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Pennington Co. Courant, October 3, 2013

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Number 40
Volume 108
October 3, 2013
U.S. Senators Tim Johnson and John Thune
and Congresswoman Kristi Noem announced
that legislation to facilitate construction of a vis-
itor center at the Minuteman Missile National
Historic Site was signed into law by President
Obama.
The law will transfer approximately 29 acres
of National Forest Service land to the National
Park Service to construct a visitor facility and
provide parking.
“This law will allow construction of the visitor
center to begin shortly at the Minuteman Mis-
sile National Historic Site” said Johnson. “This
is the first unit of the National Park Service
dedicated exclusively to Cold War events.
With the visitors center the Park Service will
be able to tell the story of this historic site and
the role South Dakota played in the Cold War.”
“I am pleased the president has cleared the
way for the development of a visitor’s center
highlighting the important role and historic sig-
nificance of the Minuteman Site,” said Thune.
“The center will make a piece of South Dakota’s
past more accessible to students of history from
around the globe.”
“Now that this bill has been signed into law,
plans for a new visitor center can move forward,
allowing South Dakotans and visitors from all
over the country to visit this historic site and
learn more about the history of the Minuteman
Minuteman Missile bill signed
into law by President Obama
Tents and motor homes were seen lining the Boulevard
on Saturday evening, September 14, 2013, for the Relay
For Life of Quad County.
S.D. Army National Guard past and present members
Michael Kroells, Wayne Shull, Jeremy Hertel and Colton
Kelly presented the Colors along with Megan Hoffman
singing the National Anthem.
Opening Ceremonies included speakers Kathy Swan of
Wall and Margee Willey of Wasta.
Luminaria Ceremony speaker was Becky Drury from
Rapid City.
Honorary Red Hot Pepper Relay Team Members, all
cancer survivors, Sandy Feller, Marilyn Drewitz, Shari
Ochs, Lorraine Fauske and Marcine Patterson lead the
opening Survivor Lap of the Relay.
Sixteen teams participated in the Relay Event coming
from Wall, Philip, New Underwood, Midland, Milesville,
Wasta, and Faith.
A variety of very talented local entertainment was en-
joyed by everyone.
Both a silent auction and live auction were held
throughout the evening creating lots of bidding opportu-
nities.
Many people ask why we went all night for the Relay
For Life this year when many communities have been
quitting at midnight. One of the most important stan-
dards of Relay is that it is an Overnight Event. Being
overnight means from dusk to dawn, at least 12 hours in
length. This is an important standard because not only
does cancer never sleep, but this is one small way that
participants can show their support and empathy for can-
cer survivors, caregivers and those lost to cancer.
We know that the nights for cancer patients and care-
givers are often the hardest part of the cancer journey,
when the side-effects of treatment are the worst and the
doubts that plague them seem their most intense. This is
why we Relay overnight, to gain just a bit of understand-
ing of their journey, to show that we can give just one
night of our lives each year in solidarity.
This year’s committee agreed that this was an impor-
tant feature and decided to go all night. We know not
everyone is able to participate that long, but we still had
a pretty lively crowd at the closing ceremonies.
As the Relay drew to a close for another year, over
$50,000.00 was raised for this successful event.
All proceeds go to the American Cancer Society in the
fight against cancer. Such amazing support these small
communities provided!
Thank you to everyone that played a part in this Event!
Missile,” said Noem. “The Minuteman Missile
National Historic Site helps tell the story of how
the Minuteman played a role in bringing peace
during tense relations between the United
States and former Soviet Union. I’m pleased the
House, Senate and the president took swift ac-
tion on this common-sense bill.”
The launch control facility and missile silo
that make up the Minuteman Missile National
Historic Site were preserved to illustrate the
history of the Cold War and the role the Air
Force’s Minuteman II Missile defense system
played in efforts to preserve world peace.
The new law builds upon a law passed in 1999
that established Minuteman Missile as a Na-
tional Historic Site. The land transfer provided
in the new law allows for the construction of a
visitor center and administrative facility at Exit
131 off of I-90 (about 70 miles east of Rapid
City).
The bill would also transfer 3.65 acres near
the missile silo for visitor parking and other ad-
ministrative uses. Congress provided funding
for the construction of the visitor center when
the Site was established.
The Minuteman Missile consists of the Delta-
01 Launch Facility and the Delta-09 Missile
Silo, located about 11 miles from one another on
Interstate 90.
Relay For Life of Quad County: Celebrate…Remember…Fight
Cancer survivor Kathy Swan was one of the guest speakers at the Relay For Life of Quad County held in Wall
on Saturday, September 14.
West River Electric team aka The Lightening Bugs were out in full force to participate in the Relay For Life of
Quad County event held in Wall, Saturday, September 13.
Laurie Hindman photos
Golden West Telecommunications celebrated
their annual meeting, Saturday, September 28,
2013, in Wall, SD.
More than 300 members attended the 61st
annual meeting. Jeff Nielsen, President of the
Board of Directors welcomed the members and
recognized Robert Hansen, from Howes, S.D.,
who retired after sitting on the Board of Direc-
tors for 24 years.
Denny Law, General Manager/CEO, reiter-
ated Robert Hansen’s many contributions, and
years of commitment to the Cooperative.
He also laid out the many ways that Golden
West continues to invest in its members. From
expansion the toll-free calling, which began in
June of 2013; the Golden West scholarship and
economic development programs; the video
programming access to state high school
events and collegiate sports, Golden West con-
tinues to invest in its members.
Law stated that Golden West constructed
just over 500 miles of fiber optic cable connect-
ing approximately 1,000 homes and busi-
nesses. In 2013, Golden West will construct
close to 900 miles of fiber optic cable, which ex-
tends our capacity for future applications and
boosts our Internet speeds.
Mr. Law also touched the Federal Commu-
Golden West Telecom
holds annual meeting
nications Commission’s recent rulings that af-
fect local service rates, future infrastructure,
and future technology. “We will continue to
fight until policymakers understand the im-
portance of ensuring that advanced telecom-
munications remain a cornerstone investment
in rural America,” stated Law.
Three of the four board members up for elec-
tion were incumbents to the board, they each
ran unopposed.
Re-elected to four-year terms were Bart
Birkeland to District VII, Dale Guptill to Dis-
trict VI, and Kenneth Zickrick Jr., to District
IV.
Also serving a four-year term will be Jade
Hlavka who ran unopposed in District I, the
district that Robert Hansen previously repre-
sented.
Brent Morris and the Western Acoustics,
from Hill City entertained the crowd with
some foot-tapping classic country music.
During the meeting, several customers won
door prizes. The grand prize of $500 went to
Mary Lou Claussen of Martin, S.D.
Next year’s Annual Meeting will be held
September 27, 2014.
Wall School began their homecoming week by crowning Jennifer Emery and Cade Kjerstad
as their 2013 Queen and King on Monday, September 30.
WHS 2013 Homecoming Royalty
Laurie Hindman photo
Local News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
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be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
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Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 2
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Guest Editorial
We covered our fourth area of
study, as directed by the Execu-
tive Board, Monday, September
23, in Pierre.
Covered were opt-outs and cap-
ital outlay funds used to supple-
ment the general funds and how
to address inequities in funding.
We have such a broad range of
school districts when it comes to
size and location finding a one
size fits all solution may be im-
possible.
We also have districts that re-
ceive no state aid so just simply
increasing the base in the formula
won't help them.
We have districts with declin-
ing enrollment and districts with
increasing enrollment.
From the Floor
By District 30
Representative Mike Vericho
My number one concern is edu-
cating our children so they are ei-
ther ready for a career or higher
education.
We graduate way too many
good test takers and not enough
good students.
On October 21, we will try to
put together recommendations to
help our districts without becom-
ing a state government that micro
manages our school systems.
There seems to be agreement
amongst the educators to restore
funding to pre-cut levels. That
would be $4,805 per student.
That seems reasonable and I
could support that, but where do
we find that 23 million dollars.
There was also interest
By Lynn Richardson,
President, Tennessee
Press Association
As a publisher of a weekly
newspaper, you find yourself
doing a lot of different things.
Both news and advertising be-
come part of the daily routine.
One day you’re crunching num-
bers for the budget, the next day
you’re calling on a new business
that has just opened in the area.
In a lot of cases, the publisher
also writes – news, features, edi-
torials – the whole gamut. What-
ever it takes.
It’s a way to stay connected to
the community in a personal way
and it can remind us when and
why we decided to make newspa-
pers our life’s work.
Bogged down with day-to-day
demands, sometimes it’s easy to
lose sight of why we do what we
do and why we love it.
There are some things, how-
ever, you just can’t forget.
Such is the story of a man
named Billy Wolfe.
Billy grew up on the rough edge
of a small town in southern West
Virginia. When he was about 14,
his dad decided he'd had enough
of parenthood and he lit out for
parts unknown, leaving Billy's
mom to take care for him and his
brothers and sisters by herself.
Through sheer determination,
he managed to get through high
school. But once he had his
diploma, Billy went where most
young men did in the late 60s – he
got shipped off to a place called
Vietnam.
I don't know what all happened
to him there. He never really
wanted to talk about it, but by the
time I met Billy, his life had
changed forever.
He had left both his legs in
Nam.
I remember the first time I saw
him. He looked a lot older than he
was. He was, of course, in a
wheelchair and had a hard time
getting around.
But there was a great spirit
about Billy. He had a great sense
of humor and he loved people.
Above all, he was thankful -
thankful for friends who had
given him a place to stay when he
returned to his hometown after
his service to his country.
His friends, a local electrician
and his wife, knew Billy really
didn’t have any place to go, so
they remodeled their detached
garage into an apartment for him,
making it fully handicapped-ac-
cessible.
It was Billy’s haven. He felt
safe there.
Unfortunately for Billy, his
benefactors had some neighbors
who didn't like them very much
and when they found out that the
two were providing someone with
an apartment - a detached
dwelling - in a neighborhood not
zoned for such places, they
jumped on it.
They took their complaint to
the zoning board. Not getting the
immediate results they wanted,
they showed up at the town's next
city council meeting and threw a
fit.
It was simple, they said. It was
against the law and Billy would
have to go.
I was a 20-year-old college stu-
dent who just worked part-time
at the local paper to get myself
through college. That day, I drew
the short straw and ended up
with the evening’s city council
meeting as my assignment.
I really hadn’t covered many
meetings and I sure wasn’t ready
for this one.
It was an ugly scene. Neighbors
stood up in defense of Billy, say-
ing they would be fine with the
council passing some sort of vari-
ance, but the opposing side per-
sisted, demanding that the coun-
cil uphold the zoning regulations.
Of course the law was on their
side and so the majority of the
councilmen voted to oust Billy. By
the time that meeting was over,
there was also another casualty.
Our mayor – a veteran himself
- resigned, saying he wouldn't
lead a town where such an atroc-
ity could take place.
And I sat there, taking notes as
hard and fast as a very green,
very young reporter possibly
could, trying desperately to cap-
ture every cruel word that was ut-
tered.
It didn’t take long, after the
story came out in the next morn-
ing’s edition of the Bluefield Daily
Telegraph, for Billy to become a
household name. The TV and
radio folks picked it up and ran
with it. People in the community
were outraged.
Our newspaper stayed on top of
the story and didn’t let go. They
kept the issue in front of the pub-
lic, covering it from every possible
angle.
The story had a happy ending.
A local attorney and a contrac-
tor contacted Billy’s friends and
together, they forged a plan that
would satisfy the town’s zoning
regulations. Volunteers went to
work to remodel the house and
garage, putting it all under one
roof.
The day I learned that Billy’s
home was saved was a day that
truly changed my life.
That was the first time I really
understood just what a difference
a newspaper could make and I
knew I wanted to be part of that.
Thinking back to Billy and his
story reminded me why I've been
in the newspaper business for so
many years and why I feel it is
such an honor to be part of some-
thing so powerful and so mean-
ingful.
We all walk this earth for a rea-
son, and we all enjoy many differ-
ent powers. Each of us has the
power to influence others, and in
turn, each of us is influenced by
those who cross our life’s path.
Every day, in the newspaper in-
dustry, we operate a power tool –
a tool that should be handled with
care.
"With great power comes great
responsibility," Spiderman’s
Uncle Ben said to him.
While we certainly aren’t su-
perheroes, I can think of no other
industry where that phrase can
better be applied.
It is our awesome responsibility
– and our privilege - to stand up
and speak out, with integrity,
truth and determination, with
every word we print.
in adjusting the formula so dis-
tricts had a hard number to begin
their budgeting process with.
That consists of a floor
say of 1.5 percent and a ceiling of
three percent for ongoing funding
increases. I could also support
that depending on what those
percentages end up being.
Of course that still leaves out
the districts that get no state aid.
In the end we need to reform
funding but do it without creating
a cumbersome 40 page document.
District 30 Rep.
Mike Verchio
289 Rainbow Ridge Crt.
574-2466 391-5093
mjverchio@aol.com
Hill City, SD 57745
Public notices published in this
newspaper play a major role in
the ongoing production of inform-
ing you about the business of your
government.
By public notices, we mean
things like the printed minutes of
the school board and city council,
election notices, rezoning notices,
advertisements for bids, notice of
property tax opt-outs, govern-
ment employee salaries, proposed
annual budgets, delinquent prop-
erty tax lists, township annual
meeting notices, exempt property
tax lists and much more.
Public notices that keep you in-
formed about what government is
doing and how it is spending your
tax dollars. An ongoing diary of
government’s work.
The public notices in this news-
paper serve a two-way trans-
parency street. Besides keeping
you informed about the work of
your elected officials, public no-
tices also provide them with an
independent and permanent
record that accurately reflects
their actions and decisions.
That is why we are observing
“Public Notices Month” this
month. Newspapers all across
South Dakota are bringing atten-
tion to the role that public notices
play in our everyday lives. We are
highlighting this month with a
“VIP All-access” theme.
Public notices printed in this
newspaper are VIP: verifiable, in-
dependent and permanent.
Verifiable because this newspa-
per is accessible to all segments of
the public as a vaild, credible
source for public notices delivered
directly to your mailbox or
doorstep.
Public Notices in this Newspaper: Your VIP All-access Pass
Independent because this
newspaper provides an independ-
ent, third-party check in the
process of delivering public no-
tices to you.
Permanent because the public
notices printed in this newspaper
cannot be altered, hacked or
deleted. Something that is not
true in the digital world.
Public Notices in this newspa-
per: your VIP all-access pass to
what your government is doing.
Unfortunately, there are ongo-
ing efforts to eliminate the publi-
cation of public notices in newspa-
pers. Certain special interests
and lobbying groups representing
local governments want to do
away with public notices laws, ar-
guing that it’s a waste of money
and that no one reads them any-
way.
We will be crystal clear that
this newspaper indeed is paid to
publish public notices. Just as
any business or entity is compen-
sated for goods and services it
provides to government, this
newspaper is paid for publication
of public notices. In doing so, we
have laws to follow. State law dic-
tates a uniform compensation
rate that is fair and consistent. In
fact, you can find the cost of pub-
lication at the bottom of almost
all government public notices
published in this newspaper.
On average, the total cost to
local governments in South
Dakota to publish all of their re-
quired public notices equals an
amount less than one-half of one
percent of their total annual
budget. What value do we put on
making sure citizens have the
ability to be informed about their
government?
As for the argument that no one
reads them anymore, not surpris-
ingly we disagree on that one as
well.
Statistically valid statewide
readership surveys conducted by
South Dakota Newspaper Associ-
ation have shown consistently
over the years that more than
half of all South Dakotans read
public notices in their local news-
paper on a frequent basis.
Or, consider the story about the
confidential $175,000 settlement
agreement between the Huron
School District and its former su-
perintendent that was uncovered
following a lengthy investigation
by The Daily Republic at
Mitchell. It made for some big
headlines around the state this
year.
All of this started because
someone wondered why a pay-
ment of more than $10,000 per
month to the former superintend-
ent kept showing up in the school
board proceedings published in
the local newspaper.
An excellent example of light
being shone on something govern-
ment wanted to keep in the dark.
And it all started with something
that someone read in the school
board minutes printed in the
newspaper. Public notices at
work.
That is why we bring special at-
tention to public notices this
month. We urge you to read them
and to tell legislators to resist the
ongoing efforts by special inter-
ests in Pierre to eliminate them.
Good government depends on
public notices. You depend on
them. Public notices are your VIP
all-access pass to knowing more
about the business of government
and your tax dollars at work.
State Soil ?? Soil is classified
into different orders just like
plants are classified into different
types.
Twelve different soil orders
exist, and within these orders are
different suborders.
Soils are composed of different
percentages of clay, sand and
loam. Each type has different
moisture, mineral and organic
content. The environment where
the soil is found plays heavily into
the soil composition.
A state soil is a soil that has
special significance to a particular
state.
Each state in the United States
has selected a state soil, twenty of
which have been legislatively es-
tablished.
These “Official State Soils”
Former Big White Student and
local resident, Author Diane
Sinykin Small, paid a visit to the
school and presented teacher Lo-
rayna Papousek and her students
with a book showing the history
of the Big White.
Diane’s two grandchildren Con-
nor and Brianna Hardin pre-
sented the students with a native
Aloe Vera plant from Arizona and
the Big White students did a pres-
entation about sunflowers for the
Arizona visitors.
Big White School enjoys visit
from former student
The cultural exchange was a
great way to start the school year.
Jami Willuweit Moon provided
treats for the students. Jami and
her brother, Will own the ranch
that Diane’s grandparents home-
stead in 1905.
Diane’s father Bronco Lou
Sinykin and the family lived on
the ranch until 1964.
For further information please
contact: Diane Small at 480-221-
1244 or Lorayna Papousek at
605-386-2635.
share the same level of distinction
as official state flowers and birds.
South Dakota has over 650 dif-
ferent soils, but Houdek is a na-
tive soil of SD and does not occur
in any other state.
The Houdek soil was chosen be-
cause of its large extent and its
importance to agriculture. There
are more than two million acres of
Houdek and closely related soils.
It is one of the most extensive
soils found in the state. Houdek is
located in central eastern SD. It
was adopted by state legislature
in 1990 as the State Soil.
Houdek topsoil is composed of
weathered glacial till and two
percent to four percent organic
matter which gives it a deep, dark
color.
The subsoil consists of layers of
clay and lime accumulations that
were carried downward from the
surface by water. Below these lay-
ers is the parent material of gla-
cial till.
Conservation Corner
Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers ........................................11-5
Shad’s Towing .............................10-6
Handrahan Const .......................10-6
Dakota Bar....................................9-7
Badland’s Auto..............................8-8
Highlights:
Marsha Sumpter .5-10 split; 185/505
Andrew Reckling..........................533
Marlis Petersen............4-7 split; 180
Clyde Schlim......3-5-10 & 3-10 splits
Carl Brown .........................5-10 split
Jason Petersen ...................3-10 split
Matt Reckling.....................3-10 split
Connie Schlim......................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm..................................13-3
Bowling Belles.............................11-5
Cutting Edge Salon ......................9-7
Jolly Ranchers ..............................8-8
Little Orphans ............................6-10
Highlights:
Debbie Gartner .............187, 158/490
Charlene Kjerstad.................179/439
Marsha Sumpter..........................157
Deanna Fees.................................155
Donna King...........................5-6 split
Shirley O’Connor..................4-5 split
Jen Schriever.......5-6 & 2-5-10 splits
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar..................................10-6
Hildebrand Concrete ..................10-6
Chiefie’s Chicks.............................8-8
First National Bank .....................8-8
Morrison’s Haying ......................6-10
Pink Ribbons...............................6-10
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz........................181/523
Marlis Petersen............................182
Stacey Schulz................4-5 split; 174
Kathy Gittings .............................172
Ashley Reckling....................5-7 split
Andrea Carley ......................5-7 split
Sandee Gittings...............4-5-10 split
Tena Slovek ........................3-10 split
Val Schulz .............................2-7 split
Friday Nite
Cristi’s Crew .................................3-1
D’s Crew........................................1-3
In Forcer’s.....................................NA
Randy’s Spray Service..................NA
Hightlights:
Jeremiah Iron Moccisan.......205/516
859-2430
Hwy. 14 · PhiIip
Monday-Saturday
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Local News & Sport s Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013•3
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Emilee Pauley is the Wall Middle School student of the month for
September 2013. Emilee is in the eighth grade and is an excellent
student! She is always friendly, caring, and respectful. She works
hard in school and is always willing to help out when needed.
Emilee participates in many activities including volleyball, basket-
ball, rodeo, FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes), and WEST
(Wall Eagles SADD & TATU). Emilee is the daughter of Bunny Bail
and Bud Pauley. Kent Jordan from First Interstate Bank presented
Emilee with a First Interstate Bank sweatshirt and bag. Congratula-
tions Emilee!
