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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 9
Volume 107
October 25, 2012
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George McGovern died on Sun-
day, October 21, after entering hos-
pice care the previous week after a
series of medical problems. He was
90 years old.
McGovern was named by Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy as head of
the Food for Peace program, which
sends U.S. commodities to deprived
areas around the world. McGovern
made a second bid for the senate in
1962, unseating Senator Joe Bot-
tum by just 597 votes. He was the
first Democrat elected to the
United States Senate from South
Dakota since 1930.
In early 2002, George and
Eleanor McGovern returned to
Mitchell, where they helped raise
money for a library bearing their
names. Eleanor died there in 2007
at age 85. They had been married
64 years, and had four daughters
and a son.
Senator John Thune issued the
following statement. “Senator
George McGovern lived a life of ex-
emplary service. George’s legacy of
service will live on at the leader-
ship program created in his name
by his beloved Dakota Wesleyan
University and in the hearts of all
of those who took courage and in-
spiration from his public life and
quiet, but powerful voice in the
counsels of government. Through-
out his post-political life, George
dedicated himself to the service of
his fellow man in the crusade
against hunger around the world.
“Today, South Dakota mourns
the loss of a war hero and a great
statesman, and our history will for-
ever reflect the impact of George
McGovern. Despite our political
differences, I was always proud to
call Senator McGovern my friend
and he will be deeply missed by
those he met and those who were
fortunate enough to experience his
goodwill through the world. Kim-
berley and my prayers are with his
family and friends during this dif-
ficult time.”
Representative Kristi Noem
made the following statement.
“George McGovern was a South
Dakota institution. He has inspired
countless Americans to get in-
volved in the political process and
will be remembered for his passion-
ate commitment to South Dakota
and to the hungry of the world. On
a personal note, Senator McGovern
was always unfailingly kind to me.
His presence will be missed in
South Dakota. Bryon and I send
our thoughts and prayers to the
McGovern family and to all of the
senator's friends and loved ones
during this difficult time.”
Senator Tim Johnson made this
statement. “Barbara and I are sad-
dened by the news of Senator
George McGovern’s passing. He
was a dear friend to both of us
throughout the years. George was
a compassionate man with a truly
deep devotion to public service.
Whether it was serving as a
bomber pilot in World War II, as an
international leader in fighting
hunger, as a talented teacher, or as
Senator, he served with uncompro-
mising values and commitment.
“His leadership inspired many,
including myself. He will be missed
by countless people across South
Dakota and the world, but mostly
by the family that he loved. Our
thoughts and prayers are with the
McGovern family.
“With such a long, accomplished
life, it is difficult to fully describe
the impact George McGovern had
on our world. In each chapter of his
life, his contributions to our society
were gigantic. His accomplish-
ments have already been the sub-
ject of many books, and his legacy
will live on forever.
“I was just nine years old when
George was elected to Congress. As
a young man, I followed his career
closely as he became increasingly
influential. To see a man from
Mitchell become a leading voice on
the biggest issues of the day was
inspiring to me and many other
young South Dakotans. This inspi-
ration continued throughout all of
George’s life. Even in these last few
years, he spent time with South
Dakota students, which undoubt-
edly inspired them to think big
about their futures and how they
can have an impact on our world.
“Although George’s 1972 presi-
dential race against Richard Nixon
gets a lot of attention, the work he
did before and after his time in
public office was incredible. George
summed it up best last month
when he wrote an article for the
Washington Post on losing the
1972 race. George wrote that while
the loss was a significant personal
setback, “I have acknowledged it,
George McGovern dies at 90
Each school year junior and sen-
ior students at Philip High School
can apply to be part of the Intern-
ships program in which they can
work at a local business or for a
teacher.
This year the program has 10
students gaining experience at pos-
sible future careers.
Shelby Schofield, a senior, is
working with Erin Baer in the ele-
mentary special education class-
room. Schofield said she plans a ca-
reer in special education following
graduation next spring. She said
this will allow her to gain experi-
ence working with children who
have special needs.
Schofield said the experience has
been “awesome” and a lot different
than she expected, but just as awe-
some as she thought it would be.
The part she enjoys is working
one on one with the kids. “You get
to know the children a lot more and
I think that’s important for the stu-
dents,” she said.
One thing Schofield has learned
is that it’s not all fun, as she re-
lated having to cut out project
items for one hour. “And my had
felt like falling off my arm after the
hour was over,” she said. “But now
I’m a master at cutting things out,
so it’s all good!”
Schofield noted she was sur-
prised at how different the special
education classroom is from others.
Last year Schofield interned in the
high school English classroom.
“It’s been a great experience so
far and I look forward to continue
learning from it,” Schofield said.
Senior Samantha Huston is busy
learning about radiology from
Kayla Eymer at Philip Health
Services. Huston said she chose the
x-ray department because she
plans to get a degree in radiology
and wanted to experience the job.
Huston said the experience has
been great. “I love working there,”
she said. “I love working with the
girls, Kayla, Lacey (Clements) and
Lori (Seager). They are so fun and
nice. And I like working with the
patients,” she said.
Huston said the hardest part for
her, is having to put the patient in
the right position for the x-ray and
it causes them pain. “It makes me
feel bad,” she said.
The amount of required paper-
work was a surprise to Huston. She
said she wasn’t expecting that.
That’s one reason the Internship
program is good for the students –
they get to see all sides of a profes-
sion.
Tara Cantrell is looking toward
a career as an elementary teacher
so she chose to work with Mary-
Lynn Crary, the second grade
teacher.
Cantrell, a senior, said since she
is looking at being a teacher this
would be a good experience for her.
“It’s been a lot of fun. The kids are
all so sweet and I get a big hug
from them as soon as they come in
from recess,” she said. “I love it!”
Cantrell said she enjoys being
around the kids. She couldn’t list
anything that she doesn’t enjoy
about the experience. “I love kids,”
she said.
An eye-opener for her has been
learning how to explain a problem.
“Sometimes a problem can be re-
ally simple, but so hard to explain
to a second grader,” she said.
PHS students gain career experiences
Shelby Schofield is a teacher’s aide
with Erin Baer in the special education
classroom. Courtesy photos
Tara Cantrell works with MaryLynn
Crary in the second grade classroom.
Samantha Huston, front, works with
Kayla Eymer in Philip Health Services
radiology department.
Reuban Vollmer, Jr., a member
of the Midland Volunteer Fire De-
partment and a South Dakota Fire-
fighters Association board member,
visited the National Fallen Fire-
fighters Memorial at the National
Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, Md.
The annual National Fallen Fire-
fighter Memorial weekend was
held Friday through Sunday, Octo-
ber 5-7.
According to Vollmer, the public-
attended activities began with the
arrival of the Red Helmet Motorcy-
cle Ride. This consisted of well over
200 motorcyclists from Fredrick,
Ma., arriving at the memorial. Fol-
lowing was a brief service with the
laying of a wreath at the memorial
by members of the ride.
Vollmer said that on Saturday
evening, a candlelight service was
held. Family members had deco-
rated luminaries with pictures and
drawings of various interest of each
fallen firefighter.
Sunday morning, with the
weather being wet, the memorial
services were held at Mount St.
Mary’s University. Noted were 80
names of those who lost their lives
in 2011. Included were the names
of Trampus Haskvitz, Jacob Wald-
ner and William Waldner, all of
South Dakota, along with other
names of South Dakota firefighters
who lost their lives in previous
years. Haskvitz died while fighting
a Black Hills forest fire in August
2011. The Waldners died in an ex-
plosion in September 2011 while
helping fight a coal bin fire at the
Sunset Hutterite Colony near Ab-
erdeen.
Those in attendance at the cere-
mony from South Dakota were R.
and Pat Vollmer; Don and LuJean
Haskvitz, John Haskvitz, Ben
Haskvitz, Mary Hattervig and
Judy Cummings, all family mem-
bers of Trampus Haskvitz from
North Sioux City Fire Department;
William D. Pappas, James Heeren,
and Jim Christenson, Deputy State
Fire Marshal Doug Hinkle, Deb
Strain, Ruth Esperance, and Jim
Strain and Jay Esperance of South
Dakota Wildland Fire Suppression.
According to National Fallen
Firefighters Memorial information,
the annual weekend ceremony fea-
tures special programs for sur-
vivors and co-workers, along with
public ceremonies. New survivors
met other fire service survivors
from across the country to share
experiences, make friendships and
begin to look ahead.
Memorial information adds that,
through private donations, the
foundation provides lodging and
meals for immediate survivors and
assists with travel expenses. This
allows family members to partici-
pate in the public tributes, and in
family day sessions conducted by
trained grief counselors.
The information also states that
families arrive at the memorial and
are escorted through a “Sea of
Blue” leading to the National
Fallen Firefighters Memorial. Uni-
formed fire service personnel line
the Walk of Honor® in honor and
support of our new families. Repre-
sentatives from Honor Guard and
Pipe Band Units participate as
part of this solemn tribute and
commemoration.
South Dakota’s firefighter me-
morial is on the state capitol
grounds in Pierre.
South Dakota firefighters killed
while performing their duty are:
•Leon J. Lehmen, Johnson Sid-
ing, 1981
•Richard L. McDonald, Rapid
City, 1988
•Wayne T. Schlosser, Timber
Lake, 1988
•Adell R. Potts, St. Stephen,
1989
*Curtis D. Mikkelsen, Hurley,
1991
*Robert Wayne 'Bob' Buhler,
Delmont, 2000
•David A. Martin, Opal, 2002
•Roger Glen McMillin, Martin,
2002
•Nathan O. Hamro, Renner,
2003
•Donald E. DeVries, Belvidere,
2005
•Gerald M. 'Jerry' Martinez,
USDA Forest Service, Custer Na-
tional Forest, 2005
•Thomas J. Kuehl, Elkton, 2006
•Trampus S Haskvitz, South
Dakota Dept of Agriculture, Divi-
sion of Wildland Fire, 2011
•Jacob Paul Waldner, Sunset,
2011
•William George Waldner, Sun-
set, 2011.
National Fallen Firefighters Memorial
The National Fallen Firefighters Memorial at the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, Md. Courtesy photos
Pictured at the National September 11 Memorial are Reuben Vollmer Jr. (second
from left), Don and LuJean Haskvitz, John Haskvitz, Ben Haskvitz, Mary Hattervig,
Judy Cummings, William D. Pappas, James Heeren, and Jim Christenson, Doug
Hinkle, Jim and Deb Strain and Jay Esperance. Not shown: Ruth Esperance and
Pat Vollmer.
These two kids,
Jenna and
Aidan Engbarth,
found a lull in
the wind, swept
the sidewalks
and gutter on
Center Avenue,
then made
good fun of the
pile of leaves.
After a few
jumps, they re-
swept and did it
all over again.
The hard wind,
sometimes
gusty and
sometimes
steady, blew
leaves from one
yard into an-
other, or some-
times simply
blew the leaves
away.
Photo by Del
Bartels
Autumn leaf jumping
The Family, Career and Commu-
nity Leaders of America and the
United Church youth group will be
trick-or-treating this halloween
evening, not for candy, but for do-
nations.
Their annual event is to help
raise funds to go to the Cystic
Foundation Foundation. Any
amount of cash, no matter how
small, is appreciated. Checks can
be made out to the CF Foundation.
The youth will be out Wednesday,
October 31, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. They will be carrying buckets
with the cystic fibrosis logo.
If you are missed and would like
to donate, money can be left at the
Philip High School office.
The event is done, not only for
such a worthy cause, but also in
memory of Jennifer Nelson,
FCCLA member and friend, who
died of cystic fibrosis in 2007. Her
family will be serving a soup sup-
per after the trick-or-treating to
the students who participate.
Trick or Treat – cystic fibrosis
Part 1 of 3
continued on page 2
See Philip Scotties
cross country team
at state meet results
8
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The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
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Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
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Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
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DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
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Publisher: Don Ravellette
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South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High of 48F.
Breezy. Winds from the NW at
15 to 20 mph.
Thursday Night: Mostly cloudy
in the evening, then clear. Low
of 18F. Winds from the NW at 10 to 15
mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Fog early. High of
39F with a windchill as low as 14F.
Winds from the WNW at 5 to 10
mph.
Friday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 18F. Winds from the
South at 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy.
Fog early. High of 45F.
Winds from the ESE at
10 to 15 mph.
Saturday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 21F. Winds from the
ENE at 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. Fog
early. High of 48F. Winds
from the ESE at 5 to 10
mph.
Sunday Night: Partly
cloudy. Fog overnight. Low of 27F.
Winds from the SE at 5 to 15 mph.
Get your complete &
up-to-the minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Monday: Mostly cloudy.
High of 61F. Winds from
the West at 5 to 15
mph.
Monday Night: Partly cloudy. Low of
28F. Winds from the NNW at 10 to
15 mph.
If you like wind, you should have
been happy as a clam this last
week since we had an excess of
highly mobile air for two whole
days. If you tried to walk into it,
you had to bend forward and strug-
gle along. If you went with it, you
had to lean back so as not to be
hurried along faster than you
wanted to go. The weathermen
said something about the cause
being a huge cold front that was in
a big hurry to head south. Yes,
well, whatever the cause, we
nearly got blown away.
On one of those wild days, we
were scheduled to drive west close
to a hundred miles so son Chance
could consult a couple of doctors.
We were planning to take wife
Corinne’s car, but that vehicle
doesn’t do well in strong wind. It
somehow feels insecure as if you
are about to become airborne. This
is fine with an airplane but not so
good with a car. In any event, we
called and cancelled our appoint-
ments and rescheduled them for
what we hope are quieter days.
Other people, however, did not
cancel their travel plans although
they should have. One picture on
the Internet showed four trucks
overturned in the ditch within a
space of less than a mile. There
must have been some kind of wind-
tunnel effect about there to tip so
many high-profile vehicles. I would
bet that driving a huge broad-sided
motor home would have made for a
scary journey indeed.
Neither was our mailman ex-
cited about travel on those days.
His pickup consumed lots more gas
than usual in trying to fight its
way through, and occasionally the
road was badly obscured due to
blowing dirt. He was not exactly a
happy camper.
Naturally, anything light that
wasn’t tied down became airborne.
That might include dog dishes,
lawn furniture, shingles, and any
loose paper or plastic. The paper
and plastic did fancy dances in the
air with swirling, bobbing, and so
on. Birds, for the most part, were
content to stay on the ground. The
few I saw flying were headed south
at great speed and were being
taken to places they probably
didn’t really plan to go. Even the
electricity was uneven or out due
to poles blowing over or wires com-
ing loose.
I chuckled quite a bit at a notice
a friend posted on Facebook. She
was alerting her East River friends
that a feed sack with a scoop in it
and her cap and jacket were
headed their way. She would like
them back if possible. Then she
said to never mind. She was good.
Stuff was blowing in from
Wyoming and Montana, and she
would just catch that and use it in-
stead.
For most of us, though, we just
hunkered down and waited for it to
get over as we usually do when the
weather is vile. We did have to
tightly hold on to the screen door
when going through it to avoid
having the wind catch it, break it,
tear it off, or damage the hinges.
Car doors were similar.
The hardest part to deal with, I
think, was the nervous response it
promotes in most of us. All the
whistling, clanking, and banging
just make a person unsettled some-
how. It’s hard to concentrate on
anything.
Another worry is prairie fires.
We have lived through two very
scary wind-blown fires that had
our nerves extremely on edge. One
was many years ago and was
started by lightning on our east
border. It went close to twenty
miles farther east before being con-
trolled. Another started over south
and blew along our western border
for many miles. It didn’t jump
across the river to our river place,
but it was a near thing. Luckily,
neither fire did a lot of damage to
us—mostly just a corner of a pas-
ture or a thin strip--but the emo-
tional toll was considerable. We
don’t want any repetitions.
After the winds had subsided
somewhat, I mentioned to wife
Corinne that it obviously was a
wimpy cold front after all since it
didn’t really drop the actual tem-
peratures all that much. It didn’t
even freeze overnight. Corinne told
me to hush up or it might hear me
and start up all over again. That
seemed a bit unlikely, but I took
her advice and kept my peace. Lord
knows we don’t need another wind
like that anytime soon.
Fortunately, today was a beauti-
ful fall day with pleasant temps
and hardly any wind at all. Mother
Nature was obviously trying to
atone for what she’d just put us
through. For those of you who like
a lot of wind, you were flat out of
luck. The rest of us, though, were
happy as clams.
our Halloween ... by Del Bartels
The sweet little goblins, Batmans and princesses, all covered in
warm winter coats, walk from one house to the next, holding out their
buckets and bags for the candy given out at each stop. For the small
groups consisting of the very young, a parent is waiting at the end of
the house’s walkway for the kids to come back, show off the additional
candy they just collected, then proceed to the next porch light.
Some people point out the dark side of Halloween. I prefer a holiday
that lets kids have fun, that highlights neighbors willing to give a little
so others can enjoy themselves. Last year, the conversations by parents
waiting along the sidewalks were neighborly and fun. Of course, some
of the words were lost because the adults were trying to talk and enjoy
pieces of candy gotten from the kids’ sacks at the same time. For those
who want to continue the trick-or-treat tradition, but with a more
benevolent purpose, the high school kids go from house to house for do-
nations to help find a cure for cystic fibrosis. A church in town is hold-
ing a “harvest festival” so all kids who want to show up can play games
and collect even more candy in a warm, safe place. This year Halloween
is on a school night, so the younger kids will probably be urged to call
it quits fairly early. The parents will probably “inspect” the evening’s
spoils and have to sample more than they need before trying to go to
sleep themselves.
An entire month of horror shows on television is more than I care
for. And that doesn’t include the political advertisements and debates
for the upcoming election in early November. I am almost eager for the
Thanksgiving and Christmas season to begin. There is a tremendous
difference between a horror movie such as “House at the End of the
Street” and a classic Christmas show such as “Miracle on 34th Street.”
Agreed, they both have at least ten minutes more of commercials than
they did last year. Yes, I will probably fall asleep in the chair while
watching either one. Yes, I will probably remember more about what I
was snacking on than the movie itself.
The idea of trick-or-treating is great in my hometown. This is mostly
because very few people think beyond the treat part. Even then, tricks
are usually limited to simply yelling “Boo!” when someone isn’t really
paying attention. Those people out canvassing the neighborhood for
candy leave someone at home to dole out candy, or leave their porch
lights off so kids don’t waste time knocking on that door.
I can’t imagine what shenanigans people might do in bigger commu-
nities. I can imagine what happens in my hometown, because I try to
join in and promote them so the friendly traditions continue next year
and the year after. If someone’s kid says “Boo” or “trick-or-treat” or
tells me yet another Halloween based knock-knock joke, I will play
along. This is my hometown, these are people I want to be around, and
the activities are wholesome and everyone is welcome to join in.
Basic computer classes … will be offered at the Haakon
County Public Library in November. There is no charge for the
class. Please call the library at 859-2442 for more information and
to register.
Haakon county puBlic liBrary … will hold its annual
Scholastic Book Fair in the community room of the courthouse from
November 13-16. Hours are from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day.
laDies’ prayer BreakFast … Monday, Nov. 5, 7:00 a.m.
at the Senechal Apts. lobby in Philip. All ladies welcome!
pHilip HealtH serVices auXiliary …will meet Thurs-
day, Nov. 1, at 7:00 p.m. in the meeting room of the hospital.
milesVille VFD HalloWeen party …Friday, Oct. 26, at
Milesville Hall. Supper, 5:30 p.m. See ad in this week’s issue of the
Profit for more details!
to have your non-proFit meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
To the editor;
As United States citizens, we
have the right to vote for our
elected leaders in government.
Along with this privilege comes
the need for voters to inform them-
selves of the past and present ac-
complishments of the candidates.
Everyone’s vote is important.
Vote November 6!
Sincerely,
/s/Keith and Lucille Emerson
Philip, SD
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Dear Editor;
I’ve had the thought over the last
few years about what a great small
town Philip is.
In visiting with customers at the
campground during the Sturgis
Rally, we often got asked where we
were from in South Dakota. Each
and every one of them was amazed
at what Philip had going on for a
town of less than 1,000 people – a
great bank, grocery store, hard-
ware store, lumber yard, variety
store, flower shop, pharmacy, hos-
pital, nursing home, steakhouse,
sale barn, Scotchman Industries,
golf course, and the list goes on.
They were especially impressed at
the transition places for the eld-
erly – Senechal, Silver Leaf, swing
bed.
Apparently, this “great small
town” thing got started in its earli-
est years. I just finished reading a
fantastic book about Philip’s early
years, “Letters from Tully.” An
early homesteader, Tully fre-
quently wrote to her cousin, Sara.
Thanks Sheryl Michael for turning
me on to this book.
A paragraph on page 124 says it
all. “We will pull together to make
Philip the best town between
Pierre and Rapid City. If we have
any differences of opinion, we will
settle them among ourselves, but to
the outside world we are as one
person .... They are as fine a group
of people you will meet anywhere.”
Further down the page, she de-
scribes the saloons in town and it is
truly hilarious.
I picked this book up at Zeeb
Pharmacy, and rumor has it he or-
dered more. You can also find it on-
line. Anyway, I’m proud to be a
small part of this great Smalltown,
USA.
/s/Jeanie Waara, Philip, SD
Letters to the Editor
Domestic violence awareness
October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Emily Wickstrom and Dodie Hardy, advocates from Missouri Shores, the
shelter in Pierre, visited Philip High School’s family and consumer science classes, Tuesday, October 16. According to the
presentation, one in four woman will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. In this country, every 15 seconds a
woman is battered. Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury in women between the ages of 15 and 44. Missouri
Shores provides shelter and services for those affected by domestic violence. Haakon County is one of the counties served
by Missouri Shores, with an advocate available at the Haakon Courthouse one Tuesday a month for anyone needing assis-
tance. Other presentation topics included date rape and date rape drugs, as well as healthy and unhealthy relationships.
The shelter is in need of many items. If anyone would like to make a contribution to the shelter, these things are especially
needed: toilet paper, laundry soap, fabric softener, diapers (especially size five and six), wipes, Clorox wipes, toilet bowl
cleaner, Swiffer mop pads and bleach. The Philip chapter of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America donated
fleece blankets made by the FACS class for children at the shelter. Community members donated cleaning supplies, diapers,
and other items that the shelter needs. Pictured, back row, from left: Nathan Wooden Knife, Joseph One Skunk, Chase
Wright, Jenny Johnston and Briaunna Williams. Middle row: Wickstrom, Garrett Snook, Tyshia Ferguson, Ellie Coyle, Colton
Alfrey and Hardy. Front: Libbi Koester, Caitie Pinella and Keegan Burnett. Courtesy photo
absorbed it and integrated it into
the rest of the long life I have been
privileged to lead. Before that race,
I had survived 35 missions as a B-
24 bomber pilot in World War II;
married Eleanor Stegeberg, the
love of my life; had five children;
completed a PhD in history; and
had a successful career in politics
and government service.
“Instead of lamenting about los-
ing the election, George went back
to work. George made our world a
better place through his work on
many issues, including agriculture
and foreign policy. But his greatest
public policy achievement has to be
his work on hunger issues. What
drove George to work tirelessly to
combat hunger worldwide was his
recognition that we are fortunate to
live in a country with food abun-
dance. He knew that so many indi-
viduals across the world were not
as lucky. George often noted that
hunger is a political condition that
is 100 percent curable. In our coun-
try and across the world, there are
countless individuals who never
knew George but are no longer suf-
fering from hunger because of his
work.
“It is sad to lose George, but we
will be able to see his impact on the
world for decades to come. South
Dakotans and folks across the
United States and world are thank-
ful for his long life of service. Per-
sonally, I am thankful for George’s
friendship and advice. And I think
I speak for many South Dakotans
who grew up following his career
when I say that I am thankful to
George for showing us that a kid
from South Dakota can have a
major impact on the world.”
Robert Duffett, president of
Dakota Wesleyan University, made
this statement.“On behalf of the
faculty, staff and students at
Dakota Wesleyan University, I
sadly acknowledge the death of our
friend and colleague, George Mc-
Govern.
“It was here in Mitchell that he
grew up during the Great Depres-
sion. He credited his excellent
teachers at Mitchell High School
and DWU with his lifetime love of
history and debate.
“Senator McGovern also had a
great love for his alma mater,
Dakota Wesleyan University. It is
where he met his beloved wife,
Eleanor, when they were freshmen.
It is where he heard the news of
the bombing of Pearl Harbor and
borrowed a campus administrator’s
car to drive to Omaha to enlist in
the Army Air Corps. It is where he
returned after the war to complete
his degree and eventually teach
history.
“It was my privilege to spend
countless hours with him in plan-
ning and building the McGovern
Library on our campus. Of course,
George McGovern’s legacy will be
his life of public service and leader-
ship, but we are delighted that the
most significant, tangible tribute to
him is the George and Eleanor Mc-
Govern Library, McGovern Legacy
Museum, and the McGovern Cen-
ter for Leadership and Public Serv-
ice at Dakota Wesleyan University.
“The McGovern Library has be-
come the hub of our campus com-
munity since it opened in 2006.
Students attend class, work on re-
search, hold meetings, enjoy infor-
mal social gatherings over coffee,
and study there. George loved
being in the library as well. He
was often in the coffee shop meet-
ing with people and chatting with
faculty, staff and students as he so
enjoyed. He also delighted in writ-
ing and working in his office in the
library. On the day of the library
dedication in 2006, he was espe-
cially pleased to invite former Pres-
ident Bill Clinton to his office for a
private chat.
“Our intellectual values at DWU
are learning, leadership, faith and
service. George McGovern embod-
ied each of those values in profound
ways. Our campus community and
I mourn this great loss and cele-
brate the man who was the favorite
son of Dakota Wesleyan Univer-
sity.”
George McGovern dies
continued from page 1
Secretary of State Jason Gant is
encouraging students, teachers and
parents to participate in the My
Voice™ National Student Mock
Election on November 1.
The mock election gives students
across the country the opportunity
to cast their votes for candidates in
both the federal and state elec-
tions. It also provides a forum for
them to talk about the issues they
care about this fall and beyond.
Student voting begins on October
25 and culminates on the National
Mock Election day, November 1, in
advance of the election. South
Dakota students, teachers and par-
ents are encouraged to take part by
registering their schools online at
sdsos.gov or nationalmockelec-
tion.org.
