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Pioneer Review, October 11, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 7
Volume 107
October 11, 2012
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........$8.21
Any Pro..............................$7.41
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.57
Milo .......................................$6.80
Corn.......................................$7.00
Millet...................................$28.75
Sunflower Seeds................$23.00
Cross
country
meet
8
Lady
Scotties
volley-
ball
9
Fridge
Door
3
Philip High
School
football
9
by Nancy Haigh
The October 2, meeting for the
Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners was uneventful as they
took care of basic business.
The first item of business was a
correction in the September 4,
2012, minutes. Auditor Pat Free-
man had written that the board
had decided to send a letter to
South Dakota State University
that Haakon County would not be
part of the four county 4-H cluster.
Freeman had also written that Sh-
eryl Hansen, 4-H administrative
assistant had been offered, and ac-
cepted the position of 4-H advisor.
The two issues had been discussed
as possibilities but no decisions had
been made.
Two Haakon County commis-
sioners will meet with their coun-
terparts from Jones, Jackson and
Mellette counties October 10 to dis-
cuss the cluster’s continuation or
demise. Also at the meeting will be
Barry Dunn, SDSU director of Ex-
tension.
Adele Harty, Extension cow/calf
field specialist and Mary Roduner,
Extension consumer horticulture
field specialist from the Rapid City
Regional Extension Center visited
with the commission. They up-
dated the board on activities within
their fields and asked for the
board’s comments and suggestions
on how the program has worked for
them and their constituents in the
past year.
Light agenda for commission
Kenny Neville, Haakon County highway
superintendent, was recognized Sep-
tember 17 at the South Dakota Associ-
ation of County Commissioners’ an-
nual convention for 40 years as a high-
way department employee in Haakon
County. Neville began as an equipment
operator in 1972. He became superin-
tendent in September 1993, replacing
Hank Miller. Photo by Nancy Haigh
Roduner noted she is in charge of
the Master Gardner program as
well as being an entomologist, spe-
cializing in garden insects, not crop
insects.
Kenny Neville updated the board
on the highway department. He
and the commission discussed
work at the Robb’s Flat site. The
new building should be moved to
the site within two weeks.
The board approved membership
payments for the Central South
Dakota Enhancement District and
the National Association of County
Officials.
Reports reviewed included the
veteran’s service officer, sheriff and
auditor/treasurer. Freeman noted
the jail and mentally ill funds were
in the red once again. The board
approved to supplement the jail
fund by $18,000 and the mentally
ill fund by $5,000.
Warrants for the past month
were approved.
An executive session for person-
nel evaluations was conducted for
approximately 45 minutes.
The board’s next meeting ws
changed from November 8 to No-
vember 6 so the board can also can-
vass the general election results.
by Del Bartels
The Philip Area AARP/Retired
Teachers Association held its
monthly soup supper and meeting,
Monday, September 24.
The guest speaker was Brit
Miller, president of the Philip
Chamber of Commerce. Miller said
he grew up in Philip and is a 2005
Philip High School graduate.
“I was one of those kids who
couldn’t wait to get out of Philip,”
said Miller. “We don’t appreciate
what we have here.” After college,
he held banking positions in Hoven
and Aberdeen. He said that, then,
his goal was to move back to Philip
and give back to the community. “I
realized just how special Philip is,”
said Miller. He has since helped
with the Philip Volunteer Fire De-
partment, helped referee football
and basketball games, and volun-
teers for various other activities.
He related that he moved back in
May, and in November was talked
into being the vice president of the
Philip Chamber of Commerce. All
he had to do was start showing up
for meetings, and next term the
vice president became the presi-
dent.
“We should be more active, both
as a chamber and economic devel-
opment,” said Miller. “We have so
many great employers, but we are
short on housing. We are not look-
ing into it real far.”
He praised the Philip Invita-
tional Matched Bronc Ride, and
noted for the past two years it has
had 2,000 people at the rodeo
grounds. “What we need to do is
find more things like that,” said
Miller.
He also praised other local
draws, such as a tax break for new
construction that has been initi-
ated by the Philip City Council.
Miller noted that the NAPA store
will be relocated to across from the
Pit Stop gas station. “If Dale (Mor-
rison) didn’t step up, we might
have lost NAPA in Philip,” said
Miller. “If you go to Wall or
Kadoka, everybody talks about the
(Gem) theater.”
Miller said that we have to get
more things going, though the
drought-affected economy is a fac-
tor, “Hopefully we can get some
rain and we can come out of it.
Pray for some rain for our local
farmers and ranchers.” He sug-
gested maybe a cost share program
or some other incentive to get some
local buildings redone.
“We are moving in the right di-
rection,” concluded Miller. “If you
ever see anybody on the street you
don’t know, say hi. It takes every-
body to make it better.”
In AARP/Retired Teacher Asso-
ciation business, the local chapter
must purchase liability insurance
as a safeguard, especially with the
use of the senior center facilities.
The annual grandparent essay
winners are students Jasmine Fer-
guson, Morgan Cantrell and Cylver
Lurz. There were 49 schools and
1,361 students across the state par-
ticipating in the essay program this
year. “They get really excited when
they can write about their grand-
parents. It’s fun to read, too,” said
Marcia West.
The “You’ve Earned a Say” pro-
gram from South Dakota AARP
made a 66-county tour across
South Dakota, registering what lo-
cals had to say about Medicare and
Social Security. The information
was compiled by SDAARP and sent
to the national office, and from
there will be sent to officials in
Washington, D.C. Local chapters
will be kept updated, mainly
through Mike West who serves on
the executive board of SDAARP.
During the local meetings of
“You’ve Earned a Say,” food drives
were held. Almost 5,000 pounds of
food was gathered statewide. The
Country Cupboard food pantry
based out of Wall needs syrup and
canned fruit, “but any kind of food
is welcome. It is used more than
we’d like to think,” said West.
The next meeting of the Philip
chapter of the AARP/Retired
Teachers Association will be Mon-
day, October 29, at 6:00 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center.
AARP guest speaker Brit Miller
by Del Bartels
For its Monday, October 9 meet-
ing, the Philip Chamber of Com-
merce hosted Kari O’Neill, who
promoted the Stronger Economies
Together program.
A few year’s back the Philip com-
munity began its participation in
the Horizons program. This is a
leadership development program
designed for small, rural towns. Its
main goals are to train future com-
munity leaders, address poverty is-
sues and work to make local
changes. Though bettering the
local economy, job prospectives and
housing are usually targets for
many communities, local econom-
ics are not necessarily the main
purpose of the Horizons program.
Stronger Economies Together
(SET) is geared to bring a region of
communities together in order to
improve the economies of all of
them as a whole. This local region
would include Haakon, Jackson
and eastern Pennington counties
“We can do more together than
we can on our own,” said Mary
Burnett. “It’s logical. This is our
trade area ... we’ve got businesses
who employ people from other com-
munities.” She related that the
stated region generally follows the
local telecommunications exchange
boundaries and “our medical serv-
ices are key to that area.”
“Basically, if we pull together
and pool our resources, we can
have a hand in our future,” said
Burnett.
O’Neill generalized how the rural
development program has done in
other states since it began two
years ago. “They’ve worked out a
lot of the kinks and its a really good
program,” said O’Neill. Once a re-
gion can show its SET plan, certain
grants may then be applied for to
help implement that plan.
To help get the regional economic
development group off the ground,
O’Neill, Burnett and Becky Breck
have been contacting people to join
in the first official SET meeting for
the region’s communities. That
meeting is tentatively set for Tues-
day, November 13, in Kadoka. Nine
meetings, to cover nine progressive
modules, are to be held within the
first year of the two-year program.
Philip may host at least two of
those meetings.
The group will consist of 40 to 50
Chamber looks into Stronger
Economies Together program
by U.S. Representative
Mike Rogers (R-Mich.)
We can get our national news on
cable television, catch the weather
on local broadcast stations, listen
to talk radio on the AM or FM dial
and follow our favorite blogs on the
Internet, but where do we turn for
local information that directly im-
pacts our daily lives? More often
than not it is community newspa-
pers.
Technology has transformed how
we gather information in the 21st
century. Newscycles run 24/7,
tablets and laptops are becoming
smaller and smart phones keep
getting smarter.
As a result most traditional large
newspapers are struggling to stay
alive – they are more and more fre-
quently printing only two to three
times a week, personnel and con-
tent are shrinking like never be-
fore, and more information is
shifted to online editions.
Yet local community newspapers
are thriving because they have per-
sistently weathered the storm year
in and year out to remain a fixture
in our everyday lives. As our soci-
eties become more complex and di-
verse with growing numbers of
ways to obtain information, the
role of local newspapers in inform-
ing our communities becomes even
more significant.
We count on them to regularly
check in with the courts and police
stations. They print announce-
ments on births, deaths, engage-
ments, marriages, anniversaries,
church news, job openings, school
information and service club en-
deavors.
They publish notices of local mu-
nicipal meetings. They print tax in-
creases, millage initiatives, notices
of changes in laws and property re-
zoning – all issues that most di-
rectly affect our pocketbooks by de-
termining how our hard-earned tax
dollars are spent at the local level
and how are local officials are rep-
resenting us.
They help run the local economic
engine and provide a marketplace
for the community. They offer local
small businesses with an effective
and affordable means of connecting
with local consumers. They print
sales at the supermarket, coupons
for discounts at local stores, real es-
tate listings, and classifieds for
everything from a used car to a
neighbor’s garage sale.
It’s also personal. Communities
feel a sense of ownership in their
local newspaper, and the people
that report the news are often our
friends and neighbors down the
street.
News aggregating websites such
as Drudge Report and the major
news blogs are great at offering up
major national and international
news and analysis, but they simply
do not provide the information on
issues that impact us at the local
level. It is especially true for the
elderly and those with low incomes
who often have less access to com-
puters and transportation.
They normally only publish once
a week, but community newspa-
pers remain the one constant
source of local information. In good
times and in bad, they stay focused
on us as a community.
Now more than ever, community
newspapers are an important bind-
ing thread of our cities and towns.
Local newspapers connect
us with our communites
by Del Bartels
The 63rd annual West Central
Electric Cooperative meeting, held
in Philip, Wednesday, October 3,
was a warning of diminishing in-
come, an increasing need for more
power plants, an environmental
condemnation of coal-powered
plants and an awareness of peak
power requirements.
Approximately 250 guests and
West Central Electric personnel
gathered in the Philip Fine Arts
Building. The official business
meeting was followed by a roast
beef supper provided by the Philip
Volunteer Fire Department. The
evening’s entertainment was the
Jim Szana Trio jazz group.
Door prizes included beef certifi-
cates, small appliances and grand
prizes of a color television, a patio
barbecue and a tabletop barbecue.
During the meeting, the Philip
chapter of Family, Career and
Community Leaders of America
provided child care. The opening
prayer was given by Father Kevin
Achbach and the national anthem
was sung by the Philip High School
honor choir.
West Central Electric is a rural
cooperative serving members in
Haakon, Jackson, Jones, Lyman
and Stanley counties. The coopera-
tive maintains around 3,573 miles
of line in an area of more than
7,000 square miles, serving approx-
imately 3,660 members. The coop-
erative’s monthly newsletter, “Co-
operative Connections,” includes
energy saving programs, current
events and issues about the cooper-
ative, along with local, state and
national news and information. Al-
most 40 people are employed by
West Central Electric.
West Central Electric officers
presented the projected future of
the cooperative. Chief Executive
Officer Steve Reed said, “One thing
about electricity, a warm winter is
not necessarily a good thing.” He
pointed out that less usage equated
into less sales, but with the same
operating costs and with increasing
peak requirements. The coopera-
tive is nine percent down from the
previous year, even with the hot
summer’s high air conditioner
needs.
“We believe this year’s weather
pattern is an anomaly,” said Reed.
After stressing that costs are going
up, he added, “Coal is all of a sud-
den the bad guy in the environmen-
tal debate,” even though almost 57
percent of the area’s electricity in
2011 came from coal operated
plants. Hydropower fulfilled 22
percent of the needs, renewables
(wind) nine percent, nuclear two
percent, natural gas half of a per-
cent, and purchases from other
areas was close to 10 percent.
Reed announced that the cus-
tomer billing due date will be on
the 20th of each month, to assist
with the cooperative’s own pay-
ment due dates. And, in 2013 a
three dollar charge increase will be
implemented. Customers who re-
quire less than 500 feet of hook-up
will not be charged, but for over
500 feet the cooperative member
will be charged an aid fee. Reed
said that it costs $12,000 to build a
1,500 foot hook-up.
One bright point, said Reed, was
that the TransCanada Keystone
XL Pipeline will, by far, be the co-
operative’s main customer. Trans-
Canada has already paid $9.5 mil-
lion for the cooperative to increase
its infrastructure.
Reed mentioned that the cooper-
ative’s two way automated commu-
nication computer program is help-
ing to control a stable output of en-
ergy. Bar coding will help with
real-time inventory. Cell phone no-
tifications to members will also
save costs and efforts, especially
since landlines may be out during
a power outage.
Vic Simmons of Rushmore Elec-
tric presented an update for the
state’s electric cooperatives. He
said, in order to keep up with fu-
ture demand, more power plants
must be built relatively soon. The
cooperatives of South Dakota,
North Dakota, Montana and
Wyoming have a $2.9 billion con-
struction program. Costs are going
up, a great percentage being a di-
rect result of requirements under
the Clean Air Act.
Cooperatives must be able to pro-
vide the generation and transmis-
sion of electricity needed to meet
maximum usage at any given in-
stance. Demand side management,
also called load control, can be pos-
itively affected by individuals by
running major appliances in off-
peak times.
Customers/members are encour-
aged to help with electrical load
bearing by running major appli-
ances at night or in the times that
are not peak times for electrical
use. The cooperative, by using a
customer-requested connection sys-
tem, can temporarily turn off hot
water heaters if variable peak load
times require it.
West Central Electric meeting
Steve Reed, chief executive officer
Philip area main-
tenance person-
nel, from left:
foreman Jim
Nickelson, line-
men Nathan
Drury and Greg
Arthur.
Chuck Kroetch, Philip, vice president on the West Central
Electric board of directors, helped distribute service awards
to employees. Here he is presenting a 20-year recognition
to Becky McQuistian, West Central Electric Cooperative cus-
tomer service.
continued on page 2
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Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
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Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Thursday: Partly cloudy in
the morning, then clear.
High of 52F. Winds from
the NE at 5 to 15 mph.
Thursday Night: Clear.
Low of 27F. Winds from the
ESE at 10 to 15 mph.
Friday: Clear in the morning, then
partly cloudy. High of 64F. Breezy.
Winds from the SSE at 15 to 20
mph.
Friday Night: Overcast. Fog overnight.
Low of 28F. Winds from the SSE at 10 to
15 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy with a
chance of snow. High of 68F.
Breezy. Winds from the North
at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of
snow 20%.
Saturday Night: Clear. Low of 34F.
Winds from the North at 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy.
High of 64F. Winds from
the SSW at 5 to 15
mph.
Sunday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 30F. Winds
from the West at 10 to 15 mph.
Get your complete &
up-to-the minute
local forecast:
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Monday: Partly cloudy.
High of 63F. Winds from
the WNW at 5 to 15
mph.
Monday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 36F. Winds
from the West at 5 to 10 mph.
“Dead skunk in the middle of the
road. You got yer dead skunk in
the middle of the road. Stinkin’ to
high Heaven!” So go the lyrics of a
song written and performed by
Loudon Wainwright. It is espe-
cially appropriate right now since
skunks appear to have had a ban-
ner year. Not only are they dead in
the middle of the road but also on
the shoulder and even on some city
streets. I don’t know how many
carcasses I’ve seen, but there have
been a lot.
This is not hard to believe since
skunks often have multiple off-
spring. They are similar to cats as
far as reproduction goes, and you
know having four kittens in a
batch is fairly common. Sometimes
there are more that that. There-
fore, if you have ten female skunks
around, they could multiply them-
selves to forty by fall. I think that’s
what happened this year. There
must have been many large
batches and few stillborns
This, too, is the season you are
most apt to see the results of the
year’s production since they are all
drifting around looking for cozy
winter quarters. Culverts under
roads are quite popular. Buildings
are too. Just the other day, Wally
asked if I’d like to help him move
three dead skunks from under his
house. I said that, alas, I had a
very busy schedule for both the
morning and afternoon and
couldn’t possibly provide assis-
tance. What a pity I couldn’t help.
Over the years, I’ve dispatched a
whole lot of skunks. They particu-
larly adore the cat food I usually
have sitting out in dishes in the
barn. What’s more, the cats just ac-
cept them as kin without making a
fuss. Let a coon come in the barn
and eat cat food, and the cats get
nervous. You can tell right away
that something is wrong when you
walk in the barn and the cats are
all sitting on high places looking
nervously around. This is a signal
to grab your gun, walk carefully,
and check the rafters for ringed
tails. Cats give no warning about
skunks, though, so you’d just bet-
ter keep your wits about you in the
barn, especially after dark. I’ve
never been actually sprayed by a
striped kitty, but it has been a near
thing many times. Early spring
and fall are the times one should
be especially careful.
It’s not bad enough that these
striped beasts have potent stink
glands, but, what is worse, they
are the most common carrier of ra-
bies in this area. As far as I know,
we have never had rabies on the
place, but that doesn’t mean it
couldn’t happen. Any critter in-
cluding cats that acts strangely
needs to be closely watched. The
only thing worse than a rabid
skunk, as far as I’m concerned,
would be a rabid bat. You could
probably outrun a skunk, but bats
would be quite a bit trickier to
avoid. We sometimes get bats in
the barn too, and I really hate that.
I go in and out just as quickly as
possible when they are there. Ac-
cording to recent statistics, not
many bats actually have rabies,
but I don’t trust them anyway, the
nasty things. If they were loveable
creatures, they wouldn’t be com-
monly displayed in conjunction
with the scariest time of year,
namely Halloween.
It is also almost impossible to
chase a skunk out of a building be-
fore shooting it. They won’t go even
if there are lots of doors, and
they’re all open. For one thing, you
have to stay a goodly distance
away so you can’t really force the
issue. Long ago I gave up trying to
get them outside and now just
shoot them where they stand.
Then I quickly exit the building
and wait at least a day before going
back, picking up the smelly beast
with a pitchfork, and disposing of
it a considerable distance away
down a draw.
The only redeeming feature
about skunks might be that they
are fairly pretty. They usually
have glossy black hair punctuated
by a big white stripe or two. Their
beauty, though, could be compared
to that of creeping jenny which also
is somewhat pretty. Neither one
can be fully appreciated when you
know what problems they can
cause.
My favorite story in this regard,
however, might be the one from
schooldays in town. It was spring
and a lilac was blooming outside
the window. Mom said, “Open the
window so you can smell the
lilacs.” I did open the window but
just as a skunk walked by. I told
Mom, “I don’t think I care much for
the smell of lilacs.” She came to my
room right away to check this out,
smelled the skunk, and got a terri-
ble fit of the giggles.
So in conclusion, “It’s dead. It’s
in the middle. Dead skunk in the
middle of the road. It’s dead. It’s in
the middle, and stinkin’ to high,
high Heaven.”
law enforcement–––––––––––––––––––––––
7-9-12: Speeding: Hank R. Hamil, Piedmont, OK; fined $105.
7-10-12: Careless Driving: Linda A. Swendsen, Hermosa; fined
$120.
7-11-12: Fee Required of Harvest Vehicle: Bryce E. Erickson,
Tustin, MI; fined $170.
7-11-12: Extra Weight Allow Vehicles Hauling From Har-
vest: Joni R. Driskell, Steinaner, NE; fined $170.
7-11-12: Extra Weight Allow Vehicles Hauling From Har-
vest: Joseph J. Gray, Remington, VA; fined $170.
continued from page 1
people representing the different
communities in the region. They
will then work in smaller groups.
The modules are geared knowing
that some people will probably not
be able to make all of the meetings.
The second year is to be more on
the region’s own initiative, with
less oversight from Extension edu-
cators, United States Department
of Agriculture Rural Development
state staff, and Regional Rural De-
velopment Centers.
Previous regional areas in the
SET program have strengthened
their local telecommunications, im-
proved their local food market and
food distribution, or brought in
adult education to augment the
local business needs such as weld-
ing training.
“In two years you are not going
to develop a big, big change, but
you’ll have a start,” said O’Neill.
Available will be coaching and ex-
pertise from the Governors Office
of Economic Development, state de-
mographic data, leadership train-
ing, technological assistance, and
peer-to-peer networking.
Some of the major benefits to
successful region applicants have
been the uncovering of local assets
and resources that can advance the
region’s economy. The local SET re-
gion may apply for a special assis-
tance grant to help with data
analyses or get specific expertise
needed by the team. If interested in
joining, individuals should contact
Burnett or Brech.
The next official meeting for the
Philip Chamber of Commerce will
be at 7:00 p.m., Monday, November
12, at the 73– Saloon’s meeting
room.
Stronger Economies Together
Perfect hunt ... by Del Bartels
On and off for months now the rancher had spotted, though only
fleetingly, the massive buck. A lifelong hunter, he had noted the first
initial growth of the antlers, then the velveting of the thick, sprawling
rack. One dewy predawn, he watched in wonder as the stag loudly
scraped off the covering against a tree, the newly polished horns glis-
tening in the first streaks of the rising sun. No other bucks had dared
answer the clacking challenge; this deer was king. Before the sun fin-
ished its kiss with the horizon, the master of the fields had vanished.
Yet, over the months the rancher had gained a feeling for the route
taken by the buck during the surveillance of its realm.
Now, the man sat by the gaping window of the loft in an old barn
fairly distant from his house. He quietly unscrewed the top of his coffee
thermos to refill his cup. Decades of experience had taught him to stay
part of the night, thus he had climbed up hours ago using braille and
familiarity in the noiseless dark. His rifle rested across his lap.
Eyes stained to penetrate the night’s darkness. Pinpricks of stars
began fading as the eastern horizon grew less black. The blurred mass
along the creek wavered into individual tentacled shapes and further
into the bare-branched trees they were. Upright spears in the distance
slowly distinguished themselves as power poles. Post by post a fence
line hazed itself out of the field behind, the field itself crawling from a
light-absorbing ebony to a brown covering of winter grasses.
Ears were aware of hints of vibration barely called sound. A bird,
acres away, scolded the coming morning. A creak echoed from below,
as old barn wood stretched to the day’s waking temperatures. Miles
away, a truck hummed through the night. The man’s own breathing,
slowed to a statue’s pace, whispered like ancient air from a cave. A ...
something ... made a single tick from out a long ways. Could it have
been brittle grass being brushed aside, one twig becoming two as it was
pushed into the ground, a tap of antler against branch?
The rising heat from the cup near his face was ignored. Coffee, straw,
the creek – all were smells as the cup was eased down. Dried grain
lines of the wood could be felt by his skin as the cup reached the board.
Out the window, grasses glanced his way as air lightly mimicked a
breeze. Lines on the earth became stems of plants, specks became
leaves on the ground, brownish spots became cow leavings, and brown-
ish lines became ancient tire tracks. There he stood! The monarch was
in full pride. Huge shoulders supported the thick neck. His head bran-
dished the sculpted antlers that were his crown.
Years of raising the gun. Hours of sighting in. Minutes of easing the
trigger. The king heard the click. He stared, snorted in disgust and was
gone. The man smiled. He laid down the rifle and unsheathed his knife.
One more deep mark joined the scores of others on the barn wall next
to the window. Never a bullet, but always hunting at its best.
Donald W. Haynes, Philip, a
Modern Woodmen of America rep-
resentative, has completed a five-
day educational program at Mod-
ern Woodmen’s home office in Rock
Island, Ill.
The advanced training program
focused on helping business owners
with Modern Woodmen life insur-
ance plans, annuities and IRAs.
Additional emphasis was given to
the use of employee benefit plans in
various types of businesses. Train-
ing also included strategies to help
provide income from retirement as-
sets and pension plans to those ap-
proaching retirement.
Founded in 1883, Modern Wood-
men of America touches lives and
secures futures. The fraternal fi-
nancial services organization offers
financial products and fraternal
member benefits to individuals and
families throughout the United
States.
Haynes finishes advanced training
The Country Cupboard food
pantry and the Wall Community
Library are working together by
Feeding the Mind and Body. The
library has donated books the li-
brary board has deemed surplus to
the food pantry. The pantry will
then use the books in fundraising
opportunities.
The first major fundraising event
will be for the pantry to participate
in the Wall Community Craft Fair
held in November. At this event,
books can be purchased for a can of
food or a monetary donation. It will
be an opportunity for gift shopping,
for motels to provide reading mate-
rial for their guests, or adding to
personal collections.
The library storage capacity for
surplus books is all but non-exis-
tent. The library cannot sell the
books, but can donate them to a
nonprofit organization 501 (c3).
The library desires to partner with
another Wall community service
group that would benefit the li-
brary and the community.
This partnership benefits citi-
zens of Wall as well as those in
many adjacent rural areas. The li-
brary and pantry have been part-
ners since the pantry opened. A
basket of books has been made
available to pantry clients since it
opened in May 2010. Both entities
desire to serve their local citizens
to the fullest degree of their mis-
sions, to share their resources.
People can help their library,
food pantry and the community by
coming to the community craft fair,
November 4, by bringing a can of
food and walking away with a book
or two. Join the community in
Feeding the Mind and Body.
Feeding mind and body
Philip Motor, in conjunction with Ford Motor Company, held a vehicle test driving
event, Friday, October 5, in which $20 per test drive was donated to the Philip
Volunteer Fire Department. Several types of vehicles – cars and pickups – were
available for inspection at the Philip Fire Hall parking lot. A free lunch was offered
to all licensed drivers who did a no-obligation test drive. Approximately 250 peo-
ple registered for test drives. The PVFD might use the funds toward purchasing a
new pumper truck, or other needed equipment. Shown above are licensed drivers
registering to test drive a vehicle. Below are Philip Motor’s Tyler Hauk, PVFD
deputy chief Marty Hansen and firefighter Tyler Gartner. Photos by Del Bartels
Drive one 4UR community
Wednesday, October 3, Doug Hauk’s freshmen and sophomore classes were vis-
ited by two state FFA officers, Kelli Garry, state reporter, left, and Taylor Leonhardt,
state president. Both are freshmen at South Dakota State University, and are
earning six credit hours in communications skills through classroom visits, busi-
ness tours and legislative breakfasts. In Philip, they led interactive games that
included introducing people as if they were vegetables or pizza toppings, and
working among different groups to find missing Lego pieces to complete a team’s
project. All this was to promote FFA. State FFA officers visit every FFA chapter in
South Dakota. These two are on a central swing through the state. “Pretty active
year for these kids,” said Hauk. “We both like it a lot, the workshop aspect espe-
cially. We have different curriculum activities for different age groups on team-
work and trust,” said Garry. Photo by Del Bartels
State FFA officers visit
The following local FFA mem-
bers have qualified to compete or
perform at the 85th National FFA
Convention in Indianapolis, Octo-
ber 24 through October 27.
Natural resources – Philip:
Wyatt Johnson, Avery Johnson,
Jade Berry and Nicholas Hamill.
Agricultural issues – Wall: Brett
Gartner, Elsie Fortune, Emily
Linn, Jennifer Emery, Josie Bla-
sius, Kaden Eisenbraun and Kailey
Sawvell.
Philip team to FFA nationals
On September 30, 22 shooters
participated in the annual Town
Team Shoot held at the Kadoka
Trapclub. Competing were shooters
from Winner, Belvidere, Pierre,
Hamill, Midland, Kadoka, Custer,
Edgemont, Hot Springs, Wall and
Gillette, Wyo.
The team competion was held
first, with three teams shooting a
total of 125 targets each The team
from Wall/Edgemont consisting of
Garrett Bryan, Toby Wagner, Jes-
sica Wagner, Mick Stoddard and
Alfred Schutt was the winner.
Kadoka and Belvidere were the
other two competing teams.
After the team shoot, there were
three other competions of 50 birds
each in singles, handicap and dou-
bles. Champion in singles was Tom
Parquet, Midland, with 50/50.
Class A was Mick Stoddard, Edge-
mont, with 48/50. Class B was Jeff
Swartz, Pierre, with 40/50, and
Class C was Toby Wagner, Wall,
with 36/50.
Winning the handicap was Rudy
Reimann, Belvidere, with 44/50.
Class A was Swartz with 37/50 and
Class C was Stoddard with 33/50.
Doubles champion was Stoddard
with 47/50. Class A winner was
Stanley Reimann, Gillette, Wyo.,
with 46/50. Class B was Russell
Cvach, Midland, with 36/50, and
Class C was Jessica Wagner, Wall,
with 33/50.
Winning the gorilla, the longest
streak in the 16-yard singles with-
out a miss, was Parquet with 50/50.
Kadoka trapshoot results
Make your opinion
known … write a letter
to the editor!
Email with phone
number to
newsdesk@
pioneer-review.com
Pocket Gophers vs. Moles and
their Control
Pocket gophers and moles have
similarities, and distinct differences.
Both animals spend the majority of
their time below ground, and cause
homeowners headaches with their
burrowing activity. Pocket gophers
also cause problems for farmers and
ranchers, particularly in hayfields,
where the dirt mounds they create
interferes with hay harvest.
Determining which pest is in-
volved is important in implementing
a control method, and the best way
to do so is by the signs that can be
seen above ground. Often, the only
visible sign of pocket gophers is the
mounds they construct as they re-
turn below ground after their occa-
sional visits into the open air. Pocket
gopher mounds are generally fan or
kidney-shaped, as opposed to the
smaller, usually round mounds
made by moles. Pocket gopher bur-
rows are typically deep enough to re-
main largely undetected from the
soil surface, whereas at least some of
the burrows moles create show up as
undulating, raised runways.
Pocket gophers are rodents, and
therefore plant feeders, not only
causing damage and being a nui-
sance because of their mound build-
ing habits, but cause some direct loss
by feeding on the roots of plants,
somewhat on aboveground vegeta-
tion, and pulling vegetation into
their tunnels from below. They are
also known to damage plastic water
lines and electrical cables by chew-
ing on them.
Moles on the other hand, are not
rodents, but insectivores. Their diet
consists mainly of the insects, grubs,
and worms they find in the soil.
Moles are thought to damage roots
and tubers by feeding on them, but
rodents usually are to blame. Al-
though moles remove damaging in-
sects from lawns and gardens, their
burrowing habits are not viewed fa-
vorably.
Due to the mole’s exclusive diet of
insects, toxic grain baits are seldom
effective, although two poisons are
federally registered for use on them.
Pocket gophers however, being her-
bivores, can be controlled with poi-
son baits. The baits can be applied in
burrows by hand on a small scale, or
with a mechanical burrow builder if
dealing with a field scale infestation.
Fumigants are possible methods
of controlling both pocket gophers
and moles, but they have been
known to close off burrows so the fu-
migant cannot get to them. The fu-
migant may also move too slowly
through the burrow system to be ef-
fective. Carbon monoxide from auto-
mobile exhaust can be effective due
to its greater volume and pressure.
Fumigating can also be quite time-
consuming and labor intensive.
Due to their somewhat solitary
nature, and the fact that one pocket
gopher or one mole can construct an
extensive burrow system, trapping is
considered very successful for both
pests. For pocket gophers, trapping
is best for small areas and animals
not controlled with a poisoning con-
trol program. Because of somewhat
different habits and size, different
traps are intended for each pest.
Both gopher traps and mole traps
can be purchased at many hardware
stores.
There are also cultural and other
methods of minimizing damage from
both pocket gophers and moles. More
information on preventing and stop-
ping damage from pocket gophers,
moles and other wildlife can be ob-
tained from the “Internet Center for
Wildlife Damage Management”:
http://icwdm.org/ or contacting your
Regional Extension Center.
Calendar
10/16-18: SDSU Extension An-
nual Conference, Brookings
11/27-28: Ag Horizons Confer-
ence, Pierre
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
FLY CONTROL
–Dust Bags
–Sprays
–Pour ons
–Golden Malrin Fly Bait
COLD
BEER
Sunbody
Straw
Hats
Rural Living
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
We have trucks
available for on
farm pickup or if you
are a trucker call
us for loads.
SPECIALTY
CROP GROWERS!
Now buying
Bird Food, Oil Sunflower Seeds,
Green & Yellow Peas, Flax, Millet,
Safflower, and Milo
Contact:
Lee Klocke (605) 350-7486
email: lklocke@sunbird-inc.com
SUNFLOWER
GROWERS!
Now buying
Large Oil, Con Oil and Confection
Sunflowers for the edible and
de hulling market.
Contact:
Jarrid Graff at (605) 350-0188
email: jarrid@advancedsunflower.com or
Danny Dale at (605) 412-0129
email: danny@advancedsunflower.com
Call for current prices and
new crop sunflower prices.
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
ELECTRONIC BILL PAYING … ask us about the
advantages (NEVER BUY ANOTHER STAMP
FOR ANOTHER BILL.)
Safe and SECURE.
William Morrison
for Haakon County Sheriff
Remember to vote on
Tuesday, November 6th!
Paid for by William Morrison.
PHiliP CaNCeR SUPPoRt will meet Tuesday, October 16, at
6:30 in the Senechal Lobby. Anyone is welcome to attend.
PHiliP aRea aaRP/Rta will meet Monday, October 29, at 6:00
in the Senior Center with a soup supper, speaker and annual meet-
ing. Anyone is invited to attend.
CBC HalloWeeN PaRtY … Free to the community …
Wednesday, Oct. 24, senior citizen’s center, Philip. Potluck, 6:15
p.m. with drinks and utensils provided. Prizes for costumes. Please
bring two cans of food for food bank and white elephant gift in
brown paper bag with no names. Everyone welcome! For more info.,
call Darlene Matt at 859-2077.
leGioN aUXiliaRY MeetiNG …Thursday, Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m.
at the home of Kay Ainslie. Please bring Christmas gifts for the vet-
erans at the state home.
PleaSe JoiN US …in praying for our nation on Saturday, Oct.
