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Pioneer Review, December 27, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 18
Volume 107
December 27, 2012
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........$7.86
Any Pro .............................$7.06
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.02
Corn.......................................$6.62
Sunflower Seeds ................$21.50
Christmas
around the
communities
throughout
this issue
Sports
9
Finance
classes
10
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Don & Tami Ravellette & Employees
eote
+o;¡e++!¸
ç
Nay these Le the hìgh¦ìght
oí the New Year
and may they grow
wìth each eLL and í¦ow.
by Del Bartels
“I’m going to miss this, too, I’m
sure,” said Lester “Les” Pearson
about his retirement from being
the site manager at Dakota Mill
and Grain, Philip, after 42 years.
Pearson is retiring now because,
“I’m spry and healthy. There’s
things I want to do while I’m
healthy; hoping I got the time to do
what I can.” His time will be filled
with his nine grandchildren, hunt-
ing, riding horse, and “that kind of
stuff.”
Pearson first started at what was
then Tri-State Milling “just to help
them out. The guys wanted to take
off some for Christmas vacation,”
said Pearson. Those guys were
manager Ed Hansen and mill-
worker Barney Pfeifer. After four
months on the job, Pearson was
drafted into the United States
Army, where he spent the next two
years doing special services. Upon
returning to Philip, he continued
his job, but now it was with Hub-
bard Mill and Grain. Pfeifer moved
to Wall to be the manager at that
site, and, about three years after
Pearson’s return, Hansen retired
and Pearson took over as manager
of the Philip site.
“It was a lot more than I thought
it was, when I first took it. I’ve
learned a lot over the years,” said
Pearson.
“Lester’s impossible to replace:
we’re looking for someone to fill the
role,” said Brian Hammerbeck,
area supervisor for Dakota Mill
and Grain. “I don’t pick on him, all
I can do is praise.”
“It’s been good. The people are
the best part of the job. I have some
families I’m working with the third
generation. You can’t beat people,”
said Pearson.
Pearson’s wife is in favor of his
retirement. “She all for it, actually.
I think she’s going to stay down
there (at the drug store) so she can
get away from me once in a while,”
said Pearson.
Lester Pearson retires after 42 years
Lester Pearson, right, after 42 years of
employment there, has retired as the
site manager of Philip’s Dakota Mill
and Grain. Photo by Del Bartels
During a special luncheon, Tues-
day, December 18, Matt Donnelly,
was honored by the Philip chapter
of Modern Woodmen of America as
a hometown hero because of his
countless hours of service to the
community and school.
Donnelly, a Philip High School
instructor and coach, had previ-
ously been chosen as the 2012
Teacher of the Year by the South
Dakota Association for Health,
Physical Education, Recreation
and Dance.
In recognition of his efforts,
members of the Modern Woodmen
chapter presented Donnelly with a
certificate and awarded a $100
grant to the Community Better-
ment Committee, the charitable or-
ganization of his choice.
The event had some attendees
speak their thoughts, some with se-
rious praise and some with friendly
roasting. Superintendent Keven
Morehart said of Donnelly, “A
stand up guy; a guy who teaches
kids responsibility. There’s nobody
better than Matt.” Kathy Peterson,
PHS secondary secretary, said
about Mrs. Donnelly, “We should
take our hats off to Linette, too.”
“Improving the quality of life for
our members, their families and
their communities is Modern
Woodmen’s mission,” said Don
Haynes, local Modern Woodmen
activities coordinator. “The home-
town heroes program helps us ac-
knowledge and thank volunteers
across the country for doing just
that.”
Coordinated by local Modern
Woodmen members. chapters pro-
vide opportunities to connect
through social activities and volun-
teer projects.
As a tax-exempt fraternal benefit
society, Modern Woodmen sells life
insurance, annuity and investment
products, not to benefit stockhold-
ers, but to improve the quality of
life of its stakeholders – members,
their families and their communi-
ties. This is accomplished through
social, charitable and volunteer ac-
tivities. Annually, Modern Wood-
men and its members provide more
than $23 million and nearly one
million volunteer hours for commu-
nity projects nationwide.
Matt Donnelly honored as hometown hero
Matt Donnelly, left, accepted the honors of being chosen as a hometown hero for his countless hours of service to the com-
munity and school. Presenting the certificate and a $100 donation in Donnelly’s name to the Community Betterment Com-
mittee was Don Haynes, activities director for the Philip chapter of Modern Woodmen of America. Photo by Del Bartels
On Thursday, December 6, at the
32nd annual Ag Appreciation Ban-
quet hosted by the Ag and Natural
Resources Committee of the Rapid
City Area Chamber of Commerce,
Grady and Bernice Crew, Philip,
were honored with the Aggie of the
Year Award.
The chamber’s Ag and Natural
Resources Committee established
this special award in 1981, the
award was created to honor indi-
viduals who provide leadership
that has benefited the local area
agriculture community over an ex-
tended period of time.
The Crews were honored for
their lifetime of service in agricul-
ture through the operation of their
successful agri-businesses includ-
ing the Crew Crop Insurance
Agency, the Badlands Trading Post
and now the Prairie Homestead.
Grady is the fourth generation
operator of Crew Ranch, Crew Cat-
tle Company, where he and Ber-
nice now raise Angus cows and
Charolais calves and grow wheat
and corn. The Crews have been
married since 1978 and have two
children. Their son Caleb is at
home and helps run the ranch with
them and their daughter Jamie
works as communications officer
for the South Dakota Department
of Agriculture.
Grady and Bernice have both
played important roles in their
community. Grady has served as
secretary of Cenex Harvest State,
president of the White River Graz-
ing District, director on the South
Dakota Wheat Board, he was on
the Jackson County Soil Conserva-
tion District Board and president of
the Kadoka School Board. Bernice
is currently a director on the Bad-
lands Natural History Association.
More than 600 people were pres-
ent at the appreciation banquet,
where South Dakota Secretary of
Agriculture Walt Bones gave the
keynote address.
Crew couple – Aggie of the Year
Members of the Philip chapter of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America worked after school Wednesday, De-
cember 19, collecting, sorting and distributing the donated gifts left under the community Maggie Grace Angel Tree. This
is Philip FCCLA’s 15th year sponsoring the project. The angel tree is dedicated in Maggie Mehlhaff’s memory in the hope
that needy children in the area will be shown the spirit and love of Christmas. Since the set up of the tree in the Haakon
County Courthouse, November 26, gifts have been piling up. The Philip FCCLA chapter, inconjunction with the local churches
and Haakon County Community Health office, have or will distribute the donations to children in need in the Philip area.
Gifts beyond our community need will be distributed by the Jackson County Community Health office and the Bennett
County foster child program. Brigitte Brucklacher, Philip FCCLA advisor, believes that the amount donated this year is equal
to, or even more, than the amount donated last year, which was over 300 gifts. Pictured are, from lower left, FCCLA Chair-
person Kelsie Kroetch, Samantha Huston, Afton Burns. Tara Cantrell and Brucklacher. Photo by Del Bartels
FCCLA Angel Tree successful
The Deep Creek School held their Christmas program December 19 at the Deep
Creek School, with numerous family members and friends. The students enter-
tained the audience with several skits and songs. During the song, “We Wish You
a Merry Christmas,” Santa Claus surprised the students with a visit and a treat
bag. The younger preschool students were awestruck when Santa called their
names and gave them each a bag of treats. Shown singing, from left, are Kori
Endres – second grade, Zakry Sinkey – third grade, Bobbie Jarvi – third grade,
Noah Johnson – fourth grade, and Dylan Endres – fourth grade. Courtesy photo
Deep Creek School program
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comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
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Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
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Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
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Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
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South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Friday: Overcast in the morning,
then partly cloudy. High of 18F
with a windchill as low as 0F.
Winds from the WNW at 5 to
10 mph.
Friday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog overnight.
Low of 3F with a windchill as low as -6F.
Winds from the West at 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Fog
early. High of 30F. Winds
from the WSW at 5 to 15
mph. Saturday Night:
Partly cloudy. Fog overnight.
Low of 9F with a windchill as
low as -4F. Winds from the SSW at 5 to
15 mph.
Monday: Clear. High of
27F. Winds from the NW at
5 to 10 mph.
Monday Night: Partly
cloudy. Fog overnight.
Low of 7F. Winds from the West at 5
to 10 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. Fog early.
High of 28F with a windchill as
low as -8F. Breezy. Winds from
the WNW at 15 to 20 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 7F with a wind-
chill as low as -8F. Winds from the NW at 10
to 15 mph.
Get your complete
& up-to-the
minute
local forecast:
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Tuesday: Clear. High of 39F with a
windchill as low as 3F. Breezy. Winds
from the WNW at 15 to 20 mph.
Tuesday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 5F with a wind-
chill as low as -11F. Breezy. Winds from the NW
at 10 to 20 mph.
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
Beginnings are often better than
endings. Take the moon in its
cycle, for instance. It starts out as
a tiny crescent in the west just
after sunset and is really nifty
then. When I first notice it hanging
there, I often say something like,
“Welcome back, Moon. Nice to see
you again.” The moon doesn’t
reply, of course, but I say it any-
way.
From that thin crescent, then,
this second-brightest light in the
heavens keeps on growing from
night to night until it blossoms into
a big and pretty full moon. It stays
big for a few nights although little
chunks start disappearing from it.
Then by the fourth week of the
cycle, I seldom notice it much since
it comes up so late – just before
sunrise. Finally, it disappears alto-
gether for a night before being
reincarnated as a thin fellow again
in the west. To me, the beginning
of the moon’s cycle is great, and
things stay interesting all the way
to the halfway point. From there
on it’s all downhill, as they say.
The life cycle of animals can be
similar. There is nothing much
cuter than a baby animal whether
it be a calf, pony, or puppy. The
cuteness tends to win your heart.
From there, critters continue to
grow into adults when they hope-
fully will become more useful, but
probably not as attractive. After
the midpoint of their lives, just like
the moon, things start to go down-
hill until that particular life is
over. The last part can even be sad.
Humans aren’t much different.
If a new baby appears in the com-
munity, the ladies are strongly
drawn to it. (Men, not so much.)
The gals, though, admire it, hold it,
and thoroughly enjoy it. Seeing
that baby grow and prosper is
pleasant as well. People in their
prime are fine too, but decline has
to eventually set in if life goes on
long enough. The final days of a life
can be hard indeed and difficult to
see or deal with.
Then we come to marriages.
They usually start out with a great
deal of joy and happiness. Unfortu-
nately, in this day and age, it fre-
quently doesn’t last very long.
When I used to do wedding photog-
raphy, a few times I barely got the
wedding albums delivered before
things fell apart. I shouldn’t com-
plain because that meant income
from another wedding in a few
years, but the collapse is not fun to
watch. I have even had a part in
someone’s third wedding a few
times, but quite often the third
time is the charm and things actu-
ally hold together.
Some marriages, though, don’t
go into decline, even right up to the
point where one of the partners
dies. They may even continue to
strengthen. That’s nice to see.
Faith in God can strengthen and
grow right to the end of life as well
so not everything goes into decline,
I’m happy to say.
Years, however, follow the more-
normal cycle of good beginning and
strong midpoint, followed by disin-
tegration. I am always very glad to
start a new year with all the possi-
bilities of interesting happenings
ahead. Sure, it can be chilly in Jan-
uary, but at least the days are get-
ting longer and the temperatures
are getting warmer as the days
pass. By March and April we’re apt
to have some really nice days.
Spring, as I have probably men-
tioned many times before, is my
absolute favorite with green grass,
flowers, baby animals and so on. I
think I could live in perpetual
spring.
From there we go to the most
productive part of the year with
growing crops and all that until we
get to fall. Although fall can be re-
ally pretty with the leaves chang-
ing color and putting on a show, it
also signals the closing of the year.
November and December are the
pits as far as I’m concerned with
short days, snow and cold. I some-
times think I really deserve to have
a few days of good old deep depres-
sion about then, but luckily I usu-
ally don’t have time for it what
with Thanksgiving and then
Christmas. By the time I recover
from those events, here it is the
first of the year and off we go
again.
Right now, as you know, we are
perched right at the beginning of a
fresh year with all the promise of
better days to come, neat new stuff
to try out, and old pursuits to enjoy
again. I’m ready for it. Let’s go.
Here’s wishing us all the greatest
of new years complete with exces-
sive productivity, joy and happi-
ness. May it be so. Have a very
happy New Year.
PRIVATE APPLICATOR CERTIFICATION …training will be
held Friday, January 4, at 1:00 p.m. at the Bad River Senior Citi-
zen’s Center in Philip. Please bring a photo identification with you
when you attend the training.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
By example ... by Del Bartels
One school morning, I headed out early to attend a Fellowship of
Christian Athletes start-up meeting. My eighth grade son had said he
wanted to go, but that morning mumbled from his pillow that he
needed a little more sleep. I was upset, but mostly disappointed. I told
him that some things had to be wanted, not a forced attendance. I
walked to the school through a fresh half inch of snow, going probably
a bit faster than normal, and muttering to myself.
That first meeting went okay; this year’s FCA will probably grow.
As I left the school, the first class warning bell rang. Lost in thought
on if my son had made it to school on time, I somehow noticed my ear-
lier footprints in the snow. It humored me that someone had walked
beside them, seemingly on purpose, rather than in them or wander-
ingly over them. The second prints were nearly my size, and had
matched me step by step, inch per inch. Then, because of the direction
of their origin and lack of too many other prints, I wondered if they
could be my son’s. If so, when had he grown to be almost my shoe size?
Since when could he match my stride, especially when I had been upset
and in a hurry?
As I neared my house, yes, the second set of footprints were his.
Well before reaching my door, I stopped dead. When I wasn’t with
him, he had matched me step by step! What other things was he match-
ing me in? I had been upset, had he? Walking may be trivial, but other
things, such as being upset, are not. I grew fearful of those other things.
Had I given the impression that I had to, rather than wanted to, go
to that FCA meeting? When was the last time I raised my voice? Have
I spoken or even implied complaints about others? Do I grumble about
chores and other responsibilities? Do I start my days with a smile or a
frown, thus showing my attitude for the rest of the day? Are my si-
lences because of brooding, or something more pleasant? Do I prefer to
talk about friends and events around me, or some sitcom on television?
Who is at fault; the writer of the traffic ticket or the person who caused
it to have to be written?
He matches me! Is that really a good thing? That was a very sober-
ing, and unsettling, thought. Will he continue to match me? Will he
someday improve upon my stride? Some people say that they don’t
want to be role models, but their footprints are left in the snow for all
to see. I would think every father wants his children to be like him, but
is that a blessing or a curse? Some kids turn out great because of their
parents, while some turn out great despite their parents.
A new year will soon begin. New snows will fall, and I will put new
footprints in that snow. I pray that their direction and pace are worthy
of others, be it with others walking beside me at the time, or in later
following my lead.
The offices of
Ravellette Publications
will be closed
MONDAY & TUESDAY
December 31 & January 1.
Deadline for the newspaper
next week is
FRIDAY AT NOON!
Deadline for the Profit is
THURSDAY AT NOON!
The members of the Philip Garden Club celebrated its third year during their Christmas party this year at Rock'n Roll Lanes,
Saturday, December 15. After a meal and desserts, there was a gift exchange. “The club's membership continues to keep
growing and local folks are always invited to join in at any meeting or outing,” said Elke Baxter. Shown, back row, from left:
Betty Smith, Tina Staben, Donna Staben, Barb Kroetch, Lori Quinn, Becky Brech, Betty LaBeau and Elke Baxter. Front: San-
dra O'Connor, Marion Nelson, Barbara Wentz, Virginia Wolden and Charmaine Stewart. Courtesy photo
Philip Garden Club – three years
Kennedy Implement & Auto Co.
The United States Department
of Agriculture announced recently
that they will be lifting the previ-
ously imposed limits on how much
protein and grains could be served
to students in one week.
The latest modifications will be
set in place for the rest of the 2012-
2013 school year, explained Ann
Schwader, South Dakota State
University Extension nutrition
field specialist.
“These changes are positive and
show that the USDA is willing to
work with nutrition officials and
others who have concerns related
to the new standards,” Schwader
said.
The original changes to the
school lunch standards were an-
nounced January 2012, due to the
national Healthy, Hunger Free
Kids Act (Public Law 111-296) that
determined how much of certain
food groups could be served, set
limits on calories and salt and
phased in whole grains.
Schwader said the move to cre-
ate stricter guidelines was moti-
vated by the fact that the obesity
rates among school children are
growing and steps were needed to
reverse the trend.
“These guidelines aligned school
meals with the latest nutrition sci-
ence, based on recommendations of
nutrition experts and the 2010 Di-
etary Guidelines for Americans nu-
trition recommendations,” she said.
The new school meal patterns meet
specific calorie ranges for children
in grades kindergarten through
five (650 calories), sixth through
eigth (700 calories), and nine
through 12th (850 calories).
