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Pioneer Review, August 15, 2013

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$
1
00
Includes Tax
12 Pro Winter Wheat ........$6.62
any Pro .........................$6.12
14 Pro Spring Wheat ........$6.62
Corn ...................................$4.87
SFS Birdseed...................$17.50
Commissioners Proceedings
City of Philip Proceedings
Notices to Creditors
Notice of hearing
Notice of Laps of Mineral Interests
10-11-12
Senechal Park work 8
Midland Vacation
Bible School 5
Philip, South Dakota 57567 ThurSDay, auGuST 15, 2013 pioneer-review.com
No. 51, Vol. 107
MARKETS
LEGALS
continued on page 2
In Brief
Local
by Kindra Gordon
The year was 1907 and agricul-
tural leaders in South Dakota rec-
ognized that conducting research
on the soils, crops and rangelands
of South Dakota would be impor-
tant to helping the state's future
progress.
With much of the research at
that time focused on the areas
near the South Dakota State Uni-
versity campus in Brookings, they
looked west to the heart of South
Dakota's rangeland. The Agricul-
tural Experiment Station at
SDSU established the Cottonwood
Range and Livestock Field Re-
search Station near Philip – and
106 years later, SDSU scientists
are still conducting studies to ben-
efit South Dakota agriculture.
Located along U.S. Hwy. 14 ap-
proximately 12 miles west of the
town of Philip – and more than
300 miles from the campus in
Brookings – the station initially
included 640 acres and research
focused on crops and soils. In
1940, 2,000 acres of federal land
were added and research was ex-
panded to include grazing and nu-
trition studies.
In 1942, a long-term grazing
study was initiated at the Cotton-
wood station to evaluate the im-
pact of range condition on range
ecosystem dynamics and livestock
production. This ongoing study
provides an opportunity to exam-
ine the responses of mixed grass
prairie ecosystems to a wide array
of climatic conditions and grazing
systems, and has resulted in sci-
entific papers that challenge sev-
eral long held range paradigms.
SDSU rangeland management
professor and Extension Range
Specialist Roger Gates explained
the value of having several
decades of research information,
“The long-term stocking rate stud-
ies at Cottonwood are extremely
important scientifically because
only a few locations nationwide
have maintained studies for so
many years. This research forms
the foundation for scientific un-
derstanding of vegetation dynam-
ics and response to grazing in the
Northern Plains. Current ecologi-
cal site descriptions, which are
used to guide management, are
derived directly from Cottonwood
research for clayey ecological
sites, one of the most widespread
in western South Dakota.”
He added, "The same long-term
studies have more recently been
used to understand relationships
of vegetation production to cli-
matic variation and the relation-
ships of financial returns to
stocking decisions. Commitment
to maintaining long term research
has provided a very important re-
source to help ranchers and their
advisors make rational manage-
ment decisions."
SDSU Extension Beef Specialist
Ken Olson added, "Most research
is short term, meaning the exper-
iment is conducted for three years
at the most. However, responses
in agricultural systems are typi-
cally slow and dynamic, and in the
rare long-term studies in exis-
tence – like what we are able to do
at Cottonwood, we often find that
the long-term conclusions change
dramatically from those drawn in
the early years.”
SDSU range science professor
Sandy Smart has completed re-
search with analysis from the his-
toric data sets and that inform-
ation provided insight into the
ability to predict forage produc-
tion from weather variables.
Smart also analyzed Cottonwood
data along with other long-term
data sets from several states in
the Great Plains to gain a better
understanding of harvest effi-
ciency under different stocking
rates.
Presently, Smart is working on
measuring annual root production
to help develop models to predict
runoff, sediment yield, nitrogen
and phosphorus from rangelands.
As a result of this long-term re-
Cottonwood Range and Livestock Field
Station – providing data for 106 years
An open house at the Cottonwood Range and Livestock Field Station, 12
miles west of Philip, will be held Saturday, September 7.
Courtesy photo
search, SDSU scientists and
South Dakota livestock producers
readily agree that the research
conducted at the Cottonwood field
station has been instrumental in
developing and refining proper
grazing management on western
South Dakota rangelands.
In the 1990s a donation was
made to update the facilities at
the Cottonwood field station to en-
hance livestock research efforts at
the site. The donation was made
by Lake Preston native and SDSU
animal science alum Bill Larson
(Ph.D. '69). The Cottonwood facil-
ity improvements were completed
during 2000 and 2001 and added
a feedlot area, cattle handling
barn and commodity shed.
The drylot feedlot area included
12 pens, waterers and concrete
feedbunks with capacity for up to
10 head per pen. On a range based
station such as Cottonwood, this
facility allows for comparing live-
stock response to various treat-
ments in drylot versus grazing
conditions or for studying re-
sponses to a forage based diet in a
more controlled setting than on
pasture.
Today, research at this 2,640
acre facility continues to focus on
range and cow-calf management.
Recent research studies have eval-
uated water quality issues during
persistent drought, use of dried
distillers grains for supplementa-
tion, and currently are focusing
work on heifer development and
utilizing the cowherd for fetal pro-
gramming studies. The station is
used to develop and calve out
more than 100 heifers which are
utilized for research programs,
and yearlings are purchased for
additional research projects.
SDSU range science professor
by Nancy Haigh
Requests to rename a road and additional
hours for employees were all discussed at the
Haakon County Board of Commissioners
meeting August 6.
Jared Doud approached the board with a re-
quest to rename a small portion of a road lead-
ing into his place in honor of former
landowner Johnny Ostlien. Currently the road
is named 208th Street. Doud noted he is the
only person who currently lives on the road.
Director of Equalization Toni Rhodes, who
is also in charge of 911 issues such as road
names, outlined the process for the board.
Commissioners Tom Radway and Nick Konst
said they were concerned with setting a prece-
dence for this and questioned how many more
requests would the board then receive. In the
past a landowner asked to have a road re-
named, but was denied.
The board decided to not approve the name
change request.
Librarian Annie Brunskill and library
board member Jennifer Henrie approached
the board about making the librarian position
full time. Brunskill noted that she is antici-
pating retirement and that the full time posi-
tion with benefits would attract a qualified
person. “A librarian is more than just check-
ing books in and out and shelving them,” she
said. It includes writing grants, strategic
plans, organizing reading programs, and other
similar tasks.
Brunskill added that if a qualified librarian
was not hired, the county would have to pay
to have someone certified. She said the cost
would be approximately $450 for four years so
that the person could attend courses at Ab-
erdeen for two weeks a year.
Commission Chairman Steve Clements
noted that the county is in a tough spot and
the opt out runs out next year. Henrie stated
that the library does not come to the county
for other monies, they raise funds or go to the
community to help with their programs and
other activities.
Register of Deeds Traci Radway also reiter-
ated her request for her deputy position to be-
come full time. Currently the deputy is paid
for half time by the county and half time by
the monies raised from the state legislated
modernization and preservation fees.
All the record books in the register of deeds
office have to be scanned into the computer
and recorded, which takes a lot of time, said
Radway. She estimates that there is at least
a year’s worth of scanning to be completed.
Radway noted that she may not have
enough funds available from that fund to keep
scanning work going through the end of the
year. She asked if the board would consider
supplementing her budget by approximately
$2,800 to finish out the year. The board will
look at the matter as the year progresses and
fund amounts are known.
Kenny Neville, Haakon County highway su-
perintendent, discussed the possibility of
crushing gravel, using remaining swap funds
for the project. Almost $130,000 remains of
those monies. No decision was made at this
meeting.
Neville updated the board on the road main-
tenance agreement with Stanley County. Both
counties were reviewing the agreement at
their regular August meetings.
The board approved to supplement
$68,607.68 of swap monies to the highway
budget account. The money was used to pur-
chase packers and culverts for the highway
department.
The board approved a plat request from
West River/Lyman-Jones Rural Water System
for a pump station along 10 Mile Road.
Other items reviewed included the sheriff’s
department report, veterans service officer’s
report and a sales audit report for the depart-
ment of equalization.
The board approved last months warrants
and meeting minutes with clarifications
and/or corrections.
The board entered into executive session to
discuss personnel for nearly an hour. No ac-
tion was taken following the session.
The board was scheduled for a special meet-
ing Tuesday, August 13 to discuss budget.
Their next regularly scheduled meeting is
Tuesday, September 3.
County commissioners hear requests
The Quad County Relay For
Life event is being held this year
at the west end of South Boule-
vard in Wall, Saturday and Sun-
day, September 14-15.
During the annual event, which
includes several special cere-
monies, the motto will be “We will
celebrate, we will remember and
we will fight back!”
Relay For Life teams are work-
ing on various fundraisers. The
teams gather for this event, and
encourage the rest of public to join
in. As in past years, there will be
performances, food and much
more. A new feature will be a
video honoring anyone who is
fighting cancer or who has lost the
battle to cancer.
Photos can be submitted elec-
tronically of someone you would
like to honor or remember in the
video. Example of information re-
quired with the photo: In Memory
Of: name as you want it listed
with their photo, and birth date
and date of death. If you do not
want these dates listed, specify
that. In Honor Of: name: as you
want listed with their photo.
There is no charge to be in-
cluded in the video. All we ask is
that luminaria bags be purchased.
Luminaria bags can be picked up
from any Relay For Life team
member in any of the participat-
ing communities.
The deadline for submitting
photos is August 19. Send your
photo as an attachment to:
tkpeters@gwtc.net or lurzcamp@
gwtc.net. For more information,
call Sue Peters at 279-2211 or
Kelly Lurz at 279-2249.
Quad
County
Relay
For Life
Crafts, baking, projects, art and
other exhibits were open for view-
ing by the public during this year’s
Haakon/Jackson County Fair and
Achievements Days, August 2-3.
In the open class, the catagories
and Best of Show winners were:
flowers – Tina Staben, horticul-
ture – Donna Staben, clothing –Sh-
eryl Hansen, needlework – Gloria
French, baked goods and hobbies
and collections – Jessica Magelky,
arts and crafts and photography –
Nancy Haigh.
The people’s choice award for
youth went to Katlin Knight for her
etched mirror, and the people’s
choice award for adults went to Sh-
eryl Hansen for her Christmas
stocking.
County fair
open class
results
by Del Bartels
The family and consumer sci-
ence class at Philip High School
has newly purchased computers,
programs, models, other equip-
ment and modules, courtesy of a
$20,850 grant from the Perkins
Reserve Program.
Brigitte Brucklacher, FACS in-
structor at PHS, said she did
grant application work from the
end of last school year to June 20
for this particular grant.
Ten new computers have re-
placed the 15 old computers,
which were acquired in 2002 and
are now obsolete. The new ones
are networked together to the in-
structor’s computer. The results of
tests taken on the new machines
will automatically register on the
teacher’s computer.
Though Brucklacher will not
use module programs of teaching
for most of the school year, she
will take advantage of the compre-
hensive curriculum units that
came with the new computers.
These include units on heart fit-
ness and on nutrition and fitness.
Brucklacher said the grant ap-
plication and the awarding of the
grant heavily stress the science-
based perspective of science, tech-
nology, engineering and math.
The modules will be worked by
two-student teams, who will per-
form pretests, post tests and daily
quizzes. Brucklacher is a certified
health instructor, and the classes
that will be using these computer
modules count toward the health
requirements needed by students
to graduate.
The FACS class also received
other equipment and curriculum,
along with the computers and
their programs. These are direct
hands-on items, such as stetho-
scopes, blood pressure cuffs, aero-
bic steps, oxygen/blood monitors,
a flexibility measuring grid, and
models of the human heart and
human skin. Some of the equipment received
with the previous Perkins Reserve
Del Bartels photo
FACS gets $20,850 Perkins Reserve Program grant
Family and consumer science instuctor Brigitte Brucklacher displays the 10
networked computers, models and some of the other equipment purchased
with the $28,500 grant from the Perkins Reserve Program.
Program grant will still be used.
These include a treadmill to meas-
ure the burning of calories.
The Perkins Reserve Program is
a special grant. There is another,
annual Perkins Funding that
Brucklacher and instructor Doug
Hauk help manage for the Philip,
Kadoka, Wall and New Under-
wood high schools. Together, these
schools make up the Badlands
Consortium, which this year qual-
ified for $31,000 in grant funds to
be distributed among the four
schools. Programs that benefit
through these funds include FFA
and Family, Career and Commu-
nity Leaders of America. Such
items covered are travel expenses
to state and national conventions,
smartboards, laptops, shop equip-
ment, and Baby-Think-It-Over
mechanized babies.
The Perkins Funding is based
on the percentage of disadvan-
taged students in a district. This
is most often determined by the
number of students who qualify
for the free and reduced meal pro-
gram.
The final law enforcement sta-
tistics are in concerning the week
of the annual Sturgis Motorcycle
Rally.
Figures are compiled by the
South Dakota Highway Patrol
from the districts that include
Sturgis and Rapid City. The fig-
ures are as of 6:00 a.m., Sunday,
August 11.
Totals 2013 2012
DUI arrests 255 251
Drug arrests
Misdemeanor 219 185
Felony 56 34
Other felonies 6 2
Citations 1,535 1,189
Warnings 4,932 4,196
Vehicles seized 9 7
Cash seized $13,221
$9,368
Concealed weapons arrests
3 0
Accidents
Non-injury 33 50
Injury 69 50
Fatal 6 8
Total fatalities 6 9
Rally law
statistics
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The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Editorial
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 2
Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
“What kind of bird is that?” wife
Corinne might inquire. If I don’t
know and despite the fact that it’s
sitting in a tree, I’m apt to reply,
“It’s probably some kind of duck.”
Corinne knows by now that this
preposterous statement simply
means I don’t know although she
might give me a look of scorn any-
way. Well, there is a specie of said
waterfowl called a “wood duck”
that does actually nest in trees. I
have never actually seen one, but
there is such a bird although the
trees where they hatch their
young are usually next to bodies
of water. Wood ducks are about
the only ones that do frequent
trees because they, unlike most
others, have claws that allow
them to get a grip on wood. Oth-
erwise, webbed feet and trees
don’t go that well together.
Actually, I mostly use the word
“duck” as often as possible be-
cause the word amuses me some-
how. Unfortunately, it’s hard to
incorporate it into normal conver-
sations so you have to work pretty
hard at sneaking it in, thus the
above statement, “It’s probably
some kind of a duck.” Of course, if
someone asks you how you are,
you can reply, “Just ducky,” which
I do from time to time. Other than
that, possible uses of the word are
somewhat limited except as sharp
commands to dodge low-flying ob-
jects. There are other favorite
words as well that are difficult to
use very much such as “shrub-
bery.” I’m able to work them in oc-
casionally but all too infrequently.
Anyway, back to ducks. They
are amusing critters for the most
part since they are so awkward
and somewhat silly looking when
they’re waddling around on land.
Put them in water, though, and
they’re really quite graceful. I
have found through experience,
however, that their husbandry is
not all that enjoyable. For one
thing, if you put them in the
chicken house in the winter, they
make an awful mess with water.
You’re likely to have an ice field
around the waterer before spring.
Secondly, the meat from most
waterfowl is not that great. If you
roast a duck, you get a large pool
of fat, lots of skin, and a little
greasy meat that isn’t all that
good. Other people find them
tasty, I guess, but they aren’t a fa-
vorite of mine.
Nevertheless, one year I or-
dered quite a number of Khaki
Campbell Ducks. These are small-
ish, walk somewhat upright, and
lay more eggs in a year than most
chickens. The hype in the poultry
catalog got me. Only later did I
find out that these nutty birds are
wild as the dickens. When I
walked into the chicken house,
they’d all, as a group, race across
the floor and crash themselves
into the back wall. This raised a
lot of dust and upset the chickens.
What’s more, although they did
lay very well, their eggs were no
tastier than their meat. The eggs
were very solid so you had to work
awfully hard at scrambling them.
Using them in a cake or some-
thing was tricky as well. All in all,
raising them was not a worth-
while adventure, but it taught me
several things. Do not believe a
salesman’s hype, for one thing,
and secondly, “Do not raise
ducks.” I have also raised Pekin
and Muscovy ducks, I might add,
and, although they are less frus-
trating than Khaki Campbells,
they aren’t of much more use.
By the way, you really shouldn’t
bother with geese either. Your
wife will get attached to them so
you can never eat them. They will
just be around forever, and the
gander will occasionally sneak up
behind you and bite you on the
rear when he’s protecting his lady
or ladies. I do like eating geese
better than ducks, but raising ei-
ther is still a fairly useless en-
deavor. Plucking either is the pits.
Neither is it worth your time to
raise rabbits or chinchillas. Rab-
bits are actually quite good to eat
and similar to chicken, but chin-
chillas are absolutely hopeless all
the way around. What’s more,
rabbits are hard to raise in a cli-
mate that gets both too hot and
too cold for them. I can’t recom-
mend either bunnies or chin-
chillas.
But you know what, I find in
looking through poultry catalogs
that I have never raised any
guineas. They say they are good
at keeping wood ticks under con-
trol since they like to eat them.
They also warn you when intrud-
ers are around. Other people have
them and seem to like them al-
though they often say they are
quite noisy. I wonder if we should
give them a try and see how they
work out. Oh, well. Maybe not. If
I want poultry around, I’d better
stick to chickens, if I can just
manage to keep them from dig-
ging holes all around the lilacs
and other shrubbery. Still, chick-
ens and I generally get along just
fine despite the fact that the word
“chicken” isn’t nearly as neat as
the word “duck.”
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your
phone number to: news-
desk@pioneer-review.com
E-MAIL ADDRESSES: ADS: ads@pioneer-review.com • NEWS: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Ducks
BOWLING ASSOCIATION MEETING … Tuesday, August 27,
6:00 p.m. at Lucky Strike in Philip.
STRONGER ECONOMIES TOGETHER … Session #8 will be
held Thursday, August 15, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Club 27 in
Kadoka with a light supper and meeting. There is an option for a
tour of the Badlands Petrified Gardens, courtesy of Laurie Fugate.
Tours will be given from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., so stop by for a look!
PHILIP ELEMENTARY/JUNIOR HIGH OPEN HOUSE will be
held Monday, August 19, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. in the elementary
gym. Everyone welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Country Praises by Del Bartels
The myth of ostriches burying
their heads in the sand is silly, but
it does illustrate some silliness
displayed by humans, including
myself.
Very few problems, it seems, go
away if you ignore them. But most
will work out if you put your head
into solving them. From a dis-
tance, an ostrich may look like its
head is in the sand, when it is ac-
tually digging a shallow pit for a
nest, turning its eggs or simply
eating. Their running from trou-
ble is often successful because
they divert predators from the
eggs and, at sustained 40 mph
speeds, easily lose their pursuers.
Some people may seem unper-
turbed or pulling away from trou-
bles, only because others expect,
or want, to see them in panic
mode.
I know some wealthy people
who bury their heads to that
wealth and its inherent problems.
They live simply and calmly. For-
tune hunting telemarketers,
senders of junk mail and others
leave them alone. Yet, elementary
children raising funds for a local
cause know to drop by. I know
some very poor people. They don’t
hide from the fact, but are striving
to change it. Local children know
this without really understanding
it, and still drop by ... just to drop
by. This is like a barber not deny-
ing me a haircut just because I’m
half bald.
Like some puppies, I too would
sometimes like to believe that if I
hide my face and can’t see others,
then they can’t see me. Almost
every family has a member who
can’t be found in photo albums.
That person quietly steps back
when cameras are raised, not
missed because others are ener-
getically mugging for the camera.
If you are hiding from people, then
you aren’t doing anything else.
Even humble volunteers are no-
ticed, and sought for their efforts.
The in attendance workers, club
participants, church goers and
community members are noted by
someone. Needing someone to be a
friend might as well be an contin-
uous and universal, if unspoken,
advertisement. Children on stage
or on the sports team search for
their grandparents and other sen-
ior friends in the audience. Who is
searching for you?
Burying my head from the na-
tional news doesn’t work, because
depressing events can happen
even in my rural community.
There are bad people out there,
disasters happen anywhere, poli-
tics come with our freedom and
democracy, the macro-economy
will eventually affect my micro
hometown, and the world is full of
different people with different
ideas. To each his own is no longer
possible in this day and age. Be-
sides, not noting the bad new
means I probably missed the good.
I once was told that a friend is
someone who supports you
enough, or stares you down
enough, so you know the color of
their eyes. If my head is in the
sand, what color are my eyes?
There used to be a T-shirt motto
“Be like a duck; calm on the sur-
face, but paddling like crazy un-
derneath.” Duck, puppy, ostrich or
whatever – I refuse to bury my
head ... unless it’s into my pillow
for just a few more minutes before
I finally get up and attack the day.
Ostrich syndrome
Pat Johnson has conducted re-
search at the Cottonwood field
station for 25 years and said facil-
ity improvements at the station
have been critical to ensuring
quality research continues there.
She stated, "The Cottonwood sta-
tion has focused on range live-
stock production throughout its
history, however the addition of
the feedlot and cattle feeding and
handling facilities has dramati-
cally improved our ability to eval-
uate the consequences of grazing
strategies on livestock production.
Without the feedlot pens and com-
modity shed, the water quality
work that we conducted would
have been impossible. They al-
lowed us to evaluate the impact of
various levels of sulfate on animal
production and to compare animal
responses to sulfate in water in
both drylot and rangeland situa-
tions."
She continued, "These facilities
have vastly increased the scope
and quality of the research for fac-
ulty and students and the Exten-
sion programming conducted at
the station in the past, and will
continue to do so into the future.”
For the future, the traditional
range research work will continue
along with new projects, such as
fetal programming studies being
initiated by SDSU meat science
assistant professor Amanda Blair.
With funding from two grants, she
reported, “We have utilized nearly
all of the cows from the Cotton-
wood station for this project and
relied on the feedlot area, working
facilities, commodity storage
areas, unit manager and pastures
for completion of this work. It is
my hope that these studies are
only the beginning of much more
research linking the beef produc-
tion chain from conception to con-
sumption, and I plan to continue
utilizing the resources of the Cot-
tonwood station for this work.”
In 2013, another upgrade was
made to the Cottonwood field sta-
tion with the addition of a modern
multi-purpose facility to enhance
the research work being done.
Built through private donations,
the facility includes office space, a
laboratory with separate drying
and grinding rooms for sample
preparation and analysis, a
heated shop area, a secure feed
storage area and a machinery
storage area.
An open house at the Cotton-
wood Range and Livestock Field
Station will be held Saturday,
September 7. Current research
project information will be shared
by SDSU faculty along with tours
of the new multi-purpose facility.
Presently, David Gay serves as
the Cottonwood station's superin-
tendent. He began his tenure in
October 2008, replacing Ron
Haigh, who retired from SDSU
after more than 30 years of serv-
ice.
Cottonwood is one of five field
research stations across the state
operated by SDSU's Agricultural
Experiment Station. Additional
stations include Antelope Range
Livestock Research Station near
Buffalo; Northeast Research Sta-
tion near South Shore; Southeast
South Dakota Experiment Station
near Beresford; and Dakota Lakes
Research Farm near Pierre.
Cottonwood Field Station
continued from page 1
Crafts, baking, projects, art and other exhibits were open for public viewing
during the county fair. Shown above are just a few of the 4-H exhibits.
Del Bartels photo
County fair exhibits
As human West Nile virus cases
continue to rise, South Dakotans
should use mosquito repellent and
take other precautions to protect
themselves.
The state has the highest num-
ber of human West Nile cases in
the nation, said Lon Kightlinger,
state epidemiologist for the De-
partment of Health. As of August
6, South Dakota had reported 21
human West Nile cases. and has
172 reported West Nile-positive
mosquito pools.
“Cleary the virus is circulating
in our state, so people need to get
in the habit of remembering repel-
lent for all their outdoor activities,
especially now that school is ap-
proaching ...,” said Kightlinger.
“Parents and coaches need to
make sure their student athletes
use repellent for those outdoors
practices and events.”
West Nile
cases rise
A new study of land use pat-
terns across seven Midwestern
states, including South Dakota,
found little net movement of habi-
tat to crop land – even by crops
covered under federal crop insur-
ance.
South Dakota Farm Bureau
was one of seven state Farm Bu-
reaus to commission the study,
conducted by Decision Innovation
Solutions of Urbandale, Iowa. The
study estimated the degree to
which land use changes have oc-
curred in these states, and identi-
fied potential factors contributing
to these land use changes.
Wayne Smith, executive director
of SDFB, said, “The study found
that there is a shift from grassland
to cropland, but it is not as large
as some would have you believe,
nor is it exclusively driven by fed-
eral crop insurance subsidies.”
During 2007-2012 across the
seven state region, an estimated
net total of 8.5 million acres has
shifted away from grassy habitat,
representing just three percent of
total land area in those states.
Large shifts of land from grass-
land and toward crops have not
uniformly occurred throughout
the study area. The research does
not support the notion that crop
insurance subsidies alone are the
dominant factor contributing to
the loss of grassy habitat.
Unlike other recent studies, this
study does not rely exclusively on
data from the United States De-
partment of Agriculture’s Na-
tional Agricultural Statistics
Service crop data layer. This re-
search cross checks the crop data
layer with farmer and rancher
land surveys from NASS, which
have a much lower standard error
rate, thereby improving the over-
all accuracy of the results.
Because of limitations in re-
motely identifying the type of land
cover, the crop data layer has been
found to overstate the amount of
grassland, especially during the
early years of this study time-
frame. Technology is improving,
so later years of data from the
crop data layer are more accurate
and show less grassland because
the acres are correctly identified.
Therefore, research that relies on
the crop data layer will erro-
neously conclude a larger net shift
away from grassland.
Specifically for South Dakota,
the study found between 2007 and
2012 a net change from grassy
habitat to cropland of 2.172 mil-
lion acres, which the researchers
said is lower than they expected.
These 2.172 million acres repre-
sent only 4.4 percent of the total
land in South Dakota. Of this
total, 1.549 million acres went to
corn (682,573 acres), small grains
(451,626 acres), and soybeans
(414,804 acres) – crops covered by
federal crop insurance. Interest-
ingly, of the total acres of grassy
habitat that were changed, more
than 324,000 acres became
“woody habitat.”
SDFB multi state land use study
Subscription Rates: For Haakon, Jackson, and Jones counties,
Creighton, Wall, Quinn, Marcus, Howes, Plainview, and Hayes ad-
dresses: $36.00 per year (+ Tax); Elsewhere: $42.00 per year.
South Dakota residents are required to pay sales tax.
Periodicals postage paid at Philip, SD.
Postmaster, send change of address notice to: Pioneer Review, PO
Box 788, Philip, SD 57567; or FAX to: 605/859-2410.
Website Subscription Rate: $36.
E-mail address:
subscriptions@pioneer-review.com
website: www.pioneer-review.com
Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of Haakon County, the
towns of Philip and Midland, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc. Pioneer Review office is
located at 221 E. Oak Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516; • FAX: (605) 859-2410;
e-mail: ads@pioneer-review.com
Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.
Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way reproduced from
this publication, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
DEADLINES:
Display & Classified Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
Philip, SD
U.S.P.S. 433-780
Winter Wheat Planting Tips
Winter wheat planting is
around the corner. Good practices
increase the odds for success.
Choose one or more varieties
with good agronomic characteris-
tics, recommended for your area,
and on average, performed well in
locations near your farm in the
last few years.
When possible, direct seed into
standing stubble. Standing stub-
ble traps snow that insulates
wheat seedlings against cold tem-
peratures, reducing risk of win-
terkill. Seeding into broadleaf
crop stubble reduces the risk of
insect, disease and weed prob-
lems. Seeding into wheat stubble
is common, but increases the risk
of residue-borne diseases. Seed-
ing wheat into corn, wheat,
sorghum or millet residue in-
creases the risk of scab (Fusarium
Head Blight). If planting winter
wheat into fallow, minimize the
number of tillage operations just
before planting. Plowing and
other deep tillage operations can
reduce seedbed firmness, dry the
topsoil and bury protective
residues, increasing the risk of
winter kill.
Control weeds early. Control-
ling grassy weeds and volunteer
wheat two weeks prior to planting
winter wheat will provide a break
in the life cycle of the wheat curl
mite and help to control wheat
streak mosaic virus. Preventing
annual weeds from producing
seed will help reduce weed prob-
lems in the planted crop. Prior to
planting winter wheat is also a
good time to control perennial
weeds and reduce competition
from them in the following sea-
son.
The recommended time to
plant winter wheat in South
Dakota is September 15 through
October 10. Wheat plants should
be well established before freez-
ing to attain maximum cold toler-
ance and accumulate enough
energy reserves for the following
spring. Planting too early may
produce excessive fall growth, re-
ducing amounts of soil moisture
and nutrients. Early planted
wheat is vulnerable to infesta-
tions of wheat curl mites that
transmit wheat streak mosaic
virus and also increases the risk
of root and crown rot diseases. Re-
search from western South
Dakota has shown that grain
yield is decreased and the crop
can suffer substantial winter in-
jury when planting later than Oc-
tober 15.
Plant winter wheat at a depth
of 1.5 to 2 inches in a firm
seedbed. Planting deeper than 2
inches reduces emergence and
can result in weak spindly
seedlings with poor ability to sur-
vive the winter. If it is necessary
to plant deeper to get to moisture,
growers should choose a variety
with a longer coleoptile (see Table
3 of “2010 Winter Wheat Variety
Yield Results and Planting Tips”:
http://igrow.org/up/resources/ExE
x8136-10.pdf). Make sure there is
good soil-to-seed contact, espe-
cially under drier conditions. If
soil cover over the seed is poor
there is risk of exposing the crown
and adversely affecting winter
survival.
The recommended seeding rate
is 22 pure live seeds per square
foot (approximately 960,000
seeds/acre, depending on seed
size). If you have a poor seedbed
or are planting later than the rec-
ommended dates, increase seed-
ing rate to 28 pure-live-seeds per
square foot. Properly managed
winter wheat does have the abil-
ity to tiller and can compensate
for thin stands.
Test soils and apply fertilizer
based on soil test results and
yield goals. Research has shown
that adequate phosphorus helps
winter survival by stimulating
root growth and tillering in the
fall. If soil test results indicate
low phosphorus levels, apply the
recommended rate.
Calendar
8/20-22: DakotaFest, Mitchell
8/27: Winter Wheat Meeting,
6:30 p.m. CT, Auditorium, Draper
Extension
by Bob Fanning. Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
¹c·e.
~æaa/e·¸ 5c../e ? \e.
LocaIIy owned & operated
859-2482 · PhiIip
FLY
CONTROL
FLY
CONTROL
·Dacl Fullcrs ·Pour-on
·Dusi Dags
Co1d Beer A1uogs on Hond!!
Rural Livin’
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 3
Thursday: Partly cloudy with a
chance of a thunderstorm and a
chance of rain. high of 82F.
Winds less than 5 mph. Chance
of rain 20%. Thursday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 59F. Winds from the East at 5
to 10 mph shifting to the SSE after midnight.
Friday: Clear in the
morning, then partly
cloudy. high of 88F.
Winds from the SSE at 5
to 15 mph. Friday Night: Clear.
Low of 59F. Winds from the SSE
at 10 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Clear in the
morning, then partly cloudy.
high of 90F. Winds from
the South at 10 to 15
mph. Saturday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 64F. Breezy. Winds
from the SSE at 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Mostly
cloudy. high of
88F. Winds from
the SW at 5 to 20
mph. Sunday Night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 64F. Winds
from the NW at 5 to 15 mph.
Monday: Clear. high of 88F.
Winds from the NNW at 5 to
10 mph shifting to the ENE in
the afternoon. Monday Night:
Clear with a chance of a thunder-
storm. Low of 63F. Winds from the SSE at
5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 20%.
Get your complete
& up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
The Truth Will Set You Free
If the truth will set you free,
then a lie will hold you in
bondage.
You would think everyone
would desire freedom. So if you
are concerned at all about the
food you eat or your carbon foot-
print, let me ease you mind.
Beef is wholesome and safe.
The latest and largest most
comprehensive study comparing
conventionally raised food and or-
ganic food showed there was no
difference in quality. There are
differences in cost and environ-
mental impact and safety. Or-
ganic food costs more which is
understandable since more ani-
mals die because they weren’t
given antibiotics and they take
longer to reach market weight be-
cause they may have gotten sick
and did not receive hormone im-
plants.
You don’t have to be afraid of
hormones in your beef. In order
for you to get the amount of hor-
mone in one birth control pill you
would have to eat 1700 pounds of
beef. However, if you drank 6 to 8
cups of soy milk a day, there is
enough estrogen in the soy to
grow boobs on a man. Do you sup-
pose the Hollywood types would
go for all natural breast enhance-
ments?
Environmentally, convention-
ally raised beef uses less land,
less corn, less manure, and less
water than organically raised
beef. If Europe would allow beef
to be imported that was same as
the way our beef is raised, it
would save the environmental im-
pact equivalent to taking 150 mil-
lion cars off the road.
Conventionally raised food is
safer. Organic crops have five per-
cent more E. coli. Organic hogs
have 16 percent more E. coli. Or-
ganic poultry have three percent
more campylobacter bacteria. Or-
ganic dairy products cause the
most food borne hospitalizations.
You may have heard that it
takes 2642 gallons of water to
make one pound of hamburger.
But if you check the figures of Dr.
Jude Capper (the only one who is
publishing the math on how they
arrived at their figures) you find
it only takes 444 gallons. Actu-
ally, I think both figures are
wrong. Didn’t we learn about the
water cycle in the third grade?
The amount of water in the world
is constant. Plants take up water
and make carbohydrate. Animals,
fungi and fire digest or burn car-
bohydrates to make water. Ani-
mals drink water but that water
is uses for growth, or urinated out
where it will evaporate, form
clouds, and rain down on the land
and start the process over.
You don’t have to worry about
“Pink Slime “. Pink slime is just
hamburger that is removed from
bone and fat. You have been eat-
ing it for 25 years. All the hype
was just the media trying to make
headlines. The truth is not a sin-
gle person in 25 years has gotten
sick from it let alone died from
eating pink slime.
You don’t have to worry about
bovine growth hormone being in-
jected into dairy cows. The truth
is there is no test that you can run
on cow’s milk that will tell the dif-
ference between the milk from in-
jected cows and non-injected
cows. From the milk cow’s stand-
point the growth hormone injec-
tions make the cow’s life better.
The milk cows with injections can
be milked longer and don’t have
to raise as many calves. Most of
the dairy cow’s problems occur
after calving. There is less calving
difficulty, less milk fever, less ke-
tosis, fewer twisted stomachs ,
less mastitis(mammary gland in-
fection), and less uterine infec-
tions in growth hormone injected
cows.
If you are worried that beef is
bad for your health, consider the
results of this new study. Two
groups of diabetic men were given
two different diets. One diet was
the recommended diet of high car-
bohydrates and low fat. The other
diet was low in carbohydrate,
high in fat and protein. Both had
the same number of calories. Both
groups of men lost the same
amount of weight, but the blood
glucose and insulin resistance
was lower in the high fat diet. In
the 30 years since the govern-
ment published its food pyramid
red meat consumption has re-
mained constant yet obesity has
tripled and diabetes has doubled.
Soft drink consumption during
the same time frame has tripled
for men and doubled for women.
And you don’t need to worry
about being fat. The latest statis-
tics show that the longest living
group of people are those classi-
fied as overweight. Even mildly
obese people live as long as “nor-
mal” people.
The truth is conventionally
raised food is safer and cheaper
for your family, better for the an-
imals, and have less environmen-
tal impact on the planet. That is
a win, win, win. What I have told
are the liberating facts. All of
them can be looked up and veri-
fied. If you chose not to believe
them, then you chose the lies that
will hold you hostage. Choose
freedom not slavery.
In My Opinion
By James D Stangle, DVM
Tbese days you want bankIng
servIces to FIT your IndIvIduaI
needs. Come In and see tbe buge
seIectIon oI CbeckIng, SavIngs, and
Loan optIons we provIde.
FIRST
NATIONAL BANK
PHÌLÌP, S.D. FAÌTH, S.D.
605-859-2525 605-967-2191
www.fnbphilip.com
Member FDÌC
Faith Stock Show & Rodeo
August 9-11
Bareback Riding: 1.Chance Englebert,
Burdock, 78; 2. Lonny Lesmeister, Rapid
City, 73; 3. Mark Kenyon, Hayti, 72; 4. Shane
O’Connell, Rapid City, 71; 5. Stetson Murphy,
Rapid City, 67; 6. Ryan Burkinshaw, Her-
mosa, 65
Breakaway Roping: 1. (tie) Jenny
Belkham, Blunt, Joey Painter, Buffalo, and
Megan Steiger, Mobridge, 2.80; 2. Bailey Pet-
son, Parade, 3.30; 3. Brenda White, Oelrichs,
3.40; 4. Amy Tierney, Oral, 3.50; 5. Patty Jo
Burress, Isabel, 3.80; 6. K.L. Spratt, Lystie,
Wyo., 3.90
Bull Riding: 1. Taygen Schuelke, Newell,
77; 2. Jake Foster, Faith, 72
Calf Roping: 1. Treg Schaack, Edgemont,
9.00; 2. Troy Wilcox, Red Owl, 9.30; 3. Matt
Peters, Hot Springs, 10.00; 4. Dallas Louden,
Martin, 10.40; 5. Jace Melvin, Ft. Pierre,
11.10; 6. Jayce Dean, McKenzie, N.D., 11.40;
7. Colton Musick, Pierre, 11.50
Goat Tying: 1. Jordan Thurston, Gillette,
Wyo., 6.70; 2. (tie) Teddi Schwagier, Mandan,
N.D., and Katie Doll, Prairie City, 6.90; 3.
Katy Miller, Faith, 7.00; 4. Lacey Tech, Fair-
fax, 7.20; 5. (tie) Hallie Fulton, Miller, and
Rickie Engesser, Spearfish, 7.30
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Elizabeth
Baker, Box Elder, 6.60; 2. Syerra (C.Y.)
Christensen, Kennebec, 7.00; 3. Devon Cor-
dova, Moorcroft, Wyo., 7.10; 4. Hanna Brown,
Faith, 7.70; 5. Trina Arneson, Enning, 7.80;
6. Danni Jo Hinmann, Hay Springs, Neb.,
7.90
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Travis Schroth,
Buffalo Gap, 74; 2. (tie) Kaden Deal, Dupree,
Wyatt Kammerer, Philip and Ty Kennedy,
Philip, 73; 3. Shorty Garrett, Dupree, 72; 4.
Cole Hindman, Belvidere, 71
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Tom Williams,
Faith, 1.60; 2. Steve Klein, Sioux Falls, 1.80;
3. (tie) Terry McPherson, Piedmont, and
Bryce Sigman, Sturgis, 2.10; 4. Chuck Nel-
son, Hartford, 2.20; 5. Larry Vetter, Flasher,
N.D., 2.30; 6. Len Hofer, Piedmont, 2.40
Steer Wrestling: 1. Casey Olson, Prairie
City, 4.40; 2. Sam Olson, Buffalo, 4.50; 3.
Jhett Williams, Faith, 4.60; 4. (tie) Taz Olson,
Buffalo, and Tate Cowan, Ft. Pierre, 4.70; 5.
(tie) Mike Wiedmn, St. Charles, and Del Pete
Day, Lemmon, 5.20; 6. (tie) Kody Woodward,
Dupree and J.J. Hunt, Ridgeview, 5.60
Team Roping: 1. Eli Lord, Sturgis/ Jade
Nelson, Midland, 6.40; 2. Levi Hapney,
Quinn/Roper Kosel, Mobridge, 6.80; 3. Matt
Hight, White River/Eliot Hight, White River,
7.40; 5. Kevin Schmidt, Box Elder/Cash Het-
zel, Lemmon, 7.60; 6. Tyrell Moody, Edge-
mont/Rory Brown, Edgemont, 7.70; 7. Cole
Spurgeon, Beach, N.D./Sloan Henley, Beach,
N.D., 7.80; 8. Brett Wilcox, Red Owl/Clint
Cobb, Red Owl, 8.80
Scottie Stampede, Scotland
August 10-11
Bareback Riding: 1. Dru Wilking, Hart-
ford, 76; 2. Kenyon, 71; 3. Andrew Hall,Wag-
ner, 66; 4. Levi Collins, Hot Springs, 46
Barrel Racing: 1. Kailee Webb, Isabel,
4.92; 2. Dori Hollenbeck, Winner, 5.13; 3.
Shelby Vinson, Worthing, 14.70; 4. Chesney
Nagel, Springfield, 14.98; 5. Lucy Huben,
Sauk Rapids, Minn., 15.00; 6. Fulton, 15.02
Bull Riding: 1. Chris Kuemper, Delmont,
74; 2. Joey Koupal, Dante, 71; 3. Allen Auer,
Whitewood, 68
Calf Roping: 1. Musick, 9.30; 2. Terry
Graff, Long Pine, Neb., 9.70; 3. Clint Kin-
dred, Meadow, 10.30; 4. (tie) Mikey Luiseau,
Egan, and Quinlan Thomas, Chetek, Wis.,
10.70; 5. Jade Lyon, Meadow, 11.10
Goat Tying: 1. Tech, 6.20; 2. (tie) Hanna
Schmitz, Johnstown, Neb., and Krystal
Marone, Isabel, 6.80; 3. Kaycee Monnens,
Watertown, 7.00; 4. Carson Smith, Utica,
8.00; 5. Fulton, 8.10
Breakaway Roping: 1. Fulton, 2.10; 2.
Colby Moore, Timber Lake, 2.40; 3. Molly
Winckler, Brandon, 2.90; Hollenbeck, 3.00; 5.
Shayna Nagel, Springfield, 3.70; 6. Cheyenne
Brown, Ponca, Neb., 3.80
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Kyle
Whitacker, Chambers, Neb., 73; 2. Miles
Kreeger, Lake Andes, 51
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Kirk Ford,
Huron, 2.70; 2. J.B. Lord, Sturgis, 3.90; 3.
Scott Vandenburg, Orange City, Iowa, 6.00;
4. Francis Knippling, Wessington, 12.60
Steer Wrestling: 1. Evan Thyberg, Hart-
ford, 4.00; 2. Jerod Schwarting, White River,
4.60; 3. Hapney, 5.10; 4. Wiedman, 5.70; 5.
Chase Albers, Hartford, 8.20; 6. Jace McKay,
Ericson,Neb., 13.70
Team Penning: 1. Robert Devitt, Harris-
burg/Gerald Sorenson, Canton/James
Kuiper, Canton, 38.10; 2. McKenzie Fawcett,
Colome/Bart Blum, Reliance/Mary Pat Faw-
cett, Colome, 61.00; 3. Randall Olson, Harris-
burg/Clinton Olinger, Plankinton/Katie
Anderson, Plankinton, 63.00; 4. Dennis
Michaels, Yankton/Jason Kriz, Sisseton/Jo
Syrvotka, Utica, 72
Team Roping: 1. (tie) Graff/Matt Elliott,
Sparks, Neb., and Travis Warren, Mullen,
Neb./Troy Hermelbracht, Homer, Neb., 5.60;
2. Dustin Chonon, O’Neill, Neb./Todd Hollen-
beck, Long Pine, Neb., 5.70; 3. Rex Treeby,
Hecla/Jake Scott, Hecla, 5.90; 4. E. Lord/J.
Nelson, Midland, 6.30; 5. Dana Sippel, Pier-
pont/Travis Johnson, Sisseton, 6.60
Bennett County Rodeo, Martin
August 10-11
Bareback Riding: 1. Englebert, 73; 2.
O’Connell, 70; 3. Casey Reder, Martin, 59
Barrel Racing: 1. Katie Loughran, Bro-
ken Bow, Neb., 15.91; 2 Mazee Pauley, Wall,
15.97; 3. Vinson, 16.04; Engesser, 16.08; 5. D.
Hollenbeck, 16.09; 6. Webb, 16.21
Breakaway Roping: 1. Tawny Barry,
Carter, 2.20; 2. Ginalee Tierney, Broken Bow,
Neb., 2.30; 3. (tie) A. Tierney, Taylor Holli-
day, Lincoln, Neb., Belkham, and Webb, 2.50;
4. (tie) Katie Jo Morgan, Valentine, Neb.,
Schmitz, 2.60
Bull Riding: 1.Lane Gambill, Johnston,
Neb., 76
Calf Roping: 1. Jacey Johnson, Hemings-
ford, Neb., 9.10; 2. Schaack, 9.50; 3. Chisum
Thurston, Hyannis, Neb., 10.10; 4. Chip Wil-
son, Lemoyne, Neb., 10.30; 5. Graff, 10.60; 5.
Musick, 10.60
Goat Tying: 1.(tie) Shayna Miller, Faith,
Pauley, and A. Tierney, 8.20; 2. Karissa Ray-
hill, Martin, 8.50; 3. (tie) Engesser, Spratt,
and Schmitz, 8.70
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Cati Stanko,
Gordon, Neb., 6.30; 2. Lacey Jo March, Hot
Springs, 6.50; 3. (tie) Josey Schomp, North
Platte, Neb., and Lorita Nelson, Philip, 7.50;
4. G. Tierney and Amber Coleman, Orchard,
Neb., 8.00
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Deal, 70; 2. Eric
Gewecke, Red Owl, 69; 3. Hindman, 68; 4.
J.D. Anderson, Faith, 60
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. John Dean,
Platte, 2.20; 2. J. Lord, 2.60; 3. Ford, 2.80; 4.
Todd Holliday, Lincoln, Neb., 2.90; 5. Harold
Gerdes, Hecla, 3.10; 6. (tie) Scott Lammers,
Hermosa, and Lynn McNenny, Sturgis, 3.20
Steer Wrestling: 1. (tie) Wyatt Schaack,
Wall, and Schwarting, 3.70; 2. J. Lord, 3.80;
4. S. Olson, 4.10; 5. B. Wilcox, 4.50
Team Roping: 1. Hapney/Wroper Kosel,
Bismarck, N.D., 4.30; 2. Warren/Tucker
White, Hershey, Neb., 4.40; 3. Troy Wilcox,
Red Owl/Melvin Arneson, Enning, 4.80; 4.
Chohon/T. Hollenbeck, 5.00; 6. Jason
Thorstenson, Rapid City/Paul Tierney, Oral,
5.20; 7. B. Wilcox/Cobb, 5.20; 8. Shelby
Ramm, Valentine, Neb.,/Miles Stone, Wood
Lake, Neb., 6.70
SDRA rodeo results
2004 Ford Excursion
LoadEd! cLEan!!
859-2744 • 685-3068
Philip
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Aug. 15: Pork
Roast, Mashed Potatoes and
Gravy, Corn, Roll, Fruit.
Friday, Aug. 16: Cod Nuggets,
Baby Bakers, Garden Veggies,
Roll, Fruit.
Monday, Aug. 19: Dijon Ham,
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy,
Caribbean Veggies, Biscuit, Apri-
cot Halves.
Tuesday, Aug. 20: Baked Po-
tato, Chicken Noodle or Beef Noo-
dle Soup, Roll, Peaches and
Cream Gelatin.
Wednesday, Aug. 21: Family
Day – Hog Dog Pucks, Hamburg-
ers, Brats and Fruit.
***
Better get out there and soak up
some sunshine, the summer is
half shot!
Becky, our former Somerset
Court housekeeper, was here to
set up a first floor display in the
alcove by the aquarium. It is very
pretty and the theme is penguins
and peonies. Thank you, Becky.
Somerset Court resident, Lu-
cille Huether, showed me a photo
that was in a recent Wall Courant
newspaper. It showed the smok-
ing remains of a 100-year-old barn
on Lucille’s nephew’s place south
of Wall.
My daughter, Vinnie Hansen,
Santa Cruz, Calif., is a finalist for
the Claymore mystery writer’s
award, to be presented at Killer
Nashville, for her novel in
progress, “Black Beans and
Venom.” All of her Carol Sabala
mysteries have food theme titles,
“Murder Honey,” “Tang is Not
Juice,” “Rotten Dates,” “Death
with Dessert,” and so on. You can
see her photo and article on <Web-
Work4Art>.
Thanks to great-grandson
Asher Maudsley, age six, who sent
a postcard from Mongolia. It had
two stamps, one with a husky fel-
low in a thick winter del and
boots, for 200 Taurags, and the
other some elegant orchids, den-
drobium nobile, for 800 Taurags.
Asher printed that “Mongolia is
awesome!” It was sent just before
they got on the train for their trip
across the Russian tundra for four
days and five nights. The picture
on the postcard is of two rosy
women who are sitting on wooden
stool like boxes, milking yaks. In
the higher and colder regions of
Mongolia, the nomads milk yaks.
Their milk is very rich. There are
two gers in the background and
beyond them there are some
horses.
Vinnie’s friend, Nanci Adams,
Watsonville, Calif., included in
her letter an account her mother
had written about farm life in
South Dakota from 1928 when her
family came from Oklahoma to
eastern South Dakota and their
progress for about the next 20
years. Much like my own life, ex-
cept eastern South Dakota was a
little ahead of western South
Dakota. Thank you, Nanci.
Saturday, August 3, these nice
days, it is so pleasant to walk laps
outdoors. One has the pleasure of
the breezes of fresh air and the
sight of the wondrous changing
clouds. The undeveloped hill on
the south side of the Somerset
Court building is a source of joy. It
reminds me of my childhood when
I could walk to school a mile and
a quarter, down a dirt road and
through the draw where weeds
were rank. Now it looks like there
is a plant of goldenrod reminding
us that we had better get outside
whenever we can, for summer
doesn’t last. Of course we are
thankful that Somerset Court has
a lap circle on the third floor,
where we walk when it is cold and
windy. And yes, even rainy!
Regarding the stamp on the
postcard from my great-grandson,
Asher, who was visiting Mongolia.
I mentioned that one stamp had a
dendrobium nobile, a type of or-
chid native to Burma, India, Thai-
land and Indochina. It is an
ingredient in Chinese traditional
medicine, serving as a replace-
ment for ephedrine. According to
google, ephedrene is used in
weight loss pills.
We miss Dani Stone, who has
gone to Fountain Springs for more
explicit treatment.
After reading “A Single Shard,”
by Sue Parks, and “Kite Runner,”
and “A 1000 Splendid Suns,” by
Khaled Hossieni, I felt like the
book, “Safe Haven,” by Nicholas
Sparks was hard to pick up. I
went looking for a book and the
first one that I ran into was an
oldie by Erle Stanley Gardner,
“The Case of the Lame Canary.” I
am intrigued! It has been years
since I read it. I dream of the
hours Virgil and I spent watching
Perry Mason on TV.
Sunday, August 4, 2013, at
Somerset Court, we had church
with Terry Pulse and Steve. Jack
Humke played the piano and we
sang.
The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is
the big news around here. The
Rapid City Journal front page
mentioned that some people will
die with motorcycle wrecks during
the rally. It is a big rally and some
people like it and some people
hate it. Some even make it a point
to be elsewhere during the rally.
M.R. Hansen took Virgil and me
to the rally, maybe 30 years ago or
so, and I never wanted to go back.
We hardly get over the rally and
it will be time for the Central
States Fair. Zooming right over
into Labor Day and school start-
ing. And it was 47˚ in Custer Sat-
urday night!
Wednesday, August 7, was resi-
dent council here at Somerset
Court and we were to dress like a
biker!
Irene McKnight, Somerset
Court resident, returned Sunday,
August 4, from Billlings, Mont.,
where she had gone to attend her
granddaughter, Aimee McK-
night’s, wedding to Brad Bell.
Irene is especially fond of Aimee
because Aimee took all of Irene’s
old eight-track music and put
them on CDs. Irene reported that
she enjoyed great dinners and see-
ing relatives who came from Stur-
gis, Belle Fourche, Spearfish,
Rapid City, Wyoming and North
Dakota.
My niece, Wanda, and her hus-
band, Ed Artz, Humboldt, phoned
from Belgrade, Mont. They were
attending a family reunion on Ed’s
side. They wanted to visit my
granddaughter, Patty Denke, who
lives in Belgrade, but Patty was
gone to Mt. View, Wyo., to her
nephew, Dylan Palmer Mair’s,
wedding.
Monday morning was beautiful,
warm and sunny with several sit-
ting out in the alcove by the front
door at Somerset Court. High
eighties are forecast all week.
Monday afternoon we had two
separate showers and a little hail.
We extend our sympathy to
Somerset Court resident, Myrna
Pokorney, whose son passed away
August 4, 2013.
Thank you to Darlene Baye for
your nice note. She said that
Philip had had a wind and hail
storm and left lots of down
branches.
Thank you to my granddaugh-
ter, Crystal Denke Jackson for the
fine photos of her son and daugh-
ter’s graduations from college.
Ariel graduated with a bachelor of
arts from the University of Cali-
fornia at Irvine and Sean gradu-
ated with a bachelor of science
from the University of California
San Bernadino. Congratulations
to both of them.
Thank you to Mike and Marcia
West, Philip, for requesting my
address so they can send me the
SDRTA news. My address is Vi-
vian Hansen, Apt. 224, 4001
Derby Lane, Rapid City, SD
57701. Mike and Marcia were al-
ways so kind when I lived at
Philip and they would take me
along to the SDRTA convention at
Pierre.
It was fun to see our five gener-
ation photo on Facebook. Gwen
Morgan had shared the photo.
Julie Slovek McQuirk, Philip,
commented on it.
Addie Rorvig had company for
her birthday. Her grandson, Noah
Lorenzen, Rapid City came over
for supper.
Alma Gruenig had a pleasant
surprise August 6 when her son,
Michael Birnbaum, Rapid City,
came to visit and he had Alma’s
son, Patrick Birnbaum, from
Washington state with him. Alma
has another son who lives in
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Thelma Frame and her sister,
who were from the Faith area,
have written books about the his-
tory of Ziebach County.
