Login

Pioneer Review, January 10, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

Market
Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........$7.49
Any Pro WW .....................$6.69
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro ...........$7.61
continued on page 2
2012 in
review
10
Wrestling
10
Pioneer review
Pioneer review
$
1
00
Includes Tax
A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 20
Volume 107
January 10, 2013
Basketball
9
by Del Bartels
What used to be known as Rock
’N Roll Lanes has been sold to
Marty and Debbie Gartner by Rus-
sell “Digger” and Dorothy Hansen.
Though the transaction has been
in the works for months, the new
owners started answering the
phone as Lucky Strike on January
2.
Debbie said that buying the busi-
ness was mostly Marty’s idea be-
cause he wanted a warmer job, and
he knows how to do carpentry and
mechanics. “It’s been interesting, to
say the least,” said Marty. “I had to
work for myself, there’s no other
way to put it.” He added, “And
there’s no better place than in
Philip. I wouldn’t have gotten on
the city council if I wanted to
leave.”
Debbie said that they plan on
doing some painting, repairs and
touchups. They will keep the lanes
open during the summer, but the
hours have yet to be determined.
She has not decided if they will
serve just dinner or supper as well.
An open house under the new own-
ership is planned, though the exact
date is yet to be decided.
Digger joked that he was getting
out of the business because he was
old and broken down, and Dorothy
joked that it was time to give it up
before it dies with you. Dorothy
then seriously said, “There comes a
point in time when you need to
turn it over for new and fresh
ideas.” She added, “There never
came a day when I hated going to
work. I always enjoyed it. These
people weren’t customers, they
were friends.”
Digger agreed and added, “I’ve
got plenty to do. I don’t need to go
look for anything.”
“I had to make a decision on
going back to milking cows,” said
Marty. “Basically, this is milking
cows; a seven day-a-week business.
We’ve worked hard all our lives,
and these people are all so wonder-
ful.”
“We’ve enjoyed all the proms for
the last 22 years,” said Dorothy.
Hosting the site for some of the
after-prom activities is “for the
community. It was our small way
of giving back to the community.”
“And we’re going to continue
that, too,” said Debbie. The Gart-
ners will continue for the lanes to
be available for birthday parties
and other occasions as well. Debbie
said that there will be some grad-
ual menu changes, some she’s
going to leave as is. The six leagues
will continue, as will the kids’
league. Opening time will be 11:00
a.m. and the phone number of 859-
2430 will remain the same.
“We had a party a couple of
weeks ago and you could tell the
league kids, saying ‘shake hands
with the head pin and it’ll shake
hands with you,’ ” said Dorothy.
Marty had to repair one of the
lane motors. “No worse than I’ve
fixed before. You look at grease and
mud, and it just jumps on you.”
According to the “Second Half
Century 1958-2007” book, Philip’s
former bowling alley closed about
20 years before Russell and
Dorothy Hansen built Rock ’N Roll
Lanes in September of 1990. A
local survey by the Economic De-
velopment Committee found there
was interest for a bowling alley in
Philip. This spurred the Hansens
to open their own bowling alley.
They gutted the old ABC Motel and
added on for the lanes.
Gartners take over bowling alley
Digger and Dorothy Hansen, left, who started Rock ‘N Roll Lanes, have sold the
business to Debbie and Marty Gartner, the new owners of Lucky Strike.
Photo by Del Bartels
by Del Bartels
Because it just make sense! We
are two very similar banks – both
agricultural banks in western
South Dakota with western South
Dakota values. Both banks are
community minded, said Ray
Smith, president of the First Na-
tional Bank in Philip concerning
the FNB purchase of the Farmers
State Bank in Faith.
The name of the FSB will now be
the First National Bank in Faith.
Both banks will be under the lead-
ership of the board of directors of
the Philip bank, with Smith as
president.
“We hope to have the application
approved by the regulators by the
end of the first quarter,” said Smith
about the projected legal timeline
of the acquisition.
“We’re very pleased to be joining
First National Bank,” stated Mor-
ris Gustafson, president of the
FSB, in a press release. “Like us,
they have been focused on serving
the credit needs of local ranchers,
local businesses and the people of
our community. As our local
ranches and businesses have
grown it has been difficult at times
to meet their credit needs due to
our size.” Gustafson will fill the po-
sition of manager of the bank in
Faith.
In a letter to customers of the
Faith bank, it was stated that the
combined bank will have over
$200,000,000 in assets, the capital
of the two banks will be in excess of
$21,000,000 and the lending limit
in excess of $3,000,000. Deposits
will continue to be insured by the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corpo-
ration up to $250,000.
Emphasizing First National
Bank in Philip’s long-term commit-
ment to its customers, Smith said,
We believe that if you are not going
forward, you are going backward.
We view buying FSB as a move for-
ward. With the increased demand
on the use of technology by cus-
tomers, as well as the increased
regulation burden on cost, we feel
that combining the two banks
makes us more efficient so that we
can afford these ever increasing
costs.
Separately, the two banks have
been a part of their respective com-
munities for over 100 years.
First National Bank in Philip buys
the Farmers State Bank in Faith
by Del Bartels
This year’s one-act play by the
Philip High School drama students
for region competition will be “Dis-
covering Rogue.”
The production date for local res-
idents to view the play will be 2:00
p.m., Sunday, January 13, in the
Fine Arts Building. The region con-
test will be January 16 in the TF
Riggs High School theater in
Pierre. The top two competing
plays at regions will go on to state
competition. The state one-act fes-
tival will be January 30-31 and
February 1 at the Brandon Valley
Performing Arts Center.
“Discovering Rogue,” written by
Christian Kiley, is a searching of
her real self by the beach vagrant
and box-residing teenager Rogue,
played by three actresses. Rachel
Parsons begins the play by explain-
ing to the audience how and why
she currently lives in a box on the
beach. Her earlier alter-ego, played
by Brooke Nelson, is the searching
transition from her earlier Miss
Perfect, played by Jane Poss.
Each aspect – almost each sen-
tence – in the play can be taken for
face value, or can be a deeper ques-
tioning or what is really important
in discovering one’s self. The lines
are full of sarcasm, sadness, harsh
insight, and sometimes a self-actu-
alizing levity.
Rogue’s parents, played by
Kelsie Kroetch and Brad Pfeifle,
look at her one way. Her class-
mates – played by Josh Quinn,
Ted’Dee Buffalo, Amanda McIlravy
and Tyshia Ferguson – look at her
a different way. Her teacher,
played by Sam Stangle, sees her in
a different light. Her boyfriend,
James Fitzgerald, looks at her in
another way. Maybe the most accu-
rate view of the growing Rogue is
by her deceased cat, Fluffy, played
by McIlravy.
Rogue’s living in a box on the
beach is a great irritant to the
wealthy landowners who pride
themselves on having beach front
property. Constance, played by
Shelby Schofield, has lost the draw
of a “red checker conspiracy” and
must get Rogue to leave. “Pluck,
pointed in the right direction, can
be a great thing.” But this pluck
backfires and now two are living on
the beach. The play ends in a type
of murder that is far more serious
than other character assassina-
tions.
Laura O’Connor, director for the
Philip actors, continues her term as
chairperson for the Region VII-B
one-act contest. Region VII in-
cludes the high schools of Philip,
Rapid City Christian, Wall,
Kadoka Area, Highmore/Harrold
and White River. Competition
rules state that the stage set-up,
performance, and set strike must
not take longer than 45 minutes.
For B schools, last year’s entries
were required to be comedies, thus
for this year they must be serious
plays.
School one-act “Discovering Rogue”
At left: “We are great! Go family!” As
Miss Perfect (Jane Poss), her parents
(Kelsie Kroetch and Brad Pfeifle) idol-
ize her, keep her on a pedestal and
cheer her on. “Sometimes I feel that
my life is their hobby.” The part of her
searching for who she really is (Brooke
Nelson) questions this perfection. A
murder – “No blood or body or crime;
more of a personality exorcism” – is
needed.
Above: “They didn’t hate me or hurt me; they just ignored
me,” said deceased Fluffy (played by Amanda McIlravy) to
her owner Rogue (played by Brooke Nelson) who is searching
for who she is as a young adult. Photos by Del Bartels
At right: “Good luck ... somewhere else!” Constance (Shelby
Schofield) has lost the draw and must get Rogue (Rachel
Parsons) to vacate her box and leave the beach. The vagrant
is looking for herself, and helps Constance to fight her own
“red checker conspiracy” to also become her own person.
by Del Bartels
The king is dead! Long live the
country yokel?
The Milesville community play
this year is, of course, a comedy. It
is also a musical. “The Royal Bach-
elor” will be performed Friday and
Saturday, January 18-19, starting
at 7:00 p.m., and Sunday, January
20, starting at 2:00 p.m. in the
Milesville Community Hall.
Nina Pekron directs the acting,
with Jodi Parsons assisting, and
Marlis Doud directing the singing.
Everyone else pitches in to hate the
king, swindle the king, woo the
king or simply get the king to give
them everything.
First, King Evian (Joe Gittings)
falls from his kingship and leaves
his sceptre in the hands of the un-
likliest country bumpkin imagina-
ble Yokel (Mark Nelson). While
signing away more and more of the
country’s treasury to the “most
trusted advisor” Frederick Pilfer
(Kelly Blair), the new king discov-
ers that he doesn’t have a queen.
The search is on.
Though the royal secretary (Jodi
Parsons) has some candidates in-
stantly available, the new king
would like a younger queen who
isn’t that “saturated with life.” Five
extremely different American
women are brought in by overnight
air, and there must be a testing of
who will be queen. These ladies are
played by Tonya Berry, Christa
Fitch, Allison Pekron, Doud and
Linda Stangle. The nationally tele-
vised singing contest hits a sour
note. In desperation, a jigsaw puz-
zle solving test is held. Nothing
about the remaining contestants
seems to fit.
All the while, the deceased king
keeps returning as a fairy godfa-
ther to direct the new king to go
down that yellow brick road. No,
there are not any munchkins.
There are back up choruses of an-
gels, hillbillies, a television crew
and peasants.
And, all the while, the prince
(Jim Stangle) is trying to assassi-
nate the new king so he can be
king. “I want to be king! I want to
Milesville community musical
comedy “The Royal Bachelor”
Yep, the new country yokel king, played by Mark Nelson, is sure the fairy godfather
and former king, played by Joe Gittings, is real. Photos by Del Bartels
by Del Bartels
The Philip City Council, during
its meeting Monday, January 7,
granted the remaining building
and flood plain permits needed by
Dakota Mill and Grain for its build-
ing and railroad siding projects.
The permits had been previously
tabled several times so citizens
could research any possible flood-
ing issues. No one from the citizen
group nor from Dakota Mill and
Grain were present at this meet-
ing.
The council also granted the only
other building permit request, by
Ralph McQuirk for Redeemer
Lutheran Church to do emergency
sewer repair/replacement.
The council granted transfer of a
malt beverage license from Russell
and Dorothy Hansen of Rock and
Roll Lanes to Marty or Debbie
Gartner of the newly renamed
Lucky Strike bowling lanes in
Philip.
Bills pending totaled over
$119,597. Of this, over $84,050
went toward projects at the Philip
airport.
Annual resolutions for 2013 in-
cluded the city’s discrimination res-
olution, that the First National
Bank in Philip is the official depos-
itory for the city, the Pioneer Re-
view is the official newspaper for
city business, official paid holidays
for city employees, and for the fi-
nance officer and the deputy fi-
nance officer to purchase certifi-
cates of deposits as they deem ap-
propriate for the city.
Annual rates and fees were also
approved. These include the rates
for properties being connected to
city water and sewer, rubble site,
airport usage, swimming pool,
liquor license, as well as other
items. Fees include the fines for
speeding and other legal infrac-
tions.
Thirty-nine volunteers have
been listed to be covered with the
city for the Philip Volunteer Fire
Department.
Salaries for city employees were
set. Members of the council itself
earn $300 per quarter plus $50 per
official meeting. The mayor earns
$450 per quarter and $85 per offi-
cial meeting. For the next city
council election, petitions can begin
circulating no earlier than January
25 and must be filed with the fi-
nance office by February 22.
The next regular council meeting
will be Monday, February 4, at 7:00
p.m. in the Haakon County Court-
house community room.
Dakota Mill & Grain permits approved
E-MAIL ADDRESSES:
ADS: ads@pioneer-review.com
NEWS: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
SUBSCRIPTIONS: subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments on any news
story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the right to edit any offensive ma-
terial and also to edit to fill the allotted space. We also reserve the right to reject any or all
letters.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding Monday at 5:00 p.m.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper should be mailed
or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office. All letters must bear the original
signature, address and telephone number of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run the two weeks
prior to an election.
The “Letters” column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to express their opin-
ions. It is not meant to replace advertising as a means of reaching people.
This publication’s goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of free speech. Your
comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
Subscription Rates: For Haakon, Jackson,
and Jones counties, Creighton, Wall, Quinn,
Marcus, Howes, Plainview, and Hayes ad-
dresses: $36.00 per year (+ Tax); Elsewhere:
$42.00 per year.
South Dakota residents are required to pay
sales tax.
Periodicals postage paid at Philip, SD.
Postmaster, send change of address notice
to: Pioneer Review, PO Box 788, Philip, SD
57567; or FAX to: 605/859-2410.
Website Subscription Rate: $36.
E-mail address:
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
website: www.pioneer-review.com
Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Overcast. High of
39F with a windchill as low as
25F. Winds from the SW at
10 to 15 mph shifting to the
NW in the afternoon.
Thursday Night: Overcast. Fog overnight.
Low of 16F. Breezy. Winds from the NNW
at 15 to 20 mph.
Friday: Overcast with a chance of snow and rain
showers in the afternoon. High of 21F with a wind-
chill as low as 1F. Breezy. Winds from the NNW at
15 to 20 mph. Chance of snow 40% with accumula-
tions up to 1 in. possible. Friday Night: Mostly cloudy
with a chance of snow. Low of 5F with a windchill as low as -
8F. Breezy. Winds from the North at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of
snow 50% with accumulations up to 3 in. possible.
Sunday: Clear. High of 23F
with a windchill as low as -
8F. Winds from the
South at 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday Night: Mostly
cloudy. Fog overnight. Low of 7F.
Winds less than 5 mph.
Saturday: Overcast with a
chance of snow. High of 16F
with a windchill as low as -13F.
Breezy. Winds from the NNW
at 15 to 20 mph. Chance of snow 20%.
Saturday Night: Clear. Low of 5F. Winds
from the West at 5 to 10 mph shifting to the
SSW after midnight.
Get your complete
& up-to-the
minute
local forecast:
pioneer-
review.com
Monday: Overcast with a
chance of snow. High of 18F
with a windchill as low as -
4F. Breezy. Winds from the
NW at 20 to 25 mph. Chance of snow
20%. Monday Night: Mostly cloudy. Low
of 3F. Winds from the NW at 5 to 10 mph.
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
These bodies we run around in
sometimes cause us grief. I recall a
time in the middle of last year
when I felt somewhat like a ram-
bling wreck. There were just
enough parts of me that hurt to
make it preferable to stay motion-
less.
At the time, I was still dealing
with a heel that had been giving
me trouble for several months. It
was a condition known as “plantar
fasciitis” and involves inflamma-
tion of a band of tissue that runs
across the bottom of your foot and
connects the heel bone to the toes.
It was probably caused by slopping
around the house in moccasins
that had no proper arch support
and had also worn unevenly thin
on the bottoms. The pain was at its
worst when I got up in the morn-
ings and made me limp some for a
while.
Then, in an effort to fix things
according to Dr. K’s recommenda-
tions, I started doing an exercise
designed to bring relief. This in-
volved placing the balls of your feet
on a step and dropping the heels
down as much as possible to
stretch things. Well, that was all
fine and well and did help some,
but I obviously got too carried
away so that my one arch started
to click when I moved and then
sometimes hurt when I walked.
Eventually I learned to repeat the
exercises fewer times so as to avoid
arch problems, and to just stretch
longer at the bottom of the cycle.
Before catching on to that, of
course, I had to deal with a clicking
arch.
At the same time as the heel and
arch were causing trouble, one
sinus decided to plug up and cause
misery. Despite my home cure of
breathing in hot coffee steam and
vapors as much as possible, it still
would clog up part of the time and
cause pressure and discomfort.
Over-the-counter meds helped
some when I remembered to take
them, and the sinus behaved itself
part of the time, but still there
were times when nothing did much
good.
Adding to those things, I also
had a wrist that throbbed when I
moved it wrong, and my back had
an occasional twinge. These latter
troubles were caused by a miscal-
culation one day in leaning down to
tend son Chance on the couch. I
thought I was going to lean on the
arm of the couch when, in fact, I
was only leaning on a pillow that
was just enough off the arm to give
no support. As a result, I lost my
balance and dropped the short dis-
tance to the floor. I obviously
landed just wrong enough on the
wrist to make it complain while, at
the same time, my back got twisted
a little. Neither of these was severe
by any means, but they both occa-
sionally reminded me to move cir-
cumspectly.
As you know, time is a great
healer in many cases, and all these
things righted themselves eventu-
ally—some with help from me and
some without. The heel thing went
on for many months but is now fi-
nally gone thanks to buying arch
supports and doing exercises. The
other conditions were fortunately
brief. At present, my only com-
plaint is little cracks in the skin
around my fingernails which are
probably caused by dryness and
cold weather. I fix those by cover-
ing them with a drop of Super
Glue. That works although re-
peated treatments are sometimes
necessary. Other than that, the old
bod has been behaving itself of
late.
When I consider things in gen-
eral, however, I realize how lucky
I am healthwise. I have very little
to complain about. Although no
one is probably going to hire me as
a model for swimwear or under-
wear, this body of mine still allows
me to mostly do what I want with-
out causing much trouble. I can
walk, or even run if I want to. I can
drive. I can eat almost anything
that looks good to me and so on. I
have needed to visit doctors very
infrequently in my life. When I
look at other people around me, I
know I am very fortunate and
blessed. Certain loved ones, friends
or acquaintances have much more
to deal with than I do such as those
bothered by arthritis, worn-out
joints, chronic pains of this and
that, digestive miseries, and so on.
These complicated bodies of ours
have so many ways of going bad
that, when they are operating
smoothly, it is a major cause for re-
joicing.
So, at the moment I am, thank-
fully, not a rambling wreck—not
even close. Memories of being one,
though, may prompt me to try to
eat a little more sensibly this year
and to get more exercise. It might
be a good idea to take good care of
this body of mine so it can continue
to serve me well. Guess I’ll at least
give it a try.
THE HAAKON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY …in partnership
with the local chapter of AARP/ARTA and through a grant from the
S.D. Humanities Council, will be hosting a discussion on the book
“One-Room Country School: South Dakota Stories” on January 28,
beginning at 6:00 p.m. at the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center in
Philip. Books are available at the library and the discussion will in-
clude former Haakon County one-room schools. For more informa-
tion call the library at 859-2442.
THE GARDEN CLUB … will meet Tuesday, January 15, at 7:00
p.m. in the community room of the courthouse in Philip. Everyone
is invited.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
The Community Betterment Committee judges viewed the nominated entries for the CBC’s annual outdoor Christmas light-
ing contest. The display that took first place was the house and yard of Darin and Kelsie Naescher on Sunshine Drive.
CBC Christmas decoration winners
Second place of the entries nominated for the Community Betterment Committee annual outdoor Christmas lighting contest
went to Roger and Val Williams on W. Pine Street. Photos by Del Bartels
Third place of the entries nominated for the CBC lighting contest went to Amy Moses on W. Pine Street.
Area high school seniors can now
apply for the Golden West Telecom-
munications college scholarship.
This year, 44 $1,000 scholarships
will be awarded to students from
high schools in the Golden West
service area. In addition, students
who attend home school and stu-
dents whose parents live in the
Golden West service area but who
attend a school not included in the
program are eligible for one addi-
tional at-large scholarship. The
Golden West scholarship program
is designed to help local students
pursue degrees at vocational
schools, military academies and
universities.
Golden West scholarship appli-
cations are available from guidance
counselors at local high schools and
at-large applications may be re-
quested by calling 777 from any
Golden West telephone or by click-
ing on the scholarship button at
www.goldenwest.com/Scholarship-
Deadlines. Application deadline is
Friday, March 15.
Golden West General Manager
Denny Law said the company sees
the scholarship program as a way
to strengthen and build South
Dakota’s rural communities. “At
Golden West, we understand how
important it is to invest in today's
latest technologies, but also the im-
portance of investing in tomorrow's
leaders,” Law said. “We recognize
that the graduating seniors of
today may be the community lead-
ers of tomorrow who will help cre-
ate greater opportunity for every-
one.”
Committees overseen by each
school’s superintendent and/or
principal will select local scholar-
ship winners, while a committee of
Golden West employees will select
the at-large recipient. Golden West
scholarship recipients will be cho-
sen based on SAT or ACT scores,
high school transcripts and schol-
arship applications. In addition,
the committees will consider lead-
ership in school, civic and other ex-
tracurricular activities, personal
character and the applicant’s moti-
vation to serve and succeed.
The student’s parent(s) or legal
guardian(s) must reside within one
of the Golden West telephone serv-
ice areas and subscribe to a Golden
West service (phone, internet or ca-
blevision). When two applicants
are extremely close in qualifica-
tions, financial need will serve as a
tiebreaker.
The 2013 Golden West scholar-
ship program marks the 14th year
the Golden West Telecommunica-
tions Board of Directors has funded
the program.
Golden West scholarships
Black Hills Federal Credit Union
is now accepting applications for
their 2013 VIBZ scholarships.
BHFCU will award $1,000 schol-
arships to six high school seniors.
Eligible students must demon-
strate outstanding commitment,
leadership, community service and
academic achievement.
To qualify, applicants must be in
their senior year of high school, 19
years old or younger, and a VIBZ
member at BHFCU. The scholar-
ships can be used at accredited vo-
cational and technical schools, col-
leges and universities during the
2013-2014 academic year.
Applications are available online
at www.bhfcu.com or at BHFCU
member service centers in Rapid
City, Cheyenne River, Custer, Hot
Springs, Spearfish and Wall. Com-
pleted applications must be re-
ceived by March 1, 2013. Recipi-
ents will be announced by April 15.
The VIBZ scholarship program is
part of BHFCU’s ongoing commit-
ment to education. The credit
union provides over 100 free finan-
cial literacy programs to area
schools each year. BHFCU also
hosts an annual school supply
drive that collects and distributes
more than 80,000 school supplies to
students in need.
BHFCU VIBZ scholarships
Insatiable insanity ... by Del Bartels
The animal channel, cooking channel, humane society ads and my
high rate of metabolism are getting to me. I see, hear and imagine an-
imals everywhere, mostly as food. Someone said they had some tenta-
tive plans: tentative sounds like tentacles, which makes me think of
deep-fat fried calamari. Someone smoothly changed subjects with a
caveat; and I think it tastes good but is far too expensive, is sometimes
too salty and has a fishy aftertaste. The family dog slowly rolled over
while sleeping, and I imagined a roasting pig turning on a spit. Free
sample booths in grocery stores close up when they see me.
Don’t think of me as an animal hater. I love animals; usually fried
or roasted. Cows are hamburger on the hoof, or steaks looking for a
home, or McDonald contestants. Instead of putting corn in my gas tank
or in livestock feeders, put it on my plate. I don’t mince words, espe-
cially if there is mincemeat around. Let’s not chew the fat; let’s go di-
rectly to the meat of the problem.
The old celebrity roasts on television used to air during supper time.
A breakfast of champions is a professional football team’s airplane over
Africa crashing in headhunter territory. An announcemnt over the
fancy restaurant’s intercom, “Attention Donner Party, your table for
24 is ready; correction, Donner Party your table for 23 is ready.”
One of my sons liked cats, but also liked cat jokes. So many cats, and
not enough recipes. He had a t-shirt, purchased from the Road-kill
Cafe, on which was printed the house specialty menu. He liked his
steak medium, I like medium rare, and some people want theirs fully
cooked Joan-of-Arc style. Some establishments have a disclaimer that
well done is not their responsibility. Some fancy restaurants have their
lobster tanks as part of their decor – a meal and a show. For some rea-
son they don’t do that with beef.
Some frugal families have just their refrigerator freezer. Many, if not
most, have a chest or stand-up freezer. I would like a walk-in. Trouble
is I would be emptying it about as fast as filling it. I definitely do not
resemble the boxer Rocky working out in a packing plant freezer full
of hanging beef, but I do like tenderized cuts.
If I owned an international restaurant – before I ate myself out of
business – my menu would have tiger meat for people who don’t cook.
My take-out French specialty would be escar-to-go. My British blood
pudding would simply drip with flavor. Regretfully, my kosher menu
would be very limited, probably just pickles. My island menu would be
simple: see food and eat food. Customers would jump for my kangaroo
shish kebab. Chopsticks would be available, but so would small shovels.
