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Pioneer Review, November 29, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 14
Volume 107
November 29, 2012
Market Report
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More
parade
of lights
8
Oral
interp
season
9
Ladies
night out
8
Fridge
Door
2
by Del Bartels
Representatives from the Na-
tional Park Service met with vari-
ous groups in Philip, Monday, No-
vember 19, about future planning
for a trail system in the Philip
area.
“I was thinking we could put
some examples together, and you
can get a feel for what the commu-
nity might want. Then, we can
meet in about another month,” said
David Thomson, program manager
for the Midwest Region’s Rivers,
Trails and Conservation Assistance
program. He said that his program
works outside of parks, helping
communities with their projects.
“We don’t have very many grants
that come through us. We help peo-
ple find grants out there,” said
Thomson.
Representatives from the city,
county, local businesses and other
Philip groups were given a brief
overview of what the rivers and
trails program has helped accom-
plish in South Dakota and other
states. The Midwest Region, based
out of Omaha, Neb., includes South
Dakota, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas,
Missouri, Nebraska and North
Dakota. Kenny Points, a rivers and
parks intern with several projects
under his belt, will stay with any
future Philip project. Thomson will
also remain involved, though to a
somewhat lesser degree.
The RTCA program is the com-
munity assistance branch of the
National Park Service. It offers
technical expertise on community-
led natural resource conservation
and outdoor recreation projects, so
communities can conserve rivers,
preserve open space and develop
trails and greenways.
Points said that assistance is
provided for one year and may be
renewed for a second year, if war-
ranted. There are experts in the re-
gion office ready to assist Philip.
Their various trail backgrounds
range from bicycling to equestrian
to water transportation. Commu-
nity goals are advanced from con-
ceptual plans to workable plans.
The program identifies potential
sources of funding, all to teach
hands-on conservation. The pro-
gram is geared to help build part-
nerships to set goals through con-
sensus.
Murdo is taking advantage of the
RTCA program with a recreational
trail around a lake south of town.
Whitewood is expanding and mak-
ing handicap friendly a current
trail around its under used, 40-acre
city park.
Philip’s Don Burns summarized,
“You’re not really coming with
money, but with assistance. When
there is money there, we have to be
in a position for it; (you’re offering)
a year’s worth of expertise.”
Thomsen agreed, “Usually we
are connecting people to grant
sources. That says a lot to the grant
people, if you are ready to be com-
mitted.”
Local groups select the trails or
rivers that they would like to con-
serve. The RTCA program does not
own or manage any of the land or
projects; that is the job of the local
organization. Some communities
have created brochures connected
to their trail project, which list
local businesses and phone num-
bers, and list the area’s different
festivals and events.
Before the Philip meeting, Thom-
sen and Points toured the area,
being shown some of the commu-
nity’s possibilities for trail projects.
They were told of the 2015 side-
walk project up Larimar Avenue,
which will be elderly friendly. They
were shown the area that used to
be a park south of town. They were
shown the triangular piece of land
between the baseball diamonds
and the western Welcome to Philip
sign. And, they were shown the
small areas around town that could
be somehow connected, such as
Fire Hall Park, Old School Park,
Haakon County Young Women’s
Kiddie Park, Lasting Legacy and
other areas.
“If you get into state or federal
funds, all the limitations are laid
out,” said Points. “I’m all for con-
necting all your hubs, your parks
and monuments.”
“I know that the biggest objec-
tion I ran into was the mainte-
nance issue,” said Philip’s Tanya
McIlravy. Points said that, with
good planning, any maintenance
could be minimalized. In offering
some feel for the direction of future
plans, McIlravy added, “A thing
that Horizons is going for is a front
porch gathering place.”
Philip’s Trish Larson inquired
about the next steps, “So, after the
community input, what part does
the community play?” She was con-
cerned about getting everyone on
board right away, especially those
who kept up the parks or own land.
“At what point do you get hold of
the landowners ... your land is in
our plan? The first place they see it
should not be in the newspaper.”
The year’s worth of assistance
from the RTCA does not really
begin until a Philip area coalition
is represented and a list of possible
plans can be narrowed.
A Philip area trail, with expertise
from National Park Service’s RTCA
Representatives of local governmental and community organizations discussed
possible expertise assistance offered by the Rivers, Trails and Conservation As-
sistance program on any consensus-based trail project. Photo by Del Bartels
by Del Bartels
The Haakon School District’s
Board of Education meeting, Mon-
day, November 19, was held after
members had gathered earlier in
the afternoon with the administra-
tion for annual tour of the Philip
school buildings.
More contracts have been offi-
cially approved for winter sports.
Brad Haynes is the assistant boys’
basketball coach. Deb Smith is the
yearbook advisor. Tayta West is
the junior high girls’ basketball
coach. Keven Morehart is the assis-
tant wrestling coach. The position
of the junior high boys’ basketball
coach will be formally approved
later.
The board went into executive
session to discuss personnel issues.
No action was taken.
The month’s substitute teacher
pay, for an equivalent of 45.5 days,
came to $3,998.98. The month’s
wages for the district, with a total
of 2,348.33 hours worked, came to
a total of $25,668.08.
In his secondary principal’s re-
port, Mike Baer announced that
November 21 was midterms for the
instructors and students. Reports
will be tabulated during the week
after Thanksgiving.
Baer listed several recent accom-
plishments. The FFA natural re-
sources team earned seventh place
in the nation. Philip High School
won the eight-school academic
challenge. There will be a sixth,
seventh and eigth grade academic
challenge in January. Matt Don-
nelly was recognized as teacher of
the year by the South Dakota Asso-
ciation for Health, Physical Educa-
tion, Recreation and Dance. Ban-
ners, plaques and team photos are
being put up in different places in
the school. The team photos will
not include only sports, but will in-
clude such groups as the FFA,
FCCLA, all school play, National
Honor Society and others. Each
photo will be replaced with the
next year’s group photo when that
particular season comes around.
The Department of Education
has requested input from the dis-
trict in producing a webinar, be-
cause the Haakon students scored
so well on a benchmark pretest.
The test was given to be used as a
benchmark, thus used to mark
later strived for improvements by
the students and the school. Such a
spectacular showing leaves less
room in order to show improve-
ment. “It’s still good news to us,”
said Baer.
The new guided study hall pro-
gram had several students test out
of certain subject areas. “There’s no
ramifications for not trying on the
South Dakota State Test of Educa-
tional Progress,” said Baer. “We
had some kids who really wanted
to get off of that (the guided study
hall).”
Semester tests will be held De-
cember 19-20. Seniors will take se-
mester tests.
In his superintendent’s report,
Keven Morehart added that a fifth
grade, sixth grade and junior high
band and choir concert will be pre-
sented at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, No-
vember 27. A Dakota Assembly will
be held at 8:00 a.m. Thursday, No-
vember 29, with Paul Imholte per-
forming on a large variety of
stringed instruments, including
the jaw harp. The public is encour-
aged to attend both.
Board member Anita Peterson
reported on the Associated School
Boards of South Dakota. Their
goals during the upcoming legisla-
tive session will include improved
school funding, promoting common
core curriculum but with funding
behind it, supporting local control
in managing school districts, and
correcting the current direction of
school nutrition.
Concerning school lunches, Pe-
terson relayed an analogy. Take a
pound of hamburger and cut it in
half, then cut it in half again for a
quarter pound hamburger. The fed-
eral government wants to cut that
in half again, and that is what you
are feeding students so they can
learn and play sports. Peterson re-
ported that some parents, espe-
cially of football players, may have
to pay for more food themselves.
The next scheduled meeting for
the board of education will be at
6:00 p.m., Monday, December 17,
in room A-1 of the Philip High
School.
School board hears district’s
recent accomplishmments
The Philip chapter of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America is again
sponsoring its community Maggie Grace Angel Tree. This is Philip FCCLA’s 15th
year sponsoring the Angel Tree. The tree was set up at the Haakon County Court-
house, November 26. Maggie Grace was born in 2002 to Doug and Karen
Mehlhaff, Rapid City. She died suddenly from complications of a very rare respi-
ratory bacteria. The angel tree is dedicated in Maggie's memory in the hope that
needy children in the area will be shown the spirit and love of Christmas. The
Philip FCCLA chapter, in conjunction with the local churches and the Haakon Com-
munity Health office, will distribute the donations to children in need in the Philip
area. Gifts beyond our community need will be distributed by the Jackson Com-
munity Health office and the Bennett County foster child program. “Last year the
response was very generous, with nearly 300 gifts,” said Brigitte Brucklacher,
Philip FCCLA advisor. “We hope this year’s giving equals that generosity, as there
are many families and programs in need because of the economy.” To donate to
the project, leave an unwrapped toy, book or new article of clothing under the
tree located next to the Extension office in the courthouse before 4:00 p.m.,
Wednesday, December 19. Gifts are for children ages infant to teenage. If you
know of a child in need in our community or would like more information, contact
Brucklacher at the Philip High School, 859-2680. Pictured are, clockwise from
lower left, Afton Burns, FCCLA Chairperson Kelsie Kroetch, Samantha Huston and
Katelyn Enders. Photo by Del Bartels
FCCLA’s angel tree
Philip Livestock Auction has
been honored by the South Dakota
Farm Bureau with the Friend of
Agriculture award, in recognition
for PLA’s service to the agriculture
community in Philip and the sur-
rounding area.
“Farmers and ranchers couldn’t
do what they do without supportive
local businesses that understand
the needs of today’s agricultural
producers,” said Scott VanderWal,
president of the South Dakota
Farm Bureau and family farmer
from Volga. “It is our pleasure to
recognize Philip Livestock Auction
and the work they do to sustain
agriculture in Philip and the sur-
rounding community.”
Businesses are nominated by
their local county Farm Bureau.
The recognition was presented dur-
ing an annual banquet held Satur-
day, November 17.
SDFB also presented the Friend
of Agriculture award to Olson’s
Motor Co. in Clark, Southwest
Grain in Lemmon, and Paul’s Feed
and Seed in Faith.
SDFB is a grassroots agriculture
organization representing more
than 13,000 member families
across the state. Founded in 1917,
SDFB works to represent, uphold,
and improve the state’s number
one industry – agriculture.
Philip Livestock Auction earns
Friend of Agriculture award
Philip’s Glo-N-Go Parade of Lights
Curt Arthur and Greg Arthur – E&A Construction Ray’s Appliance
Kennedy Implement
The annual Glo-N-Go Parade of Lights traveled down the streets of Philip, Satur-
day, November 24. Just before it, the Philip Volunteer Fire Department held its
barbeque fundraiser at the fire hall. Above is float entry by the South Dakota De-
partment of Transportation. Photos by Del Bartels
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ions. It is not meant to replace advertising as a means of reaching people.
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The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
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Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
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Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High of 39F
with a windchill as low as 19F.
Winds from the NNE at 5 to 10
mph.
Thursday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 19F. Winds from the ESE
at 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. High of 52F.
Winds from the South at 10
to 15 mph.
Friday Night: Overcast in
the evening, then mostly
cloudy. Low of 37F. Winds from
the West at 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy.
High of 57F. Winds from
the WSW at 5 to 10
mph.
Saturday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 36F. Winds
from the SW at 10 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. High
of 66F. Breezy. Winds from
the SSW at 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 41F. Breezy.
Winds from the SW at 15 to 20 mph.
Get your complete &
up-to-the minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Monday: Partly cloudy. High of
57F. Breezy. Winds from the
West at 10 to 20 mph.
Monday Night: Partly cloudy.
Fog overnight. Low of 25F with a
windchill as low as 12F. Breezy. Winds
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Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
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Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
Motion catches the eye. Which of
us hasn’t been trailing cattle
across the prairie only to have your
attention drawn to a coyote streak-
ing away to safer quarters? Maybe
instead it was a deer or rabbit
bouncing away or a grouse flying
up right in front of you. Even if
you’ve never trailed cattle or been
on a horse, the same principle ap-
plies to just taking a walk or driv-
ing down the road. If something
moves, you tend to see it.
What’s more, once you’ve noticed
something in motion, you might
continue to gaze at it if it’s inter-
esting. Lots of times I’ve paused to
look at deer leaping over fences.
They’re quite graceful and enjoy-
able to watch. Rabbits playing in
the yard are similar. They often
race around playing tag, or they
might jump straight up into the air
as if scared to death which they
aren’t. They’re just having fun. A
horse running full tilt is pleasing
to see as well – strength and grace
all at the same time. Little calves
gamboling about in the springtime
are nifty too.
People are often fun to observe,
and sometimes I have trouble not
staring. That is supposedly impo-
lite. Have you even noticed that
young men tend to strut a bit, es-
pecially those of the cowboy per-
suasion? Dress a young fellow in
cowboy boots, spurs, jeans, cowboy
shirt and hat, and they’re apt to
strut. Other times they saunter
and act really cool. Noticing either
can bring a smile to my face.
Then you have the graceful peo-
ple. They move as if doing some
kind of slow dance. Women are a
bit better at this than men, but
some men have an easy grace as
well. I remember noticing a young
fellow shinny up a tall auger one
day. He did it quickly and effort-
lessly. I just stared in appreciation
at the strength and agility that al-
lowed him to do it.
How about watching kids on a
playground? They’re apt to be run-
ning, jumping, chasing each other,
screaming, laughing and having
such a grand time. It helps one to
remember that it’s okay to have
fun from time to time. Sometimes
we forget how to do that and need
a reminder.
This is not to say that all motion
is attractive. Take slithering, for
example. Unless you are a major
fan of snakes, you might not care
for slithering. Snakes tend to creep
me out so noticing their movement
does nothing for me except to send
me running for a hoe to behead
them and stop them from moving
ever again. My moves in killing
snakes might not be that great to
examine either since they are apt
to be hard and fast and perhaps
with just a touch of loathing or
maybe a dram or two of panic.
Crab-like locomotion is some-
what disturbing too. Why can’t
those that use it walk straight like
everyone else? Fluttering, of
course, can occasionally get on
your nerves such as when millers
circle repeatedly around a light or
in your face. You usually just want
to shout, “Stop that!” If they don’t,
you may be somewhat prone to
grabbing a swatter or newspaper
and making them quit.
Some people enjoy seeing objects
travel at high speeds such as you
might find at the NASCAR races.
It doesn’t do much for me, either
when seeing it or doing it. It’s fine
with airplanes since they need a
certain amount of forward move-
ment to keep themselves from
dropping out of the sky. Vehicles
don’t have that rationale. I recall a
few years ago when I drove 95
MPH for about 15 miles on the
freeway trying to keep up with an
ambulance containing my son and
wife. Going that fast made me de-
cidedly nervous. I wasn’t used to it.
After a bit I decided I’d rather get
to the hospital safely than not at
all and slowed down to more man-
ageable levels. Since then, I’ve
been fairly content with the 75
MPH freeway speed limit with oc-
casional downhill bursts to 78.
Anyway, to get the full effect of
my hypothesis that motion attracts
the eye, you probably should go
outside now and sit on the porch or
deck for a bit. I’d bet you will
mostly look at things that are mov-
ing such as birds in the air, vehi-
cles driving close by or in the dis-
tance, floating clouds, grass rip-
pling in the breeze, people and crit-
ters moving about, and the like.
Sometimes it’s fun to just sit and
watch the world go by. Give it a
try. You might like it.
Eye of an angel ... by Del Bartels
The little girl was full of joy and fear, as her father held her under
her arms and raised her high over his head. She could just reach the
top of the Christmas tree. Her arms outstretched, she lowered the cone
like robe of the antique ornament over the top branch. The girl never
forgot how the light glistened off of the porcelain angel’s eyes.
As years went by, she didn’t realize how the two of them struggled.
Compared with two parent families, their Christmases were almost
bare. The tree itself was often a gift from a landowner who let them
cut it down. The girl loved going with her father to get it. Afterward,
the hot chocolate helped rewarm her tingling feet and numb fingers.
Gifts were mostly needed clothing, but there was always something
for her that was handmade by father. As her birthdays grew, those
gifts changed from wooden dolls and miniature furniture to a lovingly
made hope chest.
The Christmas of her last year in high school, she gracefully bal-
anced on a chair to place the tree’s angel. College, even with all her
hard-earned grades, savings, scholarships and loans, would be a penny
pinching trial. In exchange for everything that he could spare, her fa-
ther insisted she simply do well. She had to bum rides from classmate
friends, but she got back each Christmas to be father.
She fell in love. The wedding present from father was the Christmas
ornament angel; she cried. The couple lived so far away, but a few
years later, he could visit over Christmas and he seemed so happy that
she was expecting. He had brought her cherished dolls and miniature
furniture, each carefully resanded and repainted. A few years later,
though his hands were growing less sure and nimble, she was so proud
when he held his granddaughter up so she take her turn at being the
one to place the porcelain angel on the tree.
A son was born. Years went by. Visits from father and to father’s
place were precious. Her husband and she did well, which seemed to
cause her father to walk a bit lighter. Still, his handmade gifts for
Christmas were better than all the lavish and extravagant packages
under the tree. Her own children grew and began their own lives.
The time had come. Her father would make no more gifts. He would
no longer raise a child, nor watch anyone else raise a child, to place
the angel at the top of the Christmas tree.
She sat in the spacious living room, with so much family all around.
She joyfully handed to her children and grandchildren decorations for
them to put on the tree. Finally, only the porcelain angel remained.
Gingerly taking it, her son gently put it in the hands of his tiny daugh-
ter, who showed joy and fear at being raised so high. She stretched out
and lowered the cone like robe of the angel over the top branch.
Granddaughter, grandmother, angel ... everyone else noted how the
light glistened off of her eyes.
LADIES’ PRAYER BREAKFAST … Monday, December 3, 7:00
a.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby in Philip. Devotions will be shar-
ing. All ladies welcome.
CORNERSTONE RESCUE MISSION WINTER NEEDS …
Boxes are located at all churches in Philip and Midland, St. Mary’s
Catholic Church in Milesville, Okaton Community Church,
Belvidere Community Church and the Presbyterian church in
Kadoka. See this week’s ad for further details.
MILESVILLE VFD ANNUAL MEETING …Monday, December
10, 7:00 p.m. at the west side fire hall in Milesville. Everyone wel-
come.
COMMUNITY BETTERMENT COMMITTEE …Annual Christ-
mas Lighting Contest. Judging for three places will begin at 6:00
p.m. Sunday, December 23. Call Darlene Matt at 859-2077 to nom-
inate a display, and don’t forget to turn your lights on!
HAAKON COUNTY CROONER CHRISTMAS CONCERT
SCHEDULE … December 2, Kadoka Catholic Church, 1:30 p.m.,
Wall Community Center, 4:30 p.m. December 16, Philip Nursing
Home, 1:30 p.m., Philip Courthouse, 4:00 p.m. Everyone welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Dear Editor,
I was reading Blast from the
Past 84 years ago, when I came
across a line in the third paragraph
that tickled my funny bone.
The newsperson was relating
that friends had gathered to give a
newly wed couple a “rousing chari-
var.” I’m quite sure they meant
chivaree.
Merriam Webster had no listing
for charivari. Even so, I think I’d be
a little hesitant in rousing one.
Jeanie Waara
Philip, SD
(We strive to leave the original
spellings from those stories for their
“flavor.”) The Pioneer Review staff
Letter to
the Editor
by Del Bartels
Sonja Crowley, Joe Heimer and
their spouses stayed in Philip, No-
vember 19-21, to take in some
pheasant hunting. Dakota Ranch
Outfitters had donated a hunting
excursion to a Women Against Vio-
lence, Inc. fundraiser auction. The
Crowley party had won the one-day
pheasant trip.
Donating to a worthy cause;
hunting pheasant; visiting Philip;
all these are run-of-the-mill occur-
rences. The story of Crowley and
Heimer, though, is not a run-of-
the-mill story.
In November of 1996, Heimer, an
experienced guide, was leading
Crowley on an elk hunt just north
of Yellowstone National Park. Back
then, Crowley was from Chamber-
lain, though now lives in Rapid
City. Heimer, now from Montana,
used to live in Dupree.
Below is a brief summary of their
story that was published as a chap-
ter in the book Mark of the Grizzly
by Scott McMillion.
On the elk hunt, the two first
saw the grizzly bear from about 60
feet away. Its cubs were farther
back. Trying to back off, the two
hunters were charged by the bear.
Heimer, who was carrying his
client’s rifle, got off one shot, but
the bear tackled him, knocking the
gun away and tearing into his legs.
The grizzly dropped him, and then
attacked Crowley. It grabbed her
by the head, crushing her jaw and
tearing apart her face. Crowley re-
membered hearing the teeth
crunching into her head.
Heimer staggered to the gun, but
couldn’t fire because he might hit
Crowley as the bear was whipping
her body around. The bear finally
dropped Crowley and ran back to-
ward its cubs.
Heimer started giving first aid to
Crowley, wrapping his shirt
around her mangled face. She fran-
tically pointed; the grizzly was
coming back. This time, Heimer
put a round through the bear’s
shoulder and it dropped, but it got
up and charged again. The third,
up-close shot put it down for good.
After a year, Crowley had done
much of the recovery from her in-
juries, physical and mental. She
lost an eye, and the left side of her
face is a bit limp. Heimer recovered
more quickly, and received the
Montana Outfitters and Guides As-
sociation’s guide of the year award
for his actions.
Since 1996, the couples get to-
gether at least once a year. The
Philip hunting trip happened to be
on Heimer’s birthday. Though this
is their first real stop in Philip, “We
drive through here all the time,”
said Crowley. Heimer added about
their trips since 1996, “We have
more fun, that’s for sure.”
Bear attack survivor visits Philip
Joe Heimer and Sonja Crowley won a pheasant hunting trip from a Woman
Against Violence Inc. fundraiser. The trip was donated by Pat West and the Dakota
Ranch Outfitters. The hunting party stayed at the West Motel. Photo by Bartels
South Dakota’s rural communi-
ties have received over $458.7 mil-
lion in United States Department
of Agriculture Rural Development
funding in federal fiscal year 2012,
completed on September 30. Dur-
ing the last four years, USDA has
invested more than $1.5 billion in
South Dakota, according to Elsie
Meeks, Rural Development state
director.