August 7, we had dress like a
biker here at Somerset Court and
there were many who observed
this activity and were all dressed
with Sturgis shirts, bandannas
and black leather jackets. I took
photos of Ben with his denim
jacket covered with badges of
places where he has biked and
Fred Smith in a bright orange
rally shirt.
At our residents council meeting
August 7, Shawn reviewed a few
of the highlights for August. Ryan
Love announced that we would
have two evacuation drills. We
should be thankful for these drills
as they are for our safety. Sandi
received a five-year pin for her five
years at Somerset Court and
Susan received a four-year pin.
Thank you girls for your steady
work to keep us interested.
There was a get-together at
Somerset Court on third floor in
the hospitality room area Thurs-
day afternoon after the funeral of
Rick Pokorney. The family
brought us a flower arrangement
with big lavendar roses in it for us
to enjoy. Thank you.
continued on page 5
Hit & Miss
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 4
by Vivian Hansen
vivivi224@yahoo.com 
or betty@pioneer-
review.com
>>AUCTION<<
Saturday Aug. 17, 2013 • 11:00 AM CDT
606 Main Street • Murdo SD
HOUSEHOLD: Crockpots ~ Fans ~ Electric Roaster ~ Carpet Shampooer ~ Milk House Heater ~ Air Purifier ~ Electric Mixer
(new) ~ Humidifier ~ (2) Ice Cream Freezers ~ 30 Cup Coffee Maker ~ Punch Set ~ Mr Coffee Coffee Maker (new) ~
Electric Percolator ~ Microwave ~ Food Dehydrator
TOOLS:Tool Box ~ Paint Pal Roller (new) ~ Dewalt Cordless Drill ~ Black & Decker Workmate ~ Misc Hand Tools ~ Weedeater
~ (2) Two Wheel Carts ~ Handyman Jacks ~ Battery Charger ~ Electric Cords ~ Leaf Blower ~ Aluminum Ladder ~ Misc
Yard Tools ~ Lincoln Stick Welder ~ Comealongs ~ (2) Bench Grinder ~ Drill Press ~ Chop Saw ~ (2) Vices ~ Table Saw
~ Tool Shop Reciprocating Saw ~ Hand Grinder ~ Portable Generator ~ McCulloch Electric Chain Saw ~ Stihl Gas Chain
Saw (16" bar) ~ (2) Ton Floor Jack ~ Impact Sockets ~ 1/2 Inch Drill ~ Car Ramps ~ Heavy Duty Ratchet Straps ~ C
Clamps ~ Jig Saw ~ Craftsman Scroll Saw ~ Hand Crank Grinder ~ Log Chains ~ Chain Binders ~ Heat Guns ~ (2)
Small Air Compressors ~ Air Bomb ~ Dremel Tool ~ Wheelbarrow
CAMPING & FISHING:Propane Heater ~ Buck Knives ~ (2) Worm Farms ~ Coolers ~ Gas Camping Grill ~ Electric Grill ~
Picnic Table ~ Minnkota Trolling Motor ~ Camping Lanterns ~ Large Igloo Cooler ~ Gun Cases ~ Minnow Traps ~ Fishing
rods and reels to numerous to list individually. Deep sea rods, river rods and stock pond rods. Also antique
reels and reels no longer made in unopened packages. Bob and Jim are avid fishermen but have decided to
downsize their fishing equipment. A very nice assortment of fishing equipment. If you have any interest in
fishing come and check it out.
MISCELLANEOUS:Shelving ~ Chess Set (new) ~ Portable Phonograph ~ VCR ~ Bowling Balls ~ Plumbing Fittings ~ Wash
Tub on Stand ~ CB Radio ~ Radio & Cassette Player ~ Cream Cans ~ (2) Boilers ~ Side By Side Bicycle ~ Walker ~
Yard Bench ~ VHS Movies
Property of Bob Totton and Jim Root
Terms and 6ond|t|ons: 6ash or good check w|th proper |0 day of auct|on. Noth|ng |s to be removed unt|| pa|d for. 0nce an |tem |s dec|ared
so|d |t |s your respons|b|||ty. A|| |tems se|| as |s where |s no warrant|es expressed or |mp||ed. Appropr|ate sa|es tax w||| be charged, |f you
are tax exempt have your tax |0 when reg|ster|ng for a b|dder number. Announcements day of auct|on take prec|dence over pr|nted mater|a|.
Thank you |n advance for attend|ng th|s auct|on.
Eckert Auction
25721 237th St · Okaton SD 57562
605-843-2845 · CeII: 605-685-8715
Lunch will be served
For more information: www.sdauctions.com
AUCTION CONDUCTED BY:
Happy 40th
Birthday
August 16th!!
To our favorite
little brother & son,
Brian (Pearson)
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
August
16-17-18-19:
Wolverine
Inmortal
PG-13
August
23-24-25-26:
Smurfs 2
Dakota Builders, LLC
For all your roofing needs, call
Brock Slovek Rio Reeves
(605) 929-9927 (605) 478-0102
Several days last week, Tim and
Joy Elshere were in Rochester
where Joy had tests and consulta-
tion with her doctors. She plans to
return to Rochester and have
heart valve surgery in mid Sep-
tember. Donella Elshere came
down from Faith to stay with Paul
during her absence.
Donnie Eymer has been dealing
with health issues as well. He
spent time in Ft. Meade with kid-
ney stones and is home now and
feeling better.
Our son-in-law, George Ho-
hwieler, had surgery Wednesday
the 7th in Omaha. He will resume
chemotherapy soon. Bryan and
Sharon Olivier drove to Omaha to
be with Nancy and the boys the
day of surgery. George got home
from the hospital Monday
evening.
We visited with Bart's sister,
Leah, and husband, Jim Waddell,
formerly of Huron, now living in
Arizona. Jim has had some seri-
ous health problems. During an
angioplasty procedure an artery
was severed. The cardiologist was
near by and got things under con-
trol. As a result of this, part of his
heart is no longer is functioning.
Then in May, while Jim was walk-
ing along the sidewalk he met a
man pushing his wife in a wheel-
chair. To get out of their way, he
stepped back and fell off the side-
walk about five feet on rocks in to
a drainage ditch. He spent eight
days in the hospital and during
that time he had a heart attack.
As a result of his injuries, he had
nerve damage and now has a drop
foot. We are so sorry to hear of all
your problems, Jim, and hope
you'll regain your strength and re-
cover from all this.
Now, on to happier news: Con-
gratulations to Kayla (Parsons)
Bastian, Pierre, on receiving her
Masters Degree in Administra-
tion/Organizational Leadership.
The weekend before last, Boyd
and Kara Parsons and Dale and
Trudy Brassfield of New Under-
wood drove to Des Moines, Iowa,
for the wedding of a family mem-
ber. On their way Thursday, they
spent the night with Eric and
Kayla Bastian and Kaidyn in
Pierre.
Tuesday, Boyd, Kara and Wade
Parsons were in Rapid City to see
Vance Moriarity, who recently
was seriously injured in a motor-
cycle accident. He is improving
and will soon be out of the hospi-
tal. Vance lives in Kansas. They
had lunch with Joanne Parsons
while in Rapid City.
Kara Parsons helped her daugh-
ter, Kayla, do some painting Fri-
day and Saturday at her home in
Pierre.
Dan and Gayla Piroutek drove
to LeSueur, Minn., last Friday to
visit with Dan's sister, Kay.
Daughter Erin and Tim Logan
also stopped by to visit Kay, and
to pick up their three-year-old son,
Daniel, who had been staying with
his grandparents, Dan and Gayla.
Erin and Tim had been vacation-
ing in Seattle and Vancouver.
Saturday night was the benefit
supper and auction for Celine
Trask at the Elm Springs Hall,
and among the large crowd were
Dan and Gayla Piroutek, who
helped with the auction portion of
the event. Celine, daughter of Pat
and Rosemary Trask, was badly
injured last spring in a ranch ac-
cident. Her spine was crushed, but
not severed, and she has been re-
ceiving therapy for several
months in Colorado at a place that
works with those who have had
spinal cord injuries. Through her
hard work, she can now walk with
the aid of a walker. With her daily
pysical therapy, she hopes to fully
recover.
Last Thursday, Bill, Connie and
Grant Parsons were in Philip
where they installed an arbor and
a fence in the Senechal Park. The
family used the memorial money
of Connie's mother, Laura Mor-
gan, to make this very nice addi-
tion to the park. Laura lived for
several years in her Senechal
apartment.
Mike and Linda Gebes and
Justin and Lacy Gebes of Lincoln,
Neb., and Lacy's family from the
Rapid City area met for a week-
end of camping at Farm Island
near Pierre.
Byron and Peggy Parsons spent
a few days at the motorcylce rally
in Sturgis. They enjoyed a visit
with Joanne Parsons in Rapid
City one day.
Dusti, Jade and Misti Berry
were in Kadoka last week from
Monday through Thursday for
Rodeo Bible Camp. Dave and
Tonya attended the rodeo Thurs-
day night.
Wednesday night, Jim Elshere,
Mark, Judith and Bailey Radway
and Bart Parsons were in Faith
for the bronc ride during Faith's
stock show and rodeo.
Leo and Joan Patton attended
the Faith rodeo Sunday. Joan said
the bulls seemed to be the win-
ners!
Guests for dinner Sunday the
third of August at Virgil and Carla
Smith's were Keith and Edith
Slovek and Les and Joann Pear-
son all of Philip.
Connor and Mackenzie Hovland
spent the weekend with their
grandparents, Debbie and Joe
Prouty, in Philip.
Phil and Karen Carley enjoyed
a few days, Wednesday through
Saturday, camping near Deerfield
Milesville News|Janice Parsons • 544-3315
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Tire Tanks
Vacuum
Excavation
Cobett Waters
Directional
Boring
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
in the Black Hills. Saturday, they
joined some of their family at Sto-
rybook Island in Rapid City to cel-
ebrate their grandaughter,
Millie's, second birthday. In-
cluded were Millie's parents, An-
drea Carley and Randy Clark, and
Randy's family, and Abby Carley,
son Wace and Abby's friend,
Mark. On their way home, Phil
and Karen stopped at the New
Underwood nursing home to see
Karen's dad, Frank O'Grady.
Earl and Jodi Parsons, Rachel
and Sarah, spent the weekend
being tourists in the Black Hills.
While climbing Harney Peak, they
got hailed on twice and soaked
with rain. They did make it to the
top, but all they could see were the
clouds that got them wet.
Kamri Parsons celebrated her
ninth birthday last Tuesday.
Sarah Parsons, Anna Piroutek
and Anna's cousin, Bethany, went
in to Philip with her family to
swim. Then Sarah and Anna
stayed overnight at Wade and
Marcy's.
Bobette Schofield visited son
Jeff Schofield and family Sunday.
Allen Piroutek visited his par-
ents, Mike and Faye Piroutek, and
family over the weekend. Allen is
working in Circle, Mont. They cel-
ebrated his birthday a little early.
Wednesday, Sharon Kauffman,
her daughter, Jessica, and chil-
dren, Trenton, McKenna and
Caleb Hulland, left for their
homes in Colorado Springs after
visiting the Leo Pattons.
Leo and Joan Patton were in
Pierre Thursday for appointments
and took Irene Patton out for
lunch.
Last Thursday, several of the
mothers cleaned the Milesville
School. It is now ready for happy,
smiling faces for another year.
Where has the summer gone?
Jim and Lana Elshere went to
the car races in Miller Friday
evening with Greg, Kathy and
Tayonna Arthur.
Lana Elshere's cousin, Debbie
Millard, and her husband, Norv,
Presho, and her aunt, Hazel
Juhnke, Vivian, visited Saturday
afternoon.
Last Thursday until Sunday,
visitors at Joan Hamill's were her
daughter and family, Racquel and
Ron Johnson, Marissa, Kaylee
and Trent, Hendricks, Minn. This
week Joan's sons and families are
at Milesville. Russell and Kari
Jasper and two daughters and
Matt and Lisa Jasper and two
boys are here from St. Paul, Minn.
After church Sunday, Bart and
I drove to Rapid City and enjoyed
brunch with Mike and Melody
Parsons and family. Then we all
went to a Special Olympics soft-
ball game that Carter played in.
I've been picking chokecherries
again this year. They are as big as
I've seen and very plentiful. It's
too bad I've got lots of juice in my
freezer from last year and don't re-
ally need any. The plums will be
ready soon. Carla Smith has made
some plum jelly. We like wild
plum pie. I use a recipe for goose-
berry pie – kind of tart, but with a
scoop or two of ice cream it's
pretty good!
Milesville News
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meet-
ing monthly. One meets on the second Tues-
day at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the
other meets on the second Wednesday at
1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov.
thru Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
UNITED CHURCH
OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Ancìcnl wìsdom lor modcrn lìlc
And whcn hc had callcd lhc µcoµlc unlo hìm wìlh
hìs dìscìµlcs also, hc saìd unlo lhcm, Whosocvcr
wìll comc allcr mc, lcl hìm dcny hìmscll, and lakc
uµ hìs cross, and lollow mc. Mark 8:34 (K)V)
1he dírectíons ure cíeur: 1o íoííov Chríst, you must
voíunturííy cust usíde your personuí desíres.
Lnderstundíng vhut you need to do ís eusy. Curryíng ít
out ís hurd. You muy huve somethíng eíse ín mínd íor
yourseíí. lorget ubout ít und do us Chríst suys. lt von't
be un eusy roud, but ít ís un essentíuí roud. Cod knovs
best. loííov Hím.
Obituaries
continued on 7
continued from 4
Church
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 5
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Call to make an appointment witb Dr. Rompca today!
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°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
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V-b, uuto, ¡¡ont ö ¡cu¡ uí¡,
íocuí t¡udc!
Leland Harry Snook, age 65, of
Alton, Ill., died Saturday, August
10, 2013, at the Alton Rehabilita-
tion and Nursing Center.
Services will be held at St. Am-
brose Catholic Church in Godfrey,
Ill., on Saturday, August 17. Inter-
ment will take place in Midland,
S.D., at a later date.
Leland was born January 7,
1948, in Philip to Clair and Sylvia
(Peters) Snook. He attended school
at the Eureka rural school through
the third grade and then attended
school in Midland. He graduated
from Midland High School in 1966.
After attending Black Hills
State College for three semesters,
he enlisted in the National Guard.
After completing basic training, he
worked with his father and brother
on the farm/ranch north of Mid-
land.
He married Carol Petoske on
July 5, 1968, in Midland. He and
Carol had two children, Shelly and
Susan.
In 1970, the family moved to
Spearfish and Leland continued his
college eduation, graduating from
Black Hills State College with a
bachelor of science degree in busi-
ness administration in 1972. After
graduation, they moved to Boulder,
Colo., where Leland was an ac-
countant for the Boulder Daily
Camera newspaper. He became a
certified public accountant and
continued to do accounting for
newspapers in Texas and Florida
before moving to Alton in 1986
where he was the business man-
ager for The Telegraph newspaper.
Due to ill health, Leland spent the
last few years in a nursing home.
Leland is survived by his wife,
Carol; daughters, Shelly (Brad)
Gentelin and Susan (Craig)
Rathgeb, Godfrey, Ill; grandchil-
dren, Sam Gentelin, Evan
Rathgeb, Anna Gentelin and Grace
Rathgeb; a sister, Gene (Snook)
Hudson, Midland; and a sister-in-
law, Pat (Fenwick) Snook.
Leland was preceded in death by
his parents and a brother, Carl
Snook.
Leland H. Snook_________________
Midland Vacation Bible School
The annual Vacation Bible School, hosted by the Open Bible Church in Midland, was held the mornings of Mon-
day, June 29 through Friday, August 2. Led by Pastor Andy Blye, the many adult and young adult helpers from
around the community helped the younger children learn through having fun. There were approximately 14 youth
in attendance each day. This year’s theme, Sonwest Roundup, was western based. Lesson’s centered around
God’s love for each of the children, and his providing for our needs on our trail of life. Games included three
legged races, boulder dash and cowpoke tag. Projects included cactus flowers, moosic shakers, snakes and spool
crosses.
Courtesy photo
I would think I could not write
about hail all the time but we had
another real bad storm here this
Saturday with golf ball sized hail-
stones that came in from the
southeast and caused more dam-
age to that side of the buildings
and my roof started leaking in
three places, but I didn’t get any
windows broken this time. But it
did break the bulbs in the security
light and tore up all the screens
that were left from the first storm.
I covered my head with a heavy
coat and ran out and put my
pickup in so it just got a very few
small minor dents in it. They may
pop back out if the hot sun gets on
it, we shall wait and see.
Marvin and Vicki Eide and
Gary and Julie Nixon got hit by
this storm also. I heard that
Nixon’s daughter, who was here,
had their pickup and horse trailer
severly damaged. Marvin and
Colby Fitch got caught in the
storm coming from the hayfield at
the top of the big hill just above
my place. They said that it got
pretty load inside of the cab of the
vehicle but they didn’t loose and
windows in the cab. The guys who
were laying cable in this area
were caught in their rigs and one
of them was driving quickly up
and down the road to get them all
picked up. That storm came up
very quickly and caught many out
away from the buildings. We got
one and a half inch of rain from it.
Ir ran over the road in several
places.
The trailer house up at Marvin’s
that belongs to Strollers had a lot
of roof damage so after the storm
Marvin and Colby were up on the
roof trying to patch what they
could. Marvin’s roof was also dam-
aged and they were up there try-
ing to stop the leaks there too.
There was lots of damage after
two storms like that. I was out
picking up pieces of the eave
troughs and pieces of tin from the
roofs of the farm buildings. I don’t
want to have it laying around
when I have to go out and mow. It
is hard to get anyone to come and
fix the damage as there are so
many in the area who were hit by
the hail storms. Everyone is busy
cleaning fixing things up.
Shayla nd Jeremy Delandy and
boys were down to visit Donna
Newman Sunday and helped her
do some things around the place
before returning home that
evening. Donna said that Ariana
Aramtatzis had her wisdom teeth
removed and plans to come and
Grindstone
|Mary Eide • 859-2188
Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
With our high humidity this
Monday morning anyone work-
ing outside will be working up a
sweat in short order. Hopefully,
they’ll remember to drink lots of
water. Humidity is a sign of mois-
ture in the air and with the rains
we’ve been getting there is mois-
ture to be sure. The lawns and
grasses in shades of green make
it seem more like June then the
middle of August. The millet,
milo, safflower, corn and sun-
flower crops are looking good.
But a farmer knows just how
quickly those crops can be de-
stroyed by wind and hail. Until
those crops are harvested and in
the grain bins, it’s not a done
deal! But for a farmer or a
rancher it’s in their blood, it de-
fines who they are, and so, they
take their chances doing what
they love.
With the Sturgis bike rally
now but a memory for many
folks, my mind is off on another
journey, picturing the town of
Sturgis a bit of a ghost town, as
silence floats over the town. No
more motorcycles lining the
streets, a town minus a whole lot
of folks going to music shows,
checking out the vendors and a
whole lot more. The echo of those
motorcycles touring the Black
Hills of South Dakota is silent. It
is back to life as usual. Saturday,
Jerry and I left for Mitchell with
a steady rain coming down most
of the way. A constant string of
motorcycles passed us. They
looked wet and cold. I couldn’t
help being a bit concerned for
them as they headed down a very
wet Interstate 90. More and more
folks haul their motorcycles, but
there are still a lot who don’t.
Time to get back to life as usual
around here, getting that local
news collected for another week.
Deidra, Blake and Stuart
Hackerott of Smith Center, Kan.,
spent a couple of weeks visiting
aunts and uncles on the Hunt
side of the family. They were a
big help to those aunts and un-
cles as they helped in the sorting
and hauling of stuff at the house
of the late Lyle and Ida Hunt. For
anyone who has gone through
that, and I think most people
have, it is time consuming and a
whole lot of work, plus it is an
emotional time as memories of
those growing up years in that
certain house come flooding back.
With football and school knock-
ing at the door, it was time to get
the kids back to Kansas. Keith
Hunt and Christine Niedan met
the kids, mom, Lisa Hackerott
and her mother-in-law, Ellie,
half-way. Blake and Stuart will
be starting football practice and
Deidra will be getting ready for
her first year of college in Hast-
ings, Neb. It is less than a two
hour drive from home, plus there
are six other kids from Smith
Center going to that college, so
that makes it a bit easier your
first year away from home. Dei-
dra’s plans are to become a den-
tal hygienist.
It was a busy, busy place at
the home of Calvin and Patricia
Saucerman. Her brother, Bernie
Brendt, and his wife, Maureen,
Ipswich, England, and her sister,
Bernice Redli, Laurel, Mont.,
came for a visit. Bernie and Ber-
nice are twins. Their son, Miles
Saucerman, and his wife, Laura,
West Minister, Colo., came Fri-
day. Coming with them was
Dustin Saucerman, a grandson of
Calvin and Pat, who lives with
Miles and Laura, works at the
Fiber Optic Co. that Miles works
at and is planning on taking
some college courses. Saturday,
Johnie Saucerman, Branson and
Kendall, and a friend, Travis, all
from Tea came for a visit with
family for the weekend. Brent
and Julie Saucerman and three
kids from Hot Springs were also
there. Calvin and Patricia’s
granddaughter, Alisha Olden-
berg, and her husband, John,
Philip, were there. Clint and Pre-
rry Saucerman and their six
grandkids came, as did Mike
Maskovwick, Ft. Pierre. Mike
and Patricia’s families were next
door neighbors and Mike and
Brent are great friends. So, it was
a busy household for the Saucer-
mans. Tuesday, Calvin and Pa-
tricia, son Brent, and Bernie and
Maureen and Bernice are going
for a sight-seeing trip to the Yel-
lowstone National Park. They
will take Bernice back to her
home in Montana.
It seems folks are fitting in
family get-togethers before school
begins and summer is over.
Thursday, August 10, at a gath-
ering at Midland’s beautiful city
park for supper and visiting with
Lois (Stotts) McFall, Florida, and
her daughter, Carmen Jensen,
and friend, Dan Bible, Washing-
ton, were Clint, Brenda and Josh
Jensen, Anita (Flom) and Jim
Larsen, Allison Fosheim, Adam
Fosheim, Lee (Fosheim) and
Nathan Gerloch and son Trent,
Janet (Flom) Gourneau, Shelly
(Jensen) Schuler, Andrew
Schuler and friend, LaFayette
Ducheneaux, David and Beth
Flom, Marian Nelson, Tommy
Jones, David and Jamie Flom,
who are Daniel Flom’s kids, Lory
Walker, Lacy Walker and chil-
dren, Casey and Pat Jensen.
Midland Market had a beauti-
ful night for their weekly supper,
with music playing and tables
with things for sale. For those
who didn’t make it, you missed
out on a delicious meal made and
served by Ruby Huston with the
help of her daughter, Diana.
There was a whole lot of garden
produce, baked goods, interesting
patterns on homemade aprons,
knitted hats with pretty flowered
pieces, also neat flowered pieces
for your hair (the one who makes
those flowered pieces had one in
her hair and it was cute as a but-
ton). Watkins products are also
there for sale. Making the
evening extra special was seeing
folks who lived in Midland at one
time, went to school in Midland,
graduated from Midland and had
come back to visit family and
friends. Among them were Car-
men Jensen, Chrisy Zuccaro,
Angie Daly and Miles Saucer-
man. Couldn’t help but chuckle
as Miles was visiting with Karel
Reiman, her son Mark and Miles
were classmates through grade
school and high school. The rest
of us at the table got in on his
visit of where he lives, what he is
doing, introducing his wife,
Laura, and asking about folks he
knew from Midland. Most of you
know the quick pop, pop, popping
of popcorn, right? Well, I’m think-
ing Miles could keep up with that
popping corn. They are a delight-
ful couple! It was just fun to see
and visit with each and every one
of those former Midland kids.
The theme for next weeks Mid-
land Market is fun and games. So
come on down to Midland’s City
Park for an evening of good food,
visiting, and a chance to buy
something that you’ll be glad you
did.
* * * *
UN & GAMES NIGHT AT MID-
LAND MARKET - BOUNCY
HOUSE FOR KIDS - LAWN
GAMES - BOARD GAMES -
VENDORS - SUPPER - LOTS
OF FUN
* * * *
Last Thursday, evening din-
ner guests at the home of Ernie
and Laurel Nemec were Mr. and
Mrs. Loren Peters and grandson
Carson, San Antonio, Texas, and
Mrs. Karen Finck, Rapid City.
Loren and Karen are brother and
sister and lived in Midland a
number of years ago. They had
visited their aunt, Alice Jeitz, in
Pierre who will be 98 in October.
Alice and Loren and Karen’s
mom, Helen Peters, were sisters.
Alice is the only one of the Jeitz
siblings still living. I remember
when Alice worked at the Green
Stamp store in Pierre for a num-
ber of years. Following their visit
with Ernie and Laurel, they
headed for Rapid City.
The ladies of the Open Bible
Church had their annual friend-
ship tea Thursday, August 8,
with the theme Shepherd of the
Stars being carried out in differ-
ent ways. It is always a fun time
of fellowship, visiting, and good
food. Miriam Schilling drove the
furthest. She and her husband,
Ivan, came from Gillette, Wyo.
Sylvia Huber came some distance
also. Her daughter, Denise,
brought her down from Rapid
City. Rebecca Ellendorf came
from Mission, stopping in White
River bringing a lady friend of
hers who has been to the teas be-
fore with Rebecca. As some of you
may remember, Rebecca and her
husband, Randy, were pastors at
the Open Bible Church for a
number of years. Everyone had a
good time and thank the ladies
for the invite.
I want to thank Pat Snook for
the following information on the
Fenwick family reunion and
some history of the Fenwick’s
and the Cole’s.
A Fenwick family reunion
took place at Lake McConaughy
at Keystone, Neb., over the week-
end. Pat Snook, Ted and Ginger
Fenwick attended. Those coming
from a distance stayed at the
Beach House townhouses, which
were very attractively decorated
with a beach theme. Three fami-
lies live nearby, so stayed at
home each night. Arizona, Col-
orado, South Dakota and Ne-
braska were represented. Pat's
grandparents, Charles and Anna,
started the town of Keystone,
built a house and barn, fences,
etc., and built, owned and oper-
ated a general mercantile store
and farmed. Fenwicks arrived by
way of England, Ireland, Canada,
and Indiana. One of their sons
later became the postmaster.
Pat's other grandfather, D.D.
Cole, and wife Anna bought the
Bank of Keystone in the 1930s
and he worked there until his re-
tirement. They came via Pennsyl-
vania, Indiana, and Arthur, Neb.,
where they homesteaded. D.D.
and Anna's daughter, Winnie,
and her husband owned and op-
erated the mercantile after Fen-
wick’s retired. The Fenwick and
Cole homes are both still occu-
pied today.
