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Pennington Co. Courant, October 25, 2012

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Number 43
Volume 107
October 25, 2012
by Laurie Hindman
Wall Superintendent/Principal
Dennis Rieckman was the guest
speaker at the Wall Badlands Area
Chamber of Commerce meeting
held on Monday, October 15.
Rieckman gave an overview on
Initiated Measure (IM) 15. He ex-
plained the measure will add one
penny to the state sales tax, which
would raise $175 - $180 million an-
nually. The money generated from
the sales tax would be split evenly
between K - 12 public education
and Medicaid. He went on to say
that school districts can’t continue
to provide students with the qual-
ity of education at the current
funding. These additional funds
would be provided to school dis-
tricts based on enrollment with
school boards having control as to
where the funding should be spent
in their school district. Rieckman
wanted the chamber to know he
was not at the meeting to sway any
ones mind on how they should vote
on this issue.
Rieckman then gave an update
on school happenings. Volleyball
and football are beginning to wrap-
up and the National Honor Society
will be hosting a blood drive on
Monday, November 5 at the school.
Nominating Committee report
was given by Mike Huether. Jackie
Heathershaw, Donna Curr and
Dawn Hilgenkamp’s seats are up
for re-election this year. The three
will run again and no other nomi-
nations have been made so far. If
anyone is interested in running at
large, petitions need to be turned in
by Monday, October 29.
Mayor Dave Hahn announced
the next council meeting will be
held on Thursday, November 8 at
6:30 p.m. at the Wall Community
Center meeting room. If anyone
would like to vote early they need
to stop in at the Wall City Office
and visit with Finance Officer Car-
olynn Anderson.
Golden West reported they held
their annual meeting and Stuart
Marty was elected to their board.
Rod Renner has stepped down as
president and Jeff Nielsen was
elected as the new president.
Nadia Eisenbraun with the For-
est Service related their visitation
is up 28 percent for the year.
Black Hills Federal Credit
Union held a member appreciation
day on Thursday, October 18.
Brett Blasius with First Inter-
state Bank noted they are having
a “One Warm Coat” drive and if
anyone has good clean quality
coats they would like to donate to
drop them off at the bank.
Blasius also spoke on behalf of
the Wall Medical Board. Flu vacci-
nations are now available at the
Wall Clinic.
Carol Hoffman with the Wall
Country Cupboard said they are in
need of oatmeal and soup.
Black Hills Badlands and Lakes
will be having their annual meet-
ing on Thursday, October 25 at
3:00 p.m. at Crazy Horse Memo-
rial.
Bev Dartt with the Beautifica-
tion Committee reported they
planted 43 planters this spring
and hired two girls to do the water-
ing. South Boulevard plots will be
available next spring if anyone is
interested in planting and caring
for a plot. Christmas decorations
will be going up the first part of
November so they can be turned
on the day after Thanksgiving.
President Mary Williams gave
the upcoming announcements:
•October 29; final day for at
large board nomination to be
turned in.
•November 6; election day at
the Wall Community Center; 7:00
a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
•November 7; Quinn VFW
Bingo; Wall Community Center;
7:00 p.m.
•November 11; 26th annual
Wall Craft Fair; Wall Community
Center; 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
•November 12; Wall City and
Chamber offices are closed in ob-
servance of Veterans Day.
•November 14; Quinn VFW
Bingo; Wall Community Center;
7:00 p.m.
•November 19; Chamber lunch-
eon; tentatively at Fat Boys BBQ;
noon.
•November 22 - 23; Wall City
and Chamber offices closed for
Thanksgiving holiday.
by Laurie Hindman
The most critical need we have
is getting locals to volunteer to be-
come EMTs was the main focus of
the Wall Ambulance meeting held
on Monday, October 15.
Board members with the help of
Dick Johnson reviewed several ads
that had been placed in the Pen-
nington County Courant. The ad
will run for the next two weeks
and will include “Critical need of
EMTs” in the wording.
By-laws for the district were re-
examined. Carolynn Anderson had
made a few changes to different ar-
ticles within the by-laws. The
board reviewed these changes and
elected to strike some of the them
and agreed to accept the other
changes. Anderson will make the
appropriate changes and resend
them to the board for their review.
Due to state statute the board is
required to hold an election at
their first quarterly meeting to be
held in February or March of 2013.
Carolynn Anderson feels there
shouldn’t be an election as board
members haven’t completed their
full term yet. Norman Eisenbraun
and Jem Kjerstad were under the
impression that they would only
hold their seat until the first elec-
tion. It was decided there would be
an election in 2013 and Eisen-
braun’s position would be filled for
a three year term. Kjerstad’s posi-
tion would also be up but that seat
would be filled with someone to
complete a three year term with
Reprinted with permission
by Kevin Woster
Rapid City Journal staff
A Wisconsin man must pay
$10,000 in fines and restitution for
illegally killing a buffalo in Bad-
lands National Park.
Some South Dakotans aren't
sure that's enough.
Jeff Olson, a Rapid City dentist
and chairman of the state Game,
Fish & Parks Commission, said he
wished that 42-year-old Joseph
Wilmet of Green Bay had to serve
some jail time along with the fine
and restitution.
"Or maybe he should be banned
from hunting for life," Olson said.
Somebody who illegally kills a
bison in a national park is a
poacher, not a hunter, Olson said.
"Please do not use 'hunter' and this
guy in the same sentence," he said.
"Real hunters don't do that."
In a guilty plea agreement an-
nounced Tuesday by U.S. Attorney
Brendan Johnson in Sioux Falls,
Wilmet admitted to details about
the incident on November 15,
2010, and agreed to one year of
probation, a $5,000 fine and
$5,000 in restitution to the park.
The details included the fact that
he shot the buffalo, also called
bison, partially butchered it in the
Wisconsin man gets $10,000 fine
for shooting buffalo in the park
field and loaded parts into a trailer
to haul out of the park.
A park ranger later found the
carcass and began an investigation
that included state Game, Fish &
Parks officers and the Pennington
County Sheriff's Office. Officers
eventually found Wilmet at a
motel in Wall after noting suspi-
cious items in a black Ford pickup
with an enclosed trailer.
The items included a rifle, spot-
light, bloody plastic wrap, bloody
saw blade and a saw. Also, blood
was dripping from the rear door of
the trailer, according to a court
document. When confronted at the
motel, Wilmet opened the trailer
and admitted the crime.
"I shot it," he said, according to
the document.
Susan Ricci of Rapid City, direc-
tor of Friends of the Badlands non-
profit park support group, said she
was shocked when she heard about
the poaching.
"To me, it's a horrendous crime
because it intrudes upon the
serenity and peace of our national
park," Ricci said. "Nothing like
this should happen in our national
parks. There are designated places
where people who want to go hunt-
ing buffalo can do that."
Ricci said she struggles to un-
derstand what impulse would lead
to such a despicable act.
"I just wonder what he was
thinking," she said. "Obviously, he
wasn't thinking. The stiffer the
sentence the better. You need a
huge deterrent so something like
this doesn't happen again."
Journal calls to Badlands Na-
tional Park on Tuesday were re-
ferred to Superintendent Eric
Brunnemann. Brunnemann didn't
immediately return a message left
on his office voice mail.
A park staffer said many person-
nel were involved in the annual
buffalo roundup there this week.
During the roundup, buffalo are
weighed, examined and tested for
disease.
only two years remaining. Then in
2014, Wally Hoffman and Elden
Helm’s terms would be up and
those positions would be filled for
a three year term. Then in 2015,
Anderson and the person who was
elected in 2013 to fill Kjerstad’s po-
sition would be up for a three year
term. So this first round with the
current board, no one in reality
will be serving the complete terms
since the district was formed in the
middle of the year.
President Hoffman has visited
with Keystone and they are not in-
terested in sharing an ambulance
director due to financial con-
straints. Hoffman will contact Hill
City to get their take on sharing a
director.
Elden Helms would like for all
the directors to go up to the ambu-
lance building and take a look
around.
Anderson asked when the board
would like to get an actual insur-
ance quote since they are close to
the 60 days out. It was decided to
wait until November 15 to get the
quote.
Anderson will also check with
the new billing service to see when
they would like to take over the
billing operation of the amublance
service.
The board will work on a “Let-
ter to the Editor” to be published
next week stressing the need for
community members to become
EMTs.
Wall Superintendent Rieckman
speaks at chamber meeting
Ambulance board discusses
critical need for EMTs
Kevin Wenzel with Prairie Schooner Towing hooks up the trailer
that was used in the illegal killing of a buffalo in the Badlands
National Park. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
Sargeant Shawn Harwood, with
the South Dakota 842nd Engineer-
ing Group, visited the Elm Springs
School Wednesday, October 17th.
He shared stories, slide show pic-
tures, explained the patches on his
uniform, and passed around
Afghanistan money for all to see.
Afterwards, the students of the
Elm Springs School each recited a
patriotic poem and sang 'America'
in Shawn's honor.
Shawn has been in the National
Guard for twelve years and has
Elm Springs School. Back row: from left to right ... Kerry Howie (aide), Teacher Connie Mickelson,
Savana Johnston (eighth grade), Carter Elshere (eighth grade), Jacob Linn (eighth grade),
Sargeant Shawn Harwood with son Emerson. Middle row: from left to right ... Jonnie Jo Anders
(first grade), Kassandra Linn (eighth grade), Rylan Elshere (kindergarten) and Camri Elshere
(frouth grade). Front row : James Nachtigall (first grade). ~Courtesy Photo
Elm Springs School declares
October 17 as Shawn Harwood Day
signed up for eight more years.
He served in Iraq in 2003. He re-
turned overseas to Afghanistan for
a year long tour in 2011.
Shawn's unit is an engineering
unit. They build bridges and
roads. They also spent time tear-
ing down old army camps. He,
along with 160 other members of
the 842nd, returned home to South
Dakota the end of September.
Shawn is married to Katie and
they have a son, Emerson. Shawn
is the son of Steve and Debbie Har-
wood of Union Center. Shawn is
enjoying time home with his fam-
ily before he returns to work at the
Forest Service in Spearfish.
The Elm Springs School and
surrounding community want to
thank Shawn Harwood, the entire
842nd, and all military personnel
(current and retired) for your
time, sacrifices, and loyalty to our
country. Freedom is not free.
Thanks to you all.
New accountability system identifies top-performing schools
Twenty-three elementary and
middle schools and seven high
schools have earned top spots
under the state’s new accountabil-
ity system.
EXEMPLARY SCHOOLS (top
five percent of schools based on
School Performance Index scores)
•Elementary/Middle
Wall Elementary, Wall School
District
•High School
Wall High School, Wall School
District
As part of South Dakota’s waiver
from No Child Left Behind, the
state was required to identify the
top five percent of public schools,
as well as the lowest five percent
of Title I schools, this fall. The
schools were identified, in most
cases, based on their scores on the
new School Performance Index, or
SPI, a 100-point index that encom-
passes key indicators that meas-
ure school performance.
At the elementary and middle
school level, those SPI key indica-
tors include student achievement
in math and reading on the state
assessment and attendance rates.
At the high school level, those SPI
key indicators include student
achievement in math and reading
on the state assessment, four-year
cohort graduation rate, and ACT
scores in English and math.
This is a transitional year for
the new accountability system. Ad-
ditional indicators, including aca-
demic growth, will be added to the
School Performance Index by the
2014-15 school year. Once fully im-
plemented, the department plans
to use three years of data for most
of the SPI key indicators. This cur-
rent calculation is based upon only
one year of data.
“A review of the data shows that
a majority of our schools are per-
forming well, and our students are
reaching appropriate bench-
marks,” said Dr. Melody Schopp,
South Dakota’s secretary of educa-
tion. “Kudos to those educators,
students and parents who are com-
mitted to seeing that our children
are getting the knowledge and
skills base that will see them
through life.”
According to Schopp, at the ele-
mentary and middle school level,
82 percent of schools earned at
least 70 out of the 100 points pos-
sible. And at the high school level,
71 percent of schools earned at
least 70 out of the 100 points. It is
at the 70 mark that SPI scores
begin to drop rapidly.
At the lower end of the spectrum
are schools whose SPI scores rank
among the bottom five percent of
Title I schools. Under the new ac-
countability system, these schools
are considered “priority” schools.
“The indicators are showing that
something is not working in these
schools,” Schopp said. “In certain
cases, the school might be serving
a unique student population that
impacts the results. But whatever
the case, it’s here that we, as a
state and as local communities,
need to make a concerted effort to
make a difference for these stu-
dents. We owe it to them.”
The Department of Education
also has identified “focus” schools,
a classification that applies only to
Title I schools and considers the
performance of historically under-
performing student groups.
As part of the new accountabil-
ity system, the department will
work with Priority and Focus
schools to implement meaningful
interventions designed to improve
student outcomes.
Data for individual schools, in-
cluding points earned for the vari-
ous indicators, can be accessed at
doe.sd.gov/secretary/spi.aspx
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Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
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be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012 • Page 2
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right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
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PennInuton County's Most Wunted
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If vou obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
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Counfv ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
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Email us with your news item or photo to courant @ gwtc.net
Letters to the Editor
Need a gift idea for that hard-to-buy someone?
How about a gift that keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the Pennington County Courant.
Call to start your subscription gift! (605) 279-2565
or subscribe online at:
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Monthly Social Security and
Supplemental Security Income
(SSI) benefits for nearly 62 million
Americans will increase 1.7 per-
cent in 2013, the Social Security
Administration announced.
The 1.7 percent cost-of-living ad-
justment (COLA) will begin with
benefits that more than 56 million
Social Security beneficiaries re-
ceive in January 2013. Increased
payments to more than eight mil-
lion SSI beneficiaries will begin on
December 31, 2012.
Some other changes that take ef-
fect in January of each year are
based on the increase in average
wages. Based on that increase, the
maximum amount of earnings sub-
ject to the Social Security tax (tax-
Social Security announces 1.7
percent benefit increase for 2013
able maximum) will increase to
$113,700 from $110,100. Of the es-
timated 163 million workers who
will pay Social Security taxes in
2013, nearly 10 million will pay
higher taxes as a result of the in-
crease in the taxable maximum.
Information about Medicare
changes for 2013, when an-
nounced, will be available at
www.Medicare.gov. For some ben-
eficiaries, their Social Security in-
crease may be partially or com-
pletely offset by increases in
Medicare premiums.
The Social Security Act provides
for how the COLA is calculated. To
read more, please visit www.so-
cialsecurity.gov/cola.
Governor Dennis Daugaard has
extended an Executive Order to
haul overwidth baled livestock
feed until December 21, 2012, in
South Dakota.
The Executive Order states that,
upon receipt of a permit, permis-
sion is granted to move over-width
baled livestock feed not exceeding
12-feet-wide or 15-feet-high for two
hours after sunset and two hours
before sunrise. The order allows
movement of overwidth baled live-
stock feed until cessation of the
drought emergency, or no later
than December 21.
Over-width vehicles must be
equipped with flashing or rotating
white or amber warning lights on
each side of the load’s widest ex-
tremity. The warning lights must
be clearly visible to motorists ap-
proaching from the front and rear.
Movement under the Executive
Order is valid only for baled live-
stock feed.
“This year’s persistent drought
conditions have left livestock pro-
ducers across South Dakota with
inadequate feed supplies,” said
South Dakota Secretary of Agricul-
ture Walt Bones. “Increasing haul-
ing height and width restrictions
for baled hay will allow producers
Overwidth baled livestock feed
hauling extended 60 days in S.D.
to move feed in a more efficient
manner.”
The normal size restriction on
South Dakota highway loads is 14-
feet, three-inches high and eight-
feet, six-inches wide.
Although height and width re-
strictions for baled livestock feed
have been temporarily increased
by Executive Order, several high-
ways in the state have width and
height restrictions in place be-
cause of construction or perma-
nent structures that cannot accom-
modate such large loads. Truckers
are encouraged to check their
routes ahead of time for those re-
strictions.
For information on permits, con-
tact a South Dakota port of entry
or call 800-637-3255.
Agriculture is South Dakota's
number one industry, generating
nearly $21 billion in annual eco-
nomic activity and employing more
than 80,000 South Dakotans. The
South Dakota Department of Agri-
culture's mission is to promote,
protect, preserve and improve this
industry for today and tomorrow.
Visit us online at http://sdda.sd.
gov or follow us on Facebook and
Twitter.
Letter to the Editor:
With the recent formation of the
Ambulance District, we as Board of
Directors realize the importance of
this service. The current EMT’s
have given this service numerous
hours of dedication for our commu-
nity. Without local involvement as
an EMT this service will be diffi-
cult to sustain. We want to encour-
age members of our community to
become involved and become an
EMT to keep this crucial service in
our area.
If you are interested in getting
involved with this much needed
service please attend the organiza-
tional meeting we have scheduled
for Thursday, November 1st at
7:00 p.m. It will be held at the fire
hall located at 120 fourth avenue.
Please consider becoming in-
volved.
Board of Directors:
/s/Wall Hoffman, President
Norm Eisenbraun, Vice President
Carolynn Anderson, Sec/Treasure
Elden Helm, Member
Jem Kjerstad, Member
By Wendy Brunnemann
Wear your favorite costume and
come trick-or-treat at the Library
on Halloween, Wednesday, October
31! We have spooky books for all
ages and treats for all our favorite
patrons!
