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Pennington Co. Courant, October 17, 2013

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Number 42
Volume 108
October 17, 2013
By Kindra Gordan, for SDSU College of
Agriculture and Biological Sciences
Being actively involved and serving in leadership
roles for various agricultural organizations has
been important to Myron and Mary Williams of
Wall, S.D. because they recognize agriculture's im-
portance to their past, present and future.
Myron and Mary both grew up on agricultural op-
erations and then attended SDSU. They each grad-
uated in 1971, and the couple began their ranching
career by leasing a registered Hereford ranch.
Today, they run a cowherd and yearling operation
and also have a feedlot facility for backgrounding
calves - which they built in the late 90's with input
from SDSU Extension's ag engineering specialists.
The Williams's son Marty works on the home op-
eration, while son Monty operates his own cowherd
nearby - both are SDSU grads.
Grandchildren are now also involved with the
daily ranch activities, as well as 4H and rodeo.
Myron credits SDSU animal science faculty, re-
searchers and Extension for providing valuable
input for their ranching and feeding operation. "We
utilize SDSU Extension for nutrition questions, bal-
ancing rations, range management or whatever we
need input on," he says.
Looking to the future, both Myron and Mary
know that continuing to support and advocate for
agriculture is key.
Mary says, "Agriculture today is being bom-
barded from every direction by non-ag people who
make decisions that affect our business and liveli-
hood. We need to repeatedly tell our story - that
those of us in agriculture are the real environmen-
talists, the legitimate stewards of the land, and we
are adamant about animal care.. Our livelihood de-
pends on how well we do in these areas."
Today, the Williams are doing their part to sup-
port the future of agriculture through their leader-
ship roles in industry organizations as well as by
supporting several SDSU programs including the
Supporting agriculture important to Williams family of Wall, S.D.
recent "Send A Cow To College" fundraising campaign
in which proceeds will fund the new South Dakota
State University Cow-Calf Education and Research
Facility.
Supporters of the unique campaign are being asked
The Myron Williams and grandchildern. Pictured from left to right ... Myron Williams holding Haydon, Mary
Williams holding Brynley, Stran Williams and Jaicee Williams holding Pacey.
to play a role by donating dollars or the proceeds from
a cull cow or group of cull cows to the SDSU Founda-
tion to make the SDSU Cow-Calf Education and Re-
search Facility a reality. Donations are tax free.
"We are helping to build the new SDSU Cow-Calf
Education and Research Facility because investing
in cows, kids, and college is the future of South
Dakota agriculture," Myron says.
By participating in the Send a Cow to College
campaign, South Dakotans who support agriculture
can assist SDSU in providing Animal Science stu-
dents with the facilities that will prepare them to
be competitive in the ever evolving cattle industry.
The proposed facility has an estimated cost of
$4.1 million. A little over half of that total has been
raised at this point, some coming from the generos-
ity of individuals, financial institutions, businesses
and organizations that have already made substan-
tial contributions to the Facility.
However, the funding effort is far from complete.
How you can participate
South Dakota sale barn owners understand the
program and are willing to provide the opportunity
for cattle producers to participate in the Send a
Cow to College campaign.
"The process is simple," said Dave Barz, a large
animal veterinarian with Northwest Veterinary
and Supply in Parkston, and active in fundraising
for the new center. "Cattlemen willing to support
this cause should complete a Deed of Gift form that
is available at their sale barn of choice. This trans-
fers ownership of the cow or cows to the SDSU
Foundation and relieves cattlemen of any tax con-
sequences for the value of the animals donated to
the campaign. That's all there is to it."
Barz added that if cattle producers prefer, they
can donate calves instead of cows. For those not in-
volved in the cattle business, but would like to sup-
port the construction of this center, monetary dona-
tions or tax free gifts of grain are also accepted.
For more information, contact Jim Krantz, SDSU
Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist at 605-480-
1056. To learn more about the Williams family and
other cattle producers who are contributing to the
Send a Cow to College Campaign visit iGrow.org.
For the past five years newspapers across South
Dakota have worked together to support a website
that aggregates all of the public notices that have
been published previously in the newspaper.
The website is www.sdpublicnotices.com.
The 130 daily and weekly newspapers in the
state cooperate to provide the online site at no
charge to any government entity. The newspapers
pay for all ongoing costs to host and maintain the
website.
Once a public notice is printed in the newspaper,
the next step taken is to upload it to sdpublicno-
tices.com.
“Newspaper publishers in South Dakota recog-
nize the value that this site delivers to enhance the
reach and searchability of public notices first pub-
lished in the local newspaper,” said David Bor-
dewyk, general manager of South Dakota Newspa-
per Association.
“South Dakota newspapers are observing “Public
Notices Month” in October, so this is a good oppor-
tunity to bring attention to the value-added online
presence for public notices through sdpublicno-
tices.com,” he said.
“Publication of public notices in the local news-
paper remains the most effective and most efficient
way to notify the public about government actions.
Plus, publication in the newspaper ensures the no-
tices are verifiable, independent and permanent,”
Bordewyk said. “And yet the newspapers in South
Dakota are keenly tuned in to the evolving and
transforming world of news and information deliv-
ery.”
Website collects public notices from state’s newspapers
That is why you see newspapers across the state
using a variety of technology tools to deliver news
and advertising information, Bordewyk said.
Newspapers are using websites, social media
such as Facebook and Twitter, email and other
media to deliver news and advertising.
Many newspapers are even sending an entire
electronic replication of the printed newspaper via
email to readers. Bordewyk points out that “elec-
tronic subscriptions” are becoming more popular in
particular among subscribers who otherwise have
been hampered by slow delivery of the newspaper
via the Postal Service.
“This transformation in technology will only con-
tinue,” Bordewyk said. “However, I believe that
newspapers that do a good job of providing local
news, information and advertising will remain the
go-to third-party provider for government public
notices as well, regardless of the delivery methods
or technology evolutions.”
Bordewyk encouraged readers wanting more in-
formation about sdpublicnotices.com or the tech-
nology changes in news delivery to talk to their
local newspaper publisher or editor.
You can also learn more about public notices by
visiting with the staff of your local newspaper and
through promotional material that your local news-
paper will be publishing during the month of Octo-
ber. You can visit www.facebook.com/PublicNotices.
South Dakota Newspaper Association, founded
in 1882 and based in Brookings, represents the
state’s 130 weekly and daily newspapers with total
On behalf of the South Dakota Public Assurance
Alliance and the SDML Workers’ Compensation
Fund, the employees of the City of Wall received a
Bronze Level Loss Control/Safety Achievement
Award at the annual South Dakota Municipal
League Conference in Aberdeen, S.D. on October 9,
2013.
This award honors the employees for their efforts
by Laurie Hindman
The Common Core Standards was discussed during
the Wall School Board meeting held on Wednesday, Oc-
tober 10.
Superintendent Dennis Rieckman asked Samra
Trask to be present at the meeting to explain what the
new standards mean for her math classes.
Trask explained the standards were developed to
help students develop their own processes and ideas.
The rigor is to begin teaching the curriculum earlier to
students to encourage them to work through the prob-
lem and not to give up. This will make them more suc-
cessful in college and when they are competing for jobs
in the workforce.
Trask did say she is nervous about the differences in
the common core standard testing and the ACT testing.
Board Member Mary Williams asked what hidden
agendas are behind the new standards. Rieckman said,
there isn’t any. Elementary Principal Chuck Sykora
said the reasoning for raising the new standards is to
make the U.S. more successful with those countries
whose students are very successful.
Trask noted the new standards are school wide and
nation wide. If a student should change schools during
the middle of the year, they will pick right up from
where they had been in their studies.
The board approved a Resolution to allow Philip to
become a member of the Wall-Kadoka gymnastics co-
op. The gymnastics program will be revisited next year
due to the loss of students who will be participating.
An open enrollment application was approved by the
board. Williams asked how the school made the new
students welcome. Rieckman replied that Mrs. Sundall
sets them up with a partner and all new students have
been accepted.
Elementary Principal Report
Chuck Sykora
Parent/Teacher conferences will be held October 16 -
17.
The Elementary and Big White attendance are at 98
percent, with 75 students having perfect attendance.
The District Report Card is done and parents or com-
munity members can obtain a report card from the
school.
Business Manager Report
Niki Mohr
Mohr informed the board she recently attended a con-
ference that mostly discussed the new Health Care Re-
form law.
The school has changed insurance companies and
Mohr noted they will have to address the issue down
the road to become compliant with the new federal
laws.
Superintendent/Secondary
Principal Report
Dennis Rieckman
Junior High Girls Basketball rules where approved
with changes mady by Williams and Pam Johnson.
Rieckman recently attended an Impact Aid meeting
in Washington, DC. He said the school has four appli-
catins in and is not sure when payment will be made
due to the government shutdown. BoardMember Todd
Trask will attend the next Impact Aid meeting in Jan-
uary.
The board approved the Native American Policies
and Procedures for Impact Aid.
A motion was approved to have either Carolynn An-
derson or Willimas attend the Delegate Assembly in
Pierre on Friday, November 22.
Rieckman informed board members there is an op-
portunity for a school board member to run for a seat
with the State School Board Association.
Rieckman is in the process of setting up meetings
with Lunchtime Solutions and CBM to meet with the
board.
Board members were asked their thoughts on pur-
chasing a small generator for the bus garage and pos-
sibly a bigger one for the school.
A volleyball game will be held on Saturday, October
26. This will be the first annual Steph Williams Tri-An-
gular tournament. Players and coaches will be given t-
shirts and the school is planning to make this an an-
nual event.
Monday, October 28 the National Honor Society will
hold their Induction Ceremony in the multipurpose
room beginning with their banquest at 6:00 p.m.
Board Member Kevin Bielmaier asked Rieckman to
remind teachers not to get away from the 15 minute
study period at the end of the classes.
Other motions approved by the board
Agenda for the meeting.
Consent agenda for:
•September 11 minutes.
•October claims.
•Addendum for Mary Roeder’s teaching contract and
her volleyball contract due to her salaries needing to be
updated with the 2013-2014 negotiated agreement.
With no other business the meeting was adjourned.
in protecting the assets of the City of Wall by mak-
ing the workplace safer for employees, reducing li-
ability exposures and saving the taxpayers’ dollars,
through loss control.
The City of Wall received a Bronze Level and was
one of 32 entities recognized for their loss
control/safety efforts.
Common Core Standards discussed
at Wall School Board meeting
City of Wall receives Bronze award from SDML The aftermath of the October, 2013 blizzard named
“Atlas” can be seen all around the City of Wall. Tree
limbs were broken or snapped off while the streets
look like a war zone with all the scattered leaves.
The City of Wall has spent the week digging out and
wonders what is in store for the rest of Fall. Hope-
fully, winter will be mild and a little less tempermen-
tal season.
Laurie Hindman photo
By Gov. Dennis Daugaard
In South Dakota, we pride ourselves on our hard
work, persistence and self-reliance. Our ancestors
tamed the prairie and lived through difficult times,
and these South Dakota values have been passed
down through the generations.
We also learn in South Dakota to care for our
neighbors. Whether it’s a natural disaster or a per-
sonal tragedy, South Dakotans always come to-
gether to lend a helping hand to those in need. We
learn that early in our lives. It becomes so in-
grained in us that when we are needed, we simply
show up. That’s just part of being a neighbor, and
in tough times, South Dakota is one big neighbor-
hood.
This is a very tough time in western South
Dakota. Our friends and neighbors there continue
to respond to the recent disaster, during which
much of West River was hit with one of the largest
blizzards in our history. Homeowners lost trees, ex-
perienced property damage and went without
power for days. Businesses suffered from collapsed
roofs or other damage that will require repairs be-
fore they can reopen.
A helping hand to our friends and neighbors
Many ranchers suffered devastating losses. The
early winter weather created a “perfect storm” that
killed thousands – probably tens of thousands – of
cattle and other livestock. These animals mean
something more than just net worth, and losing
them has put our ranchers in an unthinkable posi-
tion.
We need to do what we can to help our friends
and neighbors during their time of need. If you are
able to help those affected by the blizzard, please
call 211 or 877-708-4357 to offer your assistance.
In addition, a Rancher Relief Fund has been set
up to help our livestock producers. The fund is a co-
operative effort of the South Dakota Cattlemen’s
Association, the Stockgrowers Association, the
Sheep Growers Association and the Black Hills
Area Community Foundation. Linda and I made a
donation earlier this week, and I hope you will con-
sider a gift as well.
To donate to the Rancher Relief Fund, visit
www.giveblackhills.org and search "Rancher Relief
Fund." Donors can also mail checks to Rancher Re-
lief Fund, PO Box 231, Rapid City, S.D. 57709.
Aftermath of October
2013 blizzard “Atlas”
Local News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding
Monday at 4:30 p.m. We do have the right to reject any or all letters to the
Editor.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper
should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office.
All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number
of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run
the two weeks prior to an election.
The "Letters¨ column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to
express their opinions. Ìt is not meant to replace advertising as a means
of reaching people.
This publication's goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of
free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review Pennington Co. Courant
P.O. Box 788 P.O. Box 435
Philip, SD 57567-0788 Wall, SD 57790-0435
605-859-2516 605-279-2565
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P.O. Box 309 P.O. Box 38
Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 Faith, SD 57626-0038
605-837-2259 605-967-2161
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P.O. Box 429 P.O. Box 465
Bison, SD 57620-0429 Murdo, SD 57559-0465
605-244-7199 605-669-2271
New Underwood Post
P.O. Box 426 · New Underwood, SD 57761-0426
605-754-6466
Bavellette Publ¡cat¡oas, Iac.
Letters Pol¡cy
1cuu:uqrcu Ccuur¸ Sícr:jj's 1cjarr¤cur
PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
MARK\S ÐANI£I KNIGHT
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boon Issuod for Mnrkus ÐnnIoI
KnIghf chnrgIng hIm wIfh Iossos-
sIon ConfroIIod Subsfnnco nnd Im-
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Inforcomonf.
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of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 5`6¨ fnII, l40
µounds, bIond hnIr wIfh bIuo oyos.
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nround fho !nµId CIfy, Soufh
Ðnkofn nron.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-394-
6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco Ðo-
µnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l or fho
nonrosf Inw onforcomonf ngoncy If
you hnvo nny InformnfIon whIch
wouId rosuIf In fho nrrosf of fhIs
IndIvIdunI.
Ravellette Publications,Inc.
Call us for your printing needs!
859-2516
Guest Editorial
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture (SDDA) reminds
producers who have lost livestock
during the recent blizzard to doc-
ument losses. Proper documenta-
tion is critical to ensure processing
of potential claims.
“This early season, record set-
ting blizzard is devastating to our
producers and our thoughts are
with them,” said Secretary of Agri-
culture Lucas Lentsch. “We are
working to coordinate with ag in-
dustry stakeholders to establish
and execute a response plan.”
SDDA is working closely with
the Office of Emergency Manage-
ment, Animal Industry Board,
Brand Board and Governor’s Of-
fice on recovery efforts.
Producers should document all
livestock losses with pictures, vac-
cination and hauling receipts, or
any other records for possible fu-
ture use in disaster relief pro-
grams. Third-party verification of
losses is recommended. If you
have questions regarding live-
stock identification, please contact
the South Dakota Brand Board at
605-773-3324.
Affected producers should con-
tact their local county emergency
manager listed below.
•Bennett County: Jeff Siscoe,
Public Notices in this Newspa-
per: Your VIP All-access Pass
Public notices published in this
newspaper play a major role in
the ongoing production of inform-
ing you about the business of your
government.
By public notices, we mean
things like the printed minutes of
the school board and city council,
election notices, rezoning notices,
advertisements for bids, notice of
property tax opt-outs, govern-
ment employee salaries, proposed
annual budgets, delinquent prop-
erty tax lists, township annual
meeting notices, exempt property
tax lists and much more.
Public notices that keep you in-
formed about what government is
doing and how it is spending your
tax dollars. An ongoing diary of
government’s work.
The public notices in this news-
paper serve a two-way trans-
parency street. Besides keeping
you informed about the work of
your elected officials, public no-
tices also provide them with an
independent and permanent
record that accurately reflects
their actions and decisions.
That is why we are observing
“Public Notices Month” this
month. Newspapers all across
South Dakota are bringing atten-
tion to the role that public notices
play in our everyday lives. We are
highlighting this month with a
“VIP All-access” theme.
Public notices printed in this
newspaper are VIP: verifiable, in-
dependent and permanent.
Verifiable because this newspa-
per is accessible to all segments of
the public as a valid, credible
source for public notices delivered
directly to your mailbox or
doorstep.
Despite the ongoing shutdown
of the federal government, all
state parks and state hunting
areas in South Dakota remain
open, Gov. Dennis Daugaard said.
“We are fortunate in South
Dakota to have many outstanding
state parks, from Custer State
Park to Good Earth State Park,
and all remain open to visitors,”
said the Governor.
Unlike some other states,
Independent because this
newspaper provides an independ-
ent, third-party check in the
process of delivering public no-
tices to you.
Permanent because the public
notices printed in this newspaper
cannot be altered, hacked or
deleted. Something that is not
true in the digital world.
Public Notices in this newspa-
per: your VIP all-access pass to
what your government is doing.
Unfortunately, there are ongo-
ing efforts to eliminate the publi-
cation of public notices in newspa-
pers. Certain special interests
and lobbying groups representing
local governments want to do
away with public notices laws, ar-
guing that it’s a waste of money
and that no one reads them any-
way.
We will be crystal clear that
this newspaper indeed is paid to
publish public notices. Just as
any business or entity is compen-
sated for goods and services it
provides to government, this
newspaper is paid for publication
of public notices. In doing so, we
have laws to follow. State law dic-
tates a uniform compensation
rate that is fair and consistent. In
fact, you can find the cost of pub-
lication at the bottom of almost
all government public notices
published in this newspaper.
On average, the total cost to
local governments in South
Dakota to publish all of their re-
quired public notices equals an
amount less than one-half of one
percent of their total annual
budget. What value do we put on
making sure citizens have the
ability to be informed about their
government?
As for the argument that no one
reads them anymore, not surpris-
ingly we disagree on that one as
well.
Statistically valid statewide
readership surveys conducted by
South Dakota Newspaper Associ-
ation have shown consistently
over the years that more than
half of all South Dakotans read
public notices in their local news-
paper on a frequent basis.
Or, consider the story about the
confidential $175,000 settlement
agreement between the Huron
School District and its former su-
perintendent that was uncovered
following a lengthy investigation
by The Daily Republic at
Mitchell. It made for some big
headlines around the state this
year.
All of this started because
someone wondered why a pay-
ment of more than $10,000 per
month to the former superintend-
ent kept showing up in the school
board proceedings published in
the local newspaper.
An excellent example of light
being shone on something govern-
ment wanted to keep in the dark.
And it all started with something
that someone read in the school
board minutes printed in the
newspaper. Public notices at
work.
That is why we bring special at-
tention to public notices this
month. We urge you to read them
and to tell legislators to resist the
ongoing efforts by special inter-
ests in Pierre to eliminate them.
Good government depends on
public notices. You depend on
them. Public notices are your VIP
all-access pass to knowing more
about the business of government
and your tax dollars at work.
Governor offers update on parks and hunting lands
South Dakota does not have any
state-run parks or recreation
areas on federal lands, so no state
facilities have been threatened
with closure.
Federal officials have an-
nounced that they have closed the
federal wildlife refuge system,
which includes wildlife refuges
and waterfowl production areas.
State Game, Fish and Parks offi-
cials are not enforcing the closure
of federal lands, but will continue
to conduct compliance checks for
licenses and bag limits, as usual.
Prior to the federal government
shutdown, Gov. Daugaard offered
state resources to keep Mount
Rushmore National Monument
open. The National Park Service
rejected the Governor’s offer say-
ing the entire National Park Sys-
tem should be closed during the
shutdown.
S.D. Ag Department reminds producers
to document livestock losses
605-685-5994
•Butte County: Martha
Wierzbicki, 605-569-2766
•Corson County: Brad Schell,
605-273-4481
•Custer County: Mike Carter,
605-673-8152
•Fall River County: Frank
Maynard, 605-745-7562
•Haakon County: Lola Roseth,
605-567-3515
•Harding County: Kathy
Glines, 605-375-3313
•Jackson County: Jackie Stil-
well, 605-488-0334
•Jones County: Angie Kinsley,
605-669-7101
•Lawrence County: Paul Thom-
son, 605-578-2122
•Meade County: Angella Sut-
ton, 605-347-7623
•Mellette County: Karen
O’Brien, 605-259-3371
•Pennington County: Dustin
Willett, 605-394-2185
•Perkins County: Kelly Serr,
605-224-5243
•Shannon County: Frank May-
nard, 605-745-7562
•Todd County: Kara Walking,
605-429-3246
•Ziebach County: Mike Burgee,
605.365.5129
The South Dakota Animal In-
dustry Board (AIB) will be coordi-
nating disposal of livestock car-
casses. Brand Board inspectors
will be involved in identifying
livestock and livestock carcasses.
For carcass disposal informa-
tion, contact the AIB at
605.773.3321. Disposal guidelines
are available at http://aib.sd.gov/
pdf/Carcass%20Disposal%20Guid
elines%202011.pdf
Individuals experiencing disas-
ter-related stress should contact a
local community health provider
or call Youth and Family Services
in Rapid City at 605.342.4195 or
605.342.4870. Information is also
available at http://dss.sd.gov/be-
havioralhealthservices/commu-
nity/outpatientservices.asp
Agriculture is South Dakota's
No. 1 industry, generating over
$21 billion in annual economic ac-
tivity and employing more than
122,000 South Dakotans. The
South Dakota Department of
Agriculture's mission is to pro-
mote, protect, preserve and im-
prove this industry for today and
tomorrow. Visit us online at
http://sdda.sd.gov or find us on
Facebook at https://www.face-
book.com/SDAgDept and Twitter
@SDAgriculture.
Attorney General Marty Jack-
ley is warning South Dakota con-
sumers to be cautious of robocalls
targeting cell phone users with a
scam that implies that their debit
Robocallers target cell phone users in debit card scam
cards have been comprised.
The automated phone message
prompts the consumer to press a
number one to unlock the card.
Once the number one is pressed
the consumer is connected to a live
person who then requests the
debit card number, current ad-
dress and confirmation of recent
transactions. The scam artist then
asks for a PIN number in order to
reset the card.
Consumers should refrain from
giving out any personal informa-
tion and to hang up without press-
ing any numbers.
If you believe you are a victim of
this scam or need any additional
information contact the South
Dakota Consumer Protection Di-
vision at 1-800-300-1986 or con-
sumerhelp@state.sd.us.
Anyone who has given out per-
sonal financial information should
contact their financial institution
immediately.
This week is Teen Read Week.
Teen Read Week began in 1998
and is held annually during the
third week of October.
Its purpose is to encourage
teens to be regular readers and li-
brary users.
