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Pennington Co. Courant, September 5, 2013

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Number 36
Volume 108
September 5, 2013
If you have taken a drive south on Highway 240 then you undoubtedly noticed the well
groomed trees of Scott and Susan Kroells. They have used old railroad ties to frame in the
front trees and continued in the back with widely spaced rows of trees for a shelterbelt. With
rows of Cedar, Russian Olive, Lilac, Honey Locust and Ponderosa Pine the Kroells have taken
measures to block wind and capture moisture on their land. Scott and Susan Kroells are the
winners this year of the Shelterbelt Stewardship award. They have met the criteria of: trees
are at least 5 years old, 80 percent tree survival rate, relatively free of weeds, and kept free
of livestock. This is no easy task when faced with dry conditions and drifts of snow over the
lifespan of trees. Many do not make it when there is inadequate care. The East Pennington
Conservation District will recognize their hard work with an award presented in November
at the EPCD Awards Banquet.
Shelterbelt Stewardship Award
by Laurie
Hindman
Courage comes in
many forms. On May,
2013, Stacie
Eichinger, who is
orginally from Tuc-
son, Ariz., left on a
3,800 mile journey
from Ocean Shores,
Wa. to Savannah, Ga.
Not much of a trek
if you’re traveling by
plane or even a car
but Eichinger, who is
already a world trav-
eler, decided she
would do something
different on this jour-
ney. She would walk
the 3,800 miles and
do it alone. Sounds
crazy to most of us
but not to Eichner.
She walked into
Wall on Tuesday, Au-
gust 27, pushing her
canopy wheeled cart
that carries her sup-
plies in heat close to
100 degrees, with a
smile on her face.
Eichinger, who is a
volunteer member
with “Beads of
Courage,” is hoping
to rasie money for the
orgainization which
provides 'arts-in-
medicine' supportive
care for seriously ill kids.
Eichinger said for every $10 she raises she will receive a
bead and is hoping to collect 3,800 beads. That means for
Walking 4 Courage strolls into Wall
every mile she has
walked she will have
raised $38,000 for
the orginzation.
When she had
reached Wall she
had $13,000 in dona-
tions.
Beads of Courage
are given to children
who have been
through different
medical procedures.
Instead of receiving
a badge of courage,
they receive a bead.
Eichinger delivers
her beads in the
shape of a running
shoe to hospitals
who belong to the or-
ganization.
Presently, there
are 150 hospitals
who participate in
Beads of Courage,
Eichinger noted. The
closest hospital she
will visiting next is
in Minneapolis.
From there, she will
walk over to
Chicago, Ill., and
then down to Savan-
nah. Her journey
should end next Feb-
ruary, if the weather
allows her to con-
tinue her walk.
You can follow her journey at www.beadsofcourage.org as
she walks, with courage, across America for “Beads of
Courage”.
Laurie Hindman photo
out-of-towners 99 percent of the time
lay up there and do their studies and
don’t help us.
Anderson replied we may have to re-
quire them to do more then. The regu-
lations will have to be changed. She
went on to say based on the hours and
the budget the revenue won’t support
the expenses. The drivers alone would
increase the budget by $30,000 a year.
President Wally Hoffman related
looking at the numbers we are already
short $20,000 in the salary budget now.
We are strained financially and where
are we going to come up with another
$30,000.
Board Member Jem Kjerstad said,
no one had the foresight of what has
happened. The only solution is to opt
out and if the community turns us
down were insolvent.
by Laurie
Hindman
Pay increases for
the local EMTs and
ambulance drivers
was open for dis-
cussion at the Wall
Community Center
meeting room on
Thursday, August
29.
Dawn Hilgen-
kamp said, don’t
mess with the out-
of-town people’s
pay. We will be
done in a month.
Butch Kitterman asked for $4 with
no money for food or run pay.
Board Member Elden Helms stated,
“People who started this thought about
the community and not filling their
pockets.”
Secretary/Treasure of the Board Car-
olynn Anderson told the audience we
have three different categories with
the ambulance service: the out-of-town
people who receive $8 an hour, the
local EMTs and the ambulance drivers.
She reasoned we have to look
at the drivers differently. They don’t go
through all the training the local EMTs
do and therefore should only receive $1
an hour plus an increase in their run
pay. The local EMTs pay should be in-
crease to $4 an hour.
Kitterman disagreed, he said I have
been driving for 70 some years and the
By Gov. Dennis Daugaard
August has come to a close, and
though temperatures are still high, fall
is almost here and students have al-
ready settled back into their class-
rooms.
This time of year always brings me
back to when I was in school. I always
enjoyed school. In fact, through sev-
enth grade, I was at the top of my
class. Of course, that wasn’t too diffi-
cult – I was the only person in my
class!
Much has changed since I attended
that one-room country school. Back
then, a gallon of gas was 40 cents, a
new house cost around $25,000 and
fewer people went to college – about 17
percent of people in the U.S. had at
least a bachelor’s degree. Now, that
number is around 28 percent.
Along with the escalating number of
people seeking higher education, the
increasingly competitive global econ-
omy requires today’s workforce to have
greater skill sets and more education.
Preparing our students for college and careers
In order to succeed, our students
need to leave high school ready for a
postsecondary experience – at a uni-
versity, a technical institute or a
shorter certificate program – and, ulti-
mately, the workforce.
How well are we preparing our youth
in South Dakota? Recent news indi-
cates we are doing pretty well.
According to the state Department of
Education, 74 percent of our students
are proficient in math and reading.
Also, South Dakota’s ACT scores
went up last year, and we continue to
outperform the national average –
even though we have one of the highest
ACT participation rates in the nation.
We also surpass the national averages
in each subject: English, reading, math
and science.
Still, there are areas where we can
improve. Although more of our stu-
dents take the ACT and attend college,
we have a higher than average college
dropout rate.
As one factor which limits success,
some students enter college needing re-
medial help. To overcome this problem
before college, the South Dakota De-
partment of Education and Board of
Regents are working to increase college
readiness by offering free remedial
coursework.
Students don’t have to retake a
whole course, but instead can focus on
the specific components of courses
where they need some extra help.
These courses are available to high
school seniors via the South Dakota
Virtual School.
I am proud of the quality of educa-
tion we offer here in South Dakota.
Our students do well because we
have committed teachers and parents
who take an active role in their chil-
dren’s education.
As our world continues to change, we
will continue to work toward even bet-
ter solutions to prepare our children
for the future.
Here’s to a great school year!
Kevin Wil-
son noted this is not
an isolated issue,
it’s a state issue.
How do you budget
all that? You’re
going to have to
think outside the
box.
H o f f m a n
asked the ambu-
lance service to be
more patient. He
would like to keep
the local EMTs and
drivers on equal
footage. Helms agreed we need to keep
everyone happy.
Anderson made a motion to pay the
local EMTs and drivers $1 an hour and
to increase their run pay to $50 when
they are on call. The motion passed
with Kjerstad voting nay.
Anderson made another motion to
give local EMTs and drivers a stippen
of $5 for food. The motion passed.
Anderson gave an update on the spe-
cial assessment. She is still waiting for
an opinion from the attorney. If the
board doesn’t hear from him in the
near future they will have to stay with
the six mills.
The next meeting will be held on
Thursday, September 19 at 7:00 p.m. in
the Wall Community Center meeting
room unless there is a need for a spe-
cial meeting.
Hoffman adjourned the meeting.
Raises approved for EMTs and drivers
Three lost hikers safely escorted
out of Badlands National Park
Park rangers received a 911 call at approximately 6 p.m. on Sunday night, reporting
three lost hikers in the Sage Creek Wilderness Area south of Pinnacles Overlook.
Members of the park's Search and Rescue (SAR) Team deployed to the Pinnacles
Overlook to assess the situation and respond. Rangers could see the lost hikers and
estimated that they were 1 to 1½ miles south-southwest of the overlook. Rangers con-
tacted the hikers by text message and learned that they had adequate food, water,
and clothing for the night. For the safety of the hikers and the responding staff,
rangers decided to wait until daylight to hike into the wilderness. Attempting to tra-
verse the rough terrain in the dark posed unnecessary risk. Rangers remained on
scene at the overlook and kept in contact with the lost party by text message through
the night. Early Monday morning, rangers hiked through the rugged badlands terrain
to the lost hikers. It took the group about one and a half hours to hike back to the
road. Everyone returned safely and there were no injuries. The lost hikers, two men
and a woman all in their mid-twenties, were from Illinois and Iowa.
Members of the park's Search and Rescue Team assist three lost hikers as they climb
through the rugged badlands.
Local News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
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publisher.
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Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 2
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Five germ-fighting tips to keep
kids healthy this school year
School is a great place to learn,
play and make friends. Unfortu-
nately it’s also a great place for
germs to get very well ac-
quainted….with your family!
With 20 to 30 kids in a class-
room and even more on the play-
ground, it’s hard to avoid the
germs that cause such illnesses as
colds, flus and more.
Three-time Gold Medalist, wife
and busy mom of two, Christie
Rampone knows the importance
of good health.
As captain of the U.S. Women's
Soccer Team, she travels over two
hundred days a year, often with
her young children in tow.
So stress, fatigue and staying
healthy are daily battles. Since
days off are not an option for
Rampone, she is offering five
"stay healthy" tips that parents
can follow all school year long:
•Eat healthy: It's no secret, a
balanced diet is key for a healthy
immune system.
By focusing on a variety of
fruits and vegetables and avoid-
ing processed foods and sugary
snacks, your family will get the
nutrition it needs to fight off
germs during the school year.
“Some of my favorite healthy
snacks are carrots, celery and ap-
ples. They are easy to pack and
extremely nutritious,” says Ram-
pone. "The trick is to create vari-
ety, because kids tend to grow
tired of the same things quickly."
•Get plenty of exercise: Fre-
quent, moderate exercise is im-
portant for good health and
strong immunity.
On a daily basis, encourage
kids to play sports, run, bike ride
or dance, all to keep their bodies
fit, hearts pumping strong and
minds happy. Better yet, join in
on the fun yourself!
•Sleep at least seven hours a
night: Sleep is crucial to good
health, both mentally and physi-
cally.
A recent study showed that
when you get less than seven
hours sleep at night, you're three
times more likely to come down
with a cold or flu.
•Take supplements as needed:
Government recommendations
call for five to eight servings of
fruits and vegetables a day. But
how many of us really get them?
To help fill the gaps, look for
nutritional supplements sup-
ported by published clinical re-
search, like those containing Epi-
Cor, an immune-strengthening
ingredient found in many dietary
supplement brands sold in stores
and online.
Rampone, who has battled
Lyme disease, which wreaks
havoc on the immune system, has
been using such supplements for
herself and her entire family.
•Don’t forget about you: As a
parent, your first priority is usu-
ally the kids. But you need to
make sure that you also take care
of yourself too, especially during
the chaotic school and work week.
Make sure that you drink
enough water and get a few min-
utes each day to relax and
recharge your immune battery.
More tips to keep kids healthy
this school year can be found at
www.epicorimmune.com.
While you can’t avoid germs,
you can take steps to strengthen
your family’s immunity and over-
all health.
Email us with
your news
item or photo
to courant @
gwtc.net
The South Dakota Telecommu-
nications Association (SDTA) is
now accepting applications for the
Brian Meyer Memorial Scholar-
ship. One scholarship in the
amount of $2,000 will be awarded
for the 2014 spring semester.
The scholarship is available to
applicants who have completed at
least two semesters of course
work at an accredited post-sec-
ondary school in South Dakota
and reside in an SDTA member
company service area.
The scholarship can be used at
any post-secondary educational
institution in South Dakota in-
cluding public and private univer-
sities as well as technical schools.
Applicants must complete an
application, write a short outline
of their career plans following
completion of their post-sec-
ondary education, and submit a
brief essay on the future of small
town South Dakota and what can
be done to enhance the quality of
life in rural areas through the use
Brian Meyer Scholarship available
for 2014 spring semester
of technology.
Also needed are a copy of the
applicant’s most recent transcript
and at least two letters of recom-
mendation. The deadline to sub-
mit an application for the Brian
Meyer Memorial Scholarship is
October 31.
For more information on the
Brian Meyer Memorial Scholar-
ship, contact any post-secondary
institution financial aid office, the
South Dakota Telecommunica-
tions Association at 605-224-7629
or gregdean@sdtaonline.com. The
application is also available on-
line at www.sdtaonline.com/re-
sources/scholarships.
SDTA membership is composed
of the state’s member-owned coop-
eratives, privately-owned, munic-
ipal and tribal telecommunica-
tions companies which collec-
tively serve almost 80 percent of
the state.
Members of the South Dakota
Telecommunications Association
are: Alliance Communications
(Garretson); Beresford Municipal
Telephone; Cheyenne River Sioux
Tribe Telephone Authority (Eagle
Butte); Faith Municipal Tele-
phone; Fort Randall Telephone
(Wagner); Golden West Telecom-
munications Companies (Wall);
Interstate Telecommunications
(Clear Lake); James Valley
Telecommunications (Groton);
Kennebec Telephone Company;
Long Lines (Jefferson); Midstate
Communications (Kimball); RC
Communications and Roberts
County Telephone Coop (New Eff-
ington); Santel Communications
(Woonsocket); Swiftel Communi-
cations (Brookings Municipal);
TrioTel Communications (Salem);
Valley Telecommunications (Her-
reid); Venture Communications
(Highmore); West River Coopera-
tive Telephone (Bison); West
River Telecom Cooperative
(Hazen, ND), Western Telephone
(Faulkton).
Attorney General Marty Jack-
ley is warning consumers of a
computer scam that has resur-
faced in South Dakota.
The Attorney General’s Con-
sumer Protection Division has re-
ceived several complaints from
consumers indicating that they
had received a telephone call from
someone posing as a well-known
computer company.
These fake security experts
claim that the computers are at
risk for security threats and offer
to help solve the problem. These
so-called experts then ask you to
perform a variety of tasks to help
prevent bogus threats and allow
them to have remote access to the
computer. They work to download
Computer scam resurfaces and
targets S.D. comsumers
malware or ask for personal iden-
tifying information.
“Acting as a well-known com-
pany, these scam artists have cre-
ated the perfect scheme to gather
information off of your computer,
including your personal informa-
tion like bank account numbers,
passwords or login identification,”
said Jackley. “We recommend
that you do not provide personal
identifying information to any un-
solicited source.”
If you receive a call from some-
one claiming to want to help fix
your computer, follow this advice:
•Be cautious of unsolicited calls
questioning the security on your
home computer, even if the caller
claims to be from a well-known
computer company.
•Do not provide personal iden-
tifying importation to any unso-
licited caller.
•Do not go to a website, type
anything into a computer, install
software or follow any other in-
struction from any unsolicited
caller.
•Make sure you have the latest
security updates installed on your
computer and always use a
strong, unique password and
change it regularly.
If you feel you have been a vic-
tim of this scam, contact the At-
torney General’s Consumer Pro-
tection Division at 1-800-300-
1986 or consumerhelp@state.sd.u
s.
Sitework Specialist are laying the new sewer pipe along side Norman Eisenbraun’s house on Tuesday,
August 27. The pipe is laid in the bottom of a 16 foot trench and is slated to be completed on or before
the October completion date.
Laurie Hindman photo
Congratulations to all the folks
who participated in the Wall
Community Library Summer
Reading Program!
To date, we have 24 people of all
ages who completed the Summer
Reading Challenge. They have
been entered into the drawing of
their choice to win a Plasmacar,
Kindle, or one-hour massage.
We couldn’t have offered these
neat prizes without donations
from our sponsors; Megan Hoff-
man of Hired Hands Massage and
Bodywork and Crescent Masonic
Lodge!
We also had book donations
from Badlands National History
Association which we gratefully
acknowledge. Good luck to all our
entrants in the drawings!
We have been fortunate to wel-
come rangers from Minuteman
Wall sewer project is progressing
Wall Community Library – Summer Readers are awesome!
Missile National Historical Site
as our last guest presenters at our
summertime Story Time series.
They have been a great addi-
tion to our Story Time presenta-
tions! It is so wonderful to have
such devoted community support
for our Library. It has been a lot
of fun to have representatives
from the agencies with public
lands in the Wall area: USFS Na-
tional Grasslands, SD Game Fish
and Parks, Badlands National
Park, and Minuteman Missile
National Historical Site. Crystal
Deal with Youth and Family Serv-
ices was also a huge help with our
reading program this summer. It
has been great working with
everyone!
So now that summer is over,
what’s next? You can still visit the
Library Wednesdays from 12 -.7
p.m., Thursdays from 9 a.m. -
12:30 p.m. and 1:30 - 5 p.m., and
Fridays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., and
check out books or use our public
computers and Wi-Fi.
Our downloadable e-books and
audiobooks are available 24 hours
a day seven days a week for all
your favorite e-readers and mo-
bile devices.
Story Time will continue every
Friday at 9 a.m. And of course,
now that things are beginning to
slow down a bit, you can partici-
pate in our monthly Book Discus-
sion Group, the last Wednesday of
the month at 6 p.m.
For the September 25th meet-
ing we will be discussing Ladies
Night by Mary Kay Andrews.
Please join us if you can!
S.D. Mountain Lion season proposed
The 2014 South Dakota moun-
tain lion hunting season will have
a lower harvest limit for the
Black Hills under a proposal by
the Game, Fish and Parks Com-
mission.
Under the proposal, all of the
state outside the Black Hills Fire
Protection District would again
be open for mountain lion hunting
for the entire year. The season
dates within the Black Hills Fire
Protection District would also re-
main unchanged from last year,
running December 26, 2013
through March 31, 2014.
The 2014 harvest limit for the
Black Hills as proposed by the
Commission would be decreased
from 2013. Last year the limit
was 100 total mountain lions or
70 females.
The 2014 proposal is for a har-
vest limit of 75 total mountain
lions or 50 females. If either har-
vest limit is reached before March
31, the season would immediately
close within the Black Hills.
Custer State Park, part of the
Black Hills season structure, also
has a proposed change increasing
the number of hunting intervals
when hunting with dogs is al-
lowed from three to four, and de-
creasing the number of hunting
intervals when hunting with dogs
is not allowed from five to four.
Four access permits will be issued
for each of the four intervals
when hunting with dogs is al-
lowed and 30 access permits will
be issued for each of the four in-
tervals when no dog hunting is al-
lowed.