My weekly wild game night would rival any dance hall or bachelor
party. People would be encouraged to walk in, and waddle out. When
was the last time you saw a skinny person at an all-you-can-eat restau-
rant? Many of those places have double doors.
Going to a Jamaican paradise versus becoming the new king by way of assassi-
nation is argued, sung and danced by bodyguard Roger Porch and Prince Daft,
Jim Stangle, in the Milesville musical comedy “The Royal Bachelor.”
be king! Wah!” His bodyguard
(Roger Porch) is assisting in the
many hilarious attempts to off the
guy.
The list of supporting actors and
actresses is a long one: Ann Harty
Connie Parsons, Donna Staben
Janice Parsons, Mark Stangle,
Sarah Parsons, Kathleen Nelson,
Paul Staben, Rick Doud, Tina
Staben, Hugh Harty, Erin Hov-
land, Father Kevin Achbach, N.
Pekron and Del Bartels.
This play includes deceit,
crookedness, backstabbing, illegal
contracts, attempted murder,
bribery ... and that’s just back-
stage.
Who will be queen? Will the new
king survive? Will the kingdom
survive? Will anyone hit a correct
musical note? In order to answer
these and other questions, you will
have to see this comedy. It is a toe-
tapper. Believe it or not, you will
even enjoy the rap music ... or else!
“The Royal Bachelor”
continued from page 1
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 3
Rural Livin’
-Pour-ons
-1vermeo11n
-Deo1omo×
-Cgdeo11n
Ncw sIi¡ncnis
of winicr
ouicrwcar,
ca¡s, coais,
vcsis!
¹c·e.
~æaa/e·¸ 5c../e ? \e.
íccæ//¸ c,·ea ? cte·æ.ea
·´´.÷·. · ¹/./.t
CoCoRaHS Update
As a volunteer CoCoRaHS ob-
server, I recently received an e-
mail from one of the key people in
the CoCoRaHS (Community Col-
laborative Rain, Hail & Snow Net-
work) network, containing some
interesting information. He notes
that it has been 15 years since the
flash flood in Fort Collins, Colo.,
(July 28, 1997) occurred that
started the volunteer rain gauge
network.
Since then it has been amazing
to watch CoCoRaHS grow and
spread. "Rain gauge champions"
have emerged in every state –
State Climate offices, National
Weather Service meteorologists,
and other weather/water profes-
sionals – to help recruit and lead
the "citizen scientists" that make
the network function.
He relates some impressive sta-
tistics for the project. 3,600,000
daily precipitation reports were
submitted in 2012 (We finally
reached our goal of more than
10,000 reports per day and even
exceeded 11,000 reports per day on
several occurrences). Approxi-
mately 18,000,000 daily reports
have been submitted since the
project began. Also, 6,000 Signifi-
cant Weather Reports, 530,000
Daily Comments, 50,000 Multiday
Precipitation reports, 1,561
Drought Impact Reports, 11,484
Daily Evapotranspiration Reports
and 3,043 Hail Reports have been
submitted.
That is an incredible amount of
information that has been com-
piled for an almost entirely volun-
teer program. Like the individual
says, CoCoRaHS doesn't "just hap-
pen". They have a small but skilled
and enthusiastic staff that makes
the whole program tick. They cur-
rently receive support from NOAA
and the National Science Founda-
tion for the educational goals of
the project. In Colorado, several
water utilities provide annual sup-
port to maintain ongoing data col-
lection. And donations are espe-
cially important as they work to
sustain CoCoRaHS.
One might take a quick look at
the CoCoRaHS website, www.coco-
rahs.org and think it’s interesting
to see where rain, hail or snow fell
around the country that day, but
what happens to all that informa-
tion? Granted, much of it never
gets looked at, but plenty of it
does, and the website is set up so
that any of the data can be easily
retrieved. I was asked earlier this
fall if I could provide somewhere
online that would show just how
little rainfall south-central SD had
received this summer. I immedi-
ately thought of CoCoRaHS and
the “View Data” feature.
For this article, I picked three
volunteer observer stations whose
reporters regularly report their
precipitation, one north of Vivian,
my station here in Winner, and a
station near Marion, also in a se-
verely drought affected area. It’s
quite remarkable that from
7/1/2012 to 1/3/2013, those three
stations received 2.42”, 2.14” and
4.53” of precipitation. That’s dry.
Consider joining the CoCoRaHS
network by visiting www.coco-
rahs.org and clicking “Join CoCo-
RaHS”.
Private Pesticide Applicator
Certification Meetings
PAT meetings have been added
to the calendar below. For a com-
plete listing, visit: http://www.sd-
state.edu/ps/extension/pat/pat-
county-dates.cfm.
Calendar
1/9: Ag CEO, 5:30 p.m. CST,
Winner Regional Extension Cen-
ter, Winner
1/11: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST, Li-
brary Learning Center, Martin
1/14: PAT, 1:30 p.m. CST/12:30
p.m. MST, Pierre, Winner, Lem-
mon & Rapid City Regional Exten-
sion Centers
1/15: Ranchers Workshop, 9:00
a.m. CST, Community Events
Center, White River
1/16: Ranchers Workshop, 9:30
a.m. CST, SDSU Regional Exten-
sion Center, Winner
1/31: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST, Pen-
nington County Extension Center,
Rapid City
2/20: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST, Wall
Community Center, Wall
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Due to the dry summer condi-
tions and lack of hay supply many
cattle producers implementing
more corn silage into their feed ra-
tions than they have in the past.
This has led to many questions on
how to properly implement corn
silage into the feed ration, said
Julie Walker, South Dakota State
University Extension beef special-
ist.
“I have received numerous calls
from cattle producers asking how
much corn silage they can use and
what is the minimum amount of
hay that a cow needs,” Walker said.
To help answer these questions,
Walker pointed to a research proj-
ect she completed at Purdue Uni-
versity which evaluated limit feed-
ing corn silage to meet the nutrient
requirements of the beef cow.
“We found that limit feeding corn
silage can be a good option for over-
wintering beef cows. As you know
corn silage typically has higher en-
ergy than the typical beef quality
hay, so the cow's energy require-
ments will be met with less total
dry matter intake of silage com-
pared to a hay diet,” she said.
However, Walker said producers
need to be aware of the fact that
protein supplementation may be
needed – depending on the protein
content of the silage.
“The specific amount can only be
determined by testing the feed-
stuffs and then balancing a ration,”
she said. “Also, with the drought
conditions this summer, it is impor-
tant to test the corn silage for ni-
trates.”
Walker’s research also looked at
replacing part of the hay in the diet
with corn. The diets were one-half,
one or two percent of the cow's body
weight as hay plus corn to meet the
cow's nutrient requirements.
“We found that the one-half per-
cent of the cow's body weight of hay
plus corn had the same perform-
ance as the two percent the cow's
body weight of hay treatment,” she
said. “At calving time the cows
were in similar body condition and
no calving problems were found.”
She pointed out that although
the one-half and one percent hay
treatments met the cows' nutrient
requirements, they did not com-
pletely satisfy their appetites. “The
cows were hungry during the adap-
tation period, and we learned the
value of good fences,” Walker said.
All of these treatments were bal-
anced for energy and protein to en-
sure the desired performance. Dur-
ing the research project, Walker
said they made sure that all of the
cows had adequate bunk space.
The rations were fed as a total
mixed ration using a mixer wagon.
Because some producers may not
have a mixer wagon, Walker said
limiting the hay supply with this
method may be difficult.
“Remember the key to success
with this program of feeding in 1)
testing your feedstuffs, 2) balanc-
ing a ration, and 3) ensuring ade-
quate bunk space,” she said. “It’s
also important that producers en-
sure their cows are on a good min-
eral and vitamin program. With
limiting feeding, cows might over
consume the recommended con-
sumption rates, so producers can
use white salt to limit consump-
tion.”
For more information contact a
cow/calf field specialist or beef spe-
cialist. For cattle producers limited
by their equipment inventory
Walker encourages them to review
an iGrow article written by Warren
Rusche, SDSU Extension cow/calf
field specialist. His article focuses
on limiting hay supply through
limiting the time cows have access
to the hay, http://igrow.org/live-
stock/beef/strategies-to-control-
hay-intake-and-waste.
Drought diets: corn silage inclusion
by Del Bartels
“They’re definitely going to yell
at you if you don’t do your home-
work,” was one response from Air-
man Allison Stahl to the third
grade students during her visit as
her younger sister’s show and tell,
Wednesday, January 2.
“I wasn’t sure what I wanted to
go to college for,” explained Stahl.
“I wanted to work on aircraft, and
I have a better chance of being a
pilot with the Navy then anywhere
else. I had a high enough ASVAB
score, I could have had any job I
wanted.”
Stahl had first visited with the
kindergarten class, where her
brother, Aidan, is a student. She
told them that, after she graduated
from Philip High School, she went
off to boot camp, then got to be a
soldier. She lives and works by the
seashore. After her specialty train-
ing, she will go “probably next to
the ocean somewhere, anywhere
they want me to go.” She added,
“They’ve been sending a lot of avi-
ation people to Japan.”
Fielding student questions, Stahl
said she has been learning naval
history, uniform regulations, to fold
clothes for a tight compartment,
firefighting and has to march only
during graduation. She will finish
her training January 17.
Stahl told her sister, Jenna’s,
third grade class that she was
wearing her Navy suit that she
wears every day. For graduation
she will wear something different,
a white thing with a different cap.
“We eat the same as you – pan-
cakes.” In boot camp, they had 12
minutes to eat. She was in the
same room as 90 other people, but
now has a room with only one other
person. She may wear makeup.
They cut girls’ hair in boot camp if
it was not short enough or if it
could not be kept off of the collar.
They work out at 5:00 a.m., start
classes at 8:00 a.m., go to lunch,
and go back to classes. “I don’t deal
with guns much.”
“If you get in trouble, you get
your freedom taken away, like you
can’t got to town or leave your
room. They always give you stuff to
do,” said Stahl. The instructors can
yell “way louder than Mrs. (Jes-
sica) Wheeler.” All of the stuff she
is learning – lots of math – can be
college credit. “We do math every
single day,” said Stahl.
Airman Stahl visits Philip Elementary
As a show and tell subject, Airman Allison Stahl visited her sister’s third grade
class and her brother’s kindergarten class. Photo by Del Bartels
Hit & Miss
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Jan. 10: Chili Day
with Beef or Chicken Chili, Pigs in
a Blanket, Fruit.
Friday, Jan 11: BBQ Meatballs,
Red Mashed Potatoes, Garden Veg-
gies, Roll, Gelatin Jewels.
Monday, Jan. 14: Tequila Lime
Chicken, White Cheddar Mashed
Potatoes, Black Beans, Roll, Fruit.
Tuesday, Jan. 15: BBQ Meat-
loaf, Cheesy Potatoes, Fried Corn,
Roll, Fruit Salad.
Wednesday, Jan. 16: Cookout
Day with Hot Dogs and Burgers,
Baked Beans, Potato Salad, Fruit.
***
January 3, 2013, Hit & Miss and
Somerset Court activities. Thurs-
day! Myron White’s daughter,
Pamela Ploog, had supper at Som-
erset Court with Myron December
31. At supper on December 31, we
had a super California chicken
sandwich. It was made with the
breast of the chicken (tender), a
slice of white cheese, bacon and a
slice of avocado on a small bun.
We had “Casino Night” on De-
cember 31, with two Black Jack
dealers and a dice table. The resi-
dents played earnestly and won
thousands of Somerset bucks.
These will buy them some nice
things at the Somerset Court June
auction. There was beer and Coke
and Sprite and assorted crackers
and cheese. There was a good turn
out. Thanks for the party, Somer-
set Court and our activity direc-
tors!
January 2, Wednesday, we had
Resident Council. Staff present
were Ryan Love, Libbi, Jason,
Shawn, Sandi and Susan. Shawn
recounted a few highlights sched-
uled for January. One item which
is not on the calendar is Dr. Con-
rad’s foot clinic visit. He plans to be
here at Somerset Court on January
22. Connie Stevens remarked that
the oyster stew was “fabulous!”
Likewise, “liver and onions” won
favor! Several residents told about
enjoying “Casino Night.” Corky
Wortman won the contest to guess
how many ornaments were on the
big Somerset Court lobby tree. He
won a tiny decorated Christmas
tree. Jim and Eleanor Holmes won
the Christmas doorway competi-
tion. Applause for these winners!
Somerset Court will have the
services of a new dietitian (Shelby)
starting in January. She will help
us select foods best for our special
needs. Let her know your special
needs.
We will have a fire drill in Janu-
ary on the afternoon shift. We are
requested to be extra careful about
driving scooters. Be sure foot sol-
diers have time to get out of the
way. Be gentle with the elevators.
They have sensitive mechanisms
that can be damaged by bumping
the door and or punching the but-
ton excessively.
January 4, 2013, Hit & Miss and
Somerset Court activities: My son,
David, dropped in at breakfast and
had a cup of coffee. He had been on
a trip with M.R. Hansen and they
drove to Albuqurque to visit their
brother, Frank, and his wife, M.K.,
and family. Frank and M.K. sent
me a pretty silver butterfly which
can be used for a key or spectacle
holder. Thanks, Frank and M.K.
Thursday, January 3, at Somer-
set Court, we had the activity of
Wii bowling. Scores were Irene
McKight, 207, Addie Rorvig, 147,
Eileen Tenold, 117, Jim Holmes,
164, Fred Smith, 121, Mary Lou
peters, 169, Irene Cox, 157, Susan,
174. Thank you, Sandi for giving
me the scores!
Thursday, bingo winners were
Marjorie Gaffin, two times, Don
Stensgaard, Doris Wellman, Mil-
dred Young, Floy Olson, Annetta
Hansen, Anne Brink. Treats for
snack and chat were apple slices
with caramel sauce. Thank you for
the entertainment and snacks!
M.R. Hansen and David Hansen
continued on their journey from Al-
buquerque to Colorado Springs
where they visited their sister,
Carol, and her husband, Al Vogan,
and their brother, Hans P. Hansen.
They ran into some snow in Ne-
braska, but in general the roads
were good. They got back to Rapid
City, January 2.
News from Philip is the obituary
of my old friend and neighbor,
Tressa (Coleman) Gabriel. I re-
member when the Orrie Colemans
moved into the neighborhood just
north of Grindstone about seven
miles. They were close neighbors of
my folks, the Rolla Palmers. Tressa
was a celebrity because she could
play the piano. I remember most,
“You Are My Sunshine.”
Darlene Baye writes from Philip,
that they had their Christmas get-
together on December 26, when her
grandson, Matthew, Chicago, could
be with them. Her granddaughtere,
Crystal Baye, brought along her
two-year-old step-nephew and he
was very entertaining.
continued on page 12
Happy 80th
Birthday
Sharon
Coyle!!
January 5, 2013
Love, Your Kids, Grandkids
& Great-grandkids
We hav e s ol d Ro c k ’ N Rol l Lane s
t o Mar t y & De bbi e Gar t ne r
Wow! The memories – 22 years, 3 months, 8
days ago on Sept. 23, 1990 Rock ’N Roll Lanes opened
its doors to be greeted by the most wonderful people who
have become extended family. We cannot thank you enough
for all of the support over the years. Our wish is for
Marty & Debbie to have the same wonderful
experience that we were so fortunate to have.
Thank you f or al l of t he Roc k ’ N Rol l i n f un!
Di gge r & Dor ot hy Hans e n
Thank You! !
Upcoming Movies:
January 18-19-20-21:
Jack Reacher (PG-13)
January 25-26-27-28:
This Is 40 (R)
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
January 11-12-13-14:
The Hobbit:
An Unexpected Journey
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
One-room Country Schools to
be topic of discussion
The library will be hosting the
first of its new Spring Lecture Se-
ries on January 28th, partnering
with the local AARP/Retired
Teachers Association chapter to
bring you an evening of discussion
on one-room country schools.
Through a grant from the South
Dakota Humanities Council we’re
able to bring Dorothy Liegl, a Hu-
manities Council scholar to Philip
to guide discussion of the book
“One-Room Country School: South
Dakota Stories” edited by Norma
C. Wilson and Charles L.
Woodard. Books are available at
the library for anyone wanting to
read it before January 28th. The
books are part of SDHC’s lending
library and must be returned to
us, but we can order a copy for
anyone who wishes to purchase
one.
The evening starts with a soup
supper at 6:00 at the Bad River
Senior Center followed by a brief
AARP/RTA chapter meeting, then
discussion on the book and our
own one-room country schools. If
you have old photos of the schools
that existed in your part of the
county, we would love to have you
bring them. Hope to see you
there.
Quote: “When you read to a
child, when you put a book in a
child’s hands, you are bringing
that child news of the infinitely
varied nature of life. You are an
awakener.” (Paula Fox)
Is it fair to keep bringing up the
old year? Well, at any rate, the
news this time is a year old – not
really, but I note that we had some
colder weather Friday, December
28, which was 2012 and around
three inches of snow. That day,
Tony Harty stopped to give me his
news and later in the day, Shelley
Seager stopped with little grandson
Ryder Seager on their way to Sioux
Falls. They settled in at the home
of Eric Seager for a few days of vis-
iting and Shelley got to spoil two
grandsons, Ryder and Eli.
Saturday bright and early, Bill
and I had breakfast out as usual
then were on the road to Sioux
Falls. The gathering place was at
the home of granddaughter
Amanda and Adam Claflin in Har-
risburg. What a feast awaited us,
the turkey fell off the bone and the
tables were set so festive. We had
an exchange of gifts and Bill and I
were overnight guests at Claflins.
Eric Seager and family and Shelley
Seager and Ryder, Chase May and
little Jaxon, Madison, all were din-
ner guests. That evening, Amanda,
Adam, Bill, Shelley, Ryder and I
went to the Falls Park to look at
the lights. There were even sleigh
rides for those dressed for the chilly
weather. (None of us enjoyed that,
but did like the team and sleigh
idea, maybe another time.)
Kinsey, Natalie and Kohen Git-
tings arrived at the George Git-
tings home Friday. Jessica Gittings
and Daniel were out for supper
that evening.
Don and Vi Moody got things
lined out at the ranch before leav-
ing for their Rapid Valley place
Sunday afternoon to bring in the
New Year. They helped neighbor
Susan Fellows with early birthday
greetings. Susan had a New Year's
Day 50th birthday party at a local
restaurant in Rapid City with most
all of her family and friends there.
Sunday, Tony Harty attended
church, enjoyed dinner out, and
visited with L.D. and Shirley Hair
during the day.
Kinsey Gittings went to town
Sunday afternoon to get Daniel to
spend a couple of nights at the
George Gittings’ home.
Sunday morning, Bill and I
loaded up great-grandson Ryder
Seager. We arrived home in good
season, and Cori and Zack Seager
arrived to relay Ryder the rest of
the way to Rapid City.
Monday, Tony Harty visited at
the L.D. Hair home then went out
for a late lunch and also to see
what was going on around town.
Roxie Gittings returned to
Eagan, Minn., New Year's Eve day.
New Year's Eve there was much
excitement at Deadwood. Bill and
Marsha ventured into one place
and ran right into Don and Vi
Moody who actually were just leav-
ing, as they had spent all afternoon
running around and had a delight-
ful buffet as well. Roger and Rita
(Rausch) Griffin (Rita is the daugh-
ter of the late Ilo Raush from the
Grindstone area.) were in Dead-
wood celebrating New Year's Eve.
Rita and Vi went to school together
in Philip and graduated in the
same class. That was a welcome re-
union. Roger, Rita's husband, got
into the middle of the conversation
when Marsha was sharing pictures
with Vi on her phone of her grand-
kids and great-grandkids. (We did-
n’t know that strange fellow was
anybody we knew.) Don and Vi
timed it just right to enjoy a spec-
tacular view of the display of fire-
works going on all over Rapid City
as they drove in on Elk Vale Road
to their Valley home. First time Vi
ever remembers fireworks on New
Year's Eve in Rapid. It was
grandiose.
As you can tell by the news
above, Bill and I went to Rapid City
Monday to get a few items and
wandered on to Deadwood. We ar-
rived home and stayed up until the
witching hour of midnight to wish
each other a Happy New Year.
Now it is 2013. We drug in the new
year.
Jessica Gittings was at the
George Gittings’ home for supper
New Year's Day and Daniel went
home with her.
Jeff Blachford, Miller, and
Austin Risseeuw, Watertown, ar-
rived at the George and Sandee’s
Tuesday evening. They work for
the railroad.
Tuesday morning, there was no
place to get food. We rummaged
around in the fridge and freezer,
getting rid of some things that
were way gone. Finally rustled up
a little breakfast, but darned near
starved to death that day. Carol
Solon came by in the morning and
she and I worked on an application
for a reality TV show that was look-
ing for South Dakota cowboys,
nominating John Solon. Tony
Harty visited at our place for
awhile.
The New Year was welcomed in
by Tony Harty, with a visit to L.D.
and Shirley Hairs, but the streets
of Kadoka were pretty well rolled
up, so he went home and enjoyed
TV the majority of the day.
Cathy Fiedler reported she and
Ralph worked the holiday – kept
them off the streets there in Stur-
gis. She said the weather has been
snow, nice, snow, nice, but
presently pretty darned good.
George Gittings, Kinsey, Natalie
and Kohen Gittings were in Pierre
for a doctor's appointment for
George Wednesday afternoon. The
weather deteriorated and it took
them two and a half hours to get
home due to the roads.
We had some snow here in the
Kadoka area, so Wednesday morn-
ing it was a bit snowy and the
roads were to be respected. I made
a trip in the morning with the
Haakon County Prairie Trans-
portation van to Philip. I got a call
from Mary Ann (Beckwith) Stoner,
who now lives with her husband,
Leo, in Moses Manor. She told me
to check out the “Prairie Progress
in West Central South Dakota”
book and I would find some infor-
mation about the Buswell family. I
just happened to have that book,
and sure enough. She even gave me
the page numbers. I passed the in-
formation on to the family in Min-
nesota. Thanks, Mary Ann, for
your help.
Tony Harty attended to getting
his mail and visited at the Hairs
Wednesday then went out to lunch
before settling in at home to a quiet
afternoon.
Don and Vi Moody stayed at
their Valley place with a couple of
appointments taking place after
the holiday. They returned home
Thursday.
Sandee Gittings left early Thurs-
day morning for Huron for meet-
ings of the South Dakota Farmers
Union, returning home Friday
evening. She was re-elected to the
secretary job on the county coun-
cilors.
Best wishes to Duke Westerberg
on his retirement and completion of
his “honey do” lists. The big cele-
bration took place Thursday, Jan-
uary 3.
Tony Harty visited at the Hair
home Thursday morning, then
went on to Rapid City where he at-
tended the visitation for Anthony
Quinn. He enjoyed seeing many
folks from the Milesville area, as
well as the immediate family of An-
thony. He did a little other busi-
ness while in Rapid before return-
ing home. Our sympathy to the
Quinn family.
I drove the HCPT van to Rapid
City Thursday. While getting a bite
to eat in Rapid, I ran into Bob
Hayes and his wife from the Wall
area, small world.
Friday after getting his mail,
Tony Harty visited Shirley Hair be-
fore settling in at home. Shirley
had a bout with the flu, so it was
good to check if she needed any-
thing.
Ever had snow cream? Bill’s
uncle gave us this recipe: one can
of evaporated milk, two table-
spoons of vanilla flavoring, and if
you aren't afraid of the salmonella,
beat up a couple of eggs and mix in
with the milk and flavoring, add
sugar, (start with a half a cup and
add according to taste) get about a
six quart pan full of light fluffy
snow, stir in the mixture and keep
stirring in more snow until it is
about as thick as homemade ice
cream, enjoy. I looked at our snow
bank and decided it wasn’t prime
for eating after the wind of Sunday.
Will try it with the next snow we
get.
Rob Maher and Greg Kastner ar-
rived at Gittings’ Friday evening to
do some deer hunting. They re-
turned to their homes near Sioux
Falls Sunday afternoon.
John Madsen, with Golden West,
was at our place getting our TV set
up with their bundle Friday. Bill
had cancelled the other service be-
cause they wanted just too darned
much money. Now he has to get ad-
justed to the new remote and
where things are all over again, but
he seems to be happy with it. Mary
Larson, Murdo, and Pat Jensen
came by to see about getting a sign
made and designed. Bill decided we
needed to use our gift certificate at
The Steakhouse, so we went to
Philip for supper. It was then I dis-
covered that the GPS tells the
story. He has “second home” set up
on that machine for the card room.
Anyway, we had a nice supper and
enjoyed seeing a lot of friends. We
also visited with a couple of fellows
from Hot Springs who were just
putting the finishing touches on a
new cell tower – one said they were
working in the Milbank area and
was quickly corrected by the other
that it was the Milesville area.
There should be pretty good cellu-
lar reception in the north now.
Sandee Gittings and Jesssica
took Daniel to Worthington, Minn.,
Sunday to go spend some time at
his dad's.