The program’s funds assist hous-
ing, business and community de-
velopment, water and waste water,
energy, distance learning and
telemedicine, electric and telecom-
munications. Water and waste
water funds are limited to commu-
nities of less than 10,000 popula-
tions. Housing and community fa-
cility funding is available to towns
of 20,000 population or less. Busi-
nesses and industries in communi-
ties up to 50,000 residents can get
funding through the business pro-
grams.
“Essentially, we can work with
every community in this state, out-
side of Sioux Falls and Rapid City,”
Meeks said. “USDA Rural Develop-
ment’s 62 South Dakota employees
look forward to serving rural South
Dakota this year.”
Over $176.5 million was deliv-
ered to South Dakota for housing
in fiscal year 2012, which is the
second highest year on record.
•The Single Family Housing
Guaranteed Loan program and the
Single Family Housing Direct Loan
program brought homeownership
to 1,381 households through more
than $164.6 million.
•The Rural Home Repair Loan
and Grant program provided
$167,321 in assistance to 28 South
Dakota homeowners for essential
repairs.
•Two Housing Preservation
Grants totaling $50,000 were
awarded to assist in repairing
homes of very low and low income
family households.
•More than $9.8 million of rental
assistance was provided to 1,967
tenants residing in a Rural Devel-
opment multi-family rural rental
housing complex. There are 362
multi-family projects in the state.
•Assisted three multi-family
housing properties with obligations
of $784,972.
More than $81.6 million was de-
livered to South Dakota through its
community programs.
•The Community Facilities Pro-
gram assisted 24 projects through
$39.1 million for libraries, public
safety, long-term care facilities,
and tribal colleges.
•Through the Water and Envi-
ronmental Programs, 15 communi-
ties and 14,608 rural residents
were helped by $42.3 million for
safe, potable drinking water, safe
and sanitary wastewater disposal,
and solid waste.
*One Rural Community Develop-
ment Initiative of $200,000 was se-
lected that will provide technical
assistance to recipients and pro-
vide new and expanded knowledge
to them in the areas of housing,
community facilities, and economic
development activities.
More than $38.3 million was de-
livered through various business
programs. The programs assisted
32 businesses and 17 agricultural
producers/small businesses. Jobs
totaling 1,873 were created and/or
saved.
•The Business and Industry
Guaranteed Loan program made
available $33.2 million that,
through leveraging, assisted nine
businesses.
•The Rural Business Enterprise
Grant program provided six grants
totaling nearly $759,900.
•The Rural Business Opportu-
nity Grant program delivered
$158,579 to three recipients.
•Three Intermediary Relending
Loan Program recipients were
awarded $1,003,000.
•Through the Rural Economic
Development Loan and Grant pro-
gram, one loan totaling $1 million
and four grants for $1 million were
awarded.
•The Rural Microentrepreneur
Assistance Program provided three
grants totaling $97,554.
S.D. gets $458.7 million in Rural Development funding
•The Value-Added Agricultural
Product Market Development
Grant program provided funding of
$17,500 to one producer and the
Value-Added Agricultural Product
Market Development Grant (Be-
ginning and Socially Disadvan-
taged Farmers and Ranchers) pro-
gram provided funding of $300,000
to one producer.
•One Rural Cooperative Devel-
opment Grant for $175,000 was
awarded.
•One Small Socially Disadvan-
taged Producer Grant for $175,000
was awarded.
•Through the 9007 Rural En-
ergy for America Program, South
Dakota was awarded 16 projects
for a total of $368,408 for renew-
able energy and energy efficiency
projects.
•The Advanced Biofuel Payment
Program issued two payments to-
taling $5,560 to advanced biofuel
producers to support and ensure an
expanding production of advanced
biofuels.
USDA Rural Utilities Service
Electric Guaranteed Loans were
received by five recipients totaling
more than $161.4 million. The Dis-
tance Learning and Telemedicine
program awarded funding totaling
$849,689 to two South Dakota re-
cipients.
Reducing Wind Erosion
Seeing local crop fields that suf-
fered from wind erosion during the
high winds in late-October seems
mild compared to the dust bowl
days of the dirty thirties, recently
portrayed in the PBS documen-
tary, “The Dust Bowl.” If you
missed the documentary, pre-
miered November 18 and 19 on
PBS, you can download it from
iTunes, and/or read about, view
pictures and video clips on the
PBS website: http://www.pbs.org
/kenburns/dustbowl/.
The question was raised in the
documentary, and occasionally in
discussions, could it happen again?
The general feeling is, thanks to
conservation practices that have
been applied, the advent of no-till
farming practices, and other ad-
vances, certainly not to the scale
that it did in the 30s. In localized
areas, however, wind erosion can
be severe, lower soil productivity
and increase the costs of producing
crops.
Wind erosion physically re-
moves the most fertile part of the
soil (organic matter, clay, and silt).
Blowing soil can reduce seedling
survival and growth, depress crop
yields, and increase the suscepti-
bility of plants to certain types of
stress, including diseases. Wind
erosion also adversely affects peo-
ple not directly connected to the
land, by polluting the air, filling
road ditches, deteriorating water
quality, causing automobile acci-
dents, and many other problems.
Although the 2012 drought has
left few options available to farm-
ers with little or no residue on crop
fields, over the long term, there
are three main practices that have
been identified to reduce wind ero-
sion.
Reduce the wind velocity at the
soil surface. Wind speed as low as
six mph one foot above the soil sur-
face can start the movement of soil
particles with highly erodible field
conditions (smooth, bare, loose, dry
and finely granulated particles).
Wind speed increasing from 20
mph to 30 mph triples the rate of
erosion. Wind velocity at the soil
surface can be reduced with wind-
breaks, crop residue, cover crops,
surface roughness and strip crop-
ping.
Maintaining crop residue on the
soil surface and/or ridging or
roughing the soil surface will trap
moving soil particles and reduce
erosion. The smallest soil particles
can be lifted from the soil surface,
suspended, and carried many
miles before falling. Larger parti-
cles can be dislodged and moved
across the soil surface in a bounc-
ing or jumping manner, often dis-
lodging other particles from the
surface, causing a cumulative ef-
fect.
Finally, increasing the size of
soil aggregates requires a stronger
wind to move soil and cause soil
erosion. The size of soil aggregates
can be increased by using crop ro-
tations that include grasses and
legumes, growing high-residue
crops and returning the residue to
the soil, or leaving it on the soil
surface, applying manure, and re-
ducing or eliminating tillage. If
wind erosion is occurring, and/or
conditions are such that the occur-
rence seems inevitable, emergency
tillage can bring large, stable clods
to the soil surface if soil moisture
and texture allow it.
Calendar
12/11: Soil Health Info Day-
Davison County Extension Com-
plex, Mitchell
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Rural Living
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
View online
production
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www.
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Can be tinted!
Local youth participated in the Haakon/Jackson 4-H Youth-In-Action Day on Friday, November 16, at Philip. The 4-H members
gave presentations, judged 4-H FCS classes, took a livestockology quiz and then worked on a visual arts project for Christ-
mas. Participants were, back row, left to right, Tate DeJong, Seth Haigh, Peyton DeJong, Shaina Solon, Savannah Solon,
McKenzie Stilwell and Elle Moon; front row, Trew DeJong, Mark Stangle, Hudson Johnson, Abby Moon, Riley Schofield, Gage
Weller, Tagg Weller, Quinn Moon and Josie Rush. Not pictured but giving a presentation was Katie Haigh. Courtesy photo
Haakon/Jackson 4-H Youth In Action Day
Haakon/Jackson 4-H recognition
Kash Block won the rodeo program
cover contest.
Katie Haigh earned the top senior live-
stock judging award.
The top secretary award went to Sage
Gabriel, for her hard work keeping club
records.
The Haakon/Jackson 4-H pro-
gram held it’s year end recognition
event, November 4 at the Philip
American Legion Hall.
Members of 4-H were rewarded
for their hard work throughout the
year. Pins, medals and certificates
were awarded during the event.
Project awards and county fair and
livestock premiums were awarded
to 46 members.
Leaders were recognized for
their dedication. Donna Staben has
led 4-H for 38 years. Nicki Nelson,
Pam DeJong and Tina Staben have
each been 4-H leaders for 12 years.
Nancy Haigh – six years, Jackie
Stilwell and Amy Smiley – five
years each, Jim Harty and Hugh
Harty – four years each, Jodi Par-
sons and Donna Enders – three
years each, and Adele Harty and
Heather Gabriel – one year each.
Haakon/Jackson 4-H also recog-
nized Grady and Bernice Crew of
Crew Agency as the Friends of 4-H.
“We appreciate the dedication of
the youth, staff, parents, leaders
and of course our sponsors and the
community for the support. With-
out you, 4-H would not flourish as
it has and will continue to do,” said
Carrie Weller, 4-H advisor.
“Be watching for 4-H youth doing
community service in your area.
The Haakon/Jackson Junior Lead-
ers are starting a new campaign.
The Ronald MacDonald House 4-H
Drive to collect supplies and dona-
tions for the Sioux Falls house.
You may notice Christmas clad
flamingoes invading the lawns
around town, so be ready to help
the 4-Hers,” said Weller.
The top three overall awards went to: Sage Gabriel for general 4-H, Gage Weller
for agriculture, and McKenzie Stilwell for family and consumer sciences.
Wyatt Enders – senior, left, and Sage Gabriel – junior, right, won the Bud May
Memorial buckes. They are pictured with Liz May. Courtesy photos
Is It tIme?
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
Call Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
Philip
Hit & Miss
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Nov. 29: Tuscan
Chicken, Duchess Potatoes,
Caribbean Veggies, Biscuit, Lemon
Cake.
Friday, Nov. 30: Spaghetti
Bolognese, Prince Edward Veggies,
Garlic Bread, Tiramisu.
Monday, Dec. 3: Fried Chicken,
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Green
Beans, Biscuit, Grapes.
Tuesday., Dec. 4: Pizza Day!
Assorted Pizzas, Tossed Salad,
Breadstick, Peachy Gelatin.
Wednesday, Dec. 5: Hot Pork,
Corn Fritters, Strawberries, But-
terscotch Brownie.
***
Saturday, November 17, at Som-
erset Court, we had exercises and
we received generous Somerset
Court bucks.
In the afternoon there was a
table of whist with Irene Cox, Irene
Arbach, Ina Oerlline and Floy
Olson playing. Quiddler was
played by Addie, Margaret and
Susan. M.R Hansen came for
scrabble. It was the 89th birthday
of LaVerne Wirth. Happy birthday,
LaVerne. Several staff members
gathered around and sang happy
birthday, gave her a miniature
birthday cake, a signed card and
Somerset bucks.
Somerset Court resident Agnes
Tastad received a birthday card
from my niece, Wanda and Ed
Artz. They said hello to Aunt Vi. So
hello right back.
Maxine Kilmer just brought me
a copy of “The Gambler,” which her
son, Mike, had just brought to her.
I had asked her if she had that
song. So I am very happy to have it.
Thank you, Maxine and Mike.
The Philip Pioneer Review for
November 15, 2012, had a big news
item about this week’s sale at
Philip Livestock Auction. Over
1,700 head of cattle were trucked in
from Montana, and the total sales
were above $3 million.
Have you read, “Nothing to Eat,”
by Slim Pickins? Or, “Timber,” by
Hugh Downs? But seriously, I
would like to read “When Zachary
Beaver Came to Town” by Kim-
berly Holt.
I was reading one of my 2002
journals, the time I went to Col-
orado Springs with Casey and fam-
ily. I also visited at my daughter,
Carol and Al Vogan’s. Al took me
over east of their place a couple
miles whree there are spectacular
rock formations. Wind there is
capricious. It rolls little rocks
around within a “dish” of a bigger
rock. I brought one set of these
home to Philip with me, and I sup-
pose it is there yet. I stayed a
month of so, and then Carol and Al
took me to Ogallala, Neb., and my
son, David, came with his small
airplane and took me to Philip. It
took less than two hours from
Ogallala to Philip.
Sunday, November 18, 2012, at
Somerset Court, we had a great
noon meal with ham and sweet po-
tatoes and pumpkin pie.
We played a lot of whist with dif-
ferent residents filling in as
needed. There was Ina Oerlline,
Irene Arbach, Irene Cox, Mary
Lou, Margaret and Vivian. Also an
adaption was carried on when
there were only three players, they
played clubs are trump (sometimes
called widow whist).
In the afternoon, we had nonde-
nominational church services with
Steve, Terry and Ardyce and Jack
Humke played the piano and we
sang Thanksgiving hymns, “Now
Thank We All Our God” and “Come
Thou Fount of Every Blessing.”
We should list all the things that
we are thankful for and pray for
those who are miserable. We are
very thankful to have a clean,
warm and beautiful place to live.
We are thankful that we have
earned enough money to be able to
live here or that our children can
afford to pay our rent. We forget
about the people who live under
bridges or are in prison.
Thanksgiving is a time when we
think first of all the turkey. We
have been raised that way, and in
itself, that is a delightful tradition.
But, let us be sure to share some of
our good fortune.
M.R. and Barbara Hansen had
me over for supper on Sunday
night. The occasion was a send off
for Wayne Hansen, who is going
out to California for the winter. He
joins his wife, Gwynn, at their new
house in Rancho Palos Verdes, and
of course their son and family live
nearby. Thank you, M.R. and Barb
for having me over and thanks to
Wayne for bringing me back to
Somerset Court.
It was pleasant to read in the
Rapid City Journal for November
18, 2012, about the wonderful
music program at South Dakota
School of Mines. The School of
Mines has the use of an 1859
Grand Steinway, a square grand
piano, and two other excellent pi-
anos.
continued on page 5
The Philip Ambulance
Service
EMT Classes
will start
Dec. 5th
for more info call
Don Weller - 685-4423
or Dodi Weller - 685-3131
We Are Here
Emily Wickstrom, Rural Advocate
for Missouri Shores Domestic Vi-
olence Center, will be at the
Haakon Co. Courthouse on
~ TUESDAY ~
December 4th
10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
For more information, call
1-800-696-7187
Domestic Violence, Sexual As-
sault, Dating Violence
Emily is also available for
presentations to any group
Brucklacher four generation
Saturday, November 10, 2012, the Brucklacher family met in Philip at Pastor Al and Lenore’s
home. The whole entire family was there. This was the first time in forty years that the whole
family has been together. Four generations with all Al and Lenore’s children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren were there. Forty-four people gathered and we did a huge family pic-
ture in Al’s music room in his barn that he built for the Bible School activities. Courtesy photo
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December 7-8-9-10:
Rise of the Guardians
Fri & Sat: 7:00
Sun 1:30 • Mon 6:00
The Twilight Saga:
Breaking Dawn - Part 2
(PG-13)
Fri & Sat: 9:00
Sun 3:30 • Mon 8:00
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH
8 p.m.: Rise of the Guardians (PG)
1/2 Price Movie Night for the
Guardians movie only.
Sponsored by Modern Woodmen.
10 p.m.: Taken 2 (PG-13)
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1ST
7 p.m.: Rise of the Guardians
9 p.m.: Taken 2
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2ND
1:30 p.m.: Rise of the Guardians
3:30 p.m.: Taken 2
MONDAY, DECEMBER 3RD
6 p.m.: Rise of the Guardians
8 p.m.: Taken 2
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Even though the weather on
Thanksgiving was cold and very
windy the folks gathered with fam-
ily and friends to enjoy the day. I
hope we all gave thanks for so
many blessings God has given us.
Mark and Pat Hanrahan, Kalie
Hanrahan, Tracie Erdmann, and
Chad and Kathy Hanrahan were
guests for the day in Pierre at Pat's
sister, Bev and Randy Wilson's.
At Jim and Lana Elshere's were
Andy, Donella, Cole and Kami
Elshere, Tim and Judy Elshere,
Paul and Joy Elshere and Donnie
and Marcia Eymer.
Enjoying the day at Boyd and
Kara Parsons' were Alyssa and
Conner DeYoung, Micah Hansen
and Jonathon Cain, Sioux Falls,
Brady and Julie Hansen and boys
from Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, Jesse
and Sheryl Hansen, Joanne Par-
sons, and Autumn and Kamri Par-
sons (Wade and Marcy were home
with Keenan who was not feeling
well.) Joanne spent the night, re-
turning home to Rapid City Friday.
Guests at Byron and Peggy Par-
sons' were Robbie and Molly Lytle,
Bodhi, Bailey and Cass, Quinn,
Brennen, Joni and EmmyLee Par-
sons, Piedmont, and Cindy and
Kevin Pfeifle, Philip. Joanne Par-
sons was a morning coffee guest.
EmmyLee stayed overnight as her
parents were working Friday.
Byron and Peggy brought her home
Friday night and stayed overnight.
The Jason Hamills hosted
Thanksgiving for Fred and
Priscilla Romkema, Spearfish,
Adam Romkema, Kingman, Ariz.,
and Mark and Tammy Hamill and
sons, Vance and JT, Parker, Colo.
All spent the night and went home
on Friday except Mark and family
who stayed until Saturday. Visit-
ing the Hamills on Saturday were
Gordon and Kurt Flesner and Seth
Thompson.
From November 17 - 19 guests at
Jerry and Joy Neville's were their
son, Rodney Neville, Ryan and
Jason, Montevideo, Minn. Sunday,
the 18th, they and Jerry and Joy
went to Rapid City where they met
the following for dinner and some
basketball games at Central High
School, Brent and Shawn Taylor,
Gillette, Wyo., Mike and Tamra
Neville, Kayley and Shayna, and
Tamra's mother, Carolyn, all of
Rapid City.
The Neville family met at the
senior citizens center in Philip for
Thanksgiving. They included Jerry
and Joy Neville, Kenny and Nancy
Neville, Lacey Neville, Annie and
Layton, and Shirley Parsons, all of
Philip, Memory Neville and Kaden,
Jim and Grace Mack and their
daughter, Chris and Brad Hovland
and their son, Dave Mack, all of
Rapid City.
Guests on Thanksgiving for sup-
per at Mike and Linda Gebes' were
Darren and Karen Gebes and fam-
ily, Horace, N.D., Roy Warner,
Milesville, Brad Gebes and friend
Kathy and her son, Devin, Philip,
and Courtney Gebes, Sturgis. Dar-
ren and family returned home Sat-
urday.
Virgil and Carla Smith and
Dave, Tonya, Jade and Misti Berry
had Thanksgiving dinner at Will
and Toni Anders.
Dusti Berry, home from school in
Mitchell, spent Thanksgiving in
Philip with the Reder family.
Zane Jeffries spent Thanksgiv-
ing with his son, Jason, and son
Cashton in Belle Fourche. Beth
had her kids all home including
Matt Arthur, Murdock Arthur and
Brad and Amber Beer and boys.
Jason and Cashton were at Zane
and Beth's on Saturday.
Enjoying Thanksgiving at Phil
and Karen Carley's were Karen's
sister, Patty and Gary Moreno and
son Briley, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho,
and their daughter, Cassie, and
friend of Minnesota, their parents,
Frank and Mildred O'Grady, New
Underwood, Dave and Angelia
Shields and family, Pierre, Joe and
LaRae Carley and family, Andrea
Carley and Randy Clark and their
daughter, Millie, and Abby Carley
and son Wace. Coming to visit Fri-
day was Karen's sister, Kim and
Ron Plunder, New Underwood.
Lee and Debbie Neville,
Amanda and Lukasz Stanczyk and
family, and Luke Neville and
daughters, Kennah and Jaylyn, all
of Rapid City, were among the
guests at the home of Debbie's sis-
ter, Sharla and Gerald Julson,
Quinn. Friends of the Nevilles,
George and Liz Jackson, and
grandson, Newell, spent the week-
end with Lee and Debbie.
Kenneth and Doris Berry's
guests were Ryon Berry, Keith and
Carol Berry, Alexis and Eri, and
Donna and Katie Berry. Ray and
Matthew Berry, Arcadia, Neb., ar-
rived Friday evening and spent the
night.
Cory and Deb Smith have had a
very busy weekend with hunting
guests, friends and family visiting
them. Friday, they celebrated
Cory's 34th birthday with a house-
ful of guests. Deb's daughter, Cate,
was home from college, but she did-
n't enjoy Thanksgiving dinner
much as she had her tonsils re-
moved the day before. So she was
eating popsicles.
Jeff and Terri Staben enter-
tained Peggy Staben, Charles
Staben and Sandra and Robert
Harrowa.
Paul and Tina Staben had din-
ner in Wall at Ruby and Gary
Keyser's home. Ruby and Donna
are sisters. After Donna got off
work, they visited at Jeff and Terri
Staben’s in the afternoon.
Spending Thanksgiving at the
Donnie Schofield's were Steve and
Lisa Jonas and Blair, Bruce and
Lynn Dunker and family, Russell
and Dawn Simons and family, and
Brennen and Vicki Daly and boys.
Theresa Deuchar, Jenna, Cass
and Cole Finn, and Zeb, Megan,
Nora and Coy Hoffman, drove to
Miles City, Mont., for Thanksgiv-
ing with Theresa's mother, Mary
Haughian, and many other family
members. They gathered at Mary's
ranch home until Sunday, when
they returned home.
Bill and Connie Parsons were
guests at Glenn and Dianne Par-
sons' home in Philip. Others in-
cluded Chelsea, AJ and Eliza Tay-
lor, Grand Island, Neb., Shayla, Je-
remey, Taiven and Nolan Delaney,
Rapid City, Donna Newman, Mike
and Debbie Clements and Luke
Clements.
Guests at Miles and Erin Hov-
land's were Joe and Debbie Prouty,
Allen Hovland and Quentin and
Kylie Riggins, Tim and Wes.
The Trevor Fitch family and
Burjes and Cheryl Fitch hosted
Thanksgiving at the new shed that
Trevor has recently completed. A
very large group of family and
friends enjoyed the day together.
