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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 40
Volume 107
May 30, 2013
Market Report
12 Pro Winter Wheat ...................$7.15
Any Pro .....................................$6.55
14 Pro Spring Wheat ...................$7.43
Milo...............................................$6.47
Corn..............................................$6.42
SFS Birdseed.............................$22.00
New Crop 12 Pro WW..................$7.11
New Crop 14 Pro SW...................$7.39
Emergency
Medical
Services
Week
9
Range
work-
shop
8
Trinity Lutheran Church in Mid-
land has seen many changes dur-
ing the last 100 years, but the
essence of serving the Lord has
been constant.
Norsk Lutherske Kirke was its
name when founded by the Norwe-
gian speaking Americans. Its con-
stitution was also written in Nor-
wegian.
The worship services, conducted
in Norwegian, were held in homes
for the first few years. Worship was
held Sunday mornings, followed by
dinner and then Ladies Aid in the
afternoon.
In 1914, the church was renamed
Scandinavian Lutheran Church. At
that time, 14 people were baptized
and there were 18 confirmed mem-
bers.
Fifteen years later in 1929, the
Midland Parish of the Black Hills
Circuit, comprised of churches in
Midland, Nowlin, Deep Creek and
Van Metre, purchased the Minard
property in Midland for the parson-
age. Two years later, they pur-
chased the Presbyterian property.
Since that time, many structural
changes have been made to the
church. The sanctuary is the origi-
nal structure.
Sidewalks were poured in front
of the church and the parsonage by
the Works Progress Administra-
tion during the Depression years.
This was done throughout the town
of Midland. WPA men provided the
labor while groups and homeown-
ers provided the materials.
An addition with a basement
was added in 1949 as well as con-
necting to the town’s sewer system.
Indoor restrooms were part of the
remodel.
The 1950s saw many changes for
the church. The church was reded-
icated in 1951 and by 1953 there
were three choirs – cherub, junior
and adult.
Brass altar appointments and an
electric organ were purchased in
1952 as a memorial to Reverend O.
H. Olson. A white altar and pulpit
were installed in 1953. Another ad-
dition was built on in 1959, provid-
ing an education room, a kitchen
and a pastor’s study.
When the Trinity church in
Nowlin and the Midland Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church merged in
1963, the name changed to Trinity
Lutheran Church of Midland.
In 1965, the church was re-
arranged with the altar to the east
and a 32 pedal organ was installed.
Other updates such as air condi-
tioning, hot water heating system
and new windows and siding have
be completed.
The Trinity Lutheran Ladies
were organized as the Midland
Ladies Aid February 23, 1913, at
the home of Mr. and Mrs Gunder
Monson with six ladies as charter
members. They met for six years
until worship services were moved
to Nowlin in 1919.
The group reorganized in 1929
with one of the original members
and four other ladies. In 1935, the
name was changed to the Women’s
Missionary Federation and later
the American Lutheran Church
Women when several Lutheran
churches formed the American
Lutheran Church.
The group was, and remains, ac-
tive in maintaining and improving
the church and parsonage. On No-
vember 1, 1930, the first supper
and bazaar was held. It became an
annual event with lutefisk becom-
ing the supper dish in 1932.
When the Nowlin and Midland
women groups merged in 1963,
groups called circles were organ-
ized. By 1964, four circles were
formed for women’s Bible study
and other activities. Currently,
there are three circles, Rebecca,
Nowlin and Ruth with nearly 30
members total. The ladies are very
active within the church and the
community with education pro-
grams, sewing, suppers and enter-
taining at the Philip Nursing
Home.
A total of 34 individuals have led
the congregation during the past
100 years. Reverend O.H. Olson
dedicated 30 years to the commu-
nity from 1918 to 1948.
A celebration of the 100 year
milestone is scheduled for Satur-
day, June 1. The church service
and program begin at 9 a.m. with a
potluck and fellowship afterward.
Trinity Lutheran reaches 100 years
The original structure can be seen in the top photo right hand side with the addi-
tions on the left. The bottom photo shows the church as it is today.
Courtesy photos
Local Memorial Day services began with the decorating of the graves of fallen
military personnel, followed by a roll call of the dead, a 21-gun salute and the
playing of “Taps,” shown above. Tributes continued at the Wheeler-Brooks Amer-
ican Legion Post #173. Below, Ramsey Kendall, longtime Philip resident and busi-
nessman, now of Rapid City, shared a visit and a hug with Ann Moses before he
presented his guest speaker memorial address. At left, from top to bottom, are
Chuck O’Connor, Donnie Eymer and Keith Harry, all showing individual forms of
respect to the memory of those fallen brothers and service members of the
United States military. Photos by Don Ravellette
Local Memorial Day services
The Midland community held its Memorial Day services in the American Legion
Hall and at the cemetery. After the invocation, the audience was led in singing
“The Star Spangled Banner” and “God Bless America.” Among other presenta-
tions, the poem “America” was recited, the song “The War was in Color” was per-
formed, and a reading “Thank God for Brave Men” was done. Above, the word
“America” was spelled out as each letter was verbally illustrated by, from left,
Kahlen Block, Brandon McLaughlin, Caylo McLaughlin, Cass Finn, Sage Bierle,
Kaitlyn Scholfield and Bailey Bierle. At right, the names of local fallen soldiers was
listed. Below, members of the local American Legion displayed colors and pre-
sented arms while Kory Bierle played “Taps.” Courtesy photos
Philip’s Ron Millage performed the opening ceremony for the Memorial Day Services at the Black Hills National Cemetery
south of Sturgis. He is the South Dakota American Legion National Cemetery chairman. The invocation and benediction
were given by retired pastor Art Weitschat. Tributes were given by representatives of the American Legion, the Forty and
Eight, the American Legion Riders, the Sturgis Honor Guard and others. Patriotic and commemorative music, including the
national anthem, were performed by the Haakon County Crooners. Courtesy photo
Black Hills National Cemetery services
The Philip High School Scotties were represented at the 2013 South Dakota State
Track and Field Meet. Shown is Holly Iwan coming out of the closest starter’s
block. For results and more photos, see page eight. Courtesy photo
Scotties at state track
In this week’s issue:
Resolution for Opt-Out - Midland FPD
Proceedings - West River Water Dev. Dist.
Notice of Public Hearing for
Malt Beverage License - Town of Midland
12
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Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
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Thursday: Overcast with a chance of a
thunderstorm and a chance of rain. High
of 72F. Breezy. Winds from the West at
10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 40%.
Thursday Night: Partly cloudy with a chance
of a thunderstorm and a chance of rain. Low
of 50F. Breezy. Winds from the West at 10 to 20 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. High of
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the West at 15 to 20
mph. Friday Night: Mostly
cloudy. Fog overnight.
Low of 46F. Breezy. Winds from
the WNW at 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Clear. High of
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at 5 to 15 mph. Sun-
day Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 52F.
Winds from the SSE at 10 to 15
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Saturday: Partly cloudy with a
chance of rain in the morning,
then overcast with a chance of
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Chance of rain 50%. Saturday Night: Clear.
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Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
Sam and I were the best of bud-
dies for a number of years. He was
a big orange dog that was already
in residence at the ranch when I
got home from college and the
Navy. I know he was part husky,
but the rest of him was a mystery.
Whatever the mix, it was a good
one since you don’t find many dogs
as nice as Sam. The folks had
named him “Sandy” after he was
given to them by a cousin so, for
awhile, I called him “San” for
short. That later became “Sam”
which seemed easier.
This hound had several traits
that endeared him to me. For one,
he was a one-dog welcome-home
committee. When I’d been gone
and drove up the lane coming
home, I could be pretty sure Sam
would be lurking along the road
somewhere. As I drove past, an or-
ange streak would rise up and ac-
company me the last bit into the
yard. Then, when I opened the
door, his front feet would land on
my lap and a tongue might try to
give me a kiss. A hug was required.
A lapdog he wasn’t since he was
much too large. He didn’t necessar-
ily agree with that assessment,
however. When we were out walk-
ing on the prairie, he would range
far and wide around me but with-
out losing track of where I was. If I
sat down on a hillside, pretty soon
he’d be sitting there beside me. If I
stayed there very long, he’d inch
his rear closer and closer to my lap
until he was right beside me. Then
he’d lift his rear one more time and
nonchalantly drop it on my lap as
if I probably wouldn’t notice a big
orange object parked there. This
always made me chuckle. I’d tell
him he was a silly old thing, grab
him around the middle, and hold
him for a little while. That’s what
he wanted, and then he was ready
to be off again to carefully check all
the old holes in the ground and any
bushes that might harbor things of
interest.
At home, Sam was an early-
warning system of anything that
was suspicious or might be an in-
truder. He especially hated snakes
and wouldn’t quit barking at them
until someone arrived with a hoe
and removed the nasty thing’s
head. The body needed to be dis-
posed of in the burn barrel, and
then his job was done. You couldn’t
just throw it out onto the prairie,
though, since that wasn’t right ac-
cording to him. He’d bark at the
corpse until it was properly dis-
posed of in the burn barrel. This
hatred of snakes was even more in-
tense after he was bitten on the
nose by a rattler that had slithered
right in front of the dog house and
got in a strike when Sam was try-
ing to get out. Sam survived the
strike, but his nose was pretty big
for a number of weeks.
Porcupine quills did pose a prob-
lem. Sam would not let you pull
them out until you’d doped him up
enough that he could barely move.
This was accomplished by sneak-
ing pills into him through cheese
balls until you had fed him enough
that he could barely drag himself
around. He adored cheese and ate
it so fast that he didn’t notice the
pills. Even then you had to proceed
with caution, but you could get the
quills out if you worked at it.
Although Sam was probably my
favorite of all the dogs we ever had,
there were others that were fine
too. As a kid, we had a pair called
Corky and Rex. Rex was my com-
panion a good bit of the time, but
Corky was more standoffish. They
were a snake-killing duo. Rex
would find them and stand barking
at them until Corky arrived on the
scene. Corky would then sneak in
without getting bitten, grab the
nasty old things, and shake them
to death. Their teamwork was ap-
preciated.
Later I had Rags who was a
black-and-white, medium-sized gal
that was a sweetie. More recently,
son Chance had a black dog he
named “Candy.” She was a good
friend to the whole family and
lived in the house quite a bit. She
was no small thing but wasn’t as
big as Sam. Wife Corinne had a
short round pooch named Noel who
was fairly frumpy but nice.
We’ve had a few dogs that were
more problematic than enjoyable.
One was a purebred beagle that
was cute as the dickens but who
had no real loyalty to anyone. He
visited neighbors far and wide and
wouldn’t bother to come back home
if we didn’t go get him. It was a re-
lief when he finally ran off never to
return. We also once got a yellow
Lab for Chance, but he was much
too busy for all of us. A neighbor
took a shine to him, and we were
very generous and allowed him to
keep him.
Right now we don’t have a dog
due to our somewhat unsettled ex-
istence. If we ever have another,
I’d like him to be a lot like Sam. He
was hard to beat. If you have a dog
at present or in the future, I hope
you luck out with him as much as
I did with Sam. He and I were bud-
dies and the very best of friends.
LADIES’ PRAYER BREAKFAST …Monday, June 3, at 7:00 a.m.
in the Senechal Apts. lobby. All ladies welcome.
DURING SCOTTY PHILIP (FESTIVAL) DAYS …the Commu-
nity Betterment Committee is sponsoring a food drive for the Coun-
try Cupboard. If you can help, please place nonperishable food do-
nations in the box at the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center.
PHILIP HEALTH SERVICES AUXILIARY …will meet Thurs-
day, June 6, at 7:00 p.m. in the conference room at the hospital. The
purpose is to discuss activities during Scotty Philip Days.
LUNDSTROMS IN CONCERT … Larry and Gloria Lundstrom
will be in concert Sunday, June 2, at 6:00 p.m. in the Midland City
Park. See related ad for details.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge. PLEASE KEEP IN MIND,
if you charge for an event, we must charge you for an ad!
Spring is the time ... by Del Bartels
“... In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love
...” wrote poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
That may be, but other things also turn. The weather is an example.
“... The first day of spring is one thing, and the first spring day is an-
other. The difference between them is sometimes as great as a month
...” wrote poet Henry Van Dyke. Around here, it sometimes seems that
we go from winter directly into summer. South Dakota is know for its
two seasons – winter and road construction.
Farmers, ranchers, golfers, track and field competitors and others
go from winter clothing to sunburns. Gardeners and lawn owners go
from mulch and unraked leaves to dandelions. Ranchers go from snow-
born calves to sweat-time branding. Farmers go from frozen ground to
planting in either mud or in dust. Trees go from brown gnarled
branches to delicate blossoms and then to greenish gnarled branches,
all before leaves show life for the summer.
No matter how short springtime feels, the feeling is great. Shake-
speare asked, “Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?” Why would
any man want to compare a lady to summer? Spring is the far higher
compliment. Spring rains are romantic. Neil Sedaka sang, “... I feel the
warmth of her hand in mine. Ooh, I hear laughter in the rain; walking
hand in hand with the one I love ...” A tender moment is a lady’s head
resting on your shoulder as both of you sit on the couch watching spring
showers tap against and inch down the window. Flowers are every-
where, just waiting to be placed in your sweetheart’s hair. Winter shut-
ins are now out in the sun. Children to seniors are running and jump-
ing, or at least enjoying a light stroll down the sidewalk. Doors and
windows are open so winter’s musk can leave and spring’s perfume can
enter. The oldest house dog yearns to leave the carpet to lay in the sun.
Young pups climb the moving mountains of their siblings, only to be-
come part of that tumbling mountain of fur. Calves, lambs, kittens, tod-
dlers, teens, me – youth at play.
Spring is also work. Now is when the land is ready for seed, tents
and campers made fully ready, tourists for entertaining, concrete for
pouring, buildings for construction. Muscles push and pull against gar-
den spades, the baseball and bat, the strike on the other end of the fish-
ing pole, the almost-in-reach frisbee. Work hard, play hard isn’t just a
saying on my T-shirt; it is a way of life, especially during spring.
Spring is also lazy. The sun and her hands are warm on my back as
I stretch out on a picnic blanket. Kids don’t see my sleepy eyes behind
my sunglasses as I sit in the baseball stands. Barbecues are in lieu of
hot ovens and washing of pots and pans. Evening strolls are in lieu of
shoveling snow or fixing roofs. It is almost work to stare at a TV when
the front door opens to spring. Jeans and coats give way to cutoffs and
halter tops ... and now I’m back to a man’s fancy. Ah, springtime.
This is the “Year of the Teacher,”
according to some people. Sandy
Hook school comes to mind, and
just this week, Briarwood and
Plaza Towers elementaries in
Moore, Okla., come to mind. Teach-
ers in both situations used their
training and care for students to
guide them to safety and protect
them.
Marcia and Mike West, Philip re-
tired teachers, have a Moore,
Okla., connection and they wish to
initiate a fund for teachers and stu-
dents in those two schools where
there are 30 teachers and 500 stu-
dents. Five of the teachers and 70
students lost their homes. Some
teachers were hurt, and one
teacher was seriously injured in
the incident. Marcia said she has a
contact with a Philip High School
graduate, Mike Coyle, who is a
principal in the Central School Dis-
trict in Moore. She thinks he would
be the best person to oversee our
donations to those in need from
Briarwood and Plaza Towers ele-
mentaries.
Marcia said when she talked to
Mike Coyle, he was awed that we
were thinking of them. His super-
intendent was surprised and
pleased, but you all do know that in
South Dakota we are all connected.
We either know each other, or we
know of a connection to a fellow
South Dakotan.
Also do be aware that AARP and
other groups will also make large
donations to the Moore area to as-
sist with rebuilding. The Wests
would like our donation to be spe-
cific to the needs of teachers and
students from the two elementary
schools in Moore. Please send your
donations to Marcia West, presi-
dent Philip Retired Teachers Asso-
ciation, P.O. Box 430, Philip, SD
57567.
As you are all aware, the feeling
of responsibility is great if you are
in a threatening situation. Having
been in both a tornado warning
and a hostage situation, I can at-
test to the feeling. Training helps a
great deal, and I believe more stu-
dents’ lives were saved because of
that. Pass the word and let others
know about this fund.
Know that we are blessed to be
the givers, not the recipients, of
funds and care.
Again, thanks for your consider-
ation.
Nancy May, Rapid City,
president S.D. RTA
Commoditization of
the United States
cattle industry
I recently read a report by one of
our cattle market analysts, who
tried to identify what issues and/or
policies had damaged the cattle in-
dustry the most. Great question ...
with an exploding population that
needs to feed itself, one would cer-
tainly wonder why the United
States cattle industry is contract-
ing.
The analyst identified two such
issues, but he also exposed the ex-
tremes that such folks as himself,
certain industry groups, and some
of our more social media will go to
distort the facts and create smoke
screens to accomplish their social-
istic agenda. The article states that
“mandatory country of origin label-
ing (COOL) for fresh meat prod-
ucts” has “added billions of dollars
of costs to the livestock and meat
industry.” WOW – billions! Some-
body needs to tell him that COOL
has only been in effect since 2009
and that even the packers and re-
tailers couldn't come up with a fig-
ure that ridiculous.
Then he goes on to say that the
blame for COOL lies squarely with
a “tiny minority of livestock pro-
ducers.”
These are the same tactics used
by our monthly Beef Enquirer-like
publications that we get for free to
create public record to try and
show a lack of producer support.
The problem is that – when you
look at all the local and state Farm
Bureau, Farmers Union and cattle-
men's groups – you will find over-
whelming producer support for
mandatory COOL.
He then goes to say, “Surveys
showed consumers didn't care
about labeling.” WOW, I believe
what we have seen reported is just
the opposite with multiple surveys
showing consumer support for
COOL.
And then he finishes up by say-
ing that USDA (United States De-
partment of Agriculture) “changes
will only increase discrimination
against foreign born livestock.” Not
sure what changes he’s talking
about, but the ones submitted by
USDA to come into WTO (World
Trade Organization) compliance
are designed to reduce the discrim-
ination practice yielded by U.S.
packers in an effort to kill COOL. I
still think what the packers did
bordered on anti-competitive and
discriminatory practices ... a heck
of a thing to witness in this coun-
try.
I point this out on COOL not be-
cause I believe anyone really buys
into these distortions, as we all un-
derstand the extremes these folks
will go to and certainly they have
lost their credibility with the aver-
age U.S. cattle producers. Rather,
I point this out because these are
the same people and groups that
told you in the late ’80s and the
’90s that you need to learn to com-
pete in a global market; however,
they oppose you identifying your
product. They also told you that
your competition was poultry and
pork and not imports.
That’s interesting, because it
was recently announced that the
National Pork Producers Council
and the Cattlemen's Beef Board
have been working in partnership
for nearly two years to provide
more “consumer-friendly” names
for 350 new and older cuts of beef
and pork under URMIS (Uniform
Retail Meat Identity Standards)
with some of the pork cuts adapt-
ing beef names. Now while some of
this appears good, other changes
have the potential to reduce and
confuse beef sales. For example, no
longer is it just pork chops; now it
will be ribeye chops, porterhouse
chops, and New York chops. So
when the young housewife walks
up to the meat counter to buy a
“ribeye” for her loved one, she will
be asked by the meat retailer,
“pork or beef?” She may then very
well ask the perceived professional,
“What do you suggest?”
I imagine the response by the re-
tailer will depend on which product
gives him the most profit, along
with his own biases.
I understand why the pork folks
went for this, but here’s the prob-
lem for U.S. cattle producers.
These meat cut names, while not
trademarked brand names, act
very much like brand names for the
beef/cattle industry. Consumers
are familiar with these terms in
beef and relate those names to such
things as flavor, tenderness and
quality. Historically, consumers
have made decisions based on
these names, they have become the
brand-like name of each cut, and
you don’t conspire to let your com-
petitor use your brand name!
It is well understood that brand
names simplify shopping and aid in
processing of information about
products; however, these types of
changes complicate meat buying
decisions for consumers and com-
promise beef’s ability to separate it-
self in the animal protein market
and promote itself. As the EBAC
noted, “People recognize brand and
attach a certain intrinsic value to
the product because of its name”
like ribeye, New York, porterhouse,
T-bone – those names kind of make
your mouth water, don’t they?
Another marketing expert goes
on to say, “Do NOT underestimate
the power of name brands. This
power can be so compelling to your
buyers that they may be blinded to
all other purchase considerations.”
