Login

Pioneer Review, October 24, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

Kroetch came onstage to march along, only to discover
that Elvis’ dance steps were not as easy as left-right-
left; to the delight of the audience.
Wright completed the show with a Vegas Elvis set,
complete with a sparkly powder-blue jumpsuit and
matching cape. He sang some of the more well-known
songs, including “I Can’t Help Falling in Love,” “Viva,
Las Vegas” and “Love Me Tender.” He gave his all on
the gospel number “How Great Thou Art” and finished
the show to a standing ovation with a rousing version
of “Suspicious Minds.”
Event organizers were pleased with the turnout and
the response. “Every seat was filled. We were really ex-
cited to bring such a fun entertainer to Philip and bring
attention to the library,” said library board of trustees
president Jennifer Henrie.
“We do fundraising to support library activities and
programs not covered in the county budget.” Added li-
brarian Annie Brunskill, “We were thrilled with the
turnout and the response tonight. It’s something a little
bit different, and people were really having a great
time.” The event came just a few weeks after Brunskill
was honored by the South Dakota Library Association
as the librarian of the year.
“It’s been a really great couple of months for us,”
said Henrie. “It is wonderful to see such support and
recognition for our librarian and our library. People are realizing how vital the library is
to our community.”
$
1
00
Includes Tax
End of Day 10/21/13
12 Pro Winter Wheat ........$6.78
14 Pro Spring Wheat ........$6.85
Milo ....................................$3.37
Corn ...................................$3.55
Millet..................................$6.75
SFS Birdseed ..................$16.00
Sports
9 & 10
Sports
9 & 10
Philip, South Dakota 57567 Thursday, October 24, 2013 www. pioneer-review.com
No. 9, Vol. 108
MARKETS
October is
Public Notices
Month in
South Dakota!
Inside
this week
Dig pink
10
The organizations coordinating
the S.D. Rancher Relief Fund at
Black Hills Area Community
Foundation have announced that
funds are available to meet the
immediate needs of ranchers im-
pacted by the blizzard of October
4-7. Livestock producers should
call 2-1-1 or 1-877-708-4357 to re-
quest assistance.
“We want South Dakota ranch-
ers to know that assistance is
available for immediate needs
such as fuel, groceries or even
travel for medical services,” said
Lisa Adler of Lutheran Social
Services and president South
Dakota Voluntary Organizations
Active in Disaster. The process for
distributing additional funds to
further assist ranchers who have
experienced cattle losses will be
developed and announced as soon
as possible.
The South Dakota Rancher Re-
lief Fund was established on Octo-
ber 8 by Black Hills Area
Community Foundation to pro-
vide support and relief assistance
to those in the agriculture indus-
try impacted by the blizzard of Oc-
tober 4-7. The fund will be
administered by BHACF in coop-
eration with the South Dakota
Stockgrowers Association, the
South Dakota Cattlemen's Associ-
ation and the South Dakota Sheep
Growers Association for the direct
benefit of the livestock producers
impacted by this devastating bliz-
zard.
Donations can be sent to P.O.
Box 231, Rapid City, SD 57709
and online at https://www.give-
blackhills.org/27677.
South Dakota VOAD is a net-
work of Voluntary Organizations
Active in Disaster that work to-
gether to foster efficient delivery
of resources to people affected by
disasters. The focus of South
Dakota VOAD is to facilitate coor-
dination, communication, cooper-
ation and collaboration.
BHACF holds endowment
funds, as well as donor advised
funds and scholarship funds.
Through its tax-exempt charitable
status, BHACF enables people
with philanthropic interests to
easily and effectively support the
issues they care about and pro-
grams that improve the quality of
life in the Black Hills. To learn
more, visit www.bhacf.org or con-
tact Regina Jahr, executive direc-
tor, at bhcfoundation@rushmore
.com or by calling 605-718-0112.
For over 120 years the mission
of the South Dakota Stockgrowers
Association has been “to promote
and protect the South Dakota live-
stock industry.” The SDSA is a
grassroots organization represent-
ing independent livestock produc-
ers on local, state and national
policies that impact the livestock
industry.
Funds for state’s
ranchers available
Ray Smith, chief executive offi-
cer and president of First National
Bank, Philip, S.D., was elected to
serve as chairman of the Inde-
pendent Community Bankers of
South Dakota at the ICBSD’s re-
cent annual meeting.
Smith is a lifelong resident of
western South Dakota. He gradu-
ated from Burke High School, re-
ceived a bachelor of science degree
in agriculture economics from
South Dakota State University in
1984, and completed the graduate
school of banking in Madison, Wis.
Smith has been with the First Na-
tional Bank his entire banking ca-
reer.
Smith is involved with the
Philip Chamber of Commerce,
Philip Economic Development and
the finance committee for the dio-
cese of Rapid City. His hobbies in-
clude golfing, fishing, hunting,
camping and motorcycling. Ray
and his wife, Donna, have two
daughters and a son. They also
enjoy spending time with their
three grandchildren.
“We are very lucky to have Ray
lead our association this year”
said Greg McCurry, ICBSD presi-
dent and CEO.  “Ray will bring a
high level of banking knowledge
and solid leadership to our associ-
ation. Ray’s knowledge, skills and
abilities will allow our association
to continue to grow and provide
leadership on banking issues in
South Dakota and our nation’s
capital.”
Smith said that he is honored
with the position, which continues
into July of 2014. He added that
he is proud that ICBSD stands ba-
sically for the small, community
banks of South Dakota.
The ICBSD was founded in
1983 to serve as the voice for inde-
pendent community banks
throughout South Dakota.  ICBSD
is the only association that advo-
cates exclusively for community
banks. Community banks help
create local jobs, support local or-
ganizations, pay local taxes, and
work to build communities.
Smith current chair of ICBSD
Elvis has left the building. But before he went, he re-
ceived a standing ovation from a crowd of fans and li-
brary supporters at the Philip Fire Hall, Saturday,
October 19.
The Haakon County Public Library hosted the show,
featuring a dessert buffet and pie auction, as a
fundraiser for library needs. Tribute artist Chris Wright
performed as Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Conway
Twitty, Jerry Lee Lewis, and several other artists before
switching gears and performing as the King of Rock and
Roll, Elvis Presley.
The fire hall was decorated with an autumn/country
theme including orange table covers, sunflower center-
pieces, gingham and burlap accents, scarecrows and
pumpkins. A buffet table offered desserts of every imag-
inable variety. Another table displayed over 20 home-
made pies donated by library supporters. Wright
conducted the pie auction throughout his musical per-
formance, eliciting laughter from the audience with his
jokes and comments as the bidding went higher and
higher.
Wright followed the country set with his Elvis at the
movies set, performing such favorite tunes as “Jailhouse
Rock,” “Teddy Bear” and “Don’t Be Cruel.” The audience
got involved during his Hawaiian numbers with volun-
teers dressing in leis and grass skirts as backup
dancers.
For the song “G.I. Blues,” military veterans Marion Matt, Corky Thorson and Chuck
Library benefit features versatile performer
Chris Wright, as Elvis Presley, brought local volunteers onstage as backup
dancers with grass skirts and leis.
Courtesy photo
by Sgt.1st
Class
Theanne
Tangen,
129th mobile
public affairs
attachment,
Kundahar
Airfield,
Afghanistan
After 12
years of ship-
ping supplies to
troops in
Afghanistan, a
surplus of con-
tainers have
filled bases
throughout the
country.
The South
Dakota Army
N a t i o n a l
Guard’s 152nd
Combat Sus-
tainment Sup-
port Battalion
is working to
not only sus-
tain the four
transportation
units and ord-
nance company
they manage at
Kandahar Air-
field, they are also helping units
in Regional Command-South
drawdown equipment.
“I have heard that there are up
to 80,000 containers in
Afghanistan,” said Major David
Moore, support operations officer,
Rapid City. “Our goal is to help re-
duce the number of containers by
identifying whether or not they
need to be demolished for scrap
metal or reused for packing up
equipment to send home.”
Ninety-five percent of the con-
tainers coming in and out of Kan-
dahar Airfield will go to the
central receiving shipping point
where the containers are in-
spected. There are three cate-
gories for the containers. One is
“sea worthy” where it can be
shipped back to the states by a
ship. The second is “intra-the-
ater,” meaning the container is
not good enough to go back on a
ship but can be used inside the
country. The third is “demol-
ished,” which means it is only
good for scrap.
The 152nd is moving the con-
tainers at a hectic pace, eliminat-
ing more than 1,200 in the last
three weeks alone, said Moore.
A hectic pace is what is keeping
Sergeant 1st Class John Kramer,
noncommissioned officer in
charge, CRSP, of Philip, busy from
dawn to dusk.
“There is a lot
more to contain-
ers than I ever
thought,” said
Kramer. “When
you are going
down the high-
way back home
and see a con-
tainer on a truck
you don’t think
about it. You
don’t know what
it is hauling or
what the num-
bers mean. Now
I look at a con-
tainer and know
if its sea worthy
or if it needs to
be demolished.”
Kramer has a
list of things he
looks for when
inspecting a con-
tainer. “Check-
ing for holes in
the containers is
the biggest
thing, and it also
gets down to the
nitty gritty of
how many dents
it has,” he said.
“The doors need to have a tight
seal. We also check the numbers
on the container to ensure the con-
tainer is accounted for on the in-
ternational database, which
tracks the ownership of the con-
tainer.”
Lt. Col. David Bedard, deputy
commanding officer,15th Sustain-
ment Brigade, Fort Bliss, Texas,
said the 152nd will have con-
tributed to 30 percent of their
overall reduction. “The 152nd has
gone above and beyond,” said Be-
dard. “They really are a stellar or-
ganization. From all accounts,
when you look at these guys they
are just stellar.”
S.D Guard unit cleaning up
remnants of Afghanistan war
The 152nd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, S.D. Army National
Guard, works with semi-sized containers at Kandahar Airfield. The 152nd
CSSB not only sustains the four transportation units and ordnance company
they manage at Kandahar airfield, but are also helping units in Regional Com-
mand-South drawdown equipment. Shown above, the man on the right is Ser-
geant 1st Class John Kramer, Philip, the noncommissioned officer in charge.
Courtesy photo
With the federal shutdown
ended, state, local and Federal
Emergency Management Agency
officials are moving quickly to con-
duct preliminary assessments of
damage from the early October
blizzard, Governor Dennis Dau-
gaard said.
The damage assessments will
begin October 28 and will cover 15
storm impacted counties and two
Indian reservations.
Immediately after the blizzard
struck western South Dakota on
October 4, Daugaard directed the
State Office of Emergency Man-
agement (OEM) staff to work
closely with local and tribal offi-
cials to keep track of costs, docu-
ment damages and keep all
records in preparation for what is
called a preliminary damage as-
sessment (PDA). That assessment
is an essential step toward seek-
ing and receiving a presidential
disaster declaration, Daugaard
said.
“The federal shutdown kept
FEMA staff members from their
offices during that early period,
but I was determined it would not
stop the state from being ab-
solutely prepared to seek a disas-
ter declaration the moment that
became possible,’ Daugaard said.
“South Dakota found a way to
keep Mount Rushmore open dur-
ing the shutdown. We used the
same resolve to carry on with
every step we could take to be
ready for preliminary damage as-
sessments as soon as FEMA was
able to participate.’’
The blizzard dumped record
amounts of snow in parts of the
Black Hills, closed interstates and
blocked many other roads, left
thousands of homes and busi-
nesses without power and killed
thousands of cattle and other live-
stock on ranches across a wide
area of western South Dakota.
The preliminary damage assess-
ments are conducted by teams of
local, state and FEMA officials.
The assessments include damage
to all public infrastructure and to
property of private, nonprofit en-
tities including the rural electric
cooperatives. The governor uses
the results of the PDAs to deter-
mine whether a request for a pres-
idential disaster declaration is
warranted.
If the president grants such a
request, up to 75 percent of eligi-
ble costs could be reimbursed by
the federal government. The gov-
ernor’s request does not guarantee
federal funding will be made
available to South Dakota.
Besides the damage to public in-
frastructure, storm costs include
the expenses incurred by the state
for its work in responding to and
State assessing
blizzard damage
continued on 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments on any news story or personal feeling on any sub-
ject. We do reserve the right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space. We also reserve the right
to reject any or all letters.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding Monday at 5:00 p.m.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual
newspaper office. All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run the two weeks prior to an election.
The “Letters” column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to express their opinions. It is not meant to replace ad-
vertising as a means of reaching people.
This publication’s goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of free speech. Your comments are welcomed and en-
couraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Editorial
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 2
Subscription Rates: For Haakon, Jackson, and Jones counties,
Creighton, Wall, Quinn, Marcus, Howes, Plainview, and Hayes ad-
dresses: $36.00 per year (+ Tax); Elsewhere: $42.00 per year.
South Dakota residents are required to pay sales tax.
Periodicals postage paid at Philip, SD.
Postmaster, send change of address notice to: Pioneer Review, PO
Box 788, Philip, SD 57567; or FAX to: 605/859-2410.
Website Subscription Rate: $36.
E-mail address:
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
website: www.pioneer-review.com
Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of Haakon County, the
towns of Philip and Midland, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc. Pioneer Review office is
located at 221 E. Oak Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516; • FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.
Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way reproduced from
this publication, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
DEADLINES:
Display & Classified Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
E-MAIL ADDRESSES: ADS: ads@pioneer-review.com • NEWS: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Philip, SD
U.S.P.S. 433-780
FORUM TO DISCUSS PUBLIC TRANSPORATION … The
public is invited to discuss this topic on Thursday, October 24, at
the Bad River Senior Citizens’ Center in Philip from 2:00 to 4:00
p.m.
COMMUNITy BeTTeRMeNT COMMITTee HALLOweeN
PARTy …Wednesday, October 30, 6:00 p.m., Bad River Senior Cit-
izens’ Center, Philip. There is a potluck meal; utensils, plates and
drinks provided. Come in costume as there will be prizes. Please
bring cans of food for the food pantry. Everyone welcome. For more
information call Darlene Matt, 859-2077.
PHILIP AARP/RTA MeeTS …Monday, October 28, at 6:00 p.m.
at the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center with a soup supper.
Speaker is Eric Nelson, SDAARP, who will speak on Social Security,
Medicare and the Affordable Care Act. Anyone is welcome to hear
the latest on these issues.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. we will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Lookin’ Around|Syd Iwan
“Talk a little slower,” I re-
quested. At the time, I was on the
phone trying to get a confirmation
number and some other informa-
tion, and the gal at the other end
was talking way too fast for me.
This was complicated somewhat
by the fact that I was holding the
phone to my ear with my shoulder
while trying to write on a wiggly
piece of paper. “Okay,” she said,
and she really did try. Pretty
soon, though, she was back up to
warp speed, and I had to remind
her to slow it back down. Eventu-
ally I got what I needed, and read
it back to check that I had it right.
Apparently it was, but it wasn’t
an easy conversation.
Some people just naturally talk
really fast. I think of Alice in this
regard. She was a friend of Mom’s
and of mine too, but it was as if
she needed to get things out as
quickly as possible so she could
get on with more-useful work. She
was a sweet gal so you just tried
to listen up and not say “what?”
too often. She didn’t talk very
loudly either, so you really had to
pay attention.
Contrast Alice with neighbor
Leonard who said very little and
said it slowly. When he called you
on the phone, first you heard a
cough and then the words, “This
is Leonard.” You kind of figured
that he hadn’t talked in so long
that he had to clear his throat be-
fore he could say anything. It got
so when I answered the phone
and heard the cough, I knew who
it was before he announced, “This
is Leonard.”
Neither was my Uncle Don in
any hurry when he visited with
anyone. He liked to tell stories,
but he did it in his own sweet
time. Since he added quite a few
details that weren’t completely
necessary, I sometimes got the
fidgets about halfway through the
tale. Again, he was a good fellow
so I tried to be patient although
sometimes it was hard. I often
wondered why he couldn’t just
summarize or get to the main
point, but that isn’t how he told
stories.
As you know, some people have
a lot to say so you’d better be pre-
pared to spend some time when
you strike up a conversation with
them. If I’m pressed for time,
there are certain folks I do not call
on the phone because I know I’ll
have the receiver stuck to my ear
for quite a while. They tend to go
on and on and then immediately
jump to another subject when the
first one is worn out. This is made
somewhat worse by the fact that I
am not a great conversationalist.
I run out of things to say before
very long and just end up saying,
“Uh huh,” or “Hmmm” a lot.
Being conversationally chal-
lenged also makes it so I’m not
eager to join a lot of organizations.
My dad, on the other hand, joined
everything that came along. He
was a Mason, a Lion, and half a
dozen other things. He also loved
to play cards and attended any
card parties that came along. He
was extremely social and loved
the give and take of anywhere
that people gathered. A neighbor
of ours has joined even more or-
ganizations than Dad and is
hardly ever home in the evenings.
He’s out gadding about and some-
times travels quite a distance if
nothing is happening close to
home.
Then we come to son Chance.
He has very little speech due to
his autism. If he says a hundred
words a year, he is being chatty.
He used to have slightly more
speech, but he hasn’t said a lot in
the last few years. He communi-
cates in other ways, but not much
with his voice. When he does say
something, it is usually witty and
worth listening to. I recall some
years ago when we were out driv-
ing in the car at night, and I was
trying to come up with the name
of the brightest star in the con-
stellation Orion. In previous night
rides but in the golf cart, I would
often tell Chance which constella-
tions were which and what some
of the stars were named. Anyway,
while I was hemming and hawing
trying to come up with the name,
I suddenly heard it coming from
the back seat. “Rigel!” Chance
said. It was spoken with a bit of
disgust at the shortcomings of my
memory. This tickled me quite a
bit because that one word said a
lot about my son’s patience and
also reminded me he had a quick
and retentive mind. He knew
which star I was talking about.
My explanations of things in the
night sky were not lost on him.
So to avoid rambling and un-
necessary detail, let me summa-
rize and get to the point.
Conversation is an extremely use-
ful tool in sharing information,
opinions, and feelings. We all tend
to go at it differently, but it is how
we communicate and interact.
More importantly, it makes it pos-
sible for people to let us know they
care about us and vice versa.
That’s worth a lot.
Talk, Talk, Talk
continued from 1
State assessing blizzard damage
Country Praises by Del Bartels
They say that a true friend will
whisper to you that your zipper is
down, rather than not tell you be-
cause it might be awkward.
With that being just one of
many similar analogies, the peo-
ple of this county, of this region,
and maybe of most of western
South Dakota are friends.
The blizzard of October 4-6
blindsided everyone. Any quick
preparations were seemingly use-
less. What can anyone do when
power poles snap, when fences
don’t even slow the soaked and
freezing herds, when drifting
snow first blinds and then buries
everything? Nothing about the af-
termath can even pretend to be
anything but terrible ... that is ex-
cept for the hand of a known or
unknown friend that is reaching
out. That hand may not come all
the way, but waits for your hand
to reach back and grab on.
A hand in clearing away the
dead cattle does not restore or pay
for the cattle, but it may be all
that helper can do. The helper has
dead cattle of his own. A minister
cannot pass the plate to help out a
person or a family, there are just
too many persons and families. A
friend doesn’t fix it; he may be no
more help than to simply banter
with you how to fix it.
A pastor friend of mine from
years ago told me that one of his
first bedside visits was with the
family mourning the passing of a
loved one. He had no idea what to
say or what to do, so he quietly
stood off to the side as the family
wept. Over the next few weeks,
most of the family individually
told him that his simple presence
helped them get through it. Isn’t
that a definition of friend?
A highly paid professional psy-
chologist listens to your troubles,
and calls you crazy as you pay the
bill. A friend listens to your trou-
bles, and calls you crazy as you
pay for his cup of coffee. I would
gladly pay for the coffee.
The vicious storm caused terri-
ble tragedy for livestock produc-
ers. Their tragedy will trickle
down to affect the financial well-
being of everyone in and near the
storm area. Yes, this is a tragedy.
It blindsided us. Now, it will be an
even worse tragedy if our blind
side hides friends from us.
If someone calls on a minister to
visit you, good. If someone visits
and thus gently forces you to be
civil for a tiny while, good. If
someone doesn’t just wave
through their pickup windshield,
but also beeps their horn, good.
Going to eat lutefisk, to see a
movie, to listen to an Elvis imper-
sonator, to play cards, to sing off-
key from the congregation ... none
of these are wrong after a terrible
tragedy. Getting a few moments of
sanity is always right.
Shortly after the funeral of my
oldest son, my next oldest son and
his friends watched a VCR tape of
“Dumb and Dumber,” a show that
had been one of his brother’s fa-
vorites. It was stupid – the show
and them getting together to
watch it. But, it helped them all
get through the mourning. His
friends acted stupid enough to
make them really smart. I hope
that similar stupidity helps me be-
come a better friend to others.
The distraction of going back to
a semblance of a routine is good.
The distraction of forcing yourself
to do what has to be done is good.
The distraction of a friend slurp-
ing down your coffee is also good.
Blind side
Philip NMB braut feed benefit
The National Mutual Benefit held a fundraiser braut feed at the Philip football field during the home game versus
the Wall Eagles, Friday, October 18. Results of the free-will donations went to a local person for expenses as they
fight breast cancer. Shown, from left, are Bruce Kroetch, Ashton Reedy, Harlan Moos, Brandon Moos, Matt Reedy,
Alex Moos and Pennie Slovek in front.
Del Bartels
Courtesy photo
recovering from the blizzard.
State resources directed to the
storm have included:
•South Dakota National Guard
provided soldiers and heavy
equipment including trucks, bull-
dozers, a snowblower and loaders,
to assist in snow removal and to
help rural electric crews reach and
repair downed lines.
•Game, Fish and Parks coordi-
nated with Civil Air Patrol for
missions over the Black Hills to
check on possible lost hunters in
the storm.
•Three staff members from the
Office of Emergency Management
to Custer, Lawrence, Meade and
Butte counties and one staffer to
the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
were provided to help answer dis-
aster related questions.
•Four Incident Management
Assistance Team (IMAT) mem-
bers through OEM to help Pen-
nington County staff its
Emergency Operations Center
functions.
•OEM staff has reached out to
potential disaster declaration ap-
plicants to provide direction on
documenting costs, hiring contrac-
tors and following FEMA guide-
lines.
•OEM also directed Civil Air
Patrol missions to locate dead cat-
tle along state rights of way and
contracted with a rendering com-
pany for removal of those car-
casses.
•OEM worked with state and
national Voluntary Organizations
Active in Disaster (VOAD) groups
to provide many types of volunteer
assistance, including shelters,
meals, and debris clean-up and
tree removal.
•Department of Transportation
provided blowers, loaders with
grapplers and trucks for debris
clean-up.
•Wildland Fire Suppression
provided Sno Cat for emergency
work during blizzard, and Black
Hat and Bear Mountain hand
crews to assist with debris clean-
up.
•Corrections provided chain
saw crews to assist communities
with debris clean-up. By the time
those crews have completed their
assignments, they will have in-
vested about 6,000 hours of work
into the blizzard recovery in sev-
eral communities in the Black
Hills area.
Shown at right, Philip FFA offi-
cers Bailey Radway and Nick
Hamill accepted a check for $370
from Irvin Jones of Jones Sad-
dlery, Bottle & Vet. The Industry
Support Program by Zoetis (for-
mally Pfizer animal health) do-
nates dollar amounts equal to one
percent of animal health vaccine
sales to local FFA chapters. By
partnering with local veterinari-
ans and animal health suppliers,
the Zoetis FFA Support Program
has provided more than $4.2 mil-
lion to local FFA chapters since
2008. This contribution has
helped put equipment in the class-
room, helped build new animal
agriculture facilities for FFA
chapters, fund leadership develop-
ment events and class projects, se-
cure blue jackets, send members
to their first conventions, and
more. Zoetis is also proud to spon-
sor and host National Association
of Agricultural Educators work-
shops at the National FFA Con-
vention, providing support, in-
sight and resources to the
teachers who make a difference.
As a champion of veterinarians
worldwide, Zoetis also sponsored
the national Veterinary Science
Career Development Event. This
CDE, which was offered as a na-
tional contest for the first time in
2012, focuses on small- and large-
animal veterinary medicine, train-
ing and then testing students’
knowledge on proper care and
handling of animals. A new step
for FFA, this CDE is a way to en-
courage many FFA members look-
ing to pursue careers in veterinary
medicine.
Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
donates to Philip FFA
SDCHIP
The South Dakota Child Identi-
fication Program (SDCHIP) contin-
ues efforts to identify children
across South Dakota as events be-
come available.
The South Dakota Masons have
hosted 152 events and identified
15,292 kids since the program’s in-
ception in South Dakota in 2007.
SDCHIP is part of an initiative
of the Masons of North America
that generates completed packages
of various identifying items of chil-
dren for parents or guardians. The
types of identification that are col-
lected include dental impressions,
DNA cheek swab, digital still
photo, fingerprints and a video im-
aged interview. All of the identify-
ing materials are returned to the
child’s family to be kept as an iden-
tification kit in the event that a
child becomes missing. This kit will
aid law enforcement in the recov-
ery of a missing child. The program
is offered to the public at no charge.
To schedule a free event, visit
www.sd-chip.org or contact the
South Dakota Grand Lodge office
at 605-332-2051 or http://mygrand-
lodge.org.
Extension
Bob Fanning. Field Specialist
Winner Regional Extension Center
Rural Livin’
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 3
Thursday: Partly cloudy in
the morning, then clear. High
of 50F. Winds from the NW
at 5 to 10 mph. Thursday
Night: Partly cloudy in the
evening, then clear. Low of 28F. Winds
from the ESE at 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Clear. High of
66F. Winds from the
SSW at 5 to 10 mph.
Friday Night: Partly
cloudy in the evening,
then clear. Low of 36F. Winds from
the WNW at 10 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Partly
cloudy. Fog early. High
of 57F. Winds from
the NW at 5 to 10
mph. Saturday
Night: Clear. Low of 36F. Winds
from the South at 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. High
of 64F. Winds from the WSW
at 5 to 10 mph shifting to
the NW in the afternoon.
Sunday Night: Mostly
cloudy. Low of 34F. Breezy. Winds from
the North at 15 to 20 mph.
Monday: Overcast with a chance of snow. High
of 43F. Breezy. Winds from the NNE at 20 to
25 mph. Chance of snow 50%. Monday
Night: Overcast with a chance of snow. Low
of 23F with a windchill as low as 16F. Breezy.
Winds from the North at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of snow
50% with accumulations up to 2 in. possible.
Get your complete
& up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
CÞLw AGLNCY, L1O.
