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Pioneer Review, December 6, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 15
Volume 107
December 6, 2012
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro ..........$8.36
Any Pro .............................$7.56
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.37
Milo .......................................$6.79
Corn.......................................$7.04
Millet...................................$30.00
Sunflower Seeds ................$21.50
Winter
Activities Guide
Inserted in
this week’s
issue
5th-8th
grade
Christmas
concert
8
Christmas
in Midland
2
Philip Nursing Home
Tree of Love honors
loved ones
The Philip Nursing Home will again have the
Tree of Love during the holidays. You may ask:
“What is the Tree of Love?”
The Tree of Love is a way in which the com-
munity can remember loved ones who may have
passed away or a loved one who is still living. It
is a worthy project which makes money for the
residents’ activity fund.
Three trees will be placed on the bulletin
board at the nursing home in early December:
The In Memory Tree – for those loved ones no
longer living; the In Honor of Tree – for that
special loved one still alive; and the Tree for
Businesses.
Colored symbols are placed on the trees.
Red symbols are $25; Blue are $10; Green are
$5; and White are $1. The price differences
allow everyone the opportunity to give a trib-
ute in someone’s name. The name of the hon-
ored person and the name of the sponsor
are placed on the symbol. Those decorat-
ing the trees appreciate a condensed ver-
sion of the information. For example: The
John Doe Family. Include the necessary
information of the honoree and the
sponsorDonations will be accepted from
now until Christmas.
Your Tree of Love donation can be
sent to the Philip Nursing Home, Attn:
Cheri Heeb, PO Box 790, Philip, SD
57567. Please note on the envelope that
it is a Tree of Love gift. Out-of-town busi-
nesses are also invited to participate.
Barbara Kroetch and Peggy Hook will
be visiting local businesses for the Busi-
ness Tree donations.
The 10th annual Christmas in Midland celebration was held Saturday, December
1, at the Midland Legion Hall. There were over 225 registered attendees. Activities
included hay rides provided by Rick Reimann and his daughter Jamie, door prizes,
cookies and cider, viewing the many trees set up by different organizations, and
a visit by Santa Claus. A live nativity scene was performed, which included tradi-
tional Christmas songs. Shown above is Clancy Doud with one of the many Christ-
mas trees on display. A drawing by the senior citizen group for a picture drawn by
Mickey Woitte was won by Shari Estep, Austin, Texas. A drawing by the Midland
Slam Dunkers Relay For Life team for an afghan was won by Ronnie Sammons,
and for a doily was won by Christine Niedan. The doily and afghan were made by
Betty Block. See more photos inside this issue. Photos by Del Bartels
Christmas in Midland
Be watching for some pink
flamingos wearing Santa hats to be
landing in a yard near you as the
Haakon/Jackson 4-H Jr. Leader's
are helping out the Ronald McDon-
ald House in Sioux Falls.
They are asking for your help to
make a difference in the lives of
those families that are affected by
illness. The Ronald McDonald
House Program provides a "Home
Away From Home" for families
with sick and injured children re-
ceiving critical medical care. They
provide stability, support, a home
cooked meal, a place to stay at little
to no cost, and let the family focus
on getting their child healthy
again.
If you find a pink flamingo in
your yard, you can call the number
listed to have them moved. All we
ask is that you donate one or more
of the items on the Ronald McDon-
ald House Wish List. These items
can be dropped off at the Extension
office in either the Haakon or Jack-
son County Courthouses. Contact
Nicki Nelson at 308-862-1051 or
the Haakon County office at 859-
2840 for questions or more infor-
mation.
There are many items that they
need to keep helping families in-
cluding: food items – fruit cups,
granola bars and individual
wrapped snacks, snack sized cere-
als, chips, crackers, individual
sized Jello and pudding snack cups,
individual cans, bottles, or boxes of
fruit juice, chunky & hearty soup,
canned pasta and spaghettios,
sugar and artificial sweeteners, cof-
fee, coffee creamer, coffee regular
sized filters, fruit snacks and roll
ups , Hamburger Helper, ketchup,
mustard, mayonnaise and paper
plates; cleaning and sanitary
items – bathroom cleaning sup-
plies, Playtex rubber gloves, paper
towels, all sizes of Ziploc bags (es-
pecially gallon), plastic wrap, alu-
minum foil, dishwasher soap, liq-
uid laundry soap, Windex and
other multipurpose cleaners, dis-
infecting wipes, antibacterial soaps
and dry Swiffer pads; personal
items – toothpaste, toothbrushes,
travel sized deodorant, pillow pro-
tectors, towels (bath hand and
washclothes), and deep pocket,
queen sized bedding.
This is being done in memory of
one of their own former 4-H Jr.
Leaders - Jennifer Nelson whose
family was helped by the Ronald
McDonald House Program. Please
help us help others! Thank you!
Pink flamingos to help raise funds
The Haakon/Jackson 4-H Jr. Leaders kicked off their pink flamingo/Ronald Mc-
Donald House fundraiser during Philip’s parade of lights. Courtesy photo
by Del Bartels
Thursday morning, November
29, Paul Imholte was the object of
an assembly for kindergarten
through sixth graders and for the
general public.
Imholte said that his goal is to
increase awareness in the audience
of not only music, but specifically
the great variety of stringed instru-
ments. He grabbed the audience’s
attention by first moving among
the students as he played a lively
tune on the fiddle.
Volunteer Mallory Vetter helped
Imholte demonstrate the wooden
spoons, which made a miniscule
pitch difference when played on dif-
ferent parts of the body, such as the
arm or even the head. The spoons
are “a very inexpensive drum set
that you can carry with you., said
Imholte.
Explaining briefly the origins of
each instrument, Imholte next
played the eight string mandolin,
first used in Italy. He then had vol-
unteers create different verses for
the song “She’ll be Coming Around
the Mountain,” as he picked the
five string banjo. The song is an
American folk song, he said, thus
no one knows who originally wrote
it, and everyone in the room owns
it.
He played the hammered dul-
cimer, which has 70 strings and
two bridges that make a musical
fifth relationship. It is a stringed
instrument, but played with mal-
lets, and is the predecessor to the
modern day piano.
Using the guitar, he sang a diddy
about rutabagas. Using the auto-
harp, he went from a minuet by
Bach to a diddy about eating ba-
nanas. Using the dulcimer – some-
times called the mountain or Ap-
palachian dulcimer – he performed
a love song “Simple Gifts.”
Having started playing such in-
struments when he was 10 and
practicing for 40 some years, “I’m
still learning, though a little bit
slower than I used to,” said
Imholte.
To the tough question from the
audience, he admitted that his
three favorite instruments of the
ones he plays would be the guitar,
hammered dulcimer and violin,
“but the violin is hard to chord.”
The last instrument introduced
was a jaw harp, technically not a
string instrument because it uses a
metal band for sound vibration.
Taking it out of his mouth to sing
the words, he played an anti-smok-
ing song, “I had a Horse That
Smoked Cigarettes.”
The assembly concluded with
Imholte playing the guitar and the
audience singing the song, “This
Land is Your Land.”
Imholte was brought to Philip
through the Dakota Assemblies
program, locally paid for by dona-
tions to the school’s teachers fund
which includes donations from the
collection of bottle caps, Box Tops
and other sources.
Stringman visits Philip Elementary
Paul Imholte, the stringman, performed for elementary stu-
dents, November 29. Above he is playing the dulcimer. The
hammered dulcimer is on its stand. Shown at right, he is
playing the wooden spoons with Mallory Vetter being the
sounding board. Below, Imholte began his session, playing
the fiddle from within the audience. Photo by Del Bartels
by Del Bartels
The Freemasons held their an-
nual District 15 meeting, Saturday,
December 1, in the Philip Masonic
Lodge #153.
Welcoming State Grand Master
Jack Hantz, Belle Fourche, as
guest speaker were District Master
Doug Thorson, Philip, Wall Master
Grant Shearer, and other attend-
ing Freemasons.
Hantz acknowledged the absence
of some district members, particu-
larly from the Martin lodge, who
were participating in the annual
Martin parade of lights. Martin,
though, will host next year’s dis-
trict meeting.
Hantz restated the hierarchy of
Masonic responsibility of family,
job, then the lodge. “Family first,
always,” said Hantz.
“My obligation is to accept the re-
sponsibility to travel all over the
state, and neighboring states, to
represent you and all Masons,”
said Hantz. With a little over 5,000
Masons in South Dakota, “We have
decided to do our best to keep the
brothers together and increase our
members.” The Grand Lodge meet-
ing this year will be family ori-
ented. “We are working on scholar-
ships for the kids and giving to
charities. We’ve got to keep our
roots growing.”
One of the most community ori-
ented programs supported by Ma-
sons is the South Dakota Child
Identification Program (CHIP). A
Masonic District 15 meeting in Philip
Ike Dale was presented his 50-year pin during the District 15 meeting of South
Dakota Freemasons, December 1, in Philip. Back row, from left: Tucker Smith,
Brad Heltzel, District 15 Master Doug Thorson and Wall Master Grant Shearer.
Front: Beau Ravellette, Dale, and S.D. Grand Master Jack Hantz. Photo – Bartels
personal identification package is
given to parents of participating
children. The packets includes a
photo, fingerprints, DNA swab,
and an audio/visual recording of
their child.
“I’m a 100 percent believer in
getting the older teenage girls in-
volved in the CHIP program. It’s
not just for little kids,” said Grant.
“If you can get in with the school,
it really helps. We did our last
CHIP program on parent/teacher
day,” said Thorson.
Hantz praised the public accessi-
bility and internal record keeping
by Masons by computers and the
Internet. “Computers are a great
thing. All this paperwork going
back and forth will stop. It’s all at
your fingertips,” said Hantz. The
South Dakota Masonic website is
mygrandlodge.org.
The district meeting concluded
with a 50-year pin presentation to
Ike Dale, Philip. Dale entered Ma-
sonry in May 1961, and was raised
to Master Mason in March 1962.
“I have a lot of stories. It’s been
quite an experience,” said Dale.
“My friends, neighbors and broth-
ers, it’s been a fun trip so far.”
Thorson noted that the year Dale
served as master of the Philip
lodge, 1969, was the year Thorson
was born.
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The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High of 48F. Breezy.
Winds from the NNW at 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday Night: Partly cloudy with a chance
of snow and rain showers after midnight.
Fog overnight. Low of 23F with a windchill as low
as 12F. Breezy. Winds from the North at 10 to 20
mph shifting to the ESE after midnight. Chance of
snow 30% with accumulations up to 1 in. possible.
Friday: Overcast with a chance of snow and
a chance of rain in the morning, then
mostly cloudy with a chance of snow and
a chance of rain. High of 41F. Breezy.
Winds from the East at 10 to 20 mph.
Chance of snow 60%. Friday Night: Partly
cloudy. Fog overnight. Low of 18F with a windchill as
low as 9F. Winds from the ESE at 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Fog early.
High of 37F with a windchill
as low as 7F. Winds from
the SE at 10 to 15 mph.
Saturday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 25F with a wind-
chill as low as 19F. Winds from the WNW
at 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. High of
30F with a windchill as low as
10F. Breezy. Winds from the
NNW at 15 to 20 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly cloudy.
Fog overnight. Low of 7F. Breezy. Winds
from the NW at 10 to 20 mph.
Monday: Partly cloudy. High of
34F with a windchill as low
as 10F. Winds from the
South at 5 to 10 mph.
Monday Night: Clear. Fog
overnight. Low of -4F. Winds
from the WSW at 5 to 10 mph.
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
I’ve worked as a waiter. I can
carry full cups of coffee around at
a goodly rate of speed without
spilling them. Well, er, usually I
can. Sometimes I may slop a little
if I try to go through a door while
carrying something in addition to
the coffee. Going through both the
front door and the screen door can
be problematic as well. Still, I have
fairly good liquid-carrying skills.
As you go through life, if you
don’t watch out, you’re apt to gain
skills at this and that (like coffee-
carrying) from jobs or experiences
you happen to have. Take cooking,
for example. I’ve always cooked
some so as to avoid starvation
when left to my own devices. I
learned quite a bit more about it,
though, when I took up trying to
feed the wife, son and some ranch
guys in addition to myself. As it
happened, we decided many years
ago to home-school son Chance,
and wife Corinne wasn’t sure she
could both teach and cook. The
cooking was known to take quite a
bit of time, especially on those days
the men came for dinner which
they did fairly often. As a result, I
volunteered for kitchen duty. This
was fine, but I had to stretch my
meager skills somewhat to avoid
serving the same fare every day
and also to accommodate some food
sensitivities plus likes and dis-
likes. I basically can and do eat al-
most everything without much
trouble, but this doesn’t hold true
for everyone.
Anyway, through doing it, I
learned to cook a varied menu.
What’s more, I tend to get carried
away with any project I take on so
I learned a lot more than strictly
necessary through my fondness for
experimentation. Some experi-
ments came out nicely and others
not so much. Scones were not a
major success. Even the dog would-
n’t eat them. He buried them in-
stead. Tacos, on the other hand,
turned out well including making
the shells from scratch. We have
eaten a lot of those.
I have also invented various
menu items and desserts although
often from goofing up and trying to
correct matters. Take the chocolate
cherry meringue cake I came up
with through accidentally adding
too much sugar when trying to
make an angel-food cake. After
cogitating over that mistake a bit,
I decided to add some cocoa and
chopped cherries and see what
happened. It turned out very well
indeed, and I still make it from
time to time. I had to call it a
meringue cake because adding too
much sugar to egg whites gives you
meringue, not angel food, but
that’s no big deal.
The other day, though, I messed
up making that cake by setting the
oven to 275 degrees instead of 325.
I didn’t notice the error until after
I’d taken the pan out and turned it
upside down to cool. The cake then
fell out of the tin so something was
obviously wrong—namely it was
badly undercooked. Taking a hint
from how you warm up French
bread (according to the bread
wrapper,) I cranked the oven up to
400 degrees and threw the confec-
tion back in the oven for ten min-
utes although I wasn’t at all sure
how that would come out. Luckily
it worked, and the cake was saved.
Alas, the learning curve is some-
what bent in areas where you may
have experience but little aptitude.
Electrical, plumbing, and mechan-
ical matters pop to mind. I’ve had
to do some of all of those through
necessity, but I’m not a fast
learner. Basic stuff I can do
through hard work and sweat, but,
if things get complicated, I call for
help. Carpentry is a little easier
but still not my best suit.
Then, too, if you live long
enough, some of the things you’ve
learned become obsolete. Take car
engines, for example. I know a lit-
tle about carburetors but nothing
about fuel injection. Electrical sys-
tems on modern cars are com-
pletely beyond me. You have to
have complicated electronic gear to
figure out what is wrong, and I’m
not really interested in learning
that. Similarly, through great ef-
fort, I learned to develop photo-
graphic film and make both color
and black-and-white prints from
negatives. Now, thanks to the dig-
ital revolution, you can barely buy
film anymore. That’s okay, how-
ever. I don’t miss all those smelly
chemicals and the tedium involved
with using them. Digital cameras
are great and computer printing
just fine.
At the moment, though, I am a
little short on my coffee consump-
tion for the day. I’d better correct
that and maybe take some black
liquid out onto the deck to drink.
That is not a problem. I’m pretty
good at carrying coffee around.
Maybe, too, I’ll take my digital
camera along and try to capture
the sunset, which seems to be
shaping up nicely. Life goes on.
Live and learn.
(By the way, opinions vary.
Corinne has a lower opinion of my
coffee-carrying skills than I do.
Something about spots on the
floor.)
Staying in shape ... by Del Bartels
Eat right, exercise, get enough sleep and don’t do anything bad for
your body. All these helpful rules sound good. That’s about all they do.
Eat right ... yeah right. Everything that tastes good is supposedly
bad for you, and if it isn’t, then the quantity needed to survive is way
too much to stay healthy. Most things on grocery shelves include
monosodium glutamate, an amino acid industrially used as a flavor
enhancer. When I want flavor, I eat a steak. No, it is not the size of a
deck of cards; it’s a STEAK. If it doesn’t cover the plate, it must be a
conspiracy by foreign-born politicians and the soy industry. Eat to sur-
vive? I survive to eat. Salad greens? I eat critters that eat greens.
Exercise (pardon my swearing) is for people who don’t work, don’t
have fun, don’t anything else or don’t have a life. Jogging, if it is not
in preparation for hunting season or to win at something, is nothing
more than self-inflicted pain. What rancher – after branding calves,
putting in fence posts, loading hay and fertilizer, and knuckle-busting
to fix the tractor – comes home and gets on the treadmill? Nobody ac-
tually wants to be stout, chunky, big-boned, horizontally tall, portly,
wide-ish or ‘but has a great personality.’ Imagine a newlywed opening
her first Christmas present from her husband, to find a weight-loss
program certificate from the health club. Imagine your kid having
show-and-tell day on examples of big, and introducing you.
The sleep idea sounds soooo good. It just doesn’t happen. Your boss
frowns on that sort of thing ... as do the passing motorists. Heaven
help you if your kid, from their chair in the band during a school con-
cert, can hear your snoring over the top of the bass drums. If sleep dep-
rivation wasn’t such a socially-promoted thing, why do dance halls stay
open until after 1:00 a.m.? And, why do TV stations air 24 hours? Be-
sides, who can fall back asleep for the rest of the night once they get
up off of the couch? Maybe I’ll get enough sleep after I’m dead.
Not doing anything bad to your body is unnatural and anti-Ameri-
can. If everyone stopped drinking and smoking, the United States
economy would crash and the government would go broke from loss of
tax revenue. A healthy population would collapse more than a few en-
tire industries – with people not needing vitamins, nor exercise equip-
ment, nor hangover remedies, nor any other health placeboes. Have
some beer, a cigar and pure sugar, then enjoy a roller coaster.
Generally, health is common sense, but that is often asking too
much. When it comes to eating habits, some people don’t get the irony
of having candy machines in a dentist’s reception room. When it comes
to having a lifestyle full of work and fun activity, it was once said that
football is 50 athletes in desperate need of rest entertaining 50,000
spectators in desperate need of exercise. When it comes to sleep, just
turn off the TV, and, if really desperate, read a little something to put
yourself asleep, such as this column.
SANTA & MRS. CLAUS … will make an appearance at the Gem
Theatre in Philip in December. Enjoy a free family movie and don’t
forget to take your picture with Santa & Mrs. Claus too. Watch our
ad for more details to come.
MILESVILLE HALL ANNUAL MEETING … will be Wednes-
day, December 5, at 6:00 p.m. at the Milesville Hall. There will be
two director positions up for election.
MILESVILLE VFD ANNUAL MEETING …Monday, December
10, 7:00 p.m. at the west side fire hall in Milesville. Everyone wel-
come.
COMMUNITY BETTERMENT COMMITTEE …Annual Christ-
mas Lighting Contest. Judging for three places will begin at 6:00
p.m. Sunday, December 23. Call Darlene Matt at 859-2077 to nom-
inate a display, and don’t forget to turn your lights on!
