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Pioneer Review, November 1, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 10
Volume 107
November 1, 2012
continued on page 2
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro ..........$8.48
Any Pro .............................$7.68
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.55
Milo .......................................$6.68
Corn.......................................$6.83
Millet...................................$30.00
Sunflower Seeds................$22.50
Milesville
Halloween
party
6
Red
Ribbon
Week
9
All-State
Music
Award
8
Fridge
Door
13
The Badlands National Park
held a bison roundup in October.
Local riders spent October 10-12
herding buffalo from the Badlands
wilderness area into pens. During
October 15-18, those animals were
processed through the park’s chute
system. The working pens can hold
approximately 800 animals. After
the processing began, and once
more space was created, riders
spent October 19 herding in more
buffalo, while the loading out
process continued. On October 23,
the last 157 bison were processed
and by October 25 the last were
loaded out.
According to Brian Kenner, chief
of resource management for the
Badlands National Park, this was
the largest and longest roundup in
the park’s history.
“We were able to remove 419 an-
imals from the herd to four differ-
ent tribes. We did an aerial survey
when we had the 853 in the facility,
and the survey found 444 bison still
in the park. Therefore: 1,297 was
the pre-roundup population esti-
mate/count, 421 were removed
from the population, 876 is the
post-roundup population estimate,”
stated Kenner.
Of those animals loaded out, one
yearling bull will be shipped to a
Minnesota zoo for their breeding
program for Minnesota State Park
herds. Of the rest, 265 bison were
shipped to the Oglala Sioux Tribe,
again the most ever. The Spirit
Lake Tribe received 66 bison, the
Standing Rock Tribe received 44
bison, and 43 bison will be shipped
to the Sisseton Tribe.
“We don’t consider this a public
event,” said Kenner. “We don’t
want tourists. It’s part of our busi-
ness of what we need to do. It’s real
controlled so we can get people who
we can trust.” One local returning
rider was Philip’s Roger Porch.
In previous roundups as well as
this year’s, local school groups vis-
ited and watched the processing.
“More than happy to show them,”
said Kenner. Students from the
Philip, Wall and Interior schools
attended the roundup.
Before this year’s roundup, Ken-
ner said, “What we did before was
have corrals in locations where buf-
falo go naturally, but geneticists
said that was taking a whole fam-
ily. Now we do a better cross
culling,” said Kenner. “This riding
by local horsemen works really
well. It’s by word of mouth; they
love doing it. Of course this year,
because it is so dry, most of the
water is right next to the corrals, so
it might be real easy.”
Though the roundup overall was
successful, it was not as easy as
hoped. An 18-year-old cow was lost
after being gored. Kenner said that
a 1:853 processing ratio was the
park’s best ratio ever, exceeding
the 2010 ratio of 1:776.
Also, one rider broke a bone in
his ankle when his horse stepped
in a hole and fell. “He went to the
hospital and they put him in a
walking ‘boot’ and I believe he is
back doing ranch work,” stated
Kenner. One horse was injured
when it ran into a gate latch in the
corrals and another horse got cut in
a trailer and received stitches.
Badlands park bison roundup
A Badlands National Park bison
Philip school instruc-
tor and coach Matt Don-
nelly has been recog-
nized as the 2012 South
Dakota Association for
Health, Physical Educa-
tion, Recreation and
DanceHigh School
Teacher of the Year.
The SDAHPERD has
been honoring high
school, middle school
and elementary teachers
of the year since 1985,
when it became its own
association, splitting
from the South Dakota
Education Association.
Donnelly was nomi-
nated for the honor by
Secondary Principal
Mike Baer. The official
presentation of the
award and an embroi-
dered jacket will be at
the convention banquet
in Spearfish, November
7. Donnelly is being rec-
ognized for his excellence
in the fields of physical
education, health and
recreation. The award is
for his dedication and
proficiency in teaching the youth of
South Dakota.
Donnelly said that he earned his
physical education major and geog-
raphy and coaching minors from
Dickenson State University. He
taught at Dickenson public schools
for two years and coached at Dick-
enson State University. He began
teaching in Philip in 1994.
In the nomination letter, Baer
stated that Donnelly, “has always
taken his role as a physical educa-
tion/health instructor seriously, fo-
cusing on activities that are life-
long. Not only does he instill a
healthy lifestyle upon his students,
he teaches by example, helps each
and every student, and teaches the
scientific aspects of health so that
students are deeply aware of the
meaning of their individual
health.”
According to Tracy Nelson,
SDAHPERD president elect, the
award criteria for a certified phys-
ical education instructor includes
that he conducts a quality physical
education program; utilizes various
teaching methodologies and plans
innovative learning experiences;
serves as a positive role model epit-
omizing personal health and fit-
ness; participates in professional
development opportunities; and
provides service to the profession
through leadership, presentations,
and/or writing.
Donnelly said that he was “very
surprized” about being nominated
for the award. “I enjoy working
with the kids and enjoy being ac-
tive,” he stated. The hardest part of
being a physical education instruc-
tor is “making class enjoyable for
all the students,” while the most
rewarding part is “watching the
kids improve and reach their
goals.” His advice to anyone, young
or old, concerning physical educa-
tion is to “stay active.”
“Mr. Donnelly’s lesson plans in-
clude a variety of activities, not just
focusing on team sports or those
sports stressed in interscholastic
competition,” wrote Baer.
“Matt’s students learn
archery, weight lifting,
bowling, as well as other ac-
tivities that will help stu-
dents maintain a healthy
lifestyle. Matt’s activities
also teach the concepts of
teamwork and dedication.
His classes are truly physi-
cal education.”
Donnelly’s physical educa-
tion classes overlap into
other classes. “As a former
science teacher at Philip
High School, I am well
aware that Matt, during his
CPR and first aid courses,
teaches about the bones,
muscles and their interac-
tions. Student’s from his
classes come to anatomy
class with a solid back-
ground,” wrote Baer.
“He would never seek
recognition on his own and
would probably be humbled
by this nomination. How-
ever, as a physical educa-
tion and health teacher,
Matt is the mold that other
physical educators should
be cast from,” wrote Baer.
Baer continued, “... I can assure
you that all you would need to do is
talk to Matt’s current and former
students and they would not only
corroborate what I have said, but
would give even a more glowing
picture of what Matt Donnelly does
as a physical education/health
teacher.”
According to Patty Hacker, the
awards chair for the SDAHPERD,
the 15-person executive board
makes the decision about who the
award recipients will be. Hacker
stated that the committee mem-
bers are peers, college professors,
students and retirees. “We had
quite a few nominated in Mr. Don-
nelly’s category this year,” stated
Hacker.
Donnelly may now be up for the
national teacher of the year award.
His credentials must pass scrutiny
before the SDAHPERD central dis-
trict convention in Jackson Hole,
Wyo., February 20-23, 2013, and
the national convention in Char-
lotte, N.C. April 23-27, 2013.
Donnelly – teacher of the year
Philip physical education instructor Matt Donnelly has been
chosen as the High School Teacher of the Year by the South
Dakota Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation
and Dance. He has taught in Philip since 1994.
Photo by Del Bartels
by Del Bartels
The public meeting Tuesday, Oc-
tober 23, concerned information by
Dakota Mill and Grain and the
Canadian Pacific Railroad on the
proposed expansion of the DM&G
site in Philip.
A walk-through of the DM&G
area of its Philip grain terminal
construction project was held at
4:30 p.m. The public input meeting
itself, hosted by the Philip City
Council, was held at 5:30 in the
community room of the courthouse.
At the walk-through, Brian
Hammerbeck, DM&G executive,
said, “We feel we want to be in the
town of Philip – a brand new grain
field; a challenging location, but a
good one.” He said that all previ-
ously built and still used grain fa-
cilities are difficult to operate, to
insure and to keep safe. Dakota
Mill and Grain is trying to get
plans approved by the Canadian
Pacific Railroad and the city of
Philip for a construction project
that would cost approximately $3.5
million.
The future buildings would all be
within the city limits of Philip, thus
a future part of the city’s property
taxes. In a two-phase project,
DM&G wants to first do elevator
construction south of the main line
rail. This will include demolition of
the current structures, grading and
construction of bins, leg, pit, scale,
office and warehouse. Phase two
would be railroad expansion north
of the main line, which would in-
clude dirt grading and construction
of the railroad siding.
Four 54 foot diameter by 66 foot
tall grain bins would be erected,
with room for more bins if the mar-
ket justified it. Each could hold ap-
proximately 150,000 bushels of
grain. By way of a 16 foot square
tower amongst them and a load out
conveyer stretching over the cur-
rent railroad track, they could load
rail cars sitting on the new railroad
siding. The siding could, over all,
hold 28 rail cars.
Mayor Michael Vetter prefaced
the walk-through with, “We’ve had
some citizens come to us and they
are concerned with flooding. While
it’s not directly your problem, it’s
indirectly your problem.”
During the public meeting, Vet-
ter said, “Let us be clear, we would
be stupid to turn away business for
a small town. We just want to be
diligent before ....”
Bart Banks, company attorney
for DM&G, replied that they want
to do the project, but in no way they
want to exacerbate a current situ-
ation. Vetter reiterated the DM&G
plan of taking fill material for the
leveling of the siding area with ma-
terial taken from the flood plain
north of the railroad tracks, “tak-
ing from the basin and putting
back in the basin, so it’s a wash.”
Mike Seager, an owner of land in
the floodplain for 50 years, said
about the railroad trestle south-
west of his house, “What I’ve seen
is not what you are saying. It’s not
letting out enough water. I’m not
against the project, no way, but
right now I’m in protection mode.
You can tell me anything you want,
but it doesn’t fix it.”
“It’s part of the problem when
you neck it down, but it’s only a
small part of a far bigger problem,”
said Banks. He recapped that
fallen trees can cause water block-
age, that upriver rains can swell
the river with little preliminary,
that 100-year floods cannot be pre-
dicted, that the runoff area in-
volves approximately 188 square
miles of area, and that four of
seven involved railroad wood spans
have been tapered down with fill-in
over the years. “We can’t say it’s all
because of this trestle.”
“I can,” said Seager.
Jay Baxter, also a floodplain
homeowner, said, “Someone who
wants to come in and invest three
and a half million dollars is a great
thing. Let’s make it sure-footed and
make it right.”
The Canadian Pacific Railroad
assumed operational control of the
Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Rail-
road, October 30, 2008. Beth Lynn,
superintendent of engineering for
Canadian Pacific Railroad, said
that no one knows when the partial
filling of four of seven trestles oc-
curred. Lynn said that according to
Philip holds public meeting on
Dakota Mill and Grain expansion
The Internship program at
Philip High School aids students in
finding possible careers.
Sam Johnson, a senior, is work-
ing at the Philip Chiropractic
Clinic under the guidance of
Doreen Vetter.
Johnson said she likes working
at the clinic and that Vetter makes
the experience and work fun.
“I enjoy every part about work-
ing for Doreen. There is not one
thing I dislike about it,” said John-
son.
Jaime Reimann is helping out
with Philip’s newest teacher Kar-
men (Powell) Marbary. Reimann
chose the science teacher aide posi-
tion as it would coincide with Pow-
ell’s teaching biology which
Reimann wanted to listen in on.
And she thought maybe the new
teacher could use a little help.
Reimann’s said she has enjoyed
the experience so far and looks for-
ward to spending more time with
Marbary. “The thing I really enjoy
the most is correcting the tests,”
said Reimann.
The copier on the other hand has
not been so good. “I have not had
good luck with it at all,” said
Reimann. Reimann is not alone as
it has confounded many a student.
When asked if there was any-
thing that she was surprised to
learn, she replied, “Not yet, but
hopefully soon.” The students have
only been in the jobs a few weeks,
so there’s lots of time for surprises
yet.
Mahalah Theye chose to work at
Ingram Hardware this year under
the supervision of owner, Jerry In-
gram and co-worker, Ashley Reck-
ling.
Theye noted that the experience
has been great, and it has been a
lot of fun, just like she thought it
would be. She also likes to stay
busy and her job provides a lot of
interaction with customers.
“I enjoy doing transactions the
most,” said Theye. “I’ve never had
a job, so it’s all very new, and at the
same time, quite fun!” Except for
the heavy lifting, that she’s not so
excited about.
Since Theye moved to Philip the
high school junior has not been in
the hardware store much. She said
she was very surprised at the
amount of Christmas supplies that
are upstairs.
Cassidy Schnabel, a typical
teenage male, has cars on his mind
and found his way to Les’ Body
Shop.
Under the tutelage of Mike Note-
boom and his staff Schnabel, a high
school senior, is finding out if this
is his future profession. “I like cars
and I wanted to know if it was a
profession I wanted to go into after
high school,” said Schnabel.
Schanbel said that it has been a
good experience, and he has gotten
to meet more people. “What I enjoy
the most is working on a vehicle
and having it come out looking like
new,” he said. As with all jobs
there’s good and bad aspects. For
Schnabel, it’s taking out the
garbage that ranks as his least fa-
vorite.
Schnabel said he did not realize
that almost every car that gets
fixed also gets a good cleaning, in-
side and out.
Jamie Reiman has discovered that a
teacher does many little things.
Sam Johnson checks over info at Philip
Chiropractic Clinic where she works as
part of the Internship program.
Cassidy Schnabel is learning body
shop repair this year. Courtesy photos
Mahalah Theye likes working with cus-
tomers at Ingram Hardware.
PHS students gain career experiences
Part 2 of 3
A special meeting of the Philip
City Council was held in the after-
noon of Friday, October 26.
Dale Morrison’s updated build-
ing permit was granted by the
council. Morrison wanted to start
concrete work as early as Tuesday,
October 30, before the weather be-
comes too cold to pour the build-
ing’s foundation.
A 60 foot by 80 foot steel building
will be erected on the southeast
corner of the intersection of High-
way 73 and Highway 14. It will be
the D&T Auto Parts NAPA store.
Before granting approval, the
council inquired about drainage
and highway access, which Morri-
son stated that there will be no
problems. Though any easements
have nothing to do with the city,
the council was made aware that
an agreement concerning egress
and ingress with the property to
the south will be recorded with the
state’s attorney.
Special city council meeting
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Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
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Thursday: Partly cloudy. High of 72F.
Winds from the NNE at 5 to 15
mph shifting to the ESE in the
afternoon.
Thursday Night: Overcast. Low of 36F.
Winds from the SW at 10 to 15 mph.
Friday: Overcast in the morning,
then mostly cloudy. High of
61F. Winds from the NNW
at 10 to 15 mph.
Friday Night: Partly cloudy.
Low of 36F. Winds from the NNW
at 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in
the morning, then overcast.
High of 50F. Winds from
the NW at 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 27F. Winds less than
5 mph.
Sunday: Clear. High
of 57F. Winds less
than 5 mph.
Sunday Night:
Clear. Low of 32F.
Winds from the West at 5 to 10
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Monday: Partly cloudy. High of
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Monday Night: Partly
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5 to 15 mph.
Perspective is sometimes hard to
get right. In drawing and painting,
for example, there tends to be a
battle between what we know is
there and what our eyes actually
see. Consider a straight highway
through the desert, if you will.
Your mind knows that the sides or
shoulders of the road basically stay
parallel, but your eyes say the
sides get closer and closer as the
road gets more distant until, way
in the distance, they seem to join
together into a straight line.
This difference between the
mind view and the eye view is
often completely ignored by young
kids when they draw. They go by
what is in their minds instead of
what they see. The sides of their
roads in drawings stay parallel.
Houses are completely square.
Cows are shown broadside.
Proportion is tricky as well. Bud-
ding artists in this area often try to
draw horses, but only the gifted
ever get it right. I’ve seen a lot of
horse pictures where you look at
them and say, “That isn’t quite
right.” Somehow the head is too big
for the body, or the shoulders or
rump are not the correct size for
the rest of the animal. You may not
know exactly what is wrong, but
something obviously is. You would-
n’t go out and buy a horse that
looks that way. That’s for sure.
Then we come to perception. As
a Christian, rancher, husband and
father from the middle of the coun-
try, I might see things differently
than does a single Jewish banker
who lives with his medium-sized
dog in a New York high-rise. Who
we are and what we value are
bound to color our perception of
events, trends, and many other
things. That’s just the way it is.
With an election coming up this
week, we will easily be able to tell
that there is a wide variety of how
citizens view what has been hap-
pening in our country and what
should happen in the future. There
is even some possibility that, if you
vote differently than I do, I might
think you are certifiable and
should be confined to a loony bin.
That was certainly the opinion of
an uncle or two of mine if I dis-
agreed with them in any way con-
cerning politics. They were not at
all open to opposing views. Never-
theless, it is important to see
things honestly in order to do a
good job of voting.
First off, we have to have an ac-
curate view of how things really
are, what things are truly impor-
tant, and who can do the best job of
filling the office for which they are
running. In other words, we have
to keep things in proportion. We
have to balance the values of lots
of things such as the economy, na-
tional security, and freedoms. We
also need to keep in mind what is
best, not only for ourselves, but
also for our community, state,
country and world. That’s a lot of
responsibility and not to be taken
lightly.
As you know, our system of gov-
ernment is not perfect by any
means, and sometimes we get
things wrong. Luckily, we don’t
elect most people for life so we
have an opportunity to make cor-
rections every two, four, or six
years. This is a good thing. When
you consider many of the countries
around the world, their govern-
ments are not nearly as flexible
and useful as ours. Many have dic-
tators and little freedom. Others
have leaders who are corrupt and
much more interested in getting
rich than leading a country as they
should. In comparison to all that,
our country is just grand. I have no
plans of emigrating anytime soon,
and I’ve been to enough different
countries to realize that I’m really
very well off living right here.
So, what to do? As usual, we can
only do our best and hope it’s right.
The definition of “perspective” in-
cidentally is as follows: “The aspect
in which a subject or its parts are
mentally viewed, especially a view
of things (as objects or events) in
their true relationship or relative
importance.” That part about true
relationship and relative impor-
tance seem to be the key to the
whole business. We’ll try to attain
that.
By the way, if you aren’t sure
how to vote, I’ll be glad to give you
some advice. I’m pretty sure that if
everyone votes the way I do, we’ll
be fine. We just have to have good
perception and keep everything in
proportion. What’s so hard about
that?
modern standards a “structure
build tomorrow would be exactly
what is there today.”
When Lynn was asked about bor-
ing a sizable culvert on the east
end of the trestle, she replied that
such work might be able to be done
on the west side of the trestle.
Banks said, “If you try to hold
the Dakota project hostage, then
that is a concern to me. We’re mar-
rying the two together – that’s
what I am hearing. Dakota cannot
fix the flooding issue. All I am say-
ing is we will not make it worse.”
Council member Jennifer Henrie
said, “I realize Dakota has inher-
ited a set of circumstances that is
not their problem.”
Council member Greg Arthur
said, “Isn’t this an issue to be taken
up with the railroad, not Dakota?”
“There’s two separate issues
here,” said Vetter. “Dakota won’t
impact what is happening already.”
To Seager, Vetter said, “I know you
want something to happen with
that trestle bridge. I get that.”
John Hart, former Philip mayor,
said, “Dakota cannot do anything.”
Hart mentioned that building per-
mits should have been a concern
when the trestle was partially
filled in years ago by DM&E.
“Dakota is concerned with this
too. We don’t want to put all this
money into a track and then have
it washed away in a flood,” said
Banks.
Hart said about Dakota, “Yeah,
the drainage issue isn’t their prob-
lem.”
A suggestion was made from
Henrie about Dakota moving or
even putting in more drainage cul-
verts under the main railroad.
Hammerbeck said that the cost
would be prohibitive and the main
line did not belong to Dakota but to
the Canadian Pacific Railroad.
“This is America; you can do any-
thing. Frankly, it’s about cost,” said
Hammerbeck. Banks added, “You
want a culvert that could handle a
100-year event. There is no way to
size it, and at our expense!” Ham-
merbeck concluded, “It’s a deal
breaker.”
Harlan Quenzer with Schmucker
Paul Nohr and Associates, the en-
gineering consulting firm working
for the city of Philip, said that sev-
eral homes in west Philip had re-
quested and received exemptions
from the Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency from being catego-
rized as being in the floodplain. Ac-
cording to Quenzer, elevation in
the area has a difference of approx-
imately three feet.
Quenzer said, “In response, I
have to say what Dakota is propos-
ing will not affect what FEMA has
established.” He said though he
was just guessing, that what Sea-
ger saw was probably debris block-
ing the flood. What Dakota is pro-
posing will not have an impact. He
said that if what the railroad has
there now is causing a problem,
that is open for debate. He said the
one thing he could address, though
he did not have the rainfall inten-
sity figures nor the 100-year or
500-year event figures, was that
Philip experienced two such events
in one relatively short time span.
Vetter thanked the audience for
coming and closed the public meet-
ing with, “We heard from all of you
and we don’t take it lightly.”
Dakota Mill and Grain expansion
continued from page 1
Time in cheek ... by Del Bartels
Daylight Standard Time is 2:00 a.m., Sunday, November 4 – except
for Arizona and Hawaii and countries which don’t do Daylight Saving
Time – except for people who call it daylight savingS time – except for
people who don’t care – except for people who would argue if the sun
rises in the west. Whatever, my clocks will be set one hour back.
First came Egyptian obelisk-inspired sundials, followed by stardials.
A good start, but they were awkward to wear on your wrist. Then came
drip-flow water clocks; the literal translation of clepsydras is “water
thief,” and I always feel robbed of time. Mechanized clocks reached
their zenith with the pendulum-based grandfather’s clock, thus the
character of Father Time. Chronometers set at Greenwich Time could
be compared with the high-noon sun to measure a ship’s longitudinal
location. Frankly, I’d still be lost at sea. The quartz clock used an elec-
tric current through a crystal to cause a constant, measurable vibra-
tion. That would make a great mad scientist scene. The next step of
digital clocks are now epitomized by the National Institute of Science
and Technology atomic clock in Boulder, Colo., that sets the official
world time and doesn’t vary one second in 20 million years. Of course,
nobody is old enough to prove it. All this sure makes my $8.99 wrist-
watch seem lame.
In the old days, many towns set clocks based on sunsets and sunrises.
Time differences between distant locations were barely noticeable be-
cause of long travel times and no instant long-distance communica-
tions. When railways came around, this became a pain. Railroad and
telegraph time tables were about as easy as an IRS 10-year audit. To
ease railroad schedules for departures and arrivals, four standard time
zones for the continental United States were introduced in 1883. Some
people, like me, have been running late ever since.
Standard time, in terms of time zones, was not set until 1918. So
much for the quickness of government. The Standard Time Act also es-
tablished Daylight Saving Time. Leave it to politicians. Daylight Sav-
ing Time was repealed in 1919. Overriding the people’s will, the pres-
ident, no not Obama, reinstated Daylight Saving Time as “war time”
from 1942 to 1945. Like taxes, its still here.
With more sunlight at the end of the office and school day, Daylight
Saving Time supposedly results in fewer road accidents, more social
time, greater tourism and outdoor activities, and saves energy for ar-
tificial lights. With that theory, let’s jump eight hours so people don’t
have to turn on their headlights when then they close down the bars.
All I know is, as one person, I can’t make everyone else follow what
I think is best for the world. So, I will turn back my clocks, watches,
microwave, VCR, car dashboard, the timer to the stink-bomb in the
courthouse basement, and anything else I can think of ... and find other
items even into December. I’ll still sleep through New Years.
Letter to the editor,
I attended the informational/
concerned citizen meeting held at
the courthouse on October 23 with
regards to the proposed Dakota
Mill and Grain project and con-
cerns about future flooding from
the North Fork of the Bad River.
