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Pennington Co. Courant, October 24, 2013

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Number 43
Volume 108
October 24, 2013
Livestock in Rights-of-way
Pennington County will make at least one more
pass to pick up and haul away livestock that are lo-
cated in county rights-of-way FREE OF CHARGE
to producers.
Carcasses will not be removed from private prop-
erty, but only from county rights-of-way.
Please contact 2-1-1 to register your location and
number of carcasses for pick-up.
OR producers may continue to use the below drop
points.
Livestock Loss Drop Points:
Two Drop Points are open and ready to receive car-
casses FREE OF CHARGE.
These sites follow the Animal Industry Board
(AIB) guidelines in regulation 12:68:03:05. Have all
your documentation for possible future needs done
prior to dumping.
•Owanka Drop Point: Base Line Road between
By Trudy Lieberman, Rural
Health News Service
On October 1, millions of unin-
sured Americans---105,000 in
South Dakota---suddenly got a
new way to buy health insurance.
They can now shop in the state in-
surance exchanges. Many of them
had been shut out of the insur-
ance market because they have
pre-existing health conditions. In
January it will be illegal for in-
surers to turn away sick people.
It's expected that about 24 mil-
lion people will find insurance
coverage in the exchanges, and
about 60 percent of them will be
eligible for a subsidy to help them
pay the premiums.
For families with incomes hov-
ering around the federal poverty
level ($23,550 for a family of four;
$11,490 for individuals) and
somewhat above, subsidies will be
large and might cover a good
chunk of the premium.
Families with higher incomes
will get smaller subsidies and will
have to pay most of the premium
themselves. That could be a big
chunk of the family budget if they
choose a policy with good cover-
age.
Customers in the exchanges
will mostly be those who have no
coverage and those who now buy
it in what's called the individual
market.
If you have employer coverage,
Medicare, Medicaid, or coverage
from the military or the Indian
Health Service, forget the ex-
changes. The law assumes you al-
ready have health coverage.
The poorest of the poor in the
26 states that have chosen not to
expand their Medicaid programs
including South Dakota cannot
shop in them either. They have in-
comes below the poverty level,
and because their states have
chosen not to expand, they have
Getting insurance under the Affordable Care Act
few options.
Because of the way the law was
written it was assumed that peo-
ple with incomes below the
poverty line would get Medicaid
as well as those with incomes be-
tween 100 and 138 percent of
poverty.
Because of the court decision,
that meant those whose incomes
were 99 percent of the poverty
level are out of luck if their state
has chosen not to expand. Their
incomes are too low for them to
buy insurance on their own and
unless their state offers benefits
to childless adults (most don't),
they can't get Medicaid either.
People who have coverage
they've already bought in the in-
dividual market can also check
out the exchange to see if they can
get a better deal. That includes
freelancers, retirees not yet old
enough to get Medicare, people
between jobs, and families of
workers whose employers provide
insurance for employees but not
for their spouses or kids.
A Hastings, Neb., woman who
is disabled because of a medical
error is one of those who will be
looking for an insurance deal on
the exchange.
She and her husband already
have insurance they bought in the
individual market. She had heard
about the new law and went on-
line to do a bit of research, She
left her name on the site of
ehealthinsurance.com, and re-
ceived calls from 15 agents eager
to sign her up when the ex-
changes opened for business. One
from Florida told her if she didn't
sign up quickly her application
would not be accepted. The
woman told me the agent's mes-
sage was "'if you don't work with
me on this, you've blown it,
honey.'"
That brings up the matter of
where to go for help. One place to
start is the website “healthcare.go
v”, the entry point for people in
states like South Dakota.
The federal government also
runs The Marketplace Call Cen-
ter 1-800-318-2596.
You can also look for a naviga-
tor, a real live person trained to
help people enroll in a policy.
They are supposed to be unbi-
ased and can't steer consumers to
any particular policy. To find one
in Hastings, I clicked on Local-
Help.HealthCare.gov. It gave me
three choices: a hospital in Lex-
ington, Community Action of Ne-
braska, and Planned Parenthood
of the Heartland, both in Lincoln.
Not exactly help around the cor-
ner.
Once you find your way to a list
of insurance offerings either on a
website or with a navigator's
help, the task becomes tricky.
Choosing health insurance is
never easy, whether you're buying
inside or outside an exchange.
You don't have to rush into any-
thing right now. Take your time
and study the options.
Coverage doesn't begin until
January (if you sign up by Decem-
ber 15), and open enrollment
doesn't end until March 31.
If you buy a cheap policy that
doesn't cover your needs when
you're sick, you may be stuck with
it for months until the next open
enrollment. "It's like walking into
a chasm of uncertainty," the Hast-
ings woman said. "It's a little like
shopping for a used car. You don't
know if you're getting a lemon."
Editor's note: The Rural Health
News Service is funded by a grant
from The Commonwealth Fund
and distributed through the Ne-
braska Press Association Founda-
tion, the Colorado Press Associa-
tion and the South Dakota News-
paper Association.
by Del Bartels
The West River/Lyman-Jones Rural Water Sys-
tems’ annual meeting was, this year, held in the Wall
Community Center, Wednesday, October 9.
This meeting, the 24th annual, celebrated 20 years
of service. The theme was “Pipe Dream to Reality”
was an obvious play on words concerning the near
completion of the Mni Wiconi water pipe project.
On the heels of the recent devastating fall storm,
manager Jake Fitzergerald said the last three years
have been challenging ones. Major flooding along the
Missouri River marked 2011. Then 2012 was one of
the driest years on record. That year, 970 million gal-
lons of water was sold. So far this year, WR/L-J has
sold 682 million gallons of water, down 13 percent. All
the while, the $23.9 million Mni Wiconi water project
is nearing completion. Construction work will con-
tinue into 2014, but using 2013 funds.
In giving the official welcome, Wall Mayor Dave
Hahn mentioned some of the wonders of the world. In
comparison, he added that a blessing to western
South Dakota was good drinking water. “And we
often tend to forget it,” said Hahn.
A summary of the creation of the WR/L-J and of the
Mni Wiconi Rural Water Supply Project was given.
“Most of 50 years people were told over and over that
this project could not be done,” said Larson. The
Lyman-Jones Water District, the fledgling West River
Water District and several tribal entities combined
fundraising and lobbying efforts. “It developed to be
a very good working relationship. Seeing this project
is something I am very proud of. We have accom-
plished making the impossible possible,” said Larson.
In relating the chain of efforts needed to get the
Mni Wiconi started on its year-by-year funding, Mike
West as director of Lyman-Jones and others were
praised for seemingly endless lobbying efforts in
Washington, D.C. Roger Porch was one person who
gave testimony to a political delegation visiting the
area. Finally, the Creighton leg of the project was let
for bid. Marion Matt attended the bid opening cere-
mony at Wall.
The history of the project is filled with highlights,
one being the borrowing of $8 million for the Ft.
Pierre to Philip pipeline. As of this annual meeting,
the Mni Wiconi project is 98 percent completed.
Dave Larson, legal representative for WR/L-J,
summed up the cooperative's legal issues in one sen-
tence, "We're not being sued by anybody, we aren't
suing anybody, and as far as I know we are not pend-
ing any litigation."
West River/Lyman-Jones Rural
Water Systems annual meeting
At the dais were, from left, Paul Goldhammer – board president, Jake Fitzgerald – manager, Dave
Larson – legal representative, Laura Leenderts – project engineer, and Amy Kittelson – office man-
ager.
Del Bartels photo
National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis
announced that as a result of the passage of a con-
tinuing resolution providing federal appropriations,
the National Park Service have resumed operations
effective October 17.
All 401 national parks are expected to reopen, as
well as dozens of programs that preserve nature and
historic sites and improve access to outdoor recre-
ation in local communities around the country.
"America's 401 national parks are open for busi-
ness!" said National Park Service Director Jonathan
B. Jarvis. "The professional men and women of the
National Park Service are waiting to greet visitors
with open arms and help you have the time of your
life in these national treasures.
Please come out and enjoy the Fall in some of the
most spectacular places on the planet."
At all national parks across the country, from
Golden Gate National Recreation Area in California
to Acadia National Park in Maine, tour roads, trails,
visitor centers and other facilities will reopen, inter-
pretive and educational programs will resume and
permits will be issued for special activities.
Park concession facilities and other park partners
are also expected to start to resume operations.
The Ben Reifel Visitor Center at Badlands Na-
National Park Service reopens all national parks
tional Park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Winter
hours change to 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., daily, on October
27. The Cedar Pass Lodge is now closed for the sea-
son.
Minuteman Missile National Historic Site is open
daily through the end of October. Their winter hours
are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. They
will be closed on weekends, effective November 1.
The Badlands Loop Road (Highway 240) has been
reduced to one lane traffic at Cedar Pass. This steep
section of the road is just north east of the Ben Reifel
Visitor Center. All downhill traffic that is traveling
towards the visitor center must stop and yield to up-
hill traffic. Stop signs and other warning signs are
in place. Please use caution when driving through
Cedar Pass.
Cedar Pass is part of a historic slump and is un-
dergoing active erosion. Recent snow and rain has
added to the problem. The park is investigating long
term solutions in partnership with Federal High-
ways. For now, all traffic must stay to the single in-
side lane to prevent further erosion and to ensure
public safety.
For information on a specific park, visit the Na-
tional Park Service website at www.nps.gov.
Atlas update-livestock pick-up
Sharpe Road and 173 Ave. (T1N R12E Sec. 36). No
set traffic flow, use caution while driving and oper-
ating. Producers or haulers must have a means for
unloading at the Drop Point.
•Quinn Drop Point: 237th St. between 197th Ave.
and Big Foot Road (T1S R17E Sec. 16). Traffic is to
COME IN from the EAST of Big Foot Road and
EXIT WEST towards 197th Ave. There are two
bridges on the west; a full load may compromise the
bridges. Use caution while driving and operating
heavy equipment. Producers or haulers must have a
means for unloading at the Drop Point.
Drop points will remain open for an undesignated
period of time. For a map of these locations, please
visit www.rcpcem.com.
Producers needing assistance for carcass removal,
fence repair, financial resources, support for emo-
tional distress, or counseling resources can contact
211 or 1-877-708-4357.
A group of South Dakota bankers participated in a
conference call organized by South Dakota Depart-
ment of Agriculture Secretary Lucas Lentsch to dis-
cuss ways to address short and long-term financial
needs of ranchers who lost livestock in the early Oc-
tober blizzard that struck much of western South
Dakota. Representatives from the offices of Gov. Dau-
gaard and South Dakota’s congressional delegation
also participated in the call.
Many bankers have already contacted their ranch
customers to discuss their losses and to make sure
those customers understand that their bank stands
ready to work with them on a one-on-one basis to de-
termine what can be done to help them through these
tough times. Casey Cowan, an ag loan officer with
Dakota State Bank in Blunt/Pierre, is one of many
bankers from across the state who have been out
meeting with their customers affected by the storm.
“First and foremost we’re concerned about ranch-
ers’ emotional and personal needs. We are there to
provide support during this extremely difficult time,”
said Cowan. “Once their primary needs are taken
care of, they need to know their banker is there to
help with restructuring their loans and to provide in-
by Laurie Hindman
The Wall Ambulance District met on Thursday, Oc-
tober 17 at the Wall Community Center meeting
room.
John Kitterman was present to discuss purchasing
a Standby Power Generator for the ambulance serv-
ice garage. He went on to say, “I feel it should be done
and it’s important we do something.” Kitterman said
there are three reasons for the need: 1. To get the
doors open; 2. No heat and 3. We could have people
up there for 48 hours with no electricity.
He has gotten a quote on two different plants and
until the load is determined he feels the liquid cooled
generator which costs $17,000 would handle the
building.
The board would like to have an electrician come in
and confirm the load usage and get quotes from other
businesses for a generator. Board Member Darwin
Haerer and Kitterman will look into getting bids from
other businesses and contact an electrician to get the
exact load usage for the building.
Kitterman is also working with Pennington County
Search and Rescue to get a Snow Cat for the area.
After going over the budget for next year the board
Wall Ambulance District discusses whether
or not to purchase Stand By Generator
approved to go with nine mills to make the budget
balance.
Ambulance Service By-laws and protocol on who is
in charge of hiring was discussed. Kitterman and
Dawn Hilgenkamp handle the hiring and both said
they deal with mainly petty problems nothing major.
The board agreed whoever attends a South Dakota
Conference should be reimbursed if they have at-
tended six training sessions and are members in good
standing with the ambulance service.
Wally Hoffman said his wife Carol is willing to set
up a pie social for the ambulance district. The money
will be put into the capital outlay fund. The board will
set a date for the pie social at a later time. Kitterman
said the ambulance service may also do a fund raiser.
Other motions approved:
•Minutes from the September 19 meeting with a
correction to be made.
•October bills.
•Financial report for the bank statement and
budget.
The next meeting will be held on November 21 at
the Wall Community Center meeting room.
With no other business the meeting was adjourned.
Bankers work with Daugaard Administration
to help ranchers in wake of blizzard
formation on programs available to them.”
Among those items discussed during the call on
Wednesday included:
•Overcoming difficulties in getting the Farm Serv-
ice Agency to sign off on checks associated with sale
of ag commodities during the government shutdown.
Bank willingness to restructure ranchers’ debt to pro-
vide short-term cash flow relief.
•Banker support for the Ranchers’ Relief Fund set
up within the Black Hills Community Foundation.
www.giveblackhills.org
•Bankers want ranchers to understand that they
should not hesitate to contact their lender to talk
about their immediate and long-term financial needs.
About the South Dakota
Bankers Association
The SDBA is the professional and trade association
for South Dakota's financial services industry. It was
established in 1884. Today, its mission is to help pro-
vide banks the opportunity to be the preeminent
providers of financial services in the state. For more
information about the SDBA, which is located in
Pierre, visit www.sdba.com.
Local News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding
Monday at 4:30 p.m. We do have the right to reject any or all letters to the
Editor.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper
should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office.
All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number
of the author.
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of reaching people.
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free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
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1cuu:uqrcu Ccuur¸ Sícr:jj's 1cjarr¤cur
PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
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InIIuro fo ComµIy wIfh ÐrIvIng
undor !ovocnfIon nnd InIIuro fo
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IIdor, Soufh Ðnkofn nrons.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-394-
6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco Ðo-
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nonrosf Inw onforcomonf ngoncy If
you hnvo nny InformnfIon whIch
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IndIvIdunI.
courant @ gwtc.net
South Dakota Army National Guard Sgt. 1st Class John Kramer,
152nd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, of Philip, S.D., and
North Carolina Army Reserve Spc. David Bryan, 846th Transporta-
tion Company, of Aberdeen, N.C., verify numbers on the data plate
of a container for the International database at Kandahar Airfield,
October 9, 2013. The 152nd CSSB is working to not only sustain
the four transportation units and ordnance company they manage
at Kandahar Airfield, they are also helping units in Regional Com-
mand-South drawdown equipment.
By Sgt.1st Class
Theanne Tangen
129th Mobile Public
Affairs Detachment
After 12 years of shipping sup-
plies to troops in Afghanistan a
surplus of containers have filled
bases throughout the country.
The South Dakota Army Na-
tional Guard’s 152nd Combat
Sustainment Support Battalion is
working to not only sustain the
four transportation units and ord-
nance company they manage at
Kandahar Airfield, they are also
SD Guard unit cleans up remnants of Afghanistan war
(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st
Class Theanne Tangen, 129th Mobile
Public Affairs Detachment/RELEASED)
helping units in Regional Com-
mand-South drawdown equip-
ment.
“I have heard that there are up
to 80,000 containers in
Afghanistan,” said Maj. David
Moore, support operations officer,
of Rapid City, S.D. “Our goal is to
help reduce the number of con-
tainers by identifying whether or
not they need to be demolished for
scrap metal or reused for packing
up equipment to send home.”
Ninety-five percent of the con-
tainers coming in and out of Kan-
dahar Airfield will go to the Cen-
tral Receiving Shipping Point
where the containers are in-
spected.
There are three categories for
the containers: one is “sea wor-
thy” where it can be shipped back
to the states by a ship; the second
is “intra-theater,” meaning the
container is not good enough to go
back on a ship but can be used in-
side the country; and “demol-
ished,” which means it is only
good for scrap.
The 152nd is moving the con-
tainers at a hectic pace, eliminat-
ing more than 1,200 in the last
three weeks alone, said Moore.
A hectic pace is what is keeping
Sgt. 1st Class John Kramer, non-
commissioned officer in charge,
CRSP, of Philip, S.D., busy from
dawn to dusk.
“There is a lot more to contain-
ers than I ever thought,” said
Kramer. “When you are going
down the highway back home and
see a container on a truck you
don’t think about it. You don’t
know what it is hauling or what
the numbers mean. Now I look at
a container and know if its sea
worthy or if it needs to be demol-
ished.”
Kramer has a list of things he
looks for when inspecting a con-
tainer.
“Checking for holes in the con-
tainers is the biggest thing, and it
also gets down to the nitty gritty
of how many dents it has,” he
said. “The doors need to have a
tight seal. We also check the num-
bers on the container to ensure
the container is accounted for on
the international database, which
tracks the ownership of the con-
tainer.”
Lt. Col. David Bedard, deputy
commanding officer,15th Sustain-
ment Brigade, Fort Bliss, Texas,
said the 152nd will have con-
tributed to 30 percent of their
overall reduction.
“The 152nd has gone above and
beyond,” said Bedard. “They re-
ally are a stellar organization.
From all accounts, when you look
at these guys they are just stel-
lar.”
Fishing Rule changes proposed for 2014
The South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Commission has pro-
posed several rule changes for
2014 centering on fishing, spear-
ing fish and the taking of bait.
Rule changes for consideration
include:
•A proposal to prohibit felt-
soled waders in any South Dakota
waters. These waders can trap
sediment and organic material
and may transport aquatic inva-
sive plants and animals, disease
spores and unwanted insect lar-
vae from one water to another.
South Dakota would join a num-
ber of states that have banned the
use of felt-soled waders.
•A proposal to increase the pos-
session limit in inland waters for
all fish species from two times the
daily limit to three times the daily
limit. Interested parties peti-
tioned the Commission to in-
crease the statewide possession
limit for walleye in inland waters,
stressing the economic benefits of
such a change to the state. In an
effort to keep possession limits
consistent among all species,
Wildlife Division staff recom-
mended that the proposed in-
crease in possession limits for in-
land waters apply to all species,
not just walleye. The change is
expected to have little to no im-
pact on the resource.
•A proposal to change the pos-
session limit on yellow perch from
15 to 30 fish on the South
Dakota/Minnesota boundary wa-
ters. A recent survey of South
Dakota anglers in counties bor-
dering Minnesota, Iowa and Ne-
braska determined that anglers
in waters bordering these states
were interested in having regula-
tions similar to inland waters. In-
land waters currently have a pos-
session limit of 30 yellow perch.
This change would also align
South Dakota and Minnesota
boundary water yellow perch pos-
session limits.