HAAKON COUNTY CROONER CHRISTMAS CONCERT
SCHEDULE … December 16, Philip Nursing Home, 1:30 p.m.,
Philip Courthouse, 4:00 p.m. Everyone welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Christmas in Midland
At left, the hay
rides provided
by the Reimann
family were
accentuated by
the children
petting the
patient horses
and the friendly
dogs. A local girl
pets one of the
horses under
Jamie
Reimann’s
supervision.
The live nativity scene performed by local children involved traditional Christmas songs, accompianied on guitar, by Pastor
Andy Blye.
During the annual Christmas in Midland, Santa Claus posed for pictures with all
young at heart. Shown, clockwise from lower left, are Cappie West, Jewel Jones,
Cylver Lurz and Kaitlyn Fosheim.
Petoske Construction – first place
Right, Midland
Auxiliary –
second place
Below, Trinity
Lutheran
Church – tie for
third place
Far right, Relay
For Life – tie for
third place
Attorney General Marty Jackley
announced today that the 15th an-
nual Pie Day will be held on Satur-
day, December 8 from 11:00 a.m. to
3:00 p.m. at the Capitol building in
Pierre.
The event will include free pie,
cookies, coffee and ice cream. This
event is free and the public is en-
couraged to stop by the Capitol and
enjoy. Area talent will provide en-
tertainment throughout the day.
If you have any questions re-
garding this event, contact Sara
Rabern at 605-773-3215.
Capitol’s
Pie Day
Condition of the Winter
Wheat Crop
The fall of 2012 has been a chal-
lenge for South Dakota’s winter
wheat producers as they faced very
dry soil conditions to plant into.
During the week of November 25,
2012, 64 percent of winter wheat
in South Dakota was rated in poor
or very poor condition. This rating
was the worst of any state in the
primary winter wheat growing re-
gion.
The quick development of se-
vere to exceptional drought, ac-
cording to the U.S. Drought Moni-
tor (http://droughtmonitor.unl.
edu/), has affected much of the
wheat producing areas of the US.
The winter wheat crop conditions
in the central US has affected the
national rating, which is now at its
lowest level since records of this
type began in 1986.
The South Dakota Weekly Crop
Weather Report, published by the
National Agricultural Statistics
Service puts the hard red winter
wheat of South Dakota at 60 per-
cent emerged as of November 25.
Other states have significantly
better ratings, both in condition
and percent emerged. Some people
believe the report of 60 percent of
winter wheat emerged seems high.
The NASS crop progress estimates
are based on a subjective opinion
survey of county officials, which
are not claimed to be statistically
accurate. The important fact is
that even if the figure is high, 60%
is the lowest percent of winter
wheat emerged by late November
in South Dakota since at least
1990. One other fall that stands
out with a low percentage of win-
ter wheat emergence in South
Dakota was 2000, when 74 percent
of the crop was reported emerged
in November. The statewide aver-
age yield in 2001 was 32 bu/acre,
which tied for the 2nd and 3rd low-
est yield since 1990. It is not advis-
able to make yield predictions for
the 2013 cropping season based on
this however.
Many areas where winter wheat
was planted into dry soil have re-
ceived small amounts of moisture
via rain and/or snow. This limited
moisture has caused some of the
wheat to sprout, but little has ac-
tually emerged to a significant de-
gree. These seedlings have used
energy reserves from the seed, and
have not been able to generate
photosynthetic activity and de-
velop crowns to store energy for
winter survival. Without addi-
tional moisture, the sprouted
seedlings may dry out and die.
Dry soil cools off more quickly
and will get colder than soil with
adequate moisture, if low air tem-
peratures occur without snow for
insulation. This potential exposure
to low temperatures could con-
tribute to significant winterkill for
a crop in marginal condition. Mois-
ture in the form of either rain or
snow would improve the condition
of the crop and chances for its sur-
vival. However prospects for mois-
ture don’t look good.
Producers may want to wait be-
fore making decisions such as fer-
tilizing until they have a better
handle on the potential of the crop.
As spring approaches, winter
wheat growers will want to assess
the condition of the crop. If the
crop is insured, producers should
contact their crop insurance agent
before taking steps to terminate
the crop and initiate alternative
plans.
The good news is that if the crop
survives, it is almost certain that
the plants will vernalize and pro-
duce a seed head. All that is neces-
sary for the winter wheat plants to
vernalize is for the kernel to take
on moisture and swell, and go
through a period of about three
weeks at about 40 degrees or
lower. It is almost unheard of for
winter wheat planted in the fall in
South Dakota to not complete that
process. It is well known among
producers that wheat, particularly
winter wheat, is a tough crop and
can surprise you with its re-
siliency.
For more information, visit
http://igrow.org/agronomy/wheat/.
Calendar
12/11: Soil Health Info Day-
Davison County Extension Com-
plex, Mitchell
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Rural Living
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
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books at:
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Selling:
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Tuesday, december 18Th
at Philip (SD) Livestock Auction
• Heifers have had all shots
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• Divided into two (2) calving groups
Call 605/859-2979 or 859-3263
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• ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
George: 441-3607 • Lee: 441-3606
Dennis
859-2970 • Philip
This fall, many livestock produc-
ers who veterinarian Jim Stangle,
Milesville, works with have to be
creative when it comes to finding
forage for their cattle.
The drought left them with re-
duced hay supplies and little to no
winter grazing. To help ensure that
the forages his clients find are safe
to feed, the Haakon County veteri-
narian tests samples of standing
forages for nitrates.
“Because of the drought we knew
nitrates would be a big problem
this year. I took a South Dakota
State University Extension train-
ing course so I could provide local
testing to producers in my area,”
said Stangle, who was one of many
South Dakota veterinarians to re-
ceive certification from SDSU Ex-
tension this summer on the nitrate
quik test.
Along with getting their forages
tested for nitrates, Stangle said
that, because many of his clients
have to purchase additional forages
or protein supplements this year,
many cattle producers rely on
SDSU Extension to provide them
with information on affordable op-
tions, as well as customized feed
rations.
“Because they aren’t selling a
product, producers know they can
trust SDSU Extension field special-
ists for unbiased recommenda-
tions,” Stangle said.
Adele Harty, Philip, is the SDSU
Extension cow/calf field specialist
Stangle works with. She is one of
about specialists hired when a new
staffing model was put into place
October 2011 as part of a complete
reorganization, implemented to
comply with state budget cuts.
Harty has worked within SDSU
Extension since 2005. When she
was rehired in 2011 as an SDSU
Extension field specialist her job
description changed.
“I was raised on a cow/calf oper-
ation. My education is focused in
cow/calf nutrition. Before I was re-
hired, I worked with all livestock
producers. Now that I'm able to
focus on, and work with solely
cow/calf producers I can utilize my
knowledge, experience and educa-
tion to help South Dakota cow/calf
producers to become better at what
they are already good at,” Harty
said.
Harty and her peers are expected
to have their master's degree.
Today, field specialists office in one
of eight regional centers, but often
travel throughout the state.
“This provides a greater level of
expertise to the entire state,” said
Rosie Nold, SDSU Extension pro-
gram director for agriculture and
natural resources. “Instead of gen-
eralists in each county, we have
several specialized staff serving the
entire state. This allows SDSU Ex-
tension to provide a deeper level of
focus, expertise and research based
information to help solve the chal-
lenging questions or issues South
Dakotans face.”
Karla Trautman, associate direc-
tor of SDSU Extension, added that
because specialists serve the entire
state, there is an increased focus on
collaboration between SDSU Ex-
tension specialists, SDSU faculty
and supporters throughout the
state.
Through the budget driven reor-
ganization, SDSU Extension in-
creased its commitment to 4-H.
More than 30 4-H youth program
advisor positions were created, in
coordination with local communi-
ties, to focus on 4-H, a program
which serves more than 59,000
South Dakota youth each year.
“The university reinforced its
commitment to 4-H and youth de-
velopment by implementing county
level 4-H youth program advisor
positions,” Peter Nielson, SDSU
Extension 4-H youth development
program director. “Four-H mem-
bers and programs did not have
this type of dedicated focus in the
old system."
Nielson explained that today
there is more of a prioritized 4-H
focus because, 4-H youth program
advisors, like field specialists, are
fully committed to 4-H and youth
programming.
“Although there have been grow-
ing pains in many areas, 4-H mem-
bers and their families have seen
increased opportunities this year,"
said Paula Hamilton, president of
the state 4-H leaders association.
Along with face-to-face educa-
tional seminars and workshops,
SDSU Extension offers webinars,
has smartphone apps and provides
24/7 access to educational materi-
als and information through iGrow.
iGrow is an online teaching plat-
form. The free service gives produc-
ers information they need to moni-
tor current developments in agri-
culture, research and trade; farm
specific agricultural weather, prof-
itability calculators, and libraries
of agricultural production and
management information, podcasts
and forums, all in a highly secure
online environment that works on
computers, smart phones and mo-
bile Internet devices.
“We look at iGrow as our virtual
SDSU Extension office. Within its
first year of operation, this virtual
office has had 96,000 visitors and
those visitors asked 300,000 ques-
tions,” said Emery Tschetter, direc-
tor of communications and market-
ing for SDSU College of Agricul-
ture and Biological Sciences.
South Dakotans can also pick up
the phone and call AnswerLine
with a question. AnswerLine is a
toll free connection to family and
consumer science specialists dedi-
cated to answering questions and
directing consumers to research-
based resources.
“This is a one-stop-shop for an-
swers to family and consumer sci-
ence questions," said Joan
Hegerfeld-Baker, Extension food
safety specialist. “Through An-
swerLine, consumers have access
to an office full of specialists, along
with data and resources compiled
by SDSU Extension field special-
ists, faculty and researchers."
During the growing season, An-
swerLine also provided access to
answers for horticultural ques-
tions.
SDSU Extension also hit the air-
waves in 2011, introducing the
iGrow radio network. A companion
service to iGrow.org, the daily
three minute segment can be heard
on 12 major radio stations across
the state and region.
Hosted by farm broadcaster,
Pam Geppert, iGrow Radio Net-
work programs are drawn from the
credible and accurate information
on iGrow.org. The radio programs
feature field specialists and univer-
sity faculty who cover a variety of
topics ranging from agronomy and
weather, to livestock production
and rural life.
To learn more about SDSU Ex-
tension, visit iGrow.org.
SDSU Extension service one year later
The Haakon/Jackson 4-H program
held its year end recognition event,
November 4, at the Philip American
Legion Hall. Members were rewarded
for their hard work throughout the
year. The top secretary award went to
Sage Bierle, shown above, for her hard
work keeping club records. In last
week’s issue of the Pioneer Review,
Bierle’s last name was mislabeled. We
apologize for the error.
Correction
4-H honors
Local businesses support
Philip FFA chapter
Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle and Vet, Philip, and Golden Veterinarian Services,
Milesville, made recent donations to the Philip FFA chapter. The donations were
made possible by a Pfizer Animal Health program. For eligible purchases of Pfizer
Animal Health cattle and equine products, a donation was made on behalf of
each local business to the Philip FFA Chapter. The chapter and its student mem-
bers can use the funding for help with classroom materials, educational oppor-
tunities, travel to the national convention and more. “The money will be used to
help fund local community projects and FFA scholarships,” said Doug Hauk, Philip
FFA Chapter advisor. Shown above, from left, are Philip FFA Chapter members
Carl Poss, Nick Hamill, Ryan Van Tassel, Avery Johnson and Thomas Doolittle
thanking Irvin Jones of Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle and Vet. Shown below is Philip FFA
Chapter member Ben Stangle thanking Dr. Jim Stangle of Golden Veterinarian
Services. Courtesy photos
More than 105 students are set
to graduate at Northern State Uni-
versity’s winter commencement
Saturday, December 8, in Ab-
erdeen.
The ceremony will be at 10:30
a.m. at the Johnson Fine Arts Cen-
ter Theater.
Of those to graduate are:
Lincoln T. Smith, Philip, who
will be receiving a bachelor of sci-
ence in honoribus in manage-
ment – marketing. He is a candi-
date for summa cum laude recogni-
tion.
Jordan R. Smith, Philip, who will
be receiving a bachelor in science in
professional accountacy – finance.
He is a candidate for magna cum
laude recognition.
College Briefs
Hit & Miss
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Dec. 6: Baked Potato
Soup or Beef Noodle Soup, Roll,
Dutch Apple Pie.
Friday, Dec. 7: Chicken Pasta
Pomodoro, Malibu Veggies, Garlic
Bread, Cranberry Orange Delight.
Monday, Dec. 10: Roast Beef,
Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Corn,
Roll, Pineapple Tidbits.
Tuesday., Dec. 11: Steak Fin-
gers, Potato Wedges, Creamy
Coleslaw, Blonde Brownie.
Wednesday, Dec. 12: French
Dip with Cheese, Potato Leek
Soup, Watermelon.
***
Wednesday, November 21, my
granddaughter, Sheridan Hansen,
took me along to a place where you
paint pottery items and they glaze
the pieces and fire them. This
makes a unique gift, a keepsake.
Sheridan, Tiger and I had fun
painting. We made a cute dish for
“Ant” Emily by Sheridan, a colorful
big bowl for “Dad” Duinkherjav by
Tiger and a mug done in very early
sunflowers by Grandma Hansen.
Thank you for the experience,
Sheridan.
Leslie Hansen, my son, sent a
letter of pleasant reminiscences
from Bend, Ore. Thank you, Leslie.
My niece, Wanda, and her hus-
band, Ed Artz, sent a beautiful
Thanksgiving card. She also sent a
page of lovely Christmas stamps
with three wise men and camels
and star. Thanks you for the card,
stamps, letter and pillows. I am
glad to get the pillows, as Gwynn
had given me some pretty fabric
that is intended for cushions. M.R.
Hansen came for scrabble. He and
senior student Tony Kuleza went to
Custer today to visit Ralph O’Neill,
who, at 104 years of age, is the old-
est living civil engineering gradu-
ate of the South Dakota School of
Mines and Technology. He lives
with his son, Ken, in Custer.
Thank you for the news item, M.R.
M.R. phoned my son, David, and
found that David and Janet were
on their way to Missouri or Kansas
to visit some of Janet’s folks for
Thanksgiving. Ralph has had an
outstanding career of over 60 years
with the S.D. Dept. of Transporta-
tion and with Aaron Swan and As-
sociates. Mr. O’Neill is also a dis-
tant relative of Philip’s oldtime
house mover and engineer, Ervin
O’Neill.
Watch out for cutesy doo-dads,
they will destroy your feng shui!
On Thanksgiving Day, at Somer-
set Court, my tablemate, Marilyn
Butts, had company at lunch, her
daughter and son-in-law, Carla
and Kelly Jerred, Rapid City. They
stayed an hour or so and showed
Marilyn photos taken on their re-
cent trip to Idaho Falls for Mari-
lyn’s great-granddaughter’s first
birthday.
Another of my tablemates at
Somerset Court had given her
daughter, Beverly, a sizable check
to buy supplies for a family
Thanksgiving dinner.
Vivian Hansen had been invited
to dinner at her son, M.R. and wife
Barbara’s home in Rapid City.
They expected their daughter,
Tiffany, and family from Iowa City,
Willow Hansen, Spearfish, and
Blaise Hansen, Cheyenne. Vivian
Hansen woke up with red circles
around both eyes, so she decided to
stay in her apartment so her “bud-
dies” would not have to see her
looking so awful.
Vivian’s son, Leslie, Bend, Ore.,
surprised her with a visit. They
shared a Somerset Court noon
meal, (plenty for both), had a good
game of scrabble, and talked phi-
losophy and then Leslie played the
piano. He has great power and
style. Thank you, Leslie.
Vivian’s daughter, Vinnie, and
husband of Santa Cruz, Calif., had
a negative experience on Thanks-
giving Day. Vinnie emailed that
Danny chased a thief out of their
house and the thief drew a gun.
Neighbors helped out with cell
phones and the thief was appre-
hended. They also found most of
the things he stole. Over all, they
were thankful because Danny was
not shot, and because in general
they have a beautiful life.
Philip Pioneer Review of Novem-
ber 15, 2012, came up with some
astounding news again. One item
puzzled me, is Rita O’Connell mov-
ing? I got a charge out of Blast
From the Past – in 1937 Grace
Fairchild took a trip to Pananma to
visit her son, Jasper. He was run-
ning a large banana plantation.
Thanksgiving was good fun. But
now it is officially Christmas sea-
son. Christmas decorations are in
order. Some beautiful doorways are
already being set up. Irene McK-
night had company at breakfast
Friday, November 23, her daugh-
ter, Gloria Crumet, spent the week-
end. It is good to see Gloria again.
She used to live here but now lives
in Spearfish.
On the day after Thanksgiving at
Somerset Court, Ken Monette
stopped by at breakfast and told
me he had written a poem (his first
in 25 years) and put it in our Som-
erset Court scrapbook on the coffee
table by the fireplace. Thank you,
Ken. Be sure to sit down and read
it.
Somerset Court resident, Bernie
James, is now at Meadowbrook. Vi-
olet Jenison, another Somerset
Court resident, is at this time at
West Hills Village. And Opal Win-
jum, who used to live at Somerset
Court is also at West Hills Village
and our volunteer, Amy Voyles, vis-
its her.
Friday morning after exercises,
Irene Cox, Addie Rorvig, Shirley
Horn and Vivian played a little 500
rummy and bananagrams.
The Somerset Court movie Fri-
day was “Miracle on 34th Street.”
We enjoyed the oldie.
M.R. Hansen brought me a big
red poinsettia. Thanks, Mig. Later
on Friday, M.R., his son, Blaise,
and Blaise’s daughter, Willow, 13,
and M.R.’s daughter, Tiffany’s two
sons, Adam, 10, and Josh, 14, all
came to visit me at Somerset
Court. Adam played the piano for
us. We played a game of six-handed
scrabble. Thanks for your visit.
The November 22, 2012, Pioneer
Review had a good article about
Philip’s Scotchman Industries gen-
erous donation of machines and
training to the workshop for veter-
ans.
Saturday, November 24, at Som-
erset Court, Vivian Hansen had
company, her son, Leslie, Bend,
Ore. Leslie sat through exercises
with the residents.
Leslie suggested that we have a
project of baking bread from
scratch. Somerset kitchen provided
a big mixing bowl and two loaf
pans, a little flour, yeast and sugar.
Leslie and Vivian stirred up a
“sponge” which means a starter to
get the yeast growing. You will
need a couple of cups of comfort-
ably warm water, not hot. Add a
couple tablespoons of sugar, and
stir it well, now add about two ta-
blespoons of granulated dry yeast
and stir. Let is develop at room
temperature. In 20 to 30 minutes,
the yeast spores will have multi-
plied and made a foamy mixture.
Now add a cup of warm water and
a cup of flour. Stir well, and let that
continue to grow the yeast. From
there you can add a little shorten-
ing and flour until it makes a firm
dough. Knead and form into a
smooth ball. Let it stand at room
temperature until it is about twice
its original size. Then form it into
two loaves. Or as we did, one loaf
and a dozen biscuits. Then go do
something else while they grow for
about an hour or maybe two. Bake
at 350 degrees. Be sure to open
your door and let the neighbors
enjoy the aroma.
Thank you to the Somerset
kitchen staff. It was a pleasant ex-
perience. Leslie also entertained
with piano music. Thank you,
Leslie. We walked some laps and
Leslie got to meet Maxine Burgess
up on third floor.