Tempers were warming and I
feel there was much confusion over
the issues. First of all, the Dakota
Mill and Grain expansion could be
a great economical benefit to our
area and most of what they are pro-
posing will not affect flooding con-
cerns that are already here ... they
have only brought to light a very le-
gitimate concern that has existed
for about a decade and that needs
to be addressed.
Around the year 1915, there was
a major rainstorm north of Philip
and the entire lower portion of our
town, including the downtown
area, was flooded (you can google
it). Shortly thereafter, a 300 foot
trestle bridge was built just
slightly upstream of the proposed
expansion project. There hasn’t
been a major flood since.
Fast forward to early 2000s and
the size of the trestle bridge was re-
duced dramatically. Supposedly
there were studies done by expert
hydrologists showing that the re-
duction to the length of the trestle
would have no effect on flooding.
They were wrong.
In 2008, there was another rain-
storm – mild compared to the 1915
storm – and the floodwaters had
nowhere to go but into some resi-
dential areas that current resi-
dents will attest they’ve not seen in
their lifetime. There are pictures
and video to show high water on
the north side of the tracks, and al-
most NO water on the south side.
There was mention at this meet-
ing that the flooding incident of
2008 could’ve been due to debris
and dead trees impeding the flow of
water and if it weren’t for those is-
sues, the current waterway
would’ve been sufficient to expel
the floodwater ... after all, there
was a “study done.” My simple
mind tells me that any study done
would account for debris, fallen
trees and even ice jams as they will
certainly always exist – one would
think.
I would like to conclude by reit-
erating that the Dakota Mill and
Grain project could be a welcome
economic addition to our area and
that the project will have little ef-
fect on flooding issues that already
exist; they plan to block only a
small portion of the reduced trestle
area that is there now.
Expansion of more drainage to
the west was discussed and that
might be adequate, but it appears
to be higher ground to the west.
Whether or not the Dakota Mill
and Grain project moves forward
has little to do with future flooding
of our town. There was a reason the
long trestle was built almost 100
years ago and it proved to be effec-
tive; less than 10 years after it was
downsized it was proven that it
shouldn’t have been. It might be a
good time to re-evaluate ... if noth-
ing is done, everyone on lower
ground should be prepared.
Sincerely,
/s/ Jason Rhodes
Philip, SD
* * * * * * * *
To the editor,
After reading last week’s letter
to the editor from Jeanie Waara, I
would like to add a few things to
her list of good things about the lit-
tle town of Philip.
I am fortunate to live in the
Senechal, and agreed with every-
thing she said about our town.
I’d just like to add to her list. We
do have the finest funeral home
and director in this state, a great
bowling alley not available in many
of our small towns, also a very good
library. The volunteer groups like
the Community Betterment Com-
mittee and Haakon County Young
Women and many, many others
who do volunteer work is just
amazing.
Philip, S.D., certainly is a great
place to live.
/s/Shirley Parsons
proud resident of Philip, S.D.
* * * * * * * *
Dear Editor,
I read with interest and nostal-
gia about the Scottie cross country
team and their achievements at the
state meet in Huron.
I was on the cross country state
champion team from Rapid City
High School for three consecutive
years in 1948, 1949 and 1950. At
that time there was only one public
junior/senior high school in Rapid
City, the building now being reno-
vated and last used as Dakota Mid-
dle School.
Things were a lot different back
then – almost in the stone age!
High school sports have changed
drastically. (That was before the
four minute mile barrier had been
broken.) All track events were
measured in the English measur-
ing system instead of the metric
system. Many records have been
broken since then and sports train-
ing has become more of a science.
In those years, the only high school
sports events were football, basket-
ball, and the various events of the
spring track season with cross
country in the fall during football
season. There were no girls
sports,  unless you count  intra-
mural   basketball. Girls were ex-
pected to be satisfied by being the
cheering squads.
The regional cross country com-
petition I participated in was in the
Black Hills area schools and that
competition consisted of running
eight times around the quarter-
mile tracks during the halftime of
football games. Some of those took
place at O'Hare Stadium at South
Dakota School of Mines and Tech-
nology.
The state cross country track
meet was always held at Brookings
during South Dakota State Univer-
sity’s Hobo Day. It took place at a
golf course on the north edge of
town. There were four of us boys on
our team who qualified to go to the
state  meet. We rode with Coach
Cobb in his car and took two days
to get there, staying overnight in
Pierre. (Cobb was also the athletic
director in RCHS and the one from
whom the Cobblers got their
name.) Our team was determined
to be the first three of us four boys
to place at the state meet. Our in-
dividual placements were totaled
to determine our team placement
as the champion team.
According to my recollection, the
course we ran must have been a
nine hole golf course. The starting
point was near the club house.
Each team had a lead man and the
others were lined up behind him.
We had to go around a flag out a
couple  hundred yards or so, and
come back past the starting point
to round the next flag. One had to
be out in the front in order to avoid
a ‘traffic jam’ in the mob at that
first flag. There were some obsta-
cles on that course. We had to ei-
ther take a turn at using a plank to
get across a ditch with water or run
through the water. At one point in
the course there was a dip with
rather tall weeds which we had to
run through or jog around the dip.
The distance of the course was a bit
over two miles. The cross country
event took place in the morning.
The timing was such that we were
able to view the homecoming pa-
rade and were given complimen-
tary tickets to the afternoon foot-
ball game.
/s/Loren Kiel
Quinn, S.D.
Letters to the Editor
United Blood Services announces
a community blood drive to stock
hospitals’ shelves for this year’s on-
going flu season.
Those who plan to donate blood
must be healthy. “If somebody has
flu symptoms, we ask that they
wait to donate until they are 100
percent recovered,” said Lori Lieb-
man, donor recruitment director of
United Blood Services, explaining
that the blood center has been get-
ting lots of questions regarding the
flu shot and blood donation.
If you have received a seasonal
or H1N1 flu vaccine, there’s no
need to wait to donate blood; you
can receive the shot and still do-
nate blood later that day.
Hero status is not reserved only
for those brave men and women
who rush into burning buildings or
step into the front lines of war.
“There’s a hero in all of us,” said
Lori Liebman, donor recruitment
director of United Blood Services,
this area’s non-profit community
blood service provider. “Ordinary
people are saving lives every day.
They do it while they are on lunch
break or while they are running er-
rands. They have found the hero in
themselves by donating blood.”
Several years ago, United Blood
Services took the innovative step of
highlighting donors, rather than
patients, in its blood drive posters
and materials. The organization
continues that focus with a new na-
tional marketing campaign that in-
vites people to “find the hero in
you” by donating blood three times
a year. “We asked a donor, a young
man, hey he gives fo consistently
three or four times a yea,” said
Liebman. “He said, ‘It feels so good
to save someone’s life. Why would
you do it just once?”
To encourage the habit of blood
donation, United Blood Services
has expanded its rewards program.
Donors can earn points for donat-
ing frequently and staying involved
year after year. The points are re-
deemable for movie and restaurant
gift certificates and other prizes.
Find the hero in you at the up-
coming National Mutual Benefit
#85 blood drive, Tuesday, Novem-
ber 13, from 10:30 a.m. to 6:00 at
the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Cen-
ter. Contact Maureen Palecek at
859-2655 for an appointment.
Volunteer blood donors must be
at least 16 years old, weigh at least
110 pounds and be in good health.
Additional height and weight re-
quirements apply to donors 22 and
younger, and donors who are 16 (or
17 in certain areas) must have
signed permission from a parent or
guardian.
Potential donors can make an
appointment to give at www.blood-
hero.com or by calling Maureen
Palecek at 859-2655, or United
Blood Services at 342-8585 in
Rapid City or 996-3688 in Mitchell.
Donors will receive a free choles-
terol test. Find the hero in you ...
donate blood three times a year.
Community blood drive November 13
The playoffs for the Black Hills
Youth Football League are com-
pleted. In the Mighty Mite age di-
vision, the Wall Eagles – made up
of area youth from Philip, Wall and
Kadoka – defeated the Broncos 7-6.
In the Junior Pee Wee age divi-
sion, the Eagles defeated the Steel-
ers 19-6. The playoffs for both these
divisions were held at the Rapid
City Christian High School, south
of Rapid City, Saturday, October
27.
In the Pee Wee age division, the
Eagles lost to the Rams 8-29. That
playoff game was held at Sturgis
High School’s Woodle Field, Tues-
day, October 23.
Both of the winning age divisions
of the Eagles will play their super-
bowl finals Sunday, November 4, in
Rapid City on the South Dakota
School of Mines and Technology
football field. The younger group
will play at 3:00 p.m. against the
Vikings. The older group will play
at 4:30 p.m. against the Rams
Blue.
Youth football in finals
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your
phone number to: news-
desk@pioneer-review.com
Using Soil
Survey Information
While many producers are fa-
miliar with the land they farm, the
drought of 2012 was very revealing
in how various soils hold water
compared to others. There were
areas that demonstrated excellent,
fair, and poor crop conditions in
the same field. Water holding ca-
pacities of different soil types
made a considerable difference in
the crops ability to survive the
drought stress.
There may be cases where a
field is predominantly made up of
a particular soil type that makes it
a poor candidate for certain crops.
Shallow soils with a low water
holding capacity for example,
might be poor candidates for full
season crops like corn, as they are
unable to store enough moisture to
produce a reasonable yield; and
rainfall during the latter part of
the growing season can be highly
unreliable.
There are some strategies a pro-
ducer could use to manage prob-
lem soils, like careful choice of
crops and crop rotations, planting
cover crops, etc. Progress would
likely be slow, and come in small
steps, but about all one could do to
improve production.
The first step is to find out more
about the soils you are dealing
with. All of South Dakota has been
surveyed for soil type and charac-
teristics. Many, if not all counties
have published soil survey books
that were provided to landowners,
and may be available at local li-
braries, Natural Resource Conser-
vation Service (NRCS) offices,
County Extension offices, etc. For
several years, the USDA-NRCS
has had the Web Soil Survey
(WSS) online: http://websoilsur-
vey. nrcs. usda. gov/ app/ Home-
Page.htm. The Web Soil Survey
contains more information than
the published soil surveys, and is
regularly updated with new op-
tions, features and data.
Chapter 18, “Online Web Soil
Survey (WSS) Information”, of
“iGrow Wheat: Best Management
Practices for Wheat Production”,
written by Doug Malo, Assistant
Department Head/Distinguished
Professor in the SDSU Plant Sci-
ence Department contains an ex-
tensive explanation of the WSS. In
addition to providing a comprehen-
sive guide to using the site, the
chapter contains a nice list of on-
line sources of soils and natural re-
sources information.
With the cost of land, fertilizer,
seed, machinery, fuel and other in-
puts in farming today, and the
prices of agricultural commodities,
farmers can enjoy significant re-
turns by using management to op-
timize their productivity. With
modern GPS technology, soil sur-
vey data yield monitoring data and
scouting reports, it may be possible
to increase profitability and reduce
the impact of agriculture on the
environment.
Chapter 18, “Online Web Soil
Survey (WSS) Information”, of
“iGrow Wheat: Best Management
Practices for Wheat Production”
should be posted in the “Resource
Library” of “iGrow Wheat”: http://
igrow.org/agronomy/wheat/ in the
near future. You can also purchase
a printed copy of “iGrow Wheat:
Best Management Practices for
Wheat Production” at the iGrow
Store: http://igrow.org/store/.
Calendar
11/27-28: Ag Horizons Confer-
ence, Pierre
12/11: Soil Health Info Day-
Davison County Extension Com-
plex, Mitchell,
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
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–Golden Malrin Fly Bait
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Rural Living
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
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Since 1906
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New Rainfall Insurance For 2013 Pasture & Hayland
Contact Crew Agencyfor details.
Sales close date is November 15, 2012
New Rainfall Insurance For 2013 Pasture & Hayland
Contact Crew Agencyfor details.
Sales close date is November 15, 2012
The Pasture, Rangeland & Forage – Rainfall Index (PRF-RI) is based on NOAA data and uses an approximate
12x12 mile grid. Producers must select at least two, two-month time periods in which precipitation is important
for the growth and production of forage/pasture. These time periods are called index intervals. Insurance pay-
ments to the producer suffering a loss are calculated based on the deviation from normal precipitation with
the grid and index intervals selected. This insurance coverage is for a single peril – lack of precipitation.
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Philip
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Beautiful rig!!
The outlook for reducing South
Dakota's nagging drought does not
appear promising based on the Oc-
tober 18 Climate Prediction Cen-
ter's long-range outlook.
“Drought appears to be getting
worse rather than better," said
Laura Edwards, South Dakota
State University Extension climate
field specialist. "We have been hop-
ing for improving our situation this
fall, but the state is getting drier
instead of wetter."
Edwards adds that the long-
range drought outlook depicts per-
sisting drought into the winter sea-
son. This week's U.S. Seasonal
Drought Outlook shows the same
forecast for most of the surround-
ing states of North Dakota, Mon-
tana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Iowa
and southern Minnesota.
Edwards said according to the
outlooks, there is a higher probabil-
ity of above average temperatures
through January.
"This is combined with equal
chances of above, below or near
normal precipitation for November
through January. One exception is
the southeastern part of the state,
which currently has higher proba-
bility of being drier than average
through January," Edwards said.
Because the winter months are
generally the driest of the year,
Dennis Todey, SDSU state clima-
tologist says it will be difficult to
get much drought relief during the
winter months, even in a normal
year.
"We may see some short-term
drought relief on and off through-
out the winter, but folks should be
prepared for this drought to carry
into the spring," Todey said.
He added that last spring's soil
moisture carried the crops in many
areas of the state through the first
several weeks of drought this year.
"South Dakota farmers won't
have the same soil conditions going
into the next planting season. Win-
ter wheat growers have already
been impacted by the dry condi-
tions, as emergence of that crop is
currently far below the five year
average," Todey said.
To learn more visit iGrow.org.
Drought likely to persist
through winter season
Coordinating efforts with the
Governor’s Drought Task Force,
the South Dakota Department of
Agriculture is asking farmers and
ranchers who struggled with this
year’s extreme drought conditions
to send in their ideas on drought
disaster relief.
“SDDA wants to know how we
can best help our producers
through this drought year,” said
Walt Bones, South Dakota Secre-
tary of Agriculture. “Hearing their
ideas first-hand is the best way to
do that.”
Producers are encouraged to e-
mail their comments and sugges-
tions by Friday, November 16, to
agmail@state.sd.us, call call 773-
5425 or write the South Dakota De-
partment of Agriculture, 523 E
Capitol Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501.
Department of Ag seeks
input on disaster relief
A large group of neighbors and
friends enjoyed coffee and rolls
with Rich Smith for his 95th birth-
day at his house. Those who came
to wish him happy birthday were
Mike and Gretchen Rausch, Wasta,
Bob and Kathy Hamann, Wall,
Henry and Nellie Chapel, Gillette,
Wyo., Esther Oldenberg, John Old-
enberg, Marvin and Phyllis Cole-
man, Dennis and Mike Sieler,
Quinn, Larry Smith and his daugh-
ter and granddaughter, Linsey and
Mesa Mangus, Newell, John Knut-
son, Doug Thorson, Herb and
Hazel Sieler, Tucker and Jess
Smith and Logan, Kieth and Deb
Smith, Arlie Smith and friend Dee
Dee Annacot, Casper, Wyo., Barb
(Smith) Coy, Sundance, Wyo.,
Janet Lurz, Wall, and Marvin,
Vicki and Mary Eide.
After coffee, the Smiths asked
me to stay and have lunch with
them which consisted of three
kinds of soup, chicken noodle,
chicken and rice and chili. There
was also a tossed salad and birth-
day cake that his granddaughter,
Colby, had made him before she
had returned to college, not being
able to be there for his birthday.
After lunch, I went into Philip to
get a few things and take the
Grindstone news in. Rich’s daugh-
ters, Joyce, Colleen, Barb and
Janet, had spent several days this
week giving Rich’s house the an-
nual fall house cleaning. Joyce and
Colleen had to leave the day prior
to the coffee/birthday party.
Friday, October 26, Kieth and
Deb Smith were in Aberdeen to
visit Lincoln and to attend two vol-
leyball games at Northern State
University where Lincoln’s girl-
friend, Ella, plays with the team.
Lincoln will be graduating from
NSU December 8.
Marvin and Vicki Eide worked
cattle this week and took their
calves to the sale Tuesday. Those
helping were Kieth and Tucker
Smith, Paul and Casey Slovek,
Trevor and Jensen Fitch. Then Fri-
day, they pregnancy tested and
sorted old cows and dry cows off to
take in to sell later on. Here to help
were grandchildren, Brayden, Kea-
gan, Colby and Jensen. Kieth,
Tucker and Rich Smith also came
along and one person from the
Slovek ranch. I don’t intend to
leave anyone out, I just see who
comes and goes at times. Anyway,
they have a lot of good help.
I went into the sale to watch the
calves sell and ate dinner at the
sale barn and Shirley O’Connor in-
vited me to sit with her and
Chuck’s cousin, Sara (Hart) Bliz-
zard, who is visiting them. Sara
planned to go to visit Dorothy
Urban while she is here. Then,
Frank Narcisian, Chuck’s brother-
in-law, came over and visited
awhile. He said that Rita wasn’t
with him on this trip.
While at the sale, I visited with
some Amish people who were here
from the Amish colonies in Iowa.
The husband was buying cattle for
the colonies’ feedlot. They had 13
children with them and each older
child was responsible and looked
after a younger sibling. The
youngest was about seven months
old. I don’t know what they were
driving, but it would take a large
van or bus to haul that many. The
children were well-behaved and
were very polite to me and when I
dropped my pencil, one of the
smaller ones came and picked it up
and gave it to me.
Wednesday, October 24, we re-
ceived .45” of rain. That was great,
we can use much more though.
There was some snow on the
ground south of us, but it never
stuck to the ground here at home.
Maybe once it gets started, it will
keep coming. I heard several say
they would even take snow, as this
ground is in for a big blowout if we
don’t get something in the line of
moisture.
Marvin, Vicki and Mary Eide
and Cliff and Rita Ramsey at-
tended the Milesville Volunteer
Fire Department’s Halloween
party, supper and spook house at
the Milesville Hall on October 26.
A nice crowd was in attendance.
We enjoyed seeing all the children
who were dressed up in their cos-
tumes, there were also some adults
who were also dressed up. There
were a lot of cakes for the cake
walk and prizes were given for the
best carved pumpkins and my
name was drawn and I received a
very nice t-shirt with the Milesville
fire department logo on it. I think
nearly everyone in attendance
came home with something from
the drawings. They also had sev-
eral games to play. Just some good
entertainment for everyone, young
and old. Hats off to the fire depart-
ment for a great evening.
They also posted on a bulletin
board a list of names and donations
they had received from Philip and
the surrounding area.
Tucker and Jess Smith attended
the supper and masquerade party
in Quinn Friday night. Tucker’s
mom, Debbie, has been busy
sewing Tucker’s costume during
the week. Someone told me Jess
helped to organize the party.
Bob Thorson and his fiancée,
Jodi, attended the masquerade in
Philip. Jodi went to Utah where
her family has a cabin and all her
family was gathered for hunting.
She returned Friday and brought
her folks back with her to spend
some time with them. Bob said he
has his calves all weaned, so it will
take some extra work till he gets
them ready to sell.
Herb and Hazel Sieler and Den-
nis, Kay and Mike Sieler all went
to Mud Butte to bring their cattle
home for the winter Saturday.
Monte Denke went along to help
haul them home. Sunday, they all
attended church and then they all
worked cattle at Herb’s.
Herb and Hazel’s grandson,
Evan Clark, got hurt while playing
football and tore something loose in
his knee and will have surgery on
it Wednesday. So they waiting to
hear how that turns out.
John and Arnis Knutson left
Thursday for Brookings to visit
their son, C.J., and to celebrate
their daughter, Katie, and daugh-
ter-in-law, Jill’s, birthdays. They
also had lunch with Beaue and
Aran Denker. They returned home
Saturday.
If you would reap praise, you
must sow the seeds, gentle words
and useful deeds. Benjamin
Franklin
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Hit & Miss
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Nov. 1: Chicken
Lasagna, Prince Edward Veggies,
Garlic Bread, Lemon Cake.
Friday, Nov. 2: Potato En-
crusted Cod, Twice Baked Mashed
Potatoes, Key Biscayne Veggies,
Roll, Diced Peaches.
Monday, Nov. 5: Beef
Rouladen, Red Mashed, Cabbage
Supreme, Roll, Kirsch Torte.
Tuesday., Nov. 6: Bourbon
Chicken, Baby Bakers, Malibu
Veggies, Roll, Pistachio Eclair
Dessert.
Wednesday, Nov. 7: Pit Ham,
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy,
Cheesy Beans, Corn Muffin, 7
Layer Bar.
***
Saturday, October 20, Shawn,
driving the Somerset Court bus full
of residents went to the funeral of
Lewis Tracy. A reception was held
on second floor at Somerset Court
for his family.
My granddaughter, Sheridan
Hansen, came and took me to a
party. Two young ladies, Kaitlin
and her friend, were there to be
with Sheridan’s children, Cecelia
and Tiger. Tina Wiese was the in-
structor and she explained the ben-
efits of each product and explained
their application. Another repre-
sentative there was, Nancy Mc-
Quon, White Owl. We used to know
Nancy’s mother, Joyce (Benson)
Chord’s, family. I remember Lycur-
gus and Hubert Benson because
they would be at dances. Anna
Benson married Harry Hanson of
the Olaf Hanson tribe.
At Somerset Court, med-aide
Robyn said that she would bring
crocheted slipper socks or cro-
cheted cowboy boots and other
footwear she makes. She would
make some for residents if we
wished to buy them.
Saturday afternoon, October 20,
at Somerset Court on third floor,
Marilyn Oyler had a birthday
party. A big decorated cake and cof-
fee and juice were served. The
Oyler family shared a hug gorgeous
bouquet they had brought for Mar-
ilyn’s 90th birthday party and it is
on display in the Somerset Court
dining room. Some of the young-
sters played pool.
Mary Lou Peters, Addie Rorvig,
Violet Jenison, Susan and Vivian
all played bananagrams. Mary Lou
took the instructions to make a few
enlarged copies. Thank you, Mary
Lou.
John Kraft joined his mother,
Marcella, at supper Saturday
evening.
My grandpa, Herbert Russell
Palmer, wrote this little ditty in
1889 in his own handwriting: “On
the 18th of December in 1889,
along the seam of Poinsett, we
were fishing in a line. Phelps and
Matthews on the iceboat, with a
fair wind at their back, they en-
tered the rolling water within the
gaping crack … up the rigging
Matthews, went like a coon upon a
log. And into the water, Phelps
went out. He took off his clothes
and began to wring them out!
Phelps came in and said, “I’m wet
to the skin!” Matthews said, “Why
sir, I didn’t think the ice would let
us in!” … Come old and young now
listen and just take my advise, …
Don’t run your little iceboat too
near the broken ice!”
Sunday at Somerset Court, Floy
Olson had company at breakfast,
her daughter, Rita Bordeaux, and
grandson, Carlito Chavez. Carlito
had a dinosaur that could change
into a car and then back into a di-
nosaur.
Marilyn Oyler’s photo was in the
Rapid City Journal Sunday, Octo-
ber 21.
Marilyn Butts returned from her
trip with her nephew, Robert Dol-
lagher, to Wagner and Bonesteel
area, and they took a tour of the
Badlands. They saw two semis
blown over, one by Ft. Randall and
one other but I can’t read my writ-
ing!
