Login

Pennington Co. Courant, Thursday, August 16, 2012

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player
$1.00
(tax included)
Number 33 Volume 107 August 16, 2012
Bikes of every kind City council reviews 2013 budget fill the streets of Wall
Wall City Council met on Thursday, August 9 at 6:30 p.m. at the Wall Community Center meeting room. Capt. Corey Brubakken with the Pennington County Sheriff ’s Office reported contractual hours were above the contracted hours due to the Wall Celebration. He noted there was no major issues with the celebration this year. Brubakken introduced Sgt. Dan Wardle who will over see the Wall office. Sign permit was approved for Petal and Pots. Rusty Olney representing Echo Valley informed the council that they are moving forward with the land north of the golf course. They have been working with CETEC Engineer Ted Schulz on installing an eight inch water line to the development. Olney asked the council to share the cost of the line since they will turn the line back over to the city after completion. Mayor Dave Hahn stated, “The council will discuss this at a later date.” Echo Valley was given approval to continue to tap onto the city water line and to continue with the project as long as it meets the engineer’s specs. Council reviewed building permits for Dorothy Fortune to install a deck and Walker’s NAPA to maintain their sidewalk. Off-sale liquor license transfer to Rosebell Inc./Wall Food Center was approved. Resolution for rezoning of Hildebrand property was approved by the council. Finance Officer Carolynn Anderson informed the council that she has sent out all the required letters for certain residents to cleanup their property. The properties have not been cleaned up and the city can now abate the properties and do the cleanup themselves. Council asked for a report from Jim Kitterman to see how much time it will take to clean them up and the council also requested pictures of the properties. Funds to open the Eastern Pennington County Ambulance District was discussed. C. Anderson has received a letter from the attorney which related the district can open a checking account with no minimal balance. They can also incorporate and become a nonprofit corporation at the same time. Wally Hoffman and Elden Helms with the ambulance district had questions about the lease agreement for the ambulance. Hoffman wanted to know if there were any repairs that needed to be done to the building. Hahn asked Hoffman and Helms to walk around the building and make sure they were okay with everything. Usage split on utilities and insurance will be specified in the lease before it is sent to the attorney. Sewer issues at 215 W. Fifth Street have been repaired by installing a new line. Hahn said, “On behalf of the city, all that they can do has been done and if they property owner is still having issues they will have to check into their property at their own expense.” CETEC Engineer Schulz has looked at the manholes around town and the ones over the hill are in bad condition and need to be replaced within the year. Phases for the sewer/lagoon project were discussed along with different options for generating funds for the project. Council decided to table this issue until they can hear more from Schulz. Bids for the airport snow blower have been advertised and will be opened on Tuesday, August 21. Council approved to have the committee open and award the bid. First reading of Ordinance 1206; sign ordinance was approved. First reading of Ordinance 1207; animals was tabled until the next city council meeting. City minutes for July 9 and 26 along with minutes from the June ambulance meeting were approved.
The 72nd annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally officially began on Monday, August 6. The streets of Sturgis are lined with motorcycles but Wall just so happens to be the stopping place for a very interesting bike. It looks like Crocodile Dundee, Jeremiah Johnson and the Buck Commanders got together to build a road kill bike complete with a buffalo robe for a seat cover. The bike features elk horns, mountain lions, bobcats, skunk, badger and many other numerous wildlife parts along with a wig that lies on the passenge seat. One can only imagine how many
Governor makes appointments to medical and arts boards
Governor Dennis Daugaard has appointed Dr. Jeffrey Murray of Sioux Falls to the state Board of Medical and Osteopathic Examiners. Murray is Medical Director of the Endoscopy Center and Vice Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Sanford USD Medical Center. He succeeds the late - Dr. John VanderWoude of Sioux Falls on the nine-member medical board. In addition, the Governor has appointed Justine Estes of Rapid City, and James L. Johnson of Brookings, to the State Arts Council. Estes has long been involved in the local arts community and currently is President of the Black Hills Chamber Music Society; Johnson is the former director of theatre at South Dakota State University. Reappointed by the Governor to the Arts Council were Brian Bonde and Lynne Byrne of Sioux Falls, Mary Bordeaux of Pine Ridge, and Lynda Clarke of Rapid City. “I’m pleased that there are so many people in South Dakota who willingly accept public service duties,” Gov. Daugaard said. “The quality of these new appointees and those I’ve reappointed is nothing less than excellent.”
hunting trips this took to complete.
Things that happened on August 16
Historical and other events that happened on August 16: •1691 - Yorktown, Virginia founded •1863 - Emancipation Proclamation signed •1868 - "Arica, Peru (now Chile) is devastated by a tsunami which followed a magnitude 8.5 earthquake in the Peru-Chile Trench off the coast. The earthquake and tsunami killed an estimated 25,000 people in Arica and perhaps 70,000 people in all." •1896 - "Skookum Jim Mason, George Carmack and Dawson Charlie discover gold in a tributary of the Klondike River in Canada, setting off the Klondike Gold Rush." •1936 - 11th Olympic games closes in Berlin •1948 - Baseball legend George Herman "Babe" Ruth dies from cancer •1954 - First Piña colada. •1960 - Joseph Kittinger parachutes from balloon at 31,330 m (84,700') •1962 - Ringo Starr replaces Pete Best as Beatle drummer •1969 - Woodstock rock festival begins in New York •1977 - Elvis Presley dies of a heart attack •1989 - Uncle Buck is released •2008 - Usain Bolt sets a new 100 meter dash world record of 9.69 seconds at the Beijing 2008 summer olympics.
Council approved the City of Wall bills along with a pay request from Wall Health Services to received their 2011 funds from reserve. Fire Department also asked for a pay request for fire fighters who have gone to state or federal fires. Council approved to only pay what C. Anderson has paper work on and they will readdress this issue at the next meeting to come up with a payment procedure. Library bills were approved for payment. Ambulance bills were approved with the exception of t-shirts from Black Hills Embroirdery that C. Anderson did not have a purchase order for. Finance Officer items for the meeting were: •The Wall City Pool was closed on Thursday, August 8 due to an incident at the pool. •The windows have been installed at the community center along with new doors at the library. •South Dakota Municipal League will hold their conference in October in Pierre. •The October meeting will be changed to Tuesday, October 9. •Council approved the purchase of Banyon software and a new computer for the finance officer. Public Works Director Jeff Clark brought a list of items for possible purchase for the city. Council decided against making the purchases. Local purchase orders have been increased from $50 to $200. Clark also noted that the campground sewer has been fixed. First reading of Ordinance 1205; 2013 budget was review by the council. Hahn informed them that the budget needs to be trimmed by $127,000. After the council had gone through each line of the budget and after making some cuts the council approved a motion to approve the budget and for the finance committee and the mayor to meet and balance the budget. The next council meeting will be held on Tuesday, September 6 at 6:30 p.m. at the Wall Community Center meeting room.
Badlands joins 48 parks across the country to participate in foundation’s 2012 program
Badlands has been selected as one of 49 national parks participating in the 2012 America’s Best Idea program sponsored by the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks. Inspired by the critically-acclaimed Ken Burns documentary The National Parks: America’s Best Idea, the America’s Best Idea grant program funds park projects designed to connect diverse, underengaged populations throughout the United States with their national parks in innovative and meaningful ways. “We are proud to provide the much needed support to create unique opportunities for all Americans to personally connect with their national parks,” said Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation. “The America’s Best Idea grants are often the catalyst for extraordinary experiences that develop into lifelong relationships with our national parks for the program participants.” The funded project at Badlands National Park includes the upcoming Astronomy Festival, August 17-19. The festival will include scientific lectures, keynote speakers, workshops, and night sky viewing. It will bring together space science professionals and enthusiasts, local community members, and visitors. Park Superintendent Eric Brunnemann notes, "The Astronomy Festival will allow Badlands National Park to partner with local communities and sister agencies as we recognize and celebrate natural darkness. In the spirit of A Call to Action, Director Jon Jarvis' vision for the Service's next 100 years, he identifies our 'Starry, Starry Night' as an resource worthy of protection for future generations of Americans." For a full listing of participating parks and program descriptions, please visit the National Park Foundation website. The National Park Foundation and Badlands National Park appreciate L.L. Bean, DISNEY, the Anschutz Foundation, and the Ahmanson Foundation for their generous support of the America’s Best Idea program. For more information on the National Park Foundation or how you can support and protect America’s national parks, please visit www.nationalparks.org. For more information about Badlands National Park please visit www.nps.gov/badl. About the National Park Foundation. You are the owner of 84 million acres of the world’s most treasured memorials, landscapes, ecosystems, and historic sites -- all protected in America’s nearly 400 national parks. Chartered by Congress, the National Park Foundation is the official charity of America’s national parks. We work hand in hand with the National Park Service to connect you and all Americans to the parks, and to make sure that they are preserved for the generations who will follow. Join us in supporting your national parks -- this is your land www.nationalparks.org.
Necessary federal cuts will cost South Dakota
By Governor Dennis Daugaard I wrote a couple of weeks ago about the good news on our state budget. South Dakota closed its fiscal year on June 30, 2012, in the black, with revenues exceeding expenses by $47.8 million. As required by law, that amount was transferred to the Budget Reserve, which brings our total rainy day funds to 11.2 percent of current spending. The next Legislature will be able to decide whether to save or spend those dollars. A major reason for this result is that South Dakota’s economy has recovered from the recession more quickly than was projected. Some might argue that, because of this strong economic news, we should be quick to spend the new money. I take a more cautious approach because of potential threats on the horizon. One important threat is the federal budget. The Budget Control Act passed by Congress last fall created a "Super Committee" charged with finding a partial solution to unsustainable federal deficit spending. Because the committee failed to agree on a plan, automatic spending cuts of $1.2 trillion over 10 years will take effect beginning January 2, 2013. The spending cuts contemplated next year total $120 billion. It is important to note that the recent deal in Congress to further delay a budget agreement until after the election does not delay, in any way, these automatic cuts. Congress needs to reduce spending. Federal spending this fiscal year will total more than $3.627 trillion. Federal revenue will total $2.456 trillion. The federal government is spending $1.171 trillion more than it receives this year, and the national debt currently stands at $15.9 trillion. I find it hard to wrap my mind around trillions of dollars – but if you remove some zeros, you can translate the federal budget scenario into your household budget: Your income stands at $24,560 per year. Your expenses total $36,270 per year. That means you are spending $11,710 more than you are earning in a year, and adding that debt to your credit card. And the debt on your credit card is already $159,100. The total cuts being proposed for next year would be only $1,200 from this household’s spending. That’s an important first step, but you can see it’s a long way from solving the problem. In order to balance the federal budget, Congress and the President need to trim more than $1 trillion from annual spending. The automatic cuts are just $120 billion. And even if they cut $1 trillion in spending and balance the budget, that would do nothing to make a dent in the nearly $16 trillion federal debt. Other governors have called on Congress to delay making any cuts, because they are concerned about the effect on their states. I don’t think we can wait much longer, though. Although I'm concerned about federal cuts to South Dakota, I'm more concerned about our nation's future if we don't get our budget under control. I will work with our congressional delegation to make sure South Dakota is treated fairly, but every state must do its share. South Dakota's share of the cuts that are scheduled for January would be about $46 million a year. That is only 2.6 percent of the federal funding our state receives, but it would be a sizable amount to replace. Our state policymakers will have decide whether to allow these federal programs to be shut down or scaled down, or whether to keep them going with state tax revenues. A cut of $46 million in federal funds to South Dakota could only be the first step. The current reduction contemplated in the Budget Control Act is a drop in the bucket compared to what needs to be done. If Congress made enough cuts to balance the federal budget, it would cost South Dakota’s budget an estimated $383 million per year. Being $47.8 million in the black this year won’t protect South Dakota from the tough decisions that need to be made in Washington, D.C., during the next several years. We need to be prepared for what has to happen. Although $47.8 million is a large sum, it is truly paltry in the context of the fiscal challenges facing our nation in the years ahead.
The Outdoor Campus-West releases fall program offerings
Game, Fish and Parks' The Outdoor Campus-West released a slate of program offerings for the fall season. Program opportunities are offered for people of all ages and are grouped into three main audiences: community, group and school. "We have an amazing set of class and program topics available this fall. All provide hands-on experiences for learners of all ages. One of the best things is that almost all of our programs are free," Chad Tussing, director of The Outdoor Campus-West, said. Community programs are those scheduled for specific dates, times and ages. Fall offerings include "Duck Detectives," "Archery Basics," "Family Fishing" and more. Individuals and families can sign up for these classes starting August 15 via The Outdoor CampusWest's website. Groups such as 4-H clubs, church groups, etc. can contact Keith Wintersteen on August 15 to set up the date and topic of their desired program. There is an extensive list of possible program topics to choose from, though groups may also request a customized program. Schools in the area can also choose from a shopping list of programs or work with Nico Red Horse to set up a custom program. Due to the high demand for school field trips last spring, all schools wishing to bring a class out this year must apply for a program slot and be entered into a lottery drawing. Applications for this drawing are due by September 7 for the fall season. The Outdoor Campus-West, located at 4130 Adventure Trail, is open to the public seven days a week and has no admission fee. For more information about The Outdoor Campus-West go to www.outdoorcampus.org and click on 'Rapid City.' Or call The Outdoor Campus-West at 394-2310.