13, at 12;00 p.m. at Philip Fire Hall Park.
aFteR 105 YeaRS, SeRViCeS at tHe MileSVille PoSt
oFFiCe aRe eNDiNG …with an “emergency suspension.” The
last day to do business was September 29. The Postal Service will
be trying to find a new plan to provide services in the Milesville
area, but the likely next step will be permanent closure.
to have your NoN-PRoFit meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Philip Area Farmer’s Market
Fall Fest
Saturday, October 13th
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
K-gee’s Building • Downtown Philip
Baked Goods ~ Honey ~ Produce
Jewelry ~ Handcrafted Items
Greetings Cards
Hair Accessories ~ Plus More!!
Lunch will be available
www.pioneer-
review.com
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2010 Dodge Ram 3500
SLT, Auto, Cummins Diesel,
Heavy Duty Grill Guard, Utility Bed
Give Ryan a call today!
www.philipmotor.com
Pasture, rangeland and forage
insurance is available for 2013 in
South Dakota based on a rainfall
index.
Haying and grazing needs can be
covered against moisture shortages
using the pasture, rangeland and
forage rainfall index, said Matthew
Diersen, South Dakota State Uni-
versity extension risk and business
management specialist.
“While producers would prefer to
be paid if they did not have forage,
the pasture, rangeland and forage
rainfall index relies on a close his-
torical relationship between rain-
fall timing and forage production
amounts,” Diersen said. He ex-
plained that producers can guard
against low precipitation during in-
sured intervals for localized grids
specific to haying or grazing needs.
Rainfall is grid-level and not farm-
or ranch-level when measured.
November 15 is the deadline to
purchase or change coverage for
the 2013 calendar year.
Diersen explained that the pas-
ture, rangeland and forage rainfall
index coverage available in South
Dakota mirrors pasture rents (per
acre) for grazing.
“The coverage is constant at
$204.23 per acre for haying. In the
event that precipitation is low dur-
ing an insured interval, producers
could use indemnity payments to
replace income or to purchase re-
placement feed," he said. "Unfortu-
nately the coverage does not in-
crease should prices move higher
during the insured year.”
Encouraging indicators at the
state level suggest that the pas-
ture, rangeland and forage rainfall
index would work well to manage
forage production risk. In years
with below average rainfall in
South Dakota, the hay yield was
also often below average. In partic-
ular, notable drought years in
South Dakota (1976, 1988, 2002
and 2006) had sharply lower rain-
fall totals and hay yields.
According to the Census of Agri-
culture, there were 23 million acres
in permanent pasture and range-
land across South Dakota in 2007.
The pasture, rangeland and forage
rainfall has been available in South
Dakota since the 2007 crop year
using a vegetation index, but only
540,000 acres were insured with
pasture, rangeland and forage in
2012.
“As detailed in the crop insur-
ance provisions, catastrophic cover-
age is not available for pasture,
rangeland and forage. Thus, pro-
ducers may also purchase Nonin-
sured Disaster Assistance Program
(NAP) coverage for the pasture,
rangeland and non-alfalfa hay-
land,” Diersen said.
He said it is up to producers to
decide whether the insurance is
necessary and valuable. “The high
subsidy rate likely gives the cover-
age value, but there are no ab-
solute guarantees that precip- ita-
tion shortages will always line up
with forage needs,” he said.
Premiums for pasture, range-
land and forage rainfall index vary
by county, type, coverage level,
practice/interval, and grid location.
Producers have to pick a coverage
level from 70 to 90 percent of the
grid base. A default to consider
would be the 70 percent level as it
has the highest subsidy rate. Pro-
ducers also have to pick a produc-
tivity level from 60 percent to 150
percent of the county base. This al-
lows for intra-county variability in
soil type, grade, and forage type.
Diersen explained that there are
many ways to allocate coverage.
“Not all acres need to be insured.
Selected acres are allocated across
11 two-month intervals. Intervals
cannot overlap a given month. At
most 70 percent and no fewer than
10 percent of acres can be in a sin-
gle interval," he said. "Ideally, a
producer will know key months
that a lack of precipitation would
result in less forage production.”
For more information, visit
www.igrow.org. Interested insur-
able parties can also contact a crop
insurance agent or go online to the
Risk Management Agency website
www.rma.usda.gov.
South Dakota pastures now
insurable with rainfall index
Due to this year’s drought, the
Natural Resources Conservation
Service has allowed an “area-wide
variance” for minimum residue re-
quirements on highly erodible
lands (HEL).
The variance applies to all coun-
ties in South Dakota except
Roberts County, if eligibility re-
quirements are met.
The area-wide variance would be
available for any untilled HEL
fields where residue levels are less
than required by the conservation
plans due to drought or because
residue has been harvested for for-
age (silage baled, grazed).
With the following exceptions,
the variance would not apply to
HEL fields that have been tilled
and have inadequate residue levels
since it is expected that tillage ac-
tivities be reduced or eliminated in
an attempt to ensure planned
residue levels are met.
Exceptions-variance would also
apply to tilled HEL fields if: A
cover crop or fall crop was planted
immediately after fall tillage. The
only tillage was due to spring ap-
plication of anhydrous ammonia
(with a narrow or low disturbance
shank on 30-inch or wider spac-
ings).
Again, the variance will only
apply if minimum residue levels
identified in the HEL compliance
plan are not met. HEL fields with
adequate residue levels would be
considered actively applying the
conservation plan and would not
need a variance.
For more information on the
area-wide variance for HEL, con-
tact Gerald Jasmer, state resource
conservationist, at 605-352-1234.
Area-wide variance on residue
requirements for erodible lands
Hit & Miss
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
elderly Meals
thursday, oct. 11: Chicken
Pasta Pomodora, Malibu Veggies,
Garlic Bread, Lemon Pie.
Friday, oct. 12: BBQ Pork
Sandwich, Sweet Potato Fries,
Curried Coleslaw, Cranberry Or-
ange Delight.
Monday, oct. 15: Roast Beef,
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Corn,
Roll, Pineapple Tidbits.
tuesday, oct. 16: Battered
Cod, French Fry Chips, Creamy
Coleslaw, Blonde Brownie.
Wednesday, oct. 17: Cookout
Day – Hot Dogs and Burgers.
***
Friday, September 28, Somerset
Court had a trip to the ice cream
shoppe which is always a gala trip.
I also saw they were setting up ta-
bles in the hospitality area on sec-
ond floor for the fall festival.
My son, Leslie, arrived at Somer-
set Court Friday morning. He had
driven to Rapid City from Bend,
Ore. He made a trip to Philip
Thursday. We had a nice visit.
Thank you for your visit, Leslie.
My daughter-in-law, Barbara
Hansen, came and took me to see
the fall foliage in Spearfish
Canyon. The colors were just peak-
ing. The scenery was so grand with
the blue sky, the high rocky cliffs,
the pines, the colorful deciduous
trees and the red vines and bushes.
We took photos at Bridal Veil Falls
and at Roughlock Falls. It seems
like a miracle that there would be
water for the falls after such a dry
summer.
Next we toured the campus of
Black Hills State University at
Spearfish and had lunch. Thank
you, Barbara, for a pleasant trip.
Floy, Violet, Irene A., and Irene
C. played rummi-cube and Mildred
K., Addie, Mary Lou, and Ina
played pinochle.
Wayne Hansen, M.R. and Bar-
bara Hansen, Clay Hansen, and
Leslie joined Vivian at suppertime
at the Somerset Court guest dining
room. Thank you, kids, for getting
together.
In the Philip Pioneer Review, I
especially like the Grindstone
News by Mary Eide. Grindstone is
my old hometown. When I was a
kid, we would take the cream to
Grindstone where there was a
cream testing station. (My sister,
Cecil, worked there.) Pa would give
me a nickle. I would buy a flat Her-
shey chocolate bar. Pa always said,
“Save some for another day.” And
those little squares lasted all week.
Saturday, September 29, my son,
Leslie, and his friend, Larry Lurz,
came to visit in the morning. Leslie
played my piano for a while, then
we went down to the activity gar-
den and he played the piano there
until the fall festival started. Then
we went out to see the tables of
goods on display on all three floors
at Somerset Court.
At Somerset Court the place was
a buzzin’ with the fall festival.
Many business enterprises set up
tables of their wares and residents
and a good crowd of townspeople
came in to buy. Most exhibits had
freebies, such as pens, tape meas-
ures, squeeze balls, samples of cos-
metics and gift certificates. Somer-
set Court provided hot cider stirred
with a cinnamon stick, candy corn
and cookies.
Jason’s daughter was with the
Rapid City Rebels softball team.
They were there selling taffy as a
fundraiser. Leslie gave a donation
to the team. One of the members of
the team was Cassidy Geerson,
granddaughter of Christine Auker,
who used to be my tablemate. Cas-
sidy kindly offered to help me see
Ariel Jackson’s (my great-grand-
daughter) trip to Salerno, Italy, on
tumblr, another sort of blog or
Facebook thing. She found the com-
puter address so we could see those
scenes and also Ariel’s Facebook
page as well as the Facebook of
many of my other granddaughter’s.
That was fun for me. Thank you,
Cassidy. Cassidy said that she
would come over in a week or two
and find it for me again.
Leslie was flying back to Bend,
Ore., around noon. Thank you,
Leslie, and also Larry.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and our new word was daube, a
braised meat stew. I was dismayed.
Everytime something new is de-
clared to be a legal word to use in
scrabble, the closer we are to the
end of scrabble as we know it. If
everything is a word, then there is
no challenge.
Thank you, Wanda Artz, for a
good newsy letter. Wanda and Ed
had been to Huron to a cemetery
association meeting and stopped by
De Smet to see “our” tree that we
planted in year 2000 in the Kings-
bury County courthouse grounds.
My parents, Rolla and Effie (Ben-
nett) Palmer were married in that
courthouse in the year 1900.
At Somerset Court be sure to see
resident Nellie Morse’s display of
wood carvings and painting and
dressed dolls that she has made.
Congratulations, Nellie. Thanks
for sharing your artistic handi-
work.
September 29, Somerset Court
resident Myrna Polorney had com-
pany at breakfast. Malina Diede,
Myrna’s sister of Yankton, and
Linda Polorney, Myrna’s daughter-
in-law from Grand Rapids, Mich.,
Jim Pokorney, Myrna’s son from
Grand Rapids, Mich., who were
here for the wedding of Myrna’s
granddaughter (Jamie Pokorney to
Jeremy Pond) at Our Lady of Per-
petual Help Cathedral in Rapid
City. There was a dance held later.
Mary Klauck Rule, daughter of
Somerset Court resident Mary
Klauck, was finding a computer
site (The Caring Bridge) for mom.
The Caring Bridge offers comfort
and support for friends and rela-
tives of cancer patients.
Hey, I had a jolly email from my
daughter, Carol, in Colorado
Springs, Colo. She told me a new
word. If you are lissatrichous, you
have no curls in you hair.
We had church with Gary Zeller
as speaker and Jack Humke at the
piano. Cincy Zeller came along
with Gary. We had the “How Great
Thou Art.” Good music to express
the sentiment. It can thunder. And
we sang, “What a Friend We Have
In Jesus.” That was one of the first
Sunday School songs I remember.
Gary used Daniel 9:3-17 as a basis
for his homily.
After church, a bunch of us
played a little whist and maybe
bridge, anyway something in the
tea room.
In the late afternoon, M.R.
Hansen came over and we tied at a
276 game of scrabble. Then we
went over to his son, Clayton’s, on
Iowa street for a big steak supper.
Thanks, kids, for having me over.
We played a little Texas hold’em.
Tuesday, October 2, 2012, at
Somerset Court, we had resident
council. Sandy presided and gave
us a review of the highlights for Oc-
tober. Some of my favorites are
scheduled like pancake breakfast
out, picnic in the park, an anniver-
sary gala dinner and dance with
music of Tom and Diane. We may
have guests for supper, but be sure
to let Kammi know how many
guests you expect. There is also
quilting scheduled. We will be
building spook houses October 24
and there will be a monster mash
Halloween party where we can
wear funny stuff.
We will have a total evacuation
practice sometime in October. We
will be notified a day or two in ad-
vance. Several residents offered
compliments on the food service.
Marge Self went to the Club for
Boys appreciation gala October 1
and received commendation for her
volunteer work.
My daughter, Vinnie, sent a
bookmark for her new book, “Art,
Wine and Bullets.” She had a book
launch October 6. It is so rare to re-
ceive a handwritten letter in ink on
paper and sent through the mail.
Thank you, Vinnie.
Jane Bunch and her sister, Dot
Busfield, are moving in to Somer-
set Court. Jane had once lived at
Aladdin, Wyo.
Wednesday, October 3, the wind
howled around the crenellations at
Somerset Court. We had cookies in
the activity garden, plus tea and
hot coffee. A good bunch showed
up. Thank you for the delicious
cookies in several varieties. Agnes,
Joyce, Warren and Vivian had a
game of scrabble.
After lunch, student nurse Crys-
tal Carnes, who is studying with
South Dakota State University, in-
terviewed Somerset Court resi-
dent, Vivian Hansen. Crystal is in
her third year of the nursing pro-
gram.
Thank you to Ravellette Publica-
tions for your kind note.
Thank you to Darlene Baye,
Philip, (my next door neighbor for
over 35 years) for your good, newsy
letter. She has been enjoying the
pretty trees. Darlene mentioned a
little rain, .22” there at Philip.
First rain for many a moon.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and we took up a new word, rex-
king or rex-an animal with a single
layer of wavy hair.
Crazy Horse Monument put out
a colorful brochure. I wanted to
share mine with other residents, so
it is on the coffee table by the fire-
place.
Monday morning our medic re-
ported that he had frost on his
windshield. Kay Daugherty (Mil-
dred Young’s comfort keeper) re-
ported about four inches of snow up
by Johnson Siding or Hisega.
Somerset Court resident, Ken
Monette, stopped by at breakfast
and said he is enjoying M.R.
Hansen’s book, “Mongolia, Where
Everything is Free Range.”
Somerset Court resident, Jane
Bunch, goes to a writer’s group at
the senior citizen’s center. She gets
a ride with Somerset Court driver,
Gary. Maybe we could ride along.
Happy 98th birthday to Lois
Price Shearn, formerly of Philip.
Lois now lives in The Grayson
House, #104, 7509 E. Long Look
Drive, Prescott, Ariz. Lois had lived
at the Silverleaf in Philip.
My son-in-law, Daniel S. Fried-
mann, annouced his open studio at
1011 Bostwick Lane, Santa Cruz,
Calif. His card had a photo of a col-
orful new acrylic.
Friday, October 5, we had the of-
ficial word that the Somerset Court
anniversary gala will be October 12
with dinner seating at 5:00 and
6:00 p.m. and dancing with Tom
and Diane following.
There was a good rain at Sturgis
October 4.
Frances, a new employee at Som-
erset Court, made my bed nice and
smooth. She even turned the mat-
tress end for end. Thank you,
Frances.
Friday, we had cooking with
Sandy. Susan and Shawn were
there to help. The recipe was for
cherry delicious. You need two cans
of cherry pie mix, one box white
cake mix, one cup margarine or
butter, melted. Smooth out the
cherries in a baking pan and then
sprinkle the cake mix evenly over
them. Drizzle with melted butter
and bake. You may add slivered al-
monds on top if you wish.
I left to have my hair rolled up,
and later Sandy brought me a dish
of the dessert. Thank you, Sandy.
Thank you to my daughter,
Carol, Colorado Springs, Colo., for
the treat of getting my hair fixed.
In the afternoon, Lois Pierce
came over to visit Irene Cox and
Lila Betten. She played the piano
for us. Thank you, Lois. Later, a
team of whist players got together.
Thanks to my Philip friends,
Marlin Evans and Emery Gibson,
for your notes.
If you have a news item for the
Philip Socials column that you
would like to submit and can’t
get ahold of Vivian, please
e-mail it to:
betty@pioneer-review.com
or call 859-2516.
We will be more than happy to
take your news over the phone!
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2010 Dodge Ram 1500
Quad Cab, 5.7L Hemi, Auto, 4x4, Low Miles
Lots of options!
As we all know, the
United States is in great
need of public prayer, re-
pentance and conversion. We
must ask God to save Amer-
ica through Rosary of His
Most Holy Mother.
Please join us
in praying for
our nation on
October 13, 2012
at 12:00 noon
Fire Hall Park
Philip
Contact Kay Williams at
859-3216 for more info.
Happy 85th birthday to
Dorothy Weber
on October 13, 2012!!
Love, Your Family
Send Dorothy birthday greetings at:
PO Box 441, Philip, SD 57567
Sacred Heart Church Basement •Philip
Sunday, October 14
NEW START TIME!
DOORS OPEN AT 2:00 P.M.
Games start at 3 p.m.
Lunch Available.
Sponsored by Sacred Heart Catholic Church of Philip
United Church of Philip
is doing a new photo directory!
All members & friends of the church
are encouraged to come & get their picture
taken on one of the two days:
Wednesday, October 24th
from 4:00 – 8:00 PM or
Thursday, October 25th
from 2:00 – 7:00 PM
at the United Church in Philip
Call Deb Smith
at 859-2889
or email:
kdsmith7@gwtc.net
to make an appointment!
Perfect
timing for
Christmas card
pictures and photo
gifts for
Christmas!
In the Black Hills Youth Football
League, the Wall Eagles hosted the
Rapid City Vikings and the Rapid
City Broncos, Saturday, September
29, in Philip. The Eagles are made
up of young players from Wall,
Philip and Kadoka.
There were three age divisions
that played, the Mighty Mites,
Junior Peewees and Peewees. The
Mighty Mites lost a battle of the
unbeatens against the Vikings 6-
18.
The Junior PeeWees won their
game against the Broncos 26-0.
The Peewees also won their
game against the Broncos, 30-0.
On Saturday, October 6, the Ea-
gles hosted the league’s team of the
Cardinals. The Mighty Mites de-
feated their Cardinal opponents
40-18 to currently hold a 4-1 season
record. The Junior Peewees easily
won 33-0 and now stand at 4-1. The
Peewees had a closer win of 12-8,
but still hold an undefeated record,
5-0.
Youth football league
Taking it wide, Stratton Morehart led blocks for Burk Blasius in the Wall Eagles
Mighty Mite football game held September 29. Photos by Beau Ravellette
Making a hole, Bosten Morehart with the help of other teammates made a hole
for the running back in the Wall Eagles Peewee football game in Philip.
OCTOBER 12-13-14-15:
The Odd Life of Timo-
thy Green(PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
OCTOBER 19-20-21-22:
Lawless (R)
OCTOBER 26-27-28-29:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
Church & Community Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting monthly. One meets on
the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other meets on the second
Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.);
6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 8:00 a.m. • Children's Church:
8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Some oI us Iuve wuIked wILI God Ionger LIun oLIers, buL
ruLIer LIun Iord our experIence over LIe Iess experIenced,
we sIouId use IL Lo brIng LIem cIoser Lo God. We sIouId
weIcome LIem InLo LIe IoId, cuLer Lo LIem wILIouL
judgmenL und keep LIem movIng Lowurd God.
Ancient wisdom Ior modern liIe
HIm LIuL Is weuk In LIe IuILI receIve ve, buL noL Lo
doubLIuI dIspuLuLIons. Romuns 1q:1 (KJV)
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Sharon Ellwein__________________
Sharon Renee Ellwein, 44,
passed away Monday October 1,
2012, at Dougherty Hospice House,
Sioux Falls, after a year-long battle
with cancer.
Sharon was born December 6,
1967, in Philip, S.D., to Robert and
Dianne (Deuchar) Anderson. She
grew up on the Manila Ranch
north of Midland and attended
rural Plum Creek Elementary
School. She graduated from Philip
High School in 1986 and married
Perry Brucklacher. Two sons were
born to this marriage, Derek Paul
and Dalles Craig.
Sharon moved to Pierre and
worked at the Sooper Dooper gro-
cery store. The last 18 years she
worked at Lynn’s Dakotamart,
most recently as the general mer-
chandise manager. On February 2,
2006, she married Shane Ellwein
in Las Vegas, Nev.
Sharon helped with the blood
drive every year while at Dakota-
mart. She organized the annual
DCB Cornhole Tournament to
honor of the Kudos Award in
Dalles’s name at Philip High
School. She loved fishing with
Shane, camping, and backpacking
in the Big Horns. She most enjoyed
spending time with family, friends,
and her two dogs, Rudy and Riley.
The nieces and nephews loved vis-
iting Auntie Sharon and she al-
ways had a treasure for them to
take home. Sharon never thought
twice about jumping in her car to
go out of town for the weekend. She
loved going to Deadwood, Las
Vegas, Mexico, and Denver. She
will be remembered for being a
lively, fun, outgoing, and very
courageous person. Her smile and
laughter will be forever missed.
Survivors include her husband,
Shane Ellwein, Ft. Pierre; a son,
Derek Brucklacher, Philip; par-
ents, Robert and Sandy (Fischer)
Anderson, Hermosa; grandparents,
Vern and Carrol Foland, Philip;
sisters, Brenda (Andy) Binegar,
Pierre, Carmen (Tom) Heier, Sioux
Falls, Tracey (Brian) Paulsen,
Spearfish, and Krystl (Jared) Ver-
mundson, Rapid City; brothers,
Craig (Dea) Anderson, Midland,
David (Kellie) Fischer, Rapid City;
stepsister, Jody (Tyler) Rodriguez
and children, San Antonio, Texas;
stepbrother, Toby Fischer and chil-
dren, Missoula, Mont.; nieces and
nephews, Laina Anderson, Kade
and Keegan Binegar, Jessi, Shane
(Cori), and Kelsey Heier; Kyle and
Brook Paulsen, Lexus, Jaxon and
Alex Vermundson, Jersey Fischer
Anderson, Kinzie, Landen, Logen
and Karsen Fischer; great-niece,
Sophie Meligan; parents-in-law,
Steven and Shirley Ellwein, Ft.
Pierre, and Steve and Renee We-
gener, Pierre; grandparents-in-law,
Phil and Lorraine Ellwein, Pierre,
and Mary Hedman, Ft. Pierre;
close friends, Dee Temple,
Mahryah Anderson and Judie
Brady; and numerous relatives and
friends.
She was preceded in death by
her son, Dalles Brucklacher; her
mother, Dianne Anderson; and
grandparents, Raymond and Mary
Alice Deuchar.
Services were held Saturday,
October 6, at Lutheran Memorial
Church in Pierre.
Graveside services were held at
the Masonic Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements have been placed
in care of Isburg Funeral Chapel.
Online condolences may be made
at www.isburgfuneralchapels.com
Joyce F. Dykema________________________________
Joyce F. Dykema, age 79 of
Murdo, S.D., died October 3, 2012,
at the Golden Living Center in
Pierre.
Joyce Finck was born to Waldo
and Clara (Jordan) Finck on Feb-
ruary 12, 1933, in Okaton.
She married Herman “Boyd”
Dykema on November 27, 1953,
and to this union three daughters
were born, Sherry, Cindy and Lora.
Joyce loved life and was known for
her fun personality. Joyce espe-
cially loved to tease the kids and
they loved to tease her back. Those
same kids (and you know who you
are) would scare her knowing how
jumpy she was. Adults and kids
alike made a special stop at Joyce’s
house at Halloween, with lights
and siren (and you know who you
are) for her popcorn balls. Joyce
also made the best bread and
chocolate fudge and she often
shared her baked goods with family
and friends. Crocheting was a pas-
time for Joyce and she enjoyed
sharing her handiwork.
Joyce loved going to bowling
tournaments except for the times
her partners angered or embar-
rassed her (and you know who you
are).
Joyce had many talents and she
used these in several of the jobs she
performed throughout the years.
She especially like working at
Dean’s Market where she could be
found by the sound of her whistle.
She always said there was no song
she just liked to whistle. Joyce has
done everything from driving com-
bines at harvest, driving semi-
trucks long haul, to milking cows,
ironing, baking doughnuts, and
loved painting apartments.
You would often find Joyce
whistling, whether she was at work
or at play. This reflected Joyce’s
love for life. Joyce will be missed by
her family and many friends.
Survivors include three daugh-
ters, Sherry Philips and her hus-
band, Bill, of Murdo, Lora Gibbs
and her husband, Brett, of Au-
dobon, Iowa, and Cindy Jost and
her husband, Mike, of Murdo; four
grandchildren, Brooke and Susie
Jost, and Georgie and Billy Gibbs;
one brother, Kenny Finck of
Newell; five sisters, Irene Brink of
Murdo, Alice Stroppel and her hus-
band, George, of Midland, Betty
Block and her husband, Dick, of
Midland, Ironis Poppe of Pierre,
and Norma Oldenberg and her hus-
band, Jim, of Philip; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Joyce was preceded in death by
her husband, Herman, on May 13,
2006; two brothers, Robert Finck
and Emil Finck, and one sister,
Bonna Lindquist.
Services were held Friday, Octo-
ber 5, at the Methodist Church in
Murdo, with Pastor Rick Hazen of-
ficiating.
Music was provided by Lois
Jaide, pianist. Ushers were Barb
Venard and Linda Kessler. Pall-
bearers were Marvin Kessler, Joe
Connot, Gary Block, Dean Block,
Brad Block and Dean Faber. Regis-
ter book attendants were Wanda
Olson and Jill Venard.
Graveside services were held
Friday at the Black Hills National
Cemetery near Sturgis.
Rush Funeral Home of Philip
was in charge of the arrangements.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Earl E. Helms_________________________________
Earl E. Helms, age 61, of Rapid
City, S.D., died Wednesday, Octo-
ber 3, 2012, in Rapid City.
Earl Erving Helms was born No-
vember 17, 1950, in Wall, the
fourth child of Erving and Eliza-
beth (Eisenbraun) Helms. As a
young child Earl was very enthusi-
astic and ambitious. At the age of
five, he became very ill and from
this he became mentally chal-
lenged, and had to learn many
things over again. In 1963, for med-
ical reasons, Earl moved to Red-
field State Hospital and School.
While there, he learned many
things and enjoyed working in the
workshop, going to dances, movies,
bowling, and horse riding. In the
summers he would enjoy coming
back home to the ranch and visit-
ing friends and relatives.
In 2010, Earl got the opportu-
nity to fulfill a dream of moving to
Black Hills Works, where he be-
came a resident and learned to
know many new people and work
in the workshop. Here he was very
helpful and liked by the staff and
residents. Here he enjoyed going
bowling, camping, football games,
and riding horses at SunCatchers
Riding Academy.
He passed away suddenly on
Wednesday, October 3, 2012, and
will be dearly missed by family,
friends, and staff.
Grateful for having shared his
life are three sisters Ester Johan-
nesen and her husband, Gene, of
Wall, Edith Eisenbraun and her
husband, Aaron, of Rapid City, and
Eileen Niederwerder and her hus-
band, Greg, of Rapid City; two
brothers, Eugene Helms and his
wife, Glenda, of Creighton and
Elden Helms and his wife, Lillian,
of Creighton; 11 nieces and
nephews; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Earl was preceded in death by
his parents.
Services were held Saturday,
October 6, at the First Lutheran
Church in Wall, with Pastor Curtis
Garland officiating.
Music was provided by Mary
Kay Wilson, pianist. Ushers were
Dennis Sieler and Mike Sieler.
Pallbearers were Bob Helms, Paul
Staben, Marvin Denke, Tom
Mahon, Eli Helms and Wade Gei-
gle.
Interment was at the Wall
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
has been established to Black Hills
Works or SunCatchers Riding
Academy.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Nancy Holub___________________________________
Nancy Holub, age 53 of Wall,
S.D., died Sunday, October 7, 2012,
at the Rapid City Regional Hospi-
tal.
Nancy G. Pederson was born No-
vember 26, 1958, at Ft. Benning,
Ga., the daughter of Gordon and
Betty Lou (Ballard) Pederson. The
family moved to Panama until
1963, then to Rapid City, when her
father served in Vietnam. In 1966,
the family moved to Ft. Leonard
Wood, Mo., until 1968 when they
moved to Taiwan. In 1970, the fam-
ily moved to Wall where Nancy fin-
ished her schooling, graduating
from Wall High School in 1976.
After high school, Nancy moved to
New York.
Nancy was united in marriage to
Terry F. Holub on February 5,
1983, in Rapid City. They moved to
Schaller, Iowa, where their first
son, Matthew, was born. They
owned and operated two newspa-
pers in that area, and Nancy also
ran a day care. In 1990, they moved
back to Wall to operate the Dairy
Queen. It was at this time their
second son, Grant, was born.
Nancy remained in Wall until 1996
when they moved to Albany, Mo.,
where she managed a convenience
store. In 1999, she returned to
Wall, where her boys attended
school.
Nancy enrolled in Western
Dakota Vo-Tech where she gradu-
ated with honors in May of 2003.
During this time, Nancy was diag-
nosed with cancer, but fought
courageously for 12 years. She con-
tinued her education at National
American University and gradu-
ated as a paralegal in 2007.
She remained in Wall where she
was a member of St. Patrick’s
Catholic Church of Wall and a
member of the Carrol-McDonald
American Legion Auxiliary #246.
She enjoyed traveling and singing,
but especially loved spending time
with her family and friends. She
also was very active in organizing
the Relay For Life events in Wall.
Nancy was always trying to make
the world a better place, and even
after death, she continued this as
she donated her corneas so that
someone may have a better life.
Grateful for having shared her
life include two sons, Matthew
Ryan Holub and Grant Jonathan
Taylor Holub, both of Wall; their
father, Terry F. Holub of
Fontanelle, Iowa; her mother,
Betty Lou Pederson of Wall; two
brothers, James D. Pederson of
Yankton and Gary W. Pederson of
Wall; a sister, Carol A. Naescher
and her husband, Leroy, of Oa-
coma; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
Nancy was preceded in death by
a daughter, Jennifer Rose, and her
father, Gordon Pederson.
Closed-casket visitation will be
held one hour preceding the serv-
ices on Saturday.
Mass of Christian burial will be
celebrated at 10:00 a.m. Saturday,
October 13, at St. Patrick’s
Catholic Church in Wall, with Fa-
ther Leo Hausmann as celebrant.
Interment will be at the Wall
Cemetery.
The family requests memorials
to the American Cancer Society.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Marilyn Walker_________________________________
Marilyn Walker, age 78, of Wall,
S.D., died Monday, October 8,
2012, at the Hospice of the Hills in
Rapid City.
Marilyn Lytle Walker was born
August 1, 1934, the second of six
daughters born to Don and Zohn
(Amiotte) Lytle. She was born in
Pine Ridge and raised in old
Washabaugh County. She attended
Lone Tree rural school through
grade school and Interior High
School.
Bill Walker and Marilyn Lytle
were married on August 29, 1950,
in Miles City, Mont. From this
union three children were born,
Harlan, Debbie and Randy. Bill
and Marilyn ranched in the Conata
Basin and on the Pine Ridge Reser-
vation from 1950 until 1979 when
they sold the ranch and moved to
Rapid Valley where they lived until
2003. At that time they moved to
Wall to be close to their three chil-
dren and their families.
Marilyn's hobbies included gar-
dening, cooking, throwing horse-
shoes and playing games with her
children and grandchildren. Bill
and Marilyn spent many happy
years raising and racing their
horses in South Dakota and sur-
rounding states.
Survivors include a son, Harlan
and his wife, Lori, a daughter, Deb-
bie Shepard and her husband,
Randy; and a son Randy and his
wife, Cheryl, all of Wall; eight
grandchildren, Brian Shepard,
Riley Walker, Tyler Walker, Brady
Shepard, Chad Walker, Haley
(Walker) Raker, Amanda (Walker)
Kjerstad, and Abbie Walker; eight
great-grandchildren, Sydney Shep-
ard, MacKenzie Shepard, Braylee
Walker, Teelan Kjerstad, Trevin
Walker, Brittney Walker, Cohen
Walker, and Presley Kjerstad; and
four sisters Loy Hamm of Wall,
Kay Price of Belle Fourche, Bobby
Crawford of Rapid City, and Sherry
Lytle of Spearfish
Marilyn was preceded in death
by her husband, Bill, on May 13,
2004; her parents; and her sister,
Janice O'Rourke.
Visitation will be held from 5:00
to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, October
11, at the Rush Funeral Chapel in
Wall.
Graveside services will be held
at 10:30 a.m. Friday, October 12, at
the Wall Cemetery, with Pastor
Harold Delbridge officiating.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
has been established.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
Those beautiful fall leaves we’ve
been enjoying are for the most part
on the ground after those hard
freezes. So, you know what that
means? You guessed it, its time to
get the rake out! We had a few
drops of rain earlier; it’s kind of
teasing us, making us think – rain.
With the sky overcast and having a
great massage earlier today I am
having a bit of trouble getting at
the news. I’m thinking a good nap
would be just the ticket. Not sure
just how much news I’ll have this
week. I’ve called some folks but
they haven’t any news! Everyone is
busy getting fall work done as old-
man-winter will be nipping at our
heels before we know it.
The good news this week is that
Mary Parquet is out of the hospital
and at home here in Midland. She
and her husband Tom are very
happy to be home. Their little
granddaughter, Remington, won’t
have so far to go to see Grandpa
and Grandma. Remington and her
folks Jake and Kristi live at White-
wood, so it was quite a trip from
there to Sioux Falls. Our thoughts
and prayers continue to be with
Mary and her family that each day
she is stronger and wishing her
God’s speed in healing. Good to
have you home Mary and Tom!
Our sympathies to the family of
Dorothy (Dennis) Seidler who
passed away at the age of 87. There
was a good turnout at the funeral
service. Among those there were a
number of the Dennis families from
the Rapid City area and Dorothy’s
half-sister Anna Marie (Dennis)
Johnson of Sioux Falls. Some time
ago I wrote a history of Bob and
Dorothy Seidler. It is something I
enjoy doing as it is always interest-
ing to learn their story. Jerry re-
members one particular time when
Bob and Dorothy were fixing fence.
Dorothy was one of those people
who always wanted the fences
tight. She and Bob were diligently
working at getting it tight when all
at once the wire snapped in to and
down they went, one on top of the
other. Funny the things you re-
member!
We wish to express our sympa-
thies to the family of Joyce (Finck)
Dykema. Joyce has a number of
relatives in the Midland area, sis-
ters Betty Block and Alice Stroppel
being two of them. I remember
Jerry hauling gas to the Texaco
station at Okaton for many years
when Joyce’s sister, Irene and her
husband Clifford Brink had it. We
have a lot of good memories of that
time.
