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Pioneer Review, November 8, 2012

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Haakon County
state’s attorney
Ralph (Chip) Kemnitz
Gay Tollefson
Haakon County sheriff
Fred Koester
William Morrison
Retain Supreme Court Justice
Glen A. Severson
Yes
No
Constitutional
Amendment M
Yes, will remove the
constitutional restrict-
ions on corporations
No, leave constitution
as is
Constitutional
Amendment N
Yes to eliminate fixed
travel reimbursement
rate for legislators
No, leave constitution
as is
Constitutional
Amendment O
Yes to changing distri-
bution from cement
plant trust fund
No, leave constitution
as is
Pioneer review
$
1
00
Includes Tax
A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 11
Volume 107
November 8, 2012
continued on page 2
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro ..........$8.59
Any Pro .............................$7.79
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.63
Milo........................................$6.71
Corn.......................................$6.86
Millet...................................$30.00
Sunflower Seeds................$22.00
Volleyball
districts
6
Halloween
9
FFA at
nationals
8
Fridge
Door
10
Due to the Veterans Day holiday,
we will have an EARLY DEADLINE
for the PROFIT
Thursday, November 8, at NOON
ERY COURAGEOUS PEOPLE
NTANGLED IN HOPE
HEY KEPT OUR FREEDOM
NDURED HARD CONDITIONS
ISKED THEIR LIVES
LWAYS RESPECT THEM
EVER DISRESPECT THEM
O VERY BRAVE
Carson Johnston
Nov. 2010
Ravellette Publications. Inc.
salutes our veterans on
Jeterans Dav. November 11
by Del Bartels
“We have volunteers planted
throughout the state. Things can
happen pretty quickly,” said Dan
Kuecker, Red Cross regional emer-
gency services director. Those vol-
unteers are trained to offer many
aspects of support at a moment’s
notice, even at 2:00 a.m., helping
people even as those people are still
watching their homes burn down.
Kuecker and Michele Lewis, re-
gional development coordinator,
visited the Philip High School stu-
dent council, Thursday, November
1, to give personal acknowledge-
ment of a donation made by the
school distict’s student body.
This year’s Homecoming theme
“Natural Disasters” had inspired a
contest between classes to collect
pennies, with the proceeds going to
the Red Cross, half to the Pierre
area Red Cross and half to the
Rapid City area Red Cross. The
total raised was $819.25.
Red Cross preparedness not only
includes making sure people have
the basics of enough food and
water, but clothing, medications,
motels, financial assistance, help
with necessary paperwork after a
personal disaster and someone to
just “be there.”
On the way to the school,
Kuecker and Lewis had dropped off
38 cases of bottled water to the
Philip Volunteer Fire Department.
Earlier that morning, they had
dropped off about the same amount
of water to the Kadoka fire depart-
ment.
Kuecker, Lewis and executive di-
rector Richard Smith are the only
paid staff in western South Dakota,
with the office based out of Rapid
City. All other help comes from vol-
unteers. “We are nothing without
our volunteers – deploying locally
and nationally,” said Lewis. Volun-
teers receive free training from the
Red Cross. Also, because of the
open distances in the state, nine
disaster trailers are stationed in
readiness for a disaster. One of
these stocked trailers is currently
in Kadoka – ready for anything,
but especially for the anticipated
needs of travelers stranded be-
cause of blizzards.
Kuecker said that one miscon-
ception is about funding. The Red
Cross receives no funding from the
federal or state governments, only
from donations. The national Red
Cross reports that 96 percent of all
donations go to disaster relief.
When given in western South
Dakota, unless designated for a
specific disaster such as Hurricane
Sandy, all donations will stay in
western South Dakota.
So far this year, the western
South Dakota Red Cross has pro-
vided over 600 days worth of people
being sheltered, mostly due to wild-
fires. Last year in this area, there
were 105 home fires. This area cov-
ers 19 counties, 38,000 square
miles, and 233,000 permanent res-
idents. It covers more people dur-
ing the tourist season. During the
Sturgis Rally, 300 gallons of free
water was distributed when
needed and non-emergency-room
first aid was provided.
To be a Red Cross disaster relief
volunteer, the person must be an
adult. Younger people, such as
Philip students, can participate in
public engagements and behind the
scenes activities such as preparing
of shelters, learning first aid and
other basic skills, and offering a
Red Cross presence in their com-
munity.
The Red Cross in western South
Dakota is looking for a volunteer
based out of the Philip area to be
trained and at the ready. Kuecker
said that he, Lewis and Smith are
in the Red Cross as second career.
They wanted more in life. And,
now, according to Kuecker,
“Thanks” is his real paycheck.
Red Cross thankful for penny wars
Representatives from the Red Cross visited the Philip High School student council, Thursday, November 1, to thank the
school for a donation of $409. The Homecoming theme “Natural Disasters” inspired a contest between classes to collect
pennies, with half the proceeds going to the Pierre Red Cross and half to the Rapid City Red Cross. The total raised was
$819.25. Photo by Del Bartels
Presidental electors
Obama and Biden
Goode and Clymer
Romney and Ryan
Johnson and Gray
U.S. Representative
Matt Varilek
Kristi Noem
Public Utilities
Commissioner
Matt McGovern
Kristie Fiegen
Russell Clarke
Public Utilities
Commission
Nick Nemec
Chris Nelson
State Senator
District 27
Jim Bradford
State Representative
District 27
Kevin Killer
Elizabeth May
Kathleen Ann
Constitutional
Amendment P
Yes to balanced budget
requirements in the
state consitution
No, leave constitution
as is
Initiated Measure 15
Yes for a 1% increase
in state sales tax for
education / Medicaid
No to the proposed law
Referred Law 14
Yes to a large project
development fund
No to the referred law
Referred Law 16
Yes, to enact the educa-
tion reform act
No to the referred law
Referendum 1
Yes means Midland’s
off-sale licenses will be
renewed
No, the license will not
be renewed
Referendum 2
Yes means Midland’s
on-sale license will be
renewed
No, the license will not
be renewed
General Election Results (unofficial)
The final installment features
three seniors who are working in
possible career fields.
Katelyn Enders is looking at cos-
metology for her future career.
Enders is working with Lois
Porch and Debbie Carley at One
Fine Day where she enjoys every
aspect of the job. “It has been very
good,” said Enders. She said some
of the things she has learned is
measuring out hair dye and how to
do manicures.
“I chose this place because I want
to got to school to do people’s hair
and nails,” said Enders. She said it
is fun to make other people feel
good about themselves with a new
look.
Enders said her experience with
Porch and Carley has been very
good. “Getting to come into an en-
vironment where people are always
happy and ready to show me some-
thing new,” is what Enders enjoys
the most about her Internship
placement.
Enders noted that each salon has
a different way of doing things and
that it is nice to experience those
ways so she knows more when she
gets ready to begin after college
graduation.
Krista Wells is learning a totally
different side to high school as she
is a teacher’s aide under the guid-
ance of history teacher, Kory Foss.
Wells admitted that Foss is one
of her favorite teachers, but she
chose the teacher’s aid job because
she wanted to interact with stu-
dents. “What I like most about this
job would have to be the debates
the classes have. I like to see how
the students answer questions,”
she said. And, how they behave,
she added.
Wells said the experience has
been pretty great so far. She is
learning to do a lot of things. Her
least favorite part of the job is read-
ing essays.
Foss is also PHS’s athletic direc-
tor so Wells also gets to help him
with that job. She said that is what
surprised her the most, at how dif-
ficult of a job the athletic director
position really is.
Brad Pfeifle is working in Laura
O’Connor’s English classroom this
year, quite a switch from the chiro-
practic clinic where he worked last
year.
Pfeifle said he chose to be O’Con-
nor’s teacher’s aide because he
wanted to learn more about teach-
ing. Pfeifle said the last few weeks
have really been fun. “I enjoy the
students the most. They have some
strange ideas,” he said.
Pfeifle has been part of Philip
High School’s one-act and spring
plays for the last few years. He said
he also likes helping out with the
drama aspect.
“Correcting is by far the most
boring,” part of Pfeifle’s duties he
said. He added that he has been
surprised by how much paper
teachers actually use.
Each student will gain more in-
sight as the year progresses as to
how each business operates and if
they want to pursue a career in
that field. The students can partic-
pate both their junior and senior
years if they want, and what better
way to find out if it’s the right path
for them.
Brad Pfeifle corrects papers for Laura
O’Connor as part of his Internship du-
ties. Courtesy photos
Katleyn Enders is working at One Fine
Day this year.
Krista Wells checks over uniforms for
Kory Foss, teacher and athletic director
for Philip High School.
PHS students gain career experiences
Part 1 of 3
by Del Bartels
The Philip City Council meeting,
Monday, November 5, was held be-
fore a standing room only audience.
In regular business, the council
approved the payment of the
month’s salaries and bills, which
totaled $218,067.30. Of that
amount, $145,037.41 is for airport
projects, which are expected to be
completed before the end of the
year. The airport farm ground will
be leased to the highest bidder,
Mike Noteboom, at $7,250 per year
for 2013 through 2017. The council
approved the lease agreement for
city office space in the courthouse
at $500 per month.
The council approved supple-
mental appropriations to pay
$4,900 in engineering fees incurred
for the evaluation of data and at-
tendance at public hearings related
to the Dakota Mill and Grain pro-
posed expansion.
The audience offered lengthy
input, including a signed petition,
specifying their concerns on the
Dakota Mill and Grain project and
the floodplain. The council then ap-
proved two plats, one for the south
side of the railroad and one for the
north side of the railroad. Mayor
Mike Vetter emphasized to the au-
dience that plats are just physical
descriptions of land. The council
also approved building permits for
the south side of the railroad
tracks. Building permits for the
north side, where flooding concerns
exist, were tabled until more inves-
tigation can be done. Permits for
construction on the north side of
the tracks would also have to be ap-
proved by the Canadian Pacific
Railroad, which currently owns the
land as well as the trestle that has
the audience worried about bottle-
necking flood waters. The Haakon
County Regional Railroad Author-
ity is still being created, but looks
like it will include two county com-
missioners, two city councilmen,
two representatives from Midland
and one representative at large.
Other approved building permits
include for Joyce Hart to remove
and replace a shed, for the Sacred
Heart Catholic Church to replace
sanitary sewer connection in the
street as long as the church pays
for all associated street repair, for
Keith Slovek to renew his deck per-
mit, and for Philip Custom Meats
to install a 10’x20’ freezer unit.
A building permit was denied for
Mike and Debbie Miller to install a
LP tank, line and furnace. The
proximity of the tank to structures
causes a safety concern and a code
violation. The city could possibly be
liable if an incident occurred and
the situation was against city code,
especially if the city was fully
aware of the violation before hand.
The point came up in discussion
City approves plats and some
permits for Dakota Mill project
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The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
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Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High of 59F.
Winds from the NE at 10 to 15 mph.
Thursday Night: Partly cloudy in
the evening, then overcast. Fog
overnight. Low of 32F with a windchill
as low as 23F. Winds from the ENE at 10 to
15 mph.
Friday: Overcast. Fog early.
High of 55F. Winds from
the East at 10 to 15
mph.
Friday Night: Overcast.
Fog overnight. Low of 23F.
Winds from the ESE at 5 to 20 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. High of 37F
with a windchill as low as 9F. Windy.
Winds from the WNW at 25 to 30
mph.
Saturday Night: Partly cloudy. Low
of 18F with a windchill as low as 3F.
Breezy. Winds from the NW at 15 to 25 mph.
Sunday: Clear. High of
32F with a windchill as
low as 7F. Winds from
the NNW at 10 to 15
mph.
Sunday Night: Clear. Low of 18F.
Winds less than 5 mph.
Get your complete &
up-to-the minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Monday: Partly cloudy. High of 45F.
Winds from the WSW at 5 to 15
mph shifting to the WNW in
the afternoon.
Monday Night: Clear. Fog
overnight. Low of 23F. Winds less
than 5 mph.
Make your opinion
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Email with phone
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Oh God, please no ... by Del Bartels
In full dress military uniform, three officers solemnly approach the
front door of a house. They pause, and, though practiced and rehearsed,
they collectively take a deep breath. One knocks with authority. An
older couple answers the door. In the next few minutes, the couple will
become far, far older. One of the officers confirms that the two are in-
deed the right people, and indeed the parents of the person they are
there about. They step completely inside. Then, in no uncertain terms
with no euphemisms or anything that can be taken unclearly, the mil-
itary personnel relate that the couple’s son is dead.
In a different town, a similar group of officers is simultaneously de-
livering the news to the deceased’s wife and children. The teams never
insinuate that they know what the survivors are going through, with
each individual case it would be a lie. Support, direction and informa-
tion ... and a presence ... is all they can offer. The teams do not rush to
leave. Often their quietly being there is a comfort while the full real-
ization sinks in. Pronouns are not used; the deceased is always referred
to by name. Informational packets, including phone numbers of people
to just talk to, are left. The packets will be forgotten for hours, even
days, then remembered with a seeming urgency. In the next few hours,
hopefully before the modern electronic social media gets in the way, the
newspapers and other serious media will be informed that a United
States military personnel is dead.
After the initial announcement, a Casualty Assistance Officer is the
main point of contact by survivors. In person when possible, and always
on-call by phone, the CAO is available to walk the next of kin through
the next stages: paperwork and death certificate, return of personal ef-
fects, return of the body, the funeral arrangements, the funeral itself.
The family will receive several personal letters from the president, the
secretaries of defense and the specific military branch, unit command-
ers, and others.
Then, painfully, life somehow goes on. Birthdays, anniversaries, the
day of death, are added to by days of remembrance such as Memorial
Day and Veterans Day. Grief and pride ... loneliness and recognition ...
knowing they are gone and still expecting a phone call or letter from
their military post. Veterans will nod in silence to the next of kin of a
fallen military person. All the medals and ribbons on the most highly
decorated chest are nothing to the simple gold star in the trembling
hand of a next of kin. All the fanfare, all the revelries, even “Hail to the
Chief” are all sound and fury to the sobering tune of “Taps.”
To some, Veterans Day may be just another day off from work or
school. To others, it is an exceedingly personal day that not only will
be remembered, but cannot ever be forgotten. In a military uniform, or
a three-piece suit, or jeans and a work shirt, people can honor the day
... and pray a military team never has to knock on their door.
Annual cattle drive through Philip
The fifth annual Oldenberg cattle drive went through the city limits of Philip, Saturday, October 27. Dan and John Oldenberg
and their crew drove the 250 head eight miles on Friday, 12 miles on Saturday, and finished the westward drive with 13
miles on Sunday. When the herd was not crossing fields and was near the blacktop of Highway 14, the county sheriff’s de-
partment and city police department slowed automobile traffic. The spring-time eastward trip to summer grazing pastures
is done by truck because of calves and other factors. Photo by Del Bartels
Donors can sign up for the up-
coming blood drive, sponsored by
National Mutual Benefit #85,
Tuesday, November 13, from 10:30
a.m. to 6:00 p.m., at the Bad River
Senior Citizen’s Center, Philip.
For an appointment, contact
Maureen Palecek at 859-2655,
United Blood Services at 342-8585
in Rapid City or 996-3688 in
Mitchell, or go online at
www.bloodhero.com. Volunteer
blood donors must be at least 16
years old, weigh at least 110
pounds and be in good health. Ad-
ditional height and weight require-
ments apply to donors 22 and
younger, and donors who are 16, or
17 in certain areas, must have
signed permission from a parent or
guardian.
Donors should bring a photo
identification and donor card when
they donate. First time donors re-
ceive a donor card with their blood
type in the mail shortly after their
first donation. All blood donors will
receive a free cholesterol test.
Blood drive November 13
Coyote calling contest
The Bad River Sportsman’s Club
held its annual West River coyote
calling contest, Saturday, October
27.
There were 23 two-person teams
entered, with 20 returning with a
total of 90 coyotes. The first place
team of Jeff Nelson, Philip, and
Jake Nelson, Creighton, brought in
11 coyotes.
The second place team of Calvin
Ferguson, Kyle, and Darrell
Hunter, Kyle, brought in nine coy-
otes. The third place team of Tan-
ner Lolley, White River, and Matt
Glynn, Belvidere, brought in eight
coyotes.
Three teams each brought in
seven coyotes. Those team were Joe
Reddest and Cornell Reddest, Kyle,
Rod Kirk, Tuthill, and Jared
Schofield, Okaton, and Bryce Van-
derMay, Long Valley, and Chad
Cerney, Wall.
Winners of the big dog contest
were Lonnie Lesmeister, Dupree,
and Dakota Longbrake, Dupree,
who got a coyote weighting 40.5
pounds. This dog outweighed the
next heaviest one by four and one
half pounds.
The little dog contest was a tie.
The team of Jace Shearer, Wall,
and his partner Neal Muscat, Sun-
dance, Wyo., and the team of J.
Reddest and C. Reddest each
brought in a coyote weighing 16
pounds.
Dear Editor,
Thank you for printing my last
letter to the editor with comments
concerning my experiences in
cross-country. As Paul Harvey
would have said, “Now for the rest
of the story.”
During the first three years
when I went to the state cross
country meet, my teammates and
I entered a pact that we would do
our level best to stay together so
that if someone tried to go ahead of
us he would have to go around all
of us. We also knew that we needed
to get off to a fast start and stay
out in front. Those two maneuvers
of staying together and getting off
to a good start may have been lead-
ing factors in us finishing first
place as a team.
During my senior year things
went differently. I sort of “kicked
myself to the moon” later for not
having had things figured out. I
was lead guy of our team. The
coach “spooked” me when he said,
“Now those guys that start out ‘like
a bat out of hell' aren’t going to fin-
ish so pace yourselves!”
Well, it just so happened that
some of them did. We didn’t stay
out in front and as we came to that
first flag there was a “traffic jam.”
We were caught in the middle of
that stampede! It cut our pace to a
near walk and really lengthened
the distance between us and those
in the lead.
We did have an opportunity to do
some damage control and shorten
the gap between us and those in
the lead when they headed for a
wrong flag. Having run the course
three previous years I made a bee
line for the right flag. Officials fi-
nally got the attention of the lead
group and they veered back on
course. But our efforts were too lit-
tle too late! We didn’t gain enough
to catch up with them. So we lost
our championship title that we had
held for three consecutive years. In
fact, as a team we came in third
place.
I don’t remember that any of us
placed in one of the first 10 places.
We went home somewhat deflated
and disappointed. The Rapid City
sports writers had to “write off”
Loren Kiel as a four time letterman
and cross country champ!
/s/Loren Kiel
Quinn, S.D.
Letter to the Editor
that suppliers may not fill tanks
that are not placed within national,
state and local codes.
The council has determined that
fees will be charged for the special
meeting on October 26 insisted
upon by Dale Morrison for approval
on a building permit. Fees are $50
per council member, $85 for the
mayor, the hourly rate of $16.61 for
administration fees, and $77.33 for
legal publications.
Morrison has also requested that
West Central Electric Association
install a light on an existing street
light circuit pole, on his property at
408 N. Larimer Avenue. As far as
the city is concerned, the installa-
tion of lighting and monthly bills
for the lighting are up to the
landowner. “I think it’s the city’s
responsibility to light the streets,
not someone’s building, or back-
yard or other things,” said Vetter.
A 4.4 percent increase from
Delta Dental insurance for 2013 for
city employees was approved.
The Haakon County Historical
Society has requested that the city
include a future small park under
the city’s insurance. The council
will consider it once plans for the
park are more formalized.
The council has granted a re-
quest from Grossenburg Imple-
ment for the business to host a
wine tasting event Tuesday, No-
vember 20.
The South Dakota Department
of Legislative Audit has approved
the city’s audit report for 2011.
Amongst a good report, the only
“ding” according to Van Lint was
the consistant lack of enough paid
personnel to be up to the audit’s
recommendation of internal checks
and balances.
City sales taxes for October 2012
were $28,675.80, compared to
$44,341.30 for October of last year.
This year’s total through October is
$348,341.65, compared to last
year’s total through October of
$330,195.81.
The Philip Police Department
has been awarded a bulletproof
vest grant from the Bureau of Jus-
tice Assistance.
The city will take advantage of a
free tractor lease with Grossenburg
Implement. As long as the machine
is used under 200 hours and the
city provides adequate insurance
on it, then the use of the tractor is
free to the city. The council also au-
thorized purchasing from the State
of South Dakota a surplus tandem
axle truck with plow; contingent
that the purchase price is within
the current budget of $25,000.
The water department is experi-
encing an 11.32 percentage water
loss. It will be watched and certain
suspected leaks will be routinely
investigated.
The council authorized Public
Works Director Matt Reckling’s at-
tendance at the 2012 safety loss
training in Pierre in mid-Novem-
ber. The council also approved
Deputy Finance Officer Brittany
Smith’s attendance at the 2012
election school in Rapid City in
early December. The rubble site
hours have changed to its winter
months schedule, which is for resi-
dents to call and make an appoint-
ment for during a working day.
The city offices will be closed No-
vember 12, 22 and 23 in observance
of the legal holidays.
The next regular council meeting
will be Monday, December 3, at
7:00 p.m. in the Haakon County
Courthouse community room.
City – Dakota Mill plats/permits
continued from page 1
Just when we were getting the
hang of this thing called “retire-
ment,” Bill has gotten homesick, so
greetings from Wyoming Sunday
night and Kadoka by Monday.
Where has the time disappeared
to? It was sure a lot warmer, a lot
farther south.
Sandee, Jessice, Natalie and
Kohen Gittings went to Iowa last
Sunday. They drove in fog all the
way to Chamberlain. Natalie and
Kohen went to her folks’ home near
Perry to spend a week or so.
Sandee and Jessica spent the night
at the home of Donna White, re-
turning home Monday evening.