Laurie Hindman photo
MS Student of the Month
Have you ever read a banned or
challenged book?
You’d be surprised at the num-
ber and types of books that have
been banned from libraries and
schools in the United States.
Some of them, I bet you have
read.
Banned books include such
classics as The Adventures of Tom
Sawyer by Mark Twain, The
Catcher in the Rye by J.D.
Salinger, Gone With the Wind by
Margaret Mitchell, and To Kill a
Mockingbird by Harper Lee.
Newer books include A Light in
the Attic by Shel Silverstein, the
Banned Books Week at the Wall Community Library
Harry Potter Series by JK Rowl-
ing, and Captain Underpants by
Dav Pilkey.
The American Library Associa-
tion (ALA) states that, “Books
usually are challenged with the
best intentions—to protect others,
frequently children, from difficult
ideas and information”.
The top three reasons books are
challenged or banned is that the
material was considered to be
sexually explicit, contained offen-
sive language, or was unsuitable
for a particular age group.
While protecting children is a
laudable concern, Libraries are
guided by the ALA’s Library Bill
of Rights, ALA’s policy concerning
access to information, which
states, “Librarians and governing
bodies should maintain that par-
ents—and only parents—have
the right and the responsibility to
restrict the access of their chil-
dren—and only their children—to
library resources.” Censorship by
librarians of constitutionally pro-
tected speech, whether for protec-
tion or for any other reason, vio-
lates the First Amendment.
Last week was Banned Books
Week where the right to read and
express opinions is celebrated.
Come by the Library and see
our display of banned books and
make your opinions known. I once
heard that a great library has
something to offend everyone.
Here is your opportunity to
come by the Library and see if
that is true. The Wall Community
Library is located at 407 Main
Street in the historic “Wall Hut”.
We are open Wednesdays from
12 – 7 p.m., Thursdays from 9
a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 – 5
p.m., and Fridays from 8 a.m. – 1
p.m.
Members of the Masonic Lodge
#153 in Philip sponsored a mem-
ber/guest golf tournament, Sun-
day, September 22.
Each of the 15 two-man teams
consisted of either two Masons or
a Mason and a man thinking of
petitioning to become a Mason.
The tournament raised $700 for
a scholarship to be offered by the
Philip Lodge to a 2014 Philip
Shooting for mulligans had an original twist at the Masonic golf tournament in Philip. Three stations
each offered one trap shooting shot for a free golf shot re-try when needed later by the golfer.
Philip Masonic golf tournament
High School graduate.
A hat was passed that produced
$550 for expenses to fellow
Mason, Beaver Scott, whose son,
Lane, was recently in a serious
car accident in Texas.
Play was held on the Lake Wag-
goner Golf Course, with a shotgun
start. The teams were divided
into two flights. Registration in-
cluded a supper following the
tournament. The day ended with
a short re-cap and inquiry ses-
sion.
It was estimated that around
40 percent of the golfers were
non-Masons. About 30-40 percent
earned at least one mulligan.
The tournament offered an
original way to earn mulligans, or
free reshots. A player could buy a
chance to use three stations
around the course where they
could use one shot at hitting a
clay pigeon. A hit meant that
player got a mulligan, a miss
meant they did not. For direction
clarification and safety, each sta-
tion was manned by at least one
volunteer.
For added entertainment, there
were circles outlined on both par
three holes for friendly betting.
George Bauder, Rapid City, was
the guest speaker at the recap/in-
quiry presentation. One of the
main goals of the tournament was
to get non-Masons to attend and
illustrate for them how much fun
membership can be. Masons from
Philip, Wall, Martin and other
lodges were invited to participate.
“You move to a relationship of
friends in a community to a rela-
tionship of friends in a fraternity,”
said Bauder. “You should know
people who know you, not just
know your name,” he said. “I
value these Masons, not just all
Masons, but these Masons, these
men.”
The Lady Eagles participated
in the White River triangular on
Saturday, September 21.
The Lady Eagles won over
White River in three sets to one
and lost to Philip three set to two.
Stats:
S1 S2 S3 S4 Final
Wall: 17 26 25 26 3
WR: 25 24 19 24 1
Attacking: Emily Linn, attack
kills - 7, kills per set - 1.8, kill percentage -
36.8, attacks attempted - 19, errors - 6, hit
percentage - .053; Josie Blasius, attack
kills - 4, kills per set - 1.0, kill percentage -
16.7, attacks attempted - 24, errors - 5, hit
percentage - (-.042); Kaitlin Schreiber,
attack kills - 8, kills per set - 2.0, kill per-
centage - 27.6, attacks attempted - 29, er-
rors - 2, hit percentage - .207; Tayah
Huether, attack kills - 2, kills per set -.5,
kill percentage - 66.7, attacks attempted -
3, hit percentage - .667; Carlee Johnston,
attack kills - 5, kills per set - 1.3, kill per-
centage - 22.7, attacks attempted - 22, er-
rors - 4, hit percentage - .045; Monica
Bielmaier, attack kills - 2, kills per set -
.5, kill percentage - 6.5, attacks attempted
- 31, errors - 9, hit percentage - (-.226);
Katy Bielmaier, attack kills - 8, kills per
set - 2.0, kill percentage - 27.6, attacks at-
tempted - 29, errors - 10, hit percentage - (-
.069).
Serving: Linn, serving aces - 1, aces per
set - .3, serving ace percentage - 5.3, total
serves - 19, errors - 1, serving percentage -
94.7, points - 12; Blasius, serving aces - 2,
aces per set - .5, serving ace percentage -
25.0, total serves - 8, errors - 2, serving per-
centage - 75.0, points - 2; Schreiber, serv-
ing aces - 2, aces per set - .5, serving ace
percentage - 11.8, total serves - 17, errors -
3, serving percentage - 82.4, points - 8;
Huether, serving aces - 3, aces per set - .8,
serving ace percentage - 25.0, total serves -
12, errors - 2, serving percentage - 83.3,
points - 7; Johnston, total serves - 13, er-
rors - 4, serving percentage - 69.2, points -
4; M. Bielmaier, serving aces - 5, aces per
set - 1.3, serving ace percentage - 20.8, total
serves - 24, errors - 4, serving percentage -
83.3, points - 16.
Blocking: Linn, solo blocks - 1, block-
ing attempts - 1, total blocks - 2, blocks per
set - .5, errors - 1; M. Bielmaier, solo
blocks - 2, total blocks - 2, blocks per set -
.5, blocking errors - 1; K. Bielmaier, solo
blocks - 3, total blocks - 3, blocks per set -
.8, blocking errors - 1.
Digs: Linn, digs - 3, dig errors - 2, digs
per set - .8; Blasius, digs - 5, dig errors - 5,
digs per set - 1.3; Schreiber, digs - 5, dig
errors - 1, digs per set - 1.3; Huether, digs
- 17, dig errors - 9, digs per set - 4.3; John-
ston, digs - 4, dig errors - 2, digs per set -
1.0; M. Bielmaier, digs - 4, dig errors - 1,
digs per set - 1.0; K. Bielmaier, digs - 4,
dig errors - 0, digs per set - 1.0; Nicole
Eisenbraun, digs - 5, dig errors - 3. digs
per set - 1.3.
Ball Handling: Linn, assists - 9, as-
sists per set - 2.3, ball handling attempts -
79; errors - 1; Blasius, ball handling at-
tempts - 5; Schreiber, assists - 5, assists
per set - 1.5, ball handling attempts - 69,
errors - 4; Huether, ball handling attempts
- 31; Johnston, ball handling attempts - 1;
M. Bielmaier, ball handling attempts - 9;
K. Bielmaier, ball handling attempts - 9;
Eisenbraun, ball handling attempts - 5.
Serve Receiving: Blasius, serve receiv-
ing success - 20, serve receiving errors - 4,
receptions per set - 5.0; Schreiber, errors
- 1; Huether, serve receiving success - 32,
errors - 1, receptions per set - 8.0; Emery,
serve receiving success - 1, receptions per
set - 1.0; Eisenbraun, serve receiving suc-
cess - 14, errors- 3, receptions per set - 3.5.
Stats:
S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 Final
Wall: 25 20 17 26 10 2
Philip: 21 25 25 24 15 3
Attacking: Linn, attack kills - 3, kills
per set - .6, kill percentage - 13.6, attacks
attempted - 22, errors - 5, hit percentage -
(-.091); Blasius, attack kills - 5, kills per
set - 1.0, kill percentage - 16.1, attacks at-
tempted - 31, errors - 5, hit percentage -
.000; Schreiber, attack kills - 9, kills per
set - 1.8, kill percentage - 23.7, attacks at-
tempted - 38, errors - 9, hit percentage -
.000; Huether, attack kills - 1, kills per set
-.2, kill percentage - 33.3, attacks at-
tempted - 3, hit percentage - .333; John-
ston, attack kills - 8, kills per set - 1.6, kill
percentage - 22.9, attacks attempted - 35,
errors - 6, hit percentage - .057; M. Biel-
maier, attack kills - 5, kills per set - 1.0,
kill percentage - 6.1, attacks attempted -
31, errors - 8, hit percentage - (-.097); K.
Bielmaier, attack kills - 9, kills per set -
1.8, kill percentage - 23.7, attacks at-
tempted - 38, errors - 5, hit percentage -
.105.
Serving: Linn, serving aces - 1, aces per
set - .2, serving ace percentage - 7.7, total
serves - 13, errors - 2, serving percentage -
84.6, points - 4; Blasius, serving aces - 1,
aces per set - .2, serving ace percentage -
9.1, total serves - 11, errors - 6, serving per-
centage - 45.5, points - 2; Schreiber, serv-
ing aces - 6, aces per set - 1.2, serving ace
percentage - 21.4, total serves - 28, errors -
2, serving percentage - 92.9, points - 19;
Huether, serving aces - 2, aces per set - .4,
serving ace percentage - 15.4, total serves -
13, errors - 2, serving percentage - 84.6,
points - 6; Johnston, serving aces - 1, aces
per set - .2, ace percentage - 5.9, total
serves - 17, serving percentage - 100.0,
points - 8; M. Bielmaier, serving aces - 1,
aces per set - .2, serving ace percentage -
6.7, total serves -15, errors - 1, serving per-
centage - 93.3, points - 6.
Blocking: Linn, errors - 1; Blasius,
solo blocks - 1, total blocks - 1, blocks per
set - .2; Schreiber, solo blocks - 1, total
blocks - 1, blocks per set - .2; M. Bielmaier,
solo blocks - 2, total blocks - 2, blocks per
set - .4, blocking errors - 2; K. Bielmaier,
solo blocks - 1, total blocks - 1, blocks per
set - .2, blocking errors - 2.
Digs: Linn, digs - 10, dig errors - 3, digs
per set - 2.0; Blasius, digs - 20, dig errors -
4, digs per set - 4.0; Schreiber, digs - 14,
dig errors - 7, digs per set - 2.8; Huether,
digs - 27, dig errors - 12, digs per set - 5.4;
Johnston, digs - 4, dig errors - 4, digs per
set - .8; M. Bielmaier, digs - 8, dig errors -
3, digs per set - 1.6; K. Bielmaier, digs - 3,
dig errors - 0, digs per set - .6; Nicole
Eisenbraun, digs - 5, dig errors - 3. digs
per set - 1.0.
Ball Handling: Linn, assists - 16, as-
sists per set - 3.2, ball handling attempts -
99; Blasius, ball handling attempts - 11;
Schreiber, assists - 8, assists per set - 1.6,
ball handling attempts - 85, errors - 2;
Huether, assists - 1, assists per set - .2,
ball handling attempts - 13; Johnston,
ball handling attempts - 4; M. Bielmaier,
ball handling attempts - 11; K. Bielmaier,
ball handling attempts - 11; Eisenbraun,
ball handling attempts - 3.
Serve Receiving: Blasius, serve receiv-
ing success - 21, errors - 4, receptions per
set - 4.2; Schreiber, serve receiving suc-
cess - 2, receptions per set - .4; Huether,
serve receiving success - 40, errors - 1, re-
ceptions per set - 8.0; Johnston, errors - 1;
M. Bielmaier, serve receiving success - 1,
receptions per set - .2; Eisenbraun, serve
receiving success - 26, errors- 3, receptions
per set - 5.2.
Volleyball stats from Philip and White River games
WALL’S “APPRECIATION
DAY” SUPPER
in conjunction with Wall High School Homecoming
Friday, October 4th • 5:00 - 6:30 p.m.
Wall City Park (alternate location Wall Fire Department)
Attend the homecoming parade at 1:30 p.m., shop wi th local merchants,
and enjoy a free meal prior to attending the football game!
We will also be accepting nonperishable food i tems for the Country Cupboard.
It’s our way of saying thanks for “Shopping Locally!”
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce Retail Committee
Wall Lube & Espresso Bar
“Thank you to our local patrons”
GOOD LUCK EAGLES
Stop in and check our vehicle
winterization specials and
weekly coffee specials.
605/279-2227 • Wall, SD
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
annc@gwtc.net
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
It feels like Fall! We have gone
from balmy to blustery and back
again, enjoyed some rain and
now, Friday, we see gray skies,
feel a nip in the air and see gold
on Faye Bryan’s cottonwood tree.
A plethora of experiences for the
senses.
Thursday afternoon’s trip to the
grocery store brought pleasures
in addition to the full basket of
good food for Faye’s pantry.
Shirrise Linn and Rose Mary
Trask were just finishing their
business at Wall Food Center so it
was greetings from those two, and
that is always fun and Danene
Skillingstad was working, and
sadly enough, even though we are
neighbors we meet more often at
the grocery store than in Wasta!
So after saying hello to Rose
Mary, Shirrise and Danene, then
Patty Coleman was dashing
through the aisles but had time
for a greeting and just as we were
saying it was feeling like “Old
Home Week” when a smiling face,
not totally familiar seemed next
in line to speak to, but asking a
name first, much to my surprise
she said, “I’m Mandy McGriff,
Selina’s granddaughter”. Well,
that happens — all grown now,
and such fun to see her and chat
for a moment.
Now that just felt good!
Marilyn Keyser went to Philip
to visit Dorothy Bathel and had a
good visit Wednesday afternoon.
Thursday, Marilyn had a visit
in Rapid City for a routine C.A.T.
scan. It gave Marilyn great pleas-
ure to report that even the doctor
was smiling and happy because
the results of the test were Ex-
CELLENT!
Another Wasta Wildcat good to
go!
Dave Stover was kind enough
to call to let us know that Marilyn
(Humphrey) Stover was out of the
hospital, but as yet not back to
her old self, out of energy and un-
able to do much, but at home.
Please keep her in your
thoughts and prayers as she re-
covers from a bad seige with West
Nile virus. It was about two
weeks that she was hospitalized.
Dale Keyser is in the hospital
in Philip and plans to go to the as-
sisted living as soon as he is up
and about. He will liven up the
place for sure! But let’s keep the
thoughts and prayers going out to
him as well.
A message to the newly found
cousin in Gillette “The Colorado
connection has been informed of
your interest.”
Sounds mysterious? It’s such a
long story my hand will be totally
worn out in the telling. Ask Lloyd.
Wasta Wildcat’s final gathering
was held Sunday at Lurz Park. It
was a beautiful fall day — one of
those you wish could last through
Thanksgiving.
Dick and Gay Hadlock brought
their guests — Ray Hadlock,
Dick’s brother and Ray’s wife
Mary. Years ago, sometime after
the Gumbo — lily Kids Ray had a
small band, Dakota Ray, gui-
tarist, Dick as vocalist and Gay
on accordion. They played for
country dances and I suppose as-
sorted gatherings, and Ray is still
actively entertaining. Maybe one
day we can get him to Wasta and
the three can team up again. Ray
and Mary live in Custer, so they
are not so far away. It was good to
meet them.
Barb Crawford and Jerry Schell
couldn’t resist the beautiful day
and being part of the Wildcats
team visited with team members
Ken and Danene Skillingstad,
Billie Hulm and Terry Schell.
Kerry Heriger tried out a new
recipe on us — creamed onions —
I loaded my sloppy jo with them
and found them very good. He
was generous and shared the
recipe. Mary Lewis came early
and scrubbed tables as we talked,
Hazel Kalkbrenner brought the
last of her garden cucumbers,
Marilyn Keyser brought her
world famous beans, and Freddie
Ferguson shared in the dessert of-
ferings.
The Carter family made it, just
a little late, but in time, to get the
team “awards”. A nice looking
button with the years Relay For
Life message, “Celebrate, Re-
member. Fight Back 2013 Gold”.
A very nice keepsake, along with
a window decal.
It was work, it was rewarding
in many ways, in addition to the
participation in a worthy cause,
just the working with other was
good.
We thank all of you who do-
nated money, time, resources and
ingenuity, it took a village to
bring home the gold!
We’re sorry some of those who
worked hard couldn’t be here.
Grenstiners had planned a fish-
ing trip, at Madi’s suggestion, for
her birthday.
Diana Turgeon had to work, but
Dan and Gus always enjoy food
and fun in the park.
Tammy Green was with dad,
Darren, as he has been feeling a
bit under the weather, recently.
Doreen and Dayton
Skillingstad were absent with
other plans as was daughter, Ko-
rtny and girls.
Faye Bryan was busy getting
her cabin ready for long time
friends who like to come here to
hunt.
All of you in our “village” no
matter the distance apart are sin-
cerely appreciated.
Happy Trials!
Social News
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Diane Bryan, Marilyn Ivers
and Debbie Bryan enjoyed a mini-
vacation to Cody, Wyo., Yellow-
stone and Billings, Mont., last
week. Bud and Barb Ray met
them on Wednesday at Old Faith-
ful. Yellowstone Park was beauti-
ful except for the rain and snow.
Thursday morning, Sydne
Lenox and Wanda Swan of
Kadoka, stopped in Wall en route
to Rapid City. It is nice they like
to join the coffee group and have
a doughnut, too.
As was expected, the north
Platte River carried water from
Colorado and flooded down
stream. Jack Guethlein said the
river flooded some in North
Platte, Neb., but not extensively.
Evelyn Kjerstad almost had a
“full” house at her open house,
Friday, September 27th, in honor
of her 90th birthday It is great to
reach that age and look and feel
as good as she. We send her our
“best of wishes” and heartiest con-
gratulations!
Felicia Reimann, granddaugh-
ter of Carol Hahn, was named
“National NAIA defensive player
of the week”. She is a senior
goalie on the Morningside College
Soccer teams. Way to go, Felicia!
Linda Eisenbraun went to
Edgemont with Marty and Susan
Huether to attend the football
game on Friday evening. Wall 50
pointed Edgemont.
Leslie, Gary and Deb Williams
attended the game at Edgemont,
also. Fun to watch those Eagles
score!
Norm and Betty Klingbile had
supper with Cristi Guptill and
kids at Interior, Thursday night.
BHYFL Cheerleaders cheered
at Coronation, Monday night, for
Wall High School.
Dale Keyser was in Wall on
Sunday for the day. It was good to
see him in church. He is in the
“swing bed” section of the Philip
Hospital at the present time.
Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle
went to Lawler, Iowa, for the
weekend to visit their grandson
Jeramy Croell and his fiancee,
Tasha Tonne. They enjoyed a trip
to the Amana Colonies.
Denny and Karen Carmichael
stopped in Wall, last Thursday, on
their way to the Black Hills. They
and Dave and Arla Olson had
supper at Merlin and Mary Jane
Doyle’s. Supper was a cooperative
effort between Arla and Mary
Jane.
The Golden West Telephone Co-
operative held their 61st annual
meeting in Wall on Saturday.
There wasn’t quite the crowd as
usual. The meeting didn’t take
long as there was no voting (no
competition for those seeking di-
rector seats), no old business, no
new business! But there were
prizes — we congratulate those
lucky winners. The group that en-
tertained, Western Acoustics,
sang and played songs the audi-
ence enjoyed — only three men,
but they sounded good.
Mary Eide, a long time resident
of the Grindstone area, had an
open house at the Senior Citizen
Center in Philip on Saturday cel-
ebrating her 80th birthday. She
writes the “Grindstone News” for
the Pioneer Review. Our congrat-
ulations go out to her.
Looking back, it was a pretty
good summer. Hardly any
grasshoppers to plague us; had
rain most every time we needed
it; crops were pretty good; some
gardens took awhile to mature
but a lot of people are tired of can-
ning. Our heat hit almost at the
end of the season so wasn’t a long
spell. If all of our summers were
like that, it would please quite a
few people.
In the 80’s today, Monday, but
forecast shows cooler tempera-
tures and some moisture this
week.
Have a good week!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
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WaII, SD
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877-224-4173 ~ becki@beckipotrzeba.com
Sponsored by:
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County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
…continued next
week.