Kids get too much candy on Hal-
loween. I did see one newspaper
item, that said that excess candy
could be shared with servicemen
and women overseas. I don’t know
who would send it. Maybe Socks for
Troops made by the Project
Warmth quilters.
I phoned my son, Hans P.
Hansen. He said that he had
painted a birthday card for his
brother, M.R. Hansen. He also said
that Coke is 53 cents, now that he
is officially a senior citizen.
For church services October 21,
Jack Humke was our pianist. He
played “Showers of Blessings” and
said to keep praying for rain. Steve
was our speaker. (Terry and Ardis
were on a trip.) Steve said he was
going to talk about mothers. He
had just been to North Platte, Neb.,
to visit his parents for a few days.
He was thankful for his childhood.
Mothers know what is good for
their children and there’s things
more important than schedules
and books on child rearing. He read
the responses in the back of the
hymnals about women who have
been called blessed. Somewhere
the phrase came up “The Hand
That Rocks the Cradle Rules the
World.”
After church, Floy, Irene C.,
Irene A., Ina, and Vivian played a
little whist all the way to supper
time. Irene had been to a wedding
shower for her godchild.
Monday, October 22, we had
crafts with Amy and we made
cutesy doo-dads. They were stick-
on candy corn mice with a broom
and sort of a Halloween motif.
Those who attended were Fred
Smith, Mildred Young and her
helper, Kay Daughterty, Eileen
Tenold, Shirley Horn and her
helper, Doris Black, Marge Self,
and Vivian. Shawn and Sandy got
back from the donut shop in time to
help.
Our Somerset Court Monday
movie was “Big Daddy.” Adam San-
dler has a lot of charm, but I
thought it was unfortunate that he
was such a brat. None of us left the
movie. But it was painful to see
him being such a goofy foster dad.
Our activity directors have re-
quested us to tell them what
movies we would like to see. So far,
I have had suggestions of “Doctor
Zhivago,” “Kindergarten Cop,”
“The Last Song,” with Nicholas
Sparks and “The Odd Life of Timo-
thy Green.” Please suggest movies
you would like. After the movie, we
played some rummi-cube and ba-
nanagrams.
Happy birthday to my niece,
Alma Schilling, Redfield, on Octo-
ber 24.
Recently the Rapid City Journal
had an item about old friends who
were old-time residents of my old
home neighborhood of Philip and
the surrounding territory, DeMaris
and Erv Nesheim. The Nesheims
were honored as South Dakota’s
outstanding philanthropists of the
year. South Dakota Governor Den-
nis Daugaard presented the award
at a celebration in Rapid City. The
Nesheims were nominated for the
governor’s award by Lutherans
Outdoors in South Dakota,
Lutheran Social Services and the
City of Philip.
In the Philip Pioneer Review’s
Grindstone News, I was pleased to
read about a party at the Philip
Nursing Home. Chuck and Ruth
Ann Carstensen played music for
the residents and guests. Ruth
plays bass and Chuck lead guitar.
Marianne Frein played the accor-
dion and Tammi Carstensen
played the flat top. Wheelchair res-
idents joined the dancing with
their helpers.
Somerset Court resident Pat Sta-
ley has a sister, Kathryn Dennis,
who wrote a book call “And Then …
We Danced.” Kathryn has given a
copy of her book to the Somerset
Court library. Thank you, Kathryn.
The book is about early life in
Meade County. I can’t wait to read
it and put it on the Somerset book
shelves. (It is in big print, maybe a
16 font.)
Thank you to my daughter,
Carol, Colorado Springs, for telling
me about two books by Sam Kean.
“The Violinist’s Thumb” deals with
DNA and RNA and Watson and
Crick and the whole bit about how
(and most every living thing) are
put together. “The Disappearing
Spoon” tells about atoms and how
they get along, some absorbing,
some repelling others, or whatever
they are set up to do. Both books
are fascinating. I think my son,
Leslie, would like “The Violinist’s
Thumb” because it has word puz-
zles something like he constructs.
There are palindromes, and on
page 183, we find one of Leslie’s
words, boustrophodonic. (As the ox
plows.) The language is rich, and
even at times uses some of our col-
loquial phrases such as ain’t or ass-
backwards.
Tuesday, October 23, we had the
activity of ring the goblins. Liter
bottles were decorated with color-
ful Halloween pictures and we
tried to ring then with stiff rope
quoits. There was a tendency to low
scores. Irene McKnight won one
game and Eileen Tenold the other.
At Somerset Court, bingo winners
were Irene Cox, twice, Doris Well-
man, twice, Fred, Blanche, An-
netta, Jim Hilton, and Irene McK-
night. For the birthday bash, we
had a big, decorated chocolate cake
and vanilla ice cream. We sang
“Happy Birthday, God Bless You.”
Residents whose birthday we cele-
brated were Berniece Christenson,
Billie Stevens, Marge Self, Jerry
Muzzy, Edna Wulff, and staff birth-
day of our nurse, Becky, John
Gerdes, P.J. Meghan Benson and
Karen Nohm. Marge S., and Mari-
lyn B. played a little pool. Irene C.,
Addie R., MaryLou, Susan and Vi-
vian played a little quiddler.
October 23, Mike Birnbaum,
Rapid City, son of Alma Gruenig,
stopped in at Somerset Court to
help her with her computer. Her
son, Terry, Chadron, came for sup-
per. Mike knew Casey and Pat Sea-
ger from Philip and had been in the
National Guards with Pat.
Mike Kilmer played for us at
Somerset Court Tuesday evening.
Thank you, Mike. He was unan-
nounced, but quite a few residents
stopped by to hear him.
October 24, it was sprinkling by
9 a.m. and by 10 a.m. it was start-
ing to snow. This is the first mois-
ture we have seen for a long time.
It was still snowing gently at 4 p.m.
At Somerset Court we made
spook houses. Shawn and Sandy
were there to help and Floy, Vi,
Jeannie, MaryLou, Marjorie and
Vivian made the little chocolate
graham cracker houses with much
of Sandy’s egg white confectionery
glue. We took a photo. No two
alike, all weird. Hopefully they will
be displayed in the front lobby,
maybe on the front desk.
M.R. Hansen came Wednesday
for scrabble and we used some
words that were new to us (zax, a
tool for cutting slates for a roof,
gabion, a wire basket to hold rocks
to make weights, hest, a com-
mand.) M.R. Hansen had been
gone to Canada with his wife Bar-
bara and 10 SDSM&T students.
They attended a civil engineers
conference in Montreal, Quebec,
and then six students returned to
Rapid City and four students and
M.R. and Barbara went on to the
International Concrete Conference
in Toronto, Ontario. M.R.’s instruc-
tor in North Carolina State, Dr.
Zia, was there.
Remember, coffee filters have a
good texture for cutting out
snowflakes.
Ken Monette has started reading
Pat Staley’s sister’s book, “And
Then … We Danced.” He reported
that it was good. You can find it on
the table by the coffee table by the
fireplace at Somerset Court.
Our seven spook houses are on
display on a ledge in the front lobby
at Somerset Court. We think that
they are delightful. Vote for your
favorite, the winner gets Somerset
Court bucks.
It is said that Rapid City re-
ceived .1” of snow on October 24,
2012, Wayne Hansen said that the
ground is still white up at the west
edge of Rapid City.
Wii bowling scores for Thurs-
day’s game were as follows: Fred,
148, Irene McK., 149, Addie, 177,
Eileen, 116, Mary Lou, 130, Jean-
nie, 147, Irene C., 126, Jim
Holmes, 128, Marilyn B., 152,
Sandy, 154, and Susan, 125.
Somerset Court Thursday bingo
winners were Doris, Floy, Doris,
Irene Cox, Don, Jim Hilton, Violet,
MaryLou, Maxine and Alma.
Snack and chat treats were apple
slices with caramel syrup.
Wayne Hansen came for supper
and took me along to the airport to
pick up his wife, Gwynn Hansen. I
had not seen the airport since it
had been redecorated. There are
pretty pictures of Black Hills
scenery and realistic pictures of the
South Dakota Badlands. Lower
parts of the walls are finished with
sheets of rock to form a tile pattern
and a big statuary out front shows
a Native American standing on a
globe holding an airplane on one
hand and a feather headdress
hangs out of his suitcase. Thank
you, Wayne.
The October 25, 2012, Philip Pi-
oneer Review, related that the
Trinity Lutheran Church in Mid-
land had their annual lutefisk sup-
per October 17. It is a big event,
and people come from Philip and
all over. It was too windy for the
bus to bring folks from Philip this
year. My son, Wayne and his wife,
Gwynn, have taken me to the Mid-
land lutefisk supper in past years.
Treasure the memories.
Friday, Susan, Shawn and
Sandy cleaned and sanitized walk-
ers and wheelchairs. Thank you,
activity directors. Our walkers are
all shined up and healthy. We
played some table games, rummi-
cube, with Violet, Sandy, Addie
and Vivian and whist with Mary-
Lou, Irene A., Irene Cox and
Susan. A little later, some pinochle
was played.
Last Sunday, Blessed Kateri
Tekakwitha, Native American, was
declared a saint. It is unusual that
someone who lived so recently
should receive sainthood. A few
years ago, Barbara Hansen gave
me a Tekakwitha t-shirt.
On third floor at Somerset Court,
there were a number of really
pretty Halloween doorways. Irene
Arbach has a jack-o-lantern that
changes colors continuously! Irene
Cox has a clever wooden-head that
she made with a little firewood log.
Connie Stevens has a theme of au-
tumn leaves and pumpkins.
Blanche Harmon has a big lighted
jack-o-lantern that is made of wire,
midst a background of Halloween
fabric. In the overpass, you can
enjoy the colored light from the
brown bottles on the window sill.
PLEASE email your news to us!!
betty@pioneer-review.com
The family of
Mary Slovek
would like to invite
you to her
80th birthday
party
Sat., November 3rd
2:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center
Downtown Philip
Cards may be sent to her at:
419 E. Oak St., Apt. 24, New Underwood, SD 57761
(No gifts, please)
November 2-3-4-5:
Pitch Perfect (PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
November 9-10-11-12:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
November 16-17-18-19:
Taken 2 (PG-13)
November 23-24-25-26:
Here Comes the Boom (PG)
November 30-December 1-2-3:
Wreck It Ralph (PG)
December 7-8-9-10: The Twilight
Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (PG-13)
We Are Here
Emily Wickstrom, Rural Advocate
for Missouri Shores Domestic Vi-
olence Center, will be at the
Haakon Co. Courthouse on
~ TUESDAY ~
November 6th
10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
For more information, call
1-800-696-7187
Domestic Violence, Sexual As-
sault, Dating Violence
Emily is also available for
presentations to any group
Church & Community Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
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yìcld yoursclvcs scrvanls lo obcy.
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obcy: whclhcr ol sìn unlo dcalh.
or ol obcdìcncc unlo
rìghlcousncss?
Romans 6:16 (KlV)
\hom do vou serve: Cod, ríght: Are vou sure: ls there nothíng eíse ín
íííe vou're consumed víth und vouíd do unvthíng to get: lover,
prestíge, possessíons: lí ve uren't cureíuí, ve cun become consumed
víth evervthíng but Cod und submít to sín vhích vííí end ín deuth.
Obituaries
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859-2744 or 685-3068
Philip
2012 Chevy Silverado 1500
Crew Cab, 4x4, Full Factory
Warranty, 6.2L Vortex, 400 HP,
6 speed AT, heavy duty towing
package, loaded, bright red,
430 miles
Linda L. Wilkie_________________
Linda Lee Wilkie, 59, of Rapid
City, S.D., died on Monday, Octo-
ber 22, 2012 at Rapid City Regional
Hospital.
Linda was born in Rapid City on
June 17, 1953, to Ed and Opal (An-
derson) Bodkin. She grew up in the
Billsburg/Milesville area and then
the family moved to Philip, where
she graduated from high school in
1971 and from Karl John’s Beauty
College in 1973.
Linda married William “Bill”
Wilkie on December 26, 1973. Bill
and Linda had four children,
Tanya, Tracy, Travis and Sherri.
Linda worked as a hairstylist
and she has worked off and on at
McDonalds for the past 16 years
where Rob referred to her as his
“Egg McMuffin of employees.”
Linda loved her kids and espe-
cially her grandkids, working at
McDonald’s, making beautiful
scrapbooking pages of her kids,
grandkids, nieces and nephews,
and friends children, and rummage
saling on Saturdays.
You never had to wonder what
Linda was thinking, because she
just said it, even if you didn’t want
to hear it.
Linda is survived by her hus-
band, Bill Wilkie, of Rapid City;
her children, Tanya Sybert of
Rapid City, Tracy (Lenn) Vessell of
Pensicola, Fla., Travis (Michele)
Wilkie of Huron, Sherri (Curtis
Colvin) Wilkie of Box Elder, Scott
Arguello of Rapid City; nine grand-
children, Katelyn, Samantha,
Kasey, Briana, Jared, Brady, Zach-
ery, Brennen and Hailey; and three
sisters, Betty (Jack) Sagdalen of
Keystone, Karen (Ed) Snyder of
Philip, and Donna Craven of Rapid
City, and numerous nieces and
nephews.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, Ed and Opal Bodkin;
a nephew, Doug Shields; her
mother- and father-in-law, Roy and
Jo-Ann Wilkie.
Services were held Friday, Octo-
ber 26, at Kirk Funeral Home with
the Rev. Jack Jewett officiating.
Interment was at Mountain
View Cemetery in Rapid City.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Friends may sign Linda’s online
guestbook at www.kirkfuneral-
home.com.
Wendell R. Hagan_______________
Wendell R. Hagan, 85, of Rapid
City and formerly of Midland, S.D.,
reunited with the Lord on October
25, 2012, at the Ft. Meade VA Med-
ical Center Hospice with his family
at his side.
Wendell Rex Hagan was born on
October 19, 1927, the son of Pat
and Ethyl (Dennis) Hagan at
Bunker.
Wendell served in the U.S. Ma-
rine Corps during WWII. He was
united in marriage to Grace
(Stotts) on September 4, 1948.
They farmed and ranched in the
Midland area for many years.
He is survived by one son, Larry
(Rose) Hagan, St. Cloud, Minn.,
two daughters, Mary (Ducie) Hulce
of Rapid City and Peggy (Mike)
Martin of North Pole, Alaska; 10
grandchildren, Patrick (Brenda)
Hagan, Nick (Malay) Hagan, Terra
(Tim) Duda, Kyleen (Shane) Liebig,
Britney and Brianna Hulce,
Nathan (Kristin) Martin, Heath
(Billie Jo) Martin, Ashley and
Grace Martin; eight great-grand-
children, Kaycee Darrow, Tianna
Duda, Tyler Liebig, Tanya, Telissa,
Branden, Macy Bell, and Ashton
Martin; one brother, Dick (Dar-
lene) Hagan; and four sisters,
Mary Lou Torres, Patty (Ulane)
Finn, Phyllis (Robert) Gural, and
Shirley (Don) Reed.
Wendell was preceded in death
by his parents; his wife, Grace; a
son-in-law, Terry Hulce; a brother,
Verlyn; and a sister, Diane Mad-
sen.
Wendell’s request was to not
have a funeral service, just to re-
member our time together, the love
laughter, and sharing. If you
choose to do something in my mem-
ory, show someone, preferably a
child, some extra kindness.
Graveside services were held Oc-
tober 29, 2012, at the Midland
Cemetery with Lyle Dennis offici-
ating.
Military honors were provided
by the Midland American Legion.
An online guestbook is available
at www.kirkfuneralhome.com
Barbara Stone_________________________________
Barbara Stone, 79, of Kadoka,
S.D., died Sunday, October 28,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Barbara Ann Hedeen was born
August 2, 1933, in Kadoka, the
daughter of Roy M. and Margaret
(Nielsen) Hedeen. She grew up in
Kadoka, graduating from Kadoka
High School in 1951.
Barbara was united in marriage
to Eldon “Gene” Stone on June 8,
1953, in Rapid City, and they were
happily married for 58 years.
She lived most of her life in
Kadoka, except for about 20 years,
when she moved with Gene as he
found more exciting teaching and
coaching positions.
She was always a hardworking
woman, holding down many jobs
while raising a loving family. Her
family was her first love, but the
children in the community were al-
ways her second. Many children
and young adults own blankets and
quilts, that have been crocheted or
embroidered by her loving hands.
Her greatest enjoyment was her
reading. She looked forward to the
new books she found at the library.
She was a lifelong member of the
American Legion Auxiliary, and a
member of the Presbyterian
Church in Penrose, Colo.
Survivors include five sons, Bill
Stone of Kadoka, Cliff Stone of
Kadoka, Jody Stone and his wife,
Sunday, of Hot Springs, Jerome
“Zeke” Stone of Kadoka, and Brad
Stone and his wife, Kristie, of
Kadoka; three daughters, Chris
Cope and her husband, Drew, of
Evanston, Wyo., Cathy Stone of
Kadoka, and Laurie Prichard and
her husband, Cleve, of Kadoka; 23
grandchildren; seven great-grand-
children; one sister, Viola Olney
and her husband, Russ, of Kadoka;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Barbara was preceded in death
by her husband, Gene Stone, on
February 19, 2012; her daughter,
Peggy Stone; a grandson, Todd
Prichard; and two sisters, Ethel
Anderson and Delores Smith.
Memorial services will be held at
10:00 a.m. Thursday, November 1,
at the Presbyterian Church in
Kadoka with Pastor Gary McCub-
bin officiating.
Interment will be at the Kadoka
Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhom.com
Harold C. Finck_________________
Harold Clifford Finck, 82, died
peacefully at Rapid City Regional
Hospital Auxiliary Hospice House
on Saturday, October 27, 2012, sur-
rounded by his family.
Harold was born August 30,
1930, in Murdo, S.D., to Harry and
Marie (Schellenberger) Finck. He
was the youngest of nine children,
and was raised and attended
schools in Jones County. After
graduation, he joined the U.S.
Navy and served on the USS Des
Moines from 1950-1954.
On July 10, 1960, he was united
in marriage to Karen Peters. To
this union two children were born,
Lynette and Steve, who were his
pride and joy. He was employed at
the Okaton State Bank and West-
ern States Wholesale before mov-
ing to Rapid City in 1964. He
worked for Brown Swiss and
Harold's Home Delivery in retail
route sales until he retired in De-
cember of 1992. He was known by
many as their milkman, or simply
as “Pepsi.” Others will remember
him as always having a smile and
a unique sense of humor. He
touched many lives and will be
missed by all who knew him.
Survivors include his wife of 52
years, Karen Finck; his sister,
Edna Mae Hensley, Belgrade,
Mont.; his son, Steve (Kris) Finck,
Black Hawk; his daughter, Lynette
(Renzo) Bianchi, Colorado Springs,
Colo., and his "Grands," Joshua,
his "main sqeeze," Kaitlyn, his "fa-
vorite granddaughter," and Logan,
his "PeeWee," Fort Collins, Colo.
Some of his favorite times were
those spent with his grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and seven siblings.
Services were held Wednesday,
October 31, at Osheim & Schmidt
Funeral Home with Rev. Doug
Diehl officiating.
Burial was in Pine Lawn Memo-
rial Park with military honors by
Rushmore VFW Post 1273 at the
South Dakota National Guard.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
His online guestbook is available
at www.osheimschmidt.com.
www.prairiedesignsstudio.com
Custom Designed
PERMANENT BOTANICALS
for the Home, Business and Event
Elke Baxter: 840-4810
Thursday, November 8th
4:00 - 8:00 p.m.
K-gee’s Bldg. - Main St., Philip
Prize Drawings • Refreshments
Holiday
Open House
• Arbonne
• DoTerra
• Dragonfly Framed Art
• Miche Bags
• Norwex
• Pampered Chef
• Princess House
• Scentsy
• Signature Homestyles
• Thirty-One Gifts
• Tupperware
• Usborne Books
_________________Vendors:_________________
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Community
Happy 72nd Birthday,
David (James) Hand
Help us celebrate
on November 1st
by filling his mailbox
with birthday wishes!
24761 SD Hwy 34
Midland, SD 57552
Hope this is the best year ever!
Love, Mike, Michelle, Austin, Ella, Cadence & Reese
St. William
Catholic Church
Annual Turkey Dinner
Sunday, Nov. 4th ~ Midland
Dinner: Noon
Everyone is welcome!
Adults: $8.00
Children 6-12 Years: $4.00
5 & Under: Free
The Milesville Volunteer Fire Department held its annual Hal-
loween party, Friday, October 26, at the Milesville Hall. After
supper, the games and spook house opened up. There was
the traditional pumpkin carving/decorating contest, cos-
tume judging, candy and socializing. Shown above is Marcy
Parsons holding Keegan. Photos by Del Bartels
Milesville Halloween gathering
Bruce Dunker as a strip of bacon and
Alexa Dunker as a sunny-side-up egg.
Below, Steve Jonas,
Lisa Jonas and Vicki
Daly as three M&Ms.
Jim and Molly Harty dividing up her spoils from the evening.
Right, Debbie Prouty
and granddaughter
MacKenzie Hovland.
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH, MIDLAND, ANNUAL
TURKEY DINNER, SUNDAY,
NOVEMBER 4. SERVING BE-
GINS AT NOON!
No Midland news this week.
Please contact Sonia Nemec
with any news you may have
for next week’s edition!
Cooper Edward was born to Ed
Harty and Steph Cooper in
Spearfish Friday, October 26. He
weighed 7 lbs. 5 oz and is 19 1/2
inches long. Hugh and Ann Harty
and the late Delia Harty are
Cooper's grandparents. Grandpa
Hugh said he has lots more hair
than he has! Congratulations!
A son was born to Jaeson and
Crystal Hanrahan Saturday Octo-
ber 27, in Rapid City. Kaeden
Craig weighed 8 lbs. 9 oz. He has
two older brothers, Nate and Jake.
Kaeden's grandmother is Debbie
Hanrahan and he has two great-
grandmothers who live locally –
Phyllis Hanrahan and Kay Couch.
Congratulations, everyone!
The Hardingrove Church will
have their annual harvest festival
at the church November 11. A
potluck supper will begin at 5:30,
followed by a special program. All
are welcome.
The Milesville Rangers 4-H Club
met on Friday October 19, at the
Milesville Hall. Election of officers
was held as follows: President
Sarah Parsons, Vice President Al-
lison Pekron, Secretary Sam Stan-
gle, Treasurer Ben Stangle, Re-
porter Grace Pekron. The club is
planning to decorate a Christmas
tree at the Capitol on November
17. Club members painted decora-
tions for the tree as their recre-
ation. A delicious snack was pro-
vided by Donna and Tina Staben.
Reporter Grace Pekron
Around 100 young folks and
adults enjoyed the Halloween party
at the Milesville Hall last Friday,
October 26. Winners of the various
contests were, costume contest for
boys – 1st Connor Hovland and 2nd
Sean Dunker; girls contest – 1st
Zoe Staben and 2nd Autumn Par-
sons, adult costume contest – 1st
Bruce Dunker and 2nd Lexie
Dunker. Pumpkin decorating con-
test for kids – 1st Lexie Dunker
and 2nd Keagan Fitch. Pumpkin
decorating contest for adults – 1st
Bailey Anders and 2nd Evonne
Womack.
October 20, Connor and Macken-
zie Hovland went to Grandpa Kelly
and Grandma Deanna Fees to
spend the night. Miles and Erin
were guests for Sunday dinner,
then the kids returned home with
them.
