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Pioneer Review, August 1, 2013

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$
1
00
Includes Tax
12 Pro Winter Wheat ........$6.57
Any Pro .........................$6.07
14 Pro Spring Wheat ........$6.59
Corn ...................................$5.04
SFS Birdseed ..................$19.00
West river rural Water
Development District
Proceedings
* * * *
Notices to Creditors
* * * *
Notice of Hearing
* * * *
Notice of Laps of Mineral Interests
14
Paulson’s Stave
Church 2
Badlands intern 10
Hot Summer Nights
concludes 11
Philip, South Dakota 57567 THurSDAy, AuGuST 1, 2013 pioneer-review.com
No. 49, Vol. 107
LOCAL
MARKETS
LEGALS
The asphalt paving of E. Pine Street was started Wednesday, July 24. Blacktop was laid from the intersection near the post
office uphill to the intersection near Philip Livestock Auction and then north to Highway 14. Concrete was poured in at the
intersection of E. Hone Street and Wray Avenue for better wear under the weight of turning trucks. Despite overnight rain,
the project was completed Thursday, July 25. The resurfacing project is a stopgap to temporarily alleviate the pothole prob-
lems for approximately four to five years. Possibly by then the city budget will allow for the road to be replace or upgraded.
Paving of E. Pine Street completed
Del Bartels/Pioneer Review
Curb and gutter concrete work was put in on the east side of lower N. Wood Avenue, Wednesday, July 24. The west side
had been poured earlier. The project is proceding on schedule.
Wood Avenue work on schedule
by Del Bartels
The Haakon/Jackson 4-H
Leader’s Council annually spon-
sors up to two high school stu-
dents to join other South Dakota
young adults in the national Citi-
zenship Washington Focus trip.
This year, Katie Haigh and Sam
Stangle passed the application, in-
terview and selection process for
the trip to Washington, D.C., June
15-23. Avery Johnson, Hayes, at-
tended under the sponsorship of
the Stanley/ Hughes 4-H Leader-
ship Association. Haigh, daughter
of Ron and Nancy Haigh, Philip,
Stangle, son of Jim and Linda
Stangle, Milesville, and Johnson,
son of Jon and Connie Johnson, all
attend Philip High School. The
other Stanley/Hughes selection
was Cade Larson, son of David
and Kim Larson, Fort Pierre.
“We were constantly doing stuff,
about every minute of every day.
we had some free time, about an
hour a day, but that kept getting
cut short,” said Haigh, relating
how many things there were to do.
The trip began with a marathon
ride, with the two South Dakota
bus loads of students joining in
Sioux Falls and proceding to
Washington to join with other na-
tionwide 4-H members on the
same trip. “All the kids on the bus
joked around and had a good
time,” said Johnson. “The ride got
a little long, having to sleep on the
bus, but we had fun, too.”
The traveling itself also stood
out in Haigh’s mind. Around
Chicago they began stopping for
toll booths. “We got to ride the
Metro, which is like the D.C. ver-
sion of the subway. It was really
cool, something I’ve never done be-
fore,” said Haigh.
“The thing that really stood out,
I thought, was all the youth in-
volvement, several different
states, was neat,” said Johnson.
“Different parts of the country,
different accents and ways of
doing things, but we are all inter-
ested in 4-H and we are the same
in some respects.”
That diversity of the 4-H mem-
bers also extended throughout the
entire trip for Stangle. “In South
Dakota you are a little bit shel-
tered. In D.C. you get to see cul-
tures you would never see if you
stayed in South Dakota,” said
Stangle. The group took a road
trip to Boston for a cultural her-
itage night, where they saw a
comedy production about nuns
from all around the world trying
to raise money for a convent. “Re-
ally funny, people of all races
laughing and having fun,” said
Stangle. He said that throughout
the trip he saw all different kinds
of people, yet he saw no discrimi-
nation. “You walk up to them and
talked like anyone else. It was re-
ally cool.”
“I thought going to all the differ-
ent monuments and memorials
was really neat,” said Johnson.
“But, I especially thought the
Capitol building was the most
memorable. It is our nation’s
Capitol building, also the architec-
ture with the high domed ceiling
and many statues – it was a neat
building.”
Haigh said you could see the
Washington Monument from
wherever you were.
For Stangle, the most interest-
ing aspect was meeting South
Dakota Representative Kristi
Noem and Senator John Thune.
Senator Tim Johnson was in a
meeting, though they did tour his
offices. “It was interesting getting
their thoughts on the current is-
sues facing America,” said Stan-
gle. For Stangle, the most fun part
was seeing the Smithsonian Insti-
tute’s museums of American his-
tory, natural history and air and
space. He took a photo of the orig-
inal Kermit the Frog puppet. “I re-
ally liked the Muppets. It was
really cool to see Kermit the Frog
in person,” said Stangle.
Haigh noticed the differences
Local students on 4-H Citizenship Washington Focus trip
Courtesy photo
The 2013 South Dakota Citizenship Washington Focus group posed at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center in Chevy Chase, Md., before they de-
parted for a cultural heritage night at Toby’s Dinner Theater in Baltimore for a performance of the musical comedy Nunsense.
from home. The humidity was far
higher – the accents and saying
“y’all” a lot – calling pop a coke –
and trees everywhere. The num-
ber of trees was a new experience
for Haigh. “We got into Wisconsin
and there were trees, Pennsylva-
nia and nothing but trees, On the
interstate (in South Dakota) you
can see for 10 miles, there, noth-
ing but trees,” said Haigh.
“Going to Washington D.C. may
not be a once in a life opportunity,
but for me it might have been, so
I jumped on the opportunity,” said
Johnson. “It’s a great opportunity.
If 4-Hers are offered the chance,
they should go for it.”
Stangle also thought it was a
great trip, and it was easy to
apply. “You have a ton of fun,”
said Stangle. He would like to go
back, but with even more time for
the trip. “It all flew by so fast.”
Haigh agreed that 4-H members
should go on the trip. “You’ll enjoy
yourself,” she said.
The Haakon County Public Library’s summer reading program concluded Wednes-
day, July 24. There was an average attendance of 18 children per week and they
read more than 10,000 pages over the course of the eight-week program. The
adults who signed up for the program read over 25,700 pages. The children in
the photo were drawing chalk pictures on the sidewalk in front of the courthouse.
Summer reading program
Courtesy photo
The United States House of Rep-
resentatives passed H.R.2609, the
Energy and Water Appropriations
bill for fiscal year 2014, by a vote of
227-198. Included in the final pas-
sage were two amendments previ-
ously offered by Representative
Kristi Noem and passed by the
House.
“This bill includes policy provi-
sions that will benefit families and
communities across our state,” said
Noem. “From furthering develop-
ment of rural water projects like
Lewis and Clark to ensuring the
Corps of Engineers doesn’t over-
reach its authority, this bill is a
good example of how we can re-
sponsibly use taxpayer dollars to
provide essential services to our
communities. I’m hopeful the Sen-
ate will soon take up its appropria-
tions bill so we can move to
conference and send this legisla-
tion to the president for his signa-
ture.”
Noem’s first amendment di-
rected $25 million in additional
funding for rural water projects,
like the Lewis and Clark rural
water system. This amendment did
not increase spending in the legis-
lation because it redirects money
from other portions of the bill to be
spent on these water projects.
Noem’s second amendment pro-
hibits the U.S. Army Corps of En-
gineers from charging constituents
in South Dakota, North Dakota
and Montana a fee for surplus
water from the Missouri River. The
amendment specifically prohibits
the Corps of Engineers from using
any of the funds in the bill to issue
rules or regulations related to
charging a fee for surplus water.
House approves energy and
water appropriations
Lifeway Christian Resources is
slated to bring Bible teacher and
best selling author Beth Moore to
Philip via simulcast on September
14. The Philip Community Evan-
gelical Free Church will be serving
as the host location for this Living
Proof live broadcast.
The day will start at 7:15 a.m.
and end at 2:15 p.m. The broadcast
is geared mostly for women, though
all are welcome from Philip, the
surrounding communities of
Milesville, Midland, Kadoka,
Murdo, Wall and farther out. For
more information and to register,
contact Tanya McIlravy at 859-
2398 or communityefc@live.com.
Moore has authored dozens of
Bible studies, books and devotion-
als specifically for women for
nearly two decades. Her latest re-
lease, “James: Mercy Triumphs,” is
a Bible study that equips women to
put their faith in action. Moore’s or-
ganization, Living Proof Ministries,
is based out of Houston, Texas.
Award winning musical artist
Travis Cottrell, who also serves as
worship pastor of Englewood Bap-
tist Church in Jackson, Tenn., is
slated to lead worship for the
event.
The event, now in its 15th year,
challenges and encourages women
to grow deeply in their faith. Join
250,000 women around the world
for this live, global, internet
streaming event. The simulcast
gives the local church a front row
seat to a one-of-a-kind Bible teach-
ing and life changing worship.
Moore to speak via simulcast in Philip
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vertising as a means of reaching people.
This publication’s goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of free speech. Your comments are welcomed and en-
couraged.
The Pioneer Review • P.O. Box 788 • Philip, SD 57567-0788
(605) 859-2516 • FAX: (605) 859-2410
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Editorial
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 2
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Lookin’ Around by Syd Iwan
How are you at feeble excuses?
You know, the kinds of things you
come up with to justify what you
want to do. Take the cartoon I saw
the other day where the man is
reaching into the freezer at the
grocery store and says, “We’d bet-
ter buy some ice cream to keep the
butter cool on the way home.” His
wife looks on with a skeptical ex-
pression meaning she thinks the
butter would arrive home just fine
without the added coolant of the
ice cream, but she doesn’t say
anything. Chances are she’s
thinking she might want to buy
something they don’t really need
as well and may have to come up
with a similar bit of misdirection.
Well, there’s nothing wrong
with buying ice cream, but ice
cream has been known to add
poundage to a person and some of
us don’t need that. You might
have to come up with a good rea-
son to buy it when maybe you re-
ally shouldn’t. There are other
cases where similar circum-
stances may apply.
For example, some folks claim
they are going to the city to take
advantage of the lower prices of-
fered at discount stores and such.
This has some credence because
you can save substantially in cer-
tain cases. You have to remember,
though, that the gas to get you
there and back could well cost
fifty bucks. So, let’s say laundry
detergent sells for ten dollars a
bottle locally and only six in the
city. That saves you four dollars,
but you’d have to buy over twelve
bottles of it to save the cost of your
traveling expenses. Either that or
make cost-saving purchases on
lots of other items.
What I suspect is that people
might want to go to the city to eat
out, catch a movie, or find some
other interesting forms of enter-
tainment. That’s okay, but saying
you’re going there to save money
on things you need might not be
the whole truth, so to speak. If
you have to go to keep a doctor’s
appointment or consult your tax
man, that’s different. Some serv-
ices are not available locally, and
you have to drive a ways to find
them. In that case, it does make
some sense to shop while you’re
there and save back a little of
your gas expense. A few times,
though, I’ve bought something in
the city thinking I was saving
money only to find it offered more
cheaply close to home. This is ir-
ritating. As a result, I’ve had to
reconsider my original idea that
things can always be purchased
more cheaply in big stores than
little ones. It isn’t necessarily so.
Impulse buying of weird stuff is
also a problem when you visit big
stores.
Then we come to cowboys. They
have a million and one reasons
why they should get on their
horses and ride instead of, say,
painting the barn or fixing the ac-
cursed tractor. They may need to
check the cattle in general, check
the fences, see if the salt supply is
running low, and, of course, in-
spect the dams in case some crit-
ter has gotten itself stuck in the
mud. What is difficult in terms of
trying to refute any such excuses
is that the Bible recommends, “Be
sure you know the condition of
your flocks; give careful attention
to your herds.” There are times, of
course, that nothing needs check-
ing very badly once the calving
season is over, the fences have
been checked and rechecked, and
the dams are full enough that
mud isn’t a problem. This doesn’t
keep your normal cowboy from
dragging out these “needs” to go
riding, but they should be taken
for what they are instead of by
how they’re explained. Ditto for
cowgirls.
The same thing might apply to
four-wheelers which are just a
kind of substitute for horse-back
riding but also fun. I personally
have dreamt up any number of
compelling reasons to rev up our
little four-wheeler and tear off
across the prairie. Unfortunately,
I married a schoolteacher who has
a low-gullibility factor and tends
to see right through me. That
doesn’t keep me from trying
though.
Just today I told her that I
needed to go to the steakhouse
since I hadn’t been there in quite
a while and they might think I
didn’t love them anymore. She
replied, “And because you’re tired
of cooking.” “That too,” I agreed,
and headed out.
At the moment, I need to come
up with some sort of lame excuse
for taking a nap. I’ve been busy
and productive today and have
managed to tire myself out. Wait.
Being tired is a legitimate reason
for resting. I don’t have to make
up an excuse. I can just go take a
nap. That, therefore, is where I’m
headed very shortly. Catch you
later.
E-MAIL ADDRESSES: ADS: ads@pioneer-review.com • NEWS: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Philip, SD
U.S.P.S. 433-780
Feeble excuses
CC, FB & VB PARENTS’ MEETING … Tuesday, August 6, 6:00
p.m. in the Philip High School. Cross Country is in Room A-3; Foot-
ball in Fine Arts Gym; and Volleyball in Room A-1.
GARDEN TALK … about wildlife/bird gardening by Elke Baxter
will be presented during the Haakon/Jackson County Fair at 2:00
p.m. at the Legion Hall in Philip on Saturday, August 3. Everyone
is welcome to attend.
LADIES’ PRAYER BREAKFAST … will be Monday, August 5,
at 7:00 a.m. in the Senechal Apts. lobby, Philip. All ladies welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Country Praises by Del Bartels
Older folks may recall the
axiom, “If the only game in town
is poker, then you learn to play
poker.” That applies to anything
anywhere.
I fondly remember my brother
and me going with my father to
the pool hall in Dad’s former
hometown. The community was
tiny and the pool hall was the
main meeting place. It had public
restrooms, served simple lunches,
had a pay phone in back and was
open when most other places
weren’t. The only game in town
was the pool hall, so everybody
stopped in, whether it served alco-
hol or not.
Now, the town I call home has
its own ‘only’ games in town, and
it is my home because of that. I
am not much of a drinker, a so-
cialite, a pool player or late night
conversationalist. Yet, I am in the
local alcohol establishments fairly
frequently. The chamber of com-
merce meets there. Functions that
could be labeled as ‘family’ are
often held there – meals, karaoke,
wedding receptions, crawdad
feeds, even talented minors pro-
viding the musical entertainment.
The town’s other entertain-
ments can be loosely put under an
umbrella heading of fundraisers.
These range from church bingo,
Relay For Life cancer walks, fire
department dances, walking taco
feeds, sports team car washes,
pancake breakfasts, free-will sup-
pers at the local kiddie park, and
the list almost endlessly goes on.
If either volunteering to work
these fundraisers, or being a cus-
tomer paying in to raise these
funds, is the only game in town,
then deal me in.
Officially, the place to get news
is the local newspaper. Unoffi-
cially, and for “other” news, you go
to one of the coffee shops. Some of
these social gatherings are sort of
traditional, and some happen
spontaneously. Many alternative
news items have been passed on
there, and many of the world’s
problems have been solved there.
Rarely, if ever, does the newspa-
per and a coffee shop cover the
same details. I may take coffee
shop news and solutions with
more than a grain of salt, but go
ahead and pour me a cup of coffee.
I love tennis, chess, frisbee golf,
and picking chokecherries for
jelly, but these aren’t the games
around here. I have willingly
learned at least the jargon of golf,
basketball, branding and demoli-
tion derbies. If I couldn’t survive
without art galleries, cappuccino,
traffic, the wrong side of town,
and a police force in the hundreds,
then I would move away from
here. Community theater, rather
than Broadway, is the game in
town. A handshake, rather than a
witnessed document in triplicate,
is the game here. First name,
rather than job title, is the way to
greet people. Crawdads are my
choice over lobster, large-mouth
bass over ocean salmon, beef over
chicken, best jeans over black tie.
The only game in town may be
the only way of doing things in the
area. That defines the area and
the people. It is not disrespectful
that other people’s way of life sim-
ply would not fit here. They have
their games in their home areas.
My home has its own, and we all
ante up.
Only game in town
Saturday, July 27, Maylin and
Alissa Brucklacher competed in
the Colorado State Champi-
onships in Swimming and Gym-
nastics. The girls are the
daughters of Matthew and Sonja
Brucklacher of Greeley, Colo., the
grandchildren of Mark and Carla
Brucklacher, Wall, and the great-
grandchildren of Al and Lenore
Brucklacher, Philip.
Maylin, age 12, swam the but-
terfly portion of the medley relay,
placing 11th out of 30 plus teams.
The team’s freestyle relay was
seeded 15th, but surprised every-
one by shaving off five seconds on
their time to place eighth in the
state. Maylin swam the second leg
of this relay, overtaking three
competitors to give her team a big
edge in their heat.
Alissa, age nine, competed in
gymnastics in the Super 4 level,
an advanced level where they
compete against all ages – seven
to 18 years of age. Alissa competed
in all five divisions at the compe-
tition – bars, beam, vault, floor
and all-around. She placed second
in vault, fifth in bars and sixth in
floor in the individual state cham-
pionships. She scored high in all
events and took third place in the
all-around state championships.
She came home with four medals.
Courtesy photo
Brucklachers place at state
swimming/gymnasics event
Alissa and Maylin Brucklacher
by Senator John Thune
The days of summer are slowly
fading. While there is still time be-
fore heading back to school, many
college students and their families
have been keeping a watchful eye
for news coming out of Washington
about what student loan interest
rates will look like for the coming
school year. On July 1, 2013, Fed-
eral Subsidized Stafford Loans re-
turned from the temporary rate of
3.4 percent to 6.8 percent.
The return to higher rates was
part of legislation Congress passed
in 2007, which provided a tempo-
rary, phased-in reduction of inter-
est rates from 6.8 percent to 3.4
percent for Federal Subsidized
Stafford Loans. This reduced inter-
est rate was set to return to its
fixed rate of 6.8 percent after July
of 2012. However, last year, Con-
gress enacted a one-year extension
of the 3.4 percent rate. That exten-
sion expired on June 30, 2013. The
recent rate change to 6.8 percent
set many students and parents on
edge about the cost of financing ed-
ucation.
Unfortunately, while students
were left wondering how they
would shoulder the burden of
higher interest rates, public dis-
agreement between the president
and Senate Democrats left legisla-
tion to provide relief to students at
a standstill in the Senate. Thank-
fully, the Senate was able to reach
a bipartisan agreement that will
provide a sustainable, market-
based solution that ensures access
and affordability for all students,
including students with subsidized
and unsubsidized loans. Previous
Democrat proposals ignored the
problem of high interest rates for
other types of federal education
loans and would have only ad-
dressed interest rates for 40 per-
cent of student loan borrowers.
This bipartisan proposal passed by
the Senate reduces interest rates
for all students.
The Senate bill would allow rates
to float with the U.S. Treasury 10-
year borrowing rates, plus an add-
on for costs associated with
defaults, collections, deferments,
forgiveness and delinquency. This
allows students to benefit from the
current low interest rate environ-
ment while better protecting tax-
payers from unnecessarily subsi-
dizing lower rates, saving both stu-
dents and taxpayers billions of dol-
lars. The resulting interest rates
for loans taken out this year, after
July 1, 2013, would be 3.86 percent
for subsidized and unsubsidized
loans for undergraduate students,
5.41 percent on unsubsidized loans
for graduate students, and 6.41
percent on PLUS loans for parents
and graduate students. These rates
would apply retroactively to newly
issued loans taken out after July 1,
2013.
The costs of attending college can
create challenging and stressful
situations for some families, but
providing certainty about interest
rates can help ease the burden. I
am pleased that the Senate was
able to reach a bipartisan, perma-
nent market-based solution that
lowers interest rates for all stu-
dents.
Keeping student loan interest rates low
Dear Editor:
I understand that Philip native
son Guy (Gaylord) Paulson recently
donated to the library a copy of the
DVD about his bulding of the Hop-
perstad Stave Church in Moor-
head, Minn., as well as a book
about his many woodcarving proj-
ects over the years.
He asked me for museum
brochures to include with his dona-
tion so that Haakon County resi-
dents might learn about our
museum and come up and see us. I
am writing to make a formal invi-
tation to the folks of the Philip re-
gion to visit the Historical and
Cultural Society of Clay County;
we run the museum at the
Hjemkomst Center.
Paulson also kindly included in
his donation a DVD of the docu-
mentary about the building and
sailing of the Hjemkomst Viking
ship to Norway in 1982. We take
care of the ship and the church for
the city of Moorhead, and we make
sure there are additional exhibits
to see throughout the four floors,
going down, of the museum.