“The intention of the new school
lunch guidelines is to ensure that
almost all children receive at least
one-third of their daily nutritional
and energy needs,” Schwader said.
The latest modifications are
being provided to allow schools
more weekly planning options to
ensure that children receive a nu-
tritious meal every day of the week.
According to the revisions, the stu-
dents can eat as many grains and
proteins as they want, as long as
they are eating the allotted amount
of calories put forth by the USDA.
SDSU Extension recommends
that parents assist their children
with the changes to the school
lunch standards.
“Parents can make sure their
youth eats a nutritious breakfast
and encourage them to take and
eat the fruits, vegetables, whole
grains, lean proteins and low-fat
milk offered in school meals," she
said.
School meals add more grains/proteins
The inherent and dynamic qual-
ities of soil were in the spotlight at
the Soil Health Information Day
held December 11 in Mitchell. The
event attracted over 230 people to
hear regional and national agricul-
ture and natural resources speak-
ers.
Ruth Beck, South Dakota State
University Extension agronomy
field specialist, Pierre, said “One
goal with the event was to help
people learn ways to manage soil
that improve the soil function. Al-
though we can’t change the inher-
ent qualities of the soil in our
yards, fields and pastures, we can
make management choices that af-
fect the amount of organic matter,
structure, depth, water and nutri-
ent-holding capacity – the indica-
tors of the health of a soil.”
“While the physical and chemical
properties of soil have long been a
main factor for land use planning,
we are now getting an understand-
ing of the biology happening be-
neath our feet,” said Colette
Kessler, public affairs specialist
with the USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service, Pierre.
“Thanks to technology advances in
microscopes and other equipment,
our understanding of the science of
soil, biology in particular, has
grown more in the last three years
than the last 30,” she explained.
Two Alpena area farmers were
enlisted to kick off the day demon-
strating water infiltration with
Ray Archuleta, conservation agron-
omist, from the NRCS East Na-
tional Technical Center, Greens-
boro, NC. “Look at this ... it isn’t a
problem of run-off; we have an in-
filtration problem,” said Archuleta
as the audience watched him work
through the soil experiment. “Ray
the Soil Guy” got to the root of
everyone’s questions with his pres-
entation “Healthy Soils Make
Healthy Profits.” Archuleta is pas-
sionate about soil health and his
passion is infectious. He special-
izes in soil biology/ecology and di-
versity approaches for agro- ecosys-
tem sustainability. “Understand-
ing the biology – the microbes – in
the soil is the ‘next step’ for farmers
and ranchers,” said Archuleta.
Every operation is unique. He out-
lined how to use above-ground
management, such as crop rota-
tions, cover crops, and reducing
tillage as tools to manipulate the
soil biology for a more sustainable
system.
“A healthy soil is not compacted.
It has structure with macro pores
that allow water to infiltrate down
into the profile,” Archuleta ex-
plained earlier. “When I pick up a
shovelful of soil, it should look like
cottage cheese.” Jim Hoorman,
Ohio State University, outlined
their university research findings
and the economics of using mixes of
cover crops to improve the problem
of compacted soils. Mixtures are
better for addressing compaction
than using a single cover crop
species. Hoorman explained that
disturbances, like tillage, can de-
stroy pore structure in a soil.
“Healthy soil regulates water
well,” explained Paul Jasa, Exten-
sion Engineer, University of Ne-
braska-Lincoln. Soil and residue
management helps control where
rain, snowmelt and irrigation
water goes. “Field after field,” he
says, “Residue drives the crop.
Buffers are good, but are a ‘band-
aid;’ fix the soil in the field with
residue and keep your water,” says
Jasa. “Go out with a spade and see
for yourself how your soil is han-
dling water.”
Internationally known Dr.
Dwayne Beck, Manager, SDSU
Dakota Lakes Research Farm near
Pierre, encourages producers to
mimic nature, “I’ve learned more
from observing nature than trying
to change it.” Crop residue helps
improve the soils balance of nutri-
ents like nitrogen and phosphorus.
Beck’s presentation outlined ‘Catch
and Release Nutrients’ and work-
ing with natural cycles to maxi-
mize crop production. “Plant roots
are ‘hot spots’ for biological activi-
ties like nutrient cycling and soil
aggregate stability,” said Beck.
A common theme recommended
throughout the day was for people
to get out with a shovel. “If we dig
a little, we can learn a lot,” says
Kessler, “We can better understand
how healthy soil should look and
smell, and how healthy soil should
feel in our hands.” By the year
2050, Earth’s population is ex-
pected to reach 9 billion. Keeping
every inch of our soil healthy will
be essential as farmers and ranch-
ers work to produce as much food
and fiber in the next 40 years as
they have in the last 500.
Ag future: soil biology as new frontier
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 3
Community
June 28 – Done our buying in
Pierre and crossed the river to Ft.
Pierre at 3 p.m. Old Missouri River
on a tare. Rose 2 feet in 1 1/2 days
from the June floods and it was full
of drift wood. Dibble bought a Mc-
Cormick mowing machine in Ft.
Pierre for $45 and at 7 in the eve
we struck out for Skieview with our
3,000 pound load with three horses
and camped a mile out of Ft.
Pierre. Heavy thunderstorm dur-
ing the night. Eaten up by mosqui-
toes near the river.
June 29 – Resumed trip at 6 a.m.
Camped for dinner 14 miles out.
Camped for night one mile west of
O’Gearys and about 30 miles from
Ft. Pierre. Shook up by heavy
thunderstorm during the night but
didn’t have much rain. Passed
Harry Hopkins Road Ranch in af-
ternoon and got a cool bottle of
beer. Water places far apart and
scarce.
Sun. June 30 – Continued on
trip. Nice and cool day. Camped for
dinner 5 miles west of Hayes – got
a cool quart bottle of beer at Hayes.
Camped for night within 25 miles
of Skieview. Disturbed by a violent
thunderstorm at 10:30 p.m. Rained
all night–got soaked–didn’t get to
sleep. We went over to a settlers at
4:30 a.m. and got a dry bed and
slept to 8:15 a.m. Broke a coupling
pole crossing Plum Creek
(Cheyenne Plum).
July 1 – Resumed the trip at 4:30
a.m. Road heavy. Comped for din-
ner 20 miles from Skieview.
Reached home about 9 p.m. tired
out – no more trips to Pierre for
Benny.
July 2 – Day opened clear and
warm. Rested up all day after the
trip to Pierre. Temperature at noon
92.
July 3 – Day opened clear and
hot. Went to the Cheyenne River
for a load of wood – like to have
died with the heat in the breaks.
Temperature 98 in the shade. 100
Indians camped in their tents 1/2
mile from us getting ready for the
celebration at Marietta.
July 4 – Clear and hot. Viola and
I started to Kertzmans at 9 a.m.
Large crowd there. Big ball games,
roping contests and dance. Roping
contest was a fake, steers got away.
Bronco busting very good. Plenty
ice cream and lemonade. Plenty of
beer in the breaks a mile away.
Procession of the sports out there
all day long. Very hot. Furious
storm came up in the eve. Had to
break into shack to escape it (Mr.
McKeown’s shack).
July 5 – Done odd jobs in a.m. In
afternoon hitched up and distrib-
uted telephone poles and went and
guyed down a couple of corner
posts on the wire fence. And then
we went over the the Indian camp
a mile west of Skieview. About 100
Indians in camp. All kinds and
ages. Saw war dance. Talked to
Rosa Red Horse and saw Eagle
Bear in paint and feathers.
July 6 – Day opened with huge
black clouds everywhere. At 1:30
p.m. a terrific storm came up from
the northwest and for 15 minutes a
perfect avalanche of hail stones the
size of bullets fell driven by a 60
mile per hour gale. Corn, potatoes
and garden truck badly cut up.
Went over to Dibbles in p.m. and
set a few posts around cornfield.
Sun. July 7 – Nice clear warm
day. Big ball game at Marietta be-
tween the Indians and the Mari-
etta Club. Buster chased the balls
and got some. Big crowd in atten-
dance.
July 8 – Fierce rain and electri-
cal storm broke over Skieview at 2
a.m. Rained incessantly until day-
light and then hailed and rained
hard until 9 a.m. All creeks run-
ning full. Put in a few telephone
poles. In p.m. helped Dibble lower
his ceiling and put a floor in attic.
Mail today but didn’t go after it.
July 9 – Dibble went to Leslie
and I took the mare Kate to Tad-
dikens stud supposed to be in foal.
Fearful thunderstorm broke at 6
p.m. with heavy rain.
July 10 – Day opened sullen and
threatening. At one p.m. another
fearful rain storm with hail fell. No
damage. Ground is soaked.
Streams running over. Good for
crops which are recovering nicely
from first hail storm.
July 11 – Awful fog at dawn. Dug
holes for telephone poles and set
some poles. Dug post holes around
my corn. In p.m. went to Dibbles
and helped him with a new hay
rack.
July 12 – Corn and potatoes com-
ing out fine since the hail storm.
Helped Dibble with his hay rack
and did odd jobs around Skieview.
July 13 – Fixed the dropping de-
vice on mowing machine and con-
tinued work on hay rack. Gentle
rain around midnight.
Sun. July 14 – Day opened cool
and threatening – later turned to
rain for 2 hrs. Good for all kinds of
vegetation. Mosquitoes coming on
again. Cool in evening a little fire
was comfortable.
July 15 – Worked pulling up tele-
phone wires from Skieview to Dib-
bles and doing odd jobs. Much
cooler weather in evening.
July 16 – New herd of mosqui-
toes on deck and as voracious as
ever. Bert began cutting hay in af-
ternoon and I worked all afternoon
connecting telephone. Got it so we
could talk over it some by evening.
July 17 – Connected up tele-
phone in morning. Viola at
Skieview end of the line and me at
Dibbles. She got her phone working
to perfection and I could hear her
plain. System now works to perfec-
tion. Finished tamping in some
posts before noon and in afternoon
went haying and hauled in three
monster loads – almost 3 tons. New
crop of mosquitoes on as bad nearly
as they were in June.
July 18 – Four months on our
claim to day. Stacked some hay in
forenoon and cut hay in the after-
noon. Mosquitoes around by the
millions. Very annoying.
July 19 – Nice day but very hot.
Began shocking hay at 9 a.m. and
shocked until 6 p.m. Got mail today
and a letter from John. Mosquitoes
positively a fright. Telephone up
and working fine. Met Mr. Gilbert
Durston.
(to be continued …)
Here’s to a New Year!
May it bring you and
yours health, happiness
& prosperity …
Happy New
Year 2013!!
Gibson Concrete
Construction
Ray & Karen Gibson
& employees
859-3100 • Philip
Hit & Miss
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Dec. 27: Chicken
Lasagna, Prince Edward Veggies,
Garlic Bread, Lemon Cake.
Friday, Dec. 28: Potato En-
crusted Cod, Twice Baked Mashed
Potatoes, Key Biscayne Veggies,
Roll, Diced Peaches.
Monday, Dec. 31: Beef
Rouladen, Red Mashed Potatoes,
Cabbage Supreme, Roll, Kirsch
Torte.
Tuesday, January 1: Happy
New Year 2013 – Chicken Osso
Bucco, Rosemary Potatoes, Bis-
cayne Veggies, Roll, Fruit.
***
Friday, December 14, at Somer-
set Court, we had wheel of fortune
as our activity. Each team playing
won big Somerset bucks. Thanks to
Susan and Sandy who set up the
puzzles and passed around the
spinner.
Marge Self, Marilyn Butts and
Vivian Hansen worked in a little
pool before the music program.
We were entertained with music
in the afternoon by Skeeter Boyer
playing his guitar and Tracy
Heeter on the banjo. I love the mel-
low guitar and the twang of the
banjo. Their amps were pleasant.
Thanks Skeeter and Heeter and
thanks Somerset Court for provid-
ing this entertainment.
Such a good bunch of mail with
pretty cards from Leonard and
Jean Meyer, Chuck Allen and Etta
Erdmann, and a year-end letter
from Carol and Al Vogan with pho-
tos to illustrate the year’s activi-
ties. There was also a box of those
wonderful See’s chocolates from
Wayne and Gwynn Hansen. Thank
you all.
Somerset Court dress-up days
included crazy sock day, December
17, Santa hat or antler day, 18th,
Christmas shirt, 19th, Christmas
tie, 20th, red and green flannel pa-
jamas, 24th.
Saturday, December 15, we had
exercises with mystery Somerset
bucks. In the afternoon, we had
painting with Susan. We used wa-
tercolors and crayons and painted
wooden forms of houses, cupcakes,
trees and other Christmas-y
shapes. It was fun and they are
cute. I got there late, so maybe I
did not see all who painted. But I
saw Eileen, Mary Lou and Mar-
cella. I wrote Christmas cards to
Thelma Heltzel and to Chuck Allen
and Etta Erdmann. There was a
nice note to Emery Gibson.
Thanks. In the mail there was a
package from my niece, Wanda and
Ed Artz. Wanda had knit me some
big, long, warm wool socks. Thank
you, Wanda. And there was a
pretty long strip of black lace with
a gold border. Not sure what to do
with that, but it is pretty, and
thank you. Wanda also sent some
cookies and M.R. liked them, so I
sent the rest home with him.
Wilma Keene’s daughter from
Hot Springs, Pat Schetens, was vis-
iting at Somerset Court Saturday.
Mildred Kraemer and daughter
were making and baking dozens of
Christmas cookies.
Florabelle Powell had company
at breakfast, her grandson and his
daughter.
Floy Olson had company at
lunch, her son, Allen, was here.
On third floor, Irene Arbach has
a wonderful new purple poinsettia!
Irene Cox next door to Irene Ar-
bach, has a charming arrangement
of red roses and red carnations
with assorted greenery.
As we go past Maxine Kilmer’s
door, we hear some quiet Christ-
mas music from her piano.
Bernadine (Bernie) James has
moved to Ft. Collins, Colo., where
her son lives.
M.R. Hansen came over for
scrabble. Later, Mary Lou and I
played bananagrams until almost
supper time. The Somerset Court
bus trip to Story Book Island was
cancelled on account of cold
weather, and Father Dahms was
sick, and there were only Connie,
Fr. Dahms and me signed up to go
anyway. Besides, Shawn had hurt
her leg and some other spots at a
store parking lot.
Sunday morning, Eileen Tenold
played Christmas hymns on the
piano and I sang along. She sings
high and I sing low. Sunday, De-
cember 16, we had an elegant Sun-
day noontime meal of baked Vir-
ginia ham, scalloped potatoes, and
tiny carrots. Dessert was some sort
of pie.
Irene Cox had company at lunch,
her granddaughter and three
great-grands, Hayley, Macey and
Sydnie. They live out in the Black
Hills. Marilyn Butts went to the
grand concert, “A South Dakota
Acoustic Christmas,” at the old
high school at the foot of sixth
street Saturday evening. It was a
fund raiser for Youth and Family
Services.
Sunday afternoon, we had non-
denominational church services
with Steve, Terry and Addie Pulse
and Jack Humke. A prayer was of-
fered for the recent tragedy of the
shooting in Newtown, Conn. We
sang several advent hymns with
Jack Humke at the piano. Terry re-
called that he had mentioned two
weeks ago that God had set up His
plan, hundreds of years before the
birth of Christ. Moved kings and
countries, and languages so that all
came to pass. Terry said that the
Greek language is the supreme
language. We are so ignorant, hav-
ing to make do with English. (And
our adaptations of English.)
Sunday afternoon, Sande Lof-
berg and her piano and guitar
pupils presented us with an excel-
lent recitation at Somerset Court.
There was a good crowd. My son,
M.R. Hansen attended. Sande
played “White Christmas.” Jamie
Iwan, piano, “Do You Hear What I
Hear?” and “Go Tell It on the
Mountain” with wonderfully pre-
cise delivery. Asia Sletten, piano,
“We Wish You a Merry Christmas,”
and a duet with Sande, “We Three
Kings,” with lilting, nice strokes.
McKayla Stratmeyer, guitar,
“Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Rein-
deer,” and “Rockin’ Around the
Christmas Tree.” Guitar duet with
excellent harmony, just enough
zing and “Silent Night” on the
piano.
Brittney Stratmeyer, “Up On the
Housetop.” Duet with McKayla,
“Away in a Manger” and “Santa
Claus is Coming to Town.”
A guitar duet with Alec Daniel,
“First Noel,” and “What Child is
This?” Quinn Daniel, “Rudolph the
Red-Nosed Reindeer” and “Go Tell
it on the Mountain.” Nice work,
played in the key of D.
Kennedy Hauge, “Drummer
Boy.” Piano with awards for accom-
plishments. Several others had
their achievements read and
awards given.
Isabella Glass, piano, “O Come
All Ye Faithful” and “Away in a
Manger” in a calm mode. Isabella
is a student of only six weeks and
shows much promise. Quentin
Glass, piano, “Holly Jolly Christ-
mas” and “Jesu, Joy of Man’s De-
siring.” With polished delivery.