Area News
Pennington County Courant • August 16, 2012 •
Page 2
Nobody likes working in front of a hot oven during the summer. But if you and your family love desserts, you’ll still want to partake of sumptuous treats that will keep you all cool. According to top dessert experts, there’s a whole world of alternatives to baking for those who suffer from a year-round sweet tooth. “On hot days, my mind usually turns to frozen treats such as popsicles or sorbet; for something a bit more elegant I'll whip up a chocolate ganache tart with cookie crust,” says Lindsay Landis, author of the new book, “The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook.” Landis has created over fifty recipes using egg-free cookie dough that is safe to eat raw. By repurposing your favorite desserts for the summer season, you can take the need for heat out of the equation. For example, if you love pie, consider a graham cracker, whipped cream and candied fruit based dessert that can be created in minutes and served cold. And don’t forget that one of the best things about summer is the abundance of fresh fruit. No matter what you come up with, adding a garnish of exotic fresh fruits like kiwi, pineapple and mango will wow your guests with a boost of natural sweetness. Or create a parfait of frozen yogurt, fresh strawberries and a variety of nuts. For a bit of inspiration, try out this perfect no-bake summer treat from Landis: Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops Makes: Four pops Active time: Five minutes Total time: Three hours
Great bake-free desserts The Outdoor Campus-West ideas for summer offers Outdoor University learning experience
Ingredients: 1 1/4 cups milk (skim, 2 percent, or whole) 1/3 cup light brown sugar, packed Pinch salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons mini semisweet chocolate chips Directions: In a microwave-safe container or glass measuring cup, microwave milk 30 seconds or until warm to the touch. Add brown sugar and salt and stir until dissolved. Add vanilla. Place 1/2 tablespoon chocolate chips in the bottom of each of four 1/3-cup ice-pop molds or small paper cups. Top each with milk mixture. Insert sticks and place molds in freezer. Freeze until solid, at least three hours. To release pops, run molds under warm water 20 to 30 seconds; they should slide right out. If using paper cups, simply peel cups away and discard. If your ice-pop mold does not include built-in sticks or a lid to hold them in place, you may find yourself with sticks pointing every which way but up. To prevent this, stretch a layer of plastic wrap over the top of the mold and secure it with a rubber band. Cut a small slit in the plastic, centered over each pop, and insert a stick through each opening. Alternatively, you can adjust sticks as necessary after about 45 minutes of freezing, when the pops aren’t yet frozen solid. For more no-bake dessert ideas, visit www.cookiedoughlovers.com. You don’t need an oven. You just need ingenuity to create crowdpleasing summer treats. Game, Fish and Parks' The Outdoor Campus-West invites the public to attend their Outdoor University event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday August 25. The family-friendly event will provide a lot of hands-on experiences with outdoor recreation and will also give participants an inside look into the management work of Game, Fish and Parks. "Outdoor University is a great event because it offers a lot more than just the typical 'Outdoor Campus' classes like kayaking and BB gun shooting. We also have staff from our management programs on hand to teach people about their work and the tools they use to do it," Chad Tussing, director of The Outdoor Campus-West, said. Some of the stations at Outdoor University include big game drop nets, the Turn In Poachers trailer, timber management, fish anatomy, trapping, kayaking, and fishing. The event is open to the public at no cost. The Outdoor Campus-West is located at 4130 Adventure Trail and is open to the public seven days a week with no admission fee. For more information about The Outdoor Campus-West go to www.outdoorcampus.org and click on 'Rapid City.' Or call The Outdoor Campus-West at 394-2310.
Social Security News
Your Questions, Our Answers Question: How can I get a copy of my Social Security Statement? Answer: If you are age 18 or older, you may get your Social Security Statement conveniently online at any time after creating an account at www.socialsecurity.gov/mystatement. The Statement provides estimates for retirement, disability and survivors benefits, as well as a way to determine whether your earnings are accurately posted to your Social Security record. Social Security sends paper Social Security Statements in the mail only to people age 60 and older and, beginning July 2012, to workers the year they turn 25. If this applies to you, you should receive your Statement about two to three months before your birthday. Also, you can get an instant, personalized estimate of your future retirement benefit using our online Retirement Estimator at www.socialsecurity.gov /estimator Question: My child, who gets Social Security, will be attending his last year of high school in the fall. He turns 19 in a few months. Do I need to fill out a form for his benefits to continue? Answer: Yes. You should receive a form, SSA-1372-BK, in the mail about three months before your son’s birthday. Your son needs to complete the form and take it to his school’s office for certification. Then, you need to return page two and the certified page three back to Social Security for processing. If you can’t find the form we mailed to you, you can find it online at the following address: www.socialsecurity.gov/schoolofficials/ssa1372.pdf Question: My neighbor, who is retired, told me that the income he receives from his part-time job at the local nursery gives him an increase in his Social Security benefits. Is that right? Answer: Retirees who return to work after they start receiving benefits may be able to receive a higher benefit based on those earnings. This is because Social Security automatically re-computes the retirement benefit after crediting the additional earnings to the individual’s earnings record. Learn more by reading the publication, How Work Affects Your Benefits, at www. socialsecurity. gov/pubs/10069.html Question: I plan to retire soon. When are Social Security benefits paid? Answer: Social Security benefits are paid each month. Generally, new retirees receive their benefits on either the second, third, or fourth Wednesday of each month, depending on the day in the month the retiree was born. If you receive benefits as a spouse, your benefit payment date will be determined by your spouse’s birth date. Here’s a chart showing how your monthly payment date is determined: Day of the Month You Were Born - Social Security Benefits Paid On: •1st-10th - Second Wednesday •11th-20th - Third Wednesday •21st-31st - Fourth Wednesday For a calendar showing actual payment dates for 2012, see the Schedule of Social Security Benefit Payments at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/calendar.htm. Question: I get Social Security because of a disability. How often will my case be reviewed to determine if I’m still eligible? Answer: How often we review your medical condition depends on how severe it is and the likelihood it will improve. Your award notice tells you when you can expect your first review using the following terminology: •Medical improvement expected—If your condition is expected to improve within a specific time, your first review will be six to 18 months after you started getting disability benefits. •Medical improvement possible—If improvement in your medical condition is possible, your case will be reviewed about every three years. •Medical improvement not expected—If your medical condition is unlikely to improve, your case will be reviewed about once every five to seven years.
National Park Service 96th celebration set for August 25
It’s our birthday and we hope you’ll visit a national park and help us celebrate! On August 25, the National Park Service turns 96 years old and we are inviting everyone, especially children, to join in the festivities taking place coast-to-coast. If you want to share birthday wishes or stories, pictures, or video from your trip to a park, our friends at the National Park Foundation have created a birthday website www.NPSbirthday.org to get the celebration going! “National parks belong to all Americans and we invite everyone to join us on this special day,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “There are hundreds of events planned. Take the kids on a snorkel adventure, bike ride, kayak tour, hike, or archeological dig. See a blacksmith demo, living history encampment, or Native American concert. Or join me and thousands of children at Rocky Mountain National Park’s big BioBlitz.” The sixth annual BioBlitz, presented by the National Park Service and National Geographic, is a 24-hour event where teams of volunteer scientists, families, students, teachers, and others explore the park and identify species of plants, animals, microbes, fungi, and other organisms. Kids can go on discovery expeditions, take fun, hands-on “classes” at the Biodiversity University, and enjoy music, live animals, and science demonstrations at the Biodiversity Festival. “Like so many park lovers, the National Park Foundation is grateful to the National Park Service for the exceptional work they do every day to protect and preserve our country’s 397 national parks,” said Neil Mulholl, President and CEO. “This month we are excited to celebrate their 96th birthday and extend our thanks to them.” You can choose the park you would like to visit by location or by event at www.nps.gov. If you can’t make it to a park for the big day, remember the mission of the National Park Service extends beyond park boundaries into communities across the country. NPS works with partners to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities that revitalize neighborhoods and enhance the quality of life. Go to www.nps.gov/communities/states.htm to see what we do in your community. www.nps.gov. •About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 397 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov. •About the National Park Foundation. You are the owner of 84 million acres of the world’s most treasured memorials, landscapes, ecosystems, and historic sites -- all protected in America’s nearly 400 national parks. Chartered by Congress, the National Park Foundation is the official charity of America’s national parks. We work hand in hand with the National Park Service to connect you and all Americans to the parks, and to make sure that they are preserved for the generations who will follow. Join us in supporting your national parks -- this is your land. www.nationalparks.org.
“Hoot Owl” burn restriction affects Custer State Park
Due to the high fire danger and continued hot and dry weather, Custer State Park and the George S. Mickelson Trail have implemented fire restrictions referred to as a “Hoot Owl,” effective immediately (Tuesday, Aug. 7). A “Hoot Owl” restricts the use of combustible engines between 1 p.m. and 1 a.m. daily in and around the forest. The Hoot Owl restrictions are in addition to the current Stage-Two fire ban that is currently in effect in the park. Campfires and charcoal fires are prohibited; propane stoves and lanterns are permitted on hard surfaces only; and smoking is only allowed in personal vehicles or in closed camping units.
"6&--&44& 5#-*$"4*0/3 *3 )"119 40 2&$&*6& -&44&23 $0/$&2/*/( $0..&/43 0/ "/9 /&73 34029 02 1&230/"- '&&-*/( 0/ "/9 35#+&$4 & %0 2&3&26& 4)& 2*()4 40 &%*4 "/9 0''&/3*6& ."4&2*"- "/% "-30 40 &%*4 40 '*-- 4)& "--044&% 31"$& 52 %&"%-*/& '02 */3&24*0/ */ 4)& )523%"9 *335& *3 4)& 12&$&%*/( 0/%"9 "4 1 . & %0 )"6& 4)& 2*()4 40 2&+&$4 "/9 02 "-- -&44&23 40 4)& %*402 &44&23 */4&/%&% '02 .02& 4)"/ 0/& "6&--&44& 5#-*$"4*0/3 /&731"1&2 3)05-% #& ."*-&% 02 )"/% %&-*6&2&% 40 &"$) */%*6*%5"- /&731"1&2 0''*$& -- -&44&23 #&"2 4)& 02*(*/"- 3*(/"452& "%%2&33 "/% 4&-&1)0/& /5.#&2 0' 4)& "54)02 0 10-*4*$"- -&44&23 "2& 40 25/ 4)& 470 7&&,3 12*02 40 "/ &-&$4*0/ )& ; &44&23< $0-5./ *3 */4&/%&% 40 0''&2 2&"%&23 4)& 0110245/*49 40 &812&33 4)&*2 01*/*0/3 4 *3 /04 .&"/4 40 2&1-"$& "%6&24*3*/( "3 " .&"/3 0' 2&"$)*/( 1&01-& )*3 15#-*$"4*0/=3 (0"- *3 40 1204&$4 4)& '*234 ".&/%.&/4 (5"2"/4&& 0' '2&& 31&&$) !052 $0..&/43 "2& 7&-$0.&% "/% &/$052"(&% )& *0/&&2 &6*&7 08 )*-*1 )& "%0," 2&33 08 "%0," )& *30/ 08 *30/ 052*&2 &//*/(40/ 08 "-0 052"/4
Next book club meeting August 29 at the Wall Community Library
Wall Community Library is pleased to host Book Club meetings on the last Wednesday of each month at 6:00 pm. Even numbered months feature a classic book and odd numbered months a more contemporary selection. An Oprah’s Book Club selection, the featured book for August is The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers. Carson McCullers was only 23 years old when she published this book as her first novel. She became an overnight literary sensation and an acclaimed southern author. A classic, this novel tells the story of a small southern mill town in the 1930s. It has been praised for its realistic portrayal of loneliness and racial tensions in the Deep South. Check out this book at the library. Everyone is welcome to join the discussion group that will meet Wednesday, August 29, at 6:00 p.m, at the Wall Community Library. Come to sit and listen or make your opinions known! Bring a snack to share if you wish.
Time change for evening lighting ceremony
As daylight shortens, the hours of operation change at Mount Rushmore National Memorial. Beginning Sunday, August 12, 2012, the Evening Lighting Ceremony at Mount Rushmore will transition to an earlier start time of 8:00 p.m. The Lincoln Borglum Visitor Center, bookstore and museum as well as the Information Center’s closing time will change to 9:00 p.m. The Lakota, Nakota and Dakota Heritage Village hours will condense to 9:00 a.m. through 1:00 p.m. Closing time for the Carvers Café and the Memorial Team Ice Cream Shop changes to 8:00 p.m. on August 16. The Xanterra Gift Shop will close at 9:30 p.m. Opening hours for all operations remain the same. The last Evening Lighting Ceremony of the season will be September 30, 2012. Remember smoking has been banned throughout the park to promote a safe visiting and working environment under the current dry conditions. For additional information regarding the park operations and seasonal time changes, please visit the park website: www.nps. gov/moru.
)& "*4) /%&1&/%&/4 08 "*4) )& 52%0 08 52%0 0904&
July 2012, Pennington County Sheriff’s report
During the month of July 2012, the Pennington County Sheriff's Office recorded the following statistics in and around the community of Wall: Time City hours: . . . . . . . . . . . . .308.50 City hrs other deputies . . .126.00 Total City hours . . . . . .434.50 Training hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00 Vacation/Sick hrs . . . . . . . . .40.00 County hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.50 # of times called out/Hrs . . . .1.00 Arrest Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Non-Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Calls For Service Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol Violations . . . . . . . . . . .65 Animal Complaints . . . . . . . . . . .4 Assaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Assist Other Agencies . . . . . . . .12 Attempt to Locate . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Civil Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Community Activity . . . . . . . . .12 Coroner Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Court . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 DPP/Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Extra Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132 Fire Medical Assist . . . . . . . . . . .3 Follow-up Investigation . . . . . .19 Found or Lost Property . . . . . . .0 Calls for Service Keep the Peace . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Minor Consuming . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Murder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Runaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 School Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 SOLV Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Suspicious Activity . . . . . . . . . . .6 Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Weapons Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Welfare Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 911 Hang up Calls . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Civil Patrol Attempted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 City Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Traffic Activity Citations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Injury Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Non-Injury Accident . . . . . . . . . .2 DUI's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Motorist Assist . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 School Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Skate/Bike Citation . . . . . . . . . .0 Skate/Bike Warning . . . . . . . . . .0 Speed Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Vehicle/Parking Comp . . . . . . . .9 Please feel free to visit with Deputies Louis Lange, Darren Ginn, Sgt. Dustin Morrison, Lt. Kraig Wood or Capt. Corey Brubakken with any questions or concerns related to law enforcement in and around the Wall Community.