The weekend of October 27-28,
Jim and Adele Harty, Molly and
Owen, were in Hermosa at the
home of Hugh and Ann Harty. Oth-
ers there were Paul and Moneik
Stephens and Mikaela, and Ed
Harty. Friends in the Hermosa
area had a shower for Hugh and
Ann.
Jade Berry and Nick Hamill,
Milesville, were among the group
of FFA members to fly to the Na-
tional FFA Convention in Indi-
anapolis, Ind., from Tuesday
through Saturday. Congratulations
to the team of Jade, Nick, Wyatt
Johnson and Avery Johnson for
coming in seventh place out of 40
teams.
Also going to the FFA convention
from Milesville was Ben Stangle
who rode on a bus. They stopped to
tour the John Deere factory in Wa-
terloo, Iowa, on their way.
A new family has moved in to the
Boyd Parsons tenant house on the
river. Brian and Jenny Slicer have
three small boys, ages five, two and
a half, and 11 months. The oldest
boy is in kindergarten at the
Milesville School. Welcome to
Milesville, folks!
Harold and Mildred Johnson,
Burke, are spending a few days
with their daughter and family,
Mark and Pat Hanrahan.
Lloyd and Jeanine Hardy, Rapid
City, were guests at the Hard-
ingrove Church Sunday morning.
Lloyd was here representing the
Gideons.
Jim and Lana Elshere went to a
peewee football game in Sturgis on
Tuesday night to watch their
grandson, Trey Elshere, play. They
lost their playoff game, so they are
done for the season.
Dustin Rische, Brooklyn and
Hudson, Redfield, spent Thursday
and Friday with Boyd and Kara
Parsons. Dustin is Boyd and Kara's
son-in-law and he installed a new
door for them while he was here.
Chad and Candy Dowling and
kids of Newell spent Sunday with
Zane and Beth Jeffries.
Beth Jeffries stopped to visit her
dad, Dean Parsons, Saturday.
Dean is at the Good Samaritan
Center in New Underwood and is
doing well.
Tanner Radway was home with
his family, Mark, Judith and Bai-
ley for the weekend. Tanner is a
student at the vo-tech school in
Mitchell.
From Thursday through Sunday,
Linda Stangle, Lori Quinn, Gayle
Rush and Heather Brown (a
teacher at Takini) were in Water-
town for an EMT convention. Linda
Smith also attended the conven-
tion.
Tim and Judy Elshere helped
their grandaughter, Ashlynn
Elshere, celebrate her fifth birth-
day Saturday at Doug and Fay
Hauk's in Philip. Others present
were Casey and Rachelle Elshere,
Paul and Joy Elshere, Shawn and
Thamy Elshere, Tyler Hauk, Dan
and Cindy Hauk and their daugh-
ters, Amy and Dana, and families,
J'Nai and Peggy Hauk and Gloria
French. Besides the birthday fun,
some came dressed in costumes.
Owen Harty turned one year old
on October 24 and he celebrated
with his family on Saturday night.
Guests at Jim and Adele's were
Adele's parents, Richard and
Sandy Gelvin, Laird, Colo., Hugh
and Ann Harty and Rowdy and
Cindy Schuler.
Sunday, Tim Elshere observed
an early birthday (October 31) with
a family dinner at their house.
Guests were Shawn, Thamy,
Casey, Rachelle, Ashlynn, Paul,
Joy, Jim and Lana Elshere.
Jim Bob and Kayla Eymer were
in Rapid City Sunday for dinner
with the family. They were cele-
brating Kayla's Grandma Moler's
birthday.
Guests at Earl and Jodi Parsons'
for dinner Sunday were Mike and
Betty McDonnell, Highmore, and
Bart and Janice Parsons. We were
helping Rachel celebrate her 16th
birthday.
Sam Stangle and Josh Quinn
were in Kadoka Saturday where
they took the ACT test.
Leo and Joan Patton's daughter,
Sharon, left for her home in Col-
orado Springs Friday. Joan said
she was a big help during her re-
covery.
The following Milesville people
were in Philip Saturday for a day
long retreat at Sacred Heart
Church: Leo and Joan Patton, Phil
and Karen Carley, Gayla Piroutek,
Nina Pekron and Joan Hamill.
Jackie Radway has been in
Pierre the last two weeks caring for
her grandaughter, Ainsley Ries.
Leah has returned to her work in
Pierre.
Marcy Parsons, Autumn, Kamri
and Keenan, and Christa Fitch,
Rayler and Aven, attended the
shower in Philip Saturday for little
Sawyer, son of Kory and Dani Foss.
Karen Carley's parents, Frank
and Mildred O'Grady, recently
moved in to the Good Samaritan
Center in New Underwood.
While in Pierre last Monday, the
Paul Stabens had a good visit with
former Milesville resident, Mary
Ann Fischer.
Brief callers at the Dave Berry
home Sunday afternoon were Pat
and Carla Quinn and family of the
Denver area.
Bart and I went to Omaha, Neb.,
Monday to be with George and
Nancy Hohwieler and the boys.
George had surgery Wednesday
and we came home Friday. Sharon
Olivier also went to Omaha to be
with the family and stayed a few
more days. George is out of ICU
and doing well.
Hurricane Sandy is leaving dev-
astations all along the East Coast
and inland with very strong winds
and heavy rain, causing power out-
ages to many, many homes and
doing so much damage. And to top
it off, there are fires burning caus-
ing more damage and loss of lives.
We should be so thankful here in
South Dakota. Even though we are
very dry God is watching over us
and moisture will come in His time.
A reminder: Set your clocks back
an hour Saturday night.
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Community
Ali
Marie
Daughter of
Alan & Cassi Rislov
Philip, SD
Born:
Sept. 7, 2012
6 lbs., 12 oz.
20: long
Proud Big Brother: Rio
Paternal Grandparents: Gerry & Barb Rislov, Philip
Paternal Great-grandparents:
Don & Betty Rislov, Florence, SD;
Eleanor Kroetch, Philip
Maternal Grandparents:
David Fitzgerald, Philip
Maralynn Burns, Philip
Maternal Great-grandparents:
Eileen Fitzgerald, Philip
Jean Burns & Howard Pihlaja, Philip
It’s
A
Girl
Jaden
Robert
Son of
Brit & Nancy
Matt
Sioux Falls,
SD
Born:
August 24, 2012
3 lbs., 8 oz.
Big Brother:
Jerret Allen
Maternal
Grandparents:
Rodney & Beverly Ruzsa, Selby
Maternal Great-Grandparents: Robert & Thelma Ruzsa, Selby;
Irene Kosters, Mobridge
Paternal Grandparents: Marion & Darlene Matt, Philip
Paternal Great-Grandparents: Elsie Matt, New Underwood &
the late Arnold Matt
This feature sponsored by Grandpa & Grandma Matt
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
PLEASE VOTE FOR
GAY KLIMA TOLLEFSON
for RE-ELECTION AS
Haakon County
State’s Attorney
I thank the citizens of Haakon County for
allowing me to work for you as state’s
attorney these past four years. I am asking that you
hire me for another four years. I promise to continue
treating everyone fairly and to play no favorites.
I think I have shown that I do not have a rug under
which I can sweep things. I am a tough prosecutor
who believes in employing common sense and
compassion when doing my job.
I do not agree with my opponent’s allegations,
but will not respond because I choose
not to get into a mud-slinging competition.
THANK YOU!
Paid for by Gay Tollefson
PO Box 848, Philip, SD 57567
Greetings from beautiful, dark,
still mostly dry northeast Haakon
County. The reason it is dark is be-
cause I am writing this news very
early on Tuesday morning. Al-
though our parched fields and bare
pastures are far from the lush con-
ditions we would prefer, they are
still home. And though the drought
is devastating, it isn't life threaten-
ing like the horrible storm the East
Coast is enduring. I have been
glued to the television for the past
day or so, almost willing the people
there to please use good judge-
ment, be prepared and be safe. My
thoughts and prayers are with the
millions of families dealing with
the aftermath of the storm. From
the looks of things, recovery and
clean up will take a while.
As I watched the news Monday,
I thought about how we prepare for
storms, and it struck me how fortu-
nate we are. Most of us wouldn't
need to go to the store to make sure
we have food on hand – our
pantries are generally pretty well
stocked. And even if the electricity
is out for a while, we have a gener-
ator that can be used to make sure
the freezers stay cold and to give us
some light. Also, we have lots of
flashlights on hand – after all, they
are standard equipment in most
every vehicle on the place. While
the folks who live in the cities de-
pend on streetlights when the sky
is dark, we depend on our flash-
lights if we need to see something.
I also thought about the types of
storms we have – hail storms, bliz-
zards, wind storms, rain storms,
maybe an occassional tornado – but
in our little corner of the world,
there isn't much chance that our
house would ever be impacted by
flood waters, thank goodness. As
always, I am thankful to live here
in our little corner of heaven.
The big event in our community
this week was the annual Deep
Creek Church supper and bazaar
held Saturday night. The weather
was great, and so was the food.
There was a good crowd on hand,
and everyone seemed to enjoy the
chance to visit with friends and
neighbors. Folks came from near
and far – there were even lutefisk
lovers from northwest of Faith,
which is a long way to drive for
some smelly fish! On the way to the
church, I was thinking of the folks
who wouldn't be there this year –
folks that have passed away or
aren't able to attend anymore. But
then as we drove up to the church,
there were young kids running all
over the place, having a great
time – young folks taking the place
of the older folks. It is wonderful to
have so many young people in the
community. I remember many
church bazaars years ago when we
would have to go round up our kids
when it was time to go home!
Thanks to the folks who put in all
the time and effort preparing for
the supper and bazaar – it is a
great event!
Billy and Arlyne Markwed were
in Pierre Friday to tend to some
business. Friday evening, their
daughter, Cindy Bresee, and her
husband, Bruce, plus Cindy's son,
Tate Gabriel, arrived to be on hand
for the bazaar Saturday. Billy
Markwed had been fighting a bug
for over a week, but even though he
was under the weather, he still
handled the auctioneer duties at
the church bazaar. His grandson,
T.J., helped also. Sunday, Billy
went to the doctor and got some
medication, so hopefully he'll soon
be feeling much better.
Lola Roseth was in Rapid City
one day last week to visit her
mother, Joy Klima. The ladies did
some shopping while Lola was
there. Saturday evening, Lola and
Duane attended the bazaar.
Dick and Gene Hudson were
close to home last week, taking
care of fall work and preparing for
the bazaar. Monday, Gene helped
at Cheyenne School since the regu-
lar aide, Judy Fosheim, was gone.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson have
also been doing clean-up, fix-up
type work, preparing for winter.
They attended the bazaar Satur-
day evening, and Dorothy attended
church Sunday. Monday afternoon,
they were in Pierre for an appoint-
ment.
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC
CHURCH, MIDLAND, ANNUAL
TURKEY DINNER, SUNDAY,
NOVEMBER 4. SERVING BE-
GINS AT NOON!
Cattle work has been the main
activity for Frank and Shirley Hal-
ligan this past week. They at-
tended the bazaar Saturday
evening.
Bill and Polly Bruce have also
been busy with cattle work, and
Polly has been busy feeding cow-
boys. One of the highlights of
Polly's week was that thanks to the
very welcome rain we received, the
middle of last week, she was able to
burn garbage! (I have to admit,
that was a highlight of my week,
too!) The Bruce's sold cattle in Ft.
Pierre Friday, so Bill and Polly
were in town to watch the sale and
pick up some groceries. Vince and
Katie were in town, and Vince's
siblings, David, Vicki, and Andy,
also came for the sale. The Bruce
kids spent the weekend at the
ranch, helping with some projects.
Bill and Polly's daughter, Marcia
Simon, came to the ranch Satur-
day, and she and Vicki went to
Rapid City for a sister's getaway.
The girls spent the night in Rapid
City and returned to the ranch
Sunday. Bill, Polly, Vince, Katie,
and David attended the Deep
Creek supper and then attended
Saturday evening church services
in Midland. Monday was preg test-
ing day at the Bruce place, so Polly
made sure the crew had plenty to
eat.
Max and Joyce Jones were in
Rapid City last Thursday to keep a
dermatologist appointment. Max
had some skin cancer removed
from his ear and some skin grafting
done, and it sounds like he has
some pretty elaborate bandages.
Joyce said the wounds are itching,
so hopefully that is a sign that
things are healing well.
Jon and Connie Johnson's sons,
Wyatt and Avery, spent Tuesday
through Saturday of last week at
the National FFA Convention in
Indianapolis. The boys were mem-
bers of the natural resources team
from Philip, and their team took
seventh place in the nation. Avery
received 11th place out of 160 com-
petitors – congratulations! I think
there is a cash award for the top 10
places, so he was wishing he had
done just a little better. The John-
son family attended the church
supper and bazaar Saturday
evening. Wyatt returned to his
studies at South Dakota State Uni-
versity Sunday, and Avery headed
to Philip Monday morning for his
classes there.
Julian and Coreen Roseth at-
tended the church bazaar Saturday
evening, along with their daughter,
Kristin Martin, and her daughter,
Fayth. As Julian left, he had a con-
tainer of lutefisk to take to his fa-
ther, Roy Roseth. Hope he enjoyed
it!
Clark and Carmen Roseth at-
tended the church supper and
bazaar Saturday evening. Their
daughter, Kelly Nelson, and her
daughter, Morgan, were there also.
Monday, Clark and Carmen visited
her father, Roy Roseth, in Philip.
Clint and Laura Alleman were
busy with cattle work and bazaar
preparations last week, as well as
preparations for Halloween.
Laura's dad, Randy Yost, helped
work cattle one day last week.
Laura's younger sister, Amy, at-
tended the bazaar with her par-
ents, Randy and Joy Yost, then
Amy spent the night at the Alle-
mans. Sunday, Clint, Laura,
Alivya, and Amy spent the day in
Hayes with Laura's folks, visiting
and decorating pumpkins.
Ed Briggs continues to be busy
moving hay. Thank goodness for
the good weather – sure makes hay
moving easier. Ed and his friend,
Beth Carr, attended the church
supper and bazaar Saturday
evening.
Marge Briggs was in Pierre last
week for an eye appointment. She
said she got a good report, which is
wonderful. She continues to enjoy
veggies from her garden, and this
week she even shared some with
me! She has more tomatoes than
she needs, so I was happy to put
them in jars – thanks, Marge!
Lee Briggs has been busy har-
vesting his corn crop. Mary worked
from home Thursday. Friday morn-
ing, she spent a few hours in the of-
fice and then headed to Sioux Falls
where her granddaughter, Kinsey,
had an appointment. They re-
turned home Friday night. Satur-
day afternoon, Mary headed west
to Whitewood to visit her daughter,
Keva, and grandsons, Seth and
Zane, returning to the ranch last
Sunday evening. It sounds like Lee
and Mary's grandson, Chancey,
has not been feeling well, so I hope
he is better soon!
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser at-
tended the church supper and
bazaar Saturday evening. Monday
evening, Kevin was in Pierre to at-
tend a meeting of the South Dakota
Cattlemen. The speaker for the
evening was State Climatologist
Dennis Todey. Evidently we should
expect a fairly normal winter, and
hopefully conditions will not be as
dry next year. However, he said the
drought is not broken by any
means – we remain in an extreme
drought category. (That doesn't
seem like news.) Kevin said Dennis
told the group that even during the
Dirty 30s, there weren't two ex-
tremely dry years in a row. Kevin
and Mary's daughter, Sarah, at-
tended Hobo Days activities at
Brookings over the weekend.
Sarah is a graduate of SDSU and
now works as a pharmacist in
Spearfish.
Our week here has consisted of
normal fall activities – feeding cat-
tle, moving feed, and getting pre-
pared for winter. It seems that the
geese and cranes are flying over-
head nearly every day, and I love to
listen to them. We did have a bit of
exciting family news this week –
our daughter, Chelsea, and her
boyfriend, Mike Hoy, got engaged!
There has been no date set for a
wedding, but we are excited to wel-
come Mike to our family – he is a
wonderful man.
This week, I am grateful that our
daughter, Lori, wasn't at her home
in Alexandria, Va., when the storm
hit the East Coast. She travels a lot
for her job, but she is generally
home for the weekends. This week-
end, however, she was spending a
few days in Las Vegas with friends.
So the stay in Las Vegas got ex-
tended a bit, and I didn't have to
worry about her being in the path
of the storm! Even though Lori has
a ton of common sense and I know
she would do everything in her
power to be safe, you just never
know what to expect when those
monster storms bear down on you.
My apologies to those I wasn't
able to reach for news this week.
One of these days, the weather will
turn more winter-like, and I'll have
better luck!
I hope all of you enjoy this beau-
tiful fall weather, and I also hope
you will take the opportunity to
vote next Tuesday. It is important!
Have a safe week.
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Judges had to pick the best Halloween costume and the best jack-o’-lantern, not easy chores, but no one really worried
about winning. The Milesville Halloween party was for fun and socializing. The haunted house, games, candy, supper and
conversation kept everybody busy the evening of Friday, October 26. Above are just some of the costumed attendees.
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports & Accomplishments
Annual Wild Game Feed!!
Friday, Nov. 9th
Everyone Welcome!!
Join us for
Friday Night Bingo
73– Saloon
859-2173 • DOWNTOWN PHILIP
Let’s do it
AGAIN!!
Halloween
Masquerade
Friday Night
Bingo
859-2173 • Downtown Philip
Friday, Nov. 2nd
Judging: 8-11 p.m. • Unmasking: 11:15 p.m.
Cash prizes for Best 3 Costumes!
Dance to “Montage”
Halloween
Masquerade
Party!
Friday Night
Steak-out
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkly SPECIAl:
French Dip
& French Fries
* * * * * *
SuNDAy SPECIAl:
Swedish Meatballs
Mashed Potatoes, Salad Bar & Dessert
HOURS: M-F: 7 A.M. TO 5 P.M. • SAT: 8 A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY 73 • 859-2100 • PHILIP
•Wood Pellets
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•Pole Barn Packages
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•Feed Bunks
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Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing...........................21-11
Rockers................................18.5-13.5
Petersen’s..................................18-14
Handrahan Const .....................16-16
Dakota Bar................................13-19
Badland’s Auto......................9.5-22.5
Highlights:
Jim Kujawa..................................210
Marlis Petersen.....2-7 split; 201/527
Kim Petersen ...............................176
Cory Boyd.....................................222
Trina Brown..........................190/537
Jason Petersen......................204/563
Matt Reckling .......................202/557
Vickie Petersen....5-10 split; 181/485
Ronnie Coyle...........8-9 & 3-10 splits
Maralynn Burns...................2-7 split
Carl Brown ...........................7-9 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................13-3
George’s Welding ........................10-6
Kadoka Tree Serv...................9.5-6.5
Philip Motor..................................8-8
Philip Health Services..................7-9
Kennedy Imp.................................7-9
G&A Trenching...........................6-10
Bear Auto..............................4.5-11.5
Highlights:
Ronnie Williams..215 clean, 220/629
Alvin Pearson........................204/568
Earl Park...............................258/562
Fred Foland...........................200/555
Johnny Wilson.............210 clean/551
Bill Bainbridge.............................550
Randy Boyd...........................200/544
Dakota Alfrey...............................533
Terry Wentz .................................531
Cory Boyd..............................209/527
Steve Varner........3-10 split; 209/520
Jerry Iron Moccasin..............200/516
Matt Schofield..............................513
James Mansfield ........3-10 split; 500
Wendell Buxcel ............................514
Les Struble .........................3-10 split
Tony Gould .........................5-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge...............................26-6
Invisibles...................................21-11
Bowling Belles ..........................19-13
Jolly Ranchers ..........................14-18
State Farm Ins..........................14-18
Highlights:
Karen Foland 4-9 split; 174, 185, 214
.............................................clean/573
Dody Weller ...5-7 split; 152, 149/439
Deanna Fees..........................155/403
Joy Neville............6-7 split; 150, 148
Debbie Gartner .....................150/425
Joyce Hicks...........................144, 141
Shirley Parsons ....................5-7 split
Judy Papousek .....................2-7 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................21-11
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................17.5-14.5
Morrison’s Haying ..............17.5-14.5
Wall Food Center......................17-15
Dorothy’s Catering ...................15-17
Hildebrand Concrete ..........14.5-17.5
First National Bank .................13-19
Just Tammy’s......................12.5-19.5
Highlights:
Beth Kennedy .......................167/409
Shar Moses ...................2-7 split; 176
Karen Iwan ..................................159
Jessica Wagner ............................128
Marlis Petersen.....................183/497
Kathy Arthur ........................171/474
Amy Morrison.............3-10 split; 471
Debbie Gartner....4-5-7 & 5-10 splits
Sandee Gittings.................4-5-7 split
Brittney Drury ...................3-10 split
Muriel Kjerstad..................3-10 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................13-3
McDonnell Farms .......................10-6
O’Connell Const ..........................10-6
Dakota Bar..................................10-6
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................6-10
WEE BADD.................................5-11
West River Pioneer Tanks .........5-11
The Steakhouse ..........................5-11
Highlights:
Alvin Pearson4-5 split; 245 clean/555
Jason Petersen......................234/542
Ronnie Williams...........................222
Greg Arthur ....3-8 & 3-10 splits; 212
Brian Pearson .....224, 188 clean/615
Matt Schofield.......................214/588
Cory Boyd 5-10 & 5-7 splits; 204/580
Rick Coyle .............................209/579
Bryan Buxcel ..............3-10 split; 567
Don Weller ............................220/565
John Heltzel .........................2-7 split
Jay McDonnell......................3-7 split
Jordan Kjerstad..................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew...............................25-7
King Pins.............................19.5-12.5
Randy’s Spray Service..............16-12
Roy’s Repair ........................15.5-16.5
Lee and the Ladies ...................15-13
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Jerry Iron Moccasin..............208/565
Cristi Ferguson.....................192/507
Brian Pearson .......................194/534
Roy Miller .............................4-5 split
The South Dakota Rodeo Associ-
ation finals were held in Rapid City
October 19-21.
Round 1
Bareback
1. Joe Wilson, Kyle, 84; 2. Dustin Luper,
Provo, 79; 3. Shayne O'Connell, Rapid City,
78; 4. Chance Englebert, Burdock, 73; 4.
Mark Kenyon, Hayti, 73.
Barrel Racing
1. Hallie Fulton, Miller, 15.47; 2.
Wendy Bechen - Rapid City, 15.78; 3. Carole
Hollers - Sturgis, 15.79;
4. Gale Beebe, Custer, 15.81.
Bull Riding
1. Andrew Coughlin, Timber Lake, 86; 2. Neil
Muscat, Wall, 80.
Calf Roping
1. Treg Schaack, Edgemont, 10.10;
2. Daine McNenny, Sturgis, 10.80; 3. Trey
Young, Dupree, 11.00; 4. Troy Wilcox, 11.90.
Goat Tying
1. Lacey Tech, Fairfax, 6.70; 2. Kristi Birke-
land, Dupree, 7.10; 3. (Tie) Tabitha Sigman,
Box Elder and Trisha Price, Faith, 7.40.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Hollers, 3.20; 2. Bailey Peterson, Parade,
4.70; Kaylee Nelson, Box Elder, 5.40; Syerra
Christensen, Kennebec, 12.20;
Mixed Team Roping
1. Hanna Brown, Faith/Rory Brown, Edge-
mont, 6.60; 2. Elizabeth Baker, Box Elder/
Levi Lord, Sturgis, 7.00; 3. Ashley Boomgar-
den, Davis/Colby Porch, 7.40; 4. Brenda
White, Oelrichs/Ora Taton, Rapid City, 8.60.