It was a lazy day in Yuma, Ariz.,
for Bill and I Monday. We went
into Yuma and explored the down-
town area. It is struggling to re-
build and fill vacant buildings like
so many downtown areas are. I vis-
ited cousin Marilyn (Larson)
Meizer in the afternoon and en-
joyed some of the items she has
from when her mother, Evalyn
(Sherwood) Larson, was a teacher.
That evening, Bill and I had supper
with Marilyn and her friend, June.
Don and Vi Moody had a busy
week getting some business mat-
ters and meetings over in Rapid
Valley. The bike path, Rail To
Trails, controversy has been one
topic that isn't very popular with Vi
since their Rapid Valley property
has the old railroad line running to
the north of it. This is going to get
interesting before this gets settled
that's for sure.
After Tony Harty picked up his
mail Monday, he stopped to see
how L.D. and Shirley Hair were
getting along for making their trip
to Hot Springs where L.D. will be
working on road construction. The
trailer was all packed and they
pulled out yet that morning. Good
thing Hot Springs is only 150 miles
away, because they needed to come
back to Kadoka to get things they
thought they forgot, only to dis-
cover most of it in the trailer.
Tuesday, Tony Harty had coffee
out, then visited with Pastor Art
and Doris Weischart as they were
getting the rest of their things out
of the parsonage and making the
move to Hot Springs. Tony took a
table he will be delivering to Pierre
for their son, Jonathan, one of
these days.
Bill and I got itchy feet and Tues-
day morning pulled out of the home
of newly-found friend, Kittie Van-
derway's, headed to Mesa, Ariz.
Friend Gib Hanna met us at the
gate of the retirement complex he
is settled in to and had a space all
arranged for us. We got settled in
and Gib and wife Delma fixed us a
nice lunch and we got in a visit.
Then it was off to see Cousin Mar-
ilyn and Ronald Parrish and her
mom, Audrey Buswell. Ronald
slow-cooked their specialty, pork
ribs, and sent us home with a
smoked pork butt for our travels.
Good food, lots of visiting and
catching up. (This would be Aunt
Edna Buswell's granddaughter and
daughter-in-law.) We found our
way home from Glendale to the
Sun Life retirement community
and our motorhome, quite an ac-
complishment in the dark!
Cathy Fiedler reported that
Sturgis had a nice week of mild
weather. Wednesday was Hal-
loween and was the nicest day with
temperature reaching 72˚. Sunday
it sprinkled rain, enough to get the
streets wet.
Wednesday after coffee out, Tony
Harty visited with his great-niece,
Katie Hicks, at her day care. Hal-
loween turned out to be a nice
night and Tony had 22 trick or
treaters come by.
Bill and I went to Apache Junc-
tion Wednesday and visited friend
Joyce Houle. We went out for
lunch. Joyce had just gotten home
from the hospital, but was feeling
good enough for company. Then it
was off to Phoenix to find Bill's
nephew, Tony and Patty Riley,
where we had a wonderful visit.
From there, we went back to
Cousin Marilyn Parrish's house.
We treated her to a couple of pic-
tures from the Midland community
that was a picture of her Grandma
Edna Buswell about age three, her
great-grandma, Fleeta May Sher-
wood, and her great, great-
grandma, Mary and George Sher-
wood and Uncle Gilbert Blackman,
(brother to Mary) in front of the
house north of Midland. She was
delighted. Marilyn has a tapestry
painting that was done by Fleeta's
aunt, Frankie Little Dolson, in
1891, which is awesome and still
looks wonderful. We felt pretty
good, found our home again in the
dark! A call from grandson Zack
Seager, his birthday was Hal-
loween and he was enjoying the
night of trick or treaters in Rapid
City. Shelley Seager and Bonnie
Moses made the trip from the Sut-
ton, Neb., area to spend the week-
end with Zack. Shelley enjoyed
spoiling little grandson Ryder. Sat-
urday, Shelley and Ryder went to
Philip to visit.
(continued next week)
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
Annie Brunskill was elected
president of the South Dakota Li-
brary Association in 2010. Typi-
cally, a person serves one year as
vice president/president elect in
order to learn the ropes and assist
the president. They then serve one
year as president whose main re-
sponsibility is running the execu-
tive board of SDLA and planning
the association’s annual confer-
ence. They serve one year as past
president, continuing to serve on
the board, managing membership
issues and advising the president.
One month after Brunskill be-
came vice president, the president
resigned due to health reasons,
which pushed Annie into an almost
two-year term as president.
With practically no prior experi-
ence in the office, Annie stepped in
and performed beautifully, said
Jan Brue Enright, the current
SDLA president. Enright works at
the Mikkelsen Library, Augustana
College, Sioux Falls.
Enright said that Brunskill kept
the association going during the
transition. She planned a success-
ful conference in Spearfish in 2011,
and then immediately began her
‘real’ term as president and served
as president for another full year.
“We have just returned from our
annual conference in Huron, which
was again well-attended, well-
planned and a financial success for
SDLA,” said Enright.
In addition, Brunskill oversaw a
strategic planning process for
SDLA, which hadn’t been done for
several years. She planned and
hosted two Legislative Days in
Pierre for SDLA members and
elected officials, and attended Na-
tional Library Legislative Day in
Washington, D.C., last April.
“You must understand that
being the president of SDLA is a
volunteer position,” said Enright.
“In addition to all this, Annie con-
tinued to run the Haakon County
Public Library as its sole (full time)
librarian. Besides being highly ed-
ucated and astute, she has a huge
heart for all of her library patrons,
from the toddlers to the senior citi-
zens who use the tiny library in
Philip. Annie inspires me con-
stantly as a servant leader who
works continually to improve li-
brary services for her community.
You are so lucky to have her.”
Brunskill completes term for SDLA
Annie Brunskill,
director of the
Haakon County
Public Library,
completed two
years as the presi-
dent of the South
Dakota Library As-
socition. Shown is
Brunskill, right,
presenting a gift
to the incoming
president, Jan
Brue Enright.
Courtesy photo
Crop Variety Trial Results
Many farmers look forward
each year for the various SDSU
crop variety trial results. The win-
ter wheat trial results are always
the first completed and published
in August to help producers make
variety decisions. Spring wheat,
oats, alfalfa (if applicable), corn,
soybeans, sunflowers and flax fol-
low as the plots are harvested and
the data compiled.
Trial results for 2012, and sev-
eral years back can be found on
iGrow at: http://igrow.org/agron-
omy/profit-tips/variety-trial-re-
sults/. The documents generally in-
clude an explanation of test proce-
dures, current and multiyear aver-
age of yields, and test weight of
each entry. Depending on the crop,
additional information is provided,
potentially including relative ma-
turity or maturity, lodging rating,
stand count, seed traits, origin,
grain color, disease resistance,
plant variety protection status,
height, protein content, area of
adaptation, top yield group per-
centage, oil content and composi-
tion, weather data, herbicide re-
sistance, harvest moisture, seed
size, and highlights of the trials by
the researchers.
Dormant Seeding
Spring Wheat
Dwayne Beck, Manager of the
Dakota Lakes Research Farm re-
cently wrote an article for iGrow
Wheat: http://igrow.org/agronomy/
wheat/ on dormant seeding spring
wheat; which will soon be on the
website in its entirety, and provide
more detail. Dormant seeding is
planting a crop long before soil
temperatures and/or moisture con-
ditions allow the seed to germinate
and grow, i.e. in early winter, for
growth the following spring. This
technique is commonly used for
plants like native grasses and
forbs. It is less common with grain
crops.
The reason for considering dor-
mant seeding is to assure early
seeding of cool-season crops like
spring wheat where it is important
to avoid hot weather that occurs
when they are planted too late in
the spring. It also helps to spread
workload. Dormant seeding spring
wheat may provide an alternative
for growers with large acreages of
winter wheat that were not
planted in the fall because of dry
soil conditions.
Dormant seeding spring wheat
is not a substitute for planting
winter wheat at the proper time
when conditions are suitable. It is
a viable alternative to a traditional
spring wheat seeding program and
as a means to keep wheat in the
rotation when dry weather pre-
cludes winter wheat seeding in the
fall.
Research at the Dakota Lakes
Research Farm has produced the
highest yields with winter wheat
planted at the recommended time,
followed by dormant seeded spring
wheat, then spring wheat planted
in early spring, closely followed by
dormant planted winter wheat.
Dormant seeded wheat should
always be done with spring wheat,
not winter wheat. Winter wheat
will most likely vernalize and pro-
duce heads the next summer when
dormant seeded, but research at
Dakota Lakes indicates that dor-
mant seeded winter wheat heads
and matures later than spring
wheat seeded the same day and
the winter wheat yields are less.
Dormant seeding should not be
considered in situations where
residue and soil conditions will re-
sult in increased wind erosion po-
tential, which has already oc-
curred with winter wheat planting
this fall. Crop insurance may be
questionable. The best recommen-
dation is to check with your agent.
Calendar
11/27-28: Ag Horizons Confer-
ence, Pierre
12/11: Soil Health Info Day-
Davison County Extension Com-
plex, Mitchell
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Rural Living
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
It's always best to stay on the legal side of
things. Use your checking account and
debit card for ALL transactions and you'll
always have proof positive of bills paid.
We will be closed
Monday, November 12th
in observance of Veterans Day.
W
W
W
.
G
R
O
S
S
E
N
B
U
R
G
.
C
O
M
Tillage
Season Ending Closeout Units
JD 2700, C-Spring Blade Mt, Nice Shape ...............
......................................... #38250 (BF) $19,750
IHC 350 Disk, 17ft, 3 Section of Old .......................
............................................. #22548 (H) $1,950
WINNER (W)
Special of the Month
BLOOMFIELD (BF)
Special of the Month
HARTINGTON (H)
Special of the Month
LAUREL (L)
Special of the Month
WAYNE (WA)
Special of the Month
PHILIP (P)
Special of the Month
PIERRE (PR)
Special of the Month
2000 John Deere 8110 ....
S#10028 $69,000
(2) John Deere 8100 .......
(1) 2WD $48,500
MFWD $75,000
Tractors: Row Crop
JD 9770 &
9770 STS
12 TO CHOOSE FROM
AS LOW AS
$199,000
Combines
(7) 2010 JD 9670 Corn/Bean 2WD Hydrostatic ...........
.................................................AS LOW AS $189,000
(4) John Deere 9760 ..............AS LOW AS $130,000
(4) John Deere 9660
Corn/Bean, 2WD,
Hydrostatic, AS LOW AS
$115,000
Prices Reduced On Select Models!
See details on web site.
‘96 Case
5250
7495 hours, MFD,
Good Tires, Has
510 Loader w/
Grapple, 112 PTO
HP, SN#9388
$
30,000
‘08 Harvest
International
13x82 Auger
Stk#32487
$11,000
2004 John Deere 1293 Cornhead
Stk#32396 Hydraulic deck plates, Contour shafts,
Sensing ...................................................... $27,500
John Deere
1790
16/31
Planter
SN#26220
$
45,000
2001 John
Deere 567
Baler
Stock#7965
$
15,000
Case IH
95
676 Hours, 2
Hydraulics, Tires
90% Stock#9670
$
31,500
Sprayers
1994 Wilmar
765, 60ft booms,
3636 hrs
(P)
$29,900
Tractors: Articulated 4WD
2006 New Holland TV145 Cab, Singles, 3 Pt Hitch,
PTO,2,288 hrs ........................... S#9966 (P) $84,500
Cab, Powershift, Duals,
359 hrs, S# 10113 (W)
........... $245,000
2011 John
Deere 9430
Cab, Collarshift, Duals, 3pt,
6,530 hrs S# 10152 (P)
............. $75,000
1997 New
Holland 9682
John Deere 4030 Cab, 2WD, Collarshift, Loader
557 hrs .......................................... S# 9713 (P) $24,000
1982 John Deere 4840 2wd, P-Shift, 3 SCVs, 1000 PTO,
8822 hrs ..................................... S#38060 (W) $25,000
(1) John Deere 7730’s MFWD 80k ...............$92,000
John Deere 7800 MFWD, ................S#8581 $50,000
2004 JD 7820 MFWD, 4170 Hrs, JD 746 Loader S#10350
(W) .................................................................. $129,500
2005 CIH MX 285 ...........................S#9938 $115,000
(3) JD 637
Disks
As Low As
$59,000
Air Drills
(3) JD 1860, tow
betweens
As Low As
$60,000
(1) JD 1820 53ft , 1900 270 Bu #8707..............(Ph) $55,000
(6) JD 1890 towbetweens.......................As LowAs $82,000
(1) Flexi Coil 5000 (2) towbetween (1) towbehind.... #9677As
Lowas .........................................................................$75,500
(1) 2000 Flexi Coil 7500, towbetween, #9844........................
......................................................................... (P-SD) $30,000
(3) JD 4930s 90 Booms, hours as lowas 896..........................
...................................................................as lowas $185,000
(2) Summers 1500 90’ Booms ............. ...as lowas $18,000
Flexi-Coil 67XL 90’ Booms, 1500 gal ...S#9753 (P) $13,000
(1) 2006 JD 4920 Self Propelled, 1677 hrs (W-N) $154,000
(1) Summers Super Sprayers, Pull Type..... choice (W-SD) $2,500
2007 JD 4930 Self-Prof Sprayer, #9536, PH, 1587 Hrs .......
.............................................................................. $185,000
2008 JD 9770S Combine, #9465, W, 1314 Hrs $200,000
2004 MacDon 963 Header, #9277, PH ................$20,000
2007 JD 7730 Tractor, #9068, PH, 5793 Hrs .......$80,000
2001 JD 1860 Air Drill, #9062, PR ........................$60,000
2004 JD 1890/1910 Air Drill, #9060/9061, PR .... $81,000
2003 Summers 1500 Sprayer, #8916, P.............. $18,000
2007 JD 1890 Air Drill, #8443, W .........................$90,000
2002 JD 1890 Air Drill, #8111, W ..........................$75,000
2009 JD 635D Draper Header, #7702, P ..............$39,900
2009 JD 635D Draper Header, #7697, W .............$39,900
1998 JD 1900 Air Drill, #7194, P ...........................$65,000
1997 MacDon 960-36 Header, #9383, P ............. $13,000
2011 Meridian GM4000 Bin, #9335, P ................ $14,500
2005 Case RBX562 Baler, #9192, W .................... $13,000
2009 Shelbourne CVS32 Header, #8626, W .......$33,000
2004 MacDon 963 Header, #8714, P ...................$25,000
2000 JD 1560 Air Drill, #8698, PH ........................$38,000
Feterl 13X82 Auger, #8665, W................................ $3,000
2009 JD 1890 Air Drill, #7495, W ..........................$80,000
2001 JD 567 Baler, #7965, W ................................$11,000
2007 JD 568 Baler, #7177, PH ..............................$25,000
2008 Frontier MJ4081 Bale Spear, #7348, PH ......... $500
Frontier 1340 Pallet Fork, #7156, W........................$1,200
Frontier 1301 Bale Spear, #6903, PH ......................... $500
2000
Case IH
Baler
Stock#22616
$4950.00
John
Deere
568 Baler
Stk# 26524
$27,950
Winner, SD
Toll Free: (800) 658-3440
Pierre, SD
Toll Free: (800) 742-8110
Philip, SD
Toll Free:
(800) 416-7839
Bloomfield, NE
Toll Free: (800) 658-3252
Hartington, NE
Toll Free:(800) 624-7826
Laurel, NE
Toll Free: (800) 365-6257
Wayne, NE
Toll Free: (800) 343-3309
Call Local Store M-F 7:30am-5:30pm;
Sat 7:30am- Call for local store
closing hours.
-Pour-ons
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of winicr
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caps, coais,
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Notice
The Rural Utilities Service has made a Finding of No
Significant Impact with respect to the proposal by West
Central Electric Cooperative, Inc to construction Twenty-
six and a half (26.5) miles of three phase, overhead 115
kV Transmission line facilities in order to provide service
to TransCanada Corporation for the proposed Keystone
XL pipeline, specifically to serve Keystone XL Pump
Station #18. For additional information, refer to our no-
tice in the legal notice section of this newspaper.
by Senator John Thune
Battles fought in wars around
the world, both past and present,
have been depicted for many Amer-
icans through the lens of a camera.
Behind the triumphs and the
sadness of the photographs, are the
men and women who have so
valiantly honored the call to duty
in defense of freedom. These men
and women, some of whom made
the ultimate sacrifice, have pro-
tected our nation from foreign and
domestic threats, and fought in the
name of liberty all over the world.
This September, I had the great
opportunity to help welcome home
the 842nd Engineer Company of
the South Dakota National Guard.
The 160 men and women of the
Spearfish, Belle Fourche and Stur-
gis based unit represent some of
the best that both South Dakota
and our nation have to offer. These
servicemen and women, like so
many before them, honored the call
to duty and selflessly put the wel-
fare of our nation before their own
personal needs.
This Veterans Day we pause to
thank and pay tribute to the veter-
ans and active members of the mil-
itary who have risked life and limb
protecting our freedoms. South
Dakota veterans, young and old,
connect us to the past and present
struggles for freedom and peace.
Their honor, duty, and patriotism
make us proud to call them family,
friends, and neighbors, and we
honor the memory of those who
have fallen, keeping all who serve
in our prayers.
While we honor our veterans sac-
rifice, we are also aware of the con-
tinued struggles for many of the
men and women in the military
who have returned home from
tours of duty. As the son of a World
War II veteran, I believe we have
an important responsibility to care
for our veterans who have sacri-
ficed so much for our freedom. I am
a strong supporter of programs
that benefit our veterans and be-
lieve more can be done in terms of
enacting pro-growth policies to ad-
dress the needs that veterans have
during this exceptionally difficult
period of slow economic growth. I
will continue to work across the
aisle to come up with viable solu-
tions to stimulate growth, boost job
creation in the private sector, and
assist those who have given so
much to their country.
I invite all South Dakotans to
join me in honoring the sacrifice of
our veterans and to keep the brave
members of our military and their
families in our thoughts and
prayers as they continue to serve
on our behalf.
Honoring
defenders
of liberty
A reminder of the harvest festi-
val this Sunday night at the Hard-
ingrove Church. Potluck supper at
5:30 with a special program to fol-
low. Everyone is welcome.
Connie Parsons hosted a party
Tuesday afternoon with the follow-
ing ladies in attendance, Karen
Carley, Joan Patton, Sandra Par-
sons, Joan Hamill, Gayla Piroutek,
Marcia Eymer and Janice Parsons.
Three tables were set up and teams
chosen to put together three jigsaw
puzzles. Lunch and visiting fol-
lowed the very enjoyable afternoon.
Tuesday night, Donna and Tina
Staben were hosts for the
Milesville Community Club. Final
plans were made and a date was
set to decorate the tree at the
courthouse in Philip. Tina had a
word game with Gayla as the win-
ner. We welcomed Ann Harty as a
new member. Attending were
Gayla Piroutek, Marcia Eymer,
Joan Hamill, Ann Harty and Jan-
ice Parsons.
Guests on Sunday at Chad and
Kathy Hanrahan's were Kathy's
parents, Don and Carol Petersen,
and some friends, all of Gregory.
Sonny Stangle is staying for a
while in Ft. Pierre at the home of
his daughter, Juanita.
Mark Radway accompanied
Doug Thorson and Cassidy Schn-
abel to Aberdeen to see a college
football game Saturday.
Erin Hovland, Connor and
Mackenzie, visited Erin's mother,
Debbie Prouty, Saturday while
Miles was at the cattle sale. That
evening, Miles and Erin enjoyed
supper out with John and Anna
Schreurs.
Tuesday evening, Marg Heard,
Melanie and Anthony, visited
briefly at Leo and Joan Pattons'.
Marg wanted to show her daugher,
Melanie, a working ranch.
Weekend visitors at Gene and
Theresa Deuchar's were Jenna
Finn and boys of Midland Satur-
day. Visiting on Sunday were Zeb
and Megan Hoffman and family of
rural Wall.
Several from the Milesville area
were in Philip Saturday afternoon
for the 80th birthday celebration
for Mary Slovek. Mary (Parsons)
grew up in Milesville and now lives
in New Underwood.
Hugh and Ann Harty spent the
weekend in Hermosa. Joining them
for supper in Rapid City Saturday
night were Jim, Adele, Molly and
Owen Harty. Sunday, Ann helped
serve a turkey dinner in Hermosa
sponsored by the Eastern Star.
Also there to spend time with Hugh
and Ann were Paul, Moneik and
Mikaela Stephens, Black Hawk.
Dan and Gayla Piroutek met
Greg and Marie Arendt, Valentine,
Neb., in Midland last Sunday for
St. William Catholic Church’s
turkey dinner. It was a good chance
to visit with many friends and
neighbors. Greg used to live in the
Milesville area when he worked for
Philip Livestock Auction. Greg now
works for Valentine Livestock Auc-
tion.
Phyllis and Rod Hinman have
sold their home in Scottsbluff,
Neb., and have moved to the Pine-
hurst area in North Carolina. They
are now closer to Rod's son and his
family. Phyllis is a sister to Dan
Piroutek, she grew up in Milesville,
and taught school for a short time
in the Ottumwa area.
Kara Parsons was in Spearfish
Saturday for a wedding. Her
cousin's daughter, Lana Ireland,
and Levi Dacar were married.
Karen Carley visited her par-
ents, Frank and Mildred O'Grady,
in the New Underwood nursing
home Thursday.
Friday evening, friends and fam-
ily helped Joe Carley celebrate his
40th birthday with supper at The
Steakhouse.
The Carley's had a big cattle
drive Sunday when they moved
cows from the Joe Carley's to Phil's
place. Nineteen riders helped move
the cattle 26 miles. The weather
was good which helped a lot.