08
:
&7 /%&2700% 034 &7 /%&2700%
Wall Writers to meet August 18
Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
The topics selected for the August 18 Wall Writers Group to write about are (a) Your favorite poet and why you selected this person. If you do not have a favorite poet, write about this. (b) How much you enjoy the heat! (c) Or, bring something else you are working on to share. All writers of any writing ability are welcome to participate in the Wall Writers Group. Also no dues or fees are required. However, please bring a notebook and pens. The next meeting is scheduled for Saturday, August 18, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 416 Sixth Avenue, Wall, SD. If you have any questions, please call either Dave at (605) 279-2952 or Linda at (605) 7866937.
Pennington County Courant
Subscription Rates: In Pennington County and those having Kadoka, Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Interior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-ofState: $42.00 per year. Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD. Postmaster Send change of address notices to: Pennington Co. Courant PO Box 435 Wall, SD 57790-0435. Established in 1906. The Pennington Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
U.S.P.S 425-720
South Dakota Newspaper Association
Publisher: Don Ravellette General Manager of Operations: Kelly Penticoff Office Manager/Graphics: Ann Clark Staff Writer: Laurie Hindman
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn and Wasta, and the school district in Wall, SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc. The Pennington County Courant office is located on the corner of 4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD. Telephone: (605)279-2565 FAX: (605)279-2965 E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way reproduced from this publication, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the publisher.
Email us with your news item or photo to courant @ gwtc.net
annc@gwtc.net
Area News
Back-to-school season is the ideal time for families to reestablish routines and get organized -both at home and on the go. But before hitting the stores for supplies, take time to plan ahead with shopping lists that meet both your children’s and your family’s needs. There are many great tips to help get a fresh start on the academic year ahead: Save If you have more than one child, or want to stock up for the year, save on items like glue sticks, notebooks and writing utensils by taking advantage of sales and purchasing value packs, which are easy to find at back-to-school time. For better deals on items like tissues and sanitizing wipes, hold off until you are also buying these products for the home at a warehouse club or with coupons. Teach Organization Teach kids the importance of starting the day organized. One way to simplify the morning shuffle is by assigning a color to each child for easy identification of binders, backpacks and pencil pouches. Assign colors before shopping to prepare for easier in-aisle decisions. Five Star products (www.meadfivestar.com), for example, are available in a variety of on-trend patterns and basic solid color options to complement and contrast styles. Or use color-coded stickers and labels to maintain consistency. Synchronize Schedules The school year often brings additional commitments for families. Creating a “mission control” in a central location in the home will improve communication and ease the stress of time management. Look for calendars with high functionality like meal planners, “look-ahead” features, magnetic backings and repositionable peeland-stick adhesives. Don’t forget to include a white board or cork board where notes can be left for one another. Student planners are crucial to help your children stay on top of due dates, keep their own commitments and operate on the same schedule as the rest of the family. Vow to spend time on a weekly basis reviewing and synching calendars and discussing the week ahead. Manage Papers With each new school year comes an overwhelming amount of handouts, reminders, permission
Pennington County Courant • August 16, 2012•
Page 3
Get the whole family organized at back-to-school time
slips and medical forms. Parents and children all benefit from a paper management system. Use bins, expanding files and binder dividers with “reminder” flags to keep track of priorities. Flag items needing immediate attention -whether it’s homework or paperwork. If your children have busy schedules, make it easier for them to work on the go. Opt for binders with writing surfaces, internal storage pockets for loose paper and places to stash pens and pencils. And you can do the same. Consider using binders and expanding files in the car to create a place for lastminute notes, papers and storage. With a little planning and creativity, the whole family can prepare to stay organized throughout the school year.
Ranch rodeo targets cancer
Stirling Family Hits 15 Year Milestone in Assisting Families. Cowboys and cowgirls throughout the region will round up with unique purpose for the 15th annual Stirling Family Memorial Ranch Rodeo to be held at the Stanley County Fairgrounds in Fort Pierre, S.D. on Saturday, September 22. Originating in 1998 as a team penning event to honor S.D. rancher Dick Stirling and his courageous battle with cancer, this benevolent event has since evolved into a ranch rodeo drawing contestants from the tri-state area and showcasing time-honored ranching traditions all in the name of helping area families fight cancer. So far 80 families have benefited from over $25,000 raised. One of eight Stirling children, Carrie Kelly said, “The funds raised by this event go directly to families that are in the midst of the battle to assist with anything they have a need for, whether it is gas money for trips to the doctor, uninsured medical expenses, a special family outing or whatever the need may be. We just want to give a little because we understand that cancer can take so much." This year’s event has expanded to include calf branding, range doctoring, a trailer relay race, and ranch bronc riding, stray gathering and wild cow milking. Plus a family chore time for kids will include grain hauling, gathering eggs, cow milking and mutton busting. There will also be an allages boot scramble and sack race, and new this year: a businessperson's boot scramble. Reflecting on the event’s success and future, matriarch Nancy Stirling Neuhauser said, “Reaching the 15 year mark has reiterated our family’s resolve to reach farther and raise more. Dick would be proud of what we’ve done, but would want us to keep on. Moving to a larger venue, extending our team target area, and offering more ways to get involved will hopefully compound our fundraising efforts and help even more families. Cancer is not going away any time soon, so we aren’t either.” The 50-team long go round will start at 10:00 a.m. A free-will donation barbeque and silent auction will run at 5:00 p.m. The top 10 teams are slated for the Calcutta short go action at 6:00 p.m. followed by a dance with music by Twice the Fun. Fifty first come, first serve team entries will be accepted until September 10. A four-person team registration is required. To enter or for more event details, contact Sandy Sivertsen at 605-943-5516 or visit www.stirlingfamily ranchrodeo.com or the Stirling Family Ranch Rodeo Facebook page.
Water releases increase at Shadehill Reservoir
Reclamation will be increasing water releases from Shadehill Reservoir through Labor Day to draw down the reservoir to allow contractors to begin shore protection work at Ketterling’s Point. Water releases will range between 40 cubic feet per second (cfs) and 160 cfs, depending on weather and inflows into the reservoir. Reclamation will partner with South Dakota Game Fish, and Parks to coordinate recreation activities and complete the shoreline protection work at Ketterling’s Point. According to Jeff Nettleton, Chief of Facility Operation and Maintenance and Engineering Services for Reclamation’s Dakotas Area Office, the shore protection contract at Shadehill Reservoir will start after Labor Day and be completed this fall “The present water surface elevation at Shadehill Reservoir is 2,264.3,” said Nettleton. “The water elevation will need to be drawn down to 2,263.5 by Labor Day to allow the contractor to install riprap protection along the shoreline of Ketterling’s Point Recreation Area.” Jim Straight, District Park Manager for Shadehill Recreation Area, South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, stated that the boat ramps at Ketterling’s Point and the West Cabin area are open and will remain open as the water level is drawn down. Following is the status of Reclamation’s South Dakota Reservoirs and Keyhole Reservoir in northeastern Wyoming: Shadehill Inflows into Shadehill Reservoir for the water year of 2012 (October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012) are 25 percent of average through July. Keyhole Reservoir Keyhole Reservoir is currently at elevation 4,096.4, with full reservoir elevation being 4,099.3. The controlled release through the outlet works is 110 cfs to meet irrigation demands. Inflows for the water year are 90 percent of average through July and Keyhole Reservoir is 87 percent full. Belle Fourche Belle Fourche Reservoir is currently at elevation 2,963.6, with a full reservoir elevation being 2,975. Belle Fourche Dam is an offstream storage reservoir located on Owl Creek. The reservoir is filled by diverting water from the Belle Fourche River at the Diversion Dam near the city of Belle Fourche, through the Inlet Canal to the reservoir. Irrigation demand has been high due to the dry summer. The reservoir is currently 54 percent full. Angostura Reservoir The current water elevation at Angostura Reservoir is 3,177.7. Angostura Reservoir is full at elevation 3,187.2. Inflows into Angostura for water year 2012 are 34 percent of average for the period of record of the reservoir. Pactola Inflows into Pactola Reservoir are 89 percent of average for the water year. Pactola’s current elevation is 4,574.4 and the reservoir is 91 percent full. The full reservoir elevation at Pactola is 4,580.2. Inflows into Pactola Reservoir have dropped off to around 25 cfs and the current release is 70 cfs. Deerfield Reservoir Deerfield Reservoir is at elevation 5,907.3, which is 0.7 feet from full. The release from Deerfield to Castle Creek is 10 cfs, and inflows into Deerfield Reservoir for the water year are 124 percent of average.
Website updates link S.D. in need of benefits
A valuable resource for families and individuals in difficult economic circumstances, the Bridge to Benefits website (www.sdbridgetobenefits.com) has been just been updated. Developed by South Dakota Voices for Children in partnership with the Children’s Defense Fund of Minnesota, the site now includes the latest eligibility requirements for benefit programs. Research that shows poverty as the single greatest threat to children’s well-being prompted development of the Bridge to Benefits site. Living in poverty can contribute to social, emotional and behavioral problems among children as well as poor physical and mental health. Risks are greatest for children who experience poverty when they are young and/or face deep and persistent poverty. On the other hand, economic security, safe, affordable housing, health care, nutrition and quality education all help children to flourish. Tax credits and benefit programs were created as a step toward helping children and their families out of poverty. The South Dakota Bridge to Benefits website can improve the well-being of many families and individuals by linking them to assistance programs that include: •Energy Assistance, •Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps), •School Meal Program, •Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), •Child Care Assistance Program, •Earned Income Tax Credit, •Sales Tax on Food Refund Program, •WIC (Women, Infants, Children) Nutritional Program. It’s easy for anyone to see if they or someone else may be eligible for support programs and tax credits by going to sdbridgetobenefits.org and clicking on the “start” button. Benefit eligibility is determined by answering a few simple questions. The screening process is easy, confidential and free; names and Social Security numbers are not required. The site can be accessed from any computer, including those at public libraries throughout the state. The mission of South Dakota Voices for Children is to improve the lives of children through policy and program advocacy. South Dakota Voices for Children: •Sioux Falls: 808 N. West Avenue • PO Box 2196 • Sioux Falls, SD 57101-2196 •Rapid City: 1010 9th St., Ste. 4A • PO Box 9575 • Rapid City, SD 605 367-9667 • office@sdvoicesforchldren.org.
courant@ gwtc.net
August 17-18-19-20:
#!
Ted (R)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m. Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
# # & "
ursday, Aug. 23 at 5 MT
From Faith, SD, 6 E, then 3 S
All bales net wrapped. Loading available. 2011 Alfalfa – 100 bales 2012 Wheat Hay – 1000 bales 2012 Straw – 500 bales
Owners: Doug & Bryant Schauer – 605-490-9528
Piroutek Auction Service ~ www.PiroutekAuction.com Dan Piroutek 605-544-3316 or Je Long 605-515-0186
# $ " " $ & #" #$ " " % $
August 24-25-26-27:
Total Recall (PG-13)
August 31, September 1-2-3:
Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG)
Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
& !+ ,) ) ,*+ ') )+ & 0
)! 0 , ,*+
(% 1 $$ !+0 )#
! ! ! ! ! !
Subscription Rates: Local: $35 plus tax, Out-of-Area: $42 plus tax and Out-of-State: $42
0', ) ,& $ +' ++ & & .',$ *+!$$ $!# +' '& + '& +!'&* % 0 * &+ +' )+ & 0 & !+ '/ $$
- )0'& !* !&-!+ !)*+ '% '% &"'0 ,) ) ') ''+ $$ % 2 $$ -* )+ & ++ & + !+ !- ) $%
!
%
%
&
!#
'!&# #!"
