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Pioneer Review, March 28, 2013

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12 Pro Winter Wheat.........................................$7.18
Any Pro .........................................................$6.58
14 Pro Spring Wheat.........................................$7.40
Milo....................................................................$6.63
Corn....................................................................$7.03
SFS Birdseed ..................................................$20.50
NEW CROP 2013
12 Pro Winter Wheat.........................................$7.24
14 Pro Spring Wheat.........................................$7.35
$
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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 31
Volume 107
March 28, 2013
Photos from
the Philip
High School
prom
9
Scholastic
Book
Fair
2
Highway
Patrol
physics
8
Pioneer review
We are celebrating
the resurrection
of our Savior
1esus Christ.
Join us in worship and
songs of praise.
United Church
Philip
Maundy Thurs. “Living Last Supper”, 5:30 p.m.
Good Friday “Service of the Nails”, Noon
Easter Celebration, 9:00 a.m.
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Philip
Easter Service: Monday, April 1 at 5:30 p.m.
with communion
Sacred Heart Catholic Church
Philip
Holy Thursday Mass, 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday Service, 5:00 p.m.
Easter Sunday Mass, 7:00 a.m. & 9:00 a.m.
St. Mary’s Catholic Church
Milesville
Good Friday Service, 3:00 p.m.
Easter Vigil Mass, Saturday at 8:00 p.m.
St. William Catholic Church
Midland
Good Friday Service, 7:00 p.m.
Easter Sunday Mass, 11:00 a.m.
Open Bible Church
Midland
Easter Sunday Breakfast, 8:00 a.m.
Easter Sunday Service, 9:00 a.m.
Philip Community Evangelical
Free Church
Good Friday Service, 7:00 p.m.
Easter Sunrise Service, 6:30 a.m.
with breakfast to follow
Special Easter Service, 10:30 a.m.
Hardingrove Community
Evangelical Free Church
Milesville
Good Friday Service, 5:00 p.m.
Special Easter Service, 8:00 a.m.;
Kids’ Easter Egg Hunt after
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church
Midland
Maundy Thursday Service,
7:00 p.m. (CT) with Holy Communion
Easter Sunday Service,
7:00 a.m. (CT) with breakfast to follow
Western New Hope Parish
First Lutheran Church, Philip
Maundy Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.
Good Friday Service, 12:00 noon
Easter Sunday Service, 8:30 a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church, Midland
Good Friday Service with
Open Bible Church, 6:00 p.m.
Easter Sunday Service, 10:30 a.m.
Deep Creek Lutheran Church, Midland
Easter Sunrise Service, 7:00 a.m. (CT)
Philip High School Prom
The queen and king of the Philip High School prom, March 22, were Kelsey
Kroetch and Chaney Burns. The theme was “Under the Big Top.” This year’s event
was held on a Friday in the Fine Arts Building. See more of the prom in this issue.
Comments sought on FSA boundaries
Due to consolidation of the
Haakon and Jackson counties
Farm Service Agency centers last
July, the county committees and
local administrative area’s each
county committee member repre-
sents must be reduced from six to
five.
The current county committees
have proposed the following bound-
aries for the new local administra-
tive areas, to be effective for 2014,
with elections held for all local ad-
ministrative areas in the fall of
2013. See map for further details.
Area One: Haakon County,
Townships 1N-3N and west of
boundary delineated by Powell
Road and Kronk Road until 11-mile
Road, continuing north along that
line. Jackson County, north of I-90
and west of South Creek Road.
Area Two: Haakon County,
Townships 4N through 9N.
Area Three: Haakon County,
Townships 1N-3N and east of
boundary delineated by Powell
Road/Kronk Road until 11-mile
Road, continuing north along that
line. Jackson County, north of I-90
and east of South Creek Road.
Area Four: Jackson County,
south of Interstate 90, west of
Ranges 36W in southern Jackson
County and 21E in northern Jack-
son County.
Area Five: Jackson County,
south of Interstate 90, east of
Ranges 37W in southern Jackson
County and 20E in northern Jack-
son County.
Representatives help implement
farm programs. In certain situa-
tions, such as drought, they make
the decision to apply for emergency
programs. After the reorganization
from six to five districts, their new
terms will be staggered in one, two
and three years. Then, each dis-
trict’s full term will be for three
years, with a limitation of three
consecutive three-year terms held
by any one individual.
The current elected district rep-
resentatives for Haakon County
are Mark Radway, Peggy Parsons
and Tucker Smith. Radway will be
finishing his third consecutive
term. The current elected district
representatives for Jackson County
are Brad Stout, Gene Fortune and
Joe Hicks. Jackson County also has
a voting, appointed, socially disad-
vantaged position currently held by
John Bauman. Jackson County
also currently has a nonvoting, ap-
pointed, minority advisor position
held by Annie Stout. Petitioning
and election information is avail-
able through the FSA office.
Public comments on the pro-
posed redistricting will be taken
through April 5. Provide comments
to Haakon/Jackson FSA Office,
P.O. Box 339, Philip, SD 57567,
phone 605-859-2186 extension two.
by Del Bartels
The monthly meeting of the
Philip AARP/Retired Teachers As-
sociation, Monday, March 26,
hosted quest speaker Jesse
Hansen. He explained the benefits
and weaknesses of the new digital
transport adapters (DTA) for tele-
visions soon to be required by
Golden West Telecommunications.
Hansen used a television, its re-
mote and another remote to illus-
trate his presentation. Many audi-
ence members have already or-
dered and received the equipment
that will keep their televisions
working once the optic cable project
is implemented. Only some have
already had the equipment con-
nected to their televisions. “Come
May 20, if you don’t have a DTA
unit on there, there won’t be a pic-
ture on your TV,” said Hansen.
Hansen thought the units were
being shipped way too soon. “This
is all new to all of us. It is a new ex-
perience to us, too,” said Hansen.
The Golden West field men are
learning, just as everyone else is.
The benefits of a DTA unit being
attached to your television, even
with the most basic cable package
from Golden West, are numerous.
Music channels are now accessible
when the viewer inputs channel
numbers 901 through 946. Addi-
tional TV channels are also acces-
sible, such as Investigation Dis-
cover on channel 150.
The local community channel,
Philip’s school activities on channel
19, is on channel 91 when using the
DTA unit. The Philip area now has
access to the Wall community
channel on 90 and the Kadoka com-
munity channel on 92.
Customers can order upgrades,
even for just one month, to get spe-
cial showings, such as the National
Finals Rodeo. The connection can
be done with a phone call to the
Golden West office, and a service-
man does not have to come to your
home.
If a customer is hooking up the
DTA unit themselves, Hansen
warned of a message coming up on
the TV scene that reads, “We’ve de-
tected a problem activating your
service. Please check ....” “If you’re
hooking these up yourself, this may
be very intimidating,” said Hansen,
“but it’s a good thing. It means
you’re doing things right. In a few
minutes you’ll get a picture.” He
also warned that the DTA units are
preset for maximum volume, so
customers will have to adjust the
unit’s volume and/or their televi-
sion’s volume. If customers do not
have VCR or DVD players, Hansen
Hansen discusses DTA television boxes
Jesse Hansen, special equipment technician for Golden West Telecommunica-
tions, illustrated how to connect and operate the new digital transport adapters
to customer’s televisions. By May 20, there will be no television picture without
the DTAs. Photo by Del Bartels
suggested that, once the unit is at-
tached, to take the batteries out of
the TV’s remote and put that re-
mote in a drawer. For VCR or DVD
players, the TV remote will still be
needed to put the TV on channel
three so the other machines will
give a picture.
A major downside to the DTAs is
that VCR and DVD recorders now
will only record what is playing on
the screen of the television. You
will not be able to watch one chan-
nel and record another.
Hansen said that anyone with
questions or experiencing difficul-
ties should phone the Golden West
office or him at his home.
The AARP/RTA meeting ad-
dressed upcoming community serv-
ice, such as yard work and spring-
time upkeep of the Old School-
house Park, which will be done the
first part of May. Improvements to,
and maybe even a shelter for, the
plot directory at the cemetery will
be discussed with the Masonic
Cemetery Committee. A free dri-
ver’s safety class will be offered
later this spring. Bob McDaniel is
still offering free tax return aid
every Tuesday morning at the Bad
River Senior Citizen’s Center. The
Country Cupboard food pantry is
still in need of food, currently all
kinds. The annual South Dakota
RTA conference will be May 1-2 in
Rapid City.
The next Philip area AARP/RTA
meeting will be at 6:00 p.m. in the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center,
Monday, April 29.
The Interior Volunteer Fire De-
partment will host a grand opening
of their new fire hall, Saturday,
April 13, starting at 6:00 p.m.
Firemen and other volunteers
will be serving burgers and brats,
beans, salads and chips. Guests
can dance to Phatt Daddy, a coun-
try western/rock band.
For the past 10 years, members
of the IVFD have been planning a
new fire hall. In October, 2012,
they broke ground on a 60’x100’
building, with six 12’x12’ doors, a
meeting room, a kitchen and two
bathrooms.
The building was built by the
IVFD members and area residents.
No grants or loans were taken out
on the building and the entire proj-
ect was paid for by contracting fire
trucks and personnel to help fight
fires in South Dakota, and through
community donations. The old fire
hall was 30’x60’ with one overhead
door. It contained five of the trucks,
with the sixth fire truck in cold
storage next to the building.
The new fire hall is complete,
and equipment is being moved in.
Areas residents are being asked to
please come and enjoy a great
evening of food, music and bever-
age to help celebrate a great accom-
plishment by some highly dedi-
cated volunteers.
Interior Fire Hall open house April 13
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letters.
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Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper should be mailed
or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office. All letters must bear the original
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POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run the two weeks
prior to an election.
The “Letters” column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to express their opin-
ions. It is not meant to replace advertising as a means of reaching people.
This publication’s goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of free speech. Your
comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
Subscription Rates: For Haakon, Jackson,
and Jones counties, Creighton, Wall, Quinn,
Marcus, Howes, Plainview, and Hayes ad-
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South Dakota residents are required to pay
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Email with phone number to
newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High of
52F. Winds from the ESE at 5 to
10 mph. Thursday Night:
Mostly cloudy in the evening,
then overcast. Fog overnight. Low of
23F. Winds from the SSE at 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Fog early.
High of 61F. Winds less than 5
mph. Friday Night: Mostly
cloudy. Fog overnight. Low of
30F. Winds from the East at 5 to 15
mph shifting to the WNW after midnight.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. High of 55F.
Winds from the NNW at 10 to 15 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly cloudy with a
chance of rain. Low of 27F with a
windchill as low as 18F. Winds from the
NNE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 20%.
Saturday: Overcast with a chance of
rain. High of 54F. Winds from the
North at 5 to 20 mph. Chance of rain
30%. Saturday Night: Partly cloudy
with a chance of rain. Low of 30F. Winds from
the WSW at 5 to 15 mph shifting to the NNW
after midnight. Chance of rain 20%.
Get your
complete &
up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
Chocolate and coffee are both
good for you. That’s what the ex-
perts currently tell us although
they may change their minds to-
morrow. For the time being,
though, we can cheerfully guzzle
coffee and munch on chocolate, se-
cure in the knowledge that they’re
good for us, sort of like apples. This
is excellent news since I like both
of these things quite a lot, and ap-
ples are okay too.
Both coffee and chocolate have
multiple benefits, and some of
those are linked to their containing
antioxidants. Antioxidants, in case
you aren’t familiar with them, are
known to prevent tissue damage
that is caused by molecules called
oxygen-free radicals. That explana-
tion does nothing at all for me
since I haven’t a clue what they are
really talking about. But, since an-
tioxidants are obviously good for
you, I’ll be glad to ingest them fre-
quently in my favorite beverage
and snack.
The health claims for chocolate,
I might add, are substantial. It re-
duces the risk of stroke, lowers
blood pressure and cholesterol,
lowers risk of heart disease, makes
you feel full so you eat less, reduces
risk of diabetes, reduces stress, in-
creases blood flow which makes
you smarter and more alert and
even gives vision a boost through
more blood flow to the retina. It
quiets coughs as well which I dis-
covered for myself last winter
when I had some bug that gave me
a nasty hack. I dislike cough drops
so I decided to try a piece of dark
chocolate. It actually helped. I rea-
soned that chocolate tends to coat
the mouth and throat and might
help in that way, but those in the
know say it’s because it contains
theobromine which reduces activ-
ity of the vagus nerve. That nerve
is the part of the brain that trig-
gers hard-to-shake coughs. No
matter how it works, it works. It
also helps calm slight jitters in my
arms or legs when I’m trying to get
to sleep. No one has said why that
might be, but maybe it has to do
with increased blood flow.
Coffee doesn’t seem to have quite
such an extensive list of benefits,
but there are many. It reduces the
risk of diabetes and heart-rhythm
disturbances. Even decaffeinated
coffee does that. It lowers the risk
of stroke, Parkinson’s disease, and
cancer (especially liver cancer,)
and has a major proven benefit of
making you sixty-five percent less
likely to develop dementia and
Alzheimer’s disease. Bring on the
coffee. On the negative side, it can
increase the risk of miscarriage
which obviously is not of major
concern to me, and it can make
heartburn worse. It doesn’t seem to
bother my digestion, and neither
does it keep me awake. I often set
down my coffee cup, fall into bed,
and go right to sleep.
All of us, of course, are looking
for ways to make our lives better.
When we hear that something
we’re doing is actually good for us,
we embrace it heartily. That’s
probably why I spend a lot of time
trying to be a better Christian.
Chocolate and coffee may have
some benefits, but being close to
God has many more. It certainly
reduces stress since God promises
to guide and protect us. I figure I
would be a basket case by now if I
couldn’t rely on him. He has helped
and protected me times without
number.
Then, too, we are naturally
drawn to those who like us or, bet-
ter yet, love us. That’s what we’re
celebrating at this time of year
when Easter reminds us of God’s
great love that led him to send his
son to die for us. That’s extreme
love. We can never hope to repay
him for this sacrifice, but we can at
least be thankful. We can also re-
spond by trying to let God accom-
plish in us and through us what is
pleasing and useful to him. He
even wants us to constantly stay in
touch with him, and we can cer-
tainly do that with a little effort.
So, during this Easter week,
there will no doubt be plenty of
chocolate to enjoy and probably cof-
fee too, but most of all we can re-
joice in being children of the King.
As such we can look forward to the
brightest of futures, both here on
earth and evermore with our Lord
in heaven. Easter blessings on us
all.
COMMUNITY BETTERMENT COMMITTEE … is sponsoring
Release Time clean-up. You may start any Wednesday after Easter.
Bags and gloves are supplied. For more information, contact Dar-
lene Matt at 859-2077.
PHILIP HEALTH SERVICES AUXILIARY …will meet Thurs-
day, April 4, in the conference room at the hospital at 7:00 p.m.
FREE TAX PREPARATION …AARP TaxAide will be providing
free federal tax return preparations at the Bad River Senior Citi-
zen’s Center in Philip on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The serv-
ice is open to all ages with emphasis on low and middle income tax-
payers. Call Bob McDaniel, 859-2227, for appointment or more in-
formation.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting
listed here, please submit them by call-
ing: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pio-
neer-review. com. We will run your
event notice the two issues prior to
your event at no charge. PLEASE
KEEP IN MIND, if you charge for an
event, we must charge you for an ad!
No way out ... by Del Bartels
Certain things are simply foregone conclusions. One example is when
you have two checkers left and your kid still has six, it’s pretty sure
you are going to lose – but they still want to play it out. Another exam-
ple is, someplace on the box and in microscopic print it reads “Batteries
not included” or “Accessories must be purchased separately” or “Some
assembly required.”
Some things should be foregone conclusions. Someone (else) speeds
past all the safe drivers, and that driver gets a speeding ticket. Some-
one (else) ‘forgets’ to include a major asset on their income tax, and
they get audited. Someone (else) eyes the last chicken leg at supper,
but politely lets the others fight over it.
Sometimes we have to help with the conclusions. “Excuse me sir, I
found your wallet. It still has the $100 in it, but I had the single bill
broken into 20s, 10s and fives so you can award any finder’s fee.” A
note on your car steering wheel announces to your teenager that the
fumes in the gas tank are from when they last used the car. Me doing
at least a little jogging for a few weeks before the community five-kilo-
meter run might be of some medical benefit.
There is a saying that when a politician states, “and in conclusion,”
the audience had better get comfortable. Other such nonconcluding in-
dicators are “as you can see,” “therefore,” “in short,” “to summarize,”
“thus,” and “in brief.” If someone tells you that it is a sure thing, do not
bet on it. Why does the person who says for you to make your own con-
clusions proceed to argue which conclusion you should make?
Some conclusions are nothing but obvious traps. “Does this dress
make me look heavy?” “Yes or no, have you stopped beating your dog?”
“You aren’t one of those vegetarian, tree-hugging, animal rights, anti-
religion, liberal, socialistic weirdos from that other political party, are
you?” My favorite is “What?” either signifying the person didn’t hear
you clearly, or daring you to be stupid enough to say it again. My sec-
ond favorite is the exclamation, “What do you think you are doing?” It
is not really a question, but a statement of you being in big trouble.
It’s when the obvious outcome does not happen, or when you actually
do have a way out, that surprizes me. The checker board layout lets
me jump four times and get crowned! After I drag the bagged deer up
the slope, my vehicle is there, rather than on the next slope over! The
oven timer is about to ding, and I then notice the recipe states “makes
four servings” and I shouldn’t still be hungry after the meal.
Some no-way-out conclusions are nothing short of miraculous gifts.
Easter is that gift. In my opinion, I continually try to improve myself,
but to no avail. I could never earn, climb, buy or rationalize my way to
heaven. The hole that I have dug myself is too deep, and despite my
best intentions I inexplicably keep digging it. Yes, there is a way out.
All I have to do is humbly look up and sincerely ask.
The annual Wall Art Show,
sponosored by the Wall Art Guild,
was held Saturday and Sunday,
March 23-24 in the Wall Drug
Cowboy Art Room. Special guest
artist was Jenny Braig, Spearfish.
According to organizers for the
event, the art show was a success
and was attended by many, in spite
of the weather. The guest book was
signed by 112 people attending the
show, and many did not sign the
book.
Thirteen artists entered items
for the show and 40 pieces of art-
work was displayed.
Winners of each category were:
Best Of Show – oil painting, “Na-
ture’s Design” by Lorna Moore,
Quinn.
Oil and acrylics: 1st – “Three Of
A Kind” by Garrett Shearer, Rapid
City, 2nd – “Respite” by Dorothy
Jones, Wall, 3rd – “Beauties” by
Lori Schrieber, Quinn.
Watercolors: 1st (three-way tie) –
“My Creighton Home” and “Earl
Thode” by Moore, and “Mr. Pea-
cock” by Nola Price, Wasta, 2nd
(tie) – “Eggs and Apples” by Byron
Crown and submitted by Betty
Crown, Wall, and “Triple Iris” by
Moore, 3rd – “The Old Thybo
Ranch House” by Price.
Graphics: 1st – “Second In The
Round” by Kailey Sawvell, Quinn,
2nd – “Tired” by Ralph Kroetch,
Philip, 3rd – “Music” by Shearer.
Photography: 1st – “Bear Butte
with Horses” by Kathy Kelly, Stur-
gis, 2nd – “One Yellow Tulip” by
Carla Brucklacher, Wall, 3rd –
“Left” by Kelly.
Kroetch second in Wall Open Art Show
Ralph Kroetch entered three pieces in the Wall Art Show. At left is the graphite
drawing “Tangle Foot. Above is the graphite drawing “Watchful eyes.” Kroetch is
holding the charcoal drawing “Tired,” which took second place in the graphics di-
vision. Courtesy photo
Edmund (Sonny) Baye, Faith,
was recognized by the Meade
County commissioners as Veteran
of the Month at the commissioners’
meeting in Faith, Wednesday,
March 6.
Baye served in the United
States Air Force from 1956 to 1968,
serving three tours in Vietnam.
In making the presentation the
following was read:
“I would like to introduce the
Meade County Veteran of the
Month for the month of February.
It is Mr. Edmund Baye from Faith.
“Mr. Baye served in the United
States Air Force from 1956 until
1968. Mr. Baye was part of the 305
Supply Squadron, 441st, and
3750th squadron. His career field
was a Fuels, POL. He would main-
tain, operate petroleum, missile,
and alternate and cryogenic facili-
ties and equipment. He would also
perform maintenance on fuels han-
dling equipment and facilities.
During the Vietnam War, Mr. Baye
was part of the company that built
and provided security to four miles
of pipeline. He spent a total of
three different tours in Vietnam.
The first two were in three-month
increments. The last tour was for
one year.
“Mr. Baye has been stationed at
Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas,
for two tours, at Yokota AFB,
Japan, at Bunker Hill AFB, Ind.,
and at Parks AFB, Calif. He has
been deployed to the Philippines, to
Okinawa, Japan, and to Vietnam.
“After separating out of the mil-
itary, Mr. Baye went to work for
the family business with the John
Deere dealership in Philip for 25
years. After that he worked in the
mail trucking business for 17 years
in Pierre and Sioux Falls. After he
retired, they wanted to move back
West River where they love the
prairie and the people.
“Mr. Baye has been awarded the
following medals: National Defense
Service Medal, Vietnam Service
Medal, Republic of Vietnam Serv-
ice Medal, Army Good Conduct
Medal with one oak leaf cluster, Air
Force Good Conduct Medal, Air
Force Longevity Medal with one
cluster.
“We, the Meade County Com-
mission and the people of Meade
County, would like to recognize
and give a heartfelt thanks to Mr.
Baye for his service to his country
during the Vietnam War.”
Edmund Baye – Veteran of the Month
Above left, Edmund Baye’s service photo. Above, back row, from left: Meade
County Commissioners Bob Bertolotto, Galen Niederwerder, Robert Heidgerken
and Linda Rausch. Front: Edmund Baye and Elsie Baye. Courtesy photos
The annual Scholastic Book Fair is being held in the Philip school library until
March 28. Students are checking out not only the books, but the games and desk
equipment. Boys, girls, avid readers and those who aren’t into reading all that
much, all showed interest in the different books and other items on display.
Scholastic Book Fair
The South Dakota Department
of Transportation will begin replac-
ing the Highway 63 bridge deck
over the Bad River in Midland on
Monday, April 1.
The bridge will be reduced to one
lane with a 10-foot-width restric-
tion, and traffic will be controlled
by temporary signal lights.
The new bridge deck will be
formed during two concrete pour-
ing sessions. The full width of the
bridge will be closed for about three
days for each concrete pour, and
motorists will need to find alter-
nate routes.
More information will be pro-
vided when construction calls for
full closing of the bridge deck. The
prime contractor on the $1,586,864
bridge project is Heavy Construc-
tors of Rapid City. Completion date
for the work is October 4.
Bridge work
in Midland
Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 3
Rural Livin’
Having a Cropping Plan
The old adage, “Failing to Plan
is Planning to Fail” can become
stark reality when faced with chal-
lenges like drought. Presenters for
the currently running webinar se-
ries, “Managing Drought Risk on
the Ranch” are highlighting the
importance of and encouraging
producers to develop a plan to fol-
low over the next few weeks,
months and beyond to help take
the emotion out of decisions they
may need to make. Crop producers
would be wise to do so as well.
With the unusually dry condi-
tions much of the winter wheat
across South Dakota was planted
into last fall, there is considerable
concern about the viability of the
crop. Although some regions of the
state have received precipitation,
many areas remain quite dry. Pro-
ducers may need to adjust their
cropping plans, depending on how
the spring progresses in terms of
weather and precipitation.
While meeting with a producer
recently, it became apparent that
he had plans in place. While he de-
voutly follows no-till farming prac-
tices, a field fire forced him to use
emergency tillage to stop wind ero-
sion that was occurring on some of
his fields. He traveled at a right-
angle to the prevailing wind, using
a tillage tool with wide-spaced
shanks, and skipping two widths
of the implement between passes.
His logic was that if dry conditions
persist he could come back a sec-
ond, and if necessary, a third time,
in the untouched ground to hope-
fully bring up clods of soil to stop
the erosion.
His cropping plans are also
based on a “what if” scenario. If ad-
equate precipitation is received by
the acceptable date to plant spring
wheat, the seed will go in. If not,
the ground will lay idle until con-
ditions are favorable for another
crop that the timing for planting is
right. If all else fails, he plans to
plant cover crops to take advan-
tage of whatever moisture arrives
to grow some residue and get the
land into condition for the future.
Managers of a cattle operation
recently requested help in design-
ing an irrigation system to better
ensure their ability to raise for-
ages. Not everyone has the soils or
the water resources to do so, but
they are planning ahead rather
than waiting and hoping.
A major concern with livestock
producers across much of the state
is the ability to raise enough for-
age to meet their needs. One po-
tential source is winter wheat
fields that may have less than ad-
equate stands for optimal grain
yields. Wheat can produce rela-
tively high quality forage, and it
may be beneficial to plant addi-
tional materials into poor stands to
beef up yields instead of destroying
the crop and starting over.
Whether you are making plans
for various crops as grain or for-
age, the following resources may
be helpful in determining how late
they can be planted, seeding rates
and intended use: ExEx8120,
“Emergency Late-seeding Op-
tions”: http://pubstorage.sdstate.
edu/AgBio_Publications/articles/E
xEx8120.pdf, ExEx8142, “Produc-
ing Annual and Alternative Crops
for Forage”: http://pubstorage.sd-
state.edu/AgBio_Publications/arti-
cles/ExEx8142.pdf, and ExEx8152,
“Utilizing Annual Crops for Forage
in Western South Dakota”: http://
pubstorage.sdstate.edu/AgBio_Pu
blications/articles/ExEx8152.pdf.
Calendar
4/24: Drought Management We-
binar, 10:00 a.m. CST, SD Re-
gional Extension Centers
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
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·´´.÷·. · ¹/./.t
S1op bg ]or o11
gour oo1v1ng needs:
·Ear Tags
·Calf Pullcrs
·Mill Fc¡laccr
·MucI, nucI norc!
View & download online
production sale books at:
www.Ravellette
Publications.com
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
If your finances are “tangled up,”
see us for a CONSOLIDATION LOAN!
Pay off credit card debts with high
interest rates, with ONE simple
interest LOW rate loan.
Urìs Mì||er, AUA ßoard of 0ìrector from 5pearfìsh, 50 and 0oug 1hee|,
Papìd Uìty marketp|ace vìce Presìdent.