Ryon, 5 years, Jocelyn, 3 years
& Kinsey, 1 year
children of
Craig & Jana Bielmaier, Wall.
Mia, 7 years & Toby, 5 years
children of
Jesse Paulsen.
Zoe, 2 1/2 years
daughter of
Cory & Annie Poseley, Wall.
Tomorrow’s
Leaders
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053 — let it ring
Wow! There is so much going on
it’s hard to keep up. I thought
with the encouragement I got
there would be some news but I
just haven’t had time to call.
Thank God there is always tomor-
row. Please bear with me.
I got my usual backing from
Mary Paulsen. That lady not only
encourages, she follows through.
Mary expressed how much she
enjoyed working with the many
different students in the title one
program.
Delmer has been busy painting
the house and some out buildings.
nothing like a coat of paint to
dress things up.
Mary has been busy canning as
it sounds like it was a great year
for the garden. I know around
here squash, tomatoes, cukes and
etc. have been numerous.
Delmer and Mary Paulsen are
planning on packing up a load
and taking it with them when
they make a trip to visit daughter
and family.
Thought: When was honey ever
made with only one bee in the
hive? Don’t wait to strike till the
iron is hot but make it hot by
striking.
Countryside
News
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 4
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
Oct. 3rd: Chicken Sandwich
w/Macaroni Salad
Oct. 4th: Super Nachos
Oct. 7th: Hot or BBQ Wings
w/French Fries
Oct. 8th: Crispy Chicken Wrap
w/Frog Eye Salad
Oct. 9th: Indian Taco
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
1st Annual Mocha Moose Sidewalk Sale!
SAVE UP TO 90% OFF!!
October 4th & 5th • 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Come for Refreshments, treats &
BLOWOUT DEALS!!
GOOD LUCK EAGLES!
We are proud to be among the
Wall Merchants serving
this great community.
AppreciAtion DAy Activities
FriDAy, october 4th
in WAll!
Homecoming Show at 12:05 p.m.
Parade at 1:30 p.m.
Free Appreciation Meal 5-6:30 p.m.
WHS Homecoming Football Game,
WAll eAgles vs.
neW UnDerWooD tigers
with kickoff at 7 p.m.
help cheer the
WAll eAgles to
victory!
RAY WILLIAMS PLUMBING
Services included but not limited to:
•Sewer line cleaning •Water heater installation and repair
•Broken water or sewer line repair •Winterize home or sprinklers
•Faucet repairs & installation
605-515-3968 (Cell) • 605-993-3003 (Home)
annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net
Rel igious
Obituaries
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
rush Funeral home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Mondays: Women’s Bible Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church • Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church • Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.; Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood • Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood • Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.; Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall • Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church • Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
According to the old adage, "A leopard never changes
its spots.¨ That leopard does not know God. A
relationship with God is life-changing. The more you
learn about God, the closer you grow to Him and the
more you change. Old thoughts give way to new ones,
and you become a better person.
Ancient wisdom for modern Iife
But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto
his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye
have suffered a while, make you perfect,
stablish, strengthen, settle you.
1 Peter 5:10 KJV)
279-2175
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 5
74th Annual Meeting
Saturday, October 5th
Wall Community Center, Wall, S.D.
•Registration: 9:00 a.m. •Business Meeting 10:00 a.m.
One Lucky Member will have a
chance to win $1,200.00
Following the meeting, lunch tickets will be given out.
If you are disabled and need a special accommodation
to have full and equal enjoyment of this meeting,
call 279-2135.
Free Babysitting during the meeting.
Wall Drug Store
Thank you for your
continued Patronage!
Good Luck Wall Eagles!
Join us in supporting
the Wall Eagles as they
unite to defeat the New
Underwood Tigers!
From the Gang
at Wall Drug
Larry “The Hat” Sinykin_________________________
Larry "The Hat" Sinykin
passed away on September 20,
2013 at the age of 71 in his home
in Las Vegas, Nev., after a long
battle with COPD.
Larry was born on September
21, 1941 in New Underwood,
S.D., the first son of Louis and
Florence Sinykin. He spent his
childhood on the 5800 acre cattle
ranch north of Wall, S.D., now
owned by Jami Moon and Will
Willuweit.
Larry attended the Big White
School for eight years before at-
tending High School in Rapid
City. He attended Black Hills
State in Spearfish, S.D., and also
the University of South Dakota in
Sioux Falls.
Larry served in the US Army
and did a tour in Germany in the
early 60s. Larry worked for
Fletcher Jones Toyota for over 20
years in Las Vegas. He loved play-
ing golf and even played once
with Arnold Palmer. He was also
an excellent pool player and poker
player. He enjoyed doing card
tricks, but his favorite thing in
life was dancing. He won many
twist contests over the years as
well as many golf tournaments.
He is survived by his wife of 30
years, Sue Monroe Sinykin; chil-
dren, Robyn Bower, Jill De Orio
(Mike), Jason Sinykin (Julie) of
Phoenix, Ariz., and Jeff Monroe
(Jennifer) of Las Vegas, Nev.
Brother, William Sinykin (wife
Jayne) of Smithfield, Utah; sister,
Diane Sinykin Small of Phoenix
Ariz. Ten grandchildren and 16
nieces and nephews. 
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Bronco Lou and Flo-
rence Sinykin; sister, Vivian
Geller; brother-in-law, Mort
Geller; and son-in-law, Ed Bower.
A memorial was held at the Vet-
erans Cemetery in Boulder City,
Nev., on Wednesday, September
25th.
Arrangements were under the
direction of Kraft-Sussman Fu-
neral Home. Las Vegas, Nev.
Wall School Upcoming Events
Thursday, October 3 - Saturday, October 12
Thursday, October 3: Homecoming Week. VB w/Newell, 6 p.m.; Flu/TDAP Clinic @ Wall School,
3:30-6 p.m.
Friday, October 4: Homecoming! Homecoming Show, 12:05 p.m.; Parade @ South Blvd., 1:30
p.m.; Tailgate Supper, 5-6:30 p.m.; FB w/NU Tigers, 7 p.m. GO EAGLES!!
Saturday, October 5: Wall JH FB Jamboree, 9 a.m.; Lead/Dwd VB Invitational, 8:30 a.m.; WGP JH
VB Conf. Tourn @ Ft. Pierre, 9 a.m. MST.
Monday, October 7: JV FB @ Box Elder w/Douglas Freshman, 4:30 p.m.; JH FB @ NU, 4 p.m.; VB
w/NU, 6 p.m.; JH VB w/NU, 4 p.m.; Jostens here for Seniors/Sophomores (Srs. @ 12:15 p.m. & Soph.
@ 1:10 p.m.)
Tuesday, October 8: JH VB @ Philip, 4:30 p.m. (3 matches)
Wednesday, October 9: School Board Meeting @ 7 p.m.; 8th (p.m.) & 10th (a.m.) Graders to BNP
data collection trip w/Miss Pittman.
Thursday, October 10: VB @ Philip, 6 p.m. (Flu Clinic going on @ game); CC CEB Invite, 2 p.m.;
FFA Chapter Visit; Jostens back for orders.
Friday, October 11: JH VB @ Kadoka, 10 a.m.
Saturday, October 12: Philip JH FB Jamboree, 10 a.m.; Wall JH VB Tri, 9 a.m.; CC Philip Invite, 10
a.m.
Wall School District #51-5
Breakfast and Lunch Menu
October 3 to October 9, 2013
Thursday: Breakfast: Omelet, Toast, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Tator Tot Casserole, Roll, Corn, Pears, Milk.
Friday: Breakfast: Yogurt w/Granola, Toast, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Steamburger, Baked Beans, Baby Carrot, Fresh Fruit, Milk.
Monday: Breakfast: Pancake, Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets, Roll, Cucumber/Green Peppers, Corn,
Apple, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Waffle, Egg Patty, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Pizza, Green Beans, Baby Carrots, Lettuce Salad, Mandarin
Oranges, Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast: Breakfast Wrap, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Taco Salad, Bread Stick, Refried/Black Beans, Orange, Milk.
Gang Tackling at its best! A "Gang" of Mighty Mite Eagles hit the ball carrier behind the line for a loss
in the game against the Spearfish Rams on Saturday. They went on to win 35-0. The Junior PeeWee
team had another tough game, but pulled off the victory 14-8 against the Rams Gold team. The PeeWee
team also won 34-0 against the Rams Blue team. This weeks games against the Steelers of Rapid City,
will be held in Philip on Saturday, October 5, starting with the Mighty Mites at 2:00 p.m.
Eagles Youth Football
Sports
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 6
By Coach Patterson
The Western Great Plains
Cross Country meet was held
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
at Philip.
The meet was a cool day and
wind coming from the southeast.
The Wall Squad had a confer-
ence winner for the boys varsity
division.
Austin Huether took the lead
after a half mile and never looked
back. He flew across the finish
line in 18:46 for first place.
David Bintliff ran an excellent
race behind Huether finishing
third in 19:14.
Roland Traveny finished 27th
in 23:28 and David Sykora 31st in
24:12.
There were 32 runners for the
varsity run and the top seven
runners were also All Conference
winners.
Team points were kept and win-
By Coach Anderson
The Wall Eagle Football team
traveled to Edgemont on Friday,
September 27 and remained per-
fect on the season with the 56 to
6 win. With the win the Eagles
improve to 5 – 0 for the season.
On the trip down it started
raining at about Rapid City and
continued when they got off the
bus. The Eagles were prepared
for a wet and wild night under the
cloudy skies. When the Eagles
took the field, the rain came to a
stop. The only thing falling from
the sky through the first quarter
would be passes from quarterback
Lane Blasius to Trevor Anderson
and Ben Linn.
The Eagles offense would be on
the field first. They would experi-
ence something they have not
dealt with all season! They had to
punt on their first series of of-
fense! On the first play the Eagles
had a penalty. On the next play
the Eagles had a breakdown in
pass protection which led to a
Mogul sac. Then they over-
whelmed the Eagles at the point
of attack for a no gain. With a
nine yard pick up on third and
long, the Eagles were forced to
punt. The problems were fixed
and the Eagles never looked back
from that point on!
The defense was dominant all
night! From start to finish they
didn’t give any ground. “We had
been focused in preparation for
their spread offense all week. We
had to adjust on the field as Edge-
mont came out in a totally differ-
ent offense.” Different look, same
result!
The Eagles Defense stifled the
Moguls offense to negative 13
yards on the night. When they did
try to pass the Eagles front line
made up of Ridge Sandal, Clancy
Lytle, Tyler Peterson, and Ben
Linn would put tremendous pres-
sure on the Moguls as they were
derailed. The couple times they
did get the ball off, Cade Kjerstad
and Anderson recorded intercep-
tions. When Kjerstad had his in-
terception, he ran down the field
like a runaway locomotive for 32
yards which ended in a big colli-
sion.
Les Williams led the Eagles de-
fense with six tackles. It was def-
initely a team effort as they
stopped the Moguls on everything
they tried.
The only Mogul score came
when the junior varsity kickoff
team gave up an 80 yard kick re-
turn. On the return, the Moguls
took the Cass Lytle kick, threw it
all the way across the field, and
watched the Mogul player run for
the touchdown.
After the first series, the Eagles
Offense ran like a well lubricated
machine.
By the end of the first quarter
the Eagles had a comfortable 35
to 0 lead.
The Eagles executed their of-
fense very well on the ground and
through the air.
The Eagles starting tailback
Carson Johnston only had three
carries on the night.
Freshman Carter Elshere and
Dusty Dartt rotated at tailback
most of the night.
Once the second quarter began,
the Eagles would rotate the rest
of the squadron as all players
took part in the action.
At the end of the night the Ea-
gles would put up 56 points and
tally 371 yards of offense in only
42 plays.
Awards this week went to: Kjer-
stad on Offense. Kjerstad had 10
carries for 80 yards and three
touchdowns.
Defensive player of the week
went to the Eagles leading tackle
Williams.
Anderson again won Special
Teams player of the week.
Hit of the Week this week will
go to Kjerstad for his physical
play on offense and defense.
This week the Eagles take their
perfect 5-0 record against the un-
defeated New Underwood Tigers.
The Western Great Plains Con-
ference game will begin at 7:00
p.m.
The winner of this game will
take over sole possession of the
number one spot in the confer-
ence. The football game will also
be the finale of an exciting Home-
coming week.
Stats
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Final
Wall: 35 13 8 0 56
Edgemont: 0 6 0 0 6
Team Totals: Wall, first downs - 13,
penalties - 6, penalty yards - 4.; Edge-
mont, first downs - 1, penalties - 2, penalty
yards - 15.
Passing: Blasius, completions - 7, at-
tempts - 8, yards - 133, percentage - .875,
average - 19.000, touchdowns - 2, long - 32,
QB Rate - 167.
Rushing: Dartt, number - 4, yards - 28,
average - 7.00, long - 9; Blasius, number -
5, yards - 19, average - 3.80, long - 16,
touchdowns - 1; Johnston, number - 3,
yards - 47, average - 15.67, long - 26, touch-
downs - 1; Elshere, number - 6, yards - 26,
average - 4.33, longs - 16; T. Anderson,
number - 4, yards - 32, average - 8.00, long
- 22, touchdowns - 1; Lytle, number - 1,
yards - (-1), average - (-1), long - (-1); Kjer-
stad, number - 10, yards - 80, average -
8.00, long - 40, touchdowns - 3; Raedon
Anderson, number - 1, yards - 3, average
- 3.00, long - 3; Tucker O’Rourke, number
- 1, yards - 4, average - 4.00, long - 4.
Receiving: Linn, number - 1, yards -
15, average - 15.00, long - 15, touchdowns -
1; T. Anderson, number - 6, yards - 118,
average - 19.67, long - 32, touchdowns - 1.
All Purpose Yards: Dartt, rushing -
28, punt returns - 35, total - 63; Blasius,
rushing - 19, kickoff returns - 26, total - 45;
Johnston, rushing - 46, kickoff returns -
6, total - 53; Elshere, rushing - 26, total -
26; Linn, receiving - 15, total - 15; T. An-
derson, rushing - 32, receiving - 118, total
- 150; Lytle, rushing - (-1), total - (-1);
Kjerstad, rushing - 80, INT Yards - 32,
total - 112; R. Anderson, rushing - 3, total
- 3; O’Rourke, rushing - 4, total - 4.
Total Yards: Dartt, rushing - 28, total
- 28; Blasius, rushing - 19, passing - 133,
total - 152; Johnston, rushing - 47, total -
47; Elshere, rushing - 26, total - 26; Linn,
receiving - 15, total - 15; T. Anderson,
rushing - 32, receiving - 118, total - 150;
Lytle, rushing - (-1), total - (-1); Kjerstad,
rushing - 80, total - 80; R. Anderson, rush-
ing - 3, total - 3, O’Rourke, rushing - 4,
total - 4.
Tackles: Dartt, assists - 2, total - 2;
Blasius, solo - 4, assists - 1, total - 5;
Elshere, solo - 1, total - 1; Linn, solo - 2,
assists - 2, total - 4; Camden Sawvell, solo
- 1, total - 1; T. Anderson, assists - 2, total
- 2; Peterson, solo - 1, assists - 4, total - 5;
Williams, solo - 2, assists - 4, total - 6; R.
Sandal, assists - 1, total - 1; Lytle, solo -
3, assists - 1, total - 4.
Interceptions: T. Anderson, INT - 1;
Kjerstad, INT - 1, yards - 32, average - 32.
Kickoffs: T. Anderson, number - 6,
yards - 296, long - 60, touchbacks - 1; Lytle,
number - 2, yards - 64, long - 40.
Punts: T. Anderson, number - 1, yards
- 40, average - 40.00 long - 40.
Kickoff and Punt Returns: Dartt,
punt returns - 1, yards - 35, average -
35.00, long - 35, total - 35; Blasius, kickoff
returns - 1, yards - 26, average - 26.00, long
- 26, total - 26; Johnston, kickoff returns -
1, yards - 6, average - 6.00, long - 6, total -
6; T. Anderson, punt returns - 1.
Points: Blasius, touchdowns - 1, total
points - 6; Johnston, touchdowns - 1, total
points - 6; Linn, touchdowns - 1, safeties -
1, total points - 8; T. Anderson, touch-
downs - 2, kick points - 6, total points - 18;
Kjerstad, touchdowns - 3, total points - 18.
PATs and Field Goals: T. Anderson,
PAT kicking made - 6, attempts - 6, per-
centage - 1.000, field goal attempts - 1, per-
centage - .000, total points - 6.
Touchdowns and Conversions: Bla-
sius, touchdown rushing - 1, total - 1;
Johnston, touchdown rushing - 1, total -
1; Linn, touchdown receiving - 1, total - 1;
T. Anderson, touchdown rushing - 1,
touchdown receiving - 1, total - 2; Kjer-
stad, touchdown rushing - 3, total - 3.
Wall Eagles derail the Edgemont Moguls
At a seemingly young 89 years of age, Frank has decided to retire and sell this
choice farm and ranch land that has remained in his family since before he was born,
and includes his father’s own original “Homestead Quarter”. is choice farmland
has never before been oered for sale to the public and will now be sold on the day
of auction regardless of price. A very large portion of this choice land is Class 3 soils
and has produced untold bushels of winter wheat through the years on a crop-rota-
tion basis of farming methods. Other than the hayland and pasture, the cropland
found on this farm is now in fallow and will be ready to the successful buyer(s) for
planting of spring crops in 2014. At this time, until future plans are made, Frank will
retain a Life Estate enabling him to remain in the home at the headquarters. Please
check all of the les listed on the website concerning tracts, soils, complete terms,
etc.
Tract 1: ±160 Ac. – NE1/4, Sec. 10. e headquarters tract and includes the mod-
est ranch home, a separate mobile home, a nice Behlen Quonset bldg., (11) grain
bins with approx. 33,000 bushel of grain storage, older livestock corrals and shelters
all found within a mature shelter belt encompassing approx. 20 acres. Rural water is
to the property feeding 4 hydrants within Section 10 and includes 2 shallow water
wells. e productive cropland consists of approx. 70% Class 3 soils with the Pro-
ductivity Index averaging around 60, with the remainder being Class 4. Unfenced
along west edge of this tract.
Tract 2: ±160 Ac. – SE1/4, Sec. 10. e “south pasture” tract and consists at this
time of entirely native grass pasture with an approx. 2-1/2 acre lake near the northern
edge. A good portion of this tract is tillable. Unfenced along the west side.
Tract 3: ±320 Ac. – W1/2, Sec. 10. Access is o Anderson Hill Rd. along the
north. Consists of approx. 84 acres of productive hayland, a few acres of drainage to
the center of the tract, approx. 85 acres of native grass pasture with the balance of
the remaining approx. 140 acres being very productive cropland of which over 70%
are Class 3 soils with the Productivity Index running mostly from 52-77. Extra tillable
acres are included in the pasture area if desired. Unfenced along the entire east side
and one shallow water well is located on this tract.
Tract 4: ±80 Ac. – N1/2NE1/4, Sec. 9. A very picturesque tract fronted on two
sides by Anderson Hill Road, this choice tract would make a great ranchette property,
or would add well to any existing operation. Includes an approx. 1.5 acre well-fed
stock dam with a scattering of mature trees in the drainage areas, an approx. 10 acre
portion of hayland and approx. 45 acres of productive mostly Class 3 soils.
Tract 5: ±320 Ac. – N1/2, Sec. 11. Lies to the east of Cedar Butte Rd. directly
across from the Headquarters Tract 1 consisting of Class 3 soils of the Blackpipe-
Wortman complex and loams for nearly 70% of this productive tract. ere are four
small dams/dugouts dispersed within the eld area with an overall slope of 0 to 3%.
An extremely nice farm tract.
Tract 6: ±160 Ac. – SW1/4, Sec. 34. e old original Anderson Homestead tract,
this parcels joins 229th Street one-half mi. west of Cedar Butte Rd. Currently, there
is approx. 54 acres of productive hayland, approx. 93 acres of mostly very productive
Class 3 farmland with a portion of that being Class 2 soils, (2) shallow water wells
and an approx. 1 acre livestock dam located in the very northeast corner. Completely
fenced tract.
Entire Unit: ±1,200 Ac. e entire unit consisting of Tracts 1 through 6 and in-
cludes all of the features spoken herein above. An ideal-sized unit within this area
within which to raise a family and/or to add to an existing operation. Water includes
rural water, 5 water wells (4 hydrants & auto waterer), 4 livestock dams and 7
dugouts. is aordable unit has amply supported Frank and his wife Bernice and
allowed them the pleasure to raise four grown adult children. Completely fenced.
We urge you to consider the purchase of the entire Frank Anderson farm operation.
You will never be disappointed.