Guests at Bill and Karyl San-
dal's were Todd and Jennifer San-
dal and John, Eden, Monte Sandal
and daughter Matrix and Monte's
friend, Shari, New Underwood, and
Tami, Donnie and Tara Ravellette.
Some of them carried on the "old"
tradition of decorating Christmas
cookies while the others watched
football.
Earl and Jodi Parsons, Rachel
and Sarah, went to Highmore for a
late Thanksgiving with the McDon-
nells Saturday. They returned
home Sunday.
Bryan and Sharon joined the
Olivier families Saturday night for
supper at Don and Donna Olivier's.
Hugh and Ann Harty spent
Thanksgiving in Hill City at the
home of John and Marti Gillaspie,
along with their family.
Leo and Joan Patton had the fol-
lowing for the day: Irene Patton,
Pierre, Jason, Valerie, Emily and
Justin Howe, Kansas City, Terry
and Janet Penland and Dave and
Susan Jones, LeSueur, Minn., Bill,
Michelle, Ally and Eric Patton,
Eagan, Minn., Bob, April and Kait-
lyn Knight, Rapid City, Melissa
Knight and friend Robert, Denver,
Colo., and locally George and Kay
Ainslie and great-grandchildren,
Domonic and Corbin, Gary
Stephenson, Brooke Scheessle and
friend, Zack, Marlene and Ashley
Scheessle, and the Jim Stangles.
Zane Pekron arrived home for
Thanksgiving Tuesday, November
20. Fellow seminarian, Aaron
Downing, also came to spend the
holiday weekend on the Pekron
ranch. Monday, they returned to
St. Mary's University in Winona,
Minn. Friday, the Pekrons were in
Pierre and stopped at the Capitol
to see the Christmas trees. The
town of Milesville was well repre-
sented with an ornament on the
Catholic Diocese of Rapid City tree
and the Milesville Rangers 4-H
Club tree.
Happy belated birthday to Don-
nie Schofield, who celebrated his
70th birthday at The Steakhouse in
Philip Saturday night. Over 70
friends and relatives enjoyed the
evening. Mackenzie Hovland was
also honored on her third birthday
that night. Local folks attending
were Donnie and Bobette, Cory and
Deb Smith and Deb's daughter,
Cate, and Miles and Erin Hovland,
Connor and Mackenzie. Guests for
dinner on Sunday at Schofield's
were the Bruce Dunkers, Steve and
Blair Jonas and Mark Jimmerson
of Colorado. Callers in the after-
noon were Jeff and Crystal
Schofield and boys.
Milesville
News
by Janice Parsons
544-3315
Church & Community Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
And cvcry man lhal slrìvclh lor
lhc maslcry ìs lcmµcralc ìn all
lhìngs. Now lhcy do ìl lo oblaìn
a corruµlìblc crown; bul wc an
ìncorruµlìblc.
1 Corìnlhìans 9:2S (K)V)
Cverínduígence ís u vuy oí íííe íor muny, but ít ís not the vuy oí
íííe íor beííevers. Cod udvíses us to exercíse greut seíí-controí
ííke uthíetes so ve muy secure u píuce ín Heuven. Lnííke the
prízes uthíetes compete íor, our príze vííí never perísh.
Obituaries
Moving?
E-mail your change of address to:
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
or call 859-2516
two weeks in advance of your move.
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
It’s Time to Bundle Up!
Announcing Cornerstone Rescue Mission’s Winter Needs Drive
Please bring new or gently used clean gloves, hats, scarves,
backpacks, socks & boots, and blankets for the homeless and needy
by Wednesday, December 5, 2012:
Hardingrove Church, Milesville Okaton Comm. Church
Belvidere Comm. Church Presbyterian Church, Kadoka
Cabin Fever Floral Petersen’s Variety
Philip Health Services, Inc. The Heart Doctors, Rapid City
and all churches in Midland and Philip
All sizes
needed!
Thank You …
We would like to thank everyone for the gifts and
everyone who stopped by during our open house.
We sincerely appreciate it all, and had a
wonderful time.
Rush Funeral Home
Jack, Gayle & DJ Rush
Give a mystery for
Christmas!
Order Art, Wine & Bullets
by Vinnie Hansen
PHS Class of ’72
$13 payable to Vinnie Hansen
1011 Bostwick Lane
Santa Cruz, CA 95062
www.vinniehansen.com
Special: All 6 books for $50
Pauline “Polly” Kujawa__________________________
Pauline “Polly” Kujawa, age 89
of Kadoka, S.D., died Friday, No-
vember 23, 2012, at the Kadoka
Nursing Home.
Pauline “Polly” Heid was born
May 27, 1923, in Kimball, Minn.,
the second of four children born to
John and Gertrude (Bach) Heid.
She grew up and attended
Cathedral High School in St.
Cloud, Minn., and later worked as
a telephone switchboard operator
for a transportation company. As a
young lady, Polly enjoyed boating,
swimming in the lake, roller skat-
ing, playing the accordion and vio-
lin, movies and dancing.
Polly met Ed Kujawa when her
good friend, Retta (Ed’s sister), in-
troduced them. They were married
November 24, 1949, in Luxem-
burg, Minn. They made their way
to Kadoka when Ed worked for
J.F. Anderson Lumber Company.
They purchased the business in
1961, and renamed it to Kadoka
Lumber and Supply Company.
They operated this until 1991
when they sold the business to
their son, Jim, and his wife, Ar-
lene.
Polly not only cooked for her
family, but she was a cook at the
nursing home for many years. She
was a devoted mother who was
home for her children and at-
tended sporting events for all six of
her children.
Polly was a member of Our Lady
of Victory Catholic Church, the
Altar Society, and taught CCD
classes. She was also a member of
the American Legion Auxiliary,
PTA and helped organize blood
drives. She enjoyed sewing, bridge
club and planting flowers. For over
20 years, she walked two or more
miles every morning. And, she
made time to go to daily Mass
early in the morning before mak-
ing breakfast for her family.
Polly’s husband, Ed, preceded
her in death on April 10, 2006. She
continued to make her home in
Kadoka. She moved into the
Kadoka Nursing Home on Decem-
ber 14, 2010, where she has since
resided.
Survivors include her six chil-
dren, Joanne Berheim and her
husband, Tom, of Forbes, N.D.,
Jim Kujawa and his wife, Arlene,
of Kadoka, Ken Kujawa and
Denise of Huntsville, Mo., Karen
Kujawa and her husband, Jack
Henderson, of Littleton, Colo., Rita
Endres and her husband, Scott, of
Maple Grove, Minn., and Rhonda
Schultz of Gilbert, Ariz.; 12 grand-
children; 15 great-grandchildren;
one sister, Delores Gunderson of
St. Paul, Minn.; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
In addition to her husband, Ed,
Polly was preceded in death by her
parents; one brother, Jerry Heid;
and one sister, Christine Scheeler.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Wednesday, November
28, at Our Lady of Victory Catholic
Church in Kadoka, with Father
Bryan Sorensen as celebrant.
Music was provided by JoAnne
Stilwell, pianist, Mary Graup-
mann, guitarist, and Diane Hogen,
vocalist. “Amazing Grace” was
sung by Polly’s granddaughters,
Colette Jones, Stephanie Beynon,
Trista Hedderman, Chelsea
McBride, Britni Schnabel, Abby
Endres, Jodi Leeper and Trina
Thorn.
Readers were Deontae Thorn,
Caleb Jones and Jack Henderson.
Ushers were Joe Leutenegger and
Bud Olney. Gift bearers were Pay-
ton and Aidan Hedderman.
Pallbearers were Jeremy Ku-
jawa, Nicholas Rhinehart, Chase
Endres, Chad Beynon, Matt
Berheim, Travis Thorn, B.J.
Leeper, Chase McBride and Scott
Jones.
Interment was at the Kadoka
Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to Our Lady of Victory
Catholic Church and the Kadoka
Nursing Home.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
M. Roger Westerberg______________
M. Roger Westerberg, 78, of
Sturgis, S.D., and formerly of
Faith, died, Monday, November
19, 2012, at his home in Sturgis.
He lived in Mitchell from age
three to 25 years, except for the
three years in the U.S. Marine
Corps. He graduated from high
school in 1951 and from Dakota
Wesleyan University in 1958 and
earned two master’s degrees from
South Dakota State University.
He was married in 1956 and
later divorced in 1988. He was
blessed with four sons, Duke, Bill,
Jim, and Curtis, who was born and
died in 1961.
Survivors include three sons, M.
Roger “Duke” Westerberg and his
wife, Patricia, of Philip, William R.
Westerberg, Philippines, and
James B. Westerberg, Redding,
Calif.; and four grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, and a son, Curtis.
Arrangements were under the
direction of Black Hills Funeral
Home.
Engaged
Paul Slovek, Philip, and Tena
Slovek, Philip, are pleased to an-
nounce the engagement and forth-
coming marriage of their daughter,
Sierra, to Tyler Cowing, son of
Larry and Allison Cowing,
Granada, Minn.
An August 24, 2013, wedding is
being planned.
Send obituaries, engagements & wedding write-ups to:
ads@pioneer-review.com. There is no charge.
Grandpa Allen Hovland had sup-
per at Miles and Erin's Sunday
night to wish Mackenzie a happy
third birthday.
Jim and Lana Elshere, accompa-
nied by Joy Elshere and Jodi Par-
sons, drove to Bonesteel Wed- nes-
day for the funeral of Judy
Elshere's mother, Leola Halverson.
Darin and Leah Ries, Deacon
and Ainsley, Pierre, visited at Glen
and Jackie Radway’s for part of the
holiday weekend.
Jennifer Stangle was home from
college at Brookings for the long
weekend.
The 4-H Junior Leaders had a
float in the parade of lights in
Philip Saturday evening. Sam, Ben
and Mark Stangle helped decorate
and were in the parade.
Jade Berry turned 17 Monday
and on Sunday some friends and
family came to help him celebrate.
Brayden Fitch observed his 16th
birthday Sunday with a quiet day
at home.
A "Meet John Edward Sandal"
party was held at Donnie and Tami
Ravellette's home Friday night. At-
tending from Milesville were Don-
nie and Marcia Eymer, Kayla
Eymer and Bart and Janice Par-
sons.
About 80 of us Thorsons and
some friends gathered at the Amer-
ican Legion Hall in Philip for
Thanksgiving. Milesville folks at-
tending were Glen and Jackie Rad-
way, Bryan and Sharon Olivier,
Earl, Jodi, Rachel and Sarah Par-
sons and Bart and me.
Local folks attending the wed-
ding and reception of Crystal Mar-
tinez and Neal Eisenbraun Friday
night were Glen and Jackie Rad-
way, Bryan and Sharon Olivier,
and Bart and me.
Mike and Melody Parsons and
family, Rapid City, spent Saturday
and Sunday at our house. Joining
us for part of the time were Bryan
and Sharon, and Earl, Jodi and
girls.
Milesville News
(continued from page 4)
On the go all the time? Don’t miss an issue of the Pioneer Review!
Subscribe online at: www.pioneer-review.com
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
www.pioneer-review.com
I am sitting at my laptop com-
puter at the Ortman Hotel and not
sure just how it will go for this
week’s Midland News column. It is
funny how you get used to the com-
puter and keyboard you use each
week and when you try another it’s
as if you are all thumbs. I even
have a separate keyboard I’m using
because not being used to typing on
a laptop I really have trouble mak-
ing my fingers work. Heard Valen-
tine, Neb., got seven inches of snow
Sunday evening. There were a few
flurries fluffing around in Canis-
tota this morning. It is that time of
the year.
Pastor Frezil Westerlund had a
meaningful message at the funeral
service of Roy Roseth Wednesday.
There was a huge crowd of family
and friends there to pay their last
respects. And as Pastor Frezil
talked of Roy being so proud of his
Norwegian heritage, how much it
meant to him, and what a legacy
those Norwegians have given us. I
couldn’t help but think of our an-
cestors and the legacy they have
given us who came after. My
brother, Phil Meyers, told of his
memories of being on the Roseth
ranch, and of Roy and Clara. And
those meaningful songs sung by
Shirley Halligan, as she and her
husband, Frank, played their gui-
tars, had a message all their own.
I enjoyed meeting some of the
Olson relatives from Bristol. Roy’s
mother, Mary Roseth, was an
Olson. They were enjoying seeing
relatives they hadn’t seen for some
time. And that’s the way it is when
family come together. Roy is at
peace now. He was ready to go.
There is a feeling of loss when
someone we love dies, but there is
also comfort in knowing that per-
son is set free from what their life
had become.
Ed and Linda Eisenbraun, Rapid
City, Steve Reiman, Patrick and
Becca, Mandan, N.D., Maynard
and Anne Moege, Mitchell, and
Mark Reiman, Kadoka, were
Thanksgiving guests at the home of
Karel Reiman. Karel’s mom, Goldie
Eisenbraun, and sister, Paula
Eisenbraun, Rapid City, were un-
able to come.
Patricia and Calvin Saucerman
had a houseful of family home for
Thanksgiving. Miles and Laurel
Saucerman, West Minister, Colo.,
Dustin Saucerman, who is going to
Mitchell Vo-tech and is the son of
John Saucerman, Lawrence,
Golden and Devin Saucerman, Hot
Springs, (their parents Brent and
Julie Saucerman, also of Hot
Springs couldn’t come until Satur-
day due to work. John Saucer-
man’s daughter, Alisha Oldenberg,
Philip. Coming to visit with the
Saucerman bunch on Saturday was
Neil Jones, Midland. Everyone
went to Pierre Friday to see the
decorated Christmas trees at the
Capitol. Company left for home
Sunday.
Wilma Saucerman, and Clint
and Prerry Saucerman were
Thanksgiving Day guests of Pre-
rry’s mom, Marlin Evans. Slate
Evans and Ashley Morris were also
dinner guests. Wilma and Clint vis-
ited with Gaylord Saucerman at
the Philip Nursing Home in the af-
ternoon.
Friday, Tel and Ellie Saucerman
and family stopped in for a visit
with Wilma, Clint and Prerry on
their way home to Rapid City. They
had been in Pierre to the home of
Ellie’s sister, Beth and Brad Hand
and family for Thanksgiving. Slate
and Ashley also stopped in at Clint
and Prerry’s, having lunch and vis-
iting.
In visiting with Maxine Jones by
phone, checking for Thanksgiving
news, she said she has been under
the weather so wasn’t able to go to
the home of Bob and Verona Evans
for dinner. But, Shorty had gone,
and Verona had sent food home
with him, so she got in on some
turkey and the fixings. Aren’t we
thankful for those microwaves,
they heat those leftovers up oh, so,
good.
Thanksgiving Day guests at Bob
and Verona’s were Allen and Traci
Evans, Tiahanna and Taylor, Sioux
Falls, Stan and Cathy Evans,
Rapid City, Ross and Melanie
Jones, Cassie and Kalli, Rapid
City, and Shorty Jones. Bob Sei-
dler and his daughter, Athellen,
Pierre, were invited, but stairs
being a problem for Athellen, and
Bob and Verona having stairs,
Verona sent food over to Bob’s. Bob
and his late wife, Dorothy, lived in
a trailer house near Bob and
Verona for a number of years, and
Bob still lives in that home. Allan
and Traci headed for home Friday,
the others went home Thanksgiv-
ing evening.
Bob and Verona went to Rapid
City Saturday to watch as their
granddaughter, Cassie Jones, in a
ice skating performance at the new
Main St. Square. Verona reports it
is a beautiful area and has many
different things to offer.
Jerry and Joy Jones attended the
funeral service for Roy Roseth-
Wednesday. Thanksgiving Day,
guests at their home were all of
their kids and families, Jodie and
Bob Schrempp and Baxter, Dupree,
Cindy and Russ Sinkey and Zak,
Deb and Mike Trapp and family,
Lani and Scott Olson and Molly,
Devil’s Lake, N.D., Cody and Au-
drey Jones, and Neil Jones. Deb,
Cassidy, Audrey and Lani braved
going shopping on Black Friday.
Neil drove up bringing Christmas
trees back with him.
Thanksgiving Day guests at the
home of Ernie and Laurel Nemec
were Becky and Rob Thompson
and Josiah, Sioux Falls, Barby and
Todd Larson, Kendall and Logan,
Sioux Falls, Tyler and Angel
Nemec and Emry, and Katey and
Brian Ortlieb and family, Black
Hawk. Randy and Holly Nemec
stopped in that evening. They had
been to Holly’s side of the family for
Thanksgiving dinner.
Barb and Morrie Jones left for
Bismarck, N.D., Wednesday, hav-
ing Thanksgiving with their
daughter, Jill and Todd Sheldon
and family. They enjoyed a tour of
the new home Jill and Todd had
built and they plan to be moved
into it in time for Christmas. Barb
said they even got in on some Black
Friday shopping. She said the
crowd in the material department
was huge, she went back a bit later
glad to find the crowd less in num-
bers. Barb and Morrie headed
home Friday. Saturday, they went
to see the trees at the Capitol, re-
porting they were beautiful.
Ronnie and Emily Sammons’
guests were daughter Corrine and
Mitch Norman and grandson Tan-
ner and Elana Norman, Colt and
Camryn, for Thanksgiving Day
dinner. Friday, Emily and Ronnie
went with Jim, Jan, and Kim
Bierle to Pierre to the Cultural
Heritage Center. Saturday, Ron-
nie and Emily were in Philip for
the parade of lights event.
Jim, Carmen, Joanna, Kayla and
Dale Nemec, Belle Fourche, April,
Steve and Miranda Meeker,
Spearfish, and Christopher,
Stephanie and Laura Nemec,
Mitchell, and Jerry and myself
were invited to the home of my
brother, Phil and Bernie Meyers,
Pierre, for Thanksgiving Day. Oth-
ers there were their daughter,
Dana and John Malferno, Brent,
Rylan and Brody, Pierre, and their
son, Damon, Sarah, and Kendall,
Colorado Springs, Colo. This all
came about thanks to Dana. She
had called to see what our plans
were for Thanksgiving. I told her of
our kids coming to our place for the
day. She then said, “You should all
come to Pierre for Thanksgiving
with all of us.” Told her I would
check with our kids, it was a go
with them, so called Dana, and
from there plans were made. And,
what a nice Thanksgiving it was,
one of the best we have had. Often
times a person gets so caught up in
their own immediate family, it’s
nice when you get together with
those other members of the family.
Nine-month-old Kendall and
seven- month-old Laura got all ex-
cited when they saw another little
people person. Just plain cute to
watch them. And, of course, we
had to get some of those family pic-
tures taken. Visiting and games of
cards were played and after most
enjoyable day, everyone headed for
home, except for Christopher,
Stephanie and Laura. They came
to our place to stay for a few days.
Stephanie had made plans with
Judy Fosheim, for Friday, giving
her a chance to meet little Laura
for the first time. As most of you
remember, John and Judy were
Stephanie’s host family when she
was in Midland as an exchange
student.
It is time to close my new’s col-
umn for this week. For those of you
whose Thanksgiving news I
missed, I hope to get it for next
week’s column. Now that Thanks-
giving is over, it is time to get at
those Christmas cards, Christmas
shopping and Christmas baking.
Wishing each of you a God blessed
week.
10th Annual
Christmas in
Midland
Saturday, December 1st
10:30 to 3:30 at the
Midland Legion Hall
•Door Prizes
•Live Nativity Scene at 1 p.m.
•Hay Rides
•Cookies & Cider
•Santa will be there for
pictures from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to come &
enjoy Midland’s Christmas!
Soup & Sandwich
Luncheon from
11 to 3 at the
Midland Senior
Citizens’
Auxiliary Room
View
Christmas
scenes by
individuals
and
organizations!
Battery Sale
Going on NOW until
the end of November!
10% off
all batteries!
859-2568 • Philip, SD
www.KennedyImplement.com
NOW ACCEPTING:
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2000 Yamaha Grizzly 600 ATV
New Tires, Windshield, Ranch Ready
I started putting my news to-
gether and some news came over
the radio and said that this was
Black Friday. I wondered why they
would call such a lovely day Black
Friday. It sure was not black to me,
it was a lovely day filled with the
memory of the blessing I had on
Thursday, Thanksgiving day, when
I enjoyed a beautiful day at the
Fitch farm for a meal in their new
machine shed. My reason to be
there was that my granddaughter,
Christa, is married to Trevor Fitch.
They live on the farm across the
road from the new shed and it is re-
ally a wonderful building. I never
asked how large it is, but it is
equipped with a bathroom and a
shower. There is a wonderful space
for an office and upstairs is where
there will be a kitchen with every-
thing in it. So they can eat there
when people who are working will
have a place to sit down and eat. It
is heated and there is a two-door
refrigerator that can hold a lot of
food and it is already running.
There is also water hooked up so a
bathroom and drinking water is
available to use. They set up tables
in the front half of the building and
Christa made the prettiest table
decorations from some old vintage
jars that were about four or five
inches tall and were filled with lay-
ers of seeds from their crops har-
vested this year. On top of the jar
lids she had placed an orange can-
dle about an inch high, then she
scattered fall leaves on top of the
white tablecloths. It was so pretty.
The other half of the room was
set up with some basketball hoops
and other games for the little kids.
So both the bigger kids and the lit-
tle ones had room to play and there
were lots of kids. The youngest
child was Truett and Dani Fitch's
baby girl, WoodLynn, and Christa
and Trevor’s little Aven. The rest
were from that age to high school
and college aged. Several of Burjes
and Cheryl’s kids were home with
their children. Darrel and Anita
Peterson and Anita’s mom, Mrs.
Paulson, from Wall, Lucille Peter-
son, Philip, Theodore and Laura
Kjerstad, Quinn, Cheryl’s sister,
Anita and Matt Sandal and family
of Quinn, and Mary Eide were all
present. Everyone brought food
and there was lots of food. But
most of the main food was fixed by
Burjes and Cheryl. Most everyone
else stayed for supper. What a
bunch of good cooks in that family.