•A proposal for special manage-
ment waters to remove the cur-
rent walleye limits in effect on
Lake Oahe and revert to standard
statewide harvest restrictions for
walleye. This change would add
East and West Heritage Game
Production Area ponds to the list
of waters with a 15-inch mini-
mum length limit for largemouth
and smallmouth bass.
•A proposal to allow rough fish
spearing in South Dakota-Min-
nesota boundary waters year-
round, anytime of day or night.
This change would increase an-
gler opportunity and make the
state’s regulation similar to Min-
nesota’s boundary water regula-
tions.
•A proposal to modify areas
open to spearing of game fish by
removing a subsection allowing
game fish spearing in a limited
number of waters in eastern
South Dakota (spearing for north-
ern pike has been allowed
statewide since December 2012
and that will not change). Under
this proposal, South Island Lake
would be added to the list of lakes
in which northern pike spearing
is not allowed due to the presence
of muskies. This change would re-
move wording that allows the di-
rector of the Division of Wildlife to
temporarily open areas to game
fish spearing for special events
and instead give that authority to
the GFP Commission through
resolution (allowing more oppor-
tunity for public input).
•A proposal to allow emerald
shiners and spottail shiners to be
taken and sold by any licensed
resident bait dealer or sold by any
licensed nonresident bait dealer.
•A proposal to allow golden
shiners, emerald shiners, spottail
shiners and dead gizzard shad to
be transported away from the
water from which they are taken
to be used as bait.
•A proposal to allow the non-
commercial taking of bait for that
portion of Lewis and Clark Lake
and the Missouri River above
Gavins Point Dam in Yankton
and Bon Homme counties (these
areas are closed to the commer-
cial taking of bait).
•A proposal to add Lake Yank-
ton in Yankton County, and Mud
Lake and Lake Byron in Beadle
County to the list of waters closed
year-round to the commercial and
non-commercial taking of bait
(Asian carp have been found in
these waters).
The proposed rule changes will
be finalized at the Nov. 7-8 GFP
Commission meeting, which will
be held in Pierre at the Best
Western Ramkota Hotel. To view
the full proposals on those sea-
sons, visit:
www.gfp.sd.gov/agency/commis-
sion/default.aspx and look under
the "Rule Proposals" heading.
To comment on any of the pro-
posals, send a letter to: South
Dakota Game, Fish and Parks
Commission, 523 E. Capitol Ave.,
Pierre, SD 57501; or email wild-
info@state.sd.us. Comments on
proposal will be taken until 5 p.m.
CST on Nov. 6. To be included in
the public record, please include
your full name and city of resi-
dence.
For those who would like to
comment in person on these pro-
posed rule changes, the GFP
Commission will host a public
hearing beginning at 2 p.m. CST
as part of their meeting on Thurs-
day, Nov. 7.
By David Jones
Assistant Librarian
A problem I have with selecting
what I will read next is habit. I
tend to get in a rut, reading all
mysteries I can find. I went
through Rex Stout this way, and
now I miss Nero Wolfe. If I try re-
reading, I know who done it to
whom.
So here’s a way to get out of the
rut: When you enter the library,
instead of turning left, turn right.
Or walk a little farther and try
some science fiction. I know, you
hated it in high school, but hope-
fully you and the writing have
Wall Community Library:
Read for the fun of it!
matured.
Or go the other way. If you
haven’t read “The Hunger
Games”, do. You’ll be surprised
how good it is.
Or – if all you read is Westerns
– try Elmore Leonard.
And remember, if you don’t like
something, try something else!
We won’t require book reports.
We’re on Main Street, next to
the sheriff ’s office, so you know
you’re safe. Wednesday, 12 p.m. to
7 p.m., Thursday 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., and Fri-
day 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Conservation Corner
Blizzard Names????
Several decades after hurri-
canes first got formal names,
some blizzards in the USA began
to get names also.
Tropical storms and hurricanes
informally received names for the
first time in the late 1800s from
Australian forecaster Clement
Wragge.
During World War II, tropical
storms and hurricanes were infor-
mally given women's names by
military meteorologists (after
their girlfriends or wives) who
were monitoring and forecasting
tropical cyclones over the Pacific.
The formal hurricane naming
system began in the mid-1950s.
Men's names were added to the
lists in 1979.
In October of 2012 the Weather
Channel started to proactively as-
sign monikers to winter storms.
Most of the names on the list have
a Greek/Roman theme.
Hence we had the winter storm
of October 2013 – “Atlas”.
To avoid confusion, none of the
Weather Channel's 26 winter
storm names (one for each letter
of the alphabet) has been on any
of the lists of names produced by
the hurricane center.
The Weather Channel naming
occurs no more than three days
before a winter storm's expected
impact, so forecasters are confi-
dent it could have a significant ef-
fect on large populations.
Unlike with tropical storms,
which have specific naming
guidelines based on wind speed,
the criteria for winter storms is
flexible. The most important
weather factors are expected
snowfall and/or ice accumulations
and wind speed.
Population plays a big role too.
A storm that dumps a foot of
snow over the Cascades in Wash-
ington state might not get a
name, while a storm set to hit At-
lanta at rush hour with one - two
inches of snow might.
An average of about eight to 10
storms will probably get a name
each winter.
Submitted by East Pennington
Conservation District
NRCS help for blizzard recovery
Agricultural producers working
their way through Atlas Blizzard
recovery may find help through
the USDA says Jeff Zimprich,
State Conservationist, USDA
Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS), Huron. “We’re
open and here to help. Blizzard
recovery is far greater than any
one organization or agency.
NRCS’ professional conservation
services can help farmers and
ranchers pull through the devas-
tation caused by Atlas.”
The NRCS specialists offer free
on-site consultations for various
facets of grazing and livestock
management explains Zimprich.
“We can help people survey
their needs related to soils infor-
mation and technical practice
standards for carcass disposal or
livestock burials to protect water
quality through our Animal Mor-
tality Facility practice. We have
technical and financial assistance
to help producers to replace de-
stroyed fences, shelterbelts or
other conservation practices dam-
aged by the storm.”
“Technical assistance is free
and help is available right now for
South Dakota,” says Zimprich.
Disaster financial assistance
through the Environmental Qual-
ity Incentives Program (EQIP)
provides opportunity for early-
start waivers. The first step, Zim-
prich says, is to contact the NRCS
at their local USDA Service Cen-
ter. Producers need to sign an ap-
plication to be ready for the next
funding cut off and application
ranking date which is November
15, 2013.
The NRCS’ EQIP is our main
Farm Bill conservation financial
assistance program that can help
address needs explains Zimprich.
EQIP is continuous signup and
is instrumental in helping ranch-
ers with needs related to water
quality and quantity. “In the Atlas
situation, financial assistance
through EQIP can help with con-
servation practices such as new
water development if the current
water source is becoming contam-
inated or if a contaminated water
source must be fenced out to pre-
vent disease or other complica-
tions.”
Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................19-9
Shad’s Towing ...........................18-10
Rockers ......................................17-11
Badland’s Auto..........................16-12
Dakota Bar................................12-16
Highlights:
Neal Petersen........................200/536
Marsha Sumpter ...5-7 & 3-10 splits;
......................................................189
Jerry Mooney ...............................200
Lee Sundall ..................................174
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor..................................6-2
PHS ...............................................6-2
People’s Mkt..................................4-4
George’s Welding ..........................4-4
Kennedy Imp.................................4-4
G&A Trenching.............................3-5
Team 1...........................................3-5
KTS................................................2-6
Hightlights:
Jerry Iron Moccasin.....................515
Tony Gould ...................................513
Cory Boyd.....................................510
Earl Park............................187 clean
Colt Terkildsen.....................2-7 split
Colt Fitzgerald......................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ............................19-9
Jolly Ranchers...........................17-11
State Farm................................17-11
Little Orphans ..........................16-12
Cutting Edge Salon ..................14-14
Highlights:
Karen Foland ................200, 154/501
Vonda Hamill ...............................163
Marsha Sumpter ....5-8-10 split; 168,
...............................................151/466
Donna King .............5-6-10 split; 155
Jen Schriever................5-7 split; 150
Sandra O’Connor .........................150
Lila Whidby.......................7-4-5 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar..................................19-9
Hildebrand Concrete ..................19-9
Morrison’s Haying ....................14-14
Chiefie’s Chicks.........................14-14
First National Bank ...................9-19
Pink Ribbons...............................9-19
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz .......5-10 split; 146 x 3
Emily Kroetch .......................163/411
Rachel Kjerstad..........3-10 split; 171
Debbie Gartner.........5-7 & 3-10 split
Lindsey Hildebrand .............5-7 split
Annette Hand.......................5-7 split
Thursday Men
The Steakhouse ..........................10-2
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................9-3
A&M Laundry...............................7-5
McDonnell Farms .........................6-6
O’Connell Const ............................5-7
Dakota Bar....................................4-8
WEE BADD...................................4-8
West River Pioneer Tanks............3-9
Highlights:
Alex (Toad) Moos...................202/559
Matt Reckling...............................202
Steve McDonnell ..........................536
Chad Walker.........................5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ........................4-5 split
Andrew Reckling................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew .................................8-4
Randy’s Spray Service............6.5-5.5
Dee’s Crew.....................................6-6
Moos on the Loose...................5.5-6.5
Inforcer’s .......................................5-7
Highlights:
Duane Hand......5-10 x 2 & 5-6 splits
Rose Bennett ................................172
859-2430
Hwy. 14 · PhiIip
Monday-Saturday
Open at 11 a.m.
- CIosed Sundays -
We have orders to go!
Local News
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013•3
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Reprinted with permission
from the Elko Daily, Elko, Nev.
Elko High School Hall of Fame
will open its doors to the Class of
2014 with six athletes and one
EHS Hall of Fame inducts seven new members
contributor being inducted at a
ceromony Thursday at the Old
Gym.
The group will also be recog-
nized at halftime of Friday's foot-
ball game against Fernley.
Contributor: Don Brown
Brown grew up the youngest of
seven children in Mobridge, S.D.
He graduated with a Bachelor of
Science in Education degree from
Black Hills State University
where he played college baseball.
Brown came to Elko County in
1966 and began his 36-year teach-
ing career as a seventh grade
teacher at Grammar School No. 1
where he taught math and sci-
ence.
In 1969, he transferred to Elko
High School and taught several
math subjects throughout his ca-
reer. While teaching, Brown
earned a Masters in Education
from Black Hills State University
in 1972.
Brown was involved in ex-
tracurricular activities during his
Honorees from across the state
will be recognized at the Annual
Casey Tibbs Foundation Tribute
Dinner to be held on Saturday,
November 2nd at the Casey Tibbs
SD Rodeo Center in Fort Pierre.
This years’ honorees include:
•Jessica Painter Holmes of
Buffalo, as “Rodeo Cowgirl Great”
who has won state, regional and
national awards at every level of
rodeo competition in the High
School, college, amateur and pro-
fessional levels;
•Casey Gates, of Miller as
“Rodeo Cowboy Great” who won
the NIRA bull riding champi-
onship in 1990 and is the only
entire teaching career. He
coached fifth and sixth grade bas-
ketball and was the head baseball
coach. Additionally, he was the
chairman of the math department
and junior class advisor. However,
his greatest contribution to ath-
letics at Elko High School was his
service as the head of sports
ticket sales.
Brown and his wife Ann who is
the former Ann Eisenbraun one of
the Eisenbraun Triplets and his
Mother n’ law is Margaret Eisen-
braun of Creighton. The couple
has lived in Elko for 47 years
where Brown works part-time at
Franklin Lumber.
He enjoys traveling, reading
and spending time with his fam-
ily. The Browns have been mar-
ried for 47 years. Their two chil-
dren, Jayme and Jayson, gradu-
ated from Elko High School and
participated in sports.
Don will be inducted by his
daughter Jayme.
Casey Tibbs Foundation announces
six honorees for Tribute Dinner
South Dakotan to qualify for the
PBR finals finishing in the top 10
twice;
•Harold Heinert, of Parmelee,
as “Past Rodeo Great” who com-
peted in the college level finals in
the SDRA, PRCA, GPIRA and
INFR. He excelled in bareback
riding until his life was tragically
cut short by cancer at the young
age of 35;
•Harold Delbridge, of Red Owl,
as “Rodeo Promoter” who as a
pastor he has touched countless
lives. An announcer for years at
high school, 4-H and SDRA, he
was the “voice of rodeo.”
•Walter and Marian Klein
Ranch, of Hartford, as “Ranch
Cowboy Family” who owned the
original tree claim or “timber cul-
tural certificate” of Marian’s fam-
ily. The fifth generation original
farm and ranch land has been in
the family for nearly 125 years.
•Sutton Rodeo’s Chuckulator,
of Onida, as “Rodeo Animal Ath-
lete” who was the first horse to
win both Bareback and Saddle
Bronc Badlands Circuit Finals
awards in the same year (2001).
He was the voted the top bronc in
2012 by the NFR.
Now in its’ 24th year, the Trib-
ute Dinner is an opportunity for
friends and families in the ranch-
ing and rodeo communities to cel-
ebrate and honor the accomplish-
ments of South Dakota cowboys,
cowgirls , families and animals.
Their photos and biographies
are added to the “Wall of Fame”
each year, located in the Rodeo
Center.
Dinner tickets can be pur-
chased by phone or by visiting the
Rodeo Center. Advance purchase
required and seating is limited to
250. Contact the Casey Tibbs SD
Rodeo Center at 605-494-1094 for
ticket information or at www.case
ytibbs.com
Acronym Key:
•National Intercollegiate Rodeo
Association (NIRA)
•National Finals Rodeo (NFR)
South Dakota Rodeo Association
(SDRA)
•Professional Rodeo Cowboys
Association (PRCA)
•Great Plains Indian Rodeo As-
sociation (GPIRA)
•Indian National Finals Rodeo
(INFR)
Finance Officer Jeanne Duch-
scher received the South Dakota
Municipal League’s 2013 Excel-
lence in Municipal Government
Award. The award was presented
during the League’s annual con-
ference held October 9 -11 in Ab-
erdeen.
Given annually, the Excellence
award is granted to elected offi-
cials, municipal employees, and
individuals outside of municipal
government based on a three-year
rotation. This year’s award was
presented to a municipal em-
ployee who has made an out-
standing contribution to the fur-
ther improvement of municipal
government in South Dakota.
Parker Mayor Ron Nelson said
“Jeanne is a great asset to this
community – she oversees many
Duchscher awarded 2013 Excellence
in Municipal Governement award
boards of our city…she brings
with her energy and commitment
that has been above and beyond
what is expected of most.”
She is active in her church, the
community club, planning and
zoning commission, economic de-
velopment board, and area fi-
nance officers’ group.
She has been instrumental in
economic development projects
and gaining recognition for her
city, and works tirelessly to offer
new ideas for consideration in
every group in which she partici-
pates.
Duchscher has also been a
leader at the State level, serving
as a district chair and moving up
through the ranks on the Munici-
pal League Board of Directors,
currently serving as the first vice
president, working on policy com-
mittees, working with the Con-
gressional delegation and leading
the SD Governmental Finance
Officers’ Association.
She and her husband, Tim,
have two children, a daughter
and son-in-law in Chicago, and a
son and daughter-in-law in Cali-
fornia.
Duchscher is a former Wall res-
ident. She was the Wall School
District Business Manager from
1994-2000.
The South Dakota Municipal
League was organized in 1934 as
a nonpartisan, nonprofit associa-
tion of incorporated municipali-
ties in South Dakota. The
League’s mission is the coopera-
tive improvement of municipal
government in South Dakota.
Glad to see someone survived the blizzard. This nice little Elk Buck
wandered into Lonnie and Teri Ann Arneson’s place on Monday,
October 14. He looks like he may have tangled with some netting
and a few cockulburs, but otherwise is happy to have found a lov-
ing and dry home.
Look who showed up in Elm Springs
Courtesy photo
Subscription Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax; Out-of-Area: $42 plus
tax;Out of-State: $42
or subscribe online at:
www.RavellettePublications.com
From the Desk of Superintendent Dennis Rieckman
We are in the midst of National
School Lunch week and I want to
thank our kitchen staff of Cindy
Weaver, Lynn Dunker, and Gwen
McConnell for their dedication
and hard work each day.
Our staff works hard to put out
a good breakfast and lunch meal
for students and staff. It is not an
easy job trying to satisfy the vari-
ety of tastes of so many students.
I do believe our staff does the
best job they can to satisfy stu-
dent’s particular tastes in food.
We follow the guidelines set by
the federal government on serv-
ing size etc. We need to follow
these guidelines so we can receive
funding for families qualifying for
free or reduced meals.
Sometimes it does not always
seem to be enough. Chicken
Nuggets are a popular item in the
lunch program. We follow the
guidelines and the serving por-
tion is not what kids are used to
eating – they want more. We can’t
“Supersize” like Burger King or
McDonald’s.
The cooks try their best to
stretch the portions whenever
possible. Students are allowed to
come back for as much of the
fruits and vegetables as they
want.
We are inviting two different
school lunch companies to the No-
vember and December board
meetings to show what they have
to offer for a lunch program. It
will give the board an opportunity
to compare our current program
to what other schools using these
companies have to offer.
I would encourage students and
parents to attend these meetings
to listen to what they have to
offer. I would also welcome any
feedback from anyone on our cur-
rent food service program to help
us improve.
We have the playoffs and state
tournaments approaching for
cross country, football, and volley-
ball.
Congratulations to the boys
cross country team for placing
second in the region meet and
qualifying for the state meet in
Rapid City on Saturday.
Good luck to the volleyball and
football teams as they head into
the playoffs and tournaments.
I want everyone to be aware the
prices of the football playoffs
games, the District and Region
volleyball and basketball tourna-
ments have been raised to $7.00
for adults and $5.00 for students.
These prices are set by the
board of directors of the South
Dakota High School Activities As-
sociation.
Please direct all concerns or
comments with the new prices to
Wayne Carney, Executive Direc-
tor of the SDHSAA in Pierre at
224-9261.
I wish to close by thanking the
many workers of West River Elec-
tric and others for the countless
hours they have put in since the
blizzard to get power back to com-
munities and ranches.
There are also numerous people
to thank who have helped neigh-
bors and strangers shovel snow,
remove branches, or helped
ranchers with their livestock is-
sues.
It is a monumental task going
forward for the ranchers and com-
munities to regroup, but faith and
toughness of the people in rural
western South Dakota will pre-
vail.
Email us with your news item or photo to courant @ gwtc.net
Courtesy Photo
WALL’S “APPRECIATION
DAY” SUPPER
in conjunction with Wall High School Homecoming
Friday, October 4th • 5:00 - 6:30 p.m.
Wall City Park (alternate location Wall Fire Department)
Attend the homecoming parade at 1:30 p.m., shop wi th local merchants,
and enjoy a free meal prior to attending the football game!
We will also be accepting nonperishable food i tems for the Country Cupboard.
It’s our way of saying thanks for “Shopping Locally!”
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce Retail Committee
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
After the October blizzard,
cleaning up Wasta — Week Two.