Crop Insurance Specialists Since 1984.
0lve us a calll
We'd be happy to
dlscuss .
All Your crop lnsurance Needs
5a|es U|ose 0ate for 2014 Urops Are:
Paìnfa|| Index on Pasture & Pay|and:
11/15/13
Annua| Iorage (Pay Mì||et, 5udan, etc.):
12/15/13
1hese are the dates to purchase, change or
cancel multi-peril crop insurance.
0fflce (606) 433-6411
or 1oll-Free (888) 433-8760
Pusty 0|ney ¹ Maurìce Pandcock ¹ Peìdì Porch ¹ 1ay|or Mohnen
1anner Pandcock ¹ Urady & ßernìce Urew
Crew Agency is an equal opportunity provider.
As farmers wait for wet
weather to clear and dry condi-
tions to return so they can con-
tinue or in some cases, begin
harvesting, they are also seeing
some of their crops lodge.
Grain sorghum, sunflower and
corn can all suffer from stalk
problems, and lodging. The most
common cause of lodging is
weather related; rain, wet soils,
high winds, and in some cases,
snow. Soil compaction, limited
root development and lack of
plant vigor can also be factors.
Early harvest is recommended
to avoid problems with lodging,
but there was a large amount of
fall crop and early moisture inter-
rupted harvest well before it was
completed.
One school of thought is to har-
vest standing crops first. These
may be better yielding, harvest
will go faster, standing crops will
field dry quicker, and you would
want to get them before they
begin to lodge.
Lodged crops may best be har-
vested with equipment choices
and/or modifications, and tech-
nique. If the crop is planted in
rows, a row crop head may lift
lodged stalks enough to get them
into the machine. There are reels
that can be mounted on corn
heads to help pull material into
the combine. Crop lifters can be
attached to the sickle bar of most
combine flex or straight heads
and improve harvesting efficiency
for both row planted and drilled or
solid-seeded sorghum or corn.
These will not work well for
lodged sunflower. Check with
your implement dealer to make
sure these attachments will fit on
your model of combine. Innovative
farmers have also developed their
own modifications, with varied
success, but sometimes damaging
their equipment (see the Sept
1998 article in “The Sunflower”
magazine: http://sunflowernsa.
com/magazine/details.asp?ID=119
&Cat=2).
Lifting the lodged crop is prefer-
able to shaving the ground. Not
only do you run less material
through the combine, but you are
likely to leave more residues at-
tached by the roots, and standing
for snow catch. Running less plant
material through the combine can
save fuel and wear on the com-
bine, allow faster harvesting, and
with sunflower, less danger of
fire.
Equipment choice and/or modi-
fications alone will not maximize
harvest efficiency of lodged crops.
Recommendations are to travel
slow, and choose the optimum di-
rection of travel. If wind was a sig-
nificant factor in the lodging of
crops, the majority of plants may
be lying in one direction. This sit-
uation may allow harvesting in
two directions by traveling per-
pendicular to the direction the
plants are leaning or lying. The
best results may be obtained by
harvesting in one direction, likely
at an angle against the direction
the plants are lying, and “dead-
heading” back for the next pass. If
the lodging is more random, as
might occur with severe stalk
weakness, the direction of travel
may not matter.
Some crops may be standing in
water or in very wet soil. These
crops will certainly be best left
until other fields or areas have
been harvested. There will cer-
tainly be opportunities to harvest
these areas when the ground is
frozen, even if part of the day.
When these are the only crops
left, producers will need to deter-
mine whether it is worth taking
the risk to harvest them, or wait
for the water to leave, the wet soil
to dry and/or the ground to freeze.
Operating equipment on very wet
soils is known to cause soil com-
paction. If doing so, minimize the
weight by limiting the amount of
grain carried by combines and
grain carts, and keep trucks on
roads and field borders. If you are
not able to harvest all of the crop,
grazing is another option, and
particularly useful for corn if the
ears fall off the plants.
Calendar
Oct. 21-23: SDSU Extension
Annual Conference, Brookings
Dec. 3-4: Ag Horizons Confer-
ence, Ramkota Inn, Pierre
Harvesting Lodged Crops
FIRST
NATIONAL BANK
PHILIP, S.D. FAITH, S.D.
605-859-2525 605-967-2191
www.fnbphilip.com
Member FDIC
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
Get ready
for Winter
Boggs
Shirts
Boots
Caps
Coats
Gloves
Preconditioning
Shots & Supplies
by Lucas Lentsch,
SD Secretary of Agriculture
Life and death are intertwined
with animal agriculture. It’s a
harsh reality, but as the old say-
ing goes, “those who do not lose
any livestock are the ones who do
not have any livestock.” Our farm-
ers and ranchers are prepared for
that reality, but nothing could
prepare us – or our livestock – for
the devastating early season bliz-
zard of October 4-7, now called
“Winter Storm Atlas.”
Thousands of cattle perished in
the relentless onslaught of driving
wind, freezing rain and heavy
snow that pounded our communi-
ties, landscapes and the livestock
of western South Dakota. This
storm was an indiscriminate
killer; it took the lives of cattle,
sheep, horses, buffalo, deer and
antelope. Adding to the loss, many
ranchers were only days away
from marketing their calves, pay-
ing their bills and re-investing for
the future.
This event is about more than
just the loss of livestock; the story
goes deeper.
The farmers and ranchers in-
volved in animal agriculture pro-
vide our country and the world
with access to high quality pro-
tein. The producers who lost live-
stock in this storm lost more than
just the product of one growing
season; they lost years of work. In
many cases, a steadfast commit-
ment over multiple generations to
developing their herd’s genetic
traits vanished in a matter of
hours.
For many ranchers, the inabil-
ity to protect their livestock has
caused a reoccurring feeling of
guilt. Clearly, this was not their
fault. Winter Storm Atlas am-
bushed the world of our ranching
families, but our fiercely inde-
pendent producers will live on and
rebuild. Even though many expe-
rienced sobering losses, they
maintain the pioneering spirit of
our ancestors. Hope remains.
In the days following the devas-
tation, we quickly saw the out-
pouring of support for our affected
communities and producers.
Whether it was a phone call, a
brief visit, a helping hand, a cou-
ple hours of volunteer labor, the
loan of needed equipment or a fi-
nancial gift, South Dakotans
showed up. With miles and miles
of fences to repair and seed stock
to replace, the chores aren’t done
yet.
The road to recovery is aided
through your generosity. If you
have enjoyed success in agricul-
ture or have enjoyed life’s bless-
ings, please consider a donation to
the “Rancher Relief Fund” at
www.GiveBlackHills.org
Please keep our ranchers and
their families in your thoughts
and prayers. Thank you.
The blizzard and lessons learned
The October 4-5 winter storm
has caused considerable death
loss of livestock in western South
Dakota.
The South Dakota Animal In-
dustry Board, in partnership with
the South Dakota Office of Emer-
gency Management, has con-
tracted with a rendering service to
begin clearing carcasses from
state highways, ditches and rights
of way. State personnel will do
their best to establish ownership
of the animal carcasses by verify-
ing brands, official identification,
description and location as car-
casses are removed from state
roadways.
Carcasses located on or along
county owned or privately owned
roadways must be removed by the
respective county or private owner
of the roadway. The removal of
carcasses located on private land
is the responsibility of the animal
owner or landowner. Although
current conditions make carcass
disposal difficult, it is urgent that
decaying carcasses be disposed of
in as timely a manner as possible
to prevent health and safety is-
sues. Carcasses may be burned,
buried to a depth of four feet or
disposed of by a licensed render-
ing plant. Carcass disposal guide-
lines may be found on the SDAIB
website http://aib.sd.gov.
Livestock owners are urged to
thoroughly document livestock
deaths in the event that indem-
nity funds may be available in the
future. Suggested recordkeeping
would include dates, photos, de-
scription of animals (type of live-
stock, number of head, weight,
sex, age, etc.), vaccination records,
pregnancy test records, hauling
receipts, collection of all identifi-
cation tags and any other informa-
tion that would verify the loss. A
third-party signature and state-
ment to verify losses will most
likely be required. Veterinarians,
extension and many other re-
sources may be verifying third
party agents. Employees and fam-
ily members are not eligible.
Motorists on western South
Dakota roadways are urged to
drive with extra caution as there
will be workers on and near the
roadways as carcasses are re-
moved. Also, motorists must be
aware that livestock carcasses or
stray livestock may be present on
or along the roadways at any time.
Livestock carcass removal
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture reminds producers
who have lost livestock during the
recent blizzard to document
losses. Proper documentation is
critical to ensure processing of po-
tential claims.
“This early season, record set-
ting blizzard is devastating to our
producers and our thoughts are
with them,” said Secretary of
Agriculture Lucas Lentsch. “We
are working to coordinate with ag
industry stakeholders to establish
and execute a response plan.”
Individuals experiencing disas-
ter related stress should contact a
local community health provider
or call Youth and Family Services
in Rapid City at 605-342-4195 or
605-342-4870. Information is also
available at http://dss.sd.gov/be-
havioralhealthservices/commu-
nity/outpatientservices.asp.
SDDA is working closely with
the Office of Emergency Manage-
ment, Animal Industry Board,
Brand Board and Governor’s Of-
fice on recovery efforts.
Producers should document all
livestock losses with pictures, vac-
cination and hauling receipts, or
any other records for possible fu-
ture use in disaster relief pro-
grams. Third-party verification of
losses is recommended. If you
have questions regarding live-
stock identification, contact the
South Dakota Brand Board at
605-773-3324.
Affected producers should con-
tact their local county emergency
manager. For Haakon County,
call Lola Roseth at 605-567-3515.
The South Dakota Animal In-
dustry Board will be coordinating
disposal of livestock carcasses.
Brand Board inspectors will be in-
volved in identifying livestock and
livestock carcasses.
For carcass disposal informa-
tion, contact the AIB at 605-773-
3321. Disposal guidelines are
available at http://aib.sd.gov/pdf/
Carcass%20Disposal%20Guide-
lines%202011.pdf
Document losses
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Tire Tanks
Vacuum
Excavation
Cobett Waters
Directional
Boring
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
The South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Department has re-
ceived a few reports of wildlife
losses resulting from the early Oc-
tober blizzard in western South
Dakota, but the extent of the bliz-
zard’s impact will take time to de-
termine.
“The focus has been on public
safety and dealing with cata-
strophic livestock losses,” said
Chad Switzer, GF&P wildlife pro-
gram administrator. “We have
only had a scattering of reports
from landowners and other indi-
viduals who are out in the fields.
There is no question that the bliz-
zard had an impact on wildlife,
but we have not observed or had
any reports of any wildlife losses
at a level comparable to the dev-
astating impacts this storm had
on livestock.”
Switzer added GF&P has also
received reports of pheasant loss
in Perkins and Bennett counties
due to the storm.
“These are vast, open areas
where it is difficult to quantify
precise impacts from the bliz-
zard,” Switzer said. “We will con-
tinue to monitor for losses through
observations by our staff, reports
from hunters and landowners.”
GF&P -
wildlife
losses
continued on 7
Hit & Miss
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 4
elderly Meals
Thursday, Oct. 24: Tortilla
Soup, Roast Beef Sandwich, Fruit,
Six Layer Bar.
Friday, Oct. 25: Potato En-
crusted Cod, Mashed Red Pota-
toes, Nantucket Veggies, Biscuit,
Spiced Apples.
Monday, Oct. 28: BBQ Pork
Loin, Mashed Sweet Potatoes, Ed-
ward Veggies, Roll, Diced
Peaches.
Tuesday, Oct. 29: Chicken
Kiev, Baked Potato with Sour
Cream and Butter, Glazed Car-
rots, Roll, Cranberry Velvet
Dessert.
wednesday, Oct. 30: Ham
Salad Sandwich, Bean Soup,
Fruit.
***
October 11, at Somerset Court,
the staff was busy decorating the
whole place in the style of the
1950s. The dining room was trans-
formed into “The Diner” with
black and white tablecloths.
Guests were invited at no extra
charge.
The activity garden was set for
the snack shop. You should have
seen the array of fancy food. There
were cuts of pickled herring, (my
favorite) darling little meat tarts
prepared by the Somerset Court
kitchen, olives (both black and
stuffed) and the usual variety of
crackers, chips and dips. Drinks
varied from lemon-lime soda and
colas to wine coolers.
From the gala of snacks and vis-
iting we next went to dinner in the
malt shop, where we could have
giant hamburgers or hot dogs,
with fries or chips. And as a nice
touch, we had chocolate or vanilla
malts. That is not all, Elvis,
straight from Nashville, sang at
the tables. “Don’t Be Cruel” to a
heart that’s true, was especially
appealing when sung to Thelma
Frame, Shirley Hessman and
Elaine Backes. The wait staff, ap-
propriately dressed in various ap-
plications of the 1950s style,
screamed and gathered around.
Photos were in order.
The exercise room became the
sock hop area with the 1950s
music playing. The music was
recorded records from Ryan Love’s
parents’ band. Jeri Deshamps’
two-year-old grandson was in
charge of the microphone and
showed his musical interest. A few
of us oldies danced to a few of
those oldies and a good many sat
around and drank champagne!
Most residents showed up for the
party and a good contingent of vis-
itors, some from the North Dakota
Somerset Court.
Thanks to all who helped make
Somerset Court’s eighth anniver-
sary party an enjoyable time. A
Blast or whatever the 1950s
phrase was!
Friday, October 10, Connie
Stevens was kindly acting as go-
between for Anne Brink, taking
things that Anne requested from
Anne’s apartment here at Somer-
set Court to Anne at Fountain
Springs.
October 12, at Somerset Court,
we found an array of bright table-
cloths in Halloween designs on
our tables in the dining room.
October 12, it was a nice, calm
morning with solid, bright blue
skies. A day to walk outdoors. The
first for quite a few days.
I have been reading “Cold Dish”
by Craig Johnson. I was enamored
with the story of Craig Johnson’s
appearance at a meeting of re-
gional authors. He has a ranch at
Ucross, Wyo., and my daughter
sent me his “Cold Dish” and
“Kindness Goes Unpunished.”
One gets used to the swearing and
off-colored language and there is a
gripping, though miserable, basic
story including murder mysteries
and local Indian lore. There is way
too much discussion of the bores of
the different guns, but that is part
of the story and probably of great
interest to gun buffs. One would
expect the other Walt Longmire
book to have some of these same
features, but I will probably try to
read it anyway. Delores also sent
“Sheep” by Louise Turk, a
Wyoming writer, and it is an au-
tobiography. I will expect a much
more wholesome type of book.
I recently read “Twisted Tree”
by Kent Meyer, also a writer from
our region. It is made up of several
related stories connected by the
conquests of a serial killer, so you
know it is awful. There is a little
story within one story, about a kid
who never had any marbles to join
marble games, but then his friend,
a blacksmith, gave him some big
ball bearings, (steelies) and then
the kid could win everything, and
did, and lost all his friends. So he
was worse off than before and
threw away all but one of the
steelies. However, let that be a
lesson to us all: Even if you can
win all the time, don’t.
October 13, we met a new Som-
erset Court resident in apartment
324, Albert Krantz. He has lived
in Rapid City since 1957. He used
to live in Wessington and has been
in the Navy. He has a daughter
named Mary.
Sunday, my son, Wayne, and
his wife, Gwynn, came over for
lunch. They had just returned
from a 10-day trip to California.
They found some broken trees in
their yard from last week’s bliz-
zard. Wayne went fishing after
lunch and Gwynn stayed for
scrabble. We had some slightly
unusual words, and unspectacu-
lar, but respectable scores.
Thanks for your visits, kids, and
the scrabble games too.
At church with Rev. and Mrs.
Richardson, attendance was good
and Eileen Tenold played the
piano and we sang. The message
was that we should pray and ex-
pect an answer. Consider whether
our goal is good. We will find an
answer by sorting out the possibil-
ities and what is most likely to
happen. If it is something we hope
to achieve, we will begin to think
of ways to accomplish our goal. We
will think of possible help we can
hope for. If we are praying for
someone’s health or other wellbe-
ing, are we doing what we can to
promote this?
Monday, October 14, we had a
cold, windy front with a little rain.
I could feel it in my bones. Must be
bones, as I don’t have much mus-
cle! And to top of that it was a
postal holiday. How Virgil used to
swear at Monday holidays!
We had a nice time anyway
with crafts with Amy, our volun-
teer girl, and Sandi. We made col-
orful Halloween characters with
sort of witch hats and long curls
made with paper loops. Amy also
put our new word searches and
paid us Somerset Court bucks for
doing last week’s word searches.
Thank you, Amy. There was a lit-
tle time left before lunch, so we got
up a game of quiddler.
Somerset Court resident Mari-
lyn Butts contributed two poems
for the Somerset Court scrapbook
and one of those poems was “The
Rancher’s Prayer” by Bobette
Schofield of the Philip area. The
other poem was “The Storm Atlas”
by Cheyenne Glade Wilson,
Oglala. Both poems were in the
Sunday, October 13, 2013, Rapid
City Journal and the Thursday Pi-
oneer Review papers.
October 10, 2013, Pioneer Re-
view had quite a few items related
to our recent October blizzard.
Thor Roseth, owner of the Philip
Livestock Auction, comments on
the severe cattle losses. Not only
the cattle that died but in weight
loss and stress on those animals
that lived. Other key personnel
were interviewed, and all note the
magnitude and aftereffects of this
terrific storm. The Rapid City
Journal also had photos and many
human interest stories with
thanks for kind deeds related.
My daughter-in-law, Gwynn
Hansen, came for scrabble and
brought me a warm jacket and
wonderful soft pajamas. She also
took my sewing machine to have it
examined and cleaned and oiled.
Thank you, Gwynn, for all. It sews
wonderfully for an old machine
with few gadgets. That is very
thoughtful of her. I would never
have thought of the possibility
that it needed attention.
M.R. Hansen emailed from
Mongolia. Happy birthday, Mig,
on October 15.
My daughter, Carol, and hus-
band Al, Colorado Springs, have
thistle, brush and dead branches
out of their tree lot. It has been a
big lot of work, even with the help
of Carol’s grandson, Ashley Allen.
Thanks to Alma Schilling for your
letter. Thanks Carol and Al for the
Imprimis magazine. This issue
discusses football injuries and the
fact that football is still a danger-
ous and gladiator sport. You can
borrow my copy.
We had new resident reception
and Ken and Bette Reumann
came. There is another new resi-
dent, Albert Kranz. We had treats
of vanilla ice cream with chocolate
and strawberry toppings.
Becky, who used to work here at
Somerset Court in the housekeep-
ing department, came in and
arranged a clever and colorful
Halloween display in the activity
garden on first floor. We took pho-
tos. Thank you, Becky.
The ornamental bushes on the
north border of Somerset Court
property are now a rich russet red.
Here at Somerset Court, we get
official weights every month. I
weighed 100 pounds on October
17, 2013.
My son, David Hansen, Ft.
Pierre, sent a letter. He related
some of his memories of making of
the movie, “Dances With Wolves.”
(That was about 1989.) To make a
huge buffalo pasture that looked
like before fences, David and fenc-
ing crew removed miles of fence at
the Houck ranch, 30 miles north of
Pierre, where the “Fort” was lo-
cated. Other preparation was to
make green trees into fall trees,
with sprayed colored paint. Later
they felt the need for a green tree,
and went and got a load of
branches and wired them onto a
bare tree. David has some of these
activities on tape and video. There
is much work behind a movie like
that with wide spreading prairie.
I feel a personal interest, because,
some years later I had the oppor-
tunity to go into the “Fort” fake
sod house. It was wonderfully re-
alistic.
Did you hear that Susan is
going to move to North Dakota?
Well, I guess we will have to learn
to get along without her.
The Pioneer Review arrived on
October 18 and the Philip Live-
stock Auction is having an all-
breeds calf and yearling sale
October 19 and there is a good list
of prospective sales. That is a form
of sharing. Buying calves for re-
placements is a way of building
back up your herd.
Haakon County Board of Com-
missioners approved a declaration
of disaster. This has to be done so
that government funds can be ap-
plied for. The board approved that
the county highway department
could dig pits for burial of dead
cattle. This would help facilitate
the procedure, yet not infringe on
local businesses which would have
hauling carcasses and covering
the pits.
The November 2013 West Cen-
tral Cooperative Connections
magazine has a good article ex-
plaining the advantages of the
new LED (light-emitting diode)
lights. LED lights can give out
more light per kilowatt than our
old-fashioned incandescent bulbs.
The magazine uses turkey farms
in Minnesota as an example and
leader in the use of the LED
lights. While the use of LED lights
is still being tested, results so far
indicate great savings in kilowatt
hours.
It is good to know that the Deep
Creek Church in the Moenville
area is planning its annual ham
and lutefisk supper and bazaar
Saturday, October 26. Where else
can you get real church lutefisk?
by Vivian Hansen
vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-
review.com
etown om H
etown h ealt HHealt
e car care h s ew ews NNew
EN OP JOB
g rsin u N
¾ rt a P - n a e im t
needed rses Nu
¾ N P r L o N R
¾ m E , l a it p Hos
S
etown om H
ING EN
l l u d f n - e im t
! needed
, cy n rge e m
etown h ealt HHealt
e car care h s ew ews NNew
Hom g in rs u N d n a
¾ im re n io it u T
oan l t den u t s d n a
ro p s s e n e orgiv f
¾ n e Carm l Cal
¾ rt a P - n a e im t
a rse Nu
NA C
¾ g in in ra t id a P
¾ erien p ex o N
e Hom
t n e m e rs u b im
oan
s m gra ro
1 6 1 . t x e t a n
l l u d f n - e im t
e/ id a
NA
g
e c
a e H p ip ip l ii h P
Time
R
a g n ii t s o h s i s e c ii v rv rv e S h t l a
bb o
g
t t
g
c O , y a dda s e n d e W
: on i t Loca l a h Senec ot H
m . a 0 3 : 11: 1 o t . m . a 0 0 : 0 110 : Time
rizes p door d n a s t n e m sh re ffre eef R
n o y t r a P n o b bb bb b i R kk n i P a
! 0 3 r e b
p li lip i Ph n i l e ot
o) g d n a e (com .
d! de i rov p rizes
¾ erien p ex o N
ry a s ces e n
¾ to 6 1 e b t s u M
¾ n e Carm l Cal
R
e c
y l p p a to
1 6 1 . t x e t a n
a M
Y
rizes p door d n a s t n e m sh re ffre eef R
a rn a o le t by op St
n a s e n li de ui g m a ogr ogra m m a
rl a e of e rtanc impo e Th
ulin ddulin e h sc or ffor ns io t op our Y
ore m And
h k n i p h
d! de i rov p rizes
bout aabout:
s on i t da n e omm c re d n
on i t c e t de y rl
m a rra og m m a m a g ulin
! ore
Benef e im TTim ll Fu
¾ ra u s in h t l a He
¾ ra u s in l a t n e D
¾ ce n ra u s in e if L
¾ n a l p n io is V
¾ in v a s l a dic e M
¾ care t den n e p e D
e
its
in P t s e W 3 0 5
0 9 7 ox B . O . P
6 5 7 5 D S , ip il h P
n, a m Hol d i v a D
Benef Benefits
ce n ra
ce n ra
ce
n a l p gs in
n a l p care
n o y r e v E
Ple
. t S
7 6
. D M. n,
s rs rs a e we we o h w e n k n i p e h t o t
! t ft ft if if g e e re re fr fr
85 t a y g
k
diolo a R ll a c se a Ple
in ore m e k
g
li ld ou w ou y f iif
: RS U HO C I N I L C
day on M - 0 0 : 9 y a Frid - 0 0 : 5
0 0 : 9 rday u t a S - n oo n
9 85 5) 60 ( -2511
a e v i e c e re re l l i wi wi y t rrt a p
9 85 859-2 8 2 112 . t x e , 11, 51 2251 -
on i t a orm fform in inf
¾ f of e im t id a P
¾ on r e t f a k) ( 1 0 4
es c vi er ervi S h t l ea HHea p i l i Ph
er d ovi r p y tty i n u t or p op
n,
f
a m Hol d i v a D
, pper o Kl en o C
P e, i Henr y err T
di erber G l nel Ja
A P , Webb ave D
r a e y e on
l a equ n a s i
. r oye l p em d n a
do a K
. D M. n,
. D M.
A P -C
A P , ng di -C
A-C
9 85 5) 60 ( 2511
9 5 8 ic: in Cl ip il h P -2566
9 5 8 : e Hom g in rs u N -2583
7 3 8 : b a L & ic in Cl ka do -2257
m o .c s e c i vvi r e hs t al phe i l phi
TIc Flu
Vaccinc
is IN!
PÞ111p C11n1o
will givc flu
sIois during
rcgular clinic
Iours
on a wall-in
lasis.
No AppoIntment
Necessary
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
October
25-28
e Family
(R)
* * * * *
Nov. 1-4 &
Nov. 8-11
Free Birds (PG)
Emmitt Lawrence
Son of John & Emily Gittings.
Hershey, Nebraska
Born: August 16, 2013 • 8:30 a.m. at Great Plains Regional
Medical Center, North Platte, Nebraska
Weight: 8 lbs., 4 oz. • Length: 20
1
⁄2” long
Maternal Grandparents: Bob & Cynthia Brinkmeier, Lakewood,
CO; Logan & Virginia Maring, Grand Island, NE
Maternal Great-Grandmother: Lametta Hampton, Lexington, NE
Paternal Grandparents: Joe & Kathy Gittings, Philip, SD
Paternal Great-Grandmother: Marie Lamm, Philip, SD
Dan and Marsha Kiel came
from Indianapolis, Ind., to visit his
parents, Loren and Rose, arriving
at the Kiel ranch home on the
evening of October 13. Loren and
Rose had just conducted the nurs-
ing home worship services earlier
that afternoon. Their visit lasted
for a whole week, with them leav-
ing for home again very, very
early Sunday morning, October
20, so as to make the trip back
home to Indy in one long day.
Loren had requested that Dan
bring his chain saw to help clear
the yard of broken tree branches
and brush. (Some of the broken
branches were still attached to the
trees and Loren doesn't own a
chain saw.) During the course of
the week, using Loren's small IH
utility tractor and loader they
managed to get the whole mess
cleaned up. Marsha even helped
some with piling branches on the
loader bucket. Loren reports that
they all had a great time in-
dulging themselves with good food
and getting into several good card
games.