Karen Carley's cousins, Betty
Ward and Tenell Johnson, Osseo,
Wis., helped with the drive Sunday
and will be at Phil and Karen's
throughout the week. Deer hunting
season starts this weekend and
they will be hunting.
A week ago Monday, Bill and
Karyl Sandal drove to Sioux Falls.
Karyl stayed there to watch grand-
son Trevor Naasz play football and
Bill went to Canistota to see grand-
sons Ridge and Gabel Sandal play
their game. They both lost their
games in the playoffs. Because of
the difference in times of the
games, Bill was able to see most of
both games. They returned home
Tuesday.
Last Sunday, Bill and Karyl San-
dal went to Rapid City to see their
great-grandson, Gage Ravellette,
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
continued on page 7
Hit & Miss
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Nov. 8: Swedish
Meatballs, Au Gratin Potatoes,
Key West Veggies, Roll, Pineapple.
Friday, Nov. 9: Dilled Salmon,
Wild Rice Pilaf, Garden Veggies,
Roll, Pear Lime Gelatin.
Monday, Nov. 12: Honey Fried
Chicken, Scalloped Potatoes, Peas,
Biscuit, Apricot Halves.
Tuesday., Nov. 13: Pork Loin,
Butternut Squash, Roasted Nan-
tucket Veggies, Roll, Peach Polka
Dot Gelatin.
Wednesday, Nov. 14: Roast
Beef, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy,
Corn, Roll, Assorted Pies.
***
Saturday, October 27, at Somer-
set Court, we had exercises in the
morning with mystery Somerset
Court bucks. Then, there was a lit-
tle time before lunch so we got up
a table of whist and Addie, Mary
Lou and I played bananagrams.
In the afternoon, we had quilting
with Sandy. Sandy laid out the
blocks and Annetta and I sewed.
Sandy ironed. Irene Cox and Mary
Lou cut out blocks. Fred and
Charley came in to visit and we got
their photos with some of the color-
ful blankets that we have made.
Sandy served ice water and cook-
ies. Pat Staley dropped in to see
what was going on. Father Dahms
had a mending project, but we did-
n’t have the ability to patch the
covering for his motorized vehicle.
During quilting time, there was
some whist and rummi-cube
played.
Thank you granddaughter Emily
Hansen, Lincoln, Neb., who sent a
pretty card.
Rapid City library’s homebound
program brought me two books of
nursery rhymes with piano music.
There are some of the less familiar
nursery rhymes like “Green Grow
the Rushes O!,” “Frog Went A-
Courting,” and “Greensleeves.”
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and the letters we drew called for
some unknown words. Well, Mig
knew codex, an ancient manu-
script. And we needed pogy, a ma-
rine fish. (I thought all fish were
marine.)
M.R. took me along over to their
new place at 1958 Woodbridge
Drive. They have a wonderful view
of Rapid City. Their son, Clayton
Hansen, was there and Wayne and
Gwynn Hansen were also there.
We had a big supper and some ten-
der roast beef. It had been a long
time since I had roast beef that I
could chew. Gwynn brought a big
pumpkin pie made by a Knollwood
church lady for their bazaar. Bar-
bara had a cut up avocado, espe-
cially for me. Thank you, Barbara.
She also gave me a cute left-
handed Halloween teapot. Thank
you Barbie. Clayton Hansen
brought me back to Somerset
Court. Thank you, Clayton.
Sunday, October 28, we had
church with Rev. and Mrs.
Richardson. Jack Humke played
appropriate church songs. Thank
you all. We liked hearing about
Rev. Richardson’s grandson, who is
now about two and a half or three
years old. He likes to go to the store
and would like grandpa and
grandma to buy him everything.
He also likes to hide among the
clothing displays.
A few people played whist, Irene
C., Irene A., Mary Lou, Floy and
Ina.
Vivian had visitors, old friend
Phyllis Doughty Reub and her son,
Larry Reub. Phyllis is a sister of
my sister-in-law, Gertrude. You
may have read my account of
Gertrude’s funeral a week or so
ago. Phyllis brought me several
photos. One was of my niece,
Wanda, and nephew, Leonard. One
was in my front porch in my Philip
house, showing the walls where we
marked how tall each grandchild,
great-grandchild and neighbor kids
were. Thank you for the photos and
thank you for your visit, Phyllis
and Larry. Phyllis lives at Echo
Ridge. We had a good visit about
old times when we were kids to-
gether. It was probably six or seven
miles to Doughty’s from Palmer’s,
sort of out across the prairie.
After Phyllis left, I went up to
Lucille (Doughty) Huether’s on
third floor. Lucille is a sister of
Phyllis Reub. Lucille had just fin-
ished a very colorful jigsaw puzzle
of hot air balloons. I took her photo
with her puzzle. Phyllis had
brought Lucille a wonderful, big,
variegated chrysanthemum, which
had been a gift at Gertrude’s fu-
neral.
My daughter, Carol, sent an
email and it wouldn’t come in, so I
phoned her. She was entertaining
several grandkids and great-grand-
kids. They were decorating pump-
kins to represent nursery rhyme
characters. It sounded like they
were having fun. Halloween and
pumpkins go together like hand
and glove.
Monday, we had crafts with
Amy. Sandy was there to help and
we made bats out of a black sort of
felt cardboard. We drew around out
hands and these shapes were the
bat wings. They had moving eyes
and vampire teeth. Thank you for
this fun activity. Marj, Floy, Addie,
Jeannie, Eileen, Mary Lou and Vi-
vian made bats.
Monday afternoon at Somerset
Court we had pumpkin carving.
The pumpkins were big, some
about 12 pounds. Sandy was there
to do the main part of cleaning out
the seeds and thready stuff, and
cutting the thick walls of the
pumpkins. Shawn and Sandy had
special tools for cleaning out and
for cutting, sort of jagged edged
knives. Those involved were Floy,
Jim Holmes, Fred, Anne, Marjorie
Gaffin, and Vivian. Thanks for
doing all the hard part, Sandy.
There will be some photos.
My nephew, Leonard Meyer,
Greenfield, Ind., sent an email with
more scrabble words from their
fourth edition scrabble dictionary.
Clon, a cutting from a plant or tree,
and cloots, cloven hoof. Thank you,
Leonard. The more combinations of
letters that are said to be words,
the closer we come to the end of
scrabble as we know it.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and we came up with the word dex,
a sulphate used to stimulant to the
central nervous system and erg,
the amount of energy used to move
one neutron one meter, or some
such formula.
The Rapid City Journal of Octo-
ber 29 had an article and photos of
Haakon County’s Deep Creek
School, 60 miles northeast of
Philip, which had reopened this fall
with five pupils, after being closed
for seven years. Theresa Deucher is
the teacher.
Tuesday after exercises, Sandy,
Shawn, Irene Cox and Vivian had
a pleasant time playing banana-
grams.
Tuesday, October 30, at Somer-
set Court, we had our annual mon-
ster mash, in other words, Hal-
loween party. There was a good
turn out. Pretty plates of Hal-
loween treats were served to resi-
dents by activity directors and
other staff. We had M&Ms and
candy corn, a gingerbread man, a
haystack on a stick (pretzel), corn
puffs, and dark red punch. Thank
you to our activity directors and
staff for arranging seating and pro-
viding ample goodies. There were
prizes for best resident Halloween
costume, won by Marjorie Gaffin.
She had an elaborate witch cos-
tume, including red slippers. She
won a Griffon statuette, a hug
chocolate bar and a good stipend of
Somerset Court bucks. Staff cos-
tume winner was volunteer, Amy
Voyles with her little red riding
hood costume. She won a statuary,
a big bag of candy and big bucks.
There was a prize for the best
spook house, won by Floy Olson,
and he received a big bag of candy
and Somerset Court bucks. There
was a contest of how many candy
corns were in the jar that was won
by Vivian and she got a big jar of
assorted candies and a big Somer-
set Court buck. Thank you. May
good photos should come from this
party.
Father Dahms had a weird wig,
representing a Donald Trump
comb-over. Ryan Love had a long
blond wig, spectacular. I said,
“Eekalaka! Montana! when I saw
it.” Kammi had a flapper dress
with spangles all over. Ray Krae-
mer wore a pigtail and a red shirt
that said, “All you need is me.”
There were lots of witches. Vivian
went as a purple people eater.
Diane (Ainslie) Walker, former
Philip kid, dropped in at the party
to see Vi Walker.
October 31, we had the activity of
bean bag toss won by Irene Cox
and Marilynn Butts.
Sandy and Marilynn Butts,
Marge Self and Vivian Hansen at-
tended fully fit October 31. I would
encourage other residents to take
advantage of this exercise class.
There are several good stretches.
We may use small weights. Fully
fit is scheduled for Novemeber 7,
21, and 28 at 3:00 p.m.
Sandy, Marilynn B. and Marge
Self played a little pool. M.R.
Hansen came to play scrabble with
Vivisn. We had a good game. M.R.
expects to be gonn pheasant hunt-
ing over the weekend.
The menu board jazzed up to in-
clude bloody red chili, moldy green
soup, and worms in the dirt. The
fungus turned out to be big mush-
rooms with a spinach filling and
they were delicious. The hog wings
were tender and tasty. Worms in
the mud, strange as it sounds, was
chocolate pudding with candy
worms.
We continued on October 31 with
an early supper, so we could be
done in time to put out treats for
the children. Great-grandchildren
of the residents and children of the
staff members and neighborhood
children. By 7:30 our party was
over. Quite a few kids showed up to
get treats. First were my grand-
daughter, Sheridan, and great-
grands, Tiger and Cecelia. Then
there children of several Somerset
Court staff. One, Charlie Chaplin,
signed my book. He is the son of
our favorite medic. We enjoyed all
the babies and children in cute and
cleaver costumes. Thank you all for
coming. We ended up with leftover
candy.
Word was received of the death
of Somerset Court resident, Jean-
nie (Regina) Alvarson, October 31
or maybe October 30, here at Som-
erset Court. Let us tell everyone,
“Goodnight.” For we do not have
the promise of another day.
We received a new Somerset
Court calendar for Novemeber. I
was glad to see that on November
6, Somerset Court will provide
rides to go vote. I am also thankful
to see that Dr. Conrad is on the
schedule for a foot clinic November
13. I wonder what rockin’ with
Roxie is all about on the 16th. I
would guess it is a musical presen-
tation, since it is followed by a so-
cial hour.
November 30, there is an un-
usual entry, practice the stairs.
Further study of the new calen-
dar reveals that we will actually
practice doing stairs. This ability is
a very useful one to have especially
when the elevators are not work-
ing. Also, stair-climbing is a great
exercise. Start gradually. Those
who venture to take on this new ac-
tivity will receive generous Somer-
set bucks.
November movies scheduled are
“Yogi Bear,” “Night at the Mu-
seum,” “Old Dogs,” “Miracle On
34th Street,” and “Stuart Little.”
Thursday’s Wii bowling scores
were Irene McKnight, 147, Addie
Rorvig, 137, Marilynn Butts, 144,
Eileen Tenold, 125, Fred Smith,
159, Mary Lou, 152, Susan, 173
and Jim Holmes, 117.
Thursday bingo winners were
Fred Olson, Vivian Hansen,
Dwight Mann, Betty Downen,
Agnes Tastad, Doris, twice, and
Marilyn Oyler. For snack and chat
we had ice water, hot coffee and
ginger squares.
Marge Self entertained at bunco
Thursday afternoon. Her guests
were Bert Ross, Lila Sharp, Ber-
nice Berg, Barb Culey, Mary
Siegler, Margaret Hanson and
Marilyn Butts substituted for Mary
Eberhard. They had refreshments
and distributed winnings. A good
time was had by all.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and we dug up new words, tew, to
work hard, bel, a unit of power as
used in decibel, 10 bels and nan, a
found flat bread, may be word from
India.
Thank you to those who sent cute
and clever Halloween cards,
Wanda and Ed Artz, Carol and Al
Vogan, and Sheridan Hansen.
Friend, Carrroll Hanten, Pierre,
sent a Judy Buswell print of water
color, “Spring Collection.” Melissa
(Butcher) Smively emailed that
Teagan was a bunny for Hal-
loween. Melissa also is planning to
make pickles with their ouw cu-
cumbers. I recommended Wanda
Artz’s pickle recipe. Wanda sent a
pressed pansy, she said they are
still blooming.
No sooner is Halloween over
than we start planning for Thanks-
giving, November 22. Somerset
Court always fixes a grand dinner.
And cooking with Sandy, activity
some time before Thanksgiving
makes a whole dinner in the activ-
ity garden. There might be a
chance of getting the turkey neck
or tail, my favorites.
Friday, November 2, we had fog
again. It was very dense early,
even wet the sidewalks a little.
Marilyn Butts went to walk with
friends in the mall and they had
lunch there, too.
Irene Cox had company, her
daughter, Trudy, and husband,
Dale Brassfield, rural New Under-
wood.
Bernard and Tieko Dusche-
neauz, Somerset Court residents,
have gone to live in Las Vegas. (Or
so I heard.) We wish them well.
Yesterday, Jeri got the computer
working, so it would give me
emails. But, today it would not.
An activity on Friday was wheel
of fortune, patterned after the TV
show. We had some fun puzzles.
Phrase … is this a great game or
what? Before and after … Brazil
nuts and bolts. Song lyrics … tiny
bubbles in the wine. Phrase … The
way to a man’s heart is through his
stomach. It was funny when
Eleanor asked for the letter L as in
lunatic. Teams were Jim, Eleanor
and Violet; Mary Lou and Floy;
Connie, Marge Self and Vivian.
Thank you, Sandy and Susan, for
making the activity for us and lots
of Somerset Court bucks. The
movie, “Where the Red Fern
Grows,” was shown for those who
missed it Monday. November 12 is
our next Monday movie, “Night At
The Museum.” It sounds plenty
wild. A bunch of us played whist
Friday. Then we switched to quid-
dler and Shawn, Sandy, Susan,
Addie, Floy, and Vivian played. It
takes a while to get used to playing
a game that is new to us.
Jaden
Robert
Matt
Son of Brit & Nancy Matt
Sioux Falls, SD
Born: August 24, 2012 • 3 lbs., 8 oz.
Big Brother: Jerret Allen
Maternal Grandparents:
Rodney & Beverly Ruzsa, Selby
Maternal Great-Grandparents: Robert & Thelma
Ruzsa, Selby; Irene Kosters, Mobridge
Paternal Grandparents:
Marion & Darlene Matt, Philip
Paternal Great-Grandparents: Elsie Matt,
New Underwood & the late Arnold Matt
This feature sponsored by Grandpa & Grandma Matt
Ali
Marie
Daughter of
Alan & Cassi Rislov
Philip, SD
Born:
Sept. 7, 2012
6 lbs., 12 oz.
20: long
Proud Big Brother: Rio
Paternal Grandparents: Gerry & Barb Rislov, Philip
Paternal Great-grandparents:
Don & Betty Rislov, Florence, SD;
Eleanor Kroetch, Philip
Maternal Grandparents:
David Fitzgerald, Philip
Maralynn Burns, Philip
Maternal Great-grandparents:
Eileen Fitzgerald, Philip
Jean Burns & Howard Pihlaja, Philip
It’s
A
Girl
November 9-10-11-12:
Hotel Transylvania(PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
November 16-17-18-19:
Taken 2 (PG-13)
November 23-24-25-26:
Here Comes the Boom (PG)
November 30-December 1-2-3:
Wreck It Ralph (PG)
December 7-8-9-10: The Twilight
Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (PG-13)
Hunter’s
Breakfast Special
Pancakes, Sausage,
Coffee & Juice
Saturday, nov. 10th
4:30 ~ 8:00 a.m.
Sunday, nov. 11th
4:30 ~ 10:00 a.m.
Philip Ambulance Building
Free Will Donation
Church & Community Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
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and lhc µowcr. and lhc glory.
and lhc vìclory. and lhc majcsly:
lor all lhal ìs ìn lhc hcavcn and
ìn lhc carlh ìs lhìnc: lhìnc ìs lhc
kìngdom. O IORD. and lhou arl
cxallcd as hcad abovc all.
1 Chronìclcs 29:11 (KlV)
Míne, míne, míne. \e're obsessed víth vhut's ours, but nothíng ín thís
voríd ís ours. Not the puvchecks ve bríng home, not the curs ve dríve,
not the íood ve eut. lt uíí beíongs to Cod. Let us thunk Hím íor Hís munv
bíessíngs toduv und evervduv.
Obituaries
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Terry A. Karrels_________________
Terry A. Karrels, age 58, of
Broadus, Mont., died Wednesday,
October 31, 2012, at the Hans P.
Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip.
Terry A. Trask was born June
10, 1954, at Rapid City, the daugh-
ter of Mark and Winifred “Winnie”
(O’Connell) Trask. She grew up on
the Spanish Five Ranch in the
Cheyenne River breaks and Elk
Creek in the Elm Springs commu-
nity.
Terry attended country school in
that area and high school at St.
Martin’s Academy in Rapid City
where she graduated in 1972. She
then attended South Dakota State
University in Brookings.
Terry was united in marriage to
Michael H. Karrels on December
27, 1991, on the Spanish Five
Ranch, and to this union was born
a son, James Michael Karrels.
They made their home on a
ranch south of Belvidere which
they operated until 2003 when they
moved to a ranch in Montana. They
continued to reside on the ranch
until her death.
Terry was generous and enjoyed
doing acts of kindness for people
privately, never wanting recogni-
tion, but ranching was the biggest
part of her life. The spring season
was her favorite, especially enjoy-
ing new colts being born and nam-
ing them, and baby calves being
born and watching them grow up.
Terry was her dad’s cowboy, and
inherited his eye for good livestock
and her uncle Milton’s passion for
raising good horses.
Grateful for sharing her life are
her husband, Michael H. Karrels of
Broadus; her two brothers, Patrick
and Rose Mary Trask and their
family of Elm Springs, and Tom
and Shelia Trask and their family
of Elm Springs; special friends,
Chuck and Charlotte Hubing of
Miles City, Mont.; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Terry was preceded in death by
her son, James Michael Karrels,
and her parents, Mark and Winnie.
Funeral services were held Mon-
day, November 5, at the American
Legion Hall in Philip with Jim
Scott officiating.
Graveside services were held at
the Elm Springs Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorials directed to the
Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospi-
tal, or the Silverleaf Assisted Liv-
ing Center, both of Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Jeanette C. Gebes_________________
Jeannette C. Gebes, 92, of
Batavia, Ill., passed away October
13, 2012, at her daughter’s resi-
dence surround by her loving fam-
ily.
She was born January 10, 1920
in Naperville, Ill., the daughter of
Michael and Barbara (nee Besch)
Lies.
Jeannette was employed by Fur-
nas electric for several years and
also worked at the Louise White
School in the cafeteria for many
years. She lived in Philip, S.D.,
from 1945 to 1964 and worked at
the Midway Cafe for several years.
Jeannette will be remembered
as a wonderful cook and baker of
her breads and pies. She was tal-
ented in crafts, and created many
beautiful quilts which she donated
to organization and people
throughout the community. Jean-
nette also had a green thumb and
a knack at gardening flowers, espe-
cially orchids. She was an active
member at Holy Cross Catholic
Church helping serve many funeral
lunches and was also a member of
Batavia V.F.W. She has been a res-
ident at the Fox Knoll Retirement
Community in Aurora since 2000.
She is survived by her daugh-
ters, Roseann (Gerald) Johnson
and Judy Armstrong; five grand-
children, Sandra (Gary) Khon,
Shawn (Cyndy) Johnson, Matt
(Stacey) Johnson, Cassandra Arm-
strong and Connie (Bob) Wuerfl; 12
great-grandchildren; two brothers,
Richard Lies and Raymond (Peggy)
Lies; two sisters, Sister Marionell
and Rosemary Paver; and a
brother-in-law, George Gebes.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her hus-
band, Henry Gebes; a granddaugh-
ter, Julie; four brothers and two
sisters; and a son-in-law, Bob Arm-
strong.
A funeral Mass was celebrated
Friday, October 19, at Holy Cross
Catholic Church in Batavia.
Interment was at Resurrection
Cemetery in Geneva.
Son of Todd & Jennifer Sandal
Eden, SD
Born: September 19, 2012
8 lbs., 5 oz. • 21” long
Maternal Grandparents:
Vince & Pat Meyer, Milbank, SD
Paternal Grandparents:
John W. & Karyl Sandal, Philip, SD
John
Edward
Sandal
Come & meet
John Edward Sandal
son of Todd & Jennifer Sandal
Friday, November 23rd
from 4 to 7 p.m. at the
Don & Tami Ravellette home
north of Philip
Ilene Breen_____________________
Ilene Breen, age 86, of Renton,
Wash., formerly of Philip, S.D.,
passed away October 21, 2012, in
Bellevue, Wash.
Ilene Ferguson was born August
13, 1926, in Philip, the daughter of
Harold and Martha Ferguson. She
grew up in the Hilland community
where she received her elementary
education in the Hilland and Plain-
view schools prior to graduating
from Philip High School. She grad-
uated from Black Hills State Col-
lege in Spearfish with her teaching
degree and she taught for several
years.
She was united in marriage to
Melvin Burns in 1945 after he was
discharged from the U.S. Army at
the end of World War II. They
made their home in Lead where a
daughter, Sheryl Ann, died at
birth. They later moved to the Hil-
land community where their two
sons, Mike and Don, were born.
They then moved to Seattle
where Ilene worked at Boeing for
many years until she retired.
While there, they had two more
children, Lexi and Kelly.
She later married Orville Breen
and they traveled extensively to
many different places. After he
passed away, she and her lifelong
friend, Edith, enjoyed going to
church together, traveling and
dancing when their health permit-
ted.
