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Pioneer Review, March 21, 2013

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 30
Volume 107
March 21, 2013
Red Dirt
and Rough-
stock
Rodeo
2
St.
Patrick’s
Day 5K
8
Track
season
begins
9
Pioneer review
by Del Bartels
The Haakon School Disctrict
Board of Education meeting Mon-
day, March 18, had a larger than
usual audience of students, parents
and other community members.
Gavin Brucklacher, president of
the junior class, was the
spokesman for convincing the
board to vote to change the location
of the March 22 prom. It had been
earlier indicated that the junior
class could hold the event in the
large gymnasium, rather than in
the Fine Arts Building. A massive
set and decorations were then or-
dered and financially committed to
by the junior class. A three-walled
circus tent facade is planned to en-
close the prom theme of “Under the
Big Top.”
Concerns were voiced to the ad-
ministration from some community
members about the preservation of
the wooden floor of the main gym.
The prom site was then changed
back to the Fine Arts Building.
Brucklacher gave a detailed and
supported argument, followed by
the board stating that it was not a
board issue. The matter was re-
turned to negotiation and compro-
mise by the junior class, the junior
class advisors and the administra-
tion. The matter was to be resolved
by the end of Tuesday, March 19
(after print time for this issue of
the Pioneer Review).
Brucklacher stated that the
larger gym had been used for
proms in 2003. In rebuttal, board
member Vonda Hamill said that
was before the Fine Arts Building
was available. Brucklacher stated
that four other activities scheduled
for the Fine Arts Building would
delay the beginning of decorating
for the prom. In rebuttal, Superin-
tendent Keven Morehart would try
to have those activities moved or
concluded earlier. Though the
wooden floor is completely refin-
ished every summer anyway,
Brucklacher said that the prom at-
tendees could dance in socks,
“That’s not we are worried about.
We want to have a good time.”
Brucklacher stressed that the
students wanted to thank the com-
munity. Kids support the commu-
nity, too. The Family, Career and
Community Leaders of Amierica,
the FFA and other groups support
the recent drive to save the Gem
Theatre, help landscape the hospi-
tal courtyard and many other proj-
ects. “It’s what we put into the com-
munity and we hope we get back
from the community, and we al-
ways do,” said Brucklacher.
After Brucklacher’s supported
speech, board members and More-
hart replied. Hamill stated she was
more concerned of when the prom
was, not where it was. Mark Nel-
son said that such floor concerns
were why a wooden floor was not
put in the Fine Arts Building. Jake
Fitzgerald said that the manual on
use and upkeep of the wooden floor
should be reviewed. Morehart
stated that he saw compromising
already going on, with changing
the prom from Saturday evening to
Friday evening. Scott Brech was
not necessarily worried about using
the wooden floor this year, but
about setting a precedent for future
years. Hamill said, “It may not look
exactly as you want, but it is possi-
ble in the Fine Arts Building. I’m
on the cleaning committee, so I’ll
probably be one of those hanging
up there like a monkey to take it
down.” Hamill stated that if a com-
promise was made, then future
uses should be steered to the Fine
Arts Building.
Brucklacher thanked the board
for listening. He pointed out that if
the Fine Arts Building had to be
used for the board’s reasonings,
then graduation should be in the
Fine Arts Building for those same
reasons. The junior advisors are
Barb Bowen, Pennie Slovek and
Brigitte Brucklacher.
In other board business, the
board approved offering adminis-
trative contracts, with salaries to
be determined at a later date.
The board went into an executive
session concerning personnel, with
no action being taken afterward.
A list of surplus items includes
the storage trailer at the football
field, which will be removed and
disposed of. Other items, mostly
used sporting equipment, of any
use will be sold at Scottie Fest.
This year works out that only
three coaches are involved with the
high school and junior high school
track team. The 2013 golf team has
30 members and is in need of an as-
sistant coach to help head coach
Doug Hauk. Thus the position has
been made and a contract has been
offered to Kory Foss.
The local spelling bee will be
April 18. The annual grandparents’
lunch will be Wednesday, March
27.
The next scheduled board of ed-
ucation meeting will be at 7:00
p.m., Monday, April 15, in room A-
1 of the Philip High School.
Prom placement problem pitch
Gavin Brucklacher, left, put forth an orderly and documented argument for the
high school prom to be in the wooden-floored gym as indicated, rather than back
in the Fine Arts Building, to accommodate the already committed-to decorations
for the prom theme “Under the Big Top.” He displayed a model of the three-walled
facade that will be the circus tent, which will be lifted with pulleys up to the ceiling
of the prom location. With Brucklacher were other junior class officers Kaci Olivier,
Jordyn Dekker and Madison Hand. Photo by Del Bartels
by Del Bartels
The Philip City Council met in
special session, Monday, March 18,
as a board of equalization.
Toni Rhodes, Haakon County di-
rector of equalization, presented
her annual report to the council.
For the city, there were no filed ob-
jections to property valuation as-
sessments received in 2013. The
Haakon County commissioners will
meet as a board of equalization,
April 9. According to Rhodes, as of
March 18, no objections have been
filed with the county.
Rhodes reported that in 2011 the
city experienced a total growth as-
sessment of $59,421. In 2012 the
city’s total growth assessment was
$203,460. Some of this is for new
buildings that fall under the city’s
tax break for new construction,
thus the property owners are as-
sessed any taxes at only one-fifth of
the total assessed value for the first
year, with another fifth added next
year, and so forth. In 2011, the
county saw a growth of new con-
struction of an assessed value of
$590,922, while in 2012 the county
grew in new construction by an as-
sessment of $3,317,873.
This adds up to a total of new
building within the borders of
Haakon County for 2012 of
$3,521,333. Rhodes reported that
we have growth in the county that
has not been assessed yet. Her goal
is to get through the entire county
every five years. For 2012, the
equalized value for all of Haakon
County and its communities is
$262,651,056.
The council adjourned as a board
of equalization and immediately re-
convened for city council business.
Rod Senn with KLJ (formerly
Kadrmas, Lee and Jackson) pre-
sented a review of the Philip air-
port projects. After his briefing, the
council approved the Land Acquisi-
tion and Environmental Assess-
ment and authorized the mayor’s
signature on the paperwork.
The Philip Municipal Airport, in
order to meet new and projected
Federal Aviation Administration
guidelines, will swap land it owns
that is not in any flight path of the
two runways for property that is at
the end of the runways. A trape-
zoidal area of land at the end of
runways has been shown to be
higher in any likelihood of an acci-
dent.
“The intent is not to purchase
any property, but to swap,” said
Senn. Later he said, “Everything is
predicated on dollar value.” The
city currently has existing ease-
ments for all the property for which
it wants to own. If the city does not
own it, it cannot pave it.
“Ultimately, it will all come down
to how cooperative the landowners
are going to be,” said Mayor Mike
Vetter. No problems are expected.
The liability issue was revisited
concerning a company wanting to
land aircraft that are heavier than
the airport is classified for. The
classification restriction and lim-
ited liability, if any at all, of the
city or the airport has been made
very clear to the company. Senn
concluded with the reality that if
an accident were to happen, then
the city might have to pay a few
thousand dollars to repair a pot-
hole in the shoulder of a runway,
while the company would have to
pay many times that to repair such
an aircraft.
Kent Buchholz and Tom Radway
asked the council if it would look
into overlaying a 75-yard section of
street between their houses. The
asphalt work on Hone Street west
of the N. Wood Avenue intersection
would be easiest done during the
Wood Avenue and Waldon Avenue
street project. Buchholz said that it
should be considered now, or out of
sight out of mind and it won’t get
done for many, many years. The
council will research the possibili-
ties.
The council approved resolutions
2013-01 and 2013-02, authorizing
the transfers of funds to finance
the Wood Avenue and Walden Av-
enue improvement project and the
Pine Street and Wray Avenue over-
lay project.
The council approved a building
permit applied for by Ralph Mc-
Quirk for Donald and Delores Poss.
It concerned an emergency repair
or replacement of a water line.
The council approved the
amended park/recreational free
water policy. It no longer lists a
price for a certain amount of water.
The policy now states, “The parks
and/or recreational areas will be
assessed the current adopted water
usage rate for free water users for
any water usage over and beyond
their maximum allotted free
water.”
There will be a garbage commit-
tee meeting, Thursday, March 28,
at 4:00 p.m. to open bids for the
residential garbage contract.
The next regular city council
meeting will be Monday, April 1, at
7:00 p.m. in the Haakon County
community room.
City council meets as board of equalization
The Midland community opened
its doors to host the fourth develop-
ment session for Stronger Econ-
omies Together, a group which
meets monthly to build a blueprint
for regional economic development
in the Badlands/Bad River region.
The group met Tuesday. March
12, at the Open Bible Church, and
focused on the topics of developing
a vision statement and goals for the
plan.
Prior to the working meeting,
Midland representatives offered
city tours, culminating in a walk-
through of the newly named, “Lava
Waters Inn,” formerly the Stropp-
pel Inn. While visitors wandered
through the historic building, sto-
ries of history and new ideas were
shared.
“About 30 people toured Midland
and the Lava Water Hotel. It was
exciting to hear Kathy Jensen's fu-
ture plans for the hotel and to see
the progress she has already
made,” said Beth Flom, Midland
member on the SET team.
Session four opened with a per-
sonality assessment, helping group
members to understand their lead-
ership style, as well as others in
the group. This led to time spent
conceiving a vision statement in
line with regional assets and val-
ues. Between this session and the
next, a small group will be forming
the ideas into a solid vision state-
ment that will represent the direc-
tion of the entire group.
Brainstorming of goals and
learning how to write them to be
“SMART” rounded out the session.
The group came up with 20 broad
goals that will be narrowed and
prioritized during the next four ses-
sions. Current group members can
share ideas they have identified.
The next SET session will be
held in Philip, Tuesday, April 9.
The educational session will be
from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. To as-
sist the group in forming their
plan, guest speakers from the Gov-
ernor’s Office of Economic Develop-
ment and the South Dakota Labor
Market Information Center will
present economic data on jobs and
industries.
All interested people in the
Haakon/Jackson/eastern Penning-
ton county area are urged to partic-
ipate. For more information,
contact Kari O’Neill, South Dakota
State University Extension Com-
munity Development, at 685-6972
or kari.oneill@sdstate.edu.
Midland hosts SET’s fourth session
Each group worked on developing a vision statement for the region.
From left, are Patty Groven, Lauri Fugate, Gene Christensen, Sarah VanderMay
and Belinda Mitchell, all from the Kadoka area. Courtesy photos
Mary Williams, Wall Mayor Dave Hahn and Rod Renner, all from the Wall area.
by Del Bartels
The Philip Ambulance Service
revealed its most modern vehicle,
during an assembly outside the
school Thursday, March 14.
Members of the high school art
class, under the instruction of Pen-
nie Slovek, supplied various art-
work as suggestions for the paint
work on the ambulance. The top
winner, 10th grader Ashton Reedy,
received a $100 check and her de-
sign was used for the ambulance
paint job. The second place winner,
10th grader Courtney Bartlett, re-
ceived $50.
The two art winners got to take
down the coverings to unveil the
ambulance detail to fellow students
and the general public. The win-
ning design was a life line symbol
connecting two ambulance stars of
life, one design on each side of the
unit. The star of life is also behind
each cab door.
The box from a 1998 ambulance
was refurbished and put on a 2013
chassis. This four-wheel drive am-
bulance “is mostly going to be used
as our bad weather rig – snow, mud
and like that,” said Don Weller, di-
rector of Philip Ambulance Service.
Weller said that he had “basi-
cally asked to see designs on the
new ambulance. Some one men-
tioned having the students do
them, and it went from there.”
Crew members judged the sugges-
tions from the students and voted
to determine the top winner. “It
was fun looking through everyone’s
art work,” said crew member Kalcy
Triebwasser.
“It was great to have a commu-
nity event that supports our ambu-
lance, and that supports our
students,” said crew member Paula
Duncan.
Slovek said that, in lieu of a fall
semester test, her students created
designs for the ambulance.
The current ambulance service
crew is between 20-25 people. Some
members have moved out of the
area, while some are recovering
from temporary burn-out. The cur-
rent emergency medical technician
class will graduate in May. Weller
said that it is always a struggle to
continually pick up and train
enough people.
Designer ambulance for Philip
Pennie Slovek’s art class provided possible designs for detail work on the newest
vehicle of the Philip Ambulance Service. Photos by Del Bartels
The newest ambulance is designed with a life line symbol connecting two ambu-
lance stars of life. Shown, from left, are crew member Paula Duncan, art winner
Ashton Reedy, runner up Courtney Bartlett, and crew member Kalcy Triebwasser.
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Opinion / Community
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
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Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Overcast with a chance of
snow, then a chance of snow and a
chance of rain in the afternoon. Fog
early. High of 39F with a windchill as
low as 3F. Breezy. Winds from the ESE
at 15 to 20 mph. Chance of snow 50%.
Friday: Partly cloudy.
Fog early. High of
32F. Winds from
the North at 5 to
15 mph shifting to the East in
the afternoon.
Sunday: Overcast with a chance
of snow. High of 36F with a
windchill as low as 0F. Windy.
Winds from the NNW at 25 to
30 mph. Chance of snow 50% with
accumulations up to 1 in. possible.
Saturday: Overcast with a chance of
snow and rain showers. Fog early.
High of 34F with a windchill as low
as 3F. Breezy. Winds from the NNE at
20 to 25 mph. Chance of snow 60% with ac-
cumulations up to 3 in. possible.
Get your
complete &
up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
If certain things happen often
enough, you start expecting them.
Take the Land-O’-Lakes truck I
frequently see when going to
church on Sunday. Quite a lot of
the time, just after I get on the in-
terstate, here comes a big blue dou-
ble-trailer rig festooned with
pictures of dairy products and
sporting the Land-O’-Lakes logo.
It’s big, it’s blue, and it’s hard to
miss. As a result, after spotting
this rig several times, I started
purposely looking for it. I find that
if I am on my normal schedule of
entering the freeway about 9:00
AM, I may well see the truck com-
ing my way within a very few min-
utes. If I’m earlier than that, I’ll
see it farther on. If I’m late, I may
miss it altogether. This little sce-
nario has played itself out enough
times now that I’m sort of let down
if it doesn’t happen, not that it
makes the slightest difference one
way or the other.
We humans tend to be creatures
of habit. We may fall into a routine
and then find ourselves somewhat
unsettled if things don’t play out as
we’re used to. Take getting up in
the morning, for example. I like to
start the day by sipping on some
orange juice followed by having a
cup of coffee. If we happen to be out
of orange juice, that is a sorry state
of affairs. I may have to look
around, see what’s available, and
maybe substitute some apple or
other juice which is not nearly as
satisfying. Sure, orange juice
sometimes gives me a sugar or
some other kind of rush if I drink
it too fast right after waking up.
This can even result in a touch of
dizziness if I stand up too quickly,
but I still want the orange and not
apple or, heaven forbid, cranberry.
Routine is not always bad, of
course. Sometimes it is only sensi-
ble. If you’ve had an ornery old
black cow kick you enough times,
you will soon learn to avoid going
behind her. This applies even more
so to horses. In the early days, my
dad and his brothers raised a lot of
horses to sell since they were more
profitable than various other pur-
suits. They had one horse, though,
that liked to kick if anyone walked
behind it when it was in a stall in
the barn. They exercised caution
around the beast, but one day it let
fly with a hoof and just narrowly
missed connecting with my Uncle
Don’s head. That was enough.
They decided caution was no
longer the answer in this particu-
lar case and promptly led the ani-
mal to the other side of the barn
and shot it. This was probably a
good idea since, just a few years
ago, a cousin of mine died from
being kicked in the head by a
horse.
Then we come to nature which
tends to follow a certain schedule.
Every month the moon goes
through a routine of growing larger
and then shrinking back again. To-
wards the end of the cycle when
I’ve probably lost track of the
moon’s exact phase, I start looking
towards the west just after sunset
to see if there is a crescent moon
hanging there. I’m always some-
what pleased when I see it since
crescent moons are neat.
Similarly, about this time of year
I start looking for meadowlarks.
They usually come back anywhere
from early to late March. Gener-
ally speaking, a bunch of robins
shows up just prior to the mead-
owlarks, so seeing them gives me
an early warning to be on the look-
out for my favorite avian species.
Hearing that first meadowlark
every year is quite a delight, not
only because it is pretty to listen
to, but also because it signals that
winter is over or, in some cases, al-
most over.
Getting back to the dairy trucks,
though, I went through three Sun-
days recently without seeing any of
them. I was somewhat disap-
pointed and figured they’d changed
their schedule somehow so I
wouldn’t be seeing them anymore.
On the fourth Sunday, however, I
just got on the interstate and there
came my truck. “Oh, they’re still
running,” I said, feeling somewhat
pleased. About another five miles
down the road, here came another
one just like the first one. “That’s a
new twist,” I thought. “I’ve never
seen two before.” Oddly enough, on
the way back from church, a third
one went by going the other way.
“Now they’re overdoing it a little,”
I concluded. Still, I guess they were
just making up for the three Sun-
days they weren’t around. My rou-
tine was intact albeit somewhat
strangely. Life could go on.
PHILIP HEALTH SERVICES AUXILIARY …will meet Thurs-
day, April 4, in the conference room at the hospital at 7:00 p.m.
COSMIC BOWLING … Free for students of the Haakon School
District in grades 7 & 8 at the Lucky Strike in Philip, Saturday,
April 6, from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. For more information contact Mindy
Green at 430-3790.
PHS GRAND MARCH …The community is welcome to view the
Philip High School prom grand march on Friday, March 22, in the
Fine Arts gym. Grand march is set for 6:30 p.m. with doors open to
the public at 6:15 p.m.
PHILIP AREA AARP/RTA … will meet Monday, March 25, at
6:00 p.m. at the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center in Philip with a
soup supper and meeting. Jesse Hansen of Golden West will speak.
Everyone is invited.
HAAKON COUNTY YOUNG WOMEN’S … Easter Egg Hunt is
scheduled for Thursday, March 28, at 4:00 p.m. at the Kiddie Park
in Philip. Three age groups, 0-3, 4-6 and 7 up to third grade will be
included. Contact Shandon Fugate for more information, 515-1951.
FREE TAX PREPARATION …AARP TaxAide will be providing
free federal tax return preparations at the Bad River Senior Citi-
zen’s Center in Philip on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The serv-
ice is open to all ages with emphasis on low and middle income
taxpayers. Call Bob McDaniel, 859-2227, for appointment or more
information.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Hard times calving ... by Del Bartels
The alarm blared. Through his grogginess, his stretched out hand
found its mark to turn the darned thing off. The rancher’s body moved
on its own, dressing into yesterday’s clothes with little wakeful thought
directing it. Not until the microwave dinged and the smell of day-old,
but hot, coffee hit him did any thought actually take place.
Still night, 4:00 a.m. Last of the night checks to the pole barn. More
details reformed as he put on his muddy boots by the back door. Four
cows were in the barn, two having already dropped their calves, which
were strengthening up before mama and baby would be making room
for more end-of-term livestock. The other two cows had still been car-
rying when the rancher checked on them just a few hours ago.
The pre-dawn breeze gnawed its way through his coat. His gloves
were damp from earlier, and he had been too worn out to remember to
get a drier pair. He trudged through the herd in the corral. No other
cows there were yet in quick need of the shelter of the barn. A seem-
ingly blaring light and some hay-sweet warmth hit him when he en-
tered through a side door. The two calves born earlier and their
mothers were doing fine. The third cow, a solid seasoned one, had given
birth quicker than the rancher had expected, and with no problems.
The cow had proven in years past to be hardy, and to be an attentive
mama. The fourth cow was the possible problem.
Each calf was a part of his future income, a part of paying the bills
and keeping his livelihood for someday when at least one of his kids
might take over. They were still young, but had been doing at least as
much as could be expected of them. The hard parts, like getting prac-
tically no sleep for about two weeks, were on his shoulders. Hard parts
like right now. The calf had not turned. Talking to the cow as if they
were old friends, he patted her and pulled on an arm-length glove.
Branding, cutting, dehorning – all were as messy and as much country
as it comes. But, this was probably the most disgusting, yet glorious,
aspect of ranching. He distracted himself with thoughts of next season’s
selling prices, hay reserves from the fall, his bankers’s face when they
last talked ... all the while his experience took over to reach in, move
and direct what he could. There, the best he could do!
Almost with an urgency the calf now wanted out. A wet, limp, gangly
blob came easily behind the rancher’s gentle pulling. The bed of hay
on the floor was not good enough for calf, as mama immediately tended
to the steaming thing that was hers. The rancher had helped, but he
was no longer there. He pulled off the long glove, cleaned up the best
he could and rested with the mug of coffee on the bench.
Long hours, questionable markets, darned cows – all balanced off.
The calf was all legs, and all awkward determination to get to its
mother’s milk. He drank the now coolish coffee and watched the four
calves and their mothers. Darn it, life was good.
Dear Editor,
There has been vandalism hap-
pening at the Kiddie Park recently,
as well as in the past. The damage
ranges from spray painting to per-
manent marker writing on the
equipment, etc.
We would like to bring this to the
community’s attention on behalf of
Haakon County Young Women
(HCYW) and all of the dedicated
volunteers and many donators who
have made the Kiddie Park what it
is today.
The Kiddie Park is a community
park taken care of by volunteers in
the community with help from the
City of Philip. It takes a lot of hard
work and dedication to keep things
in good working condition and safe
for the kids. HCYW work very hard
to make sure that all of this is
done. We do a lot of fundraising to
keep things as up to date as possi-
ble and keep new ideas rolling for
the future. To date HCYW has up-
dated almost all of the play equip-
ment currently at the park,
including all rock, gravel and edg-
ing around the play areas. The big
playground area took from 1998
until 2005 to raise the funds and
get the man power to install it. The
total cost for that was $28,751. The
new swing set that was installed on
the Northwest side was $1,094.
These are just two figures of many,
just to give an idea.
Vandalism is the “willful or ma-
licious destruction of public or pri-
vate property.” Vandalism is taken
pretty seriously by law enforce-
ment and can have severe conse-
quences. Vandalism is considered a
misdemeanor offense and if
charged could result in court hear-
ings, restitution, community serv-
ice, etc. HCYW does not take
vandalism very lightly as we have
put in a lot of hours collecting do-
nations, fundraising and installing
the equipment that is at the Kiddie
Park.
We would like to make it very
clear that a person, or persons, li-
able for acts of vandalism at the
Kiddie Park in Philip will be pros-
ecuted to the fullest. HCYW is not
responsible for these acts of van-
dalism ever and we feel that those
responsible would in return have
the responsibility to clean up their
mess!
Sincerely,
/s/ HCYW president
and some of its many members:
Brittney Drury, Mary Ravellette,
Jenny Terkildsen, Doreen Vetter
Shandon Fugate, Heidi Burns,
Aaron Fitzgerald, Trisha Larson,
Tami Ravellette, Denise Buchholz
To the editor,
Concerning the Living Memorial.
A few weeks ago I went to a WWII
veteran’s funeral in Philip. This
man was very instrumental in
building the Living Memorial for
those killed in action, from the
Haakon County area.
When I walk among these mark-
ers, I wonder how they lived and
especially the events in their mili-
tary careers that ended by giving
their life for their country. I have
asked about some names on mark-
ers and learned some of their his-
tory. Many of these men are
unknown to me, and I believe other
people also would like to know
about the accomplishments and
places or campaigns where these
brave men served.
When I get these written ac-
counts, I will place them accessible
to visitors at the Living Memorial.
The legacy of these men needs to
be recorded for future generations.
I fear we will lose the memory of
the most deserving.
The following list of names are
the ones in the Living Memorial:
John Piroutek, Cory Brooks,
Richard Brech, Rupert Nelson,
Philip Colvin, Oliver Omdahl, John
Gates, Albert Altfillisch, Orval
Tofte, Earl Ferguson, Carlos Yel-
low Elk, Fredrick Nedved, Glen
Cox, Walter Briggs, Ben Owen,
Vern Anderson, George McCam-
mon, Vernon Martin, John Urban,
Daniel Eng, Richard Wheeler, Ed-
ward Wheeler, Lloyd Brooks, Gor-
don Calhoon, Stanley Martin, V.
Calvin Alleman.