Last week, we shared the mas-
sive clean-up done in Wasta — on
the ground, folks with chain saws
helping neighbors who were hap-
pily dragging fallen limbs to
streets edge so Terry Schell in his
big tractor with big loader could
haul it off.
We were feeling rich because by
Saturday (the 12th) we had
power!
Tuesday, a Town Board meeting
and a gathering of town folk to
discuss the situation and where
and how we needed help. Good
suggestions and good discussions.
By Wednesday, (the 16th) the
“Big Guns” were in town! Paul
Frazier and crew, Terry and Kyle
Schell, Ken Skillingstad, Brent
Taylor, brother-in-law Ray Jeppe-
sen and crew of two, Chris and
Jeff were working their way
through town to bring down the
most dangerous limbs and trees.
Unofficial crew members, but
equally hard working, Shane
Green, Mary Lewis, Billie Hulm,
Tammy Green, Lloyd Willey, Ray
Williams, Hazel Kalkbrenner
Kyle Schell, Larry Schell, Travis
Grenstiner and nephew Zack and
the Green’s friend, Dakota, and
Dan and Diana Turgeon and
Kerry Heriger.
Last week, Billie Hulm fixed
lunch for the crew so the rest of us
took a day and served a good hot
lunch at the Community Hall.
Mary Lewis and I, with help
from Faye Bryan, Ken
Skillingstad, with Dick and Gay
Hadlock providing dessert, both
days, Jamy and Ray Williams en-
tertainment provided by young
Mavrick, finished the week.
Sunday, Greens and Grenstin-
ers and again Dick and Gay
bringing some dessert, began the
week.
Today, we thank Karen Gunn,
our post master for offering her
help.
We’re sorry for Bud Jeppesen’s
loss in the death of his wife,
Mavis.
Please send your thoughts and
prayers out to him as he goes
through this time of grieving and
for the family members as well.
As Ray Jeppesen and I have
had bits and pieces of conversa-
tion this past week, a story came
to mind about Bud when we were
re-doing our little community hall
kitchen. Bud was putting up glass
shelves we had decided on instead
of cupboards (the shelves were do-
nated).
He had just finished when I
walked into the kitchen and im-
mediately started fussing, be-
cause “Bud, I can barely reach the
first shelf of the three!” Bud just
calmly got his tools together and
said without a pause, “Stand on a
sheet of paper, Margee.”
Good memories of good times.
We have worked hard on the
Wasta Community Hall as did
those senior citizens before us.
Ash Grenstiner finished volley-
ball season and is eagerly await-
ing the beginning of gymnastics,
as is cousin, Kelly Green. Kelly
Green was given a very nice
award from Black Hills Financial
Services. She was selected Sep-
tember’s Student of the Month.
We congratulate you, Kelly and
your plans to continue your edu-
cation in nursing is so admirable.
It is so amazing the work that
has been done in Wasta. Again,
our thanks to you, Paul, Brent
and Ray who brought your equip-
ment in and started on the project
so quickly.
Dayton Skillingstad and
Kaylen Spotted Bear and their
Mitey Might football team are off
to the Play-Off! Congratulations!
Happy Trails!
Social News
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Donna Jedlicka left on Tuesday,
October 10th, to go to Sioux Falls,
staying with Mike and Cheryl.
They all went to Minneapolis for
the wedding of Donna’s grand-
daughter, Heidi Jedlicka and Joe
Halvarson, which took place on
Saturday, October 12th. Donna
came home to Wall on Tuesday.
Congratulations and the best of
wishes go out to the newly weds.
Sleepy Hollow Campground
closed last week for the season. A
good source revealed it has been
sold, so when it opens we will see
new people. We will miss the
Nickels.
Norman and Betty Klingbile
hosted a family dinner on Friday.
Hugh and Amie Estes, Lyndell
and Jill Peterson were there from
Rapid City.
After knee replacement sur-
gery, Viola Williams was home for
a little while and then entered the
Clarkson Mt. View Health Care
in Rapid City to have rehab.
Plans are for her to come home
the end of this week. Hope you
are doing well, Viola!
The Wall Eagles have a couple
football games scheduled for this
week. Monday night is a game
with New Underwood (probably
the one that should have been
played for Homecoming) and
Thursday’s game is against Ft.
Pierre. Go, Eagles!
Thursday evening was Senior
Citizen Potluck night. Eighteen
were counted. not many, but food
was plenty. Anytime the couple
with the ice cream comes, it
makes a good dessert table.
West River Electric held their
74th annual meeting on Saturday
morning, October 19th. It had
been originally scheduled for Oc-
tober 5th, the “Atlas” blizzard
day. There was a nice crowd, a lot
of prizes given and the director of
District I voted in to replace Mar-
ion Wilson is Jamie Lewis of
Rapid City. Everyone was really
ready for lunch as it took longer,
having to vote twice.
Roy Hamann is still in the hos-
pital but is resting comfortably.
We will keep him in our prayers.
Last Friday was “Theme” meal
day at Prairie Village. It has been
postponed from Tuesday so don’t
know if everyone, who wanted to,
got signed up. It was a good roast
beef dinner.
We wish to offer our condo-
lences to the families and friends
of those listed in the obituaries in
last week’s Courant, (that we had-
n’t mentioned before). Lary Os-
burn of Philip was an employee of
Wall Drug, Katy Drageset of
Philip and Karen Eisenbraun of
Sturgis (Delbert’s wife).
The Wall Appreciation Supper
had to be rescheduled, also. It will
be this Thursday night, October
24th at the Community Center,
5:00 until 6:30.
Our weather pattern seems to
be stuck — windy with tempera-
tures 40s and 50s. Report for next
Monday is snow, but that is a way
off, so could change.
“Children learn best from exam-
ple; the trouble is they don’t know
a good example from a bad one.”
~Anonymous
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506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
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Becki Potrzeba, Agent
1315 E. Wells Ave., Pierre, SD 57501
877-224-4173 ~ becki@beckipotrzeba.com
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • 4
RAY WILLIAMS PLUMBING
Services included but not limited to:
•Sewer line cleaning •Water heater installation and repair
•Broken water or sewer line repair •Winterize home or sprinklers
•Faucet repairs & installation
605-515-3968 (Cell) • 605-993-3003 (Home)
The family of Lola Simpfenderfer
requests your presence to help Lola
celebrate her 90th birthday on
October 26, 2013 at the Wall
Community Center from 1 to 3 p.m.
No gifts please, your presence is
enough. If you can’t attend, you may
send a card to: Lola Simpfenderfer,
PO Box 46, Wall, SD 57790
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053 — let it ring
Mary Paulsen got the happy
news, great-nephew Ryder James
Allbee arrived October 3. His
grandpa Allbee was honored with
Ryder being named James after
him.
Delmer and Mary Paulsen are
thankful they sold their hereford
cattle last spring. The pictures in
the paper and on the news are
heartbreaking to look at, so un-
real and questionable that it had
to happen. There is no easy way
but just suck it up and figure out
how to go on. My heart goes out to
them. I have been there and seen
the likes happen.
Mary Paulsen enjoyed lunch at
the Red Rock with Mary Hansen
last Saturday and has been busy
subbing at the Wall school quite
frequently. I am sorry last weeks
new didn’t get in the paper, hope-
fully this week.
Thought: Effort plus motive
speaks result. Integrity is the
essence of everything successful.
this connection takes a lot of mo-
tive, but we are trying.
Countryside News
Happy Birthday Lillian!
Lillian Horton will celebrate
95 years on October 27, 2013.
Cards may be sent to Lillian at
Philip Health Care
PO Box 790, Philip, SD 57567
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
October 24 to
October 31, 2013
Thursday: Breakfast: Waf-
fle, Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Breast over
Rice, Green Beans, Roll, Ba-
nana, Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast: French
Toast, Egg Patty, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Mac & Cheese, Baby
Carrots, Green Peppers, Roll,
Orange, Lettuce Salad, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Break-
fast Wrap, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Chili, Cinnamon
Roll, Applesauce, Celery, Cu-
cumbers, Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast:
Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Sandwich,
Macaroni Salad, Baked Beans,
Lettuce Salad, Orange, Milk.
COURANT
BRIEFS
AMERICAN LEGION
& AUXILIARY
American Legion and Auxiliary
will have a pot luck meal and
meeting Thursday, October 24,
2013. Please plan to attend and
bring a dish to share. The pot luck
will start at 6 p.m., the meeting
will start at 7 p.m.
Halloween safety tips
Halloween is almost here, and
we want to remind the public to
stay safe while celebrating the
holiday. Both drivers and trick-or-
treaters should be watchful and
alert, to make sure everyone has a
safe and happy Halloween.
Drivers:
•Be alert. Most trick-or-
treaters will likely be out after
dark, and costumed kids may be
hard for drivers to spot. Motorists
need to be especially alert to chil-
dren crossing the road; watch for
reflective clothing and quick
movements.
•Slow down. Traveling at
slower speeds gives drivers more
time to see hazards and stop
quickly. If other cars are slowing
or stopping, be cautious, as their
actions might be the only indica-
tion that a pedestrian is in the
roadway.
•Yield to pedestrians. Pedes-
trians have the right-of-way when
crossing at intersections, even if
there isn’t a marked crosswalk.
Trick-or-Treaters:
•Watch for cars. Even if a
car’s headlights are shining on
you, the driver may not see you.
Dark clothing absorbs light, and
glare from other headlights can
momentarily blind drivers.
•Cross in the crosswalk.
Pedestrians don’t always have the
right-of-way. Pedestrians crossing
at any point other than a cross-
walk or intersection must yield
the right-of-way to vehicles.
Other tips to keep in mind:
•A parent or guardian should
always accompany young chil-
dren.
•Parents should talk with their
children about safety before head-
ing out to trick-or-treat.
•Utilize well-lit streets.
•Always walk on the sidewalk.
•If no sidewalk is available,
walk at the far edge of the road-
way facing traffic.
•Look both ways before crossing
the street.
•Cross the street only at cor-
ners (intersections).
•Don't cross the street between
parked cars.
•Wear light-colored or reflective
clothing so you are more visible to
drivers.
•Carry a flashlight.
•Motorists may not see you –
just because one car stops, it does-
n’t mean other cars will stop too.
Turn In Poachers benefits
South Dakota wildlife
The Game, Fish and Parks De-
partment is reminding citizens
that the South Dakota Turn in
Poachers (TIPs) program contin-
ues to be operational and callers
who have knowledge of illegal
hunting and fishing activity could
be eligible for rewards. The pro-
gram provides an important av-
enue for citizens to report hunting
and fishing law violations, and in
the process, prevent the loss of
wildlife that can result from ille-
gal actions.
“In the annual reporting period
from July 1, 2012 through June
30, 2013 the TIPs program re-
sulted in 103 arrests of wildlife
law violators,” GFP law program
administrator Andy Alban said.
“Wildlife would have been lost and
violators would have gone unpun-
ished if citizens had not been
proactive by calling the TIPs hot-
line and reporting violations they
had observed.”
During the past year, the TIPs
program reported 212 investiga-
tions initiated through citizen re-
ports, leading to 103 arrests, $
$19,143 in fines and $7,300 in civil
penalties.
Callers can remain anonymous,
and are eligible for rewards in
cases that lead to an arrest. Re-
wards may range up to $300 for
big game and $100 for small game
or fishing violations. Higher re-
wards may be offered in extreme
cases. Last year $9,000 in rewards
were paid.
“The TIPs program has been
going since 1984, and in that time
citizens have generated over
10,000 investigations that have
led to 3,500 arrests,” Alban said.
“We are grateful to the men and
women who have cared enough
about South Dakota’s wildlife to
report illegal activity. Each and
every individual is a vital part of
the work to preserve our natural
resources.”
Alban pointed to several viola-
tions that were investigated and
successfully prosecuted this past
year through the assistance of
eyewitnesses including:
The arrest of two out-of-state
suspects for driving into South
Dakota, trespassing and chasing
down a deer with a pickup. The
passenger shot a deer from a mov-
ing vehicle with archery equip-
ment, tagged it with a license from
a neighboring state, loaded the
deer and quickly hauled it back to
the neighboring state.
•Two out-of-state suspects who
were arrested for chasing a coyote
across a field with a snowmobile,
running down the coyote with a
snowmobile, recklessly operating
a snowmobile and eluding officers.
•Two out-of-state suspects ar-
rested for taking walleye over
their limit.
•Prosecution of three out-of-
state suspects for chasing snow
geese with a motor vehicle and
shooting from a moving motor ve-
hicle.
•Three South Dakota residents
prosecuted for shooting deer with
the aid of a spotlight, chasing and
running over deer with a vehicle,
all during April when seasons are
closed.
Individuals may call the TIPs at
1-888-OVERBAG (683-7224) to re-
port violations, or report via the
TIPs website at
gfp.sd.gov/agency/law-enforce-
ment/turn-in-poachers.aspx.
We Don’t
Charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements
and wedding wri te-ups
are published free of
charge. Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
Rel igious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Mondays: Women’s Bible Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church • Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church • Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.; Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood • Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood • Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.; Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall • Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church • Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
Ancient wisdom Ior modern liIe
Every mun uccordIng us Ie purposeLI In IIs IeurL, so
IeL IIm gIve; noL grudgIngIy, or oI necessILy: Ior God
IoveLI u cIeerIuI gIver. z CorInLIIuns q:;-8 (KJV)
WIen you gIve, do you do IL becuuse you need Lo
or becuuse you wunL Lo? God preIers LIe IuLLer.
WIen you gIve Irom LIe IeurL, you gIve wILIouL
regreL. ¡I you were on LIe receIvIng end, wIIcI
kInd oI gIvIng wouId you preIer?
279-2175
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • 5
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTION: How can couples
overcome communication prob-
lems in marriage? Whenever I try
to talk with my spouse on a
deeper, more meaningful level,
nothing I say seems to connect.
Sometimes my words even back-
fire on me. Am I doing something
wrong?
ANSWER: This is one of the
most common problems in mar-
riage. Fortunately, it’s also one of
the easiest to resolve if both part-
ners are willing to learn some
basic communication skills and
put them into practice. To put it
another way, this is not a hopeless
situation. On the contrary, it’s an
area in which you and your
spouse can expect to see rapid
and marked improvement if you’ll
simply take the time to work at it.
It’s likely that a large part of
the difficulty you’re experiencing
is due to gender differences. Men
tend to use language to transmit
information, report facts, fix prob-
lems, clarify status, and establish
control. Women are more inclined
to view language as a means to
greater intimacy, stronger or
richer relationships, and fostering
cooperation rather than competi-
tion. In other words, when it
comes to communication between
the sexes, it’s often a matter of
“debate vs. relate.”
Of course, one size never fits
all. Females can’t all be squeezed
neatly into one communication-
style box and males into another.
Some men can be quite nurturing
and emotionally empathetic in
their language; some women are
aggressive and task-oriented in
theirs. In spite of this, it’s still
true that, in a general sense, you
and your spouse are probably tun-
ing into very different “meanings”
when you attempt to talk. This
provides fertile ground for misun-
derstanding, hurt feelings, and
conflict. What one of you thinks
is the other’s “hidden meaning”
can be 180 degrees out of phase
with what the speaker really in-
tends to communicate. This can
easily lead to inaccurate conclu-
sions about the other person’s mo-
tivations.
What can be done about it? The
first step is to remember your
vows and determine to keep the
promise you made on your wed-
ding day. Many couples, during
their wedding ceremony, light a
“unity candle” and blow out their
individual candles, symbolizing
that they are dying to self in order
to become one. Among other
things, this implies that both hus-
band and wife are making a com-
mitment to focus on loving rather
than being loved. Loving means
accepting the other person as
they are. So don’t try to change
your spouse. Instead, adapt to
their style of communication.
Make it your goal to hear your
partner’s heart rather than key-
ing in on the frustration you may
feel about not being heard or un-
derstood.
You can help encourage this
process by making a date with
each other once a week to try a
communication exercise. When
you’re together and in a relaxed
frame of mind, one of you should
get the ball rolling by talking for
ten minutes about the feelings or
issues that are on your heart.
During this time, the other
spouse does nothing but listen, re-
sponding only with questions or
statements intended to promote
clarification – for example, “I
don’t understand; could you re-
state that?” or “What I hear you
saying is …” After that, you
switch sides, following the same
rules. At the end of the exercise,
neither of you is allowed to try to
“straighten the other one out,”
react angrily to something you
didn’t want to hear, or debate the
issue.
To make this plan work you’re
going to have to be intentional
and stick with your commitment.
It’s also important to be creative
and varied in your choice of sub-
jects. Try to enjoy one another
and encourage uniqueness. You
and your spouse aren’t alike, and
that’s a good thing. Think how
awful and boring it would be to be
married to yourself! So resist the
temptation to re-make your part-
ner in your own image. Start
small and build. Avoid unrealistic
expectations. Be loving, patient,
and respectful.
Other approaches to getting
“unstuck” can include attending a
weekend Christian marriage re-
treat, participating in a couples’
support group through your
church, or enlisting the help of a
licensed Christian marriage coun-
selor.
QUESTION: Why does my
wife always want me to talk to
her? When I’m tired and just
want to relax, she launches into
an emotional outburst about how
we don’t “communicate” the way
we used to. I have to leave the
house to get any peace and quiet.
Why won’t she leave me alone?
ANSWER: It’s not unusual to
find that spouses differ radically
from one another when it comes
to their needs and desires for ver-
bal communication. This is partly
attributable to gender, as most
women have a far greater stock of
words in their arsenal than do
their husbands. Or it can also be
a matter of individual tempera-
ment and personality. Opposites
attract, which is all well and good
until the honeymoon is over and
couples have to get down to the
business of living together and
understanding each other.
If you’re feeling nagged to talk,
you’re probably feeling over-
whelmed too – like a trapped vic-
tim, at the mercy of your spouse’s
“need to talk.” Worse yet, you
may be dreading another session
of having your shortcomings
pointed out. Under these circum-
stances, avoidance may seem like
the only way to find relief, but ul-
timately avoidance doesn’t work.
The relief it brings is only tempo-
rary because it leaves your spouse
without resolution – and often de-
termined to try even harder the
next time.
So what can you do if you’re
feeling cornered by a spouse who
always seems to be asking, “Can
we talk?” Here are a few sugges-
tions.
1) Take the initiative to spend
time doing things together other
than talking.
2) Go to a Christian bookstore
and buy a book about communica-
tion in marriage. Read from it
aloud to your spouse and ask her
questions about her reactions.
3) Share a chore, like doing the
dishes. You may find yourselves
communicating during the dull
moments.
4) When she's not expecting it,
ask her what she really needs.
Say, "How can I show you that I
love you?" or, "What would make
your day easier?"
5) Put the newspaper away,
neglect a hobby or turn off the TV
in order to spend time with your
spouse.
6) Keep a sense of humor. For
example, find cartoons about the
differences between men and
women and how they communi-
cate. Post them on your refriger-
ator. Be sure to poke more fun at
your own gender than your part-
ner's.
Once you’ve tried some of these
strategies you’ll be in a stronger
position to ask for the peace and
quiet you may feel you need. It’s
important to do this – you should-
n’t deny the realities of your own
personality and temperament. If
you do, you’ll probably end up
feeling like a helpless victim of
your mate’s demands.