Keystone is known for its little
church which has a Catholic altar
on one end, a Protestant altar on
the other end, and pews with
hinges so they can face either
way! Ed Fenwick, Pat's dad,
worked on Kingsley Dam, which
created Lake McConaughy, be-
fore entering the Army Air Force.
Pat, Ted and Ginger also got to
visit some of their Cole relatives
who live in Oglala.
The Snook families got word
Saturday of the death of Leland
Snook, Pat's brother-in-law, who
died earlier that day. Plans are
that he will be cremated, a pri-
vate family service will be held in
Alton, Ill., and a memorial serv-
ice and burial will take place in
Midland next May. Leland was
65 years old. Carol (Petoske)
Snook lives in Alton, and daugh-
ters, Shelly (Brad) Gentelin, Sam
and Anna, and Susan (Craig)
Rathgeb, Evan and Grace, live in
nearby Godfrey, Ill. Our sincere
sympathies to the family of Le-
land Snook.
Gene and Audrey Jones went
to Pierre Friday, as Gene had
softball. They won one and lost
one. Bernadette and Dick Knox,
Highmore, came in to watch the
games. Gene, Audrey, Dick and
Bernadette spent the weekend
camping at Griffin Park. They
did tourist things, drove up 1804
to visit with Stacy Nemec and
seeing the sights on up to the rac-
ing track. Then they drove
through the campgrounds to see
the recovery from the Missouri
River floods behind the Oahe
Dam and Farm Island. After at-
tending Mass in Ft Pierre and
saying hello to Father Mark Mc-
Cormick Sunday, theygrilled
burgers for lunch and all re-
turned to their homes.
Morris and Barbara Jones left
Thursday for Wessington Springs
to attend an outdoor music enter-
tainment show held at the beau-
tiful Shakespeare Gardens in
Wessington Springs. Their
daughter-in-law, Sandy Jones,
and their grandchildren, Braden
and Monica, were featured that
night singing songs from two
Broadway musicals. Wessington
Springs Community Choir put on
the show and was also show-
cased. This is a weekly program
during the summer with singers
and bands from the area enter-
taining at the Gardens. Shake-
speare Gardens features an old
English cottage with an authen-
tic thatched roof, beautiful flow-
ers and landscaping. Barb
reports it is a gorgeous setting for
the show. Wes and Carrie
Mentele and children from
Howard also came to hear the
Joneses sing. Morrie and Barb
stayed overnight and returned
home Friday in time for the Mid-
land Market. Barb showed pic-
tures she had taken of the
Shakespeare Gardens with its
old English cottage to some of us
at Midland Market. She is right,
it is absolutely beautiful.
Word was received by family
of the death of former Midland
man, Leland H. Snook, Alton, Ill.
Leland Snook grew up north of
Midland on the Snook ranch. He
was the son of Clair and Sylvia
Snook. He married Carol Petoske
from Midland and they have two
children, Shelly Gentelin, Alton
and Susan Rathgeb, Godfrey, Ill.
Leland had been ill for many
years and passed away Friday,
August 9. A funeral Mass for Le-
land will be held in Alton this
week. Carol (Petoske) Snook is a
sister to Barb Jones, Jody Block,
Jim Petoske and the late Jill Eck-
ert.
Shorty and Maxine Jones
were in Rapid City last Friday.
They happened to see Alice (Lar-
son) McGuire having a nice visit.
Alice says ‘hi’ to all of her friends
in Midland. Alice is one of those
people with a dry sense of humor;
she tells it like it is. She’s one of
those people you just enjoy visit-
ing with. Nancy and Don Smith
came from Bellevue, Neb., to see
her folks, Shorty and Maxine,
and also having a chance to see
Angie Daly and Chrisy Zuccaro.
Matthew and Brianna Jones
were at Leola visiting her folks,
also visiting her grandmothers,
one who had been staying at the
senior citizen’s apartment build-
ing in Watertown that caught
fire.
July 29, Larry, Jennifer, Ash-
ton, Kateland and Cambrim
Sawyer and Lareshia Bragg
came from Amherst, Texas,
spending a week visiting with
Gaylord and Wilma Saucerman
and Clint and Prerry Saucerman.
The Sawyers harvested wheat for
the Saucermans for a number of
years. They went to Onida pick-
ing up their son, Jarrod, who had
been with a harvest crew taking
him back home with them to
Texas. While the Sawyers were
visiting at Saucerman’s, Tel and
Ellie Saucerman and family
came from Rapid City for a cou-
ple days visit. Later, the Sawyers
went to Tel and Ellie’s spending
the night. They went on to Au-
rora, Colo., spending the night
and having a chance to visit with
Ty and Emily Saucerman and
family and with Talon Saucer-
man. They left for Texas on Sun-
day, August 4.
Mariah Heaton came from
Oak Creek, Wis., Tuesday,
spending Tuesday and Wednes-
day night with Clover Evans at
Interior, and going to see Marlin
Evans Thursday. Friday, Prerry
and Mariah took Marlin to Rapid
City where she had hip replace-
ment surgery. They brought Mar-
lin back to her apartment in
Philip and Mariah is staying with
her for a time while she recuper-
ates. Friday, August 9, Clint and
Prerry Saucerman drove to
Bridgeport, Neb., where they met
Emily Saucerman and her mom,
Vera Beneke, having lunch be-
fore bringing grandkids, Rebekah
and Benjamin, home with them.
On the way home, they stopped
at Tel and Ellie’s in Rapid City
bringing grandkids, Emma,
Sawyer, Meleah and Raygen,
home with them. All six of Clint
and Prerry’s grandkids had a fun
time with grandpa and grandma
and their cousins. Prerry and the
grandkids stopped to see Gaylord
Saucerman at the Philip Nursing
Home before heading for Wall
where they met Tel and Ellie, as
the kids had to get home to get
ready for school. Meleah starts
kindergarten this year. On the
way home, Prerry, Benjamin and
Rebekah stopped to see Marlin
and Mariah. Sunday, Alaetra
Evans and Mariah Heaton came
to see Benjamin and Rebekah.
Wilma came over for lunch Mon-
day having a chance to see every-
one. The lunch was made by
Benjamin and Rebekah, with
grandma Prerry’s help. Mariah
and Alaetra went to 1880 Town
having a chance to visit with
Jake and Dottie. They got to
know Jake and Dottie when they
were all working at 1880 Town.
Jake and Dottie were thrilled to
see them.
Senior Citizens Meet
The senior citizens met at the
center on August 5, 2013, for
their monthly meeting with 11
members in attendance. Presi-
dent Kandus Woitte called the
meeting to order and led in the
flag salute. The minutes of the
July meeting were read and ap-
proved. Mahlon Alcock gave the
treasurer’s report. Alice Stroppel
moved to accept the report and
George Stroppel seconded and
the motion passed.
Three cards were sent. The
bulletin board was done. Mainte-
nance unhooked the bottle gas
and fixed the protection on the
air conditioner. Mike Stroppel
mowed the yard. The meeting ad-
journed and games were played
and we had lunch.
Mickey Woitte, Secretary
***
Time to close my column this
Monday evening, as Tuesday
morning I have to be in Murdo.
When Jerry and I were in
Mitchell Saturday, we had a visit
and lunch with Christopher,
Stephanie and Laura and Beth
Nemec. Beth had come from Den-
ver, Colo., for a weekend visit
with Christopher and Stephanie.
Christmas being the last time we
had seen Beth, it was an added
bonus that she happened to be in
Mitchell. Laura took a real liking
to Beth – they were buddies, for
sure. Wishing each of you a good
week!
Midland News
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 6
Night
Friday, Aug. 16
6-8 PM
• Bouncy House •
• Lawn Games •
• Board Games •
Supper by
Lutheran Ladies
WErE yOu rIGhT? Last week’s picture: Part of a window on the Ingram
hardware building. around Philip there are many architectural elements
on buildings as well as other items that we see on a daily basis. But, can
you identify them when given just an upclose snapshot? here’s one for
you to try. The answer will be in the next week’s Pioneer review.
Where is it?
Community
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 7
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and toddlers. Regional travel required, flexible
schedule available. Experienced PTs as well as
new graduates with PT license are encouraged to
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CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
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Grindstone News|Mary Eide • 859-2188
spend some time with her while
she is healing. I suppose that she
will be leaving for college soon so
wants to spend time with her
grandma and other family and
friends before she goes off to
school.
Herb and Hazel Sieler enjoyed a
fish fry at Marvin Colemans Sat-
urday night along with several
other neighbors and friends. Herb
is keeping busy with crop adjust-
ments. It hasn’t been a good crop
year for some.
Bob Thorson and his fiancé,
Jodi, and her mother and dad, Ed
and Cleo, have been busy. Satur-
day night, Jodi’s son, Scott Jones,
and Abbie Fitzgerald were mar-
ried at the Lake Waggoner Golf
Course north of Philip. Jodi’s un-
cles, Ed, Jr. and Patty Tangren
and two daughters, Lisa and Mil-
isa, and kids, Jerry Tangren and
daughter, Kiley, Perry and Shiela
Tangren and son, Jeff, from Utah,
came on Thursday. Some are still
here Monday and they are busy
touring the Badlands and Black
Hills. Sunday, August 11, Bob’s
mother, Phyllis, came out to visit
with them and enjoyed a steak
dinner in the evening. Scott and
Abbie Jones and Curt Flesner
were also guests.
It seems when there is some
event that is going on or there are
wrecks and accidents, it touches
someone in our area, far and near.
Recently, Lloyd and Marianne
Frien’s son, Vance Moriarty, was
in an accident with his motorcycle
when he was run into by a vehicle.
I was unable to reach them, but
want them to know that we all
wish him the best in his recovery.
Tucker and Jess Smith joined
all of Tucker’s siblings and their
spouses for a camping trip in the
Black Hills near Pactola. One day,
they rented a boat and boated on
the lake. What fun they had!
Tucker and Jess’ boys stayed with
Jess’ parents while they were
gone.
Marvin reported that the last
hail storm finished Trevor’s millet
on section 16. They thought that
they could hay it after the first
storm, but this last one finished it
beyond any chance of haying.
What seems so funny is that the
weeds are surviving when nothing
else has.
God sent children for another
purpose than merely to keep up the
race – to enlarge our hearts; and to
make us unselfish and full of
kindly sympathies and affections;
to give our souls higher aims; to
call out all of our faculties to ex-
tend enterprise and exertion; and
to bring around our fireside bright
faces and happy smiles, and loving
tender hearts. Mary Botham
Howitt
Life was a lot simpler when
what we honored was father and
mother rather than all major
credit cards. Robert Orben
continued from 5
“He is the Shepard of the Stars”
was this year’s theme for the an-
nual Midland Open Bible Women's
Ministry Friendship Tea.
The church social event, held
Thursday, August 8, had approxi-
mately 65 ladies attend. They came
from many surrounding towns –
Midland, Philip, Murdo, Hayes,
Kadoka and others. The farthest
traveled attendees was from
Gillette, Wyo., and Mission.
“It was a very good turnout, and
we didn’t have any problems with
the weather. It was a great day,”
said Betty Sinkey, director of
women’s ministries. “Each year we
have such good reports.”
Every year the luncheon takes
place in August and has a unique
theme. Each of the tables was dec-
orated with china tea cups and
flowers, but also included a stack of
hymnals to be used by the ladies at
the table. The main centerpiece
was a cake shaped like a star, with
cupcakes surrounding it.
Each guest received a memento
and a person at each table received
a door prize.
Some of the activities of the an-
nual luncheon, which all tied in
with the theme, included an open-
ing led by Sinkey and a devotion
given by Jennifer Blye. Singing
was led by Beth Flom and Kim
Bierle.
“People keep saying that it is the
highlight of the summer. People
feel good when we accomplish
something like that,” said Sinkey.
She added that it makes a nice fel-
lowship – sit back and enjoy.
Midland’s annual friendship tea
Courtesy photo
Goodness, it seems that August
just arrived and here it is about
the middle of the month already.
Rain has brightened the land-
scape with more green in the
Kadoka area and across the state.
Our yard was in dire need of mow-
ing when we got home this Mon-
day. Road ditches are purple with
alfalfa in bloom, it seems a good
chance to get a second cutting
even along the roads. In some
places, that was happening! The
down side of all the rain is that
wheat is still standing in the
fields, waiting for the ground to
dry, as well as moisture to be right
to bin or market, which ever the
farmer wants to do. Other crops,
soybeans, corn, and sunflowers,
are going to be late this year, but
at the present they look wonder-
ful.
Sandee Gittings, Jessica and
Kelsey Gittings were in Rapid
City Monday for Sandee's chemo
treatment. Richard Meyer, Neche,
N.D., spent Monday night at the
Gittings. Philip DeLuce, Portland,
Ore., spent Monday and Tuesday
nights at their place and Brian
Mills, Pierre, spent Monday, Tues-
day and Wednesday nights.
Monday found Tony Harty re-
covering from the week before
when he was in Rapid City. Tony
discovered an interesting fellow,
Paul Verna, who had a booth set
up selling special decorated skulls
here in town. The designs were a
special deal. The design floats in a
chemical and when the skulls or
any item is dipped in the solution
the decal adheres to it. Tony vis-
ited with Kathy Brown in the
evening.
Monday, Bill and I were on the
road from Sioux Falls to
Knoxville, Iowa. We met Terry
Buchert and Leonard Konst at
Winnevagas, Iowa, (next to Sloan,
Iowa) for breakfast, then traveled
together into Knoxville for car
races. We no sooner pulled into
the camp, than a repair was
needed on our motor home. The
plug on the water heater twisted
off when Bill tried to tighten it.
Jerry Payton to the rescue with
everything needed. Leonard and
Terry joined others from the
campground to go to races at Os-
kaloosa, Iowa, that night and
Tuesday evening. I begged Inter-
net access at the local motel so I
could work on the news. Some-
times the challenge of getting the
news to the paper reminds me of
years past when I would meet the
mailman Monday morning and if
I happened to be too late for our
mail, would rush across country
about 10 miles and put it in
Fiedler’s mailbox. Then came the
age of the fax machine and I could
send it by fax Tuesday morning to
the lawyer’s office, but they
charged the paper per sheet to re-
ceive it. Next, one surplus fax
went from my house to the Pio-
neer Review office, that worked
pretty good. Some days if I was
hauling pigs to town and had a
commissioner meeting, I would
swing the pig bus by the paper,
drop off the news, then drop off
the pigs at the auction and go to
the meeting. I probably didn’t
smell too great those days, but
then I guess it smelled like money!
Jody Gittings was out to help
George Gittings a couple of days
during the week. A helping hand
is always appreciated, especially
when you’re not supposed to get
too carried away with things.
George’s eye seems to be healing
in fine shape, so that is good.
Tuesday morning, Kadoka got
one and one half inch of rain. It
was a humid day. Tony Harty was
out learning more about the
skulls, they were quite unusual
and drew a crowd where they
were displayed. Too wet to do
much else.
Meanwhile, Tuesday morning
in Knoxville, Iowa, after breakfast
with the gang, I got the password
to hook up to L.T. Works Internet
connection so I could sit in our
motor home and get the news
sent. I resisted the urge to call the
paper and ask if they received it,
but it does make you wonder how
in the world things can go the dis-
tance without paper and pencil.
Don and Vi Moody escaped from
their ranch Wednesday evening
for a longer than normal trip up to
their Rapid Valley place. They got
nearly as far as Wall when they
remembered that they forgot to
put in one important parcel – the
frozen food bag. So Vi turned
around at the Big Foot Road and
back to the ranch they came in a
nice little rain shower. It was a
good thing they came back any-
way, as Vi needed to retract the
awning over the patio since so
much hail has been all around
them. Then they started back for
Rapid again! They spent the next
four days in Rapid and did a lot of
cleaning up around the former
tenant trailer site and moved
some things over to the pole barn
up there. Don is working on his
JD 530 tractor and wants to get it
back into running condition and
maybe put it to work a little bit.
While driving into Rapid one
evening, they came across a bale
of hay that had fallen off a pickup
and was all over the east lane of
Hwy 44. The driver didn't strap it
down and it was the top bale of a
three bale load all in one pickup
box with the tailgate down. Some-
one had a lot of pitchfork work to
do promptly as the traffic was get-
ting pretty well slowed down on
the 4-lane highway to the airport.
Tony Harty did get to some of
his mowing Wednesday, but had
numerous breakdowns until he
made a bit of a repair, then all was
good. Another rain shower came
through and left a half inch of
moisture behind, just enough to
settle the dust at the Rodeo Bible
Camp that was going on here in
Kadoka. Tony went out and
watched some of the rodeo events.
The World of Outlaw races in
Knoxville, Iowa, officially started
Wednesday. The temperature was
perfect for the evening qualifying
event. We got dirt so it was
shower time when we got back to
the motor home. We’ve had the
same seats for so many years that
it is like old home week when we
all get seated and catch up on how
things are with these race friends.
Don and Vi Moody had a nice
evening out Thursday night and
enjoyed a gift certificate for sup-
per at a seafood restaurant. Vi
says they also have one for an-
other restaurant, but will have to
use that East River somewhere as
there isn’t one in Rapid City. They
did happen to have a chance visit
with a longtime friend while in
Rapid. His name is Al Pitts and he
sings with the Shrine of Democ-
racy Barbershop Quartet. Al used
to work as a salesman at the Ford
dealership in Rapid in the days
when Bill Sumpter and Don
Betwixt Places| Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048
bilmar@gwtc.net
continued on 9
Sports & Community
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 8
DO YOU WANT TO CONSERVE MOISTURE FOR YOUR CROPS?
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN TRYING NO-TILL PLANTING?
I WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR CUSTOM
PLANTING OF YOUR FALL CROPS!
For more information, contact
Glen Bennett
(605) 685-3066 or 859-2624
LARGE ANIMAL SHOW
Goat
Dairy goat, spring doe: Myles
Clements – purple ribbon, Sage Gabriel –
purple.
Champion dairy goat – Myles
Clements, reserve champion – Sage
Gabriel.
Champion beginner goat showmanship
– Myles Clements.
Champion junior goat showmanship –
Sage Gabriel.
Sheep
Rambouillet yearling ram – Gage
Weller – purple.
Rambouillet ram lamb – Tagg Weller –
purple.
Rambouillet yearling ewe – Gage
Weller – purple.
Rambouillet ewe lamb – Gage Weller –
purple.
Champion ram – Gage Weller, reserve
champion – Tagg Weller.
Champion ewe - Gage Weller, reserve
champion – Gage Weller.
Champion beginner sheep showman-
ship – Tagg Weller.
Champion junior sheep showmanship –
Gage Weller.
Breeding beef
Beginner beef showmanship – Myles
Clements – champion, Wyatt Schriever –
reserve champion, Ryley Schofiled – pur-
ple.
Junior beef showmanship – Trew De-
Jong – champion, Casey Schriever – re-
serve champion, Sage Keegan – purple.
Senior beef showmanship – Peyton De-
Jong – champion, Dustin Enders – reserve
champion, Rachel Parsons – purple, Sam
Stangle – purple.
Angus bull calf – Rachel Parsons – blue.
Angus heifer calf – Myles Clements –
purple, Dustin Enders – purple, Wyatt
Enders – purple, Ryley Schofield – purple.
English cross heifer calf – Sage Kee-
gan – purple.
Other breeds heifer calf – Trew DeJong
– purple, Peyton DeJong – purple, Wyatt
Schriever – purple.
Angus yearling heifer – Sam Stangle –
purple.
Champion heifer – Myles Clements, re-
serve champion heifer – Trew DeJong.
Feeder calf
English feeder steer – Dustin Enders –
purple, Sam Stangle – purple.
Other breeds feeder steer – Peyton De-
Jong – purple.
Other breeds feeder heifer – Casey
Schriever – purple.
Haakon/Jackson livestock
and small animal shows
Champion feeder calf – Peyton DeJong,
reserve champion – Dustin Enders.
SMALL ANIMAL SHOW
Dog
Senior cog showmanship – Dustin En-
ders – champion, Mark Stangle – blue.
Junior dog showmanship – Sage
Bierle – champion, Gage Weller – reserve
champion.
Cat
Heatlhy cat class – Mark Stangle – pur-
ple, Dustin Enders – purple, Sage
Gabriel – purple, Peyton DeJong – purple,
Tagg Weller – purple.
Healthy kitten class – Gage Weller –
purple, Mark Stangle – blue.
Senior cat showmanship – Petyon De-
Jong – champion, Dustin Ender – reserve
champion, Mark Stangle – purple.
Junior cat showmanship – Gage
Weller – champion, Sage Gabriel – reserve
champion.
Beginner cat sowmanship – Tagg
Weller – champion.
Poultry
Poultry class – Sage Bierle – purple,
blue, blue and purple.
Junior poultry showmanship – Sage
Bierle – champion
Rabbit
Rabbit class – Bailey Bierle – purple.
Junior rabbit showmanship – Bailey
Bierle – champion.
The Achievement Days livestock and small animal shows were held Saturday at the county fair. The judge for
large animals was Jon Beastrom, Pierre. The judge for small animals was Wyatt Johnson, Hayes. Above is the
group of small animal division winners. Back row, left, is Gage Weller and Sage Gabriel. Front: Peyton DeJong,
Tagg Weller, Mark Stangle, Sage Bierle, Bailey Bierle and Dustin Enders.
Del Bartels photo
This year’s Haakon/Jackson
County Fair and Achievements
Days honorees are Grossenburg
Implement for Haakon County and
Orville and Shirley Josserand for
Jackson County.
Grossenburg Implement
Grossenburg Implement was
founded in 1937 by Charlie and
Blanche Grossenburg. Grossen-
burg was born near Rock Valley,
Iowa. At the age of 20, he came to
Tripp County. Jessie Blanche De
Bolt was born near Stuart, Neb., in
1905. She settled later in Presho
and taught school for three years
near Kennebec and Hamill. They
met near Hamill and were later
married on August 24, 1926.
C. Grossenburg had a passion for
selling and trading cattle and hogs.
He would bring cattle to Sioux
Falls and Omaha for sale, and later
around 1937 found an opportunity
in bringing tractors to the Tripp
County area. During World War II
the market for two cylinder trac-
tors was on the rise and this is
what started the foundation of
Grossenburg Implement. As a
friend at Deere and Company put
it, “Charlie possessed the American
secret of making things work, and
simultaneously exploiting them.
That spells service, and a way of
selling it to the customer.”
Barry Ross Grossenburg is the
son of Gene and LaWayna
Grossenburg. B. Grossenburg grad-
uated from Winner High School in
1974, and later from South Dakota
State University in Brookings in
1978 with a bachelors in science in
agri-business. He married Marilyn
LaCompte on July 21, 1978. M.
Grossenburg is the owner of Rose-
bud Concrete at Grossenburg Imp.
B. Grossenburg was always in-
volved in the implement business
since he was a little boy. In his own
words, “I was born, raised, and will
die, an implement dealer.” B.
Grossenburg is now the president
of Grossenburg Implement.
The Grossenburg family are
strong supporters of 4-H in all of
the communities where they have
established dealerships. They have
the Grossenburg Implement and
Employees 4-H Support Fund in
Haakon/Jackson Counties, and
each year the Haakon/Jackson 4-H
Council receives a very generous
check to help support the 4-H pro-
gramming in our area. Their con-
tinued support and interest of the
4-H programming in our communi-
ties is very appreciated by the
Haakon/Jackson 4-H Club mem-
bers and leaders.
Orville and Shirley Josserand
Orville Josserand belonged to 4-
H clubs in Kansas and has been in-
volved with 4-H clubs for many
years. He has also worked with 4-
H clubs in Colorado and South
Dakota. Josserand has also served
in a variety of community posi-
tions. He has served as a county
commissioner, a member of the
South Dakota School Board and in
various positions as a community
volunteer.
S. Josserand has been involved
with 4-H since she began attending
meetings in Colorado at the age of
10. Both were active in the South
Creek 4-H Club, which was led by
Russ and Eunice Hicks. They both
served as volunteer helpers while
their own girls were involved in 4-
H. They also assisted other 4-H
club kids and have been strong
supporters of 4-H every since they
were members themselves.
S. Josserand is a homemaker
and has also taught Sunday school
and release time for many years.
She also has helped to make quilts
for abused children at the Chil-
dren’s Home near Rockerville.
The Josserands have been farm-
ers and ranchers all of their lives
and have been married for 64 years
this October. They feel that they
have been blessed to live in the
greatest community and country in
the world.
Haakon/Jackson County Fair honorees
Courtesy photos
Shirley and Orville Josserand – Jackson County honorees.
From left are Adam Severson, northeast regional manager, Gene Grossen-
burg, Barry Grossenburg, chief executive officer, and Charlie Grossenburg,
South Dakota regional manager for Grossenburg Implement.
A pen of 3 contest is held annu-
ally as part of the Haakon/Jackson
County Fair and Achievements
Days, August 2-3.
In the commercial class, Tom
Clements won first place.
In the registered class, T.J.
Gabriel – Deep Creek Angus won
first place.
The judges also awarded the
over-all trophy to Gabriel. The fair
attendees also voted the people’s
choice award to Gabriel.
County fair
pen of 3 
results
The 12th annual Farm Bureau
Golf Tournament, Saturday, Au-
gust 3, ended with the team of
Luke Weber, Craig Weber, Ryan
Seager and Andrew Reckling tak-
ing top honors in the champi-
onship flight.
The play at the Lake Waggoner
Golf Course north of Philip began
in two shotgun starts. One began
at 7:00 a.m. with nine teams, and
the other began at 1:00 p.m. with
19 teams. According to Glenn Par-
sons, tournament organizer, there
was a little rain delay, but the
players did not complain.
Competition was 18-holes with
four players per team dividing
into three flights. The tournament
included pin prizes and a steak
dinner.
“This was the 12th annual event
and it usually gets people from
across the state, however this year
two members of one team came
from Savage, Minn., a suburb of
Minneapolis,” said Parsons. Other
teams came from Sioux Falls,
Rapid City, Faith, Presho, Wall,
Kadoka, Murdo and the surround-
ing areas.
Championship flight
First place – Luke Weber, Craig
Weber, Ryan Seager, Andrew
Reckling.
Second place – Dean Schulz,
Stan Anderson, Mathew Ander-
son, Troy Schultz
Third place – Ronnie Coyle,
Rick Monheim, Matt Mickley,
Ashely Litz.
First flight
Second place – Jon Johnson,
Avery Johnson, Blake Norman,
Mitch Norman
First place – Chad Walker, Jan
Bielmaier, Jordan Kjerstad, Tony
Schulz
Third place – Glenn Parsons,
Dianne Parsons, Darian Gray,
Isaiah Gray
Second flight
First place – Travis Grueb,
Randy Wilts, Randy Clements,
Ross Fees
Second place – Jack Heinz, Matt
Heinz, Pat Seager, Jim Sandstrom
Third place – Colt Fitzgerald,
Elliotte McQuirk, Dana Kerns,
Casey Slovek
Courtesy photo
Farm Bureau Golf Tournament
The winning team of the 2013 Farm Bureau Golf Tournament, held August
3 at the Lake Waggoner Golf Course, consisted of members, from left, Luke
Weber, Rapid City, Ryan Seager, Philip, Andrew Reckling, Philip, and Craig
Weber, Philip.