Please send information to Keith
Harry,, 22874 Mitchel Creek Road,
Midland, S.D. 57552
/s/Keith Harry
Letters to the Editor
The Red Dirt and Roughstock
Rodeo was held in Rapid City, Fri-
day, March 15, at the James Kjer-
stad Event Center. The rodeo
featured bareback, saddle bronc
and bull riding with 10 riders in
each event.
Bareback: 1st Round
1st/2nd: Dustin Luper - #946 Popeye -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 83
1st/2nd: Corey Evans - #637 Little Sister
- Joe Waln - 83
3rd: Shane O’Connell - #52 Bad Romance
- Joe Waln - 81
4th: Travis Sharp - #D Secret Storm -
Marvin Garrett - 78
5th: Kenny Feidler - #22 Red Top - Mar-
vin Garrett - 78
Joe Wilson - #2 Deadly Disaster - Joe
Waln - 77
Nick Schwedhelm - #760 Pistol Annie -
Joe Waln - 74
Weston Garrett - #C Molly Bee - Marvin
Garrett - 73
Chance Englebert - Camp Fire - Marvin
Garrett - 66
Lonny Lesmeister - #1P33 White River -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 0
Bareback: Top 5
Championship Round
1st: Shane O’Connell #814 Blueberry
Buckle - Spud Creek Rodeo - 85
2nd/3rd: Dustin Luper - #405 Pendleton -
Wilson Rodeos - 82
2nd/3rd: Travis Sharp #674 Tequila
Magic - Wilson Rodeos - 82
4th: Corey Evans - #012 Feathers - Mar-
vin Garrett - 78
5th: Kenny Feidler #9 Sherlock - Spud
Creek Rodeo - 0
Bareback Champion Results
1st: Shane O’Connell, 166 pts, $1,600
2nd: Dustin Luper, 165 pts, $800
3rd: Corey Evans, 161 pts, $600
4th: Travis Sharp, 160 pts, $500
5th: Kenny Feidler, 78 pts, $300
High Point Buckle: Shane O’Connell #814
Blueberry Buckle - Spud Creek Rodeo - 85
Saddle Bronc: 1st Round
1st: Rollie Wilson - #710 Silver Wings -
Joe Waln - 81
2nd: Jade Blackwell - #408 Locks Of Love
- Joe Waln - 77
3rd: Jace Blackwell - #144 Goldie Locks -
Joe Waln - 76
4th: Jamie Willert - #44 Empty Hearts -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 70
5th: Jace Nelson - Last of the Great One -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 60
Ty Kennedy - #947 Fog Lifter - Spud
Creek Rodeo - 0
Wyatt Kammerer - #213 Preachers Wife -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 0
Wade Yost - #704 Candyman - Spud
Creek Rodeo - 0
Chet Smith - #44 Hired Gun (Sage) - Jeff
Gabriel - 0
Eric Addison - #229 Dirt Devil - Joe Waln
- 0
Saddle Bronc: Top 5
Championsip Round
1st: Rollie Wilson - #335 Boot Licker -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 81
2nd: Jade Blackwell - #H Top Deck - Mar-
vin Garrett- 77
Jamie Willert - #575 Muddy Creek - Wil-
son Rodeos - 0
Jace Blackwell - #OH I'm No Angel - Joe
Waln - 0
Jace Nelson - #852 Play Hard - Wilson
Rodeos - 0
Saddle Bronc
Champion results
1st: Rollie Wilson, 162 pts, $1,600
2nd: Jade Blackwell, 154 pts, $800
3rd: Jace Blackwell, 76 pts, $600
4th: Jamie Willert, 70 pts, $400
5th: Jace Nelson, 60 pts, $300
High Point Buckle: Rollie Wilson - #335
Boot Licker - Spud Creek Rodeo - 81
Bull Riding 1st Round:
1st: Andrew Coughlin - #600 Kryptonite -
Harvey Bierema - 85
2nd: Casey Stirling - #603 Easy Money -
Harvey Bierema - 83
3rd: Joey Koupal - Beer Juggler - Wilson
Rodeos - 81
4th: Allen Auer - #504 McGuiver - Harvey
Bierema - 80
5th: Wyatt Gregg - #529 Honky Tonk Kid
- Spud Creek Rodeo - 0
Taylor Cowan - #021 Boarding Pass -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 0
Tyson Donovan - #15 Duck Commander -
Spud Creek Rodeo - 0
Clay Hindman - #985 Justified - Spud
Creek Rodeo - 0
Dakota Seymour - #26 Tiger Lips - Wilson
Rodeos - 0
Cat Clifford - Blueberry Bomb - Wilson
Rodeos - 0
Bull Riding: Top 5
Championship Round
1st: Wyatt Gregg - #WB8 Carter Mall -
Harvey Bierema – 88
2nd: Allen Auer - #0 Hot Potato - Spud
Creek Rodeo - 84
3rd: Casey Stirling - Cheers & Beers -
Wilson Rodeos - 83
Joey Koupal - Red Beer - Wilson Rodeos -
0
Dakota Seymour - #72 Danger Zone - Har-
vey Bierema - 0
Bull Riding Champion results
1st: Casey Stirling, 166 pts, $1,600
2nd/3rd: Wyatt Greg, 164 pts, $700
2nd/3rd: Allen Auer, 164 pts, $700
4th: Andrew Coughlin, 85 pts, $400
5th: Joey Koupal, 81 pts, $300.00
High Point Buckle: Wyatt Gregg - #WB8
Carter Mall - Harvey Bierema - 88.
Red Dirt and Roughstock Rodeo
The second annual plant share
will be at the Haakon County
Courthouse, Saturday, May 18.
“Philip Garden Club members
and other generous folks have
started seedlings of veggies, peren-
nials, annuals and starts of house
plants to share this spring,” said
Elke Baxter, club president. “The
public is encouraged to do the same
in order to have lots of plants to
share with the community. Any
and all healthy and desirable
plants are welcome, from vegetable
transplants to trees.
Plants should be individually
potted to ease transportation and
survivability. Each marked with
species and cultivar is helpful to
the new owner. There is no limit on
how many plants a person may
bring or receive. The more plants,
the more successful the event. Mas-
ter gardeners will answer ques-
tions. The Philip Garden Club
encourages anyone to attend a
meeting or two. Talk to any mem-
ber or email Baxter at elke@
prairiedesignsstudio.com.
Plant share
May 18
The students in Jessica Wheeler’s third grade class have been learning about
the five senses. They were excited to have Physicians Assistant Terry Henrie come
in and speak about how ears hear sound and about the parts of the ear. He
brought an otoscope so the students could see what a real eardrum looks like.
In their ongoing study section, the students have made raised glue names and
did crayon rubbings to test their sense of touch. Shown is Henrie holds the oto-
scope while his son Reese looks at the ear canal and eardrum of fellow third
grader Clark Hindman-Hopkins. Courtesy photo
Lend me your ears
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 3
Rural Livin’
Winter Wheat Webinar
With the extremely dry August
and September last fall, winter
wheat growers are concerned
about the lack of plant develop-
ment prior to dormancy and about
whether their winter wheat crops
will survive the winter. A webinar
sponsored by Winter Cereals: Sus-
tainability in Action and North
Dakota State University will help
growers and agronomists analyze
a crop’s winter health and offer
tips for spring management.
Participants will also learn the
latest about winter wheat produc-
tion at the free webinar, which
starts at 9 a.m. on March 26. Pro-
duction topics include stand eval-
uation, fertility management,
winter annual weed identification
and control, and disease manage-
ment.
To participate, log on to
http://ndivnlc.wimba.com/ any
time before the conference and run
the setup wizard. About 15 min-
utes before the conference, partic-
ipants log on to the same site and
click "Participant Login.” The
Room ID is NDSU_Ag. Once
logged in, select “NDSU Crop
Calls” to join the meeting. For
more information or help with on-
line access, contact Scott Swanson
at s.swanson@ndsu.edu or 701-
231-7086.
Continuing education credits
will be available. Certified Crop
Advisors may register for a one
half-credit Crop Management and
one half-credit of Nutrient Man-
agement CEU by including their
name and CCA number when they
log into the class. CCAs will also
have an opportunity to sign up for
the credit during the class.
One lucky webinar registrant
will receive several gifts from
Ducks Unlimited at the end of the
seminar. The winner must still be
on-line at the time of the drawing
which will be at the close of the we-
binar. The gifts can be viewed on-
line by visiting the link, “Free
winter wheat webinar with CEU
March 26, 2013” on the “Winter
Cereals: Sustainability in Action”
website: http://wintercereals.us/.
The webinar is part of the Win-
ter Cereals: Sustainability in Ac-
tion initiative, a collaboration
between Ducks Unlimited, Bayer
CropScience, NDSU and other re-
gional universities, and Winfield
Solutions.
For more information on the we-
binar, contact Blake Vander Vorst
at 701-355-3500.
The Winner Regional Extension
Center will host the webinar for
producers interested in viewing
the event in a group setting. Dis-
cussion and additional questions
are welcome following the webi-
nar.
Managing Drought Risk on
the Ranch Webinar
The third of a five-part webinar
series providing drought planning
information will be hosted at each
of the eight Regional Extension
Centers across South Dakota on
Wednesday, March 27, beginning
at 10:00 am CDT. The topic for this
session is the New Cumulative
Forage Reduction (CFR) Index: As-
sessing Drought Impacts and
Planning a Grazing Strategy.
For more information or to reg-
ister and watch the webinar from
home, visit: http://igrow.org/
events/the-new-cumulative-forage-
reduction-cfr-index/.
Calendar
3/20: Next Generation of Live-
stock Production, 6:30 p.m. CT,
Winner Livestock Auction
3/21: Next Generation of Live-
stock Production, 6:30 p.m. CT,
Chamberlain Livestock Auction
3/27: Drought Management We-
binar, 10:00 a.m. CT, SD Regional
Extension Centers
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
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Extended Cab, Automatic, 4x4
’06 Ford F-150
by Rep. Kristi Noem
Easter is right around the cor-
ner, which means many families
across South Dakota are busy with
calving season.
I particularly remember one
Easter Sunday spent pulling calves
in and out of the barn in the midst
of a South Dakota blizzard. But
with rising spring temperatures
often comes new lambs, colts and
calves. This means long nights
with 2:00 a.m. trips to the barn to
make sure everything’s going all
right.
I have a lot of memories of time
spent with my dad, and time with
my kids, during calving season. Al-
though there were many late
nights, early mornings and nights
with no sleep whatsoever, it’s an
incredible experience to see new
life and the hope that it provides
for the upcoming season.
For those of you who may not be
familiar with the calving process, it
can be very time consuming and
also very stressful. I remember
how precarious those first few mo-
ments can be with a new calf. Re-
gardless if it’s at 4:00 a.m. in the
barn or 3:00 p.m. in the pasture,
it’s important that mother and calf
have an opportunity to bond and
for the calf to get the proper nour-
ishment to start a healthy life.
Farmers and ranchers also rec-
ognize that this process is not only
important to the animals, but also
important to their business. Strong
and happy livestock result in a
healthy herd that provides food to
feed our world.
Although South Dakota farmers
and ranchers are used to working
long hours, I hope you take a mo-
ment to thank a farmer for all of
their work and dedication to ensur-
ing we have a safe, reliable and af-
fordable food supply. Whether you
can provide a handshake or a cup
of coffee, any gesture will go a long
way.
I will continue to do my part on
the House Agriculture Committee
as we prepare for another round of
Farm Bill discussions and will keep
South Dakota agriculture priorities
at the forefront. Assuring we have
adequate livestock disaster assis-
tance for our ranchers will be one
provision I will work hard to in-
clude in the Farm Bill.
I’d like to encourage you to reach
out to my office and share any sto-
ries you may have about the first
time you helped with calving. I’d
love to hear from you! Contact in-
formation for my offices is:
Sioux Falls ...............605-275-2868
Watertown................605-878-2868
Aberdeen ..................605-262-2862
Rapid City ................605-791-4673
Washington, D.C......202-225-2801
Toll free .................1-855-225-2801
Calving season
by Walt Bones
S.D. Sec. of Ag
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture is celebrating 110
years
In 1885, South Dakota and
North Dakota, jointly known then
as Dakota Territory, were man-
aged by a Board of Agriculture.
When South Dakota and North
Dakota officially became states in
1889, the board continued to man-
age both areas with citizens from
each state. As each state continued
to separate and grow on their own,
South Dakota developed the De-
partment of Horticulture, Manu-
factories and Domestic Arts,
established in 1903.
One hundred and 10 years later,
the South Dakota Department of
Agriculture continues to promote,
protect, preserve and improve
South Dakota’s agriculture. That
mission statement is carried out by
seven very diverse divisions within
the department: Office of the Sec-
retary, Policy, Services, Develop-
ment, State Fair Park, Wildland
Fire, and Resource Conservation
and Forestry.
The programs within SDDA are
administered by almost 200 full
time employees and have three dif-
ferent sources of funding (general
funds, federal funds, and other
funds or fees). As far as the total
tax dollars, or general funds, the
SDDA receives about four-tenths of
one percent of the state’s annual
budget.
The programs and projects that
we support, fund and administer
reflect the diversity within South
Dakota’s agricultural industry.
Just in this last year, we have
helped promote and fund farmers
markets and local gardens. We
have commented on federal policies
that would have crippled farmers
regardless of size. Our services and
development staff have provided
technical expertise and guidance to
not only Bel Brands USA and their
400 jobs coming to Brookings, but
also the first artisan cheese plant
in the state near Crooks.
Our crews have fought forest
fires, range fires and pine beetles
on both private and state land. We
have helped finance a robotic milk-
ing machine to a family-run 60-cow
dairy, allowing them to continue
milking cows efficiently and eco-
nomically. This also improved the
family’s quality of life by giving
them the benefit of not being tied to
the cows all day, every day.
At the same time, we have
helped larger dairy, swine and beef
operators grow their existing busi-
ness here in South Dakota and
found locations for livestock pro-
ducers to relocate to our great
state.
The South Dakota State Fair is
growing and provides entertain-
ment, education and a platform to
highlight the vast array of projects
our 4-H and FFA kids have worked
on all year long. Our conservation-
ists administer over $1.5 million to
plant trees and kill weeds.
We also annually train and cer-
tify over 8,000 private and commer-
cial pesticide applicators. Our
inspectors watch over dairies, nurs-
eries, feed, and food processing
plants along with registering 7,500
plus products annually for eco-
nomic, environmental, health and
safety reasons.
We have a great story to share
and are constantly trying to tell the
consuming public what our agricul-
tural producers are doing, how they
are doing it, and why they are
doing it that way. Our new website
(sdda.sd.gov) has been running for
over a year and provides a wealth
of information on all our programs
and projects. You can also connect
and interact with us over Facebook
and Twitter (@SDAgriculture).
It has been an honor to serve as
your secretary of agriculture for
two years now. We have worked to
always be inclusive knowing that
“at the table of opportunity, there
is room and need for everyone.”
So please join me as we celebrate
110 years of SDDA and Ag Week
during March 18 through 22.
Thank you all for making Agricul-
ture South Dakota’s number one
industry.
An ear to the ground
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture is seeking nomina-
tions for the South Dakota Gover-
nor’s Ag Ambassador Award.
Nominees should be those who
have continually worked to pro-
mote agriculture in South Dakota.
The individual or organization
nominated must possess strong ties
to agriculture in South Dakota,
leadership skills in agriculture, an
emphasis on education through
campaigns or programs, and focus
on pro-active agriculture policies
and practices
Nominations are due to SDDA by
April 1 and can be found at http://
sdda.sd.gov/education-outreach/ag-
ambassador-award/. The award
will be presented during the Gover-
nor’s Ag Development Summit in
Pierre on June 26.
The 2012 Governor’s Ag Ambas-
sador was Jim Woster of Sioux
Falls. For years, Woster has been a
cattleman, media personality, phi-
lanthropist and spokesman for
agricultural interests.
Ag ambassador sought
Drought recovery in 2013 is not
looking promising for South
Dakota’s grazing lands.
Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS) State Range Spe-
cialist Stan Boltz, Huron, said even
with normal precipitation, forage
production will still be limited this
summer. “If we were to get normal
precipitation now until peak pro-
duction which is about July 1,
western and central South Dakota
would only have about 60 to 70 per-
cent production.”
At this level, these drought dam-
aged pastures can only sustain 55
to 65 percent of normal stocking.
Eastern South Dakota counties
that did not suffer as much drought
during 2012 could expect about 80
percent of normal stocking rates.
The lower production rate is be-
cause grassland plants’ ability to
recover from drought takes several
seasons with normal moisture, and
longer with limited precipitation,
like we’re seeing now, explained
Boltz.
South Dakota livestock produc-
ers can get help for handling the
impact of drought by developing a
drought plan with the aid of the
South Dakota drought tool, avail-
able from NRCS. “The drought tool
is a good planning tool to set up a
drought plan,” Boltz said. “We’re
encouraging people to have a
drought plan in place so as condi-
tions change, producers are ready
and can act on the management de-
cisions they have already made
ahead of time.”
The drought tool helps producers
assess current conditions by using
the past two years of precipitation
to predict the expected percent of
normal forage production and then
stocking rate. Users can use the
weather stations or enter their own
precipitation data.
The tool also walks producers
through development of a current
drought plan. Computer users can
download the South Dakota
drought tool from the South
Dakota NRCS website or producers
can stop in their local USDA serv-
ice center for one-on-one assis-
tance. “Every operation is unique
with different goals and resources.
Sometimes,” said Boltz, “just talk-
ing with resource professionals re-
garding land management deci-
sions and options can be the
biggest benefit and reassurance
producers need for their farming
and ranching decisions.”
Last year in South Dakota,
NRCS worked with people on more
than 4,700 plans that resulted in
conservation work improving or en-
hancing the quality of more than
1.7 million acres.
Drought recovery, forage
production looking short
Representative Kristi Noem has
announced that she has joined a bi-
partisan group of House members
in cosponsoring legislation to ap-
prove construction of the Keystone
XL pipeline by taking the approval
out of President Barack Obama’s
hands.
“It’s been four and a half years
since this project was first proposed
and Americans and stakeholders
have waited long enough,” said
Noem. “Keystone XL will result in
thousands of jobs for hard-working
Americans, as well as millions of
dollars injected into the economy.
The president has shown that he is
unwilling to act in a timely matter,
so it’s time to find another way.”
H.R.3, the Northern Route Ap-
proval Act, originally introduced by
Rep. Lee Terry (R-NE), removes
the need for a presidential permit
for the northern portion of the Key-
stone XL Pipeline, which is
planned to run from the Canadian
border to Steele City, Neb.
This legislation also states that
the final environmental impact
statement issued by the Secretary
of State on August 26, 2011, satis-
fies all requirements and also takes
into consideration the Nebraska re-
route.
Noem has continued to be a vocal
supporter of the Keystone XL proj-
ect. Earlier this month, she sent a
letter to Secretary of State John
Kerry requesting he support imme-
diate approval of the project. This
letter was sent in response to the
most recent State Department en-
vironmental report released March
1.
Noem also joined over 145 House
members in signing a letter to
President Barack Obama encour-
aging immediate approval follow-
ing Nebraska Governor Dave
Heineman’s approval of the
pipeline route in January.
Legislation introduced to
approve Keystone XL Pipeline
View & download online production sale books at:
www.RavellettePublications.com
Hit & Miss
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Mar. 21: Chimi-
changas, Southwest Rice, Borracho
Beans, Fruit.
Friday, Mar. 22: Lemon Pepper
Tilapia, Duchess Potatoes,
Caribbean Veggies, Biscuit, Fruit.
Monday, Mar. 25: Cheesy
Meatloaf, Baby Bakers, Green
Beans, Roll, Spiced Apples.
Tuesday, Mar. 26: Hot Pork
Sandwich, Corn Fritters, Straw-
berries, Fruit.
Wednesday, Mar. 27: Baked
Potato, Broccoli Cheese Soup,
Seafood Bisque, Roll, Dutch Apple
Pie.
***
Shar Moses called the newspaper
office today to notify us that her
dad, Clark Morrison, is leaving for
the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota to
begin cancer treatments. The fam-
ily knows he would appreciate
your prayers and cards during his
six-week stay there. Cards may be
sent to Hope Lode, 411 Second St.
N.W., Rochester, MN 55901, % of
Clark Morrison.
Saturday! What a low blow! I
was sick all Friday afternoon and
then the computer wouldn’t turn
on! So I will write a few words in
long hand.
Friday, March 8, we had cooking
with Sandi. Fred ran the mixers,
Agnes put the cupcake papers in
the pans and Mary Lou put the
batter in. Others on hand were
Addie, Marcella, and Vivian. The
spumoni cupcakes had pink and
green batter, colored with mar-
aschino cherry juice and pistachio
pudding. The recipe called for
chocolate frosting and a cherry on
top. The crew played quiddler
while the cakes baked.
In the afternoon of Friday,
March 8, we had Skeeter and Allen
for entertainment. They sang and
played guitars. From reports, they
were most enjoyable. Virginia Gray
met me in the hall and told me
about them and Ben Stone added a
highlight. Ben has known Skeeter
for years over in Lead. Skeeter’s
mother, Mrs. Boyer, made the best
chili for miles around and served it
in bowls with handles. The hot chili
would steam up the windows.
Thank you to my daughter,
Carol, who sent a beautiful Easter
card and photos of her four great-
grands, Delilah, three and one half,
Sophia, almost two, Tony, one and
a half, and Faith, two, at Wall
Drug, along with us. There was
also a photo of Leslie’s daughter,
Carol Marie, and her husband,
Lance Salinas, and their Chelsea
Agelo.
Philip’s Pioneer Review had a
good letter to the editor from
Shirley Kangas and she asks why
not stick to God and the 10 com-
mandments, they have been doing
good in the U.S.A. for 200 years.
There was also a letter to the ed-
itor from Ramsey Kendall, long-
time Philip businessman, who
commends Hans E. Hanson and
other Philip businessmen who have
built the town of Philip over the
years – always contributing funds
and labor where needed.
Saturday, March 9, we had a
howling wind all day. Colorado
Springs did too. Thank you to my
daughter Carol, Colorado Springs,
Colo., for sending money to get my
hair fixed here at the Somerset
Court beauty shop by Sharon Keen.
In the afternoon, we had quilting
with Sandi. I was thankful to do
something real. We started on the
Somerset Court June auction quilt.
You should come and see the new
pattern. It has snowmen and pine
trees and moons, alternating with
nine-patch squares. Irene Cox,
Margaret Jacobs, Mary Lou Peters,
and Addie Rorvig cut designs for
the blocks and Irene ironed too. An-
netta Hansen and Vivian Hansen
sewed quilt blocks. Sandi arranged
fabrics, and kept us all on the
straight and narrow. Plus, she
brought some great cinnamon
bread. At the same time while were
quilting, Susan, Ina Oerlline, Irene
Arbach, and Shirley Hodgson
played whist. Marcella and John
Kraft came in to visit. John is stay-
ing all weekend. Charlie Hathaway
and Irene Brink also came in to
visit.
SACRED HEART CHURCH
EVENING GUILD EASTER
BAKE SALE, SATURDAY,
MARCH 30, 9 A.M. UNTIL
GONE, AT THE BAD RIVER
SENIOR CENTER, DOWN-
TOWN PHILIP.
Agnes Tastad had a lovely potted
purple chrysanthemum. Who
would like an airplane plant? My
plant, that Ben and Danni Stone
gave me a couple of years ago, has
prospered and has many shoots
reaching out complete with roots.
My neighbor across the hall, La-
Verne With, kindly accepted one.
St. Labre Indian School sends
many “dream catchers.” Do you
know anyone who wants one?
My son, Leslie Hansen, Bend,
Ore., has sent me a new copy of one
of his earlier books, “Cosmic
Quest,” and a page of his number
puzzles, and a nice letter written in
green for St. Patrick.
Sunday, March 10, at dinner we
had a wonderful chicken cordon
bleu, and cinnamon rolls just like
old homemade ones.
At 2:00 p.m., we had church with
Rev. Richardson. Mrs. Richardson
and their daughter came along and
the daughter sang, “It’s a Me, It’s a
Me, It’s a Me, O Lord! Standing in
the Need of Prayer.” Thank you.
Jack Humke played piano for
singing hymns: “Bring Them In,”
(This song had a delightful triplet
which Jack executed fluently.) “To
God Be the Glory,” “O Worship the
King,” and “There Shall be Show-
ers of Blessings.” Thank you. And
thanks to Rev. Richardson.
