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Pioneer Review, December 20, 2012

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 17
Volume 107
December 20, 2012
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........$7.90
Any Pro..............................$7.10
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.06
Corn.......................................$6.79
Milo .......................................$6.54
Sunflower Seeds ................$21.50
Basketball
boys’ and girls’
9 & 10
continued on page 8
Parade of Trees
at the courthouse
(more next week)
Page 13
Rural
schools
2
Wcrm
uishes
jor c
secson
thct
sets cll
others
cpcrt.
TIe ProIIL · PIoneer RevIew · PennIngLon Co. CourunL · Kudoku Press
Murdo CoyoLe · BIson CourIer · ¡uILI ¡ndependenL · New Underwood PosL
8traight frem the headlines
8avellette Pablicatiens, Inc.
by Del Bartels
The Haakon School District #27
Board of Education meeting Mon-
day, December 17, began with a
moment of silence in deference to
the elementary school shooting
that happened in Newtown, Conn.,
December 14.
Ruth Carley has been added on
as a special education paraprofes-
sional at the Milesville School.
Though “she is doing a great job,”
according to Superintendent Keven
Morehart, her official approval
must remain contingent on a clear
report from the mandatory back-
ground check.
The meeting did include an exec-
utive session for student matters
which lasted almost an hour. No
action was taken.
General fund bills for up to De-
cember 17 totaled $28,886.59. Of
that amount, over $12,810 was for
insurance.
Capital outlay bills totaled over
$158,945. Of that amount, all but
about $500 went to the final pay-
ment to the First National Bank in
Sioux Falls for the loan used to fi-
nance the Fine Arts Building.
Special education claims totaled
$2,125.44.
Food service bills for the month
totaled $7,394.49.
The school district paid out over
$3,998 for an equivalent of 42.5
days for substitutes. Hourly wages,
for an equivalent of 1,970.34 hours,
came to over $20,076.
In Mike Baer’s secondary princi-
pal’s report, a zero hour weight
training course will be offered next
semester for seventh through 12th
grade students. It will include var-
ious principles of weight lifting,
such as speed drills. The class will
be Monday through Thursday from
6:30 a.m. to 7:15 a.m. High school
students may earn a half credit in
physical education.
In the superintendent’s report,
Morehart praised the “tremendous”
concert done by the first through
sixth graders and director Barb
Bowen. He also was pleased with
the Santa’s secret workshop spon-
sored by the Haakon Education As-
sociation, where students can pur-
chase gift items for Christmas.
Though other years have also been
good, “this year some pretty nice
gifts,” said Morehart. The
Milesville School Christmas pro-
gram was “fantastic.” The Deep
Creek School held its program
Wednesday, December 19.
The federal meats and grains re-
strictions for school lunches have
been lifted.
The second scheduled online as-
sessment was done by third
through sixth graders. This pilot
program is just a trial, so everyone
can get used to it. The district vol-
unteered to participate. “Best thing
is they can break down each ques-
tion and isolate what we can work
on,” said Morehart.
Because of a home sports event
later that evening, the Monday,
January 14, board of education
meeting in room A-1 of the Philip
High School will begin at 5:00 p.m.
District pays off Fine Arts Building
The Philip High School Student Council is recognizing those who are currently
serving in this country’s armed forces. The student council is including those sol-
diers with ties to the Haakon School District. Please include the following infor-
mation: photo, name, rank, branch of service, assignment/job and where they
are stationed or deployed. Contact Holly Iwan or Peyton DeJong with your soldier's
information or email pamela.dejong@k12.sd.us. Courtesy photo
Military bulletin board
at Philip High School
by Del Bartels
In 2008, Mary Parquet, Midland,
began receiving dialysis treat-
ments required because of her hav-
ing polycystic kidney disease. She
had been diagnosed with the dis-
ease “years and years ago,” and her
kidneys were slowly filling with
cysts. “It progresses differently in
everybody,” said Parquet.
Parquet had been on a kidney
donor list since 2009. While wait-
ing, she had been on peritoneal
dialysis for three years, then re-
quired hemodialysis. Both are
methods to remove waste products
from a person’s blood when their
kidneys can no longer function ad-
equately.
Now, after a kidney transplant,
“It’s so wonderful,” said Parquet. “I
had been stuck in dialysis mode. I
don’t envy anyone on dialysis.”
During peritoneal dialysis, blood
vessels in a patient’s abdominal
lining do some of the work for the
kidneys, with the help of a proce-
dure which uses a dialysate fluid
that flows into and out of the lin-
ing. A patient can self administer
the procedure at home, but must
have manual dexterity or a reliable
caregiver. Parquet had to have the
treatments five days a week, at
four hours per session.
Then, for a year and a half, Par-
quet needed hemodialysis, which
required treatment every day. She
had to be connected to a filter by
tubes attached to her blood vessels.
Blood was slowly pumped from her
body into the dialyzer, where waste
products and extra fluid were re-
moved. The filtered blood was then
pumped back into her body.
None of Parquet’s relatives could
be a possible organ donor for her,
since the kidney disease was ge-
netic. Hope, though, came by way
of her husband, Tom’s family. His
sister, Betty Weber, Douglas, Wyo.,
decided to check into the possibili-
ties. “His sister decided, being my
family was out of the question, and
having talked to people about do-
nating a kidney,” then to look into
it, said Parquet. Betty had to run a
whole battery of tests to even be
considered as a donor.
“Betty called us one day in Au-
gust and asked us if we were ex-
cited. Excited about what?” said
Mary. Mary said that the donor
calls the recipient. Eveyone had
about three weeks to prepare.
On September 12, the four of
them, Mary, Tom, Betty and
Betty’s husband, Tim, were in
Sioux Falls for the transplant sur-
gery. “They removed her kidney,
then took me in. I really didn’t
know much until I woke up,” said
Mary.
Tom said, “Mary was going into
surgery about the same time as
Betty was coming out.” He said
Betty’s surgery took roughly about
two hours and Mary’s about three
hours.
Tom said that, when Tim was al-
lowed to see his wife, Tom went in,
too, with Tim saying we are all to-
gether anyway. Later, when Tom
could see Mary, he said “Well, he’s
(Tom) coming with me again.”
Mary spent that night in the in-
tensive care unit, but the next day
was moved to two rooms from
Betty’s room. “So, when they got up
to take their walks, they could go to
visit each other,” said Tom. Betty
returned home nine days later,
though “we stayed in Sioux Falls
until October 14,” said Tom.
The Parquets related that there
are three “big rejection periods” in
such transplant operations, and
Mary has made it through the first
24 hours and the first two to three
weeks. She did have to return to
the hospital, from her medical re-
covery apartment, because of
tremendous puffing up from her
body holding on to extra water as
her new kidney was trying to work
its way up to adequate capacity.
“It didn’t really kick in real well
at first,” said Mary. Tom added,
“After that, it seemed to be working
good.”
“When we first came home, we
had to go to Philip twice a week,”
for lab tests said Tom. During the
first part of November, that
changed to only once a week, and
we just found out she only has to go
every other week, said Tom. A visit
with the transplant team will be
held in late February or early
March.
Mary returned to work as the
fifth through eighth grade instruc-
tor at Midland Elementary School.
“I’m doing really well; feel good.
The first couple of days I was defi-
nitely ready for the end of the
week. It was tiring.”
“The kids were great – great
helpers and helped her do things,”
said Tom. Mary added, “The sup-
port from both of our schools was
just unbelievable!” Mary, Tom and
Betty are all teachers.
The Parquets praised the con-
cern given from the surrounding
communities – Midland, Philip,
Kadoka, Murdo, “and then some.”
Among other community fundrais-
ers, a benefit soup supper for Mary
was held Wednesday, December
19, in Midland. This one was spon-
sored by the Midland School
Booster Club and St. William Alter
Society, with matching funds by
National Mutual Benefit #85.
Mary Parquet’s road to recovery
Tom and Mary Parquet have been living with Mary’s progressive kidney disease
and the increasing dialysis needs, until her successful kidney transplant. Tom’s
sister, Betty Weber, was the donor. Photo by Del Bartels
Thune Statement on Corps’ An-
nouncement to Reject Requests to
Increase Missouri River Water Re-
leases
Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) is-
sued the following statement re-
garding the United States Army
Corps of Engineers announcement
that it will not increase the re-
leases of Missouri River water to
aid Mississippi River navigation.
The Corps’ announcement is in re-
sponse to requests from lawmakers
and groups to aid Mississippi River
navigation by authorizing the un-
precedented release of water from
the Missouri River’s dams and
reservoirs.
“I am pleased that the Corps fol-
lowed the law and rejected the de-
mand to unlawfully increase flows
from the Missouri River reservoirs
specifically for the benefit of Mis-
sissippi River navigation inter-
ests,” said Thune. “The low water
levels and harsh drought condi-
tions that have occurred in our re-
gion have already had a significant
negative impact on the people and
businesses along the Missouri
River. Further releases by the
Corps would only have exacerbated
the drought related conditions.”
On November 30, 2012, Thune
spearheaded a letter to President
Barrack Obama, Assistant Secre-
tary of the Army Jo-Ellen Darcy,
and Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency Administrator Craig
Fugate. The letter, sent with mem-
bers of the South Dakota, North
Dakota, Kansas, and Montana del-
egations, urged the president to
deny requests to release water
from the Missouri River reservoirs
to aid Mississippi River navigation.
Thune followed up on his letter
with a call to Darcy on December 6,
underscoring the harmful impacts
of releasing water from the Mis-
souri River.
U.S. Senator Tim Johnson (D-
S.D.) was encouraged by the
United States Army Corps of Engi-
neers’ response.
The letter echoes many of the
concerns Johnson has voiced about
the wrongheaded idea of releasing
Missouri River water to help Mis-
sissippi River navigation traffic.
Among other negative impacts
cited, the Corps highlighted that
increasing releases would hurt eco-
nomic activity, diminish the ability
to respond to long term drought,
and risk ice jam flooding in winter
months. The letter outlines sepa-
rate actions that the Corps of Engi-
neers will take to alleviate naviga-
tion concerns on the Middle Missis-
sippi that, along with an updated
forecast, are expected to be suffi-
cient to sustain navigation on the
Mississippi.
“When I heard that some were
asking the Corps’ to increase Mis-
souri River releases, I sent a clear
message that this would be unac-
ceptable,” said Johnson. “It not
only goes against the law, but it is
very short sighted. South Dakotans
are facing intense drought condi-
tions, and increasing releases
would risk significant harm to
South Dakota and other upstream
states. I’m pleased that the Corps
of Engineers is taking action along
the Mississippi River to address
the navigation concerns.”
“The response the Corps sent is
encouraging for South Dakota. If
folks continue to pressure the
Corps to increase releases, you can
bet that I will fight their efforts.”
Representative Kristi Noem (R-
S,D,) issued the following state-
ment.
“I am pleased that the Corps has
upheld the spirit of the law in re-
jecting requests to increase water
releases from the Missouri River,”
said Noem. “The drought has cre-
ated challenges throughout the
country, but releasing additional
water from one river for the ex-
press purpose of aiding the naviga-
tion of another would only exacer-
bate the challenges faced by South
Dakotans. I appreciate the swift re-
view and action taken by the Corps
in this matter.”
On November 30, Noem was
joined by South Dakota’s delega-
tion, other upstream representa-
tives, senators and governors in
calling on the administration to re-
ject any such requests on the
grounds that it was unlawful and
hurtful to upstream states also
struggling from drought.
Corps of Engineers’ response to Missouri
River flow encouraging for South Dakota
Argus Leader Media has filed no-
tice that it intends to appeal a fed-
eral judge’s decision to throw out
its lawsuit against the United
States Department of Agriculture,
which sought the disclosure of how
much taxpayer money businesses
get by participating in the food
stamp program.
The appeal, made to the United
States Court of Appeals for the
Eighth Circuit, comes after Chief
Judge Karen Schreier dismissed
the lawsuit in September. The
newspaper filed suit last year al-
leging that USDA violated the
Freedom of Information Act when
it refused to release several years
of payments that grocers, big-box
retailers, gas stations and others
receive for accepting food stamp
purchases. The Argus Leader had
requested that information for the
hundreds of thousands of busi-
nesses nationwide that are enrolled
in the program.
But Schreier sided with the
USDA, which asked her to dismiss
the lawsuit before a hearing.
At issue is whether a federal
statute in the law that created the
food stamp program prohibits the
USDA from disclosing the revenues
businesses earn in a program now
costing taxpayers $80 billion a
year. The statute in question re-
quires the USDA to collect inform-
S.D. newspaper appeals
federal food stamps ruling
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letters.
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prior to an election.
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ions. It is not meant to replace advertising as a means of reaching people.
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comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
duced from this publication, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Clear in the
morning, then partly
cloudy. High of 27F.
Winds less than 5
mph.
Thursday Night: Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 14F. Winds
from the South at 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy.
Fog early. High of
39F. Winds
less than 5
mph.
Friday Night: Clear.
Low of 10F. Winds less than
5 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy.
Fog early. High of 27F.
Winds from the NNW
at 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday Night:
Partly cloudy. Fog
overnight. Low of 3F. Winds from
the North at 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Clear. Fog early. High
of 34F. Winds from the SE at 5
to 15 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly cloudy.
Low of 9F with a windchill as
low as -6F. Winds from the North at 10 to
15 mph. Chance of rain 20%.
Get your complete
& up-to-the
minute
local forecast:
pioneer-
review.com
Monday: Mostly cloudy with a chance of snow. High of
21F with a windchill as low as 3F. Winds from the
North at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of snow 50% with ac-
cumulations up to 2 in. possible. Monday Night: Over-
cast with a chance of snow. Low of 0F with a windchill
as low as -11F. Breezy. Winds from the NNW at 15 to 20 mph.
Chance of snow 50% with accumulations up to 4 in. possible.
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
We don’t have many shepherds
around here that are guarding
their flocks by night as described
in the Christmas story. We do have
quite a few cowboys and ranchers
that tend their herds although not
so much at night. Cattle are a lot
bigger than sheep and need less
protection. Both shepherds and
cowboys are in a similar line of
work, though, in looking after live-
stock, and Jesus came to earth for
people like us. He had a fondness
for ordinary folks that had no great
claim to fame and just went about
their business.
He also tended to surround him-
self with fishermen. Peter, James,
and John were all men of the sea.
And, although these men were not
particularly learned, being with
Jesus made them into forces to be
reckoned with. They basically
turned the world upside down so
that it would never again be the
same.
During his time on earth, our
Lord was even kind to tax collec-
tors and showed them they were
acceptable to God and could please
him by being fair and honest.
There weren’t, in fact, many people
that Jesus didn’t reach out to and
have compassion for. He had some
trouble with the proud, greedy,
and power-hungry, but he was
willing to give even those a chance
to get close to him.
When you consider all these dif-
ferent types of people that Jesus
came to help, we can see that his
only motivation for coming to earth
had to be love for us. It wasn’t be-
cause we were important and de-
served his help. Why else would
someone leave the glory of heaven
to be born in a lowly stable in Beth-
lehem where he was no doubt sur-
rounded by animals and there
caretakers. And if that wasn’t bad
enough, considering who he really
was, he also came knowing he
would have to die a terrible death
to buy salvation for those he loved.
Not many of us would be eager to
leave a great and beautiful place
only to humble ourselves and later
die for others. Jesus did just that,
however, and is therefore worthy of
our thanks, love, respect and wor-
ship.
The apostle Peter is one of my fa-
vorite people. He was rather a
wild, impetuous fisherman who
tended to act first and think later.
This got him into trouble fairly
often. He had a good heart, though,
and stayed right next to the Lord,
kept trying, and became a pillar of
the early church. It just goes to
show what being with Jesus can do
for a person.
When you consider this world
and all the terrible things that go
on—murder, strife, dissention,
pride—being changed by God looks
very attractive. We would rather
be the kind policeman who pro-
vides shoes for a street person in
New York than the evil man who
forces his way into a school and
kills children and other innocent
folks. There are forces of good and
evil, and we are much more likely
to be classed with the good than
the evil if we stay in touch with
God.
Hard hearts just don’t cut it, as
you might expect. Judas was one of
the disciples, but he never softened
his heart. He stayed greedy and
self absorbed right to the end, and
even betrayed the Lord with a kiss.
He got thirty pieces of silver for his
betrayal. It wasn’t worth it as he
suddenly realized afterward, so he
killed himself in remorse. What a
sad account.
We, of course, have the option of
being tenderhearted towards God
instead of self-serving, and it is by
far the best option. May we this
Christmas be touched by the famil-
iar story of Bethlehem, the shep-
herds, the star, the wise men and
all of that. May it open our hearts
to the Lord so his goodness can
flow into us and then back out to
others. If you consider what Christ
did for us, it’s the least we can do.
We can become positive forces for
good, thanks to our Lord’s exam-
ple. Merry Christmas.
PRIVATE APPLICATOR CERTIFICATION …training will be
held Friday, January 4, at 1:00 p.m. at the Bad River Senior Citi-
zen’s Center in Philip. Please bring a photo identification with you
when you attend the training.
STRONGER ECONOMIES TOGETHER …Session 2, “Profiling
Your Region,” will be held Wednesday, January 2, from 5:30 to 8:00
p.m. at the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center in Philip. For more
information contact Christine Sorensen at 224-8870, Ext. 123.
Everyone welcome.
HAAKON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY …will be open the Fri-
day before Christmas, December 21, and the Friday after, December
28, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
COMMUNITY BETTERMENT COMMITTEE …Annual Christ-
mas Lighting Contest. Judging for three places will begin at 6:00
p.m. Sunday, December 23. Call Darlene Matt at 859-2077 to nom-
inate a display, and don’t forget to turn your lights on!
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Bah, humbug ... by Del Bartels
I had to put the Bandaid on with one hand, and the blood from the
Christmas-wrap paper cut almost soaked through. Some of the tree
lights were a possible electrical-short hazard, because they kept going
out and then coming back on. Nobody told me that a sugar high from
snitching from the brownie/candy plate would be followed by a sugar
low. If the wrapping covers up the “fragile” label, it’s not my fault for
the tinkling noise after I shook the package to guess what the gift was.
If the radio plays “Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer” one more
time, I’m going to start hunting something other than whitetail.
I am worn out from all the church, school and community programs,
pageants and activities. Can’t they perform Christmas programs dur-
ing some other, less busy season? Most of my mailed Christmas cards
came back as supposedly undeliverable; it’s not my fault people got dif-
ferent addresses since about eight years ago. My head is still aching
from eggnog, rum cake, Christmas cheer and the punchbowl at the
party I crashed last night. You want Santa to come, well I’m sorry but
I’m not going to have a fireplace put in just so some fat, hairy, old guy
can be a once-a-year chimney sweep.
The problem with carolers is they knock during supper time, then
expect you to smile, listen and shiver outside your own door while they
a cappella songs that I could butcher even with accompaniment. I
would give them some wassail, but I’m saving that for myself later.
Why would anyone abuse a horse by having it drag a sled through the
snow on a miserable winter day? A yule log; is that something like a
cheese log? “O Tannenbaum;” why don’t you speak English and say
Christmas tree? Deck the halls; like on a ship? “Carol of the Bells;” not
Carol from Pine Street? “Frosty the Snowman;” what else you going to
call him – Blaze? “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen;” give them enough
ale and they will rest plenty. Wasn’t “Jingle Bell Rock” first done by
the Rolling Stones? “We Three Kings” should have been done by Three
Dog Night. A “White Christmas” might be okay, but no where near
enough when we need about three months of good hard rain.
Bells are everywhere – tree ornaments, Salvation Army, churches,
schools, dinner, sleighs ... no wonder Edgar Allan Poe went mad.
Lights, too, are everywhere ... it’s like spending all day under a disco
ball. Ah the smells of Christmas – sappy trees, fattening baked goods,
the exhilarating sweat of shopping mobs, rolling smoke from the ham
left in the oven. Yearly, the language of Christmas changes more and
more – season’s greetings, happy holidays, happy Hanukkah, Happy
New Year, your bills are due, have a good day ... but all too rarely
“Merry Christmas.” The season of Christmas time also has a feel –
mostly cold and windy. Why couldn’t the birth have been in July?
Get your paws off of me! I don’t need a Christmas hug! Well, on sec-
ond thought, maybe I do. Perhaps everybody does. Merry Christmas.
by Nancy Haigh
Rural schools have a uniqueness
about them that inspires the com-
munity, as well as the students
themselves.
Many who have attended a rural
school and/or taught at one will say
that they are the absolute best for,
well, everything.
Many residents of Haakon
County attended a rural school for
their kindergarten through eighth
grade educations. The book,“Philip,
S.D., Second Half Century,” lists
rural schools and their teachers
starting with 1958. Schools like
Leslie, Marietta, Lincoln, Pleasant
View, North and South Schoening,
Elbon, Maupin, West Fork, Old
Trail and many others exist in
name only now.
Up until the fall of 1970 all the
rural schools were in their own dis-
trict with their own school boards.
Each district paid the teacher and
provided for the school. A county
superintendent of schools oversaw
all the districts and teachers.
Colby Smith, who attended Al-
falfa Valley for seven years begin-
ning in the late 90s, said, “Because
of how few students attend each
school, it feels like a family envi-
ronment rather than an education
system, while still offering above-
average learning.”
Arlyce Griesel knows about
country schools from both sides of
the teacher’s desk. She attended
Hilland and a couple other rural
Haakon County schools. She came
back as a teacher, teaching at rural
schools – North Schoening, Elbon,
Enterprise, Hilland, Lincoln and
Marietta – as well as Philip Ele-
mentary.
Arlyce said one of the best as-
pects of the rural schools was that
the children learn from each other.
What they have learned is rein-
forced, especially when they help
the younger students. Arlyce said,
“They learn to work with other
children. Sometimes children can
explain better than a teacher be-
cause they can relate to that level.”
Superintendent Keven Morehart
noted that rural school students
tend to relate more easier to the
younger students even when they
come into high school.
Keven said while at the rural
schools they become independent
workers with a good work ethic. He
believes that work ethic comes
from their hard working parents.
“They make sure the homework is
done,” he said. Keven, it turns out,
also attended a rural type school.
He said he attended first grade in
a two room building in Cummings,
N.D. He admitted that the school
was in town, but the town was very
small.
Ellen Schofield taught at rural
schools for 32 years, a time frame
that included the outhouses to mi-
crowave ovens. During those 32
years she taught at Cherry, Old
Trail, Robb’s Flat, Hart, Milesville,
Cheyenne, Plum Creek, Alfalfa
Valley, Elbon and Enterprise.
“Some were a lot easier than oth-
ers,” Ellen said.
She started teaching in 1963 and
the first school, where she stayed
in the teacherage, still used the
outhouse. Another one had running
water – a line that went through
the foundation to a sink that sat
over a hole. And in that hole, one
time was a skunk, not a mouse like
she thought when she went to do
away with it.
Ellen noted that rural school
teachers had to be self-reliant.
Among regular school duties they
had to take care of little problems,
like rattlesnakes; and being nurses
for various injuries.
Ellen said she enjoyed her years
of teaching at the rural schools.
Some of her favorite memories are
when the road ditches had frozen
water and the kids and her would
go skating on them. She said she
enjoyed the time spent with the
kids.
Ellen was always concerned with
those students, in the early years,
who rode their horses to school
even when it was below zero. But
the students were as hardy as the
teachers who taught them. Arlyce
recalled a time when one of her stu-
dents came in at a gallop and rode
the horse right into the barn where
he promptly came off and ended up
getting cut on something and Ar-
lyce had to do nurse duties before
school could start.
“I did so enjoy teaching at the
rural schools,” said Arlyce. “You get
so attached, it gets to be personal.”
It’s a different way of teaching, she
said, it’s more relaxed.
“This season was always a spe-
cial time,” Arlyce said. The Christ-
mas program, entertaining the par-
ents, making presents for them
was always a part of the Christmas
season. “It was a very important
time in their lives,” she said.
Colby noted they’d spend a cou-
ple of weeks practicing their lines.
Then they’d clean up the Grind-
stone Hall as well as decorate it for
the Christmas program. “Not only
our families would come watch our
Christmas programs, but also
neighbors from the area would join
in on the fun and treats, “ she said.
Rural schools enrich community and lives
Beth King, White River, and her team give the Deep Creek students and teacher
a lift out to Robb’s Draw to hunt for their Christmas tree. Landowner Ed Briggs
helped the school renew this annual tradition and added the wagon as a new tra-
dition. Photo by Nancy Haigh
It was a long
haul up and out
of Robb’s Draw
but the Deep
Creek School
students along
with their
teacher,
Theresa
Deuchar and
parent, Russ
Sinkey, are
ready to load
the tree into the
wagon.
Courtesy photo
Vern Foland attended eight
years of country school at Madison,
which was located north of Ot-
tumwa. That was back in the 30s,
he said. He remembers performing
in the Christmas programs as well
as Easter programs.
Times were tough then, but he
remembers that the parents were
willing to help the teacher if there
was something needed. That was
what the community did, he said,
whenever anyone needed help.
They would band together to help
each other. Vern said that sense of
community is getting hard to find.
Part of the reason is that there
are less people in the county. Vern
noted that where there once were
many families in a township, there
might be two families now.
Jayne Gottsleben taught for two
years at Deep Creek and while the
kids learned well, they also faced
challenges students in town didn’t.
She said it was tough having a sib-
ling in the same room, watching
over them. It is harder for a child
to be an individual that way.
At Deep Creek’s annual Christ-
mas program she said the pre-
school siblings also had a part,
such as reciting a poem. Jayne
noted she did not know when or
how the tradition began. But it was
a way to involve the community
more.
While she was at Deep Creek
from 1986 to 1988 there was an-
other teacher for the upper grades
as there were 25 kids at the school.
Jayne taught kindergarten to third
grade the first year and had 12 stu-
dents. The next year she said she
had 16 students in grades kinder-
garten through second.
“I enjoyed my time there,” said
Jayne. “I loved the kids and the
parents.” She recalled the time
they held a fundraiser so they
could buy a computer for the
school, a Commodore.
The school is bordered on three
sides with pastures so it wasn’t un-
common for cattle to be along the
fences separating the playground
and the pastures. And cactus on
the playground was always a chal-
lenge for the students to stay out
of.
This year Haakon County School
District reopened the Deep Creek
School after a closure of seven
years. An event that garnered
much publicity, from news stories
to the teacher, Theresa Deuchar,
being featured on a West Central
Electric billboard. Keven said, “It’s
great exposure we’ve been getting
shed on the school system.”
Milesville is another rural school
in the district. The school is taught
by Dani Foss and has 14 students
in grades kindergarten through
eighth. There is at least one stu-
dent in each grade, which can be a
challenge for Dani. Each school has
a teacher’s aide. Karen Nelson
works with Dani and Lana Elshere
with Theresa.
The Milesville school has been
open almost continously for the
past 100 plus years. It was closed
between 1982 and 1986. Dani has
continued with many of the tradi-
tions such as the school cutting
down its own Christmas tree and
presenting the Christmas program
at the Milesville Hall.
People working together, a place
to meet and visit, a place to learn
and grow – that is the essence of a
rural school.
The offices of
Ravellette Publications
will be closed
MONDAY & TUESDAY
December 24 & 25.