The mountain lion hunting sea-
son proposals will be finalized at
the October 3 - 4 GFP Commis-
sion meeting at the Holiday Inn
Express in Spearfish. To view the
full proposals on those seasons,
visit www.gfp.sd.gov/agency/com-
mission/default.aspx and look
under the "rule proposals" head-
ing.
To comment on any of the pro-
posals, send a letter to South
Dakota Game, Fish and Parks
Commission, 523 E. Capitol Ave.,
Pierre, SD 57501; or email wild-
info@state.sd.us. Comments on
proposal will be taken until 5 p.m.
CDT on October 2. To be included
in the public record, please in-
clude your full name and city of
residence.
To comment in person on these
proposed rule changes, the GFP
Commission will host a public
hearing beginning at 2 p.m. MDT
as part of their meeting on Thurs-
day, October. 3.
Area News Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013•3
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
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Home: (605) 837-2945
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859-2000 • Philip
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
Sept.
6-7-
8-9
Planes
(PG)
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Participation in high school
sports increased for the 24th con-
secutive year in 2012-13 and
passed the 7.7 million mark for
the first time, according to the an-
nual High School Athletics Partic-
ipation Survey conducted by the
National Federation of State
High School Associations (NFHS).
Based on figures from the 51
NFHS-member state high school
associations, which includes the
District of Columbia, sports par-
ticipation for the 2012-13 school
year reached an all-time high of
7,713,577 participants – an in-
crease of 21,057 from the previous
year.
An additional 15,190 girls par-
ticipated in high school sports last
year, moving the girls all-time
record to 3,222,723 and marking
the 24th consecutive year for an
increase in the number of female
participants.
After its first decrease in 20
years last year, boys participation
started on the upswing again
with an additional 5,867 partici-
pants. The boys total of 4,490,854
is second all-time to the 4,494,406
in 2010-11.
“While we recognize that many
schools are experiencing chal-
lenges with funding high school
sports programs, we are encour-
aged that schools are responding
to the challenges and that more
and more students are involved in
high school sports,” said Bob
Gardner, NFHS executive direc-
tor. “Playing sports within the
school setting continues to be the
desire of more than 55 percent of
students enrolled in our nation’s
high schools.”
Eight of the top 10 girls sports
registered increases in participa-
tion in 2012-13, led by competi-
tive spirit squads (8,201), outdoor
track and field (4,172), and swim-
ming and diving (3,536).
Lacrosse, cross country, volley-
ball, soccer and tennis also had
additional female participants,
while basketball and fast-pitch
softball had minor declines.
Five of the top 10 boys sports
High School sports participation
increases for 24th consecutive year
showed increases in participation,
led by outdoor track and field
(5,044), swimming and diving
(4,354), and basketball (3,387).
Cross country and baseball also
registered gains among top 10
sports.
Eleven-player football remains
the top sport for boys with
1,086,627 participants in 2012-
13, although the number of play-
ers has decreased slightly each of
the past four years, including a
drop of 9,366 from 2011-12 to
2012-13.
In terms of combined participa-
tion, track and field, and swim-
ming and diving registered the
best overall gains. Track and field
had an increase of more than
9,100 participants when combin-
ing girls and boys, while swim-
ming and diving was up almost
8,000 participants.
Girls sports outside the top 10
that recorded increases in partic-
ipants and could be emerging
sports for females are bowling
(25,450 participants in 2012-13),
ice hockey (9,447), wrestling
(8,727) and flag football (7,019).
A sizeable increase in “adapted
sports” participation also con-
tributed to the rise in 2012-13 fig-
ures. With seven states offering
these programs for students with
disabilities in 14 sports, the num-
ber of participants rose almost
3,000 to 8,747 (girls and boys
combined).
The top 10 states by partici-
pants remained in the same order
as last year, with Texas and Cali-
fornia topping the list with
798,333 and 777,545, respectively.
The remainder of the top 10
was New York (389,475), Illinois
(339,944), Ohio (327,919), Penn-
sylvania (315,492), Michigan
(304,438), New Jersey (270,423),
After four successful years
training new farmers on the east-
ern side of the state, Dakota
Rural Action’s Farm Beginnings®
course is moving west and will be
offered in Rapid City this year.
Farm Beginnings is a farmer
and rancher-led training and sup-
port program that provides par-
ticipants the opportunity to learn
first-hand about low-cost, sus-
tainable methods of farming and
ranching and the tools to success-
fully launch a profitable enter-
prise.
“We are very excited to be mov-
ing the Farm Beginnings course
to Rapid City so other aspiring
farmers and ranchers may be
given a chance to live out their
dreams of living off the land,” said
course graduate and farmer
Aaron Johnson, who also serves
on the program’s steering com-
mittee. Johnson is now a partner
at Johnson Farms, an organic
grain operation near Madison,
S.D.
Farm Beginnings classes are
held November to March and
focus on topics such as whole
farm planning, financial and
business planning, marketing,
and connecting with resources
and mentors.
All classes are led by estab-
lished farmers and ranchers and
agricultural professionals. There
are opportunities for students to
further their skills by participat-
ing in mentorships with local
farmers and four - six field days
are offered through Dakota Rural
Farm Beginnings class helps kickstart new operations
training program moves to Rapid City
Action’s Farmer Network in the
summer. Over 80 percent of
course graduates participate in
these on-farm activities after fin-
ishing the course.
A limited number of scholar-
ships are available to help with
course tuition. Special funding for
veterans may be available and
veterans are encouraged to in-
quire.
“Farm Beginnings was the
launching pad we needed to get
started,” said Anne Hauglid,
farmer and course graduate. “Our
success as JHA Farms stemmed
from our experience with the
class.
We went from zero farm income
to over $21,000 gross sales last
year for our broiler and egg busi-
ness. We’re looking to increase
that this year. If it hadn’t been for
Farm Beginnings we wouldn’t be
raising chickens successfully
today.”
Farm Beginnings participants
can be of any age, do not need to
currently own land, and come
from wide range of experiences
and farming and ranching inter-
ests.
Nearly 40 families have en-
rolled in the course over the last
four years and 83 percent of grad-
uates are currently engaged in
farming activities (only 30 per-
cent reported involvement in
farming activities before taking
the class).
Danny Dyck of Worthing, S.D.
completed the course and fol-
lowed up with an internship
where he gained the production
skills necessary for him and his
wife to launch their own CSA,
Deep Root Gardens, which is now
in its second season of production.
Said Dyck, “I've found Farm Be-
ginnings and the Farmer Net-
work to be indispensable tools for
connecting to other local farmers,
information, and hands-on skill-
building workshops. I am always
looking to see what kind of valu-
able info the Network will provide
me with next.”
Prospective participants should
contact Dakota Rural Action at
605-697-5204 or email Program
Coordinator Heidi Kolbeck-
Urlacher at heidiku@dakotarural.
org. Class size is limited and early
application is encouraged. Appli-
cation deadline for the 2013
Rapid City class is October 18th.
Course information and online
application can be found at www
.dakotarural.org/farmbeginnings.
Farm Beginnings® is an estab-
lished curriculum developed over
a decade ago by the Minnesota-
based Land Stewardship Project
that is now replicated in several
different states, including Ill.,
Neb., N.D., and N.Y.
Dakota Rural Action has
adapted the curriculum to meet
the needs of South Dakota farm-
ers and ranchers. The project is
supported by the Beginning
Farmer and Rancher Develop-
ment Program of the National In-
stitute of Food and Agriculture,
USDA, Grant #2010-03066.
Gov. Dennis Daugaard made a successful jump from 10,000 feet just before 8 p.m. CDT on Wednes-
day, August 28. Gov. Daugaard agreed to skydive with DeLon Mork, operator of the Madison Dairy
Queen, if the restaurant sold 32,000 Blizzards on Miracle Treat Day to raise money for Children’s
Miracle Network Hospitals. Mork and the restaurant surpassed their goal by selling 38,412 Blizzards.
The Governor and Mork had originally planned to skydive on Thursday, August. 15, but could not
make the jump because of weather conditions.
Gov. Dennis Daugaard soars to new heights
Florida (243,397) and Minnesota
(230,421).
Although only one of the top 10
states registered an increase in
participation (New Jersey), over-
all, 30 states reported higher fig-
ures from the previous year.
The participation survey has
been compiled since 1971 by the
NFHS through numbers it re-
ceives from its member associa-
tions. The complete 2012-13 High
School Athletics Participation
Survey is attached in PDF format
and is available on the NFHS
Web site at www.nfhs.org.
annc@gwtc.net
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
This morning it was necessary
to check last week’s “doings” just
to be sure only ONE week had
flashed by.
Many of you seem to be in the
same boat and another month has
seemed to disappear.
Wasn’t it so enjoyable to have a
small respite from the heat? As
the days counted down to Satur-
day the mantra, “I can hold on for
just 4-3-2-1 more day/days with-
out whining!” It felt so good out-
side, going inside became a pun-
ishment! It’s a curious thing, the
morning thank yous for the day
are more fervent when the morn-
ing is 50° at 6:00 rather thatn 70°!
One of life’s secrets to share —
don’t look at the thermometer
when you know already the day
will be hotter/colder than is
comfy.
So, all this blathering in an at-
tempt to get my mind working
with last week’s news.
Thanks to all of you who have
continued to support and partici-
pate in Wasta Wildcat’s fundrais-
ers.
Our final “fun”-raiser in Wasta
is the Great Chili Cook-off at the
Wasta Community Hall, Septem-
ber 8 at 6:00 p.m.
We invite you to come, to vote
for your favorite chili, enjoy some
old songs in Gay Hadlocks sing-a-
long and finish the evening with
ice cream sundaes. How can you
resist?
We will have the A.C. to keep us
cool!
I often think of Babe Bathel,
when planning Wasta events
would have many occasions to
say, “It will work out. It will all
just work fine.”
And speaking of Bathels, Mary
Lewis and Dorothy Bathel went
to see Carl Humphrey at his new
home at the Silver Leaf in Philip.
Mary reports that Carl looks
very well and seems to enjoy his
new home.
Hopefully, Wasta will have new
good neighbors moving into the
home where Carl and Anna Lee
lived since 1997, and were good
Wasta neighbors.
Faye Bryan offered a trip to the
river in her little buggy and along
the way we spied really big
dragon flies. Faye called them
“Ten spot” dragon flies. They were
as large as small birds and were
out in great number. Thanks,
Faye.
The squirrels keep many of us
entertained in Wasta. Marilyn
Keyser’s favorite view from her
front window is that of bird feeder
that “A” St. squirrels have
mostely taken over. One fellow
not only jumps to the base of the
feeder but hangs on with his back
feet to allow to lower his body to
eat the seeds without letting go
and then lifts himself upright to
repeat the process.
Barb Crawford has visiting
squirrels named and also enjoys
the entertainment.
Saturday, we had a surprise
from Selina (McGriff) Gasseling
and husband Jack. they had been
in Wicksville at the Venhuizen’s
auction. Jack appreciates vintage
tractors and wanted to check out
an interesting oldie.
Selina and Jack are involved
with the Canyon Lake Senior Cit-
izens annual Polka Fest coming
up soon.
Back to school for Wasta kids
and Wasta has a pretty good
number of school age kids.
Kelly green is a senior this year,
with Audrina Harper and Will
Houseman not far behind. We can
boast two babies, Mavrick
Williams and Kylee Smid.
Well, we’ll get a proper tally
when we start reporting on school
functions!
Rapid City High School Class of
1958 is having their 55th gradua-
tion reunion. Harlan and Linda
Eisenbraun and Bob and Della
Hays are regular attendees. Hope
Bob’s health is okay!
Happy trails!
Social News
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Thursday, Charlene Kjerstad
met her sister, Cleo Rowe and
Aunt Hazel Thompson from
Spearfish, in Rapid City. They
were joined by Laurie, Austan,
Lexi and Westan for lunch. After
lunch, Charlene took Hazel to her
eye doctor appointment and then
back to Spearfish. Charlene at-
tended her brother Claude's
birthday party and then spent the
night with Claude and Isabel,
coming home Friday.
On Sunday, Clayton and Char-
lene celebrated their 40th wed-
ding anniversary (which was in
June) along with her sister, Cleo
and Peter Rowe from Spearfish,
who were celebrating their 30th
wedding anniversary with a fam-
ily gathering at Story Book Island
in Rapid City. Russell Thompson,
Sundance, Wyo., and Hazel
Thompson, Spearfish; Ester and
Elry Hoefs, Sandra Sether
Merchen, Rapid City, cousins of
the late Chuck Ramsey were
there to see the families. From
Spearfish, Bea Ramsey, Dorcie
Ramsey Johner, and her children,
Kenya and Rayce Johner, Claude
and Isabel Ramsey; from Rapid
City, Cindy and Steve Severson,
(who moved back from Utah this
last year), and Clay Ramsey and
his son, Landon; John and Can-
dee Kitterman, Rachel, Darin,
Bria, Breckin, and Chessa Buh-
mann; Brennan, Laurie, Austan,
Lexi, and Westan Kjerstad; Jor-
don, Rachel, Kyler, Karmyn and
Karley Kjerstad; Conrad, Kalie
and Carsten Kjerstad; Muriel
Kjerstad, Martin, and her
boyfriend, Steve Yenulonis,
Custer; Sue Eisenbraun, Lucy
and Emmy Moon, Creighton.
Carla Brucklacher came and took
family pictures of everyone. And
as a surprise, Darin Buhmann
and Dave Ghering showed up in
Charlene's anniversary gift from
Clayton, her Grandma Hilda
Ramsey's 1951 Chevy Car that
Clayton had restored for their an-
niversary. Darin and Dave have
been working on the car since
January and it is beautiful.
Monday, Rachel, Kyler, Karmyn
and Karley Kjerstad took Austan
and Lexi Kjerstad to the Labor
Day Parade in New Underwood.
On the way home, they stopped at
Grandpa and Grandma Kjer-
stad's. Then they took Charlene
to Long Valley to bring a pickup
home. On the way back to Wall,
Charlene stopped to visit Bessie
O'Bryan, Patsy and Dave Silva at
Silva's new home out on the
Bruce and Sharon Barnett's
place. Patsy and Dave have re-
tired from California and are
making their summer home out
at her former home place and
Bessie is living with them. They
have a beautiful house and view
where they put it. Charlene was
also trying to recruit Patsy to her
Wednesday bowling league in
Philip, which starts this Wednes-
day at 9 a.m. as they are short
bowlers. So any lady any age we
would welcome you to join our cof-
fee league, no experience needed.
Debbie Denke Gartner and hus-
band, Marty bought the bowling
alley in January and have done
some remodeling and sprucing up
and are looking for more bowlers
to fill the leagues. Judy Papousek,
Deanna Fees and Christy Park
bowl with Charlene and they
have been bowling in Philip since
the Wall Bowling Lanes closed. So
the bowling alley is looking for
men, women and students to join
their leagues starting this week.
Evelyn Kjerstad’s family gath-
ered at the Drug Store on Satur-
day morning to eat an early lunch
before going out to the country.
Most of her family were there an
among them the youngest great-
granddaughter, Evelyn’s name-
sake. They planned to go and see
where George was born, to the
place where they used to live and
to the top of a hill that was special
to George and his boys — they
could see all over the countryside
from up there. The family has
placed a memorial plaque there to
honor George. It was cooler
weather that day so hope they en-
joyed the tour.
Betty and Norman Klingbile
spent three days the beginning of
last week visiting Wanda and
Gail Johnson near Pierre. They
went to Onida and picked corn.
Barb and Dale Patterson are
spending the long Labor Day
weekend in Denver visiting son
Dain and family.
The artist of the month of Sep-
tember at the First Interstate
Bank is Bernard Foster. We can
look forward to that.
Saturday evening, George and
Lorna Moore went to the Prang
ranch south of Kadoka. They
joined other family for a ‘cook-
out’. On Sunday, they attended
the Huether reunion in Wall.
Leslie and Kay Williams went
to the first WHS football game of
the season. Their grandson Les,
who is a senior, played in the
game that was very one-sided —
Wall being the victor over White
River, Yah, Eagles!
On Saturday, Leslie and Kay
Williams went to Philip to the
Bud Williams’ home. Bud was cel-
ebrating his 99 years! A wonder-
ful achievement — happy birth-
day, Bud!
Friday morning while Frances
Poste was enjoying her morning
coffee at Wall Drug, she was sur-
prised to se Jeff, Lori and Andy
Joyce from the Minneapolis area.
They were on their way home
after spending sometime with
Jeff ’s parents — Jim and Leila
near Custer. Think they were the
last of the siblings to vacation
there this summer.
We offer our sympathy ot the
family and friends of Deloris
(Dobbie) Foster, who passed away
on Friday. Her funeral was held
at the Methodist Church in Wall
on Tuesday morning, September
3rd.
Frances Poste peeked in at the
Huether reunion for a bit on Sun-
day afternoon. Was glad to visit
with Lucille Huether as I don’t
see her very often anymore.
Dale Keyser has been in the
Philip hospital for over a week.
Seems he had a problem breath-
ing, is doing better but not ready
to come home.
Senior Citizens group (YAH)
had their regular meeting on
Monday, September 2nd, after
taking the summer off. We had
election of officers, but like the
ones we have so well, we voted
them in again. Veva Wernke and
Martha Johnston had a game for
us and served an ice cream cake
that was so delicious on a hot day.
Fifteen were in attendance.
School is in session so watch
out for students walking. Sounds
like it won’t be as hot this week,
as last, so Wall is lucky to start
later.
Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle
met Joe and Barb Croell of Sun-
dance and Jim Doyle of Belle
Fourche, in Rapid City for lunch
on Sunday.
Bill and Kay Leonard cele-
brated 62 years of marriage on
Tuesday, August 27th. They went
to Rapid City, visited daughter
Robin, ate out and did fun things
(I take it, that meant no doctor’s
appointments). Happy anniver-
sary to them!
The annual “Artist’s Ride” out
at Shearer’s was a big success —
it was on the weekend of August
23rd and 24th, around 150 at-
tending. Next year, circle August
30th on your calendar as that will
be the date.
Anita Peterson and her daugh-
ters, Kelsie and Ashlee, visited
Edith Paulsen on Sunday. They
went out to eat and helped Edith
with chores.
