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Pioneer Review, November 22, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 13
Volume 107
November 22, 2012
continued on page 2
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro ..........$8.20
Any Pro .............................$7.40
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.30
Milo .......................................$6.69
Corn.......................................$6.94
Millet...................................$30.00
Sunflower Seeds................$20.50
FCCLA
cluster
meeting
9
High school
Veterans
Day concert
8
Scholastic
book fair
2
Fridge
Door
2
Residents from three western
counties met November 14 in
Kadoka to learn more about a year-
long training program designed to
assist rural regional teams in de-
veloping new approaches to
strengthen and enhance regional
economic development activities.
Philip’s Mary Burnett and Becky
Brech were present. Burnett had
initially explained the year-long
Stronger Economies Together pro-
gram to the Philip Chamber of
Commerce.
“SET organizers were very
pleased to hear the commitment of
participants in working together as
a region to strengthen the local
economy. They seemed to under-
stand the power of individual com-
munities uniting under one eco-
nomic development plan for the
three counties,” said Kari O’Neill,
Midland. Other Midland partici-
pants at this meeting were David
and Beth Flom and Andy Blye.
Haakon, Jackson and eastern
Pennington counties have part-
nered to become the West Region
team, one of only two regions in
South Dakota selected to partici-
pate in the SET program. Adminis-
tered by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture – Rural Devel-
opment and South Dakota State
University Extension, the SET pro-
gram is an opportunity for current
or newly formed rural, multi-
county teams to receive the latest
tools, training and technical assis-
tance to help their region move for-
ward and take advantage of posi-
tive growth and quality of life op-
portunities.
During the year-long program,
the selected regions will receive in-
tensive strategic planning training
for their regional team. They will
also receive data base tools de-
signed to examine the critical driv-
ers of their region and identify
emerging growth sectors and re-
gional competitive advantages. The
teams will also receive technical
assistance and educational sup-
port. The teams will share educa-
tion and information with more
than 40 other SET regions around
the country.
“The SET program is an unique
opportunity for participants to
learn how to determine what eco-
nomic opportunities exist in the re-
gion and then develop a practical
plan to capitalize on their poten-
tial,” said Christine Sorensen, SET
program coordinator with USDA –
Rural Development.
“In addition, the SET program
encourages involvement from all
regional residents as their diverse
personal and professional experi-
ences can add valuable perspective
to an economic development plan,”
Sorensen added.
All Haakon, Jackson and eastern
Pennington county residents, in-
cluding business owners, farmers/
ranchers, employees, parents, edu-
cators, healthcare professionals,
elected leaders, seniors, clergy and
youth are invited to participate in
SET training sessions, which will
be held monthly in various loca-
tions in the west region.
The next training session is
scheduled for January 2 in Philip
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The lo-
cation will be announced later. At
the January 2 session, participants
will examine regional demographic
date and its impacts on their econ-
omy.
For more information, contact
Burnett at 441-2059 or at
mary@fnbphilip.com.
Stronger Economies Together
After 94 years, the Get Together
Extension Club has wrapped up
business and disbanded.
Begun in 1918, the women mem-
bers met to share knowledge and
skills, such as how to make cheese,
soap and dress forms, and how to
can meats and vegetables. Having
once grown to a standing member-
ship as large as 23, the group mem-
bers entered fairs and helped with
charity drives and community proj-
ects. The club sponsored commu-
nity dances, one being with the
Myron Floren band performing at
the Philip auditorium. Other past
projects have been aiding the hos-
pital auxiliary and holding farm
safety seminars.
The outgoing members have do-
nated the remains of their funds to
five local organizations. Receiving
$100 each were the Hospital Auxil-
iary, Haakon/Jackson 4-H Awards,
Philip Ambulance Service,
Milesville Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment and the Philip Volunteer Fire
Department. According to the do-
nation letter, “This is to a tribute to
Get Together Club members who
have worked hard and diligently to
make their community a better
place.”
The letter explained, “As times
changed and many of the women
took jobs away from the home,
farm and ranch, the club became
less active.”
The letter continued, “Those
ladies who were past and present
members who are still in the area,
or close by, consist of Elfrieda Note-
boom, Kay Kroetch, Helen Harty,
Charmaine Stewart, Sandee Git-
tings, Amy Kroetch, Pam Dale,
Marsha Sumpter, Cindy Kerns,
Donna King, Ann Williams, Linda
McIlravy, Vonnie O’Dea, LaVonne
Hansen, Barbara Wentz, Marie
Hansen, Betty Fedderson, Rapid
City, Gwen McConnell, Wall,
Brenda Noack, Iowa, Deanna
Brooks, Gregory, Cathy Diedler
and Shiela Kahl, Sturgis. We also
honor the memory of the many
members wo have passed on.”
Get Together Club disbanded
by Del Bartels
Last summer Scotchman Indus-
tries Inc. donated two industrial
machines to the Workshop For
Warriors in San Diego. During the
Fabtech Trade Show in Las Vegas,
Nev., November 12-14, Workshop
for Warriors founder Hernan Prado
and one of its promoters, profes-
sional boxing champion Evander
Holyfield, stopped by Scotchman’s
booth to thank the Philip company.
Scotchman’s had donated a semi-
auto cold saw and a semi-auto band
saw. The company will be donating
a $30,000 dual operator 85-ton
ironworker.
“He (Prado) called me, looking
for fabricating equipment,” said
Jerry Kroetch, president of Scotch-
man Industries. “He knows the
quality out there. He came to me.
He’s turned away foreign product.
He’s a hell of a salesman. It’s all
American-made materials he
wants. We’ve very well known in
the industry.”
According to its promotional in-
formation, Workshops for Warriors
is a San Diego-based, nonprofit or-
ganization that provides free job
training and certification to veter-
ans. Its mission is to provide voca-
tional training to veterans of the
United States armed services. Vet-
erans receive vocational training,
commercially viable work experi-
ence, job placement and a chance to
contribute to the community. It of-
fers hands-on shop training and
classroom instruction in AutoCAD-
SolidWorks-Mastercam software,
plasma cutting, welding, milling,
machining, fabrication and wood-
working. One product the work-
shop produces is a Warrior Weld-
ing Wagon for open tool storage.
“This is a fantastic organization
and Scotchman is very proud to be
part of it,” stated Karen Kroetch.
“It was a very up-beat, well at-
tended trade show,” said J.
Kroetch. He added, “According to
Mike Albrecht (Scotchman’s sales
manager), we sold over half a mil-
lion dollars of machine orders in
the three days of the trade show,”
said J. Kroetch. “Certainly after
the show because of seeds planted,
but never before actually at the
show. It was pheromonal.”
Albrecht, who missed Holyfield
because he was taking orders, said,
“This was the best activity we’ve
seen at a trade show in the last 15
years. Scotchman has started
showing its special tooling and
component tooling that sets us
apart from our competitors.”
Scotchman Industries, Inc.
helps Workshop for Warriors
Shown, from left, professional boxing champion Evander Holyfield, Workshop For Warriors founder Hernan Prado and
Scotchman Industries, Inc. president Jerry Kroetch. Courtesy photo
cessful, he eventually felt, “It’s time
to quit playing life and start really
living it and making a difference in
the world,” said Blye. He contacted
his former pastor from his college
days, now the regional director of
the Open Bible Churches, to find
out that an opening existed in Mid-
land. Having family in South
Dakota, and some connections
through college friends in the area,
he first prayed, then accepted with-
out reserve. He, Jennifer and their
two sons, Evan (five) and Aaron
(three) moved to a new career and
a new life.
J. Blye is from a small town in
Ohio. She has a major in business
administration and marketing
management. “I’ve worked in bank-
ing and bookkeeping, as well as
serving in the church along with
Andy,” said J. Blye.
“The church has been doing very
well,” said A. Blye. “The first year
has been mostly about getting to
know the church, the people and
the needs within our com-
muity. We are a very out-
wardly focused church, so
we desire to serve outside
the walls, helping others
however we can. Our
church is very committed
to supporting missions
work around the world,
and, on an annual per
capita basis, ranks as one
of the top giving churches
throughout all of Open
Bible. We may be small,
but that doesn’t mean we
are small in our impact.”
Haakon County Commu-
nity Action operates out of
the church, assisting
needy families with food
and commodities. The
women’s ministry,
Women’s World Fellow-
ship, holds a luncheon on
the second Thursday of
each month, as well as spe-
cial functions during the
year. They provide meals
for funerals, weddings and
other events. “We often
say that these Midland ladies are
the best cooks around, and when
Jesus comes back and we have the
“Marriage Supper of the Lamb” our
ladies will be catering it,” said A.
Blye.
The church is even on Facebook.
“When I first moved here, I didn’t
expect anyone to be using services
like Facebook, thinking that was
more of an ‘urban’ thing, but was
surprised to meet so many people
from the area through Facebook. I
have people here I am Facebook
friends with that I haven’t met yet
in person, though I do hope to in
time,” said A. Blye.
Several new families have begun
attending the church and becoming
involved. “... one of the things I
have come to really like about
being in a town like Midland is the
way people help each other out,
without even a second thought and
without any expectation of doing
Open Bible Church in Midland
celebrating and growing
The Hereford Volunteer Fire De-
partment station was broken into
and an estimated $18,000 worth of
equipment was stolen.
The incident occurred approxi-
mately two weeks ago. Stolen items
include Johnson inter-agency ra-
dios, portable generator, flotation
water pump, medical kit, self con-
tained breathing apparatus and its
spare bottles, and an older light
bar.
According to Walt Haley, Here-
ford fire chief, the equipment was
pretty much brand new, used only
in training. The light bar was the
only older item.
“Basically, you steal from every-
one when you do that,” said Haley.
“That’s what ticked everyone off,
not what they stole, but that they
stole from the fire department.”
A passing resident was taking
her children to school and noticed
that the walk-in door was ajar. She
then contacted a fire department
member. The building has no win-
dows, and in gaining entry, the
thieves destroyed the door. The
perpetrator(s) went through the
fire trucks, taking some items from
the building and leaving others.
“You accumulate stuff and it gets
to be a really big number,” said
Haley. “I’ve been at this for over 25
years, and I haven’t got fired yet. I
think I got the job because I can do
the paperwork.”
If anyone can supply any infor-
mation concerning the break-in,
contact the South Dakota Fire
Marshal’s Office at 605-773-3562.
Hereford Volunteer Fire Department burglarized
The Country Cupboard food pantry, through donations and volunteers, put to-
gether Thanksgiving dinner boxes for families less able to have the basics for
such a meal. A dozen of these boxes were picked up by families in the Philip area.
Each box contained a small turkey with an aluminum roasting pan and oven bags,
boxed stuffing, potatoes, gravy mix, buns, margarine, can of corn, can of green
beans, can of cranberry sauce, a fruit pie and whipped topping, Shown helping
distribute boxes to prearranged recipients are Kathy Gittings, left, and Marcia
West. Courtesy photo
Country Cupboard food
pantry Thanksgiving meal
by Del Bartels
The Open Bible Church in
Midland has celebrated its
first year under its new pas-
tor, Andy Blye.
Blye has been a licensed
pastor since 2005 with the
Open Bible Churches, an as-
sociation of evangelical,
Bible-based churches based
out of Des Moines, Iowa. His
wife, Jennifer “Jenni,” is
part of the team. “... as my
partner in ministry (she)
serves in many capacities
alongside me,” said A. Blye.
Though the two held their
first service in Midland,
Sunday, November 13, 2011,
the church has been in exis-
tence since 1936, when it
was founded by Violet
LeLacheur during a season
of church plantings through-
out the Dakotas and Ne-
braska in the 1930s. “The
church has been well re-
garded for service to the
community and a heart for
loving people, sharing the
gospel and great Bible teaching,”
said A. Blye.
His interest in ministry began
while he was working on a commu-
nications degree at Black Hills
State University. He helped out at
an Open Bible Church there – tech-
nology, hospitality, youth leader,
playing the piano, mowing the
lawn. “You name it. I did it,” said
Blye. “During that time I began to
receive various confirmations from
others that God was preparing me
for a life of ministry and particu-
larly to pastor.” He also worked
several years at the KSLT radio
station. Transfering to New Hope
Christian College in Eugene, Ore.,
he graduated in 2005 with a bach-
elor of science in pastoral studies
and a minor in youth and music.
He then worked in Portland,
managing sales operations for a
company there. He said that he
“took the sales job to support my
family, while serving in the church
however I could.” Though very suc-
by David Bordewyk
S.D. Newspaper Assoc.
The newspaper’s name almost
always dominates the top of the
front page of the printed newspa-
per or the top of the newspaper’s
website. In the newspaper busi-
Political mailer
confuses readers,
threatens
newspaper’s
credibility
continued on page 2
Andy and Jenni Blye, of the Open Bible Church in Midland.
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Opinion / Community
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
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South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Clear. High of 50F. Windy.
Winds from the WNW at 30 to 35
mph.
Thursday Night: Partly cloudy. Low
of 27F with a windchill as low as 21F.
Breezy. Winds from the NW at 10 to 20
mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. High of 46F.
Winds from the SSW at 5 to
10 mph.
Friday Night: Partly cloudy.
Low of 30F. Winds from
the SSW at 5 to 10 mph shifting
to the West after midnight.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy.
High of 55F. Winds
less than 5 mph.
Saturday Night:
Partly cloudy. Low
of 32F. Winds less than 5 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. High of 48F. Winds
from the ENE at 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly cloudy with a
chance of snow. Fog overnight. Low of
25F with a windchill as low as 14F.
Breezy. Winds from the NE at 10 to 20 mph. Chance
of snow 70% with accumulations up to 3 in. possible.
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Monday Night: Overcast. Low of 23F. Winds
from the NNW at 5 to 10 mph.
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
We live in a land of plenty. The
question is not so much, “Will we
eat?” as “What should we eat?”
There are so very many choices
when it comes to food that some-
times it’s hard to make up your
mind and actually pick something
from the staggering variety.
Even take the many choices
there are when it comes to pizza.
Most pizzas contain tomato sauce
of some kind as a base, and cheese
as the final topping. Between the
two, though, there might be pep-
peroni, sausage, Canadian bacon,
hamburger, anchovies, onions,
green peppers, black olives, and
various other things. If I buy a
pizza, either frozen or hot, my pref-
erence is for the “deluxe” models
which have practically everything
on them. Those are quite fine. If I
make my own from the bottom up,
I generally stick with just one meat
plus the tomato sauce and cheese.
Those are good too.
Even when you go to the frozen-
food section of the grocery store, all
the different brands of pizzas can
be confusing. You might want to
get expert advice before buying as
I did from William one day. He was
a young fellow who worked at the
store and claimed that, if you are
what you eat, he was at least
twenty-percent pizza if not more. I
figured he was probably an expert
so I asked his advice. Pointing at
one brand he said, “Those are the
best.” Another brand had his ap-
proval as well except he said they
were more expensive than the first
one but not any better. A third
kind was labeled as okay in a
pinch, and a fourth was said to be
“really bad! Save your money.” Out
of curiosity over several months, I
tried all four kinds and found
William’s advice to be sterling. He
knew what he was talking about.
Pizza, however, is generally not
considered proper fare for Thanks-
giving. Traditions must be upheld,
you know. As a result, cooking
might take up a good part of the
morning on that holiday. Natu-
rally, you want to make dressing
and stuff it into a turkey about
daylight. Then it will roast all
morning and smell so good that
you are completely ravenous by
noon. With the turkey, you obvi-
ously need mashed potatoes and
gravy, candied yams, a vegetable of
some sort like corn, some cran-
berry sauce, perhaps a fruit salad,
some buns with butter and jelly,
and possibly olives, pickles, carrot
or celery sticks with the celery
sticks preferably being stuffed with
cheese spread. Dessert almost cer-
tainly has to include pumpkin pie,
but some might prefer pecan or
fruit pie or various others such as
banana or coconut cream. Ice
cream might also be required.
When you cook that much all at
one time, however, you are proba-
bly going to have to deal with left-
overs. That’s generally okay for a
day or two, but then you might con-
sider sharing some with the dog or
cats or even the chickens. Some of
the excess can be frozen for later
consumption, of course, if you ever
remember to take it back out of the
freezer. I do like to remove all the
meat from the turkey carcass and
boil the bones up for soup base. It
makes excellent broth and can
quite easily be frozen with some
meat for later use. I do usually re-
member to use that up before it
gets ancient.
In this country, even if you are of
middle, low or no income, you can
usually have a turkey-and-dress-
ing meal on Thanksgiving thanks
to the generosity of many of our
people. One local fellow, many
years ago, started making a huge
traditional meal to which everyone
was invited. He, with the help of
some others, has been doing it for
many years, and they get a big
turnout. It’s a neat social event, es-
pecially for those who either aren’t
able to cook for themselves or have
no local relatives to share with. In
other words, this is not only a land
of plenty but also a land with many
kind and generous people. For that
I am thankful.
As usual, when you think or talk
about food too much, you get hun-
gry. That is now the case with me.
It’s a little too late in the day to
cook a turkey, but it doesn’t take
very long to make a pizza. I think
I’ll go do that. If all this culinary
discussion has made you hungry as
well, I recommend a deluxe pizza.
You can’t really go wrong with
that.
Best laid schemes ... by Del Bartels
Ever have one of those days when nothing goes right? My calendar
is full of them. During my hot morning shower, someone started a load
of white laundry. After the door lock clicked shut, it was too late to re-
member my house keys were on the dresser. Finishing a travel mug of
coffee on a day-long trip, I then doubted if I turned off the empty cof-
feepot. The hardware salesman, upon my third visit while doing a
long-running home repair project, said he would see me again: he did
not, because I went to a different store. I rushed in to a mega-grocery
store to do some “quick” shopping, and crashed into food-stamp day. I
filled my car’s tank the day before, and then gas prices drop 20 cents.
Returning home I relearned that deer, able to run at great speeds,
sometimes will race a car so they can ultimately commit suicide. When
rushing supper, turn on the burner that is actually under the pot! I
laid down, exhausted, Sunday night, then my kid remembered he
needed help with his homework due the next day.
Even leasure can be work. Halfway to a distant field at 5:00 a.m. is
a poor time to remember my hunting license and bullets are on the
kitchen table. For fishing trips, maybe I should test the rod for tangled
line before hand. Stepping in something is an ugly way to find out the
soles of your running shoes are worn through. At least I didn’t have to
put up with those annoying commercials ... when my television went
out. Taking a nap on the couch is difficult with the family dog is quietly
staring into your face, hoping to finally get fed. That last piece of cake
sounded good, but it also sounded good to someone else who left the
empty container on the counter.
Work also can go all too wrong. It’s Thursday, but I thought today
was Wednesday! So much for dependable %*$@ cell phone reception!
What, it was 2:00 an hour ago? Not this week, but next week is payday.
If I think things are working out, I’m scared to check, because the light
at the other end of the tunnel is often an oncoming train.
I know that God can laugh, but I suspect it’s most often when I tell
Him my plans. I guess that I should learn to go with the flow and not
worry about things. Aren’t past disasters supposed to be called learn-
ing experiences? Everything today will somehow be laughed at tomor-
row ... I guess I’ll have to wait until tomorrow. Worrying about the fu-
ture won’t change any part of it the tiniest bit. I should buck up; after
all, am I a man or a mouse? The poet Robert Burns stated my worries
simply in To a Mouse.
“You are not alone in proving foresight may be vain.
The best-laid schemes of mice and men oft go astray,
and leave naught but grief and pain for promised joy.
Still, thou art blest compared wi’ me; the present only touches thee.
But, oh, I backward cast my eye on prospects drear;
and forward, though I cannot see, I guess and fear.”
Cabin Fever Floral started off the holiday season with a Christmas celebration
open house, November 14. Door prizes and refreshments made the shopping
mood more festive, as guests browsed through the variety of items. Shown are
Teresa O’Connell, left, and Krystle Doud admiring a selection. Photo by Bartels
Cabin Fever open house
The annual Scholastic Book Fair was held in the Haakon County Public Library,
November 13-16. According to Annie Brunskill, director of the library, this is one
of the library’s biggest fundraisers for buying books and equipment. Shown are
Evan Kroetch, left, and Dusty Formanek looking over a book. Photo by Del Barels
Library’s scholastic fair
The new work area and show room has been completed for the Prairie Designs
Floral Studio business owned and operated by Elke Baxter. “I have some orders,
sales going for Christmas and a stack I have to catch up on,” said Baxter. Her
work can be ordered from and delivered to anywhere in the continental United
States. “We consult via phone or email and I send pictures of the finished product
for your approval before you buy, and then I either ship or deliver,” said Baxter.
She has recently completed a week-long floristry II - advanced design course
through the Institute of Floristry in Minneapolis. Photo by Del Bartels
Show room completed for
Prairie Designs Floral Studio
Members of the Philip Modern
Woodmen of America chapter re-
cently helped raise money for Mary
Parquet by holding a 50/50 raffle.
The event, held October 18,
raised $1,123. This includes $500
matched funds by Modern Wood-
men’s home office through the or-
ganization’s matching fund pro-
gram. The money will be used for
helping cover medical expenses.
The matching fund program offers
Modern Woodmen members na-
tionwide the chance to show their
support for a community cause, or-
ganization or individual in need by
holding fundraisers. Modern Wood-
men matches money raised up to
$2,500. These fundraising projects
contribute more than 6.5 million to
community needs nationwide each
year
Coordinated by local Modern
Woodmen members, chapters pro-
vide opportunities to connect
through social activities and vol-
uneer projects.
For more information about the
local chapter and how you can get
involved, contact Don Haynes at
859-2778 or dwhaynes@gwtc.net.
As a tax-exempt fraternal benefit
society, Modern Woodmen sells life
insurance, annuity and investment
products not to benefit stockhold-
ers but to improve the quality of
life of its stakeholders – members,
their families and their communi-
ties. This is accomplished through
social, charitable and volunteer ac-
tivities. Annually, Modern Wood-
men and its memers provide more
than $23 million and nearly one
million volunteer hours for commu-
nity projects nationwide.
Funds raised for Parquet
Political mailer confuses readers, threatens newspaper’s credibility
by Del Bartels
“I don’t want your best friend’s
mom standing up here telling
about them being gone,” said
Penny Whipps, during a Dakota
Assemblies program for seventh
through 12th grade Philip school
students and the general public,
Thursday, November 15.
Whipps first had members of the
audience briefly discuss with
friends sitting next to them about
choices they might make in listed
hypothetical scenarios. She then
related about when her 22-year-old
son, Kyle, died of a drug overdose.
Her mission is now to reach as
many kids as she can with the mes-
sage that, by speaking up, a true
friend can save a life.
Along with photos on a screen,
she described Kyle in a personable
way, with comments such as, “He
was a fat baby.” Kyle was not an
“at risk” student, nor were his
friends. They were smart students,
good athletes, musicians and long-
time friends. At a crowded house
party where drugs were available,
all of them knew something was
wrong with Kyle, but kept quiet in-
Just One Time – right
choices school assembly
continued from page 1
anything for them in return. People
help and look out for each other
simply because they believe it’s the
right thing to do,” said A. Blye.
A. Blye serves as vice president
on the board of Midland’s Second
Century Develpment and he is a
member of the Haakon County
Crooners men’s singing group.
The most difficult part is “being
so far from Starbucks,” said A.
Blye. “All joking aside, I wouldn’t
trade it for anything. It’s an adjust-
ment from living in the city, but
you learn to change the way you do
things.” He added, “It’s a much bet-
ter pace of life. You actually feel
like you are in control of life, rather
than life controlling you.”
Open Bible Church in Midland
continued on page 9
ness, we call it the “flag.”
A newspaper's flag is a represen-
tation of it’s credibility and brand.
In short, a newspaper flag conveys
instant familiarity and connection
for those who read it.
So it is no wonder some south-
eastern South Dakota residents
were confused when they received
a political campaign piece in the
mail just before the November 6
election that looked very similar to
a local weekly newspaper. The
campaign mailer included a flag
that was similar in design and type
style to the local weekly newspa-
per, the Dakota Dunes North Sioux
City Times.
The campaign mailer, called the
“Lincoln Union County Times,”
was paid for by the Union County
Republican Party, whose chairman
is state Senator Dan Lederman, as
a promotional piece for GOP candi-
dates.
Shortly after the mailer showed
up in mailboxes, Times Publisher
Bruce Odson began receiving calls
from local residents confused by it.
Was his newspaper responsible for
this campaign literature? Odson
assured them he was not.
Nevertheless, the confusion was
out there. Later, Odson published
a front-page story, telling readers
that the real Times was not respon-
sible for the political campaign
“Times” and that he did not appre-
ciate confusion by it or the appar-
ent deception.
Businesses invest millions of dol-
lars to build and promote their
image and brand. Newspapers do
the same thing with their flag.
Most newspapers have been con-
veying a connection with their
readers and a sense of public trust
via their newspaper flag for more
than a century.
Any unauthorized use of that
newspaper's brand and trademark
undermines that connection and
trust. Apple would not like it if
someone misused its iconic logo.
S.D. publishers don’t like it either
when someone abuses the trust
and connection they have worked
hard to build with their readers
and community.
It’s been said that imitation is
the sincerest form of flattery. And
perhaps we should be flattered that
a political campaign would emulate
one of our newspapers to further its
agenda. But the risk of confusing
our readers and potentially weak-
ening our credibility as an inde-
pendent source of information is
simply too steep a price to pay.
continued from page 1
THE PHILIP VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT’S BBQ
FUNDRAISER …will begin serving at 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, No-
vember 24, at the fire hall in Philip. The Glo-N-Go Parade will begin
at 6:30 p.m. Everyone welcome!!
HAAKON COUNTY CROONER CHRISTMAS CONCERT
SCHEDULE … December 2, Kadoka Catholic Church, 1:30 p.m.,
Wall Community Center, 4:00 p.m. December 16, Philip Nursing
Home, 1:30 p.m., Philip Courthouse, 4:00 p.m. Everyone welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Grain Storage Tips
The dry conditions of 2012
prompted cautions regarding pos-
sible molds; with the potential of
producing mycotoxins in corn and
other crops. Reports of molds were
minimal, but improper storage can
only cause existing mold and in-
sect infestations to get worse.
Standard grain storage recom-
mendations are to: dry corn down
to 13 percent moisture if storing
for more than a month, run aera-
tion fans when the air tempera-
ture is 10 degrees lower than the
grain temperature and cool stored
grain to 25 to 35 degrees Fahren-
heit to stop mold growth and insect
activity.
Checking grain bins is not the
preferred task for most producers,
but can be important as detecting
problems early can pay off well.