$
# # ('#!" $ !
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste Friday, August 5, Carla Brucklacher traveled to Custer State Park to meet Ron and Jennifer Tietsort and family for a movie at the new Hermosa outdoor movie screens. We went to the 9:40 movies. It was supposed to have two movies. We saw Brave, but due to technical difficulties, The Avengers never did get shown. For all the warm beautiful evenings in the past, this night was extremely windy and chilly. We were sitting outside shivering, and it started to lightning and rain, so we weren’t too unhappy when they couldn’t get the second movie to show. Noah was the only one who had never seen it, as the rest of us had. I had seen it twice. On the way home, Carla saw her first real live Mountain Lion, as one ran across the road in front of the car. Saturday morning, Carla, Jennifer, Noah and Hope headed for Colorado to visit Matthew and family and get away from all the Motorcycle Rally bikes that inhabit Custer State Park at this time. Saturday evening, we discovered that The Avengers movie was playing in Fort Collins, so we loaded up for the 9:00 p.m. showing and Noah finally got to see the movie. It was three times for me and Matthew and his family. On Sunday, we all headed for Denver and Coors Field to see the Colorado Rockies play San Francisco. It was part of Carla’s birthday party and presents to celebrate her 65th. We ate $12.00 hotdogs, cracker jacks and $8.00 drinks. After the game, we went to a fun arcade and restaurant. Hope Tietsort promptly hit a thousand tickets, Noah, a master of the crane machines, pulled out a huge blue dolphin, two frogs, one elephant, one stuffed banana, one small dolphin and a couple other things. Matthew hit two thousand ticket jackpots and G-Ma Carla hit a 500 jackpot. What fun we had. The grandkids had a grand time shopping with their tickets in the gift shop. We spent two afternoons swimming at the Greeley Country Club pool and attended a going away reception at the Country Club for Matthew’s former wrestling coach from the University of Northern Colorado. Wednesday evening, August 8, Matthew and Jennifer cooked a fantastic meal for my actual Birthday and I opened gifts and celebrated with one fabulous cupcake with one candle on it. Everyone sang the birthday song and took pictures and everyone got one bite of the cupcake! Thursday, Sonja, Maylin and Alissa Brucklacher and Jennifer and her children and Grandma went school clothes shopping at the mall. Friday morning, we headed back to the Black Hills of South Dakota, exhausted but happy! July 28th, some of the West River Huethers attended a East River Huether reunion at Tripp, S.D., put on by Maynard Huether. Those that attended from here were Margie and George Martin of Rapid City; from Wall were Sonny and Patty Huether, Delja Hoffman and Violet Smoot. It was very well attended with a hundred or more people. Lots of good German food, melons, kuchen and kuchen and more kuchen. We even got to meet the mayor of Sioux Falls, Mike Huether, our third cousin. Wolfords had company from the state of Washington last Monday, the 6th. They were friends of Amy and planned to meet with her in Mitchell the next day. It was Motorcycle Rally week in Sturgis and that meant lots of traffic for miles around that town. Wall had its share — motorcycles, trailers, campers etc. It certainly brings in a lot of people. It was over on Sunday. Roger and Mary Ellen Hutchison, a couple from Sioux Falls, have been coming year after year to take in the Rally — in fact, this was their 32nd year traveling to Sturgis. He is a retired school principal/farmer, very nice people. They look for Dorothy and Roy Hamann each year. Bernice and Frank Anderson took Edith Paulsen to lunch on Sunday. Judy Yocum invited the Badlands Quilters to her home on Tuesday, August 7th. It was their regular meeting day. Those who attended had a busy day working on pieces that will become their new “raffle” quilt, had a great lunch and enjoyed seeing the countryside to Judy’s home. Sunflower fields are in bloom, brightening the landscape. XXX Summer Olympics came to a close on Sunday. the United States athletes did very well, collecting 104 medals in all, receiving the most of any other country. “Theme” meal was on Monday, the 13th. Thirty some people enjoyed the bountiful meal. Mary Jane Doyle had Brenda Carmichael, Arla Olson and Ruby Keyser come for strawberry pie in celebration of Brenda’s birthday on
Pennington County Courant • August 16, 2012 •
Tuesday. Guests at Brenda Carmichael’s this week were Angie, Tyson and Aiden Dunbar and Marla, Mason and Cooper Venjohn. They all had a part in celebrating Brenda’s birthday. Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle met Josh, Darcy and Max Croell in Rapid City on Saturday. Great to see them and see how Max is growing. Jon Strandell of Excelsior, Minn., visited with Roy and Dorothy Hamann last week. He is George’s brother. Adam, Megan (Lurz) Rislov, Harper and Taton were here in Wall and Philip to visit their families. Les and Kay Williams had some family home last week — Randy of Lincoln, spent from Wednesday through Saturday. Thursday brought Shauna, Marlee Kay and Remmington Meyerink of Platte, and Gwen and Abby Hamilton of Casper. They went home on Saturday, also. Jess Williams left on Thursday for Sioux Falls, where he will attend the University. Football practice started on Saturday, the 9th, and he had to be on hand for that. We all wish him good luck! Bernice Anderson had a birthday on Monday. Rod and Gloria Gunn were down from Rapid City, Gwen and Wayne Davis, Craig and Frank Anderson and Edith Paulsen all went out to eat with her to help her celebrate. Happy birthday, Bernice. Michelle Lamphere stopped in Wall on Monday en route to Sioux Falls. She was toting lots of produce for her grandma Frances Poste. Her apples are relatively bigger than last year. She also brought zucchini, rhubarb, broccoli, cherry tomatoes and summer squash. Have had very little rain but the extreme heat has subsided some. Morning temperatures are nice and cool. Have a good week!--
Page 4
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers your Questions
QueSTION: It seems like there aren't enough hours in the day to do all that needs to be done. What with working and maintaining a household it's difficult to spend quality time with my kids. What do you think I should do? ANSweR: You may have more time than you realize. If not, it's crucial that you put out an effort to find or make some. A few years ago family experts were preaching that what's important is "quality time," not "quantity time." More recent research shows that kids need both "quality" and "quantity" time with their parents. In fact, the more involved parents are with their children, the less likely they are to have social, emotional or academic problems, use drugs or alcohol, become involved in crime or engage in premarital sex. Without more detailed information about your family situation it's hard to know exactly how to advise you. But your inquiry leads us to believe that you may need to re-examine your priorities. You can begin by asking yourself a few simple questions. Is your employment outside the home a matter of providing for basic needs, or are you driven by materialistic desires or a longing for personal significance? Are there any aspects of "maintaining a household" that you can afford to sacrifice? Do you attach a greater value to status or appearance than to the well-being of your kids? After all, a spotless home isn't nearly as important as a close relationship with your children. As an anonymous poet has written: For when at times I'm forced to choose The one job or the other, I'd like to cook and clean and scrub, But first I'll be a mother. Another suggestion: one of the easiest ways to make more time for your kids is to turn off the TV. In the average American home, the television is on 49 hours a week. By way of contrast, the average amount of time that both parents spend in meaningful conversation with their children is 39 minutes a week. If you're serious about wanting more time with your kids, make the obvious choice. Instead of watching TV, read to them, play board games together, take a walk to a local park or just talk to them. It's also important to avoid the temptation to get your kids overly involved in activities outside the home. Some parents feel pressure to sign their children up for numerous sports teams, music and dance lessons, social clubs and all kinds of community organizations. Don't fall
TDM Excavation & Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching •Repair Dams & Roads •Heavy Haul Trailer •Dozer •Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Happy 50th Birthday Roger on August 18th
with love from all of your family
Countryside News
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins 837-2053 Greetings… Mary Paulsen reported they had a freak hail storm recently and her vegetable garden was ruined, also the sunflowers planted on some of their acres. The sunflowers are struggling to come back but the garden is a loss. Grandson Dawson Paulsen is at a basketball camp in Billings, Mont. Dawson has qualified for future honors in the basketball field and is very sports honored. Another very dedicated family member is son Tom of Lead. He is in training at Fort Lee, Virginia. When he goes back to school in January and finishes, Tom will eligible for the honor of Major. Our best wishes and prayers for Tom to be working for this honor. May the Countryside join Toma nd parents in feeling the honor of one of our own local residents to reach this place in his life. Thought: A creative person is motivated by the desire to achieve. Hope sees the invincible, feels the intangible and achieves the impossible.
: :
& ) $
',)* *+ ',$ - ) '& ("
:
&+"*+).
)" "+.
:
:
:
6)4(%9
+!' "*+ !,) !
:
3-(%9
* % &+
:$
2/
*+ &+) &
))5-0+
#,)0 %0910) %098,)3) 3)%',)4 165 *13 ,).2 8%05 5,) ,%0( 1* %.8%94 51 &) 5,)3) 0( *13 5,%5 / )42104-&.)
FALL HELP NEEDED!
"+ !"&
&
) & !"& ' '#
$$ +.( *
3%-+ 1..)3
It’s A Girl!
Zoey Marie Shearer
Born: April 7, 2012 Weight: 6 lbs. 6 oz. 19” Parents: T rent & Betsy Shearer, Wall Maternal Grandparents: Gary & Sue Woodford, Custer T & Barb Plooster, Custer om Paternal Grandparents: Glendon & Pam Shearer, Wall Maternal Great-Grandmothers: Arlene Plooster, Corsica Rosemarie Scott, Custer Paternal Great-Grandparents: Donna Moler, Rapid City Lavon & Dorothy Shearer, Wall
Sponsored by Grandpa Glendon & Grandma Pam
)3-%. 22.-'%5-10 )37-')
$ ! "'
#%..
%
%.) %55)3410
prey to this mindset. Kids don't need a dozen different weekly activities. They need quality and quantity time with loving, involved and committed parents. QueSTION: I've received a lot of conflicting answers to the following question: is the quality of time I spend with my family more important than the quantity? What do you say? ANSweR: We don't think so. A few years ago family experts were preaching that what's important is "quality time," not "quantity time." More recent research shows that kids need both "quality" and "quantity" time with their parents. In fact, the more involved parents are with their children - and the word "more" here is used with direct reference to the concept of quantity - the less likely they are to have social, emotional, or academic problems, use drugs or alcohol, become involved in crime, or engage in premarital sex. You have to bear in mind that it's not always possible to plan meaningful interactions between parent and child. Such serendipitous moments can't be cooked up and crammed into a few minutes of "quality time" every day. Many critical opportunities to teach or model moral values may catch you off-guard and will be gone in the blink of an eye. You can't seize the moment if you're not there to do the seizing. And that means spending lots of "quantity" time together with your kids. Without more detailed information about your family situation it's hard to know exactly what else to tell you. But your inquiry leads us to believe that you may need to re-examine your priorities. The very fact that you're thinking in terms of "quality" vs. "quantity" indicates that you're looking to justify spending smaller amounts of time with your family. Is this supposition anywhere near the truth? If you're not sure, you can put the matter to the test by asking yourself a few simple questions. Is your employment outside the home a matter of providing for basic needs, or are you driven by materialistic desires or a longing for personal significance? Are there any aspects of "maintaining a household" that you can afford to sacrifice? Do you attach a greater value to status or appearance than to the well-being of the people with whom you share your life? After all, a spotless home isn't nearly as important as a close relationship with your spouse and children. Another suggestion: one of the easiest ways to make more time for loved ones is to turn off the TV. In the average American home, the television is on 49 hours a week. By way of contrast, the average amount of time that both parents spend in meaningful conversation with their children is 39 minutes a week. If you need more time with your spouse and your kids, make the obvious choice. Instead of watching TV, read together, play board games together, take a walk to a local park, or sit and talk. If you have children, it's also important to avoid the temptation to get them overly involved in activities outside the home. Some parents feel pressure to sign their children up for numerous sports teams, music and dance lessons, social clubs, and all kinds of community organizations. Don't fall prey to this mindset. Kids don't need a dozen different weekly activities. They need quality and quantity time with loving, involved, and committed parents. Send your questions to Dr. Dobson, c/o Focus on the Family, PO Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO 80903. This question and answer is excerpted from books authored by Dr. James Dobson and published by Tyndale House Publishers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman of the Board of Focus on the Family, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of the home. Copyright 2003 James Dobson, Inc. All rights reserved. International copyright secured.
Wall, SD
$ ! "'
%
') $$ .',) ,+'%'+"- &
)339 ,10)
$$
*
)7
110)9 13
$
'%% ) " $ )-"& )-" $$ *"
!
&+" $ &*+ $$ +"'& ( ") ,))',& "& ) *
!
"
#
#
# "
$ ! "'
%
%.. 3-' %04)0
#!
August 16th: Fleish Keichla
w/Fruit
Daily Lunch Specials
SanDee’s
& Super Nachos
: #%..
August 17th: Taco August 20th: Bacon
Cheeseburger w/Fries
August 21st: Chicken Salad
w/Crasins on Croissant w/Fruit
"
#
" $ (
& "$ #
)
August 22nd: Brat
w/Macaroni Salad
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Religious
Obituary Irene Fortune__________________________________
Philip from 1970 to 1979, where they resided while some of their daughters were attending Philip High School. After 1979, they returned to their ranch near Quinn, where they continued to reside. Her husband preceded her in death on September 4, 2000. She later moved into Philip, where she has since resided. First and foremost, Irene was a prayer warrior. She told Kay that she didn’t know where she got her faith except for seeing how important going to Mass was for her dad as he shoveled snow so they could get there. Irene was a true German, everything was clean, neat and tidy, windows clean, everything ironed, and the garden and yard had not a weed. She loved feeding friends and family, and playing cards. She could whip up a meal in 30 minutes. She baked cakes, cookies, and pies. She was always expecting company. Survivors include five daughters, Kay Williams of Philip, Judy Harrington and her husband, Dan, of Ridgefield, Wash., Billie Hett and her husband, Donn, of Buffalo, Pam Dale and her husband, C.K., of Philip, and Mary Lou Guptill and her husband, Pat, of Quinn; 25 grandchildren; 40 great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; one sister, Helen Louison of Rapid City; and a host of other relatives and friends. Irene was preceded in death by her husband, Howard “Bill” Fortune, on September 4, 2000; a daughter, Janet Waara; a son, Scott Fortune; her parents; four brothers, Carl, Charles, John and Raymond Clements; a sister, Catherine Hawley; and a son-in-law, Dick Williams. Mass of Christian burial was celebrated Saturday, August 11, at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Philip with Father Kevin Achbach as celebrant. Music was provided by Marianne Frein, pianist, and Shelby Schofield, vocalist. Altar servers were Sammy Schofield and Tristen Rush. Lector was Rita O’Connell. Eucharistic ministers were Lloyd Frein and Debby Prouty. Pallbearers were grandsons Paul, Mark and Ross Williams, Jason and Tyler Hett, Michael Rotzien, William and Heath Morrison, and Tate, Troy and Paul Guptill. Interment was at the Masonic Cemetery in Philip. Arrangements were with the Rush Funeral Home of Philip. Her online guestbook is available at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Pennington County Courant • August 16, 2012 •
Page 5
Tomorrow’s Leaders
Irene Fortune, age 94 of Philip, died Tuesday, August 7, 2012, at the Philip Nursing Home. Irene Clements was born April 20, 1918, in Haakon County, S.D., the daughter of Ernest and Elfreida (Meyers) Clements. She grew up and attended rural schools in the area. During her high school years, she lived with Mrs. Senechal in Philip. She learned many things from her, including cooking and cleaning. Irene was united in marriage to Howard “Bill” Fortune on September 23, 1940, at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Philip. They ranched in the Quinn area all their married life. They moved into
Ava, 8 years, Nora, 6 years & Emmet, 4 years, children of Ryan & Cindy Dinger, Wall.