Last week was Teen Read Week
and it reminds us that there are
lots of new teen books at the Li-
brary that aren’t just for teens. I
began reading kid’s books so I
could have conversations and
make connections with my chil-
dren and my students about books
they were reading. Let me tell you,
there are a whole new set of chil-
dren’s book than when we were in
school! New authors have written
some tremendous stories that can
be enjoyed by all, not just by kids.
When I was a teacher, the best
Wall Community Library
part of our day was just after lunch
when the entire class would settle
down on the carpet and listen to a
chapter or two of our current class
book. It was just for fun, no tests
on those books, but often it
sparked questions and discussions
among the class. Perhaps one of
my favorite discussions was when
the class agreed that Harry Potter
and the Sorcerer’s Stone was bet-
ter as a book than as a movie be-
cause the movie left out too much
important stuff.
At any rate, come by and try out
some of our new teen and chil-
dren’s books. It may kindle a dis-
cussion with your child, grand-
child, or great grandchild. You’ll be
glad you did, and it just might in-
troduce you to a new favorite au-
thor!
Dirt fills the air at the Roberts Prairie Dog town in the Badlands
National Park, Wednesday, October 17. The dirt was so thick that
headlights had to be turned on and drivers had to slow down to
blizzard driving conditions. The prairie dogs have eatten the
ground bare so there was nothing to catch the dirt as winds blew
in excess of 30 mph. The park had closed Rim Road as the dirt
blowing in the air made driving conditions impossible. Makes
one think this is what it was like in the “Dirty Thirties.”
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Wind closes road and causes
poor driving conditions in park
Volunteer opportunities at the
Country Cupboard Food Pantry
Volunteer opportunities are
abundant at the Country Cup-
board Food Pantry (CCFP). Carol
Hoffman, President, requested of
the board to find additional volun-
teers at the October Board of Di-
rectors meeting.
The most visible volunteer is
there during the hours of opera-
tion. Those hours are every
Wednesday from 1:00 - 4:00 and
every third Saturday from 9:00 -
11:00.
Checking, sorting and stocking
donated food items can be done
anytime. Each donated items is in-
spected for food safety, expiration
date and free of damage to the
package. Donated food is received
on a sporadic basis but needs to be
done about once a week. This is a
great opportunity for someone who
works during business hours and
would like to help at the pantry.
Shopping at the Food Bank in
Rapid City is a very different vol-
unteer opportunity. This must be
done during the Food Bank hours
which are Monday through Friday
during the day. Volunteers work
closely with the Country Pantry
Board so they know what to look
for. A reliable vehicle is necessary.
The pantry appliances need to
be cleaned at least once a year if
not twice. This past summer two
college students accomplished this
task in addition to sanitizing all
the shelves in the pantry. The
cleaning of appliances goes a long
ways in maintaining this equip-
ment to needed Health Depart-
ment standards.
Recruitment, training and coor-
dination of volunteers that serve
the clients is currently the greatest
need right now. As the pantry
moves toward its three years of
service to the community a new
flush of volunteers are needed in
this capacity.
Food drives are vital to the
pantry. Coordination of food drives
and follow up on sorting and shelv-
ing the donations is needed. There
is much flexibility in this volunteer
opportunity.
You can help support your food
pantry and the community in so
many ways. Please contact Carol
Hoffman for additional informa-
tion.
On Sunday, October 14, 2012
President Jenny Behlings, AAF,
AIFD, PFCI, SDCF the CEO of the
South Dakota Florists Association
and Vice-President Patience Pick-
ner, AIFD, PFCI, SDCF played
host to florists from all over SD at
the Free Fall Seminar, in Cham-
berlain. The seminar has been de-
veloped to give our member
florists, from across the state, an
educational opportunity that they
can get to and back home in one
day. That it is free is an added ben-
efit.
Juanita Schroeder, Petals and
Pots in Wall, was the registrar for
the SDFA Free Fall Seminar held
in Chamberlain. The featured de-
signer was Damon Samuel, AIFD,
PFCI, NAFA NMF. Damon is one
of the country’s leading floral de-
Petals and Pots was the registrar at
the SDFA’s free fall seminar 2012
sign professionals. Juanita serves
on the SDFA, Board of Directors as
one of the Western Division Repre-
sentatives. She helped created a
team of other SD florists, who
helped assist Damon. A Wholesale
florist called J. W. Perry, Inc. do-
nated the fresh flowers and supply
product and Sullivan, Inc supplied
the permanent botanical.
A Design Contest is offered as
part of the event. There are four
levels of competition, Student,
Level one, two and three. The top
evaluated designs in Level three
then go on to a Design Off. In the
design off, the designer is pre-
sented with a surprise package
and has 40 minutes to create a
composition. President Jenny,
Jenny’s Floral in Custer, Chad
Kruse, SDCF, DeSmet Flowers
and Gifts in DeSmet and Thelma
Busk, Flowers on Main in Dell
Rapids were this year-featured de-
signers in the 2012 Design Off.
Jenny won the contest and was
awarded “The Pasque”, SDFA’s De-
signer of the Year. She will go on to
be a featured designer in next
springs Annual Convention. .
SDFA is a member run organiza-
tion whose mission is to create ed-
ucational opportunities and foster
good will between the member
florists.
Seven DSU students have en-
tered the KIDS COUNT Info-
graphic Challenge sponsored by
SparkAction and the Annie E.
Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT
project. South Dakota KIDS
COUNT project invited young peo-
ple ages 13 to 24 and adults to join
in the national contest. The goal of
the KIDS COUNT Infographic
Challenge was to use data from
the KIDS COUNT Data Center to
design a creative, engaging info-
graphic that tells a story about the
well-being of children in South
Dakota or the nation.
The public will be able to vote for
their favorite entry until October
29, and the winner will be an-
nounced the first week in Novem-
ber. The two entries with the most
votes will win state-of-the-art lap-
tops and design software.
Students entered in the contest
along with their infographic topics
include:
•Ashley Burtz, a Digital Arts
and Design major from Wall, S.D.,
Children in Poverty in SD;
•Alicia Davidson, a Digital Arts
and Design Major from Water-
town, S.D., Poverty/deaths of Chil-
dren;
•Amanda Welbig, an Elemen-
tary Education/Special Education
major from Dell Rapids, S.D., Sin-
gle Teens and Births;
•Rhannon Gardner, a Digital
Arts and Design major from Lake
DSU students need your
vote to win challenge!
Havasu City, Ariz., National Teen
Obesity;
•Tyler Carr, a Digital Arts and
Design major from Renner, S.D.,
Juvenile Justice;
•Elise Bunkers, a Digital Arts
and Design major from Dell
Rapids, S.D., Obese Children in
America;
•Andy Martin, a Digital Arts
from Watertown, S.D., Total Teen
Births;
KIDS COUNT, a project of the
Annie E. Casey Foundation,
(www.aecf.org) is a national and
state-by-state effort to provide
high-quality data and trend analy-
sis. KIDS COUNT seeks to enrich
local, state, and national discus-
sions concerning ways to secure
better futures for all children.
The South Dakota KIDS
COUNT project (www.sdkid-
scount.org) is part of the KIDS
COUNT network of projects. SD
KIDS COUNT data provides
South Dakotans a broad picture of
how the state's children are doing
and provide parents, policymak-
ers, advocates and others inter-
ested in the well-being of children
with information they need to
make informed decisions about
policies and programs for children
and families.
Log on to http://sparkaction.org/
info-challenge to vote for your fa-
vorite DSU student’s infographic!
Ryan Bielmaier, son of Jana and Kevin Bielmaier, sits on one of
Great Grandpa Butch Kitterman’s giant pumpkins. I heard
through the pumpkin vine that great grandpa would let the water
run for a really long time. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
School & Area News
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012• Page 3
OCT. 26-27-28-29:
Trouble With
The Curve (PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
November 2-3-4-5:
Pitch Perfect (PG)
November 9-10-11-12:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
November 16-17-18-19:
Taken 2 (PG-13)
courant@gwtc.net
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Slender as a whippet, the Sioux
Horse Effigy is one of the most rec-
ognizable and cherished artifacts
in the South Dakota State Histor-
ical Society’s Museum at the Cul-
tural Heritage Center in Pierre.
The effigy is the logo of the
SDSHS.
Most horse dance sticks carved
by the Lakota are of the front half
of a horse on a stick that could be
carried in a dance. The Sioux
Horse Effigy is considered a mas-
terpiece of American Indian sculp-
ture because it is the complete fig-
ure of a horse. Carved out of wood,
the three-foot-long dance stick is
enhanced by a mane and tail of
real horsehair, with reins and a
bridle made of leather.
It is believed that the Sioux
Horse Effigy was carved by a war-
rior in the late 1800s to honor a
brave horse that was injured or
killed in battle. The sides of the ef-
figy are riddled with holes that
suggest bullet wounds, with red
paint suggesting blood seeming to
seep from the wounds. Its ears are
slanted backward, symbolizing
fear and pain. The horse sculp-
ture’s elongated body and forward
leaping motion suggest a leap from
life to death.
The Sioux Horse Effigy was col-
lected by Mary Collins, a mission-
ary to the Lakota.
Collins was born in 1846 in Illi-
nois and grew up in Keokuk, Iowa.
She received a Master of Arts de-
gree from Ripon College in Wiscon-
sin. After three years of teaching
in Keokuk, she decided to become
a Congregational missionary and
was sent to Dakota Territory to be
a missionary to the Lakota.
She arrived at Oahe Mission, lo-
cated about 12 miles north of what
is now Pierre, on Nov. 10, 1875.
Ten years later, Collins moved to
the Little Eagle Station on the
The Sioux Horse Effigy and
Missionary Mary Collins
Grand River, located about 20
miles west of Mobridge. Her home
made of logs was used for both
school and church.
Collins learned the Lakota lan-
guage and ways. Her knowledge of
medicine resulted in her becoming
known as a “medicine woman” and
gave her a status that she might
not otherwise have had. Collins be-
came friends with Sitting Bull and
tried to convince the Lakota to give
up the Ghost Dance. She possessed
a sense of humor and was a prac-
tical woman. She taught American
Indians how to live well in this
present life, how to serve God, how
to build homes and how to become
self-supporting. By all accounts,
Collins was respected by the
Lakota.
“I had dedicated my life to this
work little knowing how much of
hard physical labor and drudgery
were required of a missionary in
our own land,” Collins wrote. “I
had been in school all my life ei-
ther as a student or a teacher, so
that I was not very well fitted for
hardships, and had I not felt that
everything I did was for the uplift
of the Indians I could not have
held out.”
Nonetheless, she described her
years to service to the American
Indians as years of delight.
Collins retired from the ministry
in 1910 and moved back to
Keokuk. There, she made the leap
from life into death on May 25,
1920. Many of her correspon-
dences, including her autobiogra-
phy, are contained in the SDSHS
Archives.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Founda-
tion, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society. Find us on the
web at www.sdhsf.org.
Congregational missionary Mary Collins and the Sioux Horse ef-
figy.
~Photo Couresty of South Dakota Historical Society Foundation
SampIe Our
SpecIaIs DaIIy
Luncb
SpecIaIs
Oct. 2S - Oct. 31
Tbursday, October 2S
·Crillcd Paiiy Mcli w1Curly Frics . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Vcgciallc Soup & SandwicI . . . . . $S.29
FrIday, October 26
·Hoi Porl SandwicI
w1MasIcd Poiaiocs & Cravy . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Dunpling Soup & SandwicI. . . . . . . $S.29
Saturday, October 2?
·Hoi Darlccuc
w1MasIcd Poiaiocs & Cravy . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dacon CIcddar Soup & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Sunday, October 2S
·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci . . . . . . . . $?.39
·CIild's Drcalfasi Duffci (12 & undcri . . . . . $3.S9
Scrvcd 7.00 io 10.30 a.n.
·CIiclcn Fricd Sical
w1MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallc. . . . . . $6.29
·Dacon CIccsclurgcr Soup & SandwicI . . . $S.29
Monday, October 29
·Indian Taco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Vcgciallc Dccf Soup & SandwicI . . . . . . . . $S.29
Tuesday, October 30
·Turlcy Clul SandwicI w1Macaroni Salad. . . $6.29
·Corn CIowdcr & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Wednesday, October 31
·113 ll. Dacon & Swiss Durgcr
ioppcd wiiI Fricd Onions & Curlcy Frics . . . . . $6.29
·Tonaio Soup & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
279-2175 · Wall, SD
N0 ALLEY 0ABBA0E SEBVICE
EFFECTIVE NOVEMBER 1, 2012
Notice is hereby given that garbage service will only
be picked up from the street front and sides and NOT
from the alleys beginning November 1, 2012. Alley serv-
ice will resume May 17, 2013.
Thank You, City of Wall
Published October 18 & 25, 2012, at the total approximate cost of
$64.00.
Two Bit Saloon
Grand Opening
Fundraising Auction
Halloween Party
(Costumes optional)
Saturday, Oct. 27th
Supper ~ 5:30 * $5/plate
Auction ~ 7 p.m. · Dance ~ 9 p.m.
(Mike Seager - DJ)
If you would like to donate auciton items please
contact Holly Schaack - 279-2869
or Jess Smith - 386-2020
From the desk of Superintendent Dennis Rieckman
I want to share some additional
good news we received this week
concerning our students and
specifically the high school. The
Wall High School has been listed
as an exemplary school by the De-
partment of Education. The high
school is one of seven high schools
(top five percent) of the high
schools in S.D. We are listed sixth
on the list. This ranking was based
on student achievement, gradua-
tion rate, and college and career
readiness (ACT scores).
Our Middle School also did ex-
ceptionally well; they were not in
the top five percent, but were in
the top 10 percent. We had re-
ceived noticed earlier the elemen-
tary school was listed as an exem-
plary school. Congratulations to all
the students and staff for receiving
these distinguished honors. I chal-
lenge the students and staff to
maintain and improve on these re-
sults. It will be tough, but I know
we can get it done.
The election is coming up in a
couple of weeks and there are two
items on the ballot which have an
impact on education. Initiated
Measure 15 and Referred Law 16
are the two ballot issues. As the
superintendent of the local dis-
trict, I feel it is appropriate for me
to share my views on these two im-
portant issues. These are my views
and they may be shared by others,
but in no way are the “official” po-
sition of the school district.
Initiative Measure 15 is an act
which would add a one cent sales
tax to all items currently having a
sales tax of four percent. It is ex-
pected to raise an estimated 180
million annually. The money will
be split between K-12 education
and Medicaid. The 90 million
going to education would be dis-
tributed back to the school dis-
tricts at about $700.00 per stu-
dent. This would mean an addi-
tional $169,000 in revenue for our
district. This money would be used
to offset the deficit spending we
have been doing and general oper-
ations within the district. We have
been using Impact Aid money to
balance our budget and we are for-
tunate to have this money avail-
able to us. If we
did not have the Impact Aid money
we would need to do what a lot of
districts have had to do. The
school district would need to look
at an opt-out asking our local prop-
erty taxpayers to pay more. The
one cent sales tax will help prevent
this from happening and I feel
makes it a more equitable way to
fund education than putting more
burden on local landowners.
The other part of IM 15 is the
Medicaid piece. In S.D. one of
seven people receives their health-
care through Medicaid and nearly
half of our children born in S.D.
qualify for Medicaid.
The cuts to Medicaid have made
it difficult for providers to accept
these patients. When these pa-
tients are denied primary care
they often end up in the emergency
room which drives up the cost of
healthcare and insurance. It is a
struggle already for rural health
facilities to provide a needed and
cost effective service. IM 15 will
help health services to continue
serving the rural communities.
I firmly believe IM 15 is the best
way to restore the funding cuts
and move forward with educa-
tional funding. I know any new tax
is a hard sell, but this measure will
help kids and people with disabili-
ties for many years. There are
measures written in the law to
safeguard the funding and to make
sure it is received by the schools
unlike the video lottery money. I
respectfully ask you to consider
voting YES on IM 15.
Referred Law 16 was placed on
the ballot by a group of teachers
and education supporters gather-
ing enough signatures to do so.
This was the Governor’s education
bill known as HB 1234.
My biggest concern with this bill
has always been how fast this bill
was passed and the local control it
takes away from school districts.
This bill was change dramati-
cally during the session with a lot
of compromises made before the
final passage. Proponents can say
we have local control over how we
would implement these ideas, but
it still comes down to being state
directed changes. The local school
boards are elected by local taxpay-
ers to make the necessary deci-
sions deem best for our school.
Referred Law 16 has five main
parts to it. The five parts are
teacher tenure, merit pay, bonus
pay for Math and Science teachers,
scholarship program for students
going into Math and Science, and
a standardize evaluation system.
These ideas all have merit and
will likely be implemented at some
level in the future by local choice.
It should be left to the local school
districts to determine what fits
best for their district. I believe HB
1234 was well intentioned, but the
way it was introduced (last
minute) and passed (strong arm-
ing) by one vote has left a lot of
unanswered questions and con-
cerns. I respectfully ask you to con-
sider voting NO on Referred Law
16.
If you have any questions or con-
cerns on these two issues please
contact me at (605) 279-2156 or e-
mail me at dennis.rieckman@k12.
sd.us
Please exercise your right to
vote and vote on November 6th.
Voters are able to see the pros and
cons of each of the proposed meas-
ures or other amendments on the
ballot to help make an informed
decision.
New Ralnfall lnsurance For 2013 Pasture & Rayland
Contact Crew Agencyfor detaiIs.
