Login

Pioneer Review, October 17, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

$
1
00
Includes Tax
End of Day 10/14/13
12 Pro Winter Wheat ........$6.69
14 Pro Spring Wheat ........$6.75
Milo....................................$3.28
Corn ...................................$3.46
Millet..................................$6.75
SFS Birdseed ..................$15.75
Haakon County Commission
Regular Meeting
* * * *
Haakon County Commission
Special Meeting
* * * *
Town of Midland
Proceedings
* * * *
West River Lyman-Jones
Rural Water Systems
Proceedings
10
Volleyball 8
Philip, South Dakota 57567 Thursday, October 17, 2013 www. pioneer-review.com
No. 8, Vol. 108
MARKETS
LEGALS
Inside
this week
Cross country 7
For the past five years newspapers across South Dakota
have worked together to support a website that aggregates
all of the public notices that have been published previously
in the newspaper.
The website is www.sdpublicnotices.com.
The 130 daily and weekly newspapers in the state coop-
erate to provide the online site at no charge to any govern-
ment entity. The newspapers pay for all ongoing costs to
host and maintain the website.
Once a public notice is printed in the newspaper, the next
step taken is to upload it to sdpublicnotices.com.
“Newspaper publishers in South Dakota recognize the
value that this site delivers to enhance the reach and
searchability of public notices first published in the local
newspaper,” said David Bordewyk, general manager of
South Dakota Newspaper Association.
“South Dakota newspapers are observing “Public Notices
Month” in October, so this is a good opportunity to bring at-
tention to the value-added online presence for public no-
tices through sdpublicnotices.com,” he said.
“Publication of public notices in the local newspaper re-
mains the most effective and most efficient way to notify
the public about government actions. Plus, publication in
the newspaper ensures the notices are verifiable, independ-
ent and permanent,” Bordewyk said. “And yet the newspa-
pers in South Dakota are keenly tuned in to the evolving
and transforming world of news and information delivery.”
That is why you see newspapers across the state using a
variety of technology tools to deliver news and advertising
information, Bordewyk said.
Newspapers are using websites, social media such as
Facebook and Twitter, email and other media to deliver
news and advertising.
Many newspapers are even sending an entire electronic
replication of the printed newspaper via email to readers.
Bordewyk points out that “electronic subscriptions” are be-
coming more popular in particular among subscribers who
otherwise have been hampered by slow delivery of the
newspaper via the Postal Service.
“This transformation in technology will only continue,”
Bordewyk said. “However, I believe that newspapers that
do a good job of providing local news, information and ad-
vertising will remain the go-to third-party provider for gov-
ernment public notices as well, regardless of the delivery
methods or technology evolutions.”
Bordewyk encouraged readers wanting more information
about sdpublicnotices.com or the technology changes in
news delivery to talk to their local newspaper publisher or
editor.
You can also learn more about public notices by visiting
with the staff of your local newspaper and through promo-
tional material that your local newspaper will be publish-
ing during the month of October. You can visit
www.facebook.com/PublicNotices.
South Dakota Newspaper Association, founded in 1882
and based in Brookings, represents the state’s 130 weekly
and daily newspapers with total readership of more than
600,000.
Website collects public notices from state’s newspapers
by Del Bartels
The West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water Systems’ annual
meeting was, this year, held in the
Wall Community Center, Wednes-
day, October 9.
This meeting, the 24th annual,
celebrated 20 years of service. The
theme was “Pipe Dream to Real-
ity” was an obvious play on words
concerning the near completion of
the Mni Wiconi water pipe project.
On the heels of the recent devas-
tating fall storm, manager Jake
Fitzergerald said the last three
years have been challenging ones.
Major flooding along the Missouri
River marked 2011. Then 2012
was one of the driest years on
record. That year, 970 million gal-
lons of water was sold. So far this
year, WR/L-J has sold 682 million
gallons of water, down 13 percent.
All the while, the $23.9 million
Mni Wiconi water project is near-
ing completion. Construction work
will continue into 2014, but using
2013 funds.
In giving the official welcome,
Wall Mayor Dave Hahn mentioned
some of the wonders of the world.
In comparison, he added that a
blessing to western South Dakota
was good drinking water. “And we
often tend to forget it,” said Hahn.
A summary of the creation of the
WR/L-J and of the Mni Wiconi
Rural Water Supply Project was
given. “Most of 50 years people
were told over and over that this
project could not be done,” said
Larson. The Lyman-Jones Water
District, the fledgling West River
Water District and several tribal
entities combined fundraising and
lobbying efforts. “It developed to
be a very good working relation-
ship. Seeing this project is some-
West River/Lyman-Jones Water annual meeting
At the WR/L-J dais were, from left, Paul Goldhammer – board president, Jake Fitzgerald – manager, Dave Lar-
son – legal representative, Laura Leenderts – project engineer, and Amy Kittelson – office manager.
Del Bartels
At left, an award of excellence went to board member Rick Doud, Midland,
in appreciation for his dedicated service and leadership through the fund-
ing, construction and completion of the WR/L-J Rural Water project.
Above, during the WR/L-J Rural Water System’s annual meeting, manager
Jake Fitzgerald, left, presented board member Marion Matt, Philip, a trail-
blazer award for Matt’s work as the liaison with West River Water Devel-
opment District.
thing I am very proud of. We have
accomplished making the impossi-
ble possible,” said Larson.
In relating the chain of efforts
needed to get the Mni Wiconi
started on its year-by-year fund-
ing, Mike West as director of
Lyman-Jones and others were
praised for seemingly endless lob-
bying efforts in Washington, D.C.
Roger Porch was one person who
gave testimony to a political dele-
by Del Bartels
The Haakon School District
meeting, Monday, October 14, did
not start with the planned build-
ing tour. Because of the current
weather and devastation, the tour
has been postponed until before
the November meeting.
Bob Fugate, Sr., was officially
approved as the head boys’ basket-
ball coach. He has already held a
player and parent meeting, which
was reported as having gone well.
An assistant coach is still being
sought.
The Haakon School District has
accepted a gift from the South
Dakota School of Mines and Tech-
nology in Rapid City. Philip’s track
and field’s old pole vault pit equip-
ment was extremely outdated.
“The pole vault pit was purchased
roughly in the late 70s,” said Su-
perintendent Keven Morehart.
“We were very fortunate to get a
call from the School of Mines ask-
ing us if we wanted the one that
was used at their facility for state
track meets, etc. When we asked
the cost, they told us it was free. I
was told that when these are pur-
chased new, they can run between
$15,000 and $20,000. It is only 10
years old, so we are very fortu-
nate. A big thank you to Tom Par-
quet and Scott Pinney for going
and picking them up for us.” The
equipment will be put in place
come Spring.
The board has surplused the old
pole vault pit equipment, as well
as the old kitchen stove.
School attorney Rodney Free-
man will receive $130 to help pay
for costs of attending the National
Education Law Association an-
nual meeting. In exchange, Free-
man will continue his policy of not
charging the school district for
telephone conferences relative to
school law questions. “Pretty
cheap for what he does for us,”
agreed school board president
Scott Brech.
The number of high school stu-
dents has increased by two
through open enrollment. One
student has come from Wall and
one from Kadoka. In such trans-
fers, students are eligible to par-
ticipate in extra-curricular
activities after 36 school days (ap-
proximately one quarter). As re-
quired, the total count of
attending students had already
been sent into the state before
these two transfers.
Bills payable as of October 14
included over $15,799 from the
general fund, over $12,764 from
capital outlay, over $24,073 from
special education, and over $9,695
from food service. Costs for sports
officials and other extra-curricular
expenses came to over $3,221. The
total is $65,554.63.
September’s cost for substitutes
came to $825 for the equivalent of
12 days. Hourly wages, for an
equivalent of at total of 2,145.09
hours worked, totaled $23,646.89.
At $50 per meeting, with three
meetings being paid for at this
time, the seven members of the
school board received a total of
$1,050.
In his secondary principal’s re-
port, Cory Lambley said that
Haakon School District uses gifts and trades
Haakon School District board mem-
ber Anita Peterson just received her
official mallot for being president of
the Black Hills Special Services Co-
operative. She finished a term of
the previous president, then began
her own one-year term last July.
There is no set limit to the number
of terms she may fill. The BHSCC
has 12 member schools.
benchmark testing will be done
four times throughout the school
year. Parent/teacher conferences
has an approximate 80 percent at-
tendance. “I thought that was re-
ally good,” said Lambley. The
district has received a high school
music participation award for the
second year from the South
Dakota Music Education Associa-
tion. Haakon School District will
be sending about 40-50 students
to compete in a quiz bowl in Stan-
ley County, October 30.
In his superintendent’s report,
Morehart said that South Dakota
State University borrowed busses
and drivers for its Cottonwood Re-
search Station open house. In ex-
change, possible school tours of
the station and its research may
be held in the future.
Morehart praised the elemen-
tary cross country practices held
by coach Ralph Kroetch. The
young students practice twice a
week, and raced during the last
Philip home meet and the regional
meet held in Philip. “It’s just
great!,” said Morehart, who added
that this is one way that Kroetch
develops some future runners for
the cross country team.
The sectional punt, pass and
kick competition will be held in
Pierre, October 20. Philip has
some boys and girls who have
qualified to compete.
Lights and other electrical
needs at the football field will be
taken care of by the school dis-
trict. Repairs because of the recent
storm should be completed by the
end of this week. Currently, any
thing on the west side of the track
is not operable.
Instructor Tom Parquet and
Conservation Officer Zach Thom-
sen are looking into possibly inte-
grating South Dakota hunter
safety requirements into a few
days of physical education classes
each year. The idea is that more
students can participate and be
legally ready for any hunting sea-
son they are interested in. “It will
be a good deal,” said Morehart.
Morehart clarified that kinder-
garten will be held on Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday
throughout the year. Kinder-
garten classes will not be held on
Tuesdays, no matter whether
their is no school on a Monday or
not.
A committee of school personnel
will be working on developing
standard based report cards. This
will be in preparation for common
core goals where results will be
more specific and each student as
well as the student body are lack-
ing or excelling in.
The next regular meeting for
the Haakon School District 27-1
will be at 6:00 p.m., Monday, No-
vember 18, in room A-1 of the
Philip High School.
gation visiting the area. Finally,
the Creighton leg of the project
was let for bid. Marion Matt at-
tended the bid opening ceremony
at Wall.
The history of the project is
filled with highlights, one being
the borrowing of $8 million for the
Ft. Pierre to Philip pipeline. As of
this annual meeting, the Mni
Wiconi project is 98 percent com-
pleted.
by Nancy Haigh
In an emergency meeting called
by Chairman Steve Clements, the
Haakon County Board of Com-
missioners approved a disaster
declaration following the cata-
strophic loses from the October 4-
5 storm.
A county or state must declare
a disaster so that landowners and
area cooperatives or other entities
may apply for governmental
funds, should they become avail-
able. Haakon County Emergency
Director Lola Roseth attended the
meeting to help with the declara-
tion.
The board approved that the
county highway department em-
ployees can dig burial pits for live-
stock carcasses, if so requested by
Haakon County residents. They
cannot help move carcasses or
cover up the pit. Typically, the
county will not interfer in poten-
tial business of area enterprises,
but the disposl of the carcasses
needs to be done as quickly as
possible to deter diseases.
Kenny Neville, highway super-
intendent, discussed with the
board his findings regarding a
semi truck.
Disaster
declaration
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments on any news story or personal feeling on any sub-
ject. We do reserve the right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space. We also reserve the right
to reject any or all letters.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding Monday at 5:00 p.m.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual
newspaper office. All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run the two weeks prior to an election.
The “Letters” column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to express their opinions. It is not meant to replace ad-
vertising as a means of reaching people.
This publication’s goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of free speech. Your comments are welcomed and en-
couraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Editorial
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 2
Subscription Rates: For Haakon, Jackson, and Jones counties,
Creighton, Wall, Quinn, Marcus, Howes, Plainview, and Hayes ad-
dresses: $36.00 per year (+ Tax); Elsewhere: $42.00 per year.
South Dakota residents are required to pay sales tax.
Periodicals postage paid at Philip, SD.
Postmaster, send change of address notice to: Pioneer Review, PO
Box 788, Philip, SD 57567; or FAX to: 605/859-2410.
Website Subscription Rate: $36.
E-mail address:
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
website: www.pioneer-review.com
Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of Haakon County, the
towns of Philip and Midland, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc. Pioneer Review office is
located at 221 E. Oak Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516; • FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.
Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way reproduced from
this publication, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
DEADLINES:
Display & Classified Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
E-MAIL ADDRESSES: ADS: ads@pioneer-review.com • NEWS: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Philip, SD
U.S.P.S. 433-780
Community Betterment Committee Halloween Party …
Wednesday, October 30, 6:00 p.m., Bad River Senior Citizens’ Cen-
ter, Philip. There is a potluck meal; utensils, plates and drinks pro-
vided. Come in costume as there will be prizes. Please bring cans of
food for the food pantry. Everyone welcome. For more info call Dar-
lene Matt – 859-2077.
Financial Aid Information Night ... Wednesday, October 23,
5:30-6:30 p.m. Room A7( Deb Snook's classroom). for upcoming
graduates and their parents- Presented by Jessica Bivens from
Great Lakes Corporation. This will be held at the school in
PHILIP AARP/RTA MEETS …Monday, October 28, at 6:00 p.m.
at the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center with a soup supper.
Speaker is Eric Nelson, SDAARP, who will speak on Social Security,
Medicare and the Affordable Care Act. Anyone is welcome to hear
the latest on these issues.
LAND O’ LAKES … has discontinued its 5¢ for school, so please
put your milk caps in the soup can at the Philip school or Coyle’s
SuperValu as they have to be turned in by October 20.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge. Lookin’ Around|Syd Iwan
What do you do when an early
October blizzard kills 54 of your
calves and 14 of your cows as it
did to us last week? Do you pound
your chest and wail? Do you slam
doors and kick dogs? Do you sink
into a deep dark depression? Well
no. Those things don’t do much
good. What you do is say with Job,
“The Lord gives, and the Lord
takes away. Blessed be the name
of the Lord.” Then you go on from
there, figuring out what to do
next.
First you have to get over the
shock of it all. Who expects a bliz-
zard that early, and why did it kill
so many cattle in the area? The
why is explained somewhat by the
cattle not having yet grown their
winter coats and not being used to
cold weather. It has just barely
frozen so far this fall. Then there
were inches of cold rain followed
by strong wind and some snow.
The temperature wasn’t all that
severe since it was barely at the
freezing point, but the wet and
wind, combined with short hair,
were enough to chill livestock be-
yond bearing.
Then, too, the cattle weren’t yet
in their winter pastures. Our
ranch has pretty good protection
all over since part of it is in river
breaks and part along a deep
creek. It is not like our critters are
usually on a big flat plain with no
protection in sight. We have
lucked out many times in past
years just because of our rugged
terrain. It probably helped some
this time around as well, but it
didn’t keep us from losses. If we’d
had our cows and calves in winter
quarters, they might have been
able to avoid more of the wind,
but there is no guarantee that
would have done the trick either.
So what next?
First off, one has to say that
God allowed us to suffer this loss.
He might not have caused it, but
he certainly allowed it. Since I
harbor no doubts about God’s love
for me, that means there was a
purpose behind how the whole af-
fair worked itself out. Two or
three things come to mind. Cer-
tainly, God wants me to learn to
trust him in every situation, and
I try to do that. I might be just
getting another lesson. Secondly,
he may be planning to provide for
our needs in an unexpected way.
Thirdly, it is possible he is leading
me towards some changes that I
might not even know I need, but
he does. Whatever his purposes, I
trust him completely and will try
to follow his leading.
With the idea of providing what
we need in an unexpected way,
that has happened many times in
the past. I recall one year when
cattle prices were down, crops
were almost non-existent, and
cash was running out. Low and
behold, an oil company came by
and wanted to lease our land for
oil exploration. They never found
any oil that I know of, but their
lease payments were certainly put
to very good use. Another time
when I was scratching my head
wondering how to get by, a dear
uncle and aunt remembered me
generously in their will. That
money also came at a time when
it was badly needed. As you can
see, God can provide for us in
many ways if we just trust him
and wait for him to act. As I have
said before and again recently,
“God will provide.”
As far as changes go in my life,
I am no longer exactly a young
thing. I’m not completely ancient
either, but the bloom of youth has
somewhat worn off. Since I am
not fond of change, I tend to resist
altering what I do and how I go
about it. God may be telling me
the time has come to make some
changes. If that is his purpose, he
will no doubt make it clearer as
time goes along.
So, for now it’s kind of a waiting
game. We need to wait a bit, see
how things go, and figure out
what we need to do next. Mean-
while, to keep myself from fret-
ting and getting into a fuss, I will
try to constantly remember an-
other favorite verse of mine which
says, “Worry about nothing. Pray
about everything.” That works for
me, and I hope it will for you too
if your life is not exactly running
smoothly at the moment. God
does love us, he takes care of us,
and he will provide what we need.
Count on it.
David writes in Psalm 27:14,
“Wait patiently for the Lord. Be
strong and courageous. Yes, wait
patiently for the Lord.” That is ex-
cellent advice. Blessed be the
name of the Lord.
Blessed Be the Name
Country Praises by Del Bartels
Vampires, werewolves, ghosts
witches and other horrors are con-
sidered creatures of the night. Ex-
cept for in novels and movies, and
during Halloween, I don’t give
them a thought. Their appeal for
fear entertainment is based off of
most humans not being able to see
well in the dark, thus what might
be out there makes people nervous
or even afraid.
Fiction is more acceptable when
based in truth. Many creatures of
the night do exist. The fancy term
is nocturnal. There are also many
twilight or pre-dawn creatures.
The fancy terms are crepuscular
and matutinal. Some of these
creatures I do fear.
It is easy for most of us to imag-
ine extreme trepidation if we were
to hear a mountain lion screaming
up-close from the dark. Most of us
get crawly skin imagining hordes
of cockroaches scuttering around
when a light is clicked on. Most
landowners instinctively reach for
a rifle when they see a skunk or
raccoon. Yet, most of us fondly re-
call childhood wonder when we
see a flittering haze of fireflies.
The adrenaline rush of seeing a
trophy white tail deer through my
hunting binoculars is markedly
different than the adrenaline rush
of suddenly seeing a white tail
deer in my headlights.
An endearment of nature’s
beauty, rather than fear, settles
over me when I softly pet a ham-
ster; that is until it nips me. On
several occasions, until they real-
ized that I was there, I silently
laughed at fox bounding at play in
fields at dusk. I was lucky a long
time ago to see him, and I gaped
in awe at the self-assured stride of
a wolf. I still feel like a child eves-
dropping on spirits when I hear
the lamenting call of an owl. I
fight disgust when I see mice or
rats, especially indoors. My gut re-
flexes are slowly overridden by my
head knowledge of the bug-eating
benefits of bats. This geographical
area is also home to coyotes, por-
cupines, badgers and the rare
opossum.
The world, mostly because of
hobby botanists, has plants that
bloom mostly at night – evening
primrose, nottingham catchfly,
moon flowers, night phlox, night
blooming cereus and evening
stock. Precursory to fictitious hol-
lywood she-creatures that bite,
any nocturnally blooming cactus
is nicknamed queen-of-the-night.
Choose: bites or scratches!
There is one more major crea-
ture of the night – man. Darkness
is an average of 12 hours of a day,
yet we sleep less than eight. Social
events and dating are often at
night. Partying hardy usually be-
gins when the bands start playing
at 9:00 p.m. Long hours of work
and study are refered to as burn-
ing the candle at both ends; I as-
sume that means the start and the
end of the night. Tell me ladies,
why does romance often mean
turning down the lights?
Halloween costumes are based
off of hollywood creatures of the
night. Agreed, younger costuming
is leaning toward Disney charac-
ters, but Halloween is not yet
Goofy and princesses. It is still
witch hats, ninja masks, dracula
capes, and flashlight beams skit-
tering along semi-dark sidewalks.
Hollywood’s and nature’s night
creatures get my interest. Cos-
tumed kids get candy. Refined
ladies ... will get steak and wine.
Creatures of night
South Dakota Family, Career
and Community Leaders of Amer-
ica members “discovered their su-
perpowers” at a recent leadership
weekend, October 5-6, in Huron.