I heartily hope that people from
your region can come up to see
what we have to offer. In the mean-
time, stop by the library and check
out one or both of the DVDs and
take a look at Guy’s impressive
handiwork. You many be inspired
to take a read trip north.
Sincerely,
/s/ Maureen Kelly Jonason
HCSCC executive director
Courtesy photos
At left is the Hopperstad Stave Church
in Moorhead, Minn., built mostly by
Philip native Guy (Gaylord) Paulson.
Above is the Hjemkomst Viking ship
that sailed to Norway in 1982.
To the Editor
Make your opinion known …
write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your
phone number to: news-
desk@pioneer-review.com
by Rep. Kristi Noem
I recently had the opportunity to
play in the Congressional Women’s
Softball Game, where female law-
makers team up and play female
members of the media in a softball
game for charity.
All proceeds of the ticket sales
went to benefit the Young Survival
Coalition (YSC), a global organiza-
tion dedicated to critical issues
unique to young women who are di-
agnosed with breast cancer. In par-
ticular, the YSC offers resources,
connections and outreach to young
women with breast cancer. Accord-
ing to the American Cancer Soci-
ety, about 12 percent of women in
the United States will develop in-
vasive breast cancer during their
lifetime.
Roughly $125,000 was raised for
the Young Survival Coalition.
Softball for
a cause
DakotaFest
IDEAg Dakotafest will be held
August 20-22 at the Schlaffman
Farm near Mitchell, South
Dakota. South Dakota State Uni-
versity and SDSU Extension will
be present with information and
answers to your questions. If you
make the trip and want to visit
the SDSU exhibits, head to the
northwest corner of the event site
and look for the blue tent. There
are also rumors that SDSU ice
cream will be served each day
around noon!
Winter Wheat Meeting –
Draper
SDSU Extension will be hold-
ing a Winter Wheat Meeting in
Draper on Tuesday, August 27.
The meeting will be held at the
Auditorium in Draper and begin
at 6:30 p.m. (CT) with a meal pre-
pared by a local group of church
women. There is no cost to attend.
Speakers will be Nathan
Mueller, SDSU Extension Agron-
omist and Lisa Elliot, SDSU Ex-
tension Commodity Marketing
Specialist. Nathan will be dis-
cussing changes to the recom-
mended and acceptable/promising
variety list, results of the Crop
Performance Testing (CPT) trials,
and discussing some highlights of
the 2012-13 production year. Al-
though one producer stated that a
lot of area producers won’t have a
lot of wheat to market, Lisa will
provide an outlook for wheat
prices based on supply and de-
mand, as well as comments on
other crops producers will be rais-
ing. She will also comment on po-
tential changes in the crop
insurance program.
Producers and area agrono-
mists will also be interested in
meeting Dr. Chris Graham,
SDSU Extension Agronomist-
West River, who is joining SDSU
Extension the week before the
meeting and plans to attend.
Chris has most recently worked
at Cornell University and will be
based at the West River Research
and Extension Center in Rapid
City. Chris is ready to begin con-
ducting research and developing
educational programming in
western South Dakota and inter-
ested in getting acquainted with
producers.
This meeting has been running
for over 20 years, with attendance
ranging from 50-75+ people, most
of which are producers, and con-
sidered one of the best Extension
meetings in the area. The meal is
sponsored by area agribusinesses,
and representatives from many of
the businesses attend. The meet-
ing is well known for good food,
good information, and a great op-
portunity to network with fellow
producers across a wide area.
For more information contact the
Winner Regional Extension Cen-
ter, 842-1267.
Calendar
8/27: Winter Wheat Meeting,
6:30 p.m. (CT), Draper
Extension
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
regional Extension Center
Pioneer Review • 859-2516
ads@pioneer-review.com • www.pioneer-review.com
Rural Livin’
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 3
Thursday: Partly cloudy. High of 81F.
Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday Night: Partly cloudy with
a chance of a thunderstorm and
rain. Low of 50F. Winds from the ENE at
10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 60% with rain-
fall amounts near 0.2 in. possible.
Friday: Overcast with a chance of rain.
High of 81F. Breezy. Winds from the
ENE at 15 to 20 mph. Friday Night:
Partly cloudy with a chance of a thun-
derstorm. Fog overnight. Low of 50F. Breezy. Winds
from the East at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain
40% with rainfall amounts near 0.5 in. possible.
Saturday: Overcast with a chance of a thunder-
storm. Fog early. High of 79F. Breezy. Winds
from the East at 15 to 20 mph. Chance of rain
70% with rainfall amounts near 0.6 in. possi-
ble. Saturday Night: Partly cloudy with a chance
of a thunderstorm. Fog overnight. Low of 48F. Breezy.
Winds from the East at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 50%
with rainfall amounts near 0.2 in. possible.
Sunday: Overcast with a chance of a thunderstorm.
Fog early. High of 79F. Breezy. Winds from the ESE
at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 50% with rainfall
amounts near 0.2 in. possible. Sunday Night: Partly
cloudy with a chance of a thunderstorm. Fog overnight. Low
of 54F. Breezy. Winds from the ESE at 10 to 20 mph. Chance
of rain 20% with rainfall amounts near 0.2 in. possible.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK has you
COMPLETELY COVERED when it
comes to the SAFETY OF YOUR
MONEY. Our accounts are
INSURED SAFE by the F.D.I.C.
FIRST
NATIONAL BANK
PHILIP, S.D. FAITH, S.D.
605-859-2525 605-967-2191
www.fnbphilip.com
Member FDIC
Soil Days/Rangeland Days celebrates 30th anniversary
The 30th annual Soil Days and
Rangeland Days, co-hosted by the
Jackson and Haakon County Con-
servation Districts, were held at
Kadoka, June 25-26.
Seventy-five students from four
categories: New Rangers, Wran-
glers, Scouts, Go-Getters, partici-
pated in the two day event.
Soil Days is held to teach about
one of the most important South
Dakota resources, our soils.
Rangeland Days is an opportu-
nity to learn more about one of the
most important South Dakota re-
sources, our rangelands. Learning
activities were designed for a va-
riety of age groups and expertise,
from eight years old through
adult. Starting with plant mor-
phology and identification on up to
judging habitat suitability for cat-
tle or grouse.
The two day event was made up
of a practice judging day followed
by a timed contest judging day, for
student land (soil), and range
judgers.
Student land (soil) judgers
identified soil texture and struc-
ture, calculated slope, determined
top and subsoil depth, and recom-
mendedd conservation practices to
improve land capability.
Student range judgers partici-
pated in plant and ecological site
identification, ecological condition
rating, identifying goals and mak-
ing recommendations to meet
those goals, livestock carrying ca-
pacity determination, and live-
stock and wildlife habitat rating.
The winning 4-H Land (Soil)
and Range teams qualifed to com-
pete at the national competition,
which will be held in May 2014 at
Oklahoma City.
This event would not have been
possible without the help and as-
sistance of many key people and
organizations, particularly South
Dakota Natural Resources Con-
servation Service and South
Dakota State University special-
ists, and the local people assisting
in the coordination and implemen-
tation of the event and activities.
The 2013 winning 4-H land
(Soils) team was Spink County 4-
H, Hitchcock/Tulare, comprised of
Cooper Gordon, Trevor Hofer,
Landon Gatzke and Trista Fliehe.
The 2013 winning 4-H Range
Team was Perkins County, com-
prised of Kailyn Dix, Shyenne
Siedel, Quirt Beer and Rachel
Siedel.
The 2013 speech winner was
Kadon Leddy of Stockholm. Leddy
qualified, to attend and present a
speech at the February 2014, In-
ternational Society for Range
Management (SRM) meeting in
Orlando, Florida.
Top Hand Buckle winners
were: New Rangers (8-11)
(judge, give speech, display) was
Hunter Eide, Gettysburg.
Wranglers (12-14) Top Hand
was Kaylen Stearns, Edgemont.
Scout was Leddy.
Go Getters (experienced high
school age) was Ben Steigelmeyer,
Selby.
Kadoka and Philip students
participating in the events were
Emily Knutson, Wyatt Enders,
Dustin Enders, Mackenzie Stil-
well, Faron Knutson and Ben
Stangle. Emily Knutson took first
place in the Scout division (14-18
no experience) for Range judging.
A special 30 year anniversary of
South Dakota Rangeland Days
was celebrated to honor the 30th
year of the event, and event origi-
nators, Rodney Baumberger, re-
tired National Resource
Conservation Service, Sturgis, Dr.
Jim Johnson, retired SDSU range
specialist, and longtime, strong
supporting entities: SDSU, South
Dakota Association of Conserva-
tion Districts, South Dakota De-
partment of Agriculture, South
Dakota NRCS, and Society of
Range Management South
Dakota Chapter. These organiza-
tions all received plaques for their
efforts and 30 year commemora-
tive caps.
A delicious supper meal was
prepared and served to 160 people
by Bank West right after the 30th
Anniversary Rangeland Days Ap-
preciation event.
Jeff Hemenway, South Dakota
National Resource Conservation
Service state agronomist, from
Huron, conducted a soil health
demonstration with a rainfall sim-
ulator simulating two inches of
rain in 20 minutes showing water
infiltration levels on Jackson
County soils based on different
cropping systems (no till versus
conventional till), and also on
rangeland (low level versus high
level management).
The 2014 South Dakota Range-
land Days and Soil Days event
will be hosted by Brule-Buffalo
Conservation District based out of
Chamberlain.
Dave Ollila, from SDSU Extension at the Rapid City Regional Center,
addresses the group during the 30th Anniversary Rangeland Days
Appreciation event.
Dave Pesicka, NRCS Tribal Liaison, works with the students during the prac-
tice session of Soil Days and Rangeland Days held on June 25-26 at
Kadoka.
Soil health demonstration with a rainfall simulator simulating two
inches of rain in 20 minutes showing water infiltration levels on Jack-
son County soils based on different cropping systems (no till versus
conventional till), and also on rangeland (low level versus high level
management).
Participants take the opportunity to practice their skills during the
first day of Soil Days and Rangeland Days. The first day of the con-
test was a practice day for all who were a part of the two day event.
We Are Here
Emily Wickstrom, Rural Advocate
for Missouri Shores Domestic Vi-
olence Center, will be at the
Haakon Co. Courthouse on
~ TUESDAY ~
August 6th
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
For more information, call
1-800-696-7187
Domestic Violence, Sexual As-
sault, Dating Violence
Emily is also available for
presentations to any group
Stop In & take a teSt DrIve toDay!
859-2744 or
685-3068
Philip
Get your complete
& up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
¹c·e.
~æaa/e·¸ 5c../e ? \e.
LocaIIy owned & operated
859-2482 · PhiIip
FLY
CONTROL
FLY
CONTROL
·Dacl Fullcrs ·Pour-on
·Dusi Dags
Co1d Beer A1uogs on Hond!!
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Aug. 1: Cheese-
burgers, French Fries, Tossed
Salad, Orange Gelatin Mousse.
Friday, Aug. 2: Chicken
Marsala, Roasted Potatoes, Cali-
fornia Veggies, Roll, Fruit Parfait.
Monday, Aug. 5: Cranberry
Ham, Squash, Nantucket Veggies,
Corn Muffin, Mandarin Oranges.
Tuesday, Aug. 6: Chicken
Croissant, Melon Salad, Cran-
berry Pear Dessert.
Wednesday, Aug. 7: Roast
Turkey, Mashed Potatoes and
Gravy, Carrots, Roll, Funshine
Bar.
***
Friday, July 19, a bus load of
Somerset Court residents took a
trip to Mt. Rushmore. It was a
nice day for the trip.
Up on third floor, the Burgess’
have a new plant, really a tree.
The tag says azalea. Zona Hair-
grave had a new planter with five
different varieties of miniature
cacti on a pedestal by her front
door. Marge Gaffin has a new wall
sconce hanging outside her door.
It is a big rosy lily in a metal vase.
Very bright and pretty.
Friday, Fred Smith’s daughter,
Connie, and her husband, Bob
Ewing, Rapid City, visited Fred
and had lunch.
July 18, the Pioneer Review had
a great photo of a hayfield loaded
with bales and another photo of a
hayfield at Casey Fortune’s that
had was on fire, which was proba-
bly started from a baler. The For-
tunes had a pickup with a water
tank and a Milesville fire truck
came and they held the fire to a
few acres.
The August 2013 West Central
Electric Cooperative Connections
magazine featured the Dakota
Style snacks of Clark. They now
process two million pounds of po-
tatoes annually. They also process
sunflower kernels and in-shell
seeds. Dakota Style has been in-
volved in sending their snacks to
troops in Afghanistan.
It also featured a new diner in
Vivian that has had good success
since its opening in June 2013. It
is named after the old Vivian High
School mascot.
Last week, I saw a pair of baby
rabbits out back on the south side
of the Somerset Court building.
When they sat still, you couldn’t
see them at all. The alfalfa out
back is blooming.
Friday, Ruthie and Monty
Smith who live on a farm near
Tabor, visited Monty’s dad, Fred
Smith, who is a resident of Somer-
set Court. Ruthie and Monty work
in the South Dakota prison camp
at Yankton.
I was pleased to see that Trey
Fortune made the dean’s list at
Torrington, Wyo., Eastern
Wyoming College.
I am glad to hear via the Philip
Pioneer Review that Leanne
Neuhauser was out picking
chokecherries. What wonderful
memories that news brings back.
I see that Midland is advertis-
ing a big top circus on July 28. I
wondered it it is a traveling circus
with a tent and animals and tra-
peze artists? Or is it the local
farmer’s market? Either way, it
would be fun to go to.
There is also an ad in the Pio-
neer Review for a job in the
Kadoka school for a middle school
special education teacher and as-
sistant cook. If I was only 40 years
younger!
Sunday, July 21, at Somerset
Court, my son, Wayne, and wife,
Gwynn, took me along with them
to Spearfish’s annual Festival in
the Park. Thank you, dear kids.
Wayne sampled fishing in
Spearfish Creek and the bottom
was hard to wade in because of the
big rocks and not much room be-
tween them. But he caught and
released five little trout. Mean-
while, Gwynn and I walked
around to see dozens and dozens
of displays of artistic creations, oil
paintings, watercolors, photos,
rugs, tattoos, wood carvings, can-
dles, stone jewelry (we could
hardly leave the agate place). We
were delighted to meet artist
Bruce Speidel, Sundance, Wyo.,
who had a very realistically
painted turkey. He also had the
honor of having his painting of
two turkey toms that was used on
a U.S. postal stamp. I liked the
paintings by Teri McTighe, mostly
of horses. There was a book for
sale, “Saints and Sinners,” by
Arthur Anderson and it was illus-
trated by Teri McTighe. I might
try to get it from the Rapid City li-
brary. I think I liked his oldtime
cowboy stories. We met artist
Marion Toillon, a lady from
Spearfish. She had good work on
birds. That is only a few of the
artists in rocks, wood and paint.
There were some stands with mot-
tos, rhymes and adages, lettered
up for signs, with touches of flow-
ers or other deco around the
edges. There were many food
stands. The usual hot dogs and
hamburgers, wok cookery, Indian
tacos, fry bread, kettle kurls, or
something like that doughnuts
and drinks. We looked at exhibits
until I played out. Then Wayne
came and we went out to lunch.
Next we went to the open house
of the Dickey House, so called be-
cause Mr Dickey, a banker, had it
for his residence. When he was old
and sick, he hired someone to
come in and take care of him and
he lived there until he died. He
willed the house to the Black Hills
Teachers College (Black Hills
State University). It has been
used as the residence for the pres-
idents of the BHSU ever since.
Now the house is for sale
($590,000). The Dickey House is a
grand old house with beautiful
grounds. BHSU is planning to
build a more modern house near
their campus.
Tuesday, July 23, at Somerset
Court, we were entertained by the
54-piece New Horizons Band. The
courtyard was ideally cool, calm
and sunny. It was beautiful with
big urns of blooming flowers and
colorful umbrellas.
Milo Winters is the director of
the band. I especially liked the
wood block contributions to repre-
sent the donkey ride down into the
canyon in one selection. Some per-
formers seem to be singing along.
The last number that the group
played was a march then the New
Horizons dance band, of about 20
members, entertained us. There
was a good turnout of appreciative
Somerset Court residents and we
thank Somerset Court and our ac-
tivity directors. Entertainment
like this means a great deal of
labor such as carrying out chairs,
as well as seeing to our comfort.
M.R. Hansen emailed from
Mongolia that he and Barbara
had a good time when their
daughter, Holly, and her six-year-
old Asher visited them. The group
took a train ride across Russia,
five days and four nights, and
then flew back to St. Petersburg.
Wednesday, July 24, the Somer-
set Court bus had a full load for
the picnic in the park. Anne Brink
reported that the park was lovely.
Eileen Tenold reported that there
was lots of good food. Sandi again
grilled her special to order hot
dogs – always a favorite.
Virginia Gray had a visit from
her daughter and son-in-law.
Vivian Hansen had company at
lunch, her son, Wayne, and
daughter-in-law, Gwynn. Gwynn
stayed and played a game of
scrabble and Wayne took a nap.
Thank you for your visit.
Then the fire drill happened,
and the (imitation) fire was just
down the hall, so we had to be
“evacuated” to the other side of
the fire doors. We are thankful
that the staff carries out these
practical drills.
The Royal baby has been taking
up the news pretty well!
Sunday, July 21, 2013, Rapid
City Journal had an article about
libraries that lend out tools such
as a branch lopper, spades, shov-
els, tape measurers, heat guns, or
a putty knife. Somer libraries
have musical instruments, fishing
poles and other items. The idea is
that it would be helpful not to
have to buy (and store) items that
are seldom used. Some such li-
braries exist in Detroit, Mich.,
Skokie, Ill., and Oakland, Calif.
USA Today’s best seller for the
week of July 18, 2013, included
“Hidden Order” by Brad Thor,
“Bombshell” by Catherine Coul-
ter, “Inferno” by Dan Brown, and
“And the Mountains Echoed” by
Khaled Hosieni.
Gay Logan and Darlene Baye,
both from Philip, visited me at
Somerset Court. Thanks for your
visit.
Happy birthday, July 25, to
Somerset Court resident, Irene
Arbach.
The Rapid City Public Library
brought books today to Somerset
Court for the homebound pro-
gram. They brought me “The
Great Gatsby,” by F. Scott Fitzger-
ald; “A Thousand Spendid Suns,”
by Khaled Hosieni; “A Single
Shard,” by Linda Sue Park; and
“Safe Haven,” by Nicholas Sparks.
They sent a printout which I had
requested of the poem, “Gunga
Din,” by Rudyard Kipling. That
does sound like a lot of reading,
but we keep these books for a
month.
My friend, Nanci Adams, Wat-
sonville, Calif., sent a lovely card
with photo of a brown pelican.
These pelicans come from the is-
lands off the coast of Mexico to
feed on the rich schools of an-
chovies and sardines near Santa
Cruz. These pelicans have been
joined by thousands of spotty
shearwaters, a gull-like bird
which comes all the way from New
Zealand. (Nanci is a bird lover and
she conducts classes of bird watch-
ers.) Recently, one of her students
knitted her a cowl to wear on cool
mornings while they are birding.
It has a pattern of owls with tiny
beads for their eyes!
Moving?
E-mail your change
of address to:
subscriptions@
pioneer-review.com
or call 859-2516
two weeks in advance of
your moving date.
Summer Hours:
Monday thru Friday:
11 am to 7 pm
Saturdays: 11 am to ???
- Closed Sundays -
859-2430 · PhiIip
Hit & Miss
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen
vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-
review.com
HERE COMES BRIDE
th
e
Please join us for a Come & Go Bridal Shower honoring
Andi Johnston
fancée of Dana Kerns
Sunday August 4
2 p.m.-4 p.m.
Andi & Dana are registered at Bed, Bath & Beyond
& Target
“Let’s wrap up our
best wishes and
shower the bride
with love!”
Stevie Uhlir residence, 410 12th St., Kadoka, SD
Murdo 0entaI CIInIc
Announces the addItIon of
0r. Aaron ßumpca to famIIy
dentaI practIce, joInIng
0r. JIm 5zana
Lcntistry for thc wholc family, including orthodontics
Acccpts Ncdicaid and othcr dcntal insuranccs
Call to make an appointment witb Dr. Rompca today!
609 Garficld Avcnuc - 60ô-669-2131 - 60ô-222-29ô2
Cpen Toesday - Tborsday and Fridays doring scbool year
Murdo 0entaI, LLC
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
August 9-10-11-12: The Heat
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
August
2-3-4-5:
Grown
Ups 2
PG-13
in celebrating the marriage of
Cassie Bennett
and 1ustin Wendt
at a Wedding Dance
Saturday,August 3, 2ô13
9:ôô PM to 2:ôô AM
73- Saloon in Philip
Come & Go
Birthday Party for
Emilie Jo Foley (turning 1)
and
Christian Anderson
(turning 16)
at the
Philip Ambulance Building
Saturday, August 10th
1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Nadine (Brech) and Jack
Kasper have been here spending
time with Nadine’s mother, Min-
nie Brech. Kiley and Taegan
Sieler went in to Philip to spend
some time with them while they
were here. Nadine is the kids’
grandmother.