Heading for Bismarck, N.D., on
Friday were Jerry and Joy Jones,
the Trapp family, the Schrempp’s,
Neil Jones, Cindy and Zak Sinkey
and Cody Jones. Cody’s wife, Au-
drey, was unable to go as she is the
assistant volleyball coach at Ft.
Pierre and they were having a tri-
angular volleyball tournament in
Ft. Pierre that weekend. Scott,
Lani and Molly of Devil’s Lake,
N.D., joined them in Bismarck. Jill
(Jones) Sheldon and three kids of
Bismarck were also there. Scott’s
mom and his brother and family of
Watford, N.D., were also there. The
occasion was to celebrate Molly’s
eighth birthday. It was a good time
and everyone headed for their
homes on Sunday. Happy Birth-
day, Molly!
Sonny Merkle, of Seattle, Wash.,
arrived in Midland on Saturday,
September 29, to visit with his sis-
ters and families. Verona and Bob
Evans hosted supper Saturday
evening. Also there were Ernie and
Laurel Nemec and Kathy Tolton.
Verona Evans, Kathy Tolton and
Laurel Nemec are his sisters. On
Sunday after church, everyone
gathered at Ernie and Laurel
Nemec's home for dinner. Monday
the group went to Pierre to view
sites at the Capitol and had a steak
dinner out provided by Kathy.
Tuesday, Sonny drove to Spearfish,
and visited his brother, Ronnie and
Janet Merkle, and family. He flew
out of Rapid City that evening to
Seattle.
Ernie and Laurel Nemec made a
trip to Sioux Falls on Thursday,
October 4. They went out for sup-
per that evening to celebrate
grandson Kendall Larson's birth-
day. On Friday, Ernie and Laurel
attended a Grandparents Day at
grandson Josiah Thompson's
school, Central Christian Elemen-
tary. After a short program they
visited Josiah's second grade room.
Josiah's other grandparents, Mike
and Judy Thompson, who live in
Arizona, were able to be there and
were awarded a plant for being the
grandparents who had come the
furthest. Mike and Judy will spend
a few days visiting with their son
Robert, Becky, and Josiah Thomp-
son. Becky Thompson teaches one
of the first grade rooms there.
Saturday morning, Ernie and
Laurel's grandson, Logan Larson,
participated in a flag football game
on the Harrisburg High School
football field. Along with Ernie and
Laurel and Todd, Barby and
Kendall Larson were Terry, Laura
and Jennifer Nemec, Dell Rapids.
It is Tuesday morning and I am
back at the news! We did get a lit-
tle more rain last night, not much,
but a little more then we have had.
At the beginning of my news col-
umn I had written about having a
great massage Monday morning
and feeling the need for a nap.
Well, just between you and me, I
had a couple of naps. Was trying to
get my act together to work at the
news and finally gave it up and
went to bed. I had an awesome
night’s sleep… eight and half
hours! Now I realize for some that
may not seem like a big deal, but
for someone who has trouble sleep-
ing, it was awesome. I rarely talk
about the fact that I have rheuma-
toid and scoliosis, as talking about
it doesn’t change anything and
most people have their own issues.
And so, why am I writing about it
in my news column? It is because I
have learned of the importance of
massage therapy and when you
find a good one, it is truly a bless-
ing. My rheumatologists have told
me about the importance of mas-
sage therapy. I’m a believer! In
writing about my own experience,
my prayer is that it may be of help
to someone else.
Prerry Saucerman and her mom,
Marlin Evans, went to Rapid City
Friday for the Rapid City Christian
school’s homecoming festivities.
Jadd and Jaya Evans go to that
school and their parents are Jack
and Jill Evans. They lived in Mid-
land for a time and the kids went
to the Midland school. Jack is Mar-
lin’s son and Prerry’s brother and
Jill is the daughter of Fuzz and
Bonnie Martin. Jadd is a sopho-
more and played in the football
game against Edgemont, making it
exciting was that Rapid City Chris-
tian won the game. Jaya is a senior
and was homecoming queen, which
is always exciting when you are in
high school. Prerry mentioned that
Geno and the late Effie Hunt’s
grandchildren, Josh, Jordan and
Zeb Hunt, also go to Rapid City
Christian. Their parents are Jim
and Joni Hunt. Josh was also a
player in the football game. Many
of us in this area remember Effie as
she was in the Midland school sys-
tem for many years.
The annual church dinners are
fast approaching. Trinity Lutheran
Church in Midland has their lute-
fisk supper Wednesday, October
17; Deep Creek Church has their
lutefisk supper Saturday, October
27 and St. William Catholic
Church has their turkey dinner on
Sunday, November 4. Not only do
you get good food, there is a lot of
good visiting as well. So be watch-
ing for the ads, go out and enjoy
good food and good visiting at
events that have been going on for
so many years.
Midland Market had a successful
summer and our thanks to Julie
Schwalm who was the coordinator.
Others helped as well, but it takes
someone to be in charge. Not only
did folks have a chance to sell their
wares, but it was a good time of vis-
iting, as well. And different folks
had the makings for a meal for
those who came to eat a bite. And
thanks to Pastor Andy Blye and
Morris Daly for their music enter-
tainment. And the different themes
throughout the summer added a lot
to the Midland Market event. For
as hot as it was all summer, the
evenings would often times cool off
enough to make it comfortable and
able to be held at the Midland City
Park, which everyone enjoyed the
most. Thanks to everyone who took
the time and all the work that goes
into doing something like Midland
Market.
Mary Lou (Foster) Wallner,
Ramsey, Minn., sent me some pic-
tures she had taken at Midland’s
free day. She and her husband,
Jerry, was in Midland for the free
day activities, as were a number of
other Foster family relatives. Mid-
land’s first free day was in 1955.
Janice Bierle was in college that
year and remembers her mom,
Pearl Madsen, writing her a letter
and telling her about what a fun
day it was. And even though Mid-
land, like all small towns, is not
what it used to be as businesses
close and things change, they still
put on a good parade. Mary Lou
had enclosed a news item of Mid-
land from her sister, Jessie Mae
Brewer, Black Hawk. Jessie Mae
and her husband, Johnny, were
also at Midland’s free day. The
news item and picture was from
the Sunday, October 3, 1999, edi-
tion of the Rapid City Journal. It
was of a street scene of Midland in
1909. There are a number of build-
ings in the picture and two build-
ings with names on them; one has
“J. C. Russell Sells Everything” he
was Charlie to everyone that knew
him and on the other was “M. Dar-
mody Hardware” the M stood for
Mike. There were even a few folks
walking down the wooden sidewalk
out front of the buildings. Love
those pictures, but always feel a bit
saddened also, as you see what
towns like Midland had been at one
time. Those folks believed in towns
like Midland, and put in a lot of
hard work to make it into the town
it was to become. One can’t help
but wonder … has our generation
lost the will to dream, to work to-
gether to make things better? I be-
lieve we have in a lot of ways! In
that 1909 picture of Midland, the
writer went on to write, “All of the
buildings on Main Street in Mid-
land have either been torn down or
burned, with the exception of the
bank building on the extreme right
and the hotel, now a bed and
breakfast, at the far end of the
street on the left. The bank, built in
1909, is now classified as a South
Dakota Historical Site.” As most of
you already know, the bank build-
ing is no longer, it was becoming
unsafe to leave standing as the
bricks were beginning to crumble
and so Petoske Construction was
hired to tear it down. I still miss
that old bank building, there was
something majestic about it as it
stood tall and inside was beautiful
with its marble and beautiful old
time features. The hotel is still here
and is being run by Kathy Jensen
of Sioux City, Iowa. You can still
rent a room for the night, get a
good massage, or take a hot min-
eral bath. And so goes my walk
down memory lane! Thanks Mary
Lou and Jessie Mae for the bit of
history of Midland.
***
The senior citizens met at the
senior center on October, 1, 2012,
with 10 members present. Presi-
dent Kandus Woitte called the
meeting to order and led in the flag
salute. The minutes of the Septem-
ber meeting were read and ap-
proved. The treasurer’s report was
given. George Stroppel moved to
approve the report, Alice Stroppel
seconded the motion and it carried.
The bulletin board was done.
Three cards were sent. Mainte-
nance, the men moved the tables
and chairs around to prepare for
free day. The Stanley County His-
torical Society and the Midland
Museum will hold their combined
yearly meeting at the center the
last Sunday of October, October 28.
We will discuss the soup and sand-
wich supper at the November
meeting.
Mickey Woitte, Secretary
***
It is time to close my column for
another week! It continues to be
cloudy and reports are there may
be a better chance for rain this
weekend. Let’s hope the report be-
comes a reality! Sunday Jerry and
I attended the turkey dinner at
Our Lady of Victory Catholic
Church in Kadoka. Jerry’s cousin,
Betty VanderMay, is staying at the
nursing home in Kadoka and told
us our granddaughter was working
at the nursing home that weekend.
And so we went over to see Joanna
before heading home. Joanna is the
daughter of our son, Jim and Car-
men Nemec. She is in her third
year at School of Mines in Rapid
City, worked at the Kadoka Nurs-
ing Home last summer and got
some hands on experience at the
Philip clinic. She is working toward
being a radiologist so enjoyed her
experiences of last summer.
It is no secret I enjoy reading
books! I just finished reading Home
to Holly Springs by Jan Karon. She
is the bestselling author of the Mit-
ford Series. For those of you who
may not be familiar with this se-
ries, it is about a bit of a quaint fel-
low by the name of Father Timothy
Kavanagh. You can’t help but
laugh at some of the situations he
finds himself in and yet there is
some truth and some heartwarm-
ing tales to his story. In this book
Jan Karon takes her celebrated
Mitford character to territory he
has long avoided, the uncharted
territory of family, giving us a
spellbinding and poignant narra-
tive laced with wisdom and forgive-
ness only a trip back home can in-
spire. That’s what I like about
reading books, they take you on a
journey and on that journey you
find there are lessons to be learned.
Of course I can’t go into all the book
told, you’ll have to check it out at
the Midland library and read it for
yourself. But, a part of it I would
like to share with you. It has to do
with life! In the book it tells of a
quote from a lady that meant so
much to one of the characters in
the book: “She had long accepted
the fact that happiness is like swal-
lows in spring. It may come and
nest under your eaves or it may
not. You cannot command it. When
you expect to be happy, you are not,
and when you don’t expect to be
happy, there is suddenly Easter in
your soul, though it be mid-winter.”
I have found that in life God gives
us those unexpected blessings in a
number of different ways, He ab-
solutely does. Have a good week, be
watchful and continue to pray for
rain.
Annual
Lutefisk & Roast Beef Supper
Bazaar to follow
Wednesday, October 17th
Trini ty Lutheran Church
Midland
Serving starts
at 5 p.m. (MST)
Adults - $8.00
Children, 12 & under - $3.00
Kam
Robert
Son of
Adam &
Jodi Roseth
Midland, SD
Born:
December 8,
2011
8 lbs., 5 oz.
19
1
⁄2” long
Big Sister: Bob-
bie
Big Brother:
Jax
Maternal
Grandparents:
Terri Wittwer, Floodwood, MN, & the late Robert Wittwer
Paternal Grandparents: Julian & Coreen Roseth, Midland
Maternal Great Grandmother: Allie Wittwer, Floodwood, MN
Paternal Great-Grandparents: Betty Severtson, Huron
Roy Roseth, Philip
This feature sponsored by
Grandpa & Grandma Roseth
National Newspaper Week is an
opportunity, and responsibility, for
all newspaper people to promote
our newspapers and our industry.
We know it, but it is heartening
to see affirmation of the fact in re-
cent national survey results re-
leased by the Pew Internet Project
about how Americans get their
news. The survey found that small-
town residents and rural residents
are more likely to rely on tradi-
tional news platforms such as tele-
vision and newspapers to get local
news. Newspapers are especially
important to them for civic infor-
mation.
The survey found that small-
town Americans prefer the local
newspaper for a long list of infor-
mation, including local weather,
crime, community events, schools,
arts and culture, taxes, housing,
zoning, local government and social
services. Residents of smaller
towns are also the most likely to
worry about what would happen if
the local newspaper no longer ex-
isted.
National Newspaper Week
84 Years ago
october 11, 1928
The biggest and best dance of tbe
season will be given at the Black
and Yellow Pavilion in the form of
a frolic Tuesday evening, October
30th.
***
Manager Schimke is getting
ready for his fall and winter shows
by enlarging and improving the
stage at the Gem Theatre. When
completed the new stage will be
fourty feet deep, making ample
room for the large stock companies
he has booked for the coming sea-
son. A new floor also has been laid
over the part extending out from
the stage making a fine place for
specialties between acts when the
curtin is down. A double row of
lights is being installed and more
lights added to the stage. The the-
atre now has seating for 400.
Local News … A son was born to
Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Morgan last
Thursday.
Mrs. Emil Marquardt arrived in
Philip from Huron this to join her
husband who is the new Ford
dealer here. Mr. and Mrs. Mar-
quardt will occupy the Carson
Williams property recently vacated
by the Raymond Byrnes family.
Grindstone News … Harry
Smith and wife are putting hollow
block about their house and adding
to it making a fine comfortable
home.
It is rumored that Fred Lewis
and and Miss Eunice Wood are
married.
75 Years ago
october 14, 1937
Trapped by a cave-in while work-
ing on a WPA spillway project two
and half miles south of Grindstone,
Mike Malonig, Cottonwood suf-
fered a fractured leg Wednesday
morning.
***
Miss Lillian Ecklund, sixth and
seventh grade teacher in Philip
schools, was called to the home
near Vermillion last Thursday by
the sudden death of her father. He
fell from a haystack and suffered a
broken neck.
***
Those who were outdoors be-
tween 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. last
Thursday night were awed by the
brillant auroreal display. At times
the sky was aglow almost to the
zenith with white shafts of light.
The weird dancing of the multicol-
ored display was an intrigueing
spectacle.
***
Hazel Ramsey, nine year old stu-
dent in the Jones School, fell on a
foot scraper at school and cut her
leg. She was brought to Dr. Ram-
sey’s office in Philip, where it was
necessary to take three stitches to
close the wound. Hazel is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Claude
Ramsey.
Moenville News … Mrs. Pete
Fosheim took their son, Richard, to
Hot Springs last week where a new
cast was put on his leg and he was
able to return home again. Mrs. Fo-
seim seemed very hopeful that his
limb will be entirely straight at the
completion of the treatments.
Roseths are having their up-
stairs finished. Ole Fjetland is
doing the carpenter work and
Harley Morgan the masonry.
The Kuhl School and their
teacher, Mrs. Olga Meyer, are giv-
ing a dance and pie supper at their
schoolhouse Friday night, October
15.
Blast from the Past
From the archives of the Pioneer Review
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Memories are great when it
comes to quilts. I have my favorite
ones. One is a star quilt that a Na-
tive American from Dupree, whose
12-year-old son was in the nursing
home had made. My sister came
and saw it and asked if she could
quilt it for me. She quilted it on
white and it was the first quilt she
had ever quilted. It turned out
great with very small stitches in a
diamond pattern.
In 1951, when we were first mar-
ried, Kenneth’s mother gave us a
quilt that she had made. It was
made of blocks with gold embroi-
dered flowers on white and she had
quilted it so pretty. It was quilted
on a gold background.
Then there was the quilt made of
small blocks with the blocks stuffed
with nylon stockings. It was on our
bed for many years and looked
worse for the wear, but it did its job
of keeping us warm in the many
cold winters.
Then there was another one that
Gladys Smith made for Marvin
after my mother passed away. She
had blocks cut out and Gladys took
them and made a quilt and one day
she drove over and gave it to Vicki
and Marvin. It hangs over their
banister and whenever I go over
there I see it, I am reminded of the
dresses that my mom wore through
the years.
Then there is the two afghans
that Pete Weeks made for me and
Kenneth. There are also two that
Lucille Carstensen made for us.
My mother did a lot of crocheting
and she made a lot of doilies. She
also made me a tablecloth and bed-
spread, as well as a bedspread for
my nephew, Vernon Montgomery.
She never got to finish Vernon’s
prior to her passing and it was a
long time before Vernon found a
lady who could finish it for him.
That lady crocheted so like my
mother that you couldn’t tell where
one quit and the other started. Now
most of these have been passed
down to Marvin and Vicki and they
will someday pass them on to their
children.
I am sure that everyone has sim-
ilar memories and those memories
leave a wonderful heritage for us.
Quilts are still being made today
for the next generation to hold dear
and as a memory of who their an-
cestors were and what they con-
tributed to the world.
We all like to keep memories,
both men and women. What about
those old shop tools that dad used
or his favorite tractor or pickup?
Some people might call it hoarding,
but we all know they are called
keepsakes and memories. They
leave us a heritage we are proud to
call ours. So keep on preserving
those memories as you are the one
who will keep history alive and
well for generations to come.
Beth Smith was in Tennessee to
visit her daughter Melann and
Jerry Nicholson. She went espe-
cially so she could attend her
granddaughter, Gabbie’s grandpar-
ent’s day at school.
We need to go away from home
at times to spend some time with
those who don’t live as close as the
others get to who live closer to
home.
Beth just arrived back and she
and Mel took her dad, Lee
Schoniger, to Logan, Utah, to the
wedding of Andrew Schoniger. An-
drew is Lee’s grandson, the son of
Bruce Schoniger. Mike, who was
also at the wedding, brought his
dad, Lee, back to Philip and to visit
for a while.
Mel and Beth continued on to
Richfield, Idaho, where Mel’s
grandparents lived and they col-
lected some family history while
there. They looked up a cousin, the
Tim Sanders family, and spent
some time with Lana Sanders who
teaches kindergarten. They found
out that Beth’s family and Lana’s
children both attend the same col-
lege at Logan.
Mel and Beth returned through
Yellowstone State Park and then
visited Mel’s sister, Colleen and
Ken Simmons in Montana. They
came back through Lemmon, S.D..
and parts of North Dakota before
arriving home. They said it was a
very enjoyable vacation. Now, they
said it is back to work for them
both.
In talking to Tammie Thorson,
she said that she had her family
back home again after they were in
the Rapid City Regional Hospital
after a car accident last week on
the Lewison corner. They came
home the last of this week, but will
have to be home for a while to con-
tinue to heal before returning to
school. The two youngest girls,
Rosie and Jessie, were not hurt. It
was the two oldest girls and
Franky who got hurt.
Marvin and Vicki Eide left for
Gillette, Wyo., Thursday, October
4, to attend a football game to
watch Taegan play. They returned
Friday and also brought some
things back for Christa Fitch.
Friday, October 5, Colby Fitch
came early with his dad who was
combining corn here. He came to
the house and had breakfast with
me and visited a couple of hours till
his dad needed him in the field.
When he was not helping his dad,
his did a little hunting on the
creek. He was trying to give his dog
some training.
Trevor finished up with the corn
here and guess it did pretty well for
as dry as it was this summer. I was
surprised by how much it made as
I watched many trucks filled with
corn leave the field.
This week, Vicki Eide attended
some football games at Philip and
watched Keagan play.
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Mike and Judy Melvin were at
Jim Oldenberg’s this weekend
andthey all attended the 90th
birthday party for Dorothy Ham-
mon in Wall Sunday, October 7.
They left to visit some friends and
relatives in the Black Hills and
planned to return to Jim and
Norma’s Wednesday.
Marvin and Vicki Eide fixed
fence so they could graze some
ground they hadn’t used for cattle
for several years and the fence was
about shot, as you might say. I am
sure that it is not one’s favorite
jobs, besides it is just plain hard
work.
Several from our area attended
the funeral of Virginia Burns. Vir-
ginia touched a lot of people in her
many years here in Philip. A lot of
her students were in attendance.
She trained well a lot of future gen-
erations to be good citizens of what-
ever community they settled in and
many have stayed here in this area.
Our sympathy goes out to Norma
Oldenberg and Kim Deuter and all
the Fink families in the loss of their
sister and aunt, Joyce (Fink)
Dykema. Her funeral was held in
Murdo Friday, October 5.
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OPEN BOWLING:
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Monday Night Mixed
Rockers........................................13-7
Shad’s Towing.............................12-8
Petersen’s....................................11-9
Dakota Bar..................................9-11
Handrahan Const .......................9-11
Badland’s Auto............................6-14
Highlights:
Andrew Reckling...................225/596
Bryan Buxcel.........................219/545
Trina Brown..........................222/567
Jerry Mooney ........................211/589
Arlene Kujawa ......................178/490
Neal Petersen........................221/581
Vickie Petersen .....................178/487
Jason Petersen......................218/569
Tena Slovek ........................8-10 split
Connie Schlim......................2-7 split
tuesday Nite Men’s early
Philip Health Service ...................3-1
Philip Motor..................................3-1
Kennedy Imp.................................3-1
People’s Mkt..................................2-2
George’s Welding ..........................2-2
Bear Auto......................................1-3
G&A Trenching.............................1-3
Kadoka Tree Service.....................1-3
Highlights:
Earl Park.......................235, 235/663
James Mansfield...................205/582
Dakota Alfrey ......3-10 split; 200/563
Bill Bainbridge......................203/560
Matt Schofield.......................207/534
Tony Gould...................................521
Fred Foland..................................517
Wendell Buxcel.....................5-7 split
Norm Buxcel......................4-7-9 split
Terry Wentz........................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ............................14-6
Cutting Edge...............................14-6
Invisibles.....................................13-7
Jolly Ranchers ..........................10-10
State Farm Ins............................7-13
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........202, 189, 184/575
Jennifer Schriever .......................165
Charlene Kjerstad.................153/446
Sandee Gittings............2-7 split; 157
Deanna Fees...............3-10 split; 152
Sandra O’Connor.............5-6-10 split
Donna King...........................4-5 split
Wednesday Nite early
Morrison’s Haying ................14.5-5.5
Dakota Bar..................................12-8
First National Bank ...................11-9
Chiefie’s Chicks ....................10.5-9.5
Hildebrand Concrete ............10.5-9.5
Dorothy’s Catering .....................9-11
Wall Food Center........................7-13
Just Tammy’s........................5.5-14.5
Highlights:
Lindsey Hildebrand..............213/518
Jackie Shull ................9-10 split; 190
Amy Morrison .......................177/503
Val Schulz .............................182/501
Cristi Ferguson.....................182/489
Marlis Petersen....................2-7 split
Ashley Reckling..................3-10 split
Debbie Gartner.............9-10 split x 2
thursday Men’s
McDonnell Farms .........................3-1
O’Connell Const ............................3-1
A&M Laundry...............................3-1
WEE BADD...................................2-2
Dakota Bar....................................2-2
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................1-3
The Steakhouse ............................1-3
West River Pioneer Tanks ...........1-3
Highlights:
Randy Boyd .........3-10 split; 226/558
Matt Reckling .......................209/573
Greg Arthur...........................201/510
Haven Hildebrand ................204/578
Harlan Moos ........3-10 split; 201/567
Ronnie Coyle .........................200/564
Jay McDonnell .............................215
Bryan Buxcel ..5-10 & 3-10 x 2 splits
Scott Brech .........................5-10 split
Alex Moos......................3-10 x 2 split
Stan Anderson......................2-7 split
John Heltzel .......................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew...............................15-5
King Pins...............................14.5-5.5
Roy’s Repair ..........................13.5-6.5
Randy’s Spray Service..................9-7
Lee and the Ladies .....................4-12
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Ed Morrison.................216 clean/551
Cory Boyd..............................204/551
Annette Hand...............................150
Duane Hand..........................219/574
Brian Pearson .......................205/580
Cristi Ferguson....5-10 & 3-10 splits;
...............................................191/510
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkly SpECial:
philly Steak Sandwich
with French Fries
Sunday SpECial:
Orange Glazed Chicken
Oven Roasted Potatoes,
Salad Bar & Dessert
The Philip Lady Scotties trav-
eled to Rapid City, Saturday, Octo-
ber 6, to compete in a triangular
volleyball meet with the New Un-
derwood Tigers and the Rapid City
Christian Comets.
The Scotties first met the Tigers
in tight play where no game was
won by more than six points and
one game went into extended play.
The matche ended 3-1, with game
scores of 19-25, 25-23, 26-24 and
25-19.
Philip vs.
New Underwood
Serving: 79 of 92 (14 aces). Leaders:
Madison Hand – 27 of 27 (5 aces), Pey-
ton DeJong – 10 of 11, Jordyn Dekker –
12 of 16 (3 aces).
Receiving: 79 of 87. Leaders: Krista
Wells – 32 of 34, Brett Carley – 18 of 18,
Dekker – 18 of 21.
Setting: 144 of 147 (46 assists). Lead-
ers: Hand – 124 of 125 (43 assists), Car-
ley – 6 of 6 (2 assists).
Hitting: 133 of 165 (54 kills). Lead-
ers: Dekker – 35 of 42 (18 kills), De-
Jong – 26 of 32 (13 kills), Hostutler – 17
of 20 (7 kills).
Blocking: 3 kills. Leaders: Dekker –
1 solo and 1 assist, Courtney Bartlett –
1 assist, Carley – 1 assist, DeJong – 1
assist.
Digging: 114 of 144. Leaders: Wells –
37 of 40, Carley – 21 of 25, Hand – 17 of
20.
The Lady Scotties next faced the
Lady Comets. This five-game
match was so close that Philip
ended up with 109 total points and
Rapid City Christian finished with
106 total points, and one game
went into extended play. The Lady
Scotties came away victorious 3-2,
with game scores of 20-25, 25-17,
26-24, 21-25 and 17-15. Their sea-
son record now stands at 10-13.
Philip vs.
Rapid City Christian
Serving: 95 of 109 (10 aces). Leaders:
DeJong – 29 of 30 (3 aces), Wells – 19 of
21, Kaci Olivier – 11 of 12 (1 ace).
Receiving: 59 of 72. Leaders: Wells –
24 of 24, Dekker – 15 of 20, Carley – 14
of 21.
Setting: 106 of 114 (21 assists). Lead-
ers: Hand – 89 of 93 (17 assists), Hos-
tutler – 8 of 10 (4 assists).
Hitting: 98 of 125 (28 kills). Leaders:
DeJong – 17 of 19 (8 kills), Dekker – 23
of 32 (8 kills), Bartlett – 20 of 27 (5
kills).
Blocking: 9 kills. Leaders: Dekker –
3 solos and 2 assists, Carley – 2 solos,
DeJong – 2 assists.
Digging: 87 of 128. Leaders: Wells –
25 of 32, Olivier – 13 of 19, Hand – 12
of 18.
The Lady Scotties next compete
in Presho against the Lyman
Raiders, Thursday, October 11,
starting at 5:30 p.m. Their follow-
ing meet is the Douglas Volleyball
Tournament, Saturday, October
13, starting at 9:00 a.m.
Scotties earn two more match wins
The Lady Scotties’ junior varsity
and junior high volleyball teams
hosted a triangular meet, Friday,
October 5, with the Kadoka Area
Kougars and the Wall Eagles.
The Philip junior varsity first de-
feated Kadoka junior varsity with
a match score of 2-1 and game
scores of 25-11, 21-25 and 15-11.
They then fell to Wall’s junior var-
sity 1-2, with game scores of 25-19,
19-25 and 6-15. The third match
had the Philip junior varsity
against Kadoka Area’s “C” team,
where the Scotties easily swept the
match 2-0, with game scores of 25-
10 and 25-9. The Philip junior var-
sity now has a season score of 8-4.
Philip JV vs.
Kadoka area JV
Serving: 54 of 62 (8 aces). Leaders: Kaci
Olivier – 14 of 14 (3 aces), Peyton DeJong –
10 of 10, Courtney Bartlett – 12 of 14 (2 aces).
Receiving: 40 of 47. Leaders: Hanna Hos-
tutler – 13 of 15, Brett Carley – 9 of 10,
Olivier – 7 of 8.
Setting: 62 of 63 (17 assists). Leader: Ash-
ton Reedy – 48 of 49 (16 assists).
Hitting: 70 of 82 (18 kills). Leaders: Car-
ley – 23 of 26 (7 kills), Olivier – 5 of 5 (2 kills),
DeJong – 10 of 12 (2 kills).
Digging: 42 of 53. Leaders: Olivier – 11 of
14, Reedy – 9 of 12, DeJong – 8 of 12.
Philip JV vs.
Wall JV
Serving: 46 of 54. Leaders: Olivier – 7 of 7
(3 aces), Reedy – 7 of 9 (4 aces), DeJong – 7 of
9 (1 ace).
Receiving: 39 of 52. Leaders: Olivier– 11 of
14, Carley – 9 of 14, Hostutler – 6 of 7.
Setting: 58 of 61 (8 assists). Leader:
Reedy – 49 of 52 (7 assists).
Hitting: 55 of 71 (12 kills). Leaders:
Reedy – 6 of 7 (3 kills), Justina Cvach – 8 of
10 (3 kills), Hostutler – 12 of 16 (3 kills).
Blocking: 3 kills. Leaders: Bartlett – 1 solo,
Cvach – 1 solo.
Digging: 48 of 57. Leaders: Hostutler – 13
of 14, Olivier – 10 of 11, Carley – 7 of 8.
Philip JV vs.
Kadoka “C”
Serving: 40 of 48 (22 aces). Leaders: De-
Jong – 20 of 21 (14 aces), Hostulter – 9 of 11
(4 aces), Reedy – 5 of 7 (3 aces).
Receiving: 10 of 16. Leader: Carley – 6 of
7.
Setting: 12 of 14 (4 assists). Leader:
Reedy – 9 of 9 (4 assists).
Hitting: 17 of 18 (6 kills). Leaders: Cvach –
3 of 3 (2 kills), Hostutler – 3 of 3 (2 kills), Car-
ley – 4 of 4 (1 kill).
Digging: 12 of 12. Leaders: DeJong – 3 of
3, Hostutler – 3 of 3, Olivier – 3 of 3.
The Lady Scotties “C” team
deftly took both games 25-7, 25-11
needed to defeat their Kadoka Area
“C” opponents. They then as easily
won 25-12, 25-14 over the Wall Ea-
gles “C” team. Their third match,
against Wall’s junior varsity, did
not go as well. Philip lost two close
games 21-25, 20-25 to walk away
with their first match loss of the
season. The Philip “C” team cur-
rently holds a season record of 5-1.
Philip “C” vs.
Kadoka area “C”
Serving: 47 of 49 (21 aces). Leaders:
Cheyenne Pinney – 19 of 19 (5 aces), Shay
Hand – 13 of 13 (7 aces), Tia Guptill – 6 of 6
(4 aces).
Receiving: 15 of 17. Leaders: Elise
Wheeler – 7 of 7, Hand – 2 of 3, Amanda
McIlravy – 2 of 2.
Setting: 18 of 20 (4 assists). Leader: Gup-
till – 8 of 9 (4 assists).
Hitting: 28 of 30 (9 kills). Leaders: Hand –
10 of 10 (4 kills), Tyana Gottsleben – 8 of 8 (3
kills), Peyton Kuchenbecker – 4 of 5 (2 kills).
Blocking: 2 kills. Leaders: Gottsleben – 1
solo, Hand – 1 solo.
Digging: 20 of 26. Leaders: Guptill – 5 of
5, Hand – 3 of 4, Kuchenbecker – 3 of 4.
Philip “C” vs.
Wall “C”
Serving: 43 of 48 (20 aces). Leaders: Gup-
till – 15 of 15 (9 aces), Hand – 8 of 9 (6 aces),
McIlravy – 6 of 7 (1 ace).
Receiving: 13 of 21. Leaders: Wheeler – 3
of 5, Afton Burns – 2 of 3, McIlravy – 2 of 4.
Setting: 24 of 26 (5 assists). Leaders:
Hand – 12 of 12 (3 assists), Guptill – 10 of 10
(2 assists).
Hitting: 30 of 33 (12 kills). Leaders:
Hand – 10 of 10 (4 kills), Katie Haigh – 4 of 4
(3 kills), Tyshia Ferguson – 4 of 4 (1 kill).
Blocking: 1 kill. Leader: Guptill – 1 kill.
Digging: 28 of 34. Leaders: Wheeler – 7 of
8, Guptill – 5 of 7, Burns – 4 of 5.
Philip “C” vs.
Wall JV
Serving: 31 of 40 (6 aces). Leaders: Gup-
till – 11 of 11 (4 aces), Gottsleben – 4 of 5 (1
ace), Wheeler – 3 of 3.
Receiving: 28 of 36. Leader: Burns: 14 of
14.
Setting: 30 of 32 (6 assist). Leaders:
Hand – 15 of 15 (5 assists), Guptill – 7 of 7 (1
assist).
Hitting: 39 of 47 (14 kills). Leaders: Gup-
till – 14 of 15 (4 kills), Gottsleben – 8 of 9 (4
kills), Ferguson – 5 of 7 (1 kill).
Blocking: 3 kills. Leaders: Kuchenbecker –
1 solo, Hand – 1 solo, Gottsleben – 1 solo.
Digging: 42 of 60. Leaders: Pinney – 10 of
13, Guptill – 12 of 13, Wheeler – 6 of 9.
The next separate match for the
junior varsity will be at Kadoka
against the Kougars, Thursday,
October 11, starting at 5:00 p.m.
They will next compete separately
from the varsity in the White River
tournament Saturday, October 13,
starting at 8:00 a.m.
Lady Scotties junior varsity, “C” teams
by Coach Ralph Kroetch
September 6, clear, calm, sunny
and 30 degrees, made for a perfect
day for one of the area’s largest,
most highly contested “B” division
cross country races of the year.
Twelve teams brought over 120
athletes together for the final reg-
ular season competition. Everyone
looked to see how their school team
might stack up at next week’s Re-
gion 5B finals.
Philip holds its youth run first.
This is for any athlete interested in
running 1,200 meters and is not
competing on a junior varsity or
varsity team. The competition
varies from untrained grade school
to highly trained junior high stu-
dents. Philip had seven of the 27
entered – Ethan Ferguson and
Ethan Burnett in the boys’ race,
and Dylin Terkildsen, Jasmine
Ferguson, Mallory Vetter, Josie
Rush and Jaida Haynes in the
girls’ race. E. Ferguson led the
Philip boys with a time of 6:32,
with Burnett at 7:19. The girls
were led by Terkildsen at 6:15, J.