Those who attended church were
Eileen Tenold, Don Stensgaard,
Connie Stevens, and daughter,
Terri, Marilyn Oyler, Elmae
Helfenstein, Floy Olson, Lucille
Huether, Lila Fiest, Annetta
Hansen, Erma Brandt, and Vivian
Hansen. I might have missed a few.
Rev. Richardson spoke from the
book of Exodus. We felt better
when we got through that and re-
alized that we ended up here with
every comfort. In clean, warm,
beautiful Somerset Court. So what
if our feet hurt when we do laps.
We are at least walking. If we are
not walking, at least we have
power carts!
In our own lives, we have had
some difficulties, such as sickness.
And some of us worked hard for a
living. Do you remember wearing
patched jeans and having mostly
potatoes to eat?
We have this list of rules called
The 10 Commandments. We are
asked to follow them the best we
can, and the main one is, “Love one
another.” Be thankful for miracles
that happen all the time. Do you
see a leaf, or a feather Do you see
someone being kind? Someone
doing his work the best he can?
Monday, March 11, 2013, at
Somerset Court we had the activity
of crafting with Amy. Shawn and
Sandi were there to help. Thank
you for the fun activity of crafts
shamrocks with a leprechaun in a
top hat, beard and bow tie. Those
making shamrocks were Mildred
Young and Kay, Fred, Mary Lou,
Shirley Horn and her visiting
angel, Doris Black, Lila Fiest, Mar-
ilyn Oyler, Monica Gavotti, Ida
Lutz, Marcella, Eileen, Grace
Tillery and Vivian Hansen.
After crafts, Sandi, Addie, Mary
Lou and Vivian had a game of
scrabble. Mary Lou made a word
using all her letters, thus earning
50 extra points. We never did catch
up with her!
To explain this next comment,
you need to know that hickory
wood crackles and sparks when it
burns. I asked Charlie Hathaway
for a comment and he said, “When
I die, I want a hickory casket.”
“Why do you want a hickory cas-
ket?” “I want to go through hell a-
snapping!”
Sandi has been watering Char-
lie’s two big butterfly bushes all
winter in the third floor “overpass.”
On March 11, Charlie was clipping
off the mature blooms to encourage
the new growth of new blooms.
Charlie said that when spring
warms up, he might be willing to
buy some butterflies for the
bushes.
Ken Monette explained that the
dolphins he mentions in his article
recently, that he and his U.S. Navy
men were building in the South
Seas, during WWII were pilings.
They would sink about seven 40-
foot poles, that were about 12
inches across, in a clump with a
pile-driver and then band them to-
gether. These pilings would be off
shore about 500 feet, so the big
ships could come in and tie up to
them. Thank you, Ken.
Thanks to Marsha Sumpter and
Kent Fairchild for the Irish jokes in
honor of St. Patrick’s Day.
Ida Lutz, Somerset Court resi-
dent, has a new Loving Hands per-
son today. Rose Eixenberger from
Sturgis writes: “I came to sit with
Ida. She is wonderful. I work for
Loving Hands. I really enjoy this
time.”
The foot clinic was well attended.
We appreciate having Dr. Conrad
come to Somerset Court every
month.
Tuesday, March 12, 2013, at
Somerset Court bingo winners
were Mary Klauck, twice, Irene
McKnight, Lucille Huether, twice,
Marilyn Butts, Marjorie Gaffin,
Marge Self, Addie Rorvig, and Mil-
dred Kraemer.
For snack and chat, we had
minty green ice cream with tiny
chocolate bits in it. It seemed espe-
cially delicious.
Jeri Deschamp has contributed
a 2010 news item about Somerset
Court resident, Florabelle Powell.
Thank you, Jeri. You can read the
story in the Somerset Court scrap-
book on the coffee table by the fire-
place. The title of the article is
“87-year-old still cutting her hay.”
That was Florabella Powell who
had made hay for over 50 years.
Working her way up from a seven-
foot mower, then a nine-foot
mower. In 2010, she ran a swather
and cut 400 tons. How wonderful to
be a person who has had such a
productive life doing work she
loved. Her ranch is southwest of
New Underwood.
We welcome Florabelle to Somer-
set Court. Florabelle Powell is ad-
justing to life at Somerset Court.
She has had hobbies of crocheting,
toll painting and wood working.
She has had purple ribbons from
the Central States Fair for exhibit-
ing some of her creations.
Wednesday, March 13, at Somer-
set Court, Ben and Danni Stone
were having a family get-together.
Ben’s sister and brother from Lead
were at Somerset Court for a visit.
(Ben’s brother is also Ben’s adopted
son.)
Thank you to the Larry Quan-
vigs who came to sing for us. We
hope they will come again. Both
Mr. and Mrs. Quanvig have electric
guitars and they sing mostly gospel
songs. Many of the lyrics were com-
posed by Mr. Quanvig. There was a
good turnout of residents. Our ac-
tivity directors arranged seating
and provided ice water and also
served delicious snickerdoodles.
March 13, 2013, Gay Logan,
Philip, came to Somerset Court to
visit Vivian Hansen. Thank you for
your visit. We are long-time friends
and somewhat related, as her
brother, Donald Denke, is married
to my daughter, Delores. Gay plans
to go to Wyoming in April and visit
Don and Delores, their kids and
grandkids and Gay’s sister,
Cerella’s kids and grandkids. Gay
sometimes comes to Rapid City on
the bus from Philip. Sometimes the
bus is driven by Kay Ainslie, some-
times by Norm Payne, Lee
Schoniger, Connie Schlim or Corky
Thorson. On this trip, Gay had
been to Spearfish to visit Hazel
Thompson, a Philip friend who now
lives in an apartment at Ponderosa
House, an assisted living in
Spearfish.
In a 1980 photo it shows my son,
M.R. Hansen, and his wife, Bar-
bara, standing among the stones at
Stonehenge, eight miles north of
Salibury, England. Stonehenge is
one of the best known standing
stone monuments because of its
long history and much remodeling.
It has circle about 100 feet across
made of 30 stone uprights, capped
with sarsen lintels. Within the cir-
cle is a horseshoe shaped setting of
five trilithons (two uprights with a
stone across the top). The stones
are thought to have been moved
from 20 miles away on the Marl-
borough Downs some thousands of
years ago. In 1980, you could walk
in the Stonehenge. Just a few years
later, we found big crowds and the
stones were chained off.
continued on page 5
March 2012 marks the anniversary month of Virgil “Dobby” Hansen’s award of the Purple
Heart and Silver Star, which he earned on March 31, 1945. Dobby’s hand painted billboards
graced the roadsides of South Dakota from the 1940s to the 1990s. His bold color schemes
and no nonsense, crisp lettering gave travelers along Highway 14 and Interstate 90 informa-
tion that could be instantly processsed at 60 mph. Dobby was quick with a smile and a hand
for friends and strangers alike. His favorite saying summed up his love for people, “The finest
things in life are the friends along the way.” Courtesy photo
The family of
Dorothy Urban
is celebrating her
99th Birthday
on March 22, 2013
with a
Card Shower.
Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 790, Philip, SD 57567
The children of
Thelma Heltzel
are hosting a party in honor
of her 85th Birthday
on Saturday, March 23, 2013
from 2 to 4 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center,
downtown Philip.
Everyone welcome!
No gifts, please.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
March 22-23-24-25
The Croods
(PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
March 29-30-31, April 1
The Croods (PG)
She went from 29
to 60 overnight!
The family of Nancy Nevi lle
requests a card shower for her
birthday – March 29.
Cards may be sent to: PO Box 683, Phi lip, SD 57567
84 Years Ago
March 21, 1928
Announcements were received in
Philip this week of the marriage of
Miss Pearl Hildebrandt to Pedar R.
Kjerstad of Quinn on March 12th.
The bride has made her home in
Philip for more than two years past
and is well known.
***
The marriage of Miss Alberta
Hanlon of Milesville and Frank C.
Johnson of Philip occurred at
Kadoka, on the fourth day of last
December. Friends of the couple
were not aware of their marriage
until a short while ago.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Thos. Hanlon of Philip.
She is a graduate of Philip High
School and has been teaching the
past two years in Haakon County.
The groom is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank P. Johnson of Philip
and since coming here has been
employed at the Farmers’ Seed
House.
Local News … Mr. and Mrs. Gay-
lord Hudson are the parents of a
son born to them March 16th at the
Einan hospital, Philip.
Manager Waddell is busy getting
the Black and Yellow Pavilion
ready for the coming season. A new
maple floor will be laid and a room
is being built on the south side of
the building to be used for prepar-
ing and serving lunches. Good
music has been secured for a part
of the dates, and if weather is fa-
vorable, the opening dance will be
given on April 6th.
Telephone manager Harrington
has been confined to his home the
past few days with a severe case of
snow blindedness, During the
storms of last week the telephone
lines were badly damaged, and it
was necessary for him to spend sev-
eral days working on them in the
glaring sun. His sight was almost
completely gone for two days but is
much better at the present time.
75 Years Ago
March 17, 1939
Sacred Heart Dramatic society
will present “Hillbilly Courtship” at
Blast from the Past
From the archives of the Pioneer Review
Church & Community Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY
CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00
a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH,
Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH •
MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 •
facebook.com/midlan-
dobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30
a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30
p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd
Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN
CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-
6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00
a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m.
CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE
CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Ther e ar e nany pr oponents oI the " pr osper i ty gospel , " but when you put your Iai th
i n God thr ough Hi s son J esus Chr i st, onl y one thi ng i s cer tai n: the sal vati on oI your
soul . God doesn' t owe you a si x- Ii gur e i ncone or a nansi on or a sweet r i de. 5o, i I
you Ii nd your sel I Iar Ir on the l ap oI l uxur y and Ieel the need to conpl ai n about i t,
r e| oi ce i nstead. For you ar e saved Ir on your si ns i I you have put your tr ust i n Hi n.
.Jesus Christ: Whom having
not seen, ye love; in whom,
though now ye see him not, yet
believing, ye rejoice with joy
unspeakable and full of glory:
Receiving the end of your faith,
even the salvation of your souls.
1 Peter 1:7-9 (KJV)
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Easter is March 31st
Rita Narcisian, age 73, of
Golden, Colo., died March 15, 2013,
in Colorado.
Survivors include her husband,
Frank Narcisian of Golden; two
brothers, Charles “Chuck” O’Con-
nor and his wife, Shirley, of Philip,
and Francis James “Jim” O’Connor
and his wife, Phyllis, of Cheyenne,
Wyo.; a sister-in-law, Sandra O’-
Connor of Philip; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Rita was preceded in death by
her parents, James Francis “FJ”
and Catherine Anna (Murphy)
OConnor; one brother, Bill O’Con-
nor; and one sister, Paula O’Con-
nor.
Memorial services are pending.
Rita Narcisian__________________
Lyle Eugene Klundt, age 79, of
Kadoka, died early Monday morn-
ing March 18, 2013, at his resi-
dence in Kadoka.
Among survivors include his
wife, Ruth A. Klundt, of Kadoka; a
son, Arlys Klundt, of Rapid City; a
daughter, Cindy Merritt and her
husband, Jim, of Brookings; four
grandchildren; two brothers, David
Klundt of Mitchell and Delmar
Klundt of Brookings; and a sister,
Mavis Potter of Sturgis.
Funeral arrangements are pend-
ing with the Rush Funeral Chapel
of Kadoka.
A complete obituary will appear
in next week’s edition.
Lyle E. Klundt__________________
Services
for Earl J.
“E.J.”
Root, 88, a
longtime
Casper,
Wyo., resi-
dent were
held
March 12,
2013, at
the Ore-
gon Trail
Veteran
Cemetery, Evansville, Wyo., with
military honors.
He died March 6, 2013, at Cen-
tral Wyoming Hospice after a
lengthy illness.
Earl, the eldest son of seven chil-
dren was born in Capa, S.D., to
Earl Charles Root and Helen Eliz-
abeth (Waller) Root, on June 22,
1924. He was raised and educated
in Midland, South Dakota. While
attending High School he was ac-
tive in sports, lettering in both foot-
ball and basketball.
As was common during the
Great Depression, he left school his
Junior year to work and help sup-
port the family and his siblings ...
thus starting his long career with
the Chicago North Western Rail-
road.
Earl enlisted in the U.S. Army
in July, 1944 and was honorably
discharged in June 1946. He served
in the European Theater as Squad
Leader of the 505th Parachute In-
fantry Squad. He attained the rank
of Staff Sergeant, and was also an
expert Rifleman. While in the Serv-
ice he was awarded the Victory
Medal, the American Theater Rib-
bon, the European African Middle
Eastern Theater Ribbon, Bronze
Battle Star, and the Good Conduct
Medal. Earl rarely discussed the
War, but he loved his County and
was proud to have served it. Upon
his discharge from the Army, he re-
turned to Midland and resumed his
employment with the Chicago
North Western Railroad.
In March of 1948, he met his
beloved Helen Mavee Stotts. After
a year courtship they were married
on April 30, 1949, in Philip. They
were blessed to have spent 63 years
together. To this union was born a
son and two daughters.
Earl’s main interest and joy in
his life was his family. He was a
great provider for his family and
possessed strong work ethics in his
everyday life, which he passed on
to his children and grandchildren.
As section foreman with the rail-
road, they lived in several small
towns in South Dakota, before re-
turning to Midland. With his pro-
motion to Roadmaster, he moved
his family to Casper in 1964, where
they have resided since. Earl re-
tired from the Chicago North West-
ern Railroad in 1987 after 43 years
employment.
Following retirement, he was
able to pursue his passions which
included hunting, fishing, camping,
and traveling. Earl and Helen thor-
oughly enjoyed their many trips
made to Mesquite, Nev., with their
dear friends.
Many fishing derbies were at-
tended by Earl, as well as countless
weekends spent with family and
friends at Pathfinder Lake. He al-
ways had a fish “wager” for the day
and collected it quite often.
His life revolved around his wife,
children and grandchildren, above
all else. Earl loved entertaining at
his home and having his family
and friends surround him. He espe-
cially enjoyed a good laugh with all
that knew him. Holidays were a
reason to gather at his home to cel-
ebrate. He especially enjoyed
Christmas, and preparing for the
traditional “drawings” held every
Christmas Eve.
He was a member of the Eagles,
Elks, Pathfinder Boat Club, and a
lifetime member of VFW #10677.
Earl is survived by his wife
Helen; son, Gary (Becky) Root of
Mills; daughters, Marla (Dan) El-
ston, and Luann (Fred) Trujillo,
both of Casper; 11 grandchildren
and 19 great-grandchildren. He is
also survived by sisters, Evelyn
“Brownie” Platt of Redding, Calif.,
Gladys Sanchez of Ramona, Calif.,
brothers-in-law, Gabe Sanchez, Ra-
mona, Calif., Roy Stotts, Sioux
Falls, Carl Stotts of Missoula,
Mont., and sister-in-law, Lois Mc-
Fall of LaBelle, Fla., as well as nu-
merous nieces and nephews.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, brothers, Charles Root
and Robert Root, and sisters, Mary
Jane Root and Clara (Root)
Roscamp.
Earl J. “E.J.” Root______________
Will Schofield, age 58, of Mid-
land, S.D., died March 15, 2013, at
the Hans P. Peterson Memorial
Hospital in Philip.
William Ray Schofield was born
November 6, 1954, in Pierre, the
son of Harry H. “Hank” and Eva
Pauline (Fosheim) Schofield. He
was baptized and confirmed in the
Trinity Lutheran Church of Mid-
land. He attended school through
10th grade in Midland.
Growing up on the family ranch
gave Will a great love for the out-
doors that he has since passed on
to his kids and grandkids. He was
an avid hunter, fisherman, and
trapper. He was a true cowboy at
heart and enjoyed working cattle,
breaking and riding horses. Over
the years, these skills were put to
good use working for several farm-
ers and ranchers in the Midland
area. Will was recognized most for
his beautiful smile, outrageous
sense of humor and contagious
laugh. He had a great passion for
music and played in a band for sev-
eral years. He loved to dance and
play the drums and he had a beau-
tiful singing voice.
Will loved all of his family and
friends and he especially enjoyed
the time he got to spend with his
grandchildren. He had the biggest
heart you could ever find; he was
always willing to help and expected
nothing in return.
Will is survived by a special
friend, Charlene Ceniceros of
Belvidere; five children, Justin
Schofield of Midland and his son,
Trace, Jared Schofield (Chaney) of
Cody, Neb., and their sons, Dyson,
Chayson, Tyan and Ryden, Roger
Schofield (Gayla) of Faith and their
daughter, Tayton, Hallie (Nick)
Konst of Philip and their children,
Chevy and Memphis, and Forrest
Schofield of Wright, Wyo.; his
mother, Pauline Schofield, of
Philip; four brothers, Monte
Schofield and Lucas (Brigit)
Schofield, both of Midland, Kirby
(Nancy) Schofield of Belvidere,
Wesley (Marina) Schofield of Tru-
man, Minn.; three sisters, Jill
(Wayne) Splitt of Wichita, Kan.,
June (Leroy) Fedderson and Julie
(Larry) McLaughlin both of Mid-
land; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
He was preceded in death by his
father, Harry H. “Hank” Schofield;
his brother, Travis Todd Schofield;
a nephew, Casey Leroy Fedderson;
and a great-nephew, Reid Chris-
tian Palecek.
At Will's request, cremation has
taken place.
A memorial service is scheduled
for 3:00 p.m. on Friday, March 22,
at the Midland School Gym with
Pastor Tel Saucerman officiating.
Private family interment will
take place at the Midland Ceme-
tery at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quest that a memorial be estab-
lished.
Will Schofield___________________
The family of
Clark Morrison
asks for prayers and cards
as he undergoes
cancer treatment
for the next six weeks.
His address will be:
Hope Lodge
Clark Morrison
411 Second St. NW
Rochester, MN 55901
the municipal auditorium in Philip
on Thursday of this week. There
will be both matinee and evening
perfomances. The play is a riotous
three act comedy, guaranteed to
make you laugh despite the income
tax returns.
***
The postmaster emphasized,
however, that there will be no
change in window service from the
usual 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The stamp
window will close at six. The clerk
on duty nights will be responsible
solely for tying and sacking mail
and the public is requested not to
ask for window service.
Moenville News … Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Sandal were busy last week
moving from the Kranz place
where they have lived the past two
years to the Ottumwa neighbor-
hood on the Martsfield place.
Wrigley, the gum magnate, says
the sun never sets on his chewing
gum – but almost everyone else
does.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Roseth and
Marcia Marie came up to the
parental Roseth home Saturday
and remained over Sunday. Marcia
Marie stayed with her grandpar-
ents Saturday night while her folks
attended the Hayes dance.
South Creek News … The music
of slow drizzling rain woke us up
Sunday morning and everybody
was happy, for this is the first rain
we have had since July 12, 1937,
except for one or two light showers
that lasted only a few minutes.
Grindstone News … Mr. and
Mrs. Joe Thorson are the parents
of a ten pound boy born Saturday
at the Hart hospital at Philip. He
has been named Corwin Joseph,
after both parents.
50 Years Ago
March 21, 1963
Ten-year-old David Hansen
(Fuddy), son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil
Hansen received some vital Scout-
ing training last Sunday when he
was lost for 3 hours in the Bad-
lands Basin, south of Kadoka.
Young Hansen, too young for the
Boy Scouts, had permission to ac-
company the rest of the local troop
on a regular Sunday outing, as his
older brother, Leslie Hansen, was
to lead the troop. (Fuddy) enjoying
the day by rock hunting, strayed
from the rest of the troop and be-
came lost in the rugged terrain
near the Floyd Munger ranch.
After discovering the lad was
lost, Scoutmaster Lee Schoniger
and Leslie Hansen walked back,
looking for him. Bus McIlravy, as-
sisting Schoniger on the outing, got
word to the Kadoka Fire Depart-
ment and Marvin Hogen with his
airplane, along with other radio
equipped cars searched for the lad.
However, the local lad realized
he was lost, walked out by himself,
backtracking to a point exactly
where the troop had started in the
first place, a short way from the
Munger ranch. When asked if he
was scared, he replied, “no, not
much, because I had my rockhound
pick with me.” He knew that bob-
cats were reported in the area.
Old Trail News … The “Walking
Craze” has come to Philip on Tues-
day. Mrs. Jean Hunt strolled from
town to spend the afternoon with
Pauline Eggers. It took her a little
over an hour.
Blast from the Past
(continued from page 4)
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
It feels good to be back home
and doing my new’s column from
my desk computer. Just between
you and me, laptop computers and
I are not the best of friends. My
fingers seem to take on a mind of
their own and I find myself doing
a lot of backspacing. What’s that
saying, “Mind over matter?” Tell
that to my fingers. As, I mentioned
in last week’s news column, I got
back from Mitchell Monday after-
noon. From there the week went
on to be a very busy week. But,
that’s another story. Tuesday,
Jerry and I were off to Philip to the
Philip Livestock Auction, as that
was the day they were auctioning
off the cattle brand of the late
Frank and Floriene Schwalm. We
much appreciate Thor Roseth,
owner of the Philip Livestock Auc-
tion, for being a part of that sale.
We met our son-in-law, Steve
Meeker, Spearfish, Frank and Flo-
riene’s daughters, Mary Scott and
friend, Mike, and Linda and Phil
Bowman, Pierre. Much thanks
goes to Sam Koedam, Philip, for
buying the brand. Following the
sale, we all headed to a local
restaurant for lunch. Jerry, Linda,
and Mary shared memories of
being neighbors while growing up
north of Midland, sharing those
stories of Frank and Floriene. Lots
of good memories! It was a fun, fun
time of visiting. The selling of the
brand was the beginning of a
Schwalm scholarship, which would
be combined with the Olga Meyers
and Harold DeYoung Scholarship
Foundation which had already
been established at Black Hills
State University at Spearfish. The
whole idea of a scholarship fund
began back in February 1992. My
mother, Olga Meyers, passed away
February 19, 1992. As many of you
know, she was a teacher for most
of her life. Because of that, my
husband, Jerry Nemec, got the
idea to establish a scholarship
fund in her name at BHSU for stu-
dents studying to become teachers.
My brother, Phil Meyers, and I
liked the idea and so the journey
began. The scholarship fund has
been renamed the Meyers, DeY-
oung and Schwalm Scholarship
Foundation. With monies from the
Meyers and DeYoung Scholarship
already in the fund, the sale of the
brand and monies from Mary and
Linda, the scholarship fund is now
at $17,500.00. We all are most
happy about that. The legacy of
Olga, Harold, Frank and Floriene
continues in the helping of college
students, in whatever field they
choose, to a journey that awaits
them.
It kind of makes me think of a
book I just finished reading, “The
Blue Bottle Club” by Penelope J.
Stokes. This book is about four
girls, it’s their senior year, and
they are best friends. It was
around Christmas time and they
went up to the attic of the home of
one of the girls. In that attic, they
wrote on paper their dreams and
hopes for the future, putting them
in this blue bottle, they left it in a
special place in the attic. Their
lives went in different directions,
the blue bottle forgotten. Many
years later that bottle was found.
The house had deteriorated and
was being torn down, when one of
the workers found that bottle in
the attic of that home. A lady news
reporter told of this grand house,
in its day, being torn down and
was given that blue bottle, by that
worker. She was about to embark
on the journey of a lifetime. Life
can take us on some interesting
journeys can it not? It’s all in how
we look at that journey that gives
it meaning.
Correction: The date for the Ed-
ucation Fair at the Midland School
is on April 11, not April 12. This is
a busy evening as students share
projects they have done thorough-
out the year with their parents
and grandparents. Edna Dale and
Lee Anna Fitzgerald are coaching
the tumblers, getting them ready
for a performance that evening.
There are a lot of others things
going on that evening, so be watch-
ing for more information. The Mid-
land library will be serving their
annual soup and sandwich supper,
so stop in for a tasty bowl of soup.
Notice: The annual Easter egg
hunt will be held Thursday, March
28, at the Midland Town Park. The
preschool will start at 2:30 M.T.
The kindergarten and grades one,
two, and three will be at 3:30 M.T.
In case of rain, the egg hunt will be
held in the Midland Legion Hall on
Main Street. This event is spon-
sored each year by the Midland
American Legion Auxiliary.