Checking bins every two weeks is
considered a minimum, with a
thorough inspection once a month
highly recommended.
A good practice is to run the aer-
ation fan at least once per month
when the humidity is low and the
air temperature is 30 to 35 de-
grees. Climbing up to the access
door and checking the air coming
out can tell a lot about the condi-
tion of the grain.
If the air coming through the
grain is warmer than you ex-
pected, has a musty odor, or con-
densation forms on the underside
of the bin roof on a cold day, there
may be problems developing. If
any of these conditions exist, it
would be recommended to run the
fan long enough to push the tem-
perature front completely through
the bin. A rule of thumb is that the
time (in hours) to push a tempera-
ture front through the bin is 15 di-
vided by the airflow in cubic feet
per minute per bushel (cfm/Bu).
For example, many aeration sys-
tems move 0.1 cfm/bu. In that
case, it would take 150 hours, or
6.25 days to push the temperature
front through the grain (15/0.1 =
150).
It can be easy to get a false
sense of security if you put grain in
a bin that is at or near the recom-
mended moisture content. Remem-
ber that as the air temperature
drops over the fall and into the
winter, grain close to the bin wall
will cool faster than the grain in
the center. Since cool air drops and
warm air rises, air can migrate
from the outside of the bin to the
center, picking up moisture, which
can be deposited at the top of the
grain, and cause the grain to go
out of condition.
If the grain is warm enough for
microbial activity, and/or insect ac-
tivity, damage can occur. Warmth,
moisture, microbial activity and
insect activity can also promote
more of the same, accelerating the
potential of problems.
To protect the investment you
have in stored grain, check them
often.
Calendar
11/27-28: Ag Horizons Confer-
ence, Pierre
12/11: Soil Health Info Day-
Davison County Extension Com-
plex, Mitchell
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Rural Living
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
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Battery Sale
Going on NOW until
the end of November!
10% off
all batteries!
859-2568 • Philip, SD
www.KennedyImplement.com
NOW ACCEPTING:
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
VALUABLES belong in a
SAFE DEPOSIT BOX.
The cost is just pennies a day and
worth much more when it comes to the
comfort you get from knowing your
prize possessions are SAFE!
Staff SpotligHt
Bill walker
– Employed 11 Years
– Agronomy Applicator
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
farmer and area may have their
own barrier that they have trouble
breaking through, which can be af-
fected by the land they farm, pre-
cipitation they receive and their
farming practices'" Fanning said.
Chapter one, "Sustainable Pro-
duction of 100-Bushel Wheat," as
well as many of the other chapters
in "iGrow Wheat: Best Manage-
ment Practices for Wheat Produc-
tion" provides information on opti-
mizing wheat yields. Producing
wheat yields of 100 Bu/acre, or ex-
ceeding whatever yield barrier you
have been limited by, requires at-
tention to detail. Read this chapter
online by visiting http://igrow.org/
up/resources/05-1001-01-2012.pdf.
The chapter points to key factors
in producing satisfactory wheat
yields which include: develop and
maintain good crop rotations, vari-
ety selection, quality seed source,
preparing an adequate seedbed, op-
timize available water, proper
iGrow wheat publication to
help increase wheat yields
Growers looking for ways to in-
crease their wheat yields should
check out chapter one of the new
"iGrow Wheat: Best Management
Practices for Wheat Production,"
says Bob Fanning, SDSU Exten-
sion Plant Pathology Field Special-
ist.
"Wheat is one of the most impor-
tant crops for semi-arid areas
across the world. As corn and soy-
bean production moves west and
north, a large number of wheat
acres have recently been lost to
those crops in South Dakota. Yet
for many producers, wheat remains
an important crop," said Fanning
who is one of the publication's 40-
plus co-authors.
"For some, wheat is their major
crop and for others it plays an im-
portant role in their cropping rota-
tion," he said. "Small grains, par-
ticularly wheat, are widely recog-
nized as a valuable crop for produc-
ing residue, which is critical in a
successful no-till production sys-
tem."
Fanning says wheat will almost
certainly remain an important crop
for much of South Dakota. How-
ever, he says for it to maintain
acres; producers must enjoy yields
that make it attractive to grow
compared with competing crops.
"A co-op agronomist commented
during the 2012 wheat harvest,
'producers in this area seem to
have trouble breaking the 50
bushel per acre barrier.' Each
planting date, proper seeding rate,
fungicide seed treatment, proper
fertilization, maintaining active
soil organisms, proper weed, insect
and foliar disease control, and har-
vest management.
To purchase your own copy of
"iGrow Wheat: Best Management
Practices for Wheat Production,"
visit the iGrow Store: http:/
/igrow.org/store/.
The 4-H Teens as Teachers pro-
gram is designed as a tool to en-
hance 4-H youth development
through service learning projects
which are planned and carried out
by local youth. This South Dakota
State University Extension 4-H
program partners youth with many
nonprofits to create learning com-
munities that allow youth the op-
portunity to experience greatness
by making a difference within their
communities and schools.
“Creating opportunities for youth
to develop and build upon healthy
lifestyle practices is crucial to their
positive youth development. 4-H
Teens as Teachers allows youth to
problem solve and plan by develop-
ing and carrying out lesson plans
for grades three through five that
are relevant to the South Dakota
Health Education Standards,” said
Suzy Geppert, SDSU Extension 4-
H youth partnerships field special-
ist.
Earlier this fall, South Dakota
schools, after school programs and
counties could apply for the pro-
gram. This year's program will be
offered in the 12 communities of
Philip, Baltic, Belle Fourche,
Burke, Clark, Lower Brule, McIn-
tosh, Redfield, Sturgis, Sisseton,
Webster and Winner.
The program consists of two
training sessions. The first session
is November 28 at the Pierre Re-
gional Extension Center. The sec-
ond training is December 4 at the
Watertown Regional Extension
Center. Teens will attend one of the
sessions and take their training
back to their local third through
fifth grade youth in elementary
classrooms and after school pro-
grams.
“Teens will design and carry out
lessons in conjunction with local 4-
H program advisors and teachers.
They will write newsletters, plan
activities, and submit a three to
five minute reflection video upon
completion, as well as various eval-
uations,” Geppert said.
Approximately 68 high school
age students will receive a $500
scholarship upon completion of the
program that will be established in
an educational account at the
South Dakota 4-H Foundation. The
scholarship will be directed toward
the post-secondary institution of
the volunteer's choice, upon pay-
ment of fees to that institution.
Philip part of 4-H Teens
as Teachers program
After spending the summer
months reporting on the devastat-
ing drought, State Climatologist
Dennis Todey was ready to provide
some good news to South
Dakotans this fall.
Unfortunately, the change in
seasons, while bringing cooler tem-
peratures, hasn’t brought the
much needed moisture South
Dakota soils need.
“As we transitioned from sum-
mer to fall, I fully expected there
to be at least a couple systems
coming through that would drop
one to two inches of widespread
rainfall. At this point, all the sys-
tems have missed most of South
Dakota except for one system
which hit the northeastern portion
of the state in late October,” Todey
said.
The storm systems Todey ref-
ered to are large low pressure
areas which occur with the change
in seasons. Differing from sum-
mer’s higher intensity thunder-
storms which tend not to produce
widespread rainfall, fall’s rain-
storms are often lighter intensity,
but provide moisture to a larger
coverage area.
Typically these fall rainstorms
average about five inches of mois-
ture in western South Dakota to
about seven inches in the eastern
portion of the state between Sep-
tember and November. This added
moisture before the soil freezes is
integral to restoring soil moisture
levels heading into spring.
“Any moisture events that hap-
pen once the ground freezes is of
limited benefit for soil moisture,”
Todey said. Unless there are some
dramatic weather changes, Todey
said drought issues will continue
into 2013. “We are at higher risk
for drought issues in 2013 because
of the lack of soil moisture. If we
get average rainfall in the spring,
it will still be difficult to rebuild
the soil moisture profile in many
places throughout South Dakota,”
he said. “We will be very depend-
ent upon rainfall throughout the
growing season next summer.”
Laura Edwards, SDSU Exten-
sion climate field specialist, agreed
with him. She said the drought ap-
pears to be getting worse rather
than better, based on the October
18 climate prediction center's long-
range outlook.
“We have been hoping for im-
proving our situation this fall, but
the state is getting drier instead of
wetter,” Edwards said. “The long-
range drought outlook depicts per-
sisting drought into the winter
season.” She added that according
to the outlooks, there is a higher
probability of above average tem-
peratures through January.
“This is combined with equal
chances of above, below or near
normal precipitation for November
through January. One exception is
the southeastern part of the state,
which currently has higher proba-
bility of being drier than average
through January,” Edwards said.
Before they can offer an opti-
mistic outlook for 2013 growing
season, Todey said a few things
need to happen. First there needs
to be an extended weather pattern
change which would allow mois-
ture to move in from the Gulf of
Mexico this fall. Then we need
snow cover this winter and some
large snow storms in early spring.
“Right now we don’t have any
strong indications one way or an-
other of the amount of spring or
summer moisture we'll receive in
2013,” he said.
Drought issues into 2013
Representative Kristi Noem is
accepting applications for spring
internships in her Washington,
D.C. office, as well as in her offices
in Sioux Falls, Rapid City and Wa-
tertown.
Student interns in Noem’s office
will assist staff with various con-
stituent service and communica-
tions projects, as well as assist with
legislative research. Both South
Dakota and Washington, D.C. in-
ternships are unpaid, but provide
students with first-hand knowl-
edge of the legislative process and
the countless other functions of a
congressional office.
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in any of Noem’s
offices should submit a resume,
cover letter and references to
Peter.Eckrich@mail.house.gov by
December 5.
For more information, contact
Peter Eckrich at 202-225-2801.
Rep. Noem’s office accepting
applications for spring interns
Happy
Thanksgiving!
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2001 Ford Taurus
V-6, Auto. Good, sound car!!
Hit & Miss
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Nov. 22: Happy
Thanksgiving – Turkey and all
the fixings.
Friday, Nov. 23: Turkey Noo-
dle Soup, Tossed Salad, Roll,
Spiced Apples.
Monday, Nov. 26: Kahlua
Pork Loin, Cilantro Rice, Roasted
Nantucket Veggies, Roll, Diced
Peaches.
Tuesday., Nov. 27: Chicken
Dijon, Potato Puffs, Broccoli Au-
Gratin, Roll, Cranberry Velvet
Dessert.
Wednesday, Nov. 28: Roast
Beef, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy,
Corn, Roll, Chocolate Mint Bar.
***
Thursday, November 8, at Som-
erset Court, we had the activity of
Wii bowling. Scores were as fol-
lows: Jim Holmes, 111, Irene
McKnight, 170, Irene Cox, 157,
Eileen Tenold, 89, Marilyn Butts,
135, Addie Rorvig, 160, Mary Lou
Peters, 138, Mildred Kraemer,
101. Thank you for giving me the
scores, Sandy.
November 8 was Somerset
Court resident Lucille Huether’s
birthday. Happy birthday, Lucille.
It was also the birthday of Con-
nie Stevens’ daughter, Terri, and
Terri came to Somerset Court for
lunch. Happy birthday, Terri.
Floy Olson’s son, Allen, came for
lunch on November 8.
Somerset Court residents,
Barry and Maxine Burgess, have
a colorful gourd wreath on their
door up on third floor. I want to
take their photo by that wreath.
November 8 at 3 p.m., Somerset
Court residents were entertained
by the music of Joyful Guys and
Gals from Canyon Lake Senior
Citizens Center. Thank you to our
activity directors, Shawn, Susan
and Sandy, for arranging seating
and for serving some delicious
brownies after the program. A
good crowd gathered and there
was a social hour afterward. The
Joyful Guys and Gals sang a
Thanksgiving song and several
songs honoring the branches of
the armed services and several
songs about various parts of the
U.S.A. “Yellow Rose of Texas,”
“Pennsylvania Polka,” “On Top of
Old Smokey” were some of those
sung. We were invited to sing
along with “God Bless America.”
Their last song was “Let There Be
Peace on Earth and Let it Begin
With Me.”
Barbara Hansen gave me this
bit of humor. Morris Bishop is a
scholar of languages and he has
produced this little rhyme: I lately
lost a preposition; it hid, I
thought, beneath my chair; And
angrily I cried, “Perdition! Up
from out of in under there!” …
Correctness is my vade mecum,
And straggling phrases I abhor,
And yet I wondered, “What should
he come Up from out of in under
for?”
Friday, November 9, at Somer-
set Court, we had the activity of
cooking with Sandy. The item
being cooked was eggnog cheese-
cake bars. Fred Smith was there
to run the mixer. Others on deck
to help were Mary Lou, Addie,
Marjorie G., Floy, Anne, Vivian,
Susan, Shawn and Sandy. The bar
mix was baked for eight minutes,
then a delicious filling was added.
Enid Schulz, Philip, sent a nice
note and the address of a place
where you can send excess Hal-
loween candy. Thank you, Enid.
Her church got a really nice letter
back last year. She sent this ad-
dress: Operation Gratitude/Cali-
fornia Army National Guard,
17330 Victory Boulevard, Van
Nuys, CA. 91406, Attn. Richard
Hernandez.
On Friday evening, Somerset
Court resident Vivian Hansen’s
family celebrated the birthday of
her granddaughter, Sheridan.
Present were Sheridan, Wayne,
Gwynn, M.R., Barbara, David K.
and Vivian Hansen and Tiger and
Cecelia Duinkherjav. Thank you
to Gwynn for bringing balloons
and to Barbara for bringing a
birthday cake and to M.R. for pay-
ing for our dinners.
Saturday was pretty quiet. I
ironed some quilt pieces that I had
sewn together, sort of a thing one
does when there is nothing going
on. The snow sort of dampened
everything. It is still white with
snow. Well, we did play a little
quiddler before lunch. Addie,
Mary Lou, Susan and Vivian.
After lunch, Ina, Mary Lou, Addie
and Floy played a little whist.
The Philip Pioneer Review had
an article about the proposed rail-
road side tracks down by the grain
elevators. I am thankful they are
giving deep consideration to the
lay of the land, for that area is
subject to flooding. True it can be
dry for years and years and then
flood like in 1915, 1927, and many
times more recently. Only a few
years ago, there were photos of
horses being led out of deep water
down on the south side of the
North Fork bridge.
Tiger and Cecelia had a good
time with the two big birthday
balloons that Gwynn brought for
Sheridan’s birthday. Thank you,
Gwynn.
Sunday, November 11, we had a
better day. It was cold and the
snow was still there, but the
streets were not so slippery. Ray
Kraemer told me at breakfast that
he planned to go the the Veterans
Day parade. Veterans would at-
tend a luncheon in their honor af-
terward. I am proud of him to get
out and go and be in the parade.
Shawn and Sandy took the
Somerset Court bus so residents
could go to the veteran’s concert at
the Calvary Lutheran Church.
Residents report a wonderful pro-
gram. Thank you to our activity
directors for this outing.
Rev. and Mrs. Richardson came
and Jack Humke was there to
play the piano. Some of the songs
we sang were “America,” “This is
My Father’s World,” and “Have
Thine Own Way, Lord.” Rev.
Richardson spoke to us about how
it is to be a veteran. He make a
point that soldiers do not hate the
enemy, they go and kill them be-
cause they want to make a better
life for them. We thank all those
who have been in the service, and
those who are in the service at the
present time. They are following
the Bible, John 13, about laying
down their lives for others. Rev.
Richardson realizes that elected
people cannot do all they promise.
Only God is in charge of what ac-
tually happens. Rev. Richardson
is in favor of prayer in schools, and
would like the old way of starting
the day with the Pledge of Alle-
giance: “I pledge allegiance to the
flag of the United States of Amer-
ica and to the Republic for which
it stands, one nation under God,
with liberty and justice for all.” He
would add the Lord’s prayer.
People who build on low lying
areas know that water seeks its
lowest level.
Monday, November 12, at Som-
erset Court we can wear red,
white and blue and get Somerset
bucks. Residents of Somerset
Court who are veterans have their
big colored photographs displayed
on a ledge in the front lobby. We
are proud of you. Thank you for
going all out for us.
Monday, November 12, at Som-
erset Court, we had crafts with
Amy and we painted cute little
plastic owls to hang in the win-
dow. Light shines through them
and they are pretty and colorful.
Fred Smith, Addie Rorvig, Mil-
dred Young and helper Kay
Daughenbaugh, Mary Lou Peters,
Eileen Tenold, Agnes Tastad, and
Vivian made owls. Sandy was
there to help.
The Somerset Court movie was
“Night at the Museum.” It was
fairly imaginative. M.R. Hansen
had seen it and said it was enter-
taining, or something favorable. It
didn’t appeal to me much. The
fresh popcorn and ice cold root
beer were very nice. Thank you to
our activity directors for setting
up the movie for us.
Monday thawed quite a bit and
the sidewalks in the Somerset
courtyard were partly wet. It looks
like it will be in the 40s and 50s all
week.
We will miss Violet Jenison. We
hope she will soon be back at Som-
erset Court. We heard that she fell
and is in the hospital.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and we had a sociable time. He
furnished pretzels.
A little incident from from my
childhood that I like to tell over
and over … At West Lincoln
School (usually called the Nelson
school) in the Grindstone neigh-
borhood in 1926 or 1927. For a
special occasion, the teacher, Is-
abelle Nelson, invited us all to
walk half a mile down to her home
to listen to the president speak on
the radio. The big kids could take
turns listening on the earphones,
and us little kids could go play in
the sand pile. Pupils were proba-
bly Jack, Howard and Darlene
Fortune, Frankie Hauk, maybe
Flossie Nelson, and me. When I
was about in the sixth grade, our
school got a wind-up phonograph.
The teacher played for us a record
of Madame Schulmann-Heinck, a
famous soprano. I did not appreci-
ate that.
Tuesday we played whist before
lunch, Irene Arbach, Ina Oerlline,
Susan and Vivian. Tuesday, No-
vember 13, at Somerset Court, we
had bingo with Sandy calling the
numbers and Amy and Susan
were there to help with reading
cards, distributing prizes, and
serving the snack and chat right
after bingo. Bingo winners were
Irene Arbach, twice, Sherman
Ellerton, Dwight Mann, Mary
Klauck, Mary Lou Peters, twice,
Marge Self, Annetta Hansen, and
Vivian Hansen. After bingo, for
snack and chat we had some deli-
cious banana bread with cream
cheese frosting. Shirley Hodgson
and Warren and Joyce Astleford
dropped in for snack and chat.
After snack and chat, Irene Cox,
Addie Rorvig, Mary Lou Peters
and maybe Marcella played
rummi-cube. Fred Ross, Susan,
Mary Lou and Vivian played 500
rummy all the way to supper time.
My granddaughter, Crystal
Jackson, reported that her son,
Sean, is home from a tour of duty
in Afghanistan. Her daughter,
Ariel, will soon be home from a
three-month study trip to Italy.
Crystal emailed that she has seen
Monarch butterflies, and now has
seen two chrysalises hanging on
the side of the house. Still bloom-
ing in her garden at Huntington
Beach, Calif., are golden yellow
zinnias with red stripes, bold or-
ange cosmos, sunflowers and
marigolds. Her lemons are bright
yellow and the oranges are not far
behind. Sure enough, it is an or-
ange colored month!
Wednesday was a wonderfully
warm day. The snow is about
gone. Somerset Court driver, Gary
the second, gave me a ride to Dr.
Eaton’s office and the doctor said
that I looked pretty good and he
would see me in six months.
Agnes Tastad had a wonderful
chrysanthemum. The centers are
golden yellow and the tips of the
petals are old gold. I thought it
was plastic, but I touched it and it
is real.
A very popular activity was car-
ried out at Somerset Court
Wednesday, November 14. Our ac-
tivity directors, Sandy, Susan and
Shawn, cooked a complete
Thanksgiving dinner with roast
turkey and all the fixin’s. I heard
that 30 residents came for the din-
ner in the activity garden. This is
not outdoors, it is in an area on
first floor where the piano is.
The Rapid City Journal for No-
vember 14, 2012, had an article
that showed a little glimmer of
hope. It told about solar powered
lights for a section of the bike path
between Roosevelt and Memorial
parks. They use no electricity.
Another Rapid City Journal
item said, “Conserving energy
good idea.” Do you remember
when mom and dad told you,
“Turn off the light.” And, “Close
the refrigerator door.”
Journal of Rolla Palmer, my
father, from October 1914,
98 years ago
These journals were written on
my parent’s homestead, four and
one half miles north and one mile
west of Grindstone.
October 1, picked corn, wind
blew hard. Oct. 2, mowed in p.m.
Effie and I went to Philip to get
our teeth fixed but no go. It was a
fine day. Oct. 4, it rained. I
banked the house. We gathered
pumpkins and squash and mel-
ons. It will frost tonight. Oct. 5,
wind blew hard and it cleared off.
They thrashed. Oct. 6, I went
down to Rausch’s and got Grover
and (Armi?) to sign my bond and
then took it over to Hauk’s, bought
a can of oil and came home.
Hauled in one load of hay in after-
noon.
Lettenweed Ball
Annual Iun Nlght
Saturdag, 0ec. 1st
Lettenweed Ball
Annual Iun Nlght
Saturdag, 0ec. 1st
7:00 p.m.
Cards · Bingo · Food Food concession by Weta River Rats ·Open for Supper at 6:30 p.m. ·Door Prizes Every Hour!
All proceeds benefit
the Cottonwood Hall!
Leme & have a
geed tlme wlth geur
lrlendsI
It’s A Girl!
Daughter of
Lucas & Hayli
Mayfield
Kadoka
Born:
May 18, 2012
Paternal Grandparents: Marcia & Ed Morrison
Maternal Grandparents:
Sheryl & Bill Bouman, Mike Stroppel
Paternal Great-Grandparents:
Bob & Ardis McCormick
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
George & Alice Stroppel
The late Elmer & Martha Hanson
Raegan
Lynn
Come & meet
John Edward Sandal
son of Todd & Jennifer Sandal
Friday, November 23rd
from 4 to 7 p.m. at the
Don & Tami Ravellette home
north of Philip
You’ re invited!
Wedding ReceptionOpenHouse
celebrating the recent marriage of
Taylor Holman
& Cody Espinoza
onSaturday, November 24th
4:00to 7:00p.m.
at the HolmanResidence, Philip, SD
Nov. 23-24-25-26:
Here Comes
the Boom(PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
November 30-December 1-2-3:
Wreck It Ralph (PG)
December 7-8-9-10: The Twilight
Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2
(PG-13)
two of them together, combined
they cannot only pull more than
double the weight, but also for a
longer period of time. This is syn-
ergy.
Of course there are many other
examples I am sure we could use to
illustrate the concept of synergism.
Just let me encourage you to look
for opportunities to come together
with others this week. Pair up.
Work together as a team. Experi-
ence the immense profit that syner-
gism provides.
One of my favorite quotes is: “Let
one plus one equal three. Work to-
gether and sanction a sum greater
than its parts. A three-sided struc-
ture is the strongest foundation in
our universe.” (Author Unknown)
Power of synergy or 1+1=3
When you take one dynamic and
mesh it with another dynamic, most
often the sum of the two is greater
than the two would be on their own.
Take the husband and wife rela-
tionship. Each of them as individu-
als has strengths, gifts and abilities
that make them successful in their
own right. However, when you com-
bine their strengths, gifts and abil-
ities as they learn to work together
as a team, the two are able to ac-
complish so much more than either
of them could have ever accom-
plished all by themselves. In other
words, 1 + 1 = 3.
Another example is the farmer,
who in the old days would plow his
fields with an ox. Pulling all by it-
self, an ox can pull a couple thou-
sands pounds. But, when you yoke
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for more details at 605-450-1955 and
be sure to check out Bob’s website at: www.mrattitudespeaks.com
Church & Community Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
And cvcry man lhal slrìvclh lor
lhc maslcry ìs lcmµcralc ìn all
lhìngs. Now lhcy do ìl lo oblaìn
a corruµlìblc crown; bul wc an
ìncorruµlìblc.
1 Corìnlhìans 9:2S (K)V)
Cverínduígence ís u vuy oí íííe íor muny, but ít ís not the vuy oí
íííe íor beííevers. Cod udvíses us to exercíse greut seíí-controí
ííke uthíetes so ve muy secure u píuce ín Heuven. Lnííke the
prízes uthíetes compete íor, our príze vííí never perísh.
Obituaries
Moving?
E-mail your change of address to:
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
or call 859-2516
two weeks in advance of your move.
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Winners of Philip’s Great Gobbler
Give-away Turkey Drawing
(Turkeys may be picked up at Coyle’s SuperValu in Philip)
Philip Livestock Auction ....................Darrin Klapperich, Rapid City
American Family Insurance...........................Leandra Arthur, Philip
First National Agency.......................................Nancy Neville, Philip
The Corner Pantry ..............................................Zach Baxter, Philip
Coyle’s SuperValu......................................Sandra Heaton, Midland
Coyle’s Standard.................................................Jerry Ellens, Philip
Ron Mann, DDS............................................Mike Koehler, Midland
Farm Bureau Insurance...................................Amelia Hurley, Philip
First National Bank..............................................Alice Jones, Philip
Pizza Etc .......................................................Roger Williams, Philip
Petersen’s Variety...............................................Mary Harrell, Philip
Ingram Hardware...........................................Dan Oldenberg, Philip
Kennedy Implement ..........................................Mike Naescher, Wall
LBS Auto..................................................Gerald Bush, Long Valley
Grossenburg Implement ...............................Glendon Shearer, Wall
Moses Building Center................................Chuck O’Connor, Philip
Philip Motor, Inc. .....................................................Rick King, Philip
The Steakhouse..............................................Ross Williams, Philip
Konst Machine & Welding................................Ann Harty, Milesville
Essence ...........................................................Doreen Vetter, Philip
Midwest Cooperative ............................................Joe Prouty, Philip
Cabin Fever Floral .......................................Alecia Fortune, Interior
Philip Clinic.....................................................Mary Perkins, Interior
Dakota Bar .........................................Melissa Reckling, Rapid City
Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle & Vet ..........................Brian Pearson, Philip
Ravellette Publications ....................................Marvin Denke, Philip
Enjoy your turkey &
Happy Thanksgiving from all
of the participating sponsors!
Bart Clennon___________________
Always known as a “Cowboy's
Cowboy,” Bart Clennon, age 101,
died November 4, 2012, at his
home in Tucson, Ariz., two hours
and 40 minutes before his 102nd
birthday.
Clennon was the last living
member of the original Cowboys’
Turtle Association – the forerun-
ner of today's PRCA – one of the 61
men who stepped up and signed
the petition that demanded fair
treatment from the sport's promot-
ers on October 30, 1936.