After her health deteriorated,
she lived with her son and his wife,
Kelly and Mary, until her death.
Grateful for having shared her
life are her four children, son Mike,
son Don and wife Lynn, daughter
Lexie and husband Henry, and son
Kelly and wife Mary; nine grand-
children; 18 great-grandchildren; a
sister, Esther Knutson of Philip; a
brother, Don Ferguson and wife
Virginia, of Philip; and a sister,
Jeanette and husband, Hal, of Lil-
liwaup, Wash.
Services were held October 25,
2012, at the Greenwood Funeral
Home in Renton, Wash. Committal
services were at Greenwood Memo-
rial Park in Renton.
Western
Purses
Owls Angels Candles Shirts Snowmen
Christmas Celebration
Wednesday, November 14th
Refreshments Served ~ Door Prizes ~ Lots of NEW items!
Plus Much
More!!!
Jewelry
9:00 to
5:30
Howard A. McGrath______________
Howard Alvia McGrath was
born October 19, 1927, and passed
away November 1, 2012.
Howard was born to Alvia and
Olive-Vene McGrath in Powell,
S.D. As a boy, he grew up on his
mother’s homestead ranch. When
he was 10 years old, his mother
passed away and the next year his
father was killed in a tornado. He
then went to live with his sister,
Gertrude Stearn, in Idaho. A year
later she passed away.
He then returned to South
Dakota to live with his sisters,
Margaret Baker and Julie Dorothy,
until he graduated from high
school in 1947. In high school, he
excelled at sports where he earned
the nickname “Flash,” which he
went by his entire adult life as well.
Howard entered the United
States Army in 1950, during the
Korean War. He was discharged
from the Army in 1953. He then
served in the South Dakota Na-
tional Guards.
On April 15, 1954, Howard mar-
ried the love of his life, Elinor King,
in Rapid City. Together they made
their home in Philip where to-
gether they raised five children.
They lived in Philip until Howard
retired from Scotchman Industries
in 1991. They then moved to Battle
Mountain, Nev., to be closer to
their children.
Howard is survived by his wife,
Elinor; his children, Clara (Lyle)
Hamilton, Linda (Howard) Thiesse,
Diane (Jerry) Engelson, Cheryl
(Gordon) Hunt, and Daniel (Julie)
McGrath; his grandchildren, Judi
Trobee, Shane Szarkowski, Brian
(Samme) Engelson, Jerome (Kat-
rina) Engelson, Teri (Chris) Spring,
Carrie (Ryan) Hunt-Rayle, Tiffany
(Dave) Ghering, Randi (Mike)
Hunt-Schwartz, Marcie (Pat)
Richards, Kheidi McGrath,
Heather Allard and Samantha Al-
lard; his great-grandchildren,
Breven Engelson, Ryan, Kaylen,
Macyn and Elijah Engelson, Mikey
Spring, Christopher and Mattie
Rayle, Noah, Emma and Eli Gher-
ing, and Rob, Rylee Hamilton and
Easton Schwartz.
Howard was preceded in death
by his parents; sisters, Bessie
Wright, Gertrude Stearns, Mar-
garet Baker and Julie Dorothy; a
brother, Edward McGrath; a
daughter, Elizabeth McGrath; a
son, John McGrath; a grandson,
Scott Hamilton; and great-grand-
daughter, Alexis Rayle.
In lieu of flowers the family re-
quests donations toward a memo-
rial bulletin board that will be at
the Battle Mountain General Hos-
pital Nursing Home, 635 Birch Ct.
Battle Mountain, NV 89820 or con-
tact Diane at 775-455-5368.
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 • Philip
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
I am back safe and sound from
Washington, D.C., and am most
definitely glad about that. In truth,
Jerry is glad I am back as well.
When you have been married for 52
years you grow accustomed to en-
joying some of the same things.
And to you folks who told of miss-
ing the Midland News in last
weeks Pioneer Review – thank you
for that. It’s always nice to know
that something you do matters to
some folks. The skies have been
overcast for the past few days.
Those overcast skies are not giving
us that much needed moisture,
some sprinkles making things a bit
damp, but not those soaker rains
we need.
The annual church dinners and
bazaars are done for another year.
St. William Catholic Church has
theirs the first Sunday in Novem-
ber each year, so are the last ones
in this area to serve their annual
dinner. Numbers were down this
year, but folks who came enjoyed a
good meal and visiting. Thanksgiv-
ing is fast approaching, so folks will
have more turkey and dressing and
visiting.
Reminder: Midland School will
have their turkey dinner November
14 from 11:30 to 12:30. Anyone
wishing to eat dinner at the school
that day is asked to call the school
cook, Amy Block, by November 12.
Veteran’s Day Supper – People
are invited to honor our veteran’s
by attending a chicken noodle and
chili supper on Saturday night No-
vember 10th from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.
at the Legion Hall. Sandwiches,
caramel and sweet rolls and other
desserts will also be served.
Reminder – Carol Hunt reported
the following – “Can’t believe it is
once again time for ‘Christmas in
Midland.’ The date has been set for
Saturday, December 1, from 10:30
a.m. until 3:30 p.m. at the Midland
Legion Hall. The senior citizens
will be serving a soup and sand-
wich luncheon in the lunch room of
the Legion Hall. We invite anyone
to join us in displaying a Christmas
tree or Christmas scene. Santa will
most likely arrive to greet the little
ones. If anyone is interested in do-
nating door prizes you can contact
Carol Hunt, Sophie Foley, Barb
Petoske, Patricia Vollmer or Susan
Martin. November 26 is the dead-
line for letting us know if you are
interested in being in the ‘Christ-
mas in Midland’ event this year.”
Our sympathies to the family of
Wendell Hagan who passed away
recently at the age of 85. Wendell
was married to Grace (Stotts) who
passed away a number of years
ago. They lived in Midland for
many years, raising their family.
They later moved to Rapid City. I
remember sitting on the election
board with Grace a number of
years ago. Grace had homemade
soup which she shared with the
rest of us. It was delicious. She and
Wendell enjoyed life, enjoyed their
family.
Our sympathy to the family of
Barbara Stone who recently passed
away at the age of 79. Barbara was
married to Gene Stone and they
and their family lived in Midland
for a time, where he was a member
of the Midland school administra-
tion. Gene and Barbara lived in
Kadoka for some years, both have
passed away. When you read mes-
sages from folks on the Rush Fu-
neral Home webpage you are given
a glimpse of people’s lives you did
not know. Ashley Schofield,
Kadoka, is about to finish her
schooling at Black Hills State Uni-
versity in Spearfish. She is study-
ing to become a teacher, following
in her mother, Renee Schofield’s,
footsteps. Renee is a good teacher
and knowing what I know of Ash-
ley, I can’t help but believe she will
be, as well. She wrote of working
with Barbara at Discount Fuel dur-
ing the summer months. As I read
what she wrote, I couldn’t help but
think you never know what an im-
pact you will have on someone else.
It can be a positive, or a negative,
it all depends on you.
Brother Phil Meyers, Pierre, was
in Sioux Falls for cancer treat-
ments this past Friday. Phil re-
ported things went well. He visited
his brother-in-law, Bob Austead, at
a Sioux Falls hospital before head-
ing home. Reports are Bob is in
critical, but stable condition. Bob
and his wife, Mary, lived at Kadoka
for a number of years and Mary
was principal or superintendent at
the school. Mary is Phil’s wife,
Bernie’s, sister. Our thoughts and
prayers are with Bob and his fam-
ily.
Gavin and Garrett Snook were
members of the 2012 All State Cho-
rus which presented their concert
Saturday evening, October 27, at
the Rapid City Civic Center. Their
family attended the event. Gavin
and Garrett go to high school in
Philip and are the sons of Gary and
Deb Snook and the grandsons of
Pat Snook and Dianna Dinsmore.
Congratulations to these former
Midland students.
* * * *
VETERANS SOUP SUPPER,
SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 5--7 P.M.
AT THE LEGION HALL. FREE
WILL OFFERING.
* * * *
Sophie (Roseth) Foley reported
she had a work force helping out
with yard work and indoor work
Saturday. Coming to help were
Todd Larson and son Kendall,
Sioux Falls, Renee Schofield and
son Landon, Kadoka, Bryan
Schofield, who is attending
Mitchell vo-tech, and Ashley
Schofield, BHSU at Spearfish. So-
phie and her husband, Pat, have a
huge yard with lots of trees and
lots of leaves and a garden spot to
make ready for winter. Busy hands
make the work load easier and are
very much appreciated. That is a
fact.
It seemed to be a weekend for
helping moms with yard work etc.
as Jenna Finn, Cass and Cole,
went to the home of her parents,
Theresa and Gene Deuchar, of the
Milesville area, with plans to help
with that yard work. Jenna’s mom
teaches at the Deep Creek School
during the week, so those weekend
jobs are usually packed full with
catch-up. With winter soon to be
knocking on one’s door it truly
means a lot to get those yard jobs
done and over with.
Tuesday, Clint and Prerry
Saucerman went to Rapid City to
the home of their son, Tel and Ellie
(Nemec) Saucerman. Tel and Ellie
were going to Kansas City, Kan., to
a church conference, so Clint and
Prerry came to stay with Emma,
Sawyer, Meleah and Raygen, while
their parents were gone. Clint, Pre-
rry and the grandkids went trick or
treating with Devlon and Noel
(Wiechmann), Bella and Calla.
Everyone had supper together af-
terwards. Glenda Nemec, Hill City,
came Friday to stay with the
grandkids until Sunday when Tel
and Ellie returned home.
Friday, Clint and Prerry went to
Rick Schofield’s in Rapid City for
RPM Associates 30th anniversary
open house. Rick’s parents, Terry
and Linda Schofield, were also
there for the event. They were
given a tour of the facility. Rick is
a welder there.
Talon Saucerman, Aurora, Colo.,
stopped in Philip Saturday, visiting
his grandfather, Gaylord Saucer-
man, who is in the swingbed at the
Philip Nursing Home. He also vis-
ited his grandmother, Marlin
Evans, at the Senechal Apartments
in Philip. And from there went to
home of his parents, Clint and Pre-
rry Saucerman, rural Midland.
Talon took his grandmother,
Wilma Saucerman, to Philip, Sun-
day, visiting with Gaylord and
Marlin. Gaylord continues to do
about the same. Talon left for home
Monday. Prerry attended the birth-
day party for Keenan’s first birth-
day on October 28 at the home of
Roy and Carol Hunt. Keenan and
his mom, Jenna Tolton, came from
Texas to visit family for a few days.
A week ago Sunday, Wilma and
Prerry went to Sundance, Wyo., to
visit and see the new home of
Wilma’s granddaughter, Raquel
Croell, and Lance and boys having
lunch with them. Everyone then
went to the home of Wilma’s grand-
daughter, Noel, and family, in
Rapid City for Bella’s birthday
party. Others there for the birth-
day party and supper were Tel and
Ellie Saucerman and family, Barry
and Carol Wiechmann, and
Shauwn and Marcy Wiechmann,
all of Rapid City.
Mr. and Mrs. Loren Peters, San
Antonio, Texas, and Mr. and Mrs.
Renzo Bianchi, Colorado Springs,
Colo., stopped and had lunch with
Ernie and Laurel Nemec Thursday.
They went on to Pierre to visit
Alice Jeitz. Alice is a sister to
Loren’s mom, Helen Peters, who
passed away a number of years
ago. They had come for the funeral
service of Loren’s brother-in-law
and Lynette Bianchi’s dad, Harold
C. Finck, Rapid City. Harry was
married to Loren’s sister, Karen
(Peters) Finck. Loren and Karen
both attended school in Midland for
a time. The Peters and Bianchis
were going back to Rapid City to
visit with Karen some more and
Lynette was going to help her mom
with some things before heading
home to Colorado Springs.
Tuesday, Jerry and Joy Jones
went to Pierre as their grandson,
Wyatt Trapp, was performing in
the T.F. Riggs High School march-
ing band, in which he plays the
trumpet. The band looked very nice
in their new uniforms and reports
are the band had an excellent per-
formance. Mike and Debbie Trapp
and family were also there to watch
their son, Wyyatt. Jerry and Joy
sold calves in Ft. Pierre Friday.
Granddaughter, Cassidy Trapp,
who is a student at School of Mines
in Rapid City came by and picked
them up before heading to Ft.
Pierre. Cody and Audrey Jones and
the Mike Trapp family were also
there. Joy visited by phone with
Miriam Schilling, Gillette, Wyo.,
recently. Ivan and Miriam are
doing fine and wish to say ‘hello’ to
folks in Midland.
American Legion Auxiliary
hosted a Halloween party for the
Midland area children October 31
at the Legion Hall. Fifty-nine chil-
dren attended and many, many
adults. Reports are the costumes
were outstanding. Going fishing at
the fish pond and a cupcake walk
were enjoyed by all. Guessing the
number of candies in a jar was won
by Bobbi Jarvi. Everyone enjoyed a
lunch of pizza, potato chips, Hal-
loween cookies and lemonade, be-
fore the kids headed out to go trick
or treating.
Jan Tolton and Michelle Meinzer
went to Rapid City Tuesday, Octo-
ber 23, to pick up Jan’s daughter,
Jenna Tolton, and son, Keenan, at
the airport. They flew in from El
Paso, Texas. Friday, the 26, Jordan
and Jessica Tolton, Aberdeen,
came. Courtney McFarland came
from Kemmerer, Wyo., and Lisa
Hackerott, Blake and Stuart, came
from Smith Center, Kan. Deidra
Hackerott was unable to come as
she had to work at the nursing
home. Friday night, everyone got
together at Christine Niedans’s for
supper. Saturday dinner at Chris-
tine’s was enjoyed by all as they
had their Norwegian klub.
Saturday, October 27, Teresa
Palmer, Murdo, Penny Schafer,
Pierre, and April Neuhauser, Ft.
Pierre, great-grandma Ida Hunt,
Philip Nursing Home came.
Saturday afternoon, Keenan’s
first birthday was celebrated at
Roy and Carol Hunt’s. His actual
birthday is October 15. Others at-
tending were Jenna and Keenan,
Grandpa Jim and Grandma Jan
Tolton, Roy and Carol, Keith Hunt,
Christine Niedan and Michelle
Meinzer. Friends coming to visit
with Jenna and to meet Keenan
were Barb Petoske, Prerry Saucer-
man, Mary Parquet, Reuben and
Patricia Vollmer, JoAnn Bork,
Nancy Schofield, Jackie Schofield,
Jamie Dolezal and Travis. Supper
was followed by a dinosaur cake
with ice cream and gift opening.
In December Jenna will be de-
ployed to Afghanistan. Jordan and
Jessica returned to Aberdeen Sat-
urday evening as he had to work
Sunday. Other out of town guests
returned to their respective homes
Sunday. Jan and Michelle took
Jenna and Keenan back to Rapid
City to fly home Thursday, Novem-
ber 1. Because of the fog, flights
were canceled or delayed, but they
finally arrived home late that
evening.
The first annual meeting of the
Pioneer Club of Old Stanley
County met at the Midland Senior
Center, October 28, 2012. The new
club is a combining of the Pioneer
Club of Western South Dakota and
the Historical Society of Old Stan-
ley County, which took place last
October 30, 2011. The purpose of
the new club is preserving history
and way of life of the pioneer peo-
ple and places of old Stanley
County and western South Dakota.
President Debbie Trapp called the
meeting to order. The secretary
Barbara Jones read the minutes of
the last year’s meetings. The new
club received dues for membership
from 21 people for the 2013 year.
Treasurer Mahlon Alcock of the
new club gave the treasurer’s re-
port. Motions were made to pay the
bills including $500 to be given to
the Midland museum. Gay Logan
asked the group for support for a
project of the Horizons group in
Philip. They are in the process of
having a bust of Scotty Philip
placed near the courthouse and
were asking for support of that
project. And $100 will be given to
them. Mahlon Alcock expressed, he
would like to be replaced as the
treasurer and Robin Bierle was
elected to that position. Next year’s
meeting will be held on October 27,
2013.
Secretary, Barbara Jones
Lonis Wendt, Vivian, was the
speaker for the afternoon. He gave
an interesting talk that featured
the Shoshone Indian woman, Saca-
gawea, and her life and death, in
what historians think, was at Ft.
Manual, S.D., on the Missouri
River, near the North Dakota bor-
der. He also told about Fort Man-
ual, which was built two years be-
fore Ft. Pierre. It didn’t survive
very long, but was an important in
the early history of the territory.
Members of the Midland mu-
seum board were also in atten-
dance. Curator Janice Bierle gave
a year-end report on the happen-
ings at the museum. A $600 me-
morial gift in memory of Clarence
Petoske is being given by the
Petoske family to the Midland mu-
seum and a roll-down wall map
from the Midland library which
shows the landowners of Stanley
County in the 1930s, and has many
historical notations, was given to
the museum.
Wednesday morning, October 24,
Jerry headed for Canistota and I
headed for Mitchell to the home of
our son, Christopher and
Stephanie Nemec and little Laura.
Thursday morning, Christopher,
Stephanie and I headed for the
Sioux Falls airport, destination,
Washington, D.C. Six-month-old
Laura stayed with some friends of
theirs in Mitchell. After arriving in
D.C., we took the Metro, which
took us to within walking distance
of our motel rooms. Friday and Sat-
urday, we were tourists visiting dif-
ferent sights, the Holocaust Memo-
rial Museum being the most hum-
bling and difficult to see. One can-
not even begin to imagine the un-
known those people faced, the ex-
haustion and the heartache, the
terror and the sadness. Sunday,
was the day of the Marine spon-
sored marathon with close to
30,000 runners. All branches of the
military had representation there.
The oldest runner finishing the
marathon was a man of 86 and the
youngest was a 10-year-old boy.
Also finishing the marathon was a
lady who had dealt with a brain
tumor. That is one of the amazing
things about a marathon. Not only
is about being there for a husband
or a wife, a son or a daughter, a
mom or a dad, it’s also about hear-
ing the stories of other runners.
The weather conditions the day of
the marathon were a bit chilly, but
the rains that were predicted held
off. We were to leave for home on
Monday. Our flight was canceled
due to the uncertainty of Hurricane
Sandy. We were told the earliest
we could get a flight out of D.C. was
Wednesday, and maybe not until
Thursday or Friday. Knowing we
needed to get out of D.C., Christo-
pher checked into flights out of
Richmond, Va. He hit pay dirt, so
the plan was to head out early
Monday morning. The Metro was
shut down, so we got a taxi and
headed for the airport to rent a car.
It was dark and it was raining and
the wind was blowing, and I have
to admit, I was a bit apprehensive
as to what we would be driving to-
wards. It finally got daylight,
which made it much better. We
were keeping in touch with Jerry,
at home, on where our journey was
taking us. It’s hard to be the one at
home wondering. Getting to the
Richmond airport we learned many
flights had been canceled due to
Hurricane Sandy, but our flight
was still a go. And then it too was
canceled, as the winds were blow-
ing stronger and it was raining
harder. So, we went to plan “C”
with a call to the airport in
Raleigh, N.C. Able to get a flight
out early Tuesday morning we
headed for Raleigh. Each of us hop-
ing this flight would not be can-
celed. We saw parts of two states
we hadn’t planned on seeing, the
trees were awesome with their
many colors, and we couldn’t help
but think – what we went through
was minimal compared to the dev-
astating pictures we were seeing on
TV from Hurricane Sandy. Each
marathon has its memory makers,
but we all agreed this one topped
them all.
As Stephanie and I were at the
finish line watching for Christo-
pher, a young lad of about six or so
came and was standing by me. As I
looked at him he was wringing his
hands a bit, but just continued to
stand there. There was such a
crowd of people also waiting at the
finish line. I asked if he had some-
one he was wanting to see cross
that finish line? He nodded his
head and being so impressed at
how he wasn't pushing at people
and was such a nice young lad, I
asked people if they could let him
through. After a while, he came
back with this smile on his face,
happy he'd gotten to see his dad
cross the finish line. Those are one
of those human interest stories of
life. A human interest story about
a young lad and his dad. He cer-
tainly left an impression on me.
It's time to close my column for
this week. We got some more sprin-
kles this Monday evening. So, it’s
working at getting us some mois-
ture. Hope you didn’t forget to do
your civic duty and voted on Tues-
day. This was an important elec-
tion to be sure. Be safe and con-
tinue to pray for rain.
The Midland Legion Auxiliary held their annual Halloween party the afternoon of October 31. There were 59 in attendence. A fish pond and cake walk were part of
the festivities. Pizza and chips ended the afternoon, before some of the costumed kids ventured out to trick or treat. Courtesy photo
Midland’s community Halloween party
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2005 Chevy Impala
3.8L V6, Auto … Good Car
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
www.RavellettePublications.com
Saturday, November 24th
after the PVFD BBQ Fundraiser @ Fire Hall
LINE-UP AT THE PHILIP LEGION HALL AT 5:30 P.M.
Parade starts at 6:30 p.m.
The Hospital Auxiliary will be serving FREE hot chocolate!!
Join in Philip’s annual
PRE-
REGISTER:
ROGER
WILLIAMS:
859-2745 or
685-3258
SIGN UP TO WIN IN PHILIP’S ANNUAL
GREAT-GOBBLER GIVE-AWAY!!
You can sign up wi th each business listed below for a chance to win a Thanksgi ving turkey!!