Deadline for the newspaper
next week is
FRIDAY AT NOON!
Deadline for the Profit is
THURSDAY AT NOON!
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 3
Community
June 10 – Stetched barb wire all
day. Hung out 3 miles. Found a
wild duck’s nest with 9 eggs. Bert
Dibble paid $5.60 - 1/2 of Howser’s
work bill. Met a man named
Flosser looking for a homestead.
June 11 – Seventy four at noon.
Planted corn in the sod behind the
plow - also some kaffir corn. Fear-
ful day with the mosquitoes. Like
to have eaten us up.
June 12 – Day opened clear and
windy. No skeeters today - wind too
high for them. Set 1/2 mile of posts
and strung 2 wires, the last of the
post setting around 560 acres. Lack
about 1/2 mile of wire. A fellow
plowing alongside were we was
working killed a rattlesnake with
six rattles. A big storm cloud
moved up in the west all afternoon.
June 13 – Put up 1/4 mile of wire
and then went to work on sod
chicken house. Mosquitoes very
bad and had to wear a mosquito
bar hood to keep them off my face.
At night incessant flashes of light-
ning all around the south.
June 14 – Worked on chicken
house in forenoon and in afternoon
drove 3 miles to Andersons and
Minueys and bought a splendid
sow that would weigh 200 pounds
for $12 and also bought nine old
hens and 2 roosters for $4 from
Minuey who was leaving for Pierre
to work.
June 15 – Mosquitoes dreadfully
bad and almost impossible to stay
out doors. Done odd jobs around
Dibbles. Sent a fellow to Marietta
for our mail as insects too bad to go
ourselves.
Sun. June 16 – Stayed at home
and read the papers all day as the
mosquitoes were so bad that is was
impossible to go out in the grass or
anyplace else. Ball game at Wells
Store but didn’t go.
June 17 – Worked around
Skieview in forenoon. Helped Dib-
ble around his place in afternoon.
Mosquitoes very bad. Compelled to
wear mosquito bar hood all the
time. Old Timers say that they will
last for 3 weeks. Some corn not
coming up on account of bum seed
sold by seed man.
June 18 – Hitched up and drove
to the store to do some shopping
and then I drove to Latigans to ery
a mare to his stallion - nothing
doing. Bert went 13 miles south to
Mooneys to see about his sheep.
His half of the wool is 250 pounds
and 33 lambs for this season. Mos-
quitoes busy yet.
June 19 – Eighty three at noon.
Mosquitoes still very bad. Dry
weather though is beginning to tell
on them. Worked at hen house and
other odd jobs during the day. Got
mail in eve and had fresh reading.
June 20 – Clear and warm.
Worked on hen house sodding the
roof. In afternoon took mare Kate
to Taddikens and bred her. Mos-
quitoes bad.
June 21 – Started to the
Cheyenne River for wood at 7:15
a.m. and got a big load of stuff and
some good telephone poles. Got
home at 6 p.m. 83 at noon.
June 22 – Worked at fence
around cornfield. At 6 p.m. Viola,
Laura and I started for the dance
at Pete Kertzmans and got there at
8 o’clock. Quite a crowd in atten-
dance.
Sun. June 23 – Sunday. Left
Kertzmans for home at 3:15 a.m. -
Got home at 5:30 a.m. and slept in
forenoon. Warm - 83 at noon.
June 24 – Went to the Cheyenne
to get wood. Laura went along to
help. Snaked out an immense load
and got home at 6 p.m.
June 25 – Cool. 44 this morning.
Sawed wood around home in morn-
Here's wishing all our
patients and their families
a season that's merry
and bright. We consider it
a privilege to serve you
and thank you for
entrusting
us with your dental care.
Happy HoIidays!
Dr. Ron & Laurie Mann
& Staff
In ihc spirii oí ihc
scason, wc`d likc io
ioasi our cusiomcrs
and wish
you all ihc
happicsi
holiday.
1hanks
íor bcing
such loyal
cusiomcrs.
Ilcasc rcmcmbcr
whcn cclcbraiing io
drink rcsponsibly.
I1- äa|ssa
Doug e JoAnn Vcsi
e Employccs
ing and went to Marietta in after-
noon to attend a caucus to nomi-
nate township officers. Dibble
named for assessor.
June 26 – Dibble and I started in
wagon to Pierre at 6 a.m. Drove in
rain from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. Camped
for dinner at creek 20 miles from
home. Had headache all day.
Reached Hayes 45 miles from home
in eve and camped for night at
Frozenman’s Creek. Nice country
east of Skieview and fine around
Hayes. Hotel, saloon and post office
at Hayes. Sent C.W. Williamson,
Clinton, Illinois, P.O. Money order
for $2.25 for Eagle dues. Most
homesteaders around here have
proved up and gone away.
June 27 – Left Hayes at 5:30
a.m. and reached Hillside Road
Ranch (Mr. Schenk) 15 miles of Ft.
Pierre where we ate dinner. Nice
country all the way across but very
rough. Water scarce. Reached Ft.
Pierre at 5 p.m. Had to wait one
hour for ferry boat to get across to
Pierre. Met about 40 wagons of In-
dians near Ft. Pierre in the canyon.
Reached Pierre at 6:30 p.m.
Weather red hot. Covered the 85
miles in 2 days. Stopped at
Riverview Hotel in Pierre.
(to be continued …)
Hit & Miss
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Dec. 20: Cheesy
Meatloaf, Baby Bakers, Green
Beans, Roll, Spiced Apples.
Friday, Dec. 21: Chicken Pic-
cata, Scalloped Potatoes, Roasted
Garden Veggies, Roll, Straw-
berry/Rhubarb Pie.
Monday, Dec. 24: Christmas
Eve – Cranberry Glazed Ham, But-
ternut Squash, Brunswick Veggies,
Corn Muffin, Mandarin Oranges.
Tuesday., Dec. 25: Merry
Christmas – Chicken Chardonnay,
Wild Rice Pilaf, Caribbean Veggies,
Roll, Tropical Fruit.
Wednesday, Dec. 26: Chili or
Wisconsin Cheese Soup, Baked Po-
tato, Funshine Bar.
***
Carson LaBeau, son of Mark and
Ann LaBeau, and grandson of
Sonny and Betty LaBeau, was
named Student of the Month at
Piedmont Elementary at an assem-
bly at the school Tuesday, Decem-
ber 18. The award was recognizing
Carson for his compassion for oth-
ers. Carson didn’t know he was get-
ting the award until they surprised
him with it during the school as-
sembly. His family also attended to
congratulate Carson.
December 5 at Somerset Court,
we had resident council. There was
a good turnout. Shawn reviewed
several highlights of the December
schedule one being the Somerset
Court bus trip to look at Christmas
lights around town.
The Rapid City Journal for De-
cember 6, 2012, carried the obitu-
ary for Harold Schnee, Kadoka. He
was 96. Two generations of my kids
spent time working on the Schnee
dairy and sheep ranch. My hus-
band, Virgil Hansen, considered
Harold a good friend.
Thank you to my daughter, De-
lores Denke, who phoned. We had
a nice visit. Thank you also to
Philip friends, Darlene Baye, Mar-
lin Evans and Gayle Rush. Gayle
enclosed a newsy letter of grand-
children and also a photo of the
new elaborate Rush Funeral Home
up on Highway 14. It is where the
old Park Inn cafe used to be.
Thanks you to Jeannie and Boyd
Waara and Rose and Loren Kiel for
your Christmas letters. My son,
Leslie, Bend, Ore., visited at Som-
erset Court over the noon hour
Thursday and entertained with
piano music.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and we agreed it was a less than
distinguished game. However, we
had the good fun of playing and vis-
iting and eating Mig’s pretzels in
Christmas-y shapes.
Happy birthday to Connie
Stevens, December 6. Connie had
family in at the Somerset Court
guest dining room on December 5.
Thank you to the Philip Pioneer
Review for the complimentary copy
of the Pioneer Review that is
placed by the fireplace at Somerset
Court.
The well-loved Haakon County
Crooners gave their Christmas con-
cert at Kadoka and Wall December
2 and at Midland December 15.
They sang at the Philip Nursing
Home and at the Haakon County
Courthouse Sunday, December 16.
News from my old hometown,
Philip, came from Larry and
Roseanne Schulz and Lydia, who
have moved into Larry’s grand-
mother’s home, Billie Hancock,
downtown. Christy Park has
moved into the Schulz mobile home
in Hansen Court. Welcome to the
neighborhood, Christy.
Thank you and Merry Christmas
to my granddaughter and family,
Carol Marie (Hansen) Salinas,
(Leslie’s daughter) for your Christ-
mas card and photo of my great-
granddaughter, Chelsea, now nine
years old. They live in Colorado
Springs, Colo.
My son, Hans P. Hansen, phoned
from Colorado Springs, Colo., to
say hi and Merry Christmas to all
our Rapid City relatives and espe-
cially the residents at Somerset
Court.
(Little blast from the past from
Vivian about a baby blanket that
was sewn and given to her brother,
Ernie, when he was born. The blan-
ket was made by neighbors with a
nursery rhyme theme and family
names stitched on the blanket.
This blanket has now been passed
on a great-grandson, Palmer, son of
Natalie. He was named after
Great-grandma Effie Palmer. The
blanket is now referred to as the
Palmer blanket and all are very
thrilled that Effie Palmer’s name is
stitched on it.)
My son, Hans P. Hansen, phoned
from Colorado Springs. He men-
tioned that he enjoyed the articles
about 4-H in the Philip Pioneer Re-
view. He said that a bunch from
Spruce House, where he lives, are
going to Pine Dale Lodge over
Christmas. He also wished a happy
“39” birthday to Barbara Hansen.
Gwen Morgan and family, Wood-
bridge, Va., sent a Christmas pack-
age. They sent some fancy tea and
a mug with photos of Melissa,
Sarah, Kelsey and Tyler. Thank
you very much.
Best wishes to Casey Allen and
Brad Riggins who sent an invita-
tion to their wedding on December
22, 2012, in Colorado Springs.
M.R. Hansen is working on his
second book about Mongolia, “Mon-
golia, Where Everything is Still
Free Range.” He left a draft of the
book with me. It has some great
photos of Mongolian country. He
plans to have it printed in Mongo-
lia in 2013.
On December 9, the Rapid City
Journal had the 90th birthday
photo of Virginia (Farnsworth)
Crowser. Happy birthday, Virginia.
Virginia was a Philip High School
mate and we both stayed in the old
Winchester Hotel, while it was
being used for a dormitory in the
winter of 1936-37.
Leslie Hansen stopped in Satur-
day evening and told me that he
was going to Philip Sunday.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble.
He said that it was big week of fi-
nals at South Dakota School of
Mines and Technology and gradu-
ation was Saturday.
The Somerset Court Monday
movie was “Jack Frost” which dealt
with fantasy, and I am no good
with fantasy. There were some
deep snow scenes and kids playing
hockey. Thanks for the root beer
and popcorn.
We received Somerset Court
bucks for finishing our word
searches and we got a new supply
of word searches and a new page of
football picks for week 15. We are
given Somerset Court bucks just
for predicting which team will win,
of a group of 15 games. Thank you
to Amy who checks our word
search papers.
Sheridan Hansen told me that
she is having a makeup party at
her home December 15.
Thank you and Merry Christmas
to Marsha and Bill Sumpter,
Kadoka, who sent an elegant
Christmas card and gift. They ad-
vertise their business on the re-
verse side of our Hansen Court
sign. Marsha makes personalized
shirts, mugs, plates, cards, photos,
and I don’t know what all. We have
had many dozens of her mugs over
the years.
Thank you to Gloria Hansen,
Philip, and Merry Christmas. It is
so good that you have been living in
my Philip house and keeping it up.
I am glad you enjoy having the pi-
anos.
M.R. Hansen dropped in for
lunch at Somerset Court Monday.
He was on his way to the airport to
pick up his wife, Barbara. Barbara
was returning from a Caribbean
cruise with her daughter, Holly,
and grandson, Asher, age six. Bar-
bara and Asher have the same
birthday, December 4.
Tuesday, December 11, 2012, at
Somerset Court, we had the activ-
ity of goofy golf with Sandy and
Susan keeping score and picking
up golf balls. Thank you girls, for
the fun time.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble.
We nearly tied, as usual.
My nephew, Leonard Meyer, and
his wife, Jeanne, of Greenfield,
Ind., sent me a pretty lavender
sweatshirt with snowflakes and an
elf. Thank you, dear kids.
The Rapid City Journal of De-
cember 12, 2012, carried the obitu-
ary of Aethel Anderson, who used
to be a resident of Somerset Court.
And another obituary in that same
issue was that of Ida Mae (Shoe-
maker) Patterson. At Philip in the
ears about 1946 to 1955, we lived
just up the street from Shoemak-
ers.
December 12, Chuck Allen and
Etta Erdmann, Philip, came to
visit at Somerset Court. Chuck now
makes agate wind chimes. I would
love to hear some of them in a gen-
tle breeze. Thank you for your visit
and Merry Christmas, Chuck and
Etta.
My son, David Hansen, Ft.
Pierre, stopped in to visit at Som-
erset Court. Tiger Duinkherjav
was with him. David had come to
attend his grandson, Tiger’s, school
program. I had received a letter
from David yesterday, telling of
their big snow. They had drifts of
four to five feet out in the tree lot.
David noticed differences in nurs-
ery cottonwood trees planted by
hand, and cottonwoods that had
planted themselves. There is a dif-
ference in leaf color. Those that
grew from seeds have a darker
green color and are taller than the
nursery planted trees.
Thursday, I missed bingo and
snack and chat because of a doctor
appointment. Ina Oerlline and I
rode back to Somerset Court to-
gether. I saw some of the snack and
chat treats, pretty little decorated
cupcakes. (Always served with cof-
fee and ice water.)
The Philip Pioneer Review came
Thursday and there was a nice ar-
ticle about Keith Emerson, who
was being honored for his lifetime
of wise conservation practices.
Keith was an old time surveyor and
had an abstracting and titling busi-
ness in Philip.
I loved Marsha Sumpter’s little
quip in her Pioneer Review column,
Betwixt Places. “Snow flakes are
fragile, but look what they can do
when they stick together.”
I got such a dandy year-end
email Christmas letter from “Chief
Kent” and Nina Fairchild. They
live somewhere above halfway up
in California. I hope they get the
Philip paper because Yahoo has
failed me. I can't email them and I
don’t have their postal service ad-
dress. Merry Christmas.
December 20th • 6 p.m.
Free Children’s Christmas Show
“Little Brother, Big Trouble: A
Christmas Adventure,” followed by
the arrival of Santa & Mrs. Claus!
* * * * * * *
December 28-29-30-31
Life of Pi (PG)
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Dec. 21-22-23-24***
Wreck It Ralph (PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. ***Mon: 1:30 p.m.
The grandchildren
of
Rudy & Susan
Roth
are requesting a
Card Shower
in honor of their
grandparents’
25th Wedding
Anniversary
on
December 19, 2012
Cards may be sent to the couple at:
22001 224th St., Philip, SD 57567 You may know him as Mr. Petersen, Neal Bob, or Pete
Passing his math class may have been a feat!
Whether you became a nurse or an engineer,
His expertise was perfectly clear!
Nearly four decades of teaching
You will never forget his hours preaching.
Son, Husband, Dad … and Grandpa in his name
without him life would never have been the same
Now in retirement, I am sure he would love a Caddy
But no matter what he is to you, to me he is just DADDY
Happy 60th Birthday
Cards: PO Box 342, Philip, SD 57567
From: Kim, Allison, Jenna, and Aidan
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 24 & 25
DEADLINE for the December 27th issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 21st!
****************
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
****************
PROFIT DEADLINES:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 20th
for the Dec. 25th issue
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
Surrounded by thousands of library books, Haakon County Public Library Director
Annie Brunskill still reads the local Pioneer Review newspaper. Stay current with
local events and news, through your local newspaper. Photo by Del Bartels
Newspapers are good reading
Engaged
Holley Kristen Boyles and Cole
Weston Stoner would like to an-
nounce their engagement and up-
coming wedding.
They will exchange vows at a
small family wedding set for De-
cember 22, 2012, in Murdo. A re-
ception will be held at a later date.
Holley is the daughter of Cathy
Masilko of Norfolk, Neb., and Cole
is the son of Kenny and Robin
Stoner of Murdo.
Engaged
Jamie Richey, daughter of Jim
and Nancy Richey of Wewela, S.D.,
and Kyle Weller, son of Don and
Dody Weller of Philip, are pleased
to announce their engagement and
forthcoming marriage.
Jamie graduated from Colome
High School in 2005, Black Hills
State University in 2009, and re-
ceived her master’s degree in ap-
plied management in 2012. She is
currently employed at Regional
Health in Rapid City as a public re-
lations and marketing specialist.
Kyle graduated from Philip High
School in 2004 and Black Hills
State University in 2012 with a
master’s degree in applied manage-
ment. Kyle is a research compli-
ance analyst with Regional Health.
A June 28, 2013, wedding is
being planned.
Church & Community Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
WE DON’T CHARGE
for obituaries, wedding or engagement
write-ups!
Send to: ads@pioneer-review.com
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
7/1¿.11z.z1
I have seen all the works that are
done under the sun, and, behold,
all is vanity and vexation of
spirit. Ecclesiastes 1.14 (KJJ)
Ancient Wisdom for Modern Life
For some, liIe is a hot pursuit. They see
something they want, they go aIter it, they get
it, and beIore long, they want something else.
One worldly desire satisIied oIten leads to
another, and none oI it ever satisIies the spirit.
Only God can do that. Believe in Him, Iollow
Him and the IulIillment you seek will be yours.
Obituaries Moving?
E-mail your
change of
address to:
subscriptions
@pioneer-
review.com
or call
859-2516
two weeks in
advance of
your move.
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Wilma Daniel___________________
Wilma Daniel, age 98, of Philip,
S.D., died Friday, December 14,
2012, at the Kadoka Nursing
Home.
Wilma Orpha Ernst Daniel was
born December 3, 1914, near
Bloomfield, Iowa, the second of five
children born to Emanuel and Iva
(Provo) Ernst. In 1919, the family
moved to a ranch 28 miles north of
Midland. She attended grade
school in a country school and high
school in Midland.
Wilma was united in marriage
to Paul Richard Daniel on October
30, 1931, in Gillette, Wyo. They
made their home 12 miles north-
east of Philip. Her husband, Paul,
preceded her in death on April 19,
1972. She continued to make her
home on the ranch northeast of
Philip until moving into the
Kadoka Nursing Home on Novem-
ber 4, 2011, where she has since
resided.
Grateful for having shared her
life include her son, Gene Daniel
and his wife, Doris, of Philip; two
grandsons, Shane Daniel and his
wife, Cher, of Rapid City, and
Aaron Daniel and his wife, Lane,
of Billings, Mont.; two great-
grandsons, Alec and Quinn of
Rapid City; several nieces and
nephews; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
In addition to her husband,
Paul, Wilma was preceded in
death by her parents; and infant
daughter at birth; and three broth-
ers, Orville, Arlo, and John Ernst;
and one sister, Willa.
Services were held Monday, De-
cember 17, at Rush Funeral
Chapel in Philip, with Pastor
Kathy Chesney officiating.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorials made to the
donor’s choice, or the Haakon
County Prairie Transportation.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Jessie Tibbs Keckler_______________
Jessie Tibbs Keckler, 68, of
Eagle Butte, S.D., passed away on
November 29, 2012, at Pierre.
Jessie Tibbs was born in Pierre
on November 10, 1944, one of five
children of Esther "Boyd" Tibbs
and Ancel Tibbs. She attended
rural schools until eighth grade
when she moved in with her
grandmother and attended Stan-
ley County High School, where she
graduated. She attended Black
Hills State University where she
received her degree in education.
She married her husband of 46
years, Jerry Keckler, on August
18, 1966, in Pierre.
Jessie then began her 39-year
teaching career with the CEB
School System. Upon her diagnosis
of pancreatic cancer she retired in
2010 to spend time with her fam-
ily.
Jessie was a founding board
member of the Casey Tibbs Foun-
dation and her greatest accom-
plishment was seeing the doors
open to the South Dakota Rodeo
Center.
She attended the Emanuel
Lutheran Church in Eagle Butte
and was a member of the United
Church of Christ of Eagle Butte.
There she taught Sunday School
and Vacation Bible School for
many years and was the youth
group advisor for twenty years.
Jessie's greatest joy was spend-
ing time with her grandchildren.
They were the twinkle in her eye.
She is survived by her husband,
Jerry Keckler; daughters, Jeri Ann
(Tommy Dale) Vines of Eagle
Butte and Mikki (James) Rea,
Woodward, Okla.; granddaugh-
ters, Miranda, Rae Lynn and
Tatum; brothers, Wayne "Fio"
(Lori) Tibbs, Mission Ridge, and
Larry (Barb) Tibbs, Pierre; sisters,
Jill (Keith) Strunk, Minnetonka,
Minn., and Dayle Angyal, Pierre;
sisters-in-law, Patti Keckler and
Joyce Collins, Eagle Butte; and
several nieces and nephews.
Jessie was preceded in death by
her mother, Esther; and father,
Ancel; and brothers-in-law, Jerry
Collins and Jack Keckler.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial is
established.
Ida Mae “Patty” Patterson________________________
Ida Mae “Patty” Patterson, age
80, of Kadoka, S.D., died Tuesday,
December 11, 2012, at the Hans P.
Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip, surrounded by her chil-
dren, grandchildren, and great-
grandchildren.
Ida Mae Shoemaker was born
December 1, 1932, in Pierre, the
daughter of Rollie and Eva (McK-
ean) Shoemaker. She attended
country school and graduated from
Philip High School. One of Patty’s
fondest memories is the old Cozy
Hotel, which her parents owned
and operated in Philip.
Ida Mae married Jerry Patter-
son in 1949, and to this union were
born six children Robert, Sharon,
Grant, Scott, Cindy and Tammy.
Patty’s children recall the many
times she would take a load of chil-
dren to baseball games. She didn’t
want to deprive anyone of a ride.
Ida Mae moved to Rapid City in
1964, where she worked and de-
cided to further her education,
graduating from National College
of Business. She relocated to Den-
ver and worked for the U.S. Life
and Title Company, and worked
weekends as a waitress, for many
years.
Being close to the sports life
through her children, Ida Mae de-
veloped a love for football and be-
came a big fan of the Denver Bron-
cos. She was actually able to meet
many of the players of the Denver
Broncos team through her wait-
ressing at the Elks Club. Wanting
to be closer to her children and
grandchildren, she moved back to
Kadoka in 1990.
In 1990, Patty went to work at
her family’s business (Discount
Fuel) as secretary/treasurer, and
worked side by side, with Grant
and Tammy, for 13 years before ill
health forced Patty to retire.
Patty enjoyed living at the fam-
ily farm where she enjoyed the
openness and could spend time
with her cats. Patty enjoyed the
Kadoka area and being able to
spend time with her children,
grandchildren, and great-grand-
children.
For health reasons, Patty had to
leave the farm moving to the
Senechal Hotel and then to the Sil-
verleaf Assisted Living Center in
Philip. She was an avid Philip
Scotties fan and would sometimes
feel like she was betraying the
team if she sat on Kadoka’s side
during a basketball game, but
being her grandsons and grand-
daughters played for Kadoka, she
was biased to her family’s team.
She then moved to the Kadoka
Nursing Home where she has been
living until our Lord took her
home to be with her other loving
family who preceded her in death.
Patty was a member of the Pres-
byterian Church, Cancer Society,
and the Arbor Association.
Ida Mae “Patty” will always be
remembered as being a wonderful
loving mother and grandmother
whom loved each and everyone of
her children, grandchildren, and
great-grandchildren, whom she
was so proud of.
Survivors include her six chil-
dren Robert Patterson of Kadoka,
Sharon Bebout of Las Vegas, Nev.,
Grant Patterson and his wife,
Susan, of Kadoka, Scott Patterson
and his wife, Arla, of Kadoka;
Cindy VanderMay and her hus-
band, Mark, of Kadoka, and
Tammy Carlson and her husband,
Mark, of Kadoka; their father,
Jerry Patterson of Kadoka, and his
daughters, Lisa and April Patter-
son of Kadoka; 22 grandchildren
Kenny Bebout of Las Vegas,
Melissa Huber of Kadoka, Joey
Patterson of Sioux Falls, Jeffrey,
Adie and Nicholas Patterson of
Kadoka, Preston Patterson of
Sturgis, Skyler and Lane Patter-
son of Kadoka, Dallas Kendrick of
Kadoka, Chris Kendrick of Pierre,
Kanan VanderMay of Kadoka,
Bethany Zipprich of Valdosta,
Georgia, Tere, Kenar, and Jarrett
VanderMay of Kadoka, Tashia
Porch of Kadoka, Tanna Gardner
of Pierre, Colter Carlson of
Kadoka, Jerad Carlson of Huron,
Seth and Tia Carlson of Kadoka;
18 great-grandchildren; two broth-
ers, Gordon Shoemaker and his
wife, Margaret, of Belle Fourche,
and Don Shoemaker and his wife,
Betty, of Evanston, Wyo.; one sis-
ter Alice Bentley of Rapid City;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Patty was preceded in death by
her parents, Rollie and Eva Shoe-
maker; an uncle, Ernie Shoe-
maker; and a brother-in-law,
Richard Bentley.
Services were held Saturday,
December 15, at the Presbyterian
Church in Kadoka with Pastor
Gary McCubbin officiating.
Music was provided by Lyndy
Ireland and Joyce Wheeler. Pall-
bearers were Nicholas, Preston,
Skyler, Lane, Joey and Jeffrey
Patterson, Dallas and Chris
Kendrick, Kanan, Tere, Kenar and
Jarrett VanderMay, Kenneth Be-
bout, and Colter, Jerad and Seth
Carlson.
Interment followed the lunch-
eon, at the Masonic Cemetery in
Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
And the angel said unto them, Fear not: Ior, behold, I
bring you good tidings oI great joy, which shall be to all
people. For unto you is born this day in the city oI David
a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. Luke 2:10-11 (KJV)
And rejoice in the hope born on that holy night!
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United Church · Philip
December 24 4:30 p.m. Candlelight Service
First Presbyterian Church · Interior
December 24: 7:00 p.m. Candlelight Service
Our Redeemer Lutheran Church · Philip
December 23 1:00 p.m., Regular Worship Service
Sacred Heart Catholic Church · Philip
December 24 Christmas Eve Mass, 5:00 p.m.
December 25 Christmas Day Mass, 8:30 a.m.
St. Mary`s Catholic Church · Milesville
December 25 Christmas Day Mass, 7:00 a.m.
St. William Catholic Church · Midland
December 24 Christmas Eve Mass, 7:30 p.m.
Open Bible Church · Midland
December 24 Christmas Services, 4:00 p.m.
Community Evangelical Free Church · Philip
December 24 Christmas Eve Candlelight Service,
7:00 p.m.
Hardingrove Comm. Evangelical · Milesville
December 24 Christmas Eve Candlelight Service,
5:00 p.m.
St. Peter`s Lutheran Church · Midland
Deceember 25 Christmas Day Service, 9:00 a.m.