Victoria Lundy, piano, “Do You
Hear What I Hear?” and “Angels
We Have Heard on High.” A com-
manding performance.
The grand finale was “Jingle
Bells” with piano and bells.
Thank you for coming to play for
us. Thank you to our activity direc-
tors for providing seating and re-
freshments.
Monday morning, we decided to
have goodies in the activity garden
instead of going on a bus trip to the
doughnut shop. Sandi and Shawn
brought an assortment of our fa-
vorites and gave us hot coffee too.
It was a pleasant party. Thanks
girls. Jim and Eleanor Holmes had
company at breakfast, their son,
Bob, Rapid City. We have a poster
that said that the Monette family
will treat the Somerset Court resi-
dents to pizza on Tuesday, Decem-
ber 18. Thanks, what a nice treat.
Somerset Court resident Ken Mon-
ette has written two new poems.
They are gentle reminiscences.
They can be read in the Somerset
Court scrapbook on the coffee table
by the fireplace.
Monday afternoon, Gary driving
and Sandy in charge of passengers,
gave a bus tour to a new store. I
went along to see the new, neat
one-piece concrete floor. It was cut
into eight foot squares and some
areas, like under the clothing dis-
plays, are surfaced with wood floor-
ing. We had a fine time. I bought a
nice ripe avacado. I even found
some items made in the U.S.A.
from Atlanta, Ga., and Pennsylva-
nia. Well anyway, nice to see that.
We got back to Somerset Court in
time to see the end of the movie,
“White Christmas,” starring Bing
Crosbie, Danny Kaye, Vera Ellen
and Rosemary Clooney.
Thank you to my grandson,
Michael Hansen, his wife, Chris-
tine, and children, Owen and Ella
(going on four), Rancho Palos
Verdes, Calif., for your lovely photo
collage Christmas card.
Thank you also your pretty
Christmas card, Edith Drew and
her daughter, Sandra, Sioux Falls.
They were our neighbors in Philip
in the 1950s.
Tuesday, December 18, at Som-
erset Court, we had the activity of
ring the reindeer that was won by
Fred Smith.
In the afternoon, we had bingo
with the big birthday bash after
bingo. There was a big chocolate
cake decorated in red and green
and baked by P.J. and ice cream.
We took a photo. Jack Humke led
us in singing, “Happy Birthday,
God Bless You.” John of kitchen
fame had a Santa hat that bobbed
like a spring. Got a photo of him,
too. Connie had the most amusing
hat on hat day. It wa a big, thick
snowman. I took a photo.
Thank you, Karen Meyer, my sis-
ter’s granddaughter, for the pretty
Christmas card with the nativity
scene. Thank you, Vinnie and
Danny, for your wise card of pho-
tos. Vinnie and Danny learned
from their cat to keep calm and
comfy.
The Rapid City Journal reported
that local bird watchers spotted 61
different species in a recent bird
county, among them a hooded mer-
ganser, a sharp-tailed grouse, a
male belted kingfisher and red-
breased nuthatch.
At 5:00 p.m. at Somerset Court,
we all went down to the dining
room for the Monette family pizza
party. There were many varieties
for residents and staff to enjoy.
Thank you to the Monette family.
Ryan Love, our director, thanked
them with a nice speech and also
read one of Ken Monette’s recent
poems, entitled “The Visitor.” It
was sweet and sentimental about
how much we appreciate visitors
from our past so we can reminisce.
I hope to include his three poems
on these pages soon.
Wednesday, December 19, we
had resident gift exchange for en-
tertainment in the afternoon.
Many lovely gifts were unwrapped
and a social time with refresh-
ments was enjoyed.
In the evening, carolers from the
Lutheran church came to Somerset
Court and sang in the front lobby
to us. Thank you, your music was
lovely.
My great-granddaughter, Mi-
randa Littlefield, announced her
wedding to T.J. Rose on May 8,
2013, at Bozeman, Mont. Best
wishes to the young couple.
Thank you to Kenneth and Mary
Hansen, Wall, for your pretty
Christmas card. Thank you to my
niece, Wanda, and her husband, Ed
Artz, Humboldt, for your pretty
card and year end letter. Again, I
will remind you all to please put
your address on your card, so I can
throw away the envelopes. That
cuts down on the bulk of stored
Christmas cards. Over the years,
they can be measured in cubic feet!
Thanks to Ravellette Publications,
Philip, for your kind greeting.
December 21, at Somerset Court,
residents were entertained by a
group from the Wild Kingdom pre-
school and kindergarten bunch
who sang and pantomimed for us.
Thank you for your songs and also
for the very nice treats you
brought. Dutch and Billie Stevens
are parents of one of the teachers.
We had a rerun of “White Christ-
mas” and it was even better than
on Monday. Thanks to Jason who
got my TV working so I could
watch Monk Reruns on Friday
evening.
The mail was loaded, a photo cal-
endar from my grandson, Mike,
and wife Christine and twins,
Owen and Ella, who are going on
four. Thank you kids.
Philip nieghbor, Dalene Baye,
sent a nice note and a bunch of for-
ever stamps. Thanks, Darlene. Rita
and Glen O’Connell, near neigh-
bors when I lived in Philip, sent
their Christmas letter. Thank you,
Glen and Rita. They have moved to
a new house out southwest of
Philip, as near as I can figure out.
I wonder who will live in their “old
house?” The staff at the bank sent
a nice card signed by a few employ-
ees. Thanks, beats keeping all my
money under the mattress.
My son, Hans P. Hansen,
painted a Merry Christmas to Vi-
vian and neighbors. Thank you
Sunday, December 23, at Somer-
set Court, we had non-denomina-
tional church services with Rev.
Richardson. Jack Humke played
the piano for some Christmas
hymn singing. Rev. Richardson had
an adventure last week, a car ran
into his car. If he had not had a
quick inkling, (message from
above) to accelerate, he would have
been injured much worse. As it
was, the car hit his car behind the
driver’s seat. So he was thankful,
and felt that he had had divine in-
terference. Remember, God is with
us. Rev. Richardson reminds us to
beware of rushing around shop-
ping. Relax, remember that we ar
celebrating the birth of Christ.
My granddaughter, Holly
(Hansen) Maudsley, and son
Asher, Woodbury, Minn., are visit-
ing in Rapid City. Holly, Asher and
M.R., Barbara and Willow Hansen
joined Vivian Hansen for lunch
Sunday. Thank you for your visit
and for your photos.
My son, David, Ft. Pierre, and
Cecelia, his two-year-old grand-
daughter, came to visit at Somerset
Court. David’s wife, Janet, had
made me a beautiful white angel
tree topper, solidly machine em-
broidered. Thank you.
Wilma Keene, Somerset Court
resident, planned to spend Christ-
mas at Hot Springs with her
daughter and family.
Whist was the entertainment
Sunday afternoon. Irene Cox and
Irene Arbach stood off Margaret
Jacobs and Ina Oerlline.
West Central Electric’s January
2013 Cooperative Connections re-
meinds us that just because elec-
tricity is so cheap and so easy to
use, we should not waste it. We
should use it economically. Con-
sider off-peak usage of high watt
users such as dishwashers and dry-
ers. Consider a reasonable amount
of Christmas lighting. Turn off the
lights. Close the refrigerator door.
PROFIT DEADLINE:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd
issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
You are invited to a Wedding Dance for
Amanda Fitzgerald
(daughter of Dean & Janice Fitzgerald)
and Rusty Bair
Saturday, December 29th at 8:00 p.m.
American Legion Hall, Philip
Fundraiser … Every Sunday
in January & February!!
Starting at 7:00 a.m.
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center, Downtown Philip
Hosted by Philip Masonic Lodge #153
Pancakes,
Biscuits &
Gravy will be
served!
GeorGe’s
Welding & Repair
• DOT Inspection
• Complete Trailer Repair
• Full Line of Bearings & Seals
• Tractor Front End & Spindles
• Selling New Steel
• Recycling Outlet
• Refrigration & A/C on Commercial,
Residential & Vehicles
• ACCEPTING APPLIANCES
George: 441-3607 • Lee: 441-3606
Dennis
859-2970 • Philip
Please join us for a
Bridal Shower honoring
Bradi Porch
Friday, January 4th
6:30 p.m. at the
Roger & Lois Porch home (Philip)
Hosted by her Bridal Party
January 4-5-6-7:
Life of Pi (PG)
January 11-12-13-14:
The Hobbitt (PG-13)
January 18-19-20-21:
Jack Kreacher (PG-13)
January 25-26-27-28:
This Is 40 (R)
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
December 28-29-30-31
Playing For Keeps (PG13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Scentsy
Haakon/Jackson County 4-H Club
Church & Community Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Lois Hall______________________
Lois Hall, 84, of Stanley County,
S.D., passed away, Tuesday, De-
cember 18, 2012, at Dougherty
Hospice House in Sioux Falls.
Services were held Saturday,
December 22, at Lutheran Memo-
rial Church. Interment will follow
at Scotty Philip Cemetery in Fort
Pierre.
Lois M. Hall was born April 13,
1928, in Jones County to Charlie
and Mary (Shimmin) Wilson. She
attended rural school through the
eighth grade and graduated from
Midland High School. She at-
tended Black Hills Teachers Col-
lege where she received her Mas-
ters in Education and taught
kindergarten through eighth
grades in rural Stanley County for
30+ years.
Lois was united in marriage to
Frank L. Hall, on May 23, 1950, in
Rapid City. They ranched north-
east of Midland. Lois was a mem-
ber of Victory Club, Midland Mu-
seum, Midland Community Li-
brary and Old Stanley County His-
torical Society. Lois enjoyed read-
ing local history, gardening, look-
ing at the livestock – cattle and
horses, and most of all spending
time with family and friends.
Lois is survived by two daugh-
ters, Ronda (Lawrence) Schofield
and Charlotte Hall, both of Mid-
land; one son, Richard (Arlette)
Hall of Fort Pierre; seven grand-
children and 10 great-grandchil-
dren.
Lois was preceded in death by
her husband, Frank, her parents
and one step-grandson.
Condolences may be conveyed to
the family at www.feigumfh.com
Delbert Sebade__________________
Delbert Sebade, age 95, of Wall,
S.D., died Sunday, December 23,
2012, at his home in Wall.
Delbert James Sebade was born
on September 16, 1917, on Bull
Creek, west of Wall, the son of
Henry and Anna (Mooney) Sebade.
He attended school in Wall, grad-
uating from Wall High School in
1935. After high school he moved
to Chillicothe, Mo., where he re-
ceived training at a business
school.
After traveling to Nebraska with
a piston out of their ’35 Plymouth,
Delbert and his soon-to-be wife,
Armista Ronning, stopped and
picked up a marriage license. After
adding one year on to her age, and
two marriage licenses later, Del-
bert and Armista were married on
November 15, 1941. To this union
were born four children, Sandra,
Norbert, Rosalind and Marsha.
Since 1963 they have made their
home in Wall.
Delbert had a lifetime of work in
the banking business. He joined
the U.S. Army on November 23,
1942, where he served in the in-
fantry in Northern France,
Rhineland and Central Europe. He
was honorably discharged on Octo-
ber 26, 1945.
Delbert was active in civic, busi-
ness, fraternal and social organiza-
tions.
Survivors include four children,
Sandra (Everett) Lerew of Valley,
Neb., Norbert (Jane) Sebade of
Rapid City, Rosalind Ham of Hud-
son, Colo., and Marsha Lytle of
Reva; 10 grandchildren; 17 great-
grandchildren; two sisters, Bernice
Anderson and Edith Paulson, both
of Wall; and one brother, Norman
Sebade of Puyallup, Wash.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Henry and Anna Sebade;
his wife, Armista Sebade; his sis-
ter, Eunice Johnson; his brother,
Dayton Sebade; and his grand-
daughter, Kimberly Cluff.
Visitation will be held from 5:00
to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, Decem-
ber 27, at the Rush Funeral
Chapel in Wall, and one hour pre-
ceding the services on Friday.
Services will be held at 10:00
a.m. Friday, December 28, at the
United Methodist Church in Wall,
with Pastor Darwin Kopfmann of-
ficiating.
Interment with military honors
will be held at the Wall Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Friday and just five more days
till Christmas. And I still have
some cards on my table! Where
does time go? It couldn’t be that I
don’t want to admit that I am slow-
ing up, could it? I can remember
when I was a kid and there just
was no money for gifts, so we set-
tled for a great meal. Mom seemed
to have found enough money from
the cream check to buy a turkey
and we raised pigs, so we always
had a roast pork ham. And we
would have sour cream chocolate
cake and Jello with several fruits
in it, pumpkin and apple pie,
mashed potatoes, candied baked
sweet potatoes, corn and green
beans, plus baked beans. And we
would have lettuce and apple
salad.
I really don’t know where they
put everyone in the house, as it was
not that big. It was not uncommon
to have 30 people there to eat with
us. For many years Sam Kirk-
patrick would make it back for
Christmas. So this Christmas take
some time to remember your fa-
vorite Christmas and have a good
one this year.
Bill and Jane Gottsleben’s kids
are all home from school and col-
lege to spend the holidays. Bill and
Jane will be hosting the family for
Christmas Eve. The kids will be
home until January 2.
Marvin and Vicki Eide and Cliff
and Rita Ramsey enjoyed a Christ-
mas dinner at the Philip Nursing
Home with Dorothy Urban
Wednesday, December 19. The
Ramseys had been visited by the
flu for several days in the last few
weeks, so they were glad to be up
and about again.
Chuck and Shirley O’Connor en-
joyed a trip to Las Vegas this past
week. Shirley said that she had
Donna Newman fill in for her on
her bowling league.
Friday, Donna Newman had
many folks at her home. And Sun-
day, Donna hosted Christmas din-
ner Sunday for Warren and Shirley
Sweezy, Glenn, Dianne, Morgan
and Kayla Parsons, (Chelsie wasn’t
able to be there as they were going
to her husband’s family for the hol-
idays this year.) Shayla and Je-
remy, Donna’s brother, Roger and
Becky Buhmann, and Debbie and
Mike Clements, (except Caleb who
had other plans). Donna helps with
release time at Redeemer Lutheran
Church, as does Sharon Hemming-
son and Katie Schultz. The church
had their annual Christmas dinner
and program Sunday. She reported
that the parents and grandparents
had a great day.
Kieth Smith took his wife, Deb-
bie, to Rapid City for a birthday
dinner Friday, December 14. Then
on Saturday evening, they went to
Ray and Donna Smith’s to watch
the rodeo finals. Sunday, Kieth and
Debbie attended the children’s
Christmas program at the United
Church.
Pat and Mary Lou Guptill were
at Kieth and Debbie Smith’s for cof-
fee and visiting.
Lincoln Smith arrived home
from Aberdeen Tuesday, December
18. He is staying at Tucker’s and
later will move into the Ted Knut-
son’s house when Carrie Buchholz
moves out. We lose one neighbor
and gain another. It seems that the
Knutson home has not been vacant
since Esther moved to Philip, Es-
ther told me she always had
Christmas there and it will be dif-
ferent this year as they are all
going to Steve and Vickie’s home
for Christmas.
Kieth and Tucker attended the
Mason meeting in Philip this week
and Lincoln plans to join the Ma-
sons as soon as he gets settled. Cas-
sidy and two girls are coming early
for the Christmas holiday and will
be here to help Debbie get ready for
Christmas. Kieth and Debbie are
hosting both Christmas Eve and
Christmas night suppers.
Stephanie (Smith) and Lance
Fountain and two boys have been
visiting Rich Smith and family.
They have rented a home in the
Rapid City area and she will be
spending time with her brothers,
the Ravellettes, and visiting and
touring the Black Hills over the
holidays.
Barb and Mike Coy are arriving
this weekend for their Christmas
with her dad, Rich. They will spend
the rest of the holidays with their
daughter and family.
Don and Donna Olivier left this
week to go to Corsica to visit her
family and have Christmas with
them. They planned to return Fri-
day.
Jerry (Olivier) and Joel Spry had
a baby girl and they have named
her Aven. She joins two sisters.
Herb and Hazel Sieler and Phyl-
lis Coleman enjoyed a Christmas
party that was hosted by Heather
Gabriel and her friend, Terry E.
They stated that they had yummy
good. Hazel and Phyllis also took
along some treats to share. Sielers
have been kept close to home due
to entertaining the flu, so no more
news from their house.
I didn’t find Bob Thorson at
home, so news from him this week.
Don and Deloris Poss plan to go
to Clifford’s for Christmas Eve oth-
erwise no news from their place.
I have enjoyed so many nice
cards and have gotten so many
Grindstone News
by Mary Eider • 859-2188
family pictures this year. It is eas-
ier to get pictures with all the new
technology. I didn’t write a Christ-
mas letter this year and those
whom I sent cards to get the Philip
paper and so can read all my news
in there. Those who don’t get the
paper, I just wrote a few lines in
their card. I also had some pictures
this year to send, but some will get
theirs late.