Saddle Bronc
1. Eric Gewecke, Red Owl, 78; 2. (Tie) Dillon
Schroth, Buffalo Gap, Travis Schroth, Buffalo
Gap and KC Longbrake, Eagle Butte, 75.
Senior Men’s Breakaway
1. Steve Klein, Sioux Falls, 2.20; 2. Marty
Burress, Piedmont, 2.40; 3. 3. Lennis Fager-
haug, Wessington Springs, 2.80; 4. Billy
Gallino, Wasta, 3.10.
Steer Wrestling
1. J.B. Lord, Sturgis, 4.80; 2. Forest Sains-
bury, Camp Crook, 5.00; 3. Lyle Smith,
Lantry, 7.00; 4. Tye Hale, Dupree, 15.20.
Team Penning
1. Gerald Sorenson, Canton, Robert Devitt,
Harrisburg and James Kuiper, Canton,
41.80; 2. Paul Borgmann, Lindsay
Borgmann, and Collin Borgmann, all of
White Lake, 44.60; 3. Terry Trower, Dell
Rapids, Jim Dunkelberger, Hartford and
Chuck Nelson, Hartford, 47.00; 4. Suzette
Fanning, Elk Point, Chad Herrboldt, Sisse-
ton, and Denny Fanning, Elk Point, 53.10.
Team Roping
1. (Tie) Jake Nelson, Creighton/ Jade Nelson,
Midland and Scott White, Oelrichs/Jeff Nel-
son, Philip, 5.10; 2. Terry McPherson, Pied-
mont/Taton, Rapid City, 6.10; 3. T. Wilcox,
Red Owl/Brett Wilcox, Red Owl, 6.20;
Round 2
Bareback
1. Luper, 81; 2. Travis Sharp, New Under-
wood, 76; 3. (Tie) Shayne O’Connell, Rapid
City, Dru Wilking, Hartford, and Joe Wilson,
Kyle, 74.
Barrel Racing
1. Bechen, 15.47; 2. Shelby Vinson, Worthing,
15.57; 3. Beebe, 15.58; 4. Kristi Steffes, Vale,
15.60.
Bull Riding
1. Tyson Donavon, Sturgis, 83; 2. Jared
Schaefer, Leola, and Allen Auer, Whitewood,
78; 3. Andrew Coughlin, Timber Lake, 75.
Calf Roping
1. Jamie Wolf, Pierre, 8.60; Young, 9.00; T.
Wilcox, 9.50; Matt Peters, Hot Springs, 10.10.
Goat Tying
1. Tech, 6.60; 2. Birkeland, 6.80; 3. Lacey He-
witt, Sheridan, Wyo., 6.90; 4. (Tie) Fulton,
and Danielle Schubert, White River, 7.10.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Fulton, 2.10; 2. Hollers, 2.10; K. Nelson,
2.40; Jacque Murray, Isabel, 2.70.
Mixed Team Roping
1. Trina Arneson, Enning/Melvin Arneson,
Enning, 7.00; 2. Samantha Nelson,
Creighton/Jake Nelson, Creighton, 11.40; 3.
Denise Nelson, Midland/Jade Nelson, Mid-
land, 11.90; Reann Grane, Whitewood/
Tommy Crane, Whitewood, 12.20;
Saddle Bronc
1. (Tie) Lane Stirling, Newell, and D.
Schroth, 78; 2. Jace Blackwell, White River,
76; 3. Longbrake, 74.
Senior Men’s Breakaway
1. (Tie) J. Lord, and Chuck Nelson, Hartford,
2.70; 2. Bob Burke, Sundance, Wyo., 3.30; 3.
Gallino, 3.40.
Steer Wrestling
1. Tye Hale, Dupree, 4.60; Casey Olson,
Prairie City, 4.70; Cole Fulton, Miller, 5.10;
Mike Wiedman, St. Charles, 5.70.
Team Penning
1. Jason Kriz, Sisseton, Clinton Olinger,
Plankinton, and Katie Anderson, Plankinton,
33.00; 2. Mary Pat Fawcett, Colome, Bart
Blum, Reliance and Lennie Steffen, Colome,
41.80; 3. Mick Varilek, Geddes, Steve Klein,
Sioux Falls and Tom Varilek, Geddes, 43.40;
4. Dani Miller, Larry Fossum and Nick Coul-
ter, all of Hartford, 45.30;
Team Roping
1. Colton Musick, Pierre/Carson Musick,
Pierre, 6.40; 2. Terry McPherson, Pied-
mont,/Taton, 8.50; 3. Pat Tibbs, Belle
Fourche, Brian McPherson, Wasta, 10.70; 4.
Jake Nelson/Jeff Nelson, 11.30.
Round 3
Bareback
1. O’Connell, 84; 2.J. Wilson, 80; 3. Wilking,
77; 4. Englebert, 73.
Barrel Racing
1. Fulton, 15.41; 2. Kailee Webb, Isabel,
15.60; 3. Bechen,15.61; 4. Steffes, 15.72.
Bull Riding
1. Auer, 85.
Calf Roping
1. T. Wilcox, 9.00; 2. Wolf, 9.20; 3. Treg
Schaack, Edgemont, 9.60; 4. (Tie) McNenny,
and Jase Clark, Wessington, 10.00.
Goat Tying
1. Birkeland, 6.70; 2. (Tie) Chelsey Kelly,
Dupree and Hewitt, 7.10; 3. Tech, 7.20.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Murray, 2.10; 2. Elizbeth Baker, Box Elder,
2.50; 3. K. Nelson, 3.20; 4. Peterson, 3.90.
Mixed Team Roping
1. Brenda White, Oelrichs/Taton, 7.90; 2. Ar-
neson/Arneson, 8.70; 3. Lorita Nelson,
Philip/Jeff Nelson, 10.60; 4. Jana Jasper,
Sturgis/ Wiedman, 11.40.
Saddle Bronc
1. Stirling, 79; 2. Marty Hebb, Cherry Creek,
78; 3. T. Schroth, 76; 4. Longbrake, 71.
Old Men’s Breakaway
1. Terry McCutcheon, Brookings, 2.70; 2.
Fagerhaug, 3.00; 3. Burke, 3.30; 4. Bryce Sig-
man, Sturgis, 3.90.
Steer Wrestling
1. Sainsbury, 4.10; 2. Lord, 4.50; 3. Cole Ful-
ton, Miller, 5.20, 4. Tee Hale, 5.20;
Team Penning
1. Rick Tebay, Cary Garbe and Morgan
Tebay, all of Alpena, 39.90; 2. Varilek, Klein,
Varilek, 46.40; 3. John Dean, Platte, Tom
Jones, Viborg, and Greg Hansen, Dell Rapids,
49.80; 4. Randall Olson, Harrisburg, Daryl
Hammerstrom, Davis, and Rhonda Dinan,
Harrisburg, 50.90.
Team Roping
1. Wilcox/Wilcox, 5.70; 2. Musick/ Musick,
6.20; T. McPherson/Taton, 6.80; Don Bettely-
oun, Eagle Butte, Melvin Arneson, 6.90.
Finals Average
Bareback
1. Wilson, 238; O’Connell, 236; Luper, 232,
Wilking, 223.
Barrel Racing
1. Bechen, 46.86; 2. Beebe, 47.12; 3. Vinson,
47.33; 4. Hollers, 47.75.
Bull Riding
SDRA wraps up season with finals
Philip High School students
Holly Iwan and Tate DeJong have
been chosen as school winners in
the Wendy’s Heisman Scholar Ath-
letes program. DeJong has also
been chosen as a state finalist.
Students who apply are judged
based on their academic achieve-
ments, athletic accomplishments,
community leadership, and in-
volvement in various extracurricu-
lar activities during grades nine
through 11.
ACT, Inc. scores applicants and
determines school winners, state fi-
nalists and state winners. Then the
Wendy’s panel of judges takes over.
The judges represent education,
business and sports, along with for-
mer college award winners and for-
mer national winners.
Seniors submit applications,
with a school official approving
each. One senior male and one sen-
ior female from every school are se-
lected as a school winner.
From those, 20 finalists – 10
males and 10 females – from every
state and the District of Columbia
advance to state finalists. State fi-
nalist receive a bronze medal, Heis-
man patch and a $25 Wendy’s gift
card. A male and female from each
state and the District of Columbia
will be selected as state winners,
each receiving a silver medal,
patch and a $50 Wendy’s gift card.
The judges select 12 national fi-
nalists – a male and female from
each of the six geographic Heisman
regions. National finalists will re-
ceive an awards banquet in New
York City, a gold medal, patch,
$2,000 donated to the winners’
high schools in the students’
names, and a $100 gift card.
A male and female will be the na-
tional winners. They will be recog-
nized during ESPN’s national tele-
cast of the college Heisman Memo-
rial Trophy presentation, a
Wendy’s High School Heisman Tro-
phy, patch, $10,000 donated to the
winners’ high schools and a $500
gift card.
Wendy’s Heisman Scholar Athletes
Holly Iwan Tate DeJong
Philip High School received a 2012 music participation award during the 60th annual South Dakota All-State Chorus and
Orchestra concert, Saturday, October 27, at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center’s Barnett Arena in Rapid City. Kathy Peterson
accepted the recognition on behalf of PHS. As the South Dakota Music Education Association awards chairman, Philip’s
PHS earns All-State music award
Philip High School student council members attended the Rushmore Region Student Council Workshop, Thursday, October
18, in Sturgis. Members attended various speakers and breakout sessions titled “You is kind. You is Smart. You is impor-
tant.” based on the book/movie “The Help.” Students also learned about the United Way and Voices for Children organiza-
tions. The PHS student council was recognized for being a 2011-2012 outstanding student council. Region officer, Peyton
DeJong, and state officer, Tate DeJong, helped plan and organize the workshop. Shown above, back row, from left: Tristen
Rush, Garrett Snook, Keegan Burnett, Nelson Holman, Gavin Brucklacher and Gavin Snook. Front: Rushmore Region Par-
liamentarian Peyton DeJong, Kaci Olivier, Holly Iwan, Katlin Knutson, Ellie Coyle, Madison Hand and Student Council State
Board Treasurer Tate DeJong. Courtesy photo
PHS student council at region
music instructor, Barb
Bowen, presented individ-
ual and school honors.
Considered exceptional,
PHS has 57 percent of its
school body participating
in the music program.
Some schools, such as
Jones County, have an ex-
emplary 96 percent partic-
ipation. Shown above,
from left, are Mahalah
Theye – soprano, Gavin
Snook – bass, Peterson,
Bowen, Garrett Snook –
tenor, and Afton Burns –
alto. Courtesy photo
1. Auer, 163; 2. Coughlin, 161, 3. Donavon,
83; 4. Muscat, 80.
Calf Roping
1. T. Wilcox, 30.40; 2. Young, 30.70; 3. Mc-
Nenny, 32.50; 4. Peters, 37.10.
Goat Tying
1. Tech, 20.50; 2. Birkeland, 20.60; 3. Schu-
bert, 22.10 4. (Tie) Price and Hewitt, 22.40.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Murray, 4.80; 2. K. Nelson, 11.00; 3. Peter-
son, 12.10; 4. Hollers, 18.30.
Mixed Team Roping
Women: 1. T. Arneson, 18.00; Brown, 18.80;
Peterson, 19.00; White, 28.40. Men: Not
available.
Saddle Bronc
1. (Tie) Longbrake and Hebb, 220; 3. Stirling,
157; 4. D. Schroth, 153.
Senior Men’s Breakaway
1. J. Lord, 11.20; 2. Gallino, 19.70; Delbert
Cobb, Red Owl, 20.40; 4. B. Sigman, 29.70.
Steer Wrestling
1. Sainsbury, 9.10; 2. C. Fulton, 9.90; 3. J.
Lord, 13.90; 4. Smith, 20.70.
Team Penning
1. Borgmann/ Borgmann/ Borg- mann,
147.40; 2. Trower/Dunkelberger/Nelson,
168.00; 3. Soreson/Devitt/Kuiper, 170.20; 4.
Fawcett/Blum/Steffen, 172.40.
Team Roping
1. Musick/Musick, 20; 2. T. McPherson/Taton,
21.40; Wilcox/ Wilcox, 24.30; 4. Jake
Nelson/Jeff Nelson, 25.60.
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2010 Ford F-250 Lariat
Crew cab, 4x4, 5th wheel ball
Low miles, 6.4L Powerstroke Diesel
Give Tyler a call today!
www.philipmotor.com
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports & Accomplishments
Legion
Fun
Night!
Saturday, Nov. 3rd • 6:30 p.m.
American Legion Hall in Philip
Proceeds will help fund improvements on the Legion Hall!
Sponsored by Wheeler-Brooks American Legion Post #173
BINGO • PRIZES • GAMES • GIFT CERTIFICATES • FUN • LUNCH WILL BE AvAILABLE!
Doors
Open at
6:00 p.m.
ElEct Ralph “chip” KEmnitz
Republican Candidate for
Haakon County State’s Attorney
Long-time resident and proud supporter of Haakon County!!
4 Long record of public service: over 38 years representing Haakon County;
handling criminal & juvenile matters and administrative appeals; advising
county commissioners, offices & officials, prosecuted thousands of different
types of cases, have tried numerous cases to a jury and convened Grand Jurys
when appropriate.
4 Special Assistant Attorney General
4 33 years military (retired Col.); 9 years as Chair of S.D. Commission on
Gaming; 9 years as Chair of Racing Commission, 4 years Lottery Commission;
1989 Volunteer of the Year award by Governor George Mickelson; 6 years on
State Bar Disciplinary Board and served on various other State Bar committees,
currently Client Security Fund
4 A guest lecturer at University of Arizona in January 2010
4 If elected, Haakon County will also have a Deputy State’s Attorney at no extra
cost to the taxpayers – opponent, when conflicted, appoints deputy at county
expense
4 Never asked the county to pay office rent, as does opponent
4 Running in Haakon County only. Opponent running in Haakon and Jackson
counties simultaneously for position of State’s Attorney. [Her attentions have
been divided between Bennett and Haakon counties in the past four years –
which county takes precedence?]
4 Believe plea bargaining should be a strategy, not a routine
4 Rated an A-V attorney by Martindale Hubble for more than 31 years, highest
rating in legal ability and ethical standards, (Peer Review)
i would appreciate your vote on november 6, 2012.
This ad approved and paid for by the candidate.
THE TIME IS HERE!!!!
Time to order your trees and perennials
for next spring, that is!
Haakon County Conservation District is taking orders for
your tree and perennial needs next
spring! Order early for best selection.
We have many options available!
Tall trees, perennials, shrubs, fruit trees … give us
a call and see what we can do for you!
859-2186 Ext. 3. Office Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-3:00
Philip, S.D.
Production Cow Sale
Saturday, Nov. 3rd
PHiliP liveStock Auction
at the Special Stock Cow
& Bred
Heifer Sale
For more
information,
contact:
Jeff at (605) 457-2100
Larry at (605) 457-3161
Larry & Jeff Gabriel’s
23nd Annual
Selling 60 Home-
Raised Black &
Black Baldy Cows
• 3-Year-Olds
• Bred to Fortune’s Rafter
U Cross Angus bulls.
Sons of Traveler 004.
• Start calving March 28th
for 44 days.
• Shots given: Vira Shield
6+ VL5 & poured with
Promectin.
Hunter’s
Breakfast Special
Pancakes, Sausage,
Coffee & Juice
Saturday, nov. 10th
4:30 ~ 8:00 a.m.
Sunday, nov. 11th
4:30 ~ 10:00 a.m.
Philip Ambulance Building
Free Will Donation
Red Ribbon Week, this year October 20-28, is nationally rec-
ognized as a symbol of support in efforts to reduce demand
for drugs through prevention and education programs. By
wearing a red ribbon during the last week in October, Amer-
icans demonstrate their opposition to drugs. For Red Ribbon
Week 2012, Philip junior high student council members per-
formed a skit titled "A Drug Free Life Rocks" for Philip kinder-
garten through sixth grade classes. The skit showed the ele-
mentary students that they have better things to do than
drugs. The student council then held relay races between the
classes, with the older grades having to carry a backpack full
of textbooks “drugs” during the race. In each race the older
students lost because they were weighed down by the
drugs/books. Shown above, the junior high student council
members are, from left, Conner Dekker, Abby Martin, Elise
Wheeler, Madyson Morehart, Shay Hand, Peyton Kuchen-
becker, Tia Guptill, Ashley Williams, Trew DeJong and Riley
Heltzel. Right, Brady Heltzel and Riley Heltzel (wearing the
"drug" backpack) get ready to race. Courtesy photos
Red Ribbon Week – drug prevention
Three new computer were in-
stalled at the Haakon County Pub-
lic Library, Wednesday, October
24.
Jamie Fry from the South
Dakota Broadband Initiative and
Ron Larson from Hometown Com-
puter Services, Philip, performed
the set-up and installation.
The computers, switch and soft-
ware were received as part of a
grant from the South Dakota
Broadband Initiative. This pro-
gram, administered by the South
Dakota Bureau of Information
Technology in Pierre, brings broad-
band capability to rural community
anchor institutions. Fourteen other
institutions in the state were also
recipients of this grant.
“Our library is so pleased to be
able to provide the use of these
computers to the residents of
Haakon County, especially since
they have capabilities that our old
ones don’t,” stated Brunskill.
“There are several more grant pe-
riods being offered and we will be
applying for another one to replace
our remaining computers.”
Qualified community anchor in-
stitutions include, but are not lim-
ited to, libraries, medical and
healthcare facilities, kindergarten
through 12th grade schools, insti-
tutions of higher education, public
safety offices, governmental offices
and community support locations.
Library gets computers
Computer pro-
fessional Ron
Larson and li-
brary director
Annie Brunskill
show off the
three new com-
puters granted
to the Haakon
County Public
Library by the
South Dakota
Broadband Ini-
tiative.
Photo by Del
Bartels
Five Philip rodeo athletes were
invited to participate in an extrav-
aganza of high school rodeo talent
was part of the South Dakota
Rodeo Association finals in Rapid
City, October 19-21.
Placing in roping events were
Rance Johnson, Jacob Kammerer
and Brooke Nelson. Also attending
were Hanna Hostutler in breakway
roping and Reed Johnson in saddle
bronc.
Bareback
1. Shane O'Connell, Rapid City, 66
Barrel Racing
1. Keenie Word, Hermosa, 5.188; 2. Taylor
Engessor, Spearfish, 15.387; 3. Sloan Ander-
son, Whitehorse 15.521, 4. Bailie Mutchler,
Whitewood, 15.669.
Bull Riding
1. Jade Nixon, Belle Fourche, 75; 2. Jake Fra-
zier, Whitehorse, 65.
Tie Down Roping
1. Treg Schaack, Edgemont, 10.37; 2. Carson
Musick, Pierre, 10.65; 3. Casey Packer, Stur-
gis, 12.18; 4. Cody Packer, Sturgis, 15.77.
Goat Tying
1. Chesney Nagel, Avon, 7.12; 2. Karissa Ray-
hill Martin, 7.72; 3. Tearnee Nelson, Faith
8.37; 4. Katie Lensegrav, Kadoka, 9.01.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Elsie Fortune, Interior 2.68; 2. Mattee
Pauley, Wall, 3.37; 3. Jayci Lamphere, Belle
Fourche, 12.31; 4. Dawson Munger, Puk-
wana, 17.00.
Pole Bending
1. Brooke Howell, Belle Fourche, 21.236; 2.
Becca Lythgoe, Colton, 21.268; 3. Remi Wien-
tjes, Onida, 21.753; 4. Kellsie Collins, Newell,
21.984.
Saddle Bronc
1. Tayte Clark, Meadow, 59.
Steer Wrestling
1. Connor McNenny, Sturgis, 4.87; 2. Jake
Fulton, Valentine, Neb., 5.37; 3. Cameron
Fanning, Olivet, 6.23; 4. Carson Johnston,
Elm Springs, 7.36.
Team Roping
1. Rance Johnson/Jacob Kammerer, both of
Philip, 8.06; 2. J.D. Kirwan, NA /Braden Pir-
rung, NA, 8.26; 3. Jordon Bickel, Trail
City/Brooke Nelson, Philip, 9.46; 4. Lane Bla-
sius, Wall/Jade Schmidt, Box Elder, 11.87.
SDRA high school
extravaganza
by Coach Ralph Kroetch
The 2012 Scotties cross country
team gathered to celebrate a suc-
cessful season and recognize team
and individual efforts.
These athletes trained or raced
six days per week. They accumu-
lated over 2,650 team miles in over
100 hours of training. As well, two
ladies met everyday at 6:00 a.m. for
cross country practice and at 4:00
p.m. every day for volleyball prac-
tice.
The Scotties captured eight team
championships with four second
place team finishes through the
season. In that process, the boys’
and girls’ teams qualified for the
state meet.
Individually, Shay Hand and
Conner Dekker were voted by team
members as rookies of the year.
Ellie Coyle and Tristen Rush were
voted for the will-to-win award.
Hand and Garrett Snook earned
most improved. Holly Iwan and
Coyle shared the girls’ athlete of
the year award, with Rush receiv-
ing the boys’ vote. The Scottie
Award, given to the most ideal
Scottie, went to Iwan and Nelson
Holman.
Both the boys’ and girls’ teams
earned the South Dakota Academic
All-State awards. The minimum
requirement is a combined grade
point average of 3.2; the girls held
a 3.85 and the boys a 4.02.
The final awards went to the
Philip Scotties cross country awards night
Left, the Philip
Scotties cross
country team.
Back row, from
left: Tristen
Rush, Garrett
Snook, Nelson
Holman, Keegan
Burnett and Ellie
Coyle. Front,
Conner Dekker,
Shay Hand, Holly
Iwan, Damian
Bartels and Sam
Stangle. At right,
Iwan when she
was a fourth
grade runner.
Courtesy
photos
seniors. Student manager Sam
Stangle received a four-year certifi-
cate. Iwan, who has led the girls’
team much of the last six years, re-
ceived a certificate noting her ca-
reer achievements – an unprec-
edented six state meet appear-
ances, earning five state meet
medals as well as being selected
all-conference in 2011 and 2012,
and her 2010 and 2011 Runsdak
Elite Team selections awarded to
the top 10 state meet times each
year without regard to division.
says
Congratulations
to the Wall Eagles` Mighty Mite
Junior Pee Wee & Pee Wee teams
on a very successful
season, and we wish
the Mighty Mite
&Junior Pee Wee
teams
good luck in the
Super Bowl!
oontinued on paee 11
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursdav, November 1, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 10
NOTICE OF 2012
PRIMARY ELECTION
ARSD 5:02:04:05
SDCL 12-12-1
A Primary Election will be held on Tues-
day, November 6, 2012, in all the voting
precincts in Haakon County.
The election polls will be open from
seven a.m. to seven p.m. (mountain
time) on the day of the election.
The polling place in each precinct of this
county is as follows:
#1 Kirley (Deep Creek Church)
#4 Milesville (Milesville Hall)
#16 Deadman (Courthouse Commu-
nity Room
#17 Lake Waggoner (Bad River Sen-
ior Citizens Center)
#19 South Fork (Courthouse Commu-
nity Room)
#20 Midland (Midland Fire Hall
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in absentee voting or polling
place accessibility.
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
[Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$27.62]
Notice For Bids
The Town Board of Midland is opening
bids for the hauling and disposal of resi-
dential garbage for the Town of Midland.
Bid specifications are available at the
City Finance Office at 509 Main Street,
PO Box 232, Midland, SD 57552, or by
calling 605-843-2810.