Ferguson at 6:25, Haynes at 6:30
and Rush at 6:31.
The boys’ varsity led the high
school competition with 35 boys on
the start line. Nelson Holman,
Blake Martinez, Tristen Rush,
Keegan Burnett and Garrett Snook
filled the roster. The team em-
ployed the same relaxed start they
have had all year. As the field
breaks down into small groups con-
nected by long lines, the boys began
to work their way toward the front.
Rush and Holman began in a group
of eight runners, all looking for the
top spot, with Martinez, Burnett
and Snook just a few spots back.
At approximately 2.5 miles,
Rush had moved up to challenge
Wall’s Austin Huether for the
fourth position. Rush later said,
“Austin saw me before I got up on
him and took off.” With that, the
final sprint began early for both,
with Holman keeping both in his
sight. They all finished strong, as
Huether, who placed fifth in the
2011 state meet, took fourth place
and with Rush just four seconds
back for fifth at 18:32. Holman took
sixth at 18:56. Martinez over took
White River’s Tomas Martinez in
the final meters to take the 14th
place medal at 19:46. Snook and
Burnett worked together through
much of the race, but the sight of
the finish line brought out one of
the best sprint battles of the day,
with Snook edging his teammate at
20:55 over Burnett’s 20:56 for the
26th and 27th positions. Friendly
rivalry at its best!
The boys’ team points were
Dupree – 19, Todd County – 22,
Philip – 24, Rapid City Christian –
29, Stanley County – 51, White
River – 53, Lyman County – 64 and
Wall – 69.
The Scotties are looking for a
team berth at the state meet. The
regional race to determine state
qualifiers was held on the Philip
course, Wednesday, October 10.
The top 20 individuals and the top
three teams will move on to the
state meet at the Broadland Golf
Course in Huron, October 21.
For the Philip girls, this season
got long a week ago. Ellie Coyle
needed to sit out most training and
all competition until the regional
meet. A hip flexor problem side-
lined Holy Iwan. A family trip took
Allison Pekron out of today’s com-
petition. Eighth grader Shay Hand
got to try it on her own. She under-
stood the importance of this solo
run, as she went against many of
the region’s finest to see what she
might expect next Wednesday.
Hand chose a very fast start, run-
ning in the lead group early on. She
found herself in a position she had
not been in this year, having early
placing on runners she had never
beaten before. Now she ran to hold
her spot. Hand went on to earn the
14th place medal, while running
easily her best 4,000 meter time
this year at 17:15.
Damian Bartels and Conner
Dekker were excited and a bit blue,
as they readied themselves for one
of their finest races of the year, and
their final regular season race.
Both had made comments at prac-
tice that the season was drawing to
a close all to soon. Dekker lead the
Scotties out for the first time, run-
ning at the front of the field of 27
runners. Bartels was just a few
yards back. Bartels went on to earn
the fourth place medal and a per-
sonal best by 20 seconds, at 16:37.
Dekker, also with his best 4,000
meter time of the year at 17:16,
earned the 11th place medal.
Scotties at home on Philip course
Conner Dekker Damian Bartels
The Lake
Waggoner Golf
Course was the
site of a golf
scramble tour-
nament, Satur-
day, October 6.
Play was a
shotgun start
and two-man
alternate shots
for 18 holes. A
portion of the
proceeds will go to benefit the
Philip Volunteer Fire Department.
Championship flight
First place – Shawn Kerns and
Luke Weber with a score of 65.
Second place – Tyler Hauk and
Brad Haynes with 67.
First flight
First place – Dana Kerns and Je-
remy Kerns with 81.
Scramble golf tournament
Luke Weber and
Shawn Kerns.
Courtesy photo
Second place – Tiana Weber and
Craig Weber with 84.
According to S. Kerns, co-orga-
nizer of the tournament along with
Hauk, the tournament was a suc-
cess, raising additional proceeds for
the PVFD. Many pin prizes were
given by local merchants and the
Rapid City Rush.
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Section “B”
Staff SpotligHt
Marvin denke
–Employed 6 Years (part-time)
–Soil Probing
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
answers on page 15
Inventory Reduction Sale
going on now at Kennedy Implement in Philip!!
859-2568
601 Pleasant • Philip
SPRAYERS
List Sale
Price Price
1980 Melroe 115, ready to go................................$4,500...............$3,950
COMBINES
JD 4400 with alfalfa screens..................................$3,500...............$2,950
JD 7720 harvesters - combines ............................$12,500 .............$11,500
SP WINDROWERS
NH 1100, 16’ header, needs engine work ..............$3,500...............$2,950
JD 2320, 21’ draper header, no conditioner ...........$6,950...............$6,250
Case IH 8840, 16’ head, field ready.....................$24,500.............$23,500
JD 800, salvage machine, good motor...................$1,950...............$1,500
NH 1100, 16’ header ..............................................$9,500...............$8,750
JD 4995, 18’ header .............................................$64,500.............$59,500
NH 1100, 14’ header ..............................................$7,500...............$6,500
MOWERS
2003 Grasshopper 725A, 61” deck,
25HP liquid cool, 890 hours ...............................$5,500...............$4,900
JD X520, 48” deck, low hours...............................$3,500...............$2,500
TRACTORS
1999 Case IH MX200, 8800 hours, MFWD........$69,500.............$65,000
McCormick MTX150, MFWD, 2600 hours,
brand new KMW loader ...................................$69,500.............$65,000
1989 Case IH 7120, 2WD, clean tractor,
10000 hours ......................................................$32,500.............$29,500
J I Case 1175, cab & heat, 5603 hours...................$7,500...............$6,500
1979 JD 4440, clean tractor, loader available......$24,500.............$22,000
NH TV145, 82LB loader, no hyd.
auxiliary pump, 2600 hours ..............................$69,500.............$65,000
JD 4630, consign., new paint, recent shop work .$22,500.............$22,500
1990 Case IH 5140, trans. out, cab top off,
mechanic’s special ............................................$19,500.............$16,000
Case IH 7120, MFWD, 8500 hrs., loader,
new paint, recent shopwork ..............................$48,000.............$45,000
1994 Case IH 7210, 7400 hrs., loader, recent
shop work..........................................................$34,500.............$32,500
TRACTORS continued
List Sale
Price Price
1989 Case IH 7110, 100HP to 174HP .................$32,500.............$29,500
2006 Case IH MXM130, MFWD, 2400 hours,
loaded, very nice tractor ...................................$59,500.............$55,000
1993 JD 7700, MFWD, 5650 hours, loader.........$59,500.............$55,000
2007 McCormick MTX120, MFWD, 3300 hours,
loader ................................................................$65,000.............$59,000
1997 JD 7410, MFWD, 10000 hours, loader.......$57,500.............$53,500
2003 NH TV140, 84LB loader w/auxiliary pump,
8800 hours, header available ............................$65,000.............$59,500
1976 Versatile 850, single metrics, transmission
work done, 897 hours .......................................$17,500.............$15,900
Ford 846, clean tractor, 60% on duals .................$39,500.............$36,500
1980 Versatile 835, duals, dozer, 10540 hours,
80% on tires ......................................................$22,500.............$21,000
1961 Oliver 1800A, 40HP to 99HP, 2384 hours....$3,000...............$1,500
1963 JD 2010, ready to go, with stacker................$4,500...............$3,950
1965 IH 504, clean unit, rock shaft no arms..........$3,500...............$2,950
JD 3020, nice running tractor ................................$6,500...............$5,950
1973 JD 4030, cab & heat, loader available ..........$9,500...............$8,850
IH 886, cab, heat, hard working tractor .................$9,500...............$8,850
JD 2020, fun yard tractor .......................................$5,500...............$4,950
1964 JD 3020, solid running tractor ......................$6,500...............$5,950
1963 IH 706D, cab & loader..................................$8,500...............$7,900
1956 JD 50, one owner tractor with IH cycle mower,
shedded ...............................................................$3,950...............$3,500
1951 IH M, parade ready!......................................$3,450...............$2,950
Ford 8N, nice, clean running tractor ......................$2,450...............$1,950
1951 IH M, painted up, sharp looking!..................$3,450...............$2,950
Ford 600, painted, ready to go................................................Just Traded
Ford 600, nice tractor..............................................................Just Traded
Farmall SC, recent transmission work....................................Just Traded
JD 2020 with loader & snow bucket.......................................Just Traded
*Sale price based on
outright sale with no trade-in.
Subject to availability. First come, first served!
Subscribe online! www.pioneer-review.com
In a Philip home game against
the Lyman Raiders, the Scotties
football team lost 28-50.
From the start of the coldest
weather game so far this season,
the Scotties fought the cold ball,
unsuccessful attempts at ball re-
covery, slipped tackles and just
plain bad luck. The first quarter
took a quick downturn for Philip
when, with 8:54 still on the clock,
Lyman’s ball carrier rushed 69
yards for a touchdown. A Raider
then caught a pass to get the two-
point conversion. A short, squiggle
kick from Lyman resulted in a fum-
ble and Lyman possession on their
own 17-yard line. Philip’s penalties
put the Raiders on the six, and a
Lyman pass play got into the end
zone, followed by a successful con-
version play.
The Scotties then got on the
scoreboard with a 40-yard run by
Paul Guptill. The extra point at-
tempt failed. Three minutes re-
mained in the quarter when
Lyman competed a 19-yard pass
play for another touchdown. After
a successful conversion play, the
score was 6-24.
The second quarter saw punts,
blocked punts, touchdown runs re-
turned because of penalties, bad
snaps and fumble recoveries, but
no action on the scoreboard.
The second half started out with
hope for the Scotties. The clock
read 8:12 when DeJong rushed six
yards for a touchdown. Cassidy
Schnabel caught a DeJong pass for
the conversion points. That hope
was then hit hard when a Lyman
punt was touched by Philip, but not
covered. Lyman got possession,
then on their next play ran 34
yards for the goal. The extra point
attempt failed. Philip fought to ad-
vance, but had to settle for a 48-
yard punt that put Lyman way
back. The long punt was for
naught, when Lyman then got a
87-yard touchdown run. The con-
version was good. Scotties’ Guptill
retaliated with an 83-yard kick re-
turn for a touchdown, with Schn-
abel making good the conversion.
The score was 22-38.
Ending the third quarter on a
hard drive, Lyman started the
fourth quarter with a seven-yard
scoring run. The extra point at-
tempt failed. Retaliation was the
word, when Guptill got his hands
on the Lyman kick, and ran 83
yards for what would be the Scot-
ties final score. The extra point at-
tempt failed. Philip gave Lyman a
squiggle kick, and after several
plays Lyman crossed the goal line
with a one-yard rush. The extra
point attempt failed. Lyman
stripped the Scotties of the ball,
even punted to the 11-yard line and
caught an interception, but could
not hurt the Scotties enough to ad-
vance the Lyman score. The
Raiders finally kneeled away the
clock to end the game 28-50.
Philip racked up 40 running
plays for a total of 228 yards, com-
pared to Lyman’s 39 for 368. Seven
Scottie passes for a total of 54
yards compared to the Raider’s
nine passes for 111 yards. Philip
punted four times, Lyman three.
Philip gave up one five-yard
penalty and one 10-yard penalty,
while Lyman had one five-yard and
two 10-yard penalties.
Philip’s rushing game was lead
by Guptill’s 228 yards in 11 carries.
DeJong gained 34 yards in seven
carries. Casey Reder rushed five
times for 24 yards, and Schnabel
had two carries for 14 yards total.
Philip defense was crammed
with teamwork. Ryan Van Tassel
racked up two solo tackles, 14 as-
sists, one quarterback sack and a
fumble recovery. Quade Slovek to-
taled one solo and 13 assisted tack-
les. DeJong added two solos, six as-
sists and one sack. Reder and Gup-
till each ended up with four solos
and four assists.
The Scotties’ next game will be
at Wall against the Eagles, Friday,
October 12, starting at 7:00 p.m.
Philip fights Lyman and bad luck
Above, this Scot-
tie squeezed
through a small
opening to gain a
few more yards.
Philip’s Paul Guptill dragged Lyman Raider opponents to get every inch of field.
The Philip Lady Scotties volley-
ball team traveled to Wall, Thurs-
day, October 4, to challenge the
Wall Lady Eagles.
The evening was also the site of
a “pack the place pink” event. The
teams and fans wore pink and par-
ticipated in fundraiser activities to
support research to find the cure
for breast cancer. The slogan was,
“Come support the strong and
beautiful; volley for a cure.”
The varsity players lost their
match 3-0, with game scores of 19-
25, 21-25 and 13-25. Their season
standing so far is 8-13.
Serving: 45 of 55 (4 aces). Leaders: Hanna
Hostutler – 11 of 11, Madison Hand – 11 of
13, Jordyn Dekker – 8 of 10 (2 aces).
Receiving: 51 of 60. Leaders: Krista
Wells – 32 of 37, Dekker – 7 of 9, Brett Car-
ley – 4 of 4.
Setting: 79 of 83 (6 assists). Leader:
Hand – 61 of 62 (5 assists).
Hitting: 65 of 86 (10 kills). Leaders:
Dekker – 19 of 25 (3 kills), Hostutler – 9 of 14
(3 kills), Peyton DeJong – 14 of 17 (1 kill).
Blocking: 5 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 2 solos
and 3 assists, Courtney Bartlett – 2 assists,
Hostutler – 1 assist.
Digging: 49 of 74. Wells – 18 of 23, Hand –
8 of 13, Hostutler – 6 of 7.
The junior varsity fared far bet-
ter, winning their match 2-1. Game
scores were 21-25, 25-15 and 15-12.
The junior varsity season record so
far is 6-3.
Serving: 44 of 57 (8 aces). Leaders: Ashton
Reedy – 12 of 14 (4 aces), DeJong – 6 of 8 (1
ace), Hostutler – 8 of 9 (1 ace).
Receiving: 41 of 48. Leaders: Bartlett – 10
of 11, Hostutler – 7 of 9, Justina Cvach – 6 of
8.
Setting: 36 of 37 (15 assists). Leader:
Reedy – 23 of 23 (12 assists).
Hitting: 45 of 57 (18 kills). Leaders: De-
Jong – 8 of 10 (7 kills), Bartlett – 4 of 5 (2
kills), Reedy – 6 of 7 (3 kills).
Digging: 24 of 29. Leaders: Hostutler – 5
of 5, Kaci Olivier – 5 of 5, Bartlett – 5 of 5.
Scotties stopped by Wall Eagles
Brett Carley, center, puts the ball over the net when Philip traveled to Wall, Thursday, October 4. Other Scotties from left
are Hanna Hostutler, Courtney Bartlett, Madison Hand and Jordyn Dekker. The Eagles from left are Kaitlyn Schriever, Monica
Bielmeier and Autumn Schulz. Photo by Nancy Haigh
Left, Hanna Hos-
tutler, left, and
Brett Carley, go
up to block this
volleyball shot by
Kaitlin Schriever.
Madison Hand
(#5) is the other
Scottie. Photo
by Nancy Haigh
Legal Notlces
1hursdav, 0otober 11, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 10
2012 ConstitutionaI
Amendments
The following amendments to the State
Constitution are submitted to the voters
by the Legislature. The amendments will
not become effective unless approved by
majority vote.
ConstitutionaI Amendment M
TitIe: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution regarding certain
provisions relating to corporations.
Attorney GeneraI ExpIanation:
The Constitution currently contains
certain restrictions on the Legislature's
authority to enact laws regarding corpo-
rations. For example, corporate directors
must be elected by cumulative voting, in
which a shareholder may choose to cast
all votes for a single candidate or spread
the votes among two or more candi-
dates. Corporate stock or bonds may
only be issued for money, labor or prop-
erty received by the corporation. Corpo-
rate stock or debt may not be increased
without prior notice to and consent of cur-
rent stockholders.
Constitutional Amendment M removes
these restrictions, and allows the Legis-
lature to: (1) authorize alternative meth-
ods of voting in elections for corporate
directors; (2) expand the types of contri-
butions a corporation may receive for the
issuance of stock or bonds; and (3) es-
tablish procedures governing the in-
crease of corporate stock or debt.
A vote "Yes¨ will remove the constitu-
tional restrictions.
A vote "No¨ will leave the Constitution
as it is.
FuII Text of ConstitutionaI Amend-
ment M:
That Article XVÌÌ, section 1 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 1. No corporation shall be created or
have its charter extended, changed or
amended by special laws, except those
for charitable, educational, penal or re-
formatory purposes, which are to be and
remain under the patronage and control
of the state; but the Legislature shall pro-
vide, by general laws, for the organiza-
tion of all corporations hereafter to be
created. The Legislature shall have the
authority to enact laws governing the op-
eration and dissolution of corporations.
That Article XVÌÌ, section 5 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 5. Ìn all elections for directors or
managers of a corporation, each mem-
ber or shareholder may cast the whole
number of his votes for one candidate, or
distribute them upon two or more candi-
dates, as he may prefer votes in the
manner consistent with laws enacted by
the Legislature.
That Article XVÌÌ, section 8 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 8. No corporation shall issue stocks
or bonds except for money, labor done,
or money or property actually received,
or for the reasonable value of other con-
tribution to the corporation; and all ficti-
tious increase of stock or indebtedness
shall be void. The stock and indebted-
ness of corporations shall not be in-
creased except in pursuance of general
law, nor without the consent of the per-
sons holding the larger amount in value
of the stock first obtained, at a meeting
to be held after sixty days notice given in
pursuance of law the manner consistent
with laws enacted by the Legislature.
ConstitutionaI Amendment N
TitIe: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution repealing certain re-
imbursement restrictions for travel by
legislators to and from a legislative ses-
sion.
Attorney GeneraI ExpIanation:
The Constitution fixes the mileage re-
imbursement rate for legislators at five
cents per mile for their travel to and from
a legislative session.
Constitutional Amendment N repeals
this constitutional limitation and allows
legislator travel reimbursement to be set
by the Legislature.
A vote "Yes¨ will eliminate the fixed
travel reimbursement rate.
A vote "No¨ will leave the Constitution
as it is.
FuII Text of ConstitutionaI Amend-
ment N:
That Article ÌÌÌ, section 6 of the Consti-
tution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 6. The terms of office of the mem-
bers of the Legislature shall be two
years; they legislators shall receive for
their services the salary fixed by law
under the provisions of § 2 of article XXÌ
of this Constitution, and five cents for
every mile of necessary travel in going to
and returning from the place of meeting
of the Legislature on the most usual
route.
No person may serve more than four
consecutive terms or a total of eight con-
secutive years in the senate and more
than four consecutive terms or a total of
eight consecutive years in the house of
representatives. However, this restriction
does not apply to partial terms to which
a legislator may be appointed.
A regular session of the Legislature
shall be held each year and shall not ex-
ceed forty legislative days, excluding
Sundays, holidays and legislative recess,
except in cases of impeachment, and
members of the Legislature shall receive
no other pay or perquisites except salary
and mileage.
ConstitutionaI Amendment O
TitIe: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution changing the
method for distributions from the cement
plant trust fund.
Attorney GeneraI ExpIanation:
Ìn 2001, the $238 million in proceeds
from the sale of the state cement plant
were placed in a constitutionally created
trust fund. Currently, the Constitution re-
quires a yearly transfer of $12 million
from the cement plant trust fund to the
state general fund. Ìn addition, under cer-
tain circumstances the Legislature must
authorize distributions of cement plant
trust fund earnings for the support of ed-
ucation.
Amendment O replaces the existing
method for cement trust fund distribu-
tions. The amendment would require a
yearly transfer of 4% of the market value
of the cement plant trust fund to the state
general fund for the support of education.
A vote "Yes¨ is for changing the
method for distributions from the cement
plant trust fund.
A vote "No¨ will leave the Constitution
as it is.
FuII Text of ConstitutionaI Amend-
ment O:
That Article XÌÌÌ, section 20 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 20. The net proceeds derived from
the sale of state cement enterprises shall
be deposited by the South Dakota Ce-
ment Commission in a trust fund hereby
created to benefit the citizens of South
Dakota. The South Dakota Ìnvestment
Council or its successor shall invest the
trust fund in stocks, bonds, mutual funds,
and other financial instruments as pro-
vided by law. Each fiscal year beginning
in fiscal year 2001, a transfer of twelve
million dollars shall be made from the
trust fund to the state general fund as
provided by law.
That Article XÌÌÌ, section 21 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 21. Except as provided in Article XÌÌÌ,
section 20 of the Constitution of the State
of South Dakota, the original principal of
the trust fund shall forever remain invio-
late. However, the The Legislature shall,
by appropriation, make distributions from
the difference between the twelve million
dollar annual general fund transfer and
five percent of the market value of the
trust fund for the support of education,
but not for the replacement of state aid to
general education or special education,
if the increase in the market value of the
trust fund in that fiscal year was sufficient
to maintain the original principal of the
trust fund after such distributions. Begin-
ning with fiscal year 2006, the market
value of the trust fund shall be deter-
mined by adding the market value of the
trust fund at the end of the sixteen most
recent calendar quarters, and dividing
that sum by sixteen transfer from the
trust fund to the state general fund four
percent of the lesser of the average mar-
ket value of the trust fund determined by
adding the market value of the trust fund
at the end of the sixteen most recent cal-
endar quarters as of December thirty-first
of that year and dividing that sum by six-
teen, or the market value of the trust fund
at the end of that calendar year for the
support of education in South Dakota.
The transfer shall be made prior to June
thirtieth of the subsequent calendar year.
ConstitutionaI Amendment P
TitIe: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution adding balanced
budget requirements.
Attorney GeneraI ExpIanation:
While the constitution currently re-
stricts the State from incurring debt, it
does not expressly require the State to
have a balanced budget. Amendment P
requires the Governor to propose a bal-
anced budget. Ìn addition, Amendment P
prohibits legislative appropriations from
exceeding anticipated revenues and ex-
isting available funds. The amendment is
not intended to affect other constitutional
provisions
A vote "Yes¨ will include balanced
budget requirements in the Constitution.
A vote "No¨ will leave the Constitution
as it is.
FuII Text of ConstitutionaI Amend-
ment P:
That Article XÌÌ of the Constitution of
the State of South Dakota, be amended
by adding a NEW SECTÌON to read as
follows:
§ 7. The Governor shall propose a
budget in which expenditures or appro-
priations may not exceed anticipated rev-
enue and existing funds available for
expenditure or appropriation. Appropria-
tions by the Legislature may not exceed
anticipated revenue and existing funds
available for expenditure or appropria-
tion. Nothing in this section is intended to
limit, restrict, expand, modify, or other-
wise affect any other provision of this
Constitution, including Article XÌÌÌ.
2012 Initiated Measure
The following initiated measure was pro-
posed by petition for submission to the
voters. This initiated measure will not be-
come effective unless approved by ma-
jority vote.
Initiated Measure 15
TitIe: An initiated measure to increase
state general sales and use taxes for ad-
ditional K-12 public education and Medi-
caid funding
Attorney GeneraI ExpIanation:
The initiated measure increases the
state general sales and use tax rate from
4% to 5%. The additional tax revenue will
be split evenly between K-12 public edu-
cation and Medicaid. The education
funds will be provided to school districts
based on enrollment, to be spent on im-
proving education as school boards de-
termine. The Medicaid funds will be
spent only on payments to Medicaid
providers and related state expenses.
The additional funds cannot replace or
reduce state funding levels set for fiscal
year 2012 relating to existing Medicaid
and K-12 public education programs, in-
cluding state aid to education. Currently,
state aid is to be adjusted annually by 3%
or the rate of inflation, whichever is less.
Under the measure, this annual adjust-
ment cannot exceed the growth rate in
state general fund revenues. Any result-
ing shortfall in state aid will be made up
in subsequent years.
A vote "Yes¨ is for the proposed law.
A vote "No¨ is against the proposed
law.
FuII Text of Initiated Measure 15:
1. Commencing January 1, 2013,
twenty percent of the monies collected
pursuant to the South Dakota sales and
use taxes imposed by SDCL chapters
10-45 and 10-46 shall be placed in a spe-
cial fund known as the Moving South
Dakota Forward fund. The monies in the
Moving South Dakota Forward fund shall
be allocated into the following two sub-
funds within the Moving South Dakota
Forward fund (1) fifty percent shall be al-
located to the Moving K-12 Education
Forward subfund; and (2) fifty percent
shall be allocated to the Moving Health-
care Forward subfund.
2. Monies allocated in Section 1 of this
initiated measure shall be disbursed as
follows:
(1) Monies in the Moving K-12 Edu-
cation Forward sub-fund are continu-
ously appropriated to the public school
districts of South Dakota, to be distrib-
uted pro rata based upon each school
district's relative share of fall enrollment
as defined in SDCL chapter 13-13, com-
pared to the fall enrollment of all school
districts. Funds deposited in the Moving
K-12 Education Forward subfund in the
preceding calendar quarter shall be dis-
tributed, provided above, to the public
school districts of South Dakota by the
first business day of February, May, Au-
gust, and November of each year, com-
mencing May 1, 2013. Funds received by
a school district form the Moving K-12
Education Forward subfund shall be
used at the sole discretion of the public
school district's governing board for the
purpose of improving public education;
(2) Eighty percent of the monies in
the Moving Healthcare Forward subfund
shall be spent only for the purpose of
funding payments to providers to the
South Dakota Medicaid program, which
are incurred due to increases in ex-
penses related to the reimbursement
rates paid to service providers per unit of
service in excess of such reimbursement
rates in effect as of July 1, 2011; and
(3) Twenty percent of the monies in
the Moving Health Care Forward sub-
fund shall be spent only for the purpose
of funding expenses related to payments
to providers to the South Dakota Medi-
caid Program, which are incurred due to
increases in the case load volume expe-
rienced by the South Dakota Medicaid
program from the case levels as of July
1, 2011.
3. No monies deposited in the Moving
K-12 Education Forward subfund may be
spent in any way, either directly or indi-
rectly, to reduce, supplant, or replace ap-
propriations for any state K-12 education
program in existence for state fiscal year
2012, including specifically the state aid
to education and special education pro-
grams established in SDCL chapters 13-
13 and 13-37. The per student allocation
in SDCL chapter 13-13 and the per stu-
dent allocation for each specified disabil-
ity in SDCL chapter 13-37 shalll be
adjusted by the annual application of
their respective index factors, as set forth
in SDCL subdivisions 13-13-10.1(3) and
13-37-35.1(6), as in effect on July 1,
2011. However, the index factor adjust-
ment shall, in no case, exceed the actual
percentage growth in state general fund
revenues for the most recently com-
pleted fiscal year. Ìf the percentage
growth in state general fund revenues is
less than the index factor sin any year,
the difference shall be made up in the im-
mediately following years to the extent
the percentage growth in state general
fund revenues exceeds the index factors.
4. No monies deposited in the Moving
Health Care Forward subfund may be
spent in any way, either directly or indi-
rectly, to reduce, supplant, or replace
state appropriations for any state Medi-
caid program in existence for state fiscal
year 2012.
5. Effective January 1, 2013, any sales
or use tax imposed at a rate of four per-
cent by the provisions of SDCL chapters
10-45 or 10-46 are hereby increased by
one percent each to a total rate of five
percent each.
2012 Referred Laws
The following laws were adopted by the
Legislature and referred to the voters by
petition. These laws will not become ef-
fective unless approved by majority vote.
Referred Law 14
TitIe: An Act to establish the Large Proj-
ect Development Fund.
Attorney GeneraI ExpIanation:
The referred law establishes the
"Large Project Development Fund.¨ Be-
ginning January 1, 2013, 22% of contrac-
tors' excise tax revenues would be
transferred from the state general fund to
the Large Project Development Fund.
The South Dakota Board of Economic
Development would use Large Project
Development Fund monies to provide
grants for the construction of large eco-
nomic development projects within the
state. To be eligible, a project must have
a cost exceeding $5 million. Examples of
eligible projects include laboratories and
facilities for testing, manufacturing,
power generation, power transmission,
agricultural processing, and wind energy.
Examples of ineligible projects include
retail establishments; residential hous-
ing; and facilities for lodging, health care
services and the raising or feeding of
livestock.
A vote "Yes¨ is for the establishment of
the Large Project Development Fund.
A vote "No¨ is against the referred law.
FuII Text of Referred Law 14:
Section 1. That § 1-16G-1.2 be
amended to read as follows:
1-16G-1.2. The Board of Economic
Development may take title by foreclo-
sure to any property given as security if
the acquisition is necessary to protect
any economic development grant or loan
or any large project development grant
made under pursuant to the provisions of
this chapter, and may sell, transfer, or
convey any such property to any respon-
sible buyer. Any sale of property hereun-
der pursuant to the provisions of this
chapter shall be performed in a commer-
cially reasonable manner. Ìf the sale,
transfer, or conveyance cannot be ef-
fected with reasonable promptness, the
board may, in order to prevent financial
loss and sustain employment, lease the
property to a responsible tenant or ten-
ants.
All sale proceeds or lease payments
received by the board pursuant to this
section shall be deposited in the fund
from which the original grant or loan was
made.
Section 2. That § 1-16G-8 be
amended to read as follows:
1-16G-8. The Board of Economic De-
velopment shall promulgate rules pur-
suant to chapter 1-26 concerning the
following:
(1) The existing barriers to eco-
nomic growth and development in the
state;
(2) Developing investment in re-
search and development in high technol-
ogy industries;
(3) The submission of business
plans prior to the approval of economic
development grants or loans or large
project development grants. Business
plans shall include the products or serv-
ices to be offered by the applicant, job
descriptions with attendant salary or
wage information by job category, educa-
tional requirements by job category,
methods of accounting, financing other
than that provided by the economic de-
velopment grant or loan or a large project
development grant, and marketing,
sales, merchandising, and other disci-
plines proposed to be used for business
growth and expansion;
(4) The cooperation between agen-
cies of state government and applicant
businesses for nonfinancial services in-
cluding loan packaging, marketing assis-
tance, research assistance, and
assistance with finding solutions for com-
plying with environmental, energy,
health, safety, and other federal, state,
and local laws and regulations;
(5) Regular performance monitoring
and reporting systems for participating
businesses to assure compliance with
their business plans and, terms of repay-
ment of an economic development loan
and compliance with terms of an eco-
nomic development grant or a large proj-
ect development grant;
(6) Establish eligibility criteria for
grants and loans;
(7) Establish application procedures
for grants and loans, including a require-
ment that grant and loan applications be
signed under penalty of perjury;
(8) Establish criteria to determine
which applicants will receive grants or
loans;
(9) Govern the use of proceeds of
grants and loans;
(10) Establish criteria for the terms
and conditions upon which loans shall be
made, including matching requirements,
interest rates, repayment terms, and the
terms of security given to secure such
loans; and
(11) Establish criteria for the terms
and conditions upon which grants shall
be made, including permitted uses, per-
formance criteria, and matching require-
ments; and
(12) Establish criteria for the terms
and conditions upon which grants shall
be repaid for noncompliance with the
terms and conditions upon which the
grant was made.
Section 3. That § 1-16G-16.1 be
amended to read as follows:
1-16G-16.1. The Board of Economic
Development may use the revolving eco-
nomic development and initiative fund for
the purpose of paying taxes and liens
and for the procuring of legal services
and other services necessary to protect,
recover, maintain, and liquidate the as-
sets of the revolving economic develop-
ment and initiative fund and the large
project development fund. Such costs
may be incurred and paid up to ten per-
cent of the loan or grant balance with a
majority vote of the board of economic
development. Costs in excess of ten per-
cent shall be approved by a two-thirds
vote of the board. Such services are not
subject to state bid laws so long as such
services are procured in a commercially
acceptable manner.
Section 4. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
Terms used in this Act Mean:
(1) "Large project," a project with a
total project cost exceeding five million
dollars; and
(2) "Project cost," the amount paid
in money, credits, property, or other
money's worth for a project.
Section 5. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
For the purposes of this Act, the term,
project, means a new building or struc-
ture or the expansion of an existing build-
ing or structure, the construction of which
is subject to the contractor's excise tax
imposed by chapters 10-46A or 10-46B.
A project includes laboratory and testing
facilities, manufacturing facilities, power
generation facilities, power transmission
facilities, agricultural processing facilities,
and wind energy facilities. A project does
not include any building or structure:
(1) Used predominantly for the sale
of products at retail, other than the sale
of electricity at retail, to individual con-
sumers;
(2) Used predominantly for residen-
tial housing or transient lodging;
(3) Used predominantly to provide
health care services;
(4) Constructed for raising or feed-
ing of livestock; or
(5) That is not subject to ad valorem
real property taxation or equivalent taxes
measured by gross receipts.
Section 6. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
There is established in the state treas-
ury a fund to be known as the large proj-
ect development fund for the purpose of
making grants for large project develop-
ment.
Section 7. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
The Board of Economic Development
may make grants from the large project
development fund for the purpose of pro-
moting large project development in
South Dakota.
Section 8. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
All money in the fund is hereby appro-
priated for the purpose of making grants
as provided in this Act. Any repayment of
grants from the large project develop-
ment fund and any interest thereon shall
be receipted into the large project devel-
opment fund.
Section 9. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
The Board of Economic Development
may accept and expend for the purposes
of sections 6 and 7 of this Act, inclusive,
any funds obtained from federal sources,
gifts, contributions, or any source if such
acceptance and expenditure is approved
in accordance with § 4-8B-10.
Section 10. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
There is hereby continuously appropri-
ated to the large project development
fund the amount of twenty-two percent of
all deposits into the general fund of the
contractors' excise tax imposed by chap-
ter 10-46A and the alternate contractors'
excise tax imposed by chapter 10-46B.
Transfers from the general fund to the
large project development fund pursuant
to this provision shall be made on a
monthly basis by the Bureau of Finance
and Management.
Section 11. The provisions of section
10 of this Act are effective on January 1,
2013.
Referred Law 16
TitIe: An education reform act to estab-
lish a teacher scholarship program; cre-
ate a program for math and science
teacher bonuses; create a program for
teacher merit bonuses; mandate a uni-
form teacher and principal evaluation
system; and eliminate state requirements
for teacher tenure.