Leslie left to do errands and M.R.
Hansen came over for scrabble. He
was just leaving when Leslie came
back. So then, Leslie sampled the
bread and pronounced it edible.
Edna Wulff dropped in and we
asked her to take our picture with
the bread and biscuits waiting to
rise.
There was quite a little whist
played in the afternoon. I saw Irene
Arbach, Irene Cox, Susan and
probably Ina playing.
Sunday, November 25, Irene
McKnight went along to Spearfish
to take Gloria Crumet to her home.
In the evening, Irene’s daughter,
Beverly, came to Somerset Court to
help Irene with Christmas decora-
tions.
You should see the new doorway
decorations on third floor at Som-
erset Court. Elaine Backes has a
Mr. and Mrs. Christmas dolls who
nod and bow. Wilma Keene has a
new Christmas arrangement. Ray
and Mildred Kraemer have a big
red nose on their deer head – their
son shot the deer some years back.
This is the time when we hang
our Christmas stockings and get
our decorations out of the store-
room at Somerset Court.
Sunday, my son, Leslie, went to
Philip to church at the old church
where he went as a youngster.
We had church at Somerset
Court in the afternoon with Rev.
Richardson. He was wearing his
great-grandfather’s clerical robe.
He told us he had spent some time
with his lively grandson. Jack
Humke played piano for us. He
played “What a Friend We Have In
Jesus,” “At the Cross,” “Angels
From the Realms of Glory,” “O
Come Emmanuel,” “There Shall be
Showers of Blessings,” and several
others for us to sing. Rev. Richard-
son’s theme was on thanks – we
should always be thankful – a
thankful heart is a happy heart.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and made two pleasant words, wel-
come and wealth. We needed a
word with the letters v i g and sure
enough, vig is a word. It refers to
money paid to a a bookie.
Leslie Hansen came for supper
and a little pool. We had a nice
visit.
At Somerset Court on November
26, 2012, we had a little snow, very
pretty. Some residents went shop-
ping and brought back loads of
Christmas gifts as well as house-
hold necessities. Thanks Shawn
and Sandy for being so helpful.
Monday morning we also had
crafts with Amy and made cute lit-
tle Christmas elves.
My son, Leslie, came to visit and
we played the piano together,
“Camptown Races.” Leslie put up
my strings of red and green Christ-
mas lights that Mig gave me last
year. Then he went to get his car
fixed. Sheridan came and brought
my jacket that I had left in her car,
but she didn’t wake me up, so I
missed seeing her.
The Somerset Court Monday
movie was “Stuart Little.” It was
sort of a cartoon and Stuart, a
mouse, was living with people. You
have to see it to understand. He
has outlandish adventures. I had to
leave, so I never found out what
happened in the end.
Irene Cox lent me Elaine Backes’
Mitchell Daily Republic newspaper
so I could read the article about the
book, “Heaven is for Real” by
Colton Burpo and his writer, Linn
Vincent. The book tells about the
little boys near-death experience.
He describes Jesus and other char-
acters in detail. The book sold well
and provided trust funds for the
boy and money for his parents to
appear on TV and tell about his
book. Thank you, Irene, and thank
you, Elaine.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble.
Crystal Denke Jackson emailed
that stray messages were on my
email. I don’t know how to fix that.
So I may not send any more emails.
Goodbye Yahoo! Crystal reported
that the Monarch butterfly in her
dooryard hatched. Also she had the
fun of going to walnut tree in the
neighborhood and finding walnuts
in the leaf litter. The walnuts are
brown and the leaf litter is brown.
November 27, Leslie dropped in
early and visited until breakfast,
when he went on his way.
After exercises, we had goofy
golf. Susan and Sandy picked up
balls and kept score. Residents who
played were Fred Smith, Mary Lou
Peters, Irene McKnight, Virginia
Gray, and her friend, Denise Beck,
Mildred Young and helper Kay,
Eileen Tenold, Marge Self, Marilyn
Butts, Jim Holmes and Vivian
Hansen. Fred won one game and
Marilyn the other. Thanks to our
activity directors. We like goofy
golf.
Also on Tuesday, at Somerset
Court, we had bingo with winners
Mary Lou, twice, Addie, twice,
Marilyn Oyler, and Mildred Young.
The birthday bash was cele-
brated for those residents with No-
vember birthdays: Mary Gaffney,
5th, Lucille Huether, 8th, Irma
Brandt, 9th, Marge Gaffin, 14th,
Agnes Tastad, 15th, LaVerne With,
17th, Elaine Backes, 27th, Grace
Tllery, 30th, and staff, Jade Rea,
1st, Alexandria Hurger, 3rd, Jes-
sica Caffee, 18th. A big decorated
cake and vanilla ice cream were
served and Happy Birthday, God
Bless You was was sung. In the
late afternoon, a group played
rummi-cube, Irene Arbach, Irene
Cox, Susan, Marcella, Addie, and
possibly others.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and with two blanks made a word
using all his letters (for 50 extra
points). My son, David Hansen,
phoned from Ft. Pierre. He had a
good trip to Missouri to visit some
of Janet’s family over Thanksgiv-
ing. His sister, Delores, had phoned
him, which is seldom enough to
rate a mention.
West Central Electric put out a
fine magazine called Cooperative
Connections. There are articles for
greater efficiency and safety in
using electricity, pictures of safety
posters made by local children, a
calendar of events and even a page
of favorite recipes in the December
issue.
At Somerset Court on Wednes-
day, our activity directors took a
Somerset Court bus load of resi-
dents out for lunch to a steak
house. I believe Lad Burgr and
Marge Self went to Deadwood on
the bus and maybe Mildred Krae-
mer. Irene Cox, Irene Arbach,
Susan and Eleanor played whist.
Mary Lou, Sandy, Addie and Mar-
garet played rummi-cube. Resident
Jane Bunch invited Vivian to play
up-words with her and her daugh-
ter, Tati, and daughter-in-law,
Julie. I had forgotten how much
fun up-words is. Thank you for
having me in, Jane. Jane’s son,
Bob, was with the group.
Our new Somerset Court resi-
dent, Richard Kessel, used to be a
professor in the college at Iowa
City for 38 years.
The Rapid City Journal of No-
vember 28, 2012, had the obituary
of Eva Doughty Forkner, Box
Elder, who passed away November
26, 2012. Eva is a sister of Somer-
set Court resident, Lucille
Huether. My sympathy to the fam-
ily and friends. I have known the
Doughty family since my childhood
in the Grindstone country.
Friday, we had the activity of
practice the stairs which is a new
activity for the purpose of making
residents more self-reliant when
and if they need or wish to use the
stairs. Stair climbing will be super-
vised with any help that is needed.
There could be times when the ele-
vators are not working and one
wishes to be on a different floor.
My son, Leslie, dropped in at
breakfast time to visit for a while.
We were puzzling ourselves about
the old method of determining the
square root of any number. We did-
n’t wish to resort to a calculator. If
you are good at the old formula,
please show me how.
Marjorie Gaffin has a pretty
Christmas tree outside her apart-
ment door on third floor. It has
needlepoint ornaments.
For snack and chat we had the
treat of some fancy cupcakes.
Glue some tissue paper around
the edge of a new flag. The glue re-
mains and helps keep the flag from
fraying. Thank you to Somerset
Court resident LaVerne With for
this bit of lore.
Irene Cox, Vivian Hansen, Addie
Rorvig, Mary Lou Peters, Susan
and Margaret played quiddler after
snack and chat.
continued on page 5
Virginia Crowser
will celebrate her
90th birthday on
December 11, 2012
Her family requests a
Card Shower
in honor of this
milestone!
Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 39
Union Center, SD 57787
December 7-8-9-10:
Rise of the Guardians
Fri & Sat: 7:00
Sun 1:30 • Mon 6:00
The Twilight Saga:
Breaking Dawn - Part 2
(PG-13)
Fri & Sat: 9:00
Sun 3:30 • Mon 8:00
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
2013 Quad County
Relay For Life
Team Meetings
Register your team, pick up a packet or find out what Relay for
Life is at a “come and go” meeting in the following communities:
Sunday, December 9th
Midland, 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. MST, Fire Hall
Philip, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. MST, Senechal Lobby
Wall, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. MST, First Interstate Bank Basement
Saturday, December 15th
Kadoka, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. MST,
Annex of the City Auditorium
New Underwood, 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. MST,
New Underwood School Lunchroom
If you are unable to attend and are interested or have
questions, call Jody Bielmaier 605-279-2841.
Greetings from dark, breezy, dry,
not-too-cool northeast Haakon
County. The reason it is dark is be-
cause I'm writing this news on
Monday night, because I have a lot
to do on Tuesday. Our weather has
been so unseasonably warm the
past few days – I haven't even
needed to wear a coat when I walk
to the barn to feed the cats. That is
certainly unusual for this time of
year! Sometimes I worry that if we
have all this nice weather now, we
are probably going to pay for it
later on. And I guess that could
possibly be the case, but for now I'll
just enjoy the warmth.
It was kind of bittersweet last
week here at Neuhauser ranch
when we removed some of the trees
that Randy's Grandpa Rube
planted many decades ago. The
trees were huge Chinese elms that
had shaded grandpa's house and
yard for years and years, but they
had come to the end of their life.
They needed to be removed before
they fell and damaged the house or
tore out electric lines. We called in
professionals to help with the job –
the trees were too big for us to
tackle on our own. I hoped that
maybe we could just take out the
dead limbs, but the experts said
the trees were 90 percent dead, and
there just wasn't anything to be
saved. So now there is a lot more
sunlight on the south side of the
house, and we have a huge pile of
tree trunks and branches at the
edge of the hill. Those trees served
their purpose well, and next spring
I'll be planting some trees to take
their place.
It is getting closer to Christmas,
and the local schools have set the
dates of their Christmas programs,
so mark your calendars! The pro-
gram at Cheyenne School will be
held at 7 p.m. CST Thursday, De-
cember 13, at the Kirley Hall. And
the program at the Deep Creek
School will be Wednesday, Decem-
ber 19, at 7 p.m. CST at the school.
Following the programs, there will
be treats and refreshments, and
everyone is invited to attend. The
students work hard preparing for
the programs – I hope they have
good crowds!
And speaking of schools, the
Deep Creek students and their
teacher, Theresa Deuchar, at-
tended an assembly in Philip
Thursday, November 29. The pre-
sentor had music as his medium to
teach some positive messages for
the kids. Unfortunately, during the
assembly, Theresa's car had a flat
tire, so Mark Coyle loaned them a
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Prairie Designs Floral Studio
By Appointment: (605) 840-4810
Christmas Specials 2012
40% off all Christmas items
including Custom Christmas Designs
(long distance business & shipping is available)
in Philip
Church & Community Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
For if any be a hearer of the word,
and not a doer, he is like unto a man
beholding his natural face in a glass. For he
beholdeth himself, and goeth his way, and
straightway forgetteth what manner of man
he was. James 1.23-24 (KJJ)
!zz¿1,..z.¸
Every Sunday people Iill up church pews everywhere
to hear the Word, but Ior some the work stops there.
They hear the Word, but they Iail to act on it. LiIe goes
on as usual their way. Are you among them? II so,
repent and return to the path God has set beIore you.
Hear His word and act upon it with zest.
Ancient Wisdom for Modern Life
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
continued on page 7
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Thomas S. McDonnell_____________
Thomas S. “Tom” McDonnell,
age 101, of Wall, S.D., died Friday,
November 30, 2012, at the Philip
Nursing Home.
Thomas S. McDonnell was born,
along with his twin brother, Vern,
on May 15, 1911, on their parents’
homestead 10 miles north of
Quinn, the son of Frank and Ida
(Riesing) McDonnell.
They grew up on the homestead
and received their education at the
Huron Township rural school in
that area. As a young man, Tom
farmed in the Quinn area.
Tom was united in marriage to
Rose Melvin on December 24,
1945, at Cheyenne, Wyo. Tom and
Rose, along with his brother, Vern,
and Vern’s wife, Beulah, farmed
on the family homestead. Tom
later purchased a D-8 Cat scraper
and Dozer, and built dams and
roads in the Quinn area for over 10
years.
In 1972, Tom and Rose moved
into Wall, yet Tom returned to the
homestead daily. After Rose’s
death on October 12, 2001, Tom
continued to reside in Wall. In
2009, at the age of 98, he remained
active operating the D-7 Cat and
did a lot of dirt work for his
nephew Steve. In May 2010, Tom
moved into the Philip Nursing
Home where he joined his brother,
Vern.
Survivors include his twin
brother, Vern McDonnell of Philip;
his nephew, Steven McDonnell
and his wife, Terry, of Quinn, and
his niece, Lea Ymker, of Armour;
18 nieces and nephews; a sister-in-
law, Cecilia Melvin of Wall; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
In addition to his wife Rose, Tom
was preceded in death by his fa-
ther Frank in 1955, his mother Ida
in 1957; and a great-nephew
Travis McDonnell.
Graveside services were held
Tuesday, December 4, at the Wall
Cemetery, with Father Leo Haus-
mann officiating.
At Tom's request, in lieu of flow-
ers memorials are to be directed to
the Philip Nursing Home.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Robert John Reedy________________
Robert John Reedy, 67, Vale,
S.D., died Thursday, November 29,
2012, at his residence in Vale.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Monday, December 3,
2012, at St. Mary's Star of the Sea
Catholic Church in Newell with
Father Tyler Dennis officiating.
Burial was at the Vale Cemetery.
Robbie was born January 18,
1945, in Kadoka to John and Emi-
lie (Barcal) Reedy. He grew up in
a family of six children north of
Philip, near the Grindstone
Buttes. He graduated from Philip
High School in 1963. Robbie then
attended one year at the South
Dakota School of Mines & Technol-
ogy.
He joined the U.S. Navy and
served in Germany for two years
before being assigned to the U.S.
Embassy in Cyprus for another
two years. He was one of only two
who earned the rank of 2nd Class
Petty Officer in the entire U.S.
Navy that year.
Following his honorable dis-
charge, Robbie returned to Philip
after the death of his younger
brother to help run the family
ranch. He married Paula Weiss on
June 9, 1973, in Mondovi, Wisc.
They ranched in Philip until 1977
when they moved to Fairpoint,
where they ranched until 1988.
They then moved to Newell. Rob-
bie always said, "They were tough
but wonderful years." Robbie then
became a surveyor for the Bureau
of Reclamation. In 2001, he began
working at the Department of Vet-
erans Affairs, Fort Meade.
His family was Robbie's greatest
treasure. He loved to dance, was
a great storyteller, and was a good
friend to many. He loved his
friends, ranching, surveying, and
taking care of those in the nursing
home. Robbie was a member of St.
Mary's Star of the Sea Catholic
Church, the Vale Township Board,
the Knights of Columbus, and the
Philip American Legion and both
the Fairpoint and Vale fire depart-
ments.
He is survived by his wife,
Paula, Vale; his children, Julie
(Scott) Wheeler, Sundance, Wyo.,
Will (Misty) Reedy, Vale, Christy
(Darrin) Jons, Pierre, Mary Reedy,
Rapid City, Anna (Chris) Skeen,
Pine Haven, Wyo., Meghan Reedy,
Camp Crook, and Joseph Reedy,
Chadron, Neb.; his mother, Emilie
Reedy, Philip; two sisters, Mary
Kay Sandal and Joann (Lester)
Pearson of Philip; one brother,
Mike, of Colorado; and eight
grandchildren, Tori, Brit, Peter,
Josie, Emilie, Mathew, Bailey and
Cooper.
He was preceded in death by his
father, John, and two brothers,
Richard and Joseph Reedy.
Robbie was a wonderful hus-
band, father and friend. He will be
greatly missed.
Inspired by God
Compiled & written by
Ruby Gabriel
$12.00 + tax
457-2353
Ruby Cadman __________________
Ruby Ann Cadman, age 75, of
Rapid City, formerly of Kadoka,
died Monday, December 3, 2012, at
the Rapid City Regional Hospital.
Survivors include a son, Don
Cadman, and his wife, Tammy, of
Holabird, S.D.; a daughter, Dixie
Cadman, of Box Elder, S.D.; one
grandson; a brother, Lewis Hook,
of Louisiana; and two sisters, Glo-
ria French and Cheryl Howard,
both of Missouri.
Ruby was preceded in death by
her husband, David Robin Cad-
man, on October 16, 1995, and a
son, David Cadman.
Graveside services will be held
1:00 p.m. Thursday, December 6,
2012 at the Black Hills National
Cemetery near Sturgis.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her guestbook is available at
www.rushfuneralhome.com
A full obituary will appear in
next week’s paper.
pickup to get to their next stop. The
students and Theresa met Tom
Radway at his home, and he told
them about his accident that oc-
curred many years ago, resulting in
him being in a wheelchair. He
showed everyone how he copes
with everyday life. The most inter-
esting aspect was how he operates
his van. Before the class left, Tom
made sure the class had some good-
ies. The students had questions
and learned much from Tom. Next
on the schedule was a visit with
Chuck Allen. The students were
much impressed by the process of
preparing rocks in his rock shop to
make different items. According to
Theresa, listening to all of the in-
formation from Chuck was like a
science class. Chuck and Etta gave
the students some of the beautiful
rocks and shared cookies with
them. After picking up the car, the
class traveled to the school for a
quick lunch and then on to Ed
Briggs' place to get a Christmas
tree. Ed Briggs and Beth King met
the group, ready to give everyone a
ride on a wagon pulled by a team of
Beth's two draft horses. Ed and
Beth had on Santa hats, and the
wagon and horses were also
dressed up. Russ Sinkey joined the
group to help with the tree hunt. It
took a little while to find just the
right tree. After getting the tree to
the schoolhouse, Russ trimmed the
tree and set it up in the classroom.
This truly is the season when we
see others giving of their time, es-
pecially all of those whom the Deep
Creek students encountered that
day. (submitted by Theresa
Deuchar)
On a personal note, thanks to
Theresa Deuchar for sharing this
information. And also thanks to
Mark Coyle, Tom Radway, Chuck
Allen and Etta Erdmann, Ed
Briggs, Beth King, and Russ
Sinkey for making the day so spe-
cial for the kids. Days like that are
but one of the benefits of attending
a rural school! The students will
probably never forget the lessons
they learned that day. And as for
Christmas tree hunting at the
Briggs' place – that is carrying on
a tradition that Ed's father, Elmer,
used to love! I'm so glad to see that
tradition continue!
Lola Roseth and her sister,
Linda Smith, were in Sioux Falls
from Tuesday through Friday of
last week attending a conference.
Saturday, Lola was in Rapid City
helping with statewide EMT test-
ing. She said it was a long day, but
it is good to get more EMTs certi-
fied in the state. Duane and Lola
attended church Sunday.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson spent
some time working on corrals again
this week. Dorothy said they were
putting in new fence in an area
where some windbreak blew down
earlier this year. Wednesday, Nels
helped the Allemans vaccinate
calves. Friday, Nels and Dorothy
were in town for supplies, and they
also had time for a brief visit with
some friends. Saturday, Dorothy
went to the neighbor's place to pick
up her Bountiful Basket that Katie
Bruce had brought from Hayes.