We wish to express our sincere
sympathies to the family of Earl
(Lou) Root who passed away-
Wednesday, March 6, at Casper,
Wyo., where he and his wife, Helen
(Stotts) Root, lived for many years.
He worked for the CNW railroad
for 43 years. Roy Hunt and Sam
Root, Midland, attended the fu-
neral service. Those from Riverton,
Wyo., at the funeral were Cliff
Root, Dan and Dorothy Root and
their daughter, Jada, and Bob
Marrington. Anyone wishing to
read Lou’s obituary you can go to
www.Bustardsfuneralhome.com.
Edith (Foshiem) Schofield
shared some memories of Lou and
Helen as follows: “Just a word
about our dear friends, E. J. (Lou)
and Helen (Stotts) Root. Such won-
derful lifelong friends from way
back to the 40s in good old Mid-
land, S.D., to Casper, Wyo., from
1968, to present day. Mike Root,
was Lou’s uncle and was married
to my dad’s sister, Emma Fosheim,
and my brother, Richard Fosheim,
married Helen’s sister, Alice Mae
Stotts. That makes them family as
far as I’m concerned. Lou’s job took
the family to Casper, Wyo., in 1964
and on one of their visits back to
Midland he had a long talk with
Martin and told him there was a
lot of work in Casper. Since we
were struggling to make a living,
Martin working out on a ranch,
the country schools closing, the
kids and I having to maintain a
place in town so the kids could go
to Midland school; we decided to
check out Casper, Wyo. We made
the move in 1968 and we owe Lou
and Helen so much for their en-
couragement and friendship over
the years. The years have been
good to us, with work opportuni-
ties for both Martin and I and so
many more opportunities for our
kids. We have made good use of
the medical facilities over the
years and our oldest daughter has
had many advantages with the op-
portunities Wyoming provides for
mentally challenged young people.
Lou was a regular visitor at our
home as long as he could drive that
big pickup and we had many good
visits, sharing news from South
Dakota. He made it a point to
bring Suzy a Reeses Peanut Butter
Cup when he came and she would
always tell him that he was a good
man. He got such a kick out of
that.” Thanks, Edith, for sharing
your memories of Lou. When folks
move from Midland there isn’t that
day-to-day connection.
Karel Reiman left for Rapid
City Friday, March 8, meeting
family members at a local restau-
rant. The occasion was a celebra-
tion of her mom, Goldie
Eisenbraun’s, (94) birthday.
Everyone had a good time sharing
memories. Sunday, Karel, her sis-
ter, Paula Eisenbraun, and her sis-
ter-in-law, Linda Eisenbraun,
went to the Good Samaritan Cen-
ter in New Underwood for the 88th
birthday celebration of their aunt,
Tillie Eisenbraun. It was also a
mini-reunion as they renewed ac-
quaintances with family they had-
n’t seen for some time. Kalvin
Eisenbraun and his two girls were
also there. His wife, Heather
(Slovek) Eisenbraun, was unable
to come as she had to work. Kalvin
and Heather live on the place
owned by her dad, Paul Slovek,
and Kalvin works for him.
Monday of last week, Jen Jones
had appendix surgery at Rapid
City. While she and husband, Jeff,
were in Rapid their kids stayed
with grandpa and grandma, Mor-
rie and Barb Jones. Reports are
Jen is back home and feeling much
better. That is good news!
Monday of last week, Clint and
Prerry Saucerman took her mom,
Marlin Evans, to Rapid City for a
doctor’s appointment. Later in the
day, Clint and Marlin headed for
home leaving Prerry at the home
of son, Tel and Ellie Saucerman
and family. Tel and Ellie were at a
pastor’s retreat. Ellie’s folks, Mark
and Glenda Nemec, Hill City,
stayed with the kids through Sun-
day night. Prerry then looked after
the kids from Monday, until Tel
and Ellie got home Wednesday.
Prerry, Tel, Ellie, Meleah and Ray-
gen visited Sawyer’s second grade
room on Wednesday. The students
had done some research on differ-
ent subjects writing it up in book
form with a table of contents etc.,
so there was a book viewing of
their project.
Sunday, Prerry Saucerman and
Carol Hunt went to Pierre with
Patricia Vollmer to a “Diaper and
Wipee” shower for Grayson
Schofield. Grayson was born Feb-
ruary 25, weighed 9 lbs. and 9 oz.
and is the son of Steven and Brid-
get (Vollmer) Schofield and has a
sister, Elizabeth. Congratulations
on that big, baby boy!
Trinity Lutheran in Midland
had a Seder meal during church
services Sunday. Members of the
Deep Creek Church joined them
for the service and meal. Ladies of
Trinity Lutheran are continuing to
work on high school senior gradu-
ates and military quilts. Plans are
to finish them next week.
Family got word that Will
Schofield had passed away at the
Philip hospital Friday, March 15.
Will was diagnosed with cancer a
number of years ago. Thankful for
the years he had been given follow-
ing that diagnosis, the cancer was
back. Will was 58 years old. The
last few years Jerry and I would
see Will on his rider-mower mow-
ing the yard of our former neigh-
bors, the late Bob and Pauline
Marrington. His memorial funeral
service will be Friday, March 22,
at 3:00 p.m. at the Midland School
gym with Pastor Tel Saucerman
officiating. Anyone wishing to read
his obituary go to www.rushfuner-
alhome.com. As you read what
people have to say on that web-
page, you see a side of Will you did
not know. Our sincere sympathies
to the family of Will Schofield.
We also wish to express our
sympathies to the family of Mary
Haughian who passed away
March 11. The funeral was at
Miles City, Mont. She is the grand-
mother of Jenna Finn, Midland,
and the mother of Theresa
Deuchar, Milesville. As Jenna
shares memories of her grand-
mother, you know without a doubt,
the love she had for her grand-
mother.
Folks were busy going to, or
watching, state basketball games
on Public TV the past few week-
ends. We watched some of the
games this past week. Dupree
played in the State B tournament
in Aberdeen and took third place.
Dayton Spiel plays on the Dupree
basketball team and is a grandson
of former Midland resident, Jessie
Mae (Foster), and her husband,
John Brewer. He is the son of their
daughter, Leah and Bryon Spiel,
Parade. Dayton is a senior so will
be graduating this spring. His
mom, Leah, has been taking col-
lege courses over the Internet and
will be graduating this spring as
well. Congratulations to both of
them.
A little bird told me former
Midland residents, Bob and Doris
Sheeley, were in town. They vis-
ited and spent Sunday night at the
home of friends Jim and Jan
Bierle. Bob and Doris moved to
Colorado City, Colo., a number of
years ago.
Keith Hunt, Christine Niedan,
Deidra, Blake and Stuart
Hackerott, headed for State B in
Aberdeen Thursday. Keith enjoyed
visiting with a number of folks he
knew that were also at the tourna-
ment. Following the games Satur-
day evening, they headed for
home. After hearing of the blizzard
conditions Aberdeen got on Sun-
day morning, they were especially
glad to be home. Sunday, they
were meeting the kid’s mom, Lisa
Hackerott, half-way between Mid-
land and Smith Center, Kan. Be-
cause of icy conditions here and at
Smith Center, they started out
later then planned. Christine re-
ported the roads were not good
until they got to Nebraska. Com-
ing home, to their relief, roads con-
ditions were much better.
The Midland Senior Citizens
met at the senior center March 4,
with eight members present. Pres-
ident Kandus (Shorty) Woitte
called the meeting to order and led
in the flag salute. The minutes of
the February meeting were read
and approved. The treasurer’s re-
port was given. Beth Flom moved
to accept the report, seconded by
George Anderson. Motion passed.
Shorty checked on the price for
the bottle gas tank we no longer
use. We will advertise it for sale
along with our Coke machine.
Mickey Woitte moved that on the
months when the meeting and the
Friday potluck come in the same
week, we move the potluck to the
third Friday. Beth moved to accept
the motion, Amy Hulce seconded
and the motion passed. The meet-
ing adjourned and cards were
played and a lunch enjoyed.
Secretary, Mickey Woitte
I’m closing my news column
this Monday evening, as we’ll be
heading out early Tuesday morn-
ing. If I missed your news I will get
it next week. Part of the activity
going on for us this past week con-
cerned the trailer house we lived
in before moving to the house we
now live in. That trailer house was
moved to the DeYoung place and
used during calving time. We no
longer have cattle, so we don’t
have use for it anymore. Jerry
made a deal with Steve Daly con-
cerning that trailer house. And so,
Steve and his wife Julie began tak-
ing the skirting off Wednesday.
Thursday, Jerry and I had to go to
Pierre. When we got home we
drove out to see how the trailer
house project was going. We found
the trailer gone and everything
cleaned up as much as we would
have done it ourselves. It was
much appreciated, as that is not
always the case. Called Steve’s
mom, Judy Daly, expressing our
appreciation. Steve and Julie had
just left her place, and seeing our
name on the caller ID she reported
she had a trailer house in her yard.
She reports her grandkids, Carson
and Dane, are all excited about
that trailer house. Their plan is to
move in when they are 10 and each
have picked out their bedroom and
have divided up the chores. Oh,
our youth, and how excited they
can get. It’s refreshing. Of course,
Carson and Dane already have a
home they live in with their par-
ents, Steve and Julie. It’s just en-
joyable to hear their excitement
over a trailer house that was a
part of our lives for a number of
years.
“Yesterday is history. Tomorrow
is a mystery. And today? Today is
a gift. That’s why we call it the
present.” – Babatunde Olatunji
The above was taken from our
Amish newspaper magazine.
Wishing you a good day and a
great week!
WHeeleR CunaP tReated
Each Unit
3”x6’6” ............................................$5.39
3
1
⁄2”x6’6” ...............$7.84 .................$7.21
4”x6’6”..................$8.97 .................$8.25
4”x7’ ................................................$8.97
4”x8’.....................$11.55 ..............$10.63
5”x8’.....................$15.49 ..............$14.25
6”x8’.....................$22.67 ..............$20.86
7”x8’ ..............................................$27.51
5”x10’...................$22.25 ..............$20.47
6”x10’...................$30.74 ..............$28.28
7”x10’...................$40.31 ..............$37.09
5”x12’...................$27.75 ..............$25.53
6”x12’...................$36.42 ..............$33.51
7”x12’...................$48.80 ..............$44.90
8”x12’...................$73.26 ..............$67.40
5”x14’...................$36.60
6”x14’...................$53.10
Pointed PoSt
Each Unit
3”x6’6” ............................................$6.05
3
1
⁄2”x6’6” ..........................................$7.88
4”x6’6”.................$10.05 ................$9.25
4”x7’ ................................................$9.96
5”x8’ ..............................................$15.91
6”x8’.....................$25.06 ..............$23.06
WHeeleR tReated PlankS
2x6-16’ .....................................$22.56 ea.
2x8-16’ .....................................$30.07 ea.
2x10-16’ ...................................$39.67 ea.
2x12-16’ ...................................$51.84 ea.
Sioux MineRal FeedeRS
1 or 2......................................$270.48 ea.
3 or more ..............................$243.43 ea.
Sioux Bale FeedeRS
1 or 2......................................$284.28 ea.
3 or more ..............................$255.85 ea.
douBle Slant FeedeR
$455.40 ea.
2”x6-BaR Steel gateS
20’.............$358.80 12’.........$218.96
18’.............$323.84 10’.........$199.64
16’.............$283.36 8’...........$182.16
14’.............$245.64 6’...........$165.60
4’...........$140.76
2”x7-BaR Steel gateS
18’.............$383.64 10’.........$232.76
16’.............$336.72 8’...........$198.72
14’.............$299.00 6’...........$172.04
12’.............$253.00 4’...........$148.12
1.66”x6-BaR Steel gateS
18’.............$257.60 10’.........$159.16
16’.............$228.16 8’...........$135.24
14’.............$205.16 6’ ...........$113.16
12’.............$177.56 4’.............$92.92
kkkkkk
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Spring 2013
poSt & gateS Sale
Cash & Carry
Sale runs March 25-May 4, 2013
Hd 1” Hinge
$23.00
Red BRand Steel PoStS
1.33# with 5 clips ea.
5
1
⁄2’ .........................Bdl. of 5....$4.99 ea.
Unit of 200 .......................$4.59 ea.
6’............................Bdl. of 5....$5.49 ea.
Unit of 200 .......................$5.05 ea.
Red BRand BaRBed WiRe
1 Roll .....................................$79.67 ea.
Unit of 27 rolls .....................$71.70 ea.
The family of
Carol Ann Hunt
are hosting a
Card Shower
in honor of her
70th Birthday!
Cards may be
sent to Carol at:
PO Box 194
Midland, SD
57552
Community
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 7
ads@pioneer-review.com
Deadline: Tuesdays at 11 a.m.
Staff SpotligHt
Jared rutHerford
– Propane & Propane Accessories
– Employed 6
1
⁄2 years
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
A suggestion from a reader is to
use hydrogen peroxide to loosen a
rusty nut or screw. They advise
pouring a little on top of the
bolt/screw and allow it to pene-
trate for a few minutes. The bolt/
screw should then be loose enough
to turn.
,.
Empty egg cartons can be used
to keep your boot tops from sag-
ging over to their sides. Just slip
the egg carton in the top of the
boot and it will stay up straight.
,.
This one sounded like a good one
to try - Instead of frosting your
cupcakes use a marshmallow.
Simply place one large marshmal-
low on top of each cupcake two
minutes prior to taking them out
of the oven.
,.
For you crocheters and knitters
this might be a good idea - put
your ball of string in a beverage
pitcher with a lid. The ball of yard
stays in one place and the thread
feeds out the spout. I’ve seen some
round, gallon pitchers that would
be perfect for this.
,.
A new use for your old doilies is
to make them into bowls, using a
blown up balloon or a glass bowl as
your form. I would suggest setting
you bowl in a tray to catch any run
off. Soak the doily in liquid starch
for about one minute. Gently
wring out starch. The more starch
removed the quicker the drying
time, but the bowl will be weaker.
Gently smooth doily around form.
Let dry completely. This may take
several hours depending on the
amount of starch and the humidity
in the air.
Once dry, gently remove the
dried doily from the bowl.
,.
Along that same line are button
bowls. These are very pretty, but I
think it would take more patience
than I have. From what I’ve found
there are two ways to go about
this.
One is to blow up a balloon,
cover the desired area with glue
and add buttons. You’re fighting
gravity so this might be where my
patience would leave. Once the de-
sired amount of buttons are ad-
hered, let dry. Then coat three
times with more glue, allowing
each coat to dry completely. When
finished deflate the balloon and
you have your bowl. Thick glue
works best, even letting it get
tacky before applying buttons
seems to help a website said. Also
don’t pop the balloon the force
could damage the bowl; instead let
the air out slowly.
The second version is to cover
the inside of a form – a bowl, plate,
serving dish, etc. – with aluminum
foil. Then lay down your glue and
buttons. Again topcoat with more
glue. Going this route I would
think you could aid the process by
tacking them together with hot
glue.
,.
We encourage our readers to share
their items of interest. Just email
nancy@pioneer-review.com, drop
your item off at our office or mail
it to the Pioneer Review, PO Box
788, Philip, SD 57567.
We pass ideas along, but make no
guarrantees to the reader.
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The luck of the Irish is upon you.
I didn’t find any major old stuff to
share this week. But don’t relax too
much, I’m still looking.
Monday, Tony Harty was by our
place a couple of times. His first at-
tempt to give me the news was in-
terrupted by telephone calls that
needed to be taken care of, so he
caught up on reading the newspa-
pers then went on his way, return-
ing to finish the news. During the
extra time, he visited at the L.D.
and Shirley Hair home. Hairs were
busy getting things lined up and
left for Oelrich for work. Tony vis-
ited with his niece, Janelle Hicks,
at her daughter’s day care. Carol
Solon stopped by Tony’s in the af-
ternoon to pick up some things and
visit.
Tuesday, Bonnie Riggins (Mrs.
Wayne Riggins) was a visitor at our
place in the morning. Phyllis Word
was a visitor in the afternoon. Bill
went to Philip for cards in the af-
ternoon and I met Lee Vaughan,
Ruth (Vaughan) Carley and Tim
Modde and we all attended the
safety meeting for the Civil Air Pa-
trol in Pierre. We were going to
grab something to eat on the way
home, but two establishments saw
us coming and shut off the lights
and locked the doors! We did man-
age to locate some food and Lee
drove us home, avoiding deer really
well.
Tuesday, Tony Harty picked up
mail and did a check at Hairs to be
sure gates were secure and such.
When Don Moody was in Kadoka to
get his driver’s license, he stopped
for a visit with Tony in the after-
noon. Interesting, the document
given by the hospital when Don
was born that was supposed to be a
birth certificate and probably was
used to get a Social Security card,
isn’t good enough now in the State
of South Dakota, it will take a no-
tarized form and $20 sent to the
county in California to get a “certi-
fied” birth certificate!
Don and Vi Moody left the Rapid
Valley area Tuesday to spend sev-
eral days at the ranch. They had
received lots of calls from friends
and relatives while Vi was hospi-
talized with a severe case of para-
influenza. Marsha Sumpter visited
twice and Vi's cousins, Raymond
and Joyce Roghair, visited one af-
ternoon. News from the Roghairs is
that Nell Lou is visiting her broth-
ers, Henry, Ray, and family, who
live near Murdo. Nell has spent the
greater part of her life as a mis-
sionary in Japan and she is in
South Dakota for the next three
weeks. Her nephew, Paul, substi-
tute teaches in Kadoka and they
have a new baby, Jack Henry, who
Don and Vi have yet to meet.
Jessica Gittings and Daniel vis-
ited George Gittings Wednesday
afternoon. Sandee Gittings visited
Peggy and Pee Wee Hook Wednes-
day afternoon.
Boy, was Wednesday one of those
days to write home about! It was
beautiful the entire day. I headed
to the airport. The time had come
to take the little plane out for some
exercise, the runway was dry and
all systems go. Surprisingly dams
south of Interstate 90 have quite a
bit of water, but are relatively shal-
low. This would have been a good
winter to clean out some of those
dams that were dry. With a little
frost, Bill and I cleaned one dam,
filled in some washouts, built the
bank up better and a better over-
flow and rain came and filled it up
overnight. The frost helped us get
the ground that still held moisture
out. A good project on a mild winter
and made for good water for live-
stock and wildlife after water
came. Anyway, I checked on what
the Solon ranch was up to, circled
Moody’s and looked over the little
farm before calling it a day. Dean
Parsons was out looking over fields
in the area and stopped for a cup of
coffee in the afternoon. Phyllis
Word was also a visitor in the after-
noon. Another pilot over here said
he had a couple of “controlled
crashes” when he flew later that
same day.
Wednesday morning, Don Moody
had an appointment with the doc-
tors in Philip, and Vi missed the
flight of the Skyhawk Cessna mak-
ing a couple of passes over the
ranch. Darn washer and dryer
were making too much noise it
seems. Many neighbors are in full
swing with calving now and getting
busier all the time.
Tony Harty enjoyed the nice day
Wednesday. Phyllis Word visited at
the home of Tony Harty. Tony vis-
ited his niece, Kathy Brown, and
her mother, Barbara Herber, and
sister, Janelle Hicks, also were vis-
iting Kathy, so that was a real plus.
Tony gave Janelle a ride to her
home outside of Wanblee and had
supper with her and husband
Blake. Janelle was getting work
done on her vehicle was the reason
a ride was needed.
Our sympathy is extended to the
family of Willie Schofield. Willie
was a bowler on our team. He was
an energetic, enthusiastic bowler
and mom tried to curb some of that
exuberance, but to no avail. He en-
tertained the entire bowling alley.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of Clifford Keyser, who
passed away this week in the
Rapid City area. Clifford is from
the Ash Creek area, but has lived
in Rapid for many years.
While at the ranch, Don and Vi
Moody enjoyed a visit with neigh-
bor Rocky Williams Thursday af-
ternoon. They had just returned
from a utility vehicle ride checking
on water, pastures and traveling
through the trails. The fully en-
closed cab was warm enough with-
out even turning on the heater.
They trimmed evergreens and used
the dump box to rid the yard of
trash at the ranch. It’s a handy
dandy little working machine.
Another beautiful day presented
itself Thursday. Tony Harty had
coffee out and called Russ Hattel to
get him up and moving. Since he
lives in a basement house, unless
he emerges from it, the outside is
pretty much obscured. You don’t
feel the wind, see sunshine, or most
anything.
Thursday, Bill and I were up
early for breakfast then I took the
Haakon County Prairie transporta-
tion van to Rapid City with a cus-
tomer. As we passed by the
outskirts of Scenic, it was men-
tioned she would like to drive
through town, so on the return trip
we did just that. This driver missed
the sign that directed me out of
town. We had a scenic drive al-
right, into Kyle, then by her place,
and on to Kadoka. A bit out of the
way! While in Rapid, I had a visit
with grandson Zack Seager, Cori
and little Ryder. In the evening, I
attended the Kadoka Community
Betterment Association meeting
and supper.
Sandee Gittings brought Daniel
Jordan out after work Friday after-
noon. Daniel discovered that the
"trunk" on his tricycle was a great
tool that he could haul mud in up
to the garage, where he proceeded
to "camouflage" grandma's red
pickup.
Our sympathy is extended to the
family of Rita (O’Connor) Nar-
cisian, who passed away in Col-
orado this past week. Bill and I
have enjoyed Rita and Frank on
their many visits to the Philip area.
Rita always shared some of her cre-
ative cleaning techniques and kept
up on the happenings of the Philip
community by reading the Pioneer
Review and expressing her pleas-
ure at some of the items. Her radi-
ant personality and quick smile
will be missed.
Don and Vi Moody returned to
their Rapid Valley home Thursday
night to be on deck for an Friday af-
ternoon appointment, and also in
time to get their newly overhauled
1960s Germany made cuckoo clock.
They found an antique from the
1898 Spanish American War of
which Vi's grandfather, David
Lampert, served at the Philippine
islands under Commodore Dewey.
It was quite a find for Don and Vi
to share with the Lampert side of
the family.
Friday was a foggy day, rain in
90 days, hopefully. Bill and I vis-
ited Dale and Cindy O’Connell in
the morning and took the HCPT
van to get the oil changed. Tony
Harty stopped by for a visit, as did
Phyllis Word and Cindy Wilmarth.
Bill went to Philip for cards in the
afternoon and when he got home
we called Dale and Cindy O’Con-
nell and took them out for supper
at Quinn. Something we hadn’t
done for a long time, not since the
old place burned down.
Jessica Gittings came out to the
George and Sandee Gittings’ home
Saturday and had lunch. She took
Daniel home with her in the after-
noon.
Saturday, Tony Harty made a
trip to Rapid City and met L.D. and
Shirley Hair to deliver their mail
and visit while they were doing
business around Rapid. Tony did
some shopping before returning
home in the snow.
Bill and I went to Rapid City Sat-
urday and joined Casey Seager,
Philip, and other invited guests at
the home of Cori and Zack Seager
for the third birthday party for
Ryder, which consisted of dinner,
dessert and of course lots of gifts.
Bill, Casey and Zack worked on
Zack’s pickup and darned near
froze. It turned cold, the wind came
up, and was spitting snow, then it
got right with it and things turned
white real quick as the snowflakes
got big and fluffy. We got home
about dark and roads were getting
a bit nasty.
Vi Moody wrote, “Saturday
brought a beautiful snowfall
amounting to six inches or so in a
much of western South Dakota. It
was most welcome and yielded al-
most .26” of precipitation. The
snowflakes were huge, larger than
half dollars and the snow was
heavy and wet and all melted down
by mid morning Sunday in most
places.” Don and Vi watched the St.
Patrick activities on TV at home.
They ventured out St. Patrick’s
Day Sunday for a buffet. Vi wore
her three strands of green and sil-
ver expensive beads Marsha gifted
her with at the hospital and lots of
green and silver Hershey candy
kisses which Vi shared with the
nurses and others who visited her.
Vi found it much more fun to walk
at their ranch when it was 74˚
Thursday than around the hospital
pods.
Tony Harty attended church
then went out for dinner Sunday.
He stopped by the state highway
department to visit with Kathy
Brown, who was just getting off
work. Tony stopped at our place
and gave me news in the afternoon.
The snow that fell Saturday after-
noon and evening was soon melted
away and running water.