Don and Vi Moody were cruising
around Philip Saturday afternoon,
did a little shopping, looked at
some new equipment, and got all
the cattle checked with their en-
closed-cab Gator.
Saturday, Tony Harty visited at
the Hairs and came by our house
for a visit, too. His niece, Kathy
Brown, was in Rapid City with Jeb
for wrestling and she reported to
Tony that Jeb got second, as did
the team. Phyllis Word also
stopped by our place while Tony
was here, bringing some home-
made bread and sweet rolls.
Saturday afternoon, I visited
Emma Jarl at the Kadoka Nursing
Home as well as Ruth Klunt,
Elmer Williams and Mary Ellen
Herbaugh.
Sunday morning at breakfast,
Bruce Kroetch and Joe Prouty,
Philip, came in while Bill and I
were there. Bruce said he and
Linda were soon to be on their way
to Death Valley to see “Scotty’s
Castle.” He said Uncle Russell
Fairchild was the one who got him
interested in this castle when he
gave him a book to read about it. I
looked it up on the Internet and it
sounds like quite a place. He needs
to give us a report when they get
home. Also out for breakfast was
Bob Hayes and wife from Wall and
Scott Huber and his trapping part-
ner.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of Tressa Gabriel and
Winona Carson.
Sunday, January 6, Don and Vi
Moody caught Bill and me by
phone as we were going to eat at
the bowling alley and invited us to
stop in at the ranch. We had a fun
visit looking at sports equipment,
photo albums, collectible items,
and enjoying tea, cookies, and con-
versations about vacations! Then it
was time to take a drive in the hy-
brid car we have. Vi got to drive it
after a little coaxing with Bill – it
was her first experience with a bat-
tery operated car, and they even
made it home without incident
with Bill and Don doing a great job
of back seat driving. Marsha
showed how the gadgetry on the
dash showed different things. We
got 40 miles to the gallon in the one
mile round trip.
Hunting friend of Don and Vi
Moody and Dale O’Connell, Larry
and Margaret Christopherson, are
celebrating their 50th anniversary
January 12. They have many
friends in the Philip and Kadoka
areas.
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
T
he fam
ily of
M
innie B
rech
is requesting a
Card Show
er in
honor of her
95th B
irthday!
Her birthday
is January 11,
2013!
Cards may be
sent to her at:
PO Box 214
Philip SD
57567
Church & Community Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
WE DON’T
CHARGE
for obituaries,
wedding or
engagement
write-ups!
Send to: ads@
pioneer-review.com
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY
CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00
a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH,
Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH •
MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 •
facebook.com/midlan-
dobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30
a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30
p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd
Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN
CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-
6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00
a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m.
CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE
CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Do you ever Ieel people are ungrateIul Ior the work
you do? II so, take heart. Anything you do Ior God
is not in vain. It is not Iorgotten and it will be
rewarded, so continue your work Ior Him.
Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable, always
abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your
labour is not in vain in the Lord. 1 Corinthians 15.58 (KJJ)
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
On the go all the time?
Don’t miss an issue of
the Pioneer Review!
Subscribe online at:
www.pioneer-
review.com
Rose Marie Peterson______________
Rose Marie Peterson, 91, died on
Saturday, January 5, 2013, at the
Good Samaritan Nursing Home in
New Underwood, S.D.
Rose Marie Block was born in
November of 1921 in Ft. Pierre to
Fred and Clara (Jeitz) Block and
was raised on the family farm near
Midland. She was a graduate of
Midland High School and Black
Hills Beauty College in Rapid City.
She then worked in Martin until
she opened her own beauty shop in
Philip.
She married Edward Peterson of
Pedro in February of 1943 in Bre-
merton, Wash. Ed was a U.S. Navy
seaman who returned to South
Dakota after the war and the cou-
ple made their home in Rapid City
where Ed began a career in car-
pentry.
Rose Marie was an avid seam-
stress and an outstanding cook.
She enjoyed quilting, dancing and
gardening. She used her beauty
school skills to give permanents to
the neighborhood ladies and hair
cuts to the neighborhood kids.
Rose Marie was fun, outgoing and
always made everyone feel com-
fortable, loved and welcome.
Her children always considered
her the best mom in the world. Her
love was unconditional and she
made every day special.
She is survived by her children,
Janice Burton (Jerry), Lakewood,
Wash., Margene Peterson and
Mark Peterson, Rapid City, Cyn-
thia Peterson, Salt Lake City,
Utah, Laura Pryde (Jack), Mc-
Cloud, Calif., and Leanne Van
Drunen (Bill), Salt Lake City; 11
grandchildren; eight great grand-
children; her brother, Dick (Betty)
Block, Midland, and her sister
Dolly Blucher, Philip.
She was preceded in death by
her husband and one grandson.
Services will be held at 11:30
a.m., Thursday, January 10, at
Trinity Lutheran Church in Rapid
City with Rev. LeRoy Flagstad of-
ficiating.
A light luncheon at the church
will follow the service and inter-
ment will follow at Mt. View
Cemetery.
Condolences may be conveyed to
the family at www.behrenswilson.
com.
Tressa Gabriel_________________________________
Tressa Gabriel, age 90, of Philip,
S.D., died Tuesday, January 1,
2013, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Tressa Belle Coleman was born
October 24, 1922, in Woodbine,
Iowa, the daughter of Orrin Wes-
ley and Goldia Belle (Thomas)
Coleman. She lived near Pisgah,
Iowa, with her parents and older
sister, Erma, until they left their
home in the Loess Hills to move to
Haakon County northwest of
Philip, at the age of eight. They
traveled at 45 mph in the Model T
Ford while their personal belong-
ings and livestock were shipped to
Cottonwood on the train.
On the farm, she helped milk
cows, herd sheep, with chores rais-
ing hogs and gardening. Her
mother taught her to preserve veg-
etables and to prepare wholesome
meals.
Tressa attained an eighth grade
education at North Lincoln School.
Being too far to walk, they rode
horseback when the weather per-
mitted. In cold, snowy weather
Tressa had a room and boarded at
Axel Olson’s.
An experience she and Erma
talked about often, was Erma tak-
ing a rein from her horse’s bridle
to kill a rattlesnake while she was
on the horse – something she did
often. One time, the snake caught
in the rein hooks, and the horses
spooked and ran full speed home
with the snake flying in the air be-
hind.
Tressa met her lifetime partner
when Floyd Gabriel arrived at her
parents’ to purchase some hay.
Floyd and Tressa developed a com-
panionship that lasted a lifetime.
Coleman’s were concerned about
Tressa and Floyd dating. For them
to go anywhere, it was necessary
to take Erma and Frank, (Floyd’s
brother), along as chaperones.
Tressa and Floyd were married
March 17, 1941, in Philip. They
went to Iowa and Nebraska to visit
relatives for a honeymoon. Quote
of Floyd’s taken from Tressa’s
Bride’s Book. “We got home in fine
shape and found everything was
o.k. We were a little wiser but just
as foolish and wished our honey-
moon to continue indefinitely.”
This marriage was truly made in
heaven. They were business part-
ners as well. At first they sum-
mered sheep for neighbors as well
as themselves on land for which
they borrowed money to purchase.
When Floyd was away helping
neighbors whose family member
were serving in the war, Tressa
was responsible for their business.
After Beverly was born, Tressa
loaded her on the saddle and took
her to tend the sheep all day long.
Their only rest was a nap in the
shade of the sheep wagon while
the sheep bedded down by water
during the heat of the day.
When Tressa was in late preg-
nancy with Larry, Tressa, leading
Beverly, took a sheep buyer to
view the herd. He told Floyd, “You
want too much for your sheep, but
I feel sorry for your wife so I’ll give
you what you want.”
Cattle replaced the sheep in
their business. Tressa still rode
horseback. “Dixie,” her mare, was
still very important in her life.
In addition to Beverly and
Larry, a sister, Ruby, brightened
Tressa’s life. In 1981, Floyd,
Tressa and Ruby began traveling
the United States. Tressa enjoyed
continued trips, collecting state
plates and shot glasses while see-
ing most of the continental United
States and part of Canada. Tressa
became an excellent map reader,
instructing Ruby where to turn.
Branson, Mo., was the highlight of
her trips.
She was active in the Dowling
Community Church where she
was baptized. She was treasurer
for many years.
Tressa’s hobbies included play-
ing the piano, which was pur-
chased in 1956 to replace the
pump organ which she played by
ear. She also played the violin, em-
broidered, scrapbooked her chil-
dren’s activities and trips, and en-
joyed reading historical fiction.
Leaving to mourn her loss are
her three children, Beverly
Hamann and her husband, Herb,
of Clear Lake, Larry Gabriel and
his wife, Charlotte, of Quinn, and
Ruby Gabriel of Pedro; a double
niece, Cindy Nuzum, of Buffalo;
four grandchildren; and six great-
grandchildren.
Tressa was preceded in death by
her husband, Floyd, on February
5, 1998; her parents; her only sib-
ling, Erma Gabriel; and two great-
grandchildren.
Services were held Monday,
January 7, at the United
Methodist Church in Wall, with
Pastor Harold Delbridge officiat-
ing.
Interment was at the Wall
Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished. Arrangements were with
the Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Winona Bell Carson_______________
Winona Bell Carson, age 94 of
Kadoka, S.D., died Sunday, Janu-
ary 6, 2013, at the Kadoka Nurs-
ing Home.
Winona Bell Ogle was born No-
vember 14, 1918, in Brownlee,
Neb., the daughter of Charles L.
and Jessie (Vian) Ogle. She grew
up on a ranch 35 miles southeast
of Valentine, Neb., where she at-
tended rural school. As a young
lady, she herded sheep for her
grandfather, Vian.
She met her future husband,
George Carson, and they were
married February 9, 1935, at
Valentine. They made their home
in Kilgore, Neb., until 1942, when
they moved to a ranch near Long
Valley. In 1976, because of
George’s health, they retired and
moved into Kadoka.
Her husband, George, preceded
her in death on August 12, 1980.
Winona continued to reside in
Kadoka, where she cleaned the
Presbyterian Church and the
bank.
She is noted for her pancakes
and donuts in this area as well as
clear to California. She loved to
cook and take care of her family
and friends.
Winona was a member of the
Presbyterian Church of Kadoka.
Survivors include two sons, Ron-
nie Carson and his wife, Renate, of
Kadoka, and Oliver Carson and
his wife, Gayle, of Wall; one
daughter, Wilma Carlton and her
husband, Mel, of Kadoka; five
grandchildren; nine great-grand-
children; 13 great-great-grandchil-
dren; two brothers, Eugene Ogle
and his wife, Millie, of Plainview,
Minn., and Ted Ogle and his wife,
Carol, of Cathedral City, Calif.;
three sisters, Joy Parker of
Kadoka, Gertrude Case of Port-
land, Ore., and Rosalie Sanks and
her husband, Dave, of Cheyenne,
Wyo.; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
In addition to her husband,
George, Winona was preceded in
death by her parents; and three
brothers, Charles, Laurence and
Frank.
Services were held Wednesday,
January 9, at the Presbyterian
Church in Kadoka with Pastor
Gary McCubbin officiating.
Interment will be at the Kadoka
Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Anthony J. “Tony” Quinn__________________________
Anthony J. "Tony" Quinn passed
away Sunday, December 30, 2012,
at the Custer Regional Senior
Care.
Anthony was always proud to
say that he was from Hudson Flat,
45 miles northeast of Philip. He
was born December 4, 1929, to
Peter and Charlotte (Phalen)
Quinn. He was the youngest of five
children, Jack, Margaret, Eliza-
beth and Leo.
In 1952, he enlisted in the U.S.
Army and took Basic Training in
Kentucky. After that, he was sta-
tioned in France, but due to med-
ical issues he was medically dis-
charged and came home to South
Dakota in 1953.
In 1954, he moved to Rapid City
and spent the next 40 years work-
ing for Hackett Construction,
which is now Gustafson Builders.
He started out as an apprentice
and worked his way up (with the
help and education from some
great guys) to become a superin-
tendent. He retired in 1995. Some
of his greatest jobs were the
Catholic church in Fort Pierre, the
federal building in Rapid City, the
remodel of the Evans Hotel into
low income apartments for the eld-
erly in Hot Springs, and the con-
trol tower at Ellsworth Air Force
Base.
On June 1, 1956, he married Es-
ther Young, of Fairburn, at the
Cathedral of the Immaculate Con-
ception in Rapid City. Anthony
and Esther had two children,
James Anthony in 1963 and Anna
Marie in 1968. Esther passed
away in 1996; it was a great loss
but he carried on whether it was
having coffee with the guys at Mc-
Donald's, enjoying a meal at Mill-
stone, or spending time at his
brother Jack's farm on Hudson
Flat.
One thing he was very proud of
was his part in the Knights of
Columbus. A devout Catholic, he
joined in 1948 when he was 18. He
was the first Grand Knight of the
St. Therese Council 8025 and was
also awarded South Dakota
Knight of Year in the spring of
1989.
Whether it was his family, con-
struction, or the Knights, he put
his whole heart into it. He will be
greatly missed but we all have one
awesome guardian angel.
He is survived by his son, Jim
Quinn and a special friend, Bonnie
White Buffalo, of Rapid City; his
daughter, Anna Marie (Joel)
Harsma of Rapid City; his sister,
Elizabeth Berry of St. Cloud,
Minn.; his brother, Leo (Joyce) of
Rapid City; his sister-in-law,
Donna Quinn of Millesville; four
special cousins, Kevin, Eamon,
Emmet and Plunkett of Northern
Ireland; and several nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death by his
wife, Esther; his parents; his sis-
ter, Margaret; his brother, Jack;
and two nephews, Joe and Tom.
Services were held January 4,
2013, at St. Therese the Little
Flower church with the Rev.
William Zandri officiating. Inter-
ment with military honors pro-
vided by Rushmore VFW Post
1273 and the South Dakota Army
Reserve National Guard will fol-
low at the Fairburn Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
will be established to Alzheimer's
Research.
Osheim & Schmidt Funeral
Home was in charge of arrange-
ments.
His online guestbook is available
to sign at www.osheimschmidt.
com.
Bountiful Baskets is coming to Philip!
Beginning Saturday, January 19th, the truck arrives at 10:45 a.m.
Pick-up begins at 11:45 a.m. to 12:10 p.m.
at the Philip Fire Hall.
Philip will be an (A) week (opposite Wall)
is is a fresh produce co-op!
To make your contribution, visit www.bountifulbaskets.org today!
Contributions must be done online.
For questions or more info., please call Michelle Butler: 859-2172
Volunteers needed during all deliveries to unload & distribute.
Arnold C. Wolden________________
Arnold C. Wolden, age 95, of
Philip, S.D., died Tuesday, Janu-
ary 8, 2013, at the Hans P. Peter-
son Memorial Hospital in Philip.
Survivors include his wife, Vir-
ginia Wolden of Philip; three sons,
Gene Wolden of Cheyenne, Wyo.,
Roger Wolden and his wife, Mary,
of Ringwood, Ill., and Terry
Wolden and his wife, Julie, of
Rapid City; one daughter, Linda
Wolden of Rapid City; a stepson,
Michael Johnson of Colstrip, Mon-
tana; 20 grandchildren; 16 great-
grandchildren; two great- great-
grandchildren; two sisters, Julie
Brooks of Sisseton, and Helga
Warrington of Aurora, Colo.; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Arnold was preceded in death by
a son, Mark Wolden; a stepdaugh-
ter, Janet Craven; a great-grand-
daughter, Tessa Brenner; his par-
ents; two brothers, Sam and Oliver
Wolden; and three sisters, Mable
Wolden, Agnes Fichbohm and
Alice Hanson Strand.
Funeral services are pending
with Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
A full obituary will appear in
next week’s paper.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
Midland news not available this week … watch here next
week for all the local Midland happenings!
In the meantime, call Sonia if you have any news!
The news will be short this week
as there was so much going on that
I did not get to call anyone and the
weather was cold and I never ven-
tured out much. But I will try to
write a little.
Some news is we have a new lit-
tle neighbor. A little boy was born
to Todd and Lacy Thorson Decem-
ber 26, Logan Thomas Thorson, at
the Philip hospital and weighed 9
lbs. He is home now doing fine. An-
other new neighbor is Lincoln
Smith, who has moved into the Ted
Knutson house.
Cliff Ramsey is in Rapid City Re-
gional Hospital and has been there
for awhile. He probably would
enjoy some cards to help pass the
time. Vicki went up January 4 and
all the other kids have been there
part of the time also. Rita is up
there and the kids take her back
and forth as needed.
Bob Thorson is getting a remod-
eled garage. Jodi’s dad and Jodi are
doing the work. She said Bob got
some new tools for Christmas so
she thought they had better put
them to use.
Carla came on the third for our
Christmas. Her boss had given
them tickets to the Globe Trotters
game in Rapid City so they came
down after the game. Marvin and
Vicki took Taegan and Kiley up so
they could go to the game then hur-
ried back to the retirement party
for Duke Westerberg at the FSA of-
fice in Philip.
We had our Christmas at Mar-
vin’s on the fifth with Mike Hud-
dleson, all Trevor and Christa’s
family, Carla and her two kids and
myself. Lots of food once more and
kids got to play all day outdoors. I
thought it was cold but they would
be outside a couple hours, come in
get warmed up good, then go back
out. They said they had a lot of fun
with the golf cart and the ATV.
They carried a scoop with them so
they could scoop out when they got
stuck in the drifts. Knowing they
were probably like all kids they
had to try the biggest drifts they
could find. The kids ranged in ages
six through 11.
Raylor, three, and Aven six
months stayed in the house with
the older people who would just as
soon stay in where it was warm.
We had supper late as we waited
for Keagan to get home from
Presho where he was wrestling.
After eating too much we all exer-
cised by sitting down and opening
our gifts. We must have been nice
and not naughty as there were sure
a lot of gifts.
Tom Radway called and said
they had strung their holidays out
over several days this year also,
but did say the family all did get
home to their place for the holiday.
Tom is a big help if I need some in-
formation about something, he will
look it up on his computer and call
me with an answer. He helps out
with my news often.
I promise I will do better next
week. Maybe we can settle down
with the holidays over. Oops, I for-
got its income tax time we must not
relax yet. And then it’s right into
March calving for some. Marvin
starts around here the first of
March, some wait ‘til April.
It is said no time to rest for the
farmer, he just has to take a little
time off when he has a chance to.
Most like to go watch the sales
even if they are not buying or sell-
ing. Some like to go to Deadwood
and enjoy a little gambling while
others just like to go play cards in
Philip. And they like the coffee
hours around Philip so they can go
and trade the news and gossip.
Everyone should go on a vaca-
tion! It renews you and helps you
do better business when you get
home. No matter where you choose
to go you will always come home a
little smarter.
This is a world in which each of
us, knowing his limitations, know-
ing the evils of superficiality and
terrors of fatigue, will have to cling
to what is close to him, to what he
knows, to what he can do, to his
friends and his tradition a his love,
lest he be dissolved in a universal
confusion and know nothing and
love nothing.
J. Robert Oppenheimer
Grindstone News
by Mary Eider • 859-2188
Øínftr (oír
When you're in Murdo for the
InvitationaI BasketbaII Tournament,
stop up at the
Senior Center ~ Main Street, Murdo
Saturday, January 12th
11 a.m. (CT) untiI it's gone!
Baked Potato Feed
$5 includes toppings
& beverage
***
Bake SaIe for Dessert
or to go!
Proceeds from food sales
benefit the Jones Co. Jazz Choir!
Vendors include:
*Scentsy*
*irty-One Gis*
*Lemongrass Spa*
*Ray’s Hot & Cold Paks*
*Pampered Chef*
*Iverson Innovations*
*Wild ings*
*Paparazzi Jewelry*
*Watkins*
Sign up for door prizes!
Greetings from sunny, cool,
snow-covered northeast Haakon
County. The weatherman has pre-
dicted that our winds are going to
howl later today, but for now it is
just a slight breeze. After the warm
temperatures of yesterday, I am
hoping that our snow has enough of
a crust that it won't drift too much.
The ditches in our area are pretty
full, so when the snow blows, it
tends to fill in the corners on the
roads, keeping the county road
maintenance staff busy. Thank
goodness for the men and their ma-
chines!
We are over a week into the new
year now, and so far it has been
good. There is something about the
new year that always fills me with
a sense of opportunity – sort of like
a new start! I guess the same can
be said for each and every day, but
a new year somehow seems even
more promising. Here's hoping that
2013 will be wonderful.
First of all, my condolences to the
family of Tressa Gabriel. I got to
meet Tressa a few times when I
worked with her son, Larry
Gabriel, in Pierre. On reading
Tressa's obituary, it is easy to see
that she and her husband, Floyd,
worked tirelessly to build this
country and raise their family. I
marvel at the strength and deter-
mination required to make a life on
the South Dakota prairies in the
early days. We owe a debt of grati-
tude to her generation, because
they made it possible for us to enjoy
the lives we now have. Hers was a
life well lived.
Duane and Lola Roseth recently
returned from a trip to the east
coast. They went to Charleston,
S.C., and toured the area. Then
they boarded a river cruise ship
and toured the Intracoastal Water-
ways. They toured many islands
and ended up in Jacksonville, Fla.
The trip was a surprise for Duane –
he knew they were going on vaca-
tion, but he didn't know the desti-
nation. Lola did all the planning,
and the details of the trip remained
a secret until they were on the final
leg of their flight into Charleston –
what an adventure! Duane is a
brave man. Lola said the trip was
wonderful, but it is great to be back
home, although the cold tempera-
tures and snow cover here are not
quite what they were used to. Prior
to leaving on their trip, they got to
visit with their daughter, Kayce,
and her husband, John Gerlach, in
Rapid City.
Lee and Mary Briggs continue to
be busy with the bathroom remodel
project at their home. The upstairs
bathroom is nearly complete, and
now they have started remodeling
the downstairs bathroom. I can't
wait to see the finished projects!
Their granddaughter, Cattibrie
Riggle, and a friend were out to the
ranch over the weekend, picking up
Cattibrie's horses. Lee and Mary's
grandson, Zane Joens, wrestled in
a tournament in North Dakota last
weekend, and he got second place
in his weight class. Way to go,
Zane! Their grandson, Seth Joens,
is also wrestling this year, but he
didn't compete in the North Dakota
match. Mary said that Lil Briggs is
doing better, which is great news.
She is back at her home near Ft.
Pierre, and family members are
helping care for her.
Dick and Gene Hudson traveled
to Rapid City last Friday to attend
funeral services for Anthony
Quinn. After the services, they
went on to Whitewood to visit
Dick's sister, Jean Keffler. Their
niece, Cheryl Pittman, and hus-
band, Emmit, were there also, so
Dick and Gene took the group to
supper before returning to the
ranch. Saturday, Jerry and Joy
Jones, Mike and Deb Trapp and
family, Cody and Audrey Jones,
and the Johnson boys were supper
guests at Dick and Gene's in honor
of Cassidy Trapp's birthday. Con-
nie Johnson was under the
weather, so she and Jon stayed
home.
Last Thursday, Coreen Roseth
went to Philip and picked up
Kristin and Vance Martin's chil-
dren and brought them home for
the weekend. The grandkids stayed
until Sunday. Adam and Jodi
Roseth's boys were also at Julian
and Coreen's for part of the week-
end – sounds like the group of
youngsters was pretty entertaining
and very energetic!
Billy and Arlyne Markwed had a
quieter week following all of their
holiday company. Saturday,
Charles and Rosalee Tennis, from
the Vale area, were afternoon visi-
tors and supper guests at the
Markwed's. They were in the area
looking at cattle at T.J. Gabriel's
ranch. Billy and Arlyne attended
church Sunday.
Calving season has started for
T.J. and Jeanine Gabriel, so it will
be busy at their place for a while.
Of course, with the three young
children, I think it is usually a busy
place! Hope the weather stays good
for calving.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson took a
tractor to a repairman south of Ft.
Pierre to have a new motor in-
stalled. Dorothy said for Nels, leav-
ing his beloved Allis Chalmers at
the repair shop was nearly like
dropping a child off at a new day
care provider! Stressful stuff! I
hope the tractor will be repaired
soon, so Nels doesn't have to worry
about it! Sunday, Dorothy attended
church at Deep Creek, and Monday
Nels and Dorothy were in town on
business.
Bill and Polly Bruce also had a
quieter week following the Christ-
mas gathering with all of their
family. They have kept busy doing
the normal chores that need doing
this time of year. Their son, Vince,
worked at the sale barn Saturday.
He has also been busy working on
barns south of Ft. Pierre. Sunday,
Bill and Polly attended church in
Midland, and they had lunch be-
fore returning home.
Frank and Shirley Halligan were
in Buffalo to a basketball game
Saturday. Their grandson plays for
the Faith team, and Faith won the
game by one point! Frank and
Shirley had supper with Frank's
sister, Lori Olson, and they spent
the night in Buffalo before return-
ing home. On New Year's Eve, they
went bowling with their kids in
Pierre and enjoyed supper to-
gether. Their daughter, Maggie,
who had been here for the holidays,
returned to her home in Texas
Monday.