Dorothy attended church Sunday,
and there was a Ladies Aid meet-
ing following the church service.
Dorothy said Christmas candle-
light services will be held at Deep
Creek Church Sunday, December
23, at 5 p.m. The church service
will be followed by a potluck sup-
per.
Work continues on the cabin at
the Markwed place. Larry Tibbs
was out last Wednesday to work on
the wiring for the cabin, and the
plumber will be doing some work
this week. Arlyne said earlier that
she would like to have the cabin
finished by Christmas, and it looks
like that is a distinct possibility!
Billy and Arlyne Markwed helped
with an auction sale Sunday. When
I spoke with Arlyne Monday morn-
ing, she and great-grandson Kyler
were busy baking a birthday cake
to celebrate Kyler's second birth-
day. Happy birthday to him! Kyler
evidently loves to help, and while
Moenville News
(continued from page 4)
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
It seems it was only the other
day that I was doing my new’s col-
umn from the Ortman Hotel and
here it is, another Monday. When
doing my column at that hotel, I
was using a table in the hallway
near our room. A couple of Amish
ladies stopped and inquired as to
what I was doing. I told them I was
doing my weekly Midland News
column for the Pioneer Review. I
shared of my aunt, Ida Hunt, hav-
ing been the Midland News re-
porter, for right at 42 years. Being
interested in how I sent my news to
the Pioneer Review, I told of typing
it up as I was doing, highlighting it,
hit copy and paste and sending it
off to the paper. Told them it works
great – unless you accidentally hit
delete and erase all your work.
From there, we struck up a friend-
ship. Sharing stories. They showed
me a newspaper from Indiana
where they live, with news columns
of the different areas. They shared
stories of their Amish way of life
and I shared stories of our ances-
tors who came from Norway, Ger-
many, Holland and other places,
buying land, and forming a com-
munity. And so, in sharing our sto-
ries, there was a feeling of kinship.
I always find it interesting and
amazing, how in doing something
like writing a local news column in
the hallway of a hotel, brings inter-
esting people into ones lives. God
gives us those unexpected bless-
ings. They were two very nice
ladies.
Hosting Thanksgiving Day at
their home near Bear Butte were
Tracy, Lori, Brooke and Brett
Konst. Those able to be there for
prime rib were Pat Snook, Gary,
Deb, Gavin and Garrett Snook,
Midland, Rene Konst, Terry
Buchert, Philip, Dick and Gene
Hudson, near the Four Corners
area, and James, Melony, Madison
and Preston Gilles, Murdo. Pat
spent Wednesday night there and
helped set tables, etc. Gary, Deb
and boys spent the night in Rapid
City with Pat so they could make
an early morning purchase before
heading home.
Pat Snook and friends attended
the parade of lights in Rapid City
Saturday evening; over 200 beauti-
fully decorated floats wowed the
thousands of people lining the
streets. The weather cooperated,
being about 40˚, but the wind was
a little chilly.
Pat drove to Pierre Friday to
keep appointments, and stayed
overnight with Ted and Ginger
Fenwick. Saturday, she was in
Midland to see the beautiful
Christmas trees set up at the Le-
gion Hall. And as Pat said, “a big
thank you goes out to Carol and
Roy Hunt and crew for making this
event possible.” There was a huge
crowd on hand to enjoy the trees,
the children's live nativity, and the
soup luncheon provided by the sen-
ior citizens.
Wednesday, Marie Anderson and
Judy Daly and Steve Daly attended
the funeral of Marie's brother, Roy
Roseth. Also going to the funeral
were Bill and LaVonne Wheeler,
Pierre, and Dr. Wayne and April
Anderson, Rapid City. Wayne and
April and Marie stopped in and vis-
ited at the Daly ranch when they
came from the funeral.
Visiting at the Judy Daly home
on Thanksgiving were Marie An-
derson of the Silverleaf, Steve and
Julie and Carson and Dane Daly,
Bruce and Linda Kroetch, Philip,
Bill and LaVonne Wheeler, Pierre,
Tim and Lynette Hullinger and
daughters, Shania and Alexis, all
of Murdo, and Andrew and Lisa
and Joe and Claire Kunz, Sioux
Falls.
Don and Vera Kraemer, Bison,
came to Midland Friday for a visit,
staying at the home of Ernie and
Laurel Nemec. Friday night supper
guests at Ernie and Laurel’s were
Don and Vera and Bob and Verona
Evans. Saturday, Don headed for
Chamberlain where he attended
some classes. Vera stayed in Mid-
land going to Christmas in Mid-
land and seeing many folks she
knew from when they lived in Mid-
land when Don was CEO of the
Midland school. Saturday evening,
Ernie and Laurel and Don and
Vera were supper guests at Bob
and Verona’s. After church Sun-
day, Don and Vera headed for
home.
Tuesday, November 20, Keith
Hunt, Christine Niedan, Teresa
Palmer, Janice Tolton and Michelle
Meinzer went to Philip for visita-
tion for Roy Roseth. After dropping
off Keith at the funeral home, they
picked up their mom, Ida Hunt, at
the nursing home, so all could go to
the visitation for their uncle and
brother-in-law.
Thanks to Teresa (Hunt) Palmer,
Murdo, for reporting on their trip
to El Paso.
Wednesday, November 21,
Christine Niedan, Teresa Palmer
and Jan Tolton flew out from the
Rapid City airport for El Paso,
Texas, to spend Thanksgiving with
Jan’s daughter, Jenna, Oscar and
one-year-old Keenan. Jenna is a PA
stationed at Ft. Bliss, the Army
base in El Paso. Oscar is stationed
in California.
Thanksgiving, the group went to
a parade which had several bands,
acrobats (who stopped and per-
formed in front of the crowd), many
huge floats – an especially pretty
one was a train engine and three
cars, and other walkers. We en-
joyed eating Thanksgiving dinner
out which was a nice treat. Jenna
had pumpkin pie for us to enjoy
later in the evening. Friday, found
everyone (except Keenan who went
to day care) viewing the border into
Chihuahua, Mexico. It was inter-
esting to see all the people crossing
the bridge, carrying goods in suit-
cases and bags, to return to Mexico.
After shopping in that area, we ate
out, picked up Keenan, and re-
turned to Jenna’s lovely home.
That night, the girls babysat
Keenan so Jenna and Oscar could
go out to a movie. Saturday was
spent going on base, shopping and
eating. Everything one wants or
needs is available on base.
Sunday was spent shopping and
going on a tram ride (a mile high)
from which you could see three
states and two nations. It was quite
an experience for all the girls who
are not very fond of heights. Early
Monday morning, Jenna, Oscar,
and Keenan took the girls to the
airport for a 7:30 a.m. flight. After
arriving in Dallas, there was a
slight delay in take off because of
freezing fog in Rapid City. We ar-
rived back in South Dakota to fog
and snow, so the plane missed the
first landing. This was quite a
change from short sleeve weather
in Texas. This was a very special
trip as Jenna will be deployed to
Afghanistan on December 8.
Keenan will go with his dad to Cal-
ifornia. Plans are Oscar and
Keenan will return to El Paso in
May when Oscar retires from the
military. Our prayers for God’s
safety are with Jenna and all oth-
ers serving in Afghanistan.
Tuesday before Thanksgiving,
Gene and Audrey Jones left home
to spend Thanksgiving with daugh-
ter Brenda and Todd Nierman and
family, Trevor, Emily, and Zoey, in
Verona, Wis. They stopped for the
night at the motel in Lacrosse for
the night as it was very foggy
around the Mississippi River. Bill
Bruce's nephew, Aaron Greenwood,
is the associate general manager of
the motel, so they enjoyed a nice
visit with him. Brenda had to work
on Thanksgiving, so dinner was in
the evening. Todd and Gene did
most of the preparations. Many
football games, much shopping and
a couple jigsaw puzzles were in-
cluded in the visit. Gene and Au-
drey returned home Monday.
Guests of Edna and Roger Dale
for Thanksgiving were her sisters,
Paula Jones, Julie and Jer
Whitcher. Also, their son, Brandon
Dale, was home for Thanksgiving
and the weekend from his school
duties in Rapid City.
St. William Altar Society had
their annual Christmas party, sup-
per, meeting and gift exchange,
Saturday, December 2, at the home
of Amiee Block with Jody Block as
co-hostess. This is always a fun
time and puts one in the Christmas
spirit.
Two-hundred-twenty-nine peo-
ple signed their name at the 10th
anniversary of Christmas in Mid-
land Saturday, December 1. The
event was held at the Midland Le-
gion Hall with the senior citizens
serving a soup and sandwich meal.
Reports are the chicken noodle
soup was delicious. I had the chili
and it was tasty, as well. This an-
nual event is enjoyed by all who
come. And each year, the trees, dec-
orated by organizations, busi-
nesses, and individuals, seem to
get prettier and prettier. Some out-
of-state folks were driving down
Main Street when they noticed the
sign about Christmas in Midland,
so they stopped in, enjoyed a good
bowl of soup, saw the decorated
trees and nativity scene and vis-
ited. The live nativity scene was es-
pecially nice this year with Pastor
Andy of the Open Bible Church
playing his guitar while kids from
all three churches sang different
Christmas carols. Santa made his
stop to the delight of small chil-
dren, with a chance to have their
picture taken with Santa. Rick
Reimann was there with his team
of horses and hay wagon, giving
folks of all ages a ride around town.
Winners of the tree contest were
1st – Petoske Construction, 2nd –
Midland Auxiliary and tying for
third was Midland Slam Dunk,
Relay for Life and Trinity
Lutheran Church. Shari (Hunt)
Estep was the winner of the beau-
tiful farm scene painting done by
Mickey Woitte. Ronnie Sammans
was the winner of the crocheted
afghan and Christine (Hunt)
Niedan won the patriotic doily,
both were made by Betty Block,
who does beautiful work. Betty
gave them as a fundraiser for the
Midland Slam Dunk, Relay for Life
team. Many thanks goes to Carol
and Roy Hunt and to all their
helpers. A lot of work and planning
goes into an event such as Christ-
mas in Midland. (A little back-
ground as to how this event came
to be, ten years ago. Carol and Lor-
raine Freeman were visiting, and
in visiting, thoughts of doing some-
thing such as Christmas in Mid-
land began to form. And from that
conversation came something that
folks enjoy each and every year.)
Santa’s Secret Shop at the Mid-
land School and sponsored by the
Midland Booster Club was held at
the school November 26 – 28. The
Booster Club gave each student
$10 Santa bucks to spend as they
wished or to add to something they
wished to get for mom and dad or
grandparents. This is something
that has been going on for some
time and the students have so
much fun looking for that special
something for someone they care
about.
Jenna Finn mentioned those
Campbell soup labels and says she
needs them no later then December
18. It takes a whole lot of labels to
get enough for education items for
the school. So, folks, save those la-
bels and either leave them at the
school or give Jenna a call.
The Midland School Christmas
program will be on December 19 at
7:00 p.m. There will be a chicken
noodle soup and chili supper at St.
William Catholic Church basement
from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. before the
program. This is a benefit for Tom
and Mary Parquet and is spon-
sored by the Midland Booster Club
and St. William.
Trinity Lutheran Church is hav-
ing their Christmas program and
Christmas service December 23 at
10:30 a.m.
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church
Christmas program is December 16
at 3:00 p.m., C.T. Their Christmas
service is December 25 at 10:00
a.m., C.T.
St. William Catholic Church
Christmas program is December 15
at 7:00 p.m. with Mass to follow.
Open Bible Church will have
their Christmas service December
23 at 10:30 a.m. And the Haakon
County Crooners will have a
Christmas concert at the church
December 15 at 5:00 p.m.
It’s time to close my column for
another week. In doing my column
of Christmas in Midland, the Mid-
land School Christmas program
and Christmas church services, I
couldn’t help but think – oh, boy, it
is that time of year. Sometimes we
get so caught up in the hustle and
bustle of Christmas, and the true
meaning of Christmas gets lost.
May we never forget why we cele-
brate Christmas. And may we hold
that reason in our hearts for all
time. Christmas cards are begin-
ning to show up in our mailbox. We
always enjoy hearing from you
folks each and every Christmas.
Have a God blessed week.
continued on page 10
Even though we are having In-
dian summer way into December
(yep, that's what month we slipped
into this past week) the saying that
for every nice winter day, it is one
day closer to spring, surely holds
true. Carol and John Solon cele-
brated their 43rd anniversary
Wednesday and when I asked
Carol what the weather was like-
when they were married, she said
it was a beautiful warm day way
back then. John was thinking the
day he got married! It is also his
birthday! Happy birthday, John.
George Gittings and Daniel Jor-
dan were in Midland Monday on
business. Daniel spent the night.
Roxie Gittings, Kinsey and Jessica
Gittings attended the movie in
Philip Monday evening.
Tony Harty came by our house
Monday morning to give me his
news, then he visited Shirley Hair.
Phyllis Word came over for a
stretch on the inversion table Mon-
day, but didn't have time to visit.
Bill and I made a trip to Philip and
while he played cards, I was busy
making wreath, swag and garland
deliveries. The reward to me is to
get to see friends I don't see that
often when I make deliveries. It's a
poor day if you don't learn some-
thing and Kay Payne told me about
using vitamin E oil on sores,
scrapes, etc. So guess what I'm
using on Bill now. Seems to be
making his wound better. It's like
watching paint dry, and even that
is faster than getting rid of band-
ages. Meanwhile, back at the card
room, Nels Crowser was wondering
if his little sow was pregnant. Bill
remembered that in my other life I
had a sow preg tester and asked if
I still had it. Would you believe
this, not only did I still have it, I ac-
tually knew right where it was and
in the dark of the shop, laid hands
on it, the instruction book, receipt
when bought and a letter from the
company, dated 1983. We got the
battery charged and it seemed to
work, however, the instructions
were to test it on two for sure, preg-
nant sows and one for sure open
one, then test the one you won-
dered about. Nels was between a
rock and a hard spot because he
only had one sow.
Don and Vi Moody were at their
ranchette in Rapid Valley earlier in
the week for appointments and had
tree trimming done in their shel-
terbelt grove and around their
yards and finally finished up with
about four cords of wood which
they gave away to a friend. So that
cleaned up that project nicely.
Thanks to professional help.
Tuesday, Tony Harty took
Shirley Hair to get the mail and did
some other errands around town.
Later in the day, he attended visi-
tation for Polly Kujawa here in
Kadoka at the Catholic church.
Our sympathy to the Kujawa fam-
ily in their loss. We were so fortu-
nate to have known Polly.
Brad and Lynne Jorgensen vis-
ited at our home Tuesday in search
of some business calendars.
Don and Vi Moody decorated
their front yard at Rapid Valley
with a Civil Air Patrol wreath and
other lighted solar exterior decora-
tions – put up the fiber optic
Christmas tree in the house which
is predecorated and glowing with
warmth and beauty and all the
neighbors seemed to get into the
spirit as well, so that was nice.
They returned Thursday to meet
with John and Jim Herber at the
ranch to line out some dam repairs.
John and Jim brought their equip-
ment for dirt moving and repaired
and built a new and improved sys-
tems for water flow and soil erosion
prevention, etc. They did this at
quite a few locations along the irri-
gation spreader system in prepara-
tion for the usual spring precipita-
tion and snow drift meltdown
which is sure to come. Don and Vi
made a quick run back up to Rapid
City for two days to finish some
other pertinent business which
kept things working in fine order at
both places. They returned to the
ranch Saturday late. Rolling stones
gather no moss!
Wednesday morning, I picked up
Cindy Wilmarth for bowling. I was
a sub for Joy Neville. After the way
I bowled, I doubt if I will have to
worry about being a sub anytime
soon. Last week, I couldn't find my
ball and shoes, it would help if you
look in the right locker. There they
were, hid in my locker! I made
some more deliveries of greenery
while Cindy did business in Philip.
I stopped by Pat Willard's apart-
ment looking for Cindy and chatted
a bit. Then I enjoyed visiting with
Dolly Blucher and checked out her
new crotchet project, beautiful lit-
tle cross book markers. She gifted
me some, so nice. Thanks, Dolly.
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Community
www.RavellettePublications.com
April 23 – Paid Dr. Varley $3.60
for accommodations. Left his place
at 7 a.m. and arrived at Skieview
shack at 12:15 p.m. Ate dinner at
Dibbles. In p.m. John and I drove
around among the neighbors and
over to Marietta. Ate dinner at Dib-
bles.
April 24 – Day opened with 2
inches of snow on the ground and
snowing furiously. John and Henry
Samuels concluded to start for
home at about noon as the snow
storm was breaking away.
April 25 – Hauled posts and dis-
tributed them along property line.
April 26 – Planted potatoes and
did other chores at Dibbles.
April 27 – Another heavy snow
and storm raging at day break.
Worked with Dibble putting in
plaster board at Skieview.
April 28 – Sunday. Snowed and
drizzled all day. Went over to
Moores to see him about building
80 rods of division fence. He prom-
ised to do so.
April 29 – Clear and fine - almost
like a summer day. Snow melted
fast. Put plaster board on ceiling.
In p.m. went over to Dibbles place
to help him on his hen house and
sawed wood.
April 30 – Went to the Cheyenne
for a load of wood. Got a big load
and 50 posts.
May 1 – Weather this morning
clear and warm. Burnt off fire
break around shack. Carried 10
buckets of water for Dibbles. (Wash
day at Skieview.) In afternoon Old
Sol was shining hot making a fel-
low think of shedding his heavy
clothes. Shower clouds began to
gather in the remote west at 4 p.m.
Wind changed to west at 5 p.m. and
became overcast. At 8:45 p.m. snow
began falling.
May 2 – Inch of snow on ground
this morning but was gone by noon.
Went to Hardingrove at 7 a.m. for
a load of hay. Got back at 4 p.m.
May 3 – Snowed during the
night. Planted potatoes and built a
water closet. Stayed home at night
and read the papers.
May 4 – Sawed wood and planted
peas in a.m. In p.m. went to Dib-
bles and planted potatoes.
May 5 – Sunday. Nice day. 60 de-
grees at 4 p.m.
May 6 – Made a drag and helped
at Dibbles sod hen house.
May 7 – Surprises on deck this
morning as 1/2 inch of snow fell
during the night. Put in the after-
noon getting our lines for fence
straightened out and marked for
fence.
May 8 – Day opened clear and
nice. Went to the Cheyenne for
posts. Turned very hot and we
liked to die for water to drink. Tem-
perature down in the draws was
torrid. Found water hole around 5
p.m. and watered the horses and
ourselves. Got home at 5 p.m. with
a big load. Temperature 85 de-
grees.
May 9 – Clear and warm in a.m.
but wind shifted to the east and it
turned cloudy with thunderstorm
in the evening. Planted corn with a
spade all day.
May 10 – Put in the day building
a sod chicken house. Temperature
at noon 50 above. Telephone outfit
came today but short the wire. In-
struments are dandies and every-
thing else came o.k.
May 11 – Planted corn all day
until 2 p.m. then quit to go to Ma-
rietta to attend meeting of settlers
called for the purpose of taking
some action in regard to stock run-
ning at large. About 50 people in
attendance. Meeting did not accom-
plish anything.