Two hundred and eleven stu-
dents and 33 advisors from across
S.D. attended rookie camp, power
training or peer education train-
ing. State FCCLA officers for
2013-2014, including State Vice-
President Gavin Brucklacher, led
the rookie training. They spoke
about national programs and star
events, and taught students basic
information about FCCLA. Rookie
training attendees received the
Step One Membership Award.
Former national officer Trent
Misak conducted power training.
He incorporated leadership activ-
ities and games into his presenta-
tion that expanded students’
knowledge of FCCLA.
Philip FCCLA members partici-
pating in this training included
Caitie Pinela, Katlin Knutson,
Ellie Coyle and Tyana Gottsleben.
Peer education team members
had their first meetings together.
Each team identified their state
projects. The community peer ed-
ucation team planned projects to
support the national FCCLA out-
reach project, Share Our
Strength. Afton Burns, one of 12
community team members, at-
tended this training.
The family team will be working
with one of the national FCCLA
educational partners, Autism
Speaks, to bring awareness to
autism issues. The career peer ed-
ucation team members are plan-
ning a year-long drive to support
Ronald McDonald houses in S.D.
FCCLA was first established in
1945 and in South Dakota in
1946. Family serves as the central
focus of this organization. This ca-
reer and technical student organ-
ization prepares youth to assume
their adult roles in society as wage
earners, community leaders and
caring family members by giving
them important life skills needed
to thrive in their families, careers
and communities.
FCCLA leadership weekend
From left: Afton Burns, Caitie Pinela, Gavin Brucklacher, Tyana Gottsleben
and Katlin Knutson. Front: Ellie Coyle.
Courtesy photo
HuntSafe course graduates
Shown above are the graduates from the free HuntSafe course that was held in Midland, Saturday, October 12.
“We had a good turnout, despite postponing it a week due to the poor weather conditions,” said instructor Tom
Parquet. Each graduate earned a hunter’s safety card, and received orange hunter’s caps, safety glasses, ear
Courtesy photo
Pumpkin give-away to kids
Young people of
the Philip Elemen-
tary School and
local day care
centers were
treated with free
pumpkins by
Jesse and An-
gela Martin.
Each recipient
got to chose their
own pumpkin.
Above is the
kindergarten
class, each mem-
ber with their
own perfect
pumpkin. At left
and at right are
two happy
youngsters, each representing a different
day care, and each smiling over their very own pumpkins.
Courtesy photos
Those affected by the western
South Dakota blizzard and those
willing to volunteer for relief ef-
forts should call 2-1-1 or 877-708-
4357.
In the coming weeks, the
helpline is available to field calls
from volunteers who would like to
help in identifying and document-
ing dead livestock, volunteers
available for farm or ranch repair
(examples: heavy equipment, re-
pairing and re-building infrastruc-
ture), volunteers who have
professional finance experience,
and volunteers who are willing to
field questions from those affected
and help citizens with mental
health needs.
Those out-of-state or living in
Harding, Perkins, Ziebach, Shan-
non, Jackson, Jones, Bennett and
Mellette counties will need to call
877-708-4357 to reach the
helpline.
For frequently asked questions,
information can be found at
http://sdda.sd.gov/documents/Fact
%20Sheet.pdf.
Blizzard
help line
plugs and hunter’s handbooks. The
course is required for youth who
wish to apply for hunting licenses in
South Dakota. It is also necessary
for hunters who wish to apply for
out-of-state hunting licenses.
Extension
Bob Fanning. Field Specialist
Winner Regional Extension Center
Rural Livin’
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 3
Thursday: Partly cloudy with a
chance of rain, then a chance of
rain in the afternoon. High of 52F.
Winds from the NW at 10 to 15
mph. Chance of rain 20%.Thurs-
day Night: Partly cloudy. Low of 32F. Winds from
the WNW at 10 to 15 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy.
High of 54F. Breezy.
Winds from the West at
15 to 25 mph. Friday
Night: Mostly cloudy.
Low of 30F. Breezy. Winds from the
NW at 15 to 20 mph..
Saturday: Clear in the
morning, then partly
cloudy. High of 54F.
Breezy. Winds from the
NW at 15 to 20 mph.. Sat-
urday Night: nt_partlycloudy Clear. Low of
27F. Winds less than 5 mph.
Monday:Partly cloudy.
High of 54F. Breezy.
Winds from the WNW
at 10 to 20 mph.Mon-
day Night: nt_clear
Clear. Low of 36F. Winds from the
WNW at 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Partly
cloudy. High of
55F. Winds less
than 5 mph.Sun-
day Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 32F. Winds from
the South at 5 to 10 mph.
Get your complete
& up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Sometimes it’s TOUGH living in the
country, but we wouldn’t change it for
ANYTHING. However, we do have to
WORK TOGETHER for the BEST
future of PHILIP. SHOP AT HOME
whenever you can.
FIRST
NATIONAL BANK
PHILIP, S.D. FAITH, S.D.
605-859-2525 605-967-2191
www.fnbphilip.com
Member FDIC
CÞLw AGLNCY, L1O.
Crop Insurance Specialists Since 1984.
0lve us a calll
We'd be happy to
dlscuss .
All Your crop lnsurance Needs
5a|es U|ose 0ate for 2014 Urops Are:
Paìnfa|| Index on Pasture & Pay|and:
11/15/13
Annua| Iorage (Pay Mì||et, 5udan, etc.):
12/15/13
1hese are the dates to purchase, change or
cancel multi-peril crop insurance.
0fflce (606) 433-6411
or 1oll-Free (888) 433-8760
Pusty 0|ney ¹ Maurìce Pandcock ¹ Peìdì Porch ¹ 1ay|or Mohnen
1anner Pandcock ¹ Urady & ßernìce Urew
Crew Agency is an equal opportunity provider.
Producers continue to harvest
hay to replace the deficit caused
by the 2012 drought. The manage-
ment challenge when harvesting
hay in the fall is getting the crop
dry enough to safely bale with
shorter days and cooler tempera-
tures. Fall is also the time of year
when the larger stemmed forages
such as forage sorghum, sudan-
grass and sorghum-sudan crosses
are harvested, and the thicker
stems take more time to dry than
finer stemmed crops. Hay that is
baled too wet is in danger of get-
ting hot enough to start on fire, or
at the least, losing much of its
feed value.
The recommended moisture
content for small square bales is
20 percent or lower, whereas large
round or rectangular bales should
be made at 18 percent or less and
some references suggest no more
than 16 percent. Hay preserva-
tives can allow baling at higher
moisture content, but add cost to
the equipment, add cost for the
product, and can be corrosive.
There is also a limit of how high
the moisture content can be and
still safely bale hay.
It is normal for temperatures to
rise in freshly baled forages due to
plant respiration and natural mi-
crobial activity. If forage moisture
levels are too high, however, the
combination of heat and moisture
provide an ideal environment for
excessive growth of bacteria that
are naturally present on these
crops. The respiration of these
bacteria can cause the tempera-
tures to rise to dangerous levels.
The moisture content of forages
can be determined with either a
forage moisture tester, or by using
an accurate scale and a mi-
crowave oven. If using a forage
moisture tester, comparing the re-
sults of several tests with the re-
sults of using the scale and
microwave oven would be much
safer and provide confidence in
the results. This may be particu-
larly important when determining
the moisture content of large
stemmed forages, as the large
stems may cause erroneous read-
ings.
To determine the moisture con-
tent of forages using a scale and
microwave oven, gather and
weigh a representative sample of
whole plant material. Heat the
forage with a cup of cool water in
a microwave oven for a few min-
utes at a time until the weight
doesn’t change. The moisture con-
tent can be determined with the
formula: % moisture = (initial
weight – final weight) X 100/ini-
tial weight.
Once forages are baled, it is ad-
vised to leave them scattered in
the field for at least three weeks
before stacking. By that time, the
temperature of the hay should
rise slightly and gradually return
to the ambient (air) temperature.
Heat can also escape from individ-
ual bales much more readily than
if the bales are stacked, and if one
or more bales are heating exces-
sively, you’re not endangering the
whole stack to the danger of fire.
If the moisture content was bor-
derline or questionable at the
time of baling, the temperature
should be monitored, particularly
before stacking. If temperatures
rise to no more than 120 degrees
F, no loss of feed value should
occur and no action is needed. If
temperatures rise to between 120-
130 degrees F, some loss of feed
value can be expected, and tem-
peratures should be monitored
daily. At 140 degrees F, significant
feed value can be lost and one
should consider taking stacks
apart. If temperatures rise to 150
degrees F or higher, significant
loss of feed value is certain, and
fire is likely.
Calendar
10/21-23/2013 – SDSU Exten-
sion Annual Conference, Brook-
ings
12/3-4/2013 – Ag Horizons Con-
ference, Ramkota Inn, Pierre
Fall Hay Harvest
by Bobette Schofield
The rancher looked toward
heaven
And said, "God where have you
been?
Do you know we had a blizzard,
With rain and snow and wind?
You know I built this herd of
mine____
With blood and sweat and tears.
You know the work and worry,
As I struggled through the years.
Now as I stand and look around,
I see that it is gone.
I don't know if I have the
strength
To rebuild or go on."
God looked down from
heaven____
Saw the pain there in his eyes.
He heard the sadness in his
voice.
He knew the sacrifice.
He said, "My son, you're not
alone.
I'm walking there with you____
I'll give you all the strength you
need
For what you have to do.
I'll give you courage to go on,
Through all this loss and pain.
I'll give you hope to start once
more,
And build your herd again.
I know that this is who you
are____
And not just what you do.
And as you're making your fresh
start,
I'll be right there with you.
Do not think this is a failure,
Or that you've done something
wrong.
You're an example of the spirit
That makes South Dakota
strong.
So stand up straight and tall my
son,
For I have faith in you.
Put yesterday behind you now,
For we've got work to do!"
The Rancher’s Prayer
Ten individuals from the region
have joined The Cattle Business
Weekly newspaper’s elite class of
Top 10 Industry Leaders. The
newspaper just recently an-
nounced its 2013 inductees with
the publishing of their annual
Cattle Business, Herd Reference
Guide. Each year the agricultural
newspaper selects 10 individuals
from the Midwest region who are
committed to helping the agricul-
tural industry thrive.
“This year’s class of Top 10
Leaders offers a well-rounded look
at the different key players the
agriculture industry has within it
today,” says Donnie Leddy, pub-
lisher of The Cattle Business
Weekly. “Everyone from commer-
cial cattlemen to university pro-
fessors are important to the beef
industry’s success. This class
shows why that is true.”
Making the Top 10 lineup this
year are:
• Thor Roseth, Philip, S.D., is
co-owner of Philip Livestock Auc-
tion and the Belle Fourche Live-
stock Exchange.
• Jessy Meyer, Flasher, N.D., is
a commercial cattle operator with
a diversified marketing program.
• Jason and Kaycee Hoffman,
Thedford, Neb., are part of Hoff-
man Hereford Ranch.
• Rusty Halvorson, Hickson,
N.D., serves as Farm Director for
the American Ag Network.
• Dustin Reisig, Lewistown,
Mont., is a businessman and an
Angus seedstock operator.
• Kristi Cammack, Laramie,
Wyo., an Associate Professor of
Quantitative and Molecular Ge-
netics with the University of
Wyoming.
• Derek Jungels, Kathryn,
N.D., operates a Shorthorn seed-
stock operation.
• Bridget Wasser, Parker, Colo.,
is the Senior Director of Meat Sci-
ence and Technology with the Na-
tional Cattlemen’s Beef
Association.
• Landi McFarland, Ellston,
Iowa, is co-owner of Hoover Angus
• T.J. Gabriel, Midland, S.D.,
rancher and operator of Deep
Creek Angus
The Cattle Business Weekly is a
leading agricultural newspaper
based in Philip, S.D. Every fall the
newspaper selects 10 individuals
to be featured in its annual herd
reference guide. Learn more about
The Cattle Business Weekly at
www.cattlebusinessweekly.com.
Top 10 ag industry leaders named
Farm Credit Services of America
has announced the financial coop-
erative is mobilizing staff and fi-
nancial resources to help its
customers who were impacted by
the recent blizzard that struck
South Dakota.
The storm killed thousands of
calves that were about to be sold
as well as cows that would produce
next year’s calves.
“The weather dealt an incredi-
bly tough blow to livestock produc-
ers and their families,” said Doug
Stark, president and chief of oper-
ations at FCS America. “All of us
are touched by the enormity of the
loss and are committed to helping
our customers rebuild their lives
and their operations.”
The customer owned FCS Amer-
ica provides more than $1.3 billion
in credit to cow-calf operators in
Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota
and Wyoming. “Agriculture is the
only industry we serve, and we
know it’s an inherently risky busi-
ness,” Stark said. “For that rea-
son, we focus on building financial
strength so we can help producers
through tough times like these.
Now our financial officers are
reaching out to customers and
helping them with individualized
plans and assistance to manage
through this loss.”
Bob Schmidt, senior vice presi-
dent with FCS America in South
Dakota, said the company’s em-
phasis is on helping livestock pro-
ducers restore working capital. He
encouraged customers to contact
their financial officers for assis-
tance. “Many of our local employ-
ees are involved in ranching
operations or have friends and
families in the business, so we ap-
preciate firsthand what customers
are facing,” Schmidt said. “As a
company, we’ve organized a broad
team of people across the organi-
zation to help ensure a quick re-
sponse to help customers rebuild.”
FCS America to help S.D. producers
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
1 and 2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups) Apartments
carpeted throughout, appliances
furnished, laundry facilities available.
Disabled and Handicap Housing
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
VelroP|a|rs
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
metrop|a|ns
management.
com
F0lll¢ N0l0f, lß0.
Pr|||p, 30
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2008 LincoIn Navigator
Local, Leather, DVD, Nice
Check out our entire selection at
www.phiIipmotor.com
8top ln & see colt todayll
Hit & Miss
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 4
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
October
18-21
Cloudy
With a
Chance of
Meatballs 2
(PG)
2000 Chevy 1500
Ext Cab 4x4 Auto
859-2744 · 685-3068
PhiIip
Get R
ea
d
y
F
o
r
W
inter!
B
a
t
t
e
r
y
S
a
le
$40 rebate card witb any
$400 porcbase combinations
of New Holland filters,
oil & batteries!
HON1H OF
OC1OBER!
859-2568
PhiIip
10% off aII
Exide Batteries
Fall Festival
Thurs. October 31st
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Community E. Free Church
(West of Philip on Hwy. 14)
G
am
es
Movie
F
U
N
f
o
r
A
L
L
A
G
E
S
!
!
F
U
N
f
o
r
A
L
L
A
G
E
S
!
!
Donate some of your candy to troops
overseas with:
Candy
Candy
C
a
n
d
y
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Oct. 17: Fried
Chicken, Mashed Potatoes and
Gravy, Cheesy Beans, Fruit.
Friday, Oct. 18: BBQ Meat-
balls, Red Mashed Potatoes, Gar-
den Veggies, Roll, Gelatin Jewels.
Monday, Oct. 21: Mandarin
Chicken, Fried Rice, Egg Roll,
Fruit.
Tuesday, Oct. 22: Meatloaf,
Cheesy Potatoes, Fried Corn, Roll,
Fruit Salad.
Wednesday, Oct. 23: Indian
Tacos, Fruit.
***
Well how did you like the fire
whistle? The only thing working is
the water. What a momentous
storm. Our clocks with batteries
said it was now 7 a.m.. Tiffany
told us that the staff would bring
our food up to our apartments so
we were to prop our doors open
(this is normally a forbidden rule)
but due to the storm it was al-
lowed. The windows were blotched
with blobs of snow. This was un-
real for October 5. Our merchan-
dise fair was called off. It was
rescheduled. A little yarn from the
blizzard of 1949 – Bert Humbert
and other private planes were
busy dropping cow cake all over
the country and couldn’t keep up
with the demand.
On October 5 our schedule was
running late due to having no
electricity. I am luckier than some
as I have a big flashlight and long
underwear. Helen Olson who lives
just two doors from me has a bat-
tery operated radio. She went to
sleep listening to the weather.
M.R. Hansen emailed yesterday
from Mongolia. He said it is beau-
tiful weather there. He heard we
were having a blizzard.
Thanks to my daughter, Delores
Denke who sent three books,
“Cold Dish,” and “Kindness Goes
Unpunished,” by Craig Johnson
and “Sheep” an autobiography by
Louise Tark. They came just in
time for blizzard reading.
Philip Pioneer Review of Octo-
ber 3 had a good photo and write-
up about Annie Brunskill who has
done so much for the Philip li-
brary. She has helped spark our
interest in reading and helped
many young students with lesson
material. She helped many of us
find books for our enjoyment
and/or information.
The recent storm piled snow on
our trees in the courtyard here at
Somerset Court, bending them to
the ground. My granddaughter,
Sheridan, phoned to say that her
car is covered with snow.
Our director, Ryan Love, visited
with residents to see how we were
getting along. (Some 60,000 peo-
ple are without power in our vicin-
ity.)
I hadn’t heard whether we
would have church service, but if
not we could ask Eileen Tenold to
play the piano for hymn singing
and residents could each recite
their favorite Bible verse or relate
a personal experience about
prayers answered. That would
make a good Sunday gathering.
Mass was held Saturday
evening up on third floor, since Fa-
ther Dahms lives on third floor
and the elevators were not work-
ing.
Thanks to the Somerset Court
staff who got us through a 24-hour
electricity outage. We had cereal
and fruit for breakfast and box
lunches for noon and evening
meals. It was weird not to have
the use of the elevators and the
night was pretty dark. Saturday,
some residents went up and
played pool on third floor and
Helen Larson had a battery oper-
ated radio, so she could follow the
storm and storm-related inci-
dents.
Charlie and Joanne Hathaway
had company October 4. Their son
from Converse City, Colo., near
Denver, came in ahead of the
storm.
Sunday, October 6, we had
church with Terry and Ardith
Pulse. They had to shovel a long-
time to get their car out of the
snowbank and come to Somerset
Court. They only live about eight
blocks away. Steve, who usually
comes to church with Terry, lives
in Hill City where the snow is
even deeper. Eileen Tenold
thought that there wasn’t any
church services so we missed her
piano playing. But Connie Stevens
played some hymns for singing.
Thank you, Terry, Ardith and Con-
nie.
A prayer was offered for Jack
Humke, and most anybody who
needs one. We sang, “All is Well
With My Soul,” “No Turning
Back,” and “How Great Thou Art.”
Terry spoke from Hebrews 9
and 10. My son, Hans, says, “Why
read a good book, when you could
be reading The Good Book.”
Larry Lurz, a Rapid City friend
of my son, Leslie, Bend, Ore.,
phoned to get Leslie’s address.
My granddaughter, Juanita
Denke Mair, has a list of 100
books to read before I die. I got it
on the computer, but I couldn’t fig-
ure out how to print it, so I wrote
it off in longhand. That was tire-
some. I have read 38 of them.
Many need to be reread. Some I
would like to read, some I don’t ex-
pect to ever read.
Author Terry Pratchett is one
author who shows up on the list
four times. I have never read any
of his books. Roald Dahl is on the
list at least three times. I will try
one of those, because I liked his
Charlie and the Chocolate Fac-
tory.” There are four Harry Potter
books on the list. (I don’t plan to
read those.)
Here’s my nephew, Leonard
Meyer’s, word puzzle from a while
back: banana, dresser, grammar,
potato, revive, uneven, assess.
(Take the first letter off each word
and put it on the end of the word,
and it spells the same backwards.)
Amusing.
Wednesday, October 9, 2013, at
Somerset Court, Shawn, Sandi
and Susan gave us a very success-
ful pizza party! Because there was
snow on the ground, we had our
pizza picnic in the activity garden
with our favorite varities of pizza.
We also had fountain drinks, rice
krispie bars, coffee and ice water.
Those who attended were Dwight
Mann, Addie Rorvig, Marge Gaf-
fin, Marge Self, Marge Olson,
Helen Larson, Tina Fliday, Alvin
Ellerton, Virginia Gray, Dot Bus-
field, Jane Bunch, Charlie and
Joan Hathaway and Vivian
Hansen. Shawn had made some
enlargements of Charlie and
Joan’s great-grandbaby and we all
enjoyed seeing those.
Later in the afternoon, there
were tables of whist, rummi-cube
and five crowns played. After the
fully fit exercise session, we had a
good time playing pool on third
floor. First we had a game of cut-
throat with Marilyn, Sandi and
Vivian playing. Then, Marjorie
Gaffin came and we played a
game of eight ball. When Marge
Self came, Vivina left and Marge,
Marjorie, Sandi and Marilyn had
a game.