But not now, not with beef. No
wonder Patrick Fleming of the Na-
tional Pork Board said it will aid
the consumer’s “decision-making
on pork by adapting beef nomencla-
ture for pork.” In other words, they
will sell more pork ... at beef’s ex-
pense.
So, as we look to answer the
question of what issues and/or poli-
cies have done the most damage to
U.S. cattle herd, I would have to
say the destructionist trade policies
of some of our industry groups and
our social media, who have had no
problem sacrificing U.S. producers
for trade liberalization, as well as
the social commoditization and
standardization of our industry
and the fading product identity in
the animal protein domestic and
global market; instead of concen-
trating on differentiating between
our products, we are blurring the
lines.
/s/ Leo McDonnell
Note: Leo McDonnell ranches in
Montana and North Dakota and
helped to grow the family business,
Midland Bull Test at Columbus,
Mont., into the largest genetic cat-
tle performance test in North
America.
Letter to the Editor Letter to the Editor
honest with yourself. I know this is
the hard part for me. It can be quite
painful when you are looking at the
decisions that you made that went
belly up. I also know that this is
good medicine for me to take be-
cause I really want to learn from
my mistakes so I can make better
decisions in the future. I know that
this is what you want too.
Let me encourage you to continue
with this process of planning your
life strategies. Planning will cer-
tainly be challenging and take some
self-discipline. There is no question
in my mind about how difficult this
process can be, and yet, planning
can also be the most rewarding and
result-producing thing you can do to
live your life to the fullest and max-
imize your personal potential.
The best advice I can give you as
you go through this step in the
planning process, is to have fun
with it. Whatever you do, do not let
it become a chore! Get those close to
you involved in the process and
gather their input. Keep looking
forward! Do not let anyone steal
your dreams.
Focus on here and now
Looking forward to what’s ahead
is an important part of the planning
process. Likewise, looking back
helps us to recognize what has
brought us to where we are. Today
we will focus on the current situa-
tions of the here and now which
gets us ready to set goals.
It’s always good to take an honest
survey of the various areas of your
life, to recognize the areas where
you are succeeding and those areas
where you may be falling short and
needing to improve. Here’s a quick
way to get an honest assessment in
any one, or all, of the areas of your
life.
First, pick an area you want to
work on. Next, take a piece of paper
and make three columns. Label the
first column the good, the second
one the bad and the third the ugly.
Considering your current situa-
tion in that area of you life, start
listing under the appropriate col-
umn, those things you feel are good
and right, what you think is not so
good, and the stuff that is down-
right ugly.
In order to really be successful
with this step you must be brutally
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for more details at 605-450-1955 and
be sure to check out Bob’s website at: www.mrattitudespeaks.com
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 3
Rural Livin’
Managing Alfalfa Weevils
A producer recently called to
ask when was the best time to
spray alfalfa weevil adults. There
are a few alfalfa producers who
seem to have discovered that
spraying the adults reduces the in-
cidence and feeding damage of the
larvae.
While there may be some truth
to it, there are some inherent prob-
lems with this practice. SDSU Ex-
tension Entomologist, Ada
Szczepaniec, reports that a num-
ber of things can happen to ad-
versely affect the adults laying
eggs, the eggs hatching, the larvae
surviving, etc. Warm and wet
springs promote the growth of
pathogens that attack the larvae
so weather conditions and soil
moisture play a role in the severity
of alfalfa weevil infestations.
There are also several predatory
insects that offer a bio control al-
ternative.
These natural controls can re-
sult in larval populations being
low enough that insecticide appli-
cations may not be economical. If
you apply insecticides with the in-
tention of controlling the adult
weevils, you will never know if the
population of larvae would have
justified insecticide treatments or
not. The larva is the damaging life
stage and the target for control, if
needed. Routine insecticide appli-
cations are detrimental to the
predatory insects that are typically
abundant in alfalfa fields. There is
also concern that consistent, rou-
tine insecticide applications may
lead to resistance of alfalfa weevils
to insecticides.
SDSU Extension’s recommen-
dation is to scout for alfalfa weevils
and make management decisions
based on numbers of weevils, the
growth stage and/or height of the
alfalfa, and other factors. The gen-
eral threshold (and least precise) is
to treat if 30 to 40 percent of tips
are damaged by the weevils, larvae
are present, and early harvest is
more than one week away. The
bucket method is a more precise
sampling method and is the pre-
ferred technique to sample alfalfa
weevils to determine whether pes-
ticide applications are warranted.
An explanation of the bucket
method, along with other good in-
formation about alfalfa weevils can
be found in the iGrow article, “En-
tomology Update: Alfalfa Weevil
Scouting Notes” at: http://igrow.
org/agronomy/other-crops/ento-
mology-update-alfalfa-weevil-
scouting-notes/.
Early cutting can be a highly ef-
fective strategy in managing al-
falfa weevils if the weather cooper-
ates. Ideal conditions for early cut-
ting in alfalfa weevil management
are good drying conditions, i.e.
warm temperatures, low humidity,
sunshine, and wind. The idea is to
cut the alfalfa and get it baled and
out of the field to expose the larva
to the drying conditions, which will
lead to a lot of mortality. With
early cutting, producers need to
monitor the regrowth after the
first cutting to make sure enough
larva didn’t survive to keep the
second cutting from regrowing.
Regular scouting is crucial in mak-
ing sustainable management deci-
sions.
Calendar
5/30/2013 – HOSTA, 10:00 a.m.
CT, Winner Regional Extension
Center, Winner
6/3/2013 – HOSTA, 10:00 a.m.
CT, C&B Operations John Deere
Dealership Gettysburg
6/11/2013 – Wheat Walks, Del-
mont and Winner
6/12/2013 – Wheat Walks,
Dakota Lakes Research Farm and
Gettysburg
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
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859-2521 · PhiIip
MEMORlA| DAY SA|E
First
National Bank
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
It’s the LITTLE THINGS that matter.
At FIRST NATIONAL BANK, we’re
SMALL enough to KNOW you and
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Have you ever wondered about
the forage value of certain plants in
your pasture? Considered an alter-
native grazing system, but need
more information about what effect
it will have on the land and produc-
tivity in your area? Do you just
want to learn to identify plants in
your range? If you answered yes to
any of these you should plan to at-
tend a pasture walk at Brett
Strain’s on Wednesday, June 12,
hosted by SDSU Extension, Mel-
lette County NRCS, Mellette/Todd
County Conservation District and
South Central RC&D. The White
River Annie’s Project Group re-
quested the pasture walk so that
they could gain a better under-
standing of plant identification and
grazing systems and better under-
stand what is happening on the
land and how management deci-
sions affect the natural resources.
The pasture walk is open to the
public and everyone is invited to
participate.
The pasture walk begins at 5:30
p.m. CDT and will conclude by 7:30
p.m. CDT. Participants will gather
on location. To get there, travel
four miles north of White River on
Hwy. 83, east of the Moran Auto
Salvage or 19 miles south of Murdo
on Hwy. 83, east of the Moran Auto
Salvage. Light snacks and refresh-
ments will be available for the par-
ticipants.
There is a registration fee for the
pasture walk, but SDSU Extension
programs are open to all South
Dakota residents regardless of
their ability to pay registration fees
or other program fees as identified.
For more information about the
pasture walk, contact the Mellette
County NRCS Office at 605-259-
3252 or Adele Harty with SDSU
Extension at adele.harty@sdstate.
edu.
Mellette County pasture walk
A large hoop barn has marked
the horizon at the Cottonwood
Field Station for a couple years. A
newly finished facility has an of-
fice, three lab rooms, a heated
shop, commodity storage, and ma-
chinery storage. Availability of the
new facilities and a desire to be-
come more integrated into area
communities prompted South
Dakota State University Ag Exper-
iment Service and SDSU Extension
to host three public forums to
gather information to increase the
utilization and improve perception
of the Cottonwood Field Station.
On April 30, May 1 and 2, forums
were held in Kadoka, Wall and
Philip to learn from community
members what they would like to
see happening at the Cottonwood
Field Station through a series of
questions. Questions ranged from
what information they have used
from the station in the past to how
the station is perceived by the com-
munity. Also community desires
for utilizing the station facilities,
what research they would like to
see coming from the station, and
how communication with the pub-
lic could be improved. SDSU em-
ployees participated only to facili-
tate and listen.
On May 9, representatives from
all three locations gathered at the
station to help determine which
ideas should be highest priority for
implementation. Through this dis-
cussion many great ideas were gen-
erated. The top six ideas for utiliz-
ing the facilities were:
1) Coordinate with innovative
producers to do ranch-based re-
search,
2) More youth activities with 4-
H and FFA organizations, such as
judging schools,
3) Reach out beyond
local communities to get
“city” people, including
school children, to the
station to learn where
their food is produced,
4) Encourage other
groups, such as Master
Gardeners, to use the
facilities,
5) Programs such as
Tri-County Ag Day,
similar to the Rancher’s
Workshop in White
River and Mission, and
6) More information and educa-
tion on birds, wildlife, hunting and
possibly partnering with Game,
Fish and Parks.
Ideas for research included local
application of research done else-
where, e.g. winter grazing and
mineral programs to boost immune
systems. More ideas in this area
were brought forward for commit-
tee review in the individual com-
munity sessions. In the area of
communication, community mem-
bers made the following sugges-
tions,
1) Visit with producers, be in the
public eye,
2) Write news columns/emails
about station activities to keep the
public aware of what is happening
(possibly quarterly or seasonally),
3)Develop a Facebook page for
the Station highlighting activities
and research, and
4) Participate in industry meet-
ings, specifically to listen, and fi-
nally attend livestock sales with a
booth and information so that peo-
ple can stop by to learn about
iGrow and SDSU research without
taking an entire day to attend a
meeting.
The next step in this process is
for SDSU employees who work di-
rectly with the station to review
the discussion and determine ac-
tion steps necessary to implement
community members’ ideas. Once
these are determined, community
members will be invited participate
in and lead activities at the Cotton-
wood Field Station.
Cottonwood forums provide great insight
by Senator John Thune
Families will soon be packing up
their cars, pulling out the maps,
and jumping on the road to enjoy
the beautiful summer weather in
South Dakota.
Tourism is the number two in-
dustry in South Dakota, so we un-
derstand the implications that
higher gas prices mean not only for
our own summer plans, but also for
the plans of thousands of other
families hoping to enjoy some sum-
mer fun in our state.
Increases in gas prices across
South Dakota and surrounding
areas of the Midwest continue to
squeeze American families and
small businesses who are still deal-
ing with a historically slow eco-
nomic recovery. The financial pain
of high gas prices is not limited to
filling up our own vehicles. The
price of gasoline is driving up the
cost of goods and services each of us
rely upon. For example, the price to
transport everyday household
goods is higher due to increased
gas prices; these fuel costs are
passed on to the consumers in the
form of higher prices. The high gas
prices also impact the state’s num-
ber one industry – agriculture.
Farmers and ranchers, who rely on
the use of tractors, combines and
other equipment, also feel the
pinch of the higher prices for gaso-
line and diesel fuel.
Instead of working together to
help lower the cost of gas for all
Americans, the administration and
Senate Democrats continue to turn
a blind eye to the problem. It is
time for Congress to get serious
about creating jobs and lowering
energy prices. Projects like the
Keystone XL Pipeline will help pro-
vide a more efficient distribution of
Bakken oil to refineries across the
Midwest and will help create
nearly 20,000 jobs. Additionally,
while oil and gas production is
booming on private lands, it contin-
ues to lag in federal areas and
some of our most promising off-
shore areas remain off limits.
America is beginning to take hold
of its energy future, but without
the right policies coming out of
Washington, consumers will con-
tinue to feel pain at the pump
throughout the year.
As South Dakotans gear up for
another season of baseball games,
camping trips and summer vaca-
tions, I will continues to push for
responsible access to all domestic
sources of energy that will help
lower prices and increase Amer-
ica’s energy security.
Summer travel should not
mean pain at the pump
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Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
ads@pioneer-review.com
Moving?
E-mail your change
of address to:
subscriptions@
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or call 859-2516
two weeks in advance of
your moving date.
Elderly Meals
Thursday, May 30: Chicken
Critters, French Fries, Green
Beans, Fruit
Friday, May 31: Lasagna, Car-
rots, Garlic Bread, Fruited Gelatin
Monday, June 3: Chicken Club,
Peas and Cheese Salad, Tossed
Salad, Watermelon
Tuesday, June 4: Steak Fin-
gers, Potato Wedges, Cucumber
Salad, Fruit
Wednesday, June 5: Roast
Beef, Mashed Potatos and Gravy,
Peas and Carrots, Biscuit, Pears
***
On Saturday, May 18, it was more
cool and cloudy, not calling us out-
doors. We just sort of muddled
around. Lunch was better than
usual, or else I just felt more like
eating. Really good potato soup.
The sweet potato fries were okay,
and the chicken strip with white
gravy was tender. The broccoli was
acceptable. I wrote a note to the
cooks and said, “We want sweet
pickles!” John came out and said
they always have sweet pickles,
just ask for them. But he didn’t
bring any out.
The movie was “Jungle to Jun-
gle” with Tim Allen. The plot, if
any, was weak and inane. Four of
us fairly normal Somerset Court
residents watched the whole thing!
Why? We must have been trying to
get out of doing something useful.
We did have root beer and popcorn.
Dot Busfield, Somerset Court
resident, is in the hospital and her
sister, Jane Bunch, went to see her
on Saturday. She said Dot may get
out in a couple of days.
Kenneth Monette, Somerset
Court resident, had company from
Plattsmouth, N.Y. Jo-Lei and Rory
Porter came out for the graduation
of Ken’s granddaughter, (Rory’s
daughter) Jamie Porter. Jamie
graduated with honors from West-
ern Dakota Technical Institute
with a degree as a medical assis-
tant.
Myrna Pokorney had guests on
Saturday, May 18, She had a good
visit with her old-time friends, Don
and Sue Smith, Sioux Falls.
There were four for whist, Irene
Arbach, Susan (activity director),
Mary Lou Peters and Irene Cox.
After that, Mary Lou, Irene C.
Susan and Vivian Hansen played
five crowns till 5 p.m.
On Sunday, May 19, it was a spe-
cial Christian church day called
Pentecost. It is said that on that
day the spirit of God went into peo-
ple and has been ever since. Terry
Pulse talked about that in Somer-
set Court’s nondenominational
church service. Jack Humke chose
several hymns on a Pentecostal
theme: “Holy Spirit, Faithful
Guide,” “The Lord’s my Shepherd,”
and “Breathe on me Breath of
God.”
Mildred Kraemer is still miser-
able with a broken wrist. Her
daughter-in-law came to help her
through lunch on Sunday.
David Placek, Lemmon, spent
the weekend at Somerset Court
with Eileen Tenold. They went
shopping and bought some tiny
birds and birdhouses at a craft
store. Eileen painted hers up very
pretty. David bought some bigger
birds and birdhouses for his home.
Several staff members gathered
around at lunch and sang “Happy
Birthday” to Shirley Hodgson on
May 19. They gave her a minature
cake and an envelope of Somerset
Court good wishes and Somerset
Court bucks.
My daughter, Carol Vogan, Col-
orado Springs, emailed that she
passed her cardiopulmonary resus-
citation test with a score of 98”!
Congratulations! I am proud of you
that you would be an emergency
medical technician.
M.R. Hansen’s recent retirement
and several honors were written up
in the Mitchell paper and Agnes
Tastad said she would bring me a
copy. The May 19 Rapid City Jour-
nal had still another story about
M.R. Hansen. Tony Kulesa, an out-
standing student, was mentioned.
On Monday, May 20, at Somer-
set Court Sandi and Shawn had
bakery treats from a local donut
shop brought in. Several residents
had strawberry rhubarb fritters.
They looked wonderful – big,
lumpy and glazed. Sandi had an
extra so I joined the group though
I wasn’t signed up. Thanks Sandi!
Anne Brink, Mary Lou Peters,
Maxine Kilmer, Charlie Hathaway
and Vivian Hansen enjoyed coffee
and visiting. One of our Somerset
Court drivers, Dennis Eliason,
brought in two little horses he had
scroll sawed out of mahognay-faced
plywood. We admired his ability to
cut intricate patterns. He also
showed us a box full of photos of his
art pieces that he has scroll sawed.
He uses different woods with inter-
esting grains and colors.
Congratulaitons to Sandi Davis’
daughter, Sarah, who graduated
with honors from Western Dakota
Technical Institute on May 18. She
will start her new job in the water
quality department at Cheyenne,
Wyo., on May 28.
Irene McKnight spent the week-
end at Stevens High School gradu-
ation events for her granddaugh-
ter, Sierra McCleod.
Thank you to Eileen Tenold who
showed us her art work she made
at crafts with Amy on Monday
morning. It is a big cross in blue
and white that says “God Bless
America.” It is supposed to have
red stars too. Thank you for this ac-
tivity, Amy and thank you for the
word searh puzzles you bring us
every week.
It is good to hear that Shawn
Hostutler, Somerset Court activity
director, caught a 14-inch northern
pike at Dakota Lake out in the
Hills over the weekend.
Mike Kilmer came and played
piano for us at Somerset Court on
Monday evening. A good bunch of
Somerest Court residents gathered
to listen. Thank you, Mike. Mike is
the son of Somerset Court resident
Maxine Kilmer.
Tuesday, May 21, we had a res-
piratory needs seminar. Residents
attending were Bert Schneider,
Marilyn Butts, Dwight Mann, Ben
and Danni Stone, Fred Smith, Jim
Hilton, Vivian Hansen, and activ-
ity directors, Shawn, Sandi and
Susan. The main speaker was Gar-
rett Meier, from a local oxygen dis-
tributor. We thank him for the
thoughtful seminar. Sandi, Shawn
and Susan treated us to warm
cookies – chocolate chip and peanut
butter!
Bingo winners Tuesday at Som-
erset Court were Sherman Ellerton
(blackout), Irene Arbach, Mary Lou
Peters, Marge Gaffin, Addie
Rorvig, Alma Gruening and Mari-
lyn Oyler (two times). Fred Smith’s
bingo prize was a big American
flag.
After bingo we had an event
called, “Cake With Major.” It was a
presentation about the Salvation
Army. The speaker told about a
camp for 125 girls, ages nine to 16.
Salvation Army has 17 acres out on
Rapid Creek where there is hiking
and fishing and a water slide.
There are no televisions or elec-
tronic games, but plenty of outdoor
activity. This is a Christian facility
and the leaders are ordained min-
isters. The Salvation Army served
doughnuts and cookies.
Thank you to my granddaughter,
Sarah Butcher, Woodbridge, Va.
She says happy birthday and best
wishes for a pleasant summer. She
recalls old times when she was a
kid and lived in Philip. Her
brother, Tyler, will soon be 18.
Happy birthday, Tyler, May 23, I
think.
Did you see Sharon Keen’s
daughter, Sarah Keen, in the Sun-
day, May 19, Rapid City Journal
with her running mates? The will
share the Mickelson Trail Mara-
thon in honor of the Boston
Marathon victims. Five Rapid City
girls have formed a running group,
The Foxy Dinos. The girls, Sarah,
Emma Burns, Dallas Beaumont,
Elizabeth “Lizzy” Erlandson and
Mya Henry have been friends since
first grade. They will run the Mick-
elson Trail for the benefit of one-
fundboston.
On May 21, M.R. Hansen came
for scrabble and we used the word
zax – a tool for slicing slate. M.R.
and Barbara Hansen use the game
of scrabble in teaching English as
a second language in Mongolia.
The children of
Kenny & Nancy Neville
are hosting a Card Shower
in honor of their parents’
40th Wedding Anniversary
June 3, 2013.
Cards may be sent to the couple at:
PO Box 683, Philip, SD 57567
qea'-e |ae|ted te ¡e|a
0eaa¡s & Jaaet Feraau
|a ce|eé-at|aq t0e|-
45tb Wedd¡ag Aaa¡versary
Saturday, Juae S, 2013
Aea Tade-aeed Cemmaa|tq Ceate-
·Supper at 6:00 p.m. ~ Please BSVP
6t5-754-6244 e-
deaa|·aad¡aaet45µqa0ee.cem
·0aace at 7:30
Ca-d· maq ée ·eat te:
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Clip & Save Clip & Save
Country Cupboard
Food Pantry
Summer Hours
Wednesdays:
June 19: 9 a.m.-11 a.m. &
5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
July 17: 9 a.m.-11 a.m. &
5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
August 21: 9 a.m.-11 a.m. &
5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Saturdays:
June 15: 9 a.m.-11 a.m.