Drawing will be held FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, at 11:00 a.m. – Businesses will notify winners
Philip
Livestock Auction
859-2577
Cabin Fever Floral
859-2064
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
859-2516
Philip Clinic
859-2566
Dakota Bar
859-2152
Petersen’s
Variety
859-2892
American
Family Insurance
859-2466
First
National Agency
859-2588
Corner Pantry
859-3500
Coyle’s
SuperValu
859-2727
Coyle’s
Standard
859-9087
Ron Mann,
DDS
859-2491
Farm Bureau
Insurance
859-2902
Ingram
Hardware
859-2521
Kennedy
Implement
859-2568
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525
Moses
Building Center
859-2100
Jones’
Saddlery
859-2482
Midwest
Cooperatives
859-2382
Philip
Motor, Inc.
859-2585
Les’ Body
Shop
859-2744
Grossenburg
Implement
859-2636
Konst
Welding & Repair
859-2789
The
Steakhouse & Lounge
859-2774
Pizza Etc.
859-2083
Essence
859-2181
Enter Today
for Your Chance
To Win!!
play in the 'Super Bowl' with the
Mighty Mights. They played a
Rapid City team and lost 18-12.
Karyl said, "It was a really fun
game to watch and those little guys
do a good job learning about foot-
ball at an early age. I'm 70 and still
learning!"
Paul, Donna and Tina Staben at-
tended a birthday party for Elke
Baxter at the bowling alley in
Philip Saturday evening.
All the members of the Milesville
Rangers 4-H Club were in Philip
Sunday night for the annual 4-H
Recognition Night. All of them re-
ceived several awards and the club
won a gold award for their commu-
nity service project.
Milesville folks who attended fu-
neral services for Terry Karrels
Monday were Mark and Judith
Radway, Dan and Gayla Piroutek,
Phil Carley and the Paul Stabens.
Our son-in-law, George Ho-
hwieler, returned home Monday
after having surgery in Omaha on
October 24. He continues to gain
strength and feel better each day.
They appreciate all your prayers.
Thank you!
October weather information:
Total moisture for the month was
.45”. So far this year we have re-
ceived 9.83”.
Average high was 61˚. Highest
for the month was 85˚ on the 2nd.
On the 15th and 20th, it got to 81˚.
It got in to the 70s eight days.
Average low was 34˚ with the
lowest on the 6th with 16˚. That
was our first killing frost. Nine
days the low temperature got in to
the 20s and 10 days to the 30s.
Milesville
News
(continued from page 3)
I promised I would not write
about any more birthdays until my
80th, but yes I enjoyed another one
on Monday, the 29th.
As you all know, Sheilia Olson
has been recovering from several
surgeries this last year and she is
doing much better. In fact, she had
me come in for a belated birthday
tea and I felt like a queen for a day.
She had out her best silver tea set
and the table was all dressed up
with her mom’s tablecloth and nap-
kins that were hand embroidered
by Beulha. This was a treat, as her
mom was in the nursing home here
in Philip while I worked there. She
was a very special lady.
Sheilia had made a delicious cof-
fee cake and put a candle in it and
made me make a wish. My wish
was the same wish that I always
make, to be happy and well as long
as I live on this planet.
I received a very nice gift from
Sheilia and what a wonderful day
the two of us enjoyed. Even if she
was feeling some better, she has a
long way to go before all is back to
normal, so keep her in your
prayers.
Marvin Eide took some cattle
into the sale Wednesday that were
dry and old cows. He said that it
was a good time to cull down his
herd with hay short and prices up.
He was well satisfied with the re-
sults. There was another big run of
cattle at the sale Saturday.
Marvin and Vicki went to Rapid
City Sunday, November 4, and I
asked them if they spent all the
money and he said no, it was too
hard of work raising them to just
spend it for silly stuff.
So, I learned something, you just
go to Rapid City to buy silly stuff,
unless of course, you have been
sent up to a doctor for that serious
stuff.
In visiting with Karyl Sandal
this week, she said she had not
done much sewing or making quilts
or rugs as the grandchildren keep
her busy going to all their sports.
No let up, Karyl, as wrestling
starts next. I know what you mean,
as I try to see my great-grandchil-
dren play also, but I just go to the
events in Philip. You and Bill fol-
low yours over a wide area.
Al and Lenore Brucklacher are
looking forward to all their family
being home for an early Thanksgiv-
ing weekend, November 10 and 11.
They are wondering if Alex and
Cain Radway would get back from
the New Jersey and New York
area, as the company they work for
sent them out there to help restore
power lines there.
I do hope they all are able to
make it, the weather doesn’t sound
too good for that weekend.
I was at the bowling alley in
Philip for an early supper and Jay
Baxter came in with his arms
loaded and proceeded to get ready
for his sweetheart’s (as he put it)
50th birthday party. He was deco-
rating it up pretty fancy.
Elke Baxter’s birthday was ear-
lier, but she was in Germany visit-
ing her parents, so this one was be-
lated and he wanted it to be very
special. He is such a big guy and
was doing his best to handle all
those little birthday things!
Jay has always amazed me, how
thoughtful he always is. I had Jay
in my camp at the One Way Seed
camping in the Faith area at the
King ranch when he was in grade
school. Well, anyway, Elke and Jay
had a blast at her party and en-
joyed all who were there.
Bill and Jayne Gottsleben had a
party Friday evening for friends
and neighbors and several were
there to enjoy the evening.
Our sympathy goes out to the
families of Linda Lee Wilkie and
Harold Finck, this last week.
Warren and Shirley Sweezy were
down for the weekend and spent
time with Donna Newman. Shirley
attended Mary Slovek’s open house
Saturday.
Several from our area also at-
tended the 80th birthday open
house for Mary Slovek. Those from
our area were Myrna and Bill
Gottsleben, Herb Sieler, Phillis and
Bob Thorson, Rita Ramsey, Martin
and Vera Nelson and Marvin, Vicki
and Mary Eide.
Her family hosted the party. It
was nice to see her daughter, Judy
Walker, as has been over a year
since I saw her. She and her sister,
Julie, and Dwight Slovek’s daugh-
ters helped serve. Mary’s son,
Scott, and daughter, Carol, and
family were unable to attend.
There were several of her grand-
children in attendance as well as
Mary’s brothers and sister. It sure
was a nice party.
I enjoyed supper with the Trevor
Fitches at Milesville Sunday night
and found little Aven is growing
and will be five months old Novem-
ber 11. They sure don’t stay babies
very long.
Christa fixed corn bread, pork
chops, hash browns and green
beans and it was ever so good and
we all ate too much.
When I came home about 7:30 it
was so foggy and I drove only about
30 miles per hour until I got about
five miles from George and Sandee
Gittings’ turnoff, then I ran out of
it. I sure was glad to get home.
I hope that everyone got out to
vote Tuesday, November 6.
Under democracy, one party al-
ways devotes its chief energies to
trying to prove that the other party
is unfit to rule … and both com-
monly succeed and both are right.
H.L Mencken
Grindstone
News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports & Accomplishments
Annual Wild Game Feed!!
Friday, Nov. 9th
Everyone Welcome!!
Join us for
Friday Night Bingo
73– Saloon
859-2173 • DOWNTOWN PHILIP
FOR SALE:
Hereford Bull Calves
Will keep until December 1, 2012.
HOvLAnD HEREFORDS
Call Allen Hovland
544-3236
or
Miles Hovland
544-3294
THE TIME IS HERE!!!!
Time to order your trees and perennials
for next spring, that is!
Haakon County Conservation District is taking orders for
your tree and perennial needs next
spring! Order early for best selection.
We have many options available!
Tall trees, perennials, shrubs, fruit trees … give us
a call and see what we can do for you!
859-2186 Ext. 3. Office Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-3:00
Philip, S.D.
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing...........................24-12
Rockers................................22.5-13.5
Petersen’s..................................19-17
Handrahan Const .....................17-19
Dakota Bar................................13-23
Badland’s Auto....................12.5-23.5
Highlights:
Venessa Buxcel .....................147/417
Kim Petersen ........................215/475
Andrew Reckling 225, 205 clean/633
Tena Slovek...........................173/504
Arlene Kujawa ......................198/501
Bryan Buxcel.........................211/589
Gail Reutter .................................199
Ronnie Coyle .............. 3-6-7-10 split;
.............................................203 clean
Brian Pearson.............2-10 split; 540
Jim Kujawa ........................200 clean
Jerry Mooney....5-10 & 4-5 split; 204
Jason Petersen ...................3-10 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................17-3
Philip Motor................................12-8
Kennedy Imp...............................11-9
George’s Welding ......................10-10
Kadoka Tree Service.............9.5-10.5
Philip Health Service ...........8.5-11.5
Bear Auto....................................7-13
G&A Trenching...........................6-14
Highlights:
Fred Foland .................5-7 split; 202,
.....................................220 clean/613
Randy Boyd...........................216/600
Jim Larson...3-10 split; 215, 221/596
Bill Stone...............................202/574
Terry Wentz...4-5 split; 208, 212/558
Wendell Buxcel...........3-10 split; 555
Earl Park .............3-10 split; 212/548
Ryan Seager ...............3-10 split; 543
Cory Boyd.....................................540
Ed Morrison ..........................228/539
Ronnie Williams......5-8-10 split; 536
Steve Varner ................................527
James Mansfield...................204/523
Tony Gould .................2-10 split; 508
Alvin Pearson .......................5-7 split
Matt Schofield ....................5-10 split
Norm Buxcel .......................5-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge...............................30-6
Bowling Belles ..........................21-15
Invisibles...................................21-15
Jolly Ranchers ..........................18-18
State Farm Ins..........................16-20
Highlights:
Shirley Parsons.....................189/416
Judy Papousek..............176, 152/465
Karen Foland ........176, 167, 163/506
Sandra O’Connor .........................163
Donna King...... 3-10 & 3-7-10 splits;
........................................161,157/424
Cindy Wilmarth...........................154
Deanna Fees.......................3-10 split
Debbie Gartner.....................2-7 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................17-3
Dakota Bar..................................14-6
McDonnell Farms .....................10-10
O’Connell Const ........................10-10
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................9-11
WEE BADD.................................8-12
The Steakhouse ..........................6-14
West River Pioneer Tanks .........6-14
Highlights:
Ky Bowen .....................................206
Neal Petersen........................202/554
Alex Moos .....................................200
Harlan Moos..........................216/578
Brian Pearson..............5-7 split; 210,
..................195 & 190 both clean/595
Doug Hauk ............................213/550
Jan Bielmaier........................212/563
Jack Heinz.............................202/559
Ronnie Coyle..............5-10 split; 200,
.....................................189 clean/554
Nathan Kjerstad ..........3-7 split; 203
Mike Moses.........................5-10 split
Wendell Buxcel.....................5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ........................4-5 split
Alvin Pearson .....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew...............................29-7
King Pins.............................19.5-16.5
Randy’s Spray Service..............19-13
Roy’s Repair ........................18.5-17.5
Lee and the Ladies ...................16-16
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Brain Pearson........2-9 split; 232/548
Robin Bierle..................5-6 split; 153
Theresa Miller.................4-7-10 split
Aaron Richardson................3-7-10 &
...........................................5-10 splits
John Heltzel .........................6-7 split
Duane Hand .......................5-10 split
Deb Neville .........................5-10 split
Annette Hand.......................5-6 split
Winners of the National FFA en-
vironmnental and natural re-
sources Career Development Event
(CDE) were announced Friday, Oc-
tober 28, at the annual awards
banquet of 85th National FFA Con-
vention and Expo in Indianapolis,
Ind.
The Philip team of Avery John-
son, Nick Hamill, Jade Berry and
Wyatt Johnson earned seventh
place. Individually, A. Johnson
earned a gold recognition by taking
11th place and Hamill took gold by
taking 26th place. Berry earned a
silver recognition for 56th place
and W. Johnson took silver for
100th place nationally.
“The kids did a fantastic job,”
said advisor Doug Hauk. “I ex-
pected them to be in the top 10 and
they came through with flying col-
ors. It was a hard two days, up at
6:00 a.m. You look at places like
California who have 66,000 FFA
members ... it’s kind of fun to have
your names called off of the list.
They did a great job!”
Hauk said that, in South Dakota,
once a student wins a state contest,
that student may not go back in
that contest, though may enter a
different CDE catagory. W. John-
son had qualified as a senior dur-
ing the 2011-2012 school year.
Hauk was very pleased with his ef-
forts, considering “he was busy try-
ing to get through the first year of
college.”
Different aspects of the total test
included identification, a writing
exercise, practicum, rotational
practicum and a written test
To recognize their success in the
event, the top 10 individuals and
the national winning team mem-
bers received cash awards.
The CDE is a competition that
allows students to apply classroom
knowledge to real life situations. It
focuses on testing students’ prob-
lem solving and decision making
skills in envoronmental and natu-
ral resources. These areas concen-
trate on soil profiles, water and air
quality, waste management, envi-
ronmental analysis and use of
global positioning units. Each team
competed at local and state levels
for the privilege of representing
their home state at the national
convention.
Philip FFA seventh at nationals
The Philip FFA team earned seventh place in the nation. Shown, from left, are
advisor Doug Hauk, Nick Hamill, Avery Johnson, Jade Berry and Wyatt Johnson.
Twenty-eight junior high volley-
ball girls started their season eight
weeks ago under the supervision of
head coach Lacey Clements. They
practiced hard after school every
day to prepare for what would be-
come a successful season.
The “C” team, with help from as-
sistant coach RaeAnn Snyder, fin-
ished their season 3-3. These girls
learned the fundamentals of volley-
ball, working hard to master the
serve/receive aspect of the game.
Playing on the “C” team were
sixth graders Jasmine Ferguson,
Sam Fillingim, Jeslyn Jindra,
Jewel Jones, Cylver Lurz, Aitanna
Nadala, Cappie West and Kari
Kanable. Seventh graders were
Bobbi Antonsen, Kobie Davis,
Dixie Enders, AnnaBelle McIlravy
and Payton Schoenhals.
Learning and setting up rota-
tions to help them become
stronger, the “B” team also had a
great season. They took home first
place at the Martin volleyball tour-
nament, October 6, and second
place at the White River volleyball
tournament, October 13. Finishing
their season with a record of 11-7,
the “B” team was composed of sixth
graders Fillingim, Lurz, Nadala
and West. Seventh graders were
Sage Bierle, Kendal Hook, Jada
Jones, AnnaBelle McIlravy and
Jaisa Snyder. Eighth graders were
Mandy Burns, Molly Coyle, Sam-
mie Schofield, Paige Slovek, Jada
Theye and Ashley Williams.
At the beginning of the season
the “A” team set a goal to “never
give up” and give up they didn’t.
Seventh graders Bierle, Hook and
Snyder and eighth graders Tia
Guptill, Shay Hand, Peyton
Kuchenbecker, Cheyenne Pinney
and Elise Wheeler played an unde-
feated season of 22-0.
On their way to the top, they
took home first place at the Philip
volleyball tournament, at the Mar-
tin volleyball tournament, and at
the October 13 White River volley-
ball tournament. A hard feat for
any team at any level.
Philip junior high school volleyball
Sixth graders, from left: Cappie West, Aitanna Nadala, Sam Fillingim, Jewel Jones, Cylver Lurz, Jeslyn Jindra, Jasmine Fer-
guson and Kari Kanable. Photos by Deb Smith
Seventh graders, from left: Sage Bierle, Anna Belle McIlravy, Dixie Enders, Payton Schoenhals, Bobbi Antonsen, Kendal
Hook, Jaisa Snyder, Kobie Davis and Jada Jones.
Eighth graders, from left: Jasyln Konst, Sam Schofield, Cheyenne Pinney, Peyton Kuchenbecker, Tia Guptill, Shay Hand,
Members of Philip’s chapter of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America collected $731.22 during the group’s
annual trick or treat for cystic fibrosis. This is over $100 than last year’s amount. All proceeds go to the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation. Members of the Philip FCCLA chapter and the United Church Youth Group went door to door on Halloween
night, collecting not candy, but donations. Shown, back row, from left: Katlin Knutson, Kelsie Kroetch, Katelyn Enders, Brad
Huffman, James Fitzgerald, Avery Johnson, Ryan Van Tassel, Gavin Brucklacher and Nelson Holman. Third row: Kaci Olivier,
Holly Iwan, Afton Burns, Tara Cantrell and Samantha Huston. Second row: Lakin Boyd, Jordyn Dekker, Madison Hand, Bailey
FCCLA cystic fibrosis trick or treat
Radway and Tate DeJong. Front: Brody
Jones, Quade Slovek, Thomas Doolittle
and Tristen Rush. Courtesy photo
Philip’s Ellie Coyle was one of
just three area athletes chosen to
this year’s all-state cross country
team. The South Dakota Cross
Country and Track and Field
Coaches Association honored the
top finishers in the October 20
state cross country meet held in
Huron. Coyle’s eighth place finish
earned her the only “B” division
West River girls’ selection. Bison’s
Daniel Burkhalter’s fifth place fin-
ish and Wall’s Austin Huether’s
eighth place finish earned them top
honors for the boys.
Coyle makes All-State
Paige Slovek, Mandy Burns, Jada
Theye, Ashley Williams and Elise
Wheeler.
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2007 Ford Edge
AWD SEL, Low Miles
Give Ryan a call today!
www.philipmotor.com
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports & Accomplishments
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkLY SPECIAL:
Taco Salad
* * * * * *
SuNDAY SPECIAL:
Barbecued Pulled Pork
Oven Roasted Potatoes,
Salad Bar & Dessert
Battery Sale
Going on NOW until
the end of November!
10% off
all batteries!
859-2568 • Philip, SD
www.KennedyImplement.com
NOW ACCEPTING:
Staff SpotligHt
alex MooS
– Employed 5 Years
– You can catch him throughout
all our departments!!
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
859-2744 or 685-3068
Philip
2006 Dodge Grand Caravan
Rear TV Entertainment
Stow-N-Go Seating
NICE VAN
The Philip Lady Scotties hosted
their first round of the District 14B
Volleyball Tournament, Tuesday,
October 30, against the New Un-
derwood Tigers.
The Scotties won 3-1. The three
wins were fairly tight, and the loss
was forced into extended play.
Philip vs. New Underwood
25-20, 24-26, 25-18, 25-23
Serving: 89/99 (12 aces). Leaders: Court-
ney Bartlett – 10/11 (4 aces), Madison Hand –
15/15 (2 aces), Hanna Hostutler – 12/13 (2
aces).
Receiving: 67/74. Leaders: Krista Wells –
37/39, Jordyn Dekker – 11/13, Kaci Olivier –
7/7.
Setting: 128/131 (42 assists). Leader:
Hand – 107/108 (35 assists).
Hitting: 125/164 (48 kills). Leaders:
Dekker – 23/33 (18 kills), Hostutler – 15/20
(8 kills), Peyton DeJong – 24/24 (7 kills).
Blocking: 5 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 2
solos and 1 assist, Hand – 1 solo, Hostutler –
1 solo, DeJong – 1 assist.
Digging: 88/132. Leaders: Well – 27/31.
Hand – 12/16, Dekker – 10/12.
Of the six schools in District 14B
volleyball, Philip began the the dis-
trict tournament seeded as number
three. New Underwood was seeded
number six, ending its season 8-18.
Also on Tuesday, number five
seeded Rapid City Christian upset
number four seeded Oelrichs.
With a record of 7-18, Rapid City
Christian faced number one seeded
Edgemont (20-8), Thursday, No-
vember 1. In a major upset, the
Comets defeated the Moguls, 3-1,
with scores of 26-24, 20-25, 25-21
and 25-11.
Philip went against the number
two seeded Wall Eagles (17-8),
Thursday, November 1, in Wall.
The Lady Scotties lost 1-3. Philip
won the first game, but lost the sec-
ond. The third and fourth games
were close, with the final going into
extended play. Ending its 2012 sea-
son, Philip has a win/loss record of
Scotties win first round, drop second,
of District 14B Volleyball Tournament
Number One according to Tate DeJong
Krista Wells
Peyton DeJong
Ellie Coyle
13-18.
Philip vs. Wall
25-18, 16-25, 22-25, 26-28
Serving: 76/91 (7 aces). Leaders: Hand –
17/18 (2 aces), DeJong – 11/13 (1 ace),
Dekker – 15/18 (1 ace).
Receiving: 69/80. Leaders: Wells – 30/35,
Coyle – 12/12, Dekker – 12/13.
Setting: 103/107 (24 assists). Leader:
Hand – 74/76 (19 assists).
Hitting: 107/127 (27 kills). Leaders:
Dekker – 27/32 (8 kills), Hand – 18/20 (5
kills), DeJong – 11/12 (4 kills).
Blocking: – 8 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 8
solos, Brett Carley – 2 solos.
Digging: 73/116. Leaders: Wells – 28/39,
Hand – 11/13, Coyle – 10/13.
The Eagles played the Comets in
Wall, Friday, October 2. Wall won
the match 3-1, with game scores of
25-19, 18-25, 25-16 and 26-24.
Courtney Bartlett
Madison Hand and Coach Bouman
The Philip Nursing
Home residents
had a variety of
young guests on
the afternoon of
October 31. Bugs,
fairies, pirates,
super heroes,
witches and oth-
ers collected
candy, circled the
elaborate goodie
table and visited
with relatives and
friends who live at
the nursing home.
Photos by
Del Bartels
Philip Nursing Home’s
annual trick or treat
The annual fall festival by the Community Evangelical Free
Church, Philip, was held for children and adults of all ages,
October 31. Games included a cake walk, face painting, in-
flatable bounce castle, ring toss, basketball toss, kiddie car
bowling and fishing pond. Along with supper, prizes and
candy, there was a message and a Veggie Tales movie. Af-
terward was a special teen event. Photos by Del Bartels
Evangelical Free fall festival
Above, all sorts of Halloween decor
was seen at Amy Moses’ home on Pine
Street this year. Her jack-o’-lanterns all
sported big, happy smiles. Even the
scarecrows were friendly.
Photo by Nancy Haigh
Make your opinion
known … write a letter
to the editor!