SaIes cIose date is November 15, 2012
New Ralnfall lnsurance For 2013 Pasture & Rayland
Contact Crew Agencyfor detaiIs.
SaIes cIose date is November 15, 2012
The Pasture, Rangeland & Forage - Rainfall Index (PRF-RI) is based on NOAA data and uses an approximate
12x12 mile grid. Producers must select at least two, two-month time periods in which precipitation is important
for the growth and production of forage/pasture. These time periods are called index intervals. Insurance pay-
ments to the producer suffering a loss are calculated based on the deviation from normal precipitation with
the grid and index intervals selected. This insurance coverage is for a single peril - lack of precipitation.
Crew Agency. Ltd.
21290 SD Hwy 240 * PhiIip, SD 57567
Cactus FIat - Interstate 90 Exit 131
605-433-5411
Rusty Olney ` Tom Husband ` Maurice Handcock ` Tanner Handcock ` Heidi Porch ` Grady & Bernice Crew
Agri-Risk SpeciaIist Since 1984
Crew Agency is an equaI opportunity provider.
First Lady Linda Daugaard an-
nounced that public tours to view
Christmas finery at the Governor’s
Mansion will be offered on two
Mondays in December.
“The Governor’s Mansion is
beautiful during the holiday sea-
son, and Dennis and I would like
to share that with all South
Dakotans,” the First Lady said.
“We are so very fortunate to live in
this home, but it really belongs to
all of us.”
Holiday tours offered at
governor’s mansion
The holiday tours are scheduled
for Dec. 10 and Dec. 17. Six tours
will be conducted each day (9 a.m.;
10 a.m.; 11 a.m.; 1 p.m.; 2 p.m.; 3
p.m.).
Those wishing to take the Gov-
ernor’s Mansion tours must obtain
tickets (free) in advance from the
Pierre Chamber of Commerce.
There is a limit of 40 people per
tour.
The Chamber of Commerce can
be reached at 224-7361.
GOT WIND DAMAGE?
Tired of replacing those old asphalt shingles?
Let us install a quality standing seam steel roof
on your home or outbuildings and solve the
problem PERMANENTLY.
A quality seamless steel roof will withstand
winds of up to 120 mph and, in many cases,
lower your insurance premiums.
We are the steel roof specialists.
Give us a call for a free quote.
Office: (605) 343-7373 • Cell: (605) 390-1859
1903 Lombardy Drive, Rapid City, SD 57703
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Friday, the 19th, after two days
of terrible wind some of the quil-
ters from First Lutheran Church,
Bonna Fortune, Mildred Harnisch
and Violet Smoot, took quilts,
blankets and sheets to the WAVI
and Corner Stone in Rapid City.
Also some quilts to the V.A. in
Sturgis. The quilts were made in
patriotic material so went to the
V.A. Hospice House. Our thanks to
the Veterans. We later met Aldena
and Wayne Haerer at their apart-
ment in Sturgis. It was good to see
them. Aldena gave us a tour of the
complex, a very nice place. We ate
pizza for lunch in Sturgis, came
back to Rapid City to shop for more
material to make more quilts and
then returned home in time for the
football game with Lyman Co. Way
to Go Eagles!! We had a very busy
but fun day!
Steve and Gayle Eisenbraun
spent the weekend in Mitchell,
S.D., with Travis, Beth and Isaiah.
Norman and Lorraine Fauske
returned Friday after traveling to
Novato, Calif., to visit daughter
Lisa and family. Nice to spend time
spoiling the grandsons. A bonus to
the travels, to and from Calif., was
time spent in Elko, Nev. with Anna
and Don Brown. Spectacular fall
colors, nice sunny days, safe trav-
els, good health, and spending
time with family, our eighteen
days made for a memorable vaca-
tion.
Senior Citizen’s potluck supper
had around 20 people “blow” in
last Thursday evening. So all con-
sidered, we had a nice group and
some stayed to play penny “Bingo”
with Carol Hahn calling the num-
bers. Potluck supper is always the
evening of the third Thursday of
the month. Just show up.
Esther and Gerald Wolford went
to Howard, S.D., to visit Amy and
Terry Beers. They drove down on
Sunday, the 14th, and returned on
Wednesday, driving into that terri-
ble wind.
A while back the Wall Eagles
football team had a game called
because of lightning and finished
it the following week. Last Thurs-
day’s game was postponed until
the next day, Friday, because of
WIND. Can you imagine kicking
or throwing the ball and having it
end up in the Badlands?! Oh, and
Eagles won the game!
Last Sunday, October 14th, Nor-
man and Betty Klingbile had a
small family gathering. They
hosted dinner for Lyndell and Jill
Petersen and Buster and Amy
Estes, siblings of Betty.
Sydney Lennox and Wanda
Swan of Kadoka, were on their
way to Rapid City to keep appoint-
ments last Thursday. They stopped
in Wall for coffee and doughnuts to
be fortified to tackle that horrible
wind.
Dolly Blucher, who now resides
in Philip, came to Wall, Sunday,
with her daughter and son-in-law
of California, Lavonne and Jim, to
eat and visit with friends from
Wall. It was nice to see them.
Just a reminder — “Theme”
meal at Prairie Village will be at
noon on October 30th - not hard to
guess that theme! Menu consists of
Swiss steak with tomatoes and
onions, baked potato, Oriental veg-
gies, fruit and cake.
Peggy Nielson of Rapid City, and
Kirby Keyser met Tyler Keyser at
Peggy’s family farm near Turlare,
S.D., for pheasant hunting on Sat-
urday. On Sunday, Tyler and Kirby
met with Rick Baton, a good friend
of Kirby’s, and his wife Arlene for
pheasant hunting at Arlene’s fam-
ily farm near St. Lawrence, S.D.
They reported very good hunting.
The Governor has ordered our
flag to be flown half-staff this week
in honor of South Dakota States-
man George McGovern. McGovern
passed away early Sunday morn-
ing at the age of 90.
Anita Peterson of Philip, took
Edith Paulsen to Rapid City on
Tuesday of last week. Edith said
she didn’t have any appointments
but just wanted to go. Sounds like
a winner to me — appointments
take up shopping time!
Halloween is next Wednesday.
Keep your eyes open for all the lit-
tle ghosts and goblins — keep
them safe.
Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle
went to Lawler, Iowa, on Friday
and returned on Monday. They vis-
ited their grandson, Jeramy Croell
and his friend Tasha Tonne. They
enjoyed visiting the Amanas while
there.
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann had
the joy of baptizing his grand-
daughter, Carley Jean Kopfmann,
at Mitchell on Sunday.
Betty Pederson is hospitalized in
Chamberlain. We wish her well.
The wind two days last week
was the worst we have experienced
for a long time. Good thing it
wasn’t blowing snow. Saturday
was a beautiful day — things are
to cool off so maybe it was our last
day in the 70’s for this year.
Have a good week!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa. 00S
Ionilx Den/ie/rx
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdnv of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
6051279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
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Call for various
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CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
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Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053
Greetings… May the Country-
side send sincere sympathy to the
families of Dorothy Seidler, Mid-
land; Virginia Burns, Philip;
Sharon Ellwein, Philip; Joyce
Dykema, Murdo; Nancy Holub,
Wall; Marilyn (Lytle) Walker, Wall;
and Earl Helms (Wall) Rapid City.
The loss has been quite busy
again.
Mary Paulsen’s sister, Lucille
Murnane recently arrived for a
visit. She had spent the summer
with family and friends in Min-
nesota. Lucille went on to Rapid
City to spend some time with
daughter and family, Kristin and
Jason Testin and granddaughter
Jamie.
Lillian Helms has been busy
with her garden stuff and the fam-
ily has had a lot of friends and rel-
atives pay their respects to them.
There were two bus loads that vis-
ited the families from the Black
Hills Works for the funeral.
Kari Denke is the proud mother
of a new baby daughter born last
week.
Gwen and Michelle McConnell
are dedicated to teaching church
school on Wednesday afternoons.
Paul McConnell is busy getting the
hay hauled in so the cows can eat
this winter. That’s one of the
preparations for winter. Garden
produce is another one. A busy,
busy time of the year as with any-
time to keep up with the work on
the farm and ranch, calving, plant-
ing, haying, combining. It seems
each job has its season. Oops,
branding, working farm ground,
breaking horses to ride and etc.
Lucille Murnane and Mary
Paulsen recently drove to Colorado
Springs, Colo., to visit Mike and
Lynn Mary Blaseg and girls, Han-
nah and Callie. They were honored
and so enjoyed staying with the
girls while Mike and Lynn Mary
enjoyed going to Las Vegas, Nev.,
to observer their 15th wedding an-
niversary. They so enjoyed doing
things with the granddaughters.
Lucille Murnane returned to her
home in Florida from Colorado
Springs, Colo., and Mary flew to
Casper, Wyo., and Delmer met
Mary there.
Vern Omdahl’s sister and hubby,
Helen and Randy Franks from
Garden City, Mo., arrived to the
Vern and Carol Omdahl home
Monday for a visit and they
planned to return home Saturday,
the 13th.
Mary Paulsen drove to Belle
Fourche recently to attend Grand-
parents Day and spend time with
grandson Dreyson at Step by Step
Preschool in Belle. Mary also en-
joyed lunch with her son Darren,
who teaches at the Belle Fourche
High School.
Well people, this is it for this
time and I might add very unsuc-
cessful especially with kids in
school and all the sports. I feel I
must give this up as it is so unrea-
sonable to call especially with no
extended service. I have so enjoyed
and its not a happy time to quite.
Those of you that have been so
helpful and cooperative have made
it a special way to keep in touch.
Countryside News
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
What a week! Beautiful fall days
Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.
Well, you know what happened in
the early hours of Wednesday. I
thought for sure we’d be blown at
least to Kansas! Even though I
greatly admire the “Wonderful
Wizard of Oz” it just didn’t seem
like the right time to go soaring off
for a visit.
Lloyd had to make a trip Thurs-
day to Ft. Meade. That was an ad-
venture! He still is bothered with
the vertigo and doctors are trying
to find answers. It is a little frus-
trating for him but he does (most
of the time) keep a sense of humor.
Barb Crawford’s mother, Iva
Eisenbraun, had knee surgery last
week. In July, Mrs. Eisenbraun
had surgery on her other knee.
That went so well for her she de-
cided to have the second knee done
so she would be able to get back to
gardening next summer. Iva is 93,
is in good health and ready to get
to work! She will spend some time
at West Hills Village to get the
therapy going and she’ll be good as
new. Best wishes for a speedy re-
covery.
Wasta Fire Department was
called to Rusty and Angela Lytle’s
place, Thursday. Two hundred to
two hundred-fifty bales were con-
sumed. The fire was believe to
have begun by spontaneous com-
bustion and then the extreme wind
just whipped it along. It was a long
day for firefighters and the Lytles.
That is a serious loss.
Madi Grenstiner has begun bas-
ketball practice with the Eagles
junior high team. Madi enjoys the
sport and is in the band as well.
Ash Grenstiner has been in-
volved with jujitsu for several
years and is now among the
wounded warriors. She explained
that the accident happened as she
and another student were working
on a move and however these
things happen, it was as though
her wrist “popped”. Sounds like a
very painful situation, but Ash just
grinned about it and said she
would be wearing the wrist brace
for a while. Ash also enjoys music.
A shower for Jamy Williams and
baby Mavrick was given by the
ladies of the Methodist church in
Wasta. Mavis Jeppesen and her
daughter, Skyla, put on a very nice
party Saturday at 11:00. Friends
and family were there to share in
the good array of salads, silly
games and conversation. It was es-
pecially nice to meet Jamy’s
mother and sisters. Of course the
spot light was on Mavrick! He pa-
tiently tolerated the passing
around, slept through most of it,
woke up briefly to eat and look
around. A very sweet baby boy.
Anna Lee Humphrey had a visit
from daughter Peggy from Gillette,
Wyo., and she and Carl joined
Anna Lee for Saturday dinner.
Anna Lee maintains her great at-
titude and continues to do all she
can for herself.
The Elm Springs community
will be having their fall festival
Friday, October 26 at the Elm
Springs Hall.
Hope to see you at the Elm
Springs Community Hall, Friday
evening for good food and good fun.
Joke for the day: What did the
green grape say to the purple
grape? “Breath!” Thank you Hazel!
Happy Trails!
Wasta Wanderings
COURANT
BRIEFS
AMERICAN LEGION &
AUXILIARY
The American Legion and Auxil-
iary will meet Thursday, October
25 in the meeting room of the Wall
Community Center. Potluck will
start at 5:30 p.m. with the meeting
to follow. If you plan on attending
the potluck, please bring a dish to
share.
Interested in
becoming an EMT?
The Wall Ambulance Service
is in critical need of EMT’s.
If interested in becoming an EMT in Wall, please attend
an organizational meeting on November 1st at 7:00 p.m.
at the Fire Hall located at 120 Fourth Avenue, Wall, SD.
Contact John Kitterman at 515-3129 or
jtk@gwtc.net with any questions.
Marvin and Kathy Jobgen of
Scenic, along with Terry Bertram
of Colome and Ron and Kathy
Baker of Albuquerque, N.M., an-
nounce the engagement of their
children, Amy Jobgen to Rustin
Bertram.
Amy is a 2005 graduate of Wall
High School and a 2009 graduate
of Black Hills State University
with a degree in Wellness Manage-
ment. She is an Admissions Spe-
cialist at Black Hills Surgical Hos-
pital.
Rustin is a 2007 graduate of
Colome High School. He is a mem-
ber of the SD Army National
Guard.
A December 1, 2012 wedding is
planned in Rapid City, SD
Engagement
WASTA BAR
HALLOWEEN PARTY
& Steak Night
Saturday, October 27th • 7 p.m.
The family of
Robert Knutson
request a Card Shower in honor of his
75th Birthday
October 24, 2012
Cards may be sent to: 4021 Elm Ave.
Apt. 103, Rapid City, SD 57701
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd Hu)nctt,
Ounc)
2DDt CÞevg JSDD
£×1ended Cob, 2×4, VS, A1r, Cru1se, T111
we don’t
charge…
Obituaries,
engagements and
wedding write-ups
are published free of
charge. Call 279-
2565 or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
annc@
gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Church
Wall Rodeo Grounds
Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
The one hundred twenty disciples in the Upper
Room had, of course, been much like any other
group of believers in history. They had not all been
equally spiritual or devoted, or faithful. Some had
been more so than others, and where some had ex-
celled in one virtue, others had excelled in another.
Yet now they were all FILLED with the Spirit, from
the least to the greatest of them.
The thoughtful student of Scripture will, of course,
ask why all these believers were now filled with the
Holy Spirit. Was it, perhaps, because they, as a
group, had been more godly than those before
them? The gospel records prove that this is not so.
Peter boasted, Thomas doubted, James and John
sought personal gain, and when our Lord was taken
prisoner, “they all forsook Him and fled.”
Was it then because they had prayed long enough
or earnestly enough for the Spirit to come upon them
and take control? No; they had been instructed to go
to Jerusalem, not to pray for the Holy Spirit to come,
as some suppose, but to “wait for the [fulfillment of
the] promise” regarding the Spirit (Acts 1: 4,5) — and
right here is the answer to our question.
The believers at Pentecost were filled with the
Holy Spirit, not because they had prayed long or
earnestly enough for the Spirit to come, but because
the time had arrived for the fulfillment of the divine
promise. The Old Testament prophets and the Lord
Jesus had promised that the Holy Spirit should some
day come to take control of God’s people (Ezek.
36:26,27), and that day had come. They were filled
with the Spirit because God, according to His prom-
ise, had baptized them with the Spirit (Acts 1:5).
THE HOLy SPIRIT AT PENTECOST
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
Senator George S. McGovern_______________________
and could retrieve names and de-
tails from memory with ease.
In 1956, George won a seat in
the US House of Representatives.
There he served two terms, lost
a run for the US Senate in 1960,
but won a Senate seat in 1962
after having served as the first Ex-
ecutive Director of President John
F. Kennedy's new Food For Peace
program, a formative experience
which allowed George peaceably
shift government power and Amer-
ican food resources towards hun-
gry people.
After a run for the Democratic
Party presidential nomination in
1968 to help hold together the-as-
sassinated Sen. Robert Kennedy's
delegates, George worked to re-
form party rules so the nominating
procedure would be more trans-
parent and accessible.
And during a drawn-out pri-
mary campaign, George won the
Democratic Party's nomination for
Presidential in 1972, a race he led
with unprecedented grassroots
support under the banner "Come
Home, America", for peace in Viet-
nam and reconciliation at home.
It was a race he did not win
against President Richard Nixon,
but the campaign's integrity re-
stored hope to a dispirited public
and established a principled model
for national campaigns to come,
validated by the resignation of a
scandal-ridden President Nixon
two years later.
George served three terms in the
Senate, until January, 1981, where
he contributed substantially to a
series of comprehensive farm bills
and chaired the new US Senate
Special Committee on Nutrition
and Human Needs.
After his Senate career, George
worked on Middle East peace, and
further focused on child nutrition
through two appointed positions:
US Ambassador to the UN Agen-
cies for Food and Agriculture, and,
separately, as UN Global Ambas-
sador to the World Food Program.
He also co-founded a world-wide
school lunch program with long-
time friend Bob Dole, the former
GOP Senator from Kansas.