Mock
election
aG ceo
To ensure a new generation of
South Dakota agriculture produc-
ers is ready to take on the chal-
lenges of operating their business
in today's agriculture industry,
SDSU Extension will soon be hold-
ing the second year of Ag CEO
workshops.
Growing Ag CEOs is a program
focused on connecting new produc-
ers with seasoned and successful
producers, agriculture leaders and
the knowledge and research base
found within the University sys-
tem. As one producer put it, “in col-
lege, the focus was on understand-
ing the concepts. With Ag CEO,
the focus is how those concepts
apply to me and my operation.”
Ag CEO is a four-part series, in-
cluding a meal at each meeting, at
a cost of $250 for up to two people
per operation. A fifth meeting is
available at each site for an addi-
tional $100, which will complete
the requirements for FSA bor-
rower training.
Course dates for the first meet-
ings in western South Dakota in-
clude Winner – January 9; Eagle
Butte – January 9; and Belle
Fourche – February 3. You will be
able to register online in the near
future at http://igrow.org/. If you
have questions, contact the Rapid
City Regional Extension Center at
605-394-1722 or your Regional Ex-
tension Center.
mccrory Gardens
While in Brookings for SDSU
Extension Annual Conference last
week, a little extra time allowed
for a quick stop at the new Mc-
Crory Gardens Education and Vis-
itor Center. Some readers may
have had the opportunity to attend
the dedication and grand opening
of the new facility on Thursday,
July 26, 2012, and/or visited it on
another occasion, and could attest
to how impressive it is.
McCrory Gardens was estab-
lished in 1966, only two years after
South Dakota State College be-
came South Dakota State Univer-
sity. The 25 acres of formal display
and evaluation gardens, which
merge into the 45 acres of the
South Dakota Arboretum and
woody plant evaluation plots was
named after and dedicated to
Samuel McCrory, a longtime
South Dakota State faculty mem-
ber.
McCrory Gardens is highly val-
ued as an active, living classroom
and laboratory for SDSU, primary
and secondary school children and
students from other colleges and
universities in the region, and has
far reaching benefits for the public.
If you are going to be in Brookings
and have some flexibility in your
schedule, the gardens are well
worth whatever amount of time
you have to visit.
The story and information
about McCrory Gardens is far too
extensive to cover here, but much
can be learned by visiting the offi-
cial website at: www.sdstate.edu/
ps/mccrory/, or the secondary web-
site at: www.mccrorygardens.com.
calendar
11/27-28: Ag Horizons Confer-
ence, Pierre
12/11: Soil Health Info Day-
Davison County Extension Com-
plex, Mitchell
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
FLY CONTROL
–Dust Bags
–Sprays
–Pour ons
–Golden Malrin Fly Bait
COLD
BEER
Sunbody
Straw
Hats
Rural Living
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
Wise operators rely on trusted financial
advice. If you’re not already banking
with us, come in for a confidential,
no cost short visit about the services
we provide that you won’t get from
the big “out of town” banks.
Please Vote
Fred Koester
For Haakon County Sheriff
H12 years Law Enforcement Experience
HCertified Officer Within State of SD
HCommon Sense Approach to Law Enforcement
HUnderstands Needs of a Smaller Community
HHas served as your Haakon Co. Sheriff since
March 2012
(This ad ordered and paid for by candidate)
D
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t
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d
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x
p
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F
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Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro ........$8.50
Any Pro ...........................$7.70
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro.........$8.63
Milo .....................................$6.91
Corn.....................................$7.06
Millet.................................$30.00
Sunflower Seeds..............$22.50
The South Dakota Stockgrowers
Association invites all area produc-
ers for supper and a meeting,
Thursday, October 25, at 6:30 p.m.
at Club 27 in Kadoka.
Bill Bullard, chief executive offi-
cer of R-CALF USA, is the featured
speaker. He will share information
regarding R-CALF’s recent lawsuit
defending Country of Origin Label-
ing from the World Trade Organi-
zation. The lawsuit, filed by R-
CALF USA and the USA Made
Foundation, stems from the com-
plaints of Mexico and Canada that
the United States' COOL laws dis-
criminate against their products.
The World Trade Organization
agreed with those countries and is
forcing the United States and the
United States Department of Agri-
culture to comply with their inter-
national courts. The lawsuit by R-
CALF and supported by South
Dakota Stockgrowers Association
attempts to protect United States
sovereignty and the United States
COOL laws in support of United
States producers and consumers.
Also, there will be a brief update
on proposed changes to South
Dakota brand laws. Stockgrowers
staff and board members will ad-
dress any questions that members
have regarding other topics that
Stockgrowers are covering.
For more information, contact
Sylvia Christen, Stockgrowers ex-
ecutive director, at 342-0429 or call
Bob Fortune, Stockgrowers vice
president, at 344-2200.
Stockgrowers supper in Kadoka
to feature R-CALF’s Bill Bullard
Drought continues its relentless
march across South Dakota, as re-
flected in the latest United States
Drought Monitor, released October
11.
Exceptional drought, the worst
category on the map, has grown to
nearly one-third of the state’s area,
a 26 percent increase from Septem-
ber 25. Currently, more than 91
percent of South Dakota is covered
in the severe, extreme or excep-
tional drought categories, said
Laura Edwards, South Dakota
State University Extension climate
field specialist.
“Last week, the drought map de-
picted one-category degradations
across much of western South
Dakota. This week’s changes re-
flect worsening conditions in the
northeast. Winter wheat planting
is being delayed, and there is poor
germination and emergence in
many of the fields that have been
planted,” Edwards said. “Dry soils
and very little rainfall have led to
very dry soil conditions to start off
winter wheat and cover crops this
fall.”
The month of September was the
record driest for several locations
in the northeast and central parts
of the state, including; Aberdeen,
Mobridge and Pierre. Pierre has
had no measurable rainfall since
August 12, when 0.01 inches fell.
Edwards said the National Cli-
matic Data Center has reported
South Dakota being the driest
state on record.
“Over the last two weeks, expan-
sions in the three worst drought
categories on the U.S. Drought
Monitor map in South Dakota re-
flected these dismal precipitation
amounts. Soil moisture is well
below normal for this time of year
as well, as farmers are concerned
about cover crops and winter wheat
statewide,” Edwards said.
The USDA Weekly Crop
Weather Report, issued October 9,
stated that 95 percent of topsoil
moisture is short to very short, and
93 percent of subsoil moisture is
short to very short.
Dennis Todey, SDSU state cli-
matologist, said that drought is
getting worse rather than better.
“The opportunities for recovery this
fall are becoming limited. We were
hoping for some relief before win-
ter, but the situation appears to be
going to the other direction,” Todey
said. “This will have implications
for cropping decisions this fall, and
possibly into the spring. Limited
surface water availability will be
an issue for livestock producers
through the winter season.”
“We don’t see any clear climate
signal that this fall or winter will
be a game-changer,” Todey said.
“The drought is so severe and ex-
tensive that it will be challenging
to make a significant recovery dur-
ing our winter dry season.”
He added that there may be
small amounts of relief over the
late fall and winter season, but
both crop and livestock producers
should be prepared for the current
drought impacts to continue into
the spring.
One positive impact of the ongo-
ing drought is that harvest is well
ahead of schedule for soybeans and
corn, according to the USDA re-
port. Soybeans are 94 percent har-
vested, up from 61 percent last
year at this time, and well ahead of
the five-year average of 43 percent.
Corn is currently 78 percent har-
vested, considerably up from 15
percent at this time last year, also
well ahead of the five-year average
of 12 percent for this same week.
Winter wheat planting
delayed due to drought
Sutton Rodeo Company, of
Onida, S.D., was awarded all three
categories of Badlands Circuit
Livestock of the Year, with the
same three animals, for the second
year in a row. Their animals, 303
Crystalyx, 420 Chuckulator and 22
Crystal Springs Peach, have won
the categories of bareback horse,
saddle bronc horse, and sull, re-
spectively.
Crystalyx is a nine-year-old
black stud horse. Chuckulator is an
eight-year-old bay stocking legged
stud horse, which also is used in
the bareback riding event. He won
bareback of the Circuit Finals in
2011, the first horse to win both
bareback and saddle bronc awards
in the same year. He has been se-
lected to the Wrangler National Fi-
nals Rodeo in 2010 and 2011, being
voted as a top ten saddle bronc at
the NFR both of those years.
Crystal Springs Peach is a six-
year-old bull, orange and white,
high horned Brahma, purchased by
the Sutton family at the Benny
Binion Bucking Horse and Bull
Sale. He has a buck-off rate of 82
percent, having been rode only four
out of 22 trips. His is partly owned
by the Crystal Springs Ranch
Rodeo committee.
The Badlands Circuit Finals
Rodeo is pro rodeo’s regional cham-
pionship for the states of North and
South Dakota, and is hosted each
year by the Minot Y’s Men’s Rodeo
in Minot. This year’s event was
held October 4-7 and champions
were crowned in each rodeo event.
Sutton Rodeo’s Crystalyx was
awarded top bareback horse of the
finals and Sandman was awarded
top bucking bull of the finals.
S.D. rodeo
animals win
Badlands
Circuit
awards
www.Ravellette
Publications.com
The South Dakota Secretary of
State office has published the 2012
Ballot Questions pamphlet online
at sdsos.gov, allowing readers to
browse the digital booklet in much
the same way they would use a
printed copy.
The pamphlet details the attor-
ney general explanations and the
pro and con statements associated
with each proposed constitutional
amendment, referred law and ini-
tiated measure that will appear on
the 2012 general election ballot in
South Dakota.
“This pamphlet is important as a
means to inform the voting citizens
of South Dakota about questions
they will have at the polls on No-
vember 6” said Jason Gant, South
Dakota secretary of state. “My of-
fice will distribute paper versions
of the pamphlet too, but we hope to
educate more voters than ever be-
fore about ballot questions by offer-
ing this booklet online in such a
reader friendly format.”
The online version of South
Dakota’s 2012 Ballot Questions
pamphlet allows users to share the
literature with other people
through several methods, including
leading social media platforms, e-
mail and by embedding the code for
use on other websites. The pam-
phlet may also be downloaded and
printed.
Election ballot questions
pamphlet available online
Hit & Miss
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
elderly meals
thursday, oct. 25: Chicken
Marsala, Rosemary Potatoes, Cali-
fornia Veggies, Roll, Fruit Parfait.
Friday, oct. 26: Chicken Pic-
cata, Scalloped Potatoes, Roasted
Garden, Veggies, Roll, Strawberry
Rhubarb Pie.
monday, oct. 29: Cranberry
Glazed Ham, Butternut Squash,
Brunswick Veggies, Corn Muffin,
Mandarin Oranges.
tuesday., oct. 30: Chicken
Chardonnay, Wild Rice Pilaf,
Caribbean Veggie, Roll, Tropical
Fruit.
Wednesday, oct. 31: Chili or
Wisconsin Cheese Soup, Baked Po-
tato, Funshine Bar.
***
Saturday, October 13, at Somer-
set Court we had exercises with
mystery Somerset bucks as reward
for Saturday attendance. We
played bananagrams before lunch
and rummi-cube after lunch. M.R.
Hansen came for scrabble and we
had a good game. He brought pho-
tos of us at the Somerset Court an-
niversary gala on October 12.
There is one of him dancing with
me and one of Barbie dancing with
me and also one of Marilyn Butts
dancing with me. Thank you, Mig.
I was pleased to receive my
daughter, Vinnie’s, good letter on
October 13. She sold a bunch of her
new books, “Art, Wine and Bul-
lets,” and Danny sold a painting at
the opening of his studio. Thank
you for your letter, Vinnie. She also
mentioned that crows take walnuts
from trees nearby their house and
drop them on the concrete to open
them.
My great-granddaughter,
Melissa (Butcher) Snively, Gillette,
Wyo., sent a good letter with some
of two-year-old Teagan’s coloring.
Melissa had accomplished her test,
so now she can bring meds to resi-
dents at the nursing home where
she works. They still have toma-
toes from their garden. She sent
photos of their trip to Virginia this
summer to see her family, Gwen,
Gary, Sarah, Kelsie and Tyler.
Melissa lived in Philip as a kid.
Virgil and I used to babysit her
while Gwen worked.
The Rapid City Journal on Octo-
ber 13, 2012, had the obituary of
Mary Pekron, Philip. My sympathy
to friends and family. In that paper
was also the obituary of my sister-
in-law, Gertrude Woodden. My
niece, Wanda, and her husband, Ed
Artz, planned to drive to Wall for
her graveside rites Monday, Octo-
ber 15, and then on to Rapid City.
Here’s a new limerick by Somer-
set Court resident Pat Staley:
There was this old man called Bill.
Who climbed up a very high hill. It
sure made him puff, he said,
“That’s enough.” And I think he is
sitting there still.
Sunday, October 14, 2012, at
Somerset Court we had entertain-
ment, a music teacher, Sande Lof-
berg, Rapid City, who brought her
pupils to play for us. I am glad to
report that rhythm and counting
were her strong points. Sorry I did-
n’t get the names of all the chil-
dren. There were piano duets, and
guitar duets with Brittany and
Mikael, and singing. You could see
the rap attention on the children’s
faces. Autumn O’Neal, who used to
volunteer at Somerset Court,
played “Music Box Dancer” in a
duet with her teacher. Autumn is
working at a music box sound and
this piano at Somerset Court in the
activity garden lends itself well to
the crisp sound. Quinn Daniel
played “LaBamba” and “Star Wars”
with great verve. The big boy with
the guitar sounded like Bach. I
need to get a complete list of the
pupils. Thank you to Sande Lof-
berg and pupils. They plan to en-
tertain us with Christmas music
sometime in December. We had a
big decorated chocolate cookie cake
and Shawn and Sandy were here to
pour coffee and facilitate seating.
Barbara Hansen was here for the
concert, as she had come to bring
me a photo of her brother’s outfit
when he went into the United
States Navy from Hot Springs in
1957. My son, Wayne, is on the
photo, as well as Darryl Hansen
and Kent Fairchild, all from Philip.
Thank you for the nice, big lami-
nated photo, Barbie. It is a keep-
sake.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble,
very satisfactory. He brought my
game of up-words and some family
treasures from my old house in
Philip. He may be able to bring the
Palmer trunk to my apartment in
Somerset Court tomorrow. The
trunk is full of old photo albums,
family genealogy, heirlooms and
trinkets. Thank you, M.R.
Monday, October 15, 2012, it was
warm and the autumn leaves were
beautiful. Our Somerset Court bus
driver Jason gave me and Mary
Klaudt a ride to the medical hospi-
tal, then he took Mary Carrier and
me to the swim center. Later Jason
took me to the Rapid Valley Baptist
Church for the funeral of Gertrude
Woodden, my sister-in-law. Her
sister, Phyllis’ daughter helped me
up the steps. Jack Rush and his sis-
ter, Margaret, were there and a
bunch of relatives. Ted Schilling,
Spearfish, brought me back to
Somerset Court. Thanks for the
ride, Ted.
My niece, Wanda, and her hus-
band, Ed Artz, came in the after-
noon and we looked at keepsakes in
the Palmer trunk. My parents
brought it with them from eastern
South Dakota (Badger/ Hetland
area) in 1907 to the Grindstone
area. M.R. had brought the trunk
over to my apartment October 16.
Thanks, Mig.
Wanda and Ed stayed overnight
at Somerset Court in the guest
suite. We played a little banana-
grams and quiddler. We fixed up a
little treat bag for Ryan Love for
boss’s day. Some Wall Drug fudge –
you gotta have it!
October 16 at Somerset Court we
had the entertainment of blongo
with Sandy and Susan helping.
Those playing were Fred Smith,
Addie Rorvig, Jeannie Alvarson,
Mildred Young and her helper,
Kay, Virginia Grey, Jim Holmes,
Mary Lou Peters, Irene McKnight,
and Vivian Hansen. Fred won the
first game and Mary Lou the sec-
ond. Wanda and Ed Artz joined us
and helped cheer.
Wanda brought a 1997 home
movie that her brother, Leonard,
had made when we stayed at his
time-share condo at Newport, R.I.
It included our trip to North Ston-
inton, Conn., and to the Palmer
property, Pauchunganuc House, all
furnished in turn of the century
1800 - 1900 style – tables set, beds
made, books and magazines from
the 1800s. The wallpaper is of the
period, very colorful and vivid. Part
of the video was about our ferry
trip to Martha’s Vineyard, Gay
Head, and a tour of the mansion.
We drove over some spectacular
bridges to the mainland of Con-
necticut to the area where my
Palmer ancestor, Walter Palmer,
landed in the early 1600s. We saw
his monument at the North Ston-
ington Cemetery. The staff mem-
bers set up the video so we could
watch it.
We played cards, scrabble, quid-
dler and bananagrams. Thanks for
your visits, Wanda and Ed.
October 16, Somerset Court had
a total evacuation drill. It was a
nice day for it.
Somerset Court resident Lewis
Tracy passed away October 17. We
will miss him.
My company, my niece, Wanda,
and her husband, Ed Artz, Hum-
boldt, took off for home with a good
tail wind. My granddaughter,
Sheridan, came over for breakfast
so they could visit. Thank you for
your trip, Wanda and Ed. We en-
joyed the old video that Wanda
brought. Staff members and resi-
dents told me that they enjoyed my
company. Ed had been acquainted
with the husband of Agnes Tastad.
Women Who Care, a singing
group from South Maple Methodist
Church, entertained us here at
Somerset Court October 17, and
stayed for lunch. Thanks, ladies.
They sang “Abide With Me” in
honor of Lewis Tracy. Other songs
were “Count Your Blessings,” “I’ll
Be A Sunbeam,” “How Great Thou
Art,” and “God Will Take Care of
You.” Thelma talked about her trip
to Alaska for her 90th birthday.
She is so thankful for the gift of
life, quoting Jeremiah 29 and 33.
Pinochle was played by Lu Yeager,
Mildred Kraemer, Violet Jenison
and Mary Carrier. A few new pho-
tos of Somerset Court residents are
in the photo book by the fireplace.
The wind howled around here for
two days. It was too windy to take
a Somerset Court bus trip to the
Open Bible Church Thursday. The
Pennington County courthouse
was closed, trees were down, a semi
blew over off the road near Sturgis,
and so on. My son, David Hansen,
Ft. Pierre, related that in 1994,
when we had similar winds in
April, dirt covered fence posts up to
the top, in a fence he had built the
year before. This year the dirt is
not blowing as much, probably due
to better soil conservation methods.
Bingo winners on October 18
were Irene Cox, twice, Floy,
Blanche, Agnes, Marilyn O., Helen
Amundsen, and Vivian. It was the
new resident reception and treats
were ice cream sundaes with choco-
late, caramel and strawberry syrup
or any combination, and hot coffee
and ice water. Thanks for the
games and the treats. New Somer-
set Court resident Florabelle Pot-
ter was present.
October 18, Floy’s granddaugh-
ter and husband came to visit.
Marilyn Butts went with her
nephew from Portland, Ore., to
visit at her old home country, Ar-
mour and Wagner.
Annetta Hansen’s brother and
wife, Harry and Dorothy Roorda,
and daughter Della McClean, Val-
ley City, N.D., came to visit Octo-
ber 18.
Somerset Court residents who
played pinochle were Mary Lou, Lu
Yeager, Mildred Kraemer and
Addie. Those who played rummi-
cube were Sandi, Marcella, Violet
and Vivian.
Friday, October 19, we had the
fun activity of goofy golf. Sandy
and Susan were busy keeping score
and picking up balls. Resident
players were Jim Holmes, Regina
Alverson, Irene McKnight, Eileen
Tenold, Mary Lou Peters, Violet
Jenison, Marge Self, Fred Smith,
Floy Olson, and Vivian Hansen.
Marge won one game and Floy won
the other. All received generous
Somerset bucks.
Shawn drove the Somerset bus
and took a bunch of residents shop-
ping and to the ice cream shop. A
bunch of us played whist and
pinochle.
Ben and Dani Stone had a pleas-
ant outing Friday. They went to
join Ben’s high school bunch who
meet every month. This time they
went to Deadwood to a new casino
and the next time they will visit
another big casino.
Berniece Christianson went out
to lunch to a restaurant with her
daughter Friday.
We have a new resident on first
floor, Florabelle Powell from a
ranch south of New Underwood.
Her daughter, a retired nurse, is
her at Somerset Court helping her
get settled.
M.R. Hansen and wife Barbara
and 10 students from South
Dakota School of Mines and Tech-
nology are gone to Canada to the
conference of the American Society
of Civil Engineers at Montreal and
the American Concrete Institute
conference at Toronto.
PLEASE email your news to us!!
betty@pioneer-review.com
OCT. 26-27-28-29:
Trouble With
The Curve (PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
November 2-3-4-5:
Pitch Perfect (PG)
November 9-10-11-12:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
November 16-17-18-19:
Taken 2 (PG-13)
Fall Festival
Wed., October 31st
5:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Community E. Free Church
(West of Philip on Hwy. 14)
F
ood
P
rizes
G
a
m
e
s
C
an
d
y
M
ovie
F
U
N
f
o
r
A
L
L
A
G
E
S
!
!
Donate some of your
candy to troops
overseas with:
The family of
Mary Slovek
would like to invite you to
her 80th birthday party
Saturday, November 3rd
2:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center
Downtown Philip
(No gifts, please)
The South Dakota Department
of Health has contacted 13 health
care facilities identified as receiv-
ing drugs from a Massachusetts
firm linked to a multistate out-
break of fungal infections, includ-
ing meningitis. The clinics were
identified this week based on infor-
mation provided by the Food and
Drug Administration and the New
England Compounding Center
(NECC), which produced the drugs.
South Dakota has reported no
cases in this outbreak. It is not
known at this time how many pa-
tients in South Dakota received the
NECC products.
On October 3, the FDA recalled
the steroid injections implicated in
the outbreak and this week re-
called additional products as a pre-
cautionary measure. No South
Dakota facilities were identified as
receiving the NECC drugs in the
initial recall.
“We have contacted every South
Dakota facility identified as receiv-
ing drugs on this week’s expanded
recall list,” said Bonnie Jameson,
Disease Prevention Administrator
for the department. “We’ve in-
structed them to suspend use of the
NECC products and notify any pa-
tients who had received them to be
alert for the signs and symptoms of
infection, including meningitis.”
The signs and symptoms of
meningitis include fever, headache,
stiff neck, nausea and vomiting,
sensitivity to light and altered
mental status. Symptoms for other
possible infections may include
fever, swelling, increasing pain,
redness, warmth at injection site;
visual changes, pain, redness or
discharge from the eye, chest pain,
or drainage from the surgical site.
Patients should contact their
healthcare provider if they have
any of these signs or symptoms.
Jameson said the department
has also issued a health alert to
providers statewide asking them to
review purchasing records and in-
ventory to make sure they have not
received any NECC products on
the recall list.
More information about the out-
break and the ongoing investiga-
tion can be found on the CDC site,
www.cdc.gov/HAI/outbreaks/menin
gitis.html or the FDA site,
www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/uc
m322734.htm.
South Dakota facilities known to
have received NECC recalled prod-
ucts:
Anderson Orthopedics, Black
Hills Plastic Surgery, Black Hills
Regional Eye Institute, Black Hills
Surgical Hospital, Rapid City Med-
ical Center and Rapid City Re-
gional Hospital, all in Rapid City.
Sanford Clinic for Ophthalmol-
ogy and Optometry, Dakota Der-
matology and Lazaderm Skincare
Centre, all in Sioux Falls. Brook-
ings Ambulatory Surgery Center
LLP – Brookings, Bruening Eye
Specialists – Dakota Dunes, Sioux-
land Surgery Center – Dakota
Dunes, Innovative Procedural
Center – Watertown.
No S.D. cases of meningitis
in multistate outbreak
With archery deer, firearms an-
telope and the waterfowl seasons
upon us, the South Dakota Game
Fish and Parks Department is urg-
ing sportsmen to be aware of the
extreme fire dangers that exist
across the entire state.
“Hunters in the field can help be
an extra set of eyes this time of
year to help report fires,” said Em-
mett Keyser, Division of Wildlife
assistant director. “GFP is taking
some proactive steps to help ease
landowner concerns, and over the
past couple of weeks we’ve worked
with South Dakota Wildland Fire
to coordinate placement of a single
engine air tanker (SEATs) aircraft
in Lemmon.”
“We’re also working to contract
with a couple of volunteer fire de-
partments who will be out conduct-
ing patrols during the antelope sea-
son, and we’re pleased that South
Dakota Wildland Fire has volun-
teered to dispatch two of their own
fire units as well,” said Keyser.
Keyser advised that a GF&P air-
craft will also conduct patrols over
the weekend in those counties
along the Missouri River.
Keyser asked that sportsmen
take a few simple precautions so
they are prepared. He urges them
to:
Equip their vehicles with a large
fire extinguisher, shovel and water
in case they may need to extin-
guish a fire. Extinguish cigarettes
with water or dirt or use an ash-
tray inside their vehicle. Walk
rather than drive and limit all ve-
hicle travel to designated roads and
trails. Never park a vehicle over
dry vegetation.
“By sticking to these rules and
using extra caution, hunters can
safely enjoy their time in the field
and help ease landowner concerns,”
Keyser said.
Hunters: Beware
of fire dangers
Church & Community Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One meets on
the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the second
Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.);
6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 8:00 a.m. • Children's Church:
8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Jesus knew LIe vuIue oI resL. Do vou? Work wILIouL
ceuse cun Ieud Lo poor uLLILude, Iuck oI enLIusIusm,
sIoddv cruILsmunsIIp und more. Don`L IeL IL Iuppen Lo
vou. Tuke u breuLIer now und LIen so vou cun perIorm
Lo vour uLmosL besL Ior God.
Ancient wisdom Ior modern liIe
And Ie suId unLo LIem, Come ve vourseIves upurL InLo u
deserL pIuce, und resL u wIIIe: Ior LIere were munv
comIng und goIng, und LIev Iud no IeIsure so mucI us
Lo euL. Murk 6:¤1 (KJV)
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Michael G. Tavernier______________
A celebration of life was held for
Michael G. Tavernier, 60, of Coos
Bay, Ore., at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
6, at the Bastendorff County Park
pavilion.
Mike was born August 25, 1952,
in Pierre, S.D., the son of Raymond
and Betty (Sommers) Tavernier.
He passed away September 26,
2012, in Coos Bay.
He moved to Oregon as a child
with his family and graduated from
Marshfield High School.