Everything was delicious
I came early and left early so I
would be home before dark. Then I
wasn’t out late and could get the
dogs settled for the night. I also
wanted to be home as Marvin and
Vicki left for Gillette, Wyo.,
Wednesday morning to spend
Thanksgiving with Carla and fam-
ily.
Marvin reported that they had a
delicious meal served at Carla’s.
He said the turkey they fixed was
the best they had ever eaten. Hats
off to the cook. It sounded like they
had too much food also.
Brayden Fitch came down and
did chores for Marvin and Vicki
while they were gone. Marvin and
Vicki returned home about 8:30
Thanksgiving night.
Yes, and I started counting calo-
ries Friday. I don’t want to gain
pounds, as I want to enjoy Christ-
mas dinner which is not far off.
Kieth and Debbie Smith had a
Thanksgiving supper for some of
their family, Tucker, Jess and
Logan, Cassidy, Emberlyn and
Bella, Don and Donna Olivier,
Colby Smith and Rich Smith. Fri-
day, Lincoln and his girlfriend,
Ella, came.
Friday night, Kieth and Debbie
attended the wedding of Crystal
Martinez and Neal Eisenbraun.
Saturday, Aaron and Chancie
Baenen, Lead, arrived at Debbie
and Kieth’s and all the family went
into Philip to Don and Donna
Olivier’s for a Thanksgiving sup-
per.
Bryan and Sharon Olivier and
sons, Scott and Dianna Olivier and
Sonja and two kids were also at
Don and Donna’s. The family all at-
tended the parade of lights in
Philip that evening.
Sunday evening, Debbie at-
tended the soup supper and annual
meeting at their church.
The Thorson family rented the
Legion Hall at Philip and had their
Thanksgiving celebration there. Ed
and Cleon Tangren, Jodi’s parents,
went along with Bob and Jodi for
the day.
Bob Thorson worked cattle Mon-
day, preg testing and fall shots.
Larry Schulz was out to help him.
Bart and Marcy Ramsey hosted
the Ramsey family for Thanksgiv-
ing, plus a few friends. All reported
that there was lots of good food and
lots of visiting during this holiday.
Herb and Hazel Sielder had
planned to be in Kansas for a
Thanksgivng family get-together.
They didn’t answer the phone
when I called, so they must still be
gone.
Eileen Fitzgerald enjoyed
Thanksgiving at Dean and Jan-
ice’s. Their family was all home
and Eileen was so glad to get to see
them all. She reported a wonderful
day.
Al and Lenore Brucklacher went
to Tom and Marie Radway’s home
and joined their family for Thanks-
giving. They had the Brucklacher
family Thanksgivng dinner earlier
in November and Lenore reported
that all their family came. There
were 42 of them there. I had stated
earlier that Cain and Alex Radway
had went to the New Jersey area to
help out with the hurricane dam-
age, but they did not go. The boys
both work for the same electric
company.
When I called Norma Oldenburg
to see what they did for Thanksgiv-
ing, she said that a couple of other
ladies were tying quilts so was put
on hold for awhile. Later when I
called her back, she said that she
and Jim hosted their family for
Thanksgiving. Those who enjoyed
the day were daughter Debbie and
Newton Brown and sons, Casey
and Clay and Clay’s finacée,
Brandie Donavon, Faith, Ross and
Janice Williams and family,
Norma’s sister, Irene Finck, from
the Silverleaf, Butch Wintrode and
LuAnn Johnson.
With all the wonderful Thanks-
giving Day celebrations, they
should not call Friday black. Fri-
day may be something else like
Special Friday would be more ap-
propriate. I guess the reason they
call it Black Friday is that the mer-
chants feel it will put them in the
black financially, but all it does it
put the shoppers in the red. So
maybe it is a red Friday for the
shoppers. Just kidding.
Sympathy goes out to the fami-
lies of Wanda Heeb and Roy
Roseth. Both were lifetime resi-
dents in this area and well known
by everyone their funerals were
Wednesday, November 21.
I attended the service for Wanda
and got to visit with Karen (Bowen)
Raymond. She said that she had
two daughters who both work in
Rapid City, the youngest is a regis-
tered nurse working at Sioux San.
Karen has bought a home in Rapid
City so when she retires she can be
closer to her kids and grandkids.
Karen’s son, Kenneth, lives in
Kadoka. I have known Wanda
since I was eight or nine years old
and she and my mom were good
friends.
The local news, that is written by
different ladies or men from a com-
munity, serves the purpose of let-
ting those who are away from the
area and those who are shut-ins
know what is happening in the
area and to know people are still
active and doing things. The re-
porters have to depend upon what
people tell them and what they see.
Now as in everything else, some-
times it is not as accurate as we
would like it to be. As in all things,
people who tell us things are seeing
it from a different point of view or
from a different place or we may
forget some detail that changes the
meaning. So when you read the
local news in a small town or big
city newspaper it is not always
exact, but we try. Those who read
the newspaper know community
members are well and enjoy read-
ing about them. In case of an error
that upsets you, please call us so
we can correct it in the next week’s
column.
The Fitch boys have been enjoy-
ing hunting here at the farm dur-
ing their vacation this week from
school.
Today, the 25th, as I finish up
my news, I hope you all had a great
Thanksgiving with family and
friends.
After I finished breakfast this
morning, I called my great-grand-
son, Brayden Fitch, to wish him a
happy 16th birthday. It reminded
me that it’s only four more weeks
till Christmas. My, where does the
time go.
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Community
continued on page 10
April 3 – Nice crowd at dance
and fine time was had. Howser and
Anderson orchestra furnished
music. Dance broke up at 3 a.m.
Bert Dibble and I retired at 1 a.m.
Got up early and went for wood.
Got home at 4:30 p.m. Mitchell fin-
ished breaking sod. New home-
steader named Moore moved on the
quarter east of us. Has 11 horses.
April 4 – Cloudy and cold.
Looked like snow. Went to the river
and snaked out an immense load of
posts.
April 5 – Sawed wood all day.
Hurricane wind until noon and set-
tled perfectly calm and a nice after-
noon.
April 8 – Got another load of
posts on the Cheyenne.
April 9 – Viola and I went to the
Cheyenne and got a big load of post
material. Left at 3 p.m. and got
home at 5:30 p.m. Met a new home-
steader and his wife on the way
with immense load of household
goods. His name was Skaggs from
Kentucky and they were locating 2
1/2 miles north of us.
April 10 – We hitched up and
drove over to Marietta in the p.m.
and returned at 5:30 p.m. Light-
ning and thunderstorm with good
rain. Prospect of frost.
April 11 – Ice on water this
morning. Day opened nice and
clear. N.W. wind gradually in-
creased in velocity until by 8:30
a.m. a hurricane gales was blow-
ing. Hard job to stay on your feet.
Bert Dibble and Howser went to
the Cheyenne for posts. Bert and
Howser said the wind was blowing
terrible along the river. Sand was
blowing in clouds.
April 12 – Ice 1/2 inch thick.
Banked up shack and sawed wood
in p.m. Went with Dibble to trace
out corners of section. One corner
came in center of big pond and
couldn’t get to it. Went over to
where Gaston was plowing sod and
chatted with him. He was plowing
with a new Sattley Sod plow made
at Springfield, Illinios. Laura Gam-
brel and Miss Bellamy hitched
Fancy up at Bellamys and she ran
away with them. Excitement high
for awhile.
April 13 – Dibble and I and
Howser went to the Cheyenne
River breaks and got an immense
load of post material. Sawed logs at
Dibbles into fence post lengths.
Met Roy Sanders and they came
over with Viola and I and ate din-
ner with us. Miss Bellamy also
dropped in for dinner.
April 14 – Dibble and I started
for Midland at 7:30 a.m. Put up for
the night at Milletts Road Ranch
15 miles from Midland. Charges at
the ranch $2.40.
April 15 – Left Milletts Road
Ranch on our way to Midland at
6:30 a.m. Arrived at Midland at
10:45 a.m. Ate dinner at Bastions.
Got $100 out of the Midland Bank.
Started for Pierre at 4 p.m. Arrived
at 7:20 p.m. Stopped at Shannon
House. Wired John Murphy at
Clinton, Illinois.
April 16 – Put in the day shop-
ping at Ft. Pierre and Pierre and
getting our goods on the car.
Stopped overnight in the Riverview
Hotel in Pierre.
April 17 – Crossed the river to
Ft. Pierre with Dibble where he
caught the train at 9:15 a.m. for
Midland. Snowing. I returned to
Pierre.
April 18 – My brother John Mur-
phy from Illinois dropped in to see
me at the Riverview House in
Pierre at 1:30 a.m. We talked to
morning and then visited the sites
in Pierre including the Indian
School.
April 19 – John, I and Henry
Samuels started for a drive in
Hughes County. Stopped for dinner
at Chas. Genebergs place 16 miles
northeast of Pierre. Mr. and Mrs.
Geneberg from Sweden and the
finest folks we ever met. Had a
splendid meal but they would not
any pay for anything. Got back to
Pierre at 5:30 p.m. and had a splen-
did time.
April 20 – Went to Fort Pierre
with John in the morning and
bummed around town until noon.
Then went back to the Riverview
Hotel for dinner.
April 21 – John and I went to
church in Pierre this Sunday. Got
acquainted with quite a number of
people. Lots of Indian children at
church. Went over to Ft. Pierre in
the afternoon and on the way back
to Pierre got stuck on a sand bar in
the Missouri River and compelled
to stay there for 2 1/2 hours until
pulled off by another boat.
April 22 – John and I went to
Midland on the train. Arrived at
12:30 p.m. Ate dinner at Bastions.
Got a rig at Gallaghers barn and in
company with Henry Samuels we
started for Marietta at 2 p.m.
Stopped overnight at Dr. Varleys,
27 miles out. Had a good trip.
(to be continued …)
Wheeler ranch
Selling:
29 Black Baldie Bred Heifers
& 21 Black Heifers
Tuesday, december 18Th
at Philip (SD) Livestock Auction
• Heifers have had all shots
• Black Angus bulls turned out June 1st
• All home-raised, one-iron cattle
• Divided into two (2) calving groups
Call 605/859-2979 or 859-3263
for more information!
Thanks! We appreciate you!
Good morning from chilly
Kadoka. There has been snow from
the west deposited along the high-
way as it shook free from vehicles
in the last few days. A result of the
snow that came in Saturday night
and Sunday. However, here we got
only a little snow that clung to the
valleys in the roofs, but was invisi-
ble on the ground.
Along the lines of the article in
my last week’s news entitled "The
Stranger" I want to add a little
family history. A letter written by
my mom, Ruth Fairchild, dated
January 10, 1956, to Aunt Emma
and Uncle Pat Patterson in May-
wood, Ill., reads as such. "The TV
man set up a temporary set (only
tried it for about a half hour) in
Philip. The boys said it came in
pretty good, so maybe they will get
some good from a set. Next sum-
mer Rapid should add power and
more programs. Personally, I’m
quite satisfied with the programs,
and I’m especially satisfied that we
have only evening telecasting. We
can relax in the evenings and enjoy
the plays, without feeling our time
is being wasted." Dad, Wayne
Fairchild, added to the letter, "Hey,
By George! The more I think of Pat
catching fish small time stuff. I just
wonder how he would like to draw-
a-bead on a 350 pound buck deer?
It could be arranged Pat old boy,
think it over. The T.V. takes care of
our spare time."
Pee Wee Hook, Steve Clements,
Henry Hanson, Doug Frien, Ed
Morrison, Jessica Gittings and
Daniel helped work cattle for
George Gittings Monday. Henry,
Doug, Ed, Jessica and Daniel had
dinner also.
Monday, I was doing some sign
business. Bill made his usual trip
to Philip to the card room in the af-
ternoon and Tony Harty stopped
for a visit at our place to give me
his news before calling at the
Shirley Hair home.
Tuesday morning, I was a substi-
tute bowler. Bill asked me where
my ball and shoes were and I made
the "assumption" they were in the
locker in Philip. Never assume.
Dorothy Hansen got me set up with
a good pair of shoes, and I found a
house ball and really messed up my
handicap, by averaging 166. That
is going to be hard to keep up I’m
afraid. Joyce Hicks rode home with
me after bowling. Phyllis Word
stopped over for a visit in the after-
noon. It was such a beautiful day, I
cleaned out the garage with the
leaf blower, which really works
quite well although it seemed I re-
distributed some of the dust.
Tony Harty visited at the home
of Shirley Hair after getting the
mail Tuesday and visited with his
niece, Kathy Brown, in the after-
noon.
George Gittings was in Midland
on business Wednesday.
Wednesday morning bright and
early, I was on the road to Rapid
City with the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation van. Nice
day for the trip.
Wednesday, Tony Harty did a lit-
tle business around town, enjoyed
coffee out with folks, then visited
Shirley and L.D. Hair.
Jessica Gittings and Daniel vis-
ited George and Sandee Gittings
Thursday morning. George and
Sandee spent a quiet day at home
on Thanksgiving.
Don and Vi Moody had a busy
first part of the week getting ready
to spend Thanksgiving and deco-
rate at their ranchette in Rapid
Valley. The main course for the
meal was the turkey they had won
in a drawing earlier this spring,
but they did some shopping for the
rest of the trimmings Wednesday.
In planning for leftovers, they
bought a mini freezer (an early
Black Friday special on Wednes-
day). Just in time for the holiday.
They were invited to Thanksgiving
dinner at their neighbors, but it
seemed that cooking and relaxing
at home with a 3D movie would be
the better option.
Cathy Fiedler reported a beauti-
ful first part of the week in the
Sturgis area. Thursday morning
the streets were wet with some
light rain. The sun came out later
and it was in the 40s for the day,
some snow showers through out
the day but didn’t amount to any-
thing. Ralph and Cathy had a
houseful for the day with Don and
Lynette Klumb and girls, Eric and
Sherry Hanson and kids, Derek,
Renee and Jazmen Erickson, and a
friend of Caitlin’s from Spearfish
coming for the day. Good food, con-
versation, a game of cards, naps
and watching football was enjoyed
by all. The grandkids made out
their Christmas lists and names
were drawn among the family.
Now everyone can start their shop-
ping! Eric, Renee and Jazmen left
early afternoon to go to his family
at Lead. After pie in the evening
everyone else headed for home. The
weather had turned much colder
with the wind. But, Sherry and
Lynette took in the Black Friday
specials Thursday night in
Spearfish. It was a first time expe-
rience and they learned some
things.
Thanksgiving at our house was
quiet, but we counted our bless-
ings, which are many. I clipped an
article out of the Friday, November
23, Rapid City Journal, entitled
"South Dakotans linked to Pil-
grims." On the Sherwood side of
the family, we are descendants of
Edward Doty, a passenger on the
Mayflower and mom and aunt
Edna proved up the lineage many
years ago.
Vi Moody wrote, "Well, Thanks-
giving is over and it seems the
larger towns get more excited
about Black Friday and Cyber
Monday, but that's the way things
seem to be nowadays. I wonder if
they still think it all should take
place "Over the Hill and Through
the Woods to Grandmother's House
We Go!" Grandmother is no doubt
on her IPad, MiniPad, IPhone on a
tropical island or some other ro-
mantic island, sipping pina coladas
in the south Pacific or Western
Caribbean."
Sandee Gittings went to Rapid
City Friday afternoon after work.
The good news is she got most
everything she intended to and did-
n’t have to fight any crowds.
Friday, Bill and I went to Philip
in the afternoon, he went to the
card room and I met Lee Vaughan
at the airport. We sorted the
wreaths, swags and garland to be
distributed for Civil Air Patrol. I
visited at the home of Larry,
RoseAnn and Lydia Schulz and
was gifted a Christmas tree made
with coat hangers. Love those little
trees. Jim Van Tassel gave us one
about 20 years ago, it adorns the
house all year long, a great night
light. Tony Harty stopped by our
place later in the evening after vis-
iting at the Hair home. He read the
papers and we enjoyed a couple of
farkel games.
Don and Vi Moody returned to
the ranch late Friday to find some
of Santa’s elves had been busy and
a fresh Christmas wreath was al-
ready at their entrance. Thank
you, Civil Air Patrol team. Don and
Vi also wanted to catch up and fi-
nalize some hay deals they started
working with, fed cattle, and put
well lids on wells and did ther
ranch things. A few deer hunters
were still out and some guys did
some coyote calling over the week-
end at the ranch as it was gorgeous
weather for travel and all to enjoy
the holiday with many many
thanks.
Jessica Gittings and Daniel were
out to see George and Sandee Git-
tings Saturday afternoon and got
some stuff. They attended the light
parade and Daniel rode out with
Roxie Gittings to spend the night.
Kinsey Gittings got back from Iowa
shortly after them.
Tony Harty visited L.D. and
Shirley Hair Saturday. L.D. was
getting ready to return to his job in
Hot Springs and Shirley was going
to stay in Kadoka.
Bright and early Saturday morn-
ing, Bill and I were on the road to
Sioux Falls for a Thanksgiving
gathering of the family. Shelley
Seager came from Sutton, Neb.,
grandson Chase May, Carly and
newest great-grandson, Jaxon,
came from Madison, granddaugh-
ter, Amanda and Adam Claflin
came from Harrisburg, and we all
met at the family home of grandson
Eric Seager for a late holiday gath-
ering. Chaciel’s grandpa, Alex, also
joined the group. We took along a
problem computer and Eric jumped
at the chance to help get it back on
its feet and salvaged as much infor-
mation as possible on the hard
drive. The one thing missing this
time is the email addressed, so to
get this to the paper I may have to
call and see if they actually get it.
Bill and I were overnight guests at
Eric’s returning home Sunday af-
ternoon after visiting at the Claflin
home. Shelley also returned home
that day.
George, Sandee, Roxie, Kinsey
and Jessica Gititngs and Daniel
had their Thanksgiving Sunday.
Daniel returned home with Jessica
in the evening.
Friendship is a blessing! Among
the many things we have in life to
be "thankful for," we hold most
dear to us also is friendship.
Vi shares her new gift with a few
quotes: "A real friend is not so
much someone you need to be seri-
ous with, as someone you feel free
to be silly with." "It takes a long
time to grow an old friend - that we
don't ever want to lose and that is
true friendship."
Cathy Fiedler wrote: the week-
end in Sturgis was cold with Sun-
day bringing in snow showers that
got everything wet. By late after-
noon, the snow stuck to everything,
accumulating about two inches of
wet snow. The sun on the new
fallen snow gave a look of a winter
wonderland in the Black Hills area.
Sunday, Tony Harty visited at
the home of Kathy Brown and Dale
Koehn and after church visited
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
The Perfect Gift!
Here’s a gi that says
“Merry Christmas” every week of the year!
Order a gi subscription to one of our
newspapers and just before Christmas, we’ll send the
recipient a card announcing your gi and start the
subscription with the holiday issue of December 20.
Buy or renew as many subscriptions as you like.
It’s the “Perfect Gi.”
$5.00 OFF EACH SUBSCRIPTION OF (2) OR MORE NEW
SUBS OR RENEWALS PURCHASED!
Pioneer Review ($36 + tax local) ($42 out of area)
(605) 859-2516 • PO Box 788, Philip, SD 57567
IncIudes Tax
A PubIIcatIon oI RaveIIette PubIIcatIons, Inc., PbIIIp, Soutb Dakota S?S6?. Tbe OIIIcIaI Newspaper oI Haakon County, Soutb Dakota. CopyrIgbt 19S1.
Number 12
volume 107
November 15, 2012
Market Report
winter wheat, 12 Pro ..........$8.30
Any Pro .............................$7.30
Milo .......................................$6.49
Corn.......................................$6.64
Millet...................................$30.00
3unflower 3eeds................$21.50 llag
presenta-
tion
2
Pearson 40
years with
3ootohmans
10
P¬3 wins
aoademio
ohallenge
9
lridge
Uoor
14
Eut you'rc in our hcarts. Thank you for your
busincss. Hopc you havc much to bc thankful
for this Thanksgiving.
From all of os at
Tbe Pioneer Review & Profit
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furnouf of 80.52 µorconf for fho
gonornI oIocfIon hoId Tuosdny, Þo-
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Counfy`s 82.93 µorconf.
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µoµuInfIon of l,93? µooµIo. Of
fhoso, l,3?6 nro ncfIvo, rogIsforod
vofors. In fho gonornI oIocfIon,
l,l08 of fhoso µooµIo cnsf bnIIofs.
Though fho Inrnck Obnmn nnd
Joo IIdon µrosIdonfInI fIckof won
fho nnfIonnI oIocfIon, Hnnkon
Counfy vofod for fho MIff !omnoy
nnd InuI !ynn fIckof by n Innd-
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vofos, comµnrod fo !nIµh Kom-
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Tho mnjorIfy of vofors In Soufh
Ðnkofn docIdod fo chnngo fho dIs-
frIbufIon from fho comonf µInnf
frusf fund, ovorrIdIng whnf
Hnnkon Counfy vofors wnnfod.
Hnnkon Counfy vofors woro µnrf
of fho mnjorIfy In nII ofhor docI-
sIons for cnndIdnfos, nmondmonfs,
InIfInfod monsuros nnd roforrod
Inws.
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mnrgIn, docIdod fo ronow fho
fown`s off-snIo nnd on-snIo IIconsos.
Tho oIocfIon cosf Hnnkon Counfy
n fofnI of $4,854.?6. ThIs IncIudos
fho µrInfIng of bnIIofs, µrogrnm-
mIng fho cnrds for fho Aufomnrk
nnd Ml00 vofIng mnchInos nnd
wngos for fho oIocfIon workors.
Thoro woro 22 workors covorIng
fho sIx dIfforonf µrocIncfs for fho l2
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Though fho fwo µrocIncfs wIfh vof-
Ing IocnfIons In fho courfhouso dId
nof roquIro ronf, fho ofhor four dId.
Tho MIdInnd IIro HnII, Ðooµ Crook
Church, MIIosvIIIo HnII nnd
IhIIIµ`s Ind !Ivor SonIor CIfIzon`s
Confor onch rocoIvod $35 for ronf
for fho oIocfIon.