Wednesday, October 16, Mikkel
Pates, Fargo, N.D., called on the
Kiels while on an assignment to
write a cover story about the live-
stock losses in western South
Dakota for the Agweek News
Magazine of Grand Forks. After
interviewing some ranchers in the
Quinn area, he joined the Kiels for
a steak dinner. Before he left, they
gathered around the piano as
Rose played some patriotic songs
in keeping with the observance of
Columbus Day. While the others
sang, Loren played his violin.
Loren and Rose had entertained
the folks at the nursing home be-
fore worship services with those
very songs.
Every once in awhile, I like to
write about someone who Marvin
reminiscences about when he
comes to have a cup of coffee. He
learned something valuable from
those of the older generation.
One of those oldtime neighbors
was Bernard Poss whose folks
homesteaded about two miles
south of us. Bernard grew up on
their homestead. Bernard at-
tended the Deadman School.
Later he married Mildred and
they raised a family of six boys.
His son, Don, and wife Delores
Poss live on the home place now.
We used to combine for Bernard
and Marvin was big enough (14 or
15) and five of Bernard’s sons
were not at home anymore. So
Marvin ran one of the combines
(the old International that kicked
Grindstone News|Mary Eide • 859-2188
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One
meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the
second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.); 6:30 p.m.
(Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
UNITED CHURCH
OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 6:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
When life takes a turn for the worse and times get tough,
you may feel like you are alone. But, as a believer, you
are never alone. God is always there, ready to lend you
a hand and give you the strength to endure. Look to Him
for solace in your times of need.
Ancient wisdom for modern life
He giveth power to the faint; and to them that have no
might he increaseth strength.
Isaiah 40:29 (KJV)
Send
obituaries,
engagements
& wedding
write-ups to:
ads@pioneer-
review.com.
There is
no charge.
Church
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 5
Obituaries
BronkInst BonoIit Ior
Snndoo Gittings
PuncuLeo & Suuouge
Sundny, Novonbor 3rd
8:00 n.n. - 11:00 n.n.
Bnd Rivor Sonior Citizons` Contor, Philip
Froo Will OIIoring
Sponsorod by
Philip Aron Knights oI Colunbus
Vaa t-e |a»|teá ta t heet t 6-eet
0|t¿e- 8t|y 8\awe- |a-
8yáaey 0-et
|a-a 8e¿tem|e- I?t\ º áta¿\te- a| 8|¿ t 0t-|st ht-t|a
0:ta|e- tât\ º t·I ¿.m.
F\|||¿ ûm|a|ta:e 8a||á|a¿
i.s|-1 |, Aar|s }+mi-, C|+ri|, c lris|ir
Fall Festival
urs., October 31st
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Community E. Free Church
(West of Philip on Hwy. 14)
G
am
es
Movie
F
U
N
f
o
r
A
L
L
A
G
E
S
!
!
F
U
N
f
o
r
A
L
L
A
G
E
S
!
!
Donate some of your candy to
troops overseas with:
Candy
Candy
C
a
n
d
y
9t. william
Catbolic Cburcb
Annual 1urkeg Dinner
Sundog, Noo. jrd ~ Midlond, SD
Dinner: Noon
Evergone is welcomel
AduIfs: $8.00
ChIIdron 6-l2 Yonrs: $4.00 : 5 & !ndor: Iroo
Lillian “Lil” Roberta (Petersen)
Briggs, 89, of Ft. Pierre, S.D., was
granted her angel wings on Thurs-
day morning, October 17, 2013, in
her home.
She was born on January 9,
1924, in Parade, to Arthur Peter
and Amelia “Molly” (Simon) Pe-
tersen. She attended and gradu-
ated from Eagle Butte High
School in Eagle Butte in 1942.
On September 15, 1942, Lillian
married Kirby Briggs of the Robbs
Flat area. In 1943, they moved to
the family ranch, Trails End,
where an old log schoolhouse with
two rooms, was their first home.
There they raised their five sons,
Lane, K, Lee, Cody, and Cole. In
1952, they received electricity and
in 1959 they remodeled and added
running water.
A woman of many talents, Lil
ranched with her husband, raised
her children, delivered mail for
Robbs Flat (the Briggs family car-
ried the U.S. mail for 50 years).
Lil loved and enjoyed her life on
the ranch; everyone was welcome
at her table, she served a good
meal, coffee, and great conversa-
tion. Kirby and Lil were pioneers
in the cattle industry, one of the
first ranchers in the area to utilize
artificial insemina-
tion (1963). Begin-
ning with Hereford
cattle, they became
interested in the
highly muscled
Limousin cattle.
Pursuing this idea,
they were one of
the first to breed
Limousin cattle;
and by 1969 they
had the largest
herd in North
America. Later in
1979, Kirby and
Lil purchased Bov
Import Semen
Sales in Colorado
and operated it as
Trails End Inc., Semen Sales and
Service.
In 1982, Kirby and Lil moved to
Stanley County, just west of Ft.
Pierre and established the Trails
End Ranch Headquarters. After
retiring, Lil worked in the kitchen
at the sale barn cafe for about 15
years as her artistic talents were
arising. She then established
Rawhide Originals, going by the
name Diamond Lil. She made over
700 rawhides over a period of 20
years. Starting in 2000, she be-
came involved
with Stanley
County school
system's Read-
ing Buddies
Program. Lil
was also a
member of
Deep Creek
L u t h e r a n
Church, Com-
munity Bible
Church, Can-
vasbacks Art
Club, and vol-
unteered at
Co unt r y s i de
Hospice.
Lil was pas-
sionate about
kids, cattle, and horses. She was
well-known and will be long re-
membered for her strength, giving
nature, and her wry sense of
humor. She was a wonderful ex-
ample and guide for generations
to come and will be greatly missed
by all who had the privilege and
honor to know her.
Especially grateful for having
shared in her life are her sons,
Lane (Sonja), Ft. Pierre, Lee
(Mary), Robbs Flat, Cody (Lila),
Ft. Pierre, Cole (friend Vicky),
Robbs Flat; daughter-in-law, Eva
Briggs; as well as daughters-in-
law, Connie Moore and LaVonne
Briggs. She was blessed with 16
grandchildren, Lane’s children,
Warren, Wade and Eileen; K’s
children, Lea, Keith, Darcy and
Justin; Lee’s children, Rea and
Keva; Cody’s children, Levi, K'Dee
and Lexi; and Cole’s children,
Beau, Chase, Erin and Austin; 29
great grandchildren; nieces and
nephews; sisters-in-law, Patricia
“Patty” Petersen and Mary Hed-
man;
Lil was preceded in death by
her parents; her brother, Les Pe-
tersen; her sister, Alyce Horning;
brother-in-law, Dale Horning;
stepfather, John Hagel; husband,
Kirby Briggs; brother-in-law, Wal-
ter Keith Briggs (Bud); sister-in-
law, Wauneta (Briggs) Stoeser
and her husband, Roy Leo
Stoeser; brother-in-law, Ralph
(Bud) Hedman; son, Walter Keith
“K” Briggs; and daughter-in-law,
LuAnn Briggs.
Services were held Tuesday,
October 22, 2013 at 11:30am at
the Community Bible Church.
Condolences may be conveyed
to the family at www.feigumfh.
com
Lillian “Lil” Briggs_____________________________________________
Homer George “Tag” Taggart
III, 78, died October 16, 2013, at
Woodhaven Care Center,
Ellinwood, Kan.
He was born April 10, 1935, at
Midland, S.D., the son of
H.George Jr. and Olive (Hogen)
Taggart.
He owned and operated Mr.
Tag’s Taxes and Bookkeeping,
Great Bend. Mr. Taggart was a
Great Bend resident since 1978,
coming from Oklahoma.
He was a U.S. Army veteran
serving during the Vietnam Con-
flict.
He was a life member of the
NRA. He was an avid gun collec-
tor and was a volunteer chaplain
at Great Bend Regional Hospital.
Survivors include four children,
Brad Taggart of New Jersey,
Karen Keesee and her husband,
Darwin, of Blue Springs, Mo.,
Bryan Taggart and his wife, Jill,
of Topeka, Kan., and Homer
George “Chip” Taggart IV and his
wife, Shelly, of Overland Park,
Kan.; three sisters, Marieta
Matos, Jean Johnson and Lynn
Brue; three brothers, Lowell
Swisher, Ken Taggart and Tom
Taggart; 13 grandchildren, Jen-
nifer, Jessica, Danielle, Caleb,
Carson, Molly, Angelina, Annal-
isa, Austin, Andrew, Nolan, Her-
schel and Ben; and two
great-grandchildren, Makayla and
Bailey
Services were held Saturday,
October 19, at Bryant Funeral
Home.
Interment was at Great Bend
Cemetery North, with military
rites by Fort Riley Honor Guard.
Arrangements were with
Bryant Funeral Home of Great
Bend. Condolences may be sent
and notice viewed at www.
bryantfh.net
Homer G. “Tag” Taggart__________________________
Five generations
Courtesy Photo
Five generations took a moment for a photo during a family reunion in
South Dakota this past July. Back row from left are mother, Krista Cordova,
great-grandmother, Sonia Duffy, and grandmother, Tracey Johnson, all of
Hemet, Calif. Sitting is great-great-grandmother Bonnie Collins, Rapid City,
holding Mackenzie Cordova, Hemet, Calif.
Midland News
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 6
The children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren
(96 & counting)
would love to
have you help
celebrate
Fuzz &
Bonnie
Martin’s
60th
Anniversary with a card shower.
Cards may be sent to:
P.O. Box 212, Midland, SD 57552
This past week has been a
gamut roller-coaster ride of emo-
tions filled with frustration, just
plain mad, exhaustion, humbling,
and best of all – thankfulness!
Like most Monday mornings at
our house, I was in the process of
putting together my Midland
News column for the week. Little
did I know, that was about to
change. The former owner of this
house had no sump pumps put in,
so a few years ago we had two out-
door pits dug with two sump
pumps put in. Earlier, we had
them checked and reported still
working. With the wet season
we’ve had Jerry periodically
checked the pits for water. In
checking the pits this particular
Monday, they were full of water,
the pumps had quit working and
water was coming in the house.
After all we’ve been through, we’re
putting in new sump pumps each
year. We aren’t taking a chance on
this happening again, if we can
help it. Jerry took care of the
sump pump situation and I
headed for the shop for our two
shop vacs. Knowing we were going
to need help, I called my cousin,
Christine Niedan. Thankfully, she
was able to come over. We moved
things out of the way from where
water was coming in and began
sucking up water. Took a break
for lunch and supper and kept on
sucking up water. Jerry was kept
busy with putting in new sump
pumps, putting bentonite around
the house to draw out the mois-
ture in the ground and fixing an
area in the closet downstairs
where water was coming in. It was
7:00 p.m. Monday evening, Chris-
tine needed to get home to get
ready to substitute teach the next
day. As, Jerry and I continued
sucking up water and being past
the point of exhaustion, we needed
more help. Knowing Anthony Ellis
had done some work for Judy Daly
and her son, Steve, I called to get
his number. Got the number,
called Anthony to see if he could
help and he said he would be right
over. While working away, there
was a knock at the door and in
came Steve Daly to see what he
could do to help. I’m telling you;
those two young fellows can move
things, and do things, that made
me tired just watching. Truth-
fully, I could have cried! It was
just plum wonderful having their
help, at that point. They worked
tirelessly until 10:30 p.m. Monday
evening, when we told them they
better head home. Don’t know
how much longer they would have
worked, but they had things to do
of their own to get ready for the
next day. Kept sucking up water
until 5:00 a.m. Tuesday morning,
when the water finally quit com-
ing in. From 11:00 a.m. Monday
morning until 5:00 a.m. Tuesday
morning, with little break in-be-
tween, is a long time to be sucking
up water. I shudder to think what
would have happened if we had
not been home. Our house would
have been filled with water. With
things pretty much back to nor-
mal, I’ve had time to look back on
the past few days, and just how
much it meant to Jerry and I to
have the help of Christine, An-
thony, and Steve. They were a
God send; we couldn’t have done it
without their help. That is a fact!
I was up at 5:00 a.m. this Mon-
day morning and looking out our
kitchen window to the west, a full
moon, in a deep blue sky, was
looking back at me. As daylight
began seeping through the early
morning, clouds began forming to
the east, blocking the sun rays.
While we were having breakfast, I
happened to look out the kitchen
window to the north. God’s paint
brush was at work, as the sun was
peaking over the clouds, shining
it’s light on the beautiful
yellow/gold cottonwood tree tops
in Scott and Susie Martin’s yard,
as the earth below, was shaded by
the clouds. From that full moon in
that deep blue sky, to the awe-
some beauty of those cottonwood
trees, I couldn’t help but think,
“God’s blessed us with His awe-
some beauty this Monday morn-
ing, letting us know, He walked
that journey with us this past
week.” Time to get at the news for
this week!
Barb and Morris Jones were in
Highmore last Thursday to watch
their granddaughter, Monica
Jones, play volleyball. Monica
plays for Wessington Springs.
They had a nice visit with Mon-
ica’s mom and sister, Sandy and
Piper, who were also there to
watch the game. Tuesday, last
week, Barb and Morris had been
to Philip to watch junior high vol-
leyball games. Granddaughters
Jewel and Jada Jones play for
Philip.
Randy and Holly Nemec had
all of their family members home
at one time or another over the
weekend. Brian, Katey, Morgan,
Tanner and Taiton Ortlieb, Stur-
gis, arrived Friday night to help
out at the open house at Ernie's
Building Center Saturday. Tyler,
Chelsee, Addison and Joey
stopped in for a visit Saturday
morning when they picked up
Morgan on their way to Rapid
City for a wedding. Sunday,
Randy and Holly attended grand-
son Tukker's eighth birthday
party. Happy birthday, Tukker!
Tyler and Angel Nemec had a
delicious appreciation meal at
Ernie’s Building Center Saturday,
October 12, with 230 people com-
ing to enjoy the meal. This has
been an annual event for some
years now, started by Tyler’s
grandparents, Ernie and Laurel
Nemec, when they were owners of
the business.
Clint and Prerry Saucerman
recently went to the home of their
son, Tel and Ellie Saucerman and
family, spending time with family
and getting to see granddaughter,
Emma, who is in sixth grade, play
volleyball. In the afternoon, they
got to watch their grandson,
Sawyer, a third grader, play soc-
cer. Sunday, Clint and Prerry
went to church at Victory Chapel
with Tel, Ellie and family and Tel
is pastor of the church. After an
enjoyable weekend, Clint and Pre-
rry headed for home late after-
noon Sunday. Prerry reported
they saw a lot of trees down and
electric poles. From Dodge Town
to the fairgrounds at Rapid City,
there were trucks lined up with
tree branches.
* * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH ANNUAL TURKEY
DINNER, SUNDAY, NOV. 3.
DINNER AT NOON. EVERYONE
WELCOME. ADULTS: $8. CHIL-
DREN 6-12: $4; 5 & UNDER:
FREE.
* * *
Our congratulations to Fuzz
and Bonnie (Foster) Martin who
are celebrating their 60th wed-
ding anniversary!
October 11, Neil Jones, Jerry
and Joy Jones, and grandson, Zak
Sinkey, went to Bismarck, N.D.,
where they met up with Scott,
Loni, and Molly Olson to help
Molly celebrate her ninth birth-
day. Bob, Jodie and Baxter
Schrempp, Dupree, were also
there. Saturday, Cassidy Trapp,
School of Mines in Rapid City, and
Wyatt Trapp were also there for
the party. Emily Trapp had been
down with pneumonia for the past
week so she and her parents, Deb-
bie and Mike Trapp, weren’t able
to come. Scott’s mom, Charlene
Olson, and his brother, Wayne
Olson, and family all of Watford,
N.D., were also there. Sounds like
you had quite a party, Molly.
Later in the afternoon, some of
them enjoyed visiting with Jill
Sheldon and family who live at
Bismarck.
Cassidy Trapp came from
Rapid City to help at the lutefisk
supper at Trinity Lutheran
Wednesday. Wyatt Trapp came
from Pierre, where he goes to high
school, helping out with things in
the kitchen. It was a beautiful
night for the lutefisk supper, with
a huge crowd there to enjoy the
meal, a time of visiting, and the
auction sale to follow. Those an-
nual lutefisk suppers and bazaars
are a lot of work. It’s always a bit
of a relief when they are done for
another year.
October 19, Eddie McGee,
Water Valley, Miss., and his son,
Tray McGee, and Tray’s son, Jude
McGee, Colorado, came for pheas-
ant hunting, staying at the Mike
and Debbie Trapp home.
Saturday, October 19, Cassidy
Trapp hosted at birthday party at
the home of her folks, Mike and
Debbie Trapp, for Judy Daly’s
70th birthday. It was a belated
birthday party due to the bad
snowstorm the weekend it was
planned. Others there to help
Judy celebrate were Dick and
Gene Hudson, Jerry and Joy
Jones, and the Mississippi and
Colorado folks even got in on the
party. A fun time of visiting was
had, along with telling of different
foods, hush puppies being one of
them. From the sounds of things,
Cassidy is a great cook! Happy
birthday, Judy! Having a party
with friends makes getting an-
other year older not so bad, right?
Cody and Audrey Jones had gone
to Valentine, Neb., to visit her
mom.
Congratulations to Jason Stan-
diford and his wife, Mirian, on the
birth of their baby boy on October
6, 2013, weighing in at 7 lbs. 10 oz.
and 20.9 inches long. This little
fellow’s name is Zack Marcelo
Standiford and his grandparents
from this area are Ken Standiford
and Wendy Standiford and his
great-grandmother from this area
is Kathy Tolton. Jason is in the
Navy and is stationed at Japan.
Sophie Foley and her daughter,
Renee Schofield, Kadoka, had a
sewing bee this weekend, making
a quilt for little Leo McEleney, the
son of Drew and Leah (Larsen)
McEleney of Clinton, Iowa. The
little guy would be Sophie’s
nephew. Congratulations to every-
one!
Senior Citizens Meet
The senior citizens met at the
Senior Center for their monthly
meeting and potluck October 9,
2013, with 18 members present.
President Kandus Woitte called
the meeting to order and led in the
flag salute.
The minutes of the last meet-
ing were read and approved. The
treasurer’s report was given.
Jessie Root moved to accept the
treasurer’s report and George
Stroppel seconded and the motion
carried.
Two cards were sent, the bul-
letin board was decorated, and
there was no maintenance. There
are a couple of light bulbs that
need to be replaced. We won first
prize with our float in the “Free
Day” parade.
We discussed Christmas in
Midland and decided to have the
soup luncheon again. We will dis-
cuss this further in November.
Meeting adjourned!
Mickey Woitte, reporter
Bad River Club
October 11, 2013, in South
Dakota we are used to having the
wind blow but, when the weather
man advises no travel, it is best to
stay home. Saturday, October 12,
2013, Emily Sammons graciously
invited the Bad River Club to
meet at her home. Betty Sinkey
was co-hostess. Fall is Emily’s fa-
vorite season and with her artistic
ability, the luncheon table and
other rooms were transformed
into a picturesque scene of the
brilliant colors of fall and other
decorations pertaining to the sea-
son.
The creed and flag salute were
in unison. Wilma Saucerman sent
a “Golden Book” to the new ar-
rival, Morgan, to the home of
Brian and Misti Hostutler and a
baby girl, Adelynn, to the home of
C.J. and Dustin Vollmer. Con-
grats! We enjoyed the pumpkin
game. A race to give our pumpkins
a face! Wilma was first, and I, Is-
abelle Sampson, won the price is
right.
While Betty and Emily pre-
pared our delicious lunch, we
looked at the scrapbook, secretary
book, and other items Emily had
kept over the years. When Exten-
sion Clubs were first organized
they were sponsored by the state
and certain guidelines were fol-
lowed. Each club was issued a
song book, secretary book and a
book containing the club’s creed.
The secretary books were judged
and records show in 1964-65 our
book was awarded a red ribbon for
neatness and excellent record
keeping. Janice Bierle was our
secretary at this time. Our song
leader was Alice Donovan. In later
years, a “Certificate of Recogni-
tion” from the state for the poetry
and the play “The Story of the
Constitition” which she had writ-
ten was awarded to Isabelle
Sampson. Pictures in the scrap-
books showed our club has won
various ribbons throughout the
years for projects displayed at the
Christmas fair. In 1988, our club
won the champion blue ribbon for
our display. In later years, Wilma
Saucerman put together keepsake
scrapbooks and now I will carry on
the tradition. All members were
present.
While our afternoon was filled
with joy, laughter, good food and
fellowship, we couldn’t help but
remember the extreme loss of oth-
ers in the October blizzard. Our
prayers are with you! November
hostess will be Verona Evans.
Bring a “Golden Book” with you.
See you next month. Thanks
Emily, for keeping all those scrap-
books. They were filled with won-
derful memories!
Club reporter, Isabelle Sampson
As I close my column for an-
other week, I would like to share
of a book I recently finished,
“Goodbye, Belvidere,” which was
written by local author Joyce
Wheeler. It is a book about the
hardships and joys of life on the
open range in the early years, be-
fore railroads and towns started
popping up on those South Dakota
prairies. It’s a very good book and
I am looking forward to the one to
follow.
My thoughts and my prayers
are with those who have lost so
much during that October bliz-
zard with rain, turning to wet, wet
snow. With the losses of many,
many cattle, it has brought hard-
ships to those who lost much.
1997 John
Deere 7610
Low hours!!
859-2744
or 685-3068
Philip
Community
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 7
Holiday
Open House
Ncáacsáa¡,
(ctooce ,¯
!,oo - ;,oo ¡,m,
(-gccs j|ág, -
_aia _t,, ]»i|i¡
Prize D
raw
ings
Refreshm
ents
· Arbonne
· Clever Container
· Miche Bags
· Norwex
· Pampered Chef
· Princess House
· Rodan & Fields
· Scentsy
· Tupperware
· Usborne Books
· Cookie Lee
& Many More
To reserve a booth contact
Terry (441-1060) or Jenny (441-1503)
/c;;¸ 3·:z/¬c¸ .c//c,æ ´´æ¬` .·//e.q/z¸´
:欬 ,c:¬. ze :<:_: 1e¬æ 7:ææ ´¬
*·¬/c¬¬, :/ ¸g¸¸:
/æ/; c .;æ,·c/ q.¸ ,æ/æz:czæ
¿¸ ¸æc:. ¸e.¬q e¬ O,zezæ: ;_z/
.·z/ c ,c:¬ ./e.æ:´
Grindstone News|Mary Eide • 859-2188
(continued from 4)
up a lot of dirt as you sat right be-
hind the feeder) and Kenneth
drove the John Deere combine, as
it could go faster. Marvin would
have to stop when one of the
trucks got full and would go help
Bernard and Jack scoop the grain
off. We were all too hard up to
have a hoist in those days.
Well, Bernard fixed up a board
about four feet tall and four feet
long with two handles and a hook
in the middle of one side so he
could put his chain in it and fasten
it to his Ford tractor and on put-
ting this up in the load of grain
you could pull a lot of grain out the
back into the tank that held the el-
evator auger. This would leave
very little hand scooping when
they got near the end.
Marvin was fascinated and on
the way home he said to his dad,
“We have to build one of those
boards.” Which they did and we
unloaded grain like that till we got
a hoist in 1971.
One time while Marvin was
combining at Bernard’s driving the
old International, he went to go
over a dam bank to get to the next
field and hit some ruts and trash
with one side of the feeder and it
jackknifed and it went down into
the dam that was dry at the time
and was full of large weeds. Mar-
vin came up off the combine seat
and ran and jumped off the back of
the combine and as the weeds
were so high he was wondering if
the combine would run over him,
but the combine kept going and
wandered off across the field.
Betty Duester, a combiner's wife
who was driving truck, asked Mar-
vin who was driving that combine.
Marvin said “nobody,” so she
loaded him up and proceeded to
catch the combine. Marvin jumped
out of the truck and caught the
ladder and climbed up and stopped
the combine.
When Kenneth and I got there,
Marvin’s foot that was on the
brake was jumping up and down
he was so afraid. He got off and his
dad talked to him and told him to
get back on and drive it. Kenneth
went with him for awhile. Kenneth
told him that if he didn’t get back
up on and drive it, he would never
ever want to drive a combine
again.
Of all the things that happened
to Marvin through his years of
growing up, he has always said
each one was a learning experi-
ence that made him wiser in run-
ning machinery and how he could
avoid getting in trouble through-
out the years that he has operated
the ranch. I have always felt he
had a special guardian angel who
watched over him as he came out
of so many accidents and never got
hurt. It always seemed if some-
thing was going to happen on the
place, it happened to Marvin! I
never did understand why they
nicknamed him Lucky on his CB
radio.
As I didn’t send any news for
last week’s paper, I will add a few
items that happened last week.
Paul Williams was in the neigh-
borhood with his backhoe and dug
trenches to bury the dead livestock
that were lost in the snowstorm.
Marvin was thankful to have that
job done. He had gathered and
hauled his home and had them in
a pile to have them buried.
I read an article that I think was
from a veterinarian who said he
didn’t think people should get paid
for their livestock loss as they had
plenty of warning about the storm
and should have had them home.
Well, he must have been misin-
formed, as some people who had
their livestock at home lost them
in their sheds and corrals and
some, whose cattle were out in the
storm, didn’t lose any. So, who
knows?
I wonder if all those people who
were warned about the storm that
was to produce heavy, wet snow
that would break trees and power-
lines should have gone out and cut
all the branches off their trees be-
forehand so they wouldn’t fall on
their houses.
I sometimes wonder if those who
write such stories have ever really
been in a disaster? You just don’t
know what you’re talking about
unless you have been there and
went through it. Then you don’t
see anything when you are there.
We had a neighbor whose cattle
were out in the storm calling his
neighbors to ask what he could do
to help them.
I am still receiving two or three
birthday cards a week from people
whose family are telling them
about being at my party.
Christa Fitch, Aven, Rayler and
Jensen, were down and spent the
day with me Thursday, October
17, Jensen didn’t go to school that
day as he had a stiff neck and it
was making him miserable. It was
so nice to have them here, I really
enjoyed the day with them. Usu-
ally they are at Marvin’s and I go
up there to see them.
Marvin and Vicki enjoyed the
evening of music and fun for the
Philip library October 19. They
said that there were a lot of people
there and everyone seemed to
have a good time.
Sympathy goes out to the family
of Katy Drageset. Katy lived in
Philip her whole life. I first met
Katy when she and her husband,
Jay Barnett, and their two kids
lived in a little house on the
Clarence Buls ranch and worked
for them. Throughout the years I
enjoyed visiting with her. She and
husband Kenneth Carpenter used
to come our to our place and hunt
with Sam Kirkpatrick.