Auctioneer’s Note ~ As many of you are aware, excellent farmland and agland in
general within this area is closely-held to say the least, and rarely ever comes onto
the market. is is a rare opportunity for anyone to invest in prime land, in a prime
location, that has never before been oered for sale. Do no miss this opportunity.
PROPERTY LOCATION: At I-90 Exit 107 (Cedar Butte Rd
Exit) just west of WaII, SD, traveI north on paved
Cedar Butte Rd. 3 miIes to the farm headquarters.
AUCTION LOCATION:
WaII Community Center, Main St., WaII, SD.
IPANK 0. AN0LP50N
"PLNNINU10N U0UN1Y ULN1UPY IAPM", Wa||, 50
AB80L01E LAN0 A0c1l0N
±1,200 Pennìngton Uounty, 50 Acres
very near Wa||, 50 on Uedar ßutte Pd.
0IILPL0 IN 1 UNI1 & 6 1PAU15 Irom 80 to 320 Acres
WE0., 0c1. 16, 2013 - 10:30 AM
PROPERTY INSPECTION: Auctioneer/Broker onsite at the
Headquarters on Wed., Oct. 2nd & Wed., Oct. 9th from 10:00 AM
until 12:00 noon each day OR inspect at your leisure, brochures
onsite and tract boundaries will be clearly marked. Broker/Auc-
tioneer represents Seller. Broker participation invited. Please view
more photos, FSA maps, etc. on www.martinjurisch.com
AUCTIONEER/BROKER
Martin Jurisch
CAI, GPPA, #4300
2I0K0 LAN05, L10.
FARM LAN0 A0c1l0N
±280.03 Jackson Uounty, 50 Acres very near ße|vedere, 50
0IILPL0 IN 1 UNI1 & 2 1PAU15
1R0R8., 0c1. 17, 2013 - 10:30 AM
PROPERTY LOCATION:
At I-90 (BeIvidere Exit) Exit 163. Both tracts are adjacent to I-90 on
the south side. Tract 1 straddIes oId Hwy 16 on each side approx.
1 mi. east of BeIvidere. Tract 2 is just adjacent to BeIvidere itseIf on
the western edge and aIso straddIes oId Hwy 16. Signs on each tract.
AUCTION LOCATION:
Kadoka Fire HaII, 810 Main St., Kadoka, SD.
AUCTIONEER/BROKER
Martin Jurisch
CAI, GPPA, #4300
This prime farmland was originally purchased by Dave Heaton in the early
1940s and has remained in the family (Donna Zidko is Dave`s daughter) all
of these past years and has never before been offered for sale in those 70+
years. Tract 1 (SE1/4, Sec. 28), the Heaton Quarter just east of Belvidere
consists of ±133.29 acres of which approx. 125.83 acres are tillable. Of these
acres, all are classified as Class 3 soils with 110 of these acres having a pro-
ductivity index of 58 and the remaining a productivity index of 71. This is a
very desirable and productive tract. Tract 2 (SW1/4, Sec. 29 & Outlot F & G,
Sec. 32) consists of ±146.74 total acres and is located on the western edge
of town. Most of these acres are tillable land with the exception of a dam and
drainage area in the northeast corner and consists mostly of Class 4 soils
with a productivity index avg. about 50. These two tracts will be offered indi-
vidually, and as one unit, selling in the manner realizing the greater return.
Make plans to attend and be in attendance.
PROPERTY INSPECTION: Brochures onsite, or Auctioneer/
Broker onsite on Tract 1 on Wed. Oct. 9th from 1:00 PM untiI 3:00 PM.
Broker/Auctioneer represents SeIIer. Broker participation invited.
PIease caII for a brochure, or view photos, maps and terms for this
Iand auction on www.martinjurisch.com
Wall School kicked off “Once Upon A Homecoming” week with
dress up day held on Monday, September 30. Kindergarten
through 12th grade students participated in the day.
Huether wins WGP Conference
ning the conference was Philip
with 19 pts., second RC Christian
24 pts., third Wall 31 pts., Stanley
Co. 32 pts., White River 44 pts.,
Lyman 49 pts., and New Under-
wood 52 pts.
Ellie Coyle won the varsity girls
division in 15:38 and Philip also
won the team plaque with 12 pts.
Lyman was second with 13 pts.
and Jones Co. with 24 pts.
Coach’s Comments: It was a
great day with two runners plac-
ing in the top three.
Huether dominated the course
and Bintliff was determined to
stay close to him.
Traveny was trying hard and
with more races, he will get his
time down.
Sykora was not feeling well, but
ran the best he could. Hills and
wind are always a factor in cross
country.
Eagles Cross Country team. Pictured back row: from left to right ...
Austin Huether, Coach Karol Patterson and David Sykora. Front
row: from left to right ... Roland Traveny and David Bintliff.
Big White students kicking off homecoming week. Pictured from left
to right ... Liam Gibson - Mowgli, Kipp Cordes - Doc Holiday, Lucy
Moon - Dumbo, Piper Cordes - Pocahontas, Quinn Moon - Woody,
and Cayne Krogman - Puss n Boots.
NowAvAilAble…
Total Equine
Horse Feed
as seen on RFDTV.
Call George Michael at 515-1181.
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • Page 7
2013 FOOTBALL TEAM
2013 VOLLEYBALL TEAM
2013 CROSS COUNTRY TEAM
Schedule of Events
for
Homecoming
Thursday - Pep Rally: Battle of the Classes,
3:00 p.m. (hosted by the FB & VB Teams)
- WHS Homecoming Volleyball game vs.
Newell Irrigators
Friday - Homecoming Show, 12:05 p.m.
- Parade starts at 1:30 p.m. (South Blvd.)
- Appreciation Supper, 5-6:30 p.m.,
City Park (alternate Wall Fire Department)
- Football game vs. New Underwood Tigers
7:00 p.m.
Saturday - Volleyball @ Lead Invitational, 8:30 a.m.
- JH FB Jamboree, 9 a.m.
- WWGP JH VB Tourney @ Ft. Pierre, 9 a.m.
Homecoming Dress-up Days
Homecoming Dress-up Days
Thursday - Class Color Day
Friday - Blue, Gold & White Day
GO EAGLES!!!
GO EAGLES!!!
These sponsors are proud to support the Wall Eagles in all their sporting acti vities ...
Badlands Automotive
Corner Pantry/Subway
Crown Oil Co.
Dartt Angus
Days Inn Motel
De’s Oil Inc./SanDee’s
Econo Lodge
First Interstate Bank
Golden West
Telecommunications
Hildebrand Concrete
Ken’s Refrigeration
& Heating, Inc.
Pennington County Courant
Rush Funeral Home
Super 8 Motel
Two Bit Saloon
& Steakhouse
Walker Red Rock
Restaurant & Lounge
Wall Auto Livery
Wall Booster Club
Wall Building Center
& Construction
Wall Dairy Queen
Wall Drug Store
Wall Food Center
Wall Lube & Espresso Bar
West River Electric
Association
WHS Homecoming 2013
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 8
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80 years ago…
The Owanka High School boys
scored their first kittenball vic-
tory of the season from New Un-
derwood, last Friday, the score
was 12 to 7. The Owanka girls
however, lost their game 11 to 6.
A forest fire is doing some dam-
age in the Hills near Hill City and
is being fought by the CCC boys
and others. It is hard to get under
control being in a district where a
windstorm has broken down con-
siderable timber.
J.Z. Mackrill was arrested
about 1 o’clock this morning by
Federal Prohibition Agent John
Ure, and Irwin A. Lins, deputy
sheriff, on charges of illegal trans-
portation of intoxicating liquor, it
was stated at the sheriff ’s office
this morning. The arrest was
made after the officers had
chased Mackrill from Box Elder
into town. A search of Mackrill’s
Hudson Coupe revealed 33 gal-
lons of alcohol and five gallons of
whiskey, it was stated, the liquor
being confiscated by the officers.
Mackrill appeared this mornings
before Justice George Hurst,
waived preliminary examination,
and was bound over to circuit
court under bonds set at $2,000.
He failed to furnish the bonds and
was committed to jail to await
trial.
Popular rates at the Beaufort
Hotel, 112 3rd Street South, Op-
posite Federal Building, Min-
neapolis; 75¢, $1.00, $1.50 per
day, parking next door.
70 years ago…
Fire of unknown source early
Friday morning completely de-
stroyed the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Carl Lurz, Jr., about three miles
west of Cottonwood. The house
belonged to Joe Hall of Cotton-
wood. The Lurz family saved only
a few items of their household be-
longings.
Construction started this week
on a mining experiment building
at the School of Mines and Tech-
nology, which will house both the
state experiment station and a
Federal Bureau of Mines Labora-
tory.
The old City jail, one of the first
buildings in Wall, was saved Sat-
urday from being destroyed by
fire, by the bucket brigade who
carried water from the Sebade
Cafe, they kept the blaze checked
until the fire department was
able to get their equipment into
action. The fire was started from
the incinerator as Merlyn Denke
was burning some papers. The
wind from the northwest brought
the grass fire growing in great
leaps toward the buildings and
sheds at the rear of the Main
Street store buildings. The fire-
men made short work of stopping
the fire when they got on the job.
60 years ago…
BIRTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Milton Denke of Quinn, a son, at
a Rapid City hospital, September
7.
Little Teddy Hustead under-
went minor surgery Tuesday at
Rapid City for a tooth that had
been pushed into his jaw when
the fell a few weeks ago.
Two junior high school boys
from Quinn were inured during
the noon hour Tuesday in a head-
on collision with a Minnesota car
about a mile west of Quinn. The
driver, Marlin Connolly, received
only minor bruises while his pas-
senger, Alvin Schreiber, has a se-
rious scalp wound. The newly-
weds, occupants of the Minnesota
car, Mr. and Mrs. Arte Fitzgerald,
were returning from their honey-
moon trip to the Hills. Mrs.
Fitzgerald received numerous fa-
cial cuts as well as knee injuries.
The injured were taken to the
Quinn hospital for treatment of
their injuries.
The Wall Fire Department has
been credited with saving the
granary and perhaps other build-
ings of the Robt. Simpfenderfer
farm, four and one half miles
south of town, Monday afternoon.
The fire broke out in the building
housing the farm’s light plant
along with fuel oil. As they had no
phone, Mrs. Simpfenderfer had to
drive to Wall to put in the alarm.
When the firemen arrived at the
scene, the fire had already
reached the granary and burning
briskly. Charlie Best reports that
the Wall truck moves slow but
that it does have a good pumping
system. A stream of water from it
soon had the fire under control.
Simpfenderfer estimates his loss
at $1,500 including the building,
light plant and tools.
50 years ago…
The doors of the new First
Western Bank in Wall opened its
doors for business Monday morn-
ing with all the banking cus-
tomers amazed at its ultra-mod-
ern atmosphere. The bank with
its brand new furnishings, three
teller windows, two large glassed-
in offices, a secretarial space and
huge lobby are some of the things
that come into view as a person
enters the bank. Other features
include the vari-colored vinyl
paneling, the acoustical plaster,
the rug and tile lobby and car-
peted offices; the night deposi-
tory; and the huge vault door.
Outside is a paved parking area
to accommodate twenty-five or
more cars. A row of trees will be
planted to cut off the unsightly
view on the north.
DeWayne and Florence Glass-
gow are observing their 5th An-
niversary in Wall and are holding
an Open House at their new of-
fices of the Wall Propane Com-
pany, all day Monday, September
30. The Glassgows have added
the Skelly line of gasoline and oils
to their LP gas and appliance
store.
A bullet from a rifle whizzed
through the front window of Joe
Knapp’s home, ricocheted off a
chest and embedded itself in the
living room wall, Saturday morn-
ing. Joe and City Marshall Nor-
man Klingbile investigated and
thought the slug came from some-
one who may have been shooting
at birds.
40 years ago…
Kitchen help needed: Be-
cause the students of the High
School lack interest to work or the
need for money, it is necessary to
obtain community help. The
kitchen at the Wall City School
needs one helper to work between
an hour and a half and two hours
per day starting at 11:20 daily.
Pay is $1.60 per hour with em-
ployment being every school day.
For a job application blank and
more information concerning the
above, kindly feel free to contact
Superintendent Dave Hahn or
telephone 279-2157.
First, second and third place
winners, respectively, in the Punt,
Pass and Kick Contest held last
week were: 8 year olds, Jamie
Babcock, Marty Huether and
Shawn Ruland; 9 year olds, Pat
Goldhammer, Kevin Foster and
Jimmy Hays; 10 year olds, Lee
Renner, Philip Hauk and Jeff Pe-
ters; 11 year olds, Scott Berry, Bill
Sautter and Grant Shearer; 12
year olds, Boe Knapp, John Mc-
Griff and Eugene Lurz; 13 year
olds, Randy Williams, Ross Ren-
ner and Tom Foster.
The Wall Roping Club held a
Buckle Roping event at the Wall
Area. Scott Pippert won the
header buckle with four steers
caught out of six head with a total
of 154.1. Second was Larry Ru-
land with three steers caught
with a total of $136.4. He was the
biggest money winner in the
buckle roping, winning four times
out of six. Third was Todd who
caught three with a time of 113.1;
fourth was Dewey Fortune who
caught one head out of six at 65.8.
Milton Trask won the Heeler
Buckle with three steers caught
with a total time of 88.4. Second,
Tracy Trask caught three steers
with 120.0. Third, Shaun Ruland
caught three steers at 146.6.
Fourth was Roger Fortune with
two steers at 30.0; and fifth, Bob
Helms with two steers at 52.6.
30 years ago…
The Wall Eagles dropped to 0-3
on the season and 0-2 in confer-
ence play, as they fell to Lyman
County High School, 16-8 last Fri-
day in Presho. Outstanding
players: Andy Linn was named
the “Offensive Player of the
Week” for his six receptions for a
total of 80 yards against Lyman
County. “Defensive Player of the
Week” went to Brent Johnson for
participating in 15 tackles and re-
covering two fumbles. On ten of
those tackles, Johnson was the
first man to reach the ball carrier.
Dan Carlbom was given the “Hit
of the Week” for a devastating of-
fensive block.
Wall High School senior Jodi
Schell was crowned the 1984
Philip Area Junior Miss, Sunday,
September 25th at the Philip Ar-
mory. Jodi is the daughter of
Jerry and Diane Schell of Wall.
Pauline Ravellette of Philip was
first runner-up and was voted by
the Contestants as the “Spirit of
Junior Miss” winner. Tish Brown
of Kadoka was second runner-up
while Penny Jorgenson of Kadoka
received the Creative Performing
Arts Award. Dee Ann Antonson of
Kadoka received the Scholastic
Achievement Award. Jodi Schell
will now represent the Philip area
in state competition at Sturgis,
November 13th.
Norman L. Klingbile, 55, Wall
Police Chief since April 1960, re-
cently received a plaque from the
South Dakota Peace Officers as-
sociation. The plaque recognized
Klingbile for 25 years of dedicated
service as a Peace Officer.
The Wall Lady Eagles struggled
through a 1-1 week, opening with
a convincing 58-38 victory over
the Midland Vikings on Tuesday,
September 27, then losing to
Custer 39-24 on September 29.
Both games were played in Wall.
The Wall of the Badlands F.F.A.
Chapter hosted the annual Fu-
ture Farmers of America and 4-H
Land and Range Judging Thurs-
day, September 29. A total of 28
judges from Wall were among 129
Range judges and 134 Land
judges. Fourteen schools com-
peted for top honors, with Wall
placing first in Land Judging and
third in Range Judging.
20 years ago…
Sonny Biegler began her first
day as head of Wall’s Pennington
County Satellite Office on Tues-
day. Biegler’s official title is Assis-
tant to the Treasurer, Auditor and
Register of Deeds. Her work in
the Satellite Office is primarily
concern with assisting Wall area
residents in their transactions
with those offices, thereby elimi-
nating necessity of a trip to Rapid
City to conduct business with
those county offices.
The Wall City Council voted
Thursday night to accept the bid
of Henry H. Hackett and Sons,
Rapid City, for construction of the
new transfer station to be located
east of Wall, near the lagoon. The
original bid was for $315,300, but
the council chose to take advan-
tage of certain alternates to lower
the cost to $310,885. In addition
to the cost of the building, engi-
neering costs will total an approx-
imate additional $25,000. This
figure is higher than original es-
timates to build the metal build-
ing. Total cost of the project is ex-
pected to be about $431,000, in-
cluding the transfer trailer, trac-
tor, engineering fees, baler, and
other costs related to bringing the
project to its present stage.
Two fire trucks, a tanker, and
nine men were called to the scene
of a fire near the Wall landfill
about 3 p.m. Wednesday, Septem-
ber 15. The fire was apparently
caused by the wind blowing burn-
ing trash from the landfill site
onto the grass. About 40 acres
were burned by the fire, according
to Fire Chief Boyd “Butch” Kitter-
man. Firemen were at the scene
for about an hour.
Clark’s Food Center has a new
meat cutter, Troy Schulz, 25, orig-
inally from McLaughlin, S.D.
Schulz began his first day of work
Monday, arranging the meat dis-
plays to his liking. He has been in
the grocery business for eight
years, in Colorado and Nebraska.
He and his wife, Gina, and their
four-year-old daughter Ashton,
have already settled down in a
rented home in Wall.
BIRTH: Born August 20, 1993,
a son, John Luke, to Johnny and
Shelly McGriff of Wasta. Little
John Luke weighed in at 6 lbs. 9
oz. and measured 17 1/2 inches
long. He joins big sister Mandy at
home. Proud grandparents are
John and Selina McGriff, Wall,
Mary Percy, Rapid City, Dallas
and Mary Thomas, Rapid City,
and Arnie and Brigitte Arnio,
Rapid City. Great-grandparents
are Jim and Edith Curry, Lead.
Mr. and Mrs. Gene Blakesley of
Quinn, and Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Rennpferd of Amboy, Minn., an-
nounce the engagement of their
children, LaLainya and Dave. a
July 1994 wedding is planned.
BIRTH: Born September 5,
1993, a daughter, Emmie Lynn, to
Travis and Sherri Benson, Gor-
don, Neb. Little Emmie weighed
in at 7 lbs. 11.6 ozs and joins big
brother Turee at home. Proud
grandparents are Bob and the
late Geraldine Knutson, Wall,
and Don and the late Lynn Dell
Benson, Gordon. Great-grandpar-
ents arte Gotthold and Emma
Eisenbraun, Wall, and Margaret
Benson, Gordon.
10 years ago…
Amy Kom and Philip Kruse are
pleased to announce their engage-
ment and upcoming wedding on
October 18, 2003, in Boise, Idaho.
The couple met this past April
through local friends. Amy Kom,
from Boise, attended Arizona
State University before moving to
South Dakota in February. Philip
Kruse is a rancher/owner of Circle
View Guest Ranch. He is a native
to the Badlands area. The couple
will make their home four miles
west of Interior.
2003 Homecoming Royalty:
Kannan Lurz and Clyde Shull
were crowned Homecoming King
and Queen on Monday, Septem-
ber 22.
BIRTH: Born July 3, 2003, a
daughter, Abygael Joy, to Jeff and
Christal Noonan, Rapid City. Lit-
tle Abygael weighed in at 8 lbs. 4
oz. and measured 20 1/4 inches
long. She joins brothers Kyle and
Wyatt at home. Proud grandpar-
ents are Bruce and Sharon Bar-
nett, Wall, Donna and the late
Ken Hurley, Rapid City, and Jim
Noonan, Riverton, Wyo. Great-
grandparents are Kathryn and
Orlando Drageset, Philip, Bessie
O’Bryan, Wall, Ruth Noonan
Riverton, and Jay and Clare Bar-
nett, Billings, Mont.
The Looking Glass of Time
annc@gwtc.net
Cl assifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
help WAnteD: Part-time cook
and/or part-time cashier,
evenings or weekend shifts
available. Would work well with
school hours for students or
adults. Applicantions are avail-
able at fuel desk at Discount
Fuel. K42-2tc
help WAnteD: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL
required, or to be obtained
within six months. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screen-
ing required. Benefits package.
Applications/resumés ac-
cepted. Information: 837-2410
or 837-2422. Fax: 837-2447.
K41-3tc
certiFieD nUrses AiDe:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tions. Benefits available. Con-
tact Heidi or Ruby at 837-2270,
Kadoka. K41-tfn
positions open: The Kadoka
Area School District has the fol-
lowing coach positions open: jr.
high boys’, jr. high girls’, jr. var-
sity girls’ and varsity girls’ bas-
ketball. Applications are avail-
able on the school’s website
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us and
may be submitted to: KASD,
Attn. Jamie Hermann, PO Box
99, Kadoka, SD 57543. For
more information contact Supt.
Jamie Hermann at 837-2175.