An entry way arbor and rustic fence were erected by volunteers at the
Senechal Park on Thursday and Friday, August 8-9. The arbor was donated
as a memorial for Laura Morgan, a long time resident of Haakon County
who also lived at the Senechal Apartments. Morgan was an outdoors kind
of person and the family – Morgan had eight children – feels that she
would have loved this park project. Volunteers helped to lay down gravel,
trim trees, weed and other work that was needed for the new park.
Work at Senechal Park
Courtesy photo
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ravellettepublications
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 9
Moody worked there. That's going
back a couple of years ago!
Tony Harty was trying to keep
ahead of the mowing and tackled
more yards Thursday. Another
half an inch of rain fell in the af-
ternoon.
Thursday, L.T. Works, Judy
DeWitt, Bill and I took a drive to
Williamsburg, Iowa, to visit rac-
ing friend, Nancy Turner. Nancy
has MS and is in a wonderful care
facility that can meet her needs.
Nancy celebrated her 76th birth-
day the day before, so it was great
to be there close to her special
day. We shared many happy
memories of the times we all were
in Knoxville. Another very pleas-
ant evening of qualifying races.
Thursday, Ralph and Cathy
Fiedler went to Rapid to get her
sister, Jeanette, from the plane.
But that didn’t work out because
she got bumped at Denver, so
they returned home to wait to see
when she would get in. Later in
the afternoon, Sherry Hanson
and Cathy Fiedler headed down
to get her and received word that
she wouldn’t arrive until late
evening, so back home they went.
Jeanette finally arrived and
rented a car to come to the
Fiedlers’ place. Friday it was one
more trip to the airport to return
the rental car.
Friday, Tony Harty watched
the booth for Paul Verna while
Paul went in search of some more
skulls in Wanblee and also to
visit family in Pine Ridge. That
evening, Tony visited with his
niece, Kathy Brown.
Friday morning before many of
us were up and moving, Terry
Buchert headed back home to
Philip to see if things were dried
out enough to cut wheat. They
were not. In fact, Kadoka got
60/100’s of rain and fog that
morning. Bill was feeling a little
under the weather so he hun-
kered down and we didn’t go out
for breakfast with the group. We
did go for supper and another out-
standing night of races.
Kelsey Gittings and Kobie
Davis had a girls' night out Fri-
day, which included supper and a
movie.
Wade McGruder and Jessica
Gittings had dinner at the George
and Sandee Gittings’ home Satur-
day as Kelsey will be leaving on
August 17 to go to Iowa to spend
a few days with her dad, Robin
Gittings, before returning to
Laramie, Wyo., for the start of
college. They enjoyed homemade
ice cream. This was the only time
they could get together because of
work schedules.
Saturday, Jeanette and Cathy
Fiedler went to Philip, stopping
in Wall for lunch and to pick up
their brother, Bruce Burnette.
They surprised their mom, Katy
Dragesett, for her 83rd birthday.
They had a nice visit, then had
rhubarb cake that Cathy brought
for the residents and Katy opened
her gifts. Bruce left a little earlier
because he had to get back. Late
afternoon, Jeanette and Cathy
headed for Sturgis. Happy birth-
day, Katy.
Saturday brought more rain,
2/10’s in the Kadoka area. It was
a cool day. Tony Harty went to In-
terior, then had supper at Cedar
Pass on the way back home. He
stopped by and took care of the
skull display while Paul Verna
went to have supper here in
Kadoka. Paul lives in Rapid City.
L.D. and Shirley Hair were back
in Kadoka for a little bit and Tony
visited at their home that
evening.
The bowling season is about to
begin and that means it is time to
get your teams lined up and plan
for a fun winter sport. A meeting
date for our organization plan-
ning is set for August 27 at 6 p.m.
at the Lucky Strike Bowling
Lanes in Philip. In order to keep
our bowling going, we need to
hear your concerns, ideas and
support for a new season. See you
then.
It was breakfast out Saturday
morning in Iowa as Terry
Buchert’s treat since he left
money with Leonard Konst to
pick up the tab for himself, L.T.
Works, Judy DeWitt and Bill and
me. We went to Pella, Iowa, for
breakfast then to Monroe and
checked out a car show where rac-
ing friends, Barb and Roger, had
their little truck on display.
Don and Vi Moody returned to
the ranch Sunday afternoon and
it will be a short week for them
this time. More about that later
when those plans unfold! Don
wanted to move more bales off the
fields as the alfalfa is getting
growthy again from all the rain.
Their jumbo gauge showed .60” of
rain while they were gone.
Sunday, the Don Klumb and
Eric Hanson families came to
Sturgis for breakfast at Ralph
and Cathy Fiedlers, so they all
could visit with Jeanette. Caitlin
couldn’t make it because she had
to work, so she came over Monday
afternoon to visit and stayed to
have supper with Jeanette and
Cathy. Sunday afternoon,
Jeanette and Cathy went to
Spearfish and took Tessa, Han-
nah, Elsie and Loman to the
movie “Airplanes”, then back to
Sturgis to have a quiet evening at
home.
Well it is officially over. The
bikers are all gone and it is quiet
in the town of Sturgis again. The
weather was not bad all week
with temperatures in the 70s and
80s with some showers in the
evenings. No heavy rain in town,
but all around in the Black Hills
there was some good rain and
some hail in places. Ralph worked
every day at the store during the
rally as the floor person who kept
things stocked and cleaned. He
was glad when he finished up
Saturday evening and is now
back to a regular schedule. Cathy
was on vacation all week so that
was very nice for her.
Early Sunday morning, Tony
Harty helped Paul Verna get his
vehicle started by giving him a
jump start. It seems Paul left his
lights on too long while getting
things in and out. In appreciation
for all Tony did for him, Paul
gifted him with a decorated deer
skull. Tony visited L.D. and
Shirley Hair in the morning be-
fore church. Shirley is getting
along fine from her hip surgery.
Tony went out to dinner, then
watched Paul load up the skulls.
Later in the day, he visited with
Kathy Brown.
Back in Knoxville, Iowa, the
campground was emptying out
Sunday morning. When we got up
and about and went to breakfast,
there was plenty of room to ma-
neuver that big motor home out of
it’s space and hook up the vehicle.
Leonard Konst got his trailer all
hooked up with the motorcycles
and we were on the road toward
home. We again stopped for diesel
and lunch at Winnevagas and the
guys watched races on TV while I
enjoyed a little gaming entertain-
ment. Then it was on to Sioux
Falls for another night of races.
This time we didn’t barge in on
the grandkids since they were ex-
tremely busy. We stayed the
night in the racetrack parking lot.
“By the time we’re wise enough
to watch our step, we’re too old to
go anywhere.” Main Street Mem-
ories.
Betwixt Places| Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048
bilmar@gwtc.net
NOTICE OF
HEARING FOR
NAME CHANGE
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FILE#
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
)SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
IN THE MATTER OF NAME CHANGE )
)
FOR ETHEL ELIZABETH FREIN )
Pursuant to SDCL § 21-37-4, Notice is
hereby given that Ethel Elizabeth Frein
has filed a Petition for Name Change to
change her name from Ethel Elizabeth
Frein to Ethel Elizabeth Martin, and that
the time and place set for hearing on this
Petition is the 18th day of September,
2013, at 1:00 p.m. in the Haakon County
Courthouse, Philip, SD, before the Hon-
orable Patricia DeVaney and that all per-
sons interested may appear and be heard
upon granting of said Petition.
Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013.
/s/Gay Tollefson
Gay Klima Tollefson
Attorney for Ethel Elizabeth Frein
PO Box 848
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2783
[Published July 25, August 1, 8 & 15,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$56.45]
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
PRO 13-6
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
)SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
Estate of )
)
LINDA L. KRAMER, )
)
Deceased )
Notice is given that on June 28, 2013,
Danny L. Kramer, whose address is
22400 Willow Creek Road, Philip, South
Dakota 57567, was appointed as per-
sonal representative of the Estate of
Linda L. Kramer.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal rep-
resentative or may be filed with the clerk
and a copy of the claim mailed to the per-
sonal representative.
Dated this 23rd day of July, 2013.
/s/Danny L. Kramer
Danny L. Kramer
Personal Representative
22400 Willow Creek Road
Philip, SD 57567
Haakon County Clerk of Courts
140 South Howard
Philip, SD 57567
[Published August 1, 8 & 15, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $51.62]
Notice of Lapse of
MineraI Interests
TO: All of the Unknown Heirs, Devisees,
Legatees, Executors, Administrators and
Creditors of the Following Named Per-
sons, To-Wit: RAY A. PELLET, MABEL
PELLET, ALÌCE Ì. RÌPPE ADAMS,
ARTHUR B. SWEET, HELEN R. RÌPPE
SWEET, MABEL A. RÌPPE CAMPBELL
and GORDON CAMPBELL, and ALL of
the Persons Unknown who Have or Claim
to Have an Ìnterest in the Mineral Rights
of the Premises Described Below.
You are hereby given notice that, pur-
suant to SDCL §43-30A, there has been
a lapse of mineral rights in the following
described land:
LOTS ONE (1) AND TWO (2) OF THE
SOUTH HALF (S1/2) OF THE NORTH-
EAST QUARTER (NE1/4) OF SECTÌON
TWO (2) ÌN TOWNSHÌP THREE (3),
RANGE TWENTY-ONE (21), EAST OF
THE BLACK HÌLLS MERÌDÌAN,
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA,
CONTAÌNÌNG 160.81 ACRES MORE OR
LESS, ACCORDÌNG TO GOVERNMENT
SURVEY THEREOF, EXCEPT ONE
HALF OF MÌNERAL, OÌL AND PETRO-
LEUM PRODUCTS WHÌCH ARE RE-
SERVED BY THE GRANTORS.
(Recorded October 19, 1946, in Book
100, Page 213, Haakon County Register
of Deeds.)
AND
LOT FOUR (4), SECTÌON TWO (2),
TOWNSHÌP THREE NORTH (3N),
RANGE TWENTY-ONE (21), EAST OF
THE BLACK HÌLLS MERÌDÌAN,
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA.
(Recorded March 16, 1946, in Book 102,
Page 79, Haakon County Register of
Deeds.)
The most recent Statement of Claim was
filed with the Register of Deeds in 1946.
The names of the record owners of the
mineral interest are: Ray A. Pellet, Mabel
Pellet, Alice Ì. Rippe Adams, Arthur B.
Sweet, Helen R. Rippe Sweet, Mabel A.
Rippe Campbell and Gordon Campbell.
Reasonable inquiry was made into the
status and addresses of the record hold-
ers. Ìt would appear that they are all de-
ceased.
The person giving this notice is Clint Nel-
son, the current surface owner of the
above described real estate, and who will
succeed as the owner of the mineral
rights.
Ìf you have knowledge of the above-
named persons or their heirs, please con-
tact:
Tollefson Law Office
PO Box 848
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2783
or
Clint Nelson
23152 11 Mile Rd.
Philip, SD 57567
605-843-2511
[Published August 1, 8 & 15, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $78.84]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
ReguIar Session
August 6, 2013
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 1:00 PM on Tuesday, Au-
gust 6, 2013. A quorum was established
with Chairman Stephen Clements, Vice
Chairman Tom Radway, Members
Nicholas Konst, Gary Snook and Edward
Briggs in attendance. Auditor Pat Free-
man, Deputy Auditor Carla Smith, High-
way Superintendent Kenny Neville,
Highway Administrative Secretary Val
Williams, Sheriff Fred Koester, Register
of Deeds Traci Radway, Director of
Equalization Toni Rhodes, Librarian Annie
Brunskill, Library Board Member Jennifer
Henrie, Custodian Nancy Neville, Jared
Doud and Pioneer Review Representa-
tive Nancy Haigh were also present.
The July 2, 2013, Regular Minutes was
reviewed. Auditor Freeman requested to
add to the following paragraph in the min-
utes: "CHN Heidi Burns turned in her first
quarterly report for January, February and
March.¨ Commissioner Snook made a
motion to strike the last two sentences ÷
"Ìt has been difficult to get the quarterly
reports made. The commissioners will re-
view her written report.¨ Commissioner
Briggs seconded the motion with all in
agreement. Their quarterly report is al-
ways written up in time but sometimes,
due to full agendas, the report gets
moved to the next meeting. Our commis-
sioners and the county residents know of
the outstanding job CHN Heidi Burns and
her Secretary Kristin Martin have done for
Haakon County. A clarification of that
statement was needed. Since it was diffi-
cult to get her report made in person due
to time limitations, she submitted a written
report for them to read.
Ìn the July 2, 2013, Regular Meeting Min-
utes, paragraph 9 needs to be amended
to read, "..transfer from 201-0-274.95
Fund Balance Restricted DOT/CO SWAP
Funds $100,000 to 201-0-276.03 Fund
Balance Assigned to Road¨ instead of..
201-0-101.00 Highway Cash. Auditor
Freeman informed the commission that
Deene Dayton had retired and Rod Fortin
out of Sioux Falls, SD has taken his
place. When speaking with him about the
highway supplemental transfers, this was
a correction. Also motioned was a correc-
tion in the last paragraph of the next reg-
ular meeting date which is. Tuesday,
August 6, 2013¨.. Not August "7¨. Com-
missioner Snook made the motion to
make the change and to approve the July
2, 2013, Regular Meeting Minutes. Com-
missioner Konst seconded. Motion car-
ried.
A motion was made by Commissioner
Snook to approve the July 16, 2013, Spe-
cial Minutes as read. Commissioner
Briggs seconded the motion with all in
agreement.
Jared Doud met with the commission to
find out the possibility of renaming a road.
Ìt was Jared's request to try to rename
208th Street (only road going to his place)
to Ostlien Street or possibly Ostlien Lane
in memory of John Ostlien. The commis-
sioners felt that there is no reason a sign
could not be put up by him naming the
road to Ostlien Lane. Ìt would be known
by the community and also be in honor
John Ostlien. Ìt is the policy of the com-
mission not to start renaming roads as
most counties go only with streets and av-
enues which cross county lines.
Under old business, Librarian Annie Brun-
skill gave her quarterly report. Jennifer
Henrie, a library board member, was also
present. Librarian Brunskill stated that
she would be eligible to retire soon and
would like to see the library become a full
time position because it would attract
more qualified applicants. There is now a
requirement that librarians are certified. Ìt
was explained that if the librarian does
not possess a college degree, there will
be training to attend over a four year pe-
riod. There would be training scheduled
for one week each year at Northern State
University. They will also be required to
complete one week of on-line training
each year. Then they would become a
"certified¨ librarian after these four years
of training. There are many duties in-
volved in the library position besides
checking books in and out. She also re-
ported that a grant has been applied for
which would provide some funds for un-
derserved communities, such as Haakon
County.
Register of Deeds Traci Radway met with
the commission for her quarterly report.
She also explained in more detail, what
the new Modernization and Preservation
Program involved. Ìn many counties, the
Register of Deed's records are not
archived. Many are not kept in fire proof
vaults. These funds which are collected
through fees paid in her office are put in
a special fund. Ìt can only be used for du-
ties involved with the modernization and
preservation of her records. She is in the
process of microfilming them. This in-
volves taking the big books out of their
binders and copying each page. Ìt is time-
consuming. She has a deputy but only for
50% of the time. She informed the com-
missioners that these M & P funds could
be used for contract labor to work on the
scanning of these books. Ìn order to keep
the process going, she computed that she
may need to supplement her budget in
the amount of $2,800 this fall. After ex-
plaining that only five of the sixty-one
huge books have been copied so far, and
with several other things mentioned that
needed to be on microfilm, such as liens,
transfers and military records, she would
need a full time deputy.
Auditor Freeman informed the commis-
sion that all budgets have been figured
using many different scenarios. Health in-
surance premiums were figured using
2011 rates plus a 7% increase and were
figured into all salaries concerning health
insurance. After discussions with Blue
Cross Blue Shield Representative Glenn
Parsons, it is very uncertain how Obo-
macare will affect the health insurance for
the county. The county has signed an
agreement with BCBS to change our re-
newal date from January 1, 2014, to De-
cember 1, 2013. This had to be decided
by July 26, 2013, and to agree that our in-
surance would remain with BCBS until
November 30, 2014. By this time, hope-
fully, more will be known about Obo-
macare and what our options will be.
Health care is a major benefit for our
county employees. Ìt is also uncertain
how this will affect their take home pay.
Haakon County Sheriff Fred Koester
gave his report for June and July 2013.
He was not able to give the June report.
The Sheriff's Office has been kept busy
with calls that require their attention. Ref-
erence was also made about a (HLS)
Homeland Security Law Enforcement
Grant. He wishes to apply for a security
camera for his office. Sheriff Koester and
Deputy Marbry are working on a project
concerning the schools. They are plan-
ning on doing an in-service about what to
do if the school has an emergency situa-
tion. Ìt would include the country schools.
Ìt was also mentioned that they were
looking into firearms safety courses. The
commission agreed with Sheriff Koester
that this would be very beneficial to the
county.
A plat was brought before the board for
their approval by West River Lyman
Jones employee Nicholas Konst.
RESOLUTION 2013-12
Haakon County Board of
Commissioners
PhiIip, South Dakota
August 6, 2013
APPROVAL OF PLAT
WR/LJ
WHEREAS, the Haakon
County Commissioners have
reviewed the Plat of Site Lot 1
of 10 Mile Pump Station lo-
cated in NE¼ of Section 35,
T3N, R20E, BHM, Haakon
County, South Dakota.
BE IT RESOLVED by the
Board of County Commission-
ers of Haakon County, South
Dakota, unanimously approve
Plat of Site Lot 1 of 10 Mile
Pump Station located in NE¼
of Section 35, T3N, R20E,
BHM, Haakon County, South
Dakota.
APPROVED this 6th day of Au-
gust, 2013 by the Haakon
County Commission at Philip,
SD 57567.
HAAKON COUNTY
COMMÌSSÌONERS
Stephen Clements
Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman
Haakon County Auditor
Vice Chairman Radway made a motion to
approve the plat. Commissioner Snook
seconded the motion with all in approval.
Veteran's Officer Terry Deuter's monthly
report was reviewed.
The following July 2013 fuel bids were
submitted:
FUEL BÌDS:
Courthouse: None
Highway Dept:
07-09-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.41 No. 2
07-09-13 Cenex...................$3.41 No. 2
07-09-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.41 No. 2
07-09-13 Cenex...................$3.35 No. 2
07-16-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.40 No. 2
07-16-13 Cenex...................$3.35 No. 2
07-20-13 Cenex...................$3.36 No. 2
07-20-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.39 No. 2
07-25-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.44 No. 2
07-25-13 Cenex...................$3.38 No. 2
07-31-13 Cenex...................$3.43 No. 2
07-31-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.48 No. 2
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
met with the commission for his monthly
report. They stopped graveling for a cou-
ple of weeks due to harvest and rally traf-
fic.
The commission and Superintendent
Neville discussed creating a 5-Year High-
way Plan for any and all future projects to
be worked on in the county. Then report
at each meeting what has been accom-
plished. Neville stated he would get to
work on the plan and get it back to the
commission. Weather can always affect
things but get done what they can.
Another discussion was on gravel crush-
ing. T.F. Luke and Sons stated they would
be crushing gravel this fall in Jones
County and could come to Haakon after
that. They were at $3.50 per ton plus roy-
alty. There was still over $100,000 left in
the SWAP money which could be used
for gravel crushing. When the commis-
sion asked how much gravel was on hand
for the county, Neville stated that there
was about 30,000 tons in all the gravel
pits Haakon County has an agreement
with. With the SWAP money, there would
be another 20,000 tons. Neville stated
that to gravel a mile of road, taking into
consideration wages, royalty, gas and
cost of gravel crushing it takes about
$10,000 to $12,000 to gravel a mile of
road. There was some discussion on
waiting until next year but the price of
gravel crushing could go up. Commission
and Highway Superintendent Neville
thought it best to crush this fall. Superin-
tendent Neville also reported that it took
$7,566.71 to repair the 1997 Freightliner.
The new road agreement being made
with Stanley County was reviewed. Stan-
ley County Commissioners were meeting
the same day and would be reviewing the
road agreement. Ìt was agreed that at the
September 3, 2013 Regular Meeting, it
could be discussed again and possibly
approved before winter.
The total amount spent on eligible
DOT/CO SWAP Funds to date is
$68,607.68. A motion was made by Com-
missioner Briggs and seconded by Com-
missioner Konst to supplement the 201
Highway budget for $68,607.68. Motion
carried. A Supplemental Hearing will be
held on September 3, 2013, at 1:30 PM
at the Courthouse in the Commissioner's
Room in Philip, SD.
A motion was made by Commissioner
Briggs and seconded by Vice Chairman
Radway with all in agreement to go into
Executive session on personnel at 4:50
PM according to SDCL 1-25-2.
Executive Session ended at 5:43 PM with
no action taken.
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for the month of July 2013:
Commissioners Wages ............3,270.00
Auditor's Office.........................5,030.09
Treasurer's Office.....................4,888.49
State's Attorney's Office ...........3,655.84
Director of Equalization............3,071.49
Register of Deeds ....................3,774.09
Janitor ......................................2,121.52
Veteran's Office...........................583.33
Sheriff's Office..........................5,480.87
Weed Supervisor.........................222.56
Highway Department..............27,422.53
WÌC and Health Nurse Sec. .....1,254.40
Librarians .................................2,082.20
Extension Secretary.................1,439.60
Emergency Management ............970.06
Blue Cross Blue Shield,
Transfer Fee..............................10.00
Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield .................................10,358.74
Dearborn National Life ................103.74
Office of Child Support ................400.00
Special Ìnsurance Services......1,349.81
AFLAC, premium.........................333.18
Colonial Life ................................124.62
SD Retirement System.............6,215.22
Delta Dental ................................795.66
Vision Service Plan .....................162.08
First National Bank,
SS & WH............................13,538.90
The following were presented for July En-
tities (paid in July) & July Expenses paid
in August of 2013:
MONTHLY ENTÌTY PAYMENTS
Schools
Haakon School Dist #27-1, July 2013
Apportionment....................55,292.42
Kadoka Area School Dist 35-2, July
2013 Apportionment.............8,229.49
63,521.91
Cities & Towns
City of Philip, July 2013 Apportionment
.............................................3,515.71
Town of Midland, July 2013 Apportion-
ment ....................................1,495.17
5,010.88
Water District
West River Water Develop Dist, July
2013 Apportionment .................84.26
84.26
State Motor Vehicle
State Treasurer, July 2013 State MV
Payment ............................55,679.90
55,679.90
Fire District
Midland Fire Protection Dist, July 2013
Midland Fire Dist ......................14.34
14.34
Birth & Death Fees
State Treasurer, July 2013 Birth/Death
Cert Amt .................................340.00
340.00
Modern/Preservation
SDACO, July 2013 M&P SDACO
Amt ...........................................94.00
SDACO, July 2013 M&P SDACO
Amt .........................................102.00
196.00
Total Checks ........................124,847.29
Commissioners
Central Enhancement, Annual Dues &
Membership Fees ...............5,618.50
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Publ ............269.99
SD Farm & Ranch News, Professional
Fee .........................................175.00
6,063.49
Auditor
First National Bank, FNB BCBS Wire
Trans Fee .................................10.00
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........185.98
Petersen's Variety, Supplies..........19.05
HCS, Prof Fees/Computer
Support ....................................90.00
Connecting Point, Travel ..............25.00
325.03
Treasurer
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............75.04
Connecting Point, Travel ..............25.00
100.04
State's Attorney
Tollefson Law Office, Office Rent
150.00
Tollefson Law Office, Tele .............75.00
Tollefson Law Office, Misc/Postage/
Etc ............................................46.00
State Treasurer, Prof Fees............35.00
306.00
Health Nurse
State Treasurer, Health Nurse Prof
Service ................................1,030.00
1,030.00
Courthouse
City of Philip, Utilities .................321.40
Coyle's SuperValu, Supplies ........32.17
Heartland Paper Co, Supplies ...993.70
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies .........73.92
Kone Ìnc, Professional Fees ......237.05
MG Oil Company, Supplies ..........20.28
Servall Uniform, Supplies ...........197.85
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........72.50
West Central Elec., Utilities .....1,649.33
Triple XXX Spraying LLC, Professional
Fees .......................................447.84
4,046.04
Director of Equalization
Century Business Leasing, Ìnc.,
Supplies .................................172.98
Connecting Point, Prof. Fees...3,374.33
Coyle's Standard, Repairs &
Maint ..........................................0.75
Coyle's Standard, Fuel ...............179.80
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........146.79
Toni Rhodes, Travel ...................116.35
Penn Co Dir of Equal, Pro. Fee ....50.00
4,041.00
Register of Deeds
Century Business Leasing, Ìnc,
Supplies ...................................95.50
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........103.80
Microfilm Ìmaging Systems Ìnc, Prof
Fees .......................................200.00
Traci Radway, Supplies ................23.33
Haakon County Treasurer, Other
Expense .................................101.73
524.36
Veterans Service
Dataspec Ìnc, Computer Equipment &
Software .................................399.00
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............44.09
HCS, Prof Services ......................60.00
503.09
Sheriff
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................82.67
Capital One Bank, Fuel ..............147.46
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel .........65.04
Galls/Quartermaster, Supplies ...447.51
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....135.19
MG Oil Company, Fuel ...............149.07
Midwest Radar & Equipment,
Prof Fees .................................40.00
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........14.25
State Radio, Communications
Teletype ...............................2,250.00
3,331.19
Jail
Winner Health Mart, Jail Exp ........83.32
Winner Police Dept., Jail Exp...2,750.82
2,834.14
Support of Poor
Case #1, Prof Services ................44.18
Wall Drug, Prof Services ..............36.00
80.18
Library
Haakon County Public Library,
Supplies .................................144.71
SD Library Network, Annual Dues &
Membership Fees ..................337.50
SDLA, Travel ..............................190.00
672.21
Extension Service
Carrie Weller, Travel ..................168.36
Crossroads Hotel, Travel .............50.00
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............56.79
Kadoka Press, Publishing ..............3.15
Reliable Office Supplies,
Supplies ...................................84.59
State 4-H, Office Supplies ..............5.00
Haakon Co. Treas., Postage.......125.33
493.22
Weed Control
Coyle's Standard, Repairs &
Maint ........................................17.00
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies .........12.99
Moses Building Center Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ........................................20.70
Haakon Co. Treas., Other Exp .......9.20
Warne Chemical & Equipment Co,
Supplies ................................... 22.13
82.02
Road & Bridge
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................46.76
Butler Machinery Co Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ......................................551.35
Butler Machinery Co Ìnc,
Supplies .................................975.66
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel ...17,592.81
D & T Auto Parts, Repairs &
Maint ......................................139.39
D & T Auto Parts, Supplies .........140.52
Dakota Mill & Grain Ìnc-Wall,
Supplies ..............................3,055.00
Dales Tire & Retreading Ìnc,
Supplies ..............................2,167.96
Eddie's Truck Sales Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ...................................7,566.71
Ernie's Bldg. Center, Supplies ....122.24
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Supplies..........711.60
Gibson Concrete Construction, Repairs
& Maint ................................6,770.81
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities.....259.53
Grimm's Pump Service, Supp.......85.21
Grossenburg Ìmplement Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ......................................113.48
Hall Manufacturing LLC, Repairs &
Maint ......................................118.06
Heartland Waste Management Ìnc, Util-
ities ...........................................26.50
Ìngram Hardware, Repairs &
Maint ........................................38.98
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies ...........5.99
Ìnland Truck Parts Co, Repairs &
Maint ......................................260.00
Kennedy Ìmplement & Auto Co, Repairs
& Maint .....................................60.94
Lawson Products Ìnc, Supplies...207.52
Town of Midland, Utilities .............25.00
Newman Traffic Signs, Supplies ...58.49
Philip Motor, Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ......................................168.00
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Supplies ......36.00
Virgil Smith, Travel .....................256.04
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........72.50
West Central Electric, Utilities.....603.05
West River Water Develop Dist,
Utilities ....................................112.50
42,348.60
9-1-1
Centurylink, 911 ..........................113.40
ESCC, ADM Fee .....................4,000.00
Golden West Tele Co, 911 .........483.66
ESCC, 911 ..............................2,748.34
7,345.40
Emergency & Disaster
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities.....105.54
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........55.06
Lola Roseth, Travel ....................114.00
SD Public Broadcasting, SDPB Tower
Lease ..................................1,200.00
Western Communications Ìnc, Grants To
Other Entities ......................3,693.00
5,167.60
Courthouse
Baye & Sons Service, Building
Fund .......................................600.00
Cenex Harvest States, Building
Fund .........................................19.26
Moses Building Center Ìnc, Building
Fund ....................................2,462.90
3,082.16
Modernization & Preservation
Microfilm Ìmaging Systems Ìnc, M&P
Expenses ............................1,444.00
1,444.00
Law Library
Thomson West Law Library,
Amt .........................................832.91
832.91
Total Checks ..........................84,652.68
Commissioner Briggs made a motion to
approve the above payments for July
2013. Vice Chairman Radway seconded
the motion with all in agreement.