Somerset Court resident Edna
Wulff has a daughter who lives
not too far from here and her
house is still without power. She
came over to Somerset Court to
get warmed up, she said. She has
been melting snow for drinking
water. Some people go to the
YMCA to take showers. There is a
great deal of work hauling
branches around town. And for
the ranchers, there is a great labor
of hauling dead livestock to the
rendering plant.
Happy birthday, October 11, to
my granddaughter, Emily
Hansen, Lincoln, Neb. She shared
the same birthday as my husband,
Virgil Hansen. He used to tell her
that she stole his birthday, and
she would cry, and he would have
to make it up to her.
Somerset Court could use a gen-
erator, but at around $200,000, it
will have to be budgeted in. Mean-
while, we will have flashlights and
batteries available in the Somer-
set Court gift shop.
Friday, October 8, was the an-
niversary gala sock hop. This
party had a 50s theme. We were to
wear our poodle skirts or what-
ever we could find. And we ex-
pected to hear some music from
the 1950s.
The Somerset Court scrapbook
on the coffee table by the fireplace
has a new cover. Please continue
to contribute your news, your pho-
tos, your writings, or favorite po-
etry or words of comfort. Jeri
Deschamp at the front office
helped me cut and punch the old
pages to adapt them to the new
cover. Thank you, Jeri.
The Rapid City Journal of Octo-
ber 9, 2013, carried the obituary of
Kathryn (Katy Nelson) Drageset.
Katy was a near neighbor of ours
when she was a little girl. We
lived down on Bad River in the
“hidden” house. My sympathy to
family and friends.
Thursday, October 10, we had
bingo at Somerset Court. Thank
you Shawn and Susan for your
hospitality, Sandi for calling num-
bers, and Amber Norman who
made the rice krispie treats for
snack and chat.
We miss Anne Brink, Somerset
Court resident who has gone over
to Fountain Springs for more spe-
cific treatment. When she returns,
she will move to a first floor apart-
ment.
by Vivian Hansen
vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-
review.com
Mark your calendars to partici-
pate in the annual Medicare open
enrollment period and review your
Medicare Part D prescription drug
plan.
Don’t confuse Medicare open en-
rollment with the new Health In-
surance Marketplace that starts
in 2014. The marketplace is not
for people who have Medicare. In-
stead, Medicare has its own en-
rollment period.
Medicare open enrollment runs
October 15 through December 7,
2013. During this time, you can:
Join a Medicare prescription
drug plan;
Switch from one Medicare pre-
scription drug plan to another
Medicare prescription drug plan;
Change from a Medicare Advan-
tage plan back to original
Medicare;
Switch from one Medicare ad-
vantage plan to another Medicare
advantage plan;
Switch from a Medicare advan-
tage plan that does not offer drug
coverage to another Medicare ad-
vantage plan that offers drug cov-
erage;
Switch from a Medicare advan-
tage plan that offers drug cover-
age to another Medicare
advantage plan that doesn’t offer
drug coverage; or
Switch from original Medicare
(Part A and Part B) to a Medicare
advantage plan.
Any changes you make will be
in place on January 1, 2014. If you
miss the December 7 deadline,
you will have to wait until next
fall to switch plans.
Whether it is buying an airline
ticket or picking your cell phone
provider, it is smart to compare
your options so you can get the
best value for your needs. The
same goes for your health cover-
age. To help you make a good de-
cision to either change your
Medicare plan or stay with what
you have, compare the four Cs –
coverage, cost, convenience and
customer service.
Coverage: Start by comparing
Medicare plans using the plan
finder on the official Medicare
website, www.Medicare.gov/find-
a-plan, or call 800-633-4227). You
can also work with a counselor at
SHIInE – the Senior Health Infor-
mation and Insurance Education
program (www.shiine.net). Ask
the counselor questions about cov-
erage issues you care about, like
which drugs are covered, whether
you will have coverage if you get
sick while traveling out of state,
and how much coverage you will
have while you are in the Part D
“doughnut hole” (the period dur-
ing which you pay a higher share
of your drug costs).
Cost: Consider what you pay
today, and what the other plans
offer and charge. When you com-
pare costs, keep in mind that it’s
more than just your monthly pre-
miums. Look at the deductibles,
drug costs and out-of-pocket max-
imums.
Convenience: Look for a plan
that provides you with easy access
to your doctors and pharmacies.
Also consider if the plan has on-
line or mail-order prescription-fill-
ing options with the Medicare
plan finder at www.medicare.gov/
find-a-plan/ or call 800-633-4227.
Customer service: Find out how
your plan ranks in customer serv-
ice by comparing ratings. A plan
can rate between one-star (poor)
and five-stars (excellent).
Medicare’s plan finder tool will
show you the star-ratings when
you click on the plan name.
Today, there are improvements
to Medicare. For example, you no
longer have to pay for Medicare-
approved preventive care services.
In fact, in South Dakota, 88,200
beneficiaries saved money and
took advantage of the free preven-
tive services. Also, if you fall into
the Part D doughnut hole, there
are discounts that lower your out-
of-pocket costs. In 2012, almost
10,000 people in South Dakota
saved nearly $650 on their pre-
scription drugs.
These are just a few examples of
how Medicare has improved. For
more information on the health
care law and protections and ben-
efits to Medicare, visit www.
HealthLawAnswers.org.
Don’t forget to mark your calen-
dar for October 15-December 7 to
remind yourself to take advantage
of Medicare open enrollment.
Medicare open enrollment
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One
meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the
second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.); 6:30 p.m.
(Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
UNITED CHURCH
OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 6:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD:
Deuteronomy 6:4 (KJV)
In this day and age, there seems to be one of
everything, if not more. Go looking for a toaster,
and you’ll find several different brands, each
with an array of features. Go looking for God,
and you’ll find only one. There is only one God
in the Bible, and He is the creator of all things.
Ancient wisdom for modern life
Church
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 5
Holiday
Open House
Ncáacsáa¡,
(ctooce ,¯
!,oo - ;,oo ¡,m,
(-gccs j|ág, -
_aia _t,, ]»i|i¡
Prize D
raw
ings
Refreshm
ents
· Arbonne
· Clever Container
· Miche Bags
· Norwex
· Pampered Chef
· Princess House
· Rodan & Fields
· Scentsy
· Tupperware
· Usborne Books
· Cookie Lee
& Many More
To reserve a booth contact
Terry (441-1060) or Jenny (441-1503)
Bible Study
Interdenominational men’s
& women’s Bible Study at
Senechal Lobby, Philip, Wed.
Oct. 16, 7;30 p.m. John & Sue
Kaiser will lead the study.
For more information,
please call LeeAnn Knutson –
859-2118 or Barbara Wentz –
859-2433. No child care avail-
able.
Lary P. Osburn, age 76, Philip,
S.D., died Friday, October 11,
2013, at them Hans P. Peterson
Memorial Hospital in Philip.
Lary P. Osburn was born June
19, 1937, in Kadoka, S.D., the son
of Paul L. and Ethel (Jackson) Os-
burn.
Survivors include his brother,
James Osburn, and his wife, Pat,
of Rapid City; and two nephews,
John Osburn and his wife, Carol,
of Rapid City, and Douglas Os-
burn and his wife, Krista, of Rapid
City; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
Lary was preceded in death by
his parents, Paul and Ethel (Jack-
son) Osburn.
At Lary’s request, cremation
has taken place, and no services
are scheduled.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Lary Osburn____________________
Mavis Jeppesen, age 78, Wall, S.
D., died Thursday, October 10,
2013, at the Rapid City Regional
Hospital.
Mavis Darlene Curl was born
February 26, 1935, in Wessington
Springs, S.D., the daughter of
Charles and Ruby (Monroe) Curl.
She grew up in that area and
graduated from Wessington
Springs High School in 1953. She
then attended Wessington Springs
Junior College, Black Hills State
College in Spearfish, Huron Col-
lege and Aberdeen College.
Mavis married Otis M. Parmely
on December 18, 1954, in Miller,
S.D., and to this union were born
two daughters, Kathy Jean and
Skyla Darlene. They made their
home on a farm near Miller. Due
to her health, she later moved to
Phoenix, Ariz., where she worked
with remedial reading for dis-
turbed boys for a number of years,
before attending St. Joseph School
of Nursing in Phoenix, where she
graduated as a LPN.
Mavis then moved back to the
Miller area, due to the death of
her father. She taught seven years
of elementary school in the Miller
area. She later moved to the Stur-
gis area where Mavis worked as a
nurse for 26 years in Newcastle,
Wyo., Sturgis, Custer and Hot
Springs.
Mavis married Robert P. Harn,
Sr. on June 15, 1974, in Hot
Springs. They made their home in
Hot Springs. Mavis was a member
of the Assembly of God Church
where she taught Sunday School
for a number of years, along with
teaching youth groups and taking
care of the sick. She was also a
member of the Missionettes, and
was awarded the highly regarded,
Esther Award, for being the top of
her class. On June 23, 2003, her
husband preceded her in death.
Mavis later met Milton Ray
“Bud” Jeppesen on the Internet,
and on May 23, 2009, they were
united in marriage in Hot Springs.
They made their home in Wall,
where they attended the Metho-
dist Church in Wasta.
Mavis enjoyed sewing, home
decorating, and also made Christ-
mas for 12 different families dur-
ing her years. She loved to cook
and refinished several pieces of
furniture.
Survivors include her husband
Bud Jeppesen of Wall; two daugh-
ters, Kathy Jean Salu-Christo-
phers (David) of Bakersfield,
Calif., and Skyla Darlene Vorhes
(Dave) of Chambersburg, Penn.;
six stepchildren, Robert P. Harn,
Jr. (Oralea) of Colorado Springs,
Colo., William Harn of Detroit,
Mich., Patrick “Calvin” Harn of
Spearfish, Tim Harn (Connie) of
Douglas, Wyo., Ray Jeppesen
(Laura) of Rapid City, and Deana
Taylor (Brent) of Rapid City; four
grandchildren; 21 stepgrandchil-
dren; four great-grandchildren; 25
stepgreat-grandchildren; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Mavis was preceded in death by
her second husband, Robert P.
Harn, Sr.; her parents; a sister,
Leta Yost; a brother, Ronald Curl;
and daughter-in-law, Kate Harn.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, October 15, at the Wall
Community Center with Rev.
David Olson officiating.
Interment at the Black Hills
National Cemetery near Sturgis.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Mavis Jeppesen__________________
Katy Drageset, age 83, of
Philip, S.D., died Tuesday, October
8, 2013, at the Philip Nursing
Home.
Kathryn “Katy” Nelson was
born August 10, 1930, in Fair-
mont, N.D., the daughter of
Clarence and Laura (Bond) Nel-
son. At the age of nine, she moved
with her family to Philip, where
she received her education. She
graduated from Philip High
School in 1948.
In November 1948, she was
united in marriage to Jay Barnett
in Philip, and to this union were
born four children, Cathy,
Jeanette, Bruce and Laurie. They
made their home in Philip, and
she worked in various cafes in the
area including the Midway Café,
the Park Inn Café, and the Skelly
Station Café.
In 1958, she was united in mar-
riage to Kenny Carpenter in
Philip, and to this union were
born two children, Diana and
Sandy. They continued to reside in
Philip, where she managed the 73
Bar for Jim Millage. After Jim
passed away, she worked for Flo-
rence Dean at the Pool Hall for a
number of years.
Katy later met and married Or-
lando A. Drageset on October 21,
1975, in Pierre. They continued to
make their home in Philip. They
enjoyed retirement and spent a lot
of time traveling.
Katy was a member of the First
Lutheran Church in Philip.
Survivors include five daugh-
ters, Cathy Fiedler and her hus-
band, Ralph, of Sturgis, Jeanette
Potts of Beaverton, Ore., Laurie
Ziegler and her husband, Al, of
Palmona, Mo., Diana Stewart and
her husband, Richard, of Philip,
and Sandy Slovek and her hus-
band, Doug, of Broadus, Mont.;
one son, Bruce Barnett and his
wife, Sharon, of Wall; one stepson,
Darrell Drageset, of Thermopolis,
Wyo.; 10 grandchildren; 21 great-
grandchildren; two brothers,
LeRoy Nelson and his wife,
Sharon, of Ft. Meyers, Fla., and
Arlie Nelson and his wife, Teri, of
Newcastle, Wyo.; one sister, Eileen
Fitzgerald, of Philip; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Katy was preceded in death by
her husband, Kenny Carpenter, in
1982; her husband, Orlando A.
Drageset, on December 4, 2004;
her parents; one grandson,
Michael Slovek; and a brother-in-
law, Tom Fitzgerald.
Funeral services were held Sat-
urday, October 12, at the First
Lutheran Church in Philip, with
Pastor Frezil Westerlund officiat-
ing.
Music was provided by Jessica
Wheeler, pianist, and Kim Kan-
able, vocalist.
Ushers were Chip Walker and
David Walker.
Pallbearers were Katy’s grand-
children, Christal Noonan,
MeLisa Balfe, Tifanie Petro,
Lynette Klumb, Sherry Hanson,
Aimee Jones, Kellie Halverson,
Beau Stewart, Jeb Stewart and
Casey Slovek.
Honorary pallbearers were all
relatives and friends in atten-
dance.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial is established to the
Haakon County Prairie Trans-
portation in Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com.
Kathryn “Katy” Drageset___________
Obituaries
Calvin T. Bohle, age 79, died
Saturday, October 12, 2013, at his
farm near Selby, S.D..
Calvin Theodore Bohle, son of
Lydia (George) and Theodore
Bohle, was born at Selby on June
29, 1934. He was brought up at
the Bohle homestead three miles
north of Selby. He received his for-
mal education at the Selby Public
School, graduating with the Class
of 1952. Cal played center on
Selby’s six-man football team.
After graduation, Cal took a me-
chanic job at Perman Implement
in Selby.
Cal married Rose Marie Wahl
at Selby on October 10, 1954. They
settled on Cal’s farm. Rose died on
June 28, 1966. Cal and his four
children then moved into Selby al-
though Cal continued farming. He
married Kathy George at Selby on
January 27, 1968. To this union, a
son, Allen, was born on April 27,
1969. Cal and Kathy relocated to
the farm where Cal lived the rest
of his life.
In addition to farming, over the
years Cal was involved in numer-
ous vocations and endeavors. Sev-
eral of these he was engaged in
for, in his words, “100 years.” He
helped build the Selby Elevator,
he purchased the Mobil Truck
Stop Café in 1967. He was em-
ployed in the fertilizer department
for Selby Equity and managed the
Equity Service Station. He helped
local farmers with their spring
and fall work and drove for
Thorstenson Trucking. For 49
years, Cal was a Selby school bus
driver. He had a great love of
music as evidenced by his involve-
ment in the Fabulous 40s Quartet
(he was the last surviving mem-
ber), the Jaycees Quartet, and the
Selby Men’s Chorus. He was a
member of the Selby United
Methodist Church, the Jaycees,
Selby Lions Club, was past chair-
man of the Selby Cemetery Board,
announced at 4-H achievement
days for many years, and was the
longtime local chairman for the
Selby Snow Queen contest. He
was also the chairman for several
fundraisers to benefit the area
and community with the most re-
cent benefit being the electronic
event board. Cal’s community in-
volvement earned him numerous
awards. He was named an Out-
standing Young Farmer, he was
awarded two Melvin Jones Fellow
Awards through the Lions Club,
received appreciation awards from
the Lio’s Club, and was awarded
an Outstanding Young Men of
America distinction from the
Jaycees. He was an avid supporter
of all school activities and loved
the young people who rode on his
bus. He enjoyed welding, refur-
bishing tractors and pickups, and
puttering in his shop. He was es-
pecially proud of the tire turning
machine that he developed. With
the untimely death of Rose, Cal
knew hard times. Consequently,
he was one of the first people to
offer help when needed.
Calvin is survived by Kathy, his
wife of 45 years; five children,
Cynthia (Tom) Finn of Philip,
Chloe (Bernard) Stulken of Selby,
Don (Kathy) Bohle of Selby, John
Bohle of Middleburg, Penn., and
Allen (Brandie) Bohle of Selby; 10
grandchildren, Stephanie (Elias)
Rostad, Heather (Kevin) Nelson,
Mitchell (Lyndsey) Stulken,
Sawyer (Luke) Dowling, Brandon,
and Travor Bohle, Peron Knoepfle,
Ethan, Elijah, and Emmit Bohle;
Three great-grandchildren, Lanie
and Liam Stulken and Emry
Dowling; two sisters, Lea Tomb of
Stockton, Calif., and Addie Baer-
wald of Sioux Falls; and a special
foreign exchange student, Ulrike
Badziong.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Rose; his father on Au-
gust 11, 1983; his mother on
March 28, 1995; one brother, Al-
bert, on October 3, 1951; and two
sisters, Frieda on October 6, 1926
and Elsie Zirbel on January 29,
2013.
Visitation will be at the church be-
ginning 6:00 p.m. Thursday, Octo-
ber 17, 2013 with a 7:30 p.m.
prayer service.
Funeral services will be 10:00
a.m., Friday, October 18, 2013, at
the Selby United Methodist
Church with Pastor Elizabeth
Jassmann officiating. Interment
will follow at Selby Memorial Gar-
dens.
Music will be provided by Bev
Sawinsky, organist and Bill
Thorstenson, Barb Bowen and
Bernard Stulken, vocalists.
Chloe Stulkenis will be the
scripture reader. Allen Bohle will
read a poem.
Ushers are Rory Thorstenson
and Tom Fiedler.
Casketbearers will be Cal’s
grandchildren.
Honorary casketbearers will be
the Selby Lions Club.
A memorial has been estab-
lished for new goal posts for the
Selby football field. An account
has been set up at BankWest in
Selby.
Please visit www.MillerLien
FH.com to leave an online condo-
lence or to view the video tribute.
Lien Funeral Home, Bowdle, is
in charge of arrangements.
Calvin T. Bohle__________________
Sonia Nemec • 843-2564 No Midland News this week
home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
MovINg?
Notify us before your move: 859-2516 or
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
Midland News
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 6
The children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren
(96 & counting)
would love to
have you help
celebrate
Fuzz &
Bonnie
Martin’s
60th
Anniversary with a card shower.
Cards may be sent to:
P.O. Box 212, Midland, SD 57552
Annual Lutesk
& Roast Beef Supper
with Bazaar to Follow!
Wednesday, October 16th
Trinity Lutheran Church, Midland
Serving starts at 5 p.m. (MST)
Adults: $10
Children 10 & Under: $3
Annual Lutefsk
& Roast Beef Supper
with Bazaar to Follow!
Wednesday, October 16th
Trinity Lutheran Church, Midland
Serving starts at 5 p.m. (MST)
Adults: $10
Children 10 & Under: $3
Vaa t-e |a»|teá ta t heet t 6-eet
0|t¿e- 8t|y 8\awe- |a-
8yáaey 0-et
|a-a 8e¿tem|e- I?t\ º áta¿\te- a| 8|¿ t 0t-|st ht-t|a
0:ta|e- tât\ º t·I ¿.m.
F\|||¿ ûm|a|ta:e 8a||á|a¿
i.s|-1 |, Aar|s }+mi-, C|+ri|, c lris|ir
/c;;¸ 3·:z/¬c¸ .c//c,æ ´´æ¬` .·//e.q/z¸´
:欬 ,c:¬. ze :<:_: 1e¬æ 7:ææ ´¬
*·¬/c¬¬, :/ ¸g¸¸:
/æ/; c .;æ,·c/ q.¸ ,æ/æz:czæ
¿¸ ¸æc:. ¸e.¬q e¬ O,zezæ: ;_z/
.·z/ c ,c:¬ ./e.æ:´
"Kindness is the language the
blind can see and the deaf can
hear." – Mark Twain
That saying holds so true as
neighbors helped neighbors dig
out, search for cattle, and remove
the dead from the places they
were found. Many animals per-
ished in dams, creeks and rivers,
so for sure they needed to be re-
moved. The next task will be the
disposition of the carcasses.
Monday, October 7, in Sturgis,
the sun was shining and it was a
very nice morning. Ralph Fiedler
took Cathy to work because they
could only get out with the jeep
and traffic was one way through
town. Sturgis received an official
total of 36” of snow.