Attorney GeneraI ExpIanation:
Referred Law 16 is an education re-
form act with five key components. First,
it establishes a scholarship program for
eligible college students who commit to
teach in South Dakota in critical need
subject areas.
Second, the referred law creates a
program to provide state-funded annual
bonuses for eligible math and science
teachers.
Third, the referred law develops a sep-
arate "Top Teachers¨ bonus program.
This program provides annual state-
funded merit bonuses for up to 20% of
each school district's full-time certified
teachers, as awarded by the local school
boards. Alternatively, a school board may
enact its own program for teacher
bonuses, using these state-provided
funds. A school board may opt out of
these merit bonus programs altogether,
resulting in re-allocation of its merit
bonus funds to other participating school
districts.
Fourth, the referred law mandates a
uniform statewide system for evaluating
teachers and principals, including a rat-
ing system.
Fifth, the referred law eliminates state
requirements for continuing contracts
("tenure¨) for teachers who do not
achieve tenure by July 1, 2016. School
boards may, in their discretion, choose to
offer continuing contracts to non-tenured
teachers.
A vote "Yes¨ is to enact the education
reform act.
A vote "No¨ is against the referred law.
FuII Text of Referred Law 16:
Section 1. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
Beginning in the 2013-2014 academic
year, there is hereby established the
South Dakota critical teaching needs
scholarship program. The purpose of the
program is to encourage South Dakota's
high school graduates to obtain their
postsecondary education in South
Dakota for teaching, to remain in the
state upon completion of their education,
and to contribute to the state and its citi-
zens by working in a critical need teach-
ing area.
Section 2. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
The South Dakota critical teaching
needs scholarship program shall be ad-
ministered by the Critical Teaching
Needs Scholarship Board which is
hereby established. The board shall con-
sist of five members appointed by the
Governor for a term of five years, except
that the initial appointments shall be for
periods of one, two, three, four, and five
years. A majority of the board shall be
present either personally or by telecon-
ference to constitute a quorum.
The Department of Education shall
provide necessary support services to
the board.
Section 3. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
From the total pool of applicants, the
Critical Teaching Needs Scholarship
Board shall award no more than one
hundred critical teaching needs scholar-
ships for each academic year. The board
shall award scholarships based on the
requirements of sections 5 and 6 of this
Act, the filling of critical teaching needs
areas, and other academic and personal
characteristics of each applicant as de-
termined by the board. Notwithstanding
the provisions of this section, if the board
rescinds a scholarship that has been
awarded, the board may award the
amount of the rescinded scholarship to
an alternate.
Section 4. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
All accredited South Dakota public
and nonpublic postsecondary institutions
which offer a baccalaureate degree in el-
ementary or secondary education are el-
igible to participate in the scholarship
program. Each institution may choose
whether to participate in the program and
may limit the number of scholarship re-
cipients the institution will accept in each
academic year.
Section 5. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
Ìn order to be eligible for a critical
teaching needs scholarship, a student
shall:
(1) Agree, in writing, to stay in South
Dakota and work in a critical teaching
needs area for five years after graduation
from a participating postsecondary insti-
tution;
(2) Agree, through a promissory
note, that failure to abide by the provi-
sions of subdivision (1) will result in the
scholarship being converted into an in-
terest bearing loan;
(3) Attend a participating South
Dakota postsecondary institution as an
undergraduate junior or senior and be
accepted in an elementary or secondary
education program at the institution that
will prepare the student to work in a crit-
ical need teaching area; and
(4) Be a United States citizen or
lawful permanent resident.
For purposes of subdivision (3), a jun-
ior is a student who has earned sixty
credit hours prior to the beginning of the
third year of instruction, and a senior is a
student who has earned ninety credit
hours prior to the fourth year of instruc-
tion.
A student is eligible to participate in
the South Dakota critical teaching needs
scholarship program for the equivalent of
two academic years (four consecutive
spring and fall terms) or until the attain-
ment of a baccalaureate degree in ele-
mentary or secondary education in a
critical teaching needs area, whichever
comes first. However, the Critical Teach-
ing Needs Scholarship Board may grant
exceptions to the continuous enrollment
requirements for good cause.
Scholarships are not provided for
summer session students enrolled in tra-
ditional four year programs.
Section 6. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
Ìn addition to the eligibility criteria iden-
tified in section 5 of this Act, the Critical
Teaching Needs Scholarship Board may
require applicants to submit a written
essay or other information by which to
judge the academic and personal qualifi-
cations of the applicant.
Section 7. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
The amount of the annual scholarship
shall equal the tuition and generally ap-
plicable fees for thirty credit hours at a
South Dakota public postsecondary insti-
tution as of July 1, 2013. The scholarship
amount paid to a recipient attending a
participating nonpublic postsecondary in-
stitution shall equal the amount paid to a
recipient attending a public postsec-
ondary institution.
One-half of the annual scholarship
shall be paid to public postsecondary in-
stitutions on behalf of eligible students
there enrolled or directly to eligible stu-
dents enrolled at nonpublic postsec-
ondary institutions at the beginning of the
fall semester, and the other half shall be
paid at the beginning of the spring se-
mester.
Ìf, in any year, the total funds available
to fund the critical teaching needs schol-
arships are insufficient to permit each el-
igible recipient to receive the full amount
provided in this section, the available
moneys shall be prorated and distributed
to each recipient in proportion to the en-
titlement contemplated by this section.
The total amount of the scholarship may
not exceed the amount stipulated in this
section.
Section 8. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
Ìn order to maintain eligibility for the
critical teaching needs scholarship pro-
gram, a student shall:
(1) Maintain a cumulative 2.8 grade
point average on a 4.0 scale. The stu-
dent shall complete consecutive spring
and fall terms in order to remain eligible
for continuation of the scholarship pro-
gram from term to term;
(2) Make satisfactory academic
progress towards a degree by earning
thirty credit hours per year;
(3) Attend and graduate from a par-
ticipating South Dakota postsecondary
institution with an elementary or second-
ary education degree which qualifies the
student to teach in a critical teaching
needs area in South Dakota; and
(4) Upon graduation, stay in South
Dakota and teach in a critical teaching
needs area for five years.
Ìf factors beyond the control of a stu-
dent who has been awarded a critical
teaching needs scholarship prevent the
student from meeting any of the require-
ments in subdivisions (1) to (3), the Crit-
ical Teaching Needs Scholarship Board
may temporarily waive the requirements
of those subdivisions. The board may re-
scind a scholarship award if the student
does not maintain eligibility as prescribed
in those subdivisions.
Failure to fulfill the requirements of
subdivision (4) shall result in the critical
teaching needs scholarship being con-
verted into an interest bearing loan. The
board shall set the rate of interest, as al-
lowed by law. The five years of employ-
ment referenced in subdivision (4) shall
be fulfilled consecutively unless the
board waives this requirement for good
cause, and the five years of employment
may be fulfilled at more than one school
district in South Dakota.
Section 9. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
The Department of Education may re-
ceive gifts, donations, grants, or endow-
ments for the purposes of sections 1 to
8, inclusive, of this Act.
Section 10. The Board of Education
may promulgate rules pursuant to chap-
ter 1-26 to define areas of critical teach-
ing need for the purposes of sections 1
to 8, inclusive, of this Act, to establish ap-
plication requirements for the critical
teaching needs scholarship, and to fur-
ther accomplish the purposes of sections
1 to 8, inclusive, of this Act.
Section 11. Beginning in the 2014-
2015 school year, there is hereby cre-
ated the math and science teacher
incentive program within the Department
of Education to provide funds to public
school districts for the purpose of provid-
ing rewards to attract certified teachers
who teach in math and science subject
areas in middle school and high school
or who are certified with a math or sci-
ence specialist endorsement which they
are utilizing for any grade, kindergarten
through twelve. By January 31, 2014, the
constltuatlonal Amendments lnform readers of ballot lssues
oontinued on paee 11
Legal Notlces
1hursdav, 0otober 11, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
South Dakota Board of Education shall
promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-
26 establishing which courses qualify as
math and science courses for purposes
of the program. For purposes of this Act,
math and science courses are those
courses established by the Board of Ed-
ucation pursuant to this section. For pur-
poses of this Act, middle school is a
school consisting of any combination of
two or more consecutive grades, five to
eight, inclusive, and high school is a
school consisting of any combination of
three or more consecutive grades, in-
cluding ninth grade to twelfth grade, in-
clusive.
Section 12. Participation in the math
and science teacher incentive program is
voluntary for teachers, and incentive re-
wards are to supplement but not replace
what a teacher receives under a contract
between the teacher and the school dis-
trict or a collective bargaining agreement
between a district and the district's teach-
ers. No collective bargaining agreement
between a district and the district's teach-
ers may limit the ability of a teacher to
qualify for or receive an incentive reward.
Nothing in sections 11 to 16, inclusive, of
this Act is intended to create a contrac-
tual right or property right in the math and
science teacher incentive program.
Section 13. The Department of Educa-
tion shall provide application forms for
teachers wishing to participate in the
math and science teacher incentive pro-
gram. A teacher wishing to participate in
the program shall complete and sign the
form and provide the form to the busi-
ness office of the school district by the
close of business on October first to be
eligible for the program for that school
year. A teacher wishing to participate
shall submit a new application for each
school year. Completed applications are
a public record pursuant to chapter 1-27,
but personal information in the applica-
tions may be redacted as allowed by that
chapter.
Section 14. To be eligible for the math
and science teacher incentive program,
a teacher shall fulfill the following require-
ments:
(1) Comply with section 13 of this
Act;
(2) Receive a distinguished rating or
proficient rating, as referenced in section
38 of this Act, on the teacher's most re-
cent evaluation;
(3) Teach math or science courses
in middle school or high school for at
least fifty percent of a full-time equivalent
position's assignments submitted in the
annual teacher data collection pursuant
to § 13-3-51, and any rules promulgated
pursuant thereto, and be currently certi-
fied with a middle school or high school
endorsement to teach each course, or
utilize a math or science specialist en-
dorsement for any grade, kindergarten
through twelve; and
(4) Be in full-time status for the en-
tire school year.
Nothing in subdivision (3) shall entitle
any teacher to receive more than the
amount stipulated in section 16 of this
Act.
Section 15. By September first of each
year, the school board of each district
shall submit to the Department of Educa-
tion a copy of the application of each
teacher eligible for the math and science
teacher incentive program for the previ-
ous school year pursuant to the require-
ments of this Act. The Department of
Education may require additional infor-
mation from the district as necessary to
verify each teacher's eligibility for the re-
ward. The department may refuse to
issue a reward for any teacher for whom
the information required by this section is
not provided by the deadline.
Section 16. The amount of the reward
under the math and science teacher in-
centive program is two thousand eight
hundred fifty dollars per eligible teacher
to be distributed as described in this sec-
tion. No later than October first of each
year, at the same time that foundation
program state aid is distributed to school
districts pursuant to §§ 13-13-10.1 to 13-
13-41, inclusive, the secretary of the De-
partment of Education shall distribute
funds for the math and science teacher
incentive program for teachers that qual-
ify pursuant to this Act. These funds shall
be distributed in lump sum payments.
Subject to the requirements of this Act,
the department shall pay to the school
district two thousand eight hundred fifty
dollars per eligible teacher in that district.
Within thirty days of receipt from the de-
partment, the school district shall distrib-
ute the funds as follows:
(1) Two thousand five hundred dol-
lars shall be paid to each eligible teacher
in the district; and
(2) Three hundred fifty dollars may
be retained by the district to pay the dis-
trict's share of applicable federal taxes,
the district's share of contribution to the
South Dakota Retirement System, and
administrative costs.
Section 17. Beginning in the 2014-
2015 school year, there is hereby cre-
ated the top teachers reward program
within the Department of Education to
provide funds to public school districts for
the purpose of providing top teacher re-
wards for certified teachers.
Section 18. Participation in the top
teachers reward program is voluntary for
teachers, and such rewards shall supple-
ment but not replace what a teacher re-
ceives under a contract between the
teacher and the school district or a col-
lective bargaining agreement between a
district and the district's teachers. No col-
lective bargaining agreement between a
district and the district's teachers may
limit the ability of a teacher to qualify for
or receive a top teacher reward. Nothing
in sections 17 to 25, inclusive, of this Act
is intended to create a contractual right
or property right in the top teachers re-
ward program.
Section 19. Ìn each school year, up to
twenty percent of each school district's
full-time equivalent certified teaching po-
sitions, as measured by the district's an-
nual teacher data collection pursuant to
§ 13-3-51 and any rules promulgated
pursuant to that section, shall be eligible
to receive a top teacher reward, subject
to the requirements of this Act. The De-
partment of Education shall multiply the
number of full-time equivalent certified
teaching positions in the district by
twenty percent. Ìf this calculation results
in a fraction, the maximum number of el-
igible positions may not exceed the next
lowest whole number. Ìf there are fewer
than five full-time equivalent certified
teaching positions in a school district, the
maximum number of eligible positions
shall be one.
Section 20. No later than May first of
each year, at the same time that founda-
tion program state aid is distributed to a
school district pursuant to §§ 13-13-10.1
to 13-13-41, inclusive, the secretary of
the Department of Education shall inform
each school district of the number of eli-
gible positions in that district for the cur-
rent school year, based on the
calculation in section 19 of this Act, and
distribute to each school district five thou-
sand seven hundred dollars per eligible
position. These funds shall be distributed
in lump sum payments. The school dis-
trict shall retain these funds until distribu-
tion pursuant to section 21 of this Act.
Section 21. No later than September
first of each year, the school district shall
distribute the funds received pursuant to
section 20 of this Act as follows:
(1) Five thousand dollars shall be
paid to each teacher selected for a top
teacher reward pursuant to section 24 of
this Act for the previous school year; and
(2) Seven hundred dollars may be
retained by the district to pay the district's
share of applicable federal taxes, the dis-
trict's share of contribution to the South
Dakota Retirement System, and admin-
istrative costs.
Any funds received pursuant to sec-
tion 20 of this Act which are not distrib-
uted according to this section shall be
returned to the Department of Education
within thirty days.
Section 22. The Department of Educa-
tion shall provide application forms for
teachers wishing to participate in the top
teachers reward program. A teacher
wishing to participate in the program
shall complete and sign the form and
provide the form to the business office of
the school district by the close of busi-
ness on October first to be eligible for the
program for that school year. A teacher
wishing to participate shall submit a new
application for each school year. Com-
pleted applications are a public record
pursuant to chapter 1-27, but personal in-
formation in the applications may be
redacted pursuant to that chapter.
Section 23. A participating teacher
shall be full-time and receive a distin-
guished rating, as referenced in section
38 of this Act, on the teacher's most re-
cent evaluation to be eligible for a top
teacher reward. Ìn addition, a distin-
guished teacher's selection for the re-
ward may be based on consideration of
the following factors as determined by
the school board:
(1) Mentoring of less experienced
teachers;
(2) Curriculum development;
(3) Assessment development;
(4) Data analysis;
(5) Service to the local district,
state, or national committees or task
forces;
(6) Leadership in a professional
learning community;
(7) National board certification;
(8) Other leadership activities or
recognitions; and
(9) Other additional criteria as de-
termined by the school board.
Section 24. No later than August first
of each year, the school board of each
school district shall determine which par-
ticipating teachers, if any, are selected to
receive top teacher rewards for the pre-
vious school year according to the crite-
ria in section 23 of this Act. The number
of teachers selected may not exceed the
number of eligible positions referenced in
sections 19 and 20 of this Act.
Section 25. Department of Education
may require each school district to pro-
vide any information necessary to verify
the district's compliance with sections 20
to 24, inclusive, of this Act. Upon a find-
ing of noncompliance, the department
may require the district to return any
funds distributed contrary to the require-
ments of this Act.
Section 26. Notwithstanding any other
provisions of this Act, public school dis-
tricts may opt out of the top teacher re-
ward program by providing written notice
to the Department of Education. The no-
tice shall be approved by a majority of
the school board and signed by the
school board president. The department
shall provide forms for this purpose. Be-
ginning in 2014, the notice shall be post-
marked no earlier than January first, and
no later than January thirty-first, of each
year in order to be effective for the next
school year. The district shall provide a
separate form for each school year for
which the district desires to opt out. Ìf a
school district fails to follow the require-
ments of this section, the attempt to opt
out is void, and the district shall comply
with the requirements of the top teacher
reward program.
Ìf a district opts out pursuant to this
section, the teachers employed in the
district are not eligible to participate in the
top teacher reward program. The district
shall provide written notice to each certi-
fied teacher of the teacher's ineligibility
for the program before executing a
teaching contract with the teacher for the
school year for which the opt out is effec-
tive.
School districts may not opt out of the
math and science teacher incentive pro-
gram established pursuant to this Act.
Section 27. Ìf a school district opts out
pursuant to section 26 of this Act, all
funds which the district would have been
eligible to receive for the top teacher pro-
gram pursuant to this Act shall be redis-
tributed as follows:
(1) To obtain the redistribution
amount, the Department of Education
shall calculate the number of positions
that would have been eligible for the top
teacher reward program in each opt out
district pursuant to section 19 of this Act,
and multiply that calculation by five thou-
sand seven hundred dollars;
(2) No later than May first of each
year, at the same time that foundation
program state aid is distributed to a
school district pursuant to §§ 13-13-10.1
to 13-13-41, inclusive, the department
shall allocate the redistribution amount,
on a pro rata basis, to each public school
district that did not opt out of the top
teacher reward program or is participat-
ing in a local teacher reward program
pursuant to sections 28 to 35, inclusive,
of this Act. Each district's pro rata share
of the redistribution amount shall be
based on the number of full-time equiva-
lent certified teacher positions in the dis-
trict, as measured by the district's annual
teacher data collection pursuant to § 13-
3-51 and any rules promulgated pur-
suant to that section; and
(3) No later than September first of
each year, the redistribution amount re-
ceived by each district pursuant to sub-
division (2) shall be distributed equally
among all teachers receiving top teacher
rewards in the district pursuant to sec-
tions 17 to 25, inclusive, of this Act, or
among all teachers receiving local
teacher rewards pursuant to sections 28
to 35, inclusive, of this Act, but each dis-
trict may withhold an amount necessary
to pay the district's share of applicable
federal taxes, the district's share of con-
tributions to the South Dakota Retire-
ment System, and administrative costs.
Any funds not distributed according to
this subdivision shall be returned to the
Department of Education within thirty
days.
Section 28. Notwithstanding any other
provision of this Act, a public school dis-
trict may create a local teacher reward
plan to act as a substitute for the top
teacher reward program beginning in the
2014-2015 school year. Ìf the local
teacher reward plan is developed in com-
pliance with sections 28 to 35, inclusive,
of this Act, the district may utilize the local
teacher reward plan to provide the district
with the flexibility to use the funds that
would otherwise be provided to the dis-
trict through the top teachers reward pro-
gram.
Participation in the local teacher re-
ward plan is voluntary. Rewards shall
supplement but not replace what a
teacher receives under a contract be-
tween the teacher and the school district
or a collective bargaining agreement be-
tween a district and the district's teach-
ers. No collective bargaining agreement
between a district and the district's teach-
ers may limit the ability of a teacher to
qualify for or receive a local teacher re-
ward. Nothing in sections 28 to 35, inclu-
sive, of this Act, is intended to create a
contractual right or property right in local
teacher rewards.
Teachers in the district may not partic-
ipate in the top teacher reward program
for any school year for which the district
has adopted a local teacher reward plan.
The district shall provide written notice to
each certified teacher of the teacher's in-
eligibility for the top teacher reward pro-
gram and provide a copy of the district's
local teacher reward plan to each certi-
fied teacher before executing a teaching
contract with the teacher for the school
year for which the local teacher reward
plan is effective.
Section 29. The local teacher reward
plan shall reward certified teachers in the
district based upon one or more of the
following criteria:
(1) Demonstrating an impact on stu-
dent achievement;
(2) Demonstrating teacher leader-
ship; or
(3) Market based needs of the
school district based upon critical teach-
ing area needs of the school district.
Section 30. There is hereby estab-
lished the Local Teacher Reward Plan
Advisory Council. The council shall pro-
vide input in developing one or more
model local teacher reward plan applica-
tions based upon the criteria in section
29 of this Act. The work group shall be
appointed by the secretary of education
and consist of the following members:
(1) A combination of six principals
and superintendents: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school;
(2) Six teachers: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school; and
(3) Three school board members:
one from a small school district, one from
a medium-sized school district, and one
from a large school district.
Section 31. The Board of Education
shall promulgate rules, pursuant to chap-
ter 1-26, establishing the application form
for the local teacher reward plan, further
guidelines for district applications based
on the criteria in section 29 of this Act, a
system to monitor whether each partici-
pating school district is complying with
the local teacher reward plan, and penal-
ties for noncompliance.
Section 32. There is hereby estab-
lished the Local Teacher Reward Plan
Oversight Board. The board shall consist
of the following members:
(1) One member of the Senate ap-
pointed by the president pro tempore of
the Senate;
(2) One member of the House of
Representatives appointed by the
speaker of the House of Representa-
tives;
(3) Two representatives of the busi-
ness community appointed by the Gov-
ernor;
(4) One representative of an educa-
tional association appointed by the Gov-
ernor;
(5) One current or former teacher
appointed by the Governor; and
(6) The secretary of the Department
of Education.
Section 33. A school district shall sub-
mit the local teacher reward plan appli-
cation to the Department of Education no
later than January thirty-first of each
year, beginning in 2014, to be eligible to
apply the local teacher reward plan to the
upcoming school year.
By March fifteenth of each year, the
Local Teacher Reward Plan Oversight
Board shall review all applications to de-
termine compliance with this Act, and
any rules promulgated thereto. The
board may request additional information
from the district as part of the review of
the application. By April first of each year,
the board shall inform each district
whether the district's local teacher re-
ward plan has been approved for the up-
coming school year. Ìf the application is
denied, the district may adopt a model
plan established pursuant to section 30
of this Act or opt out pursuant to sections
26 and 27 of this Act.
Section 34. Ìf a district's local teacher
reward plan is approved, the Department
of Education shall calculate the number
of positions in the district that would have
been eligible for the top teacher reward
program pursuant to section 19 of this
Act and multiply that calculation by five
thousand seven hundred dollars. No later
than May first of each year, at the same
time that foundation program state aid is
distributed to the district pursuant to §§
13-13-10.1 to 13-13-41, inclusive, the
secretary of the Department of Education
shall distribute this amount to the district
in a lump sum payment.
Section 35. No later than September
first of each year, the district shall distrib-
ute the funds received pursuant to sec-
tion 34 of this Act to each certified
teacher selected for a reward under the
local teacher reward program for the pre-
vious school year, but the district may
withhold an amount necessary to pay the
district's share of applicable federal
taxes, the district's share of contributions
to the South Dakota Retirement System,
and administrative costs. Any funds not
distributed according to this section shall
be returned to the Department of Educa-
tion within thirty days.
Section 36. A teacher may apply for
both the math and science teacher in-
centive program and the top teachers re-
ward program established pursuant to
this Act or both the math and science
teacher incentive program and the local
teacher reward plan established pur-
suant to this Act.
Section 37. That § 13-42-34 be
amended to read as follows:
13-42-34. Any public school district
seeking state accreditation shall evaluate
the performance of each certified teacher
in years one through to three, inclusive,
not less than annually, and each certified
teacher in the fourth contract year or be-
yond, not less than every other year.
Each For the 2012-2013 school year
and the 2013-2014 school year, each
school district shall may adopt proce-
dures for evaluating the performance of
certified teachers employed by the
school district that:
(1) Are based on the minimum pro-
fessional performance standards estab-
lished by the Board of Education
pursuant to § 13-42-33;
(2) Require multiple measures;
(3) Serve as the basis for programs
to increase professional growth and de-
velopment of certified teachers; and
(4) Ìnclude a plan of assistance for
any certified teacher, who is in the fourth
or subsequent year of teaching, and
whose performance does not meet the
school district's performance standards.
Section 38. That § 13-42-34 be
amended to read as follows:
13-42-34. Any public school district
seeking state accreditation shall evaluate
the performance of each certified teacher
in years one through three not less than
annually, and each certified teacher in
the fourth contract year or beyond, not
less than every other year. Beginning in
the 2014-2015 school year, each certified
teacher shall be evaluated on an annual
basis.
Each school district shall adopt the
model evaluation instrument required by
section 40 of this Act and procedures for
evaluating the performance of certified
teachers employed by the school district
that:
(1) Are based on the minimum pro-
fessional performance standards estab-
lished by the Board of Education
pursuant to § 13-42-33;
(2) Require multiple measures of
performance as follows:
(a) Fifty percent of the evaluation of
a teacher shall be based on quantitative
measures of student growth, based on a
single year or multiple years of data. This
quantitative data shall be based on re-
ports of student performance on state
validated assessments established pur-
suant to § 13-3-55. For those teachers in
grades and subjects for which there is no
state-validated assessment for the quan-
titative portion of the evaluation, teachers
shall demonstrate success in improving
student achievement using objective
measures, which can include portfolio
assessments, end-of-course exams, or
other district approved assessments
which demonstrate student growth; and
(b) Fifty percent of the evaluation of
a teacher shall be based on qualitative,
observable, evidence-based characteris-
tics of good teaching and classroom
practices as further defined in the model
evaluation instrument referenced in sec-
tion 40 of this Act. Districts may collect
additional evidence using any of the fol-
lowing if not required by the model eval-
uation instrument:
(i) Classroom drop-ins;
(ii) Parent surveys;
(iii) Student surveys;
(iv) Portfolios; or
(v) Peer review;
(3) Serve as the basis for programs
to increase professional growth and de-
velopment of certified teachers; and
(4) Ìnclude a plan of assistance for
any certified teacher, who is in the fourth
or subsequent year of teaching, and
whose performance does not meet the
school district's performance standards;
and
(5) Are based on the following four-
tier rating system:
(a) Distinguished;
(b) Proficient;
(c) Basic; and
(d) Unsatisfactory.
Section 39. The provisions of section
38 of this Act are effective July 1, 2014.
Section 40. That § 13-42-35 be
amended to read as follows:
13-42-35. A work group appointed by
the secretary of education shall provide
input in developing the standards for
defining the four-tier rating system re-
quired by section 38 of this Act and shall
develop in developing a model evalua-
tion instrument that may shall be used by
school districts for the 2014-2015 school
year and subsequent school years. The
work group shall consist of the following
members:
(1) Six teachers: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school;
(2) Three principals: one from an el-
ementary school, one from a middle
school, and one from a high school;
(3) Two superintendents;
(4) Two school board members;
(5) Four parents who have students
in various levels of the K-12 system:
(6) One representative of the South
Dakota Education Association;
(7) One representative of the
School Administrators of South Dakota;
and
(8) One representative of the Asso-
ciated School Boards of South Dakota.
Section 41. That chapter 13-42 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
Pursuant to chapter 1-26, the South
Dakota Board of Education shall promul-
gate rules establishing standards for
defining the four-tier rating system re-
quired by section 38 of this Act and
adopting the model evaluation instru-
ment referenced in section 40 of this Act.
Section 42. That chapter 3-18 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
Beginning with the 2014-2015 school
year, the procedures for evaluation and
the model evaluation instrument refer-
enced in sections 38 to 41, inclusive, of
this Act may not be the subject of any col-
lective bargaining agreement between a
district and the district's teachers.
Section 43. The Board of Education
shall promulgate rules pursuant to chap-
ter 1-26 to establish minimum profes-
sional performance standards for
certified principals in South Dakota public
schools, and to establish best practices
for the evaluation of the performance of
certified principals that shall be used by
individual school districts. The South
Dakota Board of Education shall promul-
gate rules pursuant to chapter 1-26 es-
tablishing standards for defining the
four-tier rating system required by sec-
tion 44 of this Act and adopting the model
evaluation instrument referenced in sec-
tion 45 of this Act.
Section 44. Beginning in the 2014-
2015 school year, any public school dis-
trict seeking state accreditation shall
evaluate the performance of each certi-
fied principal not less than every other
year.
Each school district shall adopt the
model evaluation instrument required by
section 45 of this Act and procedures for
evaluating the performance of certified
principals employed by the school district
that:
(1) Are based on the minimum pro-
fessional performance standards estab-
lished by the Board of Education
pursuant to section 43 of this Act;
(2) Require multiple measures of
performance;
(3) Serve as the basis for programs
to increase professional growth and de-
velopment of certified principals;
(4) Ìnclude a plan of assistance for
any certified principal whose perform-
ance does not meet the school district's
performance standards; and
(5) Are based on the following four-
tier rating system:
(a) Distinguished;
(b) Proficient;
(c) Basic; and
(d) Unsatisfactory.
Section 45. A work group appointed by
the secretary of education shall provide
input in developing the standards refer-
enced in section 43 of this Act, the four-
tier rating system required by section 44
of this Act, and in developing a model in-
strument for principal evaluation that
shall be used by school districts for the
2014-2015 school year and each school
year thereafter. The work group shall
consist of the following members:
(1) Six principals: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school;
(2) Three teachers: one from an el-
ementary school, one from a middle
school, and one from a high school;
(3) Two superintendents;
(4) Two school board members;
(5) Four parents who have students
in various levels of the K-12 system;
(6) One representative of the South
Dakota Education Association;
(7) One representative of the
School Administrators of South Dakota;
and
(8) One representative of the Asso-
ciated School Boards of South Dakota.
Section 46. All persons conducting
teacher or principal evaluations required
by sections 38 to 45, inclusive, of this Act
shall participate in training conducted by
the Department of Education before con-
ducting the evaluations.
Section 47. That chapter 13-43 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TÌON to read as follows:
For purposes of this chapter, the term,
tenured teacher, means a teacher who is
in or beyond the fourth consecutive term
of employment as a teacher with the
school district prior to July 1, 2016. Ìf,
prior to July 1, 2016, the school district
and the teacher have entered into a con-
tract pursuant to §§ 13-43-4 and 13-43-
5 for the teacher's fourth consecutive
term of employment with the district or a
subsequent consecutive term of employ-
ment with the district, then that teacher is
a tenured teacher for purposes of this
chapter. The term, nontenured teacher,
means a teacher who is not yet in or be-
yond the fourth consecutive term of em-
ployment as a teacher with the school
district prior to July 1, 2016. Any teacher
who is not in or beyond the fourth con-
secutive term of employment with the
school district prior to July 1, 2016, need
not acquire continuing contract status
under this chapter. Nothing in this section
or section 53 of this Act prohibits a school
district from choosing to provide continu-
ing contract to a nontenured teacher be-
yond what is provided for in this chapter.
Section 48. That § 13-43-6 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6. The contract shall specify the
date at or about which the school shall
begin, the term of employment, the
wages per month, and the time of pay-
ment thereof; such of wages. The con-
tract shall be signed in duplicate and one
copy filed in the office of the business
manager and the other retained by the
teacher. Such The contract may be is-
sued covering any period of years, not to
exceed three employment up to one
year, over which a teacher holds a cer-
tificate which will shall remain valid with-
out renewal.
Section 49. That § 13-43-6.1 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.1. A tenured or nontenured
teacher may be terminated, by the
school board, at any time for just cause,
including breach of contract, poor per-
formance, incompetency, gross immoral-
ity, unprofessional conduct,
insubordination, neglect of duty, or the vi-
olation of any policy or regulation of the
school district. A school district may non-
renew a teacher who is in or beyond the
fourth consecutive term of employment
as a teacher with the school district pur-
suant to § 13-43-6.3 for just cause, in-
cluding breach of contract, poor
performance, incompetency, gross im-
morality, unprofessional conduct, insub-
ordination, neglect of duty, or the
violation of any policy or regulation of the
school district.
Section 50. That § 13-43-6.2 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.2. Ìf nonrenewal of a tenured
teacher is contemplated under § 13-43-
6.1 § 13-43-6.3, the superintendent or
chief executive officer shall give written
notice of an intention to recommend non-
renewal to the teacher and the school
board; a written statement of the reasons
for the recommendation; access to the
employment records of the teacher; the
opportunity to the teacher for a hearing
before the school board to present rea-
sons in person or in writing why the non-
renewal should not occur; and the
opportunity to be represented. The
teacher shall request the hearing as pro-
vided in § 13-43-6.9. The school board
shall conduct the hearing not sooner
than fourteen days, nor later than forty-
five days, after receipt of the teacher's re-
quest for hearing. The parties may waive
the time limitations provided for in this
section.
Section 51. That § 13-43-6.3 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.3. Until a teacher is in or be-
yond the fourth consecutive term of em-
ployment as a teacher with the school
district, a Aschool board may or may not
renew the teacher's contract of a non-
tenured teacher. The superintendent or
chief executive officer shall give written
notice of nonrenewal by April fifteenth but
is not required to give further process or
a reason for nonrenewal.
After a teacher is in or beyond the
fourth consecutive term of employment
as a teacher with the school district, §§
13-43-6.1 and 13-43-6.2 apply to any
nonrenewal of the teacher's contract. A
school board may refuse to renew the
teacher's contract of a tenured teacher
for just cause, including breach of con-
tract, poor performance, a rating of un-
satisfactory on two consecutive
evaluations pursuant to section 38 of this
Act, incompetency, gross immorality, un-
professional conduct, insubordination,
neglect of duty, or the violation of any pol-
icy or regulation of the school district. On
or before April fifteenth, the superintend-
ent or chief executive officer shall notify
the tenured teacher and the school board
in writing of the recommendation to not
renew the teacher's contract.
Acceptance by the a tenured or non-
tenured teacher of an offer from the dis-
trict to enter into a new contract with the
teacher shall be in the manner specified
in the offer. Failure of the teacher to ac-
cept the offer in the manner specified
constitutes the termination of the existing
contract between the teacher and the
district at the end of its term.
Section 52. That § 13-43-6.4 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.4. Notwithstanding §§ 13-43-
6.1 to §§ 13-43-6.2 and 13-43-6.3, inclu-
sive, if a teacher's contract is not
renewed due to a reduction in staff, only
written notice is required, which shall be
provided by the school board to the
teacher by April fifteenth.
Section 53. That § 13-43-6.6 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.6. Although a collective bar-
gaining agreement between a district and
its teachers may set forth specific addi-
tional grounds for termination or set forth
provisions as to the procedure or notice,
no agreement may limit the district's right
to terminate or refuse to renew the con-
tract of a tenured or nontenured teacher
for the grounds set forth in §§ 13-43-6.1
to 13-43-6.3, inclusive. No agreement
may limit the protection afforded to a
teacher under § 13-43-6.5.