Sunday afternoon, the Liverpool
Legends Beatles tribute band held
a performance at the Kadoka audi-
torium with the Kadoka Area
music students playing back up for
the band the second part of the per-
formance. Some of the proceeds
from the concert went to the music
department. Tony Harty and Mar-
sha Sumpter were among the
many in attendance. The band got
good audience participation from
young and old during the nearly
two hour performance.
“Some women fight old age until
the day they die. Lady Nancy Astor
said, ‘I refuse to admit I am more
than fifty-two, even if it does make
my sons illegitimate’.”
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
The story about famous hills this
week recalls one that always drew
my attention. Anderson, Hill, over
by Wasta, is at the top of where the
Andersons lived and that is why
they called it Anderson Hill. My
memory of that hill goes back to
when I was about 12 years old and
my dad was hauling a load of fire
wood down for a family who lived
there. We got about to the top of
the hill where it was very steep and
the motor died on the truck. Dad
put on the brakes and pulled the
emergency brake and told mom
and I to get out and to get some
wood off of the load to block the
wheels, which we did. Then dad got
the truck going and put it in super
low and went up the hill. Mom and
I had to pick up the wood and carry
it up the hill to where dad waited
for us. Those were the good old
days that you hear people talk
about!
Then there is Stone Man Hill
where the Silent Monument is.
This brings another memory of
when we were bringing a load of
posts to my uncle, Nels, and aunt,
Ethel Carstensen, and there had
been a small shower earlier and it
had dried a little. Some of you will
remember how the gumbo got
when wet. Well we got stuck going
up that hill. Ralph Hansen and his
family lived close by and he had
lots of equipment and tractors as
he and his boys built dams around
the area. Cecil Hansen came and
pulled us up and over the hill and
we were able to continue on to
Carstensens with our load. Was I
ever glad to get out of that truck as
we slipped and slid around the rest
of the way there. If you could go
fast enough you could throw the
gumbo off and it would not roll and
build up on the wheels and bog you
down.
As I was putting the Grindstone
News together Sunday evening,
March 17, the wind came up and
blew something furious. The
weather forecaster said the gusts
were registered up to 72 miles per
hour at Wall, so I am sure they
were that high here also. It was
wet enough that the dust was not
blowing around. We had about
three inches of snow Saturday
night, but it was about all gone by
3:00 p.m. Sunday. The electricity
went out for a spell and I thought,
“oh I bet I lost what news I had
typed up,” but when the computer
came back on it was still there.
Thank my lucky stars.
Marvin said that we were getting
several calves a day now, so they
were busy getting them in as it
chilled down a little on Saturday
night. They were down at the barn
from 2:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. helping
a heifer calve and getting others in
and out of the weather. Carla Eide
and the grandkids were here over
the weekend visiting the Eide and
Ramsey families. Kiley, Marvin
and Vicki’s granddaughter, really
likes to help with calving. After the
late night, they let her sleep in late
that morning. They returned to
Gillette about 2:00 p.m. Sunday.
I went into the Philip Nursing
Home Tuesday evening, March 12,
to listen to the music of Chuck,
Ruth, and Tammi Carstensen and
Marianne Frein who were playing.
I visited some of the residents and
had an enjoyable evening.
Bob Thorson and his fiancée,
Jodi, brought Jodi’s folks, Ed and
Cleon, in to dance. Jodi dances
with several of the residents, even
some of the ones who are in wheel-
chairs are pushed around in time
with the music, which they enjoy
immensely. Others who do this are
Gayle Rush, Debbie Hansen,
Phillis Thorson and Gloria French.
Lee Schoniger even made me dance
three times. Lee told me that I had
to keep moving or I would get old. I
must admit I was pretty rusty as I
have not danced much in the last
10 years.
I have danced since I was a little
girl, in fact my dad would let me
stand on his feet as he danced
around with me. After I married
Kenneth, we would go dancing
every week somewhere. We did
take up a little square dancing for
a few years with some of our neigh-
bors.
Getting back to the nursing
home, Jack Hansen was there
dancing up a storm. Jack gave
Tammi Carstensen an A+ when
she sang “Daddy’s Hands.” There
were a few who came over on the
mini bus from the Silverleaf and
there were senior citizens there
from their homes around town. We
are so fortunate that we have peo-
ple who volunteer at the nursing
home and Silverleaf. So, if you live
in Philip, there is no need to be-
come bored, just step out and do
some volunteering.
March 8 - 10, Kieth and Debbie
Smith went up to Lead for the
weekend to visit their daughter,
Chancie and Aaron. This was the
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
last weekend for a while to spend
with the kids before calving got in
full swing. Lincoln Smith’s fiancée,
Ella, from Aberdeen, spent from the
15th -17th with Smiths. Debbie
said she really enjoyed Wednesday,
March 13, as she got to keep grand-
sons, Logan and Myer, while Jess
went to Rapid City for doctor ap-
pointments.
Debbie has been attending play
practice in Philip, which will be a
sequel to last year’s play. But this
one, Debbie said has three men in
it. It is to be performed in Philip in
a couple of months.
Saturday, Kieth, Deb, Tucker,
Jess, Logan and Meyer Smith all
attended the 90th birthday open
house for Jess’s Granddad Luede-
man at Quinn.
Sympathy is extended to the fam-
ily and friends of Father Reuben
Valades. He was well known in the
Philip area as a very kind person
who was always willing to help
everyone who needed it. I learned a
lot from him and he asked me to
teach the Catholic Bible study out
here in my neighborhood to the
Catholic families here. I was glad to
have had the opportunity and that
he thought I was capable to do so
and that he asked me to.
continued on page 13
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
School & Community
Last Sunday Special:
March 24th
Then closed on Sun-
days thereafter.
859-2430 • Philip
SuNDAY SPECIAL:
Your Choice
with all the extras,
salads, dessert
WEEKLY SPECIAL:
Pizza Burger & Fries or
3-pc. Chicken Fillet & Fries
BUSINESS FOR SALE
Pizza Etc.
175 S. Center Ave. • Philip
•Great Family Business
•1 Year In Newly Remodeled Building
•Lots of Possibilities for Expansion
Contact
Kim or
Vickie
(605) 
859-2365
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 • Philip
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar................................28-16
Shad’s Towing...........................26-18
Handrahan Const .....................26-18
Badland’s Auto..........................20-20
Rockers......................................16-28
Petersen’s..................................16-28
Hightlights:
Gail Reutter ..........................216/495
Joe Handrahan ............................210
Wendell Buxcel ............................200
Andrew Reckling.........224 clean/578
Marlis Petersen.....................190/472
Carl Brown .................3-10 split; 547
Jackie Shull..................................186
Tena Slovek........................178 clean
Connie Schlim..............................172
Vickie Petersen ............................172
Jerry Mooney...................6-7-10 split
Venessa Buxcel...................5-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor..............................26-10
Peoples Market .........................25-11
Kennedy Impl ...........................21-15
G&A Trenching.........................18-18
George’s Welding ......................16-20
Bear Auto..................................15-21
Philip Health Service ...............14-22
Kadoka Tree Service...................9-27
Highlights:
Tony Gould..........................233, 235,
................................214 all clean/682
Fred Foland.........244, 194 clean/597
Cory Boyd..............................205/567
Pat Berkimer................5-7 split; 516
Todd Radway ........................209/515
Earl Park ....................3-10 split; 511
Jim Larson ............................200/510
Eliel Poor Bear.............................510
Ryan Seager .................................507
Matt Schofield..............................503
Alvin Pearson .............3-10 split; 500
Les Struble .........................3-10 split
Norm Buxcel .........................5-6 split
Wendell Buxcel...................9-10 split
Curtis Bitting .....................3-10 split
Bill Bainbridge .............3-10 split x 2
Bill Stone ..............................5-7 split
Ronnie Williams...................5-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Invisibles.............................35.5-12.5
State Farm..........................31.5-16.5
Cutting Edge Salon ..................30-18
Bowling Belles ....................22.5-25.5
Jolly Ranchers ....................15.5-32.5
Highlights:
Karen Foland ................190, 183/494
Charlene Kjerstad 178, 157, 152/487
Debbie Gartner .....................171/466
Shirley Parsons.............153, 152/415
Sandra O’Connor.....5-8-10 split; 169
Joy Neville....................................158
Deanna Fees ............................3-5-10
Kay Williams........................4-5 split
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................32-8
Morrison’s Haying ....................25-15
Hildebrand Concrete ................20-20
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................18.5-21.5
Wall Food Center......................17-23
First National Bank .................16-24
Dorothy’s Catering ...................16-24
Just Tammy’s......................15.5-24.5
Highlights:
Chelsea Moos .......................129, 125
Lois Porch.....................................179
Laniece Sawvell ...........................400
Stacey Schulz ........................177/477
Amy Morrison .......................175/503
Val Schulz...............2-7 split x 2; 488
Shar Moses...................................472
Cristi Ferguson............................180
Marlis Petersen............5-7 split; 175
Tena Slovek..................................174
Thursday Men’s
The Steakhouse ..........................35-5
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................30-10
O’Connell Const ........................22-18
WEE BADD...............................18-22
A&M Laundry...........................16-24
Dakota Bar................................16-24
West River Pioneer Tanks .......13-27
McDonnell Farms .....................10-30
Highlights:
Ky Bowen..........2-10 split; 207 clean
Haven Hildebrand .......................200
Ronnie Coyle.......................216 clean
Jay McDonnell .............................215
Jan Bielmaier........................207/571
Harlan Moos ........3-10 split; 202/562
Cory Boyd.....................................213
Nathan Kjerstad ........5-10 split; 547
Neal Petersen........................205/546
Ronnie Williams.................5-10 split
Wendell Buxcel...................5-10 split
Tyler Hauk ...........................5-7 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service..............34-10
Cristi’s Crew.............................28-16
Lee & the Ladies.......................25-19
Roy’s Repair ..............................24-20
King Pins...................................17-27
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Kristin Schmidt ...................126, 143
Tanner Norman...3-10 split; 205/541
Bart Guptill..................................205
Annette Hand...............................402
Lee Neville....................5-6 split; 184
Brian Pearson .......................222/601
Brenda Grenz........................176/490
Alvin Pearson .............3-10 split; 202
Duane Hand ...............5-10 split; 537
John Heltzel .4-7-9, 3-10 & 5-6 splits
Kelly Fees .....................3-10 split x 2
Theresa Miller....................5-10 split
These elementary students are
Super Scotties for February 2013. They have
earned the distinction through different individual
displays of good character. Each teacher selects at
least one of their students at the end of each month.
Super Scotties
Jensen Fitch
Kindergarten
Gabriella Walker
Kindergarten
Katie Butler
3rd grade
Grace Pekron
5th grade
Cappie West
6th grade
Elementary Students of the
Month for February
Lane Kuchenbecker
1st grade
Karlie Coyle
2nd grade
Brett Daly
4th grade
Sarah Parsons
Milesville
The Philip Area wrestling squad gathered together Tuesday, March 12, to recognize teammates with awards. From left are
Clint Stout, co-captain, Gavin DeVries, most improved, Lane Blasius, Scottie Award, Chance Knutson, co-captain and Chand-
lier Sudbeck, outstanding wrestler. Photo by Nancy Haigh
Philip Area wrestlers recognized
by Del Bartels
The third annual St. Patrick’s
Day five kilometer walk/run event
in Philip was held Sunday, March
17.
“It’s just for fun, and to give the
community something to do,” said
Jenny Terkildsen, who coordinates
the event, with help from friends
and family.
Since it is held on St. Patrick’s
Day, there were prizes for the best
dressed and wearing of the most
green. This year also included a
one kilometer fun run for young
kids. All races started and finished
at The KinderCottage on W. Pine
Street.
This year, 44 people partici-
pated, despite the blustery day.
This is more than the participation
last year, which was almost too hot,
according to some returning run-
ners. All preregistered participants
received specially made t-shirts
that stated, “Today I will run what
you will not so that tomorrow I will
run what you cannot.” Water and
water bottles were donated by
Philip Motor, Inc. and First Na-
tional Agency. Any extra funds,
after taking care of costs and the
purchase of t-shirts, will go toward
multi-sport improvements to the
Philip tennis court area. This
year’s amount donated to the
Haakon County Young Women’s
versatile court project came to
$150.
This year’s one kilometer participants in-
cluded Josie Rush, Keldon Fitzgerald, Kelcey
Butler, Kade Fitzgerald, Clarissa Heisinger,
Wakely Burns, Eli Heisinger, Drew Terkild-
sen, Lukas Butler, Creston Burns, Baylor
Burns, Michelle Butler and Katie Butler.
Five kilometer bicyclists were Mallory
Vetter with a time of 24:16, Doreen Vetter –
24:16 and Gracie Fitzgerald – 31:30.
Five kilometer walkers included J.J.
Walker, Christine Andrus, Madyson More-
hart, Julie Daly, LeeAnna Fitzgerald, Sara
Wilson, Rod Knutson, Mary Ravellette,
Melanie Morehart, Jackie Heltzel and Mary-
Lynn Crary.
Age group placers
Five kilometer runners
0-10: Girls: 1st – Dilyn Terkildsen
25:57.50, 2nd – Rehgan Larson 36:45.05.
0-10: Boys: 1st – Layton Terkildsen
36:03.75.
11-15: Girls: 1st – Timber Hudson
31:20.91.
11-15: Boys: 1st – Damian Bartels
26:12.50, 2nd – Braden Burns 35:54.10.
30-39: Women: 1st – Heidi Burns 28:30.51,
2nd – Jenna Finn 28:32.44, 3rd – Sara Speer
31:46.54.
30-39: Men: 1st – Craig Burns 21:06.57,
2nd – Colt Terkildsen 22:14.23, 3rd – Mike
Vetter 22:41.64.
40-49: Women: 1st – Trisha Larson
22:41.02, 2nd – Krista Burns 30:11.26.
40-49: Men: 1st – Chip King 24:56.37,
2nd – Brad Burns 30:37.40
50 plus: Women: 1st – Debbie Antonsen
30:35.85.
Annual St. Patrick’s Day 5K run
Breezy and coolish, but still participants were smiling in the annual St. Patrick’s
Day 5K run/walk in Philip.
Members of the Philip Junior
High vocal music program took
part in the 39th annual
Lyman/Jones County Junior High
Music Festival, Tuesday, March
12, in Presho.
Approximately 240 students par-
ticipated, representing Philip,
Lyman, Jones County, Kadoka
Area, Stanley County, White River
and Wall schools. Approximately
200 people attended the evening’s
concert. The festival alternates
from being held in Presho one year
and in Murdo the next.
“It was a great day,” stated Barb
Bowen, Philip’s music instructor.
“Philip's spotlight song was “Follow
the Sun” by Joyce Eilers. It was a
great experience for Philip stu-
dents to experience a large choir
setting.”
According to Kym Lebeda,
Presho music instructor and organ-
izer of the music festival, the day’s
rehearsals were done as a large
group, since the individuals and
school groups were supposed to
have the notes down before the stu-
dents arrived that day. Each school
had the opportunity to perform a
spotlight number for the audi-
ence – a song that just their school
group performed by themselves to
show off their choir. Schools that
did a spotlight number were
Kadoka, Philip, Stanley County
and Lyman.
The songs rehearsed during the
day and presented during the con-
cert were “A Patriotic Festival,”
“Two Too Wet,” “Inscription of
Hope,” “Sing Jubilate,” “A Whole
Lot of Love to Share” and “Didn't
My Lord Deliver Daniel.” The guest
conductor was Susan Porter from
Platte-Geddes High School.
“I thought it was a great day.”
stated Lebeda. “Mrs. Porter's en-
thusiasm was electric and the stu-
dents were engaged with her, and
that showed in the concert. She
knows how she wants the songs to
sound and didn't stop until they
were exactly the way she wanted
them.”
Junior high music festival in Presho
Philip Junior High choir girls. Back row, from left: Christine Womak, Ashley Williams, Shay Hand and Tia Guptill. Third row:
Payton Schoenhals, Abigail Martin, Kendal Hook, Peyton Kuchenbecker and Cheyenne Pinney. Second row: Jada Theye,
Jaslyn Konst, Paige Slovek and Jada Jones and Kobie Davis. Front: Josie Kukal, Sage Bierle, Anna Belle McIlravy, Jaisa Sny-
der, Madison Morehart and Bobbi Antonsen.
Philip Junior High choir boys. Back row: Tristen Schofield, Lane Kroetch and
Cooper West. Second row: Dawson Reedy, Nathan Kreft and Colton Crimmins.
Front: Hunter Peterson and Damian Bartels. Courtesy photos
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Philip, SD
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Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports & accomplishments
Gibson
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
859-3100 • Philip, SD
For all your concrete
construction needs:
by Del Bartels
Practices for the track and field
season for the Philip High School
and junior high school boys and
girls began March 4. The team's
first meet is scheduled for Satur-
day, March 23 at Douglas.
“We always just hope to be com-
petitive at the end of the year,” said
head coach Tom Parquet. “In the
past we have been very fortunate
and the kids have really stepped up
their performances. We hope that
they will continue to do this, but it
will be tough as we are very
young.”
“Every year is different as kids
change in strength and ability. We
will miss our graduates just like al-
ways, but we have several return-
ing. Young track people just need
to remember that the key is to im-
prove yourself throughout the
year,” said Parquet.
“The first meet of the year is al-
ways tough, as you don't really
know what to expect,” said Par-
quet. “We hope to get a base per-
formance from the kids so that we
know where and what to work on.
The Douglas meet is always a big
meet, with some big schools there,
and the competition is always
good.”
Assistant coaches are Ralph
Kroetch and Scott Pinney. Several
community members are volun-
teering their time and expertise,
two being former head track coach
Jerry Rhodes and Pat Guptill.
The team members, by grade,
Scottie track and field begins
are:
12th – Quade Slovek, Holly Iwan
and Krista Wells.
11th – Allison Pekron and Seth
Haigh.
10th – Tyana Gottsleben, Katie
Haigh and Katlin Knutson, Paul
Guptill, Nelson Holman, Austin
Pinney and Tristen Rush.
Ninth – Garrett Snook, Ellie
Coyle and Tyshia Ferguson.
Eighth – Molly Coyle, Tia Gup-
till, Shay Hand, Peyton Kochen-
becker, Cheyenne Pinney, Sammie
Schofield, Elise Wheeler, Damian
Bartels, Blake Crowser, Riley
Heltzel, Coy Kramer, Nathan Kreft
and Cooper West.
Seventh – Misty Berry, Payton
Schoenhal, Paige Slovek, Jaisa
Snyder, Lane Kroetch, Dawson
Reedy and Anna Belle McIlravy.
Schools competing in this sea-
son’s Region 7B boys’ and girls’
track and field include Philip,
Crazy Horse, Edgemont, Jones
County, Kadoka Area, Lyman,
New Underwood, Oelrichs, Rapid
City Christian, Wall and White
River.
2013 schedule
March 23 @ Box Elder – Douglas
Early Bird Meet
March 29 @ Winner – Bill Pis-
tulka Invitational
April 9 @ Kadoka – Harry Weller
Invitational
April 13 @ Belle Fourche – Cen-
ter of the Nation Invitational
April 16 @ Kadoka Community
Invitational
April 19 @ Kadoka – People’s
Market Meet
April 20 @ Chamberlain Invita-
tional
April 25 @ Presho – Cecil John-
son Invitational
April 26 @ Lemmon – junior high
April 27 @ Kadoka – junior high
April 27 @ Sturgis – Black Hills
Track Classic
May 4 @ Lead – Mountain West
Invitational
May 10 @ Kadoka – Western
Great Plains Conference, varsity
and junior high
May 11 @ Kadoka Area High
School Meet
May 16 @ Kadoka – Region 7
Meet
May 25-26 State B Meet @
O’Hara Stadium, Rapid City
The Philip Scotties 2013 track and field team. Back row, from left: Austin Pinney, Paul Guptill, Riley Heltzel, Seth Haigh and
Quade Slovek. Fourth row: Katlin Knutson, Garrett Snook, Dawson Reedy, Lane Kroetch, Katie Haigh and Tyana Gottsleben.
Third row: Coy Kramer, Cooper West, Allison Pekron, Cheyenne Pinney, Tia Guptill, Shay Hand, Payton Shoenhal and Misty
Berry. Second row: Peyton Kuchenbecker, Damian Bartels, Anna Belle McIlravy, Ellie Coyle, Molly Coyle, Jaisa Snyder and
Paige Slovek. Front row: Krista Wells and Holly Iwan. Not pictured: Nelson Holman, Tyshia Ferguson, Tristen Rush, Blake
Crowser, Elise Wheeler, Sammie Schofield and Nathan Kreft. Below, the three seniors on the 2013 Philip Scottie track and
field team are, from left, Krista Wells, Quade Slovek and Holly Iwan. Photos by Del Bartels
The annual Philip Scotties girls’
basketball awards banquet was
held Thursday, March 14, in room
A-1 of the high school.
“Overall, I consider it a good sea-
son,” said head coach Karmen Mar-
bry. “You could tell we came a long
way and learned a lot. What more
can a coach really expect?”
Assistant coach Kory Foss said,
“From where we were at the first
game, it wasn’t pretty, but from
there we did continually better.
They did pretty well this year as a
younger group. When it comes to
the season, that’s how it works,
how well you’re doing at the end of
the year.”
The coaches first announced a
round of in-house silly/fun awards,
such as who texted the most and
who was the most likely to forget to
dribble.
The serious awards were more
difficult when it came to team vot-
ing and coach decision making. For
the junior varsity, deciding the
Most Improved Award recipient
was tough because, “We saw a lot
of upward mobility,” said Foss.
Team member Ellie Coyle ended up
with the most improved honor. The
Hustle Award, though there were
“A lot of good workers on the team,”
said Foss, also went to Coyle.
The junior varsity Spark Plug
Award for team encouragement
and positive attitude went to
Hanna Hostutler. She also earned
the 2012-2013 season Most Valu-
able Player recognition.
In announcing the varsity
awards, Marbry said, “There were
many girls who were most im-
proved.” The Most Improved
Award actually went to two play-
ers – Holly Iwan and Ellie Coyle.
“They went out there and pushed
themselves,” said Marbry of the en-
tire team concerning the Hustle
Award, which finally went to
Krista Wells. The Scottie Award,
related to the most valuable player,
was also given to Wells, though, “It
just depended on the night. They
all stepped up,” said Marbry.
Marbry concluded with, “I en-
joyed the season; looking forward
to next year.” The team captains
for the 2013-2014 season will be
Bailey Radway and Madison Hand.
The coaches will help the team to
pick up a number of summer bas-
ketball camps and three-on-three
tournaments, and the players are
to take advantage of open gym
nights.
PHS girls’ basketball awards night
Above, varsity awards went to, from left: Ellie Coyle – most improved, Holly Iwan –
most improved, and Krista Wells – Hustle Award and Scottie Award. Below, junior
varsity honors went to, from left: Coyle – most improved and Hustle Award, and
Hanna Hostutler – Spark Plug Award and most valuable player. Photos - Bartels
The Philip Health Services, Inc.
annual career day for area high
school students was held Tuesday,
March 12. Interested students
grades nine through 12 came to the
hospital throughout the day for in-
formation sessions .
Each session was presented by a
PHSI medical professional and in-
cluded hands-on activities, infor-
mation about the job’s typical daily
tasks, potential income, education
requirements and the South
Dakota schools where such train-
ing could be obtained.
“Some of the sessions were very
popular, with 20 to 25 students at-
tending,” said Jennifer Henrie,
human resources manager. “They
especially liked being able to see x-
rays and touch medical instru-
ments and orthopedic devices like
an artificial hip and artificial knee.
I think the kids were inspired by
seeing people who have a passion
for their field and love their jobs.”
In session one, the students
learned about emergency room op-
erations and the health unit coor-
dinator career from Linda Smith.
In session two, Nursing Manager
Tanya Haynes discussed the ca-
reers of registered nurses, licensed
practical nurses and certified nurse
assistants.
Session three was Mindy Green,
radiologic technologist, taking the
students through the steps from
taking the x-ray to viewing the dig-
ital images and answer, what is a
CAT scan anyway?
Dr. David Holman led session
four. He discussed the education,
skills and opportunities of a med-
ical career.
In session five, Laboratory Tech-
nologist Melanie Berdin used
demonstrations to illustrate the
importance of laboratory careers.
In session six, Dr. Clark Duch-
ene of the Black Hills Orthopedic
and Spine Centerex explained
about the medical specialty of or-
thopedics (care of bones and joints).