Our sympathy goes out to the
family and friends of Carla
McLaren, who passed away re-
cently; especially to her mother,
Carol Wickstrom.
“The best way to get the last
work is to apologize.”
~Guideposts
Have a good week.
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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Becki Potrzeba, Agent
1315 E. Wells Ave., Pierre, SD 57501
877-224-4173 ~ becki@beckipotrzeba.com
Sponsored by:
Pennington
County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
…continued next
week.
Ruth Bryan, 12 years,
Faith, 6 years, Rhyden, 4 years
& Hope, 1 1/2 years
children of
Travis & Amanda Frink, Quinn.
Allie Kjerstad, 5 years &
Natalie Kjerstad, 8 months
children of Nathan Kjerstad &
Heather Nelson, Quinn.
Tomorrow’s
Leaders
Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 4
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
Sept. 5th: BLT
w/Macaroni Salad
Sept. 6th: Walking Taco
Sept. 9th: Swiss Mushroom Burger
w/French Fries
Sept. 10th: Crispy Chicken Wrap
w/Grape Salad
Sept. 11th: Steak Tips over Rice
w/Veggies
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Quinn Horse racing Derby
saturday, september 7, 2013
Starting at 2:00 p.m.
•Horse Races •Children’s Games
•Live Band •Rib Supper
Two BiT Saloon & STeakhouSe
“get your Derby Hat on!”
• Save The Date • Save The Date • Save The Date • Save The Date • Save The Date •
Rel igious
Obituaries
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Mondays: Women’s Bible Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church • Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church • Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.; Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood • Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood • Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.; Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall • Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church • Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
And be not
conformed to this
world: but be ye
transformed by
the renewing of
your mind, that ye
may prove what
is that good, and
acceptable, and
perfect, will of
God. Romans
12:2 (KJV)
How often do you take time out to reflect upon
the Father's will? Spiritual meditation is vital to
staying on the right track, especially in this
day and age when people are so busy. Make
time for it. By doing so, you will renew your
love and loyalty to God and find the strength
and motivation to see His wishes through.
Ancient wisdom for modern Iife
279-2175
Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 5
Congratulations
Carla Seybold,
You went beyond great!
A Bachelor’s Degree and GPA of 3.8!
You knew it was
possible, and we
did too.
The whole
family is very
proud of
you!
Wall, SD
Clip & Save Clip & Save
Country Cupboard
Food Pantry
will resume their
winter hours starting
September 4, 2013
Wednesdays:
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
& every third
Saturday: 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Phone: 279-1045 • Wall, SD
Karla McLaren, age 55, of Inte-
rior, S.D., died Thursday, August
29, 2013, at the Nebraska Medical
Center in Omaha.
Karla K. Saunders was born
April 20, 1958 in Kadoka, the
daughter of Elwin and Carol
(Lange) Saunders. She grew up
and received her education in Wall.
After her education, she did vari-
ous jobs in the Wall area.
One of the places she worked
was the Wagon Wheel Bar in Inte-
rior. It was there that she met her
husband, Donald “Scotty”
McLaren. They were married April
3, 1998, at the Presbyterian
Church in Interior. They made
their home in Interior all their
married life. After their marriage,
Karla worked at the A&M Cafe in
Interior.
Karla enjoyed horseback riding,
and rock hunting with her friends
Shirley Gartner, Pat Fortune, and
Carolyn Guptill.
Due to health reasons, Karla
moved to the Philip Nursing Home
in November of 2012, where she
resided until the time of her death.
Survivors include her husband
Donald “Scotty” McLaren of Inte-
rior; her son, Travis Saunders, and
his wife, Cheryl, of Murdo; three
grandchildren; her mother, Carol
Wickstrom of Wall; her father,
Elwin Saunders of Missouri; one
brother, Terry Saunders, of Tonto
Basin, Ariz.; and one sister, Jean
Saunders of Silverthorne, Colo.
Karla was preceded in death by
her stepfather, William H. Wick-
strom, on August 23, 1993.
Visitation was held Monday,
September 2, at the Rush Funeral
Home in Philip, and again on Tues-
day, September 3, at the Rush Fu-
neral Home in Philip.
No other services will be held.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Karla McLaren_________________________________
Deloris “Dobbie” Foster, age 92,
of Wall, S.D., died Friday, August
30, 2013, at the Clarkson Health
Care Center in Rapid City.
Deloris F. Crown was born Feb-
ruary 25, 1921, along with her twin
sister, Doris, the daughters of
Orrin and Maggie (Wetzel) Crown.
She grew up in the Wall area,
where she attended rural school be-
fore attending Wall High School,
graduating in 1938. After gradua-
tion, she worked as a switchboard
operator for the telephone com-
pany.
Deloris was united in marriage
to Delos Foster on September 14,
1940, at Rapid City. They made
their home in Wall where they op-
erated a Conoco service station
until moving to Tacoma, Wash.
Delos entered the U.S. Navy dur-
ing World War II and Deloris
moved back to Wall during that
time. After his discharge from the
Navy, they returned to Wall. They
owned and operated various serv-
ice stations until 1958, when they
began operating the Foster Texaco
Station at the south end of Main
Street. They continued to operate
the station until Delos’ death in
1995, and Dobbie retired.
She spent her retirement years
in Wall, until moving to Rapid City
in March in 2013 due to health rea-
sons, where she had since resided.
Dobbie was a member of the
Methodist Church in Wall, and en-
joyed bowling in her spare time.
She spent many hours traveling
with her bowling team to different
bowling tournaments in the state.
She made world famous peanut
brittle, and crocheted doilies for a
number of residents in Wall.
Survivors include two sons,
Allen Foster and his wife, Anne, of
Rapid City, and Jerry Foster and
his wife, Sue, of Rapid City; a
daughter, Karen Holst and her
husband, Gary, of Rapid City; four
grandchildren, Juli, Steve, Megan
and Luke; three great-grandchil-
dren; a brother-in-law, Norman Se-
bade of Tacoma, Wash.; and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Dobbie was preceded in death by
her husband, Delos Foster, on Oc-
tober 13, 1995; three brothers,
Merle, Wayne and Ivan Crown; and
two sisters, Elsie Mortensen and
Doris Sebade.
Services were held Tuesday, Sep-
tember 3, at the Methodist Church
in Wall, with Pastor Darwin Kopf-
mann officiating.
Interment was at the Wall
Cemetery.
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall
was in charge of arrangements.
A memorial has been estab-
lished. Her online guestbook is
available at www.rushfuneral-
home.com
Deloris “Dobbie” Foster___________________________
Shearer’s Cow Creek
Third Annual
Wild At Heart Prairie Dog Shoot
September 14, 2013
Bring your lunch, come in the morning,
shoot prairie dogs till rifle games and
clay pigeons at 3:00 p.m.
Free supper at 7:00 p.m.
(Please RSVP by Sept. 12, 2013 for supper count.)
Some games will have a small entry fee!
Contact: Glendon 279-2681
Colby 685-8604 • Trent 279-0112
YounG aT HEaRT
SEnIoR CITIZEn GRouP
Fifteen members met Septem-
ber 2, at Prairie Village. Meeting
was called to order by Pres. Carol
Hahn, who led the group in the
Pledge of Allegiance to our Flag.
A moment of silence was held for
those with illness and other spe-
cial needs.
Carol read an article called “In-
teresting Facts on Birds and Ani-
mals”. It was very informative.
May minutes were read and
corrected. Treasurers report was
approved and readied for audit.
Old business: We were asked to
bring old greeting cards for St.
Jude’s Children’s Hospital. We
will pay the postage for mailing
them.
Motion was made, seconded
and approved to keep the same of-
ficers for next year.
Upcoming Events:
Sept. 7: Fly-in at Airport
Sept. 9: Blood Drive and Stroke
Screening
Sept. 14: Relay For life, 7 p.m.
Sept. 19: Free Theme Meal -
paid by State
Sept. 19: Senior Citizen Potluck
Our next meeting will be held
Oct. 7th at 1:00 p.m. Hostess will
be Loretta. We will end the meet-
ing by playing games.
Club Notes
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Fri., August 30 -
Sat., September 7
Friday, August 30: FB
w/White River, 7 p.m. MST; CC
Douglas Invite @ 9 a.m.
Monday, September 2: Labor
Day; JV FB @ Philip, 5:30 p.m.
MST; JH FB @ Philip, 4 p.m.
Tuesday, September 3: First
Day of School, out @ 2 p.m.; VB
w/Jones Co., 5:30 p.m. MST.
Thursday, September 5: JH
FB @ RCC, 4 p.m.; VB w/RCC, 5
p.m.; CC Spearfish Invite @ 3
p.m.
Friday, September 6:
SCHOOL IN SESSION; FB @
Murdo w/Jones Co., 6 p.m. MST.
Saturday, September 7: Wall
JV FB Jamboree @ 10 a.m.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
Can "ExCESS"
RETIREMEnT DoLLaRS
HELP YouR
GRanDCHILDREn?
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
National Grandparents Day is
observed on Sept. 8. And although
this “Day” is not as widely known
as Mother’s Day or Father’s Day, it
does remind us of the importance
of grandparents. If you’re a grand-
parent yourself, you may be think-
ing of ways to help your grandchil-
dren on their journey through life.
One of the greatest gifts you can
give them may be financial support
for their college education — and
one way you can help provide this
support could be found in the dis-
tributions you receive from your
retirement accounts.
To understand how this tech-
nique might work, you’ll need to be
familiar with the required mini-
mum distribution (RMD) rules
governing various retirement ac-
counts. Actually, they’re pretty
straightforward: Once you turn
70½, you’ll generally have to start
taking withdrawals from your tra-
ditional IRA and your 401(k) or
other employer-sponsored retire-
ment plan — such as a 457(b) plan,
if you work for a state or local gov-
ernment, or a 403(b) plan, if you
work for an educational institu-
tions or nonprofit group. (If you
have a Roth IRA, you are not re-
quired to take withdrawals at any
age.)
Your required minimum distri-
bution is calculated by dividing the
prior Dec. 31 balance of your re-
tirement account by a life ex-
pectancy factor published by the
Internal Revenue Service. As the
word “minimum” suggests, you can
take out more than this amount,
but not less.
You can use the money you with-
draw for any purpose you choose.
It may be that you need all of it to
help support your retirement
lifestyle. But if you have enough
money coming in from other
sources — such as Social Security
and any investments held outside
your retirement accounts — you
may find that you don’t really need
to use every dollar from your
RMDs. And if that’s the situation,
you might want to devote some of
this money to a college fund for
your grandchildren.
Or you could simply give the
funds to your grandchildren’s par-
ents and let them decide how best
to employ it for college. But you do
have other options. For example,
you could establish a 529 plan and
name your grandchildren as bene-
ficiaries.
With a 529 plan, any potential
earnings accumulate tax free, pro-
vided they are used for qualified
higher education expenses. (Keep
in mind, though, that 529 plan dis-
tributions not used for qualified ex-
penses may be subject to federal
and state income tax and a 10%
IRS penalty.) Furthermore, your
529 plan contributions may be de-
ductible from your state taxes if
you participate in your home
state’s plan. However, 529 plans
vary, so check with your tax advi-
sor regarding deductibility.
In all likelihood, you’ll be able to
contribute as much as you want to
a 529 plan, because the lifetime
contribution limits are generous —
although these limits vary by
state. Plus, a 529 plan is flexible: If
your grandchild decides against an
eligible college or vocational school,
you can generally transfer the un-
used funds to an eligible family
member.
A 529 plan is not the only college
savings vehicle available to help
your grandchildren; for other pos-
sibilities, you may want to consult
with your financial advisor.
In any case, once you start tak-
ing your RMDs from your retire-
ment accounts, think about put-
ting any “excess” amounts to work
for your grandchildren’s college ed-
ucation. Your generosity could pro-
vide benefits for a lifetime.
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
September 3 to
September 11, 2013
No Breakfast will be served
the first week of School.
Tuesday: Lunch: Steam-
burger, Baked Beans Baby Car-
rots, Fresh Fruit Salad, Milk.
Wednesday: Lunch: Chicken
Fajita w/Cheese & Lettuce,
Black Beans, Corn, Banana,
Milk.
Thursday: Lunch: Goulash,
Lettuce Salad, Mixed Veggies,
Apple, Roll, Milk.
Friday: Tator Tot Hot Dish,
Green Beans, Pears, Roll, Milk.
Monday: Breakfast: Pan-
cake, Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Stromboli, Cucum-
ber/Carrots, Orange, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Cereal,
Cheese Stick, Orange, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Lettuce, Salad, Roll, Apple,
Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast:
Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Apple,
Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Spanish Rice w/Ham-
burger, Refried/Black Beans,
Mixed Fruit, Milk.
Sports
Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 6
Email us
with your
news item
or photo to
courant @
gwtc.net
Time to consider a home in Wasta! ----very economical to
heat & cool ~ Low taxes ~ Just o I-90 & only 40 mi. to
Rapid City, or 12 mi. to Wall. Excellent, well-known city
water, which comes from a spring!
• Well-kept 16x80 Chief II Mobile Home w/ Spacious
Open Floor Plan
• 6 inch Sidewalls ~ well-insulated ~ New ermal Pane
Windows & Doors 5 yr. ago ~ 3 ceiling fans ~ Plus,
roomy 18 . Entry/Mudroom
• 3 Bedrooms & 2 Full Bathrooms, 1 with Garden Tub
• Includes Appliances: gas stove (5 yr old), newer Amana
Refrig w/Freezer on bottom & Amana Dishwasher
• LP Furnace ~ Plus outside Wood Furnace which feeds
all ductwork. (is furnace is capable of heating the en-
tire house, using little or no LP.) Includes 500 gal. LP
tank, just lled
• Central Air ~ City Spring Water ~ City Sewer
• Insulated, attractive, well-lit 24 x 40 Steel Garage/
Shop w/elec overhead door ~ LP Furnace ~ Electric-
ity, both 110 & 220, plus welding port
• Beautiful Yard ~ Flowers ~ Garden ~ 3 Producing
Apple Trees planted in 1997 ~ Cottonwood ~ Silver
Maple ~ Cedars ~ Lilacs ~ Clothesline ~ Yard Hydrant
~ Front & Back Decks
• 2 Lots: 100 x 140 ~ Pleasant Neighborhood
• Taxes: $540.36 last year
• Access from several directions ~ City Street Light at
corner of Shop ~ Good Home or could be a Rental
is is an ideal property in Wasta. Shop would hold up to
4 vehicles & could be part of a hometown business. With 2
lots right on corner, plenty of space for additional building. Mobile home is in very good shape. However, could be
easily moved, as Wheels & Axles are under Home.
Property absolutely sells to highest bidder without minimum or reserve!
^^^ LEGAL: Lots 1 and 2, of Block 2, Wasta, Pennington County
Terms: 20% down Auction Day w/closing within 30 days. Auctioneers represent the Seller.
Showings: Mondays, Aug. 26 from 5-6 pm & Sept. 2 from 3 - 4 pm
or by appointment---Please call auctioneers.
Owner: Carl Humphrey
More photos & info at www.PiroutekAuction.com or www.ArnesonAuction.com
Rome & 8hop on 2 corner Lots
Wasta, 80
AB80L01E A0c1l0N
Wed. 8ept. 11, 2013 ^ 6 pm M1
Exit 99 on I-90, then at 25
A Street in Wasta, SD
(corner of Pine & A St.)
(Former home of Carl Humphrey.
Carl has only recently moved to Philip.)
>>>>>>>Move-In-Ready<<<<<<<<
llkê|IlK 1||IlêK älk\l|l 1kKläêK 1||IlêK älk\l|l
Dan Piroutek · 605-544-3316 Lonnie Arneson · 605-798-2525
R.E. Auctioneer #282 R.E. Auctioneer #11296
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Crew Agency is an equal opportunity provider.
Boxes and lumber marked “J.D.
Hilger, Pierre, east of Fort Pierre”
were unloaded from a river boat
onto the east bank of the Missouri
River in May of 1880. John
Hilger, his brother Anson and
Anson’s wife and son were wait-
ing to retrieve the items.
That was the explanation
Anson Hilger gave for how he
named Pierre, according to
Harold H. Schuler’s A Bridge
Apart.
Pioneer merchants such as
Hilger, explorers, military offi-
cers, settlers, railroad officials
and more have all left their mark
on South Dakota by the names
they gave to its lakes, towns and
mountains.
In 1838, 2nd Lt. John C. Fré-
mont accompanied French-born
naturalist Joseph N. Nicollet as
Nicollet mapped the area between
the Upper Mississippi and Mis-
souri rivers. Frémont charted sev-
eral lakes in northeastern South
Dakota.
He named Lake Benton after
his future father-in-law and pow-
erful U.S. Sen. Thomas Hart Ben-
ton; Lake Preston after South
Carolina Sen. William Campbell
Preston; and Lake Poinsett after
his friend and benefactor Joel
Poinsett. Frémont christened an-
other lake Abert after his supe-
rior, U.S. Army Col. J.J. Abert.
This body of water later became
known as Lake Albert.
When Gen. George Armstrong
Custer and the 7th Cavalry en-
tered the Black Hills in 1874,
they were journeying into a place
unknown to non-Indians. En
route from Fort Abraham Lincoln
near present-day Mandan, N.D.,
to the Black Hills, Indian scouts
led expedition members to a cave
that was an important spiritual
place to them.
Custer named the cave after
Capt. William A. Ludlow, the chief
engineer for the Department of
Dakota. Custer also named a
stream in what is now Penning-
ton County Castle Creek because
the high cliffs between which it
flows reminded him of castles. He
presumably conferred the name
Gold Run upon a small tributary
of Castle Creek.
While standing on the most el-
evated portion of the Black Hills,
Ludlow named two prominent
peaks for Custer and Gen. Alfred
Terry.
The South Dakota name game: who named what
Ludlow and Nicolett both re-
tained many place names given
by American Indians when mak-
ing maps.
The town of Wasta received its
name when state historian Doane
Robinson selected the Lakota
word for “good” for the Penning-
ton County community. Robinson
also named the town of Tolstoy in
honor of the Russian writer.