When was the last time you
read a teen novel? If you are an
adult, chances are you are miss-
ing out on some great reads if you
bypass the teen section of the Li-
brary.
Some wonderful books have
been produced in young adult lit-
erature in the past years.
National Public Radio reports
that, “Just last year, the Associa-
tion of American Publishers
ranked Children's/Young Adult
books as the single fastest-grow-
ing publishing category.” Teen
books include such NY Times
bestsellers as The Hunger Games,
The Fault in Our Stars, Insur-
gent, and The Book Thief.
Of course, many of the teen
books have been turned into hit
movies as well.
Wall Community Library celebrates Teen Read Week
The theme for this year is Seek
the Unknown at your library,
which encourages teens to explore
and learn about the unknown
through mystery, adventure, sci-
fi, and fantasy books.
We have a fairly good selection
of young adult literature at the
Wall Community Library.
Come by and pick up a new
read, and maybe even find a new
favorite!
The Library is open Wednes-
days from 12 - 7 p.m., Thursdays
from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and 1:30
- 5 p.m., and Fridays from 8 a.m.
- 1 p.m. We are located at 407
Main Street.
When life gives you lemons make lemonade and when life gives
you snow make snowwomen. This gal showed up in Peno Basin
shortly after “Atlas” blew in with an October 4 - 5 blizzard.
Courtesy Photo
Subscription Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax; Out-of-Area: $42 plus tax;Out of-State: $42 or subscribe online
at:www.RavellettePublications.com
Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................16-8
Rockers........................................15-9
Badland’s Auto............................15-9
Shad’s Towing .............................15-9
Dakota Bar................................11-13
Highlights:
Jerry Mooney ........................217/561
Jackie Shull..................................170
Lee Sundall ..................................471
Marsha Sumpter .............5-8-10 split
Trina Brown..........................2-7 split
Tena Slovek ..........................2-7 split
Venessa Buxcel ...................3-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor..................................3-1
People’s Mkt..................................3-1
PHS ...............................................3-1
Kennedy Imp.................................3-1
George’s Welding ..........................1-3
KTS................................................1-3
Team 1...........................................1-3
G&A Trenching.............................1-3
Hightlights:
Wendell Buxcel ....3-10 split; 212/565
Tony Gould ...................................546
Alex Moos .....................................539
Cory Boyd.....................................508
Dan Addison .......................3-10 split
Colt Terkildsen...................8-10 split
Ronnie Williams ...................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm Ins............................17-7
Bowling Belles ............................15-9
Cutting Edge Salon ..................14-10
Jolly Ranchers...........................13-11
Little Orphans ..........................12-12
Highlights:
Marsha Sumpter...................167/423
Donna King .......................2-5-7 split
Jen Schriever......................3-10 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar..................................17-7
Hildebrand Concrete ..................15-9
Chiefie’s Chicks.........................12-12
Morrison’s Haying.....................11-13
First National Bank ...................9-15
Pink Ribbons...............................8-16
Highlights:
Marlis Petersen.....................175/516
Shar Moses............................173/483
Cheryl Behrend....................5-7 split
MaryLynn Crary ..................2-7 split
Thursday Men
A&M Laundry...............................7-1
McDonnell Farms .........................6-2
The Steakhouse ............................6-2
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................5-3
WEE BADD...................................3-5
O’Connell Const ............................2-6
Dakota Bar....................................2-6
West River Pioneer Tanks............1-7
Highlights:
Jan Bielmaier........................225/600
Don Carley ...................................206
Andrew Reckling...................208/525
Jay McDonnell .............................204
Alvin Pearson ......4-7-10 & 5-6 splits
Chad Walker....................7-8-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew .................................7-1
Dee’s Crew.....................................5-3
Randy’s Spray Service............3.5-4.5
Moos on the Loose...................3.5-4.5
Inforcer’s .......................................1-7
Highlights:
Toad Moos ..............5-8 split; 234/552
Earl Park...............................196/570
Annette Hand.....................3-10 split
Brian Pearson.....................3-10 split
859-2430
Hwy. 14 · PhiIip
Monday-Saturday
Open at 11 a.m.
- CIosed Sundays -
We have orders to go!
Local & Area News
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013•3
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George Washington has been
called “The Father of our Coun-
try.” He might also be called “The
Father of our Pheasants.”
The nation’s first president is
credited with being the first per-
son to bring pheasants to the
United States, according to infor-
mation from the South Dakota
Department of Game Fish &
Parks contained in the South
Dakota State Historical Society --
Archives, located in the Cultural
Heritage Center in Pierre.
Washington had several pairs
of English pheasants sent from
England to his Mount Vernon es-
tate during his first term as pres-
ident.
The basis of pheasants in South
Dakota and throughout the
United States, though, is said to
have come from 70 pheasants
that Judge O. N. Denny, then U.S.
Consul at Shanghai, shipped to
his brother, John Denny, in Ore-
gon in 1880. The pheasants were
released in Oregon’s Willamette
Valley in 1880, 1881 and 1883.
Redfield calls itself the “Pheas-
ant Capital of the World®.” It was
in Spink County that the first
successful stocking of pheasants
and the first pheasant hunting
season took place in South
Dakota.
A. E. Cooper and E. L. Ebbert
bought several pairs of pheasants
from a Pennsylvania game farm
in 1908 and introduced them in
wooded sections of their farms
south of Doland. Those pheasants
This picture was taken in the 1920s near Madison. According to information on similar photographs in
the State Archives, local sportsmen from the American Legion had taken National American Legion
Commander O’Neil pheasant hunting. The man on the right is O’Neil. His first name is not included on
any of the captions.
The immigrant who thrived in South Dakota
Photo courtesy of South Dakota State Historical Society – Archives
fell victim to heavy snow that
winter. Cooper and Ebbert’s ef-
forts to release pheasants the
next year met with success.
H. P. Packard, H. J. Schalke
and H. A. Hagman, all of Redfield,
bought pheasants and released
them on Hagman’s farm north of
Redfield in 1909. About that same
year, A. C. Johnson released 25
pheasants on his ranch south of
Frankfort.
Inspired by the success of these
releases, the Redfield Chamber of
Commerce made the first large
release of pheasants in the area.
In 1911, the South Dakota De-
partment of Game and Fish re-
leased 48 pairs of pheasants near
Redfield that were purchased
with privately donated funds.
That same year, the state
bought 200 pairs of pheasants
and issued them to farmers living
along the James River in Spink
and Beadle counties.
The headline in the Sept. 3,
1913, Daily Capital-Journal in
Pierre read “The Pheasants are
Coming.” The article stated that
State Game Warden H. S.
Hedrick had been notified that
5,000 Chinese ring-necked pheas-
ants were arriving from a game
farm near Chicago.
After being displayed at the
state fair in Huron, the pheasants
in “families” of one rooster to sev-
eral hens were to be distributed
throughout the state, “the places
of location being determined by
the showing for natural protec-
tion and care which will be as-
sured the birds for the first few
years.”
In 1919, the shots heard round
South Dakota were fired when
the first open season on pheas-
ants took place on October 30 in
Spink County. Game wardens es-
timated that 200 of the pheasant
population of 100,000 made the
transition from the landscape to
the dinner table.
In 1943, state Rep. Paul
Kretschmar of Eureka delivered a
speech to the South Dakota Leg-
islature in which he extolled the
virtues of the pheasant. Other
states had designated the
meadow lark as their state bird,
while others had chosen song
birds, he said.
“To reward a bird of fine table
delicacy, sporting blood vigorous
and hardy, found throughout the
state, responsible for a substan-
tial part of our state income, and
one that has given us national
recognition, it is my recommenda-
tion that the Ring Neck Pheasant
be officially named as the bird of
our state,” he said.
A bill designating the Chinese
ring-neck pheasant as the state’s
official state bird was passed by
the Legislature in 1943. Thus,
South Dakota became a state that
extensively promotes the killing
and eating of an official symbol.
Pheasant numbers have varied
through the years, but that allure
of hunting pheasants has not.
Movie stars such as Clark
Black Hills Financial Services located at Black Hills Federal Credit
Union is pleased to announce that Kelly Green has been selected
as September’s student of the month. Kelly is a senior at Wall High
School; she excels in school helping younger children and students.
Kelly is taking advanced classes for college and loves participating
in gymnastics. When Kelly isn’t busy at school she enjoys hanging
out with friends and working on her gymnastics. In the summer,
Kelly enjoys working at Badlands National Park. After she gradu-
ates from High School, Kelly would like to attend college to major
in Nursing. Kelly is the proud daughter of Tammy Green, Wasta,
S.D. Congratulations Kelly from Black Hills Financial Services!
BH Financial Services
Student of the Month
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Gable, Carole Lombard and
Robert Taylor; baseball players
Ty Cobb, Bob Feller and Gabby
Hartnett; and politicians such as
former U.S. Vice President Dick
Cheney have all hunted pheas-
ants in South Dakota.
A magazine article by Don
Eddy, published about 1948, told
how railroad executive Lucien
Sprague brought a special 11-car
train from Minneapolis to Leola
containing at least two carloads of
millionaires from all points of the
compass during the pheasant
hunting season.
At Huron, 36 out-of-state air-
planes were parked for the pheas-
ant hunting season opener.
In Aberdeen, the pheasant can-
teen operated from Aug. 19, 1943,
to March 31, 1946, as a project of
the American Red Cross and the
USO.
Thousands of soldiers, sailors
and marines who were traveling
through Aberdeen toward train-
ing facilities or deployments were
greeted with hospitality and
pheasant sandwiches.
The 2012 pheasant hunting
season was from October 20,
2012, through January 6, 2013,
statewide.
There were 68,337 resident and
93,419 nonresident licenses is-
sued that allowed holders to hunt
pheasants, according to informa-
tion from G,F&P. A projected total
of 1.4 million pheasants were har-
vested. The economic impact of
pheasant hunting was $172.5 mil-
lion.
When the 2013 pheasant hunt-
ing season begins at noon on Sat-
urday, Oct. 19, it continues an an-
nual autumn holiday in South
Dakota.
The opening weekend is filled
with good food, good dogs and
good tales of previous hunts. It’s
the story of how enduring friend-
ships are built upon common in-
terests, and how the tradition of
hunting still serves as an impor-
tant rite of passage into adult-
hood.
It’s passing down from one gen-
eration to the next the essential
values of good sportsmanship: re-
spect for nature and sharing
abundance.
The immigrant bird has made
good in a big way.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Foun-
dation, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society.
Find us on the web at
www.sdhsf.org. Contact us at
info@sdhsf.org to submit a story
idea.
South Dakota National Guard
members continue to support the
state in aftermath of the Oct. 4
winter storm that crippled west-
ern South Dakota.
Nearly 50 Soldiers and Airmen
have been called to state active
duty to support local citizens
since October 5 and have helped
to clear road ways, remove snow
and assist electrical cooperative
crews with gaining access to loca-
tions needing power lines re-
paired.
More than a dozen other full-
time National Guard members
have also provided dedicated sup-
port to state active-duty person-
nel in response to the storm.
So far, 19 separate missions
have been requested of the Guard
since operations began. Eight
missions are complete and the
Guard expects to continue to as-
sist electric companies in power
restoration efforts for the next
seven to 10 days.
Guard forces and equipment
began responding immediate
after the blizzard and sent to lo-
cations hardest hit in Harding,
Meade, Perkins and Pennington
counties.
Equipped with snow blowers,
front-end loaders, bulldozers,
heavy expanded mobility tactical
S.D. Guard continues support to state in wake of winter storm
trucks and humvees, Guard mem-
bers were dispatched locally and
from across the state to help com-
munities dig out from the record-
breaking storm.
“Our Soldiers and Airmen are
proud to be able to respond to
local emergencies such as this,”
said Maj. Gen. Tim Reisch, adju-
tant general of the SDNG. “Our
service in a state active duty sta-
tus like this is foundational to
what the National Guard is all
about.”
Across the region, snow totals
averaged 30 inches, with some
isolated areas recording almost
five feet, setting new snowfall
records for October in the Black
Hills and many western counties.
Snow accumulation, along with
freezing temperatures and wind
gusts up to 70 mph, downed thou-
sands of tree limbs and electrical
power lines, blocked roadways
and decimated livestock caught in
the storm.
Local emergency management
officials from multiple counties
requested support to the state’s
emergency management office
and the governor, who declared a
state of emergency and activated
National Guard forces to assist.
The call for Guard assistance
came early Saturday morning
and coordination began immedi-
ately to bring in personnel and
dig out equipment.
With roads nearly impassable
and no travel advised, several
Soldiers trekked on foot several
miles to reach the Guard head-
quarters on Camp Rapid in Rapid
City to set up operations. Soldiers
also trudged through deep snow
in the towns of Belle Fourche and
Sturgis to begin opening equip-
ment yards. From across the
state, Guard personnel from units
in Aberdeen, Mobridge, Sioux
Falls and Yankton were dis-
patched to deliver equipment and
to help respond to recovery ef-
forts.
Gov. Dennis Daugaard an-
nounced that he has reached an
agreement with the National
Park Service to re-open Mount
Rushmore for the duration of the
federal government shutdown.
“Visitors from around the world
come to the Black Hills to see
Mount Rushmore, and I’m
pleased that our nation’s Shrine
to Democracy will be re-opened,”
said Gov. Daugaard. “I appreciate
the willingness of the National
Park Service to partner with us to
operate the monument.”
The National Park Service will
charge the state $15,200 per day
to operate the monument. The
monument re-opened Monday
morning at 8 a.m. MDT.
Partners from across South
Dakota have stepped forward to
“buy a day” of operation of Mount
Rushmore:
•The Mount Rushmore Society,
•Rapid City CVB / BID Board,
•Black Hills Central Reserva-
tions,
Gov. Daugaard, National Park
Service reach agreement to
re-open Mount Rushmore
•West River Foundation,
•Lawrence & Schiller,
•Lantis Enterprises, Inc.,
•Neiman Enterprises, Inc.,
•J. Scull Construction Service,
Inc.,
•Avera Health,
•First PREMIER Bank/PRE-
MIER Bankcard,
•MDU Resources,
•Sanford Health,
•ISIS Hospitality,
•Wall Drug, and
•One anonymous donor.
“Visitors from across the world
will be able to enjoy Mount Rush-
more because of the generosity of
these partners,” said Gov. Dau-
gaard. “I am grateful for their un-
hesitating commitment.”
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(continued on page 6)
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Wasta Week in Review — After
the Storm — October 7 - 12, 2013.
Residents in Wasta are feeling
grateful!
Some who drove through our
town reported to us and to others,
“Wasta looks like a war zone!”
That was Monday. Today is
Sunday.
Much hard work by many have
us pretty well cleaned up.
Power was restored Saturday
at 5:45 p.m.
There are so many people to ac-
knowledge and thank it is hard to
know where to start.
I missed the actual storm,
being in Utah because of a death
in the family and could not get
back until Monday afternoon.
Faye Bryan opened her home to
Mary Lewis and Lloyd. Faye has
a free standing propane heater
and gas cook-top so when the
power went out Friday night, she
was well prepared with
“kerosene” lamps, candles and a
great attitude.
By Monday, the streets were
passable as the snow melted and
residents could assess the dam-
age through town. And it weren’t
purdy! Our tall old trees took a
major hit.
Todd Trask, who had not been
able to fully assess damage and
loss at his own place came to offer
help, Tuesday morning.
Later that morning, Terry
Schell was setting up generators
for those who needed to keep
freezers and refrigerators going.
We were prepared to save what
we could using blocks of ice. How
rich we felt knowing that genera-
tor was keeping food fresh, as we
shared with neighbors in Wasta
on a rotation basis.
As we were out clearing and
cleaning up, stacking limbs,
branches and general debris
along the street as Terry Schell
had volunteered to pick up the
stacked remains of Wasta’s trees,
it looked like great hedges lining
the streets.
Ray and Jamy Williams, Ken
and Danene Skillingstad and
Kerry Heriger teamed up to put
great meat loaf together to share
with neighbors, David Humphrey
had an extra generator to lend
and Norm Current and chain saw
was busy with B Street clean-up.
Billie Hulm and niece Becky
took goodies around to workers
who welcomed a cool drink and a
snack.
Kyle Schell and friend, Carrie
Buchholz, helped whomever
wherever they were needed, Don
Anderson and son Daryl spent a
day cutting tree limbs into fire-
wood and went home with a
promise to return.
Mary Lewis and Faye Bryan
hitched up Faye’s mule and it ap-
peared that they were roping
snags and urging the mule to pull
them down. However, that may
not be exactly how it happened!
Hazel Kalkbrenner was search-
ing for and finding what had been
spared in her garden and yard as
well as helping others.
Today, Sunday, Stuart and
Shirley Kitterman, Colby Shearer
and Melanie Webber pitching in
to clear Cliff Sieh’s home where
Melanie now lives and then went
on to Wasta’s Community Hall
and Ann Mae Allread’s.
The last I saw of Mary Lewis
and Faye Bryan, they came to en-
courage Kyle and Carrie to join
the fun on “A” Street with one
more clean-up!
I don’t know if Terry Schell has
yet called it quits or if he’s still
picking up.
Lloyd finally came in and is en-
joying a snooze in his chair.
We thank the West River Elec-
tric Association for their tireless
work to get power back to cus-
tomers as soon as possible.
Mel and Dorothy Anderson,
Bunny Bail and daughter Emily
were also part of the great “Wasta
Blizzard Clean-up of 2013”.
We feel fortunate and grateful
that no homes were damaged or
people injured.
We are also aware of those all
around us who have suffered
losses with livestock or damage
far more serious than we here in
Wasta have known.
Our thanks to all our neighbors
who have pitched in to help us. It
is, after all, about people helping
people.
All of you who drove through
Wasta last week are invited to
come by again for a “look-see”.
You could even join in our fun
and help us — we have a great
time!
It was recently mentioned that
our tourist traffic was “high
tourist season” and maybe we
should install a toll booth. Just
kidding! We appreciate your con-
cern.
So — come have a look at us
now!
Monday morning — Power out
and back on. And thank you all
who helped!
Happy Trails!
Social News
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Belated congratulations to the
royalty for Homecoming — Jen-
nifer Emery was selected as
Homecoming Queen and Cade
Kjerstad, King. The storm took
presidence over a lot of the Home-
coming activities — a real bum-
mer!
The funeral for Bea Fisher For-
tune was held in Rapid City on
Saturday, October 12th. We wish
to offer our condolences to her
husband Vern and the rest of the
family.
Our sympathy goes out to the
family and friends of Mavis
Jeppesen, also, who died on Sat-
urday, October 12th. Her funeral
is scheduled for Tuesday, the
15th, at the Wall Community
Center. We hope the weather does
not interfere.
“Theme” meal at Prairie Village
has been rescheduled to Friday,
October 18th.
West River Electric’s annual
meeting will be on Saturday, Oc-
tober 19th. Remember it is a
morning meeting.
Darrell, Anita, Michael Peter-
son and his family (except Tanya
as she had to work) came to Wall
on Saturday. They helped Edith
Paulsen clean up her yard after
last week’s storm.
The Wall Eagles Youth Football
teams (Mighty Mites, Junior Pee
Wees and Pee Wees) had games at
Custer on Saturday. They all
came out victorious. Yah, Eagles!
Heard on the noon news that
huge pits have been dug for
ranchers to get rid of the livestock
lost in the blizzard. One is at
Quinn, one at Owanka and an-
other near White Owl. Perhaps
there will be more.
The Carmichael family held a
reunion this past weekend. Satur-
day, the Wall Golf Course Club-
house was the scene for their
gathering. Those attending from
out of town were Denny and
Karen Carmichael of Brookings;
Tom Carmichael of Oakland,
Neb.; Barb Croell of Sundance,
Wyo.; Jim Doyle of Belle Fourche;
Tim, Loni Jane and Logan Lands-
man of Hutchinson, Minn.; Scott,
Angie, Tyson and Aiden Dunbar
of Summerset; and Marla, Mason
and Cooper Venjohn of Piedmont.
Joining them were Merlin and
Mary Jane Doyle, Dave and Arla
Olson, Brenda Carmichael and
Maddie Bauer. They enjoyed good
food, fellowship and made plans
for next year.
Stan and Alice Mettler are an-
nouncing the birth of their first
great-grandchild. Konrad Michael
LaRue was born October 12,
2013, to Kate and Sean LaRue of
Whispering Pines, N.C. Proud
grandparents are Tina and
Calvin Carstensen of Lusk, Wyo.
Proud great aunt and uncle are
Stewart and Rhonda Mettler of
Wall. Our congratulations go out
to the family.
We have another birth to report
— daughter of Randy and Mary
Williams, Kaylin and Robert Sea-
ger of Lincoln, Neb., have a baby
girl, making Leslie and Kay
Williams great-grandparents
again. the little miss has been
named Eden Marie, weighed 7
lbs. 12 oz. and 19 inches long.
Congratulations to the family!
Yesterday was Columbus Day,
or Native American Day,
whichever you prefer. It actually
fell on Saturday but is being ob-
served so some offices can have a
three day weekend — such as
banks, Post office, GWTC and
WREA (but I bet the outside crea
worked if they still have some
consumers without power). If we
get as much snow as we had on
the first weekend of October,
more places may close.
Tuesday, and snow is coming
down with wind. Are you ready
for round two?
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Becki Potrzeba, Agent
1315 E. Wells Ave., Pierre, SD 57501
877-224-4173 ~ becki@beckipotrzeba.com
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 4
The family of Lola Simpfenderfer
requests your presence to help Lola
celebrate her 90th birthday on
October 26, 2013 at the Wall Commu-
nity Center from 1 to 3 p.m. No gifts
please, your presence is enough. If
you can’t attend, you may send a
card to: Lola Simpfenderfer,
PO Box 46, Wall, SD 57790
For the people who have
suffered loss and hardship in
the October 4th blizzard,
please know that the
Churches of St. Patrick,
St. Margaret and Holy Rosary
in Wall, Lakeside and Interior
are offering prayer daily for
your welfare.
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
Oct. 17th: Fried Chicken
w/Mashed Potatoes & Corn
Oct. 18th: Smothered Burritos
w/Tossed Salad
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
October 17 to
October 23, 2013
Thursday: Breakfast:
French Toast, Sausage, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Teriyaki
over Rice, Cooked Carrots,
Green Peppers, Lettuce Salad,
Banana, Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast:
Omelet, Toast, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Stromboli, Cucum-
ber/Carrots, Lettuce Salad,
Apple/Mixed Fruit, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Pan-
cake, Egg Patty, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Pulled Pork, Baked
Beans, Pears, Baby Carrots,
Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast: Hot
Cereal, Cheese Stick, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Goulash, Roll, Corn,
Pears, Milk.
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053 — let it ring
Delmer and Mary Paulsen got
to make their trip to Colorado
Springs and visit their daughter
Lynn Mary and family. Grand-
daughter Hannah is in the eighth
grade now and was the Cantor for
Mass on Sunday evening, the
29th of September. Callie was one
of the servers at the St. Peter
Church in Monument, Colo.