Area Farm credlt 8ervlces of Amerlca
customer-owners recelve $2.76
mllllon ln 2012 cash-back dlvldends
- Funds Beneflt Local 0ommunltles -
Rapid City, SD (March 18, 2013) – Farm Credit Services of America (FC-
SAmerica) announced today that customer-owners in western South Dakota
and Crook and Weston counties in Wyoming served by the cooperative’s
Rapid City Marketplace are receiving checks totaling $2.75 million this
month, and cumulative in nine years $16,553,000 million. ese checks rep-
resent the areas’ share of a total $130 million cash-back dividends distributed
by FCSAmerica for 2012.
“History suggests customers will spend a signicant percentage of their
cash-back dividends in the communities they call home in addition to using
the funds to support their operations,” said Doug eel, Vice President. e
Rapid City local oce works with customers in Harding, Perkins, Butte,
Meade, Haakon, Lawrence, Pennington, Custer, Shannon, Fall River, Jackson,
Bennett and Crook and Weston counties in Wyoming.
Because of the cooperative’s consistency through agriculture’s good times
and challenging times, we are able to make this signicant distribution, eel
said. FCSAmerica’s nancial strength and staying power enabled the coop-
erative’s Board of Directors to return one of the largest cash-back dividends
in its history to customer-owners, while continuing to oer attractive interest
rates and building capital for future generations.
e $130 million cash-back dividend for 2012 is the ninth in FCSAmer-
ica’s history and brings the total cash distributions since 2004 to nearly $700
million. During this same nine year period, FCSAmerica’s capital (members’
equity) has grown from $1.5 billion to $3.2 billion and net income has grown
from $294 million to $481 million.
FCSAmerica has adopted a patronage program every year since 2004.
Each eligible customer’s cash-back dividend is based on the average loan vol-
ume during the calendar year. e more loan business a customer has with
the cooperative, the more they benet nancially through cash-back divi-
dends.
e FCSAmerica Board also approved a patronage program for 2013,
with the total cash-back dividend to be decided by the Board in December
2013.
For more information on the 2012 cash-back dividend distribution, in-
cluding every county in the state of South Dakota and Wyoming visit
www.powerofownership.com.
About Farm Credit Services of America: Farm Credit Services of America
is proud to nance the growth of rural America, including the special needs
of young and beginning producers. With assets of more than $19 billion, FC-
SAmerica is one of the region’s leading providers of credit and insurance serv-
ices to farmers, ranchers, agribusiness and rural residents in Iowa, Nebraska,
South Dakota and Wyoming. For more information, visit www.
fcsamerica.com.
We Are Here
Emily Wickstrom, Rural Advocate
for Missouri Shores Domestic
Violence Center, will be at the
Haakon Co. Courthouse on
~ TUESDAY ~
April 2nd
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
For more information, call
1-800-696-7187
Domestic Violence, Sexual
Assault, Dating Violence
Emily is also available for
presentations to any group
South Dakota Horse Fair 4-H winners
Twenty counties had 4-H youth represented at the recent South Dakota Horse Fair held in Sioux Falls, March 15 through
March 17. It is an event open to all youth, statewide. Pictured are the first and second places for the senior, junior and be-
ginner horse judging contests. Gage Weller, third from right, Haakon/Jackson 4-Her, won second place in the junior division.
Tagg Weller won fifth in beginners, and Wyatt and Dustin Enders placed 14th and 19th in the senior division. Youth also
participated in hippology contests and attended the youth horse training event, which is required for 4-Hers in the horse
project. Presenters of the youth horse training program were Dr. Rebecca Bott – South Dakota State University, Kaycee Mc-
Daniel – Minnehaha 4-H advisor, and Carrie Weller – Haakon/Jackson/Jones/Mellette 4-H advisor. Courtesy photo
The South Dakota FFA Associa-
tion will host the 85th annual
South Dakota State FFA Conven-
tion on April 14-16 on South
Dakota State University’s campus
in Brookings.
The theme of the 85th State FFA
Convention was recently an-
nounced as “Push it to the Limit.”
Throughout the three-day conven-
tion, over 2,000 FFA members, ad-
visors and guests will be taking
part in leadership activities, career
development events and sessions
highlighting the successes of South
Dakota’s FFA members.
The State FFA Career Develop-
ment Events are scheduled for
April 14-15. Career Development
Event participants will compete in
the following areas: agricultural
business management, agricul-
tural communications, agricultural
mechanics, agronomy, dairy cattle
evaluation, floriculture, food sci-
ence and technology, horse evalua-
tion, livestock evaluation, meats
evaluation and technology, milk
quality and products, natural re-
sources, nursery/landscape, range
plant identification and veterinary
science.
South Dakota FFA members will
also serve others at the third an-
nual South Dakota FFA Day of
Service. Through a partnership be-
tween the South Dakota FFA
Foundation, South Dakota FFA As-
sociation and Kids Against
Hunger, FFA members package
thousands of meals for the less for-
tunate.
During the convention, the state
FFA officers will conduct five ses-
sions. The first session begins at
7:00 p.m., April 14, with reflections
from the officers. Individuals and
chapters will be recognized for out-
standing proficiency in agricultural
placement and entrepreneurship
as well as service to agricultural
education. Those FFA members
who received their American De-
gree at the past national conven-
tion will also be recognized. The
keynote speaker for the evening
will be Rick Rigsby.
The third session will begin at
7:00 p.m., April 15. The State FFA
Degree, the highest degree of mem-
bership in the South Dakota FFA,
will be conferred upon 264 mem-
bers. The South Dakota Star
Greenhand, Star Farmer, and
Stars in Agribusiness, Ag Place-
ment and Agriscience will also be
recognized. The keynote address
will be delivered by 2012-2013 na-
tional FFA officer Lindsey Ander-
son.
The final session will begin at
8:30 a.m., Tuesday, April 16. Dur-
ing this session, the Governor’s Ci-
tation for Community Service will
be presented to a South Dakota
FFA chapter to recognize their out-
standing involvement in commu-
nity service activities. The Career
Development Event winners who
will advance to the National FFA
Convention held in Louisville, Ky.,
this fall will also be announced.
The installation of the 2013-2014
state FFA officers will be the cul-
mination of the convention, Tues-
day at noon.
South Dakota FFA extends
invitation to annual convention
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Two basic tax seminars being
held in Rapid City in April will offer
helpful state tax information to
businesses operating in South
Dakota.
The seminars are scheduled for
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 in the li-
brary community room at Western
Dakota Technical Institute at 800
Mickelson Drive. The seminars are
sponsored by the South Dakota De-
partment of Revenue
A sales and use tax seminar will
be from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. The
session covers topics such as how
and when to apply for a sales tax li-
cense, exemptions from sales and
use taxes, exempt entities, use tax,
municipal taxes, purchases for re-
sale, and how to file sales tax re-
turns by paper and electronically
through SD QUEST.
A contractors’ excise tax seminar
will be from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The agenda includes how and when
to apply for a contractors’ excise tax
license, projects for qualifying utili-
ties and governmental agencies,
prime and sub contractors, sales
and use tax, owner furnished mate-
rials, special juris- dictions, and how
to file contractors’ excise tax returns
by paper and electronically through
SD QUEST.
Both seminars are offered free of
charge. Register online at http://
dor.sd.gov/ (click on “Business Edu-
cation” in the e-services info box on
the right side of the page) or by call-
ing the South Dakota Department of
Revenue at 1-800-829-9188.
Free business tax seminars
Happy Easter!
Hit & Miss
Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Mar. 28: Chicken
Pasta, Pomodoro, Malibu Veggies,
Garlic Bread, Fruit.
Friday, Mar. 29: Walleye
Strips, Fried Potato Chips, Roasted
Veggies, Garlic Cheddar Biscuit,
Strawberry Gelatin.
Monday, April 1: French Dip,
Minestrone Soup, Fresh Pineapple.
Tuesday, April 2: Steak Fin-
gers, Potato Wedges, Creamy
Coleslaw, Fruit.
Wednesday, April 3: Roast
Beef, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy,
Corn, Roll, Watermelon.
***
Clark Morrison, is at the Mayo
Clinic in Minnesota for cancer
treatments. The family knows he
would appreciate your prayers and
cards during his six-week stay
there. Cards may be sent to Hope
Lode, 411 Second St. N.W.,
Rochester, MN 55901, % of Clark
Morrison.
Profanity is a cheap cop-out for
expression of our feelings. Wouldn’t
it be much more elegant to say,
“What an unfortunate happening,
than “Oh, blank blank.”
Thursday, March 14, at Somer-
set Court, we had the activity of
Wii bowling.
We had Tuesday bingo with
Sandi calling numbers. After bingo
we had snack and chat with apple
butter and pecan cupcakes for
treats.
My granddaughter, Sheridan
Hansen, and children, Tiger and
Cecelia, came to play and stayed
for supper. We rolled, kicked and
threw the little ball and the big ball
up and down the halls, rolled pool
balls by hand and ran in the court-
yard. They charge me up with their
energy. Thanks for your visit, kids.
Friday, March 15, 2013, at Som-
erset Court, we had the activity of
the tossing of the coins. This was in
honor of St. Patrick’s Day and the
Irish “Pot of Gold.” Sandi and
Susan picked up and scattered
coins and kept score. Those playing
were Irene McKnight, Addie
Rorvig, Jim Homes, Bert Schnei-
der, Eileen Tenold, Eleanor
Holmes, Mary Lou Peters, Mar-
cella Kraft, Marilyn Butts, and Vi-
vian Hansen. The first round was
with plastic coins (two wrapped to-
gether) to throw into a laundry tub.
Then we had a round using choco-
late “coins,” a little heavier and
traveled a little more predictably.
Then we had a round of the plastic
ones again. Eileen won one round,
Bert the other. We received Somer-
set bucks for playing and for win-
ning, and also received a chocolate
“coin.” Thank you for giving us this
activity.
The March 14, 2013, Philip Pio-
neer Review arrived Friday, and
has the news that Tami Ravellette
is 50. Happy birthday, Tami. It has
been great to send you my news a
couple times a week. Keeps me
going.
In this new Pioneer Review, Del
Bartels writes an inspiring and en-
tertaining column called “Let it be
green.” He has brought ever so
many references to the color green.
I am glad the Pioneer Review sends
a complimentary copy of the paper
to Somerset Court so you all here
at Somerset Court can read it on
the reading table by the fireplace.
The town of Philip, my home-
town, puts on a big celebration
every June. This year it will be
June 14-16, and it has been re-
named, “Scotty Philip Days.” It
sounds like it will be bigger and
better than ever. Our family usu-
ally tries to get together in Philip
for this event every year. We hope
to sleep at my old house and attend
the events at Philip’s Scotty Philip
Days.
I got a charge out of the Pioneer
Review’s Betwixt Places news by
Marsha Sumpter. She quotes an
1887 article about how much is
spent for alcohol. That hasn’t
changed. People are hooked. They
spend more for alcohol than for
bread. And so on. Highly entertain-
ing reading.
March 16, we had wet, clumpy
snow all day. We are thankful.
Thank you to Christy Park of
Hansen Court, Philip, for your nice
note.
Thank you to Gayla and Dan
Piroutek, Milesville, for your excel-
lent history of the Milesville Post
Office, where Gayla was postmas-
ter for 33 years. Thank you for your
bit of family lore and memories of
Milesville Post Office.
Saturday, March 16, Ben and
Danni Stone and Danni’s two
daughters drove up through the
beautiful pines through the thick
white snow to a grand lunch at the
Alpine Inn in Hill City.
Myrna Pokorny had company at
supper March 16, her granddaugh-
ter, Nicole.
The Saturday Somerset Court
movie was “8 Below.” I had some
fine scenery of Antarctica and eight
great sled dogs.
The Rapid City Journal for
March 16, 2013, carried the obitu-
ary of Rita (O’Connor) Narcisian,
73, formerly of Philip – my sympa-
thy to family and friends.
Thank you to Wanda Meyer Artz
for your good newsy letter. She
used to be postmaster at the Hum-
boldt. Now she is retired and busy
as ever! She mentions that they
have a peace lily plant, maybe four
foot tall and three feet across.
Wanda and Ed hope to come out
west this spring. Wanda knits and
crochets. And bakes! Wanda and
Ed entertain and attend church
and church related affairs and
visit relatives. Sometimes, they go
over to Ed’s place by Stickney and
Ed helps with whatever farm/ranch
work that’s going on.
Somerset Court resident, Mar-
jorie Gaffin, used to be a proof-
reader at the Rapid City Daily
Journal. She said it was a delight-
ful job!
On St. Patrick’s Day at Somerset
Court, we enjoyed a special Irish
menu, boiled potatoes and carrots,
cabbage and corned beef and
grasshopper pie.
Sunday, March 17, at Somerset
Court, we had church with Terry
Pulse and Steve. Jack Humke
played the piano for several hymns.
Thank you all.
At 3 p.m., Somerset Court enter-
tained at their annual St. Patrick’s
Day green beer party. They had
lots of snacks, deviled eggs, chips,
and peanuts in the shell. There
was a good turnout. Thank you for
the great party. Shawn and Jeremy
and Jami and Susan and Sandi
were there. On this day, residents
of Somerset Court wore a lot of
green. We saw green hats, beads,
sweaters, jackets, shamrocks and
leis. I took a photo of Eileen and
Eleanor in their outfits. M.R.
Hansen came for scrabble and we
permitted the word bragh as in
Erin go Bragh,” which means, “Ire-
land Forever.” Somerset Court res-
ident, Vi Walker, my next door
neighbor, gave me a little story
about “Erin go bragh.” She and
family were out to Las Vegas,
(maybe Reno) anyway, one of those
casino towns, on St. Patrick’s Day,
some years ago, and the greeters at
the casino were all dressed in top
hats and green and she said to
them, “Erin go Bragh,” and they
didn’t know what she was talking
about, so she explained. And after
that the greeters greeted everyone
with “Erin go bragh.” Regarding
old time customs, our neighborhood
was mostly Catholic and observed
Lent with no dances. Except St.
Patrick’s Day. We really looked for-
ward to St. Patrick’s Day.
Happy birthday to Maxine
Kilmer March 18. Her son, Mike,
had taken Maxine our for lunch
Sunday. After the St. Patrick’s
party, Mike Kilmer played piano
for the residents at Somerset
Court. Thank you, Mike.
Mary Eide had a good yarn about
the famous or infamous Reynick
Hill over east of Grindstone.
Monday, March 18, 2013, we had
crafts with Amy. Those who at-
tended were Marilyn Oyler, Mary
Lou Peters, Shirley Horn and visit-
ing angel, Doris Black, Bert
Schneider, Fred Smith, Kay
Daugherty and Mildred Young,
Amy Voles, Addie Rorvig, Eileen
Tenold, Floy Olson, Irene McK-
night and Vivian Hansen. We
made pretty pastel colored Easter
stick-on scenes.
The March 18, 2013, Rapid City
Journal had a nice story about the
three kids who found the
Verendrye Plate just 100 years ago
on the hill overlooking the Missouri
River, north of Ft. Pierre. This is a
historical marker, a six by eight by
one eighth inch lead plate. On one
side the writing is in Latin and had
been stamped on the surface. The
other side is in French, and the
writing had been scratched onto
into the surface. The plate had
been placed there in March 1743,
by French explorers. Now the plate
can be seen at the South Dakota
Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre,
and an exact replica of the plate is
at the Verendrye Museum in Ft.
Pierre. The names of the children
mentioned in the story in the Rapid
City Journal are George O’Reilly,
Hattie May Foster and Martha
Burns. Ethel (Parrish) Roberts was
with the group, but somehow was
left out of the write-up. My sister,
Cecil (Palmer) Meyer, my niece,
Wanda, and Veronica O’Dea, sis-
ter-in-law of Austin O’Dea made a
trip to Madison in the 1970s to visit
Ethel Parrish Roberts and Wanda
still has the tape in which Ethel
told of her adventure finding the
Verendrye Plate.
March 18, 2013, M.R. Hansen
came for scrabble. He will be gone
March 19 to Pine Ridge where they
will be discussing concrete. It is
hoped, with the help of a Pine
Ridge student’s mother, to trans-
late the instructions for making
concrete into Lakota language.
The Sunday Rapid City Journal
had a photo of Somerset Court res-
ident, Thelma Frame, for her birth-
day. She turned 90 on March 25.
Happy birthday, Thelma.
Tuesday, March 19, at Somerset
Court we had the activity of goofy
golf with Susan and Sandi. Thank
you, girls. Players were Floy, Fred,
Marge, Mary Lou, Bert, Jim
Holmes, Marilyn Butts, Irene McK-
night, Kay, Mildred Young, Eileen
and Vivian. Eileen won the first
round, and Bert won the second
round. We received Somerset bucks
for playing and for winning.
At Tuesday bingo at Somerset
Court the winners were Mildred
Kraemer, twice, Marcella, Addie,
Irene Arbach, Marge Self,
Florabelle and Dwight. Treats for
snack and chat which followed
were apple slices and caramel
syrup.
Monday evening, Warren and
Joyce Astelford had company at
supper, their grandson from White
River.
Tuesday after bingo, Marilyn
Butts, Marge Self and Bert Schnei-
der had a little game of pool by the
numbers otherwise known as cut-
throat pool. I am glad to see this in-
terest in pool.
Friday, March 22, 2013, Rapid
City Journal had an article about
F.) Named for the 13th century
mathematician, Leonardo of Pisa,
(better known as Fibonacci.) The
Fibonacci numbers follow a pat-
tern, (1,2,3,5, 8, 13, 21, and so on.)
Add the previous Fibonacci num-
bers to generate the next one.
The pattern is found in pine
cones and spiral sea shells. You
may read the article in the Somer-
set Court scrapbook on the coffee
table. Also this material can be
found on http://allbleeding
stops.blogspot.com/2012/01/spirals-
and-fibonacci-series-and-pine.html.
Jeri Deschamps, front office at
Somerset Court, printed off a com-
puter copy of “Here Comes Peter
Cottontail!” Thanks, Jeri.
Our activity directors have been
decorating Somerset Court for
Easter. Thank you. Be sure to see
the front lobby where the two
ledges are set up with villages of
tiny houses, trees and churches
and also Easter baskets and rab-
bits.
For the Vernal (spring) Equinox,
and egg stood on end overnight
from March 19 to March 20. In the
dining room, an egg stood on end in
the morning of March 20. At exer-
cises on March 20, we had almost
every chair filled. Join us! We can
get more chairs.
Women Who Care from the
South Maple Methodist Church
came to sing for us. Thelma had
some jokes and some devotions.
Love our neighbor and everyone in
the world is our neighbor. Thank
you, ladies, and thanks for the neat
neck pillows you gave us last time
you were here.
Student nurses interviewed a
few Somerset Court residents. My
nurse was Kyaera Amo. Thank
you, Kyaera, for the interesting
time. She would like to receive the
Philip paper from time to time.
March 20, 2013. On third floor in
the hospitality area, at Somerset
Court we had the annual spring
camp in. The big TV had a beauti-
ful blazing fireplace, and we sat in
a circle. Shawn, Sandi, and Susan
made s’mores for us, warm and
gooey! And we had Sprite. Sandi
stood an egg on end for us. There
was a pretty good attendance: Mar-
ilyn Butts, Margaret Jacobs, Lu-
cille Huether, Anne Brink, Blanche
Harmon, Phyllis Capeheart, Vi
Walker, Fred Smith, Marcella
Kraft, Marcella’s sister, Elaine
Backes, Marge Self, Mary Lou Pe-
ters, Ida Lutz and her helping
hand, Floy Olson and Vivian
Hansen. Fred Smith led off with
the fireside stories with a rooster
who somehow got lit with radiator
water. Vi Walker told of a couple
sitting on the porch. The man was
listening to the crickets in the yard,
the woman was listening to a band
on the radio. She said to him, “Nice
continued on page 11
Sacred Heart Church
Evening Guild
Easter Bake Sale
Bad River Senior Center –Downtown Philip
Saturday, March 30th
Beginning at 9 a.m. until gone.
The children of
Lucille Emerson
are hosting an Open House
in honor of her
90th birthday
Saturday, April 6 • 2-4 p.m.
Bad River Senior Citizen’s
Center, Downtown Philip
Everyone Welcome!
Let your presence be your gift.
Cards may be sent to
Po Box 345, Philip, SD 57567
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
March 29-30-31, April 1
The Croods (PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
April 5-6-7-8:
The Call (R)
April 12-13-14-15:
Oz The Great & Powerful (PG)
April 19-20-21-22:
GI Joe: Retaliation (PG-13)
The Milesville Rangers 4-H Club participated in the statewide South Dakota
Wheat Commission Bake and Take Day. It’s been a long tradition, over 40 years,
to celebrate the day on the fourth Saturday of March, this year March 23. The
day’s activity is designed to educate people on home baking, using flour from
wheat. Members of the Milesville Rangers baked bars and rolls, especially mak-
ing use of a filled breakfast roll recipe. They put together plates with the goodies,
and surprised 20 community members with a plate each of baked goods to enjoy,
courtesy of the club. Pictured are, from left, Sam Stangle, Sarah Parsons and Al-
lison Pekron. Not pictured are Ben Stangle, Mark Stangle, Rachel Parsons and
Grace Pekron. The club’s leader is Donna Staben and assistant leader is Tina
Staben. Courtesy photo
Milesville Rangers’
annual bake and take
The family of
Helen Ufen
(Julie Kemnitz’s mother)
is requesting a
Card Shower
in honor of her
95th Birthday
on April 9, 2013.
Cards may be sent to Helen at:
PO Box 790
Philip, SD 57567
- Thursday -
March 28th
4:00 p.m.
Kiddie Park, Philip
Age Divisions:
1 to 3 years
4 to 6 years
7 years up to 3rd grade
1he Easter Bunny will be there!!
Haakon Co.
Young Women's
Annual
Church & Community Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY
CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00
a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH,
Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH •
MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 •
facebook.com/midlan-
dobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30
a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30
p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd
Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN
CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-
6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00
a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m.
CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE
CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
And Samuel told
him every whit,
and hid nothing
from him. And he
said, Ìt is the
LORD: let him do
what seemeth him
good.
1 Samuel 3:18 (KJV)
Ll i bel i eved the Lor d shoul d do " what seeneth hi n good" aIter r ecei vi ng gut-
wr enchi ng news Ir on 5anuel that both oI hi s sons woul d di e on the sane day and
he' d l i ve to see i t. Ll i under stood that 5anuel was bear i ng God' s wor ds and took
conIor t i n that. We shoul d l i kewi se tr y to do the sane, knowi ng the pai n we go
thr ough can br i ng us cl oser to God i I we tr ust i n Hi n.
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
More obituaries on page 7
Easter is March 31st
On March 11, 2013, Mary Rose
Kasten Haughian died peacefully
at Holy Rosary Extended Care.
She was born on June 26, 1925,
to Richard and Mary Ellen (Dwyer)
Kasten in the upstairs of Mrs.
Ryan’s dress shop in Ismay, Mont.
Bob Askin and Patty Ryan said she
was the prettiest baby ever born in
Ismay. Her brother Joe was born
three years later.
They lived in several places near
Mildred, but Mary’s fondest mem-
ories were at their place just north
of Mildred across the O’Fallon
Creek. Mary and Joe had to use a
cable car to cross the creek and
walk into Mildred for school. In
1935, they moved to a farm outside
Miles City. Mary attended Kircher
and Sacred Heart schools and grad-
uated from Custer County High
School in 1943. After a year’s train-
ing at the junior college, she taught
at the Hartwick School near Crow
Rock; while teaching there, she met
and married Daniel Haughian and
they moved to Saugus where she
lived the rest of her life. Again, she
found herself on the other side of
the river and the family depended
on a cable car to cross to get to
town.
Mary stayed very busy, raising
nine children, cooking for big crews
of men, gardening and canning,
drawing and painting, playing the
piano, writing and compiling local
history books. She wrote several
books including “Mildred Memo-
ries, Ismay: Little Chicago, Home
on the Range” cookbook, “On the
Banks of the Yellowstone”, as well
as co-authoring “Wheels Across
Montana’s Prairie”, “Wheels Keep
Rolling Across Montana’s Prairie”,
“The War Years”, “Terry Does
Exist”, and “They Came to Mon-
tana” with family and Terry com-
munity members. Mary was avid at
writing letter – the post office in
Terry can attest to that! She was
also a regular correspondent for
the Terry Tribune. She was an ac-
tive member of many local organi-
zations, but was most dedicated to
the Prairie County Museum; she
was an original board member and
had just retired due to health is-
sues.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; a brother, Joe; her
husband, Dan; and a son-in-law,
Doug Stanley.
She is survived by her children,
Cecelia Stanley and children
Simon, and Kate (Tristan) Kale;
Susan (Russ) Waples; Theresa
(Gene) Deuchar and children,
Jenna (Shad) Finn, Dixon, Megan
(Zeb) Hoffman; Donna (Paul) Faber
and children, Danielle (Patrick)
Sullivan, Marie (Kevin) Layton,
Michael Rivard, Lindsay (Ben)
Bryan; Quinn (Penny) Haughian
and children, Chase and Lacey;
Nora Haughian; Jodette (Bill)
Huckins and Coaly (Sherry); Terry
(Janet) and children Kelsey, Alec,
Evan; Pat (Shelia) and children,
Rory and Brennan; sisters-in-law,
Donna Kasten and Betty Haugh-
ian. She is also survived by 11
great-grandchildren.
Mass of Christian burial was cel-
ebrated March 15, 2013, at the Sa-
cred Heart Catholic Church in
Miles City.
Mary Rose Haughian_____________________________
Lyle Klundt, age 79 of Kadoka,
S.D., died Monday, March 18, 2013,
at his residence.
Lyle Eugene Klundt was born
February 10, 1934, at Herrick, the
son of Leon and M. Louise (Dunn)
Klundt. He grew up on a farm near
Herrick and received his education
at a rural school in that area.
At the age of 19, he entered the
U.S. Air Force and served during
the Korean War. He was honorably
discharged on September 9, 1955.
Lyle was united in marriage to
Ruth Ann Malmberg on April 28,
1961, in Gregory. They made their
home in Gregory where their two
children, Arlys and Cindy, were
born.
While in Gregory, Lyle worked
as a meat cutter. In 1966, the fam-
ily moved to Longlake, where he
was a meat cutter until 1967 and
the family moved back to Gregory.
In 1969, the family moved to Wall,
where he worked at the grocery
store and also at the locker plant.
In 1976, the family moved to
Kadoka.
While in Kadoka, he worked at
the Public Lockers until 1982 when
he became custodian with the
Kadoka School System a position
he held until retiring in 1997.
