Login

Pioneer Review, October 18, 2012

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

Pioneer review
$
1
00
Includes Tax
A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 8
Volume 107
October 18, 2012
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........$8.15
Any Pro .............................$7.35
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.46
Milo .......................................$6.67
Corn.......................................$6.82
Millet...................................$30.00
Sunflower Seeds................$22.50
Cross
country:
eight to
state
11
X-ray
upgrade
2
Fridge
Door
3
“Dig Pink”
volleyball
and FCCLA
9
Two candidates are running for
the position of Haakon County
sheriff. They are Fred Koester and
William Morrison.
Fred Koester
Family: I have been married to
my wife, Missy, for 20 years. We are
in the final stage of raising the last
of seven children; hers, mine and
ours. Our daughter, Libbi, is the
last child we have at home and she
is a freshman here at Philip High
School. We have six grandchildren
that are truly a gift from God. I
may add that if our future is in the
hands of these children, Lord have
mercy. We love them all.
How long in area? I moved to
Philip in March of this year. My
wife and daughter moved here in
May. I grew up in Murdo and we
raised our children there before
moving to Philip.
Why are you the best candi-
date? I am a certified law enforce-
ment officer within the state of
South Dakota. I have approxi-
mately 12 years law enforcement
experience – over seven years as
Chief of Police in Murdo, and four
and a half years as county sheriff.
This experience has allowed me to
gain insight, patience, good judge-
ment and understanding as it is
applied to my daily duties.
What are your top strengths
for this position? Law enforce-
ment is a career that you learn as
you go. Many of the tools that are
applied to this profession are
learned by what you have encoun-
tered in the past. With experience
your priorities change and you
quickly realize that your job is
working with and for the people in
your community, not against them.
You learn that respect and dignity
go a long way, even with the locals
who you must sometimes arrest. I
truly believe that common sense
when using officer discretion is one
of our greatest tools. I believe that
I am fair and listen to both sides of
every story. I then look at each sit-
uation as a whole and try to make
an educated decision before I react.
I understand the role of the sheriff
in regard to law enforcement as it
pertains to a smaller community
such as Haakon County.
William Morrison
Family: My wife, Marcy, and I
have three children. TJ is 10 years
old, Spencer six and Luther is four.
Most of our extended family live in
and around the Haakon County
area.
How long in area? I grew up
north of Philip. I went to country
school from kindergarten through
eighth grade and graduated from
Philip High School in 1993. I went
to South Dakota State University
for 1-1/2 years. I came back and
worked for a couple of ranchers. In
April of 1997, I moved to the Rapid
City area. I have been in the con-
struction industry since that time.
Why are you the best candi-
date? I am very interested in the
safety of the public. I intend to
have yearly meetings with high
school students and talk to them
about drinking and driving and
other things that may be of con-
cern. I want to make sure that no
one is afraid to come to our county
and have a good time as long as
they have a safe way home. I will
try to be a phone call away if you
don’t.
What are your top strengths?
I strive to be one of the best at
everything I do. I have done a lot of
public speaking and dealing with
people one on one. I will do my very
best at taking care of the whole
county and my door will always be
open. I am not afraid of questions
and will find the answers.
Haakon County sheriff candidates
Fred Koester. William Morrison
Two candidates are running for
the position of Haakon County
state’s attorney. They are Gay
Tollefson and Chip Kemnitz.
On October 15, Secretary of
State Jason Gant made the follow-
ing statement, “We are 10 days
away from the voter registration
deadline of October 22, and 25 days
away from election day on Novem-
ber 6. As of today, 17,369 South
Dakotans have cast an absentee
ballot and there is still plenty of
time to make your voice heard.”
Registration may be done at the
Haakon County auditor’s office, the
municipal finance office, secretary
of state’s office, or any location that
provides driver’s licenses, military
recruitment or assistance to the
disabled as provided by the Depart-
ment of Human Services. Voter
registration can also be done at any
location that provides Supplemen-
tal Nutrition Assistance Program,
Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families, or Special Supplemental
Nutrition Program for Women, In-
fants and Children.
Gay Tollefson
Family: I am the mother of two
children and I have four grandchil-
dren. My daughter, Chris, and her
family live in Rapid City, and my
son, Mike, and his family live in
Green River, Wyo. My mother, Joy
Klima, lives near Phoenix and my
sisters, Linda Smith and Lola
Roseth, live in Haakon County.
How long in area? I moved
back to God’s country 11 years ago.
I was born and raised in the
Belvidere area.
Why are you the best candi-
date? I have been privileged to
serve as Bennett County state’s at-
torney as well as Haakon County
state’s attorney. In Bennett County
we have up to 100 open cases at a
time. The challenge as a part-time
state’s attorney has taught me how
to utilize my time, how to work at
saving the county money and how
to prosecute everything from mur-
der, rape and assaults, to child
abuse, and drug and alcohol abuse.
Even though I have chosen not to
run for re-election in Bennett
County, I believe that experience is
invaluable to being state’s attorney
in Haakon County.
What are your top strengths
for this position? Much to the
consternation of a few people, I
treat everyone the same under the
same situations. No favorites. This
sometimes makes a state’s attorney
unpopular. We need to be tough on
the one hand, but yet have common
sense and compassion on the other.
I believe that a state’s attorney
must set an example for our young
people. I try to attend all home
games, not only because I enjoy
sports, but also because I want the
kids to know that I am not just a
person in the legal system to be
afraid of and to dislike. I also try to
attend all fundraisers and other
community events because I feel it
is important to be an interested
member of the communities.
Chip Kemnitz
Family: I have been married to
Julianne for nearly 48 years. Ju-
lianne is retired, but formerly
served as vice-president at First
National Bank in Philip. We have
three children, all of whom were
raised and educated in Haakon
County. All are now highly produc-
tive professionals in their own
right. We have been blessed with
nine grandchildren to date.
How long in area? I have lived
here 42 years. Despite some oppor-
tunities to leave, I declined, know-
ing there isn’t a better place to
raise a family, nor better people to
serve, nor better friends to be
found.
Why are you the best candi-
date? Thirty-eight years in the po-
sition. I have a firm grasp of the re-
quirements of the office, whether
civil, criminal or administrative. I
know the commissioners and their
values; I know our officers and of-
ficials and highly respect the job
they do for the taxpayer; I know
how all their respective duties in-
teract with one another. I am well
acquainted with Administrative
Procedures Act, Open Meetings
Law and the requirements of due
process. As Special Assistant Attor-
ney General, I also assist the state
in enforcement of child support ob-
ligations. My partner serves as
deputy at no additional cost to tax-
payers.
What are your top strengths
for the position? Experience,
leadership and commitment. Aside
from the state’s attorney office, I
have chaired the South Dakota
Racing Commission, the South
Dakota Lottery Commission and
currently chair the South Dakota
Commission on Gaming. I serve as
chair of the Continuing Education
Committee of the Association of
Racing Commissioners Interna-
tional. In that capacity, I have
made presentations and partici-
pated in panel discussions in sev-
eral United States jurisdictions. I
have served in the military (33
years, retired colonel); I have held
the positions of Inspector General,
and Judge Advocate General of the
South Dakota Army National
Guard. I was awarded the Legion
of Merit, this nation’s highest
peacetime award in the military. In
1989, Governor Mickelson honored
me as a Volunteer of the Year. I
served six years on the South
Dakota State Bar Disciplinary
Board, my last as chairman, and
currently serve on the Client Secu-
rity Fund. I have been rated an A-
V attorney by Martindale Hubble
for more than 32 years, the highest
rating in legal ability and ethical
standards (peer review).
State’s attorney candidates
Gay Tollefson Chip Kemnitz
by Del Bartels
The Monday, October 15, meet-
ing of the Haakon District Board of
Education mainly involved a pres-
entation over the 2012 fiscal year
audit.
Business Manager Britni Ross
stated that the Auditor General in
Pierre has received the report, and
has offered no recommendations
for changes.
“One hit from the audit, the
same one we always get, is because
of too small of a staff for checks and
balances,” said Ross. “The impor-
tant thing is they gave us a gold
star, and we are off and running for
the next year.”
Some details included that “we
are in control of only two percent of
our revenue, so what do you do?”
said Ross. Taxes are set by the
county and state, and other sources
of funds are set by interest rates or
other reasons.
The district seems to have access
to a large percentage of its fund-
ings if an emergency or unprece-
dented cause for spending should
arise. Over 28 percent of its operat-
ing funds are considered unre-
stricted net assets, which is not to
say those funds cannot be reallo-
cated without a desperate cause.
Two possibly negative points
were noted. The audit gave a 70
percent capital asset condition to
the district. This translated to
“stuff getting older and depreciat-
ing, and not getting replaced,” said
Ross. Most of this represents build-
ings, for which nothing can be done
until the need eventually comes for
demolition and rebuilding. The
audit simply indicated the need to
replace.
The district has budgeted in such
a way that some expenses could be
paid out of reserves. This has not
had to happen. Expenses are com-
ing out of current or behind in-
come, but not out of future income.
Ross said that the food service is
the one area where increased ex-
penses are obvious. “All the other
schools have had to supplement,
but we haven’t,” she said. “The
fruit is running us into the hole.”
Board member Doug Thorson
said, “We set our budget at the be-
ginning of the year, and then food
costs jump. What can we do about
it?” Discussion was held on the per-
centage of students who qualify for
the government’s reduced or free
lunch program. The school year did
start out with the cupboards bare
and had to be restocked. A re-
arranged lunch line might help dis-
tribute the portions more to the in-
dividual student’s appetite. Access
to more food is appreciated by stu-
dents who exercise more and have
a higher metabolism.
September’s costs for substitutes
came to $2,675.74 for an equivalent
of 31.5 days of classroom substitu-
tion. Hourly wages came to over
$22,446 for 2,022.75 total hours.
Board members were paid for their
last three meetings, at $50 per
member per meeting. This totaled
$1,050. Other bills payable October
15 totaled over $37,906.
The recent parent-teacher con-
ferences had an 82 percent turn out
for parents with students in grades
eight through twelve, 98 percent
for in town elementary, and 100
percent for the Milesville and Deep
Creek schools. Milesville has
earned the distinction from the
state level as an “exemplary
school.” Good comments were made
by Philip parents about the avail-
ability of baby sitting and about
the building tours in Philip. A vol-
unteer survey for parents came
back with a slight disproval with
the lunch system, but included
comments that nothing practical
could be done to improve the situa-
tion. Parents also wanted commu-
nications with them to be im-
proved, beyond sending notes home
with students, a daily updated
website, an open door policy and
activities being published in the
newspaper.
Open gym for the public has now
been expanded to have men in the
high school gymnasium, mostly
basketball, to women exercising in
the elementary gym, mostly volley-
ball. This open time is every
Wednesday evening, starting at
6:00.
The annual social Donuts for
Dads will be Thursday, October 18,
in the cafeteria before school. The
end of the first quarter will be the
same day. Picture retakes will be
done October 31.
The next Board of Education
meeting will be at 6:00 p.m., Mon-
day, November 19, in room A-1 of
the high school.
School board reviews audit
Superintendent Keven Morehart and Board of Education President Scott Brech
display two of the Lifetouch Photography plastic posters of Philip High School sen-
ior athletes that will be displayed on the east wall of the gymnasium for the rest
of this year. The posters will be given to the students after graduation.
Correction
The next Haakon County com-
missioners’ monthly meeting has
been changed from November 6
to November 8 so the board of
commissioners can also canvass
the general election results.
I apologize for my switching of
the dates in last weeks newspa-
per.
Del Bartels
Midwest Cooperatives has an-
nounced it is expanding its agron-
omy service center located in
Philip.
In this first of a three-phase
plan, construction will expand the
cooperative’s current liquid fertil-
izer capabilities, as well as, con-
struct a new 6,000-ton dry fertilizer
plant, seed warehouse and seed-
treatment facility.
This expansion should decrease
customer load times from 45 min-
utes to less than 10 minutes. The
company is also adding automation
that allows for inducting liquid
products on to dry fertilizer to in-
crease nutrient efficiencies.
The new dry fertilizer plant will
be situated on land already owned
by Midwest Cooperatives. There is
available space for the future ac-
commodation of the Canadian-Pa-
cific railroad as it increases its
train sizes in western South
Dakota. The phase one enhance-
ment will allow the plant to unload
25 cars of fertilizer in six hours.
“This change will affect a lot of
people in a pretty big area,” said
Jay Baxter, Philip location man-
ager. “We have like a 600 ton plant,
and they are going to make it 10
times larger. It’ll be more auto-
mated and less laborsome for our
employees.”
Details of subsequent phases are
not final, but phase two plans in-
clude grain storage expansion with
additional train loading and truck
unloading capacity in phase three.
“Our goal is to provide our pa-
trons both speed and space at our
facilities that are unrivaled in the
area. Our board and management
are firmly committed to growing
alongside our customers to ensure
Midwest Cooperatives is able to
meet their needs now and in the fu-
ture,” said Milt Handcock, general
manager, based out of Pierre.
Expansion of agronomy
service center in Philip
Annually, applications for the
Environmental Quality Incentives
Program (EQIP) and the Conserva-
tion Stewardship Program (CSP)
are batched for funding considera-
tion. November 16 is the date by
which an operator or landowner
must sign an application at their
local Natural Resources Conserva-
tion Service office for fiscal year
2013 funding consideration.
The EQIP program provides fi-
nancial and technical assistance to
help producers implement volun-
tary conservation practices to im-
prove their natural resources. Pay-
ment is provided for variety of
practices to maintain or improve
resource concerns such as water
quality, grazing land health and
productivity, soil erosion and soil
quality, and wildlife habitat devel-
opment.
The CSP encourages land stew-
ards to improve their conservation
performance by installing and
adopting additional activities, and
improving, maintaining, and man-
aging existing activities on agricul-
tural land and nonindustrial pri-
vate forest land.
“The ranking period for these
two popular conservation programs
is quickly approaching,” said Jeff
Vander Wilt, assistant state conser-
vationist for programs with the
NRCS. Applications for all NRCS
conservation programs are contin-
uously accepted, however the appli-
cation batching date, or call for
ranking, is November 16 for both
EQIP and CSP. He encourages any
operator or landowner not to wait
until the last minute to visit their
local United States Department of
Agriculture Service Center.
For more information about
EQIP and CSP, contact your local
NRCS office. For more information
on technical assistance and conser-
vation programs, go to http://www.
sd.nrcs.usda.gov.
Program deadlines for
EQIP/CSP November 16
E-MAIL ADDRESSES:
ADS: ads@pioneer-review.com
NEWS: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
SUBSCRIPTIONS: subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments on any news
story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the right to edit any offensive ma-
terial and also to edit to fill the allotted space. We also reserve the right to reject any or all
letters.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding Monday at 5:00 p.m.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper should be mailed
or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office. All letters must bear the original
signature, address and telephone number of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run the two weeks
prior to an election.
The “Letters” column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to express their opin-
ions. It is not meant to replace advertising as a means of reaching people.
This publication’s goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of free speech. Your
comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
Subscription Rates: For Haakon, Jackson,
and Jones counties, Creighton, Wall, Quinn,
Marcus, Howes, Plainview, and Hayes ad-
dresses: $36.00 per year (+ Tax); Elsewhere:
$42.00 per year.
South Dakota residents are required to pay
sales tax.
Periodicals postage paid at Philip, SD.
Postmaster, send change of address notice
to: Pioneer Review, PO Box 788, Philip, SD
57567; or FAX to: 605/859-2410.
Website Subscription Rate: $36.
E-mail address:
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
website: www.pioneer-review.com
Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High
of 55F. Winds from the NW at
35 to 40 mph with gusts to 55
mph. Thursday Night: Partly
cloudy in the evening, then
clear. Low of 32F. Breezy.
Winds from the NW at 10 to 30 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy in the morning,
then clear. High of 64F. Winds from
the SSW at 5 to 10 mph.
Friday Night:Overcast in the evening,
then partly cloudy. Low of 34F.
Winds from the SSW at 5 to 15
mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. High of
79F. Winds from the West at 5
to 10 mph shifting to the South
in the afternoon.
Saturday Night: Clear. Low of
41F. Winds from the East at 5
to 10 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy.
High of 70F. Breezy.
Winds from the NW at
10 to 20 mph.
Sunday Night: Mostly
cloudy. Low of 37F.
Winds from the NNE at 5 to 15 mph.
Get your complete &
up-to-the minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Monday: Mostly cloudy with
a chance of rain. High of
55F. Winds from the NNE
at 5 to 15 mph. Chance of
rain 20%. Monday Night:
Partly cloudy. Low of 32F.
Winds from the ENE at 5 to 10 mph.
“On Sale” is a relative term.
Sometimes it represents consider-
able savings and sometimes not so
much. Take cottage cheese and
sour cream for instance. Locally
they are usually priced at about
$4.09 whereas the sale price often
is maybe only $3.89. Okay, that’s
twenty cents off, but only an actual
five-percent reduction. Not exactly
a hot deal. Still, twenty cents is
twenty cents so you might as well
take advantage of the slight bar-
gain if you actually need the stuff.
If your refrigerator is already too
full, you can safely delay the pur-
chase for later without suffering
major financial consequences.
On the other hand, products like
paper towels and toilet paper are
best to buy and stock up on when
they’re sale priced. Paper towels
can be over $13 for a large multi-
ple-roll package whereas on sale
they may range from $5 or $8. In
other words, they may be half off.
Since we go through a ton of paper
towels around here, I always buy a
goodly supply when they’re cheap.
One brand of paper towels
wasn’t a good buy, however, accord-
ing to wife Corinne. They were an
off-brand variety at a good price
that I dragged home a month or so
ago. Corinne said they were about
as absorbent as tinfoil and not to
buy any more of them despite their
having a pretty design. We have
allocated them to uses that don’t
require a lot of absorbency and put
a better brand on the kitchen cup-
board. I think we have the bad
ones almost used up now, but it’s
taken a concerted effort.
Coffee is another product that is
often a lot cheaper when on sale. A
good brand currently goes for over
$13 a can at standard prices
whereas it can drop to close to $7
or $8 on sale. Luckily, we aren’t
tied into just one brand since sev-
eral are okay. We can take advan-
tage of most of the price cuts.
All of this brings to mind the
concept of actual worth. If the reg-
ular prices and sale prices are
vastly different, this might possi-
bly indicate that the product is
generally overpriced. Conversely,
if there isn’t much difference,
maybe you’re actually getting a
product that is worth what you’re
paying for it.
Unfortunately for my mid-sec-
tion, ice cream is frequently offered
at reduced prices. One of my fa-
vorite brands tends to go on sale
about once a month and severely
tests my somewhat-feeble sales re-
sistance. They have a chocolate-al-
mond that is to die for. Also excel-
lent is their “moose-tracks” involv-
ing vanilla ice cream with lots of
chocolate strips and peanut butter
cups. Even their vanilla bean is
quite tasty with fresh peaches or
maybe a banana and a touch of
chocolate syrup. When these lus-
cious dairy delights are on sale,
they offer a form of low-cost weight
gain although they aren’t un-
healthful in other ways.
Some sales techniques are a bit
confusing. It is popular nowadays
to offer ten packages of something
for $10. Do you really need ten
boxes of Hamburger Helper? This
is more of a gimmick than any-
thing since you can usually buy
one or two items instead of ten and
still get the sale price. Another
trend is for stores to say, “Buy one.
Get one free.” This may be okay,
but I noticed that deal being of-
fered on a cut-up chicken this
week. The only problem was that
the one you pay for is around $9
which is about twice what a
chicken is worth in the first place.
Generally speaking, if a store
cuts something up, it costs more.
Similarly, if they cook it or make it
instant, it is higher priced. When
it comes to bacon, though, I often
buy the pre-cooked stuff since we
don’t eat a lot of it. What’s more, it
is so simple to microwave four
strips for fifteen seconds rather
than spend twenty minutes frying
it and dealing with all that grease.
My nephew would find this a silly
idea, however, since many of his fa-
vorite dishes include bacon grease
for frying or simply as an addition.
He fishes and hunts almost con-
stantly, and I suspect that venison
and other wild game might indeed
be improved with lashings of bacon
grease.
So, as usual, one needs to keep
their wits about them when buying
anything whether it’s on sale or
not. I have noticed that sour
cream is this week actually being
offered at $2.49 which is a good
deal on that product. I should
probably stock up. I make a form
of kolache with that which involves
flattening a bit of bread dough,
poking a dent in the middle, and
baking it six minutes. Then you
add the sour cream mixed with
some sugar and cinnamon in the
dent and on top and bake it some
more. This is just first-rate, and I
actually crave it from time to time.
Got to go now. The sale ends today.
Don’t want to miss it.
A perfect “oops” ... by Del Bartels
I know a devilish grin was plastered on my face as I packed the snow-
ball and watched my buddy’s car creep along the college drive. The wild
idea was impossible, but too tempting. His open window, the upcoming
slow turn to the left, his bragged athletic ability pitted against my pure
luck. The snowball arched high, with an extra long lead. Hey, it might
be close enough to get his attention. Hey, it might even hit his car. Hey,
it might ... No! It went in through the driver’s window and explosively
splattered his entire dash and windshield!
We’ve all had some such perfection that simply cannot be attributed
to skill, no matter how often we retell and garnish the story. It’ll never
happen again; we’ll never forget it; we’ll never stop laughing about it.
We’ve heard of, or maybe been, the hunter who drops the buck, then
discovers that another buck standing behind the first also dropped.
How about when you are teaching your kids to play 21, and you get al-
most a dozen blackjacks in a row? So much for teaching them odds.
Walking along the gravel road, you and your son are taking turns kick-
ing a rock. Your powerful kick sends the rock ricochetting off of another,
to bounce back and land exactly where it was to begin with. You pre-
pare to do the clean up as your very young children learn to crack eggs,
and the first few they do perfectly. Only when you are sure they can
handle it does the perfection disappear and all they can do is shatter
shells and yokes all over the counter top.
Once in my college room, my half full glass was on the edge of the
desk. Four or five friends witnessed as I accidentally hit the glass side-
ways. Reflexes to the max, I reached out to catch the glass, grabbing it
in mid drop and easing it back up in a graceful curve so not one drop
was spilled. A chorus of voices went, “You’ve got to kidding me! That’ll
never happen again!” The dismal reality is they were right.