He worked several years at Wey-
erhaeuser, and the Oregon Inter-
national Port of Coos Bay. He also
worked in tunnel construction. He
helped build the Portland Zoo tun-
nel.
He was a loving father and
grandfather with a golden heart.
He enjoyed spending time with his
family and grandchildren. He loved
doing these things with his family:
barbecue, fishing, clamming, camp-
ing, nature walks, the ocean and
beach, the simple treasures in life,
gardening. He liked playing board
games and reading to his grand-
children. He got his name
“Grandpa Chicken,” because he
used to raise chickens. All the
grandchildren wanted to go to
Grandpa Chickens house. He had a
passion for building and refinish-
ing furniture, and restoring an-
tiques.
Michael is survived by son,
Jason and Tina Tavernier of Coos
Bay; daughters, Christina and
Mike Freeman of Coos Bay,
Melissa Gaston of Coos Bay and
Kynetta Tavernier of Coos Bay;
five grandchildren, Amanda, Ker-
mit, Portia, Julia, Haylee, and Ash-
lee; brothers, Roger and June Tav-
ernier of Escondido, Calif., John
Tavernier of Roseburg and Charles
Tavernier of Eugene; sister,
Shirley and Chuck O’Conner of
Philip, S.D.; sister, Rhoda Clark of
Arizona; and nummerous nieces
and nephews.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and three brothers, Larry,
Robert and Boyd Tavernier.
Senator George S. McGovern_______________________________________
greater organization on the cam-
paign trail; George would walk
both sides of the entire length of a
main street, shake the hand and
listen to every person on the side-
walk or in the coffee shops. In an
era before hand-held electronic de-
vices, George had accumulated an
archive of 40,000 voter 3x5 cards
and could retrieve names and de-
tails from memory with ease.
In 1956, George won a seat in
the US House of Representatives.
There he served two terms, lost
a run for the US Senate in 1960,
but won a Senate seat in 1962
after having served as the first Ex-
ecutive Director of President John
F. Kennedy's new Food For Peace
program, a formative experience
which allowed George peaceably
shift government power and Amer-
ican food resources towards hun-
gry people.
After a run for the Democratic
Party presidential nomination in
1968 to help hold together the-as-
sassinated Sen. Robert Kennedy's
delegates, George worked to re-
form party rules so the nominating
procedure would be more trans-
parent and accessible.
And during a drawn-out pri-
mary campaign, George won the
Democratic Party's nomination for
Presidential in 1972, a race he led
with unprecedented grassroots
support under the banner "Come
Home, America", for peace in Viet-
nam and reconciliation at home.
It was a race he did not win
against President Richard Nixon,
but the campaign's integrity re-
stored hope to a dispirited public
and established a principled model
for national campaigns to come,
validated by the resignation of a
scandal-ridden President Nixon
two years later.
George served three terms in the
Senate, until January, 1981,
where he contributed substantially
to a series of comprehensive farm
bills and chaired the new US Sen-
ate Special Committee on Nutri-
tion and Human Needs.
After his Senate career, George
worked on Middle East peace, and
further focused on child nutrition
through two appointed positions:
US Ambassador to the UN Agen-
cies for Food and Agriculture, and,
separately, as UN Global Ambas-
sador to the World Food Program.
He also co-founded a world-wide
school lunch program with long-
time friend Bob Dole, the former
GOP Senator from Kansas.
For these decades of work en-
riching the lives of countless fami-
lies and children around the globe,
George was awarded the Presiden-
tial Medal of Freedom, our coun-
try's highest civilian distinction,
by President Bill Clinton, in 2001.
In more recent years, George
stayed intricately connected to
South, national and international
issues. He lectured about policy
and politics on campuses here and
abroad. He would work, as was hit
his habit, on just a few hours of
sleep, and frequently asked arriv-
ing visitors for their input on a
fresh draft of an op-ed or magazine
piece he had been crafting on a yel-
low pad.
He even finished last year, at
age 89, the 14th book he had writ-
ten, co-authored or edited, “What
It Means To Be A Democrat, and
conducted book signings in several
states also for a recent biography
of President Abraham Lincoln.
No portrait of George would be
complete without remembering
the succession of outrageously af-
fectionate and outsized Newfound-
land dogs George and Eleanor nur-
tured and cherished.
He loved going for a walk across
the DWU campus, or on a drive to
Lake Mitchell, or to a night at the
movies. He enjoyed dinners at
Chef Louie's and kept everyone
amused and amazed with stories
and anecdotes from his youth, the
campaign trail, or the Senate floor.
And he kept his childhood and
life-long faith with his beloved St.
Louis Cardinals, expressing no
surprise at their last-minute qual-
ification for this year's playoffs,
just as they had done last year on
their way to a World Series cham-
pionship run that George had fol-
lowed with inning-by-inning de-
light.
More than anything, George
adored Eleanor, their grown chil-
dren, and 10 grandchildren and
eight great-grandchildren, was en-
gaged in their interests, schooling
and careers, and generously
helped with advice, encourage-
ment and support.
George McGovern lived an ex-
ceptional public and private life of
more than 90 years with an un-
common energy, adherence to
ideals, thirst for knowledge and a
consuming dedication to others.
George rarely raised his voice in
anger, but always raised the level
of discourse and achievement
around him.
He didn't live for confrontation,
but risked his life in the greatest
struggle of the century to defeat
evil on a grand scale, yet never
bragged about his personal war-
time achievements.
Instead, he used that experience
instead as a working, life-long
foundation for a more peaceful,
constructive, and forgiving world.
We who knew and loved him will
remember his singular dedication
to a life that made a difference.
We resolve to honor George's
spirit by emulating his example.
Public viewing will be held from
1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Thursday,
October 25, 2012, at First United
Methodist Church, 401 S. Spring
Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD, with the
family present to greet friends
from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. A 6:30 p.m.
Prayer Service will follow the visi-
tation at the church.
Funeral Services will begin at
1:00 p.m., Friday, October 26th, at
the Mary Sommervold Hall at the
Washington Pavilion of Arts and
Science, 301 S. Main Avenue,
Sioux Falls, SD.
Private burial will take place at
Rock Creek Cemetery, Washing-
ton, DC, at a later date.
Miller Funeral Home, Sioux
Falls, SD, is in charge of funeral
arrangements.
George Stanley McGovern, hus-
band and father, teacher and
politician, proud South Dakota De-
mocrat, author and advocate for
the poor, lived a life of service
through decades of American his-
tory he also strongly influenced.
Born in Avon, South Dakota on
July 19, 1922 to the Rev. Joseph
and Frances McLean McGovern,
George left Dakota Wesleyan Uni-
versity DWU), in Mitchell, where
he excelled in debate, to join the
Army-Air Force in 1943.
That same year, on Halloween
Day, he married Eleanor Stege-
berg, a fellow DWU student who
had grown up on a Woonsocket
farm and got to know George after
having beaten him in a student de-
bate competition. They would
eventually have five children, Ann,
Susan, Teresa, Steven and Mary,
and a 63-year marriage.
A B-24 pilot at the age of just 22
and assigned to a bomber group in
Italy, George flew 35 combat mis-
sions across Europe, safely-landed
his damaged plane on several oc-
casions and was discharged at the
war's end as a First Lieutenant
having won the Distinguished Fly-
ing Cross with three Oak Clusters.
After the war, he and Eleanor
returned to DWU, and following
his graduation, joined its faculty
as a professor of history and polit-
ical science.
He later completed a Ph.D. in
History at Northwestern Univer-
sity, and studies at nearby Garrett
Theological Seminary. But living
through the war pushed George to-
wards public service, so he began
traveling town-to-town and farm-
to-farm rebuilding the South
Dakota Democratic Party and
competitive two-party system in
the state.
No one worked harder or with
Russell Means__________________
Russell Means never shunned atten-
tion. Whether leading Native Ameri-
cans in railing against broken federal
treaties, appearing in a Hollywood
blockbuster or advocating a sovereign
American Indian nation within U.S.
borders, the activist who helped lead
the 1973 uprising at Wounded Knee
reveled in the spotlight.
But it was only on his terms. Openly
critical of mainstream media, the one-
time leader of the American Indian
Movement often refused interviews
and verbally blasted journalists who
showed up to cover his public appear-
ances. Instead, he chose to speak to his
fan base through YouTube videos and
blog posts on his personal website.
When he did speak out publicly, he
remained steadfast in his defense of
AIM. He found himself dogged for
decades by questions about the group's
alleged involvement in the slaying of a
tribe member and the several gun bat-
tles with federal officers during the 71-
day occupation of Wounded Knee, bu t
denied the group ever promoted vio-
lence.
"You people who want to continue to
put AIM in this certain pocket of ille-
gality, I can't stand you people," Means
said, lashing out an at audience mem-
ber question during an April gathering
commemorating the uprising's 40th an-
niversary. "I wish I was a little bit
healthier and a little bit younger, be-
cause I wouldn't just talk."
Means, who announced in August
2011 that he had developed inoperable
throat cancer but told The Associated
Press he was forgoing mainstream
medical treatments in favor of tradi-
tional American Indian remedies, died
early Monday at his ranch in in Porcu-
pine, S.D., Oglala Sioux Tribe spokes-
woman Donna Salomon said. He was
72.
Born in Wanblee on the Pine Ridge
Indian Reservation, Means grew up in
the San Francisco area before becom-
ing an early leader of AIM. He often
was embroiled in controversy, partly
because of AIM's alleged involvement
in the 1975 slaying of Annie Mae
Aquash.
But Means also was known for his
role in the movie "The Last of the Mo-
hicans" and had run unsuccessfully for
the Libertarian nomination for presi-
dent in 1988.
AIM was founded in the late 1960s
to protest the U.S. government's treat-
ment of Native Americans and demand
the government honor its treaties with
Indian tribes. Means told the AP in
2011 that before AIM, there had been
no advocate on a national or interna-
tional scale for American Indians, and
that Native Americans were ashamed
of their heritage.
"No one except Hollywood stars and
very rich Texans wore Indian jewelry,"
Means said. "And there was a plethora
of dozens if not hundreds of athletic
teams that in essence were insulting
us, from grade schools to college. That's
all changed."
The movement eventually faded
away, the result of Native Americans
becoming self-aware and self-deter-
mined, Means said.
Paul DeMain, publisher of Indian
Country Today, said there were plenty
of Indian activists before AIM bu t that
the group became the "radical media
gorilla."
"If someone needed help, you called
on the American Indian Movement and
they showed up and caused all kind of
ruckus and looked beautiful on a 20-
minute clip on TV that night," DeMain
said.
Means and AIM co-founder Dennis
Banks were charged in 1974 for their
role in the Wounded Knee uprising, but
after a trial that lasted several months,
a judge threw the charges out on
grounds of government misconduct.
Means said he felt his most impor-
tant accomplishment was the founding
of the Republic of Lakotah and the "re-
establishment of our freedom to be re-
sponsible" as a sovereign nation inside
the borders of the United States. His
efforts to have his proposed country
recognized by the international com-
munity continued at the United Na-
tions, he said, even as it was ignored by
tribal governments closer to home, in-
cluding his own Oglala Sioux Tribe.
But others may remember him for
his former organization's conn ection to
Aquash's slaying. Her death remains
synonymous with AIM and its often-vi-
olent clashes with federal agents in the
1970s.
Authorities believe three AIM mem-
bers shot and killed Aquash on the
Pine Ridge reservation on the orders of
someone in AIM's leadership because
they suspected she was an FBI inform-
ant. Two activists – Arlo Looking Cloud
and John Graham – were both eventu-
ally convicted of murder. The third has
never been charged.
Means blamed Vernon Bellecourt,
another AIM leader, for ordering
Aquash's killing. Bellecourt denied the
allegations in a 2004 interview, four
years before he died.
DeMain, an Indian journalist who
researched the case, said AIM's leaders
know who ordered Aquash's killing but
have covered up the truth for decades.
Also in 1975, murder charges were
filed against Means and Dick Mar-
shall, an AIM member, in the shooting
death of Martin Montileaux of Kyle at
the Longbranch Saloon in Scenic. Mar-
shall served 24 years in prison. Means
was acquitted.
In addition to his presidential bid,
Means also briefly served as a vice
presidential candidate in 1984, joining
the Larry Flynt ticket during the Hus-
tler magazine publisher's unsuccessful
bid for the Republican nomination.
But Means always considered him-
self a Libertarian and couldn't believe
that anyone would want to call them-
selves either a Republican or a Democ-
rat.
"It's just unconscionable that Amer-
ica has become so stupid," he said.
His acting career began in 1992
when he portrayed Chingachgook
alongside Daniel Day-Lewis' Hawkeye
in "The Last of the Mohicans." He also
appeared in the 1994 film "Natural
Born Killers," voiced Chief Powhatan
in the 1995 animated film "Pocahon-
tas" and guest starred in 2004 on the
HBO series "Curb Your Enthusiasm."
Means recounted his life in the book
"Where White Men Fear to Tread." He
said he pulled no punches in his auto-
biography, admitting to his frailties
and evils but also acknowle dging his
successes.
"I tell the truth, and I expose myself
as a weak, misguided, misdirected,
dysfunctional human being I used to
be," he said.
Salomon, the tribal spokeswoman,
called Means' death a "great loss" for
the Oglala Sioux Tribe.
Means' death came a day after for-
mer U.S. Senator George McGovern
died in Sioux Falls at the age of 90. Mc-
Govern had traveled to Wounded Knee
with U.S. Sen. James Abourezk during
the 71-day takeover to try to negotiate
an end.
"I've lost two good friends in a mat-
ter of two to three days," Abourezk said
Monday morning. "I don't pretend to
understand it."
Wake services for Means are sched-
uled for Wednesday, October 24, at the
Little Wound School in Kyle, on the
Pine Ridge reservation. His ashes will
be scattered in the Black Hills of South
Dakota on Thursday.
Interior School Carnival
Friday, October 26th
6-9 p.m.
Interior School Gym
Concession Stands
Serving Supper
Bingo ($100 Black-out)
Games For All
Costume
Contest
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
continued on page 13
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH, MIDLAND, ANNUAL
TURKEY DINNER, SUNDAY,
NOVEMBER 4. SERVING BE-
GINS AT NOON!
The sky is overcast this Monday
morning. Looking out the window
it makes one think it may snow. It
isn’t really cold enough for snow. In
truth, I am not ready for snow, but
hopefully we will get some of that
much needed moisture in the form
of rain. Weren’t the winds on
Wednesday and Thursday of this
past week something else? Jerry
and I took a drive down I-90 Fri-
day, checking out the semi-trucks
that had blown over in the ditch
near the farm of Bob and Diane
Bork. It was a rather amazing
sight to see, as each of the four
trucks was lying in the same posi-
tion, and looked to be the same dis-
tance apart. It was almost as if it
had been a stunt performance, had
been planned, but of course it
wasn’t. But, seeing it, left a person
with a lasting impression to be
sure. I heard tell of other trucks
and vehicles blown off the road at
other places. That wind meant
business. A large spruce tree was
uprooted in the front yard of Bob
and Verona Evans’ here in town. I
got the silly idea to walk downtown
to get the mail Wednesday. Going
down was okay, as the wind was to
my back, but coming home was an-
other story. I was bucking the wind
and at times thought the wind was
going to win out, I was struggling
to keep upright. Needless to say, I
used some common sense Thurs-
day.
Family has been taking turns
staying with Roy Roseth at the
Philip hospital. He is some better
and family continues to take turns
staying with him. Still has his
sense of humor and wit and has
been having a good amount of com-
pany. Roy turned 96 August 11.
Our thoughts and prayers are with
you Roy.
I always find it interesting how
unexpectedly you will learn of
something you did not know; about
someone you have known all of
your life. In visiting with Keith and
Cheryl Harry the other day, I
learned that my cousin, Ivan
Schanzenbach’s, first name is actu-
ally Thomas and not Ivan. Keith
said he would send out Legion
membership cards to James and
Thomas Schanzenbach. I said,
“You mean James and Ivan?” He
said, “No, James and Thomas.” Not
doubting what Keith said, I still
had to call Ivan to get a bit of his-
tory about his name. Having spent
so much time during the early
years of my childhood at the home
of John and Esther Schanzenbach,
James and Ivan seemed more like
brothers to me then cousins. Ivan
said his military papers and other
important papers have his first
name of Thomas. Said he really
didn’t know why he used his mid-
dle name instead of his first name
of Thomas, but he did. To me, he
will always be Ivan. Ivan was feel-
ing good about his baseball team,
the Detroit Tigers, as they had won
their games and will be playing in
the World Series. Ivan and his late
brother, James, were and have
been Detroit fans for a number of
years. Like Ivan said, “It isn’t easy
getting into the World Series.”
Wishing your team good luck Ivan.
Keith and Cheryl Harry told that
they had visited Ivan and Miriam
Schilling at Gillette, Wyo., on Octo-
ber 4. When Ivan and Miriam still
lived in Midland, they and Keith
and Cheryl would go out to eat to-
gether on October 4 as their an-
niversaries are both on that day.
Happy late anniversary wishes to
both couples. Keith and Cheryl
said Ivan and Miriam are doing
well. Keep busy with grandkids
and family, as all of their children
and families live at Gillette. As
many of you remember, Ivan and
Miriam had a business in Midland
for many years. We miss those for-
mer Midland folks.
Trinity Lutheran Church had
their annual lutefisk supper and
bazaar on that windy Wednesday,
October 17. Despite the wind, they
had a good turnout. I am certain
there were some disappointed sen-
ior citizens from the Philip assisted
living and nursing home and the
Senechal apartments who were un-
able to come due to the windy con-
ditions. Each year a driver of the
large van or mini bus, which ever
you call it, brings those folks down
for the annual lutefisk supper.
Some being former Midland resi-
dents and many of them enjoying
that lutefisk. With those strong
winds and a high profile vehicle,
plans were changed. The ladies had
a delicious meal as always, and oh,
my, some of the folks sure do enjoy
that lutefisk. They can have my
share. But save me some lefse,
please.
Deep Creek will be having their
lutefisk supper and bazaar this
Saturday, October 27. Am sorry we
will miss that. St. William has
their annual turkey dinner Sun-
day, November 4.
Prerry Saucerman went to Philip
one day last week picking up her
mom, Marlin Evans, at the
Senechal apartments and going to
the volleyball game at Philip be-
tween Martin and Philip. Taylor
Amiotte plays on the Martin junior
variety team. Taylor’s dad, Tucker
Amoitte, is a cousin of Prerry’s. His
mom, Asta Amiotte, is a sister to
Marlin Evans.
Wednesday, Clint Saucerman
visited his dad, Gaylord Saucer-
man, at the Philip Nursing Home.
He later went to the Senechal
apartments, picked up his mother-
in-law, Marlin Evans, and brought
her down for the lutefisk supper.
Slate Evans and Ashley Morris,
also of Philip, came down for the
lutefisk supper, taking Slate’s
grandmother, Marlin, back to
Philip. Slate and Ashley had left
their dog at Clint and Prerry’s
while they were at the supper.
Going to pick the dog up before
heading to Philip they found the
dog had tangled with a porcupine.
It had a lot of porcupine needles, so
had to take it to the vet. Ouch.
That had to hurt.
Judy Daly’s sister, LaVonne
Wheeler, Pierre, spent a few days
with Judy while her husband, Bill
Wheeler, was hunting. It is pheas-
ant hunting season. Judy said they
don’t have many pheasants at their
place, but have a number of
turkeys. Judy and LaVonne went
to Philip to visit their uncle, Roy
Roseth, at the hospital. Judy also
took her mom, Marie (Roseth) An-
derson, to visit her brother, Roy
Roseth.
Saturday, Keith Hunt and his
sisters, Teresa Palmer, Murdo, and
Christine Niedan, went to Rapid
City to surprise their aunt, Anna
(Hunt) Dick, for her birthday. They
took along an angel food cake and
strawberries which they shared
with Anna and her husband,
Marin. On the way to Rapid City,
they stopped in Philip and visited
their mom, Ida Hunt, at the nurs-
ing home. They also visited their
uncle, Roy Roseth, who was a pa-
tient at the hospital.
Monday night, Keith Hunt and
Christine Niedan went to Murdo
picking up Teresa Palmer and
going on to Pierre meeting Roger
and Peg (Hunt) Johnson. The
group attended the United States
Air Force Heartland of American
Band “Brass in Blue” concert at
Riggs Theatre. They report the con-
cert was excellent. They ate supper
at the Johnson home following the
concert.
During Fire Prevention Week
Midland firemen, Reuben and
Dustin Vollmer and Lawrence
Stroppel, came to the Midland
School. Students were given a ride
on the fire truck and were then
taken to the firehall where they
tried on the gear firemen wear.
They were shown and told about
the jaws of life and other equip-
ment that the firemen use. Each
student also got to experience the
use of the water hose, shooting
water. The elementary principal,
Jeff Nemecek, Kadoka, had come
over to visit the Midland School
that day, so he got to be in on the
fun, too. Students were given sev-
eral gifts pertaining to fire fighting
week. They express their thanks to
the Midland fire department.
Tuesday, the Midland School,
with Roger Dale as bus driver, had
the opportunity to go to the buffalo
roundup south of Wall. Students
were able to watch them sort and
work the buffalo. They were told all
about the buffalo and where some
of them are shipped, as land is lim-
ited where they were now. A sack
lunch was eaten at the Wall City
Park.
Shad, Jenna, Cass, and Cole
Finn attended Sharon (Anderson)
Ellwein's Life Celebration Satur-
day, October 20, in Pierre at the
American Legion. There was a free
will offering supper and silent ac-
tion held, with a great turnout of
family and friends present. Dona-
tions will be given to the family for
medical expenses and to St. Mary's
Healthcare Center Home Health
and Hospice. Sharon was Jenna’s
first cousin.
Tyler and Angel Nemec had a
combination birthday and Hal-
loween party at their new home for
son Tukker Saturday evening.
Tukker turned seven. A lot of folks
were there for a fun evening, many
dressed in costume. Carol Hunt
made the birthday cake. There was
even a pumpkin piñata for kids to
give a whack at getting some good-
ies from inside. Making it nice is
Midland’s city park is just across
the street from Tyler and Angel’s,
so kids and deer, as well, were en-
joying the park that evening.
Sounds like everyone had a fun
evening. Happy birthday, Tukker.
Sounds like you had a good party.
Bob and Verona Evans left for
Sturgis Monday, October 15,
picked up Bob’s sister, Betty Shan-
non, and headed for Belle Fourche
where they enjoyed lunch with Bob
and Betty’s brother, George and
Alice Evans and their daughter,
Valerie and Al Garr. Later that
evening after an enjoyable time of
visiting, Bob, Verona, and Betty
headed for home.
Sam and Barb Lockhart, Oko-
toks, Alberta, Canada, were
overnight visitors of Shorty and
Maxine Jones recently. They live in
a large motorhome, about six
months in the United States and
the rest of the year at their farm in
Canada. Being retired, they lease
their farm and enjoy traveling in
the southwest. After a short tour of
the ranch, with deer and the big
longhorn steers being something
they don't often see at home, we all
had supper at JT's. They 'camped'
on the driveway, had breakfast in
the morning, then got on the long
road to Palm Springs, Calif., as
they had to go to the factory where
there home was made in Alabama
first. They were interesting to visit
with.
Gene and Audrey Jones reported
that they had been doing the usual
since they got home from North
Dakota and the sister party. They
stopped and visited with Tom and
Joni Lammon and Verna Lammon
on our way through Aberdeen.
Then went on to Lisa's for a couple
of days. While there they attended
one of Sam and Jaycie's volleyball
games. Also took Dackery out for a
birthday supper. And have enjoyed
going to a couple of Destiny and
Miranda's volleyball games. Sun-
day afternoon, Andy Olesen and
his nephew, Eric, a grandson of
Henry Kuhlman, visited and en-
joyed watching a football game
with us. They were staying at Ron
and Shirley Douds for a couple
days. Andy was showing Eric some
of the Kuhlman memories around,
as he had never been in this area
before.
Not finding some folks at home,
I am closing my column for this
week. Maybe they see my number
on their caller ID and think, nope,
not answering. You think? One
never knows. I’ve been sharing
about books I have been enjoying
reading lately. Many of us know of
the book and movie of “Charlotte’s
Web.” It was written in 1952 and is
celebrating 60 years. I remember
reading the book and seeing the-
movie. I was a young girl at the
time and remember thinking parts
of it a bit sad.
I leave you with the following
quote from my Amish calendar,
“Good teachers are the ones who are
able to challenge young minds
without losing their own.” Have a
good week, be safe, and continue to
pray for that much needed rain.
Annual Meetings
Midland Pioneer Museum
& The Pioneer Club of Old Stanley County
Sunday, October 28th
Midland Senior Citizen’s Center
Potluck dinner - 12 Noon
Guest Speaker: Lonis Wendt
Everyone is welcome!
PLEASE VOTE FOR
GAY KLIMA TOLLEFSON
for RE-ELECTION AS
Haakon County
State’s Attorney
I thank the citizens of Haakon County for
allowing me to work for you as state’s
attorney these past four years. I am asking
that you hire me for another four years. I
promise to continue treating everyone fairly
and to play no favorites. I think I have
shown that I do not have a rug under which
I can sweep things. I am a tough prosecutor
who believes in employing common sense
and compassion when doing my job.
THANK YOU!
Paid for by Gay Tollefson
PO Box 848, Philip, SD 57567
Happy 72nd Birthday,
David (James) Hand
Help us celebrate
on November 1st
by filling his mailbox 
with birthday wishes!
24761 SD Hwy 34
Midland, SD 57552
Hope this is the best year ever!
Love, Mike, Michelle, Austin, Ella, Cadence & Reese
St. William
Catholic Church
Annual Turkey Dinner
Sunday, Nov. 4th ~ Midland
Dinner: Noon
Everyone is welcome!  
adults: $8.00
children 6-12 years: $4.00
5 & under: Free
What a windy time, weather-
wise. In talking to my brother,
Rich, he said he only remembered
three times the wind blew like that
for that many days and that was in
1966 and 1949 and now this in
2012. I think we had blizzards in
‘49 and ‘66. All I know, I thought it
was terrible. I remember my
mother saying when the wind blew
in the ‘30s it was so bad with dust
she even plugged the key holes to
keep the dust out of the house and
every other hole she could find. I
did not have to much dirt come in,
as this old house is pretty tight
even if it is over a 100 years old. It
has stood up to many hard winds
through the years. In fact, I was
surprised that we didn’t have any
damage. The wind tried to move
the water tank, and did move it
about two feet from where it was
sitting. Feel sorry for those who did
have damage as this has been a
hard enough year without that.