Later, he became a part time
custodian at the school and contin-
ued until the time of his death. He
worked part time for the Kadoka
City Bar for a few years. After mov-
ing into the Gateway Apartments
he became their custodian and
caretaker as well as doing snow re-
moval and other odd jobs for any-
one in need of help.
Lyle was very community
minded and was active with the
American Legion, the volunteer
ambulance and volunteer fire de-
partment both in Wall and Kadoka.
He was a member of the Concordia
Lutheran Church, and the Bad-
lands Lions Club and delivered
meals on wheels. Lyle served as
Jackson County coroner for many
year. He was also umpire for men’s
and women’s softball for over 50
years in the Kadoka and surround-
ing areas.
Lyle enjoyed starting out his
early mornings by having coffee
with his many friends in the
Kadoka area at the local truck
stops and restaurants.
Lyle will be missed not only by
his family but his many friends in
Western South Dakota.
Survivors include his wife, Ruth
A. Klundt, of Kadoka; a son, Arlys
Klundt, of Rapid City; a daughter,
Cindy Merritt and her husband,
Jim, of Brookings; four grandchil-
dren, Nicholas, Caleb, Kelli Jo and
Noah; two brothers, David Klundt
and his wife, Sharon, of Mt. Ver-
non, and Delmar Klundt and his
wife, Jane, of Las Vegas, Nev.; a
sister, Mavis Potter and her hus-
band, Jim, of Sturgis; and a
brother-in-law, Brad Baker, of
Idaho Falls, Idaho; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and a sister, Alice Baker.
Services were held Friday
March 22, at the Kadoka Presbyte-
rian Church with Pastor Gary Mc-
Cubbin and Pastor Art Weitschat
officiating.
Music was provided by Lois Pet-
tyjohn, pianist, and Susan David-
son, vocalist. Ushers were Tim
Huffman, Butch Klundt, Arlyn
Klundt and Rick Wilmarth. Pall-
bearers were Nicholas and Caleb
Merritt, Larry Miller, Bernard Fos-
ter, Harry Weller and Bruce Mad-
sen.
Interment with military honors
by the Sturgis Honor Guard was
Monday March 25, at the Black
Hills National Cemetery near Stur-
gis.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Lyle Eugene Klundt______________________________
Carol Naescher, age 55 of Oa-
coma, S.D., died Saturday, March
23, 2013, at the Sanford Medical
Center in Chamberlain.
Carol Ann Pederson was born
June 23, 1957 in Nuremberg, Ger-
many, the daughter of Gordon Roy
and Betty Lou (Ballard) Pederson
of Wall. Graduating in 1975, Carol
attended Wall High School where
she made many friends, was a
cheerleader and excelled on its
track team whose records can still
be seen on the gymnasium walls of
the school. She then attended two
years of college at Huron.
First and foremost, Carol loved
and spent most of her focus on her
children and grandchildren. She
also loved biking, sewing, travel,
shopping, boating and fishing on
the Missouri River (Lake Francis
Case) with her husband, LeRoy,
and NASCAR racing with her fa-
vorite driver being Tony Stewart.
Carol worked various jobs, first
as a waitress in her earlier years,
was owner and operator of Carol’s
Restaurant and Grocery Store in
Wall, then in retail sales at Al’s
Oasis located in Oacoma, and later
a manager of Chamberlain Home
Center and of A-Square Ammuni-
tion, both located in Chamberlain.
She was united in marriage to
LeRoy Naescher on July 29, 2005,
in Chamberlain.
Grateful for having shared her
life are her husband, LeRoy
Naescher, of Oacoma; two sons,
Nick Niemann and his wife,
Heather, of Edwardsville, Ill., and
Tyler Niemann of Austin, Texas; a
stepson, Justin Naescher, of Sioux
Falls; a stepdaughter, Shonna
Naescher, of Spearfish; a grand-
daughter, Alyssa Niemann; seven
stepgrandchildren, Kane Naescher,
Teisha Riggs, Elijah Riggs, Josiah
Riggs, Jeffery Riggs, Macey Riggs
and Hilarie Riggs; her mother,
Betty Pederson of Wall; two broth-
ers, James Darwin Pederson of
Yankton and Gary Wayne Peder-
son of Wall; and a host of other rel-
atives and friends.
Carol was preceded in death by
her father, Gordon Pederson, and a
sister, Nancy Holub.
At her request, cremation has
taken place.
Memorial services were held
Wednesday, March 27, at the First
Lutheran Church in Wall with Pas-
tor Curtis Garland officiating.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
The family requests that in lieu
of flowers, a memorial be estab-
lished.
Carol Ann Naescher______________________________
Clifford Dean Keyser, age 82, of
Rapid City, S.D., passed away
March 15, 2013 in his home.
Clifford, son of Lowell and
Mayme Keyser, was born February
25, 1931, at Grindstone, at his
Grandparents Keyser's home on
Ash Creek with his Grandmother
Keyser and Grandmother Burjes as
midwives.
He grew up in the Dowling-Ash
Creek area of Haakon County,
northwest of Philip. He attended
the first two grades of his elemen-
tary education in Philip and the re-
mainder of his elementary educa-
tion in rural schools, attending
Quinn High School in Quinn. He
served in the U.S. Navy from 1950-
1954.
Senator Tim Johnson presented
a certificate to Clifford Keyser for
serving within the boundaries of
the Combat Zone during hostile
outbreaks, June 25, 1950, of the
Korean War. He returned home to
help his dad on the ranch until his
parents moved to Philip and he
took over the ranch until he moved
to Rapid City where he resided
until his death.
Grateful for having shared his-
life are his wife, Gale Keyser,
Rapid City; daughters, Tanya
(Mark) Larive, Sturgis, Tracie
(Dean) Huffman, Wheatland, Mo.;
stepdaughter, Pam (Ray) Kruse,
Gillette, Wyo.; stepsons, Joe Cash,
Gillette, Wyo., and Charlie Potts,
Atlanta, Ga.; 12 grandchildren,
Gunnar Foss, Shania Larive, Myles
Keyser, Breonna Thompson,
Dustin Thompson, Murphy Potts,
Darcy Potts, Lisa Cash, Nicole
Cash, Shelby Cash, Casey Cash
and Cassidy Kruse; three great-
grandchildren, Brody Keyser, Riley
Keyser and Aubre Hoffman; three
brothers, Donald (Mary) Keyser,
Rapid City, Arlen Keyser, Ft.
Pierre, and David (Claudia)
Keyser, Bedford, Texas; and two
sisters, Gayle Nielson, Longbeach,
Calif., and Charleen Stern, Denver,
Colo.; and many nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Lowell and Mayme
Keyser; his wife, Arlene Keyser;
and brother, Clair Keyser.
Memorial services were held
March 20 at Westminister Presby-
terian Church in Rapid City with
the Rev. Bob Jacobs officiating.
Osheim & Schmidt Funeral
Home was in charge of arrange-
ments.
Clifford Keyser__________________
Esther Long, age 89, of Het-
tinger, N.D., formerly of Philip,
S.D., died Sunday, March 24, 2013,
at the Western Horizon Care Cen-
ter in Hettinger, N.D.
Esther Pauline Clawson was
born March 6, 1924, in Sheridan,
Wyo., the daughter of Cecil Ran-
som and Sarah Ethel (Shaw) Claw-
son.
She grew up on her parents’
homestead near Arvada, Wyo.,
graduated from Gillette High
School and the Gillette Normal
School (for a teaching certificate) in
1942 and then furthered her edu-
cation in teaching at Black Hills
State College in Spearfish.
Esther taught at rural schools in
Sheridan and Campbell counties in
Wyoming and while at the Powder
River School in Campbell County
met Leroy D. Long, who was visit-
ing relatives in the area. They mar-
ried on December 22, 1945, at
Hardin, Mont., which was 15 days
after Leroy’s discharge from the
U.S. Army. (When Esther decided
to do something, there was no wait-
ing around.)
They initially made their home
in Campbell County where Esther
was teaching school, but in June
1946, they moved to Philip, where
they built a home and established
a permanent residence.
In addition to raising six chil-
dren, Esther worked a variety of
jobs to help support the family as a
housekeeper, waitress and day care
provider. For her last two years
prior to retirement, she worked as
a kitchen assistant in the Philip
hospital and nursing home.
In 1997, Esther and Leroy
moved into the Senechal Apart-
ments. After the passing of her
husband, Leroy, in January 2000,
Esther lived mostly with her
daughter, Cheryl, and her hus-
band, Phil, in Philip in the warmer
months of the year and with her
son, Wayne, and his wife, Kathy,
during winter months at Hastings,
Nebraska. In July 2012, she went
to Hettinger where son, Jim, and
his wife, Jenifer, live and was ad-
mitted to the Western Horizons
Care Center where she resided
until being called to heaven.
She was a member of the Evan-
gelical Free Church of Philip and
was appreciative of the cards, notes
and prayers from her prayer group
while she was residing in the care
center.
She is survived by three sons,
Wayne (Kathy) of Hastings, Neb.,
Jim (Jenifer) of Hettinger, N.D.,
and Mike of Sioux Falls; two
daughters, Palma Johannesen of
Wall and Cheryl (Phil) Pearson of
Philip; 12 grandchildren; several
great-grandchildren; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Esther was preceded in death by
her parents, Ethel and Cecil Claw-
son; her husband, Leroy; her
brother, Joseph Clawson; her sis-
ter, Ruth Watt; and her eldest son,
Fred.
Funeral services will be held at
10:00 a.m. Thursday, March 28, at
the Evangelical Free Church in
Philip, with Pastor Gary Wahl offi-
ciating.
Interment will be held 2:00 p.m.
Thursday, March 28, at the Black
Hills National Cemetery near Stur-
gis.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Esther Long___________________________________
Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
It’s Monday morning. The sun
doesn’t know whether to shine or to
let the clouds take over. Palm Sun-
day was a day of sunshine one
minute and then overcast and
snowing, then sunshine and over-
cast with snow flying around. It
continued that way throughout the
day. And, we must not forget the
wind. How’s that? How could a per-
son forget the wind with it blowing
50 miles per hour? That’s an exag-
geration. But, the wind was strong
and it did make those tempera-
tures cold. Not spring-like at all.
I’m thinking the weatherman is
confused and is putting us back
into winter. But, from the sounds
of things it will become more
spring- like later in the week. That
will be nice. And, since a person is
talking about the weather, it would
be much appreciated if rain show-
ers would come with those warmer
temperatures. It is just plain sad to
see those pastures so barren of
grasses. And, farmers are in need
of moisture as well. A need for
warmer temperatures and mois-
ture to bring the wheat crops to
life. At times, I’ve thought “What
would it be like if people were in
charge of the weather?” One would
want sunshine, while another
would want rain. So, it’s a good
thing God is in control. Our prayers
continue for that much, much,
needed moisture. Time to get off
the subject of weather and on to my
news column for this week. People
I’ve talked to didn’t have much
news. They are busy calving, so are
sticking close to home.
Now for a bit about a Norwegian
delicacy! I got an email from a
friend of mine, Maureen (Gillaspie)
Wadahl, Hill City. It had to do with
lutefisk! So, you lutefisk enthusi-
asts, did you know they now have
cream of lutefisk soup? Wonder if it
has that lutefisk smell? Maureen
tells that the grocery store in town
even has lutefisk TV dinners. Uff
da, vhat vill dey tink of next? I am
half Norwegian, but just between
you and me, I’m not real fond of
lutefisk. Give me that lefse any
time. Maureen said that grocery
store has lefse every winter. Must
be some Norwegian heritage con-
nected with that store, or Norwe-
gians in the area. According to
Maureen, they got a foot of snow
last Friday afternoon, but by noon
the next day they were plowed out.
Though Maureen reported the
snow was pretty to look at with
snow on all the pine trees. She was
glad it was spring and not Novem-
ber 1. The snow won’t last too long!
Thanks for sharing, Maureen.
Jeff and Jen Jones were in
Brookings Saturday. Jeff and D.J.
Rush have been coaching sopho-
more boys’ basketball players from
the Philip school. There was a
Willie Mac basketball tournament
at Brookings Saturday. Boys from
Midland, who go to the Philip
school and were in the tournament,
were Brody Jones and Kruse
Bierle. Congratulations to that
sophomore boys’ team. They won
two games and lost the third by
only two points. Good job!
JoAnn Bork reported they are
pretty much staying home with
calving going on. Their son, Danny,
lives in Louisville, Ky., and is get-
ting into this running thing. He
has run the 5K, did the Triple
Crown 10K and his next run will be
a 10-mile run. Good for him!
The Trinity Lutheran ladies fin-
ished their quilt making Monday,
March 18. So, that is a big job done,
but a project that is a thoughtful
gift to Midland senior graduates
and those in the military from this
area.
I finally caught up with Joy
Jones checking on her news.
Granddaughter Cassidy Trapp was
home for spring break earlier in the
month. Her first year at School of
Mines in Rapid City is almost be-
hind her. On March 17, Joy and
Jerry had Mike and Debbie Trapp
and family for their traditional St.
Patrick’s Day dinner of corn beef
and cabbage. It’s the luck of the
Irish when you get that corn beef
and cabbage.
Roy and Carol Hunt have birth-
days a day apart. Roy’s is March
23, he turned 72, and Carol hit the
big “70” on March 24. To help Roy
and Carol celebrate their birth-
days, Wilma, Clint and Prerry
Saucerman, Tom and Mary Par-
quet, Roger and Peg Johnson,
Pierre, Teresa Palmer, Murdo,
Keith Hunt, Christine Niedan, Jan
Tolton and Michelle Meinzer, all of
Midland, took a carry-in supper to
their home Saturday. Happy birth-
day, Roy and Carol! Where do the
years go?
Sunday at Sunday school,
Carol’s birthday was again cele-
brated. LeeAnna Fitzgerald made
a beautiful cake and others
brought ice cream and snacks to go
with it. Carol’s birthday continued
to be celebrated at the Midland
Community Library board meeting
Thursday, where everyone sang
“Happy Birthday.” Carol was given
a little pink hostess cake with a
candle in it, along with snacks for
everyone. Compliments of librarian
Karel Reiman! So, Carol, guess it
makes turning ‘70’ not so bad,
right?
A little bird told me Alice (Dono-
van) Venner, Pierre, will be cele-
brating her 84th birthday March
29. Her daughter, Micaela, reports
her mom has a mix of good days
and not so good days. It would
brighten her day to hear from folks
and to share a memory. Reaching
out and caring helps make those
tough days a bit better. Happy
birthday, Alice! May God grant you
the gift of a good day on your birth-
day!
My brother, Phil Meyers, called
Sunday evening. His wife, Bernie,
is in the Pierre hospital with pneu-
monia. Phil had a checkup at Sioux
Falls to see if the chemo treat-
ments in his bladder had done
what they hoped. They found two
more tumors, so, those will have to
be taken care of. But, he has a good
attitude. He says it could be worse.
Wishing you both God’s healing.
Terry Schofield had surgery a
week ago Friday to remove a can-
cerous tumor. He is still at the
Rapid City Regional Hospital and
is hoping to be able to come home
soon. Once he has healed from the
surgery he will undergo cancer
treatments. Our prayers are with
all of these folks who are dealing
with cancer. Only someone who
has gone through it can know what
that journey is like.
Family received word that Doris
(Dale) Jenniges passed away on
March 20, 2013. She was at a nurs-
ing home in Pipestone, Minn., and
was 86 years old. She graduated
from Midland High School in 1947.
Her siblings, Dwayne Dale and
Dorothy (Dale) Spinsby, passed
away a number of years ago. Their
parents were Severt and Gladys
(Root) Dale. Diane (Spinsby) Bork
remembers her grandmother hav-
ing a huge garden. My memories of
that garden are of Severt putting in
a garden in that same spot. Gladys
had passed away, so he took to gar-
dening. We lived in a trailer house
just across the alley from that gar-
den. One day I was outside visiting
with Severt. He told me I could
have a part of that garden on the
west end. So I did. Whenever I
went out to hoe the garden, Severt
would be working in the garden.
His part always looked weed free. I
remember telling him if he didn’t
quit having such a weed free gar-
den, I was going to have to break
his hoe. He would laugh and go on
with his hoeing. Good memories!
Our condolences to Doris’ family.
Judy Daly made a business trip
to Pierre this Monday. She met her
sister, LaVonne Wheeler, and her
husband, Bill, at Pierre, all having
lunch together. LaVonne and Bill
spend the winter in Texas and are
back home in Pierre. With the cold
spring we are having LaVonne
thinks in the future they may need
to extend their stay in Texas. Take
heart, LaVonne, temperatures are
supposed to warm up later this
week. Mother Nature just wanted
to give you a taste of winter, so you
wouldn’t feel left out.
The Midland play cast contin-
ues to practice getting ready for
their performance. They haven’t
settled on a date for sure, but are
thinking sometime towards the
last weekend in April. So, be
watching for updates.
Jerry and I were in Canistota
this past week for treatments at
Ortman Clinic. We went to
Mitchell, Thursday evening, hav-
ing a chance to visit and have sup-
per with our son, Christopher and
Stephanie Nemec and little Laura.
It was cold at Canistota, too. And
for some reason, it always has a
colder bite to it. They had more
moisture to the east than we have
here. Like us in western South
Dakota, they are looking forward to
warmer temperatures as well.
News is short this week. As I men-
tioned before, folks are sticking
close to home, looking after those
baby calves.
As I close my column for this
week, my focus is on Holy Week,
and all that it stands for. Reflecting
on God’s gift to us. The death of His
only son Jesus on the cross and
Jesus rising from the tomb on
Easter Sunday, to give us life. He
loved us that much. Wishing each
of you a God blessed Easter with
family and friends!
House Bill 1123, “an act to in-
crease the surcharge on certain
hunting licenses for predator con-
trol purposes, approve temporary
funding provisions relating to pred-
ator control, and to declare an
emergency,” has been signed into
state law by Governor Dennis Dau-
gaard.
The law includes an emergency
provision that puts it into immedi-
ate effect when signed by the gov-
ernor.
It increases the surcharge on cer-
tain hunting licenses from five dol-
lars to six dollars, in essence rais-
ing the fee of these hunting li-
censes by one dollar: resident com-
bination, resident senior combin-
ation, resident small game, nonres-
ident small game, nonresident wa-
terfowl, nonresident early Canada
Goose, nonresident Spring light
goose, all shooting preserve li-
censes, and all big game hunting li-
censes with the exception of youth
deer and mentored big game hunt-
ing licenses.
Previously South Dakota law re-
quired a five dollar surcharge on
these licenses that was split evenly
between sportsmen’s access and
landowner depredation programs.
The South Dakota legislature en-
acted the new law to provide addi-
tional one dollar funding to the
state’s animal damage control fund
that assists agriculture producers
with predator and varmint control
issues.
The fee change is now in effect
for general license sales through
storefront license agents and the
Game, Fish and Parks online li-
cense system. The additional fee
will be added to all future applica-
ble big game licenses.
The full text of House Bill 1123
can be found online at http://legis.
state.sd.us/sessions/2013/Bill.aspx?
File=HB1123ENR.htm.
Hunting license costs raised
Secretary of State Jason Gant
has issued the Secretary of State
Economic Report for the fourth
quarter of 2012 based on corporate
registration data.
Gant stated, “Corporate filings in
December 2012 were the highest
on record, and up 23 percent over
December 2011. In December 2012
there were 827 corporate filings.
There were 7,108 new entities cre-
ated in South Dakota in 2012, and
Limited Liability Companies
(LLC’s) dominated all new filings
with 70 percent.
This is the sixth issue of the sec-
retary’s economic report. Gant is-
sues the reports on a quarterly
basis, tracking data on corporate
registration and other business re-
lated activities which take place
through the Secretary of State’s of-
fice.
The report is available for down-
load at Economic Report Issue or
http://issuu.com/sdsospubs/docs/20
12_4th_quarter_sd_economic_re-
portdone_- _20130305?mode=
embed&layout=http%3A%2F%2Fs
kin.issuu.com%2Fv%2Flight%2Fla
yout.xml&showFlipBtn=true.
South Dakota’s economic
report for fourth quarter
People traveling in southeastern
and south central South Dakota
are seeing a familiar spring event
– the annual migration of snow
geese. Geese have been arriving in
growing numbers in areas along
the southern South Dakota border
and northward to Interstate 90.
The snow goose population has
ballooned in the past several years.
To help control them and prevent
further habitat degradation that
those nesting birds have caused to
the Arctic tundra, the United
States Fish and Wildlife Service
has issued a conservation order to
states that allow hunting of snow
geese in the spring.
In South Dakota, the conserva-
tion order runs from February 16
through May 5. Hunting is allowed
statewide with no limit on the
number of snow geese that may be
taken. Hunters are required to
have a valid hunting license, but
the federal waterfowl stamp is not
required. Nontoxic shot is manda-
tory.
The conservation order is specific
to snow and blue geese, and Ross’
geese. Other waterfowl may not be
shot.
For more information on the
Spring conservation order, visit the
South Dakota Game, Fish and
Parks Department website at
http://www.gfp.sd.gov/hunting/wa-
terfowl/spring-light-goose.aspx.
GFP has information on snow
goose migration movement and
hunting opportunity at http://gfp.
sd.gov/hunting/waterfowl/migra-
tion/.
Snow geese unlimited hunting
South Dakota’s four technical in-
stitutes boasted high job-placement
rates again this year, with a com-
bined graduate placement rate of
97 percent. The placement report
for the 2011-12 school year was
presented to the South Dakota
Board of Education during a meet-
ing March 25.
Of the 2,093 graduates respond-
ing, 97 percent reported either
being employed, continuing their
education or entering the military.
The survey response rate was 91
percent, and 89 percent of all those
responding said they were not only
employed, they were also employed
in a training-related career field.
“The really exciting thing about
these numbers is they’ve been good
for several years now – and still
they just keep getting better,” said
Deb Shephard, president of Lake
Area Technical Institute in Water-
town, which was just named one of
the top two-year colleges in the
country by the Aspen Institute.
The report tracks several key
factors, including location, job sta-
tus, and entry wage through a sur-
vey mailed to graduates. The num-
bers, including response rate and
entry wage, have traditionally been
very strong, despite a national
economy struggling to rebound
after recession.
At its meeting, the board also ap-
proved a new program and a pro-
gram expansion for Western
Dakota Technical Institute in
Rapid City. Western Dakota will be
beginning a precision machining
program in fall 2013, and WDT’s
practical nursing program is being
upgraded to an associate’s of ap-
plied sciences degree.
“These programs align with the
state’s goals of filling rural health
care jobs and growing the manufac-
turing sector in South Dakota,”
said WDT President Mark Wilson.
“In addition, they also make sense
in terms of the development we’re
seeing in our region right now.”
The board also approved a $7 per
credit increase in tuition and fees
for the upcoming year.
Technical institutes
boast high job
placement rates
As the third anniversary of the
Affordable Care Act approaches,
Health and Human Services Secre-
tary Kathleen Sebelius announced
that people with Medicare in South
Dakota saved $17,536,391 on pre-
scription drugs.
“By making prescription drugs
more affordable, the Affordable
Care Act is improving and promot-
ing the best care for people with
Medicare,” Sebelius said.
The Affordable Care Act makes
Medicare prescription drug cover-
age (Part D) more affordable by
gradually closing the gap in cover-
age where beneficiaries must pay
the full cost of their prescriptions
out of pocket. This gap is known as
the donut hole. Nationally, since
the law was enacted, more than 6.3
million people with Medicare saved
over $6.1 billion on prescription
drugs.
Total savings reported by HHS is
over $17,536,000 for South Dakota.
The total number of beneficiaries
was 253, with an average discount
per beneficiary of $1,161, thus
making the total gap discount
amount $293,690.
People with Medicare in the
donut hole now receive discounts
when they purchase prescription
drugs at a pharmacy or order them
through the mail, until they reach
the catastrophic coverage phase.
The Affordable Care Act gave those
who reached the donut hole in 2010
a one-time $250 check, then began
phasing in discounts and coverage
for brand-name and generic pre-
scription drugs beginning in 2011.
The law will provide additional
savings each year until the cover-
age gap is closed in 2020.
In 2013, the health care law in-
creases the discounts and savings
to 52.5 percent of the cost of most
brand name drugs and 21 percent
of the cost of covered generic drugs.
Also under the Affordable Care
Act, those who choose to enroll in
Medicare Advantage and Part D
now have access to a wider range of
high quality plan choices, with
more four- and five-star plans than
were previously available. The Af-
fordable Care Act continues to
make Medicare more secure, with
new tools and enhanced authority
to crack down on criminals who
cheat the program.
For more information, visit
http://www.healthcare.gov/law/fea-
tures/65-older/drug-discounts/.
Medicare
Part D closing
gap on
prescription
drug costs
Community
Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 7
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A suggestion from a reader is to
use hydrogen peroxide to loosen a
rusty nut or screw. They advise
pouring a little on top of the
bolt/screw and allow it to pene-
trate for a few minutes. The bolt/
screw should then be loose enough
to turn.
,.
Empty egg cartons can be used
to keep your boot tops from sag-
ging over to their sides. Just slip
the egg carton in the top of the
boot and it will stay up straight.
,.
This one sounded like a good one
to try - Instead of frosting your
cupcakes use a marshmallow.
Simply place one large marshmal-
low on top of each cupcake two
minutes prior to taking them out
of the oven.
,.
For you crocheters and knitters
this might be a good idea - put
your ball of string in a beverage
pitcher with a lid. The ball of yard
stays in one place and the thread
feeds out the spout. I’ve seen some
round, gallon pitchers that would
be perfect for this.
,.
A new use for your old doilies is
to make them into bowls, using a
blown up balloon or a glass bowl as
your form. I would suggest setting
you bowl in a tray to catch any run
off. Soak the doily in liquid starch
for about one minute. Gently
wring out starch. The more starch
removed the quicker the drying
time, but the bowl will be weaker.
Gently smooth doily around form.
Let dry completely. This may take
several hours depending on the
amount of starch and the humidity
in the air.
Once dry, gently remove the
dried doily from the bowl.
,.
Along that same line are button
bowls. These are very pretty, but I
think it would take more patience
than I have. From what I’ve found
there are two ways to go about
this.
One is to blow up a balloon,
cover the desired area with glue
and add buttons. You’re fighting
gravity so this might be where my
patience would leave. Once the de-
sired amount of buttons are ad-
hered, let dry. Then coat three
times with more glue, allowing
each coat to dry completely. When
finished deflate the balloon and
you have your bowl. Thick glue
works best, even letting it get
tacky before applying buttons
seems to help a website said. Also
don’t pop the balloon the force
could damage the bowl; instead let
the air out slowly.