(MT)
Concordia Lutheran Church · Kadoka
December 20: 10 a.m. Children`s Christmas
Program;
Potluck & Caroling to follow
December 24: 5:00 & 11:00 p.m. Candlelight
Services
December 27: Regular Service
WESTERN NEW HOPE PARISH
First Lutheran Church · Philip
December 24 Christmas Eve Service, 7:00 p.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church · Midland
December 23 Christmas Service & Program, 10:30
a.m.
Deep Creek Lutheran Church
December 23 Christmas Service, 5:00 p.m.
Christmas is the
holiday that brings
us all together as family.
You are welcome to attend services
at the church of your choice.
Merry Christmas!
Help us raise funds for the
Ronald McDonald House!
We’ll place Pink Flamingos in the yard
of your choice!
The recipient may donate
to have them removed by calling:
Haakon Co. Extension Office: 859-2840
Nicki Nelson: 308-862-1051 (cell)
Nancy Haigh: 859-2888
Will You Be Part of the Solu-
tion, or Part of the Problem?
Farmers and ranchers are pro-
ducing more food, fiber and fuel
than ever before. The dramatic in-
crease in agricultural productivity,
particularly in the past 100 years,
has occurred due to a combination
of ingenuity, university research,
Extension education, and technol-
ogy.
Much of this technology is in the
form of chemical pesticides to con-
trol weeds, insects and diseases.
These products have been a relief
for producers as they provided an
effective way to protect their crops
and livestock, but they didn’t come
without drawbacks.
Of course, they come at a price,
but if chosen, applied and man-
aged wisely, return more than the
cost to use them in increased pro-
duction. Pesticides vary in their
level of toxicity, but if used with
care, and while wearing the proper
personal protective equipment,
can be relatively safe. There are
also potential environmental and
residue concerns, but by following
label recommendations, and used
with training and discretion, these
risks can also be minimized.
An emerging problem has been
resistance of the pests to the pesti-
cides farmers and ranchers have
come to depend on to control them.
Herbicide, insecticide and fungi-
cide resistance have all been docu-
mented for individual species and
products as early as the 1940’s.
The incidence of documented re-
sistance has become more common
in recent years, which is no sur-
prise due to the large number of
products that have become avail-
able, and to a dramatic increase in
the use of them.
Resistance starts small and can
go unseen for a period of time as
mutations in weed, insect and/or
disease populations enable indi-
vidual or a small percentage of
plants, insects or fungal organisms
to survive an application of the
chemical. Resistance can acceler-
ate quickly however, as the suscep-
tible individuals are controlled and
the resistant population survives,
becomes dominant and multiplies.
Using higher rates and/or products
with the same mode of action can
speed up the process.
Certain practices are known to
increase the incidence of resist-
ance to pesticides, and fortunately,
there are recommendations to
avoid it.
Monitor pests – Use research-
based sampling procedures to de-
termine if pesticides are necessary
(based on action/economic thresh-
olds) and the best application tim-
ing (when pests are most suscepti-
ble). Consult your Extension Field
Specialist or crop advisor about
economic thresholds for the pest in
question. After treatment, con-
tinue monitoring to assess pest
populations and their control.
Employ appropriate control
measures – Effective IPM-based
programs will include pesticides,
cultural practices, biological con-
trol, mechanical control and sani-
tation. A healthy plant or crop is
often less susceptible to pests.
Select and use pesticides wisely
and according to label directions.
You can decide whether you are
part of the solution, or part of the
problem. For more information,
contact your Regional Extension
Center.
Calendar
1/04: Private Applicator Certifi-
cation meeting (PAT), 1:00 pm
MST, Sr. Citizens Ctr, Philip
1/9: Ag CEO, 5:30 pm, Winner
Regional Extension Center, Win-
ner
1/11: PAT, 1:00 pm MST, Li-
brary Learning Center, Martin
1/14: PAT, 1:30 pm CST/12:30
pm MST, Pierre, Winner, Lemmon
& Rapid City Regional Extension
Centers
1/15: PAT, 1:00 pm CST, Fire
Hall, Presho
1/16: Ranchers Workshop,
SDSU Regional Extension Center,
Winner
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Rural Living
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
-Pour-ons
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Hcrc`s hoping c·cryihing
runs smooihly íor you
ihis holiday scason.
Vc apprcciaic your
choosing us and ihank you
íor your coniinucd busincss.
CoyIc`s Standard
Mu·i, D«n:.« . Fum:!y
To a¦¦ oí our cherìshed customers and
írìends. ve va¦ue your Lusìness and wìsh
you a wonderíu¦ ·hrìstmas
and a Lountìíu¦ New Year.
harvest
oí thanks
Kennedy lmp¦ement 8 Emp¦oyees
And muny mugícuí
moments to you und
yours thís hoííduy seuson.
1hunk you
síncereíy íor
choosíng us!
Farr 8ureau L|le lrsurarce
Corpary÷/wesl 0es Vo|res, lA. Farr
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0roup, lrc. 331
GlennParsons
110 S. Center
Philip, SD
(605) 859-2902
Gree1ings!
Gree1ings!
¬ope your
holidoys ore
doggone good,
ond your New
¥eor is, 1oo.
ur. Jim 51ongle
¬eo1her, Lindo & Jen
Milesville, 5u
ur. Jim McConoghy
¬eo1her & Megon
Woll, su
South Dakota State University
Extension will host private pesti-
cide applicator certification train-
ings beginning January 4.
Anyone planning to apply any
pesticides to an agriculture com-
modity potentially worth $1,000 or
more, needs to receive certification
as a private pesticide applicator,
explained Buyung Hadi, SDSU Ex-
tension pesticide education and
urban entomology coordinator.
“It does not matter what pesti-
cide you apply whether it is herbi-
cide, insecticide or fungicide, you
need to be certified as a private ap-
plicator,” Hadi said.
There are three options to get
certified. A person many attend a
three-hour recertification class at
any certification site. Alternatively,
they may stop by the local regional
extension center and pick up the
materials to complete the open-
book, home study exam, or the per-
son may take the private applicator
exam on-line at the Department of
Agriculture's website, http://apps.
sd.gov/doa/pwt/.
Although it is the law to become
certified, Hadi said there are other
benefits to becoming certified.
“Certification gives you the tools to
apply pesticides properly, safely
and profitably. The certification is
good for five years and allows ap-
plicators to buy and apply general
and restricted use pesticides,” he
said.
During the trainings, SDSU Ex-
tension personnel will cover the
South Dakota rules and regula-
tions about applying pesticides. De-
pending on the location, they will
also discuss local pest management
issues, be it insect pests, weeds or
diseases.
There is no charge for attending
the private applicator class or tak-
ing the open book home study
exam to become certified or recerti-
fied as a private pesticide applica-
tor.
The session in Haakon County
will be Friday, January 4, at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center
in Philip, starting at 1:00 p.m. The
email contact is robert.fanning@sd-
state.edu.
Private pesticide applicator certification training
Farmers and ranchers in South
Dakota will soon have the opportu-
nity to make a positive impact on
their communities by taking part
in the 2012 Census of Agriculture.
Conducted every five years by
the United States Department of
Agriculture’s National Agricultural
Statistics Service, the census is a
complete count of all U.S. farms,
ranches and those who operate
them.
“The census remains the only
source of uniform, comprehensive
agricultural data for every county
in the nation,” said Carter Ander-
son, South Dakota field office direc-
tor. “It’s a critical tool that gives
farmers a voice to influence deci-
sions that will shape the future of
their community, industry and op-
eration.”
The census looks at land use and
ownership, operator characteris-
tics, production practices, income,
expenditures and other topics. This
information is used by all those
who serve farmers and rural com-
munities from federal, state and
local governments to agribusi-
nesses and trade associations. For
example, legislators use the data
when shaping farm policy and
agribusinesses factor it into their
planning efforts.
“Your answers to the census im-
pact farm programs and rural serv-
ices that support your community,”
Anderson said. “So do your part
and be counted when you receive
your form, because there’s strength
in numbers that only the census
can reveal.”
The 2007 Ag Census shows the
number of farms and ranches in
South Dakota totaled 31,169, down
two percent (567 farms) from 2002.
The average size farm in South
Dakota was 1,401 acres, up from
1,380 acres in 2002. The average
age of a South Dakota farm or
ranch operator was 55.7 years old
in 2007, up from 53.3 years in
2002. The market value of agricul-
tural products sold in 2007 was
$6.57 billion dollars compared to
$3.83 billion in 2002. This 71 per-
cent increase in value over 2002
was due to severe drought reduced
production in 2002, along with
higher commodity prices in 2007.
NASS will mail out census forms
in late December, to collect data for
the 2012 calendar year. Completed
forms are due by February 4, 2013.
Producers can fill out the census
online via a secure website, www.
agcensus.usda.gov, or return their
form by mail. Federal law requires
all agricultural producers to partic-
ipate in the census and requires
NASS to keep all individual infor-
mation confidential.
Census countdown begins for S.D. farmers/ranchers
by Walt Bones, South Dakota
Secretary of Agriculture
Cheers.
It seems that our Holiday Season
has been commandeered by the
“fiscal cliff” discussions in Wash-
ington, D.C.
I’m not sure who “Cliff” is, but
judging by the rhetoric I hear, they
must be referencing Cliff Clavin
the infamous know-it-all from the
“Cheers” program. He always had
this penchant for coming up with
some of the most obscure facts at
the most (in)opportune moment.
He may have not been fast enough
on the buzzer for the “Jeopardy”
show, but he surely was armed
with a plethora of facts, figures and
numbers.
I think the discussion is really
simple and the answer is one that
our state and our farmers and
ranchers have figured out a long
time ago ... you can’t spend more
than you earn. No credible lending
institution would allow us to spend
140 percent of what we earn while
we try to manage 640 percent of
our annual earnings hanging over
us as outstanding debt. This pat-
tern is not sustainable.
I appreciate the efforts of our
Senate and House Agriculture com-
mittees. Even though we have not
come up with total consensus, they
have streamlined some programs,
eliminated others and proposed
millions of dollars in cost saving
cuts that will provide for an ade-
quate level of funding.
Our forefathers taught us a long
time ago that tough decisions must
be made in tough times. If all the
other departments in Washington,
D.C. exerted the same effort and
diligence, I think the discussion
would be totally different. But,
since the percentage of the federal
budget that goes to support produc-
tion agriculture and conservation
is only one-half of one percent, our
overall impact, though admirable,
is fairly minimal.
Agriculture is the rock that pro-
vides a firm foundation for not only
the state of South Dakota, but for
our country as well. That rock is
made out of our farmers and ranch-
ers that take care of business, the
land, their livestock, the wildlife
and the environment.
I am eternally grateful, humbled,
and honored to serve as your secre-
tary of agriculture. As we turn the
calendar from 2012 to 2013, I
thank you for all you do and wish
you a blessed holiday!
An Ear to the Ground
by Representative
Kristi Noem
South Dakota is a state that runs
on small businesses and family
farms. In the face of the economic
and regulatory challenges thrown
at them over the past several
years, the resilience of our business
and agriculture communities is in-
spiring. Unfortunately, there is an-
other challenge on the horizon.
This challenge is the estate tax,
commonly referred to as the “death
tax.”
On January 1, this tax is sched-
uled to skyrocket and ensnare an
increasing number of South
Dakota’s family owned businesses
and farming and ranching opera-
tions. Currently, a family can ex-
empt up to $5 million from the
death tax, and any assets exceed-
ing that are taxed at 35 percent.
Unless action is taken soon, begin-
ning in January families will only
be allowed to exempt $1 million,
and any excess assets will be taxed
at a staggering 55 percent.
Don’t get me wrong, $1 million is
a lot of money. However, we have
to consider that many farmers and
small business owners are “cash
poor” but “asset rich.” This means
their land or business value is
high, but those assets aren’t liquid.
So in order to pay estate taxes,
many families would be forced to
sell assets or take out a loan to set-
tle the bill. Under the new estate
tax policy scheduled to go into ef-
fect in the new year, a whole lot
more South Dakotans could face
the penalty. This is a problem that
has been accelerated for many in
rural America by the increasing
value of land.
According to data compiled by
the nonpartisan Joint Committee
on Taxation, nearly 14 times as
many small businesses and 24
times as many farms would be hit
by the death tax. In South Dakota
alone, we’re looking at as many as
71 percent of crop producers being
impacted, according to the Farm
Bureau.
Many in South Dakota know my
story. When my father died unex-
pectedly in an accident on our
farm, we were hit with the death
tax and made the decision to take
out a loan so that we didn’t have to
sell land. No family should have to
make the decision we were forced
to make. That is why I continue to
advocate for the permanent repeal
of the death tax.
I am proud to come from a state
with such a strong heritage of agri-
culture and work ethic, but the es-
tate tax threatens the hard work so
many have done to build busi-
nesses and farming and ranching
operations. I will continue to fight
for full repeal of the death tax and,
at the very least, an extension of
the current rates until we can deal
with this tax in comprehensive tax
reform.
Put simply, death should not be
a taxable event. Hard working
South Dakota families shouldn’t
pay the consequences of Washing-
ton’s failed policies.
The death tax burden
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 7
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
We woke up to a bit of fog this
morning. The trees were lightly
frosted in white. Then the sun
came out, so it didn’t last long. But,
they did look pretty with that light
dusting of frost. Sitting at my com-
puter this Monday morning my
thoughts are in a whirl, thinking of
things that need to be done before
family come home for Christmas.
Now if I was as organized as some
people, many of those things would
already be done. But, it is as it is
and now it’s time to get at my Mid-
land News column, so I’d better
shift gears and get to typing.
Ernie and Laurel Nemec made
a trip to Manhattan, Kan., Decem-
ber 4, to be present at their grand-
daughter, Jackie Nemec's, college
graduation from Kansas State Uni-
versity. Jackie graduated with a
BS in art and a secondary major in
international studies. The day be-
fore graduation, they attended an
art exposition showing the art of
Jackie and three other graduating
seniors. Also attending were
Jackie's parents, Terry and Laura
Nemec, and her sister, Jennifer, all
of Dell Rapids. Three of Laura's
sisters and two of their husbands
were there. After the graduation,
Terry and Laura hosted a party for
Jackie. Ernie and Laurel traveled
home through Sioux Falls and got
home Monday, December 10. Wow!
Time does fly. It doesn’t seem that
long ago Terry and our son, Les,
were high school classmates at
Midland. Congratulations, Jackie!
Clint and Prerry Saucerman
and his mom, Wilma, headed for
Rapid City December 10 for two-
year-old Raygen’s birthday party.
She is the daughter of Tel and Ellie
(Nemec) Saucerman. Mark and
Glenda Nemec, Hill City, were also
there and everyone enjoyed supper
together. Noel and Devlon
Volhken, Calla and Bella, Rapid
City, came later to wish Raygen a
happy birthday, enjoying birthday
cake.
Wednesday, Prerry took her
mom, Marlin Evans, Philip, to
Rapid City for a doctor appoint-
ment. They met Marlin’s son, Jack
Evans, for lunch. On the way home,
Prerry and Marlin stopped for a
visit with Ken and Gay Lange who
live in rural Box Elder.
Thursday, Prerry and Marlin
enjoyed the annual Midland Open
Bible ladies Christmas tea and
party. It is always a fun time with
lots of visiting, singing Christmas
carols and enjoying those tasty
snacks. Kind of puts one in the
spirit of Christmas.
Sunday, Clint, Prerry, and Mar-
lin were in Rapid City for the
church Christmas program in
which Emma, Sawyer, and Meleah
Saucerman were a part of. Their
dad, Tel Saucerman, is the pastor
at Victory Chapel in Rapid City,
and reports are he and his wife,
Ellie, did an excellent job with
those 39 young kids in the church
program. Mark and Glenda Nemec
were also there, bringing two-year-
old Raygen with them, as she had
stayed with grandpa and grandma,
giving Tel and Ellie time to get
everything organized for the pro-
gram the next day. The program
was followed with a potluck meal.
Anyone who has worked with put-
ting on a church or school Christ-
mas program; knows it takes a lot
of time and work, but in the end it
is worth it. Later, everyone went to
Tel and Ellie’s for more visiting, be-
fore heading for home.
Karel Reiman went to Rapid
City Friday as her mom, Goldie
Eisenbraun, is in the Rapid City
hospital. Her brother, Ed, and her
sister, Paula, both live in Rapid
and have been at the hospital, as
well. Karel came home Sunday,
planning on going back sometime
this week. She reports her mom is
feeling somewhat better, but is still
in the hospital. Our prayers are
with Goldie.
Morrie and Barb Jones went to
Wessington Springs Friday to see
the grandkids in the school Christ-
mas program for children, K-12th
grades. Junior, Braden Jones and
sophomore, Monica Jones were a
part of the swing choir performance
with singing and dancing. Fifth
grader, Piper Jones, played in the
sixth grade band. They are the chil-
dren of Morrie and Barb’s son, Pat
and Sandy Jones. There was freez-
ing rain during the night Friday,
making for very icy conditions Sat-
urday, so Barb and Morrie waited
until afternoon to head for home.
They attended grandson Brody
Jones’ basketball game in Philip
that evening. Keeping up with the
activities of their grandchildren
keeps them on the road.
Saturday, Jenna Tolton left for
Afghanistan where she will be
serving in the Army medical, as a
PA. Our prayers are with Jenna
and all others serving in
Afghanistan. These are not easy
times. May we never forget those
who have served, those who are
serving, and those who lost their
lives, in the serving of their coun-
try!
And when one hears the stories
of the shooting at a Connecticut
school, your heart aches for those
families whose six and seven year
old children, are now but a mem-
ory. The grief, the loss, the disbelief
that goes with a tragedy of this
magnitude, is something you can-
not even begin to comprehend.
And, when you hear of the heroism
of their principal, and others, who
cared about those children, and
gave their lives in trying to protect
those children, your heart aches
and you don’t even know them.
Our prayers are with these fami-
lies. May God in His goodness wrap
His comforting arms around these
families, bringing them the comfort
and strength that only He can.
Wednesday, Cassidy Trapp
came home on Christmas break
from the School of Mines in Rapid
City. Thursday, Joy Jones and
granddaughter, Cassidy, were
guests of Jan Bierle at the Open
Bible annual Christmas tea. It is
always a festive occasion with deli-
cious goodies and a time of visiting
with friends.
Friday, Jerry and Joy Jones and
Cassidy went to Dupree as Joy and
Jerry’s grandson, six-year-old Bax-
ter Schrempp was in the school
Christmas program. He is the son
of their daughter, Jodie and Bob
Schrempp. Baxter came home with
grandpa and grandma for the
weekend, his dad picking him up
on Sunday.
Sunday, December 23, at 10:30
a.m., Trinity Lutheran Church in
Midland will have their Christmas
program, followed with a Christ-
mas tea and finger foods. Everyone
is welcome.
Bad River Club
December 7, 2012, the covering
of white snow was a welcome sight
after seeing nothing but brown for
so many weeks. It helped to put
one’s frame of mind into thinking
about Christmas and the holiday
season. Even though it had
snowed, the roads were clear which
enabled Kathy Tolton, Isabelle
Sampson, Janice Bierle and Betty
Sinkey to arrive at the home of our
hostess, Emily Sammons, to enjoy
our annual Christmas luncheon.
Verona Evans was our co-hostess.
We were saddened to realize
Maxine Stirling probably won’t be
able to be with us next year as she
is still in Rapid City under doctor’s
care. However, she and Edna Joy
will be welcome to be with us at
any time. The flu hit this day of all
days to make Wilma Saucerman
miserable. We wrote cards to her
and Maxine with our best wishes to
feel better soon.
The clever idea Kris and Katie
Sammons had for decorating with
candy canes in various ways along
with Emily’s beautiful china and
glassware, made the table setting
picture perfect for the Christmas
season. Even the chairs were deco-
rated. Emily’s Christmas elves
were not only the decorators, but,
they also prepared and served the
delicious luncheon meal and even
volunteered for the clean-up com-
mittee which enabled our hostess
and co-hostess to relax and enjoy
the afternoon activities. Names
were drawn again for hostess
month and secret pal. No one
guessed the correct name for this
year’s secret pal. Gifts were ex-
changed and Kathy took home the
price is right and door prize.
After a delicious piece of
Verona’s pumpkin pie and other
goodies, we went our separate
ways. Another memory to cherish
for the year 2012! December 7th
brought to a close our fun-filled af-
ternoon being with friends for an-
other year. Merry Christmas and
Happy New Year! See you in 2013.
Kathy will be our February host-
ess.
Isabelle Sampson, club reporter
In closing my column for this
week my thoughts continue to be
on many things. Thursday, I went
to Mitchell to the home of our son,
Christopher and Stephanie. Fri-
day, I took care of Laura as her
day-care lady was going to be gone,
so we had some bonding time. She
is such a happy baby! As it turned
out, I got a double-plus as there
was a boy’s basketball game be-
tween Mitchell Christian and Kim-
ball/White Lake, Thursday
evening. Christopher is assistant
coach at Mitchell Christian and the
game was held at Mitchell, so
Stephanie, Laura and I were there.
The school has a beautiful gym.
The varsity game was an upset as
Mitchell Christian was looking to
be crushed. Kimball/White Lake is
a strong team. With a minute left
of the game, one of the Mitchell
boys shot a three-pointer, made the
basket, and the game was tied.
Mitchell Christian wound up losing
by three points, but, were happy
about the game. Another plus was
that Marti and Trish Spinsby had
a baby girl at the Mitchell hospital,
so Stephanie and I got to see that
little gal, Aria Elizabeth Spinsby,
who weighed 6 lbs. 5 oz. and has a
brother, Charles, who is five. As I
close my column for this week, I
want to wish each of you a wonder-
ful Christmas with your families
and a good New Year.
continued on page 18
TIuL`s wIuL we wIsI
Ior you. Muy you Iook
und IeeI your besL
eucI und every duy!
Merrg Christmos &
Hoppg Neu Yeor!
Creutions
Gulore
Pct Vollmer
8(¸-z¸¸¸ · Midlcnd
1c¡c:.c :u ríc 1cra¹
!crr¸ Cír:sr¤as¹
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Nemec Construction - MidIand
Randy & HoIIy Nemec
All of our best to
all of the faces
we've come to
know this year
and many happy,
healthy
days ahead.
Midland
Food
& Fuel
Iond: o¡ tInní:
T)íc¡ & Angcí
Ncncc & ¡nn¡í)
Io) Hunt
New SaIurday Hours
beginning in Ihe New Year:
8 a.m. Io Noon
Special Iimes call lor special Ihanks lor
all Ihe special people in our lile. We
appreciaIe your supporI and wish you a
magical holiday season.
(continued from last week)
Kelly Briggs was in Pierre last
Thursday, and she took Grandma
Lil Briggs to the women's dinner at
the Community Bible Church. Sat-
urday, Kelly hosted the Christmas
cookie exchange at her home.
Twelve ladies attended, and they
had a nice time visiting. Sunday,
Chase and Kelly delivered cookies
to some neighbors. Chauncey Jor-
gensen was one of the lucky recipi-
ents of the delicious cookies, and he
wanted me to make sure I con-
veyed his thanks to Kelly and the
rest of Santa's helpers, as he called
them. There are lots of perks to liv-
ing in a rural community, and sur-
prise cookie deliveries is probably
one of those perks!
Lee and Mary Briggs were in
Rapid City last Friday for a Golden
West Telecommunications meet-
ing, followed by the annual Christ-
mas party. They spent the night in
Rapid City, and returned home on
Saturday. Granddaughters, Cattib-
rie and Kinsey Riggle, came out on
Saturday afternoon and they
helped Grandma Mary decorate
the tree. Cattibrie also brought fab-
ric so Grandma Mary can sew a
dress for her for the upcoming King
of Hearts dance to be held in Feb-
ruary. I hope Cattibrie knows how
lucky she is to have such a talented
grandmother!
I haven't spoken to Aunt Ruth
Neuhauser this week, but I have
seen pictures of how festive the
decorations are at Highmore
Health. As a matter of fact, they
had a contest, and the door to
Ruth's room was among the win-
ners! We did talk to Ruth's son-in-
law, Bunky Boger, and he is doing
well following his recent vehicle ac-
cident. He still has bruises, but oth-
erwise he is doing fine, which is
great news.
Our week was a busy one. Tues-
day, we sold calves in Philip and
Wednesday, I was in Pierre for ap-
pointments. Thursday, Randy and
I took butcher steers to the proces-
sor in Wall. On the way home, we
stopped in Kadoka and picked up
my mother, Letoy Brown, so she
could spend a couple of days with
us. After we got home on Thursday,
Mom and I worked on preparing
her Christmas cards for the mail.
Friday morning, we decorated the
Christmas tree, and in the after-
noon we went to Pierre. We met my
sister Tish and her friend Shane
for supper before heading to
Kadoka. We encountered quite a
bit of thick fog on the way to
Kadoka Friday night -- the kind of
fog that makes you feel like your
eyeballs are about pulled out of
their sockets from straining to see
the road. I spent the night in
Kadoka, and Saturday morning
Mom and I attended funeral serv-
ices for Harold Schnee. Saturday
afternoon was spent getting all of
Mom's Christmas gifts wrapped,
bagged and labeled, and then I re-
turned home. Fortunately, I got
home before the roads got nasty.
Monday was Bangs vaccinating
day here at the ranch, so we had
several guys for lunch. It was a cold
day, but thankfully the wind was-
n't blowing while they were work-
ing the heifers.
This week, I am grateful for
childhood memories. Sometimes I
feel like I grew up in a bubble, be-
cause it seemed like my childhood
was truly magical. I was so blessed
to be born into a happy, loving fam-
ily. Growing up in Kadoka, South
Dakota, I wasn't really aware of
most of the bad things that were
going on in the world -- I wasn't
even aware of bad things going on
in the community until later.
Harold Schnee's daughter, Carol,
was one of my best buddies, so
Harold was a big part of many of
my childhood memories. I spent a
lot of time at their dairy farm, and
Carol and I tried to help in what-
ever way we could. However, our
efforts weren't always that "help-
ful". There were lots of times when
I'm sure Harold could have happily
strangled us for some of the stunts
we pulled, but that didn't happen.
He would just smile -- always kind,
always a gentleman. He lived a
good, long, honorable life, and I'm
so glad I got to attend his funeral
on Saturday. Rest in peace, Harold.
This week, as everyone is rush-
ing around with all the seasonal ac-
tivities, I hope you'll take some
time to relax, take a deep breath
and think about what we are cele-
brating at Christmas. Also, when
you start to get a little frazzled,
take a lesson from Harold
Schnee...just smile, be kind, and be
gentle.
(this week’s news)
Greetings from partly cloudy,
cool, snow covered northeast
Haakon County! We received a lit-
tle more snow last night, and I ex-
pect today's winds will blow it
around a bit. The trees here are
pretty again this morning, covered
with frost from the fog we have
been experiencing. It looks sort of
like a Christmas card outside my
window, and I'm so lucky to be able
to stay home and enjoy it! We are
content in our little piece of
heaven. We have had many foggy
days recently, and it brings to mind
the old wives tale that says we'll
have moisture 90 days following
the fog. (At least that's the way I
remember the tale.) If that is true,
mid-March calving season could
get pretty exciting! Actually, this
year, precipitation of any sort is
going to be exciting!