"We called ourselves Turtles,"
Clennon said in a 2010 interview
with the ProRodeo Sports News,
"because we were so damn slow in
getting it started before we finally
stuck our necks out."
Clennon was a saddle bronc
rider from South Dakota who rode
in his first competition at Post's
Trading Post in Ash Creek, S.D.,
in 1928, and was hooked from the
start. He went to work for a Wild
West show in Wisconsin and
slipped off to compete in rodeos as
often as possible. He rode as many
broncs as they would give him,
sometimes as many as 30 to 40 a
week.
When he quit the Wild West
show in 1936 and began competing
full time, he rode with a loose and
careless posture and the audiences
loved his nonchalance.
All that practice had taught him
to anticipate a bronc's actions and
he won or placed often.
He never kept a record of his
wins, but when asked about his ca-
reer he was quick to point out that
he made a living at it for 20-plus
years.
The late Casey Tibbs, a six-time
world champion saddle bronc rider
and one of Clennon's long-time
friends said, "Bart was one of the
best bronc riders I've ever seen. I
don't understand why he was
never a world champion."
Perhaps Clennon's greatest sad-
dle bronc riding victory came in
1945 at Madison Square Garden,
when they had 50 performances
and 13 go-rounds in what was then
considered the year-end champi-
onship.
Clennon married Geraldine
“Gerry” Parker in 1941 and they
had two boys, Bart Jr., and Terry.
His wife died in 1982.
Roy Roseth____________________
Roy Roseth, age 96, of Midland,
S.D., died Sunday, November 18,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Leroy “Roy” M. Roseth was born
August 11, 1916, in Moenville, the
third child of Julius and Mary
(Olson) Roseth. He grew up in that
area where he attended rural
school. Upon completion of his
schooling, he began his life on the
family ranch.
Roy enlisted in the U.S. Navy
shortly after the Japanese attack
on Pearl Harbor. He served four
years in the Pacific Theater on the
destroyer USS Dale. Roy returned
home on furlough to marry his
childhood sweetheart, Clara Fos-
heim, on September 18, 1944.
After completing his service, Roy
and Clara made their home on the
ranch in Moenville for the next 62
years. In September 2006, they
moved into the Silverleaf Assisted
Living Center in Philip.
Roy’s wife, Clara, preceded him
in death on January 10, 2007. Roy
continued to reside in Philip.
Roy was a lifetime member of
the Deep Creek Lutheran Church,
the Elks, and the American Legion
Post #143 of Midland. He also
served as a Haakon County com-
missioner for 12 years, held vari-
ous positions on the Deep Creek
Lutheran Church Board of Direc-
tors, and a member of the South
Dakota Stockgrowers Association.
Roy dedicated his life to the
ranch, and was very proud of the
trees that he had planted and nur-
tured there. He lived a full life,
still riding horses at the age of 83.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Carmen Alleman and her
husband, Clark, of Hayes, and So-
phie Foley and her husband, Pat,
of Midland; two sons, Duane
Roseth and his wife, Lola, of Mid-
land, and Julian Roseth and his
wife, Coreen, of Midland; 11
grandchildren, Kayce (John) Ger-
lach, Thor (Jackie) Roseth, Rhett
Roseth, Kristin (Vance) Martin,
Adam (Jodi) Roseth, Nicholas
Roseth, Clint (Laura) Alleman,
Kelly (Anthony) Nelson, Renee
Schofield, and Todd (Barb) Larson,
and Jim Larson; 14 great-grand-
children; a sister, Marie Anderson
of Midland; a sister-in-law, Ida
Hunt of Midland; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
In addition to his wife, Clara J.
Roseth, Roy was preceded in death
by his parents; two brothers, Paul
(Charlotte) Roseth and Clarence
(Marjorie) Roseth; and a son-in-
law, Charlie Larson.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday, November 21, at the
Deep Creek Lutheran Church
north of Midland, with Pastor
Frezil Westerlund officiating.
Music was provided by Frank
and Shirley Halligan. Ushers were
Billy Markwed and Dick Hudson.
Pallbearers were Thor, Rhett,
Adam and Nicholas Roseth, Clint
Alleman, and Todd and Jim Lar-
son. Honorary pallbearers were
Kayce Gerlach, Kristin Martin,
Kelly Nelson and Renee Schofield.
Interment was at the Deep
Creek Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Wanda Heeb____________________
Wanda Heeb, age 94, of Philip,
S.D., died Saturday, November 17,
2012, at the Philip Nursing Home.
Wanda Bernice Bowen was born
October 8, 1918, in Elrod, the
daughter of Charles H. and Minnie
(Thompson) Bowen. At the age of
10, she moved with her family to
western South Dakota. She was
educated in rural schools in Pen-
nington and Haakon counties.
Wanda was united in marriage
to Floyd “Jim” Heeb on December
30, 1935, in Kadoka. They lived in
the Ottumwa area until moving
into Philip, where she has since
resided.
Survivors include a daughter,
Barbara Kroetch of Philip; a son,
Dean Heeb and his wife, Cheri, of
Midland; six grandchildren, Brad
Kroetch (Donna) of Bossier City,
La., Renea Koupal (Greg) of Rapid
City, Matt Heeb of Mandan, N.D.,
Dawn Schwinler (John) of Brook-
ings, Rose Heeb of Brookings, and
Cecil Heeb in the U.S. Marine
Corps; four great-grandchildren,
Chris and Ryan Kroetch and Riley
and Anora Schwinler; a great-
great-granddaughter, Norah; and
a host of other relatives and
friends.
Wanda was preceded in death by
her husband, Jim; her parents;
two brothers, Dale and Marvin
Bowen; a sister, Irene Triolo; and
a son-in-law, Fritz Kroetch.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Wednesday, November
21, at the Sacred Heart Catholic
Church in Philip, with Father
Kevin Achbach as celebrant.
Music was provided by Mari-
anne Frein, pianist, and Rose
Heeb, vocalist. Lector was Lloyd
Frein. Eucharistic ministers were
Chuck Kroetch, Kay Ainslie and
Joann Pearson.
Ushers were Bill Stahl and Jeff
Nelson. Altar servers were John
and Brett Daly. Pallbearers were
Brennan and Mickey Daly, Mark
Foland, Bruce Kroetch, Tom
Konst, Alvin Pearson and Steve
Van Tassel.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to the EMS of Midland and
Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Leola Halverson_________________
Leola Mae Halverson was born
September 14, 1926, at her par-
ents’ home near Bonesteel, S.D., to
Gustav and Wilhelmine (Dummer)
Witt. She was called to her heav-
enly home on Sunday, November
18, 2012, at the age of 86 years.
Leola attended country school
just three-quarters of a mile north
of the home place for seven years.
She then attended school in Bon-
esteel, graduating from high
school in 1944. She attended
Southern State Teachers College
and earned a teaching degree. She
taught school for one year.
On August 2, 1945, she married
Leonard Hoar and to this union
seven children were born. She
spent much of her life in Bonesteel,
where she and Leonard owned and
operated a repair shop and truck-
ing business. Leonard passed
away December 2, 1982. Leola
then worked in the school cafeteria
in Bonesteel and also in Mitchell
for a short time.
On November 6, 1985, Leola
married Leland Halverson. They
enjoyed traveling and visiting fam-
ily and friends. They retired to
Bonesteel and lived there until
their health began to fail. At that
time they moved to Mitchell. Le-
land passed away on September
21, 2008. Leola then moved to an
assisted living and later to the
Avera-Brady Care Center in
Mitchell until her death.
Leola’s faith and her family
were the most important things in
her life. She was unselfish in her
love for her kids and grandkids.
She also loved jigsaw puzzles,
crossword puzzles, watching
Wheel of Fortune and Twins base-
ball games.
Grateful for having shared her
life are her sons, Jim (Betty) of
Murdo, Tom (Denise) Scott of Co-
lumbia, Mo., Paul (Nancy) of Bat-
tle Creek, Neb., and Jeff (Becky) of
Cheyenne, Wyo.; her daughters,
Janice (Benny) Baker of Fairfax,
Marilyn (Fred) Bailey of Mitchell,
and Judy (Tim) Elshere of
Milesville; her sisters-in-law,
Luella Witt of Fargo, N.D.,
Dorothy Pistulka and Theon Hoar
of Fairfax; 18 grandchildren and
26 great-grandchildren; and a host
of nieces, nephews and friends.
Leola was preceded in death by
her parents, her two husbands, six
brothers and two sisters.
Services were held November
21, 2012, at Zion Lutheran Church
in Bonesteel with Pastors Justin
Gosch and David Reichel officiat-
ing.
Pallbearers were Jim Hoar, Tom
Scott, Paul Hoar, Jeff Hour, Benny
Baker, Fred Bailey and Tim
Elshere.
Interment was at Rosebud
Cemetery in Bonesteel.
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
It is a beautiful Monday morn-
ing, the sun is shining, and there is
no wind. What better day could you
find for getting out and just enjoy-
ing the day? As for me, I will be sit-
ting at the computer writing up the
Midland News for the week. Enjoy
the great outdoors for me, okay?
Reminder: Auxiliary members
are reminded to bring snacks to
Christmas in Midland which will
be at the Midland Legion Hall, De-
cember 1. This has become an an-
nual event and is enjoyed by all
who come to see the beautifully
decorated trees and Christmas
scenes etc.
In my book readings, I have been
enjoying “The Walk” series by
Richard Paul Evans. The series is
of a man’s soul-searching journey,
by foot, from Seattle, Wash., to Key
West, Fla., after he lost his job, his
home, and the love of his life – all
at the same time. As you read of his
journey, you find yourself pulled
into the heartwarming stories and
at times, frightening encounters he
faces. And the people he meets on
that journey? As, Richard Paul
Evans writes, “Sometimes you can
heal your own pain only by helping
to heal someone else’s.”
And so, why am I writing about
this series at this particular time?
Midland had a walker stop in at
their little town. He stopped at the
post office in Midland this Monday
morning for a food care package.
He is on a 2,100-mile hike across
the country from September
through December of 2012. In
preparation for that journey, he
had made arrangements with a
friend of his to mail food packages
to different post offices, at different
times, to ensure he would have
enough food to eat on his journey.
Midland’s post office was one of
those places. The post office had re-
ceived a letter from him stating
that a food care package would be
coming for him at that post office.
And so it did. Life continues to be
an interesting journey, does it not?
Friday, Keith Hunt, Christine
Niedan and Teresa Palmer headed
for Smith Center, Kan., to spend
the weekend with their sister, Lisa
and Brian Hackerott and kids. Sat-
urday, Brian’s mom, Ellie
Hackerott, came to visit. Saturday
evening, all attended “The Ransom
of Red Chief,” a remake of an old
O’Henry’s classic, put on by the
Smith Center High School Drama
Club. Deidra Hackerott had a lead-
ing role, playing the part of nine-
year-old Jonni “Red Chief” Dorset,
who is a menace to everyone. Re-
ports are the students put on an
outstanding performance. Good for
them. The Hackerott kids keep
busy as Blake has started basket-
ball practice; Stuart plays on a
sixth grade team, they won their
first two games; and Deidra, who is
a senior, works part time at a nurs-
ing home and takes some college
courses at night. After an enjoyable
visit, everyone returned home on
Sunday.
Ernie and Laurel Nemec spent
from Thursday until Sunday at the
home of their daughter, Barby and
Todd Larson and family, Sioux
Falls. They looked after grandchil-
dren, Kendall and Logan, while
their folks, Barby and Todd, went
to a Husker’s football game at Lin-
coln, Neb. Ernie and Laurel came
back home Sunday.
There was a huge turnout at the
Rush Funeral Home open house
Sunday afternoon. As some of you
know, they purchased the former
Kingdom Hall for Jehovah Wit-
nesses at Philip, building onto it,
making for a beautiful funeral
home facility. At that open house
was the authentic replica of Abra-
ham Lincoln’s coffin, made by the
Batesville Casket Company. The
Lincoln replica is often requested
by funeral directors celebrating
new funeral home openings and
anniversaries, by historical muse-
ums and Lincoln enthusiasts cele-
brating Lincoln’s birth and death.
Richard Mauer and Jean (Elrod)
Hunter, Wall, were down for the
open house. In visiting with Jean,
I learned that through her descen-
dents she was related to Lincoln. A
number of great, great, great’s
down the line. Jean’s great-grand-
mother was a sister to Lincoln’s
mom. I found that especially inter-
esting since the replica of Abraham
Lincoln’s coffin was there at the
open house. Leta Agee, a great-
aunt to Jean’s dad, Artie Elrod,
told of this many years ago.
Charles and Leta Agee lived in
Midland for a number of years.
Charlie operated a harness and
shoe repair shop. Mahlon Alcock
remembers going into that shop,
liking the smell of the oils used on
the harnesses etc. Charlie owned
the pool hall at one time, later sell-
ing it to Orland Kieffer. And so, on
life’s journey, with one story con-
necting to another, you never know
what you may learn. I find it inter-
esting. In visiting with Jean, she
mentioned reading that Joan
(Schanzenbach) Parks and her hus-
band, Farrell, and some of their
family had been to see Joan’s
brother, Ivan Schanzenbach. She
would like to have seen Joan. She
said that the two of them had been
classmates in Midland. She hadn’t
seen Joan since those high school
days. Jean worked at Wall Drug for
45 years. For 30 of those years she
worked in the office. After those 30
years, she worked wherever she
was needed, but not during the
winter months. She is enjoying re-
tirement, visiting her kids and
families, no more schedules. That
is a good thing.
Saturday, Joy Jones, Deb and
Emily Trapp went to a party at
Cindy Sinkey’s on the Hamilton
place. Baxter Schrempp, Dupree,
and Zak Sinkey came home with
them. Cindy works in the dialysis
department at Eagle Butte. She
had to work the next day, making
it so she gets Thanksgiving Day off.
We wish to express our sincere
sympathies to the family of Roy
Roseth, who passed away at the
age of 96. Uncle Roy loved ranch
life and riding horses. Can’t you
picture him riding his horse up
there in heaven? He and Clara can
have a great reunion. When Clara
passed away, a part of Roy went
with her. He missed her. Mom,
Phil, and I spent many enjoyable
times at the Roseth home. Those
rides Roy gave all of us kid’s across
the deep snow in his weasel. In
places the snow was over the
fences. Christmas Eve at the
Roseth home was a fun time. I re-
member Aunt Esther Schanzen-
bach, shaking her packages, trying
to guess what was inside. The tra-
ditional Norwegian foods of lutefisk
and lefse were always a part of
Christmas. And Clara would make
little Christmas wreaths of cereal
flakes, decorated in green colored
holly and red hot candies. They
were oh, so, good. When I called our
kids to tell them about Roy, they
had their own memories to share.
Good memories.
We also wish to express our sin-
cere sympathies to the family of
Wanda Heeb, who passed away at
the age of 94. Wanda was quite the
Wanda. She told it like it was. She
enjoyed a good laugh and helped
out with activities at the nursing
home and was a part of the singing
group going around singing ‘Happy
Birthday’ to folks at Silverleaf, etc.
November has been a busier
than usual month at the Morris
Jones’ home. Guests for the open-
ing of hunting season were Wes
and Carrie (Jones) Mentele, Cole,
Logan and Ava, Howard, Pat and
Braden Jones, Wessington Springs,
and Tom Riddle, Mitchell. Denny
and Wanda Mentele, Wes’s par-
ents, were also visiting, bringing
food to help feed the hungry
hunters and families. Seven bucks
were harvested Friday and Satur-
day from the Jones’ ranch. Brody
Jones had one of them as he
hunted with Wes and shot a nice
deer. Jeff Jones’family visited and
helped out. Jada Jones was at
Grandma and Grandpa Jones’ for
some of the weekend and was
joined by her siblings on Monday
following grade basketball games
played in Philip. Jaya Evans
brought the Jones kids from Rapid
City where they stayed with Jack
and Jill Evans over the weekend
while Jon and Jennifer Jones were
enjoying a vacation in the Ba-
hamas. Jon and Jennifer returned
Thursday to pick up the kids from
grandma and grandpa’s house.
Morris and Barbara Jones, Jeff
and Jen Jones and Jon Jones sold
steer calves, in Philip Tuesday, No-
vember 13.
Jody and Gary Block took Arline
Petoske to Rapid City, November
13 and 14, to have cataract surgery
on her eye. She is back at the Sil-
verleaf in Philip and seeing better
every day.
Stetson Jones recently had a rou-
tine checkup and MRI in Sioux
Falls to check for any remnants of
cancer in his eye. He received a
clean report. That is good news.
Wednesday, Prerry Saucerman
and her mom, Marlin Evans, were
in Rapid City for doctor appoint-
ments. They spent the morning
and had lunch with Jack Evans,
later going to the home of Jack and
Jill (Martin) Evans having a
chance to visit with Jill. They also
stopped in at the home of Tel and
Ellie (Nemec) Saucerman visiting
them and Meleah and Raygen. The
other kids were in school.
Saturday, Wilma Saucerman
rode with Roy and Carol Hunt to
Sundance, Wyo., for the birthday
party for Carter and Cooper Croell,
sons of Lance and Raquel Croell. It
was Cooper’s first birthday and
Carter’s third. Happy birthday,
boys.
Jerry and I went to the home of
Ivan Schanzenbach last Tuesday,
having a chance to visit with Joan
and Farrell Parks, and their
daughter, Pam Simms, their son,
Chris Parks, their son, Kirk and
Jennifer Parks and four kids.
There was just enough snow to give
the kids a fun time of sliding down
the big hill southwest of Ivan’s.
They enjoyed exploring the farm,
coming up with a skeleton of some
small animal they found on their
journey. What a fun time of shar-
ing stories, catching up on family,
taking pictures and all that goes
with visiting family you haven’t
seen for some time. They really are
a fun bunch. Oh, we did have some
good laughs.
As I close my column for this
week, I wish each of you a great
Thanksgiving Day with family and
friends. A time for being thankful
for those blessings we often take
for granted. I leave you with some
food for thought from an Amish
magazine we subscribed too.
“If quitters never win and win-
ners never quit, then whoever came
up with the idea, “Quit while you’re
ahead?”
“Life is like an onion, you peel one
layer at a time and sometimes you
weep.” There is some truth to that.
Have a good week, be safe, and be
thankful for those little blessings
that come your way.
10th Annual
Christmas in
Midland
Saturday, December 1st
10:30 to 3:30 at the
Midland Legion Hall
•Door Prizes
•Live Nativity Scene at 1 p.m.
•Hay Rides
•Cookies & Cider
•Santa will be there for
pictures from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to come &
enjoy Midland’s Christmas!
Soup & Sandwich
Luncheon from
11 to 3 at the
Midland Senior
Citizens’
Auxiliary Room
View
Christmas
scenes by
individuals
and
organizations!
Ray’s Appliance • 859-2794 • Philip
YEAR-END SALE
1 – Kenmore 500 Washer ..................................$200.00
1 – Kenmore 80 Series Washer.........................$140.00
1 – Maytag Washer............................................$100.00
1 – Maytag Electric Dryer ..................................$150.00
1 – Maytag Performa Electric Dryer...................$140.00
1 – Maytag Electronic Dryer ..............................$135.00
2 – Kenmore 122 Electric Dryers................$90.00 each
1 – Kenmore 868 Electric Dryer.........................$125.00
1 – Kenmore Electric Dryer................................$100.00
1 – Kenmore Gas Dryer.......................................$50.00
1 – Roper Electric Dryer ....................................$135.00
1 – Frigidaire Electric Dryer ...............................$180.00
1 – Kenmore Electric Range..............................$185.00
1 – GE Gas Range ............................................$280.00
1 – Maytag Built-in Dishwasher ...........................$60.00
1 – Barlow & Seelig Wringer Washer.................$100.00
Greetings from sunny, unseason-
ably warm, dry northeast Haakon
County. We have been enjoying
some beautiful days here – days
that make me want to find all sorts
of outdoor projects. Actually, the
warm, dry weather makes me a lit-
tle unsettled, because I know how
desperate we are for moisture. But,
I need to keep reminding myself to
just enjoy these wonderful days –
worrying about the lack of mois-
ture won't accomplish anything.
And, I can't do anything to change
the weather. Well, maybe if my
husband would take me dancing,
we could do a "rain dance" – it cer-
tainly wouldn't hurt to try!
First of all, my condolences to the
family of Roy Roseth. Roy passed
away Sunday at the ripe old age of
96. What a life he lived, and what
a legacy he left! He was so dedi-
cated to his family and to the ranch
that he loved. I heard comments
about him being a "kindhearted
cowboy" and "a prairie pioneer,"
and that is certainly true. He, like
many of his generation, lived
through numerous challenges and
changes, and he adapted and per-
severed, with his bride, Clara, by
his side. It is comforting to know
that they are together again in
eternal peace. I will miss his little
grin and the twinkle in his eye, but
some of his children have that
same grin – I'll be thinking of Roy
when I see it! Rest in peace, Roy.
The county has upgraded the
housing near the county shop, and
plans are in the works to hire
someone to live out here and take
care of roads in our area. It will be
wonderful to have someone living
locally, especially if the snow gets
deep! I noticed that the county staff
recently mowed the edges of the
roads in the community, which is
wonderful. The grass hadn't gotten
as tall as it does some years, but it
was certainly tall enough to stop
snow and cause drifting problems.
And the grass also made it a little
more difficult to see the deer that
are moving across the roads. So,
thank you, county workers – I ap-
preciate your efforts!
Billy and Arlyne Markwed had a
houseful of deer hunters on open-
ing weekend of deer season. Cindy
and Bruce Bresee came from
Spearfish, Clint and Jenna Bresee
came from Sioux Falls, and Eric
and Damian Bresee came from
Wall to enjoy the hunting. The
weekend was cold and blustery,
making hunting a little difficult
and causing some travel issues.
Billy and Arlyne joined friends,
Larry and Charlotte Gabriel, Sun-
day, November 11, and the four of
them hopped a tour bus to Bran-
son. Arlyne said it was so nice to
travel by bus – they could just relax
and enjoy the sights. The couples
saw six shows in Branson, and it
sounds like the entertainment was
great. They returned home Friday,
the 16th. This past weekend, Cindy
and Bruce Bresee came from
Spearfish and spent the weekend
helping Billy work on the cabin.
The work is progressing well, and
they hope to have it completed in
time for Christmas.
Frank and Shirley Halligan were
in Pierre Saturday to attend the fu-
neral of Donna Youngberg. Donna
was the aunt of their friend, Rich
Gloe, and Shirley had known
Donna's husband, Quentin, or
"Punt" as he is called, for many
years. When Shirley and her par-
ents first moved to Pierre for high
school, they rented a house from
Punt's father for most of the first
year until Shirley's parents bought
the house on Central and Seneca in
the spring of 1965.
Dick and Gene Hudson traveled
to New Underwood last Wednes-
day. While there, they visited Ruth
Little and Anna Lee Humphrey at
the nursing home. Ruth was a for-
mer neighbor of Gene's father, and
Anna was a niece of Carol Scarbor-
ough. They also stopped for a visit
with Elsie Matt at her home in
New Underwood. Elsie's youngest
daughter, Bonnie (Bloom) Yearous,
lived in our community for several
years until her husband, Wayne,
died unexpectedly. After their vis-
its, Dick and Gene went on to
Rapid City to spend the night and
kept an eye appointment Thurs-
day. They stopped in Philip and
visited Roy Roseth on their way
back to the ranch Thursday. Satur-
day, Gene and her daughter, Con-
nie Johnson, attended a party at
the home of Cindy Sinkey.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson were
in Pierre Thursday getting some
supplies. Nels has been taking ad-
vantage of the nice weather by
working on corrals. Dorothy at-
tended church Sunday, and she
also helped prepare the church for
Roy Roseth's funeral Wednesday.
Lola Roseth was in Rapid City
one day last week to visit her
mother, Joy Klima. Over the week-
end, Lola was in Chamberlain for a
meeting of the South Dakota Ag
and Rural Leadership group.
Kevin Neuhauser hosted hunters
from Sioux Falls last week. Satur-
day evening, there was a neighbor-
hood gathering at Kevin's shop,
where the hunters were cooking
pork loins and all the fixins. Mary
Neuhauser was home, as were
daughters, Sarah and Brianna.
Kevin traveled to Highmore this
week to pick up his mother, Ruth
Neuhauser. The two of them went
to Miller so Ruth could get new
hearing aids.
Bill and Polly Bruce traveled to
Pierre Thursday. They took advan-
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
continued on page 14
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Community
March 14 – Went to Cheyenne
Breaks for wood. Got back at 4:30.
Got 50 posts. Killed a grouse with
rifle at 50 yards. Clear and cold.
March 15 – Went to the
Cheyenne Breaks for wood - big
job. Got back at 4 p.m. Got 21 posts
and a lot of firewood. Frank Reed
arrived with lumber for shack.
Contract price for hauling $35 - ex-
penses $14.90 - four horse team.
Bought 1/4 beef of Saxbys. Clear
and warm. Regular spring day.
March 16 – Began constructing
shack on the 40 acres located in
Section 11. Laid the foundation
and floor and put part of one side
up. Got acquainted with Jack Dai-
ley, a settler living 18 miles east of
us. Got mail at Marietta.
March 17 – Went to Parkers in a
farm wagon - got there about 11
a.m. and ate a good dinner. Met
John Miller and Joe Graderick.
Left Parkers for home at 4 p.m.
March 18 – Resumed building
operations on our shack. Shack
pretty well up and moved our stuff
in today.
March 19 – Finished outside
work on shack and put rubberoid
roof on. Weather mild and turned
much colder in p.m.
March 20 – Weather very warm
-in fact, hot. Regular summer day.
Put door and windows in shack and
put up stove. Got 8 bushels of pota-
toes off Hardy at Hardingrove.
March 21 – Went to Hardingrove
for load of hay. Got there at 11:30
a.m. 12 miles from home. Wind
came up at 10 a.m. and blew a hur-
ricane. Tried to load hay and could-
n’t. Wind went down some at about
3:30. Started for home at 4:30 and
at 7:20 got stuck at Spotted Bear.
Unhitched and walked home.
Wrote card to Illinois at Hard-
ingrove. Nice country around
Hardingrove.
March 22 –Went after load stuck
in Spotted Bear. Secured Mr.
Neville, homesteader, and teams to
pull us out. At 9:30 started home.
Wind in S.E. and blowing a gale
again. Went 3 miles to Council
Bear in p.m. and got a load of wood
and hauled it to our shack. Hired
Howser and Newbar to 400 posts
for us for $20. They cut the wood
and put in position for us to get it
out and to make the posts at J.D.