Don and Vi Moody cared for
their livestock at the ranch the
early part of the week and
checked in with neighbors and
those who have cattle on pasture
with them, some faired quite well
and others had losses. Appoint-
ments in Rapid had to be resched-
uled.
Sandee Gittings was in Rapid
City Monday. Jessica Gittings and
Wade McGruder brought supper
out to George and Sandee that
evening. Sandee says it is so won-
derful to get pampered after she
gets home from having treat-
ments. There is going to be a
fundraiser at the ballgame Octo-
ber 18 with matching funds as
well as an auction at the North
Bar Saturday the 19th. Your sup-
port and well wishes will be ap-
preciated.
Tony Harty delivered the mail
he had been stockpiling and en-
joyed visiting with L.D. and
Shirley Hair when they arrived
back in Kadoka Monday to get
some supplies. They returned to
Oelrichs later.
Bill and I enjoyed the sunny
weather Monday and Tuesday. I
drove folks to Philip for appoint-
ments with the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation van Tues-
day and visited with Elke Baxter,
Dianne Parsons and Roberta
Vaughan while in Philip. I visited
Emma Jarl at the Kadoka Nurs-
ing Home later.
Tuesday, October 8, Diana Stew-
art called early to let Cathy
Fiedler know that their mom,
Katy Drageset, had passed away.
Cathy spent the morning calling
family and then Ralph and Cathy
packed a bag and headed to
Philip. Cathy wrote, “Very sad
drive to Philip with the thoughts
of my Mom on my mind and all
the dead cattle along the inter-
state.” They met Richard and
Diana Stewart downtown so
Diana could do some errands and
started getting arrangements
made. They had supper downtown
and then went to the Stewart
home.
George Gittings kept a doctor's
appointment in Rapid City Tues-
day.
Wednesday, October 9, Ralph
and Cathy Fiedler went to the cafe
at the livestock auction for break-
fast, Diana Stewart had to get it
opened for the day. Then, Diana,
Ralph and Cathy went to the fu-
neral home where their brother,
Bruce Barnett, Wall, met them.
Later, Doug and Sandy Slovek ar-
rived from Brodus, Mont. They
went to the nursing home and
cleaned out Katy’s room, then
went to the Stewart home for the
evening. Jeb and Cassie Stewart
arrived from Brandon. Bruce had
to head for home so he could look
for more of his cattle lost in the
storm. Ralph and Cathy headed
for Sturgis that evening.
George and Sandee Gittings at-
tended the West River/Lyman-
Jones Rural Water meeting in
Wall Wednesday afternoon.
Wednesday morning, I picked
up Lila Whidby and we went bowl-
ing in Philip. As soon as I got
home, Bill and I headed to the
Plainview area to see how things
were up there, especially to check
on the motor home that was ma-
rooned about four miles out in a
disced millet field. On Highway
34, after crossing the Cheyenne
River, we started to see the after-
math of the storm of October 5,
which has been dubbed the Bliz-
zard Atlas. Cattle were laying life-
less along fence lines and road
ditches. It was a blessed relief to
see cattle grazing in the distance,
alive and healthy and restoring
themselves after surviving the
storm. Our adventure to find a
way to the motor home led us
through pastures where cattle
were grazing contented and won-
dering if we were there to feed
them to within sight of the motor
home tethered to a lifeless REA
pole in the middle of the field. Bill
didn’t feel like he could walk too
far, but it ended up walking far-
ther than expected, when we got
stuck. Then we had to get a trac-
tor to pull ourselves out. Things
were shipshape in our home on
wheels, the make shift window
had blown out, but was recovered
and reinstalled and things were
good. It may be next summer be-
fore we can get our home away
from home back to Kadoka!
Don and Vi Moody had a lot of
doctors appointments that had to
be rescheduled because of the
early October storm, so they ar-
rived at their home in Rapid Val-
ley Wednesday afternoon – where
there was still no electricity and
no phone service. The trees and
both yards (including their ten-
ants) looked like a ravaging tor-
nado had hit Rapid Valley. They
couldn’t even park in their drive-
way until a branch was pulled off
and then Don manually opened
the south garage door. Thanks to
Richard and Susan Fellows, they
did get a neighbor hired to plow
the snow off the paved entrance to
the houses. It was a dark night
and finally after piling on six blan-
kets, Don and Vi got a little sleep.
Vi said she thought about using a
paper towel tube as a way to
breathe while under so many cov-
ers! She asked Don if they made
propane electric blankets. Thurs-
day they had to be at an appoint-
ment by 7:30 a.m. Their electric
pole broke the new backyard
fence, but the houses and camper
were spared. Don and Vi decided
to lower down their HILO camper
and postpone their Indian Sum-
mer vacation until a later date!
Thursday, October 10, Sonja
Nonnast, Whitewood, brought
breakfast over for Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler at their home in
Sturgis. Comfort food is a wonder-
ful way to reach out in times of
need. Later in the afternoon,
Sherry Hanson and Cathy went to
Rapid to get Cathy’s sister,
Jeanette Potts, Beaverton, Org.
Ralph went to work. The snow in
Sturgis was mostly gone by the
end of the week, except for the
snow that is in piles around town.
There are still lots of trees to clean
up, but the town is slowly getting
back to normal and power has
been restored to most everyone.
Tony Harty went to Martin
Thursday and attended the
Knights of Columbus monthly
meeting.
Jessica Gittings and Wade Mc-
Gruder made supper at the
George Gittings home Thursday
evening.
Early Friday morning, I made a
trip to Rapid City with the HCPT
van. The wind was blowing gale
force, flipping a semi tractor
trailer off the highway on an over-
pass in Rapid. In the afternoon,
Heather and Shaina Solon
stopped by with a bit of a project
for me to do.
Friday, October 11, the Fiedlers
awoke to rain and wind in Sturgs.
It was raining so hard they could
not see across the street at times,
so Ralph and Cathy and Jeanette
Potts packed up and got on the
road to Philip because it was
starting to change to snow. It was
rough going with the wind blow-
ing so hard, but they arrived safe
and sound at the Stewart home.
Later in the afternoon, the family
attended the viewing of their
mother, Katy, then they all re-
turned to the Stewart home for
supper. Later in the evening, Beau
and Jamie Stewart, Bersford, ar-
rived. The family spent the
evening sharing memories, look-
ing at pictures and telling stories,
with friends stopping by. Ralph,
Jeanette and Cathy went to the
motel for the night.
Friday evening, Tony Harty at-
tended the football game here in
Kadoka. It was a blustery day and
some trees that managed to sur-
vive the heavy snow were weak-
ened and broke under the steady
pressure of the relentless wind
with gusts up to 60 and 70 mph.
George Gittings attended the
supper at Milesville Friday
evening for St. Mary’s Catholic
Church. They had quite a repair
and renovation project and it was
to celebrate the completion of that,
too.
Tony Harty came by our place
for a visit Saturday and caught up
on reading the papers. The new
fast food place being put in here in
Kadoka is moving along, but no
opening date is set yet.
Saturday, family members of
Katy Drageset gathered at the
Stewart home for brunch. The
Don Klumb and Eric Hanson fam-
ilies from Spearfish arrived and
Mark, Kellie and Kadence Halver-
son, Kennbec, arrived. After the
service, the family went to the
Stewart home to take family pic-
tures and spend some time to-
gether before returning to their
respective homes.
Our sympathy is extended to
Ralph and Cathy Fiedler and fam-
ilies in their loss. What a comfort-
ing thought – to imagine our
grandchildren facing some tough
decision someday or feeling lonely
in some far-off place and suddenly
remembering a grandmother’s
love – and being comforted by it.
Katy Drageset enjoyed her chil-
dren, grandchildren and great-
grandchildren and they will carry
with them that blessing. I was
among the many who attended
the services for Katy Saturday.
George Gittings attended serv-
ices for Katy Drageset Saturday
afternoon. Randy and Brenda Mc-
Gruder of Lead, Wade McGruder
and Jessica Gittings were at the
George Gittings home Saturday
afternoon for a tour of the bed and
breakfast. George and Sandee
joined them for supper in town
Saturday evening for Jessica's
birthday.
Sunday, October 13, the sun
was shining and it was 45˚ in
Sturgis, Cathy Fiedler reported.
Sunday, Tony Harty attended
church. He gave Phyllis Word a
ride when he spotted her on the
way home afoot.
A liquid feed truck pulled in at
the Gittings’ home Sunday morn-
ing, as the roads were too bad for
him to get to the Steve Clements'
and Casey Slovek's places. Casey,
Steve, and Tommy met him and
got their tanks filled to take home.
Jessica Gittings and Wade Mc-
Gruder visited George and Sandee
Gittings Sunday afternoon and
had supper. George went to Rudy
Roth's about some of the cattle
that Rudy found dead. Some of
them belonged to Gittings'.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of Lary Osburn who passed
away this week.
Saturday and Sunday in the
Rapid Valley area turned out to be
beautiful days and everyone was
busy in their yards, Vi Moody re-
ported. It does look better and
everyone knows it can’t get done
in one day! So we’re all grateful
that no damage was done to
houses and humans.
Sunday morning, I gave Phyllis
Word a lift to church when I went.
The Sunday Rapid City Journal
covered a lot of stories about the
blizzard and Bobette Schofield
had a poem she wrote in the ensu-
ing days following the storm, that
was published along with items
others folks wrote. Vonnie O’Dea
wrote that if her mom, Vivian
Buchert, were still around she
would have put together verse en-
titled “Trail of Tears” and I can al-
most imagine it now. Maybe
Vonnie will take pen in hand and
fill in the rest.
Priceless gifts to give for free.
The gift of affection: Be generous
with appropriate hugs, kisses, pats
on the back, and handholds. Let
these small actions demonstrate
the love you have for family and
fiends. - Barbara Johnson
"Imagination is everything. It is
the preview of life's coming attrac-
tions." - Albert Einstein
Betwixt Places| Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048
bilmar@gwtc.net
Sports
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 7
Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................16-8
Rockers........................................15-9
Badland’s Auto............................15-9
Shad’s Towing .............................15-9
Dakota Bar................................11-13
Highlights:
Jerry Mooney ........................217/561
Jackie Shull..................................170
Lee Sundall ..................................471
Marsha Sumpter .............5-8-10 split
Trina Brown..........................2-7 split
Tena Slovek ..........................2-7 split
Venessa Buxcel ...................3-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor..................................3-1
People’s Mkt..................................3-1
PHS ...............................................3-1
Kennedy Imp.................................3-1
George’s Welding ..........................1-3
KTS................................................1-3
Team 1...........................................1-3
G&A Trenching.............................1-3
Hightlights:
Wendell Buxcel ....3-10 split; 212/565
Tony Gould ...................................546
Alex Moos .....................................539
Cory Boyd.....................................508
Dan Addison .......................3-10 split
Colt Terkildsen...................8-10 split
Ronnie Williams ...................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm Ins............................17-7
Bowling Belles ............................15-9
Cutting Edge Salon ..................14-10
Jolly Ranchers...........................13-11
Little Orphans ..........................12-12
Highlights:
Marsha Sumpter...................167/423
Donna King .......................2-5-7 split
Jen Schriever......................3-10 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar..................................17-7
Hildebrand Concrete ..................15-9
Chiefie’s Chicks.........................12-12
Morrison’s Haying.....................11-13
First National Bank ...................9-15
Pink Ribbons...............................8-16
Highlights:
Marlis Petersen.....................175/516
Shar Moses............................173/483
Cheryl Behrend....................5-7 split
MaryLynn Crary ..................2-7 split
Thursday Men
A&M Laundry...............................7-1
McDonnell Farms .........................6-2
The Steakhouse ............................6-2
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................5-3
WEE BADD...................................3-5
O’Connell Const ............................2-6
Dakota Bar....................................2-6
West River Pioneer Tanks............1-7
Highlights:
Jan Bielmaier........................225/600
Don Carley ...................................206
Andrew Reckling...................208/525
Jay McDonnell .............................204
Alvin Pearson ......4-7-10 & 5-6 splits
Chad Walker....................7-8-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew .................................7-1
Dee’s Crew.....................................5-3
Randy’s Spray Service............3.5-4.5
Moos on the Loose...................3.5-4.5
Inforcer’s .......................................1-7
Highlights:
Toad Moos ..............5-8 split; 234/552
Earl Park...............................196/570
Annette Hand.....................3-10 split
Brian Pearson.....................3-10 split
859-2430
Hwy. 14 · PhiIip
Monday-Saturday
Open at 11 a.m.
- CIosed Sundays -
We have orders to go!
The Philip Scotties football
team traveled to Murdo, Friday,
October 11, to challenge the Jones
County Coyotes.
In a cold wind, but otherwise
dry evening, the Scotties got on
the scoreboard first. From the 10-
yard line, Paul Guptill was given
the ball and he rushed the rest of
the way in for the field goal. The
extra points attempt failed. The
Scotties held the Coyotes scoreless
for the first quarter.
The second quarter saw an ex-
plosive rush by Guptill that cov-
ered 43 yards to the end zone.
Austin Pinney followed by catch-
ing a Gavin Brucklacher pass for
the conversion. Philip reacquired
possession of the ball and drove it
down to the three-yard line. Ryan
Van Tassel completed the drive
with a carry over the goal line.
The attempt for extra points
failed. Philip ended the first half
still keeping their opponents
scoreless.
In the third quarter, Guptill
caught a pass from Brucklacher
and went 36 yards to add another
six points to the Philip side of the
scoreboard. The extra point play
was again unsuccessful. Later,
when Philip was again in posses-
sion of the ball, it was Van Tassel’s
turn to snag one from Bruck-
lacher, this time going 19 yards to
score. The extra points attempt
failed. Philip was now up to 32
points, and had kept the Coyote’s
side of the scoreboard dark.
The fourth quarter saw no more
scoring by the Philip Scotties. It
did see a 20-yard rush by Jones
County’s Wyatt Weber to put six
points on the score board for the
Coyotes. Their extra points at-
tempt failed.
1 2 3 4
Philip 6 20 32 32
Jones County 0 0 0 6
Rushing: Yards/Carries
Philip – 293/51 Leaders: Paul Guptill –
131/18, Ryan Van Tassel – 72/16, Brody
Jones – 28/4, Austin Pinney – 27/6
Jones County – 146/32
Passing: Compl./Att./Yds
Philip – 5/7/149 Leader: Gavin Bruck-
lacher – 5/7/149
Jones County – 11/33
Scotties mangle Coyotes
The Scotties traveled to Murdo where they walked away with a 32-6 win last Friday night. Scotties from left are
Rance Johnson, #23, Jacob Kammerer, #26 who just received the ball from quarterback, #11 Brody Jones. Blocking
are Austin Pinney, #21, Riley Heltzel, #27 and Chase Wright, #40.
Junior high sweeps
2013 football season
Winning the Philip Jamboree on Saturday, October 12, the Philip Scotties
junior high football team has completed its 2013 season undefeated.
Shown, back row from left: coach Travis DeJong, John Daly, Brandon
McLaughlin, Wade Kroetch, Pedro Dennis, Carson Hamill, Brice Hanson,
Lane Williams and assistant coach Scott Pinney. Middle row: student man-
ager Madyson Morehart, Keagan Fitch, Hunter Peterson, Lane Kroetch,
Kaylor Pinney, Dawson Reedy, Dylan Schofield, Trew DeJong, Tristen
Schofield and tempory helper Payton Schoenhals. Front: Victor Dennis, Rig-
gin Anders, Jet Jones, Colby Fitch, Alec Schofield, Juan Pinela and Caylo
McLaughlin. Not pictured: Mayson Mansfield.
Courtesy photo
The FFA motto includes “Living
to Serve,” making service a core
value taught to South Dakota's al-
most 6,000 high school agriculture
education students through their
FFA participation.
With state educational budgets
becoming tighter all the time, FFA
chapters are forced to choose in
which activities they can still par-
ticipate. As a result, the S.D. FFA
Foundation started a program
providing up to $500 per chapter
for community service projects.
Among the chapter projects re-
ceiving S.D. FFA Foundation
funds this fall to go toward their
service projects is the Philip FFA
chapter for a picnic table and
raised flower bed at the Senechal
Apartments.
FFA projects
Tackles: Solo/Assists/Sacks
Philip – 14/39/0 Leaders: Jade Berry –
1/13, Guptill – 4/7, Ben Stangle – 5/6, Jacob
Kammerer – 3/7, Brayden Fitch – 1/6
First Downs
Philip – 25 Jones County – 16
Punts
Philip – 1 Jones County – 3
Penalties
Philip – 85 yards; 5 5-yard, 3 10-yard, 2
15-yard
Jones County – 25; 2 5-yard, 1 15-yard
The next game for the Philip
Scotties will be at home, hosting
the Wall Eagles, Friday, October
18, starting at 7:00 p.m.
Nancy Haigh
Quarterback Brody Jones, center of photo, opts to keep the ball for a gain of several yards. The Scotties ran the
play back to back gaining yards on both attempts. Others in the photo are at left, #13 - Nick Donnelly, #21 -
Austin Pinney, and behind him is #27 - Riley Heltzel.
Youth football
still undefeated
The Wall Eagles Youth Football played in Custer against the Ravens, Satur-
day, October 12. All three age-based teams had dominate performances,
winning all three games. The Wall Eagles Mighty Mites won 33-0, the Jun-
ior PeeWees won 30-0, and the PeeWees won 38-0. Next Saturday’s
games will be held in Sturgis, with the Junior PeeWees playing the Bears
out of Rapid City, and the PeeWees playing the Sturgis Buccaneers Gold.
The Mighty Mites will have a bye this week, thus ending their 2-13 regular
season with a perfect 5-0 record. Shown is Bosten Morehart and Kole
Gallino teaming up to make the tackle in the PeeWee game against the
Ravens.
Courtesy photo
Philip JH sweeps Martin quad
The Philip Jun-
ior High girls’
Volleyball
team headed
to Martin, Sat-
urday, Octo-
ber 12, to
play in Mar-
tin's quadran-
gluar. Philip
took both their
A and B
teams, and
both teams
won all their
matches. The
A team was
coached by
Sayde Slovek
and the B
team was
coached by
Lacey Clements. A
team results: Philip versus Gordon,
Neb. – 25-9, 25-14; Philip versus
Bennett County – 18-25, 25-11,
15-8; Philip versus Todd County –
25-19, 25-11. B team results: Philip
versus Gordon, Neb. – 25-8, 25-
18; Philip versus Bennett County –
26-24, 25-17; Philip versus Todd
County – 25-15, 25-14.
Deb Smith
Sports
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 8
Lady Scotties bound over Wall
Jordyn Dekker with Madison Hand
At right, Tia Guptill with Madison Hand, Kaci Olivier
and Ellie Coyle.
by coach Ralph Kroetch
The Philip Invitational Cross
Country Meet, Saturday, October
12, started with a youth run. This
was their first race for most of the
Philip first through six grade run-
ners. They train two evenings per
week in October, and race in this
and the regional meets on the
Lake Waggoner Golf Course.
This time of year warming up
has double meaning – warming
muscles and keeping skin warm –
as temperatures at race time were
in the low 40s with 15 mile per
hour breezes.
There were 23 contestants in
the 1,200 meter youth race,
Philip’s lone boy, first grader Luke
Ferguson, finished with a time of
8:00 for 21st place. Four young
ladies earned Philip the team
title, compiling 12 points. Kadoka
earned 18 points. Dilyn Terkildsen
and Copper Lurz led the Scotties
in tandem, placing ninth and 10th
at 6:22 and 6:27. Jaida Haynes
and Grace Pekron also finished
back to back in 17th and 18th
places at 7:29 and 8:00.
The boys’ varsity talent runs
deep. Juniors Tristen Rush and
Nelson Holman were on the injury
list, yet were on the sidelines
cheering on their teammates.
Sophomore Garrett Snook took
the helm for the Scotties, running
in a group of 10, all looking for
fourth place. Seventh grader
Khalen Martin led a group of 16
that included eighth grader Con-
ner Dekker, sophomore Keegan
Burnett and freshman Damian
Bartels.
As this race drew to a close,
Snook traded places with Wall’s
David Bentliff several times,
with Snook pulling away in the
final meters to place fourth. His
time of 19:10 was an 84 second
course improvement. Martin,
running easily his best 5,000
meter race, earned his first var-
sity medal, placing 17th with a
time of 20:54. improving over a
minute on his 5,000 meter time.