To avoid this, try setting up a
specific time to talk. This should
thrill your spouse, since it demon-
strates a commitment to commu-
nicate. Be sure to establish a
time frame beforehand in order to
manage any false expectations.
Your wife may be thinking of a
marathon conversation while you
may dread anything longer than
a TV sitcom. Twenty or thirty
minutes should be long enough to
begin with – that’s sufficient for a
serious discussion. Pray at the
beginning and the end if you like.
Get a kitchen timer and stick to
the limit. Promise not to run, but
allow for a time-out if things get
too intense.
What should you talk about
during this time? You could start
by focusing on your respective
needs for communication and
quiet time. From there move on
to express your feelings to one an-
other about outside friendships
and recreation. Make a conscious
effort to use “I” statements to con-
vey your feelings of being pres-
sured, overwhelmed, or discour-
aged. In other words, don’t blame
or attack your spouse. The goal is
for the speaker to be heard and
understood. If you need to take a
time-out, schedule a reunion ses-
sion within twenty-four hours for
further discussion. This will give
both of you a sense of reassurance
and safety.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer
is excerpted from books authored
by Dr. James Dobson and pub-
lished by Tyndale House Publish-
ers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman
of the Board of Focus on the Fam-
ily, a nonprofit organization dedi-
cated to the preservation of the
home. Copyright 2003 James
Dobson, Inc. All rights reserved.
International copyright secured.
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Come & join us in wishing
Teri & Gary Allison
goodbye & good luck at a potluck dinner
Sunday, November 3, 2013
1:00 p.m. • Creighton Hall
Drinks, plates, and silverware will be provide,
also a special cake.
You’re invi ted to help
George Moore celebrate his
80th Birthday
Sat., November 2, 2013
1-3 p.m. • Quinn Communi ty Center
Please, no gifts.
Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 38, Quinn, SD 57775
FINANCIAL FOCUS
TAkE ADvANTAGE OF
"OPEN ENROLLMENT"
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
At many places of work, it’s
“open enrollment” season — the
time where you get to make
changes to the various benefits
you receive from your employer.
As you review your overall bene-
fits package, what areas should
you focus on?
Here are three possibilities:
•Life insurance — If your em-
ployer offers life insurance as a
benefit, and you haven’t already
signed up for it, consider adding it
during your open enrollment pe-
riod — because life insurance can
be important to your family’s fi-
nancial security. If you already
have life insurance with your em-
ployer, you may want to take the
time, during open enrollment, to
review your beneficiary designa-
tions. If you’ve experienced a
change in your family situation,
such as divorce or remarriage,
you’ll want to update your benefi-
ciaries, as needed.
•However, the amount of life in-
surance offered by your employer
in a group policy may not be suffi-
cient for your needs, so you may
want to consult with a financial
professional to determine if you
should add private, or individual,
coverage. You may find that indi-
vidual coverage is comparable, in
terms of cost, to your employer’s
coverage. Also, individual cover-
age is “portable” — that is, you
can take it with you if you change
jobs.
•Disability insurance — Your
employer may also offer disability
insurance as a low-cost benefit.
The coverage can be invaluable.
In fact, nearly one in three
women, and about one in four
men, can expect to suffer a disabil-
ity that keeps them out of work for
90 days or longer at some point
during their working years, ac-
cording to the Life and Health In-
surance Foundation for Education
(LIFE). Again, as was the case
with life insurance, your em-
ployer’s disability policy may not
be enough for your needs, so you
may need to consider addi
•Retirement plan — Your em-
ployer may offer a 401(k) or simi-
lar retirement plan, such as a
403(b) plan, if you work for an ed-
ucational institution or a non-
profit organization, or a 457(b)
plan, if you work for a governmen-
tal unit. All these plans offer the
chance to contribute pretax dol-
lars; so the more you put in, the
lower your taxable income.
Equally important, your earnings
can grow tax deferred, which
means your money can accumu-
late faster than if it were placed in
an account on which you paid
taxes every year.
•Consequently, try to contribute
as much as you can possibly afford
to your 401(k) or other employer-
sponsored plan. If you’ve gotten a
raise recently, consider boosting
your contributions during open
enrollment. Also, take this oppor-
tunity to review the array of in-
vestments you’ve chosen for your
401(k) or other plan. If you feel
that they’re underperforming and
not providing you with the growth
opportunities you need, you may
want to consider making some
changes. You might also think
about making adjustments if your
portfolio has shown more volatil-
ity than the level with which you
are comfortable. Your financial
professional can help you deter-
mine if your investment mix is
still suitable for your goals, risk
tolerance and time horizon.
Open enrollment season gives
you the perfect opportunity to
maximize those benefits offered to
you by your employer. So, think
carefully about what you’ve got
and what improvements you can
make — it will be time well spent.
Howl the Night
Away at the
Two Bit Saloon &
Steakhouse, Quinn
Saturday, October 26th
Dance to “Country Rush”
Come in your Best Costume
B
eer
S
p
ecials
•••••
P
rizes!
Sports
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • 6
Subscription
Rates:
Local: $35 plus
tax; Out-of-Area:
$42 plus tax; Out
of-State: $42
or subscribe
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www.Ravellette
Publications.com
Email us with your news item or
photo to courant @ gwtc.net
By Coach Patterson
Regions are complete! On
Wednesday, October 16th, the
Wall Squad traveled to Philip for
the Region Cross Country meet.
It was a cool, but nice day con-
sidering the day before was cold
and rainy. Spikes were definitely
a must for running, especially on
the hills.
To make it to state there are
two ways to qualify. The first 20
runners to finish qualify or the
top three teams in which all the
team runners qualify.
To make a team there needs to
be three runners up to five for
Class B schools. The Wall Squad
had two runners place in the top
20.
Austin Huether finished second
in 18:23 and David Bintliff third
in 18:45.
Then the team placed runner-
Wall Cross Country team prepares for state meet
Wall Cross Country team takes four to state. Pictured back row: Coach Karol Patterson. Front row:
from left to right ... Roland Traveny, David Bentliff, Austin Huether and David Sykora.
Del Bartels photo
up (second) to qualify all four run-
ners as well. David Sykora placed
26th in 22:09 and Roland Traveny
28th in 22:33. What an exciting
finish.
Team placings were: First,
Philip 15 points; Second, Wall 27
points; Third, RC Christian 34
points; Fourth, White River 37
points; Fifth, New Underwood 40
points; Sixth, Bison 40 points;
Seventh, Newell 57 points and
Eighth, Faith 87 pts.
Ellie Coyle, Philip won the
Girls race with Newell winning
the Girls title, Philip - second,
and Lemmon - third.
State will be Saturday, October
26th at Rapid City. The site will
be at Robbinsdale Park instead of
the Elks due to tree damage from
Blizzard Atlas.
The Class B boys run at 1:00
with awards at 2:30 p.m. The
Class B Girls run at noon that
day.
Coach’s comments: Regions
was a day of strong competition
for the boys with team standings
up for grabs. We have been finish-
ing third during the season and
knew we had our work cut out for
us.
The race was exciting, competi-
tive, fast, and lots for determina-
tion. Huether stayed pace with
the Bison runner for two miles
(the Bison runner won the race)
and finished the race in a strong
second.
Then Bentliff was running in a
pack of third - seventh positions
until the last three-fourths mile of
the race. He kicked it in and past
runners never looking back for
third. What a finish!
Sykora ran with determination
to place for the team with a score
to determine team placings. He
did it!
Traveney was one runner be-
hind Sykora and almost beat that
runner. It was a difference of .01
between them. A lean at the finish
line!
I am so proud of the guys with
their determination to make it to
state. They had personal best
times for the season and now it is
time for the final race. State!
By Coach Anderson
The Wall Eagle Football Team
defeated Philip 31 to 6 on Friday,
October 18 and turned around
and beat undefeated New Under-
wood 47 to 26 on Monday.
Due to the recent storm and a
bye week, the Eagles had not
played for three weeks prior to
the Philip game.
The Eagles came out a little
rusty vs. Philip but put together
enough plays to win the game.
That win set up a battle of ti-
tans as both New Underwood and
Wall entered the game at 6 – 0.
The winner of this game would
have control of the conference
with the win. Wall has at least a
share in the conference title and
can win it outright with a victory
Thursday, October 24 against
Stanley County.
The defense dominated the
game against Philip. The Eagles
dominated the Scotties Offense
all night.
Led by a solid effort on the line
of scrimmage and dominance by
the linebacking core of Les
Williams, Lane Blasius, and
Dusty Dartt, the Eagles only al-
lowed 66 yards of offense.
Philips only score came off of a
tipped pass that fell into a Philip
receivers hands.
Offensively the Eagles gradu-
ally scored throughout the game
and they led 7 to 0 after one and
had a comfortable 21 to 0 lead at
half. The game ended with a big
conference win.
Wall mixed the run with the
pass pretty well all day as Blasius
ended the day completing 62 per-
cent of his passes for 143 yards.
Blasius threw two scoring strikes
to Trevor Anderson.
Anderson finished with seven
catches for 81 yards and two
touchdowns on the day.
Cade Kjerstad and Carson
Johnston did most of the duties
on the ground as they combined
for 156 yards.
Kjerstad has a bulldozer men-
tality when he runs the ball and
Johnston uses more finess and
quickness when he carries the
ball. I guess you could say it’s
Wall’s version of thunder and
lightning. Add Gabe Sandal, the
bull, to the mix as a lead blocker
and you have a pretty potent
backfield.
Stats
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Final
Wall: 7 14 0 10 31
Philip: 0 0 6 0 6
Team Totals: Wall, first downs - 16,
penalties - 6, penalty yards - 30.; Philip,
first downs - 3, penalties - 2, penalty yards
- 10.
Passing: Blasius, completions - 13, at-
tempts - 21, yards - 143, percentage - .619,
average - 11.000, touchdowns - 2, intercep-
tions - 1, long - 35, QB Rate - 94.
Rushing: Blasius, number - 3, yards -
5, average - 1.67, long - 5, touchdowns - 1;
Johnston, number - 19, yards - 87, aver-
age - 4.58, long - 17, touchdowns - 1; T. An-
derson, number - 3, yards - 0, average -
.00, long - 3, touchdowns - 0; kjerstad,
number - 12, yards - 69, average - 5.75, long
- 15, touchdowns - 0; G. Sandal, number -
1, yards - 3, average - 3.00, long - 3.
Receiving: Ben Linn, number - 3,
yards - 15, average - 5.00, long - 6; T. An-
derson, number - 7, yards - 81, average -
11.57, long - 22, touchdowns - 2; Tyler Pe-
terson, number - 3, yards - 47, average -
15.67, long - 35.
Offensive Fumbles and Pancake
Blocks: Blasius, fumbles - 1; Johnston,
fumbles - 2, lost - 1.
All Purpose Yards: Blasius, rushing -
5, total - 5; Johnston, rushing - 87, kickoff
returns - 24, total - 111; Linn, receiving -
15, total - 15; T. Anderson, receiving - 81,
total - 81; kjerstad, rushing - 69, total - 69;
G. Sandal, rushing - 3, total - 3; Peterson,
receiving - 47, total - 47.
Total Yards: Blasius, rushing - 5, pass-
ing - 143, total - 148; Johnston, rushing -
87, total - 87; Linn, receiving - 15, total -
15; T. Anderson, receiving - 81, total - 81;
kjerstad, rushing - 69, total - 69; G. San-
dal, rushing - 3, total - 3, Peterson, receiv-
ing - 47, total - 47.
Tackles: Dartt, solo - 1, assists - 9, total
- 10; Blasius, solo - 6, assists - 5, total - 11;
Johnston, solo - 2, assists - 3, total - 5;
Carter Elshere, solo - 1, total - 1; Linn,
solo - 2, assists - 4, total - 6; C.J. Schulz,
solo - 1, assists - 1, total - 2; T. Anderson,
assists - 2, total - 2; G. Sandal, solo - 3, as-
sists - 1, total - 4; Peterson, solo - 3, assists
- 6, total - 9; Williams, solo - 3, assists - 8,
total - 11; R. Sandal, assists - 4, total - 4;
Clancy Lytle, assists - 2, total - 2.
Sacks: Blasius, sacks - 1.0, sacks yard
lost - 3; Linn, sacks - 1.0, sacks yard lost -
2; Peterson, sacks - 1.0, sacks yard lost -
6.
Defensive Stats: Williams, fumbles re-
ceived - 1.
Kickoffs: T. Anderson, number - 6,
yards - 211, long - 46.
Punts: T. Anderson, number - 1, yards
- 24, average - 24.00 long - 24.
Kickoff and Punt Returns: John-
ston, kickoff returns - 1, yards - 24, aver-
age - 24.00, long - 24, total - 24.
Points: Blasius, touchdowns - 1, total
points - 6; Johnston, touchdowns - 1, total
points - 6; Linn, conversions - 2, total - 2;
T. Anderson, touchdowns - 2, kick points -
5, total points - 17.
PATs and Field Goals: T. Anderson,
PAT kicking made - 2, attempts - 3, per-
centage - .667, field goals - 1, field goal at-
tempts - 1, percentage - 1.000, long - 29,
total points - 5.
Touchdowns and Conversions: Bla-
sius, touchdown rushing - 1, total - 1;
Johnston, touchdown rushing - 1, total -
1; Linn, PAT receiving number - 1, total -
2; T. Anderson, touchdown receiving - 2,
total - 2.
Eagles one step closer to
playing at the dome
Wall Eagles #10 Quarterback Lane Blasius is getting blocks from
#24 Ben Linn and #32 Cade Kjerstad during the Eagles vs Scotties
football game held in Philip on Friday, October 18. The Eagles won
31 - 6 taking their record to 6 - 0 for the season.
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By Coach Herring
After being rescheduled twice
for weather related reasons, Wall
finally got to face New Underwood
in a Western Great Plains Confer-
ence game on Thursday, October
17th.
The Eagles came out and took
control in the first set and never
let the Tigers in, as Wall took the
games 25-11, 26-24, 25-11.
Wall was firing on all cylinders,
netting 34 kills, 26 assists and 16
aces.
Kaitlin Schreiber led the team
in kills with nine, and had 11 as-
sists.
Emily Linn had 12 assists and
three kills.
Monica Bielmaier also had eight
kills and six ace serves.
Josie Blasius led the defense
with eight digs.
Stats
S1 S2 S3 Final
Wall: 25 26 25 3
NU: 11 24 11 0
Attacking: Linn, attack kills - 3, kills
per set - 1.0, kill percentage - 30.0, attacks
attempted - 10, errors - 2, hit percentage -
.100; Blasius, attack kills - 5, kills per set -
1.7, kill percentage - 33.3, attempted - 15,
errors - 2, hit percentage - .200; Schreiber,
attack kills - 9, kills per set - 3.0, kill per-
centage - 50.0, attacks attempted - 18, er-
rors - 0, hit percentage - .500; Tayah
Huether, attacks attempted - 1, errors - 1,
hit percentage - (-1.000); Carlee Johnston,
attack kills - 2, kills per set - .7, kill percent-
age - 25.0, attacks attempted - 8, errors - 2,
hit percentage - .000; M. Bielmaier, attack
kills - 8, kills per set - 2.7, kill percentage -
30.8, attacks attempted - 26, errors - 3, hit
percentage - .192; katy Bielmaier, attack
kills - 7, kills per set - 2.3, kill percentage -
26.9, attacks attempted - 26, errors - 7, hit
percentage - .000.
Serving: Linn, serving aces - 2, aces per
set - .7, ace percentage - 22.2, total serves -
9, errors - 1, serving percentage - 88.9,
points - 5; Blasius, serving aces - 1, aces
per set - .3, ace percentage - 16.7, total
serves - 6, errors - 2, serving percentage -
66.7, points - 2; Schreiber, serving aces - 3,
aces per set - 1.0, ace percentage - 15.0, total
serves - 20, errors - 2, serving percentage -
90.0, points - 16; Huether, total serves - 6,
errors - 1, serving percentage - 83.3, points
- 3; Johnston, serving aces - 4, aces per set
- 1.3, ace percentage - 30.8, total serves - 13,
errors - 2, serving percentage - 84.6, points
- 9; M. Bielmaier, serving aces - 6, aces per
set - 2.0, ace percentage - 35.3, total serves
- 17, errors - 2, serving percentage - 88.2,
points - 12.
Blocking: Johnston, solo blocks - 1,
total blocks - 1, blocks per set - .3; M. Biel-
maier, solo blocks - 1, total blocks - 1, blocks
Lady Eagles take all three sets over New Underwood
per set - .3; k. Bielmaier, solo blocks - 1,
total blocks - 1, blocks per set - .3.
Digs: Linn, digs - 3, dig errors - 6, digs
per set - 1.0; Blasius, digs - 8, dig errors -
0, digs per set - 2.7; Schreiber, digs - 5, dig
errors - 1, digs per set - 1.7; Huether, digs
- 7, dig errors - 2, digs per set - 2.3; John-
ston, digs - 1, dig errors - 1, digs per set -
.3; M. Bielmaier, digs - 3, dig errors - 2,
digs per set - 1.0; k. Bielmaier, digs - 3,
dig errors - 1, digs per set - 1.0; Nicole
Eisenbraun, digs - 5, dig errors - 0, digs
per set - 1.7.
Ball Handling: Linn, assists - 12, as-
sists per set - 4.0, ball handling attempts -
43, errors - 1; Blasius, ball handling at-
tempts - 3; Schreiber, assists - 11, assists
per set - 3.7, ball handling attempts - 41,
errors - 0; Huether, assists - 1, assists per
set - .3, ball handling attempts - 11; John-
ston, assists - 1, assists per set - .3, ball
handling attempts - 3; M. Bielmaier, ball
handling attempts - 3; k. Bielmaier, as-
sists - 1, assists per set - .3, ball handling
attempts - 3; Eisenbraun, ball handling
attempts - 3.
Serve Receiving: Blasius, serve receiv-
ing success - 1, receptions per set - .3;
Schreiber, serve receiving success- 2, re-
ceptions per set - .7; Huether, serve re-
ceiving success - 26, errors - 1, receptions
per set - 8.7; M. Bielmaier, serve receiving
success - 1, receptions per set - .3; Eisen-
braun, serve receiving success - 5, errors -
3, receptions per set - 1.7.
Nancy Haigh photo
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • Page 7
Congratulations
Wall Eagles Football
team on a grEat season
&
good
luck
at
Playoffs!
These sponsors are proud to support the Wall Eagles...
Badlands
Automotive
279-2827
De’s Oil Inc.