I want to take this opportunity to
express my sympathy to all the
folks impacted by the recent
tragedy at the Sandy Hook Ele-
mentary School in Connecticut.
Words seem inadequate – there
doesn't seem to be any plausible ex-
planation for this type of violence.
Now on to more pleasant news!
The National Finals Rodeo is
now over for another year, and just
in time, too! I was getting a little
sleep deprived! Congratulations to
the South Dakota contestants!
Julian and Coreen Roseth were
among those attending a birthday
party for Monte Whidby Saturday
evening in Pierre. Their children
and spouses were also in atten-
dance. Sunday evening, Julian and
Coreen were guests at the home of
Clark and Carmen Alleman for
supper and card playing in honor of
Clark's birthday.
Duane and Lola Roseth were in
Philip last Wednesday for a festive
supper at the home of Jerry and
Pam Ingram. Saturday morning,
daughter Kayce (Roseth) and her
husband, John Gerlach, as well as
son Rhett Roseth arrived at Duane
and Lola's, and the entire group
went to Pierre later in the day to
attend Monte Whidby's birthday
party. Prior to the party, the
Roseth crew took the opportunity
to tour the beautifully decorated
trees at the Capitol building.
Kayce, John and Rhett returned to
their homes in Rapid City Sunday
morning.
Sunday evening, Duane and Lola
joined the group for supper and
card playing at Clark and Carmen
Alleman's.
It has been another busy week at
the home of Clint and Laura Alle-
man. Early last week, T.J. and Jea-
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports & More
Coyle’s
SuperValu
Holiday Hours
Monday, Christmas Eve
7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Closed Tuesday,
Christmas Day
Monday, New Year’s Eve:
7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
(regular hours)
Closed Tuesday,
New Year’s Day
859-2727 • Philip
Coyle’s
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEklY SPECIAl:
Philly Steak Melt
with French Fries
* * * * * *
SUNDAY SPECIAl:
Honey Stung Chicken
with Mashed Potatoes,
Salad Bar & Dessert
We will be closed Monday & Tuesday,
December 24 & 25.
Philip Motor, Inc.
859-2585 • (800) 859-5557 • Philip
www.PhilipMotor.com
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing...........................40-20
Rockers................................33.5-26.5
Petersen’s..................................30-30
Badland’s Auto....................26.5-33.5
Handrahan Const .....................26-34
Dakota Bar................................24-36
Highlights:
Clyde Schlim.................201, 207/596
Jason Petersen....................245, 248,
.....................................228 clean/657
Bryan Buxcel.........................235/639
Kim Petersen ........................181/472
Andrew Reckling.........223 clean/600
Cory Boyd .......3-10, 4-9 & 5-7 splits;
...............................................209/605
Trina Brown............6-7-10 split; 486
Jim Kujawa...........................214/581
Maralynn Burns....................187/474
Marlis Petersen.....................177/478
Wendell Buxcel..................3-10 split;
.....................................204 clean/550
Vickie Petersen .....................182/478
Carl Brown .........................3-10 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................35-9
Kennedy Imp.......................27.5-16.5
George’s Welding ......................23-21
Philip Motor..............................23-21
G&A Trenching...................18.5-25.5
Kadoka Tree Service...........17.5-26.5
Philip Health Service .........16.5-27.5
Bear Auto..................................15-29
Highlights:
Randy Boyd...........210, 247, 213/670
Bill Bainbridge..............227, 207/590
Bill Stone......................................558
Matt Schofield..............................555
Earl Park...............................203/553
Ronnie Williams....................203/536
Alvin Pearson...............................532
Jerry Iron Moccasin.....................526
Kent Buchholz.......................201/522
Fred Foland..................................517
Eliel PoorBear..............................514
Jim Larson .............3-7-10 split; 506
Johnny Wilson .............................504
Tony Gould...................................501
Terry Wentz .................................500
Ryan Seager........................3-10 split
Tyler Hauk .........................5-10 split
Wendell Buxcel.....................2-7 split
Les Struble .........................3-10 split
Gene Jones..........................2-10 split
James Mansfield ................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge.......................47.5-12.5
State Farm..........................35.5-24.5
Bowling Belles ..........................34-26
Invisibles...................................34-26
Jolly Ranchers ..........................26-34
Highlights:
Karen Foland.....3-10 split; 182, 181,
...............................................168/531
Christy Park..........................177/457
Jundy Papousek ..........5-8 split; 169,
...............................................156/459
Beth Stewart .........................153/427
Shirley O’Connor ..................159/419
Sandra O’Connor..3-10 x 2 split; 166
Vonda Hamill ...............................154
Deanna Fees........2-7 & 5-8-10 splits
Charlene Kjerstad................2-7 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Morrison’s Haying ..............30.5-21.5
Wall Food Center......................30-22
Dakota Bar................................30-22
Chiefie’s Chicks ..................28.5-23.5
First National Bank .................24-28
Hildebrand Concrete ..........22.5-29.5
Just Tammy’s......................22.5-29.5
Dorothy’s Catering ...................20-32
Highlights:
Rachel Kjerstad...........203 clean/479
Alicia Heathershaw..............173/400
Amy Morrison .......................202/532
Lois Porch.....................................182
Cristi Ferguson.....................185/524
Kathy Arthur ...............................170
Traci Radway......................5-10 split
Debbie Gartner.....................5-7 split
Ashley Reckling....................2-7 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................32-8
Dakota Bar................................26-14
O’Connell Construction............22-18
McDonnell Farms .....................19-21
West River Pioneer Tanks .......18-22
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................16-24
WEE BADD...............................16-24
The Steakhouse ........................11-29
Highlights:
Doug Hauk ..........232, 222 clean/634
Brian Pearson .....245, 228 clean/678
Randy Boyd...........................223/592
Jay McDonnell ......................202/595
Matt Schofield .....3-10 split; 200/591
Jason Petersen......................201/585
Haven Hildebrand ................202/568
Nathan Kjerstad...................200/563
Mark Foland.................................554
John Heltzel .........................5-7 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew.............................46-10
King Pins.............................37.5-18.5
Randy’s Spray Serv ..................31-25
Lee & the Ladies.......................24-32
Roy’s Repair ........................22.5-33.5
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
Duane Hand..........................235/608
Jeremy Iron Moccasin .................226
Tanner Norman ...........................202
Kelly Fees ...................5-10 split; 201
Lee Neville ...................................178
Alvin Pearson..............205 clean/583
Marla Boyd............................189/473
Cristi Ferguson.....................172/477
John Heltzel .................5-7 split; 547
Angel Nemec.........................4-5 split
Randy Boyd ........................3-10 split
Philip Area wrestlers took a trip
down to Valentine, Neb., for a
chance to test themselves against
top teams from that state as well as
two other South Dakota schools.
Head coach Matt Donnelly noted
that the tournament did not go as
good as expected. “We had some
wrestlers who did not wrestle as
well as expected,” he said. The 126
and 145 pound weight classes were
not filled, one due to an injury.
Reed Johnson, who typically wres-
tles at 152 pounds, is out due to a
cartiledge injury. “Hopefully he’ll
be back in two weeks,” Donnelly
said. Lane Blasius moved up from
the 145 pound class to fill John-
son’s spot.
Philip Area followed only Pierre’s
T.F. Riggs High School in the final
team standings. In order of points
were Pierre (191.5), Philip (141),
Valentine (131.5), Plattsmouth,
(127), Winner, S.D. (100), Ord (90),
O’Neill (86.5), Chadron (85.5),
David City (82.5), Alliance (64),
Ainsworth (39.5), Gordon/Rush-
ville (35), McCook (30), and Broken
Bow (10).
106 lbs: Jed Brown 2nd, 7-5 record
•Pinned Cristian Hulsey (ALL) 1:21
•Pinned Keith Helm (MCC) 1:24
•Major dec. Clinton O’Neel (OR) 12-0
•Decisioned by Zach Prall (PLA) 4-10
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 4th, 1-3 record
•Bye
•Major dec. by Jebben Keyes, (PIE) 5-17
•Bye
•Decisioned Wyatt Phillips (DC) 16-15
•Injury default by Keaton Gracy (AIN) 2:42
•Decisioned by Andrew Null (PLA) 14-8
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 1st, 11-3 record
•Pinned Spencer French (BB) 1:59
•Decisioned Michael Varela (DC) 7-5
•Decisioned Kasey Taylor (MCC) 6-5
•Decisioned Ely Sharkey (AIN) 6-4
132 lbs: Grady Carley, 6-6 record
•Decisioned Chase Govier (BB) 9-6
•Pinned by Blake Walters (ON):28
•Pinned Coy Terry (MCC) 1:35
•Decisioned Thomas McClure (CHA) 2-1
•Decisioned by Jospeh McNair (AIN) 0-2
138 lbs: Raedon Anderson, 1-7 record
•Major dec. by Cory Rowse (ON) 16-4
•Bye
•Pinned by Tyrel Haley (WIN) :43
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st, 11-1 record
•Pinned Dakota Baumgartner (MCC) 3:53
•Pinned Gage Orton (PLA) 3:02
•Major dec. Dusty Staab (OR) 8-0
•Pinned Seth Scott (PIE) 4:50
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 3rd,
10-4 record
•Bye
•Pinned Dawson Johnson (ALL) 3:50
•Decisioned by Colby Risen (CHA) 5-9
•Decisioned Adam Farner (WIN) 8-2
•Win by forfeit - Johnson (ALL)
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 3rd, 10-4 record
•Bye
•Pinned Sayth Jacobsen (PIE) 5:14
•Decisioned in OT by Joseph Varela (DC) 14-
16
•Pinned David Fox (ON) 4:06.
•Win by forfeit - Brandon Shuler (PLA)
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 8-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned Austin Kock (OR) 1:46
•Decisioned by Spencer Knopp (ON) 1-3
•Decisioned by Cooper Cogdill (CHA) 0-1
Grapplers score second place at Valentine
Logan Ammons works hard to pin this opponent at the Valentine Invitational Tour-
nament December 15. Ammons place third at the tournament.
Photos by Dayle Knutson
The Philip Area grapplers pose with their second place trophy after the Valentine tournament December 15th.
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Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2010 Ford F-150 Lariat
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Give Colt a call today!
Footprints in the sand
Christmas in South Dakota is a
time of family and of giving. It is
also a time to say thank you.
Over the past year in South
Dakota, more than 500 people were
eye, tissue and/or organ donors.
Each of these donors left their foot-
prints in the sands of time, leaving
us forever changed and forever
grateful. These precious gifts of do-
nation, when the donor did not
need them anymore, helped to
make many miracles happen.
A child in West River can see be-
cause of a corneal transplant. A
woman can return to her career be-
cause she received a bone graft
during spinal surgery allowing her
to walk. A high school student can
once again play soccer after a seri-
ous knee injury. An infant can see
the faces of those who love her for
the first time. A new heart beats
strong giving someone a second
chance at life.
In 2012, approximately 2,200
South Dakotans' received a cornea,
tissue or organ transplant.
Chances are good that your lives
are touched by one or more of these
people. Many thousands more will
benefit from the knowledge and
tools gained from research dona-
tions aimed at curing or treating
cancer, diabetes, and other dis-
eases. In addition, lives have been
saved by the new or strengthened
skills learned in Sioux Falls and
Rapid City by paramedics, nurses,
and other emergency responders
through donor family authorized
EMS training. Thank you, donor
families across South Dakota, for
these very special gifts. When your
hearts were breaking, you reached
out and gave permission, or sup-
ported your family member's donor
designation. This kindness helped
stop another heart from breaking.
You made a difference; we are all
forever touched and grateful.
We hope that as you read this,
you will think of the compassion of
the gifts given and if you have not
already done so, decide to be a
donor yourself when you do not
need your sight and organs any-
more. Be a hero; tell your family
and sign up at the Driver's License
Bureau to be a donor. You may also
sign up to be a donor at www.do-
natelifesd.org. We are proud that
55 percent of South Dakota drivers
have already signed up as desig-
nated donors. This Christmas,
please join the crowd.
For more information, call the
South Dakota Lions Eye and Tis-
sue Bank at 605-373-1008. And,
thank a Lions Club member in
your community for starting and
continuing to sponsor our Lions
Eye and Tissue Bank. Thank you,
Jens Saakvitne
executive director, S.D.
Lions Eye and Tissue Bank
Letter to the Editor
195 lbs: Gavin DeVries, 3-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Blake Bandur (OR) 2:33
•Bye
•Major dec. by Mike Leger (PLA) 4-12
220 lbs: Logan Ammons, 3rd,
10-3 record
•Bye
•Decisioned Broderick Hoeft (DC) 13-9
•Pinned by Lane Lettau (PIE) 2:34
•Pinned Jacob Baldwin (ALL) :56
•Pinned Devin Hernandez-Cronk (OR) 2:30
220 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries
•Pinned by Mitch collicott (MCC) :06
•Bye
•Pinned by Keith Sandall (ON) :44
The grapplers will focus on im-
proving their performance as they
have an extra week between meets.
Donnelly felt the wrestlers took a
step backward and were not focus-
ing on what was ahead of them;
were living off last week’s accom-
plishment.
They will travel to Salem for Mc-
Cook Central-Montrose’s tourna-
ment on December 29. Donnelly
noted that it was going to “be a dog
fight all the way around.” Philip is
the lone West River team traveling
east to take on the East River
teams.
It took nine days, but Oelrichs
barrel racer Lisa Lockhart won a
prestigious round and $18,257 at
the 10-day, $6 million Wrangler
National Finals Rodeo in Las
Vegas. The night prior, she had
reached the milestone of $1 million
in earnings through her 12-year ca-
reer.
“When you really put things in
perspective and see the stats on
how few have reached that level, it
makes it that much more sweet to
know it’s a very elite group,” said
Lockhart. “I’m honored.”
Only the top 15 contestants in
each of seven events qualify for
rodeo’s Super Bowl, which kicked
off in UNLV’s Thomas and Mack
Center on December 6 and
wrapped up December. 15.
Lockhart, a wife and mother of
three, competed in her sixth
straight Wrangler NFR. On her
horse she calls Louie, 47-year-old
Lockhart raced around the barrels
in 13.66 seconds for the win, which
brought her total NFR earnings to
$63,409.
Lockhart entered the NFR in
fourth place in the world champi-
onship standings and, aside from a
penalty she took in round two for a
tipped barrel, she placed in every
round but one. Still, she trailed
leader Mary Walker by nearly
$100,000 and had no chance at a
gold buckle this year.
“You come in here hoping you
can have the rodeo you’re capable
of having,” said Lockhart. “Some-
times you do and sometimes you
don’t. It happens to all of us; it’s a
roller coaster. I’m thrilled it’s
turned out as good as it has.”
Oelrichs cowgirl wins big at
Wrangler National Finals Rodeo
The 23rd annual Central South
Dakota Youth Goose Hunt will be
held in Pierre in early January.
The hunts will be held Saturday
and Sunday, January 5-6. They are
free to youngsters who are 12-to-15
years old.
However, young hunters will be
required to attend a mandatory in-
formation meeting at the Pierre
Ramkota at 7:00 p.m. CST, Friday,
January 4. Hunters will be as-
signed their guides for the weekend
and given instructions for their
morning hunting sessions on Sat-
urday and Sunday.
Following the Saturday morning
hunt, youth can attend seminars
on goose calling, decoy placement
and be eligible for several prizes.
“This event is a great way for
kids to get involved in waterfowl
hunting,” said Sam Koenecke, a
past participant, and now one of
the event coordinators. “We want
kids of all experience levels to see
what goose hunting is all about, get
some hands-on training and hope-
fully become the future of water
fowl hunting.”
For more information, call the
S.D. Game, Fish and Parks Water-
fowl Access Trailer at 264-5380,
Tim Withers at 280-6435, or Sam
Koenecke at 220-0001.
Youth goose hunt to be held in Pierre
mation from businesses when they
apply to be part of the program, in-
cluding income and sales tax docu-
ments, and it forbids the release of
that information. USDA argued
the provision also applied to the
money amounts that businesses
earn from food stamp sales.
The Argus Leader argued that
the statute didn’t forbid the release
of food stamp revenues, noting that
nowhere was there a specific refer-
ence to those revenues. The food
stamp program is now known as
the Supplemental Assistance and
Nutrition Program, or SNAP.
But in her ruling to dismiss the
suit, Schreier said that redemption
amounts – the money businesses
get from food stamp purchases –
was information that would be in-
cluded among the sales figures of
stores that reapplied to be part of
the SNAP program.
“Although Congress has not ex-
pressly deemed redemption infor-
mation as essential data to be in-
cluded under (the statute), the
statutory language encompasses
this type of income and tax infor-
mation because redemption data
naturally falls under either term’s
broad umbrella,” Schreier wrote.
Argus Leader lawyer Jon Arne-
son said the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act dictates that the disclosure
of government records is the rule,
not the exception. “In this case, the
United States Department of Agri-
culture has kept secret the
amounts government pays to food
vendors voluntarily participating
in USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program,” Arneson
said.
Newspaper appeals food stamps ruling
continued from page 1
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports
Staff SpotligHt
rowdy SCHuler
– Employed 4 Years
– Jack-of-all-Trades
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
| |
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the whole year through...
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Schofield Trucking
1ordan & Anita
Dylan, Alec, Hana & 1essa
Schofield Trucking
1ordan & Anita
Dylan, Alec, Hana & 1essa
II's possIbIe wIIh our heIp.
CIve us a caII Ioday! We'II geI
you back on Irack and ready
Ior aII oI Ihe IesIIve Iun ahead. Ph¡I¡p Ch¡ropruct¡c CI¡n¡c
MIke, Doreen & MaIIory
F8lß·lf00 00ll08¶8
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F8lß·lf00 00ll08¶8
The Lady Scotties’ home game
against the Stanley County Lady
Buffaloes, Thursday, December 13,
began with 11 turnovers before the
first score.
The first quarter clock read 5:52
when the Lady Buffs sank the
game’s first basket. It took more
than a full minute of game play for
the Scotties to get on the score-
board, and they followed behind
their opponents until only 1:35 re-
mained in the game.
That 28-27 lead held for less
than five seconds, when Stanley
County sank a field goal and two
free throws to again be on top.
Thirty seconds later, Philip tied the
score. The clock ticked down the
last minute of the fourth quarter as
the Buffaloes sank a free throw,
then sank another. Eight seconds
remained when Philip’s Bailey
Radway put in a two-pointer to tie
the game.
At the start of the four-minute
overtime play, the Buffs gained the
lead by sinking two free throws, fol-
lowed by Philip sinking their own
two to again tie the score. Then,
Philip’s Madison Hand drilled in a
field goal to put the Scotties over
the Buffaloes. The last minute saw
Radway applying the coup de grâce
with two free throws to cinch the
38-34 win.
1 2 3 4 OT
Philip 6 11 23 32 38
Stanley Co. 9 17 24 32 34
Field goals:
11/56 – 20%.
F r e e
t h r o w s :
12/24 – 50%.
Three-point
goals: 0/2 – 0%.
Philip scor-
ers: Bailey
Radway – 15,
M a d i s o n
Hand – 11,
J u s t i n a
Cvach – 4,
Katie Hostutler
and Jordyn
Dekker – 3
each, Holly
Iwan and
Hanna Hostut-
ler – 1 each.
S t a n l e y
County top
scorers: Cody
Ryckman – 8,
Lady Scotties come
back to beat Stanley
County in overtime
The Lady Scotties won the year-long bragging rights of holding the James “Scotty”
Philip Traveling Girls’ Basketball Trophy between Philip and Stanley County.
Philip’s Justina Cvach made the free
throws during overtime that started
the Scotties’ rise over the Stanley
County Lady Buffaloes.
Madison Hand (#12) and Krista Wells (#13) sandwich a Stanley County Lady Buf-
falo in this attempted rebound retrieval. Photos by Del Bartels
Tawnee Whitley – 7, Nicole Smith and
Bailey Tibbs – 5 each.
Rebounds: 38. Leaders: Hand – 12,
Dekker – 11, Radway – 9, Iwan and
Cvach – 2, Hostutler – 1.
Assists: 8. Leaders: Radway – 3, H.
Hostutler – 2, Krista Wells, Iwan and
Hand – 1 each.
Steals: 10. Leaders: Radway – 5,
Iwan – 4, Dekker – 1.
Blocks: 5. Leaders: Dekker – 2,
Wells, Radway and H. Hostutler – 1
each.
Turnovers: 26.
Fouls: 22. Fouled out: Dekker.
The Philip junior varsity team
also fought a close game, winning
25-21.
1 2 3 4
Philip 4 11 17 25
Stanley Co. 5 9 19 21
Field goals: 8/48 – 17%.
Three-point goals: 0/2 – 0%..
Philip scorers: Katlin Knutson – 6,
H. Hostutler – 5, K. Hostutler and Brett
Carley – 4 each, Ellie Coyle and Megan
Williams – 2 each.
Stanley County top scorers: Ryck-
man and Tibbs – 6 each, Ali Scott and
Lilly Cook – 4 each.
Rebounds: Philip – 25, Stanley
County – 24. Philip leaders: K. Hostut-
ler and Ashton Reedy – 5 each, Kaci
Olivier and H. Hostutler – 3 each,
Tyana Gottsleben, Cvach and Knut-
son – 2 each, Williams, Peyton DeJong
and Coyle – 1 each.
Assists: 4. Leaders: Carley – 2, K.
Hostutler and Reedy – 1 each.
Steals: 10. Leaders: Carley, H. Hos-
tutler and Reedy – 2 each, K. Hostutler,
Olivier, Knutson and Cvach – 1 each.
Blocks: 1. Leader: Reedy.
Turnovers: Philip – 26, Stanley
County – 24.
Fouls: 16.
The Philip Lady Scotties hosted
the Edgemont Moguls to a devas-
tating defeat, Saturday, December
15.
In the first quarter, the Scotties
almost tripled their opponent’
score, with a 19-7 lead. Limiting
the Moguls to even one less point
than they got in the first quarter,
Philip finished the first half with
an 18 point advantage.
The second half saw no mercy. In
the third quarter, Philip allowed
only three points while rocketing
ahead by putting another 17 points
on the scoreboard. In the fourth
quarter, an additional 21 points for
Philip, and only one point for Edge-
mont, sealed the lid shut on the
game. Philip won 68 to 16.
1 2 3 4
Philip 19 30 47 68
Edgemont 7 12 15 16
Field goals: 23/85 – 27%.
Free throws: Philip – 16/35 – 46%,
Edgemont – 7/23 – 30%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 0/2 –
0%.
Philip scorers: Bailey Radway – 21,
Madison Hand – 18, Jordyn Dekker –
14, Brett Carley – 7, Krista Wells – 5,
Katlin Knutson – 2, Katie Hostutler –
1.
Edgemont scorers: Kyla Porter – 7,
Cay-D Sedlacek – 5, Jaymie Litzel – 3,
Chelsea Christopherson – 1..
Rebounds: 56. Leaders: Hand – 15,
Radway – 11, Dekker – 9, K. Hostutler
and Holly Iwan – 5 each, Justina
Cvach – 4, Wells – 3, Carley – 2, Hanna
Hostutler and Knutson – 1 each..
Assists: 13. Leaders: Hand – 5,
Iwan – 3, Carley, Wells, Radway, H.
Hostutler and Knutson – 1 each.
Steals: 21. Leaders: Wells – 7,
Hand – 5, Carley and Iwan – 2 each, K.
Hostutler, Radway, H. Hostutler, Knut-
son and Dekker – 1 each.
Blocks: 11. Leaders: Iwan and
Dekker – 3 each, Hand and Knutson –
2 each, H. Hostutler – 1.
Turnovers: Philip – 20, Edgemont –
26.
Fouls: 24. Fouled out: Sedlacek,
Porter and Litzel.
The Philip junior varsity also
had a somewhat easy victory,
though with a far closer score. The
third quarter is where the Lady
Scotties and the Moguls both
slowed their advancement, with
Philip scoring only six points and
Edgemont gaining only two.
1 2 3 4
Philip 12 20 26 35
Edgemont 7 11 13 21
Field goals: 16/65 – 25%.
Free throws: 3/5 – 60%.
Three-point goals: 0/3 – 0%.
Philip scorers: Carley and Cvach –
8 each, Ashton Reedy – 6, Tyanna
Gottsleben – 3, Megan Williams, K.
Hostutler, Kaci Olivier, Knutson and
Peyton DeJong – 2 each.
Edgemont top scorers: Porter – 7,
Sedlacek – 6.
Rebounds: Philip – 32, Edgemont –
14. Philip leaders: Cvach – 7, Olivier
and Knutson – 6 each, DeJong – 5, K.
Hostutler and Carley – 2 each,
Williams, Ellie Coyle, H. Hostutler,
Reedy and Gottsleben – 1 each.
Assists: 9. Leaders: Knutson – 5,
Cvach – 2, K. Hostutler and Reedy – 1
each.
Steals: 14. Leaders: Knutson – 4,
Reedy – 3, Coyle, H. Hostutler and
Cvach – 2 each, K. Hostutler – 1.
Blocks: 4. Leader: Coyle – 2, Olivier
and Cvach – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 25, Edgemont –
23.
Fouls: 14.
Lady Scotties smoke Edgemont
Kadoka was the site for one of
the Philip Lady Scotties basketball
team’s few losses so far this season.
On Monday, December 17, the
Kadoka Area Kougars defeated the
Scotties 32 to 49.
The Philip offense just could not
get on the scoreboard quickly
enough, and defensively could not
keep Kadoka from outscoring them
in the first three quarters. The
fourth quarter saw a Scottie gain of
11 to Kadoka’s nine, but the slight
teetering in scoring was too little
too late.
1 2 3 4
Philip 10 15 21 32
Kadoka 16 30 40 49
Field goals: 13/40 – 33%.
Free throws: Philip – N/A,
Kadoka – 11/17 – 65%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 0/2 –
0%.
Philip scorers: Madison Hand –
14, Jordyn Dekker – 10, Bailey Rad-
way – 6, Holly Iwan – 2.
Kadoka Area scorers: Kwincy
Ferguson – 17, Tessa Stout – 10,
Marti Herber – 9.
Rebounds: Philip – 28, Kadoka –
24. Philip leaders: Hand – 7, Iwan,
Radway, Hanna Hostutler and
Dekker – 4 each, Krista Wells – 2,
Katie Hostutler, Brett Carley and
Justina Cvach – 1 each.
Assists: 11. Leaders: Iwan and
Wells – 3 each, Hand – 2, Radway, H.
Hostutler and Dekker – 1 each.
Steals: 18. Leaders: Iwan – 6,
Dekker – 4, Hand, Wells, Radway
and H. Hostutler – 2 each.
Blocks: 17. Leaders: Dekker – 7,
Radway – 4, Iwan and Hand – 2 each,
Wells and H. Hostutler – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 34, Kadoka –
22.
Fouls: 12. Fouled out: Hand.
The Philip junior varsity fought
a close game, starting with a deficit
in the first quarter. By halftime the
Scotties were trailing 8-11. The
third quarter saw a tilt back to
even play, with both Philip and
Kadoka showing 17 on the score-
board. The Scotties forced that tilt
to tip even further by outscoring
their opponents by four points to
make a successful comeback and
win 27-23.