In visiting with Frank Wilsey,
he said the river is a worry but
they didn’t get a hugh amount of
snow just the storm. He had just
a few calves temporarily blinded
and had to move hay bales away
from it.
Kathleen Shull was so excited
about her new great-grandson Eli
Thomas. His parents are Mary
Lynn and Joey Roeder. They were
snowed in at Rapid City during
the storm but it has settled down
now.
Josh Geigle did fine during the
storm. It was a storm but it could
have been worse.
People are talking about the
devastation on the road and side
sights going to Rapid City. It is
heart breaking and that is a
farmer/ranchers yearly wages
laying there.
Mary Wilsey is visiting her sis-
ter in Spearfish for a few days.
On Delbert and Mary Paulsen’s
trip, they left before the storm so
they got to enjoy their trip and
also the evening meal on Satur-
day, while in Colorado Springs.
They also enjoyed a great garden
and Mary was busy canning be-
fore going and they enjoyed tak-
ing the produce to share.
Sunday evening, Delbert and
Mary enjoyed attending their gift
program with friends and neigh-
bors at the St. Patrick’s Church,
that was well attended.
They did bring their garden
pumpkins and winter squash into
the quonset before the storm to
save them from nasty weather.
Mary Paulsen is anxiously
waiting for the birth of a great-
nephew and praying all goes well
for all.
I got my usual please leave a
message and we will get back to
you or no answer at all. I also en-
joyed a great visit with Kathleen
and then with Frank.
May the Countryside send sin-
cerest sympathy to those that
have lost loved ones and those
waiting for loved ones to heal and
get better.
Thought: “Honesty is the first
chapter in the book of wisdom.”
Countryside News
FINANCIAL FOCUS
WHAT DOES GOvERNMENT
SHUTDOWN MEAN TO
INvESTORS?
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
As you’re well aware, a partial
government shutdown began on
Oct. 1. No matter what one’s views
are on the political issues that led
to this event, it’s probably fair to
say that a shutdown is not partic-
ularly good news, on many fronts.
Although essential services will
continue, including Social Security
and Medicare payments, other
governmental functions will be dis-
rupted, and hundreds of thousands
of workers will be furloughed. So,
as a citizen, you may well have
concerns about the shutdown. But
how will the shutdown affect you
as an investor?
First of all, you may want to
take to heart the slogan popular-
ized by the British in World War
II: “Keep calm and carry on.” You
don’t need to panic, nor do you
need to make massive changes to
your investment portfolio or even
take a “time out” from investing.
It’s highly likely that, like all polit-
ical/economic traumas in the past,
this one, too, shall pass.
To gain some perspective, you
might be interested in knowing
that the current situation is not
unique. We’ve had 17 government
shutdowns in the past, most re-
cently in 1996. And the overall ef-
fect of these shutdowns on the fi-
nancial markets has not been par-
ticularly negative. Stocks dropped
during nine of these shutdowns
and rose during the other eight.
Once the shutdowns ended, the av-
erage stock market gain was 2.5%
over the following three months
and 13.3% over the following 12
months, according to an analysis of
the S & P 500 stock market index.
Of course, as you’ve no doubt
heard, “past performance cannot
guarantee future results,” so you
shouldn’t necessarily expect the
market to turn in similar results
once this current shutdown is over.
Nonetheless, the history of the
market’s performance following
government shutdowns does tell
us something about the tremen-
dous ability of the financial mar-
kets to absorb short-term crises —
and then move on.
This isn’t to say that you won’t
see some volatility in the days and
weeks ahead if the shutdown con-
tinues for a while. The financial
markets do not like uncertainty,
and while some of this uncertainty
may already have been “factored
in” during the past few weeks, as
the possibility of a shutdown in-
creased, we may still see some sig-
nificant price gyrations.
Try not to overreact to these
price swings, if they do occur. If
you feel you must do something
with regard to your investments,
why not take this opportunity to
look over your long-term strategy
to make sure it’s still properly
aligned with your goals, risk toler-
ance and time horizon? Over time,
your personal situation can change
in many ways, so it’s always a good
idea to review your investment
portfolio, and to make those
changes that can help you con-
tinue making progress toward
your objectives, such as a comfort-
able retirement.
Furthermore, if we do see some
price declines, you may well be
presented with the opportunity to
buy quality investments at good
prices, so stay alert for these pos-
sibilities.
Above all else, don’t let the head-
lines of today scare you away from
investing for tomorrow. With pa-
tience, discipline and the ability to
maintain a long-term perspective
in spite of short-term events, you
can develop good investment
habits that will serve you well for
a lifetime.
State Parks open after early October
blizzard
Though State Parks in western
South Dakota were affected by the
early fall blizzard last week, park
officials say that all parks have re-
opened with the exception of
Shadehill Recreation Area near
Lemmon.
Shadehill Recreation Area will
likely be without power for another
week.
“The electric company is focused
on restoring power to residential
areas first,” said Shadehill man-
ager Jim Straight. “We hope to
have electricity to the campground
by next weekend.”
In addition to the power outage,
Shadehill also lost around 30 per-
cent of its trees. Nearby Llewellyn
Johns campground is open with
electricity.
French Creek Horse Camp,
Game Lodge and Blue Bell Camp-
grounds are open at Custer State
Park. Needles Highway remains
closed; however, all other park
roads are open.
“With the exception of some tree
branch cleanup, the park is back to
normal for this time of the year,”
said park superintendent Matt
Snyder. “Custer State Park did not
lose any buffalo or wildlife to the
storm.”
There are downed trees and large
snow drifts on the Mickelson Trail.
The trail is open, but it could take
several weeks to completely clear
the trail.
Angostura Recreation Area near
Hot Springs and Rocky Point
Recreation Area near Belle Fourche
received some tree damage, but
both parks are fully functional.
Camping reservations can be
made online at www.campsd.com or
by calling 1.800.710.2267.
annc@
gwtc.net
We Don’t
Charge…
Obi tuaries,
engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are
published free of
charge. Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
Rel igious
Obituaries
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Mondays: Women’s Bible Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church • Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church • Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.; Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood • Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood • Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.; Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall • Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church • Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
Hear , O l sr ael : The LORD our God i s one
LORD: Deuter onony 6:4 ( KJV)
Ìn this day and age, there seems to be one of
everything, if not more. Go looking for a toaster,
and you'll find several different brands, each
with an array of features. Go looking for God,
and you'll find only one. There is only one God
in the Bible, and He is the creator of all things.
Ancient wisdom for modern Iife
279-2175
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 5
Bea Pourier Fischer Fortune________________________
Bea Pourier Fisher Fortune, 78,
Wall, died October 8, 2013 at the
Rapid City Regional Hospice Aux-
iliary House in Rapid City.
Bea Fern Pourier Fisher For-
tune was born to John and Pearl
(O'Rourke) Pourier on July 25,
1935 at the Cain Creek Ranch
south of Emily, S.D. She attended
school at the Emily Elementary
and Rapid City Central.
In 1951, Bea married Duane
Fisher from Rapid City, and later
was blessed to share her life with
seven children. She lived in Rapid
City until 1968, when they relo-
cated to Huron, S.D. In 1979, she
moved back to Rapid City and
worked at Lady Bee's Dress Shop
until she enrolled in college at the
Oglala Lakota College in Kyle,
S.D. She obtained college credit
hours beyond her Associates of
Arts degree in General Education
in 1989. She was employed at
Project Phoenix, a drug and alco-
hol treatment center located at
Kyle, as a counselor and finished
her career as a high school guid-
ance counselor at the Red Cloud
Indian School, Holy Rosary Mis-
sion, Pine Ridge, S.D.
In 1990, Bea married Vern For-
tune and lived on their Ranch
near Kyle. Her hobbies on the
ranch included, reading, growing
many beautiful flowers and tend-
ing to her yard. Bea had a very
special bond with her children
and grandchildren and especially
enjoyed watching them compete
in their rodeo events.
At the time of her death she
resided in Wall.
Grateful for having shared her
life with her was husband, Vern
Fortune, Wall; five children: Bill
(Liz) Fisher, Huron, Coy (Liz)
Fisher, Scenic, Darla (Randy) Wil-
son, Colman, Donna (Dan) Curr,
Scenic, Art (Cindy) Fisher, Kyle;
sixteen grandchildren; eleven
great-grandchildren; one sister,
Madeline Steen, Rapid City; one
brother, Gerald (Sonnie) Pourier,
Scenic; and several nieces,
nephews and cousins.
Bea was proceeded in death by
her two daughters, Dianne Lynn
and Bobbie Jo; her parents, John
and Pearl Pourier; one sister,
Verna Heathershaw; and two
brothers, Loren and Jackie
Pourier.
Christian Mass was held Satur-
day, October 12, at Mother Butler
Center, Rapid City, with Rev.
David Matzko, S.J. as celebrant.
Burial followed at Mount Cal-
vary Cemetery at Rapid City.
The family will be establishing
a memorial.
Arrangements are with Osheim
& Schmidt Funeral Home, Rapid
City.
An online guest book for Beat-
rice may be signed at www.os-
heimschmidt.com
Karen K. Eisenbraun_____________________________
Karen Kay Eisenbraun, 71,
Sturgis, died Thursday, October 3,
2013 at the Rapid City Regional
Hospital.
Memorial services were held
Monday, October 14, 2013 at the
Kinkade Funeral Chapel in Stur-
gis, with Fr. Tyler Dennis officiat-
ing. Inurnment will be at a later
date at the Scotty Phillips Ceme-
tery near Fort Pierre, S.D.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Karen was born April 12, 1942
at Cripple Creek, Colo., to Lloyd
and Ruby (Board) Vetos. She grew
up in Fort Pierre. She graduated
from Cosmetology school in Den-
ver, Colo., in the mid 60’s.
She married Delbert Eisen-
braun at Wall, on July 20, 1996.
They lived at Wall and moved to
Sturgis in 2009.
Karen enjoyed knitting, crochet-
ing, quilting and her cat Sammy.
She especially loved her great-
grandchildren.
Family includes her husband
Delbert, who never stopped loving
her, Sturgis; son, John (Kim) Lass,
Sioux Falls; daughter, Cindy
(Robert) Dennis, Red Owl; broth-
ers, Doug (Janet) Vetos, Dia-
mondville, Wyo., Cork Vetos, Kem-
merer, Wyo, Sam (Cindy) Vetos,
Kemmerer, Paul (Linette) Vetos,
Missoula, Mont.; six grandchil-
dren and 10 great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her parents and one nephew.
Mavis Jeppesen, age 78, Wall, S.
D., died Thursday, October 10,
2013, at the Rapid City Regional
Hospital.
Mavis Darlene Curl was born
February 26, 1935, in Wessington
Springs, S.D., the daughter of
Charles and Ruby (Monroe) Curl.
She grew up in that area and
graduated from Wessington
Springs High School in 1953. She
then attended Wessington Springs
Junior College, Black Hills State
College in Spearfish, Huron Col-
lege and Aberdeen College.
Mavis married Otis M. Parmely
on December 18, 1954, in Miller,
S.D., and to this union were born
two daughters, Kathy Jean and
Skyla Darlene. They made their
home on a farm near Miller. Due
to her health, she later moved to
Phoenix, Ariz., where she worked
with remedial reading for dis-
turbed boys for a number of years,
before attending St. Joseph School
of Nursing in Phoenix, where she
graduated as a LPN.
Mavis then moved back to the
Miller area, due to the death of
her father. She taught seven years
of elementary school in the Miller
area. She later moved to the Stur-
gis area where Mavis worked as a
nurse for 26 years in Newcastle,
Wyo., Sturgis, Custer and Hot
Springs.
Mavis married Robert P. Harn,
Sr. on June 15, 1974, in Hot
Springs. They made their home in
Hot Springs. Mavis was a member
of the Assembly of God Church
where she taught Sunday School
for a number of years, along with
teaching youth groups and taking
care of the sick. She was also a
member of the Missionettes, and
was awarded the highly regarded,
Esther Award, for being the top of
her class. On June 23, 2003, her
husband preceded her in death.
Mavis later met Milton Ray
“Bud” Jeppesen on the Internet,
and on May 23, 2009, they were
united in marriage in Hot Springs.
They made their home in Wall,
where they attended the Metho-
dist Church in Wasta.
Mavis enjoyed sewing, home
decorating, and also made Christ-
mas for 12 different families dur-
ing her years. She loved to cook
and refinished several pieces of
furniture.
Survivors include her husband
Bud Jeppesen of Wall; two daugh-
ters, Kathy Jean Salu-Christo-
phers (David) of Bakersfield,
Calif., and Skyla Darlene Vorhes
(Dave) of Chambersburg, Penn.;
six stepchildren, Robert P. Harn,
Jr. (Oralea) of Colorado Springs,
Colo., William Harn of Detroit,
Mich., Patrick “Calvin” Harn of
Spearfish, Tim Harn (Connie) of
Douglas, Wyo., Ray Jeppesen
(Laura) of Rapid City, and Deana
Taylor (Brent) of Rapid City; four
grandchildren; 21 stepgrandchil-
dren; four great-grandchildren; 25
stepgreat-grandchildren; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Mavis was preceded in death by
her second husband, Robert P.
Harn, Sr.; her parents; a sister,
Leta Yost; a brother, Ronald Curl;
and daughter-in-law, Kate Harn.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, October 15, at the Wall
Community Center with Rev.
David Olson officiating.
Interment at the Black Hills
National Cemetery near Sturgis.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Mavis Jeppesen__________________
Lary P. Osburn, age 76, Philip,
S.D., died Friday, October 11,
2013, at them Hans P. Peterson
Memorial Hospital in Philip.
Lary P. Osburn was born June
19, 1937, in Kadoka, S.D., the son
of Paul L. and Ethel (Jackson) Os-
burn.
Survivors include his brother,
James Osburn, and his wife, Pat,
of Rapid City; and two nephews,
John Osburn and his wife, Carol,
of Rapid City, and Douglas Os-
burn and his wife, Krista, of Rapid
City; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
Lary was preceded in death by
his parents, Paul and Ethel (Jack-
son) Osburn.
At Lary’s request, cremation
has taken place, and no services
are scheduled.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Lary Osburn___________________________________
NO ALLEY GARBAGE SERVICE
EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY
Notice is hereby given that Residential garbage
service will only be picked up from the street front
and sides and NOT from the alleys beginning Imme-
diately. Alley service will resume in the Spring.
Thank You, City of Wall
Published October 17 & 24, 2013, at the total approximate cost of
$64.00.
Katy Drageset, age 83, of
Philip, S.D., died Tuesday, October
8, 2013, at the Philip Nursing
Home.
Kathryn “Katy” Nelson was
born August 10, 1930, in Fair-
mont, N.D., the daughter of
Clarence and Laura (Bond) Nel-
son. At the age of nine, she moved
with her family to Philip, where
she received her education. She
graduated from Philip High
School in 1948.
In November 1948, she was
united in marriage to Jay Barnett
in Philip, and to this union were
born four children, Cathy,
Jeanette, Bruce and Laurie. They
made their home in Philip, and
she worked in various cafes in the
area including the Midway Café,
the Park Inn Café, and the Skelly
Station Café.
In 1958, she was united in mar-
riage to Kenny Carpenter in
Philip, and to this union were
born two children, Diana and
Sandy. They continued to reside in
Philip, where she managed the 73
Bar for Jim Millage. After Jim
passed away, she worked for Flo-
rence Dean at the Pool Hall for a
number of years.
Katy later met and married Or-
lando A. Drageset on October 21,
1975, in Pierre. They continued to
make their home in Philip. They
enjoyed retirement and spent a lot
of time traveling.
Katy was a member of the First
Lutheran Church in Philip.
Survivors include five daugh-
ters, Cathy Fiedler and her hus-
band, Ralph, of Sturgis, Jeanette
Potts of Beaverton, Ore., Laurie
Ziegler and her husband, Al, of
Palmona, Mo., Diana Stewart and
her husband, Richard, of Philip,
and Sandy Slovek and her hus-
band, Doug, of Broadus, Mont.;
one son, Bruce Barnett and his
wife, Sharon, of Wall; one stepson,
Darrell Drageset, of Thermopolis,
Wyo.; 10 grandchildren; 21 great-
grandchildren; two brothers,
LeRoy Nelson and his wife,
Sharon, of Ft. Meyers, Fla., and
Arlie Nelson and his wife, Teri, of
Newcastle, Wyo.; one sister, Eileen
Fitzgerald, of Philip; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Katy was preceded in death by
her husband, Kenny Carpenter, in
1982; her husband, Orlando A.
Drageset, on December 4, 2004;
her parents; one grandson,
Michael Slovek; and a brother-in-
law, Tom Fitzgerald.
Funeral services were held
Saturday, October 12, at the First
Lutheran Church in Philip, with
Pastor Frezil Westerlund officiat-
ing.
Music was provided by Jessica
Wheeler, pianist, and Kim Kan-
able, vocalist.
Ushers were Chip Walker and
David Walker.
Pallbearers were Katy’s grand-
children, Christal Noonan,
MeLisa Balfe, Tifanie Petro,
Lynette Klumb, Sherry Hanson,
Aimee Jones, Kellie Halverson,
Beau Stewart, Jeb Stewart and
Casey Slovek.
Honorary pallbearers were all
relatives and friends in atten-
dance.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial is established to
the Haakon County Prairie Trans-
portation in Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com.
Kathryn “Katy” Drageset__________________________
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thurs., October 17 -
Sat., October 26
Thursday, October 17: PTC
(3:45-6:30 p.m.); School Pics;
Book Fair from 8-6:30 p.m.; VB
w/NU, 4 p.m. (starting w/JH,
then JV & V).
Friday, October 18: FB @
Philip, 7 p.m.
Saturday, October 19: Dou-
glas VB Invitational, 9 a.m.;
White River JH VB Tourn @ 8
a.m. MST.
Sunday, October 20; FFA
Family Pumpkin Carving night
from 4-8 p.m.
Monday, October 21: MS/HS
Honor Band @ Stanley Co.; VB
@ Sturgis JV, 5:45 p.m., C game
to follow (no JV); FB w/NU, 7
p.m.
Tuesday, October 22: NCRC
Assessment, SR, 9:40 a.m., Rm
#121; Staff Flu Shot from 3:30-5
@ School; JH FB Jamb.
w/Philip/NU, 4 p.m.; JV FB @
Douglas, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, October 23:
PLAN Testing for all Sopho-
mores @ 7:50 a.m., Rm #121.
Thursday, October 24: FB
w/Stanley Co., 7 p.m. MST;
Chamber Supper from 5-6:30
p.m. @ Park.
Friday, October 25: Teacher
In-Service; New Underwood VB
Tri, 4 p.m.
Saturday, October 26: CC
State, Elks @ RC; Wall VB Tri @
1 p.m. w/HC/NU; Steph Williams
1st Annual Memorial VB Tri.
Local News & Sport s
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 6
By Coach Patterson
On Thursday, October 10th, the
Wall Squad traveled to Cheyenne
Eagle Butte.
It was a beautiful day, no wind
and 61 degrees. It was also the
LNI Cross County meet with the
CEB Invite.
Everyone was put together for
awards and team points were
Care and Pruning of Damaged
Trees
Trees can be damaged by high
winds, snow, ice and/or other se-
vere weather. (As we well know!)
Some damage will require im-
Wall Cross County squad runs at CEB
By Coach Patterson
Saturday, October 12th, it was
off to the Philip Invite. This was
the last regular meet before Re-
gions. The wind was blowing and
the air was crisp for running.
split between LNI results and
CEB results.
Austin Huether came in sixth
in 18:01.78, David Bintliff was
11th in 18:30.90, and David
Sykora was 33rd in 22:59.56.
Teams points for the CEB invite
were: First, Todd County - 38
points; Second, Pine Ridge - 38
points; Third, CEB - 39 points;
Fourth, Wall - 50 points; and
Lower Brule - 92 pts.
Coach’s Comments: There
were many schools there due to
the LNI moved there due to
weather.
I felt the guys ran well consid-
ering the competition for the
meet. It was nice to have a perfect
day to run after the blizzard.
Austin Huether wins Philip Cross Country Invite
Austin Huether won the meet
handily in 18:35.
David Bintliff was fifth in
19:12, and David Sykora was
24th in 22:39.
Roland Traveny is not running
due to an ankle injury.
Team placings were: First, Red
Cloud - 11 points; Second, New
Underwood - 28 points; Third,
Wall - 29 points; Fourth, White
River - 40 points; Fifth, Lyman -
42 points; Sixth, Philip - 42
points; and Seventh, Rapid City
Christian - 44 points.
Ellie Coyle from Philip won the
girls race and Timber Lake won
the team division.
Coach’s Comments: This was
a meet of preparing for Regions.
Regions is October 16th at noon
at the Philip Golf Course.
Huether ran very well lowering
his time from when we ran at
Philip for Conference.
Bentliff was not feeling well,
but ran well also lowering his
time from conference.
Sykora also lowered his time
and gave it all he could.
We do miss Roland and hope
his injury is on the mend.
Murdo 0entaI CIInIc
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0r. JIm 5zana
Lcntistry for thc wholc family, including orthodontics
Acccpts Ncdicaid and othcr dcntal insuranccs
Call to make an appointment witb Dr. Rompca today!
609 Garficld Avcnuc - 60ô-669-2131 - 60ô-222-29ô2
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Conservation Corner
mediate attention while others
may be dealt with at a later time.
Decisions made soon after the
damage occurs can, and will, de-
termine whether or not a dam-
aged tree survives.
Do not prune or remove more
than necessary right after an oc-
currence. Remove any hazards,
and clean up roughly broken
branches, but save major deci-
sions on pruning and removals for
later.
While the damage may look se-
vere at first, concentrate more on
how to save the tree rather than
making a quick decision to cut it
down.
Damaged trees may still be
able to serve the function for
which they were planted. Don't be
too hasty to remove a tree if that
decision can be delayed until
spring or even for a year. The tree
may not have been damaged as
badly as first believed.
On the other hand, a major in-
jury may reduce the useful life of
the tree. Severe or large wounds
can produce an entry point for
decay, fungi or insects.
The only pruning that really
needs to be done immediately
after damage has occurred is the
removal of broken branches.
If damage occurs during the
winter leave the fine pruning and
finishing cuts until late winter or
early spring. All pruning cuts will
dry out to some degree during the
winter.
Die back of inner bark around a
pruning cut can be minimized if
final pruning is left until just be-
fore the tree begins to grow in the
spring.
If a tree is injured so badly that
it must be removed, consider re-
placing it. Before planting a new
tree, make sure the replacement
tree is the proper species and size
for the site.
Contact your Conservation Of-
fice or tree nursery for advice on
tree selection and planting.
Before you completely dispose
of all your branches check out a
Google search or Pintrest for
some interesting uses of tree
branches. It isn’t every day we
have branches to use!!
By Coach Herring
The Wall Lady Eagles traveled
to Philip for a rival game on
Thursday, October 10th.