Bids will be accepted until 5:00 PM on
Tuesday, November 13, 2012, and
opened at the regular Town Board meet-
ing that evening at 7:00 PM MT.
The Town of Midland reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bids.
Michelle Meinzer, Finance Officer
Town of Midland
[Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$15.59]
Notice to Creditors
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Pro. 12-8
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
)
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON
)
In the Matter of the Estate of
)
MARY A. PEKRON, Deceased.
)
Notice is given that on the 17th day of
October, 2012, Karen Kroetch, whose
address is PO Box 122, Philip, SD
57567, was appointed as Personal Rep-
resentative of the Estate of Mary A.
Pekron.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
/s/Karen Kroetch
Karen Kroetch
PO Box 122
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2761
Haakon Co. Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2627
Kemnitz Law Offices
Ralph A. Kemnitz
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2540
[Published October 25, November 1 & 8,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$51.62]
CaII For Bids
CITY OF PHILIP
AIRPORT FARM GROUND
The City of Philip, South Dakota, is call-
ing for bids to lease the land surrounding
the City of Philip Municipal Airport, de-
scribed as follows:
216.3 acres, more or less, lo-
cated within the boundaries of
the NW¼, N½NE¼,
SW¼NE¼, NE¼SW¼, and
NW¼SE¼, in Section 16,
Township 01 North, Range 21
East, Black Hills Meridian,
Haakon County, South
Dakota.
The foregoing description, for conven-
ience, is agreed to be an adequate
though non-recordable description; it is
intended to describe that portion of the
"Philip Municipal Airport¨ facility owned
by Lessor, not presently utilized for Air-
port purposes.
Tenant must agree to reimburse the cur-
rent lessee, at the termination of the cur-
rent lease, for fieldwork done and for
other crop costs incurred for crops to be
harvested during the following year. Un-
less otherwise agreed, current custom
rates for operations involved will be used
as a basis of settlement.
Tenant is required to abide by and com-
ply with all FAA regulations affecting the
subject premises, the adjacent Airport fa-
cility and its runways.
The term of the Lease shall commence
on the 1st day of January 2013, and shall
expire on the 31st day of December
2017. For further information and to ex-
amine the proposed Lease Agreement,
contact the City Finance Officer. Maps of
the area to be leased and the adjacent
Airport will be available for inspection.
Rentals shall be payable in cash, in ad-
vance, in each year of the term of the
Lease.
Sealed bids will be accepted at the City
Finance Office, PO Box 408, 140 S.
Howard Ave., Philip, SD, until 4:00 p.m.
on Monday, November 5, 2012. All bids
must be sealed and clearly marked "Bid
÷ Airport Farm Ground Lease¨ on the out-
side envelope.
Bids will be opened at the regular City
Council meeting on Monday, November
5, 2012, at 7:30 p.m. or as soon after that
hour as practical in the Haakon Co.
Courthouse Community Room.
The City Council of the City of Philip re-
serves the right to reject any and all bids.
Monna Van Lint
Finance Officer
[Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$57.83]
Instructions
to the Voters
TO MARK THE BALLOT
Fill in the oval ( ) next to the name
or ballot question. Use only the pencil or
marker given to you!
Do not make any marks other than fill-
ing the oval.
Do not erase anything on your ballot.
Do not rip your ballot or make holes in
it.
Do not write in a name.
ÌF YOU MAKE A MÌSTAKE
Ìf you make a mistake, give the ballot
back and get a new one.
Ìf you cast more votes than allowed in
a race, give the ballot back and get a
new one.
TO RETURN THE BALLOT AFTER
VOTÌNG
Put the ballot in the holder so the bal-
lot stamp shows and take to the ballot
box.
ÌF YOU NEED HELP, ASK.
The instructions to be published with
the facsimile ballot for primary and gen-
eral elections must be in the following
form:
INSTRUCTIONS TO THE VOTERS
VOTÌNG RÌGHTS
Any voter who can't mark a ballot be-
cause the voter has a physical disability
or can't read, may ask any person they
choose to help them vote.
Any voter may ask for instruction in the
proper procedure for voting.
Any voter at the polling place prior to
7:00 p.m. is allowed to cast a ballot.
Ìf your voting rights have been vio-
lated, you may call the person in charge
of the election at 605-859-2800, the Sec-
retary of State at 888-703-5328, or your
state's attorney.
Any person who is convicted of a
felony on or after July 1, 2012, loses the
right to vote. However, any such person
may register to vote following the com-
pletion of their felony sentence. Any such
person who is convicted of a felony on or
before June 30, 2012, and who receives
a sentence of imprisonment to the adult
penitentiary system, including a sus-
pended execution of sentence, loses the
right to vote, Any such person so sen-
tenced may register to vote following
completion of their sentence. Further in-
formation is available at www.sdsos. gov.
ELECTÌON CRÌMES
Anyone who makes a false statement
when they vote, tries to vote knowing
they are not a qualified voter, or tries to
vote more than once has committed an
election crime.
Haakon County Auditor
[Published November 1, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $29.24]
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
SPECIAL EMERGENCY MEETING
October 23, 2012
A special emergency meeting of the
Philip City Council was called by Council
member Marion Matt and held on Octo-
ber 23, 2012, at 4:30 p.m. at the Dakota
Mill and Grain (DMG) property located at
300 W. Cherry Street. A meeting of the
Building Committee and representatives
of Dakota Mill & Grain, Canadian Pacific
Railroad and local utility companies had
been previously scheduled for this date
and time, but Council member Matt felt
that it was vital that the entire Council be
in attendance to garner information rela-
tive to the proposed DMG project and to
have the opportunity to educate them-
selves about the project while visually in-
specting the area proposed for
construction and expansion.
The emergency special meeting was
called and the following were in atten-
dance: Mayor Michael Vetter, Finance
Officer Monna Van Lint, Council Mem-
bers Greg Arthur, Jason Harry, Jennifer
Henrie, Trisha Larson, Marion Matt, and
Marty Gartner. Also present were Public
Works Director Matt Reckling, Harlan
Quenzer and Jeff McCormick with SPN
& Assoc., Del Bartels of the Pioneer Re-
view, Andrew Kangas and Carey Bretsch
with Civil Design Engineering, Beth Lynn
with Canadian Pacific Railroad, Brian
Hammerbeck, Bart Banks, and Lester
Pearson, representing Dakota Mill &
Grain, Dean Nelson with West Central
Electric Cooperatives, and Tom Finn with
Golden West Companies and later, Mike
Seager, landowner.
Absent: None
Mayor Vetter called the meeting to order
stating that the purpose of this special
meeting was to conduct an on-site walk-
ing tour of the Dakota Mill and Grain
(DMG) property and review their expan-
sion plans hands on.
Mayor Vetter introduced Brian Hammer-
beck, President of Dakota Mill and Grain
and Bart Banks, Attorney for Dakota Mill
and Grain. Hammerbeck opened by stat-
ing that the proposed expansion plan to
upgrade their facilities in their current lo-
cation is and has presented many chal-
lenges and obstacles that, quite frankly,
would have been easier to do in another
location, but, Hammerbeck stressed,
DMG wants to be in Philip and as a result
of their desire to be in our community,
they are making the requests for platting
and building permits from the City of
Philip.
The gentlemen proceeded with a general
overview of the proposed expansion,
which has been set out in two Phases.
Phase Ì will encompass all that area
south of the existing main rail line and will
include leveling and grading. This will be
followed by the construction of four (04)
140,000 to 150,000 bushel grain bins to
start. They anticipate that they will con-
struct four to five more bins in the future.
The construction will also include an
overhead grain transport system that will
unload/load trucks and/or railcars. Their
plan will include the construction of a
new scale, office building, and ware-
house facility. Phase Ì includes all of the
bins and structures, but Hammerbeck did
state that they are unsure as to what will
ultimately happen with the old mill struc-
ture as it has met and exceeded its use-
ful life, but presents its own challenges
as it relates to removing the structure. He
stated that DMG is still weighing their op-
tions as it relates to this structure.
Phase ÌÌ of the project encompasses all
that area north of the existing rail main-
line and sidings.
DMG has approached the Canadian Pa-
cific (CP) Railroad and expressed their
desire to purchase railroad right-of-way
north of the existing CP mainline in order
that DMG can construct a new 28 car rail
siding for the purpose of transporting
product to market more efficiently and ef-
fectively. The right-of-way to be pur-
chased includes approximately 2.3 acres
more or less. This 50' wide area running
east and west will be cleared and filled
with approximately 8,000 yards of mate-
rial to construct the rail car siding that will
be a necessary part of the DMG expan-
sion project.
Ìt is understood by DMG that there have
been concerns voiced by some residents
living near the proposed rail siding area,
that this construction will consume addi-
tional reservoir space in the current flood
plain area potentially causing more or
additional flooding issues. Added to this
are concerns voiced by the public re-
garding the matter of a portion of the
trestle bridge to the west which spans the
North Fork of the Bad River which at
some time in the past was partially filled
in by the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern
Railroad Co. (DM&E).
Beth Lynn, representing the CP Railroad,
addressed the group relative to this mat-
ter and informed the group that CP is at-
tempting to locate records relative to this
trestle. She noted that four of eleven
spans on this particular trestle were filled
in leaving seven of the spans open. She
noted that a hydraulic study had been
complete in 2007 during the DM&E's pur-
suit into the Powder River Coal Basin on
this particular bridge (Bridge #560.3) as
well as several others, so DM&E has
done their due diligence with that regard.
This hydraulic study was presented to
the US Army Corp. of Eng., Wyoming
Regulatory Office in Cheyenne,
Wyoming, in November of 2007.
Andrew Kangas, Civil Design Ìnc, then
led the group on a walking tour of the rail-
road and examined the proposed siding
area answering questions and exploring
the area that is proposed for construction
of the 28 car siding up and to the west
trestle bridge area.
At approximately 5:20 p.m., Mayor Vetter
adjourned this portion of the emergency
special meeting until such time as Coun-
cil could reconvene for the previously
scheduled public hearing relative to this
project in the Courthouse Community
Room at 5:30 p.m.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint, Finance Officer
[Published November 1, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $56.21]
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING
CONTINUED
October 23, 2012
Mayor Vetter reconvened the City Coun-
cil for the scheduled special public meet-
ing at 5:30 p.m. in the Community Room
of the Haakon Co. Courthouse. Present
were Mayor Michael Vetter, Finance Of-
ficer Monna Van Lint, Council Members
Greg Arthur, Jason Harry, Jennifer Hen-
rie, Trisha Larson, Marion Matt, and
Marty Gartner. Also present were Deputy
Finance Officer Brittany Smith, Public
Works Director Matt Reckling, Harlan
Quenzer and Jeff McCormick with SPN
& Assoc., Del Bartels of the Pioneer Re-
view, Andrew Kangas and Carey Bretsch
with Civil Design Engineering, Beth Lynn
with Canadian Pacific Railroad, Brian
Hammerbeck, Bart Banks and Lester
Pearson with Dakota Mill & Grain, Robert
McDaniel, Emily Kroetch, Jay Baxter,
Howard Pihlaja, John Hart, Nick, Chevy
and Memphis Konst, Mike and Lori Sea-
ger, Jason and Troye Rhodes, Marilyn
Millage, Barbara Sloat, Rita O'Connell,
Richard Hildebrand, and Carol Schofield.
Mayor Vetter welcomed everyone to the
public meeting to discuss Dakota Mill
and Grain's (DMG) expansion plans.
Brian Hammerbeck, President of DMG,
addressed the audience and introduced
their representatives overseeing the pro-
posed project for the Philip site. They in-
cluded: Bart Banks, attorney, Lester
Pearson, local plant manager; and,
Carey Bretsch and Andrew Kangas, en-
gineers.
He then turned the presentation over to
Andrew Kangas, engineer, to review
DM&G's plans.
Mr. Kangas presented a PowerPoint
presentation outlining the expansion plan
that will be done in two different phases.
The first phase deals with the improve-
ments on the south side of the current rail
line, north and west of the current DM&G
elevator. This included the demolition
and clearing of the area which has been
completed in order to accommodate the
construction of four 60' by 84' grain bins
(according to the plans, each bin has a
214,000 bushel capacity), a dump pit,
scale, conveyor system, and an
office/warehouse building. Ìt was noted
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursdav, November 1, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
that there is also sufficient room for fur-
ther expansion in this area should the
need arise.
The second phase is the proposed addi-
tional rail siding on the north side of the
main rail line. This will serve as the load-
ing and unloading line and will have a
twenty-eight train car capacity, utilizing
the conveyor system from the bins on the
south side of the tracks. The new rail sid-
ing will start 100 feet east of the current
trestle bridge and end 75 feet west of the
SD Highway 73 crossing.
He noted that the concerns that have
been brought forward from the City and
community deal mainly with the installa-
tion of the new rail siding on the north
side of the main rail line. The new siding
will be installed in the designated flood
zone area where past flooding events
have occurred. Ìn an effort to address
these concerns, an existing culvert will
be extended and measures will be taken
to alleviate any additional flood hin-
drances in the area.
Bob McDaniel questioned the estimated
total cost of DMG's proposed expansion
plan.
Brian Hammerbeck advised that the total
expansion plan is estimated to cost sev-
eral million dollars and will be a great in-
vestment in the community; not only for
the area farmers, but will also add to the
current property tax base for the City and
County.
Mayor Vetter inquired if DMG has esti-
mated the portion of drainage area that
will be consumed by the installation of
the new rail siding.
Carey Bretsch, engineer, reported that
the entire project area, Phase Ì and ÌÌ,
encompasses approximately 8,000 cubic
yards. Of that, approximately 2,000 cubic
yards will be the new rail siding. Their
plans include utilizing material from
within the flood basin area to construct
the rail siding ÷ displacing it from one
area of the flood plain basin and then re-
locating to another location, providing an
insignificant impact in the area. He also
referenced the Powder River Basin
(PRB) Hydraulic Data Report, noting that
the trestle currently has a drainage area
of 188.5 square miles which has been
proven to be within the flood elevation
standards.
Mike Seager, property owner, spoke with
regard to the flooding concerns in the
area. He referenced documentation from
the 1996 and 2008 floods, noting that in
2008 the flood waters raised to the point
of potential evacuation in a half an hour's
time span. This was the first time in the
past fifty years that it has raised that
quickly which he claims to be a result of
the reduction in size of the trestle bridge.
Mr. Seager went on to stress that he is
not against DMG's proposed expansion
plans, but wants to make sure that the
community and property owners are pro-
tected. Ìn essence, this could be accom-
plished by extending the trestle bridge
back to its original size as it does not
support the water flow during a flood
event like it did before.
John Hart questioned how much of the
trestle bridge was removed and voiced
flooding concern relative to the school's
barium treatment ponds in the area.
Beth Lynn, engineer with Canadian Pa-
cific (CP) Railroad, elaborated on the
PRB Hydraulic Data Report for the trestle
bridge (crossing location: BR 560.3) area
that was completed by Dakota, Min-
nesota and Eastern (DM&E) railroad in
1999 and filed with the Army Corps of
Engineers in 2007. She noted that ac-
cording to the report, the study was com-
pleted as part of the DM&E PRB Project
which indicates that the current size of
the trestle measures at 170.1 feet long
which is well below the 100-year flood el-
evation standards. Ìf it were installed
today, it would be of the same size. (Ìt
was mentioned that four of the trestle
bridge spans were removed from the
original 245 foot trestle, but no exact date
for this work was provided as it was com-
pleted by DM&E, not CP. At this time, the
documentation to confirm this informa-
tion has not been located.)
Mike Seager provided copies of photo-
shopped pictures showing the trestle
bridge before and after the renovations,
indicating that the trestle was originally
built at 350 feet long. He mentioned that
the bridge was built following the 1915
flood event that encompassed a large
span of the town; with the water moving
from Oak St. all the way north to Pine St.
and east to the railroad depot.
Bart Banks spoke on behalf DMG's proj-
ect, stating that he understands the ex-
isting flood concerns of the community,
but reassured everyone that the project
will be a benefit for the community, not a
hindrance. He pointed out that the river
bottom north of the trestle bridge is full of
debris and trees which also impedes
water flow. Ìn other words, the trestle
bridge is not the only concern for causing
flooding in the area.
Jay Baxter, property owner, went on to
say that the improvements DMG are pro-
posing would be an excellent investment
for our community, but it needs to be
done correctly in order for the investment
to be long standing. He noted that during
his experience with the 2008 flood event,
the same concerns then are what are
being heard today. He stressed that if
something needs to be done to protect
the area properties, now would be the
time.
Del Bartels questioned if the DMG proj-
ect and the concerns with the CP trestle
bridge are connected. Ìf the DMG rail sid-
ing is installed, does it have any influ-
ence on the future flooding?
Carey Bretsch confirmed that these are
separate concerns as DMG's project
does not have any influence on future
flooding. He reassured everyone that the
capacity of the flood basin will be the
same as they will only be displacing soil
from within the area of the flood basin.
Council Member Arthur also confirmed
that the flooding issues are not DMG's
problem; it is a problem CP inherited
when they took over the DM&E railroad.
Mike Seager and Jay Baxter simultane-
ously questioned what would happen if
DMG moved forward with the new rail
siding and then CP had to rebuild the
trestle.
Bart Banks questioned if the community
is trying to hold DMG's project "hostage¨
in order to get CP to widen the trestle. He
stressed that DMG cannot fix the flood is-
sues nor can they predict a flood event
as the area in question is in a designated
flood zone area. Again, he reconfirmed
that they will not worsen the flooding is-
sues.
Nick Konst suggested that since this is a
known problem area, would it not be in
the best interest to fix it now, instead of
later?
Mayor Vetter reminded everyone that the
DMG expansion and the CP trestle
bridge are two separate issues. The
DMG expansion will not impact the flood-
ing as they are only displacing the fill in
the flood basin north of the trestle.
Ìt was questioned about the displace-
ment of the water around the flood basin
in which Barry Knutson provided an ex-
ample on the map of how he foresees
the water being displaced. He stated in
his opinion, the new rail siding will create
water restrictions to the bridge, causing
a "bottle-neck¨ effect.
Brian Hammerbeck then asked for the
City's Engineer, Harlan Quenzer's, opin-
ion as to the impact DMG's proposed rail
siding would have on the flooding in the
area as SPN has been provided with
copies of the proposed expansion plans
and is very familiar with the City of
Philip's floodplain and elevations.
Mr. Quenzer reported that according to
the Federal Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) they have established
the 100-year flood elevations for this
area through filed Letters of Map Amend-
ments (LOMA'S) at 2163.5. This eleva-
tion also mirrors that of the trestle bridge
and rail line elevation as they are cur-
rently and proposed to be constructed.
He noted that in order to meet the re-
quired FEMA regulations, construction of
bridges and buildings are required to ei-
ther meet or exceed the 100-year base
flood elevation as established.
He then went on to say that in reviewing
this information, it is his opinion that
DMG's proposed rail siding will not have
any impact on the flooding in this area.
This is for two reasons: one being the
plans provided by DMG show the eleva-
tion of the rail line additions will be below
the elevations of the existing CP rail lines
which will not change the current condi-
tions and the other one being the DMG
plans show that they are not planning to
add more soil in the area of the trestle
which would leave the trestle opening
and stream flow area at the current area.
He gave examples of different flooding
situations where debris blocks the flow of
the water to the predictability of 100-year
to 500-year flood events.
He also explained that with the 2008
flood, he is not able to determine what
flood event that was as he does not have
the rainfall data. He also mentioned that
in his experience, he has observed two
500-year flood events within five months
of each other. This reassured that it is dif-
ficult to predict Mother Nature's course of
action, but either way, he is confident that
the DMG rail siding will not add to the
flooding concerns within the area.
Council Member Henrie questioned the
possibility of installing more drainage
outlets under the rail line east of the tres-
tle bridge in an effort to address some of
the flooding concerns; i.e. bore culverts
under the main rail line and new rail sid-
ing?
Beth Lynn advised that the request for a
culvert installation under the rail line
would have to be made through an appli-
cation to CP. She suggested that it would
be imperative to take into consideration
the barium treatment ponds. Ìn her opin-
ion, the additional drainage should be in-
stalled west of the holding ponds, moving
water away from them.
Carey Bretsch then questioned who
would be responsible for the costs of in-
stalling the culvert(s). He noted that in his
experience with the railroad, it would be
the person or entity requesting the addi-
tional drainage to bare the sole costs in-
volved.
Bart Banks further advised that the instal-
lation costs for such work would be cost
prohibitive for their project. Not only for
the study that would have to be con-
ducted in order to determine the size and
location of the culvert, but also for the
placement of the culvert in which Brian
Hammerbeck stated this would be a
"deal breaker¨ for the proposed DMG ex-
pansion plan.
Lori Seager questioned the reasoning
behind installing the new rail siding on
the north side of the existing rail line
compared to the south side.
Andrew Kangas reported that the south
side was not considered as a possibility
due to the river location. When reviewing
their options for the new rail siding, it was
noted that it would require the construc-
tion of a trestle bridge that would cost ap-
proximately $1.2 million alone. That does
not take into consideration the rest of the
proposed improvements.
Mayor Vetter reiterated that the evidence
has been provided that shows that the
DMG's new rail siding will not adversely
affect the flooding issues in the area.
Should CP want to address the concerns
of the community regarding the trestle
bridge, it will be done at their discretion.
Ìt is his opinion, that the City should not
stop the expansion of DMG in an effort to
get CP to address the concerns voiced
regarding the trestle bridge as they are
two separate issues.
Ìt was questioned about what would hap-
pen if DMG installed the new rail siding
and later on, CP determines to extend
the trestle bridge. Ìt was noted that it
would be addressed at that time while
Carey Bretsch mentioned the possibility
of extending the trestle bridge to the west
should the need arise. This would be
conducive considering the location of the
barium treatment ponds being within
close proximity of the trestle bridge if it
would be extended to the east.
Mike Seager stressed that no matter the
outcome of the public meeting, he wants
to make sure that the trestle concerns
are addressed and not forgotten.
Beth Lynn reassured that she is now
aware of the concerns with the trestle
bridge and will be relaying them to the
experts at CP Railroad. She did note that
in her sixteen-year employment with the
railroad, the first time she became aware
of the concerns now voiced relative to
the trestle bridge was in August of this
year.
John Hart then questioned those present
whether the flooding concerns for the
new rail siding have been taken into con-
sideration. Ìt was noted that DMG will be
building the siding in accordance with the
railroad and FEMA flood elevation stan-
dards.
With nothing further to come before the
public meeting, Mayor Vetter expressed
his appreciation to those in attendance
stating that all of the concerns have been
heard.
With nothing further, Mayor Vetter de-
clared the public meeting adjourned at
6:39 p.m.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Brittany Smith
Deputy Finance Officer
[Published November 1, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $143.93]
PubIIc NctIce
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F0 Eox 788, 220 E. 0ak BL., FLIlIp, BD S7S67
(60S} 8S9-2S16 · ads¤pIoneer-revIew.com
LegaI Advertising
DeadIine:
Fridays at Noon
ads@pioneer-review.com
(605) 859-2516
Classifieds • 859-2516
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 12
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
GRAVEL: Screened or rock. Call
O'Connell Construction Inc.,
859-2020, Philip. P51-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: Hereford bull calves.
Will keep until December 1,
2012. Hovland Herefords, Allen
Hovland, 544-3236, or Miles
Hovland, 544-3294.
PR10-2tc
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
local delivery included, semi-
load lots, no mold or weeds,
large rounds put up right. Call
Rob, 390-5535; Charles, 390-
5506. P47-4tc
HAY FOR SALE: 2012, 1st, 2nd
& 3rd cutting alfalfa hay. 2012
millet hay test results available.