There was a lot of hail damage this
year and some people got hit more
than once.
Vicki and Mary Eide attended
Keagan Fitch’s last ball game on
the 15th in Philip. I think all of the
grandkids will be out of sports till
wrestling starts. We will be busy
attending school programs soon.
And it will be Christmas before we
can catch our breath.
Fires are still a threat to the
country. Mike Rausch called and
said that a fire over in the Wall
area on that windy Thursday
burned up about 350 big round
bales and some grass land.
We have had some small fires in
the Philip area, but they were con-
tained and put out in short time.
Thanks to our local firefighters and
the Philip fire department and all
the other fire departments who
come to help when needed.
Carla Eide, Kiley and Taegan,
came Friday night to visit her par-
ents, Vicki and Marvin. They were
here to take some pictures for
Christmas and to see grandpar-
ents, Dorothy Urban, Minnie
Brech, Rita and Cliff Ramsey and
Mary Eide. And of course to visit
her sister, Christa and Trevor
Fitch and family at Milesville.
Marvin and Vicki Eide had their
children and grandchildren for sup-
per Saturday night, a total of 11.
Saturday evening, Christa and
her family and Carla all visited
with Glenn and Terrie Stoller.
The Stollers had never seen
Aven, so they were glad to see them
all. They always remember the
kids during the holidays.
The Smith kids are have coffee
for Rich Smith’s 95th birthday with
the ones who go there for coffee in
the mornings, when they can, for
the last few years. I will report
more about this next week.
Tucker Smith has been helping
Bill Slovek with some cement work
this week. I don’t know what they
are doing, but did see several ce-
ment trucks go by, so must have
been a good sized project.
I am like Janice Parsons, I can’t
seem to find people at home when
I try for news. If they are gone,
they probably would have some
news if we did catch up to them.
All work brings a profit, but
mere talk leads only to poverty. –
Proverbs 14:23
Yes you need the water. Yes, you
need the sun. But that alone will
not give you the plant. You need
the working hands to give it life. –
Adrian Alvarez
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Greetings from cool, overcast,
slightly breezy, still dry northeast
Haakon County. This morning
looks and feels like fall, and the
best part is that there is a slight
scent of moisture in the air. There
are no raindrops here yet, but
hopefully in the next day or so we
will have a little moisture. That
would be wonderful! Last week we
had two days of horrific winds,
which took care of most of the
leaves on the trees – took care of a
lot of twigs and a few branches
also. Of course, a good portion of
them landed in my yard, so I had
plenty to do this weekend. There
were some apples high up in the
apple trees that I couldn't reach, so
I expected the birds would enjoy
them. However, the wind brought
the apples down also, so I have
been busy picking those up – some
got tossed and some are ending up
in the freezer, ready to be pies or
crisps later this year. The wind
also tipped over several semis on I-
90, took down a few power poles,
damaged some buildings, etc. We
were fortunate here to escape wind
damage, but not everyone was so
lucky. There were some areas that
experienced lots of blowing dirt, re-
ducing visibility and leaving banks
of dirt. Quite a few fences are now
full of tumbleweeds, which could
pose a problem if we have much
snow this winter. And speaking of
tumbleweeds, Aunt Ruth
Neuhauser told me that when she
was in school at Robbs Flat during
the really dry years, the boys in the
school used the thistles to build a
"thistle house" in the corner of the
school yard. She said it was in the
shape of an igloo, and they were
able to go inside. I don't know how
long the thistle house lasted before
the wind took it away.
Now to the news.
A week ago Sunday, Dick and
Gene Hudson visited Tucker and
Beverly Hudson near Enning.
Tucker is Dick's cousin, and he re-
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
It’s A Girl!
Daughter of Stephen & Karri Jo Buck
Born: August 18, 2012 • 8 lbs., 12 oz. • 22” long
Proud Big Brothers:
Hayden, Hadley, Hudson & Hendrick
Maternal Grandparents:
Ed & Becky Heeb, Midland
Paternal Grandparents:
Jim & Sharon Buck, Cody, Wyoming
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
Gale & Virginia Hagen, Rapid City
This feature sponsored by Papa & Grammie Heeb
Hopelynn Grace
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Greetings from Sierra Vista,
Ariz. The air conditioner is hum-
ming along but the temperature is
comfortable to be outside if it
suited you. As I tackle the news for
this week, I find we don’t have ac-
cess to the Internet where we are
parked. I am not going to take a
cup to borrow a cup of sugar from
the local folks parked here, but try
to get one of them to give me their
code so I can do a hook up from
their Internet connections, other-
wise, we will be going to the local
eatery that usually allows access
for free or Bill’s uncle Max. Mon-
day, we backtracked from Mem-
phis, Tenn., to Colt, Ark., because
a shipment of medical supplies
hadn’t been delivered by UPS in
four days, Bill and I drove to Jones-
boro, Ark., and picked up the sup-
plies, then went to visit Martha
Sue Phillips and her guests,
Aubrey Glen Bridges and his son,
Brian. There was a water issue, so
Bill and I decided to try to figure
out how to fix it. In an attempt to
find some tools in her shed I was
working on getting into one of
those boxes that fit in a pickup. It
was rusty and I couldn’t push the
button in with my finger so hauled
off and kicked the button, the lid
flew up and my forehead was in the
way. Dad always said if we got hit
in the head it probably wouldn’t
hurt us, and he was pretty much
right, I didn’t even get a headache,
but got a very nice bruise smack in
the middle of my forehead. We had
to abandon the water line repair for
lack of tools, but discovered a leak-
ing propane regulator, that was a
lucky find, so it wasn’t a total loss
and we had fun visiting one last
time. J.L. and Ernestine Riley and
Bill and I had supper together that
evening. So far the medical sup-
plies still haven’t shown up!
Monday, Tony Harty visited
Shirley Hair some, then checked on
Wilma Stout and got her mail for
her and discussed a meeting they
were planning to attend. He visited
Russ Hattel in the afternoon.
Don and Vi Moody were busy at
the ranch again Monday moving
cattle into different pastures after
the cattle sale and feeding them
along for supplemental nutrition.
It's nice to see these calves out and
off to other buyers who are into dif-
ferent feeding operations, espe-
cially this year. It's been terribly
dry in parts of South Dakota and
Nebraska.
George Gittings attended funeral
services for Mary Pekron Monday.
Our sympathy is extended to the
family in their loss. Mary and
Hank lived and loved in the home
built by my grandpa, Shy
Fairchild, and cousin, Fred
Fairchild, (half brother to my dad,
Wayne Fairchild). With their ten-
der care, that old home built in the
early 1900s stayed the course and
served them well until they moved
into Philip.
Tuesday, Tony Harty went to cof-
fee and visited Shirley Hair later in
day.
Tuesday, Bill and I spent a little
time in the morning with J.L. and
Ernestine, did a couple of loads of
laundry and waited for the mail to
come before we hit the road. Our
next destination is Garland, Texas.
We pulled in at just the right time
to have supper with friends, Truitt
and Huleen Works, get parked in
the street, hoping not to get run
into, the slides on the street side
stayed tucked in for the better part
of the time, except for when we did
bandages and got Bill into bed and
visited. It was a pretty quiet street.
They told us it was a little town of
only 225,000 plus people. That is
little!
Wednesday, Tony Harty checked
on Wilma Stout about their Rapid
City meeting. It was very windy
that day and many vehicles were
blown over and it was recom-
mended they stay put.
Vi Moody had a nice long phone
visit from former Philip area resi-
dent, Lori Newman Courtney, Ft.
Worth, Texas, Wednesday after-
noon. Lori is the daughter of Owen
and June Newman who used to live
west of the Lampert ranch (where
Don and Vi now live) on the old
Cottonwood road. Lorraine went to
grade school in Philip until her
sixth grade year when the family
moved to St. Louis, Mo. Lori has
lots of relatives in Philip as her
cousin, Donna and the late Sonny
Newman and families all still live
in this area. Lori and her husband,
Ed, also have property near Tex-
oma in Oklahoma where they
spend time also. Lori's brother,
Guy, lives in southern California
and many would remember him
also from this area.
Bill and I had a very relaxed day
in Garland, Texas, Wednesday
with Truitt and Huleen Works, en-
joying a wonderful home-cooked
meal in the evening. Huleen and I
made a trip to the craft store get-
ting ready to make some angels out
of cotton bolls.
Thursday, Tony Harty visited
Shirley Hair and checked out areas
in town for wind damage. He vis-
ited with Kathy Brown and Dale
Koehn. Kathy had shingle damage
on her rental house.
Daniel Jordan spent a couple of
nights with great-grandparents,
George and Sandee Gittings, dur-
ing the week.
In the Sturgis area it was a cool
and very windy week. Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler escaped any wind
damage at their house and didn’t
hear of anything significant in the
town itself. It just rearranged a lot
of leaves and garbage cans. Satur-
day being the most beautiful day of
all, reaching 74˚ at their house.
They have new neighbors to the
west who are from California, so
they got to be the welcoming folks.
Cathy said it is a change because
they haven’t had any steady neigh-
bors for a long time.
Don and Vi Moody drove into
Rapid City Thursday for a couple of
days, after the 70 mph wind. They
made a trip up to Deadwood Friday
to enjoy a shrimp fest and on the
way home into Rapid City that af-
ternoon almost had a big fat tire
and rim ride up onto the hood of
their car. It came off a heavy truck
trailer and careened all over the in-
terstate with cars dodging from left
to right on I-90 just west of Rapid
near the truck stop. Quick action
and lots of dodging from the drivers
– the tire finally rolled into a re-
taining fence to the right of the
highway. A person needs to keep a
constant and very close watch at all
times. If one car had missed seeing
that wheel, about six to eight cars
or more would have had a pile-up
at 65 mph.
Thursday, Bill and I toured
around Garland, Texas, a little
with Truitt and Huleen Works and
saw where Truitt worked until he
retired. We also visited their
beauty shop which is all antique
and saw a picture of Garland in the
1900s. A bunch of great gals. We
had a nice tour and enjoyed supper
out before calling it a night.
Friday turned out to be a beauti-
ful day. Tony Harty visited with
Kathy Brown who was re-shingling
on her house. Tony was on hand
watching the old elevator being
taken down. It was a case of they
huffed and puffed and finally with
cables and tractors and lots of ef-
fort they tipped it over.
Friday, Truitt Works found a
project he and Bill could tackle, so
we extended our visit for another
day and Huleen and I finished
making our ornament angels. We
had a great supper of leftovers that
Huleen was so embarrassed at hav-
ing to serve her guests, not know-
ing that we basically live on left-
overs.
Saturday, Tony Harty visited
L.D. and Shirley Hair. It was such
a nice day, so he did some raking
up of leaves and tidying up the
yard. Kathy finished shingling and
she got into the mood of getting
their yard raked up, too.
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
continued on page 12
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports / accomplishments
Come to
our Annual
Halloween
Masquerade
Friday Night
Bingo
859-2173 • Downtown Philip
Saturday, October 27th
Judging: 8-11 p.m. • Unmasking: 11:15 p.m.
Cash prizes for Best 3 Costumes!
Dance to “Montage”
Halloween
Masquerade
Party!
And … in case the 27th spooks you out …
GUESS WHAT!? We’re doing it again!!
Friday, November 2nd … Same thing, different day!!
Friday Night
Steak-out
Is It tIme?
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
Call Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
Philip
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
monday night mixed
Shad’s Towing.............................19-9
Petersen’s..................................17-11
Rockers................................16.5-11.5
Handrahan Const .....................14-14
Dakota Bar................................10-18
Badland’s Auto......................7.5-20.5
Highlights:
Jason Petersen ............243 clean/608
Andrew Reckling...................238/629
Jerry Mooney ........................235/597
Jackie Shull...........................174/502
Karen Byrd..2-7-8 & 3-10 splits; 129
Vickie Petersen .....................180/496
Matt Reckling .......................203/567
Gail Reutter .................................178
Tena Slovek..................................479
Ronnie Coyle ................................548
Trina Brown.................................471
tuesday nite men’s early
People’s Mkt................................10-2
Kadoka Tree Serv.........................9-3
Philip Motor..................................8-4
George’s Welding ..........................6-6
G&A Trenching.............................6-6
Kennedy Imp.................................6-6
Philip Health Serv........................3-9
Bear Auto....................................1-11
Highlights:
Tony Gould....................221, 203/590
Steve Verner .................216, 217/580
Cory Boyd..............................201/553
Dakota Alfrey ......3-10 split; 201/531
Earl Park ....................5-10 split; 531
Fred Foland ................3-10 split; 521
Alvin Pearson...............................521
Ronnie Williams6-7 & 5-7 splits; 519
Bill Stone......................................506
Jim Larson............3-10 & 2-10 splits
Norm Buxcel .........................2-9 split
Terry Wentz............3-10 & 4-5 splits
Dale O’Connell....................3-10 split
Wednesday morning coffee
Cutting Edge...............................22-6
Invisibles.....................................20-8
Bowling Belles ..........................18-10
Jolly Ranchers ..........................11-17
State Farm Ins..........................11-17
Highlights:
Sandra O’Connor ..161, 151, 151/463
Shirley Parsons....................154, 152
Dody Weller..................................181
Charlene Kjerstad........................172
Debbie Gartner.....................6-7 split
Judy Papousek ...................5-10 split
Wednesday nite early
Dakota Bar..................................20-8
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................14.5-13.5
Morrison’s Haying ..............14.5-13.5
Wall Food Center......................14-14
Dorothy’s Catering ...................14-14
Hildebrand Concrete ..........13.5-14.5
First National Bank .................12-16
Just Tammy’s........................9.5-18.5
Highlights:
Alicia Heathershaw.....................171
Stacey Schulz ........................186/489
Kalie Kjerstad..............................125
Trina Brown..........................203/516
Brenda Grenz ......5-10 & 3-10 splits;
...............................................185/496
Jackie Shull..................................477
Annette Hand....................4-5-7 split
Debbie Gartner.....................3-7 split
Emily Kroetch ......................3-7 split
thursday men’s
A&M Laundry...............................9-3
Dakota Bar....................................9-3
O’Connell Const ............................8-4
McDonnell Farms .........................7-5
West River Pioneer Tanks ...........5-7
The Steakhouse ............................4-8
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................3-9
WEE BADD...................................3-9
Highlights:
Jordan Kjerstad ....................217/557
Ronnie Williams...........................217
Bill Slovek ....................................202
Alex Moos ...........................201 clean
Brian Pearson .......................207/608
Jack Heinz.............................215/558
Cory Boyd ............3-10 split; 200/574
Jan Bielmaier........................213/573
Wendell Buxcel...................214 clean
Alvin Pearson........................202/553
Harlan Moos..........................206/536
Jay McDonnell .............................535
Randy Boyd...................3-10 x 2 split
Chad Walker ...................5-8-10 split
Matt Schofield...................4-5-7 split
Mark Foland.........................4-5 split
Ky Bowen............................3-10 split
Stan Anderson......................2-7 split
Don Weller............................2-7 split
Friday nite mixed
Cristi’s Crew...............................21-7
King Pins.............................16.5-11.5
Roy’s Repair ........................15.5-12.5
Randy’s Spray Service................15-9
Lee and the Ladies ...................11-13
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Deb Neville...................................186
Cory Boyd..............................200/533
Brenda Grenz...............................174
Duane Hand ................198 clean/551
Alvin Pearson...............................553
Ed Morrison...5-10 & 2-5-7 x 2 splits
Aaron Richardson.......3-10 x 2 splits
Deanna Fees..................... 4-5-7 split
These elementary students are Super Scotties for August and
September 2012. They have earned the distinction through
different individual displays of good character. Each teacher
selects at least one of their students at the end of each month.
Super Scotties
Talan Haynes
Kindergarten
Colden Kramer
1st Grade
Reece Heltzel
4th Grade
Bailey Bierle
5th Grade
Brittney Park
6th Grade
Elementary Students of the
Months for August/September
Wyatt Schriever
2nd Grade
Eathan Martin
3rd Grade
Bobbi Jarvi
Deep Creek
Samantha Huston – senior
An upbeat and positive student in
class. Completes quality work and is
always prepared. Displays strong
leadership skills.
Philip High School
October 2012 Students of the Month
Seth Haigh – junior
Intelligent student who always
hands in quality work. Works well
with others. Is a good contributor
in class.
by coach ralph kroetch
From the very first practice at
8:00 a.m., August 13, to the bus’ re-
turn at 8:00 p.m. October 21, it was
apparent that this year’s Scotties
cross country team was something
special. Special, not only in their
athleticism, but their camaraderie
and belief in one another – “we not
me equals team.”
That belief motivated the Scot-
ties through a fantastic season.
Philip qualified both boys’ and
girls’ teams for easily the biggest
setting for a state B championship
in the state of South Dakota. Thou-
sands lined the 4,000 and 5,000
meter course on Huron’s Broadland
Golf course to witness the best B
endurance athletes in the state
compete for 2012 bragging rights.
12:50 p.m. brought final call for
113 B division girls. Philip was in
box 13 of 30, which made fighting
for early position the first of many
challenges facing the Scotties. Sen-
ior Holly Iwan was in her sixth
state meet, junior Allison Pekron in
her second, freshman Ellie Coyle in
her second and eighth grader Shay
Hand in her first state meet.
Iwan led the Scotties early, with
Coyle on her hip as they held posi-
tions at the one mile mark in the
low teens, Hand in the low 60s and
Pekron in the 90s. Mid race found
Coyle now in 10th and Iwan in
19th. Coyle was able to avenge a
region defeat as she ran away from
Region 5B champion Morgan Ham
of Lemmon to make Coyle the high-
est placing West River finisher
with eighth place and a time of
16:34.28. This was an improve-
ment of 16 places over last year.
Though five young ladies
dropped out of today’s race, Iwan’s
courage allowed her to fight
through a hip injury she’s been qui-
etly dealing with since mid season.
She finished her final cross country
meet just ahead of a pair of Kadoka
runners at 17:43.38, giving her a
respectable 37th place and bring-
ing a stellar high school career to
an end. Iwan has earned five state
medals in six years, placing 20th,
ninth, ninth, eighth and fifth over
five years. Very few runners earn
state medals, much less five. This
leaves Iwan the most highly deco-
rated cross country athlete in
Philip High School history.
A much-improved Hand, who
began her year over 20 minutes on
a 4,000 meter course, placed a foot
on the finish mat at 18:48.28, edg-
ing out Lemmon’s Amber Ellison
for the 86th spot; an excellent first
state meet. Pekron improved seven
places and 14 seconds from her
2011 state finish as she extended a
computer-chip-carrying shoe in
front of Dupree’s Sage Brooks at
the finish to place 105th and a time
of 19:48.68. Great job girls!
Philip’s 96 team points allowed
them to break into the top 10 state
teams for the second straight year.
2:00 p.m. brought 119 boys from
43 schools to the start line. Our
boys held start box 19 of 30, giving
them the same early challenge the
girls faced of just surviving the first
half mile without being knocked
down, elbowed or stepped on.
Sophomores Tristen Rush, Nel-
son Holman and Blake Martinez,
and freshmen Garrett Snook and
Keegan Burnett were one of just
two teams comprised of entirely
underclassmen. Once things got
separated enough to get a good
count, nearly one mile into the
Cross country team 4th overall at state
The Philip High
School cross
country team
members who
were in the state
meet in Huron,
October, 2012.
From left: Tristen
Rush, Nelson Hol-
man, Holly Iwan,
Garrett Snook,
Blake Martinez,
Ellie Coyle, Shay
Hand, Keegan
Burnett, Allison
Pekron and stu-
dent
manager Sam
Stangle.
Courtesy photo
race, Rush was in 40th place, with
Holman just two spots back. Mar-
tinez was just a few yards back at
52nd place, and Snook and Burnett
were in the mid 90s. At mid race,
Rush had moved up to the 16th
place with Holman in 24th and
Martinez in the high 60s.
This race always brings great
finishing battles. Rush, in a group
of three, split Ipswich’s Danzan
Gilborne and Irene-Wakonda’s
Jack Johnson to earn his first state
medal at 14th place with a time of
18:30.26, a 19 spot improvement
over 2011. Holman out ran Free-
man Academy’s Matthew Graber to
earn his first state meet medal. He
had an unbelievable improvement
of 77 seconds and 51 places for
22nd at 18:50.11. Martinez fin-
ished strong, keeping Alcester-
Hudson’s Marcus Ireland behind
him to place 73rd, while improving
his course best by 41 seconds.
Burnett became the Scotties’
fourth for the first time this year by
putting Parker’s Tristen Erickson
behind him to place 97th in his first
ever state meet. Snook out ran
Wessington Springs’ Owen Witte
for the 103rd place, also Snook’s
first state meet. Their times were
21:05.41 and 21:35.51, respectively.
The boys accumulated 77 team
points to place sixth as a team for
the second straight year. The Scot-
ties were one of only four teams to
medal two men in this year’s meet,
and will be one of just three teams
to return two medalists in 2013.
The boys’ sixth place and girls’
10th place gave Philip a combined
team count of 16, tying Lyman for
the fourth place combined team in
this year’s state meet. This year’s
Philip Scotties team was very easy
to coach, as everyone had one
goal – we not me. All were here to
do what was best for the team. Few
complaints, much fun, great re-
wards.
Each of the 12 students in family and consumer science class take Baby Think
It Over for two days and two nights. The assignment addresses teen pregnancy
and the responsibilities of teen parenting, teaching that babies are a lot of work
and must have their needs timely met. The mechanical babies record neglect,
abuse, head tips and total crying time. They require diaper changes, feeding,
burping and rocking. They make sounds of crying, cooing, coughing, burping and
breathing. And, FACS students learn the proper use of car seats, and about fetal
alcohol, shaken baby and sudden infant death syndromes. The babies were pur-
chased with federal Perkins funding at approximately $500 each. PHS has five
such babies, of four different ethnic groups. Pictured with Baby Think It Over are,
from left, Briaunna Willliams, Jenny Johnston and Libbi Koester. Courtesy photo
Think it over babies
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
Weekly SPeCial:
Grilled Chicken Breast
with Tossed Salad
* * * * * *
SuNday SPeCial:
Cod
Baked Potato, Salad Bar & Dessert
Legion
Fun
Night!
Saturday, Nov. 3rd • 6:30 p.m.
American Legion Hall in Philip
Proceeds will help fund improvements on the Legion Hall!
Sponsored by Wheeler-Brooks American Legion Post #173
BINGO • PRIZES • GAMES • GIFT CERTIFICATES • FUN • LUNCH WILL BE AvAILABLE!
Doors
Open at
6:00 p.m.
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2006 Chevy 1500
Extended Cab, 2x4, V8, Air, Cruise, Tilt
Twenty-three elementary and
middle schools and seven high
schools have earned top spots
under the state’s new accountabil-
ity system.
As part of South Dakota’s waiver
from No Child Left Behind, the
state was required to identify the
top five percent of public schools, as
well as the lowest five percent of
Title I schools, this fall. The schools
were identified, in most cases,
based on their scores on the new
School Performance Index, or SPI,
a 100-point index that encom-
passes key indicators that measure
school performance.
At the elementary and middle
school level, those SPI key indica-
tors include student achievement
in math and reading on the state
assessment and attendance rates.
At the high school level, those SPI
key indicators include student
achievement in math and reading
on the state assessment, four-year
cohort graduation rate, and ACT
scores in English and math.
Of the schools considered exem-
plary – in the top five percent, one
was Milesville Elementary in the
Haakon School District. Another
was Wall Elementary in the Wall
School District.
Of the schools considered prior-
ity (bottom five percent) that will
be part of a School Improvement
Grant), one is the New Underwood
High School in the New Under-
wood School District.
Of the schools considered focus
schools – bottom 10 percent, one is
the Long Valley Elementary in the
Kadoka Area School District.
This is a transitional year for the
new accountability system. Addi-
tional indicators, including aca-
demic growth, will be added to the
School Performance Index by the
2014-15 school year. Once fully im-
plemented, the department plans
to use three years of data for most
of the SPI key indicators. This cur-
rent calculation is based upon only
one year of data.
“A review of the data shows that
a majority of our schools are per-
forming well, and our students are
reaching appropriate benchmarks,”
said Dr. Melody Schopp, South
Dakota’s secretary of education.
“Kudos to those educators, stu-
dents and parents who are commit-
ted to seeing that our children are
getting the knowledge and skills
base that will see them through
life.”
According to Schopp, at the ele-
mentary and middle school level,
82 percent of schools earned at
least 70 out of the 100 points possi-
ble. And at the high school level, 71
percent of schools earned at least
70 out of the 100 points. It is at the
70 mark that SPI scores begin to
drop rapidly.
At the lower end of the spectrum
are schools whose SPI scores rank
among the bottom five percent of
Title I schools. Under the new ac-
countability system, these schools
are considered “priority” schools.
The Department of Education
also has identified “focus” schools,
a classification that applies only to
Title I schools and considers the
performance of historically under-
performing student groups.
As part of the new accountability
system, the department will work
with Priority and Focus schools to
implement meaningful interven-
tions designed to improve student
outcomes.
Milesville in top five percent
of new accountability system
Over 1,000 of South Dakota's
best high school vocal and instru-
mental musicians will gather in
Rapid City for the 60th annual
South Dakota All-State Chorus
and Orchestra, Friday and Satur-
day October 26-27.
The activities will culminate
with a concert at the Rushmore
Plaza Civic Center in Rapid City
beginning at 7:00 p.m., Saturday
evening, October 27. Doors of the
Barnett Arena will open for the
concert at 5:30 p.m.
Philip High School will be repre-
sented by its All-State Chorus
members of Garrett Snook singing
bass, Gavin Snook singing tenor,
Ellie Coyle singing alto, Peyton De-
Jong singing soprano, Afton Burns
singing alto, and Mahalah Theye
singing soprano. Two of the girls
are alternates. The students are di-
rected by music instructor Barb
Bowen.
The annual All-State Chorus and
Orchestra, co-sponsored by South
Dakota High School Activities As-
sociation and the South Dakota
Music Educators Association, is the
largest interscholastic high school
music activity held in South
Dakota. The chorus includes 932
singers representing 150 South
Dakota high schools. The orches-
tra is comprised of 155 musicians
from 30 schools.