Auditor Freeman advised the commis-
sioners that 101-212-422.00 Jail Ex-
penses budget was in the negative by
$84.23 and that the Courthouse Building
budget was over $296.31. This would be
taken care of at the September meeting
and Auditor Freeman was asked to con-
tact the sheriff about a jail expense
budget for the rest of 2013.
There will be a Special Meeting on Tues-
day, August 13, 2013, which will start at
10 AM to finish 2014 budgets. The next
Regular Meeting will be on Tuesday Sep-
tember 3, 2013, at 1:00 PM in the Com-
missioner's Room at the courthouse. The
meeting was adjourned at 6:40 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMÌSSÌON
Stephen Clements, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $251.80]
LcgaI Noticcs
August ia, ecis · Pionccr Rcvicw ic
NOTIC£ OI H£ARING TO
S\PPI£M£NT B\ÐG£TS
Thoro wIII bo InsuffIcIonf funds In fho budgof nIIownncos In fho 20l HIghwny
!ond & IrIdgo Iund In fho 20l3 budgof. If Is horoby µroµosod fhnf fho foIIow-
Ing SuµµIomonfnI Iudgof bo ndoµfod for fho 20l3 yonr.
201 - 311- 422.20 ÐOT/CO SWAP £xpenses
$6B,60?.6B
Trnnsfor from 20l-0-2?4.95 Iund InInnco !osfrIcfod ÐOT/CO SWAI Iunds
Info fho nbovo oxµonso.
ÞofIco Is horoby gIvon fhnf fho Ionrd of CommIssIonors of Hnnkon Counfy,
Soufh Ðnkofn wIII hoId n µubIIc honrIng on fho nbovo µroµosod suµµIomonfnI
budgofs for fho yonr 20l3 nf l:l5 µ.m. on Tuosdny, Soµfombor 3, 20l3, nf whIch
fImo nny µorson Inforosfod mny nµµonr nnd bo honrd In fnvor or oµµosod fho
µroµosod budgof.
IOA!Ð OI CO!ÞTY COMMISSIOÞI!S
HAAKOÞ CO!ÞTY, SO!TH ÐAKOTA
Sfoµhon CIomonfs, ChnIrmnn
ATTIST:
InfrIcIn C. Iroomnn
Hnnkon Counfy AudIfor
|IubIIshod Augusf l5 & 22, 20l3, nf fho fofnI nµµroxImnfo cosf of $205.20]
LcgaI Noticcs
August ia, ecis · Pionccr Rcvicw ii
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
REGULAR MEETING
AUGUST 5, 2013
A regular meeting of the Philip City Coun-
cil was held on Monday, August 5, 2013,
at 7:00 p.m. in the Community Room of
the Haakon Co. Courthouse. Present
were Mayor Michael Vetter, Finance Offi-
cer Monna Van Lint, Council Members
Greg Arthur, Marty Gartner, Trisha Lar-
son, Jennifer Henrie and Marion Matt.
Also present were Deputy Finance Officer
Brittany Smith, Public Works Director
Matt Reckling, General Maint. Brian Pear-
son, Harlan Quenzer with SPN & Assoc.,
Haakon Co. Emergency Manager Lola
Roseth, Del Bartels with the Pioneer Re-
view; and later, Police Officer David But-
ler, Kerli Toming, and Rod Senn with
Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson.
Absent: Council Member Jason Harry
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the agenda as pre-
sented. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Arthur to approve the minutes of the last
meeting as published in the Pioneer Re-
view. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Larson to approve the payment of the
bills from the appropriated funds. Motion
carried.
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Arthur to authorize FO Van Lint to can-
cel and stop payment on check #27838 in
accordance with SDCL 9-23-21. Check
was issued on Dec. 28, 2012, to Lindsey
Jones for $10.00 and has not been pre-
sented for payment. Motion carried.
Gross SaIaries - JuIy 31, 2013: Adm. -
$2,965.73; Police - $6,085.73; Public
Works - $3,187.59; Street - $4,945.19;
Swimming Pool - $13,303.45; Water -
$2,308.80
Colonial Life, Employee Supplemental
Ìns.- 07/13...............................372.25
EFTPS, S.S., Medicare, Withholding-
07/13....................................7,544.23
Office of Child Support Enf., Garnish-
ment - 07/13............................266.00
SDRS, Employee Retirement-
07/13....................................2,884.59
Add'I BiIIs - JuIy 2013:
Automated Fuel Systems, Ìnc., 3,501
Gals. Fuel - 07/13 ..............18,790.07
Pine St. Phase III Project:
J&J Asphalt Co., Overlay Pay Req. #01
thru 7/26/13......................185,975.19
SPN & Assoc., Const. Eng. thru 7/27/13
5,795.40
SD Hwy 14/Tracts A, B & C HydrauIic
Study:
SPN & Assoc., Eng. Services thru
7/27/13....................................336.25
Wood/WaIden Ave. Improv. Project:
Haakon Co. Register of Deeds, Copies
of Deeds - 07/13 .......................11.00
O'Connell Construction, Ìnc., Crushed
Asphalt - 05/13........................285.20
Petty Cash, Copies of Deeds -
07/13...........................................3.00
Rosebud Concrete, Ìnc., Pay Req. #04
thru 07/26/13....................251,921.35
SPN & Assoc., Const. Eng. thru 7/27/13
59,830.91
Customer Deposit Refunds in Accor-
dance w/ Ord. #5-002.1(b):
Bartels, Delvin .............................100.00
Buchholz, Kent ............................100.00
Hook, Jared.................................100.00
Kroetch, Karen & Jerry (508 Dupree St.)
100.00
Moses, Mike (509 Hone St.)........100.00
O'Connell, Glenn & Rita ................25.00
Reckling, LouAnn ..........................40.00
Rush Funeral Home ....................100.00
This Month's BiIIs:
3B's Heating & Air Cond., Pool Heaters
Repairs - 06/13 .........................84.18
AT&T Mobility, Cell Phone
06-07/13....................................81.82
CBA Lighting & Controls, Ìnc., Airport
Bulbs- 07/13............................183.38
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel
06-07/13...............................1,639.10
Coyle's SuperValu, Pool Supplies/ Re-
sale 06-07/13.......................1,544.60
Airport Supplies - 07/13 ............12.71
CRA Payment Center, Supplies -
07/13.........................................29.80
D&T Auto Parts, Supplies -
07/13.........................................11.59
Dakotacare Health Ìns., Employee
Health Premium - 07/13.......9,790.11
Delta Dental Ìns., Employee Dental Pre-
mium - 07/13...........................688.90
1st Nat'l Agency, Airport Fuel System
Ìns.08/13-08/14.......................825.00
1st Nat'l Bank - Philip, Utility Billing -
07/13.......................................122.97
1st Nat'l Bank - S.F., SRF Loan #02 Pay
#177 - 08/13.........................2,163.90
SRF Loan #03 Pay #80 -
08/13 .................................. 2,223.41
Fitzgerald Oil Co., Fuel/LP
06-07/13...............................1,407.72
George's Welding, Sewer Truck Repairs
- 07/13.....................................335.00
Golden West, Telephone/Ìnternet
06-07/13..................................686.35
Graham, Kit, Shoe Reimb. -
07/13.......................................100.00
Haakon Co. Register of Deeds, Code
Enf. Deed Copies - 07/13 ...........2.00
Haakon Co. Treasurer, Office Rent-
08/13.......................................500.00
Hawkins, Ìnc., Pool Chemical -
07/13....................................1,973.27
HD Supply Waterworks, LTD, (16) ¾¨
Meters - 07/13......................1,948.80
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies & Pool Rail-
ing 06-07/13............................333.95
Ìngram Pest Service, Ìnc., R. Site Pest
Control - 07/13..........................77.00
Jones Saddlery Bottle & Vet, City Flag
Repair - 06/13.............................5.00
Lurz Plumbing, Pool Urinal -
06/13......................................547.72
McLeod's Printing, Supplies -
07/13.......................................276.55
MG Oil Co., Fuel/Supplies -
06/13.........................................90.96
Midwest Radar & Equip., PD Radar
Service - 07/13..........................40.00
Morrison's Pit Stop, Fuel/Supplies/ Re-
pairs - 07/13.........................3,099.23
O'Connell Construction, Ìnc., Gravel/
Base Course/Crushed
Asphalt ....................................458.35
Petty Cash, Code Enf. Postage -
07/13.........................................34.96
Philip Standard, PD Oil Chg/Tire Repair
- 07/13.......................................92.95
Pioneer Review, Publishing/Supplies -
07/13.......................................625.50
Quill Corp., Supplies - 07/13 .......216.41
Sanford Laboratories, Pre-Employ. Test-
ing - 05/13...............................287.00
SD Assoc. of Rural Water Systems, An-
nual Dues 08/13-08/14 ...........410.00
SD Dept. of Revenue, Sales Tax
Payable - 07/13.......................580.56
Pool/Water Coliform Testing 06-07/13
77.00
SDML, Attorney Handbook Supp. - 2013
10.00
SD One Call, Locates 04-06/13.....56.70
The Lifeguard Store, Guard Attire/Sup-
plies - 07/13 ............................110.85
The Septic Guys, Ìnc., Sewer Backup
Pumping - 06/13 .....................600.00
Thomson Reuters-West, 2013 SDCL
Updates ....................................16.25
Tollefson, Gay, Attorney Retainer - 08/13
200.00
Triple XXX Spraying, LLC, Round Up
Lagoons - 06/13......................403.00
Twilight, Ìnc., Eye Wash Srv/1st Aid -
07/13.......................................257.88
USDA, RD Loan Pay #103 -
08/13....................................3,069.00
Van Diest Supply Co., Biomist Chemical
- 06/13..................................4,162.50
VÌSA-UMB Bank, Postage (Sewer
Backup) 07/13.............................6.15
Walker Refuse, 371 Residential
Garbage - 07/13...................4,897.20
West Central Electric, Electric 06/01-
06/30/13...............................3,688.89
Electric 06/30-07/31/13........3,830.39
Wohlenberg Ritzman & Co, LLC, Final
FY2012 Audit Prep...............8,532.00
WR/LJ Rural Water, 6,364,000 gals. -
07/13....................................7,955.00
Contract Min. - 07/13 ...........2,500.00
Airport Water - 07/13.................40.00
South Shop Water - 07/13 ........22.50
Zeeb Pharmacy, Supplies - 07/13 ...2.65
Total Expenditures -
08/05/13.........................$578,792.01
OId Business:
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the 2nd reading of the
following Ordinance #2013-09. Motion
carried with all members voting aye.
ORDINANCE #2013-09
SUPPLEMENTAL
APPROPRIATION TO
FINANCE STREET DEPART-
MENT MACHINERY &
EQUIPMENT PURCHASE -
DUMP TRUCK 2013
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota was presented
with the opportunity to pur-
chase a much needed, used
1998 ÌH F2554 Tandem Dump
Truck from the State of South
Dakota Surplus Property, Divi-
sion of Property Management;
and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota had budgeted for
such a purchase in 2012 in an-
ticipation of the State of South
Dakota surplusing this machin-
ery in 2012. Unfortunately, the
State did not surplus this ma-
chinery as anticipated and bud-
geted for in the City's 2012
appropriations; and,
WHEREAS, by the time the
City of Philip became aware of
the fact that this particular ma-
chinery and equipment would
not be offered for sale until
2013, the City had already
adopted its 2013 Appropria-
tions Ordinance; and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota does maintain a
street equipment reserve ac-
count for said capital pur-
chases and has maintained a
sufficient balance within said
account to finance the pur-
chase of this used dump truck;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED, that the City
Council of the City of Philip,
South Dakota, does hereby au-
thorize the Finance Officer to
Supplement the City's Street
Department capitalized ma-
chinery and equipment budget
to cover the expenses that will
be incurred to purchase the
1998 ÌH F2554 Tandem Dump
truck from the State of South
Dakota Property Management
office.
FROM: 101-00000-10410
General Fund - Street Equip.
Assigned Cash.....$20,800.00
TO: 101-43100-43400 Street
Dept. Mach. & Equip. - Capi-
talized...................$20,800.00
Approved this 5th day of Au-
gust 2013.
/s/Michael Vetter,
Mayor, City of Philip
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint,
Finance Officer
Passed First Reading:
July 1, 2013
Passed Second Reading:
August 5, 2013
Ayes: 5 Nays: 0
Motion was made by Henrie, seconded
by Arthur to approve the second reading
of the following Ordinance #2013-11. Mo-
tion carried with all members voting aye.
ORDINANCE #2013-11
SUPPLEMENTAL
APPROPRIATION
AIRPORT MIRL LIGHTING
PROJECT GRANT AND EX-
PENSES 2013
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota was awarded a
Federal Aviation Administration
Grant for the design and re-
placement of the Municipal Air-
port's Medium Ìntensity
Runway Lighting on July 30,
2012, in the amount of
$307,000, and;
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota hosted a bid let-
ting and opening for said im-
provements on July 02, 2012,
and awarded said bid to Muth
Electric on September 13,
2012, and;
WHEREAS, Muth Electric
began the replacement of the
Medium Ìntensity Runway
lighting on or about September
17, 2012, and all construction
and installations were com-
pleted on December 13, 2012;
and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota had budgeted for
all construction and engineer-
ing expenses associated with
this project within the 2012 Mu-
nicipal Appropriations Ordi-
nance, but;
WHEREAS, a large portion of
the actual pay requests, engi-
neering fees and grant dollars
awarded for this project were
not received by the City until
after January 01, 2013;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED, that the City
Council of the City of Philip,
South Dakota, does hereby au-
thorize the Finance Officer to
Supplement the City's Airport
Department engineering and
contract services budget to
cover the expenses that were
incurred in 2012, but reim-
bursed and booked against the
2013 budget.
FROM: 101-00000-33170
Federal Airport Ìmprovement
Grant ....................$92,150.00
TO: 101-43500-42220 Airport
Engineering............$9,200.00
101-43500-42230
Airport Contract
Services ...............$82,950.00
Approved this 5th day of Au-
gust 2013.
/s/Michael Vetter,
Mayor, City of Philip
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint,
Finance Officer
Passed First Reading:
July 1, 2013
Passed Second Reading:
August 5, 2013
Ayes: 5 Nays: 0
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the 2nd reading of the
following Ordinance #2013-12. Motion
carried.
ORDINANCE #2013-12
CITY OF PHILIP, SD
SUPPLEMENTAL
APPROPRIATION
WEST RIVER WATER DE-
VELOPMENT DISTRICT
GRANT TO ASSIST WITH
HYDRAULIC STUDY
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota was, on or about
June 20, 2013, awarded a
grant from the West River
Water Development District
Board in the amount of
$10,000, and;
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota will utilize said
funds to conduct a hydraulic
study of property currently
under easement with the State
of South Dakota, and;
WHEREAS, this hydraulic
study is being required by the
State in order to explore and
determine storm water
drainage and its potential im-
pact on the City of Philip from
drainage areas located north
and west of the City of Philip -
more specifically; an area north
and west of the City on which
are currently located two stock
dams; a retention pond located
just south of US Highway 14 lo-
cated on property legally de-
scribed as Tracts A & B of
Section 13-1-20; a W.P.A. dam
constructed in 1936 directly
south of the aforementioned
retention pond located on Lot
01, Block 01 of Kurka Addition
to the City of Philip, and a
drainage area located on Tract
C of Section 13-1-20 of the City
of Philip, and;
WHEREAS, once the afore-
mentioned hydraulic study is
complete, its findings will be re-
viewed by the State of South
Dakota and the City of Philip to
determine if the drainage ease-
ments issued in 1936 can and
should be released either back
to the City of Philip and/or the
current property owners im-
pacted by said easements,
and;
WHEREAS, this is an unantic-
ipated grant award as well as
an unanticipated expenditure
and was therefore not appro-
priated for within the 2013
budget;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED, that the City
Council of the City of Philip,
South Dakota, does hereby au-
thorize the Finance Officer to
Supplement the City's 2013
Municipal Appropriations to ac-
curately reflect the grant award
as well as the expenditures as-
sociated with the hydraulic
study to be conducted.
FROM: 101-00000-36700
Cont. and Donations/Private
Sources ...............$10,000.00
TO: 101-43150 -42220 Storm
Drainage
Engineering .........$10,000.00
Approved this 5th day of Au-
gust 2013.
/s/Michael Vetter,
Mayor, City of Philip
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint,
Finance Officer
Passed First Reading:
July 1, 2013
Passed Second Reading:
August 5, 2013
Ayes: 5 Nays: 0
Mayor Vetter updated the Council on the
Keystone XL Pipeline work camp's re-
quest to haul waste to the City's waste-
water treatment facility. The request has
been revoked, as according to their engi-
neer, they will be constructing their own
treatment facility.
Harlan Quenzer, City's Engineer with
SPN & Assoc., reported that their deci-
sion was based on the SD Dept. of Envi-
ronment and Natural Resources (DENR)
concerns regarding the hauling of the
waste away from their sites. Ìn turn, they
have determined that it would be in their
best interest to construct individual on-
site lagoons at their camps.
New Business:
Lola Roseth, Haakon Co. Emergency
Manager (HCEM), addressed the Council
with her annual update. She explained
that the state provides her with the major-
ity of her job duties and during a recent
assessment with both the State and Fed-
eral Emergency Management Administra-
tion (FEMA), the need for the local
elected officials to complete the required
National Ìncident Management Systems
(NÌMS) training was stressed. Ìt was
noted that the elected officials are being
held responsible for disaster mishaps if
they do not have the training as this
teaches officials how to assist during an
emergency.
Mrs. Roseth went on to state that accord-
ing to the FEMA training records, only
30% of the City of Philip officials have
completed the NÌMS training, more
specifically the City employees, leaving
the Mayor and Council to complete the
training. She has expressed concern to
the FEMA representatives that the major-
ity of the elected officials are volunteers.
Ìn turn, their response was that they
would like to at least see some improve-
ment in the amount of trained officials, i.e.
two completed trainings per year to be in
compliance.
Mrs. Roseth presented the Council with
the training information, noting that it can
be completed on-line or in the classroom
setting. Ìt was pointed out that the deci-
sion to complete the training is at the
Council's discretion.
Mrs. Roseth then reviewed other projects
within her emergency management du-
ties. The State's Health Alert Network
(HAN) will provide immediate notification
to local officials regarding any health
alerts throughout the state. A disaster re-
covery team has also been established,
designating stationing areas for the vari-
ous needs during a disaster event. Ìn ad-
dition, they held a state mandated, full
scale disaster exercise at the hospital this
year.
Mrs. Roseth then asked the Council if
they had any questions. With none forth-
coming, the Mayor, Council, and those in
attendance thanked Mrs. Roseth as she
left the meeting at this time.
Kerli Toming addressed the Council by in-
troducing herself as an exchange college
student from Estonia doing a summer
work program through Southwestern Ad-
vantage Company. This consists of sell-
ing books door to door, but she has not
sold any in Philip as she does not have a
permit. She noted that the City's permit
fee for a peddler is more than her budget
will allow and asked the Council if they
would consider offering her a reduced
rate.
Mayor Vetter questioned how long she
plans to be in Philip and how this program
benefits her. Ms. Toming advised that her
plan includes selling in Philip for at least
three if not four days. She receives four
college credit hours for the work plus 40%
of the sales which pays for her living ex-
penses during the school year.
Council Member Henrie questioned how
often the City issues a peddler's permit?
FO Van Lint noted that there are usually
three annual permits issued each year
along with others that arise from citizen
complaints of door-to-door sales people.
The established fee for a peddler license
was reported at $35.00 per day or
$125.00 per year. Ìn addition, they must
also provide a copy of their valid S.D.
sales tax license.
Following discussion, motion was made
by Matt, seconded by Henrie to issue Ms.
Toming a 7-day peddler permit for $50.00,
a one-time only exception made for edu-
cational purposes. Motion carried.
Ms. Toming expressed her appreciation
to the Council and confirmed that she
would provide a copy of her S.D. sales
tax license when she file's for the permit
tomorrow.
Mayor, Council, and those in attendance
then thanked Ms. Toming and wished her
well in her future endeavors as she left
the meeting at this time.
Ìnsurance Claims:
Barry and Edna Knutson addressed the
Council with their concerns regarding the
City's insurance provider following the
sewer back up in the basement of their
201 E. Oak St. property on June 21,
2013.
Mr. Knutson noted that since the incident,
it has been "a waiting game.¨ They would
like to see a resolution to their property so
that they can move forward with the re-
maining clean up and repairs. To date, an
insurance adjuster has not reviewed the
damages to their property.
Mr. Knutson went on to explain they have
been in contact with the City Ìnsurance
Agent, Joe Gittings, and Continental
Western's Ìnsurance Representative,
Patty Hulsing, regarding their concerns.
Unfortunately, nothing has transpired and
they have been advised to take photo-
graphs and document any clean up and
repair expenses. Ìn the mean time, they
have had to endure up front expenses,
i.e. a $1,500.00 Stanley Steamer bill. He
also mentioned what an excellent re-
source Stanley Steamer has been to the
Knutsons' as far as proceeding with the
clean up when in his opinion; this should
be provided by the City's insurance com-
pany.
Mrs. Knutson went on to state that their
property's current condition is unsanitary
and needs to be addressed. For instance,
some of the rubble from the clean-up is
being stored behind their building as they
are uncertain if they should hold onto this
until an adjuster arrives. She stressed
that they would like to know when they
will have an answer to the claim.
Council Member Arthur questioned if the
City's Ìnsurance Agent has reviewed the
damages. Mr. Knutson confirmed that he
provided pictures to Mr. Gittings, but not
once has he stopped to review the dam-
ages.
Ìt was then questioned about the contact
with Continental Western Ìnsurance Rep-
resentative. Mr. Knutson noted that Ms.
Hulsing had promised to get back to
them, but currently, she is on vacation.
FO Van Lint also added that she sent par-
tial claim information to Ms. Hulsing last
week, but has only received a read re-
ceipt since that time. She also visited with
Mary Burnett with First National Agency,
who indicated that an adjuster may not be
required since they have pictures.
Arthur then inquired if the City has the au-
thority to request an adjuster since we are
the ones that carry the insurance cover-
age. He also commented on being in a
similar situation as the Knutson's where
he ended up calling the adjuster himself.
Henrie questioned if the City should con-
sider posing the idea of changing insur-
ance agents in order to get this resolved.
Council Member Matt expressed concern
over changing insurance agents, stating
that once a claim is filed, it is turned over
to the insurance provider. He then ad-
vised that with the Council's blessing, he
will inquire with the City's insurance
agent.
Mayor, Council, and those in attendance
then thanked Mr. and Mrs. Knutson for
their time as they left the meeting at this
time.
By general consensus of the Council,
Matt will follow-up with the City's insur-
ance agent with hopes of getting the
claim resolved while keeping the Finance
Office apprised of the progress in order to
properly document the insurance claim.
Council went on to discuss the damages
to the City equipment and property from
the July 30, 2013, hail storm. FO Van Lint
inquired if the Council desires filing an in-
surance claim for the damages, noting
that the deductible is $250.
By general consensus, the Council di-
rected FO Van Lint to file a claim with the
insurance agent and request an adjuster
review the damages to the City equip-
ment and property.
Airport:
Rod Senn, Airport Engineer with Kadr-
mas, Lee and Jackson (KLJ), addressed
the Council regarding the ongoing im-
provement projects at the City's Airport.
The project status update for the Land
Acquisition and Environmental Assess-
ment (LA/EA); and, both the project and
construction status updates for the
Medium Ìntensity Runway Lighting
(MÌRL) were presented for the Council's
review.
Mr. Senn apprised the Council of the Fed-
eral Aviation Administration (FAA) ap-
proval's to proceed with the LA/EA
project. The next step includes that of
contacting the property owners within the
runway protection zones (RPZ's) in which
the City will be pursing land exchanges
with. Mr. Senn then asked for the Coun-
cil's permission to proceed with contact-
ing those property owners in order to
obtain a point of contact to conduct the
land surveys and appraisals.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Henrie to authorize KLJ to proceed with
the LA/EA project by contacting the
landowners as well as conducting the sur-
veys and appraisals. Motion carried.
Mr. Senn went on to review the Pavement
Rehabilitation Project that is scheduled
for design and bidding in 2013 and con-
struction in 2014. At this time, the project
will consist of general pavement rehabili-
tation to the parking area, aprons, and
turn around areas. Should the LA/EA be
finalized prior to bidding the project, the
pavement of the access road will also be
included.