1 2 3 4
Philip 4 8 17 27
Kadoka 7 11 17 23
Field goals: 13/40 – 33%.
Free throws: Philip – 1/2 – 50%,
Kadoka – 5/18 – 28%.
Three-point goals: Philip – 0/0,
Kadoka – 0/0.
Philip scorers: Ashton Reedy – 5, K.
Hostutler, Ellie Coyle, H. Hostutler and
Katlin Knutson – 4 each, Ta’Te Fortune,
Tyanna Gottsleben and Peyton DeJong – 2
each.
Kadoka top scorers: Destiny Dale – 10,
Mackenzie Word and Tori L. – 4 each.
Rebounds: Philip – 28, Kadoka – 24.
Philip leaders: H. Hostutler – 5, Knutson and
Cvach – 4 each, Carley, Fortune and Reedy –
3 each, K. Hostutler and Gottsleben – 2 each,
Kaci Olivier and DeJong – 1 each.
Assists: 6. Leaders: Reedy – 2, K. Hostut-
ler, H. Hostutler, Knutson and Cvach –1
each.
Steals: 9. Leaders: Cvach – 3, Coyle and
H. Hostutler – 2 each, Reedy and DeJong – 1
each.
Blocks: 6. Leaders: Cvach – 3, H. Hostut-
ler, Knutson and Reedy – 1 each.
Turnovers: Philip – 33, Kadoka – 22.
Fouls: 18.
The next game for the Philip
Lady Scotties will be in Bison
against the Cardinals, Thursday,
December 20, starting at 6:00 p.m.
Lady Scotties fall to Kougars
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 10
School & Community
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your
phone number to: news-
desk@pioneer-review.com
With special thanks to
everyone who has
dropped by this year.
We appreciate your
business and wish you
all of the best in the
coming year.
PhiIip Motor, Inc.
A very Merry
Christmas and a
Happy New Year,
too!
Frøm us,
1ø yøu
Frøm us,
1ø yøu
www.myHCSsupport.com
Ron Larson
859-2471 · Philip
Æe--q C0-|·tma· te ea-
Ca·teme-· . Ae|q0ée-· .
u··ec|ate· . aad J-|ead·!
1o uíí those vho huve íít up our yeur,
\e gíve our very best víshes íor the
bríghtest hoííduy seuson ever!
\e couídn't huve done ít víthout uíí oí you. 1hunks!
Brant's fIcctric
Btan| & Iee
Iance, Ie|||, Btod| & Cat|et
Warm and
Toasty Wishes
Warm and
Toasty Wishes
May the
joys of the
season light
up your
life and
warm your
coldest day.
West Central Electric
Cooperative, Inc.
A Touchstone Energy Cooperative
Believe
DaIe TruckIng
C.K. & Pam DaIe
1or God so Iovcd thc worId, thut hc guvc
h¡s onI) bcgottcn 5on, thut whosocvcr
bcI¡cvcth ¡n h¡m shouId not pcr¡sh, but
huvc cvcrIust¡ng I¡]c. |ohn 3:16 (K|V)
The Philip Scotties boys’ basket-
ball team hosted the Stanley
County Buffaloes, Thursday, De-
cember 13.
Less than 40 seconds passed
after the tipoff and the Philip var-
sity had two points on the score-
board. Defensively, they did not
allow Stanley County to score until
after the beginning of the second
quarter. The rest of the game con-
tinued as a walk-away for the Scot-
ties, until the final buzzer and a 62-
30 win.
1 2 3 4
Philip 13 30 46 62
Stanley Co. 0 14 18 30
Field goals: 24/73 – 33%.
Free throws: 5/12 – 42%.
Three-point goals: 3/13 – 23%.
Philip scorers: Brody Jones – 12, Tris-
ten Rush and Thomas Doolittle – 10 each,
Tate DeJong and Gunner Hook – 8 each,
Blake Martinez – 6, Paul Guptill – 2,
Quade Slovek – 1.
Stanley County scorers: Kevin An-
derson – 15, Colten Dragaset and Tucker
Fischback – 5 each, Brevin Klemann – 3,
Brady Washechek – 2.
Rebounds: 51. Leaders: Rush – 12, De-
Jong – 8, Hook – 7, Doolittle, Slovek and
Wyatt Schaack – 4 each, Jones and Gup-
till – 3 each, Martinez and Gavin Bruck-
lacher – 2 each, Nelson Holman and Kruse
Bierle – 1 each.
Assists: 12. Leaders: DeJong – 3, Hol-
man, Martinez, Rush and Doolittle – 2
each.
Steals: 14. Leaders: Holman and
Rush – 4 each, Doolittle and Hook – 2
each, Jones and Brucklacher – 1 each.
Blocks: 2. Leaders: Hook and Bierle –
1 each.
Turnovers: 11.
Fouls: Philip – 16, Stanley County –
16.
The Philip junior varsity team
did not start with as devastating of
a lead, but also walked away with
a 51-17 victory.
1 2 3 4
Philip 11 17 43 51
Stanley Co. 7 9 15 17
Field goals: 24/59 – 41%.
Free throws: 3/19 – 16%.
Three-point goals: 0/5 – 0%.
Philip scorers: Guptill – 14, Jones and
Brucklacher – 6 each, Martinez – 5, Schaack,
Jace Giannonatti and Jacob Kammerer – 4
each, Bierle, Ben Stangle, Garrett Snook and
Keegan Burnett – 2 each.
Stanley County scorers: Klemann – 7,
Damon Hoftiezer – 6, Dalton Shrake and
Trey Montana – 2 each.
Rebounds: 26. Leaders: Schaack and Gi-
annonatti – 5 each., Guptill –4, Stangle and
Todd Antonsen – 3 each, Kammerer – 2, Mar-
tinez, Jones, Brucklacher and Bierle – 1 each.
Assists: 10. Leaders: Martinez – 3, Jones
and Antonsen – 2 each, Brucklacher, Bierle
and Kammerer – 1 each.
Steals: 27. Leaders: Brucklacher and
Kammerer – 6 each, Jones – 4, Martinez and
Guptill – 3 each, Giannonatti – 2, Schaack,
Stangle and Antonsen – 1 each
Blocks: 1. Leader: Bierle.
Turnovers: 14.
Fouls: 8.
Scotties work over Buffaloes 62-30
Philip’s Tate DeJong up, over and through for two.
Photos by Del Bartels Rebound determination by Tristen Rush.
Philip’s Nelson Holman.
Quade Slovek.
Blake Martinez.
This Stanley County player found out that he really did not want to crash into on-
coming Scottie Gunner Hook.
The Philip Scotties boys’ basket-
ball team hosted the Edgemont
Moguls, Saturday, December 15.
The varsity game began as an
even match, with the first quarter
ending in a 10-10 tie. Then, the
Scotties took the lead, and ended
the first half with a comfort zone of
13 points over the Moguls.
The third quarter saw only seven
points allowed to Edgemont, while
Philip could put only nine on the
scoreboard. The final quarter was
a run-away for the Philip players,
who gained another 24 points be-
fore the final buzzer to end the
game with a decisive 68-37 win.
1 2 3 4
Philip 10 35 44 68
Edgemont 10 22 29 37
Field goals: 22/63 – 35%.
Free throws: Philip – 15/24 – 63%,
Edgemont – 10/28, 36%.
Three-point goals: 3/15 – 20%.
Philip scorers: Thomas Doolittle –
16, Tate DeJong – 14, Tristen Rush –
13, Gunner Hook – 11, Nelson Hol-
man – 9, Quade Slovek and Blake Mar-
tinez – 2 each, Paul Guptill – 1.
Edgemont scorers: Dakota Mohler
and Miles Englebert – 8 each, Mason
Ostenson and Treg Schaack – 7 each,
Zack Evens – 3, Lathen Stevens and
Tim Christopherson – 2 each..
Rebounds: 55. Leaders: Hook – 15,
DeJong – 12, Rush and Doolittle – 7
each, Martinez – 4, Holman, Slovek and
Wyatt Schaack – 3 each, Gavin Bruck-
lacher – 1.
Assists: 9. Leaders: Doolittle – 3,
Holman, Rush and DeJong – 2 each.
Steals: 10. Leaders: Hook – 4, De-
Jong – 3, Martinez – 2, Brucklacher –
1.
Blocks: 6. Leaders: Hook – 3, De-
Jong – 2, Martinez – 1.
Turnovers: 14.
Fouls: Philip – 26, Edgemont – 18.
The Philip junior varsity began
its four quarters with taking, hold-
ing and expanding the lead for a
48-28 victory.
1 2 3 4
Philip 11 20 33 46
Stanley Co. 7 16 22 28
Field goals: 19/59 – 32%.
Free throws: Philip – 8/21 – 38%,
Edgemont – 10/15 – 66%.
Three-point goals: 0/2 – 0%.
Philip scorers: Schaack – 11, Ben
Stangle – 10, Guptill – 7, Brody Jones – 5,
Kruse Bierle – 4, Brucklacher, Todd An-
tonsen, Jacob Kammerer and Garrett
Snook – 2 each, Martinez – 1.
Edgemont scorers: Englebert – 11,
Mohler – 7, Stevens – 6, Ostenson and
Christopherson – 2 each.
Rebounds: 38. Leaders: Bierle – 8,
Schaack – 5, Guptill, B. Stangle and Ryan
Van Tassel – 4 each, Martinez – 3, Jones,
Jace Giannonatti and Snook – 2 each,
Chase Wright, Antonsen, Kammerer and
S. Stangle – 1 each.
Assists: 6. Leaders: Martinez – 2,
Jones, Brucklacher, B. Stangle and
Snook – 1 each.
Steals: 12. Leaders: Jones and Gup-
till – 3 each, Martinez – 2, Brucklacher,
Bierle, B. Stangle and Kammerer – 1 each.
Blocks: 1. Leader: Martinez.
Turnovers: 16.
Fouls: 19.
Scotties ease past
Edgemont 68-37
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 11
Community
W
W
W
.
G
R
O
S
S
E
N
B
U
R
G
.
C
O
M
Tillage
Season Ending Closeout Units
JD 2700, C-Spring Blade Mt, Nice Shape ...............
......................................... #38250 (BF) $19,750
WINNER (W)
Special of the Month
BLOOMFIELD (BF)
Special of the Month
HARTINGTON (H)
Special of the Month
LAUREL (L)
Special of the Month
PIERRE (PR)
Special of the Month
2000 John Deere 8110 ....
S#10028 $69,000
John Deere 8100 #26789
2WD $48,500
MFWD $75,000
Tractors: Row Crop
JD 9770 &
9770 STS
12 TO CHOOSE FROM
AS LOW AS
$199,000
Combines
(6) 2010 JD 9670 Corn/Bean 2WD Hydrostatic ...........
.................................................AS LOW AS $189,000
(4) John Deere 9760 ..............AS LOW AS $130,000
(2) John Deere 9760
AS LOW AS
$130,000
Prices Reduced On Select Models!
See details on web site.
‘08 Harvest
International
13x82 Auger
S#32487
$11,000
2004 Knight
4042 Feed
Wagon
SN#28919
Single Axle, 540 PTO
Scale , 3’ Auger
$
17,500 cash
200 Flexicoil
Slim Air Hoe Drill
Double Shoot, All Run
Blkg, Towbetween,
3450 Tank,Sn Tank
114135C-1004 Steel
Packers 9 Inch 51Ft
Dual Fans Sn #9844
$
28,000
Sprayers
1994 Wilmar
S# 10334
765, 60ft booms,
3636 hrs (P)
$29,900
Tractors: Articulated 4WD
2006 New Holland TV145 Cab, Singles, 3 Pt Hitch,
PTO,2,288 hrs ........................... S#9966 (P) $84,500
Cab, Powershift, Duals,
359 hrs, S# 10113 (W)
........... $245,000
2011 John
Deere 9430
Cab, Collarshift, Duals, 3pt,
6,530 hrs S# 10152 (P)
............. $75,000
1997 New
Holland 9682
John Deere 4030 Cab, 2WD, Collarshift, Loader
557 hrs .......................................... S# 9713 (P) $24,000
1982 John Deere 4840 2wd, P-Shift, 3 SCVs, 1000 PTO,
8822 hrs ..................................... S#38060 (W) $25,000
John Deere 7800 MFWD, ................S#8581 $50,000
2004 JD 7820 MFWD, 4170 Hrs, JD 746 Loader S#10350
(W) .................................................................. $129,500
2005 CIH MX 285 ...........................S#9938 $115,000
(4) JD 637
Disks
As Low As
$51,500
Air Drills
(3) JD 1860, tow
betweens
#8106, 9062,
7191
As Low As
(6) JD 1890 towbetweens....................... As LowAs $75,000
(1) Flexi Coil 5000 (2) towbetween (1) towbehind.... #9677As
Lowas .........................................................................$75,500
(1) 2000 Flexi Coil 7500, towbetween, #9844........................
......................................................................... (P-SD) $30,000
(3) JD 4930s 90 Booms, hours as lowas 896..........................
.................................................................. as lowas $209,000
Summers 1500 90’ Booms ....... ..#8014 .as lowas $20,000
Flexi-Coil 67XL 90’ Booms, 1500 gal ...S#9753 (P) $13,000
(1) 2006 JD 4920 Self Propelled, 1677 hrs (W-N) $154,000
(1) Summers Super Sprayers, Pull Type..... choice (W-SD) $2,500
2007 JD 4930 Self-Prof Sprayer, #9536, PH, 1587 Hrs .......
.............................................................................. $185,000
2008 JD 9770S Combine, #9465, W, 1314 Hrs $200,000
2004 MacDon 963 Header, #9277, PH ................$20,000
2001 JD 1860 Air Drill, #9062, PR........................$60,000
2004 JD 1890/1910 Air Drill, #9060/9061, PR.... $81,000
2003 Summers 1500 Sprayer, #8916, P.............. $18,000
2007 JD 1890 Air Drill, #8443, W.........................$90,000
2002 JD 1890 Air Drill, #8111, W..........................$75,000
2009 JD 635D Draper Header, #7702, P..............$39,900
2009 JD 635D Draper Header, #7697, W.............$39,900
1998 JD 1900 Air Drill, #7191, P...........................$65,000
1997 MacDon 960-36 Header, #9383, P............. $13,000
2005 Case RBX562 Baler, #9192, W.................... $13,000
2009 Shelbourne CVS32 Header, #8626, W.......$33,000
2004 MacDon 963 Header, #8714, P...................$25,000
Feterl 13X82 Auger, #8665, W................................ $3,000
2009 JD 1890 Air Drill, #7495, W..........................$80,000
2001 JD 567 Baler, #7965, W................................$11,000
2007 JD 568 Baler, #7177, PH..............................$25,000
2008 Frontier MJ4081 Bale Spear, #7348, PH......... $500
Frontier 1340 Pallet Fork, #7156, W........................$1,200
Frontier 1301 Bale Spear, #6903, PH......................... $500
WAYNE (WA)
Special of the Month
Winner, SD
Toll Free: (800) 658-3440
Pierre, SD
Toll Free: (800) 742-8110
Philip, SD
Toll Free:
(800) 416-7839
Bloomfield, NE
Toll Free: (800) 658-3252
Hartington, NE
Toll Free:(800) 624-7826
Laurel, NE
Toll Free: (800) 365-6257
Wayne, NE
Toll Free: (800) 343-3309
Call Local Store M-F 7:30am-5:30pm;
Sat 7:30am- Call for local store
closing hours.
2009 John
Deere 9630
4WD Tractor
Stock#10290
$237,000
2010
artsway
auger
12x82 auger
in great shape
Stock #22590
$13,000
John
Deere
568 Baler
Stk# 26524
1000 PTO, 5’ Belt
Mega Wide plus p/u
$27,950
PHILIP (P)
Special of the Month
John Deere 1860 and
1900 Air seeder & cart
SN#9062 & 9063
Width: 42’ • Spacing:
7.5” • Shoot: Single
Shoot • Smooth gauge
wheel • All Run Blockage
warning System • Single
Shoot Air Package for
Tow-Between Cart
$
58,000
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Wlshlng you all ol thc |oy...
Òl a maglcal scason. May
thc splrlt ol thls spcclal
tlmc warm your hcart & llll
your homc wlth happlncss.
Jo our customcrs and all
ol our lrlcnds wc cxtcnd
our bcst wlshcs lor a
|oyous hollday scason
and prospcrous ncw ycar!
Jhank you lor your
patronagc!
1ratssa k l|rsa|t| 1at||sa ätrr|tts
Wishing you a season
fiIIed vilh harmony and |oy.
Thanks for making lhis ¡asl year
a nolevorlhy one for us.
L0£H Q 1tHut£ Kt0þþ£t
Q Ïumtty
Dogs can be man’s best friend, a faithful companion, an aggressive protector.
This dog is all these, but can see better with glasses on.
This month we celebrate the birth of a man who taught us life’s important
things. Among them faith, hope and love. The best of these, He said, is love.
Love abounds at this season, but we should remember as well our pet dogs
who love us unconditionally and would risk their lives to defend us.
So, love one another and give your dog a bone and a hug!
Photo & message by Bill Kunkle
Season of Love
Christmas time is special as you
hear from old neighbors and
friends who only write once a year
or so. I received letters from both
Glen Reynick and Brad Schofield
who recalled old times and memo-
ries in their letters.
Glen has left Torrington, Wyo.,
and moved to Columbia, Mo.,
where he can be near Ginger. He
found a home he really likes and is
all settled in and he sold his condo
in Torrington. He stated that he is
enjoying all the big ballgames they
have there and gets to see a lot of
college games as the University of
Missouri is located there. He said
that he is now a big Mizzou fan.
In October, Glen came back to
visit his sister, Ruth, in Crawford,
Neb. Then went on from there to
see his sister, Marilyn, in Torring-
ton. He met Craig Reynick, Gene’s
son, in Boise, Ind. And they went to
watch St. Boise play Wyoming in
Laramie. He said Janna is living in
Union City, N.J., but was up high
enough that the flooding did not
reach her home, but was without
electricity and phone service for a
week, so he was unable to contact
her. He said it was a worry for a
while. Janna will be spending the
holidays with him and other fam-
ily.
The Grindstone Club had the
last of the three times they meet a
year at the senior center in Philip
Friday for their Christmas dinner.
Guests were Larry Gabriel, Loren
Kiel, Jack Griesel, Terry Wentz,
Dorothy Fortune, Herb Sieler and
Vicki Eide. Rich Smith, who comes
every year, was not able to attend
this year. We all enjoyed a great
meal and entertainment by Loren
and Rose Kiel who played Christ-
mas music.
We all exchanged our gifts and
roll call was interesting. It was to
tell of a good or bad event we had
went through this year. As Jean
Burns was in the hospital and was
not able to be there she wrote us all
a greeting of Merry Christmas sent
by way of her daughter, Charlotte.
We all signed a get well card for
Charlotte to return to Jean wising
her a speedy return to health.
It was decided what to do for our
outings for 2013. One thing we will
for sure do is have the Grindstone
card party again in October. We
will go on a special trip somewhere
as a group. We had an election and
Arlyce Griesel will remain presi-
dent, Bev McDaniel, treasure, and
Esther Knutson didn’t wish to re-
main secretary, so Mary Eide will
take over that job.
A couple tables of card players
came in to play cards and put up
with all the noise we were making.
Everyone got along, after all it is
the Christmas season and time to
share and be thankful for what we
have due to Jesus’ birth.
I received a nice card and picture
from Grace (Oldenberg) Hunt. The
photo was of Grace, Gary and Con-
nie taken at Gary’s house in
Mitchell where they had a small
family reunion. The kids sure do
grow up and change in looks over
the years.
To my surprise when I was read-
ing the country magazine I re-
ceived this week, I saw an article
by an old friend, Geraldine Evans.
She wrote about the blizzard of ‘49
at Hermosa. She now lives in
Brighton, Colo.
I’m sure you wonder how I know
so many people. Well, as a kid our
family moved to Custer and then
lived at Sundance, Wyo., for three
years where I went to high school
and also spent time in Hamilton,
Mont., and Nampa, Idaho. My
mother was a daughter of Webster
Hicks. She was born near Elm
Springs at Dellzel, S.D. and was
one of 13 children. I still have sev-
eral relatives in that area. I spent
a lot of time in the camping pro-
gram at Faith and down in the In-
terior area. Then worked at the
Philip Health Service for 35 years
where I met many people. And I
am a close and distant relative to
so many people in Haakon County.
My mother’s sisters lived in the
Salem and Sioux Falls area and I
have several cousins still living in
those areas, so it is easy to run into
people I know.
I was in Philip for doctor ap-
pointments and so was Mike and
Gretchen Rausch, Wasta, who met
up with me and they took me out to
lunch.
Marvin, Vicki and Mary Eide at-
tended the Milesville school pro-
gram and Marvin accompanied
Colby playing and singing “Blue
Christmas.” A nice supper was
served after the program.
Then on Sunday night, we all at-
tended the nice Christmas program
at the E. Free Church after which
we had a wonderful soup supper
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
continued on page 18
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2006 Chevy Impala
V-6 Auto. Nice, clean, dependable car.
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 12
Community
1hen spuke }esus uguín unto them, suyíng, l
um the ííght oí the voríd: he thut íoííoveth
me shuíí not vuík ín durkness, but shuíí
huve the ííght oí íííe. }ohn 8:l2 (l}V)
Muy He be víth you uívuys.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & DJ Rush
And your
New Year, too!
¿zzz ,1z1.
Truly a gift
Jesus was born on Christmas Day to
light our way and save us from sin.
Let us give thanks and praise His
holy name.
Merry Christmas!
Fitzgerald Oil Co.
Dean, Janice & family
¡n thc rcason for thc scason! For without Him, wc arc nothing!
C'Connell Constroction
8ò9-2020 - Pbilip
Milesville School students
present Christmas program
The Milesville country school presented its annual Christmas program, Thursday, December 13, in the Milesville Community
Hall. The program by the kindergarten through eighth graders began with a parody of the “Twelve Days of Christmas (vaca-
tion).” Between guitar and piano solos and a Christmas poem, was the short play “Goldilocks and the Christmas Elves.”
The program ended with “We Wish You a Merry Christmas.” Shown above, from left, are instructor Dani Foss, Mark Stangle,
Sarah Parsons, Autumn Parsons, John Piroutek, Jensen Fitch, Carlee Fitzgerald, Wade Piroutek, Kamri Parsons, Dylan
Packard, Riggin Enders, Colby Fitch, Wyatt Fitzgerald, aid Karen Nelson and Anna Pirouotek. Shown right are Autumn Par-
sons, left, and Sarah Parsons in a scene from the “Goldilocks.” Courtesy photos
The Milesville country school
presented its annual Christmas
program, Thursday, December 13,
in the Milesville Community Hall.
The program by the kinder-
garten through eighth graders
began with a parody of the “Twelve
Days of Christmas (vacation).” Be-
tween guitar and piano solos and a
Christmas poem, was the short
play “Goldilocks and the Christmas
Elves.” The program ended with
“We Wish You a Merry Christmas.”
The staff at the Milesville school
are instructor Dani Foss and aide
Karen Nelson. The students are
kindergarteners Jensen Fitch,
Ashtyn Johnson and Wade
Piroutek, second graders Dylan
Packard and Kamri Parsons, third
grader Wyatt Fitzgerald, fourth
graders Sarah Parsons and John
Piroutek, fifth graders Riggin An-
ders, Colby Fitch and Autumn Par-
sons, sixth grader Carlee Fitzger-
ald, seventh grader Ann Piroutek,
and eighth grader Mark Stangle.
Shown are Autumn Parsons, left,
and Sarah Parsons in a scene from
“Goldilocks.”
The Haakon County Crooners men’s singing group, directed by Marlis Doud and accompainied by Marilyn Millage, performed
locally several times this last weekend. A community wide presentation in Midland was hosted by the Open Bible Church,
Saturday evening, December 15. On Sunday, December 16, the Crooners treated residents at the Philip Nursing Home to
their own presentation. The singers then gave their traditional concert in the Haakon County Courthouse courtroom, followed
by an open house hosted by Nancy Neville in the community room. Shown, back row, from left: Joe Gittings, Mark Nelson,
Paul Staben, Del Bartels and Art Weitschat. Front: Marilyn Millage, Rick Doud, Roger Porch, John Staben and Marlis Doud.
Courtesy photo
Haakon County Crooners Christmas
Gibson
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
859-3100 • Philip, SD
For all your concrete
construction needs:
by Senator John Thune
Christmas has always been a season
of tradition. From picking out the
Christmas tree, to baking for the neigh-
bors, nearly every family has their own
customs and traditions around the hol-
idays. Some of these traditions are com-
munity wide celebrations that capture
the true spirit of the season. Through-
out the state you will find small and
large towns coming together to enjoy
the company of others and reflecting on
the year that has passed.
For some, a trip to Pierre for a look
at the Christmas trees that are deco-
rated by businesses, nonprofit organi-
zations, and government offices is an
annual tradition. Others enjoy the na-
tivities and Christmas pageants that
local churches and community groups
will host each year. Some enjoy the
sounds of the season at school concerts
and the South Dakota Acoustic Christ-
mas in Sioux Falls, Yankton, Lead, and
Rapid City. No matter the tradition, the
season presents wonderful opportuni-
ties to enjoy the fellowship of friends
and family.
Perhaps no tradition is more impor-
tant than celebrating the season of giv-
ing by remembering those who are less
fortunate. I am always amazed by the
generosity of South Dakotans, and I
know that in difficult times those in
need can count on others for support
during the Christmas season.
Not all South Dakotans have the
means to make financial donations to
those in need, but many South
Dakotans will choose to donate their
time and talents, offering a helpful
hand to a neighbor in need, organizing
food drives, and providing a warm meal
and gifts to less-fortunate children.
We also think about those families
who have loved ones serving in the mil-
itary around the globe who will be apart
this Christmas. The strength of the
family members who celebrate tradi-
tions while praying for the safety of
loved ones in harm’s way reminds us all
of how fortunate we are to be together
this time of year.
As you continue to celebrate your
Christmas traditions this season, Kim-
berley and I would like to wish all of
those travelling this season safe jour-
neys and a very Merry Christmas. May
God continue to bless South Dakota and
our great nation.
South Dakota
Christmas
traditions
ads@
pioneer-review.com
’96 Volvo
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wheel ball,
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Your great deal is
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Philip
We will be closed Dec. 24 & 25, Dec. 31 & Jan. 1.
We wish you a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 13
Community
It's been a pIeasure to serve you.
Happy HcIIdays
0ase 0Icsed
Gay ToIIefson
Attorney at Law
PO Box 848 · PhiIip, SD 57567
859-2783 · grekt@gwtc.net
Mcrry Christmas &
Happy Ncw Ycar!
Thank you for your patronagc!
PlA Cafc
O|ana &
R|chatd S|evat|
& emp|oyees
Happy Holly Days
May your scason bc lìllcd wìlh µcacc, lovc and joy.
Thc Stcakhousc & loungc
Oon & Oebb|e Cat|ey & Imp|oyees
¿z..1.zq ¿z..1.zq
Sincere thanks for
your patronage.