May 12 – Hitched up in forenoon
and drove over to Mr. Tatigans 1
mile south and west of Marietta.
Bred a mare got back at 12:30.
Storm center visible in remote
west. Rain needed badly. Walked
over to Dibbles in the afternoon
and nearly smothered with the
heat.
May 13 – Found about an inch of
snow on the ground this morning.
Weather chilly with a strong n.w.
wind. Began snowing about 8 a.m.
and snowed furiously with a strong
gale wind the entire day. At 8:30
p.m. temperature was 33 and there
was 3 inches of snow on the
ground. Country looked grand with
snow on it in the middle of May.
Will be fine for crops.
May 14 – About 4 inches of snow
on ground this a.m. Drifted 18
inches deep around our shack. Got
a tub and boiler of snow water. Sun
shone hot and by noon not a speck
of snow was visible. Plowed ground
was mellowing fast and the grass
was looking fine. Dug 3/4 mile of
post holes, Temperature at 6 a.m.
26 and ground frozen on top. Corn
planted on the 10th has sprouted.
(to be continued …)
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Arlyne and I were talking, Kyler
was "helping" with the dishes. It
sounded like he was going to need
a change of clothes after the dishes
were done!
Julian and Coreen Roseth had
Thanksgiving at their home this
year, and their son, Nick, was there
as well as Coreen's brother and sis-
ter from Hermosa. Julian Roseth
was in Pierre for two days last
week attending the Horizon's con-
ference, put on in part by South
Dakota Wheat, Inc.
Bill and Polly Bruce were busi-
ness callers in Pierre last Tuesday,
running errands and getting sup-
plies. Wednesday, their daughter,
Marcia, and her husband, Doyle
Simon, Eagle Butte, came to get
some feed from Vince Bruce. Fri-
day, Vince and Ted Schofield did
some work on the Hayes Hall, and
Vince's wife, Katie, spent the day
helping work cattle at Neal
Tolton's. Saturday, Ed Briggs
stopped by to get some parts that
Katie had brought out from town
for him. He stayed for a nice visit
and had pictures of the student's
Christmas tree hunting adventure.
Katie was in Hayes Saturday
morning to pick up the Bountiful
Baskets. Bill and Polly attended
church in Midland Saturday
evening, and Sunday was a true
day of rest at their house.
Last Thursday, Ruth Neuhauser
had a visit from her friend, Connie
Reichert, Hereford, along with
Connie's son, Ross, and grandson
Jake. The Reicherts had brought
cattle to Ft. Pierre, then they had
gone on to Highmore to pick up a
new puppy. Connie was able to join
Ruth for supper while the guys got
the pup, so there was lots of time
for visiting. Saturday, Kevin and
Mary Neuhauser were at High-
more Health to join in the festivi-
ties at the annual Christmas party.
There was a large crowd, with lots
of fun and entertainment. Monday,
Ruth had an appointment with the
audiologist in Pierre. When she re-
turned to Highmore, they were
having musical entertainment at
Highmore Health, so it was a busy
day!
Ruth Neuhauser's son-in-law,
Bunky Boger, was involved in a ve-
hicle accident near his home in
Arkansas last Friday evening.
Bunky has bruises and a few
stitches – hope he feels much better
real soon!
Carmen Alleman and Shirley
Halligan went to Midland Satur-
day to attend Christmas in Mid-
land. Carmen said it was a very
nice event, and it was evident that
the folks had put a lot of work into
the decorations. There was a good
crowd on hand to have lunch and
enjoy the beautiful trees. Sunday,
Clark and Carmen were at the
capitol building in Pierre where
their granddaughter, Morgan, was
among those providing seasonal
music. Monday, Clark and Carmen
were in Ft. Pierre to attend funeral
services for Jessie (Tibbs) Keckler.
Clint and Laura Alleman were
busy Wednesday Bangs vaccinat-
ing heifers. Saturday, Laura spent
some time at Kirley Hall and then
went to Hayes to visit her parents.
Sunday, Clint, Laura and Alivya
were in Pierre to hear their niece,
Morgan, play piano at the capitol.
After the recital, they took the op-
portunity to feed the geese at Capi-
tol Lake. There are lots of geese in
Pierre now, which also equates to
lots of goose "stuff" on the side-
walks......you have to choose yours
steps carefully.
Shirley Halligan was in Rapid
City last Tuesday for a doctor's ap-
pointment, and she stayed over
and did some shopping Wednesday.
Saturday, Shirley was in Midland
for the Christmas activities there.
Marge Briggs said she hasn't
made any news this week, but she
did submit the following weather
data for November, 2012: The high
temperature for the month was 68˚
on the 21st, and we had three days
of 60˚ or above, 10 days of 50˚ or
above, and nine days of 40˚ or
below. The lowest maximum for
the month was 19˚ on the 11th. The
low temperature for the month was
7˚ on the 11th and the 26th. All the
minimum temperatures for the
month were under 40˚, with 23
days of 30˚ or below and 10 days of
20˚ or below. The average high for
the month was 46˚, and the aver-
age low was 24˚, giving us an aver-
age temperature of 35˚ for the
month.
Precipitation for the month was
.33”. Normal precipitation for No-
vember is .43”, leaving us .10”
below normal for the month. Pre-
cipitation to date for 2012 is 10.98”.
Normal is 15.88”, leaving us 4.90”
below normal for the year. That
equates to 69 percent of normal for
the year thus far.
Chase and Kelly Briggs and chil-
dren cut their Christmas tree last
week. Monday, Kelly had a visit
from one of her college friends and
her husband. They have been liv-
ing in Oregon, and they are moving
to Minnesota, so they took the op-
portunity to stop in for a visit.
Kelly said that Grandma Lil Briggs
is adjusting well to life at Dakota
Heritage House – so glad to hear
that!
Raymond and Nancy Neuhauser
had a busy week with senior center
activities. Saturday morning,
Nancy attended a South Dakota
Cattlewomen's meeting, and Satur-
day evening Ray and Nancy at-
tended the Ag Appreciation Ban-
quet in Pierre. Sunday, Ray and
Nancy joined a group of folks head-
ing to Bowdle and Hoven. The out-
ing was planned by the senior cen-
ter, and it included a German
lunch in Bowdle, then on to Hoven
for the 125th anniversary of the
Cathedral on the Plains. Nancy
said the cathedral was spectacular,
and the concert was wonderful.
They thoroughly enjoyed the day.
Lee and Mary Briggs are in the
process of having the bathrooms in
their house remodeled. It sounds
like the contractor is making good
progress – I can't wait to see the
finished project! (Our basement
bathroom could use some work –
I'll have to go get some ideas!)
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser were
in Highmore Saturday for the
Christmas party at Highmore
Health, then they returned to the
ranch for the remainder of the
weekend. Monday, Kevin was in
Pierre to be with his mother at her
appointments. Their daughter,
Sarah, is in Las Vegas this week
with some of her friends from phar-
macy school, and their daughter,
Brianna, was in Sioux Falls over
the weekend to attend Vespers at
Augustana.
Gene Hudson took Judy Fos-
heim's place as the teacher's aide
at Cheyenne School last Thursday,
since Judy was under the weather.
Saturday, Dick and Gene were in
Midland to enjoy the Christmas in
Midland festivities. Gene was
amazed at the beautiful decorating
and the amount of work that went
into the event. Sunday, the Hud-
sons went to church at Deep Creek.
Monday, they were in town for doc-
tor's appointments. It sounds like
the chickens at their house are still
on strike, but Gene and the boys
are trying several different meth-
ods to remedy the situation. It is
too late for another of the old hens,
though – but I'll bet she was good
in the stew pot!
Randy Neuhauser was in Philip
last Tuesday to take care of busi-
ness and attend the cattle sale.
Thursday, he joined a group at
Duane Roseth's cabin to play crib-
bage. Dylan Neuhauser was at the
ranch over the weekend helping
with some projects. Our big project
was taking down trees, and I'm so
glad we had professional help for
that job!
This week, I am grateful for the
trees around our place. We are for-
tunate that trees grow pretty well
here, and we are so lucky that
Randy's grandfather had the fore-
sight to plant the shelterbelts.
Randy's father, Raymond, also
planted some of the trees, as did
Randy. When we were first mar-
ried, we could see over the tops of
the trees to the north, but that was
a lot of years ago, and the trees are
much taller now. I especially ap-
preciate the trees when the snow is
blowing out of the northwest, and
the trees keep us sheltered here in
the yard. I've seen pictures of this
place when there were no trees – it
looked almost desolate! I can un-
derstand why some of the early set-
tlers brought roots of shrubs and
trees from their homes back east.
I hope all of you are enjoying the
warmer temperatures we've been
having – winter will arrive one of
these days! Go out and make it a
great week!
Moenville News
(continued from page 5)
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
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Wednesday, December 19
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A PubIIcatIon oI RaveIIette PubIIcatIons, Inc., PbIIIp, Soutb Dakota S?S6?. Tbe OIIIcIaI Newspaper oI Haakon County, Soutb Dakota. CopyrIgbt 19S1.
Number 12
volume 107
November 15, 2012
Market Report
winter wheat, 12 Pro ..........$8.30
Any Pro .............................$7.30
Milo .......................................$6.49
Corn.......................................$6.64
Millet...................................$30.00
3unflower 3eeds................$21.50 llag
presenta-
tion
2
Pearson 40
years with
3ootohmans
10
P¬3 wins
aoademio
ohallenge
9
lridge
Uoor
14
Eut you'rc in our hcarts. Thank you for your
busincss. Hopc you havc much to bc thankful
for this Thanksgiving.
From all of os at
Tbe Pioneer Review & Profit
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n fofnI of $4,854.?6. ThIs IncIudos
fho µrInfIng of bnIIofs, µrogrnm-
mIng fho cnrds for fho Aufomnrk
nnd Ml00 vofIng mnchInos nnd
wngos for fho oIocfIon workors.
Thoro woro 22 workors covorIng
fho sIx dIfforonf µrocIncfs for fho l2
hours fhnf fho µoIIs woro oµon.
Though fho fwo µrocIncfs wIfh vof-
Ing IocnfIons In fho courfhouso dId
nof roquIro ronf, fho ofhor four dId.
Tho MIdInnd IIro HnII, Ðooµ Crook
Church, MIIosvIIIo HnII nnd
IhIIIµ`s Ind !Ivor SonIor CIfIzon`s
Confor onch rocoIvod $35 for ronf
for fho oIocfIon.
0eneral electlon results now offlclal
1he 73- 3aloon's annual wild game feed was held lriday, November 9, the
evening before the opening of west River deer season. 1his year's orowd was the
largest so far, ¨probably beoause people were hearing how good it was," said
LouAnn Reokling, the main oook of the orew that annually provides the various
dishes. 1he smorgasbord fare inoluded turkey, pheasant shish kebabs, elk oasse-
role, and other seleotions, though this year there was no turtle soup.
Annual wlld game feed
by Nuncy HuIgL
Tho Hnnkon Counfy commIssIon-
ors, nf fhoIr Þovombor 8 moofIng,
IIffod fho burn bnn ImµIomonfod
Insf summor.
Tho bonrd urgod rosIdonfs fo sfIII
fnko cnufIon whon burnIng ns con-
dIfIons nro sfIII oxfromoIy dry.
CommIssIonor !Ifn O`ConnoII
nnnouncod fhnf sho wIII sfoµ down
from fho commIssIon. Sho wIII bo
movIng ouf of hor dIsfrIcf. Tho com-
mIssIon roquosfs fhnf nnyono who
mny wIsh fo fIII fho sonf from ÐIs-
frIcf 3 µIonso cnII fhom.
ÐIrocfor of IqunIIznfIon TonI
!hodos gnvo nn uµdnfo on growfh
fIguros for fho counfy. Sho nIso ox-
µInInod how fho cIfy of IhIIIµ`s now
fnxIng ordInnnco nffocfs fho
counfy`s growfh fIguros. InsIcnIIy,
nny sfrucfuro buIIf wIfhIn fho cIfy`s
IImIfs cnn onIy bo fnxod on 20 µor-
conf of Ifs vnIuo for fho fIrsf yonr,
workIng uµ fo l00 µorconf nf fIvo
yonrs fImo. Two now sfrucfuros,
ono homo nnd ono busInoss, nro nf-
focfod.
!hodos nofod fhnf Sngo Informn-
fIon SorvIcos, CIon IIIon, CnIIf.,
hns rosµondod bnck rognrdIng fho
commIssIon`s docIsIon fo nof µro-
vIdo fho comµnny wIfh fho µubIIc
InformnfIon from fho oqunIIznfIon
offIco. Tho commIssIon, nnd
Hnnkon Counfy rosIdonfs, sfnfod
fhnf fho comµnny couId como nnd
coµy fho mnforInI fhomsoIvos If so
dosIrod, buf fhoy dId nof fooI fhnf
!hodos noodod fo sµond counfy
fImo coµyIng nnd mnIIIng fho Infor-
mnfIon.
Tho comµnny`s Ioffor sfnfod fhnf
nccordIng fo Inw If n comµnny ro-
quosfs fho InformnfIon vIn oIoc-
fronIc monns, fho counfy musf sond
If In fhnf mnnnor. Tho commIssIon
roquosfod !hodos sµonk wIfh
Hnnkon Counfy Sfnfo`s Affornoy
Cny ToIIofson rognrdIng fho Inws.
Tho comµnny Is sookIng nII Infor-
mnfIon nbouf Innd In fho counfy
whIch IncIudos, fho µroµorfy ns-
sossmonf, IognI doscrIµfIon, num-
bor of ncros, buIIdIngs nnd ownor`s
nnmo.
Konny ÞovIIIo, hIghwny suµorIn-
fondonf, dIscussod rosIdIng nnd
now wIndows for fho frnIIor nf fho
!obbs IInf IocnfIon. ÐIfforonf sId-
Ing oµfIons woro dIscussod nnd
ÞovIIIo wIII gof quofos on somo of
fhom.
ÞovIIIo wns gIvon fho go-nhond
fo ndvorfIso for nn omµIoyoo. Ho
nofod fhnf fwo mon nro µInnnIng fo
rofIro noxf yonr, ono In Mny nnd
ono In Soµfombor.
ÞovIIIo nofod fhnf hIs doµnrf-
monf Is µuffIng In now cuIvorfs nnd
grnvoIIng shorf sfrofchos of ronds.
A suµµIomonfnI honrIng wns nµ-
µrovod fo ndd $l8,000 fo fho jnII
fund nnd $5,000 fo fho monfnIIy III
fund.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod Tronsuror
InffI !hodo`s roquosf fo uso 20l2
funds fo µurchnso n comµufor for
hor offIco. Tho µurchnso wns bud-
gofod for In fho 20l3 budgof, buf
!hodos snId sho hnd onough funds
fo µurchnso ono fhIs yonr, nnd fhon
µurchnso nnofhor comµufor In 20l3
for fho doµufy fronsuror. Tho com-
mIssIon nµµrovod fho roquosf.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod fho Ocfobor
2, 20l2 moofIng mInufos nnd fho
wnrrnnfs for fho µnsf monfh. Thoy
nµµrovod for counfy omµIoyoos fo
hnvo IrIdny, Þovombor 23 nnd Ðo-
combor 24 off ns ndmInIsfrnfIvo
Ionvo. Covornor ÐonnIs Ðnugnnrd
hnd nµµrovod fhoso for sfnfo om-
µIoyoos nnd fho counfy foIIows suIf.
Tho bonrd fnbIod dIscussIon nnd
ncfIon on fho roscIndIng of !osoIu-
fIon #2008-03. Tho rosoIufIon ouf-
IInod fho counfy µuffIng In nµ-
µronchos nnd nof drIvownys.
Hnnkon Counfy AudIfor Inf Iroo-
mnn sfnfod fhnf n sfnfo nudIfor
foId hor If shouId bo roscIndod ns
fho counfy shouId nof µrovIdo ovon
fho nµµronchos.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod VIrgII SmIfh
nnd n wood bonrd mombor fo nf-
fond n moofIng In IIorro, Þovom-
bor 8. Iy hnvIng fwo µooµIo nffond,
fho counfy Is oIIgIbIo for grnnf doI-
Inrs.
Tho bonrd nµµrovod n rnffIo ro-
quosf by MIko Mosos for n Com
Thonfro fundrnIsor. Tho nµµrovnI
In confIngonf on Mosos µrovIdIng
µnµors rognrdIng fho fhonfors non-
µrofIf sfnfus.
Tho commIssIon nIso snf ns fho
gonornI oIocfIon cnnvnss bonrd.
Thoy wonf ovor fho fofnI vofos In
onch µrocIncf nnd nµµrovod fho
counfs.
Tho bonrd onforod Info oxocufIvo
sossIon Thursdny mornIng for nµ-
µroxImnfoIy 90 mInufos fo conducf
doµufy shorIff InforvIows. Þo nc-
fIon wns fnkon foIIowIng fho sos-
sIon.
Tho commIssIon dIscussod fho
counfy`s rovIsod µorsonnoI hnnd-
book for fhroo nnd ono-hnIf hours
wIfh MnrIono Knufson, dIrocfor of
fho ConfrnI Soufh Ðnkofn In-
hnncomonf ÐIsfrIcf. Tho bonrd nµ-
µrovod fho hnndbook whIch wIII
fnko offocf Jnnunry 20l3.
Burn ban llfted for county, 0'connell reslgns 0ver 3,000 head slngle conslgnment
of yearllngs sold 1uesdayl
by Kuv!ee Buvnes
Muvdo Coyote
Tho Murdo Aron Chnmbor of
Commorco µnrfnorod wIfh Soufh
ConfrnI !osourco ConsorvnfIon
nnd ÐovoIoµmonf fo sµonsor n µub-
IIc moofIng Þovombor 5 fo dIscuss
Inndoqunfo housIng In smnII com-
munIfIos.
A µnnoI of sµonkors from fodornI,
sfnfo nnd IocnI ngoncIos wIfh hous-
Ing µrogrnms µrosonfod Informn-
fIon nnd InsIghfs on whnf com- mu-
nIfIos cnn do fo ovorcomo curronf
housIng Issuos. Thoy nIso dIscussod
wnys fo oncourngo com- munIfy Im-
µrovomonf fhrough µrogrnms such
ns InInf Soufh Ðnkofn.
Tho moofIng wns woII nffondod
by busInoss µooµIo, confrncfors nnd
mombors of fho communIfy, ns woII
ns rosIdonfs from surroundIng com-
munIfIos. Sµonkors IncIudod Mnrk
!nusong oxocufIvo dIrocfor for
fho Soufh Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoI-
oµmonf AufhorIfy, !ogor Jncobs
fIoId offIco dIrocfor for HousIng nnd
!rbnn ÐovoIoµmonf, Crog Hondor-
son oxocufIvo dIrocfor for IInn-
nIng nnd ÐovoIoµmonf ÐIsfrIcf III,
MnrIono Knufson oxocufIvo dIroc-
for for ConfrnI Soufh Ðnkofn In-
hnncomonf ÐIsfrIcf, InuIn Corco-
rnn Ionn sµocInIIsf from !urnI
ÐovoIoµmonf, IIII Hnnson !urnI
HousIng CoIInbornfIvo, nnd Joy
McCrnckon ÞoIghborWorks
Ðnkofn Homo !osourcos nnd
Ðnkofn !nnd Trusf.