The 2012 chorus selections are
“Festival Sanctus” by John Leavitt,
“The Last Words of David” by Ran-
dall Thompson, “David's Lamenta-
tion” by Joshua Shank, “If Music be
the Food of Love” by David C.
Dickau and “The Awakening” by
Joseph M. Martin. The combined
chorus/orchestra selections are
“Kyrie from Memorial” by René
Clausen, and “America the Beauti-
ful” by Ward.
The conductors for the 2012 are
Dr. Anna Hamre from the Univer-
sity of California, Fresno, and
Brian Cole from Moorhead, Minn.
Hamre will conduct the chorus,
while Cole will lead the orchestra.
During the concert, the South
Dakota Music Educators Associa-
tion will recognize several high
schools and individuals for their
contributions to music in South
Dakota.
PHS All-State Chorus members
Philip High School’s All-State Chorus representatives, from left, Peyton DeJong – soprano, Garrett Snook – bass, Afton
Burns – alto, Ellie Coyle – alto, Gavin Snook – tenor and Barb Bowen. Not pictured: Mahalah Theye – soprano.
Dig Pink breast cancer awareness
The Family, Career and Community Leaders of America and the Philip High School volleyball team honored breast cancer
survivors who were present during the annual Dig Pink Night volleyball game, Friday, October 19. Each survivor was given
bracelets and pink roses by the three Dig Pink program student representatives. From left, Katelyn Enders, Debbie Gartner,
Kathy Gittings, Amber West, Pam Clements, Marlis Doud, Val Schulz, Carolyn Heltzel, Sam Huston and Tara Cantrell.
The Jackson-Kadoka Economic
Development Corporation has re-
ceived an award of $99,000 from
Rural Business Enterprise Grant
Funds (RBEG).
The Rural Development funds
will aid the Jackson-Kadoka Eco-
nomic Development Corporation
with establishing a revolving loan
fund to assist small and emerging
businesses. The revolving fund will
be a catalyst for interested entre-
preneurs to secure financing and
assist with furthering economic de-
velopment. Keeping businesses
running in rural areas is critical to
the survival of the town.
“This project provides opportu-
nity and resources to support serv-
ices in Jackson County. The part-
nership with Jackson-Kadoka Eco-
nomic Development shows what
can be accomplished when govern-
ment and entrepreneurs work to-
gether to bring increased economic
stimulus and jobs to rural South
Dakotans,” said Elsie Meeks, Rural
Development South Dakota state
director.
“This funding opportunity is
amazing. It will further help us
with our goals of continued support
for our existing businesses and pro-
vide opportunities for new and
emerging small businesses,” said
JoBeth Uhlir, director of operations
for the Jackson-Kadoka Economic
Development Corporation. “Pro-
viding our residents with home-
town services and economic stabil-
ity is one of our highest priorities
and this grant will help us meet
those challenges.”
Jackson-Kadoka Economic Development
gets $99,000 from Rural Development
Lady Scotties Volleyball Team
Back row from left, Head Coach Kim Bouman, Hanna Hostutler, Tyana Gottsleben, Katie Haigh, Courtney
Bartlett, Ashton Reedy, Justina Cvach; third row, Katlin Knutson, Brett Carley, Peyton DeJong, Tyshia
Ferguson, Amanda McIlravy, Libbi Koester, Asst. Coach Mary Lynn Crary; second row, Student Mgr. Gavin
Snook, Afton Burns, Madison Hand, Jordyn Dekker, Kaci Olivier, Ellie Coyle, Student Mgrs. Deserae
Williams and Catie Pinela; front row, Kelsie Kroetch, Krista Wells, Sam Johnson. Photo by Deb Smith
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 10
Good Luck at Districts
Lady Scotties Volleyball Team!
B&B Sales
859-3200
Brant’s Electric
859-2254
Coyle’s Standard
859-9087
Coyle’s SuperValu
859-2727
Dr. Ron & Laurie Mann
& Staff • 859-2491
Ernie’s Bldg. Center,
LLC • 843-2871
Farm Bureau Financial
Services • 859-2902
First National Bank in
Philip • 859-2525
First National Agency
859-2588
Fitzgerald Oil Company
859-2007
G&G Excavation
859-2621
Gibson Concrete Const.
859-3100
Golden Willow Seeds
843-2187
Grossenburg Impl.
859-2636
Haakon Co. Abstract
859-2461
Ingram Hardware
859-2521
Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle
& Vet • 859-2482
Kennedy Implement
& Auto • 859-2568
Midwest Cooperatives
859-2382
Modern Woodmen of
America • 859-2778
Moses Bldg. Center
859-2100
Philip Health Services
859-2511
Philip Livestock
Auction • 859-2577
Philip Motor, Inc.
859-2585
Ravellette Publications
859-2516
Rush Funeral Home
859-2400
State Farm Insurance
859-2559
The Steakhouse &
Lounge • 859-2774
District Tournament will be held:
Tuesday, October 30th, Thursday, November 1st
& Friday, November 2nd
Top seed to host!!
Teams include Philip, Wall, Edgemont,
New Underwood, Oelrichs & Rapid City Christian
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 11
Sports
StaFF SpotligHt
KarCH Foley
–Employed 2 Years
–Works in the elevator driveway
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
ElEct Ralph “chip” KEmnitz
Republican Candidate for
Haakon County State’s Attorney
Long-time resident and proud supporter of Haakon County!!
4 Long record of public service: over 38 years representing Haakon County;
handling criminal & juvenile matters and administrative appeals; advising
county commissioners, offices & officials, prosecuted thousands of different
types of cases, have tried numerous cases to a jury and convened Grand Jurys
when appropriate.
4 Special Assistant Attorney General
4 33 years military (retired Col.); 9 years as Chair of S.D. Commission on
Gaming; 9 years as Chair of Racing Commission, 4 years Lottery Commission;
1989 Volunteer of the Year award by Governor George Mickelson; 6 years on
State Bar Disciplinary Board and served on various other State Bar committees,
currently Client Security Fund
4 A guest lecturer at University of Arizona in January 2010
4 If elected, Haakon County will also have a Deputy State’s Attorney at no extra
cost to the taxpayers – opponent, when conflicted, appoints deputy at county
expense
4 Never asked the county to pay office rent, as does opponent
4 Running in Haakon County only. Opponent running in Haakon and Jackson
counties simultaneously for position of State’s Attorney. [Her attentions have
been divided between Bennett and Haakon counties in the past four years –
which county takes precedence?]
4 Believe plea bargaining should be a strategy, not a routine
4 Rated an A-V attorney by Martindale Hubble for more than 31 years, highest
rating in legal ability and ethical standards, (Peer Review)
i would appreciate your vote on november 6, 2012.
This ad approved and paid for by the candidate.
NoTiCe
To better serve you and
prevent needless
waiting, we ask that you
call 24-48 hours ahead
of time for prescription
refills. If you have no
refills remaining on your
prescription we will
attempt to notify your
doctor which may
require an additional 24
hours. Please call if you
have any questions.
We appreciate you and
THaNk you for your
continued business.
Zeeb Pharmacy
859-2833 • Philip
GeorGe’s
Welding & Repair
• DOT Inspection
• Complete Trailer Repair
• Full Line of Bearings & Seals
• Tractor Front End & Spindles
• Selling New Steel
• Recycling Outlet
• Refrigration & A/C on Commercial,
Residential & Vehicles
• ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
George: 441-3607 • Lee: 441-3606
DennIs
859-2970 • Philip
859-2744 or 685-3068
Philip
2012 Chevy Silverado 1500
Crew Cab, 4x4, Full Factory
Warranty, 6.2L Vortex, 400 HP,
6 speed AT, heavy duty towing
package, loaded, bright red,
430 miles
The Philip Lady Scotties volley-
ball team hosted the Bennett
County Lady Warriors, Friday, Oc-
tober 19.
In an off night, the Scotties just
could not get in sync with each
other’s play. Three games went by
rather quickly and Philip lost its
varsity match. The team’s season
record so far is 11-16.
12-25, 15-25, 15-25
Serving: 43 of 44 (6 aces). Leaders:
Hanna Hostutler –10 of 10 (3 aces), Madi-
son Hand – 10 of 10 (1 ace), Kaci Olivier –
7 of 7 (1 ace).
Receiving: 53 of 66. Leaders: Krista
Wells – 31 of 33, Jordyn Dekker – 8 of 10,
Olivier – 7 of 9.
Setting: 76 of 87 (13 assists). Leaders:
Hand – 49 of 55 (7 assists), Ashton
Reedy – 15 of 15 (5 assists).
Hitting: 70 of 90 (16 kills). Leaders:
Hostutler – 15 of 17 (5 kills), Hand – 9 of
13 (3 kills), Dekker – 8 of 9 (2 kills).
Blocking: 1 kill. Leader: Dekker – 1
solo.
Digging: 58 of 87. Leaders: Wells – 15
of 21, Olivier – 12 of 18, Hostutler – 8 of
11.
The junior varsity team handily
won two games to win its match.
The junior varsity season record
now stands at 10-4.
25-16, 25-13
Serving: 46 of 51 (11 aces). Leaders: Hos-
tutler – 17 of 18 (4 aces), Courtney Bartlett –
12 of 13 (4 aces). Peyton DeJong – 6 of 7 (2
aces).
Receiving: 18 of 20. Leaders: Olivier – 6 of
6, Hostutler – 5 of 5, Brett Carley – 4 of 5.
Setting: 58 of 58 (10 assists). Leader:
Reedy – 45 of 45 (9 assists).
Hitting: 45 of 61 (10 kills). Leaders: Hos-
tutler – 15 of 15 (5 kills), Olivier – 6 of 6 (2
kills), Bartlett – 5 of 5 (1 kill).
Blocking: 3 kills. Leaders: Carley – 1 solo
and 1 assist, Hostutler – 1 solo, Justina
Cvach – 1 assist.
Digging: 49 of 58. Leaders: Olivier – 11 of
13, DeJong – 10 of 12, Hostutler – 9 of 9.
The “C” team played two close
games to win its match. The “C”
team’s season record so far is 6-1.
25-22, 25-22
Serving: 41 of 46 (11 aces). Leaders: Afton
Burns – 8 of 8 (3 aces), Peyton Kuchen-
becker – 4 of 4 (2 aces), Tia Guptill – 10 of 10
(1 ace), Tyana Gottsleben – 9 of 9 (1 ace).
Receiving: 15 of 21. Leader: Burns – 7 of 7.
Setting: 26 of 27 (3 assists). Leaders: Tia
Guptill – 16 of 16 (1 assist), Cheyenne Pin-
ney – 5 of 6 (2 assists).
Hitting: 28 of 32 (6 kills). Leaders: Gup-
till – 10 of 10 (3 kills), Tyshia Ferguson – 4 of
4 (1 kill), Elise Wheeler – 2 of 2 (1 kill)..
Blocking: 1 kill. Leader: Kuchenbecker – 1
solo.
Digging: 24 of 31. Leader: Afton Burns – 8
of 10.
The District 14B volleyball tour-
nament will be Thursday and Fri-
day, November 1 and 2.
Lady Scotties fall to Bennett County
Jordyn Dekker taking the shot, with Peyton DeJong backing her up.
Krista Wells receiving, with Kaci Olivier
backing her up. Photos by Del Bartels
The Philip Scotties football team
hosted the Kadoka Area Kougars,
Thursday, October 18.
The first kick of the game was
sent by Philip into the end zone,
thus the Kougars started out at the
20 yard line. Within two minutes of
play Kadoka was forced to punt.
The Scotties blocked the punt and
took possession of the ball on the
25-yard line. With 9:25 still on the
first quarter clock, Philip sent
Casey Reder over the six remaining
yards for a touchdown. Chaney
Burns put the ball through the up-
rights for the extra point and the
Scotties were ahead 7-0.
Philip again kicked into the end-
zone, and the next few minutes
were filled with turnovers. Three
minutes remained in the first quar-
ter when Philip stopped Kadoka
inches from a first down. The next
play was a long gain for Philip.
Only 15 seconds were left when
Reder was given the ball for a four-
yard touchdown. Burn’s extra point
kick was again good. The first
quarter ended with Philip ahead
14-0.
The second quarter was scoreless
for both teams. Kadoka did do well
when it was forced to punt, twice.
The first put Philip back to the 25.
Later, Kadoka could not make good
use of its next possession and
punted to Philip’s one-yard line.
The second half was a Kougar
resurgence prompted by Chandlier
Sudbeck, who broke free to run 45
yards for a touchdown. A pass from
Lane Patterson to Chance Knutson
was successful for the two-point
conversion play. Kadoka was on
the scoreboard, 14-8.
The third quarter continued with
a Kadoka squiggle-kick that made
it to Philip’s 20-yard line. Though
no further scoring was done in the
quarter, good plays, broken plays
and awkward possession changes
were highlighted with a final long
run by the Scotties down to the
five-yard line.
The final quarter had barely
begun and Philip was fourth down
and goal. The Scotties opted to try
for the touchdown, rather than a
field goal. They did not accomplish
it and Kadoka gained possession.
With 9:42 on the clock, the Kougars
made a long run into the end zone,
but the play was called back to
Philip’s 44 because of a foul. With
6:39 on the clock, Kadoka repeated
their touchdown play, only to have
it called back to the 21 because of
another foul. Finally, on their third
touchdown play, the Kougars re-
frained from fouling and the three-
yard carry by Knutson was good for
six points. Knutson was then given
the ball for the successful two-point
conversion play. Kadoka was now
ahead 14-16.
Philip could not advance effec-
tively enough, and Kadoka gained
possession. The quarterback
dropped to his knee several times,
and even let the 25-second delay-of-
game run out. The quarter eventu-
ally ticked away for a Philip loss of
its last regular season game.
Philip earned 18 first downs,
compared to Kadoka’s 16. Philip
used one punt during the game,
while Kadoka used two. Philip gave
up 25 yards because of one 10-yard
and three five-yard penalties.
Kadoka gave up 50 yards because
of one 15-yard, one 10-yard and five
five-yard penalties.
The Scotties’ passing game con-
sisted of five throws by Tate De-
Jong for two completions, which
gained a total of 61 yards.
The Philip rushing game con-
sisted of 46 carries at a total gain
of 202 yards. Paul Guptill used his
17 carries to add 84 yards to the
Scotties’ forward march. Reder was
given the ball 21 times to go a total
of 76 yards. DeJong’s three carries
added 28 more yards. Ryan Van
Tassel used his five carries to go 14
yards.
The Philip defense was again
strong in tackles. Cassidy Schnabel
racked up three solo tackles, 11 as-
sists and one quarterback sack.
Quade Slovek earned four solos,
nine assists and one sack. Jade
Berry added two solos and nine as-
sists. Jacob Kammerer earned one
solo and six assists. DeJong ended
his game with one solo and five as-
sists.
Philip can’t hold lead over Kadoka
And the punt was away. Philip’s Chaney Burns punted once and scored two extra
points during the Philip/Kadoka game.
Successful fake. Casey Reder (#24) had this Kadoka defender convinced that
Reder was the ball carrier. Photos by Del Bartels
Philip’s Paul Guptill (#25) was given an open backfield by his teammates while
he looked for an opening to run through.
Kougar in trouble. At least three Scotties were going to make sure this Kadoka
ball carrier was not going to get much further.
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 12
Show & dance with full band at 8 p.m.!
come early
for supper!
859-2744 or 685-3068
Philip
2012 Chevy Silverado K1500
4x4, 244 Actual Miles,
Pearl White, Full Factory Warranty
Beautiful rig!!
Bad River Sportsman’s Club
West River Coyote
Calling Contest
One Day Event
— Saturday —
October 27th
• Sign-up Deadline: Friday, Oct. 26, 7:00 p.m. at the
73 Bar in Philip; Calcutta to follow
• $40 entry fee per two-person team
• Pays 3 Places on 1-12 teams; 4 places on 13-24 teams;
5 places on 25 & over
• Saturday Deadline: 7:30 p.m. SHARP! Bring your
critters to the 73 Bar’s Back Door by 7:30 p.m. on
Saturday, October 30th
• For more information, contact Jerry Ellens:
605/859-2173
73— SALOON
859-2173 • DOWNTOWN PHILIP
On Tuesday, October 16, the stu-
dents of Midland School went to
the buffalo roundup at the Bad-
lands National Park. The students
were able to watch as park employ-
ees worked the buffalo. There were
a variety of things being done while
they were there. The buffalo were
all weighed, had blood tests, got
implanted with a microchip if they
didn't have one, and some were
tagged to be sent elsewhere. There
was a buffalo population of about
1,500 and they were sorting them
to try to get the population down to
a number that was better suited for
the amount of space available at
the park. The excess buffalo will be
shipped to reservations, including
Pine Ridge.
Midland students attend buffalo roundup
Back row, left to right, Nicki Nelson, Christine Neidan, Miranda Dale, Kaelan Block, Mariah Dale, park ranger, and Renee
Schofield. Middle row, Kash Block, Eagan Fitzgerald, Caylo McLaughlin, Cole Finn, Logan Sammons, Cass Finn, Carson Daly,
and Brandon McLaughlin. Front row, Morgan Sammons, Karlee Block, Dane Daly, Kaitlyn Schofield, and Rydek Neilan. Cour-
tesy photo
AI Bred Angus to
DL Incentive 228
(EPDs BW 0,WW 81,YW 133, M 28).
Pasture bred to Green
Mountain Front Man
(EPDs BW -.7,WW 61,YW 99 M 28.
These heifers originated out of the
2012 BHSS pen of five.These very fancy bred
heifers will weigh 1,050 lbs. and are bred to start
calving March 1st for 45 days.
Selling 10 Black Angus commerical bred heifers
Saturday, November 3rd
at Philip (SD) Livestock Auction
Don and Vi Moody returned to
the ranch Saturday, the beginning
of bird hunting season. It's really
too dry for much hunting around
south of Philip, but Don said a
sporting goods store was jammed
packed. Don checked out some new
binoculars and Vi checked out the
fudge! They arrived home to the
ranch that evening.
Saturday morning early, Bill and
I idled away from our parking
space on the street at Truitt and
Huleen Works in Garland, Texas.
We fueled up with diesel being
$3.989. The speed limit on I-10 was
80 mph and the temperature
creped up to 89˚. Part of the way
the area looked good, we were sur-
prised the road ditches were not
hayed. The cotton fields looked to
be good, spotted some winter wheat
fields that also looked good, these
fields co-habited with oil wells
pumping away. We pondered how
the oil went from one pump to an-
other and would finally spot some
holding tanks. It must go by
pipelines and those must be laid
out for miles and miles. The
thought of the objections going out
for one big pipeline being proposed
to carry oil across the nation made
us think it would be a lot easier to
find a leak in one line rather than
the miles and miles of underground
lines laid out in Texas. This is the
time of year when they will soon be
in the monsoon season, as they call
it, when most of the rain comes and
for sure, everything can use rain.
Then we traveled through a part of
the region where there was only
sand and sagebrush. No grass to
even hold the sand from erosion.
Our day ended in Pecos, Texas, and
we visited with other travelers
from Michigan where we parked. I
asked what there was to see in
Pecos and the old boy checking us
in wondered if we had five minutes
to spare, cause that would about
take care of the tour!
Sandee, Natalie and Kohen Git-
tings attended the baby shower for
Stephanie (Hook) Gisi Saturday af-
ternoon.
Sunday, Tony Harty attended
church in the morning and went
out for dinner. He had a nice visit
with Joann Stilwell. Her husband,
Jerry, is trying to recover after an
incident that happened at the
motel that landed him in the hos-
pital in critical condition. Tony vis-
ited with L.D. and Shirley Hair as
well as Casey Bauman, a neighbor
on the block to the south, who is
doing carpentry work in Kadoka.
Tony checked out the trucks and
trailers that had been towed in by
the tow service after the big winds
during the week. He watched the
football players working out for the
play-offs coming up next week.
Sunday evening, the Don Klumb
and Eric Hanson families came for
supper at Ralph and Cathy
Fiedler’s. The girls did the cooking
and Ralph and Cathy hosted with
making the dessert. It was a good
time to see everyone and catch up
on what everyone has been doing.
Tessa helped Cathy program her
new cell phone and showed her all
the new things she can now do.
Sandee Gittings spent Sunday
afternoon and evening traveling
around the area with her job.
Bill and I broke camp from
Pecos, Texas, Sunday morning and
spent the day trying to get out of
Texas. We ran into this Texas
rancher and asked him just how
big his spread was. “Well,” he said,
“I can get in my pickup in the early
morning and not get across it by
dark.” We told him we had a pickup
like that once too! We got into
Sierra Vista, Ariz., toward evening
and settled into an RV park a little
ways from his uncle, Max, and
aunt, Jean Riley. Max whipped up
a quick supper for us and we en-
joyed visiting before calling it a
day.
Betwixt Places News
(continued from page 7)
Christmas in the Attic
Wednesday, Oct. 31 • 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
All new Christmas Trees & Decorations
Christmas Trees,
Wreaths,
Garland, Balls,
Tinsel, Skirts,
Stockings
(Excluding Toys)
3
0
%
o
f
f
50% off
Fall
Decorations!!
Bargain
Corner
Starting at
99¢ - $9.99
Values to $50
Drawings for
Door Prizes
throughout
the day!
Gift Bags
79¢
& up!
Don’t forget
our picture
gallery!
New pictures
weekly!
Stop in and
see our Toy
Selection!
Cash & Carry
Ingram Hardware
859-2521 • Philip
Christmas Display
Coffee & Cookies too!
Micah Sechler, age 12, died last
Thursday, Ocotber 18, in Litch-
field, Minn., from complications of
kidney disease. He is the son of
Mike and Traci Sechler and grand-
son of former Pastor Bud and
Marge Sechler. He was waiting for
a kidney transplant to be donated
by his dad, Mike, but didn't regain
enough strength for the surgery.
Our sympathy is extended to this
family. Mike and Traci's address is:
313 S Armstrong; Litchfield, MN
55355.
Everyone is invited to the Hal-
loween party sponsored by the
Milesville Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment Friday night, October 26, at
the hall. Supper begins at 5:30 fol-
lowed by games, cake walk, spook
house, carved or decorated pump-
kin contest, costume judging, etc. It
sounds like a fun evening is
planned. Cakes for the cake walk
are welcome as well as candy for
bags to be sent home with the kids.
Larry and Linda Smith are in the
process of moving to rural Philip,
the former Reickman home north
of town. Their girls and families
were all here for the weekend help-
ing with the move. We all wish you
the very best in your new home,
Larry and Linda!
Last Saturday afternoon, Lana
Elshere visited at Paul and Joy
Elshere's home in Philip. Jim was
prairie dog hunting with Matt,
Nick and Cody Donnelly.
The range team from Philip High
School went to the Badlands Na-
tional Park Tuesday where they
observed the process of culling the
buffalo. There are too many ani-
mals there in the park and they
need to be relocated. Milesville kids
were Rachel Parsons, Bailey An-
ders, Ben Stangle and Brock Han-
son.
Jerri Cordes and boys and Kalie
Hanrahan, Rapid City, spent the
weekend at Mark and Pat Hanra-
hans.
Chad and Kathy Hanrahan were
in the Gregory area for the week-
end for pheasant hunting.
Phil Carley celebrated his birth-
day Sunday with his family home
to enjoy the day with him. Coming
from Pierre were Dave and Angelia
Shields and family, Joe and LaRae
Carley and family and Andrea Car-
ley and Millie, all of Philip, and
Abby Carley and son Wace,
Spearfish.
Guests at Donnie and Bobette
Schofield’s Saturday afternoon
were Jeff and Crystal Schofield and
three boys, Bryan, Landon and
Chase. The boys stayed overnight
with their grandparents and went
home Sunday.
Mark, Judith and Bailey Radway
were in Fargo, N.D., over the week-
end for the college rodeo in which
Tanner Radway participated. Tan-
ner and his roping partner, Austin
O'Dea, placed seventh in the long
go and second in the short go, end-
ing up with a second place average.
Football season ended last week
with the last junior high game on
Monday and the last high school
game Thursday. The cross country
team did well at the state meet in
Huron. There are several Milesville
kids involved in these sports.
Linda Stangle attended the
Sharon (Anderson) Ellwien benefit
in Pierre.
Joan Hamill recently spent three
weeks at her home in St. Paul. Part
of that time she was busy babysit-
ting her four young grandchildren
as the regular sitter was gone.
Jason and Vonda Hamill had a
few friends out for opening pheas-
ant season. Brad Dana, Dave En-
gelhardt and family and Mike De-
lahoyde all joined them for a good
weekend of hunting. Vonda said
she is enjoying her Wednesday
morning bowling league.
Peggy Parsons spent the week-
end at her sister, Christi Weber's,
house in Rapid City, honoring their
mother, Francis Zebroski, on what
would have been her birthday. All
the women and girls in the family
were there for their second annual
Francie days.
Brad and Amber Beer and boys
visited Matt Arthur Sunday. They
were all guests at Zane and Beth
Jeffries at noon and had supper at
Matt’s.
Bill and Karyl Sandal have kept
busy going to their grandson's ball
games. After the games last Mon-
day, they had the following for a
soup supper, Matt and Anita San-
dal and family, Don and Tami Rav-
ellette, and Beau and Mary Ravel-
lette and family. Friday night, they
went to the game in Wall with
Lyman County.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer were
in Rapid City Saturday and Sun-
day where they attended the South
Dakota rodeo finals.
Aren't we glad the wind quit
blowing? Both Wednesday and
Thursday were terrible days to be
outside. Still no rain – we'll keep
praying that it will come.
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
aPaRTMeNTS aVailaBle!
PHiliP PlaZa:
2 Bedrooms Available
RiVeRVieW aPaRTMeNTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For application
& information:
PRO/Rental
Management
1113 Sherman St.
Sturgis, SD 57785
605-347-3077 or
1-800-244-2826
www.prorental
management.com
www.freerenters
guide.com
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 13
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 • Philip
HOURS: M-F: 7 A.M. TO 5 P.M. • SAT: 8 A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY 73 • 859-2100 • PHILIP
•Wood Pellets
•DeWALT Tools
•Storage Sheds
•Gates & Fencing
Supplies
•Skid Loader Rental
•Pole Barn Packages
•House Packages
•Feed Bunks
•Calf Shelters
We offer …
& new Colormatch System for
all your painting needs!
Call today for your
free estimate!!
New Rainfall Insurance For 2013 Pasture & Hayland
Contact Crew Agencyfor details.