2011, 1st & 2nd cutting alfalfa.
Call 845-3045. F9-2tp
STILL HAVE ROOM FOR 100
plus head of calves to back-
ground. Good feed, 10 years ex-
perience. Phone 685-6725 or cell
454-0053 or 454-0123.
P45-3tp
SELLING: 10 Black Angus com-
merical bred heifers Saturday,
November 3, at Philip (SD) Live-
stock Auction. AI bred Angus to
DL Incentive 228 (EPDs BW 0,
WW 81, YW 133, M 28). Pasture
bred to Green Mountain Front
Man (EPDs BW -.7, WW 61, YW
99 M 28). These heifers origi-
nated out of the 2012 BHSS pen
of five. These very fancy bred
heifers will weigh 1,050 lbs. and
are bred to start calving March 1
for 45 days. Ravellette Cattle,
685-5147 or home, 859-2969.
PR6-5tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-
ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
FOUND/FREE/LOST
FOUND: (2) terrier-type dogs, six
miles north of Philip. Call 859-
3101 to claim. PR10-1tc
FREE TO GOOD HOME: 6
month to 1-year-old female
mutt/part Beagle. Found on
Hwy. 14, Jerry Ingram resi-
dence, Philip. Call 859-2435 or
859-2521. P47-1tc
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Dakota Mill &
Grain, Inc. is looking for an ag-
gressive, team-minded, forward-
thinking individual to be a Loca-
tion Manager at our Philip, SD
location. All applicants and in-
formation is 100% confidential.
Apply to Jack Haggerty at
jackh@dakotamill.com or fax re-
sumé to 605-718-2844.
WP10-2tc
POSITION AVAILABLE: The
Kadoka Area School District is
looking for a bus monitor at an
hourly rate of $11. The hours for
this position would be approxi-
mately 6:15 to 8 a.m. and 3:30
to 5:15 p.m. on all school days
with the possibility of additional
days as assigned. An applica-
tion may be obtained from the
school or on the school district’s
website; kadoka.k12. sd.us.
Please feel free to contact the
school with further questions
about this position. Completed
application may be dropped off
at the school or sent it to:
Kadoka School, Attn: Supt.
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543 or call 837-
2175. EOE. K47-2tc
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED at
Days Inn, Wall. Possibly perma-
nent year-round position, start-
ing immediately. Contact
Theresa, 279-2000. PW46-tfn
POSITION AVAILABLE: The
Kadoka Area School District is
looking for a full-time Special
Education Teacher’s Assistant.
The duties of this position in-
clude; assisting in the education
of Special Education Students
K-8, possible recess/ lunchroom
supervision, and other duties as
assigned. A non-certified appli-
cation may be obtained from the
school or on the school district’s
website; kadoka.k12.sd.us.
Please feel free to contact the
school with further questions
about this position. This posi-
tion will be a one-year position
based on need. Completed appli-
cation may be dropped off at the
school or send it to: Attn: Jeffery
M. Nemecek, Elementary Princi-
pal, PO Box 99, 800 Bayberry
Street, Kadoka, SD 57543 or call
1-605-837-2175. EOE
K46-2tc
WAITRESS NEEDED: at Red
Rock Restaurant in Wall. Call
279-2387 or 279-2388.WP8-3tc
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE IN QUINN: Flotation
waterbed in a self-contained
foam bag (uses regular queen
sheets) with baffles, includes en-
tire bed, $100. Call 386-2372.
PW47-2tc
FOR SALE: Maytag washer,
Maytag electric stove, china
hutch, buffet. Call 515-3962.
WP10-1tc
FOR SALE: Several nice used
refrigerators with warranties.
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder.
390-9810. WP9-4tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
FOR SALE: Several nice used
refrigerators with warranties.
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder.
390-9810. P46-4tp
NOTICES/WANTED
KADOKA LEGION AUXILIARY
MEMBERS: Please bring two
baked good items or a cash do-
nation to Holiday Festival Bake
Sale, Nov. 4. Thanks.
K47-1tc
WANTED: Old Indian items,
beadwork, quillwork, old guns,
old painted buffalo hides, old
photographs. Cash paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802. F46-4tc
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, attached 2-car
garage, large lot. Call 859-2403,
Philip. PR10-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apart-
ment in Wall. Call 386-2222.
WP9-4tc
FOR RENT: 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments for rent in Wall.
Contact Christianson Properties,
858-2195. WP7-4tc
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge will
be added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
THANK YOUS
I would like to thank everyone
for the cards, gifts, food, and
most of all the prayers while I
was in Sioux Falls and back in
Midland.
A special thank you to Kristi for
setting up the Caringbridge site
and keeping everyone informed.
Thanks to Christine for subbing
for me. Thank you to Kristi's fam-
ily and others who stayed with
me so Tom could come back to
Midland. Thank you to Cynthia
and Pastor Kathy for the rides
back to Midland. We appreciate
all those involved with and those
who participated in the 50/50
raffles.
Words just can't express how
thankful we are for the kindness,
thoughtfulness, and generosity
shown to us from Midland and
the surrounding communities. We
are truly blessed to live in such a
caring area.
A special thank you to Tom for
being by my side through the
good times and not so good
times. You are the best.
Thank you. Many prayers
were answered. God bless all of
you.
Mary Parquet
We would like to thank every-
one who came and enjoyed the
Halloween party, for their gener-
ous donations, the cakes for the
cake walk, and help with the
contest and games. Also, thank
you to the businesses that do-
nated the door prizes. We appre-
ciate your support.
Milesville Volunteer
Fire Department
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for SALE
(serious inquires only). Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
* * * * * *
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Quality Air-Entrained Concrete
Call toll-free 1-888-839-2621
Richard Hildebrand
837-2621 • Kadoka, SD
Rent This Space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
EMPLOYMENT
JOIN OUR TEAM ~ looking for
responsible, outgoing and ener-
getic advertising sales represen-
tative. Apply at Mobridge Trib-
une, PO Box 250, Mobridge, SD
57601 or email linda@mobrid-
getribune.com.
PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR –
City of Hill City, SD seeks pro-
fessional candidate for city oper-
ations. Open until filled. Salary
DOE. Info at hillcitysd.org or
605-574-2300. EOE.
CITY OF DE SMET: Full-time
water, wastewater, buildings,
parks, swimming pool mainte-
nance assistant. Possession of
or ability to obtain Commercial
Driver’s License, Chemical Ap-
plicator’s License, Water-Waste-
water Operator Certifications re-
quired. Salary DOE/ Benefits.
For application contact 605-
854-3731 or
desmetcity@mchsi.com. EOE.
SALES AGRONOMIST/PRECI-
SION AG position at Howard
Farmers Coop, Howard SD.
Sales experience, knowledge of
Ag chemicals and precision
Ag/VRT is preferred. Call Colby
605-772-5543.
FOR SALE
2010 GMC YUKON XL 4x4,
65,000 miles, rear DVD, heated
leather seats, remote start,
many more extras. $32,500. Call
605-853-3687 or 605-871-9996.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
continued on page 13
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per
word thereafter; included in the Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The
Pennington Co. Courant, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum for
first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and
initial must be counted separately. Included in the
Pioneer Review and the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢
per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Printed only in the Pioneer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all
charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the
Pioneer Review and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the
Pioneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on
race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limita-
tion, or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of
the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available
on an equal opportunity basis.
benefits
Qualifications
DRIVERS NEEDED
• Good driving record
past 3 years
• 23 years old
• Pass drug screen
• 2 years verifiable experi-
ence (Class A CDL)
• Must meet all federal
motor carrier guidelines
• Sign-on bonus!
• Health insurance
• Employer paid short & long
termdisability, Life Ins.
• Roth & Traditional
401(K) plans
• Regular home time
1-800-525-6958 ext. 1102
Apply Online: www.adamsii.com
“Careers”
APARTMENTS AVAIlAblE!
PHIlIP PlAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For application
& information:
PRO/Rental
Management
1113 Sherman St.
Sturgis, SD 57785
605-347-3077 or
1-800-244-2826
www.
prorental
management.
com
Is It tIMe?
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
Call Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
Philip
For all your
concrete
construction
needs:
Gibson
CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
859-3100
Philip, SD
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Greetings from Yuma, Ariz. We
have had a great trip so far, but
Bill is beginning to get homesick.
Each time he clicks the GPS on
“home” he tells me how far it is to
get home. But, we still have folks to
visit!
This article from the Agraweb
was of interest and thought I would
share it with you. “About 1.3 billion
tons of food are lost in the global
food system every year, and so are
the more than 500 million gallons
of water drawn to produce the
wasted food, according to a new re-
port by Rabobank International. In
a world where almost one billion
people are experiencing hunger –
despite continuous improvements
in food production over recent
decades – and where worldwide
water resources are under stress,
‘this level of waste makes no sense,’
the bank said in the report.
In developing regions, waste gen-
eration is greatest in the agricul-
tural production and post-harvest
stages, whereas in the developed
world, waste generation is greatest
closer to the consumption end of
the system, according to the report,
‘Don't Waste a Drop!’
In response, agriculture and food
companies around the world are in-
creasingly focused on ways to ‘val-
orize’ waste, which is ‘a paradigm
shift’ from viewing waste as a cost
to viewing waste as a potential rev-
enue source, according to the re-
port's authors, Paul Bosch and
Justin Sherrard, who are with
Rabobank's Food and Agribusiness
Advisory division.”
Mel Roghair visited Sandee Git-
tings Monday morning. George,
Kinsey, Natalie and Kohen Git-
tings were in Pierre Monday after-
noon.
Tony Harty was a visitor at the
Shirley Hair home Monday after
getting the mail. Pastor Art and
Doris Weischart were busy getting
their things moved to their new
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Classifieds • 859-2516
Thursday, November 1, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 13
BASIC CoMpUTER ClASSES … will be offered at the Haakon
County Public Library in November. There is no charge for the
class. Please call the library at 859-2442 for more information and
to register.
HAAKoN CoUNTY pUBlIC lIBRARY … will hold its annual
Scholastic Book Fair in the community room of the courthouse from
November 13-16. Hours are from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day.
To have your NoN-pRoFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, November 3 ~
Steak & Shrimp
~ Monday, Nov. 5 ~
Philly Roast Beef
Sandwich
the Steakhouse & lounge
open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, October 30 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, October 31 ~
Basket of Barbecued
Pork Ribs
~ Thursday, November 1 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Nov. 2 ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Shrimp • Chicken
Try our new charbroiled steaks & burgers! All steaks come with a choice of potato and includes salad bar!
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2000 Buick LeSabre
3.8L V6, Economical, Dependable
Just another good Buick!!
residence in Hot Springs.
Bill and I were in Sierre Vista,
Ariz., Monday still enjoying time
with his uncle, Max, and aunt,
Jean Riley. We did activities that
were pretty low key, looking
around the area, bowling on Wii
and visiting. The park we found
was really nice and the folks visited
but they had goat heads and more
than once Bill and I got stuck with
them.
Tuesday, Tony Harty visited
with Pastor Art and Doris Weis-
chart.
The county decided to check on
assessments of real estate changes
and building improvements Tues-
day at Don and Vi Moody’s so they
went around and looked at all the
changes and/or deletions and addi-
tions. Seems the weather is making
more of the changes with wind
damage, but basically everything
that was good survived the wind in
good order.
Bill was in second heaven when
Uncle Max fixed him up with corn
bread and milk Tuesday for sup-
per. We learned a new card game,
so passed the time away with cards
and visiting. This trip is good on
Bill since he can’t do too much lift-
ing or repairing of things.
Vi Moody reported they received
about .50" of rain/snow mix mid-
week, but was dry again by the
weekend. However, every little bit
helps.
In the Kadoka and Philip areas
Wednesday, there was precipita-
tion in the form of rain, turning to
snow as the day wore on. Tony
Harty reported about a half an
inch. While visiting with friends in
the Philip area I had reports of one
half inch to .70. All very welcome.
The snow didn’t stay around too
long, but soaked in to help out pas-
tures and crops.
In the Sturgis area, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler were watching the
weather change the latter part of
the week, reporting rain/snow mix
on Wednesday, a bit of a taste of
winter with an inch and half of
snow.
Wednesday, Bill and I joined
Max and Jean Riley at their home.
The day started off a little weird
and got even worse for me. Some
people will do anything for atten-
tion and as it turned out I was the
one who did it. When I came to,
both Bill and Max were calling 911.
Four nice EMTs came to check me
out and said I may have had some
food poisoning or flu. Some folks
say I don’t have high blood pres-
sure, I just give it, which was so
true that day. Anyway, we girls
beat the boys at that card game
when things settled down.
Thursday, Tony Harty reported
the morning temp was 22˚ he vis-
ited Shirley Hair and helped get
bottled gas tanks filled and put on.
He visited Kathy Brown that
evening.
Bill and I got off to a leisurely
start Thursday morning, destina-
tion Yuma, Ariz. Bill drove all the
way and we arrived early afternoon
and settled in an RV park for that
night. Cousin Marilyn (Larson)
Meizer was not quite home when
we made contact, but she intro-
duced us to her friend, Kitty Van-
derway, who graciously invited us
to park at her house. Cousin Mari-
lyn was born in Cottonwood, and
went to school with Cliff Fees and
Pat Stout. She sent a bundle of
items to me, and it is waiting at the
post office. It will be like Christmas
when I get to that mail. We enjoyed
supper with her that night.
Kinsey, Natalie and Kohen Git-
tings took George Gittings to Rapid
City Friday so that he could attend
funeral services for Linda (Bodkin)
Wilkie. Our sympathy to the family
as well.
Marilyn Meizer joined Bill and
me for breakfast Friday morning
and we enjoyed visiting. We ex-
plored around the area and looked
at the fields. That evening, Marilyn
and Kitty were our supper guests.
Bill and I checked out downtown
Yuma that evening.
Tony Harty had coffee out Friday
and caught up on the news of town.
He took Shirley Hair shopping. It
was a nice day, up to 40˚.
“Make a memory with your chil-
dren, Take the time in busy days,
have some fun while they are grow-
ing, show your love in gentle ways.”
– Elaine Hardt
Friday, Sherry (Fiedler), hus-
band Eric and kids, Elsie and
Loman Hanson, took a drive down
memory lane. They went by way of
Highway 34, arriving first at the
Tom Harty ranch to see the old red
barn that was from the Fiedler
farm. The kids thought that was
something, there were a lot of sto-
ries shared and Kodak moments
there. Then on to the Hilland area
where Sherry showed them the
combine she used to play in and the
house she was raised in. Sherry
said the kids thought she lived in a
great place. They went on to Philip
and visited grandma Katy Drage-
set and spent the night at the
Richard and Diana Stewart home.
Saturday morning, they stopped to
visit Grandma Katy again before
returning home to Spearfish. A
wonderful trip of sharing memories
for all.
George and Sandee Gittings at-
tended a birthday party in Kadoka
Saturday for Dale and Cindy O’-
Connell. There was a large crowd.
Dale hit the big 70 and I won’t tell
what Cindy turned.
Jessica Gittings and Daniel were
out to the George Gittings home
Saturday evening to carve pump-
kins for Halloween.
Saturday morning, cousin Dave
Sherwood joined Marilyn, Bill and
me at breakfast. I had tracked him
down the day before and surprised
him as he was serving lunch at the
RV park he lives at. Dave and Mar-
ilyn both have those fancy phones
and because I was having so much
trouble with email on the road, we
went shopping for an iPhone. As
luck would have it, we got the four
model, but figured by the time a
contract was over, we may know
how to use the darned thing. That
took a lot of time over in Yuma.
Supper with Marilyn and Kitty
Vanderway. Nice day, temp about
92˚. Our old cat is plumb happy
with his digs and we are enjoying
folks we meet.
Don and Vi Moody visited with
Tony Harty as he was calling in on
his cell phone to see how everyone
was fairing. Also Vi got a call from
friend and former classmate, Mary
Lou Michael Schimke, Sunday
evening. Mary Lou and husband
Chuck were dressing up in mas-
querade style for Halloween and
were going as Prince Charles and
Camille from London. Mary Lou
said the last party they dressed as
cowboy and cowgirl and were de-
nied prizes as in New Mexico that
wasn't considered to be a costume.
Don and Vi have been enjoying
Halloween decorations around
Rapid and their Black Hills fa-
vorite destinations. They decorated
at their home in Rapid Valley. Vi's
witch almost blew away on her
broom though, but they retrieved it
from the neighbor’s yard after the
70 mph wind the week before that
was blowing 18-wheelers off the
highway like toy trucks.
Tony Harty visited with Kathy
Brown Sunday after church. He
had lunch with Jerry Nemec of
Midland and found out Sonia was
in Washington, D.C., at the Marine
marathon race. Jerry said land
prices in the Midland area were
from $2,000 to $1,500 per acre.
Tony visited Russ Hattel later in
the afternoon and also got together
with Sheriff Ray Clements. Nice
day with a high in the 40s.
Bill and I were breakfast guests
of cousin Marilyn Meizer, then
with new phone in hand, Bill and I
were back to the phone company in
Yuma knocking on the door to get
into a class we didn’t think we
needed the day before. While in the
area, we visited the Yuma Territo-
rial Prison. The next thing was to
look up cousin Dave Sherwood at
the washer board games in his RV
court. We needed to take a lesson
from my “older” cousin. A couple of
hours later, and we could do a lot
more. That evening, Marilyn and
her friend, June, invited us to join
them for supper out.
May you all have a fun Hal-
loween and a safe one. Be sure to
exercise your right to vote Novem-
ber 6.
Oh no, is this going to be a prob-
lem? Will we will get so cozy with
our smart phone we forget to con-
nect with each other? The good
news is we only have one phone!
Betwixt
Places News
(continued from page 12)
Pioneer Review
Ad Deadline:
Tuesdays at 11 a.m.
* * * *
Call 859-2516
ads@pioneer-
review.com
A collaborative effort between
the South Dakota Department of
Education and the Board of Re-
gents will help the state’s college-
bound juniors and seniors who may
need some assistance to get up to
speed before hitting campus for the
first time.
The Board of Regents requires
students whose ACT sub-scores fall
below 20 in math and 18 in English
to take remedial courses prior to
entry into college-level courses.
The new partnership will allow
students to complete remedial
coursework before entering one of
the Board of Regents’ institutions.
“We’re excited about this part-
nership and the opportunity it cre-
ates for students,” said South
Dakota Secretary of Education Dr.
Melody Schopp. “This initiative
supports our core mission of ensur-
ing students are college-, career-
and life-ready when they exit K12.”
The new program, available
through the South Dakota Virtual
School, uses a diagnostic assess-
ment to generate online course-
work tailored specifically to each
student’s needs. The Board of Re-
gents will honor successful comple-
tion of the tailored coursework, al-
lowing students who successfully
complete the coursework to enter
directly into college-level courses.
The Board of Regents estimates
that about 28 percent of incoming
freshmen require remediation in at
least one subject prior to beginning
college-level courses.
“Research shows that students
who graduate from high school
ready for college-level work are
more likely to be retained and to
successfully graduate from college,”
said Jack Warner, the regents’ ex-
ecutive director and CEO. “Not
only is this a win for the state, it’s
also a win for students and their
parents, who save time and several
hundred dollars in costs if the stu-
dent can avoid remedial classes.”
The online remedial courses are
scheduled to be available to stu-
dents beginning in January 2013,
and will be offered in both 10-week
and 12-month options. Students
must register for the courses
through their local school district,
similar to other online courses of-
fered through the South Dakota
Virtual School.
For more information, visit
www.sdvs.k12.sd.us.
Partnership to help college bound students
AI Bred Angus to
DL Incentive 228
(EPDs BW 0,WW 81,YW 133, M 28).
Pasture bred to Green
Mountain Front Man
(EPDs BW -.7,WW 61,YW 99 M 28.
These heifers originated out of the
2012 BHSS pen of five.These very fancy bred
heifers will weigh 1,050 lbs. and are bred to start
calving March 1st for 45 days.
Selling 10 Black Angus commerical bred heifers
Saturday, November 3rd
at Philip (SD) Livestock Auction
1hursdav, November 1, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review ·Page 14
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED
HEIFER SALE & WEIGH-UP COWS, BULL, & HFRT SALE. WEI-
HGUPS: 8:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 11:00 A.M. (MT) EARLY CONSIGN-
MENTS: ESTIMATING 4000 HEAD.