She was beautiful, far beyond my wildest dreams. My buddies
watched as I casually increased the conversational banter to get up the
nerve to ask her to dance. My nerdiness, clumsiness and pure fear
somehow did not interfere. I was actually walking her to her dorm
room. My friends never did hear the story of how I reached up to caress
her hair in preparation to steal a good night kiss. The hug was perfect;
my hand gently touched the side of her face; our lips slowly drew closer;
and my finger got stuck in her hoop earring. The “perfect” story never
got told until now, and I never saw the gal again.
Though gliding at less than a walking pace, the car is out of control
in the icy parking lot. It slowly drifts into an agonizing spin that puts
it heading toward the intended parking spot back bumper first. My
hands are useless on the steering wheel, my ears await that expensive
sound of metal against metal. Then, somehow, the car inches exactly
into the waiting spot. It eases to a stop. I get out, careful not to fall,
and act like I did it on purpose. One more perfect “oops.”
The Philip Health Services Inc., x-ray deparment has now upgraded to a filmless,
computerized radiography system. Shown, from left, are Lori Seager, Kayla Eymer,
Lacey Clements and Mindy Green. Photo by Del Bartels
by Del Bartels
Philip Health Services, Inc., has
finished the process of upgrading
its x-ray technology and the train-
ing of its x-ray personnel.
The new computerized radiogra-
phy (CR) allows for three viewing
stations in the Philip facility, plus
instant transfer to radiologists at
Regional Hospital and Dakota Ra-
diology in Rapid City. Medical
providers at PHSI are able to see
images instantly, zoom in, and ro-
tate the images. Connected radiol-
ogists are also able to view the CR
images with almost no time gap or
degradation of the images.
Kayla Eymer, PHSI radiology
manager, said, “Basically, we are
filmless.” She explained that the x-
ray image is now captured on a
reusable plate that then goes into
a plate reader. After the computer
reads the plate image, the image is
accessible on any securely con-
nected viewing station. “Before, we
had to develop the film and digitize
it. We also had to wait for radiology
staff to process and deliver images
to a radiologist. This way it’s in-
stant,” said Eymer.
PHSI Physician Assistant Terry
Henrie said, “The new CR system
is far superior to film. Not only are
the images clearer, we can see
them instantly. Patients get better
care because we can make treat-
ment decisions sooner, especially in
emergency situations.”
The darkroom is no longer
needed for the developing of x-ray
film. Processingand and developing
chemicals are not needed. The for-
mer darkroom now holds the com-
puterized screen plate reader.
Through secure computer connec-
tions, radiologists in Rapid City see
exactly what the medical providers
see in Philip, which they did before,
but the images do not have to go
through as many steps and are
clearer.
Before, PHSI medical providers
could either put developed x-rays
up on a lighted viewing box, remi-
niscent of the old Ben Casey and
Marcus Welby, M.D. shows on tele-
vision, or they could have the de-
veloped film digitized onto the com-
puter. Reduced steps, and the im-
ages not leaving the digitized
realm, make the new end product
far clearer than before. Eymer said
that the difference between film
and CR is visible to the naked eye.
Radiologists recommended that
PHSI upgrade to the CR system.
PHSI continues to balance ever-in-
creasing technological development
with operating costs. “Radiology
technology is constantly being im-
proved, and we are keeping up with
it,” said Kent Olson, chief executive
officer for PHSI. “We are delighted
to be using today’s technology.”
“Everything is electronic nowa-
days. Today’s technology is simply
replacing yesterday’s technology;
we are always striving for that,”
added Olson. According to Olson,
the operating costs for the new x-
ray system fit into the general op-
eration and upgrading of all serv-
ices at PHSI. “The incremental
costs are really negligible,” said
Olson. He pointed out that there
are no longer costs for film or devel-
oping chemicals.
Upgrade of x-ray technology
by Del Bartels
The Midland Community Fire
Protection District’s annual meet-
ing was held Monday, October 1, at
the Midland Fire Hall.
Approval was given for the fire
district to purchase a 1994 Interna-
tional truck to replace unit 5, the
Ottumwa truck.
The annual election of directors
was held. The current directors are
Randy Nemec – president, Steve
Daly – vice president, Kory Bierle –
secretary/treasurer, James Van
Tassel, Sandy Heaton, Dustin
Vollmer and Fred Foland.
During the meeting, the Van Tas-
sel family presented a check in
memory of Walter “Junior” Van
Tassel.
According to Reuban Vollmer, Jr.,
the new board discussed this year’s
many fires and the ensuing ex-
penses. End of the year items,
preparing the new truck, any offi-
cial training and always being
ready for the next fire will keep the
volunteers busy. “We’re going to be
looking for a lot of volunteer hours
to put all this together,” said
Vollmer. “I’m sure we are no differ-
ent than any other fire department
in the state. Man power and fund-
ing are always an issue.”
Midland Fire Protection District
The Midland Community Fire Protection District board was given a check in mem-
ory of Walter Van Tassel. Back row, from left, are Sandy Heaton, Jim Van Tassel,
Kory Bierle, Steve Daly and Dustin Vollmer. Front: Randy Nemec and Joann Van
Tassel. Courtesy photo
Lincoln Smith - NSU royalty
Northern State University, Ab-
erdeen, held its Gypsy Days Home-
coming Week, October 1-6.
Philip High School graduate Lin-
coln Smith was a member of the
NSU homecoming royalty. He and
his girlfriend, Ella Campbell, were
both in the top five in the royalty
court. Coronation was Thursday,
October 4, at the NSU Fine Arts
Center
Smith was a starting player on
the Wolves football team. He has
earned honors in football and is a
2011 Academic All-American.
Campbell is a member of the NSU
volleyball team.
by Del Bartels
The Philip Fire Protection Dis-
trict’s annual meeting was held
Tuesday, October 2, at the Philip
Fire Hall.
Elections moved Jay Baxter from
last year’s secretary/treasurer to
this year’s board president. Robert
McDaniel is the current vice presi-
dent. Marty Hansen is the new sec-
retary/treasurer. The other board
members are Greg Arthur, Chuck
O’Conner, Doug Hauk and Bill
Gottsleben. Their one-year term
began as of the meeting, October 2.
“We welcome anyone, town or
country, who would want to get on
the board,” said Hansen. “We
would welcome any input, too, from
anyone who has any suggestions or
comments.”
The fire district board discussed
the financial fitness of the Philip
Volunteer Fire Department. Ac-
cording to Baxter, the situation has
altered a bit after the attempted
tax ceiling opt-out of the district.
Businesses, landowners and other
people had donated more and more
often to aid the fire department.
Costs of fighting a particular fire
have been more readily aided by
landowners and by communica-
tions with the landowners’ insur-
ance companies. “That’s a cool
thing,” said Baxter.
Further board discussion in-
cluded possible fundraisers for the
department. Baxter stressed that
the board wants citizens of the area
to keep adequate amounts of fire
insurance for their property.
“Thank goodness we didn’t have
more fires this year than we did,”
said Baxter.
“We are not out of the woods yet
just because its been cooler,” said
Hansen. “I’ll feel a lot better when
there’s four inches of nice wet snow
on the ground.”
One of the long term objectives of
the PVFD is to continue saving for
a new pumper truck, at an approx-
imate cost of $180,000. The
planned replacement of aging
equipment is not only part of con-
tinuing business of the depart-
ment, but also keeps a good Insur-
ance Services Office (ISO) rating
for the department, which affects
the PVFD insurance coverage and
rates.
“We are in good shape, until
something breaks down, such as
the pumper,” said Hansen. “The
problem with the pumper is there
are no parts for it in the United
States any where; we’ve looked. As
long as the pumper doesn’t break
down ... but you cannot get by with-
out a pumper in a town, it just
doesn’t work.”
All members of the board encour-
age discussion and suggestions
from residents. The official meet-
ings, held twice a year, are open to
everyone. “That’s one thing this
board is all about; transparency
and open communications,” said
Baxter. The next meeting will be
the first Tuesday in March 2013.
Philip Fire Protection District
Dear Editor;
I would like to comment on an
article published on the front page
of the Pioneer Review 10/04/12:
City seeking solution on railroad
siding versus flooding concerns.
In it, Monna Van Lint suggests
“that there is a large, though some-
what silent, group that is worried
about damages from any future
flooding.”
First of all, Mrs. Van Lint should
at least define “large,” otherwise it
could be misconstrued to be a gen-
eralized assumption. Secondly, if
there are people who are con-
cerned, they need to speak up.
Even though I don’t live in the
area the article describes and have
no vested interest in this specific
issue, I think it’s ludicrous that
there are people whom it does af-
fect that aren’t willing to voice
their opinion.
A democracy operates on the
basis of defining problems and col-
lectively working towards a solu-
tion. Why would a public meeting
to talk specifically about this issue
be necessary when there are
monthly Philip City Council meet-
ings with the railroad trestle al-
ready on the agenda? And, if the
group that has concerns is so large,
how come I don’t read about the
Letter to the Editor
standing-room-only attendance?
I suggest using meeting times al-
ready in place for residents to voice
their concerns and ask their ques-
tion. If no one voices concerns or
asks questions before this and any
project begins, they should not
complain about the results of this
or any project. This can also hold
true to the upcoming election:
make your opinion known when it
counts and make it less known
where it doesn’t count.
And, Dad, thanks for building
your house on a hill.
Sincerely,
Marcy M. Morrison
Rapid City, SD
1st Anniversary of the SDSU
extension re-organization
We’re closing in on a year since
the re-organization of the SDSU
Extension Service, in which the
county Extension educator posi-
tions were eliminated. Four-H ad-
visors took over the youth program
at the county level, and eight re-
gional Extension centers became
the home base for Extension field
specialists covering a wide variety
of topic areas.
This transition has yielded both
progress and pains. We encourage
you to continue to rely on SDSU
Extension for unbiased, research-
based information. If we can help,
contact the Winner Regional Ex-
tension Center at 605-842-1267.
Testing for Soybean
Cyst Nematode
Soybean cyst nematode is the
most damaging pest of soybean in
North America. While not yet
found in all soybean-producing
areas, soybean cyst nematodes are
hardy and will survive anywhere
soybeans are produced in South
Dakota as well as North Dakota
and northern Minnesota. This
nematode often reduces average
yields by as much as 50 percent or
more.
Soybean cyst nematodes have
been found in at least 20 counties
in eastern South Dakota and
throughout Minnesota and Iowa as
well as many other states. The
nematode is a small, plant-para-
site round worm that feeds in the
roots of soybeans. Most nematodes
are too small to be seen with the
naked eye.
The first and most important
step in management of SCN is
identification. Soil sampling is a
means of determining both the
presence of the nematode as well
as its population levels. Fall sam-
pling allows adequate time to em-
ploy nematode management tech-
niques for the following season,
but sampling at any time can be
useful.
The SDSU Plant Diagnostic
Clinic offers soybean cyst nema-
tode testing free of charge for
South Dakota growers, funded by
the South Dakota Soybean Re-
search and promotion council. Soil
sample information sheets and
sample bags can be picked up at
the SDSU Plant Diagnostic Clinic.
Copies may be made of the infor-
mation sheet, which can be down-
loaded from: http://www.sdstate.
edu/ps/plant-clinic/upload/SCN-
Soil-Sampling-Info-Sheet.pdf.
Mailing information can be found
on the information sheet.
For more information on SCN
you can go to http://www.plant
health.info for an updated “Soy-
bean Cyst Nematode Management
Guide.” The guide is provided by
the North Central Soybean Re-
search Program and the Coopera-
tive Extension Service. You can
also access fact sheet 902-A, “Soy-
bean Cyst Nematode” at: http://
pubstorage.sdstate.edu/AgBio_Pu
blications/articles/FS902A.pdf.
Good candidates for testing are
soybean fields that have had de-
clining yields, stunted plants,
plants that are slow to canopy, be-
come yellow in July or August, and
show reduced vigor or mature ear-
lier than normal.
Sample fields at a depth of zero
to six inches with a soil probe,
spade or vehicle mounted probe.
Key areas in fields to sample are
fence rows where blowing soil may
collect, areas with a history of
flooding, field entry points, and
low yielding areas. Sampling can
continue until freeze up with hand
equipment, and all winter with hy-
draulic probes. Collect 15-20 sam-
ples per site, mix thoroughly and
submit as soon as possible, but do
not use heat to dry or grind.
Calendar
11/27-28: Ag Horizons Confer-
ence, Pierre
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
FLY CONTROL
–Dust Bags
–Sprays
–Pour ons
–Golden Malrin Fly Bait
COLD
BEER
Sunbody
Straw
Hats
Rural Living
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
PHiliP AreA AArP/rTA will meet Monday, October 29, at 6:00
in the Senior Center with a soup supper, speaker and annual meet-
ing. Anyone is invited to attend.
CBC HAllOWeeN PArTY …Free to the community … Wednes-
day, Oct. 24, senior citizen’s center, Philip. Potluck, 6:15 p.m. with
drinks and utensils provided. Prizes for costumes. Please bring two
cans of food for food bank and white elephant gift in brown paper
bag with no names. Everyone welcome! For more info., call Darlene
Matt at 859-2077.
To have your NON-PrOFiT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
PUBLIC MEETING
DAKOTA MILL & GRAIN EXPANSION /
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILROAD
City of Philip, SD
The residents of Philip, SD, are invited to attend a public
meeting with representatives from Dakota Mill & Grain and
Canadian Pacific Railroad on Tuesday, October 23rd at
5:30 p.m. in the Community Room of the Haakon County
Courthouse.
Dakota Mill & Grain’s expansion plans and the railroad
trestle bridge will be reviewed.
Bad River Sportsman’s Club
West River Coyote
Calling Contest
One Day Event
— Saturday —
October 27th
• Sign-up Deadline: Friday, Oct. 26, 7:00 p.m. at the
73 Bar in Philip; Calcutta to follow
• $40 entry fee per two-person team
• Pays 3 Places on 1-12 teams; 4 places on 13-24 teams;
5 places on 25 & over
• Saturday Deadline: 7:30 p.m. SHARP! Bring your
critters to the 73 Bar’s Back Door by 7:30 p.m. on
Saturday, October 30th
• For more information, contact Jerry Ellens:
605/859-2173
73— SALOON
859-2173 • DOWNTOWN PHILIP
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
Tired of high interest rate monthly credit
card bills? SEE US NOW … TODAY!
A LOW, LOW rate of interest
with a repayable schedule
CUSTOM DESIGNED for YOUR needs.
Greetings from sunny, beautiful,
still dry northeast Haakon County!
Yesterday was a perfect fall day,
and today is starting out to be gor-
geous as well. The leaves on the
elm trees have turned to gold, and
the slight breeze is helping them
fall to the ground. The weatherman
says we can expect very high winds
for the next couple of days, so I ex-
pect the leaves will be flying! I hope
you are enjoying the beautiful col-
ors while they last! The burr oak
tree in my backyard is absolutely
crimson this year – it seems that
dry years make the colors more in-
tense than ever.
And, while I'm on the subject of
wildlife, I might mention that we
now have antelope in the area
again. There haven't been any here
for several years, but this summer
there have been three head of an-
telope wandering the fields. On my
way to the mailbox the other day,
there was a group of seven ante-
lope! They just stood and stared at
me – they weren't scared a bit. I
hope they were just passing
through. And when I drove into the
yard the other night, there was a
porcupine heading south across the
road right in front of our house.
Plus there have been some geese
starting their annual flight south,
as well as several large flocks of
blackbirds. It is like wild kingdom
around here!
One more bit of good news – it is
only 21 days until the election! Al-
though I do get tired of political ads
and rhetoric, it is an important
event. I hope you will all take time
to vote!
While this beautiful weather is
wonderful, it made it difficult to
reach my neighbors for news. They
are either outside doing fall chores,
or possibly they are traveling.
Whatever the case, the news is a
bit short this week. I have threat-
ened to start making things up if
they don't return my calls, but I
haven't resorted to that – at least
not yet.
Duane and Lola Roseth attended
a fish fry at the home of Boyd and
Jeanie Waara Saturday night.
Duane and a group of his friends go
fishing in Canada each fall, and
they share their catch with friends
at an annual fish fry. Duane and
Lola's grandson, Royce, attended
the fish fry also with his parents,
Thor and Jackie Roseth – Royce
was one of the stars of the show.
What a handsome young man!
Nels and Dorothy Paulson have
been busy taking care of fall chores,
including digging the potatoes and
putting the garden to bed for the
winter. Saturday, a friend from
Pierre was out to help Nels fix a
tractor. The good news is the trac-
tor is fixed – the bad news was that
by the time the repair work was
done, it was too late to attend the
third annual Hayes picnic, darn it.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed were
in Philip Tuesday to help with the
cattle sale. Friday, they went to
Deadwood and met Arlyne's
brother, Ronnie, and wife Emily of
Midland, her sister, JoAnn, Sioux
Falls, and aunts and uncles from
Gillette, Wyo., and Virginia. The
group had a great visit.
Deep Creek Church ham and
lutefisk supper and bazaar
Saturday, October 27th, 5:30 -
7:30 p.m. CT
Friday night, Billy and Arlyne
went to Spearfish and spent the
night with their daughter, Cindy,
and her husband, Bruce Bresee.
I'm glad to report that Bruce is
doing well following his recent
health scare. Billy and Arlyne re-
turned home Saturday. They at-
tended church Sunday, and Sunday
evening neighbor and friend, Steve
McDaniel, stopped by for card play-
ing and supper.
Monday, Lee Briggs was a visitor
at the Markwed place. It sounds
like the carpenters are making
progess on the cabin that is being
built in Billy and Arlyne's yard. It
will be fun to see the finished proj-
ect!
Bill and Polly Bruce had a visit
Wednesday from Hazel Rathbun
and Mildred (Redden) Clark. Hazel
and Mildred both lived in the area
when they were growing up and at-
tended country schools. According
to Hazel, her twin sister, Hattie,
has good days and bad days, and
she resides in a nursing home in
Pierre.
Thursday, Bill and Polly were in
Pierre to keep dental appoint-
ments, and they came home with a
new clothes dryer to replace the old
one. Polly said the new one works
great!
Friday, Bill and Polly's daughter-
in-law, Katie, went to Pierre to stay
with her niece, Allison, while Alli-
son's parents (Andy and Carla)
headed for a weekend in the Black
Hills. Bill and Polly attended the
Hayes community picnic Saturday
evening, then went on to Midland
to attend church. Katie and Vince
also attended the Hayes gathering.
Frank and Shirley Halligan were
in Philip last week to watch their
grandsons, J.J. and Jerin, compete
in the regional cross country meet
held at the Philip golf course. Sun-
day, they attended the Willow
Creek dinner held at the Varmint
Hunters building. It was a potluck
meal, and Shirley said there was a
good crowd.
Max and Joyce Jones spent last
week Tuesday through Sunday in
Pierre at Grand Chapter of Eastern
Star. Joyce said it is always won-
derful to see all the friends they
have made through the years.
Monday, Max and Joyce were in
Pierre to keep doctor's appoint-
ments. When they stopped for mid-
morning brunch at a local restau-
rant, they had the opportunity to
have a good visit with friends Mar-
vin and Marj Olson.
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser at-
tended the football game in Pierre
Friday evening. Saturday, Kevin
was among the local group of Ma-
sons who cleaned ditches west of
Ft. Pierre. Both Mary and Kevin
returned to the ranch Saturday.
Their daughter, Brianna, spent the
week in Chicago, attending train-
ing for her job as an auditor with
the State of South Dakota. Kevin
told me that his sister, Nina, had
an accident as she was preparing to
leave for their extended visit in
Italy. The evening before they left,
she had the misfortune of falling,
resulting in stitches in her head
and a chipped bone in her hand.
Luckily, she was able to get it all
taken care of in time to catch the
flight for Italy, but it is kind of a
tough way to start a vacation! Hope
things are healing well for her.
Marge Briggs is continuing to get
a few late season veggies out of her
garden. There are lots of skunks
and coons at their house, compet-
ing with the cats for the cat food.
Ray Neuhauser spent last week
busy with his card playing groups,
and Nancy was busy with activities
at the senior center. Sunday, they
attended the Willow Creek gather-
ing at the Varmint Hunters. Nancy
is now busy entertaining the flu –
hope she feels better soon.
Lee Briggs has been busy har-
vesting crops and planting wheat
for next year's crop. It will be nice
to have things buttoned up for the
season.
Our week here at the ranch was
a little calmer now that the elk
hunting here is done for 2012. Todd
Mortenson and the young couple
that work for him were lunch
guests Thursday. Saturday, Randy
and I were among those enjoying
the fish fry at Boyd and Jeanie
Waara's home near Philip – great
food and great people. Sunday, Ed
Briggs and his friend, Beth,
stopped by for a brief visit, as did
Kevin Neuhauser.
This week I am grateful for com-
munities. This past weekend, the
Hayes community had a potluck
gathering, and so did the Willow
Creek community. And the fish fry
at Waara's was also sort of a com-
munity event. In our sparsely pop-
ulated area, "communities" can
take in lots of square miles, but the
friendship and fellowship can't be
beat! You know that if you need
help, members of the community
are going to step up and do what-
ever needs done, and that is so im-
portant.
Another upcoming community
event will be the Deep Creek
bazaar scheduled for later this
month – another opportunity to see
friends and neighbors!
Go out and make this a wonder-
ful week. Please continue to pray
for rain, and be sure to be safe as
you go about your fall work.
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Hit & Miss
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
elderly Meals
Thursday, Oct. 18: Chicken Cor-
don Bleu, Wild Rice Blend, Roasted
Nantucket Veggies, Roll, German
Chocolate Cake.
Friday, Oct. 19: Lasagna, Green
Beans, Garlic Bread, Fruited Gela-
tin.
Monday, Oct. 22: Glazed Ham,
Mashed Sweet Potatoes, Green
Beans, Roll, Red Velvet Cake.
Tues., Oct. 23: Chipolte,Lime
Tilapia, Baby Bakers with Sour
Cream, Cauliflower Au Gratin,
Roll, Cherries.
Wednesday, Oct. 24: Chicken
Fried Steak, Mashed Potatoes,
Corn, Roll, Lemon Pudding.
***
Saturday at Somerset Court we
had a little snow. There are still
some trees that are golden and
green.
Saturday morning, Agnes, Mary
Lou, Susan and Vivian played a co-
operative game of bananagrams
and also built a big puzzle in 10
minutes. Let’s see you beat that!
Overheard in the breakfast line:
Don Stensgaard said, “The big bell
said to the little bell, ‘I get more
dongs than you do!’” And the little
bell said, “But I get more dings.”
What can you make of that?
Floy’s daughter and foster child
came for lunch Saturday. Lewis
Tracy went out with his daughter.
Marcella went out with her son.