Sales close date is November 15, 2012
New Rainfall Insurance For 2013 Pasture & Hayland
Contact Crew Agencyfor details.
Sales close date is November 15, 2012
The Pasture, Rangeland & Forage – Rainfall Index (PRF-RI) is based on NOAA data and uses an approximate
12x12 mile grid. Producers must select at least two, two-month time periods in which precipitation is important
for the growth and production of forage/pasture. These time periods are called index intervals. Insurance pay-
ments to the producer suffering a loss are calculated based on the deviation from normal precipitation with
the grid and index intervals selected. This insurance coverage is for a single peril – lack of precipitation.
Crew Agency, Ltd.
21290 Sd Hwy 240 * Philip, Sd 57567
Cactus Flat – interstate 90 exit 131
605-433-5411
Rusty Olney * Tom Husband * Maurice Handcock * Tanner Handcock * Heidi Porch * Grady & Bernice Crew
agri-Risk Specialist Since 1984
Crew agency is an equal opportunity provider.
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, October 27 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Oct. 29 ~
Prime Rib
Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, October 23 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, October 24 ~
Indian Taco or
Taco Salad
~ Thursday, October 25 ~
Basket of Beef Tips
~ Friday Buffet, Oct. 26 ~
Seasoned Steak
Chicken ~ Shrimp
Try our new charbroiled steaks & burgers! All steaks come with a choice of potato and includes salad bar!
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
Philip motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2006 Chrysler 300C
Hemi, sunroof, leather
Give Ryan a call today!
www.philipmotor.com
cently had a horse wreck. Gene
said Tucker is doing better, but he's
still moving a little slow because of
some broken ribs. Last Tuesday,
Gene taught school at the
Cheyenne School. Gene's daughter,
Connie, who is the teacher at the
school, had to attend training in
Rapid City. Wednesday, Dick and
Gene were in Rapid City for ap-
pointments, but they returned in
time to attend the church supper in
Midland. Sunday, Gene was among
those helping prepare the Deep
Creek Church for the upcoming
bazaar.
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH, MIDLAND, ANNUAL
TURKEY DINNER, SUNDAY,
NOVEMBER 4. SERVING BE-
GINS AT NOON!
Duane and Lola Roseth spent
quite a bit of time in Philip over the
weekend, because Duane's father,
Roy, was pretty sick. Roy is better
now – he sure has a strong consti-
tution! Saturday, Lola helped
Linda and Larry Smith move to a
home they purchased near Philip.
(I was thinking of what a mess I
would be in if I tried to move –
there is over 35 years of "stuff"
here! I need to get more serious
about purging.)
Dorothy and Nels Paulson had
company Sunday, and it sounds
like they had a wonderful day.
Their friends, Myrna and Dale
Hartmann, came out from Ft.
Pierre, along with their house-
guest, Violet, who is from China.
Dorothy said they called the guest
Violet, partly because that is what
her name means and partly be-
cause they can't pronounce her
name in Chinese. Violet is working
with computers at the South
Dakota Health Lab, and she is an
exuberant young thing, interested
and excited about all the new expe-
riences here in rural South Dakota.
Dorothy said Violet lives in a city of
33 million people, so you can imag-
ine how much of a culture change
our rural South Dakota prairies
are for her. While out in the coun-
try, she wanted to ride a horse and
pet a cow, and she got to do both!
Nels and Dorothy have a cow that
used to be a bottle calf, and she is
very friendly, so she was glad to
have Violet give her some atten-
tion. And neighbor Vince Bruce
provided a gentle saddle horse and
led Violet around a bit. Violet also
got to help feed the horses and she
got to drive the "mule," Nels and
Dorothy's ATV. The Paulsons
brought their friends, as well as a
pot of stew, and the group joined
the Bruces for supper. There was
lively conversation, and Dorothy
said it was great to learn about
China. Violet was so excited about
meeting a real cowboy and cowgirl
(Vince and Katie Bruce), and Vince
capped things off by giving Violet a
straw hat, so now she is a cowgirl,
too! As for their news for the rest of
the week, Ed Briggs moved their
hay in for them Friday. Nels helped
fight a fire at Stoeser's Friday –
several hay bales were lost. Nels
and Dorothy did some cleaning at
the church Saturday, and they also
repaired some windbreak that our
recent winds blew down.
Shirley Halligan joined a group
of ladies for lunch in Pierre
Wednesday. The ladies are neigh-
bors (past and present) along and
east of Highway 63. Joyce Jones
and Rosemary Scarborough
Rounds organized the luncheon.
After lunch, Shirley decided to
spend the night in Ft. Pierre rather
than battle the winds getting back
to the country. She said the wind
caused a portion of their fence in
Ft. Pierre to fall over, so Frank and
a helper were repairing that on
Saturday. Sunday, Frank and
Shirley attended church in town,
followed by lunch with Frank's fa-
ther, Ken Halligan. While in town,
they toured the new airport termi-
nal in Pierre – Shirley said it is
very nice.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed were
at the cattle sale in Philip last
Wednesday. Following the sale,
they joined their grandson, T.J.
Gabriel, and his family at the Mid-
land lutefisk supper. Friday, Billy
and Arlyne were in Faith to help
Dan Piroutek with a community
auction to benefit the school and
city. Arlyne attended church Sun-
day, then helped clean the church
in preparation for the annual Deep
Creek bazaar which will be held
Saturday, October 27. Billy has
been a bit under the weather re-
cently with the stomach bug that
has been making the rounds – hope
he feels better soon.
Chase and Kelly Briggs and fam-
ily attended the Hayes community
picnic. They also enjoyed a visit
from Chase's aunt, Lavonne
Briggs, and her daughter and
granddaughter, Darcy and Hailee.
Nancy Neuhauser is feeling bet-
ter following her bout with the
stomach bug. Ray helped out with
the newsletter at the Masonic
Lodge in Pierre Monday, and
Nancy had a visit from her daugh-
ter, Kathy, and son Brett.
Ruth Neuhauser had a visit from
her daughter, Connie Boger, last
week. Connie arrived from her
home in Arkansas Tuesday.
Wednesday, they spent the day vis-
iting and capped off the day by at-
tending the fall fling at Highmore
Health. Kevin and Mary
Neuhauser also attended the fes-
tivities. Thursday, Kevin and Mary
went to Highmore, and Ruth and
Connie joined them for supper at a
lodge there. Ruth enjoyed the out-
ing and the wonderful food, al-
though the wind was kind of nasty.
Connie headed back to Arkansas
following supper, spent the night in
Sioux City and got to her home the
next day. She has a busy schedule
that keeps her on the move!
Marge Briggs is still enjoying
produce from her garden. She has
tomatoes ripening in her house,
and she is getting ready to make
green tomato salsa.
Polly Bruce said they survived
the wind this past week. However,
some metal trim on the house came
loose and made quite a racket
while it was being blown around.
Thankfully, there were no windows
for the trim to bang into. Saturday
night, Bill and Polly attended
church in Midland. Sunday morn-
ing, their son, Vince, and wife
Katie went to Jess Brewer's place
north of the river to pick up a cou-
ple of colts. They now have four
young horses to work with, which
will keep them busy. Later in the
day, Nels and Dorothy Paulson
brought their company over, and
they all enjoyed visiting and learn-
ing about China. Polly said it was
fun to see how excited and inter-
ested Violet was in learning about
the ranching life.
Carmen Alleman spent most of
the weekend in Philip with her fa-
ther, Roy Roseth. She said her
flower beds have huge amounts of
leaves in them now, so she will be
busy getting those cleaned up. She
also said she hopes the road to the
church is muddy for the upcoming
Deep Creek bazaar this weekend,
and I agreed with her!
Laura Alleman said she spent
part of the week vacuuming up dirt
following the wind storm this past
week. Although the doors and win-
dows are good quality, the dirt still
finds a way inside when it is that
windy. Saturday morning, Laura
was in Hayes to pick up her Boun-
tiful Baskets order, then she went
to Kirley Hall to do some scrap-
booking. Saturday afternoon, Clint,
Laura and Alivya went to Philip to
visit Grandpa Roy Roseth, and
they were pleased to find him doing
better. Sunday morning, Clint and
daughter Alivya spent some qual-
ity time together while Laura went
back to Kirley Hall for more scrap-
booking. In the afternoon, they
went to Hayes to the visit at the
home of Laura's parents. Laura's
sister, Jessica Cox, and her family
were also there.
Joyce Jones was in Pierre on
Wednesday to attend lunch with
the Highway 63 ladies. Joyce said
they hope to be able to get together
several times a year. Thursday,
Joyce was in Onida for a meeting of
Eastern Star. As part of her prepa-
ration for winter, Joyce has been
soaking the ground around some of
her trees before she rolls the hoses
up for the winter. Joyce's sister,
Debbie, who lives in Fort Pierre,
hasn't had very good luck with her
trees recently. Last year's flood
took some of them, and the ones
that are left were weakened by the
prolonged water that stood in the
area. Several of them came down in
the recent wind.
Connie Johnson was in Pierre
last Friday for teacher's in-service,
and Saturday she and her mother,
Gene Hudson, were in Pierre at the
mall. They each had a booth at the
"Hunter's Wives" event there. Mon-
day night, Connie went to Rapid
City and spent the night with her
friend, Michelle (Scarborough) Ju-
lian. Tuesday, Connie attended
teacher training in Rapid City and
returned home that evening. There
was no school at Cheyenne School
Thursday because of the dust
storm. She said there was so much
dirt blowing in the area that you
could hardly see, and all the dirt in
the air was making the students
sick. She said it was like a black
blizzard, and there are now banks
of dirt two feet high in some areas.
Jon and Connie's son, Wyatt, came
home from his studies at South
Dakota State University Monday.
Tuesday morning, both Wyatt and
his brother Avery headed for Indi-
anapolis with their FFA natural re-
sources team from Philip. They
earned the right to compete at the
National FFA Convention – good
luck to them! They'll return home
Saturday.
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser were
in Highmore Wednesday and
Thursday, visiting with Ruth
Neuhauser and Kevin's sister, Con-
nie.
Mary Briggs enjoyed a visit from
her sister-in-law, Lavonne Briggs,
and Lavonne's daughter, Darcy,
and granddaughter, Haille, Little-
ton, Colo. The ladies were out for a
tour of the area, and it was a beau-
tiful day for it.
We have moved into fall mode
here at Neuhauser ranch, feeding
cattle, moving cattle, working cat-
tle, making sure all the hay is
hauled in, etc. We have also been
winterizing machinery, turning on
waterers, and other chores that
need to be done before the weather
gets too cold. I spent Tuesday and
Wednesday in Kadoka with my
mother, Letoy Brown. My nephew,
Joe Brown, was there putting new
shingles on mom's roof, so it was
nice to visit with him also. My
brother, Bill Brown, and Bryan
Buxcel were also helping with the
job. Tuesday afternoon, mom and I
went to visit my cousin, Lyndy Ire-
land, at her bed and breakfast
southwest of Philip. There is never
enough time to do all the visiting
we would like to do! Tuesday night,
we had a big family dinner at
mom's house, and it was delicious
as usual. The dinner was delayed a
bit as the guys hurried to get the
last of the shingles on the house,
since high winds were predicted for
the next day. Wednesday, I helped
mom with a few projects around
her house, then we joined the
courthouse crew for morning coffee.
Mom worked there for several
decades, so it is nice when she can
go see some of her former co-work-
ers. I headed home late Wednesday
afternoon in the awful wind, and I
was very glad to get home. I was
surprised by the number of big
trucks that were traveling in that
wind! Friday was spent cleaning
the yard – there were several carts
full of twigs and branches to be
picked up before I could start gath-
ering all the leaves. Our daughter,
Chelsea, and her boyfriend, Mike,
arrived Saturday to spend the
weekend. They helped do some de-
horning, and Chelsea helped with
some of the yard work while Mike
helped move cattle. He recently
had knee surgery, so his activities
are still a bit limited. Chelsea also
helped dig all of the canna bulbs –
that is a huge chore, so I was
thrilled to have help. Chelsea and
Mike returned to Rapid City Sun-
day afternoon.
This week, I am grateful for two
things – actually, I'm grateful for
lots of things, but I'll mention two.
First of all, I am grateful for the
tree rows that surround our yard.
Although the elm trees are getting
old and trashy, they really do pro-
tect us from the worst of Mother
Moenville
News
(continued from page 6)
continued on page 16
Legal NoticesDeadline: Fridays at Noon
Thursday, October 25, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 14
Notice of Testing
Automatic Tabulating
Equipment for
2012 General Election
Notice is hereby given that automatic
tabulating equipment will be tested to as-
certain that it will correctly count the
votes for all offices and measures that
are to be cast at the General Election
held on Tuesday, the 6th day of Novem-
ber in 2012.
The test will be conducted Thursday, the
1st of November 2012 at the following lo-
cation:
Haakon County Courthouse
140 S. Howard Ave. - Philip, SD
2nd floor in the Commissioners Room
5:00 PM MST
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
[Published October 25, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $9.75]
NOTICE OF 2012
GENERAL ELECTION
ARSD 5:02:04:05
SDCL 12-12-1
A Primary Election will be held on Tues-
day, November 6, 2012, in all the voting
precincts in Haakon County.
The election polls will be open from
seven a.m. to seven p.m. (mountain
time) on the day of the election.
The polling place in each precinct of this
county is as follows:
#1 Kirley (Deep Creek Church)
#4 Milesville (Milesville Hall)
#16 Deadman (Courthouse Commu-
nity Room
#17 Lake Waggoner (Bad River Sen-
ior Citizens Center)
#19 South Fork (Courthouse Commu-
nity Room)
#20 Midland (Midland Fire Hall
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in absentee voting or polling
place accessibility.
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
[Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$27.62]
Notice For Bids
The Town Board of Midland is opening
bids for the hauling and disposal of resi-
dential garbage for the Town of Midland.
Bid specifications are available at the
City Finance Office at 509 Main Street,
PO Box 232, Midland, SD 57552, or by
calling 605-843-2810.
Bids will be accepted until 5:00 PM on
Tuesday, November 13, 2012, and
opened at the regular Town Board meet-
ing that evening at 7:00 PM MT.
The Town of Midland reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bids.
Michelle Meinzer, Finance Officer
Town of Midland
[Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$15.59]
Notice to Creditors
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Pro. 12-8
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
)
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON
)
In the Matter of the Estate of
)
MARY A. PEKRON, Deceased.
)
Notice is given that on the 17th day of
October, 2012, Karen Kroetch, whose
address is PO Box 122, Philip, SD
57567, was appointed as Personal Rep-
resentative of the Estate of Mary A.
Pekron.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
/s/Karen Kroetch
Karen Kroetch
PO Box 122
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2761
Haakon Co. Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2627
Kemnitz Law Offices
Ralph A. Kemnitz
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2540
[Published October 25, November 1 & 8,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$51.62]
Call For Bids
CITY OF PHILIP
AIRPORT FARM GROUND
The City of Philip, South Dakota, is call-
ing for bids to lease the land surrounding
the City of Philip Municipal Airport, de-
scribed as follows:
216.3 acres, more or less, lo-
cated within the boundaries of
the NW¼, N½NE¼,
SW¼NE¼, NE¼SW¼, and
NW¼SE¼, in Section 16,
Township 01 North, Range 21
East, Black Hills Meridian,
Haakon County, South
Dakota.
The foregoing description, for conven-
ience, is agreed to be an adequate
though non-recordable description; it is
intended to describe that portion of the
“Philip Municipal Airport” facility owned
by Lessor, not presently utilized for Air-
port purposes.
Tenant must agree to reimburse the cur-
rent lessee, at the termination of the cur-
rent lease, for fieldwork done and for
other crop costs incurred for crops to be
harvested during the following year. Un-
less otherwise agreed, current custom
rates for operations involved will be used
as a basis of settlement.
Tenant is required to abide by and com-
ply with all FAA regulations affecting the
subject premises, the adjacent Airport fa-
cility and its runways.
The term of the Lease shall commence
on the 1st day of January 2013, and shall
expire on the 31st day of December
2017. For further information and to ex-
amine the proposed Lease Agreement,
contact the City Finance Officer. Maps of
the area to be leased and the adjacent
Airport will be available for inspection.
Rentals shall be payable in cash, in ad-
vance, in each year of the term of the
Lease.
Sealed bids will be accepted at the City
Finance Office, PO Box 408, 140 S.
Howard Ave., Philip, SD, until 4:00 p.m.
on Monday, November 5, 2012. All bids
must be sealed and clearly marked “Bid
– Airport Farm Ground Lease” on the out-
side envelope.
Bids will be opened at the regular City
Council meeting on Monday, November
5, 2012, at 7:30 p.m. or as soon after that
hour as practical in the Haakon Co.
Courthouse Community Room.
The City Council of the City of Philip re-
serves the right to reject any and all bids.
Monna Van Lint
Finance Officer
[Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$57.83]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
REGULAR SESSION
OCTOBER 2, 2012
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 1:04 PM on Tuesday, Oc-
tober 2, 2012. A quorum was established
with Chairman Edward Briggs, Vice
Chairman Stephen Clements, Members
Rita O’Connell, Gary Snook and
Nicholas Konst in attendance. Auditor
Pat Freeman, Deputy Auditor Carla
Smith, Highway Superintendent Kenny
Neville, Highway Administrative Secre-
tary Val Williams, Cow/Calf Field Special-
ist Adele Harty, Consumer Horticulture
Field Specialist Mary Rodumer and Pio-
neer Review Representative Nancy
Haigh were also present.
The September 4, 2012, Regular Meet-
ing Minutes were read with the following
amendment: the eighth paragraph dis-
cussing the Extension Department, the
last three sentences will be removed
starting with “It was decided …” to the
end of the paragraph. A motion was
made by Vice Chairman Stephen
Clements to approve the amended Sep-
tember 4, 2012, Regular Meeting Min-
utes and the Sept 25, 2012, Special
Meeting Minutes. Commissioner Gary
Snook seconded the motion to approve
both sets of minutes with all in agree-
ment. At this time, the commission re-
quested that Auditor Freeman call Jack-
son County and request to be put on the
agenda for their next meeting to visit
about the 4-H in their county.
At 1:30 PM, the commissioners met with
Cow/Calf Field Specialist Adele Harty
and Consumer Horticulture Field Spe-
cialist Mary Rodumer from Rapid City,
SD office. They reported to the commis-
sion what programs were available and
workshops coming up. They also asked
the commission what they could do for
Haakon County and that they could be
contacted at any time.
The following September 2012 fuel bids
were submitted:
FUEL BIDS:
Courthouse: None
Highway Dept:
09-04-12 Fitzgerald Oil ......$3.705 No. 2
09-04-12 Cenex...................$3.72 No. 2
09-06-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.72 No. 2
09-06-12 Cenex...................$3.73 No. 2
09-07-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.74 No. 2
09-07-12 Cenex...................$3.76 No. 2
09-10-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.74 No. 2
09-10-12 Cenex...................$3.75 No. 2
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
and Administrative Secretary Val
Williams gave a report to the commis-
sion. The highway department had re-
ceived word that the situation with the
gate being locked on a county road giv-
ing access to public land had been re-
solved.
There was discussion on the Robbs Flat
Shop Area work that is being done.
Chairman Edward Briggs reported that it
should be ready any time after October
10, 2012, and asked Superintendent
Neville to have a couple of highway em-
ployees to help with the project. Chair-
man Briggs also reported that some
trees had become available and it would
be good to set some of them around the
area for protection from weather, wind,
etc.
Superintendent Neville reported that he
had talked with Alex who works for Cater-
pillar in Rapid City, SD. It is time to look
at replacing some of the older blades. It
was the intention of the county to stay on
a cycle of trading in their blades so that
eventually they would all be covered
under warranties.
The commission went into executive ses-
sion on personnel at 1:40 PM for per-
formance evaluations on Custodian
Nancy Neville and Highway Superintend-
ent Kenny Neville. The commission
came out of session at 3:25 PM with no
action taken.
An email was received by Auditor Free-
man from Carrie Weller, 4-H Advisor, list-
ing her September, October and Novem-
ber 2012 activities. Copies were made
and passed out to the commission for re-
view.
A letter was received from the SD Veter-
ans Office stating that Terry Deuter has
completed and passed his yearly train-
ing. His monthly report was also re-
viewed by the commission.
Sheriff Fred Koester reported to the com-
mission that he would be advertising for
a new deputy for the county as Mike Kof-
fler had turned in his resignation effective
the end of September. Sheriff Koester
asked the commission how they would
like to proceed with the hiring of a deputy.
It was agreed that the first step would be
to advertise again.
Auditor Freeman asked the commission
if they would want to hold a special meet-
ing to give final approval on the Haakon
County Policy Handbook. SD Enhance-
ment Director Marlene Knutson has been
helping with the project and is ready for
the final review and adoption of the hand-
book. A decision was made to work on
the handbook at the next Thursday, No-
vember 8, 2012, Regular Meeting.
Commissioner Rita O’Connell made a
motion to approve the Fiscal Year 2013
Statement of Extension to the Joint Co-
operative Agreement and Financial Com-
mitment in the amount of $5,579.76. This
is the Central SD Enhancement District
who have helped the county each year
with projects such as the redistricting be-
cause of census, found a grant to help
with the purchase of 911 signs and the
Multi-Juristictional Mitigation Plan Up-
date for 2012, which we had to have to
be eligible for any future FEMA funds.
They are a valuable asset to the county.
A motion was made by Vice Chairman
Stephen Clements to approve the 2013
(NACO) National Association of County
Officials membership dues of $400.00. It
was seconded by Commissioner Gary
Snook with all in agreement.
Auditor Freeman informed the commis-
sion that (101-212) Jail Expenses and
(101-441) Mentally Ill budgets needed to
be supplemented. Commissioner Gary
Snook motioned to supplement (101-
212) Jail Expenses by $18,000.00 and
(101-441) Mentally Ill by $5,000.00.
Commissioner Konst seconded the mo-
tion with all in agreement.
The Auditor’s Account with the
County Treasurer was presented as
taxes for the month of July 2012.
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...............................62,071.28
Cash Management Fund......923,120.81
Bank Balance...........................1,083.65
Checks & Cash on Hand..........6,912.54
The Auditor’s Account with the
County Treasurer was presented as
taxes for the month of August 2012.
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...............................62,071.28
Cash Management Fund......849,629.69
Bank Balance...........................1,395.77
Checks & Cash on Hand........15,817.46
The Auditor’s Account with the
County Treasurer was presented as
taxes for the month of September 2012.
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...............................62,071.28
Cash Management Fund......721,793.68
Bank Balance...........................1,395.77
Checks & Cash on Hand........23,817.45
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for the month of Septem-
ber 2012:
Commissioners Wages ............2,820.00
Auditor’s Office.........................4,506.69
Treasurer’s Office.....................4,506.69
State’s Attorney’s Office ...........3,468.34
Director of Equalization............2,733.89
Register of Deeds ....................2,999.81
Janitor ......................................1,729.60
Veteran’s Office...........................810.00
Sheriff’s Office..........................5,230.87
Highway Department..............24,802.67
WIC and Health Nurse Sec......1,006.08
Librarians..................................1,711.26
Extension Secretary....................758.98
Emergency Management ............972.90
Weed Supervisor......................1,797.14
Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield .................................13,295.57
Special Insurance Services......1,398.66
AFLAC, premium.........................577.92
SD Retirement System.............6,103.58
Delta Dental ................................745.90
Vision Service Plan .....................155.65
First National Bank
SS & WH............................11,372.59
The Vendor Warrants were presented
for September Expenses paid in October
2012:
Commissioners
Nat Association of Counties, Annual
Dues & Membership Fees.......400.00
Pioneer Review Inc, Commissioner’s
Publishing................................484.11
884.11
Election
McLeod’s Printing & Supply,
Supplies ..................................212.75
212.75
Auditor
Century Business Leasing, Inc.,
Copier......................................248.46
First National Bank, FNB BCBS Wire
Trans Fee..................................10.00
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone................................190.38
448.84
Treasurer
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone..................................86.99
Noble Ink & Toner, Supplies........173.97
260.96
State’s Attorney
Tollefson Law Office, Rent ..........150.00
Tollefson Law Office, Telephone ...75.00
225.00
Courthouse
Brant's Electric Inc, Repairs &
Maint ........................................48.45
City of Philip, Utilities .................532.50
Coyle's SuperValu, Supplies ........92.78
Heartland Paper Co, Supplies .1,005.90
Ingram Hardware, Supplies .........77.15
Kone Inc, Professional Fees ......230.03
MG Oil Company, Supplies ............9.85
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........41.70
Servall Uniform, Supplies ...........147.53
Walker Refuse Inc, Utilities ..........70.00
West Central Electric, Utilities..1,880.89
Triple XXX Spraying, Professional
Fees .......................................158.00
4,294.78
Director of Equalization
Best Western Ramkota Inn,
Travel .....................................431.38
Coyle’s Standard, Fuel ...............111.50
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ...............................121.76
Petersen's Variety, Supplies ...........6.99
Pioneer Review Inc, Supplies ......29.24
Toni Rhodes, Supplies ...................3.89
Toni Rhodes, Travel .....................47.93
HCS, Professional Fees .............181.48
934.17
Register of Deeds
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............99.66
Microfilm Imaging Systems Inc,
Professional Fees ..................200.00
Pioneer Review Inc, Supplies ......36.00
Traci Radway, Travel ..................221.34
Sleep Inn, Airport Travel .............139.50
696.50
Veteran’s Service
Terry Deuter, Travel ......................37.00
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............39.00
76.00
Sheriff
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................84.18
D&T Auto Parts, Supplies ...............9.04
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....139.32
Fred Koester, Fuel .......................72.50
MG Oil Company, Fuel ...............501.01
Morrison's Pit Stop, Repairs &
Maint ........................................64.01
870.06
Jail
Winner Health Mart, Jail
Expenses .................................18.74
Hughes Co Finance Office, Jail Ex-
penses .................................5,600.00
Winner Police Department, Jail Ex-
penses .................................2,527.12
8,145.86
Health Nurse
Zeeb Pharmacy, Supplies ..............6.97
6.97
Mentally Ill
Carol Butzman Consulting LLC, Prof
Services .................................314.91
Penn Co Sheriff’s Office, Prof
Services .................................200.20
Penn Co Public Defender, Prof
Services ...................................55.00
Yankton Co Sheriff’s Office, Prof
Services ...................................25.00
595.11
Library
Jaywil Software Support, Professional
Fees .......................................125.00
Haakon Co Public Library,
Supplies .................................177.02
302.02
Extension Service
Carrie Weller, Travel ...................161.22
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............56.52
Sheryl Hansen, Travel ....................8.14
Best Western of Huron, Travel ....147.00
372.88
Weed Control
SD Dept of Ag-Rodent Control, Sup-
plies ........................................165.40
Virgil Smith, Travel .....................102.49
267.89
Road & Bridge
1st Western Ins, Liability/Workman's
Comp Ins. ...............................184.00
American FAB Inc, Supplies ......187.95
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................47.38
Baum Iron Co, Supplies .............145.94
Briggs Trucking, Supplies .......1,750.00
Butler Machinery Co Inc, Repairs &
Maint ...................................2,935.38
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel ....1,904.32
D&T Auto Parts, Repairs &
Maint .........................................79.61
D&T Auto Parts, Supplies ...........134.76
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Supplies .....1,526.75
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Fuel ..........13,366.50
Golden West Tele Co Utilities......234.48
Grossenburg Implement Inc,
Supplies ...................................43.47
Hall Manufacturing Inc, Repairs & Maint
................................................102.68
Heartland Waste Mgmt Inc,
Utilities ......................................21.20
Ingram Hardware, Supplies .........38.97
Kennedy Implement & Auto Co, Repairs
& Maint ...................................130.76
Kimball Midwest, Supplies .........340.08
Town of Midland, Utilities .............19.00
Moses Building Center Inc,
Supplies .................................186.95
NAPA, Supplies ............................36.91
Kenny Neville, Travel .................234.18
Newman Traffic Signs,
Supplies ..................................101.49
Philip Body Shop, Repairs &
Maint ......................................140.00
Philip Motor, Inc, Repairs & Maint ...4.89
SD DOT Finance Office, Road/Bridge
Projects .............................12,736.21
Sheraton Conv Center, Travel ....416.00
Walker Refuse Inc, Utilities ..........70.00
Walker Automotive, Repairs &
Maint .......................................311.00
West Central Electric, Utilities ....238.48
W R Water Develop Dist,
Utilities ......................................42.50
37,711.84
9-1-1
Centurylink, 911 ..........................113.40
Golden West Tele Co, 911 .........494.32
607.72
Emergency & Disaster
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....101.26
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........48.78
Lola Roseth, Travel ....................408.47
SD Public Broadcasting, SDPB Tower
Lease ..................................1,200.00
1,758.51
Courthouse Building
Ken's Refrigeration, Building
Fund .......................................789.89
789.89
Law Library
Lexisnexis Matthew Bender Law Li-
brary, Materials .......................206.77
SD CLE Inc, Law Library
Materials .................................106.00
312.77
Total Checks ..........................59,774.63
A motion was made, seconded with all in
agreement to approve the above war-
rants.