The first time we met Philip
this year it took five sets to decide
the match and it was highly con-
tested until the end.
This time Philip took control
early and was able to take advan-
tage of some Wall players that
were feeling a bit under the
weather.
Wall had a hard time making
hits count and were not able to get
much offense going throughout
the game. Philip took the game in
three sets.
Leading the Eagles were Nicole
Eisenbraun and Kaitlin Schreiber
both with 100 percent serving,
Katy Bielmaier with seven kills
and one block, Emily Linn with 10
assists and Tayah Huether with
13 digs.
The Eagles face off against New
Underwood on Thursday, October
17, in a make-up game from the
blizzard followed by the Douglas
Tournament on Saturday, October
19.
Stats
S1 S2 S3 Final
Wall: 15 10 21 0
Philip: 25 25 25 3
Attacking: Linn, attacks attempted -
11, errors - 0, hit percentage - .000; Josie
Blasius, attacks attempted - 12, errors - 4,
hit percentage - (-.333); Schreiber, attack
kills - 5, kills per set - 1.7, kill percentage -
19.2, attacks attempted - 26, errors - 1, hit
percentage - .154; Huether, attacks at-
tempted - 3, errors - 2, hit percentage - (-
.667); Carlee Johnston, attack kills - 5,
kills per set - 1.7, kill percentage - 23.8, at-
tacks attempted - 21, errors - 4, hit percent-
age - .048; Monica Bielmaier, attack kills
- 4, kills per set - 1.3, kill percentage - 16.0,
attacks attempted - 25, errors - 3, hit per-
centage - .040; K. Bielmaier, attack kills -
7, kills per set - 2.3, kill percentage - 26.9,
attacks attempted - 26, errors - 4, hit per-
centage - .115.
Serving: Linn, serving aces - 1, aces per
set - .3, ace percentage - 11.1, total serves -
9, errors - 1, serving percentage - 88.9,
points - 4; Blasius, total serves - 4, errors
- 2, serving percentage - 50.0, points - 0;
Schreiber, serving aces - 1, aces per set -
.3, ace percentage - 8.3, total serves - 12, er-
rors - 0, serving percentage - 100.0, points -
6; Huether, serving aces - 1, aces per set -
.3, ace percentate - 14.3, total serves - 7, er-
rors - 1, serving percentage - 85.7, points -
2; Johnston, serving aces - 1, aces per set -
.3, ace percentage - 20.0, total serves - 5, er-
rors - 1, serving percentage - 80.0, points -
1; M. Bielmaier, serving aces - 2, aces per
set - .7, ace percentage - 22.2, total serves -
9, errors - 2, serving percentage - 77.8,
points - 4; K. Bielmaier, total serves - 1, er-
rors - 0, serving percentage - 100.0, points -
1; Eisenbraun, total serves - 1, errors - 0,
serving percentage - 100.0, points - 0.
Lady Eagles loose to Philip in three sets
Blocking: Linn, solo blocks - 1, total
blocks - 1, blocks per set - .3; K. Bielmaier,
solo blocks - 1, total blocks - 1, blocks per set
- .3.
Digs: Linn, digs - 6, dig errors - 6, digs
per set - 2.0; Blasius, digs - 7, dig errors -
7, digs per set - 2.3; Schreiber, digs - 6, dig
errors - 6, digs per set - 2.0; Huether, digs
- 13, dig errors - 6, digs per set - 4.3; John-
ston, digs - 2, dig errors - 3, digs per set -
.7; M. Bielmaier, digs - 5, dig errors - 3,
digs per set - 1.7; K. Bielmaier, digs - 0, dig
errors - 2, digs per set - .0; Eisenbraun,
digs - 2, dig errors - 3, digs per set - .7.
Ball Handling: Linn, assists - 10, as-
sists per set - 3.3, ball handling attempts -
49, errors - 3; Blasius, ball handling at-
tempts - 2; Schreiber, assists - 4, assists
per set - 1.3, ball handling attempts - 46, er-
rors - 3; Huether, ball handling attempts -
11; Johnston, ball handling attempts - 1;
M. Bielmaier, ball handling attempts - 5.
Serve Receiving: Linn, serve receiving
success - 3, receptions per set - 1.0; Blasius,
serve receiving success - 15, errors - 2, re-
ceptions per set - 5.0; Schreiber, serve re-
ceiving success- 1, receptions per set - .3;
Huether, serve receiving success - 33, er-
rors - 2, receptions per set - 11.0; Johnston,
serve receiving success - 1, receptions per
set - .3; Eisenbraun, serve receiving suc-
cess - 11, errors - 0, receptions per set - 21.3.
Emily Linn and Carlee Johnston
Nicole Eisenbraun
Josie Blasius
Tayah Huether
Monica Bielmaier
According to local electrical com-
panies, more than 38,000 cus-
tomers suffered power losses
throughout the storm and re-
ported more than 3,800 downed
power poles.
While snow removal missions
are complete, the Guard contin-
ues to support power crews who
S.D. Guard continues support continued from page 3
are working from house to house
to restore electricity in rural
areas; working alongside them
pulling electrical bucket trucks
out of the snow and mud after
they work on a utility pole.
Guard units providing state ac-
tive duty personnel to the storm
recovery efforts include Alpha
and Bravo Batteries of the 1-
147th Field Artillery Battalion,
109th Regional Support Group,
842nd Engineer Company, 200th
Engineer Company, 155th Engi-
neer Company, Joint Force Head-
quarters and the 114th Fighter
Wing.
Email us with
your news item
or photo to
courant @
gwtc.net
The Eagles Youth Football played in Custer against the Ravens on Saturday, October 12th. All three
teams had dominate performances winning all three games. The Mighty Mites won 33-0, the JPW won
30-0, and the PW won 38-0. Next weeks games will be held in Sturgis, with the JPW playing the Bears
out of Rapid City, and the PW
playing the Sturgis Buccaneers
Gold. The MM will have a bye
this week ending their regular
season with a perfect 5-0
record. Shown is Bosten More-
hart and Kole Gallino teaming
up to make the tackle in the Pee-
Wee game against the Ravens
Ravellette
Publications,Inc.
Call us for your printing
needs!
859-2516
Wall Cross Country team. Pictured from left to right ... Austin
Huether, David Sykora and Coach Karol Patterson. (Not picutred
David Bentliff)
courant@gwtc.net
Girl Players
Development
Program
Grades: 6th through 12th
$65 per player.
Five Sunday afternoons,
starting October 20th.
Contact Coach Hess 515-1930 or
Coach Lytle 685-8419
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 7
74th Annual Meeting
Postponed to
Saturday, October 19th
Wall Community Center, Wall, S.D.
•Registration: 9:00 a.m. •Business Meeting 10:00 a.m.
One Lucky Member will have a
chance to win $1,200.00
Following the meeting, lunch tickets will be given out.
If you are disabled and need a special accommodation
to have full and equal enjoyment of this meeting,
call 279-2135.
Free Babysitting during the meeting.
80 years ago…
The Wall and Murdo football
squads met on the local grid iron,
last Friday. Murdo defeated Wall
with a final score of 21-7.
Several games of kitten ball
were played in Quinn this past
week. On Wednesday, the high
school boys and girls played
against Cottonwood. Quinn won
with the following scores, girls 14
to 7, boys 9 to 6. Thursday after-
noon, the town women played
against the high school girls, the
girls winning by a score of 28 to 5.
Friday afternoon, the high school
boys and girls met the Owanka
teams. Quinn girls won by a score
of 16 to 15. At the end of seventh
inning, the two teams were a tie,
but in playing off the tie, the
Quinn girls came out victorious.
The boys lost by a score of 5 to
nothing.
A processing tax will be levied
on hogs starting November 5 for
a two year period. the rate will be
50 cents a hundred pounds at the
start and increasing gradually
until February 1 after which it
will be $2 per hundred or two
cents a pound, live weight, for the
rest of the period.
While obtaining their 90 day
Arkansas divorces in Bentonville,
Mrs. Stuart McDonald of New
York City, and Mrs. W. B. Brad-
ford of Brownsville, Texas, leased
an apartment together. The hus-
bands finally arrived, and after
Chancellor Lee Seamster had
granted the decrees, Mr. McDon-
ald married Mrs. Bradford and
Mr. Bradford married Mrs. Mc-
Donald.
70 years ago…
Wall High School lost its first
football game of the season, Fri-
day afternoon, October 1, in a
hard fought battle with Philip, 7
to 0. Wall Eagles were defeated by
Kadoka Kougars, 27 to 13. The
home field was a scene of a hard
fought battle on October 8.
Two more hospitals in small
towns in the west river country
have been forced to close for lack
of help, according to reports. The
Murdo hospital was one of these.
Mrs. England, in charge there,
had been working 18 hours a day
and when she could not find help
anywhere, was finally forced to
close. The hospital at Kadoka was
closed recently because no help
was available.
BIRTH: Mr. and Mrs. Clarence
Lyle are the proud parents of a
baby boy, born Thursday, October
7, at Rapid City. The young man’s
name is William Clarence.
Through the Eagle’s Eye:
What if —1. Jeanne Bryna came
to school? 2. Norma and Bernice
weren’t cheerleaders? 3. Warren
and Irene weren’t together every
night? 4. Faye and Arla didn’t
wear slacks to school? 5. Mary
Bielmaier didn’t hear from Byron
S. every week? 6. The girls didn’t
like Bill Gardner? 7. Elry wasn’t
so mean? 8. Merl would go to the
Army? Poor Eileen!!! 9. Mr. Gard-
ner would lose his temper? 10.
Peggy didn’t fall down every kit-
tenball practice? Mr. Gardner ev-
idently thinks there is something
quite serious between Warren
and Irene as he asked Ruth if
they had eloped last Thursday,
when they were both absent from
school. Peggy and Kathleen seem
to be interested in the affairs of
Philip. I wonder why?
60 years ago…
A huge crowd jammed into the
Wall school gymnasium Saturday
evening, for the annual school
carnival and left $1200 for the
benefit of school activities. The
seniors’ candidates, Myrnaloy Se-
bade and Darwin Hocking were
crowned king and queen of the
1953 Wall Carnival.
“Ma and Pa Kettle on Vacation”
will be shown at the Riata The-
atre in Wall on Friday, Saturday
and Sunday, October 16, 17 and
18, with a special 2:30 Sunday
matinee. This popular show will
star Marjorie Main and Percy Kil-
bridge.
At the meeting of the WREA
board of directors, the old officers
were all re-elected — George
Crouch, president; Clarence Wise-
hart, vice president; C. M. Best,
secretary; and W. A. Joyce, treas-
urer.
Work started Monday toward
graveling the seven miles of road
north from Wall. Some big trucks
are hauling, making it very un-
pleasant to drive along this seven
miles. But we are glad to have it
done before spring.
50 years ago…
The Wall Eagles got off to a fast
start against the New Underwood
Tigers to win, 26 to 13. The Ea-
gles played behind a solid defense
mainstayed by Dick Tines and
Dan Walsh. Scoring for Wall were
Larry Gravatt on a blocked punt,
Dan Walsh and Gail Johnson on a
20 yard sprint and on a pass from
Wayne Hildebrandt to Johnson.
Extra points were added by
Denny Carmichael and Gail
Johnson. Injured on the Eagles
team was Larry Gravatt with a
sprained ankle.
Emil Kjerstad Sr. had an oper-
ation on his leg last week at a
Rapid City hospital. His leg is in
a cast and he will be in the hospi-
tal for some time.
Pursuant to the due call and
notice thereof, a regular meeting
of the City Council of the City of
Wall, Pennington County, South
Dakota, was duly held in the
Community hut, in said City on
Monday, the 7th day of October,
1963, at 7:30 p.m. Present were:
the Mayor, City Auditor, and the
following Aldermen: T. E. Hus-
tead, Otto Eisenbraun, Marlin
Jensen, Merl Flatt and H. M.
Hatton. Absent was: Erhart
Eisenbraun. Motions were made
and seconded for the following:
minutes of the last regular meet-
ing, minutes of a special meeting,
and pay the bills. Howard Con-
nolly appeared at the meeting to
discuss the possibility of building
a new fire hall. City tabled any
action on their part, pending at-
torney’s advice. The following per-
mits were approved: building per-
mits: Jack Brown, residence; Roy
Campbell, residence; and Joe
Knapp, addition to residence;
water and sewer permits: Roy
Campbell, Susan White and Jack
Brown; Sewer Permit: Merl Flatt.
40 years ago…
The first drawings for 100 sil-
ver dollars by the Wall Chamber
of Commerce was held on Main
Street, Friday afternoon, and
drew a large crowd. Five names
were drawn from a barrel con-
taining the registration slips from
Wall merchants who are partici-
panting in the Chamber’s promo-
tion for increasing local trade.
The five names of persons present
were Lydia Harnisch, Florence
Doughty, Ida Huether, Geraldine
Knutson and Alva Hindman.
These five then drew for positions
for choosing the tube containing
the silver dollars. Florence
Doughty who won first place in
pulling the slide on the money
tubes received the low prize of $5.
Lydia Harnisch, the next in line,
hit the jack pot for $50 silver dol-
lars. Geraldine Knutson won $25
and Ida Huether and Alva Hind-
man each won $10.
A new grocery store has opened
in Quinn by Edward (Shorty) and
Doris Gagne. The new store,
Gagne’s Community Grocery
Store, is located in one of the
rooms of the Quinn School build-
ing. This building had recently
been purchased by the Gagnes.
The store will handle all staple
grocery items and the shelves are
already well stocked. The place is
neat and clean and will fill a need
for the people of Quinn and sur-
rounding areas. The Gagnes were
former residents of Nashville,
Tenn., and have a dance orches-
tra, The Green Mountaineers.
They plan to have a dance at the
Quinn gym once a month.
30 years ago…
Pennington County authorities
are investigating the theft of over
$42,000 worth of gold jewelry
from the Buffalo Gift Shop in
Wall, following a break-in at the
shop between 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oc-
tober 11, and 8:30 a.m. Wednes-
day, October 12. The jewelry
stolen included Black Hills gold
rings and bracelets, according to
investigators. This was the sec-
ond theft at the Buffalo Gift Shop
in recent months. In July, thieves
broke through the rear door of the
shop and stole around $3000
worth of jewelry. That burglary
has not been solved.
The theft of a 13-inch black and
white television set and a shop
vacuum cleaner from the Big
Foote School is being investigated
by local authorities, according to
Wall Police Chief Norman Kling-
bile. The theft occurred this past
weekend. Klingbile, who says the
incident probably happened Sat-
urday night, said entry was
gained to the school by prying
through the front door.
Jerry Johannesen, 32, repre-
senting the Wall Volunteer Fire
Department, was among 10 nom-
inees for the 1983 Pennington
County “Firefighter of the Year”
at a ceremony and banquet in
Rapid City, Sunday, October 9.
This was the first year for the
county-wide recognition award
for firefighters, and it was held in
conjunction with National Fire
prevention Week, October 9-15.
Johannesen, who was selected
last December as Wall’s 1982
“Firefighter of the Year’ by his
peers, has served with the Wall
VFD since November 1974. Den-
nis Gorton, Fire Chief for the
North Haines, VFD, was named
the County’s 1983 “Firefighter of
the Year”.
BIRTH: Born October 14, a
son, Michael John, to Don and
Debbie Freeman at Rapid City
Regional Hospital. He weighed in
at 7 lbs. 2 ozs. and measured 19
inches in length. Young Michael’s
proud grandparents are Jess
Bryan and the late Ruth Bryan of
Wall and Ed Freeman, Wall and
Bernice Jezierski, Hibbing, Minn.
Maternal great-grandmother is
Hazel Kennedy, Custer and Ida
Snell, Hibbing, Minn. is paternal
great-grandmother. Michael joins
brother Garrett at home.
20 years ago…
Crowned the 1993 Homecoming
King and Queen were Ryan Pat-
terson and Shannon Shampson.
It wasn’t a pretty game, and it
would be argued that it wasn’t
even a good game. A hopelessly
out-classed Rapid City Christian
was stomped by the Wall Eagles
football team, 40-0. The home-
coming victory was sweet, how-
ever. Ice and freezing tempera-
tures delayed the Wall Homecom-
ing game from Friday night to
Saturday afternoon, providing
perfect football weather to make
up for the delay.
It was a good basketball game
for Wall as they played the
Kadoka Kougars, until the third
quarter when things fell apart
leading to a 49-44 loss to Kadoka.
The B-squad was also defeated by
Kadoka, 27-32.
BIRTH: Born September 9,
1993 a girl, Shelly Josephina, to
Delbert and Diane Gegelman,
Gillette, Wyo. Little Shelly
weighed in at 8 lbs. 3 oz. and
measured 20 inches long. She
joins brother Shawn at home.
Proud grandparents are Delores
and the late Otto Eisenbraun,
Wall, Richard and Mardella
Gegelman, Halliday, N.D. and
great-grandmother, Mrs. Fred
Keller, Bismarck, N.D.
David Sims has purchased the
Madre’s Pizza Plus Pub business
from Larry and Sheryl Hicks and
will take over operations on Octo-
ber 1. The Hicks’ will retain own-
ership of the building. Sims has
been working at Madre’s for the
past two and one-half years as
bartender/pub manager.
10 years ago…
Over 312 Member Owners of
the West River Electric Associa-
tion, Inc. registered and partici-
pated in the 64th Annual meeting
held Saturday, October 11th at
the Wall Community Center here
in Wall. Members enjoyed free en-
tertainment provided by Kenny
Miller and West River Electric
bought 727 meals at local Wall
restaurants for members in atten-
dance. Those in attendance also
qualified for a number of door
prizes including a $200 grand
prize.
The Wall Eagles football team
played at home on Friday, Octo-
ber 10, against the New Under-
wood Tigers. Wall defeated New
Underwood with a final score of
38 to 6.
With the Lady Eagles hitting
the road to New Underwood on
Monday, October 6, the girls had
a tough match-up with the Tigers.
The varsity match had a tough
battle, as they had to play all five
games, and then came up short
the fifth game.
The Looking Glass of Time
Every now and then we hear
these questions nagging at us, ei-
ther in reality or in our imagina-
tions. What is this all about? Why
are we doing it this way? Where are
we going? When will we get there?
How will we know when we get
there? Who is staying with us?
These are all good questions just
begging for an answer, would you
not agree?
Here is what happens. (Keep in
mind, this can happen on the job or
in our personal life). We are busy;
our schedules jam-packed. There
are pressing deadlines and de-
mands literally shouting for us to
hurry up and get things done. So
much of the day is given over to
whatever seems most urgent, and
yet you have this nagging feeling
that what you value most-the really
important things in your life-are
being left in the dust. Every day
starts out the same-so much to do,
so little time to do it in. We promise
ourselves that the important things
will get done, but at the end of the
day, we realize all we have done is
rushed around stomping out brush
fires, and what is most important to
us has been left-again-by the way-
side.
Time passes all too quickly, at a
blinding speed that many times
stunts our better judgment and
thinking. It's at this time when the
haunting questions come, and we
realize we have lost our focus, and
we can't seem to find our motivation
anywhere. Our momentum, too,
seems to have got up and left. Dis-
couragement abounds and we need
answers now!
So what's the solution? What we
need, quite frankly, is to step back,
regroup, and rethink our reasons
for doing things in a certain way,
method or manner. After all, if we
keep doing a certain thing a certain
way with out thinking of change or
improvement, we can very easily be
left in the dust. (Can't say I am
aware of any buggy whip manufac-
turing companies that are profiting
today, can you?)
In other words, a much needed
clarification, or possibly a re-clarifi-
cation, of the mission must occur if
we are to regain our focus, be
rightly motivated, and build mo-
mentum for future success. Each of
us needs to rethink the purpose be-
hind what we are doing, by asking
ourselves these two basic questions:
"What do I want?" and "Why do I
want that?" and then writing down
the answers to be able to see things
from a new and improved perspec-
tive.
Is it time for you to do a little
"tweaking" on your mission? I can
guarantee you will never regret tak-
ing the time to examine your focus
and motivations, as you clarify your
mission, and your momentum will
most assuredly begin to pick up
speed. Call or write me if you need
help with clarifying your mission.
Clarification of a Mission
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands
of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for
more details at 800-437-9715 and
be sure to check out Bob’s website
at: www.mrattitudespeaks.com
Cl assifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & Ranch
MISSING CATTLE: 5 head.
Could be 1 cow, 4 calves. Lazy M
L Bar, left hip. Roy and Margaret
Pfeifer, 859-2243 (work), 859,
2466. P45-2tp
FOR SALE: JD 4450 tractor, 15
speed, power shift, 3-point, 3 hy-
draulic outlets, 540 and 1000
PTO, new tires. JD 740 self-lev-
eling loader, excellent shape.
Call 530-9540. P45-2tp
FOR SALE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
found
FOUND: A video camera in a
walk-in area near Cottonwood,
S.D., while bird hunting on Oc-
tober 13. Call to identify, 355-
0728. PR8-2tc
Pets/suPPLies
KITTENS READY FOR NEW
HOME. Will make excellent barn
or house cats. Call 605-685-
5327 for more info. P44-2tc
heLP Wanted
CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tions. Benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Ruby at 837-2270,
Kadoka. K41-tfn
Business & seRvice
WANT TO HEAR YOUR OLD
clock tick & chime again? I re-
pair cuckoo, mantel clocks. Rea-
sonably priced. Call 381-9812,
Kadoka. PR7-2tp
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn, 441-1053, or leave a
message at 837-0112.
K44-4tp
BUSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
FULL TIME JACKSON COUNTY
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
WORKER: Truck driver, heavy
equipment operator, light equip-
ment operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumes accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422. Fax 837-
2447.
K45-5tc
WANTED: Housekeeper 1 day/
week, every 2 weeks. Call 859-
2256. PR8-2tp
THE JONES COUNTY BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS will be
accepting applications for full-
time employment with the
County Highway Department.
Applications and resumé will be
received at the Jones County Au-
ditor’s office, P.O. Box 307,
Murdo, SD 57559 until Friday,
November 1, 2013 at 5 p.m.
CDST. Applications must be
picked up at the County Audi-
tor’s office, 310 Main Street,
Murdo, SD, or the Jones County
Highway Shop, 311 N. Main
Street, Murdo, SD. Please state
valid South Dakota driver’s li-
cense number and C.D.L. status
on application. For further infor-
mation, call 669-7102 (County
shed), 530-3355 (Highway Su-
perintendent cell) or 669-7100
(County Auditor’s office). Jones
County is an equal opportunity
employer. M44-3tc
LOOKING FOR: Finance Man-
ager & Sales Person. Contact
Colt at Philip Motor, 859-2585 or
685-4314. P43-tfn
FULL- OR PART-TIME PRESS-
ROOM HELP WANTED: Monday
and Wednesday mornings (3-4
hours each day). Will train the
right person. Call Beau Ravel-
lette, 859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K33-tfn
AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping and laundry. Stop
in to apply or call Joseph at 279-
2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax resumé
to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
Misc. foR saLe
FOR SALE: Several nice refriger-
ators with warranties. Del’s, Exit
63, Box Elder, SD, 390-9810.