Steve Smith has been here for a
few days visiting his dad, Rich,
and other family members. Rich
told me that Kieth and Deb Smith
took him out for an early birthday
supper, his 96th, which will be Oc-
tober 22. I had lunch in Philip with
Rich. He said that after we ate, he
was going to see if he could find a
card game downtown.
Phillis Thorson called and said
that she was leaving a book for me
to read at the bank with her
daughter, Crystal. It was written
by an oldtime neighbor of Lenard’s
folks. They raised a boy by the
name of Fred M. and he married
Opal Hicks, a girl who my folks
raised. Opal and her sister,
Pearl’s, dad helped a relative, Jay
Hicks, rob a man and they hit him
over the head and knocked him
out. They hit him hard enough and
it killed him. They hung uncle Jay
Hicks. He was one of the first men
hung in South Dakota and the
rope they used to hang him and
the history of that event is
recorded in Pierre. Several years
later, Uncle Bob was released as
he was not the one who hit him
over the head. They sent him up as
he was there with Jay. Fred and
Opal moved to Sun Valley, Idaho.
Fred and Opal lost a little girl
while living here. Fred and Opal’s
neighbor was Sonja Heinz and
they knew her well. My mom and
dad and I stopped at their house
and stayed overnight with them on
our way to Idaho in 1950. The Pen-
siens and Wintrodes both left here
at the same time in the Dirty Thir-
ties. We also visited their homes in
1950, both families had done well
after moving there. Anyway, their
(I think grandson) has put this
book together. I have only met him
twice. He was back here with
Uncle Nels Carstensen many
years back and Ethel invited Ken-
neth and I to come over and have
supper with them and visit with
them. They lived where Happy
Wenzel lived and now the Trinity
Lutheran Church that was closed
years ago is on that spot and Bob
Thorson owns that land and the
church now.
Lloyd and Marianne Frien said
that they came through the storm
fine, but are still busy getting
everything back in order as every-
one ended up with neighbors cattle
drifting in and sorting and other
factors have to be taking care of.
I didn’t catch anyone at home at
the Herb Sielers. They are proba-
bly busy getting ready for the cat-
tle sale Tuesday.
An old schoolmate that I went
through eighth grade with at Bull-
flats School, 12 miles west of
Custer, Duane Hunt called from
Polson, Mont., to see how we faired
after the blizzard and stated it was
not very bad where he lived, but
other parts of Montana did get it.
Duane Hunt is a relative of the
Hunts from around Cottonwood.
One of the Kiels, Orville Kiel’s
brother, married Ruth Hunt and
they ran the grain elevator in
Custer for many years.
Marvin planned to sell calves
October 22 and is in hopes that it
didn’t rain as then trucks won’t be
able to load them out if it does. It
is in the forecast for light rain.
Guess he will have to wait and see.
I have been attending the great-
grandson’s football games and see
Al and Lenore Brucklacher there.
They are doing well, and like the
rest of us aren’t spring chickens
anymore. We are all past 80 years
old. Their grandson plays in the
games and they have attended all
the sports in Philip since they
moved here and they both like
sports. They also watch sporting
events on TV. This year is the last
year their grandson, Gavin Bruck-
lacher, will be playing as he is a
senior.
I think that they have some
great-grandchildren who are in
sports now and more are coming
up that will be playing, so they will
be attending as long as they are
able to. They remind me of the late
George Kennedy. I don’t think that
he ever missed a game if he could
get there.
Larry Lewison called and re-
called a blizzard (I think 1966 or
1967) when he was working for
Don Ferguson and he said that his
brother, Arnold, and his dad were
caught in town and his mother,
Golda, and another brother, Tony,
were home alone during the bliz-
zard. After the blizzard, Kenneth
took the cat down and broke the
hay loose so they could pitch it to
feed the cattle. Kenneth also
plowed a road out so Orville and
Arnold could get home when the
snowplows didn’t come out from
Philip.
I liked Bobette Schofield’s poem
in the paper, it was so true.
The South Dakota Rodeo Associ-
ation Finals were held in Rapid
City October 18-20 at the James
Kjerstad Event Center.
First Go
Bareback Riding: 1. Mark Kenyon,
Hayti, 76; 2 (tie) Stetson Murphy, Rapid
City, and Shane O’Connell, Rapid City,
73; 3. Chance Englebert, Burdock, 71
Barrel Racing: 1. Melodi Chris-
tensen, Kennebec, 15.21; 2. Shelby Vin-
son, Worthing, 15.29; 3. Krystal Marone,
Isabel, 15.31; 4. Kailee Webb, Isabel,
15.35
Breakaway Roping: 1. Joey Painter,
Buffalo, 2.70; 2. Webb, 3.10; 3. Bailey Pe-
terson, Parade, 3.20; 4. Kaylee Nelson,
Dickinson, N.D., 3.30
Bull Riding: 1. Ian Jacobs, Faith, 82;
Zach Scofield, Belle Fourche, 75; 3. (tie)
Allen Auer, Whitewood, and Jared
Schaefer, Leola, 71
Calf Roping: 1. Trey Young, Dupree,
9.60; 2. Treg Schaack, Edgemont, 11.00;
3. Kourt Starr, Dupree, 11.90; 4. Rex
Treeby, Hecla, 12.60
Goat Tying: 1. Shayna Miller, Faith,
7.40; 2. Marone and Lacey Tech, Fairfax,
7.50; 3. Stacy Doll, Prairie City, 7.70
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Ashley
Price, Faith/Clint Cobb, Red Owl, 7.60
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Wyatt
Kammerer, Philip, 74; 2. Shadow
Jensen, Martin, 73; 3. (tie) Eric Addison,
Caputa, and Travis Schroth, Buffalo
Gap, 72
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Scott Lam-
mers, Hermosa, 3.10; 2. Billy Gallino,
Wasta, 3.60; 3. Steve Klein, Sioux Falls,
3.90; 4. John Dean, Platte, 4.20
Steer wrestling: 1. Tom Hunt, Eagle
Butte, 4.40; 2. J.J. Hunt, Ridgeview,
4.60; 3, (tie) Levi Hapney, Quinn and
Casey Olson, Prairie City, 4.80
Team Penning: 1. Doni Zeller,
Forestburg/Warren Kiehn, Chamber-
lain/Sara Teeslink, Kimball, 42.50; 2.
Morgan Tebay/Gary Garbe/Rick Tebay,
all of Alpena, 50.80; 3. Klein/Tom Var-
ilek, Geddes/Mick Varilek, Geddes,
63.00; 4. Chuck Nelson, Hartford/Terry
Trower, Dell Rapids/Joe Skibinski, Sioux
Falls, 64.00
Team Roping: 1. J.B. Lord,
Sturgis/Paul Griemsman, Piedmont,
7.20; 2. Rex Treeby, Hecla/Jade Nelson,
Midland, 7.40; 3. Hapney/Dalton Richter,
Quinn, 8.10; 4. Tucker Dale, Timber
Lake/Levi Lord, Sturgis, 8.50
Second Go
Bareback Riding: 1. Englebert, 76;
2. O’
Connell, 71; 3. Murphy, 61; 4. Brody Kro-
nberg, Bison, 53
Barrel Racing: 1. Lacy Cowan, High-
more, 15.19; 2. Christensen, 15.22; 3.
(tie) Webb, and Courtney Whitman,
Sturgis, 15.27
Breakaway Roping: 1. Elizabeth
Baker, Box Elder, 2.50; 2. K. Nelson,
2.70; 3. Syerra Christensen, Kennebec,
2.90; 4. Painter, 3.10
Calf Roping: 1. Colton Musick,
Pierre, 9.10; 2. Jess Woodward, Dupree,
11.50; 3. Young, 12.70; 4. Treeby, 12.70
Goat Tying: 1. Tech, 6.80; 2. Kristi
Birkeland, Dupree, 7.10; 3. (tie) Marone
and Doll, 7.50
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Trina Arne-
son, Enning/Melvin Arneson, Enning,
8.20; 2. K. Nelson/J. Nelson, 8.50; 3.
Lorita Nelson, Philip/Jeff Nelson, Philip,
15.90; 4. Lacey Jo March, Hot
Springs/Daine McNenny, Sturgis, 24.30
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Lane Stir-
ling, Buffalo, 79; 2. Shorty Garrett,
Dupree, 77; 3. Kash Deal, Dupree, 76; 4.
Jensen, 73
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Terry
McPherson, Piedmont, 2.70; 2. Klein,
2.80; 3. Lammers, 3.10; 4. Gallino, 5.40
Steer wrestling: 1. J. Lord, 4.40; 2.
Mike Wiedman, St. Charles, 4.70; 3.
Wyatt Schaack, Wall, 4.80; 4. J. Hunt,
4.90
Team Penning: 1.
Tebay/Garbe/Tebay, 45.20; 2. C. Nel-
son/Trower/Skibinski,48.30; 3.
Zeller/Kiehn/Teeslink, 52.40; 4. James
Kuiper, Canton/Robert Devitt, Harris-
burg/ Gerald Sorenson, Canton, 52.60
Team Roping: 1. Jake Nelson,
Creighton/Jeff Nelson, Philip, 7.30; 2.
Musick/Carson Musick, Pierre, 7.50; 3.
Jared Odens, Letcher/Emit Valnes,
Eden, 8.10; 4. Kevin Schmidt, Box
Elder/Jade Schmidt, Box Elder, 8.60
Third Go
Bareback Riding: 1. Kenyon, 78; 2.
O’Connell, 77; 3. Englebert, 69; 4. L.D.
LaPlante, Eagle Butte, 63
Barrel Racing: 1. Whitman, 15.08; 2.
Wanda Brown, Edgemont, 15.15; 3.
Marone, 15.19; 4. Cowan, 15.30
Breakaway Roping: 1. (tie) S. Chris-
tensen, and K. Nelson, 2.50; 2. Jenny
Belkham, Blunt, 2.80; 3. Jana Jasper, St.
Charles, 4.90
Bull Riding: 1. Joey Koupal, Dante,
79
Calf Roping: 1. Justin Scofield,
Volga, 9.20; 2. Dallas Louden, Martin,
9.70; 2. Matt Peters, Hot Springs, 10.30;
4. Young, 10.90
Goat Tying: 1. (tie) Birkeland and
Tech, 7.50; 2. Marone, 7.80; 3. Doll, 7.90
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Hanna
Brown, Faith/Rory Brown, Edgemont,
6.30; 2. Ashley Price, Faith/Cobb, 6.80; 3.
K. Nelson/Jade Nelson, 7.70; 4. Arne-
son/Arneson, 8.20
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Garrett, 81;
2. Addison, 80; 3. Taygen Schuelke,
Newell, 77; 4. Schroth, 76
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Lammers,
3.00; 2. Gallino, 3.30; 3. Klein, 12.40; 4.
Clifford Tibbs, Ft. Pierre, 12.50
Steer wrestling: 1. Tye Hale, Faith,
3.80; 2. (tie) W. Schaack and Lord, 4.50
3, Clint Nelson, Philip, 4.80
Team Penning: 1. Klein/Varilek/
Varilek, 34.80; 2. Tebay/Garbe/Tebay,
42.70; 3. Zeller/ Kiehn/Teeslink, 45.00; 4.
C. Nelson/Trower/ Skibinski, 50.30
Team Roping: 1. Jake Nelson/Jeff
Nelson, 6.60; 2. Dale/L. Lord, Sturgis,
7.00; 3. (tie) J.Lord/Griemsman and
Treeby/Jade Nelson, 7.60
Finals Standings
Bareback Riding: 1. O’Connell, 221;
2. Englebert, 216; 3. Kenyon, 154; 4.
Murphy, 134
Barrel Racing: 1. Whitman, 45.73; 2.
M. Christensen, 45.74; 3. Cowan, 45.87;
4. Vinson, 46.38
Breakaway Roping: 1. K. Nelson,
8.50; 2. S. Christensen, 18.00; 3. Webb,
27.40; 4. Belkham, 28.00
Bull Riding: 1. Ian Jacobs, Faith, 82;
Koupal, 79; 3. Z. Scofield, 75; 4, (tie)
Jared Schaefer, Leola, and Auer, 71
Calf Roping: 1. Young, 32.60; 2.
Louden, 36.60; 3. T. Schaack, 39.90; 4.
Treeby, 42.40
Goat Tying: 1. Birkeland, 14.60; 2.
Tech, 21.80; 3. Marone, 22.80; 4. Doll,
23.10
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Price, 14.40;
2. K. Nelson, 16.20; 3. T. Arneson, 16.40;
4. H. Brown, 31.80
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Garrett,
229; 2. Jensen, 220; 3. Kammerer, 219;
4. Schuelke, 216
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Lammers,
9.20; 2. Gallino, 12.30; 3. John Hoven,
McLaughling, 17.20; 4. Klein, 19.10
Steer wrestling: 1. J. Lord, 8.90; 2,
H. Hunt, 9.50; 3. W. Schaack, 14.30; 4.
Wiedman, 15.30
Team Penning: 1. Tebay/
Garbe/Tebay, 138.80; 2. Zeller/Kiehn/
Teeslink, 139.90; 3. Klein/Varilek/Var-
ilek, 154.30; 4. C. Nelson/ Trower/Skib-
inski, 162.60
Team Roping: 1. Jake Nelson/Jeff
Nelson, 13.90; 2. Treeby/Jade Nelson,
15.00; 3. J. Lord/Griemsman, Piedmont;
4. Odens/ Valnes, 28.60
SDRA finals rodeo held
Cross Country
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 8
Way to go, Scotties!
Good luck at the State Cross Country Meet
Saturday, October 26th
Robbinsdale Park • Rapid City
Brant’s Electric
* * *
Coyle’s SuperValu
* * *
Dr. Ron & Laurie Mann & Staff
* * *
Ernie’s Bldg. Center, LLC
* * *
Farm Bureau Financial Services
* * *
First National Agency
* * *
First National Bank
* * *
Fi tzgerald Oil Co.
Golden Willow Seeds
* * *
Grossenburg Implement
* * *
Ingram Hardware
* * *
Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
* * *
Kennedy Implement
* * *
Midwest Cooperati ves
* * *
Modern Woodmen of America
* * *
O’Connell Construction
Philip Chiropractic Clinic
* * *
Philip Heal th Services, Inc.
* * *
Philip Li vestock Auction
* * *
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
The Pioneer Review
* * *
Rush Funeral Home
* * *
State Farm Insurance
* * *
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Ellie Coyle
1st Place at Region
Katlin Knutson
11th Place at Region
Nelson Holman
4th Place at Region
Tristen Rush
6th Place at Region
Khalen Martin
16th Place at Region
Garrett Snook
5th Place at Region
Jasmine Ferguson
12th Place at Region
Allison Pekron
28th Place at Region
Conner Dekker
23rd Place at Region
Shay Hand
22nd Place at Region
Football Playoffs
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 9
Deb Smith
Scotties Football Team: Back row, left to right, Nick Donnelly, Phillip Leithauser, Jacob Kammerer, Grady Carley, Ben Stangle, Brody
Jones, Paul Guptill, Head Coach Keven Morehart. Middle row, Managers Mandy Burns and Bailey Radway, Jace Gianonatti, Chase Wright,
Brayden Fitch, Austin Pinney, Rance Johnson, Cooper West, Managers Katie Hostutler and Stratton Morehart. Front row, Seth Haigh,
Nick Hamill, Gavin Brucklacher, Ryan Van Tassel, Reed Johnson, Brian Pfeifle and Jade Berry.
Good Luck, Scotties
at the 1st Round Football Playoffs
Tuesday, October 29th
Game Time: 6:00 p.m. • Location: Highest Seed
* * *
Quarterfinal Playoffs: Thursday, October 31st
Semi-final Playoffs: Saturday, November 9th
State Football Championships: November 14-16
Dakotadome in Vermillion
Brant’s
Electric
Coyle’s
SuperValu
Dr. Ron & Laurie
Mann & Staff
Ernie’s Bldg.
Center, LLC
Farm Bureau
Financial Services
First National
Agency
First National
BankMember FDIC
Fi tzgerald Oil
Company
Golden
Willow Seeds
Grossenburg
Implement
Ingram
Hardware
Jones’ Saddlery,
Bottle & Vet
Kennedy
Implement
Midwest
Cooperati ves
Modern Woodmen
of America
O’Connell
Construction
Philip
Chiropractic Clinic
Philip Heal th
Services, Inc.
Philip Li vestock
Auction
The Pioneer
Review
Rush Funeral
Home
State Farm
Insurance
The Steakhouse
& Lounge
Sports
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 10
_omc to oae
¿aaaa|
(a||ovcca
_asqaceaác
]aet¡(
_eiáa¡, ¸o»cmoce ¡st
¿aágiag, ;-¡¡ ¡,m,- {amas|iag, ¡¡,¡, ¡,m,
_as» ¡eizcs [oe jcst ¯ _ostamcs(
jaacc to ¯¯- _a|ooa jaaá
73 ÷ 3aleen
839·2l73 º Ph|l|p
Frìday Nìghl
Slcak-oul
Frìday Nìghl
Bìngo
Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................19-9
Shad’s Towing...........................18-10
Rockers......................................17-11
Badland’s Auto..........................16-12
Dakota Bar................................12-16
Highlights:
Neal Petersen........................200/536
Marsha Sumpter ...5-7 & 3-10 splits;
......................................................189
Jerry Mooney ...............................200
Lee Sundall ..................................174
Tuesday Men’s early
Philip Motor..................................6-2
PHS ...............................................6-2
People’s Mkt..................................4-4
George’s Welding ..........................4-4
Kennedy Imp.................................4-4
G&A Trenching.............................3-5
Team 1...........................................3-5
KTS................................................2-6
Hightlights:
Jerry Iron Moccasin.....................515
Tony Gould...................................513
Cory Boyd.....................................510
Earl Park............................187 clean
Colt Terkildsen.....................2-7 split
Colt Fitzgerald......................2-7 split
wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ............................19-9
Jolly Ranchers ..........................17-11
State Farm................................17-11
Little Orphans ..........................16-12
Cutting Edge Salon ..................14-14
Highlights:
Karen Foland ................200, 154/501
Vonda Hamill ...............................163
Marsha Sumpter ....5-8-10 split; 168,
...............................................151/466
Donna King .............5-6-10 split; 155
Jen Schriever................5-7 split; 150
Sandra O’Connor .........................150
Lila Whidby.......................7-4-5 split
wednesday Nite early
Dakota Bar..................................19-9
Hildebrand Concrete ..................19-9
Morrison’s Haying ....................14-14
Chiefie’s Chicks ........................14-14
First National Bank ...................9-19
Pink Ribbons...............................9-19
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz .......5-10 split; 146 x 3
Emily Kroetch.......................163/411
Rachel Kjerstad..........3-10 split; 171
Debbie Gartner.........5-7 & 3-10 split
Lindsey Hildebrand .............5-7 split
Annette Hand.......................5-7 split
Thursday Men
The Steakhouse ..........................10-2
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................9-3
A&M Laundry...............................7-5
McDonnell Farms .........................6-6
O’Connell Const ............................5-7
Dakota Bar....................................4-8
WEE BADD...................................4-8
West River Pioneer Tanks ...........3-9
Highlights:
Alex (Toad) Moos ..................202/559
Matt Reckling...............................202
Steve McDonnell ..........................536
Chad Walker.........................5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ........................4-5 split
Andrew Reckling................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew.................................8-4
Randy’s Spray Service............6.5-5.5
Dee’s Crew ....................................6-6
Moos on the Loose...................5.5-6.5
Inforcer’s .......................................5-7
Highlights:
Duane Hand......5-10 x 2 & 5-6 splits
Rose Bennett ................................172
859-2430
Hwy. 14 · PhiIip
Monday-Saturday
Open at 11 a.m.
- CIosed Sundays -
We have orders to go!
Domestic violence awareness
October is Domestic Violence Month. Representatives from Missouri Shores spoke to the Philip High School family
and consumer science classes, October 16, about domestic violence, healthy/unhealthy relationships, red flags
and more. The FACS classes, taught by Brigitte Brucklacher, made fleece blankets to be used by recipients of Mis-
souri Shores services. Back row, from left: Blake Crowser, Peyton Kuchenbecker, Riley Heltzel, Phillip (Bob) Lei-
thauser and Cooper West. Second row: Shay Hand, Elise Wheeler, Paige Slovek, Molly Coyle, Damian Bartels,
Mandy Burns and Jada Theye. Front row: Tia Guptill, Jaslyn Konst, Cheyenne Pinney and Ashley Williams, with
Mark Stangle sitting below.
Courtesy photo
The Philip Lady Scotties hosted
the Lyman Raiders, Thursday,
October 17. In a four-game match,
the Philip varsity slipped on the
first game, only to come back in
extended play to win the second
game. The Scotties’ momentum
faltered and the third game fell to
the Raiders. A loss in the fourth
game ended the match.
15-25, 27-25, 14-25, 12-25
Serving: 62/67 (7 aces) Leaders: Tia
Guptill – 13/13 (3 aces), Jordyn
Dekker – 13/13 (1 ace), Ellie Coyle –
18/18 (1 ace)
Receiving: 77/90 Leaders: Dekker –
27/31, Coyle – 20/22, Kaci Olivier – 11
of 11
Setting: 106/114 (26 assists) Lead-
ers: Olivier – 43/44 (13 assists), Gup-
till – 46/50 (10 assists)
Hitting: 107/139 (29 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 31/43 (15 kills), Guptill –
33/38 (8 kills), Peyton Kuchenbecker –
14/16 (2 kills)
Blocking: 3 kills Leaders: Dekker –
1 solo and 1 assist, Kuchenbecker – 1
solo, Courtney Bartlett – 1 assist
Digging: 74/110 Leaders: Guptill –
15/18, Coyle – 14/18, Dekker – 12/18
The Lady Scotties junior varsity
succeeded in their comeback. Like
with the varsity, the first game
slipped to the Raiders. Then
Philip, also in extended play,
claimed the second game. The
similarity stopped there. The
Lady Scotties earned the win in
the third game and took the
match.
21-25, 28-26, 15-10
Serving: 43/53 (11 aces) Libbi
Koester – 5/5 (2 aces), Cheyenne Pinney –
6/7 (2 aces), Ashton Reedy – 8/11 (2 aces)
Receiving: 40/49 Leaders: Pinney –
12/13, Courtney Bartlett – 7/7, Peyton De-
Jong – 8/11
Setting: 52/53 (11 assists) Leader:
Reedy – 36/36 (9 assists)
Hitting: 58/73 (21 kills) Leaders: De-
Jong – 13/17 (6 kills), Shay Hand – 6/8 (4
kills), Kuchenbecker – 6/7 (3 kills)
Blocking: 3 kills Leaders: Kuchen-
becker – 2 solos, Brett Carley – 1 solo
Digging: 29/39 Leaders: Pinney – 5/5,
DeJong – 5/5, Bartlett – 5/5
Philip ladies lose to Lyman
Above, Tia Guptill (#6) and
Peyton Kuchenbecker (#2)
Del Bartels
Jordyn Dekker
The Philip varsity volleyball
team faced three opponents dur-
ing the Douglas Volleyball Tour-
nament, Saturday, October 19. At
this point in the season, the first
two were just too much for the
Lady Scotties. Not until the third
match did the ladies start to play
more up to the calibre they have
shown in the first part of the sea-
son.
Philip vs. Douglas
18-25, 15-25
Serving: 32/34 (2 aces) Leaders: Peyton
DeJong – 7/7 (1 ace), Ellie Coyle – 5/5 (1 ace),
Jordyn Dekker – 7/7
Receiving: 47/50 Leaders: Coyle – 22/24,
Tia Guptill – 13/13
Setting: 80/81 (13 assists) Leaders: Kaci
Olivier – 44/44 (6 assists), Guptill – 20/20 (3
assists)
Hitting: 69/82 (16 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 12/17 (5 kills), Guptill – 10/13 (4
kills), Peyton Kuchenbecker – 10/10 (2 kills)
Blocking: 2 kills
Digging: 48/73 Leaders: Guptill – 12/18,
Coyle – 12/19, Olivier – 9/12
Philip vs. Bennett County
9-25, 23-25
Serving: 28/33 (5 aces) Leaders: Guptill –
10/10 (3 aces), Dekker – 6/7 (2 aces), Olivier –
5/5
Receiving: 40/45 Leaders: Coyle – 16/19,
Dekker – 14/15
Setting: 64/70 (9 assists) Leaders:
Olivier – 35/37 (6 assists), Guptill – 20/22 (3
assists)
Hitting: 72/83 (12 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 24/29 (7 kills), Guptill – 20/24 (2
kills), Olivier – 12/12 (1 kill)
Blocking: 2 kills Leader: Dekker – 2 as-
sists
Digging: 50/70 Leaders: Coyle – 13/16,
Guptill – 10/13, Dekker – 7/7
Philip vs. Little wound
19-25, 25-14, 25-23
Serving: 63/70 (16 aces) Leaders: Coyle –
12/12 (3 aces), Olivier – 15/16 (3 aces), Ashton
Reedy – 9/10 (2 aces)
Receiving: 48/54 Leaders: Coyle – 23/23,
Dekker – 12/12, Guptill – 5/6
Setting: 87/89 (29 assists) Olivier – 57/58
(15 assists), Guptill – 22/23 (10 assists)
Hitting: 90/111 (33 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 38/43 (16 kills), Guptill – 20/25 (7
kills), Olivier – 12/14 (5 kills)
Blocking: 4 kills Leaders: Dekker – 3
solos, Guptill – 1 solo
Digging: 60/80 Leaders: Coyle – 25/27,
Guptill – 14/18
The next match for the Philip
Lady Scotties will be with them
traveling to Martin to challenge
the Bennett County Lady War-
riors, Friday, October 25, starting
at 4:30 p.m. Philip’s next match
will be Saturday, October 26, at
Lead to go up against the Golddig-
gers, starting at 8:30 a.m. On
Monday, October 28, the Lady
Scotties will be in New Under-
wood playing against the Lady
Tigers, starting at 6:00 p.m.
Lady Scotties struggle
at Douglas Tournament
These elementary students are
Super Scotties for August/September 2013. They
have earned the distinction through different indi-
vidual displays of good character. Each teacher
selects at least one of their students at the end of
each month.
Super Scotties
Creston Burns
Kindergarten
Josie Jones
1st grade
Ember Gabriel
3rd grade
Dilyn Terkildsen
5th grade
Caylo McLaughlin
6th grade
Elementary Students of the
Month for August/September
Taryn Ravellette
1st grade
Colden Kramer
2nd grade
McCoy Peterson
4th grade
Autumn Parsons
Milesville
Dig Pink - awareness
Sandee Gittings, Kay Ainsle and Kathy Gittings volunteered to declare that
they are breast cancer survivors. Many other survivors live in the area, but
did not attend the game or did not step forth to receive recognition. K. Git-
tings won the fleece blanket prize. With them is Philip High School student
council coordinator of Dig Pink night, Afton Burns.