Trevor Fitch and boys came
down one day this week and
picked up Kiley and Taegan and
all went golfing at the Lake Wag-
goner Golf Course. The cousins en-
joyed being together and said they
all enjoyed playing golf.
My aunts, three of the Hicks
girls, who were raised up in the
Elm Springs area, all married into
the Doughty family. George and
Otis Doughty and Howard Platt.
Well, Thursday I went with
Donna Newman to Kadoka to look
up my cousin, Aunt Ester and
George Doughty’s grandson,
Lester’s son, Steve, who moved
there a little over a year ago.
Steve Doughty was just 17
years old in Custer, the last time
that I saw him. That was when he
enlisted in the Marines and went
off to see the world. That military
world sure changed him, as he
was not the happy-go-lucky kid I
once knew. The world had left its
marks and I found a 57-year-old
man who had changed from the
knocks the world had taken from
him. We visited about other fam-
ily members and caught up on
where everyone is. So, when you
go to look up family members you
have not seen for a long time,
don’t expect to find them the
same. Unless they have never left
South Dakota. The world does not
treat you like the state of South
Dakota does.
The only one living of the four
boys is Roy. He is the oldest son of
George and Ester and lives in Hot
Springs. The late Don Doughty’s
family members are still in Hot
Springs and have a car business.
Dale also lived in Hot Springs
until he passed away. Uncle
Howard and Aunt Vivian Platt
moved to Hamilton, Mont., and
raised their family there and
where their children still reside.
Some of these aunts, the Hicks
girls, attended some high school in
Philip and roomed in the house
behind the First Lutheran Church
where Golda Lewison lived at that
time. It was sort of a dormitory for
kids to stay in when they came to
Philip to attend school. The Hicks’
granddad and grandma Webster
and Edith lived over near Cotton-
wood then – close to where Butch
Wintrode lives now.
Donna Olivier had a health
scare while she was attending a
family reunion and was taken to
the hospital. But, after a short
stay, she was released and was
able to go back and enjoy her fam-
ily reunion.
We received about another .75”
of rain during this last week. Mar-
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide • 859-2188
vin got a lot of hay stacked while
Kiley was here to help. He sure
will miss her when she leaves.
Taegan came and helped me clean
house. He stated this is girl’s work,
but the pay is good so he didn’t
mind. He sure did a good job. I
have a lot of shelves that are high,
so he climbed up and washed them
off for me and put the knickknacks
back up. I don’t like to climb up so
high.
Kieth and Debbie Smith and
most of their children were at a
Brink family reunion in Aberdeen
over the weekend. Chancie and
Aaron Baenen weren’t able to at-
tend as they left Friday to climb
Mt. Shasta and are expecting to
get home in the middle of the
week.
Todd O’Connor was busy cutting
wheat at Kieth Smith’s this last
week.
Herb Seiler has been kept busy
with his hail adjustments in the
area. But, they did take time out
to go to the Deadwood Days of ‘76
Rodeo and enjoyed seeing Ryan
and J.J. Elshere ride.
Mel Smith has been helping
Brock Smith put up a big shed on
his place south of Philip.
Rich Smith is doing well and
still enjoys going into Philip for
cards and visiting.
Bob Thorson and his fiancée,
Jodi, were in the Black Hills near
Lead camping over the weekend.
Jodi’s mother and dad and daugh-
ter looked after things while they
were gone. Jodi’s dad is a handy-
man and has been helping her
spruce up around the place. They
are expecting a lot of people to ar-
rive for her son, Scott Jones and
Abbie Fitzgerald’s, wedding. She
said that she was expecting about
18 people to be staying with them.
Some are coming from Utah. So,
they are a busy bunch over there.
Marvin and Vicki Eide went to
Rapid City Sunday to meet Carla.
Kiley and Taegan returned home
with her so they could get ready
for football and basketball practice
prior to the starting of school.
My three-year-old daughter
came in one day holding her hand
over her face and crying. When I
asked her what happened, she
said, “I hurt my two head.” “You
mean your forehead” I asked? “Oh
yeah,” she said, “I always forget the
numbers.”
Playground prayer – As we sat
down to the big table for Sunday
dinner, everyone bowed their
heads. My friend, Andy’s, little
brother, Hendrix, prayed: “Dear
Lord, thank you for all the things
we have and for the swingset we
don’t have. Amen.” – Stephen Gre-
gory
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meet-
ing monthly. One meets on the second Tues-
day at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the
other meets on the second Wednesday at
1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov.
thru Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
UNITED CHURCH
OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy
Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * * *
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Lvery veek you uttend church to íeurn more
ubout the \ord. You heur u íot, but hov much oí
ít do you uct upon: lí you íínd out u neíghbor ís
ííí, do you drop by íor u vísít or íeuve thut tusk to
someone eíse: As beííevers, ve shouíd uct upon
the \ord ut every opportuníty possíbíe.
Ancìcnl wìsdom lor modcrn lìlc
Bul bc yc docrs ol lhc word, and nol hcarcrs only,
dcccìvìng your own sclvcs. For ìl any bc a hcarcr ol lhc
word, and nol a docr, hc ìs lìkc unlo a man bcholdìng
hìs nalural lacc ìn a glass: For hc bcholdclh hìmscll,
and goclh hìs way, and slraìghlway lorgcllclh whal
manncr ol man hc was. )amcs 1:22-24 (K)V)
Obituaries
Send obituaries, engagement
& wedding write-ups to:
ads@pioneer-review.com.
There is no charge.
Engaged
Cassie J. Bennett, Belle
Fourche, S.D., daughter of Glen
and Rose Bennett of Philip, and
Justin D. Wendt, Belle Fourche,
son of James and Sherry Wendt of
Turon, Kan., are pleased to an-
nounce their engagement and
forthcoming marriage.
Cassie graduated from Philip
High School and the University of
South Dakota School of Law in
2012. She is employed with the
Butte County state’s attorney’s of-
fice in Belle Fourche.
Justin graduated from Fairfield
High School in Fairfield, Kan., and
Autry Technical Center in Enid,
Okla. He is currently employed at
Regional Health in Spearfish as a
certified surgical technician.
Correction: An August 3,
2013, wedding is planned.
Church
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 5
Jerry John Hunt, age 69, of
Midland, S.D., died Thursday,
July 25, 2013, at the Hans P. Pe-
terson Memorial Hospital in
Philip.
Jerry John Hunt was born Au-
gust 22, 1943, in Midland, the
third of 18 children born to Lyle
and Ida (Fosheim) Hunt.
He was baptized and confirmed
in the Lutheran church. Jerry was
raised in Midland and attended
all 12 years in the Midland school,
graduating in 1961.
Following graduation, Jerry
joined the U.S. Navy. He served
his country aboard the USS He-
lena, USS Saint Paul and the USS
Kitty Hawk as an interior commu-
nication electrician. While serving
his enlistment, his stay was ex-
tended and he was deployed to
Vietnam. Jerry was honorably dis-
charged on March 31, 1966, and
then transferred to Naval Reserve
until December 27, 1967. He re-
ceived the Good Conduct Medal
and the Vietnam Service Medal.
After completion of service
duty, Jerry attended Black Hills
State College for four years, ma-
joring in business. He worked as a
logger in the Black Hills area.
Jerry also worked construction in
South Dakota, Nebraska and
Iowa. He was a “jack-of-all-trades”
and worked for many area busi-
nesses and farmers and ranchers.
He was a member of the Midland
American Legion Post #143.
You could often find Jerry gar-
dening; he enjoyed sharing his
produce. Cooking was a favorite
pastime. He was an avid reader,
making good use of the the Mid-
land Library. While living at Hot
Springs VA Hospital, Jerry taught
ceramics and leather work to
other veterans and acted as a cer-
tified nurse’s aide. He enjoyed
fishing, hunting and played soft-
ball on the local team.
Jerry fought a hard battle with
cancer. The night before his hospi-
talization, he made one final trip
to Midland Food & Fuel where he
visited with others.
Survivors include eight broth-
ers, Roy Hunt (Carol) of Midland,
Ted Hunt (Dena) of Rapid City,
Keith Hunt of Midland, Terry
Hunt of Watertown, Gordon Hunt
(Cheryl) of Battle Mountain, Nev.,
Jeff Hunt (Liz) of Battle Moun-
tain, Barry Hunt of Battle Moun-
tain, and Ron Hunt (Laura) of
Riverside, Calif.; eight sisters,
Christine Niedan of Midland,
Teresa Palmer of Murdo, Peggy
Johnson (Roger) of Pierre, Penny
Schafer of Pierre, Shari Estep
(Pete) of Austin, Texas, Janice
Tolton (Jim) of Midland, Lisa
Hackerott (Brian) of Smith Cen-
ter, Kan., and Michelle Meinzer
(Cameron) of Midland; a special
aunt, Anna Dick (Martin) of Rapid
City; and a special family friend,
Brenda Jensen of Midland; 19
nieces and nephews, Derek (Erin)
Hunt, Nicole (Ryan) Thorburn,
Erik Hunt, Carrie Hunt (Ryan
Raley), Tiffany Ghering (Dave),
Randi Hunt (Mike Schwartz),
Marcie Richards (Patrick), Laurie,
Leesa, and Chad Johnson, Jordan
and, Jenna Tolton, Jamie Estep
(Sarah), Logan and Evan Estep,
Courtney McFarland (Cody), Dei-
dra, Blake and Stuart Hackerott;
and 14 great-nieces and nephews
Lauren Hunt, Madie, Gabby and
Peyton Thorburn, Christopher
Hunt, Maddie Raley, Noah,
Emma, and Eli Ghering, Easton
Schwartz, Landon Johnson-Toles,
Jessica Tolton, Keenan Gonzales,
and Kylie Estep.
Jerry was preceded in death by
his father, Lyle Warren Hunt on
August 17, 1986; his mother, Ida
Hunt on February 5, 2013; a
brother, Frederick Hunt on Janu-
ary 24, 2007; a great-niece, Alexis;
and two brothers-in-law, Curt
Niedan and Marvin Palmer.
Memorial services were held
Monday, July 29, at the Trinity
Lutheran Church in Midland,
with Pastor Frezil Westerlund of-
ficiating.
Interment with military honors
was Monday, July 29, at the Black
Hills National Cemetery near
Sturgis.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Rush Funeral Home of Philip
was in charge of the arrange-
ments. An online guestbook can be
signed at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Jerry J. Hunt__________________________________
Warren Allen Turvey was born
on October 29, 1931, in Blackwell,
Okla., and died on July 22, 2013,
in Le Sueur, Minn.
He attended schools in Black-
well and attended Colorado State
University and Montana State
University and graduated with a
master’s degree from Oklahoma
State University. He, alongside
his brother, George, served with
the National Guard 45th Artillery
Division in Korea.
He married Patricia Dale of
Blackwell in 1954. At one time he
and his brother, Bill, owned Snow
White Market and Lockers, and
later Allen and Pat moved to Le
Sueur when he bought the Min-
nesota Valley Fertilizer Company.
In 1993, Allen married Kay
Ruud and they continued to live in
Le Sueur until his death.
He was a member of the First
United Methodist Church of Le
Sueur. Allen was preceded in
death by his parents, Harold and
Grace Turvey, and his wife, Pat.
With Allen’s death the world has
lost a kind and thoughtful man
who enjoyed life and loved to
make his family and friends
laugh. After his heart transplant
nearly 15 years ago he said he felt
that each day he lived was a
bonus, and it was obvious that he
truly believed that. He will be
greatly missed.
In addition to his wife, Kay, he
leaves two children, Ann Man-
teufel and her husband, Brian,
and their children, Jennifer,
Patrick, Sara and Nathan; and
Matthew Turvey and his wife,
Julie, and their son, Mason; four
great-grandchildren, Olivia,
Amelia, Malia and Anthony; three
stepchildren, Lori van der Merwe
and husband, Anton, and chil-
dren, Rochelle and Kathryn;
Michelle Straub and husband,
Jeff, and children Jarek and Syd-
ney; and Scott Ruud and wife, Tri-
cia, and children Alexander,
Griffin, and Lariana; two broth-
ers, Bill and George and wife,
Tonya; and two sisters, Alice
Moore and Carol Sjoberg and hus-
band, Jim.
His memorial service was held
July 31 with burial scheduled for
Friday, August 2, in Blackwell,
Okla.
Memorials may be made to:
Gift of Life Transplant House in
Rochester, MN (www.gift-of-
life.org) or Mayo Home Hospice.
Allen's widow, Kay (Piroutek)
Ruud Turvey, is the daughter of
the late Allen and Kathryn
Piroutek, and sister of Dan
Piroutek of Milesville. Kay grad-
uated from Philip High School.
Her address is 108 Regency Rd,
LeSueur, MN 56058.
Warren A. Turvey_______________________________
Karen Noreen Bowen-Raymond
was born October 23, 1950, at St.
Mary’s Hospital in Pierre, S.D.,
the daughter of Marvin Thompson
Bowen and Lois Jean (Harry)
Bowen.
Karen grew up in northern
Haakon County and the Ottumwa
area. Around 1968, her family
moved to the Grindstone area
northwest of Philip. She gradu-
ated from Philip High School in
1968. While attending high school,
she boarded with Shorty and
Edith Clark in Philip. Karen then
attended Black Hills State Uni-
versity in Spearfish where she
earned her bachelor’s degree in el-
ementary education. During her
junior and senior years of college
she became part of the Fifth
Teacher Corps Cycle and a mem-
ber of the Todd County (SD)
Teacher Corps Team. She also
met and married Thomas Ray-
mond of Mission.
Karen and Tom were married
on April 10, 1971, at the First
Lutheran Church in Philip, where
Karen was also baptized and con-
firmed. Karen taught school in
Mission, Okreek and Klein
schools. She then earned a mas-
ter’s degree in elementary educa-
tion from Black Hills State
University. Tom and Karen then
moved to Winner where Karen
was employed in the Winner
school system.
While in Winner, Karen was
also employed as a dispatcher for
the Winner Police Department.
The next move was to Kadoka.
Karen became employed at Crazy
Horse School in Wanblee as a mid-
dle school teacher and upon earn-
ing her second master’s degree in
secondary school administration
served as high school principal at
Crazy Horse School. Karen then
became principal of Rockyford
School north of Sharp’s Corner on
the Pine Ridge Reservation. She
then moved to Batesland and con-
tinued employment with the
Shannon County School District.
Karen’s next move was to Lone-
man School near Oglala, where
she served as instructional super-
visor.
For more than 20 years, Karen
was afflicted with kidney disease
and was on dialysis most of the
time. In 2008, Karen received a
kidney transplant and was able to
live a normal life until this last
year. Also during the past 10
years, Karen suffered from
melanoma skin cancer. The first
occurrence resulted in major sur-
gery at the Mayo Clinic. The can-
cer seemed to abate. In January of
2012, the cancer came back and
Karen underwent chemo therapy
and the cancer again disappeared.
This past year the cancer came
back with a vengeance and Karen
spent most of the past two months
in and out of the hospital. The
past two weeks Karen was able to
spend at home and passed away
around 2:00 a.m. Monday, July 29.
This leaves behind her hus-
band, Tom, to whom she was mar-
ried for 42 years. Karen is also
survived by three children, daugh-
ter, Carrie May (Wayne) and son,
Coy, of Rapid City; daughter, Cal-
lie Raymond and daughter, Tom-
mie Jo, of Rapid City, and son,
Kenneth Raymond (Christena)
and son, Bayden, of Kadoka and
daughter, Mayson Buffington, of
Ridgeview; special daughter,
Keeko (Magnus) Gythfeldt and
children, Myles and Emma of
Ridgefield, Conn. Karen also
leaves behind a brother, Kyron
Bowen, of Philip; a sister, Karla
Whiting, of Aberdeen, and special
sisters, Barbara Esser, Arla Pat-
terson and Anne Lyon.
Karen was preceded in death by
her mother and father and special
aunt Wanda Heeb.
Karen was a caring person who
never complained of her afflictions
and the toll it took on her body.
She had a good sense of humor
and developed a high respect for
the spirituality of the Lakota peo-
ple with whom she worked. Karen
believed in the worth and dignity
of everyone she met and seldom
criticized others.
Memorial services will be held
at 2:00 p.m. Friday August 2, at
the United Church in Philip with
Pastor Kathy Chesney and a fam-
ily friend, Pastor Harold Ambrose
officiating. A Lakota prayer will
be recited by Ed Young Man
Afraid of His Horses.
Interment will be in the Ma-
sonic Cemetery in Philip.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
has been established.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Karen Bowen-Raymond___________________________
State parks near Pierre and
Fort Pierre will hold special, fam-
ily events Saturday, August 3.
Farm Island Recreation Area
will hold its annual Riverman/
Riverwoman Sprint Triathlon at
7:40 a.m. CDT. Compete as an in-
dividual or as part of a team. Take
a 0.4-mile swim along swim beach,
an 18-mile bike ride on S.D. Hwy.
34, and a 3.5-mile run on the is-
land trail. For more information,
call 605-773-2885
Oahe Downstram Recreation
Area will hold its annual Steady
Eddy Disc Golf Tournament at
10:00 a.m. CDT. This golf tourna-
ment is played in memory of Ed
Headrick, known as the inventor
of disc golf. Players will complete
two rounds of 18 holes. Cash pay-
out to place winners. For more in-
formation or to register, call
605-223-7722.
Also at Oahe Downstream
Recreation Area will be an owls
walk at 9:00 p.m. CDT. Enjoy a
walk and talk on South Dakota
owls. For more information, call
605-223-7722.
State park
events for
August 3
Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
This past weekend the weather
was absolutely wonderful. With
temperatures in the 70s during
the day and cool evenings, actu-
ally last night it was down right
chilly, it seemed more like fall
then the later part of July. At
least that’s how it was in Mitchell.
I headed out of Mitchell at 5:00
a.m. this Monday morning, for two
reasons. Number one, going down
Interstate 90 in the early morning
hours the motorcyclists and the
tourists weren’t on the move, as
yet. And two, it gave me ample
time to make it home for the fu-
neral service of my cousin, Jerry
Hunt. Jerry lost his fight with
cancer at the age of 69 years. He
would have been 70 August 22,
2013. As some of you know, Lyle
and Ida (Fosheim) Hunt had 18
children. With the deaths of Fred
Hunt January 24, 2007, and Jerry
Hunt July 25, 2013, the 16 re-
maining siblings are eight broth-
ers: Roy Hunt, Midland, Ted
Hunt, Rapid City, Keith Hunt,
Midland, Terry Hunt, Watertown,
Gordon Hunt, Jeff Hunt and
Barry Hunt all of Battle Moun-
tain, Nev., and Ron Hunt, River-
side, Calif., and eight sisters,
Christine Niedan, Midland,
Teresa Palmer, Murdo, Peggy
Johnson, Pierre, Penny Schafer,
Pierre, Shari Estep, Austin,
Texas, Janice Tolton, Midland,
Lisa Hackerott, Smith Center,
Kan., and Michelle Meinzer, Mid-
land. A special family friend,
Brenda (Dale) Jensen, was in-
cluded in the list of family names.
Spending so much time at the
Hunt home, she was like a mem-
ber of the family and she and Lisa
Hunt were also classmates. All of
them were there for the funeral
service of their brother, Jerry. In
later years, Jerry enjoyed garden-
ing, and sharing his produce with
others. He was an avid reader,
often coming to the Midland Com-
munity Library to check out books
and if he found one he didn’t care
for he would share that informa-
tion with librarian Karel Reiman.
Something I didn’t know, was of
cooking being a favorite pastime of
his. He had a wide variety of inter-
ests. Our sincere sympathies to
the family of Jerry Hunt.
I’m not having any luck finding
folks at home. Could be some are
off on a family vacation before
school begins. Those high school
graduates are in the process of
getting things organized to head
for college or a vo-tech school. And
for that mom whose first one is
leaving the nest, well it’s an ad-
justment time for them, as well.
It’s been a rather different sum-
mer. Normally, this time of year
our little town of Midland is filled
to capacity with harvesters and
trucks are lined up at the elevator,
but due to the lack of winter
wheat because of the drought, we
are a bit off kilter. It’s as if we are
still waiting for the harvest, but
according to the calendar those
school bells will be ringing in the
not too distant future. Remember
taking your kids school shopping
with the teachers list in hand?