For these decades of work en-
riching the lives of countless fami-
lies and children around the globe,
George was awarded the Presiden-
tial Medal of Freedom, our coun-
try's highest civilian distinction,
by President Bill Clinton, in 2001.
In more recent years, George
stayed intricately connected to
South, national and international
issues. He lectured about policy
and politics on campuses here and
abroad. He would work, as was hit
his habit, on just a few hours of
sleep, and frequently asked arriv-
ing visitors for their input on a
fresh draft of an op-ed or magazine
piece he had been crafting on a yel-
low pad.
He even finished last year, at
age 89, the 14th book he had writ-
ten, co-authored or edited, “What
It Means To Be A Democrat, and
conducted book signings in several
states also for a recent biography
of President Abraham Lincoln.
No portrait of George would be
complete without remembering
the succession of outrageously af-
fectionate and outsized Newfound-
land dogs George and Eleanor nur-
tured and cherished.
He loved going for a walk across
the DWU campus, or on a drive to
Lake Mitchell, or to a night at the
movies. He enjoyed dinners at
Chef Louie's and kept everyone
amused and amazed with stories
and anecdotes from his youth, the
campaign trail, or the Senate floor.
And he kept his childhood and
life-long faith with his beloved St.
Louis Cardinals, expressing no
surprise at their last-minute qual-
ification for this year's playoffs,
just as they had done last year on
their way to a World Series cham-
pionship run that George had fol-
lowed with inning-by-inning de-
light.
More than anything, George
adored Eleanor, their grown chil-
dren, and 10 grandchildren and
eight great-grandchildren, was en-
gaged in their interests, schooling
and careers, and generously
helped with advice, encourage-
ment and support.
George McGovern lived an ex-
ceptional public and private life of
more than 90 years with an un-
common energy, adherence to
ideals, thirst for knowledge and a
consuming dedication to others.
George rarely raised his voice in
anger, but always raised the level
of discourse and achievement
around him.
He didn't live for confrontation,
but risked his life in the greatest
struggle of the century to defeat
evil on a grand scale, yet never
bragged about his personal war-
time achievements.
Instead, he used that experience
instead as a working, life-long
foundation for a more peaceful,
constructive, and forgiving world.
We who knew and loved him will
remember his singular dedication
to a life that made a difference.
We resolve to honor George's
spirit by emulating his example.
Public viewing will be held from
1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Thursday,
October 25, 2012, at First United
Methodist Church, 401 S. Spring
Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD, with the
family present to greet friends
from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. A 6:30 p.m.
Prayer Service will follow the visi-
tation at the church.
Funeral Services will begin at
1:00 p.m., Friday, October 26th, at
the Mary Sommervold Hall at the
Washington Pavilion of Arts and
Science, 301 S. Main Avenue,
Sioux Falls, SD.
Private burial will take place at
Rock Creek Cemetery, Washing-
ton, DC, at a later date.
Miller Funeral Home, Sioux
Falls, SD, is in charge of funeral
arrangements.
George Stanley McGovern, hus-
band and father, teacher and
politician, proud South Dakota De-
mocrat, author and advocate for
the poor, lived a life of service
through decades of American his-
tory he also strongly influenced.
Born in Avon, South Dakota on
July 19, 1922 to the Rev. Joseph
and Frances McLean McGovern,
George left Dakota Wesleyan Uni-
versity DWU), in Mitchell, where
he excelled in debate, to join the
Army-Air Force in 1943.
That same year, on Halloween
Day, he married Eleanor Stege-
berg, a fellow DWU student who
had grown up on a Woonsocket
farm and got to know George after
having beaten him in a student de-
bate competition. They would
eventually have five children, Ann,
Susan, Teresa, Steven and Mary,
and a 63-year marriage.
A B-24 pilot at the age of just 22
and assigned to a bomber group in
Italy, George flew 35 combat mis-
sions across Europe, safely-landed
his damaged plane on several oc-
casions and was discharged at the
war's end as a First Lieutenant
having won the Distinguished Fly-
ing Cross with three Oak Clusters.
After the war, he and Eleanor
returned to DWU, and following
his graduation, joined its faculty
as a professor of history and polit-
ical science.
He later completed a Ph.D. in
History at Northwestern Univer-
sity, and studies at nearby Garrett
Theological Seminary. But living
through the war pushed George to-
wards public service, so he began
traveling town-to-town and farm-
to-farm rebuilding the South
Dakota Democratic Party and
competitive two-party system in
the state.
No one worked harder or with
greater organization on the cam-
paign trail; George would walk
both sides of the entire length of a
main street, shake the hand and
listen to every person on the side-
walk or in the coffee shops. In an
era before hand-held electronic de-
vices, George had accumulated an
archive of 40,000 voter 3x5 cards
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
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Todd Sieler
Russell Means__________________
Russell Means never shunned
attention. Whether leading Native
Americans in railing against bro-
ken federal treaties, appearing in
a Hollywood blockbuster or advo-
cating a sovereign American In-
dian nation within U.S. borders,
the activist who helped lead the
1973 uprising at Wounded Knee
reveled in the spotlight.
But it was only on his terms.
Openly critical of mainstream
media, the onetime leader of the
American Indian Movement often
refused interviews and verbally
blasted journalists who showed up
to cover his public appearances.
Instead, he chose to speak to his
fan base through YouTube videos
and blog posts on his personal
website.
When he did speak out publicly,
he remained steadfast in his de-
fense of AIM. He found himself
dogged for decades by questions
about the group's alleged involve-
ment in the slaying of a tribe mem-
ber and the several gun battles
with federal officers during the 71-
day occupation of Wounded Knee,
bu t denied the group ever pro-
moted violence.
"You people who want to con-
tinue to put AIM in this certain
pocket of illegality, I can't stand
you people," Means said, lashing
out an at audience member ques-
tion during an April gathering
commemorating the uprising's
40th anniversary. "I wish I was a
little bit healthier and a little bit
younger, because I wouldn't just
talk."
Means, who announced in Au-
gust 2011 that he had developed
inoperable throat cancer but told
The Associated Press he was forgo-
ing mainstream medical treat-
ments in favor of traditional Amer-
ican Indian remedies, died early
Monday at his ranch in in Porcu-
pine, S.D., Oglala Sioux Tribe
spokeswoman Donna Salomon
said. He was 72.
Born in Wanblee on the Pine
Ridge Indian Reservation, Means
grew up in the San Francisco area
before becoming an early leader of
AIM. He often was embroiled in
controversy, partly because of
AIM's alleged involvement in the
1975 slaying of Annie Mae Aquash.
But Means also was known for
his role in the movie "The Last of
the Mohicans" and had run unsuc-
cessfully for the Libertarian nomi-
nation for president in 1988.
AIM was founded in the late
1960s to protest the U.S. govern-
ment's treatment of Native Ameri-
cans and demand the government
honor its treaties with Indian
tribes. Means told the AP in 2011
that before AIM, there had been no
advocate on a national or interna-
tional scale for American Indians,
and that Native Americans were
ashamed of their heritage.
"No one except Hollywood stars
and very rich Texans wore Indian
jewelry," Means said. "And there
was a plethora of dozens if not
hundreds of athletic teams that in
essence were insulting us, from
grade schools to college. That's all
changed."
The movement eventually faded
away, the result of Native Ameri-
cans becoming self-aware and self-
determined, Means said.
Paul DeMain, publisher of In-
dian Country Today, said there
were plenty of Indian activists be-
fore AIM bu t that the group be-
came the "radical media gorilla."
"If someone needed help, you
called on the American Indian
Movement and they showed up
and caused all kind of ruckus and
looked beautiful on a 20-minute
clip on TV that night," DeMain
said.
Means and AIM co-founder Den-
nis Banks were charged in 1974
for their role in the Wounded Knee
uprising, but after a trial that
lasted several months, a judge
threw the charges out on grounds
of government misconduct.
Means said he felt his most im-
portant accomplishment was the
founding of the Republic of Lako-
tah and the "re-establishment of
our freedom to be responsible" as a
sovereign nation inside the bor-
ders of the United States. His ef-
forts to have his proposed country
recognized by the international
community continued at the
United Nations, he said, even as it
was ignored by tribal governments
closer to home, including his own
Oglala Sioux Tribe.
But others may remember him
for his former organization's conn
ection to Aquash's slaying. Her
death remains synonymous with
AIM and its often-violent clashes
with federal agents in the 1970s.
Authorities believe three AIM
members shot and killed Aquash
on the Pine Ridge reservation on
the orders of someone in AIM's
leadership because they suspected
she was an FBI informant. Two ac-
tivists - Arlo Looking Cloud and
John Graham - were both eventu-
ally convicted of murder. The third
has never been charged.
Means blamed Vernon Belle-
court, another AIM leader, for or-
dering Aquash's killing. Bellecourt
denied the allegations in a 2004 in-
terview, four years before he died.
DeMain, an Indian journalist
who researched the case, said
AIM's leaders know who ordered
Aquash's killing but have covered
up the truth for decades.
Also in 1975, murder charges
were filed against Means and Dick
Marshall, an AIM member, in the
shooting death of Martin Mon-
tileaux of Kyle at the Longbranch
Saloon in Scenic. Marshall served
24 years in pris on. Means was ac-
quitted.
In addition to his presidential
bid, Means also briefly served as a
vice presidential candidate in
1984, joining the Larry Flynt
ticket during the Hustler maga-
zine publisher's unsuccessful bid
for the Republican nomination.
But Means always considered
himself a Libertarian and couldn't
believe that anyone would want to
call themselves either a Republi-
can or a Democrat.
"It's just unconscionable that
America has become so stupid," he
said.
His acting career began in 1992
when he portrayed Chingachgook
alongside Daniel Day-Lewis'
Hawkeye in "The Last of the Mo-
hicans." He also appeared in the
1994 film "Natural Born Killers,"
voiced Chief Powhatan in the 1995
animated film "Pocahontas" and
guest starred in 2004 on the HBO
series "Curb Your Enthusiasm."
Means recounted his life in the
book "Where White Men Fear to
Tread." He said he pulled no
punches in his autobiography, ad-
mitting to his frailties and evils
but also acknowle dging his suc-
cesses.
"I tell the truth, and I expose
myself as a weak, misguided, mis-
directed, dysfunctional human
being I used to be," he said.
Salomon, the tribal spokes-
woman, called Means' death a
"great loss" for the Oglala Sioux
Tribe.
Means' death came a day after
former U.S. Sen. George McGov-
ern died in Sioux Falls at the age
of 90. McGovern had traveled to
Wounded Knee with U.S. Sen.
James Abourezk during the 71-day
takeover to try to negotiate an end.
"I've lost two good friends in a
matter of two to three days,"
Abourezk said Monday morning. "I
don't pretend to understand it."
Wake services for Means are
scheduled for Wednesday, October
24, 2012 at the Little Wound
School in Kyle, on the Pine Ridge
reservation. His ashes will be scat-
tered in the Black Hills of South
Dakota on Thursday.
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012 • Page 6
These sponsors are proud to support the Wall Eagles...
Good Luck at Districts
Lady Eagles Volleyball Team!
Tuesday, October 30th, Thursday, November 1st
& Friday, November 2nd ~ Top seed to host
Teams included: Wall, Edgemont, Philip,
New Underwood, Oelrichs, Rapid Ci ty Christian
2012 Wall High School Volleyball Team …
Back Row: Kaitlin Schreiber, Nicole Eisenbraun, Josie Blasius, Emily Linn,
Carlee Johnston, & Tayah Huether. Front Row: Jennifer Emery, Bailey Lytle,
Autumn Schulz, Kailey Rae Sawvell, & Monica Bielmaier.
Badlands Automoti ve
Black Hills Federal Credi t Union
Common Cents
Corner Pantry/Subway
Crown Oil Co.,
Dakota Mill & Grain
Dartt Angus
Days Inn Motel
De’s Oil Co. /SanDee’s
Econo Lodge
First Interstate Bank
Golden West Telecommunications
Hildebrand Concrete
Ken’s Refrigeration
Pennington County Courant
Polished Pinky
Rush Funeral Home
Super 8
TLC Electric
Two Bi t Saloon & Steakhouse
Walker NAPA/Red Rock Restaurant
Wall Auto Li very
Wall Booster Club
Wall Building Center & Construction
Wall Dairy Queen
Wall Drug Store
Wall Food Center
Wall Lube & Espresso Bar
West Ri ver Electric Assoc.
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012• Page 7
courant@gwtc.net
Black Hills Financial Services located at Black Hills Federal
Credit Union is pleased to announce that Nicole Eisenbraun has
been selected as October’s student of the month. Nicole is a jun-
ior at Wall High School. Nicole keeps herself busy in school with
Volleyball, National Honor Society, HOBy and Managing Boys
Basketball. Nicole is always willing to help others and is a pos-
itive role model. Away from school Nicole enjoys working at
Motel 6. When Nicole isn’t busy in school or working, she likes
to read and hang out with friends. After she graduates from High
School, Nicole looks forward to attending college for Publishing
to major in English Literature. Nicole is the daughter of Tim and
Mary Eisenbraun, Wall, S.D. Congratulations Nicole from Black
Hills Financial Services! ~Courtesy Photo
Black Hills Financial Services
student of the month
Jaicee Williams is the Wall Middle School student of the month
for October 2012. Jaicee is in sixth grade and is an excellent stu-
dent. Jaicee always has her classwork done and is very respon-
sible. She is also kind and respectful. She takes time to stop and
help other students out when needed. Jaicee participates in
many activities including band, volleyball, rodeo, 4-H, children’s
theatre, youth to youth, and AWANA. Jaicee is the daughter of
Marty and Stephanie Williams. Kent Jordan from First Interstate
Bank presented Jaicee with a First Interstate Bank sweatshirt
and bag. Congratulations Jaicee!
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Wall Middle School
student of the month
By Coach Karol Patter-
son
The Cross Country season for
2012 is now officially complete.
The state meet was held on Satur-
day, October 20th in Huron on a
cool, breezy day.
Austin Huether finished his
running season against 113 other
Class B runners. He ran well fin-
ishing eighth in a time of 18:19.96.
It was quite a race with the top 25
medaling.
Five other runners from our re-
gion also finished in the top 25
making for a strong showing.
Duane Jongeling from Parker won
the race in 16:13.51 with Parker
also winning the team title. Es-
telline came in second with 34
points and Dupree was third with
50 points. The Philip boys team
ran well finishing sixth.
Huether places eighth at
state meet held in Huron
There were 108 girls running in
Class B with Ipswich running
away with the team title with nine
points. A perfect score is six.
Coach's Comments: What an
ending for Huether! He gave it his
all throughout the entire 3.1 miles.
The competition was outstand-
ing with strong runners. With
many spectators and family (all
his siblings were there) he ran
very well.
Again, wonderful memories of
another successful season and a
great group of athletes.
I appreciate the parents for
your support, fans for always
cheering and asking how the
squad was doing, and the many
volunteers for helping us when
meets were hosted here this sea-
son. Until next season. Coach Pat-
terson
By Coach Kent Anderson
The Wall Eagles Football Team
ended their regular season in great
fashion as they defeated the
Lyman Raiders 42 to 14. With the
win the Eagles finished the regu-
lar season with a 5 – 3 record and
a three way tie for second place in
the conference race. Also with the
win the Eagles secured second
place in the region and will host
the first round game on Tuesday,
October 23rd against the New Un-
derwood Tigers. Game time is set
for 7:00.
The Eagles came out and took
control of the game early. The Ea-
gles defense dominated the
Raiders in the first series and
forced them to punt. This would
set the tone for the game as the de-
fense controlled them all night.
They had one breakdown in the
second quarter and gave up a long
touchdown run. That would be
pretty much the only negative
from the varsity defense.
The offense also controlled the
game with a punishing run
scheme. We ran our power play
many times and were very success-
ful with it all night. The Eagles
took a 7 to 0 lead in the first quar-
ter and quickly turned it in to a po-
tential runaway in the second
quarter scoring three more times.
Lane Blasius would call his own
number on a sneak and score the
first touchdown of the night. After
more dominant defense in the sec-
ond quarter, the Eagles offense
would also spark as Carson John-
ston would score from six yards
out and Tyler Trask would ramble
in for two scores of nine and 30
yards. Anderson would add the
point after kick on each of the four
first half touchdowns.
The third quarter started with a
bang as Trask took the first play of
the half the distance. Trask cut
back against the grain and ran 35
yards for the score. Once again An-
derson was successful on the kick
and the Eagles put the game away.
The Eagles defense stayed
stingy and continued not to budge.
The Eagles were once again quick
to answer as Carson Johnston cut
his way in for his second touch-
down of the game from eight yards
out. With the Anderson kick good,
the Eagles had a dominant 42 to 6
lead midway through the third
quarter. With the play clock run-
ning for the remainder of the
game, the Eagles were able to play
many players in the remainder of
the game. The Eagles did allow a
late score by Lyman but did play
pretty well until the final horn
blew.
It was a great win and a super
way to end the regular season.
Stats
1st 2nd 3rd 4th Final
Wall: 7 21 14 0 42
Lyman: 0 6 0 8 14
Team Stats
•First Downs: Wall - 13, Lyman
- 7.
• Rushing Attempts: Wall - 45,
Lyman - 27.
•Rushing Yards: Wall - 300,
Lyman - 133.
•Passes Complete: Wall - 1,
Lyman - 8.
•Passes Attempted: Wall - 3,
Lyman - 20.
•Passes Intercepted: Wall - 1,
Lyman - 1.