Dibbles shack.
March 23 – Put shelves up in
shack and braces to the sides and
cleaned up the place in good shape.
Put in hard days work. Finished up
in the evening spading a small fire
break around shack. Weather clear
and superb. A regular summer day.
Ate dinner at Laura Gambrels
shack. Viola made biscuits.
March 25 – Got up at 5:30 and
started for the Cheyenne at 7 for
wood. Got an immense load and
started home at 4:30 and arrived at
7:10.
March 26 – Bert Dibble came
over in p.m. and with team plowed
a fire break around our shack.
Planted 2 rows of potatoes. En-
gaged Mr. Mitchell to break 5 acres
of sod for me at $4.50 per acre and
his board. Howser boys and Joe
Newbar, Laura Gambrel and Jose
Dibble came over to see us in the
evening. Boys brought violins along
and spent a couple of enjoyable
hours.
March 27 – Went to Cheyenne
breaks at 5:30 and got a big load of
posts and wood.
March 28 – Mitchell began
breaking 5 acres of sod for me.
Sawed wood and put in a clothes
line and hitching posts.
March 29 – Cold, 30 degrees.
Planted some potatoes and done
odd jobs. Made a maul.
March 30 – Got a big load of post
material from the Cheyenne
breaks. Went to post office in p.m.
for mail and Howser boys returned
with us to Skieview and spent the
evening.
Sun. March 31 – Sunday. In af-
ternoon we hitched up and drove to
Bellamys 3 miles south and spent
2 hours. Drove to Wells 1 mile east
of Bellamys and got ham and some
eggs. Eggs 20¢ per dozen and ham
20¢ per pound, Drifted home and
shot a grouse enroute.
April 1 – Worked around the
place in forenoon and in p.m. went
to Hardingrove for a load of hay.
Started home at 7:30 p.m. Stopped
and unhitched for the night 5 miles
south of Hardingrove. Ate supper
out of bucket and then went to bed
on top of load of hay. Very cool
night. Weather threatening.
April 2 – Got up at 5 a.m. Took
horses to nearby pond and watered
them. Started home at 5:30. Got
home at 7:30 a.m. with ton of hay.
In p.m. went for a load of wood at
Council Bear. Sun dogs in evening.
Dance scheduled tonight at Mur-
phys.
(to be continued …)
Engaged
Amanda Lynn Jones, daughter of Brian and Carrie Frahm, Pierre, and
Kit William Bramblee, son of Orie and Monica Bramblee, Hayes, will be
united in marriage on December 15, 2012.
Amanda earned her associate’s degree as a Pharmacy Technician from
Western Technical Institute, Rapid City. She is currently employed as a
pharmacy technician with Rapid City Regional Hospital.
Kit has a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences from SDSU,
Brookings. He is currently employed as an aerial gunner with the USDA
Wildlife Services.
Taylor Holman and Cody Es-
pinoza were married September 8,
2012, in the LDS temple in Salt
Lake City, Utah.
The couple’s parents are Terry
and Dave Holman, Philip, S.D.,
Wendi Mills, Heber City, Utah,
and Richard and Lynnie Espinoza,
Charleston, Utah.
Taylor’s bridesmaids were
Randi Holmes (sister) of Lehi,
Utah, Marissa Mann (friend) of
Philip, Jordin Bybee (cousin) of
Gila Bend, Ariz., Jenae Clawson
(cousin) of Salt Lake City, Utah,
Deejay Espinoza (sister-in-law) of
Heber City, Utah, and Brandee
Ostler (sister-in-law) of Provo,
Utah.
Cody’s groomsmen were JD Es-
pinoza (brother) of Springville,
Utah, Parker Cummings (cousin)
of Heber City, Utah, Colby Hyde
(friend) of Cedar City, Utah, Ben
Ostler (brother-in-law) of Provo,
Utah, Chris Holmes (brother-in-
law) of Lehi, Utah and Nelson Hol-
man (brother-in-law) of Philip.
Special guests were Ron, Laurie
and Lindsay Mann, Tara Ravel-
lette, Mariah Heaton, Andrea Car-
ley (bride’s hairdresser) and her
daughter, Millie.
Photography was done by Shan-
non Kaeding of Saint George,
Utah.
On the evening of the wedding,
a reception and dance were held in
Charleston, Utah, and on Novem-
ber 24, an open house wedding
celebration will be held in Philip
(please see newspaper ad for de-
tails).
Taylor and Cody spent their
honeymoon in Cancun, Mexico,
and now make their home in Ari-
zona.
c Holman ~ Espinoza c
by U.S. Representative
Kristi Noem
The final months of every year
are full of annual traditions that
bring family and friends together.
These events serve as a good re-
minder to pause and be thankful
for one another, our friends, family
and country.
I’m thankful for the opportunity
to see my children grow. When I
look at Kassidy, Kennedy and
Booker, I am continually amazed
by the strong young individuals
they are turning out to be. It’s been
different around the Noem house
with Kassidy away at college,
which makes me appreciate the
time we have together as a family
even more.
Here in South Dakota, we have
so much to be thankful for. In the
face of a severe drought, our state’s
economy has managed to stay
strong. Due to the perseverance
and determination of South Dakota
families and small businesses, our
state continues to lead the way to-
wards long lasting economic stabil-
ity.
We should also give thanks for
our great country. All too often,
people across the world are perse-
cuted for their political beliefs or
the religion they adhere to. It’s
hard to believe that the freedoms
we enjoy in the United States that
are so fundamental to our way of
life are unthinkable elsewhere in
the world. I am thankful for the
men and women who have fear-
lessly fought to defend these free-
doms and for those who will con-
tinue to answer the call to defend
our nation into the future.
While many of us may celebrate
in warm homes this holiday sea-
son, I encourage South Dakotans to
also give back to those who are less
fortunate. Many communities
across the state have volunteer op-
portunities for individuals and
families to lend a helping hand to
those in need in the upcoming
weeks.
So whatever the family tradition
is this Thanksgiving, I hope South
Dakotans will take the time to re-
flect on all there is to be thankful
for.
Giving thanks
The Philip Ambulance
Service
EMT Classes
will start
Dec. 5th
for more info call
Don Weller - 685-4423
or Dodi Weller - 685-3131
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2000 Ford F-250
2WD, V-10, Flatbed, Clean & Nice!!
www.philipmotor.com
Stop in & see Colt today!!
The Perfect Gift!
Here’s a gi that says
“Merry Christmas” every week of the year!
Order a gi subscription to one of our
newspapers and just before Christmas, we’ll send the
recipient a card announcing your gi and start the
subscription with the holiday issue of December 20.
Buy or renew as many subscriptions as you like.
It’s the “Perfect Gi.”
$5.00 OFF EACH SUBSCRIPTION OF (2) OR MORE NEW
SUBS OR RENEWALS PURCHASED!
Pioneer Review ($36 + tax local) ($42 out of area)
(605) 859-2516 • PO Box 788, Philip, SD 57567
IncIudes Tax
A PubIIcatIon oI RaveIIette PubIIcatIons, Inc., PbIIIp, Soutb Dakota S?S6?. Tbe OIIIcIaI Newspaper oI Haakon County, Soutb Dakota. CopyrIgbt 19S1.
Number 12
volume 107
November 15, 2012
Market Report
winter wheat, 12 Pro ..........$8.30
Any Pro .............................$7.30
Milo .......................................$6.49
Corn.......................................$6.64
Millet...................................$30.00
3unflower 3eeds................$21.50 llag
presenta-
tion
2
Pearson 40
years with
3ootohmans
10
P¬3 wins
aoademio
ohallenge
9
lridge
Uoor
14
Eut you'rc in our hcarts. Thank you for your
busincss. Hopc you havc much to bc thankful
for this Thanksgiving.
From all of os at
Tbe Pioneer Review & Profit
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fho µrInfIng of bnIIofs, µrogrnm-
mIng fho cnrds for fho Aufomnrk
nnd Ml00 vofIng mnchInos nnd
wngos for fho oIocfIon workors.
Thoro woro 22 workors covorIng
fho sIx dIfforonf µrocIncfs for fho l2
hours fhnf fho µoIIs woro oµon.
Though fho fwo µrocIncfs wIfh vof-
Ing IocnfIons In fho courfhouso dId
nof roquIro ronf, fho ofhor four dId.
Tho MIdInnd IIro HnII, Ðooµ Crook
Church, MIIosvIIIo HnII nnd
IhIIIµ`s Ind !Ivor SonIor CIfIzon`s
Confor onch rocoIvod $35 for ronf
for fho oIocfIon.
0eneral electlon results now offlclal
1he 73- 3aloon's annual wild game feed was held lriday, November 9, the
evening before the opening of west River deer season. 1his year's orowd was the
largest so far, ¨probably beoause people were hearing how good it was," said
LouAnn Reokling, the main oook of the orew that annually provides the various
dishes. 1he smorgasbord fare inoluded turkey, pheasant shish kebabs, elk oasse-
role, and other seleotions, though this year there was no turtle soup.
Annual wlld game feed
by Nuncy HuIgL
Tho Hnnkon Counfy commIssIon-
ors, nf fhoIr Þovombor 8 moofIng,
IIffod fho burn bnn ImµIomonfod
Insf summor.
Tho bonrd urgod rosIdonfs fo sfIII
fnko cnufIon whon burnIng ns con-
dIfIons nro sfIII oxfromoIy dry.
CommIssIonor !Ifn O`ConnoII
nnnouncod fhnf sho wIII sfoµ down
from fho commIssIon. Sho wIII bo
movIng ouf of hor dIsfrIcf. Tho com-
mIssIon roquosfs fhnf nnyono who
mny wIsh fo fIII fho sonf from ÐIs-
frIcf 3 µIonso cnII fhom.
ÐIrocfor of IqunIIznfIon TonI
!hodos gnvo nn uµdnfo on growfh
fIguros for fho counfy. Sho nIso ox-
µInInod how fho cIfy of IhIIIµ`s now
fnxIng ordInnnco nffocfs fho
counfy`s growfh fIguros. InsIcnIIy,
nny sfrucfuro buIIf wIfhIn fho cIfy`s
IImIfs cnn onIy bo fnxod on 20 µor-
conf of Ifs vnIuo for fho fIrsf yonr,
workIng uµ fo l00 µorconf nf fIvo
yonrs fImo. Two now sfrucfuros,
ono homo nnd ono busInoss, nro nf-
focfod.
!hodos nofod fhnf Sngo Informn-
fIon SorvIcos, CIon IIIon, CnIIf.,
hns rosµondod bnck rognrdIng fho
commIssIon`s docIsIon fo nof µro-
vIdo fho comµnny wIfh fho µubIIc
InformnfIon from fho oqunIIznfIon
offIco. Tho commIssIon, nnd
Hnnkon Counfy rosIdonfs, sfnfod
fhnf fho comµnny couId como nnd
coµy fho mnforInI fhomsoIvos If so
dosIrod, buf fhoy dId nof fooI fhnf
!hodos noodod fo sµond counfy
fImo coµyIng nnd mnIIIng fho Infor-
mnfIon.
Tho comµnny`s Ioffor sfnfod fhnf
nccordIng fo Inw If n comµnny ro-
quosfs fho InformnfIon vIn oIoc-
fronIc monns, fho counfy musf sond
If In fhnf mnnnor. Tho commIssIon
roquosfod !hodos sµonk wIfh
Hnnkon Counfy Sfnfo`s Affornoy
Cny ToIIofson rognrdIng fho Inws.
Tho comµnny Is sookIng nII Infor-
mnfIon nbouf Innd In fho counfy
whIch IncIudos, fho µroµorfy ns-
sossmonf, IognI doscrIµfIon, num-
bor of ncros, buIIdIngs nnd ownor`s
nnmo.
Konny ÞovIIIo, hIghwny suµorIn-
fondonf, dIscussod rosIdIng nnd
now wIndows for fho frnIIor nf fho
!obbs IInf IocnfIon. ÐIfforonf sId-
Ing oµfIons woro dIscussod nnd
ÞovIIIo wIII gof quofos on somo of
fhom.
ÞovIIIo wns gIvon fho go-nhond
fo ndvorfIso for nn omµIoyoo. Ho
nofod fhnf fwo mon nro µInnnIng fo
rofIro noxf yonr, ono In Mny nnd
ono In Soµfombor.
ÞovIIIo nofod fhnf hIs doµnrf-
monf Is µuffIng In now cuIvorfs nnd
grnvoIIng shorf sfrofchos of ronds.
A suµµIomonfnI honrIng wns nµ-
µrovod fo ndd $l8,000 fo fho jnII
fund nnd $5,000 fo fho monfnIIy III
fund.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod Tronsuror
InffI !hodo`s roquosf fo uso 20l2
funds fo µurchnso n comµufor for
hor offIco. Tho µurchnso wns bud-
gofod for In fho 20l3 budgof, buf
!hodos snId sho hnd onough funds
fo µurchnso ono fhIs yonr, nnd fhon
µurchnso nnofhor comµufor In 20l3
for fho doµufy fronsuror. Tho com-
mIssIon nµµrovod fho roquosf.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod fho Ocfobor
2, 20l2 moofIng mInufos nnd fho
wnrrnnfs for fho µnsf monfh. Thoy
nµµrovod for counfy omµIoyoos fo
hnvo IrIdny, Þovombor 23 nnd Ðo-
combor 24 off ns ndmInIsfrnfIvo
Ionvo. Covornor ÐonnIs Ðnugnnrd
hnd nµµrovod fhoso for sfnfo om-
µIoyoos nnd fho counfy foIIows suIf.
Tho bonrd fnbIod dIscussIon nnd
ncfIon on fho roscIndIng of !osoIu-
fIon #2008-03. Tho rosoIufIon ouf-
IInod fho counfy µuffIng In nµ-
µronchos nnd nof drIvownys.
Hnnkon Counfy AudIfor Inf Iroo-
mnn sfnfod fhnf n sfnfo nudIfor
foId hor If shouId bo roscIndod ns
fho counfy shouId nof µrovIdo ovon
fho nµµronchos.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod VIrgII SmIfh
nnd n wood bonrd mombor fo nf-
fond n moofIng In IIorro, Þovom-
bor 8. Iy hnvIng fwo µooµIo nffond,
fho counfy Is oIIgIbIo for grnnf doI-
Inrs.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod n rnffIo ro-
quosf by MIko Mosos for n Com
Thonfro fundrnIsor. Tho nµµrovnI
In confIngonf on Mosos µrovIdIng
µnµors rognrdIng fho fhonfors non-
µrofIf sfnfus.
Tho commIssIon nIso snf ns fho
gonornI oIocfIon cnnvnss bonrd.
Thoy wonf ovor fho fofnI vofos In
onch µrocIncf nnd nµµrovod fho
counfs.
Tho bonrd onforod Info oxocufIvo
sossIon Thursdny mornIng for nµ-
µroxImnfoIy 90 mInufos fo conducf
doµufy shorIff InforvIows. Þo nc-
fIon wns fnkon foIIowIng fho sos-
sIon.
Tho commIssIon dIscussod fho
counfy`s rovIsod µorsonnoI hnnd-
book for fhroo nnd ono-hnIf hours
wIfh MnrIono Knufson, dIrocfor of
fho ConfrnI Soufh Ðnkofn In-
hnncomonf ÐIsfrIcf. Tho bonrd nµ-
µrovod fho hnndbook whIch wIII
fnko offocf Jnnunry 20l3.
Burn ban llfted for county, 0'connell reslgns 0ver 3,000 head slngle conslgnment
of yearllngs sold 1uesdayl
by Kuv!ee Buvnes
Muvdo Coyote
Tho Murdo Aron Chnmbor of
Commorco µnrfnorod wIfh Soufh
ConfrnI !osourco ConsorvnfIon
nnd ÐovoIoµmonf fo sµonsor n µub-
IIc moofIng Þovombor 5 fo dIscuss
Inndoqunfo housIng In smnII com-
munIfIos.
A µnnoI of sµonkors from fodornI,
sfnfo nnd IocnI ngoncIos wIfh hous-
Ing µrogrnms µrosonfod Informn-
fIon nnd InsIghfs on whnf com- mu-
nIfIos cnn do fo ovorcomo curronf
housIng Issuos. Thoy nIso dIscussod
wnys fo oncourngo com- munIfy Im-
µrovomonf fhrough µrogrnms such
ns InInf Soufh Ðnkofn.
Tho moofIng wns woII nffondod
by busInoss µooµIo, confrncfors nnd
mombors of fho communIfy, ns woII
ns rosIdonfs from surroundIng com-
munIfIos. Sµonkors IncIudod Mnrk
!nusong oxocufIvo dIrocfor for
fho Soufh Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoI-
oµmonf AufhorIfy, !ogor Jncobs
fIoId offIco dIrocfor for HousIng nnd
!rbnn ÐovoIoµmonf, Crog Hondor-
son oxocufIvo dIrocfor for IInn-
nIng nnd ÐovoIoµmonf ÐIsfrIcf III,
MnrIono Knufson oxocufIvo dIroc-
for for ConfrnI Soufh Ðnkofn In-
hnncomonf ÐIsfrIcf, InuIn Corco-
rnn Ionn sµocInIIsf from !urnI
ÐovoIoµmonf, IIII Hnnson !urnI
HousIng CoIInbornfIvo, nnd Joy
McCrnckon ÞoIghborWorks
Ðnkofn Homo !osourcos nnd
Ðnkofn !nnd Trusf.
!nusong µrosonfod housIng µro-
grnms offorod fhrough fho Soufh
Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf Au-
fhorIfy. Ho sµoko nbouf fho IIrsf-
TImo Homobuyor Irogrnm, fho
CommunIfy Homo Imµrovomonf
Irogrnm (CHII, fho HOMI Invosf-
monf InrfnorshIµs Irogrnm nnd
fho Covornor`s Houso Irogrnm, ns
woII ns fho µossIbIIIfy of n housIng
noods sfudy.
Thoso µrogrnms nro nII nvnIInbIo
fo nµµIIcnnfs who moof corfnIn
qunIIfIcnfIons sof by onch µrogrnm.
AII of fho µrogrnms nro dosIgnod fo
µrovIdo snfo, nffordnbIo housIng oµ-
µorfunIfIos fo Iow-Incomo or Iow-fo-
modornfo Incomo nµµIIcnnfs.
Moro InformnfIon cnn bo found
nbouf onch µrogrnm by cnIIIng l-
800-540-424l or vIsIfIng fho Soufh
Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf Au-
fhorIfy`s wobsIfo, www.sdhdn.org.
Jncobs foId nbouf µrogrnms of-
forod fhrough H!Ð, whIch cnn bo
found nf www.hud.gov, nnd ho nd-
drossod fho HousIng OµµorfunIfy
Iund.
AccordIng fo n fncf shoof wIfh
dnfn comµIIod by fho Soufh Ðnkofn
HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf AufhorIfy, n
HousIng OµµorfunIfy Iund wIII bo
n now sfnfo fund wIfh rovonuo dod-
Icnfod fo onnbIo Soufh Ðnkofn com-
munIfIos fo cronfo nnd µrosorvo
homos nffordnbIo fo hnrdworkIng
fnmIIIos, vofornns, µorsons wIfh
dIsnbIIIfIos, sonIors nnd ofhors. Jn-
8olvlng lnadequate houslng ln communltles
Members of the Philip oommunity attended the housing meeting in Murdo.
Photo by Karlee Barnes
oontinued on page 8
cobs snId fhnf Soufh Ðnkofn Is ono
of fhroo sfnfos fhnf curronfIy hns
no housIng frusf fund.
Tho nood for n HousIng Oµµor-
funIfy Iund wns oufIInod wIfh suµ-
µorfIng fncfs. Ono In sovon Soufh
Ðnkofnns fnII boIow fho µovorfy
rnfo. AIso, ronfs nro moro fhnn
mnny Soufh Ðnkofnns cnn nfford.
AccordIng fo fho fncf shoof, fho nv-
orngo H!Ð fnIr mnrkof ronf for n
fwo-bodroom nµnrfmonf In Soufh
Ðnkofn Is $556 µor monfh.
Ofhor fncfs suµµorfIng fho nood
for fho fund IncIudo ronfnI housIng
mnrkofs nro fIghf ns ovIdoncod by
Iow vncnncy rnfos, domnnd for
housIng oxcoods nssIsfnnco nvnII-
nbIo, fhoro Is n shorfngo In fundIng
fo dovoIoµ nffordnbIo housIng,
vouchors nro undorufIIIzod, somo
Soufh Ðnkofnns nro InckIng doconf
nnd snfo housIng, Soufh Ðnkofnns
nro sfruggIIng fo mnInfnIn n roof
ovor fhoIr hond.
An In-doµfh rovIow of fhoso fncfs
cnn bo roquosfod fhrough fho
Soufh Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµ-
monf AufhorIfy.
Hondorson sµoko of IrnIrIoInnd
HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf. IHÐ Is n
non-µrofIf orgnnIznfIon whoso
mnIn gonI Is fo suµµorf fho dovoI-
oµmonf of nffordnbIo housIng In fho
rogIon. Moro InformnfIon cnn bo
found nf www.dIsfrIcfIII.org. Hon-
dorson gnvo InsIghfs IncIudIng
Ionrn fo mnnngo oxµocfnfIons nnd
don`f ovor-ronch housIng. Ho cnu-
fIonod dovoIoµors fo bo nwnro of
fhoIr mnrkof, nnd fo gof commIf-
1he Lazy 3 Livestook Ranoh of Billings, Mont., brought over
3,000 head of yearling steers and heifers to Philip this past
week and sold 1uesday morning, November 13. 1he total head
oount was 3,052, oonsisting of both steers and heifers with the
average weight per head of 887 lbs. 1hey brought a little over
$1.40/lb. totaling $1,244 per head. 1his one oonsignment sale
grossed over $3,798,000.
1ruoks started bringing in the oattle lriday before the 1ues-
day sale, with 45 truoks delivering oattle to the yards. Philip
Livestook Auotion sold these yearlings along with other year-
lings and oalves during the regular sale that totaled over 7,500
head.
Read the oomplete report of representative sales for this
week on the baok page of 1he Pioneer Review.
ALL IN-STATE SUBSCRIPTIONS
ARE SUBJECT TO SALES TAX.
FIRST SUBSCRIPTION:
Name ______________________________
Address ____________________________
City________________________________
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SECOND SUBSCRIPTION:
Name ______________________________
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CALL (605) 859-2516 WITH CREDIT CARD PAYMENT INFORMATION
OR FOR ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE!
MAIL TO: Ravellette Publications, PO Box 788, Philip, SD 57567.
Receive $5.00 off each subscription of (2) or more renewals or new subscriptions!
Offer ends December 14, 2012. Clip & mail with your payment to the newspaper of your choice (above).
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
School & Community
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkLY SPECIAL:
Chimichanga & Tossed Salad
* * * * * *
SUNDAY SPECIAL:
Roast Beef
Mashed Potatoes, Salad Bar & Dessert
* * * * * *
Closed Thursday for Thanksgiving!
Have an enjoyable holiday!
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 • Philip
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing...........................30-14
Rockers................................26.5-17.5
Handrahan Const .....................23-21
Petersen’s..................................21-23
Dakota Bar................................17-27
Badland’s Auto....................14.5-29.5
Highlights:
Jason Petersen..............230, 237/661
Jim Kujawa...........................247/598
Neal Petersen....................3-10 split;
.............................209, 198 clean/601
Bryan Buxcel.........................235/593
Trina Brown..........................202/506
Marlis Petersen.....7-8 split; 176/485
Andrew Reckling...................222/551
Jackie Shull ..............3-6-7-8-10 split
Carl Brown .................3-10 split; 556
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................24-4
Kennedy Imp.............................18-10
Philip Motor..............................17-11
George’s Welding ......................15-13
G&A Trenching.........................10-18
Bear Auto..................................10-18
Philip Health Service ...........9.5-18.5
Kadoka Tree Service.............8.5-19.5
Highlights:
Cory Boyd..............225, 248, 202/675
Matt Schofield.............229 clean/592
Alvin Pearson..............3-7-8-10 split;
.............................206 clean, 211/583
Randy Boyd...........................214/581
Earl Park...............................206/579
Wendell Buxcel .....3-6-7 & 3-10 split
...............................................223/558
Fred Foland...........................205/551
Tony Gould ..........3-10 split; 201/540
Bill Stone ........3-6 & 7-10 splits; 517
Ronnie Williams...........................505
Todd Radway ........................235/500
Les Struble ...........................2-7 split
Norm Buxcel .......................5-10 split
Gene Jones.........3-10 & 3-7-10 splits
Ed Morrison........................3-10 split
Jerry Iron Moccasin ...........3-10 split
Dale O’Connell ..................4-5-7 split
Dakota Alfrey .....................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge...............................37-7
Bowling Belles ..........................25-19
Invisibles...................................24-20
State Farm................................23-21
Jolly Ranchers ..........................20-24
Highlights:
Judy Papousek ...............3-9-10 split;
...............................194, 163, 154/508
Charlene Kjerstad.................178/479
Donna King ...........................172/435
Sandra O’Connor ..................170/465
Shirley O’Connor ..................159/418
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................24-16
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................23.5-16.5
Wall Food Center......................22-18
Morrison’s Haying ..............20.5-19.5
Dorothy’s Catering ...................19-21
Hildebrand Concrete ..........17.5-22.5
First National Bank .................17-23
Just Tammy’s......................16.5-23.5
Highlights:
Amy Morrison .......................210/531
Cheryl Behrends ..........................157
Kalie Kjerstad..............................312
Christy Park..........................192/527
MaryLynn Crary ................4-10 split
Shar Moses ......................3-5-10 split
Brittney Drury .....................2-7 split
Kathy Gittings......................2-7 split
Annette Hand.......................2-7 split
Sandee Gittings..................9-10 split
Kathy Arthur........................4-5 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................21-7
Dakota Bar................................18-10
McDonnell Farms .....................14-14
O’Connell Const ........................14-14
WEE BADD...............................13-15
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................12-16
The Steakhouse ........................10-18
West River Pioneer Tanks .......10-18
Highlights:
Matt Schofield.......................230/578
Neal Petersen..............203 clean/553
Dean Schulz .................................203
Haven Hildebrand.............3-10 split;
...............................................202/536
Chad Walker ................................177
Steve McDonnell ..3-10 split x 2; 223
Doug Hauk...........3-10 split; 213/585
Jason Petersen.............................211
Jan Bielmaier ......3-10 split; 201/582
Jay McDonnell .............................547
Ronnie Coyle ................................545
Mike Moses ..................................540
John Heltzel .......3-7, 3-10, 4-7-9, 2-7
.........................................& 4-5 splits
Brian Pearson...............3-10 split x 4
Randy Boyd ...2-10, 4-5 & 3-10 splits
Wendell Buxcel...................3-10 split
Corky Thorson....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew...............................37-7
King Pins.............................27.5-16.5
Randy’s Spray Service..............22-22
Roy’s Repair ........................19.5-24.5
Lee and the Ladies ...................19-25
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Kristin Schmidt ....................139/402
Duane Hand..........................228/555
John Heltzel ........216 clean, 201/596
Ed Morrison .................................200
Lee Neville....................2-7 split; 179
Brian Pearson..............217 clean/618
Cory Boyd..............................212/586
Alvin Pearson........................202/559
Annette Hand...2-7-8 & 5-6-10 splits
Jerry Iron Moccasin..................5-7 &
...........................................3-10 splits
Tanner Norman............3-10 split x 2
Dorothy Hansen ...................2-7 split
The Philip High School band and choir Veterans Day concert was Tuesday, November 13. All branches of the armed forces
were honored. A flag ceremony was held. Under the direction of Barb Bowen, the band began with “Free World March,”
“The Black Eagles” and “Spirit of the Winds.” The story of each piece was related by Bowen. The choir then performed
“Come to the Music,” “Give Us Hope” and “American Anthem.” The band continued with “Spirit Endures” and “Armed Forces
- Pride of America.” Senior trumpet player Quade Slovek played “Taps.” As their military branch’s theme was played, flags
of the five branches of the United States military were displayed by an honor guard. Veterans in the audience stood and
were recognized, each receiving a lapel pin in honor of their service. The band concluded with “Thank You, Soldiers.” The
PHS select vocal ensemble sang “Starwatcher.” The full choir then performed “Sing, Sing, Sing” and “Can You Hear.” They
finished the evening by singing “Blades of Grass and Pure White Stones.” Photos by Del Bartels
Band and choir Veterans Day concert
During the Philip High School band
and choir Veterans Day concert, Tues-
day, November 13, the branches of
the armed forces were honored.