PRODUCTIONSALE:
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL – 60 BLK & BWF COMING 4 YR OLD COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-28 FOR 55 DAYS
DISPERSIONS:
LARRY SMITH– “COMPLETE DISPERSIONOF 480 HD” – 80 BLK AI’DHFRS;
BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 200 BLK 3 TO 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 150
BLK 6 YR OLD TO SOLID MOUTHCOWS; BRED:BLK; CLV: 3-20
50 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
PAUL SCHNOSE – “COMPLETE DISPERSION” – 130 BLK 4 YR OLD TO BRO-
KEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
MARVINCOLEMAN“AGE DISPERSION” – 75 BLK COMING 3 YR OLD COWS;
BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-25 FOR 60 DAYS
TIM & DENISE NELSON – “AGE DISPERSION” – 60 BLK COMING 3 YR OLD
COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1 FOR 30 DAYS
SHANNONGARTNER & FLOYDKJERSTAD”AGE DISP” – 40 BLK 3 YR OLD
COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10
PETE REINERT “AGE DISP” – 30 BLK COMING 3 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK;
CLV: 3-10 FOR 60 DAYS
JOE CARLEY “AGE DISPERSION” – 35 BLK COMING 3 YR OLD COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-20
BREDHEIFERS:
KENNY MATT – 190 FIRST CROSS BWF ULTRASOUND HFRS; BRED; LBW BLK;
CLV: 2-27 (SORTED INTO 1 WEEK CLVG PERIODS)
JONMILLAR– 135 FANCY BREDHFRS (1000-1050#); BRED: SITZ DASHSON; 50
HDAI’DHFRS; CLV:2-15 FOR 3 DAYS; 80 HDOF BULL BREDULTRASOUNDHFRS;
40 HD CLV: 3-1 FOR 20 DAYS & 40 HD CLV: 4-1 FOR 20 DAYS
TODDMORTENSON – 100 BLK & BWF AI’D HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 2-15
(CLEAN UP WITHBLK BULL 3-1)
MCDANIEL BROTHERS – 100 BLK ULTRASOUND HFRS; BRED:O’NEILL BLK
ANG; CLV:3-6 (SORTED INTO TWO 15 DAY CLVG PERIODS)
MICKEY SIMONS – 75 BLK ULTRASOUNDHFRS (HOME RAISED); BRED: BLK;
CLV: 3-1
JOHNMCGRIFF – 75 BLK HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1
JERRY GRIMES – 30 RED ANG HFRS (HOME RAISED); BRED: LBW RED ANG;
CLV: 4-24 FOR 20 DAYS
NICK & LILA CASPERS – 23 BLKAI’DHFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-27 FOR 21 DAYS
WOODRANCH– 25 BLK&REDHFRS; BRED: REDANG; CLV: 3-15 FOR 60 DAYS
DAVE BERRY – 22 RED & BLK ANG AI’D HFRS; BRED: RED ANG; CLV: 3-10
MARLINBRINK – 20 BLK HFRS; BRED: LBW BLK; CLV: 3-10 FOR 15 DAYS
SCOTT EDOFF – 18 BLK ANG LHX HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10 FOR 45 DAYS
DON RAVELLETTE – 10 FANCY BLK ANG HFRS (1050#); AI BRED: DL INCEN-
TIVE 228; PASTURE BRED: GREEN MOUNTAIN FRONT MAN; CLV: 3-1 FOR 45
DAYS
STOCK COWS & BROKENMOUTHCOWS:
BUCHHOLZ & RISLOV – 250 BLK SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-20
KJERSTAD LIVESTOCK – 225 BLK 5 TO 6 YR OLD COWS & BROKEN MOUTH
COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-15 FOR 45 DAYS
WOOD RANCH– 90 BLK & RED 3 TO 10 YR OLD COWS; BLK BRED: BLK; RED
BRED: RED; CLV: 3-15 FOR 75 DAYS
LEE BALDWIN – 50 BLK 7 TO 9 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1 FOR 55
DAYS
RISSE UV RANCH – 50 BLK MOSTLY 4 & 5 YR OLD COWS & FEW BROKEN
MOUTHCOWS; BRED: JORGENSEN & LINDSKOV THIEL; CLV: 3-5
ALVINSIMMONS – 45 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10
DAN& SUSANTAFT – 45 BLK & RED MOSTLY BROKEN MOUTHCOWS;
KNUTSONRANCH– 40 REDANG7 TO8 YROLDCOWS; BRED: REDANG; CLV:
4-1
SCOTT PHILLIPS – 40 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-25
JOE CARLEY – 35 BLKCOMING 3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 30 BLK
BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
SHAWN FREELAND – 25 BLK 3 TO 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; 4-1 FOR 30
DAYS
JIMWILSEY – 25 BLK & BWF SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK;
CLV: 4-1 FOR 45 DAYS
JERRY WILLERT – 20 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20 FOR
50 DAYS
KELLY RIGGINS – 20 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1
DAVE JENNINGS – 18 BLK 3 TO 8 YR OLD COWS; BRED: CHAR; CLV: 3-30 FOR
50 DAYS
JOHNSTABEN– 16 REDSOLIDTO BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: RED; CLV:
3-1
WILLIAMDAVEY– 16 BLK& BWF MIXEDAGE COWS; BRED: RED& BLK; CLV:
3-20
GARY HERRINGTON – 15 BLK BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-1
FOR 60 DAYS
HUNSAKER RANCH– 13 BLK & BWF 9 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-1
BLAZYTRANCH– 12 BLK&RED3 TO7 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: REDANG; CLV:
2-28 FOR 70 DAYS
GALE BRUNS – 10 BLK COMING 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 2-25
IRIS BEARHEELS – 10 BLK BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETHAT
605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE. YEARLINGS: 10:00 a.m. CALVES: 11:00 a.m. MT. EARLY CONSIGN
MENTS: ESTIMATING 75008000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE
& SOURCE VERIFIED
SANDERS RANCH 500 BLK CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI.................................500600#
JOHNSTON 450 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,ASV.............................................400550#
THOMPSON & THOMPSON 400 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...............................450550#
EDOFF 400 BLK, BWF, & A FEW HERF CLVS; FS,NI..............................400525#
HERRON 350 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................................450575#
RICHTER 300 CHAR X & A FEW BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............................500600#
BCR INC. 300 BLK & BWF CLVS; NI ..........................................................400550#
EISENBRAUN 300 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................500550#
WISHARD 260 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI 200 STRS & 60 BWF FIRST CROSS
HFRSALL HFRS IN TOWN.............................................................................500600#
PORCH & PORCH 250 BLK STRS; FS,ASV...............................................500600#
BLAIR 230 BLK & A FEW RED CLVS; FS,NI,ASV,AN.............................500600#
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
DAYCO LTD 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................450500#
JONES & SONS 220 BLK & RED X STRS; FS .............................................450550#
VOGELGESANG 180 BLK CLVS; FS............................................................500550#
HULM 180 CHAR X CLVS; FS...............................................................................700#
TRIPLE T ENT. 175 BLK CLVS; FS,NI,ASV...............................................500580#
SCARBOROUGH RANCH 165 BLK & RED X CLVS; FS,WEANED....500600#
FLESNER 150 BLK CLVS; FS,NI....................................................................450525#
HOWIE 135 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,WEANED....................................450550#
R & G SMITH RANCH LLC 130 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..................................450525#
WILLIAMS 130 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................425550#
SAMPSON 120 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .........................................................................500#
KETELSEN 120 BLK STRS; FS,NI.................................................................450550#
SMITH 115 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................................500#
UPELL 115 MOSTLY CHAR X & A FEW BLK CLVS; FS .........................500600#
STOVER 114 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,BQA.............................................575600#
GROPPER 110 RED CLVS; FS .......................................................................550650#
PHILIPSEN 100 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI..........................................................550#
LARSON & LARSON 100 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..............................................500550#
WHEELER 100 BLK CLVS; FS,NI,WEANED.............................................500550#
BLOOM 90 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ................................................................525550#
MICKELSON 90 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI.................................................400550#
FEES 80 BLK CLVS; FS ....................................................................................500550#
MERCHEN RANCH 75 BLK CLVS; NI .......................................................425550#
DODSON 70 BLK CLVS; NI,AN...........................................................................500#
SAWVELL 65 BLK CLVS; FS ..........................................................................450550#
MCDANIEL BROTHERS 60 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS.........................................550#
STRAND 60 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................................450550#
KILNESS RANCH 45 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................400450#
KALISIAK RANCH 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................500550#
WARD 25 BLK CLVS; FS.................................................................................300450#
CARLSON 25 BLK CLVS; FS,NI....................................................................450500#
HAUK 18 BLK CLVS; FS,NI............................................................................500550#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETHAT
605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE
& REGULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PAS
TEURELLA, 7WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE & THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2: NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
NOVEMBER 7 & 14.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. SD, 2DJ2
We Þod ono1Þer b1g run o] oo111e. Lorge
oroud o] bugers u11Þ o 1o1 o] 1ong s1r1ngs
1n 1Þe o]]er1ng. £×peo11ng SDDD oo111e
ne×1 ueeK.
CALVES:
PERAULT RANCH - BELVIDERE
101.................................DWF STFS 503= ....$190.00
112.................................DWF STFS 440= ....$202.00
121 ................................DWF HFFS 482= ....$173.00
77..................................DWF HFFS 405= ....$173.00
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
63 ..................................FED HFFS 536= ....$200.00
368 ................................FED HFFS 458= ....$195.00
17 ..................................FWF HFFS 490= ....$170.00
142 ................................FED HFFS 394= ....$173.00
45 ..................................FED HFFS 402= ....$169.00
STERLING RIGGINS - WANBLEE
110.......................DLK & DWF STFS 533= ....$171.50
24.........................DLK & DWF STFS 467= ....$180.50
99 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 503= ....$160.00
BUCHHOL2 & RISLOV - PHILIP
300 ..........DLK & DWF WEANED STFS 549= ....$172.25
91.......................DLK WEANED STFS 613= ....$162.75
78.......................DLK WEANED STFS 480= ....$179.00
LYNN FIELDS - ELM SPRINGS
94 .................................CHAF STFS 589= ....$166.25
72 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 500= ....$172.25
96.................................CHAF HFFS 548= ....$149.25
31.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 477= ....$147.25
JIGGS O'CONNELL - RAPID CITY
88.........................DLK & DWF STFS 545= ....$169.25
10 ...................................DLK STFS 436= ....$181.00
JONES RANCH - CAPUTA
107.......................DLK & DWF STFS 560= ....$166.25
111.......................DLK & DWF STFS 486= ....$180.25
39 ...................................DLK STFS 419= ....$190.50
102 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 470= ....$162.25
33 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 386= ....$170.25
SCOTT BOOMER - INTERIOR
91.........................FED & DLK STFS 581= ....$165.00
65.........................FED & DLK STFS 480= ....$164.00
99 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 542= ....$169.00
TOM & LACEY CLEMENTS - PHILIP
33 ...................................DLK STFS 536= ....$169.25
CARLSON & ROMERO - BELVIDERE
48.........................DLK & DWF STFS 530= ....$169.75
30.........................DLK & DWF STFS 458= ....$184.50
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - PHILIP
95 .................................CHAF STFS 622= ....$161.25
85 ...................................DLK STFS 566= ....$164.25
67.......................CHAF & FED STFS 547= ....$167.50
38 ...................................DLK STFS 458= ....$186.00
106...............................CHAF HFFS 568= ....$148.50
WINK CATTLE CO,. - HOWES
87.........................FED & DLK STFS 520= ....$169.50
34 ...................................DLK STFS 419= ....$189.50
99...................................DLK HFFS 488= ....$159.75
28...................................DLK HFFS 383= ....$169.50
HARLAN & JUSTON EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
105 .................................DLK STFS 569= ....$168.25
42 ...................................DLK STFS 472= ....$176.00
95...................................DLK HFFS 519= ....$152.50
31...................................DLK HFFS 432= ....$160.00
LENDEN KJERSTAD - CREIGHTON
66 ...................................DLK STFS 545= ....$169.00
28 ...................................DLK STFS 456= ....$185.00
35 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 488= ....$153.00
11...................................DLK HFFS 387= ....$171.00
KETELSEN & BEUG - STURGIS
45 ...................................DLK STFS 543= ....$168.00
26 ...................................DLK STFS 454= ....$183.50
13 ...................................DLK STFS 336= ....$204.00
JACQUELINE CROWLEY - ST. ONGE
33 ...................................DLK STFS 414= ....$189.00
17 ...................................DLK STFS 335= ....$202.50
37...................................DLK HFFS 389= ....$170.00
14...................................DLK HFFS 318= ....$169.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
46 ...................................DLK STFS 530= ....$168.00
24 ...................................DLK STFS 430= ....$186.50
45...................................DLK HFFS 461= ....$154.75
16...................................DLK HFFS 378= ....$169.00
JESSE MORELAND - RED OWL
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 529= ....$167.50
26.........................DLK & DWF STFS 420= ....$192.00
9 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 421= ....$165.50
NORMAN & JOSH GEIGLE - WALL
53 ...................................DLK STFS 542= ....$168.25
9 .....................................DLK STFS 424= ....$186.50
KEFFELER RANCH - RED OWL
55.........................DLK & DWF STFS 522= ....$169.50
41 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 502= ....$147.50
KIEFFER & SHARKEY - STURGIS
60 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 552= ....$169.00
13 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 507= ....$172.50
32...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 533= ....$146.75
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
34 ...................................DLK STFS 553= ....$165.75
7 .....................................DLK STFS 466= ....$186.00
AARON & JIM MANSFIELD - KADOKA
118 .................................DLK STFS 488= ....$177.25
39 ...................................DLK STFS 575= ....$162.25
PAT TRASK FAMILY - WASTA
95.........................DLK & DWF STFS 567= ....$166.00
128.......................FED & DLK STFS 470= ....$180.00
44 ...................................DLK STFS 376= ....$190.25
DOUG & VICKY DAHL - WALL
46.........................DLK & DWF STFS 557= ....$168.00
26.........................FED & DLK STFS 466= ....$176.00
54 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 540= ....$144.75
16 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 437= ....$152.00
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
65 ...................................DLK STFS 630= ....$157.75
13 ...................................DLK STFS 531= ....$168.00
CHASE RANCH - MIDLAND
58 ...................................DLK STFS 616= ....$161.25
64...................................DLK HFFS 587= ....$150.50
DON & JUDY RAWHOUSER - NEWCASTLE, WY
51 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 567= ....$165.00
13 ...................................DLK STFS 468= ....$174.00
10.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 469= ....$152.50
KILNESS RANCH - HOWES
47.........................DLK & DWF STFS 521= ....$168.50
27.........................DLK & DWF STFS 406= ....$192.50
11.........................DLK & DWF STFS 303= ....$207.50
22 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 408= ....$168.00
13 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 337= ....$171.00
JEFF MADSEN - QUINN
56.........................FED & DLK STFS 462= ....$182.50
27.........................DLK & DWF STFS 372= ....$198.50
58 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 441= ....$150.50
32 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 348= ....$172.75
MARTY & VICKI HEBB - CHERRY CREEK
32 ...................................DLK STFS 463= ....$176.00
14.........................FED & DLK STFS 361= ....$192.00
20...................................DLK HFFS 435= ....$164.50
18...................................DLK HFFS 363= ....$172.00
GENE CROSBIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
86.........................DLK & DWF STFS 473= ....$176.00
16.........................DLK & DWF STFS 374= ....$194.00
63 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 451= ....$159.25
18 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 383= ....$169.00
DEAN & MATT HEEB - MIDLAND
19.........................DLK & DWF STFS 564= ....$163.00
8 .....................................DLK STFS 435= ....$177.00
9.....................................DLK HFFS 418= ....$161.00
BRUCH RANCH - STURGIS
78 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 521= ....$165.25
19 ...................................DLK STFS 386= ....$190.50
DARRELL ENNEN - RAPID CITY
40 ...................................DLK STFS 617= ....$157.75
19 ...................................DLK STFS 533= ....$166.75
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
33.........................DLK & DWF STFS 678= ....$154.75
9...........................DLK & DWF STFS 535= ....$164.00
33 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 642= ....$140.00
GERRY ECKERT - RAPID CITY
39 ...................................DLK STFS 650= ....$153.00
ROBERT J. WHITE - FAIRBURN
64.........................DLK & DWF STFS 491= ....$170.50
24 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 376= ....$192.50
52 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 475= ....$150.00
23 ...................................DLK STFS 394= ....$160.00
BURT DARTT - WALL
30.........................DLK & DWF STFS 617= ....$155.25
JAY & CONNIE PRICE - NEW UNDERWOOD
13.........................DLK & DWF STFS 596= ....$153.00
6.....................................DLK HFFS 543= ....$141.75
CHANCE & ROBERT DENNIS - RED OWL
29.........................FED & DLK STFS 512= ....$168.00
11.........................FED & DLK STFS 424= ....$185.00
18 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 458= ....$150.50
CODY & MANDI SKOGEN - OPAL
19.........................FED & DLK STFS 539= ....$166.75
25 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 509= ....$144.50
SANDY HANSON - STURGIS
18 ...................................DLK STFS 653= ....$150.50
KETELSEN FAMILY TRUST - UNION CENTER
48 ...................................DLK STFS 603= ....$158.50
29 ...................................DLK STFS 514= ....$172.00
37...................................DLK HFFS 537= ....$144.50
SHUCK BROTHERS - UNION CENTER
99.........................FED & DLK STFS 477= ....$171.50
82.........................FED & DLK STFS 411= ....$178.00
110 ......................FED & DLK HFFS 463= ....$160.50
93 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 373= ....$165.00
JJ ELSHERE - HEREFORD
15 ...................................DLK STFS 529= ....$166.50
10 ...................................DLK STFS 425= ....$190.00
WADE GEIGLE - CREIGHTON
16.........................DLK & DWF STFS 517= ....$162.25
20 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 501= ....$151.50
BAR OPEN A INC - KADOKA
36 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 545= ....$165.75
14 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 459= ....$172.50
41 ......................CHAF & FED HFFS 525= ....$147.50
CHANE COOMES - MANDERSON
70.........................FED & DLK STFS 550= ....$153.75
34.........................FED & DLK STFS 436= ....$170.00
50 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 473= ....$147.25
ERIC HENDRICKSEN - RAPID CITY
10.........................DLK & DWF STFS 575= ....$146.00
10........................FWF & DWF HFFS 592= ....$134.00
FLOYD VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
12.........................FED & DLK STFS 598= ....$145.00
22 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 561= ....$139.00
BEN SMITH - QUINN
10.........................FED & DLK STFS 465= ....$173.00
IRWIN FERGUSON - KADOKA
47 .................................HEFF STFS 495= ....$161.75
17 .................................HEFF STFS 403= ....$173.25
15...................................DWF STFS 466= ....$181.00
16..................................DWF HFFS 415= ....$160.00
PAUL PARKS - OWANKA
9 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 537= ....$134.50
MARLIN MAUDE - HERMOSA
5...........................FED & DLK STFS 358= ....$178.00
8 ..........................FED & DLK HFFS 459= ....$145.50
MISTY HEBB - EAGLE BUTTE
18 ...................................DLK STFS 490= ....$162.50
16...................................DLK HFFS 456= ....$156.00
DELINDA SIMONS - ALLEN
36.........................DLK & DWF STFS 543= ....$158.75
23 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 538= ....$141.00
VoIunfoor opporfunIfIos nro
nbundnnf nf fho Counfrv Cupbonrd
food pnnfrv.
ÐurIng fho Ocfobor bonrd of dI-
rocfors moofIng, IrosIdonf CnroI
Hoffmnn roquosfod fho bonrd fo
fInd nddIfIonnI voIunfoors.
Tho mosf vIsIbIo voIunfoor posI-
fons nro nf fho wnrohouso durIng
fho hours of opornfIon. Thoso hours
nro ovorv Wodnosdnv from l:00
p.m. fo 4:00 p.m., nnd ovorv fhIrd
Snfurdnv from 9:00 n.m. fo ll:00
n.m.
ChockIng, sorfIng nnd sfockIng
donnfod food Ifoms cnn bo dono
nnvfImo. Inch donnfod Ifom Is In-
spocfod for food snfofv, oxpIrnfIon
dnfo nnd fhnf fho pnckngo Is nof
dnmngod. Ðonnfod food Is rocoIvod
on n sporndIc bnsIs, buf noods fo bo
dono nbouf onco n wook. ThIs Is n
good opporfunIfv for somoono who
works durIng busInoss hours nnd
wouId IIko fo hoIp nf fho pnnfrv.
ShoppIng nf fho food bnnk In
!npId CIfv Is n vorv dIfforonf voI-
unfoor opporfunIfv. ThIs musf bo
dono durIng food bnnk hours,
whIch nro Mondnv fhrough IrIdnv
durIng fho work dnv. VoIunfoors
work cIosoIv wIfh fho food pnnfrv
bonrd so fhov Ionrn whnf fo Iook
for. A roIInbIo vohIcIo Is nocossnrv.
Tho Counfrv Cupbonrd nppII-
nncos nood fo bo cIonnod nf Ionsf
onco n vonr, If nof fwIco. ThIs pnsf
summor fwo coIIogo sfudonfs nc-
compIIshod fhIs fnsk In nddIfIon fo
snnIfIzIng nII fho shoIvos In fho
pnnfrv. Tho cIonnIng of nppIInncos
goos n Iong wnv In mnInfnInIng fho
oquIpmonf fo roquIrod Ðopnrfmonf
of HonIfh sfnndnrds.
!ocruIfmonf, frnInIng nnd coor-
dInnfIon of voIunfoors who sorvo
fho cIIonfs Is curronfIv fho gronfosf
nood rIghf now. As fho food pnnfrv
movos fownrd Ifs fhIrd vonr of sorv-
Ico fo fho communIfv, n now group
of voIunfoors nro noodod In fhIs cn-
pncIfv.
Iood drIvos nro vIfnI fo fho
pnnfrv. CoordInnfIon of food drIvos
nnd foIIow up of sorfIng nnd shoIv-
Ing fho donnfIons Is noodod. Thoro
Is n Inrgo nmounf of fIoxIbIIIfv In
fhIs voIunfoor opporfunIfv.
You cnn hoIp supporf vour food
pnnfrv nnd fho communIfv In so
mnnv wnvs. Ior moro InformnfIon,
confncf Hoffmnn.
Volunteer
at the
country
cupboard
Thoro wns n wIdo rnngo In mnr-
kof oxpocfnfIons for corn nnd sov-
bonn producfIon nnd whonf ondIng
sfocks prIor fo fho roIonso of Tho
WorId AgrIcuIfurnI SuppIv nnd Ðo-
mnnd IsfImnfos (WASÐI) roporf
Ocfobor ll.
ThIs roporf mnv hnvo cnsf moro
IIghf on uncorfnIn suppIv nnd do-
mnnd fundnmonfnIs, snId !Isn II-
IIoff, Soufh Ðnkofn Sfnfo !nIvor-
sIfv IxfonsIon commodIfv mnrkof-
Ing spocInIIsf. IIIIoff summnrIzod
fho Ocfobor ll roporf ns If por-
fnIns fo Soufh Ðnkofn commodI-
fIos.
Corn: Ior Soufh Ðnkofn, 20l2
corn hnrvosfod ncros woro In-
cronsod 50,000 ncros from fho Sop-
fombor crop producfIon roporf fo
5.35 mIIIIon ncros. YIoId, In Soufh
Ðnkofn, wns docronsod fwo bushoIs
por ncro fo 94 bushoIs por ncro.
ThIs wns mosf IIkoIv duo fo n do-
cronsod numbor of onrs por ncro
(2l,550) nnd pInnfs por ncro
(23,900) osfImnfod In fho Soufh
Ðnkofn Ocfobor objocfIvo vIoId dnfn
compnrod fo fho Sopfombor dnfn
fhnf hnd 22,l50 onrs por ncro nnd
24,200 pInnfs por ncro.
Whonf: Mosf mnrkof nnnIvsfs ox-
pocfod fhnf fho !.S. whonf bnInnco
shoof wouId bo ndjusfod gIvon nn
osfImnfod unprocodonfod nmounf
of food usngo roporfod In fho Sop-
fombor 28 grnIn sfocks roporf.
IrIor fo fho roporf, whonf ondIng
sfocks woro oxpocfod fo rnngo from
550 mIIIIon bushoIs fo ?l4 mIIIIon
bushoIs wIfh nn nvorngo nf 62?
mIIIIon bushoIs. As oxpocfod, nn-
nunI food/rosIdunI wns Incronsod
95 mIIIIon bushoIs fo 3l5 mIIIIon
bushoIs, nn Incronso of 43 porconf
from fho Sopfombor WASÐI. If ro-
nIIzod, 3l5 mIIIIon bushoIs wouId
bo fho Inrgosf food nnd rosIdunI
usngo sInco l998.
CIvon fho sIowor pnco of oxporfs
In fho fIrsf qunrfor, oxporfs woro
Ioworod 50 mIIIIon bushoIs. ThIs ro-
suIfod In ondIng sfocks nf 654 mII-
IIon bushoIs, whIch Is nbouf 30
mIIIIon bushoIs hIghor fhnn fho
mnrkof nvorngo oxpocfod ondIng
sfocks osfImnfo. AIso Imporfnnf fo
nofo Is fhnf WASÐI Ioworod gIobnI
whonf suppIIos bv 6.2 mIIIIon mof-
rIc fons duo fo fho drvnoss In Aus-
frnIIn, !ussIn, nnd I!-2? nnd
docronsod gIobnI whonf consump-
fIon of 2.4 mIIIIon mofrIc fons nnd
gIobnI oxporfs of four mIIIIon mof-
rIc fons.
Sovbonns: Ior Soufh Ðnkofn,
20l2 sovbonn hnrvosfod ncros woro
Incronsod 200,000 ncros from fho
Sopfombor crop producfIon roporf
fo 4.65 mIIIIon ncros. YIoId, In
Soufh Ðnkofn, romnInod fho snmo
nf 28 bushoIs por ncro. YIoId ro-
mnInod fho snmo dospIfo fowor
pods por ncro osfImnfod In fho Oc-
fobor objocfIvo dnfn (2,?63,640
pods) compnrod fo fho Sopfombor
objocfIvo dnfn (2,833,820 pods).
Tho ImpIIcnfIon Is fhnf pod woIghfs
nro hIghor fhIs vonr fhnn fho hIs-
forIcnI nvorngo.
To rond IIIIoff's summnrv of fho
compIofo roporf ns If roInfos fo fho
nnfIon ns n whoIo, vIsIf ICrow.org.
World ag supply
estlmates on
8outh 0akota
commodltles

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