Saturday p.m. the whist bunch
was Ina, Irene C., Irene A., and
Susan. Mary Lou brought her good
scrabble board and newer scrabble
dictionary and she, Agnes and Vi-
vian played a game of scrabble.
My great-granddaughter, Ariel
Jackson, is in Italy on a three-
month study trip. She has sent a
detailed account of her travels and
observations. You may be able to
get her trip story on http://ariel-of-
orange.tumblr.com. She thanks all
who have helped her out with en-
couragement.
She reported that she loved
Naples, old and worn. She used the
metro, but also walked over a lot of
Rome. She visited the Vatican, St.
John Lateran, and the Sistine
Chapel. There were lots of tourists
taking photos. Ariel also found
friends. She stays in a hostel. She
said that she has enjoyed some
pizza, described a prevalent tree,
an Italian stone pine, (Pinus
pinea). She suggested that if you go
there, cover you guide book and
Latin phrase book with pretty
paper so pickpockets will not know
you are a greenhorn.
Sunday, October 7, at Somerset
Court, M.R. Hansen came for
scrabble in the morning as they
had returned from their antelope
hunt (they got two antelope). M.R.
and Barb were going to Spearfish
in the afternoon to see their grand-
daughter, Willow, age 13, in a
school play.
Friday, October 12, was the
100th anniversary of the School of
Mines and Technology. Students
and professors whitewashed the M
on M Hill. The usually dump the
excess whitewash in the groovy
path up to the M and then slide
down in the nice white mud. Just a
lark, to remind us that the
SDSM&T is thriving and flourish-
ing.
Friday, October 12, was the Som-
erset Court seventh anniversary
bash.
The flu shot clinic on October 4
went as planned with a good crowd
and prompt dispatch.
Terry and Ardis Pulse came to
Somerset Court for lunch Sunday,
October 7. In the afternoon, we had
church at the Somerset Court
Chapel. Steve gave us a little pep
talk and then Terry delivered a
plea. He urged us to read the Bible
and pray for guidance. He said we
have lived to ripe old ages for a rea-
son although we may not know the
that reason is. Jack Humke played
some good old hymns, one which
was “There Shall be Showers of
Blessings.” Thank you, Terry, Steve
and Jack.
There was a time for a little
whist after church, with Jim and
Eleanor and Irene Cox and Irene
Arbach making a foursome.
Monday, October 8, at Somerset
Court, Marilyn Butts went to walk
the mall with friends. Irene McK-
night went to Newell Sunday and
attended church where she met old
friends who had been in her Sun-
day school classes. She reported an
enjoyable time.
Somerset Court bus with Shawn
driving and Sandy helping resi-
dents, went to the new store in our
area of town. Fred Smith said that
he liked the wide isles at the new
store.
Happy birthday to my grand-
daughter, Emily Hansen, Lincoln,
Neb., October 11. She shares my
husband’s birthday. He used to
tease her and said, “You stole my
birthday!” Then she would cry.
Happy birthday to my son, M.R.
Hansen, on October 15 and also to
Darlene Baye whose birthday is
the same day.
M.R. Hansen brought me more of
my journals from my old house in
Philip. I read half of the 1987 jour-
nal in the middle of the night. It in-
cluded some of Virgil and my trip
to Santa Cruz, Calif., to our daugh-
ter Vinnie’s wedding party with
M.R. Hansen and his eight-year-
old Tiffany. That year, Virgil ro-
totilled and we had a big garden
with plenty of vegetables for our-
selves and our neighbors. Also that
year, Virgil had Glenn O’Connell
dam up the draw on our land just
north of the highway, and we went
to Pierre and got a load of live
geese and to Hill City to get a scad
of ducks. They loved the dam until
the water got too low. Then we had
to sell or give away the ducks and
geese. But it was quite entertain-
ing, following them down to the
dam in the morning and back to
the garden shed in the evening. It
was great fun to watch them nest
and hatch. The little ducks and
geese were so darling. That year,
baby Shannon Noelle Butcher was
stillborn and we buried her body
between my parents, Rolla and
Effie Palmer, in the Philip Masonic
Cemetery. (Her great, great-grand-
parents.)
October 9, at Somerset Court, we
had the activity of ping-pong-poker
with Susan and Sandy keeping
score and picking up balls. Thank
you for a good time. Players were
Mildred Young and her comfort
keeper, Kay Daugherty, Marilyn
Butts, Addie Rorvig, Eileen Tenold,
Fred Smith, Mary Lou Peters, Jim
Holmes, Marge Self, Irene McK-
night, Jeannie Alverson, and Vi-
vian Hansen. Jeannie won one
round and Vivian the other.
Somerset Court bingo winners
were Mildred Kraemer, Betty Dow-
nen, twice, Addie Rorvig, Floy
Olson, Violet Jenison, Marilyn
Oyler, Annetta Hansen, Marjorie
Gaffin, and Vivian Hansen, twice.
For snack and chat, we were served
some delicious-looking coconut
bars. Marilyn Butts and Vivian
Hansen also practiced a couple
rounds of pool.
Vivian received letters from two
of her sons. Leslie sent a pretty
card and said that he had a good
time when he visited here in South
Dakota. Thank you, Leslie, for your
visit and letter. David sent some
reminiscences about thistles on a
fence and wool sweaters giving off
sparks in the dark!.Thank you,
David. (As a lad, he had pitched
thistles off the fence for Bob Jones,
who was a rancher and deplored
“farming” as such. Another time he
built fence for the movie, “Dances
With Wolves.” The specifications
called for four strands of barbed
wire. It was in the familiar path-
way of the bison herd, and they
walked over it. The problem was
that they didn’t see it in time.
David t.p’d (draped it with toilet
paper.) the fence and that gave
them fair warning.
The Rapid City Journal of Octo-
ber 8, 2012, had a hopeful new’s
item. South Dakota entrepreneur,
Brian Gramm, CEO of Peppermint
Clean Energy, had developed a
solar panel device called the
Forty2. It is about 3’x4’ and six to
eight inches thick. It is being made
mostly in the upper Midwest and is
expected to be in good demand by
the United States military and also
a power source in remote villages
to charge up phones and to refrig-
erate meds.
Wednesday, October 10, the pic-
nic in the park was a great success.
It was a gorgeous October day with
bright blue sky for the last picnic of
the season.
At Somerset Court Wednesday
morning, we had a sneak preview
of a fire drill. Everyone was out of
the building. One noble resident
volunteered to be carried out to
give the staff practice in carrying.
My daughter, Vinnie Hansen,
emailed photos of a billboard with
her name in lights for her book
launch and of her luxurious, ram-
pant flower gardens in Santa Cruz,
Calif. Thank you, Vinnie.
My son, David K. Hansen, said
that he often thinks of his cousin,
Alma Hulett Schilling. I always
kept her saying on a poster by the
sink at my old Philip home. “Don’t
just wash your hands, wash your
dishes and your hands will be clean
too!” Thank you, David. He men-
tioned his daughter, Emily’s birth-
day, October 11, which she shared
with her granddad, Virgil Hansen.
At fully fit exercise class with
Sandy Wednesday, we had seven
residents who attended. I am glad
to see an increase of interest in
fully fit. In the afternoon, Marge
S., Marilyn B., and Vivian played a
little numbered pool. One player
has balls one to five, another player
has six through 10, and the third
player has 11-15. Then you try to
put the other player’s balls in the
pocket. When Sandy came, we
played partners. M.R. came and I
left to play scrabble. We finished
with scores of 263 and 268. Our
new word was dap (a special way of
joining beams in a building. Thank
you to my granddaughter, Ginger
Denke Bennett, who sent email
photos of her baby, Delores Ginger
Vivian Rose. I didn’t print them as
there is no color here.
Somerset bingo winners were
Betty Downen, Mildred Kraemer,
Irene Cox, Irma Brandt, Marilyn
Butts, Sherman Ellerton, and Vi-
vian Hansen. For snack and chat
we had vanilla ice cream with sun-
dae toppings of chocolate and
caramel. Thank you, Sandy, who
called numbers and to Susan who
provided hospitality.
Marilyn Butts gave us a very
thoughtful poem, “How You Live
Your Dash.” (Author unknown.) I
will tape it into the scrapbook on
the coffee table by the fireplace.
Thank you, Marilyn. The dash
refers to the line between the dates
found on a cemetery marker, one’s
birth date and death date.
The Rapid City Journal had a
printing press problem and we did-
n’t get any Journal Wednesday.
Thursday, we received the Wednes-
day and Thursday paper, so we
were way behind with the cross-
word, jumble and sudokus puzzles,
and yes, even behind with the
news.
It was good to hear about Bill
and Marsha Sumpter’s trip to
Branson, Mo., and the many stops
along the way. They send back
their news to the Pioneer Review
paper in Philip. I remember send-
ing back news from trips, maybe
faxes. There was a word I really
liked that means a fast urgent mes-
sage. What is it? Maybe bulletin.
Friday, October 12, we celebrated
Somerset Court’s seventh anniver-
sary with the theme “The Twen-
ties.” The exercise room on second
floor, with its good section of dance
floor, was decorated with lots of
spangles. Ben Stone had set up his
big screen there for the showing of
early days of Somerset Court.
Thank you, Ben.
The downstairs social hour table
was set up with hundred of minia-
ture candy bars, each originated in
the 1920s. There were Baby Ruth,
Bit-o-Honey, Reece’s, Butterfinger,
and Mounds. There were big trays
of tiny sweet pickles, dill slices,
deviled eggs, jello, olives and
drinks of uncertain vintage. After
that, we were seated in the dining
room area and served a fine, com-
plete dinner. Desserts were served
on the second floor.
We had lots of company, and
many of us dressed 1920s. The
flapper dresses, feather boas, arm
bands, pin stripes, long ropes of
pearls, all added to the scene. We
enjoyed dancing to the music of
Tom and Diane. Well, Diane was
there in person. Thank you, Somer-
set Court staff and management,
for a great party. Thank you, Mig
and Barbie, Sheridan, Tiger and
Cecelia, for coming. Bobby Knut-
son, PHS 1972, and friend Beth
were there.
Lucille Huether, Somerset Court
resident, brought me a note this
morning. Funeral services for her
sisters, Gertrude Doughty (Palmer,
McGriff) Wooddin, will be held
Monday, October 15, 2012, at the
Rapid Valley Baptist Church. My
sympathy to family and friends.
Gertrude was married to my
brother, Richard Palmer, from 1945
to 1959.
Friday, before the day heated up
with fixin’ for the Somerset Court
anniversary party. We had table
games in the morning. Addie, Irene
Cox and Vivian played banana-
grams.
In the October 11, 2012, Philip
Pioneer Review, there was a good
photo of Marvin Denke, six-year
part-time soil probing employee,
shown by CHS Midwest Coopera-
tive.
If you have a news item for the
Philip Socials column that you
would like to submit and can’t
get ahold of Vivian, please
e-mail it to:
betty@pioneer-review.com
or call 859-2516.
We will be more than happy to
take your news over the phone!
United Church of Philip
is doing a new photo directory!
All members & friends of the church
are encouraged to come & get their picture
taken on one of the two days:
Wednesday, October 24th
from 4:00 – 8:00 PM or
Thursday, October 25th
from 2:00 – 7:00 PM
at the United Church in Philip
Call Deb Smith
at 859-2889
or email:
kdsmith7@gwtc.net
to make an appointment!
Perfect
timing for
Christmas card
pictures and photo
gifts for
Christmas!
OCTOBER 19-20-21-22:
Lawless (R)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
OCTOBER 26-27-28-29:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
Hey Birthday Girl
- That’s Kelly -
It’s your 50th!
On behalf of Ravellette Publ.
We just wanted to say:
Hope you have a great day on
October 16,
Even if you are in Houston!
Don Ravellette
& Ravellette Publ. Staff
noTice
To better serve you and
prevent needless wait-
ing, we ask that you call
24-48 hours ahead of
time for prescription re-
fills. If you have no re-
fills remaining on your
prescription we will at-
tempt to notify your doc-
tor which may require
an additional 24 hours.
Please call if you have
any questions. We ap-
preciate you and
THank you for your
continued business.
zeeb pharmacy
859-2833 • philip
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
zWeekly Special:
Grilled Ham & Turkey Melt
with French Fries
Sunday Special:
Roast Beef dinner
Mashed Potatoes,
Salad Bar & Dessert
The open enrollment period for
Medicare Part D and Medicare Ad-
vantage plans is October 15
through December 7.
“One of the things we want peo-
ple to know is that if they have a
Medicare Advantage plan the only
time they can make changes to
their plans is October 15 through
December 7, 2012,” said Kim Mal-
sam-Rysdon, secretary for the
South Dakota Department of So-
cial Services. “All Medicare recipi-
ents should take this time to re-
view their current plans and con-
sider whether a change in coverage
is necessary for them.”
Medicare Advantage is a health
plan offered by a private company
that contracts with Medicare to
provide Part A and Part B coverage
(hospital, skilled nursing, home
health, hospice, doctors’ care and
other outpatient services).
Medicare Part D offers prescription
drug coverage for all people with
Medicare. The drug coverage in-
cludes both brand name and
generic drugs.
Trained volunteers from the
South Dakota Senior Health Infor-
mation and Insurance Education
Program (SHIINE) are offering
free assistance to seniors seeking
additional Medicare information.
SHIINE volunteers can help sen-
iors compare plans, evaluate their
current coverage and fill out paper-
work. Seniors taking advantage of
the free one-on-one counseling
should bring their Medicare card
and a current list of medications.
The volunteers will use the infor-
mation to sort through the
Medicare Plan Finder and compare
coverage options. The Plan Finder
can also be accessed from home at
www.medicare.gov.
For more information on SHI-
INE or to meet with a volunteer in
your community, call 1-800-536-
8197 or contact your regional coor-
dinator. For central South Dakota,
contact Kathleen Nagle at 605-224-
3212 or SHIINE@centralsd.org.
For western South Dakota, contact
Debbie Stangle at 605-342-8635 or
SHIINE@westriversd.org.
Medicare open enrollment
Church & Community Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One meets on
the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the second
Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.);
6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 8:00 a.m. • Children's Church:
8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
God sees uII-LIe good und LIe bud. He knows wIen we
ure beIng Lrue Lo ourseIves, und wIen we ure noL. WIIIe
we mIgIL be ubIe Lo IooI eucI oLIer, we cunnoL IooI God,
und we wIII reup wIuL we sow.
Ancient wisdom Ior modern liIe
Be noL deceIved; God Is noL mocked: Ior wIuLsoever u
mun soweLI, LIuL sIuII Ie uIso reup. GuIuLIuns 6:;
(KJV)
Obituaries
This space for rent! call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Come & Go Baby Shower
for Sawyer Allan Foss
(Son of Kory & Dani Foss)
Saturday, October 27th • 9-11 a.m.
Senechal Apts. Lobby, Philip
Registered at Target
You are
i nv i ted to a baby
shower for
Stephani e
( Hook) Gi si
(I t’ s a Boy)
Sunday, Oct. 20t h
3 - 5 p. m
Senechal Lobby,
Phi l i p.
Hosted by
Aunt J ’ Nai
& Aunt Bonni e
Mary Pekron__________________________________
Mary Pekron, age 80 of Philip,
S.D., died Wednesday, October 10,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Mary A. Gottsleben was born
January 18, 1932, in Philip, the
daughter of William and Helen
(Gehan) Gottsleben. She grew up
on a farm-ranch northwest of
Philip, and attended the Deadman
Rural School in that area. She at-
tended high school at St. Martin’s
Academy in Sturgis, graduating in
1951. She then attended Black
Hills State College in Spearfish,
where she obtained her teaching
certificate. She taught rural school
at the Jones Rural School for three
years and one year at the Malone
Rural School near Milesville. Once
their children were in school, she
returned to teaching, and served as
a substitute teacher and teacher's
aide for numerous years.
Mary was united in marriage to
Henry “Hank” Pekron on August
28, 1954, in Philip. They made
their home in the Milesville area,
where they worked on a ranch and
later purchased their own ranch.
They continued to ranch for over 50
years.
Due to health reasons, they
moved into Philip in October 2007.
Her husband, Henry “Hank”
Pekron, preceded her in death on
August 27, 2010. Mary continued
to reside in Philip until her death.
Mary was a member of the Sa-
cred Heart Catholic Church of
Philip, and a former member of St.
Mary’s Catholic Church and Altar
Society of Milesville.
Survivors include six children
Nancy Ehrhardt and her husband,
Rick, of Brandon, Steve Pekron and
his wife, Nina, of Milesville, Beth
Walker of Gillette, Wyo., Karen
Kroetch and her husband, Jerry, of
Philip, Theresa Pekron of West-
minster, Colo., and Joe Pekron and
his wife, Julie, of Hot Springs; 13
grandchildren; six great-grandchil-
dren; one sister, Ann Pattno, and
her husband, Tom, of Hastings,
Neb.; a sister-in-law, Myrna
Gottsleben, of Philip; several nieces
and nephews; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
In addition to her husband,
Mary was preceded in death by her
parents, and one brother, Jim
Gottsleben.
Mass of Christian Burial was
held Monday, October 15, at the Sa-
cred Heart Catholic Church in
Philip, with Father Kevin Achbach
as celebrant.
Altar servers were Mike Gebes
and Ben Stangle. Lectors were
Linda Stangle and Joe Gittings.
Eucharistic ministers were Don
Schultz, Kelly Blair and Donna
King.
Music was provided by Mari-
anne Frien, pianist, and Maureen
Palecek, vocalist. Ushers were
Mike Gebes and Bill Gottsleben.
Pallbearers were Ryan Hovland,
Jeremiah Walker, Joshua Kroetch,
Nathan Walker, Zane Pekron, Cody
Pekron, Justin Pekron, and Jeff
Goertz. Gift bearers were Melinda
Coslet, Brooke Formanek, Katie
Pekron, Allison Pekron and Grace
Pekron.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Gertrude E. Woodden_____________________________
Gertrude E. Woodden, age 95 of
New Underwood, S.D. died Fri-
day, October 12, 2012, at the
Good Samaritan Center in New
Underwood.
Gertrude E. Doughty was born
February 23, 1917, in Rapid City,
the daughter of Phillip and Clara
(Evenson) Doughty. She grew up
north of Quinn and graduated
from Wall High School. She then
attended Spearfish Normal and
earned her teacher’s certificate.
She taught at rural schools for 21
years.
Gertrude married Richard R.
Palmer on January 8, 1944. They
lived on his ranch at Grindstone.
She took great pride in raising or-
phaned lambs. Richard and
Gertrude had a baby girl, Mar-
jorie Rachel, who lived only seven
hours. Richard, along with
Gertrude’s father, Philip, lost
their lives in a boating accident
on August 16, 1956.
She later married Raymond
McGriff on November 23, 1962.
They lived at the ranch until
Ray’s health was so that he
couldn’t do the ranch work, so
they moved to Hermosa. Ray died
January 5, 1977.
Gertrude met Roy Woodden
and they were dating when a
drunk driver ran into them. Due
to the trauma, Gertrude was un-
conscious for 18 days and in
rehab for three months. This
caused severe damage but she
did all she could to get better.
She married Roy on August 19,
1983, and they made their home
in Hermosa. Roy later died, and
she remained in Hermosa until
moving into the Good Samaritan,
Echo Ridge, and later into the
Good Samaritan Center in New
Underwood, where she has since
resided.
Survivors include three sis-
ters, Eva Farkner of Box Elder,
Phyllis Reub of Rapid City, and
Lucille Huether of Rapid City;
several nieces and nephews; and
a host of other relatives and
friends.
In addition to her three hus-
bands, Gertrude was preceded in
death by her daughter, Marjorie
Rachel, as an infant; and a sister
Esther Doughty.
Funeral services were held
Monday, October 15, at the Rapid
Valley Baptist Church in Rapid
City, with Pastor O.C. Summers
officiating.
Music was provided by Kay
Williams, pianist, and Lynn
Fuerst, vocalist. Honoray pall-
bearers were all relatives and
friends in attendance.
Interment followed at the Wall
Cemetery.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Bar S Lodge, the couple spent
their honeymoon in the Black
Hills.
The bride holds a bachelor of
science from the University of
Wyoming and is a soil conservation
technician for the National Re-
source Conservation Service.
The groom has a vocational in-
stitutue degree in drafting and de-
sign. He is a railroad carman with
Burlington, Northern and Santa
Fe Railroad.
The couple is at home in
Guernsey, Wyo.
Cassie Hurley and John Wells
were married October 14, 2011 at
K Bar S Lodge in Keystone.
Parents of the bride are Amelia
and the late Warren Hurley,
Philip. The groom’s parents are
Larry and Penny Wells.
Matron of honor was Carrie
Aarestad. Bridesmaids were Molly
McClure and Julie Gentle.
Best man was Jason Vore.
Groomsmen were Jake Bartz and
Billy Clark.
Ushers were David Seyfang and
Ashton Vore.
Following a reception at the K
c Hurley ~Wells c
by rep. Kristi Noem
Like all South Dakota moms, I
have loved watching my children
grow and cannot wait to see the ca-
reers they go into, the spouses they
choose and the children they will
have.
I want to be around for all of life’s
little milestones, and breast cancer
awareness is a big part of that.
Breast cancer is one of the leading
causes of cancer death among
women, and research shows that
one in eight women will be diag-
nosed with breast cancer at some
time during her life.
I encourage all South Dakotans
to recognize this month and put an
extra effort into spreading the word
about breast cancer. If possible,
consider participating in or volun-
teering for a Komen event, or help
spread the word through social
media or simply by talking with
family, friends and colleagues.
October is
breast
cancer
awareness
month
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2004 Ford F-250 XLT
Powerstroke Diesel,
Auto, 5th Wheel Ball
Great Ranch Pickup!
Give Tyler a call today!
www.philipmotor.com
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
MoVinG?
cHanGe
oF
addReSS?
please notify us
of your change
of address
BeFoRe
you move!
call 859-2516 or
e-mail
subscriptions
@pioneer-re-
view.com
www.
pioneer-
review.com
Amy Block, who is the cook at
the Midland school, gave me the
October menu for noon meals at
school. Anyone wishing to eat at
the school is welcome. Amy just
needs to know in advance so she
can prepare enough food.
School Menu
Thursday, Oct. 18: chicken patty,
fruit, veggie, and milk.
Monday, Oct. 22: taco casserole,
fruit, veggie, and milk.
Tuesday, Oct. 23: waffles, fruit,
veggie and milk.
Wednesday, Oct. 24: chili, fruit,
veggie and milk.