!nusong µrosonfod housIng µro-
grnms offorod fhrough fho Soufh
Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf Au-
fhorIfy. Ho sµoko nbouf fho IIrsf-
TImo Homobuyor Irogrnm, fho
CommunIfy Homo Imµrovomonf
Irogrnm (CHII, fho HOMI Invosf-
monf InrfnorshIµs Irogrnm nnd
fho Covornor`s Houso Irogrnm, ns
woII ns fho µossIbIIIfy of n housIng
noods sfudy.
Thoso µrogrnms nro nII nvnIInbIo
fo nµµIIcnnfs who moof corfnIn
qunIIfIcnfIons sof by onch µrogrnm.
AII of fho µrogrnms nro dosIgnod fo
µrovIdo snfo, nffordnbIo housIng oµ-
µorfunIfIos fo Iow-Incomo or Iow-fo-
modornfo Incomo nµµIIcnnfs.
Moro InformnfIon cnn bo found
nbouf onch µrogrnm by cnIIIng l-
800-540-424l or vIsIfIng fho Soufh
Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf Au-
fhorIfy`s wobsIfo, www.sdhdn.org.
Jncobs foId nbouf µrogrnms of-
forod fhrough H!Ð, whIch cnn bo
found nf www.hud.gov, nnd ho nd-
drossod fho HousIng OµµorfunIfy
Iund.
AccordIng fo n fncf shoof wIfh
dnfn comµIIod by fho Soufh Ðnkofn
HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf AufhorIfy, n
HousIng OµµorfunIfy Iund wIII bo
n now sfnfo fund wIfh rovonuo dod-
Icnfod fo onnbIo Soufh Ðnkofn com-
munIfIos fo cronfo nnd µrosorvo
homos nffordnbIo fo hnrdworkIng
fnmIIIos, vofornns, µorsons wIfh
dIsnbIIIfIos, sonIors nnd ofhors. Jn-
8olvlng lnadequate houslng ln communltles
Members of the Philip oommunity attended the housing meeting in Murdo.
Photo by Karlee Barnes
oontinued on page 8
cobs snId fhnf Soufh Ðnkofn Is ono
of fhroo sfnfos fhnf curronfIy hns
no housIng frusf fund.
Tho nood for n HousIng Oµµor-
funIfy Iund wns oufIInod wIfh suµ-
µorfIng fncfs. Ono In sovon Soufh
Ðnkofnns fnII boIow fho µovorfy
rnfo. AIso, ronfs nro moro fhnn
mnny Soufh Ðnkofnns cnn nfford.
AccordIng fo fho fncf shoof, fho nv-
orngo H!Ð fnIr mnrkof ronf for n
fwo-bodroom nµnrfmonf In Soufh
Ðnkofn Is $556 µor monfh.
Ofhor fncfs suµµorfIng fho nood
for fho fund IncIudo ronfnI housIng
mnrkofs nro fIghf ns ovIdoncod by
Iow vncnncy rnfos, domnnd for
housIng oxcoods nssIsfnnco nvnII-
nbIo, fhoro Is n shorfngo In fundIng
fo dovoIoµ nffordnbIo housIng,
vouchors nro undorufIIIzod, somo
Soufh Ðnkofnns nro InckIng doconf
nnd snfo housIng, Soufh Ðnkofnns
nro sfruggIIng fo mnInfnIn n roof
ovor fhoIr hond.
An In-doµfh rovIow of fhoso fncfs
cnn bo roquosfod fhrough fho
Soufh Ðnkofn HousIng ÐovoIoµ-
monf AufhorIfy.
Hondorson sµoko of IrnIrIoInnd
HousIng ÐovoIoµmonf. IHÐ Is n
non-µrofIf orgnnIznfIon whoso
mnIn gonI Is fo suµµorf fho dovoI-
oµmonf of nffordnbIo housIng In fho
rogIon. Moro InformnfIon cnn bo
found nf www.dIsfrIcfIII.org. Hon-
dorson gnvo InsIghfs IncIudIng
Ionrn fo mnnngo oxµocfnfIons nnd
don`f ovor-ronch housIng. Ho cnu-
fIonod dovoIoµors fo bo nwnro of
fhoIr mnrkof, nnd fo gof commIf-
1he Lazy 3 Livestook Ranoh of Billings, Mont., brought over
3,000 head of yearling steers and heifers to Philip this past
week and sold 1uesday morning, November 13. 1he total head
oount was 3,052, oonsisting of both steers and heifers with the
average weight per head of 887 lbs. 1hey brought a little over
$1.40/lb. totaling $1,244 per head. 1his one oonsignment sale
grossed over $3,798,000.
1ruoks started bringing in the oattle lriday before the 1ues-
day sale, with 45 truoks delivering oattle to the yards. Philip
Livestook Auotion sold these yearlings along with other year-
lings and oalves during the regular sale that totaled over 7,500
head.
Read the oomplete report of representative sales for this
week on the baok page of 1he Pioneer Review.
ALL IN-STATE SUBSCRIPTIONS
ARE SUBJECT TO SALES TAX.
FIRST SUBSCRIPTION:
Name ______________________________
Address ____________________________
City________________________________
State: __________Zip ________________
SECOND SUBSCRIPTION:
Name ______________________________
Address ____________________________
City________________________________
State: __________Zip ________________
CALL (605) 859-2516 WITH CREDIT CARD PAYMENT INFORMATION
OR FOR ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE!
MAIL TO: Ravellette Publications, PO Box 788, Philip, SD 57567.
Receive $5.00 off each subscription of (2) or more renewals or new subscriptions!
Offer ends December 14, 2012. Clip & mail with your payment to the newspaper of your choice (above).
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
School & Community
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkLY SPECIAL:
Swiss Mushroom Burger & Fries
* * * * * *
CLOSED
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9
FOR THE DAY ONLY!
2013 Season Philip AAU Wrestling
Sign up
Friday, December 7
5:30 p.m Room A-3
Philip High School
If you are unable to attend please contact
Nicole Dennis – 441-4194 or Brad Heltzel – 859-3209
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing...........................35-17
Rockers................................29.5-22.5
Petersen’s..................................26-26
Handrahan Const .....................24-28
Dakota Bar................................21-31
Badland’s Auto....................20.5-31.5
Highlights:
Ronnie Coyle .......223, 188 clean/611
Trina Brown..........................219/591
Clyde Schlim.................5-6 split; 525
Kim Petersen ...............................183
Jenny Reckling.............................130
Jerry Mooney...............223 clean/595
Cory Boyd ....................213 clean/587
Bryan Buxcel......4-5-7 split; 215/575
Marlis Petersen.....................196/540
Vickie Petersen .....................171/481
Tena Slovek...........................174/475
Maralynn Burns...........................175
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................31-5
Kennedy Imp.......................21.5-14.5
Philip Motor..............................21-15
George’s Welding ......................18-18
Kadoka Tree Service...........14.5-21.5
G&A Trenching...................13.5-22.5
Philip Health Service .........12.5-23.5
Bear Auto..................................12-24
Highlights:
Cory Boyd......................237, 236/666
Terry Wentz ..................227, 212/622
Alvin Pearson........................217/585
Randy Boyd...........................246/573
Earl Park......................................569
Wendell Buxcel...4-7-9 split; 218/552
Tony Gould............................201/549
Dane Hellekson............................522
Fred Foland..................................522
Eliel Poor Bear......................210/511
Jim Larson..................3-10 split; 511
Ronnie Williams.........9-10 split; 505
Norm Buxcel .........................212/504
Dakota Alfery ....5-8-10 & 3-10 splits
Bill Bainbridge ...................3-10 split
Matt Schofield ......................2-7 split
Gene Jones ......................2-3-10 split
Johnny Wilson......................5-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge.......................41.5-10.5
Invisibles...................................32-20
Bowling Belles ..........................30-22
State Farm..........................28.5-23.5
Jolly Ranchers ..........................21-31
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........214, 195, 180/589
Cindy Wilmarth...........................178
Shirley O’Connor ..................169/454
Judy Papousek ......5-7 split; 166/416
Audrey Jones.........................162/416
Deb Neville...................................157
Deanna Fees.......................3-10 split
Shirley Parsons ..................3-10 split
Jennifer Schriever..............3-10 split
Donna King.........................3-10 split
Debbie Gartner.....................4-5 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................28-16
Wall Food Center......................25-19
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................24.5-19.5
Morrison’s Haying ..............23.5-20.5
Just Tammy’s......................19.5-24.5
Dorothy’s Catering ...................19-25
Hildebrand Concrete ..........18.5-25.5
First National Bank .................18-26
Highlights:
Lindsey Hildebrand..............207/491
Amy Morrison.....2-7-8 split; 180/504
Shar Moses...................................181
Cindy VanderMay........................173
Debbie Gartner ............................173
Sandee Gittings ...........................171
Val Schulz ....................................171
Jessica Wagner...................2-10 split
Brenda Grenz .....................5-10 split
Brittney Drury ...................3-10 split
Carrie Buchholz .................3-10 split
Jackie Shull ..........................5-6 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................24-8
Dakota Bar................................19-13
WEE BADD...............................16-16
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................15-17
McDonnell Farms .....................15-17
O’Connell Construction............15-17
West River Pioneer Tanks .......13-19
The Steakhouse ........................11-21
Highlights:
Don Weller...................243 clean/600
Harlan Moos..........................226/555
Doug Hauk.............5-7 split; 236/590
Jan Bielmaier......222, 213 clean/623
Rick Coyle....................223 clean/607
Brian Pearson......3-10 split; 212/598
Jason Petersen........3-6-7-10 & 4-10
splits; 224/585
Cory Boyd..............................224/585
Matt Schofield.......................213/581
Fred Foland .....5-7 split x 2; 206/562
Nathan Kjerstad ................206 clean
Matt Reckling .......................211/544
Bryan Buxcel ...................6-7-10 split
Mike Moses........................5-7-9 split
Jack Heinz ..........................3-10 split
John Heltzel .......................3-10 split
Ronnie Coyle.......................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew...............................40-8
King Pins.............................30.5-17.5
Randy’s Spray Serv ..................26-22
Roy’s Repair ........................20.5-27.5
Lee & the Ladies.......................20-28
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Randy Boyd...........................257/656
Dorothy Hansen....................209/493
Cory Boyd..............................211/554
Duane Hand ................211 clean/549
John Heltzel .................3-7 split; 543
Brian Pearson.....................3-10 split
The sixth through eighth grade band opened up the concert, Tuesday, November 27, with four musical pieces. The fifth grade band then performed its debut with
three instrumental selections. The sixth grade band members joined the fifth graders for three more pieces. Then, the seventh and eighth grade choir sang five
vocal numbers. The sixth through eighth grade band concluded the evening with three more pieces. The band and choir were under the direction of Barb Bowen.
Marilyn Millage was the piano accompanist for the choir. Photos by Del Bartels
Skills of 5th-8th grade band, junior high choir
Shown above is part of the brass section of the Philip fifth through eighth grade
band during the November 27 concert.
Shown is part of the band’s saxophone section during the November 27 concert.
The Christmas decorations for the
street light poles in Philip were put up
by the city crew November 28.
Photo by Del Bartels
Street light
decorations
A community-wide dinner and Christmas concert were given, Sunday, December 2, at Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church
in Kadoka. The men’s singing group, the Haakon County Crooners, performed their own style of four-part harmony Christmas
music. “We don’t do holiday concerts, we do Christmas concerts,” said director Marlis Doud. The Crooners then traveled
to Wall to perform in the Wall Community Hall. The next concerts for the Crooners are scheduled for 5:00 p.m. in a com-
munity wide concert at the Open Bible Church in Midland, Saturday, December 15, and at 4:00 p.m. Sunday, December
Haakon County Crooners Christmas
16, in the Haakon County Court-
house in Philip. Shown, back row,
from left: Roger Porch, Joe Gittings,
Mark Nelson and Rick Doud. Middle
row: Paul Staben, Art Weitschat,
John Staben, Steve Ferley and Del
Bartels. Front: accompanist Marilyn
Millage and director Marlis Doud.
Not pictured: Andy Blye, Mike West
and Don Kramer.
Courtesy photo
by Rep. Kristi Noem
We know just how cold it can get
in the Great Plains during the win-
ter. Before the first major snowfall
of the year, it’s important to make
sure our families, homes and vehi-
cles are prepared for the winter
season.
Organizations like the American
Red Cross and the National
Weather Service encourage people
to have winter supply kits in vehi-
cles and at home. This kit should
include water, non-perishable food,
shovel, battery powered radio,
flashlight, warm clothing and blan-
kets, medication and emergency
contact information, among other
items. The S.D. Office of Emer-
gency Management has published
a 2012 Winter Weather Prepared-
ness Guide; visit www.oem.sd.gov.
Our family has a NOAA Weather
Radio, which alerts us of any po-
tential weather threats. The
weather radio warns of approach-
ing strong winds, severe wind chills
and blizzards. I encourage people
to be aware of weather threats,
whether through the use of a radio
like the one our family uses or
through other means.
Ensure that all vehicles are win-
terized and the gas tanks are full.
The Red Cross also encourages
homeowners to maintain heating
equipment on an annual basis.
Have the fireplace and furnace
cleaned and inspected by a profes-
sional. Many communities sponsor
coat drives where you can donate
old or extra coats.
The winter months provide
unique opportunities, but we
shouldn’t forget that winter should
be taken seriously.
Preparing for winter
Philip Motor, inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2007 Ford Edge SEL
AWD … Merry Christmas!!
www.philipmotor.com
Give Ryan a call today!
Newly remodeled 4-bedroom home on (2) lots
•New high-efficiency electric A/C, heating pump & propane furnace
•New roof, siding, windows & doors
•New “on demand” hot water heating system
•New propane fireplace •New carpet & painting
•Established Yard •Established Playground • Very nice large back deck
•2 blocks from school
•Large 2-vehicle garage with room for workshop
This is a very nice family home that one could begin living in right away!
Would consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer • Philip, SD
Don & Tami Ravellette • (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 • Cell
(605) 859-2516 • Work
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports
It was close, but Philip Area
wrestlers brought home the team
title from the Kimball/White Lake/-
Platte-Geddes Invitational Wrest-
ling Tournament last weekend in
Kimball.
The Scotties won the tournament
by two points over Wagner – 245 to
243. Head coach Matt Donnelly
was pleased with how the team did,
but he said he noticed areas that
need improvement.
Donnelly noted the team’s
younger wrestlers are doing well,
but they need more mat time, more
experience.
Two Philip Area wrestlers were
also given individual awards –
Lane Blasius was named “Out-
standing Wrestler” and Paul Smi-
ley was given the “Pinner Award.”
Individually the wrestlers gar-
nered two first place wins, six sec-
ond place, three fifth place and one
each in the third, fourth and six
placings.
Other team standings were 3rd –
Winner (225.5), 4th – Mt. Vernon/
Plankinton/Corsica (101), 5th –
Miller/Highmore-Harrold (92),
6th – Sunshine Bible Academy
(91), 7th – Kimball/ White Lake-
Platte-Geddes (64), 8th – Wessing-
ton Springs/Woonsocket /Wolsey-
Wessington (45), 9th –
Ipswich/Leola (39), 10th – Scotland
(36), 11th – Marion Freeman
(31.5), 12th – Andes Central (29).
Some teams also had unattached
wrestlers (-U in stats).
106 lbs: Paul Smiley, 5th, 4-2
record
•Pinned Wyatt Stevens (WSWWW) 3:03
•Pinned by Leo Hopkins (AC) 1:56
•Pinned Alex Daum (KWLPG) 5:21
•Pinned Jackson Nockels (KWLPG-U)
1:31
•Pinned by Marcus Urban (MVPC) 2:19
•Pinned Dawson Petrik (WAG-U) 4:08
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 2nd, 1-1
record
•Bye
•Bye
•Pinned Denver Paul (SBA) 1:48
•Pinned by Patrick Aeschbacher (WIN)
3:53
120 lbs: Jed Brown, 5th, 2-2
record
•Bye
•Pinned Cody Peterson (IPL) 1:55
•Decisioned by Israel Appel (SBA) 9-7 in
OT
•Major decisioned by Zack Rucktaeschel
(WAG) 11-2
•Major decisioned Peterson 10-0
126 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 2nd, 2-1
record
•Bye
•Pinned Logan Wolter (WSWWW) 2:20
•Pinned Kruz Knudson (MVPC) 3:24
•Lost by default to Sage Zephier (WAG)
132 lbs: Grady Carley, 5th, 2-2
record
•Bye
•Forfeit (MVPC)
•Pinned by Nick Dion (WAG) 1:23
•Decisioned by Tayte Clark (SBA) 6-0
•Pinned Dominic Paulson (WIN-U) 3:50
138 lbs: Raedon Anderson, 6th, 1-
3 record
•Bye
•Pinned Wesley York (M/F) 2:58
•Technical fall by Tyler Dion (WAG) 18-
1
•Pinned by Trig Clark (SBA) 2:29
•Decisioned by Cole Johnson (KWLPG)
7-2
145 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st, 3-0
record
•Bye
•Pinned Mason Van Vuuren (MVPC)
3:54
•Decisioned Austin Soukup (WAG) 5-2
•Decisioned Paul Waring (MHH) 5-3
152 lbs: Paul Kary, (Unattached),
1-2
•Bye
•Pinned by Brian Vermeulen (MVPC) :22
•Pinned by Reed Johnson (PHIL) 1:43
152 lbs: Reed Johnson, 3rd, 4-1
•Decisioned by Brady Soulek (WAG) 5-2
•Bye
•Pinned Paul Karey (PHIL-U) 1:43
•Pinned Seth York (M/F) 2:01
•Pinned Andrew Bortle (MVPC-U) 3:56
•Forfeit by Vermeulen (MVPC)
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 2nd,
2-1
•Bye
•Pinned Cody Heezen (MVPC) 3:31
•Decisioned Luke Warejcka (KWLPC) 7-
1
•Decisioned by David Kocer (WAG) 8-6
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 2nd, 2-1
record
•Bye
•Pinned Jed Vissia (MVPC-U) 3:45
•Decisioned Turner Blasius (KWLPG) 6-
1
•Pinned by Trevor Lensing (WAG) 5:53
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 2nd, 2-
1 record
•Bye
•Pinned Jimmy Sharkey (WIN-U) 1:45
•Major decisioned Cameron Kostal
(MVPC) 15-2
•Decisioned by Tate Novotny (WIN) 7-1
195 lbs: Gavin DeVries, 2nd, 2-1
record
•Bye
•Forfeit (MHH)
•Pinned Nathaniel Schroeder (KWLPG)
2:48
•Pinned by Scott Assman (WIN) 3:11
220 lbs: Logan Ammons, 1st, 3-0
record
•Bye
•Pinned Austin Moore (WSWWW) :51
•Pinned Truman Ashes (WAG) 2:09
•Pinned Logan Boerner (WIN) :27
285 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries, 4th, 0-
2 record
•Bye
•Bye
•Pinned by Colton Best (WIN) :44
•Bye
•Pinned by Trazen Doren (AC) 4:44
The team will be in Rapid City at
Philip Area scores team win at Kimball
Chance Knutson works to take down one of his opponents at the tournament in
Kimball this past weekend. Knutson placed second in the 182 pound weight
class. Photos by Dayle Knutson
Nick Donnelly gives the impression that this was an easy match for him. Donnelly
placed second in the 126 pound weight division at Kimball. Photo by D. Knutson
Lane Blasius puts the pressure on his opponent at the Kimball wrestling tourna-
ment. Blasius captured the championship title in the 145 pound class.