/SanDee’s
279-2168
Ken’s Refrigeration
& Heating
279-2894
Two Bit Saloon
& Steakhouse
386-2115
Wall Dairy Queen
279-2655
Wall Lube &
Espresso Bar
279-2227
Corner Pantry/
Subway
279-2355
Econo Lodge
279-2121
Pennington
County Courant
279-2565
Walker’s Red Rock
Restaurant & Lounge
279-2387/279-2388
Wall Drug Store
279-2175
West River
Electric Association
279-2135
2013 Wall High School Football Team …
Front row: Les Williams, Tyler Peterson, Tucker O’Rourke, CJ Schulz, Clancy
Lytle, Lane Blasius, Dusty Dartt, Ben Linn, Trevor Anderson, Ridge Sandal,
Joaquin Contreras, Cade Kjerstad. Second row: David Sharp, Cameron
Richter, Riley Ruland, Cody Huether, Reed Hertel, Will Houseman, Danny
Musik, Carson Johnston, Camden Sawvell. Third row: Riley Fortune, Carter
Elshere, Jacob Linn, Allan McDonnell, Raedon Anderson, Gabe Sandal,
Rylee Schreiber, Cass Lytle. Back row: Student Manager Kallie Anderson,
Head Coach Kent Anderson, Assistant Coaches Jackson Anderson, Jesse
Willis, David Ermish, Wayne Shull. (Not pictured: Branden Hamann, Travis
Brenner, Jesse Sawvell.)
Days Inn Motel
279-2000
Hildebrand
Concrete
490-2926
TLC Electric
279-2622
Wall Building
Center & Const.
279-2158
1st Round of Playoffs
will be held
Tuesday, October 29th
Dartt Angus
279-2242
Golden West
Telecommunications
279-2161
Super 8 Motel
279-2688
Wall Booster Club
Wall, SD
Crown Oil
Co.
279-2245
First Interstate
Bank
279-2141
Rush Funeral
Home
279-2592
Wall Auto
Livery
279-2325
Wall Food
Center
279-2331
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • 8
80 years ago…
Some pretty strong winds vis-
ited this part of the state the lat-
ter part of last week. The follow-
ing is a sample. Friday afternoon,
L. F. Mulbey, driving a Chandler
sedan was on his way to Rapid
City from the east, about six miles
east of Quinn, the wind tore off
the top of his car and blew it
around so the car was facing the
east and then forced it into the
ditch. Mr. Mulbey was not injured.
It was reported that the gravel-
ing on the road south of town has
again been turned down and will
again be up for bids on November
2.
Messers, Joyce Douglas and
Alvin Schone of Wall, were mem-
bers of the freshmen Tug O’ War
team which contested against the
sophomores at Dakota Wesleyan
on their Annual Homecoming Day,
Saturday. This is an annual event
and it is the first time the fresh-
men have won over the sopho-
mores in five years.
70 years ago…
Wall’s old City Hall, theatre,
dance pavillion, prize fighting
ring, roller skating rink, and liv-
ery stable, will soon be torn down
to give way for a more modern im-
plement and machine warehouse.
The A. C. Kingsbury Hall was pur-
chased last week by H. H. John-
son. The building will be torn
down and the lumber used to re-
build a warehouse and display
room for the Johnson Implement
Co. It was back in 1907 that Gene
Mackrill erected the building and
for its first ten years was used as
a livery barn. O. C. Marshall, Joe
Knapp, Harry Babcock and Sam
Bloom were some of the names
connected with the livery busi-
ness. About 1917, John Hinrichs,
brother of A. A. Hinrichs of Pedro,
bought the livery barn and made
it over into a dance hall. From
that time until a few years ago, it
was used as a place for public
gatherings. C. H. Parr and Her-
man Ballard were the first to
make the hall into a moving pic-
ture theatre.
John Sieh moved a small house
last week to the Kjerstad district
to be used as a school house. The
school board, Peter Kjerstad, Emil
Kjerstad Jr. and Schreiber now
have a school house and five
pupils and are trying to locate a
teacher for the school.
Through The Eagles Eye:
What if… Warren Harnisch
brought a pencil? Dick Logan was
never absent? Violet Williams
wore her hair in an up-sweep?
Eileen and Mary didn’t whisper in
the assembly? John didn’t tease
Bernice? Kathleen knew her les-
sons? Donna didn’t lose her tem-
per? Wall Eagles hadn’t turned
cowboys? Some unknown party
didn’t take Milton’s desk apart?
Three certain Freshmen girls did-
n’t fight over nothing?
60 years ago…
Oil drilling equipment started
moving yesterday to the oil drill-
site at the Roy Shull place, 12
miles south-west of Wall. The spot
is a half mile west of Shull’s house
and is considered the most favor-
able from the data obtained from
seismograph surveys. The drillers
immediate problem is obtaining
water for the drilling operations.
Yesterday they were debating
whether to drill a well for water or
a pumping station on the
Cheyenne River about three miles
away.
BIRTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Smith at the St. Johns
hospital in Rapid City, a daughter,
Friday. Papa is as proud as a pea-
cock. The daughter’s name is Lori
Lenet.
The Wall PTA’s family night
was well attended in spite of the
rain Tuesday evening at the
school gymnasium. Parents and
children enjoyed a pot luck dinner
at six o’clock and then an evening
of dancing. Eight members of the
Badlands girl scouts entertained
the folks with three dances. The
girls were JoAnn Jensen, Sandra
Pierce, Barbara Joyce, Margaret
Wright, Sharon Dartt, Ann Garri-
son, Beverly Romans and Delores
Hiller. Clive Wyant served as
caller for square dances and circle
two steps. For orchestra, Mrs.
Cliff Sorensen was at the piano,
Leroy Trask on the drums, and
Chuck Romans at the banjo.
50 years ago…
Burglars broke into the Wall
Bowling Lanes early Thursday
morning but found the “cupboard
quite bare.” Items reportedly
missing was $4.00 change taken
for the cash register, about one
carton of cigarettes and approxi-
mately four cases of beer. Accord-
ing to City Marshall, Norman
Klingbile, the entry was made by
prying the rear door and occurred
after the 12:30 closing hour and
before 7:00 a.m.
The Wasta fire truck was called
to the Ed Coad ranch home late
Wednesday evening to extinguish
a prairie fire started by lightning.
Nearly two inches of rain fell in
Wasta in a short period of time
early Sunday morning. The down-
pour even flooded the floor of the
Pruess Grocery. There was no
damage to merchandise as Oscar
was there to keep things out of the
water.
Quite a few Creighton folks at-
tended the masquerade party at
Elm Springs, put on by the Linn
school with Paula and Alma
Eisenbraun as teachers. Jean
Linn and Otto Eisenbraun carried
off first place for the best cos-
tumes.
40 years ago…
Very fine fall weather greeted
the Wall High School Homecom-
ing activities Thursday evening
and Friday. Following the pep
rally and bon fire, the Homecom-
ing royalty were announced and
knighted to their respective posi-
tions, Miss Angie Johnston for
Homecoming Queen and John
Kitterman for King. The Wall Ea-
gles had to give ground to the
Cheyenne Eagle Butte boys in the
Homecoming football game, 26 to
8. It was John Kitterman who car-
ried the ball for the single touch-
down, with Don St. Clair taking
the ball over for the two point con-
version. This scoring came in the
their period.
BIRTH: Born a son to Mr. and
Mrs. Don Brown of Elko, Nev.,
Sept. 26. Mrs. Brown is better
known here as Ann Eisenbraun,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar
Eisenbraun. The young man has
been named Jayson Darin and
joins his four year old sister,
Jayme, at home.
The $100.00 winners at the
weekly Chamber of Commerce
drawings of names on Main Street
were: Linda Szarkowski for the
fifty silver dollars, Alvin Drewitz
and Pauline Morgan, ten silver
dollars each; Marilyn Sutter, the
twenty-five dollar pot, and Glenda
Knapp, five dollars.
Miss Connie Olic, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Olic, Sce-
nic, was united in marriage to
Arlen R. Carmichael, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Vern E. Carmichael of
Faith, in the Scenic Congrega-
tional Church, September 22,
with Rev. Ted Gustafson perform-
ing the ceremony. The bride is a
graduate of Wall High School and
attended the National College of
Business in Rapid City. Mr.
Carmichael is a graduate of Faith
High School and presently sta-
tioned at Ellsworth Air Force
Base.
The annual meeting of the Pen-
nington County Farm Bureau was
held at the Wall Legion Hall, Oct.
9 beginning at 11:00 a.m. with the
County president, Rodney Renner,
presiding. After the opening
prayer by Harlan Eisenbraun and
the flag salute led by Alvin Eisen-
braun, the business meeting came
to order. Both the secretary’s and
the treasurer’s reports were read
and approved with all outstanding
bills ordered paid. Mrs. Lorena
White was honored as the Out-
standing Farm Bureau Woman of
the Year from Pennington County.
She was awarded a plaque from
the County Farm Bureau. Mrs.
Shirley Printz, Dist. VI Chair-
woman, announced that Mrs.
White had also been chosen as
Dist. VI Outstanding Farm Bu-
reau Woman of the Year.
30 years ago…
Only after the results of Fri-
day’s Homecoming game were in
could the festivities that go along
with a homecoming be considered
successful. The Wall Eagles
earned a 42-20 victory over the
New Underwood Tigers in the
contest and picked up their second
victory of the season. Rhonda
Lurz and Kevin Wilson were cho-
sen as King and Queen to reign
over the 1983 Homecoming.
Jana Fauske finished first in
the girls division at the Region 5B
cross country meet held Saturday,
Oct. 22, in Philip to lead the Wall
team to a second place team finish
behind Hill City in the girls divi-
sion. Wall’s second place finish
with a team total of 14 points was
high enough to earn the team a
berth in state competition to be
held Saturday, Oct. 29, in
Mitchell.
The Wall Lady Eagles contin-
ued to play close games this past
week, as the team picked up their
third victory of the season against
New Underwood on Tuesday, then
suffered their ninth setback when
they played St. Martin’s on Thurs-
day. The victory over New Under-
wood was by a score of 35-33, and
the loss to St. Martin’s was by a
45-41 count.
20 years ago…
Re-elected to the WREA Board
of Director members were Roy
Hamann, Wall; Leo Grubl, Here-
ford; and Jerry Hammerquist, Ca-
puta. The three men were unani-
mously re-elected at WREA’s 54
Annual meeting held Saturday at
the Wall Community Center.
The Wall Police Department re-
sponded to 24 incidences in the
month of September, and made
nine arrests. There were five acci-
dents reported and investigated.
The police also investigated a
stolen vehicle complaint, two ani-
mal complaints (one dog bite, one
barking dog), two disturbances in-
volving racing vehicles, three
petty larcenies involving gas drive
offs, one lost and found, one dam-
age to property, six church re-
sponses, 10 ambulance calls, one
alarm, one Class I misdemeanor
arrest, and four motorist assists.
Misty Linabery of Wall, and
Jerry Hays of Wall, exchanged
wedding vows in a ceremony held
at St. Nicholas Catholic Church in
Valentine, Neb., on Saturday, Au-
gust 28. Father Jim Janovec offi-
ciated the double ring ceremony.
Misty is the daughter of Leo and
Ruth Linabery of Todd County,
and Jerry is the son of Robert and
Della Hays of Wall.
It was another 40 on the score-
board for the Wall Eagles football
team and Head Coach Kent An-
derson as the Eagles defeated the
New Underwood Tigers, 40-6, Fri-
day night.
The Wall Lady Eagles took an
early lead over the Philip Lady
Scotties, Tuesday, Oct. 12, and
The Looking Glass of Time
Have you ever pondered how
unique creation truly is? Consider
the spider web. No two of them
are ever the same. There are no
two snowflakes ever alike either.
Each leaf on a tree is just a tad bit
different than its neighbor. Every
mountain range is shaped just so
special that you can only imagine
that the pressures from within the
Earth must have been great. Cre-
ation is utterly filled with exam-
ples of uniqueness!
We can easily look around us
and see the diversity in nature,
and yet, for some strange reason,
we humans don't understand that
each of us is special and unique
too. The fact is, we all have varied
backgrounds and experiences-
where and when we were born
and grew up, how we were raised,
trials, challenges, successes we've
encountered-and have developed
our values and our own unique
ways of doing things. Every
human being ever created is an in-
dividual, unique in purpose and
no two are ever exactly alike.
So how is it that we so easily fall
into the habit of comparing our-
selves with others? Whether we
realize it or not, most of us con-
stantly compare ourselves to an-
other's income, position, knowl-
edge, talents, abilities, growth,
beauty, character, or some other
quality. But we are unique! We
shouldn't be comparing ourselves
with others at all! The only com-
paring that should be happening
is within ourselves-where we are
in our personal and professional
growth compared to where we
were yesterday or last year. Com-
paring ourselves with others only
leads to being judgmental and
critical, either of ourselves or of
others, and in the long run can be
very unhealthy for us and our re-
lationships.
You and I can choose to refrain
from the unhealthy habit of com-
paring ourselves to others. We can
choose to be the unique individu-
als that we are made to be, and we
can and should honor and respect
the uniqueness of others. I encour-
age you today, to reaffirm your
own uniqueness and that of oth-
ers. Remind yourself that you are
somebody; you are special and
have been made for a unique pur-
pose that can only be fulfilled as
long as you are not trying to be
like somebody else. And remember
that every other person is also a
special somebody with a unique
purpose-and they don't have to be
just like you.
If you feel as though you have
been caught up in making com-
parisons that have hindered you
in fulfilling your destiny in life,
you may want to consider that you
have been looking in the wrong di-
rection. Instead of watching oth-
ers to see how well they are (or are
not) doing, simply shift and turn
your perspective and point of view
back to your own life. If you are on
your way to meeting the stan-
dards that you have established
for yourself, then be free to be
uniquely yourself. Go a step fur-
ther and allow others to be the
unique individuals they are, and
in doing so you will be honoring
the uniqueness of us all!
Honor The Uniqueness Of Us Al!
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly moti-
vational seminars each year. Call
Bob for more details at 800-437-
9715 and be sure to check out
Bob’s website at: www.mratti-
tudespeaks.com
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDS CÞevg Tro11b1ozer
V-b, Auto, 4x4 . Good 1o go!!
NowAvAilAble…
Total Equine
Horse Feed
as seen on RFDTV.
Call George Michael at 515-1181.
NO ALLEY GARBAGE SERVICE
EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY
Notice is hereby given that Residential garbage
service will only be picked up from the street front
and sides and NOT from the alleys beginning
Immediately. Alley service will resume in the Spring.
Thank You, City of Wall
Published October 17 & 24, 2013, at the total approximate cost of
$64.00.
held on to the lead for a 57-51 vic-
tory.
10 years ago…
Brett Blasius has been ap-
pointed to the South Dakota State
Fair Advisory Commission. Bla-
sius is the Assistant Vice-Presi-
dent of First Western Bank in
Wall and also serves as the Ag
Loan Officer. In addition to bank-
ing, he ranches and raises horses.
He and his wife live near Wall and
have two children with another
one on the way. Brett Blasius is
the tenth member to join the
South Dakota State Fair Advisory
Commission.
Nadezda Muckova and Todd
Eisenbraun were married October
4, 2003, in a garden wedding at
the home of Todd’s parents in
Wall, by the Rev. David Schwan,
with Vicar Monty Dell assisting.
The bride’s parents are Pavol and
Sona Muckova of Partizanske,
Slovak Republic. Parents of the
groom are Stephen and Gayle
Eisenbraun of Wall.
Ernest Helms children, Donna
Staben, Bob Helms and Ruby
Keyser, accepted a plaque in
honor of their father at the South
Dakota State Fair awards pro-
gram. Ernest was inducted into
the South Dakota 4-H Hall of
Fame, a program that aims to rec-
ognize people who contribute a
great deal of time to the develop-
ment of 4-H programs in South
Dakota. He had a distinguished
career as a 4-H leader in Penning-
ton county for 26 years.
The Wall Eagles football team
lost to the Lyman County Raiders
by a score of 22-20, Friday, Octo-
ber 17.
CONGRAtuLAtIONS, EAGLES
these sponsors are proud to support the Wall eagles ...
Badlands Automoti ve
Corner Pantry
/Subway
Crown Oil Co.
Dartt Angus
Days Inn Motel
De’s Oil Inc./SanDee’s
Econo Lodge
First Interstate Bank
Golden West
Telecommunications
Hildebrand Concrete
Ken’s Refrigeration
& Heating, Inc.
Pennington County
Courant
Rush Funeral Home
Super 8 Motel
Two Bit Saloon
& Steakhouse
Walker Red Rock
Restaurant & Lounge
Wall Auto Li very
Wall Booster Club
Wall Building Center
& Construction
Wall Dairy Queen
Wall Drug Store
Wall Food Center
Wall Lube & Espresso
Bar
West Ri ver Electric
Assoc.
on placing
second as a
team at
Regions.
Good Luck
at the
State Cross
Country Meet
Saturday,
October 26th
Robbinsdale Park
(626 E. Fairmont Blvd.)
Rapid City, SD
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • Page 9
Cl assifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & Ranch
HAY FOR SALE: Approx. 1250
tons, half hybrid Pearl millet and
half sorghum/sudan BMR.
Tested good, net wrapped, big
round, trucking available if
needed. Call Rick at 386-2375.
WP9-4tc
ATTENTION RANCHERS:
WANTED: Used oil and payment
if over 200 gallons. We also carry
new lubes and greases for the
care and maintenance of your
Heavy Equipment. Contact Gary
Perlebert, Red Giant Oil Sales,
Rapid City, SD, 605-877-4064,
www.redgiantoil.com. WP9-2tp
MISSING CATTLE: 5 head.
Could be 1 cow, 4 calves. Lazy M
L Bar, left hip. Roy and Margaret
Pfeifer, 859-2243 (work), 859,
2466. P45-2tp
FOR SALE: JD 4450 tractor, 15
speed, power shift, 3-point, 3 hy-
draulic outlets, 540 and 1000
PTO, new tires. JD 740 self-lev-
eling loader, excellent shape.
Call 530-9540. P45-2tp
FOR SALE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
found
FOuND: Video camera in a walk-
in area near Cottonwood, S.D.,
while bird hunting on October
13. Call to identify, 355-0728.
PR8-2tc
GaRaGe saLes
HuGE RuMMAGE SALE: Knut-
son-Hostutler. Thursday, Octo-
ber 24th 12 - 6p.m., Friday, Oc-
tober 25th 8 a.m. - 12 noon.
NEW and used items: furniture,
decorative, Christmas, LOTS of
name brand teenage - women’s
clothing, Miche purses, motorcy-
cle, antique kitchen stove/tools,
and much more! Old NAPA
building, downtown Philip. No
early sales. P46-1tp
heLP Wanted
HELP WANTED: Looking for an
honest, hardworking house-
keeper to take care of general
cleaning. $600 per week. Email
maryjohnsonking@hotmail.
com for more details. PR9-3tp
RN/LPN POSITIONS: Seeking
loving and patient geriatric
nurses at the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Benefits available. Con-
tact Heidi or Ruby at 837-2270.
K46-tfn
DIETARY AIDE POSITION:
open at the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Full time with benefits.
Call Ruby or Cathy or 837-2270.