Del Bartels
Sports
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 11
F0lll¢ N0l0f, lß0.
Pr|||p, 30
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2005 GMC 1500 SLE 4x4
Check out our entire selection at
www.phiIipmotor.com
8top ln & see Ryan todayll
Bod R1ver Spor1smon's C1ub
hts| k|rtr |s¡s|t
|a|||a¡ |sa|ts|
One Dog £ven1
- Saturday -
November 2nd
- SIgn-up DeadIIne: Friday, Nov. 1, 6.00 ¡.n. ai iIc
73 Dar in PIili¡; Calcuiia io follow
- $40 entry Iee ¡cr iwo-¡crson ican
- Pays 3 PIaces on 1-12 icans; 4 ¡laccs on 13-24 icans;
5 ¡laccs on 25 & ovcr
- Saturday DeadIIne: 7.30 ¡.n. SHAFP! Dring your
criiicrs io iIc 73 Dar's Dacl Door ly 7.30 ¡.n. on
Saiurday, Novcnlcr 2nd
- For more InIormatIon, coniaci Jcrry Ellcns.
605/859-2173
I1- ä1lêêK
SS9-21?3 - DOWNTOWN PHILIP
After much consideration, the
Milesville Fire Department has decided
NOT to have the Halloween Party this year, due to the
storm and the extra work it caused for all.
We will see you next year –
God willing and the Creek don’t rise.
Due to the loss of lighting at the
football field in Philip, the Friday,
October 18, football game between
the Philip Scotties and the Wall
Eagles began at 3:00 p.m. Philip’s
next game, with the Scotties host-
ing the White River Tigers on
Thursday, October 24, is sched-
uled for 6:00 p.m., but may be
moved up if there are still no
lights at the field.
In the Wall game, the Eagles
scored the first points when a one-
yard carry completed a march
down field. The kick for the extra
point was good. In the second
quarter, 4:51 showed on the clock
when Wall got through with a
four-yard rush to score. Their at-
tempt of an extra point kick failed.
Only 43 seconds remained in the
first half when Wall completed a
pass play to go, again, the last
four yards to the end zone. A con-
version play got two more points,
ending the second quarter at 0-21.
Philip owned the third quarter,
holding back the Eagles while get-
ting on to the score board. Philip’s
Gavin Brucklacher passed to Paul
Guptill for a five-yard play to earn
a touchdown. The attempt for
extra points failed.
The fourth quarter saw Wall
complete a trip down field with a
seven-yard pass play. A successful
kick added another point to Wall’s
side of the score board. The last
scoring in the game came when
Wall put a kick through the goal
posts for three points.
1 2 3 4
Philip 0 0 6 6
Wall 7 21 21 31
Rushing: yards/Carries
Philip – 112/36 Leaders: Ryan Van
Tassel – 37/12, Paul Guptill – 41/13,
Austin Pinney – 34/7
Wall – 187/39
Passing: Compl./Att./yds
Philip – 2/3/20 Leader: Gavin
Brucklacher – 2/3/20
Wall – 21/133
Tackles: Solo/Assists/Sacks
Philip – 13/44 Leaders: Guptill –
7/9 and 1 fumble recovery, Jade
Berry – 2/11, Pinney – 2/9, Brody
Jones – 2/7, Brayden Fitch – 0/8
First Downs
Philip – 14 Wall – 19
Punts
Philip – 3 Wall – 1
Penalties
Philip – 25 yards; 2 5-yard, 1 15-
yard
Wall – 30; 6 5-yard
Scotties stopped by Wall
Philip’s Paul Guptill (#25) and Jade Berry (#43) made sure the Wall ball
carrier was not going anywhere but down.
Del Bartels
Philip defenders Jacob Kammerer (#26) and Brayden Fitch (#81) showed
the effectiveness of double-teaming a lone offensive Eagle runner.
by coach Ralph Kroetch
The Region 5B championship
races were held on Philip’s Lake
Waggoneer Golf Course, Wednes-
day, October 16. Temperatures in
the mid-50s and a light breeze
made for ideal racing conditions.
Philip entered five runners, a
full team, in a field of 38, all look-
ing to qualify for the 2013 State
Cross Country Meet to be in Rapid
City’s Robbinsdale Park, Satur-
day, October 26. The standard
qualification is to place individu-
ally in the top 20 or be a member
of one of the top three teams.
The Philip team included Nel-
son Holman, a junior who has led
the Scotties through all but one
race this season, Garrett Snook, a
sophomore, had taken control at
the Philip Invitational, Tristen
Rush, a junior, had led the Scot-
ties through 2012, but due to in-
jury was entering his second race
of 2013, Khalen Martin, a seventh
grader, and Conner Dekker, an
eighth grader, had just earned
their varsity spots two weeks
back.
Once through the early scram-
ble, Holman led the Scotties up
the first steep hill, with Snook and
Rush in tow. Martin and Dekker
each moved up three places, keep-
ing the orange shirts close to-
gether.
Though Philip had many posi-
tion changes mid-race, determina-
tion put the front trio together
again at race end. Most of the
hometown spectators were at the
finishing stretch as Holman led
the Scotties across the finish line
for fourth place, with Snook in
fifth place. A long sprint moved
Rush up to successfully challenge
Rapid City Christian’s Cole Smith
for the sixth spot. Holman and
Snook set course bests at 18:56
and 19:05, while Rush bettered
his 2013 course time at 19:14.
Martin made a strong move in
the final 200 meters, challenging
a pair of runners to take the 16th
place medal, and set a personal
course best of 20:05. Dekker was
able to hold off a late charge to
hold the 23rd place spot and a
course best of 21:44. The team
earned the second regional title in
three years.
Boys’ team points: Philip – 15,
Wall – 27, Rapid City Christian –
34, White River – 37, New Under-
wood – 40, Bison – 40, Newell –
57, Faith – 87.
The girls’ varsity race held 35
girls, and represented 10 schools.
A breakaway group of four ladies,
led by Ellie Coyle, became a
breakaway of one at the top of the
first steep hill as Coyle took con-
trol early. She completed this race
in 15:37, earning her the first
place regional title. This is Coyle’s
seventh meet championship in a
row this season. Katlin Knutson
completed her first ever regional
race in 17:22. Jasmine Ferguson
did a personal best of 17:26. These
girls earned 11th and 12th place
medals. Shay Hand’s racing gave
no indication of her continuing hip
strain, as she used long powerful
strides to stop the clock at 18:44.
Senior Allison Pekron finished her
final regional race in 19:22. She
has been a team member over the
last six years, helping the Scotties
earn three team qualifications to
state, including this year’s re-
gional team runner-up placing.
Girls’ team points: Newell – 14,
Philip – 16, Lemmon – 31, Jones
County – 32, Faith – 52.
Sophomore Keegan Burnett
said today’s 4,000 meter junior
varsity race felt different. He set
the early pace, with teammate
Damian Bartels holding strong in
the fifth position. Burnett ran his
best ever 4,000 meter time of
17:03, cutting 57 seconds, to place
third. Bartels made a strong move
with 400 meters remaining, going
around Lemmon’s Dillon Reed.
Bartels turned in his best time of
the season, 17:03, to place fifth.
Great way to finish gentlemen.
The final race of the day fea-
tured 30 runners grades one
through six. These kids seem to be
smiling no matter what place they
finish this 1,200 meter course.
Twelve Scotties raced. Girls: Dilyn
Terkildsen – 4th at 6:01, Josie
Rush – 5th at 6:10, Copper Lurz –
6th at 618, Jaida Haynes –8th at
6:50, Grace Pekron – 9th at 7:08,
Rehgan Larson – 10th at 7:40,
Drew Terkildsen – 11th at 9:05
Boys: Layton Terkildsen – 11th at
6:20, Ethan Ferguson – 12th at
6:22, Luke Ferguson – 16th at
7:18, Trey Larson – 17th at 7:30,
Wakely Burns – 18th at 7:55.
Scottie teams earn berths
in state cross country meet
The Philip Scotties 2013 team will be competing in the State B cross country meet, Saturday, October 26, in Rapid
City. The boys took first place at the regional meet in Philip, October 16, and the girls took second place. Seven
of the 10 varsity runners earned medals. Back row, from left: coach Ralph Kroetch, Keegan Burnett, Tristen Rush,
Conner Dekker, Garrett Snook, Nelson Holman, Khalen Martin, Damian Bartels and student manager Tyshia Fer-
guson. Front: Katlin Knutson, Ellie Coyle, Allison Pekron, Shay Hand and Jasmine Ferguson.
Del Bartels
At left, this Wall Eagle found he
was surrounded by Philip Scotties,
with the ball about to be forcibly
knocked out of his grasp.
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or mail to: Pioneer Review,
PO Box 788
Philip, SD 57567
Community
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 12
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 • Philip
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
Get R
ea
d
y
F
o
r
W
inter!
B
a
t
t
e
r
y
S
a
le
$40 rebate card witb any
$400 porcbase combinations
of New Holland filters,
oil & batteries!
HON1H OF
OC1OBER!
859-2568
PhiIip
10% off aII
Exide Batteries
Gibson
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
859-3100 • Philip, SD
For all your concrete
construction needs:
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
Shelves, memory cases
The high school shop class instructed by Tom Parquet built and donated
sets of shelves that have been permanently set up, one set for each of the
possible 30 residents. “They did such a wonderful job,” said Dorothy Urban
of her shelves. Arlene Petoske said, “I think they’re great – about the right
size, they balance out. Some place to put things on.” The students also
made memory boxes which are attached to the hallway walls outside of
each resident’s room, for each resident to fill as they wish.
Del Bartels
As I watch from a distance the
heartache that has played out in
the last few weeks in the farm and
ranch community of western
South Dakota, many things go
through my mind. The blessing
was that there were not human
lives lost due to the severity of the
storm. The courage it takes to
push forward and not give up
under the loss of livestock and the
inability to harvest crops. Only
the special ones can endure these
things and look up to God to pro-
vide for them “next year.
I’d like to share part of a letter
written by my cousin, Don Patter-
son, son of Emma Fairchild Pat-
terson, to his Uncle Wayne and
Aunt Ruth Fairchild in December,
1975. “It was good to hear that all
is well with you out on the home-
place. I guess there are quite a
bunch of us around who feel roots
attaching us to your ranch. Either
directly or indirectly, we all spring
from that black gumbo.
“I am happy for Marsha and
Bill. I hope they can make it – it
takes a real man and a very
strong woman to meet the chal-
lenges of that land. I speak with
great pride and respect whenever
I have the opportunity of mentor-
ing ‘my people’ and our heritage of
homesteaders.”
“If Wayne had ever said to me
‘come and share my work with me,
I’ll give you another chance’ I
would have done it without a blink
of an eye. I still would – I would
give it every ounce of energy I
could muster in order to prove my-
self worthy of that life. Wayne al-
ways has been and always will be
my idol – for me he’s the perfect
example of what a man should be.
It may sound silly to you Ruth,
but my love runs very deep – ever
since the first time Wayne ever
kicked my butt.
“I hope Bill can become like
Wayne in his devotion to the land
and the stock. He will need to
learn to love that soil as he would
his own wife – and respect it as he
would his master. …
“I’ve seen Wayne living through
drought and grasshoppers – fire
and poverty. He takes it as a boy
would take a whipping from his
father – almost as if he probably
had it coming and he’d do better
next time – no deep resentment –
no hate….” Love to all Don and
family.”
Sandee Gittings was in Rapid
City Monday for her last chemo
treatment. That is worth a cele-
bration in itself. Now on to the
next step.
Monday was a rather cool,
drippy day here in Kadoka. I was
busy with an embroidery project
part of the day, then Bryon Buxcel
picked me up to bowl on their
team for Carl Brown in the
evening. Bill enjoyed his afternoon
in Philip at the card room
Monday, Ralph and Cathy
Fiedler took her sister, Jeanette
Potts, to the plane in Rapid, hav-
ing lunch before her flight, she
made it home okay without any
problems. Tuesday and Thursday,
Cathy went back to work.
Tony Harty spent the afternoon
in the rain Monday watching the
football junior varsity/junior high
jamboree here in Kadoka. Teams
competing were Stanley County,
Wall and Kadoka.
Tuesday was a windy day, more
rain and cold. I made a trip to
Philip with the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation van in the
morning then spent the rest of the
day doing book work. Bill worked
on the T-bird then went to Philip
for cards. We got around two
inches of rain.
George Gittings was in Midland
Wednesday on business.
Lila Whidby picked me up for
bowling Wednesday morning and
enjoyed lunch at the senior citi-
zens’ center in Philip. As soon as I
got home, I took the HCPT van for
a trip to Rapid. It was a pretty
nice day compared to the first part
of the week, I even settled in the
sun and took a snooze in the van
since the appointments were
rather long.
Don and Vi Moody were kept
busy at their Rapid Valley place
getting post-storm problems han-
dled. First thing they had to take
care of was flooding in their base-
ment and needing to call a
plumber, so that got all taken care
of. Then a phone company had to
make a visit to get the landline
phone back in order due to a surge
in the line. Don and Vi went back
to the ranch for a couple of days,
checked on everything and loaded
up their Kawasaki 4x4 to take
back up to Rapid. That came in
very handy to tow limbs out of the
yards without tracking up the
grass. They did notify their tree
service for help in the future for
getting some of the worst damage
cleaned up.
Vi had a cute message from for-
mer Philip High School classmate,
Mary Lou Michael Schimke, Albu-
querque, N.M., who just recently
celebrated her birthday. Mary Lou
said they had been celebrating her
birthday by driving along Route
66 (I-40) to Big Sky Casino near
Grants, N.M., to see Williams and
Ree in concert. Mary Lou was re-
ally excited about this as this duo
is from South Dakota. Mary Lou
also stated they are coming back
to South Dakota this summer as
they enjoy seeing so many people
they know.
Wednesday, Tony Harty
checked on L.D. and Shirley
Hairs’ home and discovered the
wind had blown out the furnace,
so he reported that problem to
Hairs and they were coming back
to Kadoka for other things and
would look into it. The new sand-
wich shop is up and running now,
so Tony tried that out. He visited
Dale O’Connell at his shop and got
a chair from Dale he wanted to get
rid of.
George, Sandee and Jessica Git-
tings and Wade McGruder at-
tended part of the volleyball game
in Philip Thursday evening. There
was a special event held between
games for breast cancer. They had
supper downtown afterwards.
Thursday, I was kept busy with
the HCPT van around Kadoka in
the morning, then a trip to Rapid
in the afternoon.
Tony Harty picked up mail, had
lunch out, then worked on getting
that chair he was gifted with to
work better. It seems the wheels
don’t wheel too well. That may be
a blessing, as it won’t scoot out
from under a person so easy!
Kinsey and Kohen Gittings,
Woodward, Iowa, arrived in Philip
Friday afternoon during the foot-
ball game which George, Sandee
and Jessica were at for the NMB
fundraiser for Sandee. Roxie Git-
tings arrived from Eagan, Minn.,
within a few minutes of Kinsey.
Kelsey Gittings arrived from
Laramie, Wyo., shortly after that!
Friday morning after helping
get an individual to an appoint-
ment at the clinic in Kadoka, Bill
and I ventured to the north land
to see how the motor home was
fairing. The good news was we ac-
tually drove up to it and left under
our own power instead of being
hitched to a tractor. However, the
motor home still sits among the
windrows of the millet field until
it dries out enough to escape the
field under it’s own power. As we
were leaving the field, rain clouds
spit at us, letting us know that a
quick rain would leave us
stranded as well since Terry had
managed to get his equipment
moved to other fields. We spent
some time in Philip on the way
home.
Tony Harty picked up mail then
later in the day made a trip to
Wanblee. He stopped by the Hair
home and put some things in the
freezer for them.
Sandee Gitings’ brother, John
Boheman, Sioux Falls, and his
daughter, Rebbeca, and husband
Chris Jacob and kids arrived at
the George Gittings home Satur-
day morning. They helped get
some things finished up to take in
to the fundraiser in Philip that
evening. Kaelyn and Taylor Mc-
Sherry, Rapid City, also came out
to help. The fundraisers were very
well attended and the money will
help with expenses for Sandee.
Jessica Gittings and Wade Mc-
Gruder spent the night so that
they could visit more with Roxie,
Kelsey and Kinsey. They went
back to Philip Sunday afternoon.
Kelsey also left for Wyoming in
the afternoon
Saturday, Tony Harty visited
with his niece, Kathy Brown, pro-
ceeded to get the mail, and picked
up lunch to take home.
Saturday morning, a plan was
hatched to get our plane home
from Pierre where it had been an-
nualed. Bill spent the morning
working on the T-bird, trying to
figure out why it wants to choke
down when he steps on the gas. It
may be a way to keep him from
getting a ticket since that bird
does like to fly! We took the little
pickup to the airport and I went to
open the doors so when I got home
I could just fly the plane in the
hanger, only one door had a prob-
lem. The nut fell off the bracket,
(probably the wind rattled it off)
but Bill figured out the only way
to get it fixed was take the bracket
off, put the nut on, then put the
bracket back in place. Lee
Vaughan was waiting at the
Philip airport for me to arrive so
he could give me a lift to Pierre.
Anyway, a new fuel pump later,
door fixed and we were on our
way. The T-bird ran good for
about five miles, then made us
wonder if we would even get as far
as the Philip airport! We made it!
Lee and I flew to Pierre and were
amazed at what a selection of jets
were on the apron there in Pierre,
all private owned. We got the VIP
treatment with a ride to the Mus-
tang Aviation pilots’ lounge where
Lee’s dad, Lee Vaughan, Sr., was
waiting to drive Lee around to do
business and have supper. I did an
inspection of our plane then
headed to Kadoka and tucked it
away. It was a rather windy day
here at home, good cross wind
practice. Phyllis Word was an af-
ternoon visitor at our place.
Sunday, Tony Harty attended
church then visited with L.D. and
Shirley Hair while they were in
town. He picked up a sandwich on
the way home. He visited at our
place in the late afternoon and
watched Bill and I struggle to get
seat belts in the T-bird.
Carol and Ralph Kroetch came
by our place Sunday with a project
for cross country. Bill took out the
gas sensor and discovered it was
all rusted up, so cleaned it, took a
test drove and things seemed to be
working much better. Tony caught
up on the papers for the week and
visited and gave me his news.
Sunday evening, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler went to the Don
Klumb home in Spearfish for a
family supper along with the Eric
Hanson family. Cathy wrote that
in Sturgis this week it’s been cool,
windy and showers of rain and
snow off and on. Saturday was the
best day with 60˚ temperatures.
The wind blows everyday. The
snow is gone on the level, just on
the hillsides and where the sun
doesn’t hit can you still see evi-
dence of winter. The city is busy
repairing buildings and cleaning
up trees.
“Stick to the task when you’re
hardest hit. It’s when things seem
worst that you mustn’t quit.” Main
Street Memories
Betwixt Places| Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048
bilmar@gwtc.net
www.pioneer-review.com
“If you or someone you care
about has Medicare, make sure
you mark your calendars, as
Medicare Open Enrollment starts
on October 15 and ends on Decem-
ber 7,” said Kim Malsam-Rysdon,
Secretary for the South Dakota
Department of Social Services.
“Medicare recipients should use
this opportunity to review their
current choices and compare them
to coverage that is available for
next year to make sure they have
a plan that is right for them.”
Medicare Advantage is a health
plan offered by a private company
that contracts with Medicare to
provide Part A and Part B cover-
age (hospital, skilled nursing,
home health, hospice, doctors’ care
and other outpatient services).
Medicare Part D offers prescrip-
tion drug coverage for all people
with Medicare; the drug coverage
includes both brand name and
generic drugs.
Trained volunteers from the
South Dakota Senior Health In-
formation and Insurance Educa-
tion Program (SHIINE) will offer
free assistance to seniors seeking
additional Medicare information.
SHIINE volunteers can help
seniors compare plans, evaluate
their current coverage and fill out
paperwork. Seniors taking advan-
tage of the free one-on-one coun-
seling should bring their Medicare
card and a current list of medica-
tions. The volunteers will use the
information to sort through the
Medicare Plan Finder and com-
pare coverage options. The Plan
Finder can also be accessed from
home at www.medicare.gov.
For more information on SHI-
INE or to meet with a volunteer in
your community, call 1-800-536-
8197 or contact your regional co-
ordinator.
•Western South Dakota – Deb-
bie Stangle at 605-342-8635 or
SHIINE@westriversd.org
•Eastern South Dakota – Tom
Hoy at 605-333-3314 or SHI-
INE@cfag.org
•Central South Dakota – Kath-
leen Nagle at 605-224-3212 or
SHIINE@centralsd.org.
Medicare open enrollment
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
1 and 2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups) Apartments
carpeted throughout, appliances
furnished, laundry facilities available.
Disabled and Handicap Housing
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
VelroP|a|rs
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
metrop|a|ns
management.
com
autoMotive
FOR SALE: 2003 Ford F350
King Ranch. Loaded, new bat-
tery, fair tires, and topper. 859-
3552. P46-2tp
Business & seRvice
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn, 441-1053, or leave a
message at 837-0112. K44-4tp
BUSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & Ranch
HAY FOR SALE: Approx. 1250
tons, half hybrid Pearl millet and
half sorghum/sudan BMR.
Tested good, net wrapped, big
round, trucking available if
needed. Call Rick at 386-2375.
WP9-4tc
ATTENTION RANCHERS:
WANTED: Used oil and payment
if over 200 gallons. We also carry
new lubes and greases for the
care and maintenance of your
Heavy Equipment. Contact Gary
Perlebert, Red Giant Oil Sales,
Rapid City, SD, 605-877-4064,
www.redgiantoil.com. WP9-2tp
MISSING CATTLE: 5 head.
Could be 1 cow, 4 calves. Lazy M
L Bar, left hip. Roy and Margaret
Pfeifer, 859-2243 (work), 859,
2466. P45-2tp
FOR SALE: JD 4450 tractor, 15
speed, power shift, 3-point, 3
hydraulic outlets, 540 and 1000
PTO, new tires. JD 740 self-lev-
eling loader, excellent shape.
Call 530-9540. P45-2tp
FOR SALE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
found
FOUND: Video camera in a
walk-in area near Cottonwood,
S.D., while bird hunting on Oc-
tober 13. Call to identify, 355-
0728. PR8-2tc
able for purchase in Gettysburg. Es-
tablished turnkey mix bakery with
both wholesale and retail sales. Con-
tact Kathleen at ltgandt@yahoo.com or
240-461-4779.
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will consider
contract for deed. Call Russell Spaid
605-280-1067.
HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW:
HOLDIAY CRAFT & BOUTIQUE Show,
November 29 & 30, Belle Fourche
Community Center. Vendor space
available. For more information con-
tact 605-892-2336 or www.black-
hillsparrotwelfare.org
LOG HOMES:
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders repre-
senting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldeneaglelog
homes.com
OTR/DRIVERS:
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner oper-
ators, freight from Midwest up to 48
states, home regularly, newer equip-
ment, Health, 401K, call Randy, A&A
Express, 800-658-3549
MISCELLANEOUS:
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installa-
tion! CALL Now! 1-800-308-1892
WANT TO BUY:
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer, Elk/moose 7.50 lb. Bleached
3.00 lb. cracked 1.00 lb. Also need
Porcupines, Rattlesnakes, Elk Ivories
,Mt. Lion skins. More info; 605-673-
4345 / clawantlerhide@hotmail.com
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper, 605-859-
2516, or 800-658-3697 for details.
(605) 837-2447
LOOKING FOR A MANAGER for our
P/O Printing & Graphics division in
Watertown. The position involves
sales, bidding of print jobs, marketing
and customer service. Successful can-
didate should have customer service
experience, strong math and computer
skills, and the ability to lead a team. A
full-time position with benefits. Send
letter of interest and resume to:
chris.carter@thepublicopinion.com
Position closes October 31, 2013.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL,
Custer Clinic, Hot Springs Regional
Medical Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care have full-time, part-time
and PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN, Li-
censed Medical Assistant and Nurse
Aide positions available. We offer com-
petitive pay and excellent benefits.
New Graduates welcome! Please con-
tact Human Resources at (605) 673-
9418 for more information or log onto
www.regionalhealth.com to apply.
THE WATERTOWN PUBLIC OPINION
has an immediate opening for a Full-
time Reporter to join its news team.
The successful candidate will have the
ability to cover a wide variety of news
events in print and video and still feel
comfortable putting together a com-
pelling feature story. Experience is
preferred but will consider a recent
journalism graduate. Photography and
video skills are a plus. The Watertown
Public opinion is a six-day a week
newspaper in northeastern South
Dakota. This job offers competitive
wage based on experience, and bene-
fits package with health benefits,
401(k) and life insurance. Send letter,
resume, layout and writing and/or
video samples to: Watertown Public
Opinion, Attn: Human Resources, PO
Box 10, Watertown, SD 57201, or e-
mail: chris. carter@thepublicopinion.
com
PATROL OFFICER – Hourly pay range:
$20.14-$24.50/hr. Visit: www.cityof-
brookings.org Return application
w/resume to PO Box 270, Brookings,
SD 57006-0270. dlangland@cityof-
brookings.org
FOR SALE:
FAMOUS CENTRAL SD BAKERY avail-
Business & Professional
Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
AUCTION
LAND AUCTION: 474+/- Acres, Lake
Oahe-Peoria Flats, Cropland, Recre-
ational, Development, Prime Hunting,
8 miles north of Pierre, SD, just above
the Oahe Dam, November 12, 2013.
Call Dakota Properties, Todd Schuet-
zle, Auctioneer, 605-280-3115,
todd@placetohunt.com, www.Dako-
taProperties.com.
4th ANNUAL LEBANON Consignment
Auction. Saturday, Oct. 26, 10 am,
Lebanon, SD. Consignments welcome
until sale day. Contact Gary McCloud
605-769-1181, 605-948-2333, Sam
McCloud 605-769-0088, Lewis Reuer
605-281-1067. Complete listing at
www.mrauctionsllc. com
800+ ACRES CROPLAND with 200+
Acres Pasture, productivity 79, Reeder
Loams, Class II & III, Mobridge SD,
Absolute Auction, Nov. 4,
www.PiroutekAuction. com or 605-
544-3316
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY:
CALL AVON TO EARN extra money for
Christmas. **40% discount/commis-
sion - $10 to start** Call 605-334-
0525
EMPLOYMENT:
IMMEDIATE OPENING. Duties include
but not limited to, bulk delivery of fuel.