Email with phone
number to
newsdesk@
pioneer-review.com
Legal NoticesDeadline: Fridays at Noon
Thursday, November 8, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 10
NOTICE OF AUDIT
OF THE FISCAL
AFFAIRS OF THE
CITY OF PHILIP
Notice is hereby given that the records
and books of account of the City of Philip,
South Dakota, have been audited by
Wohlenberg Ritzman & Co., LLC, Certi-
fied Public Accountants of Madison,
South Dakota, for the year ended De-
cember 31, 2011. A detailed report
thereon is filed with the City of Philip and
the Department of Legislative Audit in
Pierre, South Dakota, for public inspec-
tion.
This notice is published in compliance
with the provisions of SDCL 4-11-12.
MARTIN L. GUINDON, CPA,
AUDITOR GENERAL
DEPARTMENT OF LEGISLATIVE
AUDIT
[Published November 8 & 15, 2012, at
the total approximate cost of $16.90]
Notice to Creditors
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Pro. 12-8
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
)
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON
)
In the Matter of the Estate of
)
MARY A. PEKRON, Deceased.
)
Notice is given that on the 17th day of
October, 2012, Karen Kroetch, whose
address is PO Box 122, Philip, SD
57567, was appointed as Personal Rep-
resentative of the Estate of Mary A.
Pekron.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
/s/Karen Kroetch
Karen Kroetch
PO Box 122
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2761
Haakon Co. Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2627
Kemnitz Law Offices
Ralph A. Kemnitz
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2540
[Published October 25, November 1 & 8,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$51.62]
Proceedings of the
City of Philip
SPECIAL MEETING
OCTOBER 26, 2012
A special meeting of the Philip City Coun-
cil was called at the request of Dale Mor-
rison and affirmed by Council Member
Marty Gartner to request formal action of
the City Council on a building permit sub-
mitted by Dale Morrison.
Morrison is very eager to proceed with
his proposed construction due to im-
pending inclement weather and, after nu-
merous changes to the original permit re-
quest, site visits to the property, tele-
phone calls to and from both parties in-
volved (Morrison and Don Ravellette),
changes to construction plans, property
line disputes, and requests made by the
building committee to Morrison, the com-
mittee felt that this permit needed to be
heard before the entire City Council prior
to giving their approval for said construc-
tion.
The special meeting was called to order
and the following were in attendance:
Mayor Michael Vetter, Finance Officer
Monna Van Lint, Council Members Greg
Arthur, Jason Harry, Jennifer Henrie, Tr-
isha Larson, Marion Matt, and Marty
Gartner. Also present were, Dale Morri-
son, Don Ravellette, Del Bartels of the
Pioneer Review and later, City Attorney,
Gay Tollefson,.
Absent: None
Mayor Vetter called the meeting to order
at 3:45 p.m. stating that the purpose of
this meeting was to review the current
building permit filed with the City on Oc-
tober 25, 2012, by Dale Morrison for a
60' x 80' steel structure to be located on
Tracts A & B, in NW1/4 of SW1/4 of Sec-
tion 13-01-20, Philip Acreage, City of
Philip, Haakon County, SD (commercially
zoned property).
This permit replaces two previous per-
mits filed by Morrison for the construction
of this building.
The building will be situated on the above
described property in an easterly/west-
erly direction. The building's store front
will be approx. 55' from the back of curb
facing SD Hwy. 73. The north wall of the
structure (running horizontally with US
Hwy. 14) will be located 17' from the
property line and the south wall of the
structure will be located approx. 21.5'
from the south property line, which abuts
a residential home (located in a commer-
cially zoned area) owned by Don and
Tami Ravellette.
The building is now proposed to house a
Napa Auto Parts Store with a repair shop
area on the south side of the building.
Mayor Vetter noted that the current build-
ing permit denotes that Mr. Morrison has
rescinded his request to fill in the open
water reservoir area located on the east-
ern side of this property and has initialed
said permit acknowledging that this re-
quest has been removed. When ques-
tioned, Morrison confirmed that this was
in fact the case.
As a matter of record, Mr. Morrison had
previously submitted a demolition and
building permit for a 60'x80' or 80'x100'
commercial structure for this same loca-
tion. These permits were reviewed by the
City on July 02, 2012. The purpose of the
structure was proposed as an auto parts
store and truck tire repair shop. The
building was originally planned to be sit-
uated on the property perpendicular to
US Hwy. 14 (kitty-corner on the lot facing
north and west).
The demolition permit was approved on
July 02, 2012, but approval of the initial
construction building permit was contin-
gent upon approval by the SD Dept. of
Transportation for an additional approach
to US Hwy. 14 in order to effectively and
safely move truck traffic in and out of the
proposed building location.
Mr. Morrison has made application to the
SD DOT for the requested highway ap-
proach to SD Hwy. 14 and a letter of sup-
port was requested from the City by Mor-
rison and provided by the City for submit-
tal with his application on August 30,
2012. To date, the State of SD has not
made formal action on this request as
confirmed by the City Offices with Dean
VanDeWiele, Regional DOT Supervisor.
This proposed construction has raised
concerns with the property owner to the
south, Don Ravellette as it relates to
ingress and egress from his property and
access to his garage, which is located to
the east at the rear of his home. With the
proposed construction, Ravellette will not
have enough area to access his garage
without trespassing on private property.
In addition to these concerns, the build-
ings are located in commercially zoned
property, which allows for structures to
be built on a property line. If this were to
happen, it would effectively negate any
use of the existing garage on Ravellette's
property. Additional areas of concern for
Ravellette are potential drainage issues
that might arise from the construction of
Morrison's building in its proposed loca-
tion. He fears that water may drain into
his garage or onto his property that could
potentially inundate his garage.
Don Ravellette and Dale Morrison then
advised the Council that they have come
to a mutual agreement relative to both of
the concerns outlined by Ravellette as it
relates to property access as well as
drainage.
Ravellette has contacted Gay Tollefson,
Attorney, and asked that she draw up a
mutual easement agreement between
both parties. Ravellette stated that the
easement is being prepared by Tollefson
and will allow for egress and ingress for
both parties on the north side of Ravel-
lette and the south side of Morrison. The
easement states that Ravellette will
agree to a seven (7) foot easement from
his north property line south and Morri-
son agrees to a fifteen (15) foot ease-
ment from his south property line north
which should effectively allow for ingress
and egress of traffic and mutual use of
the area by both parties. The Council
was assured that both parties would be
signing the mutual easement agreement
as soon as it was ready and Ravellette
will be responsible for having the docu-
ment filed against both properties in the
Register of Deeds Office. A copy of the
easement agreement, once signed and
filed, was requested by the City Office to
be made a part of the building permit
record as submitted by Morrison. Ravel-
lette agreed that this would be done.
Next addressed was Ravellette's con-
cern about drainage onto his property.
Morrison and Ravellette, along with the
building committee, have done an on-site
visit to the property and reviewed Ravel-
lette's concerns about drainage. Morri-
son's permit stated that once foundations
are dug and poured, all excess sand on
the south side of the structure will be lev-
eled out which should then make the
drainage concern a mute issue. Both
parties verbally stated that they have
agreed to work out a mutual agreement
to correct any drainage issues that may
arise.
Motion was then made by Gartner, sec-
onded by Matt to approve the building
permit of Dale and Tami Morrison as pre-
sented and outlined above.
At this time, Attorney Gay Tollefson ar-
rived. Tollefson confirmed with the Coun-
cil that she has in fact drawn a mutual
easement agreement for use of the prop-
erty in question between Don and Tami
Ravellette and Dale and Tami Morrison.
She noted for the record that she will not
be charging neither party nor the City for
the drafting of this document as it will ac-
commodate the greater good of the com-
munity as part of her City Attorney duties.
Council and those present thanked
Tollefson for her generosity and willing-
ness to assist with this matter and more
effectively finding a suitable compromise
for all parties involved.
The motion previously made was then
formally acted upon with all members
voting in favor of approving Dale & Tami
Morrison's building permit. Motion car-
ried.
Mayor Vetter declared the meeting ad-
journed at 3:53 p.m.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint, Finance Officer
[Published November 8, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $77.33]
FINDING OF NO
SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
WEST CENTRAL
ELECTRIC
COOPERATIVE, INC.
OVERHEAD
TRANSMISSION LINE
FOR KEYSTONE XL
PIPELINE PUMP
STATION #18
ENGINEERING AND
ENVIRONMENTAL
STAFF RURAL
UTILITIES SERVICE
OCTOBER 2012
Background
West Central Electric Cooperative, Inc.
(West Central) has requested financial
assistance from the Rural Utilities Serv-
ice (RUS) for the construction of 26.5
miles of 115 kV overhead transmission
line in Haakon County, South Dakota.
The line would provide electrical power
to Pump Station 18 to the proposed Key-
stone XL pipeline (KXL). TransCanada
Keystone Pipeline, L.P. (TransCanada)
applied to the U.S. Department of State
(DOS) for a presidential permit for the
construction of KXL. In considering this
application, DOS prepared an environ-
mental impact statement (EIS) to meet its
obligations under the National Environ-
mental Policy Act (NEPA), as amended
(42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) and the Council
on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regula-
tions (40 CFR §§ 1500-1508). RUS was
a cooperating agency in the preparation
of the EIS, which evaluated the potential
impacts of the construction and operation
of the KXL and its associated facilities.
The final EIS was issued on August 26,
2011 and it is available at http://key-
s t o n e p i p e l i n e - x l . s t a t e . g o v /
archive/dos_docs/index.htm.
Due to concerns about the KXL align-
ment in Nebraska, the presidential permit
was denied to allow further consideration
of the alignment in Nebraska. The DOS
is currently preparing a supplemental EIS
(SEIS), and RUS is a cooperating
agency in the preparation of that SEIS.
In June 2012, DOS notified RUS that the
SEIS would only be considering changes
in the alignment in Nebraska, but that no
changes were being considered for align-
ments in other states. To meet its obliga-
tions under NEPA and the CEQ regula-
tions and because the DOS EIS did not
include detailed and site-specific infor-
mation related specifically to West Cen-
tral’s proposed transmission line, RUS
prepared an environmental assessment
(EA) of this proposal.
Description of Proposed Project
The proposed project would construct a
new 115 kV transmission line on private
property adjacent to existing county and
township road rights-of-way. The line
would begin at an existing Western Area
Power Administration substation located
approximately 3 miles north-northwest of
the town of Philip in Haakon County
South Dakota. The line would be con-
structed of single-structure wood or steel
poles. Specific information on the facili-
ties to be constructed and their locations
are provided in the EA.
Alternatives Considered
West Central submitted an environmen-
tal report to RUS which addressed the
potential environmental impact of the
proposal. RUS conducted an independ-
ent evaluation of the environmental re-
port and concurred with its scope and
content. West Central and RUS consid-
ered the alternatives of no action, alter-
native routes for the transmission line, al-
ternative methods of delivery such as
burying the line underground, and alter-
native design and construction methods.
Under the no action alternative, RUS
would not provide financing for the pro-
posed facilities. In accordance with
NEPA, CEQ regulations, and RUS’ Envi-
ronmental Policies and Procedures at 7
CFR 1794.53, RUS has accepted West
Central’s environmental analysis as its
EA for the proposed project.
Public Involvement Process
RUS published the EA for a 30-day pub-
lic comment period. The public notice an-
nouncing the availability of the EA was
published in the (Philip) Pioneer Review
on October 11, 2011, and the document
was also made available at West Cen-
tral’s office in Murdo, South Dakota. RUS
did not receive any comments during the
30-day public comment period.
Finding of No Significant Impact
West Central consulted with the South
Dakota state field office of the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the
South Dakota Department of Game, Fish
and Parks (SDGFP) regarding federally
listed threatened and endangered
species as well as other species of con-
cern. In October 2009, the USFWS re-
sponded to West Central stating that the
project “…will have no significant impact
on fish and wildlife resources. It does not
involve any federally listed threatened or
endangered species or their habitats.” In
December 2009, SDGFP responded to
West Central, identifying sensitive areas
to avoid and recommending that West
Central follow guidance from the Avian
Power Line Interaction Committee
(APLIC). West Central’s mitigation plans
include avoidance of sensitive areas and
following APLIC guidance to mitigate bird
collisions. RUS has reviewed West Cen-
tral’s mitigation plans and Federal and
State agency correspondence, and finds
that the project complies with the Endan-
gered Species Act, the Migratory Bird
Treaty Act, and all other Federal and
State laws regarding the protection of
species of concern.
The proposed project is an undertaking
subject to review under Section 106 of
the National Historic Preservation Act
and its implementing regulation (36 CFR
Part 800). In accordance with the RUS’s
delegation of authority memo for Section
106 review, West Central initiated con-
sultation dated July 16, 2009, West Cen-
tral initiated consultation with the State
Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) at
the South Dakota Historical Society.
Based on a commitment of avoidance
from West Central for two sites in the
area of potential effect, the SHPO con-
curred with a finding of “no historic prop-
erties affected.” RUS finds that Section
106 review is complete for this project,
however, if unanticipated discoveries are
encountered during construction, work
will cease in the area of the discovery
and the RUS Environmental and Engi-
neering Staff will be notified immediately.
Based on consultation with the above-
mentioned agencies as well as consulta-
tion with the U.S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers, the Natural Resources Conserva-
tion Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs,
the South Dakota Department of Natural
Resources, and based upon the analysis
provided in the EA, RUS concluded that
the construction and operation of the
transmission line would have no signifi-
cant impact to land use, vegetation, fish
and wildlife resources, federally listed
threatened or endangered species, water
quality, air quality, social or economic
concerns in the project area, aesthetics,
human health and safety, transportation,
or ambient noise levels. The proposal
would have no impact to the 100-year
floodplain, prime farmland, or cultural re-
sources. The proposed project will not
have a disproportionate adverse environ-
mental or human health impact to minor-
ity or low-income populations.
No other potential significant impacts re-
sulting from the proposal have been
identified. Therefore, RUS has deter-
mined that this finding of no significant
impact fulfills its obligations under the
National Environmental Policy Act, as
amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the
Council on Environmental Quality Regu-
lations (40 CFR §§ 1500-1508), and
RUS’s Environmental Policies and Pro-
cedures (7 CFR part 1794) for its action
related to the proposal. Because RUS’
federal action would not result in signifi-
cant impacts to the quality of the human
environment, it will not prepare an Envi-
ronmental Impact Statement for its action
related to the proposal.
RuS Loan Review and Right of Ad-
ministrative Review
This FONSI is not a decision on a loan or
loan guarantee application and therefore
not an approval of the expenditure of fed-
eral funds. Issuance of the FONSI and its
notices concludes RUS’s environmental
review process in accordance with NEPA
and RUS’s Environmental Policies and
Procedures (7 CFR Part 1794). The ulti-
mate decision as to loan or loan guaran-
tee approval depends upon conclusion of
this environmental review process in ad-
dition to financial and engineering re-
views. Issuance of the FONSI and publi-
cation of notices will allow for these re-
views to proceed. The decision to pro-
vide financial assistance is also subject
to the availability of loan funds for the
designated purpose in RUS’s budget.
There are no provisions to appeal this
decision (i.e., issuance of a FONSI).
Legal challenges to the FONSI may be
filed in federal district court under the Ad-
ministrative Procedures Act.
Approval
This Finding of No Significant Impact is
effective on signature
Dated: _______________________
_____________________
Nivin A. Elgohary
Assistant Administrator
Electric Program
Rural Utilities Service
[Published November 8, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $78.95]
continued on page 11
ads@pioneer-review.com
IN HONOR OF VETERANS DAY …the Philip High School band
and choir are performing in concert Tuesday, November 13, at 6:30
p.m. in the Fine Arts Building. All veterans will be recognized for
their service.
HAAKON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY … will hold its annual
Scholastic Book Fair in the community room of the courthouse from
November 13-16. Hours are from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Greetings from sunny, breezy, a
little bit damp northeast Haakon
County. We have had some dreary,
overcast days, and I am so thankful
for the rain showers we have re-
ceived. Even though we didn't get
a lot of moisture, it is just nice to
have the dust settled a bit. But I
am also glad to see the sun! I know
I am solar powered, and the cloudy
days, coupled with the time
change, have kept my energy levels
on low – guess it is time to start
taking vitamin D, since I'm pretty
sure I won't be wintering in a
warm, sunny location. Actually, we
have had such a nice fall – it is
truly a gift.
Large numbers of geese and
cranes continue to go over the
house, heading to their winter
quarters. I love to watch them and
hear them as they head across the
sky. And our small song birds have
been bunching up also. It seems
like a large number of them are di-
rectionally challenged, because
they keep flying into my living
room window. At least I think it is
a large number – certainly it can't
be the same stupid bird every time!
If it is the same bird, he or she
probably has quite a headache by
now.
We are still seeing quite a few
skunks around here – they have
been practically epidemic this year.
Last night, Randy shot a porcupine
near our shop, so that is one more
varmint that won't be bothering us.
In the evenings, it sounds like
there are dozens of coyotes not too
far away. And the fox sometimes
get in on the noise making. Our
poor dogs stay pretty busy, trying
to protect their territory, but I
think sometimes they just cover
their ears so they can get some
rest!
Yesterday, as I was gathering
news, the house seemed to get a lit-
tle chilly. It was cloudy, and the
breeze had picked up, so I decided
to use my tried and true remedy for
a chilly house – baking! While I
was deciding what to bake, I re-
membered that the banana supply
in the freezer had reached critical
mass. You see, it never matters
how many bananas I buy, if I buy
four, we eat three, if I buy five, we
eat four. The result is that one of
the bananas gets tossed in the
freezer, ready to become banana
bread or banana muffins or banana
"something" at a later date. The
critical mass is reached when there
are so many bananas in the
freezer, there is a danger of getting
hit on the toe by a falling frozen ba-
nana when the freezer door is
opened. (That makes my husband
unhappy.) So, we now have banana
bread, which will come in handy
when the deer hunters arrive this
weekend.
Enough silly stuff – on to the
news.
The first order of news is that
our former neighbor, Lil Briggs,
has moved from her home near Ft.
Pierre to the Dakota Heritage
House in Pierre. It is a wonderful
facility, and I hope Lil will be very
comfortable and happy there. She
has worked so hard all her life –
time for her to be able to take
things a little easier. Her mailing
address is Lil Briggs, c/o Dakota
Heritage House, 520 E. Dakota,
Pierre, SD 57501. I believe her
phone number will remain the
same.
Duane and Lola Roseth went to
Philip last Friday and visited their
daughter-in-law, Jackie, and
grandson, Royce. They also got to
see their son, Thor, for a bit, but he
is very busy with cattle business
this time of year. They visited
Duane's father, Roy, also. I'm glad
to report that Roy is doing better,
regaining some strength and en-
ergy after his recent illness. What
a tough guy he is! From Philip,
Duane and Lola went on to Rapid
City to visit Lola's mother, Joy
Klima.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed
helped at the cattle sale Saturday
and attended church Sunday. Billy
missed a couple of the cattle sales
last week because he was under
the weather, but Arlyne said he is
feeling better every day now –
great news!
Last Tuesday, Gene Hudson was
in Philip to pick up materials for
this week's election. Saturday,
Dick and Gene attended the 4-H
recognition event in Pierre. I know
their grandsons received some
awards, but I wasn't able to reach
Jon or Connie Johnson to get the
details – more on that next week,
hopefully. The kids work hard on
their projects, and I congratulate
them on their success. Both Dick
and Gene are dealing with colds, I
guess it is just that time of year.
Ray and Nancy Neuhauser have
been busy with their normal card
games and senior center activities.
Nancy played cards with a group of
friends last Friday, then attended
another card party that evening.
Nancy had a visit this past week
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursdav, November 8, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
DSS 30, 25' luclci lifi. $1,800.
441-9669, Wall. WP11-ifn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford E×pcdi-
iion XLT 4×4, cloiI scais, powcr
windows, locls & scais, good
iircs. Call 685-8155. PF10-ifn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O'CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Focl, Sand,
Cravcl (scrccncd or crusIcdi. Wc
can dclivcr. Dans, dugouis,
luilding siics. Our 37iI ycar.
Clcnn or Tracc, 859-2020.
PF11-ifn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Spccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV applicaiion. ALSO. prairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23ip
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iypcs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
ups, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52ip
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iypcs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׫gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: Hcrcford lull calvcs.
Will lccp uniil Dcccnlcr 1,
2012. Hovland Hcrcfords, Allcn
Hovland, 544-3236, or Milcs
Hovland, 544-3294.
PF10-2ic
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
local dclivcry includcd, scni-
load lois, no nold or wccds,
largc rounds pui up rigIi. Call
Fol, 390-5535; CIarlcs, 390-
5506. P47-4ic
SELLING: 10 Dlacl Angus con-
ncrical lrcd Icifcrs Saiurday,
Novcnlcr 3, ai PIilip (SDi Livc-
siocl Auciion. AI lrcd Angus io
DL Inccniivc 228 (EPDs DW 0,
WW 81, YW 133, M 28i. Pasiurc
lrcd io Crccn Mouniain Froni
Man (EPDs DW -.7, WW 61, YW
99 M 28i. TIcsc Icifcrs origi-
naicd oui of iIc 2012 DHSS pcn
of fivc. TIcsc vcry fancy lrcd
Icifcrs will wcigI 1,050 lls. and
arc lrcd io siari calving MarcI 1
for 45 days. Favcllciic Caiilc,
685-5147 or Ionc, 859-2969.
PF6-5ip
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Cci rcady for fall Iauling! 12-
ply, 235185116F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIop, 859-
2744, PIilip. P40-ifn
GARAGE SALES
MOVING SALE: Musi downsizc!