July 20: 9 a.m.-11 a.m.
August 17: 9 a.m.-11 a.m.
Phone: 279-1045 • Wall, SD
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
May 31, June 1-2-3:
Iron Man 3
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
June 7-8-9-10:
Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13)
June 14-15-16-17:
Epic (PG)
June 21-22-23-24:
Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13)
South Dakota’s Highway Patrol
used the Memorial Day travel
weekend to kick off “Obey the Sign
and Avoid the Fine,’’ a summer
long, safe travel campaign.
The campaign is an initiative to
reduce highway crashes and in-
crease safety on South Dakota’s
roadways, said Colonel Craig Price,
superintendent of the highway pa-
trol. The kick off weekend included
a high visibility saturation patrol
on Memorial Day.
“Our statistics show that speed-
ing, impaired driving and other
hazardous moving violations are
major contributors in crashes, in-
juries and deaths on our high-
ways,’’ Price said. “We’re kicking
off our safety campaign on Memo-
rial Day weekend to get the maxi-
mum public awareness of the need
for safety on the roadways.’’
Speed and alcohol will be the top
two targets for the enforcement
campaign this summer, Price said.
The highway patrol believes that
focus will have the largest impact
on reducing fatal crashes.
“Obviously, we will be enforcing
all the other traffic laws,’’ he said.
“That’s the reasoning behind the
‘Obey the Sign and Avoid the Fine’
campaign slogan.’’
Highway patrol troopers will
work in teams and will partner
with other law enforcement agen-
cies when opportunities arise, Price
said. Monday’s saturation patrol
had virtually all uniformed troop-
ers on the highways.
In addition to enforcement, the
summer safety campaign will use
social media for public education
and will partner with the State De-
partment of Transportation for per-
manent and portable message
boards with safe driving messages
on the interstates and other high
traffic areas in South Dakota.
Highway patrol, “Obey
the Sign, Avoid the Fine”
by Representative
Kristi Noem
As a new member of the House
Armed Service Committee, it has
been especially troubling to hear of
the rise of sexual assaults in the
military. According to the Penta-
gon, there has been nearly a 35
percent increase in sexual assaults
in the U.S. military since 2010.
This statistic is one of the reasons
I’ve spent the last couple months
working on ways to address this
problem.
Any man or woman who enters
the service does so with a strong
love for country, and with full
knowledge and understanding that
he or she may be called to serve the
United States in times of danger.
Soldiers should feel safe around
their fellow service members and
should never feel threatened in
their presence.
I recently announced several pro-
visions to improve sexual assault
investigations, establish qualifica-
tions for sexual assault prevention
and support personnel positions,
and to develop basic training stan-
dards for sexual assault preven-
tion.
I believe there is room to improve
the investigation of sex related of-
fenses, so I’m looking at ways to
give commanders better informa-
tion in the form of an expert opin-
ion when dealing with sexual as-
sault crimes. This policy change
would direct the secretary of de-
fense to standardize recommenda-
tions by military criminal investi-
gative organizations as to whether
a sex related offense is founded or
unfounded.
We’ve also heard about those in
sexual assault prevention related
positions being accused of sexual
crimes. I find this behavior abhor-
rent. These highly sensitive posi-
tions are intended to be filled by
those who can provide comfort, aid
and assistance to victims of sexual
assault, who may be reluctant to
come forward in the first place. I
believe the military needs to raise
the bar for these individuals and I
propose that the secretary of de-
fense be required to establish
stronger selection criteria for these
positions.
There’s also room to improve
basic training plans and materials
for sexual assault prevention be-
cause we’re currently seeing a lack
of consistency from branch to
branch. Uniform plans and materi-
als, which is what I am advocating
for, would set a basic standard for
all branches of service to ensure
consistency across our entire mili-
tary.
Stopping sexual assault in our
military is an issue that lawmakers
on both sides of the aisle can get be-
hind. During my recent trip to
Afghanistan, my female colleagues
and I had numerous conversations
about specific actions that can be
taken to change this problem.
We can, and we must, do more. I
look forward to further addressing
this issue in the coming weeks as
we prepare for work on the Na-
tional Defense Authorization Act
and would encourage you to reach
out to one of my offices if you have
any thoughts or comments to
share.
Combating sexual assault
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SAV004 TraveIer 4412
Two-year-o|d Angus bu||s for sa|e!
8ons & grandsons of:
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- 3erer Tesled & 3crola| Veasured
- Ca|v|rg Ease & Valerra||y 8red
- 3e|||rg Pr|vale Trealy
ßob Fortune: (ô05} 488-1003
6huck Fortune: (ô05} 891-8197
The family of
Dorothy Stahl
is requesting a
Card Shower
in honor of her
90th Birthday
on June 7, 2013.
Cards may be sent to Dorothy at:
PO Box 227
Philip, SD 57567
Church & Community Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the
other meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00
p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June,
Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
The LORD
of hosts is with us,
the God of Jacob is
our refuge. Selah.
Psalm 46.11 (KJJ)
ßß0l0ßl
Nl800M l0f
M000fß lll0
When liIe throws
you a major
curveball, like the
loss oI a job, home
or relationship, it can
be hard to recover.
You may not Ieel
like you can go on,
but Iortunately, God
is there. When all
appears to be lost,
you can count on
God to comIort you
and give you the
strength to carry on.
On the go all
the time?
Don’t miss an
issue of the
Pioneer Review!
Subscribe
online at:
www.pioneer-
review.com
Obituaries
Our beloved
mother and
grandmother,
Margaret Den-
nis, was born
August 2, 1936,
in Pierre, S.D.,
the eighth of
nine children
born to Jack
and Margaret (McCullough) Hus-
ton. Friends and family always
knew her as "Marguerite."
Marguerite's childhood home
was a large ranch in South Creek
Township, eight miles southeast of
Midland. She also lived for a time
in Okaton, Capa, Murdo and Stur-
gis. She attended grade school at
the White Bell country school in
South Creek Township, where her
mother often taught class, as well
as Capa and Okaton schools. She
attended seventh grade in Murdo
while living with her sister, Mary
Jane Dugan. High school years
were spent at St. Martin's Catholic
Academy in Sturgis, where she
lived in a dorm.
Marguerite was a dark-haired
beauty with big brown eyes. Rela-
tives remember her as a young lady
who looked for fun and made
friends everywhere she went. She
had a knack for conversation and
entertaining. Her laugh was conta-
gious and she always knew how to
have a good time. She sometimes
sang in a family band, and also for
her parents’ 50th anniversary
party in Midland. "Please Release
Me" was one of her favorite songs
to sing.
On December 14, 1958, she mar-
ried Ronald Dennis, also from Mid-
land. The couple moved from South
Dakota to Maui, Hawaii, in 1960,
then to Anchorage in 1961, where
they raised daughters, Marda and
Mikayla. The family traveled
around the state on numerous road
construction jobs, including Valdez,
during the pipeline days, then set-
tled in Fairbanks for the last 33
years.
"Mudder," as she was named by
her granddaughter, Marsharie,
loved her grandchildren. She was
there for them in every aspect of
their lives. The kids have fond
memories of her telling them to
"hush" as they sat around her with
big eyes, listening to her give a
play-by-play of the happenings on
her police scanner. At the many
basketball games she attended, she
yelled "Get your hands up" even on
offense.
She watched her family as they
grew and was always there with a
helping hand to pick them up. She
also knew every move they made,
even before they told her. She was
a very special person to all who
knew her, and she will be greatly
missed.
Marguerite is survived by her
daughter, Mikayla Dennis, of Fair-
banks; her grandchildren, Mar-
sharie Buchanan and children,
Jacob and Ariel, of Palmer; Hope
Britt, of Fairbanks, Alaska; Justin
Britt, of Anchorage, Alaska; Jayla
Gentry and Ronald Gentry, and
Ronald's wife, Lisa, all of Fair-
banks. She also is survived by her
sisters, Mary Jane Dugan, of Rapid
City, and Sharon Malsom, of Fort
Bragg, Calif.; and dozens of nieces
and nephews.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Ronald H. Dennis;
her daughter, Marda M. Smith;
brothers, Arthur A. Huston, Jack
B. Huston, Rex W. Huston, Joseph
M. Huston, Huey F. Huston; sister,
Josephine A. (Joann) Flyte; and
parents, Jack and Margaret Hus-
ton.
Arrangements were entrusted to
Chapel of Chimes Funeral Home,
Fairbanks.
Margaret Dennis________________________________
Phyllis Kochersberger, age 59, of
Philip, S.D., died May 25, 2013, at
her home in Philip.
Phyllis Ann Eisenbraun was
born October 12, 1953, in Wall, the
daughter of Martin C. and Adella
(Schwarting) Eisenbraun. She
grew up in Wall, graduating from
Wall High School in 1971.
Phyllis was united in marriage
to Larry Kochersberger on April
24, 1971, in Wall. After their mar-
riage they made their home in
Philip, where she worked numer-
ous jobs in the area. She then
began working at Dakota Case and
later Scotchman Industries, where
she worked for the last 24 years.
Family was most important to
Phyllis, and she also enjoyed work-
ing in the yard, puzzles, reading
and being home.
Survivors include her husband,
Larry, of Philip; one son, Alan
Kochersberger, of Philip; one
daughter, Amy Kittelson and her
husband, Scott, of Murdo; four
grandchildren, Rachel, William
“Willy” and Lane Kochersberger,
and Kamri Kittelson; one great-
grandson, Camo; two brothers,
Martin Eisenbraun of Webster and
Roger Eisenbraun and his wife, Va-
lerie, of Morrison, Colo.; two sis-
ters, Ida Neiffer of Custer and
Dorothy Jensen and her husband,
Dale, of San Antonio, Texas; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Phyllis was preceded in death by
her parents, Martin C. and Adella
(Schwarting) Eisenbraun; five
brothers, Bernard, LeRoy, Robert,
Alan and Leonard Eisenbraun; and
two sisters, Evelyn Fuerstenau and
Mary Ballistreri.
Memorial services were held
Wednesday, May 29, at the Ameri-
can Legion Hall in Philip.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Phyllis Kochersberger_____________________________
Rosie Lejeune, age 94, of Philip,
S.D., died May 23, 2013, at the
Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospi-
tal in Philip.
Rosie Plasschaert was born De-
cember 21, 1918, in Tracy, Minn.,
the daughter of Richard and
Pauline (Lee) Plasschaert. Rosie
grew up in South Dakota, where
she attended rural schools around
the Philip area, before attending
Philip High School, graduating in
1936.
Rosie was united in marriage to
William “Bill” Humphrey in Philip.
They made their home in various
places in South Dakota while Bill
worked on various ranches. In
1964, they moved to Bakersfield,
Calif., where Rosie had various jobs
throughout the years.
Her husband, Bill, preceded her
in death in 1967. Rosie continued
to remain in Bakersfield after his
death.
In 1981, Rosie was united in
marriage to Elgie Lejeune. They
made their home in Bakersfield,
where Rosie worked as a clerk for
the court systems. Elgie passed
away in 1998.
In 2009, Rosie moved to Philip,
South Dakota to be near her sister,
Marie Hansen and her family,
where she has since resided.
Survivors include her son James
“Jim” Humphrey and his wife,
Nancy, of Eureka, Nev.; three
grandchildren Scott Humphrey
and his wife, Teri, of Burnt Ranch,
Calif., Nancy Mondonca and her
husband, Ben, of Newman, Calif.,
and Jody Freitas and her husband,
Vic, of Newman; three great-grand-
children, Jenna Vanderziel and her
husband, Jeremy, of Bakersfield,
Calif., Jaimee Humphree of Bak-
ersfield, and Clay Freitas of New-
man; several nieces and nephews;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
In addition to her first husband,
Bill, and her second husband,
Elgie, Rosie was preceded in death
by her parents; one brother,
Richard Plasschaert; one sister,
Marie Hansen; and one sister in in-
fancy, Alice Ruth Plasschaert.
Memorial services will be held at
2:00 p.m. Saturday, June 8, at the
United Church in Philip, with Pas-
tor Kathy Chesney officiating.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Rosie Lejeune__________________________________
James “Jimmie” Dean, age 86, of
Rapid City, formerly of Philip, S.D.,
died Monday, May 27, 2013, at the
Hospice of the Hills in Rapid City.
James “Jimmie” Dean was born
May 26, 1927, in Philip, the son of
John “Jack” and Helen (Poste)
Dean. He grew up on a farm-ranch
in the Grindstone area northwest
of Philip. He attended Dean Rural
School in that area. He worked on
his parents’ farm-ranch until mov-
ing into Philip in the late 1940s.
While in Philip, he played the
drums for a local band. In the mid-
1970s he moved to Rapid City
where he worked and stayed at the
Black Hills Workshop, where he
has since resided.
Survivors include his brother,
Raymond Dean of Rapid City; his
sister, H. Lucile Peterson of Philip;
a sister-in-law, Florence Dean of
Philip; many nieces and nephews;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Jimmie was preceded in death
by his parents; and one brother,
Fay Dean.
Services will be held at 10:00
a.m. Friday, May 31, at the United
Church in Philip with Pastor
Kathy Chesney officiating.
Interment will be at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with Rush
Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
James “Jimmie” Dean______________
Laura Morgan, age 102, of
Philip, S.D., died Tuesday, May 28,
2013, at her son’s home in Billings,
Mont.
Survivors include five sons, Ger-
ald Glen Morgan and his wife,
Gladys, of Rapid City, Philip Dale
Morgan and his wife, Nanette, of
Billings, Mont., Edward Samuel
Morgan and his wife, Bonnie, of
Miller, Kent Homer Morgan and
his wife, Twila, of Billings, and
Keith Lauren Morgan and his wife,
Norlene, of Billings; two daughters,
Connie Mae Parsons and her hus-
band, Bill, of Milesville, and Kyle
Elaine Taylor of Gillette, Wyo.; sev-
eral grandchildren, great-grand-
children, and great-great-grand-
children; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Laura was preceded in death by
her husband, Homer; her son, Paul
Allen Morgan; a great-grandson,
Kirk Michael Parsons; a sister,
Mabel Ireland; two daughters-in-
law, Mary Morgan and Lorraine
Morgan; and one son-in-law, Fred
Taylor.
Funeral services are pending
with Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
A full obituary will appear in
next week’s paper.
Laura Morgan__________________
There will be an Open House
for Pastor Kathy Chesney
who received her Master’s of Divinity
on May 25, 2013.
Come help her celebrate on
Sunday, June 2, 2013
from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the
United Church of Philip Basement
Refreshments & Fellowship
Let your
presence
be your
gift.
Engaged
Zhong-Lin Lee and Shu-Fen
Weng of Taipei, Taiwan, are
pleased to announce the forthcom-
ing wedding of Lucy Lee to Zack
Hoffman, son of Wally and Carol
Hoffman, Creighton, S.D.
An August 24, 2013, wedding is
planned at the ranch of the pater-
nal parents with a reception to fol-
low at the Wall Golf Course in
Wall.
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
On this Memorial Day, May 27,
2013, we give special thanks to
those who have served, to those
who are serving, and to those who
lost their lives to keep our nation
free. Memorial Day is a special day
of remembering and thanking
those veterans’s for their service to
our great land. May we never, ever,
take that freedom for granted! Our
prayers go out to those serving in
this war that seems to not end!
May one day in the not too distant
future this war will end and our
troops can come home. Midland
had their annual Memorial Day
program this Monday morning.
Poems were read by young folks
from the Midland area; Julie
Willoughby and daughter Joni
Willoughby sang a duet, “Remem-
ber Me” and Rodd Bauck and Nick
Johnson sang “The War Was in
Color.” Kim Bierle had heard Rodd
and Nick sing this song in Pierre,
liked it and was responsible for get-
ting them to our memorial service.
Both songs and some of the poems
had a most meaningful message.
The ‘service melody’ was led be
Julie and Joni. Veterans were
asked to stand when their branch
of the military was sung. Pastor
Andy Blye closed with a meaning-
ful message of God’s values for our
lives; our ancestors passing on
those values; and the importance of
carrying on those values for future
generations. Following the cere-
mony, folks went to the Midland
Cemetery where veterans did their
gun salute and Kory Bierle once
again played “Taps.” There was a
potluck dinner and visiting before
everyone headed for their respec-
tive homes.
Trinity Lutheran Church in
Midland is busy working toward
their 100th anniversary on June 1,
2013, beginning at 9:00 a.m. with a
potluck dinner to follow. The
ladies of the church will be furnish-
ing the meat and the drinks. They
invite you to come and help them
celebrate the past 100 years!
Jerry and Joy Jones and their
granddaughter, Cassidy Trapp, at-
tended the funeral service for Alice
Donovan-Venner Wednesday, May
22, at Saints Peter and Paul
Catholic Church in Pierre. Friday,
Joy reports they had branding at
their place. The Trapp grandkids
were able to help as Cassidy has
finished her first year at School of
Mines in Rapid City and the other
Trapp kids were done with school
at Pierre Tuesday of this past
week.
Pat Snook attended the visita-
tion service for Alice Donovan-Ven-
ner Tuesday evening.
Jody Block and Barbara Jones,
Midland and Marcia Jackson,
Custer, flew out of Rapid City on
May 15 for Gulf Port, Miss., where
they rented a car driving to Bay St.
Louis, Miss., which is right by the
Gulf of Mexico. Barb and Jody’s
aunt and Marcia’s sister, Nadine
Stamm, and her husband, Richard,
lived there for a number of years.
Nadine was also a sister of Arline
Petoske. Some time back I wrote
about hurricane Katrina and Na-
dine and Richard’s miraculous sur-
vival from that hurricane. It was
an amazing story! Their home,
with only a road separating them
from the Gulf, was totally de-
stroyed. They loved living at Bay
St. Louis with all of its beauty and
white sand beaches, but the hurri-
cane changed things. Their daugh-
ter, Penny Rizan, and her family
lived in Greensburg, La., so they
moved there. Barb, Jody, and Mar-
cia came for the memorial service
held for Nadine on the lot where
their house had been. I got the fol-
lowing report from Barb. “Nadine
and her husband, Dick Stamm,
survived Hurricane Katrina in
2005. They took refuge in an old
bed and breakfast called The Bay
Town Inn along with a few friends
in the town of Bay St. Louis. They
were afraid to stay in their home
and they were elderly and didn’t
want to face the challenges and
long lines to evacuate. The inn was
a large two story structure that
had survived many hurricanes in-
cluding Camille. It was located on
the North Beach Boulevard. The
old inn did not survive the large
storm surge, breaking apart into
the water during the surge from
the bay. All those in the house were
miraculously saved, some grabbing
a large oak tree with the Stamms
floating on a piece of wood and
bumping into a house they took
refuge in. The tree has been moved
now across the street and has an-
gels carved in its dead branches
and is called the angel tree. The
Stamms moved to Greensburg, La.,
after the storm and lived there at
their daughter’s place. We met peo-
ple who were with Nadine and Dick
and saw where they had been in
the storm. The memorial for Na-
dine was held on the same lot their
home had been on, directly on the
Bay of St. Louis in the Gulf of Mex-
ico.” Barb reports they were so glad
they were able to go to the memo-
rial service and to see family they
had not seen for many years.
Visiting Jim and Jan Bierle over
the Memorial Day weekend were
Jan’s cousin, Jim and Helen Illian,
Colorado Springs, Colo. Jan’s
mother, Pearl Madsen, and Jim’s
dad, Charlie Illian, were brother
and sister.
All four of Karel Reiman’s
grown children came for the Memo-
rial Day weekend. Enjoying a time
of visiting and being on the farm
were Mark Reiman, Kadoka, Steve,
Patrick and Becca Reiman who
came from Mandan, N.D., Friday.
Saturday, Kathy and Darron Nel-
son, Minnetonka, Minn., stopped at
Mitchell picking up Anne Moege.
Anne’s husband, Maynard, was un-
able to come as he had farming he
needed to get done. Brad Hand and
daughter Adrian, Pierre, came for
a visit. He and Mark graduated
from Midland school a year apart
and played basketball throughout
their school years. Brad and his
family were camping over the Me-
morial Day weekend with other
family members.