Conventional people are roused to
fury by departures from convention,
largely because they regard such de-
partures as criticism of them-
selves. – Bertrand Russell
Hope everyone has a great
Christmas and a safe trip going and
coming. In hearing the weather re-
port, sounds like it is going to be
wintery weather, so drive careful.
Ravellette Publications Inc.
5 …
4 …
3 …
2 …
1 …
HAPPY
NEW
YEAR!
Thank you for all your support and for
giving us so much to celebrate this year.
Coyle’s
New Year’s Eve Regular Hours: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Closed New Year’s Day
Ronnie & Dawn
Coyle &
Employees
Help us raise funds for the
Ronald McDonald House!
We’ll place Pink Flamingos in the yard
of your choice!
The recipient may donate
to have them removed by calling:
Haakon Co. Extension Office: 859-2840
Nicki Nelson: 308-862-1051 (cell)
Nancy Haigh: 859-2888
Tri-County
Ranchers Workshop
The Tri-County Ranchers Work-
shop will be held Wednesday, Jan-
uary 16, at the Winner Regional
Extension Center in Winner, SD,
beginning with registration at 9:30
am, CST. Dr. Barry Dunn, Dean of
the College of Agriculture and Bi-
ological Sciences, SDSU is sched-
uled to emcee the event, and share
some thoughts about SDSU, SDSU
Extension and how the University
serves farmers and ranchers dur-
ing the noon break.
The topics and speakers were
selected to address issues facing
ranchers dealing with the linger-
ing effects of the 2012 drought, but
should be of interest to anyone in
the ranching business over the
long term.
Starting the program will be
Jim Krantz, Extension Cow/Calf
Field Specialist, discussing
CHAPS and Record Keeping.
CHAPS is a computerized per-
formance testing system that was
originally developed in the early
1990’s in North Dakota. North
Dakota State University is collab-
orating with SDSU to revamp the
program to better fit the needs of
today’s cattlemen.
The next speaker will be Adele
Harty, Extension Cow/Calf Field
Specialist, providing information
on Livestock Nutrition and Water
Quality. The 2012 drought re-
quired producers to get creative in
securing enough feed to maintain
their cow herds, and may be deal-
ing with feedstuffs they are not
used to dealing with. Water was
also a major concern, and an im-
portant part of a ranching opera-
tion.
Finishing up the morning will
be Pete Bauman, Extension Range
Field Specialist, outlining some in-
novative ideas for Rangeland
Water Development. Lunch will be
served at no charge to partici-
pants, courtesy of area Conserva-
tion Districts and agri-businesses.
After lunch, Laura Edwards, Ex-
tension Climate Field Specialist
will provide a Weather Update and
outlook for 2013, and Matt
Diersen, Extension Risk Manage-
ment Specialist, will outline the
Market situation in the cattle in-
dustry.
For more information, contact
your local NRCS office; Winner –
842-0603, Burke – 775-9122, Ken-
nebec – 869-2216, or the Winner
Regional Extension Center – 842-
1267. The Winner Regional Exten-
sion Center is located at 325 S
Monroe St., Winner, SD, one block
south of the stop light on SD Hwy
18.
Calendar
1/04: Private Applicator Certifi-
cation meeting (PAT), 1:00 pm
MST, Sr. Citizens Ctr, Philip
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Rural Living
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
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10 cheers for 10 cheers for our our customers customers
9 rounds of applause, 8 smiles of gratitude, 7 nods of appreciation...
We’re
counting
down thanks
to all of the
great folks
we had the
privilege to
serve this
year.
We can’t
thank you
enough and
wish you a
wonderful
New Year.
West Central Electric
Cooperative, Inc.
A Touchstone Energy Cooperative
Santa Claus made it to the In-
galls house in De Smet, Dakota
Territory, even if the train bearing
supplies did not.
In The Long Winter, Laura In-
galls Wilder describes how she and
her family faced the hard winter of
1880-81.
That Christmas, small striped
packages by each place at the table
contained Christmas candy. There
were presents, too. Laura, her sis-
ter Carrie and Ma had combined
their money to purchase a pair of
blue suspenders for Pa.
Laura gave a cardboard hair re-
ceiver to Ma and a roll of knitted
lace to her sister Mary. She found
the prettiest card she had been
given in Sunday school and placed
it in a frame for Carrie.
Baby Grace tore the paper from
her gift to reveal a toy.
The two cans of oysters that Pa
had bought from the store were
combined with the last of the milk
the Ingalls’ cow gave to make a
Christmas dinner of oyster soup.
“‘Oh, what a lovely Christmas,’
Carrie sighed. Laura thought so
too.
Whatever happened, they could
always have a merry Christmas,”
Ingalls wrote in The Long Winter.
Christmas, whether one was a
pioneer in town, in the Army or a
homesteader, was observed on the
frontier, as evidenced in different
writings about the day.
In A Frontier Army Christmas
compiled by Lori A. Cox-Paul and
Dr. James W. Wengert, 1st Sgt.
Ragnar Theodor Ling-Vannerus of
the Seventh Cavalry wrote of his
camp’s holiday preparations at
Pine Ridge in 1890: “Every tent
was decorated with firs and twigs,
and long garlands of evergreens
were stretched between the tents.
At each end of the picket lines,
sheaves were put up … In the
kitchens everybody was busy;
turkeys and geese were roasted or
grilled and filled with apples and
other delicacies, whole pigs were
Ingalls family. Back row: from left to right ... Carrie, Laura and
Grace. Front row ...Caroline, Charles and Mary.
~Photo South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives
A merry prairie Christmas
hung on the broaches, pastries and
cakes were baked, and so on …
Eventually came the feast ea-
gerly longed-for, and mighty was
the drinking among high and low
… Along the walls there were low
seats covered with a mixed collec-
tion of skin rugs, in whose soft,
warm furs it was delightful to rest,
while speeches, toasts, and songs
made time unnoticeably go by.
There were also Christmas gifts
from near and far.”
In June 1909, 21-year-old Eliza-
beth Corey came to South Dakota
to stake out a claim, homestead
the land and to teach school.
She filed claim to land 10 miles
southwest of Pierre, along the Bad
River.
The letters she wrote to her fam-
ily in Iowa from 1909 to 1919 are
contained in the State Archives of
the South Dakota State Historical
Society at the Cultural Heritage
Center in Pierre. The letters are
the basis of Bachelor Bess.
Corey wrote of her first Christ-
mas as a homesteader, “I have
three Xmas presents. Mrs. Stone
gave me a beauty of a button box.
Myrtle gave me a pretty Xmas
card and Speers gave me an enam-
eled quart cup … Xmas day there
was lots of company and lots to do
so I never had time to get home-
sick. Just before supper Howard
hitched to the bobsleigh and we
went to take Ben Share some
Xmas goodies.”
All was not calm on Christmas
Day 1862 in Yankton, Dakota Ter-
ritory.
According to Christmas on the
American Frontier 1800-1900 by
John E. Baur, a brawl broke out
between a supporter of territorial
legislator J.B.S Todd and a backer
of territorial Governor William
Jayne. Todd’s supporter threw in
the towel and Jayne’s defender
broke the man’s thumb.
Politics and Christmas seldom
mix.
This year’s annual hunters breakfast, sponsored by the Philip Ambulance Service
in their building’s community room, resulted in approximately 250 people attend-
ing. The meal, a free will donation for pancakes and sausage, was held from 4:00
a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Saturday and Sunday, November 10-11, the first weekend of
the West River deer season. Proceeds will be used by the ambulance service for
needed equipment and training. Show are some of the ambulance crew servers.
From left, Karyl Sandal, Lee Vaughan and Gayle Rush. Courtesy photo
Philip Ambulance Service’s
hunters’ breakfast results
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture is hosting commer-
cial pesticide applicator certifica-
tion meetings this January and
February.
The goal of these meetings is to
insure the safe and effective stor-
age, handling, distribution, use and
disposal of pesticide products. Pes-
ticide applicators must take a test
to become initially certified, but
can recertify by attending one of
these meetings.
Once certified, commercial appli-
cators must obtain a license, which
is also valid for two years.
A commercial applicator license
is $25 and a recertification class is
$50. Applicator and dealer licenses
must be renewed by February 28,
2013, or a $50 late fee will be as-
sessed.
For times, dates and places of
the commercial applicator meet-
ings, visit https://apps.sd.gov/doa/
ecat3/ Appl i catorMeeti ngPro-
grams.htm. Please bring a govern-
ment issued photo identification
and your applicator license to the
meeting for check-in.
For more information on SDDA’s
pesticide program, visit http://sdda.
sd.gov/legacydocs/Ag_Services/Agr
onomy_Services_Programs/Pesti-
cide_Program/2011-07pesticide_
program_brochurewebopt.pdf.
Commercial applicator
certification meetings
Governor Dennis Daugaard has
extended an executive order to
haul overwidth baled livestock feed
until February 21, 2013, in South
Dakota.
The executive order states that,
upon receipt of a permit, permis-
sion is granted to move overwidth
baled livestock feed not exceeding
12 feet wide or 15 feet high for two
hours after sunset and two hours
before sunrise. The order allows
movement of overwidth baled live-
stock feed until cessation of the
drought emergency, or no later
than February 21.
Overwidth vehicles must be
equipped with flashing or rotating
white or amber warning lights on
each side of the load’s widest ex-
tremity. The warning lights must
be clearly visible to motorists ap-
proaching from the front and rear.
Movement under the executive
order is valid only for baled live-
stock feed.
“This year’s persistent drought
conditions have left livestock pro-
ducers across South Dakota with
inadequate feed supplies,” said
South Dakota Secretary of Agricul-
ture Walt Bones. “Increasing haul-
ing height and width restrictions
for baled hay will allow producers
to move feed in a more efficient
manner.”
The normal size restriction on
South Dakota highway loads is 14
feet, three inches high and eight
feet, six inches wide.
Although height and width re-
strictions for baled livestock feed
have been temporarily increased by
executive order, several highways
in the state have width and height
restrictions in place because of con-
struction or permanent structures
that cannot accommodate such
large loads. Truckers are encour-
aged to check their routes ahead of
time for those restrictions.
For information on permits, con-
tact a South Dakota port of entry or
call 800-637-3255.
Overwidth baled feed
hauling extended in S.D.
Greetings At
The New Year
Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company+/West Des
Moines, IA. Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance
Company+/West Des Moines, IA.
+Companies of Farm Bureau Financial Services
©2007 FBL Financial Group, Inc. 331
Before the festivities begin, we’d like to give you our best wishes
for a wonderful year filled with much cause for celebration.
We thank you for giving us so much to celebrate this past year
and look forward to your
continued business.
Remember to celebrate safely this New
Year’s Eve. Don’t drink and drive!
Glenn Parsons
110 S. Center
Philip, SD
(605) 859-2902
Dr. Jim Stangle
Heather, Linda & Jen
Milesville, SD
Dr. Jim McConaghy
Heather & Megan
Wall, sD
Before the calendar starts anew,
We’d like to extend our thanks to each one of you
For your friendship, goodwill and
loyalty, too
So we’re pouring a glass to say,
“cheers” to you!
Happy New Year to our many
good friends and neighbors.
We appreciate your choosing us
and look forward to
your continued support.
With all good wishes
to you & your family
for health & happiness
throughout the
coming year!
Mike & Shar Moses
& employees
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 7
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
www.pioneer-
review.com
You can tell Christmas is draw-
ing near as there are school Christ-
mas programs and school Christ-
mas meals, Christmas carols sung
and Christmas cards sent and
Merry Christmas greetings called
out here and there. We woke up to
some snow the other morning,
making it look like Christmas, as
well. Soon bells will be ringing in
the New Year, welcoming us to the
year 2013. A reminder of just how
quickly time flies! A reminder to
enjoy those unexpected blessings!
For those unexpected blessings are
memory makers!
For those of us who had the
privilege of attending rural schools,
Nancy Haigh’s article on rural
schools in this week’s Pioneer Re-
view, was an interesting read.
There’s just something special
about being a part of a country
school. Remember those softball
games at noon recess? With the
school bell ringing out that recess
was over, and kids calling out for a
bit more time to finish the game,
the teacher would oftentimes allow
it, as being a country school there
wasn’t another classroom heading
out for recess. Growing up in the
rural Deep Creek area, I’ve enjoyed
the articles on the Deep Creek
School, reopening after being
closed for seven years. In Nancy’s
article of rural schools, she had pic-
tures of, and wrote of, the Deep
Creek School renewing their an-
nual tradition of going out and cut-
ting down a Christmas tree. That’s
what I call one of those memory
makers!
Wednesday of this week was a
full evening. It began with the soup
supper benefit for Mary Parquet
held at St. William Catholic
Church. It just plain warmed a per-
son’s heart to see such a huge
crowd there. Mary and her hus-
band, Tom, have been on a journey
for the past four years, or more. A
journey of what lies ahead? With
doctor appointments, kidney dialy-
sis, Mary’s name on the kidney
donor list! As, Mary and I were vis-
iting at that benefit Wednesday
evening, I was truly moved, as she
shared some of that journey. With-
out a doubt, they believe God has
walked that journey with them.
And, little grandbaby girl, Reming-
ton, was an added plus to that jour-
ney. Those little ones have a way of
worming their way into your heart,
making you forget for a time, the
difficulties that can come on this
journey I call, “life.” Tom and Mary
have been an inspiration to others,
for sure. We pray Mary’s new kid-
ney continues to do well, and wish
them a Merry Christmas and a
good New Year.
The Midland School Christmas
program had a crowd of parents,
grandparents, and others as the
kids performed the play, “Yo-ho-ho
A Pirate’s Christmas.” Those little
ones were just the cutest in their
pirate costumes. Nicki Nelson is
the school aid, works some with
music, and worked with the stu-
dents in kindergarten-eighth grade
on this Christmas program. There
were 22 children in the pirate’s
Christmas program which included
pre-school, as well. Ella Schofield,
daughter of Lucas and Bridget
Schofield, celebrated her fourth
birthday that day, so all the kids
sang “Happy Birthday.” Santa
made his usual stop with Christ-
mas gifts for all the kids. And, a
sack full of goodies and a bright red
apple were given out to the rest. It
was a cute program!
Thursday was the community
Christmas meal at the Midland
School. Amiee Block is the school
cook and had ham, potato casserole
and decorated sugar cookies as
part of the menu. With parents and
grandparents, and anyone else who
wanted to come for that meal, there
was a larger crowd then usual. So
Jenna Finn and Katie Sammons
were Aimee’s helpers. Music direc-
tor, Ben Latham, of the Kadoka
Area school, came from Kadoka
that day with his Midland students
entertaining the folks with Christ-
mas carols.
We were saddened to learn that
Lois (Wilson) Hall of rural Midland
passed away, with her funeral
being in Pierre Saturday morning.
Lois was one of those people who
enjoyed history, knew a lot of local
history, had a unique sense of
humor, was a rural school teacher
for many years, and was just plain
interesting, as she shared stories of
going to school in Midland, gradu-
ating with the Class of 1946. Lois’
mother, Mary Wilson, and my
aunt, Esther Schanzenbach, would
visit in the basement of this home
on Main St. in Pierre. The menfolk
would go to the cattle sale and Es-
ther and Mary wpuld spend the af-
ternoon visiting. Mom, Phil and I
went to that basement to see Es-
ther one time. If memory serves me
correctly, you went down the steps
to that basement apartment on the
outside of the building. I remember
it being nice and cozy on a cold win-
ter’s day. With each of those folks,
such as Lois, a big part of our his-
tory goes with them. Our sincere
sympathies to the family of Lois
Hall.
I visited a bit with Larry Venner
of Pierre this Friday morning, ask-
ing how Alice is doing. Larry and
Alice had just gotten back from a
bit of an outing. There is just some-
thing about getting out of the house
for a bit, that makes a person feel
better. Larry reported that Alice is
getting some weaker, her eyesight
has been affected, and her voice is
weaker making it more difficult to
talk, but that she continues to be
without pain, for which they are
thankful. Anyone who knows Alice,
knows how much she enjoys visit-
ing, her ready laugh, her love for
life. For them each day is gift, with
the future for Alice being uncer-
tain, they cherish this precious
time with family and friends. Their
faith in a loving, caring God is an
important part of their journey.
Our prayers continue to be with
them!
Don and Sally Ehlers have a
new great-grandson! Brody James
was born December 19 to Tyler and
Stephanie Gisi, Newcastle, Wyo.,
weighing 9 lbs. 13 oz. He has twin
five-year-old sisters, Madison and
Alexis. Proud grandparents are
Marty and Cheryl Hook, Mobridge.
Congratulations!
Karel Reiman was in Rapid City
once again as her 93-year-old
mother, Goldie Eisenbraun, has
been in the Rapid City hospital.
Goldie was being moved from the
hospital to the Clarkson Care Cen-
ter. Karel left for Rapid Wednesday
morning and she, her brother and
sister, Ed and Paula, Rapid, got
their mom settled in at Clarkson.