K46-2tc
autoMotive
FOR SALE: 2003 Ford F350
King Ranch. Loaded, new bat-
tery, fair tires, and topper. 859-
3552. P46-2tp
Business & seRvice
NEED A PLuMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn, 441-1053, or leave a
message at 837-0112. K44-4tp
ROuGH COuNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
BuSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
O’CONNELL CONSTRuCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
KADOKA AREA SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT: is accepting applications
for an assistant janitor. Applica-
tions are available on the web-
site, www.kadoka.k12.sd.us and
submitted to KASD, Attn. Supt.
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543. For more in-
formation call 837-2175.
K46-2tc
WANTED: Housekeeper 1 day/
week, every 2 weeks. Call 859-
2256. PR8-2tp
FuLL TIME JACKSON COuNTY
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
WORKER: Truck driver, heavy
equipment operator, light equip-
ment operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumes accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422. Fax 837-
2447. K45-5tc
THE JONES COuNTY BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS will be
accepting applications for full-
time employment with the
County Highway Department.
Applications and resumé will be
received at the Jones County Au-
ditor’s office, P.O. Box 307,
Murdo, SD 57559 until Friday,
November 1, 2013 at 5 p.m.
CDST. Applications must be
picked up at the County Audi-
tor’s office, 310 Main Street,
Murdo, SD, or the Jones County
Highway Shop, 311 N. Main
Street, Murdo, SD. Please state
valid South Dakota driver’s li-
cense number and C.D.L. status
on application. For further infor-
mation, call 669-7102 (County
shed), 530-3355 (Highway Su-
perintendent cell) or 669-7100
(County Auditor’s office). Jones
County is an equal opportunity
employer. M44-3tc
LOOKING FOR: Finance Man-
ager & Sales Person. Contact
Colt at Philip Motor, 859-2585 or
685-4314. P43-tfn
FuLL- OR PART-TIME PRESS-
ROOM HELP WANTED: Monday
and Wednesday mornings (3-4
hours each day). Will train the
right person. Call Beau Ravel-
lette, 859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K33-tfn
AMERICA’S BEST VALuE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping and laundry. Stop
in to apply or call Joseph at 279-
2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Jackie at 348-
8108 or 391-7806, or fax resumé
to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
Misc. foR saLe
FOR SALE: 300 Magnum with
scope, 2506 with scope. Call
859-3552. P46-2tp
ELK MEAT FOR SALE: For de-
tails call 484-1898. P46-2tp
FOR SALE: Several nice refriger-
ators with warranties. Del’s, Exit
63, Box Elder, SD, 390-9810.
PR8-2tc
LOOKING FOR SPECIFIC an-
nual vegetables or flower seeds
for next growing season? I am
ordering seeds now. Call 859-
2057 or 515-0675, Gary’s
Greenhouse. P44-3tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notices/Wanted
KADOKA LEGION AuXIIARY
MEMBERS: Please bring two
items or cash donation to Holi-
day Festival bake sale, November
3. K46-2tc
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday,
November 3, 2013, Kadoka City
Auditorium. Booths available.
Call Ruby at 837-2270.
K45-3tc
OPEN HOuSE: Featuring Pam-
pered Chef, Lemon Grass, Taste-
fully Simple, and wine tasting at
Creative Cuts & Fitness in
Kadoka, Friday, October 25th, 1
to 6 p.m. K46-1tc
WANTED: Old Indian items,
beadwork, quillwork, old guns,
old painted buffalo hides, old
photographs. Cash paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802.
F46-4tp
WANTED: Antlers. Looking to
buy deer, elk, and moose antlers.
Paying cash. 360-3749.
P46-3tp
NOW IS THE TIME … TO
THINK OF YOuR FAMILY &
FRIENDS! It’s not too early to be
compiling your Christmas or
end-of-the-year letter! You write
it, email it to us (ads@pioneer-
review.com) and we will print it
on beautiful holiday stationary.
We can even put your full color
family picture with the letter. Let
us help you make the holiday
season special (and easier) this
year. Ravellette Publications,
Inc. Philip Office: 859-2516; Wall
Office: 279-2565; Kadoka Office:
837-2259; Faith Office: 967-
2161; Bison Office: 244-7199;
Murdo Office: 669-2271; New
Underwood Office: 754-6466.
P41-tfn
WANTED TO BuY: Old farm ma-
chinery and junk cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
ReaL estate
HOuSE FOR SALE: Asking
$25,000. 406 Norris Street, Wall.
279-2825. PW46-3tp
HOME FOR SALE: 206 Myrtle
Ave., Philip. Double lot, 30x24
double garage, 30x24 concrete
pad in front of garage, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, 1,200 sq. ft. main
floor, full basement unfinished,
second floor - 430 sq. ft. room
remodel started, central air/
heat, 12x8 storage shed, 500 gal.
propane tank, new 85 gal.
Marathon water heater, dish-
washer. Call Kanables at 859-
2957. P46-2tp
FOR SALE: Single bedroom
house, 26x24, with 6x8 porch.
Good for dwelling, workshop,
storage. Call 859-2057 or 515-
0675. P44-3tc
RecReation
FOR SALE: 2005 Polaris four
wheel drive, 300 Magnum four
wheeler. $3,500. Call 669-2165.
P46-2tp
FOR SALE: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
good shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, frig and large front stor-
age box. Stored inside off sea-
son. Call 279-2195 or 441-7049,
Wall, anytime. WP4-tfn
RentaLs
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
cLassified PoLicy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
AuCTION:
LAND AUCTION: 474+/- Acres, Lake
Oahe-Peoria Flats, Cropland, Recre-
ational, Development, Prime Hunting,
8 miles north of Pierre, SD, just above
the Oahe Dam, November 12, 2013.
Call Dakota Properties, Todd Schuet-
zle, Auctioneer, 605-280-3115,
todd@placetohunt.com, www.Dako-
taProperties.com.
4th ANNUAL LEBANON Consignment
Auction. Saturday, Oct. 26, 10 am,
Lebanon, SD. Consignments welcome
until sale day. Contact Gary McCloud
605-769-1181, 605-948-2333, Sam
McCloud 605-769-0088, Lewis Reuer
605-281-1067. Complete listing at
www.mrauctionsllc.com
800+ ACRES CROPLAND with 200+
Acres Pasture, productivity 79,
Reeder Loams, Class II & III, Mo-
bridge SD, Absolute Auction, Nov. 4,
www.PiroutekAuction.com or 605-
544-3316
BuSINESS OPPORTuNITY:
CALL AVON TO EARN extra money
for Christmas. **40% discount/com-
mission - $10 to start** Call 605-334-
0525
EMPLOYMENT:
FULL TIME JACKSON COUNTY
HIGHWAY Department Worker. Truck
driver, heavy equipment operator,
light equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug and
alcohol screening required. Benefits
package. Applications / resumes ac-
cepted. Information (605) 837-2410
or (605) 837 – 2422 Fax (605) 837-
2447
LOOKING FOR A MANAGER for our
P/O Printing & Graphics division in
Watertown. The position involves
sales, bidding of print jobs, market-
ing and customer service. Successful
candidate should have customer
service experience, strong math and
computer skills, and the ability to
lead a team. A full-time position with
benefits. Send letter of interest and
resume to: chris.carter@thepubli-
copinion.com Position closes October
31, 2013.
PATROL OFFICER – Hourly pay
range: $20.14-$24.50/hr. Visit:
www.cityofbrookings.org Return ap-
plication w/resume to PO Box 270,
Brookings, SD 57006-0270. dlang-
land@cityofbrookings.org
IMMEDIATE OPENING. Duties in-
clude but not limited to, bulk delivery
of fuel. CDL, Hazmat required. Will
train. Farmers Oil Company, Orient
SD. Information, Don, 392-2424.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL,
Custer Clinic, Hot Springs Regional
Medical Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care have full-time, part-time
and PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN, Li-
censed Medical Assistant and Nurse
Aide positions available. We offer
competitive pay and excellent bene-
fits. New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at (605)
673-9418 for more information or log
onto www.regionalhealth.com to
apply.
THE WATERTOWN PUBLIC OPINION
has an immediate opening for a Full-
time Reporter to join its news team.
The successful candidate will have
the ability to cover a wide variety of
news events in print and video and
still feel comfortable putting together
a compelling feature story. Experi-
ence is preferred but will consider a
recent journalism graduate. Photog-
raphy and video skills are a plus. The
Watertown Public opinion is a six-day
a week newspaper in northeastern
South Dakota. This job offers com-
petitive wage based on experience,
and benefits package with health
benefits, 401(k) and life insurance.
Send letter, resume, layout and writ-
ing and/or video samples to: Water-
town Public Opinion, Attn: Human
Resources, PO Box 10, Watertown,
SD 57201, or e-mail:
chris.carter@thepublicopinion.com
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Belle
Fourche Development Corp. Job re-
quirements include a degree or work
experience in economic development
or related fields. Application and in-
structions at www.bellefourche.org
(click on BF Development Corpora-
tion tab). Contact Krysti at 605-892-
3006 or Krysti@bellefourche.org if
you have any questions.
FOR SALE:
FAMOUS CENTRAL SD BAKERY
available for purchase in Gettysburg.
Established turnkey mix bakery with
both wholesale and retail sales. Con-
tact Kathleen at ltgandt@yahoo.com
or 240-461-4779.
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will consider
contract for deed. Call Russell Spaid
605-280-1067.
HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW:
HOLDIAY CRAFT & BOUTIQUE
Show, November 29 & 30, Belle
Fourche Community Center. Vendor
space available. For more information
contact 605-892-2336 or www.black-
hillsparrotwelfare.org
LOG HOMES:
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders repre-
senting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com
OTR/DRIVERS:
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner op-
erators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549
MISCELLANEOuS:
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
lation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-1892
WANT TO BuY:
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer , Elk/moose 7.50 lb. Bleached
3.00 lb. cracked 1.00 lb. Also need
Porcupines, Rattlesnakes, Elk
Ivories, Mt. Lion skins. More info;
605-673-4345 / clawantlerhide@hot-
mail.com
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
Pennington County Courant • October 24 2013 • 10
annc@gwtc.net
THANK YOuS
I would like to thank West
River Electric for the $100 I won
at their Annual Meeting in Wall
on October 19, 2013.
Thank you,
Nick Feller
WASTA TOWN
BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
OCTOBER 15, 2013
The Wasta Town Board held their reg-
ular meeting on Tuesday, October 15,
2013 at the community building. Board
Chairman Justin Crawford called the
meeting to order at 7:00pm with board
members Dorreen Skillingstad and Norm
Current present. Others present were
Gay and Richard Hadlock, Barb Craw-
ford, Tammy Green, Tommy and Angela
Carter, Stuart and Shirley Kitterman, Ken
and Daneene Skillingstad, Keri Heriger,
Mary Lewis, Dan and Dianne Turgeon,
Larry Schell, Terry Schell, Billie Hulm,
Margie and Lloyd Willey, Ray Williams
and Hazel Kalkbrenner.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the September 9th minutes as
read. Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the financial statement as given.
Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the bills as follows: Justin Craw-
ford, wages, $27.70; Dorreen
Skillingstad, wages, $23.09; Norm Cur-
rent, wages, $23.09; Tammy Green,
wages, $554.10; Carolynn Anderson,
wages/supplies, $306.42; WREA, elec-
tricity, $708.92; Pennington Co. Courant,
publishing, $110.47; Energy Laboratories,
water test, $246.50; Department of Labor,
unemployment tax, $5.37; Midwest Coop-
eratives, propane, $413.26; EFTPS, pay-
roll tax, $149.18; Walker Refuse, garbage
pickup, $641.90. Motion carried.
Carolynn commented she was unsure
of the meter deposit that Barb Crawford
was asking about last month and asked
Barb to look through the book to make
that determination. Barb was able to dis-
tinguish the deposit in the book. Motion
by Norm, second by Dorreen to approve
the meter refund of $7.50 to Barb. Motion
carried.
Carolynn presented a rate increase
sample to the board with a $2 increase on
all minimums across the board as well as
increasing the additional gallon usage by
a $1.25 across the board. It was a con-
sensus of the board that would be a fair
increase. It was questioned if the sewer
rates were going to increase. Tammy
commented it was suggested to be good
practice at a workshop she attended to
keep the sewer mains cleaned with a ro-
tation schedule. Carolynn will review the
quote that was received to determine a
suggested increase for sewer rates for
next month’s meeting.
Carolynn explained the garbage rates
will need to be increased with the in-
creased cost to the town. Raising the fee
to $19.25 was suggested. This will be in-
cluded in the resolution for water rate in-
creases.
Norm reported on the street locations
for repair with the $6,000 budget. The
contractor agreed to lower the mobility
fee to make the budget work. B Avenue
and Oak Street, B Avenue and Pine
Street and Hwy 14/16 from A Avenue and
C Avenue will be repaired with this
budget.
Update on the waterline repair was
given. Rackicy Plumbing has not been in
touch with Tammy since August. The
Board directed Tammy to get in contact
with Ronnie and give a deadline to com-
plete the job. If the deadline is not
reached another contractor will be notified
for the job.
Tammy stated the ‘State’ meter pit is
full of water and therefore unable to get a
reading. She will pump the water before
it freezes and breaks the meter. With the
extra moisture the blocks are beginning
to push inside the pit.
Concerned citizens spoke of their con-
cern for getting the trees cleaned up from
the blizzard because of the potential fire
hazard it has become. A committee was
formed with Terry Schell named the ‘Pro-
ject Manager’; to continue moving for-
ward with the cleanup and to receive
funding from any disaster aid relief that
may become available. The Town will
need to front the cost to receive the aid
reimbursement.
With all business complete, Justin ad-
journed the meeting at 8:35pm.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
Town of Wasta
Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $36.71.
NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
Sealed bids will be received by the Pen-
nington County Highway Department on
behalf of the Board of Commissioners for
the following project at the Pennington
County Highway Department, 3601 Cam-
bell Street, Rapid City, SD 57701, until
2:00 PM (MST) on Wednesday, Novem-
ber 6, 2013. Any bids received after 2:00
PM (MST) will be returned unopened.
NEW UNDERWOOD SHOP
CONSTRUCTION
Copies of the project plans are on file at
the Pennington County Highway Depart-
ment, 3601 Cambell Street, Rapid City,
South Dakota 57701, and may also be
obtained from the Pennington County
Website at http://www.co.pennington.sd.
us/highway/hwy.html. For questions and
comments, please contact the Penning-
ton County Highway Department at (605)
394-2166.
By virtue of statutory authority, preference
will be given to materials, products, and
supplies found or produced within the
State of South Dakota.
The Board of Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities therein and re-
serves the right to award the contract to
the lowest responsible bidder as they so
determine.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $14.30.
PENNINGTON
COUNTY
SPECIAL BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS’ MEETING
OCTOBER 10, 2013
A special meeting of the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners was
held on Thursday, October 10, 2013, in
the Commissioners' meeting room of the
Pennington County Courthouse. Chair-
person Lyndell Petersen called the meet-
ing to order at 2 p.m. with the following
Commissioners present: Ron Buskerud,
Ken Davis and Nancy Trautman. Com-
missioner Holloway was not in atten-
dance.
ASSISTANCE / PLAN FOR DISPOSAL
OF LIVESTOCK
MOVED by Petersen and seconded by
Davis to allow Pennington County pro-
ducers to bring dead livestock to the two
designated burial sites, with the sites to
be closed upon 24 hour notice from the
Board of Commissioners. It was further
moved to authorize Emergency Manage-
ment to open other burial sites as the
need is identified. Vote: Unanimous.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 2:55
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $10.87.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
James and Charlette Steele; Fisk Land
Surveying – Agent, has applied for a Re-
zone to rezone 25 acres from General
Agriculture District to Limited Agriculture
District located on NW¼SE¼SE¼;
NE¼SE¼SE¼; and S½SE¼NE¼SE¼,
in Section 25, T2N, R6E, BHM, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota, approximately
two (2) miles northwest of Rapid City,
near the intersection of Sun Ridge Road
and Pushing Place, in accordance with
Sections 206 and 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
8th day of November 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $18.11.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Rapid City DSDP VIII, LLC; (Jerry and
Donna Olson – landowners) has applied
for a Variance to reduce the minimum re-
quired parking spaces from 36 to 30 in a
General Commercial District located on
the following metes and bounds descrip-
tion: The following describes a parcel of
real property being a portion of Tract 1,
less Utility Lot 1, less Lot B, less Lot WR
of the NE1/4NE1/4, less Lots H1, H2, H3,
H4 and less ROW of Longview Road, all
in Paul Subdivision, Section 15, Township
1 North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, being more particularly described
as follows: COMMENCING at the South-
east corner of Lot H-4 of Tract 1 of Paul
Subdivision recorded in Book 11 of High-
way Plats at Page 173, said corner
marked by a 5/8” rebar capped “LS
3712”; THENCE; along the southerly
boundary line of said Lot H-4, also being
the southerly Right-of-Way line of
Longview Road, South 87°54’00” East,
242.58 feet to a found 5/8” rebar capped
“LS 3712” marking the Southwest corner
of said Lot H-4; THENCE; leaving said
southerly boundary line along the west-
erly boundary line of said LOT H-4, South
02°06’47” West, 11.22 feet to a point on
the southerly Right-of-Way of Longview
Road; THENCE; leaving said westerly
boundary line, along said southerly Right-
of-Way line, also being the Southerly
boundary line of Lot H1 as shown on the
official plat thereof on file in the Penning-
ton County Register of Deeds office in
Book 11 of Plats at Page 67, North
87°53’13” West, 112.49 feet to a set 5/8”
rebar capped “ CETEC LS 4725” marking
the beginning of a curve to the left;
THENCE; along said curve to the left
90.79 feet to a set 5/8” rebar capped “LS
4215”marking the Northwest corner of
said Lot C, said curve having a central
angle of 37°03’34”, a radius of 460.00
feet, and being subtended by a chord
which bears South 86°36’37” West, a dis-
tance of 90.64 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE; leaving said
southerly Right-of-Way line, along the
northerly boundary line of said Lot C,
South 49°16’36” East, 168.91 feet to a set
5/8” rebar capped “LS 4725” marking the
Northeast corner of said Lot C; THENCE;
leaving said northerly boundary line,
along the easterly boundary line of said
Lot C, South 40°43’03” West, a distance
of 271.80 feet to a set 5/8” rebar capped
“LS 4725” marking the Southeast corner
of said Lot C, said point also being on the
northerly Right-of-Way line of SD High-
way 44; THENCE; leaving said easterly
boundary line, along the southerly bound-
ary line of said Lot C, also being the
northerly Right-of-Way line of said SD
Highway 44, North 49°15’59” West, a dis-
tance of 277.06 feet to a set 5/8” rebar
marking the southwest corner of said Lot
C, said corner also marks the intersection
of the Right-of-Way lines for said
Longview Road and said SD Highway 44;
THENCE; leaving said southerly bound-
ary line, and said northerly Right-of-Way
line, along the southeasterly Right-of-Way
of said Longview Road, also being the
westerly boundary line of lot C, 297.53
feet along the arc of a curve to the right,
said curve having a central angle of
37°03’34”, a radius of 460.00 feet and
being subtended by a chord which bears
North 62°25’35” East, a distance of
292.37 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; The above-described parcel of real
property contains 65,282.32 Sq. Ft.,
1.498 Acres, more or less and is SUB-
JECT TO a 15 foot wide Right-of-Way
Easement granted to the Rapid Valley Ir-
rigation Ditch Company being centered
on the centerline of the Murphy Ditch,
said Easement is recorded in Book 15 at
Page 8318 of Miscellaneous Record,
Pennington County Recorders Office;
Also SUBJECT TO an Access and Cul-
vert Maintenance Easement granted to
the Rapid Valley Irrigation Ditch Company
for the maintenance of a 48 inch pipe and
the aforementioned Murphy Ditch, said
Easement is recorded in Book 16 at Page
5460 of Miscellaneous Records, Pen-
nington County Recorders Office; Also
SUBJECT TO all easement and reserva-
tions of record, 3579 Reservoir Road, in
accordance with Sections 209, 310-A-2,
and 509 of the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
5th day of November 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $45.43.