Camping south of Midland for
the Memorial Day weekend were
Mark and Glenda Nemec, Hill City,
Brad and Beth Hand, Isiah,
Samuel, Elijah and Adrian, Pierre,
Stacy Nemec, Pierre, and Tel and
Ellie Saucerman, Sawyer, Meleah
and Raygen, Rapid City. All of
Mark and Glenda’s kids and fami-
lies were there but for their daugh-
ter, Jackie, and her husband, Dave
Good Sheild, and two boys, as they
live at Ajo, Ariz.
MIDLAND MARKET, MAY 31 - 6
TO 8 P.M. - CELEBRATING TRA-
DITIONAL MEMORIAL DAY -
PRODUCE - BAKED GOODS -
EGGS - SUPPER - LIVE MUSIC -
MORE
Pat and Sophie Foley went to
Omaha Friday to attend the grad-
uation ceremony for Pat's nephew
and godson which was held on Sat-
urday. Sophie reports there were
nearly 500 in the class and they we
were out of there in one hour seven
minutes. Now that’s what you call
being organized. They went to Pat's
brother’s for visiting and came
back Sunday. Two of the sisters
and some of their families were
there also. One was from Gillette
and one from Wahpeton, N.D. Pat
and Sophie stopped at the home of
her son, Todd and Barby Larson
and family on the way through
Sioux Falls. They had had six plus
inches of rain Saturday night, so
there was water everywhere!
Jerry and I attended the visita-
tion service for Alice Donovan-Ven-
ner Tuesday, May 21. It was good
to visit with family and to see the
pictures of Alice and her families
over the past years. She was one of
those people who was so full of life
and enjoyed being a part of that
life.
Thursday, Jerry and I were in
Rapid City for doctor appoint-
ments. Coming home we decided to
take Highway 44 for a change of
scenery. It is wonderful to see the
countryside so green, with cattle
grazing on that green grass and
many dams full of water. We
stopped at Cedar Pass for some ice
cream and had a nice visit with
Amanda, the daughter of Donna
(Olson) Enders. She lives and
works in Rapid City, but when she
comes to see her mom and family
at Kadoka she works a couple of
days at Cedar Pass. Amanda was
sharing with us changes Donna
has made to the house she and her
husband, Chuck Enders, bought
that had been the home of Donna’s
parents, the late Duane and Dottie
Olson in Kadoka. We stopped to see
Glenda Carlson and her mom, Lil-
lian Carlson, at Kadoka, having a
good visit. Before going on home,
we stopped south of Midland hav-
ing a visit with Greg and Betty who
are back for another summer sea-
son. Saturday, we met our daugh-
ter, April and Steve Meeker at the
1880 Town exit as April had some
pictures to leave with us. They had
been to Sioux Falls to the state
track meet in which their daugh-
ter, Miranda, took part in. They en-
joyed having April’s brother,
Christopher and Stephanie Nemec
and Laura, Mitchell, at the track
meet for Miranda’s events and
some visiting time. Before Jerry
and I headed home, we stopped at
the campground having a bite to
eat and some visiting with Mark
and Glenda Nemec and their crew,
who as I mentioned before, were
camping there. Besides camping,
they had gone to 1880 Town and
the Badlands and from what I
hear, some went to Wall Drug on
Sunday.
MIDLAND TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH IS CELEBRATING ITS
“100 YEARS OF BELIEVING”
ANNIVERSARY, JUNE 1, 2013.
CHURCH SERVICE / PROGRAM,
9 A.M. MST. A POTLUCK MEAL
AND FELLOWSHIP WILL FOL-
LOW (MEAT & DRINKS WILL
BE FURNISHED).
While visiting with Glenda and
some of the rest, I learned some-
thing I wanted to share in this
week’s news column. Some may
have heard of it before, but, I felt
with all that is going on it bears
telling again. Brad and Beth
Hand’s son, Isiah, is 11 years old
and is in the fifth grade at Pierre.
He is a member of the Pierre Capi-
tal Children’s Choir and the choir
was in Boston April 17-23. Beth
went as one of the chaperones.
Many of you remember the tragedy
that happened at the Boston
Marathon. Beth reports the day
they got to Boston the city was in
lockdown so some of their events
were canceled. But that they were
able to sing at most of the planned
stops. They sang at a Boston Red
Sox game, the Cathedral Church of
St. Paul, at the Old North Church,
and at the bombing site of the
Boston Marathon. As the Boston-
ian’s listened to their songs, some
with such a meaningful message
after what had just happened, peo-
ple had tears in their eyes. At one
point as they were going to their
bus, a fellow asked them where
they were from. When they told
him South Dakota, there were
tears in his eyes as he thanked
them for coming. Kind of gives you
a lump in your throat and warms
your heart doesn’t it? On the news
it told that some of the Boston
Marathon runners went back to
Boston to finish the run, one fellow
ran the whole thing over again.
What a moving moment in time
that had to be, as they remembered
that tragic day some weeks ago.
Stories such as Isiah and the Chil-
dren’s Choir and those marathon
runners going back to finish the
race is one of those heartwarming
stories, to be sure. It’s what gives
us hope in this world with its ups
and its downs! I want to thank
Beth for sharing their story!
A celebration of the life of Andy
Olesen was held at the farm of Ron
and Shirley Doud Sunday, May 26.
Many of us remember his untimely
death as a medic helicopter pilot.
Family members there were Andy’s
wife, Pat Olesen, Rockford, Ill.,
their son, Tony, and family and
daughter, Michelle, and family and
a good friend of Michelle’s, all of
Texas, Andy’s sister, Kathryn
Nordstrom, Yankton, her daugh-
ters, Cindy and family, Spencer,
Neb., and Sherry and family, Oak
Park, Ill., and Andy’s sister, Connie
and Dave Shellech, Portland, Ore.
Cousins from the Kuhlman and
Olesen families were there as was
Pat’s mom of Eureka and a cousin
who brought Pat’s mom. Class-
mates of Andy’s were Tony and his
wife, LaVonne, Gillette, Wyo, Mor-
rie and Barb Jones and Keith
Hunt, all of Midland. Mark and
Glenda took time from camping to
attend as well. There was a large
crowd there for a time of visiting
and remembering.
The sky is beginning to look
rather threatening, so am going to
close my column for this week.
Called and talked to some about
getting their news, but haven’t
heard from them, so will have to
get it in next week’s news. I am
sending if off this Monday evening,
as Jerry and I have plans, leaving
Tuesday morning. Talking about
threatening clouds, when our
daughter, April, and husband,
Steve, were heading back to
Spearfish following the state track
meet in Sioux Falls, she called to
say they had just passed a threat-
ening looking cloud, the worst she
ever remembers seeing. There were
storm chasers in the area of that
cloud between Wall and New Un-
derwood. Thankfully, the tornado
did not materialize due to condi-
tions not being exactly right. The
other day, we happened to see
Ronda (Rockafellow) Coyle who
had a picture of that cloud on her
phone camera. April was right, it
was an awful looking cloud. Time
to close and get off the computer!
Have a good week and be safe from
those summer storms.
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
Call Tyler today!
Drive into summer with an all new
Ford F-150 FX4. Great rebate packages!!
Check out our entire selection at
www.philipmotor.com
ads@pioneer-review.com
“100 years      
of 
Believing”
Saturday, June 1st
Midland Trinity
Lutheran Church
is celebrating its
Anniversary
Church
Service &
Program
9:00 a.m.
(MST)
A potluck meal & fellowship will follow
(meat & drinks will be furnished)
Celebrating
Traditional
Memorial
Day!
Friday
6-8 p.m.
Eggs
Jewelry
Baked
Goods
Cheese
Garden
Produce
Handcrafted
Items
That’s Sew
You Clothing
Plants
Come for supper …
stay & visit!
Midland City Park
Live Music!
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Community
This morning, May 28, word
was received of the death of Laura
Morgan, age 102. She died in
Billings, Mont., where she had
been living with one of her sons.
Sympathy is extended to all her
family, including her daughter,
Connie and Bill Parsons from here
in Milesville.
Congratulations, Hugh Harty,
on your retirement from the
Haakon County highway depart-
ment! After 32 years, Hugh will no
longer be seen running the main-
tainer or the snowplow, or mowing
the road ditches. We wish you the
best, Hugh! Family coming for the
retirement party in Philip Friday
night were Paul and Moneik
Stephens, Mikaela and Mathew,
Jim and Adele Harty, Molly and
Owen, and Ed Harty. Also attend-
ing was Hugh and Ann's brother-
in-law, Joe Hockett, Winner.
The Hardingrove Church had a
great week of Vacation Bible
School with 14 kids enrolled. The
church was packed Friday night for
their program.
Hugh and Ann Harty drove to
Winner Saturday for the surprise
60th birthday party for Joe Hockett
and the 50th birthday for his sister,
Anna.
Dan and Gayla Piroutek drove
to Sioux Falls Saturday to watch
the state high school track meet.
On the way they stopped in
Mitchell to take Gayla's mom, Bon-
nie Peterson, out for breakfast.
Monday, Dan and Gayla
Piroutek met Phyllis (Piroutek)
and Ron Hinman at the Black Hills
National Cemetery to join the
many others in honoring the veter-
ans. Dan's brothers, Lee and Jack
Piroutek, are both buried at the na-
tional cemetery. Phyllis and Ron
are visiting in the area. They
moved last fall from Scottsbluff,
Neb., to Pinehurst, N.C.
Mary Ann (Piroutek) George is
coming to South Dakota Thursday,
May 30. She will be at Milesville
until Thursday, June 6, and hopes
to see many of her friends. Kay
(Piroutek) and Allen Turvey will be
in Philip Friday, May 31.
EmmyLee, daughter of Brennen
and Joni Parsons, spent a couple of
days with her grandparents, Byron
and Peggy, during the Memorial
Day weekend. Guests on Saturday
at Byron and Peggy's were Glenn
and Rita O'Connell.
Guests at Mike and Linda
Gebes' for the long weekend were
Sally Gebes and daughter, Emma,
who will be staying all week, Dar-
ren Gebes and two of his boys,
Courtney Gebes, and Brad Gebes,
his friend, Kathy, and her son,
Devin.
Ray Berry and son, Matthew,
Arcadia, Neb., spent four days last
week visiting Kenneth and Doris
Berry in Philip. Thursday evening,
Dave Berry went in to visit.
Karen Carley spent Friday in
New Underwood visiting her par-
ents, Frank and Mildred O'Grady.
Guests at various times at Don-
nie and Bobette Schofield's over the
long weekend were Tyra Austin,
Zachery and Zane, Big Stone City,
Bruce and Lynn Dunker and fam-
ily, Wall, Steve, Lisa and Blair
Jonas, Pierre, and Jeff and Crystal
Schofield, Chase, Landon and
Bryan. Saturday, they celebrated
their three eighth grade graduates
in the family, Zachery Austin, Blair
Jonas and Sidney Dunker. Joining
them on Sunday were Dawn and
Sammi Sauer and friend, Travis
Ingle, and Jeff, Crystal and Chase.
Everyone left for home Monday.
Jeanine Anderson, Rapid City,
spent the weekend with Joan
Hamill. It sounds like they were
busy planting trees and doing yard
work.
Sunday, the Boyd Parsons fam-
ily gathered at the home of Kayla
and Eric Bastian and Kaidyn in
Pierre. Included were Boyd and
Kara Parsons and Wade and Marcy
Parsons, Autumn, Kamri and
Keenan. Andrea and Dustin
Rische, Brooklyn and Hudson, Red-
field, joined them.
Paul, Donna and Tina Staben
attended the Memorial Day serv-
ices at the Black Hills National
Cemetery. The Haakon County
Crooners sang during the program.
Wednesday, the Milesville
Rangers 4-H Club sponsored a
rangeland workshop in Philip. At-
tending were Nina Pekron, Allison
and Grace, Jodi Parsons, Rachel
and Sarah, Ben and Mark Stangle
and Donna and Tina Staben.
The Leo Pattons had their usual
big crew here for the weekend.
Only their first names will be re-
ported as Joan didn't know some of
their last names. Barb came from
Texas, picking up her grandaugh-
ter in Kansas, Janet, Chuck and
Kendra, Minnesota, Jason, Valerie
and Justin, Kansas, Jon, Jamie,
Ashley and Kenny, Minnesota,
(bringing their horses) Don, Judy,
Terry, Kevin, Karen and Billy,
Minnesota, Sue and Darwin,
Texas, Gary, Philip, Judy Arm-
strong, Illinois, Bill Michelle, Ally,
Eric and Lainie, Minnesota, Kait-
lyn, Rapid City, Irene, Pierre,
Carol, Karla, Marlene, Cheryl,
Ashley and Corbin, George and
Kay, and Bob and Marge. They had
their cookout Sunday night with
lots of food for lots of people.
Last evening, Monday the 27th,
we got a couple of nice rain showers
here that totaled .60”. The country-
side looks so different from two
weeks ago. We are all very thank-
ful. We can't have too much rain in
May, can we?
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports
Phlllp's cltywlde
8aturday, 1une 8th
AmbuIance Luncheon at the PhiIip AmbuIance
buiIding ~ Free wiII benefit, roast beef sand-
wiches, chips, desserts and refreshments
from 11 - 1:30 p.m.
MuIti-FamiIy at PhiIip Fire HaII 9 - 1 p.m. (noon -
1 p.m. ½ price) Girls sizes 6 months to 7/8, boys
sizes 0-18 months & 3T-4T, adult women`s
clothes S-M some large, maternity clothes,
shoes of various sizes, household items, toys,
(2) upright car seats, (2) kitchen booster seats,
(2) potty chairs, Pack and Play, baby swing,
bouncy seat, infant tub, Bumbo chair, infant ac-
tivity mat, Johnny Jump Up, some tools, hunting
& fishing gear.
MuIti-famiIy at K-gee's BuiIding downtown PhiIip
8 a.m. - 1 p.m. ~ Women`s medium to 2X, boys
sizes 2T and up, girls sizes infant on up, men`s
size large, upright car seats, bouncy seat with toy
bar, kids toys, Graco stroller, Graco Stroller/car
seat combo, Foosball/multigame table, jewelry,
household items.
HaIIi Konst's residence in PfeiferviIIe, south
across the bridge, 1st Ieft, big house on the
corner 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. indoor/outdoor toys,
women`s clothes, misc. items, kids clothes -
boys sizes 0-5T & girls sizes 0-4T. A wood desk
(paid $800 NEW) asking $200 OBO. 25¢ SALE!
All items not marked will be 25¢.
109 N. Wood Ave, Brad Gebes' residence (use
aIIey entrance by Ingram's Shed), Iook for
signs, 7 a.m. - 1 p.m. Household misc., knick-
knacks, books, clothes.
Joann Stark seIIing at Lou Ann ReckIing's resi-
dence (203 W. Oak St) starts at 7 a.m. glass-
ware, (2) matching lamps, (2) ceramic bathroom
sinks, Albino deer head mounted, Walt Disney
tapes, lots of ceramic vases, baskets, Christmas
items, knickknacks & clothes small to large.
Simons' Residence, 404 W. Oak St., 9 a.m. - 1
p.m. Entertainment center, snowboards, daybed
w/bedding, boys size 3, three piece suit & shoes,
baby boy clothes, television set and misc. items.
Dan & Theresa WaIker residence, 410 W. Oak St.,
starts at 8 a.m. Flat screen T.V. stand with
shelves, 55 gal. fish tank with stand & acces-
sories, bookcase cabinet, clarinet, stove, tires,
collector steins, household/camping items,
stereo receiver and speakers, motorhome.
MuIti-famiIy saIe, 300 S. PhiIip Ave. (two bIocks
south of hospitaI) Myrna GottsIeben's resi-
dence, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Large and plus size cloth-
ing, household items, crafts, miscellaneous
items and baked goods.
Nancy Haigh's residence, 601 W. Pine St. 8 a.m.
- 1 p.m. 1920-ish L.E. Smith typewriter, 1930ish
crazy quilt, other misc. collectibles/antiques, end
tables, footstool, kid size computer chair, adult
clothing medium to plus size, craft items, Time
Life Epic of Flight book set, Broncos swan neck
floor lamp, jigsaw puzzles and more! In case of
inclement weather the location will be moved to
the United Church basement, 101 S. Howard St.
MuIti-famiIy Dorothy Weber's residence, 515 W.
Pine St. Ab lounger, easy shaper, baby swing,
bouncy seat, stroller, convertible crib and mat-
tress, color printer and b/w printer, dishes, cur-
tains, sheets, Americana and holiday
decorations, women`s clothes and shoes.
Tom & Jody StrubIe residence, 612 Sunshine
Drive, starts at 8 a.m. twin bed frame, dresser,
computer stand, (4) wooden chairs, (3) electric
heaters, microwave, massage cushion, rocking
chair, portable dog kennel and many more misc.
items!
MuIti-famiIy at PhiIip Fine Arts gym (PhiIip
SchooI) 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. Girls clothes size infant
on up, boys clothing, teen girls size M-LG.,
women`s sizes M-plus size, kids bikes, décor/
kitchen misc., 4-in-one crib (no mattress), queen
oak surround, some power tools and tires, small
2hp trailer tandem axle.
MuIti-famiIy at oId NAPA buiIding, Center Ave.
downtown PhiIip 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Some adult
clothes, name brand clothes for boys (0-10 yrs.),
welder, movies, toys, purses & much, much
more! Come check it out!
MuIti-famiIy (Amber Rush, Heidi Burns, AshIee
MiIIer, Aaron FitzgeraId), west on Hwy. 14
across from rodeo grounds, FitzgeraId resi-
dence, 8 a.m. - 12. Adult clothes, boys` clothes,
girls` clothes, 2T-3T, kids` trikes, boys` bikes,
toys, holiday decorations, kitchen and household
items,12" TV with VCR, 12" TV with DVD, girls`
crib bedding, much more!
Doris Berry, 205 Prairie Drive, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. (3)
kitchen stools, (2) lamps, (2) lawn chairs, kitchen
appliances, dishes, pans, steak plates, new
Christmas lights, water coolers, thermos bottles,
new curtains, vases, candles, books, DVDs,
sewing supplies, Singer sewing cabinets and
chair, planters, queen size pillows and cases.
Summer Hours:
Monday thru Friday: 11 am to 7 pm
Saturdays: 11 am to ???
– Closed Sundays –
859-2430 • Philip
WEEKLY SPECIAL:
Egg Salad
Sandwiches
Jackpot Bowling:
Thursday, May 30
7:00 p.m.
We Are Here
Emily Wickstrom, Rural Advocate
for Missouri Shores Domestic Vi-
olence Center, will be at the
Haakon Co. Courthouse on
~ TUESDAY ~
June 4th
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
For more information, call
1-800-696-7187
Domestic Violence, Sexual As-
sault, Dating Violence
Emily is also available for
presentations to any group
4-H youth benefit from Philip range workshop
Area youth from eight years old up through high school attended a range workshop
May 22 near Philip to not only learn how to identify plants, but also how those plants
impact the land and the animals that graze them. The Milesville Rangers 4-H club
sponsored the workshop with Nina Pekron, district conservationalist, Haakon County
National Resource Conservation Service, coordinating the event. Instructing the stu-
dents were at left Dave Ollila, Extension sheep specialist, Newell; bottom left photo
in back Tate Lantz, NRCS, Rapid City; and Pekron in the bottom right photo. The in-
structors broke the youth up into three different age groups with the youngest learn-
ing basic skills and the teenage group having more indepth instruction. The morning
session was held in a pasture west of Philip. Pressing and preserving plant speci-
mens for 4-H exhibiting was part of the afternoon session. Ollila is a former ag
teacher who is involved in the South Dakota Range Camp and South Dakota Range-
land Days and Soils Days. Range Camp will be June 4-6 in Sturgis, and Rangeland
Days and Soil Days is June 25-26 in Kadoka. Preregistration is required for both
events. To register for Range Camp contact Ollila at 394-1722 or email david.ollila
@sdstate.edu. To preregister by June 10 for Rangeland Days and Soil Days contact
Jackson County Conservation District at 837-2242 or email mayola.horst @sd.nacd-
net.net or Haakon County Conservation District at 859-2186 or email hccd@gold-
enwest.net.
High school rodeo contestants
continue at practice rodeos across
South Dakota. Results below are
from Highmore, May 17 and 18 and
Timber Lake, May 18.