The South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Commission finalized
changes to fisheries regulations at
its November commission meeting,
and the rule changes went into ef-
fect December 3.
Anglers are now allowed to spear
northern pike on all inland waters
in South Dakota, except those
managed as muskie waters.
Additionally, the daily limit for
walleye on Lake Oahe has in-
creased to eight fish per day. Of the
walleye taken daily, no more than
four may be 15 inches in length or
longer, and only one of those four
may be 20 inches or longer. The
possession limit has been increased
to 24 walleye.
More information can be found in
the 2013 fishing handbook avail-
able online at http://gfp.sd.gov/fish-
ing-boating/rules-regs.aspx. The
printed version will be available
through license vendors and GFP
offices in early December. Anglers
with questions are encouraged to
contact their local Game, Fish and
Parks office.
Fisheries rule
changes add new
opportunities
the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center
December 7 and 8 for the Rapid
City Invitational Wrestling Tour-
nament. Friday’s matches begin at
2 p.m. and Saturday’s at 9 a.m.
Donnelly noted that 35 teams
particpate in this tournament so
the wrestlers will gain experience
with different techniques from the
various schools.
continued on page 12
Legal NoticesDeadline: Fridays at Noon
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 10
Notice of Public
Hearing on
Application for Retail
(on-off sale)
Wine License
Notice is hereby given that a public hear-
ing will be held before the Midland Town
Board at a special meeting on December
13, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. MT. This hearing
will be held in the Town Hall for the re-
newal of the retail on/off sale wine license
for the year beginning January 1, 2013.
Midland Food & Fuel, LLC
Clint and Brenda Jensen
Located Lot A2, S1/2NE1/4
Sec. 6, Township 1 North of
Range 25
Any interested person may appear and
will be given an opportunity to be heard
either for or against the above listed ap-
plicant.
Michelle Meinzer
Finance Officer
Town of Midland
[Published December 6, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $12.27]
Notice of Application
No. 2692-2 to
Appropriate Water
Notice is given that Steve Elshere Land
Company, Box 201, Philip, SD 57567,
has filed an application for a water permit
to appropriate 7.87 cubic feet of water per
second from springs and tributaries to
Straighthead Creek located in the
SW1/4SW1/4 and SW1/4SE1/4 Section
35-T7N-R20E for irrigation of 552 acres
located in the N1/2 Section 3 and NW1/4
Section 2; all in T6N-R20E and the
SW1/4 Section 34 T7N-R20E. The water
will also be used for hydropower genera-
tion.
Pursuant to SDCL 46-2A-2, the Chief En-
gineer recommends APPROVAL of Appli-
cation No. 2692-2 because 1) unappro-
priated water is available, 2) existing
rights will not be unlawfully impaired, 3) it
is a beneficial use of water, and 4) it is in
the public interest. In accordance with
SDCL 46-2A-23, the Chief Engineer will
act on this application, as recommended,
unless a petition is filed opposing the ap-
plication or the applicant files a petition
contesting the Chief Engineer’s recom-
mendation. If a petition opposing the ap-
plication or contesting the recommenda-
tion is filed, then a hearing will be sched-
uled and the Water Management Board
will consider this application. Notice of the
hearing will be given to the applicant and
any person filing a petition.
Any person interested in opposing or sup-
porting this application or recommenda-
tion must file a written petition with BOTH
the applicant and Chief Engineer. The ap-
plicant must file a petition if contesting the
Chief Engineer’s recommendation. The
Chief Engineer’s address is “Water Rights
Program, Foss Building, 523 E. Capitol,
Pierre, SD 57501 (605-773-3352)” and
the applicant’s mailing address is given
above. A petition filed by either an inter-
ested person or the applicant must be
filed by December 17, 2012.
The petition may be informal, but must in-
clude a statement describing the peti-
tioner’s interest in the application, the pe-
titioner’s reasons for opposing or support-
ing the application, and the signature and
mailing address of the petitioner or the
petitioner’s legal counsel, if legal counsel
is obtained. Contact Eric Granlund at the
above Water Rights Program address to
request copies of information pertaining
to this application.
Steven M. Pirner, Secretary
Department of Environment and
Natural Resources
[Published December 6, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $24.91]
Selling 100 Bred Heifers
80 Black Angus & 20 F1 Baldy from
First Time Offering
ALL HOME RAISED
Moderate-Framed, Easy Fleshing
JUST REAL NICE ONE-IRON HEIFERS
Sire and Dam Information Available
EXCELLENT
MATERNAL
GENETICS
ALL BRED TO DIRECT
SONS OF
MYTTY IN FOCUS
SALE ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
Also selling: 55 Bred Cows mixed ages
For more information: Jess Martin (605) 200-5090
Mytty in Focus
Tony Harty enjoyed coffee out on
Thursday, then visited at the home
of Shirley Hair.
Bill helped me out on Thursday
by dropping off greenery at the Jer-
ald Cook home, as well as catching
up to Marie Radway, all on the way
to the card room. I was busy with
some business and getting things
ready for the family over the week-
end.
John Boheman, Sioux Falls,
spent Friday night at the George
and Sandee Gittings’ home.
Friday, Tony Harty picked up
Shirley Hair to do some grocery
shopping and business in Kadoka
and then he had coffee out before
visiting at our house. I put Tony to
work figuring out half-measures on
a recipe and was making other
things up ahead of family arriving.
Tony attended the community play
that evening and visited with
Kathy Brown afterward.
Friday night, Ralph Fiedler
worked at the store, so Cathy went
down and sat with him to watch
the Sturgis parade of lights to-
gether. They had ring-side seats.
After he got off work, they ate sup-
per out before going home. The
weekend was spent putting up
Christmas decorations. They had
an outstanding week of beautiful
weather and Cathy etnertained a
nasty cold part of the time.
Bill made a trip to Howes Friday.
He also made a delivery to Dave
Fitzgerald, helping me get some
things done, before the card room
beconed him in. As dark settled,
folks started arriving here at our
place. First to pull up were grand-
daughter Amanda and Adam
Claflin, Sioux Falls, and Chase,
Carly and little Jaxon May, Madi-
son, and almost right behind them
was Shelley Seager, Sutton, Neb.
We enjoyed supper and watched
oldtime videos from the 90s.
John Boheman and Roxie Git-
tings returned to their homes Sat-
urday.
Saturday was a beautiful day,
with the temperature over 60˚. Lori
Snellgrove, Rapid City, and Brenda
Grenz, Philip, and Cori Barber,
Zack and Ryder Seager, Rapid
City, joined all the others here for
dinner. We then went to the ceme-
tery and placed Sandra in her final
resting place. "Peace I leave with
you; my peace I give to you. Let not
your hearts be troubled, neither let
them be afraid." John 14:27
We were blessed that the day
was nice and memories were
shared. The rest of the day was
spent enjoying visiting and spend-
ing time with little Ryder and see-
ing that Jaxon is getting a real per-
sonality at just five months. Lori
went back to Rapid and Zack, Cori
and Ryder spent the night with all
the rest.
Tony Harty visited L.D. and
Shirley Hair Saturday monring. He
had breakfast out and enjoyed a
visit with Don and Freddie Heck.
They were informed about the up-
coming road construction planned
for Highway 73 by a customer in
the cafe who worked for the con-
struction company that will be
doing the work. That evening, he
went to Cottonwood via Philip, to
attend game night. When he got
back in Kadoka, he visited Russ
Hattel before calling it a night.
Sunday morning following
brunch here at the house, everyone
started for their respective homes.
We went from three dogs, two little
ones and nine adults, back to just
us and the cat, home alone. The
day was a bit overcast and a breeze
out of the south, but Bill joined me
for a fly around the country, look-
ing to see what was happening.
There isn't a drop of green visible
from the air. Any planted wheat
hasn't greened up, at least enough
to see it. The air was quite smooth
and the landing was one I could be
proud of. Maybe Bill will try it
again – it wasn't all that bad.
Sunday, Don and Vi Moody went
to the auction at the Fine Arts
Building in Philip for the auction of
Marie Hansen’s collection and wide
variety of antiques and collectibles.
Vi had fun visiting with many folks
and friends from her graduation
class of 1963, which also brought
on a pause to send thoughts and
prayers to the passing of another
classmate, Robbie Reedy, who will
be missed very much. Vi also was
so grateful to visit with her very
close friend again, Chuckie
Hansen, Marie's daughter. They
had not had a chance to visit lately
and programmed their cell phones
with new and current phone num-
bers (with Don's help)!
Our sympathy to the family of
Robbie Reedy. You are in our
thoughts and prayers.
Sandee Gittings attended Marie
Hansen's auction Sunday.
Tony Harty attended church
Sunday. There was a potluck din-
ner and the Crooners entertained.
He said the Chrismas music was
outstanding. Later in the day, he
visited L.D. and Shirley Hair, then
came by our place to give me his
news and engage in a couple of
farkel games.
“Do not let what you cannot do
interfere with what you can do."
John Wooden
Betwixt Places News
(continued from page 6)
View &
download
Livestock
Production
Sale Books:
www.RPI
promotions.
com
The news may be a little short as
I had a hard time finding people at
home.
Christmas is just 22 days away
as I finish writing my news today.
It will be here soon. Another year,
2013! Where do the years go? Some
say it goes by slow, but for me, it is
hard to keep up and with all the
changes and new inventions, there
are so many new electronics that
has lost most of the older genera-
tion in the fast movement of chang-
ing computers and phone systems.
I know some have kept up, but I
have to ask my 10-year-old grand-
child to help me out when I get in a
jam with them.
I can tell it is getting close to
Christmas, as I look out my back
door to the south, Bill Gottsleben
has his lights up and I can see the
big star from here. I will have to
drive down and see the rest of the
scene. I also noticed some nice
lights at Tammie Schofield’s at the
Jack Carstensen place. The build-
ing at Chuck and Ruth
Carstensen’s are all decorated too.
It is so nice to see all of these as I
drive home after dark.
Myrna Gottsleben said it is much
easier for her to get around and she
is doing much better. Her daugh-
ter, Kathy, was here to spend this
weekend with family.
Lee Schoniger and others from
Philip enjoyed dancing in Rapid
City Saturday evening.
Lee’s grandson, Taylor Ragland
(Mary’s son) who has been staying
with him and working for Mel
Smith has left to go to school in
Rapid City. Lee and Mel sure do
miss him.
Beth Smith was home Friday
evening for a short weekend, but
was busy all the time she was
home.
Lana (Smith) and family were
here from Pierre. Lana went on to
Rapid City Saturday and had lunch
with her sister, Tara, and family.
She returned to Philip and spent
more time with family. The rest of
her family were in the Kadoka area
doing some hunting and hiking.
They all returned to their home in
Pierre Sunday evening.
Beth attended the basketball
game to watch Tarin Smith, Cylver
Lurz and Cappie West play.
Mel and Beth were supper
guests at Brock and Brittany
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
Smith’s Sunday, December 2.
All of the Kieth and Debbie
Smith family plan to attend the col-
lege graduation of Lincoln Smith
December 8 in Aberdeen.
A week after Lincoln graduates,
he will be moving home to join
Kieth and Tucker on the ranch.
Marvin and Vicki Eide, had
grandchildren Colby and Jensen
Fitch at their home for the week-
end. Trevor, Christa, Aven, and
Rayler took Keagan to Rapid City
to a wrestling competition. He
placed first and we were all happy
for him. Wrestling and football are
Keagan’s favorite sports.
Marvin and Colby played some
music while they were at Eide’s.
Colby played the flat top gitbox and
Marvin the piano. I went up one
evening to listen to them. Colby has
sure improved a lot since I heard
him last and he sings along too.
Trevor and Christa returned Sat-
urday night. They visited for a
while at Marvin and Vicki’s before
taking the kids home with them.
Get well wishes go out to Al
Brucklacher who was taken to
Rapid City for emergency surgery.
We are happy to report that he
came through the surgery very
well. The family report that, as a
result of keeping busy, he is strong
Classifieds • 859-2516
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 11
WANTED: Summer pasture for
up to 100 pair within 50 miles of
New Underwood. 754-6166.
P52-1tp
FOR SALE: 2000 Doonan
Stepdeck, 48x102, 22.5 steel
wheels, 2 tool boxes, $17,500;
’02 Timpte grain trailer, 51x102
x78, Low Pro 24.5 all alum. 3
axle with lift, elect. tarp,
$28,500; 1995 Marquez double
belly dumps, 3 axle front, 5 axle
pup, Low Pro 24.5 all alum.,
$52,500. Call CK Dale, Philip,
859-2121 or 685-3091.
PR14-2tp
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
some alfalfa, big rounds, semi-
load lots, delivered pricing, no
mold. Call Rob, 390-5535, or
Charles, 390-5506. P50-5tp
FOR SALE: 320 acres of crop-
land, 14 miles north of Midland.
NE1/4 Sec. 3, NW1/4 Sec. 2,
3N24E. Call 222-6261.
PR12-4tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-
ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Dakota Mill &
Grain, Inc. is looking for an ag-
gressive, team-minded, forward-
thinking individual to be a Loca-
tion Manager at our Philip, SD,
location. All applicants and in-
formation is 100% confidential.
Apply to Jack Haggerty at
jackh@dakotamill.com or fax re-
sumé to 718-2844.
PW52-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Department
Worker. Experience in road /
bridge construction / mainte-
nance preferred. CDL Pre-em-
ployment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications
/ resumes accepted. Information
(605) 837-2410 or (605) 837-
2422, fax (605) 837-2447.
K51-3tc
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED at
Days Inn, Wall. Possibly perma-
nent year-round position, start-
ing immediately. Contact
Theresa, 279-2000. PW46-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
WE HAVE THE PERFECT GIFT
for everyone on your holiday list!
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder,
390-9810. PR15-3tp
MARY JO JONES IS HOSTING
a PartyLite Come & Go Show on
December 8th, 1PM-5PM at
23539 SD Hwy. 63, Midland.
Discounts on several in stock
items! Great Christmas gifts!
Also the NEW catalogs are here!
You can also shop on my web-
site: www.partylite.biz/maryjo
jones, or call 843-2105 to place
orders. Thank you. P52-1tc
FOR SALE: 14’x20’ Menard’s
shed kit for sale. It has light gray
siding with slate gray trim. Ask-
ing $3,000 for it; paid $3,700 for
it a couple months ago. The kit
has never been touched and
stored out of the weather. If in-
terested, contact 685-4608.
PR14-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
WE HAVE THE PERFECT GIFT
for everyone on your holiday list!
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder,
390-9810. WP15-3tp
WANTED: Complete driving har-
ness for miniature horses, 36” -
40” tall. Call 484-5409.
PR14-2tp
TRIANGLE RANCH BED &
BREAKFAST is available for
brunches, luncheons, dinner
parties and retreats, December -
April. Contact Lyndy, 859-2122,
triangle@gwtc.net, www. trian-
gleranchbb.com P51-8tc
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 24x68 doublewide,
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, new
tin roof and skirting, new paint.
Call Cody, 515-0316. P52-4tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 High
St. in Philip, 2 bedrooms, full
basement, great view off back
deck. Call 859-2783 or 859-
3249 or 567-3515 to view.
P49-tfn
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrtle
Ave Philip. 3 bedroom 1.5 bath,
central air, fuel oil heat and
wood stove. Open concept,
stainless steel fridge and stove.
washer and dryer included.
Hardwood laminate floors, sepa-
rate dining room. Mostly fin-
ished basement. Ceiling fans
throughout. New windows and
roof. Fenced in, large backyard
with cover patio and storage
shed. Can email photos. Call
859-2470 or (785) 259-4207.
P48-8tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, attached 2-car
garage, large lot. Call 859-2403,
Philip. PR10-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apart-
ment in Wall. Call 386-2222.
PW51-4tc
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge will
be added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
THANK YOUS
Thank you to everyone who
helped us in so many ways
through Terry’s illness and
death. Your many prayers, calls,
cards, food and support is
greatly appreciated.
Terry loved western S.D. and
in her final months, Philip was
home.
Thank you to the staff of Hans
P. Peterson Memorial Hospital –
how very caring all of you are!
Tom & Shelia Trask
Mark, Tomilyn, Mick & Levi
Thank you to all the surround-
ing towns that donated to the
Cottonwood Fun Night and a spe-
cial thanks to the Philip Legion.
Cottonwood Hall Board
Thank you to Ingram Hard-
ware for the turkey I won in the
Great Gobbler Giveaway!
Dan Oldenberg
Thank you to all my family and
friends for the wonderful surprise
birthday party and to all who
sent birthday wishes. Especially
to my husband, kids and my sis-
ter, Kathy, for all the planning
they did.
Laurie Mann
Thank you to First National
Agency for the turkey I won in the
Great Gobbler Giveaway.
Nancy Neville
seasoned professionals. Termi-
nals in KS, SD, TN, NM. 2 years
OTR experience. Call 800-796-
8200 x103.
FOR SALE
PHEASANTS FOR SALE: Roost-
ers and hens. Ph: (605) 835-
8129.
PETS
CHESAPEAKE PUPPIES: In
Time For Christmas!!! Champion
Bloodlines! Excellent Hunters!
Great Personalities! 605-730-
2088.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health ins.,
credit, 03¢ safety bonus, Call
Joe for details, 800.456.1024,
joe@tbitruck. com.
* * * * * * * *
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1999 F-350 Lariat,
V-10, regular cab, long box,
182K miles, $6,000. Call 545-
3795. P52-2tp
FOR SALE: 1979 Chevrolet Sil-
verado 30, dually with Duralist
DSS 30, 25’ bucket lift. $1,800.
441-9669, Wall. WP11-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
WHEAT HAY FOR SALE: Call
685-3068. P52-tfn
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Quality Air-Entrained Concrete
Call toll-free 1-888-839-2621
Richard Hildebrand
837-2621 • Kadoka, SD
Rent This Space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for SALE
(serious inquires only). Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
EMPLOYMENT
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
COUNSELOR: McLaughlin, SD -
Three Rivers Mental Health and
Chemical Dependency Center
has an immediate opening for a
South Dakota Certified Chemi-
cal Dependency Counselor.
Salary DOQ with full benefit
package. Call 605-374-3862 or
e-mail threerivers@
sdplains.com for an application
and job description.
PIERRE SCHOOL DISTRICT is
seeking a Technology Adminis-
trator. Apply online at
www.pierre.k12.sd.us/employ-
ment <http://www.pierre.k12.
sd.us/employment> or contact
the Pierre School District at 605-
773-7300 for more information.
EOE.
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
COUNSELOR: Lemmon, SD -
Three Rivers Mental Health and
Chemical Dependency Center
has an immediate opening for a
South Dakota Certified Chemi-
cal Dependency Counselor.