Raymond and Nancy Neuhauser
had a lot of company over the holi-
days. A week ago Saturday, their
son, Brett, and his family, as well
as their daughter, Julie, and her
family spent the night with Ray
and Nancy in Pierre. New Year's
Eve, Ray and Nancy were at Marv
and Del Paulson's. Thursday, Ray
and Nancy attended funeral serv-
ices for Janice Stabnow, who was a
cousin of Ray's. Friday through
Sunday, the Severtson family were
guests of Ray and Nancy. Monday
was busy getting the house put
back to rights following all of the
company!
Marge Briggs said things have
been quiet at her house. She said
she has been reading a fascinating
book about nutrition and wellness.
Marge is definitely a life long
learner – we could probably all
take a lesson from her!
Chase and Kelly Briggs and fam-
ily have been dealing with some of
the seasonal coughs and colds. But
now that they are all well, they
have been spending some time vis-
iting Grandma Lil in Pierre.
Ruth Neuhauser said her daugh-
ter, Nina, and husband Lynn
Nachtigall returned to their home
in Cheyenne, Wyo., last Thursday
after spending several months in
Italy with their son, Troy, his wife,
Annaluisa, and their son, Aurelio.
They were fortunate to be on hand
for the celebration of grandson Au-
relio's first birthday. Monday, Ruth
traveled to Pierre to get her hear-
ing aids checked. Her son, Kevin,
met her in town and attended the
meeting with her, then he traveled
on to Highmore to meet with staff
at Highmore Health. He also
helped Ruth put away all her
Christmas decorations so they'll be
ready for next year.
Max and Joyce Jones were in
Pierre last Saturday to attend a
90th birthday gathering for their
friend and former neighbor, Marj
Olson. The gathering was held at
Marv and Marj's home in Ft.
Pierre, and Joyce said there was a
nice crowd. Marj's birthday is Jan-
uary 5, and her husband, Marvin's,
birthday is January 12, so happy
birthday to them both! And while
I'm at it, happy birthday to Joyce
Jones, who celebrates her birthday
on January 13!
Our week was a little quieter
here also, now that all of the holi-
day celebrating is done for another
year. Randy and I were in Philip
Thursday to keep appointments,
and Randy was in Pierre Monday
taking care of some business. Our
nephew, Dylan, was at the ranch
Saturday, helping with some proj-
ects. We had deer hunters here
Saturday and Sunday, getting
meat for the winter. Other than
that, it has been business as usual
here.
This week, I am grateful for the
new year. As I said earlier, it feels
like an opportunity to me, and op-
portunity is good! However, you
have to take advantage of opportu-
nities – otherwise, they are wasted.
So I'm going to concentrate on
making the most of 2013, and I
hope you do too!
Make this week a good one – and
take time to count your blessings.
And, in talking to others, try to
have compliments outnumber com-
plaints – it will make your day (as
well as theirs) much better!
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
January 18-20 will be the time to
be in Milesville to see the musical
comedy, "The Royal Bachelor," to
be presented at the Milesville Hall.
This hilarious comedy consists of a
large cast and promises to enter-
tain young and old. Co-directors,
Nina Pekron and Jodi Parsons,
music director, Marlis Doud, and
Peggy Parsons on sound, as well as
the cast have been working very
hard and are enjoying preparing
for this production. The perform-
ance begins Friday and Saturday
evenings at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday
at 2:00 p.m. Following is a list of
the cast members in no particular
order: Joe Gittings, Dr. Jim Stan-
gle, Kelly Blair, Roger Porch, Del
Bartels, Mark Nelson, Jodi Par-
sons, Marlis Doud, Tonya Berry,
Christa Fitch, Linda Stangle, Alli-
son Pekron, Janice Parsons, Con-
nie Parsons, Sarah Parsons, Rick
Doud, Paul Staben, Donna Staben,
Tina Staben, Erin Hovland, Hugh
Harty, Ann Harty, Mark Stangle,
Fr. Kevin Achbach, Kathleen Nel-
son and Nina Pekron. Tickets can
be purchased at Golden Vet in
Billsburg and Farm Bureau Finan-
cial Services in Philip. Cookies will
be furnished Friday night by the
Hardingrove Community Church,
Saturday by the Milesville Com-
munity Club and any others who
would like to donate, and Sunday
the cookies will be furnished by St.
Mary's Catholic Church.
The Milesville Volunteer Fire
Department will again be serving
soup and sandwiches prior to each
play performance. Proceeds will
help the fire department with their
costs in putting out fires in our
area and surrounding areas. We
never know when we may need
them.
Next Monday morning, January
14, at about 8:30 a.m., the commu-
nity will be cleaning the Milesville
Hall in preparation for the play.
Your help is appreciated.
Anthony Quinn, age 83, died
Sunday, December 30, at Custer
Regional Senior Care. Local folks
attending his funeral Friday were
Donnie and Bobette Schofield, Tim
and Lori Quinn and boys, Steve
Pekron, and Hugh Harty.
Now, on to the folks' Christmas
and New Years news: Amy and Joe
Hogue and children, Jacob and Eli-
jah, arrived at the parental home of
Dan and Gayla Piroutek Saturday,
December 22. Erin, Tim and Daniel
Logan had already arrived. All the
little boys had lots of fun with
grandpa's train and sled. The Lo-
gans flew home Christmas Day and
the Hogues drove to Joe's mom's
home at Tekamah, Neb., December
26.
Sunday, December 23, Bob,
April and Kaitlyn Knight, Rapid
City, and Melissa Knight and
friend, Robert, Denver, were sup-
per guests at the home of Leo and
Joan Patton. At the Pattons’
Christmas Day were Gary
Stephenson and Ralph and Carol
Kroetch, Philip, Irene Patton,
Pierre, Kent and Kris Lowe, Volga,
Chad Kroetch and girlfriend,
Rocky, Denver, and Bob, April,
Kaitlyn and Melissa Knight and
Robert. The Jim Stangles were
guests Wednesday night for sup-
per.
Dixon Deuchar spent a few days
before Christmas with his parents,
Gene and Theresa Deuchar. The
three of them had dinner with
Shad and Jenna Finn and boys,
Midland, Sunday, the 23rd. Christ-
mas Eve, they enjoyed time with
Zeb and Megan Hoffman, Nora and
Coy, Wall. Others there were Zeb's
parents, Wally and Carol Hoffman,
Zackry Hoffman and friend, Lucy.
Guests at Gene and Theresa's
Christmas Day were Dixon
Deuchar, Shad and Jenna Finn
and boys, Zeb and Megan Hoffman
and family, Jim Deuchar, Keith
and Cheryl Harry and Henry and
Lorraine Hanson.
The Glen Radways celebrated
Christmas and New Years with
lots of family. Glen's mother, Mil-
dred, was a guest from the 24-26,
with the three of them enjoying
Christmas at Arlie, Gretchen and
Jason Radway's, Plainview. Carey
and Erin Radway, Sioux Falls,
were there from the 27-30. From
the 28th to January 1, Darin and
Leah Ries, Deacon and Ainsley,
Pierre, were at the farm. (Deacon
loves helping 'Papa' with the
chores.) New Year’s Eve, Glen's
brother, Bruce and Raelynn Rad-
way of Fairbanks, Alaska, visited.
Bruce and Raelynn Radway
spent several days visiting rela-
tives in the area over Christmas.
Thursday, Glen and Jackie, Mil-
dred, Bruce and Raelynn and
Gretchen Radway went to Pierre to
see Glen and Jackie's house that
they recently purchased. Bruce is a
second grade teacher and Raelynn
is the CEO of MAC (Military and
Civilian) Credit Union.
The Miles Hovlands have also
had a busy week with family. They
went to Kelly and Deanna Fees' on
Christmas Eve, along with James
and Melony Gyles, Preston and
Madison. Christmas Day, Allen
Hovland was host to Miles, Erin,
Connor and Mackenzie, and Joe
and Debbie Prouty. December 29,
they celebrated a late Christmas at
the Prouty's, along with Erin's
brothers, Quentin and Kylie Rig-
gins, Tim and Wes, Rapid City, and
Cody and Jasmine Riggins, Cody,
Jack and Henry, Lodi, Calif. Stop-
ping to visit in the afternoon were
Walt and Jan Schaefer and family
and Corky and Zoni Thorson. Jan
and Zoni are sisters of Erin's late
dad. Cody, Jasmine and family and
Debbie Prouty all came out to play
in the snow on the 28th. Being
from California, they don't have
that opportunity very often. The
Hovlands spent New Year’s Eve
and Day in Rapid City with Debbie
Prouty, Quentin Riggins and fam-
ily and Cody Riggins and family.
They went to a dinosaur museum
in Hill City and had fun at a water
park near Rapid City. Then on
Thursday Erin, Connor and
Mackenzie went to Joe and Debbie
Proutys' in Philip to visit one more
time with Cody, Jasmine and fam-
ily as they left for their home in
Lodi, Calif., the next day.
Approximately 30 family mem-
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
continued on page 12
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2005 Buick LeSabre
3.8L V6 … Another good Buick!!
Friends & family of
Mahlon Alcock
would like to wish a quiet
but very knowledgeable
man a
Happy 90th Birthday
on January 15, 2013!
Send birthday
greetings to him at:
PO Box 221
Midland, SD 57552
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, 1anuary 10, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 7
NOTICE OF INTENT
TO MINE GRAVEL
Notice is hereby given that a mining op-
eration is to be conducted by Western
Construction, Ìnc.
Legal location of the mine:
NE1/4SE1/4 of Sec. 21, T1N,
R20E, Haakon Co., SD.
NW1/4SW1/4 of Sec. 22, T1N,
R20E, Haakon Co., SD.
General location of the mine: 2.0 miles
west from Philip, SD, on the south side of
Hwy. 14.
Material to be mined: Sand & Gravel
The operation is to begin by January 15,
2013, and will be completed to include
final reclamation by December 31, 2018.
Proposed future use of the affected land:
final reclamation will consist of regrading,
replacing topsoil, and reseeding to allow
the area to be returned to crop land.
Additional information about the operation
may be obtained from either Western
Construction, Ìnc., telephone #605-716-
2446 or 605-381-9709, or the South
Dakota Department of Environment and
Natural Resources, Minerals and Mining
Program, 523 East Capitol Avenue,
Pierre, SD 57501-3182, phone (605) 773-
4201.
[Published January 3 & 10, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $29.89]
Notice
Notice is given that application has been
made to the Comptroller of the Currency,
1225 17th Street Suite 300, Denver, CO
80202 for consent to merge Farmers
State Bank, Faith, South Dakota, into
First National Bank in Philip, Philip, South
Dakota. Ìt is contemplated that the main
and branch offices of the above named
banks will continue to operate. Ìt is con-
templated that the main office (127 Main
Street, Faith, South Dakota 57626) of
Farmers State Bank will become a branch
office of First National Bank in Philip.
This notice is published pursuant to 12
USC 1828(c) and 12 CFR 5. Anyone may
submit written comments on this applica-
tion by February 11, 2013, to: Director for
District Licensing, 1225 17th Street, Suite
300, Denver, CO 80202 or WE.Licens-
ing@occ.treas.gov.
The public file is available for inspection
in the district office during regular busi-
ness hours. Written requests for a copy of
the public file on the application should be
sent to the Director of District Licensing.
January 10, 2013
FARMERS STATE BANK
Faith, South Dakota
FÌRST NATÌONAL BANK ÌN PHÌLÌP
Philip, South Dakota
[Published January 10, 17 & 31, 2013, at
the total approximate cost of $39.42]
CITY OF PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
INVITATION TO BID
EAST PINE ST. & WRAY AVE.
OVERLAY IMPROVEMENT
The City Council of Philip, South Dakota,
will receive sealed bids for their East Pine
Street and Wray Avenue Overlay Ìm-
provements Project until 4:00 PM (local
time), Monday, February 4, 2013, at the
office of the Finance Officer, City of Philip,
located on the 4th Floor of the Haakon
County Courthouse at 140 South Howard
Avenue in Philip, South Dakota. Sealed
bids may be sent to the Finance Officer,
City of Philip, at PO Box 408, Philip SD
57567. Received sealed bids will be pub-
licly opened and read aloud at the above
place and time.
Bids are invited upon the items and ap-
proximate quantities of work as follows:
Approximately 266 tons of
gravel base course, 945 tons of
asphalt surfacing, 501 square
yards of 8¨ concrete pavement,
and all related appurtenances
to the aforementioned work
items. Other items based on a
percentage of total project area
include 1,270 square yards of
asphalt area repairs and 50
tons of asphalt leveling course.
The approximate quantities mentioned
above are subject to increase or de-
crease. Ìt will be agreed by bidders that
all quantities of work will be performed in
accordance with the provisions of the
plans and specifications and at the unit
price bid. Bidders agree to furnish all
labor, material, and equipment necessary
to complete all the work as shown in the
plans and specifications.
The complete set of Contract Documents,
including drawings and specifications, is
on file with the Finance Officer, City of
Philip, South Dakota 57567, and/or at the
office of Schmucker, Paul, Nohr and As-
sociates, 2100 North Sanborn Blvd,
Mitchell, South Dakota 57301. A paper
copy of the contract documents and plans
can be ordered with a non-refundable
payment of $35 which includes tax. The
contract documents and plans will also be
made available as electronic media with
a non-refundable payment of $20. Digital
copies of the plans and specifications can
be downloaded from the Schmucker,
Paul, Nohr and Associates website at
www.spn-assoc.com. Upon request, one
copy of the contract documents and plans
will be furnished at no charge as required
by SDCL 5-18B-1 to each contractor who
is a South Dakota resident and who in-
tends to bid the project.
Each bid must be accompanied by a cer-
tified check or bank draft payable to the
order of the City of Philip, South Dakota,
or negotiable U.S. Government Bonds (at
par value) in an amount equal to five per-
cent (5%) of the total bid. A bid bond in an
amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the
total bid will be accepted in lieu of a certi-
fied check or bank draft. Surety for bid
bond must be authorized to do business
in the State of South Dakota.
Pursuant to State Law, a copy of the bid-
der's sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder's excise tax license as
issued by the State of South Dakota must
accompany the bid. Ìn lieu of a copy of
the license, the bidder shall submit appro-
priate evidence that the bidder and all af-
filiates have the appropriate licenses.
Bidders are advised that any contracts
awarded on this project will be funded by
the City of Philip.
Bids may be held by the City Council of
Philip, South Dakota, for a period of not
more than thirty (30) days from the date
of opening of bids for the purpose of re-
viewing the bids, investigating the qualifi-
cations of the bidders and completing
financial arrangements prior to awarding
the Work. The Owner reserves the right
to reject any or all bids and to waive any
informalities in the bidding and make
awards to the Owner's best interest.
Dated this 19th day of December, 2012.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
City of Philip, South Dakota
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint, Finance Office
[Published January 10 & 17, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $71.48]
CITY OF PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
INVITATION TO BID
WOOD AND WALDEN AVENUE
UTILITY & STREET IMPROVEMENTS
The City Council of Philip, South Dakota,
will receive sealed bids for their Wood Av-
enue and Walden Avenue Utility and
Street Ìmprovements Project until 4:00
PM (local time), Monday, February 4,
2013, at the office of the Finance Officer,
City of Philip, located on the 4th floor of
the Haakon County Courthouse at 140
South Howard Avenue in Philip, South
Dakota. Sealed bids may be sent to the
Finance Officer, City of Philip at PO Box
408, Philip, South Dakota 57567. Re-
ceived sealed bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud at the above place and
time.
Bids are invited upon the items and ap-
proximate quantities of work as follows:
Bid ScheduIe "A"
Approximately 2,500 linear feet of 8¨
sanitary sewer, 10 sanitary sewer
manholes and all related appurte-
nances to the aforementioned work
items.
Bid ScheduIe "B"
Approximately 560 linear feet of 6¨
water main, 7 service saddles and curb
stops, 2 gate valves and all related ap-
purtenances to the aforementioned
work items.
Bid ScheduIe "C"
Approximately 2,000 linear feet RCP
storm sewer, 21 storm sewer inlets, 8
storm sewer manholes, 2,100 linear
feet of 4¨ drain tiles and all related ap-
purtenances to the aforementioned
work items.
Bid ScheduIe "D"
Removal of approximately 9,800
square yards of pavement, 8,400 tons
of gravel base course, 2,200 tons of
asphalt surfacing, 1,000 square yards
of 8¨ concrete pavement, 4,600 linear
feet of concrete curb and gutter, 870
square feet of segmental block retain-
ing wall, 7,500 square yards of seed-
ing, and all related appurtenances to
the aforementioned work items.
The approximate quantities mentioned
above are subject to increase or de-
crease. Ìt will be agreed by bidders that
all quantities of work will be performed in
accordance with the provisions of the
plans and specifications and at the unit
price bid. Bidders agree to furnish all
labor, material and equipment necessary
to complete all the work as shown in the
plans and specifications.
The Bid will be awarded as ONE contract
to the lowest responsible bidder.
A complete set of contract documents
and plans may be obtained at the office
of Schmucker, Paul, Nohr and Associ-
ates, 2100 North Sanborn Blvd., Mitchell,
South Dakota 57301, (605) 996-7761. A
paper copy of the contract documents
and plans can be ordered with a non-re-
fundable payment of $35.00 which in-
cludes tax. The contract documents and
plans will also be made available as elec-
tronic media with a non-refundable pay-
ment of $20.00. Digital copies of the plans
and specifications can be downloaded
from the Schmucker, Paul, Nohr and As-
sociates' website at www.spn-assoc.com.
Upon request, one copy of the contract
documents and plans will be furnished at
no charge as required by SDCL 5-18B-1
to each contractor who is a South Dakota
resident and who intends to bid the proj-
ect.
Each bid must be accompanied by a cer-
tified check or bank draft payable to the
order of the City of Philip, South Dakota,
or negotiable U.S. Government Bonds (at
par value) in an amount equal to five per-
cent (5%) of the total bid. A bid bond in an
amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the
total bid will be accepted in lieu of a certi-
fied check or bank draft. Surety for bid
bond must be authorized to do business
in the State of South Dakota.
Pursuant to State Law, a copy of the bid-
der's sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder's excise tax license as
issued by the State of South Dakota must
accompany the bid. Ìn lieu of a copy of
the license, the bidder shall submit appro-
priate evidence that the bidder and all af-
filiates have the appropriate licenses.
Bidders are advised that any contracts
awarded on this project will be partially
funded by the City of Philip and the State
of South Dakota through the State Re-
volving Fund Loan Program. Contractors
and/or subcontractors performing work on
this project will be required to comply with
all requirements of the above-listed agen-
cies. Neither the United States nor any of
its departments, agencies, or employees
is or will be a party to this Ìnvitation to Bid
or any resulting contract.
Bidders on this work will be required to
comply with the President's Executive
Order Numbers 11246 as amended,
11518 and 11625 as amended. The re-
quirements for bidders and contractors
under these orders are explained in the
Contract Documents.
Bidders on this work will be required to
comply with Title 40 CFR 33 and Execu-
tive Order 12138. The goal for Minority-
Owned Business Enterprise (MBE) on
this project is one percent (1%) and the
goal for Woman-Owned Business Enter-
prise (WBE) on this project is four percent
(4%). The goals and other requirements
for bidders and contractors under this
regulation which concerns utilization of
disadvantaged/minority business enter-
prises are explained in the Contract Doc-
uments.
The Bidder's attention is called to the
"Equal Opportunity Clause¨ and the
"Standard Federal Equal Employment
Opportunity Construction Contract Spec-
ifications¨. The requirements for bidders
and contractors under this order are ex-
plained in these Contract Documents.
Ìn addition to all of the above-listed Fed-
eral requirements for work on this project,
compliance with the contract Work Hours
and Safety Standards Act, Executive
Order 11375, Copeland Act, the Clean Air
Act, and Water Pollution Control Act and
subsequent amendments to all of the
above will be required of contractors
and/or subcontractors performing work on
this project.
Bidders are also reminded that not less
than the minimum wages as determined
by the Davis-Bacon Act and set forth in
the Contract Documents must be paid on
this project and that the contractor and/or
subcontractor must ensure that employ-
ees and applicants for employment are
not discriminated against because of their
race, color, religion, sex or natural origin.
Bids may be held by the City Council of
Philip, South Dakota, for a period of not
more than thirty (30) days from the date
of opening of bids for the purpose of re-
viewing the bids, investigating the qualifi-
cations of the bidders and completing
financial arrangements prior to awarding
the Work. The Owner reserves the right
to reject any or all bids and to waive any
informalities in the bidding and make
awards in the Owner's best interest.
Dated this 19th day of December 2012.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
City of Philip, South Dakota
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint, Finance Officer
[Published January 10 & 17, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $138.02]
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
SPECIAL MEETING
December 28, 2012
A special meeting of the Philip City Coun-
cil was held on Friday, December 28,
2012, at 4:00 p.m. in the Community
Room of the Haakon Co. Courthouse.
Present were Mayor Michael Vetter, Fi-
nance Officer Monna Van Lint, Council
Members Greg Arthur, Marty Gartner,
Jennifer Henrie, and Trisha Larson. Also
present were Deputy Finance Officer Brit-
tany Smith, Public Works Director Matt
Reckling, Chief of Police Kit Graham,
Mary Burnett with First National Agency;
and later, Del Bartels with the Pioneer Re-
view.
Absent: Council Members Jason Harry
and Marion Matt.
Mayor Vetter called the meeting to order
stating that the purpose of this meeting
was to clear up year-end business for
2012.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the agenda as pre-
sented. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Henrie to approve the minutes of the last
meeting as published by the Pioneer Re-
view. Motion carried.
Mayor Vetter requested FO Van Lint ex-
plain the customer deposit refunds being
presented for payment with the year-end
bills. Van Lint stated that according to City
Ordinance #5-104(c), utility customers
are entitled to a refund of their customer
deposit if they make twelve consecutive
on-time monthly payments. Under this
rule, refunds are given during December
of each year with the year-end bills.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Henrie to approve payment of the bills
from the appropriated funds. Motion car-
ried.
Gross SaIaries - Dec. 30, 2012 IncIud-
ing Longevity Pay & ProfessionaI In-
centives for 2012: Mayor & Council -
$4,410.00; Adm. - $4,734.06; Garbage -
$2,041.86; Police - $7,793.92; Public
Works - $880.00; Sewer - $8,494.12;
Street - $880.00; Water - $2,893.73
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ìns.-
12/12 .......................................291.90
EFTPS, S.S., Medicare, Withholding-
12/12 ....................................6,682.93
SDRS, Employee Retirement-
12/12 ....................................3,696.10
Customer Deposit Refunds in Accor-
dance w/ Ord. #5-104(c):
Andrus, Christine (306 W Pine
St)............................................100.00
Behrend, Cheryl ..........................100.00
Berry, Ryon .................................100.00
Fitch, Diane...................................90.00
Fitzgerald, Erin (Wee-Won
Daycare)..................................100.00
Flesner, Gordon (200 N Wood
Ave) ...........................................90.00
Green, Seth/Mindy ......................100.00
Hanson, Brian/Heather................100.00
Hook, Monte................................100.00
Jelinek, Gloria .............................100.00
Johnson, Jody Sue......................100.00
Konst, Dave (301 S Dakota Ave) 100.00
Kroetch, Emily.............................100.00
M.G. Oil Co. ................................100.00
Manley, Allan...............................100.00
Murray, Willard/Beth (103 N Larimer
Ave) .........................................100.00
Philip Ambulance Service............100.00
Roseth, Thor ...............................100.00
Seager, Ryan ..............................100.00
Weber, Gregor/Dorothy...............100.00
This Month's BiIIs:
3D Specialties, Ìnc., 540 Sign Posts -
12/12 ....................................7,965.00
AT&T, Cell Phone 11-12/12...........82.30
Black Hills Occupational Med., Random
Testing - 11/12.........................265.28
Brant's Electric, (2) St Light Ballasts -
12/12 .......................................577.32
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel
11-12/12 ..................................412.76
City of Philip, "Free Water/Sewer¨ Parks
- 2012...................................2,247.80
Water/Sewer Streets - 2012......53.41
Water/Sewer Pool - 2012 ........749.77
Water/Sewer Fire Dept. -
2012 ........................................471.90
D&T Auto Parts, Supplies - 11/12..11.10
Ed's Repair, '99 Ranger Clutch Repair -
12/12 .......................................557.65
1st Nat'l Agency, Ìnland Marine Ìns.