Shown, the full Philip High School choir performed six numbers during the Veter-
ans Day concert. A select vocal ensemble performed one piece. The band pre-
sented seven pieces, plus the anthem for each United States military branch.
“Taps” was also played as a trumpet solo.
Lexa Crowser – sophomore
Works hard in class. Asks when
she doesn't understand something.
Willing to help others who
have questions. Kind and
thoughtful to others.
Philip High School
November 2012 Students of the Month
Nathan Wooden Knife – freshman
Kind and respectful of others.
Organized and does quality work.
Makes good use of study hall time.
Helps others when they
struggle in class.
In honor of Veterans Day, school classes recited the Pledge of Allegiance at the
beginning of each day the school week of November 12-14. Family, Career and
Community Leaders of America sponsored a Red, White and Blue Day, Tuesday,
November 13, where students were encouraged to wear patriotic colors to school.
The best dressed in each grade kindergarten through 12th received a prize. Be-
fore and after the PHS Veterans Day concert, patriotic cupcakes and chances on
patriotic blankets were sold as a community service project by the band, choir
and FCCLA. Proceeds were given to the Wheeler-Brooks American Legion. Shown
taking their turn in the cupcake booth are, from left, Jordyn Dekker, Afton Burns
and Amanda McIlravy.
Photo by Del Bartels
Patriotic cupcakes for Legion
Jada Jones
7th
Conscientious. A
good student.
Willing to help
others. Respect-
ful. Uses time
wisely.
Riley Heltzel
8th
Good leader. En-
courages others.
Consistently gives
best effort. Sets
good example.
Respectful of
classmates.
Christine Womack
8th
Completes work
in timely manner.
Works to get
caught up after
absent. Uses
study time wisely.
Very polite.
Tristen Schofield
7th
Uses study hall
wisely. Polite
and cheerful.
Helpful toward
other students
Junior High School
November 2012
Students of the Month
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
School
PHS FCCLA at national meeting
The Philip chapter of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America attended the National FCCLA cluster meeting in
Oklahoma City, Okla., November 16-17. Some of highlights included motivational speakers and educational sessions. Mem-
bers Gavin Brucklacher, Tristen Rush, Blake Martinez, Nelson Holman and Garrett Snook competed in the FCCLA Knowledge
Bowl. The Philip chapter also made time to visit the the Oklahoma City Zoo. Joining Philip on the chartered bus were chapter
members from Sturgis, Bison and Scotland. Shown, back row, from left: Elliot Johnson (national FCCLA president from
Brookings), Tyana Gottsleben, Rush, Holman, Brucklacher, Martinez and James Fitzgerald. Front: Amanda McIlravy, Madison
Hand, Bailey Radway, Afton Burns, Katlin Knutson, Sam Stangle and Snook. Also attending were Philip FCCLA advisor
Brigitte Brucklacher and parent chaperone Deb Snook. Courtesy photo
The Philip FFA participated in
the District V Career Development
Events leadership contest in Lem-
mon, Monday, November 12.
“The kids did a great job at dis-
tricts, with most of the students
competing for the first time in their
contest area in the leadership
CDEs. It is normally won by senior
students with multiple years of
competition under their belt,” said
Philip FFA advisor Doug Hauk.
Job interview: Peyton DeJong –
6th, Justina Cvach – 7th.
Ag broadcasting: Thomas Doolit-
tle – 6th.
Public speaking: Katie Haigh –
5th.
Creed speaking: Grady Carley –
4th.
Extemporaneous speaking: Nick
Hamill – 4th, Gavin Snook – 9th.
Ag sales team: Ben Stangle,
Brock Hanson, Blake Puhlman and
Jade Berry – 4th.
Ag sales individual: Jade Berry –
5th, Ben Stangle – 8th.
First, second and third places are
eligible for state competition.
Nick Hamill and Ryan Van Tas-
sel were selected to the District V
FFA officer team serving all of
western South Dakota. Hamill will
serve as the 2013 vice president
and Van Tassel will serve as the
2013 sentinel. Their first officer
training workshop will be in Janu-
ary and they will host the FFA Leg-
islative Breakfast the following
morning. The students will also
serve on state convention commit-
tees at at the South Dakota State
Fair, Black Hills Stock Show, FFA
leadership camps and District V
CDE events.
Students applying for district of-
fice present written applications
with resumes, must have a confi-
dential letter of recommendation
from the advisor and then go
through a interview process with
the selection committee made up of
state FFA officers.
Above, Philip FFA students who com-
peted at the District V FFA CDEs. Back
row, from left: Katie Haigh, Jade Berry,
Nick Hamill, Blake Puhlman and Ryan
Van Tassel. Front: Brock Hanson, Pey-
ton DeJong and Justina Cvach. Not pic-
tured: Thomas Doolittle, Grady Carley,
Gavin Snook and Ben Stangle.
Courtesy photos
Philip FFA at District V in Lemmon
Shown second from the left, Nick Hamill was selected as District V FFA vice pres-
ident for 2013. Ryan Van Tassel, far right, was selected as sentinel. Other officers,
from left, are Kaden Eisenbraun, Wall – president, Jennifer Emery, Wall – secre-
tary, Brad Karl, Newell – treasurer, and Miranda Mullen, Sturgis – reporter.
Members of the Philip FFA chap-
ter, led by advisor Doug Hauk, are
using 2012-2013 FFA handbooks
donated by Farm Credit Services of
America.
The handbooks provide back-
ground information on FFA activi-
ties, benefits and opportunities. In
addition to the handbooks, FSC
America also provided Hauk with
the advisor’s guide, which contains
lesson plans, teaching ideas, trans-
parency masters, handouts,
quizzes and games.
“Farm Credit Services of Amer-
ica is pleased to make this invest-
ment in the youth of tomorrow’s
agriculture,” stated Doug Theel,
vice president of the Rapid City
marketplace. “The future of agri-
culture lies within its youth. That
is why Farm Credit Services of
America is so heavily involved in
FFA, 4-H and other local, state and
national agricultural youth pro-
grams.”
FFA handbooks donated by FCS
stead of making the choice to step
in or get help, and Kyle died.
Whipps said that each Philip stu-
dent will someday be in a situation
“when you know in your gut some-
thing is off, something is wrong. I’ll
guarantee, at some point in your
life, you will have to make a
choice.”
She understands that challeng-
ing friendships is hard. “As I travel
across the United States, I am
learning that friends don’t tell ... a
code of silence ... a friends-don’t-tell
pact. What I’m challenging is stu-
dents to be more than a friend, be
a selfish friend, to do something.
We have a choice, if you will face
the choice,” said Whipps. One of
her short videos exclaimed, “Live
together or die alone,” and “We
stay silent and the silence wins.”
Whipps told of a young woman
whose best friend broke that code
of silence and warned the parents
of a suicide attempt. The woman
was saved and is now daily thank-
ful that the silence was broken.
“She had a lot to live for. She just
lost sight of that for a short time,”
said Whipps.
Whipps concluded, “You have a
staff that cares about you. They got
a lady to come all the way from
Oregon to talk to you about danger-
ous choices.”
Another assembly by Dakota As-
semblies, this time geared for the
elementary and the general public,
will be Thursday, November 29, at
8:20 a.m. in the Fine Arts Building,
According to promotional material,
Paul Imholte’s goal is to increase
awareness of not only music, but
the great variety of stringed instru-
ments. He uses humor and encour-
ages the audience to move in uni-
son with the music. He plays such
instruments as the hammered and
mountain dulcimers, mandolin,
jaw harp and autoharp.
Just One Time school assembly
continued from page 2
oontinued on page 11
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, November 22, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 10
Notice of Meeting
The annual meeting of the Tri-County
Predator District will be held Tuesday,
December 4, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at The
Steakhouse in Philip, S.D.
[Published November 15, 22 & 29, 2012,
at the total approximate cost of $8.45]
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON
APPLICATION
TO RENEW
LIQUOR LICENSES
Notice is hereby given that a public hear-
ing will be held before the Philip City
Council at its regular meeting on Mon-
day, December 3, 2012, at 7:15 p.m., or
as soon after that hour as practical, in the
Community Room of the Haakon Co.
Courthouse. Hearing will be held on the
applications listed below for liquor li-
censes in the City of Philip, South
Dakota, for the year beginning January
1, 2013.
73 Bar & Lounge, BMT, Ìnc. ÷
Lots 12 & 13, Block 06, Origi-
nal Town, City of Philip, SD;
On Sale Liquor w/Sunday On-
Sale privilege.
Dakota Bar, Jason or Marlis
Petersen ÷ Located at Lot 08,
Block 03, Original Town, City
of Philip, SD; On-Sale Liquor
Jones' Saddlery, Bottle & Vet,
Ìrvin or Alice Jones ÷ N 19' of
Lot 19, Block 06, Original
Town, City of Philip, SD; Off
Sale Liquor
The Ìncorporated Steakhouse
and Lounge, Gerald Carley -
Lots 16 & 17, Block 06, Origi-
nal Town, City of Philip, SD:
On/Off Sale Liquor w/Sunday
On-Sale privilege.
Zeeb Pharmacy, Ìnc. ÷ Lot 20,
Block 06, Original Town, City
of Philip, SD; Off Sale Liquor
Any interested person may appear and
will be given an opportunity to be heard
either for or against approval of any or all
of the above listed applications.
Monna Van Lint
City Finance Officer
[Published November 22, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $27.44]
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON
REQUEST FOR
VARIANCE
Notice is hereby given that a public hear-
ing will be held at 7:20 p.m. at the regular
meeting of the Philip City Council on De-
cember 3, 2012, in the Community Room
of the Haakon County Courthouse on the
application of Mike and Debbie Miller for
a variance to the 1997 Uniform Fire Code
as adopted, and more specifically Article
82 Liquefied Petroleum Gases, Section
8204.3 Container Location Require-
ments.
Application has been made for a five and
one-half (5½') variance to the public way
and property line distance requirements
of ten feet (10') on the north side of the
N50' of the E150' of Lot 01, Block 03,
Russell's Addition, City of Philip, Haakon
Co., South Dakota, for the placement of
a 250 gallon propane tank.
The propane tank's "point of transfer¨ will
be located ten feet (10') north of the
house; four and one-half feet (4½') from
the inner edge of the sidewalk; and, four-
teen feet (14') from the street curb.
All interested persons may appear at the
public hearing and show cause why the
variance should be approved or rejected.
Monna Van Lint
Finance Officer
[Published November 22, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $14.44]
Proceedings of
West River Water
DeveIopment District
October 11, 2012
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Of-
fice in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph
Hieb called the meeting to order at 10:27
a.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: Review FY
2013 Tax Levy
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Krogman, seconded by Director Smith to
approve the agenda with additions. Mo-
tion carried unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the September 20, 2012, meeting were
previously mailed to the Board for their
review. Motion by Director Prokop, sec-
onded by Director Matt to approve the
September minutes. Motion carried
unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BÌLLS: Joseph
Hieb - $56.61, Casey Krogman - $56.61,
Marion Matt - $56.61, Veryl Prokop -
$56.61, Lorne Smith - $56.61, West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS - $1,000.00, Ìn-
ternal Revenue Service - $95.76. Motion
by Director Matt, seconded by Director
Smith to approve the District bills. Motion
carried unanimously.
B. DÌSTRÌCT FÌNANCÌAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the September Finan-
cial Report is on file at the District office
in Murdo. Motion by Director Prokop,
seconded by Director Smith to approve
the September Financial Report. Motion
carried unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his October report
to the Board. Motion by Director Krog-
man, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the Manager's Report. Motion
carried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
REVIEW FY 2013 TAX LEVY: We re-
ceived the individual county tax levies
from the Department of Revenue for the
FY 2013 Tax Resolution and the Board
reviewed the numbers.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:33 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
/s/Kati Venard, Recording Secretary
/s/Joseph Hieb, Chairman
[Published Novedmber 22, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $26.00]
Proceedings of the
Town of MidIand
November 13, 2012
The Town Board of the Town of Midland
met on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at
7:00 PM in the Town Hall with the follow-
ing members present: Diana Baeza,
Jared Fosheim, Rock Gillaspie, Finance
Officer Michelle Meinzer and Utilities Op-
erator Lawrence Stroppel.
Also present: Kent and Helen Mauck,
Brenda Jensen and Marlene Knutson.
Minutes of the October 9, 2012, meeting
were read and approved as published.
Board received two bids for the five-year
contract for garbage collection. One bid
was from Heartland Waste Management
for $18.00/per resident per month and
the other from Walker Refuse for
$24.95/per resident per month. Fosheim
made a motion, second by Gillaspie to
accept the bid from Heartland Waste.
New garbage fee beginning in 2013 will
be $22.00 plus tax with $4.00 of this fee
going toward upkeep of the Restricted
Use Solid Waste Facility.
Marlene Knutson, representing Central
South Dakota Enhancement District, met
with the Board to discuss the services
that they offer to the Town of Midland with
our membership. Highlights of what Mar-
lene discussed were applying for grants,
Governor's homes and the previous work
done on updating the Town of Midland's
Ordinances.
Hearing was held on the renewal of the
Town of Midland's liquor licenses. No one
opposed these renewals. Fosheim made
a motion, second by Gillaspie to approve
the renewal of these licenses.
Discussed results of referendum ques-
tions put to a vote during recent election.
On the renewal of off-sale Alcoholic Bev-
erage License for the Town of Midland 59
voted yes and 20 voted no. On the re-
newal of on-sale Alcoholic Beverage Li-
cense 60 voted yes and 20 voted no. The
Town of Midland will not exit the Munici-
pal Liquor License Business. On Novem-
ber 8, 2012, the ballots were canvassed
by Edward Briggs, Stephen Clements,
Gary Snook, Nicholas Konst and Rita
O'Connell, who made up the County
Board of Canvassers in Haakon County
for the General Election. Thank you to all
who helped with this election! Our next
election will be held on April 9, 2013, for
a three-year term as Trustee.
Complaints have been received about
people not obeying the speed limit on
Northwestern Avenue. Haakon County
Sheriff Fred Koester will be contacted to
aid in correcting this issue.
Utilities Operator gave his report. We dis-
cussed water meters, backup sewer gen-
erator project, tractor repairs, boring of
water line, restricted use site and also
discussed responsibility for water meters.
Residents are responsible for repairing
and replacing their water meters if dam-
age is done by resident's negligence.
Discussed Stroppel attending classes in
Pierre in January in order to attain his re-
quired contact hours as required for his
certifications. Discussed report from SD
DENR Drinking Water Program regard-
ing the recent inspection. Congratula-
tions to Stroppel for his one year
anniversary at the Town of Midland!
Finance Officer plans on attending Elec-
tion School in Pierre on December 6,
2012.
Discussed renewal of Town of Midland's
insurance with South Dakota Public As-
surance Alliance.
A motion was made by Fosheim, second
by Gillaspie to pay the following claims:
Armstrong Extinguisher Service, Main-
tenance......................................78.00
Paula Duncan, Water Deposit
Refund.......................................28.54
Banyon Data System, Annual
Support....................................770.00
Lawrence Stroppel, Wages......1,885.07
Lawrence Stroppel, Ìnsurance, Phone,
Vehicle.....................................500.00
Michelle Meinzer, Wages, Phone, Sup-
plies.........................................649.56
Electronic Federal Tax Payment, Em-
ployee Tax ...............................776.28
Ernie's LLC, Supplies..................185.53
G & A Trenching, Repairs ...........945.00
Golden West, Phone/Ìnternet......140.37
Haakon County Abstract, Laminated
Map............................................11.00
HD Supply Waterworks,
Supplies...................................803.72
Heartland Waste Management, Refuse
Service ....................................960.00
McLeod's Printing, Supplies..........13.64
Mid-American Research Chemical,
Supplies...................................468.55
Marshall Lawn Ìrrigation, Winterization
Sprinkler System.......................75.00
Midland Food & Fuel, Fuel..........412.02
Pioneer Review, Publications .......58.80
Postmaster, Stamps......................90.00
SD Municipal League, Annual
Dues ........................................113.35
SD Assn. of Code Enforcement, Mem-
bership.......................................40.00
SD Governmental Finance Officers'
Assn., Membership....................40.00
SD Governmental Human Resources
Assn., Dues...............................25.00
SD Municipal Liquor Control Assn.,
Dues..........................................25.00
SD Municipal Street Maintenance
Assn., Dues...............................35.00
SD Municipal League, Election Work-
shop...........................................20.00
SD One Call, Message Fee ............1.11
SD Retirement System,
Retirement...............................297.60
SD State Treasurer, Sales Tax......76.80
SD Workers' Comp. Fund, Workers'
Compensation .........................951.00
USA Bluebook, Supplies..........1,278.35
West Central Electric, Electric
Supply ..................................1,042.88
WR/LJ Rural Water, Water
Supply ..................................1,073.75
There being no further business to come
before the board, the meeting adjourned.
Diana Baeza, President
Michelle M Meinzer, Finance Officer
[Published November 22, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $61.41]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
REGULAR SESSION
NOVEMBER 8, 2012
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 10:00 AM on Thursday,
November 8, 2012. A quorum was estab-
lished with Chairman Edward Briggs,
Vice Chairman Stephen Clements, Mem-
bers Rita O'Connell, Gary Snook and
Nicholas Konst in attendance. Auditor
Pat Freeman, Deputy Auditor Carla
Smith, Sheriff Fred Koester, Highway Su-
perintendent Kenny Neville, Highway Ad-
ministrative Secretary Val Williams,
Treasurer Patti Rhodes, Director of
Equalization Toni Rhodes, SD Enhance-
ment Director Marlene Knutson and Pio-
neer Review Representative Nancy
Haigh were also present.
The agenda had two cancellations of ap-
pointments. At this time, the vendors
were reviewed for payment.
The Vendor Warrants were presented
for October Expenses paid in November
2012:
COMMISSIONERS
Alert Magazine, LLC, Professional
Fee .........................................170.00
Central Enhancement, Annual Dues &
Membership Fees ...............5,579.76
CNA Surety, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ..........................................269.22
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Publishing...595.54
SDACC, Annual Dues & Membership
Fees .......................................771.18
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ..........................................142.30
United States Treasury, Due For
2009 ....................................1,162.06
8,690.06
ELECTION
Kay Ainslie, Salaries ...................144.00
Bad River Senior Citizen, Misc
Exp ...........................................35.00
Diana Baeza, Salaries ..................29.75
Diana Baeza, Travel .....................19.24
Joan K Bessette, Salaries ..........339.50
Pauline Bruce, Salaries ..............110.50
Pauline Bruce, Travel .....................7.40
Lenore Brucklacher, Salaries .....135.50
Lenore Brucklacher, Travel ............4.44
Mary J Buffalo-Harrell, Salaries...137.63
Mary J Buffalo-Harrell, Travel .......35.52
Century Business Leasing Ìnc, Copier
Usage .....................................172.98
Shirley Chin, Salaries .................144.00
Deep Creek Church, Misc Exp .....35.00
Etta M Erdmann, Salaries ..........144.00
Election Systems/Software Ìnc, Sup-
plies ........................................429.30
Arlyce Griesel, Salaries ..............144.00
Arlyce Griesel, Travel ...................41.44
Patricia Hanrahan, Salaries ........110.50
Patricia Hanrahan, Travel .............11.10
Faye Hauk, Salaries .....................29.75
Gene Hudson, Salaries ..............152.50
Gene Hudson, Travel ...................88.80
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies ............6.49
Hallie Konst, Salaries ...................57.38
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies .................................360.00
Milesville Hall, Misc Exp ...............35.00
Annabel E Moses, Salaries ........110.50
Peggy Parsons, Salaries ............135.50
Peggy Parsons, Travel .................62.16
E Joann Pearson, Salaries .........110.50
E Joann Pearson, Travel ................1.48
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Publishing...809.44
Gayla Piroutek, Supplies ................5.00
Lola Roseth, Salaries .................110.50
Lola Roseth, Travel ........................6.66
Gayle M Rush, Salaries .............144.00
Donna Staben, Salaries .............135.50
Donna Staben, Travel ..................31.82
Elaine Thennis, Salaries .............119.00
Phillis Thorson, Salaries .............110.50
Phillis Thorson, Travel ....................1.48
4,854.76
COURTS
SDACC, Court CLERP Legal Ìns
Exp ......................................1,322.95
1,322.95
AUDITOR
Coyle's SuperValu, Auditor
Supplies ...................................13.92
First National Bank, FNB BCBS Wire
Trans Fee .................................10.00
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................183.24
SDACO, Annual Dues & Membership
Fees .......................................220.20
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ............................................28.47
Haakon County Treasurer,
Postage ..................................142.10
597.93
TREASURER
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................101.12
Mcleod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies .................................343.31
Quill Corporation, Supplies ........178.40
HCS, Repairs & Maint ................293.00
SDACO, Annual Dues & Membership
Dues .......................................220.20
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ............................................28.47
Haakon County Treasurer,
Postage ......................................2.12
1,166.62
STATE'S ATTORNEY
Lori Grode, Transcription/Discovery
Compli ....................................100.80
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ............................................71.62
Tollefson Law Office, Office
Rent .......................................150.00
Tollefson Law Office, St Atty
Telephone ................................75.00
Tollefson Law Office, Misc/Postage/
Etc ............................................45.00
442.42
COURT APPOINTED ATTORNEY
KSL Corp/Kevin S Lewis, Court Ap-
pointed Attorney .....................865.00
865.00
COURTHOUSE
City of Philip, Utilities ..................214.00
Coyle's SuperValu, Supplies ........44.85
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Fuel ............7,400.00
Heartland Paper Co, Supplies ......69.90
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies ..........34.75
Kone Ìnc, Professional Fees ......230.03
MG Oil Company, Supplies ............8.30
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........14.30
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ..........................................656.48
Servall Uniform, Supplies ...........300.94
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........70.00
West Central Electric, Utilities ..1,346.64
Triple XXX Spraying, Professional
Fees .......................................158.00
Triple XXX Spraying, Professional
Fees .......................................158.00
10,706.19
DIRECTOR OF EQUALIZATION
Century Business Leasing, Ìnc., Copier
Usage .......................................42.20
Coyle's Standard, Fuel .................37.00
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................120.54
Petersen's Variety, Supplies ...........5.98
Reliable Office Supplies,
Supplies .................................177.47
Toni Rhodes, Supplies ...................5.40
Toni Rhodes, Travel .......................7.67
SDAAO, Annual Dues & Membership
Fees .........................................55.00
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ..........................................310.34
761.60
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Golden West Tele Co, Tele. ...........98.56
Microfilm Ìmaging Systems Ìnc, Profes-
sional Fees .............................200.00
Microfilm Ìmaging Systems Ìnc, Monthly
Rent Scan Equip ....................200.00
PMB 0112, Prof Fees ...................99.42
PMB 0112, Supplies .....................48.78
SDACO, Annual Dues & Membership
Fees .......................................220.19
Haakon County Treasurer
Postage ....................................92.80
959.75
VETERANS SERVICE
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone .................................39.00
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ..........................................310.34
349.34
SHERIFF
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................83.73
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel .......145.88
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................137.48
Fred Koester, Fuel ........................50.00
MG Oil Company, Fuel ...............207.06
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........62.86
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Other
Expense .................................200.00
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns .......................................1,336.83
Haakon County Treasurer,
Postage ....................................45.00
2,268.84
JAIL
Winner Health Mart, Jail
Expenses .................................55.36
Winner Police Department, Jail Ex-
penses ................................5,950.00
6,005.36
HEALTH NURSE
Coyle's SuperValu, Health Nurse Sup-
plies ..........................................31.33
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ............................................28.47
59.80
MENTALLY ILL
Denise Cody, Prof Services ..........15.00
Lewis/Clark Behav Health Ser, Prof
Services .................................149.00
Lucy Lewno, Prof Services .........150.45
Pollard & Larson LLP, Prof
Services .................................170.00
Shepherd Reporting LLC, Prof
Services ...................................27.50
Karen Swanda, Prof Services ......15.00
526.95
LIBRARY
Annie Brunskill, Travel ................500.00
Annie Brunskill, Training .................8.08
DEMCO, Supplies ........................76.26
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ............................................85.38
669.72
EXTENSION SERVICE
Carrie Weller, Travel ...................132.38
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ................................57.58
Petersen's Variety, Supplies ...........4.50
Postmaster, PO Box Rent ............76.00
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ............................................28.47
Haakon County Treasurer,
Postage ....................................47.62
346.55
WEED CONTROL
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ..........................................238.72
Virgil Smith, Travel .....................100.27
Haakon County Treasurer,
Postage ......................................4.50
343.49
ROAD & BRIDGE
A&A Tire & Repair, Supplies .......889.95
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................48.87
Butler Machinery Co Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ...................................1,424.33
Dales Tire & Retreading Ìnc,
Supplies ..............................3,087.74
Deadwood Mountain Grand
Travel .....................................146.00
Fitzgerald's Oil Co Fuel ...........3,633.00
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities.....238.17
Hall Manufacturing Ìnc, Repairs & Maint
................................................141.17
Heartland Waste Management Ìnc, Utili-
ties ...........................................21.20
Kennedy Ìmplement & Auto Co, Repairs
& Maint .....................................35.51
Konst Machine, Repairs &
Maint ......................................453.58
Town of Midland, Utilities.............. 22.00
Morrison's Pit Stop, Repairs &
Maint ......................................248.00
NAPA, Repairs & Maint ................54.20
Kenny Neville, Travel ...................98.03
Philip Body Shop Repairs &
Maint ......................................283.40
Philip Motor, Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ........................................45.16
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns. ......................................8,359.78
Valarie Williams, Travel ................92.50
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities .......... 70.00
Walker Automotive, Repairs &
Maint ......................................595.50
West Central Electric, Utilities ....272.77
West River Water Develop Dist,
Utilities ...................................107.50
20,368.36
9-1-1
Centurylink, 911 ..........................113.40
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................491.48
604.88
EMERGENCY & DISASTER
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................101.26
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........57.11
Lola Roseth, Travel ....................153.18
SDML, Liability/Workman's Comp
Ìns ..........................................310.34
Western Communications Ìnc, Other
Expenses .................................50.00
671.89
COURTHOUSE
Brant's Electric Ìnc, Building
Fund .........................................78.74
Brant's Electric Ìnc, Building
Fund .......................................106.68
Cenex Harvest States, Building
Fund .........................................19.97
Ìngram Hardware, Building
Fund .......................................669.82
Ken's Refrigeration, Prof
Services ...................................83.47
Kennedy Ìmplement & Auto Co, Build-
ing Fund ...................................38.46
McQuirk Ditching, Building
Fund........................................629.41
Moses Building Center Ìnc, Building
Fund ....................................2,068.62
Kenny Neville, Building Fund .......49.14
Gary Snook, Building Fund ........100.62
West River Water Develop Dist, Build-
ing Fund ..............................8,133.63
11,978.56
Total Checks...........................74,561.02
A motion was made by Commissioner
Gary Snook, seconded with all in agree-
ment to approve the warrants..