Highmore Practice Rodeo
First Go
Pole Bending: 1. Becca Lythgoe,
Colton, 21.247; 2. Savanna Glaus,
Chamberlain, 21.952; 3. Ashley
Theobald, Pierre, 22.186, 4. Hanna
Hostutler, Midland, 22.291
Bareback Riding: 1. Casey Kreutz,
Sturgis, 48
Steer Wrestling: 1. Jake Fulton,
Valentine, Neb., 9.83;
Breakaway Roping: 1.Dawson
Munger, Pukwana, 2.74; 2. Cedar Jan-
dreau, Kennebec, 3.59; 3. Glaus, 3.97;
4. Katie Hostutler, Midland, 4.08
Goat Tying: 1. Maggie Heiberger,
Hartford, 8.31; 2. Jacey Hupp, Huron,
9.67; 3. Kaycee Monnens, Watertown,
9.69; 4. Taya Heisinger, NA, 9.85
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. John The-
len, Brandon, 41
Team Roping: 1. Sterling Gehrke,
Castlewood/Cole Carlson, Aberdeen,
11.86; 2. Wyatt Janisch, Lake
City/Trevor Peterson, Sisseton, 14.73;
3. Munger/Kyle Kalhoff, Watertown,
18.46; 4. Tanegai Zilverberg, Ho-
labird/Moriah Glaus, Chamberlain,
29.59
Tie Down Roping: 1. Fulton, 11.56;
2. Braedy Edleman,Huron, 11.68; 3.
Gehrke, 13.47; 4. Wyatt Fulton, St.
Lawrence, 14.75
Barrel Racing: 1. Munger, 17.252;
2. Kallie Carey, Huron, 17.407; 3.
Shanna Swanson, Waubay, 17.455; 4.
H. Hostutler, 17.463
Bull Riding: No qualifed rides
Second Go
Pole Bending: 1. Sydney Cowan,
Harrold, 21.256; 2. Munger, 21.658; 3.
Sidney Carey, Huron, 21.729; 4. Joeni
Lueders, Spearfish, 22.057
Bareback Riding: No qualified
rides
Steer Wrestling: 1. W. Fulton, 7.80;
2. Cameron Fanning, Olivet, 9.64
Breakaway Roping: 1. Brooke Nel-
son, Philip, 2.72; 2. Jandreau, 3.66; 3.
Zilverberg, 3.67; 4. Bailey Tibbs, Ft.
Pierre, 3.74
Goat Tying: 1. Remi Wientjes,
Onida, 9.35; 2. Jandreau, 10.16; 3.
Lythgoe, 10.24; 4. Hupp, 10.44
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1.Casey
Henninger, Ft. Pierre, 49; 2. Tyler Op-
stdahl, Piedmont, 43
Team Roping: 1. Janisch/Peterson,
15.64; 2. J. Fulton/Nolan Richie, Bris-
tol, 22.70; 3. Joe Hendrickson, Chancel-
lor/Thelen, 24.93; 4. Henninger/Robert
Tolton, Ft. Pierre, 32.23
Tie Down Roping: 1. Gehrke,
16.04; 2. Brody Jones, Midland, 16.42;
3. J. Fulton, 17.37; 4. Jim Ellsworth,
NA, 19.14
Barrel Racing: 1. Malary McKen-
ney, Colton, 17.807; 2. Monnens,
17.869; 3. Makayla Kroeplin, High-
more, 18.164; 4. Lythgoe, 18.193
Bull Riding: 1. Kyle Blume, Red-
field, 49; 2. Chance Jandel, Redfield, 47
Finals
Pole Bending: 1. Lythgoe, 21.282l
2, Cowan, 21.329; 3. Munger, 21.725.
Average winners: 1. Munger, 65.744;
2. S. Carey, 66.34; 3. Cowan, 68.510
Bareback Riding: No qualified
rides
Average winner: Kreutz, 48
Steer Wrestling: 1. J. Fulton, 7.81
Average winners: 1. J. Fulton, 17.63
on two head; 2. W. Futon, 7.78; 3. Fan-
ning, 9.62
Breakaway Roping: 1. Zilverberg,
2.99; 2. Nelson, 3.00; 3. Jandreau, 3.04;
4. Tibbs, 3.31
Average winners: 1. Jandreau, 10.29;
2. Monnens, 12.04; 3. Nelson, 5.71 on
two head; 4. Zilverberg, 6.65
Goat Tying: 1. Monnens, 10.11; 2.
Tibbs, 10.48; 3. Jandreau, 10.78; 4.
Hupp, 11.00
Average winners: 1. Hupp, 31.11; 2.
Tibbs, 32.23; 3. Heisinger, 32.93; 4.
Wientjes, 33.90
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Hen-
ninger, 32
Average winners: 1. Henninger, 81;
2. Opstedahl, 43; 3. Thelen, 41
Team Roping: 1. Janisch/Peterson,
14.11; 2. Swanson/Brody Jones, Mid-
land, 14.77; 3. Zilverberg/M. Glaus,
18.67; 4. Gehrke/Carlson, 21.04
Average winners: 1. Janisch/Peter-
son, 44.48; 2. Gehrke/Carlson, 132.89;
3. Zilverberg/M. Glaus, 148.25; 4. J.
Fulton/Richie, 148.42
Tie Down Roping: 1. W. Fulton,
12.14; 2;. Hendrickson, 17.57; 3. Richie,
18.78; 4. Jones, 22.88
Average winners: 1. Jones, 54.13; 2.
J. Fulton, 28.92 on two head; 3. Gehrke,
29.50; 4. W. Fulton, 26.88
Barrel Racing: 1. Lythgoe, 18.004;
2. Tibbs, 18.097; 3. K. Carey, 18.114; 4.
Kroeplin, 18.207
Average winners: 1. Monnens,
54.226; 2. Joenie Lueders, Spearfish,
54.569; 3. Cowan, 54.609; 4. Munger,
54.872
Bull Riding: No qualified rides
Average winners; 1. Blume, 49; 2.
Jandel, 47
Timber Lake Practice Rodeo
Pole Bending: 1. Jana Hunt,
Dupree, 20.91; 2. Maclyn Hauck, Belle
Fourche, 22.06; 3. Morgan Ham, Lem-
mon, 22.39
Bareback Riding: 1. Trig Clark,
Meadow, 66; 2. Tayte Clark, Meadow,
63
Steer Wrestling: 1. Tayte Clark,
16.9
Breakaway Roping: 1. Katy Miller,
Faith, 4.3; 2. Ham 4.7; 3. Alaina Stan-
gle, Milesville, 5.7
Goat Tying: 1. Alix Thorstenson,
Belle Fourche, 9.3; 2. Cassy Woodward,
Dupree, 10.1; 3. Kailee Webb, Timber
Lake, 10.3
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Tayte
Clark, 72; 2./3. tie Kash Deal,
Dupree/Seth Longbrake, Dupree, 68
Team Roping: 1. Dalton Sheridan,
Faith/Lane Foster, Faith, 11.6; 2. Sage
Donner, McIntosh/Shay Oliver, Lem-
mon, 11.78; 3. Colby Hetzel,
Lemmon/Cash Hetzel, Lemmon, 26.13
Tie Down Roping: 1. Cash Hetzel,
High school rodeo results
Cassidy Schnabel, a recent grad-
uate of Philip High School, has
been named recipient of the $1,000
Golden West Scholarship for 2013.
Schnabel was selected by the
school for a number of merit based
qualities including leadership, aca-
demic achievement, civic and ex-
tracurricular activities, and the
motivation to serve and succeed.
Some of his activities have in-
cluded National Honor Society,
FFA, football, basketball, track and
band.
He will be attending Dakota
Wesleyan University, where he
plans to major in athletic training
and play football.
The Golden West Scholarship is
an annual award established to
help promote educational opportu-
nity for students within the Golden
West service area. Nearly 500
scholarships have been awarded by
the Wall based telephone, Internet
and cable television company since
Golden West’s scholarship program
was established in 1999.
Golden West scholarship
“We had two placers at the state
track meet,” stated Philip head
coach Tom Parquet.” “Austin Pin-
ney tied for fourth in the pole vault
at 11’09”. Cheyenne Pinney tied for
fifth at 8’0”. Both of these vaults
were personal bests.”
The 108th South Dakota State
Track and Field Meet was held Fri-
day and Saturday, May 24-25. The
preliminary action on Friday took
place in Sioux Falls for B schools,
in Lennox for Class A and in Bran-
don for Class AA. All classes then
finished the competitions on
Howard Wood Field on Saturday.
Overall, a total of 2,424 individ-
uals from 149 South Dakota
schools had qualified to compete at
the meet. In Class B, there were
800 athletes – 387 girls and 413
boys. In Class A, there were 912 –
435 girls and 477 boys; in Class AA
712 – 348 girls and 364 boys.
With a team total score of 3.5,
the PHS girls’ team placed 37th out
of 44 schools represented at state.
With a team total of 4.5, the PHS
boys’ team finished in 34th place
out of 45 schools represented.
BOYS
Pole Vault
Austin Pinney – 4th, 11’9”
800 Meter Hurdles
Paul Guptill – 50.28 in preliminar-
ies
GIRLS
Pole Vault
Cheyenne Pinney – 5th, 8’0”
100 Meter Dash
Holly Iwan – 13.61 in preliminar-
ies
200 Meter Dash
Iwan – 28.71 in preliminaries
1600 Meter Run
Coyle – 12th, 5:43.31
1600 Sprint Medley Relay
Iwan, Katlin Knutson, Tia Guptill,
Coyle – 4:46.08 in preliminaries
“We had a very good perform-
ances at the state track meet this
year as five of the seven events that
we particatpated in ran or vaulted
season best performances and you
can't ask for more than that from
any team,” said Parquet. “We
would like to thank all of the area
people who came to watch the
Philip Scotties all year long as the
season had it’s ups and downs.
Great job to all of the team and
good luck next season.”
Scotties in State “B” Track Meet
At the South Dakota State “B” Track and Field Meet, Philip High School’s Austin
Pinney placed fourth in the pole vault with a height of 11’9”. Courtesy photos
Cheyenne Pinney placed fifth state in the pole vault with a height of 8’0”.
23.26
Barrel Racing: 1. Jami Derflinger,
Opal, 15.53; 2. Laura O’Leary, Timber
Lake, 15.83; 3. Madison Rau, Mobridge,
15.97
Bull Riding: 1. Jesse James White,
Cherry Creek, 69; 2. Dalton Gerbracht,
Faith, 67; 3. Matthew Larvie, Mission,
60
All-Around Cowboy: Tayte Clark
All Around Cowgirl: Woodward
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your
phone number to: news-
desk@pioneer-review.com
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9 Community “Section B”
PHILIP SWIMMING POOL
OPENING THURSDAY, MAY 30th
2013 SEASON HOURS:
1 PM to 7 PM - Open Swimming on Monday, Friday,
Saturday & Sunday
1 PM to 6 PM - Open Swimming on Tuesday, Wednesday &
Thursday
FAMILY SWIM NITE: Wednesday from 7 PM to 9 PM
WATER AEROBICS: Tuesday & Thursday
from 6 PM to
7 PM (June 11th - Aug. 8th)
ADMISSION FEES:
Swimmer Daily Admission: $3.00
Non-Swimmer Daily Admission: $1.00
Season Passes: $55.00 for Single Pass
$75.00 for 2-Person Pass
$100.00 for 3-Person Pass
$125.00 for 4 or More Person Pass
(*Passes are limited to 2-adults & children living in the same
household.)
Water Aerobics: $3.00 per session or $25.00 season pass
The pooI wiII cIose if there is Iightning or thunder or if a severe weather
warning is issued for our area, or if the quaIity of water or faciIity pres-
ents a heaIth or safety hazard. The pooI may be re-opened if severe
weather passes over at the discretion of the pooI manager.
FOR SALE:
1998 Ford Expedition XLT 4x4
Cloth Seats, Good Tires
Power Windows & Locks
$3,750
Call 685-8155
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
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In celebration of National Emergency Medical Services Week, May 19-25, the Philip Ambulance Service held a member
recognition and training, along with their scheduled business meeting, Wednesday, May 22. Recognitions came with the
individual’s years of being qualified as at least an emergency medical technician. Back row, from left: Lee Vaughn (30
years), Don Weller (18), acting director Garry Bauer (20), Kalcy Triebwasser (1) and Marty Hansen (10). Second row: Ruth
Carley (15), Sheila Trask (8), Paula Duncan (2), Dody Weller (21), Lori Quinn (10), LaRae Van Tassel (beginner), Amy Kroetch
(10) and Theresa Walker (beginner). Front: Arthur McIlravy (3), Debbie Hansen (10), Steve Millage (30), Ashley Scheessele
(2), Dan Walker (beginner) and Kim Bouman (6). Not pictured are: Kassie Kukal (2), RaeAnn Snyder (3), Karyl Sandal (16),
Gayle Rush (20), Carla Smith (17), Debbie Hanrahan (NA) and Heather Brown (17). Photo by Del Bartels
Emergency Medical Services Week
Prayers for rain were answered, so the Vacation Bible School put on by the United
Church ended with its closing presentation held in the Fine Arts Building, Thurs-
day, May 23. “There’s no other way to say it, there’s no better group of people to
work with,” said Pastor Kathy Chesney. “Sit back and enjoy the energy that the
kids put forth all week long.” The youth, teen helpers and adult leaders summed
United Church Vacation Bible School
up the classes, projects, themed
meals and song for the attending au-
dience of parents, other family mem-
bers and friends. This year’s theme
was “Where Kids Stand Strong; King-
dom Rock for God.” Bible stations vol-
unteers were led by Melanie Morehart,
Britni Ross, Cynthia Finn and Tami
Ravellette.
Photos by Del Bartels
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 10 Community
BUSINESS FOR SALE
Pizza Etc.
175 S. Center Ave. • Philip
•Great Family Business
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Contact
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(605) 
859-2365
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Memorial Day was celebrated
May 27, and I was waiting for the
30th, so it really snuck up on me.
So many things to be thankful for
and one is for the soldiers and their
families who have served this great
country. Thank you.
Would you believe it? I am think-
ing about mowing the yard again,
that will be the fourth time this
year. The price of gas has leaped
up, it went from $3.46 to $3.83 this
week alone. On the bright side,
diesel has remained about the
same, $3.73 cash price.
Monday it dribbled and rained.
Our visitors, Ken and Lynn Hart-
man, pulled up stakes and moved
on toward Mystic. Bill was all pre-
pared to go to Plainview to help
with farming for Terry Buchert,
but in checking with Bob Hansen
at Howes, decided it wouldn’t be
much use to go just yet since they
had over two inches of rain. Bill
went off to Philip for cards in the
afternoon and I was kept busy
working on some shirts as well as
making a lunch run with the little
community van.
Tony Harty, after getting his
mail Monday, picked up Shirley
Hair and they did business around
Kadoka and Philip. They had
breakfast at the Philip sale barn
while waiting for a prescription.
L.D. and Shirley were in Kadoka
for a few days so L.D. could do
some work in the Philip and Wall
area. Tony came by and gave me
his news in the late afternoon.
Kelsey Gittings, who is a student
in college in Laramie, Wyo., is in
the Philip area for the summer.
Her mother, Beth Stewart, went to
Laramie last week and picked her
up, so she is enjoying time with
family while here. Tuesday, Kelsey
Gittings and Jessica Gittings and
Daniel were supper guests of their
grandparents, George and Sandee
Gittings.
Our rain gauge showed one-half
inch of rain Tuesday morning and
it was overcast and drippy most of
the day. Heidi Coller stopped for a
visit in the morning and picked up
shirts for wrestlers. I worked on
some other projects as well.
Tuesday, Tony Harty visited at
the Hair’s home and Wednesday
when he called to check, they were
already on their way back to Ol-
richs.
Vi and Don Moody’s week at the
ranch was full of a lot of exciting
things to do and see. Rusty Baye
got their ATV fixed and delivered
back to Moody ranch in time for
running the irrigation dike system
for leaks and re-enforcements that
comes when the water runs. Don,
throughout the week, was follow-
ing the water as it was coming
through and doing some minor re-
pairs with dirt plugs and now it's
all the way to the headquarters
just east of the house and there it
has stopped until more rain. Alfalfa
is really gathering momentum al-
ready with the two and one-half
inches of rain, so all things are
bright and beautiful!
Brr, Wednesday it seems that
48˚ was the high for the day. Carol
Solon stopped for a visit and Phyl-
lis Word also came by with a little
project for me to work on. Carol
transferred some pictures to a
jump drive that she had some trou-
ble with at home. Bill made a deliv-
ery for me when he went to Philip
and did a few other errands.
Doug Frein visited George Git-
tings Wednesday morning. Kelsey
and Jessica Gittings and Daniel
were out to the George Gittings
home Wednesday afternoon.
Vi Moody kept her hair appoint-
ment Wednesday in Philip. Almost
forgot to get there and that would
have been bad since she wants to
look her best for the big 50th class
reunion.
Thursday, Tony Harty got in
some mowing, accomplishing get-
ting three yards done. He visited
Dale O’Connell when having some
trouble with his mower. Dale said
the “shade tree mower mechanics”
always come around when they
need expert help!
Thursday, Jason from the over-
head door company stopped to give
an estimate on putting in a little
smaller door on our shop. Bill got
the pressure washer up and run-
ning for the summer and cleaned
the motorhome in fine shape before
taking off for Philip. I finished
some decals, then went to Philip to
decorate graves, pay bills, drop off
decals at West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water company to John
Kramer, did some measurements
for other work, and visited Dean
and Mary Parsons just about the
time Dean had experienced a prob-
lem while mowing an incline. Dad
always used to tell us if we hit our
heads, we probably wouldn’t hurt
anything. Dean seemed to be not
too worse for the wear, but will
know better the day after when all
the aches and pains develop. Bill
and I both got with the program
and got our yard mowed after sup-
per. I noticed the apple tree is full
of blossoms and so are the
chokecherry bushes along the
draw. Hope they bear some fruit. I
also noticed a web in the apple tree
so will have to find a favorable in-
secticide spray to clear that away.
Thursday evening, Sherry Han-
son and family stopped by Ralph
and Cathy Fiedler’s with the first
cutting of rhubarb from their gar-
den. That must be a hint for Cathy
to make her well-loved rhubarb
crisp. Elsie had ball games in Stur-
gis and her team won both games.
Makes for a good start for the year.
Kurt Gustafson, who is staying
at the Gittings’, left to visit his
folks in Minnesota Thursday after-
noon over the long weekend.
George Gittings helped Roseths
work cattle in Kadoka Thursday
and Friday.
Friday was cool and windy in the
morning. Bill and I made a trip to
Rapid for my eye appointment and
20/20 was a good report. My old
glasses are working fine, so things
are good. It looked like a rain-out
for car races and if not, it would be
cold so we picked up a new fishing
pole and some fake bait and hur-
ried for home, loaded the cat and
supplies in the motorhome and
headed to Big Bend Dam by Ft.
Thompson and set up camp in the
Corps of Engineers campground.
We discovered one slide wouldn’t
come out, but could live with it that
way, so we checked out where fish-
ing would be the best and Bill
tested the water, then went for
supper and finished the evening
watching TV.
MIDLAND TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH IS CELEBRATING ITS
“100 YEARS OF BELIEVING”
ANNIVERSARY, JUNE 1, 2013.
CHURCH SERVICE / PROGRAM,
9 A.M. MST. A POTLUCK MEAL
AND FELLOWSHIP WILL FOL-
LOW (MEAT & DRINKS WILL
BE FURNISHED).
Tony Harty was at the truck stop
when some folks needed help get-
ting their car started Friday. He
helped as much as possible then
had supper out.
Thursday, Don and Vi Moody
visited the Philip and Kadoka
cemeteries. Tony Harty met them
Friday afternoon at the Sumpter’s
to check out a few measurements
on the trailer for the Philip parade,
which is just around the corner on
the 15th of June. They wanted to
be sure all the “older folks” in the
class could get on board without
needing ramps or hoists. Vi visited
Nancy Ekstrum about a few details
for their reunion. They called
Nancy Gaylord to check with her
about weather around Branford
and New Haven, Conn., and other
areas including the tornado disas-
ter in Oklahoma near where Don's
brothers and family live. Donations
were sent to their area and Lexi,
Jim Moody's granddaughter, was
in charge of donations and contri-
butions doing her volunteer fund
raising drive to include the Ameri-
can Red Cross as well as local char-
ities with food, clothing, etc. after
the Moore, Okla., tornado disaster.