Add.- 12/12................................36.00
1st Nat'l Bank - Philip, Utility Postage -
12/12....................................... 114.34
Fitzgerald Oil Co., Fuel/LP -
12/12 ....................................1,159.02
Flesner, Gordon, Refund Water Over-
payment - 12/12 ........................10.00
Golden West, Telephone/Ìnternet 11-
12/12 .......................................588.27
Haynes, Brad, Cust. Deposit Refund -
12/12 .......................................100.00
Heartland Waste Mgmt, Ìnc., 365 Resi-
dential Collection - 12/12......3,978.50
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies/Equip -
12/12 .........................................97.44
Jones, Disa, Cust. Deposit Refund -
12/12 .......................................100.00
Petty Cash, Supplies/Postage 11-12/12
38.15
Philip Health Services, Cust. Deposit
Refund (315 E Pine St) ...........100.00
Philip Standard, Fuel - 12/12.......607.95
Pioneer Review, Publishing/Supplies -
12/12 .......................................553.02
Schulz, Enid, Cust. Deposit Refund -
12/12 .......................................100.00
SD Dept. of Revenue, Water Coliform
Testing - 12/12...........................13.00
Smith, Brittany, Election School Mileage
Reimb. ......................................63.64
Smith, Lindsay, Refund Water Overpay-
ment - 12/12..............................10.00
Stamp Fulfillment Center, Stamped En-
velopes - 12/12........................549.90
US Postal Service, Stamps -
12/12 .......................................180.00
USTÌ, 2012 Tax Forms ..................95.00
West Central Electric, Electric 10/31/12-
12/01/12 ...............................3,171.72
WR/LJ Rural Water, 2,058,000 gals. -
12/12 ....................................2,572.50
Contract Min. - 12/12............2,500.00
Airport Water - 12/12.................40.00
South Shop Water - 12/12.........20.00
Total Expenditures -
12/28/12 ...........................$42,843.67
OId Business:
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Arthur to approve the second reading
of Ordinance #2012-20, Supplemental
Appropriations Ordinance, Unanticipated
Expenses. Motion carried with all mem-
bers voting aye.
ORDINANCE #2012-20
2012 SUPPLEMENTAL
APPROPRIATIONS
ORDINANCE
UNANTICIPATED
EXPENSES
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota has realized un-
expected and unanticipated
expenses within the General
Fund Budget in 2012 due to
several additional special
meetings and the costs associ-
ated with said meetings, more
specifically publishing costs;
and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
in order to meet worker's com-
pensation safety requirements,
invested in updated safety
equipment for the welfare of
law enforcement. The City has
been awarded grant funds to
cover some of these costs, but
said grant funds have not been
received to date and in order to
assure compliance with SDCL
appropriations laws, the City
has determined that it is in their
best interest to take precau-
tionary measures to insure the
integrity of said City appropria-
tions;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
ORDAINED, that the following
Supplemental Appropriations
Ordinance be and hereby is
adopted:
GENERAL FUND
41100 LEGISLATIVE
41100
Publishing ...........$2,500.00
TOTAL
LEGISLATIVE.....$2,500.00
42100 PUBLIC SAFETY
42100 Police
Equip......................$600.00
TOTAL PUBLIC
SAFETY.................$600.00
TOTAL APPROP. &
ACCUM. .............$3,100.00
MEANS OF FINANCE
The foIIowing designates the
fund or funds that money de-
rived from the foIIowing
sources is appIied to.
GENERAL FUND
10400 UNASSIGNED CASH
BALANCE
10400 Unassigned
Cash ...................$2,500.00
TOTAL UNASSIGNED
CASH..................$2,500.00
10430 ASSIGN. CASH PO-
LICE EQUIP.
10430 Assign. Cash Police
Equipment..............$600.00
TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS/
DONATIONS..........$600.00
TOTAL MEANS OF
FINANCE............$3,100.00
Dated this 28th day of Decem-
ber 2012.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint,
Finance Officer
Passed First Reading: De-
cember 03, 2012
Passed Second Reading:
December 28, 2012
Yeas: 4 Nays: 0
Published: Dec. 13, 2012 and
Jan. 10, 2013
FO Van Lint updated the Council on the
conversion of the utility billing software
from RVS to Asyst. She noted that Gen.
Maint. Pearson is currently running a par-
allel system÷working simultaneously in
both systems in order to ensure that
everything is working properly. The plan
for the official conversion to the Asyst
software is expected to occur with either
the February or March utility billing.
Council Member Henrie questioned if the
historical data for each customer account
is included in the conversion? Van Lint
advised that it is not moved over from the
RVS system and in turn, the RVS system
will remain as a backup source for at least
a year following the conversion.
PWD Reckling updated the Council on
the repairs needed to the lift station's wet
well. He noted that the City's engineer,
Harlan Quenzer with SPN & Assoc., has
reviewed options to laser the depth and
condition of the wet well in an effort to de-
termine the extremities of needed repairs.
This option, according to Mr. Quenzer, is
estimated to cost well above $15,000 and
in his opinion, is an astronomical ex-
pense. Therefore, he has recommended
the City hire SPN to review the condition
of the well by lowering one of their em-
ployees in to inspect the wet well. At this
time, a cost estimate for SPN's work is
not available.
PWD Reckling stated that he will obtain a
cost estimate for SPN's proposed work
and report back to the Council after the
new year.
New Business:
Mary Burnett, Ìnsurance Agent with First
National Agency, addressed the Council
with insurance policy updates and ques-
tions regarding the City's property, liabil-
ity, and inland marine insurance coverage
through Continental Western Group
(CWG).
Burnett stated that the Finance Office,
PWD Reckling and other City personnel
have been busy providing her the needed
information in order to make updates to
the City's insurance, but as for the type of
coverage, this needs to be determined by
the City Council. More specifically, if cov-
erage is for actual cost value (ACV) or re-
placement costs estimate (RCE) as well
as any other changes such as de-
ductibles.
Burnett noted that the main focus of up-
dating the City's insurance coverage has
centered on the City's property coverage
as CWG believes some of them are un-
dervalued. A listing of the properties was
presented and reviewed, showing the
coverage and description changes that
have been made as well as the new RCE
that have been determined by CWG for
the properties. Ìn addition, other proper-
ties owned by the City have been added
in order to ensure that the City's liability
insurance covers all the properties owned
by the City. Ìt was noted that if the Council
wishes not to make the recommended in-
creases to the properties, the insurance
company has proposed changing their
classification from RCE to ACV.
Some of the properties reviewed in more
detail were the south shop, pool bath-
house, airport hangars, rubble site shed,
and municipal building. For instance, the
current values of these buildings are
lower than today's RCE. Ìn addition, they
are looking into including the van body
storage unit that is adjacent to the south
shop as part of the south shop's coverage
area.
Burnett went on to state that the one
property that she would like addressed at
this time is the pool bathhouse, noting the
increase in its value due to the recent im-
provements. Ìt is currently covered at a
RCE of $56,000, but after the improve-
ments, the underwriters have provided ei-
ther a minimum limit of $115,300 for a
premium of $405/year or a maximum limit
of $144,133 for a premium of $481/year.
They have not provided a RCE at this
time.
Council Member Henrie stated that she
would prefer to pay the additional $76 in
premium for the maximum amount of cov-
erage. Ìt was mentioned that this is a min-
imal amount when considering the
difference in coverage.
Discussion regarding the pool bath-
house's coverage ensued and Burnett
advised that if the Council would prefer to
wait for a RCE, the City's coverage will
continue at its current values.
By general consensus of the Council,
they will wait until a RCE is available for
the pool bathhouse before increasing its
property coverage.
The property insurance coverage for the
airport hangars was then discussed in de-
tail. Ìt was reported that three of the four
hangars are well below their RCE. Ìn ad-
dition, Burnett requested more detailed
costs for the wind cone and segmented
circle.
Mayor Vetter and Council Member Arthur
both voiced concern for increasing the
values on the hangars as it would result
in an increase in premiums. Ìt was ques-
tioned if the revenue the City receives for
hangar rent would even cover the pre-
mium costs and in turn, would it be a ben-
efit to the City.
Council Member Larson questioned the
City's liability for the airplanes housed in
the hangars if the City does not increase
the property values. FO Van Lint advised
that the City had a previous occurrence
where an airplane was damaged along
with a hangar during a wind storm. Fol-
lowing that occurrence, the City's insur-
ance was sued and the case settled. Ìt
was after this event that the City imple-
mented the requirement that all airplanes
housed at the airport must carry and pro-
vide proof of insurance in order to rent
hangar space.
Ìt was noted that the City also carries
hangar keepers insurance and fuel liabil-
ity insurance for the airport.
Burnett went on to discuss that the rubble
site building's new RCE mirrors that of the
recent shed at the swimming pool and the
municipal building's new RCE is also con-
siderably higher than its current value.
She also explained that business prop-
erty has been increased in some in-
stances. This is for the property that is
housed continuously on the property.
Burnett then advised the Council that the
City's umbrella policy has changed to an
excess liability policy. She noted that the
same provisions will apply except for that
of the underlying limits and excess liabil-
ity. For instance, if a limit of coverage is
stipulated in one policy, the excess will
not apply. Currently the City's liability pol-
icy's limit is $1 million, the umbrella policy
is for $1 million and the auto liability with
a revision of the policy can increase up to
$5 million. The premium for this coverage
is estimated at $1,224.00 per year which
is a $24.00 increase from 2012.
Burnett stated that she would like to do
what's best for the City while providing af-
fordable insurance premiums. Ìt was
mentioned that with the increases in the
RCE's for the properties, the premiums
will more than likely increase. Ìn turn, she
questioned the Council's thoughts on
what types of coverage they would like to
see for the properties as well as the op-
tion of increasing the deductible as it is
currently $250.
Ìt was questioned whether or not the
smaller properties are even worth insur-
ing as the City may be able to self insure
those. For instance, the rubble site shed
that is currently valued at $1,050.00.
Mayor Vetter then requested a compari-
son of each property showing the current
premium along with the new RCE and
ACV with their premiums at a $500 and
$1,000 deductible.
Burnett confirmed that she will work on
this and report back once the information
is available. Until then, the current cover-
age for the properties will remain.
Mayor, Council and those in attendance
thanked Burnett as she left the meeting
at this time.
Street Ìmprov. Projects:
The Wood and Walden Ave. project plans
have been updated and approved by SD
Dept. of Environment and Natural Re-
sources per their request.
The bid opening for the following projects
has been scheduled for Feb. 4, 2013, at
4:00 p.m.: Wood/Walden Ave. utility and
street improvements; and, E. Pine
St./Wray Ave. overlay project.
FO Van Lint reported on the recent finding
from the SD Dept. of Revenue (DOR) re-
garding the City's 2013 property tax re-
quest. She noted that the amount the City
is able to collect is $5,809.00 less than
that adopted in the 2013 appropriations
ordinance and submitted to the County
for collection of 2012 taxes in 2013.
She reminded the Council that the Coun-
cil approved to take an increase in tax
collections of new growth plus 1.5% of
the allowed 3% Consumer Pricing Ìndex
(CPÌ). At that time, the DOR provided an
estimate of 1.8% for growth, but once the
final amounts were calculated, the growth
was only .22%. This is the cause for the
decrease in available tax revenue.
She went on to explain that in order to re-
flect this change, the City submitted an
amended certification of taxes to the
County Auditor. Ìt was reported that this
had to be completed prior to the year-end
Council meeting as the County was push-
ing the deadline to print tax statements.
On the other hand, the Council still has
the option to amend the 2013 appropria-
tions ordinance and take the full 3% CPÌ.
Mayor Vetter mentioned Council Member
Larson's ideas of cost savings throughout
2013 as well as the potential for sales tax
revenue being higher than anticipated to
cover the shortfall in property tax rev-
enue. Ìt was noted that sales tax revenue
for 2012 is considerably higher than an-
ticipated and budgeted.
No action was taken.
FO Van Lint advised the Council that
City's drug and alcohol testing contract
services provided by Black Hills Occupa-
tional Medicine (BHOM) will be changing.
oontinued on page 8
City Council Legal con’t. from 7
Legal NoticesDeadline: Fridays at Noon
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 8
They will no longer be coming to Philip to
provide services, but will offer the drug
testing portion through Philip Health Serv-
ices, Inc. (PHSI) and the alcohol testing
in either Rapid City or Pierre.
She reported that BHOM also served
Scotchman Industries and following the
last testing, they have determined to
switch from BHOM to Sanford Laborato-
ries. She then reviewed a cost compari-
son of the two companies noting that
BHOM is cheaper, but this does not in-
clude the costs that would be incurred for
employees to travel to Rapid City or
Pierre for any required alcohol testing.
Larson questioned if the City switches to
Sanford, would drug testing still be avail-
able at PHSI when needed. Van Lint con-
firmed and stated that it will be either
completed at PHSI or during the next
testing day.
Following discussion, motion was made
by Gartner, seconded by Arthur to ap-
prove changing the City’s drug and alco-
hol testing services from BHOM to San-
ford Laboratories. Motion carried.
Council reviewed the Commercial
Garbage Hauler’s permits for 2013, not-
ing that Waste Connections of S.D. dba
Walker Refuse has not provided proof of
a current landfill contact per the licensing
requirements.
Motion was then made by Gartner, sec-
onded by Larson to approve Heartland
Waste Management’s and Waste Con-
nections of S.D. dba Walker Refuse’s
Commercial Garbage Hauler’s permits for
2013. Walker Refuse’s permit is contin-
gent upon receiving proof of their landfill
contract. Motion carried.
Council reviewed the 2012 year-end
sales tax revenues reported at
$407,847.03 which is up 2.94% from
2011. Appreciation was expressed to the
community for supporting the local econ-
omy.
Council reviewed the SD Dept. of Envi-
ronment and Natural Resources on-site
evaluation report of the City’s water sys-
tem completed on Nov. 13, 2012.
Council reviewed the following building
permits: Ralph McQuirk for Dean & David
Fitzgerald - sewer repair/replacement;
and, Ralph McQuirk for Tena Slovek -
emergency sewer repair/ replacement.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the above building
permits as presented above. Motion car-
ried.
Council reviewed the following L/P
Propane bids received this month:
Dec. 10 Dec. 28
2012 2012
Fitzgerald Oil
Company $1.24/gal. $1.27/gal.
Midwest
Cooperatives $1.25/gal. $1.35/gal.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the election agree-
ment and the following resolution combin-
ing the municipal election with the school
election on April 9th, 2013, with the only
polling place at the school. Motion carried
with all members voting aye.
Resolution to Hold a Joint
Election with the School
WHEREAS, it appears to the
governing body of the City of
Philip that combining the mu-
nicipal and school election
would result in a reduction in
cost to both governmental en-
tities and,
WHEREAS, such a combined
election would result in in-
creased public interest and
participation,
BE IT THEREFORE RE-
SOLVED, that subject to the
approval of the governing body
of Haakon County School Dis-
trict 27-1, the municipal elec-
tion normally scheduled for
April 9, 2013, be held in con-
junction with the school elec-
tion scheduled for April 9,
2013, upon such agreement for
cost sharing as may be mutu-
ally agreed.
Dated this 28th day of Decem-
ber 2012.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint,
Finance Officer
Council was then informed of the follow-
ing positions that will be up for election
this year: Ward I (currently held by Greg
Arthur) - 2 Year Term; Ward II (currently
held by Marion Matt) - 2 Year Term; Ward
III (currently held by Jennifer Henrie) - 2
Year Term.
Nominating petitions for these positions
may begin circulation no earlier than the
25th day of January 2013 and must be
filed with the Finance Office no later than
the 22nd day of February 2013. Petitions
are available in the City Finance Office.
At 4:46 p.m., motion was made by Hen-
rie, seconded by Gartner to enter into ex-
ecutive session per SDCL 1-25-2(1) for
2013 personnel salaries. Motion carried.
At 5:16 p.m., motion was made by Hen-
rie, seconded by Gartner to come out of
executive session with the following ac-
tion: Motion was made by Henrie, sec-
onded by Arthur to approve the following
employee salary increases for 2013: 5%
- Brittany Smith; 4% - Matt Reckling; 3%
- David Butler, Rick Coyle, Kit Graham,
Jason Petersen, Monna Van Lint; and,
2% - Brian Pearson. Motion carried with
all members voting aye.
Public Comments: None.
Other Business:
Departmental Inventories for 2012 need
to be completed and returned to the Fi-
nance Office by no later than Jan. 10,
2013.
Mayor Vetter advised the Council that a
meeting with Jay Baxter and the neigh-
borhood community that has voiced con-
cerns regarding the Dakota Mill and Grain
expansion has been scheduled for Dec.
30th at 4:00 p.m. The meeting will entail
reviewing the notes from the City’s engi-
neer taken during the public hearing in
October. He has invited the building com-
mittee to attend.
The SD Assoc. of Rural Water Meeting is
Jan. 8-10, 2013, in Pierre.
The SD Dept. of Transportation is hosting
a meeting to discuss the proposed sale of
the Canadian Pacific Railroad on Jan. 15,
2013, in Pierre.
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Arthur to authorize Reckling and
Coyle’s attendance at the Pesticide Re-
certification on Jan. 23, 2013, in Rapid
City. Motion carried.
Pipeline Safety Emergency Response
program will be held on Jan. 29, 2013, in
Rapid City.
SDML Day at the Legislature is Feb. 5-6,
2013, in Pierre.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to authorize Reckling, Coyle,
Pearson, and Petersen’s attendance at
the SDML WC Fund Annual Safety Train-
ing on Feb. 14, 2013, in Wall. This is the
City personnel’s yearly "M Shaw” training.
Motion carried.
City Offices will be closed Jan. 1, 2013, in
observance of the New Year’s holiday.
The next Regular Council Meeting will be
held on Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, at 7:00
p.m. in the Community Rm.
With nothing further to come before the
Council, Mayor Vetter declared the meet-
ing adjourned at 5:25 p.m.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Brittany Smith,
Deputy Finance Officer
[Published January 10, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $307.68]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
SPECIAL SESSION
DECEMBER 26, 2012
The Haakon County Commissioner’s
Meeting was called to order at 1:04 PM
on Wednesday, December 26, 2012. A
quorum was established with Chairman
Edward Briggs, Vice Chairman Steve
Clements, Members Rita O’Connell,
Nicholas Konst and Gary Snook in atten-
dance. Also present were State Auditor
Bruce Hintz, Auditor Pat Freeman,
Deputy Auditor Carla Smith, Highway Su-
perintendent Kenny Neville, Highway
Secretary Val Williams, Sheriff Fred
Koester, Deputy Sheriff Seth Marbry, Tom
Radway and Pioneer Review Represen-
tative Nancy Haigh.
A letter was received from the South
Dakota Department of Veteran Affairs in-
forming the commission that our Vet-
eran’s Affairs Officer, Terry Deuter was up
for reappointment for a period of four
years through the first Monday in January
2017. A motion was made by Vice Chair-
man Stephen Clements, seconded with
all in agreement to appoint Veterans Offi-
cer Terry Deuter until January 2017.
At 1:30 PM, State Auditor Bruce Hintz met
with the commission to have the exit con-
ference concerning the 2012 Audit of
2010 and 2011. There were no written
comments about the audit and a few ver-
bal comments. Mr. Hintz reported that the
audit had gone very well.
A copy of the final revision of the Haakon
County Policy Handbook was handed out
to commissioners. It was given to each
commissioner to review. At the January 8,
2013, meeting, the new 2012 Revised
Haakon County Personnel Policy Hand-
book will be approved, if the commission-
ers agree. Any employee receiving the
new Haakon County Policy Handbook will
be asked to sign stating that the hand-
book was received and that it would be
read.
The SDSU Memorandum of Understand-
ing for 2013 was approved by a motion
from Commissioner Nick Konst, sec-
onded with all in agreement. It was dis-
cussed that one more year would be
given to see if things improved for the
county 4-H group. There was also a re-
quest for prior travel approval. It is the
policy of Haakon County that if travel is
paid, it be pre-approved. Carrie Weller
would be contacted regarding this re-
quest.
The Resolution 2012-5 which was ap-
proved on March 3, 2012, was rescinded
due to the SD Codified Laws referred to
in the resolution. The correct Codified
Laws were 31-11-41 thru 31-11-45 which
refer to maintenance of private roads.
SDCL referred to in the resolution was for
new construction. A motion was made to
rescind the resolution, seconded with all
in agreement.
A motion was made to go into Executive
Session on personnel matters at 2:20
PM. The motion was seconded with all in
agreement. At 2:45 PM, the session
ended with no action taken.
Sheriff Fred Koester and Deputy Sheriff
Seth Marbry met with the commission to
report on a firearm incident in the Veteran
Officer’s room. Sheriff Koester also re-
ported that his office was working on the
inventory in the “evidence room” which is
the old jail room on fourth floor. Also re-
ported was that Deputy Sheriff Marbry’s
name has been sent in to the training
academy but not yet confirmed with a
date. The deputy has one year to com-
plete his certification. He has qualified
with firearms with instructor Terry Deuter.
There was some discussion on which
motor graders to trade in the next pur-
chase. Commissioner Nicholas Konst
had gotten information on the five motor-
graders concerning date purchased, unit
number, number of years with warranty,
expenses not including payment, those
without warranty and the average cost
per year. This gave the commission valu-
able information as to which graders were
costing the most money.
The Auditor’s Account with the County
Treasurer was presented as taxes for the
month of October 2012.
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...............................62,204.27
Cash Management Fund...1,336,967.56
Bank Balance...........................1,552.96
Checks & Cash on Hand........30,885.69
The Auditor’s Account with the County
Treasurer was presented as taxes for the
month of November 2012.
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...............................62,204.21
Cash Management Fund...1,586,946.20
Bank Balance..............................622.23
Checks & Cash on Hand........10,808.02
The Vendor Warrants were presented
for end of year expenses paid in Decem-
ber 2012:
ELECTION
ELECTION SYSTEMS/SOFTWARE
INC SUPPLIES ...................2,246.17
2,246.17
AUDITOR
CARLA SMITH, TRAVEL ..............68.09
CENTURY BUSINESS LEASING, INC.,
MAINT - COPIER .....................24.94
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, GROUP
INS ...........................................10.00
PATRICIA G FREEMAN,
TRAVEL ....................................82.88
MCLEODS PRINTING & SUPPLY, SUP-
PLIES .....................................218.68
OFFICEMAX INCORPORATED, AUDI-
TOR SUPPLIES ..................1,246.38
U S POSTAL SERVICE, AUDITOR
SUPPLIES ..............................558.10
2,209.07
TREASURER
HCS, EQUIPMENT .................1,830.20
HAAKON COUNTY TREASURER,
POSTAGE ..............................473.75
U S POSTAL SERVICE,
SUPPLIES ..............................776.85
3,080.80
STATE’S ATTORNEY
POSTMASTER, MISC/POSTAGE/
ETC ..........................................76.00
76.00
COURT APPOINTED ATTORNEY
KSL CORP/KEVIN S LEWIS, COURT
APPOINTED ATTORNEY ....6,802.00
6,802.00
COURTHOUSE
COYLE'S SUPERVALU,
SUPPLIES ................................52.22
HEARTLAND PAPER CO,
SUPPLIES ..............................108.45
INGRAM HARDWARE,
SUPPLIES ..............................101.88
KONE INC, PROFESSIONAL
FEES ......................................230.03
STATE FLAG ACCOUNT,
SUPPLIES ................................60.69
553.27
DIRECTOR OF EQUALIZATION
FIRST WESTERN INSURANCE WALL,
LIABILITY/WORKMANS COMP
INS ...........................................50.00
RELIABLE OFFICE SUPPLIES, SUP-
PLIES .....................................137.20
SD SEC OF STATE, PROFESSIONAL
FEES ........................................30.00
217.20
REGISTER OF DEEDS
MCLEOD’S PRINTING & SUPPLY,
SUPPLIES ..............................480.55
MICROFILM IMAGING SYSTEMS INC,
PROFESSIONAL FEES .........200.00
HAAKON COUNTY TREASURER,
OTHER EXPENSE ...................90.00
770.55
VETERANS SERVICE
DATASPEC INC, PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES .............................399.00
399.00
SHERIFF
AT&T MOBILITY, UTILITIES.........91.85
COYLE’S STANDARD, REPAIRS &
MAINT ......................................57.95
COYLE’S STANDARD, FUEL.....342.20
D&T AUTO PARTS, REPAIRS & MAINT
140.39
SETH MARBRY, FUEL ................21.00
MG OIL COMPANY, FUEL ...........81.25
NEVE'S UNIFORM & EQUIPMENT,
SUPPLIES ..............................419.69
PETERSEN'S VARIETY,
SUPPLIES ................................46.99
PHILIP CLINIC, PROFESSIONAL FEES
................................................100.00
HCS, PROFESSIONAL FEES....180.00
1,481.32
JAIL
WINNER POLICE DEPARTMENT, JAIL
EXPENSES .........................2,985.89
2,985.89
SUPPORT OF POOR
BLACK HILLS ORTHO & SPINE CENT,
PROF SERVICES ...............4,255.29
COMM HEALTH CENTER OF BH,
PROF SERVICES ..................104.61
CLINICAL LAB OF THE BLACK HILLS,
PROF SERVICES ..................120.06
DAKOTA RADIOLOGY, PROF SERV-
ICES .........................................25.29
PHILIP EYE CARE, PROF
SERVICES .................................6.00
PHILIP HEALTH SERVICES, PROF
SERVICES .............................119.70
RAPID CITY REG HOSPITAL, PROF
SERVICES .............................196.65
RAPID CITY REGIONAL HOSP INC,
PROF SERVICES ..................727.35
REG HEALTH PHYSICIANS, PROF
SERVICES .............................289.90
WEST RIVER ANESTHESIOLOGY,
CONS PROF SERVICES .......743.38
6,588.23
MENTALLY ILL
PENNINGTON CO STATES ATTOR-
NEY, PROF SERVICES .........215.00
RAPID CITY REG HOSPITAL, PROF
SERVICES .............................167.20
RAPID CITY REGIONAL HOSP INC,
PROF SERVICES ..................620.96
1,003.16
LIBRARY
MOUNTAIN PLAINS LIBRARY ASSOC,
ANNUAL DUES & MEMBERSHIP
FEES ........................................40.00
SDLA PROFESSIONAL FEES .....35.00
75.00
EXTENSION SERVICE
CARRIE WELLER, TRAVEL ........98.12
SHERYL HANSEN, TRAVEL .........8.14
HAAKON COUNTY TREASURER,
POSTAGE ................................45.98
152.24
WEED CONTROL
VIRGIL SMITH, PROFESSIONAL FEES
................................................500.00
VIRGIL SMITH, TRAVEL ..............30.34
530.34
ROAD & BRIDGE
ALL STAR AUTO, AUTOMOTIVE/
MAJOR EQUIPMENT .........8,000.00
AT&T MOBILITY, UTILITIES ........50.50
BUTLER MACHINERY CO INC, RE-
PAIRS & MAINT .....................756.89
CENEX HARVEST STATES, SUPPLIES
..................................................13.48
D&F TRUCK & AUTO, ELECTRIC RE-
PAIRS & MAINT .....................125.90
D&T AUTO PARTS, REPAIRS & MAINT
26.33
D&T AUTO PARTS, SUPPLIES....99.74
DWARE INC, PROF
SERVICES ..........................1,470.00
ELSON EQUIPMENT, REPAIRS &
MAINT ....................................550.00
FITZGERALD OIL CO,
FUEL....................................1,970.00
GROSSENBURG IMPLEMENT INC,
SUPPLIES ................................48.00
HEARTLAND WASTE MANAGEMENT
INC, UTILITIES ........................21.20
INGRAM HARDWARE,
SUPPLIES ..................................4.69
INLAND TRUCK PARTS COMPANY,
REPAIRS & MAINT ................260.00
KONST MACHINE SUPPLIES .....37.90
TOWN OF MIDLAND,
UTILITIES .................................22.00
PHILIP MOTOR, INC REPAIRS &
MAINT ....................................390.62
SD DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION,
ROAD/BRIDGE PROJECTS.....94.10
SD FEDERAL PROPERTY AGENCY,
SUPPLIES ................................77.50
HAAKON COUNTY TREASURER, R&B
OTHER CURRENT
EXPENSES ................................5.00
TWILIGHT FIRST AID SUPPLY, ...........