Charles Prior worked in the
Minneapolis office of the Chicago,
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad,
deciding where new railroad
tracks would go and where towns
would be located along the rail-
road. He is said to have named a
community in Brown County Ab-
erdeen because his boss, Alexan-
der Mitchell, came from Ab-
erdeen, Scotland. Prior named
another town site Virgil due to his
admiration of the Greek poet. He
named Alpena for a town in
Michigan, Ipswich for his own
birthplace in England, Bath and
Bristol for cities in England and
Woonsocket for a town in Rhode
Island. He also named Wilmot,
probably after Judge Wilmot W.
Brookings. A railway official
named the town of Bradley out of
gratitude to E.R. Bradley, who
saved his life when Bradley inter-
vened in a fight between the offi-
cial and laborers. Other railroad
officials named Alcester, Amherst,
Canistota, Junius, Java, Huron,
Hitchcock, Renner, Trent, Wor-
thing, Frederick, Mystic, Orient
and other towns.
Settlers sometimes made them-
selves feel more “at home” by
naming their new town after the
one they had left. Edward Tilton
and other settlers named Hart-
ford for their home town in Con-
necticut. Czech settlers named
Tabor for a town in Bohemia.
William Van Epps named Madi-
son because the nearby lakes re-
minded him of the Wisconsin city.
Other settlers honored people
by naming a place after them. Dr.
O. Richmond named Tyndall for
John Tyndall, a British scientist.
Lily was named by the town’s
first postmaster, Ross Parks, after
his sister, Lily. Holabird owes its
name to Henry Wicker, superin-
tendent of the North Western
Railroad. He gave his bride’s fam-
ily name to the new town.
As for the state’s most well-
known geographic feature, one
story goes that an eastern attor-
ney was in the Black Hills in the
early 1880s when he asked his
guide the name of a granite peak.
The guide, William Challis,
said that the mountain did not
have a name before, but would
now bear the lawyer’s name. An-
other story states that the attor-
ney joked that he had visited the
Black Hills so many times that he
had earned the right to have the
mountain named after him.
The attorney’s name was
Charles Rushmore, and whatever
the story, the United States Board
of Geographic Names officially
recognized the name Mount
Rushmore in 1930.
Rushmore’s name, like that of
John Tyndall, Thomas Hart Ben-
ton and so many others, lives on
in South Dakota’s geographic
names.
In 2009, the South Dakota Leg-
islature created the S.D. Board on
Geographic Names to replace cer-
tain geographic place names con-
sidered offensive.
The board has established a
public process and works with the
U.S. Board on Geographic
Names. For more information, see
www.sdbgn.sd.gov.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Foun-
dation, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society. Find us on the
web at www.sdhsf.org. Contact us
at info@sdhsf.org to submit a
story idea.
Pictured is Terry Peak circa 1911. The peak was named in 1874 by
Capt. William A. Ludlow, who was a member of Gen. George Arm-
strong Custer’s expedition to the Black Hills that year.
Photo couresty of the South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives for the photograph.
By Coach
anderson
The Wall Eagle
Football team
opened the sea-
son by dominat-
ing the White
River Tigers by
the score of 47 to
6.
As you looked
at White River it
appeared as if it
were a David and
G o l i a t h
matchup. They
had a front line
that blocked the
sun. Wall faced
possibly the
largest opponent
they may see all
season.
Also in the
back of the Ea-
gles minds was
the previous
year’s game with
the Tigers. Once
the game began,
soon the Eagles
would spread
their wings and
fly.
The Eagles
dominating de-
fense and explo-
sive offense seemed too much for
the Tigers. Though smaller, Wall
would use their quickness and ag-
gressive play to control the line of
scrimmage and the game.
As you watched the game it
seemed the Eagles became more
dominant throughout the night.
The defense was all over the
Tigers allowing 45 yards of of-
fense and zero points through
three quarters. White River
would finish the game with six
points and 107 yards of offense.
The defense had a solid per-
formance in the trenches from
Ridge Sandal, Tyler Peterson,
Ben Linn, Clancy Lytle and
Freshman Cass Lytle.
Lane Blasius led the Eagles de-
fense with 12 tackles followed
closely by Les Williams with 11.
While the defense was swarm-
ing the offense was soaring. The
Eagles soar in season opener
Eagles executed very well all
night in the air and on the
ground.
Wall finished with 334 yards
rushing and 120 yards passing for
a total of 454 yards of offense. On
average we scored every five
plays.
Once again our offensive line of
scrimmage did a great job against
superior size.
Peterson, Lytle, Sandal,
Williams, and Linn opened the
way for the Eagles offensive suc-
cess.
Carson Johnston opened many
eyes as he rushed 10 times for 241
yards and three touchdowns. He
was explosive and proved he has
breakaway speed.
There was early concern as full-
back Cade Kjerstad pulled up
with a leg injury. Then Raedon
Anderson came
off with a knee
injury after the
first play of of-
fense. Gabe San-
dal would an-
swer the call at
fullback as he led
J o h n s t o n
through the hole
and ran the ball
in an aggressive
nature.
When we
weren’t running
the ball the Ea-
gles were domi-
nating through
the air. Blasius
passed 11 times
and completed
seven for 120
yards.
Trevor Ander-
son caught the
ball four times
for 83 yards and
a touchdown.
Ben Linn
caught three for
37 yards and a
touchdown.
Gabe Sandal
ended the scor-
ing with a five
yard touchdown
run.
Special Teams also did some
damage as T. Anderson returned
three punts for 103 yards, one of
which he took back 79 yards for
the score. He also added three
PAT kicks. T. Anderson also did
the kickoff duties.
The Eagles used the dirty ball
many times along with solid kick
coverage. Williams punted once
for 43 yards.
Overall, we had a solid first
game. We stressed all week that
the most important game of the
season was game one.
Now we focus on the second
most important game. Game two
against a physical Jones Co.
team.
Jones Co. lost their season
opener to Kadoka 20 to 34. The
game will be in Murdo at 7:00
CST or 6:00 MST.
Wall Eagle Trevor Anderson running the ball in for an Eagle touch-
down during the Eagles season opener against White River.
Laurie Hindman photo
Cl assifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
FaLL HELP nEEDED: full or
part-time for September & Octo-
ber, Badlands Trading Post.
flexible hours & scheduling –
competitive wages – gas dis-
count. Contact Heidi, 433-5411.
PR52-3tc
HELP WanTED: full-time posi-
tion at Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle &
Vet, Philip. 859-2482. PR52-tfn
CERTIFIED nuRsEs aIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tion, benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Nikki, 837-2270.
K34-tfn
HELP WanTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K33-tfn
aMERICa’s BEsT VaLuE Inn
In WaLL has positions open for
housekeeping, laundry and
maintenance. Call Joseph at
279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HousEkEEPERs anD Laun-
DRY PERsonnEL WanTED:
High school and college students
are welcome to apply. Will train.
Apply at either America’s Best
Value Inn and Budget Host Sun-
downer in Kadoka or call 837-
2188 or 837-2296. K26-tfn
HELP WanTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax resumé
to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
misC. foR sale
FoR saLE: 1986 Yamaha mo-
torcycle, gas stove, refrigerator,
table and chairs. (4) kittens to
give away. Call Kolette Struble,
441-1909. K38-2tc
FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notiCes/Wanted
VEnDoRs WanTED for Philip’s
annual Craft Show, to be held
saturday, september 28th.
Call Julie at 441-9305 for more
information. P38-4tc
WanTED To BuY: Old farm ma-
chinery and junk cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
FoR saLE: 1999 Travelong 20
ft. gooseneck stock trailer, good
condition, good tires, $3,000
OBO. Call 441-9468, Kadoka.
P37-tfn
WanTED To CuT: Alfalfa seed
on shares. Call Larry Schell,
279-2236 or 685-3933.
PW38-4tc
FoR saLE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WanTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
FoR saLE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
fRee
FREE! 3 bedroom 14’x70’ mobile
home in New Underwood, to be
moved. Needs work. Call or text
863-2206. P39-2tp
GaRaGe sales
RuMMaGE saLE: friday, Sept.
6, at Senechal Apts. Lobby,
Philip, 1-5 p.m. Clothes: kids &
adults; household items; baby
items: swing, bouncy chair and
more; home school supplies.
P39-1tc
GaRaGE saLE: Wed., Sept. 11,
5-7 p.m.; Thurs., Sept. 12, 8
a.m. - 2 p.m., 707 Dorothy
Street, Wall, in garage behind
the house. Lots of clothes and
misc., size 4 boys clothes, girls
clothes size 4 and under, boys
clothes size 10/12, toys, cook-
books, Princess House crystal,
loft bed, hardwood rocker and
much more. WP1-2tc
helP Wanted
PaRT-TIME PREssRooM
HELP WanTED: Monday and
Wednesday mornings (3-4 hours
each day). Will train the right
person. Call Beau Ravellette,
859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WanTED: full- or part-
time position for cashier or cook,
all shifts. Wages DOE. Apply at
Kadoka Gas & Go. K38-2tc
Rn/LPn PosITIon: Seeking
loving & patient geriatric nurse.
Benefits available. Contact Heidi
or Nikki, 837-2270. K34-tfn
Business & seRviCe
BusInEss FoR saLE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & Con-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
RouGH CounTRY sPRaYInG:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
o’ConnELL ConsTRuCTIon,
InC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETon RIVER TREnCHInG:
for all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIon
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRm & RanCh
FoR saLE: Paint Gelding, 14.3h
13 yrs old. Done it all! Kid/ older
person safe. Cowy with a handle.
Shown and placed in 4-H by 11-
yr-old boy. 441-9468. PR1-tfn
Pets/suPPlies
FoR saLE: AKC German Wire-
hair Pointers, born June 11,
2013. first shots, wormed, mi-
crochip implant, AKC documen-
tation. (5) females, (1) male.
$500. 808-895-9041, Milesville.
P36-4tp
Real estate
HoME FoR saLE In PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new roof,
windows, siding, high efficiency
heat/air with heat pump, on-de-
mand hot water, nice propane
fireplace, nice backyard, deck
and more. Would consider con-
tract for deed. Contact for show-
ing: Don or Tami Ravellette, 685-
5147 (cell) or 859-2969 (home).
P27-tfn
Rentals
aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
Classified PoliCy
PLEasE REaD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
auCTIons
LAND AUCTION: 3790+/- Acres,
Jones County, Cropland, Grass-
land, Recreational, Investment.
1.5 miles northwest of Murdo,
SD, September 25, 2013. Call
Dakota Properties, Todd Schuet-
zle, Auctioneer, 605-280-3115,
www.DakotaProperties.com.
EMPLoYMEnT
SHOP fOREMAN SOUGHT by
multi-store John Deere dealer-
ship operation. Position currently
open at Potter County Imple-
ment, Gettysburg, SD; a part of
C&B Operations, LLC. Applicants
should possess good organiza-
tional skills and the ability to
manage farm equipment service
personnel in a growth oriented
dealership. We offer progressive
marketing plans, competitive
pay, and a full benefit package.
Please send resume to Ben
Wieseler, store manager, or Jerry
Hericks, service manager, Potter
County Implement, 30965 U.S
Highway 212, Gettysburg, SD
57442, or e-mail to
hericksj@deerequipment.com, or
call Jerry at 605-769-1710.
PATROL OffICER – Hourly pay
range: $20.14-$24.50/hr. Visit:
www.cityofbrookings.org Return
application w/resume to PO Box
270, Brookings, SD 57006-0270.
dlangland@cityofbrookings.org.
PARTS SALESPERSON SOUGHT
by multi-store John Deere deal-
ership operation. Position cur-
rently open at Potter County Im-
plement, Gettysburg, SD; a part
of C&B Operations, LLC. Appli-
cants should possess good
knowledge of farm equipment,
computer skills, retail selling
skills, and be customer service
oriented. We will train the right
person. We offer John Deere
training, competitive pay, full
benefit package, including 401k,
health, and dental plan. Please
send resume to Naomi Hermann,
parts manager, Potter County
Implement, 30965 U.S Highway
212, Gettysburg, SD 57442, or e-
mail to hermannn@deerequip-
ment.com or call Naomi at 605-
765-2434.
LOOKING fOR AN EXPERI-
ENCED SALES AGRONOMIST
who is willing to be a part of a
team and play a role in manage-
ment. Knowledge in plant nutri-
tion, crop protection and preci-
sion Ag is needed. Call Colby at
605-772-5543. Howard farmers
Coop, Howard SD.
Qualified service technicians
sought by progressive, multi-
store South Dakota John Deere
dealership. We offer factory train-
ing, health insurance, dental in-
surance, life insurance, 401k
plan, paid holidays and vacation
days in our benefit package. Ap-
plicants must be able to work in-
dependently and want to
progress in compensation and
skill level. Enjoy low cost of living
with great hunting and fishing!
Our very competitive wage de-
pends on qualifications and ex-
perience. Please send resume to
Jerry Hericks, service manager,
Potter County Implement, 30965
U.S Highway 212, Gettysburg,
SD 57442, or e-mail to her-
icksj@deerequipment.com or call
Jerry at 605-769-1710.
oTR/DRIVERs
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
noTICEs
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
oTR/DRIVERs:
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
aPaRTMenTS
aVailaBle
Wall Ridge apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
Deadline for Classifieds & Cards of Thanks
is 11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 7
Winter WheAt SeeD
For SAle
•SY Wolf (Heavy Residue Champion)
•AP503 CL2 (The Oringinal 2-Gene Clearfield)
Also ask us about treating seed with
Cruiser Maxx Cereals.
Yardley & Co., Inc.
Rick Johnson -386-2375
State Seed Permit SP-14682
Double J Horse Sales
All Breeds
Consignment Sale
Saturday, Sept.14, 2013
Stockmen’s Livestock
Exchange
Dickinson, ND
Ranch Horse Competition
8 a.m. MDT
Sale 12 noon MDT
For a catalog or more info call
or log on:
Joe (701) 230-3044
John (701) 720-6674
horsesale@nccray.com
www.doublejhorsesales.com
“We don’t sell the most; we
try to sell the best.”
THank Yous
We want to THANK our family
and friends for celebrating with
us for our 55th anniversary, the
beautiful cards and best wishes!
Theodore for loaning two AC
units, Jen and Katie for songs. To
our family for all the work to put
on such a great party!
May God bless you all!
Lonnie & Rose Ellen Kjerstad
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
AUGUST 20, 2013
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, August 20, 2013, in the Com-
missioners' meeting room of the Penning-
ton County Courthouse. Chairperson
Lyndell Petersen called the meeting to
order at 9:00 a.m. with the following Com-
missioners present: Ron Buskerud, Don
Holloway and Nancy Trautman. Commis-
sioner Ken Davis entered while the meet-
ing was in progress.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to correct Item 12 to read, Dis-
cussion of SDCL 10-6-31, Classification
of Property – Criteria for Classification of
Agricultural Property, and approve the
agenda as amended. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed on
the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-9 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the August
6, 2013, Board of Commissioners’ meet-
ing.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling $
3,311,593.70.
7. Approve the Resolution to Discharge
County Aid Liens with no activity for 30
years totaling $590,440.56 and authorize
the Chairperson’s signature thereto.
RESOLUTION TO
DISCHARGE COUNTY AID
LIENS
WITH NO ACTIVITY FOR 30
YEARS
WHEREAS, the Pennington
County Commission has deter-
mined that it is in the County’s
best interest to annually dis-
charge those county aid liens
with no activity for 30 years,
and
WHEREAS, as of August
13, 2013, there are inactive
liens totaling $590,440.56 as
listed on a report that will be on
file with the Pennington County
Register of Deeds;
NOW, THERFORE BE IT
RESOLVED by the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers, that the Register of Deeds
is hereby directed to discharge
these liens with no activity for
30 years.
Dated this 20th Day of Au-
gust, 2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Karen McGregor,
Deputy Auditor
8. To assign $2 million of the restricted
fund balance in Accumulated Building to
the joint use facility between Pennington
County Health & Human Services and
Community Health Center.
9. Recognize and thank Pennington
County volunteers for the month of July
2013. The list of volunteers is on file in
the Human Resources office and is
posted on the County bulletin board.
End of Consent Agenda
Rail Lines and Rail Service Protection
Support Effort – State of South
Dakota/West River Rail Association:
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Trautman to support the State of South
Dakota’s effort to obtain answers regard-
ing the Canadian Pacific Railroad’s com-
mitments on its railroad lines in South
Dakota and authorize the Chairperson’s
signature on the letter to the Surface
Transportation Board. Vote: Unanimous.
Grant Update and Grant Opportunities
for Mountain Pine Beetle – Greg
Josten, SD Department of Agriculture
Commissioner Davis entered the meet-
ing.
Discussion of SDCL 10-6-31, Classifi-
cation of Property – Criteria for Clas-
sification of Agricultural Property
(Commissioner Trautman)
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to direct the Pennington
County State’s Attorney to research and
provide guidance on the legality of Pen-
nington County defining the criteria for
classification of land as agricultural on
county level and further moved that the
Chairperson appoint a committee to de-
velop a proposal to take to legislature for
better definition of the criteria. Vote:
Unanimous.
Criteria For Classification of Lands as
Agricultural – Minimum Acre Require-
ment (Commissioner Trautman)
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to change the minimum acre
requirement for ag classification in Pen-
nington County to 40 acres.
Commissioner Buskerud called the
question. The motion to call the question
failed 3-2 on a roll call vote: Buskerud –
yes, Davis – yes, Holloway – no, Traut-
man – no, Petersen – no.
The vote on the original motion failed
3-2 on a roll call vote: Buskerud – no,
Davis – no, Holloway – no, Trautman –
yes, Petersen – yes.
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
A. General Fund Budget Supplement
Hearing SP13-012 – Juvenile Diversion &
Detention Budgets: MOVED by Holloway
and seconded by Trautman to approve a
supplement to the General Fund Juvenile
Diversion budget in the amount of
$20,000 and the General Fund Juvenile
Detention budget in the amount of $6,035
from non-budgeted revenue received in
the current year. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM BUILDINGS &
GROUNDS
A. PC Campus Expansion Project
(Block 99) – Change Order #3: MOVED
by Holloway and seconded by Buskerud
to authorize the Chairperson’s signature
to Change Order No. 3 dated August 13,
2013, which increases the Contract Sum
by $52,471.01 to $22,609,768.82 and the
Contract Time will be unchanged for the
J. Scull Construction Services contract for
the construction of the Pennington
County Campus Expansion project. Vote:
Unanimous.