And then, there was shopping for
some new school clothes. It was a
busy, busy, time. With sunflowers,
millet, flax and milo being planted
to replace those winter wheat
crops it will be a busy fall harvest.
At least we hope it will be a busy
harvest. And those garden toma-
toes, cucumbers, beets, beans and
peas are a tasty addition to a
meal.
* * * *
MidlAnd MArkEt FridAy Au-
GuSt 2nd - 6-8 PM - SuPPEr
By MidlAnd liBrAry BoArd -
VEndorS - MuSiC - CoME And
ViSit - SEE you thErE
* * * *
I did get some feedback on my
article about the Little Eagle
School, their teacher Bonnie Tivis
and her students from Edith (Fos-
heim) Schofield, Casper, Wyo. and
Joan (Schanzenbach) Parks, Blue
Water, N.M. Edith and Joan were
in the first grade in that picture.
The girl I thought was Joan was
actually Thelma Jean (Fosheim)
Schofield and the three little girls
at the end of the front row were
Edith, Joan, and Pauline (Fos-
heim) Schofield. They both re-
member having their aunt Clara
(Fosheim) Roseth as their fifth
grade teacher. Joan remembers
not many pictures were taken
until Clara became their teacher.
Edith gave a bit of interesting in-
formation about her sister,
Pauline. Mrs. Tivis had Pauline
sing “Alice Blue Gown” on stage in
some Philip doings. Mrs. Tivis
came to the house and rolled
Pauline’s hair in rag ringlets. She
went to town and bought her a
beautiful blue silk dress and
coached her to sing – with a mir-
ror in the background. Edith re-
ports Pauline wasn’t too happy
about the whole thing as she
didn’t appreciate all the attention
and didn’t want to do it. But she
did. Edith remembers she looked
so cute with those curly ringlets in
her red hair. Much appreciate the
feedback with some added stories
to the article.
Karel Reiman reports it has
been a very busy week! Last Mon-
day, she and son Mark Reiman
headed for Yankton where they
met Leonard and Anis Reiman,
Eau Claire, Wis., for the prayer
service for Leonard and Karel’s
brother-in-law and Mark’s uncle,
Bob List. Bob was married to Lor-
raine Reiman who passed away in
1988. Karel’s daughter Anne
Moege, Mitchell, had also come for
the prayer service. Bob enjoyed
fishing and hunting on the
Reiman place. The funeral service
was held Tuesday, July 23, at St.
John’s Lutheran Church in Yank-
ton, survivors included his wife,
Elaine, and his four children and
their families. Steve, Patrick and
Becca Reiman came to the Reiman
place Friday enjoying time with
family. That evening, Karel and
her grandkids, Patrick and Becca,
headed for Midland Market whose
theme for that night was “Circus.”
With a theme such as that a huge
crowd of parents and kids, grand-
parents and grandkids and others
mixed in-between came for an en-
joyable evening of fun, food, buy-
ing wares and a time of visiting.
Saturday, Tim List and sons,
Dakota and Roman, Richmond,
Ind., stopped at the Reiman place
for a visit. They had been to the
Black Hills following the funeral
service for his dad, Bob List, and
stopped at the Reimans on their
way back home. Sunday, Maynard
and Anne stopped at the Reiman
home on their way back to
Mitchell following a vacation trip
to Montana. That evening, the
birthdays of Maynard and Mark
were celebrated. Anne and May-
nard left for home Monday morn-
ing and Karel, Steve, Patrick,
Becca and Mark were off on a day
of adventure as it was Mark’s ac-
tual birthday that day. They vis-
ited a tourist attraction at
Kadoka, had a picnic lunch at
Mark’s place in Kadoka and then
it was off to Wall Drug. You’re
right, Karel, you did have a busy
week.
Jerry Jones and his daughter,
Jodie and Bob Schrempp and Bax-
ter, Dupree, headed out for John-
son, Minn., July 25 to the Paul
Gillaspie farm to a free concert
put on by the Bellamy Brothers.
Reports are the concert was great.
Paul and Jerry became friends
while serving in the Army to-
gether. There’s a little history of
the Bellamy Brothers. and Paul
and his family. They have a farm
at Johnson, Minn., and also a lim-
ousine service. It was through
that limousine service that the
Gillaspie farm kids became
friends of the Bellamy Brothers.
Just goes to show how one thing
ties into another, doesn’t it? Sat-
urday, Cody Jones’ wife, Audrey
Jones, flew to Alaska to spend
some time visiting with her sister
at the North Pole. That would be
North Pole, Alaska.
Many of you may remember
Randy and Rebecca Ellendorf who
served as pastors at the Open
Bible Church in Midland for some
years and their kids went to
school in Midland. Rebecca’s dad,
Owen Mincks, and his wife,
Lynette, lived in the former Bob
and Doris Sheeley home for some
years, as well. Later they moved
to Arkansas and Randy and Re-
becca and family moved to White
River for a time and now live at
Mission where they continue on as
pastors serving the people of that
area. Rebecca’s dad recently
passed away and his funeral serv-
ice will be in Aberdeen Friday. Ab-
erdeen was home to Owen and his
family for many years. Our sym-
pathies to the family of Owen!
Anyone wishing to send a card to
Rebecca and her family the ad-
dress is: Rebecca and Randy El-
lendorf; P.O. Box 1615; Mission,
SD 57555.
I stopped in at the Midland Pi-
oneer Museum to visit with Jan
Bierle, who is there to greet and
welcome those folks who stop in to
see that museum. As some of you
know, the first building you come
to is the former Chicago North-
western depot, made into a mu-
seum. It is an interesting building
with a whole lot of things to see
from days gone by. The sign out
front, which was made by
Clarence “Smokey” Petoske, tells
a bit of history of that old depot. It
was built in 1906 and that was
also the year the railroad came to
Midland. In the Midland history
book it tells, “On December 10,
1906, the long awaited train first
went through Midland. This was a
work car.” It goes on to say, “On
April 7, 1907, at 2:00 p.m. the first
passenger train pulled into Mid-
land with 123 passengers aboard.”
It was a source of travel for home-
steaders, businessmen, livestock
and sometimes a hobo. The Mid-
land Pioneer Museum purchased
the depot in 1974, moving it some
600 feet southeast of the railroad
where it became a museum. For
50 years mail came in and out of
Midland, as well as 100s of tons of
freight on that train. The brick out
front as you go into museum is the
same brick that was laid on the
railroad platform. At the bottom of
Smokey’s sign it says, “This build-
ing and its contents is dedicated to
the preservation of the lifestyles,
tools of trade, the joys and hard-
ships of our pioneers.” I felt a bit
nostalgic, as I thought of those pi-
oneers of yesteryear, who paved
the way for those of us who came
after. May we never take for
granted the awesome legacy they
left us. If you’ve never stopped in
to see the museum and other
buildings, I advise you to do so, I
assure you, you won’t be disap-
pointed. There is a whole lot of
history in those buildings.
Late Wednesday night, Linda
and son, Triston Giltner, Meriden,
Kan., arrived at the home of
Linda’s parents and Triston’s
grandparents, Gene and Audrey
Jones. After sleeping a few hours,
they went on their way Thursday
morning. Late Thursday night,
Brenda, Todd, Trevor, Emily, and
Zoey, Verona, Wis., arrived to
spend the night with Gene and
Audrey. They also spent a few
hours sleeping, then on Friday
morning went on their way. All
were on their way to Rapid City to
spend a couple days vacationing
and visiting sisters, Julie Jones
Whitcher and family and Paula
Jones, and to get acquainted with
Julie and Jer Whitcher's son, Walt
Edward. Saturday, Gene and Au-
drey Jones traveled to Rapid City
to be with family members. Lisa
Foley and Jaycie Gieman had ar-
rived in Rapid City on Friday
night, where they met up with
Matt Foley who was going
through in his truck. Dackery
Geiman, who lived in Rapid City,
was also among those at the gath-
ering. Edna Dale and family had
visited earlier in the week getting
a chance to meet little Walt. She
had an emergency medical techni-
cian session in Pierre over the
weekend. Sunday, Lisa and Jaycie
spent the night with Gene and Au-
drey. Lisa attended the funeral of
Jerry Hunt Monday before they
returned home.
Shelly Gentelin, Sam and
Anna and Carol Snook returned to
their homes in Alton, Ill., last
Wednesday. They had been visit-
ing their Petoske and Snook fami-
lies, enjoying their vacation for
about a week in Midland.
Guess that’s it for this week.
Couldn’t get hold of some folks
and some I did had no news. We
woke up to a humid Tuesday
morning. The weatherman is say-
ing we may be in for some stormy
weather in our area later in the
day. Hopefully, that doesn’t be-
come a reality for anyone. I left for
Mitchell Friday afternoon spend-
ing the weekend with our son,
Christopher, Stephanie and
Laura. Laura is at that fun stage,
15 months old, walking, and is be-
ginning to talk and just has her
own personality. Fun, fun! Sun-
day, Christopher, Stephanie,
Laura and I headed for Sioux
Falls attending church with Becky
(Nemec) Thompson, her husband,
Rob, and their son, Josiah. After
church, we all went out to eat hav-
ing a chance for an enjoyable visit.
Josiah is growing tall and I be-
lieve he said he will be in third
grade this year. They don’t stay
little long. I had planned on com-
ing home after we got back to
Mitchell, but it wound up being
later then we planned and with
the traffic on the road and facing
into the sun, I decided to get up
early Monday morning and head
out. It was a good choice, no traffic
to speak of at that hour, making
for a more relaxing trip home.
A thought for today from my
Amish calendar: “Measure your
success by the challenges and les-
sons you learn along the way.”
Some good advise. Go out and
make it a good week!
Midland News
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 6
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on /u¿u+| c|/, +/c marr|cd /cr
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|/c¿ +|||| arc!
Wish
Aicki & Wes Aelson
a
Happy Anniversary
PO Box 94
Midland, SD 57552
or catch them on
Facebook!
Please join us for a Cancer Benefit
for 1erry Schofield
Saturday,August 17th
at the Legion Hall in Midland, SD.
Benefit starts at 5:ôô PM(M1)
with an Auction & Free Will Donation
Supper being provided.
Dance to follow to celebrate
1erry &Linda's 4ôth Wedding Anniversary.
For more information, contact Vince Bruce at 567-3671
or 280-3385 or Dustin Vollmer at 441-3958.
All proceeds will go to help the family with
medical expenses that insurance does not cover.
AII Pennington-Jackson County Farm Bureau Members
The annual meeting and resolutions meeting will be held on Monday,
August 12th at 7:30 p.m. Ìt will be held in the small meeting room in
the Wall Community Center and refreshments will be served.
Resolutions presented by Pennington-Jackson County Farm Bureau
members will be voted on and those that pass will be sent on to the
state.
Tayton Schofield was crowned
Days of ’76 Princess, July 25, 2013.
Tayton is 11 years old and is the
daughter of Roger and Gayla
Schofield. They ranch 25 miles
west of Faith.
Some of the competition events
are riding a horse in two different
patterns and they are judged on
horsemanship, horsemanship in-
terview, modeling, photo session,
personal interview, mock media in-
terview about current events, his-
tory of Deadwood and rodeo circuit
people.
Friday and Saturday, the queen,
junior queen and princess rode
their horses in the parades, had an
autograph session at a local casino
and went to businesses to thank
them for being sponsors. They also
carried flags at the rodeos.
Schofield is princess
WErE yOu rIGHT? Last week’s picture: Detail work on 73– Saloon.
Around Philip there are many architectural elements on buildings as well
as other items that we see on a daily basis. But, can you identify them
when given just an upclose snapshot? Here’s one for you to try. The an-
swer will be in the next week’s Pioneer review.
Where is it?
Community
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 7
Raakon/1ackson
county Falr
4-R Achlevement
0ays
Friday, August 2nd: PhiIip Legion HaII
1:00 p.m. 4-H & Open Class Exhibits open to the
Public
3:00 p.m. 4-H Talk-Off
4:30 p.m. 4-H Project Runway
5:30 p.m. Free Will Barbecue &
Ice Cream Social
7:00 p.m. Talent Show *
* During intermission a Sweet Treats
live auction will be held
Saturday, August 3rd: PhiIip Legion HaII
8:30 a.m. 4-H Large Animal Show
9:00 a.m. Farmer`s Market & Trade Show Opens
9:00 a.m. Open Class & 4-H Exhibits open to the
public
10:30 a.m. 4-H Small Animal Show
12:00 p.m. Lunch, sponsored by Haakon/Jackson
Fair Board
2:00 p.m. Elke Baxter, Gardening presentation
3:00 p.m. Open Class Exhibits released
4:00 p.m. Rascal Rodeo, Philip Roping Arena
PhiIip Masonic
Saturday,August 3rd
4:00 p.m. at the
PhiIip Roping Arena
REGISTRATION:
2:00 to 3:45 p.m.
AGE GROUPS:
6 & Under ~ 7-8-9
10-11-12 ~ 13-14
ADMISSION:
$5/person · $15/family
• Goat Tying
• Barrel Racing
• Flag Racing
• Mutton Bustin’ and
Calf & Pony Riding
• Breakaway Roping
• Pole Bending
• Team Roping
Entries:
$5.00 per event
Fun for all
with or
without a
horse!
Greetings from beautiful, cool,
foggy, northeast Haakon County.
The fog this Tuesday morning is
so thick – I guess we'll see if we
have moisture again in 90 days, as
the weather lore says. In 90 days,
we will be at the end of October, so
moisture at that time could cer-
tainly be snow, and I'm not ready
to think about that just yet. We
have had several days of cool
weather, and it has been a won-
derful break from the heat. It is so
nice to be able to have the win-
dows open and leave the air condi-
tioner off! We received some much
needed rain over the past week, as
well as some hail that damaged
fields, as well as some gardens.
Thankfully, my garden got no hail
this time, but Lola Roseth's gar-
den wasn't so fortunate.
Speaking of the garden, the
plants are continuing to grow and
produce. This is the time of year
that you might want to lock your
car door if you are not wanting a
gift of zucchini! I visited Marge
Briggs briefly yesterday to share
some green beans and beets with
her, and she gifted me a couple of
beautiful zucchini. I was glad to
get them, and I plan to share with
our daughter and my mother. Up
until yesterday, we had been eat-
ing or sharing all of the green
beans from the garden, but the
supply overwhelmed us, so I
canned a cooker full of beans.
They will taste great next winter.
As I was snapping the beans,
preparing them to be canned, I
thought about how easy and rela-
tively inexpensive it would be to
go to the grocery store and buy
several cans of beans. But the
beans from our garden taste so
much better, and I know they
were raised in excellent conditions
with plenty of love – that makes a
difference! Plus, I love to see the
gleaming jars of produce in the
pantry – it gives me a sense of ac-
complishment.
On to the news!
Lee and Mary Briggs are busy
harvesting wheat. Their grand-
son, Seth Joens, and granddaugh-
ter, Cattibrie Riggle, comprise
part of the harvest crew, and they
are doing a great job. Seth arrived
at the ranch last Thursday, and
he'll be going back to his home in
Whitewood later this week. He
will be going to Texas for a couple
of weeks to help with a fencing
project before beginning classes at
Black Hills State University this
fall. Granddaughter Kinsey Riggle
came out to the ranch with Mary
Thursday evening to spend the
weekend. While she is in the coun-
try, she is practicing her driving
skills. Kinsey's parents, Rea and
Clay Riggle, celebrated their wed-
ding anniversary last weekend in
the Black Hills, doing some hik-
ing. Mary worked from home Fri-
day, and after work she and
Kinsey picked chokecherries.
Mary was in Pierre over the week-
end for supplies. While there, she
attended the opening of a photo
studio owned by her friends.
Nels and Dorothy continue to be
busy with cutting and baling hay,
as well as fixing the machinery, of
course. Saturday, they went to
Corsica and picked up Dorothy's
sister, Wilma, and the trio headed
to Platte for a family reunion.
Dorothy's brother, Dallas, also
came to the reunion, bringing
nieces from Woonsocket with him.
Dorothy said there were about 30
people at the reunion, and it was
wonderful to have the opportunity
to see everyone and have a nice
visit. They returned Wilma to the
nursing home in Corsica before
heading back home Saturday
evening. A portion of Sunday was
spent chasing cows – evidently
they have cows that would prefer
the pasture next door to the one
they are in! I wonder if the cows
are thinking that "the grass is al-
ways greener on the other side of
the fence?"
Dick and Gene Hudson's niece,
Shelley, and her children left for
their home in St. Louis Wednes-
day evening after spending sev-
eral days visiting relatives in the
area. Friday, Dick and Gene
picked chokecherries and Gene
made jelly. The chokecherries are
especially plump and beautiful
this year – Gene said she remem-
bers back in the early 70s we had
a crop of chokecherries like this.
Saturday evening, Dick and Gene
attended church in Midland. Mon-
day, they were in Midland again
to attend funeral services for
Jerry Hunt. Gene found a few
days last week to work in the yard
and garden – it always looks pris-
tine at her place! I guess I'll have
to pay her a visit!
Lola Roseth spent the weekend
at home, but that wasn't her orig-
inal plan. She and a couple of
ladies had planned to spend the
weekend in Las Vegas. However,
weather problems caused flight
delays and cancellations, so the
Las Vegas trip is postponed.
Duane and Lola's son, Rhett, spent
the weekend at the ranch, return-
ing to his home in Rapid City Sun-
day evening.
Billy and Arlyne had a family
filled weekend and week. Their
grandson, Todd Kurtz, Fargo, and
his friend came to the ranch Fri-
day. Saturday, Billy and Arlyne
were in Midland to attend a Sam-
mons family reunion. Their daugh-
ter, Kim, and husband, Jeff Marso,
and Jace were here from their
home in Missoula, Cindy and
Bruce Bresee came from
Spearfish, and grandson T.J.
Gabriel and his family attended
also. Following the reunion, Kim
came back to the ranch with Billy
and Arlyne, and Jeff and Jace
went into Pierre to see the Marso
relatives. Sunday, T.J. and his
family were dinner guests at Billy
and Arlyne's, and Todd and his
friend left to return to their homes.
Trent and Danny Kurtz arrived
from their homes in Aberdeen
Sunday afternoon and will be stay-
ing until Wednesday. Monday
evening, the Markwed families
and the Marso families gathered
at the Pierre home of Patti (Marso)
Petersen for a family dinner.
Wednesday, Billy and Arlyne and
Jeff and Kim will be going to the
Black Hills and will spend the
night with Cindy and Bruce Bre-
see. The Marsos will return to
Montana Thursday. Congratula-
tions to Billy Markwed! In the
midst of all the company, Billy
went to Pierre Sunday for a horse-
shoe tournament. He won the
tournament and received a travel-
ing trophy that he will keep for the
year. Arlyne said the trophy is
very large!
Jon and Connie Johnson re-
cently returned from a trip to
Alaska. They joined friends from
Eureka, and the two couples flew
to Anchorage. They were gone for
eight days and saw lots of sights.
Connie said one of her favorite
spots was Whittier, Alaska. To
reach Whittier by car, you have to
drive through a tunnel (through a
mountain) on railroad tracks. Evi-
dently, the tracks are made avail-
able every hour on the hour.
Whittier was a very strategic spot
during World War II because it
was so secluded and oftentimes ob-
scured by clouds or fog. There are
no houses in Whittier – the people
who live there stay in the two
apartment buildings there. Connie
said there is an abandoned apart-
ment building that was a govern-
ment installation, and it had 1,000
apartments in it. It is now falling
into disrepair and is full of as-
bestos. Other spots of interest
were the Kenai Peninsula, Denali
National Park, a ship tour to see
glaciers, and a salmon fishing out-
ing. Jon had planned to do some
halibut fishing, but the weather
didn't cooperate. Connie thor-
oughly enjoyed the many hours of
sunlight in Alaska at this time of
year. She said that it never got re-
ally dark there – it was more like
dusk. Last Friday, their son,
Noah, celebrated his 10th birth-
day, and to make the day special
he got to go fishing in the boat
with his dad and brother on the
Missouri River. The outing was
followed by a steak supper, and
Grandma and Grandpa Hudson
joined the family for supper. Mon-
day, Jon and Noah were in Ft.
Pierre to take part in a fundraiser
for the Kirley BB gun team. Con-
nie said that school will start in
both Stanley County and Haakon
County schools August 21, and the
state colleges will begin classes
August 26. Where has the summer
gone?
Clark and Carmen Alleman
kept an appointment at Mayo
Clinic last week. On the way
home, they stopped in Brookings
to watch their granddaughter,
Morgan, compete in the state
swim meet. Morgan did very well.
She placed in all of her eight
events, and she won two state
championships and was third in
the all around. Great job, Morgan!
Since they returned home, Car-
men said she has been mowing
weeds and catching up on yard
work.