Karel arrived back home Thursday
evening and is busy getting things
ready for family coming home for
Christmas.
Tony and LaVon Nemec,
Gillette, Wyo., attended the funeral
service of Tony’s classmate and
friend, Andy Olesen, at Rockford,
Ill. Judy Fosheim rode to the fu-
neral service with Richard and
Celia Doud. Jack and LaVona Kir-
patrick, Hayes, and Arnold Gerton-
son and his wife of Colorado were
also at the funeral. Gene and Au-
drey Jones attended the service
and then drove to the home of their
daughter, Brenda Neiman, and
family at Verona, Wis., which is 90
miles from Rockford. Our sincere
sympathies to Andy’s family.
***
The senior citizens met at the
senior center December 14 for their
monthly meeting and potluck.
President Kandus Woitte called the
meeting to order and led in the
klag salute. The minutes of the No-
vember meeting were read and ap-
proved. The treasurer’s report was
given. George Stroppel moved to
approve and George Anderson sec-
onded and motion was approved.
One card was sent. The bulletin
board was done. No maintenance
was done. The meeting was ad-
journed.
Mickey Woitte, Secretary
It is 11:15 this Friday morning,
time to get my news in for next
week, as it was to be sent by noon
today. News is short this week, as
with news collected twice in one
week, folks haven’t done a whole
lot. They are busy getting ready for
family coming home for Christmas.
So I will close by wishing each of
you and very Merry Christmas and
a good New Year.
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDt CÞrgs1er Sebr1ng
Pouer £verg1Þ1ng, £oonom1oo1
N1oe C1eon Cor!
(continued from last week)
Kevin Neuhauser attended a
farm auction Saturday afternoon,
and that evening he and Mary at-
tended birthday gatherings for
Kathy (Marso) Harford as well as
Monte Whidby. Kevin and Mary
spent Saturday night in town, and
Sunday Kevin and fellow Shriners
had their annual fruit delivery to
local nursing homes. Kevin said
they will be in Miller next week-
end, celebrating the holidays with
the Schlecter families.
Bill and Polly Bruce went to
Rapid City last Thursday, and they
spent the night with David and
Robin Bruce in their new home.
Friday, Bill and Polly spent the day
with Dennis and Betty (Bruce)
Casey. Betty is Bill's sister, and she
now resides in a nursing home due
to her battle with Alzheimers.
Betty was able to go out to lunch
with Bill, Polly, and Dennis, and
they had an enjoyable time. Bill
and Polly spent Friday night with
David and Robin and headed back
to the ranch Saturday. When they
got home, they discovered that they
now have a new back door – an
early Christmas present, installed
by their son, Vince Bruce. What a
great surprise! There was no Mass
on Sunday, because their priest
was ill. Monday, Bill and Polly
were in Pierre, making arrange-
ments for their family Christmas
gathering to be held the weekend
after Christmas.
I spoke with Marge Briggs, and
she said her place is an "empty
well" as far as news is concerned
this week. But, she did want to
wish everyone a Merry Christmas
and Happy New Year. And she
wanted to remind folks that "giving
a present isn't the big thing. Re-
ceiving God's present is what is im-
portant. For unto us a Child is
born; unto us a Son is given."
Nels and Dorothy Paulson were
in Pierre last Wednesday deliver-
ing Christmas presents. Sunday,
Dorothy attended church – there
was a good crowd, and Julian and
Coreen Roseth served lunch. Nels
has taken advantage of the snow
cover to burn garbage that piled up
during the hot, dry weather.
Dorothy said they stored the
garbage in an empty bin, and it is
nice to have the trash gone! Mon-
day, Nels and Dorothy were in
Philip and Murdo on business.
Tuesday, they are planning to go to
Corsica to attend the Christmas
program at the nursing home
where Dorothy's sister, Wilma, re-
sides. Weather permitting, that is.
Reminder: Christmas services at
Deep Creek Church will be Sun-
day, December 23, at 5:00 p.m., fol-
lowed by a potluck meal. Everyone
is welcome.
Randy and I were in Union Cen-
ter Thursday to pick up some sup-
plies, and the fog was really thick!
We nearly drove past Union Cen-
ter, because we couldn't see it!
Dylan Neuhauser was here Satur-
day helping with some fencing and
welding projects. Saturday night,
we attended the birthday party for
Monte Whidby in Pierre. Monday,
Todd Mortenson and Ed Briggs
stopped by for some socializing and
cribbage playing.
This week, I am grateful for com-
munity halls, especially the Kirley
Hall and Hayes Hall. And I'm
grateful for those who work hard to
keep them maintained. The halls
serve as gathering places for our
area, and they are host to school
programs, community plays, BB
gun practice, 4-H club meetings,
crafting meetings and numerous
other events – all events that help
keep the communities intact! We
are truly fortunate to have the
buildings and the activities. In
cities, it isn't uncommon to not
even know the person on the other
side of your apartment wall or in
the house next door. That isn't the
case here, and I, for one, am glad.
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
The Midland Elementary School students, under the direction of Nicki Nelson, performed “Yo Ho Ho ~ A Pirate Christmas”
as their Christmas program. This musical production takes place on Captain Jake's pirate ship anchored offshore near the
Spanish Main just days before Christmas. The crew is swabbing the deck, tying up the ropes, polishing the brass and clean-
ing. The captain gets some new crew members who soon find out that this ship is different from most pirate ships. They
never rob and plunder, they only clean. The captain likes a tidy ship, and he does not like Christmas. Captain Jake comes
from a long line of pirates and that's what he thought he had to be. He discovered the rest of the pirates had decorated the
ship for Christmas. He also discovered that he was missing something about Christmas, and that he doesn't have to be a
pirate. The crew sails home to have the biggest Christmas party the seven seas has ever seen. Shown is the entire crew.
Courtesy photo
Midland school Christmas program
10, 9, 8 ...
Just seconds left to say thank you for your business
and wish you much success in the new year.
Happy
New Year!
Tyler & Angel
Nemec
& family
Roy Hunt
Cheers to a
New Year
like no other!
Thanks for your
business & see
you again soon!
Midland Food
& Fuel
This year is new,
but our wish is
the same, that we may
continue to serve you as we have in
the past … Thank you for your patronage!!
Have a happy, healthy, prosperous New Year!
Petoske Construction
Jim & Barb & family
The Happiest of
New Year’s …
to one and all!
May the fun
never end!
A&A Tire & Repair
Midland
Aaron & Angie Doolittle
& family
Thank you
for your
patronage.
May 2013
be prosperous!
Randy & Holly Nemec
Nemec Construction
Midland
Happy New Year!
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Community
Happy 2013
THf BfST lS YfT TO COMf!!
ARNfSON
AUCTl ON
Pl ROUTfk
AUCTl ON
… And three cheers for you,
our neighbors and friends.
We’re always proud to serve
you and wish you a very happy
and prosperous New Year.
Kemnitz Law Office
& Staff
To All Our Valued Customers
At Year’s End
Before another year begins, we’d like to lift up
our glasses and wish you a year that’s as
wonderful as you’ve been to us. Your goodwill
and generosity make it all worthwhile!
3B’s Heating & Cooling
Brian, Heather, Brock,
Brice & Taylor Hanson
Even when the party’s
over, friends like you
give us something to
celebrate all year
through.
Happy New Year
and many thanks!
Jason & Marlis Petersen
& employees
A New Year is Dawning
Hope You Have
A Blast!
Happy New Year 2013!
Lurz Plumbing
C&D Storage
C&D Flood &
Smoke Restoration
THREE ROUNDS
OF CHEER
for our customers,
friends and
families. We had
a prosperous year
and we owe it all
to you.
Thanks so much
for your continued
support and have
a Happy New
Year.
MIDWEST
COOPERATIVES
PhiIip &
Kadoka
The Gem Theatre was visited by Santa and Mrs. Claus, December 20, after the
free movie “Little Brother, Big Trouble: a Christmas Adventure.” Children of all
ages visited with the two jolly characters, received candy canes, and some even
sat on Santa’s lap. Shown above are, from left, Jasmine, Luke, Aisha and Ethan
Ferguson. Below is Samantha Fillingim with Santa.
Santa and Mrs. Claus
at Philip’s Gem theatre
More from
the
Parade
of Trees!
Milesville Community Club
Haakon County Public Library
Philip Health Services Inc. Auxiliary
Philip Ambulance Service
National Mutual Benefit
First National Agency
Cattle Business Weekly
Here’s to a new year that’s
overflowing with health,
happiness and harmony.
We appreciate your filling us
with so much joy this past year.
Cheers!
73– Saloon
Motel West
Doug & JoAnn West & Employees
I
n
g
r
a
m
H
a
r
d
w
a
r
e
8
5
9
-
2
5
2
1
D
o
w
n
t
o
w
n
P
h
i
l
i
p
To all of the
people we have
had the pleasure
to serve this year,
we say thank
you and wish
you all the best
in the New Year.
Time to celebrate!
Best wishes for a
healthy, happy 2013
to all of our
customers & friends!!
Coyle’s Standard
Mark, Denise & family
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
SPECIAlS:
Wednesday: Mr. Rib & Fries
Thursday: Taco Salad
Friday: Chicken Fajita Wrap & Fries
Saturday: Swiss Bacon Chicken Fillet & Fries
* * * * * *
SUNDAY SPECIAl:
Swedish Meatballs
with Mashed Potatoes, Salad Bar & Dessert
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports
Wishing you thc
vcry bcst this ycar
has to offcr.
1/ S/.//a « Laa,
Da « D/// C.·/j
« Eoo/j
Jhc
Countdown
Is Òn!
Philip Motor, inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2010 Dodge 2500
Diesel, SLT, Short Box
www.philipmotor.com
Give Ryan a call today!
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt..............................35-13
Kennedy Imp.......................28.5-19.5
George’s Welding ......................26-22
Philip Motor..............................26-22
G&A Trenching...................22.5-25.5
Kadoka Tree Service...........18.5-29.5
Bear Auto..................................18-30
Philip Health Service .........17.5-30.5
Highlights:
Cory Boyd ............5-7 split; 201, 238,
...............................................200/639
Matt Schofield.......................204/578
Bill Bainbridge ......8-9 & 3-10 splits;
.....................................223 clean/564
Tony Gould...................................559
Ronnie Williams....................202/550
Alvin Pearson........................212/537
Jerry Iron Moccasin .....3-7 split; 537
Todd Radway ........................232/533
Terry Wentz .................................522
Wendell Buxcel ............................512
James Mansfield ........3-10 split; 507
Earl Park......................................506
Ed Morrison .................................504
Jim Larson..........................3-10 split
Colt Terkildsen.....................2-7 split
Steve Varner.........................4-9 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm....................................4-0
Bowling Belles ..............................3-1
Invisibles.......................................3-1
Jolly Ranchers ..............................1-3
Cutting Edge Salon ......................0-4
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........................182/472
Shirley Parsons.....................176/423
Deb Neville............................167/397
Donna King ...........................164/453
Debbie Gartner....9-10 split; 161/416
Joyce Hicks ........4-5 x 2, & 2-7 splits
Have a Happy New Year!
Brant’s Electric
Brant & Lee Lance, Kelli, Brodi & Carter
Good customers.
Good neighbors.
Good friends.
It’s been a very
good year and we
have you to thank,
so please accept
our gratitude and
best wishes for a
very healthy, and
happy New Year.
KONST MACHINE & WElDINg
Jeff, Lori, Jade & Jaslyn Konst
Rudy, Jim & Jace
Scotties maul Kougars 89-32
Philip’s Quade Slovek made a physical statement, that under no uncertain terms,
the ball was in his possession. The Philip Scotties strong-armed Kadoka 89-32.
Photo by Robyn Jones
The Philip Scotties boys’ basket-
ball team not only defeated the
Kadoka Area Kougars on the
Kougars’ home court, Monday, De-
cember 17, but did so in an over-
whelming and resounding fashion.
The game was a non-district
match, with the Scotties aligned in
District 14B, and the Kougars in
District 13B basketball.
The first quarter was obviously
lopsided in Philip’s favor. The Scot-
ties racked up 23 points and al-
lowed only two points by the
Kougars.
The second quarter was pretty
much a repeat, at least offensively,
with Philip gaining another 21
points. Defensively, the Scotties al-
lowed 11 points to be put on the
scoreboard by their opponents.
The second half was a continua-
tion of the run-away action. Philip
stacked up another 29 points, while
Kadoka fought for another eight.
The final quarter saw just a little
mercy from the Scotties. Philip
eased another 16 points onto the
scoreboard, while Kadoka showed
its best quarter by fighting for 11
points. Philip accepted the 57 ad-
vantage in the victory over Kadoka
Area.
1 2 3 4
Philip 23 44 73 89
Kadoka 2 13 21 32
Field goals: 21/58 – 36%.
Free throws: Philip – 17/27 – 63%,
Kadoka – 6/9 – 67%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 10/18 –
56%.
Philip scorers: Thomas Dolittle –
18, Tristen Rush – 16, Nelson Holman –
14, Blake Martinez, Brody Jones and
Wyatt Schaack – 7 each, Tate DeJong –
6, Paul Guptill – 5, Gunner Hook – 4,
Quade Slovek – 3, Cassidy Schnabel –
2.
Kadoka Area scorers: Kenar Van-
derMay – 10, Chris Anderson – 8,
Shane Ring – 5, True Buchholz – 4,
Kahler Addison – 3, Logan Chris-
tensen – 2.
Rebounds: Philip – 47. Philip lead-
ers: Rush and DeJong – 8 each,
Schaack – 6, Doolittle – 4, Holman,
Martinez, Jones and Hook – 3 each,
Schnabel, Guptill and Slovek – 2 each,
Gavin Brucklacher, Kruse Bierle and
Ben Stangle – 1 each.
Assists: 14. Leaders: Holman and
Rush – 3 each, Martinez and Doolittle –
2 each, DeJong, Brucklacher and
Hook – 1 each.
Steals: 18. Leaders: Martinez – 4,
Hook – 3, Holman, Rush, Doolittle,
Brucklacher and Schaack – 2 each, De-
Jong –1.
Blocks: 5. Leaders: Martinez – 3,
Hook – 2.
Turnovers: 14.
Fouls: Philip – 12, Kadoka –20.
The Philip junior varsity, with
help from seven players who later
played during the varsity game,
also handily defeated their Kadoka
opponents. Though the Philip of-
fense was not quite as devastating,
the defense was just as unforgiv-
ing. In the final quarter, the Scot-
ties allowed Kadoka to claim only
two points.
1 2 3 4
Philip 21 32 54 65
Kadoka 4 15 21 23
Field goals: 22/62 – 36%.
Free throws: Philip – 15/28 – 54%,
Kadoka – 7/11 – 64%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 2/12 –
17%.
Philip scorers: Jones – 15, Martinez –
11, Stangle – 9, Brucklacher – 7, Jacob
Kammerer – 5, Bierle, Jace Giannonatti
and Sam Stangle – 4 each, Schaack, Todd
Antonsen and Ryan Van Tassel – 2 each.
Kadoka Area scorers: Yuki Hot-
sumi – 7, Wyatt Enders – 4, Aaron Janis –
3, Brendon Porch, Zack Stone, Sam Pretty
Bear and Emery Little Thunder – 2.
Rebounds: Philip – 42. Philip leaders:
Bierle – 7, Guptill – 6, Schaack – 5,
Jones – 4, Martinez and Van Tassel – 3
each, B. Stangle, Chase Wright, Gian-
nonatti, Garrett Snook, S. Stangle and
Keegan Burnett – 2 each, Brucklacher and
Antonsen – 1 each.
Assists: 5. Leaders: Martinez – 2,
Jones. Schaack and Burnett – 1 each.
Steals: 27. Leaders: Jones – 7, Mar-
tinez , Brucklacher and B. Stangle – 3
each, Bierle, Guptill, Giannonatti, Kam-
merer and Van Tassel – 2 each, Schaack –
1.
Blocks: 7. Leaders: Martinez and
Bierle – 2 each, Brucklacher, Schaack and
Giannonatti – 1 each.
Turnovers: 5.
Fouls: Philip – 16, Kadoka –23.
The next Scotties’ game will be
Friday, January 4, in Murdo versus
the Jones County Coyotes, starting
at 5:30 p.m.
The Bison Lady Cardinals
hosted the Philip Lady Scotties
basketball team, Thursday, De-
cember 20.
Philip could put in only one bas-
ket, and that a free throw, the en-
tire first quarter. Starting in the
second quarter, though, the Scot-
ties grabbed the lead and never let
go. Though a continuous barrage of
111 attempted field goal shots,
Philip sank 20 for an average of 18
percent. This barrage was made
possible by the team’s 37 steals and
three players getting rebounds in
the double digits. At the final
buzzer, the Scotties had more than
doubled their opponent’s score, for
a clear 48-19 win.