K41-3tc
FUll- or pArt-tiMe press-
rooM help WAnteD: Mon-
day and Wednesday mornings
(3-4 hours each day). Will train
the right person. Call Beau Rav-
ellette, 859-2516, for more de-
tails.
PR1-tfn
help WAnteD: Cooks,
counter personnel, wait staff
position(s) are available for Aw!
Shucks Café opening soon at
909 Main Street in Kadoka.
Please apply within or contact
Teresa or Colby Shuck for more
information: 837-2076.
K33-tfn
help WAnteD: Full-time posi-
tion at Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle &
Vet, Philip. 859-2482.
PR52-tfn
AMericA’s best vAlUe inn
in WAll has positions open for
housekeeping and laundry.
Stop in to apply or call Joseph
at 279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
help WAnteD: Sales person
to sell the historic Black Hills
Gold jewelry, in Wall. Meet trav-
elers from all over the world.
Salary + commission. Call Con-
nie at 279-2354 or 939-6443,
or fax resumé to 279-2314.
PW24-tfn
misC. foR saLe
For sAle: 124 gal. propane
(pig) tank, new valves, $200.
545-3033, Wasta. PR6-1tp
teton river trenching:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
West river eXcAvAtion
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD,
or call 837-2690. Craig cell:
390-8087, Sauntee cell: 390-
8604; wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRm & RanCh
For sAle: Hens and pullets.
Call 859-2129. P43-2tp
For sAle: 2nd cutting alfalfa
hay, $130/ton. Hybrid pearl
millet hay, $70/ton. All big
round bales. Feed analysis
available. Located at Milesville.
Call 544-3275. P43-2tp
For sAle: (7) Vern’s deep 16’
feed bunks, like new. ALSO;
900’ windbreak. (320) 226-
1038.
WP5-2tc
WAnteD: 100-200 cows to
graze sudan grass in the Murdo
area. Have plenty of feed to win-
ter cows also. If interested, call
Mike Waldron, 280-3748 or
669-2823. P42-2tp
For sAle; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WAnteD: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-
3151. PR45-tfn
trAiler tires For sAle:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GaRaGe saLes
rUMMAge sAle: Jennifer O’-
Connell Residence (511 E.
Dupree St) philip, tues., oct.
10, 4-7 p.m. Name Brand Girls
clothes NB-6, baby bath, pink
bouncy seat, potty chair, ride-
on toy, toddler trike, toys, mini
fridge (used a few times), cooler,
Tupperware, garden hose, uni-
forms L-XL, women’s clothes L-
XL, men’s XXL. Jennifer O’Con-
nell & Janet Schofield
PR6-1tc
heLP Wanted
looking For: Finance Man-
ager & Sales Person. Contact
Colt at Philip Motor, 859-2585
or 685-4314. P43-tfn
help WAnteD: Opening date
of Subway getting closer. Taking
applications for all shifts and
positions. Apply on-line at
www.mysubwaycareer.com. Al-
ready applied? Please reapply.
Questions call 837-2400.
K42-2tc
automotive
For sAle: 2008 Chevy Cobalt,
2-door, great school car, 107K+
miles, very clean inside & out,
asking $6,500. Call 295-1414.
PR6-1tp
For sAle: 1998 Toyota RAV4,
front wheel drive, 27 mpg, 114K
miles, power windows/locks,
sunroof, FM/CD, $3,500. Call
Steve, 837-2915, after 6:00.
P43-1tp
For sAle: 2008 Ford Edge
SEL, 84,000 miles, white,
$9,500. Call 530-1141, days, or
859-3023, evenings. P42-tfn
Business & seRviCe
bUsiness For sAle: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots
of possibilities for expansion.
Contact Kim or Vickie, 859-
2365.
PR45-tfn
hilDebrAnD steel & con-
crete will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-
2226, toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
roUgh coUntry sprAying:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
o’connell constrUction,
inc., philip: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed).
We can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
pool tAble For sAle: Ask-
ing $450 or best offer. Call Cork
at 859-2515. PR6-2tc
For sAle: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notiCes/Wanted
noW is the tiMe … to
think oF yoUr FAMily &
FrienDs! It’s not too early to
be compiling your Christmas or
end-of-the-year letter! You write
it, email it to us (ads@pioneer-
review.com) and we will print it
on beautiful holiday stationary.
We can even put your full color
family picture with the letter.
Let us help you make the holi-
day season special (and easier)
this year. Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. Philip Office: 859-
2516; Wall Office: 279-2565;
Kadoka Office: 837-2259; Faith
Office: 967-2161; Bison Office:
244-7199; Murdo Office: 669-
2271; New Underwood Office:
754-6466. P41-tfn
WAnteD to bUy: Old farm
machinery and junk cars for
crushing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
ReCReation
For sAle: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
good shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, frig and large front
storage box. Stored inside off
season. Call 279-2195 or 441-
7049, Wall, anytime.
WP4-tfn
ReaL estate
For sAle: Nice three bedroom
home w/finished basement, two
baths, single car attached
garage and covered back deck.
All major appliances included.
514 Hone St., Philip, SD. Con-
tact Kit Graham at 859-2325 or
515-3926. PR6-tfn
For sAle: Jackson Co. prop-
erty, approx. 64 acres with (2)
dams, 14 miles west of Kadoka.
Newly remodeled doublewide,
detached garage with cement
floor, shed, barn, water and
sewer. Call 837-2643 or (cell)
488-0304. PR5-2tp
hoUse For sAle in philip:
Approx. 1200 sq. ft., 3 bed-
rooms, 1.75 baths, detached 2-
car garage, fenced yard.
$50,000 OBO. Contact Erin or
Mike, 840-2257. P40-4tc
For sAle: 160 acres with
rural water. Call 515-1253.
PW41-3tc
RentaLs
ApArtMents: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
CLassified PoLiCy
pleAse reAD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid at
the time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
AUction
HARRIET AND TIP SISK ESTATE
AUCTION, 10:00 a.m. Oct. 12,
Miller, SD. Antiques, collectibles,
glass. See sale bill at www.sdauc-
tions.com. Midwestern Auction
Service, 605-870-1082.
HILL CITY, SD, ABSOLUTE
LAND AUCTION. Friday, October
18. 24 prime development acres
within city limits. Complete
seclusion amongst the pines!
Marv Matkins, owner. Details at
www.bradeenauction.com. 605-
673-2629.
LAND AUCTION: 428+/- acres,
Walworth County, Cropland,
Recreational, Investment, 6 miles
west of Bowdle, SD at the junc-
tion of Hwy 12 and Hwy 47, Oc-
tober 30th, 2013. Call Dakota
Properties, Todd Schuetzle, Auc-
tioneer, 605-280-3115,
www.DakotaProperties.com.
eMployMent
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL,
Custer Clinic, Hot Springs Re-
gional Medical Clinic and Custer
Regional Senior Care have full-
time, part-time and PRN (as-
needed) RN, LPN, Licensed Med-
ical Assistant and Nurse Aide po-
sitions available. We offer com-
petitive pay and excellent bene-
fits. New Graduates welcome!
Please contact Human Resources
at (605) 673-9418 for more infor-
mation or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
log hoMes
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneagleloghomes
.com.
MiscellAneoUs
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
notices
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
otr/Drivers
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
For sAle
FAMOUS CENTRAL SD BAKERY
available for purchase in Gettys-
burg. Established turnkey mix
bakery with both wholesale and
retail sales. Contact Kathleen at
ltgandt@yahoo.com or 240-461-
4779.
FOR SALE BY OWNER: 2009
Chevrolet Silverado, white, low
mileage, roll up topper. Call 605-
421-8526.
WAnt to bUy
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer , Elk/moose 7.50 lb.
Bleached 3.00 lb. cracked 1.00
lb. Also need Porcupines, Rat-
tlesnakes, Elk Ivories ,Mt. Lion
skins. More info; 605-673-4345 /
clawantlerhide@hotmail.com.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
Deadline for Classifieds
& Cards of Thanks is
11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 9
thAnk yoUs
Thank you to Golden West
Telecommunications for the "Pot
Of Gold" I won at your annual
meeting. It was Greatly Appreci-
ated!!
Linda Tifft
We would like to thank our
family and friends for phone
calls, cards and other acts of
well wishes for our 73rd an-
niversary.
Roy & Dorothy Hamann
I want to thank all the people
who sent cards and came to my
birthday party. It all ment so
much to me.
Evelyn Kjerstad
annc@
gwtc.net
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
SEPTEMBER 20, 2013
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on Fri-
day, September 20, 2013, in the Commis-
sioners' meeting room of the Pennington
County Courthouse. Chairperson Lyndell
Petersen called the meeting to order at
9:00 a.m. with the following Commission-
ers present: Ron Buskerud, Ken Davis,
Don Holloway and Nancy Trautman.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to approve the agenda as pre-
sented. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-7 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the Septem-
ber 3, 2013, Board of Commissioners’
meeting.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$2,687,292.15.
7. Schedule a hearing at 9:15 a.m. on
Tuesday, October 1, 2013, to supplement
the General Fund Operating Transfer to
Accumulated Building budget in the
amount of $84,400 from Assigned Gen-
eral Fund Reserves and to supplement
the approved Operating Transfer to the
Accumulated Building Fund Tower Project
budget in the same amount.
End of Consent Agenda
Second Reading And Public Hearing –
Ordinance #106 – An Ordinance For
The Declaration And Abatement Of
Public Nuisances (To Prohibit Texting
While Driving): MOVED by Buskerud
and seconded by Trautman to continue
this item and the next item, Pennington
County Resolution in Support of State
Legislation Prohibiting the Use of Elec-
tronic Communication Devices While
Driving, to the October 1, 2013, Board of
Commissioners’ meeting. Vote: Unani-
mous.
Pennington County Resolution in Sup-
port of State Legislation Prohibiting
the Use of Electronic Communication
Devices While Driving: Continued to
October 1, 2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY RESOLUTION
TO HONOR THE 2013 SOUTH DAKOTA
HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES: MOVED
by Davis and seconded by Buskerud to
adopt the Resolution to Honor the 2013
South Dakota Hall of Fame Inductees:
Jerry Shoener, Ruth Brennan and Pat Le-
brun as presented and authorize the
Chairperson’s signature thereto. Vote:
Unanimous.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
RESOLUTION TO HONOR
THE
2013 SOUTH DAKOTA HALL
OF FAME INDUCTEES
WHEREAS, It is right and
proper for Pennington County
to give special recognition to its
outstanding citizens and it is
important to celebrate the con-
tributions made by dedicated
individuals in shaping our com-
munity; and
WHEREAS, Jerry Shoener,
Ruth Brennan and Pat Lebrun
were inducted into the South
Dakota Hall of Fame on Satur-
day, September 14, 2013; and
WHEREAS, Jerry Shoener
is a Rapid City native who
served in the Pacific during
World War II. After returning
home and completing school,
he began work at the Rapid
City Journal where he stayed
for 50 years before retiring.
Shoener also served as a
State Senator for 8 years and
Rapid City Councilman for 12
years; and
WHEREAS, Ruth Brennan
has been essential to the
Rapid City arts scene. She
has served as the president of
the Rapid City Concert Associ-
ation and the Rapid City Arts
Council. She was also execu-
tive director of the Dahl Arts
Center from 1975 to 1998 and
was an arts columnist for the
Rapid City Journal; and
WHEREAS, Pat Lebrun’s
contributions came in the world
of education where she served
on the South Dakota Board of
Regents for 18 years, including
two terms as board president.
Lebrun helped expand South
Dakota universities from teach-
ing-only institutions into more
research-based learning; and
BE IT THEREFORE RE-
SOLVED, by the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers, on behalf of the citizens
and communities, to honor the
2013 South Dakota Hall of
Fame Inductees: Jerry
Shoener, Ruth Brennan and
Pat Lebrun and in recognition
of this induction, urge all Pen-
nington County citizens to join
in appreciation of the contribu-
tions these individuals have
made to our community and to
our County.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I
have hereunto set my hand
and caused the Seal of Pen-
nington County to be affixed
hereto, this 20th day of Sep-
tember, 2013.
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
Pennington County
Commission
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Contractual/Pending Litigation per
SDCL 1-25-2(3)
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to convene in executive ses-
sion. Vote: The Board remained in ex-
ecutive session from 9:09 a.m. until 9:26
a.m. Vote: Unanimous. MOVED by Hol-
loway and seconded by Trautman to ad-
journ from executive session. Vote:
Unanimous.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to hire the law firm Gunderson,
Palmer, Nelson & Ashmore LLP, to pro-
ceed with the issues discussed in execu-
tive session. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM INFORMATION TECH-
NOLOGY DEPARTMENT
A. Request to Reclassify IT Specialist
III: MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to authorize the IT Director
to reclassify an IT Specialist III to IT Sys-
tems Analyst at grade/step 20C. Vote:
Unanimous.
B. Preview of New County Website.
Proposed Cain Creek Land Exchange
– Martha Whitcher: MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Davis that the
Chairperson appoint a Commissioner to
meet with Imlay Township and Scenic
Township representatives to draft a letter
to the Congressional delegations, the
U.S. Attorney, and other appropriate enti-
ties with concerns regarding the handling
of the Cain Creek Land Exchange. Vote:
Unanimous.
Lien Release Request - DR (Name
withheld per SDCL 28-13-42)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to postpone action on this item
until the October 1, 2013, Board of Com-
missioners’ meeting when the State’s At-
torney will be present.
Substitute motion: MOVED by Traut-
man and seconded by Buskerud to post-
pone action until later in the meeting
when Deputy State’s Attorney Patrick
Grode can be present to advise the Board
of Commissioners. Vote: Unanimous.
Request to Set a Speed Zone – Clear
Creek Placer Road District – Bill Bigley
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Trautman to continue this item to the Oc-
tober 1, 2013, Board of Commissioners’
meeting so the Pennington County Sheriff
can come back with a recommendation.
Vote: Unanimous.
Lien Release Request - DR (Continued
from above)
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to release liens totaling
$4,873.85 in the name DR (Name with-
held per SDCL 28-13-42) from the prop-
erty described as Lot 2 of Tract E of the
NE ¼ of the SE ¼, Section 18, T2N, R9E,
BHM, also known as 337 Main Gate
Road, Box Elder, SD 57719. It was fur-
ther moved that the liens will remain
recorded against DR and the property he
owns at 4755 Bennett Road. The motion
carried 3-2 on a roll call vote: Buskerud
– no, Davis – no, Holloway – yes, Traut-
man – yes, Petersen – yes.
Request for Extension for Cup #13-07
– Jack Bradt
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to allow Jack Bradt of Rushmore
Resorts to operate under CUP #13-07
until November 1, 2014, without the doc-
umentation required by Condition #9
which states: That within 120 days the ap-
plicant obtain approval from the U.S. For-
est Service to utilize the Forest Service
easement and the Section Line Road be
maintained to a minimum of a 12-foot-
wide driving surface and a driveable con-
dition or obtain a minimum of a 40-foot-
wide access easement across private
property or a prescriptive easement,”
since the U.S. Forest Service has not yet
acted on road use permit FDR 363.1A. It
was noted that the CUP will actually be
reviewed by the Planning Commission in
May of 2014, the anniversary of its ap-
proval, and the Planning Director will note
today’s action on the file. Vote: Unani-
mous.
Request for Authorization to Construct
2nd Approach – Dale Erickson
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to approve the request from
Dale Erickson to construct a second ap-
proach to his property at 9700 Nemo
Road for safety reasons. Vote: Unani-
mous.
Request for Waiver of Penalty Fees –
Gene Hensley, Agent for Julie Jensen
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to approve the request to
waive penalties for the variance applica-
tion totaling $800 and for building permits
totaling $269 for Gary and Julie Jensen.
The motion carried 4-1 on a roll call vote:
Buskerud – no, Davis – yes, Holloway –
yes, Trautman – yes, Petersen – yes.
Building Permit Fee – Independence
Hall Project (COBP13-280)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to forward this item to Planning
Commission for discussion and possible
action on an ordinance amendment.
Vote: Unanimous.
PLANNING & ZONING BOARD OF AD-
JUSTMENT
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to convene as the Board of Ad-
justment. Vote: Unanimous.
A. VARIANCE / VA 13-11: Julie
Jensen; Gene Hensley – Agent. To re-
duce the minimum required side yard set-
back from 25 feet to 2.5 feet in a Low
Density Residential District in accordance
with Sections 207 and 509 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Lot 23, Block 1 of Spring
Canyon Estates, Section 6,
T1S, R7E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis to approve Setback Variance /
VA 13-11 with two conditions. Vote:
Unanimous.
1. That this Variance only applies for
the portion of the side-yard setback re-
quirement that is being encroached upon
by the existing detached garage. All other
structures must maintain the proper set-
back requirements or obtain separate
Variance(s) for that structure; and,
2. That Building Permits be obtained
for both the detached garage and studio
space, in which an updated site plan
showing the location of the on-site waste-
water treatment system must be provided
for review by the Environmental Planner
to ensure adequate setbacks to existing
structures are being maintained.
B. VARIANCE / VA 13-12: Carol Nav-
ickas; Davis Engineering – Agent. To re-
duce the minimum required setbacks
from 25 to 15 feet from the northwest
property line and zero (0) feet from the
Section Line Right-of-Way in a General
Agriculture District in accordance with
Sections 205 and 509 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Golden Reef Lode MS, Sec-
tions 27 and 28, T2N, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to approve Variance / VA13-12
with one condition. Vote: Unanimous.
1. That this Variance is only valid for
the proposed shed. If the applicant were
to construct another structure that en-
croaches into the required 25 foot set-
back requirement, the applicant must ob-
tain approval of another Variance.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn as the Board of Ad-
justment and reconvene as the Board of
Commissioners. Vote: Unanimous.
PLANNING & ZONING CONSENT
AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken on all items by a single vote of the
Board of Commissioners. Any item may
be removed from the Consent Agenda for
separate action.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to approve Planning & Zon-
ing Consent Agenda Items C & D as pre-
sented. Vote: Unanimous.
C. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-15 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-09: Neil Tschetter. To rezone .26
acre from General Agriculture District to
Suburban Residential District and to
amend the Pennington County Compre-
hensive Plan to change the Future Land
Use from Planned Unit Development
Sensitive to Suburban Residential District
in accordance with Section 508 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Lot 10 (of Gov’t Lot 9), Black
Forest Village, Section 22,
T1N, R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
Continue Rezone / RZ 13-15 and Com-
prehensive Plan Amendment / CA 13-09
to the November 8, 2013, Board of Com-
missioners’ meeting.
D. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-13 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-07: Mitch Morris. To rezone
151.36 acres and 30.49 acres from Gen-
eral Agriculture District and Light Indus-
trial District to General Commercial Dis-
trict and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Limited Agriculture
District to General Commercial District in
accordance with Section 508 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Being 151.36 acres of land located in
the E1/2 of Section 32, Township 1 North,
Range 8 East of the Black Hills Meridian,
Pennington County, South Dakota, said
151.36 acres of land being more particu-
larly described by metes and bounds as
follows, all measurements are to be con-
sidered as being followed by the words
“more or less”; BEGINNING at the south-
west corner of Lot 1 of the SW1/4 SE1/4
of Section 32, Township 1 North, Range
8 East of the Black Hills Meridian, on the
south line of Section 32 at the intersection
of the east right-of-way line of South
Dakota Highway 79; Thence, North
06°32'53" West, along the west line of
said Lot 1 of the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section
32 and east right-of-way line of SD High-
way 79, a distance of 4310.98 feet to a
point on the easterly line of Lot A of the
NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32 as shown on
plat recorded in Highway Plat Book 9,
Page 93, in the office of the Pennington
County Register of Deeds, in a curve from
which the center of curvature bears North
48°17'34” West a distance of 103.00 feet;
Thence, southwesterly, following the
easterly line of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, along a curve to the
right having a radius of 103.00 feet, a
central angle of 35°53', for an arc dis-
tance of 64.51 feet to a point of tangency;
Thence, South 77°35'27” West, continu-
ing to follow the easterly line of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, a dis-
tance of 4.12 feet to a point for corner on
the east right-of-way line of SD Highway
79, in a curve from which the center of
curvature bears South 73°13'38” West a
distance of 3920 feet; Thence, northwest-
erly, along a curve to the left having a ra-
dius of 3920 feet, a central angle of
00°29'02", for an arc length of 33.11 feet
to point for corner on the centerline of the
alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32; Thence, North
77°35'27” East, following the centerline of
the alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, a distance of 6.78
feet to a point of curvature; Thence,
northeasterly, continuing to follow the
centerline of the alignment of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, along
a curve to the left having a radius of 70.00
feet, a central angle of 84°05'03", for an
arc length of 102.73 feet to a point of tan-
gency; Thence, North 06°29'36” West,
continuing to follow the centerline of the
alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, a distance of 606.16
feet to a point of curvature; Thence,
northwesterly, continuing to follow the
centerline of the alignment of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, along
a curve to the left having a radius of
1432.39 feet, a central angle of
05°45'52", for an arc length of 144.11 feet
to point for corner on the west line of the
E1/2 of Section 32; Thence, North
00°01'24” East, along the west line of the
E1/2 of Section 32, a distance of 206.71
feet to the northwest corner of the E1/2 of
Section 32; Thence, South 89°48'35”
East, along the north line of the E1/2 of
Section 32, a distance of 2656.84 feet to
the northeast corner of Section 32;
Thence, South 00°04'45” West, along the
east line of Section 32, a distance of
500.00 feet to a point for corner; Thence,
North 89°48'35” West, parallel to and 500
feet distant from the north line of the E1/2
of Section 32, a distance of 1514.54 feet
to a point for corner; Thence, South
06°22'35” East, a distance of 4844.00
feet to a point for corner on the south line
of the E1/2 of Section 32; Thence, North
89°36'35” West, along the south line of
the E1/2 of Section 32, a distance of
1088.72 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING and containing 151.36 acres, more
or less, of land.