Foriy ycars collcciion of Iousc-
Iold iicns. Sonc furniiurc, an-
iiqucs, collcciillcs, variciy of
aduli cloiIing (sonc nanc
lrandi, sizcs vary, 0-5 and 10-
12, snall applianccs and nucI
norc! Friday Nov. 16, 5.00 -
7.30 p.n. and Saiurday Nov. 17,
10 a.n. - noon. Clcnn & Fiia O'-
Conncll rcsidcncc 615 N Wood
Avc., jusi noriI of iIc WF1L-J
luilding. PF11-2ic
HELP WANTED
CLASS A CDL DRIVER: Daloia
Mill & Crain is looling for driv-
crs. Laic nodcl cquipncni.
Clcan driving rccord. Doullcs,
Triplcs and ovcrnigIi siays rc-
quircd, in iIc SouiI Daloia
arca. Conpciiiivc pay wiiI lcn-
cfiis. Siop ly any of our 10 loca-
iions and picl up an applicaiion
or c-nail rcsunc io jaclI«
daloianill.con. E.O.E.
PW48-2ic
COOK WANTED: Cood Sanari-
ian Sociciy, Ncw Undcrwood,
Pari-iinc for 4-8.30 p.n. sIifi.
Coniaci. Lorrainc, 754-6489 or
apply onlinc www.good-san.
con. CHECK OUT OUF NEW
WACE SCALE, INCLUDINC
COMPENSATION FOF EXPEFI-
ENCE. EOE1AA1M1F1V1H.
PW48-4ic
HELP WANTED: Daloia Mill &
Crain, Inc. is looling for an ag-
grcssivc, ican-nindcd, forward-
iIinling individual io lc a
Locaiion Managcr ai our PIilip,
SD locaiion. All applicanis and
infornaiion is 100% confidcn-
iial. Apply io Jacl Haggcriy ai
jaclI«daloianill.con or fa× rc-
sunc io 605-718-2844.
WP10-2ic
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED ai
Days Inn, Wall. Possilly pcrna-
ncni ycar-round posiiion, siari-
ing inncdiaicly. Coniaci
TIcrcsa, 279-2000. PW46-ifn
POSITION AVAILABLE: TIc
Kadola Arca ScIool Disirici is
looling for a lus noniior ai an
Iourly raic of $11. TIc Iours for
iIis posiiion would lc appro×i-
naicly 6.15 io 8 a.n. and 3.30
io 5.15 p.n. on all scIool days
wiiI iIc possililiiy of addiiional
days as assigncd. An applica-
iion nay lc oliaincd fron iIc
scIool or on iIc scIool disirici's
wclsiic; ladola.l12. sd.us.
Plcasc fccl frcc io coniaci iIc
scIool wiiI furiIcr qucsiions
aloui iIis posiiion. Conplcicd
applicaiion nay lc droppcd off
ai iIc scIool or scni ii io.
Kadola ScIool, Aiin. Supi.
Janic Hcrnann, PO Do× 99,
Kadola, SD 57543 or call 837-
2175. EOE. K47-2ic
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE IN QUINN: Floiaiion
waicrlcd in a sclf-coniaincd
foan lag (uscs rcgular quccn
sIccisi wiiI lafflcs, includcs cn-
iirc lcd, $100. Call 386-2372.
PW47-2ic
FOR SALE: Scvcral nicc uscd
rcfrigcraiors wiiI warraniics.
Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63, Do× Eldcr.
390-9810. WP9-4ip
FOR SALE: Fopc Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ropc, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
FOR SALE: Scvcral nicc uscd
rcfrigcraiors wiiI warraniics.
Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63, Do× Eldcr.
390-9810. P46-4ip
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: Old Indian iicns,
lcadworl, quillworl, old guns,
old painicd luffalo Iidcs, old
pIoiograpIs. CasI paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802. F46-4ic
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrilc
Avc PIilip. 3 lcdroon 1.5 laiI,
ccniral air, fucl oil Icai and
wood siovc. Opcn conccpi,
siainlcss siccl fridgc and siovc.
wasIcr and drycr includcd.
Hardwood laninaic floors, scpa-
raic dining roon. Mosily fin-
isIcd lascncni. Cciling fans
iIrougIoui. Ncw windows and
roof. Fcnccd in, largc laclyard
wiiI covcr paiio and sioragc
sIcd. Can cnail pIoios. Call
859-2470 or (785i 259-4207.
P48-8ic
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 lcd-
roons, 2 laiIs, aiiacIcd 2-car
garagc, largc loi. Call 859-2403,
PIilip. PF10-ifn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two lcdroon apari-
ncni in Wall. Call 386-2222.
WP9-4ic
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: Spacious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or siop in iIc lolly and
picl up an applicaiion. Caicway
Aparincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc acccpi
rcsponsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc paid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi paid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is placcd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
A síncc)c und upp)ccíutíuc
tIunI uou to cuc)uonc uIo
stoppcd Iu tIc Iospítuí to uísít,
cuíícd, scnt ]íouc)s, o) díd unu
uct o] Iíndncss ]o) nu uí]c, Tc))u
A. Ku))cís, du)íng Ic) stuu ut tIc
PIíííp Iospítuí. It uus uc)u nucI
upp)ccíutcd Iu IotI o] us, ]u)
no)c tIun I cun cxp)css uítI
nc)c pcn und pupc). Aíso, I uunt
to tIunI tIc docto)s, nu)scs und
stu]] ut tIc PIíííp Iospítuí ]o)
tIcí) uondc)]uí und conpussíon-
utc cu)c o] nu uí]c ín Ic) ]ínuí
duus. I t)uíu Icíícuc tIut tIís
ícucí o] cu)íng couídn`t Ic ]ound
unuuIc)c císc ín tIc Unítcd
Stutcs und ]o) tIut I`n uc)u
g)utc]uí.
Fínuííu, I uunt to cxtcnd u uc)u
spccíuí und Icu)t]cít tIunI uou
to D). Cocn Kíoppc) ]o) not oníu
uou) ncdícuí cxpc)tísc, Iut uíso
]o) uou) Iununítu. You u)c un cx-
t)uo)dínu)u Iunun Icíng und
uou) ])ícndsIíp und Iíndncss to
IotI Tc))u und nc uííí ncuc) Ic
]o)gottcn. Vcstc)n SoutI DuIotu
ís uc)u ]o)tunutc to Iuuc uou und
uou) ]unííu ííuíng Ic)c. Muu tIc
good Lo)d Iícss und Iccp uou
und uou) ]unííu.
Síncc)cíu,
MícIucí H. Ku))cís
Munu ]oíIs ])on Mídíund
uouíd ííIc to tIunI tIc Ludícs
Auxíííu)u CíuI ín Mídíund ]o) put-
tíng on tIc uondc)]uí Huííouccn
Pu)tu und IuIíng tIc dcíícíous
cooIícs. Vc uouíd uíso ííIc to
tIunI ScIuuns ]o) donutíng
pízzu und Mídíund Food ö Fucí
]o) donutíng pízzu und cIíps.
TIís ís un cucnt uc uíí cn]ou
cuc)u ucu) und tIc Iíds Iuuc u
Iíust sccíng cucI otIc) cos-
tuncs. TIunIs ]o) nuIíng ít pos-
síIíc.
EMPLOYMENT
KTC CONSTFUCTION SEEKS
EMPLOYEES, loiI pari-iinc
and full-iinc. E×ccllcni pay1
lcncfiis! Undcrground plunl-
ing, digging, ircncIing, opcrai-
ing cquipncni. Willing io irain.
Sulnii rcsuncs io rodl«lcn-
nclcciclcpIonc.con. Oucsiions,
call 605-869-2220.
SALES ACFONOMIST1PFECI-
SION AC posiiion ai Howard
Farncrs Coop, Howard SD.
Salcs c×pcricncc, lnowlcdgc of
Ag cIcnicals and prccision
Ag1VFT is prcfcrrcd. Call Colly
605-772-5543.
FOR SALE
AKC llacl and ycllow lal pup-
pics, nalc and fcnalc, rcady io
go Nov. 14, good Iuniing par-
cnis, dcw claws rcnovcd,
$250.00. Fingnccl Foosi, Crc-
gory. PI. (605i 835-9629.
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Capiiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs onlyi. Call Fus-
scll Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rcprcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.i Call
iIis ncwspapcr, 859-2516, or
800-658-3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
DFIVEFS. $1,000 SICN-ON
DONUS. Ncw Pay Progran!
¯Earn up io 50 cpn ¯Honc
Wcclly ¯2500+ nilcs, 95% no-
iarp. Musi lc Canadian cligillc
(888i 691-5705.
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI,
33¢134¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456. 1024,
joc«iliirucl.con.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2001 CMC Sonona,
appro×. 147K nilcs, dcpcndallc,
good iircs, $5,000. 441-1364.
PF11-2ip
FOR SALE: 1979 CIcvrolci Sil-
vcrado 30, dually wiiI Duralisi
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN. ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Oualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
ADOPTION
ADOPT - WE WILL PFOVIDE a
Iappy, loving Ionc, lcauiiful
lifc for your prccious ncwlorn
laly. E×pcnscs paid. Marricd
couplc Wali1Cina. Call for info.
1-800-315-6957.
AUCTION
LAFCE NATIVE AMEFICAN col-
lcciion of prinis, piciurcs, plaics
and dccoraiivc iicns for salc ai
in-doors Two-Fing Auciion, Car-
pcnicr Auciion Ccnicr, Lalc
Dcnion, MN, Saiurday, Nov. 10,
9.30 a.n. Piclups, loai,
fircarns, aniiqucs, furniiurc,
IouscIold, nisccllancous.
www.carpcnicrauciion. con.
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
oontinued on paee 12
0IassItIed
AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50
nininun for firsi 20 words;
10¢ pcr word iIcrcaficr; in-
cludcd in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu,
tIc P)o]ít, ö TIc Pcnníngton
Co. Cou)unt, as wcll as on our
wclsiic. www.pionccr-rc-
vicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns,
Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nini-
nun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
pcr word iIcrcaficr. EacI
nanc and iniiial nusi lc
counicd scparaicly. Includcd
in iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc
P)o]ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
nininun for firsi 20 words;
10¢ pcr word iIcrcaficr.
EacI nanc and iniiial nusi
lc counicd scparaicly.
Prinicd only in iIc Píoncc)
Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc
for loollccping and lilling
on all cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00
pcr colunn incI, includcd in
iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu and tIc
P)o]ít. $5.55 pcr colunn incI
for iIc Píoncc) Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic ad-
vcriiscd in iIis ncwspapcr is suljcci io iIc
Fcdcral Fair Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI
nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany prcfcrcncc,
or discrininaiion on racc, color, rcligion,
sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io
nalc any sucI prcfcrcncc, liniiaiion, or
discrininaiion."
TIis ncwspapcr will noi lnowingly acccpi
any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a vi-
olaiion of iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd
iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncwspa-
pcr arc availallc on an cqual opporiuniiy
lasis.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
Fo( app||cal|or
& |rlo(ral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varadererl
1113 3re(rar 3l.
3lu(d|s. 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ o(
1-800-211-282ê
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
l$ l1 1lNlF
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
CaII Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
PhiIip
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
6l086l`$
Welding & Repair
· DOT Inspection
· CompIete TraiIer Repair
· FuII Line of Bearings & SeaIs
· Tractor Front End & SpindIes
· SeIIing New SteeI
· RecycIing OutIet
· Refrigration & A/C on CommerciaI,
ResidentiaI & VehicIes
· ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
0eo(de: 111-3ê0Z · Lee: 111-3ê0ê
0l88l$
859-2970 · Philip
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing
Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today for your
free estimate!!
Job Opening
Haakon SchooI District 27-1
Haakon SchooI District is accepting appIications for a
SpeciaI Education ParaprofessionaI at the
MiIesviIIe RuraI Attendance Center.
Must be highly qualified or able to become highly qualified.
Position will be open until filled. Applications are available in the
Business Office or online at www.phiIip.k12.sd.us.
Direct anv questions to
Mr. Keven Morehart at . EOE emplover.
CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
S=n-¿1oo · Philip, SÐ
Ior ull yoor concrete
constroction needs:
Lunch 8pec|a|s:
Honday-Fr|day
11:00 to 1:30
6a|| for
spec|a|s!
Regu|ar Henu
Ava||ab|e N|ght|y!
* * *
Fr|day ßuffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
0swa|swa l||||a
ktstrra||sas:
ääâ-tII1
~ Saturday, Nov. 10 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Nov. 12 ~
Prime Rib
Sandwich
I|t ä|ta||sast k lsaart
êata 0a||r Msa¢ar ||ra äa|ar¢ar
8
a
|a
d
ß
a
r
A
v
a
||a
b
|e
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, Nov. 6 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Nov. 7 ~
Indian Taco or
Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Nov. 8 ~
Petite Top Sirloin
~ Friday Buffet, Nov. 9 ~
Barbecued Pork Ribs
Chicken • Shrimp
from hor grnnddnughfor fhnf IIvos
nonr Ynnkfon. Tho grnnddnughfor
usod fo IIvo In Þow York, nnd fhov
woro fhnnkfuI fo bo IIvIng In Soufh
Ðnkofn whon fho hurrIcnno dovns-
fnfod fho Insf Consf Insf wookond.
ÞoIs nnd Ðorofhv InuIson woro
In IIorro Insf IrIdnv fo fnko cnro of
busInoss. Snfurdnv mornIng,
Ðorofhv vIsIfod hor noIghbor, IoIIv
Iruco. And Sundnv, Ðorofhv nf-
fondod church nf Ðoop Crook. Sho
snId fhov rocoIvod .06 Inchos of rnIn
from fho mosf roconf showor.
Ðorofhv snId sho nnd ÞoIs hnvo
boon sfnvIng busv mosf roconfIv,
fhov hnvo boon busv IookIng for
fhoIr smnII sfnInIoss sfooI fhormos.
If sounds IIko If Is ono of fhoso "I
know If's nround horo somopInco"
donIs. As mv dnd wouId hnvo snId,
"You'II fInd If In fho Insf pInco vou
Iook." If fook n whIIo for fhnf fo
mnko sonso fo mo.
!nsf Tuosdnv, IIII nnd IoIIv
Iruco wonf fo IhIIIp nnd If. IIorro
fo fnko cnro of busInoss. ThoIr son,
VInco, nnd dnughfor-In-Inw, KnfIo,
hnvo boon busv hoIpIng frIonds nnd
noIghbors wIfh cnffIo work. IoIIv
nffondod church In MIdInnd Sun-
dnv nnd hoIpod wIfh fho nnnunI
furkov dInnor fhoro. IIII sfnvod
homo, bocnuso ho wns onforfnInIng
n coId. IoIIv hnd boon sIck onrIIor
In fho wook I guoss sho shnrod
fho bug wIfh hor husbnnd!
If sounds IIko Irnnk nnd ShIrIov
HnIIIgnn hnvo boon busv wIfh son-
sonnI fnsks. Irnnk workod on
wnfor IInos Thursdnv nnd IrIdnv,
nnd ShIrIov mndo n swIpo nf fho
Ionvos nf fhoIr houso In fown nnd
fhov hnuIod fhom off on Snfurdnv.
Thov wonf ouf fo suppor wIfh fhoIr
noIghbors In fown IrIdnv nIghf,
nnd Snfurdnv fhov fook fhoIr
frIonds, IIIIv nnd Þnncv Wobb, fo
Iunch boforo fho Wobbs Ioff for
Toxns.
CIInf nnd !nurn AIIomnn hnd
nnofhor busv wook nf fhoIr pInco,
nnd fhov snId fhov nro ronIIv onjov-
Ing fho wonfhor. Tuosdnv, CIInf,
AIIvvn nnd !nurn wonf fo fown fo
McenvIIIe News
{ccntInued trcm page 10)
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE. YEARLINGS: 10 A.M. CALVES: 1 P.M.
(MTi. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING ?S00 HEAD
YEARLINGS:
STEVE NELSON/LA2Y 3 LIVESTOCK - CONSCINMENT OF 3300 HEAD
OF YFLCS
-2400 DLK SPAY HFFS
-680 FED ANC & CHAF X SPAY HFFS
-220 DLK, FED, & CHAF X STFS...............................................800-950=
SHEARER - 30 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS.....................................750-850=
SIMONS - 25 DLK STFS ................................................................800-900=
LONG - 20 DLK SPAY HFFS .............................................................7-750=
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE
ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
SANDERS RANCH - 550 DLK & CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI,AN..............500-600=
ROBERTSON & ROBERTSON - 450 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI.......475-575=
R. PORCH & S. PORCH - 350 DLK CLVS; FS ................................400-525=
GUPTILL - 325 DLK CLVS; FS.......................................................550-650=
M. JONES & SONS - 220 DLK & FED STFS FS, NI........................450-550=
KNECHT - 160 DLK CLVS; FS .......................................................450-550=
LONG - 150 DLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................400-500=
ENDERS - 125 DLK CLVS; FS........................................................500-600=
SHEARER - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI.................................................450-550=
LANTIS - 120 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .........................................400-500=
HOWIE - 110 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI, WEANED .........................500-600=
CAPP RANCH - 100 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI,AN..........................350-450=
TAYLOR - 100 DLK STFS; FS........................................................500-600=
GARTNER & GARTNER - 100 DLK ANC STFS; FS,NI,AN .....................575=
STOVER - 80 DLK STFS; FS,NI ............................................................550=
PRICE - 80 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,WEANED.........................................550-600=
BRUNSON - 75 DLK CLVS; FS,NI..........................................................550=
BAKER - 75 DLK CLVS; FS,ASV ....................................................500-575=
CARLSON - 70 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................500-550=
MAILLOUX - 70 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-600=
SAMPSON - 70 DLK CLVS; FS,NI...................................................400-550=
SINKEY - 70 DLK CLVS; FS, NI .....................................................500-550=
RICHARDS - 60 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI......................................550-600=
SIELER & SIELER - 60 DLK STFS; FS,NI ......................................450-500=
BERRY - 50 FED & DLK AND STFS; FS,NI ...........................................600=
CARROLL - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................475-575=
HALEY - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................400-500=
EISENBRAUN - 45 DLK STFS; FS..................................................500-600=
WEISER - 40 DLK STFS; FS,AN............................................................600=
ADDISON - 40 DLK CLVS; FS,NI....................................................500-550=
PATTERSON - 35 DLK STFS; FS,NI...............................................500-550=
ELSHERE - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................500=
SMITH - 30 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS, NI ...........................................550-600=
ANDERSON - 25 FED X CLVS; FS.................................................500-575=
IRELAND - 25 DLK CLVS; FS, NI ..........................................................550=
WOODFORD - 20 DLK CLVS; NI ....................................................550-600=
ELLENS - 14 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................500-550=
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
PAULSEN - 12 HEFF STFS; FS,NI .................................................400-550=
MERCHEN - 7 DLK CLVS; FS ...............................................................500=
CROWSER - 7 DLK & FED HFFS; FS,NI,WEANED................................400=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT tDS-
SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE. SALE
TIME 10:00 A.M. (MT)
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-
WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUSi.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11. SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2. NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATE:
NOVEMBER 14.
CATTL£ R£PORT -
SATURDAY, NOV£MB£R S, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run ]or our onnuo1 November s1ooK
oou ond bred Þe1]er so1e. TÞere uos o b1g oroud
on Þond ond oo11ve b1dd1ng 1ÞrougÞou1 1Þe so1e.