1 2 3 4
Philip 1 19 35 48
Bison 5 9 14 19
Field goals: 20/111 – 18%.
Philip scorers: Bailey Radway – 17,
Jordyn Dekker – 14, Madison Hand – 8,
Krista Wells – 7, Katie Hostutler – 3,
Holly Iwan and Katlin Knutson – 2 each.
Bison top scorers: Sydney Arneson –
7, Kiana Brockel – 4.
Rebounds: Philip – 56. Bison – 20.
Philip leaders: Hand and Radway – 16
each, Dekker – 13, Brett Carley – 5,
Hanna Hostutler – 3, Justina Cvach – 2,
Iwan and Knutson – 1 each.
Assists: 9. Leaders: Knutson – 5, Hand
and Dekker – 1 each.
Steals: 37. Leaders: Hand – 8, H. Hos-
tutler and Dekker – 6 each, Radway – 5,
Iwan and Knutson – 2.
Blocks: 4. Leaders: Radway, H. Hos-
tutler, Cvach and Dekker – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 26, Bison – 33.
Fouls: Philip – 16.
The Philip junior varsity began
their game by shutting out their
opponents in the first quarter.
They allowed only four points by
Bison in the second quarter, none
in the third, and only one in the
fourth quarter. Philip averaged 10
points per quarter, for a devastat-
ing 40-5 victory.
1 2 3 4
Philip 12 20 31 40
Bison 0 4 4 5
Field goals: 16/70 – 23%.
Three-point goals: 0/04 – 0%.
Philip top scorers: K. Hostutler – 10,
Knutson – 7, Carley – 6, Ellie Coyle and
Ashton Reedy – 4 each, Megan Williams,
Ta’Te Fortune and Peyton DeJong – 2
each, Kaci Olivier – 1.
Bison top scorers: Tessa Kopren and
Marranda Hulm – 2 each.
Rebounds: Philip – 40, Bison – 24.
Philip leaders: Cvach – 8, K. Hostutler –
6, Carley – 5, Olivier, Knutson and
Reedy – 4 each, Coyle and DeJong – 3
each, H. Hostutler, Fortune and Tyana
Gottsleben – 1 each..
Assists: 7. Leaders: Olivier and Coyle –
2 each, Carley, H. Hostutler and Knut-
son. – 1 each.
Steals: 34. Leaders: Oliver and H. Hos-
tutler – 6 each, K. Hostutler and Knut-
son – 5 each, Carley and Cvach – 4 each,
Coyle – 2, Reedy and Gottsleben – 1 each.
Blocks: 16. Leaders: Carley – 5, K.
Hostutler – 3, Knutson and Cvach – 2
each, Coyle, Reedy, Gottsleben and De-
Jong – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 15, Bison – 24.
Fouls: 14.
Lady Scotties bite Bison 48-19
Thomas Doolittle and Tate De-
Jong have been chosen as semifi-
nalists for the Coca Cola Scholars
scholarship program.
From 111,000 applicants, 2000
students were chosen as semi-final-
ists. Of those, only 11 are from
South Dakota. From these semi-fi-
nalists, 250 students will be chosen
for a $10,000 or $20,000 scholar-
ship.
The official notification letters
received by Doolittle and DeJong
included, “You have been selected
as a semifinalist in the Coca-Cola
Scholars Program. Because so few
of the total number of applicants
(nearly 111,000) for the Coca-Cola
Scholars program are advanced as
semifinalists, we consider this an
outstanding achievement. As one of
2,000 semifinalists, we hope that
you see your selection as affirma-
tion of your ability to distinguish
yourself academically and person-
ally.”
The next step for the Philip High
School students was to download,
complete and submit the semifinal-
ist forms. This gave them an oppor-
tunity to elaborate further on the
activities and accomplishments ref-
erenced in their initial applica-
tions.
Notification informing them of
the reading committee’s decision
will be mailed in early February.
Those selected as Coca-Cola Schol-
ars must attend the Coca-Cola
Scholars Weekend, April 18-21,
2013, at the Scholars Foundation's
expense during which time they
will be interviewed for one of 50
National Scholar awards of
$20,000. The remaining 200 schol-
ars will receive regional scholar
awards valued at $10,000.
Two local finalists for
Coca Cola scholarship
AARP/Retired Teachers Association
City of Philip
Cradles to Crayons Day Care
Riders and Racers 4-H Club
Deer hunters who have unfilled
antlerless deer tags for the West
River and East River deer seasons
will have nine additional days
available to harvest antlerless deer
beginning December 29 and ending
January 6.
Tom Kirschenmann, South
Dakota Game Fish and Parks ter-
restrial chief, reminds hunters to
be aware of the regulation change
from the past several years.
“Over the past several seasons,
‘any deer’ tags have converted to
‘antlerless’ tags for the extended
season,” Kirschenmann said. “That
is not the case this year. Only un-
filled ‘antlerless’ tags will be valid
during the late season.”
The changes were made as part
of deer herd management objec-
tives to direct additional antlerless
harvest in the areas of the state
that need it most while curtailing
the doe harvest in areas where it is
not needed.
Anterless deer only season
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 10
Youth in our Community
May your world be lled
with warmth, joy
& good cheer …
Wishing you a
Happy New Year!
Philip Motor, Inc.
Happy new Year from Dr. ron & Laurie Mann & staff
Happy new Year from Dr. ron & Laurie Mann & staff
All’s well that ends well All’s well that ends well
The year’s end brings us no greater pleasure than to thank you, our most
cherished patients, for a year beyond measure.
Best wishes to you and yours in the coming year.
See you next year!
We’re putting on our best to say,
Hope you enjoy a great holiday!
And when at last the year is through,
We’d like to continue to serve each one of you!
Happy New Year & Many Thanks for Choosing Us!!
Philip Livestock Auction
Thor Roseth &
Employees
Twenty-seven students from
Brigitte Brucklacher’s personal fi-
nance class at the Philip High
School recently completed the
EverFi Financial Literacy pro-
gram. This Web-based program
uses the latest in new media tech-
nologies – video, animations, 3-D
gaming, avatars and social net-
working – to bring complex finan-
cial concepts to life for today’s digi-
tal generation.
First National Bank in Philip
partnered with EverFi, Inc. to
bring the interactive financial
management program to Philip
High School students at no cost to
the school.
“I appreciate the FNB sponsor-
ing this program for the personal
finance classes. The  Everfi pro-
gram provides reinforcement of fi-
nancial concepts as well as intro-
duces new information to stu-
dents,” said Brucklacher.
The 10-unit course offered six
hours of programming aimed at
teaching, assessing and certifying
students in a variety of financial
topics including credit scores, in-
surance, credit cards, student
loans, mortgages, taxes, stocks,
savings, 401k, and other critical
concepts that map to national fi-
nancial literacy standards. The
platform tracks the progress and
score of every student. Students
who successfully complete the
course receive a certification in fi-
nancial literacy, a mark of distinc-
tion on college applications and re-
sumes.
“We have made this commitment
in our community because of our
strong belief that if we can better
educate the students of today, then
they will become the financially re-
sponsible citizens of tomorrow,”
said Ray Smith, president of the
First National Bank in Philip.
Finance classes by First National Bank
Class One. Back row, from left: personal finance instructor Brigitte Brucklacher, Dustin Hand, Josh Quinn, Nick Hamill, Brian
Pfeifle, Carl Poss, Wyatt Schaack, Seth Haigh (hidden) and Colter King. Second row: Ryan VanTassel, Casey Reder, Colton
Triebwasser, Reed Johnson, Gavin Brucklacher and First National Bank in Philip’s Crystal Eisenbraun. Front: Deserae
Williams, Kaci Olivier, Jade Berry, Bailey Radway and Jordyn Dekker.
Class Two. Back row, from left: personal finance instructor Brigitte Brucklacher, Brooke Nelson, Lakin Boyd, Sam Johnson,
Quade Slovek, Rachael Kocherberger, First National Bank in Philip’s Crystal Eisenbraun, and Jaime Reimann. Front: Chaney
Burns, Thomas Doolittle and Sam Stangle. Courtesy photos
by Del Bartels
In starting up its 2012-2013 sea-
son, the Philip chapter of Fellowhip
of Christian Athletes met Tuesday,
December 18, at 7:15 a.m. in Betty
Berry’s classroom at the Philip
High School.
The student-directed group is ad-
vised by Berry and Tom Parquet.
This meeting’s Bible verse that was
discussed was Mark 10:43-44,
“Whoever wants to become great
among you must be your servant,
and whoever wants to be first must
be slave of all.” A modern analogy
was being a team’s waterboy; an
important role, though a humbling
job that most people don’t want.
After some group discussion, the
concluding questions were “As a
competitor or a coach, is it easier to
serve or be served? Why?”
Parquet confessed that, with the
surrounding communities offering
concern and fundraisers for his
wife’s recent kidney transplant, he
found that being served is far
harder. He has been accepting and
grateful, but feels it is easier and
more comfortable to be on the giv-
ing end.
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
The student directed group will meet once a month, discussing a pre-chosen Bible
verse and how it relates to the attending individuals. Photo by Del Bartels
These elementary students are
Super Scotties for November 2012.
They have earned the distinction
through different individual displays
of good character. Each teacher selects
at least one of their students at the
end of each month.
Super Scotties
Rainee Snyder
1st grade
Danessa Heltzel
2nd grade
Reese Henrie
3rd grade
Eryka Johnson
5th grade
Pedro Dennis
6th grade
Elementary Students of the
Months for November
Allison Williams
3rd grade
McCoy Peterson
3rd grade
Mattisen Reckling
Kindergarten
Dilyn Terkildsen
4th grade
The release time children of the First Lutheran Church in Philip presented their Christmas program, Wednesday, December
19. Shown above, the program included a live nativity scene. Preschool students playing the part of the animals in the
manger scene were Camden Fitzgerald, Ellis Baer, Allie Kjerstad, Chevy Konst, Memphis Konst and Tierny Arthur. Kinder-
garten students were Josie Jones, Fayth Martin, Even Kroetch and Talan Haynes all as shepards, Tayanna Arthur as Mary,
and Grayson Martin as Joseph. First graders included Kade Fitzgerald, Adam Kanable, Jess Jones and Cohen Reckling all
Lutheran release time program
Brian Pfeifle – junior
Happy, optimistic student in class
and in the hallways. Does a good
job on his work. Good about
making up his assignments.
Philip High School
December 2012 Students of the Month
Rachel Parsons – sophomore
Very bright and helpful.
Respectful of others.
Completes excellent work.
Keagan Fitch
7th
Volunteers an-
swers in class.
Very careful with
his work. Uses his
time wisely.
Shay Hand
8th
Uses study hall
time wisely. Al-
ways polite. Pre-
pared for class.
Does her best on
all assigned work.
Nick Donnelly
8th
Works hard.
Turns work in on
time. Willing to
help others. Al-
ways prepared
with assignments
Madyson Morehart
7th
Very conscien-
tious about work.
Attends to the
classroom assign-
ment. Helps other
students.
Philip Junior High School
December 2012 Students of the Month
as wise men, and Sarah Huston as an angel. Second graders included Ali
Schofield, Macy Martin and Gracie Fitzgerald all as angels. Courtesy photo
Make your opinion known … write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410 or e-mail with your
phone number to: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 11
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Dakotafire Media
At a time when the news could
be pretty bad coming from rural li-
braries in the James River Valley,
many area communities report
that their libraries are holding
their own or even thriving.
The library in Britton, which
moved to fine new quarters in
2002, is a social gathering spot for
the community. “There is always a
jigsaw puzzle in the works and cof-
fee available,” said Britton Public
Library head librarian, Peggy
Satrang. “Some people come in two
or three times a week to put pieces
in the puzzle, and others come in
just to have a cup of coffee and visit
a little bit. It really is a community
place. It’s busy, but it’s a good place
to be.”
Nationwide, the report from
rural libraries is not so upbeat. In
the face of a dire financial situa-
tion, “library administrators and
trustees are grappling with incred-
ibly difficult decisions to reduce
services, programs and staffing,”
according to a presentation given
at the Association of Small and
Rural Libraries conference in Sep-
tember. When budgets are tight,
local government officials some-
times question the relevance of li-
braries in an increasingly digital
world.
“A public library helps keep the
status of the community on an in-
tellectual level and provides a won-
derful pastime for many people,”
said Anita Lowary, Groton’s city fi-
nance officer.
It can also be a place where peo-
ple can gather on neutral ground.
“A lot of times in rural areas, the
library can be a focal point for the
community,” said Al Peterson,
president of the North Dakota Li-
brary Association. “The nice thing
about a library, it’s open to anyone
and everyone. You don’t have to be
rich, you don’t have to be poor. You
don’t have to be Catholic, you don’t
have to be Lutheran. You can be
anybody you want to go to a li-
brary.”
Doing more with less
In the Dakotas and elsewhere,
the costs that rural libraries have
to pay are going up: “Books cost
more, anything you want to do
costs more,” said Annie Brunskill,
past president of the South Dakota
Library Association.
The funding that libraries re-
ceive from their local governments
often doesn’t go up quite as quickly
as costs do, and with the nation-
wide economic slowdown in recent
years, some budgets have been cut.
The budget of Brunskill’s home li-
brary in Philip, for example, was
trimmed a year ago, and Groton
lost a significant part of the fund-
ing it used to receive from the
county when the bookmobile was
still in service.
But rural libraries have another
source of funds if the regular
budget isn’t enough – the users
themselves. When community
members see a need, they often
step up to fill the gap. Avid readers
in the community often donate new
books right after they have read
them, and area librarians report
their recent fundraisers have been
quite successful.
“People are so generous. It’s un-
real,” Satrang said of her Britton
community. “We also have had a
couple substantial donations from
people who have passed away.”
Busy places
The population of many rural
areas is going down, and book-
stores in larger areas have closed,
which might lead a person to guess
that rural libraries have fewer pa-
trons than they used to.
That is not what is actually hap-
pened. “The number of people
using them has gone up,” Brunskill
said.
Another factor is that the world
expects people to have online ac-
cess, so if they don’t have Internet
at home the library serves that
need. For example, people looking
for jobs search for openings online,
and many employers prefer online
applications now, Brunskill said.
Peterson added that as people
manage their own budgets and see
the cost of books and other media
rising, they often opt to check out
books or DVDs from the library in-
stead of purchasing them.
Some patrons have also realized
they can get just about anything
they want through interlibrary
loan. They may not have cable, but
if they want to see the TV show
“Dexter” (a Showtime channel ex-
clusive), they can request full sea-
sons from their library, Peterson
said.
Changing technology
As library patrons pick up e-
readers such as Kindles and Nooks,
librarians have done what they can
to serve those new readers of e-
readers. Not all rural libraries are
able to offer e-books yet. Groton, for
example, needs to upgrade their
equipment before they can offer
that service, Lowary said.
“If you have a small budget, it’s
kind of out of reach,” Brunskill
said. “We have to balance the cost
of e-books against hardcover
books.”
Libraries also serve as a place for
the public to use the Internet, and
setting up that system can take
technical expertise that many li-
brarians don’t have. Money from
the American Recovery and Rein-
vestment Act has funded broad-
band initiatives nationwide that
Rural libraries survive and thrive with community support
can help with that.
In South Dakota, the S.D. Broad-
band Initiative provides a free
technological assessment for all
community anchor institutions,
which includes libraries but also
applies to city offices, health care
facilities, YMCAs and more. Then
those institutions can apply for a
grant to help with needed technol-
ogy upgrades.
A role for the
foreseeable future
Overall, rural libraries in the
Dakotas are holding their own or
thriving, but there are some that
are struggling. Brunskill said the
difference is sometimes related to
declining population, but the effort
of the people involved matters
more to how the library is doing
than numbers do.
“If you’ve got people who really,
really think highly of their library,
it doesn’t matter whether it’s a
small town or medium sized town,
that library going to get a lot of
support from that community,”
Brunskill said.
Many rural libraries are serving
an important niche in their com-
munities, as a social gathering
space as well as a place to gather
information.
Community Home Health
Haakon County Young Women
Karyl’s Angel Tree
Haakon County Sheriff’s Office
and Philip Police Department
Legal NoticesDeadline: Fridays at Noon
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 12
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS AND
NOTICE OF
INFORMAL
PROBATE AND
APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
ESTATE OF )
LeROY M. ROSETH )
Deceased. )
Notice is given that on the 4th day of De-
cember, 2012, Duane W. Roseth, whose
address is 20075 Manilla Road, Midland,
SD 57552, and Julian T. Roseth, whose
address is 19925 Manilla Road, Midland,
SD 57552, were appointed as personal
representatives of the estate of LeRoy M.
Roseth.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of the notice or their
claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal rep-
resentatives or may be filed with the clerk
and a copy of the claim mailed to the per-
sonal representatives.
Dated this 4th day of December, 2012.