Section 54. For purposes of this Act,
the term, school year, means the regular
school term as referenced in § 13-26-2.
Section 55. That § 13-3-73 be re-
pealed.
13-3-73. There is hereby created the
teacher compensation assistance pro-
gram within the Department of Education
to provide funds to school districts for the
purpose of assisting school districts with
teacher compensation. School districts
are eligible to receive funds from the
teacher compensation assistance pro-
gram based on their fall enrollment num-
bers. The department shall provide
four-fifths of the funds for the teacher
compensation assistance program to
each participating school district. The
Board of Education shall promulgate
rules, pursuant to chapter 1-26, to create
an oversight board appointed by the sec-
retary of education for approval of appli-
cations as well as guidelines for district
applications based on district instruc-
tional goals, market compensation or
other specific district requirements as ap-
proved by the department. Participation
in the program is discretionary. District
applications shall be approved by the
local board of education. The applica-
tions shall be reviewed by the teacher
compensation assistance program over-
sight board and shall be recommended
to the Board of Education for final ap-
proval.
The Legislature shall review the
teacher compensation assistance pro-
gram in 2012 to determine its effective-
ness and to determine whether to
continue the program.
Section 56. That § 13-3-74 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74. The Teacher Compensation
Assistance Program Oversight Board
shall annually monitor the progress of
participating school districts with their
teacher compensation assistance plans,
and submit its findings to the Board of
Education.
Section 57. That § 13-3-74.1 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74.1. There is hereby established
the Teacher Compensation Assistance
Program Advisory Council. The council
shall be under the supervision of the De-
partment of Education. The speaker of
the House of Representative shall ap-
point three members of the House of
Representatives to the council, including
at least one member from each political
party, and the president pro tempore of
the Senate shall appoint three members
of the Senate to the council, including at
least one member from each political
party. The Governor shall appoint the re-
maining members of the council, includ-
ing at least one teacher, one school
administrator, and one representative of
a statewide education organization.
Section 58. That § 13-3-74.2 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74.2. The council shall examine
how teacher quality and teacher salaries
in the state can be enhanced, and how
the funds appropriated in fiscal year 2010
and in subsequent fiscal years by the
state for the teacher compensation assis-
tance program established in § 13-3-73
can best be utilized to assist in that effort.
The council shall consider a variety of is-
sues surrounding teachers including
constltutlonal
Amendments
contlnued
oontinued on paee 12
Legal Notlces
1hursdav, 0otober 11, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 12
market compensation, a tiered licensure
system, a system for evaluating teach-
ers, mentoring and induction programs
for teachers, and continuing contracts for
teachers.
Section 59. That § 13-3-74.3 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74.3. The council shall complete
its work and the secretary of education
shall provide its recommendations to the
Governor and to the Executive Board of
the Legislative Research Council no later
than November 15, 2008.
Section 60. That § 13-3-75 be re-
pealed.
13-3-75. The South Dakota Board of
Education shall promulgate rules pur-
suant to chapter 1-26 establishing the
application process; application time-
lines; the guidelines for district applica-
tions based on school district
instructional goals or market compensa-
tion; and a system to monitor the
progress of participating school districts
with their compensation assistance plans
and to ensure that each participating
school district is complying with the plan
as submitted to the board.
Section 61. That § 13-3-83.1 be re-
pealed.
13-3-83.1. Once all the school districts
with approved applications have re-
ceived their funding pursuant to § 13-3-
73, the Department of Education may set
aside from any funds remaining, a sum
not to exceed one hundred thousand dol-
lars from the teacher compensation as-
sistance program appropriation for the
purpose of providing grants to educa-
tional cooperatives and multi-district cen-
ters that employ teachers for public
schools. The South Dakota Board of Ed-
ucation may promulgate rules, pursuant
to chapter 1-26, to establish the granting
process.
Section 62. The following groups shall,
no later than January 15, 2013, provide
a progress report to the Legislature out-
lining the work accomplished:
(1) The Critical Teaching Needs
Scholarship Board, established in sec-
tion 2 of this Act;
(2) The Local Teacher Reward Plan
Advisory Council established in section
30 of this Act;
(3) The Local Teacher Reward Plan
Oversight Board established in section
32 of this Act;
(4) The teacher evaluation work
group appointed pursuant to section 40
of this Act; and
(5) The principal evaluation work
group appointed pursuant to section 45
of this Act.
Section 63. Sections 47 to 53, inclu-
sive, of this Act are effective on July 1,
2016.
Section 64. There is hereby estab-
lished the South Dakota Education Re-
form Advisory Council. The council shall
advise upon the implementation of this
Act, and shall examine further education
reform issues including:
(1) The advantages and disadvan-
tages of initiatives designed to provide
for increased compensation for teachers;
(2) Future teaching areas of critical
need, and solutions to recruit, retain, and
train teachers in these critical need
areas; and
(3) Other ideas to improve student
achievement.
The council shall report its initial find-
ings to the Legislature and the Governor
no later than December 1, 2012.
Section 65. The South Dakota Educa-
tion Reform Advisory Council established
in section 64 of this Act shall consist of
the following members:
(1) Three members of the Senate,
including at least one member of each
political party, appointed by the president
pro tempore of the Senate;
(2) Three members of the House of
Representatives, including a member of
each political party, appointed by the
speaker of the House;
(3) The secretary of the Department
of Education, who will serve as chair;
(4) Three superintendents, jointly
appointed by the president pro tempore
of the Senate and the speaker of the
House;
(5) Three principals, one each from
an elementary school, a middle school,
and a high school, jointly appointed by
the president pro tempore of the Senate
and the speaker of the House;
(6) Five teachers, jointly appointed
by the president pro tempore of the Sen-
ate and the speaker of the House;
(7) Three school board members,
jointly appointed by the president pro
tempore of the Senate and the speaker
of the House;
(8) One member of the Board of
Regents, selected by the board;
(9) One representative of the post-
secondary technical institutes, selected
by the presidents of the respective insti-
tutions;
(10) One representative selected by
the School Administrators of South
Dakota;
(11) One representative selected by
the South Dakota Education Association;
and
(12) One representative selected by
the Associated School Boards of South
Dakota.
CITY OF MIDLAND
Referendum 1
TitIe: CITY OF MIDLAND RenewaI of
Iicenses for OFF-SALE AIcohoIic Bev-
erages
ExpIanation: Shall the present off-saIe
licenses for the sale of alcoholic bever-
ages, except malt beverages, held by the
City of Midland be renewed?
YES A vote YES means the off-
saIe licenses will be renewed.
NO A vote NO means the off-saIe
licenses will NOT be renewed.
Referendum 2
TitIe: CITY OF MIDLAND RenewaI of
Iicenses for ON-SALE AIcohoIic Bev-
erages
ExpIanation: Shall the present on-saIe
licenses for the sale of alcoholic bever-
ages, except malt beverages, held by the
City of Midland be renewed?
YES A vote YES means the on-
saIe licenses will be renewed.
NO A vote NO means the on-saIe
licenses will NOT be renewed
[Published October 11, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $774.35]
ARSD 5:02:04:04
NOTICE OF
DEADLINE FOR
VOTER
REGISTRATION
Voter registration for the 2012 General
Election to be held on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 6, 2012 will close on Monday, Octo-
ber 22, 2012. Failure to register by this
date will cause forfeiture of voting rights
for this election. Ìf you are in doubt about
whether you are registered, check the
Voter Ìnformation Portal at www.sdsos.
gov or call the county auditor at 605-859-
2800.
Registration may be completed during
regular business hours at the county au-
ditor's office, municipal finance office,
secretary of state's office, and those lo-
cations which provide driver's licenses,
SNAP, TANF, WÌC, military recruitment,
and assistance to the disabled as pro-
vided by the Department of Human Serv-
ices. You may contact the county auditor
to request a mail-in registration form or
access a mail-in form at www.sdsos.gov.
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in voter registration, absentee
voting, or polling place accessibility.
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
[Published October 4 & 11, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $25.34]
NOTICE OF
DEADLINE FOR
VOTER
REGISTRATION
Voter registration for the Special Election
to be held on November 6, 2012, will
close on October 22, 2012. Failure to
register by this date will cause forfeiture
of voting rights for this election. If you are
in doubt about whether you are regis-
tered, check the Voter Information Portal
at www.sdsos.gov or call the county au-
ditor at (605) 859-2800.
Registration may be completed during
regular business hours at the county au-
ditor's office, municipal finance office,
secretary of state's office, and those lo-
cations which provide driver's licenses,
SNAP, TANF, WIC, military recruitment,
and assistance to the disabled as pro-
vided by the Department of Human Serv-
ices. You may contact the county auditor
to request a mail-in registration form or
access a mail-in form at www.sdsos.gov.
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in voter registration, absentee
voting, or polling place accessibility.
Michelle M. Meinzer
Finance Officer
Town of Midland
[Published October 4 & 11, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $25.34]
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
REGULAR MEETING
OCTOBER 01, 2012
A regular meeting of the Philip City Coun-
cil was held on Monday, October 1, 2012,
at 7:00 p.m. in the Community Room of
the Haakon Co. Courthouse. Present
were Mayor Michael Vetter, Finance Of-
ficer Monna Van Lint, Council Members
Marty Gartner, Greg Arthur, Jennifer
Henrie, Trisha Larson, and Marion Matt.
Also present were Deputy Finance Offi-
cer Brittany Smith, Public Works Director
Matt Reckling, Police Officer David But-
ler, Del Bartels with the Pioneer Review;
and later, Attorney Gay Tollefson.
Absent: Jason Harry
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the agenda as pre-
sented. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Arthur to approve the minutes of the last
meeting as published in the Pioneer Re-
view, noting that the Pioneer Review re-
ceived the correct copy of the minutes,
but erred to publish Ord. #2012-16 cor-
rectly. They published it as Ord. #2012-
13 with John F. Hart as the Mayor, not
Michael Vetter. A correction was pub-
lished to this effect in their Sept. 2012,
edition. Motion carried to approve the
minutes with the noted correction.
Motion was then made by Matt, sec-
onded by Henrie to approve the payment
of the bills from the appropriated funds.
Motion carried.
Gross SaIaries - Sept. 29, 2012: Adm.
- $4,920.93; Mayor & Council -
$3,355.00; Police - $5,908.92; Street -
$4,799.59; Water - $5,328.26
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ìns.-
08/12 .......................................291.90
EFTPS, S.S., Medicare, Withholding-
08/12 ....................................5,688.82
SDRS, Employee Retirement- 07/12 .....
2794.43
Airport Improv. Projects:
Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson, Ìnc., MÌRL
Bid/Const Eng. thru
08/25/12 ...............................2,601.02
Pine St. Phase III Project:
SPN & Assoc., Paving/Repairs Design
thru 09/22/12........................3,941.50
Wood/WaIden Ave. Improv. Project:
Meierhenry Sargent, LLP, Clean Water
Go Bond Counsel ...............10,733.00
SPN & Assoc., Special Asses.
Prep.........................................108.75
Re-Design Eng. thru
09/22/12 ...............................4,253.75
This Month's BiIIs:
A&B Welding Supply Co., Welding Sup-
plies ÷ 09/12............................489.29
AT&T, Cell Phone 08-09/12...........78.93
Canadian Pacific Railway Co., Storm
Sewer Utility Rent #91135.......120.00
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel/LP/Sup-
plies ÷ 08/12............................831.18
Coyle's Super Valu, Supplies
08/12 .........................................14.11
CRA Payment Center,
Supplies/Postage ÷ 08/12 .......105.73
D & T Auto Parts, Supplies ÷
08/12 .........................................84.88
Dakotacare Health Ìns., Employee
Health Premium ÷ 10/12 ....10,598.24
Defensive Edge Training, Butler Reg.
Fee ÷ 09/12.............................375.00
Delta Dental Ìns., Employee Dental Pre-
mium ÷ 10/12 ..........................660.10
FedEx, Shipping ÷ 09/12 ...............11.48
1st Nat'l Bank - Philip, Utility Postage ÷
09/12 .......................................117.93
1st Nat'l Bank ÷ S.F., SRF Loan #02
Pay #167 ÷ 10/12.................2,163.90
SRF Loan #03 Pay #70 ÷
10/12 ....................................2,223.41
Fitzgerald Oil Co., Fuel
08-09/12..................................221.96
G&G Excavation, LLC, Pump Airport
Septic Tank ÷ 09/12.................165.00
Golden West, Telephone/Ìnternet 08-
09/12 .......................................584.88
Haakon Co. Treasurer, Office Rent ÷
10/12 .........................................60.00
Haakon Co. Young Women, FCSA Do-
nation ÷ 09/12 .........................835.00
Heartland Waste Mgmt, Ìnc., 376 Resi-
dential Collection ÷ 09/12.....4,098.40
Highway Ìmprovements, Ìnc., Crack
Sealing ÷ 09/12 ....................2,666.13
Hometown Computer Service, LLC,
Computer & External Floppy
Drive.....................................1,482.51
Konst Machine & Welding, CO2 ÷ 09/12
94.44
Malik Bros. Plastering, Ìnc., Dryvit Ext.
Pool Bathhouse ÷ 09/12.....16,700.00
Morrison's Pit Stop, Fuel/Battery ÷
09/12 .......................................214.13
Moses Building Center, Supplies ÷
09/12 .......................................127.76
Petro Tech, Ìnc., Airport Fuel System
Maint. ÷ 09/12 ......................1,393.80
Philip Standard, Supplies ÷
09/12 .........................................18.95
Pioneer Review, Publishing ÷
09/12 ....................................1,534.17
Quill, Supplies/Shredder ÷
08/12 .......................................753.93
SD Dept. of Revenue, Sales Tax
Payable ÷ 09/12 ......................315.78
Water Coliform/Pool Testing 08-09/12
38.00
Sheehan Mach Sales & Equip.,
Sweeper Parts ÷ 09/12............845.19
Tollefson, Gay, Attorney Retainer ÷
10/12 .......................................200.00
Triple XXX Spraying, LLC, Lake/ La-
goon Spraying 06-08/12.......2,575.56
Twilight, Ìnc., First Aid Supplies ÷
09/12 .........................................53.99
USDA, RD Loan Pay #94 ÷
10/12 ....................................3,069.00
VÌSA ÷ UMB Bank, Postage/Cell Phone
08-09/12....................................63.79
West Central Electric, Electric Services
08-09/12...............................3,222.10
WR/LJ Rural Water, 5,650,000 gals. ÷
09/12 ....................................7,062.50
Contract Min. ÷ 09/12...........2,500.00
Airport Water ÷ 09/12 ................42.50
South Shop Water ÷ 09/12........25.00
Wohlenberg, Ritzman & Co., LLC,
FY2011 Audit Prep ...............5,848.47
Total Expenditures ÷
10/01/12 ...............................$96,325.14
OId Business:
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Matt to approve the 2nd reading of Ord.
#2012-16, 2013 Municipal Appropriations
Ordinance. Motion carried with all mem-
bers voting aye. (see beIow)
FO Van Lint updated the Council on her
correspondence with Canadian Pacific
(CP) Railroad and Dakota Mill and Grain
(DM&G) representatives. This is regard-
ing the concerns voiced about the re-
moval of a portion of the railroad's trestle
bridge restricting the water flow in the
area where DM&G is proposing to build
a new rail siding.
She stated that according to Kimberly
Duke with CP Railroad, they are in the
process of researching the historical data
on the trestle bridge. Ìt was noted that
when a portion of the trestle bridge was
removed, the railroad was owned by
Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (DM&E)
Railroad. She has also been in contact
with Andrew Kangas, DM&G's Engineer
with Civil Design Engineering, and Bart
Banks, DM&G's Attorney, regarding
DM&G's plans. Ìt was mentioned more
than once from DM&G's representatives,
that they are not responsible for what oc-
curred in years past with the removal of
the trestle bridge, but are taking the con-
cerns voiced by the City and its residents
into consideration. One option that is
being looked into is that of cleaning out
the river bed, but nothing is concrete at
this time.
She went on to advise the Council that
she has also suggested Mr. Kangas con-
tact the City's Engineer, Harlan Quenzer,
as he is familiar with the City's flood plain
and the Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (FEMA) regulations.
Council Member Henrie questioned if
comments or concerns have been re-
ceived by more than one property owner,
Mike Seager, in the area of the proposed
siding. She also inquired if there are any
outstanding issues with the School's Bar-
ium Treatment ponds in the area.
FO Van Lint confirmed that Mike Seager
has been the main contact. He has been
very helpful with historical information
and pictures of the area over the last sev-
eral years, but there are others that have
concerns. They were present at the ear-
lier meeting when these issues were first
brought to the City's attention.
She stressed that the main concern is
what the additional siding will do to the
area, more specifically restricting the
water flow even more so with the addi-
tional proposed rail siding. As for the bar-
ium treatment ponds, she is unaware of
any outstanding issues, but noted that
they are regulated by the SD Dept. of En-
vironment and Natural Resources.
Mayor Vetter questioned if DM&G has
completed a hydrological study. FO Van
Lint confirmed that according to Mr. Kan-
gas, they have not completed a hydro-
logical study, measuring the flood events
at this time. They have, on the other
hand, inquired about presenting a plat,
building and flood plain development per-
mits for the City's approval. Van Lint ad-
vised DM&G that if they file these
permits, she could make no promises
that the City Council would move to ap-
prove them at this time ÷ it was her opin-
ion that the Council would more than
likely require more concrete information
relative to the flooding concerns and ex-
pected changes and impacts to the flood-
ing if approvals for siding construction
are approved.
Council Member Matt stated that the
trestle bridge concerns may not be
DM&G's problem at this time, but it could
be if they install a new rail siding.
FO Van Lint stressed that she does not
intend to point any fingers, but would
rather find an amicable solution to assist
in alleviating some of the flooding con-
cerns in order for DM&G's expansion to
be a successful improvement to the com-
munity. She stressed that everyone
needs to work together in order for this
to happen and therefore would suggest
that the Council entertain the idea of
hosting a public meeting amongst all of
the entities involved and the residents
that may be impacted.
By general consensus, the Council
agreed that a public meeting would be in
the best interest of all involved and re-
quested that a public hearing be sched-
uled for some time during the week of
Oct. 22nd, pending official confirmation
from the representatives of CP Railroad
and DM&G as well as Harlan Quenzer.
Once the official date and time is avail-
able, a public notice will be published in
the local newspaper.
Mayor and Council thanked FO Van Lint
for her efforts with the trestle bridge and
DM&G expansion plan research.
Mayor Vetter then questioned the status
of the Haakon Co. Regional Railroad Au-
thority (HCRRA).
FO Van Lint reported that the original au-
thority was adopted in the 1980's with
Haakon County and the Town of Midland.
This was filed with the Secretary of State,
but has since become inactive since it is
not fulfilling its legal entity obligations ÷
hosting meetings and submitting annual
reports for example. Ìn 2002, an amend-
ment was made to the authority, adding
the City of Philip to the authority board,
increasing the previous five person board
to a seven person board. Unfortunately,
the amendment in 2002 was not filed
with the State so therefore it is not rec-
ognized by the State as a legal entity.
City Attorney Tollefson confirmed Van
Lint's comments, noting that the authority
will have to be reinstated in order to qual-
ify as a legal railroad authority.
Ìt was questioned the number of mem-
bers on the authority-five or seven. Ìf the
Town of Midland should and would be in-
cluded or if it should be limited to the
County and City of Philip. Also, which
taxing entity would oversee the authority.
Council Member Arthur recommended a
seven person board if the Town of Mid-
land is interested in being a member of
the authority. This would provide equal
representation from each taxing entity as
well as one at-large member.
FO Van Lint then mentioned that it may
be in the best interest of the County to
oversee the authority since they are the
largest taxing authority. Ìn addition, if
Midland is excluded at this time, an
amendment would have to be made
should Midland experience a railroad im-
provement. Ìn her opinion, it would be
beneficial to include all taxing entities at
this time.
Mayor Vetter questioned if the County
Commissioner's were discussing the
HCRRA at their meeting tomorrow and
how the City shall go about reinstating
the authority. Tollefson stated that she
would be happy to facilitate the informa-
tion amongst the City of Philip, Haakon
County and Town of Midland. She is also
willing to serve as the agent for the au-
thority and will draft a Regional Railroad
Authority agreement for all parties to con-
sider.
Attorney Tollefson will report back to the
Council with a draft authority agreement
at the November Council meeting.
Council was then informed that the pool
bathhouse exterior repairs have been
constltutlonal
Amendments
contlnued
ORDINANCE #2012-16
2013 MUNICIPAL APPROPRIATIONS ORDINANCE
Be it ordained by the City of PhiIip, South Dakota that the foIIowing sums be and
hereby are appropriated to meet the obIigations of the municipaIity for fiscaI year
2013.
CAPITAL
GENERAL CONST.
FUND FUND
410 GENERAL GOVERNMENT
411 Legislative (Pub./Const./Ìns.)..........................160,650.00
412 Executive..........................................................18,175.00
413 Elections.............................................................1,350.00
414 Financial Adm. ................................................132,350.00
419 Public Works.....................................................43,150.00
Capital Building...............................................................14,750.00
TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT..............................370,425.00
420 PUBLIC SAFETY
420 Police Department ..........................................149,600.00
422 Fire Department................................................13,850.00
423 Code Enforcement..............................................1,450.00
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY .............................................164,900.00
430 PUBLIC WORKS
431 Street Department ..........................................173,615.00
Street Lights ............................................................22,500.00
Street Ìmprov. 2nd Cent.........................................240,000.00........1,998,300.00
435 Airport .............................................................108,350.00
438 Rubble Site.........................................................5,750.00
TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS..............................................550,215.00........1,998,300.00
440 HEALTH & WELFARE
441 West Nile Virus ...................................................5,450.00
444 Dog Kennel ............................................................150.00
446 Ambulance..........................................................2,500.00
TOTAL HEALTH & WELFARE..........................................8,100.00
450 CULTURE & RECREATION
451 Swimming Pool .................................................70,195.00
452 Parks/Recreation................................................4,250.00
455 Library.................................................................1,200.00
TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION...............................75,645.00
460 ECONOMIC DEVELOP.
460 Economic Development......................................5,300.00
TOTAL ECONOMIC DEVELOP.........................................5,300.00
470 DEBT SERVICE
471 Principal ...........................................................45,050.00
472 Ìnterest..............................................................21,636.00
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE..................................................66,686.00
511 OPER. TRANSFER OUT
511 Operating Transfer.......................................1,208,300.00
TOTAL OPER. TRANSFER OUT...............................1,208,300.00
CAPITAL OUTLAY ACCUMULATION
Resolution #97-10 Street .................................................25,000.00
Resolution #97-20 Police...................................................4,000.00
Resolution #01-09 Rubble Site..........................................1,000.00
Resolution #04-08 Swimming Pool....................................5,000.00
Resolution #06-20 Capital Building Res........................................--
Resolution #10-05 - St. Rehab./Sidewalk ......................111,400.00
TOTAL CAP. OUTLAY ACCUM. ...................................146,400.00
TOTAL APPROP. & ACCUM......................................2,595,971.00........1,998,300.00
2013 MEANS OF FINANCE
The foIIowing designates the fund or funds that money derived from the foIIow-
ing sources are appIied.
CAPITAL
GENERAL CONST.
FUND FUND
UNDESIGN. RETAINED EARNINGS............................113,157.00
DESIGN. FROM LAST YR. APPROP...........................109,000.00
DESIGN. CASH - CAP. OUTLAY..................................241,900.00
310 TAXES
General Property Tax.....................................................379,110.00
All Prior Property Taxes .....................................................2,500.00
Sales Tax .......................................................................380,000.00
Amusement Machine Tax .....................................................300.00
Penalty & Ìnterest - Del. Tax .................................................500.00
762,410.00
320 LICENSES & PERMITS
Licenses & Permits............................................................7,500.00
330 INTERGOVERNMENTAL REV.
Ìntergovernmental Revenues.........................................115,100.00
340 CHARGES FOR GOODS & SERVICES
Charges for Goods & Services........................................29,200.00
350 FINES & FORFEITURES
Fines & Forfeitures ...............................................................800.00
360 MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE
Miscellaneous Revenues.................................................79,734.00
380 AIRPORT REVENUE
Airport Revenues.............................................................21,870.00
390 OTHER SOURCES
Operating Transfer Ìn - GO Bond Loan Proceeds....................................1,073,300.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - 2nd Cent Sales Tax................................................135,000.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - Water .......................................................................40,000.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - Sewer.....................................................................750,000.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - Garbage .....................................40,000.00
GO Bond Loan Proceeds ...........................................1,073,300.00
Sale of Fixed Assets ..........................................................1,000.00
Ìnsurance Proceeds...........................................................1,000.00
TOTAL OTHER SOURCES........................................1,115,300.00........1,998,300.00
TOTAL MEANS OF FINANCE...................................2,595,971.00........1,998,300.00
2013 PROPRIETARY FUNDS
*WATER*
WATER REVENUE
Assigned Cash Cap. Outlay ............................................40,000.00
Estimated Water Revenues...........................................259,700.00
TOTAL EST. WATER REVENUE ..................................299,700.00
WATER APPROPRIATIONS
Water .............................................................................229,270.00
RD Loan Principal Pay.......................................................9,525.00
Capital Outlay Res. #98-09 .............................................20,000.00
Operating Transfer Out - Cap. Project Const. .................40,000.00
TOTAL WATER APPROPRIATIONS ............................298,795.00
ESTIMATED WATER SURPLUS.........................................905.00
*SEWER*
SEWER REVENUE
Res. Cash - Sewer Surcharge.........................................63,200.00
Assigned Cash Cap. Outlay ............................................34,500.00
Estimated Sewer Revenues ............................................72,000.00
SRF Loan Proceeds ......................................................750,000.00
TOTAL EST. SEWER REVENUE..................................919,700.00
SEWER APPROPRIATIONS
Sewer.............................................................................118,625.00
SRF Loan Principal............................................................7,500.00
Capital Outlay Res. #98-10......................................................... - -
Restricted Cash - Surcharge ...........................................43,200.00
Operating Transfer Out - Cap. Construction..................750,000.00
TOTAL SEWER APPROPRIATIONS............................919,325.00
ESTIMATED SEWER SURPLUS.........................................375.00
*GARBAGE*
GARBAGE REVENUE
Unrestricted Cash............................................................40,000.00
Estimated Garbage Revenues ........................................59,670.00
TOTAL EST. GARBAGE REVENUE...............................99,670.00
GARBAGE APPROPRIATIONS
Garbage............................................................................ 6,550.00
Garbage Contract ............................................................52,000.00
Capital Outlay Res. #01-09 ...............................................1,000.00
Operating Transfer - Gen. Fund 2nd Penny ....................40,000.00
TOTAL GARBAGE APPROPRIATION...........................99,550.00
TOTAL EST. GARBAGE SURPLUS....................................120.00
TOTAL ENT. FUND REVENUE..................................1,319,070.00
TOTAL ENT. FUND APPROP.....................................1,317,670.00
TOTAL EST. ENTERPRISE SURPLUS ............................1,400.00
The Finance Officer is hereby directed and authorized to certify the following dollar
amount of tax levies in this Ordinance to the Haakon County Auditor.
Dated this 1st day of October, 2012.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint, Finance Officer
Passed First Reading: September 4, 2012
Second Reading: October 1, 2012
Yeas: 5 Nays: 0
(PUBLÌSHED: Sept. 13 and Oct. 11, 2012)
oontinued on paee 13
Legal Notlces
1hursdav, 0otober 11, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 13
completed. This included the dryvit sur-
facing, new lighting and soffits as well as
gutter end caps and downspouts.
New Business:
Street Ìmprovement Projects:
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to authorize the Mayor's signa-
ture on the State Revolving Fund (SRF)
Sanitary Sewer Loan document, noting
that the closing date for the loan is Oct.
9, 2012. Motion carried.
FO Van Lint reviewed addendum number
one to the engineering agreement with
SPN & Assoc. for the Wood and Walden
Ave. Ìmprovement project. She ex-
plained that engineering agreements
start with the design phase of the project
since it is uncertain when construction
will begin. Then the bidding/negotiation
and construction phase engineering
agreements are prepared when the con-
struction is known and presented as an
addendum to the initial engineering
agreement. The City approved the de-
sign engineering agreement in 2009 and
the current addendum is for the
bidding/negotiation engineering ($8,600)
and construction phase engineering
($230,000) for the Wood/Walden Ave.
Ìmprov. project.
Council Member Matt questioned what
the construction engineering entailed.
FO Van Lint confirmed that an engineer
is staffed on-site during the construction
of the project. They are the go between
for the City, contactor, and Mr. Quenzer.
They perform various duties such as
compaction testing, slump testing, and
measuring to name a few.
Following discussion, motion was made
by Arthur, seconded by Gartner to ap-
prove addendum number one to the en-
gineering agreement with SPN & Assoc.
for the bidding/negotiation and construc-
tion phase of the Wood/Walden Ave. Ìm-
prov. Project. Motion carried.
Council reviewed a Street Ìmprove-
ments-Property Owner Expense Policy.
This reflects the property owner(s) re-
sponsibility when the City completes the
design phase of a street improvement
project and outlines the process when in-
dividuals request improvements above
and beyond the scope of the originally
designed project. For example, replace-
ment/installation of new sidewalks and/or
driveway approaches.
Mayor Vetter questioned when the dead-
line is for residents to submit recom-
mended improvements to their
properties, above the original design
plans for the Wood/Walden Ave. project.
He noted that currently one property
owner has already confirmed updates,
but would like to allow everyone an op-
portunity to do so if they so choose.
By general consensus, the Council re-
quested FO Van Lint contact Mr. Quen-
zer to set up a time to meet with the
residents, suggesting the same day that
he will be in town for the CP Railroad and
DM&G expansion plan meeting. Once a
schedule is determined, a public notice
shall be published in the local newspa-
per.
Following review, motion was made by
Gartner, seconded by Matt to approve
the following policy. Motion carried.
Street Improvements - Property
Owner Expense PoIicy
Ìn the event that the City of Philip does a
street improvement project, property
owners will be assessed for the curb and
gutter, driveway approaches, and/or
sidewalks abutting their respective prop-
erties. They will only be assessed for the
replacement costs of said actual im-
provements in accordance with SDCL 9-
43.
The City Council has the authority to offer
discounts to the property owners' a s -
sessments.
The replacements to the curb and gutter,
driveway approaches, and/or sidewalks
shall be included as part of the designed
project. Only those items included shall
be allotted a discount if the City Council
determines to offer a discount to the as-
sessment.
Should a property owners wish to make
changes to the plans for their respective
properties during the project, the follow-
ing shall be considered.
1) The City will only pay that portion of
the replacement costs as determined
by the City Council. Ì.e. if a discount is
applied such as 60% to the property
owners, the city would pay that 60%
with the property owner paying the re-
maining 40%.
2) Costs for any upgrades or improve-
ments above the initial designed proj-
ect, will be the property owner(s) sole
responsibility, over and above the ini-
tial replacement costs. Said upgrades
will be assessed at 100% and shown
as a separate assessment.
At 7:30 p.m., as previously advertised,
Mayor Vetter announced that it was time
to open bids for the Airport Farm Ground
Lease for 2013 to 2017. Mayor Vetter
called for any bids from the floor. With
none forthcoming, the following bids
were opened.
Bob Berry - $6,000 annually
Ed Morrison, Morrison Family Farms,
LLC - $6,000 annually
Following review, motion was made by
Matt, seconded by Arthur to reject both
bids since they are for the same amount
and re-bid the Airport Farm Ground
Lease with a Nov. 5th, 2012, bid opening
date. Motion carried.
Airport:
Council reviewed project status updates
for the Land Acquisition and Environ-
mental Assessment (LA/EA) and the
Medium Ìntensity Runway Lighting
(MÌRL) Design projects.
Council then reviewed a construction up-
date for the MÌRL project. PWD Reckling
noted that the contractors located an old
cistern that they had to remove, but oth-
erwise everything is going smoothly.
They started on Sept. 17th with the sub-
stantial completion date being Nov. 1,
2012. Ìn his opinion, everything will be
completed prior to the Nov. 1st deadline
with the exception of the beacon replace-
ment as it is on back order.
Council then went on to review the fol-
lowing building permits as presented:
Dakota Mill & Grain ÷ tree removal, dem-
olition of house & Quonset; Burjis &
Cheryl Fitch ÷ addition; Lee Ìke Neville ÷
renew sewer line replacement permit;
Lary Osburn ÷ replace front step; and,
Hazel Rowcliffe ÷ wheelchair ramp.
Following review, motion was made by
Arthur, seconded by Gartner to approve
the above building permits as presented.
Motion carried.
PWD Reckling reviewed the condition of
the lift station wet well, noting that when
the lift station was cleaned this past sum-
mer, deterioration of the walls was re-
ported. The main areas of concern are
those of the north and south walls that
showed breakage from the sewer gasses
and water.
He noted that the wet well was installed
in the early 1990s with repairs to the wet
well being completed in 2002. Similar re-
pairs are once again needed and accord-
ing to the City's Engineer, Harlan
Quenzer, the work is estimated at
$68,800. This includes the use of a trans-
fer pump while a new rubber lining is in-
stalled in the ten (10) foot by twelve (12)
foot in diameter and fourteen (14) foot in
depth well.
Council Member Larson questioned if
this is an expense that occurs every ten
years, is the City saving funds to cover
the repairs. Ìt was noted that the sewer
has a reserve fund established, but it is
not specifically for this expense.
PWD Reckling was questioned about
other options to repair the wet well. He
noted that he is unaware of any other op-
tions as our wet well has a poured in
place lid, making it more difficult to repair
the walls.
Council was reminded that the $68,800
noted is only an estimate. The estimated
amount is above the bid limit, requiring
the repairs to be bid in accordance with
State law.
Mayor Vetter stated that he would be in
contact with Mr. Quenzer regarding the
needed repairs and if other options are
available to bring the wet well back into
an acceptable state of repair. No action
was taken relative to this matter at this
time.