Deacon, 3 years, & Camden, 10 months, children of Dar & Lisa Haerer, Wall.
Mia, 6 years, & Toby, 4 years, children of Jesse Paulsen, Wall
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by Lloyd & Margee Willey Sunday morning gratitude for the blessings of the morning! It is cool, sweatshirt cool; translating to 60ish degrees. It just feels good! Morning clouds to the east and to the west, big puffy guys with Wasta in the middle. Last night we thought for certain that two big dark clouds from east and west would converge and give Wasta a needed downpour but as we watched the potential for the downpour went quickly off to the south. Maybe my Gursen cousins west of Martin were beneficiary of much needed moisture. As for us on the front porch of the Old Hotel at Wasta, we didn’t even get a good spit! As promised the friend of Lloyd’s from Custer grade school days arrived Monday afternoon from California. Long time good friends are always enjoyable, easy to be with and don’t embarrass you with, “yes you just told me...”!! Boyd Simonson has enjoyed the Rally for several years but recently decided that as “geezerhood” was upon him he would sell his motorcycle but come to visit by car during the Rally. A visit to Sturgis for t-shirts, time with Mary Jones (friend fo Boyd’s mother) in Quinn and her son Kelly, a must trip to Custer to say hello to Jack and Joyce O’Connor and a relaxing “sit “upon the front porch for a glass of wine and evening viewing of the traffic — interstate and Wasta. A friendly appearing fellow coasted by on his motorcycle, giving us a wave and a cheerful grin. Within minutes we heard tires squeal and then a THAWACK! Lloyd and friend Boyd said an “Uh-oh” and jumped in his car and took off in the direction of the highway leading to the interstate entrance going east. Under the over pass on the east side of the road, lay the motorcycle with the rider between the guard rail and the concrete support pillar. 911 was called, sheriff, highway patrol, ambulance, fire truck and ultimately Life Flight came and flew the injured rider away. We don’t know his name, he appeared to be badly hurt, but so far have not heard on the news that there was a fatality at Wasta. It is so hard to get my mind around the quickness, the sadness. It has been a sort of mantra to say the last two years. “None of us know how much time we have on this earth” and that certainly was brought home Wednesday, the 8th of August, 2012. Our thoughts and prayers are with him and his loved ones and we hope to hear he is doing well, this fellow with the friendly grin and wave. Speaking of the Rally, were we speaking of the Rally? A former guests of the hotel stopped by Friday morning to say hello. Brent “Buzz” Moermond from Winchester, Ohio stayed here in 2005 with his brother Lonnie and friend Willa. They were here enough days to become acquainted and to enjoy coffee visits in the morning and front porch talks at night. In 2007, Brent and friend Kelly returned for another several day stay that we enjoyed so much. This year, Brent and friend Daryl Wright from Sardinia, Ohio, stopped during their Rally vacation for a good “catch up” visit. How thoughtful of them to take the time to stop. Thanks guys it was appreciated. Hope to see them again along with Kelly! Dick and Gay Hadlock won the award for most company in a summer! Grandson Joshua McNeil and his family, wife Natalie, daughters, Nadia, 4, and Karalynn, seven months, and son Peter, 7, had a wonderful time here in Wasta. A surprise was daughter Melody who came along! Gay said that the little ones were so good, even though they had traveled so much. A trip to the Badlands and time with grandparents was the agenda. Joshua and Natalie live in Gainesville, Georgia and Melody (Hadlock) O’Neil lives in Davis Junction, Illinois. An additional surprise was from Terry (Wenzel) and husband Gary Rantela from Ocala, Fla., who helped blow out candles on Gay’s birthday cake while everyone was still here! Happy Birthday! A correction: Gay and Dick’s former daughter-in-law and visitor later part of July, with Uncle Les Ever, are from Cal-Nev-Ari, NEVADA not Arizona. I called them four times and still got it wrong! Thank you for your patience and sense of humor, Hadlocks. We think we have a “hummingbird sitting” in Wasta. Faye Bryan spotted the little guy hovering over the red monarda flowers at the northeast edge of the hotel’s back yard (AKA Margee and Lloyd’s). We spent some happy moments observing the darts, dashes and occasionally buzzing the finch who wanted to share the tasty “breakfast”. The problem is with identification. It seemed to be over-all a drab light brown and very tiny maybe not more than two and one half to three inches. Would we have enjoyed it more had we known its name? Probably not. A brief description by Hazel Kalkbrenner of Heather Schell’s wedding — it was wonderful! Start to finish great! To be continued next week Happy Trails!
Braylee Walker, 4 years, & Brittney Walker, 3 years, children of Alicia Heathershaw & Chad Walker, Wall.
Lane, 4 years son of Jeremy Paulsen, Wall.
Ryon, 4 years, Jocelyn, 2 years, & Kinsey, 5 months, children of Craig & Jana Bielmaier, Wall.
Sponsored by:
Pennington County Courant
& Thompson Photographics
…continued next week.
Dowling Community Church Memorial Day through Labor Day Service 10:00 a.m. Badlands Cowboy Church Wall Rodeo Grounds Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Evangelical Free Bible Church Wall Ron Burtz, Pastor 279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m., Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.; Sundays: Sunday School & Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m., Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m., Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Interior Community Church Highway 44 East Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m. Scenic Community Church Pastor Ken Toews Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May. First Baptist Church New Underwood Pastor James Harbert Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m. Wall United Methodist Church Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. Wasta Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m. New Underwood Community Church Pastor Wes Wileman Sunday School 9 a.m.; Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.; Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m. St. John's Catholic Church New Underwood Father William Zandri Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.; Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at Good Samaritan Nursing Home; Reconciliation before Sun. Mass First Evangelical Lutheran Church Wall Pastor Curtis Garland Sunday Service, 9 a.m. Emmanuel Lutheran Church Creighton Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society PO Box 756 Germantown, WI 53022 www.bereanbiblesociety.org
GOD, WHO CANNOT LIE, PROMISED
by Cornelius R. Stam "In hope of eternal life, which GOD, WHO CANNOT LIE, PROMISED..." (Tit. 1:2). In the Mediterranean Sea there lies an island which in Paul's day had a very bad reputation. It's name is Crete. To Titus, a pastor sent to evangelize the inhabitants, the Apostle Paul wrote: "One of themselves, even a prophet of their own, said. The Cretians are always liars..." (Tit. 1:12), and he added: "This witness is true" (Ver. 13). Paul knew this to be a fact, for he had labored among them. Indeed, even secular history bears witness to this trait of the Cretians, for we are told that in ancient times to call a man a Cretian was to call him a liar. How wonderful that St. Paul had succeeded in establishing a few small Christian assemblies on this island and that Titus was now laboring there as his successor! And how reassuring that to Titus and these few believers, surrounded on every hand by people who could not be trusted, Paul could write about "eternal life, which God, who cannot lie, promised"! "God is not a man, that He should lie; neither the son of man, that He should repent: hath He said, and shall He not do it? or hath He spoken and shall He not make it good?" (Num. 23:19). Thank God, millions have trusted His Word, especially about salvation through the all-sufficient and finished work of redemption wrought by Christ at Calvary, and they have found it to be blessedly true. In dozens of passages of Scripture God has promised eternal life to those who trust in Christ and His payment for sin. "Christ died for our sins" (I Cor. 15:3). "[He] was delivered for our offences and was raised again for our justification" (Rom. 4:25). "He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life" (John 3:36). "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved" (Acts 16:31). Take Him at His Word; His promise is good. "GOD, WHO CANNOT LIE, PROMISED."
"
% #" " $ $ " "! # ! ! " "
%
! % ! #
"
!
" " $
It’s A Boy!
Westan Roger Kjerstad
Born: June 8, 2012 Weight: 7 lbs. 4 oz. 20 1/2” Parents: Brennan & Laurie Kjerstad, Wall Siblings: Austan & Lexi Paternal Grandparents: Clayton & Charlene Kjerstad, Wall Maternal Grandparents: Roger & Judy Fiegen, Dell Rapids Paternal Great-Grandmothers: Mary Kjerstad, Quinn Bea Ramsey, Spearfish Maternal Great-Grandparents: Melvin & Delores Fiegen, Dell Rapids
Sponsored by Grandpa Clayton & Grandma Charlene
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall Rev. Leo Hausmann Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. Weekdays refer to Bulletin St. Margaret Church • Lakeside Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months Holy Rosary Church • Interior Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
wall Bldg. Center
279-2158 Wall, SD
De's Tire & Muffler
279-2168 Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall Drug Store
Call 279-2565 to be a sponsor on this church directory.
annc@ gwtc.net
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The Pioneer Review, as well as on our website: www.pioneer-review.com. CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit. NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges. DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington County Courant only. PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Pennington County Courant • August 16, 2012 •
CITY OF HOT SPRINGS is accepting applications for a certified Water\Wastewater Superintendent. Salary $32,500 $50,000. Contact, Harley Lux, (605)745-3135. hlux@hs-sd.org PIERRE SCHOOL DISTRICT has open teaching positions for middle school math for the 2012-13 school year. Apply online at www.pierre.k12.sd.us/employment or Pierre Schools, 211 S Poplar, Pierre SD 57501. EOE CUSTER CLINIC IS accepting applications for a full-time LPN or Licensed Medical Assistant to join our team in the beautiful southern Black Hills. Salary based on experience; includes excellent benefits. Contact Human Resources at (605)673-2229 ext. 110 for more information or log onto www.regionalhealth.com to apply. EEOC/AA. EVENTS The Menno Pioneer Power Show: Make plans now for the September 22 and 23 show. For more information, visit www.pioneeracres.com or call 605-387-5166. NOTICES ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS statewide for only $150.00. Put the South Dakota Statewide Classifieds Network to work for you today! (25 words for $150. Each additional word $5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-3697 for details. OTR DRIVERS $1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety bonus, Call Joe for details, 800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com WANTED BUYING ANTIQUES. One ITEM to Collection. Also Antique Indian ITEMS. Beadwork, Quillwork, ArArtifacts, Guns, rowheads, Spurs, Coins, Toys, Slot Machines. Serious Buyer. 605-8900539. ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING: Specializing in controlling Canada thistle on rangeland. ATV application. ALSO: prairie dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298. PR41-23tp HILDEBRAND STEEL & CONCRETE: ALL types of concrete work. Rich, Colleen and Haven Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877867-4185; Office: 837-2621; Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291. K36-tfn TETON RIVER TRENCHING: For all your rural water hookups, waterline and tank installation and any kind of backhoe work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888, Midland. PR20-52tp WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will do all types of trenching, ditching and directional boring work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604; wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn WAITRESS NEEDED at Red Rock Restaurant in Wall. Call Lori at 279-2387. WP51-3tc THE WALL AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM is looking for an enthusiastic, energetic, reliable individual to work part-time. Must be 18 with a high school diploma. Please contact Mandi at 279-2156 ext. 2110 for more information. Deadline is August 31st. PW36-2tc HELP WANTED: Full-time & part-time starting August 13th at Rock ’N Roll Lanes, Philip. Call 859-2355 for more informaP33-tfn tion. GREAT SUMMER JOB! Sales experience preferred but will train. Salary plus commission. Possibility of up to $12.00 per hour wage. Housing is supplied in Wall. You will make great wages, meet lots of people and have fun. Position available May 1, 2012. Apply at GoldDiggers on Mt. Rushmore Road in Rapid City or call factory at 348-8108 or fax resumé to 348-1524. P14-tfn
Page 6
LOCATION! PRICE! Central air/heat, country kitchen, 3 bdrm house for sale. 2 garages, sun porch. 700 9th St., Kadoka. 837-1611. K35-tfn FOR SALE: 3 bedroom + office, 1-1/2 bath mobile home, $17,000. Call 685-4085, Jeremy P36-2tc Noteboom, Philip. HOUSE FOR SALE, LOCATED AT 607 SUNSHINE DRIVE, PHILIP: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2100 sq. ft. home on a large lot located on a quiet cul-de-sac. Has attached 2-car garage, storage shed, large deck and an underground sprinkler system which operates off a private well. Contact Bob Fugate, Philip, at 859-2403 (home) or 515-1946 (cell). P24-tfn
LOOMIX® FEED SUPPLEMENTS is seeking dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Bethany at 800-870-0356 / becomeadealer@adm.com to find out if there is a dealership opportunity in your area. EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY WANT A WAY TO PAY off that summer vacation? Join our team! Sell Avon! Work from home. Earn 40% on your first 4 orders. 1-877-454-9658. JACKSON COUNTY HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT Worker. Experience in road/bridge construction /maintenance preferred. CDL Pre-employment drug and alcohol screening required. Applications / resumes accepted. Information (605) 837-2410 or (605) 837-2422 Fax (605) 837-2447. BOOKKEEPER AT THE MADISON DAILY Leader and Leader Printing in Madison, SD. Responsibilities include AP, AR, GL and Payroll accounting. Resumes may be sent to Karen@madisondailyleader.com. SERVICE MANAGER, IMMEDIATE OPENING. 5-star Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep dealership. Excellent earnings, benefits, job security. Apply: Jim Gesswein, Gesswein Motors, PO Box 71, Milbank, SD, 57252