0eneral electlon results now offlclal
1he 73- 3aloon's annual wild game feed was held lriday, November 9, the
evening before the opening of west River deer season. 1his year's orowd was the
largest so far, ¨probably beoause people were hearing how good it was," said
LouAnn Reokling, the main oook of the orew that annually provides the various
dishes. 1he smorgasbord fare inoluded turkey, pheasant shish kebabs, elk oasse-
role, and other seleotions, though this year there was no turtle soup.
Annual wlld game feed
by Nuncy HuIgL
Tho Hnnkon Counfy commIssIon-
ors, nf fhoIr Þovombor 8 moofIng,
IIffod fho burn bnn ImµIomonfod
Insf summor.
Tho bonrd urgod rosIdonfs fo sfIII
fnko cnufIon whon burnIng ns con-
dIfIons nro sfIII oxfromoIy dry.
CommIssIonor !Ifn O`ConnoII
nnnouncod fhnf sho wIII sfoµ down
from fho commIssIon. Sho wIII bo
movIng ouf of hor dIsfrIcf. Tho com-
mIssIon roquosfs fhnf nnyono who
mny wIsh fo fIII fho sonf from ÐIs-
frIcf 3 µIonso cnII fhom.
ÐIrocfor of IqunIIznfIon TonI
!hodos gnvo nn uµdnfo on growfh
fIguros for fho counfy. Sho nIso ox-
µInInod how fho cIfy of IhIIIµ`s now
fnxIng ordInnnco nffocfs fho
counfy`s growfh fIguros. InsIcnIIy,
nny sfrucfuro buIIf wIfhIn fho cIfy`s
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conf of Ifs vnIuo for fho fIrsf yonr,
workIng uµ fo l00 µorconf nf fIvo
yonrs fImo. Two now sfrucfuros,
ono homo nnd ono busInoss, nro nf-
focfod.
!hodos nofod fhnf Sngo Informn-
fIon SorvIcos, CIon IIIon, CnIIf.,
hns rosµondod bnck rognrdIng fho
commIssIon`s docIsIon fo nof µro-
vIdo fho comµnny wIfh fho µubIIc
InformnfIon from fho oqunIIznfIon
offIco. Tho commIssIon, nnd
Hnnkon Counfy rosIdonfs, sfnfod
fhnf fho comµnny couId como nnd
coµy fho mnforInI fhomsoIvos If so
dosIrod, buf fhoy dId nof fooI fhnf
!hodos noodod fo sµond counfy
fImo coµyIng nnd mnIIIng fho Infor-
mnfIon.
Tho comµnny`s Ioffor sfnfod fhnf
nccordIng fo Inw If n comµnny ro-
quosfs fho InformnfIon vIn oIoc-
fronIc monns, fho counfy musf sond
If In fhnf mnnnor. Tho commIssIon
roquosfod !hodos sµonk wIfh
Hnnkon Counfy Sfnfo`s Affornoy
Cny ToIIofson rognrdIng fho Inws.
Tho comµnny Is sookIng nII Infor-
mnfIon nbouf Innd In fho counfy
whIch IncIudos, fho µroµorfy ns-
sossmonf, IognI doscrIµfIon, num-
bor of ncros, buIIdIngs nnd ownor`s
nnmo.
Konny ÞovIIIo, hIghwny suµorIn-
fondonf, dIscussod rosIdIng nnd
now wIndows for fho frnIIor nf fho
!obbs IInf IocnfIon. ÐIfforonf sId-
Ing oµfIons woro dIscussod nnd
ÞovIIIo wIII gof quofos on somo of
fhom.
ÞovIIIo wns gIvon fho go-nhond
fo ndvorfIso for nn omµIoyoo. Ho
nofod fhnf fwo mon nro µInnnIng fo
rofIro noxf yonr, ono In Mny nnd
ono In Soµfombor.
ÞovIIIo nofod fhnf hIs doµnrf-
monf Is µuffIng In now cuIvorfs nnd
grnvoIIng shorf sfrofchos of ronds.
A suµµIomonfnI honrIng wns nµ-
µrovod fo ndd $l8,000 fo fho jnII
fund nnd $5,000 fo fho monfnIIy III
fund.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod Tronsuror
InffI !hodo`s roquosf fo uso 20l2
funds fo µurchnso n comµufor for
hor offIco. Tho µurchnso wns bud-
gofod for In fho 20l3 budgof, buf
!hodos snId sho hnd onough funds
fo µurchnso ono fhIs yonr, nnd fhon
µurchnso nnofhor comµufor In 20l3
for fho doµufy fronsuror. Tho com-
mIssIon nµµrovod fho roquosf.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod fho Ocfobor
2, 20l2 moofIng mInufos nnd fho
wnrrnnfs for fho µnsf monfh. Thoy
nµµrovod for counfy omµIoyoos fo
hnvo IrIdny, Þovombor 23 nnd Ðo-
combor 24 off ns ndmInIsfrnfIvo
Ionvo. Covornor ÐonnIs Ðnugnnrd
hnd nµµrovod fhoso for sfnfo om-
µIoyoos nnd fho counfy foIIows suIf.
Tho bonrd fnbIod dIscussIon nnd
ncfIon on fho roscIndIng of !osoIu-
fIon #2008-03. Tho rosoIufIon ouf-
IInod fho counfy µuffIng In nµ-
µronchos nnd nof drIvownys.
Hnnkon Counfy AudIfor Inf Iroo-
mnn sfnfod fhnf n sfnfo nudIfor
foId hor If shouId bo roscIndod ns
fho counfy shouId nof µrovIdo ovon
fho nµµronchos.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod VIrgII SmIfh
nnd n wood bonrd mombor fo nf-
fond n moofIng In IIorro, Þovom-
bor 8. Iy hnvIng fwo µooµIo nffond,
fho counfy Is oIIgIbIo for grnnf doI-
Inrs.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod n rnffIo ro-
quosf by MIko Mosos for n Com
Thonfro fundrnIsor. Tho nµµrovnI
In confIngonf on Mosos µrovIdIng
µnµors rognrdIng fho fhonfors non-
µrofIf sfnfus.
Tho commIssIon nIso snf ns fho
gonornI oIocfIon cnnvnss bonrd.
Thoy wonf ovor fho fofnI vofos In
onch µrocIncf nnd nµµrovod fho
counfs.
Tho bonrd onforod Info oxocufIvo
sossIon Thursdny mornIng for nµ-
µroxImnfoIy 90 mInufos fo conducf
doµufy shorIff InforvIows. Þo nc-
fIon wns fnkon foIIowIng fho sos-
sIon.
Tho commIssIon dIscussod fho
counfy`s rovIsod µorsonnoI hnnd-
book for fhroo nnd ono-hnIf hours
wIfh MnrIono Knufson, dIrocfor of
fho ConfrnI Soufh Ðnkofn In-
hnncomonf ÐIsfrIcf. Tho bonrd nµ-
µrovod fho hnndbook whIch wIII
fnko offocf Jnnunry 20l3.
Burn ban llfted for county, 0'connell reslgns 0ver 3,000 head slngle conslgnment
of yearllngs sold 1uesdayl
by Kuv!ee Buvnes
Muvdo Coyote
Tho Murdo Aron Chnmbor of
Commorco µnrfnorod wIfh Soufh
ConfrnI !osourco ConsorvnfIon
nnd ÐovoIoµmonf fo sµonsor n µub-
IIc moofIng Þovombor 5 fo dIscuss
Inndoqunfo housIng In smnII com-
munIfIos.
A µnnoI of sµonkors from fodornI,
sfnfo nnd IocnI ngoncIos wIfh hous-
Ing µrogrnms µrosonfod Informn-
fIon nnd InsIghfs on whnf com- mu-
nIfIos cnn do fo ovorcomo curronf
housIng Issuos. Thoy nIso dIscussod
wnys fo oncourngo com- munIfy Im-
µrovomonf fhrough µrogrnms such
ns InInf Soufh Ðnkofn.
Tho moofIng wns woII nffondod
by busInoss µooµIo, confrncfors nnd
mombors of fho communIfy, ns woII
ns rosIdonfs from surroundIng com-
munIfIos. Sµonkors IncIudod Mnrk
!nusong oxocufIvo dIrocfor for
fho Soufh Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoI-
oµmonf AufhorIfy, !ogor Jncobs
fIoId offIco dIrocfor for HousIng nnd
!rbnn ÐovoIoµmonf, Crog Hondor-
son oxocufIvo dIrocfor for IInn-
nIng nnd ÐovoIoµmonf ÐIsfrIcf III,
MnrIono Knufson oxocufIvo dIroc-
for for ConfrnI Soufh Ðnkofn In-
hnncomonf ÐIsfrIcf, InuIn Corco-
rnn Ionn sµocInIIsf from !urnI
ÐovoIoµmonf, IIII Hnnson !urnI
HousIng CoIInbornfIvo, nnd Joy
McCrnckon ÞoIghborWorks
Ðnkofn Homo !osourcos nnd
Ðnkofn !nnd Trusf.
!nusong µrosonfod housIng µro-
grnms offorod fhrough fho Soufh
Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf Au-
fhorIfy. Ho sµoko nbouf fho IIrsf-
TImo Homobuyor Irogrnm, fho
CommunIfy Homo Imµrovomonf
Irogrnm (CHII, fho HOMI Invosf-
monf InrfnorshIµs Irogrnm nnd
fho Covornor`s Houso Irogrnm, ns
woII ns fho µossIbIIIfy of n housIng
noods sfudy.
Thoso µrogrnms nro nII nvnIInbIo
fo nµµIIcnnfs who moof corfnIn
qunIIfIcnfIons sof by onch µrogrnm.
AII of fho µrogrnms nro dosIgnod fo
µrovIdo snfo, nffordnbIo housIng oµ-
µorfunIfIos fo Iow-Incomo or Iow-fo-
modornfo Incomo nµµIIcnnfs.
Moro InformnfIon cnn bo found
nbouf onch µrogrnm by cnIIIng l-
800-540-424l or vIsIfIng fho Soufh
Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf Au-
fhorIfy`s wobsIfo, www.sdhdn.org.
Jncobs foId nbouf µrogrnms of-
forod fhrough H!Ð, whIch cnn bo
found nf www.hud.gov, nnd ho nd-
drossod fho HousIng OµµorfunIfy
Iund.
AccordIng fo n fncf shoof wIfh
dnfn comµIIod by fho Soufh Ðnkofn
HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf AufhorIfy, n
HousIng OµµorfunIfy Iund wIII bo
n now sfnfo fund wIfh rovonuo dod-
Icnfod fo onnbIo Soufh Ðnkofn com-
munIfIos fo cronfo nnd µrosorvo
homos nffordnbIo fo hnrdworkIng
fnmIIIos, vofornns, µorsons wIfh
dIsnbIIIfIos, sonIors nnd ofhors. Jn-
8olvlng lnadequate houslng ln communltles
Members of the Philip oommunity attended the housing meeting in Murdo.
Photo by Karlee Barnes
oontinued on page 8
cobs snId fhnf Soufh Ðnkofn Is ono
of fhroo sfnfos fhnf curronfIy hns
no housIng frusf fund.
Tho nood for n HousIng Oµµor-
funIfy Iund wns oufIInod wIfh suµ-
µorfIng fncfs. Ono In sovon Soufh
Ðnkofnns fnII boIow fho µovorfy
rnfo. AIso, ronfs nro moro fhnn
mnny Soufh Ðnkofnns cnn nfford.
AccordIng fo fho fncf shoof, fho nv-
orngo H!Ð fnIr mnrkof ronf for n
fwo-bodroom nµnrfmonf In Soufh
Ðnkofn Is $556 µor monfh.
Ofhor fncfs suµµorfIng fho nood
for fho fund IncIudo ronfnI housIng
mnrkofs nro fIghf ns ovIdoncod by
Iow vncnncy rnfos, domnnd for
housIng oxcoods nssIsfnnco nvnII-
nbIo, fhoro Is n shorfngo In fundIng
fo dovoIoµ nffordnbIo housIng,
vouchors nro undorufIIIzod, somo
Soufh Ðnkofnns nro InckIng doconf
nnd snfo housIng, Soufh Ðnkofnns
nro sfruggIIng fo mnInfnIn n roof
ovor fhoIr hond.
An In-doµfh rovIow of fhoso fncfs
cnn bo roquosfod fhrough fho
Soufh Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµ-
monf AufhorIfy.
Hondorson sµoko of IrnIrIoInnd
HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf. IHÐ Is n
non-µrofIf orgnnIznfIon whoso
mnIn gonI Is fo suµµorf fho dovoI-
oµmonf of nffordnbIo housIng In fho
rogIon. Moro InformnfIon cnn bo
found nf www.dIsfrIcfIII.org. Hon-
dorson gnvo InsIghfs IncIudIng
Ionrn fo mnnngo oxµocfnfIons nnd
don`f ovor-ronch housIng. Ho cnu-
fIonod dovoIoµors fo bo nwnro of
fhoIr mnrkof, nnd fo gof commIf-
1he Lazy 3 Livestook Ranoh of Billings, Mont., brought over
3,000 head of yearling steers and heifers to Philip this past
week and sold 1uesday morning, November 13. 1he total head
oount was 3,052, oonsisting of both steers and heifers with the
average weight per head of 887 lbs. 1hey brought a little over
$1.40/lb. totaling $1,244 per head. 1his one oonsignment sale
grossed over $3,798,000.
1ruoks started bringing in the oattle lriday before the 1ues-
day sale, with 45 truoks delivering oattle to the yards. Philip
Livestook Auotion sold these yearlings along with other year-
lings and oalves during the regular sale that totaled over 7,500
head.
Read the oomplete report of representative sales for this
week on the baok page of 1he Pioneer Review.
ALL IN-STATE SUBSCRIPTIONS
ARE SUBJECT TO SALES TAX.
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CALL (605) 859-2516 WITH CREDIT CARD PAYMENT INFORMATION
OR FOR ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE!
MAIL TO: Ravellette Publications, PO Box 788, Philip, SD 57567.
Receive $5.00 off each subscription of (2) or more renewals or new subscriptions!
Offer ends December 14, 2012. Clip & mail with your payment to the newspaper of your choice (above).
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Community
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your
phone number to: news-
desk@pioneer-review.com
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkLY SPECIAL:
Chicken Fajita Wrap
& French Fries
* * * * * *
SUNDAY SPECIAL:
Roast Pork Dinner
Mashed Potatoes,
Salad Bar & Dessert
Lettenweed Ball
Annual Iun Nlght
Saturdag, 0ec. 1st
Lettenweed Ball
Annual Iun Nlght
Saturdag, 0ec. 1st
7:00 p.m.
Cards · Bingo · Food Food concession by Weta River Rats ·Open for Supper at 6:30 p.m. ·Door Prizes Every Hour!
All proceeds benefit
the Cottonwood Hall!
Leme & have a
geed tlme wlth geur
lrlendsI
Ray’s Appliance • 859-2794 • Philip
YEAR-END SALE
1 – Kenmore 500 Washer ..................................$200.00
1 – Kenmore 80 Series Washer.........................$140.00
1 – Maytag Washer............................................$100.00
1 – Maytag Electric Dryer ..................................$150.00
1 – Maytag Performa Electric Dryer...................$140.00
1 – Maytag Electronic Dryer ..............................$135.00
2 – Kenmore 122 Electric Dryers................$90.00 each
1 – Kenmore 868 Electric Dryer.........................$125.00
1 – Kenmore Electric Dryer................................$100.00
1 – Kenmore Gas Dryer.......................................$50.00
1 – Roper Electric Dryer ....................................$135.00
1 – Frigidaire Electric Dryer ...............................$180.00
1 – Kenmore Electric Range..............................$185.00
1 – GE Gas Range ............................................$280.00
1 – Maytag Built-in Dishwasher ...........................$60.00
1 – Barlow & Seelig Wringer Washer.................$100.00
73— SALOON
859-2173 • DOWNTOWN PHILIP
NFR Fun Night &
Calcutta
Tuesday, Dec. 4th
6:30 p.m. –
Steak-out & Social
7:00 p.m. – The Fun Begins! (calcutta)
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing...........................32-16
Rockers................................26.5-21.5
Petersen’s..................................25-23
Handrahan Const .....................23-25
Dakota Bar................................21-27
Badland’s Auto....................16.5-31.5
Highlights:
Carl Brown.....................5-8-10 split;
.....................................217 clean/561
Jenny Reckling.............................132
Andrew Reckling.........223 clean/589
Vickie Petersen .....................193/533
Ronnie Coyle .........................220/552
Rick Groven...........................204/580
Marlis Petersen.....................185/501
Jerry Mooney ........................206/563
Trina Brown..........................186/479
Neal Petersen.....................191 clean
Kim Petersen ...............................170
Clyde Schlim.......................5-10 split
Connie Schlim......................3-8 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................28-4
Philip Motor..............................20-12
Kennedy Imp.............................20-12
George’s Welding ......................15-17
Philip Health Service .........12.5-19.5
G&A Trenching.........................11-21
Bear Auto..................................11-21
Kadoka Tree Service...........10.5-21.5
Highlights:
Cory Boyd......................207, 246/633
Tony Gould....................201, 214/612
Ronnie Williams................3-10 split;
.......................................223, 210/611
Earl Park..........6-7-10 split; 228/600
Bill Stone...............................203/576
Wendell Buxcel .....................209/563
James Mansfield...........204, 220/557
Randy Boyd..............5-7 & 3-7 splits;
...............................................210/555
Fred Foland.................228 clean/547
Steve Varner .........................201/538
Ed Morrison.............6-7-10 split; 536
Bill Bainbridge.............................535
Dakota Alfrey ..............226 clean/527
Johnny Wilson .............................521
Alvin Pearson...............................520
Terry Wentz................5-10 split; 518
Jim Larson ...................................505
Les Struble .........................8-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge.........................38.5-9.5
Bowling Belles ..........................29-19
Invisibles...................................28-20
State Farm..........................25.5-22.5
Jolly Ranchers ..........................20-28
Highlights:
Donna King ......2-4-10 split; 197/443
Marsha Sumpter...172, 168, 158/498
Judy Papousek..............164, 157/463
Dody Weller...........................159/450
Shirley Parsons ...................5-7 split;
.......................................160, 157/433
Lila Whidby ..........................9-7 split
An evening of snacking, sampling
wines, socializing and shopping was
sponsored by Grossenburg Implement
in Philip, Tuesday, November 20.
Courtesy photos
The first ladies night held at
Grossenburg Implement in Philip,
held Tuesday, November 20, was a
success.
A relaxed come and go atmos-
phere was highlighted with wine
sampling, even a wine list. There
were “cheeses from around the
world, or at least as far away as
Dublin,” said Bobbi Woitte, book-
keeper.
“It was a pretty enjoyable
evening, lots of ladies looking
around and enjoying themselves,”
said Diane Fitch, parts depart-
ment.
Each of the seven Grossenburg
Implement sites held similar
events this year, after one of their
stores started the idea several
years ago. The only change for next
year’s event in Philip, might be to
hold it on some other evening than
Tuesday, because potential guests
may be too weary from a long day
at the Philip Livestock Auction.
Approximately 40 guests
browsed over merchandise while
socializing. “Clothing seemed to be
real popular. Clothing and tools,”
said Woitte. Door prizes included a
John Deere glass cutting board and
various bottles of wine.
“It was real nice to have a few
gentlemen stop in with their wives.
It wasn’t strictly ladies,” said
Woitte. “It was actually a lot of fun.
Actually doing something for the
ladies and getting to know the
wives was a pleasure.”
Grossenburg’s ladies night a success
Above left, the hospital auxiliary distributed free hot choco-
late. Above, Philip’s American Legion #173. Below, Kennedy
Manure Spreading. Left, Gem Theatre.
Glo-N-Go Parade of Lights
recommit to being a person of high
standards and quality, one who
looks for and exposes the good in
others. Determine right now that
from now on you will be a people
builder.
In ancient Greece, Socrates was
reputed to hold knowledge in high
esteem. One day, an acquaintance
met the great philosopher and said,
“Do you know what I just heard
about your friend?”
“Hold on a minute,” Socrates
replied. “Before telling me any-
thing, I’d like you to pass a little
test. It’s called the triple filter test."
“Triple-filter test?”
“That's right,” Socrates contin-
ued. “Before you talk to me about
my friend, it might be a good idea to
take a moment and filter what
you’re going to say. The first filter
is truth. Have you made absolutely
sure what you are about to tell me
is true?”
“No,” the man said, “actually I
just heard about it and ...”
“All right,” said Socrates. “So you
don’t really know if it’s true or not.
Now let’s try the second filter, the
filter of goodness. Is what you are
about to tell me about my friend
something good?”
“No, on the contrary.”
“So,” Socrates continued, “you
want to tell me something bad
about him, but you’re not certain
it’s true. You may still pass the test,
though, because there’s one filter
left, the filter of usefulness. Is what
you want to tell me about my friend
going to be useful to me?”
“No, not really.”
“Well,” concluded Socrates, “if
what you want to tell me is neither
true nor good nor even useful, why
tell it to me at all?”
Just think what this world might
be like if each of us applied the
triple filter test to every thing we
are about to say.
Be a people builder
I hate to admit it, but sometimes
I can easily slip into the habit of
speaking negatively about people. I
don’t like this about myself, and I
am embarrassed once I realize what
I have done, and I quickly take re-
sponsibility for my shortcoming and
try to make things right.
Everybody knows that tearing
others down, being derogatory and
spreading nasty negative things are
simply not the traits of a person of
good character and moral fiber.
Still, it often seems so much easier
for us to find the negative in other
people, but it doesn’t have to be that
way.
We can learn to stop tearing oth-
ers down and become people
builders. I believe that whenever
people invest their time thinking of
healthy and positive ways to build
people, it makes it a lot harder to be
so critical of others. When we ac-
tively look for ways to say some-
thing positive to, or about someone
else, and take time to recognize peo-
ple's strengths, we are ready to ex-
pose the good we know whenever
the opportunity presents itself. And
that is people building.