The second version is to cover
the inside of a form – a bowl, plate,
serving dish, etc. – with aluminum
foil. Then lay down your glue and
buttons. Again topcoat with more
glue. Going this route I would
think you could aid the process by
tacking them together with hot
glue.
,.
We encourage our readers to share
their items of interest. Just email
nancy@pioneer-review.com, drop
your item off at our office or mail
it to the Pioneer Review, PO Box
788, Philip, SD 57567.
We pass ideas along, but make no
guarrantees to the reader.
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Uatho|ìcs Peturnìng Pome
5acred Peart Parìsh, Phì|ìp
wì|| conduct an
ongoìng serìes ca||ed
"Uatho|ìcs Peturnìng Pome"
on sìx consecutìve Monday
evenìngs at 7:00 p.m.
ìn the church basement
begìnnìng Aprì| 8th.
No matter how |ong you have been away, and
for whatever reason, we ìnvìte you to consìder
renewìng your re|atìonshìp wìth the Uatho|ìc
Uhurch.
1hese sessìons are conducted ìn a support group
format. Lveryone ìs we|come, no matter where they
are from. No preregìstratìon requìred.
Ior more detaì|s, ca||
Uoordìnator Marìanne Ireìn · 859-2312
859-2744
or 685-3068
Philip
2006 Chevy 2500HD
Rolling Calf Shelter!
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HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
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& new CoIormatch System for
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Call today
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Come & Go Baby Shower
for Amy Pi nel a & Toby Hook
(Expect i ng a Boy i n May)
Saturday Apri l 6 • 1 - 4 p. m.
Senechal Apt s. Lobby, Downtown Phi l i p
Registered at Target & Walmart
Hosted by  Aunt J’Nai & Great-Aunt Debbie
Dona Mae Mitchell, age 77, of
Elko, Nev., died March 20, 2013, in
Elko.
Survivors include her husband,
Dean Mitchell of Elko; her chil-
dren, Michael (Peggy) Weldon of
Lancaster, Ohio, Rebecca (Rocky)
Williams of Philip, and Diana
Fuentes of Reno, Nev.; six grand-
children, Jeremiah Adkins, Amber
(Ron) Eaton, Joshua (Tiffany) Wel-
don, all of Lancaster, Ohio; Joshua
(Jamie) Williams, Jonathan (Car-
rie) Williams, Lacy Williams, all of
Rapid City; and 11 great-grandchil-
dren; her brother, Carl (Marie)
England of Vallejo, Calif.; and sis-
ter-in-law, Lotty Fuentes of Red-
wood City, Calif.; and a host of
nieces and nephews.
Dona Mae was preceded in
death by her parents; her steppar-
ents; her husband, Donald
Fuentes; sister-in-law, Liz Jones; a
nephew, Doug Fultz; and brother-
in-law, Joe Fuentes.
Per her request, she was cre-
mated.
Memorial services are pending
with the Rush Funeral Home of
Philip.
A full obituary will appear in
next week’s paper.
Dona Mae Mitchell_______________
The landmarks this week of the
hills around the area are the
Hawkey Hill that was named after
the Hawkeys who lived at the top
just about a mile and a half south
of Rich Smith’s. The place had a big
red barn on it plus a house and
other outbuildings. Rich who
bought the place moved the barn to
the bottom of the hill and added to
it for a cattle shelter. That hill was
steep and at the top was a mean
curve which is still there. If you did
not know the road, you could go off
it into the gulley below. The last
person that I remember going into
the gulley was Allen Riddell who
was coming home from Cotton-
wood. He never got hurt, but it was
a rough ride and I never did hear
how the car survived or if it had
any damage.
Then there is a hill between
Tucker and Rich Smith that is
steep and we had a ‘48 Chevy six
cylinder truck and they were com-
bining over to Rich’s and Kenneth
was helping. Gladys was about to
run out of water in the cistern. So I
took our thousand gallon water
tank and proceeded to Quinn to get
a load of water. When I got to that
hill, I had visions of it stalling out
and going down the hill backwards,
so I stopped at the bottom and
shifted the truck into super low
and went right up the hill. I got
back in time for dinner.
Then there is a hill up by Byron
and Peggy Parsons that comes up
out of their place. I don’t recall why
we were up to that place. It was be-
fore Byron lived there and they
were loading cattle out and they
had to take a tractor and pull the
trucks up that hill. It was long and
steep. Of course, they have gravel
on it now, but I bet it still is bad if
it is snowy or icy.
The trucks have also improved a
lot, but the semis are still helpless
when the roads are not good, even
with gravel. So, if a load is to go out
and the weather and roads are not
good, they just cancel the trip and
go another day.
This is the end of memories of
those unpleasant hills and old
landmarks. There are very few of
the younger generation who would
know where to find you if you gave
a hill as to your whereabouts. They
would not know what you were
talking about. They have the roads
all marked with little green signs
now and I still have not gotten
them all figured out. I have to look
in one of the directories with the
maps to see where the new roads
are marked and finally figure out
where I want to go.
Lincoln and Lisa McIlravy and
family are here from Nebraska vis-
iting their folks, Kenneth and
Linda McIlravy, Philip, and Ted
and Laura Kjerstad, Quinn, and
the rest of the families, the Soren-
sons, Fitches, Sandals and other
family and friends in the area over
the weekend. Lisa attended the
prom’s grand march to see rela-
tives who were attending. After the
grand march, Lisa joined her sis-
ters, Cheryl Fitch and Anita San-
dal, downtown Philip for dinner.
Mary Eide attended the grand
march. We should be proud of you
young folks, what a bunch of beau-
tiful and handsomely dressed
young people.
I enjoyed meeting up with a long-
time friend, Leilana Hand, who I
hadn’t seen for three or four years.
We attended the grand march to-
gether and got to visit. We both
were pointing out our grandchil-
dren who were attending the prom.
My how time flies. It doesn’t seem
that it was that long ago that we
saw each other every other week.
Hands are related to the
Schofields.
The Hands had family in the
nursing home when I worked there
and Leilania would be at Jean
Schofield’s at times when she came
to Philip. They live a long ways
north of Philip. She said that she
was blessed with a flat tire that
day and was concerned about get-
ting back home as the spare was
not that great either, but her kids
were there so I am sure they saw to
it that she go home okay.
Trevor, Christa, Keagan and
Aven Fitch treated Mary Eide to
dinner after the grand march.
Jensen and Rayler went to the
show with Krammerers and then
went home with them to spend the
weekend as Trevor, Christa, Kea-
gan and Aven were leaving at 5:00
a.m. to go to Brookings to watch
Colby and the Peterson boys wres-
tle. I often wonder how everyone
keeps up with all that is going on
with their childrens’ activities.
They have a very tight schedule to
get everywhere and to everything
that they are involved with. It
seems to keep me on the run just
going to Philip to watch them. I sel-
dom go out of town to any of their
activities. Trevor and family were
to return Sunday. I bet they will be
a tired bunch.
Baby calves are still arriving.
Marvin said that some were chill-
ing down on the cold, windy and
snowy days, which the weather has
been this week. We had so much
wind out of the east last week. He
had to put a few babies in the hot
box to warm them up, after being
in there for awhile, they got up and
were going. Seems once they get
dried off and warm and get some of
their mother’s milk, they are
strong enough to put up with the
cold after that.
Our sympathy goes out to the
families of Rita (O’Connor) Nari-
cisian and Will Schofield. They
shall be missed, not only by their
families but by the friends they
had.
Rita was a devoted daughter to
her mother. She was back often
and spent a lot of time with her
mother, Catherine, before and
while she was in the Philip Nurs-
ing Home. She liked to visit her
brothers and their families when
here also. Not only did she visit her
mother at the nursing home, but
we would see her bringing other
residents and staff treats when she
visited.
Will Schofield was special to me.
He worked and lived here. When I
would come home from work he
would have supper ready and he
would always say I dirtied the
dishes, so I will wash them, you go
sit down and rest. He was a pretty
good cook! He would let Kenneth
help him once in awhile, so they
could tell each other wild stories
while they were doing dishes. I can
remember his laugh, it was conta-
gious. You did not have to know
what he was laughing about, you
just had to laugh with him anyway.
Will played in the band with
Marvin and would be here a lot. I
used to drive them to and from
dances. Between Will, Mike Sea-
ger, Brad Schofield, and Marvin,
you could have your hands full!
What a bunch, but I would not
trade those days for anything. Such
a bunch of wonderful memories.
Well, maybe a few were not so
wonderful, when I would have to
put my foot down and say “knock it
off guys, that’s about enough for
awhile. Do you want to get out and
walk or do you want me to turn this
rig around and go back home?” Will
would always make a card for any
occasion for us and he would draw
a picture on a folded paper. It was
usually a western scene or a funny
cartoon of his own imagination. He
could draw almost anything.
I did not call anyone for news as
it seemed this column is kind of
long and I ran out of time and I
needed to get to Philip early be-
cause I had an appointment with
the dentist. Catch everyone next
week.
True happiness comes from the
joy of deeds well done, the zest of
creating things new. – Antoine De
Saint - Exupery
Happiness is not a goal, it is a by-
product. – Eleanor Roosevelt
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Obituaries, con’t.
Send
Classifieds
to:
ads@
pioneer-
review.com
Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports & Accomplishments
859-2430 • Philip
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859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar................................31-17
Handrahan Const .....................29-19
Shad’s Towing...........................27-21
Badland’s Auto..........................21-27
Rockers......................................19-29
Petersen’s..................................17-31
Hightlights:
Wendell Buxcel............248 clean/543
Jim Kujawa .................238 clean/577
Kim Petersen......................200 clean
Jason Petersen ....3-10 split; 223/592
Matt Reckling......8-10 split; 208/573
Vickie Petersen .....................186/516
Cory Boyd..............................200/555
Gail Reutter ..........................196/504
Trina Brown.................................178
Tena Slovek..................................177
Venessa Buxcel .................4-5-7 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Peoples Market .........................28-12
Philip Motor..............................27-13
G&A Trenching.........................22-18
Kennedy Impl ...........................21-19
George’s Welding ......................19-21
Bear Auto..................................16-24
Philip Health Service ...............14-26
Kadoka Tree Service.................13-27
Highlights:
Cory Boyd..............................225/596
Tony Gould............................239/596
Randy Boyd...........................261/594
Johnny Wilson ......................214/546
Matt Schofield ............3-10 split; 530
Coddy Gartner ......................200/523
Terry Wentz .................................512
James Mansfield ..........2-7 split; 506
Wendell Buxcel ............................505
Alvin Pearson...............................504
Jim Larson ..................201 clean/502
Fred Foland..................................502
Dan Addison.................3-6-7-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Invisibles.............................37.5-14.5
Cutting Edge Salon ..................34-18
State Farm..........................33.5-18.5
Bowling Belles ....................25.5-26.5
Jolly Ranchers ....................16.5-35.5
Highlights:
Cindy Wilmarth...........................183
Dody Weller..................................161
Charlene Kjerstad........................159
Sandra O’Connor ..........159, 152/423
Shirley Parsons............................154
Deanna Fees.......4-7-9 split; 153/423
Judy Papousek.............................153
Lila Whidby ........................3-10 split
Christy Park.......................3-10 split
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................35-9
Morrison’s Haying ....................28-16
Hildebrand Concrete ................21-23
First National Bank .................20-24
Wall Food Center......................20-24
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................19.5-24.5
Just Tammy’s......................16.5-27.5
Dorothy’s Catering ...................16-28
Highlights:
Lindsey Hildebrand..............193/536
Dani Herron.................................189
Lois Porch..............................182/487
Dorothy Hansen...........................181
Stacey Schulz ........................177/486
Kalie Kjerstad..............................131
Jessica Wagner...........3-10 split; 126
Shar Moses............................198/488
Amy Morrison .......................190/481
Marlis Petersen.....................180/530
Val Schulz .............................185/525
Kathy Arthur ........................183/515
Emily Kroetch..............................174
Rachel Kjerstad............................173
Brittney Drury.............................172
Debbie Gartner ............................172
Linda Stangle........................171/475
Annette Hand....5-7, 4-5, 4-5-7 splits
Carrie Buchholz ...................4-9 split
Laniece Sawvell....................2-7 split
Sandee Gittings..................3-10 split
Thursday Men’s
The Steakhouse ..........................35-9
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................34-10
O’Connell Const ........................26-18
Dakota Bar................................20-24
WEE BADD...............................19-25
A&M Laundry...........................16-28
McDonnell Farms .....................13-31
West River Pioneer Tanks .......13-31
Highlights:
Jan Bielmaier........................236/607
Greg Arthur..................................203
Ronnie Coyle ................................224
Harlan Moos.................................222
Randy Boyd ...........4-5 split; 210/572
Brian Pearson .......................202/563
Wendell Buxcel...........5-10 split; 557
Don Weller ...................................213
Jack Heinz ..................2-10 split; 543
Matt Reckling .......................203/539
Alvin Pearson ......................5-6 split;
.....................................194 clean/540
Bart Ramsey........2-7 & 2-5-10 splits
Scott Brech .........................5-10 split
Ky Bowen............................5-10 split
Bryan Buxcel ......................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service........37.5-10.5
Lee & the Ladies.......................29-19
Cristi’s Crew.......................28.5-19.5
Roy’s Repair ..............................26-22
King Pins...................................19-29
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Annette Hand........................178/440
Tanner Norman...........210 clean/569
Jason Schofield ............................503
Angel Nemec .........................181/477
Dorothy Hansen....................181/474
Jeremy Iron Moccison..................212
Duane Hand..........................201/534
Brian Pearson .................3-9-10 split
Theresa Miller......................4-5 split
Roy Miller.................5-6 & 3-10 split
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
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by Del Bartels
In response to the common stu-
dent question of “When will we
ever use this in real life?” troopers
from the South Dakota Highway
Patrol headed Deb Snook’s
trigonometry and physics classes
for a day to show how math is used
by law enforcement.
Troopers Slade Ross, Philip,
Stephen Schopp, Wall, and Dylan
Dowling, Murdo, spent Thursday,
March 21, reconstructing crashes
that were more than just hypothet-
ical. “These are real life situations
that happened right around here,”
said crash reconstruction specialist
Ross.
The samples involved were of
fatal crashes that occurred in the
light of day, during good weather,
on straight roads and the drivers
were sober. Ross said, “Seventy
percent of our crashes happen dur-
ing good weather.” Schopp added,
“We’ve had half a dozen fatals this
year. I think one was weather re-
lated.” The drivers had simply
fallen asleep at the wheel.
Using rise over run, and cosigns
and tangents, the students were
taught how the officers figured the
speed of the vehicles which had
gone airborne during the crashes.
Because of variables, though one
example was airborne a greater
distance, it was actually going far
slower than the other example. The
mathematical constants used were
figures derived from Newton’s laws
of time, distance and gravity.
Snook pointed out, “Notice what
they are doing with all these num-
bers. They are listing them all.”
Ross said that, for civil cases, the
records and math can be brought
into court five years after the
crash. Actual surveying equipment
is used to record distances and
slope.
Lack of seat belt usage figured
into both fatal crashes. Dowling
made the figures real, “We can go
to these crashes and figure all day
long, it’s still the loss of their five-
year-old son.” Dowling concluded,
that even despite the math, the
conclusion still equals “wear your
seatbelt, don’t speed, stay awake.”
The physics students were given
a field trip to a level stretch of high-
way north of Philip. Skid sleds
were illustrated in determining the
specific surface’s friction factor.
Ross, with a student riding shot-
gun, skidded his patrol car three
separate times to leave tread
marks. These were measured to
prove how fast the vehicle was
going before it’s brakes were ap-
plied.
Trig/physics in highway patrol work
Classroom math was first explained in its usage by troopers, then taken to the
field. Most occupations, even working for the highway patrol, can use advanced
math on a regular basis. Photo by Del Bartels
The Philip FFA team competed
in the Sturgis Career Development
Events, Wednesday, March 20.
Advisor Doug Hauk was espe-
cially pleased with the teams’ first
time out, remarking that they
“cleaned house” in many of the cat-
egories.
“There are definitely some areas
we need to work on, but I am really
pleased with the progress of the
students this early in the year,”
stated Hauk. The next contest was
Wednesday, March 27, at Harding
County.
The Philip agriculture mechan-
ics team earned second place. Indi-
vidually, Jade Berry took 6th place,
Brayden Fitch – 9th, and Todd An-
tonsen – 10th.
The Philip agriculture business
management team placed second.
Individually, Nick Hamill – 2nd,
Carl Poss – 5th, and Madison Hand
and Bailey Radway tied – 7th.
The agronomy team took first
place honors. Individually, Avery
Johnson – 2nd, Ryan Van Tassel –
4th, Colter King – 5th, and Gavin
Snook – 10th.
Philip’s natural resources team
also placed first. Individually, Ben
Stangle – 2nd, Thomas Doolittle –
3rd, Brody Jones – 7th, and Rance
Johnson supported as a team mem-
ber.
The range plant identification
team placed second. Individually,
Seth Haigh – 1st, Brock Hanson –
5th, with Blake Pulman, Rachel
Parsons and Bailey Anders as sup-
porting team members.
Philip brought home first place
in floriculture. Individually, Peyton
DeJong – 2nd, Jane Poss – 4th,
Katie Haigh – 10th, with Katie
Hostutler, Shelby Schofield and
Ashton Reedy rounding out the
team.
The livestock team earned a
third place spot. Individually, Reed
Johnson – 5th, Megan Williams –
9th, and Seth Haigh and Grady
Carly finishing the team.
Philip’s horse team also brought
home a first place. Individually,
Hanna Hostutler claimed the top
spot, with help from fellow team
members Jacob Kammerer, Wyatt
Schaack, Justina Cvach, Evonne
Womack and Frankie Womack.
Philip FFA cleans house in CDEs
Students competed at the Sturgis Career Development Events, Wednesday, March 20. Shown, back row, from left: Katie
Hostutler, Nick Hamill, Jade Berry, Brayden Fitch, Casey Reder, Frankie Womack, Grady Carley, Seth Haigh, Blake Puhlman,
Colter King, Gavin Snook and Ashton Reedy. Middle row: Peyton DeJong, Todd Antonsen, Rance Johnson, Brody Jones, Reed
Johnson, Ryan Van Tassel, Avery Johnson, Brock Hanson, Megan Williams, Rachel Parsons, Bailey Anders and Katie Haigh.
Front: Ben Stangle, Jacob Kammerer Madison Hand, Bailey Radway, Evonne Womack, Hanna Hostutler, Thomas Doolittle
and Shelby Schofield. Courtesy photo
The golf season for Philip ath-
letes officially started March 11.
Over 30 students, grades six
through 12, are on the Philip boys’
and girls’ team. According to head
coach Doug Hauk, seven of the
team members are returning let-
termen – Carl Poss, Tate DeJong,
Gavin Snook, Avery Johnson, Tris-
ten Rush, Madison Hand and Pey-
ton DeJong. Four of these six are
returning state competitors – Poss,
T. DeJong, Snook and Hand. Hand
is the only returning state placer,
having earned 16th place at the
state tournament last year. “Hope-
fully to improve on that this year,”
said Hauk.
The team will have an official as-
sistant coach this season, Kory
Foss, and Travis DeJong is volun-
teering as an assistant coach. “It’s
nice having an assistant,” added
Hauk. “With the numbers, they
deemed it safer with more of us.”
Those numbers of team members,
though, are not a problem. “The lit-
tle ones make it fun and interest-
ing, and come up with some good
questions,” said Hauk.
The season may be fun, but will
be work. “We’re in a tough region;
returning state competitors and
deep teams,” said Hauk. “To take
region, we are going to have to play
some good golf.”
Hauk plans on entering extra
competing teams whenever possi-
ble, perhaps a black and an orange
team, or an A and B team, to give
as many members as much experi-
ence as possible. He plans on Philip
competing in as many junior high
tournaments as he can work into
the season’s schedule.
We started that last year, and
some students noticed they could
actually play, and helped others
come out this year, said Hauk. We
will try for more junior varsity and
junior high (meets). “They love it.
Those kids have a good time,” said
Hauk.
It’s nice to see some more girls
out this year, said Hauk. “Hope-
fully the younger ones will step up
and compete for a varsity spot. Lots
of young kids out this year. Good to
see them and hope they stick with
it,” said Hauk.
Some meets allow five players on
each competing group of golfers.
The region and state tournament
call for four-person competing
teams.
2013 golf schedule
April 4 – Elks Golf Invitational,
Rapid City, 10:00 a.m.
April 12 – Wall Invitational, 9:30
a.m.
April 19 – Philip Invitational,
9:30 a.m.
April 25 – Wall Junior Varsity/
Junior High Invitational, 4:00 p.m.
April 27 – Western Great Plains
Conference Golf Tournament at
Philip, 9:30 a.m.
April 30 – Philip Junior Var-
sity/Junior High Invitational, 4:30
a.m.
May 3 – Newell Invitational 9:30
May 6 – Hart Ranch, Pre-Re-
gions, 9:30 a.m.
May 10 – Marjean Huber Invita-
tional (Bison) Golf at Sturgis, 9:30
a.m.
May 13 – Region Golf Tourna-
ment at Hart Ranch, 9:30 a.m.
May 20-21 – State Golf at Brook-
ings, 9:30 a.m.
Region 6B golf schools include
Bison, Harding County, Hill City,
Jones County, Kadoka Area, Lem-
mon, McLaughlin, Newell, Philip,
Rapid City Christian, Takini, Tim-
ber Lake, Wall and White River.
Philip Scottie golf season begins
The 2013 Philip golf team. Back row, from left: assistant coach Kory Foss, Avery Johnson, Tristen Rush, Colter King, Gavin
Snook, Jacob Kreft, Carl Poss and head coach Doug Hauk. Third row: Brice Hanson, Keagen Fitch, Trew DeJong, Colton
Alfery, Dustin Hand, Logan Hand, Nathan Kreft and Colton Crimmins. Second row: Carson Hamill, Chaney Burns, Tate De-
Jong, Madison Hand, Ashton Reedy and Rachel Parsons. Front: Madyson Morehart, Kelsey Hand, Brittney Park, Kobie Davis,
Corbin Kramer and Jane Poss. Not pictured: Josh Quinn, Khalen Martin, Hunter Peterson and Dixie Ehlers. Photo - Bartels
The South Dakota Game, Fish and
Parks Commission has finalized most
big game hunting season dates for
2013 with no changes from 2012.
•Pheasant, Oct. 19 – Jan. 5
•Youth pheasant, Oct. 5-9
•Resident only pheasant, Oct. 12-
14
•Grouse/partridge, Sept. 21 – Jan.
5
•Mourning dove, Sept. 1 – Nov. 9
•Fall turkey, Oct. 1 – Jan. 31
•Archery antelope, Aug. 17 – Sept.
27 & Oct. 14-31
•Firearms antelope, Sept. 28 –
Oct. 13
•Black Hills archery elk, Sept. 1-
30
•Black Hills firearms elk, Oct. 1-
31 & Dec. 1-15
•Archery deer, Sept. 28 – Jan. 15
•Youth deer, Sept. 14 – Jan. 15
•Black Hills deer, Nov. 1-30
•West River deer, Nov. 16 – Dec.
1
•East River deer, Nov. 23 – Dec. 8
•Muzzleloader deer, Dec. 1 – Jan.
15
Dates set for
hunting seasons
Thursday, March 28, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Prom at Philip High School
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDt CÞevg JSDD Creu Cob
LT, 4VD, 5.JL
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Annual
Spring
Clean-Up
Day at
Lake
Waggoner
Golf Course
Sunday,
April 7th
9:00 a.m.
Lunch will be
provided for all
volunteers.
Four smiling ladies showing off. From
left: Hanna Hostutler, Katlin Knutson,
Katie Hostutler and Courtney Bartlett.
Clowning around “Under the Big Top,”
Brian Pfeifle.
Proms are of what memories are made
of, Ashton Reedy, left, and Brett Carley.
All prom ladies are queens for the evening. Here, Krista Wells
shares her time and smile with her niece, Lavonne Neal.
If you can’t have fun at the prom, why bother? Shown, from left: Sam Johnson,
Kady Pinney and Ashton Reedy.
In their own right, every gentleman’s date was his queen, but the guys didn’t have
to spend every second with the gals for everyone to have fun at the Philip High
School prom. Shown, from left: Wyatt Schaack, Grady Carley, Jace Giannonatti
and Jacob Kammerer.
The “Under the Big Top” seal of approval, from left, Kaci Olivier, Jordyn Dekker,
Sam Johnson and Justina Cvach.
What’s “Under the Big Top” without everyone being the clown, the strong man,
and the person on the flying trapeze for at least a few seconds? From left, Katlin
Knutson, Justina Cvach and Casey Reeder.
Attitiude, as long as it goes along with the occasion, is every-
A grand march, a good meal, fun dancing and friends; isn’t
that what a prom is supposed to be? Arianna Arampatzis,
left, and Holly Iwan.
Left, even the
“Under the Big
Top” decora-
tions were rub-
ber-necking to
take a longer
look at the well-
dressed gentle-
men and the el-
egantly
dressed ladies.
Shown are
Afton Burns,
left, and Lakin
Boyd.
thing. From left,
Tara Cantrell, Nick
Hamill, Ashton
Reedy and Jade
Berry.
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Maroh 28, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 10
Notice to Creditors
AND NOTICE OF
INFORMAL PROBATE
AND APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
3-801B
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FILE NO. PRO 12-11
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
):SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ROBERT L. PFEIFER, DECEASED
Notice is given that on the 12th day of De-
cember, 2012, Shelli L. Dowdy, whose
address is 920 EZ Street, Apt. B, Gillette,
WY 82718, and whose phone number is
(307) 660-2018, and Tammi R. Williams,
whose address is 840 Kingswood Drive,
Rapid City, SD 57702, and whose phone
number is (605) 391-9449, were ap-
pointed as Co-Personal Representatives
of the estate of ROBERT L. PFEÌFER.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within sixty (60) days after the
mailing or other delivery of this Notice, or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
Dated the 10th day of March, 2013.
/s/Shelli L. Dowdy
Shelli L. Dowdy
Personal Representative
Estate of ROBERT L. PFEÌFER
/s/Tammi R. Williams
Tammi R. Williams
Personal Representative
Estate of ROBERT L. PFEÌFER
Claims should be sent to:
JANET MAGELKY
CLERK OF COURTS
HAAKON COUNTY
P.O. BOX 70
PHÌLÌP, SD 57567
(605) 859-2672
Copy to:
Mark W. Walters, Attorney at Law
1818 W. Fulton St., Ste. 101
Rapid City, SD 57702
(605) 348-3390
Fax (605) 348-3367
[Published March 21, 28 & April 4, 2013,
at the total approximate cost of $67.57]
Notice of
ResponsibiIity to
ControI
Noxious Weeds and
DecIared Pests
NOTÌCE ÌS HEREBY GÌVEN this 18th
day of March, 2013, pursuant to SDCL
38-22 as amended to all owners, occu-
pants, agents and public officials in
charge of lands in Haakon County, South
Dakota, that they are responsible for the
suppression, control and eradication of
noxious weed and declared pest infesta-
tions that may exist on such lands.