•Completion Percentage:
Wall - 33.3, Lyman - 40.0.
•Passing Yards: Wall 20,
Lyman - 89.
•Fumbles: Wall - 2, Lyman - 2.
•Fumbles Lost: Wall - 0,
Lyman - 1.
•Punt Attempts: Wall - 1,
Lyman - 3.
•Return Yards (punt and
kick): Wall - 16, Lyman - 133.
•Number of Penalties: Wall -
3, Lyman - 9.
•Penalty Yards: Wall - 25,
Lyman - 65.
•Total Offensive Plays: Wall -
320, Lyman - 222.
•Average Per Play: Wall - 6.7,
Lyman - 4.7.
Scoring recap
•First Quarter: Wall - Lane
Blasius three yard run; Trevor An-
derson kick, 7 - 0.
•Second Quarter: Wall -
Carson Johnston six yard run;
Trevor Anderson kick, 14 – 0.
Wall - Tyler Trask nine yard run;
Trevor Anderson kick, 21 – 0.
Lyman - Charlie LaRoche 65 yard
run; PAT failed, 21 – 6. Wall -
Tyler Trask 30 yard run; Trevor
Anderson kick, 28 – 6
•Third Quarter: Wall - Tyler
Trask 35 yard run; Trevor Ander-
son kick, 35 – 6. Wall - Carson
Johnston eight yard run; Trevor
Anderson kick, 42 – 6.
•Fourth Quarter: Lyman -
Jailani Uthe 15 yard pass to
LaRoche; LaRoche run 42 – 14.
•Eagles Quarterback: Bla-
sius, Passing Completions - 1, At-
tempts - 3, Interceptions - 1, Yards
- 20, Touchdowns - 0, Percentage -
33.3.
•Receiving: Cade Kjerstad,
Catches - 1, Yards - 20, Touch-
downs - 0, Average - 20.0.
•Rushing: Trask, Attempts -
16, Yards - 164, Touchdowns - 3,
Average - 10.3. Taran Eisen-
braun, Attempts - 17, Yards - 66,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 3.9.
Blasius, Attempts - 6, Yards - 30,
Touchdowns - 1, Average - 5.0.
Kjerstad, Attempts - 2, Yards - 2,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 1.0.
Johnston, Attempts - 3, Yards -
35, Touchdowns - 2, Average - 11.7.
Anderson, Attempts - 1, Yards - 3,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 3.0.
•Scoring: Trask, Touchdowns -
3, Total Points - 18. Blasius,
Touchdowns - 1, Total Points - 6.
Anderson, PAT-1- 6/6, Total
Points - 6. Johnston, Touchdowns
- 2, Total Points - 12.
•Kickoff (five dirty balls):
Anderson, Attempts - 7, Yards -
327, Average - 46.7.
•Punt: Anderson, Attempts - 1,
Yards - 50, Average - 50.0.
•Kick Return: Trask, At-
tempts - 1, Yards - 16, Touchdowns
- 0, Average - 16.0. CJ Schulz, At-
tempts - 1,Yards - 0, Touchdowns -
0, Average - 0.0.
•Fumble Recoveries: Eisen-
braun - 1.
•Interceptions: Anderson - 1.
•Tackels: Eisenbraun, Solo -
1, Assists - 4, Sacs - 0, Total - 5,
Points - 6. Tyler Peterson, Solo -
2, Assists - 3, Sacs - 0, Total - 5,
Points - 7. Laketon McLaughlin,
Solo - 0, Assists - 1, Sacs - 0, Total
- 1, Points - 1. Blasius, Solo - 2,
Assists - 5, Sacs - 0, Total - 7,
Points - 9. Clancy Lytle, Solo - 3,
Assists - 4, Sacs - 0, Total - 7,
Points - 10. Trask, Solo - 1, Assists
- 2, Sacs - 0, Total - 3, Points - 4.
Johnston, Solo - 5, Assists - 4,
Sacs - 0. Total - 9, Points - 14.
Dusty Dartt, Solo - 3, Assists - 1,
Sacs - 0, Total - 4, Points - 7. An-
derson, Solo - 1, Assists - 1, Sacs -
0, Total - 2, Points - 3. Les
Williams, Solo - 3, Assists - 6, Sacs
- 0, Total - 8, Points - 11. Luke
Wilkins, Solo - 0, Assists - 1, Sacs
- 0, Total - 1, Points - 1. Gabe San-
dal, Solo - 0, Assists - 2, Sacs - 0,
Total - 2, Points - 2. Tyrel Clark,
Solo - 0, Assists - 1, Sacs - 0, Total
- 1, Points - 1. Ben Linn, Solo - 1,
Assists - 0, Sacs - 0, Total - 1,
Points - 2. Trey Richter, Solo - 1,
Assists - 0, Sacs - 0, Total - 1,
Points - 2. Lane Hustead, Solo -
1, Assists - 0, Sacs - 0, Total - 1,
Points - 2.
Eagles blast the Raiders
Austin Huether running at the State Cross Country meet held
in Huron on Saturday, October 20. Huether finished in eighth
place. ~Photo Courtesy Hannah Huether
courant
@
gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
HAY FOR SALE: 2012, 1st, 2nd
& 3rd cutting alfalfa hay. 2012
millet hay test results available.
2011, 1st & 2nd cutting alfalfa.
Call 845-3045. F9-2tp
STILL HAVE ROOM FOR 100
plus head of calves to back-
ground. Good feed, 10 years ex-
perience. Phone 605-685-6725
or cell 454-0053 or 454-0123.
P45-3tp
SELLING: 10 Black Angus com-
merical bred heifers Saturday,
November 3, at Philip (SD) Live-
stock Auction. AI bred Angus to
DL Incentive 228 (EPDs BW 0,
WW 81, YW 133, M 28). Pasture
bred to Green Mountain Front
Man (EPDs BW -.7, WW 61, YW
99 M 28). These heifers origi-
nated out of the 2012 BHSS pen
of five. These very fancy bred
heifers will weigh 1,050 lbs. and
are bred to start calving March 1
for 45 days. Ravellette Cattle,
685-5147 or home, 859-2969.
PR6-5tp
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
local delivery included, semi-
load lots, no mold or weeds,
large rounds put up right. Call
Rob, 390-5535; Charles, 390-
5506.
P43-4tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-ply,
235/85/16R. $160, mounted.
Les’ Body Shop, 859-2744,
Philip. P40-tfn
GARAGE SALES
RUMMAGE SALE: Friday, Oct.
26, 4-6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27,
8-12 p.m. at K-gee’s Bldg.,
Philip. No early sales. House-
hold items, kids-adult clothing,
décor, plus more! P46-1tc
HELP WANTED
WAITRESS NEEDED: at Red
Rock Restaurant in Wall. Call
279-2387 or 279-2388.
WP8-3tc
POSITION AVAILABLE: The
Kadoka Area School District is
looking for a full-time Special
Education Teacher’s Assistant.
The duties of this position in-
clude; assisting in the education
of Special Education Students K-
8, possible recess/ lunchroom
supervision, and other duties as
assigned. A non-certified appli-
cation may be obtained from the
school or on the school district’s
website; kadoka.k12.sd.us.
Please feel free to contact the
school with further questions
about this position. This position
will be a one-year position based
on need. Completed application
may be dropped off at the school
or send it to: Attn: Jeffery M. Ne-
mecek, Elementary Principal, PO
Box 99, 800 Bayberry Street,
Kadoka, SD 57543 or call 1-605-
837-2175. EOE K46-2tc
BUSINESS & SERVICES
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
GRAVEL: Screened or rock. Call
O'Connell Construction Inc.,
859-2020, Philip. P51-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED at
Days Inn, Wall. Possibly perma-
nent year-round position, start-
ing immediately. Contact
Theresa, 279-2000. PW46-tfn
DEPUTY SHERIFF’S POSI-
TION: The Haakon County Sher-
iff’s office is accepting applica-
tions for a full time Deputy Sher-
iff. Competitive wages and an ex-
cellent benefits package. This
position will be open until filled.
Send state applications and/or
resumes to: Haakon County
Sheriff, Box 249, Philip, SD
57567. For more information
contact Sheriff Fred Koester at
859-2741. P43-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Several nice used re-
frigerators with warranties. Del’s,
I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder. 390-
9810. WP9-4tp
FOR SALE: Pheasant roosters
and hens. Contact Larry for in-
formation on prices and delivery.
Call 843-2830 or 840-8097.
PR8-3tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each. Call
685-3317 or 837-2917. K44-tfn
FOR SALE: Several nice used re-
frigerators with warranties. Del’s,
I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder. 390-
9810. P46-4tp
WANTED: Old car and truck bod-
ies and parts, 1920-1950s, pay-
ing better than scrap so clean out
the tree line or metal pile for
quick $$. Call Ben, 669-2012,
Murdo. P43-4tc
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: Old Indian items,
beadwork, quillwork, old guns,
old painted buffalo hides, old
photographs. Cash paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802. F46-4tc
KADOKA LEGION AUXILIARY
MEMBERS: Please bring two
items of cash donation to Holiday
Festival Bake Sale, Nov. 4.
Thanks. K46-2tc
MARK YOUR CALENDARS!!
Turner Youth is hosting the an-
nual Christmas Fair at the
Murdo Auditorium, Sunday, No-
vember 11, 9:00 - 4:00 (CT).
M46-1tc
RULAND ARENA TEAM ROP-
ING: Sunday, Oct. 28, 1:00 p.m.
Handicapped drawpot. Novice #1:
pick your own partner. Rifle Rop-
ing: enter with partner, draw 3
more. 386-2164, Quinn.
PW46-1tp
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need rental
assistance or not, we can house
you. Just call 1-800-481-6904 or
stop in the lobby and pick up an
application. Gateway Apart-
ments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
FOR RENT: 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments for rent in Wall. Con-
tact Christianson Properties,
858-2195. WP7-4tc
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house at
102 Wood. Ave. Rent on garage
optional. Call 484-5409.PR8-2tp
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apart-
ment in Wall. Call 386-2222.
WP9-4tc
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-run
your ad correctly. We accept re-
sponsibility for the first incor-
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Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
INDEPENDENT PROFESSION-
ALS needed for custom modular
home builder to sell and build in
your area using our system. Call
Lonnie to learn more: 1-800-759-
2782.
EMPLOYMENT
JOIN OUR PLANKINTON CITY
CREW! FT maintenance position.
Electric, Streets, Water, Waste-
water. Competitive salary. Attrac-
tive benefit package. In a growing
progressive community. For ap-
plication contact City Hall (605)
942-7767.
CITY OF PIERRE: Baler/Equip-
ment Operator - Salary: Mini-
mum $14.42. More information
and applications available at
www.pierre.sd.gov. EOE.
CITY OF DE SMET: Full-time
water, wastewater, buildings,
parks, swimming pool mainte-
nance assistant. Possession of or
ability to obtain Commercial Dri-
verís License, Chemical Applica-
torís License, Water-Wastewater
Operator Certifications required.
Salary DOE/Benefits. For appli-
cation contact 605-854-3731 or
desmetcity@mchsi.com. EOE.
THE YANKTON COUNTY COM-
MISSION seeks to hire someone
for the position of Administrative
Highway Superintendent. Bene-
fits include paid vacation, sick
leave, longevity pay, health in-
surance and a retirement plan.
Starting pay is per current wage
schedule. Applications will be re-
ceived through October 26th,
2012. Interested persons should
contact Bill Balvin at the Depart-
ment of Labor, Yankton office
3113 Spruce Street, 605-668-
2900, for application informa-
tion. Special accommodations for
application or job information in
alternative formats available
upon request.
MATH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEACHER - Qualifications: Pos-
sess valid SD Teaching Certifi-
cate for appropriate level. Experi-
ence teaching Native American
children preferred. Must pass
background and drug testing. In-
dian preference observed &
Lakota speaker preferred. Duties:
Maintain individual student
records as required including
three forms of assessment. Con-
fer with parents as needed for
student concerns. Supervise
meals, playground and early
morning duties as assigned. For
a complete job description con-
tact Lisa Bielawski, Principal at
605-823-4235.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is taking applictions for
full-time Douglas County High-
way Superintendent. Must have
valid Class A Driver’s License.
Experience in road/bridge con-
struction/maintenance pre-
ferred. For application contact:
Douglas County Auditor (605)
724-2423.
PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR -
City of Hill City, SD seeks profes-
sional candidate for city opera-
tions. Open until filled. Salary
DOE. Info at hillcitysd.org or
605-574-2300. EOE.
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for Mechanic
and Equipment operators. Good
Benefits. Applications are avail-
able at Courthouse in Bison, SD,
or call 605-244-5629.
LAND FOR SALE
ABSOLUTE BLACK HILLS LAND
AUCTION 40 Acres, On snowmo-
bile Trail 1, Abundant wildlife,
6890í Elevation, Remote land,
Very peaceful! Selling November
1, 2012 www.mcphersonauc-
tion.com.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneaglel-
oghomes.com.
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
SEALED BIDS: CLARK COUNTY,
160 acres, cropland, waterway &
old bldg site, 3 miles N of
Bradley, SD. Bids due by Novem-
ber 2, 2012. Contact Pro Realty,
Pat Kisely, Broker, (605)354-
7653 or http://ProRealtySold.
com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
OTR & DRIVER
OPPORTUNITY
DRIVERS: $1,000 SIGN-ON
BONUS. New Pay Program! *Earn
up to 50 cpm *Home Weekly
*2500+ miles, 95% no-tarp. Must
be Canadian eligible (888) 691-
5705.
FOR SALE
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for SALE
(serious inquires only). Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
ALPINE TRUSS LCC - 24-26-28-
30 garage and 40í ag trusses on
hand. Call Sam for more infor-
mation 605-770-5398 or email:
samalptruss@ gmail.com.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
1 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRO/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
www.freerentersguide.com
THANK YOUS
What a blessing for so many
family, friends and neighbors
sending their love to me by mes-
sages, phone calls, gifts, roses
and the many, many cards I re-
ceived.
A special thanks to the family
that came with balloons, two
cakes and ice cream. Then 80
candles were put on the cakes
and lit. Have you ever tried blow-
ing out that many candles? It
took me about four tries by then
it was getting pretty hot and
smokey. The smoke alarm went
off. It was a day to remember.
God loves you and I do too.
Marjorie Winkowitsch
Congratulations
First, congratulations on
achieveing one of the United
States Department of Educa-
tion’s highest awards as a Na-
tional Blue Ribbon School. We
can see why Wall school was
chose for this award. We feel the
principal, Mr. Sykora, teachers
and staff are outstanding.
Then, many thanks to every
person involved and concerned
at the school board meeting Oct.
10, 2012 in the decision making
it possible for Mason and Mor-
gan Zelfer to come back to the
Wall school system.
And last, but not least, thank
you to the mothers, grandmoth-
ers and friends who have offered
assistance if needed because of
the travel distance.
Great Grandpa & Grandma
to Mason & Morgan
Jessica & Brandon Zelfer
Thank you seems so inade-
quate at a time like this. Thank
you to Pastor Garland for coming
to our house and finding out all
the things we could tell him
about our brother and for the
great service he prepared for
him. Thank you to the Rush Fu-
neral Home for all the comfort
and help in putting our minds at
ease. Thank you to Black Hills
Works for giving Earl such a
good home these last few years.
Also thank you to everyone who
helped, visited, attended the
services, and sent memorials.
Ester & Gene Johannesen
& family
Edith & Aaron Eisenbraun
& family
Eileen & Greg Niederwerder
& family
Eugene & Glenda Helms
& family
Elden & Lillian Helms & family
Many thanks to our family,
relatives and friends who at-
tended, called, sent cards and
had us in their thoughts on our
50th Wedding Anniversary. Each
and every one of you made our
day very special.
The memories, kindness and
thoughtfulness will never be for-
gotten.
God Bless all of you.
Jerry & JoAnn (Fosness)
Sanders
WALL CITy
COUNCIL MEETING
OCTOBER 9, 2012 6:30PM
The Wall City Council met for a regular
meeting October 9, 2012 at 6:30 pm in
the Community Center meeting room.
Members Present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Bill Leonard,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Stan Anderson, Councilman; Jerry
Morgan, Councilman
Carolynn Anderson, Finance Officer; Jim
Kitterman, Public Works; Lindsey Hilde-
brand, Chamber/Assistant FO; Lieutenant
Kraig Wood, Pennington County Sheriff;
Laurie Hindman, Pennington Co.
Courant; Leah Bifulco, Casey Peterson &
Associates; Andrew Ferris, Teen 19;
Steve Wyant; Kent Jordan; Neal Lurz;
Fred Folsom, Seth Green, Waste Con-
nections
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve the agenda. Motion carried.
Lieutenant Kraig Wood presented the po-
lice report. Wood informed the council he
is being deployed to Afghanistan soon;
therefore Sgt. Wardle or Capt. Bruback-
ken will be attending the meetings.
Leah Bifulco from Casey Peterson & As-
sociates presented the 2011 City of Wall
audit. Leah commented one of the
biggest problems is; purchase orders are
not completed before purchases are
made. Finance Officer (FO) Anderson
also informed the council a letter of ap-
proval was received from the SD Legisla-
tive Audit on the 2011 audit. Motion by
Dunker, second by Leonard that the 2011
audit has been accepted and approved.
Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to let Wounded Knee Museum
owner, Steve Wyant, proceed with the
stabilization of his roof following the fire in
his business; however, with the stipulation
proper paperwork is turned into FO An-
derson. Wyant explained the entire build-
ing has been gutted and his next step is
to stabilize the roof. He is hoping for
quick action and to complete the shell
soon. He has always wanted to expand
the building so no interior work will be
done until he has decided whether to ex-
pand or keep the same building design.
At this time building permits were re-
viewed: Lucille Randolph – build new
steps on south door at 203 Creighton
Road; Bart & Tommi Cheney – move in
storage sheds at 508 Spur Drive; Bob
Hamann – replace roof material w/steel at
303 Creighton Road; Vickie Willuwiet –
reside mobile home w/steel siding at 428
Fifth Avenue.
Motion by Hustead, second by Leonard to
approve applications for water utility serv-
ice connections for Echo Valley and Tan-
ner Handcock. Motion carried.
Fred Folsom from Waste Connections
was on hand to answer any questions the
city may have if they move forward with
an ordinance to require commercial busi-
nesses contracting for garbage service.
Presently Waste Connections does not
contract with any other communities that
mandate garbage service for businesses.
The policing aspect of enforcing this ordi-
nance would be the difficult part of the
process, but one option would be locking
dumpsters. Motion by Dunker, second by
M Anderson to appoint S Anderson, Hus-
tead, Morgan to a committee to review
this issue and report back at the next
council meeting. Motion carried.
Folsom also requested that residents
have no alley garbage service from No-
vember 1st to May 15th. Motion by Mor-
gan, second by S Anderson to approve
no residential alley garbage service from
November 1st to May 15th; therefore, all
garbage will be picked up on the street.
Motion carried.
De’s Oil offered contracting for propane
for $1.399 per gallon. Last year 8,000 gal-
lons was contracted. Motion by Leonard,
second by Hustead to contract 8,000 gal-
lons at a price of $1.399 with De’s Oil.
Motion carried.
The Ambulance district has decided to get
insurance coverage with EMS Pak
through Fischer Rounds. FO Anderson
also received a quote for the fire depart-
ment, as the ambulance quote was much
lower than with the previous provider.
The fire department quote came in ap-
proximately $2,000 cheaper with extra
coverage. Motion by S Anderson, second
by Morgan to go with the EMS Pak insur-
ance through Fischer Rounds for the fire
department. Motion carried.
Motion by Morgan, second by S Ander-
son to reduce the required horsepower
from 140 to 120 for the airport snow re-
moval equipment, thus, enable bidders to
meet the 60% made in America guide-
lines by the FAA. Motion carried.
Motion by Morgan, second by S Ander-
son to advertise and open bids for the air-
port snow removal equipment at the No-
vember 8th meeting.
The lease agreement for the Ambulance
District on the building and equipment is
still under review with the Attorney.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve September 6th and Sep-
tember 14th City Council meeting min-
utes. Motion carried. Note: Minutes are
due immediately following approval from
the membership.
Motion by Hustead, motion by M Ander-
son to approve July, August and Septem-
ber fire department meeting minutes.
Motion carried. Note: Minutes are due im-
mediately following approval from the
membership.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve June, July, and August ambu-
lance meeting minutes. Motion carried.
Motion by Leonard, second by M Ander-
son to approve paying application request
#1 for $4,387.23 on the Airport terminal
project. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve the remaining October City of
Wall bills. Motion carried with Morgan ab-
staining on the Dakota Mill bill.
AIR HON LTD, av gas, 61.48; Carolynn
Anderson, mileage for conference, 88.80;
BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE, headlamp
for pickup, 7.49; BROSZ ENGINEERING,
INC, engineering on Airport building,
1,417.54; CASEY PETERSON &
ASSOC, LTD, 2011 audit wrap up,
3,806.45; CETEC, engineering on sewer
project, 2,418.63; JEFFREY CLARK,
SDWWA conference fees, 70.00;
CROWN OIL, diesel fuel for Well #7 gen-
erator, ,230.72; CUSTOM ENVIRON-
MENTS INC, Pay request Application #1-
airport building, 4,387.23; DAKOTA
BACKUP, backup service, 165.69;
DAKOTA BUSINESS CENTER, copier
contract, 40.00; DAKOTA MILL &
GRAIN, chemical for spraying, 85.00;
DE'S OIL & PROPANE, propane contract,
11,192.00; DE'S OIL & PROPANE, 2 front
tires on 1 ton pickup, 370.20; DVL FIRE
& SAFETY, inspect fire extinguisher,
382.00; ENERGY LABORATORIES,
water testing, 102.50; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, ach fees, 12.30; FIRST IN-
TERSTATE BANK, sales tax, 480.06;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK - LOAN, fire
truck loan, 31,018.21; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, office supplies at Office
Max, 64.54; FLEXIBLE PIPE TOOL
COMPANY, nozzles for sewer machine,
174.91; GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLO-
GIES, security monitoring, 1,854.93;
GOLDEN WEST TELE, CC phone,
452.05; GUNDERSON, PALMER,
GOODSELL, legal fees, 1,443.60; DAVID
L. HAHN, mileage for conference, 88.80;
HAWKINS, INC, water treatment,
1,293.44; HD SUPPLY WATERWORKS,
meter head for Well #6, 736.74; JIM KIT-
TERMAN, insurance reimbursement,
414.61; BILL LEONARD, mileage for con-
ference, 88.80; EARL McCallum, water
deposit refund, 129.10; ONE CALL
STYSTEMS, INC., locate requests, 9.99;
PENN. COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE,
4th Qrt budget, 25,017.50; PENNING-
TON COUNTY COURANT, publishing,
368.76; RAPID DELIVERY INC, delivery
fees, 8.40; SD DEPARTMENT OF REV-
ENUE, water testing, 1,722.00; S.D.
PUBLIC ASSURANCE ALLIANCE, insur-
ance, 17,410.12; S.D. SOLID WASTE
MNGE. ASSOC, membership for 2012-
2013, 100.00; SD DEPT OF TRANS-
PORTATION, appraisel for Airport project,
1,660.16; SERVALL UNIFORM, CC rugs,
53.49; TLC ELECTRIC, INC, service call
for BB field lights, 55.00; WALKER RE-
FUSE, garbage service contract,
7,779.07; WALL BADLANDS AREA
CHAMBER, BBB funds, 2,269.54; WALL
BUILDING CENTER & CONST, supplies,
247.01; WALL CELEBRATION COMMIT-
TEE`, budgeted funds, 1,570.00; WEST
RIVER ELEC, electricity, 13,788.56
; WEST RIVER ELECTRIC ASSOC, INC,
Main St Loan, 7,500.00; WEST
RIVER/LYMAN-JONES RURAL, water
purchases, 3,500.00.
TOTAL: 147,137.42
Gross Salaries – September 30, 2012:
Gross Salaries: Adm. - $5,533.04; PWD -
$9,520.08
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ins.,
$357.10; HEALTH POOL, Health/Life In-
surance, $4,180.42; METLIFE, Employee
Supplemental, $25.00; SDRS, Employee
Retirement, $1,754.26; SDRS-SRP, Em-
ployee Supp Retirement plan, $150.00;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $3,140.03.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve October Fire Department
bills excluding the SD Public Assurance
Alliance bill for $9,681.00. Motion carried.
OCTOBER 2012 FIRE DEPT BILLS
ALERT ALL CORP, fire safety material,
272.00; BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE, fuel
pump repair on Tender, 413.57; BLACK
HILLS FIBERGLASS, firefighter gloves,
126.00; DAIRY QUEEN, food, 10.56;
DE'S OIL & PROPANE, oil-filters on Res-
cue unit, 127.04; DVL FIRE & SAFETY,
inspect fire extinguisher, 119.00; FIRST
INTERSTATE BANK, Rapid Diesel-auto
repair on Rescue, 730.12; FORWARD
DISTRIBUTING, glass cleaner, 25.20;
GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLOGIES, se-
curity monitoring, 107.96; GOLDEN
WEST TELE, phone-internet, 127.68; M
& T FIRE AND SAFETY, pump testing on
Engine #1 & #2, 3,749.94; MOYLE PE-
TROLEUM, fuel, 21.74; WALL DRUG
STORE, dunk balls for Celebration,
71.52; WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity,
133.31.
TOTAL: 6,035.64
Motion by Dunker, second by S Anderson
to approve October Ambulance bills. Mo-
tion carried.
OCTOBER 2012 AMBULANCE BILLS
AT & T, cell phone, 46.36; CROWN OIL,
diesel fuel, 925.00; DE'S OIL &
PROPANE, oil/filter for W1, 179.75; DVL
FIRE & SAFETY, inspect fire extinguisher,
178.50; MIKE ERZ, food for runs to RC,
49.09; FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, bat-
tery for power cot, 127.78; GOLDEN
WEST TECHNOLOGIES, security moni-
toring, 323.88; LUCILLE HOLSETHER,
ink cartridge & toner, 113.98; BOYD KIT-
TERMAN, food for runs to RC, 18.62;
Matheson Tri-Gas Inc, oxygen supplies,
189.30; MARGE PAHL, foor dor runs to
RC, 50.17; POSTMASTER, stamps,
90.00; RAPID CITY FIRE DEPT, ALS
runs, 750.00; RAPID CITY REGIONAL
HOSPITAL, supplies, 465.24; S.D. PUB-
LIC ASSURANCE ALLIANCE, insurance,
3,931.00; WALL DRUG STORE, medical
supplies, 125.48; WALL FOOD CENTER,
supplies, 129.60; WEST RIVER ELEC,
electricity, 153.25.
TOTAL: 7,847.00
Gross Salaries – September 30, 2012:
Gross Salaries: $7,701.75
FIRST WESTERN BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $1,383.72
Motion by Morgan, second by Hustead to
approve October Library bills. Motion
carried.
OCTOBER 2012 LIBRARy BILLS
DVL FIRE & SAFETY, inspect fire extin-
guisher, 9.00; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, Upstart-Demco-books from Ama-
zon, 91.46; GOLDEN WEST TECH-
NOLOGIES, security monitoring, 107.96;
GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone, 36.46;
PENNINGTON COUNTY COURANT,
newspaper subscription, 37.10; S.D.
PUBLIC ASSURANCE ALLIANCE, insur-
ance, 775.00; WALL FOOD CENTER,
supplies, 13.76; WEST RIVER ELEC,
electricity, 42.20.
TOTAL: 1,112.94
Gross Salaries – September 30, 2012:
Gross Salaries: $688.50
FIRST WESTERN BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $91.57
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
approve October Cemetery bills. Motion
carried.
OCTOBER 9, 2012 CEMETERy BILLS
SD PUBLIC ASSURANCE ALLIANCE,
insurance, 130.00.
TOTAL: 130.00
At this time the On-call schedule, Com-
munity Center report, Compensatory re-
port, Wall Health Service reports were re-
viewed.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to waive the fee for the Library/Food
Pantry table at the craft fair on November
11th. Motion carried.
Motion by Morgan, second by Dunker to
waive the fee for the Haakon County
Crooners to host a Christmas concert in
the Grand Hall on December 2nd. Motion
carried.
FO Anderson collected useful information
at the municipal league conference and
also acquired a codebook to follow con-
cerning the cleanup of properties. She will
give comments and recommendations
when she has time to review it.
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
approve FO Anderson attends a free Risk
Management Workshop in Rapid City on
October 11th. Motion carried.
Public Works Items: The motor in the
pump at Well 7 has gone down and
needs repair; public works will check to
see if the cause could be “dirty power”; ei-
ther too high or too low of voltage. This
could cause the motor to burn out.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve renewal of a 3-year agree-
ment with DOT; for the City to perform
snowplow removal activities on the
frontage road. Motion carried.
A quote was received for $399 to do an
inspection on the backhoe, not including
an oil change to determine needed re-
pairs. Expenses for any needed repairs
were not included in the budget for
CY2013. The backhoe is currently used
very little: occasional water repairs, etc.
The consensus was to keep it in inven-
tory; use only if necessary and look at it
next spring for budget purposes.
Issues with no signs or restrictions on
Kelly Avenue were addressed. There was
concern that the city doesn’t own the
property that the signs would be control-
ling. Possible signage would be “private
road and no thru traffic” on city property
at both ends of Gloria Street. A “Dead
End” sign could be placed at the Kelly Ave
entrance off of Stone Drive. Motion by
Dunker, second by Hustead that Dunker
and S Anderson meet with landowner and
install signs if he agrees. Motion carried.
One landowner has concern with signing
the construction and sewer easements
needed to proceed with the sewer project.
The original landowner did not sign sewer
easements when the sewer main was
originally constructed. The landowner
has someone interested in purchasing
land to build a shop but with an easement
and sewer line that wouldn’t be possible.
The landowner would like the city to pur-
chase the property. Other landowners
will need to approve easements before
any kind of transaction can be made.
Dunker and M Anderson met with parks
committee, with a list of items needing to
be accomplished at the park. Most are
general maintenance items and can be
completed by the public works depart-
ment. The list included staining the play-
ground equipment, repairing park
benches, painting the bathrooms, repair-
ing the sprinkler system and the reinstal-
lation of the volleyball court.
The renter of the Wall Discount Outlet has
requested to install a fence on the back-
side of the property and has completed
the building permit application. Public
Works Director Clark was unable to reach
the property owner, Tim Eisenbraun, to
see if he approved of the fence. There
was concern that property lines may not
be accurate and are infringed upon by
neighboring property owners. FO Ander-
son will talk with DC Scott, the surveyor,
to resolve this issue of property lines
being incorrect. The building permit will
be addressed at the next council meeting.
The next City Council meeting will be No-
vember 8th at 6:30pm.
Meeting was adjourned at 8:27pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published October 24, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $156.60.
NOTICE OF SALE
OF COUNTy SURPLUS PROPERTy
(TAX DEED PROPERTy)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the fol-
lowing surplus property will be offered for
sale at public auction in the Commission-
ers’ Meeting Room at the Pennington
County Courthouse Annex in Rapid City,
South Dakota on November 1, 2012, at
10:00 a.m. There is a 20% non-refund-
able earnest money deposit from the
buyer at the conclusion of the sale. The
buy will be required to pay in full, by the
end of the day.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE NORTH-
WEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWES
QUARTER (NW ¼ NW ¼) OF SECTION
24 TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH OF RANGE 1
EAST OF THE BLACK HILLS MERID-
IAN, PENNINGTON COUNTY, SOUTH
DAKOTA. (ID 57890)
s/Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$18.19.
INVITATION FOR
BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the Fi-
nance Officer of the City of Wall, South
Dakota. 501 Main Street, PO Box 314,
Wall, South Dakota, until 2:15 PM (Moun-
tain Time) on the 5th day of November,
2012 and then be publicly opened and
read, for furnishing all equipment, labor,
and materials as set forth in the specifi-
cations and performing all work, inciden-
tal thereto for Acquisition of a 120 HP Non
Utility Wheel Tractor with attachments in-
cluding a Snow Blower, Front End Loader
with bucket, Broom, and Blade, AIP 3-46-
0069-04-2011, Wall Airport Improve-
ments, Wall, South Dakota.
Primary Work: The City of Wall plans to
acquire a Non Utility Wheel Tractor with a
minimum of 120 HP. This Tractor will be
the power source for attachments, which
are also part of this bid, including a snow
blower, a loader with bucket, a blade, and
a rotary broom. Bidders should submit
quotes for the tractor and all specified ac-
cessories.
1. Specifications: Copies of the Specifica-
tions are available for inspection at:
Office of Brosz Engineering, Inc., 3561
Whitewood Road, or P.O. Box 636, Stur-
gis, South Dakota 57785 (605) 347-2722.
Specifications may be obtained on the
Brosz Engineering website at
www.broszeng.com at no charge. One
hard copy may be obtained at the office
of Brosz Engineering located at 3561
Whitewood Road, Sturgis, SD 57785 at
no charge to South Dakota Contractors.
2. Bid Guarantee: Each bid must be ac-
companied by a certified check, cashier's
check or draft in the amount of five per-
cent (5%) of the total bid, and drawn on a
solvent State or National Bank, or a ten
percent (10%) Bid Bond issued by a
surety authorized to do business in the
State of South Dakota and payable to the
City of Wall, Wall, South Dakota.
3. Contract Bonds: Separate Payment
and Performance Bonds guaranteeing
faithful performance of the Contract and
payment of all labor, materials, rentals,
etc., will be required for an amount equal
to one hundred percent (100%) of the
amount of the Contract. All bonds must be
issued or co-signed by a licensed resi-
dent agent of South Dakota.
4. Award of Contract: The Contract and
Agreement will be executed with the City
of Wall, SD and the acceptable Low Bid-
der. The right is reserved, as the interest
of the City of Wall, to reject any and all
bids, to waive informality in bids received,
and to accept or reject any items of any
bid, unless such bid is qualified by spe-
cific limitation.
6. Nondiscrimination (EEO): The pro-
posed contract is under and subject to
Executive Order 11246 of September 24,
1965, as amended, and to the Equal Op-
portunity Clause.
7. Civil Rights Act: South Dakota Depart-
ment of Transportation of Pierre, South
Dakota in accordance with Title VI of the
Civil Rights Acts of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42
U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49,
Code of Federal Regulations, Depart-
ment of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office
of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimina-
tion in Federally-assisted programs of the
Department of Transportation issued pur-
suant to such Act, hereby notifies all bid-
ders that it will affirmatively insure that in
any contract entered into pursuant to this
advertisement, disadvantaged business
enterprises will be afforded full opportu-
nity to submit in response to this invitation
and will not be discriminated against on
the grounds of race, color, or national ori-
gin in consideration for an award.