PR8-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
LOOKING FOR SPECIFIC an-
nual vegetables or flower seeds
for next growing season? I am
ordering seeds now. Call 859-
2057 or 515-0675, Gary’s
Greenhouse. P44-3tc
RecReation
FOR SALE: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
good shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, frig and large front stor-
age box. Stored inside off sea-
son. Call 279-2195 or 441-7049,
Wall, anytime. WP4-tfn
notices/Wanted
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday,
November 3, 2013, Kadoka City
Auditorium. Booths available.
Call Ruby at 837-2270.
K45-3tc
NOW IS THE TIME … TO
THINK OF YOUR FAMILY &
FRIENDS! It’s not too early to be
compiling your Christmas or
end-of-the-year letter! You write
it, email it to us (ads@pioneer-
review.com) and we will print it
on beautiful holiday stationary.
We can even put your full color
family picture with the letter. Let
us help you make the holiday
season special (and easier) this
year. Ravellette Publications,
Inc. Philip Office: 859-2516; Wall
Office: 279-2565; Kadoka Office:
837-2259; Faith Office: 967-
2161; Bison Office: 244-7199;
Murdo Office: 669-2271; New
Underwood Office: 754-6466.
P41-tfn
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm ma-
chinery and junk cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. P36-12tp
ReaL estate
FOR SALE: Single bedroom
house, 26x24, with 6x8 porch.
Good for dwelling, workshop,
storage. Call 859-2057 or 515-
0675. P44-3tc
RentaLs
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
cLassified PoLicy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: SEMI TRACTORS, 2001
Peterbuilt 379, Detroit 470, 13-
speed. 2003 International 9200’, C15
Cat 435, 10-speed. 2008 Kenworth
T660, C15 Cat 475, 13-speed.
(605)660-2249.
EMPLOYMENT
MANAGER SOUGHT. Well-kept small
town motel. Two room apartment,
utilities provided. Friendly commu-
nity in south central ND. E-mail re-
sume, references to stpmotel@
gmail.com.
CONCRETE FOREMAN, finishers and
laborers. Experience with lasers and
setting forms a plus. Good wages,
benefit package and new equipment
to work with. Prime Concrete, Wah-
peton, ND. 701-642-1393 www.prime
concreteinc.com.
THE AWARDING WINNING Chamber-
lain/Oacoma SUN newspaper at
Chamberlain, SD seeks an energetic,
resourceful editor who enjoys cover-
ing community news and events. Ap-
plicants qualified in writing, newspa-
per design and layout should apply to
publisher Lucy Halverson at
lucy@lcherald.com or mail resume to
PO BOX 518, Presho, SD 57544.
PRESIDENT/CEO – Visit: www.ad-
vancebkg.info for job description.
Submit cover letter, resume and cur-
rent salary information to: Maureen
Simet, ADVANCE, PO Box 810,
Brookings, SD 57006-0810.
msimet@advancebkg.com.
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Competitive
wages, benefits, training, profit shar-
ing, opportunities for growth, great
culture and innovation. $1,500 Sign
on Bonus available for Service Tech-
nicians. To browse opportunities go
to www.rdoequipment.com. Must
apply online. EEO.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL,
Custer Clinic, Hot Springs Regional
Medical Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care have full-time, part-time
and PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN, Li-
censed Medical Assistant and Nurse
Aide positions available. We offer
competitive pay and excellent bene-
fits. New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at (605)
673-9418 for more information or log
onto www.regionalhealth.com to
apply.
AUCTION
4th Annual Lebanon Consignment
Auction. Saturday, Oct. 26, 10 am,
Lebanon, SD. Consignments welcome
until sale day. Contact Gary McCloud
605-769-1181, 605-948-2333, Sam
McCloud 650-769-0088, Lewis Reuer
605-281-1067. Complete listing at
www.mrauctionsllc.com 800+ Acres
Cropland with 200+ Acres Pasture,
productivity 79, Reeder Loams, Class
II & III, Mobridge SD, Absolute Auc-
tion, Nov. 4, www.PiroutekAuction.
com or 605-544-3316.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders repre-
senting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner op-
erators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
lation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-1892.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
WANT TO BUY
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer , Elk/moose 7.50 lb. Bleached
3.00 lb. cracked 1.00 lb. Also need
Porcupines, Rattlesnakes, Elk
Ivories, Mt. Lion skins. More info;
605-673-4345 / clawantlerhide@hot-
mail.com.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 8
annc@
gwtc.net
Got a Iot of junk?
Get rid of it fast in the
classifieds. You never know
what trash could wind up
treasure.
PENNIN0T0N C0UNTY
C0UBANT
212 4th Ave., Wall, SD
annc@gwtc.net · 279-2565
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
OCTOBER 1, 2013
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, October 1, 2013, in the Com-
missioners' meeting room of the Penning-
ton County Courthouse. Chairperson
Lyndell Petersen called the meeting to
order at 9:00 a.m. with the following Com-
missioners present: Ron Buskerud, Ken
Davis and Nancy Trautman. Commis-
sioner Don Holloway was not in atten-
dance.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to remove Item 20, Request to
Set a Speed Zone – Clear Creek Placer
Road District at the request of the appli-
cant, and approve the agenda as
amended. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-11 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the Sep-
tember 20, 2013, Board of Commission-
ers’ meeting.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at
the end of the minutes for expenditures
for insurance, professional services, pub-
lications, rentals, supplies, repairs, main-
tenance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$295,433.54.
7. Approve the revisions to the
Video Recording Policy of Commission
Meetings.
8. Approve the Highway Depart-
ment’s request to enter into the Serv-
ices/Contract Agreement with the South
Dakota Department of Game, Fish and
Parks for snow removal for the Hill Top
Parking Lot off of Deerfield Road for the
period December 1, 2013, to April 1,
2014.
9. Approve the request by the IT Di-
rector to rescind the motion made during
the September 20, 2013, meeting that
placed the IT Systems Analyst at Grade
20C. It was noted that the correct
step/grade is 20E which will pay the Sys-
tems Analyst more than those being su-
pervised per County Wage Policy 220,
Reclassification.
10. Approve the amendment to Con-
tract for Library Services – Rapid City
Public Library - and authorize the Chair-
person’s signature.
11. Approve the request from Weed
& Pest to declare surplus 40 cases of red
marking paint for the purpose of donation.
End of Consent Agenda
Pennington County Employee Service
Recognition Awards
Commissioner Buskerud presented
awards from the South Dakota County
Convention.
Outstanding Service Award Winner for
2013: Scott Guffey, Director of Weed and
Pest, for his work on the Mountain Pine
Beetle problem.
Safety Awards: Pennington County
Highway Department and Pennington
County Buildings and Grounds.
Years of Service Certificates:
Captain Jay Evenson, 30 years, Sher-
iff’s Office
Randy Walker, 30 years, Highway De-
partment
Hiene Junge, 30 years, Highway De-
partment
Luanne Thovson, 25 years, Depart-
ment of Equalization
James Hohenthaner, 25 years, Build-
ings and Grounds
Karen Romey, 25 years, Health &
Human Services
Lt. Joe McDonald, 25 years, Jail
Second Reading And Public Hearing –
Ordinance #106 – An Ordinance For
The Declaration And Abatement Of
Public Nuisances (To Prohibit Texting
While Driving): MOVED by Buskerud
and seconded by Davis to approve the
second reading of the amendment to
Pennington County Ordinance No. 106,
An Ordinance for the Declaration and
Abatement of Public Nuisances. Vote:
Unanimous.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
ORDINANCE NO. 106
AN ORDINANCE FOR THE
DECLARATION AND
ABATEMENT
OF PUBLIC NUISANCES
PURSUANT TO SDCL 7-8-
33 and 7-18A-2, and consistent
with the purpose of creating
and maintaining a safe and
healthy environment for the
public welfare of Pennington
County residents and their pos-
terity; and
WHEREAS, the County be-
lieves a general definition of
and a non-exhaustive list of
enumerated conditions de-
clared to be public nuisances
will serve to clarify potential
public nuisance situations in
unincorporated areas; then
therefore,
BE IT ORDAINED BY THE
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION AS FOLLOWS:
Section 1. Definitions:
Clean Fill: Any concrete,
rock, gravel, sand, dirt, or clay
which has not been used as an
absorbent for a regulated sub-
stance. Articles that contain
chrome, are petroleum based
such as asphalt, are com-
pactible or burnable materials
such as but not limited to
paper, wood or plastic are pro-
hibited.
Public Nuisance: Unlaw-
fully doing an act or omitting to
perform a duty which act or
omission: (1) annoys, injures,
or endangers the comfort, re-
pose, health, or safety of oth-
ers; (2) in any way renders
other persons insecure in life or
in the use of property; (3) ren-
ders the ground, the water, the
air, or food a hazard or an in-
jury to human health; and in
addition, (4) the specific acts,
conditions, and things listed in
Section 3 are hereby declared
to constitute public nuisances,
however, such additional enu-
meration is not deemed to be
exclusive.
Manure: Animal excreta and
other materials such as bed-
ding, straw, soil, hair, feathers
and other debris normally in-
cluded in animal waste han-
dling operations.
Stockpiling: In this context,
it is unhealthful accumulation
of a substance which causes a
noxious odor, provides for in-
festation of flies, mosquitoes,
rodents or other pests or is
present in such concentrations
that potential exists to cause
contamination of water or soil
by leaching, lateral transport,
absorption, or other move-
ment.
Adult Bookstore: “Adult
Bookstore” means an estab-
lishment having as a substan-
tial or significant portion of its
stock in trade, books, maga-
zines, films for sale or viewing
on premise by use of motion
picture devices or any other
coin operated means, and
other periodicals which are dis-
tinguished or characterized by
their emphasis on matter de-
picting, describing or relating to
specified sexual activities or
specified anatomical areas or
an establishment with a seg-
ment or section devoted to the
sale or display of such mate-
rial.
Specified Sexual Activities:
“Specified sexual activities” is
defined as
A. Human genitals in a state
of sexual stimulation or
arousal;
B. Acts of human masturba-
tion, sexual intercourse or
sodomy;
C. Fondling or other erotic
touching of human genitals,
pubic region, buttocks or fe-
male breasts.
Specified Anatomical Areas:
“Specified anatomical areas” is
defined as
A. The following shall not be
less than completely and
opaquely covered:
1. Human genitals, pubic re-
gion;
2. Buttocks;
3. Female breasts below a
point immediately above the
top of the areola;
4. Human male genitals in a
discernibly turgid state, even if
completely and opaquely cov-
ered.
Adult Entertainment
Cabaret: “Adult entertainment
cabaret” means a public or pri-
vate establishment which fea-
tures topless dances, strippers,
male or female impersonators,
or similar entertainers.
Adult Motion Picture The-
ater: “Adult motion picture the-
ater” means an enclosed build-
ing used for presenting mate-
rial distinguished or character-
ized by an emphasis on matter
depicting, describing or relating
to specified sexual activities or
specified anatomical area for
observation by patrons therein.
Electronic Communication
Device: “Electronic communi-
cation device” means wireless
or cellular phones, PDA’s,
BlackBerries, smartphones,
MP3 players, laptop or note-
book computers utilizing VoIP
(Voice-over Internet Protocol)
technology, wireless and cellu-
lar phones utilizing push-to-talk
technology, and any other mo-
bile communication device that
uses shortwave analog or digi-
tal radio transmission between
the device and a transmitter to
permit wireless communica-
tions to and from the user of
the device.
Electronic Message: “Elec-
tronic message” means a self-
contained piece of digital com-
munication that is designed or
intended to be transmitted be-
tween two electronic communi-
cation devices. An electronic
message includes, but is not
limited to, email, a text mes-
sage, an instant message, a
command or request to access
a World Wide Web page, or
other data that uses a com-
monly recognized electronic
communications protocol. An
electronic message does not
include the use of global posi-
tioning or navigation systems
or voice or other data transmit-
ted as a result of making a
phone call or data transmitted
automatically by an electronic
communication device without
direct initiation by a person.
Section 2.
A. No persons, owner, occu-
pant or person in charge of any
house, building, lot, premises
or motor vehicle in any unincor-
porated areas of Pennington
County shall create, maintain
or commit, or permit to be cre-
ated, maintained or committed,
any public nuisance as defined
in Section 1 of this ordinance or
as enumerated in Section 3 of
this ordinance.
B. Property classified as
agricultural by the Pennington
County Director of Equalization
shall not be considered a nui-
sance in regard to the Defini-
tion in Section 1 for Clean Fill,
Manure or Stockpiling; nor for
the Definitions in Section 3
subparagraphs A, B, C, E, G
and J.
Section 3.The following are
hereby declared to constitute
public nuisances:
A. Abandoned property: Any
deteriorated, wrecked, disman-
tled or partially dismantled; in-
operable and/or abandoned
property in unusable condition
having no value other than
nominal scrap or junk value,
which has been left unpro-
tected outside of a permanent
structure from the elements.
Without being so restricted,
this shall include deteriorated,
wrecked, dismantled, or par-
tially dismantled, inoperable,
abandoned, and/or unlicensed
motor vehicles, abandoned
mobile homes, trailers, boats,
machinery, refrigerators, wash-
ing machines and other appli-
ances, plumbing fixtures, furni-
ture, building materials and any
other similar articles in such
condition. This shall not include
any item which may be reason-
ably recognized as an antique
by dealers in those types of
items.
B. Breeding place for flies,
rodents, and/or pests: The un-
healthful accumulation or
stockpiling of manure,
garbage, tires, debris or dis-
carded items.
C. Combustible materials:
Any dangerous accumulation
upon any property of com-
bustible refuse matter such as
papers, sweepings, rags,
grass, dead trees, tree
branches, wood shavings,
wood, magazines, cardboard,
etc.
D. Garbage and refuse:
Household waste, including,
but not limited to, items such as
paper, rags, trash, garbage,
discarded clothing, shoes, cur-
tains, linen and other apparel,
tin cans, aluminum cans, plas-
tic containers, glass contain-
ers, cleaning utensils, cooking
utensils, and discarded house-
hold fixtures, when such items
are stored, collected, piled or
kept on private or public prop-
erty, and in view of adjacent
properties or public right-of-
ways.
E. Fill: Filling a gravel pit or
other hydrologically or environ-
mentally sensitive area with
something other than clean fill.
F. Impure Water: Any well or
supply of water which is not in
compliance with or is in viola-
tion of sanitary sewer district
regulations, state water regula-
tions, or state waste laws or
county ordinances.
G.Manure Disposal: Any un-
spread accumulation of ma-
nure which has been trans-
ported from the point of gener-
ation. Any manure deposited
within 300 feet of a residence
without benefit of incorporation
into the soil.
H. Polluting River: Deposit-
ing any dead animal, decayed
animal, vegetable matter,
garbage, discarded, items, ma-
nure or any slops or filth what-
ever, either solid or fluid, into
any water body designated or
undesignated as a source of
water supply, or allowing such
material to be deposited or re-
main in an area where runoff
from such material may end up
on such water body.
I. Transport of Materials:
Deposition, permitting deposi-
tion or negligent deposition on
any road, highway or public
right-of-way any manure, sep-
tage, garbage, rubbish, fill, fuel,
fertilizers, wastes, chemicals,
or wood while engaging in han-
dling or removing any such
substances.
J. Vegetation: Weeds and
grass, exclusive of crops and
pasture land, growing to a
height of greater than eighteen
(18) inches.
K. Adult bookstores, adult
entertainment cabarets or adult
motion pictures theaters that
are located within 1000 feet of
any existing residential zone,
school, church, park, playing
fields, or other areas in which
large numbers of minors regu-
larly travel or congregate.
L. Operation of motor vehi-
cle while using an electronic
communication device: No
person may operate a motor
vehicle while using an elec-
tronic communication device to
compose, read, or send an
electronic message when the
vehicle is in motion.
Exceptions: It is not a public
nuisance if the electronic com-
munication device is being
used:
1) In the reasonable belief
that a person’s life or safety is
in immediate danger; or
2) In an emergency vehicle
while in the performance of of-
ficial duties.
Section 4.Public Nuisance
Penalty and Remedy:
A. Any person who main-
tains, commits, or fails to abate
a public nuisance as required
under the provisions of this or-
dinance shall be subject to a
maximum penalty of thirty (30)
days in jail or a two hundred
dollar ($200.00) fine, or both. A
separate offense shall be de-
termined on each day during or
on which a violation occurs or
continues.
B. In addition, the County
may also use the remedies of
civil action and abatement as
set forth in SDCL 21-10-5
through SDCL 21-10-9.
Section 5.Notwithstanding any
provision of this Ordinance to
the contrary, it is expressly de-
clared that a person shall not
be charged with a violation of
this Ordinance and no relief
can be sought against the per-
son under the provisions of this
Ordinance when the conduct or
activity which is alleged to vio-
late this Ordinance is conduct
or activity which is authorized
by permit, license, authoriza-
tion, or approval issued by the
United States of America, the
State of South Dakota, Pen-
nington County, or any munici-
pality within the County, and
any agency or department of
those governmental entities.
Section 6.Severability. If any
provision of this ordinance
shall be held invalid, it shall not
effect any other provisions of
this Ordinance that can be
given effect without the invalid
provision, and for this purpose,
the provisions of this Ordi-
nance are hereby declared to
be severable.
Approved this 1st day of Octo-
ber, 2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
/s/Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Pennington County Resolution in Sup-
port of State Legislation Prohibiting
the Use of Electronic Communication
Devices While Driving: MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Trautman to
approve the Resolution entered below
and authorize the Chairperson’s signa-
ture thereto. Vote: Unanimous.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION
RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT
OF STATE LEGISLATION
PROHIBITING THE USE OF
ELECTRONIC
COMMUNICATION
DEVICES TO COMPOSE,
READ OR SEND
ELECTRONIC MESSAGES
WHILE OPERATING A
MOTOR VEHICLE
WHEREAS, according to
the NHTSA, in 2010 3,092
people were killed in crashes
involving a distracted driver
and an estimated additional
416,000 were injured in motor
vehicle crashes involving a dis-
tracted driver, and
WHEREAS, texting while
driving is one of the most dan-
gerous of all distracted driving
activities because it takes your
hands off the wheel and eyes
and mind off the road, and
WHEREAS, sending or
reading a text averages 4.6
seconds and, at 55 mph that’s
like driving the length of a foot-
ball field blindfolded which cre-
ates a crash risk 23 times
worse than nondistracted driv-
ing, and
WHEREAS, without a uni-
form state-wide law prohibiting
such activity, motorists and
pedestrians are subject to a
checkerboard application of in-
consistent local ordinances fur-
ther confusing those subject to
the law and leaving significant
populated areas without ade-
quate safeguards in place; now
therefore,
BE IT HEREBY RE-
SOLVED that the Pennington
County Commission is in favor
of legislation being introduced
and enacted during the 2014
legislative session prohibiting
the use of electronic devices
while operating a motor vehi-
cle.
Duly passed and adopted by
the Pennington County Com-
mission on the 1st day of Octo-
ber, 2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION:
/s/Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST: (SEAL)
Julie A. Pearson,
Pennington County Auditor
Lien Release Request – Kirk Murphy
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to approve the request sub-
mitted by Kirk Murphy to release the fol-
lowing liens from the property legally de-
scribed as Lot 9, Glore Brothers Addition,
Pennington County, SD, Property ID
2409. The liens are recorded as (Names
withheld per SDCL 28-13-42) A.B.J.,
$2980.37; A.B.J., $160.33; J.J., $323.93;
K.W., $302.90. Vote: Unanimous.
Proposed Cain Creek Land Exchange
Letters: MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Davis to approve the signatures
of the five sitting commissioners on the
letters opposing the Cain Creek Land Ex-
change. Vote: Unanimous.
Agricultural (AG) Taxation – Reports
from Commissioner Trautman &
Brenda Whiting
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
A. General Fund Supplement SP13-
013 – Accumulated Building Fund Tower
Project Budgets: MOVED by Buskerud
and seconded by Trautman to supple-
ment the General Fund Operating Trans-
fer budget in the amount of $84,400 from
Assigned General Fund Reserves and
approve the Operating Transfer in the
same amount. It was further moved to
supplement the Accumulated Building
Tower Project budget in the amount of
$84,400 from the transferred funds. Vote:
Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM HUMAN RESOURCES
A. County Employee Handbook – In-
formation Item
Items From Chair
Commissioner Buskerud read a
Proclamation from South Dakota Gover-
nor Dennis Daugaard declaring the week
of September 30, 2013, as Manufacturing
Week.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1)
B. Contractual/Pending Litigation
per SDCL 1-25-2(3)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to convene in executive ses-
sion. Vote: Unanimous. The Board re-
mained in executive session from 9:54
a.m. until 10:30 a.m. MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Trautman to
adjourn from executive session. Vote:
Unanimous.
PLANNING & ZONING CONSENT
AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken on all items by a single vote of the
Board of Commissioners. Any item may
be removed from the Consent Agenda for
separate action.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis to approve Planning & Zoning
Consent Agenda Items A-E as presented.
Vote: Unanimous.
A. MINOR PLAT / PL 13-19: Robert
Tschetter; Fisk Land Surveying – Agent.
To create Lots 1R and 2R of Berry Devel-
opment in accordance with Section 400.3
of the Pennington County Subdivision
Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Lots 1,
2, and 3, Berry Development,
Section 15, T1N, R5E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lots
1R and 2R, Berry Develop-
ment, Section 15, T1N, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve Minor Plat / PL 13-19 with one
(1) condition: 1. That prior to filing the plat
with Register of Deeds, the 33-foot ac-
cess easement be signed as Meander
Lane.
B. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-16 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-10: Alison Lewis; Fisk Land Sur-
veying – Agent. To rezone 3.71 acres
from Limited Agriculture District to Low
Density Residential District and to amend
the Pennington County Comprehensive
Plan to change the Future Land Use from
Planned Unit Development Sensitive to
Low Density Residential District in accor-
dance with Section 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Lots 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10, Eng-
berg Subdivision, Section 6,
T2S, R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
Approve Rezone / RZ 13-16 and Com-
prehensive Plan Amendment / CA 13-10.