Chemical, biological and/or cultural con-
trol methods used for the suppression,
control and eradication of noxious weed
and declared pest infestations shall be
those approved for such purposes by the
Haakon County Weed and Pest Supervi-
sor, County Extension Educator or the
South Dakota State University Experi-
ment Station.
Upon failure to observe this notice, the
county weed and pest board is required
to proceed pursuant to the law and have
the noxious weeds or declared pests de-
stroyed by such methods as they may
find necessary, the expense of which
shall constitute a lien or be entered as a
tax against the land, and be collected as
other real estate taxes are collected, or
by other means as provided by law.
Plants and animals designated as being
noxious weeds and declared pests in the
state of South Dakota are Leafy spurge,
Saltcedar, Perennial sow thistle, Russian
knapweed, Hoary cress, Canada thistle,
Purple loosestrife and Gypsy moth.
NOTÌCE ÌS HEREBY GÌVEN that upon
establishing probable cause to believe a
noxious weed or declared pest infestation
exists upon any property in Haakon
County, a representative of the Haakon
County Weed and Pest Board will enter
upon said property for the purpose of in-
specting and confirming that such infes-
tation actually exists.
/s/Virgil Smith
Haakon Co. Weed & Pest Supervisor
605-544-3263
[Published March 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $37.69]
Proceedings of the
Town of MidIand
EQUALIZATION BOARD MINUTES
MARCH 18, 2013
The Town Board of the Town of Midland
met on Monday, March 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. in the Town Hall with the following
members present: President Diana
Baeza, Jared Fosheim, Rock Gillaspie
and Finance Officer Michelle Meinzer.
Also present: Toni Rhodes, Haakon
County Director of Equalization.
The Board of Equalization met to exam-
ine the books and reviewed the city and
county growth increase. There were no
objections made.
There being no further business to come
before the board, the meeting adjourned.
Michelle Meinzer Diana Baeza
Finance Officer President
[Published March 28, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $10.07]
Proceedings of
West River Water
DeveIopment District
February 21, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Vice-Chairman Casey
Krogman called the meeting to order at
10:32 a.m. (CT).
Roll Call was taken and Vice-Chairman
Krogman declared a quorum was pres-
ent. Directors present were: Casey Krog-
man, Veryl Prokop and Lorne Smith.
Absent: Joseph Hieb and Marion Matt.
Also present: Jake Fitzgerald, Manager;
Kati Venard, Sec./ Bookkeeper; Dave
Larson, Larson Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Smith to
approve the agenda. Motion carried
unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the January 17, 2013, meeting were pre-
viously mailed to the Board for their re-
view. Motion by Director Smith, seconded
by Director Prokop to approve the Janu-
ary minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BÌLLS: Casey Krog-
man - $55.41, Veryl Prokop - $55.41,
Lorne Smith - $55.41, West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS - $1,000.00, Kadoka Press -
$49.06, Lyman County Herald - $42.00,
Murdo Coyote - $81.89, Pennington
County Courant - $38.66, Pioneer Review
- $41.26, Todd County Tribune - $44.64.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Smith to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DÌSTRÌCT FÌNANCÌAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the January Financial
Report is on file at the District office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Prokop, sec-
onded by Director Smith to approve the
January Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his February report
to the Board. Motion by Director Smith,
seconded by Director Prokop to approve
the Manager's Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW: Manager
Fitzgerald reviewed the 2012 Annual Re-
port which was submitted to the South
Dakota Department of Legislative Audit.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Prokop to approve the 2012 An-
nual Report. Motion carried unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:43 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_____________________________
/s/Kati Venard, Recording Secretary
_____________________________
/s/Casey Krogman, Vice-Chairman
[Publish March 28, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $30.54]
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
BOARD OF EQUALIZATION
MARCH 18, 2013
The Philip City Council met in special ses-
sion on Monday, March 18, 2013, at 4:00
p.m. in the Commissioner's Room of the
Haakon Co. Courthouse for the purpose
of meeting as a Board of Equalization.
Present were Mayor Michael Vetter, FO
Monna Van Lint, Council Members Greg
Arthur, Jason Harry, Trisha Larson, and
Marion Matt. Also present were Deputy
FO Brittany Smith, Public Works Director
Matt Reckling, Haakon Co. Director of
Equalization Toni Rhodes, Del Bartels of
the Pioneer Review, Kent Buchholz; and
later, Tom Radway and Rod Senn with
Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson Engineers.
Absent: Jennifer Henrie and Marty Gart-
ner
Mayor Vetter called the meeting to order
and announced that the Council would
convene as a Board of Equalization.
Mayor Vetter introduced Director of
Equalization Toni Rhodes.
Ms. Rhodes proceeded to review the City
of Philip's total growth for 2012, reported
at $203,460 which is an increase of
$144,039 from 2011. The total growth for
the County is $3,317,873 compared to
$570,922 in 2011. These property growth
numbers are for 2012 taxes payable in
2013.
Ms. Rhodes noted that the majority of the
City's growth includes two properties
which made substantial improvements: a
new home and a business expansion.
With the City's adopted discretionary tax-
ation ordinance, taxes on these two prop-
erties are only being assessed one-fifth
of their assessed valuations which will in-
crease by one-fifth over the next five
years to the point of 100% of their valua-
tions.
Ms. Rhodes went on to note that the Di-
rector of Equalization's Office has not re-
ceived any property assessment
objections within the City this year. She
presented a copy of the assessment roll
for the Council to review and noted that a
copy is on file in her office.
Ms. Rhodes then stated her plans of re-
assessment in 2013. This includes any
new construction and remodeling in addi-
tion to starting on those properties that
have not been reassessed in the last five
years within the City. As for the County,
she will be starting in the northeast corner
with the hopes of reassessing the entire
County within the next five years. She
then asked the City Council to advise her
office of any new construction that they
are aware.
Council Member Matt questioned if she
has assessed Midwest Cooperatives new
rail siding. Ms. Rhodes confirmed that
their rail siding assessment is planned for
2013.
She then asked for any other questions
from the Council. With none forthcoming,
it was noted that the Haakon Co. Com-
missioners will meet as Board of Equal-
ization on April 9, 2013.
Mayor, Council and those in attendance
thanked Ms. Rhodes as she left the meet-
ing at this time.
With no further business to come before
the Board of Equalization, Mayor Vetter
declared the meeting adjourned at 4:05
p.m. and reconvened as the City Council.
OId Business:
None.
New Business:
Street Ìmprovement Projects:
Kent Buchholz, property owner on N.
Wood Ave., addressed the Council with a
request to asphalt overlay that portion of
Hone St., west of the N. Wood Ave. and
Hone St. intersection. Ìt was noted there
is approximately 75 feet by 24 feet of as-
phalt in that area.
Mr. Buchholz stressed that even though
the current asphalt in this area is not in
major disrepair, he is concerned that if
any of the other areas of Hone St. are
ever resurfaced, this area will be over-
looked. For instance, the area to the west
is the gravel dip and the other portion of
Hone St. is on the other side of town.
Therefore, he would like the Council to
consider an asphalt overlay in this area
during the Wood/Walden Ave. Ìmprove-
ment project.
He was questioned about the current con-
dition of the asphalt and curb and gutter
in the area. Mr. Buchholz noted that the
curb and gutter is more than satisfactory
condition. The asphalt is showing signs of
deterioration ÷ cracking, but not to the
point of any potholes. Therefore in his
opinion, an overlay would be sufficient to
repair the asphalt along with matching the
street surface of N. Wood Ave.
Council Member Matt reported that he re-
viewed the area and with its signs of de-
terioration, it is still in better condition than
other streets in town. On the other hand,
he understands Mr. Buchholz's concerns
for this area being overlooked with future
street improvements.
FO Van Lint reported that the City's Engi-
neer has provided the estimate of $1,820
per the contractor's bid amount for as-
phalt. This would be for an 1½¨ thickness
of asphalt in this area, but stressed that
the estimate does not include any labor
or miscellaneous expenses that may be
incurred for the overlay.
PWD Reckling was questioned if this area
has been chip sealed and his thoughts on
the overlay. PWD Reckling confirmed that
the street area has been chip sealed in
the past. His initial estimate for the over-
lay was under $10,000 and is concerned
that if the cracks are not repaired, they
may resurface in the next few years.
Mayor Vetter stressed that the City's
budget for the Wood/Walden Ave. project
is already restricted with the current
plans, but would not be adverse to the
City's Engineer looking into this further.
Tom Radway stated that this area of as-
phalt that they are requesting the City
overlay is very minimal. He mentioned the
City's policy for replacing the entire curb
and gutter in the project area for unifor-
mity and suggested that this overlay
would serve the same purpose in relation
to the asphalt surfacing.
By general consensus of the Council,
they will have the City's Engineer look
into the cost estimates to overlay this por-
tion of asphalt on Hone St. in the near fu-
ture. Ìf budget allows, they will consider it
further.
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Arthur to approve the following Resolu-
tion #2013-01 and #2013-02, Authorizing
Transfers of Funds to Finance the
Wood/Walden Ave. Ìmprovement Project
and Pine St./Wray Ave. Maintenance Ìm-
provement Project as below. Motion car-
ried with all members voting aye.
RESOLUTION #2013-01
AUTHORIZING THE
TRANSFER OF FUNDS FOR
ANTICIPATED
WOOD/WALDEN AVENUE
CONSTRUCTION
EXPENSES
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota has awarded a
construction contract to make
much needed improvements to
Wood and Walden Avenues;
and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
in anticipation of said construc-
tion, did budget to utilize as-
signed funds from the City's
Water and General Fund,
transferring a portion of the
City's assigned Water equip-
ment replacement cash as well
as a portion of the assigned
second penny sales tax rev-
enues to assist in the financing
of said street improvements,
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED, that the City Fi-
nance Officer is authorized to
make the following cash trans-
fers from the Water and Gen-
eral Funds to assist with the
financing of the Wood/ Walden
Avenue Capital Ìmprovement
Project.
CASH TRANSFER FROM:
WATER FUND
WATER FUND CASH
10460 Assigned
Cash.....................$40,000.00
TotaI Transfer Out - Water
Fund ....................$40,000.00
GENERAL FUND
GEN. FUND ASSIGNED
CASH
10411 Assign. Cash 2nd Cent
oontinued on page 11
[Published March 28, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $80.60]
Pleneer Bevlew · 859-251é · Phlllp
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Maroh 28, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
Tax..................... $135,000.00
TotaI Gen. Fund 2nd Penny
Cash ..................$135,000.00
TOTAL CASH
TRANSFER........$175,000.00
CASH TRANSFERS TO:
CAP. PROJECT FUND
WOOD/WALDEN AVE.
CAP. PROJECT
WOOD/WALDEN:
39122 Transfer Ìn
from Water ...........$40,000.00
39121 Transfer Ìn from 2nd
Penny Tax. ........ $135,000.00
TotaI Cash Transferred
In........................$175,000.00
Dated this 18th day of March
2013.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint
Finance Officer
(Published once on March 28,
2013)
RESOLUTION #2013-02
AUTHORIZING THE
TRANSFER OF FUNDS FOR
ANTICIPATED PINE STREET
& WRAY AVENUE CON-
STRUCTION
EXPENSES
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota has awarded a
construction contract to make
much needed maintenance im-
provements in the form of as-
phalt overlay and concrete turn
out construction to E. Pine
Street & Wray Avenue; and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
in anticipation of said construc-
tion, did budget to utilize a por-
tion of surplus cash from the
City's Garbage Fund, transfer-
ring it to the General Fund per
SDCL 9-21-26.1 to assist in fi-
nancing said improvement.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED, that the City Fi-
nance Officer is authorized to
make the following cash trans-
fer from the Garbage Fund to
assist with financing the E.
Pine Street & Wray Avenue
Maintenance Project.
CASH TRANSFER FROM:
GARBAGE FUND
GARBAGE FUND CASH
10400 Cash..........$40,000.00
TotaI Transfer Out - Garbage
Fund ................... $40,000.00
CASH TRANSFERS TO:
GENERAL FUND
GEN. FUND
ASSIGNED CASH
10411 Assign. Cash 2nd Cent
Tax........................$40,000.00
TotaI Gen. Fund 2nd Penny
Cash ................... $40,000.00
TOTAL CASH
TRANSFER..........$40,000.00
Dated this 18th day of March
2013.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint
Finance Officer
(Published once on March 28,
2013)
Council then reviewed the following build-
ing permit: Ralph McQuirk for Donald &
Delores Poss ÷ emergency water line re-
pair/replacement.
Following review, motion was made by
Matt, seconded by Harry to approve the
above permit as presented. Motion car-
ried.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Larson to approve the Park/Recreational
Free Water Policy as amended. A copy of
the policy is on file in the Finance Office.
Motion carried.
The Garbage Committee will meet on
Thursday, Mar. 28th at 4:00 p.m. to open
bids for the Residential Garbage Con-
tract.
Airport Ìmprovement Project:
Rod Senn, City's Engineer with Kadrmas,
Lee & Jackson, reviewed the Dept. of
Transportation Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration (FAA) impact study on the Airport
Land Acquisition/Environmental Assess-
ment (LA/EA) project. Ìt was noted that
the FAA has determined a "Finding Of No
Significant Ìmpact¨ or FONSÌ from the
completed EA in relation to the proposed
LA for runway protection zones (RPZs).
Mr. Senn provided the Council with an in-
formation packet explaining the purpose
of the LA project and reviewed the last
updated project map. The map identifies
the RPZs around the City's airport that
the FAA has determined as being most
susceptible for airport accidents. The City
currently has easements for these areas,
but the FAA is intent on the ownership
lying with the City in order to warrant that
they remain clear of any obstructions.
Over the course of the project, the FAA
has approved two areas that the City will
be exempt from pursing ownership of, but
will be required to maintained with ease-
ments. This includes the area north of the
SD Highway 14 and over the dam located
southeast of airport.
FO Van Lint also pointed out that the City
will also be pursuing ownership of the air-
port access road. This will allow the road
to qualify for improvements through the
FAA.
Mr. Senn then requested the Council's
approval of the LA Project Errata which
will be proceeded with the publication of
the FONSÌ. Following thirty days of publi-
cation, it will be become effective and the
City can move forward with reviewing
land exchange options with those
landowners within the RPZs.
Mr. Senn stressed that the FAA is
adamant about the City exchanging, not
purchasing land with the landowners.
This is due to the fact that the City has
land that is currently not being utilized for
aviation purposes. For instance, the City's
airport pasture land that this currently
being leased out would be optimal for the
land exchange. He also noted that the
land will have to be surveyed and ap-
praised in order to ensure a fair exchange
of the land. These expenses are grant el-
igible and will be reimbursed once the
land exchange is finalized with the
landowners.
Council Member Matt questioned about
the possibility of landowners being ad-
verse to the land exchange? Mr. Senn
noted that the FAA would be contacted
and it would be at their discretion to pur-
sue condemnation. He noted that the City
has been awarded grant money for the
project, but the FAA is not in favor of pur-
chasing the land.
Following review, motion was made by
Arthur, seconded by Harry to approve the
LA FONSÌ and authorize the Mayor's sig-
nature on the LA Project Errata. Motion
carried with all members voting aye.
Mr. Senn thanked the Council and re-
ported that he would be in contact with
the Airport Committee to review different
land exchange options once the survey-
ing is completed and the publication re-
quirements for the FONSÌ have been
satisfied.
Mr. Senn then went on to review the Ìn-
demnity Agreement that the Council re-
quested from NetJets, Ìnc. regarding the
use of the City's airport. He noted that the
agreement addresses all of the previous
stipulations noted by the Council with a
few discrepancies. For instance, NetJets,
Ìnc. previously listed only that of the Cita-
tion Excel aircraft, but the agreement
names various aircrafts with a number of
them weighing well above the approved
weight limitations for the airport runway.
He also noted that the agreement fails to
include a clause to negotiate with them
for any damages that may occur at the
airport due to their aircraft. He stressed
that regardless of these concerns, they
have a greater liability as damages to
their aircraft would be substantially
greater than that to the City's airport and
therefore, he would recommend entering
into the agreement.
Ìt was also noted that City Attorney Tollef-
son has reviewed and approved the
agreement taking into consideration the
concerns noted by Mr. Senn.
Following review, the City Council, by
general consensus approved the Ìndem-
nity Agreement as presented by NetJets,
Ìnc.
The next regular Council meeting will be
held on Monday, April 1, 2013, at 7:00
p.m. in the Community Room.
With no further business to come before
the Council, the Mayor declared the
meeting adjourned at 4:40 p.m.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Brittany Smith
Deputy Finance Officer
[Published March 28, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $206.96]
Prooeedings of the
City of Philip Board of
Lqualization
oontinued from page 10
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musIc,¨ nnd ho snId, ¨And fhoy do
If nII wIfh fhoIr hInd Iogs!¨ Hmm.
Ofhor sforIos rnngod fo onrIy ox-
µorImonfs wIfh roIIIng our own cIg-
nroffos, fo ronsfIng wIId µIums In
fho µIum fhIckof, fo swIngIng on
roµos In fho hnymow. Mnrgnrof Jn-
cobs hnd n µosIfIon of honor, sho
wns µrIvIIogod fo Iond n horso fo
roII hny uµ Info fho hnymow. InrIy
momorIos of fho Sonrs, !oobuck
CnfnIog In fho oufhouso, you know
fho groon Indox µngos woro nof
quIfo so scrnfchy!
Thursdny, Mnrch 2l, 20l3, nf
Somorsof Courf wo hnd bIngo wIfh
wInnors: ShIrIoy Hodgson, IIoy
OIson, ArIono Horbor (nof n rosI-
donf), who gnvo hor µrIzos fo HoIon
Amundson, AImn CruonIg, Mnr-
jorIo CnffIn, Mnry KInudf, Agnos
Tnsfnd, fwIco.
Af fho now rosIdonf rocoµfIon,
wo gnvo nµµInuso for fwo now rosI-
donfs, !IIn IIosf nnd MnrIIyn
InIIIo. Tronfs woro Ico cronm nnd
sfrnwborry nnd/or chocoInfo foµ-
µIng. Thnnk you for fho nIco µnrfy,
Somorsof Courf nnd our ncfIvIfy dI-
rocfors.
Io suro fo sfoµ by nnd soo fho nf-
frncfIvo dIsµIny on socond fIoor.
Shnwn hns nrrnngod fho coIIocfIon
of owIs fhnf boIong fo now Somor-
sof Courf rosIdonf, Ðorofhy (Ðof)
IusfIoId.
Somorsof Courf Is µInnnIng n
now TV commorcInI. I hnvo boon
foId fhnf Somorsof Courf rosIdonf
MnxIno Iurgoss wIII nµµonr on If
nIong wIfh fwo IIffIo gIrIs who nro
rovoIIng In fho doIIghffuI nrrny of
foys nnd µorIod cIofhIng fhnf Is
found on fhIrd fIoor nf Somorsof
Courf`s ¨Crnndmn`s AffIc.¨
!oforrIng ngnIn fo fho dIscovory
of fho Vorondryo IInfo nonr If.
IIorro on Iobrunry l6, l9l3, (jusf
l00 yonrs ngo,) M.!. Hnnson con-
suIfod fho IhIIIµ IIonoor !ovIow
nnd fhoy kIndIy sonf hIm nn nrfIcIo
fhnf my nIoco, Wnndn Moyor Arfz,
hnd gIvon fhom from fho SfurgIs
nowsµnµor In l985.
M.!. Hnnson hns Ionf mo fho
µrInfouf of fho Soufh Ðnkofn
SchooI of MInos frIµ fo Iogofn
Mnrch 2-9. You mny borrow If from
mo. M.!. nnd hIs wIfo, Inrbnrn,
nnd SÐSM&T sfudonfs, Tony
KuIosn, CoIo Iodford, !oboccn
Coromugn nnd TrncI CIbson, woro
guosfs of fho !nIvorsIdnd JnvorI-
nnn.
IrIdny, Mnrch 22, nf Somorsof
Courf, wo hnd fho ncfIvIfy of WII
bowIIng.
Mnrch 2l, Irono McKnIghf`s son,
Sfnn, cnmo fo vIsIf hor durIng
bIngo. Ho wns IookIng good nffor
hIs roconf byµnss.
Hnµµy bIrfhdny fo Somorsof
Courf rosIdonf, IrvIng Amundson,
on Mnrch 2l.
Mnrch 22, MIko KIImor cnmo
nnd µInyod fho µInno for us nnd n
good bunch of rosIdonfs gnfhorod
nround. Ho µInyod sonsonnI,
gosµoI, nnd oId fnvorIfos. Ivon
¨Horo Comos Iofor CoffonfnII!¨
Thnnks, MIko.
In fho ovonIng of Mnrch 22, snow
wns comIng down fhIck nnd soff.
My son, ÐnvId K. Hnnson, If.
IIorro, sonf mo n fwo-µngo fyµod
Ioffor. Ho hns honrd n mondowInrk
sIngIng fhIs sµrIng nf sovon do-
groos nbovo zoro. Ho hns soon somo
bIrds fhnf woro bIuo, mnybo nzuro
or IndIgo bunfIngs.
Af Somorsof Courf on IrIdny nf-
fornoon, bonrd gnmos woro schod-
uIod nnd wo hnd fhroo gnmos
goIng. WhIsf µInyors woro Irono Ar-
bnch, Inn OorIIIno, ShIrIoy Hodg-
son, nnd Mnrgnrof Jncobs.
QuIddIor µInyors woro Mnry !ou
Iofors, !ucIIIo Huofhor, MnrjorIo
CnffIn, AddIo !orvIg, SnndI nnd VI-
vInn Hnnson. Af fho rummI-cubo
fnbIo woro Irono Cox, IIoy OIson,
MnrcoIIn, Susnn nnd Shnwn.
Thnnk you fo AnnIo IrunskIII, II-
brnrInn nf fho IhIIIµ IIbrnry, for
sondIng fho book ¨Ono !oom Coun-
fry SchooI Soufh Ðnkofn SforIos.¨
M.!. Hnnson hns fIrsf dIbs on rond-
Ing If (nffor mo) nnd nffor fhnf, ros-
Idonfs nf Somorsof Courf mny
borrow If.
Þ/.:.e Ç--.+::oontinued from 4
Irom droughf fo fIoodIng fo nII
fhnf's In bofwoon, fho ÞnfIonnI
OconnIc nnd AfmosµhorIc AdmInIs-
frnfIon (ÞOAA) Is µrodIcfIng n IIf-
fIo of ovoryfhIng fhIs sµrIng. If
sounds IIko ono of fhoso yonrs
whoro you`d boffor ¨hnng on fo your
hnfs,¨ fho rIdo mny nof bo onsy In
fho fnrm nnd rnnchIng Indusfry.
ThIs Is wIshIng ovoryono n
bIossod Insfor. Mny fho Iossons of
fho IIbIo sfrongfhon nII durIng fhIs
fImo ns wo coIobrnfo fho rosurroc-
fIon.
Cnfhy IIodIor roµorfod sho
mIssod somo work nnd ondod uµ nf
docfor`s offIco Insf wook nnd Is now
doIng boffor nnd bnck fo work.
Howovor, sho shnrod If nnd !nIµh
who Is now fIghfIng hIs fIrsf coId of
fho sonson. Iofh nro on fho mond.
If hns boon n coId wook, wIfh fho
wInd bIowIng ovory dny nnd snow
showors In SfurgIs.
!nIµh nnd Cnfhy IIodIor`s
grnnddnughfor, IIsIo Hnnson, wns
In n bnnd confosf In SµonrfIsh. Sho
won n bIuo rIbbon for hor soIo nnd
now Is fIffh chnIr for bnnd. Sho Is
In mIddIo schooI bnnd.
Mondny, Mnrch l8, IIII nnd I
woro on nn ndvonfuro fo coIobrnfo
hIs ¨fhIrd bIrfhdny.¨ Wo droµµod
off n cnrd fo Ðr. OrocchIn, doIIvorod
somo bowIIng shIrfs fo !nymond
O`ConnoII fhon wonf on fo Ðond-
wood for n couµIo of IoIsuroIy
nIghfs. Af Ðondwood wo onjoyod
sooIng Knfhy (Ionrson) WIIIuwoIf
nf hor work µInco.
Our symµnfhy Is oxfondod fo fho
fnmIIy of !yIo KIundf horo In
Kndokn. !yIo wns n busy foIIow
nround fho communIfy, workIng fo
mnko If n boffor µInco. Ho couId bo
found mowIng ynrds nnd shovoIIng
snow fo monfIon n fow. If wIII fnko
mnny fo do fho jobs ho covorod.
Mondny nffornoon, Tony Hnrfy
vIsIfod hIs nIoco, Knfhy Irown, nnd
ÐnIo Koohn.
Ðoug IroIn vIsIfod nf fho Coorgo
CIffIngs homo Mondny nffornoon.
Coorgo nnd Snndoo CIffIngs nf-
fondod fho CoIdon Wosf moofIng In
IhIIIµ Mondny ovonIng nbouf fho
fIbor cnbIo fhnf wIII bo Inyod fhIs
summor.
Mondny nnd Tuosdny, Ðon nnd
VI Moody fInIshod somo µrojocfs nf
fhoIr !nµId VnIIoy homo IncIudIng
vIsIfIng wIfh Irod Krush. Irod Is
fnmIIInr wIfh fho IhIIIµ nron nnd
hns sovornI cIIonfs down fhIs wny
nnd frnvoIs fhrough IhIIIµ fo hIs
fnvorIfo fIshIng dosfInnfIon onsf of
horo nnd nIso ronds fho IIonoor !o-
vIow.
Tony Hnrfy hnd coffoo ouf fhon
vIsIfod WIImn Sfouf Tuosdny. Ho
µIckod uµ hor mnII nnd mndo
nrrnngomonfs for fhoIr monfhIy
frIµ fo !nµId CIfy.
Ðoug IroIn hoIµod Coorgo CIf-
fIngs movo cnffIo nround In µroµn-
rnfIon for cnIvIng nnd fhoro wns n
cnIf born whIIo fhoy woro doIng
fhnf.