At 10:28 AM, Commissioner Gary Snook
made a motion to go into executive ses-
sion on personnel issues concerning four
Haakon County Deputy position inter-
views. The motion was seconded with all
in agreement. At 11:49 AM, the commis-
sion came out of executive session with
no action taken. A motion was made and
seconded, with all in agreement to ad-
journ for lunch and to return at 1:00 PM
to reconvene.
At 1:14 PM, Chairman Edward Briggs
called the meeting to order.
Director of Equalization Toni Rhodes re-
ported to the commission that she had
completed her schooling for appraising.
She has been very busy getting caught
up on the new growth in the county. The
growth increases she reported to the
commission totaled $3,228,342 in
Haakon County. This will be considered
in 2013 payable in 2014.
The next topic DOE Toni Rhodes pre-
2012 GENERAL
ELECTION CANVASS
BOARD MEETING
The Haakon County Commissioners met
on Thursday, November 8, 2012, as the
2012 General Election Canvass Board at
5:00 PM. Those present at the meeting
were Chairman Edward Briggs, Vice
Chairman Steve Clements, Members Rita
O'Connell, Nicholas Konst and Gary
Snook. Also present were Auditor Pat
Freeman, Deputy Auditor Carla Smith,
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville,
Highway Secretary Val Williams and Pio-
neer Review Representative Nancy
Haigh.
The following election results were read
to all commissioners:
sons in charge of the election.
The meeting was adjourned at 5:50 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMÌSSÌON
Edward Briggs, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published November 22, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $134.61]
The amounts were read from the M-100
tape totals with each poll totaling zero
votes prior to the next precinct to be
counted, thus showing all totals were
cleared before each precinct count. All
numbers agreed and a motion was made
to sign the Certificate to be faxed to the
Secretary of State's Office certifying that
the foregoing is a true abstract of the
votes cast in the jurisdiction of Haakon
County, South Dakota, at the election as
shown by the returns certified to the per-
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, November 22, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
sented to the commission was a letter re-
ceived from the Sage Ìnformational Serv-
ices wanting an electronic copy of
Haakon County's appraised land. The
commission requested the States Attor-
ney, Gay Tollefson look at the letters re-
ceived by Director of Equalization Toni
Rhodes and Auditor Pat Freeman. A mo-
tion was made, seconded with all in
agreement, to table the matter until this
could be done.
Treasurer Patti Rhodes met with the
commission and asked for permission to
order a new computer for the Treasurer's
Office. Her computer is seven years old.
The funds are in her budget due to budg-
eting for a new deputy, assuming she
would take out all insurances. The new
deputy did not take insurance so there
will be extra money in their budget. Vice
Chairman Stephen Clements made a
motion. Ìt was seconded with all in agree-
ment to purchase the computer.
Vice Chairman Stephen Clements and
Commissioner Rita O'Connell reported
that the 4-H advisors position must be
filled with a qualified person with a de-
gree. There has been communications
with Jackson County in regards to how
the 4-H Program is working with only one
advisor for four counties. This will be dis-
cussed at a later date when more infor-
mation is available. A decision will need
to be made before the beginning of the
2013 year.
A Supplemental Hearing was held at
1:15 PM for (101-212) Jail Expenses for
$18,000.00 and for (101-441) Mentally Ìll
for $5,000.00. No one appeared at the
meeting. A motion was made by Com-
missioner Nicholas Konst, seconded by
Vice Chairman Stephen Clements, with
all in agreement to make the supple-
ments.
SD Enhancement Director Marlene Knut-
son came to finalize the Haakon County
Personnel Policy Manual. Every page
was reviewed with discussion on various
topics. We will now need a position de-
scription on each position. Auditor Free-
man has been keeping examples of
position descriptions as they come avail-
able. Each department head will be re-
quired to review the description and
make changes they feel is needed before
finalizing them. Ìt was also decided that
a policy would be established that a com-
missioner would be present when inter-
views are made with individuals applying
for county employment. Once the per-
sonnel policy manual is completed, each
employee will sign an employee's ac-
knowledgement of receipt of the em-
ployee manual and that it is their
responsibility to read and comply with the
policies contained in the manual and any
revisions to it. Chairman Ed Briggs, Com-
missioner Nick Konst, Highway Secre-
tary Valarie Williams and Auditor Pat
Freeman have met several times during
the past year with SD Enhancement Di-
rector Marlene Knutson to complete the
personnel policy manual. Commissioner
Nick Konst made a motion and Commis-
sioner Gary Snook seconded, with all in
agreement to approve the final revision
of the Haakon County Personnel Policy
Manual.
At 5:00 PM, the commission adjourned
the Regular Meeting to meet as the Can-
vass Board to canvass the votes of the
November 6, 2012, General Election.
At 5:55 PM, the Regular Meeting was
called to order. Highway Superintendent
Kenny Neville and Highway Secretary
Valerie Williams gave their monthly re-
port to the commission. Neville reported
that one of the new blades had the trans-
mission go out of it and that the differen-
tial was shot. Ìt is all under warranty. He
also reported that the engine in the green
pickup had blown up and that it had over
300,000 miles on it. He was not going to
repair it. There is money in the highway
budget to replace it with another good
used one.
The following October 2012 fuel bids
were submitted:
FUEL BÌDS:
Courthouse:
10-09-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.70 No. 2
10-09-12 Cenex...................$3.79 No. 2
Highway Dept:
10-24-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.58 No. 2
10-24-12 Cenex...................$3.73 No. 2
Superintendent Neville requested per-
mission to advertise for a new highway
worker as two of the men presently work-
ing had plans for retirement soon. The
commission also wanted the job put on
the State Jobs site.
There was discussion on how the Robbs
Flat Complex Site was coming along.
Commissioner Edward Briggs informed
the commission that he had brought in
the Bill of Sale for the used trailer house
and had given it to the treasurer. Other
discussion included some leaks had de-
veloped during the transfer but were
fixed. The trailer would be insured now
that it was anchored.
State Auditor Bruce Hintz had supplied
information for the commission to look at
concerning Resolution 2008-03 Haakon
County Private Drive Maintenance Pol-
icy. Ìt was motioned to table any discus-
sion until the state auditor could be
present at the December 4, 2012, meet-
ing.
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for the month of October
2012:
Commissioners Wages ............2,820.00
Auditor's Office.........................4,772.61
Treasurer's Office.....................4,772.61
State's Attorney's Office ...........3,468.34
Director of Equalization............2,733.89
Register of Deeds ....................2,999.81
Janitor ......................................1,989.04
Veteran's Office...........................810.00
Sheriff's Office..........................2,975.00
Highway Department ..............22,029.11
WÌC and Health Nurse Sec......1,089.92
Librarians .................................1,955.22
Extension Secretary....................819.92
Emergency Management ............918.85
Weed Supervisor.........................791.40
Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield .................................12,166.17
Special Ìnsurance Services......1,348.89
AFLAC, premium.........................577.92
SD Retirement System.............5,548.78
Delta Dental ................................609.70
Vision Service Plan .....................127.99
First National Bank, SS &
WH.....................................10,289.50
The monthly Veteran's report was re-
viewed by the commission.
The October 2, 2012, Regular Meeting
minutes were approved as read.
Commissioner Rita O'Connell requested
that the Burn Ban Resolution 2012-07 be
rescinded for this year. Vice Commis-
sioner Stephen Clements motioned to re-
scind the Burn Ban Resolution 2012-07.
Ìt was seconded with all in agreement.
Auditor Freeman put in a request for the
day after Thanksgiving and the day be-
fore Christmas to be given to the Haakon
County employees as the state employ-
ees were granted these days. A motion
was made by Commissioner Rita O'Con-
nell and seconded by Commissioner
Gary Snook with all in agreement.
The Commission was informed of a letter
received from (NRCS) Natural Re-
sources and Conservation Service re-
questing if the county had any cultural
resource concerns (historic places) that
they should be aware of before they
begin applying conservation practices.
The commission knew of no such place
within the county that was not already
listed.
Commissioner Edward Briggs signed off
on the incoming State Auditor Bruce
Hintz's letter stating Legislative Audit
would be auditing the 2010 and 2011
years for Haakon County. The audit is
done every two years.
The commission was informed of the dol-
lar amounts saved by Haakon County
residents who were using the NACO's
Prescription Discount Card. For 2011,
$1,582.82 had been saved.
Weed Supervisor Virgil Smith has re-
quested permission to attend the District
3 Weed Board meeting in Ft. Pierre, SD,
on November 8, 2012. This also included
another individual as two must attend the
meeting so that Haakon County is eligi-
ble for the yearly grant. A motion was
made by Vice Chairmen Stephen
Clements and seconded by Gary Snook
with all in agreement.
Auditor Freeman informed the commis-
sion of a company named (CRS) Correc-
tional Risk Services, Ìnc. that had sent a
letter explaining that their services
helped a county save money on inmate
medical expenses. There was some dis-
cussion with Sheriff Koester and he is
normally contacted if an inmate needed
any medications or medical attention. Ìt
has not been a problem for the county
yet. A motion was made, seconded with
all in agreement to table any decisions at
this time.
Mike Moses had requested that the Gem
Theatre would like approval on a raffle for
a "Children's Play House¨. He stated that
the Gem Theater is now officially a non-
profit organization and would supply the
paperwork, if it were requested. Vice
Chairman Stephen Clements motioned
to approve the raffle pending proper pa-
perwork was submitted.
Commissioner Nick Konst seconded the
motion with all in agreement.
The commission was informed by Auditor
Freeman that a company called Se-
cureTech Systems, Ìnc. had come by the
office to show their product, a wave wire-
less instant notification system. This
would strengthen the security within the
courthouse. There is a system already in
use. This one would cost $5,000 but
could be used at many more sites. An ex-
ample would be the courtroom, clerk of
courts office, treasurer's office, etc. Al-
though the modern technology would be
nice, at this time it is not justifiable.
The next regular session meeting will be
held on Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at
1:00 PM. The meeting was adjourned at
7:27 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMÌSSÌON Ed-
ward Briggs, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published November 22, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $245.62]
commlssloners
oontinued from page 10
Our communIfy sonds symµnfhy
fo Judy nnd TIm IIshoro nnd fnm-
IIy on fho donfh of Judy's mofhor,
!ooIn HnIvorson, who dIod Snfur-
dny In MIfchoII. IunornI sorvIcos
woro hoId Wodnosdny, fho 2lsf, In
IonosfooI.
!oy !osofh, ngo 96, of fho Ðooµ
Crook nron dIod Sundny, fho l8fh,
In fho Hnns I. Ioforson MomorInI
HosµIfnI In IhIIIµ. SorvIcos for hIm
woro nIso Wodnosdny, fho 2lsf, nf
fho Ðooµ Crook Church.
A IongfImo rosIdonf of fho Of-
fumwn nron, Wnndn Hoob, ngo 94,
dIod Snfurdny, Þovombor l?fh, nf
fho IhIIIµ ÞursIng Homo. Hor fu-
nornI wns Wodnosdny In IhIIIµ.
!nsf Wodnosdny, JudIfh Mc-
ÐnnIoI broughf InIIoy !ndwny nnd
Snmnnfhn Husfon fo MIfchoII
TochnIcnI InsfIfufo In MIfchoII for
'Scrubs Ðny.' ThIs Is n µrogrnm
sµonsorod by fho sfnfo of Soufh
Ðnkofn whoro fhoso Inforosfod In
fho modIcnI fIoId cnn rocoIvo moro
InformnfIon.
SovornI ICC!A mombors from
IhIIIµ HIgh SchooI woro In OkIn-
homn CIfy for cIusfor moofIngs
from Thursdny fhrough Sundny.
Thoso from MIIosvIIIo IncIudod InI-
Ioy !ndwny, Snm SfnngIo nnd
Jnmos IIfzgornId. InIIoy coIo-
brnfod hor l?fh bIrfhdny whIIo sho
wns gono.
Snfurdny, Mnrk nnd JudIfh !nd-
wny wonf fo !nµId CIfy fo soo fhoIr
gronf-nIoco, KondnI McÐnnIoI, µIny
In fho sfnfo voIIoybnII fournnmonf.
KondnI µInys for Abordoon ConfrnI.
Thnf nIghf, fhoy mof Cnry nnd
Sfncy ÐoIo for suµµor.
Chnd nnd Knfhy Hnnrnhnn nf-
fondod fho Sfnfo Inrm Iuronu
ConvonfIon In SµonrfIsh IrIdny
nnd Snfurdny.
CnyIn IIroufok Is sµondIng
nbouf n wook nnd n hnIf In
Muskogon, MIch., nf dnughfor,
Amy nnd Joo Hoguo's fnkIng cnro
of fho fwo IIffIo grnndsons.
Ðnrron nnd Knron Cobos nnd
fnmIIy of Hornco, Þ.Ð., nrrIvod nf
fho µnronfnI MIko nnd !Indn Cobos
homo Wodnosdny ovonIng. Thoy nf-
fondod fho woddIng of Knron's
brofhor In SfurgIs Snfurdny.
SµondIng fho wookond wIfh
Hugh nnd Ann Hnrfy woro InuI,
MonoIk nnd MIknoIn Sfoµhons,
IInck Hnwk, JIm, AdoIo, MoIIy nnd
Owon Hnrfy, nnd Id Hnrfy, hIs fI-
nncoo, Sfoµh Cooµor, nnd fhoIr son,
Cooµor.
Mnff nnd Murdock Arfhur nnd
Murdock's frIond, Cody, from
WyomIng, onjoyod suµµor on Snf-
urdny wIfh Iofh nnd Znno JoffrIos.
Iofh snId hor dnd, Ðonn Inrsons,
Is doIng µroffy woII In fho Cood
SnmnrIfnn Confor In Þow !ndor-
wood.
Wookond vIsIfors of CIon nnd
JnckIo !ndwny woro ÐnrIn, !onh,
Ðoncon nnd AInsIoy !Ios nnd Ðon-
nIs !Ios, IIorro. ÐnrIn nnd ÐonnIs
hnd n succossfuI hunf.
VIsIfors nf ÐonnIo nnd MnrcIn
Iymor's Mondny woro Shnron
CoyIo, dnughfor ConnIo nnd hor
frIond.
ÐonnIo nnd MnrcIn Iymor nf-
fondod fho !IffIo IrIfchos !odoo In
SµonrfIsh IrIdny. ThoIr grnnd-
dnughfor, IrIffnny Iymor, wns ono
of fho confosfnnfs.
Cnsoy !odor wns nIso n confosf-
nnf nf fho !IffIo IrIfchos !odoo
Snfurdny nnd Sundny. Cnsoy, who
IIvos wIfh Ðnvo nnd Tonyn Iorry,
comµofod In fho buII rIdIng.
IIA kIds from MIIosvIIIo who
wonf fo !ommon Insf Mondny for
dIsfrIcf comµofIfIon woro Jndo
Iorry, Ion SfnngIo nnd ÞIck
HnmIII.
IIII nnd KnryI SnndnI nnd InuI,
Ðonnn nnd TInn Sfnbon woro
nmong fhoso who nffondod fho
oµon houso Sundny nf !ush Iu-
nornI Homo. I'vo honrd fhnf If Is n
vory nIco fncIIIfy.
Irynn nnd Shnron OIIvIor woro
Snfurdny suµµor guosfs nf fho
homo of VIcfor nnd Joy !Imnchor.
Mondny, Irynn nnd Shnron wonf
fo IIorro fo hoIµ fhoIr son, TyIor,
coIobrnfo hIs bIrfhdny.
Joff nnd !nurIo Sovor nnd fhoIr
son, TyIor, wIfo JossIcn nnd dnugh-
for !oognn sµonf fho wookond In
fho nron. Somo of fhom woro door
hunfIng.
IrIdny, Mnrk SfnngIo wns In
IhIIIµ for n 4-H judgIng schooI.
AIso on IrIdny, Ion nnd Mnrk
SfnngIo nnd Crnco Iokron nf-
fondod n crnff workshoµ.
Ioyd nnd Knrn Inrsons' son-In-
Inw, ÐusfIn !Ischo, !odfIoId, nr-
rIvod Wodnosdny. IrIdny, AndI,
IrookIyn nnd Hudson cnmo for fho
wookond. JoInIng fhom woro IrIc,
KnyIn nnd KnIdyn InsfInn, IIorro,
Jonnno Inrsons, !nµId CIfy, nnd
Wndo, Mnrcy nnd kIds.
SµondIng µnrf of fho wookond nf
ÐonnIo nnd Ioboffo SchofIoId's
woro Iruco, Sonn nnd Iofo
Ðunkor, Sfovo Jonns, nnd Joff nnd
CrysfnI SchofIoId nnd boys.
!nnn IIshoro wonf fo !nIon
Confor IrIdny nffornoon fo wnfch
fhoIr grnndchIIdron µIny bnskof-
bnII. !yInn, Thnyno, KnmrI, TnIon
nnd Cnrfor woro nII µInyIng ns woII
ns JnycIo nnd Insfnn Wosf. Thoy
woro on fho snmo fonm ns Thnyno
nnd TnIon.
JIm IIshoro wns surµrIsod on
Snfurdny ovonIng whon !nnn
µInnnod n bIrfhdny µnrfy for hIm.
ComIng for suµµor nnd fho ovonIng
wns dnughfor, MIsfy Andorson,
nnd Crnco of Monfnnn, Cory nnd
Sfncy IIshoro nnd fnmIIy, InuI nnd
Joy IIshoro, Joff, !nurIo nnd TyIor
Sovor, Crog !nrson, !Ich ÐnnIoI-
son, Crog nnd Knfhy Arfhur nnd
Curf Arfhur.
Sundny ovonIng, fho Hnnkon
Counfy Croonors snng In fho
!ufhornn church In Kndokn for
fhoIr ThnnksgIvIng sorvIcos. InuI
Sfnbon, n mombor of fho Croonors,
Ðonnn nnd TInn nII nffondod.
Inf Hnnrnhnn vIsIfod fhoIr
dnughfor, TrncIo, In SIoux InIIs
from Snfurdny fhrough Mondny.
TrncIo wIII bo rocoIvIng hor mns-
fors dogroo In counsoIIng In fho
sµrIng.
Tho MIIosvIIIo !nngors 4-H CIub
mof Snfurdny, Þovombor l?, In
IIorro. Ior now busInoss, fho cIub
docIdod fo docornfo n ChrIsfmns
froo nf fho courfhouso In IhIIIµ on
Þovombor 28 nf 4:00 µ.m. Tho
mombors vofod fo hoId fhoIr nn-
nunI ChrIsfmns µnrfy nf !ock &
!oII !nnos Ðocombor ? nf 2:00 µ.m.
Ior fhoIr rocronfIon In IIorro, fho
mombors onjoyod µIzzn nnd doco-
rnfod n froo nf fho CnµIfoI. ThoIr
froo Is Iocnfod on fho Iowor IovoI,
nnd fhoy InvIfo MIIosvIIIo rosIdonfs
fo fInd If whon vIsIfIng fho CnµIfoI.
SuIni//eJ I,
Groce Pe/ron, repor/er
Hnµµy ThnnksgIvIng, ovoryono!
MIIesvIIIe News
by JanIce Parscns · S44-ßß1S
A Iong fImo ngo Insf summor, n
Indy mof uµ wIfh somo µooµIo In
IIorro who snId fhoy usod fo bo
from fho HIIInnd communIfy. Thoy
snId fhnf fhoIr nnmo wns ÐnvId.
sho cnIIod mo fo nsk If I romom-
borod fhom. I snId fhnf I hnd no
Idon who fhoy woro, so I cnIIod
!oso KIoI nnd sho romomborod
fhom. If wns sfnfod fhnf fhoy hnd
n dnughfor who n Iof of fho young
mon In fhIs nron, IIko MnrvIn KIoI
nnd !oron Thorson, fhoughf sho
wns fho µroffIosf gIrI fhoy hnd ovor
soon nnd hor nnmo wns IInIno. As
fhIs Indy novor gof fho Indy`s nnmo,
somo of us hnvo wondorod If If
couId hnvo boon IInIno sho fnIkod
fo fhnf dny.
You don`f hnvo fo go fnr fo run
Info somoono you know or who
cnmo from fho snmo communIfy ns
you.
KIofh nnd ÐobbIo SmIfh woro In
SIoux InIIs vIsIfIng fhoIr dnughfor,
CnssIdy, nnd fnmIIy Insf wookond.
VIckI IIdo nnd CIIff nnd !Ifn
!nmsoy woro In SµonrfIsh fhIs
wook vIsIfIng HnzoI Thomµson.
Thoy hnd dInnor wIfh hor In fho
dInIng nron whoro sho IIvos. Somo
ofhor fnmIIy mombors woro nIso
fhoro vIsIfIng nnd hnd dInnor wIfh
hor nIso. HnzoI onjoyod hor com-
µnny nnd wns gInd fo soo fhom nII.
Wo hnd n fnIrIy good bIIzznrd
horo fhIs µnsf wook nnd fho hIgh
wInds drIffod fho snow uµ In drIffs.
Wo musf hnvo hnd nbouf fhroo
Inchos nII foId.
I wns nof nbIo fo gof fo fho mnII-
box duo fo fho bnd vIsIbIIIfy. Iuf
wIfh wnrm fomµornfuros, If won`f
Insf Iong.
Tho wonfhor cIonrod nnd fho
ronds woro good so VIckI fook fho
grnndkIds, KIIoy nnd Tngonn
SIoIor, fo SµonrfIsh fo moof fhoIr
rIdo bnck fo CIIIoffo. Tho grnndkIds
hnd boon vIsIfIng horo for n fow
dnys nnd mIssod n dny of schooI
duo fo fho sform.
Horb nnd HnzoI SIoIor hnd n
scnry wook. HnzoI`s dnughfor,
Ðobrn, who IIvos In Toxns, hnd n
honrf nffnck nf fho ngo of 55 nnd
hnd fo hnvo fwo sfInfs µuf In. Sho
Is homo nnd doIng woII now. Sho
µInns fo joIn fnmIIy mombors,
nIong wIfh Horb nnd HnzoI, In
Knnsns for ThnnksgIvIng.
HnzoI foId mo fhnf hor son, nf
ngo 40, nIso hnd n honrf nffnck n
fow yonr ngo. Sho snId fhIs wns In-
horIfod from fhoIr fnfhor`s sIdo of
fho fnmIIy. ThIs Is whnf hor formor
husbnnd hnd µnssod nwny from
nIso.
Horb nnd HnzoI snId fhnf fhoy
hnd hunfors nf fhoIr µInco fhIs
wook. Jnck, n frIond from Wnfor-
fown, gof hIs fwo door nnd fwo
furkoys. MnrvIn CoIomnn`s grnnd-
chIIdron nIso fIIIod fhoIr fngs In
fhIs snmo nron.
I hnvo honrd fhnf hunfIng hns
boon good fhIs yonr. If wns nIso
good µhonsnnf hunfIng onrIIor. Our
hunfors hnd good Iuck horo.
Iob Thorson nnd hIs fInncoo,
JodI, nnd hor µnronfs, Id nnd
CIoon, wonf fo IhIIIµ Tuosdny
nIghf. JodI nnd hor foIks wonf fo
fho nursIng homo fo dnnco nnd Iob
nffondod fho sµocInI Vofornns Ðny
µrogrnm fo honor vofs. Iob cnrrIod
fho AIr Iorco fIng for fho µrogrnm.
Iob, JodI, hor µnronfs, nnd
IhIIIIs Thorson nII wonf fo fho
sfonkouf In IhIIIµ IrIdny ovonIng.
!Ich SmIfh onjoyod n fow gnmos
of cnrds In IhIIIµ nnd nIso vIsIfod
nf fho snIo bnrn fhIs wook.
IIIoon IIfzgornId hnd good nows
Sundny, Þovombor l8. A son, !uko
!oborf, wns born fo grnnddnugh-
for, SfoµhnnIo nnd Wos !yngsfnd,
SIoux InIIs. !uko joIns n sIsfor,
Jnsn. HIs grnndµnronfs nro CnrIn
nnd MIchnoI Ðo!oon nnd Sfovo
VIckI Knufson, nnd gronf-grnnd-
µnronfs nro IIIoon IIfzgornId nnd
Isfhor Knufson. Whnf n sµocInI
ThnnksgIvIng for fhom ns IIffIo
onos nro so µrocIous.