FOR LEASE
Scenic Township Quarter (160 acres) SE
1/4 of Section 33, Township 2 South,
Range 13 East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian.
Notice is hereby given that Scenic Town-
ship #7 of Pennington County, South
Dakota, will be accepting sealed bids up
to 7:00 p.m., November 6, 2013, at which
time the sealed bids will be opened and
read during the monthly Township meet-
ing held at the Scenic Community Center.
The above Township quarter will be
leased for a period of (5) five years. The
lease is to be paid annually in advance.
Ten percent (10%) of said bid must be ac-
companied by a certified cashiers check
or money order. This lease will be from
November 1, 2013 through October 31,
2018. There is a minimum bid of $1200
per year. The first payment is due upon
executive of the lease agreement.
This land is for livestock grazing only and
will not be over grazed. Prairie dogs will
be controlled by the lessee. The Township
Board reserves the right to reject any and
all bids. The Township Board reserves the
right of inspection, with the lessee at any
time.
The bids must be mailed to: Scenic Town-
ship, Attn: Acting Clerk, Lease Bid, PO
Box 15, Scenic, SD 57780, or presented
to the Board by 7:00 p.m. at the meeting.
Kathy Jobgen,
Acting Township Clerk
Published October 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $29.90.
Publ ic Notices
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • 11
annc@
gwtc.net
People read the
newspaper for many
different reasons. Some
want to stay abreast of the latest local,
state and national news, while
others read the sports pages
word-for-word. Still others scan the
latest classifieds.
Call or stop by your local newspaper
office today to subscribe.
Pennington Co. Courant
Box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
Got a Iot of junk?
Get rid of it fast in the
classifieds. You never know
what trash could wind up
treasure.
PENNIN0T0N C0UNTY
C0UBANT
212 4th Ave., Wall, SD
annc@gwtc.net · 279-2565
South Dakota state parks to host
Halloween weekend events
Campgrounds are open year-
round and several parks will host
trick-or-treaters at special events
this Halloween season.
Make plans to attend a Hal-
loween event:
•Halloween Night Hike, Fri-
day and Saturday, October 25-26,
5 - 8 p.m. MT at the Peter Norbeck
Visitor Center. Participants take a
guided one-mile night hike along
a path lit only by jack-o-lanterns
during this festive educational
event. The event is geared to ex-
pose families to the interesting
and humors sights, sounds, and
night life of Custer State Park.
Hikes take place every 15 minutes
from 5:30 - 8 p.m. MT. Reserva-
tions are required. For more infor-
mation or to make reservations
call 605-255-4464.
•Spooktacular Trick or
Treat Trails, Saturday, Oct. 26,
at Big Sioux Recreation Area near
Brandon. Big Sioux’s trails will
provide tons of Halloween fun.
Participants can follow reflective
signs with their flashlights on a
scavenger hunt and gather prizes
and treats at stops along the trail.
Hot chocolate, cider and coffee will
be available at the park’s picnic
shelter. Bring a flashlight. The fun
begins at 5 p.m. CT. For more in-
formation call 605-582-7243.
•Forest Drive Night Hike,
Saturday, Oct. 26, at Richmond
Lake Recreation Area Fun for all
ages can be had at this frightening
event. Explore the trails in the
dark as you participate in a scav-
enger hunt. Be careful as there
may be spooks along the way. For
more information call 605-626-
3488.
•Trick or Treat Trails, Sun-
day, Oct. 27, at LaFramboise Is-
land Nature Area in Pierre. A trail
marked by reflective signs will
guide participants through the
wooded nature area. Trick-or-
treaters can gather prizes, infor-
mational material and treats by
visiting event sponsors at stops
along the trail. Bring a flashlight.
The Halloween fun runs from 4:30
to 7:30 p.m. CT. For more informa-
tion call 605-773-2885.
There is no cost to participate in
any of these events, although a
park entrance license is required
at Custer, Big Sioux and Rich-
mond. Participants should wear
comfortable hiking shoes and
dress for the weather. Children
must be accompanied by adults.
Costumes are encouraged for the
hikes but not required.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
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859 2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: SATURDAY, OCT. J9, 2DJS
We Þod o Spe1oo1 So1urdog Co1] So1e due 1o
1Þe ueo1Þer pos1ponemen1s. N1oe run o] oo1-
11e 1n 1oun & o good oroud o] bugers. A verg
s1rong morKe1.
FEEDER CATTLE:
ROBERT R. YOUNG SR., UNION CENTER
71.............................CHAF-STF 722=...........$173.25
41..............................DWF-STF 642=...........$174.50
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 538=...........$189.00
22.............................HEFF-STF 623=...........$170.50
60...........................CHAF HFFS 651=...........$163.25
28 ..................DLK & DWF HFFS 578=...........$169.50
12...........................HEFF HFFS 486=...........$171.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF:
108 .........................DLACK-STF 526=...........$200.50
119 .........................DLACK-STF 458=...........$221.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 370=...........$216.50
RYAN VIG, OPAL
92 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 556=...........$184.25
15.........................FD/DLK-STF 438=...........$219.00
101....................FWF/DWF-HFF 522=...........$171.50
CARL & CASEY KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
30.........................FD/DLK-STF 476=...........$217.00
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 415=...........$210.00
GALE BRUNS, NEW UNDERWOOD
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 573=...........$187.00
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 491=...........$201.00
95...........................DLACK-HFF 544=...........$179.00
14...........................DLACK-HFF 451=...........$186.50
BAKER & THOMPSON, NEW UNDERWOOD
56 ...........................DLACK-STF 564=...........$182.50
11.......................DLK/DWF-STF 447=...........$215.00
19 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 467=...........$180.50
CARL BAUMAN, KADOKA
79.....................CHAF/FED-STF 480=...........$197.00
12.........................FD/DLK-STF 419=...........$211.00
29 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 455=...........$181.00
8 ......................CHAF/FED-HFF 357=...........$171.00
DENNIS & KAY SIELER, QUINN
21 ...........................DLACK-STF 458=...........$211.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 535=...........$194.00
RUBY GABRIEL, CREIGHTON
96.......................DLK/DWF-STF 558=...........$188.50
17.......................DLK/DWF-STF 488=...........$208.00
14..............................FWF-STF 582=...........$171.50
54 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 524=...........$176.75
16 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 428=...........$181.00
BRYAN CUNY, ALLEN
66 ...........................DLACK-STF 554=...........$189.00
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 435=...........$205.00
15...........................DLACK-HFF 464=...........$174.50
COY & LI2 FISHER, SCENIC
49 ...........................DLACK-STF 586=...........$184.50
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 482=...........$204.00
36..............................DWF-HFF 550=...........$172.75
13...........................DLACK-HFF 479=...........$184.50
GERALD (SONNY) POURIER, SCENIC
34 ...........................DLACK-STF 566=...........$183.50
9.............................DLACK-HFF 399=...........$180.00
28 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 537=...........$171.75
GARY ALLISON, CREIGHTON
20.........................FD/DLK-STF 599=...........$174.75
12 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 559=...........$166.50
RUTH & ISAACS, FAITH
27 ...........................DLACK-STF 489=...........$202.50
38 ...........................DLACK-STF 614=...........$176.75
GLENN & DELORIS PUCKETT, KYLE
71....................DK/FD/CH-STF 538=...........$188.00
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 447=...........$202.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND, RED OWL
107 ...................CHAF/DLK-STF 531=...........$189.00
28 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 446=...........$201.00
79 ............................CHAF-HFF 493=...........$180.25
13.....................CHAF/DLK-HFF 414=...........$181.00
JOHN NAESCHER, WALL
18.......................DLK/DWF-STF 580=...........$179.50
8.........................DLK/DWF-STF 437=...........$201.00
11.............................HEFF-STF 515=...........$178.00
21 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 532=...........$174.00
12 ............................HEFF-HFF 474=...........$170.00
JIM STRATMAN, BOX ELDER
14.............................CHAF-STF 528=...........$185.00
5...............................CHAF-STF 465=...........$199.00
17 ............................CHAF-HFF 483=...........$176.00
DALE BRASSFIELD, NEW UNDERWOOD
68 ...........................DLACK-STF 512=...........$193.50
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 427=...........$212.00
24...........................DLACK-HFF 421=...........$193.50
BEAU BENDIGO, HOWES
29....................DK/FD/CH-STF 571=...........$175.50
8...........................FD/DLK-STF 484=...........$196.00
43....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 527=...........$167.00
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 433=...........$175.00
DAN & JOHN OLDENBERG, PHILIP
82 ...........................DLACK-STF 535=...........$187.75
KEN BRONEMANN, ENNING
22.......................DLK/DWF-STF 618=...........$176.00
ROBERT SCHERER, MARTIN
15.......................DLK/DWF-STF 605=...........$173.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 572=...........$164.00
TERRY ELLERTON, CUSTER
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 646=...........$171.75
10...........................DLACK-HFF 628=...........$160.50
DAN & DIXIE OEDEKOVEN, STURGIS
9 .............................DLACK-STF 542=...........$183.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 526=...........$164.00
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, OCT. 22, 2DJS
J2,DSS Þeod o] oo111e so1d Þere on Tuesdog.
Mong, mong po11oods o] n1oe quo111g oo1ves
ond geor11ngs. We uou1d 11Ke 1o 1ÞonK o11 o]
our gord Þe1p ]or moK1ng 1Þ1s Þoppen. TÞ1s
uos o b1g dog. TÞonKs 1o o11 1Þe bugers &
oons1gnors ]or 1Þe1r 1ogo11g & oon]1denoe.
FEEDER CATTLE:
RICHARD JOBGEN, KADOKA
105 .........................DLACK-STF 531=...........$205.50
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 449=...........$214.00
RATTLE SNAKE RIDGE RANCH, NEWCASTLE
37 ...........................DLACK-STF 452=...........$217.00
121 .........................DLACK-STF 538=...........$200.00
21...........................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$200.00
118.........................DLACK-HFF 501=...........$186.00
PATRICIA OLIC, SCENIC
6 .............................DLACK-STF 411=...........$222.50
74 ...........................DLACK-STF 536=...........$202.75
REINERT & ENRIGHT, HOWES
87.......................DLK/DWF-STF 523=...........$200.00
95.......................DLK/DWF-STF 598=...........$183.75
23 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 464=...........$183.00
ROGER & TRAVIS LARSON, MURDO
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 500=...........$210.00
96 ...........................DLACK-STF 595=...........$182.75
SHAW RANCH INC., WHITE OWL
47 ...........................DLACK-STF 528=...........$200.00
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 556=...........$195.25
96 ...........................DLACK-STF 624=...........$184.00
JOHN EISENBRAUN, KADOKA
69 ...........................DLACK-STF 426=...........$224.00
108 .........................DLACK-STF 505=...........$208.75
105.........................DLACK-HFF 481=...........$203.00
107.........................DLACK-HFF 424=...........$197.00
DAVID FEES, MUD BUTTE
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 468=...........$210.50
96.......................DLK/DWF-STF 569=...........$181.50
17 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 452=...........$185.00
43 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 530=...........$174.00
DIAMOND S RANCH LLC, UNION CENTER
43.......................DLK/DWF-STF 490=...........$198.00
113.....................DLK/DWF-STF 593=...........$181.75
14 ......................FED/FWF-STF 576=...........$179.00
65 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 538=...........$170.00
TED & LUCILLE BERNDT, EAGLE BUTTE
164 .........................DLACK-STF 485=...........$212.50
102 .........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$194.25
CHUCK O'CONNOR, PHILIP
98.............................CHAF-STF 529=...........$199.00
180...........................CHAF-STF 611=...........$184.25
81 ............................CHAF-HFF 503=...........$184.50
184 ..........................CHAF-HFF 576=...........$170.25
ROSS WILLIAMS, PHILIP
80.............................CHAF-STF 686=...........$176.00
40.............................CHAF-STF 661=...........$173.00
80.............................CHAF-STF 726=...........$171.75
80 ............................CHAF-HFF 640=...........$170.50
84 ............................CHAF-HFF 676=...........$166.50
17 ............................CHAF-HFF 624=...........$165.25
WILCOX & RHODEN, UNION CENTER
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 461=...........$214.00
133 .........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$186.00
95 ...........................DLACK-STF 643=...........$179.00
MARTY BURNS, PHILIP
79.............................CHAF-STF 659=...........$179.50
79.............................CHAF-STF 550=...........$185.00
18 ...........................DLACK-STF 548=...........$191.00
6...............................CHAF-STF 431=...........$211.00
49 ............................CHAF-HFF 499=...........$174.75
100 ..........................CHAF-HFF 612=...........$170.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST, HOWES
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 442=...........$211.00
98.......................DLK/DWF-STF 544=...........$197.50
OWEN & JOSH FERGUSON, LONG VALLEY
78.......................DLK/DWF-STF 474=...........$211.00
105.....................DLK/DWF-STF 550=...........$195.50
RUSTY FOSTER, MEADOW
49 ...........................DLACK-STF 476=...........$197.25
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 562=...........$185.25
TJ GABRIEL, MIDLAND
34 ...........................DLACK-STF 633=...........$176.00
35...........................DLACK-HFF 601=...........$177.00
TOM & LACY CLEMENTS, PHILIP
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 415=...........$226.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 544=...........$191.00
16...........................DLACK-HFF 491=...........$188.00
DICK & ERIC GROPPER, LONG VALLEY
12 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 380=...........$236.00
44 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 475=...........$206.50
103 ....................FWF/DWF-STF 532=...........$189.25
26......................FWF/DWF-HFF 409=...........$182.50
74......................FWF/DWF-HFF 499=...........$175.25
GARY & JULIE NIXON, PHILIP
60 ...........................DLACK-STF 633=...........$181.50
MERLE HICKS, MARTIN
106.......................FD/DLK-STF 543=...........$189.00
87 ...........................DLACK-STF 655=...........$179.00
81 ..............................FED-STF 671=...........$178.25
MCDANIEL BROTHERS., PHILIP
56 ...........................DLACK-STF 430=...........$220.50
97 ...........................DLACK-STF 518=...........$202.50
59...........................DLACK-HFF 400=...........$199.00
92...........................DLACK-HFF 476=...........$193.75
10 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 435=...........$186.00
ROBERT L HARTSHORN, SPEARFISH
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 471=...........$200.00
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 552=...........$187.00
14...........................DLACK-HFF 469=...........$182.00
ROBERT COMPTON, HOWES
12.......................DLK/DWF-STF 398=...........$228.00
46....................DK/FD/CH-STF 511=...........$189.75
8........................FWF/DWF-HFF 351=...........$190.00
24....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 474=...........$170.00
JARMAN RANCH, MIDLAND
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 509=...........$199.50
94.......................DLK/DWF-STF 627=...........$180.75
20...........................DLACK-HFF 504=...........$176.00
51..............................DWF-HFF 596=...........$166.50
PAT & ROSE TRASK, WASTA
126.....................DLK/DWF-STF 407=...........$213.00
90.......................DLK/DWF-STF 481=...........$195.25
PAUL SCHNOSE, BUFFALO GAP
25 ...........................DLACK-STF 483=...........$205.50
48 ...........................DLACK-STF 551=...........$190.00
PHILIP HOY LIVING TRUST, GILLETTE, WY
58 ..............................FED-STF 386=...........$236.50
110.......................FD/DLK-STF 462=...........$211.50
12..............................FED-HFF 312=...........$216.00
160............................FED-HFF 423=...........$209.00
PHILIP KRUSE, SCENIC
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 523=...........$191.00
RONALD OPSTEDAHL, UNION CENTER
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 436=...........$212.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 544=...........$189.00
27...........................DLACK-HFF 496=...........$175.25
GARY HERRINGTON, HERMOSA
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 515=...........$192.00
51 ...........................DLACK-STF 610=...........$175.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 505=...........$165.50
GARY WILLIAMS, WALL
36 ...........................DLACK-STF 433=...........$214.00
24 ...........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$184.50
DUSTIN LUR2, PHILIP
12....................DK/FD/CH-STF 433=...........$201.00
27.....................CHAF/FED-STF 556=...........$187.00
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 454=...........$175.00
11 ............................CHAF-HFF 521=...........$171.00
MIKE PIROUTEK, MILESVILLE
6...............................CHAF-STF 556=...........$184.50
21.............................CHAF-STF 614=...........$178.00
ETTIE MAE WHIRLWIND HORSE, INTERIOR
13 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 457=...........$205.00
19 ...........................DLACK-STF 564=...........$185.50
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 446=...........$171.00
STEPHEN RIGGINS, KADOKA
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 486=...........$206.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 582=...........$178.00
STEVE CLEMENTS, PHILIP
8 .............................DLACK-STF 350=...........$239.00
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 466=...........$213.00
13...........................DLACK-HFF 353=...........$213.00
12...........................DLACK-HFF 433=...........$190.00
TREVOR WILLIAMS, INTERIOR
24 ...........................DLACK-STF 518=...........$200.00
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 620=...........$175.00
BILL MUNROE, UNION CENTER
36.........................FD/DLK-STF 453=...........$207.00
56.........................FD/DLK-STF 560=...........$183.25
9 ..........................FD/DLK-HFF 424=...........$184.50
57 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 503=...........$166.50
ANDREW J. SCHOFIELD, BELVIDERE
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 433=...........$217.00
80.......................DLK/DWF-STF 518=...........$197.50
20 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 415=...........$193.00
22 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 484=...........$178.00
CARMICHAEL & DRESSEN, NEW UNDERWOOD
20 ...........................DLACK-STF 456=...........$211.50
93 ...........................DLACK-STF 578=...........$182.50
12...........................DLACK-HFF 468=...........$184.00
BILL BURGAN, ROBERTS, MT
9 .............................DLACK-STF 426=...........$209.00
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 497=...........$200.00
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 605=...........$185.50
14...........................DLACK-HFF 454=...........$171.00
BILL HAMANN, WALL
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 555=...........$190.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 531=...........$170.00
BRAVE BULL CREEK, MIDLAND
13.........................FD/DLK-STF 517=...........$194.50
BRIAN WILCOX, STURGIS
4 .............................DLACK-STF 373=...........$237.00
6 .............................DLACK-STF 469=...........$211.00
44 ...........................DLACK-STF 590=...........$179.00
16...........................DLACK-HFF 471=...........$178.50
35...........................DLACK-HFF 556=...........$168.25
BRUCE & SHARON BARNETT, WALL
6.........................DLK/DWF-STF 541=...........$188.50
CAPUTA LAND CO LLC, CAPUTA
81 ...........................DLACK-STF 713=...........$171.50
CASEY SAMMONS, MIDLAND
25....................DK/FD/CH-STF 511=...........$190.50
9......................DK/FD/CH-STF 594=...........$177.00
CHARLES A KRUSE, INTERIOR
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 460=...........$205.00
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 545=...........$192.00
21...........................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$194.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY, PHILIP
15.......................DLK/DWF-STF 456=...........$201.00
92.......................DLK/DWF-STF 605=...........$180.75
LYNN & BEN SMITH, NEW UNDERWOOD
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 477=...........$205.00
90 ...........................DLACK-STF 602=...........$180.00
KOLETTE STRUBLE, KADOKA
5.........................DLK/DWF-STF 390=...........$237.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$197.00
9.............................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$187.00