Thursday, Oct. 25: grilled ham
and cheese, fruit, veggie and milk.
Monday, Oct. 29: breakfast bur-
ritos, fruit, veggie and milk.
Tuesday, Oct. 30: spaghetti, fruit,
veggie and milk.
Wednesday, Oct. 31: Italian
dunkers, fruit, veggie and milk.
***
It is a beautiful Monday morn-
ing. There is no wind. Earlier the
temperature was a bit cool, but
without the wind it was good. It’s
much too nice a day to be sitting at
the computer. Jerry took a load of
branches etc. out to the farm this
morning. We’ve been busy cleaning
up bushes and sedums, raking
leaves and getting things ready for
winter. Those stinkers called deer
have been busy leaving their call-
ing cards on our lawn on a regular
basis. So, I headed out this morn-
ing to shovel what the deer had
left, so Jerry could dump it out at
the farm as well. Our little town is
becoming a place for not only deer,
but turkeys as well. There for a
time there was a bunch of turkeys
in our yard. I haven’t noticed them
lately, but then maybe they are off
visiting someone else by the time
we get up. One evening, we were
headed home and on the road were
four coyotes. A person will often-
times see a coyote, but can’t re-
member seeing four at once. A few
hunters are out. We don’t hunt.
Haven’t heard if they are having
any success. Folks are busy with
rounding up cattle, bringing them
home to winter pastures, selling
their calves and working at getting
ready for winter.
Reminder: October 31 from 4:00
to 5:00 the Midland Legion Auxil-
iary are having a Halloween party
at the Legion Hall with some
games and a pizza supper before
the kids head out for trick or treat
around town.
Attention: October 23 thru 31 is
Red Ribbon week at the Midland
school in which the Midland school
booster club is sponsoring drug and
alcohol prevention.
The Midland Community Li-
brary had a meeting at the library
October 11, 2012, with Librarian
Karel Reiman, Nicki Nelson, Barb
Jones, Carol Hunt, Christine
Niedan, Amy Hulce, Jenna Finn,
Betty Sinkey and Sonia Nemec in
attendance. There was discussion
on whether to have a tree at
Christmas in Midland which will
be Saturday, December 1. It was
voted to do so with the theme
“Treat Yourself to a Good Book.”
Jenna and Carol agreed to be in
charge of doing up the tree. Karel
furnished a tasty lunch with coffee
and apple juice. The next meeting
will be January 3, 2013. Just typ-
ing that date made me realize how
quickly we will be saying goodbye
to the old year and welcoming in
the new year. But, not to rush
things, as we have Thanksgiving
and Christmas to get through.
The Midland High School class of
’86 had their 26-year class reunion
with eight present. They all got to-
gether for supper and visiting Fri-
day. Brunch was at classmate Ron
Larson’s home in Philip. Everyone
toured the Midland school, had
lunch together and more visiting.
From the sounds of things, they
had a whole lot of fun as they
shared memories and stories of
their high school years.
Visited with JoAnn (Mulcahy)
Bork on the phone this Monday
morning checking on how things
are going at their place. JoAnn and
Paul’s daughter, Shelby, is a soph-
omore at the Murdo school. JoAnn
reported she and her cousin, Teresa
(Hunt) Palmer, who teaches at
Murdo, have been going to the
Murdo football games. JoAnn has
decided she will have finally
learned all the ins and outs of the
game of football by the time Shelby
graduates high school. Reports are
she and Teresa have enjoyed going
to the games. Paul and JoAnn’s
son, Danny, lives in Louisville, Ky.,
and works for F.D.I.C. He does a lot
of traveling with his job and is en-
joying it. Paul and JoAnn’s daugh-
ter, Jenny Geuther, Pierre, works
for the state for the visually im-
paired. She recently received her
master’s degree in rehabilitation in
counseling. This was no small ac-
complishment as Jenny is married,
has a little one, and works full-
time. Congratulations, Jenny.
Saturday was a busy day at Mid-
land when Ernie’s Building Center
had their annual appreciation
roast beef meal. This was some-
thing Ernie and Laurel Nemec
started in 1992, as an appreciation
to their customers. Their grandson,
Tyler Nemec, and his wife, Angel,
now have Ernie’s Building Center
and are continuing on with the tra-
dition. There was a nice crowd
there that day, enjoying a good
meal and visiting. We want to
thank Tyler and Angel for a good
meal. Tyler’s sisters, Katey and
Chelsee, and some of their families
were also at the dinner and helped
out, as did Tyler’s dad, Randy
Nemec. Holly still has her neck
brace on from her surgery a while
back, so was limited on being able
to help. Ernie and Laurel’s son,
Rick Nemec, Riley and Ben, Hazel
Green, Wis., and their daughter,
Barby Larson and Kendall, Sioux
Falls, came Friday to visit and help
in the serving of the meal Satur-
day. Everyone headed for home
Sunday.
Shorty Jones and the variable
ranch crew have been busy fencing,
moving cattle, culling cows, wean-
ing, with Barry and Bryer Jones
and Jeff and Stetson Jones even
getting in on a little roping fun
lately.
Visiting family members by
phone recently, Maxine Jones
learned that there are three new
grandbabies in the Stalley families.
Patty and the late T.R. Stalley fam-
ily has two girls, Tiayla was born in
August to Karie and Randy Suhn.
She joins two-year-old sister, Sha-
hayla, and five-year-old brother,
Kail. They live with Patty. Kellie
(Stalley) and Robbie's baby girl,
Rhea, arrived in September. They
live at Goodwell, Okla. There are
also Madelyn and Max Morman,
children of Kolene and Matt, who
live near Patty. Connie (Stalley)
and Steve Leek in Minnesota wel-
comed a new grandson, Joel Lloyd.
Little Joel was born on his great
aunt Dorothy Seidler’s birth date,
October 10, just days after her cel-
ebration of life at the Open Bible
Church in Midland.
Members of St. Peter’s Lutheran
Church, Jim and Delores Peters,
Okaton, and Karel Reiman, Mid-
land, and Mark Reiman, Kadoka,
rode with Bob and Diane Bork to
St. John’s Lutheran Church, Nor-
ris, Sunday for the annual joint
worship service. Following church
services, there was a potluck meal
with a joint voters meeting follow-
ing. Pastor Denke’s 30th year in
the ministry was celebrated. He
has been pastor of St. Peter’s and
St. John’s for 15 years and this was
also celebrated. He stays at the
parsonage in Norris and drives the
50 miles-one-way trip to St. Peter’s
each Sunday. Pastor Denke’s
brother, Paul and Lauren and their
son of Pierre was there, pastor’s
sister, Darlene Baye, Philip, and
his niece, Sandra, Rapid City, were
also there. Reports are it was an
enjoyable day and always good to
see those people from the sister
churches.
Bad river Club
October 6, a bit chilly day. Quite
a difference in temperature we
have previously had. The hard
freeze brought an end to the gar-
dens and the brilliant display of the
foliage of the trees this fall. God
must have used His paint brush
and touched each and every leaf to
bring forth such vivid colors.
Roll call was answered with our
likes and dislikes of the fall season.
We missed having Maxine Stirling
and Kathy Tolton with us. We sent
Maxine a card with our best
wishes. She is still in Rapid City
awaiting surgery.
Our hostess, Verona Evans, chal-
lenged us to identify the pictures of
various kinds of candy. Most could
only recognize Snickers, Milky Way
and Butterfingers. It was decided
we would no longer have the door
prize. Price is Right and other ac-
tivities would be at the discretion
of the hostess. Secret pal and host-
ess month will be drawn at the
Christmas luncheon. Remem-
brance on birthdays and Christ-
mas. Members who enjoyed the
fun-filled afternoon and the deli-
cious lunch (complete with Verona’s
famous popcorn) prepared and
served by our hostess at the attrac-
tive fall table setting was, Janice
Bierle, Betty Sinkey, Emily Sam-
mons, Isabelle Sampson and
Wilma Saucerman.
No special business, just enjoyed
visiting. Isabelle will be the No-
vember hostess.
Club reporter, Isabelle Sampson
***
News is scarce this week. People
are either not home or had no
news. So, I will close out my col-
umn for this week. We are going to
be gone Tuesday so if you had some
news and I missed it for this week,
I will put it in next week. I was
walking on our lots to the north of
us and oh, my, what huge cracks
there are in the ground. We don’t
have any lawn grass on those lots
and not having any rain, they
didn’t get any of natures watering.
It is clouding up, there was talk of
a chance for moisture, let’s hope it
is more then talk. I am presently
reading a book by Nora Roberts,
“The Next Always,” which is about
an old historic hotel in Boonsboro
which has endured war and peace,
the changing of hands, and even
rumored hauntings. It is getting a
face-lift by three brothers and their
eccentric mother who have plans to
make it into a wonderful inn with
character. It is one of three books.
It takes you on an interesting jour-
ney with all of its twists and turns.
We did not have that particular
book at the Midland library so I
checked it out at the Haakon
County library at Philip. Jody Daly
was there as a volunteer at the li-
brary helping librarian Annie
Brunskill. The three of us had a
most interesting visit about books.
Have a good week, be safe and con-
tinue to pray for that much needed
rain.
Inventory Reduction Sale
going on now at Kennedy Implement in Philip!!
859-2568
601 Pleasant • Philip
SPRAYERS
List Sale
Price Price
1980 Melroe 115, ready to go................................$4,500...............$3,950
COMBINES
JD 4400 with alfalfa screens..................................$3,500...............$2,950
JD 7720 harvesters - combines ............................$12,500 .............$11,500
SP WINDROWERS
NH 1100, 16’ header, needs engine work ..............$3,500...............$2,950
JD 2320, 21’ draper header, no conditioner ...........$6,950...............$6,250
Case IH 8840, 16’ head, field ready.....................$24,500.............$23,500
JD 800, salvage machine, good motor...................$1,950...............$1,500
NH 1100, 16’ header ..............................................$9,500...............$8,750
JD 4995, 18’ header .............................................$64,500.............$59,500
NH 1100, 14’ header ..............................................$7,500...............$6,500
MOWERS
2003 Grasshopper 725A, 61” deck,
25HP liquid cool, 890 hours ...............................$5,500...............$4,900
JD X520, 48” deck, low hours...............................$3,500...............$2,500
TRACTORS
1999 Case IH MX200, 8800 hours, MFWD........$69,500.............$65,000
McCormick MTX150, MFWD, 2600 hours,
brand new KMW loader ...................................$69,500.............$65,000
1989 Case IH 7120, 2WD, clean tractor,
10000 hours ......................................................$32,500.............$29,500
J I Case 1175, cab & heat, 5603 hours...................$7,500...............$6,500
1979 JD 4440, clean tractor, loader available......$24,500.............$22,000
NH TV145, 82LB loader, no hyd.
auxiliary pump, 2600 hours ..............................$69,500.............$65,000
JD 4630, consign., new paint, recent shop work .$22,500.............$22,500
1990 Case IH 5140, trans. out, cab top off,
mechanic’s special ............................................$19,500.............$16,000
Case IH 7120, MFWD, 8500 hrs., loader,
new paint, recent shopwork ..............................$48,000.............$45,000
1994 Case IH 7210, 7400 hrs., loader, recent
shop work..........................................................$34,500.............$32,500
TRACTORS continued
List Sale
Price Price
1989 Case IH 7110, 100HP to 174HP .................$32,500.............$29,500
2006 Case IH MXM130, MFWD, 2400 hours,
loaded, very nice tractor ...................................$59,500.............$55,000
1993 JD 7700, MFWD, 5650 hours, loader.........$59,500.............$55,000
2007 McCormick MTX120, MFWD, 3300 hours,
loader ................................................................$65,000.............$59,000
1997 JD 7410, MFWD, 10000 hours, loader.......$57,500.............$53,500
2003 NH TV140, 84LB loader w/auxiliary pump,
8800 hours, header available ............................$65,000.............$59,500
1976 Versatile 850, single metrics, transmission
work done, 897 hours .......................................$17,500.............$15,900
Ford 846, clean tractor, 60% on duals .................$39,500.............$36,500
1980 Versatile 835, duals, dozer, 10540 hours,
80% on tires ......................................................$22,500.............$21,000
1961 Oliver 1800A, 40HP to 99HP, 2384 hours....$3,000...............$1,500
1963 JD 2010, ready to go, with stacker................$4,500...............$3,950
1965 IH 504, clean unit, rock shaft no arms..........$3,500...............$2,950
JD 3020, nice running tractor ................................$6,500...............$5,950
1973 JD 4030, cab & heat, loader available ..........$9,500...............$8,850
IH 886, cab, heat, hard working tractor .................$9,500...............$8,850
JD 2020, fun yard tractor .......................................$5,500...............$4,950
1964 JD 3020, solid running tractor ......................$6,500...............$5,950
1963 IH 706D, cab & loader..................................$8,500...............$7,900
1956 JD 50, one owner tractor with IH cycle mower,
shedded ...............................................................$3,950...............$3,500
1951 IH M, parade ready!......................................$3,450...............$2,950
Ford 8N, nice, clean running tractor ......................$2,450...............$1,950
1951 IH M, painted up, sharp looking!..................$3,450...............$2,950
Ford 600, painted, ready to go................................................Just Traded
Ford 600, nice tractor..............................................................Just Traded
Farmall SC, recent transmission work....................................Just Traded
JD 2020 with loader & snow bucket.......................................Just Traded
*Sale price based on
outright sale with no trade-in.
Subject to availability. First come, first served!
Please Vote
Fred Koester
For Haakon County Sheriff
H12 years Law Enforcement Experience
HCertified Officer Within State of SD
HCommon Sense Approach to Law Enforcement
HUnderstands Needs of a Smaller Community
HHas served as your Haakon Co. Sheriff since
March 2012
D
e
d
i
c
a
t
e
d
E
x
p
e
r
i
e
n
c
e
d
F
a
i
r
HOURS: M-F: 7 A.M. TO 5 P.M. • SAT: 8 A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY 73 • 859-2100 • PHILIP
•Wood Pellets
•DeWaLT Tools
•Storage Sheds
•Gates & Fencing
Supplies
•Skid Loader Rental
•Pole Barn Packages
•House Packages
•Feed Bunks
•Calf Shelters
We offer …
& new colormatch System for
all your painting needs!
call today for your
free estimate!!
Annual Meetings
Midland Pioneer Museum
& The Pioneer Club of Old Stanley County
Sunday, October 28th
Midland Senior Citizen’s Center
Potluck dinner - 12 Noon
Guest Speaker: Lonis Wendt
Everyone is welcome!
Five generations
Top photo from left are great-grandma Mary Niessink, Sioux City, Iowa, holding
Natalie Cvach, Belle Fourche, great-great-grandma Marie Evers, Soldier, Iowa, dad
Casey Cvach, Belle Fourche, and grandma Kim Cvach, Midland. Bottom photo are
from left, grandpa Russell Cvach, Midland, great-grandma Gaynold Willoughby,
Midland, dad Casey Cvach holding Natalie Cvach, Belle Fourche, and front row is
great-great-grandma Bernice Raben, Martin, SD.
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
1999 Buick Park Avenue
3.8L V6, Heated Leather, Keyless Entry
Hard to find!
Governor Dennis Daugaard has
issued an executive proclamation
dedicating Saturday, October 20, as
Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration
Day in South Dakota.
The proclamation honors the
75th anniversary of the Wildlife
and Sport Fish Restoration Pro-
gram and highlights the federal
money derived from the program
that helps fund wildlife and fish
management in South Dakota.
“I think it is appropriate to pay
homage to this incredible program
on the opening day of South
Dakota’s traditional pheasant sea-
son,” Daugaard said. “South
Dakota has some of the finest hunt-
ing and fishing found in the United
States. And, throughout our state’s
history, hunters and anglers have
provided most all of the funds that
support management of our state’s
fish and wildlife resources. This
source of federal funding related to
hunting and fishing provides addi-
tional money and greatly enhances
our work.”
The Wildlife and Sport Fish
Restoration Program was started
in 1937 when Congress, working in
cooperation with sportsmen and
sporting goods-related businesses,
instituted a hunting equipment ex-
cise tax paid by manufacturers. A
similar tax on fishing equipment
was added in 1950. Since its incep-
tion, more than $13 billion has
been distributed to state game and
fish agencies across the nation to
help fund management programs.
South Dakota received more
than $10.8 million in federal aid
last year from the program, which
comprised about 22 percent of the
Game, Fish and Parks Department
operating budget.
“If you've ever purchased
firearms or ammunition, bows, ar-
rows, fishing lures, rods and reels,
hunting or fishing licenses, you’re
part of the most successful effort to
conserve fish and wildlife in Amer-
ica,” Daugaard said.
Governor proclaims wildlife
and sport fish restoration day
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
I am always amazed at what a
small world we live in. When I took
my pickup in to have it fixed where
the wind hit it that windy day and
made a mess of it. The door would
not shut like it should and there
was some other damage. So I got it
appraised and when the insurance
adjuster called me he said this is
Brenden Hendrickson and I said
you wouldn’t be the Brenden Hen-
drickson I knew as a kid, Roy Hen-
drickson’s son, would you. He said
“Yes he was.” So in visiting a short
while with him, I found out where
some of the Hendrickson kids were.
He said that his grandmother, Eve-
lyn, was doing well and that she
was in her 90s. Some of you proba-
bly remember Joyce and Leola who
went to high school here in Philip.
They were nieces of George Hen-
drickson who was the school super-
intendent at Philip and was also a
relative of Jean Radway. He said
Leola was spending her winters in
Arizona and then came back to the
old Four Mile Trading Post and
spends her summers there. Her
folks lived just across the road from
the trading post while she was
growing up. Her brother, Everett,
ran the trading post for several
years after George and Sal
(Sanders) Marsh sold out. They
have made a museum out of it now
and it is a tourist attraction. I grew
up with all those kids. Margaret
and I were the same age. Some of
Everett’s family still own the trad-
ing post. Their father, Guy Hen-
drickson’s wife sang for many spe-
cial occasions around the Custer
area.
Eloise, who still lives in Custer,
was married to Ernie Pepin who
was the Custer County Sheriff for
many years.
As you go west of Custer, all that
area is tourist attractions now. The
Bailey brother’s place is still there.
Some of you older rodeo people will
remember they used to have the
Bailey Brothers rodeos and fur-
nished stock for rodeos elsewhere
around the country.
Mike and Judy Melvin returned
to Jim and Norma Oldenberg’s
Wednesday. Thursday, they took
me out for a belated birthday sup-
per. Jim just about had to walk
home as he jumped the gun and
paid for supper. Mike told him he
would have to walk home because
of that! Bob and Kathy Hamann,
who were also with us, felt sorry for
him and told Jim he could ride
home with them. Jim didn’t stay in
the dog house long, as the rest of
the evening was spent visiting and
enjoying our time together. Mike
and Judy went home Friday.
There was a large crowd at the
nursing home Tuesday, October 9,
when Chuck and Ruth Ann
Carstensen played music for the
residents and guests. Others help-
ing them were Marianne Frein
playing the accordion, and their
daughter, Tammie playing the flat
top. Ruth played the bass and
Chuck the lead guitar. Many old-
time favorite songs were played
and a lot of dancing was done.
Some of the residents who were in
wheelchairs were also dancing with
the help of a person who danced be-
hind them keeping time with the
music.
Laurie, JoAnn Thorson’s, daugh-
ter, who is here visiting, took her
mother for quite a few spins
around the floor during the
evening. It was JoAnn’s birthday
and Chuck played the happy birth-
day song and everyone sang happy
birthday to her.
Many who attended, Phyllis
Thorson, Lee Schoniger, Debbie
Hansen, Gloria French, Marie
Mortellaro, and Chuck and Kay
Kroetch, danced with the residents
and they sure enjoyed that.
Eleanor Kroetch was also there to
enjoy the music and watch the
dancing and do some visiting.
Emmie Reedy enjoyed watching
her kids, Joann and Lester Pear-
son, dance.
Bob Thorson and his fianceé,
Jodi, brought her parents, Ed and
Cleone Tangren, in to the dance as
they like to do that while they are
here. This would be the last time
they could attend because they
planned on going home later in the
week. Bob and Jodi kicked up their
heels a little also. And I did see a
few ladies get Lloyd Frein up for a
few dances.
Marie Hansen enjoyed the
music. She kept time with both feet
and hands. I bet she remembered
her days of playing music all over
Haakon County for many years.
Rita Ramsey was there with her
mother, Dorothy Urban, and she
was up and danced a few times.
Hans Hanson enjoyed the dance
and visiting with several from the
area. In fact, I think that most of
the residents were out enjoying the
evening. Hats off to the staff for
getting the residents out for this
event.
Our sympathy to the family of
Mary Pekron whose funeral was
Monday, October 15.
Mary grew up just two and one
half miles south of my home on the
Jim Gottsleben homestead. Her
mother, Helen, taught school at the
Deadman School and she taught
my husband, Kenneth. Helen be-
came sick and was confined to her
bed for a long time and passed
away leaving a small daughter,
Ann. Mary and Jim helped their
dad raise Ann. Mary would take
Ann with her to school at St. Mar-
tin where Mary attended high
school. They would come home on
weekends and Mary would do the
family wash and cleaned the house
before they returned to school. She
worked very hard and she went on
to college and then she also taught
school. Mary always had a smile
and was thankful for everything
she ever received.
Mary enjoyed her family and
grandchildren and it brought her
much pleasure when they stopped
to chat for a while. Whenever I
would see her she liked to talk
about her family and show pictures
of them.
Everyone is busy in this neigh-
borhood getting ready for winter. I
think most have their wheat
planted. Marvin was still planting
some Saturday, but he will be done
with that with another day of plant-
ing.
Vicki has been getting Glenn and
Terri Stoller’s building ready for
them when they arrive this Friday
for bird hunting.
I am still pulling weeds. It
doesn’t take much of that to tire me
out. They are so tough to pull from
the dry earth. Day by day, I can see
where I have been and lots of places
I have not been yet. If it stays nice,
I will succeed in getting them all
pulled yet.
I baked several loaves of banana
bread this Saturday and put them
in the freezer. I like the bananas re-
ally black and ripe as they make
the bread more moist and flavorful.
I like to use Laura Nelson’s recipe
from the old Rural Electric Assoc.
cookbook. It is so good. Some like
walnuts in the bread and others
don’t, so I fix some both ways. I
bought some at a bake sale once
that had chocolate chips in it, but I
wasn’t fond of it that way.