FOR RENT: 4 bedroom, 3 bath house in the country, 16 miles north of Philip. Call Janice Williams, 859-2124 or 6853539. P35-2tc FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apartment in Philip, $275/month plus deposit. Call 391-3992. PR45-tfn APARTMENTS: Spacious one bedroom units, all utilities included. Young or old. Need rental assistance or not, we can house you. Just call 1-800-4816904 or stop in the lobby and pick up an application. Gateway Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
RENTALS
HAY FOR SALE: 24 round bales grass hay; 300+ small square, grass with some alfalfa; 50 lb. avg.; 280 small square grass, 43 lb. avg. Call Al at 222-8454. PR51-1tp LARGE ROUND BALES of straw for sale. Call 222-5126. WP51-1tp FOR SALE: 250 acres of standing corn, to be baled or cut for silage. Milesville, SD. Call 859P36-tfn 2943 or 685-5147. WANTED: Pasture for up to 100 cows or would like to rent grass. Call 837-2589. K50-4tc FOR SALE: 2006 7’x22’ 4-horse Featherlite trailer, in excellent condition with dual 7,000 lb. axles. Aluminum with white smooth skin all enclosed horse trailer. 3x6 tack room and only one solid stud stall divider up front and the rest is open. $15,995. More than $1,000 below book value. Please call Lynette at 454-6914. PR50-3tc FOR SALE: Older JD Model 535 baler, $5,000. JD Moco 14’ hydroswing, $5,000. Both in very good shape, been shedded & are ready to go! Jerry Nemec, 8432564, Midland. PR50-2tc INTERIOR ROPING CLUB Family Playday, August 19. Sign up, 12 p.m. 10 & Under Free Events, Adult Rescue Races. Something for everyone. Concessions available. Contact Jen Hawkins, 4415484. P35-2tp TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE: Get ready for spring hauling! 12ply, 235/85/16R. $155 mounted (limited quantities available). Les’ Body Shop, 859-2744, Philip. P27-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: Maytag washing machine, very good condition, $135.00. Call 279-2858. WP51-2tc FOR SALE: Round table with (4) chairs, dark wood stain; futon; chest of drawers. Call 279-2222. PR51-2tc FOR SALE: #4 36”x72” bamboo Roman shades, dark walnut color, new in boxes, $20 each. 859-3095 or leave message. P36-1tp FOR SALE: Craftsman lawn tractor, 21 hp., 46” mower, electric start, auto. trans., one year old, $1200. Call Glen, 279-1016. P35-2tp FOR SALE: Rope horse halters with 10’ lead rope, $15 each. Call 685-3317 or 837-2917. K44-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
apaRTMEnTS aVaIlaBlE
wall Ridge Apts. 1 Bedroom
on-site laundry facility
in Wall
FOR SALE: 1997 Polaris 6x6 w/plow, rebuilt engine, new chains and sprockets, $5,600. Call 685-4085, Jeremy Noteboom. P36-2tc FOR SALE: 1991 Tioga Montara 21’ class C motorhome, very clean, always shedded. 4335380. P36-1tc
RECREATION
PRO/Rental Management 605-347-3077 1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com www.freerentersguide.com
FOR SALE: 1978 Chevy Silverado 4x4; 1973 Winnebago 5th wheel – ready to roll. Call 2792222. PR51-2tc FOR SALE: 2010 Chevy Malibu LTZ, loaded, 37K miles. Call Judy Goldhammer for more details, 685-4380 or 279-2546. P36-2tp FOR SALE: 60 ft. boom spray truck. Call 685-4085, Jeremy Noteboom. P36-2tc FOR SALE: 1987 3/4 ton Chevy pickup, $1100. Call 685-4085, Jeremy Noteboom. P36-2tc FOR SALE: 1978 1-ton Chevy pickup, $750. Call 685-4085, Jeremy Noteboom. P36-2tc
AUTOMOTIVE
WANT TO HEAR your old clock tick and chime again? I repair cuckoo, mantle clocks. Reasonably priced. Call 381-9812, Kadoka. PR49-2tp WANTED: Old Indian items, beadwork, quillwork, old guns, old painted buffalo hides, old photographs. Cash paid. Call 605/748-2289 or 515-3802. F33-4tp WANTED: Looking for used oil. Taking any type and weight. Call Mike at 685-3068. P42-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
PLEASE READ your classified ad the first week it runs. If you see an error, we will gladly rerun your ad correctly. We accept responsibility for the first incorrect insertion only. Ravellette Publications, Inc. requests all classifieds and cards of thanks be paid for when ordered. A $2.00 billing charge will be added if ad is not paid at the time the order is placed. All phone numbers are with an area code of 605, unless otherwise indicated.
CLASSIFIED POLICY
BACKHOE AND TRENCHING: Peters Excavation, Inc. Excavation work of all types. Call Brent Peters, 837-2945 or 381-5568 (cell). K3-tfn GRAVEL: Screened or rock. Call O'Connell Construction Inc., 859-2020, Philip. P51-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
PART-TIME FALL HELP WANTED at the Wall Golf Course. Call Stan at 381-2861. WP51-tfn
HELP WANTED
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrtle Ave., Philip, SD. 3 bedroom, 11/2 bath. Open concept with laminate hardwood floors, stainless steel fridge and stove and washer/dryer all included. New roof, windows and front deck. Large fenced-in backyard with storage shed and covered concrete patio. Close to school. Call 859-2470, leave a message if no answer. P36-4tc HOUSE FOR SALE IN MIDLAND, SD: Nice, 4 bedroom, 2 bath ranch-style home with new shingles, large 3-stall attached garage with (1) 12’ overhead door, heated with compressor, car hoist, tire machine & floor drain. (2) lots (50’x150’) with electrical, sewer & water hookups. Priced to sell. Call 8432161. PR50-2tc TRI-LEVEL HOUSE FOR SALE: 303 E. High St., Philip. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, or can be used as 3 bedroom, 2 bath and a mother-in-law apartment with 1 bath; or business on ground level area. Also has basement. Has new high efficiency heat pump w/central air. Includes large double car garage, set up for a mechanic; all on double lot. Quiet area, very private backyard. Call Russ Bandi at 8404789. P34-3tc MOBILE HOME FOR SALE: 1999 Redman 28’x72’ 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 150’x75’ lot, shed, double carport, Midland. Call Paula, 441-6967. $49,500 (negotiable). K50-4tp
REAL ESTATE
Thanks to all my family and friends for their encouragement, and support during and after my recent illness. I can’t really express in words how much your cards, flowers, phone calls, gifts, texts and encouraging words have meant to me this past month. I am truly blessed to have such a large, caring family and to live in a community where people reach out with their hands and hearts to let you know how much they really care. A special thanks to the Wall Clinic staff for making a difficult time easier. Again, thanks everyone and God bless all of you. Kathy Beach We would like to thank our children and their spouses, grandchildren and great-grandchildren for arranging a trip to Pinedale, Wyo. and renting cabins at Fremont Lake at the foot of Wind River Mountains. Activities - boating, fishing, waterskiing, swimming, water sports on the beach, playing games and sitting around the campfire in the evenings and cookouts. Supper on a balcony restaurant with a view of the mountains in Pinedale. It was a welcome change from the heat with 80° high and relaxing. Everyone had a fabulous time. We couldn’t have had a better gift for our 50th Anniversary from our family. God bless all of you! We love you, Larry & Norie Ruland Thank you to the Wall Chamber of Commerce and area businesses for your generous support of the Pennington County 4-H Rodeo. Also, thank you to all who donated your time to make the rodeo a success. This event wouldn’t be possible without you! Pennington County 4-H Rodeo Committee
THANK YOUS
GATEWAY APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW KADOKA, SD
Spacious 1 bedroom units are available for the elderly (62 years or older) and/or disabled/handicapped adults (18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904 TDD-Relay 1-800-877-1113
HElp WanTED
Full-time positions for framers and carpenters, must live in the Wall area. Starting immediately. Call 279-2158, ask for Darwin.
Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising Protects Your Right To Know.
Pennington County Courant • August 16, 2012 •
PENNINGTON COUNTY'S 2013 PROVISIONAL BUDGET
DEPARTMENT BUDGET AMOUNT
Page 7
FUND
QUINN TOWN BOARD OF TRUSTEES
REGULAR MEETING AUGUST 6, 2012 The Quinn Town Board met at 7 pm on Monday, August 6, 2012, at the Quinn Community Center with the following members present Kevin Wenzel, Patty Coleman and Juston Eisenbraun. Others present were Michael Luedeman, Lorna Moore, and Finance Officer Deborah Bryan. Motion by Kevin, seconded by Juston to approve the agenda, motion carried. Kevin made a motion, seconded by Patty to approve the minutes of the last meeting, motion carried. Motion by Kevin, seconded by Juston to approve the financial statement, motion carried. Deborah reported that David Curtis has paid his water bill to the Town of Quinn. Kevin made a motion to approve the vouchers, seconded by Juston, motion carried. The following vouchers were paid: WREA, $206.00; Pennington County Courant, $21.12; WRLJ Rural Water, $55.00; Kevin Wenzel, $25.00; Patty Coleman, $25.00; Juston Eisenbraun, $25.00; Deborah Bryan, $200.00; CHS, $29.00; Patty Coleman, $106.03. With all business complete, the meeting was adjourned. Deborah Bryan Finance Officer Town of Quinn Published August 16, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $13.64.
faithful performance of the Contract and payment of all labor, materials, rentals, etc., will be required for an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the amount of the Contract. All bonds must be issued or co-signed by a licensed resident agent of South Dakota. 4. Award of Contract: The Contract and Agreement will be executed with the City of Wall, SD and the acceptable Low Bidder. The right is reserved, as the interest of the City of Wall, to reject any and all bids, to waive informality in bids received, and to accept or reject any items of any bid, unless such bid is qualified by specific limitation. 6. Nondiscrimination (EEO): The proposed contract is under and subject to Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, as amended, and to the Equal Opportunity Clause. 7. Civil Rights Act: South Dakota Department of Transportation of Pierre, South Dakota in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award. 8. Affirmative Action: A Contractor having 50 or more non-construction employees who may be awarded a contract of $50,000 or more and subcontractors having 50 or more non-construction employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the advertised specifications. 9. Non-segregated Facilities: Contractor will be required to submit a certification of non-segregated facilities from all Subcontractors for subcontracts exceeding $10,000. 10. Bidders and sub-bidders: Required to comply with Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations (1518, 36 F>R> 7340) promulgated by the United States Secretary of Labor, in accordance with Section 107 of the contract work hours and safety standards act, (82 Stat. 96) not requiring any laborer or mechanic to work in surroundings or under working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to their health and safety. 11. Contractors: Subject to the Requirements for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Employment Opportunity (Executive Order 11246, as amended), provisions of which are contained in the advertised specifications. 12. Award of Contract: The Contract and Agreement will be executed with City of Wall, in Wall, SD and the acceptable Low Bidder. The right is reserved, as the interest of City of Wall, in Wall, SD, may require, to reject any and all bids, to waive informality in bids received, and to accept or reject any items of any bid, unless such bid is qualified by specific limitation. 13. Materials Preference: By statutory authority, preference will be given to materials, products and supplies found or produced within the State of South Dakota. 14. DBE Requirements: The Contractor will insure Disadvantaged Business Enterprises as defined in 49 CFR, Part 23, have the maximum opportunity to participate in the performance of contracts and subcontracts. The DBE project
goal percentage is noted in the specification documents and the contractor is required to complete the DBE Assurance and DBE form SDDOT (OA) 289-A, 2-1892, both attached to project proposal. The contractor who is determined to be low bidder will provide DBE Participation dollar amounts as required by the Specifications and reasonable acceptance "Good Faith Effort" documentation, to be submitted no later than 3 working days after the bid opening to be considered an eligible bidder. 15. The Contractor will certify that he and any of his Subcontractors meet the requirements of 49 CFR, Part 29, regarding debarment, suspension, ineligibility and voluntary exclusion as further described in these specifications. 16. The Contractor will certify that he and his Subcontractors will comply with the 49 CFR, 30.17, regarding Foreign Trade Restrictions as further noted in project specifications. 17. The Contractor will certify that he and his Subcontractors will comply with Section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code prohibiting the use of federal funds for lobbying and influencing federal employees. 18. The Contractor will certify that he and his Subcontractors will comply with "BUY AMERICAN CERTIFICATION (JAN. 1991)" as further noted in project specifications. Attest: /s/Carolynn Anderson Title: Finance Officer (SEAL) Published August 9 & 16, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $136.46.
journed the meeting at 7:20pm. Carolynn Anderson Finance Officer Town of Wasta Published August 16, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $19.82.
ADOPTION OF PROVISIONAL BUDGET
FOR PENNINGTON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That the Board of County Commissioners of Pennington County, will meet in the Courthouse at 315 St. Joseph Street, Rapid City SD on Tuesday, September 4, 2012 at 10 a.m. for the purpose of considering the Provisional Budget for the year 2013 and the various items, schedules, amounts and appropriations set forth therein and as many days thereafter as is deemed necessary until the final adoption of the budget on or before September 30, 2012. At such time any interested person may appear either in person or by a representative and will be given an opportunity for a full and complete discussion of all purposes, objectives, items, schedules, appropriations, estimates, amounts and matters set forth and contained in the Provisional Budget. “Pennington County fully subscribes to the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you desire to attend this public meeting and are in need of accommodations, please notify the Commissioners’ Office at (605) 394-2171 at least 24 hours prior to the meeting so that appropriate services and auxiliary aids are available.” Julie A. Pearson Pennington County Auditor Published August 16 & 23, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $25.47.