PLANNING & ZONING CONSENT
AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken on all items by a single vote of the
Board of Commissioners. Any item may
be removed from the Consent Agenda for
separate action.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman that Planning & Zoning Con-
sent Agenda Items A-F be approved as
presented. Vote: Unanimous.
A. SECOND READING OF ORDI-
NANCE AMENDMENT / OA 13-02: Pen-
nington County. To amend Section 103
“Construction Permit Definitions” and
Section 507(A) “Construction Permits” of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
Approve the second reading of Ordi-
nance Amendment / OA 13-02.
ORDINANCE #34-26
AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
MENT TO THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY ZONING ORDI-
NANCE.
BE IT HEREBY ORDAINED
BY THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF COM-
MISSIONERS THAT THE
PENNINGTON COUNTY OR-
DINANCE #34 BE AMENDED
AS FOLLOWS:
SECTION 103: Construc-
tion Permit Definitions shall be
amended as follows:
Municipal Separate Storm
Sewer System (MS4):
e. Determined by the EPA
from census data identified in
Appendix A – Urbanized Areas
of the Pennington County
Stormwater Management Plan.
SECTION 507: Construc-
tion Permits shall be amended
as follows:
Attachment A and Attach-
ment B shall be removed from
the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance, as they are no
longer valid and are not repre-
sentative of the current MS4
boundaries.
Dated this 20th day of Au-
gust, 2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
B. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-13 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-07: Mitch Morris. To rezone
151.36 acres and 30.49 acres from Gen-
eral Agriculture District and Light Indus-
trial District to General Commercial Dis-
trict and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Limited Agriculture
District to General Commercial District in
accordance with Section 508 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Being 151.36 acres of land
located in the E1/2 of Section
32, Township 1 North, Range 8
East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, said 151.36 acres of
land being more particularly
described by metes and
bounds as follows, all meas-
urements are to be considered
as being followed by the words
“more or less”; BEGINNING at
the southwest corner of Lot 1
of the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section
32, Township 1 North, Range 8
East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian, on the south line of Section
32 at the intersection of the
east right-of-way line of South
Dakota Highway 79; Thence,
North 06°32'53" West, along
the west line of said Lot 1 of the
SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section 32
and east right-of-way line of SD
Highway 79, a distance of
4310.98 feet to a point on the
easterly line of Lot A of the
NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32 as
shown on plat recorded in
Highway Plat Book 9, Page 93,
in the office of the Pennington
County Register of Deeds, in a
curve from which the center of
curvature bears North
48°17'34” West a distance of
103.00 feet; Thence, south-
westerly, following the easterly
line of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, along a
curve to the right having a ra-
dius of 103.00 feet, a central
angle of 35°53', for an arc dis-
tance of 64.51 feet to a point of
tangency; Thence, South
77°35'27” West, continuing to
follow the easterly line of said
Lot A of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of
Section 32, a distance of 4.12
feet to a point for corner on the
east right-of-way line of SD
Highway 79, in a curve from
which the center of curvature
bears South 73°13'38” West a
distance of 3920 feet; Thence,
northwesterly, along a curve to
the left having a radius of 3920
feet, a central angle of
00°29'02", for an arc length of
33.11 feet to point for corner on
the centerline of the alignment
of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32; Thence,
North 77°35'27” East, follow-
ing the centerline of the align-
ment of said Lot A of the
NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, a
distance of 6.78 feet to a point
of curvature; Thence, north-
easterly, continuing to follow
the centerline of the alignment
of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, along a
curve to the left having a radius
of 70.00 feet, a central angle of
84°05'03", for an arc length of
102.73 feet to a point of tan-
gency; Thence, North
06°29'36” West, continuing to
follow the centerline of the
alignment of said Lot A of the
NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, a
distance of 606.16 feet to a
point of curvature; Thence,
northwesterly, continuing to fol-
low the centerline of the align-
ment of said Lot A of the
NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32,
along a curve to the left having
a radius of 1432.39 feet, a cen-
tral angle of 05°45'52", for an
arc length of 144.11 feet to
point for corner on the west line
of the E1/2 of Section 32;
Thence, North 00°01'24” East,
along the west line of the E1/2
of Section 32, a distance of
206.71 feet to the northwest
corner of the E1/2 of Section
32; Thence, South 89°48'35”
East, along the north line of the
E1/2 of Section 32, a distance
of 2656.84 feet to the northeast
corner of Section 32; Thence,
South 00°04'45” West, along
the east line of Section 32, a
distance of 500.00 feet to a
point for corner; Thence, North
89°48'35” West, parallel to and
500 feet distant from the north
line of the E1/2 of Section 32,
a distance of 1514.54 feet to a
point for corner; Thence, South
06°22'35” East, a distance of
4844.00 feet to a point for cor-
ner on the south line of the
E1/2 of Section 32; Thence,
North 89°36'35” West, along
the south line of the E1/2 of
Section 32, a distance of
1088.72 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING and containing
151.36 acres, more or less, of
land.
Being 30.49 acres of land lo-
cated in the N1/2 NW1/4 of
Section 33, Township 1 North,
Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian, Pennington County,
South Dakota, said 30.49
acres of land being more par-
ticularly described by metes
and bounds as follows, all
measurements are to be con-
sidered as being followed by
the words “more or less”; BE-
GINNING at the northwest cor-
ner of Section 33, Township 1
North, Range 8 East of the
Black Hills Meridian; Thence,
South 89°51'35" East, along
the north line of the NW1/4 of
Section 33, a distance of
2656.84 feet to the northeast
corner of the NW1/4 of Section
33; Thence, South 00°08'05”
West, along the east line of the
NW1/4 of Section 33, a dis-
tance of 500.00 feet to a point
for corner; Thence, North
89°51'35” West, parallel to and
500 feet distant from the north
line of the NW1/4 of Section
33, a distance of 2656.35 feet
to a point for corner on the
west line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33; Thence, North
00°04'45” East, a distance of
500.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING and containing
30.49 acres, more or less, of
land.
Continue Rezone 13-13 and Compre-
hensive Plan Amendment 13-07 to the
September 20, 2013, Board of Commis-
sioners’ meeting.
C. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-14 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-08: Mitch Morris. To rezone
200.73 acres from General Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District
and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Limited Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District in
accordance with Section 508 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Being 200.73 acres of land
located in the NE1/4 of Section
32 and in the NW1/4 of Section
33, Township 1 North, Range 8
East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, said 200.73 acres of
land being more particularly
described by metes and
bounds as follows, all meas-
urements are to be considered
as being followed by the words
“more or less”; COMMENC-
ING, for location purposes only,
at the northeast corner of Sec-
tion 32 also being the north-
west corner of Section 33,
Township 1 North, Range 8
East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian; Thence, South 00°04'45"
West, along the common line
between Section 32 and Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 500.00
feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING of the herein described
tract; Thence, South 89°51'35"
East, parallel to and 500 feet
distant from the north line of
the NW1/4 of Section 33, a dis-
tance of 2656.35 feet to a point
for corner on the east line of
the NW1/4 of Section 33;
Thence, South 00°08'05”
West, along the east line of the
NW1/4 of Section 33, a dis-
tance of 2165.91 feet to a point
for corner; Thence, North
89°41'05” West, along the
south line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 2654.26
feet to the southwest corner of
the NW1/4 of Section 33 also
being the southeast corner of
the NE1/4 of Section 32;
Thence, North 89°42'51” West,
along the south line of the
NW1/4 of Section 32, a dis-
tance of 1270.58 feet to a point
for corner; Thence, North
06°22'35” West, a distance of
2169.92 feet to a point for cor-
ner, 500 feet south of the north
line of the NE1/4 of Section 32;
Thence, South 89°48'35" East,
parallel to and 500 feet distant
from the the north line of the
NE1/4 of Section 32, a dis-
tance of 1514.54 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING and
containing 200.73 acres, more
or less, of land.
Continue Rezone 13-14 and Compre-
hensive Plan Amendment 13-08 to the
September 20, 2013, Board of Commis-
sioners’ meeting.
D. LAYOUT PLAT / PL 13-15 AND
SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS VARI-
ANCE / SV 13-08: Alison Lewis; Fisk
Land Surveying – Agent. To create Lot 4
Revised of Engberg Subdivision and to
waive platting requirements in accor-
dance with Sections 400.1 and 700.1 of
the Pennington County Subdivision Reg-
ulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Lots 4,
5, 7, 8, 9, and 10, Engberg
Subdivision, Section 6, T2S,
R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lot 4
Revised, Engberg Subdivision,
Section 6, T2S, R6E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
Approve Subdivision Regulations Vari-
ance / SV 13-08 to waive Section Line
Highway improvements; topography at a
five foot interval, road improvements to
Old Hill City Road, which include right-of-
way width requirements and driving sur-
face improvements; improvements to the
access easements; percolation tests and
soil profile information due to the appli-
cant consolidating lots and a residence
already exists on the property; and, also
approve Layout Plat / PL 13-15 with eight
(8) conditions.
1. That prior to County Board approval
of the Minor Plat, the property be rezoned
from Limited Agriculture District to Low
Density Residential District;
2. That prior to County Board approval
of the Minor Plat, a Comprehensive Plan
Amendment be approved to amend the
Future Land Use Map from PUD Sensi-
tive to Low Density Residential District;
3. That the plat heading be corrected
to “The title needs to be corrected to
show “formerly all of lots 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 & 10
of Engberg Subdivision”;
4. That the applicant submits engi-
neered road construction plans for the
Section Line Highway, the 20 foot access
easement and Old Hill City Road or ob-
tain approval of a Subdivision Regula-
tions Variance waiving this requirement;
5. That prior to County Board approval
of the Minor Plat, the applicant obtain Op-
erating Permit for the onsite wastewater
treatment system on the property;
6. That the Section Line ROW and Old
Hill City Road are built to Local Road
Standards in a Low Density Residential
District, which includes a 32-foot paved
driving surface for Old Hill Road; and Or-
dinance 14 for the Section Line ROW or
obtain approval of a Subdivision Regula-
tions Variance be obtained waiving this
requirement;
7. That the 20 foot access easements
be widened to a 40-foot-wide access
easement and ROW for Old Hill City
Road be widen to 80 feet or obtain ap-
proval of a Subdivision Regulations Vari-
ance waiving this requirement; and,
8. That approval of this Layout Plat
does not constitute approval of any fur-
ther applications to be submitted for the
above-described property.
E. VACATION OF EASEMENT / VE
13-01: Jerry and Michele Sowards. To
vacate a portion of the access easements
located along the interior of Lots 13, 14,
17, and 18 of Tract A of Sunnyside Acres
Subdivision in accordance with the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Lots 13, 14, 17, and 18 of Tract
A, Sunnyside Acres Subdivi-
sion, Section 25, T2N, R4E,
and Section 30, T2N, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve of a portion of the applicant’s
Vacation of Easement request to vacate
the access easements within Lots 13, 14,
17 and 18 with the exception of the 17
foot easements located along the north-
west property line of Lot 13 and the
southeast property lines of Lots 17 and 18
with one (1) condition: 1. That prior to
County Board approval, a signed agree-
ment, by all parties involved, be submit-
ted to Planning and Zoning.
F. LAYOUT PLAT / PL 13-14 AND
SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS VARI-
ANCE / SV 13-07: Robert Tschetter; Fisk
Land Surveying – Agent. To create Lots
1R and 2R of Berry Development and to
waive platting requirements in accor-
dance with Sections 400.1 and 700.1 of
the Pennington County Subdivision Reg-
ulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Lots 1,
2, and 3, Berry Development,
Section 15, T1N, R5E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lots
1R and 2R, Berry Develop-
ment, Section 15, T1N, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve Subdivision Regulations Vari-
ance / SV 13-07 to waive topography at
a five foot interval; road improvements to
Custer Gulch Road; engineered road
construction plans; improvements to the
access easement; percolation tests and
soil profile information due to the appli-
cant is consolidating; and, topography as
the applicant is decreasing density in the
area; and, approve Layout Plat / PL 13-
14 with seven (7) conditions.
1. That Custer Gulch Road be im-
proved to Table one standards, which in-
cludes a 24-foot wide paved road with
curb, gutter sidewalks and on-street par-
allel parking or obtain approval of a Sub-
division Regulation Variance waiving this
requirement;
2. That the 33-foot wide access ease-
ment be improved to Table one stan-
dards, which includes a 24-foot wide
paved road with curb, gutter sidewalks
and on-street parallel parking or obtain
approval of a Subdivision Regulation Vari-
ance waiving this requirement;
3. That engineered road construction
plans be submitted for both Custer Gulch
Road and the 33-foot private access
easement or obtain approval of a Subdi-
vision Regulation Variance waiving this
requirement;
4. That at the time of submittal of the
Minor Plat, the applicant submit percola-
tion tests and soil profile information or
obtain approval of a Subdivision Regula-
tion Variance waiving this requirement;
5. That the applicant submit topogra-
phy at a five foot contour interval or obtain
approval of a Subdivision Regulation Vari-
ance waiving this requirement;
6. That the 33-foot private access
easement be named with the filing of this
plat; and,
7. That approval of this Layout Plat
does not constitute approval of any fur-
ther applications to be submitted for the
above-described property.
End of Consent Agenda
Regular Agenda Item
G. DISCUSSION OF TATTOO IN-
SPECTIONS (Cont. from 8/6/2013):
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to continue this item until the
Planning Director has an opportunity to
do further research to ensure that if the
Ordinance is repealed, there is some
mechanism to protect the people operat-
ing tattoo businesses and recoup the in-
spection costs. Vote: Unanimous.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1)
B. Contractual/Pending Litigation per
SDCL 1-25-2(3)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Holloway to convene in executive session
after a ten minute recess. Vote: Unani-
mous. The Board remained in executive
session from 11:52 a.m. until 12:55 p.m.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn from executive ses-
sion. Vote: Unanimous.
PERSONNEL
CCADP: Effective 8/5/2013 – D.
Cowher, $16.97/hr.; B. Christiansen,
$16.17/hr.; Effective 9/2/2013 – M. An-
dres, $16.97/hr.
JSC: Effective 7/21/2013 – C.
Rochleau, $19.65/hr.; Effective 7/22/2013
– N. Zielke, $16.17/hr.; Effective 8/5/2013
– M. McDonald, $3405.95; Effective
8/19/2013 – G. Sitzes, $3632.00; Effec-
tive 9/1/2013 – D. Burney, $4019.15; R.
MacLanders, $3461.74; H. Clausen,
$3063.19.
Jail: Effective 8/5/2013 at $19.65/hr.: T.
Jimenez, J. Trouton, T. Vallette, A. Pur-
cell; Effective 8/5/2013 - T. Spear,
$19.94/hr.; J. Cole, $15.39/hr.; P. Brooks,
$15.39/hr.; V. RadekeWilliams,
$18.27/hr.; Effective 7/25/2013 – W.
Reynolds, $16.58/hr.; Effective 8/1/2013
- J. Morris, $4142.92.
Law Enforcement: Effective 8/5/2013
– C. Beyer, $19.65/hr. M. Cole,
$19.94/hr.; J. Bloom, $19.65/hr.; Effective
8/1/2013 at $19.65/hr.: M. Bartik, G.
Strong B. Boreman, K. Luze, J. Hogue, A.
Meier, S. Stalder, C. Stickler, D. Hubbard,
R. Rodriguez, J. Hoffman, T. Nicolai, E.
McManigal.
Public Defender: Effective 8/12/2013 -
Jodi McDermand, $4,689.00; Effective
8/1/2013 – J. Albertson, $4,791.00; effec-
tive August 7, 2013, J. Lawler, $4,791.00.