BRED CATTLE:
JON & BREE2Y MILLAR - NEWELL
21 ...................................DLK ANC PUFE DFED AI'D HFFS
(2-15 FOF 3 DAYSi.......................................................... 1015= .........$2,000.00
39..........................................DLK ANC PUFE DFED HFFS
(2-15 FOF 3 DAYSi.......................................................... 1015= .........$1,850.00
37..........................................DLK ANC PUFE DFED HFFS
(3-1 FOF 20 DAYSi.......................................................... 1059= .........$1,650.00
DON RAVELLETTE - PHILIP
7 ...................................................................DLK HFFS 1066= .........$1,950.00
KENNY MATT - ELM SPRINGS
53.................................................................DWF HFFS 1018= .........$1,650.00
11.................................................................DWF HFFS 983= ...........$1,600.00
29.................................................................DWF HFFS 996= ...........$1,610.00
31.................................................................DWF HFFS 1004= .........$1,560.00
DAVE & TANYA BERRY - MILESVILLE
11 ..........................................................FED AI'D HFFS 999= ...........$1,635.00
6...................................................................FED HFFS 948= ...........$1,485.00
RISSE UV RANCH - MARTIN
21............................................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1192= .........$1,650.00
5..............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1305= .........$1,525.00
LARRY SMITH - PHILIP
101 .............................DLK COMINC 3 TO 4 YF OLD COWS 1186= .........$1,610.00
61 ...............................DLK COMINC 3 TO 4 YF OLD COWS 1024= .........$1,620.00
100 .............................DLK COMINC 5 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1324= .........$1,510.00
21 ...............................DLK COMINC 5 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1285= .........$1,525.00
30...........................................................DLK AI'D HFFS 971= ...........$1,500.00
39...........................................................DLK AI'D HFFS 974= ...........$1,425.00
50..................................................................DLK HFFS 973= ...........$1,420.00
63.............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1387= .........$1,410.00
23..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1390= .........$1,050.00
LARRY GABRIEL - QUINN
32........................................DLK COMINC 4 YF OLD COWS 1166= .........$1,550.00
13 .....................................DWF COMINC 4 YF OLD COWS 1159= .........$1,525.00
12 .....................................DWF COMINC 4 YF OLD COWS 1145= .........$1,500.00
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
53..................................................................DLK HFFS 1009= .........$1,485.00
49..................................................................DLK HFFS 998= ...........$1,460.00
GARTNER & KJERSTAD - INTERIOR
28........................................DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS 1001= .........$1,480.00
MARVIN COLEMAN - QUINN
72........................................DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS 1066= .........$1,480.00
TIM NELSON - MIDLAND
56 .................................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1014= .........$1,470.00
NICK CASPERS - NEW UNDERWOOD
24..................................................................DLK HFFS 909= ...........$1,435.00
PETE REINERT - HOWES
24 ...................................................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 944= ...........$1,430.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
9 ...................................................................DLK HFFS 883= ...........$1,425.00
8 ...................................................................DLK HFFS 948= ...........$1,410.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE - QUINN
21............................................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1319= .........$1,410.00
60............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1326= .........$1,400.00
25............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1318= .........$1,390.00
37.............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1369= .........$1,260.00
MARLIN & LINDA BRINK - UNION CENTER
19..................................................................DLK HFFS 931= ...........$1,400.00
MORTENSON CATTLE - HAYES
50.......................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1058= .........$1,370.00
17.......................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1005= .........$1,325.00
28.......................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1016= .........$1,300.00
JOE CARLEY - PHILIP
30........................................DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS 987= ...........$1,370.00
14 .............................DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1276= ............$935.00
CAPUTA LAND & CATTLE - CAPUTA
19 ...............................................DLK 3-4 YF OLD COWS 1052= .........$1,350.00
4 .................................................DLK 5-6 YF OLD COWS 1301= .........$1,250.00
LEONARD WOOD - PRINGLE
13 .................................................................FED HFFS 901= ...........$1,335.00
18............................................FED 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1033= .........$1,380.00
11 .................................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1040= .........$1,325.00
11 .................................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1182= .........$1,300.00
15...................................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1203= .........$1,235.00
JOHN MCGRIFF - QUINN
25.................................................................DWF HFFS 930= ...........$1,310.00
39..................................................................DLK HFFS 918= ...........$1,285.00
88..................................................................DLK HFFS 894= ...........$1,260.00
35..................................................................DLK HFFS 864= ...........$1,175.00
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
5.........................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 912= ...........$1,235.00
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
18..................................................FED 8 YF OLD COWS 1396= .........$1,275.00
6 ...........................................FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1424= ............$990.00
6 ..............................................FED SOLID MOUTH COWS 1393= ............$940.50
ALAN RISLOV - PHILIP
47...................................DLK & DWF SOLD MOUTH COWS 1317= .........$1,235.00
WILLIAM DAVEY - RAPID CITY
6 .................................................DLK 3-4 YF OLD COWS 963= ...........$1,235.00
2.......................................DLK & DWF 5-6 YF OLD COWS 1100= .........$1,200.00
1 ................................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COW 1115= .........$1,100.00
2 ....................................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1218= .........$1,000.00
LEE BALDWIN - ELM SPRINGS
31.............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1455= .........$1,225.00
19..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1414= ............$960.00
DAVE JENNINGS - OELRICHS
3 ...................................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1188= .........$1,210.00
2..............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1358= .........$1,150.00
7...............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1368= ............$975.00
5............................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1405= ............$960.00
BILL GOTTSLEBEN - PHILIP
13 ...............................................DLK 3-4 YF OLD COWS 1030= .........$1,200.00
B LA2Y T RANCH - HOT SPRINGS
6 ....................................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1372= .........$1,000.00
3.................................................FED 3-4 YF OLD COWS 1045= .........$1,235.00
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
10..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1422= ............$985.00
GALE BRUNS - NEW UNDERWOOD
8............................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1369= ............$975.00
JOHN & PAULINE STABEN - ORAL
13...................FED & DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1382= ............$960.00
JAMES WILSEY - OWANKA
19 ...............................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1362= ............$960.00
4...............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1398= ............$975.00
DAN & SUSAN TAFT - NORRIS
31................................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1352= ............$950.00
12................................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1186= ............$950.00
KELLY RIGGINS - PHILIP
17..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1392= ............$950.00
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
30..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1229= ............$875.00
8..................................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1451= ............$950.00
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT -
TU£SDAY, NOV. t, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run o] oo1ves ond o
reo1 b1g oroud o] bugers. MorKe1
uos good. Reo1 b1g so1e Þere Tues-
dog u11Þ SDDD Þeod oo1ves ond
geor11ngs.
FEEDER CATTLE:
MATT, STANLEY & COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
119 .................................DLK STFS 548= ....$176.00
95 ...................................DLK STFS 617= ....$164.00
TRIPLE T ENTERPRISES - NEWCASTLE, WY
96 ...................................DLK STFS 597= ....$166.00
39 ...................................DLK STFS 509= ....$172.50
30...................................DLK HFFS 501= ....$154.00
MILES WHEELER - PHILIP
46.........................DLK & DWF STFS 538= ....$170.25
13 ...................................DLK STFS 455= ....$173.50
38 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 478= ....$153.25
SHARON HERRON - UNION CENTER
105.......................DLK & DWF STFS 514= ....$170.00
33.........................DLK & DWF STFS 391= ....$185.25
108 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 484= ....$154.25
41 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 403= ....$167.50
JOE WISHARD - LANTRY
102.......................DLK & DWF STFS 500= ....$170.00
58.........................DLK & DWF STFS 414= ....$189.50
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 334= ....$192.25
40....................................DWF HFF 494= ....$156.50
47 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 374= ....$167.00
BCR INC - HERMOSA
109.......................DLK & DWF STFS 516= ....$172.00
62.........................DLK & DWF STFS 418= ....$185.00
24 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 432= ....$163.00
RICK JOHNSTON - UNION CENTER
97 ...................................DLK STFS 446= ....$186.25
21 ...................................DLK STFS 365= ....$206.50
86...................................DLK HFFS 425= ....$165.00
24...................................DLK HFFS 351= ....$175.00
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
127.......................DLK & DWF STFS 489= ....$175.75
104.......................DLK & DWF STFS 559= ....$168.00
31.........................DLK & DWF STFS 400= ....$198.00
99 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 524= ....$155.00
38 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 390= ....$167.00
KELLY BLAIR - MILESVILLE
91.........................DLK & DWF STFS 606= ....$163.75
18 ...................................DLK STFS 517= ....$171.50
94 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 570= ....$147.00
19...................................DLK HFFS 456= ....$155.50
TRAVIS & TATE THOMPSON - WANBLEE
115.......................DLK & DWF STFS 535= ....$168.25
92.........................DLK & DWF STFS 458= ....$185.50
107 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 464= ....$161.25
30 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 395= ....$164.00
DENNIS HULM - MEADOW
79 .................................CHAF STFS 750= ....$149.75
31 .................................CHAF STFS 662= ....$150.00
79.................................CHAF HFFS 723= ....$142.75
31.................................CHAF HFFS 647= ....$136.25
220 ...HEAD OF STEEFS & HEIFEFS AVC ....$1037.751HD
JIM EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
98.........................DLK & DWF STFS 579= ....$166.50
41 ...................................DLK STFS 501= ....$174.00
113 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 531= ....$154.00
36 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 457= ....$154.50
PHILIPSEN & STOVER - NEW UNDERWOOD
95.........................DLK & DWF STFS 576= ....$165.00
42.........................DLK & DWF STFS 464= ....$174.75
11 .................................CHAF STFS 597= ....$156.00
45...................................DLK HFFS 574= ....$142.50
18...................................DLK HFFS 476= ....$146.00
TROY & DAWN RICHTER - QUINN
102 ...............................CHAF STFS 564= ....$167.00
31 .................................CHAF STFS 451= ....$180.75
105...............................CHAF HFFS 544= ....$150.75
30.................................CHAF HFFS 468= ....$153.00
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
105 .............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 592= ....$164.25
19 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 518= ....$170.50
27...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 512= ....$153.00
10.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 463= ....$150.00
DAYCO LTD INC - SCENIC
43 ...................................DLK STFS 529= ....$167.50
22 ...................................DLK STFS 437= ....$176.50
17 ...................................DLK STFS 333= ....$196.00
28...................................DLK HFFS 418= ....$163.50
ROGER LARSON FAMILY - MURDO
80.........................DLK & DWF STFS 554= ....$167.00
18 ...................................DLK STFS 438= ....$189.00
KEITH SMITH - MILESVILLE
42.........................FED & DLK STFS 524= ....$167.00
30.........................FED & DLK STFS 440= ....$178.00
25 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 474= ....$144.00
15 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 404= ....$166.00
JAY VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
26.........................DLK & DWF STFS 533= ....$166.00
52.........................DLK & DWF STFS 435= ....$185.00
37 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 469= ....$159.00
15 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 384= ....$156.00
SCOTT EDOFF - HERMOSA
97.........................DLK & DWF STFS 525= ....$166.00
53.........................DLK & DWF STFS 435= ....$188.00
94 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 482= ....$154.00
31 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 408= ....$155.00
GORDON & KURT FLESNER - MILESVILLE
60.........................DLK & DWF STFS 547= ....$165.00
27 ...................................DLK STFS 447= ....$177.75
55...................................DLK HFFS 497= ....$156.00
14...................................DLK HFFS 394= ....$164.00
ROCKY WILLIAMS - PHILIP
66 ...................................DLK STFS 473= ....$176.50
20 ...................................DLK STFS 397= ....$193.50
50...................................DLK HFFS 460= ....$159.50
15...................................DLK HFFS 397= ....$163.00
WAYNE MICKELSON - WHITE OWL
34.........................FED & DLK STFS 500= ....$170.00
18.........................FED & DLK STFS 411= ....$174.00
32 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 451= ....$150.00
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
14 ...................................DLK STFS 537= ....$165.00
16...................................DLK HFFS 493= ....$153.00
GEORGE GITTINGS - PHILIP
24.........................DLK & DWF STFS 537= ....$164.00
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 423= ....$180.75
8 .....................................DLK STFS 367= ....$190.00
7 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 364= ....$164.50
DALE SAWVELL - QUINN
33 ...................................DLK STFS 543= ....$164.25
37...................................DLK HFFS 508= ....$146.50
BLOOM RANCH LLC - RAPID CITY
47 .................................CHAF STFS 498= ....$170.00
10 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 384= ....$185.00
42.................................CHAF HFFS 492= ....$147.00
14.................................CHAF HFFS 414= ....$160.00
CHASE STRAND - TUTHILL
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 507= ....$169.50
20.........................DLK & DWF STFS 406= ....$179.00
8.....................................DLK HFFS 459= ....$152.00
TK SAMPSON - INTERIOR
29 ...................................DLK STFS 470= ....$173.00
66...................................DLK HFFS 466= ....$155.50
KELVIN POPPEN - RAPID CITY
10 ...................................DLK STFS 491= ....$166.00
GEORGE PAUL MICHAEL - WALL
16 ...................................DLK STFS 527= ....$165.00
DOUG HAUK - PHILIP
9 .....................................DLK STFS 566= ....$160.00
9.....................................DLK HFFS 534= ....$142.50
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
64.........................FED & DLK STFS 597= ....$159.25
28.........................FED & DLK STFS 510= ....$169.00
20...................................DLK HFFS 559= ....$143.50
HOWIE & PAULTON - NEW UNDERWOOD
55.........................DLK & DWF STFS 457= ....$166.75
15 ...................................DLK STFS 350= ....$184.50
39...................................DLK HFFS 446= ....$152.00
27...................................DLK HFFS 355= ....$162.00
BROKEN BRIDGE LIVESTOCK - STURGIS
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 364= ....$189.00
19 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 331= ....$190.50
9.................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 442= ....$135.00
24...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 305= ....$165.00
R&G SMITH RANCH LLC - PHILIP
42 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 586= ....$159.75
15 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 500= ....$170.50
50.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 560= ....$143.00
18.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 463= ....$151.00
KURT KETELSEN - BOX ELDER
57 ...................................DLK STFS 588= ....$157.50
52 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 565= ....$143.50
STEVE DODSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
33 ...................................DLK STFS 502= ....$157.50
31...................................DLK HFFS 515= ....$137.50
C & J RANCH - NORRIS
35 ...................................DLK STFS 611= ....$151.50
29...................................DLK HFFS 584= ....$138.25
TOM COOLAHAN - HERMOSA
17 ...................................DLK STFS 641= ....$150.25
15 ...................................DLK STFS 560= ....$161.50
KELLY FEES - PHILIP
29.........................DLK & DWF STFS 626= ....$147.50
24 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 602= ....$139.50
JERAMY WARD - MARTIN
3 .........................CHAF & DLK STFS 662= ....$136.00
7...........................DLK & DWF STFS 421= ....$177.50
8 .....................................DLK STFS 325= ....$190.00
1hursdav, November 8, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review ·
koop nppoInfmonfs nnd gof grocorIos.
Thnf ovonIng, fhov hnd n good fImo coI-
obrnfIng nIoco Morgnn ÞoIson's l0fh
bIrfhdnv! (Hnppv bIrfhdnv, Morgnn!
ÐoubIo dIgIfs!) Wodnosdnv, AIIvvn nnd
!nurn fook fImo fo do fhoIr frndIfIonnI
HnIIowoon pIcfuros boforo fIndIng CIInf
In n frncfor nnd hondIng ouf for frIck or
fronfIng. AIIvvn wns drossod ns n vorv
cufo IIffIo boo, compIofo wIfh IIffIo nn-
fonnn! Thov hnd such n fun fImo vIsIf-
Ing nf dIfforonf IocnfIons! (!nndv nnd
Jov Yosf`s, ÞoIs nnd Ðorofhv InuIson`s,
IIII nnd IoIIv Iruco`s, VInco nnd KnfIo
Iruco`s nnd CInrk nnd Cnrmon AIIo-
mnn`s.) CIInf nnd !nurn docIdod fhnf If
fhov confInuo fo vIsIf nf ovorv houso,
fhov wIII nood fo Ionvo onrIIor In fho dnv
noxf vonr, bocnuso voung AIIvvn wns
vorv hungrv nnd fIrod whon fhov fInnIIv
gof homo. !nurn found fImo fo puf up
cnrrofs fhIs wook wIfh fho hoIp of hor
mom, Jov Yosf. !nurn snId fhnf sho
noods fo romombor fo bo vorv spocIfIc In
hor prnvors. IvIdonfIv In ono of hor
prnvors fhIs wook, sho hnd nskod Cod
for n dnv fhnf sho nnd hor husbnnd,
CIInf, wouId bo nbIo fo sfnv InsIdo fo-
gofhor. Suro onough, fho noxf dnv, hor
prnvor wns nnsworod. Thov nII sfnvod
Indoors fogofhor ns fhov woro sIck.
!nurn snId sho hnd fo Inugh whon sho
ronIIzod fhnf Cod hnd gIvon hor whnf
sho nskod for. Tho good nows Is fhnf
fhov nro now bIossod fo hnvo fhoIr
honIfh nnd sfrongfh bnck!
Mnx nnd Jovco Jonos woro In !npId
CIfv Insf Thursdnv for nn nppoInfmonf
wIfh fho dormnfoIogIsf. Mnx roconfIv
hnd somo work dono on hIs onrs fo ro-
movo skIn cnncor, nnd fhov nro honIIng
woII, nIfhough fhov sfIII Iook n IIffIo
rough. Jovco snId Mnx hns fo sIoop In
fho rocIInor fo koop from dnmngIng fho
skIn grnffs. I'm gInd fho rocovorv Is
goIng woII! Snfurdnv, Mnx nnd Jovco nf-
fondod fho 4-H rocognIfIon ovonf In
IIorro. Somo frIonds from Knnsns CIfv
hnvo boon nf fhoIr pInco phonsnnf hunf-
Ing. Crnndson !uko hns boon proffv
succossfuI hunfIng phonsnnf nnd
grouso, nnd grnnddnughfor MnffIo shof
hor doo Insf wookond. AII fho shoofIng
sporfs frnInIng Is pnvIng off for fho kIds,
nnd fho gun snfofv nspocf of fho shoof-
Ing sporfs progrnm Is ronIIv Imporfnnf
nIso.
Chnso nnd KoIIv IrIggs nnd fnmIIv
woro In IIorro Ocfobor 2? fo hoIp
KoIIv's grnndmofhor, !oIn Þoss, coIo-
brnfo hor 80fh bIrfhdnv. Hnppv boInfod
bIrfhdnv fo hor. KoIIv nnd fho kIds nf-
fondod fho HnIIowoon pnrfv nf Ðoop
Crook SchooI Insf Wodnosdnv, nnd fhov
woro ouf frIck or fronfIng fhnf nIghf.
!ufh Þouhnusor hnd n vIsIf from hor
dnughfor-In-Inw, Mnrv Þouhnusor, Snf-
urdnv. !ufh nIso snId fhov hnvo hnd
somo wondorfuI musIcnI onforfnInmonf
nf HIghmoro HonIfh, whoro sho Is n ros-
Idonf. !ufh hns fwo grnnd- dnughfors
who IIvo In Þow York CIfv, nnd bofh
cnmo fhrough Insf wookond's hurrIcnno
jusf fIno. ÞoIfhor gIrI Iosf powor In fhoIr
npnrfmonfs, fhnnk goodnoss.
Mnrgo IrIggs hns hunfors comIng
fhIs wook for fho upcomIng door sonson.
Thoso hunfors, ono from MInnosofn nnd
ono from Þow York, hnvo boon comIng
for ovor 20 vonrs. Mnrgo snId whon fho
gonfIomon fIrsf sfoppod nII fhoso vonrs
ngo fo nsk for hunfIng prIvIIogos, Mnrgo
nnd hor husbnnd, IImor, woro In fho
procoss of roundIng up somo hogs. Tho
guvs jumpod rIghf In fo hoIp, nnd fhov
hnvo confInuod onrnIng fhoIr hunfIng
prIvIIogos fhrough fho vonrs bv hoIpIng
movo cnffIo or hoIpIng wIfh ofhor fnsks.
Tho hunfors hnvo bocomo good
frIonds hopo fhov hnvo n succossfuI
hunf.
KovIn Þouhnusor hns boon sfnvIng
cIoso fo homo fhIs wook, fnkIng cnro of
fnII jobs nround fho pInco. HIs wIfo,
Mnrv, frnvoIod onsf Snfurdnv, vIsIfIng
hor pnronfs In IoIo nnd KovIn's mofhor
In HIghmoro. Mnrv cnmo fo fho rnnch
Infor on Snfurdnv, rofurnIng fo IIorro
Sundnv.
!oo IrIggs nffondod n moofIng In
WnII Thursdnv. Mnrv IrIggs workod
from homo Thursdnv. IrIdnv, Mnrv
sfoppod fo vIsIf hor mofhor-In-Inw, !II
IrIggs, nf Ðnkofn HorIfngo Houso. Ono
ovonIng, Mnrv gof homo fo fInd fwo
skunks nonr hor houso, onfIng ouf of
fho dog dIsh sho snId If mnv bo fImo
fo movo fho dIsh n IIffIo fnrfhor from
fho houso! !oo Is fInIshod wIfh fho corn
hnrvosf for fhIs vonr vnhoo!
Our wook hns boon busv buf fun.
!nsf Tuosdnv nffornoon, wo hondod fo
!npId CIfv fo spond fImo wIfh our
dnughfor, ChoIson, nnd hor fInnco, MIko
Hov. MIko's pnronfs woro vIsIfIng from
fhoIr homo In Snn AnfonIo, so wo hnd
fho opporfunIfv fo gof ncqunInfod wIfh
fhom. Thnf nffornoon, MIko gnvo us n
four of fho nIr bnso, nnd wo nII onjovod
suppor nf n IocnI rosfnurnnf. Wodnos-
dnv wns n bIg dnv for MIko ho wns
promofod fo sonIor mnsfor sorgonnf,
nnd wo woro fhrIIIod fo bo on hnnd for
fho coromonv. Wo rofurnod fo fho rnnch
In fImo fo groof fho frIck or fronfors.
(Thoro woro sIx voungsfors wouId
hnvo boon sovon, buf ono of fho voungor
onos foII nsIoop boforo ho gof horo!) IrI-
dnv, MIko nnd ChoIson nnd MIko's pnr-
onfs nrrIvod nf fho rnnch fo spond fho
nIghf, rofurnIng fo !npId CIfv Snfur-
dnv. Our nophow, ÐvInn Þouhnusor,
wns horo for fho wookond nIso, hoIpIng
wIfh somo woIdIng nnd ofhor projocfs.
Ho's such n cnpnbIo voung mnn!
ThIs wook, I nm grnfofuI fhnf fodnv
Is IIocfIon Ðnv. Of courso, I Iook for-
wnrd fo fhoro boIng no moro poIIfIcnI
ndvorfIsomonfs, nnd I'II bo gInd fo nof
rocoIvo fho compufor gonornfod phono
cnIIs nskIng mo fo vofo ono wnv or nn-
ofhor. Iuf mosfIv, I nm so grnfofuI fo
IIvo In n nnfIon whoro wo hnvo fho rIghf
fo chooso who our Iondors wIII bo, nnd
wo cnn hnvo our voIcos honrd rognrdIng
whIch Inws wIII bo pnssod. I hopo wo
novor fnko fhoso fhIngs for grnnfod
wo nood fo gunrd our froodoms nnd our
rIghfs nnd our prIvIIogos! So fodnv, I'II
bo vofIng, nnd I hopo nII of vou vofod ns
woII.
As I monfIonod onrIIor, door sonson
opons noxf wookond. Cood Iuck fo fho
hunfors, nnd pIonso fnko fImo fo bo
snfo. Tho wonfhormnn Is snvIng fhnf
fhoro mnv bo n IIffIo rnIn or snow noxf
wookond, buf ns of now, our drv condI-
fIons porsIsf, so pIonso bo oxfrn vIgIInnf.
Hnvo n gronf wook, ovorvbodv!
McenvIIIe
{ccntInued trcm page 11)

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