CDL, Hazmat required. Will train.
Farmers Oil Company, Orient SD. In-
formation, Don, 392-2424.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Belle Fourche
Development Corp. Job requirements
include a degree or work experience in
economic development or related
fields. Application and instructions at
www.bellefourche.org (click on BF De-
velopment Corporation tab). Contact
Krysti at 605-892-3006 or
Krysti@bellefourche.org if you have
any questions.
FULL TIME JACKSON COUNTY HIGH-
WAY Department Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light equip-
ment operator. Experience preferred,
but will train. CDL required, or to be
obtained in six months. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening re-
quired. Benefits package. Applications
/ resumes accepted. Information (605)
837-2410 or (605) 837 – 2422 Fax
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Classifieds
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 13
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS statewide for only
$150.00. Put the South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call this newspaper,
605-859-2516, or 800-658-3697 for details.
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The Pennington Co. Courant, as well as on our website: www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Printed only in the Pioneer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pioneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make
any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity basis.
GaRaGe saLes
HUGE RUMMAGE SALE: Knut-
son-Hostutler. Thursday, Octo-
ber 24, 12 to 6 p.m., Friday,
October 25, 8 a.m. - 12 noon.
NEW and used items: furniture,
decorative, Christmas, LOTS of
name brand teenage - women’s
clothing, Miche purses, motorcy-
cle, antique kitchen stove/tools,
and much more! Old NAPA
building, downtown Philip. No
early sales. P46-1tp
heLP Wanted
RN/LPN POSITIONS: Seeking
loving and patient geriatric
nurses at the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Benefits available. Con-
tact Heidi or Ruby at 837-2270.
K46-tfn
KADOKA AREA SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT: is accepting applications
for an assistant janitor. Applica-
tions are available on the web-
site, www.kadoka.k12.sd.us and
submitted to KASD, Attn. Supt.
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543. For more in-
formation call 837-2175.
K46-2tc
DIETARY AIDE POSITION:
open at the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Full time with benefits.
Call Ruby or Cathy or 837-2270.
K46-2tc
FULL TIME JACKSON COUNTY
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
WORKER: Truck driver, heavy
equipment operator, light equip-
ment operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train. CDL
required, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumes accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422. Fax
837-2447. K45-5tc
THE JONES COUNTY BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS will be
accepting applications for full-
time employment with the
County Highway Department.
Applications and resumé will be
received at the Jones County
Auditor’s office, P.O. Box 307,
Murdo, SD 57559 until Friday,
November 1, 2013 at 5 p.m.
CDST. Applications must be
picked up at the County Audi-
tor’s office, 310 Main Street,
Murdo, SD, or the Jones County
Highway Shop, 311 N. Main
Street, Murdo, SD. Please state
valid South Dakota driver’s li-
cense number and C.D.L. status
on application. For further infor-
mation, call 669-7102 (County
shed), 530-3355 (Highway Su-
perintendent cell) or 669-7100
(County Auditor’s office). Jones
County is an equal opportunity
employer. M44-3tc
LWANTED: Housekeeper 1 day/
week, every 2 weeks. Call 859-
2256. PR8-2tp
OOKING FOR: Finance Manager
& Sales Person. Contact Colt at
Philip Motor, 859-2585 or 685-
4314. P43-tfn
FULL- OR PART-TIME PRESS-
ROOM HELP WANTED: Monday
and Wednesday mornings (3-4
hours each day). Will train the
right person. Call Beau Ravel-
lette, 859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or
Colby Shuck for more informa-
tion: 837-2076. K33-tfn
AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping and laundry. Stop
in to apply or call Joseph at 279-
2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Jackie at 348-
8108 or 391-7806, or fax re-
sumé to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
Misc. foR saLe
FOR SALE: 300 Magnum with
scope, 2506 with scope. Call
859-3552. P46-2tp
ELK MEAT FOR SALE: For de-
tails call 484-1898. P46-2tp
FOR SALE: Several nice refrig-
erators with warranties. Del’s,
Exit 63, Box Elder, SD, 390-
9810. PR8-2tc
LOOKING FOR SPECIFIC an-
nual vegetables or flower seeds
for next growing season? I am
ordering seeds now. Call 859-
2057 or 515-0675, Gary’s
Greenhouse. P44-3tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notices/Wanted
KADOKA LEGION AUXIIARY
MEMBERS: Please bring two
items or cash donation to Holi-
day Festival bake sale, Novem-
ber 3. K46-2tc
OPEN HOUSE: Featuring Pam-
pered Chef, Lemon Grass, Taste-
fully Simple, and wine tasting at
Creative Cuts & Fitness in
Kadoka, Friday, October 25th, 1
to 6 p.m. K46-1tc
WANTED: Old Indian items,
beadwork, quillwork, old guns,
old painted buffalo hides, old
photographs. Cash paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802. F46-4tp
WANTED: Antlers. Looking to
buy deer, elk, and moose
antlers. Paying cash. 360-3749.
P46-3tp
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday,
November 3, 2013, Kadoka City
Auditorium. Booths available.
Call Ruby at 837-2270. K45-3tc
NOW IS THE TIME … TO
THINK OF YOUR FAMILY &
FRIENDS! It’s not too early to be
compiling your Christmas or
end-of-the-year letter! You write
it, email it to us (ads@pioneer-
review.com) and we will print it
on beautiful holiday stationary.
We can even put your full color
family picture with the letter. Let
us help you make the holiday
season special (and easier) this
year. Ravellette Publications,
Inc. Philip Office: 859-2516;
Wall Office: 279-2565; Kadoka
Office: 837-2259; Faith Office:
967-2161; Bison Office: 244-
7199; Murdo Office: 669-2271;
New Underwood Office: 754-
6466. P41-tfn
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm
machinery and junk cars for
crushing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
ReaL estate
HOME FOR SALE: 206 Myrtle
Ave., Philip. Double lot, 30x24
double garage, 30x24 concrete
pad in front of garage, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, 1,200 sq. ft. main
floor, full basement unfinished,
second floor - 430 sq. ft. room
remodel started, central air/
heat, 12x8 storage shed, 500
gal. propane tank, new 85 gal.
Marathon water heater, dish-
washer. Call Kanables at 859-
2957. P46-2tp
HOUSE FOR SALE: Asking
$25,000. 406 Norris Street, Wall.
279-2825. PW46-3tp
FOR SALE: Single bedroom
house, 26x24, with 6x8 porch.
Good for dwelling, workshop,
storage. Call 859-2057 or 515-
0675. P44-3tc
RecReation
FOR SALE: 2005 Polaris four
wheel drive, 300 Magnum four
wheeler. $3,500. Call 669-2165.
P46-2tp
FOR SALE: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
good shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, frig and large front stor-
age box. Stored inside off sea-
son. Call 279-2195 or 441-7049,
Wall, anytime. WP4-tfn
RentaLs
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
cLassified PoLicy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
thank yous
I would like to thank everyone
for the many cards, phone calls,
flowers and gifts I received. A
special thanks to my family for
the card shower and the party at
the Silver Leaf and all who came
for the event.
Thanks to all,
Marie Gartner
I would like to thank Golden
West Telecommunications for the
$50 GW Service Certificate I won
at the annual meeting.
Roslie Stangle
Much thanks and appreciation
to Christine Niedan, Anthony
Ellis and Steve Daly for all their
help during our recent water in
the basement of our house. They
were a God send. We couldn't
have made it through without
their help.
God bless,
Jerry & Sonia Nemec
Thank you to WREA for the dol-
lars I won at the annual meeting.
My dollars are being donated to
the RePlant Wasta Committee.
Barb Gunn Williamson
With saddened hearts, we
want to thank everyone for their
expressions of sympathy after
the sudden death of Cynthia’s fa-
ther, Cal Bohle. Your prayers
during his rehabilitation and then
death, words of encouragement,
cards, memorials, & plants will
never be forgotten.
God bless you,
Tom & Cynthia Finn
Stephanie & Heather
In memory of Kathryn Drage-
set …
The family of the late Katy
Drageset wishes to express their
deep appreciation to those who
have offered such kindness, sup-
port and messages of sympathy
and comfort in our bereavement.
We especially wish to thank Dr.
Klopper, all the staff at the Philip
Nursing Home and Rush Funeral
Home. We also send our sincere
gratitude for the kindness of food
that was provided and the beau-
tiful flowers for Katy’s service.
To the many of you who sent
donations to the Prairie Trans-
portation as a memorial, we sin-
cerely thank you for all your
generosity.
The family of Katy Drageset
Send your
classifieds to:
ads@pioneer-
review.com
DEADLINE:
Tuesdays at Noon
GeorGe’s
Welding & Repair
• DOT Inspection
• Complete Trailer Repair
• Full Line of Bearings & Seals
• Tractor Front End & Spindles
• Selling New Steel
• Recycling Outlet
• Refrigration & A/C on Commercial,
Residential & Vehicles
• ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
George: 441-3607 • Lee: 441-3606
Dennis
859-2970 • Philip
Community
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 14
Subscribe to online edition:
www.pioneer-review.com
continued on 15
* Legion Fun Night *
Saturday, November 2nd * 6:30 p.m. (Doors open at 6 p.m.)
American Legion Hall in Philip
Sponsored by Wheeler-Brooks American Legion Post #173
Proceeds to
help fund
Legion Hall
improvements
Bingo · Prizes
Games · Fun
Gift Certificates
Lunch available
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDS CÞevg Tro11b1ozer
V-b, Auto, 4x4 . Good 1o go!!
Notice: There will be no Hal-
loween party this year at the
Milesville Hall. This has been a
yearly event sponsored by the
Milesville Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment and they do plan to have it
next year. Thank you!
A daughter was born to Casey
and Rachelle Elshere Friday, Oc-
tober 18, in Rapid City. Lainey
Lea weighed 8 lb. 11 oz. and is 20
inches long. She has a very proud
big sister, Ashlynn, who will have
her sixth birthday October 26.
Grandparents, Tim and Judy
Elshere, went up to see the new
little girl Friday. Congratulations,
everyone, including great-grand-
parents, Paul and Joy Elshere.
September 24, a daughter, Allie
Pamela, was born to Jennie (Mor-
rison) and Dave Shumacker, rural
Howard. Grandparents are Ed
and Marcia Morrison and Pam
and CK Dale. Clark Morrison is
her great-grandpa. Congratula-
tions, everyone!
Friday afternoon, Brian and
Kristi Delahoyde, Kaylene and
Brayden, and Mike and Chris De-
lahoyde and friend, Erin Cole, all
of Spearfish, met the Jason
Hamill family in Philip. Brian is
Vonda's brother and Mike and
Chris are her nephews. They came
to see Nick Hamill play football
against Wall. Nick is a senior this
year so not too many games left
for him. Mike, Chris and Erin
spent the night in Milesville and
returned home Saturday morning.
Vonda Hamill spent Saturday
afternoon and evening in Philip
preparing for, enjoying, and clean-
ing up after the Friends of the Li-
brary fundraiser at the Philip Fire
Hall. It was well attended and a
great success.
A large crowd attended a party
Sunday afternoon in Philip for
Jaeson and Crystal Hanrahan and
their family. Kaeden celebrated
his first birthday and folks met his
new little brother, Chaelen. The
family recently moved to Sac City,
Iowa. Among those coming from a
distance were Crystal (Hanrahan)
and Eric Jackson and boys of
Greenwood, Ind.
Jerry Frawley, daughter Jes-
sica, and friend, Lexi, Minneapo-
lis, and Tracie Erdmann spent the
weekend at Mark and Pat Hanra-
hans’. Jaeson and Crystal Hanra-
han and sons, Jake, Nate, Kaed
and Chael had picked up Tracie in
Vermillion and brought her along
to Milesville. Jaeson and family
stayed at Chad and Kathy Hanra-
han's home since they were in
Gregory for the weekend.
Boyd and Kara Parsons had a
busy weekend with friends and
family members. Included were
the following who were there for
all or part of the weekend: Eric
Bastian, Andi and Dustin Rische
and family, Neal, Nathan, Rhegan
and River Drury, Pat Moriarity,
and Joanne Parsons. Sunday,
Boyd, Kara and Joanne attended
the Hanrahan party.
Jim and Lana Elshere attended
the football game Friday after-
noon in Philip. Their grandson,
Carter Elshere, was one of the
Wall players. Sunday, Jim and
Lana brought dinner in to Paul
and Joy Elshere, then went to the
meet and greet party for the Han-
rahan boys.
Jensen Fitch took second place
at the Punt, Pass and Kick contest
in Pierre Sunday. Congratula-
tions, Jensen!
Connor and Mackenzie Hovland
spent the weekend in Philip with
their grandparents, Debbie and
Joe Prouty.
Last Thursday, Dan Piroutek
picked up Jenna and Cass Finn in
Midland, and Dan's sister, Kay
Turvey, in Minnesota. They trav-
eled to South Bend, Ind., to watch
the Notre Dame football team de-
feat the USC Trojans. Joining
them were Dan's daughter, Erin
and Tim Logan and Daniel, St.
Louis, and Dan's niece, Mary, and
Bob Bryant, Effingham, Ill. Gayla
had been visiting daughter, Amy,
and son, Eli, in Muskegon, Mich.,
so they drove down and joined the
group. All returned to their homes
Sunday. Dan and Gayla and
Jenna and Cass stopped in Sioux
Falls to have Sunday supper with
Amy's husband, Joe Hogue, and
son, Jacob.
Marilyn and Fred Bailey,
Mitchell, stopped in Philip to visit
with Paul and Joy Elshere Tues-
day evening on their way to
Milesville. They visited with Mar-
ilyn's sister, Judy and Tim
Elshere until Thursday morning.
Last Wednesday, all of the Jim
Stangle family were in LeSeuer,
Minn.. for the funeral of Terry
Penland, husband of Janet (Pat-
ton).
Sonny Stangle is scheduled to
return to the Philip hospital Tues-
day. We're glad to hear that,
Sonny.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer were
in Rapid City Saturday to see
their grandaughter, Brittany, bar-
rel race in the high school extrav-
aganza. Congratulations, Brit-
tany, on coming in fourth!
Saturday dinner guests at Bill
and Connie Parsons' were Glenn
and Dianne Parsons and Grant
Parsons.
Kadoka hosted 4-H recognition
Sunday with the following
Milesville folks attending: Earl,
Jodi, Rachel and Sarah Parsons,
Linda, Ben and Mark Stangle,
Steve, Allison and Grace Pekron
and Paul, Donna and Tina Staben.
Last Thursday evening, Bryan
and Sharon Olivier joined Don
and Donna Olivier and Tyler
Olivier and Stacy Lewis for supper
in Pierre.
Bryan Olivier went pheasant
hunting at the Kieth Smith's Sat-
urday. It sounds like the pheasant
population has dwindled since our
recent storm.
Local folks who attended a book
club meeting in Philip Sunday
were Linda Stangle, Nina Pekron,
Theresa Deuchar and Mike and
Faye Piroutek.
Joy Elshere continues her recov-
ery from her heart surgery in
Rochester. Visiting her and Paul
Sunday evening after the Hanra-
han party were Tim and Judy
Elshere and Mark and Pat Hanra-
han.
Last Saturday afternoon, Tina
Staben and Theresa Deuchar
were among those at a home party
at Barbara Wentz's in Philip.
Peggy Parsons joined three gen-
erations of her family for the third
annual "Francie Days." This year
the ladies met over the weekend
in Gillette at the home of her sis-
ter, LaVon Nemec. They meet the
weekend closest to their late
mother, Frances Zebroski's birth-
day, which happened to be on Sat-
urday this year. What a neat way
to honor their mother.
Sunday evening, Phil and
Karen Carley drove to Spearfish,
bringing with them a meal to
share at the Newman Center on
campus at Black Hills State Uni-
versity. This is a place where folks
can go for a good homecooked
meal and fellowship all in a safe
environment.
Phil and Karen Carley's
grandaughter, Jaeryn Shields, is
spending time with them this
week. Her parents, Angelia and
Dave Shields, are in Rochester for
appointments.
Pastor Gary Wahl stopped to
visit us Monday evening and had
supper with us.
Milesville News|Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Pink filled the gymnasium during the volleyball match October 17 in aware-
ness of the fight against breast cancer. Hunter Peterson, far left, won the
dress-up contest for the guys and Brady Heltzel, far right, won for the gals.
With them are student council coordinators of the event Katlin Knutson and
Afton Burns.
Del Bartels
Everything pink was for sale during Dig Pink night at the Philip High School
volleyball match October 17. The student council sponsored the event to
raise funds to be donated toward the research to find a cure for breast can-
cer. Shown are, from left, are student council members Nelson Holman,
Tristen Rush and Afton Burns.
Del Bartels
Dig Pink – breast
cancer awareness
The South Dakota Board on Ge-
ographic Names is holding its
board meeting, Thursday, October
24, at 7:00 p.m. CDT at the Sioux
Falls Library Main Office, 200 N.
Dakota Ave., Sioux Falls.
The purpose is to seek addi-
tional public comment on whether
the word “negro” is offensive in
names of geographic features.
Also the board will be discussing a
proposed new name for Squaw
Creek in Moody County.
The meeting agenda will be
posted on the board’s website
(http://www.sdbgn.sd.gov/) by Oc-
tober 21.
Current legislation directs the
SDBGN to rename any features
with the word “negro” in the
name. A number of comments
from the public have been received
stating that the individuals and
organization representatives do
not find the word offensive. Based
on those comments, SDBGN is
seeking more input from the pub-
lic regarding the use of the word
“negro” as a part of a name for ge-
ographic features in the state.
If unable to attend the meeting,
send written comments by Octo-
ber 23 to S.D. Board on Geo-
graphic Names, 302 East Dakota,
Pierre, SD 57501. or email to
carol.postulka@state.sd. us .
Based on the public input re-
ceived, the SDBGN will decide at
this meeting whether the features
that currently have “negro” in
their name are to be renamed or
whether the issue needs to be
brought to the South Dakota Leg-
islature for further consideration.
Board of Geographic Names:
“squaw” “negro” offensive?
84 years Ago
October 10, 1929
Mrs. Laura Reid of Grindstone
has recently written a short play
entitled “Mrs. Hayseed Stays
Put.” Having had much experi-
ence coaching plays, Mrs. Reid has
been able to give this one a profes-
sional pep in its situations and
sure-fire comedy in its dialoge, as
she details the longing of the dis-
contented farm wife for the ease
and gaiety of city life. The play is
one of the three which will be
given by the Grindstone Ladies
Aid.
***
Early last Saturday morning,
the entire interior of the Swisher
home in Philip was completely de-
stroyed by fire together with the
furniture and much of the clothing
belonging to the family. The
tragedy is doubly sad, due to the
fact that the body of Mr. Swisher
who passed away here early
Thursday morning was in the
house at the time of the fire broke
out. Fred Barber and son, Art, and
Roy Larson, were all former
neighbors of the deceased when he
lived on the ranch by Powell had
spent the night there and were
starting a fire in the kitchen range
with the aid of kerosene when the
explosion occurred. All three men
were badly burned, Art Barber re-
ceiving the most serious injuries.
Grindstone News … Turkey
thieves are already working in
this community. They stole
twenty-seven from Mrs. Jim Wil-
son. It is believed that an attempt
was made to steal a work team be-
longing to Mr. Tungland. Mr.
Buls, who lives on the place, heard
a noise outside one night. He went
out with a gun to investigate, but
tripped and fell down. As he made
an angry exclamation, three men
ran from the barn. He fired after
them, but they got away.
Local News … Frank, the ten
year old son of C.J. Lamm re-
ceived a broken arm by falling
from a horse Sunday. He was
brought to Dr. Ramsey who ad-
vised them to take him to Pierre
for further treatment.
75 years Ago
October 13, 1938
Around Ash Creek … Dale
Keyser had the misfortune of
throwing his knee out of joint.
Mr. Fosse, Mr. Burjes and
Robert Burns have all been busy
cutting the second crop of sudan
grass due to the fine rain we had
this fall.
Helen Crowser, a former pupil
of the Dowling School, is attend-
ing school in Rapid City. Helen
has the natural ability to play the
violin.
Moenville News … Rat-
tlesnakes – and more rattlesnakes
are meeting their doom from
many reports. Albert Walsh’s
have killed around a hundred in a
den near their place and the den
southeast of the Moenville post of-
fice in which 200 were killed sev-
eral years ago, has offered about
29 lately with prospects for more.
Harry Schofield of Midland re-
ports locating a den southwest of
the Moenville post office about a
mile and a half in which he killed
76 a week ago Sunday and most
everyone also made unusually
large kills.
South Creek News … Neighbors
Blast from
the Past
From the archives of
the Pioneer Review
Community
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 15
~ Saturday, Oct. 26th ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Oct. 28th ~
Prime Rib Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday Downtown Philip
~ Tuesday, Oct. 22nd ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Oct. 23rd ~
Chicken Fried Steak
~ Thursday, Oct. 24th ~
Beef Tip Basket
~ Friday Buffet, Oct. 25th ~
Roast Beef • Chicken
Shrimp
Reservations:
859-2774
Package
Liquor &
Casino
Regular Menu Available Nightly!
Friday Buffet: 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Lunch Specials: Monday-Friday • 11:00 to 1:30
Call for specials!
Salad Bar
Available at
Lunch!
Stop in &
Check out our
Newly Remodeled
Bar & Casino!
W
W
W
.
G
R
O
S
S
E
N
B
U
R
G
.
C
O
M
Bloomfield, NE
Toll Free: (800) 658-3252
Hartington, NE
Toll Free:(800) 624-7826
Laurel, NE
Toll Free: (800) 365-6257
Wayne, NE
Toll Free: (800) 343-3309
Winner, SD
Toll Free: (800) 658-3440
Pierre, SD
Toll Free: (800) 742-8110
Philip, SD
Toll Free: (800) 416-7839
Call Local Store M-F 7:30am-5:30pm;
Sat 7:30am- Call for local store
closing hours.
Bargain Price of $8,500 Cash
HARTINGTON (H)
Special of the Month
John Deere Gator XUV550
SN #27509
John Deere Gators Are the Best on the
Market! Only 24 Hours on This Unit and
It is Ready to Go
WAYNE (WA)
Special of the Month
2007 John Deere 9620
4WD
This is a Great Grain Cart Tractor
in Time for Harvest- PTO on Unit!,
AutoTrac Ready, Nice Running
and Clean 4WD, Tires at 60%, 4
SCV’s, 3,302 Hours #39096
$192,000 Cash
LAUREL (LA)
Special of the Month
2012 John Deere S550
Combine
SN #42725, This Combine is
Just Like Brand New (Except the
Price!) Very Little Material Run
Thru It, Been Serviced and Field
Ready PowerGard Extended
Powertrain Warranty 211 Engine
Hours, 155
$252,000 Cash
Low Rate or Waiver Available
With Approved Credit
BLOOMFIELD (BL)
Special of the Month
Feterl 12 X 116
Very Nice Clean Auger, Flighting
is Good, Hydraulic Lift, Twin Auger
Swing Hopper, Unit is Ready for the
Upcoming
Fall Harvest! #39976
$12,500 Cash Price
$30,000 Cash
PIERRE (PI)
Special of the Month
WINNER (WI)
Special of the Month
PHILIP (PH)
Special of the Month
Killbros 2008 1950 Grain
Cart
SN #38247
1,100 Bushel Cart, Big Flotation Tires
900/60R32, Scale and Tarp, Unit has
Just Went Through the Shop and is
Field Ready for the Upcoming Fall
Harvest!!
$30,000 Cash
2012 John Deere X310
SN #12298
Low Effort Steering System & Hydrostatic
Drive New Unit With 0 Hours on It
42” Mower Deck
$3,499 Cash- Priced to Move!
2008 Killbros 1950
Grain Cart
SN #38248
1,100 Bushel Cart, Big Flotation Tires
900/60R32, Scale and Tarp, One of 2 Units
That is Priced to Move for the Upcoming Grain
Harvest! Excellent Unit!
Family owned for over 75 years,
Grossenburg Implement is here to serve you
Prices are falling on pre-owned John Deere tractors.
If you’re in the market this Fall for a used John Deere tractor, look no further than Grossenburg
Implement. Grossenburg Implement offers a variety of used tractors and implements for any
budget! And right now, take advantage of John Deere governmental rental tractor returns.
For information on available models and
additional financing options, please contact
your local Grossenburg Implement store
location today!
*Offers valid while supplies last and vary by store location. 20% down-payment is required in order to hold or purchase any equipment.
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
in this vicinity were cutting their
second growth of cane last week.
As can be expected, it is rather
light, but it is October 10 and frost
can be expected anytime.
South Fork News … Chandler
Ward came home Thursday after-
noon with a light case of mumps.
Grindstone News … Mr. and
Mrs. Mike Rausch have been vis-
iting their daughter, Anna, Mrs.
Lester Tubbs, at Custer. They
were expected back this week. Mr.
and Mrs. Emil Baye stayed at the
place while they were gone.
This warm weather, Emil and
Hank Sieler have been making it
hot for the rattlesnakes. They
make a social affair of it, taking a
few neighbors along, and all who
attend seem to think it is great
sport. There is enough danger to it
to satisfy anyone’s sporting in-
stinct, certainly. Some of the
snakes they find in masses, sun-
ning themselves in front of the
den, but most of them they find
one at a time, at holes around the
central den. They pour cold water
down the holes in which they
think there are snakes, and some-
times the snake comes up. Some-
times he won’t budge, but they can
hear him blowing water out of his
nose. Personally we wouldn’t
stand over a hole to hear a rat-
tlesnake blow his nose; another
one might come of the hole or an-
other one might be sneaking up on
us from behind. In one hole they
found rattlesnakes, bull snakes,
blue racers and a frog. Why the
snakes didn’t eat the frog is a
poser. By last Saturday they had
killed between 50 to 60, getting
most of them from the den on the
hillside about a quarter of a mile
from the dam where the WPA
workers killed over 60 when they
were building it.
Raymond Dean and Clifford
Lewison left Sunday for Min-
nesota where Clifford has work,
and where Raymond hopes to find
work.
50 years Ago
October 10, 1963
Pauline Eggers received word
from Mr. and Mrs. Tom Mannis
telling of the death of David Weza,
young son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Weza, formerly of Philip.
Exact details are not known,
but the family were vacationing in
Milwaukee and it is believed that
David dashed into the street in
front of a car. Death was instanta-
neous.