INVITATION FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the Finance Officer of the City of Wall, South Dakota. 501 Main Street, PO Box 314, Wall, South Dakota, until 2:15 PM (Mountain Time) on the 21st day of August, 2012 and then be publicly opened and read, for furnishing all equipment, labor, and materials as set forth in the specifications and performing all work, incidental thereto for Acquisition of a 150 HP Non Utility Wheel Tractor with attachments including a Snow Blower, Front End Loader with bucket, Broom, and Blade, AIP 3-460069-04-2011, Wall Airport Improvements, Wall, South Dakota. Primary Work: The City of Wall plans to acquire a Non Utility Wheel Tractor with a minimum of 150 HP. This Tractor will be the power source for attachments, which are also part of this bid, including a three point front mounted snow blower, a front end loader with bucket, a front mounted blade, and a front mounted rotary broom. Bidders should submit quotes for the tractor and all specified accessories. 1. Specifications: Copies of the Specifications are available for inspection at: Office of Brosz Engineering, Inc., 3561 Whitewood Road, or P.O. Box 636, Sturgis, South Dakota 57785 (605) 3472722. Specifications may be obtained on the Brosz Engineering website at www.broszeng.com at no charge. One hard copy may be obtained at the office of Brosz Engineering located at 3561 Whitewood Road, Sturgis, SD 57785 at no charge to South Dakota Contractors. 2. Bid Guarantee: Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check, cashier's check or draft in the amount of five percent (5%) of the total bid, and drawn on a solvent State or National Bank, or a ten percent (10%) Bid Bond issued by a surety authorized to do business in the State of South Dakota and payable to the City of Wall, Wall, South Dakota. 3. Contract Bonds: Separate Payment and Performance Bonds guaranteeing
WASTA TOWN BOARD OF TRUSTEES
AUGUST 6, 2012 The Wasta Town Board held their regular meeting on Monday, August 6, 2012 at the community building. Board Chairman Justin Crawford called the meeting to order at 7:00pm with board member Dorreen Skillingstad present. Board member Stan McNabb was absent. Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to approve the July 2nd minutes as read. Motion carried. Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to approve the financial statement as given. Motion carried. Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to approve the bills as follows: Justin Crawford, July wages, $28.30; Dorreen Skillingstad, July wages, $23.59; Tammy Green, July wages, $566.10; Carolynn Anderson, July wages, $278.33; Walker Refuse, garbage pickup, $616.32; WREA, electricity, $673.28; Pennington Co. Courant, publishing, $24.04; Energy Laboratories, water test, $42.50; Plumdone Co., chlorine pellets, $107.12; WBC, lube spray, $8.99; Summit Signs, sign accessories, $49.00; EFTPS, payroll tax, $126.36. Motion carried. Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to notify Billy Gallino of pasture lease termination unless rent is paid in 15 days and horses are reduced to 4 head. Motion carried. At this time Kendall Kjerstad entered the meeting. Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to approve the 1st reading of Ordinance 122; 2013 Budget. Motion carried. Carolynn requested moving the September meeting to Monday, the 10th. Motion by Dorreen, second by Justin to move the September meeting to Monday, the 10th and the time to 8:00pm. Motion carried. Kendall informed the board of some streetlights around town that needs to be replaced. West River Electric will be notified of the needed repair. With all business complete, Justin ad-
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Sealed bids will be received by the Pennington County Highway Department on behalf of the Board of Commissioners for the following project at the Pennington County Highway Department, 3601 Cambell Street, Rapid City, SD 57701, until 2:00 PM (MT) on Wednesday, August 29, 2012. Any bids received after 2:00 PM will be returned unopened. PLAYHOUSE ROAD REPAIR PROJECT 1 330 01 - 2012 Copies of the specifications are on file at the Pennington County Highway Department, 3601 Cambell Street, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701, and may also be obtained from the Pennington County Website at http://www.co.pennington.sd. us/highway/hwy.html. For questions and comments, please contact the Pennington County Highway Department at (605) 394-2166. By virtue of statutory authority, preference will be given to materials, products, and supplies found or produced within the State of South Dakota. The Board of Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive any irregularities therein and reserves the right to award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder as they so determine. Julie A. Pearson, Auditor Pennington County Published August 16, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $13.97.
Adams St.........................................................1,431,701 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL A&N Appointed Attorneys ................................224,672 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Auditor .............................................................298,830 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Bonds - Jail......................................................1,355,969 . . . . . . . . . .ACCUM BLDG Bonds - JSC ....................................................149,465 . . . . . . . . . . . .ACCUM BLDG Bonds - Master Plan........................................2,535,833 . . . . . . . . . .ACCUM BLDG Buildings & Grounds........................................3,314,895 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL B & G -Honeywell Lease .................................473,785 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Capital improvement Projects* ........................300,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .ACCUM BLDG CCADP ...........................................................2,357,803 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Commissioners................................................326,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Communications Center-CC* ..........................3,295,504 . . . . . .COMMUNICATIONS Communications Ctr - Gen Fund OTO............525,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Conservation Districts .....................................63,850 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Contingency & Financial Software Res ...........200,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Coroner ...........................................................131,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL County Fairgrounds Bond Payment*...............327,625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CO. FAIR County Fairgrounds.........................................178,295 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CO. FAIR County Fire* ....................................................297,559 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CO. FIRE Court Administration .......................................258,613 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Court Appointed Attorney ................................336,183 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL DENR 319 Grant .............................................255,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Domestic Abuse Fund*....................................45,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOM ABUSE Drainage..........................................................75,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Drug Seizure* ..................................................60,000 . . . . . . . . . . .DRUG SEIZURE Econ Devel/BH Vision/keep ellsworth .............35,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Elections..........................................................339,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Emergency Management*...............................308,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .EMMA EMMA - OTO General Fund Support ..............70,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Equalization.....................................................1,289,802 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL 4-H Extension..................................................83,939 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL GIS ..................................................................100,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Hazmat LEPC* ................................................16,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .HAZMAT LEPC Hazmat Response-General.............................20,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Health & Human services................................1,681,208 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Health Care Centers........................................190,848 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Health Care Trust*...........................................5,469,588 . . . . . . . . . .HEALTH CARE Health Care Trust OTO ...................................181,387 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL HIDTA Grant ....................................................167,651 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Hill City Law Contract ......................................212,838 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Home Detention ..............................................251,449 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Homeland Sec - Equipment* ..........................702,675 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .EMMA Human Resources...........................................96,280 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Insurance ........................................................480,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL ITS - General...................................................988,123 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Jail ...................................................................9,055,796 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Jail Adult Work Program..................................79,727 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Jail Medical......................................................444,350 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Juvenile Diversion ..........................................205,222 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Juvenile Services Center (JSC) ......................5,277,092 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL JSC Education.................................................276,625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL JSC Grants......................................................176,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Keystone Law Contract ...................................104,045 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Law Enforcement ...........................................6,668,388 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Law Enforce Equipment Grant ........................113,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .LIBRARY Library* ............................................................457,935 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Lien Collections ...............................................88,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Mental & Alcohol Inv - HHS .............................64,743 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Mental & Alcohol Inv - SAO .............................909,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Met Warn-Flood Warning ................................37,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .EMMA Modernization & Preservation ROD*...............0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Mountain Pine Beetle ......................................60,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . .ACCUM BLDG New Underwood Law .....................................92,051 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Ordinance........................................................71,631 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Pandemic Flu* ................................................52,598 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .EMMA Planning .........................................................386,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Predatory Animal Control ...............................3,339 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RD & BRIDGE Public Advocate...............................................196,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Public Defender...............................................1,513,308 . . . . . . . . . . . .UNORG RD Register of Deeds............................................444,208 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Road & Bridge*................................................13,504,371 . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Road & Bridge - Gen Fund OTO ....................2,206,755 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Road & Bridge - Unorg Rd OTO.....................2,513,233 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL School Liaison .................................................285,631 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Search & Rescue ............................................41,212 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TITLE 3 Senior Citizens ................................................17,446 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TITLE 3 States Attorney ................................................2,386,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TITLE 3 Station .............................................................151,428 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Title III Mtn Pine Beetle* .................................211,951 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24-7 Title III (old) Fire* .............................................52,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Treasurer .........................................................880,892 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Twenty-four 24/7 Program* .............................362,937 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL VAWA Grant ....................................................291,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL VOCA ..............................................................83,210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Wall Law Contract ...........................................224,068 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Water Protection..............................................119,611 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Water Rescue Response.................................15,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Weed & Pest ...................................................263,449 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL West Nile Defense...........................................0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Witness - Public Defender...............................34,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL Witness - States Attorney ................................45,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GENERAL TOTAL Expenditures .....................................81,971,639 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FUND SUMMARY: Accumulated Building ...................................................................................4,341,267 County Fairgrounds .........................................................................................505,920 County Fire ......................................................................................................297,559 Communications Center ...............................................................................3,295,504 Domestic Abuse.................................................................................................45,000 Drug Seizure......................................................................................................60,000 Emergency Management..............................................................................1,063,273 General .......................................................................................................49,775,101 HazMat-LEPC....................................................................................................16,000 Health Care Trust..........................................................................................5,469,588 Library..............................................................................................................457,935 Road & Bridge ............................................................................................13,504,371 Title 3 ...............................................................................................................283,951 24-7..................................................................................................................362,937 Unorganized Road........................................................................................2,513,233 **TOTAL**...................................................................................................81,991,639 Published August 16, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $134.61.
PENNINGTON COUNTY'S MEANS OF FINANCE
TOTALS ACCUM BLDG COMM CTR COUNTY FAIR COUNTY FIRE DOM ABUSE DRUG SEIZE EMERG MGMT GENERAL HAZMAT LEPC HEALTH CARE LIBRARY ROAD & BRIDGE TITLE 3 24-7 UNORG ROAD
CASH BALANCE APPLIED . . . .9,115,594 . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .12,329 . . . . . .20,350 . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .52,598 . . . . . .4,676,568 . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .33,870 . . . . . .3,942,927 . . .283,951 . . .0 . . . . . . . . .93,001 CURRENT PROP TAXES . . . . .36,095,338 . . .3,650,546 . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .505,187 . . . . .255,312 . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .29,645,537 . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .436,362 . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . .1,602,394 OTHER TAXES (310) . . . . . . . . .1,978,096 . . . .45,225 . . . . . .1,327,396 . . . .13,500 . . . . . .6,075 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .531,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43,500 LICENSE & PERMITS (320) . . .291,170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258,170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INTERGOVERNMENTAL (330) .10,777,956 . . .849,559 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200 . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60,000 . . . . . .940,675 . . . . .3,333,522 . . . . . .16,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,678,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .900,000 CHARGES GOODS & SVC (340) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,542,515 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,443,108 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30,700 . . . . . .13,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,610,659 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,920,201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161,910 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .362,937 . . . . . . . . . FINES (350) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MISCELLANEOUS (360) . . . . . .551,646 . . . . .13,000 . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .170,100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .368,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .546 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OTHER FINANCING (370) . . . .5,496,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .525,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70,000 . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181,387 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,719,988 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL MISC REVENUES . . . . .39,675,258 . . .907,784 . . . . .3,295,504 . . . .13,700 . . . . . .36,775 . . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .60,000 . . . . . .1,010,675 . . . .17,941,751 . . . . .16,000 . . . .5,469,588 . . . .10,600 . . . . . .9,561,444 . . .0 . . . . . . . .362,937 . . .943,500 TOTAL REVENUE SOURCES . .84,886,190 . . .4,558,330 . . . .3,295,504 . . . .531,216 . . . . .312,437 . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .60,000 . . . . . .1,063,273 . . . .52,263,856 . . . . .16,000 . . . .5,469,588 . . . .480,832 . . . . .13,504,371 . .283,951 . . .362,937 .2,638,895 LESS UNCOLLECTIBLE (5%) . .2,894,551 . . . .217,063 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25,296 . . . . . .14,878 . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,488,755 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,897 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125,662 MEANS OF FINANCE . . . . . . . .81,991,639 . . .4,341,267 . . . .3,295,504 . . . .505,920 . . . . .297,559 . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .60,000 . . . . . .1,063,273 . . . .49,775,101 . . . . .16,000 . . . .5,469,588 . . . .457,935 . . . . .13,504,371 . .283,951 . . .362,937 .2,513,233 TOTAL BUDGET . . . . . . . . . . . .81,991,639 . . .4,341,267 . . . .3,295,504 . . . .505,920 . . . . .297,559 . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .60,000 . . . . . .1,063,273 . . . .49,775,101 . . . . .16,000 . . . .5,469,588 . . . .457,935 . . . . .13,504,371 . .283,951 . . .362,937 .2,513,233 Difference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 GRAND TOTAL BUDGET: GRAND TOTAL MEANS OF FINANCE 81,991,639 81,991,639
SUMS ABOVE MOF SUMS diff CASH RESERVES USED:..................9,115,594 ................9,115,594 ................ 0 CURRENT TAXES LEVIED: ...............36,095,338 ..............36,095,338 .............. 0 TOTAL MISC REVENUES: .................39,675,258 ..............39,675,258 .............. 0 5% UNCOLLECTIBLE ......................2,894,551 ................2,894,551 ................ 0 MATH CHECK.....................................87,780,741 ..............87,780,741 .............. 0 Published August 16, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $113.77.