Election day will soon be here so
be sure to get out and vote. Who-
ever you vote for is your choice, but
I am tired of all the talk, good and
bad. It seems to me if they would
say once what they are for and not
spend all those millions of dollars
on all the he done this and he done
that and give the money they spend
to the poor we would be better off.
If their reputation has not already
spoken for itself, all that talk and
campaigning won’t do any good
anyway. People don’t know who to
believe anyway after all the back-
lashing. This is just my personal
opinion, such as it is.
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports and accomplishments
Christmas in the Attic
Wednesday, Oct. 31 • 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
All new Christmas Trees & Decorations
Christmas Trees,
Wreaths,
Garland, Balls,
Tinsel, Skirts,
Stockings
(Excluding Toys)
3
0
%
O
f
f
50% Off
Fall
Decorations!!
Bargain
Corner
Starting at
99¢ - $9.99
Values to $50
Drawings for
Door Prizes
throughout
the day!
Gift Bags
79¢
& up!
Don’t forget
our picture
gallery!
New pictures
weekly!
Stop in and
see our Toy
Selection!
Cash & Carry
Ingram Hardware
859-2521 • Philip
Christmas Display
Coffee & Cookies too!
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
Interior School Carnival
Friday, October 26th
6-9 p.m.
Interior School Gym
Concession Stands
Serving Supper
Bingo ($100 Black-out)
Games For All
Costume
Contest
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing .............................16-8
Rockers......................................14-10
Petersen’s ..................................14-10
Handrahan Const .....................13-11
Dakota Bar..................................9-15
Badland’s Auto............................6-18
Highlights:
Harvey Byrd..........................157/448
Bryan Buxcel.........................205/578
Jim Kujawa .........3-10 split; 201/562
Trina Brown..........................179/506
Arlene Kujawa.....4-10 split; 182/486
Andrew Reckling.........203 clean/545
Marlis Petersen.....2-9 split; 180/495
Maralynn Burns....................180/477
Matt Reckling..............195 clean/526
Connie Schlim......................2-7 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s early
People’s Mkt..................................6-2
Kennedy Imp.................................6-2
George’s Welding ..........................5-3
Kadoka Tree Serv .........................5-3
Philip Motor..................................4-4
Philip Health Serv........................3-5
G&A Trenching.............................2-6
Bear Auto ......................................1-7
Highlights:
Earl Park.......................258, 201/636
Alvin Pearson..............197 clean/579
Fred Foland3-10 split; 222 clean/552
Tony Gould ...................................520
Johnny Wilson.......................205/519
Cory Boyd.....................................514
Dakota Alfery........................215/506
Bill Bainbridge ...................3-10 split
Dan Addison............3-6 & 7-10 splits
Norm Buxcel .......................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ............................18-6
Cutting Edge...............................18-6
Invisibles.....................................16-8
Jolly Ranchers...........................11-13
State Farm Ins............................7-17
Highlights:
Dodi Weller....................188, 156/477
Sandra O’Connor ..................173/432
Donna King ...........159, 155, 148/462
Judy Papousek..............151, 148/437
Lila Whidby ..........................2-7 split
Marti Kjerstad....................5-10 split
Kay Kroetch.....................3-9-10 split
Karen Foland......................3-10 split
Wednesday Nite early
Dakota Bar..................................16-8
Morrison’s Haying ................14.5-9.5
Chiefie’s Chicks...................13.5-10.5
Dorothy’s Catering....................13-11
First National Bank .................12-12
Hildebrand Concrete ..........10.5-13.5
Wall Food Center ......................10-14
Just Tammy’s........................6.5-17.5
Highlights:
Kalie Kjerstad.......................166/426
Val Schulz....................207 clean/484
Emily Kroetch..............................194
Shar Moses...................................185
Ashley Reckling ...........................175
Cindy VanderMay........................417
Brenda Grenz........................184/469
Sandee Gittings ...........................479
Debbie Gartner.....................5-7 split
Kathy Arthur......................3-10 split
Jessica Wagner...................3-10 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry...............................7-1
O’Connell Const ............................7-1
Dakota Bar....................................6-2
McDonnell Farms .........................4-4
West River Pioneer Tanks............4-4
WEE BADD...................................2-6
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................1-7
The Steakhouse ............................1-7
Highlights:
Jan Bielmaier........................248/668
John Heltzel .................................202
Matt Reckling .......................202/545
Jason Petersen......................209/604
Bryan Buxcel ......2-5-7 & 5-10 splits;
...............................................202/561
Jack Heinz.............................203/554
Jay McDonnell ......................203/543
Alvin Pearson...............................541
Nathan Kjerstad...................204/537
Brian Pearson.............3-10 split; 534
Wendell Buxcel ................5-7 split x2
Neal Petersen ................3-10 split x3
Mark Foland......................3-6-7 split
Tyler Hauk............................5-7 split
Alex Moos.......................3-10 split x2
Ron Coyle............................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................19-5
King Pins...............................14.5-9.5
Roy’s Repair ........................13.5-10.5
Randy’s Spray Service................13-7
Lee and the Ladies .....................8-12
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Duane Hand ................225 clean/608
Tanner Norman.....................212/530
Brian Pearson......3-10 split; 205/573
Alvin Pearson...............................203
Cristi Ferguson....4-7-9 & 3-10 splits
John Heltzel ......................4-5-7 split
Deb Neville ...........................2-7 split
DeMaris, left, and Erv Nesheim, right, Hill City, were recently honored as South
Dakota’s Outstanding Philanthropists of the Year at a celebration held in Rapid
City, Septemer 27, with Governor Dennis Daugaard presenting. “It is with great
humbleness that we accept this award,” D. Nesheim, formerly of Philip, said when
accepting the award. “We try to support organizations that use the gifts given to
them wisely and in a thrifty manner ... The joy we have been given by sharing
God’s goodness with others cannot be measured in words ... I am reminded of a
saying my late husband, Chuck, has said many times. It goes like this, ‘You never
see a U-Haul truck following the hearse to the cemetery.’ So let’s all go out and
share some of those gifts that God has given us to fill some of the needs of this
very needy world.” The Nesheims were nominated for the award by Lutherans
Outdoors in South Dakota, Lutheran Social Services and the City of Philip. Also
recognized were Black Hills Power in Rapid City as Outstanding Philanthropic
Business; Rushmore Rotary Club of Rapid City, chosen as Outstanding Philan-
thropic Volunteer Fundraiser; and, the City of Wall as the recipient of Outstanding
Philanthropic Community. The National Day of Philanthropy luncheon, hosted by
Association of Fundraising Professionals, was a tribute in honor of the people
and organizations whose generosity enriches our state, according to Brian Loken,
SD AFP president. Courtesy photo
Philanthropist of the Year
a former Philip resident
by laurie Hindman
The 23rd annual West River/
Lyman-Jones Rural Water System
meeting was held in Wall, Wednes-
day, October 10, at the Wall Com-
munity Center.
Members who attended the
meeting received a $10 water cer-
tificate when they registered.
Manager Jake Fitzgerald intro-
duced WR/L-J board of directors,
office and field staff along with spe-
cial guests Mayor Dave Hahn,
Wall, and Mayor Mike Vetter,
Philip.
President Paul Goldhammer in-
formed members there was proof of
a quorum. Fitzgerald read the
proof of mailing and notice of the
annual meeting.
Fitzgerald then gave the man-
ager’s report. He began with an
overview of the past year. The Bad
River Distribution project has been
completed. It consisted of 26 miles
and 105 new users. They have in-
stalled a satellite reading service
which autoreads the water meters
and detects water leaks. This new
system allows them to notify a
water user immediately if there is
a higher water usage spike.
Fitzgerald reported, “Due to the
extreme drought users have used
777 million gallons of water this
year, over 507 million gallons from
last year.” WR/L-J has plans to pro-
tect the water lines in case the
TransCanada XL pipeline is al-
lowed to pass through South
Dakota, noted Fitzgerald. He also
informed members that their fed-
eral funding will end in the fiscal
year 2013. WR/L-J will then be re-
sponsible for $23.9 million to com-
plete the Mni Wiconi project. They
plan to install a 200,000 gallon
tower north of Philip, build a chlo-
rine station in the Badlands Na-
tional Park and install pipeline and
pump stations.
Attorney Dave Larson reported
that Jim Schaefer, Richard Doud,
Veryl Prokop and Joseph Hieb were
re-elected to the board.
During the question and answer
portion of the meeting, members
asked if WR/L-J would be affected
by the Corp of Engineers proposal?
Since WR/L-J has signed a water
service agreement with the Bureau
of Reclamation, no they would not
be affected. It was then asked how
much the automatic reading de-
vices cost? Fitzgerald said, “They
are $450 a piece and air time is $5
per month per unit.”
With no other business Gold-
hammer adjourned the meeting.
West River/Lyman-
Jones Rural Water
System meeting
Manager of West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water System Jake Fitzgerald
looks over the crowd at the 23rd an-
nual meeting held in Wall on Wednes-
day, October 10.
Photo by Laurie Hindman
The Philip High School football
team traveled to Wall, Friday, Oc-
tober 12, to challenge the Eagles.
In the first quarter, Wall’s of-
fense has its kicker, Trevor Ander-
son, attempt a field goal. The 39-
yard kick was successful. Later, he
repeated the effort, but from two
yards closer. The quarter ended
with the score of 0-6.
The second quarter saw a two-
yard carry by Wall’s Taran Eisen-
braun for a touchdown. The extra
point attempt failed. The first half
ended 0-12.
The third quarter might have
gone scoreless, but a surprise 97-
yard rush by Wall’s Tyler Trask put
another touchdown on the board.
The score held at 0-18.
The fourth quarter saw more ac-
tion, this time by both teams. Wall
got within two yards of the goal
line, and Anderson carried the ball
the rest of the way in. This time the
extra point kick attempt was good.
Philip got on the scoreboard with
Tate DeJong passing to Paul Gup-
till, who finished the 37-yard play
for the touchdown. Casey Reder
carried the ball in for the successful
two-point conversion play. The
Scotties finished the game with
eight points to the Eagle’s 25.
Philip earned 15 first downs,
compared to Wall’s 24. Philip lost
25 yards because of three five-yard
penalties and one 10-yard penalty.
Wall lost 55 yards because of four
five-yards penalties, two 10-yard
and one 15-yard penalty.
Philip rushed a total of 145
yards. Reder used his 18 carries to
run the ball a total of 67 yards
down field. Guptill carried 15 times
for 42 yards. DeJong gained 18
yards for his team in his seven car-
ries. Nick Hamill was given the
ball five times to gain 16 yards for
Philip.
Philip’s passing game consisted
of seven attempts and two comple-
tions. These resulted in 42 total
yards and one touchdown.
The Scotties defense saw Hamill
racking up one solo tackle, seven
assists and two quarterback sacks.
Guptill and DeJong each added
three solos and six assists. Quade
Slovek finished the game with two
solo tackles and seven assists. Jade
Berry added two solos and six as-
sists.
The next game for the Philip
Scotties will be them hosting the
Kadoka Area Kougars, Thursday,
October 18, starting at 7:00 p.m.
Philip Scotties lose to Wall by quarters
The Scotties football line makes a huge opening, holding back the Eagles for ball carrier Casey Reder. The other Scotties from left are Reed Johnson, Quade Slovek,
Tate DeJong, Jade Berry and Cassidy Schnabel. The other three Scotties are partially visible behind the Eagle players. Photo by Nancy Haigh
Nick Hamill tried to make headway while carrying the ball against the Wall Eagles in Philip last Friday night. Other Scotties,
from left, are Jade Berry, Casey Reder, Cassidy Schnabel, and on the far right Brian Pfeifle. Photo by Nancy Haigh
This will be the last regular season
game for the Scotties, with the first
round of playoffs starting Tuesday,
October 23.
On October 10, United States
Senator Tim Johnson (D-S.D.) wel-
comed Department of Transporta-
tion Secretary Ray LaHood to
Pierre.
Johnson and LaHood attended
the grand opening of the newly ex-
panded River Cities Public Transit
facility. The work was done with
the help of $3.9 million in federal
funds, and includes a new dispatch
center, offices and a bus garage.
River Cities Public Transporta-
tion serves a number of counties in-
cluding Haakon, Dewey, eastern
Pennington, Hand, Hughes, Hyde,
Lyman, North Jackson, Jones, Pot-
ter, Stanley, Sully and Ziebach.
The Haakon County Prairie
Transportation is operated by
River Cities Public Transit.
LaHood at River Cities Public Transit
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports and accomplishments
Come to
our Annual
Halloween
Masquerade
Party!
Sat., October 27th
Judging: 8-11 p.m.• Unmasking: 11:15 p.m.
Cash prizes for Best 3 Costumes!
73 – Saloon
859-2173 • Philip
Friday Night
Steak-out
Friday Night
Bingo
WOOD & WALDEN AVE. RESIDENTS
City of Philip, SD
The City Council has invited the City’s Engineering Firm,
SPN & Assoc., to meet with you regarding any upgrades to
your properties during the Wood and Walden Ave. Street
Improvement project slated for 2013.
This is your opportunity to request additional work such
as a driveway approach and/or sidewalk replacement that
was not included in the original design project.
The meeting is slated for the afternoon of Thursday, Oc-
tober 25th on the 4th floor of the Haakon County Court-
house. Please contact the City Finance Office at 859-2175
by Tuesday, October 23rd, to make an appointment.
Fall Festival
Wed. October 31st
5:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Community E. Free Church
(West of Philip on Hwy. 14)
F
ood
P
rizes
G
a
m
e
s
C
an
d
y
M
ovie
F
U
N
f
o
r
A
L
L
A
G
E
S
!
!
Donate some of your
candy to troops
overseas with:
It’s A Girl!
Paternal Grandparents:
Russell and Kim Cvach, Midland
Maternal Grandparents:
Greg and Polly Odle, Nisland, SD
Paternal Great-Grandparents:
Tony and Gaynold Willoughby, Midland,
Larry and Ann Cvach, Midland,
Hyman and Mary Niessink, Sioux City, IA
Proud Aunts:
Justina Cvach and Katie Odle
Proud Uncles: Colter Cvach, Bronson Odle, Chase Odle and Dillon Odle
This ad sponsored by Grandpa & Grandma Cvach
Daughter of Casey
Cvach &
Ashlee Odle,
Belle Fourche
Born: August 16, 2012
7 lbs., 15 oz.
20 1/2” long
Natalie
LeeAnn
Cvach
The South Dakota FFA Founda-
tion has announced the recipients
of three $100 scholarships for stu-
dents placing first in each of the
three South Dakota Regional
Range Evaluation Competitions
this fall in Wessington Springs,
Wall and Roslyn.
Scholarship 2012 recipients are
Seth Haigh and Ryan Van Tassel –
Philip FFA, Shannon Duxbury –
Wessington Springs FFA, and
Jacob Siglin, Webster FFA.
The scholarships are designed to
encourage and reward students’ ac-
complishments in the field of range
management. Scholarships are
made possible by a contribution to
the S.D. FFA Foundation from
LeRoy and Cathie Draine, Black
Hawk.
“These scholarships represent a
good combination of three impor-
tant beliefs: first, our respect for
the integrity of the land, our soils
and water; second, the imperative
to provide educational opportuni-
ties for understanding and the wise
use and care of the land; and third,
faith in the process of developing
knowledgeable custodians for the
future,” said C. Draine.
The Range Evaluation Competi-
tion, hosted by the United States
Department of Agriculture’s Natu-
ral Resource Conservation Service,
provides students insight into the
basic tools used in land steward-
ship, which is the application of
ecological principles and histori-
cally significant disturbance such
as grazing. Contest objectives are
to teach some of the principles of
ecology including soil/plant rela-
tionships, plant/animal relation-
ships, and plant succession as ap-
plied to management of the land
resource. Beef cattle and grouse
have been chosen to demonstrate
the concept of habitat evaluation.
Both species are ecologically and
economically important and their
relationship to different stages of
plant succession is well known.
L. and C. Draine support agricul-
tural education and the FFA's mis-
sion to make a difference in the
lives of students by developing
their potential for premier leader-
ship, personal growth and career
success through agricultural edu-
cation. For more information about
the S.D. FFA Foundation and
South Dakota’s FFA programs,
visit www.sdffafoundation.org.
FFA regional range scholarship winners
Seth Haigh, left, and Ryan Van Tassel tied for first place in the South Dakota Re-
gional Range Evaluation competitions. Courtesy photo
Ruland Arena LLC, held their
first Black Hills Roping Club team
roping series for 2012-2013 on Oc-
tober 13, 2012.
There was a total of 380 teams.
Open incentive roping: 73 teams.
First Go winners: Tyrell Moody/
Levi Lord – 5.29. Second Go win-
ners: Jake Nelson/Dan Nelson –
5.57. Average winners: first – Levi
Lord/Shaun Ruland – 27.30, sec-
ond – Tyrell Moody/Levi Lord –
27.50, third – Tim Nelson/Dalton
Richter – 29.00, fourth – Shaun
Ruland/Rory Brown – 29.30, fifth –
Tyrell Moody/Paul Griemsman –
32.49, sixth – Wyatt Treeby/Rowdy
Curr – 35.16.
Number 9 roping: 71 teams.
First Go winners: Wyatt Treeby/
Brett Wilcox – 5.44. Second Go win-
ners: Tye Hale/Dalton Richter –
5.00. Average winners: first – Tel
Schaack/Clint Hupty – 21.54, sec-
ond – Levi Hapney/Dan Nelson –
22.11, third – Tel Schaack/Levi
Lord – 22.14, fourth – Wyatt
Treeby/Bret Wilcox – 23.26, fifth –
Troy Richter/Ora Taton – 23.38,
sixth – Troy Richter/Melvin Arne-
son – 23.99.
Number 5 roping: 115 teams.
First Go winners: Ty Hicks/Jess
Harris – 6.31. Second Go winners:
Hanna Brown/Tel Schaack – 7.04.
Average winners: first – Dewey
Ertz/Ross McPherson – 28.79, sec-
ond – Hanna Brown/Daine Mc-
Nenny – 29.90, third – Ty Hicks/
Jess Harris – 35.04, fourth – Troy
Richter/Rowdy Curr – 35.23, fifth –
Dewey Ertz/Bryce Sigman – 35.79,
sixth – Dewey Ertz/Bob Rose –
40.02.
Drawpot incentive roping: 121
teams. First Go winners: Tyrel
Moody/Daine McNenny – 5.28. Sec-
ond Go winners: Tyrel Moody/
Daine McNenny – 5.71. Average
winners: first – Tim Nelson/Glen
King – 17.07, second – Levi Lord/
Ora Taton – 20.03, third – Larry
Ruland/Ora Taton – 21.97, fourth –
Melvin Arneson/ Carson Musick –
25.85, fifth – Jim Selchert/Bryan
Jones – 26.26, sixth – Troy Richter/
Rory Brown – 26.30.
Ruland Arena Black Hills
Roping Club team results
The Philip Lady Scotties volley-
ball team traveled to Presho,
Thursday, October 11, to challenge
the Lyman Raiders.
In a four-game match, Philip lost
1-3. Game scores were 17-25, 25-
22, 20-25 and 18-25. The varsity
currently stands with a season
record of 10-14.
Serving: 75-81 (14 aces). Leaders: Madison
Hand – 15 of 15 (1 ace), Courtney Bartlett –
10 of 11 (3 aces), Peyton DeJong – 17 of 18 (1
ace).
Receiving: 81 of 88. Leaders: Krista
Wells – 45 of 48, Brett Carley – 11 of 12, Jor-
dyn Dekker – 11 of 13.
Setting: 124 of 128 (31 assists). Leader:
Hand – 108 of 110 (30 assists).
Hitting: 120 of 155 (38 kills). Leaders: De-
Jong – 28 of 31 (12 kills), Wells – 8 of 8 (3
kills), Hanna Hostutler – 15 of 19 (5 kills).
Blocking: 3 kills. Leaders: Hostutler – 2
solos, Dekker – 1 solo.
Digging: 72 of 115. Leaders: Wells – 19 of
24, Kaci Olivier – 13 of 19, DeJong – 12 of 13.
The junior varsity fared far bet-
ter, with a 2-0 match win. The
game scores were 25-21 and 25-10.
The junior varsity stands with a
season record of 9-4.
Serving: 43 of 47 (7 aces). Leaders: De-
Jong – 14 of 14 (1 ace), Ashton Reedy – 12 of
14 (3 aces), Hostutler – 6 of 7 (2 aces).
Receiving: 20 of 31. Leaders: Olivier – 6 of
7, Carley – 6 of 9, DeJong – 4 of 5.
Setting: 56 of 59 (12 assists). Leader:
Reedy – 37 of 39 (9 assists).
Hitting: 44 of 51 (11 kills). Leaders:
Justina Cvach – 7 of 7 (3 kills), DeJong – 4 of
4 (1 kill), Carley – 15 of 18 (3 kills).
Blocking: 2 kills. Leaders: Cvach – 1 solo,
Hostutler – 1 solo.
Digging: 44 of 46. Leaders: Olivier – 10 of
10, Carley – 10 of 11, DeJong – 8 of 8.
Philip Lady
Scotties fall
to Lyman 1-3
The Douglas Volleyball Tourna-
ment, Saturday, October 13, ended
with the Philip Lady Scotties com-
ing away with a season record of
11-16.
The ladies first defeated the Lit-
tle Wound Lady Mustangs, win-
ning the match 2-0. Game scores
were 25-13 and 25-12.
Serving: 50 of 50 (6 aces). Leaders:
Madison Hand – 14 of 14 (2 aces), Peyton
DeJong – 13 of 13, Hanna Hostutler – 8 of
8 (1 ace).
Receiving: 14 of 22. Leader: Krista
Wells – 6 of 7.
Setting: 40 of 41 (15 assists). Leader:
Hand – 34 of 35 (10 assists).
Hitting: 43 of 47 (16 kills). Leaders: Jor-
dyn Dekker – 11 of 12 (6 kills), DeJong – 9
of 10 (5 kills), Courtney Bartlett – 9 of 9 (1
kill).
Blocking: 3 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 2
solos, Hostutler – 1 solo.
Digging: 31 of 42. Leaders: DeJong – 7
of 7, Dekker – 7 of 8, Hand – 5 of 7.
Philip next face the Bennett
County Lady Warriors. This match
went against the Scotties, 1-2.
Even though the first game was an
extended time win for Philip, the
next two fell through. Game scores
were 26-24, 12-25 and 15-25.
Serving: 49 of 57 (5 aces). Leaders: Hostut-
ler – 11 of 12 (2 aces), Hand – 15 of 17 (1 ace),
DeJong – 9 of 11 (2 aces).