Vital Statistics … Sept. 2, boy,
Steven Floyd, to Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore C. Brooks, Philip.
Sept. 3, boy, Thomas Richard, to
Mr. and Mrs. James H. Heltzel,
Philip.
Sept. 23, boy, Donald Andrew,
to Mr. and Mrs. Gay Moses,
Philip.
Sept. 28, girl, Julie Mae, to Mr.
and Mrs. Charles J. Jobgen,
Milesville.
Old Trail News … Wednesday
morning on the way to school
Doreen Peterson was thrown from
her horse and received a bump on
her head. She remained at home
for a couple of days.
Skyline News … Mrs. Hans
Hanson received word that her
daughter, Kay, was quite severely
burned when a gas stove exploded
in her home at Murdo. Susie went
to Murdo to help take care of the
children.
25 years Ago
October 13, 1988
Mini Wiconi water bill may soon
become reality.
***
The 1988-89 Homecoming at-
tendants included Donna Brun-
skill, Kristen Husband, Queen
Amy Hostutler, King Brad Burns,
Jennifer Sandstrom, Billie Van
Ourkerk, Theresa Pinney, Clayton
McIlravy, Jim Reedy, Mark
LaBeau and Doug Kroetch.
***
A fire at The Ridge caused by a
chainsaw exploding while Milo
Knight was repairing it destroyed
the garage, shop equipment and
one tractor that was being re-
paired there. Knight was treated
at the Philip hospital for minor
burns.
Blast from
the Past
From the archives of
the Pioneer Review
Greetings from partly sunny
(that is me being optimistic),
damp, cool, slightly breezy north-
east Haakon County. This is such
a beautiful fall day! The trees are
still full of leaves, and they are so
pretty with their fall colors. I hope
the leaves fall before we get heavy
snow!
It seems that most everyone in
the community has been busy try-
ing to get the fall work buttoned
up – trying to harvest the corn
and milo, trying to get the cattle
worked, trying to get the hay
moved home. The wet conditions
are making things a little difficult,
especially in the gumbo areas! We
had rain showers again last night,
so there will probably be no har-
vesting today.
Today the community, as well
as people near and far, are cele-
brating the life of Lil Briggs. Lil
passed away last Thursday – or,
as her obituary said, she gained
her angel wings. Lil had been in
failing health, but fortunately,
with the help of family and
friends, she was able to spend the
past several months at her home
near Ft. Pierre. I always thought
of Lil as sort of a "force of na-
ture" – if she decided something
should be done, it got done. What
a bundle of energy wrapped up in
such a small package! She was so
capable in every aspect of her life,
and I was especially in awe of her
artistic talents. She left quite a
legacy, and she will be missed.
I also extend my sympathy to
Don and Shirley Sandal. Shirley's
son, Doug Keller, age 55, died sud-
denly while hunting with a group
of friends and relatives near High-
more. Funeral services will be
held Friday at 10 a.m. in Harrold.
My thoughts and prayers are with
the Keller and Sandal families.
Duane and Lola Roseth had
company over the weekend. Their
son, Rhett, and their daughter,
Kayce, and her husband, John
Gerlach, came Friday to spend the
weekend at the ranch. They re-
turned to their homes Sunday.
Duane and Lola attended church
at Deep Creek Sunday. Following
services, everyone pitched in to
clean the church in preparation for
the upcoming Deep Creek bazaar.
The Deep Creek Church supper
and bazaar will be held next Sat-
urday, October 26. The ham and
lutefisk supper will be held from 6
- 7:30 p.m. CDT, followed by the
bazaar auction at 8 p.m. This is al-
ways such a fun event – it is a
great place to visit with friends
and neighbors, and it is a good op-
portunity to support the commu-
nity. I must confess, though – I
have never gotten up enough
nerve to try the lutefisk. And I
don't think I will probably be try-
ing it this year, either. I guess that
will leave more for the lutefisk
lovers. Speaking of lutefisk, I re-
member years ago that some com-
pany in North Dakota was
marketing a TV dinner that fea-
tured lutefisk. I never heard if
they were successful or not.
* * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH ANNUAL TURKEY
DINNER, SUNDAY, NOV. 3. DIN-
NER AT NOON. EVERYONE
WELCOME. ADULTS: $8. CHIL-
DREN 6-12: $4; 5 & UNDER:
FREE.
* * *
Nels and Dorothy Paulson were
in Pierre on business last Friday,
and they stopped to visit at the
Briggs home. Saturday, Dorothy
did some cleaning at the Deep
Creek Church. Monday evening,
Dorothy attended the prayer serv-
ice for Lil Briggs, and Tuesday she
continued on to Sioux Falls to visit
her sister, Wilma, who is hospital-
ized there.
Last Wednesday, Billy and Ar-
lyne Markwed were in Midland to
attend the church supper there.
Their grandson, T.J. Gabriel, and
family also attended the supper,
and T.J. assisted Billy with the
auctioneering. Thursday, Billy and
Arlyne took his aunt, Alice Jeitz,
to Rapid City for a doctor's ap-
pointment. Saturday, they helped
with the cattle auction in Philip.
Sunday, Billy and Arlyne attended
church and helped get things
ready for the upcoming bazaar.
Monday evening, they joined their
daughter, Kim, and son-in-law
Jeff Marso for supper in Pierre,
then they attended the visitation
and prayer service for Lil Briggs.
Things have been very busy at
Lee and Mary Briggs' home. They
have been busy with funeral
preparations for Lee's mother, and
they have also been busy with
ranch work. This past weekend
they had a large crew on hand to
help work cattle. Their grand-
daughters, Kinsey and Cattibrie
Riggle, and friend, Alex, helped
Saturday. That evening, Lee and
Mary's daughter, Keva, arrived to
spend the night and help Sunday.
Keva's son, Zane, and several
friends arrived Sunday, along
with Cole Briggs and Vicki, Chase
Briggs, Sharlo Deal and many
others. The cowboys and cowgirls
got the cattle worked, and Mary
made sure they all had plenty to
eat. Also on Sunday, friends Lee
and Madeline Cornwell and their
daughter and granddaughter of
Glasgow, Mont., stopped by to
visit. Other visitors on Sunday in-
cluded Wade and Jennifer Briggs
and family, Warren Briggs, and
Sonja Briggs' son, Darrin. I have
probably missed some of the
names – suffice it to say that this
has been a very busy weekend at
the Briggs' home.
Bill and Polly Bruce had a qui-
eter week last week. They at-
tended church in Midland
Saturday evening, and they at-
tended the visitation and prayer
service for Lil Briggs in Pierre
Monday evening.
Frank and Shirley Halligan also
had a quieter week. They went to
Ft. Pierre to deliver food to the
Briggs' family Sunday. While they
were in town, they took the oppor-
tunity to rake up some of the
leaves before they got wet. Tues-
day they attended funeral services
for Lil Briggs.
Kevin Neuhauser was in Murdo
Friday to attend a West Central
Electric board meeting. Other
than that, his time has been spend
trying to get fall harvest com-
pleted. He said he is finished with
the corn harvest, and now he is
working on the milo. Mary
Neuhauser was at the ranch for
the weekend, and she did some
painting in the house. Kevin and
Mary attended the prayer service
for Lil Briggs Monday evening.
After the service, Kevin went to a
Masonic Lodge meeting.
Marge Briggs has had a quiet
week. Her friend, Katie, from Min-
neapolis arrived Monday to be on
hand for Lil Briggs' funeral. Katie
will return to her home Wednes-
day. Lynn Briggs attended the
prayer service for Lil on Monday
evening.
Max and Joyce Jones were in
Brookings for a couple of days last
week helping with bookkeeping
duties for Eastern Star. Later in
the week, they were in Wessing-
ton Springs to attend a reception
for the new Worthy Grand Matron
and her family. On their way to
Wessington Springs, they dropped
off some food at the Briggs' home
near Ft. Pierre. Max and Joyce at-
tended Lil Briggs' prayer service
Monday evening and her funeral
Tuesday.
Ron and Helen Beckwith have
still been busy buttoning up their
garden for the season. Helen said
all the produce is now in the
house, and she is busy preserving
it. Helen makes some of the best
homemade tomato juice around!
Ray and Nancy Neuhauser trav-
eled to Sioux Falls last Thursday.
They spent the night with Nancy's
daughter, Julie, and family, then
they traveled on to Omaha to at-
tend a Scottish Rite reunion, re-
turning to Pierre Sunday. Nancy
is also serving on federal jury, so
that is taking up some of her time.
Clark and Carmen Alleman
were in Pierre Saturday to help
their brother-in-law, Ben Stoeser,
celebrate his 90th birthday at an
open house at Parkwood. Happy
belated birthday to him! That
evening, they enjoyed a pizza sup-
per with friends, Jim and Reyna
Martin, Brookings, and Bonnie
and Jerry Langum, Spearfish.
Last weekend, Clark and Car-
men's daughter, Kelly Nelson,
came to the ranch and helped Car-
men prepare the lefse for the up-
coming church supper at Deep
Creek. The Alleman ranch has
also been busy weaning calves –
such a busy time of year!
Weaning and harvesting have
also been on the agenda at our
place this past week. Son Scott
and grandson Austin came from
Spearfish to help, and daughter
Jen and her husband, Ross
Tschetter, came from their home
in Salem. They all spent a night
here, so we had a chance to visit.
It was wonderful to have them
here! Saturday, our nephew, Joe
Brown, came to help us put a steel
roof on the house at the former
Allen Towne place. He returned to
his home in Rapid City Sunday.
Saturday evening, I took some
food to the Lee and Mary Briggs
home and visited for a bit. Mon-
day evening, Randy and I at-
tended the visitation and prayer
service for Lil Briggs in Pierre.
This week, I am again grateful
for technology. Last night at the
prayer service, I noticed that one
of Lil's grandsons had his ipad
(small computer), and he was
skyping (sort of like using a video
phone) with a cousin that wasn't
able to attend the service. How
wonderful that the cousin could
still be part of the prayer service,
even though he was several states
away!
I hope you are continuing to
pray for the ranchers in western
South Dakota and our neighbor-
ing states who continue to deal
with the losses and hardships fol-
lowing the recent blizzard. I know
that things will work out some-
how, but this is a very tough time
for our state. Please do what you
can to help – even phone calls,
kind words or a smile can help!
And please take time to be care-
ful as you go about your fall work.
And take time to look at the beau-
tiful fall colors and appreciate that
you are able to live in such a won-
derful part of the world!
Moenville News|Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Send ads to: ads@pioneer-review.com • Deadline: Tuesdays at 11 a.m.
October 24, 2013 • Pioneer Review 16
The South Dakota Rodeo Association saw
few changes in the standings between the last
rodeo in September and the SDRA finals in
Rapid City October 18-20.
Bareback Riding: 1. Chance Englebert,
Burdock; 2. Mark Kenyon, Hayti; 3. Shane O'-
Connell, Rapid City; 4. Lonny Lesmeister,
Rapid City; 5. Stetson Murphy, Rapid City; 6.
Joe Wilson, Long Valley; 7. Ryan Burkinshaw;
8. Brody Kronberg, Bison; 9. Andrew Hall,
Wagner; 10. Cheyenne Seymour, Gillette,
Wyo.; 10. 11. Levi Collins, Hot Springs
Barrel Racing: 1. Shelby Vinson, Wor-
thing; 2. Kailee Webb, Isabel; 3. Lacy Cowan,
Highmore; 4. Courtney Whitman, Sturgis; 5.
Melodi Christensen, Kennebec; 6. Kaylee
Gallino, Wasta; 7. Hallie Fulton, Miller;
Wanda Brown, Edgemont; 8. Wanda Brown,
Edgemont; 9. Kristi Steffes, Vale; 10. Krystal
Marone, Isabel; 11. Courtney Birkholtz, Willow
Lake; 12. Tanya Talsma, Iona; 13. Katie
Lensegrav, Interior; 14. Colbee Mohr, Timber
Lake; 15. Brooke Steckelberg, Chamberlain;
16. Carole Hollers, Sturgis; 17. Megan Leddy,
Virgil; 18. ReAnn Crane, Whitewood; 19. Debra
Bixler, Hitchcock; 20. Lisa Bruley, Willow Lake
Breakaway Roping: 1. Kaylee Nelson,
Dickinson, N.D.; 2. Jenny Belkham, Blunt; 3.
Laura Hunt, Ridgeview; 4. Syerra Christensen,
Kennebec; 5. Joey Painter, Buffalo; 6. Jacque
Murray, Isabel; 7. Bailey Peterson, Parade; 8.
Jana Jasper, St. Charles; 9. Webb; 10. Megan
Steiger, Mobridge; 11. Elizabeth Baker, Box
Elder; 12. Cassy Woodward, Dupree; 13. Ful-
ton; 14. Toree Gunn, Wasta; 15. Trisha Price,
Faith; 16. Jamie Britton, Buffalo; 17. Brenda
White, Oelrichs; 18. Hollers; 19. Patty Jo Bu-
ress, Isabel; 20. Dori Hollenbeck, Winner
Bull Riding: 1. Tyson Donovan, Sturgis; 2.
Jared Schaefer, Leola; 3. Ian Jacobs, Faith; 4.
Taygen Schuelke, Newell; 5. Joey Koupal,
Dante; 6. Allen Auer, Whitewood; 7. Chris
Kuemper, Delmont; 8. Clint Nelson, Philip
Calf Roping: 1. Trey Young, Dupree; 2.
Treg Schaack, Edgemont; 3. Colton Musick,
Pierre; 4. Troy Wilcox, Red Owl; 5. Dallas
Louden, Martin; 6. Jace Melvin, Ft. Pierre; 7.
Matt Peters, Hot Springs; 8. Justin Scofield,
Volga; 9. Rex Treeby, Hecla; 10. Jess Wood-
ward, Dupree; 11. Jamie Wolf, Pierre; 12.
Kourt Starr, Dupree; 13. Daine McNenny,
Sturgis; 14. Chad Pelster, Belle Fourche; 15.
Owen Fagerhaug, Plankinton; 16. Calder John-
ston, Elm Springs; 17. Levi Hapney, Quinn; 18.
Carson Musick, Pierre; 19. Brent Belkham,
Blunt; 20. Travis Cowan, Highmore
Goat Tying: 1. Lacey Tech, Fairfax; 2.
Marone; 3. Kristi Birkeland, Dupree; 4. Katie
Doll, Prairie City; 5. Fulton; 6. Katy Miller,
Faith; 7. Shayna Miller, Faith; 8. Chelsey
Kelly, Dupree; 9. Stacy Doll, Prairie City; 10.
Tarin Hupp, Huron; 11. Shandel Yordy, Mar-
tin; 12. Price; 13. Lensegrav; 14. Britton; 14.
Lexy Williams, Hettinger, N.D.; 15. Courtney
Dahlgren, Timber Lake; 16. Abby Jo Eck-
staine, Kennebec; 17. Kelsey Arthur, Fairfax;
18. Painter
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Baker; 2. Trina
Arneson, Enning; 3. Ashley Price, Faith; 4. K.
Nelson; 5. Lorita Nelson, Philip; 6. Hanna
Brown, Faith; 7. Brooke Nelson, Philip; 8.
White; 9. S. Christensen; 10. Lacey Jo March,
Hot Springs; 11.Painter; 12. Hunt; 13. Price;
14. Jasper; 15. Crane 16. Denise Nelson, Mid-
land; 17. Whitney Knippling, Chamberlain; 18.
Cassie Foster, Lemmon; 19. Jolene Loiseau,
Colman; 20. Alisa McGrath, Belle Fourche
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Shorty Garrett,
Dupree; 2. Wyatt Kammerer, Philip; 3. Travis
Schroth, Buffalo Gap; 4. Eric Gewecke, Red
Owl; 5. Kaden Deal, Dupree; 6. Eric Addison,
Caputa; 7. Ty Kennedy, Philip; 8. Shadow
Jensen, Martin; 9. Lane Stirling, Buffalo; 10;
K.C. Longbrake, Eagle Butte; 11. Schuelke; 12.
Jay Longbrake, Dupree; 13. Kash Deal,
Dupree; 14. Marty Hebb, Cherry Creek; 15.
Kyle Hapney, Harrold; 16. Tate Longbrake; 17.
Dillon Schroth, Buffalo Gap; 19. Tyrell Bach-
man, Faith; 19. Seth Longbrake, Howes, 20.
Shilo Donner, Morristown
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Steve Klein,
Sioux Falls; 2. J.B. Lord, Sturgis; 3. Scott Lam-
mers, Hermosa; 4. Billy Gallino, Wasta; 5.
Chuck Nelson, Hartford; 6. John Hoven,
McLaughlin; 7. Terry McPherson, Piedmont;
8. John Dean, Platte; 9. Kirk Ford, Huron; 10.
Delbert Cobb, Red Owl; 11. Clifford Tibbs, Ft.
Pierre; 12. Bryce Sigman, Sturgis; 13. Lennis
Fagerhaug, Wessington Springs; 14. Bob
Burke, Sundance, Wyo.; 15. Dana Sippel, Pier-
pont; 16. Tom Williams, Faith; 17. Jerry Sharp,
Long Valley; 18. Lynn Williams, Faith; 19.
Mike Nelson, Philip; 20. Gary Simon, Timber
Lake
Steer wrestling: 1. J. Lord; 2. Wyatt
Schaack, Wall; 3. Sam Olson, Buffalo; 4. Tom
Hunt, Eagle Butte; 5. Clint Nelson; 6. Mike
Wiedman, St. Charles; 7. Casey Olson, Prairie
City; 8. L. Hapney; 9. Jerod Schwarting, White
River; 10. Wilcox; 11. J. Melvin; 12. Eli Lord,
Sturgis; 13. Tye Hale, Faith; 14. Tate Cowan,
Ft. Pierre; 15. Johnston; 16. J.J. Hunt,
Ridgeview; 17. J.D. Johnson, Dupree; 18. Blake
Williams, Piedmont; 19. Evan Thyberg, Hart-
ford; 20. Dean Moncur, Sturgis
Team Penning: 1. Gary Garbe/ Morgan
Tebay/Rick Tebay, all of Alpena; 2. Tom Var-
ilek, Geddes/ Klein/Mick Varilek, Geddes; 3.
Sara Teeslink, Kimball/Doni Zeller, Forest-
burg; 4. Warren Kiehn, Chamberlain; 5. Terry
Trower, Dell Rapids/Joe Skibinski, Sioux
Falls/Chuck Nelson; 6. Robert Devitt, Harris-
burg/Jamie Kuiper, Canton/ Gerald Sorenson,
Canton; 7. Clinton Olinger, Plankinton/ Katie
Anderson, Plankinton/Randall Olson, Harris-
burg; 8. Bart Blum, Reliance/Mary Pat Faw-
cett, Colome; 9. Jason Friz, Sissteton; 10. Chad
Herrboldt, Sisseton; 11. Collin Borgmann/Lind-
sayBorgmann/Paul Borg-mann, all of White
Lake; 12. Steve Deschepper, Chancellor/Eliz-
abeth Reurink, Lennox/ Jay Reurink, Lennox;
13. Harold Fischer/ Dana Nelson/Michelle
Johnson, all of Vermillion; 14. Tom Jones, Vi-
borg/Terry McCutcheon, Brookings/Dean; 15.
Carson Olinger, Plankinton; 16. Ronald South,
Jr., Wessington Springs; 17. Nick Coulter,
Montrose/Larry Fossum, Hartford/Dani Miller,
Montrose; 18. Suzette Fanning, Elk Point
Team Roping - Header: 1. Tucker Dale,
Timber Lake; 2. E. Lord; 3. J. Lord; 4. Tyrell
Moody; 5. Colton Musick; 6. L. Hapney; 7. Jake
Nelson, Creighton; 8. Jared Odens, Letcher, 9.
Treeby; 10. Wilcox; 11. Devin McGrath; 12.
Clay Edgar, Oral; 13. Terry McPherson, Pied-
mont; 14. Kevin Schmidt, Box Elder; 15. Jr.
Dees, Aurora; 16. Connor McNenny; 17. Shaun
Ruland, Wall; 18. Brett Wilcox; 19. Scott
White, Oelrichs; 20. Jensen
Team Roping - Heeler: 1. Jade Nelson,
Midland; 2. L. Lord; 3. Paul Griemsmann,
Piedmont; 4. Rory Brown, Edgemont; 5. Car-
son Musick; 6. Dalton Richter, Quinn; 7. Jeff
Nelson, Philip; 8. Emit Valnes, Eden; 9. Melvin
Arneson, Enning; 10. M. Peters; 11. Billy
Myers, St. Onge; 12. Jade Schmidt, Box Elder;
13. Jesse Dale, Timber Lake; 14. Matt Zan-
canella, Aurora; 15. D. McNenny; 16. Clint
Cobb, Red Owl; 17. Eliot Hight, White River;
18. Dustin Schaefer, South Shore; 19. L.
Williams, Faith; 20. Cash Hetzel, Lemmon
Men’s All-Around: 1. J. Lord; 2. Klein; 3.
E. Lord; 4. Colton Musick, Pierre; 5. T. Wilcox;
6. L. Hapney; 7. Chuck Nelson; 8. B. Gallino; 9.
J. Melvin; 10. Treeby; 11. Carson Musick; 12.
Peters; 13. McPherson; 14. Schuelke; 15. Wied-
man; 16. Jensen; 17. Clint Nelson; 18. Wilson;
19. Dean; 20. D. McNenny
women’s All-Around: 1. Webb; 2. K. Nel-
son; 3. Painter, 4. Baker, 5. H. Fulton; 6. S.
Christensen; 7. Marone; 8. L. Hunt; 9. Peter-
son; 10. Jasper; 11. B. White; 12. H. Brown; 13.
Price; 14. K. Doll; 15. C. Woodward; 16. B. Nel-
son; 17. Miller; 18. Lensegrav; 19. Hollers; 20.
Hollenbeck
Mens Rookie: 1. L. Lord; 2. T. Schaack; 3.
W. Schaack; 4. Jensen; 5. Murphy; 6. Jacobs; 7.
T. Cowan; 8. Skibinski; 9. J. Schmidt; 10. Kash
Deal; 11. Dees; 12. C. McNenny; 13. J. Hapney;
14. Thyberg; 15. (tie) Cash Hetzel and Colby
Hetzel; 16. Bachman; 17. Ollerich; 18. Hoyt
Kraeger, Miller; 19. Tucker McDaniel
womens Rookie: 1. Vinson; 2. Teeslink; 3.
K. Miller; 4. Lensegrav; 5. S. Miller; 6. Katie
Anderson; 7. S. Doll; 8. Birkholtz; 9. Talsma;
10. Jill Jandreau; 11. Katie Jo Morgan, Valen-
tine, Neb.; 12. Steckelberg; 12. Foster; 14.
Molly Winckler, Brandon; 15. Lexy Williams;
16. E. Reurink; 17. Tana Bonnet, Rapid City;
18. Brandy Jo March, Hot Springs; 19.
Dahlgren 20. Whitney Sprunk, Hermosa
SDRA standings
after finals rodeo
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
859 2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: SATURDAY, OCT. J9, 2DJS
We Þod o Spe1oo1 So1urdog Co1] So1e due 1o
1Þe ueo1Þer pos1ponemen1s. N1oe run o] oo1-
11e 1n 1oun & o good oroud o] bugers. A verg
s1rong morKe1.
FEEDER CATTLE:
ROBERT R. YOUNG SR., UNION CENTER
71.............................CHAF-STF 722=...........$173.25
41..............................DWF-STF 642=...........$174.50
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 538=...........$189.00
22.............................HEFF-STF 623=...........$170.50
60...........................CHAF HFFS 651=...........$163.25
28 ..................DLK & DWF HFFS 578=...........$169.50
12...........................HEFF HFFS 486=...........$171.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF:
108 .........................DLACK-STF 526=...........$200.50
119 .........................DLACK-STF 458=...........$221.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 370=...........$216.50
RYAN VIG, OPAL
92 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 556=...........$184.25
15.........................FD/DLK-STF 438=...........$219.00
101....................FWF/DWF-HFF 522=...........$171.50
CARL & CASEY KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
30.........................FD/DLK-STF 476=...........$217.00
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 415=...........$210.00
GALE BRUNS, NEW UNDERWOOD
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 573=...........$187.00
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 491=...........$201.00
95...........................DLACK-HFF 544=...........$179.00
14...........................DLACK-HFF 451=...........$186.50
BAKER & THOMPSON, NEW UNDERWOOD
56 ...........................DLACK-STF 564=...........$182.50
11.......................DLK/DWF-STF 447=...........$215.00
19 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 467=...........$180.50
CARL BAUMAN, KADOKA
79.....................CHAF/FED-STF 480=...........$197.00
12.........................FD/DLK-STF 419=...........$211.00
29 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 455=...........$181.00
8 ......................CHAF/FED-HFF 357=...........$171.00
DENNIS & KAY SIELER, QUINN
21 ...........................DLACK-STF 458=...........$211.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 535=...........$194.00
RUBY GABRIEL, CREIGHTON
96.......................DLK/DWF-STF 558=...........$188.50
17.......................DLK/DWF-STF 488=...........$208.00
14..............................FWF-STF 582=...........$171.50
54 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 524=...........$176.75
16 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 428=...........$181.00
BRYAN CUNY, ALLEN
66 ...........................DLACK-STF 554=...........$189.00
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 435=...........$205.00
15...........................DLACK-HFF 464=...........$174.50
COY & LI2 FISHER, SCENIC
49 ...........................DLACK-STF 586=...........$184.50
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 482=...........$204.00
36..............................DWF-HFF 550=...........$172.75
13...........................DLACK-HFF 479=...........$184.50
GERALD (SONNY) POURIER, SCENIC
34 ...........................DLACK-STF 566=...........$183.50
9.............................DLACK-HFF 399=...........$180.00
28 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 537=...........$171.75
GARY ALLISON, CREIGHTON
20.........................FD/DLK-STF 599=...........$174.75
12 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 559=...........$166.50
RUTH & ISAACS, FAITH
27 ...........................DLACK-STF 489=...........$202.50
38 ...........................DLACK-STF 614=...........$176.75
GLENN & DELORIS PUCKETT, KYLE
71....................DK/FD/CH-STF 538=...........$188.00
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 447=...........$202.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND, RED OWL
107 ...................CHAF/DLK-STF 531=...........$189.00
28 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 446=...........$201.00
79 ............................CHAF-HFF 493=...........$180.25
13.....................CHAF/DLK-HFF 414=...........$181.00
JOHN NAESCHER, WALL
18.......................DLK/DWF-STF 580=...........$179.50
8.........................DLK/DWF-STF 437=...........$201.00
11.............................HEFF-STF 515=...........$178.00
21 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 532=...........$174.00
12 ............................HEFF-HFF 474=...........$170.00
JIM STRATMAN, BOX ELDER
14.............................CHAF-STF 528=...........$185.00
5...............................CHAF-STF 465=...........$199.00
17 ............................CHAF-HFF 483=...........$176.00
DALE BRASSFIELD, NEW UNDERWOOD
68 ...........................DLACK-STF 512=...........$193.50
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 427=...........$212.00
24...........................DLACK-HFF 421=...........$193.50
BEAU BENDIGO, HOWES
29....................DK/FD/CH-STF 571=...........$175.50
8...........................FD/DLK-STF 484=...........$196.00
43....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 527=...........$167.00
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 433=...........$175.00
DAN & JOHN OLDENBERG, PHILIP
82 ...........................DLACK-STF 535=...........$187.75
KEN BRONEMANN, ENNING
22.......................DLK/DWF-STF 618=...........$176.00
ROBERT SCHERER, MARTIN
15.......................DLK/DWF-STF 605=...........$173.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 572=...........$164.00
TERRY ELLERTON, CUSTER
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 646=...........$171.75
10...........................DLACK-HFF 628=...........$160.50
DAN & DIXIE OEDEKOVEN, STURGIS
9 .............................DLACK-STF 542=...........$183.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 526=...........$164.00
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, OCT. 22, 2DJS
J2,DSS Þeod o] oo111e so1d Þere on Tuesdog.