July 21, Ed Briggs accompanied
Jack and Betty Carr and their
daughter, Beth, to Valentine,
Neb., to help Jack's sister-in-law
celebrate her 98th birthday. Last
Friday, Ed traveled to Brookings
to visit his son, Shane. Ed's son,
Casey, works in Clark, and he
came down to Brookings also to
join Ed and Shane. Shane came
back to the ranch for the weekend
and helped with haying activities.
Clint, Laura and Alivya Alle-
man have been enjoying the
milder weather. Laura and Alivya
spent a day visiting a friend in
Pierre "one more time" before the
friend returns to her home in
Italy. Laura said, "It is wonderful
to spend time with old friends, but
hard to say, see you later, when
they live so far away." Thank
goodness for technology that
makes it easier to keep in touch
these days. Clint, Laura and
Alivya went to Midland Market on
Friday and enjoyed all the park
had to offer. Sunday was a family
day spending time together. They
had lunch with Laura's parents,
Randy and Joy Yost, and they wel-
comed home Amy Yost, who is
home for just a couple of weeks
from Washington, D.C. The Alle-
mans are enjoying this wonderful
time of year, and they keep very
busy with farm and ranch work,
gardening, and also trying to get
some fun stuff packed in on top of
it all. It sounds like Laura will be
making salsa today!
Last Saturday, Kevin
Neuhauser was in Pierre to help
with the Masonic breakfast.
Later, he and Mary traveled to
Highmore to visit Ruth
Neuhauser. From Highmore,
Kevin and Mary went to Plankin-
ton to watch the Four Corners
baseball team in the district tour-
nament. The Four Corners team
will play in Plankinton again
today (Tuesday) to determine if
they qualify for the state tourna-
ment to be held in Mitchell. Kevin
and Mary's daughter, Brianna, is
in London with friends, enjoying a
10-day vacation there. Son Nick
spent last weekend in Sioux Falls
visiting friends.
Bill and Polly Bruce have been
busy with haying activities, and
they haven't had much time for so-
cializing. Polly said they are offi-
cially done with haying, and now
the task is getting the bales
moved home. They were in Pierre
last Wednesday for groceries, and
Sunday they attended church in
Midland. Following church, they
had lunch at the local café and
had a nice visit with Larry Hoppe,
a custom harvester from Min-
nesota who used to cut wheat for
them. Polly said Vince and Katie
were in the Black Hills for the
weekend. They saw a Merle Hag-
gard concert, and they helped
Tony Fischer with projects at his
home in Rapid City.
Shirley Halligan was in Pierre
last Wednesday, and she took her
father-in-law, Ken Halligan, out
for supper. Ken will be celebrating
his 92nd birthday Friday – so
happy birthday to him! Friday,
Frank and Shirley attended the
Midland Market. Shirley said it
was a beautiful evening, and they
enjoyed visiting with friends.
It is harvest season at the Max
and Joyce Jones place, although
this morning's fog probably slowed
the process a bit. Joyce said she
has been getting some projects ac-
complished, with the help of
granddaughter Mattie. Last week,
that included putting shelves in a
closet, making things much more
organized and freeing up some
drawer space. Monday evening,
Joyce attended the BB gun team
fundraiser in Ft. Pierre. Joyce
took her friend, Reta Lathem, to
the fundraiser supper also. Reta
recently sold her home and is in
the process of moving to a duplex.
Our week here at the ranch has
been a busy one, which is gener-
ally the case this time of year. We
had some very welcome rain
showers during the week, so
Randy and I took advantage of the
damp weather and made a trip to
town for supplies. We finished up
winter wheat harvest Saturday,
and now the guys are in the
process of moving some bales. Our
daughter, Chelsea, and her hus-
band, Mike, were here for the
weekend, and Mike was a very ca-
pable addition to the harvest crew.
They returned to their home in
Rapid City Sunday afternoon. Our
daughters, Lori and Jennifer, are
both in Atlanta, Ga., this week –
one for work, and one for train-
ing – so they will get to spend a lit-
tle time together. And our son,
Scott, and his wife, Corry, cele-
brated their 18th wedding an-
niversary this week!
Today, I am grateful for my
pressure cookers. They make the
job of preserving food for the fam-
ily a lot easier than the old open
kettle method of canning. My
large pressure cooker is one that
my father bought at an auction
back in the late 60s, and my
medium sized pressure cooker was
a wedding gift nearly 40 years ago
from my Aunt Louisa and Uncle
Vint. Obviously, the pressure
cookers are very durable! I think
of all of these dear folks every time
I use the pressure cookers!
I hope you are enjoying this
milder weather as you go about
your busy lives. Please keep pray-
ing for rain – I think it is working!
Go out and make it a great
week!
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
Subscribe to our
online edition:
www.pioneer-review.com
After more than eight months of
training, nine recruits officially
joined the ranks of the South
Dakota Highway Patrol during a
graduation ceremony in the Capitol
Rotunda on Friday.
The nine new troopers, formally
members of Class 53, completed
basic law enforcement training, fol-
lowed by the South Dakota High-
way Patrol Recruit Academy. From
mid-May until graduation day,
they were in field training. The pe-
riod from initial application to
graduation is about one year.
Lieutenant Governor Matt
Michels joined family and friends
of the new troopers for the cere-
mony. He told the new troopers
that law enforcement officers are
critically important to our free so-
ciety.
“Please remember there are hun-
dreds of thousands of South
Dakotans who appreciate you,”
said Michels. “With every action
you take, and even with every
ticket you give, you will be motivat-
ing people to obey the law.”
At the conclusion of the cere-
mony, the recruits officially became
members of the highway patrol and
left for their initial duty stations.
Several of the new troopers were
scheduled to be on duty as early as
Saturday, July 27.
The troopers and their duty sta-
tions are Aric Dierkhising, Wall,
Ben Filipiak, Kadoka, Bill Berry,
Sturgis, Brandon Hansen, Elk
Point, Brandon Mathistad, Rapid
City, Kyle Mobley, Pierre, Matt
Robl, Huron, Steve Tow, Redfield,
and Adam Woxland, Winner.
Highway patrol
graduates nine
new state troopers
Community
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 8
Presenting … Tomorrow’s Leaders
Blake, 17; Braden, 15; Brodie, 4.
Children of Lacy Puhlman, Philip.
Kameron, 5; Weston, 3. Children of
Matt & Micky Reedy, Philip.
Hunter, 13; McCoy, 10; Ryker, 7;
Kale, 5; Miken, 2. Children of
Michael & Tanya Peterson, Philip.
Taylor, 5; Kendall, 3. Children of
Trace & Jennifer O’Connell, Philip.
Brayden, 16; Keagan, 13;
Colby, 12; Jensen, 7; Rayler, 4;
Aven, 1. Children of
Trevor & Christa Fitch, Milesville.
This feature sponsored by The Pioneer Review & Thompson Photographics
Thank you for
participating in
this year’s
Tomorrow’s
Leaders project!
This is the
final installation
of the project
this year.
Levi Scott
Hook
Son of
Amy Pinela &
Toby Hook
Philip, SD
Born:
May 21, 2013
7 lbs., 11 oz.
19
1
⁄2” long
Proud Siblings:
Shane, Alex, Caitie,
Junior & Gabriella
Maternal Grandpar-
ents:
the late Mike &
Carla Carroll
Maternal Great-Grand-
parents: Mildred Raymond, Ft. Pierre, and the late Robert Raymond
Paternal Grandparents: Pee Wee & Peggy Hook, Philip
This feature sponsored by
Grandpa & Grandma Hook
The annual heritage yard and garden tour and luncheon in Midland was held Sun-
day, July 21. The event was presented by Second Century Development, Inc. After
the social at the Open Bible Fellowship Hall, the attendees visited three yards and
gardens. Mark reiman and his mother, Karel, shown upper left, were the second
Garden tour in Midland
stop on the tour. The first stop was at the garden of Tommy Jones, shown upper right. This year’s yard and garden tour concluded with a trip through Bud Manke’s
Cedar Creek Gardens, shown lower right.
Courtesy photos
ads@pioneer-review.com
84 Years Ago
August 1, 1929
The marriage of Miss Helen
Dorothy and Charles O. West,
both of Philip, came as a complete
surprise to their many friends
here when it became generally
known last week.
The wedding occurred at
Belvidere on Saturday, July 6th
and was kept a profound secret by
the contracting couple until a few
days ago.
***
At the last legislative session a
bill was introduced to place all of
South Dakota in Central Stan-
dard Time, instead of the present
division on the Missouri River,
with Central Standard for that
part of the state east of the Mis-
souri, and Mountain Time for that
portion west of the river. The bill
followed a like bill which passed
the North Dakota legislature, but
could not muster the strength to
put it across here. Now that the
bill has gone into effect in North
Dakota, they are having complica-
tions. The railroads have refused
to change their schedules from the
settle time division line of the
river, and they have railway time
and legal time in that part of
North Dakota west of the Mis-
souri. The situation is also compli-
cated along the state line with the
towns in South Dakota using the
Mountain Time, and those just
across the line in North Dakota a
different schedule.
Local News … Elaine Rowcliffe
left for Hot Springs yesterday to
visit her grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. C.W. Chambers. She will
also visit her aunt, Mrs. M. Kern
and family at Rumford.
Helen Wheeler entertained a
party of little friends at her home
Monday afternoon from two-thirty
until five o’clock. A dainty lunch
was served at the close of the af-
ternoon. Helen celebrated her
tenth birthday on this happy occa-
sion.
Hunters are enthusiastic in the
reception of lower prices on Win-
chester shells. The famous re-
peater 12 guage, load now under
one dollar. Ranger shells 75¢ per
box in case lots.
The city dray line, owned and
operated for many years by Ira A.
Taylor in Philip, was sold by him
this week to Mr. R.H. Dunmore of
Kadoka. Mr. Dunmore will move
his family here as soon as suitable
living quarters can be secured.
An eight pound baby girl ar-
rived at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold O’Neal on Monday morn-
ing of this week.
Grindstone News … Little Verle
Sanders, four year old son of Mr.
and Mrs. Theodore Sanders, was
badly burned last week when his
clothing was ingnited by a spark
from a battery. He had washed his
hands in gasoline to get the ma-
chine grease off, and wiped his
hands on his overalls, and at once
began playing with the battery. A
spark caught the gasoline, and he
was aflame in a second. His
brother, Tim, who was very near,
quickly rolled him in the dirt and
put out the fire, but the little fel-
low’s hands and arms and legs
were badly burned. Dr. Cowen
fears that it may be necessary to
graft some skin on his arm.
Jim Kennedy is carrying his
arm in a sling as a result of a fall
off the combine last week. He was
on top of the machine, and when
the wagon came alongside for a
load of grain he shouted “Whoa!”
at the team. Earl Teeters, who
was driving the tractor, thot the
command was for him, so he
stopped quickly, and Jim cata-
pulted forward, striking his shoul-
der on the tractor wheel as he fell.
The shoulder is not broken, but it
is very painful.
Among those from Grindstone
who attended the dance at Cedar
Pass last Friday were McClures,
George Kennedys, Teeters,
Gottslebens, Gus Knodle, Emil
Baye, and A.R. Rickards. They
like the music of the Virginia
Ravens so well that another crowd
is planning to god down this
Thursday.
Chester and Francis Farrell and
Will Lockett went fishing Sunday
and caught seventy-five chubs.
Nowlin Items … Jerry Jarman,
our County Commissioner, was in
Philip on business Saturday.
Mrs. Ray Noble and daughter,
Margaret, opened their lunch
stand on the highway, Saturday.
The venture is proving to be very
successful.
75 Years Ago
July 28, 1938
Grindstone – Named after
Grindstone buttes, ten miles
away, Grindstone is not even in
sight of the peculiarity of nature
after which it was named. The
reason is the post office at Grind-
stone buttes, run by “Old Grizzly”
Shown in the early days, was
moved ten miles west along the
Deadwood Trail to the old road-
house run by “Mexican Ed”
Sanchez, its present location.
Grindstone buttes, three hills cov-
ered with sparse grass and an out-
cropping of coarse sandstone
resembling grindstones, were a
conspicous land mark along the
old trail.
The Deadwood Trail crosses
Deadman Creek half way between
Grindstone Buttes and Grind-
stone, and these beside the trail
are the three graves which gave
the creek its name. In 1876 three
men left a wagon trail which was
enroute to the gold rush in the
Black Hills, to go back and look for
some strayed horses. When they
did not return, their companions
went to look for them and found
them dead, scalped by the Indi-
ans. They buried them at the
creek crossing, and although the
names on the boards at the graves
are obliterated, the men have an
anonymous immortality in the
name “Deadman Creek.”
Women who live along Dirty
Woman Creek, near Grindstone,
stoutly deny that the creek was
named for any of them. E.A. Mor-
rison, Philip, who went over the
old trail in 1877 with a party of
gold-seekers, upholds the women.
He declared the freighters told
him that Dirty Woman Creek got
its name from a woman freighter
who was so dirty that the men re-
fused to let her camp with them,
so she went up the little creek now
called Dirty Woman in her mem-
ory, and camped alone.
Mixes Food Creek, a short creek
draining into the Cheyenne River,
is named after an Indian who
lived on the creek before the battle
of Wounded Knee.
Local Briefs … Luther Knutson,
who has lived on the West Coast
for several years, arrived home in
Philip last week. He had been em-
ployed by the Al G. Barnes circus,
which had started from California
and worked eastward. When it
reached Huron, Mr. Knutson left
to come to Philip. He had been
working in the electrical depart-
ment of the circus.
A thick, delicious malted milk
for 10¢ at Severin Drug Co.
A seven pound baby girl was
born to Mrs. Elmer Johnson Tues-
day morning.
Blast from the Past
From the archives of the Pioneer Review
Welcome to 4-H Achievement Days and the
Haakon/Jackson County Fair
Friday & Saturday,
August 2 & 3, 2013
American Legion Hall & Fairgrounds in Philip
HAAKON/JACKSON CO. OPEN CLASS
& 4-H SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Friday, August 2nd: Philip Legion Hall
1:00 p.m. 4-H & Open Class Exhibits open to
the Public
3:00 p.m. 4-H Talk-Off
4:30 p.m. 4-H Project Runway
5:30 p.m. Free Will Barbecue & Ice Cream
Social
7:00 p.m. Talent Show *
* During intermission a Sweet Treats
live auction will be held
Saturday, August 3rd: Philip
Legion Hall
8:30 a.m. 4-H Large Animal Show
9:00 a.m. Farmer’s Market & Trade Show
Opens
9:00 a.m. Open Class & 4-H Exhibits
open to the public
10:30 a.m. 4-H Small Animal
Show
12:00 p.m. Lunch, sponsored by
Haakon/Jackson Fair
Board
2:00 p.m. Elke Baxter, Gardening
presentation
3:00 p.m. Open Class Exhibits released
4:00 p.m. Rascal Rodeo, Philip Roping Arena
Badlands
Riders
If you are interested in joining 4-H, please check
with the Haakon Co. Extension Office
(859-2840) or the Jackson Co. Extension Office
(837-2133) for further information.
Milesville
Rangers
Kountry
Kousins
Lightning
Bugs
Rider &
Racers
Bad River
Buckaroos
Milesville
Musketeers
Jackson County Honorees:
Orville & Shirley Josserand
Haakon County Honorees:
Grossenburg Implement
Brant’s Electric
859-2254
Philip
Dr. Ron & Laurie
Mann & Staff
859-2491 • Philip
Ernie’s Bldg. Center, LLC
843-2871
Midland
Farm Bureau Financial
Services, Glenn Parsons
859-2902 • Philip
First National Agency
859-2588
Philip
First National Bank
Member FDIC
859-2525 • Philip
Fitzgerald Oil Company
859-2007
Philip
Gibson Concrete Const.
859-3100
Philip
Golden Willow Seeds
843-2187
Midland
Grossenburg Implement
859-2636
Philip
Ingram Hardware
859-2521
Philip
Jones’ Saddlery,
Bottle & Vet
859-2482 • Philip
Kennedy Implement
859-2568
Philip
Midwest Cooperatives
859-2382
Philip
Modern Woodmen of
America, Don Haynes
859-2778 • Philip
Morrison’s Pit Stop
859-2613
Philip
O’Connell Construction
859-2020
Philip
Philip Health Services, Inc.
859-2511
Philip
Philip Livestock Auction
859-2577
Philip
Philip Motor, Inc.
859-2585
Philip
Pioneer Review • Kadoka Press
859-2516 • 837-2259
Philip • Kadoka
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall &
Kadoka • 859-2400
State Farm Insurance
Jan Hewitt
859-2559 • Philip
The Steakhouse & Lounge
859-2774
Philip
County Fair
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 9
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LWGC: 859-2211 or
Glenn or Dianne Parsons
Office: (605) 859-2902 · Cell: 515-0712
12th Annual
Farm Bureau
Colf 1ournament
Sat., August 3rd
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´2 mi., E 1/2 mi. of PhiIip
Shotgun Start:
7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.
·18 Holes ·Pin Prizes
·Steak meal included
·$50/person entry fee
·36 team limit
$5,000 Hole-in-One Prize!!
Come join us & have fun!
Reserve your spot - call early!!
This & That
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 10
F0lll¢ N0l0f, lß0.
Pr|||p, 30
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
Just arrived: 2014 LincoIns!
Check out our entire selection at
www.phiIipmotor.com
8top ln & see Ryan todayll
Philip Masonic
Saturday, August 3rd
4:00 p.m. at the Philip Arena
Registration: 2:00 to 3:45 p.m.
Age Groups: 6 & Under; 7-9; 10-12; 13-14
Admission: $5/person • $15/family
Fun for all with or without a horse!!
· Goat Tying
· BarreI Racing
· FIag Racing
· Mutton Bustin' /
CaIf & Pony Riding
·Breakaway
Roping
·PoIe Bending
·Team Roping
Entries:
$5/event
Jade Kampfe, Gillette, Wyo.,
has been accepted to Jamestown
College, Jamestown, N.D., begin-
ning in the fall of 2013.
Kampfe is the son of Jacqueline
Kampfe-DeLancey and Michael
DeLancey. He graduated this
spring from Campbell County
High School where he was active
in basketball, National Honor So-
ciety and DARE. He plans to
major in psychology, economics or
business at Jamestown College
and play basketball for the Jim-
mies.
The college has awarded him an
honor scholarship, alumni referral
award and men’s basketball
award.
* * * * * *
Southeast Technical Institute in
Sioux Falls has announced its
spring 2013 graduates. These stu-
dents have completed all require-
ments necessary to earn a diploma
or associate of applied science de-
gree from STI.
One of the graduating students
is Joshua Tyler Schuller, cur-
rently of Hartford, with an associ-
ate of applied science in
mechatronics.
College Briefs
The current internship program
at Badlands National Park grew
out of the park’s Volunteer in
Parks program, a Park Stewards
Grant from the National Park
Foundation, and a nationwide
NPS initiative to engage youth as
the next generation.
According to Julie Johndreau,
education specialist at Badlands
National Park, a Philip High
School student has been a park
volunteer for several summers
now. Specifically, he was the first
youth intern at Badlands National
Park. The original student is
Nathan Wooden Knife, son of
Ansel and Teresa Wooden Knife,
Interior. This is Wooden Knife’s
fourth year of volunteering, he
started when he was 12, and has
stuck it out.
Now the program has grown to
six 2013 student participants. The
current interns are two girls from
Wall High School – Kelly Green
and Jennifer Emery, one boy and
one girl from Crazy Horse
School – Dwan Wilcox and Earl
Lamont, and two from Philip High
School – Joseph One Skunk and
Wooden Knife.
According to Johndreau, Alison
Shout, a current park ranger with
BNP, initially recommended
Wooden Knife as the first intern
for this BNP program.
“Basically what I do, is answer
questions and help the tourists,”
said Wooden Knife. “We do some
presentations for the little kids,
with fossils and such. The main
thing I do is give directions and
answer questions about the park;
that’s my main job.” Wooden Knife
said that one of the most enjoyable
parts of the internship is meeting
people from all parts of the world
and talking with them.”
“The overall goal of the intern-
ship program, and our youth pro-
grams in general, is to inspire the
next generation to get involved
with public lands and make it part
of their lives, communities and ca-
reers,” stated Johndreau.
“The interns this summer will
be developing leadership and pro-
fessional skills through group ac-
tivities and training with different
divisions in the park,” said John-
dreau. “On a day-to-day basis,
they will be assisting at the infor-
mation desk in the visitor center,
roving trails, welcoming visitors to
our fossil prep lab, and assisting
rangers with junior ranger and
other programs.”
Wooden Knife original intern in
Badlands National Park program
Nathan Wooden Knife is shown working in the museum storage facility at
the Badlands National Park.
Courtesy photo
Join the festivities at the Bad-
lands National Park, Friday
through Sunday, August 2-4, to
celebrate the beauty of a dark
night sky and the wonder of space
exploration.