SUPPLIES ................................35.55
14,059.40
9-1-1
CENTURYLINK, 9-1-1 ................113.40
113.40
EMERGENCY & DISASTER
HAAKON COUNTY TREASURER,
OTHER EXPENSES ................45.00
45.00
COURTHOUSE
CENEX HARVEST STATES, BUILDING
FUND .......................................18.83
INGRAM HARDWARE, BUILDING
FUND .....................................185.90
LURZ PLUMBING, BUILDING
FUND .....................................480.92
MOSES BUILDING CENTER INC,
BUILDING FUND ...................139.94
825.59
Total Checks ..........................44,213.63
The final approval of vendor bills was mo-
tioned by Commissioner Rita O’Connell
and seconded by Nicholas Konst, with all
in agreement.
The following motion was made by Com-
missioner Gary Snook, seconded by Vice
Chairman Stephen Clements with all in
agreement, to transfer from 101-112 Con-
tingency, which has a balance of
$48,852.00, the following cash balances:
101-120 Elections .......................544.34
101-153 Court Appt. Atty. .........5,246.01
101-161 Courthouse ..............13,053.87
101-212 Jail Expenses.............1,983.16
101-411 Support of the Poor ..23,311.94
101-441 Mentally Ill ..................3,247.64
101-611 Extension ......................627.63
Total........................................48,014.58
$48,852.00 .........................Contingency
- 48,014.58 ..............Dollars Transferred
$837.42.................................Remaining
In the 233 Courthouse Building budget,
there is a -$26,441.84. The 233 Court-
house Bldg Cash Fund is $23,660.02. A
motion was made to transfer $2,781.82
cash into the 233 Courthouse Building
Fund. The motion was seconded with all
in agreement. The 233 Courthouse Cash
Fund total is $23,660.02 plus $2,781.82
(transferred cash from 101 General)
equals $26,441.84 balance in the 233
cash fund. Commissioner Rita O’Connell
made a motion to supplement the budget.
Vice Chairman Stephen Clements sec-
onded with all in agreement. The result
will be $23,661.02, leaving 233 Court-
house Bldg Cash at “0” and 233-161
Courthouse Bldg budget with a “0” bal-
ance.
The meeting was adjourned at 5:40 PM.
The next Regular Commissioner’s Meet-
ing will be on Tuesday, January 8, 2013,
at 1:00 PM in the Commissioner’s Room
in the Courthouse.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMISSIONER
Edward Briggs, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published January 10, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $158.88]
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 • Philip
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports
HOME FOR SALE
300 HIGH ST. • PHILIP, SD
•2 Bedrooms •Trees in Front & Back Yards
•1 Bathroom •Back Yard Fenced
•Utility Room• •Many Perennial Plants
•1-Car Attached Garage •Storage Shed
•Full Basement •Permanent Siding
•Back Deck •Propane Heat & Central Air
Contact: (605) 859-3367 ~ 859-3249 ~ 567-3515
A drama in one-act
by Christian Kiley
Produced by
special
arrangement
with eatrefolk.
Admission – Adults: $3
Students Grades 1-12: $2
– Sunday –
January 13th
2:00 p.m.
Philip High School
Fine Arts Building
The Philip High School Drama Club presents
WEEKly SPECiAl:
Philly Steak Sandwich with French Fries
859-2430 • Philip
SuNDAy
SPECiAl:
Roast Beef
with Mashed Potatoes &
Gravy, Dinner Roll,
Salad Bar & Dessert
Kids’ bowling starts January 14th ~ Sign up today!
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers..........................................4-0
Shad’s Towing...............................3-1
Badland’s Auto..............................1-3
Petersen’s......................................0-4
Handrahan Const.........................NA
Dakota Bar ...................................NA
Hightlights:
Andrew Reckling........3-10 split; 246
Trina Brown.................................182
Ron Coyle .....................................201
Connie Schlim..............2-7 split; 180
Tena Slovek.....................4-7-10 split
Wendell Buxcel ............3-6-7-10 split
Jerry Mooney........................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm....................................7-1
Bowling Belles ..............................5-3
Invisibles.......................................5-3
Cutting Edge Salon ......................4-4
Jolly Ranchers ..............................1-7
Highlights:
Judy Papousek...............176,173/481
Deanna Fees........3-10 split; 154/422
Debbie Gartner....3-10 split; 147/425
Audrey Jones......................3-10 split
Kay Kroetch..........................7-9 split
Donna King .....................3-9-10 split
Wednesday Night Early
Morrison’s Haying ....................35-25
Dakota Bar................................34-26
Wall Food Center......................34-26
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................33.5-26.5
First National Bank ...........29.5-30.5
Hildebrand Concrete ..........26.5-33.5
Just Tammy’s......................24.5-35.5
Dorothy’s Catering ...................23-37
Highlights:
Kalie Kjerstad.......................130/314
Kathy Arthur ........................181/483
Amy Morrison .......................180/481
Shar Moses............................172/474
Christy Park......................3-6-7 split
Val Schulz.............................5-7 split
Dani Herring.....................5-7-9 split
Brenda Grena.......................2-7 split
Thursday Men
A&M Laundry...........................37-15
Dakota Bar................................36-16
O’Connell Const ........................32-20
McDonnell Farms .....................25-27
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................23-29
West River Pioneer Tanks .......22-30
WEE BADD...............................19-33
The Steakhouse ........................14-38
Highlights:
JJ Walker ..............................196/508
Steve McDonnell ..........................228
Wendell Buxcel .....................223/573
Brian Pearson.......2-5-7 & 5-6 splits;
...............................................221/609
Neal Petersen...............................561
Matt Reckling........5-7 split; 200/554
Alvin Pearson........................215/552
Jason Petersen ....3-10 split; 206/553
Jan Bielmaier .............3-10 split; 212
Greg Arthur........................205 clean
Corky Thorson....................197 clean
Cory Boyd ...........................3-10 split
Mark Foland......................2-5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel.......3-10 & 2-4-10 split
Friday Night Mixed
Lee & the Ladies...........................7-1
Randy’s Spray Service..................7-1
Cristi’s Crew.................................4-4
King Pins.......................................3-5
Roy’s Repair ..................................2-6
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Aaron Richardson .................224/626
Ed Morrison ..........................210/526
Duane Hand ......................3-10 split;
.....................................211 clean/578
Debbie Gartner .....................172/477
Tanner Norman ................3-10 x 2 &
................................3-9-10 splits; 558
Jerry Iron Moccasin..............200/555
Alvin Pearson.................3-7-10 split;
.....................................201 clean/548
John Heltzel .........................5-7 split
Dorothy Hansen .................5-10 split
Scotties pulled down by Coyotes
In a home game, the Philip Lady
Scotties defeated the visiting New
Underwood Tigers, Thursday, Jan-
uary 3.
The first quarter for the varsity
game saw the Scotties take the ad-
vantage, though that lead dimin-
ished to just one field goal before
halftime.
The third quarter was tight, but
Philip expanded the lead. The final
quarter simply cinched the win for
the Scotties.
1 2 3 4
Philip 16 22 30 45
New Underwood 11 20 25 34
Field goals: Philip – 18/51 – 35%.
Free throws: Philip – 9/23 – 39%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 0/1 – 0%.
Philip scorers: Bailey Radway – 13, Madi-
son Hand – 11, Holly Iwan – 9, Jordyn
Dekker – 6, Krista Wells – 4, Hanna Hostut-
ler – 2.
New Underwood scorers: Taylor Brind-
ley – 14, Jacy Benter – 11.
Rebounds: Philip – 32, New Underwood –
27. Philip leaders: Hand – 10, Radway and
Dekker – 7 each, Wells – 4, Iwan and Hostut-
ler – 2 each.
Assists: 12. Leaders: Radway – 4, Hand,
Wells and Dekker – 2 each, Iwan and Hostut-
Lady Scotties defeat New Underwood Tigers 45-34
Thomas Doolittle
goes up for two
when the Scotties
took on the Jones
County Coyotes,
Friday, January 4.
Photo by Karlee
Barnes,
Murdo Coyote
Jordyn Dekker’s shot was quickly halted as the New Underwood Lady Tigers
moved in to protect the basket. Katie Hostutler, #33, was positioned to take a
pass from Dekker if needed. Photo by Nancy Haigh
Madison Hand took one for the team after her shot attempt was blocked by the
New Underwood player. Jordyn Dekker, left, and Bailey Radway, right, were coming
in for the rebound. Photo by Nancy Haigh
The Philip Scotties challenged
the Jones County Coyotes on the
Murdo court, Friday, January 4.
The Scotties had a solid lead at
the end of the first quarter, and
were still holding on to that advan-
tage come halftime.
The third quarter, though, saw a
turn around, with Philip trailing by
two. Philip made only four three-
point baskets out of 21 tries, and
lost three players due to fouls. For
the Scotties, the final quarter was
the lowest scoring one of the entire
game for either team. Jones
County shot ahead to win the
game..
1 2 3 4
Philip 18 32 41 50
Jones County 10 26 43 62
leaders: Hook – 16, Rush – 10, DeJong – 7,
Slovek – 6, Schaack – 4, Doolittle – 2, Guptill
and Brody Jones – 1 each.
Assists: 6. Leaders: Holman – 4, Rush and
Blake Martinez – 1 each.
Steals: 8. Leaders: DeJong and Guptill –
2 each, Holman, Doolittle, Hook and Slovek –
1 each.
Blocks: 1. Leader: Hook – 1.
Turnovers: Philip – 24.
Fouls: Philip – 29, Jones County – 22.
Fouled out: Holman, Doolittle and Hook.
The junior varsity played a closer
game, though similar in having the
lead at halftime and the loss at the
final buzzer. The first quarter was
a 8-8 tie. A field goal lead belonged
to the Scotties at the end of the sec-
ond quarter. The fourth quarter
saw that advantage slip by and the
Coyotes sprint ahead for the win.
1 2 3 4
Philip 8 14 19 24
Jones County 8 12 25 37
Field goals: Philip – 9/44 – 20%.
Free throws: Philip – 6/13 – 46%, Jones
County – 1/3 – 33%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 0/5 – 0%.
Philip scorers: Schaack – 8, Gavin
Brucklacher, Guptill and Ben Stangle – 4
each, Martinez and Jones – 2 each.
Jones County scorers: Venard – 12,
Dylan Kinsley – 8, J. Volmer – 6, Weber – 5,
John King – 4, Clayton Evans – 2.
Rebounds: Philip – 26. Leaders: Guptill –
9, Schaack – 4, Martinez and Jace Gian-
nonatti – 3 each, Jones, Brucklacher and
Kruse Bierle – 2 each, Jacob Kammerer – 1.
Assists: 5. Leaders: Jones – 3, Martinez
and Brucklacher – 1 each.
Steals: 12. Leaders: Jones – 5, Martinez
and Brucklacher – 2 each, Guptill, Stangle
and Giannonatti – 1 each.
Blocks: 2. Leader: Guptill – 2.
Turnovers: Philip – 13.
Fouls: Jones County – 11.
The next competition for the
Philip Scotties will be the Jones
County basketball tournament,
Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
January 10-11-12, in Murdo.
ler – 1 each.
Steals: 9. Leaders: Justina Cvach, Iwan,
Wells and Dekker – 2 each, Hand – 1.
Blocks: 6. Leaders: Wells – 3, Iwan, Hand
and Dekker – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 22, New Underwood –
20.
Fouls: Philip – 18. Fouled out: Dekker.
The junior varsity had a lower
scoring game, with Philip keeping
New Underwood off of the score-
The Philip Lady Scotties varsity
basketball team played a hard
fought game against the Tigers in
Dupree, Saturday, January 5. When
the final buzzer sounded to finish
overtime play, Philip was down by
three for a 43-46 loss.
The Scotties claimed the first
quarter by sinking 10 points worth
of shots and holding the Tigers to
just two points. By halftime,
though, the score was tied at 16.
The third quarter ended with Philip
trailing by just one point. Regular
play ended in a 36 tie. Philip’s
shooting game consisted of one in
four field goal shots hitting their
mark. Philip balanced this with giv-
ing Dupree only nine free throw
shots for the entire game. In over-
time, the Scotties put seven points
on the score board; not enough com-
pared to the Tigers’ 10.
1 2 3 4 O
Philip 10 16 23 36 43
Dupree 2 16 24 36 46
Field goals: Philip – 16/63 – 25%.
Free throws: Philip – 9/23 – 39%,
Dupree – 5/9 – 56%.
Philip scorers: Hand – 25, Jordyn
Dekker – 7, Bailey Radway – 6, Krista Wells –
4, Holly Iwan – 1.
Dupree scorers: Peyton Smith – 15, Cassy
Woodward and Tiffany Shaving – 10 each.
Rebounds: Philip – 38, Dupree – 31. Philip
leaders: Hand – 18, Radway – 9, Dekker – 5,
Iwan – 4, Wells – 2.
Assists: Philip – 11. Leaders: Radway – 5,
Iwan – 3, Dekker – 2, Wells – 1.
Steals: 23. Leaders: Hand – 8, Wells – 6,
Iwan – 4, Radway and Dekker – 2 each, Katlin
Knutson – 1.
Blocks: 11. Leaders: Iwan and Radway – 3
each, Hand and Wells – 2 each, Dekker – 1.
Turnovers: Philip – 21, Dupree – 26.
Fouls: Philip – 5. Dupree – 18. Fouled out:
Shaving and La’Chelle Eagle Chasing.
The Philip junior varsity had a
easier time in their game, handily
winning it by 11 points. At the end
of each quarter, the Scotties were
ahead. The fourth quarter saw more
scoring by Philip than in any earlier
quarter.
1 2 3 4
Philip 6 8 16 28
Dupree 4 6 12 17
Field goals: Philip – 11/58 – 19%.
Free throws: Philip – 6/12 – 50%.
Philip Scorers: – Hanna Hostutler – 14,
Brett Carley – 5, Ashton Reedy – 4, Ellie
Coyle – 3, Peyton DeJong – 2.
Dupree scorers: Jadyn Woodward – 9,
Tahnee Shaving – 8.
Rebounds: Philip – 24. Leaders: Hostut-
ler – 6, Tyana Gottsleben – 5, Kaci Olivier – 4,
Knutson – 3, Reedy – 2, Katie Hostutler, Car-
ley, Justina Cvach and Peyton DeJong – 1
each..
Assists: 3. Leader: K. Hostutler – 3.
Steals: 9. Leaders: H. Hostutler – 5, K.
Hostutler, Coyle and Cvach – 1 each.
Blocks: – 7. Carley and Coyle – 2 each, K.
Hostutler, H. Hostutler and Reedy – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 17.
Fouls: Philip – 13, Dupree – 10.
Scotties fall by three
Field goals:
Philip – 14/49 –
28%.
Free throws:
Philip – 10/25 –
40%, Jones County –
13 of 33 – 39%.
Thr e e - po i nt
goals: Philip –
4/19 – 21%.
Philip scorers:
Gunner Hook – 12,
Tate DeJong – 11,
Thomas Doolittle –
9, Nelson Holman
and Tristen Rush –
6 each, Wyatt
Schaack – 3, Quade
Slovek – 2, Paul
Guptill – 1.
Jones County
scorers: Gus
Volmer – 15, Wyatt
Hespe – 14, Philip
Mathews and Con-
nor Venard – 11
each, Wyatt Weber –
4, Skyler Miller – 3,
Wyatt Walker and
Jackson Volmer – 2
each.
R e b o u n d s :
Philip – 48. Philip
board for the first quarter. In the
third quarter, the Lady Scotties
doubled their opponents’ score, and
did the same in the final quarter for
a clear win.
1 2 3 4
Philip 6 15 20 26
New Underwood 0 5 10 13
Field goals: Philip – 9/40 – 23%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 1/1 – 100%.
Philip scorers: Katie Hostutler – 9, Brett
Carley – 5, Ellie Coyle and H. Hostutler – 4
each, Ta’Te Fortune and Ashton Reedy – 2
each.
New Underwood scorers: Karlie Robert-
son and Brianna Philipsen – 5 each.
Rebounds: Philip – 18, New Underwood –
17. Philip leaders: Peyton DeJong – 4, Coyle
and Cvach – 3 each, Fortune – 2, Megan
Williams, Kaci Olivier, Katlin Knutson, Car-
ley, Reedy and H. Hostutler – 1 each.
Assists: 3. Leaders: Carley, Knutson and
Katelyn Enders – 1 each.
Steals: 15. Leaders: K. Hostutler, Coyle,
H.Hostutler, Knutson and Reedy – 2 each,
Olivier, Fortune, Cvach, DeJong and Enders –
1 each.
Blocks: 5. Leaders: K. Hostutler – 3, Coyle
and Knutson – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 14, New Underwood –
17. Fouls: Philip – 11.
The first of eight Sunday breakfasts sponsored by the Philip Masonic Lodge #153
was January 2. The communitywide fundraiser will be held at the Bad River Senior
Masons’ Sunday breakfasts
Citizen’s Center
through February,
offering pancakes,
biscuits and gravy,
starting at 7:00
a.m. Funds will be
used to offer fami-
lies the free Child
Identification Pro-
grams (CHIP),
teachers the free
Masonic Student
Assistance Pro-
gram, and other
events to all of the
c o m m u n i t y .
Shown is the first
Sunday’s cook
and bottle-wash-
ing crew, from left,
Doug Thorson,
Nels Crowser and
Mel Smith.
Photo by D.Bartels
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review •Page 10
Sports & Community
Sacred Heart Church Basement •Philip
Sunday, Jan. 13th
DOORS OPEN
AT 2:00 P.M.
Games start at 3 p.m.
Lunch Available.
Sponsored by Sacred Heart Catholic Church of Philip
Musical Cast Stars: Joe Gittings, Jim Stangle, Roger Porch,
D
e
l
B
a
r
t
e
l
s
,
K
e
l
l
y
B
l
a
i
r
,
J
a
n
i
c
e
P
a
r
s
o
n
s
,
J
o
d
i
P
a
r
s
o
n
s
,
C
o
n
n
i
e
P
a
r
s
o
n
s
,
C
h
r
i
s
t
a
F
i
t
c
h
,
N
i
n
a
P
e
k
r
o
n
a
n
d
P
a
u
l
S
t
a
b
e
n
.
A
l
s
o
m
a
n
y
c
h
o
r
u
s
a
n
d
d
a
n
c
e
r
s
!
M a r l i s D o u d , l i n d a S t a n g l e , A l l i s o n P e k r o n , T o n y a B e r r y ,
Milesville Hall Presents
A 2-Act Musical
Comedy by
Martin A. Follose
and Bill Francoeur
it’s Fun Family Entertainment!!
Friday, January 18th.........................7:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 19th ....................7:00 p.m.
Sunday, January 20th.......................2:00 p.m.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:
Farm Bureau insurance, Philip
Golden Veterinary Service, Milesville
The Milesville Fire Department will be serving
soup & sandwiches at the
Hardingrove Free Church in Milesville
Friday & Saturday (Jan. 18-19): 5:30 p.m.
Sunday (Jan. 20): 12:00 Noon
These events are fundraisers for the Milesville Hall
and the Milesville Volunteer Fire Department.
Overall it was a good trip down
interstate to Presho for the Philip
Area grapplers as they brought
back second place, the sportsman-
ship award, eight individual plac-
ings, and Nick Donnelly garnered
the Quick Pin Award.
Lyman’s Mid-Dakota Monster
Tournament brought together 22
South Dakota teams and one from
Nebraska. Matt Donnelly, head
coach for Philip Area, noted it was
a good tournament for the wrest-
lers. He said the Spearfish/Lead-
Deadwood team is a good team.
The team is not yet 100 percent
due to injuries and illness, but it
was a good showing for Philip Area.
Team placings were Spearfish/
Lead-Deadwood (123), Philip Area
(111.5), Winner (108), O’Neill,
Neb., (106), Bennett County (86),
Stanley County (80), Potter County
(76), Redfield/Doland (71), Kings-
bury County (63.5), Custer and
Lyman (63), Rapid City Centeral
junior varsity (58), Mobridge-Pol-
lock (56), St. Thomas More (52.5),
Todd County (52) Newell (42), Hill
City (39), Pine Ridge (37.5), Kim-
ball/White Lake-Platte-Geddes
(32), Harding County (19), Sun-
shine Bible Academy (18), Red
Cloud (11) and Little Wound (6)
106 lbs: Jed Brown 2nd, 14-7 record
•Pinned Logan Schelske (LYM) 5:36
•Pinned Keagan Fitch (PHI) 4:19
•Major Dec. Cassen Burgess (RCC) 13-3
•Major Dec. Daniel Slama (SC) 10-0
•Major Dec. by Tyler Waterson (SLD) 3-12
106 lbs: Keegan Fitch 1-1 record
•Pinned Logan Kennedy (SC) 1:28
•Pinned by Brown (PHI) 4:19
•Pinned Colby Curtis (WIN) 2:09
•Major Dec. by Jack Whaley (SC) 1-12
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 4th,
10-9 record
•Bye
•Pinned Cole Thurness (STM) 1:15
•Major Dec. Jordan Poignee (TC) 12-2
•Pinned by Rance Sivertsen (SLD) 2:42
•Pinned Thurness (STM) 1:27
•Decisioned by Patrick Aeschbacher (WIN) 4-
7
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 4th,
18-6 record
•Bye
•Pinned Amanda Standing Bear (RC) :07
•Major Dec. Garrett Rausch (PC) 9-0
•Major Dec. by Gene Trimble (SLD) 1-14
•Decisioned Jon Marvin (ON) 6-2
•Decisioned by Austin Gilbertson (KC) 0-3
132 lbs: Grady Carley, 5th,
15-10 record
•Bye
•Pinned Makoa Runs Against (RCC) 5:36
•Pinned by Sean Bice (WIN) 3:01
•Pinned Hunter Lewis (CUS) :21
•Decisioned Kayleb Brozik (WIN) 6-4
•Tech. Fall by Teigen Strohschein (NEW) 0-
15
•Major Dec. Reed Gray (LYM) 9-1
138 lbs: Raedon Anderson, 2-9 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Sam Ireland (BC) 3:54
•Bye
•Win by Forfeit (HLC)
•Pinned by Ty Welsch (RCC) 2:22
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st, 17-2 record
•Bye
•Pinned Tucker Jones (SC) 3:07
•Pinned Brady Hicks (BC) 3:40
•Pinned Lane Scott (LYM) 4:00
•Major Dec. Dylan Severyn (CUS) 11-1
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 1st,
17-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned Tim Lechtenberg (ON) 2:17
•Pinned Austin Borah (MP) 3:57
•Pinned Austin Haberer (PC) 2:10
•Decisioned Luke Warejcka (KWLPG) 6-3
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 1st, 17-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned D.J. Beckwith (SBA) 2:47
•Tech. Fall over Brady Rude (RCC) 17-2
•Major Dec. Turner Blasius (KWLPG) 11-2
•Decisioned Tate Novotny (WIN) 8-6
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 2nd,
13-7 record
•Bye
•Pinned Tanner McCloskey (TC) 2:35
•Major Dec. David Jensen (MP) 16-5
•Decisioned Spencer Knopp (ON) 4-2
Grapplers bring home awards from Lyman
Clint Stout takes on one of his four opponents at the Mid-Dakota Monster
wrestling tournament in Lyman last Friday and Saturday. Stout took first place
honors in his weight divisiion. Photo by Dayle Knutson
Nick Donnelly has his opponent all tied up at the Lyman wrestling tournament.