Mong, mong po11oods o] n1oe quo111g oo1ves
ond geor11ngs. We uou1d 11Ke 1o 1ÞonK o11 o]
our gord Þe1p ]or moK1ng 1Þ1s Þoppen. TÞ1s
uos o b1g dog. TÞonKs 1o o11 1Þe bugers &
oons1gnors ]or 1Þe1r 1ogo11g & oon]1denoe.
FEEDER CATTLE:
RICHARD JOBGEN, KADOKA
105 .........................DLACK-STF 531=...........$205.50
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 449=...........$214.00
RATTLE SNAKE RIDGE RANCH, NEWCASTLE
37 ...........................DLACK-STF 452=...........$217.00
121 .........................DLACK-STF 538=...........$200.00
21...........................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$200.00
118.........................DLACK-HFF 501=...........$186.00
PATRICIA OLIC, SCENIC
6 .............................DLACK-STF 411=...........$222.50
74 ...........................DLACK-STF 536=...........$202.75
REINERT & ENRIGHT, HOWES
87.......................DLK/DWF-STF 523=...........$200.00
95.......................DLK/DWF-STF 598=...........$183.75
23 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 464=...........$183.00
ROGER & TRAVIS LARSON, MURDO
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 500=...........$210.00
96 ...........................DLACK-STF 595=...........$182.75
SHAW RANCH INC., WHITE OWL
47 ...........................DLACK-STF 528=...........$200.00
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 556=...........$195.25
96 ...........................DLACK-STF 624=...........$184.00
JOHN EISENBRAUN, KADOKA
69 ...........................DLACK-STF 426=...........$224.00
108 .........................DLACK-STF 505=...........$208.75
105.........................DLACK-HFF 481=...........$203.00
107.........................DLACK-HFF 424=...........$197.00
DAVID FEES, MUD BUTTE
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 468=...........$210.50
96.......................DLK/DWF-STF 569=...........$181.50
17 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 452=...........$185.00
43 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 530=...........$174.00
DIAMOND S RANCH LLC, UNION CENTER
43.......................DLK/DWF-STF 490=...........$198.00
113.....................DLK/DWF-STF 593=...........$181.75
14 ......................FED/FWF-STF 576=...........$179.00
65 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 538=...........$170.00
TED & LUCILLE BERNDT, EAGLE BUTTE
164 .........................DLACK-STF 485=...........$212.50
102 .........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$194.25
CHUCK O'CONNOR, PHILIP
98.............................CHAF-STF 529=...........$199.00
180...........................CHAF-STF 611=...........$184.25
81 ............................CHAF-HFF 503=...........$184.50
184 ..........................CHAF-HFF 576=...........$170.25
ROSS WILLIAMS, PHILIP
80.............................CHAF-STF 686=...........$176.00
40.............................CHAF-STF 661=...........$173.00
80.............................CHAF-STF 726=...........$171.75
80 ............................CHAF-HFF 640=...........$170.50
84 ............................CHAF-HFF 676=...........$166.50
17 ............................CHAF-HFF 624=...........$165.25
WILCOX & RHODEN, UNION CENTER
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 461=...........$214.00
133 .........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$186.00
95 ...........................DLACK-STF 643=...........$179.00
MARTY BURNS, PHILIP
79.............................CHAF-STF 659=...........$179.50
79.............................CHAF-STF 550=...........$185.00
18 ...........................DLACK-STF 548=...........$191.00
6...............................CHAF-STF 431=...........$211.00
49 ............................CHAF-HFF 499=...........$174.75
100 ..........................CHAF-HFF 612=...........$170.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST, HOWES
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 442=...........$211.00
98.......................DLK/DWF-STF 544=...........$197.50
OWEN & JOSH FERGUSON, LONG VALLEY
78.......................DLK/DWF-STF 474=...........$211.00
105.....................DLK/DWF-STF 550=...........$195.50
RUSTY FOSTER, MEADOW
49 ...........................DLACK-STF 476=...........$197.25
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 562=...........$185.25
TJ GABRIEL, MIDLAND
34 ...........................DLACK-STF 633=...........$176.00
35...........................DLACK-HFF 601=...........$177.00
TOM & LACY CLEMENTS, PHILIP
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 415=...........$226.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 544=...........$191.00
16...........................DLACK-HFF 491=...........$188.00
DICK & ERIC GROPPER, LONG VALLEY
12 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 380=...........$236.00
44 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 475=...........$206.50
103 ....................FWF/DWF-STF 532=...........$189.25
26......................FWF/DWF-HFF 409=...........$182.50
74......................FWF/DWF-HFF 499=...........$175.25
GARY & JULIE NIXON, PHILIP
60 ...........................DLACK-STF 633=...........$181.50
MERLE HICKS, MARTIN
106.......................FD/DLK-STF 543=...........$189.00
87 ...........................DLACK-STF 655=...........$179.00
81 ..............................FED-STF 671=...........$178.25
MCDANIEL BROTHERS., PHILIP
56 ...........................DLACK-STF 430=...........$220.50
97 ...........................DLACK-STF 518=...........$202.50
59...........................DLACK-HFF 400=...........$199.00
92...........................DLACK-HFF 476=...........$193.75
10 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 435=...........$186.00
ROBERT L HARTSHORN, SPEARFISH
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 471=...........$200.00
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 552=...........$187.00
14...........................DLACK-HFF 469=...........$182.00
ROBERT COMPTON, HOWES
12.......................DLK/DWF-STF 398=...........$228.00
46....................DK/FD/CH-STF 511=...........$189.75
8........................FWF/DWF-HFF 351=...........$190.00
24....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 474=...........$170.00
JARMAN RANCH, MIDLAND
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 509=...........$199.50
94.......................DLK/DWF-STF 627=...........$180.75
20...........................DLACK-HFF 504=...........$176.00
51..............................DWF-HFF 596=...........$166.50
PAT & ROSE TRASK, WASTA
126.....................DLK/DWF-STF 407=...........$213.00
90.......................DLK/DWF-STF 481=...........$195.25
PAUL SCHNOSE, BUFFALO GAP
25 ...........................DLACK-STF 483=...........$205.50
48 ...........................DLACK-STF 551=...........$190.00
PHILIP HOY LIVING TRUST, GILLETTE, WY
58 ..............................FED-STF 386=...........$236.50
110.......................FD/DLK-STF 462=...........$211.50
12..............................FED-HFF 312=...........$216.00
160............................FED-HFF 423=...........$209.00
PHILIP KRUSE, SCENIC
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 523=...........$191.00
RONALD OPSTEDAHL, UNION CENTER
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 436=...........$212.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 544=...........$189.00
27...........................DLACK-HFF 496=...........$175.25
GARY HERRINGTON, HERMOSA
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 515=...........$192.00
51 ...........................DLACK-STF 610=...........$175.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 505=...........$165.50
GARY WILLIAMS, WALL
36 ...........................DLACK-STF 433=...........$214.00
24 ...........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$184.50
DUSTIN LUR2, PHILIP
12....................DK/FD/CH-STF 433=...........$201.00
27.....................CHAF/FED-STF 556=...........$187.00
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 454=...........$175.00
11 ............................CHAF-HFF 521=...........$171.00
MIKE PIROUTEK, MILESVILLE
6...............................CHAF-STF 556=...........$184.50
21.............................CHAF-STF 614=...........$178.00
ETTIE MAE WHIRLWIND HORSE, INTERIOR
13 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 457=...........$205.00
19 ...........................DLACK-STF 564=...........$185.50
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 446=...........$171.00
STEPHEN RIGGINS, KADOKA
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 486=...........$206.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 582=...........$178.00
STEVE CLEMENTS, PHILIP
8 .............................DLACK-STF 350=...........$239.00
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 466=...........$213.00
13...........................DLACK-HFF 353=...........$213.00
12...........................DLACK-HFF 433=...........$190.00
TREVOR WILLIAMS, INTERIOR
24 ...........................DLACK-STF 518=...........$200.00
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 620=...........$175.00
BILL MUNROE, UNION CENTER
36.........................FD/DLK-STF 453=...........$207.00
56.........................FD/DLK-STF 560=...........$183.25
9 ..........................FD/DLK-HFF 424=...........$184.50
57 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 503=...........$166.50
ANDREW J. SCHOFIELD, BELVIDERE
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 433=...........$217.00
80.......................DLK/DWF-STF 518=...........$197.50
20 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 415=...........$193.00
22 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 484=...........$178.00
CARMICHAEL & DRESSEN, NEW UNDERWOOD
20 ...........................DLACK-STF 456=...........$211.50
93 ...........................DLACK-STF 578=...........$182.50
12...........................DLACK-HFF 468=...........$184.00
BILL BURGAN, ROBERTS, MT
9 .............................DLACK-STF 426=...........$209.00
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 497=...........$200.00
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 605=...........$185.50
14...........................DLACK-HFF 454=...........$171.00
BILL HAMANN, WALL
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 555=...........$190.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 531=...........$170.00
BRAVE BULL CREEK, MIDLAND
13.........................FD/DLK-STF 517=...........$194.50
BRIAN WILCOX, STURGIS
4 .............................DLACK-STF 373=...........$237.00
6 .............................DLACK-STF 469=...........$211.00
44 ...........................DLACK-STF 590=...........$179.00
16...........................DLACK-HFF 471=...........$178.50
35...........................DLACK-HFF 556=...........$168.25
BRUCE & SHARON BARNETT, WALL
6.........................DLK/DWF-STF 541=...........$188.50
CAPUTA LAND CO LLC, CAPUTA
81 ...........................DLACK-STF 713=...........$171.50
CASEY SAMMONS, MIDLAND
25....................DK/FD/CH-STF 511=...........$190.50
9......................DK/FD/CH-STF 594=...........$177.00
CHARLES A KRUSE, INTERIOR
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 460=...........$205.00
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 545=...........$192.00
21...........................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$194.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY, PHILIP
15.......................DLK/DWF-STF 456=...........$201.00
92.......................DLK/DWF-STF 605=...........$180.75
LYNN & BEN SMITH, NEW UNDERWOOD
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 477=...........$205.00
90 ...........................DLACK-STF 602=...........$180.00
KOLETTE STRUBLE, KADOKA
5.........................DLK/DWF-STF 390=...........$237.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$197.00
9.............................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$187.00
22...........................DLACK-HFF 497=...........$177.00
KEN KAUFMAN, ROBERTS, MT
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 553=...........$190.00
32 ...........................DLACK-STF 616=...........$184.50
LAUREL ANN LAWRENCE, TIOGA, ND
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 432=...........$216.00
21.......................DLK/DWF-STF 520=...........$190.00
17 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 424=...........$173.00
CHASE RANCH LLC, MIDLAND
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 475=...........$209.00
66 ...........................DLACK-STF 578=...........$182.00
8.............................DLACK-HFF 440=...........$190.00
51...........................DLACK-HFF 558=...........$174.00
CODY & MANDI SKOGEN, WHITE
8.........................DLK/DWF-STF 460=...........$213.00
18 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 577=...........$177.25
21 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 512=...........$172.50
LEVIN & CASTEEL, HEREFORD
22.......................DLK/DWF-STF 414=...........$224.00
41.......................DLK/DWF-STF 492=...........$201.00
97.......................DLK/DWF-STF 562=...........$184.50
41 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 430=...........$186.00
80 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 514=...........$175.00
BASEL & LAMONT, UNION CENTER
14.........................FD/DLK-STF 489=...........$197.00
45....................DK/FD/CH-STF 577=...........$176.00
DARWIN SCHOCK, HERMOSA
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 766=...........$152.50
DUSTIN W. & WES REEVES, OWANKA
10 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 892=...........$155.50
MEEKS RANCH, INTERIOR
47.......................DLK/DWF-STF 424=...........$210.00
10.........................FD/DLK-STF 342=...........$203.00
93.......................DLK/DWF-STF 527=...........$187.75
34 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 394=...........$175.00
94 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 480=...........$171.00
LARRY GRAVATT, ELM SPRINGS
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 427=...........$209.00
42.......................DLK/DWF-STF 523=...........$194.00
48 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 504=...........$177.00
MARK LANTIS, BOX ELDER
46.......................DLK/DWF-STF 402=...........$231.00
16.......................DLK/DWF-STF 496=...........$200.00
31...........................DLACK-HFF 375=...........$210.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 451=...........$188.00
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE, PHILIP
26 ...........................DLACK-STF 374=...........$209.00
41 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$195.50
43 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$192.75
13 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 311=...........$201.00
7 ......................CHAF/FED-HFF 442=...........$183.00
35 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 428=...........$183.00
MARVIN WILLIAMS, OWANKA
20 ...........................DLACK-STF 445=...........$210.00
46 ...........................DLACK-STF 589=...........$184.25
18...........................DLACK-HFF 440=...........$189.00
MAX & TOM BOWEN, NEWELL
76.......................DLK/DWF-STF 584=...........$177.75
10 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 564=...........$168.00
MIKE & BONITA HENRY, EDGEMONT
4.........................DLK/DWF-STF 436=...........$208.00
29.......................DLK/DWF-STF 579=...........$175.00
19 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 507=...........$165.50
MORRIS & ANDY LINN, ELM SPRINGS
104 .........................DLACK-STF 496=...........$197.00
93 ...........................DLACK-STF 566=...........$187.50
19...........................DLACK-HFF 410=...........$195.00
66...........................DLACK-HFF 471=...........$182.00
NICHOLAS HOBART, HILL CITY
23 ...........................DLACK-STF 533=...........$185.00
O M IWAN & SONS, MIDLAND
88.........................FD/DLK-STF 442=...........$201.50
13......................FWF/DWF-HFF 284=...........$187.00
109....................FWF/DWF-HFF 412=...........$186.50
12............................XDFD-HFF 332=...........$152.00
RICHARD BERTOLINO, ROBERTS, MT
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 626=...........$176.00
8 ..........................FD/DLK-HFF 602=...........$165.00
ROBERT GRAV, HERMOSA
7.............................DLACK-HFF 590=...........$163.00
ROSETH CATTLE CO., PHILIP
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 467=...........$212.00
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 568=...........$186.00
45...........................DLACK-HFF 533=...........$176.00
ADDISON & WILLIAMS, NORRIS
10.....................FWF/HEFF-STF 403=...........$208.00
VERNON SCHLECHT, HERMOSA
13.......................DLK/DWF-STF 470=...........$209.00
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 585=...........$168.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 595=...........$162.00
YEARLINGS:
SIDNEY FAIRBANKS, PHILIP
330 .........................DLACK-STF 851=...........$168.75
71 ...........................DLACK-STF 792=...........$166.00
ROSETH CATTLE CO., PHILIP
179 .........................DLACK-STF 949=...........$161.75
63.....................CHAF/FED-STF 964=...........$160.50
57.............................HEFF-STF 973=...........$155.50
BERNARD NESS, CAPUTA
62.......................DLK/DWF-STF 832=...........$170.75
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 757=...........$171.00
MARK & KAREN FOLAND, MIDLAND
100 ....................DLK/DWF-HFF 802=...........$162.00
HAROLD MILLER, NEWELL
9.......................CHAF/FED-STF 919=...........$153.50
11 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 939=...........$150.00
PAUL SLOVEK, PHILIP
82 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 823=...........$156.50
81 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 847=...........$155.75
RAPID CREEK RANCH, CANTON
33..............................FED-HFF 923=...........$153.50
GENE OR SHERYL MICHAEL, PHILIP
24 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 869=...........$156.00
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG, KADOKA
7......................DK/FD/CH-STF 1,025=........$142.50
RUSSELL NELSON, LEMMON
18.............................HEFF-STF 744=...........$164.00
28.............................HEFF-STF 821=...........$160.00
15......................FWF/DWF-HFF 787=...........$155.50
RASMUSSEN LEHMAN 33 RANCH, BELVIDERE
11...........................DLACK-HFF 712=...........$152.00
MCILRAVY RANCH, PHILIP
48 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 774=...........$159.75
14.....................CHAF/FED-STF 710=...........$151.00
RON ADAM, STURGIS
21.........................FD/DLK-STF 732=...........$169.50
13 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 568=...........$158.00
33 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 688=...........$156.00
(SEE CORRESPONDING AD FOR UPCOMING SALES)
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567-3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman & AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985-5486
Ccll (605} 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544 3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347-0151
(605} 641-1042
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9 2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R CALF USA! R CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859 2577
PhiIip, SD
UPCOM1NG SAL£S:
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2013: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE. CALVES: 12.00 MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EST. 5000 HEAD
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED.
WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS - 600 MOSTLY DLK & A FEW FED & CHAF X CLVS; FS, NI . 450-
600= DEAL & DEAL - 450 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= TRASK - 320 DLK MOSTLY
STFS; FS,NI . 500= CAMMACK - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS . 550-650= DEERING -
250 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 600= DALY - 250 DLK CLVS; FS . 550-600= VIG - 220
DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= LONG - 200 CHAF X STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= GRUBL -
200 CEFT FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI . 550= CROSBIE - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550=
ANDERS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-575= ALDREN - 150 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 500-
570= LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT - 150 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= LAMPHERE &
GRUBL - 130 MOSTLY CHAF X & A FEW DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600= TRUEBLOOD &
TWISS - 130 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= COLLINS - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-
550= BALDWIN - 110 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-575= GOLDEN WILLOW RANCH -
100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= BACHAND - 100 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-
550= BREWER - 75 DLK CLVS; FS . 450-500= MARLER - 75 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI
(ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-600= CHORD - 70 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550=
SHARP & SIMMONS - 70 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 550= KNIFE - 70 DLK STFS; FS .
450-500= BASEL - 70 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 450-525= SHULL - 65 DLK CLVS;
FS,NI . 500= TRUEBLOOD - 54 DLK CLVS . 400-500= MAY - 50 DLK & FED CLVS;
FS,NI,AN . 550= MARLER - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI (ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-
600= SIMONS - 40 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= SCULL - 40 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI . 500-550= HEBB - 40 DLK CLVS; FS . 450= BILLS - 25 DLK CLVS; FS . 525=
GRIMES - 20 DLK CLVS; FS . 500= BECKWITH - 22 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500=
YEARLINGS: SCULL - 20 DLK EXPOSED HFFS . 750-800=
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE. YEARLINGS
9.00 MT CALVES 11.00 MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATINC
12,000 HEAD
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEH-
IFIED. CUNY & SONS - 500 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= BUCHHOL2 & RISLOV -
500 DLK STFS; FS . 500-625= SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - 400 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 550-
600= WEBER - 350 DLK, DWF & FWF CLVS; FS . 500-600= CARLEY RANCH - 350 DLK
CLVS; FS,NI . 550= C. WILLIAMS - 340 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= WISHAR
& MANGUS - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= JOHNSON & LAMONT - 300 DLK
CLVS; FS,NI (ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-575= FIELDS - 300 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .
500-600= TRIPLE S LIVESTOCK - 300 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= WILLERT
& WILLERT - 275 CHAF X CLVS; FS (FEW FED ANC FEPLC HFFS} . 600-650= M.
WILLIAMS - 250 FANCY FED ANC CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI (2 LDS STFS & 1 LD HFFS} . 600-
700= MADER & MADER - 220 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-575= DIAMOND S
RANCH - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= BRENNAN - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI,ASV . 450-550= JOHNSTON RANCH - 200 FED X & CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 500-
550= RIGGINS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550= WILSON BROTHERS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS
. 500-550= WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK - 200 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 450-
550= L. JONES RANCH - 200 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= KC BIELMAIER RANCH -
200 DLK CLVS; FS . 600= BUCHERT & BUCHERT - 200 FED CLVS; FS,NI . 600-700=
VANDERMAY & VANDERMAY - 190 DLK ANC STFS; FS,NI . 575= LIVERMONT RANCH -
175 DLK HFFS; FS,NI . 500= MANSFIELD - 160 DLK STFS; FS . 500-600= STOUT -
160 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 550-600= O'DANIEL - 160 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= PAUL-
SON - 150 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= VOGELGESANG - 140 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-
600= SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - 140 DLK STFS . 575= KEFFELER - 130 DLK & DWF
CLVS; FS,NI . 525-575= JULSON - 125 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 450-550= O'ROURKE -
125 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-525= O'CONNELL - 120 DLK CLVS; FS . 550= DAHL -
115 DLK CLVS; FS . 500-600= CANTRELL - 110 DLK CLVS; FS . 500-550= HARTY
RANCH - 110 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= SHARP - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-
600= DAVIS - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN . 550= O'DANIEL - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .
550= REEVES & REEVES - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500= BIRKELAND - 100 DLK & DWF
CLVS; FS . 600= HEATHERSHAW - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 550= PRANG - 100 DLK
STFS; FS,NI . 550-600= FERGUSON - 100 HEFF & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600=
KNIGHT - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 450-550= SHUCK BROTHERS - 100 DLK &
FED LIM X CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= HEATHERSHAW - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 600=
VOLMER - 90 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 570= CAPP RANCH - 90 DWF & FWF STFS . 450-
500= ECKERT - 85 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 600-650= COE - 85 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI
(ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 575= JULSON - 80 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= BARRY - 80 DLK &
DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= HALL - 70 FED & DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= HUNSAKER
CATTLE CO - 45 MOSTLY DWF FIFST CFOSS STFS; FS,NI,AN . 600=; 25 FANCY DWF
FIFST CFOSS HFFS; FS,NI,AN . 600= MCKAY - 65 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-
575= SAMMONS - 65 FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI . 600-650= DENKE - 65 DLK STFS; FS,NI
. 575-600= CARLSON - 65 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= ROSETH - 60 DLK STFS; FS
. 600= ENNEN - 60 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 600= WILSEY - 55 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI . 500-550= VANDENBOS - 51 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500= PFEIFER - 50
DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= HANNUM - 50 DOSTLY DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= STRAND -
45 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= DOOLITTLE - 45 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 600-
650= HANSON - 45 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600= DARTT - 40 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 600=
DAVEY - 40 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= RYPKEMA - 35 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .
500-550= BARRETT - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= MEINEN - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI
. 500= HAUK - 26 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550= BEARHEELS - 15 DLK CLVS; FS . 400-
500= YOUNG - 15 DLK CLVS; FS . 400-500= REICHERT - 15 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI
. 450-500=
YEARLINGS: LONG - 400 DLK SPAY HFFS (5 LD ALL SAME SOFT} . 800= BRUCH
RANCH - 50 DLK TESTED OPEM HFFS . 900= BUCHANAN - 20 DLK STFS . 950= BIER-
WAGEN - 6 DLK OPEN HFFS . 950=
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE & WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE. WEIGH-UPS 9.00MT BRED CATTLE 12.00MT EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
DISPERSIONS: JOE & LARAE CARLEY ºAGE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK COMINC 3 & 4 YF
OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25. STEVE ISKE ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK &
DWF 2 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-20. MIKE PIROUTEK ºCOM-
PLETE DISPERSION" - 50 DLK & DWF MOSTLY 5 YF OLDS COWS; DFED.CHAF; CLV. 3-15
FOF 65 DAYS GALEN NIEDERWERDER ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 25 FANCY DLK AI'D 3 &
4 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FINAL ANSWEF; CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. HEFF; CLV. 4-1; 10
FANCY DLK AI'D HFFS; DFED. DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. DLK; CLV.4-1 JJ HUNT
ºDISPERSION OF THREES" - 45 DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25 FOF
60 DAYS RYON RYPKEMA ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 30 DLK 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN
MOUTH COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV.2-28 FOF 45 DAYS
BRED HEIFERS: MILLAR ANGUS - 80 FANCY DLK AI'D HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL AN-
SWEF; CLV. 2-18 FOF 2 DAYS; 40 FANCY DLK DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL
ANSWEF; CLV. 3-5 FOF 20 DAYS; 35 FANCY DLK DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL
ANSWEF; CLV.4-1 FOF 30 DAYS STEVE MCDANIEL - 100 DLK ULTFASOUND AI'D HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-15 (SOFTED INTO CLVC CFOUPS} BILLY MARTIN ÷ 93 FANCY ULTFA-
SOUND DLK ANC HFFS; DFED LDW SONS OF SAV DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-1 (SOFTED INTO SHOFT
CLVC PEFIODS} MARK WELDON ÷ 75 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW SONS OF FINAL ANSWEF; CLV.
2-20 FOF 45 DAYS DANNY ARNESON - 70 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED FIFST CALF
HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS ANC; CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS} MELVIN AR-
NESON ÷ 40 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED FIFST CALF HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS
ANC; CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS}
STOCK COWS: ED MILLER - 30 DWF 5 TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FED ANC; CLV. 4-
1 BEAU BENDIGO ÷ 25 DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-20 MIKE &
LORI JACOBSEN ÷ 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK DALANCEF; CLV. 3-1
BROKEN MOUTH COWS: ROSETH CATTLE CO - 50 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-25 MILLAR ANGUS ÷ 35 FANCY DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS (COMMEFICAL &
FECISTEFED}; DFED. CONNEALLY SONS OF FINAL PFODUCT; CLV. 3-1 FOF 60 DAYS ED
MILLER ÷ 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.FED ANC; CLV.4-1
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or tDS-
tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
PR_10-24-13_Layout 1.pdf12.59 MB