As part of the park’s astronomy
festival, there will be presenta-
tions from special guest speakers
and family friendly activities, in
addition to telescope viewing. As-
tronomy festival events do not re-
quire advance sign-ups or tickets;
just drop by.
Public Star Parties – all three
days from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
at the Cedar Pass Campground
Amphitheater. Hands-on experi-
ence with multiple state-of-the-art
telescopes and amateur as-
tronomers providing constellation
tours and guiding visitors around
the universe. View planets, star
clusters, nebulae, and double
stars while going down the “scope
line.”
Friday night keynote speaker –
Herman Bender. Saturday night
keynote speaker – Chad Moore.
Sunday night keynote speaker –
Dark Ranger Kevin Poe. Night
sky program interpreter – Ranger
Larry Smith.
Sun Fun Solar Observing – all
three days from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00
p.m. at the Ben Reifel Visitor Cen-
ter. View solar flares and sunspots
through our special solar tele-
scope, 100 percent safe for eyes.
Build your own sundial work-
shop - Friday and Saturday from
1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Ben
Reifel Visitor Center.
Model rocket building and
launching workshop - Saturday
and Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon in Interior. Rocket-
building kits will be available for
sale.
Planetarium shows - Through-
out all three days at the Interior
School gymnasium, two miles
south of the Ben Reifel Visitor
Center. The Journey Museum
from Rapid City and the South
Dakota Discovery Center from
Pierre will present planetarium
shows using their portable plane-
tariums.
Meet a missileer – all three days
at the Interior School gymnasium.
Minuteman Missile National His-
toric Site rangers will host talks
and rocket exhibits throughout
the festival. Meet former missile
field personnel who can describe
how rockets work and tell per-
sonal stories about being a mis-
sileer in the United States Air
Force.
Night sky viewing is offered at
the Cedar Pass Campground Am-
phitheater on Friday through
Monday nights throughout the
summer months. After the conclu-
sion of the evening ranger pro-
gram, stay to look at the night sky
through telescopes provided by
the park. The ranger will point out
constellations, stars and planets.
Everyone is given an opportunity
to see impressive objects of the
night sky.
Join night sky rangers Friday
through Monday evenings this
summer to look through tele-
scopes.
On any given night, visitors will
be exposed to more than 7,500
stars. Especially phenomenal is
the clarity of our own Milky Way
Galaxy. Night sky views include
not only galaxies but also star
clusters, nebulae, planets and
moons. Visitors are also treated to
fly-overs by numerous satellites
and the International Space Sta-
tion.
If you are interested in sharing
your love of astronomy and natu-
ral dark skies, consider applying
for a position as a volunteer in
park (VIP) night sky assistant.
For more information contact the
park’s volunteer program coordi-
nator.
Badlands park astronomy festival
Courtesy photo
Midland Market circus
The Friday, July 26, gathering of the Midland Farmer’s Market went under
the theme of big top circus. Shown are Jim and Jessie Root visiting with
market attendees. The Bad River Buckaroos 4-H Club served the hot dog
and sloppy joe meal, which included a circus cupcake with animal crackers.
There were popcorn and peanuts, also. An estimated 70 people attended.
Various gardeners offered beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, broccoli
and cauliflower. There was also baked goods, fresh eggs and handcrafted
items. The market’s theme on Friday, August 16, will be fun and games.
August 30 and most of September are still open for suggestions. September
20 will be German night, with Oktoberfest starting September 21.
New control available for Leafy Spurge
When Leafy Spurge's yellow
flowers begin to bloom, landown-
ers can evaluate the effectiveness
of their control program, says
Paul Johnson, SDSU Extension
Agronomy Field Specialist.
“If you have been doing a good
job at control in the past, it maybe
a little slower and if you have been
doing a really good job, there may
even be fewer plants out there
than last year,” Johnson said.
He adds that the only way to get
spurge under control is to be on it
every year and get the root re-
serves depleted so the plants will
start to die. “A cold winter helps
takeout the spurge when the root
reserves have been
depleted,”Johnson said. “As soon
as the yellow flowers are out it is
time to start spraying.” Johnson
says the control window is only
about one month before there will
be viable seed in the plant.
“If you also have thistles in with
the spurge you may want to wait
a little until thistles are at bud to
make sure you get good coverage
and control on both of the weeds,”
he said.
But again, Johnson says be
careful not to wait to long. “Wait-
ing too long only allows the root
reserves to build back up in the
plant and then you will not make
progress on getting rid of the
plants. Instead, they will come
back stronger than ever,” he said.
New Control Tools Available
Based on SDSU test plots in
Moody County a new compound
called Perspective®looks like it
should be as good as Tordon® in
controlling Leafy Spurge, but
Johnson says this compound has
fewer use-restrictions; and it is
more environmentally friendly.
“It should be able to be used in
more areas tat have a shallow
ground water problem,” he said.
“This is the first new product that
has effect on thistles and spurge
that has been developed in the
last 40 years.”
At present Perspective® is not
labeled on any areas that are
cropped or hayed, Johnson says
until more labeling is done, it will
be limited on where it can be used.
Also some grass injury will need to
be tolerated with its use.
“Usually the grass will recover
the next year,”he said. “And, I al-
ways want readers to know that
use of product’s names does not
imply endorsement. information is
based on SDSU research observa-
tions.” Before use, landowners
need to verify information on cur-
rent product labels prior to appli-
cation.
Community
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 11
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The Hot Summer Nights, Thursday, July 25, included not
only the various entertainment, farmer’s market, face
painting and socializing, but also a free-will barbecue
of hamburgers and and hot dogs. The free, annual
event, which runs each Thursday evening during July, is
sponsored by the Haakon County Young Women in the
HCYW Kiddie Park just west of Philip.
Hot Summer Nights ends season
Tristen Schofield.
Aitanna Nadala
Kenny Feidler, who is part of the Bad River Band.
Del Bartels/Pioneer Review
Tammi Carstensen and Kendra Schofield.
Marcus Martinez, Philip, and Miranda Swick, Spearfish.
Chevelle and Chris Pierce having some daughter/father
time during Hot Summer Nights, Thursday, July 25, at
the Haakon County Young Women’s Kiddie Park.
Taryn Ravellette and Kiarra Moses.
Trey Larson and Reghan Bloomquist.
Brady Heltzel gets a moustache from Copper Lurz.
Representative Kristi Noem made the following
statement on July 11 regarding passage of H.R.2642,
the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Manage-
ment Act of 2013 (Farm Bill):
“This process hasn’t been easy and we still have a long way to go to get a farm bill signed into law. I remain
committed to the end game, which is to ensure we have sound policy that provides a safety net and certainty
for our agriculture community. Splitting the Farm Bill is not ideal and certainly wasn’t the path I would have
chosen, but at the end of the day, we need to get a farm bill into conference with the Senate.
“I was proud of the bipartisan bill we passed out of the Agriculture Committee. It’s unfortunate that many
members were unable to put people before politics and pass that bill when we had the opportunity last month.
Now it’s time to move forward and continue working to complete a five-year bill.”
The vote was 216-208, with Noem voting in favor of the bill. It is identical to the previous farm bill brought
to the House floor, excluding the nutrition title which will be considered at a later date.
Noem championed four main provisions in the House version of the bill, all of which were included in some
form in the final version approved by the House. They include:
•Livestock Disaster Protection Act: would extend the Livestock Indemnity Program, the Livestock Forage
Program and the Emergency Livestock Assistance Program authorized
in the 2008 farm bill for the life of the bill, as well as retroactive coverage
for fiscal years 2012 and 2013.
•Protect Our Prairies Act: would encourage good land stewardship
practices and preserve habitats for pheasants, ducks and other wildlife
on native sod and on grasslands that haven’t been farmed in the past,
while estimated to save taxpayers nearly $200 million over 10 years.
•National Forest Emergency Response Act: would streamline
processes to get boots on the ground faster for pine beetle mitigation ef-
forts. Calls for the federal government to grant categorical exclusions
up to 10,000 acres.
•USDA Office of Tribal Relations: Would permanently establish an
Office of Tribal Relations within the United States Department of Agri-
culture (USDA) to help improve communication between USDA and
tribal nations. This provision would not cost taxpayers any additional
dollars and instead requires USDA to use existing resources to establish
the office.
South Dakota Farmers Union President Doug Sombke issued the fol-
lowing statement on the Farm Bill, which takes out nutrition and food
programs while repealing permanent law.
House Republican leaders dropped the nutrition title from the farm
bill which included food assistance programs to low-income Americans.
Today’s vote also included a provision to repeal permanent law estab-
lished in the 1930s and 1940s.
“This is an attempt to let Congress get out of the business of writing
farm policy,” Sombke said. “Because of the permanent law, Congress
has been forced to write new farm policy every five years to ensure that
those policies reflect our current situation. Without permanent law,
there is no incentive to write new legislation.”
The South Dakota Corn Growers Association is pleased that the U.S.
House has passed its version of a farm bill, a long overdue step that
paves the way for the two branches of Congress to compromise and craft
an agricultural policy to serve the country in the coming years.
“We didn’t like the politics, the process or some of the policy, but we
do support passage of the bill,” SDCGA President Mark Gross said.
Statements on
passage of 2013
U.S. Farm Bill
Community
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 12
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thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you
Jackson County Conservation District and Haakon County Conservation
District would like to thank everyone who participated in this year’s South
Dakota Rangeland Days event along with the 30th Anniversary Recogni-
tion of Rangeland Days. We also send a big Thank You to all those
who donated to, sponsored or provided services for this year’s event.
City of Kadoka
Bank West, Kadoka
First National Bank, Philip
Kadoka Area School District
West River Water Development
District
Veryl Prokop
Mark & Jayme Williams
Sauntee Coller
Wendell Buxcel
Kadoka Community Betterment
Association
Philip Motor Company
Kadoka Gas and Go
Fitzgerald Oil
Discount Fuel, LLC
West Central Electric
Ken’s Refrigeration & Heating Inc.
Ernie’s Building Center, LLC
George’s Welding & Repair
Rush Funeral Home, Inc.
Scotchman Industries, Inc.
Rodeway Inn
H & H Restaurant
Grossenburg Implement, Inc.
Cattle Business Weekly
Hildebrand Steel & Concrete
Construction
Main Street Plaza, LLC
Crew Agency, Ltd.
Kenny & Roxy Fox
Golden Willow Seeds
Moses Building Center
Magelky Trucking
People’s Market
West River Excavation
Jigger’s Restaurant
Jackson County Title Company
Golden West Telecommunications
Farmers Union Insurance Agency
America’s Best Value Inn
Kadoka Sundowner/Budget
Host Inn
Public Locker
Penny’s Riverside Catering
Hughes County Conservation
District
Hyde County Conservation District
Jerauld Conservation District
Jones County Conservation District
Pennington County Conservation
District
Spink Conservation District
Stanley Conservation District
A heartfelt thank-you to all of the volunteers who provided instruction,
chaperoned, drove buses, judged displays and talks and helped with the
preparation/serving of meals from the Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS), SDSU Extension Service, Brule-Buffalo, East Pennington
and Jones County Conservation Districts and local volunteers from both
Kadoka and Philip
Daryl and Paula from Rainbow Ridge Gardens in Iowa
will again be selling home-raised
vegetables and S.D. melons at the
NAPA Auto Store (Hwys. 14-73, Philip)
on Sundays, from 10 AM to 2 PM.
We will sell Sunday, August 11,
through Sunday, September 22.
Visit our website at
www.rainbowridgegardens.com
for a wealth of recipes!
Jessica Gittings and Wade Mc-
gruger were supper guests at the
George and Sandee Gittings home
Monday.
Monday, I made a trip to Rapid
City with the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation commu-
nity van. While there, Casey Pe-
terson and his dad, Stanley,
stopped for a visit with me. Stan-
ley has been in Rapid City staying
with Casey and family, so it was
good to get in a short visit. Tony
Harty visited me in the evening. It
was a nice day, cool enough to just
find a shade tree and hang out be-
tween appointments.
Don and Vi Moody finished
some more of the moving bales off
the fields (seems an everyday "get
some done") ranch business going
on currently right now. Thank the
Lord that He did provide the rain
to accomplish this abundant sup-
ply of feed for the cattle this win-
ter. Everyone is so grateful.
I had an email from Boyd
Stephenson who wrote, “When I
was 12 years old, your dad paid
me $1.50 a day and I was glad to
get it. That summer stopped my
uncle, Jerry, from using me for
nothing. The next summer he paid
me $40 a month. I remember buy-
ing my own school clothes from
Sears and Robuck." Thanks, Boyd,
for telling me that.
George and Sandee Gittings
had supper in town Saturday
evening for Sandee's birthday.
Roxie Gittings arrived that night
to spend a couple of days.
Don and Vi Moody excused
themselves from the ranch Tues-
day (owners have that right) and
headed back up to their place in
Rapid Valley to do some trimming
on the yards and keeping every-
thing matched up with what their
tenants take care of. They also en-
joyed taco Tuesday at a little fa-
vorite spot on lower main street in
Deadwood. They had a fun visit
with Herb and Hazel Seiler enjoy-
ing the lovely day around and
about town in the Black Hills
also – so beautiful and green.
Wednesday was proof to never
put off until tomorrow what you
can do today. Christina Zuccaro
and her friend, Lucy Laffoon,
came to Kadoka and we took a fly
over the Badlands. Christina is
from Midland, but lives and works
in Guam. Lucy is from Colorado
and just took her bar exam. We
had an outstanding day to fly, but
our first choice of Thursday would
not have been as pleasant. Thanks
girls for an enjoyable morning.
Christina sent a “smilebox” with
pictures to enjoy on Facebook. I
went to the motor home and fixed
supper for Bill and spent the
night, returning home Thursday
morning.
A happy birthday to daughter
Shelley Seager. She had the best
birthday spending time with
grandsons, Ryder and Raiden, as
well as Zack and Cori. Her friend,
Lori Snellgrove, made a cake and
it was a great day.
Don Moody and Vi kept appoint-
ments while in Rapid, then Don
wanted to finish out a field that he
had cut in the alfalfa bottoms, so
he drove back to the ranch Thurs-
day and Vi stayed on at Rapid
rather than pack up things. Don
left that morning and when he
came back to the Valley that
evening, all the bales of hay had
been removed off the frontage
hayfield. Don and Vi visited sev-
eral times by cell phone, but Vi
didn't mention that the hay was
being moved. So when Don got
back into the Valley that evening,
Vi told him she got all that hay
moved by herself while he was at
the ranch. That was a cool trick on
hubby!
Jessica and Sandee Gittings
were in Rapid City Thursday.
Sandee had some surgery done.
Thursday, our rain gauge
showed 2/10s, every little bit
helps. I drove the community van
for lunch for some and to a doctor
in Philip for another. Had a nice
visit with two cousins. Dave Sher-
wood, who is visiting in Tea this
summer and plans to stop by, and
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
continued on page 13
Community
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 13
Betwixt Places News
(continued from previous page)
Dick Sherwood, Edmonds, Wash.,
who is well known to the Blair
family since he summered at Bob
and Ingas’ when he was young.
Don and Vi Moody finished up
their appointments and stops at
ranch supply stores and arrived
back at the ranch with furry
friends for the weekend and
moved more hay bales. Vi wrote,
“Don is lucky, as he has stereo
music cassette player and A/C in
his tractors, etc. Makes a boring
task much more fun. Vi went to
the fields several times helping
move equipment and Sunday af-
ternoon they hooked up to the hay
hiker for the moving of bales
which virtually has an arm with a
spike that can flip a bale from the
ground right up on to a chain mov-
ing trailer. Don't be on the down-
side of a dike though – the bale
will flip right back off the trailer,
momentum of course. And being
downhill away it rolls back off the
trailer. Don found that out and we
all laughed when it rolled back off
the first practice we had. Practice
makes perfect they say!
That's what keeps ranching and
farming fun, when so many new
things come with equipment and
stuff to make changes to the en-
joyment and less effort. Can you
imagine if we ever went back to
the way it was when our folks first
started. It seems that there were
always lots of haystacks though
and the cattle weighed heavy in
the fall at selling time.”
Friday, Shelley Seager arrived
at our place to drop off the car and
Bonnie Moses picked her up and
they were on their way to Sioux
Falls to visit at the home of
Michael Moses and see their new
little boy. Then they went to Madi-
son. I took the community van to
Philip for an appointment, but
Kay Ainslie had to bail me out
after the appointment went longer
than expected. I hurried home and
went to Madison to visit at the
Chase May home and stayed
overnight with Shelley and Bon-
nie at a motel with a pool. It al-
ways take a little while to get the
little great-grandson warmed up
to who we are, but once that is
over, all is good.
Saturday in Madison, folks ar-
rived for little Jaxon’s first birth-
day. Eric Seager came by with Eli
and after a short visit, Eric re-
turned to Sioux Falls and Eli
stayed with us. Granddaughter
Amanda and Adam Claflin came
by and we all went to downtown
Madison since it was a special day
with art in the park and exotic an-
imals to pet and see. Chase grilled
burgers and brats and the fresh
corn on the cob was a hit, then it
was birthday party time at Carly’s
mother’s home. Jaxon got into his
cake big time. It was a fun after-
noon. Amanda and Adam took Eli
home with them, Bonnie and
Shelley headed toward Sutton,
Neb., and I turned the car toward
home. Now the little May family
can relax, but we expect word any
day that they will have a new lit-
tle boy. The room is all fixed up
and waiting.
Jody Gittings had dinner with
George, Sandee and Roxie Git-
tings Sunday.
Robin Gittings and friend,
Kristie, and her son, Nick, and
Kelsey Gittings arrived late Sun-
day evening at the George Git-
tings’ home after spending the
week in the Wyoming towns of
Cheyenne and Laramie.
Sunday morning, my plans were
interrupted early when I ran into
a gal from Bellevue, Wash,, mov-
ing to Palm Beach, Fla., and we
took a fly over the Badlands. That
evening, I went to spend the night
with Bill and fix him supper. He is
still just north at Terry’s.
It is always surprising how in-
formation on family comes in dif-
ferent ways. Just like Rich Smith
sharing with me the fact he re-
membered my great-uncle, Frank
Sherwood, who was postmaster in
Cottonwood for many years. He
married Cora Guptill after his
first wife was killed by a train in
Iowa only two days after they
were married. My second cousin,
Marilyn (Larson) Mizer, George,
Wash., (her mother was my great-
aunt, Evalyn Sherwood, who mar-
ried Lars Larson) had a friend
who was cleaning house and gave
her two quite significant items
from the U.S.S. South Dakota.
One was a July 4, 1912, “Smoker”
program (which had to be boxing)
and the other the menu for Christ-
mas Day 1912 San Francisco Bay.
It is quite amazing the quality of
the print, even though a mouse ev-
idently liked the menu a little.
The U.S.S. South Dakota was
built in 1904 at San Francisco by
union iron workers. July 20, 1904,
Governor Herried and his daugh-
ter, along with a party of 10, ar-
rived in San Francisco. Thursday
the 21st of July, they attended the
launching ceremony. In a very
simple ceremony, Miss Grace Her-
reid pressed a button that re-
leased the cruiser from her blocks.
As she slid down the ways, Miss
Herreid swung a bottle of cham-
pagne against the hull and be-
stowed the name of U.S.S. South
Dakota on the ship. She was
launched July 21, 1904. The ship
was 502 feet long by 69 feetsix and
one half inches wide. It had a
speed of 22 knots; horsepower
23,000 and cost $3,750. On board
were 41 officers and 791 men. The
South Dakota was renamed
Huron on June 7, 1920. South
Dakota was assigned to the Ar-
mored Cruiser Squadron, Pacific
Fleet, cruising off the west coast of
the United States through August
1908. This ship served in the Asi-
atic fleet and finally the South
Dakota/Huron was decommis-
sioned June 17, 1927. What to do
with these ships. Well many got a
new life when the Powell River
Company took possession of some
ships to be used as floating break-
waters for the log pond at their
pulp and paper mill at Powell
River, British Columbia, Canada.
The South Dakota hull, stripped
to her waterline, took her place
August 1931 in the log pond at
Powell River along side the
Charleston. The ships were bal-
lasted and anchored in place and
routinely pumped out to keep
them afloat. For the next 30 years,
the South Dakota/Huron re-
mained rusting peacefully protect-
ing the log pond along with the
other hulks that formed the
Breakwater Fleet. On February
18, 1961, with a storm raging and
the South Dakota/Huron riding
low in the water, the once proud
ship lost her battle with her
enemy of 30 years and slipped qui-
etly beneath the waves. She set-
tled to the bottom of the log pond
in about 80 feet of water and rests
there to this day.