Salary DOQ with full benefit
package. Call 605-374-3862 or
e-mail threerivers@sdplains.
com for an application and job
description.
MENTAL HEALTH POSITIONS:
McLaughlin, SD - Three Rivers
Mental Health and Chemical De-
pendency Center has immediate
openings for a full time Masters
level Therapist (Licensed pre-
ferred) and a Bachelors level
Case Manager. Salary DOQ with
full benefit package. Call 605-
374-3862 or e-mail three-
rivers@sdplains. com for an ap-
plication and job description.
SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOL-
OGIST ASSISTANT: immediate
opening in NW SD, great bene-
fits and educational cost reim-
bursement: contact Cris Owens,
Northwest Area Schools
( 6 0 5 ) 4 6 6 - 2 2 0 6
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us
MENTAL HEALTH POSITION:
Lemmon, SD - Three Rivers
Mental Health and Chemical De-
pendency Center has an imme-
diate opening for a full time
Masters level Therapist (Li-
censed preferred). Salary DOQ
with full benefit package. Call
605-374-3862 or e-mail three-
rivers@sdplains.com for an ap-
plication and job description.
REPORTER & FARMER, an
award winning weekly newspa-
per in the heart of the Glacial
Lakes area, seeks fulltime
news/sports reporter and pho-
tographer. Send resume and
clips to Reporter & Farmer, PO
Box 30, Webster, SD 57274 or
emai l suhr s@r epor t er and-
farmer.com
DRIVERS: OWNER OPERATORS
NEEDED Refrigerated Division,
join our experienced team of
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Classified
Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 min-
imum for first 20 words; 10¢ per
word thereafter; included in the
Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The
Pennington Co. Courant, as well
as on our website: www.pioneer-
review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems,
Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum
for first 20 words; 10¢ per word
thereafter. Each name and initial
must be counted separately. In-
cluded in the Pioneer Review and
the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
minimum for first 20 words; 10¢
per word thereafter. Each name
and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Printed only in the Pio-
neer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for
bookkeeping and billing on all
charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per
column inch, included in the Pi-
oneer Review and the Profit.
$5.55 per column inch for the Pi-
oneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which
makes it illegal to advertise “any preference,
or discrimination on race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation, or
discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is a vi-
olation of the law. Our readers are informed
that all dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal opportunity
basis.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For application
& information:
PRO/Rental
Management
1113 Sherman St.
Sturgis, SD 57785
605-347-3077 or
1-800-244-2826
www.
prorental
management.
com
is it tiMe?
Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
Call Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
Philip
Gibson
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
859-3100 • Philip, SD
For all your concrete
construction needs:
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 • Philip
859-2744 or 685-3068
Philip
2003 GMC 1500 HD
Crew Cab
Low Miles!!
Staff SpotligHt
JiM BouMan
– Employed 4 Years
– Elevator Mill-Right
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. WELLER RANCH: 1 P.M. BRED CATTLE TO FOL-
LOW. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
WELLER RANCH 32ND ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE - 50 DLACK
ANCUS 2 YF OLD DULLS; 4 FED ANCUS DULLS; 40 HOMES FAISED HFFS;
AI DFED TO SITZ DULL DUFHAM 9935; 100 YOUNC PUFEDFED ANCUS
COWS; DFED. WELLEF ANC; CLV. MAF & APF (ALL FEMALES WILL DE UL-
TFASOUND TESTED & DFOKE INTO SHOFT ALVINC CFOUPS.}
DISPERSIONS.
MYRON & MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-5 FOF 60 DAYS
WILMA & TRENT TOPE - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 70 DLK
MOSTLY 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20; 10 FED SOLID TO
DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV. 3-20
BRED HEIFERS:
MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW DLK;
CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO TWO 20 DAY CLVC PEFIODS}
JOHN & MAGGIE AYER - 75 HEFF HFFS (1065=} (STUDEF DFEEDINC};
DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS (90% WILL CLV IN 21 DAYS}; 40
DLK HFFS (1100=}; DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS
CLAYTON SANDER & ESTEL DEAN - 25 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-1 FOF 35 DAYS
TUCKER HUDSON - 14 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW MILLAF
ANC DULLS; CLV. 3-25 FOF 45 DAYS (SOFTED INTO SHOFT CLVC PEFI-
ODS}
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
JASON HAMILL - 50 DLK & DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAMSEY & RAMSEY - 45 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-15 FOF 45 DAYS
NEWTON BROWN - 45 FED & FWF 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. FED ANC; CLV.4-5
CHUCK SPRING - 40 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 60 DAYS
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - 30 DLK SOLID TO DFOIEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 5-1 FOF 30 DAYS
HERB SIELER - 30 DLK 2 TO 5 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-6
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL - 30 DLK 8 TO 9 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-28 FOF 45 DAYS
PAUL FANNING - 25 DLK 4 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 4-10
ARLEN CARMICHAEL - 16 DLK 4 TO 5 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-20 FOF 30 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 16 DLK HFF TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
CLAYTON SANDER - 15 DLK, FED, CHAF, & HEFF FUNNINC ACE
COWS; FED & HEFF DFED.DLK; DLK & CHAF DFED. HEFF; CLV. 3-1 FOF
60 DAYS
JIGGS O'CONNELL - 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-28
JOHNSON BAR S RANCH - 14 DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS; DFED.DLK;
CLV.3-18 FOF 50 DAYS
TUCKER HUDSON - 12 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
BART CARMICHAEL - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 4-15 FOF 45 DAYS
RICHARD PAPOUSEK - 9 DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-1
ANDREW RABA - 9 HEFF 4 TO 6 HYF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
10 FOF 60 DAYS
JERRY BOEDING - 5 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
25
EXPOSED COWS:
BRUCE SIMMONS - 25 LH COWS. DFED. HOFNED HEFF; CLV. 4-15
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & SPECIAL
STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
CATTL£ R£PORT : TU£S., D£C. 4, 2DJ2
We so1d ?,DS? Þeod on our Speo1o1 Weoned
& Preoond111oned So1e. Buger 1n1eres1 on
1Þese ueoned oo1ves uos os good os ue Þove
seen. Mong neu bugers on 1Þe seo1s. A b1g
oroud Þere o11 dog u11Þ 9S oons1gnors.
Some d1]]erenoes 1n ]1esÞ re]1eo1ed 1n 1Þe
pr1oes. A verg s1rong so1e!!
FEEDER CATTLE:
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
86..........................DLK & DWF STFS 510=......$182.00
28..........................DLK & DWF STFS 412=......$199.00
42 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 401=......$170.00
BUTCH & NEAL LIVERMONT - INTERIOR
93 ....................................DLK STFS 506=......$180.50
104..................................DLK HFFS 465=......$170.25
BART & KATHY KISSACK - GILLETTE, WY
118 ..................................DLK STFS 529=......$180.50
75 ....................................DLK STFS 464=......$189.25
SHAW RANCH INC. - WHITE OWL
95 ....................................DLK STFS 620=......$168.50
104 ..................................DLK STFS 563=......$170.50
40 ....................................DLK STFS 511=......$176.00
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
105........................DLK & DWF STFS 608=......$169.00
120........................DLK & DWF STFS 522=......$179.75
83 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 478=......$163.75
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIS - VALE
74..........................DLK & DWF STFS 772=......$151.00
78..........................DLK & DWF STFS 701=......$159.00
27.........................FWF & DWF STFS 636=......$163.00
FINN FARMS - MIDLAND
64....................................FED STFS 805=......$150.25
HOSTUTLER RANCH INC. - MIDLAND
100 ................................CHAF STFS 621=......$166.50
102 ......................CHAF & DLK STFS 578=......$166.25
82 ..................................CHAF STFS 692=......$157.25
EMMIT DICKSCHAT - HERMOSA
98 ....................................DLK STFS 600=......$168.25
44 ....................................DLK STFS 539=......$170.50
HERBER RANCH - KADOKA
92..........................DLK & DWF STFS 603=......$166.00
94..........................DLK & DWF STFS 518=......$177.25
LYNN DENKE - CREIGHTON
89 ....................................DLK STFS 555=......$172.50
56....................................DLK HFFS 516=......$158.00
LARRY SWIFT - PHILIP
21 ....................................DLK STFS 552=......$170.00
25 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 532=......$157.00
DENNIS BOOMSMA - BOX ELDER
25..........................DLK & DWF STFS 539=......$170.00
CHUCK & TOBY KROETCH - PHILIP
92 ................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 612=......$165.00
18..........................DLK & DWF STFS 522=......$173.00
86................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 584=......$150.00
RANDY & RHONDA VALLERY - NISLAND
35 ....................................DLK STFS 500=......$177.50
23 ....................................DLK STFS 393=......$195.50
23....................................DLK HFFS 427=......$169.00
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
75 ....................................DLK STFS 565=......$169.50
BONENBERGER RANCH INC - BELVIDERE
69....................................DLK HFFS 655=......$151.00
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
85 ..................................CHAF STFS 667=......$158.75
80 .......................CHAF & FED HFFS 603=......$149.50
GARY JORGENSEN - MEADOW
63 .........................FED & FWF STFS 713=......$153.00
PATTERSON CATTLE - KADOKA
41 ....................................DLK STFS 563=......$167.75
28 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 532=......$154.50
MORTENSON CATTLE COMPANY - HAYES
31..........................DLK & DWF STFS 560=......$166.50
CHRIS & LEO GRUBL - STURGIS
36..........................FED & DLK STFS 558=......$164.25
50 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 510=......$154.25
NICK UHERKA - STURGIS
26 ....................................DLK STFS 673=......$154.50
22....................................DLK HFFS 597=......$145.00
MARVIN COLEMAN - QUINN
21 ....................................DLK STFS 553=......$165.00
10 ....................................DLK STFS 738=......$150.25
24....................................DLK HFFS 573=......$146.00
10....................................DLK HFFS 401=......$171.00
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
85..........................DLK & DWF STFS 658=......$156.00
87 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 574=......$162.25
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - KADOKA
26 ................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 644=......$149.00
54................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 641=......$135.50
DAN PIROUTEK - MILESVILLE
60 ..................................CHAF STFS 629=......$162.00
39..................................CHAF HFFS 581=......$143.75
KIM COE - NEWELL
24..........................FED & DLK STFS 624=......$160.25
39....................................DLK HFFS 587=......$146.00
DOUG THORSON - QUINN
38..........................DLK & DWF STFS 567=......$168.00
DAVID JOHANNESEN - QUINN
32..........................DLK & DWF STFS 621=......$157.50
MARVIN & CHASE SMITH - STURGIS
33 ....................................DLK STFS 611=......$162.75
34....................................DLK HFFS 554=......$144.00
22....................................DLK HFFS 442=......$156.50
GREG SHEARER - WALL
89 ....................................DLK STFS 639=......$159.00
47 ....................................DLK STFS 549=......$162.50
DAN GRUBL - STURGIS
22................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 588=......$143.25
TODD TRASK - WASTA
46 ....................................DLK STFS 587=......$166.00
DAN STARR - BOX ELDER
33..........................FED & DLK STFS 583=......$163.00
HEINRICH RANCH INC.- CAPUTA
24 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 574=......$146.00
CASEY & SHIRLEY TRASK - CREIGHTON
60 ....................................DLK STFS 572=......$167.25
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
9 ......................................DLK STFS 669=......$154.00
20....................................DLK HFFS 675=......$140.50
CLAYTON & TIM SANDER - CUSTER
52 ................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 593=......$165.00
21....................................DWF STFS 515=......$172.50
36 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 556=......$152.00
JOEL DEERING - WASTA
52..................................CHAF HFFS 567=......$144.00
TOM CLEMENTS - PHILIP
31....................................DLK HFFS 536=......$155.00
JOHN CAPP RANCH - FAITH
76..........................FED & DLK STFS 519=......$170.25
20..........................FED & DLK STFS 433=......$185.00
GARY CAMMACK - UNION CENTER
47 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 513=......$156.75
25 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 410=......$171.00
MIKE HENRY - EDGEMONT
15 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 520=......$160.00
2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
20 ...................................FED HFFS 501=......$157.00
MICHELE SMITH - NEWCASTLE, WY
42 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 497=......$157.00
DILLON & JEREMIAH WHITCHER - RAPID CITY
37 ....................................DLK STFS 488=......$180.00
TRIPLE T RANCH - RAPID CITY
33....................................DLK HFFS 485=......$156.50
21 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 408=......$164.00
HARLEY ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
41 ....................................DLK STFS 471=......$176.50
JERRY MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
41....................................DLK HFFS 468=......$166.50
JIM BOB & KAYLA EYMER - MILESVILLE
52..........................FED & DLK STFS 460=......$177.75
20....................................FED STFS 378=......$194.50
LARRY SMITH - PHILIP
53....................................DLK HFFS 458=......$169.75
JOHN BRENNAN - MUD BUTTE
20..........................DLK & DWF STFS 430=......$191.00
25....................................DLK HFFS 454=......$162.00
PETE REINERT - HOWES
20....................................DLK HFFS 381=......$174.00
HENRY BRUCH - STURGIS
10 ....................................DLK STFS 334=......$195.00
14....................................DLK HFFS 331=......$176.00
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
SELLING TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 11,
AT 12:00 MT
RH CATTLE
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: WELLEF ANCUS, 1.00 P.M.
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: MCPHEFSON ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFD 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC
DULL SALE 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS 12.00MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS 1.00MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS 12.00MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Thursday, December 6, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 12
Newspapers online!
See pictures in full color!
Subscribe at: www.pioneer-review.com
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
downtown Philip
reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, Dec. 8 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Dec. 10 ~
Prime Rib
Sandwich
The steakhouse & lounge
Open daily ~ monday thru saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
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!
~ Tuesday, Dec. 4 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Dec. 5 ~
Indian Taco
or Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Dec. 6 ~
Beef Tip Basket
~ Friday Buffet, Dec. 7 ~
Roast Beef
Shrimp • Chicken
Try our new charbroiled steaks & burgers! All steaks come with a choice of potato and includes salad bar!
and in good physical health which
helped him a lot. He will need to re-
turn for some additional surgery
later. So we will keep you in our
prayers, Al.
Both Al and Lenore have had
some hospital visits in the past few
months and we wish them both
well.
Bill and Jayne Gottsleben and
Tara went to the Cottonwood Hall
fundraiser fun night. They re-
ported that there was a nice crowd
and everyone had a good time.
Deer season is now over and the
deer have come out of hiding once
again. They are thick on the roads,
so be careful while driving.
Be curious about everything and
everyone. You’ll get tickled in the
process. I tell you, I am not going to
fret because someone is a few fries
short of a happy meal, or another
driver on the interstate does not
have all their cornflakes in a box. I
can freely forgive everyone and
move on. Learning all I can from
my own mistakes, I had better tol-
erate the mistakes of others. – Un-
known
Grindstone News
(continued from page 10)
The South Dakota Century Club
has just received an application
from Dorothy Antritter, Water-
town, age 108, which now makes
her the oldest resident in the club.
After the recent passing of Beryl
Kapaun, who was the Century
Club’s oldest resident, friends filed
an application form to induct
Dorothy into the club.
Dorothy, the daughter and last
surviving child of Charlie and
Louise (Pfefferle) Antritter, was
born November 25, 1904, in Round
Lake, Minn. Her father emigrated
from Germany in 1885 when he
was eight; her mother at the age of
five. Dorothy remembers her fam-
ily singing German songs, some of
which Dorothy will still sing when
asked.
For six years, the Antritter fam-
ily lived in Moose Jaw,
Saskatchewan. Dorothy said that
she had to take second and third
grades twice because the United
States education system was be-
hind. But, she also noted, that
upon return to the states, she
skipped the eighth grade. She said,
“I never took eighth grade!”
Dorothy was on the Watertown
Arrow Basketball Team, and, when
asked if she was good, she replied,
“Well, I was the tallest and wore a
size 11 shoe. They only played
against classes in their school, sen-
iors against juniors.” Which meant
she played against her sister,
Ruby, who was one year older and
passed away over a year ago at 108.
Remembering her school days,
Dorothy still recalls the high school
she attended being across the
street from where she resides
today.
Dorothy worked for Alan Austin
as a legal secretary for many years
and retired in 1967. Dorothy said,
“I was good! I was the highest paid
secretary in the office. My pay-
check was $50 per month. I
pounded the typewriter just like
any other secretary, but I had to do
shorthand first.” She has never
used a computer, but recalled the
first time she used an electric type-
writer. It scared her to death be-
cause it went so fast and jumped
right out at her. Dorothy said, “I
walked to work, back and forth
from lunch and home again, 10
blocks one way. Do you think any-
one does that today?”
Dorothy’s family was a very
close-knit unit. When a trip was to
be taken, they all went, mom, dad,
and all three kids. Sometimes they
were even gone for months at a
time. She has traveled to every
state, with the exception of Hawaii
since she has never flown. She said,
“I wish I could travel again. You
see a lot of things when you travel
by bus.”
She recalled many occasions
where her dad would come home
and say, “I bought a house.” or “I
bought a car.” She speaks of her
family very fondly. Her dad and
brother decided to build the very
first housetop Christmas decora-
tion in Watertown, which had rein-
deer and, as Dorothy said it, “San-
tee Claus.” She said the people
would drive by, car after car after
car.
Dorothy recalled the end of
World War I. They were living in
Moosejaw, Saskatchewan and bells
and whistles started to blare out on
the streets, signifying the war was
over. People were chanting, “The
war is over! The war is over!”
With only a few remaining rela-
tives, she and Stanley Beal, her
younger cousin at the age of 92,
who lives in Minnesota, still corre-
spond by mail.
In her room at Jenkins Living
Center, Dorothy looked up and
said, “Every morning, I wake up
and think ‘I’m still here.’
The Century Club is a creation of
the South Dakota Health Care As-
sociation and has recognized over
1,000 South Dakotans since its be-
ginning in 1997. Its sponsors cre-
ated the club to recognize both the
contributions and the years of
these special individuals. The Cen-
tury Club is, as its name states, a
club. Therefore, there may be older
people in the state who have not
yet been inducted by a family mem-
ber or loved one into the Century
Club.
The Century Club is open to res-
idents of South Dakota upon the
celebration of their 100th birthday.
There are no dues, and every in-
ductee receives a specially de-
signed certificate and membership
card signed by sponsors. Once a
year, the current oldest living Cen-
tury Club member is recognized as
the “Centenarian of the Year.” Sub-
mit names for the Century Club by
visiting www.sdhca.org and down-
loading an application or call
LuAnn Severson, club coordinator,
at 1-800-952-3052.
Oldest living South Dakotan, 108
this Ad
will
disappear
in seconds
if we put it on
the radio.
seeinG
is
BeLieVinG
ravellette
Publ., inc.
with offices
at
The Pioneer Review
859-2516
Philip, SD
The Kadoka Press
837-2259
Kadoka, SD
The Bison Courier
244-7199
Bison, SD
The Pennington Co.
Courant
279-2565
Wall, SD
The Faith Independent
967-2161
Faith, SD
The Murdo Coyote
669-2271
Murdo, SD
The New Underwood
Post
754-6466
New Underwood, SD

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