C. MINOR PLAT / PL 13-18 AND
SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS VARI-
ANCE / SV 13-10: Wade and Sharon
Reynolds. To create Lots 1 and 2 of
Reynolds Subdivision and to waive plat-
ting requirements in accordance with
Sections 700.1 and 400.3 of the Penning-
ton County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL:
E1/2SW1/4 and W1/2SE1/4
lying south of Spring Creek
Road, Section 5, T2S, R9E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lots
1 and 2 of Reynolds Subdivi-
sion, Section 5, T2S, R9E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve Subdivision Regulations Vari-
ance / SV 13-10 with the exception of
dedication of a drainage easement for the
portion of Spring Creek traversing the
southwest portion of proposed Lot 1, and
approve Minor Plat / PL 13-18 with the fol-
lowing six (6) conditions:
1. That the Certificate of Planning Di-
rector be removed from the plat;
2. That a drainage easement be dedi-
cated on the plat for the portion of Spring
Creek traversing the southwest portion of
proposed Lot 1;
3. That the dedicated access ease-
ment on existing W1/2SE1/4 lying south
of Spring Creek Road be vacated on the
plat;
4. That an access easement be dedi-
cated on the plat if the applicant is pro-
posing to share the existing approach off
of Lower Spring Creek Road to provide
access to proposed Lot 2;
5. That an approved Floodplain Devel-
opment Permit be obtained prior to any
work being conducted within the bound-
aries of the 100-year floodplain; and,
6. That following platting of the pro-
posed lots, any on-site wastewater treat-
ment system be subject to the require-
ments of Section 204-J of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance, including the
requirement to obtain an Operating Per-
mit.
D. MINOR PLAT / PL 13-17 AND
SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS VARI-
ANCE / SV 13-09: Arlin Stratmeyer. To
create Lots 7 Revised, 8 Revised, and 9
of A & J Subdivision and waive platting re-
quirements in accordance with Sections
400.3 and 700.1 of the Pennington
County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Lots 7
and 8, A & J Subdivision, Sec-
tion 14, T1S, R6E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lots
7 Revised, 8 Revised, and 9 of
A & J Subdivision, Section 14,
T1S, R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
Approve Subdivision Regulations Vari-
ance / SV 13-09 to waive road improve-
ments to Adjenty Court and Stratmeyer
Court and waive submittal of engineered
road construction plans for the required
road improvements, and approve Minor
Plat / PL 13-17 with the following eight (8)
conditions.
1. That an Operating Permit be ob-
tained for the existing on-site wastewater
treatment system on proposed Lot 7 Rev
prior to filing the plat at the Register of
Deed’s Office;
2. That the spelling of the last name
of the owners of proposed Lot 7 Rev be
corrected on the plat prior to filing the plat
at the Register of Deed’s Office;
3. That the minimum required set-
backs be maintained for all structures and
on-site wastewater treatment systems on
each of the proposed lots in accordance
with the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance and South Dakota Administrative
Rules. If it is ever determined in the fu-
ture that any of these improvements are
not meeting the minimum required set-
backs, it will be the responsibility of the
landowner to correct;
4. That the applicant provide verifi-
cation that Lot 9 will be incorporated into
the Pine Haven Road District;
5. That prior to filing the plat at the
Register of Deed’s Office, Adjenty Court
and Stratmeyer Court be improved to Low
Density Residential Local/Collector Road
Standards, including a 24-foot-wide, four
(4)-inch graveled driving surface, a surety
or bond be posted for the road improve-
ments, or the applicant obtain approval of
a Subdivision Regulations Variance to
waive this requirement;
6. That prior to the required road im-
provements being conducted on Adjenty
Court and Stratmeyer Court, engineered
road construction plans be provided or
else the applicant obtain approval of a
Subdivision Regulations Variance to
waive this requirement; and,
7. That all U.S. Forest Service
boundary markers and corner be pro-
tected, no personal property or utilities be
located on National Forest System
Lands, and no access be provided
through National Forest System Lands.
8. That a Fire Mitigation Plan, for
proposed Lot 9, addressing thinning,
building construction materials, and land-
scaping be reviewed and approved by the
County Fire Coordinator prior to issuance
of a Building Permit on proposed Lot 9.
E. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-17 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-11: Rapid City DSDP VIII, LLC;
Austin Rogers – Agent; (Landowner –
Jerry and Donna Olson). To rezone 1.5
acres from Limited Agriculture District to
General Commercial District and amend
the Pennington County Comprehensive
Plan to change the Future Land Use from
Suburban Residential District to General
Commercial District in accordance with
Section 508 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
The following describes a par-
cel of real property being a por-
tion of Tract 1, less Utility Lot 1,
less Lot B, less Lot WR of the
NE1/4NE1/4, less Lots H1, H2,
H3, H4 and less ROW of
Longview Road, all in Paul
Subdivision, Section 15, Town-
ship 1 North, Range 8 East of
the Black Hills Meridian, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota,
being more particularly de-
scribed as follows: COM-
MENCING at the Southeast
corner of Lot H-4 of Tract 1 of
Paul Subdivision recorded in
Book 11 of Highway Plats at
Page 173, said corner marked
by a 5/8” rebar capped “LS
3712”; THENCE; along the
southerly boundary line of said
Lot H-4, also being the
southerly Right-of-Way line of
Longview Road, South
87°54’00” East, 242.58 feet to
a found 5/8” rebar capped “LS
3712” marking the Southwest
corner of said Lot H-4;
THENCE; leaving said
southerly boundary line along
the westerly boundary line of
said LOT H-4, South 02°06’47”
West, 11.22 feet to a point on
the southerly Right-of-Way of
Longview Road; THENCE;
leaving said westerly boundary
line, along said southerly
Right-of-Way line, also being
the Southerly boundary line of
Lot H1 as shown on the official
plat thereof on file in the Pen-
nington County Register of
Deeds office in Book 11 of
Plats at Page 67, North
87°53’13” West, 112.49 feet to
a set 5/8” rebar capped “
CETEC LS 4725” marking the
beginning of a curve to the left;
THENCE; along said curve to
the left 90.79 feet to a set 5/8”
rebar capped “LS 4215”mark-
ing the Northwest corner of
said Lot C, said curve having a
central angle of 37°03’34”, a
radius of 460.00 feet, and
being subtended by a chord
which bears South 86°36’37”
West, a distance of 90.64 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE; leaving said
southerly Right-of-Way line,
along the northerly boundary
line of said Lot C, South
49°16’36” East, 168.91 feet to
a set 5/8” rebar capped “LS
4725” marking the Northeast
corner of said Lot C; THENCE;
leaving said northerly bound-
ary line, along the easterly
boundary line of said Lot C,
South 40°43’03” West, a dis-
tance of 271.80 feet to a set
5/8” rebar capped “LS 4725”
marking the Southeast corner
of said Lot C, said point also
being on the northerly Right-of-
Way line of SD Highway 44;
THENCE; leaving said easterly
boundary line, along the
southerly boundary line of said
Lot C, also being the northerly
Right-of-Way line of said SD
Highway 44, North 49°15’59”
West, a distance of 277.06 feet
to a set 5/8” rebar marking the
southwest corner of said Lot C,
said corner also marks the in-
tersection of the Right-of-Way
lines for said Longview Road
and said SD Highway 44;
THENCE; leaving said
southerly boundary line, and
said northerly Right-of-Way
line, along the southeasterly
Right-of-Way of said Longview
Road, also being the westerly
boundary line of lot C, 297.53
feet along the arc of a curve to
the right, said curve having a
central angle of 37°03’34”, a
radius of 460.00 feet and being
subtended by a chord which
bears North 62°25’35” East, a
distance of 292.37 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING; The
above-described parcel of real
property contains 65,282.32
Sq. Ft., 1.498 Acres, more or
less and is SUBJECT TO a 15
foot wide Right-of-Way Ease-
ment granted to the Rapid Val-
ley Irrigation Ditch Company
being centered on the center-
line of the Murphy Ditch, said
Easement is recorded in Book
15 at Page 8318 of Miscella-
neous Record, Pennington
County Recorders Office; Also
SUBJECT TO an Access and
Culvert Maintenance Ease-
ment granted to the Rapid Val-
ley Irrigation Ditch Company
for the maintenance of a 48
inch pipe and the aforemen-
tioned Murphy Ditch, said
Easement is recorded in Book
16 at Page 5460 of Miscella-
neous Records, Pennington
County Recorders Office; Also
SUBJECT TO all easement
and reservations of record.
Approve Rezone 13-17 and approve
Comprehensive Plan Amendment 13-11.
End of Consent Agenda
REGULAR PLANNING & ZONING
ITEMS
F. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-14 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
Publ ic Notices Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 9
Continued on page 10
/ CA 13-08: Mitch Morris. To rezone
200.73 acres from General Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District
and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Limited Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District in
accordance with Section 508 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Being 200.73 acres of land lo-
cated in the NE1/4 of Section
32 and in the NW1/4 of Section
33, Township 1 North, Range 8
East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, said 200.73 acres of
land being more particularly
described by metes and
bounds as follows, all meas-
urements are to be considered
as being followed by the words
“more or less”; COMMENC-
ING, for location purposes only,
at the northeast corner of Sec-
tion 32 also being the north-
west corner of Section 33,
Township 1 North, Range 8
East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian; Thence, South 00°04'45"
West, along the common line
between Section 32 and Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 500.00
feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING of the herein described
tract; Thence, South 89°51'35"
East, parallel to and 500 feet
distant from the north line of
the NW1/4 of Section 33, a dis-
tance of 2656.35 feet to a point
for corner on the east line of
the NW1/4 of Section 33;
Thence, South 00°08'05”
West, along the east line of the
NW1/4 of Section 33, a dis-
tance of 2165.91 feet to a point
for corner; Thence, North
89°41'05” West, along the
south line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 2654.26
feet to the southwest corner of
the NW1/4 of Section 33 also
being the southeast corner of
the NE1/4 of Section 32;
Thence, North 89°42'51” West,
along the south line of the
NW1/4 of Section 32, a dis-
tance of 1270.58 feet to a point
for corner; Thence, North
06°22'35” West, a distance of
2169.92 feet to a point for cor-
ner, 500 feet south of the north
line of the NE1/4 of Section 32;
Thence, South 89°48'35" East,
parallel to and 500 feet distant
from the the north line of the
NE1/4 of Section 32, a dis-
tance of 1514.54 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING and
containing 200.73 acres, more
or less, of land.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to deny without prejudice
Rezone / RZ 13-14 and Comprehensive
Plan Amendment / CA 13-08 pursuant to
Planning Commission recommendation
and a recent foreclosure sale. The motion
carried 4-0 on a roll call vote: Buskerud
– yes, Davis – yes, Trautman – yes, Pe-
tersen – yes.
This item was reconsidered at the end
of the Planning & Zoning Items.
Commissioner Buskerud briefly left the
meeting and returned during Item G.
G. THE SPRING CREEK WATER-
SHED MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – PROJECT
UPDATE / FEEDBACK – SD DENR:
Pete Jahraus, Non-Point Source Man-
ager, and Barry McLaury, Spring Creek
Project Manager for the South Dakota
Department of Environment and Natural
Resources were in attendance for this
item.
H. THE SPRING CREEK WATER-
SHED MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – ADVISORY
GROUP RECOMMENDATIONS.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to continue two onsite waste-
water applications: SPC2013PC98B for
Warren Alexander and SPC2013PC101B
for Jeff Hermanson, for further informa-
tion. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Davis to approve riparian
application SPC2013PC105 for Darrell
Sullivan and postpone SP2013PC98A
until Warren Alexander has an opportu-
nity to disclose information. The motion
died for lack of a second.
MOVED by Trautman to approve ripar-
ian application SPC2013PC105 for Dar-
rell Sullivan. The motion died for lack of
a second.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to approve riparian applica-
tion SPC2013PC105 for Darrell Sullivan.
There was a 2-2 tie vote* on the roll call
vote: Buskerud - no, Davis - no, Traut-
man – yes, Petersen – yes.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to approve riparian applica-
tion SP2013PC98A for Warren Alexander.
There was a 2-2 tie vote* on the call vote:
Buskerud – no, Davis – no, Trautman –
yes, Petersen – yes.
*7-8-18. Tie vote of commissioners.
When the board of county commissioners
is equally divided on any question, it shall
defer a decision until the next meeting of
the board and the matter shall then be de-
cided by a majority of the board.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to approve the recommen-
dation that the Pennington County Board
of Commissioners allow continuous cost-
share application submittals for Segment
2. The Advisory Group will meet at least
twice per year but not more than quarterly
to consider the applications and make
recommendations to the Board of Com-
missioners. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to approve the Spring Creek
Watershed Management and Project Im-
plementation Plan Segment 2 Amend-
ment for submission to the South Dakota
Department of Environment and Natural
Resources. Vote: Unanimous.
I. THE SPRING CREEK WATER-
SHED MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – PARTICI-
PANT AGREEMENTS: MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Trautman to
continue the request for the chairperson’s
signature on the Spring Creek Watershed
Management and Project Implementation
Plan participant agreements. Vote:
Unanimous.
F. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-14 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
/ CA 13-08, Mitch Morris (Brought back
from earlier in the meeting): MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Davis to re-
consider the denial without prejudice of
Item 22F and bring it back for the October
15, 2013, County Board meeting since
more information has now become avail-
able. Vote: Unanimous.
AUDITOR’S ACCOUNT OF THE
TREASURER
To the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners, I hereby submit the fol-
lowing report of my examination of the
cash and cash items in the hands of the
County Treasurer as of September 24,
2013: Total balances of checking/savings
accounts, $26,695,481.01; Total balance
of Treasurer’s Office safe cash,
$9,700.00; Total certificates of deposit,
$2,592,133.11; Total Prime Value Invest-
ment, $3,075,836.74; Total petty cash,
$111,470.00; Total Cash Items, $0; Total
long/short, ($485.00); Total,
$32,484,135.93. Submitted by Lori Wes-
sel, Deputy Auditor.
PAYROLL
Commissioners, 10,004.51; Human Re-
sources, 4,747.58; Elections, 12,716.57;
Auditor - liens, 3,497.26; Auditor,
18,611.81; Treasurer, 52,716.52; Data
Processing - General, 81,177.74; State's
Attorney, 149,202.89; Public Defender,
112,655.49; Juvenile Diversion,
11,826.66; Victim's Assistance, 5,387.37;
Buildings & Grounds, 109,945.64; Equal-
ization, 70,714.05; Register of Deeds,
24,624.06; Sheriff, 367,589.06; Service
Station, 8,335.53; HIDTA Grant, 9,985.42;
Jail, 521,419.61; Jail Work Program,
4,834.41; Coroner, 419.47; Hill City Law,
12,474.12; Keystone Law, 5,385.15; New
Underwood – Law, 4,340.09; School Liai-
son, 17,173.18; Wall Law, 13,967.91;
Home Detention, 11,713.71; Alcohol &
Drug, 133,589.99; Friendship House,
80,469.98; Economic Assistance,
59,703.28; Mental & Alcohol-SAO,
8,049.84; Mental & Alcohol-HHS,
3,632.01; Extension, 3,234.00; Weed &
Pest, 18,918.96; Planning and Zoning,
23,650.58; Water Protection, 6,117.03;
Ordinance, 3,632.01; Juvenile Services
Center, 216,331.44; Highway,
186,835.93; Drug Seizure, 1,983.37; Fire
Administration, 7,028.09; Title III MPB,
2,466.20; Dispatch, 164,870.93; Emer-
gency Management, 7,096.73; 24-7 Pro-
gram, 19,552.68; PCCCC Building Proj-
ects, 3,194.72.
VOUCHERS
Amcon Distributing, 407.30; Att, 5.51; BH
Power Inc, 49,587.83; CBM Food Serv-
ice, 10,675.17; Century Link, 7,939.80;
City Of Box Elder, 463.41; City Of Hill
City, 17.05; City Of Rapid City Water,
19,505.74; Executive Mgmt Fin Office,
20.00; First Administrators Inc,
178,711.35; FSH Communications LLC,
60.00; Montana Dakota Utilities,
3,972.42; Orbitcom Inc, 45.86; Pioneer
Bank Trust, 4,732.11; Rapid Valley San-
itary, 213.36; RR Waste Solutions, 54.22;
SDN Communications, 4,054.98; Verizon
Wireless, 5,409.96; West River Electric,
1,430.31; WEX Bank, 2,995.13; WOW In-
ternet Cable And Phone, 5,132.03.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 11:48
a.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $560.96.
qUINN TOWN
BOARD
OF TRUSTEES
REGULAR MEETING
OCTOBER 7, 2013
The Quinn Town Board met at 7 pm,
Monday, October 7, at the Quinn Commu-
nity Center. Board members present were
Kevin Wenzel, Juston Eisenbraun and
Jerry Pabst. Others present were Lorna
Moore, Dennis Terry, Dave Curtis,
Michael Luedeman and Finance Officer
Debbie Bryan.
Motion by Juston, seconded by Kevin
to approve the agenda, motion carried.
Kevin made a motion, seconded by Jus-
ton to approve the minutes of the last
meeting, motion carried. Motion by Kevin,
seconded by Juston to approve the finan-
cial statement, motion carried.
Kevin reported that the lawyer will at-
tend the November meeting for the issue
of ordinances. Kevin has signed a form to
keep the Town of Quinn on the State
Water Plan. Motion by Kevin, any one
who want to rent the Quinn Community
Center must make a payment to the fi-
nance officer before they can obtain the
key to the center, seconded by Jerry, mo-
tion carried. Motion by Kevin, if Lytles or
Wilsons want to rent the community cen-
ter in the future they must pay back rent
for graduation, amount owed is $45.00,
seconded by Jerry, motion carried. Lorna
Moore has asked to rent the community
center on November 2, to celebrate
George’s birthday, they will not be
charged because Lorna does work for the
town and does not get paid. Jerry will take
care of the broken branches at the park.
John Fortune has been asked to cut
down the dead tree in the ditch by the
Two Bit. Michael and Lorna have been
mowing around the fire hall. Lorna will
take the flag down at the park, in the
spring she will get a new flag.
Motion by Kevin, seconded by Juston
to approve the vouchers, motion carried.
The following vouchers were paid:
WREA, $207.00; Pennington County
Courant, $17.06; WRLJ Rural Water,
$35.00; Kevin Wenzel, $25.00; Juston
Eisenbraun, $25.00; Jerry Pabst, $25.00;
Debbie Bryan, $223.78; SD Unemploy-
ment, $2.95; Russell Curtis, $2,500.00.
With all business complete, the meet-
ing was adjourned.
Deborah Bryan
Finance Officer
Town of Quinn
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $21.12.
WALL CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
COMMUNITY CENTER
MEETING ROOM
OCTOBER 3, 2013 6:30PM
Members Present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Dan Hauk,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Stan Anderson, Councilman; Gale
Patterson, Councilman
Carolynn Anderson, Finance Officer; Gar-
rett Bryan, Public Works Director; Carol
Steffen, Chamber/Assistant FO; Sgt,
Pennington County Sheriff; Laurie Hind-
man, Pennington Co. Courant; Shawn
Cutler, Teen 19; Ray Williams, Ray
Williams Plumbing
Members Absent: Jerry Morgan, Council-
man
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by M. Anderson, second by S An-
derson to approve the agenda. Motion
carried.
Sgt.Wardle gave the police report. Wardle
commented the coverage was a few
hours short this month with losing one
deputy and vacations taken. He stated
the new deputies are still scheduled to
start in January.
The Auditors were unable to attend and
give the presentation on the 2012 audit
because of sick family members. They
are rescheduled for the November meet-
ing.
The property at 428 Fourth Avenue has
been purchased by Tim Eisenbraun and
a building permit to demolish the house
and garage was submitted. Motion by S
Anderson, second by Patterson to ap-
prove the permit for demolition with a
completion date of December 31, 2013
and to waive the rubble site fees. Motion
carried.
The following building permits were re-
viewed: Jim Reynolds at 408 Glenn
Street to build a privacy fence for a wind
break; Rick Sutter at 612 Norris Street to
build a carport/storage shed; Wall School
at 206 First Avenue to build a crow’s nest;
Curt Williweit at 409 Norris Street to build
an addition on the garage; Terry Mohr at
606 Hustead Street to replace the roof
material on his house.
Discussion was held again on the Wall
Health Service. The attorney was con-
tacted about drawing up a lease agree-
ment between the City and Regional
Health Service (RHS). The attorney re-
quested answers to several questions
that would need to be addressed in the
agreement. The council felt Brett Blasius
and a representative from RHS would
need to attend the November meeting be-
fore moving forward any farther with the
agreement.
Motion by Patterson, second by S Ander-
son to approve Dave Jones as the librar-
ian assistant with an hourly wage of
$7.75, with the previous assistant unable
to fulfill the position. Motion carried.
Finance Officer (FO) Anderson asked for
a set wage for a fill-in employee in the ab-
sence of the librarian and assistant librar-
ian. Motion by Patterson, second by M
Anderson to approve an hourly wage of
$8.00 for a fill-in. Motion carried.
Mayor Hahn asked Ray Williams to ad-
dress the council on the invoice that was
submitted for payment. Ray explained he
was contacted by the public works em-
ployees to run his rotor router in the
sewer main so it could be located for the
contractor working on the sewer project.
Public Works Director (PWD) Bryan com-
mented the contractors planned on pay-
ing that expense. Williams was directed
to submit his bill to Site Works Specialists.
Williams commented he wanted the
council to be aware he has started a
plumbing service and would like to be
considered when there were any plumb-
ing needs.
PWD Bryan reported a quote for boring
on the I-90 light repair was $12 a foot and
there would be approximately 3,000 feet
to bore. Bryan was in contact with the
State for permission to do the boring and
Gary Engel with the State indicated they
may be able to help with the costs. Bryan
will report back when he hears back from
Engel.
The Engineer’s estimate for the
2013/2014 Street Improvement project
was $258,673.50. Two bids were re-
ceived; Hills Material Company for
$448,203.00 and from Simon Contractors
of SD for $404,469.35. The Engineers
recommendation was to reject the bids
and to rebid the project for January 23,
2014. Comments were made that funds
for this project are $375,000 which would
include the engineer’s fees. Some cuts
may need to be made on the project and
possibly having the PW employees do
some of the tear out for the project since
the City now has a backhoe that could be
used. Motion by S Anderson, second by
Hauk to reject all bids. Motion carried.
Motion by Patterson, second by Hauk to
have the street committee review the op-
tions to cut costs for rebidding the project.
Motion carried.
Mayor Hahn commented on the condition
of the Airport Road. Hahn stated it use to
be the old Highway and was turned over
to the City since it was in the limits of the
City. The City council at that time agreed
to retain pavement on a portion and the
rest would be graveled. The pavement
portion has major potholes and needs to
be repaired or turned into gravel. Motion
by Patterson, second by S Anderson to
have the street committee meet to review
the options and bring back for council ap-
proval. Motion carried.
Two quotes from H-C Galloway on up-
grade options for the water system was
reviewed. The water fund is over budget
already with emergency repairs done on
Well #2 and #7. Motion by S Anderson,
second by Hauk to have the water com-
mittee meet to review the options and
bring back a recommendation for the
2014 Expenditure Budget. Motion carried.
There is 2,075 gallons left in the 2013
propane contract. The contract price for
2014 is $1.49/9 per gallon. Motion by
Hustead, second by M Anderson to ap-
prove contracting 8,000 gallons of
propane. Motion carried.