My quest to know more about
these treasures sent to me by
cousin Marilyn led me to want to
learn more about the ship that
bore the name for our state. Be
careful what you ask for in this
age of computers, I pushed “print”
to capture some information and
got 33 pages of information on the
U.S.S. South Dakota.
“We are happier with what we
have when it is shared with those
we love.” Anonymous
The First Lutheran Church in Philip held its annual Vacation Bible School Monday through Thursday, July 22-25. The learning and fun began each evening at 5:30
p.m. and went until 8:00 p.m. The theme this year, “Mary, Martha and Many Faithful Women,” was announced during the program’s final presentation Thursday
evening as a tribute to all teachers. The students performed songs such as “We Love,” “Won’t you Come and Sit With Me,” “I Am Trusting you, Lord Jesus,” “I Love
to Tell the Story,” “Jesus Loves Me” and “Goodbye.” Individual and group reading of Bible versus were also done. The VBS offering was designated to go toward the
local Backpack Food Program.
First Lutheran’s annual Vacation Bible School
Del Bartels/Pioneer Review
Pioneer Review is a legal newspaper for the City of Philip, Haakon County, Haakon School Dist. 27-1, Town of Midland, West River Rural Water Development District.
NOTICE OF
HEARING FOR
NAME CHANGE
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FILE#
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
)SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
IN THE MATTER OF NAME CHANGE )
)
FOR ETHEL ELIZABETH FREIN )
Pursuant to SDCL § 21-37-4, Notice is
hereby given that Ethel Elizabeth Frein
has filed a Petition for Name Change to
change her name from Ethel Elizabeth
Frein to Ethel Elizabeth Martin, and that
the time and place set for hearing on this
Petition is the 18th day of September,
2013, at 1:00 p.m. in the Haakon County
Courthouse, Philip, SD, before the Hon-
orable Patricia DeVaney and that all per-
sons interested may appear and be heard
upon granting of said Petition.
Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013.
/s/Gay Tollefson
Gay Klima Tollefson
Attorney for Ethel Elizabeth Frein
PO Box 848
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2783
[Published July 25, August 1, 8 & 15,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$56.45]
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
PRO 13-6
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
)SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
Estate of )
)
LINDA L. KRAMER, )
)
Deceased )
Notice is given that on June 28, 2013,
Danny L. Kramer, whose address is
22400 Willow Creek Road, Philip, South
Dakota 57567, was appointed as per-
sonal representative of the Estate of
Linda L. Kramer.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal rep-
resentative or may be filed with the clerk
and a copy of the claim mailed to the per-
sonal representative.
Dated this 23rd day of July, 2013.
/s/Danny L. Kramer
Danny L. Kramer
Personal Representative
22400 Willow Creek Road
Philip, SD 57567
Haakon County Clerk of Courts
140 South Howard
Philip, SD 57567
[Published August 1, 8 & 15, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $51.62]
Notice of Lapse of
Mineral Interests
TO: All of the Unknown Heirs, Devisees,
Legatees, Executors, Administrators and
Creditors of the Following Named Per-
sons, To-Wit: RAY A. PELLET, MABEL
PELLET, ALICE I. RIPPE ADAMS,
ARTHUR B. SWEET, HELEN R. RIPPE
SWEET, MABEL A. RIPPE CAMPBELL
and GORDON CAMPBELL, and ALL of
the Persons Unknown who Have or Claim
to Have an Interest in the Mineral Rights
of the Premises Described Below.
You are hereby given notice that, pur-
suant to SDCL §43-30A, there has been
a lapse of mineral rights in the following
described land:
LOTS ONE (1) AND TWO (2) OF THE
SOUTH HALF (S1/2) OF THE NORTH-
EAST QUARTER (NE1/4) OF SECTION
TWO (2) IN TOWNSHIP THREE (3),
RANGE TWENTY-ONE (21), EAST OF
THE BLACK HILLS MERIDIAN,
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA,
CONTAINING 160.81 ACRES MORE OR
LESS, ACCORDING TO GOVERNMENT
SURVEY THEREOF, EXCEPT ONE
HALF OF MINERAL, OIL AND PETRO-
LEUM PRODUCTS WHICH ARE RE-
SERVED BY THE GRANTORS.
(Recorded October 19, 1946, in Book
100, Page 213, Haakon County Register
of Deeds.)
AND
LOT FOUR (4), SECTION TWO (2),
TOWNSHIP THREE NORTH (3N),
RANGE TWENTY-ONE (21), EAST OF
THE BLACK HILLS MERIDIAN,
HAAKON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA.
(Recorded March 16, 1946, in Book 102,
Page 79, Haakon County Register of
Deeds.)
The most recent Statement of Claim was
filed with the Register of Deeds in 1946.
The names of the record owners of the
mineral interest are: Ray A. Pellet, Mabel
Pellet, Alice I. Rippe Adams, Arthur B.
Sweet, Helen R. Rippe Sweet, Mabel A.
Rippe Campbell and Gordon Campbell.
Reasonable inquiry was made into the
status and addresses of the record hold-
ers. It would appear that they are all de-
ceased.
The person giving this notice is Clint Nel-
son, the current surface owner of the
above described real estate, and who will
succeed as the owner of the mineral
rights.
If you have knowledge of the above-
named persons or their heirs, please con-
tact:
Tollefson Law Office
PO Box 848
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2783
or
Clint Nelson
23152 11 Mile Rd.
Philip, SD 57567
605-843-2511
[Published August 1, 8 & 15, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $78.84]
Proceedings of
West River Water
Development District
June 20, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb
called the meeting to order at 10:30 A.M.
(CT).
Roll Call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper; Mike Vetter, City of Philip.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the agenda. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the May 16, 2013, meeting were previ-
ously mailed to the Board for their review.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the May
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph Hieb
- $55.41, Casey Krogman - $55.41, Mar-
ion Matt - $55.41, Veryl Prokop - $55.41,
Lorne Smith - $55.41, West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS - $1,000.00, Kadoka Press -
$65.04, Lyman County Herald - $56.30,
Murdo Coyote - $62.10, Pennington
County Courant - $53.60, Pioneer Review
- $56.21, Todd County Tribune - $103.38.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the May Financial Re-
port is on file at the District office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Krogman, sec-
onded by Director Matt to approve the
May Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his June report to
the Board. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the Manager’s Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
PRELIMINARY FY 2014 BUDGET: Man-
ager Fitzgerald presented the Board with
the draft preliminary FY 2014 budget for
their review. Motion by Director Prokop,
seconded by Director Matt to approve the
FY 2014 preliminary budget. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
ESTABLISH FY 2014 BUDGET HEAR-
ING: Motion by Director Matt, seconded
by Director Smith to advertise the budget
hearing for 10:45 A.M. (CT) Wednesday,
July 17, 2013. Motion carried unani-
mously.
MELLETTE COUNTY CONSERVATION
DISTRICT: Manager Fitzgerald presented
two funding assistance requests from the
Mellette County Conservation District.
The first request is for a cost-share Tech-
nician Grant in the amount of $12,500.
The technician provides assistance to
any landowner interested in a natural re-
source conservation practice in the Mel-
lette and Todd County Conservation Dis-
tricts. Last year 80,000 feet of pipeline
and 48 livestock watering tanks were in-
stalled under the Technician’s assistance,
along with many other projects. Motion by
Director Matt, seconded by Director
Prokop to provide half of the requested
assistance in the amount of $6,250 to be
directed towards the Mellette County
Conservation District for water resource
and conservation related activities in Mel-
lette County. Motion carried unanimously.
The second funding assistance re-
quest outlined a Pipeline IV Grant for in-
stallation of pipeline, tanks and rural
water hook-ups. The primary beneficiar-
ies will be landowners and livestock pro-
ducers in Mellette County. The total cost
of engineering and technical assistance
for these projects would be $5,300 which
is detailed in the project plans provided
by the Conservation District. Motion by
Director Prokop, seconded by Director
Matt to provide assistance in the amount
of $5,300 to the Mellette County Conser-
vation District for the estimated costs of
engineering and technical assistance for
planned pipeline projects in Mellette
County. Motion carried unanimously.
CITY OF PHILIP: Mayor Mike Vetter
summarized the City of Philip’s current
US Highway 14 – SD Highway 73
Drainage Issue Evaluation Project and
provided copies of engineering plans and
cost estimates. The City requests assis-
tance in the amount of $10,000 for the hy-
draulic study. The study will determine if
there is adequate retention in the storage
basin to protect the downstream Philip
area from flooding, which the State is re-
quiring in order to release easements dat-
ing back to 1936 for the drainage area.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Krogman to provide $10,000 in
assistance to the City of Philip to be used
for their hydraulic study. Motion carried 4-
0, Director Matt abstained.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 11:04 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_____________________________
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
_____________________________
Kati Venard, Recording Secretary
[Published August 1, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $52.31]
Legal Notices
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 14
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NOTICE OF WEST CENTRAL
ELECTRIC DIRECTOR ELECTION
To All Members of Zone Four, Haakon County
Petitions have been filed by more than one candidate in Zone
4, Haakon County, to fill the vacancy on the Cooperative’s Board of
Directors. The zone will now hold an election to elect the Director
for Zone 4. The person elected at the Zone Meeting will represent
their zone for a three (3) year term on the board effective at the 2013
Annual Meeting.
The following candidates have filed petitions for the Zone 4,
Haakon County, Rural Director position:
Chuck Kroetch Kevin Neuhauser
PO Box 944 23817 192nd Street
Philip, SD 57567 Midland, SD 57552
The Zone 4 meeting, for the purpose of electing a director, will
be held on August 13, 2013, at Philip American Legion Hall. The
Zone meeting will begin at 6:55 PM (MDT) with the polls opening at
approximately 7:00 PM. The polls will remain open until 8:00 PM
(MDT). All members of Zone 4, Haakon County are encouraged to
attend.
Early Thursday morning our
area received some much wel-
comed rain. Here at our house we
had .40” and I've heard reports of
over an inch. What a blessing for
the crops, grass, gardens and
yards! The bad news is that the
night before some had hail which
did damage to corn and other
crops.
Mark Stangle is spending some
time in Colorado Springs with his
cousin, Trenton Hulland, and his
family. Trenton's grandmother is
Sharon (Patton).
Sam Stangle and Shannon
Todd, who is spending the sum-
mer at the Stangles and working
in Philip, drove to Brookings last
Thursday in preparation for col-
lege this fall.
SaraLi Petersen visited her
grandparents, Bill and Connie
Parsons, last week from Wednes-
day until Saturday. SaraLi is the
daugher of Marla and Kyle Pe-
tersen of Dazey, N.D.
Bill and Connie Parsons were
guests for supper at Grant and
Sandra Parsons' Saturday night
in honor of Sandra and Jaycee
Parsons' birthdays. Jaycee is the
daughter of Aaron and Shannon
Parsons. She and her brother are
enjoying the month of July with
their grandparents, Grant and
Sandra.
Last Friday, Sawyer and Rivers
Sandal, Quinn, spent the day with
Bill and Karyl Sandal. They had
fun swimming in the afternoon
with Gage and Taryn Ravellette.
Monday, Karyl Sandal, Vonnie
O'Dea and her grandchildren,
Amy and Mary Deichert, tied a
quilt for Amy at Karyl's house.
Karyl Sandal hosted a birthday
party for Gayle Rush Wednesday
morning. Guests were Gayle, Mar-
garet Rush, Kay Ainslie, Cheryl
Fitch and Barbara Wentz.
The weekend of July 19-21, the
Patton families held their annual
get-together at Lake McConaughy
near Ogalalla, Neb. Local folks at-
tending were Leo and Joan Pat-
ton, Irene Patton, the Jim Stangle
family, Shannon Todd, and Jen-
nifer Stangle and boyfriend, Colt.
Sunday night, the Patton's sons-
in-law, Terry Penland and Dave
Jones, stayed and left for their
homes in Minnesota Monday
morning. Janet Penland, Susan
Jones and Ally Patton spent Mon-
day night with Leo and Joan.
Keagan, Colby, Jensen and
Rayler Fitch took swimming les-
sons last week in Philip.
Friday, July 19, Christa Fitch's
sister, Carla, and her children,
Kiley and Taegan, along with
Christa, Colby, Jensen, Rayler
and Aven Fitch spent the day at
Wall Drug. Saturday, they were
joined by Trevor, Brayden and
Keagan Fitch in Rapid City for
Hills Alive. They met Carla's fi-
ancé, Michael, and his family from
Gillette.
July 22, Autumn Parsons cele-
brated her 12th birthday by hav-
ing Sarah Parsons and Anna
Piroutek overnight. Autumn now
shares her birthday with the new
little prince in England.
Last week, Ben and Mark Stan-
gle were in Rapid City for a
Catholic youth camp.
Saturday evening, July 20,
Mark and Pat Hanrahan and Bur-
jes and Cheryl Fitch drove to En-
ning for supper at Nellies
Mercantile and Saloon. They en-
joyed the evening listening to the
Knutson girls sing and play.
Frank O'Grady is staying with
his daughter, Karen and Phil Car-
ley for a while. Visiting at Carley's
Wednesday night were Joe and
Kathy Gittings.
Danielle Piroutek, daughter of
Mike and Faye, arrived at her
home Saturday and plans to stay
until she returns to college in
Washington, D.C., the end of Au-
gust. Anna Piroutek recently cele-
brated her 14th birthday. She and
her family met her grandparents,
Gary and Rita Piroutek, Sturgis,
in Enning for a good time of visit-
ing and eating.
July 17, Mike and Faye
Piroutek and family, Mike's par-
ents, Gary and Rita, and his sis-
ter, Mary and Bob Bryant,
Effingham, Ill., and his nieces,
Christina and Rebecca, met for a
fun day of boating near Pierre.
Anna Piroutek is very happy
that she qualified in poles to go to
the state 4-H rodeo in Pierre. Con-
gratulations, Anna!
Chad, Kathy and Preston Han-
rahan were in Burke for the rodeo
the weekend of the 20th-21st.
They also helped Chad's sister,
Tracie Erdmann, move to Vermil-
lion.
Donna and Tina Staben hosted
the meeting of the garden club at
their home July 16. They have a
very pretty yard with a variety of
flowers – lots of work!
Wednesday evening, Paul,
Donna and Tina Staben brought a
birthday cake to Jeff and Terri
Staben's in honor of Terri's birth-
day.
The weekend of the 20th-21st,
the Steve Pekron family traveled
to Medora, N.D., to spend time
with Nina's family. They camped
in the Theodore Roosevelt Na-
tional Park and attended the
Medora musical Saturday night.
There were some close encounters
with buffalo in the park, but
everyone made it out safely.
Wade and Marcy Parsons, Au-
tumn, Kamri and Keenan, Jim
and Betty Smith, and Brock Ash-
ley and Jaisa Heid had a birthday
celebration at Storybook Island
Sunday, the 21st. They celebrated
the birthdays of Autumn, Kamri,
Jaisa, Brock and Betty. They en-
joyed a barbecue, outdoor games,
Storybook Island and of course
splashing in the creek.
Guests for lunch Sunday at
Donnie and Bobette Schofields
were the Bruce Dunker family,
Wall, and Jeff and Crystal
Schofield. Michael and Janice
Schofield were callers on Tuesday
night.
Darren Gebes and two youngest
sons spent from a week ago Tues-
day until Saturday with his par-
ents, Mike and Linda Gebes.
Bart and I were in Aurora, Neb.,
at George and Nancy Hohwieler's
a few days last week. We were
there to see the Aurora team win
the Legion baseball district tour-
nament. They play in the state
tournament beginning on Satur-
day the 27th in Gering, Neb. Our
grandson, Jordan, is one of the
players. We will be going to that
so I'm writng the news on Friday
this week.
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Think back to the days of school
lunches, study guides and late
night homework.
Sure the days seemed long and
we may have been more excited
about the big game that night
than algebra, but what we all
learned in the classroom gave us
the foundation we needed for fu-
ture education and jobs.
I’ve always believed that deci-
sions are best made at the local
level, and this includes decisions
relating to our education system.
Recently, the House voted to reau-
thorize the Elementary and Sec-
ondary Education Act, commonly
referred to as No Child Left Be-
hind. The Student Success Act,
which I supported, will restore
local control, support effective
teachers, reduce the federal foot-
print and empower parents.
We all know that no one has a
greater stake in student success
than moms and dads who care
deeply about their children’s fu-
ture. This bill will give parents a
stronger voice and allow them to
become more hands-on in their
child’s education.
Included in the Student Success
Act were provisions I introduced
alongside Rep. Rick Larsen (D-
WA) that improve the Impact Aid
program by increasing efficiency,
eliminating subjectivity, and pro-
viding greater flexibility to school
districts. Impact Aid helps many
South Dakota school districts with
costs resulting from large
amounts of federally impacted
land including military bases, In-
dian lands and federal property.
We are currently operating
under outdated policies that make
it hard to get the best teachers
possible in our schools. Great
teachers have the ability to in-
spire and empower our children
each day. This bill will eliminate
ineffective federal teaching re-
quirements and will instead
switch the focus to classroom re-
sults. We should be supporting
our teachers, not pressuring edu-
cators to “teach to the test.”
In South Dakota, we know and
understand that a one-size-fits-all
approach doesn’t work. The needs
of our rural schools are much dif-
ferent than schools in New York
City. I believe it’s crucial that leg-
islation take into account the dif-
ferences between states, and
that’s exactly what the Student
Success Act does.
Our children deserve the best
education we can offer. In the face
of stiff global competition for jobs
and research opportunities, we ex-
pect a lot from our students,
teachers and administrators. But
with the proper support and ac-
countability, I have no doubt that
our students can and will be suc-
cessful in tackling any challenges
they may encounter.
I hope you’ll take a moment to
send me an email through my
website to share your thoughts on
education reform and perhaps
share a story about one of your fa-
vorite teachers. You can email me
at http://noem.house.gov.
Investing in our kids
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper, 605-859-2516,
or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
* * * * * * * *
AutoMotive
FOR SALE: 1999 Dodge Dually,
Ext. cab, Cummins diesel, 5
speed, $8,500. Call 685-4052.
K34-2tc
FOR SALE: 1998 Dodge, 2WD,
regular cab, diesel, automatic,
$5,800. Call 685-4052. K34-2tc
FOR SALE: 1978 MGB convert-
ible, 52K miles, good shape. Call
279-2606 or 515-3270, Wall, for
price. PW34-2tp
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
Business & seRviCe
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn 441-1053 or leave a mes-
sage at 837-0112. K31-4tp
BUSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
fARM & RAnCh
FOR SALE: (3) Billy goats: (1)
full grown Boer/Nubian Billy
and (2) three-month-old Boer/
Toggenburg/Nubian Billy kids.
$50 apiece OBO. Call 433-5403.
P34-2tp
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GARAGe sAles
2-FAMILY RUMMAGE SALE:
August 2, 12-7; August 3, 8-2,
K-gee’s Bldg., Main St. Philip.
Clothes - men’s, women’s, Scot-
tie, shoes, household, décor,
kitchen, board games, books,
cookbooks, (2) decorator tables,
discontinued Princess House,
holiday décor. P33-2tc
helP WAnted
HELP WANTED: Waitress/as-
sistant cook, 2 days a week. Call
PLA Café, 859-3272, Diana
Stewart, 685-3228. P34-1tc
CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tion, benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Nikki, 837-2270.
K34-tfn
RN/LPN POSITION: Seeking
loving & patient geriatric nurse.
Benefits available. Contact Heidi
or Nikki, 837-2270. K34-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff, and assis-
tant manager position(s) are
available for Aw! Shucks Café
opening soon at 909 Main Street
in Kadoka. Please apply within
or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K33-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employment
spraying county highway right of
way. Commercial herbicide li-
cense required or to be obtained
before start of work. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Applications / re-
sumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. K33-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. K33-4tc
AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping, laundry and
maintenance. Call Joseph at
279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Part-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Tractor opera-
tor to mow county road right of
way, and perform other duties
as directed. Pre-employment
drug and alcohol screening re-
quired. Applications / resumés
accepted. Information 837-2410
or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K33-4tc
HELP WANTED: CDL driver,
Class A, two years flatbed OTR
experience, clean record, refer-
ences. Rapid City area based
company. 390-5535. P32-4tp
OPTIMETRIC TECHNICIAN:
One day per week (Tuesdays), 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Medical experi-
ence preferred, but not required.
Mail resumé to: Philip Eye
Clinic, 810 Mountain View Road,
Rapid City, SD 57702. Ques-
tions, call Angie, 342-0777.
P28-tfn
HOUSEKEEPERS AND LAUN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED:
High school and college students
are welcome to apply. Will train.
Apply at either America’s Best
Value Inn and Budget Host Sun-
downer in Kadoka or call 837-
2188 or 837-2296. K26-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax re-
sumé to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
MisC. foR sAle
FOR SALE: Rapala Husky Jerk
fishing lures, HJ8 and HJ10.