When we have taken time to no-
tice the good and positive about peo-
ple, rather than the negative, it is
much easier to steer negative con-
versations in the right direction. I
often do this by saying something
like, “Let's get to the good news.”
and then proceed to say something
uplifting about the person who was
being bashed.
Face it. All of us are a work in
progress and none of us can say we
don’t need to improve in one area or
another. And yet, don’t we all want
people to think and say the best
about us anyway? Shouldn’t that
make us all the more willing to look
for ways to be building others
rather than tearing them down?
I encourage you, this week, to
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for more details at 605-450-1955 and
be sure to check out Bob’s website at: www.mrattitudespeaks.com
About 36 million Christmas trees
are sold between Thanksgiving and
Christmas. While artificial trees
enjoyed increased sales for the past
decade, those sales have stagnated
and now there is a return to having
the traditional tree, said John Ball,
South Dakota State University Ex-
tension forestry specialist.
“A traditional Christmas tree is
also the environmentally friendly
way to celebrate the holidays. The
average artificial Christmas tree
has a life span of six years before it
ends up in a landfill. The tradi-
tional Christmas tree, while used
only one season, can become valu-
able mulch, a winter bird feeder or
even used as a fish habitat after
the holidays,” Ball said.
Here are some tips on picking
out the perfect tree.
The way to obtain the freshest
tree is to harvest it yourself at a
choose-and-cut Christmas tree
farm, Ball said. “This way you are
guaranteed a ‘fresh’ tree rather
than one that may have been har-
vested several weeks earlier,” he
said.
If cutting your own tree is not
possible, Ball said to use these tips
to check for freshness at a Christ-
mas tree sales lot.
First, give the tree a light but
vigorous shake. Only a few interior
needles should fall out of the tree if
it is fresh. If a pile of brown needles
appears on the ground below the
tree, particularly from the branch
tips, it is not a fresh tree.
Next, reach into a branch and
pull the needles gently through
your hand as you move out towards
the tip. The needles should bend,
not break, as your fingers run
across them and the branch should
only slightly bend.
Regardless of whether you buy a
tree from a lot or cut it yourself,
once you get the tree home, leave it
outside while you set the stand up.
Ball said the choice of a stand is
probably the most critical factor in
maintaining the freshness of the
tree once in the home. “The stand
should be able to hold one-half to
one gallon of water, as the new
Christmas tree may absorb up to
this amount in the first day," Ball
said. A good rule of thumb he
shared is a tree will use one quart
of water per day for every inch
trunk diameter at the base. If you
have a tree with a three inch base,
it may use three quarts of water
per day.
Just before you bring the tree in
the house, cut the base about one
inch from the bottom. Ball said this
will open the sap filled tracheids,
the pores responsible for transport-
ing water, and allows water to be
absorbed into the tree. The base cut
does not have to be slanted; the
angle makes little difference in the
amount of water absorbed.
Once the tree is in the stand, add
water and then never let the stand
become empty. “If the stand be-
comes empty for more than six
hours, the tree’s pores plug up.
Water uptake will then be signifi-
cantly reduced. The tree will dry
out and the needles will soon begin
to fall,” he said. “If the tree stand
does dry up for half a day or more
there is nothing that can be done
other than pull the tree out of the
stand and recut the base, not a
pleasant task once the lights and
ornaments are already up.”
Ball also said that nothing needs
to be added to the water in the
stand to improve needle retention.
“The commercial tree fresher prod-
ucts do not significantly increase
the life of the tree and the home
remedies such as aspirin, sugar,
soft drinks and vodka do not work
and may be harmful to pets that
may drink from the stand,” he said.
Place the stand in a spot that re-
ceives only indirect light from the
windows and not near any heat
duct. This will reduce water loss
from the tree and prolong its fresh-
ness. “Another tip to prolonging
freshness is to start out with a
clean stand. Before setting up the
tree, wash the stand out with a so-
lution of about a capful of bleach to
a cup of water, to reduce the
growth of microorganisms that
may also plug up the tree's pores,”
said Ball.
Which is the best tree? Ball said
each species has its good points,
but the Fraser fir is probably one of
the favorites. “The tree is very fra-
grant, has excellent needle reten-
tion and the branches are stiff
enough to hold ornaments. Balsam
fir is another good choice, though
the needles do not last as long and
Selecting the perfect Christmas tree this year
the branches are not quite as stiff.
Canaan fir, another popular fir, ap-
pears to have qualities similar to
Fraser fir and is also becoming a
popular Christmas tree," he said.
Pines are very popular with
Scotch pine probably the most pop-
ular tree in the country. It also is
very fragrant, has excellent needle
retention and the branches are
stiff.
“White pine is another pine com-
monly sold at Christmas tree
stands and has a fair fragrance,
but the needle retention is not
quite as good as Scotch pine and
the branches are very flexible,
meaning heavy ornaments may fall
off,” he said. “White pines do have
very soft needles and if you are
going to run into the tree in the
middle of the night this is the one.”
Spruces are not as popular of
Christmas trees, said Ball, prima-
rily due to their poor needle reten-
tion. “If you want to have a blue
spruce as your Christmas tree, you
probably should wait until a couple
of weeks before Christmas as the
needles may only last that long.
Once the needles begin to fall, blue
spruce are about the worst tree to
have as the fallen needles are
sharp and seem to find their way
into socks and slippers,” he said.
Blue spruce has the best needle
retention of the spruces, but does
not have much of a fragrance. The
branches are very stiff, however,
and can support the heaviest orna-
ments. White spruce, or Black Hills
spruce is not commonly available
though is used in the Black Hills.
“It does make a nice tree, partic-
ularly when cut fresh, but it does
not have much of a fragrance and
occasionally Black Hills spruce
trees can have a slight musky
odor,” he said.
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
School
“It’s one of those lifelong lessons,
to be able to get up and talk to peo-
ple. And, they had fun,” said Kathy
Nelson, coach for this year’s oral in-
terpretation team.
The eight student team com-
peted in three “practice” contest
events before the district and re-
gion competitions. Their first
meets, all on Saturdays, were in
Sturgis, October 13, in Pierre, Oc-
tober 20, and at Rapid City Stevens
High School, October 27. The dis-
trict tournament was in Winner,
Monday, November 5, and regions
were Pierre, Monday, November
19.
Three students qualified, by
being judged to be in the top three
in their specific categories, to move
on to regional competition. Per-
formers had to then be in the top
three at regions to qualify for the
state competition.
Members of the readers theater
group included Brad Pfeifle, Sam
Johnson, Kaci Olivier, Deserae
Williams and Ted’Dee Buffalo. The
piece that they performed was
“Spin.”
Under the heading of serious
prose, Jane Poss spent her season
working on and improving on the
piece “Endings.” Allison Pekron se-
lected to do “On My Own,” and took
it all the way to regions.
Johnson performed the humor-
ous reading of “Green Eggs and
Ham” by Dr. Seuss.
Philip had two duet teams, both
choosing to work with humorous
pieces. Williams and Buffalo did
“Gary Trotter and He Who’s Name
We Cannot Mention Due to Copy-
right Infringement.” Brooke Nelson
and Olivier did “My Life in
Babysitters,” with which they
earned an alternate position at re-
gions.
In the poetry division, Nelson
read a collection of three cowboy
poetry pieces by Baxter Black. She
also moved on to regions.
Oral Interpretation team wraps up season
Philip High School oral interpretation team. Back row, from left: Jane Poss, Brad Pfeifle, coach Kathy Nelson, Kaci Olivier
and Ted’Dee Buffalo. Front: Allison Pekron, Brooke Nelson, Sam Johnson and Deserae Williams. Photo by Deb Smith
These elementary students are Super Scotties
for October 2012. They have earned the
distinction through different individual displays
of good character. Each teacher selects at least
one of their students at the end of each month.
Super Scotties
Jess Jones
1st Grade
Stratton Morehart
1st Grade
Rosie Womack
3rd Grade
Cody Donnelly
4th Grade
Joey Carley
5th Grade
Elementary Students of the
Months for October
Ali Schofield
2nd Grade
Derek Fugate
2nd Grade
Hana Schofield
Kindergarten
Brice Hanson
6th Grade
“I hope that they keep going and
do it next year,” said Nelson.
“They’ve got more experience
under their belt and will just get
better.”
The 2012 Western Great Plains
Conference football all conference
team players have been an-
nounced.
From Philip High School, mak-
ing the all conference team was
Chaney Burns. Making the honor-
able mention list were Tate De-
Jong, Quade Slovek and Cassidy
Schnable.
Other all conference players
from within the WGP conference
were:
Kadoka – Chance Knutson, Clint
Stout, Kenar VanderMay, Logan
Ammons and Chandlier Sudbeck.
Wall – Tyler Trask, Taran Eisen-
braun, Laketon McLaughlin, Lane
Blasius and Trevor Anderson.
Lyman – Charlie LaRoche.
Jones County – Philip Mathews
and Skyler Miller.
New Underwood – Cameron
Koch, Travis Smith, Dalton Benter,
Lucas Hall and Aaron Oberlander.
White River – Matt Gillen,
Gilbert Morrison, Nic Waln, Chris-
tian Bartlett, Cory Rogers and
Wyatt Krogman.
Other honorable mention players
were:
Kadoka – Klay O’Daniel, True
Buchholz and Sam Pretty Bear.
Wall – Cade Kjerstad, Clancy
Lytle and Tyler Peterson.
Lyman – Ben Authier and Jaylen
Uthe.
Jones County – Gus Volmer,
Wyatt Hespe and Clayton Evans.
New Underwood – Tanner
Brindley, Tyler Klug and Trevor
Baker.
White River – Tre Iyotte and
Bubba Young.
All conference football
by Rep. Kristi Noem
As South Dakota families gear
up for the frenzied holiday shop-
ping season that begins for some
after Thanksgiving Day, it’s impor-
tant to remember the role our
small businesses play.
November 24 was Small Busi-
ness Saturday, a day to celebrate
small businesses and the impact
they have on our communities.
South Dakota is home to over
78,000 small businesses that ac-
count for almost 62 percent of the
private sector jobs in the state, ac-
cording to data from the Small
Business Administration. While
the national economy has struggled
the past few years, our economy
has grown, due in large part to the
success of small business. In fact,
South Dakota continually ranks as
the friendliest state for small busi-
nesses.
Unfortunately, many small busi-
nesses in S.D. and the nation are
facing uncertainty about our econ-
omy. Looming at year’s end is what
has become known as the "fiscal
cliff," a combination of across-the-
board spending cuts and tax in-
creases that economists say could
send America back into a recession.
Showing support for our state’s
small businesses through initia-
tives like "Small Business Satur-
day" is a great way to give South
Dakota employers a confidence
boost. I encourage South Dakotans
looking to purchase gifts to see
what their local small businesses
have to offer.
by Senator John Thune
Small business is the lifeblood of
communities. Across the state,
small businesses sponsor baseball
teams, support fine arts fundrais-
ers, contribute to development
projects and make the conscious
decision to keep their business in
our community to help stimulate
our local economies. These busi-
ness owners often treat their cus-
tomers and their employees like
family, because in small towns, en-
suring customer satisfaction is vi-
tally important to keeping their
doors open.
The economic climate has been
difficult for many small businesses.
Economic uncertainty has led to
revenue and job loss, and many
small businesses wonder how they
will weather the economic storm.
The hope for any small business
during this season is that members
of their community will first choose
to shop local for their holiday gifts.
The loyalty and patronage of cus-
tomers in small towns and in small
businesses across the state injects
money into local establishments,
helping them to lower prices and
provide a greater array of products
and services.
We must do more to provide cer-
tainty and support for our small
businesses. As the holiday season
continues, don’t limit your small
business patronage to Small Busi-
ness Saturday. Support your
friends, support your community,
support small businesses by shop-
ping locally this holiday season.
Support small businesses this Christmas season
continued on page 12
Legal NoticesDeadline: Fridays at Noon
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 10
Notice to Creditors
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE )
OF MARILYN FRANCES GILLASPIE, )
ALSO KNOWN AS MARILYN )
FRANCES LEIGHTON, AND )
FORMERLY KNOWN AS MARILYN )
FRANCES WIEDOWER, Deceased. )
Notice is given that on November 9, 2012,
Rebecca A. Gilbert, whose address is
1589 Avenida Ladera, El Cajon, CA
92020, was appointed as personal repre-
sentative fo the estate of Marilyn Frances
Gillaspie.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred. Claims may
be filed with the personal representative.
Dated this 23rd day of November, 2012.
Rebecca A. Gilbert
Personal Representative
1589 Avenida Ladera
El Cajon, CA 92020
Tele. No. 619-449-4417
[Published November 29, December 6 &
13, 2012, at the total approximate cost of
$41.30]
ads@pioneer-review.com
3.49, Delta Dental - Dental Insurance
Premiums - 465.70, Ertz, Dewey - Psy-
chological Testing - 1,950.00, Morehart,
Melanie - SPED Travel - August thru Nov
16 - 750.36, Nelson, Karen - Isolation
Mileage - 597.18, Petersen's Variety -
SPED Supplies - 2.87, Wellmark Blue
Cross Blue Shield - Health Insurance
Premiums - 412.22. TOTAL: 5,080.98.
Food Service Claims Payable Novem-
ber 19, 2012: AFLAC - Insurance Premi-
ums - 80.34, Child & Adult Nutrition -
Commodity Purchases - 608.00, Coyle's
SuperValu - Purchased Foods - 116.09,
Dean Foods - Milk Purchases - 1,573.26,
Earthgrains - Purchased Foods - 117.70,
Reinhart Food Service - Purchased
Foods - 3,331.47, Reliable One - Sup-
plies - 626.30, Servall - Linen Care -
52.39, US Foods - Purchased Foods -
3,886.93. TOTAL: 10,392.48. Hourly
wages for Month of October 2012:
26,598.25. Gross Salaries/Fringe for
October 2012: FUND 10: Instructional -
95,204.17, Administration - 17,388.77,
Support Services - 6,130.51, Extra Cur-
ricular - 18,849.39; FUND 22: SPED
Gross Salaries/Fringe - 8,617.46.
13-60 Motion by Hamill, second by
Fitzgerald to approve the following per-
sonnel contracts: Brad Haynes, Assistant
Boys’ Basketball - $2,320.00; Deb Smith,
Annual - $2,030.00; Keven Morehart, As-
sistant Wrestling - $2,320.00; Tayta
West, Junior High Girls’ Basketball -
$1,740.00.
13-61 Anita Peterson gave the BHSSC
report.
13-62 Motion by Nelson, second by Pe-
terson to enter into Executive Session at
6:08 p.m. for personnel matters (SDCL
1-25-2). Motion by Nelson, second by
Thorson to resume meeting at 6:31 p.m.
with no action required.
Anita Peterson gave a brief overview
of Delegate Assembly and the issues
they plan on taking to the Legislature this
winter.
13-63 Secondary Principal Mike Baer re-
ported on the following items: (A)
Midterm of the 2nd Quarter is 11/21/12.
(B) Congratulations to the FFA Natural
Resources team for placing 7th in the
Nation. (C) Congratulations to Mr. Matt
Donnelly for being selected as the SDH-
PERD 2012 Teacher of the Year! (D) The
Department of Education contacted the
school to request help via webinar be-
cause our students scored so well on the
benchmark pretesting. (E) 26 students
making up 8 teams went to the Academic
Olympics. They placed 1st in the written
portion, advancing them to the quiz bowl
round where they also placed 1st. They
also hosted an Art Competition where
our students won 1st and 2nd place.
Great job! (F) A 6 person team will attend
the JH Acalympics in January. (G)
Guided study hall report - we started with
15 students in 22 areas, and have now
had 7 students test out of 8 areas. (H)
Banners and Photos are up in the Armory
and the plaques are starting to go up in
the Armory Entryway. (I) Semester tests
will be December 19 and 20. Seniors will
also be testing. (J) The High School Pa-
triotic concert on November 13 was
great!
13-64 Superintendent Keven Morehart
reported on the following items: (A)
Midterm Quarter 2 grades will be due
Monday, November 26th at 8 a.m. (B)
Early Release on November 21st at 1:30
p.m. Happy Thanksgiving! (C) The 5th,
6th, and Jr High Band and Choir will have
a concert at 6:30 p.m. on November
27th. (D) There will be a Stringman As-
sembly for grades K-6 at 8:10 a.m. on
November 29th. (E) We are looking into
the Pep Grant again. (F) A Collective
Bargaining Workshop will be held in
Rapid City on November 28th. (G) Our
condolences to the Westerberg family for
the loss of Duke’s father.
Adjournment at 6:53 p.m. Will meet in
regular session on December 17 at 6:00
p.m.
_______________________________S
cott Brech, President
_______________________________B
ritni Ross, Business Manager
[Published November 29, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $104.27]
Proceedings of Haakon
School District 27-1
Board of Education
Regular Meeting Minutes
November 19, 2012
The Board of Education of the Haakon
School District 27-1 met in regular ses-
sion for its regular meeting on November
19, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. at the Philip Ar-
mory, Room A-1. President Scott Brech
called the meeting to order with the fol-
lowing members present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Scott Brech, Vonda Hamill, Mark
Nelson, Anita Peterson, Mark Radway
and Doug Thorson. Also present:
Supt/Elementary Prin. Keven Morehart,
Business Manager Britni Ross, Second-
ary Principal Mike Baer, Lisa Schofield,
Katlin Knutson, Madison Hand and Del
Bartels.
All action taken in the following minutes
was by unanimous vote unless otherwise
specified.
13-57 Communications from the audi-
ence: None
13-58 Motion by Hamill, second by Pe-
terson to approve the agenda as pre-
sented.
13-59 Motion by Thorson, second by
Nelson to approve the following items of
consent calendar.
Approved the minutes of the October
15, 2012, meeting.
Approved the unaudited financial re-
port of October 31, 2012, as follows:
General Fund Claims Payable Novem-
ber 19, 2012: AFLAC - Insurance Pre-
mium - 662.71, All Star Auto - Vehicle
Rental - Music/Oral Interp - 576.50,
Avesis - Vision Insurance Premiums -
301.55, Badlands Computer Service -
Technology Repairs - Server - 450.00,
Book Systems - Concourse/ EzCat Sup-
port (Library System) - 525.00, Bruck-
lacher, Brigitte - Consortium Travel -
238.60, Century Business Products -
Copier Maintenance - 350.00, City of
Philip - Water/Sewer - 633.55, Coyle's
SuperValu - BOE/Science/Janitorial Sup-
plies - 171.33, Days Inn Brookings -
Lodging - State Cross Country - 276.00,
Delta Dental - Dental Insurance Premi-
ums - 1,617.96, Department of Health -
Health Nurse Services - 80.00, Dept of
Public Safety - Wresting Scales Calibra-
tion - 56.00, EcoLab - Pest Control -
121.94, Elshere, Lana - Isolation Mileage
- 48.84, Foothills Inn - Lodging - All State
Chorus - 294.00, Foss, Dani - Isolation
Mileage - 44.40, Gebes, Mike - Reim-
burse Janitorial Supplies - 63.60, Haakon
Food Service - Donuts for Dads - Sup-
plies - 173.75, Haggerty's MusicWorks -
Instrument Repair - 40.00, Harlow's Bus
Service - Bus Repair - 28.15, Hauff Mid-
America - Athletic Supplies - 84.80, Hauff
Mid-America - Region Cross Country
Medals - 83.84, Herring, Dani - Consor-
tium Travel - 36.00, Ingram Hardware -
Janitorial/Maintenance Supplies -
178.27, Kadoka FFA - Consortium Travel
- 675.00, Knutson, Brandy - Consortium
Travel - 85.78, Knutson, Vicki - Mileage -
RTI Class and Reading Recovery -
149.48, Lurz Plumbing - Rotoroot Main in
Boys Bathroom - 153.06, Lurz Plumbing
- Drain/Sink Cleaning - 174.49, Make
Music - Music Supplies - 212.00, Mid-
west Alarm Company - Fire Alarm Moni-
toring Services - 77.72, Morehart,
Melanie - Reimburse Kindergarten Sup-
plies - 104.64, Morrison's Pit Stop -
Bus/Maintenance Fuel - 2,353.50, Moses
Building Center - Janitorial Supplies -
28.27, Moses Building Center - VoAg
Supplies/Janitorial Supplies - 168.21,
Nelson, Kathy - Reimburse Oral Interp
fuel - 35.02, Noteboom's Glass - Chip
Repair - Bus - 50.00, O'Connor, Laura -
Mileage - Common Core Training in RC
- 60.68, Petersen's Variety - Janitorial
Supplies/UPS Shipping - 30.68, Peter-
son, Kathy - Mileage - All State Music
Banquet in Rapid City - 60.68, Petty
Cash Reimbursement - Postage - 71.21,
Philip Clinic - Physical - 150.00, Philip
FCCLA - Consortium Travel - 202.99,
Philip FFA - Consortium Travel - 245.00,
Philip Standard - Maintenance Fuel -
66.00, Philip Trust and Agency - Imprest
Reimbursement* - 2,151.75, Pioneer Re-
view - Publications - 151.84, Quill - Toner
- 143.98, Ramkota - Pierre - Consortium
Travel - 630.00, Rasmussen - Boiler Re-
pair - 495.34, SD FFA Association - Con-
sortium Travel - 865.00, SDHSAA - Dues
- 31.00, Smith's Fire Extinguisher Sales
- Janitorial Supplies - 136.25, Triple XXX
Spraying - Football Field Lawn Care -
598.00, Walker Refuse - Garbage Serv-
ice - 800.16, Wall School District - Con-
sortium Travel - 397.00, Wellmark Blue
Cross Blue Shield - Health Insurance
Premiums - 10,957.34, West Central
Electric - Electricity - 4,935.56, WRLJ
Rural Water - Milesville/Cheyenne Oct.