Receiving: 60 of 67. Leaders: Wells – 23 of
24, Kaci Olivier – 17 of 18, Dekker – 10 of 11.
Setting: 97 of 100 (20 assists). Leader
Hand – 89 of 89 (15 assists).
Hitting: 91 of 121 (23 kills). Leaders: De-
Jong – 20 of 22 (6 kills), Dekker – 18 of 27 (9
kills), Bartlett – 12 of 18 (3 kills).
Blocking: 6 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 2 solos
and 1 assist, Bartlett – 2 assists, Hostutler –
1 solo and 1 assist.
Digging: 79 of 103. Leaders: Wells – 27 of
28, Hand – 10 of 14, Dekker – 8 of 10.
The Lady Scotties finished the
tournament challenging the Hot
Springs Tigers. The match ended 0-
2, with one game going into ex-
tended play. The game scores were
24-26 and 10-25.
Serving: 34 of 35 (3 aces). Leaders: Hand –
8 of 8 (1 ace), Hostutler – 7 of 7 (1 ace),
Olivier – 5 of 5 (1 ace)
Receiving: 32 of 43. Leaders: Wells – 12 of
14, Dekker – 9 of 11, Olivier – 5 of 7.
Setting: 43 of 44 (12 assists). Leader:
Hand – 37 of 37 (11 assists).
Hitting: 40 of 53 (13 kills). Leaders:
Bartlett – 8 of 8 (3 kills), Hostutler – 4 of 4 (1
kill), Brett Carley – 3 of 3 (1 kill).
Blocking: 1 kill. Leader: Dekker.
Digging: 33 of 55. Leaders: Hand – 7 of 8,
Wells – 6 of 9, Dekker – 6 of 9.
The next match for the Lady
Scotties will be with Philip hosting
Bennett County, Friday, October
19, starting at 4:30 p.m. Their next
match will be at New Underwood
against the Tigers, Monday, Octo-
ber 22, starting at 6:00 p.m.
Ladies lose 1-2 at Douglas Tourney
The Family, Career and Community Leaders of America and the Philip High School
volleyball team ask everyone to wear pink in support of breast cancer awareness.
Thursday, October 18, will be “Wear Pink” day. All students and staff are encour-
aged to wear pink, and they may even wear hats, pink ones, during school for a
fee. During Thursday’s home football game versus Kadoka, the football players
will be wearing pink socks. A pink football signed by the Philip Scottie football
players will be raffled during the game. Friday, October 19, will be the annual “Dig
Pink” night at the Philip volleyball match versus Bennett County. There will be
prizes for the best dressed girl and guy fan. Between matches, a serving game
will be held for audience participants. Pink and white mini-volleyballs will be sold.
Volleyball players will be autographing and throwing balls to the crowd during in-
troductions. A raffle for a fleece blanket made and donated by FCCLA members
will be held. Italian sodas and a pink bake sale will be available. The biggest part
of the “Dig Pink” night will be recognition of local breast cancer survivors in at-
tendance, who will be given free admission, bracelets and pink roses. Pink items
for sale during the week include bracelets, gloves, feathery and sequin hats, boas,
headbands, socks, scarves, necklaces and much more. All fundraising proceeds
will be donated to the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Foundation. Shown dis-
playing just some of the pink items for sale are, from left, Sam Huston, Katelyn
Enders and Tara Cantrell. Photo by Del Bartels
Philip volleyball and
FCCLA “Dig Pink” night
There are a few spaces left for
the Farm Beginnings® course, a
training program hosted by Dakota
Rural Action and taught by local
farmers.
Farm Beginnings® provides par-
ticipants with the support and ed-
ucation needed to launch a prof-
itable and sustainable farm enter-
prise. Classes begin November 3
and are held in Sioux Falls two
Saturdays a month through mid-
March. Classes are followed up by
summer skills sessions and farm
tours.
Beginning farmers of all ages
and backgrounds are welcome to
apply. Participants do not need to
currently own land. Class size and
scholarship funding is limited and
applications will be accepted only
until the course is full. Course in-
formation and online application
can be found at www.dakotarural.
org/farmbeginnings, or contact
Dakota Rural Action at (605) 697-
5204 or heidiku@dakotarural.org.
Farm Beginnings® is an estab-
lished curriculum developed over a
decade ago by the Minnesota-based
Land Stewardship Project that is
now replicated in several states, in-
cluding IL, NE, ND and NY.
Dakota Rural Action has adapted
the curriculum to meet the needs of
South Dakota farmers. The project
is supported by the Beginning
Farmer and Rancher Development
Program of the National Institute
of Food and Agriculture, USDA.
Scholarships for Farm Beginnings course
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 10
Good Luck, Scotties
at the State Cross Country Meet
October 20th • 12 Noon MT
Broadland Golf Course in Huron!!
The Scotties are proudly supported
by these fine local businesses:
Brant’s
Electric
B&B
Sales
Coyle’s
SuperValu
Dr. Ron & Laurie
Mann & Staff
Ernie’s Bldg.
Center, LLC
Farm Bureau
Financial
First National
Agency
First National
Bank in Philip
Fitgerald
Oil Company
Gibson
Concrete Const.
Golden Willow
Seeds
Haakon County
Abstract
G&G
Excavation
Ingram
Hardware
Jones’ Saddlery
Bottle & Vet
Kennedy
Impl. & Auto
Grossenburg
Implement
Midwest Co-op
Cenex
Modern Woodmen
of America
Philip Health
Services, Inc.
Philip Livestock
Auction
Ravellette
Publications
Rush Funeral
Home
State Farm
Insurance
The Steakhouse
& Lounge
Philip Motor,
Inc.
Coyle’s
Standard
Region 5B
Runner-up
Back Row:
Nelson Holman - 5th,
Tristen Rush - 2nd
Garrett Snook - 16th
Front Row:
Blake Martinez - 13th
Keegan Burnett - 22nd
Team Champions
Back Row:
Ellie Coyle - 2nd
Holly Iwan - 4th
Front Row:
Shay Hand - 14th
Allison Pekron - 26th
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 11
Sports
Milesville Vol. Fire Dept. Annual Halloween Party
Friday, October 26th
Milesville Hall
Games &
Spook House: 6:30
Costume Judging: 7 p.m.
Supper
5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
If you would like to donate
a cake for the cake walk
you are welcom
e to. P
u
m
p
k
in
ca
r
v
in
g
/
d
e
co
r
a
tin
g
co
n
te
s
t
It’s A Girl!
Daughter of
Alex & Jeni Rad-
way
Rapid City, SD
Born:
May 18, 2012
5 lbs., 12 oz.
17.5” long
Maternal Grandparents:
Paul & Jolene Jacobs, Scranton, ND
Paternal Grandparents:
Tom & Marie Radway, Philip
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
Lenny & Carol Jacobs, Reeder, ND
June Drolc, Reeder, ND
Paternal Great-Grandparents:
Jeanne Radway, Philip
Al & Lenore Burcklacher, Philip
Sponsored by
Grandma &
Grandpa
Radway
Adlee
Jo
Show & dance with full band at 8 p.m.!
Come early
for supper!
Pep rally
Philip High School
will hold a pep rally,
Thursday, October 18,
at 3:20 p.m. in the
high school gymna-
sium for the Scotties
cross country team.
by Coach ralph Kroetch
Nine weeks of two-hours-per-day,
six days per week of biking, swim-
ming, weight lifting and, yes, even
running, all payed off for the Philip
Scotties cross country team on the
Lake Waggoner Golf Course,
Wednesday, October 10. It was the
Region 5B Cross Country Champi-
onships.
Clear skies and 70 degrees made
near perfect temperatures. The 23
mile per hour winds made racing
tactics very important today.
Three sophomores – Tristen
Rush, Nelson Holman and Blake
Martinez – and two freshmen –
Garrett Snook and Keegan Bur-
nett – would compete with many of
South Dakota’s finest for a spot at
this year’s state cross country meet
to be held on Huron’s Broadland
Creek Golf Course, Saturday, Octo-
ber 20.
From the starter’s gun, Bison’s
Daniel Burkhalter led a three-man
breakaway, which included Wall’s
Austin Huether and Dupree’s Hos-
teen Rave. Scotties’ Rush, Holman
and Martinez ran in a group of a
dozen runners all looking to gain
an early advantage on the field.
Snook and Burnett, running in
their first region championships,
worked to stay with this lead group
in the early go. Burkhalter pulled
away for good around mile two,
leaving Huether and Rave now the
catchable runners. Rush put him-
self in striking distance of this duo
and, with 300 meters to go, made
his move, overtaking both less than
100 meters from the finish. This
gave Rush the runner up spot at a
time of 18:21.
Holman had worked his way up
to over take Nate and Tate Widow,
both highly rated athletes from the
number two team picked by the
2012 coaches’ polls. With that, Hol-
man earned the fifth spot. These
two Scotties cut a combined 2:25
evenly from their 2011 region fin-
ish times – Rush at 18:21 and Hol-
man at 19:01.
Martinez kept Dupree’s Dee-
Hawk Moran behind him as he
earned the 13th place medal at
20:00 even. Snook held off a late
challenge from Rapid City Christ-
ian’s C. Stahleckeer to earn the
16th place medal and a spot in the
state meet. Burnett, also chal-
lenged in the final meters, sprinted
to keep White River’s James
Leader Charge behind him and
placed 22nd. Their times, respec-
tively, were 20:35 and 21:17. It took
a great team effort by all five Scot-
ties to earn their region runner up
placing.
The team standing were
Dupree – 17 points, Philip – 20,
White River – 37, Rapid City Chris-
tian – 37, Bison – 49, Wall – 63,
Crazy Horse – 74, and Faith – 81.
The Lady Scotties stepped to the
start line unsure at best as late
season injuries had detoured both
training and racing over the final
weeks of this season for senior
Holly Iwan and freshman Ellie
Coyle. Shay Hand and junior Alli-
son Pekron trained through peak
season pains as all did what they
had to do to prepare for these
championships.
All four ladies got off to a strong
start in this field of 34 athletes. At
the one kilometer mark, Iwan and
Cole topped a steep hill side by
side, with current race leader
Kadoka’s Victoria Lettelier in their
sights. Just a few meters later the
girls split, putting one on either
side of Lettelier and giving the
Scotties the one and two positions
early on. Hand looked early on for
the now familiar purple jerseys of
Kadoka and the placing she knew
her team needed. Pekron, as
today’s team pusher, worked to con-
tribute near mid pack.
The final meters brought more
exciting sprints for the Scotties as
Lemmon’s Morgan Ham made a
strong move at the finish to win the
race. Coyle and Iwan fought to hold
second and fourth place positions,
each bettering their own 2011 re-
gion finish times, Coyle by 41 sec-
onds at 15:46 and Iwan by nine sec-
onds at 15:52. Hand put Kadoka’s
Marti Herber behind her for the
second time this year, placing 14th
at 17:32. Pekron out ran Faith’s
Brooke Enright and improved her
course time by 62 seconds.
This great effort by all four girls
gave the Scotties their second re-
gion championship in school his-
tory. The last came in 1995.
Team standings were Philip – 19
points, Kadoka – 21, Lemmon – 24,
Rapid “City Christian – 30, Jones
County – 31, Dupree – 58, and
Faith – 71.
Eighth grader Damian Bartels
and seventh grader Conner Dekker
ran their final race of 2012. Both
young men had game plans and
had picked out runners they
Scotties dominate Region 5B cross country; nine to state
The 2012 Philip High School Scottie cross country team. Back row, from left: Shay Hand, Holly Iwan, coach Ralph Kroetch,
Ellie Coyle, Allison Pekron and manager Sam Stangle. Front: Conner Dekker, Blake Martinez, Nelson Holman, Tristen Rush,
Gavin Snook, Keegan Burnett and Damian Bartels. Photo by Del Bartels
wanted to beat today. Bartels
started in eighth place, with
Dekker in 10th, both moving up
throughout the race. Bartels
crossed the finish line in fourth
place, improving his course best set
just last week by nine seconds.
Dekker cut another 26 seconds off
his previous best to place seventh.
Respective times were 16:28 and
17:42. These two men worked hard
all season long, improving each
week. Both look forward to next
season and the possibility of earn-
ing a varsity spot in 2013.
The final race of the day was for
the elementary runners. The re-
sults were Dilyn Terkildson – third
girl at 6:22, Ethan Ferguson – sev-
enth boy at 6:27, Jasmine Fergu-
son – 4th girl at 6:29, Jaida
Haynes – seventh girl at 6:29,
Ethan Burnett – 10th boy at 6:55,
and Grace Pekron – 8th girl at
7:00. We are proud to call these
young people the future of Philip
cross county.
United States wheat stocks
measured 2.1 billion bushels for
the first quarter of 2012-2013 mar-
keting year, according to the
United States Department of Agri-
culture September 1 grain stocks
report released September 28.
This estimate was about eight
percent lower than market expec-
tations due in large part to un-
precedented feed usage, said Lisa
Elliott, South Daota State Univer-
sity Extension commodity market-
ing field secialist and assistant pro-
fessor of economics.
“This is equivalent to a total
wheat disappearance of about 908
million bushels, which is a 27 per-
cent increase in comparison to the
first quarter of 2011,” Elliott said.
She added that, since the stocks
report calculates disappearance
without assuming any imports for
the quarter, it could be reasoned
that disappearance is underesti-
mated.
Using the September World Agri-
cultural Supply and Demand Esti-
mates report marketing year pro-
jections, she said greater insight
can be gained from the stocks re-
ports. By including estimated quar-
terly imports of 32.5 million
bushels, or 25 percent of projected
annual imports in the September
WASDE report, total disappear-
ance would be closer to 940 million
bushels.
USDA allocates disappearance of
wheat into four categories in their
WASDE reports: food, seed,
feed/residual and exports.
She said a closer examination of
the large first quarter disappear-
ance points to, “The disappearance
of 940 million bushels in the first
quarter is examined further by
subtracting one known component
of disappearance, first quarter ex-
ports (June through August 30),”
Elliott said.
First quarter exports were 251
million bushels, according to the
Foreign Agricultural Service. With
the annual projected exports of
1,200 million bushels, each quarter
approximately 300 million bushels
should be exported to stay on pace
to the annual projection. First
quarter exports were 49 million
bushels below this pace.
“Since first quarter exports are
known, this leaves a disappearance
of 689 million bushels to be allo-
cated between food, seed, and
feed/residual,” she said.
Food and seed usage has typi-
cally been fairly stable on a quar-
terly basis, averaging 237 million
bushels in the first quarter for the
last five years. This figure would be
right on track with the September
WASDE annual food and seed esti-
mate, being almost a quarter of the
estimate.
Using the food and seed usage
estimate (237 million bushels) and
subtracting that from the disap-
pearance (689 million bushels)
leaves 452 million bushels to be al-
located to feed and residual. That
estimate amounts to over twice the
projected annual feed/residual use
in the September WASDE report
(220 million bushels).
Over the past 10 years, United
States feed and residual usage has
averaged 150 million bushels, and
has not been over 300 million
bushels since 2000.
“To put the total into perspective,
the United States wheat feed and
residual use in the first quarter
was estimated to be roughly equiv-
alent to the Kansas and Colorado
2012 wheat harvest,” Elliott said.
Given such a large disappearance
of wheat in the first quarter, Elliott
said future annual adjustments
will likely be required in upcoming
WASDE releases.
Over the past 10 years, the end-
ing stocks to use ratio has averaged
28 percent. If food and residual
usage were to remain near 452 mil-
lion bushels for the remainder of
the year, ending stocks to use may
end near 20 percent. It has not
been lower than 20 percent since
2007, when it was at 13 percent.
More minor adjustments could be
made to food usage, export de-
mand, imports, and feed and resid-
ual, thus keeping ending stocks to
use at higher rates, however.
“Regardless, the September 1
Wheat stocks tighten because of unprecedented feed usage
grain stocks report suggests that
United States wheat supplies likely
will be tighter this marketing year
than anticipated, due to an unex-
pected rate of disappearance in the
first quarter,” Elliott said.
As a result, she said prices may
be supported until new crop wheat
supplies are realized. The Septem-
ber quarterly grain stocks report
helped rally Chicago Dec. wheat fu-
tures 47 cents to close at $9.02 on
Friday, September 28.
Make your opinion
known ... write a letter
to the editor!
email with phone
number to
newsdesk@
pioneer-review.com
Legal Notices
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 12
Notice of Hearing to
Supplement Budgets
There will be insufficient funds in the
budget allowances in the 101 Fund in the
2012 budgets of (101-441) Mentally Ill
Expenses and (212) Jail Expenses. It is
hereby proposed that the following Sup-
plemental Budgets be adopted for the
2012 year.
101 – 441 Mentally Ill
$5,000.00
101 – 212 Jail Expenses
$18,000.00
Notice is hereby given that the Board of
Commissioners of Haakon County,
South Dakota will hold a public hearing
on the above proposed supplemental
budgets for the year 2012 at 1:15 p.m. on
Thursday, November 8, 2012, at which
time any person interested may appear
and be heard in favor or opposed the
proposed budget.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA
Gary Snook, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
[Published October 11 & 18, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $26.64]
Proceedings of
West River Water
Development District
September 20, 2012
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the K Bar S
Lodge in Keystone, S.D. Vice Chairman
Casey Krogman called the meeting to
order at 8:05 a.m. (MT).
Roll call was taken and Vice-Chairman
Casey Krogman declared a quorum was
present. Directors present were: Casey
Krogman (via teleconference), Marion
Matt, Veryl Prokop. Absent: Joesph Hieb
and Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake
Fitzgerald, Manager; Amy Kittelson, Of-
fice Manage for WR/LJ.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the agenda. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the August 14, 2012, meeting were pre-
viously mailed to the Board for their re-
view. Motion by Director Prokop, sec-
onded by Director Matt to approve the
August minutes. Motion carried unani-
mously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Casey
Krogman - $56.61, Marion Matt - $56.61,
Veryl Prokop - $56.61, West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS - $1,000.00,
Pennington County Courant - $31.52,
Lyman County Herald - $69.56, Murdo
Coyote - $39.71, Todd County Tribune -
$36.58, Pioneer Review - $35.41,
Kadoka Press - $77.71, Motion by Direc-
tor Matt, seconded by Director Prokop to
approve the District bills. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the August Financial
Report is on file at the District Office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Prokop, sec-
onded by Director Matt to approve the
August Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his September re-
port to the Board. Motion by Director
Matt, seconded by Director Prokop to ap-
prove the Manager’s Report. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
ADJOURNMENT: There being no further
business, the meeting was adjourned at
8:15 A.M. (MT).
ATTEST:
Amy Kittelson, Recording Secretary
Casey Krogman, Vice-Chairman
[Published October 18, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $25.34]
proceedings of the
Town of Midland
october 9, 2012
The Town Board of the Town of Midland
met on Tuesday, October 9, 2012, at
7:00 PM in the Town Hall with the follow-
ing members present: Diana Baeza,
Jared Fosheim, Rock Gillaspie, Finance
Officer Michelle Meinzer and Utilities Op-
erator Lawrence Stroppel.
Minutes of the September 11, 2012,
meeting were read and approved as pub-
lished.
Utilities Operator gave his report. We dis-
cussed water meters, backup sewer gen-
erator project, upkeep needed on water
tower, winterization of park bathrooms
and sprinkler system and street signs on
Elm Street. also discussed responsibility
for water meters. Residents are respon-
sible for repairing and replacing their
water meters if damage is done by resi-
dent’s negligence.
Special election will be held on Novem-
ber 6, 2012, to decide whether or not
Midland should renew their licenses for
on/off sale alcoholic beverages. Thank
you to Haakon County auditor Patsy
Freeman for all her assistance in getting
the ballot ready for the election. Please
make sure to vote!
Garbage Contract with Heartland Waste
is up for renewal at the end of the year.
Finance Officer will be advertising for this
contract.
a motion was made by Gillaspie, second
by Fosheim to pay the following claims:
a & a Tire & Repair, Repairs.........40.90
Lawrence Stroppel, Wages......2,336.83
Lawrence Stroppel, Insurance, Phone,
Vehicle ....................................500.00
Michelle Meinzer, Wages,
Phone, Supplies......................653.23
Electronic Federal Tax Payment,Em-
ployee Tax...............................954.74
Ernie’s LLC, Supplies ................ 506.97
Golden West, Phone/Internet .....141.07
Heartland Waste Management, Refuse
Service....................................948.00
Midland Food & Fuel, Fuel .........191.01
Midland School Booster Club, Calendar
and Listings...............................11.00
Northwest Pipe Fitings, Inc.,
Supplies..................................169.88
Pioneer Review, Publications .......69.53
Riter, Rogers Law Office,
Legal Fees..............................975.00
SD Retirement System,
Retirement ..............................372.00
SD Retirement System, Penalts ...15.21
SD State Treasurer, Sales Tax......75.84
USa Bluebook, Supplies.............112.48
West Central Electric, Electric
Supply.................................... 893.14
WR/L-J Rural Water, Water
Supply..................................1,542.50
John Hoffman Electric, ..........................
Generator/Installation.........16,326.56
SD One Call, Message Fees...........2.22
Diana Baeza, Mileage .................. 63.64
Jared Fosheim, Mileage................44.40
Rock Gillaspie, Mileage.................44.40
Michelle Meinzer, Mileage.............19.24
There being no further business to come
before the Board, the meeting adjourned.
Diana Baeza, President
Michelle M. Meinzer, Finance Officer
[Published October 18, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $33.46 vvf]
ads@pioneer-review.com
A| 8reo Angus to
DL |ncentlve 228
(LPDs 8W 0,WW 81,YW 133, M 28).
Pasture breo to Green
Mountaln Front Man
(LPDs 8W -.7,WW 61,YW 99 M 28.
Tbese belters orlglnateo out ot tbe
2012 8HSS pen ot tlve.Tbese very tancy breo
belters wlll welgb 1,050 lbs. ano are breo to start
calvlng Marcb 1st tor 45 oays.
Selling 10 Black Angus commerical bred heifers
Saturday, November 3rd
at Philip (SD) Livestock Auction
Good morning America. We are
still in Colt, Ark., where the cotton
fields are looking pretty, some
ready to harvest and some still
very green. Bill and I want to climb
on one of the machines that har-
vests the cotton, they are making
big round bales, wrapped in yellow
plastic and the machine looks like
a sort of combination of a combine/
baler. Many soybean fields are in
all stages of growth with some
being combined and others are still
too green to cut, the rice fields are
all pretty much harvested, winter
wheat is planted and greened up.