Being 30.49 acres of land located in
the N1/2 NW1/4 of Section 33, Township
1 North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, said 30.49 acres of land being
more particularly described by metes and
bounds as follows, all measurements are
to be considered as being followed by the
words “more or less”; BEGINNING at the
northwest corner of Section 33, Township
1 North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian; Thence, South 89°51'35" East,
along the north line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 2656.84 feet to the
northeast corner of the NW1/4 of Section
33; Thence, South 00°08'05” West, along
the east line of the NW1/4 of Section 33,
a distance of 500.00 feet to a point for
corner; Thence, North 89°51'35” West,
parallel to and 500 feet distant from the
north line of the NW1/4 of Section 33, a
distance of 2656.35 feet to a point for cor-
ner on the west line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33; Thence, North 00°04'45” East, a
distance of 500.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING and containing 30.49 acres,
more or less, of land.
Continue Rezone / RZ 13-13 and Com-
prehensive Plan Amendment / CA 13-07
to the November 8, 2013, Board of Com-
missioners’ meeting, at the request of the
applicant.
End of Consent Agenda
REGULAR PLANNING & ZONING
ITEMS
E. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-14 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-08: Mitch Morris. To rezone
200.73 acres from General Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District
and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Limited Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District in
accordance with Section 508 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Being 200.73 acres of land located in
the NE1/4 of Section 32 and in the NW1/4
of Section 33, Township 1 North, Range
8 East of the Black Hills Meridian, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota, said
200.73 acres of land being more particu-
larly described by metes and bounds as
follows, all measurements are to be con-
sidered as being followed by the words
“more or less”; COMMENCING, for loca-
tion purposes only, at the northeast cor-
ner of Section 32 also being the north-
west corner of Section 33, Township 1
North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian; Thence, South 00°04'45" West,
along the common line between Section
32 and Section 33, a distance of 500.00
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING of the
herein described tract; Thence, South
89°51'35" East, parallel to and 500 feet
distant from the north line of the NW1/4
of Section 33, a distance of 2656.35 feet
to a point for corner on the east line of the
NW1/4 of Section 33; Thence, South
00°08'05” West, along the east line of the
NW1/4 of Section 33, a distance of
2165.91 feet to a point for corner;
Thence, North 89°41'05” West, along the
south line of the NW1/4 of Section 33, a
distance of 2654.26 feet to the southwest
corner of the NW1/4 of Section 33 also
being the southeast corner of the NE1/4
of Section 32; Thence, North 89°42'51”
West, along the south line of the NW1/4
of Section 32, a distance of 1270.58 feet
to a point for corner; Thence, North
06°22'35” West, a distance of 2169.92
feet to a point for corner, 500 feet south
of the north line of the NE1/4 of Section
32; Thence, South 89°48'35" East, paral-
lel to and 500 feet distant from the north
line of the NE1/4 of Section 32, a distance
of 1514.54 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING and containing 200.73 acres, more
or less, of land.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to continue Rezone / RZ 13-14
and Comprehensive Plan Amendment /
CA 13-08 to the October 1, 2013, Board
of Commissioners’ meeting pursuant to
Planning Commission recommendation.
Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to take a 10 minute recess.
Vote: Unanimous. The Board recessed
at 11:20 a.m. and reconvened at 11:30
a.m. with Commissioners Buskerud,
Davis, Trautman and Petersen present.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to reconvene the meeting.
Vote: Unanimous.
Commissioner Holloway entered the
meeting.
F. THE SPRING CREEK WATER-
SHED MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – ADVISORY
GROUP RECOMMENDATIONS:
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded by
Trautman to place the Spring Creek Wa-
tershed Management Advisory Group
recommendations on the October 1,
2013, agenda for action. Vote: Unani-
mous.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
The second executive session was not
needed.
PERSONNEL
ESCC: Effective 10/1/2013 – C.
Noble, $3,906.91; K. Smith, $4,637.96; D.
Felkey, $4,250.08; N. Miller, $3,689.74.
Planning: Effective 8/26/2013 – P.
Conover, $4,346.22.
State’s Attorney: Effective 9/23/2013 –
J. McConnell, $16.17/hr.
WSDJSC: Effective 9/1/2013 – H.
Heinert, $4,644.05 and A. Weathers,
$4,004.51.
Jail: Effective 9/1/2013 – K. Ankele,
$17.25/hr.
Law Enforcement: Effective
11/12/2013 – D. Switzer, $20.64/hr. and
S. Stalder, $19.65/hr.; Effective 9/9/2013
– P. Garland, $3,405.95; Effective
10/7/2013 – N. Nelson, $20.64/hr.; Effec-
tive 10/1/2013 – K. Kintigh, $15.39/hr.; T.
Battest, $4,312.48 and J. O’Cilka,
$4,414.49; Effective 10/8/2013 – J. Jack-
son, $20.95/hr.
Treasurer: Effective 9/23/2013 – K.
Vachon, $13.96/hr.
Weed & Pest: Effective 9/18/2013 – L.
Ader, J. Gabel, R. Milburn, J. Newman at
$12.66/hr.
Human Resources/Commission: Ef-
fective 9/23/2013 – J. Love, $16.17/hr.
VOUCHERS
Century Link, 6.52; First Interstate
Bank, 1,841.90; Midcontinent Communi-
cations, 55.00; Verizon Wireless, 84.82;
Wow Internet Cable And Phone, 207.55;
SD Dept Of Revenue, 16,219.25; First
Administrators Inc, 172,534.62; 10 Prop-
erties LLC, 240.00; 4H Revolving, 62.00;
A A Professional Property Management,
150.00; A B Business Inc, 8,808.37; A B
Welding Supply Co, 306.12; A To Z
Shredding Inc, 297.30; A1 Auto Recy-
clers, 65.00; A1 Sewer Drain Inc,
440.00; Ace Hardwareeast, 23.14; Ace
Steel And Recycling, 374.01; Ainsworth
Benning Construction Inc, 15,458.71;
Ahmed Alasfour, 100.00; Alcohol Monitor-
ing, 301.70; American Hotel Register
Company, 388.75; American Technical
Services Inc, 3,585.00; Americinn Motel,
1,410.00; Amerigas, 69.86; Anamosa
Street Apartments, 390.00; Mary Ander-
son, 17.60; Applied Maintenance Sup-
plies And Solutions, 1,417.01; ARC Inter-
national Inc, 120.00; ARChitecture Inc,
8,333.33; Ascension Parish Sheriff Exof-
ficio Tax, 35.00; Don Atkinson, 218.64;
Atrix International Inc, 319.45; William
Atyeo, 112.04; Audra Malcomb Consult-
ing, 9,925.26; S Mahala Bach, 218.70;
Badlands Automotive, 242.47; Amy
Baehler, 20.00; Lisa Ball, 1,475.00; Brid-
gette R Banks, 401.25; Bargain Printing,
617.15; Greg Barnier, 1,029.00; Basler
Printing Co, 374.00; Batteries Plus,
129.35; Lawrence D Beezley, 370.00; Be-
havior Management Systems Inc,
9,160.00; Lori Benson, 17.60; Bettmann
Hogue Diedrich PLLC, 3,299.77; BH Am-
munition Inc, 2,654.00; BH Chemical
Company Inc, 5,498.05; BH Obstetrics
And Gynocology LLP, 40.57; BH Oral
Maxillofacial Surgery PC, 1,498.36; BH
Orthopedic Spine Center PC, 833.49; BH
Patrol, 931.50; BH Services Inc, 518.78;
BH State University, 531.00; BH Surgical
Hospital LLC, 2,231.56; BH Wilbert Vault,
330.00; BI Inc, 343.20; Greg Biegler LPC
CCDC IIi, 360.00; Bierschbach Equip-
ment, 126.05; Big D Oil Co, 412.27;
Blockbuster, 22.94; Bluetarp Financial
Inc, 573.19; Bob Barker Company Inc,
724.96; Raquel Bradford, 250.84; Roger
Braunstein, 4,583.33; Amy Bristol, 35.80;
Corey Brubakken, 91.08; Budget Host
Inn, 400.00; Butler Machinery Company,
319.81; Cabelas Retail Inc, 97.37; Debo-
rah J Cady, 396.00; Scott Cammack,
44.00; Carquest Auto Parts, 83.40;
Cashwa Distributing, 795.52; CBCInnovis
Inc, 36.00; CBH Cooperative, 37.25;
CBM Food Service, 70,132.82; CDW
Government Inc, 14,230.06; Central
States Fair Inc, 57,172.88; Central States
Sanitation, 190.80; Cetec Engineering,
15,821.45; ChemseaRCh, 2,544.14;
Chris Supply Co Inc, 409.36; ChuRChill
LP, 150.00; City Of Hill City, 40.00; City Of
Rapid City, 25,832.03; Clark Printing,
995.30; Jessica Cleveland, 21.60; Cli-
mate Control Systems, 1,951.00; Jean M
Cline, 2,366.35; Clinical Laboratory Of
The Black Hills, 11,858.00; Clousing Eye
Care, 110.00; Denise Cody, 108.00; An-
gela M Colbath, 1,063.80; Communica-
tions Center, 87.95; Randal E Connelly,
3,926.66; Contractors Supply Inc, 106.50;
Copy Country, 766.55; Countryside Prop-
erty Management LLC, 775.65; Crescent
Electric Supply, 2,668.15; Crisis Preven-
tion Institute Inc, 219.19; Croell Redimix
Inc, 371.00; Crum Electric Supply,
1,752.48; D D Tire Service, 200.00; D R
Service Inc, 541.11; Brenda Dahlke,
61.00; Dakota Business Center, 3,942.25;
Dakota Plains Legal Services Inc,
16,333.33; Dakota Supply Group Inc,
596.66; Dakotaland Autoglass Inc, 35.00;
Dales Tire Retreading Inc, 7,904.36;
Tammie Darnallknowlton, 20.00; Dash
Medical Gloves Inc, 1,812.00; David M
Hosmer Law Office PC, 319.88; Kathy
Davis, 875.20; Des Oil Inc, 112.27; Ray-
mond R Degeest, 226.80; Dell Marketing
LP, 23,644.67; Demersseman Jensen
Tellinghuisen Huffman LLP, 252.00; Den-
nis Supply RC, 59.52; Diamond Mowers
Inc, 1,673.03; Diamond Vogel Paint Cen-
ter, 618.33; Diesel Machinery Inc, 175.30;
DJ Rentals, 270.00; Dodge Town Inc,
303.00; Doiblm Natl Interagency, 7.76;
Charlene Doorn, 61.00; Kristine M
Downs, 95.00; Driftwood Estates, 270.00;
Dultmeier Sales LLC, 542.04; Eagle
Ridge Apartments I, 448.85; Ecolab Pest
Elimination, 186.00; Eddies Truck Sales
Inc, 1,017.60; Edgewood Estates LP,
390.00; Marvin R Ekeren, 15.00; Tim En-
gesser, 24.80; Environmental Chemical
Enterprises Inc, 1,287.87; Evergreen Of-
fice Products, 646.72; Executive Mgmt
Fin Office, 40.00; Jesse Fagerland,
216.98; Farmer Brothers Coffee, 568.56;
Fastenal Company, 488.60; Federal Ex-
press, 432.99; Fennell Design Inc,
19,951.99; Barbara Ferguson, 20.00;
Guy Ferguson, 20.00; Ferguson Enter-
prises Inc 226, 2,133.99; Teresa L Fink,
594.20; First American Title Co, 270.00;
First Photo Inc, 212.00; Foleys Custom
Print, 32.50; Foothills Seed Inc, 34.00;
Four Seasons Sports Center, 726.95;
Lisa Fowler, 785.00; Fox Youngberg
Lewno, 517.32; Fremont Apartments
LLC, 190.00; Cora Fried, 188.80; Joshua
D Friedman Dr, 2,791.66; Frontier Preci-
sion Inc, 3,287.32; G H Distributing RC,
674.17; Bernard George, 97.94; Holly L
Gittings, 140.00; GJ Holsworth Sons Inc,
428.78; Kayla L Glasshoff, 344.25;
Globafone Inc, 1,374.00; Global Equip-
ment Company, 217.79; Elizabeth Glynn,
1,231.20; Godfrey Brake Service And
Supply Inc, 885.69; Golden West Tech-
nologies, 3,438.02; Dennis Gorton, 44.66;
Great Western Tire Inc, 848.24; Robin R
Gregory Prof LLC, 754.27; Grey Law,
193.20; Grimms Pump Service Inc,
446.90; Jamie Guffey, 203.00; Gunder-
son Palmer Nelson And Ashmore LLP,
37.26; Brooke Haga, 217.00; Dana L
Hanna, 1,041.60; Betsey Harris, 546.00;
Harveys Lock Shop, 128.95; Health Edu-
cation Design, 147.00; Heartland Paper
Company, 2,531.58; Hebron Brick Supply
Co, 76.80; Herds Ribbon Laser Service,
597.60; Hewlettpackard, 6,428.00; Rod-
ney Hickey, 187.20; Hill City Hardware
Inc, 83.18; Hill City Prevailer, 746.36; Hills
Materials Co, 419,055.36; Hillyardsioux
Falls, 885.09; Honeywell Inc, 51,643.00;
Horwath Laundry Equipment, 86.35; Hot
Pink Ink, 1,200.00; Howard Johnson Inn
Suites, 81.99; Howes Oil Company Inc,
52,669.36; Stacie Hull, 23.20; Humane
Society Of The Black Hills, 4,166.67; Ice-
houseartic Glacier, 78.15; Imperial Hotel,
270.00; Indoff Inc, 688.36; Industrial Elec-
tric And Supply, 750.00; Information Tech-
nology Solutuions Inc, 11,669.73; Inter-
state All Battery Center, 335.80; Interstate
Batteries, 353.90; Intoximeters Inc,
2,000.00; ISI LLC, 1,678.80; J Scull Con-
struction, 619,944.82; Jacks Uniforms
Equipment, 468.49; Jackson Lewis LLP,
2,129.00; Valerie Jagim, 88.92; Charli Jo
Janis, 101.60; Donald A Janz, 425.00;
Jefferson Partner LP, 684.50; Jeffries Law
Office PC, 378.98; Jenner Equipment Co,
2,201.06; Debra Jensen, 42.40; Jimmy
Johns Catering, 151.40; Heather M John-
son, 96.00; Johnson Machine Inc,
2,560.83; Johnsons Carpet Cleaning
Service, 1,905.00; Jeff Jundt, 28.00;
Colton Juso, 20.00; Sharon Kallemeyn,
152.00; Jean Kappedal, 2,253.40; Karls
Appliance, 79.56; KD Contractors Inc,
63,683.64; Keiths Repair Service, 200.00;
Kennedy Pier Knoff Loftus LLP, 138.40;
Kimball Midwest, 1,372.01; Kirk Funeral
Home, 3,610.00; Kevin E Kirschenmann,
1,155.00; Aaron Klapkin, 392.40; Knecht
Home Center Inc, 1,151.77; Knollwood
Heights Apartments, 579.00; Knollwood
Townhouse Properties, 334.00; KT Con-
nections, 1,067.00; KVS Information Sys-
tems, 1,155.00; L3 Communications,
195.50; Laboratory Corporation Of Amer-
ica Holdings, 22.50; Heather M Lacroix,
271.89; Lakota Community Homes Inc,
502.50; Laminex Inc, 491.39; Language
Line Services, 56.32; Amber Larvie,
22.40; Lattice Incorporated, 25,925.70;
Rodney C Lefholz, 104.91; Leo A Daly,
29,554.75; Lewis Clark Behavioral
Health Services, 480.00; Lucille M
Lewno, 1,050.25; Liberty Chrysler Center,
265.04; Neal Lutke, 171.00; M M Fenc-
ing, 1,596.00; Mainline Contracting Inc,
188,337.06; Sean Makepeace, 104.00;
Manlove Psychiatric Group, 3,626.15;
Maple Green LLC, 590.00; Maplewood
Townhouses, 180.00; MaRCo Inc,
1,783.87; Matheson Trigas Inc, 70.37;
Mathison Graphics Plus, 209.71;
Matthew Bender Co Inc, 298.72; Cather-
ine E Mattsoncasteel, 1,872.39; Chad
Maxon, 104.00; May Johnson PC,
3,317.88; Wendy T McGowan, 2,002.68;
McLeods Printing Inc, 622.63; Meade
County Sheriffs Office, 11.60; Meadow
Ridge Apartments, 153.00; Medical
Waste Transport Inc, 369.15; Medline In-
dustries Inc, 116.20; Dianna Meeker,
27.12; Robert Meeker, 20.00; Lorie D PC
Melone, 394.80; Menards, 1,071.02;
Tiffany Meyer, 273.43; MG Oil Company,
597.40; Midwest Marketing LLC, 140.00;
Midwest Tire Muffler Inc, 91.08; Mikelson
Law Office, 54.00; Lenora Moechel,
272.80; Montana Dakota Utilities, 229.37;
Monte Kahler Rentals, 190.00; Moore
Medical Corp, 382.04; William A Moss
Psy D LLC, 520.00; Motive Parts Supply
Inc, 81.20; Mouser Electronics Inc,
650.96; Moyle Petroleum, 30,270.28;
MRO Corporation, 84.77; Murphy Law
Office PC, 1,926.08; NAADAC, 110.00;
Neurosurgical Spinal Surgery Associ-
ates, 138.49; Neves Uniforms Inc,
11,457.98; New World Systems,
24,400.00; Newkirks Ace Hrdwreeast,
1,148.29; Newkirks Ace Hrdwrewest,
432.87; Nfpa, 165.00; Janice Nickelson,
40.80; Linda J Nohr, 1,470.00; North Cen-
tral Supply Inc, 1,820.71; North East SD
Area Health Education Center, 375.00;
Northern Heights Apartments, 287.00;
Northern Truck Equipment, 625.00;
Northwest Pipe Fitting Inc, 1,787.96;
Valarie Oday, 255.00; Odyssey Automo-
tive Specialty, 4,663.00; Office Of Attor-
ney General, 173.00; Officemax Incorpo-
rated, 2,415.48; Olsons One Call, 137.00;
Overhead Door Co Of RC, 364.91; Pacific
Steel Recycling, 396.56; Paradis Proper-
ties LLC, 570.00; Parr Law PC, 1,621.20;
Julie A Pearson, 2,016.07; Pederson Law
Office LLC, 1,543.50; Penn Co Health
Human Sv Petty Cash, 374.68; Penn Co
Highway Petty Cash, 15.59; Penn Co Jail
Petty Cash, 47.00; Penn Co JSC Petty
Cash, 19.95; Penn Co Juv Diversion,
73.76; Penn Co Sheriff Petty Cash,
1,524.17; Penn Co States Atty Petty
Cash, 143.51; Pennington County
Courant, 1,398.05; Pennington County
Housing, 307.00; Performance Develop-
ment Group Ltd, 1,530.62; Pete Lien
Sons Inc, 18,841.79; Phoenix Supply
LLC, 24.75; Ponderosa Sportswear,
41.00; Michael Powell, 150.00; Power
House, 232.99; Pressure Services Inc,
58.60; Price Motel, 150.00; Print Market,
255.65; Printz Trailer Court, 350.00; Proj-
ect Lifesaver Intl, 251.96; PSI Health
Care Inc, 45.00; Psychological Evalua-
tions Therapy ReseaRCh Ltd, 942.50;
Nicolas Quetter, 240.00; Quill Corpora-
tion, 416.05; Radiology Associates Prof
LLC, 897.24; Ranch House Motel,
330.00; George Rankin, 190.00; Rapid
Chevrolet Co Inc, 308.30; Rapid Delivery
Inc, 132.00; Rapid Diesel Service Inc,
2,330.99; Rapid Leasing, 860.49; Rapid
Refrigeration LLC, 1,215.40; Rapid
Rooter, 655.00; Rapid Tire Alignment,
539.44; Rapid Transit System, 30.00;
Rapp Sales Company, 63.00; RC Area
School Dist 514, 2,023.70; RC Emer-
gency Services, 191.08; RC Journal,
3,291.30; RC Medical Center LLC,
4,133.60; RC Police Deptevidence,
57.22; RC Public Library, 101,785.50; RC
Regional Hospital Inc, 8,701.77; RC Re-
gional Hospital Inc, 511.67; RC Regional
Hospital Education Development,
927.02; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
166.77; RC Winsupply, 222.04; RCS
Construction Inc, 134,651.39; Rdo Equip-
ment Co, 3,623.09; Redwood Toxicology
Laboratory Inc, 70.50; Regional Health
Physicians, 3,667.00; Regional Health
Reference Laboratory, 2,902.05; Re-
gional Medical Clinic Neurology Rehabil-
itation, 250.00; Cathryn Rehfuss, 18.00;
David A Rempel DDS, 1,395.00; Rensch
Law Office, 610.00; Allen Reuer,
2,310.00; Ricoh USA Inc, 633.49; Shan-
non Rittberger, 61.00; Rochester Armored
Car Company Inc, 408.40; Roger Fryes
Paint Supply, 101.65; Karen Romey,
61.00; Royal Wheel Alignment, 126.00;
Ted Rufledt Jr, 84.00; Rushmore Com-
munications, 119.74; Sams Trailer Sales
LLC, 5,995.00; Rusty Schmidt, 349.70;
Scott Schuft, 325.94; Todd A Schweiger,
2,965.24; Scotts Bluff County Court, 3.00;
SD Dept Of Public Safety, 20.00; SD Dept
Of Revenue, 2,340.00; SD Dept Of
Transpfinance, 4,630.04; SD Div Of
Motor Vehicles, 14.00; SD Federal Prop-
erty Agency, 200.00; SD Invasive Species
Mgmt, 50.00; SD Police Chiefs Associa-
tion, 794.00; SD Rose Inn, 515.00; SD
Secretary Of State, 180.00; SD Sheriffs
Association, 75.00; SDsu West River Ag
Center, 250.80; Sentinel Offender Serv-
ice, 1,680.99; Servall Uniformlinen Co,
3,438.98; Sheehan Mack Sales, 251.27;
Shepherd Reporting LLC, 150.00; Sher-
win Williams Paints, 188.88; Shoener Ma-
chine Tool Supply Inc, 39.60; Simon Con-
tractors, 6,377.60; Simplexgrinnell LP,
166.00; Simpsons Printing, 575.00;
Matthew L Skinner, 4,781.25; Darrel F
Smith, 240.00; Jackie Smith, 28.80; Snap
On Tools, 87.90; Solemate Shoes And
Uniform Center, 213.35; Southwest Ther-
mal, 2,212.91; Spizzirri Press Inc, 50.00;
Springbrook Software Inc, 2,442.74; Stan
Houston Equipment, 287.05; Stardust
Motel, 510.00; State Bar Of South
Dakota, 200.00; Matthew Stephens,
576.00; Sturdevants Auto Parts, 951.41;
Sturdevants Refinish, 171.07; Summit
Signs Supply Inc, 135.00; Sundial
Square Apartments, 319.00; Karen
Swanda, 75.00; Tactical Command Indus-