VOUCHERS
4h Revolving, 1,000.00; 7-Eleven
32203 - Romeoville, Il, 18.59; A A Profes-
sional Property Management, 580.00; A
B Business Equipment, 211.89; A B
Welding Supply Co, 63.57; A A Horwath
And Sons, 124.40; A To Z Shredding Inc,
291.15; A1 Sewer Drain Inc, 120.00;
AAFBlack Hills, 190.00; Aaron Klapkin,
372.00; Ace Hardwareeast, 86.43; Active
Data Systems Inc, 2,604.80; Adamsics
LLC, 1,352.02; Adoba Eco Hotel Rapid
City, 150.00; Advanced Drug Testing Inc,
206.00; Ahmed Alasfour, 100.00; Air
Works, 299.00; Al Wessel Jr MD,
9,050.00; Alcohol Monitoring, 259.70; Ale-
cia Fuller, 445.60; All American Glass
Mirror, 230.30; All Continent-Agent Fee,
90.00; Allan Tuhy, 240.00; Allegiant Emer-
gency, 292.00; Allen Reuer, 1,540.00;
Amazon Mktplace Pmts, 194.18; Ama-
zon.Com, 449.26; Amber Larvie, 23.20;
American Correctional Association,
767.55; American Engineering, 600.00;
American Planning Assoc, 179.00; Amer-
ican Technical Services Inc, 5,633.00;
Americinn Lodge Suites, 180.00;
Americinn Motel, 987.00; Amerigas,
39.05; Ames Engineering, 1,417.15;
Amick Sound Inc, 45,028.86; Angela M
Colbath, 1,304.72; Angela Schultz, 20.00;
Anker Law Group Pc, 450.92; Apria
Health Care Inc, 545.28; Arc International
Inc, 2,635.02; Ashlie Parks, 40.00; As-
phalt Zipper, 167,470.00; Atlantic Signal,
1,390.00; Atrix International Inc, 319.45;
Audio Video Solutions, 137.10; Audra
Malcomb Consulting, 11,429.76; Auto-
clear LLC, 810.00; Avtech Electronics Inc,
4,299.95; Badlands Automotive,
1,485.14; Bareis Engineering Consulting,
920.00; Bargain Printing, 575.10; Basler
Printing Co, 702.75; Batteries Plus,
81.37; Behavior Management Systems
Inc, 9,560.00; Behrens Wilson Funeral
Home, 1,910.00; Bernard George, 43.36;
Best Western Ramkota Inn, 83.99; Best
Western Vermillion Inn, 770.00; Betsey
Harris, 1,944.20; Bettmann Hogue
Diedrich PLLC, 320.48; BH Chemical
Company Inc, 6,012.71; BH Eye Surgery
Center LLC, 990.53; BH Insurance Agenc
Inc, 360.00; BH Landscapes Valley
Green Lawn Garden Center, 402.50; BH
Orthopedic Spine Center Pc, 4,438.21;
BH Patrol, 1,845.00; BH Power Inc,
2,482.63; BH Power Inc, 808.68; BH
Power Inc, 48,983.48; BH Power Inc,
401.62; BH Powersports, 17.97; BH Re-
gional Eye Institute Llp, 852.31; BH Roof-
ing Co, 232.15; BH Society For Human
Resource Management, 65.00; BH Sur-
gical Hospital LLC, 2,338.07; BH Urgent
Care LLC, 50.00; BH Window Cleaning
Inc, 6,837.00; Biegler Greg Lpc Ccdc Ii,
120.00; Bierschbach Equipment, 99.60;
Black Hills Chemical, 2,819.49; Blakes
Trailer Sales, 525.00; BlockbUSter,
34.83; Bluetarp Financial Inc, 630.01;
Bob Barker Company, 4,643.44; Bob
Barker Company Inc, 102.80; Border
States Electric, 1,144.86; Brian Freeouf,
38.00; Bridgette R Banks, 1,230.60;
Brooke Haga, 43.70; Butler Machinery
Company, 1,708.89; Carquest Auto Parts,
183.44; Cashwa Distributing, 683.93;
Cats Cleaning, 40.00; Cbcinnovis Inc,
162.00; Cbm Food Service, 2,638.30;
Cbm Food Service, 70,533.33; Cdw Gov-
ernment Inc, 6,588.57; Cedar Ridge
TownhoUSes Inc, 240.00; Cedar Shore
Resort, 91.95; Central States Fair Inc,
31,079.30; Central States Sanitation,
276.33; Cetec Engineering, 7,939.60;
Chemguard, 4,217.60; Chemsearch,
1,126.40; Chivukula Venkata Aditya,
1,541.19; Chris Supply Co Inc, 1,160.34;
Cindi KrUSe, 142.76; City 3 Mart - Okla-
homa City, Ok, 10.91; City Of Box Elder,
173.99; City Of Chamberlain, 550.00; City
Of Hill City, 86.00; City Of Rapid City,
19,836.26; City Of Rapid City, 2,000.00;
City Of Rapid City Water, 79.06; City Of
Rapid City Water, 23,249.16; Civic Re-
search Institute, 329.90; Clark Printing,
1,272.05; Clifford J Zent, 240.00; Climate
Control Systems, 2,605.04; Clinical Lab-
oratory Of The Black Hills, 6,527.00;
Clock Tower Gardens Apartments,
240.00; Cmc Rescue Inc, 188.75; Coca-
cola Bottling Co Of The Black Hills,
374.00; Community Health Center Of The
Black Hills Inc, 22,137.00; Contractors
Supply Inc, 148.80; Copy Country,
138.85; Cora Fried, 236.00; Coremr Lc,
10,000.00; Cornerstone Apartments,
1,007.00; Corral Motel, 300.00; Correc-
tions Products Comp, 215.64; Council Of
Substance AbUSe Directors, 1,156.05;
Publ ic Notices
Country Inn & Suites - Bloomington, Mn,
249.12; Countryside Property Manage-
ment LLC, 1,761.00; Courtesy Subaru
Inc, 2,381.35; Creative Ironworks,
195.00; Creighton Thurman, 651.90;
Crescent Electric Supply, 935.49; Cross
Country Education LLC, 169.00; CSD,
223.25; Cynthia Weichmann, 979.70; D
And R Service, 468.75; Dakota BUSiness
Center, 3,123.89; Dakota Plains Legal
Services, 16,333.33; Dakota Radiology,
102.45; Dakota Supply Group Inc,
172.60; Dales Tire Retreading Inc,
3,144.44; Dan Leon, 136.00; Dana L
Hanna, 1,621.20; Dash Medical Gloves,
1,492.60; David M Hosmer Law Office
Pc, 117.90; Dawn Puckett, 121.00; Deb-
orah J Cady, 271.00; Dell Marketing Lp,
430.29; Delta Air, 567.60; Delta Air,
741.60; Delta Air, 741.60; Denise Cody,
60.00; Dennis Gorton, 107.50; Dennis
Prue, 21.20; Dennis Supply Rc, 418.96;
Des Oil Inc, 296.16; Diagnostic Imaging
Systems Inc, 151.16; Diamond D Steam
Cleaning, 400.00; Diamond Mowers Inc,
160.02; Diesel Machinery Inc, 2,867.84;
Dillon Law Office, 1,100.40; Dioten Engi-
neering Inc, 1,190.00; Ditch Witch Of
South Dakota Inc, 299.80; Dollar Car
Rent - Oklahoma City, Ok, 390.38; Dollar
Rac Ord, 173.06; Donald A Janz,
3,300.00; Donna Mayer, 19.24; Door Se-
curity Products, 38.27; Doris I Olmstead,
1,143.42; Doug Fast Horse, 21.60; Eagle
Enterprises, 1,478.20; Eastern Penn
Conservation, 9,175.00; Ecolab Pest
Elimination, 874.50; Eddies Truck Center
Inc, 1,085.69; Eddies Truck Sales Inc,
1,806.02; Election Center The, 150.00;
Elisa Rangel, 100.00; Elizabeth Glynn,
1,415.88; EProvider Solutions, 338.60;
Evergreen Office Products, 2,532.16; Ex-
ecutive Mgmt Fin Office, 820.84; Exhaust
Pros, 294.88; Expedia, 587.15; Expedia
Expedia.Com, 975.17; Fall River Co Au-
ditors Office, 207.00; Farmer Brothers
Coffee, 1,068.23; Fastenal Company,
325.84; Federal Express, 50.35; Fedex,
16.60; Fennell Design Inc, 1,310.97; Fer-
nand D Marquis, 139.00; Firesteel Tech-
nologies Inc, 620.00; First Administrators
Inc, 174,227.26; First Administrators Inc,
83,146.58; First American Title Co,
270.00; First Photo Inc, 1,344.00; Flag-
house Inc, 283.15; Fleet Safety Equip-
ment Inc, 285.21; Foleys Custom Print,
32.50; Foothills Seed Inc, 850.00; Fred
Pryor Careertrack, 128.00; Fremont In-
dustries Inc, 1,823.22; Frenchs Uphol-
stery, 175.00; Frontier Auto Glass LLC,
271.54; Frontier Commercial, 925.00;
Fruit Of Loom / Jerzees, 991.64; Fsh
Communications LLC, 60.00; G H Dis-
tributing Rc, 902.17; Galls Intern, 224.98;
Georges Vacuum Sales And Service,
319.95; GJ Holsworth Sons Inc,
1,380.00; Godfrey Brake Service And
Supply Inc, 1,218.42; Golden West Com-
panies, 582.41; Golden West Technolo-
gies, 1,814.52; Gordon Wendell, 121.00;
Grace Investigations, 1,388.53; Great
Western, 267.85; Great Western Tire Inc,
1,095.67; Greg Barnier, 1,344.00; Grey
Law, 520.80; Grimms Pump And Indus-
trial, 8.26; Grimms Pump Service Inc,
430.46; Gunderson Palmer Nelson And
Ashmore Llp, 212.26; H L Properties Inc,
160.00; Hampton Inn Chicago -
Naperville, Il, 176.64; Harveys Lock
Shop, 365.83; Health Education Design,
70.00; Heartland Paper Company,
6,888.91; Heather M Lacroix, 296.00; He-
bron Brick Supply Co, 230.25; Henry
Schein Inc, 96.45; Herds Ribbon Laser
Service, 130.49; Hewlettpackard,
15,696.00; Hill City Hardware Inc, 80.73;
Hill City Prevailer, 1,138.70; Hill City Pub-
lic Library, 6,548.25; Hills Materials Co,
61,370.31; Hillyard Sioux Falls, 1,167.28;
Hitech Trad, 778.73; Hodges Badge Co
Inc, 417.30; Holiday Inn Express, 77.00;
Holiday Stnstore, 44.70; Holly L Gittings,
402.50; Honeywell Inc, 187.50; Horwath
Laundry Equipment, 621.72; Howes Oil
Company Inc, 84,155.46; Humane Soci-
ety Of The Black Hills, 4,166.67; Ice
House Arctic Glacier, 94.59; Imperial
Hotel, 410.00; Indoff Inc, 492.79; IndUS-
trial Electric And Supply, 575.80; Inter-
state All Battery Center, 1,402.66; Inter-
state Batteries, 371.85; Intoximeters Inc,
3,380.00; Ione Wolf, 307.00; Isi LLC,
706.72; J Garcia Properties, 190.00; J
Scull Construction, 855,744.51; J1 LLC,
240.00; Jackson Lewis Llp, 5,230.00;
James Croyle, 20.00; James F Neuzil,
270.00; James L Jeffries, 504.80; Janet
Sayler, 22.20; Jason Enders, 96.00;
Jason Mitzel, 298.91; JC Supply Co,
669.00; Jean Carlson, 902.50; Jean
Kappedal, 837.45; Jean M Cline,
3,037.30; Jeanne Wing, 44.80; Jeff
Rohrich, 349.00; Jefferson Partner Lp,
206.16; Jenner Equipment Co, 296.23;
Jennifer Knighton, 20.00; Jeromey Smith,
243.60; Jimmy Johns Catering, 706.47;
Joan Kittelson, 15.00; Jodi Rodriguez,
21.60; Joe Doran, 121.00; John E Slagle,
270.00; John Gordon, 375.00; Johnson
Machine Inc, 2,174.66; Johnsons Carpet
Cleaning Service, 1,375.50; Jolly Lane
GreenhoUSe, 292.13; Jolly Lane Green-
hoUSe Inc, 1,601.24; Jonathan Kirk,
59.03; Josh Hendrickson, 26.80; Joshua
D Friedman Dr, 2,875.00; Jrs Logging
Inc, 4,580.00; Judy L Weber, 90.00; Julie
Moore, 150.00; K D Appliance Service,
100.00; Karen Swanda, 45.00; Karls Ap-
pliance, 349.00; Kathryn M ReishUS,
350.00; Kayla L Glasshoff, 649.80; Kc
Video Production, 87.50; Kd Contractors
Inc, 6,029.10; Kea Properties, 190.00;
Keiths Repair Service, 100.00; Kelly
Thomas, 8.00; Kennedy Pier Knoff Lof-
tUS Llp, 396.40; Kenneth Orrock,
2,931.60; Kent Przymus, 90.00; Kevin E
Kirschenmann, 1,260.00; Kevin Thom,
1,892.99; Keystone Community Center,
2,275.00; Kieffer Sanitationa Waste Man-
agement Co, 419.96; Kimball Midwest,
1,356.50; Kirk Funeral Home, 9,948.49;
Kmart, 45.97; Knecht Home Center, 3.72;
Knecht Home Center Inc, 601.81; Knights
Quality Welding, 650.00; Knollwood
TownhoUSe Properties, 190.00; Kone
Inc, 5,622.60; KSL Corporation Atty
Fees, 336.00; Kyle KraUSe, 495.60; Kyle
Theisen, 462.40; L3 Communications,
238.00; Laboratory Corporation Of Amer-
ica Holdings, 45.00; Lakota Community
Homes Inc, 215.00; Language Line Serv-
ices, 282.27; Lara Roetzel, 42.35; Larry
D FUSs, 190.00; Latta Technical Services
Inc, 7,300.00; Lattice Incorporated,
48,607.53; Lawrence D Beezley, 130.00;
Lawson Products Inc, 522.73; Leo A Daly,
10,521.78; Leroy Dean Hix, 190.00;
Leslie Phd Fiferman, 1,800.00; Leslie
Havemeier, 30.60; Lester Davis, 590.44;
Letha R Bonham, 240.00; Lewis Clark
Behavioral Health Services, 1,192.00;
Lighting Maintenance Co, 1,522.49; Lin-
coln County Auditor, 90.00; Linda J Nohr,
1,190.00; Lisa Ball, 945.00; Lori Benson,
Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 8
Continued on page 9
19.20; Lorie D Pc Melone, 1,257.17; Lor-
raine M Bergan, 1,140.00; Lowes,
583.98; Lucille M Lewno, 642.09;
Lutheran Social Service, 2,895.83; Lyle
Signs Inc, 8,387.70; Lynn Von Wald,
230.00; Mainline Contracting Inc,
104,365.44; Malcom Chapman, 900.00;
Manlove Psychiatric Group, 6,624.19;
Maple Green LLC, 240.00; Maplewood
TownhoUSes, 774.00; Marcia Whiting,
2,637.60; Marco Inc, 1,992.61; Mar-
gadant Law Office Pc, 247.00; Mary An-
derson, 17.60; Masters Awards, 100.00;
Matheson Trigas Inc, 203.35; Mathison
Graphics PlUS, 217.81; Matthew L Skin-
ner, 4,976.22; Matthew Stephens,
2,095.00; May Johnson Doyle Becker
Pc, 3,896.78; Mccolleys Chapel Of The
Hills Inc, 250.00; Mckie Ford Inc, 39.02;
Mckie Ford Lincoln, 499.29; Mcleods
Printing Inc, 159.10; Meade County Sher-
iffs Office, 18.00; Medical Waste Trans-
port Inc, 558.61; Medicap Speciality Serv-
ice, 2,110.94; Medline Industries Inc,
167.95; Melissa Goodmitzel, 325.00;
Menards, 377.50; Metrocount USa Inc,
234.00; Mg Oil Company, 4,299.92; Mid-
continent Communications, 1,025.76;
Midwest Marketing LLC, 70.00; Midwest
Radar Equipment, 1,120.00; Midwest
Tire Muffler Inc, 32.96; Mighty Kids
Media, 70.54; Montana Dakota Utilities,
36.12; Monte Kahler Rentals, 190.00;
Moore Medical Corp, 3,377.13; Morse
Watchmans Inc, 15,139.60; Motive Parts
Supply Inc, 129.16; Moyle Petroleum,
54,048.44; Mt RUShmore Telephone Co,
44.73; Murphy Law Office Pc, 1,042.31;
Ncchc, 325.00; Nd Chapter Of The Inter-
national Association Of, 245.00; NDSU-
Customer Acct Svcs, 54.00; Network So-
lutions, LLC, 160.00; Neurosurgical
Spinal Surgery Associates, 30.14; Neves
Uniforms Inc, 1,745.63; Newegg Inc,
222.70; Newkirks Ace Hrdwreeast,
605.26; Newkirks Ace Hrdwrewest,
407.91; Nicolas Quetter, 228.00; Nielsen
S- Ellendale, Mn, 44.76; Nms Labs,
282.00; Nooney Solay Van Norman,
4,738.68; North Central Supply Inc,
9,042.99; Northern Heights, 149.00;
Northwest Pipe Fitting Inc, 3,708.69; Npc
International, 53.95; Oberles Radiator
And Repair, 175.00; Office Max, 36.76;
Officemax Ct Inc, 308.67; Officemax Ct
Inc, 8.85; Officemax Incorporated,
1,860.15; Olson Towing Ii, 100.00; Olsons
One Call, 112.00; Omni Charlotte,
587.79; Orbitcom Inc, 45.86; Oreilly Auto
Parts, 13.11; Osheim Schmidt Funeral
Home, 1,700.00; Pacific Steel Recycling,
1,385.95; Paradis Properties LLC,
640.00; Parr Law Pc, 2,772.00; Patricia
Croyle, 20.00; Patty Caster, 121.00; Paul
A Lewis, 3,130.40; Pederson Law Office
LLC, 458.50; Peggy Clark, 20.00; Penn
Co Equalization Petty Cash, 3.71; Penn
Co Health Human Sv Petty Cash,
240.06; Penn Co Highway Petty Cash,
13.43; Penn Co Jsc Petty Cash, 29.93;
Penn Co Juv Diversion, 151.96; Penn Co
Sheriff Petty Cash, 3,052.99; Penn Co
States Atty Petty Cash, 138.25; Penn Co
Treasurer Petty Cash, 5.27; Penn Con-
servation Dist, 6,787.50; Pennington
County Courant, 921.45; Pennington
County HoUSing, 190.00; Pete Lien
Sons Inc, 1,044.51; Pheasantland IndUS-
tries, 54.08; Phoenix Investigations,
802.40; Phoenix Supply LLC, 367.22;
Piedmont Cemetery Association, 50.00;
Pine Lawn Memorial Park, 680.00;
Plantsmyth, 181.62; Pollard Larson Llp,
171.00; Price Motel, 520.00; Print Market,
1,409.50; Quill Corporation, 1,790.30;
Rachael High Bear, 21.60; Ranch HoUSe
Motel, 280.00; Randal E Connelly,
2,306.63; Randy Moore, 150.00; Rapid
Chevrolet-Cadillac, 439.76; Rapid Colli-
sion, 539.97; Rapid Delivery Inc, 142.80;
Rapid Leasing, 860.49; Rapid Rooter,
635.00; Rapid Tire Alignment, 340.50;