Council was informed that nuisance vio-
lation expenses have been certified to
the County for collection with property
taxes for parcels 8896 and 8918.
Departmental Reports:
The quarterly Police Dept. report was
presented and reviewed with Officer But-
ler.
For the record, Terry Deuter is no longer
considered an employee of the City due
to the lapse in his fire arms certification.
The monthly Street Dept. report was re-
viewed.
Council Member Arthur requested the
pot holes be filled on N. Wood Ave. and
on E. Pine St. before it intersects with
Wray Ave.
The monthly Water Dept. report was re-
viewed.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Henrie to approve the surplus and dis-
posal of the Dell 370 Computer pur-
chased in 2004 for $1755.10. This
computer was recently utilized by PWD
Reckling and will be replaced with FO
Van Lint's computer that was purchased
in 2007. Motion carried.
PubIic Comments:
None.
In Other Business:
West Central Electric's annual meeting is
Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, in Philip.
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Arthur to officially authorize Officer
Butler's attendance at the AR15/M16/ M4
Armorer School, Oct. 4-5, 2012, in
Spearfish. Tools and repair manuals are
included with the registration fee. Motion
carried.
The 2012 Airport Fall Seminar is Oct. 10-
11, 2012, in Mandan, ND.
The Finance Office will be closed on Fri-
day, Oct. 5, 2012. FO Van Lint and DFO
Smith will be attending the SDML Annual
Conference in Pierre, Oct. 3-5, 2012.
The next Regular Council Meeting will be
held on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, at 7:00
p.m. in the Community Rm.
With no further business to come before
the Council, Mayor Vetter declared the
meeting adjourned at 7:50 p.m.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Brittany Smith,
Deputy Finance Officer
[Published October 11, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $326.52]
Notice of Hearing to
SuppIement Budgets
There will be insufficient funds in the
budget allowances in the 101 Fund in the
2012 budgets of (101-441) Mentally Ìll
Expenses and (212) Jail Expenses. Ìt is
hereby proposed that the following Sup-
plemental Budgets be adopted for the
2012 year.
101 - 441 MentaIIy III
$5,000.00
101 - 212 JaiI Expenses
$18,000.00
Notice is hereby given that the Board of
Commissioners of Haakon County,
South Dakota will hold a public hearing
on the above proposed supplemental
budgets for the year 2012 at 1:15 p.m. on
Thursday, November 8, 2012, at which
time any person interested may appear
and be heard in favor or opposed the
proposed budget.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMÌSSÌONERS
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA
Gary Snook, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
[Published October 11 & 18, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $26.64]
Phlllp clty
councll meetlng
contlnued
LegaI Advertising
DeadIine:
Fridays at Noon
ads@pioneer-review.com
(605) 859-2516
ads@pioneer-review.com
P0BLI0 M££TIN0
0AK01A MlLL & 0RAlN EXPAN8l0N /
cANA0lAN PAclFlc RAlLR0A0
clty of Phlllp, 80
1he residents of Philip, 3U, are invited to attend a publio
meetine with representatives from Uakota Mill & 0rain and
Canadian Paoifio Railroad on 1uesday, 0ctober 23rd at
5:30 p.m. in the Communitv Room of the ¬aakon Countv
Courthouse.
Uakota Mill & 0rain's expansion plans and the railroad
trestle bridee will be reviewed.
Corv nnd ÐnnI Ioss bocnmo pnr-
onfs Thursdnv, Ocfobor 4, fo n nIno
pound, four ounco bnbv bov mons-
urIng 20 l/2 Inchos. HIs nnmo Is
Snwvor AIIon nnd ho hns nn oIdor
sIsfor, IvIo. Mrs. Ioss Is fho
fonchor nf fho MIIosvIIIo SchooI.
JodI Inrsons Is fonchIng for hor
durIng hor sIx wooks mnfornIfv
Ionvo.
CongrnfuInfIons, Ivron nnd
Ioggv Inrsons, on vour 30fh nn-
nIvorsnrv! A coIobrnfIon wns hoId
In WnII Snfurdnv ovonIng, com-
bInod wIfh fho 20fh nnnIvorsnrv of
fhoIr dnughfor, MoIIv nnd !obbIo
!vfIo. AffondIng from MIIosvIIIo
woro Mnrk nnd Inf Hnnrnhnn,
Iovd nnd Knrn Inrsons InuI,
Ðonnn nnd TInn Sfnbon, nnd Wndo
nnd Mnrcv Inrsons.
ComIng fo fho Iovd Inrsons
homo for fho wookond woro AndI,
ÐusfIn, IrookIvn nnd Hudson
!Ischo, !odfIoId. Thov nnd Jonnno
Inrsons nIso nffondod fho nnnIvor-
snrv pnrfv for Ivron nnd Ioggv.
Jonnno sponf fho rosf of fho wook-
ond nf Iovd nnd Knrn's, rofurnIng
homo Mondnv. Wndo, Mnrcv nnd
kIds joInod fhom nII on Sundnv.
ÐonnIo SchofIoId gof n vorv good
roporf from hIs docfor Insf wook.
Ho nnd Ioboffo woro In SIoux InIIs
for hIs nppoInfmonf Insf Mondnv
nnd Tuosdnv. ThoIr dnughfor,
!vnn Ðunkor, nnd fnmIIv, WnII,
sponf fhIs pnsf wookond wIfh
fhom.
Iovd nnd Knrn Inrsons woro
gono Insf Mondnv fhrough Wodnos-
dnv for chockups In !ochosfor.
Thov nIso gof good roporfs.
IIII nnd KnrvI SnndnI woro In
Idon for fho wookond sfnvIng wIfh
fhoIr son, Todd, JonnIfor nnd bnbv
John. Inrf nnd TrIcIn Þnnsz nnd
Tronf, SIoux InIIs, woro nIso fhoro.
Snfurdnv nffornoon, fho IndIos nnd
John nffondod n bnbv showor for
John. Sundnv, fhov nII nffondod
fho bnpfIsm of John Idwnrd Snn-
dnI, foIIowod bv n dInnor nf Todd
nnd JonnIfor`s. Inrf nnd TrIcIn
woro John's sponsors.
Knron CnrIov nnd KnrvI SnndnI
drovo fo Þow !ndorwood Thursdnv
fo fho homo of Knron's pnronfs,
Irnnk nnd MIIdrod O'Crndv. Tho
O'Crndvs nccompnnIod fhom homo,
whoro fhov wIII bo sfnvIng wIfh fho
CnrIov's for n coupIo of wooks. Abbv
CnrIov nnd son Wnco sponf fho
Iong wookond wIfh hor pnronfs,
IhII nnd Knron. Abbv Is nffondIng
schooI nf IInck HIIIs Sfnfo !nIvor-
sIfv.
MIIosvIIIo CommunIfv CIub mof
nf JnnIco Inrsons' homo Tuosdnv
nIghf. JodI Inrsons showod pIc-
furos of fhoIr roconf frIp fo Ðon-
mnrk. Mombors nffondIng woro
CnvIn IIroufok, Ðonnn Sfnbon,
TInn Sfnbon, MnrcIn Ivmor nnd
IrIn HovInnd. Cuosfs who nf-
fondod woro Shnron OIIvIor, JodI
Inrsons, Snndrn Inrsons nnd Jov
!Imnchor.
MIIosvIIIo foIks who nffondod fho
Wosf ConfrnI IIocfrIc nnnunI moof-
Ing In IhIIIp Wodnosdnv nIghf
woro InuI, Ðonnn nnd TInn
Sfnbon, Mnrk nnd Inf Hnnrnhnn
nnd Joff, ChnrIos nnd !onh Sfnbon.
!nsf wook, !Indn Cobos nnd
dnughfor Courfnov Cobos, SfurgIs,
woro gono vIsIfIng fnmIIv. Thov
sponf fImo wIfh Ðnrron nnd Knron
Cobos nnd fnmIIv, Hornco, Þ.Ð.,
nnd wIfh SnIIv Ann Cobos nnd
dnughfor In IoshfIgo, WIs.
AInn nnd ÐorIo VoIdor, IowIor,
CoIo., vIsIfod wIfh ÐonnIo nnd
MnrcIn Ivmor Insf Mondnv. Mnr-
cIn nnd ÐorIo nro sIsfors.
Snfurdnv, ÐonnIo, MnrcIn, JIm
Iob nnd KnvIn Ivmor nffondod fho
'bnrn wnrmIng' pnrfv nf KnvIn's
pnronfs, CIondon nnd Inm
Shonror. Thov onjovod nn ovonIng
of suppor, vIsIfIng, musIc nnd dnnc-
Ing.
Ðnn nnd CnvIn IIroufok nf-
fondod fho woddIng of Adnm Iofor-
son nnd ÐonIso !nngIov nf fho
Crnnd Oporn Houso In IIorro Insf
Snfurdnv nIghf. If wns fhoughf fo
bo fho fIrsf ovor woddIng In fhnf
buIIdIng. Adnm hns boon In mnnv
pInvs, mosf roconfIv Insf Ðocombor
ns fho nnrrnfor In ¨Tho ChrIsfmns
Sforv.¨ CnvIn roporfs, ¨If wns n fun
fImo nf nn unusunI nnd vorv non-
frndIfIonnI woddIng. Tho Inrgo
brIdnI pnrfv wns In fnncv drossos
nnd fuxodoos, buf ovorvono, IncIud-
Ing fho mInIsfor nnd pnronfs, woro
bInck nnd whIfo Convorso AII-Sfnr
fonnIs shoos. Thoro woro no ush-
ors, onIv socurIfv gunrds drossod ns
Ðnrfh Vndor. Tho brIdo cnmo down
fho nIsIo fo fho funo of 'Sfnr Wnrs.`
Tho fIvo mInufo coromonv con-
cIudod wIfh Inforosfng musIc nnd
fho nowIvwods, In fhoIr Info 30s,
woro vorv omofIonnI nnd hnppv.
Thov fruIv wnnfod ovorvono fo
hnvo n good fImo nf fhoIr woddIng.
Af fho rocopfIon, fho fnbIos woro
docornfod wIfh fIo-dvod fnbIo run-
nors, mInI Invn Inmps, AfnrI jov-
sfIcks, nnd hIgh fop Convorso
fonnIs shoo kov chnIns. If Is n wod-
dIng I'II novor forgof.¨ Adnm Is fho
son of CnvIn's cousIn, AInn nnd
JonnnIo Ioforson, nnd ÐonIso Is nn
nffornov.
Wodnosdnv, Jonn Inffon nnd
dnughfor Shnron nffondod fho fu-
nornI of VIrgInIn Iurns In IhIIIp.
Snfurdnv Iunch guosfs nf !oo
nnd Jonn Inffons' woro Iob, AprII
nnd KnIfIvn KnIghf nnd frIond
Irnnk. JoInIng fhom for suppor
woro fho JIm SfnngIo fnmIIv. Sun-
dnv Iunch guosfs woro fho JIm
SfnngIos nnd Sonnv SfnngIo. In-
fhor KovIn nnd JIm SfnngIo woro
fho 'cook's hoIpors.` JonnIfor Sfnn-
gIo nnd hor frIond, Shnnnon Todd,
woro homo for fho wookond from
Soufh Ðnkofn Sfnfo !nIvorsIfv.
Sonnv SfnngIo's dnughfor,
JunnIfn, Is spondIng n fow dnvs
wIfh hor dnd nf hIs homo nonr fho
vof cIInIc.
!nsf Thursdnv, Mnrk, JudIfh
nnd InIIov !ndwnv drovo fo HIn-
fon, Iown, sfnvIng ovornIghf wIfh
Mnrk's nophow, CnIn !ndwnv. IrI-
dnv, fhov wonf on fo Iorf Ðodgo,
Iown, whoro Tnnnor !ndwnv wns
pnrfIcIpnfIng In n coIIogo rodoo. Ho
wns nIso In n rodoo In Amos, Iown,
Snfurdnv. Tnnnor nnd AusfIn
O'Ðon mndo If fo fho shorf go on
bofh IrIdnv nIghf nnd Sundnv nf-
fornoon In fonm ropIng. Mnrk, Ju-
dIfh nnd InIIov rofurnod homo
Sundnv.
SpondIng fho Iong wookond nf
Corv nnd Ðob SmIfh's homo wns
Ðob's dnughfor, CnIfo, nnd frIonds,
AdrInn nnd Mnff, who nII nffond
Soufh Ðnkofn Sfnfo !nIvorsIfv.
VIsIfIng Snfurdnv ovonIng woro
ÐusfI (nIso homo from coIIogo) nnd
Jndo Iorrv nnd Cnsov !odor. Thov
nII hnd fun cnrvIng pumpkIns.
!ocnI kIds pInvIng In n foofbnII
jnmboroo Snfurdnv In IhIIIp woro
Cnrson HnmIII, IrIco Hnnson nnd
Kongnn IIfch.
Trov IIshoro pInvod In fho jnm-
boroo wIfh fho WnII fonm nnd hIs
grnndmn, !nnn IIshoro, wns fhoro
fo wnfch.
Ovor fho wookond, fho Sfovo
Iokron fnmIIv frnvoIod fo WInonn,
MInn., fo vIsIf Znno Iokron nf Sf.
Mnrv's !nIvorsIfv. If wns fnmIIv
wookond nf fho coIIogo nnd Sf.
Mnrv's Is coIobrnfIng Ifs l00 vonr
nnnIvorsnrv. Thoro woro mnnv nc-
fIvIfIos fo pnrfIcIpnfo In. Znno nnd
AIIIson rnn In fho nnnunI 5K run
on Snfurdnv.
!nsf Mondnv nffornoon, fho IocnI
4-H cIub puf up fhoIr wIndow dIs-
pInv nf IhIIIp`s Ind !Ivor SonIor
CIfIzon`s buIIdIng. ThIs Is In obsor-
vnnco of ÞnfIonnI 4-H Wook, buf If
wIII bo on dIspInv unfII Ocfobor l9.
InuI, Ðonnn nnd TInn Sfnbon nf-
fondod fho funornI of Ðonnn's
cousIn, InrI HoIms, In WnII Snfur-
dnv nffornoon.
Inrf Inrsons hnd nnofhor sfonf
pIncod In nn nrforv Insf Wodnosdnv
In !npId CIfv. Þow ho shouId bo In
good shnpo. I sfnvod wIfh MIko,
MoIodv nnd kIds whIIo ho wns In
fho hospIfnI ovornIghf.
Snfurdnv ovonIng, our grnndson,
TvIor OIIvIor, nnd hIs frIond, Sfncv
!owIs, hoId n housownrmIng-
pofIuck nf fhoIr roconfIv purchnsod
houso In IIorro. InjovIng fho
ovonIng woro Ðon nnd Ðonnn
OIIvIor, IhIIIp, Irvnn nnd Shnron
OIIvIor, InrI, JodI, !nchoI nnd
Snrnh Inrsons, nnd Inrf nnd I.
MIIesvIIIe News
by JanIce Parscns · S44-ßß1S
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 14
Community
W
W
W
.
G
R
O
S
S
E
N
B
U
R
G
.
C
O
M
Tillage
JD 980, 38’ 3” Field Cutter, Complete, Robust ........
........................................ #22223 (WA) $19,900
JD 2700, C-Spring Blade Mt, Nice Shape ...............
......................................... #38250 (BF) $19,750
IHC 350 Disk, 17ft, 3 Section of Old .......................
............................................. #22548 (H) $1,950
CIH 496, 9” Space, 3 Section Fold, 3 Bar Harrow ....
..............................................#38590 (L) $7,500
Winner, SD
Toll Free: (800) 658-3440
Pierre, SD
Toll Free: (800) 742-8110
Philip, SD
Toll Free:
(800) 416-7839
Bloomfield, NE
Toll Free: (800) 658-3252
Hartington, NE
Toll Free:(800) 624-7826
Laurel, NE
Toll Free: (800) 365-6257
Wayne, NE
Toll Free: (800) 343-3309
Call Local Store M-F 7:30am-5:30pm;
Sat 7:30am- Call for local store
closing hours.
WINNER (W)
Special of the Month
BLOOMFIELD (BF)
Special of the Month
HARTINGTON (H)
Special of the Month
LAUREL (L)
Special of the Month
WAYNE (WA)
Special of the Month
PHILIP (P)
Special of the Month
PIERRE (PR)
Special of the Month
2000 John Deere 8110 ....
S#10028 $69,000
(2) John Deere 8100 .......
(1) 2WD $48,500
(1) MFWD $75,000
(3) JD 8110
Tractors: Row Crop
JD 9770 &
9770 STS
12 TO CHOOSE FROM
AS LOW AS
$199,000
Combines
(7) 2010 JD 9670 Corn/Bean 2WD Hydrostatic ...........
.................................................AS LOW AS $189,000
1995 JD 9600 Corn/bean, Hydrostatic, 4000 hrs ..........
................................................. S#9875 (PR) $40,000
(4) John Deere 9760 ..............AS LOW AS $130,000
(4) John Deere 9660
Corn/Bean, 2WD,
Hydrostatic, AS LOW AS
$115,000
Prices Reduced On Select Models!
See details on web site.
Feteral
13x82
Auger
SN#8665
$
3,000
2008
Harvest
Interna-
tional
13x82
Auger
Stk#32487
$11,000
2004 John Deere 1293 Cornhead
Stk#32396 Hydraulic deck plates, Contour shafts,
Sensing ...................................................... $27,500
Lahman
Hay
Mover
SN#29444
$
4230.00
2001 John
Deere 567
Baler
Stock#7965
$
15,000
1998
John
Deere
1860
$
67,000
Sprayers
1994 Wilmar
765, 60ft booms,
3636 hrs
(P)
$29,900
Tractors: Articulated 4WD
2006 New Holland TV145 Cab, Singles, 3 Pt Hitch,
PTO,2,288 hrs ........................... S#9966 (P) $84,500
Cab, Powershift, Duals,
359 hrs, S# 10113 (W)
........... $245,000
2011 John
Deere 9430
Cab, Collarshift, Duals, 3pt,
6,530 hrs S# 10152 (P)
............. $75,000
1997 New
Holland 9682
John Deere 4030 Cab, 2WD, Collarshift, Loader
557 hrs .......................................... S# 9713 (P) $24,000
1982 John Deere 4840 2wd, P-Shift, 3 SCVs, 1000 PTO,
8822 hrs ..................................... S#38060 (W) $25,000
(2) John Deere 7730’s MFWD w/loaders ....$92,000
(2) John Deere 7800 MFWD, as low as ......... $47,500
2004 JD 7820 MFWD, 4136 Hrs, JD 746 Loader ..............
S#10350 (W) ................................................. $129,500
2005 CIH MX 285 ...........................S#9938 $115,000
Corn & Bean Heads
(2) JD 1293
Corn Heads
$33,500
(4) JD 637
Disks
As Low As
$51,000
(9) 2009 JD 612 Corn Heads .......... Choice $59,000
(2) JD 643 #38083 ...................... As Low As $8,000
(1) JD 653, #8125 ............................................$2,500
(6) JD 893 ................................... As Low As $16,500
Air Drills
(3) JD 1860, tow
betweens
As Low As
$60,000
(1) JD 1820 53ft , 1900 270 Bu towbetween...(Ph) $55,000
(1) 1997 JD 1850, 787 towbehind tank .............(P) $35,000
(9) JD 1890 towbetweens ......................As LowAs $82,000
(2) Flexi Coil 5000 (2) towbetween (1) towbehind . As Lowas
......................................................................................$75,000
(1) 2000 Flexi Coil 7500, towbetween........ (P-SD) $35,000
(4) JD 4930s 90 Booms, hours as lowas 896..........................
...................................................................as lowas $195,000
(3) Summers 1500 90’ Booms ............. ...as lowas $15,000
Flexi-Coil 67XL 90’ Booms, 1500 gal ...S#9753 (P) $13,000
(1) 2006 JD 4920 Self Propelled, 1677 hrs (W-N) $154,000
Hardi N 155, 3pt, Pasture Sprayer.....................(W-N) $3,500
(2) Summers Super Sprayers, Pull Type..... choice (W-SD) $2,500
2000
Case IH
Baler
Stock#22616
$4950.00
John
Deere
568 Baler
Stk# 26524
$27,950
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
Greetings from cool, breezy,
overcast, dry northeast Haakon
County. We had some clouds that
looked promising yesterday, but we
only received a few drops of rain. I
am still amazed at how quickly our
hot summer mornings have turned
into brisk autumn mornings!
Mother Nature is definitely keep-
ing to her schedule. We had a hard
freeze this past week, so I've been
spending some time clearing off the
garden – or what was left of the
garden. It has not been a stellar
gardening year here, and I can't
say that I am sorry to see it end. I
still have some tomato plants piled
up under some blankets, so I'll be
checking to see if any of the green
tomatoes are ripening. And I still
have a few hills of potatoes to dig.
Otherwise, I guess I'll start plan-
ning for 2013!
The cool weather seems to have
slowed down the flies and boxelder
bugs. Of course, the bug spray I
used may have had something to
do with that, too! There are some
things in this world that I feel God
wasted time creating, and boxelder
bugs fall into that category. The
skunks and coyotes are still plenti-
ful, and I don't have any spray for
those critters. Our hired man shot
a skunk in his yard earlier this
week – I guess it had developed a
taste for dog food, and his dog,
Kate, wasn't too happy about it. I
was thinking about skunks the
other day – wouldn't you just hate
to smell that bad all the time?
Oh well, on to the news.
Dick and Gene Hudson were in
Philip Wednesday to attend fu-
neral services for Virginia Burns.
Friday, Gene Hudson attended fu-
neral services for Dorothy Seidler
in Midland. After church Sunday,
Chauncey Jorgensen and his
friend, Misti, visited at Dick and
Gene's home. Monday, Harry and
Ruth Burma, Platte, were lunch-
eon guests at the Hudson home.
The Burmas are the parents of
Dick and Gene's son-in-law, Cory
Burma.
Billy and Arlyne have a quieter
house this week since all of their
company have returned to their
homes. Last Friday, Billy and Ar-
lyne, along with Kim and Jeff
Marso and Kim's son Danny and
his friend, traveled to Spearfish to
visit with Cindy and Bruce Bresee.
Bruce is a football coach at
Spearfish, so the group attended
the football game Friday night. Un-
fortunately, Bruce got sick during
the game and was taken to the hos-
pital. He was suffering from some
arrhythmia in his heart, so he was
taken to Rapid City the next day.
Following treatment to get the
heart back into the correct rhythm,
Bruce was able to leave the hospi-
tal Sunday. Great news! Thank
goodness for modern medicine!
Duane and Lola Roseth enjoyed
a visit from their children last
weekend. Kacey and John Gerlach
and Rhett Roseth arrived Friday
from their homes in Rapid City and
stayed until Sunday. Thor, Jackie
and baby Royce Roseth spent Sat-
urday at the ranch. It sounds like
they all had a great time.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson were
in Ft. Pierre last week to attend the
auction of the Thorson land.
Paulsons and Thorsons have been
longtime neighbors and friends.
Other than that, it has been busi-
ness as usual at the Paulson place.
Connie Johnson spent several
days in Mitchell last week attend-
ing teacher's training. Wyatt John-
son, a freshman student at South
Dakota State University, spent the
weekend at home helping with cat-
tle work. Jon and Connie's friend,
Dave Bauer, Minnesota, spent the
weekend helping with the cattle
weaning chores.
Bill and Polly Bruce were in Mid-
land Friday to attend funeral serv-
ices for Dorothy Seidler. Their son,
Vince, was one of the pallbearers.
Following the funeral, Vince went
to Ft. Pierre to the cattle sale, and
Bill and Polly returned to the
ranch. Saturday night, Bill and
Polly attended church services in
Midland.
Clark and Carmen were in
Pierre last week to attend a sur-
prise 40th birthday party for their
son-in-law, Anthony Nelson. Clint,
Laura and Alivya also attended the
party. Happy belated birthday, An-
thony!
Frank and Shirley Halligan re-
turned last week from a 10-day trip
to Texas. Shirley said it rained
seven inches while they were in
Texas – she hoped to bring some of
the rain back to South Dakota!
Shirley said that it had been so dry
in Texas, and the steady rain just
soaked right in – sounds wonder-
ful, doesn't it? While they were
gone, Frank's father, Ken Halligan,
spent a few days in the hospital.
I'm glad to report that he is doing
better now and is back home.
Max and Joyce Jones have been
harvesting like mad, trying to get
things wrapped up for the season.
This week, they will be in Pierre for
Grand Chapter of Eastern Star.
Ruth Neuhauser said it has been
a quiet week for her at Highmore.
Her daughter and son-in-law, Nina
and Lynn Nachtigall, made it
safely to Italy where they will be
spending the next several months
with their son, Troy, and his fam-
ily. Ruth's daughter and son-in-
law, Connie and Bunky Boger,
Arkansas, are back home after
their season on the road with their
educational agricultural exhibit.
They provide such important infor-
mation about agriculture to those
that have no connection to the
land! The Bogers may be coming to
visit in a couple of weeks.
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser were
in Sturgis Saturday to attend the
wedding of Danny and Lynelle
Chapman's daughter, Danna Lee.
Danny grew up here on Robb's
Flat, and his parents worked for
Tipp Hamilton. Kevin and Mary's
daughter, Sarah, joined them at
the wedding reception. Sunday,
Kevin and Mary spent time in
Spearfish helping Sarah with some
projects at her home there, return-
ing home by way of Highway 212.
Kevin said there is a lot of dry
ground along that stretch of road
also.
Mary Briggs has been staying
busy. She stopped to visit her
mother-in-law, Lil Briggs, Thurs-
day night on the way home from
work. Warren Briggs (Lane’s old-
est) was there from North Car-
olina. She said it was so very good
to see him, and he is looking great.
Rea and Mary went to Sonja
Briggs’ retirement party at her of-
fice in driver licensing Friday after-
noon, then finished the day off
working in town. Saturday morn-
ing, Mary went to town for parts
for Lee’s tractor, then Lee and
Mary both went back in Saturday
evening to attend a get-together for
Warren at Grandma Lil’s. There
was a very nice turnout. Lee and
Mary's daughter, Keva Joens,
headed home from Whitewood
after she got off work Saturday, but
she didn’t make it in time to come
in to the party. Keva brought a cou-
ple horses home and took some
back to Whitewood with her when
she returned to her home Monday
morning. Keva, granddaughter
Cattibrie Riggle (who had been at
Shad Riggle’s), and Mary pulled a
combine header to just west of
Pierre Sunday morning and met
Rea and Kinsey Riggle at a local
restaurant for pie. Kinsey returned
to the ranch with Mary. Cattibrie
and Kinsey returned to Pierre
Monday. Lane, Warren and An-
thony Briggs all stopped by around
noon on Monday on their way up to
see Lane's brother, Cole. Mary
spent part of a quiet afternoon
Monday working on the deck stow-
ing flower pots and getting things
ready for winter. She also took care
of laundry chores before heading
back towards Pierre Monday
evening to pick up Lee, who had
driven the combine in. Whew!
Makes me tired just thinking of
trying to get all that done!
Chase and Kelly Briggs and fam-
ily enjoyed a visit from Chase's
cousin, Warren, Monday. I'm sure
Kelly and the kids are enjoying
these fall days!
The week here at Neuhauser
ranch has been busy but rather un-
eventful. Our daughter, Jennifer,
returned to our home Friday from
a conference in Bismarck. It
snowed while she was there, so she
has had a taste of winter already.
Jen's husband, Ross, came to the
ranch Friday night, and he and Jen
returned to their home in Salem
Saturday. Dylan Neuhauser was
here over the weekend, helping
with some projects. We have had
hunters here, but the elk season
here at the ranch is nearly over.
The guys have been feeding cattle,
moving hay, and getting prepared
for winter.
This week, I am grateful for vac-
cines and antibiotics and whatever
else it takes to keep calves healthy.
Putting weaned calves in these
dusty pens is a sure fire formula for
sickness, but sometimes there is no
alternative. So thank goodness we
have some medications to help
them get better – we sure don't like
to lose any! Hopefully next year
won't be quite so dry.
Enjoy this fall weather, and
please continue to be vigilant with
fire – it is still awfully dry! Make it
a great week!
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Good morning from Colt, Ark.
Don and Vi Moody finished quite
a few appointments in Rapid the
first part of the week regarding
some important agriculture issues.
Not only with their insurance rep-
resentative which was quite re-
warding, as well as meeting with
their tax advisor on some year-end
issues. They had a new solar light
put up on their entrance sign in the
valley as their neighbors entrance
was highly adorned with flashing
strobe lights and beautiful en-
trance autumn decor. It makes it
fun to try all the lighting affects
that are out there, such as revolv-
ing crystal solar balls and lights on
lamp posts, etc. Vi said they have
to make sure they keep all these or-
naments free of their "snow re-
moval" man who has helped them
for many years to clear their drive
as well as the tenants, of whom one
happens to be his daughter. This
job has always been highly appre-
ciated by everyone who lives at
"Driftwood Acres." (Don and Vi's
formal name of their property in
the valley - if you can still read the
sign behind all the trees.) A new
neon sign is what they need!
Monday morning, October 1, Bill
and I folded in our house on wheels
and set sail for Osborn, Mo. We had
a great time with Shelley and Mike
in Sutton, Neb., but they had to get
to work. We got to Osborn in such
good season that Bill Morrison and
Clint Cashman took us back to St.
Joseph to visit Bill’s aunt, Mary
Morrison, who is recovering from a
broken hip. She had a wild dream
and fell out of bed. (I just read a tip
that if you put one of those pool
water noodles-not sure that is the
exact name- under a fitted sheet on
the edge of the bed, it is bulky
enough to wake a person up before
they fall out of bed.)
Tony Harty visited Shirley Hair
Monday and also Dale Koehn while
he was cleaning up the garden. The
squash show up better when you
pick up the whole vine.
Tuesday, Bill and I spent the bet-
ter part of the day with Bill Morri-
son and Clint Cashman, Osborn,
and Charles Cashman, Kansas
City, Mo., visiting with Mary at the
rehab center. Mary did a lot of
walking and was working on swal-
lowing. The nurse, Pat, working
with Mary to help with swallowing
said she was from Murdo and her
husband, Joe Norton, is a nephew
to Kay Jensen. Pat was helping
Mary both days we visited.
Tony Harty took Shirley Hair to
Wanblee Tuesday.
Don and Vi Moody's friends, Bob
and Kathy Norton, and son Kyle,
came through Rapid City Wednes-
day with a big trophey elk which
Bob downed the first week of elk
season near Cicero Peak. They
were on their way to Howard to a
processing plant and hurried on
through with Bob's prize. Bob
thought because he was an elder it
may take him all month to get his
elk, so he was really pumped up
about that deal.
Wednesday morning, Bill and I
were again on the road, this time
headed to Branson, Mo., for a few
days of shows and visiting. Bran-
son is in the process of rebuilding
after a tornado went through on
February 29. There are many busi-
nesses that are in the process of re-
building, but also many that have
for sale signs up. We got settled in
and saw one show that evening.
George, Roxie, Kinsey, Natalie
and Kohen Gittings, were in Rapid
City Wednesday for a checkup for
George after his surgery. The sta-
ples were removed and he is doing
great. It will be a while before he
can go back to work though.
Kinsey Gittings helped work on
the trailer house for his sister, Jes-
sica, a couple of afternoons during
the week.
Sandee Gittings attended the
West Central Electric meeting in
Philip Wednesday evening.
Wednesday after visiting with
Shirley Hair, Tony Harty went to
Philip in the afternoon for some
shopping and to attend the West
Central Electric meeting. He en-
joyed seeing so many former neigh-
bors as well as friends from the
Midland area.
Don and Vi Moody returned to
the ranch Thursday to settle them-
selves back in, help keep cattle set-
tled in and check on last minute de-
tails before the cattle sale. They
ran into Lonnie Arneson while in
Rapid City Thursday before head-
ing back home and had a nice visit
about area conditions. Time will
eventually change things for the
better and rain will come or even
snow. The Lead/Deadwood area
had five inches, so that's a start.
Brrr, Thursday morning was the
start of cooler weather in the
Kadoka area. Tony Harty went out
for coffee then visited Shirley Hair.
Later in the day, he stopped by his
niece, Kathy Brown’s. Kathy was
busy making chili and sweet rolls
for the football team supper.
Sandee Gittings was in Huron
Thursday for groundbreaking for
the new Farmers Union office
building and a meeting in the after-
noon.
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
continued on page 16
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursdav, 0otober 11, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 16
FARM & RANCH
SELLING: 10 Dlacl Angus con-
ncrical lrcd Icifcrs Saiurday,
Novcnlcr 3, ai PIilip (SDi Livc-
siocl Auciion. AI lrcd Angus io
DL Inccniivc 228 (EPDs DW 0,
WW 81, YW 133, M 28i. Pasiurc
lrcd io Crccn Mouniain Froni
Man (EPDs DW -.7, WW 61, YW
99 M 28i. TIcsc Icifcrs origi-
naicd oui of iIc 2012 DHSS pcn
of fivc. TIcsc vcry fancy lrcd
Icifcrs will wcigI 1,050 lls. and
arc lrcd io siari calving MarcI 1
for 45 days. Favcllciic Caiilc,
685-5147 or Ionc, 859-2969.
PF6-5ip
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
local dclivcry includcd, scni-
load lois, no nold or wccds,
largc rounds pui up rigIi. Call
Fol, 390-5535; CIarlcs, 390-
5506. P43-4ip
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Cci rcady for fall Iauling! 12-
ply, 235185116F. $155
nounicd (liniicd quaniiiics
availallci. Lcs' Dody SIop, 859-
2744, PIilip. P40-ifn
GARAGE SALES
HUGE GARAGE SALE: Tucs-
day, Oci. 16, 3 p.n. io 7 p.n.;
Wcd., Oci. 17, 8 a.n. io noon ai
110 Wood Avc., PbIIIp. Jclincl &
Fadway. Applianccs, furniiurc,
pool iallc, ncial gazclo, lcd-
ding, lois of Hallowccn & CIrisi-
nas dccoraiions, nucI nisc.
P43-2ip
HELP WANTED
NOW HIRING! Ccriificd Nurscs
Aidc Posiiion. Full1pari-iinc
availallc. Dcncfiis for full iinc.