An oµon houso for !ush IunornI
Homo wns hoId Sundny, Þovombor
l8, In IhIIIµ. Thoro wns n Inrgo
crowd In nffondnnco. Whnf n IovoIy
µInco nnd If Is so good fhnf wo nro
so forfunnfo fo hnvo such n nIco
µInco In IhIIIµ. IvoryfhIng Is vory
uµ fo dnfo for fho !ushos uso nnd
for fho communIfy`s uso whon fhnf
fImo Is noodod. If ronIIy doos Im-
µrovo fho Iooks uµ on fho hIII whoro
If Is nIong fho hIghwny.
If Is so good fo soo Imµrovomonfs
mndo fo fho fown. And now wIfh
fho now Þnµn buIIdIng fhnf fho
ÐnIo MorrIsons nro buIIdIng whIch
roµIncos fho oId drIvo Inn fhnf wns
forn down. If doosn`f onIy Iook IIko
If, buf IhIIIµ ronIIy Is fhrIvIng.
Thoso from fhIs nron who nf-
fondod !ush`s oµon houso woro
!oron nnd !oso KIoI, Myrnn
CoffsIobon, Jnck nnd ArIys CrIosoI,
nnd MnrvIn, VIckI nnd Mnry IIdo.
Affor fho oµon houso, I sfoµµod
by MoI SmIfhs for n fow mInufos fo
sny hI fo Iofh. I hnd nof soon hor
for n fow wooks nnd grnndson Cndo
Kjorsfnd wns fhoro sµondIng fho
wookond wIfh fhom. Iofh wns gIv-
Ing fnmIIy hnIrcufs. Sho scnffors
fhom ouf so fnmIIy cnn como on dIf-
foronf wooks fo gof fhnf job dono.
Sho snId fhnf fho IndIos of fho fnm-
IIy nII wonf on sfrIko nnd nro goIng
fo go ouf for ThnnksgIvIng dInnor.
IrIffnny nnd Irock nro In chnrgo of
mnkIng fho rosorvnfIons. Þow
fhnf`s fho wny fo go, no cookIng nnd
no dIshos!
Sounds IIko fun, n Ionsf for n
chnngo, buf I sfIII onjoy fho oId
fnmIIy frndIfIon. Yos, If`s work, buf
If ovoryono brIngs somofhIng, If`s
nof so bnd. And you hnvo fo hnvo n
µInco fo vIsIf. Thoro Is nIwnys
onough Ioffovors for suµµor nnd wo
nood fo nIwnys fhnnk fhoso who
furnIsh fho µInco fo hnvo If.
Hoµo ovoryono wIII hnvo n good
ThnnksgIvIng nnd fhoso who nro
frnvoIIng, hnvo n snfo frIµ fo nnd
from. Injoy fho kIds homo from
schooI nnd coIIogo. And bo suro fo
bo fhnnkfuI fhnf wo IIvo In AmorIcn
whoro wo cnn onjoy fnmIIy nnd
frIonds ns wo do.
Tho IIA sfudonfs nro ngnIn ouf
soIIIng fruIf ofc. Crnndson Irnydon
IIfch cnIIod nnd I ordorod from
hIm. I hnvo nIwnys hnd good µrod-
ucfs from fhom In µrIor yonrs. Wo
cnn hoIµ suµµorf our schooIs In fhIs
wny.
I dIdn`f cnfch uµ wIfh nny of fho
IruckInchor fnmIIy fo soo If ovory-
ono hnd mndo If for fhoIr onrIy
ThnnksgIvIng gof-fogofhor. Mnybo
I wIII gof dofnIIs Infor. Wns won-
dorIng how Iong AIox nnd CnIn
!ndwny woro on fho Insf Consf
hoIµIng rosforo oIocfrIcIfy In fhnf
nron.
Symµnfhy goos ouf fo fho fnmIIy
of JunnIfn (SnoII) CoodsoI, Hownrd
McCrnfh, Irono (Iorguson) Iroon,
Jonnoffo Cobos nnd TorrI KnrroIs.
As I rond nII of fhoso obIfunrIos,
I know fhom nII so woII. If mnkos
mo ronIIzo fhnf I nm of fhIs gonor-
nfIon nnd fhnf our fImo on fhIs
onrfh Is shorf. So bo fhnnkfuI, hoIµ
ofhors, nnd bo kInd for fho nmounf
of fImo wo hnvo on fhIs onrfh. Þo
mnffor whnf your ngo, you novor
know whon your fImo Is uµ.
Core leee for ,our lortee/ /lon
for lou i/ ie eloreJ onJ ,our life
uill lote nore neoning onJ ,our
leor/ uill lote nore peoce. Kon
Þorburn
0rIndstcne News
by Mary BIde · SS9-B1SS
ads@pioneer-review.com
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 12
Community
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Interior & Exterior
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HOURS: M-F: 7 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
SAT: 8 A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG.
CENTER
S. HWY 73
859-2100 • PHILIP
Liquidation
Monday was an extension of Vet-
erans Day. Thank you veterans for
your service and your families for
their roles and support.
Although Monday was a holiday
for a lot of government offices,
school was held. A great opportu-
nity to let the children understand
the high price war costs, as well as
peace keeping. Bill helped Phyllis
Word get her car started and I
drove her to get some groceries to
get the battery going a little better
and enjoyed a nice visit.
Tony Harty visited with his
niece, Kathy Brown, Monday since
she was off work because it was
Veterans Day Monday closing.
Most of the hunters left Monday
from George and Sandee Gittings'.
Steve Glaser and Justin Unruh left
Tuesday morning.
Don and Vi Moody had several
visitors at their Rapid Valley place.
They enjoyed a gift certificate from
the Nortons while in Rapid City.
Duck hunting happens to be the
current sport in the valley and Don
and Vi have a natural setting for a
lot of duck habitat so one guy who
knows Eric Seager was given per-
mission to set a blind up along
Rapid Creek. The frontage doesn't
go too long of a distance, as their
neighbors are near, so only one or
two guys can have a little fun with
that by the waterfall. Don and Vi
returned to the ranch Tuesday and
were surprised the mercury vapor
yard light was on. It hadn't been on
for two months – the wind must
have finally quit blowing.
Tuesday was pretty quiet for
Tony Harty only got the mail.
At breakfast Wednesday morn-
ing, Bill and I visited with a Hilde-
brand, formerly from Quinn area,
living in Rapid City and related to
Arlyce and Jack Griesel. Arlyce
knew just who he was when I told
her about it. Actually, we had a hill
on the road to the ranch called the
Hildebrand. Wonder if that was
any kind of relative. I searched the
old maps, but didn't find any Hilde-
brand listed as a landowner.
Sandee Gittings was in Midland
Wednesday afternoon on business.
Wednesday, Tony went to coffee,
then visited at Wilma Stouts about
some business she wanted to dis-
cuss and they enjoyed an afternoon
of visiting.
John and Chad Boheman, Sioux
Falls, arrived at George and
Sandee Gittings' Thursday morn-
ing for deer hunting. John Brooks,
Mike Blow, Bruce, Mike and Matt
Halter arrived that evening. Larry
Woodward, Dana Claussen, Jason
Criechten, Jim, Jake and Alex
Koepke, Chad, David and Eric Van
Ede all arrived Friday morning.
Most are from the Sioux Falls area.
All returned home Sunday after a
very successful hunt.
I made a trip to Pierre Thursday
with the Haakon County Prairie
Transportation. Had an enjoyable
day keeping that appointment. It
was a very nice, sunny day.
At the Moody ranch the activity
was deer hunting when Chip and
Chris Walker were out and about.
Don and Vi checked cattle and re-
distributed some hay bales for the
cattle and worked at getting caught
up on ranch things, mail, etc. It's
not fun when the bookkeeping piles
up and your printer goes on the
blink, so Vi has been frustrated
with that, time for a new printer.
Friday started off with the usual
mail pick up for Tony Harty when
he discovered that the water bill for
Shirley and L.D. Hair was really
high. A water leak was the prob-
lem, so Tony went about getting
the water turned off for them, since
they are Hot Springs. They also
wanted him to shut off the electric-
ity and propane, they would be
back in Kadoka Saturday. He also
got a call that there was some deer
meat if he knew how to get a hold
of Hairs.
I sure do haul Bill out of bed
early for breakfast, when I have a
run with the HCPT van. Friday it
was up and at 'em early because I
was on the road to Rapid City. An-
other nice day.
Saturday evening, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler met Richard and
Diana Stewart, Rick and Selma
Thorson and JoAnn Hanson in
Deadwood for supper to celebrate
Diana’s birthday. JoAnn lives in
Spearfish. After a nice supper and
evening, Ralph and Cathy went
home and the other folks spent the
night in Deadwood.
Saturday morning early, Tony
Harty went to Philip and got three
big deer from Marty Hansen that
hunters didn't want and got them
delivered to L.D. and Shirley Hair.
Next, he was busy helping where
he could to get their water leak re-
paired. Dale Koehn was able to
turn the water back on and the
leak was fixed, then it was on to
handle the meat cutting, which he
assisted with too.
Bill and I had a mission Satur-
day. Since it was a beautiful day,
we went to Philip to pick up a piece
of plexiglass and make a repair on
the shop at the little farm and put
a few screws in the tin, left off an
item to be picked up in town, and
Bill even got in a few hands of
cards before I was done with my
other project. I helped that evening
with the turkey bingo sponsored by
the Save the Pearl. Sometime dur-
ing the week, the main computer
decided to go bad, so after repeated
attempts to do a home cure, it was
time to think about outside help.
Sunday evening, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler joined Eric, Sherry
and Elsie Hanson, Derek and
Renee and family and Lorene
Klumb at the Don and Lynette
Klumb home to celebrate Hannah’s
10th birthday supper. Loman was
invited to his friend’s birthday
party. A good supper, and birthday
cake was enjoyed by all. After Han-
nah opened her gifts, everyone
headed home.
Sunday after church, Tony Harty
visited at the Hair home. In the
late afternoon, he attended the
community Thanksgiving service
at the Concordia Lutheran Church
where a supper was served. The
Haakon County Crooners enter-
tained at the service. After the
service was completed, Tony went
to the Catholic church where the
Crooners held a practice session.
They will be singing December 2
There will be a potluck dinner,
then the Crooners will entertain
with Christmas songs.
Another nice day Sunday. Bill
and I went to dinner at the bowling
alley in Philip and were joined by
Brenda and Larry Grenz, and en-
joyed a nice visit. We attended the
open house for Rush Funeral Home
and enjoyed seeing the new facility
that at one time was the Park Inn
Cafe, a service station and cafe. In
its last life it was Jehovah Witness
Kingdom Hall. There are new addi-
tions, but the integrity of the old
building still exists. It is nice to see
the evolution of one little structure
that was well built. There was a
large crowd on hand for the open
house and to also view a replica of
the casket used for our 16th Presi-
dent of the United States, Abra-
ham Lincoln. Bill and I stopped for
a visit with Gary Stephensen and
were the recipients of some pecans
Danny Pfeifer from Oklahoma sent
for us and some tenderized deer
steaks that Gary whipped though
the tenderizer while we waited.
Tom Radway saw the activity and
came across the street to supervise
and Marion Matt stopped to show
deer he had in his trailer. Almost
had a traffic jam. Later that
evening, I picked up Phyllis Word
for the community Thanksgiving
service and supper. Always a pleas-
ant treat to get hugs from so many
friends when we attend an event.
Our sympathy to the family of
Wanda Heeb. Wanda was an exten-
sion member for many years and
also was among those that were
‘Birthday Gals’ who would surprise
folks with a birthday song. Mom
and Aunt Edna really enjoyed
being serenaded, at the beauty
shop, the bowling alley, and even
the cafe.
Our sympathy to the family of
Roy Roseth. I served on the
Haakon County Commisioners
Board at the same time Roy did.
Dad also had his favorite horse he'd
bought from Roy, a Tennessee
Walker, the gait was like sitting in
a rocking chair. So glad we enjoyed
these friends and have fond memo-
ries.
This week is Thanksgiving. In
reality, every day needs to be
thanksgiving. We can be thankful
for so much. However, this tradi-
tion started when those pilgrims
who came over on the Mayflower in
1620 hosted a feast for the Indians
who helped them survive the first
winter and taught them many
ways to feed themselves. May your
travels be safe and your blessings
many.
The Stranger - So true!
A long time ago, my dad met a
stranger who was new to our small
town. From the beginning, Dad
was fascinated with this enchant-
ing newcomer and soon invited him
to live with our family. The
stranger was quickly accepted and
was around from then on.
As I grew up, I never questioned
his place in my family. In my young
mind, he had a special niche. My
parents were complementary in-
structors: Mom taught me good
from evil, and Dad taught me to
obey. But the stranger – he was our
storyteller. He would keep us spell-
bound for hours on end with adven-
tures, mysteries and comedies.
If I wanted to know anything
about politics, history or science, he
always knew the answers – about
the past, understood the present
and even seemed able to predict
the future! He took my family to
the first major league ball game.
He made me laugh, and he made
me cry. The stranger never stopped
talking, but Dad didn't seem to
mind.
Sometimes, Mom would get up
quietly while the rest of us were
shushing each other to listen to
what he had to say, and she would
go to the kitchen for peace and
quiet. (I wonder now if she ever
prayed for the stranger to leave.)
Dad ruled our household with
certain moral convictions, but the
stranger never felt obligated to
honor them. Profanity, for exam-
ple,
was not allowed in our home. Not
from us, our friends or any visitors.
Our longtime visitor, however, got
away with four-letter words that
burned my ears and made my dad
squirm and my mother blush.
My Dad didn't permit the liberal
use of alcohol. But the stranger en-
couraged us to try it on a regular
basis. He made cigarettes look cool,
cigars manly and pipes distin-
guished.
He talked freely (much too
freely!) about sex. His comments
were sometimes blatant, some-
times suggestive, and generally
embarrassing. I now know that my
early concepts about relationships
were influenced strongly by the
stranger. Time after time, he op-
posed the values of my parents, yet
he was seldom rebuked. And never
asked to leave.
More than 50 years have passed
since the stranger moved in with
our family. He has blended right in
and is not nearly as fascinating as
he was at first. Still, if you could
walk into my parents' den today,
you would still find him sitting over
in his corner, waiting for someone
to listen to him talk and watch him
draw his pictures.
Categorically, he destroyed all
the moral values, ethics, love, time
for each other and other good qual-
ities we had in our family. – whilst
adding some unnoticeable quantity
of positive stuff also, which any-
way, we would have had even with-
out him. His name? We just call
him 'TV.' (Note: This should be re-
quired reading for every house-
hold!) He has a wife now. We call
her ‘Computer.' Their first child is
‘Cell Phone.’ Second child ‘I Pod.’
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
84 Years Ago
November 29, 1928
A deal was consummated re-
cently whereby Frank Carrier of
Garden City, S.D., became owner
and publisher of the Midland Mail.
Editor E.M. Lyman, who for the
past three years has guided the
destines of the Mail will move with
his family to Mitchell where they
will make their home.
***
James W. Scanlan, World War
veteran and manager of the Philip
Milling Company, passed away
after a week’s illness, on Saturday,
November 11th at the St. John’s
Hospital, Rapid City. Notable is the
fact that his final summons came
just ten years from the day upon
which the Armistice, which found
him in active service in France,
was signed.
***
Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Griggs gathered at the Griggs
home, north of town, last Saturday
evening to give the newlyweds a
rousing charivari, the young couple
having returned from Mingo, Iowa,
on Friday.
Mrs. Griggs was, until her mar-
riage a week ago, Miss Velva Borst,
granddaughter of Mrs. Viola Couch
of Philip.
Elbon Locals … A baby girl was
born to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Curtis
at the Einan hospital in Philip Sat-
urday, November 10th.
75 Years Ago
November 25, 1937
Milesville News … Mrs. John
Sandal, Mrs. Bob Eymer, Mrs. Wm.
Parsons, Mrs. O. Manor and the
pupils of the Hardingrove School
carried out a real surprise birthday
party on Wednesday afternoon in
honor of a schoolmate, Howard
Parsons, and the teacher, Harriet
Olson.
Local Briefs … A postnuptial
party was given recently for Mrs.
John Oldenburg (Marjorie Poss) at
her home west of town.
The cars driven by Fr. Thomas
Carroll and Chet Farnsworth came
together at the intersection west of
the Fred Merkle residence last
Wednesday just after noon. Nei-
ther driver was injured beyond
painful bruises.
Moenville News … Most of the
neighbors know Ole Sandal has a
hog that insists on visiting around.
It was last captured at Norwalks
and brought home and the owner
insists it shall roam no more so put
it in a pen and will slaughter it this
week.
Ottumwa News … The best
wishes of the community are ex-
tended to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
Tollakson who were married in
Philip Saturday afternoon. The
bride is the former Ruth Van Tas-
sel and the daughter of Mrs. Wm.
Lee of this community. Mr. Tollak-
son is the Nash dealer in Rapid
City, where the couple will be at
home to their friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Heeb and
Packie spent Friday evening at the
Thomas Gillaspie home.
Butte View News … Marguerite
Farrell, Bernice Kellogg, Clara
Frien and Earl Slovek are spending
a week’s vacation with home folks.
50 Years Ago
November 29, 1962
The Philip High School carnival
was held Friday night, November
16. At 11:30 the Grand March
began, led by Student Senate Pres-
ident Nancy Seager and Vice Pres-
ident Dennis Kennedy, followed by
the candidates for King and Queen.
After the Grand March, Miss
Mary Lou Michael and Steve Fer-
ley were crowned King and Queen.
the King and Queen each received
a black Scottie dog.
***
Births … born to Mr. and Mrs.
Everett Slovek, a girl, 6 pounds
and 3 ounces, on November 17.
Mr. and Mrs. John Griesel, a girl,
5 pounds and 7 1/4 ounces, on No-
vember 17.
Mr. and Mrs. John Ostlien, a
girl, 7 pounds and 13 1/2 ounces, on
November 21.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Masters, a
girl, 8 pounds and 9 1/2 ounces, on
November 22.
Grindstone News … Linda Knut-
son celebrated her birthday last
Friday by having the 4-H kids over
for a party. There were 29 there be-
sides 10 women and three men.
The young folks enjoyed dancing
down in their basement.
Hilland Hustlers … Our club
met at the home of Bob Clements
on November 13. Roll call was an-
swered by nine members by each
giving courtesy rules and new goals
for the year. We have two new
members, Doug and David Hauk.
The next meeting will be at Loyd
Frein’s home on December 14 at 7
p.m. For roll call each is to bring a
“good grooming” picture and also
tell what we want for Christmas.
The meeting adjournd and we
played football for recreation.
Phil Carley
25 Years Ago
November 26, 1987
Social News … Sonny and Donna
Newman went to Aberdeen to visit
Janell and Tony Arampatzis No-
vember 2 to get acquainted with
their new grandson, Anthony
Steven, born November 2. He
weighed 7 lbs. 14 oz. and was 20
1/2 inches long. He joins a sister
Audra, three years old.
Gertie Kopp attended Grandpar-
ent’s Day at the King School last
Wednesday. Her grandchildren,
Wade and Andrea Parsons attend
school there.
Bill and Penny Stahl and family,
Bowman, N.D., are coming
Wednesday, November 25, to spend
Thanksgiving with his parents,
Paul and Dorothy Stahl.
Herb Pates went to see Ron Mill-
age and while there Robert Reedy
was there hauling bales for Ron.
Then Clifford Keyser came – so all
had a real good visit.
Ottumwa News … The Ed Heebs
had guests in Tuesday evening for
birthday cake in honor of their
daughter, LeeAnna Jo’s birthday.
Jim Van Tassel returned home
from his flying instructors’ course
in Bolivar, Tenn., Monday.
Milesville … Friday evening,
Linda Stangle directed the senior
class play in Philip. Mike Parsons
and Todd Fischer were two local ac-
tors. Keith Berry was a stage hand.
Loyd and Vivian Buchert picked
up Ashley and Dustin Smith Sun-
day night to take them home.
Dustin celebrated his fourth birth-
day at Aunt Vonnie’s. His comment
was, “She sure makes sticky frost-
ing.”
Blast from the Past
From the archives of the Pioneer Review
After spending the summer
months reporting on the devastat-
ing drought, State Climatologist
Dennis Todey was ready to provide
some good news to South Dakotans
this fall.
Unfortunately, the change in
seasons, while bringing cooler tem-
peratures, hasn’t brought the much
needed moisture South Dakota
soils need.
“As we transitioned from sum-
mer to fall, I fully expected there to
be at least a couple systems coming
through that would drop one to two
inches of widespread rainfall. At
this point, all the systems have
missed most of South Dakota ex-
cept for one system which hit the
northeastern portion of the state in
late October,” Todey said.
The storm systems Todey refered
to are large low pressure areas
which occur with the change in sea-
sons. Differing from summer’s
higher intensity thunderstorms
which tend not to produce wide-
spread rainfall, fall’s rainstorms
are often lighter intensity, but pro-
vide moisture to a larger coverage
area.
Typically these fall rainstorms
average about five inches of mois-
ture in western South Dakota to
about seven inches in the eastern
portion of the state between Sep-
tember and November. This added
moisture before the soil freezes is
integral to restoring soil moisture
levels heading into spring.
“Any moisture events that hap-
pen once the ground freezes is of
limited benefit for soil moisture,”
Todey said. Unless there are some
dramatic weather changes, Todey
said drought issues will continue
into 2013. “We are at higher risk
for drought issues in 2013 because
1/3 cup butter or margarine
1 large onion, chopped (1 cup)
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper
(cayenne)
3 cups milk
4 eggs, slightly beaten
2 bags frozen corn, thawed
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley or 2
tablespoons dried parsley flakes
2/3 cup plain bread crumbs
1 tablespoon butter or margarine,
melted
Heat oven to 350°F. Spray 13x9-
inch (3-quart) glass baking dish or
3-quart casserole with cooking
spray.
In 4-quart Dutch oven, melt 1/3 cup
butter over medium heat. Add
onion; cook 3 to 4 minutes, stirring
frequently, until tender. Stir in
flour, salt and peppers until well
blended. Stir in milk. Cook 4 to 5
minutes, stirring constantly, until
thickened. Gradually stir in eggs.
Stir in corn and parsley. Pour into
baking dish.
In small bowl, mix bread crumbs
and 1 tablespoon melted butter;
sprinkle over corn mixture.
Bake uncovered 55 to 65 minutes
or until mixture is set and knife in-
serted in center comes out clean.
Let stand 5 to 10 minutes before
serving.
of the lack of soil moisture. If we
get average rainfall in the spring,
it will still be difficult to rebuild the
soil moisture profile in many places
throughout South Dakota,” he said.
“We will be very dependent upon
rainfall throughout the growing
season next summer.”
Laura Edwards, SDSU Exten-
sion climate field specialist, agreed
with him. She said the drought ap-
pears to be getting worse rather
than better, based on the October
18 climate prediction center's long-
range outlook.
“We have been hoping for im-
proving our situation this fall, but
the state is getting drier instead of
wetter,” Edwards said. “The long-
range drought outlook depicts per-
sisting drought into the winter sea-
son.” She added that according to
the outlooks, there is a higher prob-
ability of above average tempera-
tures through January.
“This is combined with equal
chances of above, below or near
normal precipitation for November
through January. One exception is
the southeastern part of the state,
which currently has higher proba-
bility of being drier than average
through January,” Edwards said.
Before they can offer an opti-
mistic outlook for 2013 growing
season, Todey said a few things
need to happen. First there needs
to be an extended weather pattern
change which would allow mois-
ture to move in from the Gulf of
Mexico this fall. Then we need
snow cover this winter and some
large snow storms in early spring.
“Right now we don’t have any
strong indications one way or an-
other of the amount of spring or
summer moisture we'll receive in
2013,” he said.
Drought issues into 2013
Baked Corn
Pudding
Prairie Designs Floral Studio
By Appointment: (605) 840-4810
Christmas Specials 2012
40% off all Christmas items
including Custom Christmas Designs
(long distance business & shipping is available)
in Philip
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursday, November 22, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 13
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iy¡cs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׸gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
sonc alfalfa, lig rounds, scni-
load lois, dclivcrcd ¡ricing, no
nold. Call Fol, 390-5535, or
CIarlcs, 390-5506. P50-5i¡
FOR SALE: 320 acrcs of cro¡-
land, 14 nilcs noriI of Midland.
NE1/4 Scc. 3, NW1/4 Scc. 2,
3N24E. Call 222-6261.
PF12-4i¡
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Cci rcady for fall Iauling! 12-
¡ly, 235/85/16F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIo¡, 859-
2744, PIili¡. P40-ifn
HELP WANTED
FIRE MITIGATION SPECIAL-
IST: Mcadc Couniy,SD (Siurgis}
Fcs¡onsillc for iIc narling,
iIinning, and rcnoval of irccs
fron ¡rivaic land owncr's ¡ro¡-
criy. TIis is a jols iraining cn-
¡loyncni cffori for Vcicran
qualificd individuals. Closcs No-
vcnlcr 30, 2012. Scc. www.
meadecounty.org for a¡¡lica-
iion insiruciions and con¡lcic
jol dcscri¡iion. Coniaci. Jcrry
Dcrr ¸ 605.720.1625 / jdcrr¸
ncadccouniy.org P50-2ic
HELP WANTED: Full and ¡ari-
iinc ¡osiiions availallc. Will
irain. Sio¡ in io a¡¡ly ai PIili¡
Cusion Mcais, 501 E. Pinc Si.,
PIili¡. PF12-2ic
COOK WANTED: Cood Sanari-
ian Sociciy, Ncw Undcrwood,
Pari-iinc for 4-8.30 ¡.n. sIifi.
Coniaci. Lorrainc, 754-6489 or
a¡¡ly onlinc www.good-san.
con. CHECK OUT OUF NEW
WACE SCALE, INCLUDINC
COMPENSATION FOF EXPEFI-
ENCE. EOE/AA/M/F/V/H.
PW48-4ic
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER J
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED ai
Days Inn, Wall. Possilly ¡crna-
ncni ycar-round ¡osiiion, siari-
ing inncdiaicly. Coniaci
TIcrcsa, 279-2000. PW46-ifn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: WIiic ¡orcclain
daylcd, con¡lcic; and a cIina
IuicI. Call Dianc Wallcr, 859-
2901, PIili¡. P49-2ic
FOR SALE: Scvcral nicc uscd
rcfrigcraiors wiiI warraniics.
Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63, Do× Eldcr.
390-9810. WP9-4i¡
FOR SALE: Fo¡c Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ro¡c, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
PETSJSUPPLIES
FOR SALE: 1-ycar-old fcnalc
7/8 Mouniain Cur, 1/8 Aircdalc
cross dog. Drcd for a coyoic
Iuniing and/or ira¡ linc dog.
Vcry fricndly. Dlondc color and
wirc-Iaircd, aloui 50 lls. Fca-
son for sclling. Iavc ioo nany
dogs. $50. Call 462-6390,
cvcnings aficr 7 ¡.n. PF12-2ic
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: Mulii¡lc Iouscs ai
nulii¡lc ¡riccs. Call Jin Coais,
685-3990 if inicrcsicd, Wall.
WP12-2ic
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 HigI
Si. in PIili¡, 2 lcdroons, full
lascncni, grcai vicw off lacl
dccl. Call 859-2783 or 859-
3249 or 567-3515 io vicw.
P49-ifn
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrilc
Avc PIili¡. 3 lcdroon 1.5 laiI,
ccniral air, fucl oil Icai and
wood siovc. O¡cn concc¡i,
siainlcss siccl fridgc and siovc.
wasIcr and drycr includcd.
Hardwood laninaic floors, sc¡a-
raic dining roon. Mosily fin-
isIcd lascncni. Cciling fans
iIrougIoui. Ncw windows and
roof. Fcnccd in, largc laclyard
wiiI covcr ¡aiio and sioragc
sIcd. Can cnail ¡Ioios. Call
859-2470 or (785} 259-4207.
P48-8ic
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 lcd-
roons, 2 laiIs, aiiacIcd 2-car
garagc, largc loi. Call 859-2403,
PIili¡. PF10-ifn
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: S¡acious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or sio¡ in iIc lolly and
¡icl u¡ an a¡¡licaiion. Caicway
A¡arincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc accc¡i
rcs¡onsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc ¡aid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi ¡aid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is ¡laccd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
TIunIs to uíí uIo nudc n¸
Ií¡tIdu¸ so s¡ccíuí. Vus g¡cut to
scc uíí o¡ ¸ou. M¸ ¡uníí¸ guuc nc
u g¡cut du¸!
TIunIs to uíí,
Mu¡¸ SíoucI
I uísI to tIunI cuc¡¸onc ¡o¡
tIc cu¡ds, gí¡ts und ¡o¡ uttcndíng
n¸ SUtI Ií¡tIdu¸ ¡u¡t¸ ín Stu¡-
gís. I uus °su¡¡¡íscd¨ und Ion-
o¡cd. S¡ccíuí tIunIs to n¸ sístc¡,
Lucíííc HucIund, und duugItc¡,
Lo¡nu Du¡¡cí, ¡o¡ uíí tIc uo¡I,
¡íunníng und g¡cut ¡ood. And to
¡uníí¸ und ¡¡ícnds uIo cunc
¡¡on A¡ízonu, Montunu,
V¸oníng, No¡tI DuIotu und
u¡ound SoutI DuIotu. And to n¸
IusIund, Lo¡¡cn, uIo I un toíd
°tIougIt u¡¨ tIc cucnt.
Louc to uíí,
Fío¡cncc Mo¡cíund
TIunI ¸ou to Esscncc ¡o¡ tIc
tu¡Ic¸ I uon ín tIc G¡cut GoIIíc¡
Gíucuuu¸!
Do¡ccn Vcttc¡
and Equi¡ncni o¡craiors. Cood
Dcncfiis. A¡¡licaiions arc avail-
allc ai CouriIousc in Dison, SD
or call 605-244-5629.
FOR SALE
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Ca¡iiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs only}. Call Fus-
scll S¡aid 605-280-1067
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rc¡rcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.} Call
iIis ncws¡a¡cr, 605-859-2516,
or 800-658-3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI,
33¢/34¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456.1024,
joc¸iliirucl. con.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1995 Poniiac Firc-
lird, c×ccllcni condiiion, low
nilcs, c×ccllcni gas nilcagc.
Asling $2,900. Call 515-1460.
PF13-2i¡
FOR SALE: 2006 Ford F-150
E×icndcd Cal 4×4, 92,000
nilcs, silvcr. Call 685-3068.
P50-1ic
FOR SALE: 1979 CIcvrolci Sil-
vcrado 30, dually wiiI Duralisi
DSS 30, 25' luclci lifi. $1,800.
441-9669, Wall. WP11-ifn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Eסcdi-
iion XLT 4×4, cloiI scais, ¡owcr
windows, locls & scais, good
iircs. Call 685-8155. PF10-ifn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O'CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Focl, Sand,
Cravcl (scrccncd or crusIcd}. Wc
can dclivcr. Dans, dugouis,
luilding siics. Our 37iI ycar.
Clcnn or Tracc, 859-2020.
PF11-ifn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
S¡ccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV a¡¡licaiion. ALSO. ¡rairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23i¡
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iy¡cs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
u¡s, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52i¡
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN, ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Qualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
EMPLOYMENT
CONSTFUCTION. SIOUX FALLS
TOWEF ¡rovidcs ycar-round
worl consiruciing, and nain-
iaining iowcrs. No fcar of
IcigIis, c×icnsivc iravcl, drug
frcc and valid Drivcr's liccnsc rc-
quircd. CDL ¡rcfcrrcd Scoii 605-
331-6972 www.siou×fallsiowcr.
con.
STANLEY COUNTY SCHOOL
DISTFICT is sccling Su¡crin-
icndcni of ScIools. A¡¡licanis
nusi lc liccnscd or cligillc for
liccnsurcs as a Su¡crinicndcni
of ScIools in SouiI Daloia.
Scnd a¡¡licaiion (Iii¡.//www.
sianclycouniy.l12.sd.us/cn-
¡loyncni.Iin}, covcr lciicr, and
rcsunc wiiI iIrcc rcfcrcnccs.
Mrs. Jcssi Fronn, Dusincss
Managcr, Sianlcy Couniy ScIool
Disirici 57-1, PO Do× 370, Fori
Picrrc, SD 57532, jcssi.
fronn¸l12.sd.us. Posiiion
closcs 1/31/2013. EOE.
OUTPATIENT COUNSELOF.
S¡carfisI, SD. Coniingcncy-
lascd ¡ay, c×ccllcni o¡¡oriuniiy
for noiivaicd ¡rofcssional. Mas-
icr's ¡rc¡arcd, SD liccnscd
w/QMHP, MSW, CCDC ¡rc-
fcrrcd. Dciails/A¡¡licaiion. DM-
SCarcs.OFC.
MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN.
Fa¡id Ciiy, SD. Fulliinc ¡ay,
lcncfiis, worling 8-
days/noniI. Masicr's in Iunan
scrviccs ficld, SD liccnscd w/
QMHP ccriificaiion. Dciails/A¡-
¡licaiion. DMSCarcs.OFC.
Cusiodial Mainicnancc Worlcr -
Ciiy of Cusicr, sccling an indi-
vidual io ¡crforn cusiodial du-
iics and luilding & ground
nainicnancc. Info ai www.
cusicr.govofficc.con or 605-673-
4824. EOE.
Hcl¡ Wanicd/Drivcrs. OWNEF
OPEFATOFS NEEDED Fcfrigcr-
aicd Division, join our cסcri-
cnccd ican of scasoncd
¡rofcssionals. Tcrninals in KS,
SD, TN, NM. 2 ycars OTF cסc-
ricncc. Call 800-796-8200 ×103.
SKILLED MEAT CUTTEF POSI-
TION availallc ai Wcsi Sidc
Mcais, Molridgc, SD. Con¡cii-
iivc wagcs, good lcncfiis, afford-
allc Iousing availallc. For
a¡¡licaiion or norc infornaiion
call 605-845-2271 or cnail
grandrivcrlison¸ yaIoo.con.
PEFKINS COUNTY HICHWAY
DEPT. Ias o¡cning for MccIanic
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
0IassItIed
AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nin-
inun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu, tIc P¡o¡ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou¡unt, as wcll
as on our wclsiic. www.¡ionccr-
rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns,
Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun
for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr word
iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial
nusi lc counicd sc¡araicly. In-
cludcd in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and
tIc P¡o¡ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc
and iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Pío-
ncc¡ Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for
loollcc¡ing and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 ¡cr
colunn incI, includcd in iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít.
$5.55 ¡cr colunn incI for iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic ad-
vcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr is suljcci io iIc
Fcdcral Fair Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI
nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany ¡rcfcrcncc,
or discrininaiion on racc, color, rcligion,
sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io
nalc any sucI ¡rcfcrcncc, liniiaiion, or
discrininaiion."
TIis ncws¡a¡cr will noi lnowingly accc¡i
any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a vi-
olaiion of iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd
iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a-
¡cr arc availallc on an cqual o¡¡oriuniiy
lasis.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
6l086l`$
Welding & Repair
· DOT Inspection
· CompIete TraiIer Repair
· FuII Line of Bearings & SeaIs
· Tractor Front End & SpindIes
· SeIIing New SteeI
· RecycIing OutIet
· Refrigration & A/C on CommerciaI,
ResidentiaI & VehicIes
· ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
0eorge: 111-3ê0Z · Lee: 111-3ê0ê
0l88l$
859-2970 · Philip
CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo · Philip, SÐ
Ior ull yoor concrete
constroction needs:
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
l$ l1 1lNlF
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
CaII Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
PhiIip
view &
download
online
produotion
sale
oatalogs at:
www.
rpipromotions.
oom
0NLlNL N0w:
3pear u Ranoh
3ale
world Lowline
3ale
C0MlN0 300N:
weller Ranoh
3ale
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. CALVES: 11 A.M.
(MT}. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EXPECTING 5UU-
lUUU HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NAT-
UHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
ROGHAIR - 130 DLK ANCUS CLVS FS &
DOOSTEFED & POUFED .................................400-500=
CAPP RANCH INC. - 100 DWF & FWF STFS; FS.500-550=
BRINK - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS ......................450-550=
TOPE & TOPE - 60 DLK STFS;
FS,NI,AN ..........................................................450-550=
KEESTER - 50 X DFED CLVS; NI .......................300-600=
GOOD - 35 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI...................500-550=
COLLINS - 34 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............450-550=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH
AT tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
PFECONDITIONED CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST
DE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFE-
CONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-WAY, PAS-
TEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11. SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
& WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE, &
THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S. NO SALE
WEIGH-UPS:
CHUCK & ELEANOR 2UCCARO - MIDLAND
31 ...................................FED HFFS 994=......$130.75
HOWARD INGALLS & SONS - OPAL
5......................................DLK HFFS 904=......$130.00
LL & RE KJERSTAD LIVING TRUST - QUINN
12 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 891=......$129.00
2...............................DLK COWETTES 1033=......$95.00
1......................................DWF COW 1315=......$69.00
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS - MIDLAND
4......................................DLK HFFS 965=......$121.00
CLEVE PRICHARD - KADOKA
2......................................DLK HFFS 965=......$119.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
12 ..................................DLK HFFTS 937=......$126.00
9.....................................DLK COWS 1152=......$81.00
FRANK BLOOM - SCENIC
5....................................DLK HFFTS 901=......$122.50
DALLIS BASEL - UNION CENTER
1 .....................................FED HFFS 855=......$119.00
JIM BOB & KAYLA EYMER - MILESVILLE
11..................................FED HFFTS 841=......$119.00
BILL MUNROE - UNION CENTER
4....................................DLK HFFTS 738=......$116.00
3....................................DLK HFFTS 867=......$114.00
R & G SMITH RANCH - QUINN
6...............................DLK COWETTES 978=......$101.00
JAY VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
9 .........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 859=......$114.00
COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
1 ................................DLK COWETTE 1000=......$96.00
FRANK BLOOM - SCENIC
32........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 916=......$113.00
7 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1229=......$73.25
PAULA VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
1......................................DLK HFFT 890=......$112.00
2...............................DLK COWETTES 948=........$93.00
WAYNE ARP & SHARON JAHRAUS - MASON CITY, IA
3....................................DLK HFFTS 878=......$112.00
STEVE & TUCKER MCDANIEL - MIDLAND
25........................FED & DLK HFFTS 887=......$111.50
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
6...............................DLK COWETTES 937=......$109.00
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
4...............................DLK COWETTES 919=......$108.00
COLTON CARTER - MIDLAND
10.............................DLK COWETTES 979=......$105.00
DENNIS & GWEN 2ELFER - SCENIC
1....................................HEFF DULL 2155=......$92.50
RON HOWIE - WHITE OWL
1 ......................................DLK COW 1855=......$79.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1615=......$79.50
ROBERT THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
2...................................CHAF COWS 1100=......$79.00
5...............................DLK COWETTES 1072=......$86.00
KUDRNA RANCH - SCENIC
1 ......................................DLK COW 1295=......$78.00
1......................................DWF COW 1545=......$75.00
5...........................FED & DLK COWS 1308=......$72.00
PAT & ROSE TRASK - WASTA
1......................................DLK DULL 2015=......$91.50
2 ....................................DLK DULLS 1945=......$82.50
RON HOWIE - WHITE OWL
1 ....................................HEFF COW 1570=......$76.00
RUSSELL SIMONS - FAITH
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1493=......$75.50
DOUG HUSTON - MIDLAND
1......................................DWF COW 1270=......$75.50
DONNA ALEXANDER - HILL CITY
1......................................FWF COW 1280=......$75.00
JIM HUGHES - CUSTER
4.....................................DLK COWS 1463=......$74.50
DALE JARMAN - MIDLAND
1......................................FWF COW 1290=......$74.00
JAMES LOFTUS - BOX ELDER
6 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1588=......$73.00
GLENN JONES - WHITE OWL
1......................................FED COW 1365=......$73.00
2 ..............................FED COWETTES 1000=......$92.00
BLAINE KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
1......................................DWF COW 1340=......$73.00
KADEN DEAL - DUPREE
1......................................FWF COW 1305=......$72.00
KUDRNA RANCH - SCENIC
1......................................DLK DULL 1765=......$92.00
1......................................DLK DULL 1875=......$88.00
SHAWN FUGIER - BUFFALO GAP
3.........................DLK & HEFF COWS 1288=......$71.75
SHAW RANCH INC - WHITE OWL
1 ......................................DLK COW 1305=......$71.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1395=......$69.00
KAREN BRYAN - VALE
5.....................................DLK COWS 1139=......$71.50
BRAD & JODY STOUT - KADOKA
1 ......................................DLK COW 1495=......$71.00
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
7...........................FED & DLK COWS 1613=......$70.50
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
5.....................................DLK COWS 1455=......$70.50
DEAN HEEB - MIDLAND
1 ......................................DLK COW 1345=......$70.50
SLC TRUST - HERMOSA
9 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1277=......$70.50
MARTY PRINT2 - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ......................................DLK COW 1475=......$70.00
SOUTH DAKOTA
BRAND SELLING
TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 11,
AT 12:00 MT RH CATTLE
CATTL£ R£PORT - TU£S., NOV. 2D, 2DJ2
B1g run o] bred oo111e ond on e×1ro b1g run o] ue1gÞ-
ups. Hoppg TÞonKsg1v1ng ]rom PÞ111p L1ves1ooK.
BRED CATTLE:
JEFF MADSEN - QUINN
29.........................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 977=...........$1,560.00
25............................................FED 3 & 4 YF OLD 978=...........$1,550.00
42.........................FED & DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1165=.........$1,400.00
23.........................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1225=.........$1,050.00
KUDRNA RANCH - SCENIC
31.........................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1138=.........$1,500.00
46.........................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1350=.........$1,440.00
21........................................................DLK HFFS 1000=.........$1,300.00
44 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1380=.........$1,150.00
42 .....................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1374=.........$1,050.00
CHRIS & LEO GRUBL - STURGIS
13 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 10, 30 DAYS} 1100=.........$1,390.00
11 ..................................DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1275=.........$1,125.00
HOWARD INGALLS & SONS - OPAL
55 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 10, 30 DAYS} 961=...........$1,425.00
35 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 10, 30 DAYS} 872=...........$1,200.00
CLEVE PRICHARD - KADOKA
66 .............................DLK HFFS (FED 20, 15 DAYS} 948=...........$1,410.00
23 .............................DLK HFFS (FED 20, 15 DAYS} 896=...........$1,360.00
13 .............................DLK HFFS (FED 20, 15 DAYS} 905=...........$1,330.00
21 ..............................DLK HFFS (MAF 7, 15 DAYS} 935=...........$1,400.00
36 ..............................DLK HFFS (MAF 7, 15 DAYS} 947=...........$1,370.00
21 ..............................DLK HFFS (MAF 7, 15 DAYS} 896=...........$1,175.00
DALLIS BASEL - UNION CENTER
21 ...........................................FED HFFS (MAF 1} 888=...........$1,400.00
8 .............................................FED HFFS (MAF 1} 825=...........$1,300.00
PAUL SCHNOSE - BUFFALO GAP
30 ...................................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1014=.........$1,470.00
KAREN BRYAN - VALE
14.......................DLK & DWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1172=.........$1,350.00
11 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1426=.........$1,060.00
34......................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1320=............$910.00
SHAWN FUGIER - BUFFALO GAP
9..........................DLK & DWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1254=.........$1,200.00
7 ..........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1412=............$960.00
5 ...................HEFF SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1351=............$920.00
5 .......................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1323=............$910.00
JAY LIVERMONT - WANBLEE
11.............................................DLK YOUNC COWS 1097=.........$1,150.00
15...................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1258=............$960.00
26....................................DLK DFKN MOUTH COWS 1262=............$900.00
DEAN HEEB - MIDLAND
4.........................DLK & DWF 4 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1196=.........$1,100.00
MORTENSON CATTLE CO. - HAYES
26 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1315=.........$1,070.00
55......................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1370=............$950.00
WILLIAM SCOTT PHILLIPS - NEW UNDERWOOD
7..........................DLK & DWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1075=.........$1,050.00
ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
14...................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1239=.........$1,025.00
17.................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1263=............$900.00
JOE HARMON - VALE
10 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1321=.........$1,010.00
19 ......................................DLK & DWF DM COWS 1374=............$980.00
BRAD & JODY STOUT - KADOKA
22................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1390=.........$1,004.28
15 ...........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1424=............$985.00
DARREN GEBES - MILESVILLE
3 ...................................DLK 5 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1330=.........$1,000.00
DILLON & JEREMIAH WHITCHER - RAPID CITY
19...................DLK & DWF YOUNC TO SOLID MOUTH 1246=............$985.00
TROY & DAWN RICHTER - QUINN
10............................DLK 5 TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1266=............$980.00
22 .....................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1300=............$900.00
SCOTT EDOFF - HERMOSA
17 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1144=............$980.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
11.........................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1315=............$960.00
24.........................DLK & DWF DFKN MOUTH COWS 1318=............$885.00
STERLING RIGGINS - PHILIP
13 ...........DLK & DWF 5 YFS TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1318=............$950.00
2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
11........................FED & FWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1204=............$950.00
BLAINE KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
44.........................DLK & DWF DFKN MOUTH COWS 1362=............$935.00
15 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1339=.........$1,000.00
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
8 .......................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1359=............$930.00
Thursday, November 22, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 14
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, Nov. 24 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Nov. 26 ~
1/2 lb.
Cheeseburger Basket
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, Nov. 20 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Nov. 21 ~
Indian Taco
or Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Nov. 22 ~
Closed – Thanksgiving
~ Friday Buffet, Nov. 23 ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Chicken • Shrimp
Try our new charbroiled steaks & burgers! All steaks come with a choice of potato & salad bar!
tage of the beautiful day by getting
groceries, a haircut, and having
lunch with their son and daughter-
in-law, Andy and Carla. Saturday
was Bountiful Baskets day at
Hayes, so daughter-in-law, Katie,
went to Hayes to pick up the good-
ies. Sunday, Bill and Polly at-
tended church in Midland, followed
by lunch at a local restaurant.
Monday, the Bruces were in Philip
to pick up some pork they had
processed there. They plan to be in
Sioux Falls to celebrate Thanksgiv-
ing with one of their granddaugh-
ters and other family members.
Jon and Connie Johnson are en-
joying a visit from friends, Jeff and
Eric Wallevand, Byron, Minn. The
Wallevands have been deer hunt-
ing while they are here. They also
stopped by to visit with Chauncey
Jorgensen, because Chauncey's
brother is a neighbor of the Walle-
vands. Connie said their son,
Avery, was home sick last Monday
and Tuesday, and now son, Noah,
isn't feeling well. There seem to be
a lot of "bugs" around the area.
Their son, Wyatt, will come home
for Thanksgiving break Tuesday,
and son, Avery, will arrive home
from his studies in Philip Wednes-
day. Connie told me that at the re-
cent 4-H Recognition Event in
Pierre, son Avery was named one of
the outstanding 4-Her's in the
area, and he won a trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., next summer. Son
Noah was awarded his first ever
trophies – one in foods and one in
visual arts. Congratulations, John-
son boys! Keep up the good work!
Laura Alleman and daughter,
Alivya, spent last weekend in
Rapid City, enjoying some sister
time with Laura's sister, Jessica.
While the ladies were gone, Clint
Alleman was home entertaining
deer hunters.
Clark and Carmen Alleman also
had a houseful of deer hunters last
weekend. Saturday, Carmen at-
tended a "mini" piano recital in
Pierre. Granddaughter Morgan
was one of the piano students, and
the recital served as a dress re-
hearsal of sorts, as the students
will be playing at the Capitol build-
ing at some point next month. All
the beautiful Christmas trees,
viewed to the accompaniment of
special music, is a real treat – if
you are needing to jump start your
Christmas spirit this season, the
Capitol in Pierre is an excellent
place to be!
Max and Joyce Jones attended a
meeting of Eastern Star in Onida
last Thursday. They had taken
some food and visited their daugh-
ter, Kim, and her husband, Dave
Ferries, hoping to see the new ad-
dition to their home. It sounds like
the addition is coming along well,
but unfortunately Max and Joyce
weren't able to see it, because the
hole hadn't been knocked in the
wall yet between the house and the
addition. Oh well – guess they'll
have to make another trip!
Marge Briggs said she hasn't
been anywhere to make any news.
Son Lynn has been busy cutting
firewood in preparation for colder
weather.
Ed Briggs has been hauling hay,
tending cattle, entertaining deer
hunters, and getting ready for win-
ter also. He will be hosting a
Thanksgiving gathering at his
home Thursday.
Ray and Nancy Neuhauser are
staying busy. Nancy said that ac-
tivities at the senior center keep
them busy several days a week,
and Raymond has many card
groups that he joins on a weekly
basis. Last Friday, the senior cen-
ter had their turkey dinner, with
the turkeys being donated by a
local bank. Saturday, they had a
visit from Nancy's daughter, Car-
rie, and husband, Tom, Sheridan,
as well as her daughter, Sandi, Ree
Heights. Ray and Nancy will be
traveling to Sioux Falls to spend
Thanksgiving with Nancy's daugh-
ter, Julie, and her family.
Mary Briggs is feeling much bet-
ter following her bout with bronchi-
tis. Mary, daughter Rea Riggle,
and granddaughter Kinsey trav-
eled to Sioux Falls last Friday to
keep an appointment. Sunday,
Mary went to Rapid City to get
some materials for their bathroom
renovation. While in Rapid, she got
to visit with her sister, Susie, who
was also doing some shopping.
Mary went on to Whitewood and
spent a couple hours visiting with
her daughter, Keva Joens, before
returning to the ranch.
Our week at Neuhauser ranch
went by in a flash, which seems to
be the norm these days. We have
had lots of hunters, and they have
had varying degrees of success.
This warm weather is not ideal for
deer hunting. Our nephew, Dylan,
was here Saturday, helping with
some welding and fencing proj-
ects – he is a talented, capable
young man. Sunday afternoon,
Randy and I took the opportunity
to head to Pierre, get him a haircut,
pick up some groceries, and see a
movie! Wow – it was like a date!
We hadn't been to a movie in many
years, but Randy is a huge James
Bond fan, and he wanted to see the
latest release. Randy even got to
eat his favorite fast food before we
left town – a perfect day for him!
Monday, I stopped at Lola Roseth's
for a short visit and checked out
the house at the Towne place, mak-
ing sure it was ready for winter.
This week, I am grateful we were
able to find a hairdresser to give
Randy a haircut on a Sunday.
Randy gets busy and doesn't go to
town very often, so sometimes his
hair gets a bit shaggy between vis-
its to the barber shop. Some of you
may know that during my early
childhood, my father, Joe Brown,
was a barber, as was his father be-
fore him. His brother, Sub, was a
barber his entire life. You would
think that possibly some of those
genetics would have passed on
down to me. That, however, is not
the case. I can do a little trimming
here and there, but I haven't mas-
tered being able to give Randy a
haircut. And ever since I inadver-
tently cut off half of one his eye-
brows, he doesn't trust me with the
clippers. Go figure. (He didn't go
anywhere for several weeks after
that episode.)
I hope all of you have a wonder-
ful Thanksgiving! Safe travels to
you and yours! Enjoy the weather,
and be sure to count your blessings.
Moenville News
(continued from page 6)
Christmas trees
adorn capitol hallways
Christmas trees will begin to fill
South Dakota Capitol hallways
later this month for the annual
Christmas at the Capitol holiday
display.
The 2012 theme is “Joyous
Sounds of Christmas.”
More than 90 Christmas trees
were decorated November 17-18 by
members of schools, churches,
communities, and civic groups
from across the state.
Thousands of guests visit the
South Dakota State Capitol each
year to view the decorated trees.
The display officially began with
a grand lighting ceremony on
Tuesday evening, November 20,
and continues through Wednes-
day, December 26. Display hours
for the public will be 8:00 a.m. to
10:00 p.m. CST each day.
The two-story South Dakota
tree specially featured this year in
the Capitol rotunda was donated
by Josh and Mary Arntz of Pierre.
It is a blue spruce that is about
35-feet tall. The tree was deco-
rated by Girls Scouts – Dakota
Horizons, who are celebrating
their 100th anniversary.
In addition to the trees, many
other parts of the Capitol will be
decorated for the holiday season,
including the Grand Marble Stair-
case and the Capitol grounds.
*
2011 survey of 500 S.D. households conducted by Pulse Research on behalf of South Dakota Newspaper Association.
My newspaper
works for me.
www.mynewspaperworks.com
Social Media
or Newspaper
Advertising?
Only 1.4% of South Dakotans
surveyed said they search social
media sites such as Facebook
for local retail advertising
information. While 47% said
they searched their local
newspaper for advertising
information.*

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