A motion was made by Vice Chairman
Stephen Clements to move the next reg-
ular meeting date from Tuesday, Novem-
ber 6, to Thursday, November 8, 2012, at
1:00 PM in the commissioner’s room at
the courthouse. This is because of the
General Election being on the sixth. The
meeting was adjourned at 4:15 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMISSION Ed-
ward Briggs, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published October 25, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $162.45]
Awards - Track Board Lettering - 62.57,
Ingram Hardware - Janitorial/Mainte-
nance Supplies - 477.23, JD Publishing
- Oral Interp Supplies - 20.00, Kennedy
Implement - Mower Repairs - 144.73,
Knutson, Vicki - Mileage - Reading Re-
covery - 82.14, Midwest Coop - Propane
- Milesville/VoEd Building - 948.32, Mor-
rison's Pit Stop - Bus/Maintenance Fuel
- 1,727.19, Moses Building Center - Jan-
itorial/Maintenance Supplies - 51.68,
Nelson, Mark - BOE Mileage - 39.96, Pe-
terson, Anita - BOE Mileage - 262.70,
Peterson, Kathy - Mileage - Campus
Meeting in Rapid City - 60.68, Petty Cash
Reimbursement - Postage - 80.99, Philip
Motor - Bus Repairs - 51.71, Philip Stan-
dard - Maintenance Fuel - 334.15, Philip
Trust and Agency - Imprest Reimburse-
ment* - 3,770.40, Pioneer Review - Pub-
lications - 114.93, Quill - Office
Supplies/Ink - 597.05, Radway, Mark -
BOE Mileage - 57.72, Rasmussen Me-
chanical - Set Oil Burner Combustion -
342.52, Region 7 Principals - Dues - M
Baer - 75.00, Sam's Club - Annual Mem-
bership - 37.10, Scholastic - Reading
Counts Software - 500.00, SD Labor Law
Poster Service - 2013 Labor Law Poster
Set - 67.25, SD One Call - Locate Tickets
- 7.35, Seager, Mike - Microphone
set/case - 65.00, Slovek, Marie - Tech-
nology Travel to Rural Schools - 101.01,
Thorson, Doug - BOE Mileage - 37.74,
US Postal Service - Stamped Envelopes
- 523.40, Vanway Trophy - Engraving -
13.24, Walker Refuse - Garbage Service
- 800.16, Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield - Health Insurance Premiums -
11,533.25, West Central Electric - Elec-
tricity - 3,881.60, WRLJ Rural Water -
Milesville/ Cheyenne Sept 12 Water -
65.00. TOTAL: 39,601.17. Capital Out-
lay Claims Payable October 15, 2012:
Century Business Leasing - Copier
Lease (September & October) - 820.68,
Heltzel, John - Repair Armory/Fine Arts
Roof - 2,152.20, Moses Building Center
- Saw - 349.99, Rasmussen - Heat Ex-
changers - 7,106.00, SHI International -
Windows Licenses - Technology -
1,467.10. TOTAL: 11,895.97. SPED
Claims Payable October 15, 2012:
Baer, Erin - SPED Mileage - 270.22, Chil-
dren's Care Hospital - OT/PT Services -
245.00, Delta Dental - Dental Insurance
Premiums - 465.70, Follett - SPED Sup-
plies - 124.88, Nelson, Karen - Isolation
Mileage - 584.60, Wellmark Blue Cross
Blue Shield - Health Insurance Premiums
- 412.22, Westerberg, Pat - Mileage/Re-
imburse SPED book - 75.14. TOTAL:
2,177.76. Food Service Claims
Payable October 15, 2012: Brant's
Electric - Repair voltage problem at sink
- 145.35, Child & Adult Nutrition - Com-
modity Purchases - 46.22, Coyle's Su-
perValu - Purchased Foods - 137.64,
Dean Foods - Milk Purchases - 1,213.45,
Earthgrains - Purchased Foods - 90.70,
Reinhart Food Service - Purchased
Foods - 2,373.88, Servall - Linen Care -
55.90, US Foods - Purchased Foods -
3,773.26. TOTAL: 7,836.40. Hourly
wages for Month of Septembert 2012:
27,965.32, Gross Salaries/Fringe for
September 2012- FUND 10: Instructional
- 93,230.67, Administration - 16,258.41,
Support Services - 6,130.51, Extra Cur-
ricular - 2,786.19; FUND 22: SPED
Gross Salaries/Fringe - 8,364.90.
13-50 Motion by Thorson, second by Pe-
terson to approve a contribution to school
attorney Rodney Freeman for $135 for
his attendance at the National Education
Law Association Annual Meeting.
13-51 Motion by Radway, second by
Fitzgerald to certify ASBSD Delegate As-
sembly delegate Anita Peterson and al-
ternate Vonda Hamill. ASBSD by-laws
stipulate that all delegates and alternates
must be certified at the local board level
prior to attending Delegate Assembly.
13-52 Business Manager Britni Ross
gave a brief overview of the final audit for
FY 2012 and associated financial state-
ments.
13-53 Anita Peterson gave the BHSSC
report.
13-54 Executive Session: None
13-55 Secondary Principal Mike Baer re-
ported on the following items: (A) Grades
7-12 saw an 82% turnout for Parent
Teacher Conferences. (B) Congratula-
tions to the Cross Country Teams - Girls
2012 Region Champs, Boys 2012 Run-
ners Up. (C) Women’s open gym volley-
ball will take place in the Fine Arts Gym
on Wednesday evenings at 6:30 PM.
Anyone interested is encouraged to at-
tend. (D) A team is being assembled to
send to Fort Pierre to the Academic
Olympics. Approximately 26-29 students
will attend. (E) Mr. Baer now has a Prin-
cipal’s page on the school website.
Check it out for any new information. (F)
The South Dakota Music Educators’ As-
sociation will present Philip school with
the High School Music Participation
Award during All State Music at the Civic
Center. Mrs. Kathy Peterson will travel to
accept the award.
13-56 Superintendent Keven Morehart
reported on the following items: (A) Par-
ent Teacher Conference turnout for K-6
in town was approximately 98%.
Milesville and Deep Creek saw 100%
turnout. (B) Title Review will take place
on October 29th. (C) Donuts for Dads is
on October 18th. (D) The state has noti-
fied us that the Milesville School is an
“Exemplary School”. (E) End of the 1st
quarter is on October 18th. (F) Picture re-
takes are October 31st. (G) There will be
an elementary staff meeting on October
17th at 2:45 PM. (H) The BOE will tour
buildings/schools next month on Novem-
ber 19th.
Adjournment at 7:54 PM. Will meet in
regular session on November 19 at 6:00
PM.
Scott Brech, President
Britni Ross, Business Manager
[Published October 25, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $78.30]
Proceedings of Haakon
School District 27-1
Board of Education
Regular Meeting Minutes
October 15, 2012
The Board of Education of the Haakon
School District 27-1 met in regular ses-
sion for its regular meeting on October
15, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at the Philip Ar-
mory, Room A-1. President Scott Brech
called the meeting to order with the fol-
lowing members present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Scott Brech, Vonda Hamill, Mark
Nelson, Anita Peterson, Mark Radway
and Doug Thorson. Also present:
Supt/Elementary Prin. Keven Morehart,
Business Manager Britni Ross, Second-
ary Principal Mike Baer, Lisa Schofield
and Del Bartels.
All action taken in the following minutes
was by unanimous vote unless otherwise
specified.
13-47 Communications from the audi-
ence: None
13-48 Motion by Peterson, second by
Nelson to approve the agenda as pre-
sented.
13-49 Motion by Fitzgerald, second by
Radway to approve the following items of
consent calendar.
Approved the minutes of the Septem-
ber 17, 2012, meeting.
Approved the unaudited financial re-
port of September 30, 2012, as follows:
General Fund Claims Payable October
15, 2012: AFLAC - Insurance Premium -
605.90, A&B Welding - VoAg Supplies -
131.67, A&M Products - Plaques - Re-
gion Cross Country - 184.50, Ability One
- Janitorial Supplies - 156.40, Adtech -
Repair fire alarm system - 473.47, All
Star Auto - Vehicle Rental - Music -
177.00, All Star Auto - Vehicle Rental -
Oral Interp - 147.70, Avesis - Vision In-
surance Premiums - 292.13, Baer, Mike
- Mileage - Region Principal Meetings -
128.76, Black Hills Chemical - Janitorial
Supplies - 39.98, Brech, Scott - BOE
Mileage - 237.54, Casey Peterson & As-
sociates - Audit 2012 - Final Bill -
2,860.92, Century Business Products -
Copier Maintenance - 350.00, Chester
Area School District - Virtual Class Pay-
ment - 500.00, City of Philip -
Water/Sewer - 666.05, Coyle's Super-
Valu - BOE/Science/Janitorial Supplies -
27.89, Coyle's SuperValu - FACS Sup-
plies - 93.18, Delta Dental - Dental Insur-
ance Premiums - 1,617.96, Deuchar,
Theresa - Isolation Mileage - 166.50,
Elshere, Lana - Isolation Mileage - 73.26,
Etch USA - Engraving - 912.92, First Na-
tional Agency - Insurance - New Bus -
358.00, Fitzgerald Oil Co - Heating Fuel
- 1,107.00, Foss, Dani - Isolation Mileage
- 261.22, Foss, Kory - Athletic Director
Travel - 37.74, GoldenWest - Telephone
- 668.57, Grainger - Janitorial/Mainte-
nance Supplies - 130.50, Hamill, Vonda
- BOE Meeting - 93.24, Hauff Mid-Amer-
ica - Football Supplies - 167.40, Healy
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursdav, 0otober 25, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 16
GRAVEL: Scrccncd or rocl. Call
O'Conncll Consiruciion Inc.,
859-2020, PIilip. P51-ifn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iypcs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׫gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
HAY FOR SALE: 2012, 1si, 2nd
& 3rd cuiiing alfalfa Iay. 2012
nillci Iay icsi rcsulis availallc.
2011, 1si & 2nd cuiiing alfalfa.
Call 845-3045. F9-2ip
STILL HAVE ROOM FOR 100
plus Icad of calvcs io lacl-
ground. Cood fccd, 10 ycars c×-
pcricncc. PIonc 605-685-6725
or ccll 454-0053 or 454-0123.
P45-3ip
SELLING: 10 Dlacl Angus con-
ncrical lrcd Icifcrs Saiurday,
Novcnlcr 3, ai PIilip (SDi Livc-
siocl Auciion. AI lrcd Angus io
DL Inccniivc 228 (EPDs DW 0,
WW 81, YW 133, M 28i. Pasiurc
lrcd io Crccn Mouniain Froni
Man (EPDs DW -.7, WW 61, YW
99 M 28i. TIcsc Icifcrs origi-
naicd oui of iIc 2012 DHSS pcn
of fivc. TIcsc vcry fancy lrcd
Icifcrs will wcigI 1,050 lls. and
arc lrcd io siari calving MarcI 1
for 45 days. Favcllciic Caiilc,
685-5147 or Ionc, 859-2969.
PF6-5ip
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
local dclivcry includcd, scni-
load lois, no nold or wccds,
largc rounds pui up rigIi. Call
Fol, 390-5535; CIarlcs, 390-
5506. P43-4ip
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Cci rcady for fall Iauling! 12-
ply, 235185116F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIop, 859-
2744, PIilip. P40-ifn
GARAGE SALES
RUMMAGE SALE: Friday, Oci.
26, 4-6 p.n. Saiurday, Oci. 27,
8-12 p.n. ai K-gcc's Dldg.,
PbIIIp. No carly salcs. Housc-
Iold iicns, lids-aduli cloiIing,
dccor, plus norc! P46-1ic
HELP WANTED
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED ai
Days Inn, Wall. Possilly pcrna-
ncni ycar-round posiiion, siari-
ing inncdiaicly. Coniaci
TIcrcsa, 279-2000. PW46-ifn
POSITION AVAILABLE: TIc
Kadola Arca ScIool Disirici is
looling for a full-iinc Spccial
Educaiion TcacIcr's Assisiani.
TIc duiics of iIis posiiion in-
cludc; assisiing in iIc cducaiion
of Spccial Educaiion Siudcnis
K-8, possillc rcccss1 luncIroon
supcrvision, and oiIcr duiics as
assigncd. A non-ccriificd appli-
caiion nay lc oliaincd fron iIc
scIool or on iIc scIool disirici's
wclsiic; ladola.l12.sd.us.
Plcasc fccl frcc io coniaci iIc
scIool wiiI furiIcr qucsiions
aloui iIis posiiion. TIis posi-
iion will lc a onc-ycar posiiion
lascd on nccd. Conplcicd appli-
caiion nay lc droppcd off ai iIc
scIool or scnd ii io. Aiin. Jcffcry
M. Ncncccl, Elcncniary Princi-
pal, PO Do× 99, 800 Daylcrry
Sircci, Kadola, SD 57543 or call
1-605-837-2175. EOE
K46-2ic
WAITRESS NEEDED: ai Fcd
Focl Fcsiaurani in Wall. Call
279-2387 or 279-2388.WP8-3ic
DEPUTY SHERIFF'S POSI-
TION: TIc Haalon Couniy
SIcriff's officc is acccpiing appli-
caiions for a full iinc Dcpuiy
SIcriff. Conpciiiivc wagcs and
an c×ccllcni lcncfiis paclagc.
TIis posiiion will lc opcn uniil
fillcd. Scnd siaic applicaiions
and1or rcsuncs io. Haalon
Couniy SIcriff, Do× 249, PIilip,
SD 57567. For norc infornaiion
coniaci SIcriff Frcd Kocsicr ai
859-2741. P43-ifn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Scvcral nicc uscd
rcfrigcraiors wiiI warraniics.
Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63, Do× Eldcr.
390-9810. WP9-4ip
FOR SALE: PIcasani roosicrs
and Icns. Coniaci Larry for in-
fornaiion on priccs and dclivcry.
Call 843-2830 or 840-8097.
PF8-3ic
FOR SALE: Fopc Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ropc, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
FOR SALE: Scvcral nicc uscd
rcfrigcraiors wiiI warraniics.
Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63, Do× Eldcr.
390-9810. P46-4ip
WANTED: Old car and irucl
lodics and paris, 1920-1950s,
paying lciicr iIan scrap so
clcan oui iIc ircc linc or ncial
pilc for quicl $$. Call Dcn, 669-
2012, Murdo. P43-4ic
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: Old Indian iicns,
lcadworl, quillworl, old guns,
old painicd luffalo Iidcs, old
pIoiograpIs. CasI paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802. F46-4ic
KADOKA LEGION AUXILIARY
MEMBERS: Plcasc lring iwo
iicns of casI donaiion io Holi-
day Fcsiival Dalc Salc, Nov. 4.
TIanls. K46-2ic
MARK YOUR CALENDARS!!
Turncr YouiI is Iosiing iIc an-
nual CIrisinas Fair ai iIc
Murdo Audiioriun, Sunday, No-
vcnlcr 11, 9.00 - 4.00 (CTi.
M46-1ic
RULAND ARENA TEAM ROP-
ING: Sunday, Oci. 28, 1.00 p.n.
Handicappcd drawpoi. Novicc
=1. picl your own parincr. Fiflc
Foping. cnicr wiiI parincr, draw
3 norc. 386-2164, Ouinn.
PW46-1ip
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two lcdroon apari-
ncni in Wall. Call 386-2222.
WP9-4ic
FOR RENT: 2 lcdroon Iousc ai
102 Wood. Avc. Fcni on garagc
opiional. Call 484-5409.
PF8-2ip
FOR RENT: 1 & 2 lcdroon
aparincnis for rcni in Wall.
Coniaci CIrisiianson Propcriics,
858-2195. WP7-4ic
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: Spacious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or siop in iIc lolly and
picl up an applicaiion. Caicway
Aparincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc acccpi
rcsponsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc paid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi paid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is placcd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
Vc tIunI cuc)uonc ]o) uíí tIc
cu)ds und Icst uísIcs on ou)
ucddíng, ScptcnIc) 2lst. An
cxt)u spccíuí tIunIs gocs to
MoncíI, Puuí, MuIucíu, Jín,
Adcíc, Moííu, Oucn, Ed und
StcpI ]o) uíí tIcí) Icíp.
God Iícss uíí o] uou,
HugI ö Ann Hu)tu
TIunI uou to tIc nunu
])ícnds, ncígIIo)s und ]unííu
uIo Iuuc sIoun tIcí) suppo)t
tI)ougI Iínd uo)ds, p)uuc)s,
gí]ts o] ]ood und ncno)íuís. A
spccíuí tIunIs to FutIc) Kcuín
AcIIucI ]o) Iís spí)ítuuí guíd-
uncc und tIc íudícs o] tIc St.
Mu)u`s Aítu) Socíctu und tIc
Suc)cd Hcu)t Eucníng Guííd ]o)
p)ouídíng ]ood ]o) tIc uígíí und
]unc)uí sc)uíccs.
Vc upp)ccíutc tIc cxccíícnt
cu)c gíucn to ou) notIc) Iu D).
Kíoppc) und tIc stu]] o] PIíííp
HcuítI Sc)uíccs. TIunIs to
HusI Func)uí Honc ]o) uou)
p)o]cssíonuí und nustc)]uí
uuu ín Icípíng uítI uíí
u))ungcncnts und tIc Icuutí]uí
]oI uítI tIc uígíí und ]unc)uí
sc)uícc.
A uc)u spccíuí tIunIs to Jodu
JoInson, Joun Hcsscttc und
Junct ScIo]ícíd ]o) uíí uou) us-
sístuncc. You Icípcd Mon
nuíntuín u IígIc) quuíítu o] íí]c.
You Icíd u spccíuí píucc ín
Mon`s Icu)t und ou)s us ucíí.
And íustíu, tIunIs to uíí tIc
uondc)]uí pcopíc uIo cn)ícIcd
Mon`s íí]c uítI íouc und ])ícnd-
sIíp. TIunI uou!
VítI g)utítudc,
Nuncu ö HícI EI)Iu)dt
Funííu
Stcuc ö Nínu PcI)on Funííu
HctI VuíIc) Funííu
Ku)cn ö Jc))u K)octcI Funííu
TIc)csu PcI)on Funííu
Joc ö Juííc PcI)on Funííu
I uísI to tIunI tIosc uIo scnt
sunputIu cu)ds und ncno)í-
uís ut tIc tínc o] nu sístc),
Mu)u HosIcín`s dcutI. TIunI
uou.
Lucíííc Enc)son
naiion 605-770-5398 or cnail.
sanalpiruss«gnail. con.
LAND FOR SALE
ADSOLUTE DLACK HILLS LAND
AUCTION 40 Acrcs, On snow-
nolilc Trail 1, Alundani
wildlifc, 6890' Elcvaiion, Fcnoic
land, Vcry pcaccful! Sclling No-
vcnlcr 1, 2012 www. ncpIcr-
sonauciion.con.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rcprcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
SEALED DIDS. CLAFK
COUNTY, 160 acrcs, cropland,
waicrway & old lldg siic, 3 nilcs
N of Dradlcy, SD. Dids duc ly
Novcnlcr 2, 2012. Coniaci Pro
Fcaliy, Pai Kiscly, Drolcr,
(605i354-7653 or Iiip.11ProFc-
aliySold.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.i Call
iIis ncwspapcr or 800-658-
3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
DFIVEFS. $1,000 SICN-ON
DONUS. Ncw Pay Progran!
¯Earn up io 50 cpn ¯Honc
Wcclly ¯2500+ nilcs, 95% no-
iarp. Musi lc Canadian cligillc
(888i 691-5705.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Spccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV applicaiion. ALSO. prairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23ip
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iypcs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
ups, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52ip
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN. ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Oualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
INDEPENDENT PFOFESSION-
ALS nccdcd for cusion nodular
Ionc luildcr io scll and luild in
your arca using our sysicn. Call
Lonnic io lcarn norc. 1-800-
759-2782.
EMPLOYMENT
PUDLIC WOFKS DIFECTOF ÷
Ciiy of Hill Ciiy, SD sccls pro-
fcssional candidaic for ciiy opcr-
aiions. Opcn uniil fillcd. Salary
DOE. Info ai Iillciiysd. org or
605-574-2300. EOE.
CITY OF DE SMET. Full-iinc
waicr, wasicwaicr, luildings,
parls, swinning pool nainic-
nancc assisiani. Posscssion of
or aliliiy io oliain Conncrcial
Drivcr's Liccnsc, CIcnical Ap-
plicaior's Liccnsc, Waicr-Wasic-
waicr Opcraior Ccriificaiions
rcquircd. Salary DOE1 Dcncfiis.
For applicaiion coniaci 605-
854-3731 or dcsnciciiy«ncIsi.
con. EOE.
THE YANKTON COUNTY COM-
MISSION sccls io Iirc sonconc
for iIc posiiion of Adninisiraiivc
HigIway Supcrinicndcni. Dcnc-
fiis includc paid vacaiion, sicl
lcavc, longcviiy pay, IcaliI in-
surancc and a rciircncni plan.
Siariing pay is pcr currcni wagc
scIcdulc. Applicaiions will lc
rcccivcd iIrougI Ociolcr 26iI,
2012. Inicrcsicd pcrsons sIould
coniaci Dill Dalvin ai iIc Dc-
parincni of Lalor, Yanlion of-
ficc 3113 Sprucc Sircci,
605-668-2900, for applicaiion
infornaiion. Spccial acconno-
daiions for applicaiion or jol in-
fornaiion in alicrnaiivc fornais
availallc upon rcqucsi.
CITY OF PIEFFE. Dalcr1Equip-
ncni Opcraior - Salary. Mini-
nun $14.42. Morc infornaiion
and applicaiions availallc ai
www.picrrc.sd.gov. EOE.
PEFKINS COUNTY HICHWAY
DEPT. Ias opcning for MccIanic
and Equipncni opcraiors. Cood
Dcncfiis. Applicaiions arc avail-
allc ai CouriIousc in Dison, SD,
or call 605-244-5629.
MATH1PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEACHEF - Oualificaiions. Pos-
scss valid SD TcacIing Ccriifi-
caic for appropriaic lcvcl.
E×pcricncc icacIing Naiivc
Ancrican cIildrcn prcfcrrcd.
Musi pass laclground and drug
icsiing. Indian prcfcrcncc ol-
scrvcd & Laloia spcalcr prc-
fcrrcd. Duiics. Mainiain
individual siudcni rccords as rc-
quircd including iIrcc forns of
asscssncni. Confcr wiiI parcnis
as nccdcd for siudcni conccrns.
Supcrvisc ncals, playground
and carly norning duiics as as-
signcd. For a conplcic jol dc-
scripiion coniaci Lisa Diclawsli,
Principal ai 605-823-4235.
JOIN OUF PLANKINTON CITY
CFEW! FT nainicnancc posi-
iion. Elcciric, Sirccis, Waicr,
Wasicwaicr. Conpciiiivc salary.
Aiiraciivc lcncfii paclagc. In a
growing progrcssivc connuniiy.
For applicaiion coniaci Ciiy Hall
(605i 942-7767.
DOUCLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is ialing appliciions for
full- iinc Douglas Couniy HigI-
way Supcrinicndcni. Musi Iavc
valid Class A Drivcr's Liccnsc.
E×pcricncc in road 1 lridgc con-
siruciion 1 nainicnancc prc-
fcrrcd. For applicaiion coniaci.
Douglas Couniy Audiior (605i
724-2423.
FOR SALE
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Capiiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs onlyi. Call Fus-
scll Spaid 605-280-1067.
ALPINE TFUSS LCC - 24-26-28-
30 garagc and 40' ag irusscs on
Iand. Call San for norc infor-
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Pioneer Review Ad DeadIine:
Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m.