tries Inc, 45.00; Beth Tebelius, 296.80;
Tessco Incorporated, 268.01; Tessiers
Inc, 92.20; The Hotel Alex Johnson,
158.00; The Little Print Shop Inc, 317.37;
The Medicine Shoppe, 1,849.89; The
Rehab Doctors PC, 396.83; Bruce E
Thiewes, 51.10; Kelly Thomas, 61.00;
Thomson Reuterswest, 3,336.40; Barry
Tice, 340.20; Time Equipment Rental
Sales, 365.61; Titan Access Account,
789.86; Tophat Tinting Inc, 1,443.63; Tow
Pros, 60.00; Truenorth Steel, 29,240.39;
Turnkey Corrections, 11,268.42; TWL
Publ ic Notices Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 10
Continued on page 11
Billing Service Supplies, 1,236.22; Mary
Two Lance, 96.40; Uline, 45.65; US
Postal Service, 3,016.00; Vanway Trophy
Awards, 15.20; Mark Vargo, 87.98;
Vemco, 5,090.75; Vinyl Graphics, 77.62;
Tom Vlieger, 123.20; Lynn Von Wald,
450.00; Wall Building Center Construc-
tion, 192.97; Washington County Court,
2.25; Watertre Inc, 724.50; Cynthia M
Weichmann, 795.55; Wells Fargo,
1,521.26; Al Wessel Jr Md, 4,950.00;
West River International Inc, 1,769.46;
West River Welding Machine, 1,823.80;
Western Communication Inc, 809.25;
Western Detention, 5,292.01; Western
Mailers, 52.36; Western Stationers Inc,
1,880.27; Western Thrifty Inn LLC,
550.00; Wex Bank, 497.44; Whisler Bear-
ing Co, 169.57; Fianna White Hawk,
21.60; MaRCia Whiting, 1,125.60; Whit-
ing Hagg Hagg Dorsey Hagg LLP,
1,933.44; Winter Law Office PC,
2,830.38; Ione Wolf, 362.50; Victoria
Wolf, 30.00; Wood Stock Supply, 72.36;
Darelene Wounded Shieldmilk, 116.00;
Wow Internet Cable And Phone, 353.75;
Wristbands Medtech Usa Inc, 107.75;
Yankton Co Sheriff Office, 125.00; Yank-
ton County Treasurer, 446.00; Yankton
Medical Clinic PC, 93.40; Rob Yantis,
217.00; Zep Sales Service, 129.40;
Ziegler Building Center Inc, 328.04;
Dakota SAF, 75.00; Wells Fargo Settle-
ment: Contractors Special Trade Not
Elsewhere Class, 619.43; Holiday Inns,
77.00; Home Supply Warehouse, 161.01;
Grocery Stores Supermarkets, 956.95;
Automobile And Truck Dealers, 51.98;
Automotive Parts Accessories Stores,
473.07; Service Stations (With Or Without
Ancillary Services), 20.08; MotorCycle
Shops And Dealers, 62.89; Miscella-
neous Automotive AirCraft And Farm
Equip, 37.40; Eating Places Restaurants,
24.59; Sporting Goods Stores, 51.30;
Book Stores, 41.40; Camera And Photo-
graphic Supply Stores, 174.17; Miscella-
neous And Specialty Retail Stores,
746.11; Business Services Not Elsewhere
Classified, 19.21; Automotive Service
Shops, 148.14.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to adjourn the meeting.
Vote: Unanimous. There being no further
business, the meeting was adjourned at
11:50 a.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published October 3, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $332.52.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Larry Teuber / School House, LLC; Ren-
ner & Associates – Agent, has applied for
a Rezone to rezone 2.1 acres from Sub-
urban Residential District to Limited Agri-
culture District and to amend the Pen-
nington County Comprehensive Plan to
change the Future Land Use Map from
Suburban Residential District to Limited
Agriculture District located on the follow-
ing metes and bounds description: A por-
tion of Lot 2R, Block 4, Spring Canyon
Estates, Section 5, T1S, R7E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota, more fully
described as follows: Commencing at a
corner on the northerly boundary of Lot
2R, Block 4, Spring Canyon Estates,
common to the northeasterly corner of Lot
1, Block 4,Spring Canyon Estates, com-
mon to a point on the southerly edge of
Clarkson Road right-of-way, and the point
of beginning; Thence, first course:
S54°32’59”E, along the northerly bound-
ary of said Lot 2R, common to the
southerly edge of said right-of-way, a dis-
tance of 142.05 feet; Thence, second
course: S03°31’20”E, a distance of 78.16
feet; Thence, third course: S40°44’38”W,
a distance of 192.59 feet; Thence, fourth
course: S63°27’08”W, a distance of
169.92 feet; Thence, fifth course:
S26°00’49”W, a distance of 33.00 feet, a
point on the southerly boundary of said
Lot 2R; Thence, sixth course:
N63°59’40”W, along the southerly bound-
ary of said Lot 2R, a distance of 97.52
feet, to a corner on the westerly boundary
of said Lot 2R; Thence, seventh course:
N26°00’15”E, along the westerly bound-
ary of said Lot 2R, a distance of 33.00
feet, to a corner on the westerly boundary
of said Lot 2R; Thence, eighth course:
N10°53’21”W, along the westerly edge of
Lot 2R, a distance of 200.55 feet, to a cor-
ner on the westerly boundary of said Lot
2R, common to the southeasterly corner
of said Lot 1; Thence, ninth course:
N76°55’43”E, along the westerly edge of
said Lot 2R, common to the easterly
boundary of said Lot 1, a distance of
231.09 feet, to a corner on the westerly
boundary of said Lot 2R, common to a
corner on the easterly boundary of said
Lot 1; Thence, tenth course:
N32°32’36”E, along the westerly edge of
said Lot 2R, common to the easterly edge
of said Lot 1, a distance of 107.11 feet, to
the said point of beginning. Said Parcel
contains 2.100 acres more or less, 9699
Clarkson Road, in accordance with Sec-
tions 206 and 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
8th day of November 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published October 3, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $.33.68
NOTICE OF AUDIT
OF THE FISCAL AFFAIRS OF
PENNINGTON COUNTY
Notice is hereby given that the records
and books of account of Pennington
County, South Dakota, have been audited
by the Department of Legislative Audit for
the year ended December 31, 2012, and
that a detailed report thereon is filed with
the county auditor of Pennington County
and the Department of Legislative Audit
in Pierre, South Dakota, for public inspec-
tion.
The following finding and recommenda-
tions referred to in the report are hereby
listed in accordance with the provisions of
SDCL 4-11-12
CURRENT AUDIT FINDING
AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Deficiencies in the Distribution of
Special Highway Fund Collections
Finding:
Pennington County did not properly dis-
tribute Special Highway Fund collections
to townships as required by South Dakota
Codified Laws (SDCL). This is the second
consecutive audit in which a similar find-
ing was noted.
RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. We recommend the County properly
distribute Special Highway Fund collec-
tions to various unorganized and organ-
ized townships as required by SDCL 32-
11-6 and 32-11-7.
2. We recommend the County consult
with legal counsel to determine appropri-
ate corrective action for the incorrect dis-
tribution of collections for prior years.
Management’s Response:
Management chose not to respond to this
finding.
Martin L. Guindon,
CPA Auditor General
Department of Legislative Audit
Published October 3 & 10, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $36.34.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
0905011 Lot 14 in block 5 of original
town of quinn; PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
60112). Alva D. Sims and Alma
Marian Sims or estates thereof, Pa-
tricia dean kangas-pr, hoyt hunter,
and denise simeone a/k/a denise
alverson.
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 25th day of Sep-
tember, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published October 3 & 10, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $26.68.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
090868 ROBBINSDALE TERRACE
#2; BLOCK 1; 10' DRAINAGE
EASEMENT LOCATED BE-
TWEEN LOTS 1-10 AS SHOWN
ON REPLAT OF BLK 1 IN STEEL
FILE PLATS IN REGISTER OF
DEED'S RECORDS; CITY OF
RAPID CITY, PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
45646). Joseph R. Keown, estate
of mary ann dineen, WELLS
FARGO BANK, Gene Dineen, AND
Charles keown or estate thereof.
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 12th day of Sep-
tember, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published September 26 & October 3,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$30.93.
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
MINUTES
AUGUST 15, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb
called the meeting to order at 10:30 a.m.
(CT).
Roll Call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the agenda. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the July 17, 2013, meeting were previ-
ously mailed to the Board for their review.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the July min-
utes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph
Hieb, $55.41; Casey Krogman, $55.41;
Marion Matt, $55.41; Veryl Prokop,
$55.41; Lorne Smith, $55.41; West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS, $1,000.00;
Kadoka Press, $100.64; Lyman County
Herald, $166.91; Murdo Coyote, $118.22;
Pennington County Courant, $66.18; Pi-
oneer Review, $35.20; Todd County Trib-
une, $99.04; USGS, $11,280.00 (previ-
ously approved). Motion by Director
Smith, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the District bills. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT: The financial status of the District
to date was previously sent to the Board.
A copy of the July Financial Report is on
file at the District office in Murdo. Motion
by Director Prokop, seconded by Director
Krogman to approve the July Financial
Report. Motion carried unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his August report to
the Board. Motion by Director Matt, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the Manager’s Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
FY 2014 TAX LEVY: County evaluations
were not available from the Dept. of Rev-
enue to calculate individual county tax
levies for the 2014 Tax Resolution. The
Board approved the Resolution with the
amounts as the state has recommended.
Individual county levies will be provided
when evaluations are available. Motion
by Director Krogman, seconded by Direc-
tor Matt to approve the 2014 Tax Resolu-
tion with the amounts as the state has
recommended. Motion carried unani-
mously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:38 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_________________
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
______________
Joseph Hieb,
Chairman
Published October 3, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $30.21.
Publ ic Notices
Proceedings of Pennington
County Commissioners
(cont. from previous page)
Legal
Publication
Deadline is
11:00 a.m.
on FRIDAY
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 11
be thinking about starting a subscription
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Are you ready for another semester of hard work and fun?
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whether it’s your first or last!
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habits and expectations.
Pioneer Review
box 788 • philip • (605) 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant
box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
Kadoka Press
box 309 • kadoka • 837-2259
Faith Independent
box 38 • Faith • (605) 967-2161
Bison Courier
box 429 • bison • (605) 244-7199
Murdo Coyote
box 465 • Murdo • (605) 669-2271
New Underwood Post
box 426 • new Underwood • (605) 754-6466
All College Subs to any of these newspa-
pers: $25.48 tax included
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685 5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567 3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman & AuctIon-
eer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985 5486
Ccll (605} 515 0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866 4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544 3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441 1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347 0151
(605} 641 1042
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685 4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9 2S??
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. YEARLINGS: 11.00 A.M. CALVES: 12.00 P.M. EARLY
CONSIGNMENTS: 6500 HEAD.
YEARLINGS:
FAIRBANKS - 450 DLK STFS...................800 850= (7 LOADS SAME SOFT}
ROSETH CATTLE CO - 280 DLK, FED, & HEFF STFS (2 LDS DLK, 1 LD
FED ANC, & 1 LD HEFF} ...........................................................875 925=
SLOVEK - 140 DLK & FED TESTED OPEN HFFS .......................900 1000=
NELSON - 65 FWF STFS ..............................................................875 900=
RAPID CREEK RANCH - 46 FED ANC TESTED OPEN HFFS .......800 900=
CONSIGNMENT - 34 DLK SPAY HFFS & A FEW STFS ..................650 700=
RAINBOW END RN - 26 DLK STFS ..............................................750 950=
DOUBLE BAR ? - 26 DLK STFS ............................................................700
FROMM - 20 MIXED YFLCS ........................................................700 900=
WHITE - 8 DLK & CHAF X STFS & OPEN HFFS ...........................750 950=
CALVES: FS÷ FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
NELSON - 340 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................400 450=
YOUNG RANCH - 330 MOSTLY CHAF X, DLK & A FEW HEFF CLVS;
FS ............................................................................................550 650=
LEVIN & CASTEEL - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................500 575=
DALY - 250 DLK CLVS; FS ...........................................................550 600=
DEERING - 250 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .................................................600=
BRUNS - 225 DLK CLVS; FS .........................................................550 600=
WEYER - 200 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................450 550=
LIVERMONT RANCH - 200 FANCY DLK STFS; FS,NI ..........................500=
GRUBL - 200 CEFT FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI .........................................550=
VIG - 180 DLK & DWF CLVS;FS,NI ...............................................500 550=
STABEN - 150 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI .......................................500 550=
ALDREN - 150 CHAF X CLVS; FS ................................................500 570=
MCPHERSON - 150 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI .....................................450=
MCPHERSON - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............................450 500=
REINERT - 140 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500 600=
BOWEN & BOWEN - 140 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................550 600=
CUNY - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI .......................................................550 600=
GRAVATT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN .................................................550=
FREELAND - 100 DLK STFS; FS ..................................................625 650=
GOLDEN WILLOW RANCH - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................500 550=
KOCH - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................600=
LANTIS - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................400 450=
DEVRIES & PROKOP - 95 MOSTLY DLK & A FEW FED STFS;
FS,NI ........................................................................................500 525=
POURIER - 90 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .........................................................575=
NOVOTNY - 80 FED CLVS; FS,NI .................................................550 650=
SCHAACK - 80 FED CLVS; FS,NI .................................................525 550=
JP RANCH - 75 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS .........................................450 500=
VALLERY & MILLS - 75 DLK CLVS; FS ........................................400 500=
MCKAY - 65 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................500 575=
SHULL - 65 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................500=
HUNSACKER - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI,AN ...........................550 600=
NIXON - 55 DLK STFS; FS ..................................................................575=
MCCORMICK - 50 DLK CLVS; FS ................................................550 575=
BARKER - 50 DLK CLVS; FS ........................................................500 550=
COY - 50 DLK MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ...................................................600=
SCULL - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................550=
ELSHERE - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................................500 550=
HEADLEE - 40 DLK CLVS; FS .............................................................500=
RYPKEMA - 35 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................500 550=
SOLOMAN INC - 20 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................600 625=
JONES - 15 FED CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................550 600=
NIEDERWERDER - 15 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................450 475=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS SS9 2S?? OR tDS tSS SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: DFED COW SPECIAL & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH UPS: 10 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EARLY CONSIGN-
MENTS:
BRED CATTLE:
A CONSIGNMENT - 185 DLK & FED FUNNINC ACE COWS; DFED. DLK
& FED
BRYAN CUNY - 40 DLK EXPOSED COWS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS SS9 2S?? OR tDS tSS SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL DFED CATTLE SALE & WEICH UP
COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23. SPECIAL DFED CATTLE SALE & WEICH UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3. SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL DFEEDS CALF & STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL
DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R CALF USA! R CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859 2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: OCT. J, 2DJS
We Þod o 11gÞ1 run o] geor11ngs & o good
run o] oo1ves & ue1gÞ ups. 11´s o good
morKe1!! Ne×1 ueeK, o b1g run o] oo1ves
& geor11ngs, e×peo11ng tSDD Þeod.
We1gÞ up & Bred Co111e So1e on Wednes-
dog. No ue1gÞ ups on Tuesdog.