Things are nice and green and if it
doesn’t shower in the evening, at
least the dew is heavy in the morn-
ings. Our friend, Hugette, gave me
a cotton boll made into an angel
Christmas ornament, I will be look-
ing to gather some of the cotton
bolls and try to have some fun
making ornaments.
Monday was a leisurely day
spent in Colt, Ark., visiting with
Bill’s uncle, J.L. and Ernestine
Riley and family. Bill’s cousin, Wal-
ter, from Memphis (J.L. and Ernes-
tine’s oldest) came by for a visit in
the afternoon.
Monday, not much going on in
the Kadoka area, Tony Harty went
out for coffee and breakfast in the
morning and visited with Shirley
Hair later in the day.
“Someone sent me an email
about using vodka for cleaning
around the house. It worked! The
more vodka I drank, the cleaner
the house looked.” Unknown Au-
thor
Kinsey, Natalie and Kohen Git-
tings went to Rapid City Tuesday.
Tuesday was a cold day, so Tony
Harty picked up Shirley Hair to
take to the post office since she
usually rides a four-wheeler to get
her mail. Then he went out for cof-
fee and breakfast. Tony and Shirley
made a trip to Longvalley in the af-
ternoon to meet L.D. Hair at his job
site to help with a task. Tony vis-
ited with Dale Koehn, his next door
neighbor.
Bill and I joined J.L. Riley Tues-
day morning to Memphis, Tenn.,
for an appointment. We came back
through some of the little towns
into Wynne and picked up some
provisions for supper
That evening here in Colt. Ark.,
the clan was gathered for an
evening of visiting and supper.
Bill’s cousin, Glen Bridges, and his
son, Brian, Visalia, Calif., were vis-
iting in the area and they came for
supper along with Martha Sue
Phillips, Donna (Riley), Larry
Riley, Joseph Riley and his wife,
Brianna, and baby, and Kaleb Ri-
iley. Bill and I are enjoying getting
well fed while here. We also cele-
brated Donna’s birthday.
Tuesday was a busy day for Don
and Vi Moody since they were sell-
ing calves at the Philip Livestock
Auction with the crew starting at
7:30 with roundup. The Kadoka
kids came to their rescue again.Vi
wrote, “It was neat after the sale,
like a mini class reunion. I ran into
Steve Ferley and John Staben
while in line to get our checks and
then Vonnie (Buchert) O'Dea
showed up in the cafe with Linda
(Long) Kramer. We had many
laughs while having a bit of a lunch
and coffee after our calves sold
around 3:30 in the afternoon. Todd
O'Connor was our trucker and Don
and I hauled 42 head in two loads
with our fifth-wheel 20 ft. Titan.”
George Gittings went to Midland
Wednesday while Sandee was at
work. They then went to the meet-
ing of West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water in Wall in the after-
noon.
Wednesday was another cool day
so Tony Harty took Shirley Hair to
the post office in the morning. After
coffee, Tony went to Philip for a
cross country meet at the Lake
Waggoner Golf Course. Many of
Tony’s nieces and nephews were in
the competition. The Kadoka team
came in second, Philip came in
first. He had dinner out in Philip
and had nice visits with many
friends.
Don and Vi Moody were busy at
the ranch Wednesday, getting
things lined up to haul bales to
their winter quarters.
Wednesday, Bill and I climbed
into the car with J.L. and Ernes-
tine Riley to look over the country.
We had a mission of picking up
some medical supplies for Bill in
Jonesboro, Ark., had lunch out and
J.L. took us around the country to
show Bill where he had lived when
he was little. J.L. is 12 years older
than Bill and remembers well
when Bill was born. Since they
sharecropped a lot, they moved a
lot and most places they lived in in
the 40s and 50s were shacks. Be-
cause they were a fairly large fam-
ily with about 12 kids between the
Riley bunch and the Sumpter
bunch. Farmers liked to have them
work. J.L. said he and Bill’s mom,
Virgie, would walk about four miles
one way to pick cotton for 10 cents
an hour and after a ten-hour day,
would walk back home. The shacks
have since disappeared and most of
the places he pointed out were
crops land or pasture. We visited at
the home of Martha Sue Phillips
where her guests were Glen and
Brian Bridges. Glen was out look-
ing around the place and encoun-
tered a rattlesnake. The snake suc-
ceeded in escaping since Glen was
so surprised.
Thursday was another cold day,
so Tony Harty taxied Shirley Hair
to the post office then went to cof-
fee. Visited again with Shirley in
the afternoon and also Kathy
Brown and Russ Hattel. Then he
went to Martin for a Knights of
Columbus meeting in the late af-
ternoon.
Don and Vi Moody enjoyed the
last part of the week at Rapid Val-
ley to finish some normal pre-win-
ter maintenance and visited their
favorite Creek Drive antique store
in Rapid Valley. Vi bought a cov-
ered wagon wheel hub which can
be used as a Halloween lamp, an
umbrella holder, flower pot or any
other decoration. (Or put it on a
wagon!) It was nicely painted. They
also ran into former Rapid Valley
friends, Bruce and Bonita Weber,
who now live in Boulder Canyon
near Sturgis. They always have fun
visiting with these folks about
ranching and the Black Hills Cow
Belles group. Don was always
pulling these ladies around Rapid
City on a float with a brand new
shiny Ford pickup when he was
selling Ford vehicles at Rapid. Vi
always cautioned Don to drive
carefully so he wouldn't "spill the
ladies."
Kinsey Gittings took Jessica Git-
tings and Greg Womack to Wor-
thington, Minn., Thursday where
they picked up Daniel after he had
spent the past two months with his
dad in Iowa.
Thursday found Bill and I and
J.L. Riley again touring the area.
We visited with cousin Desmond
Murphy in Cherry Valley, Ark.
Desmond has a welding repair
shop and is busy making various
things. He made some metal duck
blind shelters that you just pushed
out into the water. There was dis-
cussion about when each of the fel-
lows stopped smoking. Desmond
said for about the first two weeks
after he quit he was hoping some-
body would cross him so he could
kill ‘em. But, he managed to make
it through that time and became a
lot more enjoyable to be around. We
went by the cemetery where Bill’s
mom, Virgie, and other family
members are buried, then back
home for a good supper Ernestine
had fixed for us.
Friday morning, Tony Harty took
Shirley Hair to the post office and
then went to coffee and breakfast.
Shirley and Tony went to Wanblee
to pick up supplies. Tony attended
the football game that evening be-
tween Kadoka and Colombe.
George Gittings picked up Daniel
Friday morning so that he could
spend the day and helped move
cattle. Jessica came out in the af-
ternoon to get Daniel and had sup-
per.
Friday afternoon, Bill and I went
to visit a classmate, Charlie and
Bunny Brown. Charlie put out the
call to other classmates. For supper
three gals, Pat Durham, Marie
Brewster Myers, and Rosemary
Reeves, along with two of the fel-
lows, Billy Gene Cowan and Billy
Brewster, arrived for a fun evening
of visiting and great food. Charlie
had a project he had bought at an
auction, a very large collection of
rocks, some over 70 years old from
all over the world. He is building
display shelves, refreshing the la-
bels each had, studying more on
them as he goes, and is making
drawers to put some in so you just
pull them out to look at them. For
a retired farmer he has many hob-
bies. He is working on a trip to
Cuba.
Jessica Gittings and Daniel were
supper guests at the George Git-
tings home Saturday for her birth-
day.
Saturday, Tony Harty made his
usual trip to the post office before
stopping by L.D and Shirley Hair’s
then went out for coffee and break-
fast. Tony checked out the new
storage shed that went up last
week. It was a beautiful warm day.
Tony visited with Kathy Brown
who had been working on road con-
struction and putting in extra
hours.
Friends Ken and Lynn Hartman
were on their way back to Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., so Bill and I pulled
up stakes at Colt and went to Mem-
phis Saturday to join them for a
day. We all settled into the RV park
right on I-55 which our friend,
Hugette, operates. We went to the
Mississippi River and watched
some boat races. Naturally we did-
n’t think to take along lawn chairs
so plopped down on the grass to
watch. When the grass didn’t offer
that much cushion after an hour or
so, we all four attempted to get
back on our feet. It was much like
watching an elephant get up after
rolling in the dirt. Anyway, as we
rolled around to rise as gracefully
as possible, a young couple was ob-
serving. (I’m sure they were think-
ing, we never want to get that old.)
I looked over and asked if they had
taken a video of that spectacle, be-
cause I figured it would win on the
“Americas Funniest Home Video.”
They got a chuckle out of that.
Hugette drove Lynn and me to a
riverboat in Tunica, Miss., for a lit-
tle entertainment that evening. It
rained during the night.
Sunday, Tony went to church and
went out for dinner, enjoying visit-
ing with folks who were out for din-
ner as well. He visited L.D. and
Shirley Hair later in the afternoon.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of Mary Pekron. Also, sym-
pathy to the family of Sharon (An-
derson) Ellwein.
The Civil Air Patrol will be hold-
ing their annual fundraiser that
helps with building maintenance
as well as support the aero space
training and gliders that Philip has
enjoyed hosting for the last three
years.
Cathy Fiedler jotted a note from
the Sturgis area reporting that
they have been enjoying the great
fall weather and they didn’t do any-
thing news worthy all week, just
kept their noses to the grindstone!
The Masonic Temple in Kadoka
got a face lift during this late fall
with a new paint job, which really
brightened up that corner.
Don and Vi Moody worked cattle
over the weekend with their
Kadoka crew for the forthcoming
sale at Philip with yearlings to go
this time and some spayed heifers.
It's been a balmy week again and
nice to be out and about.
Kohen Gittings spent Sunday af-
ternoon with his grandma, Beth
Stewart.
Sunday morning, Ken and Lynn
Hartman broke camp and were off
to Tennesse after we all had break-
fast together. Bill and I were guests
for supper at the home of his
cousin, Walter and Cheryl Riley.
We got there a little early and had
a great supper, lots of visiting and
received some jelly produced from
their trees. Friend Hugette gave
me an angel made from a cotton
boll off her eternal Christmas tree,
(it stays up in a special room all
year long).
“When a woman says ‘what?’ it’s
not because she didn’t hear you.
She’s giving you a chance to change
what you said.”
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
Mary Pekron, age 80, died
Wednesday, October 10, at the
Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospi-
tal in Philip. Among her survivors
is her son, Steve, his wife, Nina,
and children, Zane, Allison and
Grace from Milesville. Mary was a
kind and gracious lady. Our sympa-
thy to all of Mary's family.
The Milesville Volunteer Fire De-
partment will again be sponsoring
their annual Halloween party at
the Milesvile Hall. This year it will
be October 26 beginning with a
supper at 5:30. There are activities
planned for all ages, including
games, cake walk, spook house,
and a decorated or carved pumpkin
contest. Cakes for the cake walk
would be appreciated as well as
bags of candy which will be divided
among the kids as they leave.
Everyone welcome!
Last Tuesday, Dean Parsons en-
tered the Good Samaritan Home in
New Underwood. He is getting
good physical therapy there follow-
ing his two surgeries. He hopes to
be back in Philip as he gets
stronger. His room number is 204
and I'm sure he would like visitors.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer spent
most of the weekend in the Black
Hills taking in the grandkids' activ-
ities – volleyball, football and the
Little Britches Rodeo.
Last Monday, Laurie (Elshere)
Sever stopped at Mark and Pat
Hanrahan's place for a short visit.
She was on her way home after
spending the weekend with her sis-
ter, Julie, in Ft. Pierre.
Milesville folks at the annual
fish fry Saturday night were Mark
and Pat Hanrahan, Byron and
Peggy Parsons and Tim and Judy
Elshere. It was hosted by Boyd and
Jeanie Warra of rural Philip.
The September issue of “Rodeo
News” has an article, with several
pictures, featuring Cole Elshere.
This fine Christian young man will
be making his first appearance at
the National Finals Rodeo in Las
Vegas in December in the saddle
bronc competition. Cole's parents
are Andy and Donella Elshere,
Faith. Paul and Joy Elshere are
Cole's grandparents. We are wish-
ing the best for you, Cole!
Earl and Jodi Parsons, Rachel
and Sarah, spent the weekend in
Sioux Falls at a McDonnell get-to-
gether. They enjoyed some sight-
seeing, shopping, visiting and eat-
ing.
Lariann Lanka and daughter,
Retta, and Mesa Mangis, daughter
of Matt and Lindsey Mangis, spent
the weekend at Larry and Linda
Smiths'.
Jim and Lana Elshere went to
Wall Saturday afternoon to watch
their grandson, Trey Elshere, play
in his peewee football league. They
lost their game against a team
from Rapid City. They had supper
at the Wall arena at their appreci-
ation supper, followed by an auc-
tion sponsored by the Wall Booster
Club.
Ashlynn Elshere stayed with her
grandparents, Tim and Judy, from
Wednesday through Friday. Tim
and Judy hosted a birthday supper
Thursday night to celebrate Paul
Elshere's 83rd birthday. Guests
were Paul and Joy, Jim and Lana,
Andy and Donella and Ashlynn,
daughter of Casey and Rachelle.
Paul, Donna and Tina Staben at-
tended the 75th annual Western Jr.
Livestock Show in Rapid City last
Tuesday through Saturday. Donna
said she hasn't missed many years
of this event.
Burke Beer, son of Brad and
Amber (Arthur) Beer, celebrated
his seventh birthday last Saturday.
His grandma, Beth Jeffries, joined
him for lunch along with his mom
and brothers.
The weekend before last, Hugh
and Ann Harty were in Valentine,
Neb., for the "Old West Days." They
stayed with Ann's cousin. This past
weekend all of Hugh's kids were
home – Moneik and Paul Stephens
and Mikaela, Jim and Adele Harty,
Molly and Owen, and Ed Harty.
Barb Howe spent from October
8th through the 16th with her par-
ents, Leo and Joan Patton, helping
out on the ranch. Friday, Joan,
Barb, Sharon and Linda, Sam and
Mark Stangle were in Pierre mov-
ing Irene Patton from her motel
room to an apartment. Guests for
dinner at the Patton’s Sunday were
Gary Stephenson, George and Kay
Ainslie, and Cheryl Brehend.
I had trouble contacting people
this week for their news. I guess
the warm weather is keeping folks
busy outside.
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Classifieds • 859-2516
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 13
waterway & old bldg site, 3 miles
N of Bradley, SD. Bids due by
November 2, 2012. Contact Pro
Realty, Pat Kisely, Broker,
(605)354-7653 or http://ProRe-
altySold.com.
LAKEFRONT BANK LOAN Liqui-
dation $29,900 lake property,
100’ clear water shore; Glacial
Lakes region NE SD. Thousand
Lakes Realty of Minnesota. 866-
3 4 6 - 7 0 0 6
www.1000LakesMN.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you TODAY! (25 WORDS FOR
$150. EACH ADDITIONAL
WORD $5.) CALL THIS NEWS-
PAPER OR 800-658-3697 FOR
DETAILS.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health ins.,
credit, 03¢ safety bonus, Call
Joe for details, 800.456.1024,
joe@tbitruck. com.
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
GRAVEL: Screened or rock. Call
O'Connell Construction Inc.,
859-2020, Philip. P51-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
STILL HAVE ROOM FOR: 100
plus head of calves to back-
ground. Good feed, 10 years ex-
perience. Phone 605-685-6725
or cell 454-0053 or 454-0123.
P45-3tp
SELLING: 10 Black Angus com-
merical bred heifers Saturday,
November 3, at Philip (SD) Live-
stock Auction. AI bred Angus to
DL Incentive 228 (EPDs BW 0,
WW 81, YW 133, M 28). Pasture
bred to Green Mountain Front
Man (EPDs BW -.7, WW 61, YW
99 M 28). These heifers origi-
nated out of the 2012 BHSS pen
of five. These very fancy bred
heifers will weigh 1,050 lbs. and
are bred to start calving March 1
for 45 days. Ravellette Cattle,
685-5147 or home, 859-2969.
PR6-5tp
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
local delivery included, semi-
load lots, no mold or weeds,
large rounds put up right. Call
Rob, 390-5535; Charles, 390-
5506. P43-4tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-
ply, 235/85/16R. $155
mounted (limited quantities
available). Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
WAITRESS NEEDED: at Red
Rock Restaurant in Wall. Call
279-2387 or 279-2388.WP8-3tc
NOW HIRING! Certified Nurses
Aide Position. Full/part-time
available. Benefits for full time.
Please Contact Heidi or Nikki at
837-2270, Kadoka. K44-2tc
DEPUTY SHERIFF’S POSI-
TION: The Haakon County
Sheriff’s office is accepting appli-
cations for a full time Deputy
Sheriff. Competitive wages and
an excellent benefits package.
This position will be open until
filled. Send state applications
and/or resumes to: Haakon
County Sheriff, Box 249, Philip,
SD 57567. For more information
contact Sheriff Fred Koester at
859-2741. P43-tfn
POSITIONS OPEN: Kadoka Area
School District is looking for
coaches for the upcoming winter
sports: Head girls’ basketball
coach; 5-6 girls’ basketball
Kadoka; 7-8 girls’ basketball
Kadoka; 5th-8th girls’ basketball
Interior; Assistant boys’ basket-
ball coach; 5th-6th boys’ basket-
ball coach Kadoka; 7th-8th boys’
basketball coach Kadoka. If in-
terested send a letter of interest
and resume to Kadoka Area
School, Attention George Seiler,
PO Box 99, Kadoka, SD 57543
or complete and submit a non-
certified application that is avail-
able on the website
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us EOE.
K42-4tc
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Pheasant roosters
and hens. Contact Larry for in-
formation on prices and delivery.
Call 843-2830 or 840-8097.
PR8-3tc
FOR SALE: (4) rollaway beds, (1)
inversion table. Call 837-2427,
Kadoka. K44-2tp
FOR SALE: Whitfield pellet fire-
place insert; steel roof and half
windshield for Polaris 500 4x4,
year 2009. Call 798-2182 or
685-3934. WP4-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
WANTED: Old car and truck
bodies and parts, 1920-1950s,
paying better than scrap so
clean out the tree line or metal
pile for quick $$. Call Ben, 669-
2012, Murdo. P43-4tc
PETS/SUPPLIES
BARN CATS: Excellent
mousers. Call 685-5327 for
more info. P43-3tc
RENTALS
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house at
102 Wood. Ave. Rent on garage
optional. Call 484-5409.
PR8-2tp
FOR RENT: 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments for rent in Wall.
Contact Christianson Properties,
858-2195. WP7-4tc
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge will
be added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
THANK YOUS
Thank you to everyone who
sent flowers, cards, get well mes-
sages, brought food and helped
in anyway after my surgery.
Extra special thank you to my
mom, Erin Bourk, for staying
with me for a couple of days and
to my husband, Randy, for the
constant love and care. You are
all so special and I have the best
friends in the world!!
Holly Nemec
The family of Dorothy Seidler
would like to thank everyone for
the calls, prayers, food, flowers,
visits and memorials.
A special thanks to Pastor
Andy Blye, Jack, Gayle and D.J.
Rush. Also to the users, pallbear-
ers and the ladies who prepared
the meal.
Bob Seidler
Athellen Westerman
Phyllis Wells
A big thank you to the Philip
Quinn, and Ash Creek fire de-
partments and all the neighbors
who responded to the fire on our
place. Your help and time was
greatly appreciated. Keep up the
great work! Also a special thank
you to Marvin Coleman who
helped finish up the baling. It is
great to have such caring neigh-
bors.
Duane & J’Nai Hauk
Thank you for all your kindness,
food, visits and cards in the
passing of my sister. It meant so
much to my family and me.
God Bless
Norma and Jim Oldenberg
and famiy.
JOIN OUR PLANKINTON CITY
CREW! FT maintenance posi-
tion. Electric, Streets, Water,
Wastewater. Competitive salary.
Attractive benefit package. In a
growing progressive community.
For application contact City Hall
(605) 942-7767.
CHARLEY’S WELDING AND
AUTO Repair, part of Kennebec
Telephone Co., seeks full-time
Mechanic. Excellent pay/bene-
fits! Submit resumes to
rodb@kennebectelephone.com
<mailto:rodb@kennebectele-
phone.com>. Questions, call
Rod or Matt, 605-869-2220.
MANAGER NEEDED for pro-
gressive credit union. Excellent
benefits and salary. Resumes
only submitted to Box 69, Gre-
gory, SD 57533. EEOC.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is taking applictions for
full- time Douglas County High-
way Superintendent. Must have
valid Class A Driver’s License.
Experience in road/bridge con-
struction /maintenance pre-
ferred. For application contact:
Douglas County Auditor (605)
724-2423.
WANTED: EXPERIENCE AP-
PRENTICE or journeyman elec-
trician. Excellent wages and
benefits. LEC Inc, Gettysburg.
Call 800-568-4324 or send re-
sume to kevin@loganelectric.biz.
FOR SALE
2008 35FT. NUWA HITCHHIKER
5th wheel with 4 slides, top of
line, used very little. Central
Vacuum, washer/dryer, lots of
storage. Call 605-845-3907.
2000 DUTCHSTAR 38FT. RV.
Diesel pusher 320 Cummins,
stacker washer & dryer, 2 slides,
heated undercarriage, driver
side entry door, 38,000 mi. 605-
461-9246.
HEALTH/BEAUTY
P EL VI C/ T RANSVAGI NAL
MESH? Did you undergo trans-
vaginal placement of mesh for
pelvic organ prolapse or stress
urinary incontinence between
2005 and present time? If the
patch required removal due to
complications, you may be enti-
tled to compensation. Call John-
son Law and speak with female
staff members 1-800-535-5727.
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
SEALED BIDS: CLARK
COUNTY, 160 acres, cropland,
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Quality Air-Entrained Concrete
Call toll-free 1-888-839-2621
Richard Hildebrand
837-2621 • Kadoka, SD
Rent This Space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY in-
side Major Retailer. Call for de-
tails: 866-622-4591. Or email:
f r a n c h i s e o p p o r t u n i t y
@hotmail.com.
LOOMIX® FEED SUPPLE-
MENTS is seeking dealers. Moti-
vated individuals with cattle
knowledge and community ties.
Contact Bethany at 800-870-
0356 / becomeadealer@
adm.com to find out if there is a
dealership opportunity in your
area.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for SALE
(serious inquires only). Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
EMPLOYMENT
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Com-
petitive wages, benefits, training,
profit sharing, opportunities for
growth, great culture and inno-
vation. $1,500 Sign on Bonus
available for Service Techni-
cians. To browse opportunities
go to www.rdoequipment.com.