Philip Health Services career day
Radiologic
Technolo-
gist Mindy
Green
shows stu-
dents how
an x-ray is
taken at
the PHSI
radiology
depart-
ment.
Courtesy
photos
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
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Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Maroh 21, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 10
Notice of AppIication
for Executive
CIemency
Justin Carlin, who was sentenced from
Haakon County,, the 19th day of August,
1999, to two years in the South Dakota
State Penitentiary for the crime of Grand
Theft, has applied to the South Dakota
Board of Pardons and Paroles for Par-
don.
Rensch Law Office
731 St. Joseph St., Ste. 220
Rapid City, SD 57701
[Published March 7, 14 & 21, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $15.02]
SCHOOL LAND
LEASE AUCTION
A school land lease auction will be held in
the Haakon County Courthouse, in Philip,
SD, on March 28, 2013, at 1:15 PM (MT).
A list of tracts available for lease can be
obtained at the Haakon County Auditor's
Office, by visiting sdpubliclands.com, or
by contacting Mike Cornelison, Office of
School & Public Lands, 500 E. Capitol Av-
enue, Pierre, SD 57501-5070, or phone
(605) 773-4172. Disabled individuals
needing assistance should contact the
Office of School and Public Lands at least
48 hours in advance of the auction to
make any necessary arrangements.
[Published February 28, March 7, 14 &
21, 2013, at the total approximate cost of
$25.76]
Notice to Creditors
AND NOTICE OF
INFORMAL PROBATE
AND APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
3-801B
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FILE NO. PRO 12-11
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
):SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ROBERT L. PFEIFER, DECEASED
Notice is given that on the 12th day of De-
cember, 2012, Shelli L. Dowdy, whose
address is 920 EZ Street, Apt. B, Gillette,
WY 82718, and whose phone number is
(307) 660-2018, and Tammi R. Williams,
whose address is 840 Kingswood Drive,
Rapid City, SD 57702, and whose phone
number is (605) 391-9449, were ap-
pointed as Co-Personal Representatives
of the estate of ROBERT L. PFEÌFER.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within sixty (60) days after the
mailing or other delivery of this Notice, or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
Dated the 10th day of March, 2013.
/s/Shelli L. Dowdy
Shelli L. Dowdy
Personal Representative
Estate of ROBERT L. PFEÌFER
/s/Tammi R. Williams
Tammi R. Williams
Personal Representative
Estate of ROBERT L. PFEÌFER
Claims should be sent to:
JANET MAGELKY
CLERK OF COURTS
HAAKON COUNTY
P.O. BOX 70
PHÌLÌP, SD 57567
(605) 859-2672
Copy to:
Mark W. Walters, Attorney at Law
1818 W. Fulton St., Ste. 101
Rapid City, SD 57702
(605) 348-3390
Fax (605) 348-3367
[Published March 21, 28 & April 4, 2013,
at the total approximate cost of $67.57]
Proceedings of the
Town of MidIand
REGULAR MEETING MINUTES
MARCH 12, 2013
The Town Board of the Town of Midland
met on Tuesday, March 12, 2013, at 7:00
PM in the Town Hall with the following
members present: Diana Baeza, Jared
Fosheim, Rock Gillaspie, Finance Officer
Michelle Meinzer and Utilities Operator
Lawrence Stroppel.
Also present: Ken Standiford and Pat
Foley.
Minutes from the February 12, 2013,
meeting were approved as published.
Finance Officer presented Board with the
Legislative Audit. Motion by Fosheim,
second by Gillaspie to approve this audit.
Motion by Fosheim, second by Gillaspie
to approve plat which was brought before
the Board by Sheldon Sturgis, represent-
ing Performance Seed Co. Motion carried
by all members.
RESOLUTION # 2013-01
RESOLUTION TO APPROVE
THE PLAT OF PERFORM-
ANCE SEED OUTLOT 1 & 2
LYING IN THE SE¼ SE¼,
SECTION 6, T1N, R25E, BHM,
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH
DAKOTA.
WHEREAS, the plat of the
above described property has
been executed according to
statute,
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED that the Town
Board, in and for the Town of
Midland, does hereby approve
the plat:
PLAT OF PERFORMANCE
SEED OUTLOT 1 & 2 LYING
IN THE SE¼ SE
1
´4, SECTION
6, T1N, R25E, BHM, HAAKON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA
Dated this 12th day of March,
2013.
Diana Baeza, President
Attest:
Michelle Meinzer, Finance Of-
ficer
Finance Officer received one (1) petition
from Rock Gillaspie for office of Trustee.
Discussed lighting at Town Park. Request
was made to increase lighting in order for
more events to be held in the evenings.
Board will look into options.
Discussed Equalization Board meeting.
This meeting will be held on Monday,
March 18, 2013, at 3:00 PM in the Town
Hall.
Annual District Meeting will be held in
Murdo on April 16, 2013. Baeza, Meinzer
and Gillaspie plan to attend.
Pre-construction meeting will be held in
Pierre on Monday, March 18, 2013, re-
garding DOT bridge work on Hwy 63
south of Midland. Fosheim and Stroppel
plan to attend.
Discussed Ordinance violations. An
abatement letter created by our attorney
to enforce our Ordinances will be sent
out.
Stroppel gave his utility operator`s report.
Topics discussed were hot water heat
lines, weed applicator`s certification, map-
ping of water and sewer lines, trees that
have been cut down, brooming of streets,
upcoming DOT bridge repairs, water tank
street repairs and sewer questions.
Motion was made by Fosheim, second by
Gillaspie to pay the following claims:
Anthony DeRungs, Water Deposit Re-
fund ...........................................65.00
Dakota Mill & Grain, Supplies........23.00
Lawrence Stroppel, Wages/
Mileage.................................1,908.42
Lawrence Stroppel, Insurance, Phone,
Vehicle.....................................500.00
Michelle Meinzer, Wages/
Phone..................................... 664.92
Electronic Federal Tax Payment, Em-
ployee Tax ...............................849.11
Ernie`s LLC, Supplies..................109.00
Golden West, Phone/Internet ......817.82
Heartland Waste Management Refuse,
Service .................................1,296.00
Konst Machine & Welding, Manhole
Cover.......................................118.13
Mid-American Research, Chemical Sup-
plies.........................................931.75
Midland Food & Fuel, Fuel ..........210.01
Nemec Construction LLP,
Repairs....................................153.00
Pioneer Review, Publications........59.93
Postmaster, Stamps ......................92.00
SD Assn. of Rural Water,
Registration.............................150.00
SD Dept. of Revenue, Lab Fees ...26.00
SD One Call, Message Fees...........1.11
SD Retirement System,
Retirement...............................307.00
SD State Treasurer, Sales Tax ......95.04
USA BlueBook, Supplies.............295.62
West Central Electric, Electric
Supply ..................................1,103.86
WR/LJ Rural Water Supply, Water
Supply .................................... 837.50
SD Municipal League,
Registration...............................60.00
There being no further business to come
before the Board, the meeting adjourned.
Diana Baeza, President
Michelle Meinzer, Finance Officer
[Published March 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $64.33]
Notice of
ResponsibiIity to
ControI
Noxious Weeds and
DecIared Pests
NOTÌCE ÌS HEREBY GÌVEN this 18th
day of March, 2013, pursuant to SDCL
38-22 as amended to all owners, occu-
pants, agents and public officials in
charge of lands in Haakon County, South
Dakota, that they are responsible for the
suppression, control and eradication of
noxious weed and declared pest infesta-
tions that may exist on such lands.
Chemical, biological and/or cultural con-
trol methods used for the suppression,
control and eradication of noxious weed
and declared pest infestations shall be
those approved for such purposes by the
Haakon County Weed and Pest Supervi-
sor, County Extension Educator or the
South Dakota State University Experi-
ment Station.
Upon failure to observe this notice, the
county weed and pest board is required
to proceed pursuant to the law and have
the noxious weeds or declared pests de-
stroyed by such methods as they may
find necessary, the expense of which
shall constitute a lien or be entered as a
tax against the land, and be collected as
other real estate taxes are collected, or
by other means as provided by law.
Plants and animals designated as being
noxious weeds and declared pests in the
state of South Dakota are Leafy spurge,
Saltcedar, Perennial sow thistle, Russian
knapweed, Hoary cress, Canada thistle,
Purple loosestrife and Gypsy moth.
NOTÌCE ÌS HEREBY GÌVEN that upon
establishing probable cause to believe a
noxious weed or declared pest infestation
exists upon any property in Haakon
County, a representative of the Haakon
County Weed and Pest Board will enter
upon said property for the purpose of in-
specting and confirming that such infes-
tation actually exists.
/s/Virgil Smith
Haakon Co. Weed & Pest Supervisor
605-544-3263
[Published March 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $37.69]
LegaI Advertising DeadIine: Fridays at Noon
Send to: ads@pioneer-review.com
First NationaI Bank in PhiIip
Report of Condition
31 December 2012
RESOURCES:
Cash & Due From Banks .......................................................................$3,303,000.00
Federal Funds Sold..............................................................................$25,500,000.00
United States Bonds ............................................................................................$0.00
U.S. Agency Bonds ..............................................................................$36,200,000.00
State & Municipal Bonds......................................................................................$0.00
Other Ìnvestments..................................................................................$3,592,000.00
Federal Reserve Bank Stock ......................................................................$48,000.00
Loans & Leases (Net) ..........................................................................$99,993,000.00
Bank Premises & Equipment .................................................................$1,813,000.00
Other Assets...........................................................................................$8,548,000.00
TOTAL RESOURCES........................................................................$178,997,000.00
LIABILITIES:
Capital Stock.......................................$800,000.00
Surplus................................................$800,000.00
Undivided Profits............................$20,277,000.00
Market Value Adj.-Sec.........................$677,000.00
TOTAL CAPÌTAL ACCOUNTS .............................................................$22,554,000.00
Other Liabilities ......................................................................................$2,683,000.00
Deposits .............................................................................................$153,760,000.00
TOTAL LIABILITIES..........................................................................$178,997,000.00
[Published March 21, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $22.56]
[Published March 21, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $337.90]
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Maroh 21, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
EXHIBIT I
HAAKON COUNTY
STATEMENT OF NET POSITION
December 31, 2012
GovernmentaI Business-Type
Activities Activities TOTAL
ASSETS:
CASH & CASH EQUÌVALENTS............................1,169,892.45 ................................................................................................................................................1,169,892.45
ÌNVESTMENTS
RESTRÌCTED CASH & CASH EQUÌV.
RESTRÌCTED ÌNVESTMENTS
TOTAL ASSETS ...........................................................1,169,892.45 ................................................................................................................................................1,169,892.45
NET POSITION:
Restricted for:
RESTRÌCTED - CAPÌTAL PROJECTS
RESTRÌCTED - DEBT SERVÌCE
PERMANENTLY RESTRÌCTED
RESTRÌCTED - OTHER PURPOSES......................610,469.54 ...................................................................................................................................................610,469.54
UNRESTRÌCTED NET ASSETS......................................559,422.91 ...................................................................................................................................................559,422.91
TOTAL NET POSITION................................................1,169,892.45 ................................................................................................................................................1,169,892.45
EXHIBIT II
HAAKON COUNTY
STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES
December 31, 2012
Program Revenue Net (Expense) Revenue and
Changes in Net Assets
Charges for Op. Grants & Cap. Grants & GovernmentaI Business-Type
Functions/Programs Expenses Services Conributions Contributions Activities Activities TotaI
Primary Government:
Governmental Activities:
General Government .........573,822.60......................66,674.46................1,853.21 .......................................................(505,294.93) ...........................................(505,294.93)
Public Safety......................219,850.49........................3,300.78......................................................................................(216,549.71) ...........................................(216,549.71)
Public Works......................907,979.17 ..................................................607,102.52 .......................................................(300,876.65) ...........................................(300,876.65)
Health and Welfare ..............72,674.84........................2,697.61........................................................................................(69,977.23) .............................................(69,977.23)
Culture & Recreation ...........29,590.34 ..............................................................................................................................(29,590.34) .............................................(29,590.34)
Conserv. Nat. Resources.....39,532.04 ..............................................................................................................................(39,532.04) .............................................(39,532.04)
Urban & Economic Devel.
Debt Service ........................41,987.28 ..............................................................................................................................(41,987.28) .............................................(41,987.28)
TotaI Business-Type: .......1,885,436.76......................72,672.85.................608,955.73 ...............................................(1,203,808.18).........................................(1,203,808.18)
TotaI Primary Gov't. .........1,885,436.76......................72,672.85.................608,955.73 ...............................................(1,203,808.18).........................................(1,203,808.18)
GeneraI Revenues:
Taxes:
Property Taxes.............................................................................................................................................................1,153,748.51 ...........................................1,153,748.51
Wheel Tax.........................................................................................................................................................................61,305.15 ................................................61,305.15
911 Surcharge ..................................................................................................................................................................31,190.73 ................................................31,190.73
State Shared Revenues........................................................................................................................................................42,939.19 ................................................42,939.19
Grants & Contributions ...........................................................................................................................................................9,360.00 ..................................................9,360.00
Unrestricted Ìnvestment Earnings...........................................................................................................................................8,454.68 ..................................................8,454.68
Debt Ìssued
Miscellaneous Revenue..........................................................................................................................................................9,617.79 ..................................................9,617.79
Special Ìtems
Extraordinary Ìtems
Transfers ............................................................................................................................................................................(10,000.00)..............................................(10,000.00)
TotaI GeneraI Revenues & Transfers ...........................................................................................................................1,306,616.15 ...........................................1,306,616.15
Change in Net Position ....................................................................................................................................................102,807.87 ..............................................102,807.87
Net Position - Beginning..................................................................................................................................................860,556.45 ..............................................860,556.45
Change -
NET POSITION - ENDING.................................................................................................................................................963,364.32 ..............................................963,364.32
[Published March 21, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $179.80]
CroofIngs from sunny, cooI, dry
norfhonsf Hnnkon Counfy. W-I-Þ-
Ð hns bocomo n four Ioffor word
fhoso µnsf fow wooks, buf rnIn nnd
snow hns boon nbsonf. ThIs µnsf
wookond, somo nrons fo our soufh
rocoIvod n doso of much noodod
honvy, wof snow, nnd hoµofuIIy our
furn for moIsfuro wIII como soon.
Thoso dry condIfIons nro bocomIng
vory worrIsomo. I guoss nII wo cnn
do Is kooµ hoµIng nnd µrnyIng. !nsf
wook, wo hnd n couµIo of wnrm
dnys, whIch of courso µuf mo In fho
gnrdonIng mood. If Is foo onrIy fo
do much gnrdonIng, buf I wns nbIo
fo bo oufsIdo cIonnIng fIowor bods
nnd chockIng fo soo whIch µInnfs
woro uµ. So fnr, nf my houso, somo
of fho fuIIµs nro uµ, nIong wIfh
dnyIIIIos nnd IrIs. Tho sodum Is
nbovo ground, nIong wIfh somo of
fho ofhor nnnunI fIowors. Ono
noIghbor snId sho wns runnIng
wnfor In sµofs, hoµIng fo gIvo fho
µInnfs n fIghfIng chnnco. I fhInk I
nood fo gIvo fho nsµnrngus nnd
rhubnrb n drInk, nIong wIfh fho
wInfor onIons. I nm ronIIy IookIng
forwnrd fo frosh sµrIng voggIos! My
noIghbor nIso snId fhnf hor grnnd-
chIIdron snw n fow smnII grnsshoµ-
µors movIng nround on fhoso wnrm
dnys, so I hoµo fhIs coIdor wonfhor
Is µrovIng fnfnI fo fho hoµµors. I
nIso found n bunch of boxoIdor bugs
fhnf ovIdonfIy hnd wInforod nonr
fho foundnfIon of my houso fhoy
gof n shof of bug sµrny, whIch
soomod fo fnko cnro of fhom. I nm
gonornIIy nof ono fo ndvocnfo donfh
nnd dosfrucfIon, buf whon If comos
fo fho gnrdon, fho µosfs boffor sfny
nwny!
If sooms fhnf mosf ovoryono In
fho communIfy Is busy wIfh cnIvIng
ncfIvIfIos fhoso dnys. Tho cnIvIng
dufIos curfnII socInI ncfIvIfIos nnd
kooµ my noIghbors oufsIdo nwny
from fho µhonos, so nows mny bo n
IIffIo shorf fhIs wook.
Todny, ns I wrIfo fhIs nows, If Is
ÞnfIonnI Ag Ðny. Thnnk goodnoss
for fho mon nnd womon who mnko
ngrIcuIfuro fhoIr IIfo's work. Wo
wouId bo In sorry shnµo wIfhouf
fho food nnd fIbor µroducod by fho
fnrmors nnd rnnchors.
Ðunno nnd !oIn !osofh woro In
IIorro Insf Wodnosdny. ThoIr son,
!hoff, wns workIng In fho IIorro
nron, so ho showod fhom hIs job-
sIfo nnd fhon fhoy onjoyod suµµor
fogofhor. If Is cnIvIng sonson nf fho
!osofh rnnch, so fhoy nro sfnyIng
cIoso fo homo.
ÐIck nnd Cono Hudson woro In
IIorro Insf Tuosdny. WhIIo fhoro,
fhoy fook fImo fo onjoy n nIco vIsIf
wIfh !II IrIggs nf hor homo.
Wodnosdny fhoy woro In !nµId
CIfy fo hnvo n chockuµ wIfh Cono's
oyo surgoon. Cono confInuos fo
honI woII from hor roconf surgory,
whIch Is good nows. Snfurdny, ÐIck
nnd Cono woro In IIorro fo wnfch
fho IocnI II gun fonm comµofo In
n mnfch fhoro. Sundny, fhoy woro
In MIdInnd fo nffond church nnd
onjoy fho Sodor monI.
ÞoIs nnd Ðorofhy InuIson woro
In IIorro Insf Thursdny, µIckIng uµ
"cow nnd humnn grub," nccordIng
fo Ðorofhy. IrIdny, !nndy Þomoc
nnd hIs hoIµor µuf In n now door on
fho onsf sIdo of InuIson's houso.
Ðorofhy wns suro gInd fhnf fhoy
gof If dono, bocnuso fho onsf wInd
wns nof µIonsnnf. Mondny, Ðorofhy
wns In IIorro fo kooµ nn nµµoInf-
monf.
!nsf IrIdny, IIIIy nnd ArIyno
hnd n vIsIf from Joo IIroufok. Joo
IIvos In MIssourI, nnd ho Is n
brofhor of Ðnn IIroufok. Thoy on-
joyod suµµor nnd n fow gnmos of
crIbbngo. Sundny, IIIIy nnd ArIyno
nffondod church nnd fho Sodor
monI nf MIdInnd.
I'm hnµµy fo roµorf fhnf ÐnvId
Hnnd Is bnck homo ngnIn, foIIowIng
nnofhor sfny In fho !nµId CIfy hos-
µIfnI. ÐnvId hnd somo comµIIcn-
fIons foIIowIng hIs honrf Issuos
onrIIor, so fho docfors gof hIm bnck
on frnck nnd µIncod n couµIo moro
sfonfs. Ho Is doIng woII now, whIch
Is gronf nows!
CInrk nnd Cnrmon AIIomnn
hnvon'f mndo much nows fhIs
wook, buf fhoIr dnughfor, KoIIy,
nnd hor husbnnd, Anfhony ÞoIson,
nro hnvIng nn ndvonfuro. KoIIy nnd
Anfhony nro curronfIy vncnfIonIng
In !omo whnf nn oxcIfIng fImo fo
bo fhoro! I'm suro fhoy nro mnkIng
Iofs of momorIos!
Mnx nnd Joyco Jonos woro In
Irosho IrIdny. Joyco hnd µInnnod
fo go fo Crofon ovor fho wookond,
buf fho wonfhor condIfIons cnusod
hor fo rofhInk hor µInn. Thoy nro
hnvIng quIfo n bIf of wInfor In fhnf
µnrf of fho sfnfo. Tho good nows nf
fho Jonos' homo Is fhnf fho sIdIng
nnd wIndows µrojocf Is comµIofod!
!on nnd HoIon IockwIfh ro-
furnod homo Insf wookond foIIow-
Ing funornI sorvIcos for HoIon's
fnfhor, !oo Cobhnrf, IIkfon. Mr.
Cobhnrf µnssod nwny nf fho ngo of
95, nnd ho IIvod n good, fuII IIfo. Ho
onjoyod good honIfh uµ unfII fho
µnsf fow wooks. Ho IIvod In hIs own
homo unfII fho fnII of 20ll, fhon ho
wns In nn nssIsfod IIvIng fncIIIfy
unfII fhroo dnys boforo hIs donfh.
!oo hnd 3? grnndchIIdron nnd ?4
gronf-grnndchIIdron, wIfh sIx moro
on fho wny! As you cnn ImngIno, If
wns n vory Inrgo funornI. My con-
doIoncos fo !on nnd HoIon nnd
fhoIr fnmIIy.
Chnso nnd KoIIy IrIggs hnvo
boon sfnyIng cIoso fo homo, fnkIng
cnro of IIvosfock nnd donIIng wIfh
sonsonnI coIds. WIfh fhroo smnII
chIIdron, I'II bof fhoy go fhrough n
Iof of fIssuos!
IIII nnd IoIIy Iruco sµonf sov-
ornI dnys In IIorro Insf wook so IIII
couId hnvo donfnI work dono. Snf-
urdny, noIghbors ÞoIs nnd Ðorofhy
InuIson cnmo fo vIsIf, nnd fhoy
broughf somo µofnfoos fo shnro
from Insf yonr's croµ. Sundny, IIII
nnd IoIIy nffondod church In MId-
Innd. Thoy hnd Iunch In fho IocnI
cnfo boforo rofurnIng fo fho rnnch.
!nymond nnd Þnncy Þouhnusor
koµf busy wIfh sonIor confor ncfIv-
IfIos nnd cnrd µInyIng Insf wook.
IrIdny, Þnncy nnd n couµIo of
frIonds nffondod n CnffIowomon's
moofIng In MIfchoII. Tho moofIng
wns hoId nf MIfchoII Toch cuIInnry
fncIIIfIos. Tho CnffIowomon nro
workIng wIfh fho cuIInnry sfnff fo
IncIudo moro boof In fhoIr frnInIng.
IrIdny ovonIng, !ny nnd Þnncy
hnd suµµor nf fho Iznnk WnIfon.
ÐurIng !onf, fho Ikos hnvo fIsh
dInnors on IrIdny nIghfs. Ovor fho
wookond, !ny nnd Þnncy onjoyod
wnfchIng fho bnskofbnII fournn-
monfs on foIovIsIon.
Mnrgo IrIggs snId hor mnIn nc-
fIvIfy fhoso dnys hns boon rond-
Ing no wondor hor mInd sfnys so
shnrµ!
Jon nnd ConnIo Johnson woro In
IIorro Snfurdny for fho II gun
mnfch. ThoIr son, Þonh, onrnod fho
socond µInco nggrognfo froµhy for
fho oIghf nnd nIno yonr oIds, nIong
wIfh vnrIous ofhor rIbbons. ConnIo
hns boon undor fho wonfhor for fho
µnsf fow dnys hoµo sho fooIs bof-
for soon. Cono Hudson hns boon
fonchIng nf Choyonno SchooI for
fho µnsf couµIo of dnys whIIo Con-
nIo Is sIck.
!oo nnd Mnry IrIggs sµonf sov-
ornI hours wIfh !oo's mofhor, !II
IrIggs, IrIdny. Thoy nIso vIsIfod
wIfh !nno nnd Sonjn IrIggs. Snfur-
dny, Mnry IrIggs nffondod fho II
gun mnfch In IIorro. Hor grnnd-
dnughfor, KInsoy !IggIo, wns ono
of fho shoofors. KInsoy cnmo homo
wIfh Mnry foIIowIng fho mnfch.
Sundny, grnnddnughfor CnffIbrIo
!IggIo cnmo fo fho rnnch for Iunch
nnd n vIsIf. CnffIbrIo nnd KInsoy
rofurnod fo IIorro Infor fhnf nffor-
noon. !oo nnd Mnry onjoyod wnfch-
Ing fho hIgh schooI bnskofbnII
fournnmonfs ovor fho wookond.
