$3,600.00
LUKE & WANDA VANDERMAY - KADOKA
LOT 206 ÷ DUN 6 YF OLD CELDINC ...............$3,500.00
STEVE MOLTER - MONTICELLO, IN
LOT 240 ÷ DUN 9 YF OLD CELDINC ...............$3,200.00
LYLE O'BRYAN - BELVIDERE
LOT 256 ÷ SOFFEL 13 YF OLD CELDINC.........$3,200.00
JERRY SAMPSON - INTERIOR
LOT 119 ÷ DLACK 11 YF OLD CELDINC...........$3,100.00
ALVIN & DOROTHY STROMER - WHITE RIVER
LOT 76 ÷ SOFFEL 6 YF OLD CELDINC..............$3,000.00
KARLA TIMM - VALE
LOT 170 ÷ DLK PAINT 9 YF OLD CELDINC .......$3,000.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
LOT 98 ÷ SOFFEL STUD COLT........................$2,900.00
LA2Y 69 RANCH - KADOKA
LOT 237 ÷ DUCKSKIN 9 YF OLD MAFE............$3,000.00
LOT 164 ÷ DUN 11 YF OLD CELDINC .............$2,500.00
LOT 235 ÷ DAY 12 YF OLD CELDINC..............$2,000.00
LOT 236 ÷ DUCKSKIN 6 YF OLD CELDINC........$1,600.00
WILL VANENGEN - HUDSON
LOT 165 ÷ SOFFEL 3 YF OLD CELDINC...........$2,400.00
LOT 166 ÷ FOAN STUD.................................$1,000.00
LOT 167 ÷ CHESTNUT STUD .............................$950.00
LOT 168 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY.................................$750.00
BRADY JANDREAU - KADOKA
LOT 234 ÷ CFAY 6 YF OLD MAFE ..................$2,400.00
JIM & MAGGIE BLOOM - RAPID CITY
LOT 187 ÷ SOFFEL 8 YF OLD CELDINC...........$2,200.00
LOT 194 ÷ SOFFEL 17 YF OLD FAMILY ...........$1,900.00
LOT 189 ÷ SOFFEL 3 YF OLD MAFE...............$1,100.00
LOT 190 ÷ SOFFEL 2 YF OLD MAFE..................$700.00
LYLE HARTSHORN - RAPID CITY
LOT 183 ÷ PALOMINO 2 YF OLD MAFE............$2,000.00
LOT 184 ÷ PALOMINO 3 YF OLD MAFE............$2,000.00
TOMMY & ALICE HARTY - MILESVILLE
LOT 132 ÷ CFAY 7 YF OLD MAFE ..................$2,000.00
LOT 133 ÷ CHESTNUT 3 YF OLD CELDINC .......$1,800.00
LOT 134 ÷ CHESTNUT 2 YF OLD FILLY ...............$750.00
LOT 136 ÷ CHESTNUT 2 YF OLD CELDINC ..........$500.00
ASA LEE HICKS - MARTIN
LOT 146 ÷ DLK & WHITE 12 YF OLD CELDINC.$1,900.00
KEN & MARILYN DERRY - SOUTH BEND, TX
LOT 78 ÷ FED FOAN MAFE ...........................$1,800.00
LOT 82 ÷ DAY FILLY ........................................$800.00
LOT 79 ÷ DAY STUD........................................$600.00
LOT 80 ÷ DUN MAFE.......................................$550.00
LOT 86 ÷ FED FOAN FILLY ...............................$550.00
LOT 77 ÷ FED FOAN MAFE ..............................$500.00
LOT 84 ÷ FED DUN FILLY ................................$500.00
MIKE & ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
LOT 89 ÷ DUCKSKIN/DUN STALLION................$1,700.00
LOT 91 ÷ DUN STALLION ...............................$1,700.00
LOT 93 ÷ PALOMINO STALLION........................$1,000.00
LOT 95 ÷ SOFFEL STALLION..............................$900.00
LOT 96 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$600.00
LOT 94 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY................................$550.00
JERRY MAYER - PIEDMONT
LOT 115 ÷ DAY 3 YF OLD STALLION ...............$1,600.00
LOT 199 ÷ CFAY 8 YF OLD MAFE .....................$850.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
LOT 109 ÷ PALOMINO STALLION......................$1,500.00
KATHLEEN WALKER - BOX ELDER
LOT 171 ÷ SOFFEL 10 YF OLD MAFE.............$1,500.00
JUD BALDRIDGE - NORTH PLATTE, NE
LOT 232 ÷ DUN 12 YF OLD CELDINC .............$1,400.00
SHAWN & LESLIE MERRILL - WALL
LOT 231 ÷ FED FOAN 2 YF OLD STALLION.......$1,100.00
SCHOFIELD QUARTER HORSE - PHILIP
LOT 64 ÷ SOFFEL HOFSE COLT.........................$950.00
LOT 66 ÷ SOFFEL HOFSE COLT.........................$850.00
LOT 63 ÷ DUN HOFSE COLT .............................$800.00
LOT 65 ÷ DAY HOFSE COLT..............................$750.00
LOT 68 ÷ DUCKSKIN HOFSE COLT......................$550.00
LOT 70 ÷ DUN FILLY .......................................$550.00
LOT 69 ÷ DUN HOFSE COLT .............................$500.00
CASPER HAMMERSTROM - STURGIS
LOT 197 ÷ DAY FOAN MAFE.............................$800.00
CHAD & CRYSTAL BRUNSCH - CHADRON, NE
LOT 117 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT ..............................$750.00
LOT 118 ÷ DAY FOAN COLT..............................$700.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
LOT 107 ÷ DAY STALLION.................................$650.00
SHARON HERRON - UNION CENTER
LOT 158 ÷ DUN STUD .....................................$550.00
LOT 160 ÷ SOFFEL STUD.................................$500.00
MOREAU RIVER QUARTER HORSES - MUD BUTTE
LOT 142 ÷ DFOWN FILLY .................................$350.00
LOOSE HORSES:
SADDLE PFOSPECTS. ..........................$550 - $900/HD
FLESHY, COOD STOUT HOFSES .................$20 - $40/CWT
POSSIDLE FIDINC PFOSPECTS, SUDSTANTIALLY HICHEF
THIN, LITE HOFSES UNDEF........ $20/CWT (MAFKET TOUCH}
HOFSES WITH DLEMISHES, HAFD TO SELL

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