Rapid Towing LLC, 225.00; Rapid Transit
System, 60.00; RC Area School Dist 514,
2,005.51; RC Chamber Of Commerce,
890.00; RC Emergency Services, 289.06;
RC Fire Emergency Services, 436.72;
RC Journal, 5,182.86; RC Medical Center
LLC, 15,763.00; RC Pizza Ranch,
136.39; RC Police Deptevidence,
9,501.73; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
5,691.99; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
117.25; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
770.22; RC Winair, 156.87; RCS Con-
struction Inc, 182,137.62; RDO Equip-
ment Co, 2,318.49; Record Storage So-
lutions, 1,406.42; Redwood Toxicology
Inc, 1,367.73; Redwood Toxicology Lab-
oratory Inc, 201.15; Regional Health
Physicians, 3,858.99; Regional Health
Reference Laboratory, 2,276.91;
Richanda Hurt, 20.00; Richard R Rieck,
121.00; Richard Schuttler, 121.00; Ricky
L Stuart, 5,288.98; Ricoh USa Inc,
170.00; Ricoh USa Inc, 237.67; Ritec In-
dustrial Prodcts, 125.00; Rob Erickson,
20.00; Robert Sharp Associates, 287.95;
Robinson Textiles, 1,440.10; Rochester
Armored Car Company Inc, 408.40;
Roger Braunstein, 4,583.33; Roger Fryes
Paint Supply, 31.99; Roxy Dix, 240.00;
Royal Wheel Alignment, 559.12; Rr
Waste Solutions, 54.22; Runnings Farm
& Fleet#27, 352.52; Runnings Supply Inc,
302.34; RUShmore Communications,
100.50; RUShmore Safety Supplies,
20.99; Ruth Portratz, 20.00; Ryan Cook,
92.22; Safety Kleen Systems Inc, 541.58;
Sand Scripts, 107.00; Sanford Clinic,
911.00; Sarah Morrison, 180.00; Sarah
Smith, 16.94; Scenic Township, 2,801.25;
Scheels, 40.98; School Outfitters, 87.34;
Scott Hix, 20.00; Scott Schuft, 957.96;
Scovel Psychological, 1,984.00; SD
Assoc Of Defense Lawyers, 20.00; SD
Dept Of Public Safety, 50.00; SD Dept Of
Public Safety, 20.00; SD Dept Of Rev-
enue, 12,391.45; SD Dept Of Revenue,
840.00; SD Dept Of Revenue, 290.00;
SD Dept Of Transpfinance, 73,476.79;
SD Div Of Motor Vehicles, 51.00; SD
Federal Property Agency, 31,474.50; SD
Human Services Center, 662.40; SD
Rose Inn, 503.60; SDAAO, 300.00;
SDACC, 660.00; SDEMA, 100.00; SDSU
West River Ag Center, 238.28; Sears
Commercial One, 137.96; Sentinel Of-
fender Service, 1,180.38; Serenity
Springs Funeral Chapel, 3,820.00; Ser-
vall Uniformlinen Co, 5,033.65; Shannon
Rittberger, 408.12; Shannon Tibbetts,
300.00; Sheehan Mack Sales, 323.31;
Shell Oil - Mitchell, SD US, 60.76; Shell
Oil - Mitchell, SD US, 46.23; Shepherd
Reporting LLC, 120.00; Sherwin Williams
Paints, 631.77; Shreves Law Office,
219.00; Simon Contractors, 545,013.17;
Smoot Utzman, 1,482.60; Solemate
Shoes And Uniform Center, 411.71;
South Creek Village, 134.00; Spizzirri
Press Inc, 75.00; Springbrook Software
Inc, 23,331.88; St Mary Parish, 45.50;
Stanley Convergent Security, 2,511.63;
Stardust Motel, 350.00; State Radio
Communication, 5,280.00; Steam Clean-
ing Specialist, 1,900.00; Stephanie Hold-
inghausen, 240.00; Stephanie Mccoy,
24.60; Sturdevant's Auto Part, 1,317.45;
Sturdevant's Auto Part, 310.30; Sturde-
vants Auto Parts, 701.09; Sue Hudgens,
7.20; Sundial Square Apartments,
660.00; Sus Psychology Today, 24.97;
Swanston Equipment, 1,058.53; Tammie
DarnallKnowlton, 20.00; Technology Cen-
ter, 600.00; Ted Jr Rufledt, 95.20; Teresa
L Fink, 1,581.65; Terri Phelps, 510.00;
Tessco Incorporated, 973.71; The
Change Companies, 779.38; The Fence
Connection, 6,208.31; The Little Print
Shop Inc, 447.88; The Medicine Shoppe,
2,407.94; The Physical Therapy Center
Inc, 254.88; The Repair Shop, 257.43;
The Ups Store, 14.94; Thomson Reuter-
swest, 7,717.10; Threed Specialties Inc,
2,276.79; Thundercloud LLC, 46.00;
Tiffany Meyer, 329.94; Titan Access Ac-
count, 33.08; Tma Downtown, 68.56;
Todd Battest, 69.73; Todd Schweiger,
839.26; Tom Vlieger, 76.80; Tomaride
LLC, 240.00; Tou Sue Lee, 2,558.00;
Tractor Supply Credit Pla, 119.97; Tracy
Lynn Binder, 152.80; Travis Rieger,
20.00; Trevor Abernathie, 121.00; Trimin
Systems Inc, 3,300.00; Turnkey Correc-
tions, 9,576.19; Twilight Inc, 159.00; Twl
Billing Service Supplies, 2,086.54; Ty
Ferley, 190.00; United, 1,011.80; United,
1,011.80; United, 505.90; Universal Lan-
guages Provider, 3,223.81; Upper Knoll-
wood TownhoUSe, 240.00; US Chemical
Procurement, 459.67; US Postal Service,
2,307.27; US Prisoner Transport,
2,235.24; Valarie Oday, 294.80; Vanway
Trophy Awards, 164.35; Verizon Wire-
less, 91.29; Verizon Wireless, 342.51;
Veronica Escalante, 44.00; Veronica Fish,
32.60; Victor Gomez, 100.00; Video Serv-
ice Of America, 287.32; Walker Refuse,
111.10; Wall Buidling Center Construc-
tion, 262.01; Wall Community Library,
3,875.00; Wal-Mart, 927.52; Wal-Mart,
591.16; Wal-Mart, 5.43; Walmart.Com,
117.80; Warne Chemical Equipment Co
Inc, 217.80; Watertre Inc, 1,026.55; Wat-
son Law Office Pc, 21.00; Wayne Satter,
20.00; Wendy T McGowan, 2,860.66;
West River Electric, 233.75; West River
International Inc, 4,203.48; West River
Welding Machine, 260.00; Western Com-
munication Inc, 1,124.75; Western Mail-
ers, 125.09; Western Stationers Inc,
2,731.36; Western Thrifty Inn LLC,
1,712.36; Wex Bank, 5,495.53; Wex
Bank, 549.09; Wex Bank, 290.74; Wex
Bank, 422.89; Wex Bank, 576.02; Wex
Bank, 1,049.28; Whisler Bearing Co,
207.03; William A Moss Psyd LLC,
520.00; William Atyeo, 87.52; William R
Grode, 634.50; Winner Police Dept,
242.43; Winter Law Office Pc, 3,133.72;
Wood Stock Supply, 26.01; Working
Against Violence, 15,980.00; WOW Inter-
net Cable And Phone, 286.81; WOW In-
ternet Cable And Phone, 387.81; WOW
Internet Cable And Phone, 383.12; WRC
Property Management, 240.00; Wrist-
bands Medtech USa Inc, 107.75; Yankton
Co Sheriff Office, 125.00; Yankton County
Treasurer, 318.75; Yolanda Prue, 100.00;
Youth Family Services, 25.00; Z S Dust
Control System, 267.42; Ziegler Building
Center Inc, 26.40; Zuercher Technologies
LLC, 1,500.00.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Holloway to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 12:55
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published September 5, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $456.89.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
090382 LOT 4 IN BLK 4 OF THUN-
DERBIRD SUBDIVISION IN THE
CITY OF BOX ELDER, PENNING-
TON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA
(ID 18022). NICHOLAS DURAN,
ANY OCCUPANTS RESIDING AT
609 CARDINAL DR, BOX ELDER,
SD., WELLS FARGO BANK
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 19th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 29 & September 5,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$27.91.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
080156 SW ¼ SE ¼ NW ¼ OF SEC-
TION 18 TOWNSHIP 2 N OR
RANGE 11 E PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
55267). BRENT NELSON, SARAH
NELSON, ANY OCCUPANTS RE-
SIDING AT 110 S MONROE AVE-
NEW UNDERWOOD, SD., EN-
GLEHART ESTATES HOMEOWN-
ERS ASSOC., KNECHT HOME
CENTER, STATE OF SD
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 19th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 29 & September 5,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$29.72.
WALL SCHOOL
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
AUGUST 14, 2013
The Board of Education of the Wall
School District #51-5 met in regular ses-
sion on Wednesday, August 14, 2013, in
the Library of Wall School. Members
present: Chairperson Eisenbraun, Vice-
Chairperson Johnson, Members Cordes,
Anderson, Williams, Bielmaier, and Trask.
Also attending were Superintendent
Rieckman, Elementary Principal Sykora,
Business Manager Mohr, Lynn Dunker,
Cindy Weaver, Kent Anderson, and Lau-
rie Hindman. Chairperson Eisenbraun
called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.
All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.
Business Manager Mohr took a roll call of
the board members. All members were
present.
The Pledge of Allegiance was recited.
4828. Anderson moved to approve the
agenda. Seconded by Johnson. Motion
carried.
It was noted there was two additions to
the consent agenda as follows: Approve
staff contract for Marlene McMillan,
WASP Aide - $9.00 per hour and approve
activity contract for Molly Lytle, Jr. Class
Co-advisor - $1,068.93.
4829. Bielmaier moved to approve the
consent agenda with the above changes
as follows: Seconded by Cordes. Motion
carried.
•Approve minutes of July 10, 2013
board meeting.
•Approve August claims.
•Approve 2013-2014 staff contracts:
Ella Campbell, WASP Director -
$12.00/hr.; Todd Grimmett, Custodian -
$10.25/hr.; Marlene McMillan, WASP
Aide - $9.00/hr.
•Approve 2013-2014 activity contract:
Molly Lytle, Jr. Class Co-advisor -
$1,068.93
•Approve addendum for Ronda Wilson
to add the other half of Student Council
Advisor to her contract in the amount of
$240.75 and to remove Senior Class Co-
Advisor from her contract in the amount
of $240.75 for a net effect of $0.
•Approve addendum for David Ermish
to change lanes from BA+40 to BA+52 in
the amount of $500.00 and to add Co-Ad-
visor for Senior Class in the amount of
$229.50
GENERAL FUND
A & B WELDING CO, SUPPLIES, 30.30;
ACE EDUCATIONAL SUPPLIES, SUP-
PLIES, 121.19; ANDERSON, CAR-
OLYNN, MILEAGE, 116.00; AVERA
HEALTH, PURCHASING FEE, 100.00;
BEST WESTERN/RAMK0TA INN,
TRAVEL, 177.98; BLACK HILLS CHEM-
ICAL CO., SUPPLIES, 6,177.94; CA-
BANA BANNERS, SUPPLIES, 25.00;
CROWN OIL CO., FUEL, 1,685.00;
DAKOTA HILLS PEST SERVICE, PEST
CONTROL, 350.00; DAKOTA MILL,
WEED SPRAY, 47.50; DAKOTA POT-
TERS SUPPLY, SUPPLIES, 70.66; DE'S
OIL & PROPANE, OIL CHANGE, 533.49;
DELTA EDUCATION, SUPPLIES, 64.08;
DOUGLAS HIGH SCHOOL, T8 BAL-
LASTS, 350.00; E-FILLIATE INC., SUP-
PLIES, 38.50; E-RATE COMPLETE,
LLC, ERATE ANNUAL FEE, 1,500.00;
ERMISH, DAVID, TUITION REIM-
BURSEMENT, 150.00; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, REGISTRATION/MEM-
BERSHI P/ TRAVEL / SUPPL I ES,
3,404.91; FLINN SCIENTIFIC, SUP-
PLIES, 556.95; FREY SCIENTIFIC, SUP-
PLIES, 239.18; GOLDEN WEST TECH-
NOLOGIES, TELEPHONE MAINT
AGREEMENT, 418.44; GOLDEN WEST
TELEPHONE COOP., TELEPHONE,
447.08; GRIMMETT, TODD, BACK-
GROUND CHECK, 43.25; DAKOTA
SPORTS, SUPPLIES, 735.60;
HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT,
SUPPLIES, 131.28; IMPACT SCHOOLS
OF SOUTH DAKOTA, 2013-14 DUES,
3,342.62; J.W. PEPPER & SON, INC.,
SUPPLIES, 276.69; JOHNSON, PAM,
MILEAGE, 116.00; LIFELINE AUDIO
VIDEO TECHNOLOGIES, SUPPLIES,
186.50; LORENZ CORPORATION, THE,
SUBSCRIPTION, 79.95; MARCO, INC.,
COLOR COPIER CONTRACT, 433.00;
MC LEODS PRINTING, SUPPLIES,
116.35; MCGRAW-HILL COMPANIES,
THE, SUPPLIES, 139.90; NASCO, SUP-
PLIES, 401.55; NETWORK SERVICES
CO., SUPPLIES, 4,705.70; PENNING-
TON COUNTY COURANT, PROCEED-
INGS, 1,083.86; PHEASANTLAND IN-
DUSTRIES, RECOVER TEXTBOOKS,
352.00; PHILLIPS66, CONOCO, 76,
GAS, 377.36; PITTMAN, PANDI,
TRAVEL, 259.00; REGION IV ADMINIS-
TRATORS, REGION IV DUES, 270.00;
RIECKMAN, DENNIS, TRAVEL, 158.00;
SCHOLASTIC, SUPPLIES, JUNIOR
SCHOLASTIC/SCOPE, 1,013.28;
SCHOOL SPECIALTY, SUPPLIES,
2,902.58; SD DEPT OF LABOR, UNEM-
PLOYMENT, 705.35; SECTION 8002,
DUES, 250.00; SIMPLEXGRINNELL,
ALARM SYSTEM SERVICE, 1,918.09;
SOUTH DAKOTA RETIREMENT SYS-
TEM, EARLY RETIREMENT, 48,226.20;
SUPREME SCHOOL SUPPLY, SUP-
PLIES, 185.83; SYKORA, CHUCK,
TRAVEL, 158.00; TAYLOR MUSIC, INC,
SUPPLIES, 214.00; TIGER DIRECT,
SUPPLIES, 176.62; TRAINING ROOM,
INC., SUPPLIES, 698.65; TRASK,
TODD, TRAVEL, 116.00; TRUST AND
AGENCY, REIMBURSE IMPREST, 0.91;
VERIZON WIRELESS, CELL PHONE,
157.05; VERNIER SOFTWARE & TECH-
NOLOGY, SUPPLIES, 760.46; WALKER
REFUSE, GARBAGE, 554.40; WALL
BUILDING CENTER, SUPPLIES,
696.35; WALL HEALTH SERVICES, BUS
DRIVER PHYSICAL, 118.00; WALL
SCHOOL, POSTAGE, 250.00; WALL
WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER,
1,987.77; WARNE CHEMICAL & EQUIP-
MENT CO., LAWN CARE, 256.00; WEST
RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELECTRIC-
ITY, 4,154.05; WEX BANK, GAS, 211.61;
WILLIAMS, MARY, TRAVEL, 116.00;
ZANER-BLOSER, HANDWRITING
PAPER, 718.80.
FUND TOTAL: 96,358.81
CAPITAL OUTLAY
AVI SYSTEM SALES, PROJECTORS,
1,153.04; BITWIXT SOFTWARE SYS-
TEMS, LLC, SOFTWARE, 1,913.00;
CALCULATORS INC, T1 SMARTVIEW
84, 277.43; CENGAGE LEARNING, VO
AG TEXTBOOKS, 1,918.13; DAKOTA
2000, FORTICLIENT LICENSE, 150.00;
DAKTRONICS, INC., ALL SPORT CG,
1,300.00; FIRST NAT'L BANK - SIOUX
FALLS, C.O. PAYOFF, 443,438.75;
FRONTIER COMMERCIAL GLASS INC.,
DOORS/GLASS, 17,214.78; GOLDEN
WEST TECHNOLOGIES, ACCESS
CONTROL/NETWORK DVR, 14,577.95;
HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT,
TEXTBOOKS, 1,932.60; KITTERMAN,
KRISTOPHER, HALLWAY PAINTING -
FINAL PYMT, 9,059.11; MCGRAW-HILL
COMPANIES, THE, TEXTBOOKS,
7,373.36; PEARSON EDUCATION,
TEXTBOOKS, 2,065.01; PERFECTION
LEARNING, TEXTBOOKS, 629.78;
ROGERS ATHLETIC CO.,
POWERBLAST 12 ARM, 2,517.00;
SCHOOL SPECIALTY, CARPET,
7,025.00; SPECIALTY INSTALLATION
LLC, INSTALLATION OF BLEACHERS,
6,373.94; TIGER DIRECT,
SUPPLIES/PRINTERS/COMPUTERS,
18,332.07; TRUST AND AGENCY, REIM-
BURSE IMPREST, 2,000.00; UNIVER-
SAL ATHLETIC SERVICE, GBB UNI-
FORMS, 3,666.88; WALL BUILDING
CENTER, PROJECT MATERIALS,
1,344.61.
FUND TOTAL: 544,262.44
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND
ACHEIEVEMENT PRODUCTS, SUP-
PLIES, 43.75; CHILDREN'S CARE HOS-
PITAL & SCH, JUNE SERVICES,
9,233.40; FIRST INTERSTATE BANK,
SUPPLIES, 1,238.25; OTICON, INC,
SUPPLIES, 160.00; PRO-ED, SPEECH
EVAL ASSESSMENTS, 379.50;
SCHOOL SPECIALTY, SUPPLIES,
99.09; WEX BANK, GAS, 26.18.
FUND TOTAL: 11,180.17
FOOD SERVICE FUND
AVERA HEALTH, PURCHASING FEE,
100.00; BEST WESTERN/RAMKOTA
INN, TRAVEL, 335.96; DUNKER, LYNN,
MILEAGE, 213.86; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, CONF REGISTRATION, 150.00;
GOLDEN WEST TELEPHONE COOP.,
TELEPHONE, 23.23; HUBERT,
KITCHEN PITCHERS/TONGS, 61.31;
INFINITE CAMPUS, FOOD SERVICE
PROGRAM FEES, 583.20; MC LEODS
PRINTING, SUPPLIES, 25.90; SCHOOL
SPECIALTY, SUPPLIES, 54.57; TRUST
AND AGENCY, MEMBERSHIP, 38.25;
WALL WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER,
13.70; WEAVER, CINDY, MILEAGE,
111.20; WEST RIVER ELECTRIC
COOP., ELECTRICITY, 169.55.