Mnry's nImn mnfor, Ðuµroo, fook
fhIrd µInco In fho Sfnfo I. Mondny,
Mnry workod µnrf of fho dny, fhon
sho drovo fo CInrk fo µIck uµ hor
husbnnd, !oo, who hnd doIIvorod n
fruck fhoro. If wns n wIndy, cooI
frIµ!
Our wook horo hns boon sµonf
foodIng IIvosfock nnd fnkIng cnro of
cnIvos. !nsf Thursdny, I fook nd-
vnnfngo of fho nIco wonfhor nnd
wonf fo Kndokn fo sµond fho dny
wIfh my mofhor, !ofoy Irown. Wo
hnd n fuII dny of vIsIfIng frIonds
nnd roInfIvos, IunchIng wIfh ono of
my fnvorIfo cousIns, shoµµIng, hnv-
Ing coffoo wIfh Mom's formor co-
workors, fourIng fho ongoIng
ronovnfIon work nf fho MnsonIc
TomµIo, nnd doIng n IIffIo ynrd
work. If wns n fun dny, buf I fhInk
Mom wns rondy fo rosf by fho fImo
I hondod homo! Snfurdny nffor-
noon, !nndy nnd I hondod wosf.
Wo hnd suµµor Snfurdny ovonIng
wIfh our dnughfor, ChoIson, nnd
hor husbnnd, MIko, nnd Sundny wo
hnd Iunch wIfh son Scoff nnd hIs
fnmIIy. IoIIowIng n IIffIo vIsIfIng,
wo hondod homo Infor Sundny nf-
fornoon. Wo woron'f gono foo Iong,
buf If wns good fo hnvo n IIffIo
bronk!
ThIs wook, I nm ngnIn grnfofuI
for fochnoIogy. Ivon fhough If
mosfIy kooµs mo bnffIod, If Is nmnz-
Ing! Our dnughfor, !orI, who IIvos
nonr WnshIngfon, Ð.C., wns nbIo fo
uso hor comµufor fo wnfch hor
nImn mnfor, IIorro Covornor's, wIn
fho Sfnfo AA bnskofbnII fournn-
monf. Our dnughfor, JonnIfor, nnd
hor husbnnd woro nbIo fo somohow
µrojocf fho gnmos from fhoIr com-
µufor fo fhoIr foIovIsIon. And our
dnughfor, ChoIson, nnd hor hus-
bnnd, MIko, uso fho Skyµo fonfuro
on fhoIr comµufor fo vIsIf fnco fo
fnco wIfh MIko's µnronfs In Toxns
ovory wook. Our oIocfonIc dovIco nI-
Iows mo fo µIny scrnbbIo wIfh our
kIds, whIch Is good fun. !nforfu-
nnfoIy, nmnzIngIy fochnoIogy doos
nof oxfond fo coII µhono sorvIco nf
our µInco, buf hoµofuIIy If wIII nf
somo µoInf.
CIInf nnd !nurn AIIomnn con-
fInuo fo sfny busy, ovon fhough fho
Hnyos µIny Is ovor for fho yonr.
CnIvIng Is In fuII swIng, kooµIng
fhom vory busy. !nurn snId sho hns
boon doIng n Iof of frnIIor drIvIng fo
nnd from fown. Sho monfIonod fhnf
"µrncfIco mny novor oqunI µorfoc-
fIon whon If comos fo bnckIng uµ n
frnIIor," nnd If hns boon my oxµorI-
onco fhnf fhnf Is n fruo sfnfomonf!
!nsf Mondny, !nurn nnd AIIvyn
wonf fo fown nnd hnd Iunch wIfh
!nurn's foIks nnd hor brofhor,
Þnfhnn. ÞoIghbors ÞoIs nnd
Ðorofhy InuIson hnvo sfoµµod uµ
n fow fImos, nnd AIIvyn osµocInIIy
Iovos fo soo Ðorofhy! !nsf Thurs-
dny, !nurn nnd AIIvyn sµonf n busy
dny In !nµId CIfy, nnd IrIdny
Crnndmn Cnrmon nnd hor frIond,
!oynn MnrfIn, onjoyod boIng onfor-
fnInod by AIIvyn. !nsf Snfurdny
nnd Sundny, !nurn's µnronfs,
!nndy nnd Joy Yosf, cnmo fo sµond
fImo wIfh fho AIIomnn fnmIIy.
Mondny, CrysfnI Þouhnrfh nnd
boys sfoµµod uµ nnd µInyod for n
bIf.
Todny, I hoµo you wIII Iook
nround you nnd bo grnfofuI for
whnf you hnvo. CrnfIfudo goos n
Iong wnys fownrds ImµrovIng your
nffIfudo! Hnvo n gronf wook!
McenvIIIe News
by Leanne Neuhauser · SB?-ßßBS
by £!IzubetL "Sum" Gvosz
CommunIty News SevvIce
Of fho l4 vofornn-roInfod bIIIs
µrosonfod fo fho Soufh Ðnkofn !og-
IsInfuro fhIs sossIon, sIx woro
ndoµfod nnd nIrondy hnvo boon
sIgnod by Covornor ÐonnIs Ðnu-
gnnrd.
In fncf, fho sIgnIng bocnmo nn oc-
cnsIon, wIfh n Inrgo numbor of vof-
ornns mnkIng fho frIµ fo IIorro for
fho formnI sIgnIng of four of fhom.
Tho coromony wns hoId In fho ro-
fundn of fho sfnfo CnµIfoI, wIfh
ngIng vofornns from numorous
wnrs sfnndIng nImosf fo fho foµ of
fho mnrbIo sfnIrcnso bohInd Ðnu-
gnnrd.
Of fho four, fho bIII dosIgnnfIng
Mnrch 30 ns WoIcomo Homo VIof-
nnm Vofornns Ðny rocoIvod fho
mosf rosoundIng rosµonso from fho
grouµ wIfh choors nnd cInµµIng.
Tho ofhor fhroo sIgnod by fho
govornor durIng fho coromony In-
cIudod bIIIs nµµrovIng sµocInI II-
conso µInfos for vofornns wIfh
dIsnbIIIfIos; nIIow vofornns fo ro-
coIvo crodIf for corfnIn mIIIfnry
frnInIng nnd oxµorfIso; nnd oxµo-
dIfo IIconsos, rogIsfrnfIons nnd µor-
mIfs for sµousos of ncfIvo dufy
mIIIfnry.
Two ofhor monsuros nIrondy hnd
boon sIgnod by Ðnugnnrd, ho
nofod, bocnuso of hnvIng fo sIgn
fhom wIfhIn n corfnIn fImofrnmo.
Thoy sof nddIfIonnI workIng sfnfo
hoIIdnys: IOW-MIA !ocognIfIon
Ðny, fho fhIrd IrIdny In Soµfombor
nnd Augusf ? ns IurµIo Honrf
!ocognIfIon Ðny.
SIgnod onrIIor In fho wook wns n
bIII roInfIng fo fho dosIgn, consfruc-
fIon nnd oquIµµIng of n vofornns
homo nonr Hof SµrIngs. Tho bIII
nµµroµrInfod $4l,2?l,2l4 In fod-
ornI sµondIng nufhorIfy. Tho Soufh
Ðnkofn IuIIdIng AufhorIfy mny fI-
nnnco uµ fo $l6,365,044 of fho
cosfs fhrough fho Issunnco of rov-
onuo bonds. ThIs µrojocf hnd boon
nµµrovod durIng fho 20l2 IogIsIn-
fIvo sossIon, howovor fhIs yonr fho
fundIng wns rovIsod duo fo somo
dosIgn chnngos In fho µrojocf. Tho
bIII nIso hnd nn omorgoncy cInuso,
whIch monns If wonf Info offocf ns
fho govornor sIgnod If.
Anofhor of fho vofornn-roInfod
bIIIs, whIIo fnbIod In fho JoInf Aµ-
µroµrInfIons CommIffoo onrIIor In
fho sossIon, ronµµonrod on fho
budgof-µrocossIng dny, Mnrch 8.
Tho nmondmonf ndds bnck fho
sfnfo`s shnro of counfy vofornn
sorvIco offIcors` snInrIos, $l46,8?5.
ThIs hnd boon nxod fwo yonrs µrIor
durIng fho sfnfo`s boIf-fIghfonIng
cufs fo fho budgof. Vofornns, vof-
ornn grouµs, counfy govornmonfs,
nnd numorous IogIsInfors docrIod
fhIs ncfIon ns dIsrosµocffuI fo vof-
ornns.
Tho monsuro, ns µnssod, wIII ro-
quIro counfIos fo sook roImburso-
monf for snInry oxµonsos.
Anofhor bIII honrd, buf doforrod,
fho Insf dny In JoInf AµµroµrIn-
fIons wouId hnvo µrovIdod $2l,000
In frnvoI funds for vofornn sorvIcos
offIcors. In fho dIscussIon, fhoro nµ-
µonrod fo bo somo confusIon ns fo
whofhor fhnf wns for VSOs, or for
fho vohIcIos usod fo frnnsµorf vof-
ornns by voIunfoors.
A bIII whIch wouId hnvo mndo
corfnIn mIIIfnry rocords nvnIInbIo
fo fho µubIIc nffor fho vofornn`s
donfh wns kIIIod In commIffoo, buf
fhoso fosfIfyIng for fho bIII IndI-
cnfod If µrobnbIy wIII rofurn noxf
yonr wIfh moro rosonrch nnd bnck-
Ing bohInd If. Tho rocords nro of In-
forosf fo fhoso doIng gononIogIcnI
rosonrch, nnd curronfIy nro onIy
nvnIInbIo fo fho fnmIIIos of such
vofornns.
Anofhor bIII fhnf wns fnbIod In
commIffoo onrIIor In fho sossIon
cnIIod for fho sfnfo fo osfnbIIsh nnd
mnInfnIn nn nddIfIonnI sfnfo vofor-
nns nnd µubIIc sorvnnfs comofory
nnd momorInI µnrk In fho onsforn
µnrf of fho sfnfo. Vofornns hnd
µIodgod fo rnIso fho monoy for Ifs
consfrucfIon.
0overnor slgns number
of veteran related bllls
by Senutov JoLn TLune
In Ðocombor of 20l2, my wIfo
KImborIoy, nIong wIfh Sonnfor TIm
Johnson`s wIfo, Inrb, wrofo nn
oµInIon-odIforInI nbouf fho frusfrn-
fIons for mnny mIIIfnry sµousos In
obfnInIng n IIconso or corfIfIcnfIon
for fhoIr cnroor ns fhoy movo ncross
sfnfo IInos.
ThoIr nrfIcIo, nIong wIfh fho hnrd
work of mnny fhroughouf fho sfnfo,
IncIudIng Covornor (ÐonnIs) Ðnu-
gnnrd, µromµfod fho sfnfo IogIsIn-
furo fo unnnImousIy µnss n bIII fhIs
yonr fhnf µrovIdos oxµodIfod con-
sIdornfIon of n IIconso hoId by n
sµouso of n mIIIfnry mombor sfn-
fIonod In Soufh Ðnkofn.
WhIIo fhIs bIII Is nn Imµorfnnf
sfoµ forwnrd fo onsuro wo µrovIdo
fIoxIbIIIfy for our mIIIfnry sµousos
In Soufh Ðnkofn In mnny cnroor
fIoIds, IIconsuro µorfnbIIIfy Is nIso
µnrfIcuInrIy Imµorfnnf for fho nd-
vnncomonf of foIohonIfh fochnoI-
ogy. Ovor fho Insf sovornI yonrs,
foIohonIfh hns rovoIufIonIzod µn-
fIonf cnro by cronfIng n wny for µn-
fIonfs fo soo sµocInIIsfs wIfhouf fho
burdon of frnvoI.
Howovor, unIoss n µhysIcInn Is II-
consod fo µrncfIco modIcIno In fho
sfnfo whoro fho µnfIonf rosIdos, n
µnfIonf cnnnof bo soon by fhnf
µhysIcInn. In somo sfnfos, If cnn
fnko monfhs for IIconsIng bonrds fo
nµµrovo nµµIIcnfIons, whIch cnn
doIny µnfIonf cnro In Insfnncos
whoro n µnfIonf wouId IIko fo bo
soon by n sµocInIIsf fhnf Is nof cur-
ronfIy IIconsod In Soufh Ðnkofn or
n Soufh Ðnkofn µhysIcInn wouId
IIko fo soo n µnfIonf Iocnfod In nn-
ofhor sfnfo.
!IconsIng roquIromonfs sorvo nn
Imµorfnnf funcfIon In onsurIng
µubIIc snfofy nnd comµofoncy In n
µrofossIon. Sfnfo IovoI IIconsuro
µrovIdos confroI nnd fIoxIbIIIfy of
sfnndnrds fo bosf moof fho noods of
fho IndIvIdunI sfnfo whIIo sfIII on-
surIng µnfIonf snfofy. WIfhouf
sfnfo confroI of modIcnI IIconsuros,
fho Soufh Ðnkofn IogIsInfuro couId
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AIoxnndor (!-Tonn.), John Inr-
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sdsos.gov.
concealed permlt record
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Classifieds • 859-2516
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 12
FOR RENT
COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE
for rent in Highmore, SD, in-
cludes office, conference room,
reception area, kitchenette.
Owner pays utilities, front/rear
parking. Jan Harkless, 605-852-
3131.
LIVESTOCK
HERBER RANCH SELLING 125
Black Angus & F1 two-year-old
heifer pairs; 20 with Charolais X
calves. Philip Livestock Auction,
April 2, 2013. 605-488-0360,
605-488-0079.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper at 605-859-2516
or 800-658-3697 for details.
REAL ESTATE
Buying or Selling / Relocating or
Investing. Specializing in Farm-
land / Ranches / Recreational
Properties. Dakota Properties,
Participating with Cabela’s Tro-
phy Properties. Contact: Mike
Konstant, (605) 641-0094, (866)
914-9278.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS BLOW OUT
SALE! Early bird spring dis-
counts! Save up to 40% off on
machinery storage and shops.
Limited Offer! Call Jim, 1-888-
782-7040.
* * * * * * *
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2004 Chevrolet
2500 HD, 4x4, LS, crew cab,
short box, Duramax diesel, Alli-
son, auto, red, gray cloth inte-
rior, running boards, box mat,
hideaway gooseneck ball,
58,900 miles, excellent, one
owner. 462-6138. P15-3tc
FOR SALE: 2005 Ford F-150
XLT Super Crew Cab, 5.4 Triton
w/80,000 miles. The vehicle is
in excellent condition, just put
brand new tires all the way
around. Asking $16,800. For
more information call 433-5060,
evenings, or 685-4608, days.
P14-2tc
FOR SALE: 2004 Pontiac Grand
Prix GT, gray with gray interior,
107,300 miles, looks and runs
great. $7,000 is the asking price,
but I will consider reasonable of-
fers. Call Keith at 454-3426 or
859-2039 for information or any
questions. PR22-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
CLEAN BY DESIGN: Full service
cleaning company with years of
experience! Commercial and res-
idential. Free estimates! Top to
bottom cleaning & some paint-
ing. Skye, 516-0226.
P15-2tp
FITCH FENCING: Line your
summer projects up now! For all
your corral, windbreak and pas-
ture fencing needs, call Truett at
859-2334. PR23-tfn
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
HORSE OWNERS: Get your
colts started this spring to be
ready for summer work. Also
taking sale horses to ride and
get ready for summer sales.
Contact Jamie Willert, 441-
4407. P13-4tp
WANTED: Summer pasture for
50 to 150 head of cows. Call
Steve Pekron, 544-3202.
P12-tfn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED:
Looking to rent pasture or com-
plete ranch, short term or long
term. Also looking for hay
ground. Cash, lease or shares.
Call 798-2116 or 798-2002.
P10-tfn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease whole
ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or 859-
2059 (home). P7-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County is accepting applications
for full time Director of Equaliza-
tion. Selected applicant must
become certified as per SDCL.
Must work well with the public,
and have clerical and computer
skills. Jackson County benefits
include health insurance, life in-
surance, S.D. Retirement, paid
holidays, vacation and sick
leave. Salary negotiable. Position
open until filled. Applications
are available at the Jackson
County Auditor’s office or send
resume to Jackson County, PO
Box 280, Kadoka, SD 57543. Ph:
605-837-2422.
K15-5tc
HELP WANTED: Janitor at the
Kadoka Area School District. Ap-
plications available on the web-
site www.kadoka.k12.sd. us or
may be picked up at the school.
Open until filled. Contact Jamie
Hermann, 837-2174, Ext. 100.
EOE. K14-2tc
BADLANDS TRADING POST &
PRAIRIE HOMESTEAD: Part
time yard work & light mainte-
nance position. Very flexible
scheduling & hours. Call Heidi
at 433-5411. P14-5tc
HELP WANTED: Service Advisor
position open at Philip Motor.
Please call Craig at 685-3435 for
details. PR28-tfn
GREAT SUMMER JOB! Sales
experience preferred but will
train. Salary plus commission.
Housing is supplied in Wall. You
will make great wages, meet peo-
ple from all over the world and
have fun. Must work some week-
ends. Position available April 1,
2013. Apply at GoldDiggers on
Mt. Rushmore Road in Rapid
City or call Jackie at the factory
at 348-8108 or fax resumé to
348-1524. PW13-tfn
JOB OPENING: Full TimeMain-
tenance Director/Custodial Su-
pervisor for Haakon School
District in Philip, SD, beginning
May 1, 2013. Wage depends on
experience. Applications may be
picked up at the Haakon School
District Administrative offices or
send a resumé with cover letter
to Supt. Keven Morehart, PO
Box 730, Philip, SD 57567, or
email to Keven.Morehart@
k12.sd.us. Any questions may
be directed to Supt. Morehart at
859-2679. Position open until
filled. Haakon School District is
an Equal Opportunity Employer.
P13-4tc
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP:
Work from home. Starting $7.50
to $10.00/hour. Growth poten-
tial. South Dakota family busi-
ness, est. 2001. Must have good
computer skills. Some nights
and some weekends required.
High-speed Internet access.
Email resumé: careers@smart
salesandlease.com P12-4tp
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Several nice used
refrigerators. All come with war-
ranties. Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box
Elder, 390-9810. PR29-2tp
FOR SALE: Pheasant hens.
Ready for spring release. Con-
tact Larry for details on pricing
and delivery at 840-8097 or
843-2830. PR29-2tc
BISON FOR SALE: $4.50 per
pound. You pay transport and
processing. Call 859-3271,
evenings and weekends or 859-
2279, anytime. P13-3tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm
machinery and cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. PR27-4tp
REAL ESTATE
WANTED: Small acreage close to
Wall. I’m interested in bare land
or an established home site.
Please call 391-9162.
PR29-3tp
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 E. High
St., Philip. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
attached garage on nice corner
lot. Full basement, central air,
propane heat. Modest price. In-
quire at 859-3367, 567-3515 or
859-3249. Former home of Joy
Klima. P11-tfn
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
2 bedrooms, downtown, fenced
yard. Make an offer. Call 859-
3095 or 859-2483. P10-tfn
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge will
be added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
ing the activities of all depart-
ments: Finance, Street, Police,
Planning and Zoning, Recreation
and Public Utilities including
Electric, Water, Sewer and
Garbage. Other responsibilities
will include serving as Executive
Director to the Economic Devel-
opment Corporation and Hous-
ing and Redevelopment
Corporation. Applicants should
have knowledge of grant writing
and administration. Salary
range based on experience. Clos-
ing date is Monday, April 15,
2013. Send resume and applica-
tion to: City of Elk Point, PO Box
280, Elk Point, SD 57025. For
job description you may call
(605) 356-2141 or visit the City’s
website at www.elkpoint.org.
EOE.
HELP WANTED: Assistant Man-
ager of convenience store in
Lemmon, SD. Will assist in the
day-to-day operations of a c-
store. Please call or send re-
sume’ to Deb Stoltman,
701-223-0154; P.O. Box 832,
Bismarck, ND 58502. Salary ne-
gotiable.
THE ELK POINT-JEFFERSON
SCHOOL DISTRICT is seeking a
Family and Consumer Sciences
teacher. If interested please send
a letter of application and re-
sume to Brian Shanks, Superin-
tendent Box 578 Elk Point, SD
57025 we will also accept elec-
tronic materials at
Brian.Shanks@ k12.sd.us.
PARTS INVENTORY MANAGER
- JOHN DEERE DEALERSHIP:
Parts manager sought by multi-
store John Deere dealership op-
eration. Position currently open
at C&B Operations, LLC, a 22
store John Deere dealership
group headquartered out of Get-
tysburg, SD. Applicants should
possess the ability to manage
parts inventory over multiple
stores, lead parts sales team
marketing efforts, create and
achieve budgets in a growth ori-
ented dealership. We offer pro-
gressive marketing plans,
competitive pay, full benefit
package, including bonus plan.
Please send resume to Mark
Buchholz, buchholzm@
deerequipment. com or call
Mark 605-769-2030.
CUSTER REGIONAL SENIOR
CARE is accepting applications
for Director of Nursing. Must be
licensed as a Registered Nurse
in South Dakota. Previous su-
pervisory/management experi-
ence in long term care preferred.
Excellent benefits; salary based
on experience. Please contact
Veronica Schmidt (605) 673-
2229 ext. 109 or Joey Carlson at
(605) 673-2229 ext. 110 for
more information. Applications
may be submitted on-line at
www. regionalhealth.com.
EOC/AA.
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
Rent This Space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
Rent This Space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
EMPLOYMENT
LAKE PRESTON SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, English teacher, with
coaching, opened 3-12-13,
closes 3-29-13, Contact: Tim
Casper, Supt, Lake Preston
School District, 300 1st St. NE.
tim.casper@k12.sd.us, 605-847-
4455.
CITY ADMINISTRATOR: The City
of Elk Point, SD (pop. 1,939) is
seeking an individual to fill the
position of City Administrator. A
BA (Master’s Preferred) Degree
in Public Administration, Busi-
ness or related field and have
three to five years of municipal
administrative or finance experi-
ence is required. Responsibilities
include supervising and direct-
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Pioneer Review
Classifieds
$6.50/week
… up to 20 words;
10¢ per word there-
after. Fill out the
form below & mail
your classified and
payment to:
The Profit
PO Box 788
Philip, SD 57567
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Classified
Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 min-
imum for first 20 words; 10¢ per
word thereafter; included in the
Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The
Pennington Co. Courant, as well
as on our website: www.pioneer-
review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems,
Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum
for first 20 words; 10¢ per word
thereafter. Each name and initial
must be counted separately. In-
cluded in the Pioneer Review and
the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
minimum for first 20 words; 10¢
per word thereafter. Each name
and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Printed only in the Pio-
neer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for
bookkeeping and billing on all
charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per
column inch, included in the Pi-
oneer Review and the Profit.
$5.55 per column inch for the Pi-
oneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which
makes it illegal to advertise “any preference,
or discrimination on race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation, or
discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is a vi-
olation of the law. Our readers are informed
that all dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal opportunity
basis.
Pioneer Review
Ad deadline:
Tuesdays
11:00 a.m.
* * *
Profit Ad
Deadline:
Fridays at Noon
* * *
859-2516
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups) Apartments
carpeted throughout, appliances
furnished, laundry facilities available.
SENECHAL APARTMENTS:
1 Bdr. This is Elderly 62+,
Disabled and Handicap Housing
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
FOR SALE:
1998 Ford Expedition XLT 4x4
Cloth Seats, Good Tires
Power Windows & Locks
$3,750
Call 685-8155
1788 +/- Acres Just North of Philip
Call Rick at 605-641-1987
Community
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 13
Whatever you’re
aiming for —
business
opportunities,
a new car or home,
investment strategies —
you can’t miss with
the Profit.
859-2516 • Philip
NOTICE
Is your roof one that needs reshingled?
Now is the time to buy your shingles. Most major
shingle companies are taking a 22-25% increase April 1st.
Moses Building Center just purchased several loads of shingles at
current pricing. We will pre-sell these before the increase and
store them for you. Give us a call – we’ll measure your roof
and give you a quote!