Dekker, also turned in his best
ever 5,000 meter time, bested
Wall’s David Sykora to place
23rd and cut 1:10 from his best
time set here at the conference
meet two weeks ago.
Burnett and Bartels finished
next behind Sykora, placing 25th
and 26th with times of 22:55 and
23:20 respectively. Great runs for
a very young team.
Team points: Red Cloud – 11,
New Underwood – 28, Wall – 29,
White River – 40, Lyman – 42,
Philip – 42, Rapid City Christian –
49.
Sophomore Ellie Coyle led the
girls’ varsity race wire to wire,
with only Kadoka’s Scout Sudbeck
giving chase early on. Coyle used
the first of many hills on the
Philip course to separate herself
from Sudbeck. She went on to a 34
second victory over the field and
set a new personal course best of
15:35, earning her a sixth individ-
ual title for 2013.
Seventh grader Jasmine Fergu-
son spent much of her race ex-
changing spots with Timber
Lakes’s Mary Aberle. This individ-
ual battle helped Ferguson as she
went on to better her course best
set two weeks ago by 30 seconds.
She earned the 12th place medal
with a time of 18:00. Senior Alli-
son Pekron was able to best her
long-time rival in Jones County’s
Skyler Green to earn the 17th
place medal. Pekron has raced
this course at least a dozen times
in the last six years and today she
improved her previous course best
by 33 seconds with a time of 19:00.
Team points: Timber Lake – 16,
Philip – 17, Red Cloud – 21,
Dupree – 24.
The Scotties hosted the regional
cross country meet, Wednesday,
October 16. The top two boys’ and
top two girls’ teams earned berths
at the state tournament. Also, the
top 20 finishes for the boys and
top 20 finishers for the girls indi-
vidually qualified for state.
The State 2013 “B” Cross
County Meet will be at Rapid City,
Saturday, October 26.
Scotties show team depth
The Philip cross country team at the Philip Invitational, October 12.
Del Bartels
The Philip Lady Scotties volleyball team hosted the
Wall Lady Eagles, Thursday, October 10. Philip did
not allow any games to go to the opponents.
The Philip varsity squad won their first three
games, thus not needing to play any more to deter-
mine the best three out of five.
25-15, 25-10, 25-21
Serving: 70/74 (4 aces) Leaders: Madison Hand – 15/15 (2 aces),
Kaci Olivier – 13/13 (1 ace), Ellie Coyle – 13/13, Peyton DeJong – 16/17
Receiving: 33/41 Leaders: Coyle – 16/18, Olivier – 7/8, Guptill – 6/8
Setting: 70/72 (25 assists) Leaders: Hand – 52/52 (20 assists), Tia
Guptill – 11 of 11, (3 assists)
Hitting: 83/95 (33 kills) Leaders: Jordyn Dekker – 18/20 (9 kills),
Peyton Kuchenbecker – 16/18 (9 kills), Guptill – 17/19 (8 kills)
Blocking: 8 kills Leaders: Dekker – 1 solo and 4 assists, Olivier –
4 assists, Kuchenbecker – 3 assists
Digging: 62/80 Leaders: Guptill – 16/21, Coyle – 12/17, Olivier –
10/11
The junior varsity team needed only two games to
prove the best out of three.
25-11, 25-21
Serving: 46/49 (18 aces) Leaders: Elise Wheeler – 15/15 (5 aces),
Peyton DeJong – 11/12 (6 aces), Courtney Bartlett – 5/6 (3 aces)
Receiving: 14/26
Setting: 34/34 (10 assists) Leaders: Ashton Reedy – 18/18 (7 as-
sists), Wheeler – 13/13 (2 assists)
Hitting: 24/35 (12 kills) Leaders: DeJong – 6/7 (5 kills), Kuchen-
becker – 7/10 (4 kills), Bartlett – 4/4 (1 kill)
Blocking: 1 kill Leader: Kuchenbecker – 1 solo
Digging: 10/13 Leaders: Bartlett – 5/7, Brett Carley – 5/5.
Haakon County Community Health Services personnel, Heidi Burns – nurse,
and Kristin Martin – clerical, held a flu and Tdap clinic in Philip High
School’s commons area, Thursday, October 10. A total of 62 flu shots and
two Tdap vaccinations were given. Shown is Burns administrating a flu shot
for Morgan Cantrell.
Del Bartels
Three influenza cases have been
detected in South Dakota and the
South Dakota Department of
Health is reminding residents
that now is the time to be vacci-
nated.
A case of influenza B was re-
ported in a Minnehaha County
resident in the 70-79 age group.
Influenza A was reported in a
Davison County child under the
age of 10 and a Minnehaha
County adult in the 30-39 age
group. None were hospitalized.
“Yearly vaccination is the single
best way to prevent influenza,”
said Dr. Lon Kightlinger, state epi-
demiologist for the department.
“The vaccine is readily available
and now is a good time to be vac-
cinated.”
Annual flu vaccination is recom-
mended for everyone, but people
over 50 should be sure to receive
the vaccination, as they are one of
the groups at highest risk for com-
plications. Also at higher risk are
pregnant women and people with
chronic medical conditions.
Healthcare workers and house-
hold contacts of high risk popula-
tions, especially those with young
infants in the household, should
also be vaccinated.
As another high risk group ac-
counting for significant cases and
hospitalizations each year, chil-
dren help drive the spread of flu in
the community. The department
offers free flu vaccine for kids ages
six months to 18 years. Contact
your health care provider or your
community health office for more
information or to schedule an ap-
pointment.
In addition to vaccination, to
prevent the spread of the flu.
Wash your hands often with soap
and water or use alcohol-based
hand gel. Cover your mouth when
you cough or sneeze. Don’t touch
your eyes, nose or mouth. Stay
home if you're sick.
Learn more about preventing
the flu at http://flu.sd.gov.
First flu cases reported in S.D.
The Philip Lady Scotties team
hosted a volleyball triangular, Sat-
urday, October 12.
Philip first tested its skills and
training against the New Under-
wood Lady Tigers. The first game
went into extended play, but fi-
nally tipped toward the Scotties.
The next two games were anti-cli-
mactic in the ease that Philip took
the wins.
27-25, 25-8, 25-10
Serving: 75/76 (9 aces) Leaders: Jordyn
Dekker – 17/17 (3 aces), Ellie Coyle – 19/19
(2 aces), Madison Hand – 10/10 (1 ace), Tia
Guptill – 11/12 (3 aces)
Receiving: 28/41 Leaders: Kaci
Olivier –11/13, Shay Hand – 5/7, Coyle – 5/11
Setting: 77/79 (35 assists) Leaders: Gup-
till – 29/29 (19 assists), M. Hand – 38/40 (14
assists)
Hitting: 81/91 (38 kills) Leaders:
Dekker – 34/35 (19 kills), Guptill – 14/16 (6
kills), Olivier – 7/7 (4 kills)
Blocking: 3 kills Leaders: Peyton
Kuchenbecker – 1 solo, Guptill – 1 solo,
Olivier – 1 solo
Digging: 59/76 Leaders: Coyle – 21/24, S.
Hand – 8/9, M. Hand – 6/9, Olivier – 6/9
The next match began differ-
ently. The Scotties woke up to
stronger opposition from the
Rapid City Christian Lady
Comets than Philip was ready for.
The first game was taken by the
Comets. Philip played the next
three games seemingly with a
vengence.
18-25, 25-10, 25-15, 25-15
Serving: 85/87 (13 aces) leaders: Dekker –
22/24 (8 aces), Guptill – 13/13 (2 aces), Peyton
Lady Scotties double-win triangular
DeJong – 11/11 (1 ace), Olivier – 17/17
Receiving: 51/55 Leaders: Olivier –
17/18, Coyle – 16/17, Guptill – 6/6
Setting: 96/100 (28 assists) Leaders: M.
Hand – 58/62 (18 assists), Guptill – 18/18 (4
assists)
Hitting: 95/106 (27 kills) Leaders: Gup-
till – 17/19 (7 kills), Dekker – 22/26 (7 kills),
Olivier – 14/14 (5 kills)
Blocking: 8 kills Leaders: Dekker – 2
solos and 2 assists, Kuchenbecker – 1 solo
and 2 assists, Guptill – 1 solo and 2 assists
Digging: 80/113 Leaders: Olivier – 18/23,
Coyle – 17/24, Guptill – 15/18
Philip’s season record is cur-
rently 15 wins and seven losses.
Philip’s next challenge will be an-
other home match. The Lady Scot-
ties will host the Lyman Raiders,
Thursday, October 17, starting at
5:30 p.m. Philip’s next match will
be Saturday, October 19, in the
Douglas Volleyball Tournament,
starting at 9:00 a.m.
Community
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 9
Highway
Maintenance Worker
The SD Department of Transportation
is accepting applications for a Highway
Maintenance Worker in Philip, SD. Duties
include performing routine maintenance
activities such as roadway patching,
flagging and directing traffic, hauling
materials, mowing, weed spraying,
roadside cleanup, sign and guardrail
repair and installation, and snow plowing
and sanding. Will operate a variety of
large equipment. Duties involve heavy
lifting and working outdoors in all kinds
of weather. Must live within a 15-20
minute commute of Philip. Requires a
valid driver’s license and a Commercial
Driver’s License. Employee will be
subject to drug and alcohol testing
and a driving record check. Closing
Date: 10/30/13. Job ID: 2138. Salary:
$13.04 plus excellent benefits. For more
information and to apply, please go to
http://bhr.sd.gov/workforus or contact
any South Dakota Department of Labor
and Regulation Local Office. SD Bureau
of Human Resources, 500 East Capitol,
Pierre, South Dakota 57501-5070. AN
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
/àe /am//, a/ Mar, 0e/a aaa/d //ke /a /àaak erer,aae
/ar /àe /are aad aaaaar/ aàaaa dar/aq Mam`a
aaaa/aq. 0e aaarec/a/e a// a/ ,aar k/ad qea/area aad
àare /reaaared read/aq aad àear/aq a/ar/ea aàaa/
Mam aad 0ad /àa/ maa, a/ ,aa àare aàared. /àere
àare àeea aa maa, aàa àare aàaaa k/ad ac/a /a Mam
/àraaqàaa/ /àe ,eara. Mam a/aa,a /a/ked a/ àaa aa·
arec/a//re aad /àaak/a/ aàe aaa /a //re /a aacà a k/ad
aad aaaaar//re cammaa//,. 4 aaec/a/ /àaak ,aa qaea
aa/ /a /àe a/a// a/ naaa P. Pe/eraaa Memar/a/
naaa//a/ aad 4ara/aq name /ar /ak/aq aacà exce//ea/
care a/ Mam /àeae /aa/ caaa/e a/ ,eara. 0e a/aa
ex/ead a aaec/a/ /àaak ,aa /a /a/àer Kar/, /a/àer
Ker/a aad /àe 5acred near/ 0a/àa//c 0àarcà /ar a//
,aa àare daae /ar Mam. 4 memar/a/ a/// àe
ea/aà//aàed /a Mam`a aame /a naaa P. Pe/eraaa
Memar/a/ naaa//a/ aad 4ara/aq name, 5acred near/
0a/àa//c 0àarcà, aad /àe Pà///a 8aa 5err/ce.
Mam àad aacà a a/raaq /a//à /a /àe lard aad
ae //ad cam/ar/ kaaa/aq aàe //red a à/eaaed
///e àere aa ear/à aad /a aaa a//à Jeaaa, 0ad, maa,
/am//, aad /r/eada, aad a/ caarae àer 8aà,.
0ad 8/eaa
/àe /am//, a/ Mar, 0e/a
M/ck, leaaae aad /am//,
Ja//e aad /am//,
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
Get ready
for Winter
Boggs
Shirts
Boots
Caps
Coats
gloves
Preconditioning
Shots & Supplies
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DJ2 CÞevg Mo11bu LT
Hcutcd LcutIc¡, XM Hudío
Hcnotc Stu¡t. Su¡c¡ Nícc.
Word was received Saturday of
the death of 55 year old Terry Pen-
land, husband of Janet (Patton)
Penland. Terry, who suffered a
heart attack, and Janet live in
LeSeuer, Minn., and had been
married for 24 years. Leo and
Joan Patton and their daughter,
Sharon, Colorado Springs, left
early Sunday morning to be with
the family in LeSeuer. Our com-
munity extends sympathy to the
family of Terry and Janet.
Last Friday, approximately 60
folks attended the celebration/
fundraiser at the Milesville Hall.
The money was used for the im-
provements to the exterior of St.
Mary's Church here in Milesville.
People enjoyed the evening with
good food and fellowship.
Sonny Stangle underwent ab-
dominal surgery in Rapid City last
Tuesday, October 8. His son, Dr.
Jim, was up to visit him Friday
and again on Saturday night, com-
ing home Monday morning the
14th. We hope you continue to re-
cover and can be back home in
Philip soon.
Last Wednesday the new little
twin daughters of Darren and
Karen Gebes, Kiara and Brigid,
were baptized in Sturgis. Along
with the family of Darren and
Karen, those from Milesville who
attended the baptism were grand-
parents, Mike and Linda Gebes.
Darren and family left for their
home in North Dakota Saturday.
Seven year-old Rex is spending
some time with his Gebes grand-
parents.
Saturday, a baby shower was
held for Cory and Deb Smith at
the home of Jeff and Crystal
Schofield. Attending the event
from our area were Dave and
Tonya Berry and Donnie and Bo-
bette Schofield. Coming from a
distance was Deb's mother from
Ohio and Deb's daughter, Caitie,
from Brookings.
Donnie and Jeff Schofield
helped Dawn (Schofield) and Rus-
sell Simons last Tuesday after the
storm. The Simons' who live near
Howes, have baby fall calves and
the help was appreciated.
Pat Hanrahan and her daugh-
ter, Kalie Hanrahan, returned
home Saturday after a 12-day
road trip to the southeast part of
the country. Some of the high-
lights were visiting the various at-
tractions in Branson, Mo.,
including the Ryman Auditorium,
Country Music Hall of Fame and
Music Row. They drove through
the Smoky Mountains, and visited
the Biltmore Mansion in
Asheville, N.C., which was built
by George Washington Vanderbilt
in the late 1800s. In Louisville,
Ky., they saw Churchill Downs,
home of the Kentucky Derby. They
visited the Indy 500 Track in Indi-
anapolis. Family members they
got to visit were Jaeson and Crys-
tal Hanrahan and boys in Sac
City, Iowa, Crystal (Hanrahan)
and Eric Jackson and boys in
Greenwood, Ind., and two of Pat's
cousins, Mark and Susan Johnson
and Bob and Terri Johnson,
Nashville, Tenn. And of course,
they stopped at several antique
shops along the way! Pat said
thanks to their GPS they got
along fine and had a great time.
Zane Pekron and a friend from
seminary, Dan, from Madison,
Wis., spent the long weekend with
Steve and Nina Pekron and fam-
ily. Dan wanted to see the South
Dakota plains, but I imagine the
rainy weather hampered them
from doing too much outdoors.
Sunday, Linda Stangle, Ben and
Mark, and Allison and Zane
Pekron joined a large number of
West River young folks for a
Catholic youth rally in Rapid City.
Abby Carley and son Wace
spent the long Columbus Day
weekend with her parents, Phil
and Karen Carley. Monday
evening, the four of them drove to
Pierre for supper and visiting with
their daughter, Angelia and Dave
Shields and family. Marissa
(Shields) and her husband,
Austin, are in the process of mov-
ing to Texas.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer were
in Rapid City Sunday to watch
their grandaughter, Brittany, com-
pete in the Little Britches Rodeo.
Brittany and her new horse are
getting acquainted with one an-
other and they did very well.
All of Boyd and Kara Parsons'
kids were home over the weekend,
including Andrea and Dustin
Rische and family, Kayla and Eric
Bastian and Kaidyn, and Wade
and Marcy Parsons and family.
Paul, Donna and Tina Staben
attended the Lyman-Jones annual
water meeting in Wall Wednesday
evening. The Crooners provided
the entertainment for the event.
Chad and Kathy Hanrahan and
son, Preston, were in Sturgis Sat-
urday for the wedding of a friend.
We had quite a bit more rain in
the past week – between two and
one half and three inches. Some
came last Thursday and more
from Sunday night through Mon-
day night. What a wet October!
The Cheyenne River is extremely
high. Now we are praying for
warm, dry weather so farmers can
get their crops harvested.
Ranchers are still trying to
gather their cattle which scattered
during the snowstorm 10 days
ago. Losses are high and most
won't know just how bad until
they can get a count at weaning
time. They need our prayers.
Milesville News|Janice Parsons • 544-3315
ads@pioneer-review.com
by Del Bartels
“We thought we would go a little
further this year, and also donate
locally,” said Afton Burns. She,
with help from co-chair Katlin
Knutson, are leading the Philip
chapter of Family, Career and
Community Leaders of America in
raising funds to be donated to a
Philip resident who is currently
fighting breast cancer.
The FCCLA is being joined by
the Philip High School volleyball
and football teams to raise at least
$2,500. This much will be
matched by the local chapter of
National Mutual Benefit. All pro-
ceeds will go to Sandee Gittings
for ongoing expenses related to
her fight against cancer.
During the week of October 14-
18, students are encouraged to
wear pink. Fans attending the vol-
leyball match Thursday evening,
October 17, and the football game
Friday, October 18, are also asked
to wear pink. Prizes will be given
to the best-dressed male and fe-
male. Both events will include a
raffle for a corresponding pink ball
autographed by members of that
team. A FCCLA made fleece blan-
ket will also be raffled Thursday
evening.
A skills-based competition will
be held between the second and
third varsity volleyball games. A
dollar donation will allow the
giver a chance to win a pink prize.
Baked goods and Italian sodas
will also be for sale.
A recognition of attending
breast cancer survivors will be
held between the junior varsity
and varsity volleyball matches.
Personal invitations are being
sent to known survivors. Under-
standing that not all survivors are
known, the FCCLA is asking for
all those who have or are fighting
breast cancer to attend. Free gate
admission will be extended to
these honored guests.
NMB will hold a fundraiser
braut feed at the Philip football
field before the game versus the
Wall Eagles, Friday.
FCCLA Dig Pink to stay local
FCCLA member Afton Burns displays just some of the pink items for sale
and to be used as prizes. Family, Career and Community Leaders of Amer-
ica are holding their annual Dig Pink events. Joining them are the Philip
High School volleyball and football teams and National Mutual Benefit.
Del Bartels
The Philip range team walked
away with first place honors at
last month’s Western Region State
Land and Range competition in
Wall, qualifing them for the Na-
tional FFA Land and Range com-
petition in Oklahoma next May.
Final scores for the range teams
were Philip, 1st - 2,059, Newell,
2nd - 1,909, Kadoka, 3rd - 1,668.
Teams are allowed 10 members
per team and the top four are
used for the team total. For Philip
individual placings were Avery
Johnson - 2nd, Seth Haigh - 3rd,
Jade Berry - 4th, Ben Stangle -
5th, Rachel Parsons - 7th, Bailey
Anders - 8th, Brock Hanson -
15th, Reed Johnson - 18th and
Grady Carley - 33rd.
Also placing at the land and
range contest held at Wall were
Justina Cvach placing 20th and
Hanna Hostutler placing 35th in
Land and Home Site Evaluation.
Eight schools competed in the
Western Region State Land and
Range contest.
The Range Evaluation Competi-
tion, hosted by the USDA Natural
Resource Conservation Service,
provides students insight into the
basic tools used in land steward-
FFA qualifies for national contest
Courtesy photos
Jade Berry
Ben Stangle
Ryan Van Tassel
ship, which is the application of
ecological principles and histori-
cally significant disturbance such
as grazing. Contest objectives are
to teach participants some of the
principles of ecology including
soil/plant relationships, plant/an-
imal relationships, and plant suc-
cession as applied to management
of the land resource. Beef cattle
and grouse have been chosen to
demonstrate the concept of habi-
tat evaluation. Both species are
ecologically and economically im-
portant and their relationship to
different stages of plant succes-
sion is well known.
Update military board
Philip High School Student Council members would like to honor soldiers
with ties to our community with a picture and brief biography on a military
bulletin board again this year. If you have updated information for current
Courtesy photo
honorees or would like to add any
other soldiers to the bulletin board,
email to pamela.dejong@k12.sd.us
or see student council members,
(pictured from left) Peyton DeJong,
Tristen Rush or Nelson Holman. The
military board is in the east hallway
of the armory building.