Donnelly was also awarded the Quick Pin Award. Photo by Dayle Knutson
Politically, the new year began
with the county and city voting dis-
tricts being realigned due to the
last United States census.
Later in the year, Mike Vetter
won the election for mayor of Philip
after John Hart decided to not
again run for the seat. The city
council saw a major change when
the mayor and six councilmen were
sworn in at one time. Voters were
asked to allow the city of Philip to
raise its debt limit in anticipation
of two street projects, which they
granted. Ed Briggs took the chair-
man seat for the Haakon County
commissioners. Other politics saw
Fred Koester filling the county
sheriff’s position, then later win-
ning the election to retain the job.
Gay Tollefson won as the state’s at-
torney. Toni Rhodes took over as
the new county assessor. The board
of education upheld its decision to
start the school year earlier than
some people wished.
Politics weren’t the only hot
topic. January saw record high
temperatures for not only Haakon
County, but also for the rest of
South Dakota. The drought
pounded most of the Midwest. Lo-
cally, wildfires added to the heat,
including the Cactus Flat fire. A
wind storm on June 9 caused dam-
age to grain bins, the highway de-
partment quonset, trees and more.
Local landmarks disappeared or
were moved. The Two Bit Saloon
burned to the ground, though was
rebuilt and reopened before year’s
end. The building that once housed
the West River Museum was razed,
as was an apartment building next
to Ingram Hardware on E. Pine
Street. The two and half story Pre-
witt house was moved to Curt
Arthur’s property north of Philip. A
huge pole barn was moved from
west of Philip to just south of the
Philip Livestock Auction. Rush Fu-
neral Home moved from W. Pine
Street to Highway 14. The Pizza
Etc. business moved a block from
its original location to S. Center
Avenue.
Culturally, the community was
presented the Philip High School
one-act play “Crisis Inc.,” which
competed at state. The Milesville
community theater put on the com-
edy “The Boardinghouse.” Last
year’s Hayes performance was the
comedy “37 Postcards.” Midland’s
comedy production was “Artificial
Intelligence.” The Philip drama
group performed the musical
“Honky Tonk Angels.” The high
Highlights from the year 2012
Philip Motor, in conjunction with Ford Motor Company, held a Drive One 4UR Com-
munity event, October 5, to benefit the Philip Volunteer Fire Department. The ve-
hicle test driving event drew in over 250 people, which in turn Ford Motor donated
$4,260 to the Philip Volunteer Fire Department Presenting the check was Tyler
Hauk, Philip Motor, to Matt Reckling, Philip fire chief. Courtesy photo
Drive One 4UR community
•Tech. Fall by Dalton McCollam (BC) 6-21
220 lbs: Gavin DeVries, 6-10 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Rob Stover (PR) 5:42
•Bye
•Pinned Cole Hottel (STM) :57
•Decsioned by Brett Christman (RED) 6-10
220 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries, 1-8 record
•Bye
•Pinned Hottel 3:13
•Pinned by Stover :49
•Pinned by Kyle Blume (RED) 1:28
285 lbs:
Philip Area will host their tour-
nament this weekend running
three mats in the main gym and
wrestlebacks in the Fine Arts
Building. Action starts at 3:00 p.m.
Friday and 9:00 a.m. Saturday.
Donnelly noted both Spearfish/
Lead-Deadwood and Rapid City
Central varisty teams will be at
this tournament. Both teams have
placed ahead of Philip at tourna-
ments and Philip is ready to even
the score.
school’s all-school comedy was “Dr.
Jeckyll, No Place to Hyde.” Last
year’s prom theme was Neon
Night. And, the local youth
dancers, Shake-It-Up Girls, per-
formed at different functions
throughout the year.
Certain standards continued or
even increased in popularity. The
school wrestling team first won dis-
tricts, then regions. School assem-
blies open to the public included ex-
otic animals, a juggler, a string in-
strument player, motivation on
wheels and a speaker promoting
anti-silence in dangerous situa-
tions. The Philip Festival Days,
Haakon/Jackson County Fair,
Philip and Midland farmers mar-
kets, Philip Civil Air Patrol’s aero-
space weekend, and the Midland
Merchants Appreciation Day, and
Philip’s parade of light were again
big hits. New hits were Hot Sum-
mer Nites at the Haakon County
Young Women’s Kiddie Park.
Personal and business recogni-
tions were abundant. Some of those
include Dan Piroutek being recog-
nized as the Black Hills Stock
Show agri-businessman. Deb
Snook won the top spot in the
South Dakota Presidental Award
for Excellence in Mathematics
Teaching. Matt Donnelly earned
teacher of the year in physical edu-
cation. Jeff Rieckman earned
South Dakota Middle School Prin-
cipal of the Year. Lincoln McIlravy
was initiated into the South
Dakota Sports Hall of Fame. Carv
Thompson was entered into the
South Dakota Hall of Fame. Mike
West entered the South Dakota
Amateur Baseball Hall of Fame.
Pat Guptill, Todd Hemmingson
and Bob Thorson are now in the
Black Hills State University Yel-
low Jackets Hall of Fame. Boyd
Porch is now a Wright Brothers
Master Pilot. Grady and Bernice
Crew were Aggie of the Year.
Kennedy Implement was recog-
nized as dealership of the year by
Farm Equipment magazine.
Many people left us last year, in-
cluding Bill Janklow, Jim Abdnor
and George McGovern.
Big news in the school district
was that the Deep Creek Rural
School reopened. Instructor
Theresa Deuchar was even pic-
tured on a West Central Electric
Association billboard. The district
paid off the Fine Arts Building.
Also, a new item was that break-
fasts were now being served at the
school cafeteria. The Philip school
buildings also now have air condi-
tioning. The cross country team
sent a boys’ and a girls’ team to
state, and took fourth overall.
Philip High School entered an aca-
demic challenge, and won it.
Philip Health Services Inc, paid
its final installment on its 10-year
loan for its major renovation work.
Midwest Cooperative increased its
railroad siding capacity. After
months of citizen concern, Dakota
Mill and Grain was granted its per-
mits for new elevators and a rail-
road siding. Scotchman Industries
purchased a million dollar laser
unit, greatly increased its nitrogen
storage and celebrated 45 years.
”The Royal Bachelor” Follow that road of life. Angelic singers try to fill the new
king’s rock-filled head with the idea that he can rule the kingdom. All King Yokel,
played by Mark Nelson, has to do is get out of the outhouse, chose a queen and
follow that yellow brick road. As just some of the cast in the Milesville musical
comedy, are the angel chorus, from left: Sarah Parsons, Rick Doud, Marlis Doud,
Roger Porch, Tina Staben and Paul Staben.
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2005 Chevy 1500
4x4 Auto, Hard Box Cover
www.philipmotor.com
Give Ryan a call today!
Classifieds • 859-2516
Thursday, January 10, 2013 • The Pioneer Review • Page 11
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
TRIANGLE RANCH BED &
BREAKFAST is available for
brunches, luncheons, dinner
parties and retreats, December -
April. Contact Lyndy, 859-2122,
triangle@gwtc.net, www. trian-
gleranchbb.com P51-8tc
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two bedroom trailer
house for rent in Philip. 685-
3801 or 859-2204. P3-tfn
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apart-
ment in Wall. Call 386-2222.
PW51-4tc
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge will
be added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
THANK YOUS
There is no sweeter gift for
our Lord than His love shown
through neighbors that care
and encircle us with their love!
We wish to thank everyone for
the prayers and gifts of food
and friendship given to us dur-
ing this difficult time.
To Dr. Klopper and Dr. Hol-
man for your excellent care of
Mom and the staff at the
Kadoka Nursing Home.
Jack, Gayle, and DJ Rush,
for all you do, we thank the
Lord for you.
It is never easy to lose a
loved one, but your acts of
kindness will always be deeply
appreciated.
May the Lord bless you all,
The family of
Ida Mae (Patty) Patterson
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
PASTURE WANTED: Looking
for pasture for 2013 and be-
yond. Pairs and/or yearlings.
Phil Jerde, Reva, SD, 866-4888.
B20-2tc
WHEAT HAY FOR SALE: Call
685-3068. P52-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Maintenance
Dept. at Cedar Pass Lodge is
looking for a hard working, de-
pendable maintenance worker.
Must have carpentry, plumb-
ing and flooring experience.
Please contact Sharon at 433-
5562 and/or complete an appli-
cation online at cedarpass
lodge.com P5-4tc
HELP WANTED: Business man-
ager for the Kadoka Area School
District. Applications available
on the website www.kadoka.
k12.sd.us or may be picked up
at the school. Wage DOE and
qualifications. Open until filled.
Contact Jamie Hermann at 837-
2174, ext. 100. EOE. K3-4tc
MISC. FOR SALE
WOODWORKING TOOLS:
Signograph, router recreator,
lathe with all the chisles, all
Craftsman brand, many other
saws and tools, large pile of
rough lumber, red cedar and
black walnut. Call 685-6808.
PR20-2tc
FOR SALE: (70) 27” TV sets with
remotes, $20 each. These are
NOT flat screens. Best Western
Plains, Wall, 279-2145 or 685-
3915. WP19-2tc
NEW – NEVER USED: Cement
railroad ties, 8
1
⁄2’ long, $75 per
tie or $50 if you buy 10 or more.
See at car wash in Midland. Call
843-2846 or (cell) 840-8441.
P3-2tc
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Quality Air-Entrained Concrete
Call toll-free 1-888-839-2621
Richard Hildebrand
837-2621 • Kadoka, SD
Rent This Space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for SALE
(serious inquires only). Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
EMPLOYMENT
TOP PAY FOR RNs, LPNs/LVNs,
CNAs, Med Aides. $2,000 Bonus
– Free Gas. AACO Nursing
Agency, Call 1-800-656-4414
Ext. 18.
INTER DEPARTMENT OPERA-
TOR - City of Custer, seeking an
individual to maintain & repairs
streets, water & wastewater sys-
tem. Info at www. custer.govof-
fice.com or 605-673-4824. EOE.
AVERA HAND COUNTY Memo-
rial Hospital is seeking one FT
RN and one PT RN for 12-hour
rotating shifts. SD RN license re-
quired. AHCMH offers a compet-
itive compensation and benefit
package. Apply online at
www.AveraJobs.org or contact
Debbie Pullman 605-853-0300.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY
$3997.00 - Make & save money
with your own bandmill - Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-
800-578-1363 Ext.300N.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper at 859-2516 or
800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health ins.,
credit, 03¢ safety bonus, Call
Joe for details, 800. 456.1024,
joe@tbitruck.com.
* * * * * *
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Classified
Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 min-
imum for first 20 words; 10¢ per
word thereafter; included in the
Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The
Pennington Co. Courant, as well
as on our website: www.pioneer-
review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems,
Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum
for first 20 words; 10¢ per word
thereafter. Each name and initial
must be counted separately. In-
cluded in the Pioneer Review and
the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
minimum for first 20 words; 10¢
per word thereafter. Each name
and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Printed only in the Pio-
neer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for
bookkeeping and billing on all
charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per
column inch, included in the Pi-
oneer Review and the Profit.
$5.55 per column inch for the Pi-
oneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which
makes it illegal to advertise “any preference,
or discrimination on race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation, or
discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is a vi-
olation of the law. Our readers are informed
that all dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal opportunity
basis.
APARTMENTS AVAilABlE!
PHiliP PlAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RiVERViEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For application
& information:
PRO/Rental
Management
1113 Sherman St.
Sturgis, SD 57785
605-347-3077 or
1-800-244-2826
www.
prorental
management.
com
GeorGe’s
Welding & Repair
• DOT Inspection
• Complete Trailer Repair
• Full Line of Bearings & Seals
• Tractor Front End & Spindles
• Selling New Steel
• Recycling Outlet
• Refrigration & A/C on Commercial,
Residential & Vehicles
• ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
George: 441-3607 • Lee: 441-3606
DennIs
859-2970 • Philip
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Manager Position Available
The Haakon County Conservation District
is currently taking applications for
District Manager. Part-time/Full-time Position.
Stop at 409 N. Wray in Philip for an application
and more information.
Haakon County Conservation District
409 N. Wray, Philip, SD 57567 • 859-2186 Ext. 3
HCCD is an equal opportunity employer.
August 26 – Worked on woodpile
and done other jobs around. Bert
mowed hay. Made arrangements to
start to Philip in the morning. Got
Stones top buggy.
August 27 – Got up early and
Viola, Laura and I started for
Philip at 6:15 a.m. Nice and cool.
Rained a light shower on us on the
road. Reached Philip at 2:30 p.m.
Laura took the 4:15 train to Pierre
where she went to file on the
SW1/4 of Sec. 3 T5N R19E of BHM.
Did some trading. Rained a shower
at night.
August 28 – Day opened hot
after the rain. Left Philip for home
at 8 a.m. Stopped at Mr. Wilsons 7
miles from home on account of ap-
proaching storm. Got home at 5:30
p.m. Heavy shower fell at Skieview
breaking the drought of 27 days
duration. More rain is imminent.
Land man at Philip sold 1/4 section
at $8.50 per acre.
August 29 – Threatening rain in
remote south east and west. Put in
day helping Dibble on his cellar.
Grass beginning to look green
again.
August 30 – Heavy southeast
wind blew buffeting immense rain
clouds all day in all directions. Sun
dogs around sun at 5:30 p.m.
Heavy electrical storm came up at
10 P.M. and heavy shower fell for
10 minute duration. Fine for grass.
Drought knocked out.
August 31 – Worked at Bert’s
cellar in forenoon and fixed barn.
Bert hauled hay in p.m. Overslept
this morning - got up at 8 a.m. Coy-
otes yelping all around tonight.
Sun. Sept. 1 – Pretty cool but
nice nice at dawn. No frost. Went
over and investigated Laura’s
claim. Pretty claim. Breaks are
fine. Good many cottonwood trees.
About 100 acres tillable. Fine for
stock.
September 2 – 48 at 5:30 a.m.
Viola, Bert and I went to the
Cheyenne breaks for some wood.
Started at 7 a.m. and bot back at 6
p.m. Hot day. Got an immense load
of stuff. Some fine fence post stuff.
Nearly all lands in the breaks are
filed on. Mr. Wilson has claims
there.
September 3 – Clear and cool
this a.m. In afternoon went down
into Council Bear breaks and got a
couple of big cottonwood logs and
other wood. Rain badly needed
again.
September 4 – Day opened clear
and cool. 42 at 5 a.m. Bert, Laura,
Viola, Jose, and their mother went
to Bridger Creek for wild plums.
Got back at 3 p.m. with about 7 gal-
lons. I stayed home and done some
odd jobs and watched in case
prairie fire might come along. Very
dry weather.
September 5 – Put in the day
getting ready to move Dibbles
house over the cellar which is 6 1/2
feet deep. Heavy thunder storm
came up at 4:30 p.m. and a light
rain fell. Storm went west and
north along Cheyenne River.
September 6 – Clear and not so
cool this a.m. Moved Dibbles house
with block and tackle over new cel-
lar in a.m. and in p.m. worked lin-
ing up same and digging stairway.
Ground dry and as hard as iron for
3 feet below the surface.
September 7 – Day opened cold
and rainy with a high wind all day.
Got our mail and some photos from
John Murphy. Pretty good pictures
from a bum sample. Had a severe
head ache all day. Got Lauras filing
papers that she filed August 27 at
Pierre on the SW 1/4 of Sec 3 R19E
T5N.
Sun. Sept. 8 – Hauled a jag of
wood from Council Bear to the
Skieview. Light showers all day.
Cold and raw with a north wind.
September 9 – 40 at 5:30 a.m.
Hauled some junk wood. Talked to
Skaggs. His brother Andy Skaggs
in Pierre wants a claim. Had wa-
termelon raised by Wiedeman
today.
September 10 – Got up a 4:30
a.m. and started to the Cheyenne
breaks at 7 a.m. Got a big load of
wood and arrived home at 6 p.m.
Met Mr. Cordell an old C.B &
Q.R.R. man. He lives on a claim 3
miles east of Elbon P.O. - east of
Mohneys. Viola walked over to Ma-
rietaa and got our mail.
September 11 – Day opened clear
and summer like. Did not do much
today. Rested from trip to the
Cheyenne. Bert set some posts
around the dam and I set some
around the haystacks. In p.m. Dib-
ble went to see Kuhn about leasing
his sheep. No frost to date.
September 12 – Very cold this
a.m. - 45 degrees. Big prairie fire
about 8 miles east of us last night.
Had us alarmed. High wind from
N.E. and it seemed to be driving
the fire our way. Made preparation
to store our goods in the cornfield.
A 9:30 p.m. after burning for 2
hours the fire went out. Heavy
thunderstorm came up at 8:30 p.m.
and a regular deluge fell for over a
half an hour.
September 13 – Done some work
around Dibbles most of the day. At
5 p.m. Viola and I walked over to
Marietta and got a couple of water-
melons and some provisions.
Weather getting very fall like. Bert
cut 15 shocks of corn. No frost yet.
September 14 – 39 this morning.
Tomato and cucumber vines are
growing same as summer. Have
picked about 3 bushes of seed corn
already. Put fence around dam
today. Took about 100 rods of wire.
September 15 – The whole fam-
ily went plum hunting on Bridger
Creek. Got a bushel. Bert and I
went over to the store in p.m. and
bought some watermelon. Very dry
everywhere.
September 16 – Heavy fog this
morning. Bert has 36 shocks of
corn cut and 4 bushels of seed corn.
Worked on addition to stable.
September 17 – Dibble went to
Leslie to see about the school he is
to teach at Fairchilds. I hitched to
the wagon and Viola and I went
over to the store to get our mail and
then drove over to McKeowns to
get some melons. He had a nice
patch. Got 2 melons and a keg of
splendid water from his well. 93 at
noon. Done odd jobs in p.m.
September 18 – Very cloudy, cold
and dreary this morning. Shot 2
blue winged teal ducks in the pond
this morning and also a huge
chicken hawk. Went and repaired
wire fence where some fellow had
broke it down. Met Mr. Dyson east
of us 2 miles. He is from Min-
nesota. Bert got back from Leslie at
10 a.m. Got the teaching job at
Fairchilds for 6 months at $40 per
month. No frost yet but Bert said
they have had frost at Leslie.
September 19 – Heavy rain fell
from 3 a.m. to daylight. Everything
looked quite wintry this morning.
Went to the store and got our mail.
September 20 – Got up at 4:30
a.m. Bert, Viola, Laura and I
started to the Cheyenne River
breaks at 7:30 a.m. Got a big load
of fine stuff and back home at 6
p.m. A regular fall day - clear and
cool.
September 21 – 35 at 6 a.m.
Mighty near frost. Bert mowed
hay. In p.m. I began digging a well
in the break east of our shack. Dug
through shale at 7 feet and some
water seeped in. Struck a big
gumbo rock 4 feet under ground.
Sun. Sept. 22 – Wind in n.w. at 9
a.m. and it increased in intensity
and blew a hurricane until 3:30
p.m. Ate dinner at Dibbles and
loafed around until evening. Got a
couple buckets of fine drinking
water out of our new well. It is fine-
no alkali.
(to be continued …)
Your great deal is waiting.
Come get it today!
• 2007 Chevrolet Impala LT, loaded, White
• 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan with Sto-N-Go
seats, white
• 2008 Chevrolet Reg. Cab 3/4 ton 4x4, white
• 2006 Ford F-150 Ext. Cab, 4x4, silver
• 2003 GMC 4 door 1500, 4x4, black
• 2002 Ford F-250, reg. cab, 3/4 ton, white
COMING SOON …
• 1995 Chevrolet Ext. Cab, 3/4 ton
• 1999 Chevrolet Ext. Cab, 1500, 4x4
• 2000 Chevrolet, reg. cab, 1500, 4x4
859-2744 or 685-3068
Philip
Stop in today &
check out our inventory!
Stop in today &
check out our inventory!
HElP WANTED
Equipment Operator/Maintenance Worker
Haakon County Highway Department has a
position open for a full-time highway worker.
Must have a commercial driver’s license or be able to
obtain one within three months of hire date. A benefits
package is offered. Position open until filled.
Apply at Haakon County Highway
Department, 22260 lake Waggoner Road,
Philip, SD •  (605) 859-2472
Haakon County is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Gibson
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
859-3100 • Philip, SD
For all your concrete
construction needs:
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12 P.M. EARLY CON-
SIGNMENTS: EXPECTINC 6000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RICK KING & SONS - 900 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED CLVS; FS .....600-750=
KEHN RANCH - 400 DLK CLVS; FS...............................................500-650=
BRUCH RANCH - 300 DLK STFS; CFEEN-HAY FED; FS,NI,W..............500=
KNUTSON - 250 DLK CLVS; FS.....................................................500-600=
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - 250 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI
40 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI ......................................................500-600=
CLINT & TERRY HAMMERSTROM - 200 DLK STFS; FS,NI ..........500-600=
JEFF JENSEN - 200 DLK CLVS; NI,W...........................................475-500=
DUSTMAN RANCH - 180 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN..............................550-650=
POSS RANCH INC - 165 DLK CLVS (135 STFS, 30 HFFS}; FS,NI...550-700=
AMIOTTE - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI......................................600-700=
LYTLE - 150 FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI..............................................550-650=
HANSON - 140 HEFF & DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS .........................650=
NELSON - 140 DWF FIFST CFOSS STFS; FS,NI ............................700-750=
KETELSEN - 135 DLK CLVS; FS,W ...............................................500-550=
AMIOTTE - 124 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ALL HFFS IN TOWN.................600-700=
WHEELER RANCH - 120 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ................625=
BARTLETT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ALL HFFS IN TOWN ..............600-700=
SIGMAN & SIGMAN - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,HFFS DV ..................700-800=
RICHTER - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................600-650=
FORTUNE - 90 DLK STFS; FS .......................................................600-650=
OLSON - 90 DLK & FED ANC STFS; FS,AN...................................550-650=
WILLIAMS - 90 DLK HFFS; FS .............................................................550=
DEUTSCHER - 90 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS, NI, W............................550-600=
LEHRKAMP - 80 DLK CLVS; FS ....................................................600-650=
BARRY - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI,DV .......................500-550=
KIEFFER - 75 FED, CHAF X, & DLK CLVS; FS,NI,HFFS DV..........575-600=
FINN RANCH - 70 CEFTIFIED FED ANCUS STFS; ASV,FS,W.......700-775=
HULM - 70 CHAF X & A FEW DLK CLVS; FS,W.............................650-750=
SLOVEK & EISENBRAUN - 70 DLK & FED HFFS; FS,W ...............625-650=
STOVER - 65 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ............................................................500=
ROTH - 60 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,W,ALL HFFS IN TOWN......................600-700=
FERGUSON - 60 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI ....................................500-600=
HERBER RANCH - 50 HEFF CLVS; FS.................................................600=
GROPPER - 50 FED ANC FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,
ALL HFFS IN TOWN ..................................................................600-700=
ARTHUR - 50 DLK STFS; FS .........................................................600-650=
PHILIPSEN - 50 DLK DV HFFS; FS,NI ...........................................550-575=
SILBERNAGEL - 43 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI................................600-650=
JOHNSTON - 40 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI.....................................400-500=
TENNIS - 40 MOSTLY FED & FWF HFFS; FS,NI...................................625=
STABEN - 36 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS..............................................650-700=
SMITH - 36 DLK STFS; FS ............................................................800-850=
PETERSON - 35 HEFF STFS; FS...................................................650-700=
ANDERS - 35 DLK STFS; FS..........................................................600-650=
EISENBRAUN - 30 DLK STFS; FS,NI,W ................................................600=
PERAULT RANCH - 25 FWF CLVS; FS..........................................550-575=
CARLSON & ROMERO - 25 DLK HFFS; FS ...................................500-600=
DEJONG - 20 DLK HFFS; FS,NI............................................................600=
MUNROE - 15 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI.........................................400-500=
WONDERCHECK - 10 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI.............................400-500=
GREGG - 10 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ......................................................475-500=
WILLERT - 9 DLK CLVS; FS..........................................................550-600=
RIGGINS - 2 DLK STFS; FS,NI..............................................................700=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC
THE CATTLE SALE.