Must apply online. EEO.
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for Me-
chanic. Good Benefits. Applica-
tions are available at Court-
house in Bison, SD or call 605-
244-5629.
MATH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEACHER - Qualifications: Pos-
sess valid SD Teaching Certifi-
cate for appropriate level. Expe-
rience teaching Native American
children preferred. Must pass
background and drug testing.
Indian preference observed &
Lakota speaker preferred. Du-
ties: Maintain individual stu-
dent records as required includ-
ing three forms of assessment.
Confer with parents as needed
for student concerns. Supervise
meals, playground and early
morning duties as assigned. For
a complete job description con-
tact Lisa Bielawski, Principal at
605-823-4235.
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
apaRTMenTS aVailaBle!
pHilip plaza:
2 Bedrooms available
RiVeRVieW apaRTMenTS:
2 Bedrooms available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For application
& information:
PRO/Rental
Management
1113 Sherman St.
Sturgis, SD 57785
605-347-3077 or
1-800-244-2826
www.prorental
management.com
www.freerenters
guide.com
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per
word thereafter; included in the Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The
Pennington Co. Courant, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum for
first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and
initial must be counted separately. Included in the
Pioneer Review and the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢
per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Printed only in the Pioneer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all
charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the
Pioneer Review and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the
Pioneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on
race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limita-
tion, or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of
the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available
on an equal opportunity basis.
Is It tIMe?
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
Call Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
Philip
For all your
concrete
construction
needs:
Gibson
CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
859-3100
Philip, SD
Thursday, October 18, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 14
www.
Ravellette
publications.
com
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, October 20 ~
Lobster Tails
Order 1 or 2!
~ Monday, Oct. 22 ~
Prime Rib Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, October 16 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, October 17 ~
Basket of BBQ Pork Ribs
~ Thursday, October 18 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Oct. 19 ~
Boneless Pork Chops
Chicken ~ Shrimp
O
p
en
S
u
n
d
a
y, O
ct. 2
1st!
4
:3
0
- 9
:0
0
p
.m
.
Try our new Char Broiled Steaks & Burgers!
All steaks come with a choice of potato and includes salad bar.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL FEEDER & ALLBREEDS CALF SALE. YEARLINGS: 9 A.M.
CALVES: 10:30 A.M. MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 12,000 HEAD.
YEARLINGS: NI=NO IMPLANTS, HR=HOME RAISED
LONG 50 MOSTLY BLK SPAY HFRS.............................................................................725750#
SIMONS 550 BLK & BWF STRS......................................................................................700750#
JERDE 180 SCOTTISH HIGHLANDER STRS & OPEN HFRS ........................................700#
ADAMS 70 BLK & BWF STRS & OPEN HFRS ............................................................650750#
LONG 50 BLK & BWF STRS & SPAY HFRS..................................................................700750#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
RAPID CREEK RANCH 1100 RED ANG STRS; FS...................................................450600#
CUNY & SONS 950 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.............................................................400600#
WILCOX & RHODEN 400 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI................................................550650#
CARLEY RANCH 400 BLK CLVS; FS....................................................................................600#
L.KJERSTAD 400 FANCY BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................450550#
CREW CATTLE CO 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI,ASV.................................................500600#
MEEKS RANCH 350 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................................550#
C. KJERSTAD 350 BLK CLVS; NI...................................................................................450550#
FERGUSON 250 FANCY BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI................................................500600#
IWAN & SONS 250 BLK, BWF, & HERF CLVS............................................................450550#
EIDE 250 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................................................450550#
PATTERSON 220 CHAR X & A FEW BLK CLVS; FS................................................525625#
BACHAND 220 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI....................................................................500600#
MUNROE RANCH 200 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................475575#
OLIC 180 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................................................500550#
DALY & DALY 180 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV WEANED 45 DAYS ......................................600#
GRUBL 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI, ALL HFRS IN TOWN.................................500550#
SCHELL RANCH 150 BLK STRS; FS.....................................................................................550#
MADER & MADER 140 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................450550#
COMPTON 135 BLK, HERF, & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI..............................................500525#
FREEMAN 130 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................................................550#
HARTY RANCH 120 BLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................................500550#
KOCH 115 BLK & BWF CLVS; NI ..................................................................................500550#
NEUAHAUSER 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................500525#
WILCOX 105 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI........................................................................450550#
FANNING ANGUS 105 BLK CLVS; FS..................................................................................500#
DAVIS 100 BLK CLVS; FSNI,AN ....................................................................................500550#
KILNESS RANCH 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................450500#
LINN BROTHERS 100 BLK STRS; FS,NI .............................................................................600#
RICHARDS 100 BLK STRS; FS,NI,AN..................................................................................500#
GROPPER & GROPPER 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................500550#
ISKE 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................550600#
PRANG 100 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.........................................................................................500600#
BITTING 85 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................................................450550#
THOMSEN 85 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................................................400500#
GRUBL 80 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................................450550#
O’ROURKE 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................................500575#
HARTSHORN 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...............................................................................400500#
DENKE & DENKE 75 BLK STRS; FS,NI .......................................................................550570#
WILLIAMS 75 BLK & BWF STRS; FS............................................................................500525#
DOOLITTLE 75 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.................................................................................550600#
VANDENBOS 75 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................................................400500#
CHORD 75 BLK & HERF CLVS; FS,NI..................................................................................500#
MCKAY 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................................................450550#
SCHLECT 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................................450500#
SAMMONS 70 RED CLVS; FS .........................................................................................500550#
STRATMAN 50 BLK & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................................500#
WILLIAMS 40 BLK STRS; FS ..........................................................................................500550#
HENRY 40 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...........................................................................................500600#
ADDISON 40 BLK & RED CLVS; FS..............................................................................450500#
VOLMER 30 BLK & RED CLVS; FS................................................................................500600#
ARMENT 30 BLK CLVS; FS .............................................................................................500600#
CHAMBERLAIN 25 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI....................................................................600#
BECKWITH 20 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................................................500600#
HAMANN 25 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................................................600#
OPSTEDAHL 10 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ................................................................................500550#
FRINK 9 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................................................500#
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2012: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGU
LAR CATTLE SALE. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
STOCK COWS:
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIS 60 BLK & BWF MOSTLY BROKEN MOUTH COWS;
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors, with
questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
BRED:BLK & HERF; CLV:31
CHUCK VANSICKILE 32 HERF BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:HERF; CLV:31 FOR
60 DAYS
KEITH PERLI 20 BLK MIXED AGE COWS; BRED:BLK; CLV:31 FOR 60 DAYS
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALEATTACHED
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALEATTACHED
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6
WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PASTEURELLA, 7WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
& THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2: NO SALE
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. Jt, 2DJ2
Vc soíd lU,l9b Icud ]o) ou) spccíuí ]ccdc) suíc Tucsduu,
OctoIc) lbtI. Vc Iud tIc Iíggcst c)oud o] Iuuc)s tIut
uc'uc sccn tIís ]uíí. Munu ncu Iuuc)s ín tIc c)oud. Huns
uííí stuu Iíg. l2,UUU cuttíc Ic)c ncxt Tucsduu.
CALVES:
TED & LUCILLE BERNDT - EAGLE BUTTE
119 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 500=........$183.00
78 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 432=........$194.75
92 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 555=........$172.00
A CONSIGNMENT -
113 .......................................Dll Sirs 496=........$186.00
138..........................................Dll Sirs 437=........$194.50
58 ...........................................Dll Sirs 367=........$221.75
ANDERS RANCH - ELM SPRINGS
120 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 499=........$181.00
119 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 429=........$193.00
64 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 438=........$191.50
31 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 329=........$217.00
220...............................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 456=........$164.50
77.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 383=........$170.75
FOLAND RANCH - PHILIP
110 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 506=........$179.00
137 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 450=........$187.50
29 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 380=........$205.50
DIAMOND S RANCH - UNION CENTER
92 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 551=........$173.25
94 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 518=........$172.75
136 ...............................Fcd & Dll Sirs 468=........$180.50
66 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 420=........$195.50
108...............................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 474=........$155.00
JOHN & SAMANTHA ADDISON - MIDLAND....
31 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 465=........$181.00
21 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 355=........$212.00
41.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 412=........$169.00
15.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 355=........$162.00
GUNN & CASPERS - WASTA
100 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 555=........$173.00
110 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 479=........$179.50
27.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 476=........$157.00
17.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 415=........$158.00
HOVLAND HEREFORDS - MILESVILLE
34...........................................Dwf Sirs 521=........$175.00
14 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 429=........$192.00
41...........................................Dwf Hfrs 495=........$157.25
DENNIS & MIKE SIELER - QUINN
56 ...........................................Dll Sirs 511=........$176.00
11 ...........................................Dll Sirs 436=........$192.00
DAVID & RON FEES - MUD BUTTE
82 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 527=........$172.00
22 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 411=........$198.00
56.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 488=........$155.25
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 384=........$166.50
JIM & JOAN CANTRELL - PHILIP
48 ...........................................Dll Sirs 536=........$171.50
13 ...........................................Dll Sirs 421=........$192.00
40 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 479=........$156.50
11 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 413=........$162.50
RIATA HILLS LLC - QUINN
111 .........................................Dll Hfrs 470=........$162.00
DUSTIN LUR2 - PHILIP
29 ...........................................Dll Sirs 517=........$173.00
10 ...........................................Dll Sirs 441=........$186.00
10.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 395=........$166.00
WES & DUSTIN REEVES - OWANKA
105 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 539=........$173.75
LUCY & EDIE KNIGHT - DUPREE
21 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 529=........$173.25
21 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 449=........$184.00
10 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 385=........$207.25
13 ...........................................Dll Sirs 316=........$215.50
23.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 423=........$164.00
JOHN BRENNAN - MUD BUTTE
97 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 537=........$170.50
47 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 467=........$180.50
56 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 465=........$159.50
JIM WILLUWEIT RANCH - CREIGHTON
58.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 441=........$184.50
42..........................................Hcrf Sirs 410=........$179.50
22.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 355=........$208.00
34 ................................Fwf & Dwf Hfrs 391=........$153.00
22 ................................Fwf & Dwf Hfrs 342=........$164.00
WILSON BROTHERS - ELM SPRINGS
88 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 496=........$172.00
25 ...........................................Dll Sirs 399=........$196.00
27.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 429=........$166.25
50.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 444=........$161.25
13 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 367=........$169.50
ANDREW SCHOFIELD - BELVIDERE
54 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 517=........$171.00
24 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 445=........$185.00
11 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 380=........$212.00
12................................Fwf & Hcrf Sirs 491=........$167.00
54.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 481=........$164.00
12.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 385=........$175.00
BILL & LORI KELLY - QUINN
22 ...........................................Dll Sirs 518=........$174.00
10 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 509=........$153.75
PHILIP KRUSE - SCENIC
50 ...........................................Dll Sirs 477=........$178.50
38 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 379=........$214.00
11 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 352=........$172.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
88 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 561..........$166.00
42 ...........................................Dll Sirs 485..........$172.75
MARK WILLIAMS - KADOKA
83.........................................CIar Hfrs 636=........$150.00
97.........................................CIar Hfrs 551=........$157.75
ROBERT R. YOUNG SR. & FAMILY - UNION CENTER
65 .........................................CIar Sirs 670=........$160.25
12...........................................Dwf Sirs 532=........$173.00
78.........................................CIar Hfrs 622=........$148.00
28...........................................Dwf Hfrs 571=........$154.00
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - KADOKA
168 .......................................CIar Sirs 660=........$159.75
84 .........................................CIar Sirs 674=........$158.50
98 .........................................CIar Sirs 576..........$166.50
80.........................................CIar Hfrs 668=........$146.75
91.........................................CIar Hfrs 586=........$150.50
184.......................................CIar Hfrs 599=........$150.75
CASTEEL & LEVINE - HEREFORD
65 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 550=........$168.75
42 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 437=........$191.00
67.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 527=........$159.00
50.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 428=........$162.75
MERLE HICKS - MARTIN
87 ...........................................Dll Sirs 630=........$158.75
85...........................................Fcd Sirs 645=........$159.75
93 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 538=........$172.50
10 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 437=........$181.00
LYNN SMITH - NEW UNDERWOOD
87 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 552=........$167.50
31 ...........................................Dll Sirs 433=........$181.50
60 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 456=........$159.25
DAN WICKS & FAMILY - RED OWL
34 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 575=........$165.50
61 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 451=........$184.25
29.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 481=........$156.25
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
35 ...........................................Dll Sirs 641=........$158.75
31 ...........................................Dll Sirs 547=........$166.75
28 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 529=........$152.50
DAN GRUBL - STURGIS
61 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 575=........$165.25
23 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 482=........$169.00
GERALD, SHARLA & JAKE JULSON - QUINN
90 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 495=........$177.75
48 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 397=........$206.50
17 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 411=........$161.00
CHARLES KRUSE - INTERIOR
34 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 485=........$173.50
26 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 391=........$195.50
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 394=........$163.50
LEE IKE NEVILLE - MILESVILLE
23 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 512=........$170.50
11 ...........................................Dll Sirs 398=........$204.50
17 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 492=........$151.00
ETTIE MAE WHIRLWIND HORSE - INTERIOR
20 ...........................................Dll Sirs 531=........$170.00
13 ...........................................Dll Sirs 448=........$178.00
36 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 518=........$152.00
11.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 445=........$155.00
JOHN NAESCHER - WALL
24 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 509=........$168.00
16.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 415=........$194.00
22 ................................Fwf & Dwf Hfrs 486=........$150.00
11...........................................Dwf Hfrs 390=........$162.00
COY FISHER - SCENIC
57 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 581=........$166.75
16 ...........................................Dll Sirs 472=........$178.00
35.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 531=........$155.00
16.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 431=........$160.00
LONNY & LARRY JOHNSTON - BELVIDERE
88........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Sirs 496=........$166.75
45........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Sirs 396=........$186.25
67 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 478=........$156.75
3 .........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 376=........$157.00
MIKE COOPER - STURGIS
73 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 486=........$166.00
42 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 381=........$187.00
18.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 437=........$171.00
15 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 282=........$201.00
55.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 461=........$154.00
50.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 375=........$169.00
MARVIN WILLIAMS - OWANKA
37 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 574=........$165.00
23 ...........................................Dll Sirs 463=........$183.25
32 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 570=........$148.25
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 440=........$156.00
BONITA HARRIS - CUSTER
14 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 592=........$163.50
11.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 535=........$152.00
DENNIS & GWEN 2ELFER - SCENIC
67.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 490=........$165.00
24...........................................Dwf Hfrs 506=........$156.00
KEVIN & CRAIG REINDL - CUSTER
22 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 640=........$160.00
11 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 619=........$160.00
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 557=........$156.25
13 ...............................CIar & Dll Hfrs 635=........$146.25
RUTH & ISAACS - FAITH
9 .............................................Dll Sirs 583=........$158.00
5 .............................................Dll Sirs 458=........$174.00
8 .............................................Dll Sirs 324=........$197.00
28 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 547=........$148.00
14 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 423=........$158.00
DEDIC TRUST - NEW UNDERWOOD
25..........................................Hcrf Sirs 566=........$158.00
JOEL DEERING - WASTA
93 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 576=........$163.75
45 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 443=........$189.00
55.........................................CIar Hfrs 500=........$160.75
STEVE & NICK HOBART - HILL CITY
9 ...................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 625=........$163.00
24.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 552=........$154.25
BRYAN CUNY - ALLEN
50 ...........................................Dll Sirs 577=........$161.50
44 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 482=........$171.00
22.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 456=........$167.00
BRIAN & HEATHER HANSON - PHILIP
16 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 629=........$155.00
5 ...................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 477=........$175.00
12.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 604=........$143.50
7...................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 434=........$156.00
TUCKER AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
31........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Sirs 541=........$160.00
27 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 499=........$153.50
WILSON & MCGRIFF - QUINN
6 .............................................Dll Sirs 522=........$174.75
10 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 496=........$153.00
19 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 414=........$160.00
BESSETTE RANCH - SCENIC
6 ...................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 512=........$152.00
10.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 463=........$151.50
YEARLINGS:
FAIRBANKS RANCH - WHITE RIVER
140 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 783=........$153.25
BERNARD NESS - CAPUTA
81 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 725=........$152.25
19 ...........................................Dll Sirs 656=........$151.50
TOM & SHELIA TRASK - WASTA
60 ..................................Dll Opcn Hfrs 743=........$143.75
40 ..................................Dll Opcn Hfrs 689=........$144.50
LARRY & JOHN DOLE2AL - BELVIDERE
31........................Dll & Dwf Opcn Hfrs 772=........$137.00
ARTHUR MCILRAVY - PHILIP
50 .....................CIar & Fcd Opcn Hfrs 792=........$136.50
MIKE O'DEA - MIDLAND
35........................Dll & Dwf Opcn Hfrs 808=........$136.25
TIM & DENISE NELSON - MIDLAND
25 ..................................Dll Opcn Hfrs 782=........$135.00
JAMES BUCHANAN - RAPID CITY
22 ...........................................Dll Sirs 1048=......$128.50
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 24, 31, & NOV. 7.
As one of the worst droughts in
over 30 years to grip South Dakota,
the United States Department of
Agriculture Natural Resources
Conservation Service reminds pro-
ducers to work with the local NRCS
office to remain in compliance with
their current conservation plan on
highly erodible land (HEL).
Drought conditions affect plant
health and yields. This in turn, af-
fects the amount of nitrogen re-
moved from the soil and the
amount of cover left on a field fol-
lowing harvest. Producers who
have a conservation plan on their
highly erodible cropland need to
maintain a certain level of crop
residue to remain in compliance
with their conservation plan. The
drought could make meeting that
requirement difficult for some pro-
ducers.
According to State Conservation-
ist Jeffery Zimprich, South Dakota
NRCS is providing flexibility in as-
sistance to the producers. Produc-
ers unable to meet residue require-
ments due to drought conditions
may be eligible for what NRCS
calls a “conservation compliance
variance.”
“South Dakota NRCS under-
stands that crop yields are down all
across the state. For this reason,
no-till producers who continue to
do no tillage prior to planting a
crop next spring on highly erodible
fields will not be found out of com-
pliance due to insufficient crop
residue. Producers who use conven-
tional tillage operations will also be
eligible for this variance if they
plant a cover crop following the fall
tillage operation,” Zimprich said.
According to Zimprich, fields
that have been grazed or cut to pro-
vide much needed forage in 2012
would also be eligible for this vari-
ance. Farmers who do not practice
no-till are encouraged to recon-
sider. If producers continue to con-
duct their normal levels and types
of tillage on drought affected HEL
fields, soil erosion will almost cer-
tainly increase.
The drought has also impacted
soil nitrogen levels if corn silage or
grain yield was affected by drought
conditions, then nitrogen uptake
would have been reduced and un-
used nitrate-nitrogen can be ac-
counted for in determining the ni-
trogen fertilization rate for the
2013 corn crop.
Drought increases soil erosion, nitrogen leaching
Representative Jacqueline Sly
and Representative Dan Dryden
from Rapid City worked on a sub-
committee during the 2012 Leg-
islative session after HB1234
was introduced by Governor Dau-
gaard’s office. Amendments were
introduced throughout the
process taking into account sug-
gestions made by a variety of
stakeholders in education. The
following is a summary of Re-
ferred Law 16.
As voters begin making deci-
sions regarding ballot questions,
it is essential that one makes in-
formed decisions based on facts
rather than perceptions or misin-
formation. Referred Law 16, also
known as HB1234, has many
parts. Regardless of one’s politi-
cal preference, each voter has a
responsibil- ity to be informed
when taking the time to vote.
referred law 16 facts
Fact 1 – The “Critical Needs
Scholarship Program” will create
100 scholarships a year for stu-
dents majoring in education for
their junior and senior years who
agree to teach in a critical needs
teaching field. Critical needs will
be determined based upon a sur-
vey of local school districts. The
scholarships will equate to full
tuition and fees at a state univer-
sity, and recipients will be re-
quired to teach in a critical needs
field for five years in South
Dakota after graduation. The
program begins in the 2013-14
school year.
Fact 2 – The “Math and Science
Teacher Incentive Program” will
reward the state’s best middle
school and high school math and
science teachers – those who are
evaluated as “distinguished” or
“proficient” on the state evalua-
tion system – with an annual
bonus of $2,500. This program
begins in the 2014-15 school year.
It is voluntary. (It is estimated
there will be 500 math and sci-
ence teachers retiring in the next
five-10 years. In fiscal year 2011
there were a total of 19 math ed-
ucation major graduates from
South Dakota universities, 12 bi-
ology education majors, one
chemistry, one earth science, and
zero physics education majors.
However, there were 142 elemen-
tary education graduates, 37 ele-
mentary/special education grad-
uates, and 40 early childhood ed-
ucation graduates.)
Fact 3 – The “Top Teacher Re-
wards Program” allows local
school districts to create their
own plans to reward teachers
based upon student achievement,
teacher leadership, or local criti-
cal needs. Districts will receive
approximately $1,000 per teacher
to set up their local plans. Each
district can opt out entirely if
they choose. A third option
schools can use is the original
proposal to give $5,000 bonuses
to the top 20 percent of teachers.
The program begins in the 2014-
15 school year.
Fact 4 – The law removes the
state mandate that requires dis-
tricts to grant continuing con-
tract to teachers. (It is sometimes
called “tenure.”) This takes effect
on July 1, 2016. Teachers who re-
ceive continuing contracts prior
to that date will not lose continu-
ing contract status. Local dis-
tricts will still be allowed to ex-
tend continuing contract if they
choose, but it will no longer be re-
quired by the state.
Fact 5 – The law creates a new
statewide evaluation system for
teachers and principals, as one
component of the state’s new
school accountability system. The
state is replacing No Child Left
Behind with a state-created sys-
tem that will create better stu-
dent assessments and measure
schools on a variety of factors.
Fact 6 – Several advisory com-
mittees are created to allow for
more input from educators as
these programs are implemented
over the next three school years.
Fact 7 – Once fully imple-
mented, these proposals will be
funded by the state at a level of
$15 million a year, on top of reg-
ular formula funding for K-12 ed-
ucation. The money will go di-
rectly to the individual teachers,
above and beyond their salary
paid by the school district.
A vote “Yes” is to enact the ed-
ucation reform act. A vote “No” is
against the referred law.
Referred
Law 16
summary

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
PR_10-18-12_Layout 1.pdf7.6 MB