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY 73 • 859-2100 • PHILIP
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
GeorGe’s
Welding & Repair
• DOT Inspection
• Complete Trailer Repair
• Full Line of Bearings & Seals
• Tractor Front End & Spindles
• Selling New Steel
• Recycling Outlet
• Refrigration & A/C on Commercial,
Residential & Vehicles
• ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
George: 441-3607 • Lee: 441-3606
DennIs
859-2970 • Philip
Grindstone
(continued from page 7)
Warren and Shirley Sweezy were
down to spend time with Donna
Newman and to attend the Hayes
play. They came and had lunch,
then attended the play and re-
turned for supper. Donna had in-
vited other guests for supper and
visiting also, including Don and
Donna Olivier and a relative of
Don’s, Mike and Evalou Litenburg,
Chuck and Ruth Carstensen, Mike
and Debbie Clements. After a deli-
cious meal, they all enjoyed playing
cards.
Happiness often sneaks in a door
you didn’t know you left open. –
John Barrymore
Many people have the wrong idea
of what constitutes true happiness.
It is not attained through self-grat-
ification, but through fidelity to a
worthy purpose. – Helen Keller
Thirty volunteers, all students
from the North Dakota State Uni-
versity, Fargo, N.D., spent their
spring break working their way to
Denver. One of the stops en route
was in Philip, Friday night March
8 and Saturday morning March 9.
For a floor to sleep on, the stu-
dent group donated several hours
of labor. Pastor Kathy Chesney
was the liasion in Philip, directing
smaller groups of workers to vari-
ous chores around the town. Some
did plaster work, some painted and
some worked at the softball/base-
ball complex. The city or other or-
ganizations provided the tools and
materials, the students provided
the labor.
The Pay It Forward Tour, with
its motto of “Students today, lead-
ers forever,” has several different
tours with different destinations
each year. The program literature
describes it as a multi-day, multi-
city experience that engages stu-
dents in service and leadership,
travel to and service in a new city
each day, learning about social is-
sues, building lasting relation-
ships, and making a commitment
to continued action when they re-
turn home.
The group that came through
Philip planned to spend Saturday
afternoon at Mount Rushmore. For
major stops, it had already been to
Beach, N.D., and was scheduled to
visit Livingston, Mont., Arco,
Idaho, Provo, Utah, Glenwood
Springs, Colo., and finally Denver,
Colo.
One of the volunteers summed
up her reason for joining the tour
was that she couldn’t think of a
better way to see the country and
meet new people. The group was
led by four student core leaders,
and some of the group had been on
previous tours.
UND Pay It Forward in Philip
One small group of college students helped replaster a section of interior wall of the United Church, while another group
helped paint interior walls. Others helped around town, particularly the solfball diamonds. Considering the cold, windy day,
interior jobs were preferred. Photos by Del Bartels
The 105th annual dance sponsored by the Philip Volunteer Fire Department was
held Friday, March 15, at the Philip American Legion Hall. From 8:00 p.m. to mid-
night, the band DeLa Cruz entertained dancers and listeners. “The dance turned
out great. Everything went good,” said Trace O’Connell, one of the main coordi-
nators of this PVFD fundraiser. He said that the turnout was about average. Quite
a few of the kids stayed around until fairly late. O’Connell noted that one of the
band member’s kids fell asleep in his guitar case. Shown is the beginning of the
evening when the youth were helping to get the band warmed up.
Photos by Del Bartels
Annual fireman’s dance
Gloria French and Lee Schoniger limbering up as the band DeLa Cruz began the
firemen’s dance, March 15.
Faith and Jasmine Schultz getting the evening started at the Philip Volunteer
Fire Department’s firemen’s dance.
United States Senators Tim
Johnson and John Thune have an-
nounced that legislation to allow
construction of a visitor center at
the Minuteman Missile National
Historic Site cleared a hurdle after
it was reported out of the Senate
Energy and Natural Resources
Committee.
The legislation would transfer
approximately 29 acres of National
Forest Service land to the National
Park Service to construct a visitor
facility and provide parking. The
legislation is now ready to be con-
sidered by the full Senate.
“We worked hard to establish the
Minuteman Missile site in the late
1990s, and with my legislation, we
can ensure that many more South
Dakotans and tourists from around
the world can learn about this his-
toric site,” said Johnson, a member
of the Energy and Natural Re-
sources Committee. “I am glad the
full committee approved this legis-
lation and it can now be brought to
the Senate floor for consideration.”
“The Minuteman Missile Na-
tional site is a reminder of the his-
toric and important role that South
Dakota played in the Cold War
arms race,” said Thune. “Providing
additional land to the Minuteman
Missile site to be used for the devel-
opment of a visitor’s center will
make a piece of South Dakota’s
past more accessible to students of
history from around the globe. I
look forward to working with my
colleagues on both sides of the aisle
to move this important legislation
through the Senate.”
The launch control facility and
missile silo that make up the Min-
uteman Missile National Historic
Site were preserved to illustrate
the history of the Cold War and the
role the Air Force’s Minuteman II
Missile defense system played in
efforts to preserve world peace. The
Minuteman Missile consists of the
Delta-01 Launch Facility and the
Delta-09 Missile Silo, located about
11 miles from one another on Inter-
state 90.
The legislation builds upon a bill
passed in 1999 that established
Minuteman Missile as a National
Historic Site, which required that
two sites be evaluated as potential
locations for a visitor center. The
land transfer provided in the bill
would allow for the construction of
a visitor center and administrative
facility at Exit 131 off of I-90. The
bill would also transfer 3.65 acres
near the missile silo for visitor
parking and other administrative
uses. Congress provided funding
for the construction of the visitor
center when the site was estab-
lished.
Johnson and Thune reintroduced
the Minuteman Missile National
Historic Site Boundary Modifica-
tion Act (S. 459) on March 5.
Minuteman Missile bill can now
be considered by full Senate
Be a Hero and Run for a Cause
at the 27th annual Spearfish
Canyon Half Marathon and 5K
Walk
The Court Appointed Special Ad-
vocate half marathon and 5K
run/walk is scheduled for Satur-
day, July 13, in Spearfish Canyon.
The race is an annual fundraiser
benefiting abused and neglected
children in northwestern South
Dakota through the Northern Hills
Area CASA child advocacy pro-
gram.
Over 400 participated in the
walk/ run events last year.
New to the race is the heroes 5K
walk/run team events. Coworkers,
friends and family are encouraged
to create a team of four or more
members. Teams can dress up to
showcase their company to vie for
the team spirit award.
Awards will be given to the team
with the most members and the
team with the fastest collective
time based on their top three run-
ners. For participants who want to
do more to support the NHCASA
organization, the superhero award
will be given to the team or individ-
ual raising the most pledges.
For individual participants,
medals are awarded to the top
three male and female half
marathon winners in eight age cat-
egories, and top two male and fe-
male winners in each age category
for the 5K. All half marathon par-
ticipants receive a participation
medal.
Participants are encouraged to
preregister online at www.nhcasa.
org or print off a registration form
to mail with your registration fee.
For more information, call the
Northern Hills CASA office in
Spearfish at 722-4558 or visit the
website.
CASA Spearfish Canyon
half marathon, 5K July 13
Governor Dennis Daugaard
signed a bill on March 8 that will
prohibit public schools in South
Dakota from signing exclusive con-
tracts for media coverage of inter-
scholastic events such as football
and basketball games.
The legislation was supported by
South Dakota Newspaper Associa-
tion and South Dakota Broadcast-
ers Association. It had been intro-
duced in response to certain
schools in South Dakota limiting or
prohibiting news media from cover-
ing high school events.
Lobbyists for the state's largest
school districts argued that the
schools controlled the broadcast
rights to school events and that
broadcasting those events on the
Internet differed from other forms
of traditional journalism.
The news organizations’ lobby-
ists told lawmakers that taxpayer-
supported public schools should not
be allowed to restrict media access
to school events and that the public
expected the news media to cover
those events. They also said that
broadcasting school events over the
Internet allowed more people to
view them.
Senate Bill 119 was approved by
the Senate on a 27-8 vote and by
the House on a 50-20 vote. It was
sponsored by Senator Mark John-
ston, R-Sioux Falls, and Represen-
tative Bernie Hunhoff, D-Yankton.
The bill becomes law July 1.
Governor signs
bill banning
exclusive media
contracts
South Dakota Farmers Union
President Doug Sombke has been
re-elected to serve as the National
Farmers Union Legislative Com-
mittee chairman.
Sombke, a member of the Na-
tional Farmers Union board of di-
rectors, was elected to the position
by his fellow NFU board members
during the national organization’s
111th anniversary convention held
at Springfield, Mass., March 2-5.
“It’s an honor to be selected
again by my colleagues to serve in
this important role,” Sombke said.
“In the weeks and months ahead
we have a lot of work to do. Our top
priority is to get a long-term fed-
eral farm bill through Congress.
We wanted to see a farm bill
passed in 2012, but now that the
previous farm bill has been ex-
tended we’ll have to work even
harder to make sure farmers and
ranchers across the country have
the business certainty that a long-
term farm bill provides.”
National Farmers Union is a
family farm organization founded
in 1902 with over 250,000 members
nationwide. The National Farmers
Union Legislative Committee is
made up of other Farmers Union
presidents from across the country.
The committee works with NFU
legislative staff in Washington,
D.C. on national agriculture issues.
Sombke, a fourth-generation
farmer who lives in Groton, was
first elected to the position in 2011.
Sombke re-elected national
legislative committee chair
Send
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review.com
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE
FEATUFINC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE & FOCHAIF ANCUS DULL SALE. WEIGH-
UPS: 10.00 A.M. ROGHAIR ANGUS: 12.00 P.M. (MT}
FEEDER CATTLE TO FOLLOW
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NAT-
UHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
JONES & SONS - 525 DLK & A FEW FED STFS;
FS,NI,CFEEN ...................................................550-650=
PARSONS - 400 DLK & FED LIMM X CLVS;
FS,NI ................................................................650-800=
LONG - 250 DLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................600-700=
OLIVIER - 220 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN....................600-750=
BRUCH RANCH - 140 DLK HFFS; FS,NI.....................500=
EISENBRAUN & EISENBRAUN - 130 DLK STFS;
FS,NI,AN .................................................................750=
THOMPSON - 130 DLK DV FEPLC HFFS; FS,NI .........700=
JONES RANCH - 125 DLK & A FEW FED DV FEPLC
HFFS; FS,NI .....................................................550-650=
REEVES - 100 DLK DV FEPLC HFFS & STFS; FS,NI ..550=
RAUSCH & RAUSCH - 100 DLK CLVS; AN .................550=
GABRIEL EST & GABRIEL - 95 DLK, DWF, & A FEW FED
CLVS; FS..........................................................600-650=
OLSON - 80 DLK & FED CLVS; FS, HAY FED......600-625=
HAMMERSTROM - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..550=
BALDWIN - 50 FANCY DLK ANC HFFS; FS,NI .....650-750=
WELLER - 40 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI................700=
FANNING ANGUS - 33 DLK ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI .......................................................................750=
CARSTENSEN - 30 DLK STFS; FS..............................600=
RIGGINS - 25 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI ..............500-600=
BOOMSMA - 15 DLK CLVS; FS...................................500=
CARLSON & CARLSON - 8 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CE-
NETIC DULL SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M.
MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00
P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, APRIL 16: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: MARCH J9, 2DJS
A 11gÞ1 run o] bred oo111e. Lo1s o] ue1gÞ-ups on o
s1rong morKe1. Qu11e o 1o1 o] Þorses.
BRED CATTLE:
ALLEN & FLOY OLSON - BOX ELDER
11.........DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1317= .........$1,420.00
18........DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1311= .........$1,380.00
32..........DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1318= .........$1,105.00
CAROLYN ANDERS - ELM SPRINGS
17.........DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1229= .........$1,390.00
22..........DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1343= .........$1,175.00
36.......DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1376= .........$1,075.00
RICHARD JOBGEN - KADOKA
17...................DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1339= .........$1,375.00
14.....................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1451= .........$1,175.00
MIKE & ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
7......................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1229= .........$1,260.00
43..............DLK SOLID MOUTH OLD COWS 1300= .........$1,070.00
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
6......................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1116= .........$1,225.00
9......................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1223= .........$1,200.00
VOLMER RANCH - OWANKA
27.................................DLK DFED HFFS 868= ...........$1,210.00
MIKE TRAPP - MIDLAND
12..........DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1329= .........$1,180.00
12.......DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1403= .........$1,085.00
WES & DUSTIN REEVES - OWANKA
10..........DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1340= .........$1,180.00
DAN & JOHN OLDENBERG - PHILIP
5.....................DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1226= .........$1,110.00
WEIGH-UPS:
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
1..........................................CHAF COW 1665= ..............$90.00
1..........................................CHAF COW 1275= ..............$84.50
LANDON STOUT - KADOKA
1..........................................CHAF COW 1720= ..............$89.00
1..........................................CHAF COW 1350= ..............$87.00
EARL PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1...........................................FED DULL 2050= ............$110.50
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
2 ..........................................DLK COWS 1235= ..............$88.50
DONELLE COBB - RED OWL
1..........................................CHAF COW 1225= ..............$87.50
1............................................FED COW 1410= ..............$86.00
WET2 & GRUBL - RED OWL
1 ...........................................DWF COW 1400= ..............$86.50
2................................DLK & DWF COWS 1513= ..............$82.75
1............................................DLK COW 1485= ..............$82.00
3 ..........................................DLK COWS 1452= ..............$81.75
MIKE TRAPP - MIDLAND
1............................................DLK COW 1290= ..............$86.50
FRANK & SHIRLEY HALLIGAN - MIDLAND
1 ...........................................DLK DULL 1590= ............$107.50
PHIL CARLEY - MILESVILLE
1 ...........................................DWF COW 1300= ..............$85.50
1............................................DLK COW 1530= ..............$84.00
1 ...........................................DWF COW 1245= ..............$82.50
REUBEN VOLLMER, JR - MIDLAND
1............................................DLK COW 1165= ..............$85.50
HARLAN & LINDA EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
1 ...........................................DLK DULL 1895= ............$106.50
BILL SLOVEK - PHILIP
1 ...........................................DLK DULL 1620= ............$105.00
TUCKER MCDANIEL - MIDLAND
1............................................DLK COW 1455= ..............$85.00
GERAD JULSON - WALL
1............................................DLK COW 1265= ..............$84.50
1......................................DLK COWETTE 980= ................$96.00
STEVE MCDANIEL - MIDLAND
8..........................................DLK HFFTS 853= ..............$104.50
BRANDON ROCK - LONG VALLEY
1............................................DLK COW 1280= ..............$84.00
1............................................DLK COW 1440= ..............$83.50
JAMES ROCK - LONG VALLEY
2 ..........................................DLK COWS 1495= ..............$83.50
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
1............................................DLK COW 1545= ..............$83.00
BAXTER ANDERS - WALL
2..........................................DWF COWS 1308= ..............$83.00
KARL SCHUL2 - PHILIP
1 ...........................................DLK DULL 2120= ............$103.50
CLINT AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
1......................................X DFED DULL 1705= ............$102.50
DON HECK - KADOKA
1............................................FED COW 1470= ..............$82.50
MONTE WHITCHER - SCENIC
1............................................DLK COW 1395= ..............$82.50
4......................................DLK COWETTE 1003= ..............$90.00
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
1............................................DLK COW 1465= ..............$82.00
OLDENBERG RANCH - PHILIP
1............................................DLK COW 1450= ..............$82.00
ROGER & CORY FORTUNE - QUINN
1............................................DLK COW 1460= ..............$82.00
10 ..................................DLK COWETTES 1090= ..............$90.50
GORDON FLESNER - MILESVILLE
1............................................DLK COW 1490= ..............$81.50
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS - MIDLAND
1............................................DLK COW 1615= ..............$81.00
GLENN JONES - WHITE OWL
1............................................FED COW 1580= ..............$80.00
MIKE LIVERMONT - BELVIDERE
1 ...........................................DLK DULL 1745= ............$101.00
BART UHLIR - HERMOSA
1...........................................FED DULL 2045= ............$100.00
ROSETH BORTHERS - MIDLAND
12........................................DLK HFFTS 854= ..............$101.50
1 ...........................................DLK DULL 1650= ............$103.00
2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
2 ....................................DLK COWETTES 948= ................$95.50
JIM WHITCHER - SCENIC
8 ....................................DLK COWETTES 913= ................$93.50
CREW CATTLE CO - PHILIP
2 ....................................DLK COWETTES 918= ................$93.50
2 ....................................DLK COWETTES 905= ................$91.00
BO SLOVEK - PHILIP
2 ....................................DLK COWETTES 1013= ..............$92.50
PAUL ERICKSON - MURDO
1......................................DLK COWETTE 1190= ..............$90.00
NEIL FANNING ANGUS
17 DLK ANCUS DULLS..........................................AVC. $2130
HORSE REPORT
1099= & UNDEF.................................................13.00 - 26.00
1100= & OVEF ...................................................24.00 - 38.00
SADDLE PFOSPECTS ............................525.00 - 1025.00/HD
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 14
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, March 23 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, March 25 ~
1/2 lb. Cheeseburger
Basket
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, March 19 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, March 20 ~
Indian Taco
or Taco Salad
~ Thursday, March 21 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, March 22 ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Fish • Shrimp
The February meeting of the
South Dakota Student Council As-
sociation board was held in Pierre
on February 13.
This meeting was the finalizing
meeting where the board observed
and approved the leadership and
skill building workshops that will
be presented at this year’s state
convention at the end of March.
The board also finalized this year’s
convention shirt design, and dis-
cussed procedural changes to the
convention. They will be adding a
baggo tournament to the activities
night, which also includes a dance,
games, movie and a homework cen-
ter.
According to James Weaver, rep-
resentative for the South Dakota
High School Activities Association,
the board also approved a state-
wide community service project
called “Project Warm-Up.” This is a
great project designed to use 700
plus students at the convention to
make fleece blankets for children,
disabled, and elderly hospital pa-
tients. The blankets will be made
the opening night of the convention
and will be counted and dispersed
to the communities of South
Dakota on the last day of the con-
vention.
The board also sponsors a state-
wide fundraising drive that collects
money for the Children’s Miracle
Network. Last year the students
raised a little over $24,000, and the
members hope the state student
council can do the same again.
A member of that board is Philip
High School’s Tate DeJong. Other
members and their high schools
are Ryder Wilson, Wall, Brock
Gilmer, Sioux Falls Lincoln, Rae-
gan Arnoldy, Lyman, Madison
Mead, Tri-Valley, Erin Eickman,
McCook Central, Chase Conrad,
Rapid City Stevens, Mason Wen-
zel, Mitchell, Jasmin Fosheim, T.F.
Riggs, Pierre, Morgan Jones, Mil-
bank, Monica Peacock, Dakota Val-
ley, Lewus Morgan and Brayden
Vogel, Hoven, and James Mayclin,
Plankinton.
The workshops include: dress for
success, just dance!, keys to suc-
cessful fundraising, battle of the
sexes – personal finance, drunk
goggles – the dangers of drunk
driving, high school – live it up,
publicizing with pizzazz, under
pressure?, use your passion, com-
munications, time management, ef-
fective communications, and social
media and the public perception.
Student council state board
The Easter schedule for the two
local churches in Milesville is:
St. Mary's Catholic Church an
Easter Vigil Mass will be on Satur-
day night, March 30.
Good Friday services will be
held at the Hardingrove Church on
March 29, at 5:00 pm. Easter Sun-
day church will be at the regular
time of 8:00 a.m.
An early reminder: Ann Harty
will be hosting the April meeting of
the community club on April 2, at
7:00 p.m.
Our community extends sympa-
thy to the Deuchar families on the
death of Theresa's mother, Mary
Haughian, age 87. Mary, Terry,
Mont., near Miles City, died Tues-
day, March 11. Members of the
Deuchar family attending the fu-
neral were Gene and Theresa,
Shad and Jenna Finn and boys,
Midland, Zeb and Megan Hoffman
and family, Quinn, and Dixon
Deuchar, Wisconsin. All of the
grandchildren and great-grandchil-
dren were involved with her fu-
neral service.
Saturday, March 16, the
Milesville Community Club
brought dinner in for the residents
of the Senechal. Following the
meal, some St. Patrick’s Day trivia
was shared. This is always a fun
event for all involved. The resi-
dents appreciate something spe-
cial, especially on Saturdays and
we, as club members, enjoy it as
well. Members from the club pres-
ent were Donna Staben, Tina
Staben, Linda Gebes, Ann Harty,
Karen Carley and Janice Parsons.
The local 4-H club met on
Thursday evening to prepare good-
ies for the annual Bake & Take
project. The next day several fami-
lies from the area were given plates
of delicious treats. Thank you, kids!
Weekend guests at Boyd and
Kara Parsons' were Joanne Par-
sons, Rapid City, Eric, Kayla and
Kaidyn Bastian, Pierre, Brooklyn
and Hudson Rische, Redfield, and
the Wade Parsons family. Visitors
Sunday were Jesse and Sheryl
Hansen and Byron Parsons. Brook-
lyn and Hudson stayed with
grandpa Boyd and grandma Kara
from Wednesday until early this
week when Kara brought them
back home to Redfield. Their par-
ents, Dustin and Andi, were enjoy-
ing a trip to Hawaii.
Christal (Hanrahan) Jackson
and boys, Torin and Kyson, Green-
wood, Ind., visited in the Milesville
and Philip areas several days last
week. Wednesday, they were at
their aunt and uncle’s place, Mark
and Pat Hanrahans, and they vis-
ited their mother, Debbie Hanra-
han, Thursday. They have had a lot
of moisture in their part of Indiana.
We are still waiting.
Ed and Marcia Morrison had six
of their grandchildren overnight
last Friday, including Dylan, Alec,
Hana, Jessa, Brit and Raegan.
They had a great time playing
games and having fun on the farm.
Ed reports that his dad, Clark Mor-
rison, will be starting chemo and
radiation soon in Rochester. We all
wish healing for you, Clark.
Several local kids have started
golf, now that the previous sports
have ended for the school year. In-
cluded are Carson Hamill, Brice
Hanson, Rachel Parsons, Josh
Quinn and Keagan Fitch.
Ryan VanTassel spent the
weekend with his friend, Nick
Hamill. Michael Delahoyde,
Vonda's nephew, came from
Spearfish to spend a couple of days
with the Hamills.
Glen and Jackie Radway at-
tended the State B basketball tour-
nament in Aberdeen Thursday to
watch Seth Longbrake play with
the Dupree Tigers. Friday through
Sunday, they were in Pierre, joined
by son Carey and Erin Radway,
Sioux Falls. They celebrated
daughter, Leah Ries's 30th birth-
day Saturday at the Ries home.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer were
in Rapid City Saturday and Sun-
day for the Little Britches rodeo
held at the event center. Their
grandaughter, Brittany Eymer,
participated in several events.
Casey Reder competed in the
bull riding and bareback events at
the the Little Britches rodeo over
the weekend.
Debbie Prouty was a Saturday
visitor at the Miles and Erin Hov-
land home.
Jim and Adele Harty, Molly and
Owen, were guests for dinner at
Hugh and Ann Harty's Sunday.
They enjoyed the traditional corn
beef and cabbage meal for St.
Patricks's Day.
Also enjoying corn beef and cab-
bage were Jeff and Crystal
Schofield, Chase and Connor, who
were guests Sunday at Donnie and
Bobette Schofield's. Friday, Jeff
built a new deck for his parents.
Ben Stangle joined his sopho-
more basketball team for the week-
end in Aberdeen attending the
State B tournament.
Thursday night, Mark Stangle
and Anna Piroutek were among
those at the junior high school
dance in Philip.
Tanner Radway and his friend,
Rylee, spent the weekend with
Mark and Judith Radway.
I got an email from Karyl San-
dal from "sunny" California. Karyl
and Barbara Wentz flew out last
week. Karyl is visiting their daugh-
ter, Michelle and Rob Thornton
and family in Auburn and Barbara
is there with her brothers, Jerry
and John Herrman. John is in the
hospital in Placerville, where his
home is.
Bryan and Sharon Olivier, Earl,
Jodi, Rachel and Sarah Parsons,
Mike and Melody Parsons, Bailey,
Carter and Landon and Bart and I
spent Sunday with George and
Nancy Hohwieler, Bradley and Jor-
dan, at their home near Spearfish.
The Hohwielers are in Spearfish
this week during the boys' spring
break from the University of Ne-
braska in Lincoln.
Our daughter-in-law, Melody, is
having surgery Monday, the 25th,
in Rochester. Bart and I will be in
Rapid City with their kids while
Mike and Melody are gone. I won't
be writing the news next week.
Happy Easter, everyone!
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315

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