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: MCPHEFSON ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M.
MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC
DULL SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JANUARY S, 2DJS
We Þod o good run o] bred oo111e ]or 1Þe Speo1o1
S1ooK Cou & Bred He1]er So1e. An e×1ro b1g oroud o]
bugers on Þond 1ooK1ng ]or 1Þe bred Þe1]ers. Quo111g
uos good. We1gÞ-up oo111e ore Þ1gÞer. Ne×1 Tuesdog,
tDDD Þeod ]or our ]1rs1 Speo1o1 Feeder Co111e So1e 1n
2DJS. 9 A.M. on 1Þe ue1gÞ-ups.
BRED CATTLE:
DOOLITTLE WAGNER RANCH - BELLE FOURCHE
53 ...................DLK HFFS (AI'D FED 22, DULL CLVS} 1082=.........$1,750.00
44 ...................DLK HFFS (AI'D FED 22, DULL CLVS} 1014=.........$1,700.00
19...............DWF HFFS (AI'D & DULL DFED FED 22} 1036=.........$1,630.00
RICHARD PAPOUSEK - QUINN
44 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 23, 10 DAYS} 1024=.........$1,690.00
31............................DWF HFFS (MAF 13, 10 DAYS} 1030=.........$1,680.00
66 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 13, 10 DAYS} 1030=.........$1,670.00
13............................DWF HFFS (MAF 23, 10 DAYS} 1063=.........$1,670.00
50 ...............................DLK HFFS (APF 2, 10 DAYS} 1023=.........$1,660.00
26...............................DWF HFFS (APF 2, 10 DAYS} 1034=.........$1,610.00
13 ...............................DLK HFFS (APF 2, 10 DAYS} 1035=.........$1,580.00
11.............................DWF HFFS (APF 12, 10 DAYS} 1017=.........$1,540.00
40 .............................DLK HFFS (APF 12, 10 DAYS} 1013=.........$1,485.00
22 .............................DLK HFFS (APF 22, 10 DAYS} 1000=.........$1,470.00
9...............................DWF HFFS (APF 22, 10 DAYS} 1027=.........$1,470.00
JESSE MORELAND - RED OWL
14....................DWF 4 TO 7 YF OLD COWS (MAF 20} 1332=.........$1,525.00
EDGAR SIMON - OWANKA
9.................................FED & FWF HFFS (MAF 16} 956=...........$1,450.00
7..........................................HEFF HFFS (MAF 16} 919=...........$1,500.00
11 .........FED & FWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS (MAF 21} 1378=.........$1,420.00
JERRY GRIMES - KADOKA
21.......................FED 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS (APF 1} 1119=.........$1,450.00
4 ........................FED 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS (APF 1} 1206=.........$1,400.00
6 .........................FED SOLID MOUTH COWS (APF 1} 1410=.........$1,260.00
8 ......................FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS (APF 1} 1343=.........$1,050.00
GALE BRUNS - NEW UNDERWOOD
40 ...........................DLK 5 YF OLD COWS (FED 25} 1473=.........$1,410.00
RAY MANSFIELD - MARTIN
8.........................DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS (MAY 1} 1301=.........$1,310.00
ROGER SHULL - WALL
6 .....................DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1193=.........$1,040.00
LYNN FIELDS - ELM SPRINGS
30........FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS (MAF 15} 1282=.........$1,035.00
BUD IRELAND - BOX ELDER
7....................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS (MAF 13} 1337=.........$1,035.00
WEIGH-UPS:
JERRY GRIMES - KADOKA
1..........................................................FED COW 1325= .............$83.50
2 ........................................................FED COWS 1300= .............$79.00
1..........................................................FED COW 1230= .............$77.00
2 ..................................................FED COWETTES 1055= .............$92.00
2 ..................................................FED COWETTES 1100= .............$88.00
DELORIS POSS - PHILIP
2 ...................................................X DFED COWS 1213= .............$82.00
2........................................................DLK HFFTS 983= .............$119.50
WILLERT RANCH INC - BELVIDERE
1........................................................CHAF DULL 2270= .............$97.50
FINN FARMS - MIDLAND
1..........................................................FED COW 1450= .............$80.50
JUDY DALY - MIDALND
2 ........................................................DLK DULLS 2158= .............$95.50
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1230= .............$80.00
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1408= .............$77.25
3...................................................DLK COWETTES 1037= .............$98.00
2 .......................................................DWF HFFTS 968= .............$118.50
EDGAR SIMON - OWANKA
1..........................................................FWF COW 1490= .............$79.50
ROGER AMIOTTE - KADOKA
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1450= .............$79.50
RAPID CREEK RANCH - BELVIDERE
1 .........................................................FED DULL 2045= .............$95.50
1 .........................................................FED DULL 2095= .............$92.00
1 .........................................................FED DULL 2055= .............$91.50
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
7.........................................................DLK COWS 1292= .............$78.25
TRIPLE T ENT. - NEWCASTLE, WY
1..........................................................DWF COW 1430= .............$78.00
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 865= .............$109.00
C & T CATTLE - MIDLAND
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1380= .............$78.00
1..........................................................DWF COW 1415= .............$76.50
JOE STANGLE - NEW UNDERWOOD
6.........................................................DLK COWS 1378= .............$78.00
1....................................................DLK COWETTE 1055= .............$87.00
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE - PHILIP
1..........................................................DLK DULL 2065= .............$95.00
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1955= .............$93.00
GENE CROSBIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
2 ..............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1323= .............$78.00
ED BECKWITH - KADOKA
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1428= .............$77.75
ALAN BISHOP - HERMOSA
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1755= .............$77.00
1 ....................................................X DFED DULL 2030= .............$96.00
LYNN FIELDS - ELM SPRINGS
1........................................................CHAF DULL 1975= .............$93.00
BRYAN OLIVIER - MILESVILLE
13.......................................................DLK COWS 1329= .............$77.00
3........................................................DLK HFFTS 990= .............$104.00
ELMER GOOD - HOUSTON TX
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1260= .............$76.25
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1415= .............$75.00
DIANE BISHOP - HERMOSA
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1885= .............$92.00
H & T BIES CATTLE CO - RAPID CITY
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1645= .............$76.00
JERRY MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1..........................................................DWF COW 1570= .............$76.00
STEVE DODSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1460= .............$76.00
CALVIN FICKBOHM FARMS - NEWELL
1..........................................................FED COW 1365= .............$75.00
MITCH KAMMERER - WALL
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1663= .............$74.75
MCTIGHE BROS INC. - FAITH
1..........................................................DWF COW 1410= .............$74.00
DON HINSON - MIDLAND
7 ...............................................FED & DLK HFTS 957= .............$110.50
KIETH SMITH - QUINN
19..............................................FED & DLK HFTS 997= .............$105.50
KEN BARTLETT - INTERIOR
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 995= .............$100.00
1hursday, 1anuary 10, 2013 · 1he Pioneer Review ·
Lunch 8pec|a|s:
Honday-Fr|day
11:00 to 1:30
6a|| for
spec|a|s!
Regu|ar Henu
Ava||ab|e N|ght|y!
* * *
Fr|day ßuffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
0swa|swa l||||ç
ktstrra||sas:
ääâ-tII1
~ Saturday, Jan. 12 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Jan. 14 ~
Prime Rib
Sandwich
I|t ä|ta||sast k lsaa¡t
êçta 0a||¡ Msa1a¡ ||ra äa|ar1a¡
8
a
|a
d
ß
a
r
A
v
a
||a
b
|e
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, Jan. 8 ~
Petite Ribeye
~ Wednesday, Jan. 9 ~
Smothered
Burritos
~ Thursday, Jan. 10 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Jan. 11 ~
Ground Sirloin
Chicken • Shrimp
Try our new charbroiled steaks & burgers! All steaks come with a choice of potato and includes salad bar!
bors, IncIudIng fho MIIos HovInnd
fnmIIy, gnfhorod for dInnor nf fho
homo of fho Info Mnry IIIon
SchofIoId on Ðocombor 30.
IIII nnd KnryI SnndnI nnd mosf
of fhoIr fnmIIy coIobrnfod bofh
ChrIsfmns Ivo nnd ChrIsfmns Ðny
nf ÐonnIo nnd TnmI !nvoIIoffo's.
ComIng nnd goIng nf vnrIous fImos
woro Tnsyn nnd Tnrn !nvoIIoffo,
Ionu nnd Mnry !nvoIIoffo, Cngo
nnd Tnryn, Tonyn nnd Joo Krugor,
TrIcIn nnd Inrf Þnnsz, Troy,
Trovor nnd Tronf, Todd nnd Jon-
nIfor SnndnI nnd Johnny, Monfo
SnndnI nnd hIs chIIdron, KnnIfIn
nnd Irock, ShnrI Þoss, nnd Mnff
nnd AnIfn SnndnI, !Idgo, Cnbo,
Mnson, CnvIn, KohI, Snwyor nnd
!Ivors. Tho onIy onos mIssIng from
IIII nnd KnryI's fnmIIy woro
MIchoIIo nnd hor fnmIIy from CnII-
fornIn nnd Monfo's dnughfor, Mn-
frIx. If sounds IIko n fun fImo.
Sundny, fho 30fh, ÐonnIo nnd
MnrcIn Iymor, JIm nnd VonnIo
O'Ðon, nnd IIII nnd KnryI SnndnI
hnd dInnor fogofhor In IhIIIµ, fhon
wonf fo JIm nnd VonnIo's fown
houso for vIsIfIng nnd cnrds. ThoIr
oxcuso for goffIng fogofhor wns
KnryI's bIrfhdny!
JIm nnd !nnn IIshoro nnd nII
fhoIr kIds nnd grnndkIds gof fo-
gofhor for nn onrIy ChrIsfmns on
fho 22nd. Thoro wns jusf onough
snow fhnf mosf wonf sIoddIng.
ChrIsfmns Ivo, !onny nnd MIsfy
Andorson nnd fnmIIy, Cory nnd
Sfncy IIshoro nnd fnmIIy, nnd
!nnn joInod mnny of fho Arfhurs
nf fho homo of Crog nnd Knfhy
Arfhur. InuI nnd Joy hosfod n bIg
ChrIsfmns dInnor on fho 25fh wIfh
mosf of fho fnmIIy fhoro. (JIm
mIssod mosf of fho ChrIsfmns nc-
fIvIfIos ns ho hnd fho fIu.) Cuosfs nf
JIm nnd !nnn's Þow Yonr`s Ivo for
n mysfory suµµor woro Mnrk nnd
Inf Hnnrnhnn, TIm nnd Judy
IIshoro, InrI nnd JodI Inrsons,
nnd Irynn nnd Shnron OIIvIor.
IIII nnd ConnIo Inrsons coIo-
brnfod ChrIsfmns Snfurdny, fho
29fh, wIfh CIonn nnd ÐInnno Inr-
sons, IhIIIµ, Crnnf nnd Snndrn
Inrsons nnd CoIo, MIIosvIIIo nnd
!nµId CIfy, WIII nnd MnknIoy Inr-
sons nnd ShnyIn ÐoInnoy nnd son
ÞoInn.
Irynn nnd Shnron OIIvIor
joInod fho OIIvIor fnmIIIos for suµ-
µor on ChrIsfmns nf fho homo of
KIofh nnd Ðob SmIfh. Sons TyIor
nnd Shon OIIvIor nnd Sfncy !owIs
woro wIfh fhom for µnrf of fho
ChrIsfmns vncnfIon.
Joff nnd TorrI Sfnbon, !onh nnd
Zoo, ChnrIos Sfnbon nnd !oborf
nnd Snndrn Hnrrown woro guosfs
nf Ioggy Sfnbons' In IhIIIµ Sun-
dny, Ðocombor 23, for nn onrIy
ChrIsfmns. Joff nnd TorrI hosfod n
ChrIsfmns Ivo suµµor wIfh Ioggy
nnd ChnrIos Sfnbon nnd InuI,
Ðonnn nnd TInn Sfnbon ns guosfs.
ChrIsfmns Ðny, Joff, TorrI nnd
gIrIs wonf fo ÐonnIs nnd SnndI
Honfon's homo.
InuI, Ðonnn nnd TInn Sfnbon's
guosfs for ChrIsfmns Ðny woro
ChnrIos nnd Ioggy Sfnbon. Thurs-
dny, fho 2?fh, InuI, Ðonnn nnd
TInn wonf fo IIorro fo fnko down
fho MIIosvIIIo !nngors 4-H CIub
froo nf fho CnµIfoI. WhIIo In IIorro,
fhoy vIsIfod wIfh Mnry Ann IIs-
chor.
InrI nnd JodI Inrsons, !nchoI
nnd Snrnh, sµonf ChrIsfmns Ivo
nnd Ðny In HIghmoro wIfh hor
fnmIIy nf hor µnronfs' homo, MIko
nnd Ioffy McÐonnoII.
Hugh nnd Ann Hnrfy woro
ChrIsfmns Ivo suµµor guosfs In
HIII CIfy nf fho homo of Jnson nnd
JIII CIIInsµIo nnd fnmIIy. Tho noxf
dny, fhoy hnd dInnor nnd suµµor nf
John nnd MnrfI CIIInsµIo's nIso In
HIII CIfy. Wookond vIsIfors nf
Hugh nnd Ann's woro InuI nnd
MonoIk Sfoµhons, MIknoIn nnd
Mnfhow, IInck Hnwk. MoIIy nnd
Owon Hnrfy sfnyod wIfh grnndµn
nnd grnndmn Snfurdny whIIo fhoIr
µnronfs nnd InuI wonf hunfIng.
Hugh nnd Ann vIsIfod wIfh JIm
nnd AdoIo Hnrfy Mondny ovonIng.
Ðocombor l9, TIm nnd Judy
IIshoro nffondod fhoIr grnndnugh-
for, AshIynn's, µroschooI µrogrnm
In Hormosn. Thoy gof fo vIsIf wIfh
formor Hnnkon Counfy fonchor,
Vodn Cnss, who hoIµs ouf nf fho
!ufhornn schooI fhoro four dnys n
wook. Sho coIobrnfod hor 80fh
bIrfhdny Insf Mny nnd Is doIng
quIfo woII. TIm nnd Judy hnd fwo
of fhoIr boys homo for nn onrIy
ChrIsfmns on fho 2lsf nnd 22nd In-
cIudIng Cnsoy, !nchoIIo nnd Ash-
Iynn, Hormosn, nnd Shnwn nnd
Thnmy, !nµId CIfy. On fho foIIow-
Ing wookond, fhoy coIobrnfod ngnIn
whon son Scoff, TIn, HoIdon nnd
Isnnc IIshoro, SIoux InIIs, cnmo.
JoInIng fhom for fho wookond woro
Cnsoy nnd fnmIIy. Shnwn nnd
Thnmy onIy sµonf Snfurdny duo fo
work schoduIos. Joy wns nIso n dIn-
nor guosf Snfurdny.
Trovor, ChrIsfn, Irnydon, Kon-
gnn, CoIby nnd Avon IIfch Ioff for
MInnonµoIIs Snfurdny, fho 29fh of
Ðocombor. Thoy wonf fo fho foof-
bnII gnmo Sundny bofwoon fho
VIkIngs nnd fho Croon Iny Inck-
ors. Thoy hnd good ronds, n fun
fImo, nnd n vory oxcIfIng gnmo fo
wnfch. Jonson nnd !nyIor sfnyod
wIfh fho MIchnoI nnd Tnnyn Iofor-
son fnmIIy In IhIIIµ.
Tho HnmIII fnmIIy sµonf n quIof
dny nf homo on ChrIsfmns. Tho foI-
IowIng wookond, Vondn's fnmIIy
from SµonrfIsh, IrInn nnd KrIsfI
ÐoInhoydo nnd fnmIIy, Tom ÐoIn-
hoydo, ChrIsfoµhor nnd MIchnoI
nnd MIchnoI's frIond, IrIn CoIo,
woro fhoro.
ChrIsfmns Ðny guosfs nf JIm
nnd !Indn SfnngIo's woro Joo,
!ynoffo, CIInf nnd CurfIs, !onn,
!osIo nnd MoIIy SfnngIo, JunnIfn
nnd TIm Hughos, JuIIo Mond,
Sonny SfnngIo, nnd Ðnvo, Chnr,
nnd AInInn SfnngIo. JonnIfor's
frIond, CoIf Moyor, cnmo Thursdny
fo vIsIf unfII Sundny whon ho nnd
JonnIfor rofurnod fo IrookIngs for
schooI. Irono Inffon rodo ns fnr ns
IIorro wIfh fhom.
Ioyd nnd Knrn Inrsons hnd
fhoIr fnmIIy homo for fho hoIIdnys
IncIudIng KnyIn, IrIc nnd KnIdyn
InsfInn, ÐusfIn, AndI, IrookIyn
nnd Hudson !Ischo, nnd Wndo,
Mnrcy, Aufumn, KnmrI nnd
Koonnn Inrsons. Ofhors joInIng
fhom for ChrIsfmns dInnor woro
Jonnno Inrsons nnd ShoryI nnd
Josso Hnnson. VIsIfIng In fho nffor-
noon woro Iyron nnd Ioggy Inr-
sons.
!nsf Thursdny, Ioyd nnd Knrn
Inrsons drovo fo !odfIoId for n ro-
fIromonf µnrfy for !Ich !Ischo,
sµondIng fho nIghf wIfh AndI,
ÐusfIn nnd kIds. IrIdny, fhoy
hoIµod fhom movo moro fhIngs
from fhoIr ronfnI fo fhoIr houso.
Ioyd rofurnod IrIdny nIghf nnd
Knrn sfnyod unfII Mondny nffor-
noon. Tuosdny nffornoon, Knrn
wonf fo IhIIIµ fo vIsIf wIfh hor sIs-
for, !no Crowsor, nnd fnmIIy.
KrIsfI (Crowsor) nnd hor husbnnd
nnd fwIn boys woro fhoro from
KImbnII, Þob.
SnIIy Cobos nnd dnughfor
Immn, IoshfIgo, WIs., nrrIvod nf
fho µnronfnI MIko nnd !Indn Cobos
homo Ðocombor l8 for n fow dnys
of vIsIfIng wIfh fnmIIy. Thoy Ioff bo-
foro ChrIsfmns fo go bnck homo.
Cuosfs nf MIko nnd !Indn's
ChrIsfmns Ivo woro Courfnoy
Cobos, Irnd Cobos, hIs frIond,
Knfhy, nnd hor son, ÐovIn, JusfIn
nnd !ncy Cobos, Honry Hnnson
nnd !oy Wnrnor. Tho snmo grouµ
woro fhoro ChrIsfmns wIfh fho ox-
coµfIon of Honry. Þow Yonr`s Ivo,
Ðnrron nnd Knron Cobos nnd fnm-
IIy joInod fhom nffor sµondIng µnrf
of fhoIr vncnfIon In SfurgIs wIfh
Knron's fnmIIy. Ofhors IncIudod
Courfnoy, JusfIn nnd !ncy nnd
Irnd, Knfhy nnd ÐovIn. Ivoryono
Ioff fho noxf dny nnd now MIko nnd
!Indn's houso Is quIof ngnIn.
Ðnvo nnd Tonyn Iorry nnd fnm-
IIy hnd nn onrIy ChrIsfmns wIfh
Konnofh nnd ÐorIs Iorry In IhIIIµ
Ðocombor 23. !ny, Mnffhow nnd
TImofhy Iorry, Þobrnskn, woro
nIso fhoro. CnrIn nnd Annn hnd
gono fo bo wIfh CnrIn's mofhor who
hnd hIµ roµIncomonf surgory.
Cuosfs nf Ðnvo nnd Tonyn's ChrIsf-
mns woro VIrgII nnd CnrIn SmIfh.
!Ighf nffor dInnor, Jndo Iorry nnd
Cnsoy !odor Ioff wIfh Tony nnd
Cody !odor for OkInhomn fo hunf
wIId hogs. Thoy rofurnod Info Þow
Yonr`s Ivo wIfh fIvo hogs. IrIdny,
Jnnunry 4, guosfs nf fho Iorry's for
sIoddIng nnd ovornIghf woro InIIoy
nnd !IggIn Andors, CoIfon TrIob-
wnssor nnd CnIfIo CrnybII.
ÐonnIo nnd MnrcIn Iymor nnd
JIm Iob nnd KnyIn Iymor joInod
fho rosf of fho fnmIIy In SµonrfIsh
for ChrIsfmns on Ðocombor 23. On
ChrIsfmns, ÐonnIo nnd MnrcIn on-
joyod fho dny nf !onnIo nnd Ðnwn
CoyIo's. Shnron CoyIo coIobrnfod
hor 80fh bIrfhdny wIfh nII hor kIds
homo. Hnµµy boInfod bIrfhdny,
Shnron! ÐonnIo nnd MnrcIn mof
ShIrIoy Inrsons, Shnron CoyIo nnd
somo of hor fnmIIy, IncIudIng Iob
nnd Knron, !Ick nnd !hondn, !ox-
nnno, !onnIo nnd Ðnwn, nnd
!ocky nnd KrIs, for suµµor In
IhIIIµ IrIdny, fho fourfh.
Tho IhII CnrIoy's guosfs ChrIsf-
mns Ivo woro Joo nnd !n!no Cnr-
Ioy nnd fnmIIy, Andron CnrIoy nnd
MIIIIo, nnd Abby CnrIoy nnd Wnco.
Ior dInnor on ChrIsfmns woro Jon
nnd !ufh CnrIoy. VIsIfIng In fho nf-
fornoon woro Ðnvo ShIoIds, JosIo,
Wynff nnd ÐnIfon, IIorro. Tho rosf
of fho fnmIIy woro nof fooIIng woII.
ÐurIng Abby's ChrIsfmns vncnfIon,
sho wonf fo OrInndo, IIn., fo nffond
fho Þowmnn Confor !ondorshIµ
ConvonfIon. IhII nnd Knron woro
In Þow !ndorwood n couµIo of
fImos fo soo hor µnronfs, Irnnk
nnd MIIdrod O'Crndy. Snfurdny,
fho fIffh, fhoy woro suµµor guosfs
nf Ðnvo nnd MorrIIyn Schroodor's,
!nµId CIfy.
ÐonnIo nnd Ioboffo SchofIoId hnd
for ChrIsfmns Ivo fho foIIowIng
Joff nnd CrysfnI SchofIoId nnd fnm-
IIy, Ðnwn nnd !ussoII SImons nnd
AIIcIn, Snmnnfhn Snuor, Iruco nnd
!ynn Ðunkor nnd fnmIIy, Sfovo
nnd !Isn Jonns nnd IInIr, nnd
Iroff nnd John InuI ÐnIy. Iofh
ÐonnIo nnd Ioboffo docIdod fo gof
fho fIu fho rosf of fho hoIIdnys, so
fhoy sfnyod homo on ChrIsfmns
nnd Þow Yonr`s.
Snfurdny, Ðocombor 22, Mnrk
nnd Inf Hnnrnhnn, Chnd nnd
Knfhy Hnnrnhnn, KnIIo Hnnrnhnn
nnd TrncIo Irdmnnn frnvoIod fo
Iurko for ChrIsfmns wIfh Inf's
fnmIIy. Chnd nnd Knfhy sfnyod In
fho nron fo coIobrnfo wIfh Knfhy's
fnmIIy. Sundny, Mnrk, Inf, KnIIo
nnd TrncIo joInod ofhor fnmIIy
mombors nf IhyIIIs Hnnrnhnn's for
ChrIsfmns.
AffondIng n µnrfy nf Chnd nnd
Knfhy Hnnrnhnn's Þow Yonr`s Ivo
woro Cnsoy nnd !nchoIIo IIshoro,
!hoff !osofh, ÐonnIo nnd MoIIssn
Ioforson, (Knfhy's brofhor nnd sIs-
for), Knfhy's frIond, AshIoy, TrncIo
Irdmnnn nnd frIond, KnIIo Hnnrn-
hnn, nnd Cody nnd JnmIo Hnnrn-
hnn. VIsIfors Sundny nffornoon nf
Chnd nnd Knfhy's woro Ioyd nnd
JonnnIo Wnnrn, IhIIIµ, nnd Mnrk
nnd Inf Hnnrnhnn.
(contInued next week)
MIIesvIIIe News
{ccntInued trcm page B)

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
PR_1-10-13_Layout 1.pdf7.36 MB