TImo fIIos so fnsf nnd nffor n dIf-
foronco In fho chnngo of wonfhor
from sµrIng bnck fo wInfor mndo
frnvoI docIsIons dIffIcuIf fhrough-
ouf fho wook. Ðon nnd VI Moody
oxchnngod Insfor gIffs wIfh noIgh-
bors nnd µhono cnIIs fo frIonds.
!Ichnrd Irooks, formorIy from
IhIIIµ, Is now IIvIng wIfh hIs sIsfor,
!nynno, for nwhIIo In IrvIngfon,
AIn. Tuosdny ovonIng, VI onjoyod n
vIsIf wIfh !nynno Irooks IuchoIz
from IrvIngfon nnd sho furnod hor
sµonkor µhono on so ovoryono hnd
n nIco chnf.
Wodnosdny mornIng, Tony
Hnrfy snf In on courf µrocoodIngs
horo In Kndokn. Ho µIckod uµ
WIImn Sfouf nnd fhoy wonf fo
!nµId fo nffond fho suµµor nnd
moofIng of fho CommunIfy AcfIon
Irogrnm nnd do n IIffIo shoµµIng.
Thursdny nffornoon, Ðon nnd VI
Moody drovo fo fho rnnch nnd mof
Mnrshn Sumµfor nonr fho Sovon-
MIIo Cornor fo µIck uµ n bnnnor
sho`d mndo uµ for fho CInss of
l963. Ðon nnd VI rnn nround fho
rnnch brIofIy nnd gof ovoryfhIng
chockod ouf, confInuod on Info
IhIIIµ fo moof wIfh nn Insurnnco
roµrosonfnfIvo, nnd fond fo ofhor
µorfInonf busInoss mnffors boforo
rofurnIng bnck fo !nµId for n IrI-
dny nµµoInfmonf. IrInn Koohn hns
boon doIng corrnI µrojocfs nf fho
rnnch nnd nII Is "µorkIng nIong
nIcoIy."
Thursdny mornIng, CnroI SoIon
cnmo by nnd sho nnd I wonf fo fho
Kndokn cIInIc nnd furnod Info fho
Insfor Iunny nnd ChIrµy ChIck
wIfh bngs fuII of goodIos for nII fho
rosIdonfs In fho nursIng homo.
Ðnrn, If`s hnrd fo skIµ nny moro,
nood fo µrncfIco fhnf. Wo nIso vIs-
Ifod nf fho homo of IIoronco Hogon
nnd surµrIsod hor wIfh somo good-
Ios. !ofoy Irown gof fho goodIos,
buf wnsn`f homo whon wo cnIIod. I
fook fho Hnnkon Counfy IrnIrIo
TrnnsµorfnfIon vnn fo Murdo nnd
whIIo wnIfIng vIsIfod IhyIIss Io-
fors nf fho rosfnurnnf sho works nf.
¨Whon You`ro 64¨ wns fho song
µInyod for Tony Hnrfy Thursdny ns
ho coIobrnfod hIs bIrfhdny. Ho hnd
bronkfnsf ouf In fho mornIng.
WIImn Sfouf nnnouncod If fo fho
grouµ Wodnosdny ovonIng whIIo
fhoy woro In !nµId. Tho foIks on-
joyod wIshIng hIm n hnµµy bIrfh-
dny.
Tony Hnrfy nnd I woro nmong
fho mnny fhnf nffondod fho vIsIfn-
fIon for !yIo KIundf Thursdny
ovonIng nf fho IrosbyforInn church
horo In Kndokn.
IrIdny whon VI Moody Ioff hor
Insf nµµoInfmonf, If sfnrfod snow-
Ing nnd koµf If uµ unfII Info fhnf
nIghf. ThIs sform broughf nnofhor
fIvo Inchos of ronIIy honvy snow
nround !nµId nnd VI roµorfod fhoy
hnd bIIzznrd condIfIons In !nµId
VnIIoy for nbouf fwo hours Infor
IrIdny ovonIng. Tho snow wns cro-
nfIng vory hnznrdous drIvIng con-
dIfIons nnd mndo vIsIbIIIfy
oxfromoIy Iow ns fho wInd wns ro-
nIIy µIckIng uµ nf nround 40 mµh
or so. Snfurdny mornIng, fho hIgh-
wny crow broughf ouf fIvo snow
µIows on I. Hwy 44 fo fho nIrµorf.
Tho snow dIdn'f moIf ns fnsf fhIs
fImo ns If wns n coIdor wookond.
IrIdny, Tony Hnrfy hnd dInnor
ouf nffor µIckIng uµ fho mnII. Snow
of nbouf fhroo fo four Inchos foII
durIng fho nIghf. Tony sfoµµod by
our µInco In fho nffornoon nnd
IhyIIIs Word nIso vIsIfod nf our
µInco fhnf dny. As I wns ouf nround
fown, I rnn Info IorIf IondIckson
nf fho grocory sforo nnd wo hnd n
nIco vIsIf. You nood fo kooµ IorIf
nnd IIoyd ¨Sµood¨ In your µrnyors
sInco ho Is hnvIng n ronI sfruggIo.
IIII mndo n shIrf doIIvory for mo In
IhIIIµ fo TIm ModdIo In fho nffor-
noon whon ho wonf fo µIny cnrds.
Thursdny nffornoon If sfnrfod
snowIng nnd bocnmo Icy In fho
SfurgIs nron, droµµIng fhroo Inchos
of snow. Thnf nII moIfod durIng fho
dny IrIdny nnd como ovonIng If
sfnrfod snowIng ngnIn. If wns vory
coId nnd wIndy nII wookond. Snfur-
dny nffornoon, !Ichnrd nnd ÐInnn
Sfownrf, IhIIIµ, nrrIvod In SfurgIs
nf fho homo of !nIµh nnd Cnfhy
IIodIor nnd sfnyod ovornIghf. Thoy
drovo fo IouInh, Wyo., fo n sfonk-
houso fhoy hnd honrd nbouf for
suµµor. Wow for n smnII fown, cnn
fhnf µInco fIx n good sfonk nnd
µrImo rIb. Thoy woro vory gInd
fhoy frIod If. Sundny nffor bronk-
fnsf, !Ichnrd nnd ÐInnn hondod for
IhIIIµ.
Snfurdny, Tony Hnrfy wns ouf
for coffoo nnd bronkfnsf In fho
mornIng. In fho nffornoon, ho wonf
fo InforIor for suµµor.
InrIy Snfurdny mornIng, IIII
nnd I woro on fho rond fo IhIIIµ for
fho honIfh fnIr fo gIvo bIood. Whnf
nn oufsfnndIng µrogrnm. Þof onIy
dId you gof fo µIck nnd chooso whnf
fhIngs you wnnfod fosfod In fho
bIood, buf whon fhnf wns ovor you
gof fo chock nnswors on n quIz you
gof. Ðr. !on Mnnn nnd !nurIo woro
fhoro foIIIng us fo brush our foofh
fwo mInufos nnd hnndIng ouf
foofhbrushos, covors nnd Informn-
fIon. A foIIow wns fhoro from IIorro
nbouf counsoIIng. Tho shorIff hnd n
boofh nnd fho quosfIon fhoro wns
who wns fho fIrsf Hnnkon Counfy
shorIff, If wns !oof; bIood µrossuro
wns boIng fnkon by !Indn SmIfh
nnd !oIn !osofh, nnd fhon fhoro
wns n bronkfnsf bocnuso wo fnsfod.
If wns n good fhIng you couIdn`f fnII
fho quIz, buf fun fo gof fho nnswors
ns wo wonf nIong. Wo Infondod fo
Iond fho moforhomo nnd fnko off
for n monfh, buf wo woro sur-
roundod by bnd wonfhor. So In-
sfond IIII wonf bnck for cnrds In
IhIIIµ In fho nffornoon nnd bocnuso
If wns l6´ ouf nnd n norfhwosf
wInd of 20 mµh wIfh gusfs fo 40
mµh, I wonf on n hunf for nIr Ionks
In our norfh nddIfIon of fho houso.
ThIs fImo, I nffnckod fho wIndows
whoro I couId fooI nIr fIowIng
fhrough, oIghf cnns of fonm InsuIn-
fIon nnd fhroo frIµs fo fho hnrd-
wnro sforo Infor, I dIscovorod nof fo
fry fo µIug hoIos wIfh fonm sInco
fho nIr wIII bIow If ouf. Þoxf fImo I
wIII µuf n bIock In fIrsf, fhon fho
fonm. I sfIII hnvo fhroo wIndows fo
work on.
¨We con Jo on,/ling ue uon/ if
ue e/ic/ /o i/ long enougl.¨ ÐnysIos
Sundny, Ðon nnd VI Moody gof
ouf fo go shoµµIng nround !nµId
nnd hnd Iunch. Thoy hnd n wnfor
IIno Ionk In ono of fho bnfhrooms
nnd sµonf fho nffornoon goffIng
µnrfs nnd goffIng fhnf µrobIom
soIvod boforo If cronfod n Inrgor
µrobIom. A sfIfch In fImo snvos
hnvIng fo do nnofhor sfIfch. Is fhnf
how If goos¨ VI snys "Tho grnss Is
goffIng groonor undor fho snow,
buf no mondowInrks yof - fhoy
musf hnvo n ronIIy sfrong sIxfh
sonso (ÐoµµIor rndnr moro fhnn
IIkoIy) nnd know whon fo fIy nnd
whon nof fo fIy. Ono cnn Ionrn n Iof
from fho bIrds, buf µrobnbIy nof n
good Idon fo foIIow fhom."
Sundny, Tony Hnrfy nffondod
church nnd wonf ouf for dInnor nnd
In fho nffornoon wonf fo hIs
brofhor, Iornnrd nnd Inrbnrn Hor-
bor`s rnnch. If wns n busy µInco
wIfh cnIvIng In fuII swIng nnd Iofs
of fnmIIy nround, buf ho gof In nn
onjoynbIo vIsIf boforo rofurnIng
homo.
Sundny nffor church, I snId fho
SoronIfy Irnyor nnd ngnIn fnckIod
fho nIr fIow In fho norfh room sInco
wo sfIII hnd n coId norfhwosf wInd.
Ðon`f know If I wns grIndIng my
foofh durIng nII my sonrchIng buf
by nIghffnII fho ono sIdo of my fnco
wns In fofnI µnIn.
¨1njo, oll of creo/ion, eocl leof
onJ flouer onJ eter, enoll peIIle
olong /le uo,. 1nIroce /le lope of
eocl neu norning, onJ /le loe/ ro,
of euneline /o foll o/ Jo,`e enJ.¨
Cod`s ÐnIIy InsµIrnfIons.
BetwIxt PIaces News
by Marsha Sumpter · Sß?-B04S · bIImar©gwtc.net
CroofIngs from sunny, coId,
broozy, µnrfIy snow covorod norfh-
onsf Hnnkon Counfy. AccordIng fo
fho cnIondnr, sµrIng nrrIvod Insf
wook, buf If hnsn'f foIf IIko If horo.
Tho coId broozos wo hnvo mosf
dnys soom fo go rIghf fhrough mo.
If mnkos mo fooI sorry for fhoso
µoor IIffIo bnby cnIvos, fryIng fo
sfny wnrm. I'm hoµIng for wnrmor
fomµornfuros by fho ond of fho
wook don'f wnnf fho Insfor
bunny fo gof frozon ns ho mnkos
hIs rounds hIdIng oggs!
SInco sµrIng Is horo (nccordIng fo
fho cnIondnr), I docIdod fo sfnrf n
IIffIo sµrIng cIonnIng fhIs wook. I
wnnf fo gof somo of If dono now, so
whon fho wonfhor doos gof n IIffIo
wnrmor I cnn sµond moro fImo ouf-
sIdo. My honrf ronIIy Isn'f In If,
fhough I ronIIy wnnf fo bo ouf
workIng In fho ynrd. Iuf I know
mysoIf, nnd I know fho wnrmor
fomµornfuros wIII fnko mo oufsIdo,
so I'd boffor gof busy now on fho In-
sIdo µrojocfs. And of courso, ns wIfh
mosf yonrs, somo of fho µrojocfs
jusf won'f gof dono, or fhoy'II "sorf
of" gof dono. Tho good nows Is, In
fho schomo of fhIngs, If doosn'f ro-
nIIy mnffor If ovory sµock of dusf Is
gono or ovory cornor nnd cuµbonrd
Is orgnnIzod IIfo goos on!
Cono Hudson hnd n busy wook
subsfIfufIng for fho fonchors In our
communIfy. Sho fnughf nf
Choyonno SchooI Mondny, Tuos-
dny, nnd Wodnosdny, bocnuso hor
dnughfor, ConnIo, (fho fonchor nf
Choyonno SchooI) wns undor fho
wonfhor. Thursdny, Cono fnughf nf
Ðooµ Crook SchooI bocnuso fho
fonchor wns III. IrIdny, Cono wonf
fo IhIIIµ wIfh hor son-In-Inw, Jon
Johnson, nnd grnndson, Þonh, fo
wnfch fho µrom. Crnndson Avory
wns ono of fho nffondoos nf fhIs
yonr's µrom. Cono snId fho drossos
woro gorgoous. I wns wondorIng
how fho gnIs sfnyod wnrm¨ ÐIck
nnd Cono nffondod church Sundny.
ConnIo Johnson Is fooIIng much
boffor fhIs wook, fhnnks fo hoIµ
from somo µoworfuI nnfIbIofIcs.
Thoro wns no II gun mnfch Insf
wookond, so fho fnmIIy gof fo sµond
fho wookond nf homo. Thoy nf-
fondod church Sundny.
!nsf Snfurdny, !oIn !osofh
hoIµod wIfh fho honIfh fnIr In
IhIIIµ. Sho snId fhoro wns n good
furnouf for fho ovonf, nnd sovornI
IocnI honIfh roInfod busInossos nnd
orgnnIznfIons hnd boofhs wIfh In-
formnfIon nvnIInbIo for fho nffon-
doos. Sundny, Ðunno nnd !oIn
woro guosfs nf fho homo of fhoIr
nIoco, !Indsoy (SmIfh) MnngIs, nnd
hor husbnnd, Mnff. Mnff nnd !Ind-
soy IIvo nonr ÞowoII, so Ðunno nnd
!oIn gof fo soo n Iof of counfry bo-
fwoon horo nnd fhoro, ovon fnkIng
somo bnck ronds on fho frIµ homo.
!oIn snId fhoy oncounforod somo
Icy ronds nnd roducod vIsIbIIIfy In
somo sµofs, buf fhoy rofurnod
homo snfo nnd sound.
ÞoIs nnd Ðorofhy InuIson hnd n
quIof wook nf homo fhIs µnsf wook.
Ðorofhy dId sny fhnf fhoro nro
somo coyofos In fho nron fhnf nro
goffIng µroffy brnzon, comIng cIoso
fo fho houso nnd bofhorIng fho
cows nnd cnIvos. (I fhInk fho snmo
Is fruo nf our houso In fho
ovonIngs, If sounds IIko fhoro nro
Iofs of coyofos In cIoso µroxImIfy!
Too bnd uncIo Iob Þouhnusor Isn'f
horo fo frnµ somo of fhom I hnvo
soon µIcfuros of Iob wIfh µnck
horsos fuII of coyofo hIdos. Ho wns
known fnr nnd wIdo for hIs frnµ-
µIng nbIIIfIos.) Ðorofhy nffondod
church Sundny, nnd sho snId fhoro
wns n good crowd In nffondnnco.
KovIn nnd Mnry Þouhnusor hnd
n busy wookond. !nsf wookond,
fhoIr dnughfor, Snrnh, wns In
SIoux InIIs fo sorvo ns mnId of
honor for n frIond's woddIng. Mnry
Þouhnusor wonf fo fho woddIng In
SIoux InIIs Snfurdny nnd rofurnod
fo IIorro Sundny nffornoon. Ðunno
Hnnd nnd KovIn woro In fown Sun-
dny nffornoon for fho nnnunI um-
µIro rocorfIfIcnfIon whIch wns hoId
nf fho SfnnIoy Counfy HIgh SchooI.
Mondny, KovIn wns In IIorro ngnIn
fo bo on hnnd for hIs mofhor, !ufh
Þouhnusor's, donfIsf nµµoInfmonf.
KovIn nnd Mnry's dnughfor, IrI-
nnnn, mIssod work Mondny bo-
cnuso of n nnsfy coId If sooms IIko
fhoso dnrnod vIrusos jusf won'f
quIf fhIs wInfor. ÞIck Þouhnusor
wns ¨on cnII¨ ovor fho wookond nf
hIs job In IIorro, whIch monns fhnf
ho hns fo bo nvnIInbIo fo como fo
work If noodod, so fhnf koµf hIm
cIoso fo homo.
IIIIy nnd ArIyno Mnrkwod hnd
vIsIfs from noIghbors, Sfovo Mc-
ÐnnIoIs nnd !oo IrIggs, fhIs wook,
bofh of whIch sfoµµod In for coffoo
nnd vIsIfIng. (ArIyno musf mnko
ronIIy good coffoo!) IrIdny, fhoIr
dnughfor, CIndy, nnd husbnnd
Iruco Irosoo nrrIvod fo sµond fho
nIghf. Tho Irosoo's wonf In fo
IIorro Snfurdny fo nffond fho nduIf
µrom fhnf CIndy's son, Tnfo
CnbrIoI, orgnnIzod. Tho ovonf wns
n hugo succoss, nnd I undorsfnnd
fho monoy rnIsod wIII bo usod for
schoInrshIµs In fho IocnI hIgh
schooIs. CongrnfuInfIons fo Tnfo
whnf n gronf ovonf for fho
IIorro/If. IIorro communIfIos!
Sundny, IIIIy nnd ArIyno nf-
fondod church, fhon ÐIck nnd Cono
Hudson sfoµµod by fo µIny cnrds.
Mnry IrIggs ochood my sonfI-
monfs fhIs mornIng whon sho snId
sho wnnfs somoono fo fInd fhnf
dnrn groundhog ho IIod! AcfunIIy,
ns Mnry snId, ¨If fhIs wns ono of our
normnI wInfors from yonrs gono by,
wo wouId bo hnµµy fo fInnIIy soo
fho ground!¨ !nsf wook wns un-
ovonffuI nf fho IrIggs` homo. !oo
nnd Mnry vonfurod fo MIdInnd Snf-
urdny ovonIng for suµµor, nnd fhoy
hnd n nIco vIsIf wIfh Cono nnd Au-
droy Jonos. Tho rosf of fho wook-
ond wns sµonf doIng choros nnd
µroµnrIng for Insfor comµnny. !oo
nnd Mnry's grnndson, Sofh Joons,
Is In IIorro fhIs wook nffondIng fho
sfnfo sfudonf councII convonfIon.
McenvIIIe News
by Leanne Neuhauser · SB?-ßßBS
oontinued on page 13
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursday, Maroh 28, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 12
norc infornaiion. A¡¡licaiions
nay lc sulniiicd on-linc ai
www. rcgionalIcaliI.con. EOC/
AA.
FOR SALE
LONCDFANCH IN PIEFFE, SD.
Wc Iavc lowcrcd iIc ¡ricc & will
considcr coniraci for dccd. Call
Fusscll S¡aid 605-280-1067.
HEALTH AND BEAUTY
IF YOU USED THE MIFENA IUD
lciwccn 2001-¡rcscni and suf-
fcrcd ¡crforaiion or cnlcdncni
in iIc uicrus rcquiring surgical
rcnoval, or Iad a cIild lorn
wiiI liriI dcfccis, you nay lc
cniiilcd io con¡cnsaiion. Call
JoInson Law and s¡cal wiiI fc-
nalc siaff ncnlcrs 1-800-535-
5727.
INVESTMENTS
12% FETUFN ON INVEST-
MENT! To find oui Iow io nalc
a safc, sccurc and guaraniccd
raic of rciurn, call (605}881-
3641. www.fillny401l.con (TIis
is noi an offcr io scll sccuriiics}.
LIVESTOCK
HEFDEF FANCH SELLINC 125
Dlacl Angus & F1 iwo-ycar-old
Icifcr ¡airs; 20 wiiI CIarolais X
calvcs. PIili¡ Livcsiocl Auciion,
A¡ril 2, 2013. 605-488-0360,
605-488-0079.
THOMAS FANCH DULL SALE,
Tucsday, A¡ril 9, 2013, 18441
Ca¡ri Placc, Harrold, SD, Troy.
605-222-1258, Ccll. 605-973-
2448. www.iIonasrancI cai-
ilc.con Salc 1.00 PM, Sclling
300 Dulls. CIarolais, Angus,
Sin-Angus, Fcd Angus.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rc¡rcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.} Call
iIis ncws¡a¡cr ai 605-859-2516
or 800-658-3697 for dciails.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL DUILDINCS DLOW OUT
SALE! Early lird s¡ring dis-
counis! Savc u¡ io 40% off on
nacIincry sioragc and sIo¡s.
Liniicd Offcr! Call Jin, 1-888-
782-7040.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2004 Ford F-250
E×i. Cal, sIori lo×, Su¡cr Duiy,
4×4, XLT, loadcd, ncarly ncw 10-
¡ly iircs, iowing ¡lg., 98K nilcs,
c×ccllcni sIa¡c, undcr lool.
$11,900. 209-8639. PF31-1ic
FOR SALE: 2004 CIcvrolci
2500 HD, 4×4, LS, crcw cal,
sIori lo×, Durana× dicscl, Alli-
son, auio, rcd, gray cloiI inic-
rior, running loards, lo× nai,
Iidcaway gooscnccl lall,
58,900 nilcs, c×ccllcni, onc
owncr. 462-6138. P15-3ic
FOR SALE: 2004 Poniiac Crand
Pri× CT, gray wiiI gray inicrior,
107,300 nilcs, lools and runs
grcai. $7,000 is iIc asling ¡ricc,
lui I will considcr rcasonallc of-
fcrs. Call KciiI ai 454-3426 or
859-2039 for infornaiion or any
qucsiions. PF22-ifn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Eסcdi-
iion XLT 4×4, cloiI scais, ¡owcr
windows, locls & scais, good
iircs. Call 685-8155. PF10-ifn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
HAVE YOU HEARD WHAT'S
NEW IN THIS AREA? Ii's an
anii-aging ¡roduci callcd Ncr-
iun, iIai guaraniccs 100% sai-
isfaciion wiiI rcsulis. Ladics in
Wall arc lcginning iIcir qucsi io
rcducc lincs and wrinllcs. For
norc infornaiion, call Connic ai
939-6443. P16-2i¡
CLEAN BY DESIGN: Full scrvicc
clcaning con¡any wiiI ycars of
cסcricncc! Conncrcial and rcs-
idcniial. Frcc csiinaics! To¡ io
loiion clcaning & sonc ¡aini-
ing. Slyc, 516-0226. P15-2i¡
FITCH FENCING: Linc your
sunncr ¡rojccis u¡ now! For all
your corral, windlrcal and ¡as-
iurc fcncing nccds, call Trucii ai
859-2334. PF23-ifn
O'CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Focl, Sand,
Cravcl (scrccncd or crusIcd}. Wc
can dclivcr. Dans, dugouis,
luilding siics. Our 37iI ycar.
Clcnn or Tracc, 859-2020.
PF11-ifn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iy¡cs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
u¡s, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52i¡
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iy¡cs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׸gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
HORSE OWNERS: Cci your
colis siaricd iIis s¡ring io lc
rcady for sunncr worl. Also
ialing salc Iorscs io ridc and
gci rcady for sunncr salcs.
Coniaci Janic Willcri, 441-
4407. P13-4i¡
WANTED: Sunncr ¡asiurc for
50 io 150 Icad of cows. Call
Sicvc Pclron, 544-3202.
P12-ifn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED:
Looling io rcni ¡asiurc or con-
¡lcic rancI, sIori icrn or long
icrn. Also looling for Iay
ground. CasI, lcasc or sIarcs.
Call 798-2116 or 798-2002.
P10-ifn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED
for 40 io 200 ¡airs wiiIin 80
nilcs of PIili¡ or can lcasc wIolc
rancI. 685-9313 (ccll} or 859-
2059 (Ionc}. P7-ifn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-¡ly, 235/85/16F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIo¡, 859-
2744, PIili¡. P40-ifn
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Will irain.
A¡¡ly ai PIili¡ Cusion Mcais,
501 E. Pinc, PIili¡. PF31-3ic
LOOKING FOR HELP in iIc
HV/AC ficld. Musi lc sclf-noii-
vaicd wiiI a good worl ciIic.
Also, cncrgciic wiiI iIc dcsirc io
lcarn. If inicrcsicd, call Drian
Hanson, 441-6543. PF31-ifn
SUBWAY IN WALL is accc¡iing
a¡¡licaiions for full and ¡ari-
iinc ¡osiiions, scasonal and
ycar-round. O¡¡oriuniiics for
advanccncni io nanagcncni
¡osiiions for iIc rigIi a¡¡licani.
Picl u¡ a¡¡licaiion ai Sulway.
WP31-ifn
HELP WANTED: Farn/rancI in
wcsi ccniral SD looling for ¡ari
iinc or ¡ossilly full iinc Icl¡.
Duiics includc calving, fcncing,
luilding nainicnancc, o¡craiing
and nainiaining Iaying, fccding
and farning cqui¡ncni. Horsc
cסcricncc noi ncccsssary. Wc
usc ATVs. Housing and lccf fur-
nisIcd. Fcfcrcnccs rcquircd.
Salary DOE. Call 843-2869 for
inicrvicw a¡¡oinincni or cnail
rcsunc io pjbork¡ gwtc.net
P16-ifn
POSITION OPEN: Jaclson
Couniy is accc¡iing a¡¡licaiions
for full iinc Dirccior of Equaliza-
iion. Sclccicd a¡¡licani nusi
lcconc ccriificd as ¡cr SDCL.
Musi worl wcll wiiI iIc ¡ullic,
and Iavc clcrical and con¡uicr
slills. Jaclson Couniy lcncfiis
includc IcaliI insurancc, lifc in-
surancc, S.D. Fciircncni, ¡aid
Iolidays, vacaiion and sicl
lcavc. Salary ncgoiiallc. Posiiion
o¡cn uniil fillcd. A¡¡licaiions
arc availallc ai iIc Jaclson
Couniy Audiior's officc or scnd
rcsunc io Jaclson Couniy, PO
Do× 280, Kadola, SD 57543. PI.