8. Affirmative Action: A Contractor having
50 or more non-construction employees
who may be awarded a contract of
$50,000 or more and subcontractors hav-
ing 50 or more non-construction employ-
ees and who may be awarded a subcon-
tract of $50,000 or more will be required
to maintain an affirmative action program,
the standards for which are contained in
the advertised specifications.
9. Non-segregated Facilities: Contractor
will be required to submit a certification of
non-segregated facilities from all Subcon-
tractors for subcontracts exceeding
$10,000.
10. Bidders and sub-bidders: Required to
comply with Title 29, Code of Federal
Regulations (1518, 36 F>R> 7340) prom-
ulgated by the United States Secretary of
Labor, in accordance with Section 107 of
the contract work hours and safety stan-
dards act, (82 Stat. 96) not requiring any
laborer or mechanic to work in surround-
ings or under working conditions which
are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous
to their health and safety.
11. Contractors: Subject to the Require-
ments for Affirmative Action to Ensure
Equal Employment Opportunity (Execu-
tive Order 11246, as amended), provi-
sions of which are contained in the adver-
tised specifications.
12. Award of Contract: The Contract and
Agreement will be executed with City of
Wall, in Wall, SD and the acceptable Low
Bidder. The right is reserved, as the inter-
est of City of Wall, in Wall, SD, may re-
quire, to reject any and all bids, to waive
informality in bids received, and to accept
or reject any items of any bid, unless such
bid is qualified by specific limitation.
13. Materials Preference: By statutory au-
thority, preference will be given to materi-
als, products and supplies found or pro-
duced within the State of South Dakota.
14. DBE Requirements: The Contractor
will insure Disadvantaged Business En-
terprises as defined in 49 CFR, Part 23,
have the maximum opportunity to partici-
pate in the performance of contracts and
subcontracts. The DBE project goal per-
centage is noted in the specification doc-
uments and the contractor is required to
complete the DBE Assurance and DBE
form SDDOT (OA) 289-A, 2-18-92, both
attached to project proposal. The contrac-
tor who is determined to be low bidder will
provide DBE Participation dollar amounts
as required by the Specifications and rea-
sonable acceptance "Good Faith Effort"
documentation, to be submitted no later
than 3 working days after the bid opening
to be considered an eligible bidder.
15. The Contractor will certify that he and
any of his Subcontractors meet the re-
quirements of 49 CFR, Part 29, regarding
debarment, suspension, ineligibility and
voluntary exclusion as further described
in these specifications.
16. The Contractor will certify that he and
his Subcontractors will comply with the 49
CFR, 30.17, regarding Foreign Trade Re-
strictions as further noted in project spec-
ifications.
17. The Contractor will certify that he and
his Subcontractors will comply with Sec-
tion 1352, title 31, U.S. Code prohibiting
the use of federal funds for lobbying and
influencing federal employees.
18. The Contractor will certify that he and
his Subcontractors will comply with "BUY
AMERICAN CERTIFICATION (JAN.
1991)" as further noted in project specifi-
cations.
Attest: ____________________
Title: _____________________
(SEAL)
Published October 18 & 25, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $134.51.
NOTICE OF
GENERAL
ELECTION
PENNINGTON COUNTy,
SOUTH DAKOTA
A General Election will be held on Tues-
day, November 6, 2012, in all the voting
precincts in Pennington County.
The election polls will be open from 7:00
A.M. to 7:00 P.M. local time on the day of
the election.
The Polling Place in each precinct of Pen-
nington County will be as follows:
1-1 First Assembly Church, 4905 S
Highway 16, Rapid City, 57701
1-2 St Paul's Lutheran School, 835 E
Fairmont Blvd, Rapid City, 57701
1-3 Grandview School Gym, 3301
Grandview Dr, Rapid City, 57701
1-4 West River Elec Assn, 3250 E
Highway 44, Rapid City, 57703
2-1 Rapid City Public Library, 610
Quincy St, Rapid City, 57701
2-2 Bethel Assembly-Atrium, 1202 N
Maple Ave, Rapid City, 57701
2-3 Walter Taylor 4H Bldg-Fairgrounds,
601 Centre St, Rapid City, 57701
2-4 South Middle School Gym, 2 Indi-
ana St, Rapid City, 57701
2-5 Rapid City Public Library, 610
Quincy St, Rapid City, 57701
3-1 Jackson Heights Highrise, 1805 W
Fulton, Rapid City, 57702
3-2 Calvary Lutheran Church, 5311
Sheridan Lake Rd, Rapid City, 57702
3-3 Southwest Middle School Gym,
4501 Park Dr, Rapid City, 57702
3-4 Meadowbrook School Gym, 3125
W Flormann, Rapid City, 57702
4-1 Horace Mann School Gym, 902
Anamosa St, Rapid City, 57701
4-2 Bethel Assembly-Atrium, 1202 N
Maple Ave, Rapid City, 57701
4-3 Lakota Homes Community Ctr,
2430 Gnugnuska Dr, Rapid City, 57701
4-4 General Beadle School Gym, 10
Van Buren St, Rapid City, 57701
4-5 Atonement Lutheran Church, 2430
Gnugnuska Dr, Rapid City, 57701
5-1 Horace Mann School Gym, 902
Anamosa St, Rapid City, 57701
5-2 Canyon Lake Senior Center, 2900
Canyon Lake Dr, Rapid City, 57702
5-3 Pinedale School Gym, 4901 W
Chicago, Rapid City, 57702
5-4 West Park Apartments, 1018 11th
Street, Rapid City, 57701
BE Box Elder VFD, 120 E Box Elder
Rd, Box Elder, 57719
CA Caputa Community Hall, 23501
Main St, Caputa, 57725
CL Canyon Lake Senior Center, 2900
Canyon Lake Dr, Rapid City, 57702
CR Creighton Community Hall, 21939
Creighton Rd, Creighton, 57729
DT Doty VFD, 8770 Nemo Rd, Rapid
City, 57702
EL Box Elder VFD, 120 E Box Elder
Rd, Box Elder, 57719
HC Hill City Senior Citizen Center, 227
Walnut Ave, Hill City, 57745
HR RC Christian School at Hart Ranch,
23757 Arena Dr, Rapid City, 57702
JS Johnson Siding Community Hall,
12270 W Hwy 44, Rapid City, 57702
Ky Keystone Community Center, 1101
Madill St, Keystone, 57751
NH Atonement Lutheran Church, 602
Auburn Dr, Rapid City, 57701
NU New Underwood Community Hall,
500 S A Ave, New Underwood, 57761
QU Quinn Community Center, 37 Main
St, Quinn, 57775
RH Rochford Fire District, 11701
Rochford Rd, Rochford, 57778
RK Rockerville VFD, 13720 S Hwy 16,
Rapid City, 57702
RV Rapid Valley School Gym, 2601
Covington St, Rapid City, 57703
SC Scenic Community Hall, Old
School House, Scenic, 57780
VF Rapid Valley Fire VFD, 5500 E
Highway 44, Rapid City, 57703
VS Rapid Valley Sanitary & Water,
4611 Teak Dr, Rapid City, 57703
VV Valley View School Gym, 4840
Homestead St, Rapid City, 57703
WL Wall Community Center, 501 Main
St, Wall, 57790
WP Whispering Pines VFD, 7980
Clarkson Rd, Rapid City, 57702
WS Wasta Community Center, A Street,
Wasta, 57791
Voters with disabilities may contact the
Pennington County Auditor’s Office for in-
formation and special assistance in ab-
sentee voting or polling place accessibil-
ity.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published October 25, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $38.44.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
John Majchrzak has applied to amend the
existing Planned Unit Development for
High Country Guest Ranch located on
Tract A less High Country Ranch Subdi-
vision and less Right-of-Way, Ray Smith
Placer MS 995, Section 15, T1S, R4E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota,
12138 Ray Smith Drive, in accordance
with Section 213 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Nina McBride has applied for a Rezone
to rezone 3.046 acres from General Agri-
culture District to Low Density Residential
District located on the following metes
and bounds: A parcel of land located in
NE1/4 of SE1/4 of Section 15, T2N, R6E,
BHM and in Lot B of SE1/4 of SE1/4 of
Section 15, T2N, R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, said parcel of land
is described as follows: Beginning at NE
corner of said parcel from whence the
E1/4 corner of said Section 15 bears N
13° 13’ 34” E a distance of 1188.44’;
thence S 24° 15’ 00” E a distance of
79.85’; thence S 8° 22’ 00” E a distance
of 199.97’; thence along the arc of a
curve to the left whose angle is 22° 20’
44” and whose radius is 418.80’ a dis-
tance of 163.33’; thence S 72° 34’ 26” W
a distance of 374.19’; thence N 6° 00’ 00”
W a distance of 254.55’; thence N 73° 03’
00” E a distance of 505.00’ to the Point of
Beginning. Said parcel of land contains
3.046 acres more or less, located at
10000 Nemo Road, in accordance with
Sections 207 and 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 13th day of November 2012. At this
time, any person interested may appear
and show cause, if there be any, why
such requests should or should not be
granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published October 25, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $24.78.
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Public Notice
Regarding
“Thank Yous”
submitted as
“Letters to the Editor”
The position of this newspaper to accept “Thank Yous”, whether
directed to a person, any institution, affiliation or entity for
placement in anything other than the “Cards of Thanks” column
located in the Classified Section of this newspaper:
THERE WILL BE A CHARGE!
Letters of thanks or congratulations shall be construed as adver-
tising and will be inserted for placement in the proper location
of this newspaper.
PLEASE ASK IF IN DOUBT
If you are in doubt about whether material sent in or brought in
to this newspaper, be sure to ask for assistance at the counter or
please leave a phone number so that you may be contacted. There
is a difference between news and advertising.
Pennington County Courant
PO Box 435, 212 4th Ave., Wall, SD 57790
(605) 279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2012: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS
CALF SALE YEARLINGS: 10:00 A.M. CALVES: 10:30
A.M. (MT) EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING:
10,000 HEAD
YEARLINGS: NI=NO IMPLANTS, HR=HOME RAISED
BIERWAGEN– 12 BLK HFRS..........................................................................950#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL,
ASV=AGE & SOURCE VERIFIED
RAPIDCREEK RANCH– 650 REDANGHFRS; FS,NI .........................500-550#
PERAULT RANCH– 525 BLK X CLVS; FS NI .........................................500-525#
BUCHHOLZ & RISLOV – 475 BLK & BWF STRS; FS, WEANED
50 DAYS .................................................................................................575-650#
EISENBRAUN& EISENBRAUN– 450 MOSTLY BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......450-500#
JONES RANCH– 420 BLK CLVS; FS NI ..................................................500-550#
SHUCK BROTHERS – 400 REDLIMX CLVS; FS,NI..............................400-525#
TRASK FAMILY – 350 BLK STRS; FS,NI ........................................................500#
FIELDS – 300 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI,AN,ASV.........................................500-600#
SCHOFIELDBROTHERS – 250 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ..........................500-600#
BOOMER – 250 REDANGUS CLVS; FS,NI ............................................400-500#
RIGGINS – 240 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,ALL HFRS INTOWN..........500-550#
CROSBIE – 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................525-550#
WINK CATTLE CO– 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS....................................475-550#
CONSIGNMENT – 200 FANCY BLK HFRS; FS,NI .................................450-525#
ROGERS – 180 BLK X CLVS; NI...............................................................500-550#
MANSFIELD& MANSFIELD– 175 BLK STRS; FS ........................................550#
LONG– 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................450-550#
WHITE – 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS........................................................500-550#
CHASE RANCH– 160 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................550-600#
KJERSTAD– 160 BLK CLVS; FS...............................................................450-550#
AMIOTTE – 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .............................................500-550#
KEFFELER – 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.............................................450-550#
DAHL – 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,ASV..................................................500-600#
O’CONNELL – 135 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................500-525#
KIEFFER – 125 REDANGCHAR X & A FEWBLK CLVS; FS,NI..................500#
HEBB – 120 BLK CLVS; FS .......................................................................450-550#
RAWHOUSER – 120 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ............................................500-600#
KETELSON– 120 BLK STRS; FS,NI.........................................................450-550#
KETELSEN– 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS..................................................550-625#
FERGUSON– 110 BWF & HERF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................500#
KILNESS RANCH– 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................450-550#
CROWLEY – 100 BLK CLVS; FS......................................................................400#
KETELSON& BEUG– 95 BLK STRS; FS,NI...................................................600#
CARLSON& ROMERO– 90 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..............................................525#
SHARP – 90 BLK CLVS; FS .......................................................................500-600#
BRUCHRANCH– 90 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..................................................500-550#
ECKERT – 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................650#
STOUT – 75 BLK STRS; FS, WEANED60 DAYS ............................................650#
WILLERT – 70 RED& CHAR X CLVS; FS ...............................................550-600#
MORELAND– 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........................................450-550#
GEIGLE & GEIGLE – 65 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..............................................550-600#
DENNIS – 65 BLK & REDCLVS; FS.........................................................525-550#
ROSETH– 60 BLK CLVS; FS............................................................................600#
ENNEN– 60 BLK STRS; FS,NI.........................................................................600#
SKOGEN– 55 BLK & REDLIMX CLVS; FS,NI,AN................................500-550#
VOGELGESANG– 55 REDCLVS.............................................................500-550#
CLEMENTS – 50 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI.....................................................550#
ELSHERE – 50 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................500-575#
MCDANIEL – 50 BLK STRS; FS.......................................................................550#
DART – 40 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV............................................................550-600#
GEIGLE – 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; NI.........................................................350-400#
HEBB – 40 BLK CLVS; FS .........................................................................450-550#
HUETHER – 30 BLK & REDCLVS; FS,NI ...............................................450-500#
HEEB & HEEB – 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI......................................................500-525#
FISHER – 27 REDCLVS; FS,NI ................................................................550-600#
MICKELSON– 25 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...........................................500-600#
HENRICKSEN– 23 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,WEANED ......................350-550#
MAUDE – 20 RED& BLK LIMCLVS; FS,NI,WEANED..........................400-500#
PRICE – 20 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................500-600#
HANSON– 20 BLK & BWF STRS; FA,NI,AN,WEANED...............................600#
HAUK – 18 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................500-550#
HUGHES – 18 BLK CLVS..........................................................................750-800#
SMITH– 16 RED& BLK STRS; FS,NI......................................................500-550#
PAULSON– 12 HERF STRS; FS,NI ..........................................................400-550#
BRAVE BULL CREEK – 10 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................450#
VANDERVOORT RANCH– 7 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI .............................600-650#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETHAT
605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT.
SALE. SALE TIME: 10:00 A.M. MT
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED
HEIFER SALE & WEIGH-UP COWS, BULL, & HFRT SALE. WEI-
HGUPS: 8:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 11:00 A.M. (MT) EARLY CONSIGN-
MENTS: ESTIMATING 4000 HEAD.