George and Sandee Gittings met
Jessica and Kelsey Gittings in
town Friday evening and had sup-
per. George and Sandee were
among the many who wished Hugh
Harty the best in his retirement.
Friday, Ralph and Cathy Fiedler
drove to Philip. They had lunch at
the café with Diana Stewart then
went to the nursing home to visit
Cathy’s mom, Katy Drageset, for
the afternoon. It was such a beau-
tiful afternoon so they sat out front.
Eileen Fitzgerald, Cathy’s aunt,
stopped by to see Katy, who is feel-
ing a little better. Later in the af-
ternoon, Ralph and Cathy ended
their visit and then stopped by the
Stewart’s to see them a minute be-
fore heading for Sturgis.
A really surprising visit Satur-
day morning as Don and Vi Moody
were getting ready to leave for
their home in Rapid Valley to
spend the Memorial Day weekend
was Philip and Irene Hansen who
used to live at Lampert ranch and
worked for Vi's parents, Bob and
Shirley. Philip and Irene wanted to
see all the changes and to visit
briefly since it had been many
years since they lived there. Vi es-
timates about 1957 or so. Vi said
that even though lots of kidding
was taking place during their visit,
she absolutely will not reveal
Philip's nickname which was play-
fully given to him by a couple of
young girls. That would have been
Vi and her little friend at that time,
Raynae Brooks, who rode horses to-
gether and "played cowhands" at
the ranch. Probably, and knowing
these two, more mischief than you
can imagine! A lot of girls rode
horseback at the ranch with Vi
during the years. Lots of pictures
and lots of fun! Philip especially
was one who could relate a lot. He
liked to pull Raynae's long braided
hair – he sure laughed about all
that! Don and Vi went on to spend
the weekend and did lots of shop-
ping and stayed in Rapid City all
weekend, not venturing into the
Black Hills. The lawns are mowed
and beautifully landscaped with
lilacs and apple trees all flowered
and their aroma is awesome. Per-
fume is in the air! A new squirrel is
at the feeder – a female with little
ones it appears. Mama squirrel
acts like a mama anyway – Don
thinks. She's has a "bossy person-
ality and acts very rude to the boy
squirrels right now." Kind of like a
cow!
Kelsey and Jessica Gittings and
Daniel brought Daniel's bike out
Saturday afternoon so he could
show great Grandpa and Grandma
Gittings how he can ride it.
Saturday, Tony Harty picked up
his mail then checked in on the
Hairs and others by phone. Tony’s
nephew, Jim Herber, visited in the
afternoon on his way to the ranch
after being at the state track meet.
Saturday, Bill and I were looking
for a spot to test the water for fish-
ing and Bill got his pole all rigged
up and tested the area for a bit,
pretty windy so we went into Ft.
Thompson. Bill went back to the
motorhome and when I got there
the slide was out (and fixed) and he
had his driver’s chair tore apart fix-
ing it. I reminded him about in the
old days when if he tore something
apart, usually it went to the dump.
Times have changed and his per-
sistence and expertise pays off now.
We went out for supper in Lower
Brule, then to fish. Brother, on
both sides they were catching fish,
a big catfish on one side a small
mouth bass on the other. Bill got a
few nibbles, but nothing stayed on
the hook, then it got dark, the line
got tangled, and it was time to give
it up. (Didn’t want to clean fish
anyway, but that catfish we saw
would have probably made a good
meal.)
Sandee Gittings and grand-
daughters, Kelsey and Jessica Git-
tings, took Daniel Jordan to Wor-
thington, Minn., Sunday afternoon
so that he could spend some time
with his dad. Sandee got home at
3:00 a.m.
Cathy Fiedler reported 4.25” of
rain in the Sturgis area over the
week. The hills are so green. The
big draw below their house was
running water from all the heavy
rains. On the weekend, Ralph
Fiedler enjoyed working in the
yard. We’ll be missing news from
Fiedlers next week because they
are going on vacation. Have a fun
time you two.
Sunday after church, Tony Harty
had dinner out then visited at our
place in the afternoon.
Meanwhile, down on the Mis-
souri River the wind was up to
about gale force, so we pulled up
stakes and headed for home, arriv-
ing in time so Bill got to see the
biggest share of his car races. Phyl-
lis Word came by for a visit and
brought us some watermelon.
“How beautiful a day can be
when kindness touches it.” Daysies
Have a wonderful week.
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
Section B • Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 11 Community
Ever start making a recipe and
then realize you don’t have all the
ingredients? These substitutions
will work in a pinch.
Cream cheese can be replaced
with cottage cheese that has been
blended with a little butter.
1 c. sifted all purpose flour = 1 c.
minus 2 Tbsp. unsifted all purpose
flour
1 c. sifted cake flour = 1 c. minus
2 Tbsp. sifted all purpose flour
1 c. sifted self rising flour = 1 c.
sifted all purpose flour plus 1 1/2
tsp. baking powder and a pinch of
salt.
1 c. brown sugar = 1 c. granu-
lated sugar plus 2 Tbsp. molasses
1 c. granulated sugar = 3/4 c.
honey
1 c. granulated sugar = 1 3/4 c.
confectioners sugar; but, 1 c. con-
fectioners sugar = 1/2 c. plus 1
Tbsp. granulated sugar
1 c. yogurt can be substituted for
an equal amount of buttermilk,
sour cream, or sour milk.
To make sour milk add 1 Tbsp.
lemon juice or vinegar per 1 c.
milk, let stand 5 minutes before
using. This can also be used as a
replacement for buttermilk.
1 c. whole milk = 1/2 c. evapo-
rated milk plus 1/2 c. water.
1 pkg. active dry yeast = 2 1/4
tsp. or 1/2 compressed cake.
1 tsp. baking powder = 1/4 tsp.
baking soda plus 1/2 tsp. cream of
tartar plus 1/4 tsp. cornstarch
1 c. dark corn syrup = 3/4 c. light
corn syrup plus 1/4 c. light mo-
lasses
1 c. light corn syrup = 1 c. honey
1 c. honey = 3/4 c. maple syrup
(or light corn syrup) plus 1/2 c.
granulated sugar
1 oz. unsweetened chocolate = 3
Tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder
plus 1 Tbsp. butter
1 egg = 2 Tbsp. oil plus 1 tsp.
water, plus 1 tsp. vinegar or bak-
ing powder
3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup
4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup
16 tablespoons = 1 cup
1 cup = 1/2 pint
2 cups = 1 pint
2 pints = 1 quart
4 quarts = 1 gallon
16 ounces = 1 pound or 1 pint
,.
Baking Powder Biscuits
2 c. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
2 tsp. sugar
1/2 c. shortening
2/3 c. milk
Mix dry ingredients. Cut in
shortening until mixture resem-
bles coarse crumbles. Add milk all
at once. Stir in until almost all
flour is combined. Turn out on
floured surface, knead 3-5 times.
(The less you knead the more ten-
der and flakier your biscuits will
be.) Roll or pat out into rectangle.
Cut out biscuits with cutter or
drinking glass. Repeat as needed
until dough is used up. The last
one I just pat into a circle. Bake on
ungreased pan 15-20 minutes at
400 degrees.
,.
We encourage our readers to
share their items of interest. Just
email nancy@pioneer-review.com,
drop your item off at our office or
mail it to the Pioneer Review, PO
Box 788, Philip, SD 57567.
We pass ideas along, but make no
guarantees to the reader.
What a nice open house for
Theresa Clement’s 80th birthday
Saturday, May 25. A large crowd
was in attendance and cake and
punch was served and the theme
that was carried out for the day
was scrabble. If you got a plate
with a three-letter word on it, you
got a prize. I was a lucky winner
and had the word jag on my plate.
All seven of her children were
there and they got some nice pic-
tures taken throughout the day,
which will be a nice remembrance
for them in the future years. I got
to see Luke, Zane, Kenny and Erica
Clements who are cousins of mine.
I have not seen them for a while
and their kids are growing up so
quickly. Some of the neighbors
from out in this area who were
there were Herb and Hazel Sieler,
Myrna Gottsleben, and Marvin and
Phyllis Coleman. I’m sure there
were others who came after I left.
Marvin and Vicki Eide met Mary
Eide in town later that evening and
all went out to the cemetery to dec-
orate the graves and then had din-
ner downtown when finished.
I was sorry to hear that Rev.
Kathy Chesney of the United
Church had the misfortune to fall
and break several bones in her
hand. It sounds like it will take a
long time for it to heal. It came at
such a bad time for her as she just
finished her schooling to become an
ordained minister. An open house
will be held for her on June 2. Sure
hope she gets along well and keep
her in your prayers.
Friday, May 24, Marvin, Vicki
and Mary Eide and Rita Ramsey
attended the Bible school program
at the Hardingrove Evangelical
Free Church in Milesville as did
Jim and Betty Smith, all to watch
their grandchildren participate. A
very nice program was presented
and it was fun to see how much the
children enjoyed their own parts.
The kids could really sing out and
you could hear them very well. A
nice lunch was served after the pro-
gram.
This must be the year for broken
bones and falling. Mike Melvin was
helping clean up the tree branches
from the snowstorm in Sioux Falls
and he fell and broke his ankle. But
Judy reports that he is getting
along well and it is healing okay
the doctor reported. He just is not
to bear any weight on it for quite a
while. The Oldenberg family re-
union is in June, so hope he will be
able to attend. It just wouldn’t be
the same if they couldn’t come. We
would miss them and and also
Judy’s potato salad that is a fa-
vorite of the family. I always said
she makes the best potato salad of
anyone I know and there is a lot of
people who make good potato
salad.
Sunday, May 26, Rich Smith’s
girls, Barb Coy, Janet Lurz, and
Joyce and Ed Buchholz, came to
spend time with their dad over the
Memorial Day weekend. They
asked me to come over to Rich’s to
have lunch with them, so I did. We
had a delicious lunch of ham,
baked sweet potatoes, tossed salad,
relish tray, and a very good cake
that Janet had made for dessert.
The day was spent visiting and
talking about the days when we
were younger and some funny sto-
ries that had happened to our fam-
ily throughout the years. There
were also some stories of our old
neighbors and friends.
Kanon Lurz stopped in on her
way home from Pierre and spent
time to visit and see family. It was
nice to see her as I hadn’t seen her
since she left Philip. The day
passed quickly and they asked me
to stay and have supper with them
and we had delicious ham and bean
soup and corn bread. In our family,
there is several ways to eat this
meal, some like vinegar on their
beans, others prefer just salt and
pepper. They like their corn bread
with butter or butter and syrup.
Anyway, it was good. Afterward
there was more conversation and it
was near 9:00 p.m. when I got
home.
Barbara and her daughter,
Shannon, and Phyllis Ramsey and
daughter Michelle, plan on leaving
soon to go to New York on a trip
which all are anticipating will be
interesting and lots of fun. Barb
said that it was a mother and
daughter trip to spend some time
with their girls.
Barb went with Rich to decorate
the graves at Quinn and Philip
May 27 and to the Memorial Day
services there.
I don’t know when the Buch-
holzes planned to return home, as
Joyce said she had to get back to
work at the bridle shop they have
in Gillette. She said there are lots
of wedding coming up that they
have to get things ready for.
My what a storm we had Monday
night, May 27. My rain gauges both
had three inches in them. Other
neighbors got from 1.75” to 2”, but
here at the house it looked like I
was on an island, with nothing but
a sea of water all around me. I can’t
remember when I have ever seen
that much water at one time here.
Some little pea sized hail fell, but
not much of that and it would come
and go with showers on and off.
The dams are all going over the
spillways and the little creek that
runs through here is bank full.
What a beautiful rain, there must
have been lots of people who were
praying, because we sure received
an answer. I did hear that some
people east of us only received .25”,
so it never reached everyone.
Marvin said that he found a dead
cow that he thought lightning had
struck. It sure could have been, as
it was pretty sharp during the
storm. All I can say is what a bless-
ing. I have never seen such a pretty
green countryside in such a long
time. If the roads settle down, you
would probably enjoy a drive out to
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
see the beauty of the countryside in
all its splendid color.
***
It’s time for springs great talent
show’
Pull the curtain open wide.
There’s no charge for the ticket,
And the stage is all outside.
From the fence post comes a solo
By a lively bunch of birds.
And nearby a nest of chicks,
Determined to be heard
Pamila Love
WANTED: Individual Philip High School
Rodeo pictures of those students
participating in the Regional Rodeos
Please email to:
ads@pioneer-review.com
by Monday, June 3, at 9 a.m.
Legal NoticesDeadline: Fridays at Noon
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 12
Larson Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Smith to
approve the agenda. Motion carried unan-
imously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of the
March 19, 2013, meeting were previously
mailed to the Board for their review. Mo-
tion by Director Smith, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the March min-
utes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Casey Krog-
man - $55.41, Veryl Prokop - $55.41,
Lorne Smith - $55.41, West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS - $1,000.00, Kadoka Press -
$82.20, Lyman County Herald - $62.56,
Murdo Coyote - $76.89, Pennington
County Courant - $65.66, Pioneer Review
- $70.18, Todd County Tribune - $76.26,
United States Treasury - $110.16, Haakon
County Conservation District - $500.00
(previously approved). Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Smith to
approve the District bills. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT: The financial status of the District
to date was previously sent to the Board.
A copy of the March Financial Report is
on file at the District office in Murdo. Mo-
tion by Director Prokop, seconded by Di-
rector Smith to approve the March Finan-
cial Report. Motion carried unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his April report to the
Board. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Prokop to approve the
Manager’s Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:50 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_____________________________
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
Notice of
Public Hearing
ON APPLICATION FOR
MALT BEVERAGE/
SD FARM WINE LICENSE
Notice is hereby given that a public hear-
ing will be held before the Midland Town
Board at its regular meeting on Tuesday,
June 11, 2013, at 7:00 PM. This hearing
will be in the Town Hall for the application
of the retail malt beverage/SD farm wine
license for Just Tammy’s Bar & Grill.
JUST TAMMY’S BAR &
GRILL, TAMMY WILLIAMS,
Located Lots 11 & 12 of Block
11
Any interested person may appear and
will be given an opportunity to be heard
either for or against the above listed ap-
plicant.
Michelle Meinzer
City Finance Officer
[Published May 30, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $12.27]
Proceedings of
West River Water
Development District
April 12, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Of-
fice in Murdo, SD. Vice-Chairman Casey
Krogman called the meeting to order at
10:43 a.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Vice-Chairman
Krogman declared a quorum was pres-
ent. Directors present were: Casey Krog-
man, Veryl Prokop and Lorne Smith. Ab-
sent: Joseph Hieb and Marion Matt. Also
present: Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Kati
Venard, Sec./ Bookkeeper; Dave Larson,
ATTEST:
_____________________________
Kati Venard, Recording Secretary
[Published May 30, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $28.59]
SUMMONS BY
PUBLICATION -
QUIET TITLE
SDCL 21-4 1-7
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FILE NO. 27 CIV. 13-6
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
ROBERT E. IVERSON, )
Plaintiff )
)
vs. )
)
DEVISEES, SUCCESSORS, )
ASSIGNS, ADMINISTRATORS, )
EXECUTORS, AND/OR PERSONAL )
REPRESENTATIVES OF THE )
ESTATES OR PERSONS OF )
JOHN E. ANDERSON, HULDA M. )
VENDEL, ELLEN M. SWANSON, )
EMMA C. SKORHEIM, CARL 0. )
ANDERSON, MAYBELLE SCHLUP, )
INEZ V. IVERSON, MILDRED )
PARKIN, EDNA BRITISON, )
KENNETH VENDEL, VERNON )
VENDEL, JOHN VENDEL, )
DELORES BRITISON, SUSIE )
VENDEL, TOM VENDEL, DOUG )
VENDEL, JANE VENDEL, KATHY )
VENDEL, JOHN VENDEL, BETTY )
VENDEL, MIKE VENDEL, BEVERLY )
JACKSON, PEARL BENSON, )
RAYMOND SKORHEIM, VERNA )
ESTES, MILDRED BAKER, )
DARRELL PARKIN, DUANE PARKIN, )
GENE PARKIN, ALL DECEASED )
PERSONS AND TO ALL OTHER )
PERSONS UNKNOWN CLAIMING )
ANY RIGHT, TITLE, INTEREST, LIEN, )
ESTATE, ENCUMBRANCE OR )
CLAIM OR CLOUD UPON TITLE TO )
THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN )
THIS COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO )
THE OWNERSHIP OF THE )
PLAINTIFF, )
Defendants. )
THE STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-
NAMED DEFENDANTS, JOHN E. AN-
DERSON, HULDA M. VENDEL, ELLEN
M. SWANSON, EMMA C. SKORHEIM,
CARL 0 . ANDERSON, MAYBELLE
SCHLUP, INEZ V. IVERSON, MILDRED
PARKIN, EDNA BRITISON, KENNETH
VENDEL, VERNON VENDEL, JOHN
VENDEL, DELORES BRITISON, SUSIE
VENDEL, TOM VENDEL, DOUG
VENDEL, JANE VENDEL, KATHY
VENDEL, JOHN VENDEL, BETTY
VENDEL, MIKE VENDEL, BEVERLY
JACKSON, PEARL BENSON, RAY-
MOND SKORHEIM, VERNA ESTES,
MILDRED BAKER, DARRELL PARKIN,
DUANE PARKIN, GENE PARKIN, ALL
DECEASED PERSONS AND TO ALL
OTHER PERSONS
UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT,
TITLE, INTEREST, LIEN, ESTATE,
ENCUMBRANCE OR CLAIM OR
CLOUD UPON TITLE TO THE PROP-
ERTY DESCRIBED IN THIS COM-
PLAINT ADVERSE TO THE OWNER-
SHIP OF THE PLAINTIFF:
You are hereby summoned and required
to answer the Complaint of the Plaintiff
which was filed in the office of the Clerk
of this Court at Philip, in Haakon County,
South Dakota on the 24th day of April,
2013, and which prays for a judgment
quieting the title to and the determination
of all adverse claims against the prem-
ises described in the Complaint, (or
which
prays for a judgment determining all in-
terests in and lien against the premises
described in the Complaint as the case
may be), situate in said County, to-wit:
The Northeast Quarter of Sec-
tion 18, Township 2 North,
Range 18 East of the Black
Hills Meridian, Haakon
County, South Dakota
and to serve a copy of your answer to
said Complaint on the undersigned at
their office in Rapid City, South Dakota
within thirty (30) days from May 30,2013,
exclusive of such date; and if you fail to
answer said Complaint within that time,
the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
DATED this 21st day of May, 2013.
WILSON, OLSON & NASH, P.C.
/s/Erika S. Olson
By James W. Olson
Erika S. Olson
Attorney for Plaintiff
2640 Jackson Blvd.
P.O. Box 1552
Rapid City, SD 57709
(605) 342-7090
[Published May 30, June 6, 13 & 20,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$203.75]
ATTENTION TAXPAyERS:
NOTICE OF PROPERTy TAX INCREASE
OF $15,000.00
RESOLuTION FOR OPT OuT
THE GOVERNING BOARD OF THE MIDLAND COMMUNITY FIRE
PROTECTION DISTRICT do state that the above board is unable
to operate under the tax limitation measure currently in statute. We
therefore OPT OUT of such tax limitation in the amount of
$15,000.00 starting with the calendar year 2013 taxes payable in
2014. This opt out will be for three years, which will be through taxes
payable in the calendar year 2016. This action has been taken by
the board and approved by at least two-thirds vote of the board.
This decision may be referred to a vote of the people upon a petition
signed by at least five percent of the registered voters in the district
and filed with the governing body within twenty days of the first pub-
lication of this decision.
Unless this action is referred to a vote of the people and reversed
by such vote, this resolution authorizes the county auditor to spread
an excess levy to raise tax dollars in the above stated amount.
Signed Randy Nemec Board Chairman
James Van Tassel Board Member
Sandra Heaton Board Member
Dustin Vollmer Board Member
Steve Daly Board Member
Fred Foland Board Member
Kory M. Bierle Board Member
[Published May 23 & 30, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $273.60]
CITy OF PHILIP RESIDENTS
PuBLIC REMINDER PROPERTy MAINTENANCE
e City of Philip requests that all residents please consider this as a courtesy notice to all property owners of real property
within the City limits of the City of Philip, South Dakota.