We value your business
and wish you all the best
in the New Year.
..,zz ..,zz
Smith Hay Grinding Smith Hay Grinding
Brock, Brittany, Brock, Brittany,
1aryn & Sawyer 1aryn & Sawyer
GoIden WiIIow Seeds
Joann, Steve, Susan, Michelle,
LaRae & Ryan
Sandi, Dennis, Terri, Jeff, Leah, Zoe,
Gina, Brian, Megan, Michael, Erika,
Jesse & Mariah, Jim & Brenda
The Lord has come!
May you have much
to rejoice about this
glorious time of year.
HoIIy boughs and candIcIight, caroIs Iingcring
in thc frosty night and hopc aII a-bright. May
thcsc bring you grcat dcIight!
ì»ia e×ii i»iLs
lois Porch
Dcbbic CarIcy
lois Porch
Dcbbic CarIcy
Shar and Amy’s Child Care
Parade of Trees at the Haakon County courthouse
Midwest Cooperatives
Grossenberg Implement
Bad River Buckaroos 4-H Club
Philip Garden Club
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling League
Philip Volunteer Fire Department
Milesville Rangers 4-H Club
Philip Masonic Lodge #153
More
next
week!
ads@pioneer-review.com
... 1o all ihc bcsi pcoplc
wc`rc pri·ilcgcd io know ÷
our cusiomcrs!
Hcrc`s hoping your holiday scason
is íillcd wiih glad iidings, happincss
and [oy írom bcginning io cnd.
1hanks!
Vc wiII cIosc Christmas Evc
at ie:cc p.m. & bc cIoscd
Christmas Day.
First NationaI
Bank in
PhiIip
859-2525 · Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com
Member FDÌC
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 14
Community
To lre very yourg, lre
rol-so-yourg ard lre
yourg-al-rearl, go our Warresl
W|sres lor a de||grllu| ro||day
seasor.
For your oe||el |r us, We are
s|rcere|y gralelu|.
Konst Hach|ne &
we|d|ng
Jell, Lor|, Jade & Jas|yr Korsl
Rudy, J|r & Jace
Mike & Shar Moses
& Employees
Much love, peace and
joy to you and yours.
Scascu's çrccr:uqs Scascu's çrccr:uqs
Moses
BuiIding Center
Muy your seuson overííov víth Lurz Plumbing
C&D Storage
C&D Flood & Smoke
Restoration
Dustin, Carrie, Cylver, Copper,
Dymond & Christopher
Kenneth & Janet
& Employees
For the best
Christmas ever!
May the magic
never end!
ßll l0ß00
0¢.
ßll l0ß00
0¢.
ßll l0ß00
0¢.
ßll l0ß00
0¢.
ßll l0ß00
0¢.
& DT Auto Parts
(NAPA Store)
Dale &Tami Morrison
& Employees
Hcrc`s hoping your holiday scason is a iruly mcmorablc onc.
Vc know wc`rc íillcd wiih íond mcmorics as wc rccall ihc many kind pcoplc
wc`·c had ihc pri·ilcgc io scr·c ihis ycar. Mcrry Chrisimas!
AII Star Auto
David, Mary,
Kccgan & Ethan Burnctt
You`rc thc bcst bunch of pardncrs wc`vc cvcr had,
Your support and your fricndship havc madc us most gIad
So wc hopc that your hoIiday brings you much chccr
And cnough good fortunc to ridc out thc ycar!
1hanks íor siopping by ihis pasi ycar.
Vc wish you ihc bcsi oí holidays
and look íorward io sccing
you again soon.
PhiIip
Livcstock
Auction
1hor Roscih
e Employccs
Trese are our W|sres lor
you. Vay lre sp|erdor ol lre
seasor or|rg rarrory
lo your rearl
ard rore.
Trese are our W|sres lor
you. Vay lre sp|erdor ol lre
seasor or|rg rarrory
lo your rearl
ard rore.
heat|ng & 6oo||ng
Brian, Heather,
Brock, Brice
& Taylor Hanson
··-· »/-.·.-..
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··-· »/-.·.-..
,-.·/- ·¸.
Want to see all the
Christmas ads in color?
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review.com
St. Mary's Catholic Church
Christmas Mass will be at 7:00
a.m. Christmas morning – better
set your alarm!
Christmas Eve services at the
Hardingrove Church will be at 5:00
p.m.
Last week folks were busy going
to Christmas parties and pro-
grams. What a fun time of year!
The Hardingrove Ladies Aid met
at Janice Parsons' for a party Tues-
day night. The evening consisted of
singing carols, playing games, a
gift exchange and lots of eating
with everyone bringing something
to share. Attending were Jodi Par-
sons, Sharon Olivier, Marcia
Eymer, Judy Elshere, Joy Li-
macher, Pat Hanrahan, Connie
Parsons, Sandra Parsons and
Christa Fitch.
A large crowd attended the
Milesville School's Christmas pro-
gram and supper Thursday night
at the Milesville Hall. Santa even
made it through the fog to pass out
goodies after the program.
Sunday night, the Hardingrove
Church was full for the release
time program and soup supper. A
very good program was presented
by the kids reading the Christmas
story from Scripture along with a
slide presentation. The pictures of
the kids were taken earlier at the
Dave and Tonya Berry farm along
with their assortment of animals.
The EMT/ambulance Christmas
party was in Philip Wednesday
night with a potluck supper. They
fixed up boxes of cookies to give to
the local businesses around town.
Among those attending were Carla
Smith, Debbie Hanrahan, Lori
Quinn and Bill and Karyl Sandal.
Jim Bob and Kayla Eymer and
some friends were in Las Vegas for
the NFR from Sunday until Thurs-
day. Cole Elshere ended up with
fourth place in the average in sad-
dle bronc. Quite an accomplish-
ment for the first time at this
rodeo, competing with the best in
the world. Congratulations, Cole!
Bryan and Sharon Olivier at-
tended the Christmas concert at
Rapid City Christian High School
last Thursday night. Their niece
and our grandaughter, Bailey
Bays, was among those singing in
the choir.
Dan and Gayla Piroutek at-
tended graduation exercises at
Black Hills State University last
Saturday morning where they cel-
ebrated the graduation of their
goddaughter, Becky Piroutek.
Becky had a double major in mass
commnications and speech commu-
nications. Her parents are David
(Mike's brother) and Rita Piroutek
from Cheyenne, Wyo. Mike and
Faye Piroutek and family attended
the graduation as well. Also grad-
uating was Skye Brucklacher,
daughter of Brigitte (Parsons) and
Bruce Brucklacher.
Glen and Jackie Radway, along
with Glen's cousins from Sioux
Falls and Rapid City, enjoyed the
weekend in Pierre. The cousins en-
joyed visiting, playing cards and
viewing the Christmas trees.
Kara Parsons spent from the
7th until the 11th in Redfield with
Andi and Dustin Rische and fam-
ily. Andi and Dustin recently
bought a house there and Kara was
helping with some remodeling and
painting.
Joanne Parsons came down
from Rapid City Thursday night for
the Milesville School program. She
stayed with Boyd and Kara, re-
turning home Friday.
Dinner and supper guests Sat-
urday at Byron and Peggy Parsons'
were Brennen Parsons and two
friends of Piedmont and Robbie,
Molly, Bodhi, Bailey and Cass
Lytle, Quinn. The guys hunted and
the girls had fun making Christ-
mas goodies.
Tuesday, Paul, Donna and Tina
Staben attended the funeral of
Vern McDonnell in Wall. Donna's
family and the McDonnells were
neighbors years ago.
Donna and Tina Staben were in
Kadoka Wednesday evening for a
4-H meeting and party at the home
of Jackie Stilwell.
The Milesville Rangers 4-H
Club held their Christmas party at
the bowling alley in Philip Friday
afternoon.
The Haakon County Crooners
presented their Christmas concert
Saturday night at the Open Bible
Church in Midland.
Also on Saturday night, the
Garden Club had their Christmas
party at the bowling alley which
Donna and Tina Staben and Tim,
Lori and Kelton Quinn attended.
The Haakon County Crooners
sang at the courthouse in Philip
Sunday afternoon. Later, they en-
joyed a light supper with the resi-
dents at the Senechal. Among
those at the courthouse were
Donna and Tina Staben, Karyl
Sandal, Eileen Fitzgerald and
Peggy Staben.
Mark and Judith Radway vis-
ited at the home of Bill and Dianne
McDaniel Saturday afternoon. This
was a good chance to visit with Bill
and Dianne's kids, who were all
home for an early Christmas.
Visiting on Saturday at Hugh
and Ann Harty's were Paul and
Moneik Stephens, Mikaela and
Mathew, Black Hawk, and Ed
Harty and fiancé Steph Cooper and
their son, Cooper.
Matt Arthur enjoyed supper
and watching the NFR with Zane
and Beth Jeffries Saturday night.
Last Tuesday, Karyl Sandal had
a breakfast party at the courthouse
at 6:00 a.m. At noon she attended
the courthouse Christmas potluck.
That evening, she joined in on the
supper the Women's Club served
the residents of the Senechal. Busy
day! Karyl says that the court-
house employees really enjoy hav-
ing all the decorated trees around
them during this time of year.
Bill and Karyl Sandal attended
the funeral of Jane Kampfe in
Rapid City Wednesday.
Saturday, Bill and Karyl and
Chuck and Ruth Carstensen were
breakfast guests at Terry and Bar-
bara Wentz's.
Sunday, Bill and Karyl Sandal
went to two church Christmas pro-
grams – the first one at the United
Church in Philip with great-grand-
children, Gage and Taryn Ravel-
lette. That night, they were in Wall
at the Evangelical Free Church for
grandchildren, Mason, Gavin,
Kohl, Sawyer and Rivers Sandal's
program. Somehow Karyl found
time to go to Nancy Neville's piano
students' recital that afternoon!
We grieve, along with the rest of
the nation for the families of the
victims of the school shooting in
Connettecut last week. How pre-
cious these children were. Let's hug
our children and grandchildren a
little tighter!
Merry Christmas, everyone!
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Mercy, I was in search of infor-
mation on the Buswell family be-
cause cousins want to know more
about Uncle Hubert and his family.
My first thought was to go to the
“Haakon Horizons,” that special
book put together by Lois Rang and
Elsie “Ozzie” Baye. What a wealth
of treasures are enclosed within it’s
covers. Having opened the book, it
enveloped me into the pages and
there went hours, reading the elo-
quent words describing the hard-
ships, celebrations, and tragedies
told by the families who had re-
sponded to the request for family
history. However, not a peep about
the Buswell family. Where had I
read something about them, seen
pictures, etc? Uncle Hubert’s sister
was Hester Markwed, married to
Oscar. Maybe they have informa-
tion!
The first part of the week Don
and Vi Moody were in Rapid City
taking care of appointments, enjoy-
ing visits around town as well as
driving around town and past Sto-
rybook Island.
Monday, Tony Harty was a visi-
tor at the Shirley Hair home and
later stopped by our place to give
me his news. He’s sure enjoying the
big TV, he has to pinch himself
every time he sets down to enjoy
viewing entertainment on it.
Visitors at our home Monday
were Carol Solon and Phyllis Word.
I was busy working on that Christ-
mas card list. Not quite like mak-
ing a list and checking it twice.
Tuesday, Cathy Fiedler went to
the Sturgis nursing home for a
Christmas dinner that is put on
every year for the staff.
Sandee Gittings was in Kadoka
Tuesday afternoon on business.
Pierre was the destination for
Tony Harty Tuesday. He had made
arrangements to get some pot pies
from the Hutterites who he han-
dles chickens for in the spring of
the year. He had dinner with them,
delivered a table to Jonathan Weis-
chart for his folks, Art and Doris,
and also got together with Merlin
Bennett, did a little business and
had dinner in Draper on the way
home.
George Gittings kept an appoint-
ment in Pierre Wednesday after-
noon.
Don and Vi Moody returned to
the ranch Wednesday and spent
the remainder of the week there.
Christmas time is so enjoyable and
Vi said she likes to relax with her
Christmas CDs as well as music on
the TV when she isn't running
around the ranch with Don. The
excitement of the National Finals
Rodeo was the evening highlight
all week.
Wednesday was one of those
days, it was 12-12-12. The numbers
all lined up. It will be nine years
before you get numbers like that,
which will be 2-2-(20) 22. On 9-9-99
I wrote letters to family, just for
fun, but missed this opportunity,
even my Christmas cards were
mailed the next day. While I was in
Philip with a van run, I had the
pleasure of visiting with Arnold
Wolden, Wilma Stout, Pastor Al
Bruchlacher, Mary Eide and Joan
Deutchar Basette. It was a busy
place over there that day.
Tony Harty made an early morn-
ing trip Wednesday to Philip.
Shirley Hair made the trip with
Tony. Tony also made a delivery to
Carl Brown here in Kadoka and
had dinner out.
Thursday morning, there was a
thick fog surrounding the area and
as it cleared everything was frosted
over. Carol Solon stopped for a visit
at our place in the afternoon. Fi-
nally our Christmas cards were in
the mail.
Kinsey Gittings picked up Daniel
Jordan Friday afternoon to spend a
few days at Grandpa and Grandma
Gittings’ house.
Sympathy is extended to the
families of Wilma Daniel and Patty
Patterson in their losses this week.
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
continued on page 15
Thursday, December 20, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 15
Community
First NationaI Agency
PhiIip, SD
Joe, Mary,
Anita & Judy
The birth of our Lord and Savior
Jesus Christ. Believe in the miracle
and rejoice in His name!
¯þc bcat g¡|t
to tþ¡a doy
¯þc bcat g¡|t
to tþ¡a doy
Merry Christmas
&Happy Aew Year!
Scotchman Industries
1erry &Karen Kroetch
& Employees
It changed everything!
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
...Ior a fun-fiIIed hoIiday season.
Thanks, friends!
Hcppq Hc|i!cqs!
His c Hcr Sc|cn
Hccin c Amq Mcrriscn,
Brin c Brii
Thursday and Friday found Tony
Harty doing about the same things
as usual except he had dinner out
and visited Shirley Hair.
Friday, I made a trip to Rapid
City with the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation van
Friday evening, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler went to Spearfish to
get their granddaughter, Caitlin
Klumb, so she could spend the
weekend with them. She just
wanted some grandpa and
grandma time. Don’t get that much
with a 15 year old, so took advan-
tage of the occasion. Saturday
morning, the three got up early and
headed to Philip where they sur-
prised Cathy’s mom, Katy Drage-
sett, and delivered some home-
made Christmas goodies. They took
Katy to the bowling alley for lunch
where Richard and Diana Stewart
joined them. They visited a little
longer at the nursing home,
stopped by the Stewart home to
drop off a Christmas gift for them
and took off for Sturgis keeping
daylight in their favor so they
didn’t have to worry about the deer.
(They almost got one two weeks
ago when they were down to
Philip.)
Thoughts and prayers are with
all the families affected by the
Sandy Hook Elementary School
tragedy in Newtown, Conn. It will
scar the nation.
Bill became Santa on his way to
Philip Saturday by dropping off a
surprise package at the Moody’s
drive. It was "chock" full of candies
and baked goodies as well as an-
other Christmas decoration to add
to their collection.
Kinsey Gittings picked up Kelsey
Gittings at the airport in Rapid
City Saturday afternoon. She will
spend some time at the George Git-
tings home before she and Kinsey
go to Iowa for Christmas.
Sunday morning, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler and Caitlin Klumb
went to Spearfish to attend church
with the Don Klumb family. Merry
Christmas to everyone from the
Fiedlers.
Sunday afternoon, Don and Vi
Moody stopped by Tony Harty's
house in Kadoka for a quick chat as
well as to pick up an order item.
They stopped for a lunch break at
Wall during a light snow squall as
they were returning to Rapid. Vi
did mention that, while at the
ranch, a flock of grouse had really
been enjoying their cedar tree in
their front yard. Fifteen or so
heavy birds flew out of their front
yard only a few yards away from
their front bay room. That was
mighty close range for these guys,
but they did miss the chimney on
their fast lift-off. May need to use
game bird repellent spray!
Saturday, I visited with Emma
Jarl at the Kadoka Nursing Home
about a poster for her for knit dust
mittens and knit dish clothes.
Emma, at 98, keeps busy knitting
things and she has a surplus, just
in time for Christmas gifts. They
are really effective. Another year of
National Finals Rodeo is complete
and there are some really tired,
beat up cowboys, but they like
what they do and the animals sure
do make them have their job cut
out for them.
Sunday, Bill and I went to Philip
for dinner and enjoyed the com-
pany of Mary Parsons. She re-
ported the good news that Dean
Parsons will be getting home by
Friday of next week. I attended the
Kadoka Area Community Choir
with Phyllis Word in the afternoon,
they presented “Heaven’s Child” in
memory of Grace Dolozal DeVries.
It was a nice presentation.
Enjoy the "Spirit of the Season"
and keep Jesus Christ in your life
as the "Reason for the Season!"
Wherever we are, if we open our
eyes to truly see, we will find the
wonder of God’s handiwork.
Betwixt Places News
(continued from page 14)
Big thanks and applause all around for our
customers and friends. We had a great year, and
we owe it all to you. Here's hoping you have a
season of love and laughter.
Gem Theatre & Staff
Rìyht on track Rìyht on track
Midwest Cooperatives
Philip & Kadoka
We had a great year and we owe it all to you.
Thanks for dropping by and see you soon!
Thanks for dropping
by. Hope to see you
again soon!
Jason &MarIis Petersen
& empIoyees
And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in
swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was
no room for them in the inn. Luke 2:7 (KJV)
s
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t
So sm
all,
yet
Coyle’s SuperValu
Ronnie & Dawn Coyle & Employees
May the m
iracle of G
od’s love
fill your heart with infinite joy.
May they
grow and
grow!
K
e
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,
S
h
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&
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i
l
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grow and
grow!
May you be blessed with
the love of family and
friends far and near.
Kemnitz Law Office & Staff
Haakon Co. Abstract
Season’s
Greetings
All our best to all of the
best people we know!
Thanks for your business.
We appreciate it.
For God so loved the
world, that he gave his only
begotten Son, that
whosoever believeth in him
should not perish, but have
everlasting life. John 3:16
(KJV)
who believe
Mike & Tina Noteboom
& Crew
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Blessed are we
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Ueoember 20, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 16
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS AND
NOTICE OF
INFORMAL
PROBATE AND
APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
ESTATE OF )
LeROY M. ROSETH )
Deceased. )
Notice is given that on the 4th day of De-
cember, 2012, Duane W. Roseth, whose
address is 20075 Manilla Road, Midland,
SD 57552, and Julian T. Roseth, whose
address is 19925 Manilla Road, Midland,
SD 57552, were appointed as personal
representatives of the estate of LeRoy M.
Roseth.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of the notice or their
claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal rep-
resentatives or may be filed with the clerk
and a copy of the claim mailed to the per-
sonal representatives.
Dated this 4th day of December, 2012.
/s/Duane W. Roseth
Duane W. Roseth
20075 Manilla Road
Midland, SD 57552
/s/Julian T. Roseth
Julian T. Roseth
19925 Manilla Road
Midland, SD 57552
Janet Magelky
Haakon County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2627
Gay Tollefson, Attorney
Tollefson Law Office
PO Box 848
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2783
[Published December 13, 20 & 27, 2012,
at the total approximate cost of $61.01]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
REGULAR SESSION
DECEMBER 4, 2012
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 1:00 PM on Thursday, De-
cember 4, 2012. A quorum was
established with Chairman Edward
Briggs, Vice Chairman Stephen
Clements, Members Rita O'Connell, Gary
Snook and Nicholas Konst in attendance.
Auditor Pat Freeman, Deputy Auditor
Carla Smith, Sheriff Fred Koester, State's
Attorney Gay Tollefson, Alex Kuleza from
Butler Machinery Co., Highway Superin-
tendent Kenny Neville, Director of Equal-
ization Toni Rhodes, Register of Deeds
Traci Radway and Pioneer Review Rep-
resentative Nancy Haigh were also pres-
ent.
The November 8, 2012, Regular Meeting
Minutes were read. Commissioner Rita
O'Connell made a motion to approve the
minutes. Vice Chairman Stephen
Clements seconded with all in agree-
ment. The November 8, 2012, General
Election Canvass Board Meeting Minutes
were reviewed. Vice Chairman Stephen
Clements made a motion to approve the
minutes. Commissioner Gary Snook sec-
onded, with all in agreement.
The commission was advised that State
Auditor Bruce Hintz would be at the end
of the year meeting for his exit confer-
ence. Things had gone well with the audit.
Under old business, the 2013 annual
lease for the City of Philip was presented
to the commission. Ìt was given a final re-
view. Commissioner Nicholas Konst
made a motion to approve the lease. Ìt
was seconded with all in agreement. Mo-
tion carried.
At 1:15 PM, the Hearing for the following
four Uniform Alcoholic Beverage License
Applications was held. T-34, South Fork,
LLC., Wheeler Brooks Post No. 173 and
Lake Waggoner Golf Course. There were
no objections to issuing these licenses for
the 2013 year. A motion was made by
Vice Chairman Stephen Clements to ap-
prove the licenses, with Commissioner
Rita O'Connell seconding and all were in
agreement.
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
gave their monthly report to the commis-
sion. Once again, the offer has been
made to the county to do the DOT Fund
Exchange Agreement for 2013. Ìn 2011
and in 2012 it amounted to $206,528.13
for each year. Superintendent Neville
stated that the funds would be close or
the same as the other years. There are
only certain things it can be used for but
has been a tremendous help on road
projects. The letter was presented to the
commission. A motion was made, sec-
onded with all in agreement to approve
the 2013 DOT Fund Exchange Agree-
ment for 2013.
Alex Kuleza from Butler Machinery Co.
was present to talk with the commission
about replacing two more motor graders
in 2013 under the Spink County Highway
Department Bid. Ìt is the intent of the
county to get all the county's motor
graders under warranty, as the cost of re-
pairing breakdowns is usually over and
above a yearly payment on a grader that
is under warranty. The payment on the
two newer used graders purchased in
2008 is $41,987.28 a year for two, or
$20,993.64 for one yearly payment on
one motor grader. Ìt was also discovered
that the DOT Fund Exchange Agreement
money can be used towards the pur-
chase of these motor graders. There is
also a Fund Balance Assigned to Capital
Outlay Accumulation in the amount of
$193,497 that has been set aside for
large purchases for Highway and Bridge.
With the combination of the trade in on
the older graders, some of the 2013 DOT
Fund Exchange Agreement money and
the Fund Balance Assigned to the Capital
Outlay Accumulation money, it will be
possible to keep our payments low
enough and spread over a 5 year plan.
Commissioner Gary Snook motioned to
commit to two graders. Steve Clements
seconded with all in agreement.
Auditor Freeman reported to the commis-
sion that there were $183,642.58 in
DOT/SWAP Agreement expenses and
$80,087.57 in Road & Bridge Reserve
Project expenses which totals
$263,730.15. Both can be funded out of
the Fund Balance Restricted DOT/ SWAP
Fund which has a total of $364,591.26 re-
maining in it. Ìt would leave the Fund Bal-
ance Restricted DOT SWAP Fund
balance at $100,861.11. This does not in-
clude the 2013 DOT Fund Exchange
Agreement money. A motion was made
by Commissioner Nicholas Konst to
transfer $263,730.15 cash from the Fund
Balance Restricted DOT SWAP Fund into
the 2012 (201) Highway budget to cover
those expenses. The motion was sec-
onded with all in agreement.
Several other items were discussed such
as the trailer placed at the Robbs Flat
site. The plumbing needs to be looked at
as water has been put to the trailer but
sinks will not drain and the sewer is
plugged. The window replacement and
siding have been ordered for the trailer.
The following November 2012 fuel bids
were submitted:
FUEL BÌDS:
Courthouse: NONE
Highway Dept:
11-07-12 Fitzgerald Oil ..........$3.37 Gas
11-07-12 Cenex .....................$3.38 Gas
11-14-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.73 No. 1
11-14-12 Cenex ...................$3.75 No. 1
11-26-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.75 No. 1
11-26-12 Cenex ...................$3.67 No. 1
11-26-12 Fitzgerald Oil ..........$3.35 Gas
11-26-12 Cenex .....................$3.29 Gas
State's Attorney Gay Tollefson came to
the meeting to discuss the information re-
quested by Sage Ìnformational Services.
They had requested a list of all real prop-
erty assessment data files in Haakon
County. This same company has re-
quested this information in many other
counties as well. Sage Ìnformational
Services had gone to the SD Bureau of
Administration, Office of the Examiners
reporting that we were not responding to
their requests. The notice was taken to
the State's Attorney and a letter was sent
requesting an extension until a week after
a decision is made on the Jerauld County
Appeal to the Circuit Court of the Hearing
Examiners decision regarding expenses
the county may request of companies
asking for copies of public records. This
was one of Haakon County's concerns,
there is no compensation for the informa-
tion.
The monthly Veteran's report was re-
viewed by the commission.
Haakon County Sheriff Fred Koester
gave his monthly report. He had gone to
some training in Pierre, SD and reported
it all went well. He had also talked to the
State Auditor who advised that the money
in the Sheriff's account that could not be
accounted for be deposited into the Gen-
eral Fund. Sheriff Koester stated that
when spring came, he would see if any of
it had been resolved and if not, he would
move it to the General Fund.
Reuben Vollmer called and requested ap-
proval for a raffle for the Midland Fire Dis-
trict on a quarter of beef with the
proceeds going towards a newer fire
truck. A motion was made, seconded with
all in agreement.
The AAU Wrestling Group requested ap-
proval of a raffle to help their group. A mo-
tion was made, seconded with all in
agreement.
The last SDACCO District meeting will be
in Sturgis, SD, at the Meade County
Courthouse on December 14, 2012. A
motion was made to approve any official
who wanted to go. Ìt was seconded with
all in agreement.
The contract with the S.D. Department of
Health Community Health Nurse for
01/01/13 thru 12/31/13 was approved by
motion from Vice Chairman Stephen
Clements. The motion was seconded with
all in agreement.