Legal Notices
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 10
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
Regular Session
October 1, 2013
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 1:04 PM on Tuesday, Oc-
tober 1, 2013. A quorum was established
with Chairman Stephen Clements, Vice
Chairman Tom Radway, Members
Nicholas Konst and Edward Briggs in at-
tendance. Gary Snook was unable to at-
tend. Auditor Pat Freeman, Deputy
Auditor Carla Smith, Highway Superin-
tendent Kenny Neville, Highway Admin-
istrative Secretary Val Williams, 4-H
Advisor Carrie Weller, Extension Secre-
tary Sheryl Hansen, Custodian Nancy
Neville, Gail Neuman and Pioneer Re-
view Representative Nancy Haigh were
also present.
The September 3, 2013 Regular Meeting
Minutes were read. Commissioner Ed
Briggs made the motion to approve the
minutes as read. Vice Chairman Tom
Radway seconded the motion with all in
agreement.
Gail Neumann wished to thank the com-
mission for the help she receives from
the Auditor’s Office in finding programs
to benefit her and her family. Auditor
Freeman reported that it has been a very
mutual benefit as our Auditor/Welfare Of-
fice learns about the programs available
through the research done by both par-
ties. During the Fall SDACO Conference,
it was learned that through the Affordable
Care Act insurance is now available to in-
dividuals. Since the county is considered
the last option for assistance, if the indi-
vidual has not applied for this insurance,
it would make them ineligible for county
assistance.
AT 1:15 PM the Supplemental Hearing
for the Courthouse Building was held.
The amount of $12,500 was approved by
a motion by Vice Chairman Tom Radway
and seconded by Commissioner Nick
Konst. Motion Carried.
Treasurer Patti Rhodes met with the
commission to ask to surplus the two
computers that were replaced in her of-
fice this year. HP DC5100 Computer (s/n
2UB5100817) is Patti’s old computer and
HP DC5100 Computer (s/n
2UB5100818) is Chelsea’s old computer.
These will be surplused. Commissioner
Nicholas Konst made a motion to surplus
the two computers with Vice Chairman
Tom Radway seconding the motion. Mo-
tion carried.
4-H Advisor Carrie Weller gave the com-
mission her report of events that hap-
pened over the past year. It was very
informative and reflected many positive
experiences for the 4-H Youth in our
area. Activities reported on were:
• Haakon/Jackson Phonathon
• A grant received from Western
Dakota Camps for Range and Pasture
Workshop (a “hands-on” workshop held
in Philip
• Summer Camps (Teen Camp, Camp
Bob Youth Camp which doubled in size,
and Citizen Washington Focus from
Haakon/Jackson Counties)
• Haakon/Jackson Horse Show
• Let’s Paint RunAways (large atten-
dance both 4-H and non-4-H)
• Haakon/Jackson 4-H Rodeo
• Iron Chef Contest
• State Horse Show & State Livestock
Show
• County Fair/Achievement Days
• Tri County Ag Day
• New Club started in town (good re-
sponse State membership up by 6%)
• Recognition Event
• Future Goals
(after school 4-H Club, will set up
with school administration and receive
assistance from volunteer 4-H leaders)
Utilize GIS/GPS Training
Getting shooting sports training for
local volunteers
Plan to combine more hands-on
workshops with judging schools, to men-
tion a few
Extension Secretary Sheryl Hansen met
with the commission to request a new
computer for her office. The old computer
was purchased by the State in 2007 and
is starting to have problems. She had
consulted with Ron Larson of (HCS)
Hometown Computer Services and re-
ceived an estimate from him in the
amount of $1,412 and $120 labor. Sheryl
has been bringing her laptop from home
to use in her office. It was reported that
she has saved the county approximately
$500 from her phone budget and $300 in
supplies. The year is almost 3/4 over and
she has used only 48.9% of her budget.
The request was tabled until the next
meeting.
At 2:15 PM the commission went into Ex-
ecutive Session for personnel evaluation
on Custodian Nancy Neville. At 2:43 PM
Executive Session was over with no ac-
tion taken.
Sheriff Fred Koester was unavailable for
his monthly report due to his duties. Vet-
eran’s Office Terry Deuter’s report was
also reviewed at this time.
The following September 2013 fuel bids
were submitted:
FUEL BIDS:
Courthouse: None
Highway Dept:
09-04-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.53 No. 2
09-04-13 Cenex...................$3.57 No. 2
09-09-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.51 No. 2
09-09-13 Cenex...................$3.64 No. 2
09-09-13 Fitzgerald Oil ......$3.495 No. 2
09-09-13 Cenex...................$3.61 No. 2
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
gave a report to the commission. There
were several items of old business to ad-
dress. The commission had asked if all
highway workers had their CDL licenses
as we have hired on several new em-
ployees. Three have yet to get their
CDLs. The next item of old business con-
cerned the 5 Year Plan for the highway
and what the projects might be. It could
be a 3 Year Plan. it probably would re-
quire some revisions each year, depend-
ing on the weather. One item on the list
would be Price’s bridge bid which would
be let in January 2014. Construction be-
gins in June and it is all funded with STP
money. No county funds are involved.
There would always be graveling on the
list.
The Curtis Bentley bridge which was
brought up at the last meeting was in-
spected by Superintendent Neville. He
reported it to be in good shape. It may
have to have some planks replaced in
the future. The Hands were concerned
about the 3 ton limit. The equipment is
too wide for the bridge anyway so if
Hands wish to put in their own crossing,
they can do so.
The 140H blade that was taken to Rapid
for repairs has antifreeze getting into the
oil. The water pump needs replacing.
Shims also need to be replaced. No idea
what the cost will be as yet. Mark Buch-
holz hauled the blade up to Rapid and
will go up and get it when repairs are
completed.
Gravel stripping has begun. O’Connell
Construction is doing the stripping and
going down 5 to 7 feet. The estimated bill
could run up to $10,000. Hopefully the
weather will cooperate so that the total
gravel crushing project can be com-
pleted. SWAP Funds have been desig-
nated to use, not county tax dollars.
Neville reported that the insurance ad-
juster has totaled the 2001 Freightliner
but has not informed the county of the
dollar amount. Superintendent Neville
asked the commission what they would
like to see him do to get the county an-
other couple of semis. The 1981 Freight-
liner is also in need of repairs.
Commissioner Nicholas Konst stated
that he would like to have it looked at by
a mechanic before any decision be
made. He suggested that around $500
would be the amount to spend to find out
the cost of the repairs. It’s original cost
was $7,500. Neville agreed to do that
and report at the next meeting the cost of
the repairs. It is difficult to find many
semis under the $25,000 mark in the
area due to the activity in North Dakota.
Anything under $25,000 does not have
to be bid. If it is over the $25,000 limit,
the county must have it bid. Neville
stated he could find them in the $30,000
to $35,000 range. He also stated that he
would like to get equipment with reason-
able miles on them so that the county
could get longer use out of them. The
amount received from the totaled out
semi and with $93,000 left in the capital
outlay account could be used to pur-
chase a semi. General funds would not
be used. The highway budget will have
to be supplemented in order to purchase
a semi. Vice Chairman Tom Radway
made a motion to look for a semi under
$25,000. No second was made when
called for. The motion died.
Under old business concerning the is-
sues brought before the commission at
the September 3, 2013 Regular Meeting
by Larry Gabriel and Marvin Coleman
about the oversized loads on county
roads not having a warning vehicle in
front, Highway Secretary Val Williams
produced the April 6, 1999 Regular Meet-
ing Minutes which recorded the following.
“Over Width and Over Weight Permits”
“Motion by Hickman and seconded by
Schofield to authorize the Highway Su-
perintendent to issue permits for over-
width and overweight equipment and
vehicles on Haakon County roads. These
permits will be issued subject to all appli-
cable laws and regulations. Approved
unanimously.”
Highway Secretary Val Williams provided
a copy to the commissioners of the De-
partment of Transportation and South
Dakota Highway Patrol’s “Highway Use
Permit for non-divisible loads.” This per-
mit is good for one year and states that
all pages of this permit must be in the
possession of the operator of a county
truck while on the state truck highway
system. The permit allows travel on the
state truck highway systems only. Travel
on other routes requires approval from
the proper county or city authority. It ap-
pears that the Highway Superintendent
has been given this authority already
(subject to all applicable laws and regu-
lations), by the commission in 1999. This
Highway Use Permit issued by the State
has two full pages of requirements, such
as requiring an escort vehicle to display
revolving amber lights to having “over-
size load signs” visible to on-coming traf-
fic with letters in upper case, 10 inches
high and in good repair. It states approx-
imately two full pages of state require-
ments for different situations. For the
county to implement these laws and reg-
ulations on county roads, it could possi-
bly add another employee. Further
discussion was tabled at this time.
Another discussion was entered into
about having safety inspections on the
vehicles driven by county employees.
Once again, Highway Secretary Val
Williams had retrieved a DOT inspection
sheet that is filled out by the State. The
suggestion was made that the county
equipment operators should be required
to fill out an inspection sheet before driv-
ing a county vehicle to be sure they are
safe. This was also tabled for future dis-
cussion.
The commission was informed that the
trailer at Deep Creek was in need of a
furnace/air conditioner unit. A proposal
was presented to the commission by
Peitz Heating and Air Conditioning out of
Pierre, S.D., in the amount of $5,974. It
included all labor and materials, mileage,
new thermostat, roof jack assembly and
removal of existing equipment. Highway
Superintendent was to get a second bid
and go with the lower bid. Commissioner
Nicholas Konst made a motion to accept
the proposal for purchasing the equip-
ment. Commissioner Ed Briggs sec-
onded with all in agreement.
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
requested to attend the Region 8 Meet-
ing in Rapid City, S.D., at the Ramkota
on October 23-24, 2013. Commission-
ers were encouraged to attend the meet-
ing also. Vice Chairman Tom Radway
made a motion to approve the travel.
Commissioner Ed Briggs seconded the
motion with all in approval.
The Auditor’s Account with the
County Treasurer was presented as
taxes for the month of August 2013.
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...............................62,483.84
Cash Management Fund...1,008,997.29
Bank Balance...........................1,413.01
Checks & Cash on Hand..........6,204.01
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for the month of Septem-
ber 2013:
Commissioners Wages ............2,820.00
Auditor’s Office.........................4,841.29
Treasurer’s Office.....................4,009.39
State’s Attorney’s Office ...........3,655.84
Director of Equalization............3,191.69
Register of Deeds ....................3,802.89
Janitor ......................................1,937.04
Veteran’s Office...........................583.33
Sheriff’s Office..........................5,480.87
Weed Supervisor......................1,916.10
Highway Department............ 29,859.69
WIC and Health Nurse Sec.........806.40
Librarians .................................1,905.20
Extension Secretary....................997.10
Emergency Management .........1,079.12
BCBS Transfer Fee.......................10.00
Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield ................................ 10,436.22
Dearborn National Life ................114.66
Special Insurance Services......1,349.81
AFLAC, premium.........................273.55
Colonial Life ................................124.62
SD Retirement System.............6,612.84
Delta Dental ................................795.66
Vision Service Plan .....................155.65
Office of Child Support ................400.00
First National Bank SS &
WH.....................................14,136.60
The Vendor Warrants were presented for
September Expenses paid in October
2013. The West Central and Golden
West invoices were not received yet but
need to be paid when received so as not
to get behind or run the risk of a discon-
nect. The commission meets only once
a month and it depends on what date the
first Tuesday of the month falls on. Com-
missioner Ed Briggs motioned to pay
West Central Electric and Golden West
Telephone when received. Commis-
sioner Nicholas Konst seconded with all
in agreement.
VENDORS
Commissioners
Alert Magazine, LLC, Prof Fee....170.00
The Drug Education Press, Prof
Fee..........................................155.00
Pioneer Review, Inc. Publ. ..........546.69
871.69
Auditor
Century Business Leasing, Inc., Maint -
Copier .....................................112.58
Connecting Point, Prof Fees/Computer
Support......................................57.50
First National Bank, FNB BCBS Wire
Trans Fee .................................10.00
Patricia G Freeman, Travel ...........98.42
Ingram Hardware, Supplies ............2.79
HCS, Prof Fees/Computer
Support....................................270.00
551.29
Treasurer
Century Business Leasing, Inc.,
Supplies ..................................172.98
Ingram Hardware, Supplies.............4.49
Patti Rhodes, Travel ......................98.42
275.89
State’s Attorney
SD Continuing Legal Ed, Annual Dues &
Membership Fees ...................500.00
Tollefson Law Office, Office
Rent.........................................150.00
Tollefson Law Office, Tele..............75.00
725.00
Courthouse
City of Philip, Utilities...................496.90
Coyle’s SuperValu, Supplies .........32.19
Heartland Paper Co., Supplies....397.86
Ingram Hardware, Supplies.........131.76
Kone, Inc., Prof Fees ..................237.05
MG Oil Company, Supplies .............6.47
Petersen’s Variety, Supplies..........21.05
Servall Uniform, Supplies............197.85
Walker Refuse Inc., Utilities ..........72.50
Triple XXX Spraying, LLC, Prof
Fees ........................................132.86
1,726.49
Director of Equalization
Best Western Ramkota Inn,
Travel ......................................445.55
Coyles Standard, Repairs &
Maint. ........................................91.95
Coyles Standard, Fuel.................149.00
John Kangas, Supplies .................27.50
Marshall & Swift/Boeckh, LLC
Prof Fees.................................544.20
Toni Rhodes, Supplies ....................5.88
Toni Rhodes, Fuel .........................38.29
Toni Rhodes, Travel ......................31.33
HCS, Prof Fees.............................90.00
1,423.70
Register of Deeds
Microfilm/Imaging Systems, Inc.
Prof Fees..............................1,568.00
Traci Radway, Travel ...................111.47
Ashley Reckling, Prof Fees.........867.30
2,546.77
Veterans Service
HCS, Prof Services, ......................90.00
90.00
Sheriff
AT&T Mobility, Utilities...................86.12
Coyles Standard, Repairs &
Maint........................................119.85
Ingram hardware, Supplies ...........30.46
MG Oil Company, Fuel ................300.37
Morrison’s Pit Stop, Fuel .............177.34
714.14
Jail
Winner Health Mart, Jail
Expense. ...................................81.56
Winner Police Department, Jail
Expense ...............................1,153.01
1,234.57
Coroner
BH Clinical Laboratory,
Coroner ................................2,117.00
2,117.00
Support of Poor
CHC Of The Black Hills, Prof
Services ....................................46.76
Dakota Radiology, Prof Services...80.84
The Medicine Shoppe, Prof
Services ......................................6.98
Philip Clinic, Prof Services ............55.55
190.13
Mentally Ill
Yankton County Treasurer, Prof
Services ....................................25.00
25.00
Library
Annie Brunskill, Travel.................399.78
Haakon Co. Public Library,
Supplies ..................................184.79
Midamerica Books, Supplies.......103.65
Lori Quinn, Salaries.......................58.44
746.66
Extension Service
Best Western of Huron, Travel ....147.00
Carrie Weller, Travel......................99.46
Ingram Hardware, Supplies...........18.74
HCS, Repairs & Maint. ................127.15
Zeeb Pharmacy, Supplies ...............5.54
397.89
Weed Control
Cenex Harvest States, Supplies .161.00
Dales Tire & Retreading, Inc.
Supplies ..................................158.50
Ingram Hardware, Supplies.............7.53
Virgil Smith, Supplies ....................12.81
339.84
Road & Bridge
A & A Tire & Repair, Repairs &
Maint. ........................................10.00
AT&T Mobility, Utilities...................45.36
Capital One Bank, Travel, .............22.99
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel .....3,452.49
D & T Auto Parts, Repairs &
Maint. ........................................86.94
D & T Auto Parts, Supplies............40.74
EMC Insurance Companies, Liability/
Workman’s Comp. Ins.................318.00
Ernies Building Center, Supplies...84.99
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Fuel .............9,254.13
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Utilities............922.88
Hall Manufacturing, LLC, Repairs &
Maint. ......................................489.29
Heartland Waste Management, Inc.
Utilities.......................................26.50
Ingram Hardware, Repairs &
Maint. ........................................28.87
Ingram Hardware, Supplies...........55.96
Kennedy Implement, Repairs &
Maint. ..........................................7.00
Town of Midland, Utilities...............25.00
Moses Building Center, Inc.
Supplies ....................................35.30
Kenny Neville, Travel ..................107.30
Petersen’s Variety, Supplies........105.80
SDSU-South Dakota LTAP,
Travel ........................................70.00
Walker Refuse, Inc., Utilities .........72.50
Walker Automotive, Repairs &
Maint. ...................................1,283,00
16,545.04
9-1-1
Centurylink, 911...........................113.40
113.40
Emergency & Disaster
Lola Roseth, Emergency Mgt
Travel ......................................503.45
503.45
Courthouse
Ken’s Refrigeration, Building
Fund........................................104.80
104.80
Law Library
Lexisnexis Matthew Bender, Law
Library Amt Held......................147.28
147.28
Total Checks.........................31,390.03
A motion was made by Commissioner Ed
Briggs, seconded by Commissioner
Nicholas Konst with all in agreement to
approve the above warrants.
The next regular meeting date will be
Tuesday, November 5, 2013, at 1:00 PM
in the commissioner’s room at the court-
house. The meeting was adjourned at
6:30 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMISSION
Stephen Clements, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $202.41]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
Special Session
October 6, 2013
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 5:25 PM on Wednesday,
October 6, 2013. A quorum was estab-
lished with Chairman Stephen Clements,
Vice Chairman Tom Radway, Gary
Snook and Edward Briggs in attendance.
Commissioner Nicholas Konst was un-
able to attend. Auditor Pat Freeman,
Deputy Auditor Carla Smith, Highway Su-
perintendent Kenny Neville, Highway Ad-
ministrative Secretary Val Williams,
Emergency Manager Lola Roseth and
Pioneer Review Representative Nancy
Haigh were also present.
The first order of business was to discuss
the recent snow storm which caused a
tremendous amount of loss, especially
concerning the livestock in Haakon
County. Chairman Stephen Clements
had been on conference calls. On the
morning of October 6, 2013, Chairman
Clements informed Auditor Freeman that
an Emergency Disaster Meeting was to
be called at 5 PM that afternoon to de-
clare Haakon County a disaster after the
October storm.
After much discussion, Resolution 2013-
15 was passed unanimously with a mo-
tion by Commissioner Gary Snook and a
second by Commissioner Ed Briggs.
Motion carried.
RESOLUTION #2013-15
Haakon County Storm
Disaster Declaration
October 9, 2013
WHEREAS, on October 3,
2013 the drizzling rain began
in Haakon County. By the
evening of October 4, 2013
heavy, wet snow began to fall
creating blizzard conditions
with high winds and freezing
temperatures until the early
morning of Sunday, October 6,
2013.
WHEREAS, many of the live-
stock in Haakon County were
lost due to these extreme
weather conditions and was
devastating financially to live-
stock producers.
WHEREAS, with the aid of the
(SDDA) South Dakota Depart-
ment of Agriculture, (OEM) Of-
fice of Emergency Manage-
ment , the (AID) Animal Indus-
try Board much time and effort
will be required by the live-
stock producers to document
the numbers lost and dispose
of the carcasses,
Therefore, be it resolved, an
early season, record setting
blizzard has created a disaster
situation and a disaster has
been declared by the Haakon
County Commissioners as of
October 9, 2013.
Approved
Stephen Clements, Chairman
Tom Radway, Vice Chairman
Edward Briggs, Member
Gary Snook, Member
Nicholas Konst, Member
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
The commission advised Highway Su-
perintendent Neville that the county
would offer their loader and an operator
to assist in the digging of the pits to bury
the dead livestock. Highway Secretary
Val Williams will keep track of the opera-
tor time, fuel and hours on the equipment
and will report back to the commission.
It will have to be first come first serve.
The bank will be called to put the an-
nouncement on the daily news. The
commissioners were also made aware
that any livestock remaining in the county
right-of-ways will be the county’s respon-
sibility to remove. The motion was made
by Commissioner Ed Briggs and sec-
onded by Commissioner Gary Snook to
offer the county’s assistance to those
producers who request it. Motion car-
ried.