PRODUCTIONSALE:
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL – 60 BLK & BWF COMING 4 YR OLD COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-28 FOR 55 DAYS
DISPERSIONS:
LARRY SMITH– “COMPLETE DISPERSIONOF 480 HD” – 80 BLK AI’DHFRS;
BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 200 BLK 3 TO 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 150
BLK 6 YR OLD TO SOLID MOUTHCOWS; BRED:BLK; CLV: 3-20
50 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
MORELL LIVESTOCK CO. – “DISPERSION OF 3 YR OLDS” – 150 BLK & BWF
COMING 3 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLAIRE BROS; CLV: 3-10 FOR 60 DAYS; 25 HERF
COMING3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: SONS OF PREDESTINED; CLV: 3-10 FOR 60 DAYS
PAUL SCHNOSE – “COMPLETE DISPERSION” – 130 BLK 4 YR OLD TO BRO-
KEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
TIM & DENISE NELSON – “AGE DISPERSION” – 60 BLK COMING 3 YR OLD
COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1 FOR 30 DAYS
BREDHEIFERS:
KENNY MATT – 190 FIRST CROSS BWF ULTRASOUND HFRS; BRED; LBW BLK;
CLV: 2-27 (SORTED INTO 1 WEEK CLVG PERIODS)
JONMILLAR– 135 FANCY BREDHFRS (1000-1050#); BRED: SITZ DASHSON; 50
HDAI’DHFRS; CLV:2-15 FOR 3 DAYS; 80 HDOF BULL BREDULTRASOUNDHFRS;
40 HD CLV: 3-1 FOR 20 DAYS & 40 HD CLV: 4-1 FOR 20 DAYS
TODDMORTENSON – 100 BLK & BWF AI’D HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 2-15
(CLEAN UP WITHBLK BULL 3-1)
MCDANIEL BROTHERS – 100 BLK ULTRASOUND HFRS; BRED:O’NEILL BLK
ANG; CLV:3-6 (SORTED INTO TWO 15 DAY CLVG PERIODS)
MICKEY SIMONS – 75 BLK ULTRASOUND HFRS (HOME RAISED); BRED: BLK;
CLV: 3-1
JOHNMCGRIFF – 75 BLK HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1
JERRY GRIMES – 30 RED ANG HFRS (HOME RAISED); BRED: LBW RED ANG;
CLV: 4-24 FOR 20 DAYS
WOODRANCH– 25 BLK&REDHFRS; BRED: REDANG; CLV: 3-15 FOR 60 DAYS
DAVE BERRY – 22 RED & BLK ANG AI’D HFRS; BRED: RED ANG; CLV: 3-10
GABE GROPPER – 20 REDANG HFRS; BRED: LBW REDANG; CLV: 3-20 FOR 50
DAYS
SCOTT EDOFF – 18 BLK ANG LHX HFRS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10 FOR 45 DAYS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
DON RAVELLETTE – 10 FANCY BLK ANG HFRS (1050#); AI BRED: DL INCEN-
TIVE 228; PASTURE BRED: GREENMOUNTAINFRONTMAN; CLV: 3-1 FOR45 DAYS
STOCK COWS & BROKENMOUTHCOWS:
BUCHHOLZ & RISLOV – 250 BLK SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-20
KJERSTAD LIVESTOCK – 225 BLK 5 TO 6 YR OLD COWS & BROKEN MOUTH
COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-15 FOR 45 DAYS
WOOD RANCH – 90 BLK & RED 3 TO 10 YR OLD COWS; BLK BRED: BLK; RED
BRED: RED; CLV: 3-15 FOR 75 DAYS
MARVINCOLEMAN– 75 BLKCOMING 3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-25
FOR 60 DAYS
LEE BALDWIN – 50 BLK 7 TO 9 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 4-1 FOR 55
DAYS
GALE BRUNS – 45 BLK COMING 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 2-25
ALVIN SIMMONS – 45 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10
KNUTSONRANCH– 40 REDANG7 TO8 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: REDANG; CLV:
4-1
SHANNON GARTNER & FLOYD KJERSTAD – 40 BLK 3 YR OLD COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-1
SCOTT PHILLIPS – 40 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-25
JOE CARLEY – 35 BLK COMING 3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20; 30 BLK
BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20
PETE REINERT – 30 BLK COMING 3 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-10 FOR
60 DAYS
CASEY BRINK – 30 BLK & BWF 3 YR OLD TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 3-20 FOR 60 DAYS
SHAWN FREELAND – 25 BLK 3 TO 5 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; 4-1 FOR 30
DAYS
JIMWILSEY – 25 BLK & BWF SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK;
CLV: 4-1 FOR 45 DAYS
JERRY WILLERT – 20 BLK BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-20 FOR
50 DAYS
JOHNSTABEN– 16 RED SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTHCOWS; BRED: RED; CLV:
3-1
GARY HERRINGTON – 15 BLK BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 3-1
FOR 60 DAYS
BLAZYTRANCH– 12 BLK&RED3 TO7 YR OLDCOWS; BRED: REDANG; CLV:
2-28 FOR 70 DAYS
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETHAT 605-859-2577
OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE
& REGULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PAS
TEURELLA, 7WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CAT
TLE SALE & THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2: NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 31, & NOV. 7.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
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859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. 2S, 2DJ2
We Þod 1Þe b1gges1 so1e ue´ve ever Þod
Þere on Tuesdog, Oo1ober 2S. MorKe1
s1oged oompe1111ve 1o 1Þe verg end. 9,SDD
oo111e Þere ne×1 Tuesdog.
YEARLINGS:
THOMAS SIMONS - WHITE OWL
315 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 775=........$166.00
223 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 698=........$166.25
JOHN & DEDE LONG - UNION CENTER
335 ......................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 776=........$151.00
149 ......................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 706=........$149.50
RUTH & ISAACS - FAITH
16 ..........................................DLK HFFS 923=........$130.50
22 ..........................................DLK HFFS 753=........$143.25
JUSTIN LONG - UNION CENTER
10..................................DLK OPEN HFFS 748=........$142.00
RON ADAM - STURGIS
31 ................................FED & DLK STFS 722=........$154.00
CALVES:
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
639 ........................................FED STFS 500=........$184.25
196 ........................................FED STFS 587=........$174.25
237 ........................................FED STFS 442=........$190.75
JUDY DALY & STEVE DALY - MIDLAND
81...........................................DLK STFS 607=........$170.00
90...........................................DLK STFS 513=........$174.25
CARLEY RANCH - MILESVILLE
96...........................................DLK STFS 583=........$173.00
114.........................................DLK STFS 506=........$176.75
114 ........................................DLK HFFS 500=........$154.75
47 ..........................................DLK HFFS 437=........$162.50
LYLE HARTSHORN - HERMOSA
27...........................................DLK STFS 505=........$180.50
LEONARD & NATHAN KJERSTAD - QUINN
103.........................................DLK STFS 552=........$173.75
108.........................................DLK STFS 488=........$181.25
111 ........................................DLK HFFS 515=........$155.75
76 ..........................................DLK HFFS 459=........$155.75
CREW CATTLE CO - PHILIP
91.........................................CHAF STFS 610=........$168.25
88...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 543=........$170.50
107 ......................................CHAF HFFS 566=........$157.50
71 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 509=........$154.00
PINNEY RANCH - PHILIP
93...........................................DLK STFS 533=........$173.50
32...........................................DLK STFS 420=........$197.00
60 ..........................................DLK HFFS 475=........$155.50
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 363=........$171.50
SETH THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
49...........................................DLK STFS 517=........$173.50
9.............................................DLK STFS 427=........$190.00
28 ..........................................DLK HFFS 458=........$161.00
5 ............................................DLK HFFS 396=........$163.00
BENNY BACHAND - STURGIS
108.........................................DLK STFS 528=........$173.50
58...........................................DLK STFS 447=........$183.25
48 ..........................................DLK HFFS 467=........$161.25
18 ..........................................DLK HFFS 391=........$166.50
LYLE O'ROURKE - INTERIOR
31...........................................DLK STFS 501=........$178.00
16...........................................DLK STFS 375=........$196.00
50 ..........................................DLK HFFS 460=........$154.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 358=........$175.00
PATTI OLIC - SCENIC
88...........................................DLK STFS 519=........$173.50
13...........................................DLK STFS 415=........$199.00
67 ..........................................DLK HFFS 491=........$156.00
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 378=........$172.00
NEIL FANNING ANGUS - VETAL
58...........................................DLK STFS 541=........$173.25
26 ..........................................DLK HFFS 474=........$150.75
RHODEN & WILCOX - UNION CENTER
113.........................................DLK STFS 516=........$177.50
35...........................................DLK STFS 457=........$181.50
100.........................................DLK STFS 589=........$168.50
DAVE CUNY & FAMILY - BUFFALO GAP
110.........................................DLK STFS 568=........$169.75
253.........................................DLK STFS 506=........$181.50
129.........................................DLK STFS 422=........$194.50
109 ........................................DLK HFFS 507=........$156.00
127 ........................................DLK HFFS 450=........$163.50
82 ..........................................DLK HFFS 385=........$166.00
SCHELL RANCH - WALL
103.........................................DLK STFS 530=........$173.00
44...........................................DLK STFS 449=........$180.50
SHAUN & LYNN MCKAY - WALL
34...........................................DLK STFS 538=........$172.50
28 ..........................................DLK HFFS 516=........$151.75
KILNESS RANCH - HOWES
54 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 416=........$190.25
14...........................................DLK STFS 325=........$205.50
26 ..........................................DLK HFFS 364=........$170.50
BRIAN WILCOX - STURGIS
35 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 542=........$172.00
26 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 450=........$184.00
33................................DLK & DWF HFFS 485=........$152.50
OWEN FERGUSON - LONG VALLEY
95...........................................DLK STFS 540=........$171.75
55...........................................DLK STFS 455=........$182.00
KEVIN NEUHASER - MIDLAND
33...........................................DLK STFS 513=........$171.50
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 427=........$192.00
41 ..........................................DLK HFFS 475=........$155.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 354=........$174.00
RANDALL & KAREN DAVIS - HERMOSA
46...........................................DLK STFS 562=........$170.75
14...........................................DLK STFS 469=........$185.25
30 ..........................................DLK HFFS 526=........$149.00
KOLETTE STRUBLE - KADOKA
32 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 567=........$170.50
10 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 433=........$191.00
30 ..........................................DLK HFFS 533=........$152.00
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 401=........$163.00
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG - KADOKA
43 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$173.50
17 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 408=........$197.50
18................................DLK & DWF HFFS 467=........$155.50
7 ............................................DLK HFFS 394=........$161.50
ANDY & MORRIS LINN - ELM SPRINGS
94 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 551=........$170.00
100 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 455=........$192.50
12 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 352=........$212.00
100..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 443=........$169.00
24 ..........................................DLK HFFS 381=........$171.00
BYRON & MONTE DENKE - QUINN
64...........................................DLK STFS 558=........$169.75
8.............................................DLK STFS 465=........$181.50
GRANT PATTERSON - KADOKA
66...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 603=........$166.50
30...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 514=........$167.00
80 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 567=........$152.25
20 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 491=........$151.50
SANFORD LANGAGER - ROBERTS, MT
18...........................................DLK STFS 625=........$166.00
STEVE ISKE - NEW UNDERWOOD
46 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 590=........$165.25
13...........................................DLK STFS 483=........$173.00
37................................DLK & DWF HFFS 534=........$151.50
6..................................DLK & DWF HFFS 418=........$158.00
KEN KAUFMAN - ROBERTS, MT
27...........................................DLK STFS 654=........$162.00
19...........................................DLK STFS 518=........$168.00
RON GRUBL - STURGIS
18...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 577=........$168.00
30...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 469=........$177.00
27 ........................................CHAF HFFS 507=........$149.50
TREVOR WILLIAMS - INTERIOR
28...........................................DLK STFS 599=........$167.50
9.............................................DLK STFS 492=........$171.50
JOYCE CHORD - WHITE OWL
29................................FWF & DWF STFS 525=........$166.00
28................................FWF & DWF STFS 442=........$181.00
JAMES GRUBL - STURGIS
55 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 507=........$166.00
15 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 403=........$198.00
51................................DLK & DWF HFFS 499=........$153.75
16................................DLK & DWF HFFS 380=........$170.25
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
71 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 555=........$169.75
DICK & ERIC GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
43 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 538=........$169.50
36...........................................DLK STFS 391=........$200.50
64 ..........................................DLK HFFS 470=........$154.50
16 ..........................................DLK HFFS 362=........$174.00
LAVERNE KOCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
58 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 532=........$169.00
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 450=........$183.00
45................................DLK & DWF HFFS 479=........$153.50
THOMAS HARTY - PHILIP
84 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 530=........$169.00
29 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 415=........$189.00
DAVE RICHARDS - STURGIS
67 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 507=........$169.00
27 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 412=........$196.50
HEATH FREEMAN - OWANKA
92...........................................DLK STFS 531=........$168.50
14 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 389=........$194.00
ED HEEB - MIDLAND
14 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 534=........$167.00
MUNROE RANCH - UNION CENTER
58.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 532=........$164.50
42 ................................FED & DLK STFS 428=........$181.00
43................................FED & DLK HFFS 500=........$147.00
46................................FED & DLK HFFS 436=........$155.00
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE - PHILIP
90...........................................DLK STFS 505=........$165.00
59...........................................DLK STFS 395=........$191.00
45................................DLK & DWF HFFS 410=........$163.00
19 ..........................................DLK HFFS 334=........$177.00
C & T CATTLE - MIDLAND
40...........................................DLK STFS 662=........$155.75
JIM ADDISON - BELVIDERE
19...........................................DLK STFS 443=........$182.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 429=........$159.50
CLAYTON KJERSTAD & FAMILY - WALL
111.........................................DLK STFS 491=........$179.50
49...........................................DLK STFS 405=........$203.50
116 ........................................DLK HFFS 463=........$162.25
25 ..........................................DLK HFFS 361=........$174.75
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
42.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 489=........$174.00
9.............................................DLK STFS 417=........$192.00
19 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 494=........$150.00
5 ................................CHAF & DLK HFFS 409=........$154.00
ED BECKWITH - KADOKA
13...........................................DLK STFS 572=........$167.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 516=........$150.00
MADER & STANGLE - NEW UNDERWOOD
40 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 556=........$163.00
20 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 448=........$178.00
45 ..........................................DLK HFFS 496=........$155.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 422=........$160.00
CHARLES CHAMBERLAIN - WHITE RIVER
23 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 600=........$156.50
BILL HAMANN - WALL
18...........................................DLK STFS 619=........$154.00
STEVE ARMENT - WANBLEE
16...........................................DLK STFS 583=........$153.00
12 ..........................................DLK HFFS 564=........$143.75
ROBERT COMPTON - HOWES
59.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 491=........$169.75
35 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 481=........$150.00
ROD VOLMER - OWANKA
18.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 459=........$171.00
O M IWAN & SONS - MIDLAND
87 ................................FED & DLK STFS 492=........$162.25
39 ................................FED & DLK STFS 401=........$183.75
72................................FED & DLK HFFS 472=........$148.25
23................................FED & DLK HFFS 380=........$153.50
MEEKS RANCH - INTERIOR
92 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 511=........$163.50
30...........................................DLK STFS 445=........$178.00
77................................FED & DLK HFFS 489=........$145.25
38 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 402=........$160.25
CASEY SAMMONS - MIDLAND
19.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 505=........$168.00
10 ................................FED & DLK STFS 593=........$153.00
24................................FED & DLK HFFS 535=........$142.75
RICHARD BERTOLINO - ROBERTS, MT
27 ................................FED & DLK STFS 625=........$154.50
Pennington County Courant • October 25, 2012 • Page 10
annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net • www.ravellettepublications.com
Submitted by Shirrise Linn
Last Sunday, Mel and Dorothy
Anderson attended a visitation at
a Rapid City Funeral Home for Es-
ther Parks, cousin of the Deering
family. Monday, they kept appoint-
ments in Rapid City. Later in the
day, they visited Karen Delbridge
at the hospital. Thursday, Mark
Anderson of Spearfish, stopped by.
Sunday, Mark and son Taylor of
Williston, N.D., came for break-
fast. Saturday, they attended the
High School Rodeo Extravaganza
at the Event Center in Rapid City
to watch the local kids compete.
They all make us proud!! Saturday
evening, they attended the Johnny
Holloway Family Cowboy Reunion
in Deadwood and spent the night
at a hotel there.
Lawrence Burke had appoint-
ments in Rapid City, Tuesday, and
had skin cancer removed from his
nose.
John and Jean Linn traveled to
the football game in Wall with
Morris, Friday night. Charlotte
Wilsey was out Monday for the
day.
Shirrise and Laken Linn had
dinner at John and Jean Linn's,
Monday, to visit Charlotte. Friday,
Shirrise and Laken joined Tiff
Knuppe in Rapid City for errands.
Morris and Kassandra attended
Wall's last home football game,
Friday night. Clyde Arneson vis-
ited Saturday evening, just in time
for chocolate chip ice cream.
Shirrise and the girls had lunch
with Tiff, Conner, and Cole
Knuppe, Sunday, before attending
the bridal shower for Lana Ireland
in New Underwood. They visited
at Casey and Tiff Knuppe's after-
wards, joining Melisa Byrne.
Jim and Caroline Wilsey braved
the terrible wind to Rapid City,
Thursday, for appointments. While
there, they visited Jim's sister-in-
law, Sammie. They attended the
High School Extravaganza Rodeo,
Saturday, in Rapid City.
Kenny and Janet attended the
Catholic Social service meeting in
Rapid City, where Kelli received a
scholarship on Sunday. They also
visited the Tschetter's at Pied-
mont.
For the second time in the last
week, JW and Dara Wrachford
hosted ten Airman from the Base.
The guys came out to help with
fencing and JW treated them to
his famous lasagna, Saturday
night.
School News: Mrs. Mickelson,
teacher at the Elm Springs School,
appreciates all who came in sup-
port of Shawn Harwood on
Wednesday. His presentation of
photos from Afghanistan was very
interesting. The school kids are
hostessing their annual Fall Festi-
val and Costume Contest, Friday,
October 26 at the Elm Springs
Hall. The school will have their
field trip November first.
Elm Springs
News
We are in the fall season, and
our weather is nice one day and
windy the next.
Sunday, the Wall Singer's, Mike
and Mary Erz, Nola Price, Hazel
Kalkbrenner and Darlene Wulf,
did gospel music.
Edna Smith entertained our res-
ident's with old time music and a
sing-a-long.Residents do enjoy
those old tunes from the 40's and
50's.
Rev. Lloyd Edwards held wor-
ship service and Marty Aus led our
hymn sing.
Rev. Darwin Kopfmann from the
Wall Methodist church, held wor-
ship service and Dorothy Shearer
led our hymn sing.
Our Bingo helpers were Bonnie
Elliott, Verna Maude, Freddie Fer-
guson, Judy Knuppe and Margaret
Larsen. We do appreciate them.
Father Zandri holds Mass every
Wednesday at 9:30 and Kenny
Karp and Margaret Larsen help.
Rev. Ron McLaughlin from the
Free Evangelical church of Pied-
mont, held worship and commun-
ion service.
Residents enjoyed Community
Coffee with family and friends
here at the Society.
Rev. Wes Weilman held worship
service and Karen Madsen led our
hymn sing.
Saturday afternoon, the Country
Clogger's entertained our resi-
dents with some Bluegrass clog-
ging. They also brought a cake to
help celebrate Opal Splittoeser's
birthday.
Until next time…May God bless.
Good
Samaritan
Society
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement
announcements to:
annc@gwtc.net

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