The Vendor Warrants were presented
for October Expenses paid in November
2012:
COMMISSIONERS
Haakon County Abstract, CO
Supplies ...................................22.00
Pioneer Review Ìnc,
Publishing ..............................245.62
267.62
ELECTION
Scotti Block, Salaries .................135.50
Scotti Block, Travel ......................21.46
Century Business Leasing, Ìnc., Misc
Exp .........................................105.37
Election Systems/Software Ìnc., Sup-
plies ..........................................63.00
Deanna Finn, Salaries ................110.50
Deanna Finn, Travel .......................1.48
Audrey Jones, Salaries ..............110.50
Joy Jones, Salaries ....................135.50
Joy Jones, Travel .........................44.40
Midland Fire Hall, Misc Exp .........35.00
Pioneer Review Ìnc,
Publishing ..............................807.52
1,570.23
AUDITOR
Century Business Leasing Ìnc, Maint -
Copier ....................................172.98
Coyle's SuperValu, Supplies ........10.88
First National Bank, FNB BCBS Wire
Trans Fee .................................10.00
Patricia G Freeman, Supplies ......60.98
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................181.12
HCS, Prof Fees/Computer
Support ..................................210.00
Haakon County Treasurer, Other Ex-
pense .........................................1.95
647.91
TREASURER
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ................................77.89
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies .................................142.99
Quill Corporation, Supplies ........259.79
Haakon County Treasurer,
Postage ..................................475.00
955.67
STATE'S ATTORNEY
SD State's Attorneys Assoc, Annual
Dues & Membership Fees .....648.00
Tollefson Law Office, Office
Rent .......................................150.00
Tollefson Law Office, Telephone ...75.00
873.00
COURTHOUSE
Baye & Sons Service, Repairs &
Maint ......................................203.04
City of Philip, Utilities ...................73.00
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies .......183.89
Kone Ìnc, Professional Fees ......230.03
Servall Uniform, Supplies ...........186.72
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........70.00
West Central Electric, Utilities ....918.96
1,865.64
DIRECTOR OF EQUALIZATION
Haakon County Abstract Co,
Supplies ...................................11.00
Coyle's Standard, Fuel .................55.70
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................138.88
Reliable Office Supplies,
Supplies ....................................28.56
Toni Rhodes, Other Exp .................9.16
243.30
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone .................................97.99
Microfilm Ìmaging Systems Ìnc, Profes-
sional Fees .............................280.00
377.99
VETERANS SERVICE
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ................................40.74
40.74
SHERIFF
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................83.89
Terry Deuter, Salaries ................960.96
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....138.54
Fred Koester, Fuel .......................65.00
Mg Oil Company, Fuel ...............345.44
Mg Oil Company, Travel .................2.53
Morrison's Pit Stop, Fuel ..............91.12
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........60.99
1,748.47
SUPPORT OF POOR
Rapid City Regional Hosp Ìnc. Prof
Services ............................21,381.07
21,381.07
HEALTH NURSE
Zeeb Pharmacy, Supplies ............49.35
49.35
MENTALLY ILL
SD Human Services Center, Prof Serv-
ices .........................................600.00
Yankton County Treasurer, Prof Serv-
ices .........................................103.75
703.75
LIBRARY
Haakon County Public Library,
Supplies .................................131.59
Midamerica Books, Supplies ........83.70
215.29
EXTENSION SERVICE
Carrie Weller, Travel ..................179.16
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ................................55.03
234.19
WEED CONTROL
Virgil Smith, Travel .....................118.80
Paul Staben, Salary ...................138.50
257.30
ROAD & BRIDGE
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................47.75
Browns Small Engine Repair
Supplies .................................128.04
Butler Machinery Co Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ...................................1,223.01
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel ....3,753.87
Cenex Harvest States,
Utilities ...................................800.00
D&T Auto Parts, Repairs &
Maint ........................................63.68
D&T Auto Parts, Supplies ..........455.50
Farmers Union Oil Company,
Fuel ..........................................76.10
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Fuel ............9,124.54
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities.....233.23
Heartland Waste Management Ìnc,
Utilities .....................................21.20
Kimball Midwest, Supplies .........208.78
Menards, Supplies .......................73.97
Town of Midland Utilities ..............22.00
Morrison's Pit Stop, Supplies .....334.00
SD Dept of Transportation, Road/
Bridge Projects .......................152.37
Sheehan Mack Sales & Equipment, Re-
pairs & Maint ............................58.50
Sioux City Floundry Co,
Supplies ..............................2,520.00
True North Steel, Supplies ......3,990.76
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........70.00
Walker Automotive, Repairs &
Maint ......................................919.90
West Central Electric, Utilities ....233.81
West River Water Develop Dist,
Utilities .....................................17.50
24,528.51
9-1-1
Centurylink, 9-1-1 .......................115.10
Golden West Tele Co, 9-1-1 .......488.71
603.81
EMERGENCY & DISASTER
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....101.26
Lola Roseth, Travel ....................165.76
267.02
COURTHOUSE
Brant's Electric Ìnc, Building
Fund .........................................50.57
Ernie's Building Center, Building
Fund ...........................................5.07
Terry Hand, Building Fund ....17,500.00
Ìngram Hardware, Building Fund ..42.16
Moses Building Center Ìnc, Building
Fund .......................................447.01
TLC Electric Ìnc, Building
Fund ....................................1,520.29
19,565.10
LAW LIBRARY
Thomson West, Supplies ...........353.22
353.22
Total Checks ..........................76,749.18
A motion was made by Commissioner
Gary Snook, seconded with all in agree-
ment to approve the warrants.
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for the month of November
2012:
Commissioners Wages ............2,820.00
Auditor's Office.........................4,683.97
Treasurer's Office.....................4,650.73
State's Attorney's Office...........3,468.34
Director of Equalization............2,733.89
Register of Deeds ....................2,999.81
Janitor ......................................1,989.04
Veteran's Office...........................810.00
Sheriff's Office..........................2,975.00
Highway Department .............20,149.36
WÌC and Health Nurse Sec......1,100.40
Librarians .................................1,799.90
Extension Secretary....................886.40
Emergency Management............767.51
Weed Supervisor ........................191.26
Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield.................................12,730.87
Special Ìnsurance Services......1,348.89
AFLAC, premium ........................577.92
SD Retirement System ............5,270.38
Delta Dental ................................677.80
Vision Service Plan.....................141.82
First National Bank, SS &
WH.......................................9,642.15
Auditor Freeman explained to the com-
mission that the Secretary of State's Of-
fice was going to a new way of doing
elections called TotalVote. Permission to
attend the TotalVote training on Decem-
ber 5, 2012, at the Ramkota in Rapid City,
SD, is requested for Auditor and Deputy
Auditor. A motion was made, seconded
with all in agreement to approve the
travel. The Subagreement Between the
South Dakota Secretary of State and
Haakon County, South Dakota was dis-
cussed. Rather than reimbursing counties
for the election expenses, TotalVote will
use those HAVA funds to help with the
transition into TotalVote. They will supply
the document scanner, label printer, bar
code scanner and e-token. A laptop will
also be provided if it is only used for elec-
tion purposes with the Haakon County
HAVA Grant money.
The next Special Session Meeting will be
held on Wednesday, December 26, 2012,
at 1:00 PM for the purpose of approving
final bills for 2012. The next Regular Ses-
sion Meeting will be on January 8, 2013,
at 1:00 PM. The meeting was adjourned
at 5:20 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMÌSSÌONER
Edward Briggs, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published December 20, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $175.12]
Proceedings of the
Town of MidIand
REGULAR MEETING MINUTES
December 11, 2012
The Town Board of the Town of Midland
met on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at
7:00 PM in the Town Hall with the follow-
ing members present: Jared Fosheim,
Rock Gillaspie, Finance Officer Michelle
Meinzer and Utilities Operator Lawrence
Stroppel.
Absent: Diana Baeza
Also present: Patrick Fosheim, Reuben
Vollmer Jr. and Jerry Nemec
Minutes from the November 13, 2012,
meeting were approved as published.
Pat Fosheim met with the Board to dis-
cuss property boundaries. Finance Offi-
cer will check into this.
Jerry Nemec met with the Board to dis-
cuss water line being put in South of Mid-
land on Highway 63.
Stroppel gave his Utilities Operator re-
port. We discussed fire hydrant that he re-
placed, water break by Catholic church,
boring on Highway 63 that was completed
for the water line placement and repairs
done at fire hall. Also reminded Board that
he will be attending meetings in Pierre in
January to keep up his certification hours.
Reuben Vollmer, Jr. met with the Board to
discuss progress on the back-up sewer
generator project. Board discussed the
possibility of getting a larger propane
tank.
Motion was made by Gillaspie, second by
Fosheim to pay the following claims:
Lawrence Stroppel, Wages/Certifica-
tions......................................1,897.07
Lawrence Stroppel, Insurance, Phone,
Vehicle.....................................500.00
Michelle Meinzer, Wages, Phone, Sup-
plies.........................................689.67
Electronic Federal Tax Payment, Em-
ployee Tax ...............................776.28
Ernie`s, LLC, Supplies.................383.93
G & A Trenching, Repairs............450.00
Golden West, Phone/Internet ......144.67
Heartland Waste Management, Refuse
Service ....................................912.00
HD Supply Waterworks,
Supplies...................................128.93
Lyle Signs, Street Signs ..............510.50
Midland Food & Fuel, Fuel ..........150.00
Peters Excavation, Boring Water
Line.......................................5,601.80
Pioneer Review, Publications........77.00
SD Dept. of Revenue, Lab Fees ...13.00
SD One Call, Message Fees...........7.77
SD Retirement System,
Retirement...............................297.60
SD State Treasurer, Sales Tax ......72.96
USA BlueBook, Supplies.............580.10
West Central Electric, Electric
Supply ..................................1,074.15
WR/LJ Rural Water Supply, Water Sup-
ply........................................... 817.50
There being no further business to come
before the Board, the meeting adjourned.
Michelle Meinzer, Finance Officer
Diana Baeza, President
Jared Fosheim, Vice President
[Published December 20, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $31.84]
Proceedings of the
Town of MidIand
SPECIAL MEETING MINUTES
December 13, 2012
The Town Board of the Town of Midland
met in special session on Thursday, De-
cember 13, 2012, at 6:00 PM in the Town
Hall with the following members present:
Diana Baeza, Jared Fosheim, Rock
Gillaspie, Finance Officer Michelle
Meinzer and Lawrence Stroppel, Utilities
Operator.
Also present: Brenda Jensen
The purpose of this meeting was to hold
a hearing on the renewal of Midland Food
& Fuel`s Wine License for 2013. Motion
was made by Fosheim, second by
Gillaspie to approve this renewal with no
one opposing.
There being no further business to come
before the Board, the meeting adjourned.
Michelle Meinzer, Finance Officer
Diana Baeza, President
[Published December 20, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $10.40]
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS AND
NOTICE OF
INFORMAL
PROBATE AND
APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
PRO #12-12
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
ESTATE OF )
WANDA BERNICE HEEB, )
Deceased. )
Notice is given that on the 12th day of De-
cember, 2012, Barbara L. Kroetch, whose
address is PO Box 514, Philip, South
Dakota 57567, was appointed as per-
sonal representative of the estate of
Wanda Bernice Heeb.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of the notice or their
claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal rep-
resentatives or may be filed with the clerk
and a copy of the claim mailed to the per-
sonal representative.
Dated this 12th day of December, 2012.
/s/Barbara L. Kroetch
Barbara L. Kroetch
PO Box 514
Philip, South Dakota 57567
Janet Magelky
Haakon County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2627
Gay Tollefson, Attorney
Tollefson Law Office
PO Box 848
Philip, South Dakota 57567
605-859-2783
[Published December 20, 27, 2012, &
January 3, 2013, at the total approximate
cost of $61.01]
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursday, Ueoember 20, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 17
ircncly lcgillc Iandwriiing. A¡-
¡licaiions and full jol dcscri¡-
iion will lc availallc ai iIc
Haalon Couniy CouriIousc,
Fcgisicr of Dccds officc, 140 S.
Howard Avc., PIili¡, SD 57567,
or ly cnail. Iaalrod¸ gwic.nci.
A¡¡licaiions io lc accc¡icd uniil
¡osiiion fillcd.
PF16-3ic
HELP WANTED: Farn/FancI
in wcsi ccniral S.D. looling for
cסcricnccd full iinc Icl¡. Du-
iics includc nigIi calving
Icifcrs, calving cows, fcncing,
luilding nainicnancc, o¡craiing
and nainiaining Iaying, fccding
and farning cqui¡ncni. Horsc
cסcricncc noi ncccssary. Wc
usc ATVs. Housing and lccf fur-
nisIcd. Fcfcrcnccs rcquircd.
Salary DOE. Call 843-2869 for
inicrvicw a¡¡oinincni or cnail
rcsunc io. ¡jlorl¸gwic.nci
P1-ifn
RANCH HAND WANTED: Hous-
ing ¡lus uiiliiics & wagc. FaiiI
arca. 739-5601. P1-2ic
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Hong Kong cusion
nadc winglacl cIair, $50. Clul
cIair, floral ¡aiicrn naicrial,
$35. Lcavc ncssagc. 859-2777.
P2-1i¡
CHRISTMAS LIGHTS!! (4} NEW
lo×cs of wIiic LED. NoiIing
wrong wiiI iIc ligIis, jusi iIc
wrong color. $32. Call 441-4909
or 859-3515, lcavc ncssagc.
P1-ifn
WE HAVE THE PERFECT GIFT
for cvcryonc on your Ioliday lisi!
Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63, Do× Eldcr,
390-9810. PF15-3i¡
FOR SALE: Fo¡c Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ro¡c, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
NOTICESJWANTED
SEALED BIDS BEING AC-
CEPTED ON: 2003 JoIn Dccrc
1590 No-iill Drill, 15' worling
widiI, 7-1/2 incI s¡acing, grass
sccdcr, agiiaior, fcriilizcr lo×,
dolly wIccl. Dids for iIc drill will
lc accc¡icd ly Easi Pcnningion
Conscrvaiion Disirici uniil Jan-
uary 1, 2013, ai 24 CrcigIion
Foad in Wall, SD, or iIcy can lc
nailcd io PO Do× 308, Wall, SD
57790. Plcasc call 279-2519 for
infornaiion or vicwing of iIc
drill. Wc rcscrvc iIc rigIi io rc-
jcci any and all lids. PW1-3ic
WE HAVE THE PERFECT GIFT
for cvcryonc on your Ioliday lisi!
Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63, Do× Eldcr,
390-9810. WP15-3i¡
TRIANGLE RANCH BED &
BREAKFAST is availallc for
lruncIcs, luncIcons, dinncr
¡ariics and rcircais, Dcccnlcr -
A¡ril. Coniaci Lyndy, 859-2122,
irianglc¸gwic.nci, www. irian-
glcrancIll.con P51-8ic
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 4-lcdroon Iousc in
PIili¡. Ton Folcy Fcal Esiaic,
859-2975 or 685-8856.
PF17-1ic
FOR SALE: 24×68 doullcwidc,
3 lcdroons, 2 full laiIs, ncw
iin roof and sliriing, ncw ¡aini.
Call Cody, 515-0316. P52-4ic
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 HigI
Si. in PIili¡, 2 lcdroons, full
lascncni, grcai vicw off lacl
dccl. Call 859-2783 or 859-
3249 or 567-3515 io vicw.
P49-ifn
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrilc
Avc PIili¡. 3 lcdroon 1.5 laiI,
ccniral air, fucl oil Icai and
wood siovc. O¡cn concc¡i,
siainlcss siccl fridgc and siovc.
wasIcr and drycr includcd.
Hardwood laninaic floors, sc¡a-
raic dining roon. Mosily fin-
isIcd lascncni. Cciling fans
iIrougIoui. Ncw windows and
roof. Fcnccd in, largc laclyard
wiiI covcr ¡aiio and sioragc
sIcd. Can cnail ¡Ioios. Call
859-2470 or (785} 259-4207.
P48-8ic
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 lcd-
roons, 2 laiIs, aiiacIcd 2-car
garagc, largc loi. Call 859-2403,
PIili¡. PF10-ifn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Onc lcdroon Iousc
in Wall. 279-2865.
PW1-2ic
FOR RENT: Two lcdroon a¡ari-
ncni in Wall. Call 386-2222.
PW51-4ic
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Sian, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-ifn
APARTMENTS: S¡acious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or sio¡ in iIc lolly and
¡icl u¡ an a¡¡licaiion. Caicway
A¡arincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc accc¡i
rcs¡onsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc ¡aid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi ¡aid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is ¡laccd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
Vc uunt to tuIc tIís uu¸ to cx-
¡¡css ou¡ g¡utítudc to cucI und
cuc¡¸onc uIo nudc Ku¡cn`s Icn-
c¡ít ín Vuíí, DcccnIc¡ lst, sucI u
¡un und cntc¡tuíníng cucníng.
TIunI ¸ou to tIc Hcd Hut
Ludícs und tIc uuctíoncc¡s ¡o¡
¡ood und ¡un, und cuc¡¸onc ¡o¡
uttcndíng, sIouíng tIcí¡ su¡¡o¡t
und concc¡n.
Ku¡cn uííí Ic ín su¡gc¡¸ Dc-
ccnIc¡ l2tI to Iuuc tIc Incc ¡ut
ín.
VIut u g¡cut ¡íucc to ííuc und
uo¡I. A Iíg tIunI ¸ou to cuc¡¸-
onc ¡o¡ uíí ¸ou Iuuc donc to nuIc
tIcsc 2-l/2 nontIs u stc¡ ín gct-
tíng ucíí.
TIunI ¸ou!
Ku¡cn ö Hu¡oíd DcíI¡ídgc
Vc uouíd ííIc to cx¡¡css ou¡
síncc¡c tIunI ¸ou ¡o¡ uíí tIc
¡¡u¸c¡s, donutíons und con¡o¡t
du¡íng tIc suddcn íoss o¡ HoI.
God Iícss ¸ou uíí,
Mu¡ícnc HuIc¡ ö ¡uníí¸
TIunI ¸ou to cuc¡¸onc uIo cx-
¡¡csscd condoícnccs on tIc ¡uss-
íng o¡ n¸ dud. Hc uus u ¡cuí
cIu¡uctc¡ und Ic uííí Ic nísscd,
cs¡ccíuíí¸ Iís scnsc o¡ Iuno¡.
DuIc Vcstc¡Ic¡g
Vc uunt to tIunI tIc u¡cu ¡cs-
ídcnts und Iusíncsscs ¡o¡ tIc
gcnc¡ous donutíons to tIc ¡ood
¡unt¡¸. You¡ su¡¡o¡t Icc¡s ou¡
doo¡s o¡cn. It ís g¡cutí¸ u¡¡¡ccí-
utcd.
Count¡¸ Cu¡Iou¡d Food Punt¡¸
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Eסcdi-
iion XLT 4×4, cloiI scais, ¡owcr
windows, locls & scais, good
iircs. Call 685-8155. PF10-ifn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
POLISHED PINKY will lc closcd
December 21-30. Plcniy of
o¡cnings lcfi if you nccd io nalc
an a¡¡oinincni. Colors. $10 off.
Call 279-2772, Wall. Merrg
CÞr1s1mos & Hoppg Neu Yeor
]rom 1Þe Brgon1s. PW2-2ic
SCHAEFER ENTERPRISES:
Re-openIng For BusIness In
WaII, Soutb Dakota, on Janu-
ary 1, 2013: Wali ScIacfcr,
Owncr/O¡craior, 605-279-2948
or 605-515-3961. S¡ccializing in
rcsidcniial & conncrcial rc¡airs
involving. Car¡cniry (rc¡airs
and ligIi consiruciion}, Plunl-
ing (rc¡airs and insiallaiion},
Minor Elccirical Fc¡airs, A¡¡li-
ancc Fc¡airs (clcciric only}.
PW2-2ic
O'CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Focl, Sand,
Cravcl (scrccncd or crusIcd}. Wc
can dclivcr. Dans, dugouis,
luilding siics. Our 37iI ycar.
Clcnn or Tracc, 859-2020.
PF11-ifn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
S¡ccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV a¡¡licaiion. ALSO. ¡rairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23i¡
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iy¡cs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
u¡s, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52i¡
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iy¡cs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׸gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: 140 acrcs, PIili¡
arca. Ton Folcy Fcal Esiaic,
859-2975 or 685-8856.
PF17-1ic
WHEAT HAY FOR SALE: Call
685-3068. P52-ifn
FOR SALE: 2012 grass Iay,
sonc alfalfa, lig rounds, scni-
load lois, dclivcrcd ¡ricing, no
nold. Call Fol, 390-5535, or
CIarlcs, 390-5506. P50-5i¡
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-¡ly, 235/85/16F. $160,
nounicd. Lcs' Dody SIo¡, 859-
2744, PIili¡. P40-ifn
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Haalon
Couniy is ialing a¡¡licaiions for
iIc ¡osiiion of Dc¡uiy Fcgisicr
of Dccds. TIis is a Ialf-iinc ¡o-
siiion. Mininun cducaiion rc-
quircncni is a IigI scIool
di¡lona or CED ccriificaic. Scc-
rciarial or rclaicd cסcricncc
¡rcfcrrcd. TIc following slills
and aliliiics arc rcquircd. iy¡c
accuraicly; lasic con¡uicr and
officc nacIincry lnowlcdgc;
aliliiy io usc Microsofi Word
and E×ccl; grcai aiicniion io dc-
iail; c×ccllcni cusioncr scrvicc
and organizaiional slills; c×-
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN, ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Qualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE cIancc io luy a
wcll csiallisIcd & succcssful
lusincss in iIc Siaic Ca¡iiol of
S.D. TIc LonglrancI is for SALE
(scrious inquircs only}. Call Fus-
scll S¡aid 605-280-1067.
EMPLOYMENT
FEPOFTEF &?FAFMEF, an
award winning wcclly ncws¡a-
¡cr in iIc Icari of iIc Clacial
Lalcs arca, sccls fulliinc
ncws/s¡oris rc¡oricr and ¡Io-
iogra¡Icr. Scnd rcsunc and
cli¡s io Fc¡oricr &?Farncr, PO
Do× 30, Wclsicr, SD 57274 or
cnail suIrs¸rc¡oricrand-
farncr.con.
FEPOFTEF & FAFMEF sccls a
full iinc gra¡Iic ariisi for ncws-
¡a¡cr advcriiscncnis and ¡rini-
ing as wcll as ¡aginaiion.
Eסcricncc rcquircd. Wc usc
Quarl lui also Iavc a con¡lcic
linc of Adolc ¡roducis. Scnd rc-
sunc and infornaiion io
suIrs¸rc¡oricrandfarncr.con
or nail io PO Do× 30, Wclsicr,
SD 57274.
FOR SALE
2005-2006 Pcicrlili 387s - C-
15, 13 s¡ccd, Plaiinun Inicrior.
Tradcs wclconc, Financing
availallc wiiI a¡¡rovcd crcdii
$29-34,000. Call TMC Trucl
Salcs 877-285-8752 or
www.DlaclandCIroncSalcs.co
n.
FOOSTEF PHEASANTS FOF
salc. 1,000 long-iailcd flying
lirds, $16 cacI. Foyal FlusI
PIcasanis. S¡cnccr, SD. 605-
480-4444.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOC HOME Duildcrs
rc¡rcscniing Coldcn Eaglc Log
Honcs, luilding in casicrn, ccn-
iral, noriIwcsicrn SouiI &
NoriI Daloia. Scoii Conncll,
605-530-2672, Craig Conncll,
605-264-5650, www.goldcnca-
glclogIoncs.con.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.} Call
iIis ncws¡a¡cr ÷ 605-859-
2516 ÷ or 800-658-3697 for dc-
iails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI,
33¢/34¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456.1024,
joc¸iliirucl. con.
WANTED
ANTLEFS, ELK IVOFIES, ¡Icas-
ani slins, raiilcsnalcs and ¡or-
cu¡incs. PI. 605-673-4345 or
cnail ai clawanilcrIidc¸Ioi-
nail.con.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1995 Poniiac Firc-
lird, low nilcs, 25 io 34 n¡g,
$2,900 ODO. Musi scll ly Janu-
ary 1si. Call 515-1460. P1-2i¡
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
0IassItIed
AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nin-
inun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu, tIc P¡o¡ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou¡unt, as wcll
as on our wclsiic. www.¡ionccr-
rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns,
Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun
for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr word
iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial
nusi lc counicd sc¡araicly. In-
cludcd in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and
tIc P¡o¡ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc
and iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Pío-
ncc¡ Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for
loollcc¡ing and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 ¡cr
colunn incI, includcd in iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít.
$5.55 ¡cr colunn incI for iIc Pí-
oncc¡ Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic ad-
vcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr is suljcci io iIc
Fcdcral Fair Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI
nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany ¡rcfcrcncc,
or discrininaiion on racc, color, rcligion,
sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io
nalc any sucI ¡rcfcrcncc, liniiaiion, or
discrininaiion."
TIis ncws¡a¡cr will noi lnowingly accc¡i
any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a vi-
olaiion of iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd
iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a-
¡cr arc availallc on an cqual o¡¡oriuniiy
lasis.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW
APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
view &
download
online
produotion
sale oatalogs at:
www.rpipromotions.oom
C0MlN0 300N:
1oseph Angus Ranoh
National Lowline 3ale
MoPherson Angus Ranoh
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
·Eden Pure Heaters
·Wood Pellets
·DeWALT Tools
·Storage Sheds
·Gates & Fencing Supplies
·Skid Loader Rental
·Pole Barn Packages
·House Packages
·FeedBunks
·Calf Shelters
We offer .
& new CoIormatch System for
aII your painting needs!
Call today
for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. BRED CAT-
TLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
TRIPLE T RANCH - 75 DLK HFFS; FS, NI............................................500=
SIMON - 25 HEFF FED ANC X CLVS; FS,NI..................................400-600=
BRED HEIFERS:
EDGAR SIMON - 22 HEFF FED ANC X HFFS; DFED. POLLED HEFF;
CLV. 3-16
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
EDGAR SIMON - 30 HEFF FED ANC X MIXED ACE COWS; DFED. HEFF;
CLV. 3-21
LYNN FIELDS - 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-
25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 15 DLK HFFS TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
JESSE MORELAND - 15 DWF FIFST CFOSS 7 YF OLD COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12
P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. EXPECTINC 4000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RICK KING & SONS - 900 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED CLVS; FS.....600-750=
KNUTSON - 250 DLK CLVS; FS.....................................................500-600=
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - 250 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI .........500-600=
KEHN RANCH - 400 DLK CLVS; FS ..............................................500-650=
FORTUNE - 150 DLK STFS; FS.....................................................650-750=
AMIOTTE - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-600=
HANSON - 140 HEFF & DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS.........................650=
AMIOTTE - 124 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................700=
WHEELER RANCH - 120 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ................625=
BARTLETT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI......................................................700=
SIGMAN & SIGMAN - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI, HFFS DV.................700-800=
OLSON - 90 DLK & FED ANC STFS; FS,AN...................................550-650=
WILLIAMS - 90 DLK HFFS; FS.............................................................550=
LEHRKAMP - 80 DLK CLVS; FS....................................................600-650=
BARRY - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI ............................600-650=
FERGUSON - 60 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI....................................500-600=
HERBER RANCH - 50 HEFF CLVS; FS................................................600=
GROPPER - 50 FED ANC FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,ALL HFFS IN TOWN600-
700=
ARTHUR - 50 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
SILBERNAGEL - 43 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................600-650=
STABEN - 36 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS..............................................650-700=
SMITH - 36 DLK STFS; FS............................................................800-850=
PETERSON - 35 HEFF STFS; FS ..................................................650-700=
ANDERS - 35 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
DEJONG - 20 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ...........................................................600=
WILLERT - 9 DLK CLVS; FS..........................................................550-600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: D£C. JS, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e
]or our 1os1 so1e o] 2DJ2. We uou1d 11Ke
1o 1ÞonK o11 bugers, se11ers & emp1ogees
]or moK1ng 2DJ2 o reoord geor o1 PÞ111p
L1ves1ooK. We u1sÞ evergone o Verg
Merrg CÞr1s1mos ond o prosperous geor
1n 2DJS. Le1´s o11 prog ]or ro1n ond
breoK 1Þe drougÞ1.