22...........................DLACK-HFF 497=...........$177.00
KEN KAUFMAN, ROBERTS, MT
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 553=...........$190.00
32 ...........................DLACK-STF 616=...........$184.50
LAUREL ANN LAWRENCE, TIOGA, ND
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 432=...........$216.00
21.......................DLK/DWF-STF 520=...........$190.00
17 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 424=...........$173.00
CHASE RANCH LLC, MIDLAND
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 475=...........$209.00
66 ...........................DLACK-STF 578=...........$182.00
8.............................DLACK-HFF 440=...........$190.00
51...........................DLACK-HFF 558=...........$174.00
CODY & MANDI SKOGEN, WHITE
8.........................DLK/DWF-STF 460=...........$213.00
18 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 577=...........$177.25
21 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 512=...........$172.50
LEVIN & CASTEEL, HEREFORD
22.......................DLK/DWF-STF 414=...........$224.00
41.......................DLK/DWF-STF 492=...........$201.00
97.......................DLK/DWF-STF 562=...........$184.50
41 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 430=...........$186.00
80 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 514=...........$175.00
BASEL & LAMONT, UNION CENTER
14.........................FD/DLK-STF 489=...........$197.00
45....................DK/FD/CH-STF 577=...........$176.00
DARWIN SCHOCK, HERMOSA
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 766=...........$152.50
DUSTIN W. & WES REEVES, OWANKA
10 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 892=...........$155.50
MEEKS RANCH, INTERIOR
47.......................DLK/DWF-STF 424=...........$210.00
10.........................FD/DLK-STF 342=...........$203.00
93.......................DLK/DWF-STF 527=...........$187.75
34 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 394=...........$175.00
94 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 480=...........$171.00
LARRY GRAVATT, ELM SPRINGS
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 427=...........$209.00
42.......................DLK/DWF-STF 523=...........$194.00
48 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 504=...........$177.00
MARK LANTIS, BOX ELDER
46.......................DLK/DWF-STF 402=...........$231.00
16.......................DLK/DWF-STF 496=...........$200.00
31...........................DLACK-HFF 375=...........$210.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 451=...........$188.00
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE, PHILIP
26 ...........................DLACK-STF 374=...........$209.00
41 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$195.50
43 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$192.75
13 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 311=...........$201.00
7 ......................CHAF/FED-HFF 442=...........$183.00
35 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 428=...........$183.00
MARVIN WILLIAMS, OWANKA
20 ...........................DLACK-STF 445=...........$210.00
46 ...........................DLACK-STF 589=...........$184.25
18...........................DLACK-HFF 440=...........$189.00
MAX & TOM BOWEN, NEWELL
76.......................DLK/DWF-STF 584=...........$177.75
10 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 564=...........$168.00
MIKE & BONITA HENRY, EDGEMONT
4.........................DLK/DWF-STF 436=...........$208.00
29.......................DLK/DWF-STF 579=...........$175.00
19 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 507=...........$165.50
MORRIS & ANDY LINN, ELM SPRINGS
104 .........................DLACK-STF 496=...........$197.00
93 ...........................DLACK-STF 566=...........$187.50
19...........................DLACK-HFF 410=...........$195.00
66...........................DLACK-HFF 471=...........$182.00
NICHOLAS HOBART, HILL CITY
23 ...........................DLACK-STF 533=...........$185.00
O M IWAN & SONS, MIDLAND
88.........................FD/DLK-STF 442=...........$201.50
13......................FWF/DWF-HFF 284=...........$187.00
109....................FWF/DWF-HFF 412=...........$186.50
12............................XDFD-HFF 332=...........$152.00
RICHARD BERTOLINO, ROBERTS, MT
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 626=...........$176.00
8 ..........................FD/DLK-HFF 602=...........$165.00
ROBERT GRAV, HERMOSA
7.............................DLACK-HFF 590=...........$163.00
ROSETH CATTLE CO., PHILIP
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 467=...........$212.00
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 568=...........$186.00
45...........................DLACK-HFF 533=...........$176.00
ADDISON & WILLIAMS, NORRIS
10.....................FWF/HEFF-STF 403=...........$208.00
VERNON SCHLECHT, HERMOSA
13.......................DLK/DWF-STF 470=...........$209.00
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 585=...........$168.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 595=...........$162.00
YEARLINGS:
SIDNEY FAIRBANKS, PHILIP
330 .........................DLACK-STF 851=...........$168.75
71 ...........................DLACK-STF 792=...........$166.00
ROSETH CATTLE CO., PHILIP
179 .........................DLACK-STF 949=...........$161.75
63.....................CHAF/FED-STF 964=...........$160.50
57.............................HEFF-STF 973=...........$155.50
BERNARD NESS, CAPUTA
62.......................DLK/DWF-STF 832=...........$170.75
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 757=...........$171.00
MARK & KAREN FOLAND, MIDLAND
100 ....................DLK/DWF-HFF 802=...........$162.00
HAROLD MILLER, NEWELL
9.......................CHAF/FED-STF 919=...........$153.50
11 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 939=...........$150.00
PAUL SLOVEK, PHILIP
82 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 823=...........$156.50
81 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 847=...........$155.75
RAPID CREEK RANCH, CANTON
33..............................FED-HFF 923=...........$153.50
GENE OR SHERYL MICHAEL, PHILIP
24 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 869=...........$156.00
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG, KADOKA
7......................DK/FD/CH-STF 1,025=........$142.50
RUSSELL NELSON, LEMMON
18.............................HEFF-STF 744=...........$164.00
28.............................HEFF-STF 821=...........$160.00
15......................FWF/DWF-HFF 787=...........$155.50
RASMUSSEN LEHMAN 33 RANCH, BELVIDERE
11...........................DLACK-HFF 712=...........$152.00
MCILRAVY RANCH, PHILIP
48 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 774=...........$159.75
14.....................CHAF/FED-STF 710=...........$151.00
RON ADAM, STURGIS
21.........................FD/DLK-STF 732=...........$169.50
13 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 568=...........$158.00
33 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 688=...........$156.00
(SEE CORRESPONDING AD FOR UPCOMING SALES)
Pennington County Courant • October 24, 2013 • 12
tDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
todd Sieler
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567-3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman & AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985-5486
Ccll (605} 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544 3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347-0151
(605} 641-1042
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9 2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R CALF USA! R CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859 2577
PhiIip, SD
UPCOM1NG SAL£S:
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2013: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE. CALVES: 12.00 MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EST. 5000 HEAD
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED.
WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS - 600 MOSTLY DLK & A FEW FED & CHAF X CLVS; FS, NI . 450-
600= DEAL & DEAL - 450 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= TRASK - 320 DLK MOSTLY
STFS; FS,NI . 500= CAMMACK - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS . 550-650= DEERING -
250 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 600= DALY - 250 DLK CLVS; FS . 550-600= VIG - 220
DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= LONG - 200 CHAF X STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= GRUBL -
200 CEFT FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI . 550= CROSBIE - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550=
ANDERS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-575= ALDREN - 150 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 500-
570= LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT - 150 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= LAMPHERE &
GRUBL - 130 MOSTLY CHAF X & A FEW DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600= TRUEBLOOD &
TWISS - 130 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= COLLINS - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-
550= BALDWIN - 110 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-575= GOLDEN WILLOW RANCH -
100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= BACHAND - 100 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-
550= BREWER - 75 DLK CLVS; FS . 450-500= MARLER - 75 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI
(ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-600= CHORD - 70 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550=
SHARP & SIMMONS - 70 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 550= KNIFE - 70 DLK STFS; FS .
450-500= BASEL - 70 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 450-525= SHULL - 65 DLK CLVS;
FS,NI . 500= TRUEBLOOD - 54 DLK CLVS . 400-500= MAY - 50 DLK & FED CLVS;
FS,NI,AN . 550= MARLER - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI (ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-
600= SIMONS - 40 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= SCULL - 40 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI . 500-550= HEBB - 40 DLK CLVS; FS . 450= BILLS - 25 DLK CLVS; FS . 525=
GRIMES - 20 DLK CLVS; FS . 500= BECKWITH - 22 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500=
YEARLINGS: SCULL - 20 DLK EXPOSED HFFS . 750-800=
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE. YEARLINGS
9.00 MT CALVES 11.00 MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATINC
12,000 HEAD
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEH-
IFIED. CUNY & SONS - 500 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= BUCHHOL2 & RISLOV -
500 DLK STFS; FS . 500-625= SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - 400 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 550-
600= WEBER - 350 DLK, DWF & FWF CLVS; FS . 500-600= CARLEY RANCH - 350 DLK
CLVS; FS,NI . 550= C. WILLIAMS - 340 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= WISHAR
& MANGUS - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= JOHNSON & LAMONT - 300 DLK
CLVS; FS,NI (ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-575= FIELDS - 300 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .
500-600= TRIPLE S LIVESTOCK - 300 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= WILLERT
& WILLERT - 275 CHAF X CLVS; FS (FEW FED ANC FEPLC HFFS} . 600-650= M.
WILLIAMS - 250 FANCY FED ANC CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI (2 LDS STFS & 1 LD HFFS} . 600-
700= MADER & MADER - 220 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-575= DIAMOND S
RANCH - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= BRENNAN - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI,ASV . 450-550= JOHNSTON RANCH - 200 FED X & CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 500-
550= RIGGINS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550= WILSON BROTHERS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS
. 500-550= WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK - 200 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 450-
550= L. JONES RANCH - 200 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= KC BIELMAIER RANCH -
200 DLK CLVS; FS . 600= BUCHERT & BUCHERT - 200 FED CLVS; FS,NI . 600-700=
VANDERMAY & VANDERMAY - 190 DLK ANC STFS; FS,NI . 575= LIVERMONT RANCH -
175 DLK HFFS; FS,NI . 500= MANSFIELD - 160 DLK STFS; FS . 500-600= STOUT -
160 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 550-600= O'DANIEL - 160 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= PAUL-
SON - 150 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= VOGELGESANG - 140 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-
600= SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - 140 DLK STFS . 575= KEFFELER - 130 DLK & DWF
CLVS; FS,NI . 525-575= JULSON - 125 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 450-550= O'ROURKE -
125 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-525= O'CONNELL - 120 DLK CLVS; FS . 550= DAHL -
115 DLK CLVS; FS . 500-600= CANTRELL - 110 DLK CLVS; FS . 500-550= HARTY
RANCH - 110 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= SHARP - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-
600= DAVIS - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN . 550= O'DANIEL - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .
550= REEVES & REEVES - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500= BIRKELAND - 100 DLK & DWF
CLVS; FS . 600= HEATHERSHAW - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 550= PRANG - 100 DLK
STFS; FS,NI . 550-600= FERGUSON - 100 HEFF & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600=
KNIGHT - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 450-550= SHUCK BROTHERS - 100 DLK &
FED LIM X CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= HEATHERSHAW - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 600=
VOLMER - 90 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 570= CAPP RANCH - 90 DWF & FWF STFS . 450-
500= ECKERT - 85 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 600-650= COE - 85 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI
(ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 575= JULSON - 80 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= BARRY - 80 DLK &
DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= HALL - 70 FED & DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= HUNSAKER
CATTLE CO - 45 MOSTLY DWF FIFST CFOSS STFS; FS,NI,AN . 600=; 25 FANCY DWF
FIFST CFOSS HFFS; FS,NI,AN . 600= MCKAY - 65 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-
575= SAMMONS - 65 FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI . 600-650= DENKE - 65 DLK STFS; FS,NI
. 575-600= CARLSON - 65 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= ROSETH - 60 DLK STFS; FS
. 600= ENNEN - 60 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 600= WILSEY - 55 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI . 500-550= VANDENBOS - 51 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500= PFEIFER - 50
DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= HANNUM - 50 DOSTLY DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= STRAND -
45 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= DOOLITTLE - 45 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 600-
650= HANSON - 45 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600= DARTT - 40 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 600=
DAVEY - 40 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= RYPKEMA - 35 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .
500-550= BARRETT - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= MEINEN - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI
. 500= HAUK - 26 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550= BEARHEELS - 15 DLK CLVS; FS . 400-
500= YOUNG - 15 DLK CLVS; FS . 400-500= REICHERT - 15 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI
. 450-500=
YEARLINGS: LONG - 400 DLK SPAY HFFS (5 LD ALL SAME SOFT} . 800= BRUCH
RANCH - 50 DLK TESTED OPEM HFFS . 900= BUCHANAN - 20 DLK STFS . 950= BIER-
WAGEN - 6 DLK OPEN HFFS . 950=
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE & WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE. WEIGH-UPS 9.00MT BRED CATTLE 12.00MT EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
DISPERSIONS: JOE & LARAE CARLEY ºAGE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK COMINC 3 & 4 YF
OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25. STEVE ISKE ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK &
DWF 2 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-20. MIKE PIROUTEK ºCOM-
PLETE DISPERSION" - 50 DLK & DWF MOSTLY 5 YF OLDS COWS; DFED.CHAF; CLV. 3-15
FOF 65 DAYS GALEN NIEDERWERDER ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 25 FANCY DLK AI'D 3 &
4 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FINAL ANSWEF; CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. HEFF; CLV. 4-1; 10
FANCY DLK AI'D HFFS; DFED. DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. DLK; CLV.4-1 JJ HUNT
ºDISPERSION OF THREES" - 45 DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25 FOF
60 DAYS RYON RYPKEMA ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 30 DLK 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN
MOUTH COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV.2-28 FOF 45 DAYS
BRED HEIFERS: MILLAR ANGUS - 80 FANCY DLK AI'D HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL AN-
SWEF; CLV. 2-18 FOF 2 DAYS; 40 FANCY DLK DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL
ANSWEF; CLV. 3-5 FOF 20 DAYS; 35 FANCY DLK DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL
ANSWEF; CLV.4-1 FOF 30 DAYS STEVE MCDANIEL - 100 DLK ULTFASOUND AI'D HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-15 (SOFTED INTO CLVC CFOUPS} BILLY MARTIN ÷ 93 FANCY ULTFA-
SOUND DLK ANC HFFS; DFED LDW SONS OF SAV DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-1 (SOFTED INTO SHOFT
CLVC PEFIODS} MARK WELDON ÷ 75 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW SONS OF FINAL ANSWEF; CLV.
2-20 FOF 45 DAYS DANNY ARNESON - 70 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED FIFST CALF
HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS ANC; CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS} MELVIN AR-
NESON ÷ 40 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED FIFST CALF HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS
ANC; CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS}
STOCK COWS: ED MILLER - 30 DWF 5 TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FED ANC; CLV. 4-
1 BEAU BENDIGO ÷ 25 DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-20 MIKE &
LORI JACOBSEN ÷ 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK DALANCEF; CLV. 3-1
BROKEN MOUTH COWS: ROSETH CATTLE CO - 50 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-25 MILLAR ANGUS ÷ 35 FANCY DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS (COMMEFICAL &
FECISTEFED}; DFED. CONNEALLY SONS OF FINAL PFODUCT; CLV. 3-1 FOF 60 DAYS ED
MILLER ÷ 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.FED ANC; CLV.4-1
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or tDS-
tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thurs., October 24 -
Thurs., October 31
Thurs., Oct. 24: FB w/Stanley
Co., 7 p.m. MST; Chamber Sup-
per from 5-6:30 p.m. @ Wall
Community Center.
Fri., Oct. 25: Teacher In-Ser-
vice; New Underwood VB Tri., 4
p.m.
Sat., Oct. 26: CC State, Rob-
binsdale Park, RC; Wall VB Tri @
1 p.m. w/Hill City & New Under-
wood; Steph Williams 1st Annual
Memorial VB Tri.
Mon., Oct. 28: NHS Banquet
Induction Ceremony @ 6 p.m.,
MP Room.
Tues., Oct. 29: 1st Round FB
Playoffs.
Wed., Oct. 30: Student Council
Region Workshop for grades 7-
12 members, all day @ Sturgis.
Thurs., Oct. 31: Halloween;
End of 1st Quarter; Wall VB Tri @
4:30 p.m., Pack The Place
Pink!!!.
Hunters reminded
about prohibitions
against use of salt
and bait stations
As South Dakota big game
hunters prepare for the opening of
hunting seasons, the Game, Fish
and Parks Department is taking
the opportunity to remind them
that the use of salt or salt licks for
the purpose of enticing or baiting
big game animals is prohibited by
state law.
“Most hunters realize that you
cannot hunt over salt, but conser-
vation officers often receive ques-
tions regarding the use of salt for
scouting,” Andy Alban, GFP law en-
forcement program administrator
said. “It is also illegal to place salt
in an area utilized in conjunction
with a camera for the purpose of
pre-season scouting and then hunt
that same area once the season be-
gins.”
Additionally, no one may estab-
lish, utilize or maintain a bait sta-
tion from Aug. 15 to Feb. 1, inclu-
sive, to attract any big game ani-
mal, including wild turkey. A bait
station is a location where grains,
fruits, vegetables, nuts, hay, miner-
als or any other natural food mate-
rials, commercial products contain-
ing natural food materials or by-
products of such materials are
placed or maintained as an attrac-
tant to big game animals for the
purpose of hunting. The use of
scents alone does not constitute a
bait station.
“If you place any of these materi-
als in a location from Aug. 15 to
Feb. 1 you may not hunt that area
for big game within the same pe-
riod,” Alban said. “It is important
to note that the regulation does not
apply to foods that have not been
placed or gathered by a person and
result from normal environmental
conditions or accepted farming, for-
est management, wildlife food
plantings, orchard management or
similar land management activi-
ties.”
Alban noted that studies have
shown baiting is not necessary to
successfully harvest big game and
it is not possible to bait or feed big
game without increasing the likeli-
hood for the spread of diseases and
parasites.
“Many commercial products are
marketed and sold at retail sport-
ing goods outlets that contain salt
or other prohibited bait station in-
gredients,” Alban said. “Hunters
should be aware that, while these
products may be sold, they may be
illegal for the purposes of big game
hunting.”
Alban encouraged those with
questions to contact their local con-
servation officer.
APARtMENtS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com

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