Mayor Vetter questioned the expenses
and if any would be incurred in 2013? Mr.
Senn noted that the estimated cost for
design and bidding is $30,000 with 90%
or $27,000 being funded federally and the
remaining 10% being split between the
state and city at $1,500 each. Ìn addition,
he does not anticipate any expenses for
the City in 2013 as the project follows the
FAA fiscal year, which ends Aug. 31,
2013. Like other airport projects, the ex-
penses will be paid by the City and then
reimbursed by the federal and state gov-
ernment.
Following review, motion was made by
Matt, seconded by Arthur to authorize
submitting the Pavement Rehabilitation
design and bidding project for federal as-
sistance and pre-authorize the Mayor's
and City Attorney's signature on the ap-
plication and grant documents. Motion
carried with all members voting aye.
Mayor, Council, and those in attendance
then thanked Mr. Senn as he left the
meeting at this time.
US Hwy 14/SD Hwy 73 Drainage:
Mr. Quenzer updated the Council, noting
that the hydraulic study field work was
completed last week, which included ob-
taining centerline cross section eleva-
tions. Ìt was reported that the data will be
calculated at 5, 10 and 25 year events as
they have been unsuccessful in contact-
ing the SD Dept. of Transportation (DOT)
for their recommendation. They plan to
have the study completed by the Coun-
cil's September meeting.
Mayor Vetter, as a matter of record,
stated that the hydraulic study does not
have any bearing on the properties south
of the drainage area. This includes Don
Ravellette's property which will not see
any adverse effects from the study re-
sults. Ìt was stressed that the City is only
completing the study in order for the State
of SD to determine if they need to main-
tain water retention easements in the
area north and east of Ravellette's prop-
erty.
Wood/Walden Ave. Utility and Street Ìm-
prov. Project:
Mr. Quenzer updated the Council on the
progress of the project, reporting that
weather permitting; Rosebud Concrete is
planning to start asphalt paving on Aug.
7th and the concrete portion by Scotch-
man's on Aug. 12th. The paving will be
done in 10-12' sections from the gutter
out in order to have solid seams in the
road. The sidewalks and driveway ap-
proaches will more than likely be installed
following the asphalt.
Mayor Vetter questioned if they will be
stopping the asphalt before the retaining
wall, north of Charles Allen's house. Ìt
was reported that the contractor failed to
install the retaining wall per the design
specifications and in turn, has been noti-
fied that this needs to be corrected prior
to laying asphalt in this area or they may
also have to replace that portion of as-
phalt.
Mr. Quenzer reported that the contractor
was going to provide an alternative for
correcting this error. To date, he has not
seen any other options, but reassured the
Council that if the alternative does not ex-
ceed the original design, it will not be ap-
proved. He also stressed that if the
asphalt is laid in front of the retaining wall
area, they will be required to remove the
entire section, seam to seam ÷ replacing
a strip of asphalt will not be acceptable.
Mayor Vetter and Council Member Arthur
both stressed that the retaining wall
needs to be installed as designed, no ex-
ceptions.
Mr. Quenzer advised that he had ap-
proved the contractor to provide alterna-
tive options for consideration. One idea
was that of installing a type of mega-block
for the retaining wall. Ìt was also sug-
gested that if an alternative is approved;
a deduction in the contract price and/or
an extended warranty may need to be
sought.
Matt mentioned the rip rap that they had
installed at base of the culvert in this area
as it is already in disrepair. Mr. Quenzer
confirmed that this installation is not ac-
ceptable and the contractor will be re-
quired to remove it and install larger rip
rap or some other type of concrete dissi-
pation pan in its place.
Mr. Quenzer then went on to report that
the portion of curb and gutter from 106 N.
Wood Ave. to E. Elm St. was removed
and will be replaced per the Street Com-
mittee's request. This was a result of the
curb and gutter having a different level of
grade than that on the west side of N.
Wood Ave. To date, Quenzer is still uncer-
tain as to the reasoning for its original de-
sign, but reassures that water did not pool
in this area. The handicap ramp at 108 N.
Wood Ave. will also installed during this
time.
Matt complimented the contractor on the
concrete work, but expressed concerns
relative to the fact that the replacement
section will be hand formed and poured.
He also questioned the area north of the
cul-de-sac on Walden Ave. as a good por-
tion of mud accumulated in this area fol-
lowing last week's rain storm.
Mr. Quenzer reassured that the on-site
engineer will be overseeing the entire
curb and gutter replacement to warrant
precise installation. As for the run-off by
the cul-de-sac, the contractor is not fin-
ished in the area. They still have to re-
grade and hydro seed which is expected
to address these concerns.
FO Van Lint also reported that the SD
DOT has not issued a permit for the con-
crete approach on N. Wood Ave. off SD
Highway 14. She stated that in the corre-
spondence from Dean VanDeWiele sent
today to Jeff McCormick with SPN &
Assoc., the state is still waiting on the final
concrete design and noted that work
should not be taking place in the right of
way until the permit is issued. Ìn addition,
the signage in the area does not meet the
reflective standards and the traffic control
is quite sub-standard.
Mr. Quenzer stated that he was not aware
of this information and will follow-up with
Mr. McCormick.
Ìt was also reported that a corner portion
of Don Haynes' driveway at 304 N. Wood
Ave. was damaged by an excavator dur-
ing the removal of his driveway approach.
The contractor has repaired the driveway
and will be responsible for this expense.
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Arthur to approve Rosebud Concrete,
Ìnc.'s pay request #04 in the amount of
$251,921.35 contingent upon receipt of
all appropriate paperwork required for the
funding agency's approval through the
oontinued on
LcgaI Noticcs
August ia, ecis · Pionccr Rcvicw ie
SRF program. Motion carried with all
members voting aye.
Motion was then made by Arthur, sec-
onded by Gartner to authorize the
Mayor's signature on the SRF drawdown
#4. Motion carried with all members vot-
ing aye.
Arthur then inquired about the status of
the overlay for that portion of Hone St.,
west of the N. Wood Ave. intersection?
PWD Reckling confirmed that he is
scheduled to meet with the Hills Material
Co. representative to determine what
they would like to have done prior to the
overlay.
E. Pine St./Wray Ave. Overlay Project:
Mr. Quenzer reported that the project
contractor, J&J Asphalt, has completed
the asphalt overlay. They are still working
on finishing the concrete valley gutter at
the Hone St. and Wray Ave. intersection.
Once this is complete, the finalization of
the project can proceed.
Matt expressed his appreciation to the
Street personnel for the work that has
been completed on the sides of the road,
blending it with the new overlay. PWD
Reckling reported that they have placed
milled asphalt on the west side of the
road and pulled the ditches for drainage
on the east side.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Henrie to approve J&J Asphalt's pay re-
quest #01 in the amount of $187,975.19
contingent upon receipt of all appropriate
paperwork. Motion carried with all mem-
bers voting aye.
Philip Trails Project:
Council Member Larson updated the
Council on the progress of the trails proj-
ect. She met with the SD DOT Trans-
portation Committee on July 10th in
Pierre and the City has since been noti-
fied that phase 1.1 of the trails project is
being recommended for Transportation
Alternative Program (TAP) funding. This
is for the concrete section along Stanley
Ave. from W. Pine St. to the swimming
pool. Formal notification of the grant
award is expected around Oct. 1st, 2013.
Larson noted that if the grant is awarded,
the 18.05% local share will be approxi-
mately $12,800. She has confirmed with
the Chamber of Commerce's President
Brit Miller that the Chamber will be paying
for the entire local portion of phase 1.1.
They had previously committed a
$20,000 monetary donation to the trails
and after this phase, $7,200 will remain
available for future phases of the project.
Larson then went on to state that the SD
DOT is offering another application period
through Sept. 23rd, 2013. She would like
to move forward with the remaining
phases of the project and presented Res-
olution #2013-13, Authorizing TAP Fund-
ing Application and Letter of Ìntent for
phase 1.2 and 1.3, for the Council's ap-
proval.
Council Member Gartner voiced strong
concerns for moving forward with addi-
tional trails projects. He stated that he has
received a great deal of negative feed-
back from the public regarding the trails.
The consensus he has heard is that they
do not want city tax dollars supporting the
trails project. He stressed that he is of the
same opinion and that the streets need to
take precedence over the trails, noting
that he lives on an unpaved street.
Arthur reiterated a majority of Gartner's
statement, noting that only a few of his
contacts regarding the trails have been in
favor of the project with the majority being
against. He also stated that those against
the project have indicated that they will
file a referendum petition in order to stop
the project if needed. He also stressed
that the City has a number of streets that
need to be repaired and those should
come before a trail.
Henrie reminded everyone that there a
greater number of grants available for
trails projects compared to that of street
and infrastructure projects.
Larson advised that the City has not com-
mitted any tax dollars to the project at this
time. They also have the TransCanada
Community Grant as an option to assist
with the future phases and had decided
to wait on the application until the TAP
grant award was determined. She would
recommend that this grant be pursued to
help with the 18.05% local share for
phase 1.2 and 1.3 since the Chamber is
paying the phase 1.1 local share. She
also mentioned that since the SD DOT
has seen our entire project, we may be
more apt to receive additional funding.
Matt stated that the project would be an
asset to our community, but like Arthur
and Gartner, he does not want to con-
tribute City dollars to the project.
Larson stressed that the trail is not only
for recreation, but also safety. For in-
stance, phase 1.1 will address major
safety concerns as pedestrians going to
the swimming pool will no longer be walk-
ing and riding bikes down Stanley Ave.
Mayor Vetter noted that he has only
heard positive comments in favor of the
trails project and stated that there would
be no harm in submitting an application.
Motion was then made by Henrie, sec-
onded by Matt to approve the following
Resolution.
RESOLUTION #2013-13
WHEREAS, the City of Philip
has identified the desire to ex-
pand its local trail system to im-
prove the quality of life for all
residents of the City; and
WHEREAS, the City of Philip
anticipates expanding a recre-
ational trail in city limits. The
City proposes to apply to the
SD Department of Transporta-
tion for Transportation Alterna-
tives Program (TAP) funding to
assist with the costs of the proj-
ect; and
WHEREAS, the City will pro-
vide 18.05% of the project
costs via cash, and equipment
and/or labor to the project, and
WHEREAS, the City of Philip
will be responsible for all future
operations and maintenance
costs of the project
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RE-
SOLVED that the City Council
authorizes Michael Vetter to
sign and submit this letter of in-
tent and application to the SD
Department of Transportation
for TAP funds for Phase 1.2
and 1.3 of trail improvements
requesting up to $400,000.
This resolution would be effec-
tive immediately upon pas-
sage.
Arthur questioned the Resolution state-
ment, "The City will provide 18.05% of the
project costs via cash, and equipment
and/or labor to the project.¨ He stated in
his opinion, the wording of this statement
pledges City tax dollars to pay the local
share of the project. He stressed that with
this statement as is, he will not approve
the Resolution as he is not in favor of
committing the City to this expenditure.
A heated discussion ensued regarding
approving the Resolution. Ìt was pointed
out that other funding sources are being
sought to cover the local share and the
Resolution is only authorizing the City to
apply for the grant. Other comments were
made that the other funding sources
should be in place prior to submitting the
grant application. Ìn addition, some are
not against committing City dollars to
cover a portion of the local share while
others are completely against it.
Following another very lengthy discus-
sion, Henrie reminded everyone that
there has been a motion and second
made to approve Resolution #2013-13 as
noted above.
Mayor Vetter called for a roll call vote of
the Council. Voting aye: Larson and Hen-
rie; Voting nay: Matt, Arthur and Gartner.
The resolution failed to pass by a vote of
2 to 3.
Following much additional discussion,
Gartner and Arthur conceded that they
would agree to passage of a like resolu-
tion if the wording is changed, not binding
City tax dollars to the construction of the
trails. Ìn addition, they are not against
providing City equipment and labor to as-
sist as this will also be required since the
City had previously guaranteed to main-
tain phase 1.1 of the trail project.
Mayor Vetter requested FO Van Lint draft
a new resolution with the requested
changes to be presented at the Septem-
ber Council meeting.
Mayor Vetter advised the Council that the
City has been approached by the SD
Game, Fish & Parks (GF&P) to purchase
their property south of Philip, previously
known as Bad River Park. They have
scheduled an informational meeting with
the City on Monday, Aug. 12th at 4:00
p.m. in the community room. Vetter then
asked for any volunteers from the Council
to meet with the GF&P.
Gartner, Arthur and Henrie volunteered to
meet with the GF&P on Monday, Aug. 12,
2013.
Council reviewed the following
Building/Flood Plain Development Per-
mits: Greg Arthur - playhouse; Brad &
Tanya Haynes - shed & replace deck;
John Heltzel - remodel porch & replace
foundation & step; Missy Koester - shed;
Sandra O'Connor - fence; Peggy Staben
- sidewalk; and, Harold Stickler - deck.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Gartner to approve the permits as pre-
sented above. Motion carried with Coun-
cil Member Arthur abstaining.
Council reviewed a request from West
River/Lyman Jones Rural Water System
(WR/LJ) to extend their water & sewer
service from 501 N. Wood Ave. to their
new building. Ìt was reassured that the
connection will be after their existing
water meter.
Ìt was noted that according to City Ord.
#5-107, this is acceptable since the prop-
erty is owned by WR/LJ, but the request
must be approved by the City Council
which is outlined in Ord. #5-104. As for
the sewer extension, this is permitted the
same way, but through Ord. #5-204.
PWD Reckling was asked for his recom-
mendation to the request. Reckling stated
that he does not foresee any problems,
but would prefer that an isolation curb
stop be installed close to the new build-
ing. This would provide accessible water
service connection to the new building if
there should be a change in the property
or property owners in the future.
Following review, motion was made by
Gartner, seconded by Arthur to approve
WR/LJ's request to extend their current
water and sewer service lines from their
existing service at 501 N. Wood Ave. to
their new building contingent upon instal-
lation of an isolation curb stop within
close range of the new building. Motion
carried with Council Member Matt ab-
staining.
Council reviewed the following L/P
Propane bids received this month:
July 26, 2013
Fitzgerald Oil Company .........$1.19/gal.
Midwest Cooperatives ............$1.25/gal.
Council was informed that the Airport
Committee approved a $40.00 daily fee
for Commercial Aerial Applicators use of
the airport. Formal approval of the fee will
be included with the annual resolution of
fees in January.
Matt reported on the River Cities Transit
community meeting held in Philip on Aug.
1, 2013. The meeting was held in an effort
for the federal government to consider
funding for the transit system as well as
any needed improvements. He noted that
informal testimonies from a number of the
attendees were taken, with all of them
being positive.
Council reviewed correspondence from
the SD Emergency Management regard-
ing an update on the Biggert Waters
Flood Ìnsurance Reform Act of 2012. The
information addresses flood insurance
premiums, noting that property owners
will more than likely see an increase in
their premiums within the near future. (A
copy of the information is on file in the Fi-
nance Office.)
Departmental Reports:
The quarterly Administrative report was
presented and reviewed with FO Van Lint.
Council reviewed the City's Depository
Disclosure for the account balances end-
ing June 30, 2013, as follows. (see box
beIow)
Council also reviewed the City's Ìnvest-
ment report which includes the City's Cer-
tificates of Deposit and the year to date
sales tax revenues.
Mayor Vetter stated that the sales tax rev-
enues are promising and thanked the
community for shopping local.
Council reviewed the FY2012 audit report
as prepared by Wohlenberg, Ritzman &
Co.
FO Van Lint noted that the audit report
has been approved by the SD Dept. of
Legislative Audit and asked that any
questions relative to the report be di-
rected to the Finance Office.
Matt congratulated the Finance Office
staff for a great job on a clean audit. The
only deficiency reported relates to the
lack of segregation of duties which like
most small entities; this is a consistent
statement.
Following review, motion was made by
Matt, seconded by Arthur to approve the
City's fiscal year 2012 audit report. Motion
carried.
The 2014 budget meetings have been
scheduled for the Aug. 7-9, 2013.
FO Van Lint went on to explain that as of
July 1, 2013, the City's new health insur-
ance premiums through Dakotacare
began. This includes that of the employer
funded deductible buy down through
Dakotacare which moved the City into a
Dakotacare Flex plan. The flex plan re-
quires payment from the City for the de-
ductible buy down prior to Dakotacare
reimbursing the employees. She noted
Dakotacare reviews these expenses be-
tween the 7th and 10th of the month and
then bills the City for whatever is owed on
the deductibles. This cycle will always be
AFTER a regular monthly Council meet-
ing.
She then inquired if the Council would
prefer waiting until the next Council meet-
ing to issue payment for the deductible
buy downs or preauthorize the payment
to be issued following receipt of the bill
from Dakotacare? Ìn addition, would they
prefer the payment be issued with a
check or ACH? She noted that the preau-
thorization for payment would be similar
to that of the monthly payroll expenses.
Following review, motion was made by
Matt, seconded by Arthur to preauthorize
payment to the Dakotacare Flex Plan
through whatever method the FO finds
easiest to manage. Motion carried.
Council went on to review a request from
the Finance Office to purchase a new util-
ity billing computer: Dell OptiPlex 7010
computer for $1,357.12 from Hometown
Computer Service. The current computer
was purchased in 2009 and since the in-
stallation of the new software it is over-
loaded and not efficient. This computer
was also scheduled for replacement in
2014, but since there are sufficient funds
to cover this expense in the water and
sewer departments, the Finance Office
would like to pursue its replacement in
2013.
Motion was made by Henrie, seconded
by Gartner to approve the purchase a
Dell OptiPlex 7010 computer from Home-
town Computer Service for $1,357.12.
Motion carried with all members voting
aye.
The monthly Police Dept. report was re-
viewed with Officer Butler.
Officer Butler reported that he has or-
dered four new tires off the state bid
through Morrison's Pit Stop for the 2011
Chevy Tahoe. The cost of each tire is
$137.39 plus $15.00 for the mounting and
balancing.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve the purchase of the
2011 Chevy Tahoe tires as presented.
Motion carried.
The monthly Street Dept. report was re-
viewed.
Arthur informed PWD Reckling that the
area on Hone St., west of S. Auto Ave. is
washed out. This area is also barricaded
to through traffic but a City water main
runs down the hill. Arthur also mentioned
that the barricades are in need of repairs.
PWD Reckling expressed his apprecia-
tion for advising him of this concern and
will get it repaired in the very near future.
He noted that this area is one that is not
highly traveled by the City personnel.
PWD Reckling reported that he is still in
the process of obtaining quotes from con-
tractors to install the municipal building of-
fice roof. He plans to have them ready for
review during the Street Dept. budget
meeting.
Council went on to review the following
quotes for a new riding mower that was
appropriated for in 2013. PWD Reckling
noted that this mower will replace the
John Deere LT150 garden tractor pur-
chased in 2002 for $2,400 that is in dis-
repair. Ìt will be utilized throughout the
City, i.e. airport, lift station, right-of-ways,
etc.
Grossenburg Ìmplement - 2013 John
Deere Mowers
Z445 EZtrak Residential Zero Turn
with 54¨ Deck......................$4,680.00
Z665 EZtrak Residential Zero Turn
with 60¨ Deck......................$5,494.87
Z720A Commercial ZTrak with 60¨
Deck ...................................$8,300.00
Kennedy Ìmplement - 2013 Grasshop-
per
727 Gas with Combination 345 & 61¨
Deck..................................$11,000.00
725 Diesel with Combination 345 &
61¨ Deck ...........................$12,900.00
Mayor Vetter suggested that only those
commercial grade mowers be considered
and questioned the mowing options for
the Grasshopper models.
PWD Reckling noted that the Grasshop-
per's have a side, rear, and mulching
mowing option. They also have attach-
ment options such as a cover and snow
blower that can be purchased which
would be essential with the new side-
walks being planned for Stanley Ave. and
SD Highway 73.
Gartner recommended the Grasshopper
Diesel mower as in his opinion, a diesel
motor will outlast a gas motor.
Following review, motion was made by
Gartner, seconded by Arthur to approve
the purchase of the 2013 Grasshopper
725 Diesel mower from Kennedy Ìmple-
ment for $12,900.00. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Gartner to approve the 2014 Tractor
Rental Agreement with Grossenburg Ìm-
plement. Motion carried.
The swimming pool report was reviewed.
Ìt was reported that attendance is consid-
erably lower than last year due to having
to close the pool for weather and sanitary
reasons. There was an increase in swim-
ming lessons from 156 in 2012 to 196 in
2013. The pool revenue through July 31,
2013, was reported at $2,154.65 for con-
cession sales and $13,398.52 for daily
admittance, passes, swim lessons and
aerobics. The expenses paid through
today, Aug. 5, 2013, were also reported
at $44,536.52.
Mayor Vetter expressed his appreciation
to Gen. Maint. Pearson for his due dili-
gence in super chlorinating the pool. Over
the past few weeks, Pearson was called
upon following the three different in-
stances where the pool was contami-
nated.
The pool's last day of operation is Sun-
day, Aug. 18th, 2013.
Mayor, Council and those in attendance
also expressed their appreciation to Ìn-
gram Hardware for their donation of eight
lawn chairs.
The monthly Water Dept. report was re-
viewed. The water loss for the month of
July was reported at 9.46%.
Arthur questioned the status of the parks
and recreational areas water use? Gen-
eral Maint. Pearson noted that a few of
the areas are within close range of their
allotment of free water for the year. Ìt was
also mentioned that the football field has
experienced two separate water break
occurrences in the past of couple of
weeks.
PubIic Comments: None
In Other Business:
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to approve moving the Oct. 7th
Council Meeting to Oct. 1st, 2013, due to
the SDML Annual meeting held during the
week of Oct. 7th. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Arthur to authorize FO Van Lint, DFO
Smith and Officer Butler to attend the
SDML Annual Conference, Oct. 8-11,
2013, in Aberdeen. Motion carried.
Ìn observance of the-Labor Day holiday,
City Offices will be closed Sept. 2nd,
2013.
The next regular Council Meeting will be
held on Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013,
at 7:00 p.m. in the Community Room.
With no further business to come before
the Council, Mayor Vetter declared the
meeting adjourned at 9:18 p.m.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Brittany Smith,
Deputy Finance Officer
[Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $674.99]
DEPOSITORY DISCLOSURE - CITY OF PHILIP, SD
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
Feb. 28, 2013 June 30, 2013
GENERAL FUND
Checking Account 11,288.42 9,825.59
Petty Cash (Finance Office) 50.00 50.00
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 465,007.11 589,491.58
CD #27909 73,000.00 73,000.00
Assigned Cash 402,300.00 307,300.00
Assigned Cash - R. Site 62,588.92 64,249.92
1,104,234.45 1,043,917.09
WATER
Checking Account 3,095.25 3,117.51
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 397,664.92 415,382.26
CD #27910 40,000.00 40,000.00
Assigned Cash 107,863.00 67,863.00
Restricted Cash - Rural Dev. Loan 37,000.00 37,000.00
585,623.17 563,362.77
SEWER
Checking Account 34.43 11.03
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 279,961.45 298,351.42
CD #27911 2,000.00 2,000.00
CD #27979 10,000.00 10,000.00
Assigned Cash 115,400.00 115,400.00
Restricted Cash - Surcharge - SRF 32,645.95 48,458.20
440,041.83 474,220.65
GARBAGE
Checking Account 20.57 34.69
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 59,223.44 21,317.15
CD #27982 20,000.00 20,000.00
Assigned Cash 24,650.00 24,650.00
103,894.01 66,001.84
CAPITAL PROJECT FUND - WOOD/WOLDEN AVE.
Checking Account -- $66.19
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. -- $149,976.00
-- $150,042.19
TotaI Checking 14,438.67 13,055.01
TotaI Petty Cash 50.00 50.00
TotaI Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 1,201,865.92 1,474,518.41
TotaI Certificates of Deposit 145,000.00 145,000.00
TotaI Assigned/Restricted Cash 782,447.87 664,921.12
TOTAL CASH 2,143,793.46 2,297,544.54
Pioneer Review is a IegaI newspaper for the City of PhiIip, Haakon County, Haakon SchooI Dist. 27-1, Town of MidIand, West River RuraI Water DeveIopment District.
clty councll
Proceedlngs
oontinued from 11
consider contract for deed. Call
Russell Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South &
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605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
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OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
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HEALTH/BEAUTY
ARE YOU A 45-79 Year Old
Woman Who Developed Diabetes
While On Lipitor? If you used
Lipitor between December 1996
and the present and were diag-
nosed with diabetes while taking
Lipitor, you may be entitled to
compensation. Call Charles H.
Johnson Law tollfree 1-800-535-
5727.
or call 605-925-7127. Com-
pleted application can be sent to
Lisa Edelman, Finance Officer,
PO Box 178, Freeman, SD
57029. Deadline for applications
is August 23, 2013.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
WANTED. Full-time, competitive
wages, and benefits provided.
Experience in auto body or
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NOW HIRING A full-time writer
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FOR SALE
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Business & Professional
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Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
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AUCTION
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EMPLOYMENT
POLICE CHIEF – FREEMAN, SD
The City of Freeman is taking
applications for a full time Police
Chief. Responsibilities include
supervision and direction of po-
lice department personnel and
policies, community relations,
police patrol and other law en-
forcement duties. High School
Diploma or G.E.D. required.
Certified Officer preferred.
Salary is dependent on qualifica-
tions and experience. Applica-
tion and job description can be
picked up at Freeman City Hall,
185 E. 3rd Street, Freeman, SD,
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
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Classifieds
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 13
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BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Printed only in the Pioneer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pioneer Review and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pioneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make
any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity basis.
Business & seRviCe
BUSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & RanCh
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
losT & found
LOST: Blue Sony Cybershot
camera possibly in a black with
red trim case. Most likely lost at
Wall City Park on 7/20/13 be-
tween the jungle gyms and park-
ing south of the football field.
400+ pics on the memory card
including newborn-8 mo. pics of
our youngest son which have
not been printed, our other son
who is very blond, my sister's
senior pics (Gerri) and ending
with our recent trip to Wall
Drug. If located, please call 430-
0613 or email sjlaurenz_dc@hot-
mail. com. P35-4tc
helP WanTed
HELP WANTED: General shop
duties, part or full-time, wash
and clean cars, parts runner,
pick up and deliver vehicles.
Great opportunity to kill some
time while the kids are in school.
Call Mike at Les’ Body Shop,
859-2744 or 685-3068, Philip.
P36-tfn
HELP WANTED: Wall Food Cen-
ter has multiple openings, in-
cluding Meat Department. Must
be able to lift 80 lbs. No experi-
ence necessary. 279-2331.
WP50-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County is accepting applications
for a full time Deputy Auditor.
Must work well with the public,
have clerical, secretarial and
computer skills and perform
other duties as directed. Knowl-
edge of governmental account-
ing and payroll beneficial.
Selected applicant will also work
with voter registration and the
election process. Jackson
County benefits include health
insurance, life insurance, S.D.