Croell’s Concrete was requesting to get
water service from West River Lyman
Jones because of the high temperature
the City of Wall provides; therefore, cre-
ates issues with the set up on their con-
crete. It was discussed there could be
other options for Croell’s to cool the water
down and therefore did not want to set a
precedence by allowing then to get their
water from another provider. Motion by
Hustead, second by S Anderson to deny
Croell’s request. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve Resolution 13-09; Home-
coming requests. Motion carried.
RESOLUTION 13-9
HOMECOMING REqUESTS
WHEREAS, the Wall High
School begins the school year
approximately the same time
as the September council
meeting; and
WHEREAS, the Homecom-
ing week begins prior to the
October council meeting; and
WHEREAS, the Homecom-
ing committee needs approval
for the homecoming bon fire
and the parade route, and
WHEREAS, it would be
practical for the Mayor, Fi-
nance Officer and two Council
members to have the authority
on behalf of the full council to
approve the Homecoming
committee requests; and
BE IT RESOLVED, the ap-
proved requests will be brought
to the full council at the next
council meeting.
Dated this 3rd day of Octo-
ber, 2013
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Dakota Mill has expressed interest in pur-
chasing the City lot west of the swimming
pool. Discussion was held on the benefits
to putting it back on the tax roll and the
need the City has for the property as a
staging area when the City has projects
going on. Motion by M Anderson, second
by Hauk the City retain ownership of the
property. Motion carried.
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to approve Resolution 13-10; Home
Rule. Motion carried.
HOME RULE
RESOLUTION 13-10
WHEREAS the Wall City
Council sees that local govern-
ment can be streamlined by
the implementation of the
home rule form of government,
and
WHEREAS the state consti-
tution provides that any city
may provide for the adoption of
a home rule charter, and
WHEREAS the state consti-
tution’s rules for establishment
of a home rule charter are quite
cumbersome and should be
changed to provide for statu-
tory home rule for local govern-
ments, and
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED by the Wall City
Council that the Legislature of
the State of South Dakota be
encouraged to provide for
statutory home rule for local
governments, and continue to
outline, within this law, the
standards that are to be met
and the powers that are not in-
cluded expressly.
Dated October 3, 2013
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
(SEAL)
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hauk
to approve Resolution 13-11; Tax Exemp-
tions for Municipal Bonds. Motion carried.
RESOLUTION 13-11
A RESOLUTION
SIGNIFYING THE CITY OF
WALL POSITION ON TAX
EXEMPTIONS FOR
MUNICIPAL BONDS
Whereas, municipal bonds
are the means by which state
and local governments finance
the critical infrastructure of our
nation, including roads,
bridges, hospitals, schools,
and utility systems; and
Whereas, under current law
the owners of municipal bonds
are not required to pay federal
income tax on the interest in-
come they receive from the
bonds; and
Whereas, this tax exemp-
tion is part of a more than cen-
tury long system of reciprocal
immunity under which owners
of federal bonds are, in turn,
not required to pay state and
local income tax on the interest
they receive from federal
bonds; and
Whereas, this federal tax
exemption provides a signifi-
cant difference between public
sector and private sector debt
financing; and
Whereas, municipalities
benefit from this tax exemption
through substantial savings on
the interest cost of borrowed
money; and
Whereas, the benefit of
lower capital costs attributable
to tax exempt financing are
passed on to property tax pay-
ers through reduced rates,
greater local investments, or
both; and
Whereas, from time to time
Congress and the President
have proposed legislation to
tax – or alter the federal tax ex-
emption of – interest on munic-
ipal bonds; and
Now, Therefore, Be It Re-
solved, that the City of Wall,
South Dakota opposes any ef-
forts by Congress and this, or
any future, President to elimi-
nate or limit the federal tax ex-
emption on interest earned
from municipal bonds.
Dated this 3rd day of October,
2013.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Motion by M Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve City minutes for Septem-
ber 5, 2013. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hauk
to approve Fire Department minutes for
September 10, 2013. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve Pay request #4 from
Site Works Specialists, Inc. for
$64,339.74. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Patter-
son to approve the remaining October
City bills with the exclusion of the Ray
Williams Plumbing bill. Motion carried.
CITY BILLS
OCTOBER 3, 2013
Gross Salaries – September 30, 2013:
Gross Salaries: Adm., $5,566.91; PWD,
$6,206.16;
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ins.,
$165.62; HEALTH POOL, Health/Life In-
surance, $2,200.87; SDRS, Employee
Retirement, $1,377.56; SDRS-SRP, Em-
ployee Supp Retirement plan, $150.00;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $2,667.00
October 3, Bills
BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE, circuit
breaker for street broom, $11.99; CETEC,
engineering on Sewer project,
$27,076.65; DAKOTA BACKUP, backup
service, $189.39; DAKOTA BUSINESS
CENTER, copier contract, $40.00; DE'S
OIL & PROPANE, propane contract,
$11,992.00; EAST PENNINGTON
CONS. DIST., Green Yard award, $22.79;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, ach fees,
$12.70; FIRST INTERSTATE BANK,
sales tax, $492.35; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, airport beacon bulbs, $117.99;
GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLOGIES, TS
security monitoring, $188.93; GOLDEN
WEST TELE, shop phone, $551.85;
HAWKINS WATER TREATMENT
GROUP, water treatment, $1,756.45; H-
C GALLOWAYS, Change Order #121-01,
$8,153.00; LINDSEY HILDEBRAND, 7
hrs training, $105.00; HOLSETHER -
WINN JONNY, 5 hours in Chamber/City
offices, $70.00; JENNER EQUIP., engine
wire for mower, $21.75
KITTERMAN, JIM, insurance reimburse-
ment, $527.31; LIGHT & SIREN, LED yel-
low beacon for tan pickup, $186.41; ONE
CALL SYSTEMS, INC., locate requests,
$27.75; PENNINGTON COUNTY
COURANT, publishings, $373.64; RAPID
DELIVERY INC, shipping for water test,
$10.80; SERVALL UNIFORM, CC rugs,
$58.66; SANITATION PROD., coil for
street sweeper replaced, $325.81; S.D.
PUBLIC ASSURANCE ALLIANCE, gen-
eral insurance, $20,507.62; SUMMIT
SIGNS, Airport signage, $244.75; TLC
ELECTRIC, install receptical at tower,
$162.02; WALKER REFUSE, garbage
service, $7,538.13; WALL BADLANDS
AREA CHAMBER, BBB funds,
$3,148.10; WALL BUILDING CENTER &
CONST, supplies, $264.89; WALL DRUG
STORE, pictures, $1.95; WEST RIVER
ELEC, well electricity, $13,867.83; WEST
RIVER ELEC, Main St loan, $7,500.00;
WEST RIVER/LYMAN-JONES RURAL,
water purchase, $3,500.00; SITE WORK
SPECIALISTS, Pay request #4-sewer
project, $64,339.74.
TOTAL BILLS: $173,388.25
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 3rd day of Ocotber 2013.
Motion by Hustead, second by Hauk to
approve October Fire Department bills.
Motion carried.
FIRE DEPT BILLS
OCTOBER 3, 2013
October 3, Bills 2013:
BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE, graphite,
$10.39; WALL AMBULANCE, electricity
at Ambulance shed, $35.35; FIRST IN-
TERSTATE BANK, fuel for trucks,
$121.84; GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLO-
GIES, security monitoring, $107.96;
GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone-internet,
$134.68; M & T FIRE AND SAFETY, an-
nual testing on trucks, $3,220.00; VERI-
ZON WIRELESS, mobile broadband,
$52.08; WALL BUILDING CENTER &
CONST, 1.7 cu refrigerator, $124.99;
WALL HEALTH SERVICES, 5594 health
check, $66.00; WEST RIVER ELEC,
electricity, $147.94.
TOTAL BILLS: $4,021.23
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 3rd day of Ocotber 2013.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Patter-
son to approve the October Library bills.
Motion carried.
LIBRARY BILLS
OCTOBER 3, 2013
Gross Salaries – September 30, 2013:
Gross Salaries: $591.25
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $90.47
October 3, Bills 2013:
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, books from
Amazon, $304.16; GOLDEN WEST
TECHNOLOGIES, security monitoring,
$107.96; GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone,
$41.07; HOLSETHER - WINN JONNY, 14
library hours, $129.50; PENNINGTON
COUNTY COURANT, subscription,
$35.00; SD LIBRARY NETWORK, Data
extract costs, $611.40; S.D. PUBLIC AS-
SURANCE ALLIANCE, insurance on con-
tents, $573.00; SYKORA DAVID, 2.50
hours at library, $19.38; WEST RIVER
ELEC, electricity, $41.00.
TOTAL BILLS: $1,952.94
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 3rd day of October 2013.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve the October Cemetery
bills. Motion carried.
CEMETERY BILLS
OCTOBER 3, 2013
October 3, Bills 2013:
S.D. PUBLIC ASSURANCE ALLIANCE,
insurance, $392.00; SECRETARY OF
STATE, Dissolve Articles fee, $5.00.
TOTAL BILLS: $397.00
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 3rd day of October 2013.
At this time the On-call schedule, Com-
munity Center report, Compensatory re-
port, Wall Health Service report were re-
viewed.
FO Anderson explained last month’s mo-
tion to approve dissolving the tax ID for
Eastern Pennington County Transit
(EPCT) and the Cemetery did not include
naming the check signers on those ac-
counts which is needed for the Banks
records. Motion by Patterson, second by
Hustead to approve the Mayor, Finance
Officer, Council President and Council
Vice-President as check signers on the
EPCT and Cemetery bank accounts. Mo-
tion carried.
PWD Bryan explained the monthly cost
for a street light at Lariat Drive would de-
pend on the bulb that was used on the
pole. The cost could range from $11.00 -
$20.00. The trenching estimate for the
wiring was $428.00 by TLC or $328 by
Todd Sieler. The pole and hook-up would
be at WREA expense. Mayor Hahn ques-
tioned whether the PW employees could
doing the digging for the wire with the
newly purchased backhoe. Motion by
Patterson, second by S Anderson to hire
Todd Sieler for the trenching and to use
WREA recommendation on the wattage
of bulb to use for that area. Motion car-
ried.
PWD Bryan commented the sprinkler
system at the Park does not work prop-
erly, there are some faults in the wiring.
He was in contact with the ‘Sprinkler
Guys’ from Rapid City and they would
come down and locate the problems and
make a recommendation on the repair
costs for $80.00 - $100.00. This would
need to wait until spring with the season
ending. Motion by S Anderson, second by
M Anderson to hire the contractor next
spring to determine the problems with the
Park sprinkler system. Motion carried.
PWD Bryan reported the meters at Well
#6 and #2 are still not working properly.
The meter at #6 is under warranty and the
problem with the meter at #2 is still being
determined.
PWD Bryan questioned the process for
getting quotes for larger purchases or re-
pairs. The consensus was to meet with
the committee that would pertain to the
purchase; thus, to get a recommendation
whether to proceed with the quote
process.
PWD Bryan explained the Bobcat tires
are showing wear with 700 hours of use
on them. He checked on cost for retreads,
they would cost approximately $200 a
tire, replacement of the same tire would
be $314 a tire and severe duty tires would
cost $386.25 a tire. Motion by S Ander-
son, second by M Anderson to purchase
four (4) retreads. Motion carried.
The Water Usage report showed 20%
water loss for September. With the water
leaks that occurred due to Site Works
Specialist hitting water mains it is hard to
track accurately. The sales tax report was
reviewed and it is down 2%.
Mayor Hahn commented the West River
Lyman Jones annual meeting will be in
the community center October 9th, start-
ing at 5:00pm. The Wall Badlands Cham-
ber ‘Appreciation Supper has been post-
poned until October 24th. The WREA an-
nual meeting has also been postponed
until October 19th.
The employee evaluations need to be
completed along with PWD Bryans six
month probation period nearing comple-
tion. Motion by Hustead, second by M An-
derson to begin the November 7th council
meeting with executive session at 5:45pm
to review Bryans probation and pending
any requests from the other employees
after being evaluated to start the execu-
tive session earlier if needed. Motion car-
ried.
Next City Council meeting will be Thurs-
day, November 7th at 6:30pm.
With no further business the meeting was
adjourned at 8:27pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
________________
Carolynn Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $257.64.
Publ ic Notices
Proceedings of Pennington
County Commissioners
(cont. from previous page)
Legal Publication Deadline
is 11:00 a.m. on FRIDAY
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 10
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
MINUTES
SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the Deadwood
Mountain Grand Hotel in Deadwood, SD.
Vice-Chairman Casey Krogman called
the meeting to order at 8:10 a.m. (MT).
Roll Call was taken and Vice-Chairman
Krogman declared a quorum was pres-
ent. Directors present were: Casey Krog-
man, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Absent: Joseph Hieb. Also
present: Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Amy
Kittelson, Office Manager for WR/LJ;
Dave Larson, Larson Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Smith, seconded by Director Prokop to
approve the agenda. Motion carried
unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the August 15, 2013, meeting were previ-
ously mailed to the Board for their review.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the August min-
utes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Casey
Krogman - $55.41, Marion Matt - $55.41,
Veryl Prokop - $55.41, Lorne Smith
- $55.41, West River/Lyman-Jones RWS
- $1,000.00, Kadoka Press - $78.36,
Lyman County Herald - $33.96, Murdo
Coyote - $38.27, Pennington County
Courant - $83.82, Pioneer Review -
$101.69, Mellette County News - $38.44.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Smith to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT: The financial status of the District
to date was previously sent to the Board.
A copy of the August Financial Report is
on file at the District office in Murdo. Mo-
tion by Director Smith, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the August Fi-
nancial Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his September re-
port to the Board. Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the Manager’s Report. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
JONES COUNTY CONSERVATION DIS-
TRICT: Manager Fitzgerald presented
two funding assistance requests from the
Jones County Conservation District for
administration costs for the implementa-
tion of grants. The Multi-Practice Grant I
is requesting $5,250 and Multi Practice
Grant II is requesting $3,487. Both grants
assist landowners in Jones and Lyman
Counties with the installation of pipeline,
tanks and cross fencing. Motion by Di-
rector Matt, seconded by Director Prokop
to provide assistance for the total re-
quested amount of $8,737 to the Jones
County Conservation District for adminis-
tration costs for Multi-Practice Grants I &
II. The funds will be paid as expenses
incur by invoice. Motion carried unani-
mously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 8:20 A.M.
(MT).
ATTEST:
_________________
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
______________
Casey Krogman,
Vice-Chairman
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $31.52.
PENNINGTON
COUNTY
EMERGENCY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS’ MEETING
OCTOBER 8, 2013
An emergency meeting of the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners was
held on Tuesday, October 8, 2013, in the
Commissioners' meeting room of the
Pennington County Courthouse. Chair-
person Lyndell Petersen called the meet-
ing to order at 1:30 p.m. with the following
Commissioners present: Ron Buskerud,
Ken Davis and Nancy Trautman. Com-
missioner Holloway was not in atten-
dance.
STATUS UPDATE OF DISASTER RE-
SPONSE AND RECOVERY – WINTER
STORM ATLAS
DECLARATION OF LOCAL EMER-
GENCY: WINTER STORM ATLAS -
RESOLUTION AND PROCLAMATION
FOR PENNINGTON COUNTY
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to approve the Pennington
County Resolution for Declaration of
Emergency/Disaster for Winter Storm
Atlas and authorize the Chairperson’s sig-
nature. Vote: Unanimous.
RESOLUTION FOR
DECLARATION OF
EMERGENCY/DISASTER
WINTER STORM ATLAS
Pennington County,
South Dakota
WHEREAS, On October
8, 2013, The Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers do hereby enact the follow-
ing resolution;
WHEREAS, T h e
Pennington County Emer-
gency Management Director
and other Officials of Penning-
ton County, SD do hereby find
that:
1. Winter Storm
“Atlas” which began on Octo-
ber 4, 2013 has resulted in sig-
nificant damage to Pennington
County’s transportation and
power distribution infrastruc-
ture;
2. All available
local resources have been
committed to response and re-
covery activities;
3. Many residents
have been displaced across
the County and its municipali-
ties;
4. Costs associ-
ated with the response and re-
covery efforts are expected to
create a significant financial
burden to the County and its
municipalities.
NOW THEREFORE, IT
IS HEREBY RESOLVED AND
PROCLAIMED that a winter
storm disaster does now exist
throughout Pennington County,
SD; and
BE IT FURTHER RE-
SOLVED, the Pennington
County Board of County Com-
missioners for, and on behalf
its citizens, request the Gover-
nor of the State of South
Dakota to declare Pennington
County a disaster area; and
IT IS FURTHER PRO-
CLAIMED AND ORDERED,
during the existence of this
emergency/disaster; the pow-
ers, functions and duties of the
Emergency Management Of-
fice of Pennington County, SD,
shall be those prescribed by
state law and the ordinances,
resolutions, and approved
plans of Pennington County,
SD, in order to mitigate the ef-
fects of this emergency/disas-
ter.
Dated this 8th day of October,
2013.
/s/Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
Pennington County Board
of Commissioners
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Karen McGregor,
Deputy Auditor
OTHER URGENT BUSINESS
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to authorize the Auditor’s Of-
fice to pay storm related expenses as
they are submitted and list the payments
in the minutes of the next meeting. Vote:
Unanimous.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to adjourn the meeting.
Vote: Unanimous. There being no further
business, the meeting was adjourned at
2:28 p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $60.32.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
080314 LOT 9-10 IN BLOCK 10 IN
THE TOWN OF OWANKA, PEN-
NINGTON COUNTY, SOUTH
DAKOTA (ID 7373). western town
lot company, Estate of D. vivian
Whitehead, a/k/a dorotha vivian
whitehead, estate of delores m
whitehead- grosz, AND THE ES-
TATE OF lola jean whitehead
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 2nd day of Oc-
tober, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published October 10 & 17, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $27.30.
FOR LEASE
Scenic Township Quarter (160 acres) SE
1/4 of Section 33, Township 2 South,
Range 13 East of the Black Hills Merid-
ian.
Notice is hereby given that Scenic Town-
ship #7 of Pennington County, South
Dakota, will be accepting sealed bids up
to 7:00 p.m., November 6, 2013, at which
time the sealed bids will be opened and
read during the monthly Township meet-
ing held at the Scenic Community Center.
The above Township quarter will be
leased for a period of (5) five years. The
lease is to be paid annually in advance.
Ten percent (10%) of said bid must be ac-
companied by a certified cashiers check
or money order. This lease will be from
November 1, 2013 through October 31,
2018. There is a minimum bid of $1200
per year. The first payment is due upon
executive of the lease agreement.
This land is for livestock grazing only and
will not be over grazed. Prairie dogs will
be controlled by the lessee. The Township
Board reserves the right to reject any and
all bids. The Township Board reserves the
right of inspection, with the lessee at any
time.
The bids must be mailed to: Scenic Town-
ship, Attn: Acting Clerk, Lease Bid, PO
Box 15, Scenic, SD 57780, or presented
to the Board by 7:00 p.m. at the meeting.
Kathy Jobgen,
Acting Township Clerk
Published October 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $29.90.
WALL SCHOOL
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
OCTOBER 9, 2013
The Board of Education of the Wall
School District #51-5 met in regular ses-
sion on Wednesday, October 9, 2013, in
the Library of Wall School. Members
present: Chairperson Eisenbraun, Vice-
Chairperson Johnson, Members Cordes,
Williams, Bielmaier, and Trask. Also at-
tending were Superintendent Rieckman,
Elementary Principal Sykora, Business
Manager Mohr, Samra Trask, Pandi
Pittman, Andrew Ferris, and Laurie Hind-
man. Chairperson Eisenbraun called the
meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.
All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.
Business Manager Mohr took a roll call of
the board members. Member Anderson
was absent.
The Pledge of Allegiance was recited.
4848. Trask moved to approve the
agenda. Seconded by Cordes. Motion
carried.
4849. Cordes moved to approve the
consent agenda. Seconded by Bielmaier.
Motion carried.
•Approve minutes of September 11,
2013 board meeting.
•Approve October claims.
•Approve addendum for Mary Roeder
in the amount of $500.00 for her teaching
contract and $20 for her volleyball con-
tract due to her salaries needing to be up-
dated with the 2013-2014 negotiated
agreement.
GENERAL FUND
A & B WELDING CO, AG SUPPLIES,
132.44; A TO Z SHREDDING, SHRED-
DING, 13.35; ANACONDA SPORTS,
VOLLEYBALL CARTS, 242.00; ANDER-
SON, KENT, MILEAGE, 23.68; BAR-
NETT, SHARON, SEPT MILEAGE,
195.36; BELLE FOURCHE SCHOOL
DISTRICT, VB TOURNAMENT FEE,
40.00; BLACK HILLS CHEMICAL CO.,
MAINT SUPPLIES, 20.00; BLACK HILLS
SPECIAL SERVICES, ONLINE CON-
SORTIUM, 150.00; BLASIUS, BRETT
OR PAULA, SEPT MILEAGE, 37.74;
BURTZ, RON, DRAMA SUPPLIES,
133.48; CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL, XC
ENTRY FEE, 50.00; CLIMATE CON-
TROL, CHANGE FILTERS/REPAIR
HEAT PUMP, 2,424.16; CROWN OIL
CO., FUEL, 1,778.28; DAIRY QUEEN,
BLIZZARDS, 535.20; DAKOTA INK &
TONER, TONER, 2,033.89; DAYS INN,
HOTEL, 100.00; DE'S OIL & PROPANE,
REPAIRS/TANK RENT, 60.25; DELGER,
JACQUELYN, SEPT MILEAGE, 37.74; E-
FILLIATE INC., SUPPLIES, 281.39;
ELSHERE, STACY, SEPT MILEAGE,
86.76; FAUSKE, TIM OR ERIN, SEPT
MILEAGE, 301.92; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, POSTAGE/TRAVEL/BOOKS,
1,552.32; FRINK, AMANDA, SEPT
MILEAGE, 130.24; GOLDEN WEST
TECHNOLOGIES, TELEPHONE MAINT
CONTRACT, 439.36; HAGGERTY'S,
BAND REPAIRS, 30.00; DAKOTA
SPORTS, WRESTLING MEDALS,
299.40; HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HAR-
COURT, PRACTICE BOOKS, 696.63;
KJERSTAD, RACHEL, SEPT MILEAGE,
288.60; LYMAN CO. SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, XC ENTRY FEE, 25.00; MARCO,
INC., COPIER CONTRACT, 433.00; Mc-
CONNELL, GWEN, SEPT MILEAGE,
201.28; MCGRAW-HILL COMPANIES,
THE, TEACHER EDITIONS, 187.92;
MED-FIT SYSTEMS, INC.,
BATTERY/CORD, 57.01; MID-CENTRAL
EDUCATIONAL COOP, TUITION,
1,100.00; MOHR, NIKI, MEALS, 33.00;
NETWORK SERVICES CO., SUPPLIES,
124.04; PENNINGTON COUNTY
COURANT, PROCEEDINGS, 327.18;
PHILLIPS66, CONOCO, 76, GAS,
820.81; RAUSCH, ANNE JO, SEPT
MILEAGE, 136.16; RESOURCES FOR
READING, INC, BOOK BAGS, 27.50;
RIDDELL, SPEED CROWN LINER,
55.65; RIECKMAN, DENNIS, TRAVEL -
I.A., 82.55; SCHOOL SPECIALTY, SUP-
PLIES, 15.15; SDAHPERD, REGISTRA-
TION FEE, 135.00; SDASSP, DUES,
75.00; SECTION 8002, CONF FEES,
260.00; SHEARER, MEGHAN, SEPT
MILEAGE, 461.76; SHIFFLER EQUIP-
MENT SALES, AUTO FLUSHER, 181.12;
SKILLINGSTAD, DORREEN, SEPT
MILEAGE, 208.82; SKILLINGSTAD, KO-
RTNEY, SEPT MILEAGE , 130.24;
SUBSCRIPTION SERV. OF AMERICA,
LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTIONS, 491.53;
VANWAY TROPHY & AWARD, XC
MEDALS, 190.40; VERIZON WIRE-
LESS, CELL PHONE, 129.27; WALKER
REFUSE, GARBAGE, 729.20; WALL
BUILDING CENTER, SUPPLIES,
366.12; WALL WATER DEPARTMENT,
WATER - FOOTBALL FIELD, 1,451.10;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELEC-
TRICITY, 7,333.73; WEX BANK, GAS,
110.04; ZELFER, JESSICA, SEPT
MILEAGE, 331.52.