FUND TOTAL: 1,880.73
WALL AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
DAKOTA INK & TONER, SUPPLIES,
62.00; EARLY CHILDHOOD CONNEC-
TIONS, CPR TRAINING, 120.00; EAST-
ERN PENNINGTON CO. TRANSIT,
TRANSPORTATION, 203.00; GOLDEN
WEST TELEPHONE COOP., TELE-
PHONE, 65.81; ORIENTAL TRADING
CO., SUPPLIES, 307.74; PENNINGTON
COUNTY COURANT, WASP AD, 24.60;
SAM'S CLUB, GROCERIES, 274.56;
TRUST AND AGENCY, GROCERIES,
422.56; WALL FOOD CENTER, GRO-
CERIES, 94.98; WALL WATER DEPART-
MENT, WATER, 38.81; WEST RIVER
ELECTRIC COOP., ELECTRICITY,
480.40.
FUND TOTAL: 2,094.46
CHECKING ACCOUNT TOTAL:
655,776.61
Cindy Weaver and Lynn Dunker were
present to discuss the recent changes to
the National School Lunch Program and
how it affects our school. There was dis-
cussion on how the lunch program oper-
ates and the regulations our district has
to follow. Our district’s lunch program will
be inspected sometime during the up-
coming school year.
Elementary Principal Sykora asked the
board if there were any questions on the
handbooks that had been handed out for
review at previous meetings.
4830. Anderson moved to approve the
Elementary Handbook. Seconded by
Cordes. Motion carried.
4831. Anderson moved to approve the
Big White Handbook. Seconded by
Johnson. Motion carried.
4832. Johnson moved to approve the
Elementary Title I Handbook. Seconded
by Anderson. Motion carried.
4833. Johnson moved to approve the
Middle School Title I Handbook. Sec-
onded by Bielmaier. Motion carried.
Business Manager Mohr informed the
board that the FY13 audit is done. The
auditors are working on the financial
statements that will then be submitted to
Publ ic Notices
Proceedings of Pennington
County Commissioners
(cont. from previous page)
the Department of Legislative Audit for re-
view and approval. Mohr then asked the
board if there were any questions regard-
ing the budget. There were no questions
at this time.
Rieckman passed around open enroll-
ment applications for 6 students.
4834. Trask moved to approve open
enrollment applications for David Sharp,
Avery Ludwig, Victoria Ludwig, Marcus
Ludwig, Maranda Poor Bear, and
Keaunna Poor Bear. Seconded by An-
derson. Motion carried.
Next, the board was asked to approve the
fall sports rules.
4835. Trask moved to approve the
2013-2014 Football rules. Seconded by
Anderson. Motion carried.
4836. Bielmaier moved to approve the
2013-2014 Volleyball rules. Seconded by
Trask. Motion carried.
4837. Johnson moved to approve the
2013-2014 Cross Country rules. Sec-
onded by Cordes. Motion carried.
Rieckman asked the board to approve
Madison McLaughlin as a volunteer for
volleyball. All of Madison’s coaching cre-
dentials are turned in and on file with the
district.
4838. Cordes moved to approve Madi-
son McLaughlin as a volleyball volunteer.
Seconded by Trask. Motion carried.
Kent Anderson was present to discuss a
couple things with the board. The first
item was about spending $500 to do a
baseline concussion test on all of our ath-
letes. The board is in favor of doing this
for the safety of our athletes. Next, Rieck-
man and Anderson discussed the possi-
bility of purchasing an enclosed trailer to
be used to haul football equipment to
games. The football team is willing to pay
half if the board or other activity groups
are willing to cover the rest of the cost.
After discussion, the board is in favor of
purchasing an enclosed trailer.
A project update was given by Rieckman.
The Black Hills Online Learning Center
that was approved at the last meeting
was discussed. Our district will have a
few students participating in this program.
Rieckman asked if there were any ques-
tions on the 7-12 handbook.
4839. Anderson moved to approve the
7-12 Handbook. Seconded by Bielmaier.
Motion carried.
Rieckman announced that our Elemen-
tary School and our High School have
been named Exemplary Schools again.
The High School was 2nd out of all the
high schools in the state. The Elementary
was 17th out of 300 elementary schools
in the state. Our Middle School was 15th
of 154 schools. They missed out being
named Exemplary, but the students are
performing well. All students and staff are
to be commended and the board decided
to award all students and staff with a bliz-
zard.
Rieckman handed out a schedule of
classes to the board.
With no further business brought to the
board, Chairperson Eisenbraun declared
the meeting adjourned at 8:30 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Niki Mohr,
Business Manager.
______________
Scot Eisenbraun,
Chairperson
________________
Niki A. Mohr,
Business Manager
Published September 5, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $179.29.
Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 9
GENERAL CAPITAL SPEC. ED. IMPACT AID LUNCH WASP TOTAL
OUTLAY FUNDS
BEGINNING BALANCE:
6-30-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$331,995.12 . . . . . .$509,704.16 . . . . . . .$67,685.92 . . . . . . . . .$4024659.03 . . . . . . .$(5,578.31) . . . . . . . .$7,229.63 . . . . . .$4,935,695.55
Receipts:
Local Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$68982.69 . . . . . . .$3670.11 . . . . . . . . .$2546.06 . . . . . . . . . .$542.50 . . . . . . . . . . .$235.05 . . . . . . . . . .$6855.59 . . . . . . . . .$82832.00
County Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . .$1179.54 . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1179.54
State Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53914.00 . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53914.00
Federal Sources: . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3033.11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3033.11
Other Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
General Journal Revenue: . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
Total to be
accounted for: . . . . . . . . . . .$456071.35 . . . . . .$513374.27 . . . . . . .$70231.98 . . . . . . . . .$4025201.53 . . . . . . .($2310.15) . . . . . . . .$14085.22 . . . . . .$5076654.20
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . . .$48679.89 . . . . . . .$12104.67 . . . . . . . .$5257.68 . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$500.55 . . . . . . . . . .$3239.06 . . . . . . . . .$69781.85
General Journal
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . .$114724.69 . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$114724.69
EOM BALANCE:
7-31-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$292666.77 . . . . . .$501269.60 . . . . . . .$64974.30 . . . . . . . . .$4025201.53 . . . . . . .($2810.70) . . . . . . . .$10846.16 . . . . . .$4892147.66
annc@gwtc.net
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.philiplivestock.com
Email: info@philiplivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605) 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, Fieldman
Midland • (605) 567-3385
JEFF LONG, Fieldman/Auctioneer
Red Owl • (605) 985-5486
Cell: (605) 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, Auctioneer
Reva • (605) 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, Auctioneer
Milesville • (605) 544-3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605) 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, Fieldman
Sturgis • (605) 641-1042
BAXTER ANDERS, Fieldman
Wasta • (605) 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(605) 859:2577
www.philiplivestock.com
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEARLING &
SPRING CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. YEARLINGS & CALVES: 12
P.M. (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING
1500 HEAD.
YEARLINGS:
LANDERS LIVESTOCK – 200 BLK SPAY HFRS...............800-900#
A CONSIGNMENT – 175 BLK SPRING CLVS...................250-350#
PASS CREEK RANCH – 110 RED ANG STRS
& OPEN HFRS....................................................................900#
STEWART – 60 CHAR X STRS...............................................900#
KARRELLS – 60 BLK TESTED OPEN HFRS...........................900#
TRASK FAMILY – 60 BLK TESTED OPEN HFRS
& FEW STRS ......................................................................850#
HELMS – 40 RED & RWF STRS & OPEN HFRS.............850-1000#
AMIOTTE – 30 BLK & BWF STRS & HFRS......................700-800#
ENNEN – 23 BLK & BWF MOSTLY OPEN HFRS .....................900#
GARRIN – 21 BLK STRS .................................................850-900#
RADWAY – 12 BLK STRS & TESTED OPEN HFRS...........850-900#
SMITH – 10 BLK TESTED OPEN HFRS...........................850-900#
THORSON – 10 BLK STRS & SPAY HFRS .......................800-900#
REINERT – 8 BLK & BWF TESTED OPEN HFRS....................850#
PFEIFER – 6 BLK STRS..................................................700-800#
TIFFT – 5 RED FALL CLVS.............................................500-600#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH
AT 605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 17: REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDER CATTLE, ALL-BREEDS
CALF SALE & SPECIAL EARLY BIRD HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 8: SPECIAL YEARLING & ALL-BREEDS CALF
SALE.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 15: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL BRED CATTLE & WEIGH-UP
COW, BULL & HEIFERETTE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER
SALE & WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 5: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.philiplivestock.com. Upcoming sales & consignments can be
viewed on the Internet at www.philiplivestock.com, or on the DTN: Click on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA is now qualified to handle third party verified
NHTC cattle (Non-Hormonal Treated Cattle).
Keep supporting R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA is our
voice in government to represent U.S. cattle
producers in trade marketing issues. Join
today & help make a difference!
Philip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, will be offering video
sale as an additional service to our consignors,
with questions about the video please call
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
Philip, SD
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER
SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS WEANED CALF SALE
& REGULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING
SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER
SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL
& FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 17: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF & STOCK
COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
Upcoming Horse Sales:
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28: BAD RIVER FALL EXTRAV-
AGANZA HORSE SALE. Go to: www.PhilipLivestock.comor
call 605-859-2577 for a catalog.
TDM excavation
& heavy haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Rapid City DSDP VIII, LLC; (Jerry and
Donna Olson – landowners) have applied
for a Rezone to rezone 1.5 acres from
Limited Agriculture District to General
Commercial District and to amend the
Pennington County Comprehensive Plan
to change the Future Land Use Map from
Suburban Residential District to General
Commercial District located on the follow-
ing metes and bounds description: The
following describes a parcel of real prop-
erty being a portion of Tract 1, less Utility
Lot 1, less Lot B, less Lot WR of the
NE1/4NE1/4, less Lots H1, H2, H3, H4
and less ROW of Longview Road, all in
Paul Subdivision, Section 15, Township 1
North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, being more particularly described
as follows: COMMENCING at the South-
east corner of Lot H-4 of Tract 1 of Paul
Subdivision recorded in Book 11 of High-
way Plats at Page 173, said corner
marked by a 5/8” rebar capped “LS
3712”; THENCE; along the southerly
boundary line of said Lot H-4, also being
the southerly Right-of-Way line of
Longview Road, South 87°54’00” East,
242.58 feet to a found 5/8” rebar capped
“LS 3712” marking the Southwest corner
of said Lot H-4; THENCE; leaving said
southerly boundary line along the west-
erly boundary line of said LOT H-4, South
02°06’47” West, 11.22 feet to a point on
the southerly Right-of-Way of Longview
Road; THENCE; leaving said westerly
boundary line, along said southerly Right-
of-Way line, also being the Southerly
boundary line of Lot H1 as shown on the
official plat thereof on file in the Penning-
ton County Register of Deeds office in
Book 11 of Plats at Page 67, North
87°53’13” West, 112.49 feet to a set 5/8”
rebar capped “ CETEC LS 4725” marking
the beginning of a curve to the left;
THENCE; along said curve to the left
90.79 feet to a set 5/8” rebar capped “LS
4215”marking the Northwest corner of
said Lot C, said curve having a central
angle of 37°03’34”, a radius of 460.00
feet, and being subtended by a chord
which bears South 86°36’37” West, a dis-
tance of 90.64 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE; leaving said
southerly Right-of-Way line, along the
northerly boundary line of said Lot C,
South 49°16’36” East, 168.91 feet to a set
5/8” rebar capped “LS 4725” marking the
Northeast corner of said Lot C; THENCE;
leaving said northerly boundary line,
along the easterly boundary line of said
Lot C, South 40°43’03” West, a distance
of 271.80 feet to a set 5/8” rebar capped
“LS 4725” marking the Southeast corner
of said Lot C, said point also being on the
northerly Right-of-Way line of SD High-
way 44; THENCE; leaving said easterly
boundary line, along the southerly bound-
ary line of said Lot C, also being the
northerly Right-of-Way line of said SD
Highway 44, North 49°15’59” West, a dis-
tance of 277.06 feet to a set 5/8” rebar
marking the southwest corner of said Lot
C, said corner also marks the intersection
of the Right-of-Way lines for said
Longview Road and said SD Highway 44;
THENCE; leaving said southerly bound-
ary line, and said northerly Right-of-Way
line, along the southeasterly Right-of-Way
of said Longview Road, also being the
westerly boundary line of lot C, 297.53
feet along the arc of a curve to the right,
said curve having a central angle of
37°03’34”, a radius of 460.00 feet and
being subtended by a chord which bears
North 62°25’35” East, a distance of
292.37 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; The above-described parcel of real
property contains 65,282.32 Sq. Ft.,
1.498 Acres, more or less and is SUB-
JECT TO a 15 foot wide Right-of-Way
Easement granted to the Rapid Valley Ir-
rigation Ditch Company being centered
on the centerline of the Murphy Ditch,
said Easement is recorded in Book 15 at
Page 8318 of Miscellaneous Record,
Pennington County Recorders Office;
Also SUBJECT TO an Access and Cul-
vert Maintenance Easement granted to
the Rapid Valley Irrigation Ditch Company
for the maintenance of a 48 inch pipe and
the aforementioned Murphy Ditch, said
Easement is recorded in Book 16 at Page
5460 of Miscellaneous Records, Pen-
nington County Recorders Office; Also
SUBJECT TO all easement and reserva-
tions of record, 3579 Reservoir Road, in
accordance with Sections 206, 209,and
508 of the Pennington County Zoning Or-
dinance.
Alison Lewis has applied for a Rezone to
rezone 3.71 acres from Limited Agricul-
ture District to Low Density Residential
District and to amend the Pennington
County Comprehensive Plan to change
the Future Land Use Map from Planned
Unit Development Sensitive to Low Den-
sity Residential District located on Lots 4,
5, 7, 8, 9 and 10 of Engberg Subdivision,
Section 6, T2S, R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, 13013 Old Hill City
Road, in accordance with Sections 206,
207,and 508 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 23rd day of September 2013. At this
time, any person interested may appear
and show cause, if there be any, why
such requests should or should not be
granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published September 5, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $52.42.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, administrators, heirs,
devisees, or legatees.
090695 LOT B, BLOCKS 70 AND 71
OF MAHONEY ADDITION, CITY
OF RAPID CITY, PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
25199). WELDINE MESTETH,
OCCUPANT(S) RESIDING AT 129
DOOLITTLE ST RC SD, BENEFI-
CIAL SOUTH DAKOTA INC.,AAA
COLLECTIONS INC., CREDIT
COLLECTION BUREAU, CITIFI-
NANCIAL INC., LVNV FUNDING
LLC., ARROW FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES LLC.,
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 19th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 29 & September 5,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$29.72.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Julie Jensen has applied for a Setback
Variance to reduce the minimum required
side yard setback from 25 feet to 2.5 feet
in a Low Density Residential District lo-
cated on Lot 23, Block 1 of Spring
Canyon Estates, Section 6, T1S, R7E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota,
8306 Bighorn Road, in accordance with
Sections 207 and 509 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Carol Navickas has applied for a Setback
Variance to reduce the minimum required
side yard setbacks from 25 to 15 feet
from the northwest property line and zero
(0) feet from the Section Line Right-of-
Way in a General Agriculture District lo-
cated on Golden Reef Lode MS, Sections
27 and 28, T2N, R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, 22774 Merritt
School Road, in accordance with Sec-
tions 205 and 509 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
20th day of September 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published September 5, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $19.38.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Neil Tschetter has applied for a Rezone
to rezone .26 acre from General Agricul-
ture District to Suburban Residential Dis-
trict and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use Map from Planned Unit
Development Sensitive to Suburban Res-
idential District located on Lot 10 of Black
Forest Village, Section 22, T1N, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota,
23209 Black Forest Place, in accordance
with Sections 205, 208,and 508 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
20th day of September 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published September 5, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $18.74.
Pennington County Courant • September 5, 2013 • 10
we don’t
charge…
Obituaries, engagements
and wedding write-ups
are published free of
charge. Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
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Announces the addItIon of
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dentaI practIce, joInIng
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Lcntistry for thc wholc family, including orthodontics
Acccpts Ncdicaid and othcr dcntal insuranccs
Call to make an appointment witb Dr. Rompca today!
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Murdo 0entaI, LLC
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053 — let it ring
Delmer and Mary Paulsen
drove to Quinn and joined the
friends and neighbors to help ob-
serve the celebration for the 55th
Wedding Anniversary for Lonnie
and Rose Ellen Kjerstad at the
Quinn Methodist Church, where
they were married.
Norma Stverak has been busy
entertaining grandchildren while
Todd and Lori are getting settled
in their new location.
Mary Paulsen’s sister, Lucille
Murname and her friend Joe ac-
companied Delmer and Mary on a
sight-seeing trip through the Bad-
lands, Sunday evening. Joe had
never been to South Dakota be-
fore and was truely amazed at the
sight-seeing tour. On Tuesday
evening, Joe and Lucille treated
Delmer and Mary to supper at the
Red Rock.
Norma entertained friends
from Sioux Falls the 18, 19, 20
and 21. They toured the Black
Hills one day and enjoyed a pic-
nic. The kids had a ball. Katelynn
and Norma made preparations.
Another day, they toured Custer
State Park so Betty could see the
animals. The only ones out were
two buffalo and some antelope, a
disappointment but they got to
enjoy a nice South Dakota day.
Lucille and Joe left for Council
Bluffs, Iowa, Wednesday morn-
ing. They planned to visit Lu-
cille’s first and only grandchild
“Jamie”, Jason, Krista Testin in
their home.
Jeff and Marilyn Wilsey en-
joyed their granddaughter
Sheana Poljansck for a few days
last week before school started in
Rapid City. Such a special time of
sharing and loving.
Delmer and Mary accompanied
Tom for an enjoyable weekend at
the State Fair. They also plan on
visiting family on Mary’s dad’s
side.
Thought: The past can hurt, but
you can either run from it or learn
from it.
Countryside News
hunT Safe ClaSS
The 2013 Hunt Safe Class will be held September 13 and
14, at the West River Electric Association conference room
in Wall. The class will be held 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Fri-
day, September 13 and 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday,
September 14. Students will need to bring a sack lunch for
Saturday’s class. Parental release forms will be available at
the beginning of class and must be signed prior to the stu-
dent taking the course. Any youth that will be 12 years of
age on or before December 31, 2013 is eligible to participate.
All students are required to attend both classes to obtain
their certification. Parents are welcome to accompany their
child if they would like. If you have any questions contact
Josh Brainard, Conservation Officer with SD GF&P, at 605-
279-2078 or email josh.brainard@state.sd.us.

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