12 Water - 65.00. TOTAL: 34,649.42.
Capital Outlay Claims Payable No-
vember 19, 2012: AVI Systems - Smart
Board Bulbs - 629.00, Century Business
Leasing - Copier Lease - 410.34, Dak-
tronics - Scoreboard Controllers -
1,625.00, McGraw Hill - Textbooks -
103.42, Taylor Music - Bass Clarinet -
1,225.00. TOTAL: 3,992.76. SPED
Claims Payable November 19, 2012:
AFLAC - Insurance Premiums - 128.18,
Avesis - Vision Insurance Premiums -
56.12, Baer, Erin - SPED Mileage -
268.62, Berry, Betty - Mileage - IEP
Training in Pierre - 56.24, Children's
Care Hospital - OT/PT Services - 390.00,
Coyle's SuperValu - SPED Supplies -
Notice of Meeting
The annual meeting of the Tri-County
Predator District will be held Tuesday, De-
cember 4, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at The
Steakhouse in Philip, S.D.
[Published November 15, 22 & 29, 2012,
at the total approximate cost of $8.45]
with Shirley Hair.
A front page article caught my
attention in the Rapid City Journal
Monday morning. "South Dakota
looks to lure dairy farmers from
Wisconsin." You should ask former
Secretary of State Larry Gabriel
about recruitment of dairy farms.
During his tenure, several large
dairy farms came into the state.
They encountered opposition from
the locals concerning manure man-
agement, use of illegal immigrants
and zoning laws, after they were al-
ready in operation and financially
burdened. It is nice to entice those
with the money from other states
or countries to come and enjoy the
wide open spaces, but quite an-
other to place new rules and regu-
lations on that business. It is noth-
ing new. Here is what my grandfa-
ther, M.C. Sherwood had pub-
lished, July 1, 1916. "ATTEN-
TION. Have you looked up Haakon
County? Do you know what we
have to offer in BARGAIN FARM
LANDS?" Notice and consider the
following Facts: Last year we
raised some big crops. Wheat as
high as 45 bushels per acre, oats as
high as 110 bushels per acre. Corn
matured as high as 75 bushels per
acre. Speltz, barley, millett and
flax accordingly. Alfalfa three to six
tons per acre. One farmer sold $168
worth of seed per acre, but the sea-
son was generally too wet for a
good alfalfa seed crop.
This is a great dairy and cattle
country. Midland - on the P.R.C.&
N.W. Ry., shipped nearly $100,000
worth of cream last year. The ship-
ments this year are greater than
ever. During June this year, there
were shipped from Midland 15,430
gallons of cream for which our
farmers received approximately
$15,400 in cash. Do you wonder
that our farmers are getting rich
and that there has been sold this
year by our local dealers $30,000
worth of automobiles, $30,000
worth of lumber and buildng mate-
rials and that they are buying more
lands adjoining their present hold-
ings, and have bought $200,000
worth of eastern and southern cat-
tle.
We have splendid black soil, with
nutritious grasses, which fatten
stock for market without the aid of
grains; plenty of hay, water and
feed.
South Dakota is the place for
homeseeker, renter and investor,
and where the Eastern Real Estate
Man should put in his efforts for
the next twelve months. YOU
SHOULD BE HANDLING MY
LAND AT $10.00 TO $25.00 PER
ACRE. Plenty of land for coloniza-
tion and ranches
Please give me two minutes of
your time. Write for my latest list
and more information. Please do
this without fail. Let me tell you
personally of the fine opportunities
I have to offer. M. C. SHERWOOD
Member C.R.E.D.A., No. 4612; The
Real Estate Man of Midland, S.D."
As Christmas is approaching this
seems to be a good quote."Purchase
gas from the neighborhood gas sta-
tion even if it costs more. Next win-
ter when it’s six degrees and your
car won’t start, you’ll be glad they
know you." This applies in all as-
pects, shop locally.
Betwixt Places News
(continued from page 7)
Greetings from sunny, cool, dry
northeast Haakon County. We re-
ally can't complain about the
weather, other than the fact that
we still need moisture. It has been
mostly warmer than usual for this
time of the year, and the roads are
dry, which is a plus in my book. I've
decided to just treat each beautiful
day as a gift; after all, sunshine is
a necessity for this solar powered
gal!
I must sheepishly wish a very be-
lated happy birthday to our aunt,
Ruth Neuhauser. Her birthday is
in mid-November, and somehow I
blew right past it – guess I need to
pay more attention to the date! I
was thinking of all sorts of ex-
cuses – preparation for Thanksgiv-
ing, projects to accomplish here at
home, working on Christmas
gifts – but in the end, there is just
no excuse for letting her special
day go unnoticed by me. One thing
is certain, I don't think Aunt Ruth
has missed my birthday since I've
known her! So happy belated birth-
day, Aunt Ruth! I'm glad you had a
great day.
Did any of you get caught up in
the Black Friday/Cyber Monday
craze that has been all over the
news? I know that some folks really
enjoy the excitement of getting a
good deal, and some folks treat
Black Friday as a social event or an
annual event with friends or fam-
ily. Personally, I treat it as some-
thing to be avoided at all costs! I
like the idea of the shopping locally
campaign, ensuring that the dol-
lars you spend get cycled through
your community. But most of all, I
hope folks will slow down a bit and
remember what we are celebrating.
It truly is a blessed season. I will
admit to taking advantage of some
of the Cyber Monday deals – it was
great to be able to "shop" in my of-
fice, comparing prices in the com-
fort of my own home without run-
ning from store to store, and not
being pressured to make a quick
decision. And the best part is that
the items will be delivered to my
home, free of charge! My Cyber
Monday deals weren't gifts,
though – well, I guess maybe they
were gifts for me. I'm redoing a
bedroom in our home, and I needed
some new bedding, bed frame, pil-
lows, etc. I found what I needed,
got a good price, and it will all be
delivered to my front door in four to
seven business days – success!
The community gathered last
Wednesday to lay our friend and
neighbor, Roy Roseth, to rest at the
Deep Creek Cemetery. It was a
wonderful service, for a wonderful
man. We are all better for having
known him and having the oppor-
tunity to learn from his example.
Our challenge now is to be that
same sort of example for the gener-
ations who come after us.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson were
Thanksgiving guests at the home of
their friends, Dale and Myrna
Hartmann. Friday, Nels spent the
day working on his corral project,
and Dorothy went to Pierre to do
some shopping. She said the early
morning crowds had come and gone
by the time she got there, so the
stores weren't too crowded. She
came home with a case of stomach
flu, which she then shared with
Nels. The stomach upset was short
lived, and they are both feeling bet-
ter now. Saturday, Nels and
Dorothy spent some more time on
their corral project. That evening,
they had a visit from their friends,
Otis and Amber Funk, and Otis'
parents. After church Sunday, Nels
and Dorothy finished up their cor-
ral project. Dorothy said it was a
good thing they got finished! Dur-
ing the project, Dorothy stepped in
a hole and bruised her leg, and she
also got whacked on the collar bone
by a steel post – she was afraid if
the project drug on much longer,
she might not make it!
Clark and Carmen Alleman were
Thanksgiving guests at the home of
their daughter and son-in-law,
Kelly and Anthony Nelson, in
Pierre.
Lola and Duane Roseth spent
Thanksgiving Day in Rapid City at
the home of Chris and Tim Rogers.
Chris is Lola's niece, the daughter
of Gay (Klima) Tollefson. All of
Duane and Lola's children were
there also. Saturday, Duane's sib-
lings gathered at Duane and Lola's
home.
Dick and Gene Hudson attended
visitation for Roy Roseth in Philip
last Tuesday, and they attended
the funeral Wednesday. After the
funeral, former neighbors, Eddie
and Bruce Buchholz, stopped for a
visit. Eddie lives in Belle Fourche,
and Bruce lives in the Denver area.
Hudson's spent Thanksgiving Day
at the home of their niece and her
husband, Lori and Tracy Konst,
near Sturgis. Friday, Dick and
Gene were in Philip to attend the
chili supper and parade of lights.
Sunday, Gene "dispatched" one
of their hens that wasn't laying
eggs, and she turned it into chicken
and dumplings. Jon and Connie
Johnson and boys were dinner
guests. (Chickens at their place
should take notice – if they don't
produce, they end up in the soup
pot!) Dick and Gene attended
church Sunday afternoon, and
Gene served lunch following serv-
ices.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed at-
tended the Roy Roseth funeral
Wednesday. Wednesday evening,
their grandson, Tate Gabriel, ar-
rived from Pierre, and their daugh-
ter, Cindy, and her husband, Bruce
Bresee, arrived from Spearfish to
join Billy and Arlyne for Thanks-
giving. Thursday, Clint and Jenna
Bresee arrived from Sioux Falls.
T.J. Gabriel had planned to join the
group, but he had the flu. Tate
Gabriel returned to Pierre Thurs-
day evening, and the rest of the
group left Saturday. Quite a bit of
work was done on the cabin over
the weekend – they are still hoping
to have it completed in time for
Christmas.
Jeanine Gabriel and children
traveled to Spearfish Thursday to
spend Thanksgiving with her par-
ents. They returned to the ranch
Saturday.
Jon and Connie Johnson had
company from Byron, Minn., for
several days last week. The gentle-
men were hunting deer and enjoy-
ing seeing the countryside. They
returned to their homes Thursday
afternoon. Wyatt Johnson was
home from his studies at South
Dakota State University in Brook-
ings.
Bill and Polly Bruce attended
Roy Roseth's funeral Wednesday
morning. That afternoon, they
traveled to Madison to the home of
their daughter, Vicki. Thursday,
Bill, Polly and Vicki were Thanks-
giving guests at the home of Bill
and Polly's granddaughter and her
family. Jim Bruce, Aberdeen, and
his son, Brandon, were also there.
Friday, Polly and Vicki had fun
checking out some of the neat
shops in Madison. Some of the
shops are antique shops and con-
signment shops – Polly said it is
fun to browse and see what the
stuff you have at home is worth!
That evening, Bill, Polly and Vicki
were in Ramona at the home of
Vicki's friends, enjoying turkey
gumbo. Bill and Polly returned
home Saturday. They attended
church in Midland Sunday.
Vince and Katie Bruce cele-
brated Thanksgiving with his
brother, Andy, and his wife, Carla,
in Pierre.
Clint Alleman and Randy Yost
made a trip to Union Center Tues-
day morning to pick up some sup-
plies. Tuesday evening, Clint,
Laura and daughter Alivya at-
tended the prayer service in Philip
for Clint's Grandpa Roy. Wednes-
day, they attended the funeral at
Deep Creek Church. Clint and
Laura got to enjoy lots of food and
family on Thanksgiving Day. They
had Thanksgiving dinner at the
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursday, November 29, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: 2000 Doonan
Sic¡dccl, 48×102, 22.5 siccl
wIccls, 2 iool lo×cs, $17,500;
'02 Tin¡ic grain irailcr, 51×102
×78, Low Pro 24.5 all alun. 3
a×lc wiiI lifi, clcci. iar¡,
$28,500; 1995 Marqucz doullc
lclly dun¡s, 3 a×lc froni, 5 a×lc
¡u¡, Low Pro 24.5 all alun.,
$52,500. Call CK Dalc, PIili¡,
859-2121 or 685-3091.
PF14-2i¡
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
sonc alfalfa, lig rounds, scni-
load lois, dclivcrcd ¡ricing, no
nold. Call Fol, 390-5535, or
CIarlcs, 390-5506. P50-5i¡
FOR SALE: 320 acrcs of cro¡-
land, 14 nilcs noriI of Midland.
NE1/4 Scc. 3, NW1/4 Scc. 2,
3N24E. Call 222-6261.
PF12-4i¡
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Cci rcady for fall Iauling! 12-
¡ly, 235/85/16F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIo¡, 859-
2744, PIili¡. P40-ifn
LOST
LOST: Silvcr lracclci wiiI grcai
scniincnial valuc; losi ai our
wcdding rccc¡iion ai iIc lcgion
Iall in PIili¡ on Novcnlcr 23rd.
If found, ¡lcasc call nc, Crysial
Mariincz, ai 859-3941 or 515-
0293. PF14-1ic
HELP WANTED
POSITION OPEN: Jaclson
Couniy HigIway Dc¡arincni
Worlcr. Eסcricncc in road /
lridgc consiruciion / nainic-
nancc ¡rcfcrrcd. CDL Prc-cn-
¡loyncni drug and alcoIol
scrccning rcquircd. A¡¡licaiions
/ rcsuncs accc¡icd. Infornaiion
(605} 837-2410 or (605} 837-
2422, fa× (605} 837-2447.
K51-3ic
FIRE MITIGATION SPECIAL-
IST: Mcadc Couniy,SD (Siurgis}
Fcs¡onsillc for iIc narling,
iIinning, and rcnoval of irccs
fron ¡rivaic land owncr's ¡ro¡-
criy. TIis is a jols iraining cn-
¡loyncni cffori for Vcicran
qualificd individuals. Closcs No-
vcnlcr 30, 2012. Scc. www.
meadecounty.org for a¡¡lica-
iion insiruciions and con¡lcic
jol dcscri¡iion. Coniaci. Jcrry
Dcrr ¸ 605.720.1625 / jdcrr¸
ncadccouniy.org P50-2ic
COOK WANTED: Cood Sanari-
ian Sociciy, Ncw Undcrwood,
Pari-iinc for 4-8.30 ¡.n. sIifi.
Coniaci. Lorrainc, 754-6489 or
a¡¡ly onlinc www.good-san.
con. CHECK OUT OUF NEW
WACE SCALE, INCLUDINC
COMPENSATION FOF EXPEFI-
ENCE. EOE/AA/M/F/V/H.
PW48-4ic
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER J
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED ai
Days Inn, Wall. Possilly ¡crna-
ncni ycar-round ¡osiiion, siari-
ing inncdiaicly. Coniaci
TIcrcsa, 279-2000. PW46-ifn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 14'×20' Mcnard's
sIcd lii for salc. Ii Ias ligIi gray
siding wiiI slaic gray irin. Asl-
ing $3,000 for ii; ¡aid $3,700 for
ii a cou¡lc noniIs ago. TIc lii
Ias ncvcr lccn ioucIcd and
siorcd oui of iIc wcaiIcr. If in-
icrcsicd, coniaci 685-4608.
PF14-2ic
FOR SALE BY SEALED BIDS:
1984 Dluclird lus and 1987
IHC lus. Sold as is. Dids will lc
o¡cncd on Friday, Novcnlcr 30
ai 1 ¡.n. MT ai iIc Kadola
ScIool Dusincss Officc. Qucs-
iion coniaci Su¡i. Janic Hcr-
nann ai 837-2175 or c-nail ai
janic.Icrnann¸l12.sd.us. Dids
nay lc sulniiicd io Kadola
Arca ScIool Disirici, PO Do× 99,
Kadola, SD 57543. K51-1ic
NATIVITY COLLECTIONS: I'n
sclling all ny naiiviiics I Iavc
cIcrisIcd and collccicd for
nany ycars. Tucsday, Nov. 27,
ai iIc ScnccIal in PIili¡, 1 io 5
¡.n. P51-1ic
FOR SALE: Fo¡c Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ro¡c, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
NOTICESJWANTED
WANTED: Con¡lcic driving Iar-
ncss for niniaiurc Iorscs, 36" -
40" iall. Call 484-5409.
PF14-2i¡
TRIANGLE RANCH BED &
BREAKFAST is availallc for
lruncIcs, luncIcons, dinncr
¡ariics and rcircais, Dcccnlcr -
A¡ril. Coniaci Lyndy, 859-2122,
irianglc¸gwic.nci, www. irian-
glcrancIll.con P51-8ic
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 HigI
Si. in PIili¡, 2 lcdroons, full
lascncni, grcai vicw off lacl
dccl. Call 859-2783 or 859-
3249 or 567-3515 io vicw.
P49-ifn
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrilc
Avc PIili¡. 3 lcdroon 1.5 laiI,
ccniral air, fucl oil Icai and
wood siovc. O¡cn concc¡i,
siainlcss siccl fridgc and siovc.
wasIcr and drycr includcd.
Hardwood laninaic floors, sc¡a-
raic dining roon. Mosily fin-
isIcd lascncni. Cciling fans
iIrougIoui. Ncw windows and
roof. Fcnccd in, largc laclyard
wiiI covcr ¡aiio and sioragc
sIcd. Can cnail ¡Ioios. Call
859-2470 or (785} 259-4207.
P48-8ic
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 lcd-
roons, 2 laiIs, aiiacIcd 2-car
garagc, largc loi. Call 859-2403,
PIili¡. PF10-ifn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two lcdroon a¡ari-
ncni in Wall. Call 386-2222.
PW51-4ic
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: S¡acious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or sio¡ in iIc lolly and
¡icl u¡ an a¡¡licaiion. Caicway
A¡arincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc accc¡i
rcs¡onsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc ¡aid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi ¡aid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is ¡laccd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
TIunI ¸ou to n¸ ¡uníí¸ und
¡¡ícnds uIo ¡cncnIc¡cd nc
uítI S5tI Ií¡tIdu¸ uísIcs. Aíso,
tIc ¡íouc¡s ¡¡on tIc °J Sístc¡s.¨
Do¡otI¸ VcIc¡
PETS
CHESAPEAKE PUPPIES. In
Tinc For CIrisinas!!! CIan¡ion
Dloodlincs! E×ccllcni Hunicrs!
Crcai Pcrsonaliiics! 605-730-
2088.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.} Call
iIis ncws¡a¡cr, 605-859-2516,
or 800-658-3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI,
33¢/34¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456.1024,
joc¸iliirucl. con.
DFIVEFS. $1,000 SICN-ON
DONUS. Ncw Pay Progran!
¯Earn u¡ io 50 c¡n ¯Honc
Wcclly¯2500+ nilcs, 95% no-
iar¡. Musi lc Canadian cligillc
(888} 691-5705.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1995 Poniiac Firc-
lird, c×ccllcni condiiion, low
nilcs, c×ccllcni gas nilcagc.
Asling $2,900. Call 515-1460.
PF13-2i¡
FOR SALE: 1979 CIcvrolci Sil-
vcrado 30, dually wiiI Duralisi
DSS 30, 25' luclci lifi. $1,800.
441-9669, Wall. WP11-ifn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Eסcdi-
iion XLT 4×4, cloiI scais, ¡owcr
windows, locls & scais, good
iircs. Call 685-8155. PF10-ifn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O'CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Focl, Sand,
Cravcl (scrccncd or crusIcd}. Wc
can dclivcr. Dans, dugouis,
luilding siics. Our 37iI ycar.
Clcnn or Tracc, 859-2020.
PF11-ifn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
S¡ccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV a¡¡licaiion. ALSO. ¡rairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23i¡
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iy¡cs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
u¡s, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52i¡
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iy¡cs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׸gwic.nci K50-ifn
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN, ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Qualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Ccnicr for Culiural InicrcIangc
sccls voluniccr Local Coordina-
iors for c×cIangc siudcnis in
SouiI Daloia. Sonc con¡cnsa-
iion. Coniaci Mary Arnsirong
for info. 1-888-440-8750 MArn-
si r ong¸cci - c×cIangc. OFC
www.cci-c×cIangc.OFC.
BIDS
ACCEPTINC DIDS THFOUCH-
OUT DECEMDEF. 1992 Ford
E350, 7.3 dicscl anlulancc (un-
cqui¡¡cd}, 110,287 a¡¡ro×inaic
nilcs. For addiiional inforna-
iion or ¡Ioios, cnail
jocoanl¸goldcnwcsi.nci or
lcavc ncssagc ai 605-669-3125.
Mail lids io. Joncs Couniy An-
lulancc, P.O. Do× 305, Murdo,
S.D. 57559.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Ca¡iiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs only}. Call Fus-
scll S¡aid 605-280-1067.
EMPLOYMENT
CENTFAL PAFK MANACEF -
Huron SD Parl & Fcc. Dc¡i. Scc
duiics and a¡¡licaiions availallc
ai www.Iuronsd.con. Clicl on
ºCiiy Covcrnncni," iIcn ºCiiy
En¡loyncni."
LIVE, INC., an accrcdiicd agcncy
su¡¡oriing ¡co¡lc wiiI disalili-
iics, Ias FT cvcning and su¡cr-
visory ¡osiiions availallc. Call
(605} 374-3742 or c-nail rc-
sunc' io juliclivc¸sd¡lains.
con.
SPEECH LANCUACE PATHOL-
OCIST ASSISTANT. inncdiaic
o¡cning in NW SD, grcai lcnc-
fiis and cducaiional cosi rcin-
lurscncni. coniaci Cris Owcns,
NoriIwcsi Arca ScIools (605}
466-2206 CIrisiinc.Owcns¸
l12.sd.us.
DFIVEFS. OWNEF OPEFATOFS
NEEDED Fcfrigcraicd Division,
join our cסcricnccd ican of
scasoncd ¡rofcssionals. Tcrni-
nals in KS, SD, TN, NM. 2 ycars
OTF cסcricncc. Call 800-796-
8200 ×103.
SKILLED MEAT CUTTEF POSI-
TION availallc ai Wcsi Sidc
Mcais, Molridgc, SD. Con¡cii-
iivc wagcs, good lcncfiis, afford-
allc Iousing availallc. For
a¡¡licaiion or norc infornaiion
call 605-845-2271 or cnail
grandrivcrlison¸yaIoo. con.
FOR SALE
MUST SELL. 2012 CIcvrolci
Sulurlan LT 4×4, 29,000 nilcs,
$38,000; 2010 CMC Yulon XL
4×4, 66,000 nilcs, $30,500;
2000 CIcvrolci Sulurlan 4×4,
$4,500. 605-871-9996.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rc¡rcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
0IassItIed
AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nin-
inun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu, tIc P¡o¡ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou¡unt, as wcll
as on our wclsiic. www.¡ionccr-
rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns,
Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun
for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr word
iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial
nusi lc counicd sc¡araicly. In-
cludcd in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and
tIc P¡o¡ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc
and iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Pío-
ncc¡ Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for
loollcc¡ing and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 ¡cr
colunn incI, includcd in iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít.