/s/Duane W. Roseth
Duane W. Roseth
20075 Manilla Road
Midland, SD 57552
/s/Julian T. Roseth
Julian T. Roseth
19925 Manilla Road
Midland, SD 57552
Janet Magelky
Haakon County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2627
Gay Tollefson, Attorney
Tollefson Law Office
PO Box 848
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2783
[Published December 13, 20 & 27, 2012,
at the total approximate cost of $61.01]
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS AND
NOTICE OF
INFORMAL
PROBATE AND
APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
PRO #12-12
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
ESTATE OF )
WANDA BERNICE HEEB, )
Deceased. )
Notice is given that on the 12th day of De-
cember, 2012, Barbara L. Kroetch, whose
address is PO Box 514, Philip, South
Dakota 57567, was appointed as per-
sonal representative of the estate of
Wanda Bernice Heeb.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of the notice or their
claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal rep-
resentatives or may be filed with the clerk
and a copy of the claim mailed to the per-
sonal representative.
Dated this 12th day of December, 2012.
/s/Barbara L. Kroetch
Barbara L. Kroetch
PO Box 514
Philip, South Dakota 57567
Janet Magelky
Haakon County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2627
Gay Tollefson, Attorney
Tollefson Law Office
PO Box 848
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2783
[Published December 20, 27, 2012, &
January 3, 2013, at the total approximate
cost of $61.01]
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON
REQUEST TO
TRANSFER MALT
BEVERAGE LICENSE
Notice is hereby given that a public hear-
ing will be held before the Philip City
Council at its regular meeting on January
07, 2013, at 8:15 p.m. or as soon after
that hour as practical. This hearing will be
held in the Community Room of the
Haakon Co. Courthouse on the request to
transfer the malt beverage license as
listed below.
Transfer From:
Russell & Dorothy Hansen – Rock &
Roll Lanes
Located Lots 08 – 21 inclusive, Block
01, Highway Addition, City of Philip, SD:
one (01) Retail On/Off Sale Malt Bever-
age License.
Transfer To:
Marty or Debbie Gartner – Lucky Strike
Located Lots 08 – 21 inclusive, Block
01, Highway Addition, City of Philip, SD:
one (01) Retail On/Off Sale Malt Bever-
age License.
Any interested person may appear and
will be given an opportunity to be heard
either for or against approval of any or all
of the above listed request for malt bev-
erage license transfer.
Monna Van Lint,
City Finance Officer
(Published December 27, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $15.52]
Proceedings of
West River Water
Development District
November 15, 2012
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at Al’s Oasis in Oa-
coma, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb called
the meeting to order at 1:00 p.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Amy Kittelson, Office Man-
ager for WR/LJ; Dave Larson, Larson
Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the agenda. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the October 11, 2012, meeting were pre-
viously mailed to the Board for their re-
view. Motion by Director Smith, seconded
by Director Krogman to approve the Oc-
tober minutes. Motion carried unani-
mously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph Hieb
- $56.61, Casey Krogman - $56.61, Mar-
ion Matt - $56.61, Veryl Prokop - $56.61,
Lorne Smith - $56.61, West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS - $51,000.00, Pennington
County Courant - $57.19, Lyman County
Herald - $66.50, Murdo Coyote - $71.84,
Todd County Tribune - $66.34, Pioneer
Review - $59.78, Kadoka Press - $76.02,
US Postmaster - $71.40. Motion by Direc-
tor Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to
approve the District bills. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the October Financial
Report is on file at the District office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Matt, sec-
onded by Director Prokop to approve the
October Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his November report
to the Board. Motion by Director Smith,
seconded by Director Krogman to ap-
prove the Manager’s Report. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
USGS GAGING STATIONS: Manager
Fitzgerald received the proposed joint
funding agreement between the District
and USGS for monitoring and operation
of streamflow gages at White River near
Kadoka and White River near White
River. They are seeking funding in the
amount of $11,280 with USGS contribut-
ing $9,270. The Board requested Man-
ager Fitzgerald invite Joyce Williamson to
a board meeting, so she can give an up-
date and answer any questions the Board
has before a decision is made. Motion by
Director Prokop, seconded by Director
Matt that this item be tabled. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
WR/LJ GRANT AGREEMENT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented to the Board the
yearly agreement that provides a grant of
$50,000 to West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water Systems, Inc. Motion by Di-
rector Matt, seconded by Director Krog-
man to approve the grant agreement for
$50,000 to West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water Systems, Inc. Motion carried
unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 1:10 P.M. (CT).
ATTEST:
Amy Kittelson, Recording Secretary
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
[Published December 27, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $36.06]
NOTICE OF
SOLID WASTE
APPLICATION AND
RECOMMENDATION
By The Department of Environment
and Natural Resources
The South Dakota Department of Envi-
ronment and Natural Resources (DENR)
has received a permit renewal application
from the city of Philip to continue opera-
tion of a Type IV restricted use solid
waste facility located ½ mile south and ½
mile west of Philip. The legal description
is the NW¼ SE¼ of Section 23, T1N,
R20E, Haakon County. The total acreage
of the site is 5 acres. The facility will serve
the city of Philip and the surrounding
area. The permit renewal will be granted
for a period of five years as provided for
under South Dakota Codified Law
(SDCL) 34A-6-1.16.
DENR has reviewed the application and
information submitted, has reached a ten-
tative decision and recommends to the
Board of Minerals and Environment
(board) that the permit be reissued to the
applicant to continue operation of the
solid waste facility.
The recommendation for renewal of this
permit is subject to the applicant’s com-
pliance with the Administrative Rules of
South Dakota (ARSD) 74:27 and a total
of 32 permit conditions. The permit con-
ditions include general requirements (10
conditions), design and construction re-
quirements (3 conditions), operating re-
quirements (9 conditions), recordkeeping
and reporting (2 conditions), closure re-
quirements (7 conditions), and financial
assurance (1 condition) as have been de-
termined to be necessary to ensure the
facility complies with the environmental
laws of this state.
In accordance with SDCL 34A-6-1.14,
DENR’s recommendation for approval will
become the final decision of the permit
application and this permit will be reis-
sued 30 days after publication of this no-
tice. A person adversely affected or hav-
ing an interest adversely affected by the
DENR’s recommendation for approval
may petition the board for a contested
case hearing. The petition must comply
with the requirements of ARSD
74:09:01:01. If a petition for such a hear-
ing is not filed within 30 days of this pub-
lication date, a permit will be formally and
finally granted at that time.
A copy of all recommended terms and
conditions are available from DENR and
may be obtained upon request from:
South Dakota Department of Environ-
ment and Natural Resources, Waste
Management Program, 523 East Capitol
Avenue, Pierre, South Dakota 57501-
3182, Attn.: Don Rosowitz, telephone
(605) 773-3153.
Steven M. Pirner, Secretary
Department of Environment
and Natural Resources
[Published December 27, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $27.44]
When you get this news, Christ-
mas will be over and we wish
everyone a joyous Merry Christ-
mas. It isn’t only about gifts.
So much for that no fail fantasy
fudge, the only good thing I can
think of is that it isn’t runny! It’s
hard to mess up boiling sugar, mar-
garine and evaporated milk, but I
think my evaporated milk got
ahead of itself!
Thanks Dorothy Fortune for call-
ing about the Buswell/Markwed
place. Dorothy said they own the
land, situated by Mona Bucholz
property off the 11 Mile Road and
she has some pictures of the old
house before it was cleaned away.
In looking through the “Centennial
Atlas of Haakon County” it was not
a homestead land because no
Buswell was listed.
"Those who don't read have no
advantage over those who can't."
Daysies
Tony Harty visited with Shirley
Hair Monday. His sister, Monica
and Pat Weaver, were visitors at
his home in the afternoon. Tony at-
tended the basketball games the
rest of the day.
Monday morning, I took the
Haakon County Prairie Transpora-
tion van to Rapid City for appoint-
ments, going by way of Philip.
Sandee Gittings took Daniel Jor-
dan home Tuesday morning.
Tuesday, Tony Harty delivered
some baking tins and other items
to Shirley Hair when he visited. He
also stopped by our place for a visit
in the afternoon.
Don and Vi Moody returned from
Rapid Wednesday night to find
that their solar lights weren't
working to guide them home, but
the big yard light was on that
Brant and Lance Sundall installed
while they were in Rapid. They
were certain this light was bright
enough to light all of Jackson
County. Anyway, it seems pack-
ages are arriving from near and far
at Vi and Don's. A package of pears
came from Harry and David and
these boys must know South
Dakota weather very well because
they were in the mailbox and not
even frozen yet. A secret Santa said
it was from friend Nancy Gaylord
in Bradford, Conn.
Tony Harty visited L.D. and
Shirley Hair Wednesday after get-
ting his mail. He went out for din-
ner then got busy and whipped up
a triple batch of his spinach dip
that he shares with so many.
Wednesday, Ralph and Cathy
Fiedler attended the West Elemen-
tary Christmas program at Black
Hills State University in Spearfish,
to watch their grandson, Loman.
He was the last of the five grand-
children to perform. He played a
jail elf in “Surfin’ Santa.” Loman
will move to Creekside Elementary
next year.
Wednesday was a blustery,
windy day, and we were thankful
not to have a foot of soft snow to
blow around. The snow that ar-
rived Monday night stayed put. I
made a van trip to Philip in the
morning.
Kinsey and Kelsey Gittings went
to Rapid City with Beth Stewart
Thursday.
Don and Vi Moody ran around
the ranch and looked at all the re-
cent changes happening with the
earthmoving equipment work that
Vi didn't have a chance to look at
yet, so that was interesting. The
cattle were all scattered along the
creeks and contented as little
lambs. All was in order and Vi de-
cided she would have a few days to
get a “leg up” on her certified public
accountant before the year ends.
They got their illuminations work-
ing at their driveway entrance. Let
there be light!
Thursday evening, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler went to the Don
Klumb home in Spearfish to help
celebrate granddaughter Tessa’s
14th birthday with a pizza party.
Other guests were Lorene Klumb,
Eric, Derek Schmacher and Jazmin
and Eric, Sherry Hanson and fam-
ily and Braden Roter, a friend of
Tessa’s. After supper, Tessa opened
her birthday gifts then everyone
enjoyed cupcakes that Braden
made.
Thursday visitors at our place
were Phyllis Word, Tony Harty and
Melissa Patterson. Bill made a pick
up on his way past Moody’s corner
and came with a couple of cute tree
ornaments. Vi wondered if I knew
about the little white ball she sent,
it was a 1969 or 70 era bobble. The
race car, #33, Bill knew the driver,
thanks kids for thinking of us.
The hull-less popcorn is deli-
cious, too.
Thursday, Tony not only visited
here, but visited with Russ Hattel
to wish him a Merry Christmas.
“May the light of your faith shine
so that it will illuminate the heart
of another.” Daysies
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
This column will be short this
week due to an early deadline.
Most of us are busy cooking, bak-
ing, and finishing up the shopping
in preparation for Christmas.
Donna and Tina Staben hosted
the Milesville Community Club
Christmas party Tuesday evening
at 5:00. We enjoyed a soup supper
followed by filling sacks with good-
ies for those living alone, elderly, or
just because. A gift exchange and
revealing our Secret Sisters and
snacks rounded out the evening.
Attending were Gayla Piroutek,
Linda Gebes, Karen Carley, Erin
Hovland, Marcia Eymer and Janice
Parsons.
Last Thursday night, most of
the Smith family gathered in
Pierre to view the trees at the Capi-
tol, then had supper out. Included
were Dave and Tonya Berry and
family, Will and Toni Anders and
family, and Cory and Deb Smith
and Deb's daughter, Caite.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer met
Jerry and Joy Neville, Sharon
Coyle and Shirley Parsons for sup-
per in Philip Thursday. Kayla
Eymer, who was on call at the
Philip hospital, joined them for
supper, then went back to work.
Later, the six of them played cards
at Sharon's house.
A week ago Thursday, Leo and
Joan Patton took Irene Patton out
for lunch. Leo and Joan were in
Pierre for a shopping trip.
Dan and Gayla Piroutek, Gene
Deuchar, Roy Warner, and Kelly
Blair all attended the Deep Creek
School program last Wednesday
evening. A large crowd attended to
watch as the five students and
teacher, Theresa Deuchar, stirred
everyone's hearts toward Christ-
mas.
Erin, Tim and Daniel Logan, St.
Louis, Mo., flew into Rapid City
last Thursday. They were met by
Dan and Gayla Piroutek. After
lunch, they toured Dinosaur Park
in Rapid City. The Logan family
will stay in Milesville until Christ-
mas Day when they fly home.
Last Wednesday, Karen Carley
spent the day with her mother,
Mildred O'Grady. After spending
two weeks in the Rapid City hospi-
tal, Mildred was released and she
returned to the nursing home in
New Underwood.
My hope is that each of you
were able to be with family and
friends this Christmas season.
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
by U.S. Senator
Tim Johnson (D-S.D.)
South Dakota physicians are un-
able to get ahold of their patients to
provide follow-up care. A police dis-
patch center in Nebraska was un-
able to connect with a law enforce-
ment center in South Dakota.
Small businesses across our state
are losing business because poten-
tial customers can’t reach them on
the phone.
Over the last couple years, rural
South Dakotans have experienced
long distance phone calls that are
failing to complete or have poor
quality. It appears that some long
distance providers are failing to
properly terminate calls to avoid
paying required fees that help pay
for telephone service in rural areas.
I am working closely with South
Dakota small businesses, tele-
phone customers, and rural tele-
phone providers on this issue, and
just last week, I recruited 35 other
senators to work with me to find a
solution.
The lack of reliable phone service
is both a safety and economic issue
for rural America. I first heard
about this issue from a small busi-
ness in Canistota. Since then, I
have heard from many individuals
in our state about the persistent
problem of long distance telephone
calls not being completed. Resi-
dents need to have phone service
that allows them to receive urgent
calls, and small businesses need re-
liable phone service to operate.
Rural phone customers affected by
this problem are rightfully frus-
trated and demand a solution.
Last month, I invited Wall resi-
dent Denny Law to Washington,
D.C., to help emphasize the sever-
ity of these problems. Denny is the
general manager and CEO of
Golden West Telecommunications,
which provides telephone service to
a large portion of southern and cen-
tral South Dakota. Telephone com-
panies, like Golden West, have
been working to fix the call termi-
nation problems. It can be difficult
for small rural wireline companies
to pinpoint where the problems oc-
curred because the long distance
calls are often dropped before they
reach their telephone networks.
Denny’s presentation and my per-
sistence helped senators from all
over the country understand the
magnitude of the issue and join me
in calling on the Federal Commu-
nications Commission to resolve
this problem.
The ball is now in the FCC’s
court. When I pressed the FCC on
this in early 2012, they released a
declaratory ruling that warned
long distance providers by reiterat-
ing the federal prohibitions against
blocking, choking, reducing or re-
stricting telephone traffic. How-
ever, the agency has not yet taken
enforcement action, and, as many
South Dakotans know, the prob-
lems are still occurring at an
alarming rate. I am hopeful the ef-
fort I recently led will lead to fixing
this problem, but I need your help,
as well.
The FCC is conducting an inves-
tigation and wants to hear from
consumers. South Dakotans should
go to http://transition.fcc.gov/eb/
rcc/RCC_Form2000B.html. Like
many other challenges we face in
rural America, this issue doesn’t
get the attention it deserves. How-
ever, I was able to get one-third of
the U.S. Senate on board, which is
no easy task. I will continue work-
ing and am confident we will find a
solution.
Restoring reliable phone
service in rural South Dakota
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursday, Ueoember 27, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 13
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Dusincss nan-
agcr for iIc Kadola Arca ScIool
Disirici. A¡¡licaiions availallc
on iIc wclsiic www.ladola.
l12.sd.us or nay lc ¡iclcd u¡
ai iIc scIool. Wagc DOE and
qualificaiions. O¡cn uniil fillcd.
Coniaci Janic Hcrnann ai 837-
2174, c×i. 100. EOE.
K3-4ic
HELP WANTED: Haalon
Couniy is ialing a¡¡licaiions for
iIc ¡osiiion of Dc¡uiy Fcgisicr
of Dccds. TIis is a Ialf-iinc ¡o-
siiion. Mininun cducaiion rc-
quircncni is a IigI scIool
di¡lona or CED ccriificaic. Scc-
rciarial or rclaicd cסcricncc
¡rcfcrrcd. TIc following slills
and aliliiics arc rcquircd. iy¡c
accuraicly; lasic con¡uicr and
officc nacIincry lnowlcdgc;
aliliiy io usc Microsofi Word
and E×ccl; grcai aiicniion io dc-
iail; c×ccllcni cusioncr scrvicc
and organizaiional slills; c×-
ircncly lcgillc Iandwriiing. A¡-
¡licaiions and full jol
dcscri¡iion will lc availallc ai
iIc Haalon Couniy CouriIousc,
Fcgisicr of Dccds officc, 140 S.