605-837-2422. K15-5ic
BADLANDS TRADING POST &
PRAIRIE HOMESTEAD: Pari
iinc yard worl & ligIi nainic-
nancc ¡osiiion. Vcry flc×illc
scIcduling & Iours. Call Hcidi
ai 433-5411. P14-5ic
HELP WANTED: Scrvicc Advisor
¡osiiion o¡cn ai PIili¡ Moior.
Plcasc call Craig ai 685-3435 for
dciails. PF28-ifn
GREAT SUMMER JOB! Salcs
cסcricncc ¡rcfcrrcd lui will
irain. Salary ¡lus connission.
Housing is su¡¡licd in Wall. You
will nalc grcai wagcs, ncci ¡co-
¡lc fron all ovcr iIc world and
Iavc fun. Musi worl sonc wccl-
cnds. Posiiion availallc A¡ril 1,
2013. A¡¡ly ai ColdDiggcrs on
Mi. FusInorc Foad in Fa¡id
Ciiy or call Jaclic ai iIc faciory
ai 348-8108 or fa× rcsunc io
348-1524. PW13-ifn
JOB OPENING: Full TincMain-
icnancc Dirccior/Cusiodial Su-
¡crvisor for Haalon ScIool
Disirici in PIili¡, SD, lcginning
May 1, 2013. Wagc dc¡cnds on
cסcricncc. A¡¡licaiions nay lc
¡iclcd u¡ ai iIc Haalon ScIool
Disirici Adninisiraiivc officcs or
scnd a rcsunc wiiI covcr lciicr
io Su¡i. Kcvcn MorcIari, PO
Do× 730, PIili¡, SD 57567, or
cnail io Keven.Morebart¡
k12.sd.us. Any qucsiions nay
lc dirccicd io Su¡i. MorcIari ai
859-2679. Posiiion o¡cn uniil
fillcd. Haalon ScIool Disirici is
an Equal O¡¡oriuniiy En¡loycr.
P13-4ic
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: (2} luili-in disI-
wasIcrs, 1-wIiic, 1-llacl, loiI
Kcnnorcs. Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63,
Do× Eldcr. 390-9810. PF31-1i¡
FOR SALE: Scvcral nicc uscd
ncial filc calincis. Savc 50% or
norc off ncw! Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63,
Do× Eldcr. 390-9810.
P16-1i¡
FOR SALE: Fo¡c Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ro¡c, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
REAL ESTATE
WANTED: Snall acrcagc closc io
Wall. I'n inicrcsicd in larc land
or an csiallisIcd Ionc siic.
Plcasc call 391-9162.
PF29-3i¡
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
2 lcdroons, downiown, fcnccd
yard. Malc an offcr. Call 859-
3095 or 859-2483. P10-ifn
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: S¡acious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or sio¡ in iIc lolly and
¡icl u¡ an a¡¡licaiion. Caicway
A¡arincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc accc¡i
rcs¡onsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc ¡aid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi ¡aid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is ¡laccd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
TIunIs to uíí tIc ncdícuí stu¡¡,
unIuíuncc ¡co¡íc, ctc. TIunIs
¡o¡ uíí tIc cu¡ds, ¡Ionc cuíís und
tIc gossí¡ I gcnc¡utcd. TIunIs to
SIu¸nc und Hcídí Po¡cI ¡o¡ tIc
¡íouc¡s.
Puuí TIonus
An EOE Pcrlins Couniy SIcriff's
Officc PO Do× 234 Dison, SD
57620 605-244-5243.
SEQUEL YOUTH AND FAMILY
SEFVICES a naiional full scrvicc
lcadcr in iIc ircaincni of youiI,
is o¡cning. Scqucl Transiiional
Acadcny, a iransiiional living
¡rogran for nalcs, agcs 16-19,
in Siou× Falls, SD. Inncdiaic
o¡cnings. Crou¡ Lcadcrs, TIcr-
a¡isi, Casc Managcr, Dusincss
Officc Managcr, Pari-Tinc FN,
Full & Pari-Tinc DcIavioral
HcaliI TccInicians, Full & Pari-
Tinc Cools. A¡¡ly www.sc-
quclcn¡loyncni.con or fa×
rcsunc (269}381-5332,
crin.ncwion¸scquclyouiIscr-
viccs.con. EOE.
ATTENTION NUFSINC PFOFES-
SIONALS. Coldcn LivingCcnicr,
a naiional lcadcr in long-icrn
carc, Ias carccr o¡¡oriuniiics ai
our Molridgc faciliiy for cvcning
& nigIi FNs / LPNs wiiI nulii-
¡lc sIifis availallc. CLC offcrs
con¡rcIcnsivc lcncfiis (includ-
ing PTO aficr 90 days of scrvicc},
con¡ciiiivc wagcs, & coniinuing
cd. For con¡lcic dciails coniaci
E×ccuiivc Dirccior SIaron Mar-
iin, Coldcn LivingCcnicr - Mo-
lridgc. 605-845-7201. AA/
EOE/M/F/V/D
TOWN AND COUNTFY COOP of
Finlcy, ND is sccling a qualificd
Ccncral Managcr. TIis is an cn-
crgy o¡craiion wiiI salcs of $11
Million. A sirong laclground in
financc, connunicaiion, and
¡crsonncl nanagcncni is dc-
sircd. Dusincss dcgrcc and or
lusincss nanagcncni cסcri-
cncc ¡rcfcrrcd Scnd, cnail, or
fa× (888-653-5527} rcsunc io.
Larry Fullcr, 5213 SIoal Drivc,
Disnarcl, ND 58503,
larry.fullcr¸ cIsinc.con.
THE ELK POINT-JEFFEFSON
SCHOOL DISTFICT is sccling a
Fanily and Consuncr Scicnccs
icacIcr. If inicrcsicd ¡lcasc scnd
a lciicr of a¡¡licaiion and rc-
sunc io Drian SIanls, Su¡crin-
icndcni Do× 578 Ell Poini, SD
57025 wc will also accc¡i clcc-
ironic naicrials ai Drian.
SIanls¸ l12.sd.us.
CUSTEF FECIONAL SENIOF
CAFE is accc¡iing a¡¡licaiions
for Dirccior of Nursing. Musi lc
liccnscd as a Fcgisicrcd Nursc
in SouiI Daloia. Prcvious su-
¡crvisory/nanagcncni cסcri-
cncc in long icrn carc ¡rcfcrrcd.
E×ccllcni lcncfiis; salary lascd
on cסcricncc. Plcasc coniaci
Vcronica ScInidi (605} 673-
2229 c×i. 109 or Jocy Carlson ai
(605} 673-2229 c×i. 110 for
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN, ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
ATTN COLFEFS. OWN YOUF
OWN golf-clul luilding lusi-
ncss, including all con¡oncnis,
sIo¡ nacIincs, & Iugc invcn-
iory. Priccd wcll lclow cosi. Call
(605} 997-3233 for ¡iciurcs, &
norc infornaiion.
EMPLOYMENT
PEFKINS COUNTY SHEFIFF'S
OFFICE accc¡iing a¡¡licaiions
for a dc¡uiy sIcriff cligililiiy lisi.
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
Pioneer Review
CIassifieds
$6.50/week
. up to 20 words;
10¢ per word there-
after. FiII out the
form beIow & maiI
your cIassified and
payment to:
The Profit
PO Box 788
PhiIip, SD 57567
1) ________________
2) ________________
3) ________________
4) ________________
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6) ________________
7) ________________
8) ________________
9) ________________
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__________________
__________________
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__________________
0IassItIed
AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nin-
inun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu, tIc P¡o¡ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou¡unt, as wcll
as on our wclsiic. www.¡ionccr-
rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns,
Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun
for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr word
iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial
nusi lc counicd sc¡araicly. In-
cludcd in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and
tIc P¡o¡ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc
and iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Pío-
ncc¡ Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for
loollcc¡ing and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 ¡cr
colunn incI, includcd in iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít.
$5.55 ¡cr colunn incI for iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic ad-
vcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr is suljcci io iIc
Fcdcral Fair Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI
nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany ¡rcfcrcncc,
or discrininaiion on racc, color, rcligion,
sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io
nalc any sucI ¡rcfcrcncc, liniiaiion, or
discrininaiion."
TIis ncws¡a¡cr will noi lnowingly accc¡i
any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a vi-
olaiion of iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd
iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a-
¡cr arc availallc on an cqual o¡¡oriuniiy
lasis.
Pioneer
Review Ad
DeadIine:
Tuesdays
11:00 a.m.
***
Profit Ad
DeadIine:
Fridays
at Noon
***
ads@
pioneer-
review.com
859-2516
N01lcE
Is your roof one that needs reshingIed?
Now is the time to buy your shingles. Most major
shingle companies are taking a 22-25% increase April 1st.
Moses BuiIding Center just purchased several loads of shingles at
current pricing. We will pre-sell these before the increase and
store them for you. Give us a call - we'll measure your roof
and give you a quote!
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups) Apartments
carpeted throughout, appliances
furnished, laundry facilities available.
SENECHAL APARTMENTS:
1 Bdr. This is Elderly 62+,
Disabled and Handicap Housing
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
B08lNE88 F0R 8ALE
Plzza Etc.
175 5. Uenter Ave. · Phì|ìp
·0reat Famlly Buslness
·l Year ln Newly Remodeled Bulldlng
·Lots of Posslbllltles for Lxpanslon
Contact
Kim or
Vickie
(605)
859-2365
F0R 8ALE:
1998 Iord Lxpedìtìon XL1 4x4
U|oth 5eats, Uood 1ìres
Power Wìndows & Locks
$3,750
Ua|| 685-8155
Ior ull yoor
concrete
constroction
needs:
CONCRITI
CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo
Philip, SÐ
communlty
1hursday, Maroh 28, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 13
Mnry snId fhnf !II IrIggs confInuos
fo bo nf homo, hnvIng good dnys
nnd bnd dnys. Horo's hoµIng fhnf
mosf of hor dnys nro good sho hns
onrnod fhom!
I dIdn'f gof fo fnIk fo Adnm nnd
JodI !osofh fhIs wook, buf I honrd
from n IIffIo bIrd fhnf fhoIr dnugh-
for, IobbI, roconfIy coIobrnfod n
bIrfhdny, so hnµµy boInfod bIrfh-
dny fo hor.
CnIvIng Is fho mnIn ordor of busI-
noss nf fho Iruco rnnch, ns If Is
wIfh mosf of fho noIghbors. Andy
Iruco cnmo for fho wookond fo hoIµ
wIfh cnIvIng dufIos. IIII nnd IoIIy
Iruco nffondod church In MIdInnd
Sundny, foIIowod by Iunch nf fho
IocnI cnfo boforo rofurnIng homo.
!nsf Mondny, ShIrIoy HnIIIgnn
wns In IIorro for n church moofIng.
ThIs µnsf wookond, Irnnk nnd
ShIrIoy woro In SµonrfIsh fo nffond
fho Quoon CIfy InskofbnII Tournn-
monf. ThoIr grnndson µInyod wIfh
fho InIfh fonm In fho fournnmonf,
nnd fhoy cnmo homo wIfh fho fhIrd
µInco froµhy.
Cnrmon AIIomnn sµonf from
Tuosdny fhrough IrIdny In IIorro
wIfh hor grnnddnughfor, Morgnn.
Morgnn's µnronfs, KoIIy nnd An-
fhony ÞoIson, rofurnod homo IrI-
dny from n frIµ fo !omo. Cnrmon
snId sho hnsn'f goffon nII fho do-
fnIIs of fho frIµ, buf If sounds IIko
KoIIy nnd Anfhony hnd n gronf
fImo.
!nsf Mondny, Joyco Jonos wonf
fo IIorro fo nffond n jowoIry µnrfy
nf fho homo of ono of hor frIonds.
Tuosdny, sho wns In fown for don-
fnI work. Sho snId fhnf roof cnnnIs
nron'f foo bnd fhnnk goodnoss sho
hnd n good oxµorIonco! Thursdny,
Mnx nnd Joyco wonf fo OnIdn for
nn Insforn Sfnr moofIng. Thoy
sµonf fho nIghf wIfh fhoIr dnugh-
for, KIm, nnd hor fnmIIy, nnd IrI-
dny fhoy hnd fho nnnunI Insforn
Sfnr OffIcInI VIsIf fhoro. Snfurdny,
Mnx nnd Joyco nffondod Insforn
Sfnr offIcInI vIsIf nf Kndokn.
If hns boon fnmIIy wook for
Þnncy Þouhnusor fhIs wook.
Þnncy's dnughfor, Knfhy, roconfIy
hnd shouIdor surgory, so sho nr-
rIvod Wodnosdny nnd Is sµondIng
µnrf of hor rocovory fImo wIfh !ny
nnd Þnncy. Thursdny, Þnncy's
dnughfor, CnrrIo, nnd husbnnd
Tom nrrIvod fo sµond fho wookond.
Þnncy's grnnddnughfor, TImbor, Is
sµondIng hor sµrIng bronk In
IIorro nnd goffIng In somo µrncfIco
fImo wIfh hor bnrroI rncIng horso.
Amongsf nII fho comµnny, Þnncy
fook fImo Thursdny ovonIng fo bo
on hnnd ns fho sonIor confor hosfod
fho IIorro chnmbor busInoss nffor
hours ovonf.
!ufh Þouhnusor frnvoIod from
HIghmoro fo IIorro Mondny fo
kooµ n donfnI nµµoInfmonf. Iorfu-
nnfoIy, fhoro Is n frnnsµorfnfIon
vnn fhnf Is whooIchnIr nccossIbIo fo
mnko fho frIµ onsIor. !ufh snId sho
hnd fnIkod fo hor son, Myron, who
IIvos In VIrgInIn. Ho snId fhoy hnvo
hnd quIfo n bIf of snow nnd ox-
fondod µowor oufngos In hIs nron.
If sounds IIko hor dnughfor, Con-
nIo, nnd son-In-Inw, Iunky Iogor,
woro nIso donIIng wIfh snow nf
fhoIr homo In Arknnsns ovor fho
wookond.
Mnrgo IrIggs hns boon sfnyIng
InsIdo on fhoso chIIIy dnys, buf sho
snId fhoy do hnvo somo sood µofn-
foos on hnnd. Howovor, sho doosn'f
oxµocf fo gof fhom µInnfod on Cood
IrIdny!
Our wook horo nf Þouhnusor
rnnch hns rovoIvod nround cnIvIng,
nIso. As n mnffor of fncf, I nood fo
gof fhIs coIumn fInIshod so I cnn go
food n cnIf In fho bnrn hIs mnmn
jusf doosn'f hnvo onough mIIk. Our
noµhow, ÐyInn Þouhnusor, wns
horo Snfurdny, hoIµIng wIfh somo
of fho novor ondIng dufIos. Wnrmor
wonfhor wIII hoIµ mnko cnIvIng go
n IIffIo smoofhor.
ThIs wook, I nm grnfofuI for fho
cnIf wnrmor If suro Is comIng In
hnndy. If Is n wnrmIng box mndo
by fho Snnborn IIA CIub, nnd fhoy
soII fho boxos fo rnIso monoy for
fhoIr ncfIvIfIos. If hns corfnInIy
µnId for IfsoIf fhIs yonr. And whnf
n gronf µrojocf for fho IIA kIds.
Tho µrojocf nof onIy fonchos fhom
n skIII, If nIso fonchos fhom fo work
fogofhor, fonchos fhom nbouf mnr-
kofIng nnd mnkIng n µrofIf, nnd
fonchos fhom fo fInnnco fhoIr or-
gnnIznfIon. A Iof of µooµIo In our
nnfIon couId bonofIf from IonrnIng
fhoso Iossons ns woII. (Inough
nbouf fhnf.)
Hnµµy Insfor fo nII of you. I hoµo
you wIII go ouf nnd mnko fhIs n fnn-
fnsfIc wook!
McenvIIIe News
{ccntInued trcm page 11)
Philip ¬ealth 3ervioes, lno., held its annual health fair, 3aturday, Maroh 23. ¬ealth
testing servioes inoluded oholesterol, iron, thyroid, prostate, omega-3 and vitamin
U. 0ther tests, suoh as blood pressure and body mass index, were provided free
of oharge. 1his year, the health fair also featured guest speakers, prize giveaways,
gourmet ooffee, a health trivia oontest and booths representing other health and
safety servioes in the oommunity. 1he winner of the ¨3uper ¬ealthy Kids!" ooloring
oontest was Paige 0'Connor, age four, Philip. 3he won a soooter and helmet. Lvery
Realth falr held at local hospltal
ohild who entered reoeived a small prize. 1he winner of the grand prize drawing was 3teve Pekron, Milesville. 3hown above left, ¬aakon County Community ¬ealth
Nurse ¬eidi Burns presented ¨3afe 3leep for Babies." upper right, Uavis 3ohofield of Capital Area Counseling 3ervioe visited with health fair guest Kathy Arthur. Lower
right, Arthur Mollravy, shown with 1ennifer 3ohriever, represented the Philip Ambulanoe 3ervioe at the health fair. 0ourres, phoros
SÐS! IxfonsIon Is hoIµIng ro-
cruIf Soufh Ðnkofnns fo voIunfoor
for n nnfIonnI nofwork of voIunfoor
µrocIµIfnfIon obsorvors, or Commu-
nIfy CoIInbornfIvo !nIn HnII nnd
Snow Þofwork (CoCo!nHS) fo
frnck µrocIµIfnfIon ovonfs ncross
Soufh Ðnkofn, roµorfod Sfnfo CII-
mnfoIogIsf nnd CoCo!nHS Sfnfo
CoordInnfor ÐonnIs Todoy.
"Thoso nro ovorydny µooµIo who
onjoy monsurIng µrocIµIfnfIon nnd
nro wIIIIng fo roµorf fhnf on fho In-
fornof," ho snId, of fho voIunfoors
who monsuro nnd roµorf nffor rnIn,
hnII nnd snow ovonfs.
ÐosµIfo fodny's nufomnfod foch-
noIogy, Todoy boIIovos IocnI roµorf-
Ing Is sfIII ossonfInI In frnckIng fho
vnrInbIIIfy of rnInfnII.
"If's n hugo bonofIf fo us fo hnvo
µooµIo ncross fho sfnfo who monI-
for µrocIµIfnfIon. Tho bIggosf vnrI-
nbIIIfy In wonfhor ncross Soufh
Ðnkofn Is how µrocIµIfnfIon dIffors
from µInco fo µInco. Ivon wIfh nII
fho fochnoIogy wo hnvo, wo ronIIy
nood fo hnvo on-ground monsuro-
monfs nII ncross fho sfnfo fo foII us
whnf Is ronIIy hnµµonIng on fho
ground," ho snId. "Whoro wo hnvo
honvy rnIn ovonfs, IIko fIood
ovonfs, fho ÞnfIonnI Wonfhor Sorv-
Ico hns Issuod fInsh fIood wnrnIngs
bnsod on µooµIo's roµorfs on how
much rnIn fnII fhoro wns," ho snId.
!nurn Idwnrds, SÐS! Ixfon-
sIon cIImnfo fIoId sµocInIIsf, Is fho
sfnfo CoCo!nHS coordInnfor. Sho
snys voIunfoor roµorfs cnn nIso bo
usofuI In documonfIng droughf con-
dIfIons.
"If µooµIo cnn foII us how mnny
dnys fhoy'vo gono wIfhouf rnInfnII,
If hoIµs us documonf droughf con-
dIfIons nnd boffor suµµorf dIsnsfor
docInrnfIon bocnuso of droughf,"
sho snId.
Idwnrds wIII work dIrocfIy wIfh
obsorvors fo frnIn fhom nnd nnswor
nny quosfIons on roµorfIng fhoy
mny hnvo; how fo uso fho gnugo or
how fo uso fho wobsIfo.
Sho nddod fhnf bocomIng n Co-
Co!nHS voIunfoor mny bo n gronf
fIf for mnny of fho sfnfo's ngrIcuI-
furo µroducors.
"Iocnuso nII fho CoCo!nHS ro-
µorfs nro mnInfnInod onIIno for
froo, fhIs cnn onso fnrmor's rocord
kooµIng. And, nII of fhoIr oId ro-
µorfs nro nccossIbIo nf nny fImo,"
Idwnrds snId. "ThIs mnkos If onsy
fo go bnck nnd Iook nf µnsf
monfhs/sonsons/yonrs of µrocIµIfn-
fIon roµorfs. If µroducors µnrfIcI-
µnfo on n roguInr bnsIs, If mny bo
onsIor fo domonsfrnfo If n µnrfIcu-
Inr IocnfIon Is woffor/drIor fhnn
ofhor nrons."
VoIunfoors who nro Inforosfod In
joInIng fho CoCo!nHS nofwork
musf bo wIIIIng fo fnko dnIIy µro-
cIµIfnfIon rondIngs bofwoon 6:00
n.m. nnd 9:00 n.m. nnd roµorf fho
ovonfs onIIno or by µhono. Thoy nro
nskod fo uso n sfnndnrd four-Inch
dInmofor rnIn gnugo nnd wIII ro-
coIvo n smnII bIf of frnInIng.
A Mnrch Mndnoss rocruIfIng
cnmµnIgn Is now undorwny. To
Ionrn moro vIsIf www.cocornhs.org
or confncf Todoy nf (605) 688-56?8.
Ior moro InformnfIon on fhIs
foµIc, vIsIf ICrow.org.
Weather reportlng volunteers needed
IIdorIy nnd dIsnbIod Soufh
Ðnkofnns hnvo unfII AµrII l fo
nµµIy for µroµorfy fnx roIIof undor
Soufh Ðnkofn`s Assossmonf Iroozo
for fho IIdorIy nnd ÐIsnbIod Iro-
grnm.
!ndor fho µrogrnm, for fnx µur-
µosos, fho homoownor`s µroµorfy
nssossmonf Is µrovonfod from In-
cronsIng. If fho ncfunI vnIuo of fho
homo Incronsos, fho homoownor
sfIII µnys µroµorfy fnxos on fho for-
mor (Iowor) vnIuo.
To bo oIIgIbIo for fho Assossmonf
Iroozo for fho IIdorIy nnd ÐIsnbIod
Irogrnm, IndIvIdunIs musf moof
fho foIIowIng qunIIfIcnfIons:
:Hnvo Incomos of Ioss fhnn
$26,020.2l for n sIngIo mombor
housohoId (onIy ono IndIvIdunI In
fho housohoId) or Ioss fhnn
$32,525.26 for n muIfIµIo-mombor
housohoId
:Hnvo ownod or rofnInod n IIfo
osfnfo In n sIngIo fnmIIy dwoIIIng,
In foo or by confrncf fo µurchnso,
for nf Ionsf ono yonr nnd hnvo boon
n rosIdonf of Soufh Ðnkofn for nf
Ionsf ono yonr
:Hnvo rosIdod for nf Ionsf 200
dnys of fho µrovIous cnIondnr yonr
In fho sIngIo-fnmIIy dwoIIIng
:Io 65 yonrs of ngo or oIdor, or
dIsnbIod (ns dofInod by fho SocInI
SocurIfy Acf).
!nromnrrIod wIdow/wIdowors of
fhoso who woro µrovIousIy qunII-
fIod mny sfIII qunIIfy In somo cIr-
cumsfnncos. Tho vnIunfIon IImIf
for fho µrogrnm Is $l?8,60?.6l or
moro of fuII nnd fruo vnIuo, monn-
Ing fhnf µroµorfy vnIuod nbovo
fhoso IImIfs Is nof oIIgIbIo unIoss
fho nµµIIcnnf hns µrovIousIy qunII-
fIod.
ÐondIIno fo nµµIy for fho µro-
grnm Is AµrII l, 20l3, nnd nµµIIcn-
fIons musf bo submIffod fo fho
counfy fronsuror. AµµIIcnfIons nro
nvnIInbIo from IocnI counfy fronsur-
ors` offIcos or by confncfIng fho Ðo-
µnrfmonf of !ovonuo, Iroµorfy nnd
SµocInI Tnxos ÐIvIsIon In IIorro nf
605-??3-3l39 or l-800-829-9l88
(µross ¨2¨ for fho Iroµorfy nnd Sµo-
cInI Tnxos ÐIvIsIon). AddIfIonnI In-
formnfIon nnd fho onIIno
nµµIIcnfIon nro nvnIInbIo nf hffµ://
www.sfnfo.sd.us/drr2/µroµsµoc-
fnx/µroµorfy/roIIof.hfm (soo ¨As-
sossmonf Iroozo for IIdorIy nnd
ÐIsnbIod¨ wIfh fho onIIno nµµIIcn-
fIon Iocnfod In fho ¨fo nµµIy¨ nron).
Property tax
assessment
freeze
dead|ìne Aprì| 1
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859-2516 · Philip
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & SLOVEK
FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETICS DULL
SALE. WEIGH-UPS 10.00 A.M. SLOVEK RANCH
ANGUS 12.00 P.M. (MT} BRED CATTLE & PAIRS TO
FOLLOW
SLOVEK RANCH ANGUS & ANGUS PLUS GENETICS - 75
DULLS INCLUDINC A SLECT CFOUP OF 2-YEAF-OLDS & 40 COM-
MEFCIAL 1ST CALF HEIFEF PAIFS WITH A.I. CALVES AT SIDE
HERBER RANCH 23RD ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE - 125
CENTLE, HOME-FAISED 1ST CALF HEIFEF PAIFS FEATUFINC
DLACK ANCUS & F1 HEIFEFS WITH DLACK CALVES AT SIDE &
20 WITH CHAFOLAIS CALVES AT SIDE; CAKE DFOKE & 4-
WHEELEF, HOFSE & PEOPLE CENTLE
PAIRS.
PAUL SLOVEK - 45 FED ANC 1ST CALF HFFS W/DLK CLVS AT
SIDE (CENTLE HFFS HAD EVEFY CALF ON THEIF OWN}
FITCH FAMILY - 40 DLK 1ST CALF HFF PAIFS; ALL DULL
CALVES AT SIDE; ALL HALF DFOTHEFS, AI SIFED DY ºDO
SLOVEK-DUSTEF" (SON OF S A V DISMAFCK} HFFS HAVE DOTH
FOUNDS OF SCOUFCUAFD
LARRY VOLMER - 20 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS
STOCK COWS:
MORTENSEN RANCH - 100 DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD TO SOLID
MOUTH COWS; DLKS DFED. HEFF; DWF DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-15
(35 HD THFEES & 65 4 YF OLDS TO SOLID MOUTH}
TIM & DENISE NELSON - 35 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-10
LARRY VOLMER - 20 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. NOW
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS
CENETIC DULL SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00
P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS,
12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, APRIL 16: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
SELLING TUESDAY,
APRIL 9 AT 12:00 (MT)
FFA/FCCLA PEOPLE AUCTION
TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 2013
BBQ 6:00 PM · AUCTION 7:00 PM
CATTL£ R£PORT: MAR 2t, 2DJS
We Þod o b1g run o] ]eeders ]or our Speo1o1 So1e.