$5.55 ¡cr colunn incI for iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic ad-
vcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr is suljcci io iIc
Fcdcral Fair Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI
nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany ¡rcfcrcncc,
or discrininaiion on racc, color, rcligion,
sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io
nalc any sucI ¡rcfcrcncc, liniiaiion, or
discrininaiion."
TIis ncws¡a¡cr will noi lnowingly accc¡i
any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a vi-
olaiion of iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd
iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a-
¡cr arc availallc on an cqual o¡¡oriuniiy
lasis.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
Ior ull yoor
concrete
constroction
needs:
CONCRITI
CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo
Philip, SÐ
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
view &
download
online
produotion
sale oatalogs at:
www.rpipromotions.oom
0NLlNL N0w:
3pear u Ranoh 3ale
weller Ranoh 3ale
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-
WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}. CALVES: 11.00 A.M. (MT}
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: £ST1MAT1NG ?DDD H£AD.
CALVES: NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL, ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE
VEFIFIED
HOSTUTLER RANCH - 400 CHAF X CLVS . 550-700; SEVEN BLACKFOOT
RN - 380 DLK CLVS; NI (CFEEN} . 450-575=; SHAW RANCH - 250 DLK &
DWF STFS; NI . 550-675=; KROETCH & KROETCH - 240 DLK & CHAF X
CLVS . 500-600=; TENNIS - 237 HEFF, DLK, & DWF STFS; ASV . 700-
750=; BENNETT RANCH - 220 DLK CLVS ALL HFFS IN TOWN . 550-650=;
KISSACK - 215 DLK STFS; HOME FAISED . 560-570=; HERBER RANCH -
200 DLK & DWF STFS . 500-600=; NEUHAUSER - 200 DWF & HEFF (140
STFS & 60 DLK HFFS} . 550-625=; LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT - 200 DLK
CLVS; NI, ALL HFFS IN TOWN . 500-600=; HEATHERSHAW - 200 LH X
CLVS; NI . 400-500=; A CONSIGNMENT - 180 DLK STFS . 500-550=;
STOUT - 170 CHAF X CLVS . 600-650=; DENKE - 150 DLK CLVS . 500-
600=; KC BIELMAIER RANCH - 150 DLK MOSTLY STFS . 650=;
SHEARER - 150 DLK ANC STFS . 600-650=; DICKSCHAT - 140 DLK
STFS . 500-600=; SANDER - 120 DLK, DWF, & FWF CLVS; NI . 650-700=;
PIROUTEK - 120 CHAF X CLVS . 550-600=; SMITH & SMITH - 115 DLK
& DWF CLVS; NI,AN . 550=; CAMMACK - 100 DLK & DWF HFFS . 575-
600=; GRUBL & GRUBL - 100 DLK & FED CLVS . 600=; CAPP RANCH -
100 DWF & FWF STFS; NI & NOT WEANED . 500-550=; BONENBERGER
RANCH - 80 DLK ANC FEPLC HFFS; NI ALL HFFS IN TOWN . 600-650=;
FUGIER - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; NI,AN . 500=; TRASK & TRASK -
80 DLK & DWF STFS . 550-600=; STILWELL - 80 DLK, FED & CHAF X
CLVS . 550-650=; PATTERSON CATTLE - 76 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI .
550-600=; COLEMAN - 75 DLK CLVS; NI . 450-800=; TRIPLE T RN - 75
DLK HFFS . 550=; EYMER - 70 FED STFS . 450-500=; WHITCHER &
WHITCHER - 70 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 450-500=; SMITH - 70 DLK CLVS
. 700=; TRASK - 70 DLK STFS; NI . 550-600=; COE - 65 DLK & DWF
CLVS; NI . 550=; SWIFT - 65 DLK CLVS; NI . 450-550=; FINN RANCH -
65 FED STFS; NI,ASV . 750-800=; VALLERY - 65 DLK STFS; NI,ASV .
550-650=; MORTENSON CATTLE CO - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 500-
550=; DEERING - 60 CHAF HFFS . 600=; FRINK - 60 DLK CLVS; NI .
600=; BRENNAN - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 500-550=; ROUNDS - 55 DLK
MOSTLY STFS; NI . 500-525=; STARR - 50 DLK CLVS . 500-600=; JOR-
GENSON - 50 FED STFS . 700-750=; SINKEY - 50 DLK STFS . 550=;
UHERKA - 50 DLK CLVS; NI . 600-650=; MADER - 50 DLK & DWF HFFS;
NI . 475=; MCLELLAN - 50 DLK CLVS . 450-550=; DARTT ANGUS - 50
DLK ANC CLVS; NI . 700=; PETRIK - 50 DLK CLVS . 400-600=; TRASK,
TIMMONS & BRUCH - 45 HEFF, FIFST X DWF, & DLK CLVS; NI . 400-
550=; THORSON HEREFORDS - 40 DLK & DWF STFS . 600-700=;
CLEMENTS - 40 DLK HFFS; NI . 550=; JOHANNESEN - 40 DLK & DWF
STFS; NI . 500-600=; HEINRICH RANCH - 40 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI .
600=; BERRY - 40 DLK CLVS; NI . 450-550=; BOOMSMA - 40 DLK CLVS;
AN . 600=; SMITH - 40 DLK & DWF HFFS; NI . 460=; REINERT - 40 DLK
& DWF CLVS; NI . 400-500=; WILLERT - 37 DLK & A FEW FED CLVS .
550-600=; GABRIEL - 35 DLK CLVS . 600-700=; ALBERS - 30 DLK & DWF
CLVS; NI . 400-500=; SHEARER - 30 DLK HFFS . 450=; GRUBL - 25
DLK & FED CLVS; NI . 450-550=; LONG - 25 DLK CLVS; NI . 600-700=;
FINN RANCH - 20 FED FALL CLVS; NI . 550-600=; MEINEN - 20 DLK
CLVS . 500=; DEJONG - 20 DLK STFS;NI . 600=; HENRY - 20 DLK &
DWF CLVS . 550-560=; REMER - 15 DLK X CLVS; NI . 700=; BROWN -
12 DLK STFS; NI . 600-700=; HOWIE - 10 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 450-
550=; SLOVEK - 10 DLK CLVS . 500=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. S: WEICH-UP COW, DULL, & HEIFEFETTE SALE-
10.00MT
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. WELLER RANCH: 1 P.M. BRED CATTLE TO FOL-
LOW. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
WELLER RANCH 32ND ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE - 50 DLACK
ANCUS 2 YF OLD DULLS; 4 FED ANCUS DULLS; 40 HOMES FAISED HFFS;
AI DFED TO SITZ DULL DUFHAM 9935; 100 YOUNC PUFEDFED ANCUS
COWS; DFED. WELLEF ANC; CLV. MAF & APF (ALL FEMALES WILL DE UL-
TFASOUND TESTED & DFOKE INTO SHOFT ALVINC CFOUPS.}
DISPERSIONS.
MYRON & MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-5 FOF 60 DAYS
BRED HEIFERS:
MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW DLK;
CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO TWO 20 DAY CLVC PEFIODS}
JOHN & MAGGIE AYER - 75 HEFF HFFS (1065=} (STUDEF DFEEDINC};
DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS (90% WILL CLV IN 21 DAYS}; 40
DLK HFFS (1100=}; DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS
CLAYTON SANDER & ESTEL DEAN - 25 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-1 FOF 35 DAYS
TUCKER HUDSON - 14 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW MILLAF
ANC DULLS; CLV. 3-25 FOF 45 DAYS (SOFTED INTO SHOFT CLVC PEFI-
ODS}
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
JASON HAMILL - 50 DLK & DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAMSEY & RAMSEY - 45 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-15 FOF 45 DAYS
NEWTON BROWN - 45 FED & FWF 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. FED ANC; CLV.4-5
ARLEN CARMICHAEL - 16 DLK 4 TO 5 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-20 FOF 30 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 16 DLK HFF TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CLAYTON SANDER - 15 DLK, FED, CHAF, & HEFF FUNNINC ACE
COWS; FED & HEFF DFED.DLK; DLK & CHAF DFED. HEFF; CLV. 3-1 FOF
60 DAYS
JIGGS O'CONNELL - 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
28
TUCKER HUDSON - 12 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
BART CARMICHAEL - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 4-15 FOF 45 DAYS
EXPOSED COWS:
BRUCE SIMMONS - 25 LH COWS. DFED. HOFNED HEFF; CLV. 4-15
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & SPECIAL
STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: MCPHEFSON ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFD 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC
DULL SALE 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS 12.00MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS 1.00MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS 12.00MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
CATTL£ R£PORT : TU£S., NOV. 2?, 2DJ2
We Þod o smo11er run o] ]eeders ]or our so1e
u11Þ o11 o] 1Þe oo111e 1n por1 1oods ond pooK-
oges. Qu11e o ]eu 1ooo1 peop1e oround 1rg1ng
1o bug 1Þe oo111e. B1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups. TÞ1s
morKe1 1s verg o1ose 1o mov1ng Þ1gÞer. B1g
so1e ne×1 ueeK u11Þ 1Þe Speo1o1 Preoond1-
11oned & Weoned Co1] So1e u11Þ over ?DDD
Þeod. Lo1s o] 1ong s1r1ngs ond po1 1oods.
We1gÞ-ups u111 se11 ne×1 Wednesdog.
FEEDER CATTLE:
DIANNE GREGG - FT. PIERRE
21 ....................................DLK STFS 502=......$178.50
11 ....................................DLK STFS 452=......$190.00
TODD & NANCY COLLINS - STURGIS
14..........................DLK & DWF STFS 443=......$193.50
11 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 438=......$157.50
6......................................DLK HFFS 405=......$163.00
BRAD & SHAWNA ROGHAIR - OKATON
48..........................DLK & DWF STFS 468=......$180.25
28..........................DLK & DWF STFS 400=......$200.00
44....................................DLK HFFS 453=......$156.25
28....................................DLK HFFS 412=......$161.00
BUD MANKE - MIDLAND
24 ....................................DLK STFS 535=......$167.50
6 ......................................DLK STFS 464=......$188.00
JOHN CAPP RANCH - FAITH
73..........................DLK & DWF STFS 543=......$167.25
21..........................DLK & DWF STFS 451=......$184.75
BILL & SUSAN PAULTON - EDGEMONT
34..........................DLK & DWF STFS 458=......$179.75
28 ....................................DLK STFS 605=......$154.25
35....................................DLK HFFS 452=......$151.25
23....................................DLK HFFS 552=......$144.25
NORDINE BRINK - MIDLAND
30..........................FED & DLK STFS 613=......$153.50
17....................................DLK HFFS 587=......$138.00
10....................................DLK HFFS 496=......$147.25
LANDON & TRISTA BORK - OKATON
6 ...........................FED & FWF STFS 498=......$168.50
3............................FED & DLK STFS 393=......$193.00
5...........................FED & FWF HFFS 444=......$149.00
2 ...........................FED & DLK HFFS 385=......$162.00
WILMA TOPE - ALADDIN, WY
16..........................DLK & DWF STFS 520=......$167.00
15 ....................................DLK STFS 438=......$194.50
CHARLOTTE GIBBONS - MANDERSON
4............................DLK & DWF STFS 556=......$164.00
8 ......................................DLK STFS 428=......$191.00
SCOTT & ALEX BRECH - QUINN
6 ......................................DLK STFS 558=......$162.25
2............................DLK & DWF STFS 378=......$188.00
2......................................DLK HFFS 515=......$141.00
2......................................DLK HFFS 408=......$162.00
ELMER GOOD - LONG VALLEY
8............................DLK & DWF STFS 644=......$146.25
5............................DLK & DWF STFS 468=......$181.50
8 ...........................DLK & DWF HFFS 592=......$135.00
WEIGH-UPS:
RON GRUBL - STURGIS
1 ....................................CHAF COW 1745=......$81.50
CARL BAUMAN - KADOKA
2 .....................................FED HFFS 810=......$129.50
5 ..............................FED COWETTES 953=........$94.00
ED HEEB - MIDLAND
1......................................DLK DULL 2055=......$95.00
1......................................DLK DULL 2305=......$94.00
SHANE SWEET - NEWCASTLE, WY
1......................................FWF COW 1520=......$78.50
1......................................FED DULL 1945=......$93.50
1......................................FED DULL 1810=......$93.00
1......................................FED DULL 2240=......$90.00
1......................................FED DULL 1720=......$89.00
MILES WHEELER - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1640=......$80.00
1.....................................DWF HFFT 920=......$126.00
EVAN DEUTSCHER - WALL
2....................................DLK HFFTS 923=......$123.00
ROGER KEFFELER - ENNING
2.....................................DLK COWS 1713=......$79.50
1......................................DLK DULL 2025=......$93.50
MARK HANRAHAN - MILESVILLE
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1443=......$76.50
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
48........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 1023=....$100.25
4....................................DLK HFFTS 860=......$110.00
BRUCH RANCH - STURGIS
32 ..................................DLK HFFTS 817=......$119.50
8...............................DLK COWETTES 898=........$97.00
3.....................................DLK COWS 1328=......$75.00
HOWARD & DELORES KNUPPE-NEW UNDERWOOD
21........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 819=......$119.50
SANDERS RANCH PARTNERSHIP - RAPID CITY
38 ..................................DLK HFFTS 884=......$116.50
26.............................DLK COWETTES 1015=......$99.50
6...................CHAF & DLK COWETTES 939=........$81.00
1 ....................................CHAF COW 1330=......$76.00
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
38....................................DLK HFFS 910=......$112.50
KERRY BISHOP - HERMOSA
2 .....................................FED HFFS 818=......$126.50
DENNIS SHARP - INTERIOR
2....................................DLK HFFTS 820=......$105.00
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
12 ..................................DLK HFFTS 1041=....$100.25
CHUCK ENDERS - KADOKA
1 ......................................DLK COW 1305=......$77.00
5....................................DLK HFFTS 945=......$107.50
TODD & NANCY COLLINS - STURGIS
5...........................FED & DLK COWS 1343=......$76.25
4......................................DLK HFFS 911=......$125.00
6 .........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 993=......$101.00
1 ................................DLK COWETTE 930=......$100.00
NEWTON BROWN - FAITH
1 ....................................FED COWS 1360=......$75.50
2 ....................................FED COWS 1300=......$73.50
5 ..............................FED COWETTES 1031=......$99.00
2 ..............................FED COWETTES 1058=......$86.00
ALLEN & FLOY OLSON - BOX ELDER
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1305=......$75.50
2...........................FED & DLK COWS 1225=......$74.50
1......................................DWF COW 1340=......$73.00
CASEY BRINK - UNION CENTER
3 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1655=......$75.00
17 ........................DLK & DWF COWS 1279=......$71.75
1 ......................................DLK COW 1215=......$70.50
TIA GUPTILL - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1520=......$75.00
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - KADOKA
1 ......................................DLK COW 1575=......$74.50
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1340=......$74.50
LARRY JOHNSTON - BELVIDERE
1......................................FED COW 1325=......$74.00
4 ..............................FED COWETTES 948=........$96.00
PAUL BORK - MIDLAND
1 ......................................DLK COW 1190=......$73.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1275=......$72.00
BOYDSTON INC. - BOX ELDER
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1315=......$73.00
1 ......................................DLK COW 1335=......$72.00
1 ......................................DLK COW 1180=......$70.50
2....................................DLK HFFTS 805=......$111.00
2......................................DLK HFFS 853=......$129.50
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
3 ....................................FED COWS 1297=......$73.00
1................................FED COWETTE 1095=......$88.00
2 ..............................FED COWETTES 1070=......$85.00
SHIRLEY O'CONNOR - PHILIP
1......................................DWF COW 1235=......$73.00
ROCKY WILLIAMS - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1410=......$72.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1335=......$70.00
8....................................DLK HFFTS 989=........$99.00
LANCE LESMEISTER - EAGLE BUTTE
1 ......................................DLK COW 1575=......$72.00
2...............................DLK COWETTES 903=........$96.00
8...............................DLK COWETTES 1008=......$90.00
TIM NEMEC - MIDLAND
1 ......................................DLK COW 1415=......$70.00
KELLY BLAIR - MILESVIILLE
1......................................DLK DULL 1905=......$89.50
TK SAMPSON - INTERIOR
1......................................DLK DULL 1765=......$87.50
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
SELLING TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 11,
AT 12:00 MT
RH CATTLE
Thursday, November 29, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 12
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
downtown Philip
reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, Dec. 1 ~
Top Sirloin Special
~ Monday, Dec. 3 ~
Rib Sandwich
Special
The steakhouse & lounge
Open daily ~ monday thru saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, Nov. 27 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Nov. 28 ~
Basket of
Pork Ribs
~ Thursday, Nov. 29 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Nov. 30 ~
Ground Sirloin
Chicken • Shrimp
home of his sister, Kelly, and her
family in Pierre. About mid-after-
noon, they joined the Thanksgiving
celebration at the home of Laura's
parents, Randy and Joy Yost, in
Hayes. Laura's sister, Amy, came
to spend Friday night at Clint and
Laura's home. Laura has been busy
with crafting, preparing for Christ-
mas.
Max and Joyce Jones spent
Thanksgiving at the home of their
daughter and her husband, Kim
and Dave Ferries, in Onida. Other
guests were Todd and Darcy Jones
and children and Shirley and
Frank Halligan. They returned
home Thursday evening. Friends
from Utah arrived Sunday to do
some hunting, and they will be
spending several days at the Jones
place.
Marge Briggs had Thanksgiving
dinner at the home of her son, Ed
Briggs. Other guests included
Janet Briggs and her friend, Larry,
Spearfish, Ed's friend, Beth, White
River, Ed's son, Casey, Lynn
Briggs and Marge's daughter,
Jackie, and her husband, Mark,
Minnesota. Beth had a team and
wagon at Ed's place, and they
spent some time exercising the
horses, but Marge said it was a lit-
tle too cool for her to take a ride.
Jackie and Mark planned to visit
their daughters – Rochelle in
Spearfish and Stephanie in North
Dakota – on their way back home
to Minnesota.
Thanksgiving guests at Ron and
Helen Beckwith's home were their
daughter, Lori, Huron, Gary and
Ann Beckwith, and friends, Bruce
and Brenda, from north of Hayes.
Saturday, Rose (Beckwith) Briggs
and Cheryl (Beckwith) Ulmen and
their families came to visit. Helen
said after two large meals in just a
few days, there were quite a few
leftover mashed potatoes. So, she
was making lefse when I talked to
her Monday.
Ray and Nancy Neuhauser were
in Sioux Falls last week to cele-
brate Thanksgiving with her
daughter, Julie, and family. They
returned to Pierre Friday. Friday
evening, Nancy's granddaughter,
LaCosta, and her family from near
Valentine came to spend a few
days. Saturday, Nancy's grand-
daughter, Patti, and her husband,
Kyle, arrived, as did Nancy's
daughter, Sandi, and her family.
They all enjoyed a Thanksgiving
gathering Saturday afternoon at
the home of Nancy's granddaugh-
ter, Kayla, in Ft. Pierre. Ray and
Nancy's company returned to their
homes Sunday.
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser and
daughter Sarah attended the Roy
Roseth funeral Wednesday. Thurs-
day, Kevin and family traveled to
Highmore to share Thanksgiving
dinner with his mother, Ruth
Neuhauser. Friday, Kevin and
Mary and all three of their children
were at the ranch. Brianna and
Nick returned to Pierre Friday
evening, and Sarah traveled to
Rapid City on Saturday to take in
the parade of lights with a friend.
Sarah returned to her home in
Spearfish Sunday.
Lee and Mary Briggs attended
Roy Roseth's funeral Wednesday.
Thanksgiving Day, their daughter,
Keva, and grandson Seth, White-
wood, joined Lee and Mary for
Thanksgiving dinner. Grandson
Zane stayed home, opting to avoid
the great quantities of food. He is
an excellent wrestler, and the sea-
son is just starting – he wants to be
sure he makes weight. Keva and
Seth returned to their home Thurs-
day evening. Friday, Mary accom-
panied daughter Rea and grand-
daughters, Cattibrie and Kinsey, to
Sioux Falls for an appointment and
some shopping. They returned
home Friday night. Sunday, Mary
took Lee into Pierre so he could get
a truck, and Mary and grand-
daughter Kinsey enjoyed a movie
matinee.
Chauncey Jorgensen and his
friend, Misty, and her three daugh-
ters spent from Thursday through
Sunday at his parent's home north-
west of Faith.
We had a wonderful Thanksgiv-
ing here at the ranch. Chelsea and
her fiancé, Mike, arrived Wednes-
day evening. Jennifer and her hus-
band, Ross, arrived Thursday
morning, as did Scott, Corry,
Marisa and Austin. Our daughter,
Lori, wasn't able to be here for
Thanksgiving, but she'll be here for
Christmas. Thanksgiving Day was
filled with lots of food, fun, and
laughter. Friday and Saturday,
Scott and Austin helped Randy
with the chores, and Mike and Ross
did some deer hunting. The gals
and I did some crafting and lots of
visiting. Marisa and I made a gin-
gerbread house out of graham
crackers and numerous candy dec-
orations. Jennifer wanted to learn
how to can beef, so that was Satur-
day morning's project. It seemed
like the time flew by! The last of
the group left late Saturday after-
noon. One of the many good things
about having the kids stay for a few
days is that the leftovers get used
up – I think I have mentioned be-
fore that turkey is not Randy's fa-
vorite meal, especially when it is
the third meal in a row!
This week, I am grateful for
some of the products that make my
life easier. Ziplock bags and disin-
fectant wipes are two of my fa-
vorites, along with those shower
cap-looking bowl covers. Of course,
I wish that I had invented these –
can you imagine the revenue? But,
mostly I'm just glad that they were
invented – I'm all for convenience!
Also, after several days of feeding
a houseful of family, I'm very grate-
ful for the dishwasher.
I hope you all had a wonderful
Thanksgiving – and even though
Thanksgiving is over for another
year, please remember to be thank-
ful for something every day. It re-
ally does make your day go better!
Now go out and enjoy this gorgeous
late November weather! It cer-
tainly won't last forever.
Moenville News
(continued from page 10)

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