$4.00 each. Call Mark at 447-
7049. WP49-2tc
FOR SALE: Rear blade, fits Ford
8N style tractor, $200 OBO. Ya-
mata commercial sewing ma-
chine, high speed, large, $150
OBO. Leather motorcycle jacket
and pants, $75. Call 837-2427.
K34-1tp
FOR SALE: Golden Grain corn
stove 2000, burn wood pellets or
shelled corn, good condition,
$1,500. 669-2508. M34-4tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notiCes/WAnted
NOTICE: The property known as
North Fork Trailer Court (Philip)
is strictly off limits to anyone ex-
cept the rental people. This in-
cludes property on both sides of
the North Fork. P34-1tp
WANTED: CLEAN 100% COT-
TON RAGS; i.e. sheets, t-shirts,
socks. NO FLANNEL OR CUR-
TAINS. 25¢ lb. Must be in-
spected before purchase.
Pioneer Review, 221 E. Oak St.,
Philip. P28-tfn
Pets/suPPlies
FOR SALE: Australian shep-
herd/heeler cross puppies. Born
6-3-13. First shots, ready to go
end of July, $150 each. 993-
3005. P34-2tp
AKC GERMAN WIREHAIR
POINTER PUPPIES: Available in
Milesville for viewing now,
pickup Second week of August.
One male, five females. Will have
first shots, wormed, microchip
implants, and registration docu-
mentation. 544-3016. P31-4tp
ReAl estAte
FOR SALE: (6) lots in Midland.
Each lot 25’x75’ (total 150’x75’).
$2,400. Paula Duncan, 515-
4418. P34-2tc
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
3 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1,100
sq. ft. open floor plan, vaulted
ceilings, fenced backyard, estab-
lished lawn, oversized detached
garage. Appliances included, all
new in 2008. Call 840-2257 or
307-251-2474. PR45-6tp
HOME FOR SALE IN PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new
roof, windows, siding, high effi-
ciency heat/air with heat pump,
on-demand hot water, nice
propane fireplace, nice back-
yard, deck and more. Would
consider contract for deed. Con-
tact for showing: Don or Tami
Ravellette, 685-5147 (cell) or
859-2969 (home). P27-tfn
2-STORY HOUSE FOR SALE IN
WALL: Will consider any reason-
able offer. $23,000 cash or will
consider contract for deed.
Please call 279-2858. PW27-8tc
RentAls
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
ClAssified PoliCy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
thAnk yous
I would like to thank everyone
for all the cards and gifts I re-
ceived for my birthday. Thank
you so much!
Joann Van Tassel
Thank you so much to all those
who helped with the annual
Summer Reading Program at the
Philip library, especially Pastor
Westerlund, Kenzy Pinney, and
Gracie Fitzgerald who took turns
reading to the kids; the moms
who helped with the craft pro-
jects; and the organizations who
donated funds for snacks and
prizes.
A special thank you goes to
Crystal Deal from Head Start in
Wall whose creative ideas and
unflagging help were very much
appreciated. We had a great time
and really enjoyed working with
the kids.
Annie Brunskill, Librarian
A special thanks to our family
for the 60th anniversary open
house for us, and to all our rela-
tives and friends who attended,
sent cards and made phone
calls. We had a great time.
Thanks again,
Clifford & Louise Simmons
“Thank you” just doesn't seem
like enough for the quick re-
sponse of our neighbors and
Philip Volunteer Fire Department
for the fire we recently had from
a lightning stike. It was in a hay
stack near our houses and we
had minimal loss due to every-
one’s efforts.
Ross & Janice Williams
& family
police.org. Application Deadline
is Friday, August 9th, 2013.
UNITED PRAIRIE COOPERA-
TIVE at New Town ND is seeking
a Manager of Business Opera-
tions. RESPONSIBILITIES: Man-
ager of Business Operations is
responsible for divisional prof-
itability, sales, new product /
market development, reporting,
purchasing, resale pricing, in-
ventory control, customer serv-
ice, asset maintenance,
environmental compliance, and
other duties as assigned by the
CEO / General Manager. This
supply very successful coopera-
tive is located in NW ND with
great recreational opportunities.
Company owned housing is
available. Email resume to:
larry. fuller@chsinc.com CHS
National Director of Placement,
5213 Shoal Drive, Bismarck ND
58503 or call (701) 220-9775.
SISSETON SCHOOL DISTRICT
OPENING: Library Media Spe-
cialist. Contact: Tammy Meyer,
516 8th Ave W Sisseton, SD
57262 605-698-7613 Position
open until filled. EOE.
HOVEN SCHOOLS SEEKING K-
12 spec. ed. teacher. Contact
Peggy Petersen, Supt. (605) 948-
2252 or at Peggy.Petersen@
k12.sd.us for application. Open
until filled.
THE DUPREE SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT is seeking applications for
a HS Math Instructor (w/wo
Head Boys BB Coach); Base Pay
- $34,150 plus signing bonus.
Contact Supt. Lenk at Dupree
School (605) 365-5138.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is taking applications for
full- time Douglas County High-
way Superintendent. Must have
valid Class A Driver’s License.
Experience in road / bridge con-
struction / maintenance. For
application contact: Douglas
County Auditor (605) 724-2423.
CHS MIDWEST COOPERA-
TIVES is seeking people inter-
ested in an agronomy career.
Various positions in central
South Dakota available. Email
Dan.haberling@chsinc.com or
call Midwest Cooperatives 1
(800) 658-5535.
FOR SALE
200 PRE-MADE 2X6 STUDDED
WALLS, 8-ft. tall in varying
lengths from 5-ft. to 14-ft.
$50.00 to $150.00 each, de-
pending on length. Call 605-
852-2122 in Highmore, ask for
Mike Konrad or Jan Busse.
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD.
We have lowered the price & will
consider contract for deed. Call
Russell Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 • Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. • South of Philip Chiropractic
CATTLE SALE
LAGRAND SCOTCHCAP ANGUS
RANCH Complete dispersal of
450 Registered and Commercial
Fall Calving Cows including
some spring calvers, 90 2012
Fall Heifers and 50 Fall Bulls.
August 10th at Sioux Falls Re-
gional Worthing Sale barn. High
health, performance and pheno-
type. Past National breeder of
the year award. Call for cata-
logue to Dan Nelson, Manager
701-351-1795 or Duane Pan-
cratz, Owner 605-359-9222, or
check website www.lagrand-
scotchcapranch.com.
EMPLOYMENT
MOBRIDGE POLICE DEPART-
MENT has opening for a FT
E1911. Application may be re-
quested or picked up at Mo-
bridge Police Department or
online at www.mobridge
PHILIP BODY SHOP
•Complete Auto Body Repairing
•Glass Installation •Painting •Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 • Philip, SD
Classified
Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 min-
imum for first 20 words; 10¢ per
word thereafter; included in the
Pioneer Review, the Profit, & The
Pennington Co. Courant, as well
as on our website: www.pioneer-
review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems,
Tributes, Etc. … $6.00 minimum
for first 20 words; 10¢ per word
thereafter. Each name and initial
must be counted separately. In-
cluded in the Pioneer Review and
the Profit.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00
minimum for first 20 words; 10¢
per word thereafter. Each name
and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Printed only in the Pio-
neer Review.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for
bookkeeping and billing on all
charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per
column inch, included in the Pi-
oneer Review and the Profit.
$5.55 per column inch for the Pi-
oneer Review only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which
makes it illegal to advertise “any preference,
or discrimination on race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation, or
discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is a vi-
olation of the law. Our readers are informed
that all dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal opportunity
basis.
CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo · Philip, SÐ
Ior ull yoor concrete
constroction needs:
Classifieds
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 15
HELP
WANTED:
Les’ Body Shop
Philip
is looking for
someone to help with
General Shop
Duties
Call Mike at
859-2744 or 685-3068
or stop in!
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Tire Tanks
Vacuum
Excavation
Cobett Waters
Directional
Boring
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
WORK WANTED:
Wheat acres to
harvest in Midland,
Philip & Kadoka area.
Larry’s Custom
Harvesting
(cell)
320-815-3495
Pioneer
Review
Ad Deadline:
Tuesdays
at 11 a.m.
Call 859-2516
or email
ads@pioneer-
review.com
* * * * *
PROFIT
DEADLINE:
Fridays
at Noon
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 6: FECULAF CATTLE SALE. SALE
TIME: 10.00 a.n. MT
TUESDAY, AUG. 13: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF & STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAVA-
CANZA HOFSE SALE. CATALOG DEADLINE: MON., AUCUST 5. CO
TO www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com FOF CONSICNMENT FOFMS.
CATTL£ R£PORT:
TU£SDAY, JULY SD, 2DJS
B1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e
ond o b1g oroud o] peop1e on Þond.
TÞonK gou so muoÞ 1o evergone
uÞo mode our onnuo1 Ann1versorg
BBQ o suooess, speo1o1 1ÞonKs 1o
Ronn1e Cog1e, Cog1e's SuperVo1u,
PÞ111p CÞomber o] Commeroe, ond
1Þe PLA Co]é.
MorKe1 uos verg good o11 1Þe uog
1ÞrougÞ 1Þe so1e.
FEEDER CATTLE:
MATT REEDY - PHILIP
47 .........................DLK STFS 1035=.....$145.00
47 .........................DLK STFS 1036=.....$145.00
47 .........................DLK STFS 1011=.....$145.00
50 .........................DLK STFS 958=.......$151.50
LLOYD MARTI - NEW UNDERWOOD
26 .........................DLK STFS 610=.......$178.00
29 ..............DLK & DWF HFFS 608=.......$161.75
LYLE & CINDY LONG - ENNING
64 ...............CHAF SPAY HFFS 901=.......$141.00
65 ...............CHAF SPAY HFFS 844=.......$144.25
14 ...............CHAF SPAY HFFS 739=.......$148.00
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
75......DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 740=.......$150.75
40......DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 662=.......$155.50
JOHN EISENBRAUN - KADOKA
20 .........................DLK STFS 755=.......$166.25
27.................DLK OPEN HFFS 711=.......$151.00
DALE YOUNG - UNION CENTER
53...............DLK & DWF STFS 996=.......$144.50
REID PALMER - FAITH
64.................DLK OPEN HFFS 685=.......$154.75
71 ......FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 762=.......$149.00
69.................DLK OPEN HFFS 787=.......$148.00
LANDERS LIVESTOCK - HOT SPRINGS
65 ...............FED & DLK STFS 1023=.....$144.75
64......DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 844=.......$152.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
67.................DLK OPEN HFFS 846=.......$145.25
27......DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 749=.......$149.75
BERNARD NESS - CAPUTA
30 .........................DLK STFS 922=.......$149.25
MIKE & LISA KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
53 .........................DLK STFS 964=.......$144.50
NICHOLS CASPERS - NEW UNDERWOOD
26.................DLK OPEN HFFS 765=.......$149.25
BRADY HAM & ROSENEAU ENT. - SHADEHILL
21 .........................DLK STFS 751=.......$155.75
8.................DLK & DWF STFS 611=.......$157.00
20 ..............DLK & DWF HFFS 695=.......$147.00
CROSSVIEW RANCH - HETTINGER, ND
16 ...............FED & DLK STFS 664=.......$159.50
15...............FED & DLK HFFS 645=.......$153.50
BERNARD HERBER - KADOKA
8................FWF & DWF HFFS 1131=.....$119.00
GLEN RADWAY - MILESVILLE
20.................DLK OPEN HFFS 952=.......$139.75
WO WELLER - KADOKA
11 .........................DLK STFS 889=.......$151.50
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
61 ...............FED & DLK STFS 834=.......$151.00
CLEVE PRICHARD - KADOKA
40.................DLK OPEN HFFS 788=.......$147.00
SANDER RANCH - CUSTER
18 .....DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 780=.......$143.50
6.................FED & DLK HFFS 634=.......$154.00
RAY KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
60 ..............DLK & DWF HFFS 570=.......$157.50
23.............CHAF & FED HFFS 549=.......$158.00
35.......................HEFF HFFS 468=.......$149.50
72....................X DFED HFFS 499=.......$129.50
KEN CASSENS - EDGEMONT
12 .........................DLK STFS 618=.......$166.00
15 ......FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 581=.......$164.00
JOHN FROST - HOT SPRINGS
12.................DLK OPEN HFFS 958=.......$136.75
STEPHEN RIGGINS - KADOKA
4 ................DLK & DWF HFFS 546=.......$155.00
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
11.........................DLK HFFS 545=.......$153.50
PETE REINERT - HOWES
6 ..........................DWF HFFS 637=.......$153.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
7...........................DLK HFFS 577=.......$152.00
SPRING CALVES:
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
2.................DLK & DWF CLVS 375=.......$740.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
3 ...........................DLK CLVS 320=.......$735.00
LARRY GRAVATT - ELM SPRINGS
17...............DLK & DWF CLVS 360=.......$690.00
WEIGH-UPS:
MIKE & LISA KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
1............................DLK COW 1655=.......$90.00
1............................DLK COW 1405=.......$89.00
3 ..........................DLK COWS 1238=.......$86.50
1............................DLK COW 1415=.......$85.50
26 ........................DLK COWS 1336=.......$85.25
1............................DLK COW 1475=.......$84.00
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2305=.....$108.00
DANNY FINN - MIDLAND
1 ...........................FED COW 1360=.......$87.50
2..........................FED COWS 1443=.......$86.25
1...........................FED DULL 2105=.....$108.00
DONALD BUFFINGTON - HERMOSA
1............................DLK COW 1345=.......$86.50
1 ...........................FED COW 1395=.......$84.00
2 ..........................DLK COWS 1405=.........83.00
SCHULTES RANCH - HOWES
1............................DLK COW 1210=.......$86.50
3 ..........................DLK COWS 1272=.......$83.25
1............................DLK COW 1415=.......$81.00
1 .....................DLK COWETTE 1110=.......$85.00
LARRY GABRIEL - QUINN
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1785=.....$107.50
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1805=.....$102.50
MIKE NOTEBOOM - PHILIP
1...........................FWF COW 1365=.......$85.50
1...........................FWF COW 1520=.......$85.00
1............................DLK COW 1475=.......$83.50
1...........................DWF COW 1420=.......$83.00
1 ...........................FED COW 1305=.......$82.50
1............................DLK COW 1260=.......$80.00
ROBERT BERRY - MIDLAND
1...........................DWF COW 1315=.......$85.50
BUNK WHITE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1............................DLK COW 1335=.......$84.50
1............................DLK COW 1440=.......$78.50
1................X DFED COWETTE 1085=.....$104.00
ROXY RICHARDSON - LONG VALLEY
1 ...........................FED COW 1475=.......$84.00
1..........................HEFF COW 1345=.......$83.50
ROBERT R. YOUNG - UNION CENTER
1............................DLK COW 1430=.......$84.00
LARRY LABRIER - MURDO
1............................DLK COW 1370=.......$84.00
1............................DLK COW 1345=.......$81.50
1 .....................DLK COWETTE 1105=.......$83.50
DAVE STOVER - OWANKA
1............................DLK COW 1325=.......$84.00
1............................DLK COW 1520=.......$82.50
1............................DLK COW 1150=.......$81.50
1............................DLK COW 1420=.......$80.50
GREG SHEARER - WALL
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1980=.....$106.50
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2055=.....$106.00
1............................DLK COW 1560=.......$77.50
JERRY ROGHAIR - OKATON
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2260=.....$105.00
GENE MICHAEL - PHILIP
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1965=.....$105.00
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
1............................DLK COW 1480=.......$83.50
MORRIS JONES - MIDLAND
1............................DLK COW 1385=.......$83.50
1............................DLK COW 1275=.......$81.00
1...........................DLK HFFT 1095=.......$99.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
1..........................HEFF COW 1360=.......$83.50
1............................DLK COW 1400=.......$78.00
MARK VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1............................DLK COW 1295=.......$82.50
WO WELLER - KADOKA
1............................DLK COW 1635=.......$81.50
TOM GRIMES - KADOKA
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1790=.....$104.50
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1945=.....$101.00
LARRY DENKE - LONG VALLEY
1...........................FED DULL 2210=.....$103.50
GARY ALLISON - CREIGHTON
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2115=.....$103.50
BLAKE HICKS - WANBLEE
1 .........................CHAF DULL 1770=.....$103.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1............................DLK COW 1260=.......$80.50
3 ..........................DLK COWS 1445=.......$75.00
2 ..........................DLK COWS 1318=.......$73.50
KOLETTE STRUBLE - KADOKA
1............................DLK COW 1255=.......$79.50
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1............................DLK COW 1250=.......$79.00
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2320=.....$102.50
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1930=.....$102.50
LARRY GRAVATT - ELM SPRINGS
23.......DLK & DWF WET COWS 1335=.......$75.75
CASEY BACHAND - PHILIP
1............................DLK COW 1705=.......$73.50
ELI HELMS - CREIGHTON
1.........................HEFF HFFT 1265=.......$88.00
JEFF JONES - MIDLAND
1...........................DLK HFFS 960=.......$124.50
JOHN EISENBRAUN - KADOKA
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1745=.....$102.50
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1740=.....$100.50
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2390=.....$100.00
RYAN CASTEEL - VALE
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1715=.....$100.00
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
~ Saturday, August 3 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, August 5 ~
Prime Rib
Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
Salad Bar
Available at
Lunch!
~ Tuesday, July 30 ~
Ribeye Special
~ Wednesday, July 31 ~
French Dip & Fries
with a Bowl of Salad
~ Thursday, August 1 ~
Beef Tip Basket
~ Friday Buffet, August 2 ~
Chicken Fried Steak
Chicken • Shrimp
Reservations:
859-2774
August 1, 2013 • Pioneer Review • Page 16
Save the date for the 2013
South Dakota Rural Women in
Agriculture conference October 3-
4 in Keystone.
This is an annual conference
that women who live and work in
rural America should appreciate.
The conference is a time for
women to share in fun, relaxing
events while also learning about
current topics of importance. The
networking and social aspect of
the conference is the number one
highlight. In the past, attendees
have been women South Dakota,
Montana, North Dakota and
Wyoming.
This year will be discussion of
key agricultural topics including
the Farm Bill, immigration, ease-
ments, consumer perceptions and
“Telling Our Story.”
Back by popular demand is jew-
elry making and shopping in Hill
City. New this year is a chance for
women to “Pay It Forward” by cre-
ating love bundles at the confer-
ence that will be donated to area
women shelters.
More of the agenda will be final-
ized in the coming months, along
with registration details. The con-
ference will be held at K Bar S
Lodge and a block of rooms is
being held. Book yours by calling
866-522-7724.
Women in Ag conference
Babies and toddlers aren’t the
only ones who need immuniza-
tions. Parents should be aware
that their preteens and college
freshmen also need to be vacci-
nated, said a state health official.
“College freshmen who live in
dorms and unvaccinated kids en-
tering high school are at high risk
for meningococcal disease and
should be vaccinated,” said Dr.
Lon Kightlinger, state epidemiol-
ogist for the Department of
Health. “And 11 and 12-year-olds
need a booster shot for pertussis.”
Meningococcal disease is a bac-
terial infection resulting in in-
flammation of the tissues covering
the brain and spinal cord. Symp-
toms include fever, severe
headache, stiff neck, vomiting and
a rash. Ten to 14 percent of people
with the disease die and up to 19
percent of survivors may suffer
permanent disabilities such as
hearing loss, limb amputations or
brain disease. South Dakota typi-
cally reports three cases of
meningococcal disease a year. To
date in 2013, four cases have been
reported.
Meningococcal vaccine is avail-
able from family health care
providers and campus student
health centers. The department
provides the vaccine for 11 to 18-
year-olds who are eligible for the
federal Vaccines for Children Pro-
gram (Medicaid eligible, Native
American or Alaskan Native,
uninsured or underinsured). The
vaccine is free for these children
but providers may charge an ad-
ministration fee.
Whooping cough, or pertussis, is
a serious illness that causes un-
controllable coughing, rib frac-
tures, pneumonia, loss of
consciousness and even death. In-
fants are at highest risk, with two-
thirds of those under age one
infected needing hospitalization.
There have been 11 pertussis
cases reported in South Dakota to
date in 2013; three of those cases
have been younger than one.
A pertussis vaccine booster dose
is recommended at 11-12 years
when immunity begins to wane.
The initial pertussis series is
given to children at two months,
four months, six months, 15-18
months, and four to six years.
The department provides the
childhood series of whooping
cough vaccine and the booster
dose free for 11-14 year olds.
Providers may charge an adminis-
tration fee.
Find a vaccine provider at
doh.sd.gov/local-offices/vaccine-
providers/. Learn more about
meningitis or whooping cough at
doh.sd.gov/diseases/infectious/dis-
easefacts/.
Immunize preteens
and college freshmen

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