CALVES:
BONENBERGER RANCH INC, BELVIDERE
82.......................DLK & DWF STF 655= .......$176.75
$1158 & HD
14..............................DLACK STF 538= .......$186.25
HOWARD & DELORES KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
34..............................DLACK STF 361= .......$229.50
70.......................DLK & DWF STF 445= .......$218.75
MIKE & MATT YACKLEY, RAPID CITY
102...............................FED STF 543= .......$193.00
42.................................FED STF 450= .......$219.00
51 ................................FED HFF 476= .......$219.00
18 ................................FED HFF 410= .......$206.00
GLENN, ROBERT & ERIC JONES, WHITE OWL
107.....................FED & DLK STF 477= .......$213.50
100.....................FED & DLK STF 544= .......$189.75
17.................................FED STF 371= .......$207.00
107 ..............................FED HFF 465= .......$213.00
38 ......................FED & DLK HFF 415= .......$203.00
THAD STOUT, KADOKA
42.......................DLK & DWF STF 491= .......$201.00
12..............................DLACK STF 406= .......$216.50
23 .............................DLACK HFF 477= .......$178.00
HENRY KARRELS, STURGIS
71.......................DLK & DWF STF 572= .......$185.00
5................................DLACK STF 432= .......$206.00
59 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 528= .......$181.50
LARRY E. GABRIEL, QUINN
100.....................DLK & DWF STF 563= .......$185.00
PATTON & STANGLE, MILESVILLE
91.......................DLK & DWF STF 567= .......$186.25
7.........................DLK & DWF STF 464= .......$197.00
5........................FWF & DWF STF 579= .......$180.25
42 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 515= .......$182.00
STEVE ISKE, NEW UNDERWOOD
48.................................DWF STF 565= .......$186.00
7................................DLACK STF 432= .......$221.00
32 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 528= .......$185.00
JOSEPH & PAT URBANIAK, UNION CENTER
39.......................DLK & DWF STF 562= .......$187.00
2................................DLACK STF 448= .......$218.00
JIM & BRENDA LINT2, HERMOSA
39..............................DLACK STF 593= .......$180.00
4.........................DLK & DWF STF 413= .......$195.00
33 .............................DLACK HFF 558= .......$171.00
3 ...............................DLACK HFF 412= .......$183.00
RON & CONNIE TWISS, INTERIOR
22..............................DLACK STF 634= .......$175.25
$1111 & HD
2................................DLACK STF 486= .......$204.00
CHUCK & MIKE CARLBOM, INTERIOR
63.......................DLK & DWF STF 527= .......$188.50
11.......................DLK & DWF STF 392= .......$207.00
45 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 460= .......$183.00
7........................DLK & DWF HFF 340= .......$186.00
HELEN PFEIFER, PHILIP
19..............................DLACK STF 453= .......$208.00
14 .............................DLACK HFF 469= .......$183.00
A CONSIGNMENT
10.........................FD & DLK STF 493= .......$201.00
4 ..........................FD & DLK STF 374= .......$211.00
10........................FD & DLK HFF 463= .......$178.00
CLARK WHITE, NEW UNDERWOOD
4................................DLACK STF 416= .......$193.00
BUNK WHITE, NEW UNDERWOOD
9................................DLACK STF 465= .......$181.00
12 .............................DLACK HFF 422= .......$171.00
YEARLINGS:
MIKE NOTEBOOM, PHILIP
7.........................DLK & DWF STF 626= .......$169.50
NICHOLS CASPERS, NEW UNDERWOOD
5................................DLACK STF 688= .......$161.50
SPENCER CORDES, CREIGHTON
3 ...............................DLACK HFF 632= .......$160.00
29 .............................DLACK HFF 899= .......$148.75
GLENDON SHEARER, WALL
60 .............................DLACK HFF 716= .......$159.75
HEATH & LARRY FREEMAN, OWANKA
19 ......................DLK & DWF HFF 748= .......$155.00
CARL & CASEY KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
18 .............................DLACK HFF 809= .......$151.25
CHARLES & ELEANOR 2UCCARO, MIDLAND
18......................FED & FWF HFF 869= .......$149.00
DEAN HEEB, MIDLAND
4 ...............................DLACK HFF 911= .......$145.00
JOHN L (JT) MOON III, CREIGHTON
14 .............................DLACK HFF 940= .......$144.25
GERALD & STEPHANIE SHARP, LONG VALLEY
8 ..................................FED HFF 981= .......$141.75
PHIL CARLEY, MILESVILLE
6 ...............................DLACK HFF 1,020= ....$138.75
THAD STOUT, KADOKA
9..........................FD & DLK HFF 762= .......$151.50
COWS:
MIKE YACKLEY, RAPID CITY
1 .................................FED COW 1,350= ......$90.00
1 .................................FED COW 1,560= ......$85.00
5 .................................FED COW 1,280= ......$80.00
CHARLES & ELEANOR 2UCCARO, MIDLAND
1 .................................FED COW 1,360= ......$87.50
LEO & JOANN PATTON, MILESVILLE
1...............................DLACK COW 1,285= ......$85.00
1...............................DLACK COW 1,215= ......$82.00
1...............................DLACK COW 1,240= ......$81.50
1...............................DLACK COW 1,260= ......$81.00
1...............................DLACK COW 1,495= ......$79.50
BOB CERNEY, PHILIP
1...............................DLACK COW 1,215= ......$82.50
1...............................DLACK COW 1,220= ......$80.00
CASEY KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
1...............................DLACK COW 1,210= ......$82.50
RICHARD PAPOUSEK, QUINN
1...............................DLACK COW 1,500= ......$82.50
BILL SLOVEK, PHILIP
1 .................................FED COW 1,225= ......$82.00
1 .................................FED COW 1,625= ......$81.50
1...............................DLACK COW 1,515= ......$79.50
DALE GOSSARD, UNION CENTER
1...............................DLACK COW 1,405= ......$81.50
CHRIS CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
2...............................DLACK COW 1,363= ......$79.50
LYLE O'BRYAN, BELVIDERE
1 .................................DWF COW 1,210= ......$79.50
REED CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
4...............................DLACK COW 1,389= ......$78.75
2...............................DLACK COW 1,271= ......$78.50
3...............................DLACK COW 1,542= ......$76.75
BULLS:
JOHN BRENNAN, MUD BUTTE
1.................................DWF DULL 1,995= ......$99.50
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,855= ......$99.00
LEO & JOANN PATTON, MILESVILLE
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,985= ......$98.75
MYRON WILLIAMS, WALL
1..............................DLACK DULL 2,095= ......$98.00
1..............................DLACK DULL 2,160= ......$97.50
BILL GIKLING, BOX ELDER
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,975= ......$96.50
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,950= ......$96.00
KELLY FEES, PHILIP
1..............................DLACK DULL 1,950= ......$96.00
GARY WILLIAMS, WALL
1..............................DLACK DULL 2,035= ......$95.50
HEIFERETTES & COWETTES:
RYAN CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
4..............................DLACK HFFT 949= .......$119.50
1..............................DLACK HFFT 1,010= ....$102.00
PATTY PRINCE, UNION CENTER
1 ................................DWF HFFT 915= .......$119.00
1..............................DLACK HFFT 1,035= ....$103.00
CHRIS CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
2..............................DLACK HFFT 988= .......$118.00
REED CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
4..............................DLACK HFFT 884= .......$115.50
GARY CAMMACK, UNION CENTER
7..............................DLACK HFFT 993= .......$115.00
ROBERT SCHOFIELD, PHILIP
1..............................DLACK HFFT 915= .......$115.00
BOB CERNEY, PHILIP
1..............................DLACK HFFT 985= .......$113.00
1..............................DLACK HFFT 980= .......$107.00
1 ........................DLACK COWETTE 1,085= ....$104.00
1 ........................DLACK COWETTE 1,050= ....$103.00
CHAD CERNEY, PHILIP
1.................................FED HFFT 1,030= ....$104.00
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Pennington County Courant • October 3, 2013 • 12
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
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859-2577
PhiIip, SD
HORS£ R£PORT: S£PT£MB£R 2S, 2DJS
Bod R1ver Fo11 £×1rovogonzo Horse So1e
uos o Þuge suooess u11Þ SS4 Þeod. We Þod
over SDD reg1s1ered bugers, u11Þ Þorses so1d
1n1o JS s1o1es ond Conodo. Ruzso Quor1er
Horses oon11nue 1o be o Þ1gÞ11gÞ1 o] 1Þ1s so1e.
TÞe oroud uos Þuge ond s1oged o11 dog
1ong, u11Þ verg ]eu emp1g seo1s. We ]e11 1Þ1s
uos one o] 1Þe bes1 overo11 oons1gnmen1 so1es
ue´ve ever Þe1d. Horses u11Þ oond111on, ped1-
gree & some oo1or ore eosg 1o se11. BroKe
Þorses o] ong K1nd ond oo1or uere 1n Þ1gÞ de-
mond, espeo1o11g 1] 1Þeg uere gen11e ond ue11
broKe.
Ne×1 Horse So1e u111 be o]1er 1Þe ]1rs1 o] 1Þe
geor.
OVERALL CATALOG AVERAGE......$1603 J HEAD
TOP 5 HEAD AVC. .........................................$7660
TOP 10 HEAD AVC. .......................................$6840
TOP 20 HEAD AVC. .......................................$5365
RU2SA QUARTER HORSES - SELBY
LOT 26 ÷ DAY FOAN FILLY ............................$9,100.00
LOT 18 ÷ DFOWN FILLY ................................$8,750.00
LOT 11 ÷ SOFFEL MAFE ...............................$6,250.00
LOT 45 ÷ DAY FILLY .....................................$5,500.00
LOT 36 ÷ SOFFEL COLT ................................$5,000.00
LOT 9 ÷ FOAN FILLY.....................................$4,800.00
LOT 6 ÷ FOAN FILLY.....................................$4,400.00
LOT 47 ÷ DAY FILLY .....................................$4,200.00
LOT 3 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY...............................$4,000.00
LOT 14 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$3,900.00
LOT 37 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$3,900.00
LOT 30 ÷ DAY COLT .....................................$3,400.00
LOT 5 ÷ CFAY COLT .....................................$3,000.00
LOT 15 ÷ SOFFEL MAFE ...............................$3,000.00
LOT 25 ÷ SOFFEL COLT ................................$3,000.00
LOT 33 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$2,900.00
LOT 8 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY...............................$2,700.00
LOT 1 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT ...............................$2,300.00
LOT 4 ÷ SOFFEL COLT..................................$2,200.00
LOT 7 ÷ CFAY COLT .....................................$2,200.00
LOT 44 ÷ PALOMINO COLT .............................$2,100.00
LOT 23 ÷ DFOWN FILLY ................................$1,800.00
LOT 49 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT .............................$1,800.00
LOT 42 ÷ DLK/DFOWN FILLY .........................$1,700.00
LOT 34 ÷ DLK/DFOWN COLT .........................$1,400.00
LOT 41 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT .............................$1,400.00
LOT 50 ÷ CFAY FILLY ...................................$1,400.00
LOT 10 ÷ DAY COLT .....................................$1,300.00
LOT 48 ÷ CFEMELLO COLT ............................$1,200.00
LOT 53 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY................................$1,100.00
LOT 46 ÷ SOFFEL COLT ................................$1,000.00
LOT 52 ÷ CFAY FILLY ......................................$950.00
LOT 17 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY................................$900.00
LOT 35 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$900.00
LOT 43 ÷ DFWN/CFAY FILLY ............................$900.00
LOT 2 ÷ FED FOAN COLT .................................$850.00
LOT 24 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$850.00
LOT 29 ÷ DAY COLT ........................................$850.00
LOT 20 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY................................$700.00
LOT 31 ÷ SOFFEL COLT...................................$700.00
LOT 54 ÷ PALOMINO COLT ................................$700.00
LOT 13 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$500.00
LOT 51 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$500.00
LOT 55 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT ................................$500.00
DANIELLE PIROUTEK - MILESVILLE
LOT 173 ÷ SOFFEL 6 YF OLD CELDINC...........$7,400.00
LOT 229 ÷ SOFFEL 4 YF OLD CELDINC ..........$5,900.00
TRAVIS & AMANDA FRINK - QUINN
LOT 88 ÷ DUCKSKIN 6 YF OLD CELDINC...........$6,800.00
SHAINA HUFFMAN - SELBY
LOT 57 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY................................$6,100.00
LOT 60 ÷ DAY STALLION................................$1,300.00
LOT 56 ÷ CHESTNUT FILLY ............................$1,000.00
DARREL HENRY - SILEX, MO
LOT 179 ÷ DAY 12 YF OLD MAFE ..................$6,100.00
LOT 176 ÷ DFOWN 13 YF OLD MAFE..............$5,300.00
LOT 177 ÷ CFAY 14 YF OLD MAFE ................$4,500.00
LOT 181 ÷ SOFFEL 8 YF OLD MAFE...............$4,100.00
LOT 180 ÷ SOFFEL 14 YF OLD MAFE.............$3,700.00
LOT 178 ÷ SOFFEL 10 YF OLD MAFE.............$2,700.00
LOT 174 ÷ SOFFEL 7 YF OLD MAFE...............$2,600.00
LOT 175 ÷ DAY 9 YF OLD MAFE....................$2,200.00
BUNKER LIVESTOCK - AMERICAN FORK, UT
LOT 230 ÷ CHESTNUT STALLION .....................$6,000.00
BILL WELLER - KADOKA
LOT 97 ÷ DUCKSKIN 8 YF OLD CELDINC..........$5,100.00
SETH WEISHAAR - BELLE FOURCHE
LOT 108 ÷ SOFFEL 9 YF OLD CELDINC...........$3,600.00
LUKE & WANDA VANDERMAY - KADOKA
LOT 206 ÷ DUN 6 YF OLD CELDINC ...............$3,500.00
STEVE MOLTER - MONTICELLO, IN
LOT 240 ÷ DUN 9 YF OLD CELDINC ...............$3,200.00
LYLE O'BRYAN - BELVIDERE
LOT 256 ÷ SOFFEL 13 YF OLD CELDINC.........$3,200.00
JERRY SAMPSON - INTERIOR
LOT 119 ÷ DLACK 11 YF OLD CELDINC...........$3,100.00
ALVIN & DOROTHY STROMER - WHITE RIVER
LOT 76 ÷ SOFFEL 6 YF OLD CELDINC..............$3,000.00
KARLA TIMM - VALE
LOT 170 ÷ DLK PAINT 9 YF OLD CELDINC .......$3,000.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
LOT 98 ÷ SOFFEL STUD COLT........................$2,900.00
LA2Y 69 RANCH - KADOKA
LOT 237 ÷ DUCKSKIN 9 YF OLD MAFE............$3,000.00
LOT 164 ÷ DUN 11 YF OLD CELDINC .............$2,500.00
LOT 235 ÷ DAY 12 YF OLD CELDINC..............$2,000.00
LOT 236 ÷ DUCKSKIN 6 YF OLD CELDINC........$1,600.00
WILL VANENGEN - HUDSON
LOT 165 ÷ SOFFEL 3 YF OLD CELDINC...........$2,400.00
LOT 166 ÷ FOAN STUD.................................$1,000.00
LOT 167 ÷ CHESTNUT STUD .............................$950.00
LOT 168 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY.................................$750.00
BRADY JANDREAU - KADOKA
LOT 234 ÷ CFAY 6 YF OLD MAFE ..................$2,400.00
JIM & MAGGIE BLOOM - RAPID CITY
LOT 187 ÷ SOFFEL 8 YF OLD CELDINC...........$2,200.00
LOT 194 ÷ SOFFEL 17 YF OLD FAMILY ...........$1,900.00
LOT 189 ÷ SOFFEL 3 YF OLD MAFE...............$1,100.00
LOT 190 ÷ SOFFEL 2 YF OLD MAFE..................$700.00
LYLE HARTSHORN - RAPID CITY
LOT 183 ÷ PALOMINO 2 YF OLD MAFE............$2,000.00
LOT 184 ÷ PALOMINO 3 YF OLD MAFE............$2,000.00
TOMMY & ALICE HARTY - MILESVILLE
LOT 132 ÷ CFAY 7 YF OLD MAFE ..................$2,000.00
LOT 133 ÷ CHESTNUT 3 YF OLD CELDINC .......$1,800.00
LOT 134 ÷ CHESTNUT 2 YF OLD FILLY ...............$750.00
LOT 136 ÷ CHESTNUT 2 YF OLD CELDINC ..........$500.00
ASA LEE HICKS - MARTIN
LOT 146 ÷ DLK & WHITE 12 YF OLD CELDINC.$1,900.00
KEN & MARILYN DERRY - SOUTH BEND, TX
LOT 78 ÷ FED FOAN MAFE ...........................$1,800.00
LOT 82 ÷ DAY FILLY ........................................$800.00
LOT 79 ÷ DAY STUD........................................$600.00
LOT 80 ÷ DUN MAFE.......................................$550.00
LOT 86 ÷ FED FOAN FILLY ...............................$550.00
LOT 77 ÷ FED FOAN MAFE ..............................$500.00
LOT 84 ÷ FED DUN FILLY ................................$500.00
MIKE & ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
LOT 89 ÷ DUCKSKIN/DUN STALLION................$1,700.00
LOT 91 ÷ DUN STALLION ...............................$1,700.00
LOT 93 ÷ PALOMINO STALLION........................$1,000.00
LOT 95 ÷ SOFFEL STALLION..............................$900.00
LOT 96 ÷ SOFFEL FILLY...................................$600.00
LOT 94 ÷ PALOMINO FILLY................................$550.00
JERRY MAYER - PIEDMONT
LOT 115 ÷ DAY 3 YF OLD STALLION ...............$1,600.00
LOT 199 ÷ CFAY 8 YF OLD MAFE .....................$850.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
LOT 109 ÷ PALOMINO STALLION......................$1,500.00
KATHLEEN WALKER - BOX ELDER
LOT 171 ÷ SOFFEL 10 YF OLD MAFE.............$1,500.00
JUD BALDRIDGE - NORTH PLATTE, NE
LOT 232 ÷ DUN 12 YF OLD CELDINC .............$1,400.00
SHAWN & LESLIE MERRILL - WALL
LOT 231 ÷ FED FOAN 2 YF OLD STALLION.......$1,100.00
SCHOFIELD QUARTER HORSE - PHILIP
LOT 64 ÷ SOFFEL HOFSE COLT.........................$950.00
LOT 66 ÷ SOFFEL HOFSE COLT.........................$850.00
LOT 63 ÷ DUN HOFSE COLT .............................$800.00
LOT 65 ÷ DAY HOFSE COLT..............................$750.00
LOT 68 ÷ DUCKSKIN HOFSE COLT......................$550.00
LOT 70 ÷ DUN FILLY .......................................$550.00
LOT 69 ÷ DUN HOFSE COLT .............................$500.00
CASPER HAMMERSTROM - STURGIS
LOT 197 ÷ DAY FOAN MAFE.............................$800.00
CHAD & CRYSTAL BRUNSCH - CHADRON, NE
LOT 117 ÷ DUCKSKIN COLT ..............................$750.00
LOT 118 ÷ DAY FOAN COLT..............................$700.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
LOT 107 ÷ DAY STALLION.................................$650.00
SHARON HERRON - UNION CENTER
LOT 158 ÷ DUN STUD .....................................$550.00
LOT 160 ÷ SOFFEL STUD.................................$500.00
MOREAU RIVER QUARTER HORSES - MUD BUTTE
LOT 142 ÷ DFOWN FILLY .................................$350.00
LOOSE HORSES:
SADDLE PFOSPECTS. ..........................$550 - $900/HD
FLESHY, COOD STOUT HOFSES .................$20 - $40/CWT
POSSIDLE FIDINC PFOSPECTS, SUDSTANTIALLY HICHEF
THIN, LITE HOFSES UNDEF........ $20/CWT (MAFKET TOUCH}
HOFSES WITH DLEMISHES, HAFD TO SELL
email your ads or social news to: annc@gwtc.net or your pictures or stories to: courant@gwtc.net
FINANCIAL
FOCUS
HOW SHOuLD YOuR RISK
TOLERANCE INFLuENCE
INvESTMENT DECISION?
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
As an investor, how much risk
can you tolerate? It’s an impor-
tant question — because the an-
swer can help you make the right
investment choices.
Before you know your risk tol-
erance, you’ll want to make sure
you first understand the nature of
investment risk — the risk of los-
ing principal. This risk is espe-
cially prevalent when you invest
in stocks, because stock prices
will always fluctuate — and there
are never any guarantees about
performance. Of course, a decline
in value does not mean you need
to sell; you can always hold on to
the stock with the hope that its
value will bounce back. And this
can certainly happen, but again
— no guarantees.
How you respond to this type of
investment risk will tell you a
great deal about your own risk
tolerance. Of course, no one,
whether he or she has a high tol-
erance for risk or a low one, par-
ticularly likes to see declines. But
people do react differently. If
you’re the sort of person who can
retain your confidence in your in-
vestment mix and can focus on
the long term and the potential
for a recovery, you may well have
a higher tolerance for risk. But if
you find yourself losing sleep over
your losses (even if, at this point,
they’re just “paper” losses), be-
coming despondent about reach-
ing your goals, and questioning
whether you should be investing
at all, then you may have a low
tolerance for risk.
This self-knowledge of your
own risk tolerance should help in-
form your investment decisions —
to a point.
Even if you determine you have
a high tolerance for risk, you al-
most certainly should not load up
your portfolio exclusively with
stocks. If the stock market enters
a prolonged slump, you could face
heavy losses that may take many
years to overcome, causing you to
lose significant ground in the pur-
suit of your financial goals. Con-
versely, even if you discover you
don’t have much tolerance for
risk, you won’t want to invest only
in supposedly “safe” vehicles,
such as certificates of deposit
(CDs). During those periods when
rates on CDs and similar instru-
ments are low, as has been the
case in recent years, your interest
payments from these investments
may not even keep up with infla-
tion — meaning that, over time,
you could end up losing purchas-
ing power, which, over the long
term, can be just as big a risk as
market declines.
Ultimately, then, you’ll proba-
bly want to let your risk tolerance
guide your investment choices —
but not dictate them with an “iron
hand.” So, if you believe you are
highly tolerant of risk, you might
have a somewhat higher percent-
age of stocks in your portfolio
than if you felt yourself to be
highly risk-averse — but in any
case, you’ll likely benefit from
building a diversified portfolio
containing stocks, bonds, govern-
ment securities, CDs and other
investments. While this type of
diversification can’t guarantee
profits or protect against loss, it
can help reduce the effects of
volatility on your portfolio.
By knowing your own risk tol-
erance, and the role it can play in
your choices, you can help your-
self create an effective, suitable
investment strategy — one that
you can live with for a long time
and that can help you avoid the
biggest risk of all: not reaching
your long-term goals.
Email your social
news, obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net

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