****
CaII 859-2516
ads@pioneer-review.com
0IassItIed AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ pcr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu, tIc P)o]ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou)unt, as wcll as on our wclsiic.
www.pionccr-rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns, Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun for
firsi 20 words; 10¢ pcr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and
iniiial nusi lc counicd scparaicly. Includcd in iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc P)o]ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
pcr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial nusi lc counicd scp-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for loollccping and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 pcr colunn incI, includcd in iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc P)o]ít. $5.55 pcr colunn incI for iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic advcriiscd in iIis ncwspapcr is suljcci io iIc Fcdcral Fair
Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany prcfcrcncc, or discrininaiion on
racc, color, rcligion, sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io nalc any sucI prcfcrcncc, liniia-
iion, or discrininaiion."
TIis ncwspapcr will noi lnowingly acccpi any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a violaiion of
iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncwspapcr arc availallc
on an cqual opporiuniiy lasis.
CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
S=n-¿1oo · Philip, SÐ
Ior ull yoor concrete
constroction needs:
Benefits
QuaIifications
DRIVERS NEEDED
• Good driving record
past 3 years
• 23 years old
• Pass drug screen
• 2 years veriable experi-
ence (Class A CDL)
• Must meet all federal
motor carrier guidelines
• Sign-on bonus!
• Health insurance
• Employer paid short & long
termdisability, Life Ins.
• Roth & Traditional
401(K) plans
• Regular home time
1-800-525-6958 ext. 1102
AppIy OnIine: www.adamsii.com
"Careers¨
859-2744 or 685-3068
Philip
2DD2 CÞevg S11verodo SSDD
Crcw Cal, Dually, Flailcd, Allison
Transnission, 6.6L Durana×, All
Ncw Injcciors - Ncw Tircs!
1hursdav, 0otober 25, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review ·Page 16
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. 2S, 2DJ2
We Þod 1Þe b1gges1 so1e ue´ve ever Þod
Þere on Tuesdog, Oo1ober 2S. MorKe1
s1oged oompe1111ve 1o 1Þe verg end. 9,SDD
oo111e Þere ne×1 Tuesdog.
YEARLINGS:
THOMAS SIMONS - WHITE OWL
315 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 775=........$166.00
223 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 698=........$166.25
JOHN & DEDE LONG - UNION CENTER
335 ......................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 776=........$151.00
149 ......................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 706=........$149.50
RUTH & ISAACS - FAITH
16 ..........................................DLK HFFS 923=........$130.50
22 ..........................................DLK HFFS 753=........$143.25
JUSTIN LONG - UNION CENTER
10..................................DLK OPEN HFFS 748=........$142.00
RON ADAM - STURGIS
31 ................................FED & DLK STFS 722=........$154.00
CALVES:
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
639 ........................................FED STFS 500=........$184.25
196 ........................................FED STFS 587=........$174.25
237 ........................................FED STFS 442=........$190.75
JUDY DALY & STEVE DALY - MIDLAND
81...........................................DLK STFS 607=........$170.00
90...........................................DLK STFS 513=........$174.25
CARLEY RANCH - MILESVILLE
96...........................................DLK STFS 583=........$173.00
114.........................................DLK STFS 506=........$176.75
114 ........................................DLK HFFS 500=........$154.75
47 ..........................................DLK HFFS 437=........$162.50
LYLE HARTSHORN - HERMOSA
27...........................................DLK STFS 505=........$180.50
LEONARD & NATHAN KJERSTAD - QUINN
103.........................................DLK STFS 552=........$173.75
108.........................................DLK STFS 488=........$181.25
111 ........................................DLK HFFS 515=........$155.75
76 ..........................................DLK HFFS 459=........$155.75
CREW CATTLE CO - PHILIP
91.........................................CHAF STFS 610=........$168.25
88...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 543=........$170.50
107 ......................................CHAF HFFS 566=........$157.50
71 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 509=........$154.00
PINNEY RANCH - PHILIP
93...........................................DLK STFS 533=........$173.50
32...........................................DLK STFS 420=........$197.00
60 ..........................................DLK HFFS 475=........$155.50
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 363=........$171.50
SETH THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
49...........................................DLK STFS 517=........$173.50
9.............................................DLK STFS 427=........$190.00
28 ..........................................DLK HFFS 458=........$161.00
5 ............................................DLK HFFS 396=........$163.00
BENNY BACHAND - STURGIS
108.........................................DLK STFS 528=........$173.50
58...........................................DLK STFS 447=........$183.25
48 ..........................................DLK HFFS 467=........$161.25
18 ..........................................DLK HFFS 391=........$166.50
LYLE O'ROURKE - INTERIOR
31...........................................DLK STFS 501=........$178.00
16...........................................DLK STFS 375=........$196.00
50 ..........................................DLK HFFS 460=........$154.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 358=........$175.00
PATTI OLIC - SCENIC
88...........................................DLK STFS 519=........$173.50
13...........................................DLK STFS 415=........$199.00
67 ..........................................DLK HFFS 491=........$156.00
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 378=........$172.00
NEIL FANNING ANGUS - VETAL
58...........................................DLK STFS 541=........$173.25
26 ..........................................DLK HFFS 474=........$150.75
RHODEN & WILCOX - UNION CENTER
113.........................................DLK STFS 516=........$177.50
35...........................................DLK STFS 457=........$181.50
100.........................................DLK STFS 589=........$168.50
DAVE CUNY & FAMILY - BUFFALO GAP
110.........................................DLK STFS 568=........$169.75
253.........................................DLK STFS 506=........$181.50
129.........................................DLK STFS 422=........$194.50
109 ........................................DLK HFFS 507=........$156.00
127 ........................................DLK HFFS 450=........$163.50
82 ..........................................DLK HFFS 385=........$166.00
SCHELL RANCH - WALL
103.........................................DLK STFS 530=........$173.00
44...........................................DLK STFS 449=........$180.50
SHAUN & LYNN MCKAY - WALL
34...........................................DLK STFS 538=........$172.50
28 ..........................................DLK HFFS 516=........$151.75
KILNESS RANCH - HOWES
54 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 416=........$190.25
14...........................................DLK STFS 325=........$205.50
26 ..........................................DLK HFFS 364=........$170.50
BRIAN WILCOX - STURGIS
35 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 542=........$172.00
26 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 450=........$184.00
33................................DLK & DWF HFFS 485=........$152.50
OWEN FERGUSON - LONG VALLEY
95...........................................DLK STFS 540=........$171.75
55...........................................DLK STFS 455=........$182.00
KEVIN NEUHASER - MIDLAND
33...........................................DLK STFS 513=........$171.50
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 427=........$192.00
41 ..........................................DLK HFFS 475=........$155.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 354=........$174.00
RANDALL & KAREN DAVIS - HERMOSA
46...........................................DLK STFS 562=........$170.75
14...........................................DLK STFS 469=........$185.25
30 ..........................................DLK HFFS 526=........$149.00
KOLETTE STRUBLE - KADOKA
32 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 567=........$170.50
10 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 433=........$191.00
30 ..........................................DLK HFFS 533=........$152.00
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 401=........$163.00
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG - KADOKA
43 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$173.50
17 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 408=........$197.50
18................................DLK & DWF HFFS 467=........$155.50
7 ............................................DLK HFFS 394=........$161.50
ANDY & MORRIS LINN - ELM SPRINGS
94 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 551=........$170.00
100 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 455=........$192.50
12 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 352=........$212.00
100..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 443=........$169.00
24 ..........................................DLK HFFS 381=........$171.00
BYRON & MONTE DENKE - QUINN
64...........................................DLK STFS 558=........$169.75
8.............................................DLK STFS 465=........$181.50
GRANT PATTERSON - KADOKA
66...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 603=........$166.50
30...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 514=........$167.00
80 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 567=........$152.25
20 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 491=........$151.50
SANFORD LANGAGER - ROBERTS, MT
18...........................................DLK STFS 625=........$166.00
STEVE ISKE - NEW UNDERWOOD
46 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 590=........$165.25
13...........................................DLK STFS 483=........$173.00
37................................DLK & DWF HFFS 534=........$151.50
6..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 418=........$158.00
KEN KAUFMAN - ROBERTS, MT
27...........................................DLK STFS 654=........$162.00
19...........................................DLK STFS 518=........$168.00
RON GRUBL - STURGIS
18...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 577=........$168.00
30...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 469=........$177.00
27 ........................................CHAF HFFS 507=........$149.50
TREVOR WILLIAMS - INTERIOR
28...........................................DLK STFS 599=........$167.50
9.............................................DLK STFS 492=........$171.50
JOYCE CHORD - WHITE OWL
29................................FWF & DWF STFS 525=........$166.00
28................................FWF & DWF STFS 442=........$181.00
JAMES GRUBL - STURGIS
55 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 507=........$166.00
15 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 403=........$198.00
51................................DLK & DWF HFFS 499=........$153.75
16................................DLK & DWF HFFS 380=........$170.25
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
71 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 555=........$169.75
DICK & ERIC GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
43 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 538=........$169.50
36...........................................DLK STFS 391=........$200.50
64 ..........................................DLK HFFS 470=........$154.50
16 ..........................................DLK HFFS 362=........$174.00
LAVERNE KOCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
58 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 532=........$169.00
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 450=........$183.00
45................................DLK & DWF HFFS 479=........$153.50
THOMAS HARTY - PHILIP
84 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 530=........$169.00
29 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 415=........$189.00
DAVE RICHARDS - STURGIS
67 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 507=........$169.00
27 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 412=........$196.50
HEATH FREEMAN - OWANKA
92...........................................DLK STFS 531=........$168.50
14 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 389=........$194.00
ED HEEB - MIDLAND
14 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 534=........$167.00
MUNROE RANCH - UNION CENTER
58.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 532=........$164.50
42 ................................FED & DLK STFS 428=........$181.00
43................................FED & DLK HFFS 500=........$147.00
46................................FED & DLK HFFS 436=........$155.00
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE - PHILIP
90...........................................DLK STFS 505=........$165.00
59...........................................DLK STFS 395=........$191.00
45................................DLK & DWF HFFS 410=........$163.00
19 ..........................................DLK HFFS 334=........$177.00
C & T CATTLE - MIDLAND
40...........................................DLK STFS 662=........$155.75
JIM ADDISON - BELVIDERE
19...........................................DLK STFS 443=........$182.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 429=........$159.50
CLAYTON KJERSTAD & FAMILY - WALL
111.........................................DLK STFS 491=........$179.50
49...........................................DLK STFS 405=........$203.50
116 ........................................DLK HFFS 463=........$162.25
25 ..........................................DLK HFFS 361=........$174.75
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
42.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 489=........$174.00
9.............................................DLK STFS 417=........$192.00
19 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 494=........$150.00
5 ................................CHAF & DLK HFFS 409=........$154.00
ED BECKWITH - KADOKA
13...........................................DLK STFS 572=........$167.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 516=........$150.00
MADER & STANGLE - NEW UNDERWOOD
40 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 556=........$163.00
20 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 448=........$178.00
45 ..........................................DLK HFFS 496=........$155.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 422=........$160.00
CHARLES CHAMBERLAIN - WHITE RIVER
23 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 600=........$156.50
BILL HAMANN - WALL
18...........................................DLK STFS 619=........$154.00
STEVE ARMENT - WANBLEE
16...........................................DLK STFS 583=........$153.00
12 ..........................................DLK HFFS 564=........$143.75
ROBERT COMPTON - HOWES
59.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 491=........$169.75
35 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 481=........$150.00
ROD VOLMER - OWANKA
18.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 459=........$171.00
O M IWAN & SONS - MIDLAND
87 ................................FED & DLK STFS 492=........$162.25
39 ................................FED & DLK STFS 401=........$183.75
72................................FED & DLK HFFS 472=........$148.25
23................................FED & DLK HFFS 380=........$153.50
MEEKS RANCH - INTERIOR
92 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 511=........$163.50
30...........................................DLK STFS 445=........$178.00
77................................FED & DLK HFFS 489=........$145.25
38 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 402=........$160.25
CASEY SAMMONS - MIDLAND
19.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 505=........$168.00
10 ................................FED & DLK STFS 593=........$153.00
24................................FED & DLK HFFS 535=........$142.75
RICHARD BERTOLINO - ROBERTS, MT
27 ................................FED & DLK STFS 625=........$154.50
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2012: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS
CALF SALE YEARLINGS: 10:00 A.M. CALVES: 10:30
A.M. (MT) EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING:
10,000 HEAD
YEARLINGS: NI=NO IMPLANTS, HR=HOME RAISED
BIERWAGEN– 12 BLK HFRS..........................................................................950#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL,
ASV=AGE & SOURCE VERIFIED
RAPIDCREEK RANCH– 650 REDANGHFRS; FS,NI .........................500-550#
PERAULT RANCH– 525 BLK X CLVS; FS NI .........................................500-525#
BUCHHOLZ & RISLOV – 475 BLK & BWF STRS; FS, WEANED
50 DAYS .................................................................................................575-650#
EISENBRAUN& EISENBRAUN– 450 MOSTLY BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......450-500#
JONES RANCH– 420 BLK CLVS; FS NI ..................................................500-550#
SHUCK BROTHERS – 400 REDLIMX CLVS; FS,NI..............................400-525#
TRASK FAMILY – 350 BLK STRS; FS,NI ........................................................500#
FIELDS – 300 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI,AN,ASV.........................................500-600#
SCHOFIELDBROTHERS – 250 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ..........................500-600#
BOOMER – 250 REDANGUS CLVS; FS,NI ............................................400-500#
RIGGINS – 240 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,ALL HFRS INTOWN..........500-550#
CROSBIE – 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................525-550#
WINK CATTLE CO– 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS....................................475-550#
CONSIGNMENT – 200 FANCY BLK HFRS; FS,NI .................................450-525#
ROGERS – 180 BLK X CLVS; NI...............................................................500-550#
MANSFIELD& MANSFIELD– 175 BLK STRS; FS ........................................550#
LONG– 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................450-550#
WHITE – 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS........................................................500-550#
CHASE RANCH– 160 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................550-600#
KJERSTAD– 160 BLK CLVS; FS...............................................................450-550#
AMIOTTE – 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .............................................500-550#
KEFFELER – 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.............................................450-550#
DAHL – 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,ASV..................................................500-600#
O’CONNELL – 135 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................500-525#
KIEFFER – 125 REDANGCHAR X & A FEWBLK CLVS; FS,NI..................500#
HEBB – 120 BLK CLVS; FS .......................................................................450-550#
RAWHOUSER – 120 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ............................................500-600#
KETELSON– 120 BLK STRS; FS,NI.........................................................450-550#
KETELSEN– 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS..................................................550-625#
FERGUSON– 110 BWF & HERF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................500#
KILNESS RANCH– 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................450-550#
CROWLEY – 100 BLK CLVS; FS......................................................................400#
KETELSON& BEUG– 95 BLK STRS; FS,NI...................................................600#
CARLSON& ROMERO– 90 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..............................................525#
SHARP – 90 BLK CLVS; FS .......................................................................500-600#
BRUCHRANCH– 90 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..................................................500-550#
ECKERT – 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................650#
STOUT – 75 BLK STRS; FS, WEANED60 DAYS ............................................650#
WILLERT – 70 RED& CHAR X CLVS; FS ...............................................550-600#
MORELAND– 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........................................450-550#
GEIGLE & GEIGLE – 65 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..............................................550-600#
DENNIS – 65 BLK & REDCLVS; FS.........................................................525-550#
ROSETH– 60 BLK CLVS; FS............................................................................600#
ENNEN– 60 BLK STRS; FS,NI.........................................................................600#
SKOGEN– 55 BLK & REDLIMX CLVS; FS,NI,AN................................500-550#
VOGELGESANG– 55 REDCLVS.............................................................500-550#
CLEMENTS – 50 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI.....................................................550#
ELSHERE – 50 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................500-575#
MCDANIEL – 50 BLK STRS; FS.......................................................................550#
DART – 40 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV............................................................550-600#
GEIGLE – 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; NI.........................................................350-400#
HEBB – 40 BLK CLVS; FS .........................................................................450-550#
HUETHER – 30 BLK & REDCLVS; FS,NI ...............................................450-500#
HEEB & HEEB – 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI......................................................500-525#
FISHER – 27 REDCLVS; FS,NI ................................................................550-600#
MICKELSON– 25 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...........................................500-600#
HENRICKSEN– 23 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,WEANED ......................350-550#
MAUDE – 20 RED& BLK LIMCLVS; FS,NI,WEANED..........................400-500#
PRICE – 20 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................500-600#
HANSON– 20 BLK & BWF STRS; FA,NI,AN,WEANED...............................600#
HAUK – 18 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................500-550#
HUGHES – 18 BLK CLVS..........................................................................750-800#
SMITH– 16 RED& BLK STRS; FS,NI......................................................500-550#
PAULSON– 12 HERF STRS; FS,NI ..........................................................400-550#
BRAVE BULL CREEK – 10 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................450#
VANDERVOORT RANCH– 7 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI .............................600-650#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETHAT
605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT.
SALE. SALE TIME: 10:00 A.M. MT
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED
HEIFER SALE & WEIGH-UP COWS, BULL, & HFRT SALE. WEI-
HGUPS: 8:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 11:00 A.M. (MT) EARLY CONSIGN-
MENTS: ESTIMATING 4000 HEAD.
PRODUCTIONSALE:
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL – 60 BLK & BWF COMING 4 YR OLD COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-28 FOR 55 DAYS
DISPERSIONS:
LARRY SMITH– “COMPLETE DISPERSIONOF 480 HD” – 80 BLK AI’DHFRS;
BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 200 BLK 3 TO 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 150
BLK 6 YR OLD TO SOLID MOUTHCOWS; BRED:BLK; CLV: 3-20
50 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
MORELL LIVESTOCK CO. – “DISPERSION OF 3 YR OLDS” – 150 BLK & BWF
COMING 3 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLAIRE BROS; CLV: 3-10 FOR 60 DAYS; 25 HERF
COMING3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: SONS OF PREDESTINED; CLV: 3-10 FOR 60 DAYS
PAUL SCHNOSE – “COMPLETE DISPERSION” – 130 BLK 4 YR OLD TO BRO-
KEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
TIM & DENISE NELSON – “AGE DISPERSION” – 60 BLK COMING 3 YR OLD
COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1 FOR 30 DAYS
BREDHEIFERS:
KENNY MATT – 190 FIRST CROSS BWF ULTRASOUND HFRS; BRED; LBW BLK;
CLV: 2-27 (SORTED INTO 1 WEEK CLVG PERIODS)
JONMILLAR– 135 FANCY BREDHFRS (1000-1050#); BRED: SITZ DASHSON; 50
HDAI’DHFRS; CLV:2-15 FOR 3 DAYS; 80 HDOF BULL BREDULTRASOUNDHFRS;
40 HD CLV: 3-1 FOR 20 DAYS & 40 HD CLV: 4-1 FOR 20 DAYS
TODDMORTENSON – 100 BLK & BWF AI’D HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 2-15
(CLEAN UP WITHBLK BULL 3-1)
MCDANIEL BROTHERS – 100 BLK ULTRASOUND HFRS; BRED:O’NEILL BLK
ANG; CLV:3-6 (SORTED INTO TWO 15 DAY CLVG PERIODS)
MICKEY SIMONS – 75 BLK ULTRASOUND HFRS (HOME RAISED); BRED: BLK;
CLV: 3-1
JOHNMCGRIFF – 75 BLK HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1
JERRY GRIMES – 30 RED ANG HFRS (HOME RAISED); BRED: LBW RED ANG;
CLV: 4-24 FOR 20 DAYS
WOODRANCH– 25 BLK&REDHFRS; BRED: REDANG; CLV: 3-15 FOR 60 DAYS
DAVE BERRY – 22 RED & BLK ANG AI’D HFRS; BRED: RED ANG; CLV: 3-10
GABE GROPPER – 20 REDANG HFRS; BRED: LBW REDANG; CLV: 3-20 FOR 50
DAYS
SCOTT EDOFF – 18 BLK ANG LHX HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10 FOR 45 DAYS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
DON RAVELLETTE – 10 FANCY BLK ANG HFRS (1050#); AI BRED: DL INCEN-
TIVE 228; PASTURE BRED: GREENMOUNTAINFRONTMAN; CLV: 3-1 FOR45 DAYS
STOCK COWS & BROKENMOUTHCOWS:
BUCHHOLZ & RISLOV – 250 BLK SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-20
KJERSTAD LIVESTOCK – 225 BLK 5 TO 6 YR OLD COWS & BROKEN MOUTH
COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-15 FOR 45 DAYS
WOOD RANCH – 90 BLK & RED 3 TO 10 YR OLD COWS; BLK BRED: BLK; RED
BRED: RED; CLV: 3-15 FOR 75 DAYS
MARVINCOLEMAN– 75 BLKCOMING 3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-25
FOR 60 DAYS
LEE BALDWIN – 50 BLK 7 TO 9 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1 FOR 55
DAYS
GALE BRUNS – 45 BLK COMING 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 2-25
ALVIN SIMMONS – 45 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10
KNUTSONRANCH– 40 REDANG7 TO8 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: REDANG; CLV:
4-1
SHANNON GARTNER & FLOYD KJERSTAD – 40 BLK 3 YR OLD COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-1
SCOTT PHILLIPS – 40 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-25
JOE CARLEY – 35 BLK COMING 3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 30 BLK
BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
PETE REINERT – 30 BLK COMING 3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10 FOR
60 DAYS
CASEY BRINK – 30 BLK & BWF 3 YR OLD TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-20 FOR 60 DAYS
SHAWN FREELAND – 25 BLK 3 TO 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; 4-1 FOR 30
DAYS
JIMWILSEY – 25 BLK & BWF SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK;
CLV: 4-1 FOR 45 DAYS
JERRY WILLERT – 20 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20 FOR
50 DAYS
JOHNSTABEN– 16 RED SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: RED; CLV:
3-1
GARY HERRINGTON – 15 BLK BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-1
FOR 60 DAYS
BLAZYTRANCH– 12 BLK&RED3 TO7 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: REDANG; CLV:
2-28 FOR 70 DAYS
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETHAT 605-859-2577
OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE
& REGULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PAS
TEURELLA, 7WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE & THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2: NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 31, & NOV. 7.
Covornor ÐonnIs Ðnugnnrd hns
oxfondod nn oxocufIvo ordor fo
hnuI ovorwIdfh bnIod IIvosfock food
unfII Ðocombor 2l, 20l2, In Soufh
Ðnkofn.
Tho oxocufIvo ordor sfnfos fhnf,
upon rocoIpf of n pormIf, pormIs-
sIon Is grnnfod fo movo ovorwIdfh
bnIod IIvosfock food, nof oxcoodIng
l2-foof-wIdo or l5-foof-hIgh, for
fwo hours nffor sunsof nnd fwo
hours boforo sunrIso. Tho ordor nI-
Iows movomonf of ovorwIdfh bnIod
IIvosfock food unfII cossnfIon of fho
droughf omorgoncv, or no Infor
fhnn Ðocombor 2l.
OvorwIdfh vohIcIos musf bo
oquIppod wIfh fInshIng or rofnfIng
whIfo or nmbor wnrnIng IIghfs on
onch sIdo of fho Iond`s wIdosf ox-
fromIfv. Tho wnrnIng IIghfs musf
bo cIonrIv vIsIbIo fo moforIsfs np-
pronchIng from fho fronf nnd ronr.
Movomonf undor fho oxocufIvo
ordor Is vnIId onIv for bnIod IIvo-
sfock food.
¨ThIs vonr`s porsIsfonf droughf
condIfIons hnvo Ioff IIvosfock pro-
ducors ncross Soufh Ðnkofn wIfh
Inndoqunfo food suppIIos,¨ snId
WnIf Ionos, Soufh Ðnkofn socro-
fnrv of ngrIcuIfuro. ¨IncronsIng
hnuIIng hoIghf nnd wIdfh rosfrIc-
fIons for bnIod hnv wIII nIIow pro-
ducors fo movo food In n moro
offIcIonf mnnnor.¨
Tho normnI sIzo rosfrIcfIon on
Soufh Ðnkofn hIghwnv Ionds Is l4
foof, fhroo-Inchos hIgh, nnd oIghf
foof, sIx Inchos wIdo.
AIfhough hoIghf nnd wIdfh ro-
sfrIcfIons for bnIod IIvosfock food
hnvo boon fompornrIIv Incronsod bv
oxocufIvo ordor, sovornI hIghwnvs
In fho sfnfo hnvo wIdfh nnd hoIghf
rosfrIcfIons In pInco bocnuso of con-
sfrucfIon or pormnnonf sfrucfuros
fhnf cnnnof nccommodnfo such
Inrgo Ionds. Truckors nro oncour-
ngod fo chock fhoIr roufos nhond of
fImo for fhoso rosfrIcfIons.
Ior InformnfIon on pormIfs, con-
fncf n Soufh Ðnkofn porf of onfrv or
cnII 800-63?-3255.
0verwldth
baled feed
haullng
extended
ln 8o. 0ak.
McenvIIIe
News
{ccntInued trcm page 1ß)
Þnfuro's wInd. Tho froo rows woro
pInnfod Iong boforo I gof horo, nnd
I know If fnkos n Iof of work fo gof
fhom osfnbIIshod. I'm nIso grnfofuI
for mv poor oId spufforIng mowor,
nffocfIonnfoIv known ns "!opIng
!onn." I hnvo hnd fho mowor for
Iofs of vonrs, nnd fho mofor kInd of
Iopos whon If gofs good nnd
wnrmod up. Iuf fho mowor hns n
bng fhnf works gronf for pIckIng up
Ionvos In fho vnrd, nnd fho poor oId
fhIng sfnrfs on fho fIrsf puII ovorv
fImo! If mnkos fho job of pIckIng up
Ionvos much onsIor!
I hopo vou'II gof ouf nnd onjov
fhIs fnII wonfhor. And I nIso hopo
vou gof n IIffIo wof In fho noxf dnv
or so! As vou go nbouf vour work,
bo smnrf nnd bo snfo, nnd I hopo I'II
soo sovornI of vou nf Ðoop Crook
Church for fho bnznnr on fho 2?fh!
Be watching
our website
for
downloadable
upcoming
production
sale books!
www.
RPI
promotions.
com
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.

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