Retirement, paid holidays, vaca-
tion and sick leave. Hourly wage.
Position open until filled. Appli-
cations are available at the
Jackson County Auditor’s office
or send resumé to Jackson
County, P O Box 280, Kadoka,
SD 57543. Ph: 837-2422.
K35-2tc
CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tion, benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Nikki, 837-2270.
K34-tfn
RN/LPN POSITION: Seeking
loving & patient geriatric nurse.
Benefits available. Contact Heidi
or Nikki, 837-2270. K34-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff, and assis-
tant manager position(s) are
available for Aw! Shucks Café
opening soon at 909 Main Street
in Kadoka. Please apply within
or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K33-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employment
spraying county highway right of
way. Commercial herbicide li-
cense required or to be obtained
before start of work. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Applications / re-
sumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. K33-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. K33-4tc
AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping, laundry and
maintenance. Call Joseph at
279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Part-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Tractor opera-
tor to mow county road right of
way, and perform other duties
as directed. Pre-employment
drug and alcohol screening re-
quired. Applications / resumés
accepted. Information 837-2410
or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K33-4tc
HOUSEKEEPERS AND LAUN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED:
High school and college students
are welcome to apply. Will train.
Apply at either America’s Best
Value Inn and Budget Host Sun-
downer in Kadoka or call 837-
2188 or 837-2296. K26-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax re-
sumé to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
MisC. foR sale
FOR SALE: Transfer bench –
new, never used – for bathtub or
walk-in shower. Call 859-2230,
Philip. P36-2tp
FOR SALE: (2) Stihl chainsaws
with extra blades, wood splitter,
wood burning stove with blower,
misc. wood cutting accessories.
All in excellent condition. Call
Merlin Doyle, 279-2452.
WP50-3tp
FOR SALE: Rapala Husky Jerk
fishing lures, HJ8 and HJ10.
$4.00 each. Call Mark at 441-
7049. WP50-2tc
FOR SALE: Golden Grain corn
stove 2000, burn wood pellets or
shelled corn, good condition,
$1,500. 669-2508. M34-4tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
noTiCes/WanTed
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm
machinery and junk cars for
crushing. 433-5443. P36-4tp
RANCH RODEO: White River,
SD. Friday Nite, Aug. 16, 2013.
6:30 pm CDT. Events: Stray
Gathering, Rescue Race, Kids
Mini Bronc Ride, Branding,
Ranch Horse Bronc Ride. Call
Bill Adrian, 685-8105, to enter
teams. P35-2tc
PeTs/suPPlies
FOR SALE: AKC German Wire-
hair Pointers, born June 11,
2013. First shots, wormed, mi-
crochip implant, AKC documen-
tation. (5) females, (1) male.
$500. 808-895-9041, Milesville.
P36-4tp
Real esTaTe
WANTED: Couple looking to
rent/contract for deed: 1 bed-
room liveable home, preferably
with acreage. To be paid in full
within 5 years. Kadoka /
Belvidere / Midland. Call 517-
2254; email: saltycoot_09@
yahoo.com K36-1tp
HOUSE FOR SALE IN WALL: 2
bedrooms, 1 bath. Make an
offer. Call 279-2322. PW36-2tp
HOUSE FOR SALE: Asking
$25,000. 406 Norris St., Wall.
279-2825. PW36-2tp
FOR SALE – MUST BE MOVED:
1973 24x68 doublewide, 3
bdrms, 2 baths, new tin roof,
skirting, paint; sheetrocked; no
mice; above average condition.
Could be used as hired man
rental or at hunting camp. Call
Cody, 515-0316. P35-3tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: Asking
$25,000, 406 Norris St., Wall.
279-2825. PW35-2tp
HOME FOR SALE IN PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new
roof, windows, siding, high effi-
ciency heat/air with heat pump,
on-demand hot water, nice
propane fireplace, nice back-
yard, deck and more. Would
consider contract for deed. Con-
tact for showing: Don or Tami
Ravellette, 685-5147 (cell) or
859-2969 (home). P27-tfn
RenTals
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
Classified PoliCY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
Thank Yous
Thanks so much to my kids,
Monty, Laurel, Karen and We-
ston, for throwing a great party;
to all who came to celebrate with
me; those who called, sent cards
or stopped to greet me on the
street. Thanks!
Audrey Nieffer
84 Years Ago
August 8, 1929
Cow calling, almost a vanished
art on the American farm, is due
for a revival when a cow calling
contest will be staged as a feature
of the Haakon County Fair,
Philip, September 2, 3, and 4. Any
man, woman or child may take
part in the contest. Volume of
voice, carrying quality, musical
quality and the appeal the voice
would have on the cow will be fig-
ured by the judges. Contestants
are allowed to use whatever call
they think best, and will be al-
lowed as much time as desired.
Local News … A daughter ar-
rived to gladden the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Virgil Colvin of Powell
on Monday, August 5.
Maurine Ronning was the vic-
tim of a painful accident Monday
evening when she ran into a stick
breaking it off in her lower limb.
Dr. Ramsey was called to extract
it.
A rousing charivari was given in
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Leach at the parental Leach home
north of Ottumwa Monday
evening. Mrs. Leach was formerly
Miss Audrey Waldo and is one of
Haakon Countys most successful
teachers. The wedding occurred
on July 31.
Mr. and Mrs. Vance Vosburg
are the parents of a son born to
them last week. Mr. Vosburg has
been employed at the Philip Pan-
torium the past several months.
75 Years Ago
August 4, 1938
Fire broke out in the Philip
Farm Equipment Company late
Wednesday night causing dam-
ages estimated at between $5,000
and $6,000.
The flames ate their way
through over a ton of binder twine
stored in the rear end of the build-
ing, and damaged other equip-
ment on hand. Articles of clothing
and nearly a dozen guns which
were the property of Heavy Hohn
were lost in the blaze.
***
Careless driving on the part of
both drivers, Chester Farrell of
Philip and Edgar Baird of Dell
Rapids, was charged by a coro-
ner’s jury Tuesday as the cause of
an accident which resulted in the
death of Lois Fossum, 16, Baltic.
The accident occurred a few miles
south of Dell Rapids early Sunday
morning.
The accident occurred when the
two cars met in a head-on collision
when coming over a hill. Bright
lights on the Baird car blinded
Farrell, according to testimony
given.
In the crash the Fossum girl
was thrown out of the open car
and was dashed against the side
of the coupe driven by Farrell, the
impact killing her. Farrell’s car ca-
reened 150 feet down the road,
running into the ditch, stopping
against a fence.
***
Meeting in the court house
Tuesday afternoon, representa-
tives of the Philip city council, the
Philip Commercial club and the
Board of county commissioners
declared Haakon County’s condi-
tion is worse than at any time last
year and that farmers are more in
need of aid here than in any other
county in the state. Maintaining
that grasshopper and Mormon
cricket infestations in this section
are more severe than in any other
section and that, together with an-
other drouth, they have deprived
farmers of a cash income.
Schools and teachers have been
hired to teach are as follows:
Robinson Creek - Shirley Curtis,
Ottumwa - Edith Gillaspie, Berry
- Lorraine Griffiths, Jones - Mary
Whisler, Alfalfa Valley - Helen
Wintrode, Dean - Carol Poste, Nel-
son - Mary Martha Harty, East
Lincoln - Cynthia Peterson, Dead-
man - Dorothy Whisler, Nowlin -
Mildred Fairchild, Eureka - Mar-
garet DeYoung, Plainview - Mar-
jorie Olson, Elbon - Mayme
Beaton, O’Connell - Tresa Cook,
Sunshine - Opal Gee, Witcherhole
- Violet Pederson, Lucerne -
Gertrude Emerson, Miller -
Gertrude Doughty, North Schoen-
ing - Helen Hawkey, South
Schoening - Teresa Carley, Cherry
- Mary Lemen, Pleasant View -
Dorothy Oberembt, Powell - Mon-
ica Walsh, Maupin - Evelyn Cal-
hoon, Milesville - Leona Hamill,
Hardingrove - Harriet Olson, Hart
- Virginia Gillaspie, Butte - Esther
Peterson, Park - Grace Shannon,
Indian Springs - Helen Meals,
Robb’s Flat - Winifred Puryear,
Kuhl - Vivian Newby, Manila -
Audrey Leach, Rogers - Sophia
Marrington, Malone - Inez Ander-
son.
Betwixt News … Mr. and Mrs.
Rob Walters received word from
their son, Leonard, that he was in
an accident while working on the
gravel 25 miles south of Ft. Pierre.
Some of the machinery broke and
crushed two of his toes to the ex-
tent that his big toe had to be am-
putated at the first joint.
Local Briefs … Phyllis Horst
and Peggy O’Neill entertained
about twenty guests at the Horst
and O’Neill homes last week.
Blast from the Past
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
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Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE. SALE
TIME: 10 A.M. (MT}
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF
SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC
SHOTS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our
vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e
produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng 1ssues. Jo1n
1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL
& FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF & STOCK
COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAV-
ACANZA HOFSE SALE. VIEW ONLINE SOON!
CATTL£ R£PORT:
TU£SDAY, AUGUST JS, 2DJS
A b1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e ]or our Speo1o1
Yeor11ng So1e. MorKe1 ogo1n verg oompe1111ve.
Good oroud o] bugers. Mong 1Þ1nner bu11s 1n 1oun.
We1gÞ-ups & Þorses ne×1 ueeK.
YEARLINGS:
LANDERS LIVESTOCK CO - HOT SPRINGS
69....................................DLK & DWF STFS 815= .................$163.00
61 ..............................................DLK STFS 906= .................$155.00
62....................................DLK & DWF STFS 894= .................$155.75
61....................................DLK & DWF STFS 869= .................$157.75
61 ..............................................DLK STFS 891= .................$155.25
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
120 ............................................DLK STFS 828= .................$159.50
60 ..............................................DLK STFS 842= .................$158.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF -
204 ............................................DLK STFS 980= .................$145.50
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
65..............................................FWF STFS 837= .................$159.00
63 ...................................FWF & DWF STFS 898= .................$153.00
22...................................FED & FWF HFFS 835= .................$148.00
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
3 ................................................DLK STFS 712= .................$162.00
5................................................DLK HFFS 673= .................$148.50
HEWITT RANCH - PIEDMONT
13 ..............................................DLK STFS 887= .................$147.75
ROD KIRK - CODY, NE
7................................................DLK HFFS 866= .................$140.25
MADSEN RANCH CATTLE - MIDLAND
8 .....................................FED & DLK HFFS 789= .................$146.00
CASEY BRINK - UNION CENTER
7................................................DLK HFFS 858= .................$139.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND - RED OWL
7 ..............................................CHAF STFS 727= .................$154.50
9....................................CHAF & DLK HFFS 729= .................$151.75
SHAYNE PORCH - WANBLEE
2 ................................................DLK STFS 673= .................$163.00
2................................................DLK HFFS 650= .................$150.50
THOMPSON RANCH - WANBLEE
6................................................DLK HFFS 811= .................$141.75
SCHULTES RANCH - HOWES
11..............................................DLK HFFS 772= .................$140.00
MERLE HICKS - MARTIN
9 .....................................FED & DLK HFFS 803= .................$146.50
LONNIE HALL - SPEARFISH
14....................................FED & DLK STFS 613= .................$162.50
GEORGE GITTINGS - PHILIP
2 ................................................DLK STFS 670= .................$151.00
6................................................DLK HFFS 645= .................$147.00
WAYNE HEATH - CODY, NE
14..............................................DLK HFFS 861= .................$139.50
DAVID SCOTT - OWANKA
11..............................................DLK HFFS 734= .................$148.25
LARRY HEATH - CODY, NE
13..............................................DLK HFFS 845= .................$140.00
HARLEY & COLLEEN ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
14..............................................DLK HFFS 837= .................$141.50
DALE YOUNG - WANBLEE
6......................................FED & DLK STFS 811= .................$150.00
7................................................DLK HFFS 701= .................$149.50
SHANE GRUBL - RED OWL
10 .....................................DLK OPEN HFFS 966= .................$134.00
TERRY & LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
12 .............................................FED HFFS 934= .................$133.75
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
8..............................................CHAF HFFS 1071= ...............$113.50
SPRING CALVES:
BEAU BENDIGO - HOWES
14 ......................DLK MXD STF & HFF CLVS 338= .................$780.00
CREW CATTLE COMPANY - PHILIP
8 ......................CHAF MXD STF & HFF CLVS 371= .................$770.00
WEIGH-UPS:
DONELLE COBB - RED OWL
1 ..............................................CHAF COW 1440= .................$88.00
OFM PARTNERSHIP - CREIGHTON
1.................................................DLK COW 1355= .................$87.50
1.................................................DLK COW 1545= .................$85.00
1.................................................DLK COW 1650= .................$83.50
1.................................................DLK COW 1520= .................$82.50
BILL GIKLING - BOX ELDER
1..............................................HEFF DULL 2030= ...............$107.50
DAN STARR - BOX ELDER
1................................................FED DULL 2000= ...............$104.00
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
1..............................................CHAF DULL 1805= ...............$107.50
1..............................................CHAF DULL 2205= ...............$102.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE COMPANY - QUINN
1................................................DLK DULL 1980= ...............$103.00
JAMES MANSFIELD - NORRIS
1.................................................DLK COW 1020= .................$88.50
1................................................DWF COW 1320= .................$82.50
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1.................................................DLK COW 1370= .................$84.50
1 ..........................................DLK COWETTE 1145= .................$95.00
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1395= .................$84.00
1...............................................HEFF COW 1160= .................$83.00
1...............................................HEFF COW 1265= .................$82.00
4.............................................HEFF COWS 1313= .................$81.50
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1308= .................$81.25
3.............................................HEFF COWS 1322= .................$81.00
1................................................FWF COW 1215= .................$80.00
4.............................................HEFF COWS 1173= .................$78.25
17.....................................DLK COWS (WET} 1158= .................$78.00
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1530= .................$77.50
3.......................................HEFF COWETTES 828= ...................$96.50
1 ........................................HEFF COWETTE 950= ...................$92.50
2.......................................HEFF COWETTES 973= ...................$91.50
1................................................FED DULL 2050= ...............$103.50
ASA LEE HICKS - MARTIN
1.................................................DLK COW 1315= .................$82.50
1................................................DWF COW 1235= .................$81.50
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
1.................................................DLK COW 1255= .................$82.50
FLOY & ALAN OLSON - BOX ELDER
1 ..............................................CHAF COW 1385= .................$82.00
1................................................FED DULL 2025= ...............$100.50
ALLEN BADURE - BELVIDERE
2...............................................DLK COWS 1358= .................$81.50
3.....................................FED & DLK COWS 1440= .................$81.25
5.....................................FED & DLK COWS 1292= .................$80.50
1..........................................FWF COWETTE 1215= .................$88.50
NEWTON BROWN - FAITH
2...............................................FED COWS 1390= .................$80.75
3...............................................FED COWS 1480= .................$80.00
PAT GUPTILL - QUINN
1................................................FED DULL 2135= ...............$102.50
1................................................FED DULL 1840= .................$97.00
CHUCK WILLARD - BELVIDERE
1..............................................CHAF HFFT 970= .................$109.50
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 980= ...................$97.00
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 965= ...................$96.00
1..........................................FED COWETTE 1020= .................$95.50
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 1065= .................$94.00
1..........................................FED COWETTE 1025= .................$91.00
TOM MILLER - RED OWL
1................................................DLK DULL 1850= ...............$102.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1815= ...............$101.50
SHANE GRUBL - RED OWL
1................................................DLK DULL 1800= ...............$102.00
DIANE BISHOP - HERMOSA
1 ................................................FED COW 1270= .................$78.50
GARY ALLISON - CREIGHTON
2 ....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1590= .................$78.25
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
1...............................................HEFF COW 1430= .................$78.00
JON MILLAR - NEWELL
1................................................DLK DULL 2110= ...............$101.50
1................................................DLK DULL 1995= .................$97.00
JEREMY MANSFIELD - NORRIS
1................................................DLK DULL 1940= ...............$101.50
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
1.................................................DLK COW 1680= .................$77.50
ROGER PETERSON - PHILIP
1................................................DWF COW 1550= .................$77.00
STEVE CLEMENTS - PHILIP
39 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS (WET} 1350= .................$76.75
4 ....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1231= .................$75.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1.................................................DLK COW 1395= .................$76.50
3...............................................DLK COWS 1223= .................$75.25
TRAVIS THOMPSON - WANBLEE
2.........................................DLK COWETTES 1143= .................$89.00
TREVOR WILLIAMS - INTERIOR
1................................................DLK DULL 2030= ...............$101.00
BRETT GUPTILL - INTERIOR
1................................................DLK DULL 1945= ...............$101.00
BURL BARBER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1................................................DLK DULL 1605= ...............$101.00
LL & RE KJERSTAD - QUINN
1................................................DLK DULL 1980= ...............$100.50
LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
1................................................FED DULL 1890= ...............$100.00
GLEN SPRING - UNION CENTER
1................................................DLK DULL 1690= .................$99.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1720= .................$98.00
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
1................................................FED DULL 2130= .................$98.50
OBIE BRUNSKILL - PHILIP
1..............................................HEFF DULL 1910= .................$98.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1880= .................$95.50
MARLIN MAUDE - HERMOSA
1................................................DLK DULL 1870= .................$98.00
CODY O'DEA - MIDLAND
1................................................DLK DULL 1995= .................$97.50
August 15, 2013 • Pioneer Review 14
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
~ Saturday, August 17 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, August 19 ~
Prime Rib
Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
Salad Bar
Available at
Lunch!
~ Tuesday, August 13 ~
Ribeye Special
~ Wednesday, August 14 ~
French Dip, Fries
& Bowl of Salad
~ Thursday, August 15 ~
Beef Tip Basket
~ Friday Buffet, August 16 ~
Ground Sirloin
Chicken • Shrimp
Reservations:
859-2774
Greetings from sunny, breezy,
beautiful northeast Haakon
County. We have been blessed with
needed moisture and gorgeous days
in our part of the world. It has even
felt a bit like fall with the cool
nights and below average temper-
atures. The days are definitely get-
ting shorter, which means that the
fall and winter seasons are on their
way. However, for now it is won-
derful. We need some heat to give
the crops a chance to mature before
frost, and it sounds like we'll be
getting that heat later this week. I
hope the frost holds off for quite a
while!
The good news from the garden
is that the tomatoes are ripening –
bring on the BLTs! We have an
abundance of zucchini, so I need to
get creative with my recipes in
order to keep it used up. I've been
canning beans and dill pickles, and
I also canned some beet pickles and
of course made more chokecherry
jelly. The pantry shelves will look
wonderful once the canning is done
for the season. The potato plants
are dying back, so I've been digging
some of the spuds, and they taste
wonderful. Fresh veggies are a lux-
ury!
On to the news – Lola Roseth
traveled to Rapid City last Tues-
day. She spent the night with her
son, Rhett. After Rhett treated
Lola to breakfast Wednesday
morning, Lola spent the day help-
ing her mother, Joy Klima, move
back to Philip. Joy is now in the
Philip Nursing Home, and Lola
said she is settling in pretty well.
Wednesday evening, Lola and
Duane were supper guests at the
home of Jerry and Pam Ingram in
Philip. They toured Jerry and
Pam's yard – Lola said it is beauti-
fully manicured with tons of flow-
ers and very tasteful landscaping.
Pam and Jerry have an extensive
collection of birdhouses and a lot of
antiques in the yard, making it
simply beautiful! Saturday, Duane
and Lola went to Elm Springs to at-
tend a benefit for Celine Trask,
daughter of Pat and Rosemary
Trask who was injured last sum-
mer. There was a good turnout for
the event.
My sympathy to Dick and Gene
Hudson and the Snook families.
Gene's brother, Leland Snook,
passed away Saturday in Alton, Ill.
Leland had been a resident in the
nursing home there.
Dick and Gene Hudson spent
Friday through Sunday in Ft.
Pierre attending achievement days
activities. Other than that, Gene
said she has been busy with yard
and garden work.
Dorothy Paulson said she and
Nels have continued to be busy fix-
ing fence and chasing cows. They
now have a double electric fence,
which seems to be keeping the cat-
tle where they are supposed to be.
Success!
Billy and Arlyne Markwed were
in Faith last Wednesday to attend
the bronc ride. Arlyne said the
event continues to grow, and there
was a great crowd this year. Satur-
day night, they joined a group at
Marvin Coleman's place for his an-
nual fish fry. Sunday, they went
back to Faith to attend the rodeo –
part of Faith's annual celebration.
Carmen Alleman said "Grandma
Camp" is still going strong. Their
granddaughter, Morgan, is staying
with them until school starts. Last
Thursday, Carmen had a dental
appointment in Rapid City. She
said it wasn't very good planning
because of all the Sturgis rally traf-
fic, but fortunately the traffic was-
n't too bad on the roadways she
traveled. Last Saturday was the
birthday of Phyllis Stoeser, sister
of Clark Alleman. Happy belated
birthday to Phyllis! To mark the
day, Clark and Carmen took Phyl-
lis and Ben out for lunch, followed
by a drive around the countryside.
Frank and Shirley Halligan kept
grandsons, Jerin and Krece, last
Friday while the boys' big brother,
J.J., had knee surgery. J.J. will be
slowed up for a while. Saturday,
Frank and Shirley attended the
wedding of Rio Reeves and Jessica
Simon in Pierre. Shirley said it was
a beautiful wedding with very cre-
ative decorations. Sunday, they at-
tended the 50th wedding
anniversary celebration for friends,
Mack and Karen Wyly. Later in the
day, Frank attended the 4-H pre-
mium sale in Ft. Pierre.
Helen Beckwith traveled to the
Brookings area a couple of weeks
ago to meet with her siblings and
take care of business related to her
father's estate. She visited with
their daughter, Lori, in Huron on
her way home. Ron and Helen have
a beautiful garden, and they have
been canning beans, pickles, and
beets. She said their tomatoes are
beginning to ripen also. Ron and
Helen's daughter and son-in-law,
Rose and Levi Briggs, and children
spent last weekend at the farm.
While there, they installed an
awning over Ron and Helen's patio
area. Sunday, Gary and Anne
Beckwith were visitors. The group
went fishing and finished the day
with a fish fry.
Joyce Jones has been busy clean-
ing and organizing in her home. I
should probably invite her to my
house! She said it is much easier to
start a craft or handiwork project
when all of the components are
where they are supposed to be. Sat-
urday, Joyce traveled to Redfield to
attend a 60th wedding anniversary
celebration for some longtime East-
ern Star friends. Grandchildren,
Luke and Mattie, took part in the
achievement days activities in Ft.
Pierre over the weekend, and they
did very well.
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser were
in Pierre on Friday night to attend
a surprise birthday party for
Mary's sister, Cindy, and Cindy's
husband, Gaylon Gerber. Both of
their birthdays fall in August.
There was a large crowd, and sev-
eral of Mary's siblings were in at-
tendance. Kevin and Mary spent
the remainder of the weekend at
the ranch.
Mary Briggs said that her week
consisted of driving and working!
Lee Briggs is continuing with
wheat harvest, but the recent wet
weather has made it a little slow
going. Mary said this may be one of
those years where they will be
lucky to be done with the wheat by
September! Granddaughter Kinsey
came home with Mary Wednesday
while Kinsey's parents, Clay and
Rea Riggle, spent several days at
the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Mary
worked from home Friday, and
later in the day she and Kinsey
took Kinsey and Cattibrie's 4-H
projects in to Ft. Pierre for achieve-
ment days. Saturday, part of the
day was spent helping Lee shuffle
vehicles around in the field. Satur-
day afternoon, Mary and Kinsey
drove to Dupree to visit Mary's sis-
ter, Sue Starr. Sunday afternoon,
Mary met Clay and Rea at the Ot-
tumwa turnoff so Kinsey could go
home with her parents.
Julian and Coreen Roseth had
little visitors from Tuesday
through Thursday last week. The
daycare was closed, so Vance and
Kristin Martin's children spent a
few days with grandpa and
grandma. Coreen said she has been
doing lots of mowing – that seems
to be a common theme among most
everyone I talk to.
Jon and Connie Johnson and
their boys spent several long days
in Ft. Pierre last weekend, taking
part in the achievement days activ-
ities. Connie said they were up and
on the road by about 5:30 in the
morning and returned home about
11 p.m. at night. That does make
for long days! However, it was
worth it. Noah Johnson was
awarded best of show in range and
pasture, painting, and horticulture
Friday. Saturday, Noah was
awarded grand champion (in his
age bracket) in showmanship for
poultry. In the older age bracket,
Wyatt Johnson won grand cham-
pion in showmanship for poultry,
and Avery Johnson was crowned
reserve champion. This year, they
had a small animal round robin,
and the 4-H young people got to
show animals that they don't nor-
mally work with. Wyatt got to show
a small dog, and Connie said it
seemed like all the dog wanted to
do was "sit!" Connie said it was
very entertaining, which was the
intent. The kids and the crowd had
a great time. Sunday, Wyatt
showed a feeder calf and received a
purple ribbon. However, poultry
continues to comprise the bulk of
the Johnson's entries. This year,
the boys took 70 birds to achieve-
ment days. They washed the birds
Thursday to prepare for the compe-
tition – that must have been quite
a process! This is Wyatt's last year
for 4-H competition, but he will
continue to be involved in the or-
ganization. Avery was one of South
Dakota's representatives on the 4-
H Citizenship Washington Focus
trip earlier this summer. He and
another of the representatives had
a lemonade stand Sunday, raising
over $100 for pediatric cancer pa-
tients. After the long weekend in
Ft. Pierre, Connie spent Monday at
the Cheyenne School where she is
the teacher, getting prepared for
the start of the school year. Connie
said teacher's meetings will begin
on the 19th, and the students will
report for class on the 21st.
Ray and Nancy Neuhauser
joined some of Nancy's daughters
and families who were camping at
the Oahe campground over the
weekend. Nancy said they all en-
joyed the visiting, campfires, s'-
mores, and fresh fish grilled over
the fire.
Polly Bruce said they had a rela-
tively quiet week, but it seemed
like there was still a lot of activity.
Tuesday, Bill and Polly were in
town for groceries and supplies.
Also on Tuesday, their son, David,
came from his home in Box Elder to
work on a tractor. He returned to
his home Wednesday. Friday, Bill
and Polly's daughter, Marcia
Simon, and Megan stopped for a
visit. They had been to Pierre for
dental appointments, and they
were returning to their home near
Eagle Butte. Saturday was a damp
day, and Vince and Katie Bruce
helped Tom Zander work cattle.
Later in the day, they attended a
50th birthday party for Duane
Prince. Bill and Polly attended
church in Midland Saturday
evening. The Bruce's grandson,
Jessie, has been helping at the
ranch this summer and he re-
turned to his home in Ashton on
Sunday in order to prepare for his
senior year of high school.
(continued next week)
Moenville News|Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325

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