Property owners of all real property within the City limits are required by City Ordinances #15-401 to mow and maintain
lawns and to control noxious weeds upon said real property. Any grasses and/or weeds growing to a height of 12 inches or
more upon any real property are considered a public nuisance and are in violation of said City Ordinance.
e City Council strongly encourages all property owners of any real property within the City, occupied or non-occupied,
to comply with City Ordinances.
We thank you in advance for your cooperation in maintaining your properties and improving the appearance of our com-
munity.
2012 CONSUMER
CONFIDENCE REPORT
A WATER QUALITY REPORT FOR
THE WATER USERS OF PHILIP
MUNICIPAL WATER SYSTEM
We serve more than 779 customers an
average of 136,000 gallons of water per
day. Our water is surface water that
comes from the Missouri River that we
purchase from West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water. The state has performed an
assessment of our source water and they
have determined that the relative suscep-
tibility for the City of Philip public water
supply system is low. For more informa-
tion about your water and information on
opportunities to participate in public meet-
ings, call (605) 859-2175, and ask for
Brian Pearson.
The sources of drinking water (both tap
water and bottled water) include rivers,
lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs,
springs, and wells. As water travels over
the surface of the land or through the
ground, it dissolves naturally occurring
minerals, and can pick up substances re-
sulting from the presence of animals or
from human activity.
Our city council meets the first Monday
of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Haakon
County Courthouse Community Room.
Please feel free to participate in these
meetings.
Contaminants that may be present in
source water before we treat it may in-
clude:
MICROBIAL contaminants, such as
viruses and bacteria, which may come
from sewage, septic tank systems, agri-
culture livestock operations and wildlife.
INORGANIC contaminants, such as
salts and metals which can be naturally
occurring, or the result of highway storm
water runoff, industrial or domestic waste
discharges, or farming.
PESTICIDES and herbicides, which
may come from a variety of sources, such
as agriculture, urban storm water runoff,
and residential uses.
RADIOACTIVE contaminants, which
are naturally occurring or can be the re-
sult of oil and gas production and mining
activities.
ORGANIC CHEMICAL contaminants
including synthetic and volatile organic
chemicals, which are by-products of in-
dustrial processes and petroleum produc-
tion, and can also come from gas sta-
tions, urban storm water runoff, and sep-
tic systems.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe
to drink, EPA prescribes regulations
which limit the amount of certain contam-
inants in water provided by public water
systems. FDA regulations establish limits
for contaminants in bottled water which
must provide the same protection for pub-
lic health.
Drinking water, including bottle water,
may reasonably be expected to contain at
least small amounts of some contami-
nants. The presence of contaminants
does not necessarily indicate that water
poses a health risk. More information
about contaminants and potential health
effects can be obtained by calling the
EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-
426-4791).
Some people may be more vulnerable
to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compro-
mised persons such as persons with can-
cer, undergoing chemotherapy, persons
who have undergone organ transplants,
people with HIV/AIDS or other immune
system disorders, some elderly and in-
fants can be particularly at risk from infec-
tions. These people should seek advice
about drinking water from their health
care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on
appropriate means to lessen the risk of in-
fection by Cryptosporidium and other mi-
crobial contaminants can be obtained by
calling the EPA Safe Drinking Water Hot-
line (800-426-4791).
If present, elevated levels of lead can
cause serious health problems, especially
for pregnant women and young children.
Lead in drinking water is primarily from
materials and components associated
with service lines and home plumbing.
The City of Philip public water supply sys-
tem is responsible for providing high qual-
ity drinking water, but cannot control the
variety of materials used in plumbing
components. When your water has been
sitting for several hours, you can mini-
mize the potential for lead exposure by
flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 min-
utes before using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned about lead
in your water, you may wish to have your
water tested. Information on lead in drink-
ing water, testing methods and steps you
can take to minimize exposure is avail-
able from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline
or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead
Detected Contaminants
The below table lists all the drinking
water contaminants that we detected dur-
ing the 2012 calendar year. The presence
of these contaminants in the water does
not necessarily indicate that the water
poses a health risk. Unless otherwise
noted, the data presented in this table is
from testing done January 1 – December
31, 2012. The state requires us to monitor
for certain contaminants less than once
per year because the concentrations of
these contaminants are not expected to
vary significantly from year to year. Some
of the data, though representative of the
water quality, is more than one year old.
Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL)
The highest level of a contaminant that
is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set
as close to the MCLGs as feasible using
the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal
(MCLG)
The level of a contaminant in drinking
water below which there is no known or
expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for
a margin of safety.
Treatment Technique (TT)
A required process intended to reduce
the level of a contaminant in drinking
water.
Action Level (AL)
The concentration of a contaminant
which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or
other requirements which a water system
must follow.
TEST RESULTS FOR THE WATER FROM WEST RIVER/LYMAN-JONES:
Regulated Contaminants
Substance Highest Date Highest Ideal Major Source of Contaminant
Level Last Level Goal Substance
Detected Tested Allowed
(MCL) (MCLG)
Fluoride 1.05 04/11/12 4 4 ppm Erosion of natural deposits; water additive
which promotes strong teeth; discharge
from fertilizer and aluminum factories
Philip Test Results
Copper 0.3 08/23/11 AL=1.3 0 ppm Corrosion of household plumbing systems;
leaching from wood preservatives
Lead 2 08/23/11 AL=15 0 ppb Corrosion of household plumbing; erosion
of natural deposits
Philip is served water from the Missouri River, which is relatively free from contaminants.
For further information, please contact Jake Fitzgerald at WR/LJ Rural Water, PO Box 407, Murdo, SD 57559, call 605-669-2931 or
toll-free 1-800-851-2349; or Mike Vetter at WR/LJ Rural Water, PO Box 144, Philip, SD 57567, call 605-859-2829 or toll-free 1-800-
859-6173.
[Published May 30 & June 6, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $178.28]
For all your
concrete
construction
needs:
Gibson
CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
859-3100
Philip, SD
ing yourself for greater success.
The result of this commitment to
greater focus will be greater produc-
tivity, and a healthier sense of sat-
isfaction for a job well done. What a
great way to maximize your life.
Seeing isn’t alway believing ....
Old beliefs, as well as old habits,
die hard. For centuries people be-
lieved Aristotle's opinion that the
heavier an object, the faster it
would fall to earth.
I am not an engineer, but accord-
ing to a report I read, in 1589
Galileo challenged Aristotle's teach-
ing. He invited learned professors
to the base of the Leaning Tower of
Pisa. Galileo went to the top of the
tower and at exactly the same mo-
ment pushed off a ten-pound and a
one-pound weight.
Both landed at the same instant,
but the professors still wouldn’t be-
lieve what they saw. They insisted
Aristotle was right.
To move ahead in life and to
grow – intellectually, emotionally
and spiritually – it is important
that we examine all our beliefs, test
them, hold to the true and discard
the false. Admittedly, this is much
easier said than done, but done it
must be if we are to keep learning
and growing. Unless we are open
and willing to change when neces-
sary, we get stuck in our ways and
cease to grow.
Greater focus maximizes life
In the past, I have prided myself
in being able to get several things
done simultaneously and always
thinking that I was being so produc-
tive. Trust me, multitasking is not
always such a great idea.
If ever you find yourself kind of
scattered, messy, unorganized and
spinning a number of plates with
some of them crashing to the floor
around you, this may be a clue that
you are requiring greater focus.
I remember in my youth taking a
magnifying glass outside and hold-
ing it just right so that the focused
rays of the sun would quickly burn
whatever I would hold it above.
Those focused rays of the sun could
get hot pretty fast. This is a great
example of focused energy.
I also remember getting eye-
glasses for the very first time and
how things looked so much different
when I put them on. What a sur-
prise that the world around me
came into such magnificent focus
with everything being so crisp and
clear. I like things in focus. I do not
like fuzziness.
This week concentrate your ener-
gies, your ideas, your thoughts, and
your focus on a specific project for a
specific period of time. Right now,
see yourself digging into any of your
key projects a little deeper for an
extended period of time. Invest
more time in planning and organiz-
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for more details at 605-450-1955 and
be sure to check out Bob’s website at: www.mrattitudespeaks.com
Classifieds • 859-2516
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 13
LEGAL SERVICES – Associated
School Boards of South Dakota
(ASBSD) seeks a person to serve
as Director to handle legal and
policy services. Qualifications –
Law Degree. Experience in educa-
tion, public policy, adjudication of
worker’s compensation claims,
public sector labor laws, human
relations and health insurance is
preferred. Application deadline,
Noon, June 14, 2013. Contact
Katie at: Katie@asbsd.org, 605-
773-2502, or ASBSD, PO Box
1059, Pierre, SD 57501 for com-
plete application materials or
h t t p : / / w w w . a s b s d . o r g /
page190.aspx Salary and benefits
competitive. An equal opportunity
employer.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online
www.sdwork.org. #construction-
jobspaybetter.
SMART SALES AND LEASE seeks
bookkeeper. Work from home.
Hourly wage based on experience.
M-F 8-4, Degree / management
experience a plus. Resume, ques-
tions: careers@ smartsalesan-
dlease.com.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL
has full time Occupational Thera-
pist, RN and LPN or Medical Assis-
tant opportunities available. We
are located in the beautiful south-
ern Black Hills of SD - just a short
distance from Mount Rushmore,
Wind Cave National Park, Custer
State Park, Jewel Cave National
Park and many other outdoor at-
tractions. Call 605-673-2229 ext.
110 for more information or go to
www.regionalhealth.com to apply.
EOE.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online
www.sdwork.org. #construction-
jobspaybetter.
FINANCE OFFICER: FAULKTON,
full time, accounting experience
necessary. Responsible for city ac-
counting system: budget, reports,
payroll. Salary DOE, qualifica-
tions. Information contact City of
Faulkton, 605-598-6515, EOE.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5 6 5 0 ,
www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide Clas-
sifieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this
newspaper, 605-859-2516, or
800-658-3697 for details.
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT Listings, sorted by rent, lo-
cation and other options. www.sd-
housingsearch.com South Dakota
Housing Development Authority.
WANTED
WANTED: HUNTING LAND for
Pheasant, quality Mule Deer 170”
class+, Whitetail Deer 150” class+
and Merrium Turkey. Call 605-
448-8064.
* * * * * * *
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2004 Pontiac Grand
Prix GT, gray with gray interior,
107,300 miles, looks and runs
great. $7,000 is the asking price,
but I will consider reasonable of-
fers. Call Keith at 454-3426 or
859-2039 for information or any
questions. PR22-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
SERVICE: Need a plumber? Li-
censed plumbing contractor for
all your indoor plumbing and
outdoor water and sewer jobs
call 441-1053 or leave a mes-
sage at 837-0112. K22-4tc
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: Yearling Angus
Bulls. All A.I. sired. Call Jim
Cantrell at 685-8961 or 859-
2144 for more information.
PR40-4tc
FOR SALE: Double 9 Rowse
mower, IH heads, PTO driven,
cut less than 100 acres,
$17,500. Call 386-3585.
P25-3tp
WANTED: Pasture for 40-45
cow/calf pairs. Call 441-0284,
please leave message. PR39-3tp
WANTED: Looking for pasture
for 30-100 cattle starting June
2013 and beyond. Tracy Strand,
682-9304. P24-4tp
WANTED: Summer pasture for
40-500 cow-calf pairs. Phone
859-2889. P17-9tp
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. WP35-8tc
PUREBRED BLACK ANGUS
BULLS FOR SALE: Private
Treaty. Bloodlines include In
Focus, Bando, Black Coat,
Frontline, Fast Money. Some
suitable for heifers. Not overfed.
Call Mike Harris, morning, at
685-1053. P19-tfn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease whole
ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or 859-
2059 (home). P7-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GARAGE SALES
CRAZY DAYS & CITY-WIDE
GARAGE SALES: Martin, SD.
Friday, May 31. Get your map of
bargains from any Chamber
business. P24-2tc
HELP WANTED
OFFICE POSITION: The posi-
tion requires the ability to effec-
tively coordinate available re-
sources and prioritize multiple
projects and meet deadlines,
communicate with others, both
orally and in writing, and main-
tain accurate records. Working
knowledge of Microsoft Word,
Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint
is required along with excellent
mathematical skills and ability
to read and write legal descrip-
tions. Duties will include lifting,
sorting, cataloging and filing of
documents, and other general
office duties as required. Must
be able to learn and use propri-
etary software. Must have or be
able to obtain a valid South
Dakota driver’s license. Position
will be located at Murdo, S.D. An
application form may be com-
pleted online at www.wce. coop
or sent to Steve Reed, CEO, West
Central Electric Cooperative,
P.O. Box 17, Murdo, SD 57559.
Email steve. reed@wce.coop
EOE. Applications will be ac-
cepted until position is filled.
PR40-2tc
BUS DRI VER POSI TI ON:
Kadoka Area School is accepting
applications for a bus driver on
the Long Valley bus route. Appli-
cations may be obtained from
the school or on the school dis-
trict’s website; kadoka.k12.
sd.us. Please feel free to contact
the school with further ques-
tions about this position. Com-
pleted applications may be
dropped off at the school or sent
to: Kadoka Area School 35-2,
Attn: Jamie Hermann, PO Box
99, Kadoka, SD 57543, 837-
2175 ext. 100. K25-2tc
CEDAR PASS LODGE, IN THE
SCENIC BADLANDS NAT’L
PARK has immediate openings
for the reservations/front desk
position. We are looking for out-
going, hardworking staff for this
position. Customer service is a
priority, phone and computer
experience is helpful and ability
to work in a friendly and fast-
paced environment is an asset.
We can teach you the rest!
Hourly wages paid for all hours
worked. Weekly optional meal
package, retail discount, activi-
ties, opportunity to make new
acquaintances from all over the
world. Download application at
cedarpasslodge.com or call
Sharon Bies at 433-5562.
P25-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Department
Worker. Experience in road /
bridge construction / mainte-
nance preferred. CDL Pre-em-
ployment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications
/ resumés accepted. Informa-
tion, 837-2410 or 837-2422;
Fax: 837-2447. K25-4tc
POSITIONS OPEN FOR 2013-
14 SCHOOL YEAR: Head &
Asst. Boys’ Basketball Coaches
at the Haakon School District,
Philip. Call Athletic Director
Mike Baer, 859-2680, for more
information. Haakon School
Dist. 27-1 is an Equal Opportu-
nity Employer. P25-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County is accepting applications
for full time Deputy Director of
Equalization. Selected applicant
may be required to become cer-
tified as per SDCL. Must work
well with the public, and have
clerical and computer skills.
Jackson County benefits include
health insurance, life insurance,
S.D. Retirement, paid holidays,
vacation and sick leave. Position
open until filled. Beginning wage
$9.00 per hour. Applications are
available at the Jackson County
Auditor’s office or send resume
to Jackson County, PO Box 280,
Kadoka, SD 57543. Ph: 837-
2422.
K24-4tc
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax re-
sumé to 279-2314.
PW24-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Department
Worker. Experience in road/
bridge construction / mainte-
nance preferred. CDL Pre-em-
ployment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications
/ resumes accepted. Informa-
tion: 837-2410 or 837-2422;
Fax: 837-2447. K24-4tc
HELP WANTED: Housekeepers,
Cashiers and Grounds keep-
ers/Maintenance. Apply in per-
son to Tammy at Frontier Cab-
ins Motel in Wall. PW23-3tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employment
spraying county highway right of
way. Commercial herbicide li-
cense required or to be obtained
before start of work. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Applications / re-
sumés accepted. Information,
837-2410 or 837-2422, fax:
837-2447. K25-4tc
DAKOTA MILL & GRAIN, INC.
is looking for a full-time person
to add to our team. Job respon-
sibilities include truck driving
(Class A CDL a plus or willing to
obtain one), hay grinding, ware-
house loading/unloading, fertil-
izer spreading, grain operations,
and various other tasks to take
care of our customers. Wage
DOE. Benefits included. EOE.
Stop at one of our locations to
pick up an application or call
Jack at 381-0031. WP37-4tc
MISC. FOR SALE
53' TRAILER FOR SALE: Excel-
lent storage trailer or over-the-
road trailer, $3,950 FIRM. call
279-2619. PW23-3tc
FOR SALE: 6500 watt Titan In-
dustrial generator, electric start
with pull start, 8 hp. diesel en-
gine, (2) 110v plug-ins, 1-RV
plug, 1-220 plug, new Interstate
battery, cover. 280-0351.
P20-tfn
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
ACCEPTING BIDS: Kadoka Area
School District 35-2 is accepting
bids to provide the school lunch
program at the Midland School.
The bid will include ordering,
preparing, serving, and clean up
after lunch each and every day
school is in session. Student
milk and free commodities will
be available to the successful
bidder and these fluctuate on a
monthly basis. Please submit
bids on a per plate basis to:
Kadoka Area School 35-2, Attn:
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543, 837-2175
ext. 100. Application deadline is
June 10, 2013. The Kadoka Area
School District reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all
bids. K25-2tc
PHILIP HIGH SCHOOL CLASS
OF 1963: 50th Reunion, June
15, 5:00 p.m., Lake Waggoner
Golf Course clubhouse. P23-4tp
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: (7) city blocks in
Kadoka, horses and calves al-
lowed, an outdoor arena with
two roping chutes, three corrals,
a pasture, two out buildings, two
car garage with a built in work-
shop, one storage shed, very
large yard, three bedroom, two
baths, large kitchen and large
living room trailer house sur-
rounded by trees. Call 488-
0022. K23-4tc
RECREATION
FOR SALE: 2004 Honda Fore-
man Rubicon 4WD 4-wheeler,
new tires, new plastic, with
windshield. 280-0351. P20-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: 1,600 sq. ft. space
for rent which includes 2 offices,
1 meeting room, large front
room. Utilites included in rent.
Main Street Plaza on Main Street
in Kadoka. Call Richard, 431-
2226, or Colleen, 431-6485.
K25-2tc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge will
be added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
THANK YOUS
I would like to thank everyone
for celebrating my 80th birthday
with me. Thank you to my family
and friends for the gifts and flow-
ers.
Also, thank you everyone for
the calls, cards, flowers and vis-
its during my recovery after hip
surgery.
I am very blessed to live in
such a loving community.
Ann Moses
We would like to thank every-
one who sent a card for our 40th
anniversary. What a special time
it was for us hearing from so
many wonderful people! May
God bless all of you as He’s truly
blessed us these last 40 years.
Mark & Glenda Nemec
Choice! Options from ALL major
service providers. Call us to learn
more! CALL Today. 888-337-5453.
HIGHSPEED INTERNET every-
where By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-
up.) Starting at $49.95/ mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST! 1-888-518-
8672.
EMPLOYMENT
BRITTON-HECLA SCHOOL, K-12
SP ED teacher. Closes 6/5/13.
Kevin Coles, PO Box 190, Britton,
SD 57430; kevin.coles@k12.sd.us,
605-448-2234.
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
CAREER! 3 Week Hands-On
Training School. Bulldozers, Back-
hoes, Excavators. National Certifi-
cations. Lifetime Job Placement
Assisance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-
866-362-6497.
BUILDING TRADES INSTRUCTOR
opening for 9TH – 12TH grade pro-
gram in Northwest South Dakota.
Competitive wage, excellent bene-
fits, car provided. For more infor-
mation contact Cris Owens,
Northwest Area Schools, 605-466-
2206 or Christine.Owens@
k12.sd.us.
LARGE COOPERATIVE SEEKS In-
formation Systems Manager to
manage company computer net-
work. Degree is required with net-
work administration experience.
For more information contact
Gene Lueb CHS at
gene.lueb@chsinc.com.
ALEXANDER, ND, SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT is seeking 1 elementary
teacher, 1 Pre-School teacher, and
a Title 1 Teacher. Send a letter of
application and resume with refer-
ences: Alexander Public School,
Lynn Sims, PO Box 66, Alexander,
ND 58831, or lynn.sims@
sendit.nodak.edu. EOE.
ACE READY MIX - is looking for
Ready Mix truck drivers. Compet-
itive wages and benefits. Stop by
the corner of Rice Street & N
Bahnson Ave, Sioux Falls, or call
605-338-0405 www.ac-
ereadymix.com. EEO/ AA.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online
www.sdwork.org. #construction-
jobspaybetter.