Howard Avc., PIili¡, SD 57567,
or ly cnail. Iaalrod¸ gwic.nci.
A¡¡licaiions io lc accc¡icd uniil
¡osiiion fillcd.
PF16-3ic
HELP WANTED: Farn/FancI
in wcsi ccniral S.D. looling for
cסcricnccd full iinc Icl¡. Du-
iics includc nigIi calving
Icifcrs, calving cows, fcncing,
luilding nainicnancc, o¡craiing
and nainiaining Iaying, fccding
and farning cqui¡ncni. Horsc
cסcricncc noi ncccssary. Wc
usc ATVs. Housing and lccf fur-
nisIcd. Fcfcrcnccs rcquircd.
Salary DOE. Call 843-2869 for
inicrvicw a¡¡oinincni or cnail
rcsunc io. ¡jlorl¸gwic.nci
P1-ifn
MISC. FOR SALE
NEW - NEVER USED: Ccncni
railroad iics, 8
1
´2' long, $75 ¡cr
iic or $50 if you luy 10 or norc.
Scc ai car wasI in Midland. Call
843-2846 or (ccll} 840-8441.
P3-2ic
FOR SALE: Hong Kong cusion
nadc winglacl cIair, $50. Clul
cIair, floral ¡aiicrn naicrial,
$35. Lcavc ncssagc. 859-2777.
P2-1i¡
CHRISTMAS LIGHTS!! (4} NEW
lo×cs of wIiic LED. NoiIing
wrong wiiI iIc ligIis, jusi iIc
wrong color. $32. Call 441-4909
or 859-3515, lcavc ncssagc.
P1-ifn
FOR SALE: Fo¡c Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ro¡c, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
NOTICESJWANTED
SEALED BIDS BEING AC-
CEPTED ON: 2003 JoIn Dccrc
1590 No-iill Drill, 15' worling
widiI, 7-1/2 incI s¡acing, grass
sccdcr, agiiaior, fcriilizcr lo×,
dolly wIccl. Dids for iIc drill will
lc accc¡icd ly Easi Pcnningion
Conscrvaiion Disirici uniil Jan-
uary 1, 2013, ai 24 CrcigIion
Foad in Wall, SD, or iIcy can lc
nailcd io PO Do× 308, Wall, SD
57790. Plcasc call 279-2519 for
infornaiion or vicwing of iIc
drill. Wc rcscrvc iIc rigIi io rc-
jcci any and all lids. PW1-3ic
TRIANGLE RANCH BED &
BREAKFAST is availallc for
lruncIcs, luncIcons, dinncr
¡ariics and rcircais, Dcccnlcr -
A¡ril. Coniaci Lyndy, 859-2122,
irianglc¸gwic.nci, www. irian-
glcrancIll.con P51-8ic
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 24×68 doullcwidc,
3 lcdroons, 2 full laiIs, ncw
iin roof and sliriing, ncw ¡aini.
Call Cody, 515-0316. P52-4ic
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 HigI
Si. in PIili¡, 2 lcdroons, full
lascncni, grcai vicw off lacl
dccl. Call 859-2783 or 859-
3249 or 567-3515 io vicw.
P49-ifn
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrilc
Avc PIili¡. 3 lcdroon 1.5 laiI,
ccniral air, fucl oil Icai and
wood siovc. O¡cn concc¡i,
siainlcss siccl fridgc and siovc.
wasIcr and drycr includcd.
Hardwood laninaic floors, sc¡a-
raic dining roon. Mosily fin-
isIcd lascncni. Cciling fans
iIrougIoui. Ncw windows and
roof. Fcnccd in, largc laclyard
wiiI covcr ¡aiio and sioragc
sIcd. Can cnail ¡Ioios. Call
859-2470 or (785} 259-4207.
P48-8ic
RENTALS
FORE RENT: Onc lcdroon
Iousc in Wall. 279-2865.
WP18-2ic
FOR RENT: Two lcdroon irailcr
Iousc for rcni in PIili¡. 685-
3801 or 859-2204. P3-ifn
FOR RENT: Two lcdroon a¡ari-
ncni in Wall. Call 386-2222.
PW51-4ic
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: S¡acious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or sio¡ in iIc lolly and
¡icl u¡ an a¡¡licaiion. Caicway
A¡arincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc accc¡i
rcs¡onsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc ¡aid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi ¡aid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is ¡laccd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
I uouíd ííIc to tIunI tIc ungcí
uIo íc¡t nonc¸ on n¸ cu¡t ut
uo¡I und Suntu ¡o¡ tIc nonctu¡¸
gí¡t ín tIc nuíí.
Loíu Huícc
ouisidc of Fa¡id Ciiy. PurcIasc
NOW lcforc iransfcr fccs in-
crcasc! Call 605-939-3112.
WANTED
ANTLEFS, ELK IVOFIES, ¡Icas-
ani slins, raiilcsnalcs and ¡or-
cu¡incs. PI. 605-673-4345 or
cnail ai clawanilcrIidc¸Ioi-
nail.con.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Eסcdi-
iion XLT 4×4, cloiI scais, ¡owcr
windows, locls & scais, good
iircs. Call 685-8155. PF10-ifn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
POLISHED PINKY will lc closcd
December 21-30. Plcniy of
o¡cnings lcfi if you nccd io nalc
an a¡¡oinincni. Colors. $10 off.
Call 279-2772, Wall. Merrg
CÞr1s1mos & Hoppg Neu Yeor
]rom 1Þe Brgons.
PW2-2ic
SCHAEFER ENTERPRISES:
Re-openIng For BusIness In
WaII, Soutb Dakota, on Janu-
ary 1, 2013: Wali ScIacfcr,
Owncr/O¡craior, 605-279-2948
or 605-515-3961. S¡ccializing in
rcsidcniial & conncrcial rc¡airs
involving. Car¡cniry (rc¡airs
and ligIi consiruciion}, Plunl-
ing (rc¡airs and insiallaiion},
Minor Elccirical Fc¡airs, A¡¡li-
ancc Fc¡airs (clcciric only}.
PW2-2ic
O'CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Focl, Sand,
Cravcl (scrccncd or crusIcd}. Wc
can dclivcr. Dans, dugouis,
luilding siics. Our 37iI ycar.
Clcnn or Tracc, 859-2020.
PF11-ifn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
S¡ccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV a¡¡licaiion. ALSO. ¡rairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23i¡
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iy¡cs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
u¡s, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52i¡
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iy¡cs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׸gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
WHEAT HAY FOR SALE: Call
685-3068. P52-ifn
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
sonc alfalfa, lig rounds, scni-
load lois, dclivcrcd ¡ricing, no
nold. Call Fol, 390-5535, or
CIarlcs, 390-5506. P50-5i¡
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-¡ly, 235/85/16F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIo¡, 859-
2744, PIili¡. P40-ifn
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN, ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Qualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Ca¡iiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs only}. Call Fus-
scll S¡aid 605-280-1067.
FOR SALE
INSULATED CONCFETE TIFE
TANK LIDS for rullcr iirc ianls.
Cusion nadc, 4'-12' widiI.
Ccnicr floai Iolc and drinling
Iolcs. Pcrnancni lids. Hildc-
lrand Siccl 1-877-867-4185.
FOOSTEF PHEASANTS FOF
salc. 1,000 long-iailcd flying
lirds, $16 cacI. Foyal FlusI
PIcasanis. S¡cnccr, SD. 605-
480-4444.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rc¡rcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.} Call
iIis ncws¡a¡cr or 800-658-
3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
SEEKINC CLASS A CDL drivcrs
io run 14 ccniral siaics. 2 ycars
ovcr iIc road cסcricncc rc-
quircd. E×ccllcni lcncfii ¡acl-
agc. Call 701-221-2465 or
877-472-9534. www.¡lirans-
¡oriaiion.con.
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI,
33¢/34¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456.1024,
joc¸iliirucl. con.
VACATIONJTIMESHARE
HAFT FANCH MEMDEFSHIP
For Salc. Dcauiiful Hari FancI
Can¡ing Fcsori is locaicd jusi
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
0IassItIed
AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nin-
inun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu, tIc P¡o¡ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou¡unt, as wcll
as on our wclsiic. www.¡ionccr-
rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns,
Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun
for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr word
iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial
nusi lc counicd sc¡araicly. In-
cludcd in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and
tIc P¡o¡ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc
and iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Pío-
ncc¡ Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for
loollcc¡ing and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 ¡cr
colunn incI, includcd in iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít.
$5.55 ¡cr colunn incI for iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic ad-
vcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr is suljcci io iIc
Fcdcral Fair Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI
nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany ¡rcfcrcncc,
or discrininaiion on racc, color, rcligion,
sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io
nalc any sucI ¡rcfcrcncc, liniiaiion, or
discrininaiion."
TIis ncws¡a¡cr will noi lnowingly accc¡i
any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a vi-
olaiion of iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd
iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a-
¡cr arc availallc on an cqual o¡¡oriuniiy
lasis.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
Ior ull yoor
concrete
constroction
needs:
CONCRITI
CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo
Philip, SÐ
view &
download
online
produotion
sale oatalogs at:
National Lowline 3ale
www.rpipromotions.oom
C0MlN0 300N:
1oseph Angus Ranoh
MoPherson Angus Ranoh
3andage Angus
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Walker Automotive
Now open Mon. thru Fri.
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tune-ups ~
Brakes ~ Service
859-2901 · PhiIip
Manager Position AvaiIabIe
The Haakon County Conservation District
is currently taking applications for
District Manager. Part-time/FuII-time Position.
Stop at 409 N. Wray in Philip for an application
and more information.
Haakon County Conservation District
409 N. Wray, PhiIip, SD 57567 · 859-2186 Ext. 3
HCCD is an equaI opportunity empIoyer.
PROFIT DEADLINE:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd
issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
PROFIT DEADLINE:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd
issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. BRED CAT-
TLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
TRIPLE T RANCH - 75 DLK HFFS; FS, NI............................................500=
SIMON - 25 HEFF FED ANC X CLVS; FS,NI..................................400-600=
BRED HEIFERS:
RICHARD PAPOUSEK - 350 FANCY DLK & 1ST X DWF HFFS; DLKS ALL
HOME FAISED OF OFICINATED OFF THE CILDEFT ANCUS FN; 1ST X DWF
ALL OFICINATED OFF THE PEFAULT FN; ALL DFED PFOVEN LDW DLK
ANCUS DULLS; STAFT CALVINC MAFCH 13 & SPLIT INTO 10 DAY PEFI-
ODS.
DOOLITTLE WAGNER RANCH - 110 FANCY DLK ANCUS HFFS; A.I.
DFED ONE DAY TO DAF EXT TFAVELEF; ALL SAFE WITH DULL CALVES; 2-
22 CALVINC
EDGAR SIMON - 22 HEFF FED ANC X HFFS; DFED. POLLED HEFF;
CLV. 3-16
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
EDGAR SIMON - 30 HEFF FED ANC X MIXED ACE COWS; DFED. HEFF;
CLV. 3-21
LYNN FIELDS - 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-
25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 15 DLK HFFS TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
JESSE MORELAND - 15 DWF FIFST CFOSS 7 YF OLD COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12
P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. EXPECTINC 4000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RICK KING & SONS - 900 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED CLVS; FS.....600-750=
KNUTSON - 250 DLK CLVS; FS.....................................................500-600=
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - 250 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI .........500-600=
KEHN RANCH - 400 DLK CLVS; FS ..............................................500-650=
FORTUNE - 150 DLK STFS; FS.....................................................650-750=
AMIOTTE - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-600=
HANSON - 140 HEFF & DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS.........................650=
AMIOTTE - 124 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................700=
WHEELER RANCH - 120 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ................625=
BARTLETT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI......................................................700=
SIGMAN & SIGMAN - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI, HFFS DV.................700-800=
OLSON - 90 DLK & FED ANC STFS; FS,AN...................................550-650=
WILLIAMS - 90 DLK HFFS; FS.............................................................550=
LEHRKAMP - 80 DLK CLVS; FS....................................................600-650=
BARRY - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI ............................600-650=
FERGUSON - 60 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI....................................500-600=
HERBER RANCH - 50 HEFF CLVS; FS................................................600=
GROPPER - 50 FED ANC FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,ALL HFFS IN TOWN600-
700=
ARTHUR - 50 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
SILBERNAGEL - 43 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................600-650=
STABEN - 36 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS..............................................650-700=
SMITH - 36 DLK STFS; FS............................................................800-850=
PETERSON - 35 HEFF STFS; FS ..................................................650-700=
ANDERS - 35 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
DEJONG - 20 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ...........................................................600=
WILLERT - 9 DLK CLVS; FS..........................................................550-600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: MCPHEFSON ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS, 1.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
South Dakota Brand
seIIing on
Tuesday, Jan. 8,
at 12:00 p.m.
Thursday, December 27, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 14
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
D
ance to
“M
ike S
ea-
ger”
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations: 
859-2774
~ Saturday, Dec. 29 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Dec. 31 ~
Steak & Lobster or
(2) Lobster Tails
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, Dec. 25 ~
Closed ~ Merry Christmas
~ Wednesday, Dec. 26 ~
Basket of
Pork Ribs
~ Thursday, Dec. 27 ~
Walleye
~ Friday Buffet, Dec. 28 ~
Roast Beef
Chicken • Shrimp
Try our new charbroiled steaks & burgers! All steaks come with a choice of potato and includes salad bar!
The Haakon County Public Li-
brary, in partnership with the
Philip chapter of AARP/Retired
Teacher Association, will host a
discussion Thursday, January 28,
on the book “One-Room Country
School: South Dakota Stories.”
The community discussion will
follow the monthly soup supper,
AARP/RTA meeting. The library
board and the Philip Book Club
will providing desserts and bars
during the discussion.
The hosts welcome all current
and former teachers and school
board members, and all other com-
munity residents to attend the
evening’s discussion. Dorothy
Liegl, discussion scholar with the
South Dakota Humanities Council,
will be guiding the evening’s event.
Books are available at the library
courtesy of a grant from the South
Dakota Humanities Council. The
book is a collection of experiences
from people all over the state, in-
cluding several from Haakon
County. Readers should recognize
many of the names and locations
included in the book. The book is
edited by Norma C. Wilson and
Charles L. Woodard, and published
by the South Dakota Humanities
Council.
A large map will be available to
help pinpoint the locations of the
original country schools in Haakon
County, with input from attendees.
Everyone is invited to bring old
photos of Haakon County schools to
share. Please bring them in a plas-
tic sleeve with your name attached.
The event will be held at the Bad
River Senior Citizen Center in
Philip, Monday, January 28, with
the meal beginning at 6:00 p.m.
The hosts ask that residents pre-
register by calling the library at
859-2442.
According to Anne Brunskill, li-
brary director, the books may be
picked up at the library, but, as
part of SDHC’s lending library,
they will need to be returned. How-
ever, if individuals would like to
have a copy of their own, the li-
brary can order extra books at a
discount, if there are 10 or more re-
quests.
If enough information and pho-
tos are made available, there may
be a follow-up meeting at some fu-
ture date.
“One Room Country School” book
study to launch local discussions
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture and South Dakota
State University Extension will
hold forums across the state to dis-
cuss South Dakota’s vision for live-
stock production this January
through March.
“South Dakota has progressive,
forward thinking entrepreneurs
who understand the exciting poten-
tial of today’s agri-business mar-
ketplace,” said South Dakota Sec-
retary of Agriculture Walt Bones.
“We’re starting the conversation
about the challenges and advan-
tages South Dakota has to increase
the number of livestock in our
state.”
All forums are scheduled to
begin at 6:30 p.m. local time, but
are subject to change. For more in-
formation, contact Sarah Caslin,
SDDA livestock development spe-
cialist at 605-773-3649 or visit
http://sdda.sd.gov.
Jan. 14 – Aberdeen Livestock
Jan. 15 – Mobridge Livestock
Jan. 21 – Ft. Pierre Livestock
Jan. 22 – Herried Livestock
Jan. 23 – Martin Livestock
Jan. 24 – Philip Livestock
Feb. 4 – Hub City Livestock
Feb. 6 – Bales Continental
Feb. 8 – Glacial Lakes Livestock
Feb. 25 – Platte Livestock
Feb. 26 – Magness Livestock
Feb. 27 – Madison Livestock
Feb. 28 – Kimball Livestock
March 5 – Mitchell Livestock
March 6 – Yankton Livestock
March 7 – Sioux Falls Regional
March 11 – Belle Fourche Livestock
March 12 – St. Onge Livestock
March 13 – Faith Livestock
March 14 – Lemmon Livestock
March 18 – Miller Livestock
March 19 – Presho Livestock
March 20 – Winner Livestock
March 21 – Chamberlain Livestock
Forums on next generation
of livestock production
Community Betterment Committee
Zeeb Pharmacy
American Legion Auxiliary
Nancy Neville
Prairie Designs Floral Studio One Fine Day

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