The Commission discussed the amount
of $10,000 - $1,000 deductible = $9,000
offered by our insurance company for the
totaled out 2001 Freightliner. Judy Gold-
hammer, our agent, was called to ques-
tion this amount. She stated she would
talk to the adjuster. This amount was
substantially less than what was paid
within the last year for the used semi.
The next Regular Meeting will be on
Tuesday, November 5, 2013, at 1:00 PM
in the Commissioner’s Room at the
courthouse. The meeting was adjourned
at 7:40 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMISSION
Stephen Clements, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Publish October 17, 2013) at the total
approximate cost of $59.78.]
Proceedings of the
Town of Midland
REGULAR MEETING MINUTES
October 8, 2013
The Town Board of the Town of Midland
met on Tuesday, October 8, 2013, at
7:00 PM in the Town Hall with the follow-
ing members present: Diana Baeza,
Jared Fosheim, Rock Gillaspie, Finance
Officer Michelle Meinzer and Utilities Op-
erator Lawrence Stroppel.
Minutes from the September 10 and
September 27, 2013 meetings were ap-
proved as published.
Discussed land transfer. A special meet-
ing will be held which will include the con-
cerned parties along with the City
Attorney.
Haakon County Sheriff was not able to
join us at our Board meeting as noted on
the agenda.
Discussed having a park donation fund
as families have contacted the Town
Board wanting to give a donation as a
memorial of their loved one. We have re-
ceived several beautiful benches as a
memorial of loved ones, as well as the
Class of 1992 planting a tree in memory
of their classmate.
Discussed complaints/compliance to Or-
dinances in the Town. Some have been
settled and others still need to be brought
into compliance.
Discussed surplus land owned by the
Town of Midland. This will be on the
agenda at our next regular Board meet-
ing in November.
Stroppel gave his Utility Operator report.
Operator has been flushing the sewer
lines and fire hydrants as well as exercis-
ing water valves. Discussed truck route
in town, marquis sign on the front of the
Fire Hall and the Town Park. Operator
will be closing the public bathrooms in
the Town Park the middle of this month
and the park sprinkler system is winter-
ized. Discussed city tractor.
Motion was made by Fosheim, second
by Gillaspie to pay the following claims:
American Legal Publishing,
Updates.................................$314.00
Lawrence Stroppel, Wages/Insurance/
Vehicle/Phone ....................$3,103.98
Michelle Meinzer, Wages/
Phone....................................$664.92
Electronic Federal Tax Payment,
Employee Tax.....................$1,322.16
Ernie’s LLC, Supplies................$250.65
Golden West, Phone/Internet ....$148.85
Heartland Waste Management, Refuse
Service ...............................$1,350.00
Marshall Lawn Irrigation, Park
Winterization ...........................$75.00
Midland Food & Fuel, Fuel ........$199.15
Midland School Booster Club, Calendar/
Listings ....................................$11.00
Pioneer Review, Publications......$46.79
Quill Corporation, Office
Supplies ................................$171.68
SD Dept. of Revenue, Lab
Fees ........................................$26.00
SD One Call System, Message
Fees ..........................................$4.44
SD Retirement System,
Retirement.............................$480.00
SD State Treasurer, Sales Tax ....$99.00
USA BlueBook, Supplies........$1,555.05
West Central Electric, Electric
Supply ...................................$884.93
WR/LJ Rural Water Supply, Water
Supply ................................$1,438.75
G & A Trenching, Repairs..........$180.00
There being no further business to come
before the Board, the meeting adjourned.
_______________________________
Diana Baeza, President
_______________________________
Michelle Meinzer, Finance Officer
[Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $38.34]
Proceedings of
West River Water
Development District
September 19, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the Deadwood
Mountain Grand Hotel in Deadwood, SD.
Vice-Chairman Casey Krogman called
the meeting to order at 8:10 a.m. (MT).
Roll Call was taken and Vice-Chairman
Krogman declared a quorum was pres-
ent. Directors present were: Casey Krog-
man, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Absent: Joseph Hieb. Also
present: Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Amy
Kittelson, Office Manager for WR/LJ;
Dave Larson, Larson Law PC
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Smith, seconded by Director Prokop to
approve the agenda. Motion carried
unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the August 15, 2013, meeting were pre-
viously mailed to the Board for their re-
view. Motion by Director Prokop,
seconded by Director Matt to approve
the August minutes. Motion carried unan-
imously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Casey
Krogman - $55.41, Marion Matt - $55.41,
Veryl Prokop - $55.41, Lorne Smith -
$55.41, West River/Lyman-Jones RWS -
$1,000.00, Kadoka Press - $78.36,
Lyman County Herald - $33.96, Murdo
Coyote - $38.27, Pennington County
Courant - $83.82, Pioneer Review -
$101.69, Mellette County News - $38.44.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Smith to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the August Financial
Report is on file at the District office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Prokop to approve the
August Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his September re-
port to the Board. Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the Manager’s Report. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
JONES COUNTY CONSERVATION
DISTRICT: Manager Fitzgerald pre-
sented two funding assistance requests
from the Jones County Conservation Dis-
trict for administration costs for the imple-
mentation of grants. The Multi-Practice
Grant I is requesting $5,250 and Multi
Practice Grant II is requesting $3,487.
Both grants assist landowners in Jones
and Lyman Counties with the installation
of pipeline, tanks and cross fencing. Mo-
tion by Director Matt, seconded by Direc-
tor Prokop to provide assistance for the
total requested amount of $8,737 to the
Jones County Conservation District for
administration costs for Multi-Practice
Grants I & II. The funds will be paid as
expenses incur by invoice. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 8:20 a.m.
(MT).
ATTEST:
_____________________________
Casey Krogman, Vice Chairman
_____________________________
Amy Kittelson, Recording Secretary
[Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $31.84]
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Tire Tanks
Vacuum
Excavation
Cobett Waters
Directional
Boring
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
For all your
concrete
construction
needs:
Gibson
CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
859-3100
Philip, SD
Profit Deadline:
Thursday at
Noon!
Business & seRviCe
WANT To HEAR YoUR oLD
clock tick & chime again? I re-
pair cuckoo, mantel clocks. Rea-
sonably priced. Call 381-9812,
Kadoka. PR7-2tp
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn, 441-1053, or leave a
message at 837-0112. K44-4tp
BUSINESS FoR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CoN-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
RoUgH CoUNTRY SPRAYINg:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
o’CoNNELL CoNSTRUCTIoN,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TEToN RIvER TRENCHINg:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIvER EXCAvATIoN will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & RanCh
MISSINg CATTLE: 5 head.
Could be 1 cow, 4 calves. Lazy M
L Bar, left hip. Roy and Margaret
Pfeifer, 859-2243 (work), 859,
2466. P45-2tp
FoR SALE: JD 4450 tractor, 15
speed, power shift, 3-point, 3
hydraulic outlets, 540 and 1000
PTO, new tires. JD 740 self-lev-
eling loader, excellent shape.
Call 530-9540. P45-2tp
FoR SALE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
FoR SALE
FOR SALE: SEMI TRACTORS,
2001 Peterbuilt 379, Detroit 470,
13-speed. 2003 International
9200i, C15 Cat 435, 10-speed.
2008 Kenworth T660, C15 Cat
475, 13-speed. (605)660-2249.
Log HoMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5 6 5 0 ,
www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.
oTR/DRIvERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
MISCELLANEoUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
NoTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide Clas-
sifieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this
newspaper or 800-658-3697 for
details.
WANT To BUY
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer , Elk/moose 7.50 lb.
Bleached 3.00 lb. cracked 1.00 lb.
Also need Porcupines, Rat-
tlesnakes, Elk Ivories ,Mt. Lion
skins. More info; 605-673-4345 /
clawantlerhide@hotmail.com.
MANAGER SOUGHT. Well-kept
small town motel. Two room
apartment, utilities provided.
Friendly community in south cen-
tral ND. E-mail resume, refer-
ences to stpmotel@gmail.com.
PRESIDENT/CEO – Visit:
www.advancebkg.info for job de-
scription. Submit cover letter, re-
sume and current salary
information to: Maureen Simet,
ADVANCE, PO Box 810, Brook-
ings, SD 57006-0810. msimet@
advancebkg.com.
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Compet-
itive wages, benefits, training,
profit sharing, opportunities for
growth, great culture and innova-
tion. $1,500 Sign on Bonus avail-
able for Service Technicians. To
browse opportunities go to
www.rdoequipment.com. Must
apply online. EEO.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL,
Custer Clinic, Hot Springs Re-
gional Medical Clinic and Custer
Regional Senior Care have full-
time, part-time and PRN (as-
needed) RN, LPN, Licensed
Medical Assistant and Nurse Aide
positions available. We offer com-
petitive pay and excellent benefits.
New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-9418 for more informa-
tion or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
Business & Professional
Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
AUCTIoN
4th Annual Lebanon Consignment
Auction. Saturday, Oct. 26, 10
am, Lebanon, SD. Consignments
welcome until sale day. Contact
Gary McCloud 605-769-1181,
605-948-2333, Sam McCloud
650-769-0088, Lewis Reuer 605-
281-1067. Complete listing at
www.mrauctionsllc. com 800+
Acres Cropland with 200+ Acres
Pasture, productivity 79, Reeder
Loams, Class II & III, Mobridge
SD, Absolute Auction, Nov. 4,
www.PiroutekAuction. com or
605-544-3316.
EMPLoYMENT
THE AWARDING WINNING Cham-
berlain/Oacoma SUN newspaper
at Chamberlain, SD seeks an en-
ergetic, resourceful editor who en-
joys covering community news
and events. Applicants qualified in
writing, newspaper design and
layout should apply to publisher
Lucy Halverson at
lucy@lcherald.com or mail resume
to PO BOX 518, Presho, SD
57544.
CONCRETE FOREMAN, finishers
and laborers. Experience with
lasers and setting forms a plus.
Good wages, benefit package and
new equipment to work with.
Prime Concrete, Wahpeton, ND.
701-642-1393 www.primecon-
creteinc.com.
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Classifieds
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 11
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS statewide for only $150.00. Put the South
Dakota Statewide Classifieds Network to work for you today! (25 words for
$150. Each additional word $5.) Call this newspaper, 605-859-2516, or 800-
658-3697 for details.
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The Pennington Co. Courant, as well as on our website: www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD oF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit.
BoLD FACE LoCALS: $8.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Printed only in the Pioneer Review.
NoTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pioneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NoTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make
any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity basis.
TRAILER TIRES FoR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
found
FoUND: A video camera in a
walk-in area near Cottonwood,
S.D., while bird hunting on Oc-
tober 13. Call to identify, 355-
0728. PR8-2tc
Pets/suPPLies
KITTENS READY FoR NEW
HoME. Will make excellent barn
or house cats. Call 605-685-
5327 for more info. P44-2tc
heLP Wanted
WANTED: Housekeeper 1 day/
week, every 2 weeks. Call 859-
2256. PR8-2tp
FULL TIME JACKSoN CoUNTY
HIgHWAY DEPARTMENT
WoRKER: Truck driver, heavy
equipment operator, light equip-
ment operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train. CDL
required, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumes accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422. Fax
837-2447.
K45-5tc
THE JoNES CoUNTY BoARD
oF CoMMISSIoNERS will be
accepting applications for full-
time employment with the
County Highway Department.
Applications and resumé will be
received at the Jones County
Auditor’s office, P.O. Box 307,
Murdo, SD 57559 until Friday,
November 1, 2013 at 5 p.m.
CDST. Applications must be
picked up at the County Audi-
tor’s office, 310 Main Street,
Murdo, SD, or the Jones County
Highway Shop, 311 N. Main
Street, Murdo, SD. Please state
valid South Dakota driver’s li-
cense number and C.D.L. status
on application. For further infor-
mation, call 669-7102 (County
shed), 530-3355 (Highway Su-
perintendent cell) or 669-7100
(County Auditor’s office). Jones
County is an equal opportunity
employer. M44-3tc
LooKINg FoR: Finance Man-
ager & Sales Person. Contact
Colt at Philip Motor, 859-2585
or 685-4314. P43-tfn
CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tions. Benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Ruby at 837-2270,
Kadoka. K41-tfn
FULL- oR PART-TIME PRESS-
RooM HELP WANTED: Monday
and Wednesday mornings (3-4
hours each day). Will train the
right person. Call Beau Ravel-
lette, 859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or
Colby Shuck for more informa-
tion: 837-2076. K33-tfn
AMERICA’S BEST vALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping and laundry. Stop
in to apply or call Joseph at 279-
2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax re-
sumé to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
MisC. foR saLe
FoR SALE: Several nice refrig-
erators with warranties. Del’s,
Exit 63, Box Elder, SD, 390-
9810. PR8-2tc
LooKINg FoR SPECIFIC an-
nual vegetables or flower seeds
for next growing season? I am
ordering seeds now. Call 859-
2057 or 515-0675, Gary’s
Greenhouse. P44-3tc
FoR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
ReCReation
FoR SALE: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
good shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, frig and large front stor-
age box. Stored inside off sea-
son. Call 279-2195 or 441-7049,
Wall, anytime. WP4-tfn
notiCes/Wanted
HoLIDAY FESTIvAL: Sunday,
November 3, 2013, Kadoka City
Auditorium. Booths available.
Call Ruby at 837-2270. K45-3tc
NoW IS THE TIME … To
THINK oF YoUR FAMILY &
FRIENDS! It’s not too early to be
compiling your Christmas or
end-of-the-year letter! You write
it, email it to us (ads@pioneer-
review.com) and we will print it
on beautiful holiday stationary.
We can even put your full color
family picture with the letter. Let
us help you make the holiday
season special (and easier) this
year. Ravellette Publications,
Inc. Philip Office: 859-2516;
Wall Office: 279-2565; Kadoka
Office: 837-2259; Faith Office:
967-2161; Bison Office: 244-
7199; Murdo Office: 669-2271;
New Underwood Office: 754-
6466. P41-tfn
WANTED To BUY: Old farm ma-
chinery and junk cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
ReaL estate
FoR SALE: Single bedroom
house, 26x24, with 6x8 porch.
Good for dwelling, workshop,
storage. Call 859-2057 or 515-
0675. P44-3tc
RentaLs
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLassified PoLiCy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
thank yous
We wish to thank all the family,
friends and acquaintances who
sent cards of congratulations on
our 60 years of marriage. It was
a humbling experience from so
many thoughtful people.
Just remember, right after you
say “I do” you immediately
change it to “yes, dear.”
Vern & Carrol Foland
A very belated heartfelt thank
you to everyone for all your kind-
ness, support, and prayers after
the loss of our brother and uncle,
Jerry Hunt.
Thank you for all the food,
drinks and paper products
brought to our homes, the cards,
memoirals, flowers and espe-
cially the memories.
Thank you to the doctors,
nurses and the staff at Philip
Health Services for your great
care whoile Jerry was hospital-
ized.
Lastly, a huge thank you to
Pastor Frezil for her support and
comforting words, the ladies at
Trinity Lutheran Church for serv-
ing the much appreciated meal;
to the Rush family for their sup-
port and professional services
and lastly, to the Rapid City
Honor Guard for their services at
the National Cemetery.
Roy and Carol
Ted, Dena and family
Terry
Keith
Christine
Teresa
Gord, Cheryl and family
Peg, Roger and family
Ron and Laura
Penny
Jan, Jim and family
Shari, Pete and family
Jeff and Liz
Lisa and family
Barry
Michelle and Cam
The family of Brian Hackerott
would like to thank all those who
sent cards and memorials in
memory of Brian.
Lisa, Deidra,
Blake and Stuart Hackerott
Courtney and Cody McFarland
We would like to thank Casteel
Auction, Jerry and Pat Casteel,
Paul and Karen Speed, Wayne
Volmer, Marshel Schnider, and
KBHB for volunteering their time
and services to the Central
Meade County Community Cen-
ter Consignment Auction. Thank
you to those individuals who do-
nated or purchased items. We
would also like to thank those
who helped in any way before,
during, or after the auction. We
want everyone to know how
much we appreciate ALL the do-
nations and memorials we have
received for the heating/air con-
ditioning project. We haven’t
quite reached our goal, but are
certainly closer.
Thank You,
CMCCC Board of Directors
We would like to thank every-
one for their prayers, calls, visits,
cards and flowers while Tyrone
was in Rapid City Regional and
since his return home.
We truly live in a caring and
loving community. A special
thank you to Dr. Holman and the
nurses in ER at our Philip hospi-
tal. Also the Philip ambulance
crew for a safe trip to Rapid City
Regional where Tyrone had ex-
cellent care.
Thank you to Pastor Frezil,
Pastor Urback and Pastor
Boumann of Pierre, and Pastor
Schwann and Pastor Winkler of
Rapid City for their many visits
and prayers.
A Big thank you to our family
who were so supportive and car-
ing.
God’s Blessings to All
Tyrone and Elvera Moos
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
ads@pioneer-review.com
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
October 17, 2013 • Pioneer Review 12
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.philiplivestock.com
Email: info@philiplivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605) 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, Fieldman
Midland • (605) 567-3385
JEFF LONG, Fieldman/Auctioneer
Red Owl • (605) 985-5486
Cell: (605) 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, Auctioneer
Reva • (605) 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, Auctioneer
Milesville • (605) 544-3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605) 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, Fieldman
Sturgis • (605) 641-1042
(605) 347-0151
BAXTER ANDERS, Fieldman
Wasta • (605) 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(605) 859:2577
www.philiplivestock.com
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
SATURDAY, OCT. 19: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS 11:00
AM (MT) CALVES 12:00 PM (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 3,000
HEAD
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
YOUNG RANCH – 330 CHAR X & A FEW BLK, BWF, &
HERF CLVS; FS ................................................................................ 600-650#
GABRIEL – 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................500-600#
BRUNS – 225 BLK CLVS; FS ................................................................. 550-600#
MORELAND – 220 CHAR X & FEW BLK CLVS; FS,NI............................. 500-575#
LIVERMONT RANCH – 200 FANCY BLK STRS; FS,NI .................................... 500#
VIG – 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................... 500-550#
BAUMAN – 160 RED ANG CHAR X CLVS; FS......................................... 500-525#
BENDIGO – 140 CHAR X & RED CLVS; FS,NI........................................ 550-600#
FISHER – 130 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................ 500-550#
CUNY – 120 BLK STRS; FS,NI................................................................ 550-600#
BRASSFIELD – 120 BLK CLVS; FS,N............................................................ 500#
BAKER & THOMPSON – 120 BLK & BWF CLVS;
FS,NI ................................................................................................ 500-600#
GOLDEN WILLOW RANCH – 100 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................ 500-550#
BACHAND – 100 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI............................................. 500-575#
POURIER – 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................... 575#
NAESCHER – 82 BWF & HERF CLVS ........................................................... 500#
SIELER – 50 BLK STRS; FS,NI ............................................................... 525-550#
SCHERER – 35 BLK & FEW RED CLVS; NI ............................................ 500-575#
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL Yearling & ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS
10:00 Am (MT) CALVES 11:00 Am (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING
12,000 HEAD
YEARLINGS: ..........................................................................................................