BRED CATTLE:
WHEELER RANCH - PHILIP
9 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 1054=....$1,725.00
24 ..................................DWF HFFS 1089=....$1,700.00
POSS RANCH INC. - STURGIS
15.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 1065=....$1,700.00
GENE & SHERYL MICHAEL - PHILIP
25.....................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 1214=....$1,650.00
74.....................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 1225=....$1,600.00
CODY WEYER - HOWES
11.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1074=....$1,540.00
40.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1065=....$1,525.00
41.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 985=......$1,500.00
JT MOON - CREIGHTON
14.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1073=....$1,525.00
18.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1054=....$1,485.00
11 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1304=....$1,300.00
6 .............DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1348=....$1,025.00
GERALD RISSE - MARTIN
22...............DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1275=....$1,550.00
42...............DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1393=....$1,520.00
25...............DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1390=....$1,510.00
20 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1540=....$1,210.00
31 ...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1410=....$1,015.00
STEVEN STEWART - PHILIP
21...............DLK 4 & 5 YF OLD COWS 1255=....$1,510.00
24 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1378=....$1,320.00
26 ...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1340=.......$985.00
BJ DARTT - WALL
11...............DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1044=....$1,500.00
13...............DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1303=....$1,475.00
LORREN MORELAND - RED OWL
30.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1079=....$1,475.00
RICHARD SMILEY - RED OWL
19...............DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1051=....$1,425.00
15 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1317=....$1,140.00
MELVIN & TRINA ARNESON - ENNING
40...................................DLK HFFS 970=......$1,410.00
10...................................DLK HFFS 1000=....$1,400.00
SHAW RANCH - WHITE OWL
10.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 956=......$1,410.00
12...................................DLK HFFS 964=......$1,310.00
20DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1453=....$1,080.00
HARLEY ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
8.................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1213=....$1,400.00
12 ...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1337=.......$985.00
DANNY & BOBBIE ARNESON - UNION CENTER
10...................................DLK HFFS 931=......$1,385.00
30.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 943=......$1,375.00
CASEY BRINK - UNION CENTER
10.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 911=......$1,370.00
5.....................................DLK HFFS 883=......$1,300.00
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - UNION CENTER
12...................................DLK HFFS 940=......$1,350.00
27...................................DLK HFFS 945=......$1,285.00
11...................................DLK HFFS 911=......$1,225.00
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
4 ............DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD COWS 1295=....$1,335.00
MIKE KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
66.....................DLK 4 YF OLD COWS 1072=....$1,320.00
78 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1165=....$1,100.00
104 .........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1203=.......$940.00
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
24..............DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1231=....$1,360.00
65...................................DLK HFFS 933=......$1,310.00
22 ..................................DWF HFFS 921=......$1,285.00
RANDY KEFFELER - RED OWL
6DLK & DWF 5 TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1468=....$1,100.00
PAT & ROSE TRASK - WASTA
42DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1366=....$1,010.00
CALVES:
MADSEN RANCH CATTLE - MIDLAND
103 .......................FED & DLK STFS 527=.........$181.00
22.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 489=.........$161.00
GARTNER & KJERSTAD - INTERIOR
25....................................DLK STFS 525=.........$181.25
19...................................DLK HFFS 483=.........$164.00
RONNIE MAHAFFY - VALE
87...................................DLK HFFS 464=.........$165.00
23...................................DLK HFFS 403=.........$162.50
RANDY & LOIS PETERSON - RAPID CITY
10....................................DLK STFS 505=.........$182.50
STEVE VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
13....................................DLK STFS 514=.........$179.75
52....................................DLK STFS 624=.........$161.50
DON & DELORIS POSS - PHILIP
68....................................DLK STFS 605=.........$165.25
88....................................DLK STFS 695=.........$157.25
97...................................DLK HFFS 630=.........$154.75
43...................................DLK HFFS 555=.........$162.50
MARK KEIFFER - RAPID CITY
26....................................DLK STFS 578=.........$169.00
68....................................DLK STFS 683=.........$158.50
17...................................DLK HFFS 544=.........$159.50
38...................................DLK HFFS 616=.........$148.00
GLEN & BRIGHAM BENNETT - PHILIP
39....................................DLK STFS 540=.........$177.50
58....................................DLK STFS 650=.........$156.25
EUGENE & GLENDA HELMS - CREIGHTON
10...................................DLK HFFS 507=.........$160.50
BROOK LOOBEY - WHITEWOOD
23 .........................FED & DLK STFS 595=.........$157.50
ED & DEBRA DODSON - NEWELL
9..........................CHAF & DLK STFS 633=.........$150.00
7.....................................DLK HFFS 583=.........$149.50
UDDER EXPRESS - NEW UNDERWOOD
27...................................DLK HFFS 494=.........$164.25
TYLER ROBERTSON - HERMOSA
9...........................DLK & DWF STFS 414=.........$200.00
16...................................DLK HFFS 419=.........$165.00
THOMAS RANCH BULLS
15........................................CHAF AVC. ............$3650
16......................................DLACK AVC. ............$2409
10..........................................FED AVC. ............$2270
6..........................................SIMM AVC. ..............$295
WEIGH-UPS:
RAY MANSFIELD - MARTIN
1......................................DLK COW 1400=.........$83.00
2..............................DLK COWETTES 1050=.........$98.00
JUDY BRINK - MIDLAND
1......................................DLK COW 1480=.........$82.50
KEVIN VANDERMAY - NORRIS
6 ....................................DLK COWS 1499=.........$81.50
RUSSELL SIMONS - FAITH
1......................................DLK COW 1885=.........$81.00
KEN JONES - BROADUS, MT
1......................................DLK COW 1900=.........$80.00
ALYSHA MORTENSON - FAITH
1 .....................................FED COW 1275=.........$80.00
DAN GRUBL - STURGIS
1....................................CHAF COW 1690=.........$81.50
1....................................CHAF COW 1550=.........$78.00
2 ..................................CHAF COWS 1555=.........$77.50
1....................................CHAF COW 1485=.........$77.00
2 ..................................CHAF COWS 1520=.........$74.50
1....................................CHAF COW 1440=.........$72.50
GWENDOLYN KILNESS - HOWES
6 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 712=.........$136.50
SHAW RANCH - WHITE OWL
1.....................................DLK HFFS 850=.........$130.00
MELVIN & TRINA ARNESON - ENNING
2.....................................DLK HFFS 883=.........$129.00
JT MOON - CREIGHTON
8 ....................................DLK COWS 1438=.........$79.50
7..........................FED & DLK COWS 1298=.........$77.25
1......................................DLK COW 1415=.........$75.00
14...................................DLK HFFS 1015=.......$104.50
NORMAN DELBRIDGE - FAITH
1......................................DLK COW 1595=.........$78.50
1......................................DLK COW 1410=.........$77.00
MIKE KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
1......................................DLK COW 1240=.........$78.50
RYAN ANDERSON - MURDO
2..........................FED & DLK COWS 1365=.........$78.00
FLOYD GABRIEL EST - CREIGHTON
2.........................FWF & DWF COWS 1518=.........$77.00
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
8 ....................................DLK COWS 1253=.........$77.00
13 ..................................DLK COWS 1297=.........$74.25
18 .................................DLK HFFTS 953=.........$102.50
GUPTILL RANCH - INTERIOR
1......................................DLK COW 1055=.........$77.00
1 .....................................FED COW 1430=.........$75.50
1......................................DLK COW 1435=.........$74.00
1................................DLK COWETTE 1180=.........$86.00
KOLBY KINSLEY - MURDO
3..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1692=.........$76.50
VERYL PROKOP - KADOKA
1......................................DLK COW 1340=.........$76.50
1 .....................................FED COW 1285=.........$76.00
8.........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 1004=.........$98.50
5.....................................DLK HFFS 860=.........$111.00
DANNY JORDAN - FAITH
1......................................DLK COW 1530=.........$76.00
7..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1256=.........$70.50
5 ...................................DLK HFFTS 896=.........$110.00
7..............................DLK COWETTES 1047=.........$94.50
JEAN LAUGHTON - INTERIOR
1......................................DLK COW 1360=.........$76.00
MICHAEL MCPHERSON - BOX ELDER
1......................................DLK COW 1205=.........$76.00
12.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 808=.........$116.00
2.....................................DLK HFFS 835=.........$111.00
3...................................DWF HFFTS 898=.........$108.00
RICHARD SMILEY - RED OWL
1.......................................DLK HFF 835=.........$125.50
ROGER FORTUNE - QUINN
11...................................DLK HFFS 1018=.......$104.25
LEE MORTENSON - FAITH
4 ...................................DLK HFFTS 914=.........$109.50
CODY WEYER - HOWES
5 ...................................DLK HFFTS 923=.........$108.00
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
1......................................DLK COW 1310=.........$75.50
CLAYTON KJERSTAD - WALL
1......................................DLK COW 1280=.........$75.50
1......................................DLK COW 1360=.........$70.00
HOSTUTLER RANCH - MIDLAND
12........................DLK & DWF COWS 1150=.........$75.25
7..........................FED & DLK COWS 1461=.........$75.00
8 ...................................DLK HFFTS 1024=.......$100.00
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
1...............................DWF COWETTE 1000=.......$100.00
JEFF LONG - ENNING
9..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1311=.........$74.50
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1328=.........$71.50
HENRY MARTIN - SUNDANCE, WY
1 .....................................FED COW 1200=.........$74.50
CHAD WHITNEY - MURDO
8..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1493=.........$74.25
10........................DLK & DWF COWS 1266=.........$72.50
GERALD RISSE - MARTIN
6 ....................................DLK COWS 1275=.........$74.25
5 ....................................DLK COWS 1298=.........$73.25
5 ....................................DLK COWS 1250=.........$73.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1405=.........$74.00
KETELSEN FAMILY TRUST - UNION CENTER
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1300=.........$73.00
5 ....................................DLK COWS 1365=.........$72.00
PAT & ROSE TRASK - WASTA
1......................................DLK COW 1200=.........$73.00
1......................................DLK COW 1415=.........$72.00
20 ..................................DLK COWS 1326=.........$70.25
LYLE O'BRYAN - BELVIDERE
1 .....................................FED COW 1515=.........$72.50
ROBERT & SHARON JONES - ENNING
1 .....................................FED COW 1455=.........$72.50
SUSAN EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
6..........................FED & DLK COWS 1478=.........$72.00
16........................DLK & DWF COWS 1219=.........$70.75
1.....................................DLK HFFS 890=.........$126.50
STEVEN STEWART - PHILIP
13 ..................................DLK COWS 1244=.........$72.00
RON KINSLEY - MURDO
3 ....................................DLK COWS 1432=.........$71.75
RANDY & LOIS PETERSON - RAPID CITY
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1310=.........$71.50
TODD & SARAH ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
1......................................DLK COW 1275=.........$71.00
1................................DLK COWETTE 1090=.........$98.00
KAREL AGA - STURGIS
3..........................FED & DLK COWS 1497=.........$70.50
KELLY FEES - PHILIP
4..........................FED & DLK COWS 1184=.........$70.50
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: MCPHEFSON ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS, 1.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
South Dakota Brand
seIIing on
Tuesday, Jan. 8,
at 12:00 p.m.
1hursday, Ueoember 20, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review ·
Lunch 8pec|a|s:
Honday-Fr|day
11:00 to 1:30
6a|| for
spec|a|s!
8aturday, 0ecem
ber 22nd: 0ance to "6rash w
agon"
Regu|ar Henu
Ava||ab|e N|ght|y!
* * *
Fr|day ßuffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
0swa|swa l||||ç
ktstrra||sas:
ääâ-tII1
~ Saturday, Dec. 22 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Dec. 24 ~
Closed
Merry Christmas
I|t ä|ta||sast k lsaa¡t
êçta 0a||¡ Msa1a¡ ||ra äa|ar1a¡
8
a
|a
d
ß
a
r
A
v
a
||a
b
|e
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, Dec. 18 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, Dec. 19 ~
Indian Taco
or Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Dec. 20 ~
Beef Tip Basket
~ Friday Buffet, Dec. 21 ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Shrimp • Chicken
Try our new charbroiled steaks & burgers! All steaks come with a choice of potato and includes salad bar!
wIfh roIIsh µInfos nnd dossorfs. If
wns n doIIghffuI ovonIng. KoIIy
Ioos, Coffonwood, Joo nnd ÐobbIo
Iroufy, JIm nnd Ioffy SmIfh, nnd
Iurjos nnd ChoryI IIfch, nII of
IhIIIµ, woro nIso fhoro fo onjoy
fhoIr grnndchIIdron.
Wo hnvo Iosf n Iof of oId frIonds
nnd noIghbors who hoIµod dovoIoµ
fhIs nron. Our symµnfhy goos ouf
fo fho fnmIIIos of Inrnoy IfoIfor,
Vorn McÐonnId, Tom McÐonnId
(fwIn brofhors), HnroId Schnoo,
Jnno Knmµfo nnd WIImn ÐnnIoI.
MnrvIn IIdo movod sfncks for
Hnuks fhIs wook. MnrvIn snId fhnf
Ioggy hnd hor grnnddnughfor,
!nchoIIo IIshoro, nnd gronf-grnnd-
dnughfor, AshIynn, fhoro for n dny
of vIsIfIng. !nchoIIo Is fho dnughfor
of Ðoug nnd Inyo Hnuk.
TrndIfIons nf ChrIsfmns fImo nro
somofhIng dIfforonf fo onch of us.
Ivory frndIfIon grows confInu-
nIIy moro vonornbIo, nnd moro ro-
mofo Ifs orIgIn, fho moro fhIs Is Iosf
sIghf of. Tho vonornfIon µnId fho
frndIfIon nccumuInfos from gonor-
nfIon fo gonornfIon, unfII If ns Insf
bocomos hoIy nnd oxcIfos.
IrIodrIch ÞIofzscho
wIndow, nnd I'm so Iucky fo bo nbIo
fo sfny homo nnd onjoy If! Wo nro
confonf In our IIffIo µIoco of
honvon. Wo hnvo hnd mnny foggy
dnys roconfIy, nnd If brIngs fo mInd
fho oId wIvos fnIo fhnf snys wo'II
hnvo moIsfuro 90 dnys foIIowIng
fho fog. (Af Ionsf fhnf's fho wny I
romombor fho fnIo.) If fhnf Is fruo,
mId-Mnrch cnIvIng sonson couId
gof µroffy oxcIfIng! AcfunIIy, fhIs
yonr, µrocIµIfnfIon of nny sorf Is
goIng fo bo oxcIfIng!
I wnnf fo fnko fhIs oµµorfunIfy fo
oxµross my symµnfhy fo nII fho
foIks Imµncfod by fho roconf
frngody nf fho Snndy Hook IIo-
monfnry SchooI In ConnocfIcuf.
Words soom Inndoqunfo fhoro
doosn'f soom fo bo nny µInusIbIo ox-
µInnnfIon for fhIs fyµo of vIoIonco.
Þow on fo moro µIonsnnf nows!
Tho ÞnfIonnI IInnIs !odoo Is
now ovor for nnofhor yonr, nnd jusf
In fImo, foo! I wns goffIng n IIffIo
sIooµ doµrIvod! CongrnfuInfIons fo
fho Soufh Ðnkofn confosfnnfs!
JuIInn nnd Coroon !osofh woro
nmong fhoso nffondIng n bIrfhdny
µnrfy for Monfo WhIdby Snfurdny
ovonIng In IIorro. ThoIr chIIdron
nnd sµousos woro nIso In nffon-
dnnco. Sundny ovonIng, JuIInn nnd
Coroon woro guosfs nf fho homo of
CInrk nnd Cnrmon AIIomnn for
suµµor nnd cnrd µInyIng In honor of
CInrk's bIrfhdny.
Ðunno nnd !oIn !osofh woro In
IhIIIµ Insf Wodnosdny for n fosfIvo
suµµor nf fho homo of Jorry nnd
Inm Ingrnm. Snfurdny mornIng,
dnughfor Knyco (!osofh) nnd hor
husbnnd, John CorInch, ns woII ns
son !hoff !osofh nrrIvod nf Ðunno
nnd !oIn's, nnd fho onfIro grouµ
wonf fo IIorro Infor In fho dny fo
nffond Monfo WhIdby's bIrfhdny
µnrfy. IrIor fo fho µnrfy, fho
!osofh crow fook fho oµµorfunIfy
fo four fho bonufIfuIIy docornfod
froos nf fho CnµIfoI buIIdIng.
Knyco, John nnd !hoff rofurnod fo
fhoIr homos In !nµId CIfy Sundny
mornIng.
Sundny ovonIng, Ðunno nnd !oIn
joInod fho grouµ for suµµor nnd
cnrd µInyIng nf CInrk nnd Cnrmon
AIIomnn's.
If hns boon nnofhor busy wook nf
fho homo of CIInf nnd !nurn AIIo-
mnn. InrIy Insf wook, T.J. nnd Jon-
nIno CnbrIoI nnd fnmIIy woro
suµµor guosfs nf CIInf nnd !nurn's.
Wodnosdny, CIInf nnd !nurn
sfoµµod by CInrk nnd Cnrmon AIIo-
mnn's fo gIvo CInrk hIs ?0fh bIrfh-
dny gIff. Thon CIInf nnd !nurn
frnvoIod fo Hnyos !nurn vIsIfod
wIfh hor µnronfs whIIo CIInf
hoIµod nf fho fIro hnII. Thursdny
ovonIng, fho AIIomnns nffondod
fho Choyonno SchooI ChrIsfmns
µrogrnm nf KIrIoy HnII. IrIdny,
dnughfor AIIvyn gof fo sµond fho
dny wIfh Crnndmn nnd Crnndµn
Yosf In Hnyos whIIo !nurn wns In
IIorro. Snfurdny, !nurn nnd AIIvyn
woro ngnIn In Hnyos, doIng hoIIdny
bnkIng wIfh !nurn's mofhor, Joy,
nnd hor sIsfor, JossIcn Cox, nnd
chIIdron. Sundny mornIng, !nurn
snId Snnfn's hoIµors cnmo fo hoIµ
hor wIfh somo ChrIsfmns dufIos,
nnd sho wns vory grnfofuI for fho
hoIµ. !nfor on Sundny, fhoy jusf
sfnyod homo nnd rosfod, ns fhoy
woro nof fooIIng l00 µorconf. Ono
moro bIf of InformnfIon from
!nurn sho snId fho Hnyos µIny
nnd cnsf hnvo boon µIckod, nnd
fhoy nro rondy fo sfnrf µIny µrnc-
fIco!
Irnnk nnd ShIrIoy HnIIIgnn wonf
fo fho bnskofbnII gnmo In InIfh
Thursdny, nnd Irnnk wonf fo
grnndson JorIn's fournnmonf on
Snfurdny. If sounds IIko ovorybody
won fhoIr gnmos, nnd JorIn's fonm
won fho fournnmonf congrnfuIn-
fIons! Snfurdny ovonIng, Irnnk
nnd ShIrIoy woro guosfs nf CInrk
nnd Cnrmon AIIomnn's ShIrIoy
ovon broughf homomndo Ico cronm
for fho grouµ, whIch wns quIfo n
fronf! Mondny ovonIng, Irnnk nnd
ShIrIoy woro on fho rond ngnIn, ns
fhoy hondod fo fho ChrIsfmns µro-
grnm In InIfh. I hnvon'f honrd If
fhoy oncounforod fog on fhoIr frIµ
homo, buf If wns suro sockod In
horo.
Mnry IrIggs wns forfunnfo fo bo
nbIo fo work from homo on IrIdny.
Sho nIso workod from homo µnrf of
Mondny buf fhon sho hnd fo
sµond fho rosf of fho dny cIonnIng
uµ nffor fhoIr wnfor honfor fnIIuro,
whIch wnsn'f so forfunnfo! !oo hnd
fho mIsforfuno of cnfchIng nnofhor
coId, so I hoµo ho fooIs boffor ronI
soon. (ThIs Is µrobnbIy n soxIsf
fhIng fo sny, buf If sooms fhnf
womon nro novor ns sIck ns mon,
no mnffor whnf fho nIImonf! Af
Ionsf fhnf's fho wny If Is nf our
houso.) !oo nnd Mnry wIII hnvo
fhoIr dnughfors, !on !IggIo nnd
Kovn Joons, nnd fnmIIIos nf fho
rnnch for ChrIsfmns.
Þows from Ðooµ Crook SchooI
(courfosy of Thorosn Ðouchnr).
Tho sfudonfs nf Ðooµ Crook hnd n
sµocInI vIsIfor Insf Tuosdny. MIko
IIroufok wnnfod fo hoIµ fho sfu-
donfs mnko n nIco ChrIsfmns µros-
onf for fhoIr µnronfs. Thorosn
Ðouchnr snId sho couIdn'f sny whnf
If Is, oxcoµf fhnf If Is mndo of wood.
MIko usod fho comµufor fo show
fho sfudonfs how ho mnkos dosIgns
for µrojocfs In hIs workshoµ. Ho
gnvo fhom sovornI oxnmµIos fo
show how Imµorfnnf mnfh Is In hIs
work. Anofhor µoInf fhnf ho
sfrossod Is nof fo gIvo uµ nnd kooµ
nf If unfII you gof If rIghf. (Sounds
IIko n good IIfo Iosson!) So from
Thorosn Ðouchnr nnd fho Ðooµ
Crook sfudonfs, fhnnks fo MIko
IIroufok for fnkIng fho fImo nnd of-
forf fo como ovor fo fho schooI. On
n soµnrnfo nofo, Thorosn Ðouchnr
snId ns sho wns sondIng mo fho
omnII, sho honrd fho dogs bnrkIng,
nnd If wns fho dIsfIncfIvo bnrk fhnf
snys fhoy hnvo somofhIng cor-
norod. And suro onough, fhoro wns
n coyofo frnµµod undor fho horso
frnIIor. Thnnks fo !oy Wnrnor,
fhoy woro nbIo fo shoof fho coyofo.
IIIIy nnd ArIyno Mnrkwod woro
In IIorro Snfurdny. Thoy vIsIfod
wIfh Aunf AIIco JoIfz, nnd fhon
fhoy nffondod fho bIrfhdny µnrfy
for Monfo WhIdby. Sundny, fhoy
nffondod church, nnd nfforwnrds
Mnrk nnd InIIoy !ndwny sfoµµod
by fo doIIvor somo IIA fruIf. Sun-
dny ovonIng, IIIIy nnd ArIyno woro
nf fho AIIomnn's for suµµor nnd
cnrds. Tho cnbIn nf fhoIr homo Is
nII dono nnd rondy for guosfs, nnd
If Is jusf In fImo, foo! ThoIr grnnd-
son, Todd, wIII nrrIvo Tuosdny, nnd
Wodnosdny fhoIr dnughfor, KIm, Is
fIyIng In from hor homo In MIs-
souIn. !of fho fosfIvIfIos bogIn!
ÐIck nnd Cono Hudson woro In
!nµId CIfy on busInoss Insf
Wodnosdny. Thoy sµonf fho nIghf
nnd koµf nn oyo nµµoInfmonf
Thursdny mornIng, nnd fhon fhoy
cnmo bnck fhrough IhIIIµ nnd vIs-
Ifod wIfh MnrIo Andorson nnd Ar-
Iono IofoskI nf fho SIIvorIonf.
Thursdny ovonIng, fhoy nffondod
fho Choyonno SchooI ChrIsfmns
µrogrnm nf KIrIoy HnII. Snfurdny,
ÐIck nnd Cono woro In IIorro, sfoµ-
µIng fo vIsIf InuIIno (IuchhoIz)
nnd CnrInnd IrboIo boforo nffond-
Ing fho bIrfhdny µnrfy for Monfo
WhIdby. If sounds IIko fho chIckons
nf Hudson's hnvo goffon fho mos-
sngo sInco Cono sfnrfod choµµIng
fho honds off fho non-µroducors,
fho rosf of fho chIckons hnvo sfnrf-
Ing InyIng oggs! Thnf Is gronf nows!
CInrk nnd Cnrmon AIIomnn woro
In !nµId CIfy Wodnosdny for nµ-
µoInfmonfs. Sundny ovonIng, fhoy
InvIfod n grouµ of frIonds In for
suµµor nnd cnrd µInyIng In honor of
CInrk's bIrfhdny. Hnµµy boInfod
bIrfhdny, CInrk!
Mnx nnd Joyco Jonos nffondod
fho Choyonno SchooI ChrIsfmns
µrogrnm Thursdny ovonIng nf KIr-
Ioy HnII. IrIdny, fhoy woro In
IIorro fo wnfch grnndchIIdron,
!uko nnd MnffIo, µorform fhoIr
µInno rocIfnI nf fho CnµIfoI buIId-
Ing. Thoy nIso fourod fho gorgoous
froos In fho CnµIfoI buIIdIng. Sun-
dny, Mnx nnd Joyco hosfod n
ChrIsfmns µnrfy for Insforn Sfnr
mombors from OnIdn. Tho µnrfy
hnd boon µosfµonod n wook duo fo
nII fho bIowIng snow Insf wookond.
Crnnddnughfor MnffIo hoIµod wIfh
cookIng nnd µInfIng µroµnrnfIons
for fho grouµ. Ovor fho wookond,
MnffIo nffondod n Iunchoon In
IIorro, nnd sho wns nwnrdod n $50
µrIzo ns fho wInnor of fho IocnI
VIW ossny confosf. Hor ossny wIII
now bo onforod In fho sfnfowIdo
confosf. AusfIn Hnnd wns fho soc-
ond µInco wInnor. CongrnfuInfIons
fo bofh young µooµIo!
!ny nnd Þnncy Þouhnusor nf-
fondod n ChrIsfmns µnrfy nf fho
sonIor confor IrIdny. Snfurdny,
fhoy frnvoIod fo ChnmborInIn fo
coIobrnfo ChrIsfmns wIfh hor son,
Iroff SforIIng, nnd hIs fnmIIy. Snf-
urdny ovonIng, !ny nnd Þnncy nf-
fondod n ShrInor's ChrIsfmns
µnrfy. Þnncy hns boon n bIf undor
fho wonfhor hoµo sho fooIs boffor
soon.
Chnso nnd KoIIy IrIggs nnd chII-
dron woro nmong fhoso nffondIng
fho Choyonno SchooI ChrIsfmns
µrogrnm nf fho KIrIoy HnII Thurs-
dny. KoIIy snId fho sfudonfs dId n
gronf job!
Jon nnd ConnIo Johnson woro In
IIorro Snfurdny for Monfo
WhIdby's bIrfhdny µnrfy. ThoIr
son, Wynff, Is homo for fho ChrIsf-
mns bronk from hIs sfudIos nf
Soufh Ðnkofn Sfnfo !nIvorsIfy.
ConnIo snId fhoro wns n good crowd
on hnnd for fho ChrIsfmns µrogrnm
nf KIrIoy HnII, dosµIfo fho honvy
fog. Somo of ConnIo's foIIow oducn-
fors from If. IIorro nIso cnmo for
fho fosfIvIfIos!
(contInued next week)
McenvIIIe News
{ccntInued trcm page ?)
0rIndstcne
News
{ccntInued trcm page 11)

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