Plcasc Coniaci Hcidi or Nilli ai
837-2270, Kadola. K44-2ic
DEPUTY SHERIFF'S POSI-
TION: TIc Haalon Couniy
SIcriff's officc is acccpiing appli-
caiions for a full iinc Dcpuiy
SIcriff. Conpciiiivc wagcs and
an c×ccllcni lcncfiis paclagc.
TIis posiiion will lc opcn uniil
fillcd. Scnd siaic applicaiions
and1or rcsuncs io. Haalon
Couniy SIcriff, Do× 249, PIilip,
SD 57567. For norc infornaiion
coniaci SIcriff Frcd Kocsicr ai
859-2741. P43-ifn
POSITIONS OPEN: Kadola Arca
ScIool Disirici is looling for
coacIcs for iIc upconing winicr
sporis. Hcad girls' laslcilall
coacI; 5-6 girls' laslcilall
Kadola; 7-8 girls' laslcilall
Kadola; 5iI-8iI girls' laslcilall
Inicrior; Assisiani loys' laslci-
lall coacI; 5iI-6iI loys' laslci-
lall coacI Kadola; 7iI-8iI loys'
laslcilall coacI Kadola. If in-
icrcsicd scnd a lciicr of inicrcsi
and rcsunc io Kadola Arca
ScIool, Aiicniion Ccorgc Scilcr,
PO Do× 99, Kadola, SD 57543
or conplcic and sulnii a non-
ccriificd applicaiion iIai is avail-
allc on iIc wclsiic www.
ladola.l12.sd.us EOE.
K42-4ic
POSITION OPEN: Jaclson
Couniy HigIway Supcrinicndcni
posiiion. E×pcricncc in road 1
lridgc consiruciion 1 nainic-
nancc. Supcrvisory 1 adninis-
iraiivc c×pcricncc prcfcrrcd.
Posiiion opcn uniil fillcd. Infor-
naiion. 837-2410 or 837-2422;
Fa×. 837-2447, Kadola.
K42-3ic
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: (4i rollaway lcds, (1i
invcrsion iallc. Call 837-2427,
Kadola. K44-2ip
FOR SALE: WIiificld pcllci firc-
placc inscri; siccl roof and Ialf
windsIicld for Polaris 500 4×4,
ycar 2009. Call 798-2182 or
685-3934. WP4-2ic
FOR SALE: Fopc Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ropc, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED TO BUY: Uscd ircad-
nill. Call Sclna ai 859-2360,
cvcnings, lcavc ncssagc.
PF6-ifn
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday,
Novcnlcr 4, ai iIc Kadola Ciiy
Audiioriun. DooiIs availallc.
Call Fuly ai 837-2270. K43-2ic
WANTED: Old car and irucl
lodics and paris, 1920-1950s,
paying lciicr iIan scrap so
clcan oui iIc ircc linc or ncial
pilc for quicl $$. Call Dcn, 669-
2012, Murdo. P43-4ic
PETS/SUPPLIES
BARN CATS: E×ccllcni
nouscrs. Call 685-5327 for
norc info. P43-3ic
REAL ESTATE
2-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
SALE IN WALL: Ncw siccl roof,
ncw carpci, fcnccd in laclyard,
wood siovc, ccniral air & lois of
sIadc! Call 515-3496 or 279-
2259 for norc dciails.
PW43-2ip
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
Malc an offcr! 2 lcdroons, 1
laiI, dining roon, applianccs,
fcnccd laclyard. 859-2483 or
859-3095, lcavc ncssagc.
P42-ifn
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
1999 Fcdnan, 28'×72', 3 lcd-
roons, 2 laiIs, 150'×75' loi,
sIcd, doullc carpori, Midland.
$42,500 or $3501noniI rcni.
Call Paula, 441-6967. P41-4ic
RENTALS
FOR RENT: 1 & 2 lcdroon
aparincnis for rcni in Wall.
Coniaci CIrisiianson Propcriics,
858-2195. WP7-4ic
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: Spacious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or siop in iIc lolly and
picl up an applicaiion. Caicway
Aparincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc acccpi
rcsponsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc paid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi paid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is placcd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
TIunI uou to uíí ])ícnds und
]unííu ]o) tIc 3UtI Ií)tIduu
uísIcs!
Huíííc Konst
Lalcs rcgion NE SD. TIousand
Lalcs Fcaliy of Minncsoia. 866-
346-7006 www.1000
LalcsMN.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.i Call
iIis ncwspapcr or 800-658-
3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI,
33¢134¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456.1024,
joc«iliirucl. con.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2002 Ford Fangcr,
c×icndcd cal, 4 door, 4 wIccl
drivc, loadcd, 68K nilcs, auio.
Asling $9,500. Call 279-2913.
PW42-2ip
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Spccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV applicaiion. ALSO. prairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23ip
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iypcs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
ups, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52ip
GRAVEL: Scrccncd or rocl. Call
O'Conncll Consiruciion Inc.,
859-2020, PIilip. P51-ifn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iypcs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׫gwic.nci K50-ifn
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN. ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Oualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
AUCTION
LAND AUCTION. 230+1- Acrcs
Crcgory Couniy, Cropland and
Crassland, 12 nilcs noriIwcsi
of Durlc, SD, Ociolcr 26iI ,
2012. Call Daloia Propcriics,
Todd ScIucizlc, Auciionccr,
605-280-3115, www.Daloia
Propcriics.con.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Capiiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs onlyi. Call Fus-
scll Spaid 605-280-1067.
BUYING GOLD/SILVER
CONVEFT YOUF COLD, silvcr,
plaiinun inio casI. Top pricc
paid, 24 Ir iurn around for nail
in. SD owncd lusincss. Visii
www.nidwcsigold-silvcr. con for
insiruciions or call 605 260
4653.
EMPLOYMENT
CHFYSLEF CEFTIFIED TECH-
NICIAN nccdcd for CIadron
CIryslcr Dodgc Jccp Fan in
CIadron Nclrasla.
$30.001Iour, rclocaiion plan,
lcncfiis, iraining, 5-day worl
wccl, grcai worl cnvironncni.
Jcrcny. 308-432-9004;
jlcnncdy«Ioinail.con.
DEPUTY SHEFIFF'S POSITION.
Haalon Couniy. Conpciiiivc
wagcs1c×ccllcni lcncfiis. Scnd
siaic applicaiions or rcsunc.
Haalon Couniy SIcriff, Do×
249, PIilip, SD 57567. Inforna-
iion. 605-859-2741.
FULL-TIME PAFKS MAINTE-
NANCE. Ciiy of Canion, SD.
CDL & conncrcial pcsiicidc ap-
plicaior liccnsc rcquircd wiiIin
6 noniIs. Dcadlinc. Ociolcr
17iI. www.ciiyofcanionsd.con
or 605-987-2881. EOE.
MANACEF NEEDED for pro-
grcssivc crcdii union. E×ccllcni
lcncfiis and salary. Fcsuncs
only sulniiicd io Do× 69, Crc-
gory, SD 57533. EEOC.
DOUCLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is ialing appliciions for
full- iinc Douglas Couniy HigI-
way Supcrinicndcni. Musi Iavc
valid Class A Drivcr's Liccnsc.
E×pcricncc in road 1 lridgc con-
siruciion 1 nainicnancc prc-
fcrrcd. For applicaiion coniaci.
Douglas Couniy Audiior (605i
724-2423.
WANTED. EXPEFIENCE AP-
PFENTICE or journcynan clcc-
irician. E×ccllcni wagcs and
lcncfiis. LEC Inc, Cciiyslurg.
Call 800-568-4324 or scnd rc-
sunc io lcvin«loganclcciric.liz
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
LAKEFFONT DANK LOAN Liqui-
daiion $29,900 lalc propcriy,
100' clcar waicr sIorc; Clacial
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
Fo( app||cal|or
& |rlo(ral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varadererl
1113 3re(rar 3l.
3lu(d|s. 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ o(
1-800-211-282ê
WWW.p(o(erla|
raradererl.cor
WWW.l(ee(erle(s
du|de.cor
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 · PhiIip
0IassItIed AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ pcr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu, tIc P)o]ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou)unt, as wcll as on our wclsiic.
www.pionccr-rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns, Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun for
firsi 20 words; 10¢ pcr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and
iniiial nusi lc counicd scparaicly. Includcd in iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc P)o]ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
pcr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial nusi lc counicd scp-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for loollccping and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 pcr colunn incI, includcd in iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc P)o]ít. $5.55 pcr colunn incI for iIc
Píoncc) Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic advcriiscd in iIis ncwspapcr is suljcci io iIc Fcdcral Fair
Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany prcfcrcncc, or discrininaiion on
racc, color, rcligion, sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io nalc any sucI prcfcrcncc, liniia-
iion, or discrininaiion."
TIis ncwspapcr will noi lnowingly acccpi any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a violaiion of
iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncwspapcr arc availallc
on an cqual opporiuniiy lasis.
l$ l1 1lNlF
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
CaII Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
PhiIip
CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
S=n-¿1oo · Philip, SÐ
Ior ull yoor concrete
constroction needs:
6l086l`$
Welding & Repair
· DOT Inspection
· CompIete TraiIer Repair
· FuII Line of Bearings & SeaIs
· Tractor Front End & SpindIes
· SeIIing New SteeI
· RecycIing OutIet
· Refrigration & A/C on CommerciaI,
ResidentiaI & VehicIes
· ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
0eo(de: 111-3ê0Z · Lee: 111-3ê0ê
0l88l$
859-2970 · Philip
Soufh Ðnkofn Socrofnrv of Sfnfo
Jnson Cnnf hns nnnouncod fhnf
porsonnIIzod vofor InformnfIon Is
nvnIInbIo onIIno fhrough fho Vofor
InformnfIon IorfnI (VII) nf
sdsos.gov.
Anvono rogIsforod fo vofo In
Soufh Ðnkofn cnn uso VII fo nccoss
InformnfIon for upcomIng oIocfIons,
such ns fho prosIdonfInI oIocfIon on
Þovombor 6.
¨Thoso rogIsforod fo vofo In
Soufh Ðnkofn cnn sImpIv onfor
fhoIr nnmo nnd dnfo of bIrfh fo nc-
coss fho InformnfIon,¨ Cnnf snId.
¨Thoro fhov wIII fInd nII sorfs of
hoIpfuI InformnfIon IIko fhoIr vofor
rogIsfrnfIon sfnfus, poIIIng pInco,
IocnfIon, snmpIo bnIIof nnd nbson-
foo bnIIof frnckIng If nppIIcnbIo.¨
Vofors cnn uso VII fo chock on
ovorvfhIng from fhoIr poIIfIcnI
pnrfv fo counfv nnd nddross of rog-
IsfrnfIon. And nccossIbIo Is gonornI
InformnfIon, IIko nccopfnbIo forms
of vofor IdonfIfIcnfIon for poIIIng
pIncos, how fo updnfo n rogIsfrn-
fIon nnd confncf InformnfIon for
counfv oIocfIon offIcInIs.
¨VII wns cronfod fo ncf ns n
SwIss nrmv knIfo for vofors,¨ Cnnf
snId. ¨Our nIm Is fo provIdo nII fho
InformnfIon or IInks fo roIovnnf ro-
sourcos fhnf n vofor mIghf nood fo
succossfuIIv cnsf n bnIIof In n Soufh
Ðnkofn oIocfIon.¨
In nddIfIon fo VII, vofors cnn
Iook fo nowspnpors, rndIo nnd
counfv nudIfors or ofhor IocnI oIoc-
fIon offIcInIs for InformnfIon nbouf
poIIIng pIncos nnd snmpIo bnIIofs
for fho Þovombor 4 oIocfIon.
Personallzed voter lnformatlon
for future electlons now avallable
Thursday, October 11, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 16
www.
Ravellette
publications.
com
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE. YEARLINGS: 10 A.M. CALVES:
11 A.M. MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 10,000 HEAD.
YEARLINGS: NI=NO IMPLANTS, HR=HOME RAISED
FAIRBANKS RANCH 130 BLK & BWF STRS....................................................775800#
MCILRAVY RANCH 100 RED ANG CHAR X STRS & OPEN HFRS...............650750#
NESS 100 BLK STRS ....................................................................................................750#
O’DEA 35 BLK & BWF OPEN HFRS..........................................................................900#
BUCHANAN 22 BLK STRS..................................................................................900950#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
STILWELL 700 CHAR X CLVS; FS,ASV.............................................................550700#
ANDERS RANCH 675 BLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN,ASV............................................400550#
DIAMOND S RANCH 600 BLK, BWF & A FEW RED CLVS; FS,NI.................450600#
DEAL 400 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................525600#
YOUNG 330 CHAR X & A FEW BLK & HERF CLVS; FS ..................................500650#
COOPER 300 BLK, BWF, & FEW RED CLVS; FS,NI ........................................400550#
BERNDT 275 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI .............................................................500550#
LEVIN & CASTEEL 270 BLK & BWF LCVS; FS,NI,ASV...................................475575#
GUN N & CASPERS 250 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV................................................500600#
HICKS 250 BLK & RED STRS; FS, ASV..............................................................600650#
BRENNAN 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................450550#
COINSIGNMENT 250 BLK STRS; FS.................................................................450525#
FOLAND RANCH 250 BLK & BWF STRS; FS ...................................................450550#
JOHNSTON RANCH 230 CHAR X & RED ANG CLVS; FS,NI .........................500550#
SCHOFIELD 200 BLK, BWF & HERF CLVS; FS ................................................450550#
SMITH 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS......................................................................500600#
WILSON BROTHERS 200 BLK CLVS; FS ..........................................................500600#
WILLUWEIT RANCH 200 BLK, BWF, RWF & HERF CLVS; FS,NI,AN .................400#
FEES 185 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................................500600#
DEERING 180 CHAR X CLVS; FS.......................................................................550600#
WICKS RANCH 160 BLK, BWF, & FEW CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI.......................500600#
JOHNSON & LAMONT 140 BLK HFRS; FS,NI .................................................400500#
WILLIAMS 140 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS...............................................................550600#
ZELFER 140 BLK, BWF, & A FEW HERF CLVS; NI ..........................................450550#
ADDISON 136 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................450500#
FISHER 130 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................550#
KRUSE 112 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .....................................................................................500#
RADWAY 110 BLK STRS; FS...............................................................................500550#
CANTRELL & WHEELER 100 BLK CLVS; FS....................................................450550#
REEVES 100 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...................................................................................550#
HOVLAND HEREFORDS 100 BWF 1ST X CLVS; FS,NI ..................................550600#
AMIOTTE 100 CHAR X & RED CLVS; FS.................................................................525#
MCGRIFF 100 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................400#
GRUBL 90 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI ..................................................................500600#
WHIRLWIND HORSE 90 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.........................................500550#
KNIGHT & KNIGHT 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................450525#
KRUSE 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................500550#
LURZ 85 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS...........................................................................500550#
CUNY 85 BLK STRS; FS,NI .................................................................................550600#
HERRINGTON 75 BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI.........................................................550#
JULSON & JULSON 75 BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI ..........................................450550#
SIELER & SIELER 75 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.................................................500525#
REINDL 75 BLK & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................575675#
NAESCHER 74 BWF & HERF CLVS ...................................................................500550#
HOBART & HOBART 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI..........................................550800#
DEDIC TRUST 55 HERF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................................500#
DAVEY 50 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................400450#
HANSON 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ...........................................................................550#
BILLS 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................................525550#
KELLY 38 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ................................................................................525575#
HARRIS 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................................575600#
NEVILLE 30 BLK & BWF MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI......................................................550#
BOEDING 18 BLK CLVS; FS ...............................................................................400500#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors, with
questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 17: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE 10:00 A.M. MT
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6
WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PASTEURELLA, 7WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
& THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 25: NO SALE
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. JD, 2DJ2
Vc Iud u )cuí Iíg )un o] IígI quuíítu cuíucs ]o) ou) spccíuí
suíc. Vc Iud ouc) 5U st)uígIt pot íouds ín tIc o]]c)íng. Hcuí
Iíg c)oud o] Iuuc)s und tIc nu)Ict uus uc)u st)ong. Huns
o] cuíucs, ucígI-ups und I)cd cous uííí stuu Iíg. 9,5UU
]ccdc) cuttíc Ic)c ncxt uccI.
CALVES:
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
104.......................................CHAF STFS 582=........$170.50
126.......................................CHAF STFS 502=........$175.50
67...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 435=........$186.00
109 ......................................CHAF HFFS 557=........$162.75
124 ......................................CHAF HFFS 499=........$163.25
61 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 434=........$165.50
MARTY BURNS - PHILIIP
91.........................................CHAF STFS 616=........$164.25
83...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 539=........$166.75
19...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 406=........$187.50
100 ......................................CHAF HFFS 585=........$158.50
71 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 507=........$157.00
22 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 403=........$153.00
JW CATTLE COMPANY INC - BELVIDERE
87.........................................CHAF STFS 638=........$163.00
47.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 516=........$168.50
92 ........................................CHAF HFFS 606=........$154.75
MARK WILLIAMS - KADOKA
85 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 663=........$161.50
80 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 585=........$161.25
16.........................................CHAF STFS 477=........$180.50
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
84.........................................CHAF STFS 711=........$156.25
112.......................................CHAF STFS 617=........$161.75
DAN PIROUTEK - MILESVILLE
101.......................................CHAF STFS 607=........$167.25
98 ........................................CHAF HFFS 572=........$160.00
GLEN SPRING - UNION CENTER
98 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$178.25
104 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 502=........$178.25
76 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 441=........$187.75
92 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 581=........$161.75
DANNY & MELVIN ARNESON - ENNING
100.........................................DLK STFS 510=........$177.00
95...........................................DLK STFS 551=........$167.00
121.........................................DLK STFS 444=........$191.50
LEE BALDWIN - ELM SPRINGS
91...........................................DLK STFS 503=........$178.00
27 ..........................................DLK HFFS 464=........$158.50
17 ..........................................DLK HFFS 401=........$162.75
WALLY & 2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
82 ................................FED & DLK STFS 470=........$180.75
27 ................................FED & DLK STFS 346=........$207.50
31................................DLK & DWF HFFS 399=........$171.50
MIKE & ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
131.........................................DLK STFS 461=........$184.00
55...........................................DLK STFS 404=........$199.00
71 ..........................................DLK HFFS 409=........$169.25
TERRY & MICHAEL MCPHERSON - PIEDMONT
137 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 460=........$183.25
120 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 405=........$206.50
128..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 431=........$167.50
67................................DLK & DWF HFFS 372=........$177.75
WADE & WYATT PETERSON - ENNING
41...........................................DLK STFS 537=........$170.25
18...........................................DLK STFS 440=........$185.00
30................................DLK & DWF HFFS 483=........$153.50
17 ..........................................DLK HFFS 427=........$164.00
WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK - MARCUS
92...........................................DLK STFS 502=........$174.00
51 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 410=........$194.75
55 ..........................................DLK HFFS 444=........$164.25
MORELL LIVESTOCK - UNION CENTER
48 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 444=........$187.00
36 ..........................................DLK HFFS 433=........$160.50
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST - HOWES
95 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 518=........$171.25
26.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 400=........$190.50
98................................DLK & DWF HFFS 500=........$153.25
LONG & SIMONS - ENNING
105.......................................CHAF STFS 541=........$168.50
118.....................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 447=........$185.00
TODD & NANCY COLLINS - STURGIS
105 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$173.50
85................................DLK & DWF HFFS 481=........$156.50
ROBERT MCCORMICK - KADOKA
40 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 528=........$172.75
11................................DLK & DWF HFFS 468=........$157.50
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS - MIDLAND
64...........................................DLK STFS 521=........$172.50
15...........................................DLK STFS 430=........$190.00
33 ..........................................DLK HFFS 466=........$158.25
REINERT, JONES & SALT FORK RANCH - HOWES
102 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 558=........$168.00
118 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 492=........$179.00
72 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 415=........$197.00
101..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 514=........$161.00
99................................DLK & DWF HFFS 438=........$167.50
KELLY RICARD - PIEDMONT
63 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 435=........$185.00
14 ................................FED & DLK STFS 328=........$195.00
52................................DLK & DWF HFFS 398=........$169.00
11................................DLK & DWF HFFS 302=........$173.00
11 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 414=........$153.50
DON & VI MOODY - PHILIP
64 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$170.00
16 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 379=........$206.50
54................................DLK & DWF HFFS 487=........$160.00
16................................DLK & DWF HFFS 398=........$162.00
RON JENSEN - EAGLE BUTTE
58...........................................DLK STFS 558=........$166.00
20...........................................DLK STFS 447=........$190.50
73................................FED & DLK HFFS 520=........$145.25
15 ..........................................DLK HFFS 393=........$164.00
FRED KARP FAMILY - OWANKA
35 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 552=........$166.75
12 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 467=........$177.50
28..............................CHAF & FED HFFS 525=........$148.00
14..............................CHAF & FED HFFS 427=........$157.50
FLOYD GABRIEL ESTATE - CREIGHTON
62................................FWF & DWF STFS 467=........$183.50
101..............................FWF & DWF STFS 567=........$162.00
WHITEHEAD, LAMPHERE & GRUBL - STURGIS
45...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 586=........$161.75
20...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 458=........$182.00
48 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 554=........$157.25
15 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 458=........$156.00
JOESPH URBANIAK - UNION CENTER
45 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 487=........$179.00
24................................DLK & DWF HFFS 473=........$154.00
12 ..........................................DLK HFFS 377=........$168.50
DENNIS SHARP - INTERIOR
30 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 494=........$171.00
12 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 402=........$192.50
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 422=........$160.50
BAKER & THOMPSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
47 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 574=........$162.75
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 504=........$164.00
38................................DLK & DWF HFFS 522=........$155.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 435=........$158.50
CACTUS FLAT CATTLE COMPANY - CACTUS FLAT
34.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 468=........$182.75
28 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 444=........$152.00
10 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 309=........$168.00
PAUL & LARRY KEARNS - HIGHMORE
40 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 523=........$165.25
16 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 515=........$165.25
10...........................................DLK STFS 425=........$195.50
48................................DLK & DWF HFFS 485=........$155.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 387=........$171.00
HUNSACKER CATTLE COMPANY - FAIRBURN
16 ..........................................DWF STFS 546=........$163.75
22..........................................DWF HFFS 558=........$150.00
13..........................................DWF HFFS 457=........$156.00
JUSTIN RANTAPAA & JULIE STRAGNER - DEADWOOD
32 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 565=........$161.50
29................................DLK & DWF HFFS 512=........$152.00
JOHNA ROVERE - STURGIS
27...........................................DLK STFS 553=........$163.50
17...........................................DLK STFS 423=........$189.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 484=........$150.50
10 ..........................................DLK HFFS 359=........$171.00
SONNY POURIER - SCENIC
36...........................................DLK STFS 566=........$162.75
11...........................................DLK STFS 396=........$204.50
40 ..........................................DLK HFFS 534=........$154.75
ROY & MARGARET PFEIFER - PHILIP
32...........................................DLK STFS 567=........$162.50
17 ..........................................DLK HFFS 539=........$147.50
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
91 ................................FED & DLK STFS 630=........$158.25
81 ................................FED & DLK STFS 541=........$159.00
56................................FED & DLK HFFS 525=........$146.50
BOB AMIOTTE - WANBLEE
57 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 591=........$161.25
17 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 454=........$184.50
30................................DLK & DWF HFFS 531=........$154.00
15................................DLK & DWF HFFS 418=........$155.50
JUSTIN WULF - OWANKA
50................................FWF & DWF STFS 580=........$161.25
38 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 528=........$156.00
STUCK & LUNDQUIST - RAPID CITY
48...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 618=........$159.00
20...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 485=........$179.50
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 522=........$153.00
23...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 522=........$148.75
15 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 649=........$140.25
BUDDY SIMONS - HOWES
17 ........................................CHAF HFFS 541=........$159.00
HUNSAKER RANCH - KEYSTONE
18...........................................DLK STFS 571=........$157.25
12................................DLK & DWF HFFS 508=........$150.00
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
21 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 630=........$156.50
BILL BURGAN - ROUND UP, MT
28 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 621=........$156.00
21................................DLK & DWF HFFS 599=........$142.00
DAVE & BILLIE HUMPHREY & DARLA WOLF - WALL
35...........................................DLK STFS 551=........$156.00
11...........................................DLK STFS 440=........$180.00
21 ..........................................DLK HFFS 494=........$153.00
STABEN & CURTIS - ORAL
81 ................................FED & DLK STFS 634=........$155.50
18 ................................FED & DLK STFS 503=........$158.00
46................................FED & DLK HFFS 562=........$152.00
KEN COUCH - BUFFALO GAP
20 ..........................................FED STFS 562=........$155.00
SALMON'S INC. - DEADWOOD
10 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 638=........$153.00
TABLE TOP RANCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
15.........................................DLK DULLS 351=........$171.00
ED & MATT MILLER - FAITH
15 ................................FED & DLK STFS 368=........$202.00
6 ............................................FED STFS 295=........$209.00
RUTH & ISAACS - FAITH
17 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 604=........$155.25
YEARLINGS:
PETERSON RANCH - PHILIP
79...........................................DLK STFS 769=........$156.00
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
26 .......................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 919=........$133.50
BILL GOTTSLEBEN - PHILIP
10........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 871=........$135.00
BILL BURGAN - ROUND UP, MT
9.................................CHAF & DLK STFS 841=........$141.50
GARY HOWIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
10...........................................DLK STFS 843=........$140.50
BRAD & SHAWNA ROGHAIR - OKATON
17..................................DLK OPEN HFFS 863=........$129.00
PAT & GARY DEERING - STURGIS
22........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 810=........$138.50
LONNIE HALL - SPEARFISH
29........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 731=........$145.75
54........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 614=........$149.50
BRUCH RANCH - STURGIS
18..................................DLK OPEN HFFS 835=........$132.50
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 17, 24, 31, & NOV. 7.
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, October 13 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Oct. 15 ~
Prime Rib
Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
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B
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A
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le
a
t
L
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h
!
~ Tuesday, October 9 ~
Petite Ribeye
~ Wednesday, October 10 ~
Indian Taco or
Taco Salad
~ Thursday, October 11 ~
Beef Tip Basket
~ Friday Buffet, Oct. 12 ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Chicken ~ Shrimp
Bill and I met Bill’s aunt, Joyce
and Leo Douglass, Harrison, Ark.,
Thursday at the restaurant in the
College of the Ozarks. In this col-
lege, the young people work their
way through. Our waiter was a
young man from New Guinea who
was a student. He said you have to
have a good grade average and a fi-
nancial need to get admittance. His
two older brothers had graduated
from this same college. They raise
most everything that was served on
the menu. We went through their
tractor museum. More shows for
Bill and me in the afternoon and
evening.
Friday afternoon, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler packed up and
headed for Philip arriving at
Richard and Diana Stewart’s
home. The four of them went down-
town for supper and Ralph and
Cathy were overnight guests.
Friday morning, Tony Harty re-
ported it was cold in Kadoka. He
had coffee out then visited L.D. and
Shirley Hair before they went to
Rapid City. He visited Kathy
Brown and Dale Koehn later in the
day. Friday night, Kadoka lost
their football game with White
River.
Friends from Philip were at Don
and Vi Moody’s Sunday just want-
ing to check out the wildlife and
drive the creek trails before the
leaves all fall off. That's fun to do
on four-wheelers if the wind isn't so
cold. It also looked like a new
pipeline was flagged north of
Moody's mailbox and paperwork
was also finalized for easements to
get that across the highway in fine
order. Thanks to WR/L-J again for
their prompt action on these issues
of great importance.
Roxie Gittings returned to
Eagan, Minn., Saturday.
My cousin, Leah (Fairchild), and
her grandson, Tyler, came to Bran-
son Saturday and joined Bill and
me for supper where the enter-
tainer was Barbara Fairchild and
Roy Morris. Some of you may re-
member in 1972 Barbara and her
band played at Milesville Hall for
the Fairchild family reunion. We
were glad to renew our friendship
with them again and spend some
time with Leah and Tyler. It rained
some in Branson and was quite
chilly.
Saturday, October 6, Dr. Mary
Milroy, Yankton, was named the
2012 Spirit of Dakota award win-
ner. She and her husband, Dan,
and daughter, Laura, attended the
tea and the awards banquet. She
was totally surprised by the an-
nouncement and very grateful for
being selected for the award. Con-
gratulations to an outstanding
woman.
Tony Harty visited Shirley and
L.D. Hair Saturday and had coffee
out. He visited with Kathy Brown
in the afternoon.
Saturday morning, Richard
Stewart and Ralph Fiedler tackled
some things that Richard needed
Ralph’s help getting done. Diana
Stewart and Cathy Fiedler went
over to the nursing home to visit
their mom, Katy Drageset. They
cleaned out her closet and dresser
of summer things and got her win-
ter clothes all put away, then met
the guys at the bowling alley for
lunch. The guys finished up their
projects while the gals did some
shopping for Katy and then re-
turned to the nursing home to visit
a while longer before Ralph and
Cathy returned to Sturgis. Cathy
said they tried every trick in the
book to get rain to come. They put
away all their summer clothes and
tempted the weather. It did get
cooler and there was a heavy freeze
Friday night and some light snow,
and Wednesday the streets got wet
which is really news this year since
we haven’t seen much rain.
Sunday morning early, Bill and I
were on the road to Colt, Ark., ar-
riving mid-afternoon at the home of
Bill’s uncle, J.L. and Ernestine
Riley. I attended a baby shower
with Ernestine for their new great-
granddaughter and Bill and I at-
tended church with them that
evening and had supper out.
Tony Harty attended the church
dinner and services that followed
Sunday. Later in the day, he vis-
ited L.D. and Shirley Hair and en-
joyed a movie with them
This quote came from friends
and it seems worth repeating.
“Some people try to turn back their
odometer, not me! I want people to
know WHY I look this way. I’ve
traveled a long way and some of the
roads weren’t paved.”
Reporters interviewing a 104-
year-old woman asked: “And what
do you think is the best thing about
being 104?” She simply replied, “No
peer pressure.”
Betwixt
Places News
(continued from page 14)
Good sportsmanship occurs
when teammates, opponents,
coaches and officials treat each
other with respect. Kids learn the
basics of sportsmanship from the
adults in their lives, especially
their parents and their coaches.
Kids who see adults behaving in
a sportsmanlike way gradually
come to understand that the real
winners in sports are those who
know how to persevere and to be-
have with dignity – whether they
win or lose a game.
Parents can help their kids un-
derstand that good sportsmanship
includes both small gestures and
heroic efforts. It starts with some-
thing as simple as shaking hands
with opponents before a game and
includes acknowledging good plays
made by others and accepting bad
calls gracefully. Displaying good
sportsmanship is not always easy.
It can be tough to congratulate the
opposing team after losing a close
or important game. But the kids
who learn how to do it will benefit
in many ways.
Kids who bully or taunt others
on the playing field are not likely to
change their behavior when in the
classroom or in social situations. In
the same way, a child who prac-
tices good sportsmanship is likely
to carry the respect and apprecia-
tion of other people into every other
aspect of life.
Good sports are winners. Ask
first or second graders who won a
game, and they may answer, “I
think it was a tie.” It is likely the
question is not of any real interest
at that age. Kids may be more
eager to talk about the hits they got
or the catches they almost made.
But as they move into older and
more competitive leagues, kids be-
come more focused on winning.
They often forget to have fun.
Without constant reminders and
good examples, they may also for-
get what behavior is appropriate
before, during and after a sporting
event.
Kids who have coaches who care
only about being in first place and
say that anything goes as long as
they win, pick up the message that
it is okay to be ruthless on the field.
If parents constantly pressure
them to play better or second-guess
their every move, kids get the mes-
sage that they are only as good as
their last good play – and they will
try anything to make one.
Adults who emphasize good
sportsmanship, however, see win-
ning as just one of several goals
they would like their kids to
achieve. They help young athletes
take pride in their accomplish-
ments and in their improving
skills, so that the kids see them-
selves as winners, even if the score-
board does not show the numbers
going in their favor.
The best coaches and parents en-
courage their kids to play fair, to
have fun and to concentrate on
helping the team while polishing
their own skills.
Fostering good sportsmanship.
Remember the saying “Actions
speak louder than words?” That is
especially true when it comes to
teaching your kids the basics of
good sportsmanship. Your behavior
during practices and games will in-
fluence them more than any pep
talk or lecture you give them. Here
are some suggestions on how to
build sportsmanship in your kids:
•Unless you are coaching your
child’s team, you need to remember
that you are the parent. Shout
words of encouragement, not direc-
tions, from the sidelines (there is a
difference).
•If you are your kid's coach, don’t
expect too much out of your own
child. Don’t be harder on him or
her than on anyone else on the
team, but don’t play favorites ei-
ther.
•Keep your comments positive.
Do not bad-mouth coaches, players
or game officials. If you have a se-
rious concern about the way that
games or practices are being con-
ducted, or if you are upset about
other parents’ behavior, discuss it
privately with the coach or with a
league official.
•After a competition, it is impor-
tant not to dwell on who won or
lost. Instead, try asking, “How did
you feel you did during the game?”
If your child feels weak at a partic-
ular skill, like throwing or catch-
ing, offer to work on it together be-
fore the next game.
•Applaud good plays no matter
who makes them.
•Set a good example with your
courteous behavior toward the par-
ents of kids on the other team. Con-
gratulate them when their kids
win.
•Remember that it is your kids,
not you, who are playing. Don’t
push them into a sport because it is
what you enjoyed. As kids get
older, let them choose what sports
they want to play and decide the
level of commitment they want to
make.
•Keep your perspective. It is just
a game. Even if the team loses
every game of the season, it is un-
likely to ruin your child's life or
chances of success.
•Look for examples of good
sportsmanship in professional ath-
letes and point them out to your
kids. Talk about the bad examples,
too, and why they upset you.
•Finally, do not forget to have
fun. Even if your child isn’t the
star, enjoy the game while you are
thinking of all the benefits your
child is gaining – new skills, new
friends, and attitudes that can help
all through life.
Reviewed by Steve Sanders,
PhD.
What is good sportsmanship?

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