FAIRBANKS RANCH – 400 BLK STRS .....................................................800-850#
(6 loads same sort) ............................................................................800-850#
ROSETH CATTLE CO ....................... – 300 BLK, RED, & HERF STRS (3 LDS BLK,
1 LD CHAR, & 1 LD HERF) ................................................................875-925#
MCILRAVY RANCH – 120 RED ANG CHAR X STRS & TESTED
OPEN HFRS...................................................................................... 850-900#
NESS – 80 BLK & BWF STRS..................................................................750-800#
NELSON – ..............................70 RWF STRS & OPEN HFRS (50 STRS & 20 OPEN
HFRS .................................................................................................875-900#
ADAMS – 50 BLK & BWF STRS & OPEN HFRS; HOME RAISED ..............700-900#
RAPID CREEK RANCH – 46 RED ANG TESTED OPEN HFRS..........................900#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
O’CONNOR – 600 CHAR X CLVS; FS.......................................................500-600#
BURNS – 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS.............................................................500-600#
EISENBRAUN – 400 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................450-550#
HOY – 80 RED ANG CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................400-500#
WILLIAMS – 360 FANCY RED ANG CHAR X CLVS (2 LDS STRS & 2 LD
HFRS) ................................................................................................600-700#
CARLEY RANCH – 350 BLK CLVS; FS,NI
RATTLESNAKE RIDGE RANCH – 300 FANCY BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............500-575#
LINN BROTHERS – 300 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................570#
TRASK FAMILY – 300 BLK STRS; FS,NI...................................................475-575#
LEVIN & CASTEEL – ..........300 BLK CLVS (ALL HFRS IN TOWN); FS,NI 550-600#
MEEKS RANCH – 275 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................................525-550#
HICKS RANCH – 275 BLK & RED STRS ..................................................600-650#
WILCOX – 270 BLK & BWF STRS; FS......................................................500-625#
IWAN & SONS – 250 X BRED CLVS.........................................................450-550#
O’DEA – 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS.........................................................500-600#
BERNDT– 250 BLK STRS; FS,NI..............................................................500-600#
MCDANIEL BROTHERS – 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........................500-550#
SHAW RANCH – 250 BLK STRS; FS,NI ....................................................500-575#
DIAMOND S RANCH – 230 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI ...............................500-600#
GROPPER & GROPPER – 225 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS...............................500-600#
SMITH & SMITH – 225 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-575#
FERGUSON – 230 BLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................500-600#
REINERT & ENRIGHT – 220 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ............................500-550#
MUNROE – 200 BLK & RED CKVSL FS,NI...............................................450-550#
EIDE – 200 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .........................................................................500#
WICKS RANCH – 190 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................500-575#
SCHOFIELD – 180 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........................................450-550#
FEES – 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI......................................................450-550#
O’DANIEL – 160 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................500#
WILLIAMS – 150 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................550#
JOBGEN – 150 BLK STRS; FS,NI ............................................................525-550#
FOSTER – 150 BLK & BWF STRS; FS......................................................525-600#
CHASE – 140 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...............................................................550-600#
BOWEN & BOWEN – 140 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................550-600#
WILCOX – 125 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................................500-575#
CUNY – 120 BLK STRS; FS,NI ........................................................................550#
BURGEN – 110 BLK BWF CLVS; FS.......................................................550-625#
KAUFMAN – 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ..................................................550-625#
HARTY RANCH – 110 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..................................................500-550#
RADWAY – 110 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...................................................................550#
CARMICHAEL & DRESSEN – 105 BLK & BWF MOSTLY STRS;
FS,NI .................................................................................................500-600#
KNIGHT – 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................................450-550#
LARSON & LARSON – 100 BLK & A FEW BWF STRS; FS,NI ...........................550#
COMPTON – 100 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI .....................................................500#
FREELAND – 100 BLK STRS; FS.............................................................625-650#
KRUSE – 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................................500#
KRUSE – 85 BLK STRS; FS,NI .................................................................500-550#
CLEMENTS – 85 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................500-525#
SAMMONS – 80 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................500-550#
OPSTEDAHL RANCH – 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI............................................450-575#
HOFFMAN – 80 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI
STRUBLE – 75 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................500-550#
LURZ – 75 MOSTLY RED & CHAR X CLVS; FS...............................................550#
WILLIAMS – 75 BLK STRS; FS........................................................................500#
MARLER – 75 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................550-650#
LAWRENCE – 75 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................550-650#
HERRINGTON – 70 BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI ........................................600-650#
BASEL & LAMONT – 65 CERT RED ANG STRS; FS,NI .............................500-550#
DEDIC – 60 HERF CLVS; FS ...................................................................450-550#
HENRY – 60 BLK & BWF MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI.......................................550-600#
HOBART & HOBART – 60 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................500#
SCHLECT – 60 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................475#
ROSETH CATTLE CO – 50 BLK CLVS; FS................................................400-600#
RIGGINS – 50 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..............................................................500-600#
PIROUTEK – 50 CHAR X CLVS; FS..........................................................600-625#
HOFFMAN – 50 RED CLVS; FS,NI
MARLER – 50 BLK & BWF CLVS (ALL HFRS IN TOWN); FS,NI .................500-600#
SKOGEN – 50 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI...................................................500-550#
WILLIAMS – 45 BLK STRRS; FS,NI ..........................................................550-600#
HANSON – 45 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................................550-600#
HARTSHORN – 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................500-600#
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.philiplivestock.com. Upcoming sales & consignments can
be viewed on the Internet at www.philiplivestock.com, or on the DTN: Click on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA is now qualified to handle third party verified NHTC cattle
(Non-Hormonal Treated Cattle).
Keep supporting R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA is our
voice in government to represent U.S. cattle
producers in trade marketing issues. Join
today & help make a difference!
Philip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Live-
stock Auction, will be offering video sale as an additional
service to our consignors, with questions about the video
please callJerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
Philip, SD
ADDISON & WILLIAMS – 30 RED STRS; FS,NI ...............................................400#
HARRIS – 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................550-600#
MEINEN – 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................................500#
HAUK – 26 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..........................................................................550#
ROSETH – 25 BLK STRS; FS..........................................................................575#
BILLS – 25 BLK CLVS; FS ..............................................................................525#
HAMANN – 25 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................................550#
BRAVE BULL CREEK INC – 15 BLK STRS; FS,NI.....................................500-550#
GRAVE – 10 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................600-650#
DUGAN – 5 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI ......................................................550-600#
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS 11:00 AM
(MT) CALVES 12:00 PM (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 3,000 HEAD
COMPLETE DISPERSION: ....................................................................................
PHILIP HOY – “COMPLETE DISPERSION OF COMING 4 YR OLD TO BROKEN
MOUTH COWS” .....................................................................................................
390 RED ANG COMING 4 YR OLD TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:RED;
CLVS:4-22 FOR 60 DAYS (REPRODUCTIVE SHOTS)
BRED CATTLE:
A CONSIGNMENT – 185 BLK & RED RUNNING AGE COWS; BRED:BLK & RED
SATURDAY, OCT. 26: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS 11:00 AM
(MT) CALVES 12:00 PM (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 2,000 HEAD
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
DEERING – 250 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................600#
LONG – 200 CHAR X STRS; FS,NI ...........................................................500-600#
ALDREN – 150 CHAR X CLVS; FS...........................................................500-570#
LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT – 150 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...............................500-550#
LAMPHERE & GRUBL – ......................130 MOSTLY CHAR X & A FEW BLK CLVS;
FS,NI .................................................................................................550-600#
BALDWIN – 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................500-575#
SHULL – 65 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................................500#
MAY – 50 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI,AN ...........................................................550#
SIMONS – 30 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI .........................................................500-600#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH-
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 5: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE
SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS WEANED CALF SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS,
& HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS
CATTLE REPORT
TUES., OCTOBER 15, 2013
A lite run of calves due to the weather.
Lots of buyers, very few potloads. Weigh-
ups very strong. Big Sale here next Tues-
day, Oct. 22nd. Weigh-ups and bred cat-
tle on Wed-nesday. Special Calf Sales
Saturday, Oct. 19th & Saturday, Oct.
26th.
CALVES:
JOHN W. & PAULINE STABEN, ORAL
80............................RED STR 626# .......$184.00
22............................RED STR 527# .......$190.00
41............................RED HFR 577.........$180.00
10............................RED HFR 473# .......$183.00
RICHTER & KELLY, QUINN
77 ..........................CHAR STR 560# .......$188.50
39 ...............BLK/RD/CH STR 438# .......$214.00
83..........................CHAR HFR 528# .......$179.25
23 ..............BLK/RD/CHR HFR 419# .......$187.00
BOB AMIOTTE, WANBLEE
14.....................BLK/BWF STR 451# .......$222.00
45 ....................BLK/BWF STR 552# .......$187.25
9......................BLK/BWF HFR 452# .......$190.00
39 ...................BLK/BWF HFR 533# .......$179.50
JOHNA ROVERE, STURGIS
32 ............................BLK STR 556# .......$188.50
3 ..............................BLK STR 462# .......$210.00
23............................BLK HFR 523# .......$179.00
VALLERY & MILLS, NISLAND
68 ............................BLK STR 533# .......$193.00
6 ..............................BLK STR 433# .......$201.00
19 ...........................BLK HFR 453# .......$185.00
TERRY GUNN, WASTA
40.....................BLK/BWF STR 586# .......$183.25
12 .....................RD/BLK STR 491# .......$200.00
7......................BLK/BWF HFR 541# .......$180.00
DIAMOND B RANCH, HERMOSA
32....................RWF/BWF STR 554# .......$183.00
32 ...................RWF/BWF HFR 528# .......$179.50
DAVE & BILIE HUMPHREY, WALL
16 ...................CHAR/BLK STR 593# .......$180.00
16 ...................BLK/BWF HFR 531# .......$178.50
DALE SCHUELKE, BLACK HAWK
17.....................BLK/BWF STR 441# .......$209.50
42.....................BLK/BWF STR 569# .......$185.25
8..............................BLK HFR 419# .......$194.00
29........................... BLK HFR 502# .......$179.75
DENNIS SHARP, INTERIOR
29............................BLK HFR 502# .......$188.50
11....................BLK/BWF HFR 467# .......$179.00
TUCKER AMIOTTE, INTERIOR
17....................BLK/BWF HFR 411# .......$209.00
54 ......................RD/BLK STR 504# .......$192.00
15......................RD/BLK HFR 400# .......$186.00
46 .....................RD/BLK HFR 484# .......$178.00
WADE & WYATT PETERSON, ENNING
51 ............................BLK STR 575# .......$181.00
7 ......................BLK/BWF STR 468# .......$206.00
12 ..................CHAR/BLK HFR 471# .......$181.00
27....................BLK/BWF HFR 543# .......$175.25
WATKINS JP RANCH, EDGEMONT
7 ..............................BLK STR 483# .......$206.50
25.....................BLK/BWF STR 602# .......$177.50
35 ...................BLK/BWF HFR 582# .......$175.00
MARK KRUGER, PLEASANTVIEW, NE
4 .............................BLK STR 475# .......$204.50
15 ............................BLK STR 592# .......$175.25
14....................BLK/BWF HFR 566# .......$170.50
KEVIN REINDL, CUSTER
6 ..............................BLK STR 503# .......$186.00
23 ...................CHAR/BLK STR 612# .......$172.50
8..............................BLK HFR 438# .......$195.00
27 ...........................BLK HFR 571# .......$170.00
GRADY BRUNSCH, INTERIOR
5 ........................RD/BLK STR 469# .....$1963.00
11 ...........................BLK STR 563# .......$171.00
LEONARD REMER, HERMOSA
9 ..................BLK STF (NO FS) 640# .......$160.50
7............RD/BLK HFR (NO FS) 471# .......$174.50
7..................BLK HFR (NO FS) 651# .......$143.25
YEARLINGS
THE NATURE CONSERVANCY, SCENIC
26 ............................BLK STR 702# .......$171.75
ERIC HANSEN, WALL
6 ......................BLK/BWF STR 870# .......$151.00
31.....................BLK/BWF STR 979# .......$149.00
GERALD & SHARLA JULSON, QUINN
12....................BLK/BWF HFR 890# .......$150.75
FORREST STEWART, CODY
16 ...................CHAR/BLK STR 801# .......$147.50
WEIGH-UPS
1 .............................BLK COW 1,486# ......$92.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,366# ......$92.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,571# ......$91.50
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,576# ......$90.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,481# ......$90.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,491# ......$89.50
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,336# ......$89.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,516# ......$88.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,471# ......$87.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,706# ......$85.50
1.............................RED COW 1, 416# ......$85.00
1 ...........................HERF COW 1, 486# ......$84.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,456# ......$83.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 231# ......$89.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1, 531# ......$87.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 416# ......$89.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 486# ......$86.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,356# ......$85.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1,336# ......$84.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 361# ......$87.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1,341# ......$85.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,446# ......$84.50
1.............................BLK BULL 2,106# ......$97.00
1...........................CHAR BULL 1,906# ......$95.00
1.............................BLK BULL 1,996# ......$92.00
1 ............................BLK HFRT 1,021# ....$100.00
1.......................BLK COWETTE 1,006# ......$99.00
1 .....................BLK COWETTEE 1,171# ......$91.00
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
~ Saturday, Oct. 19th ~
New York Strip
~ Monday, Oct. 21st ~
1/2 lb. Cheeseburger
& French Fries
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday Downtown Philip
Salad Bar
Available at
Lunch!
~ Tuesday, Oct. 15th ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Oct. 16th ~
Indian Taco or
Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Oct. 17th ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Oct. 18th ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Shrimp • Chicken
Reservations:
859-2774
Bill and Polly Bruce had a visit
last Tuesday from Brian and Lola
Scott of Ft. Pierre. The Scotts
were delivering some pork that
Bill and Polly had purchased from
them. Thursday, Vince and a
group of helpers moved cattle
home from the south pasture.
Polly fed the crew lunch. Dorothy
Paulson was also there for lunch,
because Nels was one of those
helping move cattle. Dorothy
brought along some clothes to be
fixed, so Polly did the sewing and
Dorothy picked the clothes up Sat-
urday. Aren't neighbors wonder-
ful? Bill and Polly's son, Andy,
came to the ranch Saturday to
help Vince with some projects, and
he returned home later Sunday.
Saturday evening, Bill and Polly
attended church in Midland.
Deep Creek Church ham and
lutefisk supper and bazaar
Saturday October 26th, 6:00 -
7:30 CT.
Jon and Connie Johnson en-
joyed having their son, Wyatt,
home from college for the long
weekend. Son Avery wasn't having
such a great weekend, however.
He had his wisdom teeth removed
Friday – hope he is getting back to
normal by now. Connie said that
they had gotten everything out of
the garden for the season, and it is
good to have that project finished.
Frank and Shirley Halligan re-
turned home Friday from a trip
that took them to points north-
east. Shirley said they boarded a
boat at Quebec City, and they
went to Newfoundland, Nova Sco-
tia, New Brunswick, Maine and
Boston. She said they saw some
beautiful country, and the trees in
Maine were especially beautiful.
The only down side of the trip was
that both Shirley and Frank were
under the weather, dealing with
bad coughs. One benefit of the trip
was that Shirley found out the
motion of the boat really helps her
sleep! Hope they both feel better
real soon.
Max and Joyce Jones were in
Pierre for several days last week
attending the Grand Chapter of
Eastern Star. While they were in
Pierre, their daughter, Kim, and
son, Todd, and their families
joined them one evening so the
kids could enjoy swimming at the
hotel pool! Max and Joyce enjoyed
seeing many good friends during
the meetings, but as always they
were glad to be back home.
Ray and Nancy Neuhauser en-
joyed their normal activities last
week. Nancy attended funeral
services Thursday for Regina
Iversen. Following the funeral,
Nancy stopped in to visit with
Clara Eldridge at a local nursing
home. Nancy went back to the
nursing home Saturday and en-
tertained the residents with some
piano playing. Nancy's daughter,
Kathy, stopped in for a visit Fri-
day evening.
Marge Briggs has been busy
drying pears from their pear tree.
She said the next thing on her
agenda will be making some
tomato preserves.
Ruth Neuhauser said there was
a fall fling last Wednesday at
Highmore Health. It is an annual
event, and families are invited to
join the residents for a potluck
supper. Ruth's son, Kevin, was
trying to get corn harvested ahead
of the rain, so he wasn't able to at-
tend, but Ruth's daughter-in-law,
Mary, was able to join her. Ruth's
daughter and son-in-law, Nina
and Lynn Nachtigall, are cur-
rently in Italy, and they will be
spending several months there
with their son and his family.
Ruth's other daughter, Connie,
and her husband, Bunky, have
been home in Arkansas following
a busy summer at fairs across the
country. They got to spend several
days at home, but they are now in
Georgia for another show. They
provide quite a service for the
agriculture industry – giving folks
in urban areas some education
about where their food comes
from!
Greetings from cool, wet, over-
cast, blustery northwest Haakon
County. What a wet country we
live in! Last May, when everything
was so dry and there was no soil
moisture for the crops and the
pastures, I couldn't have imagined
that things could be so wet here.
Our ditches are full of water, the
dams are full and overflowing, the
pastures are still green, and the
low spots in the fields are full of
water. The harvest of fall crops is
certainly put on hold for a while! I
think the weatherman should
start giving the wind chill factors
when he reports the weather – I
know I've been wearing a cap and
gloves when I am working out-
doors.
The clean up continues after the
recent blizzard in western South
Dakota. I know some folks are still
without electricity following the
storm, and ranchers who lost live-
stock are doing all they can to dis-
pose of the carcasses. Flooding
and more rain and snow are mak-
ing the task even more difficult.
The numbers are still being tal-
lied, but animal agriculture in
western South Dakota took a
tremendous hit. And, of course,
the families who lost livestock are
reeling from the loss. My thoughts
and prayers continue to go out to
everyone who has been impacted.
Thank goodness for the help of
friends and neighbors in times
like this!
On to the news – Mary
Neuhauser was in Sioux Falls
with her brother Friday. Her
brother has been having back
problems, so Mary took him to
Sioux Falls for some tests. Satur-
day morning, Mary took a geneal-
ogy class in Pierre before coming
to the ranch for the weekend. Sat-
urday evening, Kevin and Mary
attended the Hayes Community
picnic.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson have
been getting some of their fall
work done. Nels has been busy
with the process of turning his
sweet corn into sweet corn meal –
a true labor of love. Nels and
Dorothy were in Pierre Wednes-
day, and Thursday, Nels helped
the Bruces move cattle home.
Dorothy attended church Sunday,
and Sunday afternoon their
friend, Otis Funk, and his parents
stopped by for a visit. Dorothy got
word that her sister, Wilma, has
been hospitalized in Sioux Falls.
Dorothy has two brothers who live
near there, so they are helping to
make sure Wilma gets the care
she needs.
Dick and Gene Hudson were in
Wall Wednesday to attend the an-
nual meeting of the West
River/Lyman-Jones Rural Water
Systems. Gene said it has been 20
years since they broke ground on
the project, and a very interesting
history was given at the meeting.
From Wall, Dick and Gene went
on to Rapid City to keep eye ap-
pointments Thursday, returning
home Thursday evening. Dick and
Gene's grandson, Wyatt, was
home from his studies at South
Dakota State University for the
weekend, and he identified a cou-
ple of roosters from his poultry
flock that needed to be butchered.
Lucky for him, Grandma Gene
butchered the roosters and
treated Wyatt and his family to a
fried chicken dinner! Later in the
weekend, Wyatt requested
Grandma Gene's homemade
tomato soup! Gene is an excellent
cook, and I'm sure the food tastes
extra good to a college kid who has
been eating in the cafeteria.
Lola Roseth has been extra busy
lately with her emergency man-
agement duties. She was in Rapid
City last Thursday to attend a
press conference, and she at-
tended an EMT meeting in Mid-
land Thursday evening before
returning to the ranch.
Sunday, Lee and Mary drove to
the river to see how much the
water had come up. Their daugh-
ter, Keva, was at the ranch for
lunch Monday, but she was in a
hurry to return to her home near
Bear Butte because the weather
was getting bad in that area.
Later Monday afternoon, daugh-
ter Rea Riggle and granddaugh-
ters, Cattibrie and Kinsey, came to
the ranch for a visit. The roads
were pretty soft because of the
rain, but they made it without any
trouble. Mary said that Lil Briggs
is not doing as well as she was
earlier – please keep Lil in your
prayers. Lil is still in her home,
with family and friends taking
care of her.
Wednesday afternoon, Billy and
Arlyne Markwed's grandson, Todd
Kurtz, arrived for a visit. Todd has
been living in Fargo, but he is in
the process of relocating to Albu-
querque where he has accepted a
position with a local television sta-
tion. He will be the morning an-
chorman – congratulations, Todd!
He left for Albuquerque Friday
morning. Saturday, Billy and Ar-
lyne's grandson, T.J. Gabriel and
his wife, Jeanine, took their older
two children to the movie in
Pierre. Young Kyler Gabriel got to
stay with Billy and Arlyne, and
they took him with them to the
Hayes Community picnic. There
were lots of young kids there, so
Kyler had a ball! Sunday morning,
Billy helped T.J. move some cattle
home from summer quarters, and
later in the day Billy and Arlyne
attended church. Their friend,
Steve McDaniel, stopped by to
visit later Sunday.
Moenville News|Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Monna Van Lint recently had surgery. If you wish to send a card mail it
to: Monna Van Lint University of Minnesota; Medical Center, Fairview;
4D Surgical ICU; University Campus, Unit J; 500 Harvard Street SE;
Minneapolis, MN 55455
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Dance to
Westbound
Saturday,
October 19
9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
PR for web_Layout 1.pdf7.6 MB