Mong 1ong s1r1ngs. MorKe1 uos s1rong 1o Þ1gÞer. B1g
oroud o] bugers. B1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups ond 1Þo1 mor-
Ke1 uos good.
FEEDER CATTLE:
SHORTY JONES RANCH - MIDLAND
104.................................DLK & DWF STFS 553=.............$162.25
202.................................DLK & DWF STFS 615=.............$155.00
173.................................DLK & DWF STFS 693=.............$146.00
27 .............................................FED STFS 689=.............$143.00
HENRY BRUCH - STURGIS
101 ...........................................DLK HFFS 445=.............$165.75
CASEY & CHANCE TRASK - CREIGHTON
50.............................................DLK HFFS 551=.............$154.75
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
144............................................DLK STFS 706=.............$144.00
JEFF LONG - ENNING
73..............................................DLK STFS 704=.............$147.00
83..............................................DLK STFS 628=.............$156.00
88 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 654=.............$137.25
MORRIS JONES RANCH - MIDLAND
82...................................FED & DLK HFFS 691=.............$133.50
53...................................FED & DLK HFFS 633=.............$137.25
BRYAN OLIVIER - MILESVILLE
82 ...................................FED & DLK STFS 742=.............$139.50
31 ...................................FED & DLK STFS 622=.............$150.25
90.............................................DLK HFFS 696=.............$134.00
EARL & BART PARSONS - MILESVILLE
66 ...................................FED & DLK STFS 736=.............$138.00
63 ...................................FED & DLK STFS 741=.............$137.50
65 ...................................FED & DLK STFS 838=.............$127.00
47...................................FED & DLK HFFS 618=.............$137.00
84...................................FED & DLK HFFS 762=.............$124.60
71...................................FED & DLK HFFS 756=.............$124.60
ED THOMPSON - STURGIS
81 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 706=.............$133.50
41 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 623=.............$136.00
FLOYD GABRIEL EATATE & RUBY GABRIEL - CREIGHTON
61 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 707=.............$133.00
19.............................................DLK HFFS 627=.............$136.50
TERRY & CHERYL HAMMERSTROM - NEW UNDERWOOD
44 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 533=.............$155.50
21.............................................DLK HFFS 460=.............$150.50
WES & DUSTIN REEVES - OWANKA
49...................................DLK & DWF STFS 482=.............$157.50
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
24 .............................................FED STFS 718=.............$139.00
16.............................................FED HFFS 696=.............$132.00
18.............................................FED HFFS 604=.............$139.00
RAY SWALLOW - BATESLAND
14 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 676=.............$136.00
22.............................................DLK HFFS 686=.............$131.50
WO WELLER - KADOKA
33.............................................DLK HFFS 586=.............$147.00
LILLIAN & LUKE CARLSON - KADOKA
3 ...............................................DLK STFS 600=.............$153.00
4...............................................DLK HFFS 668=.............$132.25
CHUCK CARSTENSEN - PHILIP
26..............................................DLK STFS 680=.............$140.00
TOM & SHELIA TRASK - WASTA
7.....................................DLK & DWF STFS 655=.............$146.00
FLOY & ALLEN OLSON - BOX ELDER
13 ...................................FED & DLK STFS 621=.............$146.50
7 .....................................FED & DLK STFS 508=.............$167.50
45...................................FED & DLK HFFS 597=.............$141.00
20...................................FED & DLK HFFS 472=.............$150.00
DENNIS BOOMSMA - BOX ELDER
3.....................................DLK & DWF STFS 550=.............$156.00
11 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 542=.............$145.50
CHUCK & TOBY KROETCH - PHILIP
8.....................................DLK & DWF STFS 584=.............$154.00
11.............................................DLK HFFS 566=.............$144.50
TERRY & LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
12.............................................FED HFFS 689=.............$131.75
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
5 ...............................................DLK STFS 805=.............$128.00
LORITA NELSON - PHILIP
5 ...............................................DLK STFS 705=.............$137.50
TYSON HEWITT - MUD BUTTE
6...............................................DLK HFFS 592=.............$138.00
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
3.....................................DLK & DWF STFS 638=.............$148.00
10..............................................DLK STFS 553=.............$166.00
SDSU EXPERIMENT STATION - COTTONWOOD
7 ....................................DLK & DWF HFFS 811=.............$123.00
16 ..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 551=.............$145.50
WEIGH-UPS:
CONNIE TWISS - INTERIOR
1 ...............................................FED COW 1380=.............$89.00
GLEN RADWAY - MILESVILLE
1 ...............................................DLK DULL 2140=...........$107.50
1................................................DLK COW 1435=.............$80.00
WANDA VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1................................................DLK COW 1535=.............$86.50
VERYL PROKOP - KADOKA
1................................................DLK COW 1280=.............$86.00
2....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1373=.............$82.50
1...............................................DLK HFFT 970=...............$98.00
TUCKER SMITH - QUINN
1 ...............................................FED COW 1220=.............$86.00
1 ...............................................DWF COW 1505=.............$81.00
1...............................................FED HFFT 915=...............$99.00
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
1................................................DLK COW 1330=.............$85.00
2....................................DLK & FWF COWS 1130=.............$81.50
BONENBERGER RANCH - BELVIDERE
1................................................DLK COW 1525=.............$84.50
GREG SHEARER - WALL
5 ..............................................DLK COWS 1284=.............$84.50
13 ...........................................DLK HFFTS 923=...............$98.00
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
1................................................DLK COW 1360=.............$84.00
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
1 ...............................................FWF COW 1285=.............$84.00
2........................................DLK COWETTES 1038=.............$94.50
NICK RISSE - TUTHILL
1................................................DLK COW 1715=.............$83.50
1................................................DLK COW 1775=.............$82.50
ROBERT YOUNG SR. - UNION CENTER
1..............................................HEFF COW 1320=.............$83.50
1 ...............................................DWF COW 1280=.............$80.50
AARON & JIM MANSFIELD - KADOKA
1 ...............................................DLK DULL 2015=...........$101.50
1 ...............................................DLK DULL 1930=...........$100.50
RUSSEL CURTIS - ORAL
1 ...............................................FED COW 1310=.............$83.50
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
1 ...............................................FWF COW 1255=.............$83.50
1................................................DLK COW 1470=.............$81.00
2 ..............................................DLK COWS 1385=.............$80.00
JACE SHEARER - WALL
1................................................DLK COW 1435=.............$83.00
2 ..............................................DLK COWS 1505=.............$81.00
TOM GRIMES - KADOKA
1................................................DLK COW 1405=.............$83.00
1................................................DLK COW 1385=.............$81.00
WILLERT RANCH - BELVIDERE
1................................................DLK COW 1395=.............$82.50
CHUCK ENDERS - KADOKA
1...............................................DLK HFFT 820=.............$107.00
BILL WELLER - KADOKA
1 ...............................................DLK DULL 2235=...........$101.00
1 ...............................................DLK DULL 2175=.............$99.50
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
1................................................DLK COW 1330=.............$82.50
MIKE & JODIE LEHRKAMP - CAPUTA
7 ..............................................DLK COWS 1224=.............$82.50
KIETH SMITH - QUINN
1 ...............................................FED COW 1155=.............$82.50
1................................................DLK COW 1180=.............$82.00
1................................................DLK COW 1330=.............$81.50
1................................................DLK COW 1320=.............$81.00
1 .........................................FED COWETTE 990=...............$93.00
1 .........................................FED COWETTE 1065=.............$92.00
1...............................................DLK HFFT 925=...............$98.00
CHUCK KROETCH - PHILIP
2....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1345=.............$82.00
STEVE ISKE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1................................................DLK COW 1330=.............$82.00
LINCOLN SMITH - QUINN
1 ...............................................FED COW 1195=.............$82.00
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
1................................................DLK COW 1150=.............$82.00
STERLING RIGGINS - WANBLEE
1................................................DLK COW 1535=.............$81.50
1...............................................DLK HFFT 885=.............$102.50
DON & DELORIS POSS - PHILIP
1................................................DLK COW 1360=.............$81.50
3 .............................................DLK HFFTS 888=.............$101.00
STEVE MACLEAY - FAIRBURN
1................................................DLK COW 1335=.............$81.50
ROBBY YOUNG - UNION CENTER
1 ...............................................DWF COW 1325=.............$81.50
CHUCK & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
2 ..............................................DLK COWS 1448=.............$81.00
JOHN NEUMANN - PHILIP
1................................................DLK COW 1420=.............$81.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1................................................DLK COW 1395=.............$81.00
2 .............................................DLK HFFTS 853=.............$104.00
STANLEY PORCH - WANBLEE
1 ...............................................DLK DULL 1640=...........$101.00
TERRY & CHERYL HAMMERSTROM-NEW UNDERWOOD
2 ..............................................DLK COWS 1273=.............$81.00
DENNIS & KAY SIELER - QUINN
1................................................DLK COW 1130=.............$81.00
BERT PERAULT - BELVIDERE
1 ...............................................DWF COW 1370=.............$80.50
TYLER CARROLL - FAIRBURN
1................................................DLK COW 1365=.............$80.50
CREW CATTLE CO. - PHILIP
1................................................DLK COW 1330=.............$80.50
JEFF & DEANN BARBER - ENNING
2....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1270=.............$80.50
JERRY ROGHAIR - OKATON
1................................................DLK COW 1200=.............$80.50
JAMES & AARON MANSFIELD - KADOKA
1................................................DLK COW 1310=.............$80.00
2 .............................................DLK HFFTS 958=.............$100.00
MARVIN BARBER - ENNING
1 ...............................................DWF COW 1210=.............$80.00
DICK LEE - WANBLEE
1................................................DLK COW 1470=.............$79.00
JIM & JOAN CANTRELL - PHILIP
1................................................DLK COW 1640=.............$79.00
KENNETH & CAROLYN HELT2EL - MIDLAND
3...................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 897=.............$101.00
DEB MCPHERSON - PIEDMONT
16.................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 889=.............$101.00
MARK & KAREN FOLAND - MIDLAND
7 .............................................DLK HFFTS 964=...............$99.50
KENNETH BARTLETT - INTERIOR
3...................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 1033=.............$92.00
ROGHAIR ANGUS - OKATON ...BULLS AVG. $2492.00
1hursday, Maroh 28, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review ·Page 14
COSMIC BOWIING . wIII bo hoId for sfudonfs of fho Hnnkon SchooI
ÐIsfrIcf In grndos ? & 8 nf fho !ucky SfrIko In IhIIIµ on Snfurdny, AµrII
6, from 6:00 fo 9:00 µ.m.
Note: There io u churge for thio etent in the umount of S3.00 per peroon.
Thio notice uuo printed in the 1ridge Door luot ueek und otuted thut it uuo free,
houeter, it io not. Pleuoe keep in mind thut ue cunnot uccept itemo for the 1ridge
Door in uhich they ure either churged for or the orgunixution io muking money.
We upologixe und ue oincerely hope thio cleuro up the
miounderotunding for ull purtieo intolted.
!osourcos nro nvnIInbIo nf fho Soufh
Ðnkofn Ðoµnrfmonf of AgrIcuIfuro fo
hoIµ young nnd bogInnIng fnrmors nnd
rnnchors gof fhoIr sfnrf In ngrIcuIfuro.
Todny`s rIsIng Innd µrIcos nnd hIghor
Inµuf cosfs mnko If chnIIongIng for bo-
gInnIng fnrmors fo gof sfnrfod. Tho Io-
gInnIng Inrmor Iond Irogrnm fhrough
SÐÐA Is nvnIInbIo for oIIgIbIo bogInnIng
fnrmors fo µurchnso ngrIcuIfurnI Innd
nf Iowor Inforosf rnfos.
¨Tho bogInnIng fnrmor bond µrogrnm
hns dIfforonf oIIgIbIIIfy crIforIn fhnn
ofhor govornmonfnI µro- grnms, so I
wouId oncourngo µroducors fo confncf
us If fhoy nro µurchnsIng ngrIcuIfurnI
ronI osfnfo,¨ snId TorrI !nIrIo, fInnnco
ndmInIsfrnfor for SÐÐA.
Tho bogInnIng fnrmor bond µrogrnm
works fhrough n IocnI bnnk fo fInnnco
fho Innd µurchnso. Inrmors Sfnfo Innk
of MnrIon roconfIy ufIIIzod fho fnx-ox-
omµf bond µrogrnm.
¨Wo woro nbIo fo nssIsf n young
fnrmor In goffIng sfnrfod In fho IocnI
communIfy wIfh hIs InIfInI Innd µur-
chnso,¨ snId InrcIny SmIfh, Inrmors
Sfnfo Innk. ¨WIfhouf fho bond µro-
grnm, fho Inforosf rnfo nnd roµnymonf
sfrucfuro wouId hnvo boon nImosf Im-
µossIbIo for hIm fo cnsh-fIow fho µrojocf.
Wo hnvo usod fhIs µrogrnm numorous
fImos In fho µnsf fo hoIµ ofhor bogIn-
nIng fnrmors, nnd Iook forwnrd fo usIng
If ngnIn In fho fufuro. Tho onso of com-
µIofIng fho nµµIIcnfIon nnd nmounf of
µnµorwork, or Inck fhoroof, nIso ns-
sIsfod gronfIy In comµIofIng fho frnns-
ncfIon.¨
SÐÐA ndmInIsfors fho IogInnIng
Inrmor Iond Irogrnm fhrough fho
VnIuo-Addod IInnnco AufhorIfy
(VAIA) bonrd. Tho bonrd moofs
monfhIy fo rovIow fho nµµIIcnfIons for
fho µrogrnm nnd Issuo bonds for nµ-
µrovod µrojocfs.
Tho µrogrnm doosn`f hnvo nn uµµor
ngo IImIf, nor doos If hnvo n IImIf on off-
fnrm Incomo. To bo oIIgIbIo, nn nµµII-
cnnf musf bo nf Ionsf l8 yonrs oId nnd
n rosIdonf of Soufh Ðnkofn. Thoy musf
hnvo n nof worfh of undor $400,000,
nnd cnnnof own, or µrovIousIy hnvo
ownod, moro fhnn 30 µorconf of fho
counfy modInn ncros. Tho mnxImum
nmounf of n bogInnIng fnrmor bond Is
$50l,l00 for cnIondnr yonr 20l3. ThIs
IImIf Is sof nnnunIIy by fho fodornI gov-
ornmonf.
¨WIfh fho nssIsfnnco of Inrmors
Sfnfo Innk In MnrIon nnd fho VAIA`s
IogInnIng Inrmor Iond Irogrnm, I
wns nbIo fo µurchnso my fIrsf µIoco of
ronI osfnfo,¨ snId bogInnIng fnrmor
JnmIo Cromor. ¨Tho nµµIIcnfIon µrocoss
wns vory onsy fo work fhrough nnd un-
dorsfnnd. WIfh fho onso of fho nµµIIcn-
fIon µrocoss, µrojocf nµµrovnI furn
nround fImo nnd roducod Inforosf rnfo,
I wns nbIo fo µurchnso fho ronI osfnfo
whIch nIIowod mo fo Incronso fho Innd
bnso of my fnrmIng oµornfIon. I wouId
oncourngo ovory bogInnIng fnrmor fo In-
quIro nbouf SÐÐA`s VAIA IogInnIng
Inrmor Iond Irogrnm.¨
¨Þof onIy Is fhIs n gronf wny fo gof
our kIds bnck on fho fnrms nnd fo sfny
In Soufh Ðnkofn, If nIso hoIµs rofIrIng
fnrmors µnss on fhoIr Innd fo n qunIIfy-
Ing bogInnIng fnrmor wIfh n confrncf
for dood whIIo snvIng monoy on fhoIr
fodornI Incomo fnxos,¨ snId !nIrIo.
Tho Inforosf rocoIvod on fho confrncf
(µrIncIµnI nmounf uµ fo $50l,l00) Is
fodornIIy fnx oxomµf µofonfInIIy snv-
Ing fho Innd ownor fhousnnds of doIInrs
In Incomo fnxos.
CIosoIy roInfod Inndownors, such ns
µnronfs nnd grnndµnronfs nro nof oIIgI-
bIo nnd cnnnof soII fhoIr Innd on n con-
frncf for dood usIng fhIs µrogrnm. CIoso
roInfIvos nro roquIrod fo go fhrough n
fhIrd µnrfy Iondor.
SÐÐA doos nof fInnnco oµornfIng ox-
µonsos or rofInnnco µrIor dobf. Ofhor
µrogrnms nro nvnIInbIo for fho µurchnso
of IIvosfock, dnIry fInnncIng, foodIof fI-
nnncIng, grnIn sforngo nnd vnIuo-nddod
busInossos.
Irogrnm InformnfIon cnn bo found nf
www.sddn.sd.gov or cnII SÐÐA, ÐIvI-
sIon of AgrIcuIfurnI ÐovoIoµmonf nf
605.??3.5436.
0epartment of Ag to he|p begìnnìng farmers
by S.Ð. Pub!Ic \tI!ItIes Com-
mIssIonevs CLvIs Ne!son, Guvy
Hunson, KvIstIe IIegen
Throughouf 20l2, fho Soufh
Ðnkofn IubIIc !fIIIfIos CommIs-
sIon workod wIfh µroducor nnd
grnIn buyor grouµs fo dovoIoµ Iog-
IsInfIon µrovIdIng fho I!C boffor
fooIs for ovnIunfIng fho fInnncInI
soundnoss of grnIn buyors nnd
wnrohousos In fho sfnfo. Thnf of-
forf bocnmo HIl0l? whIch ro-
coIvod gronf bIµnrfIsnn suµµorf In
fho IogIsInfuro, hns boon sIgnod
Info Inw by Cov. ÐonnIs Ðnugnnrd,
nnd bocomos offocfIvo AµrII l.
Tho IogIsInfIon confnIns sovornI
µrovIsIons fhnf sfrongfhon fho
I!C`s ovorsIghf of grnIn buyors
nnd wnrohousos. Thoso µrovIsIons
IncIudo:
l. !oquIromonfs fo µrovIdo fho
I!C wIfh curronf fInnncInI Infor-
mnfIon undor µonnIfy of µorjury
2. IrovIdIng fho I!C quIck nc-
coss fo fInnncInI InformnfIon fhnf Is
Iocnfod ouf of sfnfo
3. !oquIromonfs for grnIn buyors
nnd wnrohousos who fnII ouf of fI-
nnncInI comµIInnco fo roµorf Immo-
dInfoIy fo fho I!C or fnco crImInnI
µonnIfIos
4. SµocIfyIng fhnf fho I!C musf
bo nIIowod fo conducf InsµocfIons of
rocords nnd fncIIIfIos; donInI of nc-
coss mny rosuIf In IIconso susµon-
sIon
5. AdjusfIng bond roquIromonfs
wIfh Incronsos for somo grnIn buy-
ors
Thoro nro sovornI Imµorfnnf µro-
vIsIons In Inw fhnf µroducors nood
fo know ns fhoy mnrkof grnIn. If
grnIn Is doIIvorod ns n cnsh snIo,
fho µroducor hns fho rIghf fo µny-
monf on domnnd. ÐoµondIng on
fho IocnfIon of fho bookkooµIng do-
µnrfmonf, roquosfs for µnymonf
shouId bo snfIsfIod wIfhIn 48 hours
of dumµIng fho grnIn. AII cnsh
grnIn snIos musf bo µnId no Infor
fhnn 30 dnys nffor dumµIng. If, for
nny ronson, n µroducor Is nof nbIo
fo obfnIn fhoIr µnymonf wIfhIn
fhoso fImofrnmos, fho µrobIom
shouId bo roµorfod fo fho I!C`s
grnIn wnrohouso dIvIsIon by cnIIIng
605-??3-5280.
ShouId n grnIn buyor InsoIvoncy
occur, bond µrocoods mny bo nvnII-
nbIo fo covor n µorfIon of nny Iossos
by µroducors who hnvo mndo cnsh
snIos. Iy Inw, bond µrocoods do nof
covor voIunfnry crodIf snIos such ns
doInyod µrIcIng or doInyod µny-
monf confrncfs.
Iocnuso mosf grnIn confrncfIng
for doIIvory or µnymonf occurs ovor
fho foIoµhono, fho IogIsInfuro sov-
ornI yonrs ngo mndo sµocIfIc µrovI-
sIons for fhoso fyµos of ornI
confrncfs for fho snIo of grnIn. If Is
Imµorfnnf fo undorsfnnd fhnf nny
ornI confrncf bofwoon n µroducor
nnd grnIn buyor musf bo foIIowod
by sondIng fho µroducor n wrIffon
confrncf. If fho µroducor dIsµufos
fho confrncf forms, fhnf dIsµufo
musf bo mndo In wrIfIng wIfhIn
fwo dnys of rocoIvIng fho wrIffon
confrncf.
If you hnvo furfhor quosfIons ro-
gnrdIng fho µrofocfIons µrovIdod In
our sfnfo`s grnIn buyor nnd wnro-
houso Inws, confncf fho I!C nf
605-??3-5280 or µuc¸sfnfo.sd.us.
PUU: new protectìons
for farmers se||ìng graìn
Lunch 8pec|a|s:
Honday-Fr|day
11:00 to 1:30
6a|| for
spec|a|s!
Regu|ar Henu
Ava||ab|e N|ght|y!
* * *
Fr|day ßuffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
0swa|swa l||||ç
ktstrra||sas:
ääâ-tII1
~ Saturday, March 30th ~
Steak & Shrimp
~ Monday, April 1st ~
Rib
Sandwich
I|t ä|ta||sast k lsaa¡t
êçta 0a||¡ Msa1a¡ ||ra äa|ar1a¡
8
a
|a
d
ß
a
r
A
v
a
||a
b
|e
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, March 26th ~
Petite Ribeye
~ Wednesday, March 27th ~
Basket of
Pork Ribs
~ Thursday, March 28th ~
French Dip, Fries & Bowl of Salad
~ Friday Buffet, March 29th ~
Chicken • Crab Cakes
•Shrimp
Inrm !oscuo, n nonµrofIf orgnn-
IznfIon fhnf µrovIdos µInnfIng nnd
hnrvosfIng nssIsfnnco froo of
chnrgo fo fnrm fnmIIIos who hnvo
oxµorIoncod n mnjor IIInoss, Injury
or nnfurnI dIsnsfor, wIII rocoIvo n
grnnf fofnIIng $34?,690 from fho
!oonn M. nnd Hnrry I. HoImsIoy
ChnrIfnbIo Trusf. Tho grnnf wIII bo
usod for oquIµmonf µurchnsos nnd
gonornI oµornfIons.
IIII Cross, Inrm !oscuo µrosI-
donf nnd foundor, snId, ¨ThIs Is fho
Inrgosf grnnf rocoIvod sInco fho In-
coµfIon of Inrm !oscuo nnd wIII
nIIow us fo ncquIro fho nocossnry
oquIµmonf fo µrovIdo offIcIonf nnd
fImoIy nssIsfnnco fo moro fnmIIIos.¨
¨If n fnrmor cnnnof µInnf or hnr-
vosf fho croµs bocnuso of nn IIInoss
or Injury, fhnf fnrm mny nof bo
nbIo fo survIvo unfII noxf sonson,¨
snId WnIfor InnzIror, frusfoo of
Tho HoImsIoy ChnrIfnbIo Trusf.
¨Thoso fnrms nro vIfnI fo rurnI com-
munIfIos. Inrm !oscuo µrovIdos
nssIsfnnco durIng n honIfh crIsIs,
nnd hoIµs gunrnnfoo fho fnmIIy cnn
focus on goffIng fho honIfhcnro
fhoy nood. Wo nro µroud fo suµµorf
Inrm !oscuo nnd fhoIr voIunfoors
ns fhoy do good work In fho uµµor
MIdwosf.¨
Inrm !oscuo, foundod In 2006,
hns hoIµod moro fhnn 200 fnmIIIos
durIng unoxµocfod crIsos. Tho or-
gnnIznfIon`s mIssIon Is fo hoIµ
fnrmors who hnvo oxµorIoncod n
mnjor IIInoss, Injury, or nnfurnI
dIsnsfor by µrovIdIng fho nocossnry
oquIµmonf nnd mnnµowor fo µInnf
or hnrvosf fhoIr croµ. Tho confInu-
nfIon of vInbIo fnrms Is fho orgnnI-
znfIon's focus. As n rosuIf of fho
nssIsfnnco, fnrm fnmIIIos cnn sur-
vIvo µofonfInIIy dovnsfnfIng cIr-
cumsfnncos, onnbIIng fhom fo kooµ
fho fnmIIy busInoss In fncf, whIch
In furn hoIµs fho oconomIc, socInI
nnd cIvIc woII-boIng of rurnI com-
munIfIos. Inrm !oscuo hoIµs fnrm
fnmIIIos In Þorfh Ðnkofn, Soufh
Ðnkofn, Monfnnn, MInnosofn nnd
Iown. AµµIIcnfIons nro curronfIy
boIng nccoµfod for fho 20l3 µInnf-
Ing sonson, whIch cnn bo obfnInod
nf ?0l-252-20l? or www.fnrmros-
cuo.org .
Tho HoImsIoy ChnrIfnbIo Trusf
nsµIros fo Imµrovo IIvos by suµµorf-
Ing offocfIvo nonµrofIfs. SInco 2008,
If hns commIffod moro fhnn $800
mIIIIon fo n wIdo rnngo of orgnnIzn-
fIons. Tho frusf`s !urnI HonIfhcnro
Irogrnm funds InnovnfIvo µrojocfs
fhnf uso InformnfIon fochnoIogIos
fo connocf rurnI µnfIonfs fo omor-
goncy modIcnI cnro, brIng fho Infosf
modIcnI fhornµIos fo µnfIonfs In ro-
mofo nrons, nnd µrovIdo sfnfo-of-
fho-nrf frnInIng for rurnI hosµIfnIs
nnd omorgoncy modIcnI sorvIco
µorsonnoI. To dnfo, fhIs µrogrnm
hns nwnrdod moro fhnn $l?2 mII-
IIon fo orgnnIznfIons nnd InIfInfIvos
In fho uµµor MIdwosf sfnfos of
Þorfh Ðnkofn, Soufh Ðnkofn, Þo-
brnskn, WyomIng, MInnosofn, Iown
nnd Monfnnn. Ior moro Informn-
fIon, vIsIf www.hoImsIoyfrusf.org.
Farm Rescue gets $347,600
grant from Relmsley 1rust

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