MYRL & ROY’S PAVING now hiring
CDL drivers. Competitive wages
and benefits. Stop by the corner of
Rice and N Bahnson Ave, Sioux
Falls, or call 605-334-3204
www.myrlandroyspaving.com.
Women and minorities encouraged
to apply. EEO/AA.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is taking applications for
full- time Douglas County High-
way Superintendent. Must have
valid Class A Driver’s License. Ex-
perience in road / bridge con-
struction / maintenance. For ap-
plication contact: Douglas County
Auditor (605) 724-2423.
DIRECTOR OF POLICY AND
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
HIGH-PROFIT PET GROOMING
BUSINESS - Aberdeen, SD. Want
to own your own business? Well-
established 38-year pet grooming
business for sale. Owner retiring.
Begin making $$ on your first day.
Training with some financing
available. Serious inquiries only.
605-225-5726.
CABLE/SATELLITE/INTERNET
DISH NETWORK. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
SAVE ON CABLE TV-Internet-Dig-
ital Phone-Satellite. You`ve Got A
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Classified
Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 min-
imum for first 20 words; 10¢ per
word thereafter; included in the
Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The
Pennington Co. Courant, as well
as on our website: www.pioneer-
review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems,
Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum
for first 20 words; 10¢ per word
thereafter. Each name and initial
must be counted separately. In-
cluded in the Pioneer Review and
the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
minimum for first 20 words; 10¢
per word thereafter. Each name
and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Printed only in the Pio-
neer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for
bookkeeping and billing on all
charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per
column inch, included in the Pi-
oneer Review and the Profit.
$5.55 per column inch for the Pi-
oneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which
makes it illegal to advertise “any preference,
or discrimination on race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation, or
discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is a vi-
olation of the law. Our readers are informed
that all dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal opportunity
basis.
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDS CÞevg 1mpo1o LS
Vb Auto, Kc¸ícss Ent¡¸
CD ¡íu¸c¡ und no¡c!
Blg, 8tout Yearllng Angus Bulls
F0R 8ALE
· Iebruary & March Year|ìng Angus ßu||s
· Most|y ca|vìng ease bu||s
· 5emen checked & ready to go!
Bulls located 3 mlles SL
of 0owntown Rapld 0lty
0ontact· 0an (605) 39l-7090
1amle (605) 39l-6399
Rapid City
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. PAIRS: 12 P.M. (MT}. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
DISPERSIONS OF PAIRS:
JOSH HEDRICKS - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 140 DLK 3 YF OLD
TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS (DLK CLVS}
LORENCE EDOFF - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 100 HEFF & DWF 3
YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS
YOUNG PAIRS:
PAUL SCHNOSE - 30 HOME FAISED DLK 4 TO 6 YF OLDS PAIFS (LATE
APF & MAY CLVS}
LYNN SMITH - 20 DLK & DWF 3 TO 10 YF OLD PAIFS (DLK CLVS}
SOLID & BROKEN MOUTH PAIRS:
MORRIS JONES RANCH - 53 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED SOLID TO DFO-
KEN MOUTH PAIFS
REX GILLES - 35 DLK & DWF 8 TO 10 YF OLD PAIFS (DLK CLVS}
MICKEY DALY - 10 DLK MIXED ACE PAIFS (DIC DLK CLVS}
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL PAIF & FALL CALVINC DFED COW SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|-
f|ed NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: MAY 2S, 2DJS
B1g run o] po1rs ond ue1gÞ-up oo111e. Po1r morKe1
respnded reo1 ue11 1o 1Þe mo1s1ure ooross 1Þe
oreo. Lo1s o] bugers on 1Þe po1rs. We1gÞ-ups
s1eodg.
PAIRS:
TJ GABRIEL - MIDLAND
18......................................DLK 3 YF OLD PAIFS 1305=.....$2,150.00
4 ...............DLK 5 YF OLD TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1475=.....$1,525.00
2..............................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1513=.....$1,400.00
KEN POPPE - WALL
19 ...............................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD PAIFS 1285=.....$1,860.00
16 ...............................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1351=.....$1,750.00
11 ...............................DLK SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1399=.....$1,540.00
20..............................DLK DOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1431=.....$1,430.00
A CONSIGNMENT -
14 ...............................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD PAIFS 1236=.....$1,840.00
6.......................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1498=.....$1,670.00
WILLIAM WELLER - KADOKA
25......................................DLK 3 YF OLD PAIFS 1222=.....$1,830.00
9........................................DLK 3 YF OLD PAIFS 1121=.....$1,650.00
DOUG THORSON - QUINN
10.....................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD PAIFS 1224=.....$1,770.00
30.....................DLK & DWF 4 & 5 YF OLD PAIFS 1325=.....$1,735.00
14 ..............................DWF SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1396=.....$1,450.00
BURJES FITCH - PHILIP
11....................DLK & DWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1482=.....$1,690.00
23 ....DLK & DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1502=.....$1,350.00
JACK WIESER - OWANKA
9.......................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD PAIFS 1131=.....$1,635.00
6 .................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1381=.....$1,550.00
13.....................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1447=.....$1,420.00
6....................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1400=.....$1,285.00
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE
16...DLK & DWF 5 YF OLD TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1575=.....$1,630.00
28..................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1506=.....$1,450.00
MARK & KRIS SAMMONS - MIDLAND
6...............FED 3 YF OLD TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1435=.....$1,525.00
6..............................FED DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1423=.....$1,390.00
PAUL SLOVEK - PHILIP
35 ...FED & DLK 3 YF OLD TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1380=.....$1,450.00
8 .......................FED DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1360=.....$1,235.00
SCHULTES RANCH LLC - HOWES
6.......................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD PAIFS 1291=.....$1,425.00
20.....................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1374=.....$1,360.00
WO WELLER - KADOKA
10................DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1481=.....$1,340.00
FEEDER CATTLE:
OWEN FERGUSON - LONG VALLEY
37................DLK & DWF STFS 561= .......$156.75
18................DLK & DWF HFFS 497= .......$145.25
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
40 ..........................DLK HFFS 681= .......$138.75
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
15...........................DLK STFS 669= .......$146.00
CARL & JUDY KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
5.............................DLK STFS 623= .......$146.00
18 ..........................DLK HFFS 628= .......$143.25
44 ...........................LH HFFS 607= .......$118.00
LORENCE & CLINT EDOFF - HERMOSA
21 ........................HEFF HFFS 547= .......$141.75
JEFF BARBER - ENNING
7 .................DLK & DWF HFFS 646= .......$142.50
SCOTT BOOMER - INTERIOR
4 ............................FED STFS 576= .......$153.50
WEIGH-UPS:
KELLY BLAIR - MILESVILLE
1 ............................DLK DULL 1835= .....$108.00
1 ............................DLK DULL 1940= .....$105.00
FUOSS ANGUS RANCH - DRAPER
1 ............................DLK DULL 1910= .....$107.50
1 ............................DLK DULL 1900= .....$105.50
KEN POPPE - WALL
1.............................DLK COW 1415= .......$83.00
1.............................DLK COW 1395= .......$80.00
FAUSKE & SONS - WALL
1.............................DLK COW 1400= .......$81.50
6.................DLK & DWF COWS 1190= .......$79.00
1.............................DLK COW 1210= .......$78.00
VERNON WARD - FRUITDALE
1...........................CHAF COW 1305= .......$81.50
LILLIAN CARLSON - KADOKA
1.............................DLK COW 1215= .......$81.00
2 ...........................DLK COWS 1238= .......$76.50
2 ..........................DLK HFFTS 993= .........$86.00
TRAVIS SHARP - INTERIOR
1.............................DLK COW 1155= .......$80.00
NORMAN GEIGLE - WALL
1 ............................DLK DULL 1940= .....$104.50
EARL BRUNSON - FAIRBURN
1 ............................DLK DULL 1855= .....$104.00
BRENDA WILSON - KYLE
1............................FED HFFT 785= .......$107.00
CRAIG ROBERTSON - CAPUTA
3.................DLK & DWF COWS 1170= .......$79.75
3.....................DLK COWETTES 913= .........$92.00
DAVE STOVER - OWANKA
1.............................DLK COW 1260= .......$79.50
HENRY BRUCH - STURGIS
14 .........................DLK COWS 1260= .......$79.25
1...........................CHAF COW 1105= .......$77.50
1.............................DLK COW 1285= .......$76.50
6.....................DLK COWETTES 903= .........$87.00
JERRY PATTERSON - KADOKA
1.............................DLK COW 1675= .......$78.50
1.............................DLK COW 1210= .......$76.50
4.....................DLK COWETTES 1011= .......$86.00
RUBY GABRIEL - CREIGHTON
1 ............................FWF COW 1465= .......$78.50
SHAYNE & SHAWN PORCH - WANBLEE
1.............................DLK COW 1330= .......$78.50
DALLIS BASEL - UNION CENTER
2...........................FED COWS 1320= .......$78.50
2...........................FED COWS 1275= .......$76.50
LEO & JOAN PATTON - MILESVILLE
1 ............................DLK DULL 1770= .....$104.00
1.......................DLK COWETTE 890= .........$91.00
PAT KEEGAN - WANBLEE
1 ..........................HEFF DULL 2000= .....$103.00
1 ..........................HEFF DULL 2250= .....$102.00
A CONSIGNMENT -
1............................DLK HFFT 845= .......$105.00
HEATH FREEMAN - OWANKA
1............................DLK HFFT 765= .......$103.00
CLAY & HOLLY SCHAACK - WALL
2 ..........................DLK HFFTS 895= .......$101.00
12.........................DLK HFFTS 1002= .......$94.50
1.............................DLK COW 1785= .......$75.00
DAVID KENNEDY - FAITH
5 ..........................DLK HFFTS 888= .......$100.00
FAIRBANKS RANCH - PHILIP
28 .........................DLK COWS 1252= .......$78.25
RHONDA ANTONSEN - WANBLEE
1 ............................FED COW 1320= .......$78.00
PATRICIA OLIC - SCENIC
17 .........................DLK COWS 1277= .......$78.00
BEN SHARP - INTERIOR
1.............................DLK COW 1265= .......$78.00
1 ..........................DLK HFFTS 840= .........$96.00
2 ..........................DLK HFFTS 995= .........$88.50
BOB AMIOTTE - WANBLEE
1.............................DLK COW 1215= .......$78.00
2...........................DWF COWS 1308= .......$77.50
H & K RANCH - WALL
1.............................DLK COW 1135= .......$78.00
DIANA PORCH - WANBLEE
8.................DLK & DWF COWS 1279= .......$77.75
DUSTIN REEVES - OWANKA
3.................DLK & DWF COWS 1108= .......$77.75
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
1 ............................FWF COW 1375= .......$77.50
1 ............................FWF COW 1395= .......$76.50
ROCKY WILLIAMS - PHILIP
2 ...........................DLK COWS 1250= .......$77.50
MARK & KRIS SAMMONS - MIDLAND
2...........................FED COWS 1135= .......$77.50
GENE MICHAEL - PHILIP
2 ...........................DLK COWS 1133= .......$77.50
CHRIS HOWIE - HERMOSA
4.............................DLK COW 1336= .......$77.25
DANA IVERSEN - FT PIERRE
1 ..........................CHAF DULL 2305= .....$102.00
JIM SCULL - RAPID CITY
1 ............................DLK DULL 1870= .....$101.00
SCOTT PHILLIPS - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.............................DLK COW 1545= .......$77.00
COY FISHER - SCENIC
2.................DLK & DWF COWS 1468= .......$77.00
TOM WARD - MARTIN
9.................DLK & DWF COWS 1317= .......$77.00
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
12 .........................DLK COWS 1293= .......$77.00
BRIAN & JENNIFER PHILIPSEN - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.............................DLK COW 1290= .......$77.00
RUDY ROTH - PHILIP
1 ............................DWF COW 1285= .......$77.00
2.................DLK & DWF COWS 1380= .......$76.50
BRADY CARMICHAEL - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.............................DLK COW 1195= .......$77.00
PAUL SCHNOSE - BUFFALO GAP
9 ...........................DLK COWS 1179= .......$77.00
KIETH SMITH - QUINN
1............................DLK HFFT 1000= .......$90.00
LINCOLN SMITH - QUINN
1............................DLK HFFT 960= .........$88.50
RAYMOND LONGBRAKE - HOWES
1.......................DLK COWETTE 1010= .......$90.00
KIM COE - VALE
2 ..........................DLK HFFTS 985= .........$90.00
LARRY FREEMAN - OWANKA
1............................DLK HFFT 910= .........$88.00
SCOTT EDOFF - HERMOSA
9 ..........DLK & DWF COWETTES 1052= .......$87.75
ROSS CUNY - BUFFALO GAP
2 ...........................DLK COWS 1500= .......$76.50
BRYAN OLIVIER - MILESVILLE
1.............................DLK COW 1425= .......$76.50
1.............................DLK COW 1320= .......$76.00
FLOYD GABRIEL EST - CREIGHTON
14...............FED & DLK COWS 1359= .......$76.50
3 ...........................DLK COWS 1142= .......$81.50
JASON HAMILL - MILESVILLE
5 ...........................DLK COWS 1330= .......$76.50
KENNETH & CAROLYN HELT2EL - MIDLAND
1.............................DLK COW 1190= .......$76.50
RICK KING & SONS - PHILIP
14...............DLK & DWF COWS 1379= .......$76.25
TATE THOMPSON - WANBLEE
1.............................DLK COW 1675= .......$76.00
MIKE & EVELYN HUNSAKER - KEYSTONE
1.............................DLK COW 1565= .......$76.00
KJERSTAD LIVESTOCK - QUINN
17 .........................DLK COWS 1460= .......$76.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
1.............................DLK COW 1290= .......$76.00
1............................DLK HFFT 910= .........$95.00
KNUTSON RANCH- QUINN
1............................FED HFFT 1120= .......$84.00
Thursday, May 30, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 14
www.RavellettePublications.com
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
~ Saturday, June 1 ~
Petite Filet Special
~ Monday, June 3 ~
1/2 lb. Cheeseburger
Basket
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
Salad B
ar A
vailable at
Lunch!
~ Tuesday, May 28 ~
Ribeye Special
~ Wednesday, May 29 ~
Indian Taco
or Taco Salad
~ Thursday, May 30 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, May 31 ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Chicken • Shrimp
Reservations:
859-2774
84 Years Ago
May 30, 1929
The largest crowd ever in atten-
dance at a commencement in Philip
assembled at the Gem Theatre last
Friday night to witness the gradu-
ation ceremonies of the class of
1929 of which there were thirty-
five members.
The hall was beautifully deco-
rated with the class colors of lilac
and green and with the class flow-
ers, lilacs, which have been bloom-
ing so profusely in Philip the last
two weeks. The very fitting motto,
“Finimus Coepturi” was used by
the class.
The commencement address was
delivered by South Dakota’s fa-
mous poet, Badger Clark, who gave
a splendid and inspirational talk
using for his theme, “Love.”
Local News – Mrs. Lucy Coyle
underwent a major operation at St.
Mary’s Hospital in Pierre.
Mrs. Maude Steen has pur-
chased a new Realistic permanent
waving machine and has secured
the services of an operator, Miss
Thompson of Pierre to assist her
with the work in Philip. She will
have her shop located in the build-
ing recently vacated by Dr. Quinn.
Grindstone News … Mike
Rausch has purchased a Chrysler.
Marjorie Rausch helped Mrs.
Eggen while the later was disabled
from her fall on the stairs.
Sam Kirkpatrick is in the Einan
hospital with a broken leg. Harry
Smith was down to visit him.
Axel Olson is driving a new
Nash.
75 Years Ago
June 2, 1938
A newly organized rural tele-
phone line went into operation last
week, as construction was com-
pleted by the South Fork Tele-
phone company. At present there
are six subscribers, but it is hoped
that ten will be connected in a
short time.
Butte View News … Mr. and
Mrs. Chester Smith and little
daughter were fishing Sunday.
They expect grand luck for Chet
said the sign was right and Chet
knows his fish.
A goodly number from this
neighborhood attended the sale at
Fred Fairchilds last Thursday. A
big crowd was there and every-
thing sold, even Fred’s socks.
West Fork News … Bad news
comes of another old neighbor,
Jack Olson, now living near
Spearfish. While gathering rocks
for a fireplace a rock dislodged
above Jack and bounding down the
hillside, struck his right side,
breaking three ribs and seriously
injuring him otherwise.
Billsburg News … Mrs. Clarence
Case experienced quite a scare Sat-
urday evening when a strange man
walked into the Case home at 10:30
when they were all asleep. Mrs.
Clarence Case was sleeping on the
first floor and heard the front door
open and could see that a man en-
tered the house. Mrs. Case
screamed and the man said he
guessed he was lost as he thought
he was at Kenneth Hongs. He ex-
plained that he was walking to
Hongs Saturday evening and ex-
pected to work there, but was un-
able to locate the place.
Elbon Chaff … There was a
wreck in our neighborhood Mon-
day. Merrill Carley and Mrs. Frank
Braddock came together near the
Egeberg corner. No one was hurt
but one car was put out of commis-
sion.
Milesville News … Friends of
Maurice Falzone received word
that he was married May 14 to
Miss Hoffman of Pierre.
Mrs. O.T. Manor was taken to
New Underwood Saturday suffer-
ing from a bursted blood vessel in
her foot.
Top of the Divide … Lawrence
McDaniel took Evelyn, and Doane
Fessenden, to Philip Sunday after-
noon for band practice.
Moenville News … The Midland
High School graduation exercises
Friday evening were well attended.
We congratulate Orville Bentley
for being chosen to give the valedic-
tory address. He was also pre-
sented with a three month scholar-
ship to Chillicothe College in Mis-
souri.
We have been correctly informed
this week that Mr. and Mrs. Fred-
erick Mulcahy are the happy par-
ents of a son born to them May 28
at the Pierre hospital.
50 Years Ago
May 30, 1963
Barbara McCormick, three year
old and youngest daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Leo McCormick had the
misfortune of losing a portion of
her index finger in a bicycle mishap
near her home last Wednesday,
May 22.
Young Barbara and her older sis-
ter were playing with the bicycle,
spinning the rear wheel when Bar-
bara accidentally put her finger
into the spokes of the wheel. It sev-
ered the index finger on the right
hand just below the second joint.
The Party Line … Tammy and
Billie Fitzgerald had measles shots
in Philip on Tuesday of last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Merrill
(Rita Patton) of Jackson, Wyo., are
rejoicing over the arrival of a six
pound baby girl born May 24. Con-
gratulations.
Northwest Corner … Congratu-
lations to Mr. and Mrs. George
Hauk on the arrival of a baby boy
born at the Quinn hospital. We
haven’t learned the young man’s
name.
Lowell Keyser had extensive
tests and x-rays taken while he
was in St. Paul, Minn., and will
enter the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,
Minn., June 17 for an operation to
remove a portion of a blocked vein
in his leg and replace it with a plas-
tic vein.
Social Lines … Miss Cecile
Hansen has a month’s vacation
from her nursing studies and has
been visiting her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Virgil Hansen.
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Baye have
moved their trailer home from the
Hilland School to the Bennett
Court in Philip.
On Friday, May 24, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Hart entertained Mr. and
Mrs. James Hart in honor of
Deanna’s sixteenth birthday. Angel
food cake and ice cream were
served.
Mrs. Belle Ravellette enter-
tained fifteen yougsters at a picnic
at the Bad River Park on Wednes-
day, May 22, in honor of Ronnie
Ravellette’s fifth birthday.
Kim Russell, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Marvin Russell, celebrated his
fourth birthday Monday, May 24th
by entertaining several of his
friends. Those present were Mark
and Vicki Coyle, Mary and Jill Kit-
ley, Bonnie and Mike Moses, Holly
Merrill, David and Jeff Blanchette,
Shari McGrath and Cal Russell.
Grindstone News … Another
school year has drawn to a close.
Congratulations to the 8th grade
graduates, Paula Knutson, Diane
Dean and Arnold Lewison. Con-
gratulations also to the high school
graduates, Rita Marie Rausch,
Dorothy Dean, LaVonne Knutson,
Marcia Peterson and Bonnie Buhls.
Joyce Smith has taken a job for
the summer on the Paradise Dude
Ranch in Colorado near Pike’s
Peak.
Johnny Knutson was 11 years
old last Thursday, so his mother
had a birthday supper in his honor.
Blast from the Past
From the archives of the Pioneer Review

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