Legal Publication Deadline is 11:00 a.m. on FRIDAY
Pennington County Courant • August 16, 2012 •
Page 8
The Looking Glass of Time
80 years ago… The Commissioners of Pennington County, C. A. McDonald, Charles Nippell, A. C. Hunt, Ben Rush and Albert Kocher were in Wall, Thursday afternoon finding out the amount of land that was necessary for the county to purchase in order to put the road through south to the Pinnacles. Thirteen-hundredths of an acre will have to be obtained from both sides of the road as it joins Highway 16. This land on the east belongs to Mr. Muller and on the west to Nystrom and Packman. The commissioners also believe that some extra land might be needed where the road curves around “The Bowl” Saturday morning, Joe Wilson had the misfortune of running over a cow belonging to Osborn Kitterman. The animal was not badly injured and is expected to recover. An axle on the truck was broken from the impact. Douglas Tatum and Mr. McLaughlin have purchased some printing presses from the printer at Hermosa, which they are assembling in the corner building belonging to Sam Johnson. At present, they plan to do job work and perhaps later publish a paper. 70 years ago… BIRTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Emil Kjerstad Jr., a boy, Monday night, August 10. A large poster in the store at Elm Springs reads that the Wasta High School is offering besides the regular courses, sewing, cooking, manual training, journalism, speech, music, art and athletics as well as operating a dormitory. Billy Kennedy injured his foot in a hay rake and is getting around with the aid of crutches. The regular monthly meeting of the trustees of the Town of Wall was held in new Council Rooms at the Filter Plant, August 3, 1943, with all members present — Best, Hustead and Smoot. The meeting was called to order, and the minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. Request for abatement of taxes on Miller Hotel was rejected. Motions were made and seconded to pay the bills, pay C. M. Best ten percent commission on truck sold, pay Julian Stover $100.00 for engineering services on filtration plant, request Emil Muller for abatement of taxes tabled for further information and to adjourn the meeting. A carload of Wall young people tipped over on a rural road north of New Underwood, Sunday evening. Glen Gregson received a few cuts, otherwise the occupants were not injured. The car belongs to Spike Kennedy and broken windows were the extent of its damage. 60 years ago… An open house was held at the Midland telephone building yesterday afternoon according to M. C. Allen, manager of the Northwestern Bell Telephone company. In addition to showing visitors the dial telephone equipment which serves them and how their calls are handled, the telephone company had a tent with some interesting telephone displays. The telephone service expansion and improvement program completed at Midland last year included installation of dial telephones with cable and wire additions and rearrangements. Also special equipment was installed to provide more telephone lines between Midland and Philip. The total cost of the work was more than $22,000. Since 1940, the number of telephones served by the Midland office was nearly double, going from 94 to 185. Of these, 101 are town telephones and 84 are on rural lines. A check of the Badlands National Monument showed a 19.4 percent loss in tourist travel for July of this year compared to last year, while the state as a whole registered a ten percent gain. Last year, 191,142 tourists visited the Badlands in July while this year only 153,965 were counted. A report from the National Park Service showed a gain of six to twenty percent in visitors to Black Hills attractions during July. 50 years ago… Leonard Eisenbraun served as a one man fire department Tuesday afternoon. Noticing a tourist car smoking in its parking area on Main Street, Leonard came forth with a hand fire extinguisher, lifted the hood and put out the smoldering wiring under the floor boards. BIRTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hays, a girl, August 5 at the Philip hospital. Twelve hundred sheep and 400 cattle went through the Wall Sale Ring at their regular sale, Monday afternoon. Their next sale will be Monday, August 27. 40 years ago… William Colman, chairman of the Advisory Board of the New Underwood Good Samaritan Center reports that the Board of Directors of the Good Samaritan Society recently approved the construction of an addition to the nursing home in New Underwood. This addition would include expanded dining space, expanded bathroom space and 19 additional beds, bringing the capacity to 50 beds. The added beds will provide additional employment and services to the residents of the community. The present facility opened as a 31 bed unit two years ago. Originally it was built as the New Underwood Community Hospital. Later, the building was donated by the community to the Good Samaritan Society which did extensive remodeling to convert it to a nursing home. This new addition is required to meet the needs, as requests for beds are being received by the home. BIRTHS: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Burton Dartt, August 1, a daughter, at the Kadoka hospital; born to Mrs. Sharon Clark, Saturday, at Rapid City Bennett-Clarkson hospital a son, John. Pedro News: Last week on Wednesday, August 9, little Peggy Lynne Wilsey was born at Bennett Clarkson Hospital to Wes and Pearl Wilsey. She weighed nine pounds and seven ounces. 30 years ago… Don Sellars shot a one under par 71 and won the Wall Annual Golf Tournament held at the golf course on Sunday, August 1. Lynn Williams came in second with a three over par 75 and S. Stone was third with a 79. Through July, South Dakota tourism shows a three percent increase over the travel season last year. State Tourism officials say that July business reports confirm a travel pattern which was established in June. Camping continues to be strong, with a gain of 16.3 percent over 1981 through July. During the month of July, campgrounds in South Dakota averaged nearly 58 percent of their sites rented per day. In the first two months of the season, motels showed a drop of two percent in guest nights from 1981. Motels had a state-wide occupancy rate of 81 percent in July, 1982. Mary Ann Wilson of Elm Springs, is proud to announce the engagement of her daughter, Joan Marie, to Kevin Howland of Rapid City. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Howland. Joan graduated from Wall High School in 1979 and Black Hills State College in 1981. She is currently employed at Vigoren & Stokes Accounting in Spearfish. Kevin graduated from Rapid City Stevens High School in 1978 and is currently attending South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. 20 years ago… Struggling with the dehabilitating affects of a major heart attack,
Duane Bessette, Rapid City, S.D., formerly of Wall and Kadoka, battled for survival for several years. Finally on July 16, it was apparent to medical personnel at Rapid City Regional Hospital that he could not continue with his present quality of life. Arrangements were made, and he was flown to Salt Lake City Utah VA Medical Center. At 10:00 p.m. on Tuesday night, August 4, he was given the news that a heart was available for him. Duane was taken to the Operating Room at Salt Lake City VA Medical Center at 5:20 a.m., Wednesday, August 5. He was prepared for surgery, anesthetized, and his chest was opened up, ribs pulled and his failing heart was removed. At 7:20 a.m. a helicopter arrived and landed at the medical center from New Mexico, carrying the new heart, his lifeline. In a total time of three and one have hours from the time Bessett had entered the operating room or at 9:00 a.m. the new heart had been placed in his chest cavity, connected, and the incision closed. Approximately 80 golfers took to the greens Sunday, August 9, for the Farm Bureau Open at the Lake Waggoner Golf Course north of Philip. The four person scramble tournament was sponsored by Farm Bureau agents Joe Gittings, Philip and Lyle Carmichael, Wall. First place went to the team of Butch Beach, Mary Jane Doyle, Veryl Schroeder and Don Ravellette. Finishing second were: Rick Muser, Don Haynes, Tami Ravellette and Doug Jensen. In a tie for third place was a team composed of Don Burns, Trish Burns, Marion Matt and Trevor Fitch and the team of Earl Roberts, Wanda Johnson, Jim Doyle and Evan Grosc. 10 years ago… No extras and postponing anticipated improvements were the
theme as the Wall City Council tightened their budget due to a decrease in sales tax revenues. The Council held the first reading of the 2003 budget during their August 8 meeting. The finance committee had prepared a budget that was presented to the full council at the August meeting. One area the
council cut back on was Wall Health Services. The Council in the past has budgeted $13,000 for the health services. They have not used the money in the past three years. Other groups that requested money and were denied include Wall Rodeo Booster and Wall Neighborhood Housing Services.
/// ( !$!($!. +,' # '% % !$ !& ' ( !$!($!. +,' # '%
((
!$!(
) ( &'( "' " &&!' " & (
&
$#&(
) # # $$ '
)'( "
()
#& $ #
'
#
) )'(
!# !&# $" ' #) #
#
!" !"
"
#$ #$
$
! "
$
&
! !%$ ! % !($ (( $
%% &) #$ & $
+
'
&
#
* '
#+ #
$%#$ #+ !" # ' )" #" )
" (
&#"" &#
) &(
+ (
'#" #!' "
# & $ !( !( #"
$%#$ &
&
& #
$%#$
#$
*
$
-
)'
&!#'
$%#$ $" !"
* #$ #$ #$
( + (
#
&'( "' "
# )$'
!' " (
$
"
& !
& $
&
+ * )
#+ ' &( $
!( !( !( !( ( & !( !( & " #" & + '#" * )") # $ !( !($ !(
$%#$ $%#$ ' ')
& ,$ & ! "(
( ! &
&&((
'(
& &
( #"
$
(
$ $ # !" !" )"
$
$%#$ $%#$ $%#$ $%#$
&
&
$ #
& "
&#"
&&#"
"( & # !( %%
&
+ #
#+ '
'
+
#$ &+## # #$ -
&
"
#"
+
!(
(( #
&#,- & %) "( ! &
& '#" # -
*
# $
$ #
& & & !( !(
"
&'
* '(#
#
#(
'$& " ' ( $%#$ ( $%#$
( (
# !#&
# ' " &&* ) " & (( "
+
&
& '(
"
$
$
$%#$ $%#$ $%#$ $%#$ $%#$ $%#$
#$ #$ #$ #$ #$ #$
#$ !" & #+ # $%#$ #$ !" ! " ( $%#$
& #
# "
&
& " ! !'
# " + )"
!($ &+## # &
#
(&)'(
& (#"
#+ ' & # !( !( !(
(#! & '
# " & & $ & & !( ) !( "( # # & & !( # " &+## #" "
&! '
#
# "'(#" &#( &#'
#&& '(
+ &(
# -
"
( (
%) "" $%#$
#(( #
)" #"
&' +
"( & !($ $ !( &+## ( ( ( !( !( !( &
$
(&
! &#'
&( "
'
#+
&# (
# )
# & '
$ )"
"
' (
#((
&
%) ""
( (
!" (# $
! "
#$ $
$
#
( *&
"" '
* !
"
$%#$ $"
* #$
&&-
!!
#(
'$& "
!" $
& $
& ''
#,
"
&( " & &! " "
'
# & "(
$" $" $" $"
'
" * * * * * *
&
(
$%#$
+" !
"
+
)"
&+## & & (#"
&
.
#
(#" )"!$ #$
#
+" & &#" ' !
'$& "
#
'
' " & )" "
"
'#"
#(
'$& "
'$& " (
'
+(
#
&&&&-"" " # "'(#"
$" $" !"
$%#$ &#'
! "" ' (
!
!( !! &'(&#! # ""
* !"
#
(!!
#$ #$ #$ #$ #$ &(
&
"
#
'()& !
' !( '* ( !( !( & &
"( & #& #$
!
"'
'! (
'
$
!
!" &
" -
$
((#"
)$( &-
"( & #&
$
$%#$ '$& " & #
' # #
"
)
)' &
!
" #
!" !" + " !"
$ &#)(
'
!
!
'* (
(
&&&(
!! &'(&#! "
"
+
)"
$%#$ #
#$ (#
#' $
! #((
"( & #&
!(
# (&
*'
'$& "
$
' #
'
"
&'
&
"
$
(
(
(
&#
&
&
$
(!( # !(
#!$'#"
&(
$
$%#$
#
&
"'
$
" !
' () ' (! )
%%
# & % # %%
$
$
* $"# $ # # $ #% $ #% $ #% $ $
() ' - ) $" * # # $ # & # %% $ () ' - ' $( # & # %% $ () ' - ' $( $" # %% # & # %% $ () ' - ' $( $" $%! !( # $ # & # %% $ () ' - ' $( $" # %% $ # & # %% $ () ' - # ( $" # $ # & # %% $ () ' - # ( $" # $ $ + " ' - # ( ( &" !( & () ' - # ( $" # $ $ + " ' - # ( ( &" !( & () ' - # ( $" # $ $ + " ' - # ( ( &" !( & () ' - # ( $" # $ $
+ " ' - # ( ( &" !( & #% $ ' ()& - "#* $" $%! !( # # $ ( &" !( & #% $ () ' - "#* $" # $ $ # & # %% $ + " ' - "#* ( &" !( & #% $ () ' - "#* $" # $ $ # & # %% $ () ' - "#* $" $%! !( # #$ # & # %% $ () ' - "#* $" # $ $ # & # %% $ () ' $" # $ "# ! %! $ # & # %% $ ' $ !# % $ $ &$% ( % $% ( $ ' "# ! %! $ !%$ !&# ( * " $% &# ( * !" &$ () ' $" $%! !( # # $ # & # %% $ ( # &$ & & $ () ' $" # $ $ # & # %% $ % ! $# & $ () ' !$
!#$
$
$
() ' ) !" ! $ % !#$ ! !( % %% $ ' ()& - ' $( ! & #' # )%# ' + !#$ $ ! %! ((( " " ' $%! ! %! ' ( % ! !# " %
.!
!$!( !. +,' # - ,!'& !& '&"-& ,!'& /!, -( *!'* !. +,' # - ,!'& /!$$ ' *!& '+ $ + & !,!'& $ + *.! ,' '-* '&+! &'*+ /!, )- +,!'&+ '-, , .! ' ($ + $$ **0 '+ , ,
" $&""!#% !&# '! !' # %% "#! & #$ %# ! %! ) "
$ % %! # "# $ % # % $$& $ #
#+ &'/ )- $#!# ,' " & $ ,"#* ( *,0 . *#!# ,,$ '& '*%'& $ * , ,,$
Email your social news, obituaries, wedding & engagement announcements to: annc@gwtc.net
*
+' ' * #" ( "( &" ( ; ?; BBB <5686<86A3>?;17 1;9 )<1;96:4 >/83> 1;:>64:93:?> 1/: 03 A63B32 ;: ?53 :?3=:3? /? BBB <5686<86A3>?;17 1;9 ;= ;: ?53 (" 8617 ;: ' &"' "#&( "(& (# #"'
#B:3= 63829/:
"
((
#&
*
& $& ' "( ( *
##
( -#)&
# " &'#" $563/04 9 ,( & " (,45, 9 &'
((
63829/: 63829/:
*
$
)'
$ * '(# ) ( #"
( #& &#' ( -! & + 0-1,2- 9
#" 63829/: @1?6;:33= #.- !81 9 .11 -"" + ' & @1?6;:33= #.7, 9
" $ &#)( @1?6;:33= 01.47011. 9 '( * " '( + &( -/=2 ;=39/:
BBB <5686<86A3>?;17 1;9

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
Courant_8-16-12.pdf2.53 MB