FUND TOTAL: 28,325.29
CAPITAL OUTLAY
CORE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES,
COMPUTERS, 3,774.95; DEANS CON-
STRUCTION, FOOTBALL GRAND
STANDS, 8,575.43; GOLDEN WEST
TECHNOLOGIES, SECURITY INSTAL-
LATION, 347.54; GOLDEN WEST TELE-
PHONE COOP., LAPTOP, 1,094.00;
JONES CAULKING, SCHOOL BUILD-
ING CAULKING, 18,326.56; KEN'S RE-
FRIGERATION, AC TO CARDIO ROOM
AT PH, 2,385.75; MCGRAW-HILL COM-
PANIES, THE, BOOKS, 93.48; TLC
ELECTRIC, AC TO CARDIO ROOM AT
PH, 701.46.
FUND TOTAL: 35,299.17
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, TIMER,
19.99; FUNSHINE PRESCHOOL, SERV-
ICES, 80.00; HANDWRITING WITHOUT
TEARS, SPED SUPPLIES, 119.74; MC-
GRAW-HILL COMPANIES, THE,
TEACHERS EDITIONS, 297.69;
PHILLIPS66, CONOCO, 76, GAS, 61.53
FUND TOTAL: 578.95
FOOD SERVICE FUND
BERNARD FOOD INDUSTRIES, INC.,
FOOD, 307.70; DEAN FOODS-NORTH
CENTRAL, MILK, 1,451.62; EARTH-
GRAINS BAKING COMPANIES, INC.,
FOOD, 115.90; HOBART, DISHWASHER
REPAIR, 193.63; REINHART FOOD-
SERVICE, L.L.C., FOOD, 2,279.83; US
FOODSERVICE, FOOD, 2,492.54; WALL
FOOD CENTER, FOOD, 135.94; WALL
WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER, 19.83;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELEC-
TRICITY, 299.34.
FUND TOTAL: 7,296.33
WALL AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
BLICK ART MATERIALS, WASP SUP-
PLIES, 26.75; ORIENTAL TRADING CO.,
WASP SUPPLIES, 200.74; WALL
WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER, 56.20;
WALMART COMMUNITY BRC, KIDS
GARDEN GRILL, 261.70; WEST RIVER
ELECTRIC COOP., ELECTRICITY,
848.12.
FUND TOTAL: 1,393.51
CHECKING ACCOUNT TOTAL:
72,893.25
Chairperson Eisenbraun thanked Andrew
Ferris for being present to video for Teen
19.
An open enrollment application was
passed around for the Board to review.
4850. Bielmaier moved to approve the
open enrollment application for Collin
Hunt. Seconded by Cordes. Motion car-
ried.
Rieckman discussed allowing Philip to be
part of the Wall-Kadoka gymnastics co-
op.
4851. Cordes moved to approve Res-
olution #14-2 which approves to add
Philip to our gymnastics cooperative as
outlined by the SDHSAA. Seconded by
Williams. Motion carried.
Next, the board discussed entering into a
propane contract with De’s Oil at the price
of $1.499 per gallon.
4852. Cordes moved to approve con-
tracting 6,500 gallons with De’s Oil at
$1.499 per gallon. Seconded by John-
son. Motion carried.
Rieckman wanted to have a general dis-
cussion about the Common Core stan-
dards due to the recent hype over the
changes, etc. There may be legislation
this year to back off Common Core.
Rieckman asked Samra Trask to discuss
some of the changes in the math stan-
dards due to the Common Core Stan-
dards being implemented. Trask dis-
cussed the new Smarter Balanced as-
sessments that will be used to test the
students. A Common Core meeting
sponsored by the Rapid City School Dis-
trict is being planned for October 30th in
Rapid City. More information on specifics
will be coming out soon. Anyone inter-
ested in learning more about Common
Core is encouraged to attend.
Elementary Principal Sykora informed the
Board that parent-teacher conferences
will be held on October 16th and 17th.
The Elementary attendance is at 98%
and there are still 75 students who have
perfect attendance. With the help of Ms.
Pittman the 2012-2013 District Report
Card is completed and will be distributed
to local business for viewing. Community
members may also contact the school for
a copy.
Business Manager Mohr noted she has
been very busy with insurance topics
dealing with changes caused by health-
care reform. She also noted that effective
October 1st our health insurance admin-
istrator is now Wellmark not First Admin-
istrators.
Rieckman referred to the Junior High
Girls Basketball rules that were sent out.
There was discussion about 9b that
states ‘Shoes and socks shall be blue,
white or black only’. Board members
were concerned about athletes who
planned to use shoes from volleyball, etc.
that have other colors included.
4853. Trask moved to approve the
2013-2014 Junior High Girls Basketball
rules with a change made to 9b noting
athletes may wear shoes they have from
another sport even if they aren’t blue,
black, or white. Seconded by Johnson.
Motion carried.
Rieckman gave an Impact Aid update.
He attended a conference in Washington
DC a couple weeks ago and noted that
the District’s most recent application has
been filed. They were told at the confer-
ence that the timeline for approval would
possibly be November, but with the gov-
ernment shutdown we are not sure of the
timeline now.
Next, the Board approved the Indian poli-
cies and procedures for purposes of Im-
pact Aid funding.
4854. Cordes moved to approve the In-
dian policies and procedures. Seconded
by Trask. Motion carried.
Rieckman asked if any of the members
were available to attend Delegate Assem-
bly.
4855. Johnson moved to approve
Member Williams or Member Anderson to
attend Delegate Assembly on behalf of
our Board. Seconded by Cordes. Motion
carried.
Rieckman notified the Board members
about an open position on the ASBSD
Board they may run for if they choose.
A couple of the topics that will be dis-
cussed at Delegate Assembly are the
equalization of Capital Outlay funding and
Other Revenue. Our District is against
the equalization of Capital Outlay funding
because we would have less funding and
some of our taxpayer dollars would be
going to fund other schools. Our District
is also against any legislation dealing with
getting rid of Other Revenue.
Rieckman asked the Board to think about
the possibility of purchasing a generator
due to the recent storm when power was
lost.
Next month, Lunchtime Solutions will be
present at the meeting to discuss serv-
ices they could offer our lunch program.
CBM should be present at the December
or January meeting to discuss what their
company could offer our lunch program.
With no further business brought to the
board, Chairperson Eisenbraun declared
the meeting adjourned at 8:30 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Niki Mohr,
Business Manager
______________
Scot Eisenbraun,
Chairperson
________________
Niki A. Mohr,
Business Manager
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $165.65.
Publ ic Notices Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 11
annc@
gwtc.net
GENERAL CAPITAL SPEC. ED. IMPACT AID LUNCH WASP TOTAL
OUTLAY FUNDS
BEGINNING BALANCE:
8-31-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$265,221.04 . . . . . .$(40,429.96) . . . . . .$45,679.50 . . . . . . . . .$4,025,673.90 . . . . . .$177.47 . . . . . . . . . .$14,703.51 . . . . .$4,311,025.46
Receipts:
Local Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$274,282.88 . . . . . .$1,805.22 . . . . . . . . .$1,673.79 . . . . . . . . . .$496.13 . . . . . . . . . . .$6,584.80 . . . . . . . . .$7,205.86 . . . . . . . .$45,048.68
County Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,019.98 . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,019.98
State Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,914.00 . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,914.00
Federal Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
Other Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
General Journal Revenue: . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
Total to be
accounted for: . . . . . . . . . . .$347,437.90 . . . . . .($38,624.74) . . . . . .$47,353.29 . . . . . . . . .$4,026,170.03 . . . . . .$6,762.27 . . . . . . . . .$21,909.37 . . . . .$4,411,008.12
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$199,335.01 . . . . . .$69,848.24 . . . . . . . .$15,837.60 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,013.35 . . . . . . . . .$7,523.70 . . . . . . .$297,557.90
General Journal
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
EOM BALANCE:
9-30-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$148,102.89 . . . . . .($108,472.98) . . . . .$31,515.69 . . . . . . . . .$4,026,170.03 . . . . . .$1,748.92 . . . . . . . . .$14,385.67 . . . . .$4,113,450.22
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Pennington Co. Courant
Box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.philiplivestock.com
Email: info@philiplivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605) 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, Fieldman
Midland • (605) 567-3385
JEFF LONG, Fieldman/Auctioneer
Red Owl • (605) 985-5486
Cell: (605) 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, Auctioneer
Reva • (605) 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, Auctioneer
Milesville • (605) 544-3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605) 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, Fieldman
Sturgis • (605) 641-1042
(605) 347-0151
BAXTER ANDERS, Fieldman
Wasta • (605) 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(605) 859:2577
www.philiplivestock.com
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
SATURDAY, OCT. 19: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS 11:00
AM (MT) CALVES 12:00 PM (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 3,000
HEAD
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
YOUNG RANCH – 330 CHAR X & A FEW BLK, BWF, &
HERF CLVS; FS ................................................................................ 600-650#
GABRIEL – 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................500-600#
BRUNS – 225 BLK CLVS; FS ................................................................. 550-600#
MORELAND – 220 CHAR X & FEW BLK CLVS; FS,NI............................. 500-575#
LIVERMONT RANCH – 200 FANCY BLK STRS; FS,NI .................................... 500#
VIG – 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................... 500-550#
BAUMAN – 160 RED ANG CHAR X CLVS; FS......................................... 500-525#
BENDIGO – 140 CHAR X & RED CLVS; FS,NI........................................ 550-600#
FISHER – 130 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................ 500-550#
CUNY – 120 BLK STRS; FS,NI................................................................ 550-600#
BRASSFIELD – 120 BLK CLVS; FS,N............................................................ 500#
BAKER & THOMPSON – 120 BLK & BWF CLVS;
FS,NI ................................................................................................ 500-600#
GOLDEN WILLOW RANCH – 100 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................ 500-550#
BACHAND – 100 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI............................................. 500-575#
POURIER – 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................... 575#
NAESCHER – 82 BWF & HERF CLVS ........................................................... 500#
SIELER – 50 BLK STRS; FS,NI ............................................................... 525-550#
SCHERER – 35 BLK & FEW RED CLVS; NI ............................................ 500-575#
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL Yearling & ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS
10:00 Am (MT) CALVES 11:00 Am (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING
12,000 HEAD
YEARLINGS: ..........................................................................................................
FAIRBANKS RANCH – 400 BLK STRS .....................................................800-850#
(6 loads same sort) ............................................................................800-850#
ROSETH CATTLE CO ....................... – 300 BLK, RED, & HERF STRS (3 LDS BLK,
1 LD CHAR, & 1 LD HERF) ................................................................875-925#
MCILRAVY RANCH – 120 RED ANG CHAR X STRS & TESTED
OPEN HFRS...................................................................................... 850-900#
NESS – 80 BLK & BWF STRS..................................................................750-800#
NELSON – ..............................70 RWF STRS & OPEN HFRS (50 STRS & 20 OPEN
HFRS .................................................................................................875-900#
ADAMS – 50 BLK & BWF STRS & OPEN HFRS; HOME RAISED ..............700-900#
RAPID CREEK RANCH – 46 RED ANG TESTED OPEN HFRS..........................900#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
O’CONNOR – 600 CHAR X CLVS; FS.......................................................500-600#
BURNS – 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS.............................................................500-600#
EISENBRAUN – 400 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................450-550#
HOY – 80 RED ANG CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................400-500#
WILLIAMS – 360 FANCY RED ANG CHAR X CLVS (2 LDS STRS & 2 LD
HFRS) ................................................................................................600-700#
CARLEY RANCH – 350 BLK CLVS; FS,NI
RATTLESNAKE RIDGE RANCH – 300 FANCY BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............500-575#
LINN BROTHERS – 300 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................570#
TRASK FAMILY – 300 BLK STRS; FS,NI...................................................475-575#
LEVIN & CASTEEL – ..........300 BLK CLVS (ALL HFRS IN TOWN); FS,NI 550-600#
MEEKS RANCH – 275 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................................525-550#
HICKS RANCH – 275 BLK & RED STRS ..................................................600-650#
WILCOX – 270 BLK & BWF STRS; FS......................................................500-625#
IWAN & SONS – 250 X BRED CLVS.........................................................450-550#
O’DEA – 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS.........................................................500-600#
BERNDT– 250 BLK STRS; FS,NI..............................................................500-600#
MCDANIEL BROTHERS – 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........................500-550#
SHAW RANCH – 250 BLK STRS; FS,NI ....................................................500-575#
DIAMOND S RANCH – 230 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI ...............................500-600#
GROPPER & GROPPER – 225 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS...............................500-600#
SMITH & SMITH – 225 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-575#
FERGUSON – 230 BLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................500-600#
REINERT & ENRIGHT – 220 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ............................500-550#
MUNROE – 200 BLK & RED CKVSL FS,NI...............................................450-550#
EIDE – 200 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .........................................................................500#
WICKS RANCH – 190 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................500-575#
SCHOFIELD – 180 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...........................................450-550#
FEES – 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI......................................................450-550#
O’DANIEL – 160 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................500#
WILLIAMS – 150 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................550#
JOBGEN – 150 BLK STRS; FS,NI ............................................................525-550#
FOSTER – 150 BLK & BWF STRS; FS......................................................525-600#
CHASE – 140 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...............................................................550-600#
BOWEN & BOWEN – 140 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................550-600#
WILCOX – 125 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................................500-575#
CUNY – 120 BLK STRS; FS,NI ........................................................................550#
BURGEN – 110 BLK BWF CLVS; FS.......................................................550-625#
KAUFMAN – 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ..................................................550-625#
HARTY RANCH – 110 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..................................................500-550#
RADWAY – 110 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...................................................................550#
CARMICHAEL & DRESSEN – 105 BLK & BWF MOSTLY STRS;
FS,NI .................................................................................................500-600#
KNIGHT – 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................................450-550#
LARSON & LARSON – 100 BLK & A FEW BWF STRS; FS,NI ...........................550#
COMPTON – 100 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI .....................................................500#
FREELAND – 100 BLK STRS; FS.............................................................625-650#
KRUSE – 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................................500#
KRUSE – 85 BLK STRS; FS,NI .................................................................500-550#
CLEMENTS – 85 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................500-525#
SAMMONS – 80 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................500-550#
OPSTEDAHL RANCH – 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI............................................450-575#
HOFFMAN – 80 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI
STRUBLE – 75 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................500-550#
LURZ – 75 MOSTLY RED & CHAR X CLVS; FS...............................................550#
WILLIAMS – 75 BLK STRS; FS........................................................................500#
MARLER – 75 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................550-650#
LAWRENCE – 75 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................550-650#
HERRINGTON – 70 BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI ........................................600-650#
BASEL & LAMONT – 65 CERT RED ANG STRS; FS,NI .............................500-550#
DEDIC – 60 HERF CLVS; FS ...................................................................450-550#
HENRY – 60 BLK & BWF MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI.......................................550-600#
HOBART & HOBART – 60 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................500#
SCHLECT – 60 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................475#
ROSETH CATTLE CO – 50 BLK CLVS; FS................................................400-600#
RIGGINS – 50 BLK STRS; FS,NI ..............................................................500-600#
PIROUTEK – 50 CHAR X CLVS; FS..........................................................600-625#
HOFFMAN – 50 RED CLVS; FS,NI
MARLER – 50 BLK & BWF CLVS (ALL HFRS IN TOWN); FS,NI .................500-600#
SKOGEN – 50 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI...................................................500-550#
WILLIAMS – 45 BLK STRRS; FS,NI ..........................................................550-600#
HANSON – 45 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................................550-600#
HARTSHORN – 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................500-600#
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.philiplivestock.com. Upcoming sales & consignments can
be viewed on the Internet at www.philiplivestock.com, or on the DTN: Click on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA is now qualified to handle third party verified NHTC cattle
(Non-Hormonal Treated Cattle).
Keep supporting R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA is our
voice in government to represent U.S. cattle
producers in trade marketing issues. Join
today & help make a difference!
Philip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Live-
stock Auction, will be offering video sale as an additional
service to our consignors, with questions about the video
please callJerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
Philip, SD
ADDISON & WILLIAMS – 30 RED STRS; FS,NI ...............................................400#
HARRIS – 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................550-600#
MEINEN – 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................................500#
HAUK – 26 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..........................................................................550#
ROSETH – 25 BLK STRS; FS..........................................................................575#
BILLS – 25 BLK CLVS; FS ..............................................................................525#
HAMANN – 25 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................................550#
BRAVE BULL CREEK INC – 15 BLK STRS; FS,NI.....................................500-550#
GRAVE – 10 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................600-650#
DUGAN – 5 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI ......................................................550-600#
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS 11:00 AM
(MT) CALVES 12:00 PM (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 3,000 HEAD
COMPLETE DISPERSION: ....................................................................................
PHILIP HOY – “COMPLETE DISPERSION OF COMING 4 YR OLD TO BROKEN
MOUTH COWS” .....................................................................................................
390 RED ANG COMING 4 YR OLD TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:RED;
CLVS:4-22 FOR 60 DAYS (REPRODUCTIVE SHOTS)
BRED CATTLE:
A CONSIGNMENT – 185 BLK & RED RUNNING AGE COWS; BRED:BLK & RED
SATURDAY, OCT. 26: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE YEARLINGS 11:00 AM
(MT) CALVES 12:00 PM (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 2,000 HEAD
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
DEERING – 250 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................600#
LONG – 200 CHAR X STRS; FS,NI ...........................................................500-600#
ALDREN – 150 CHAR X CLVS; FS...........................................................500-570#
LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT – 150 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...............................500-550#
LAMPHERE & GRUBL – ......................130 MOSTLY CHAR X & A FEW BLK CLVS;
FS,NI .................................................................................................550-600#
BALDWIN – 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................500-575#
SHULL – 65 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................................500#
MAY – 50 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI,AN ...........................................................550#
SIMONS – 30 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI .........................................................500-600#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH-
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 5: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE
SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS WEANED CALF SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS,
& HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS
CATTLE REPORT
TUES., OCTOBER 15, 2013
A lite run of calves due to the weather.
Lots of buyers, very few potloads. Weigh-
ups very strong. Big Sale here next Tues-
day, Oct. 22nd. Weigh-ups and bred cat-
tle on Wed-nesday. Special Calf Sales
Saturday, Oct. 19th & Saturday, Oct.
26th.
CALVES:
JOHN W. & PAULINE STABEN, ORAL
80............................RED STR 626# .......$184.00
22............................RED STR 527# .......$190.00
41............................RED HFR 577.........$180.00
10............................RED HFR 473# .......$183.00
RICHTER & KELLY, QUINN
77 ..........................CHAR STR 560# .......$188.50
39 ...............BLK/RD/CH STR 438# .......$214.00
83..........................CHAR HFR 528# .......$179.25
23 ..............BLK/RD/CHR HFR 419# .......$187.00
BOB AMIOTTE, WANBLEE
14.....................BLK/BWF STR 451# .......$222.00
45 ....................BLK/BWF STR 552# .......$187.25
9......................BLK/BWF HFR 452# .......$190.00
39 ...................BLK/BWF HFR 533# .......$179.50
JOHNA ROVERE, STURGIS
32 ............................BLK STR 556# .......$188.50
3 ..............................BLK STR 462# .......$210.00
23............................BLK HFR 523# .......$179.00
VALLERY & MILLS, NISLAND
68 ............................BLK STR 533# .......$193.00
6 ..............................BLK STR 433# .......$201.00
19 ...........................BLK HFR 453# .......$185.00
TERRY GUNN, WASTA
40.....................BLK/BWF STR 586# .......$183.25
12 .....................RD/BLK STR 491# .......$200.00
7......................BLK/BWF HFR 541# .......$180.00
DIAMOND B RANCH, HERMOSA
32....................RWF/BWF STR 554# .......$183.00
32 ...................RWF/BWF HFR 528# .......$179.50
DAVE & BILIE HUMPHREY, WALL
16 ...................CHAR/BLK STR 593# .......$180.00
16 ...................BLK/BWF HFR 531# .......$178.50
DALE SCHUELKE, BLACK HAWK
17.....................BLK/BWF STR 441# .......$209.50
42.....................BLK/BWF STR 569# .......$185.25
8..............................BLK HFR 419# .......$194.00
29........................... BLK HFR 502# .......$179.75
DENNIS SHARP, INTERIOR
29............................BLK HFR 502# .......$188.50
11....................BLK/BWF HFR 467# .......$179.00
TUCKER AMIOTTE, INTERIOR
17....................BLK/BWF HFR 411# .......$209.00
54 ......................RD/BLK STR 504# .......$192.00
15......................RD/BLK HFR 400# .......$186.00
46 .....................RD/BLK HFR 484# .......$178.00
WADE & WYATT PETERSON, ENNING
51 ............................BLK STR 575# .......$181.00
7 ......................BLK/BWF STR 468# .......$206.00
12 ..................CHAR/BLK HFR 471# .......$181.00
27....................BLK/BWF HFR 543# .......$175.25
WATKINS JP RANCH, EDGEMONT
7 ..............................BLK STR 483# .......$206.50
25.....................BLK/BWF STR 602# .......$177.50
35 ...................BLK/BWF HFR 582# .......$175.00
MARK KRUGER, PLEASANTVIEW, NE
4 .............................BLK STR 475# .......$204.50
15 ............................BLK STR 592# .......$175.25
14....................BLK/BWF HFR 566# .......$170.50
KEVIN REINDL, CUSTER
6 ..............................BLK STR 503# .......$186.00
23 ...................CHAR/BLK STR 612# .......$172.50
8..............................BLK HFR 438# .......$195.00
27 ...........................BLK HFR 571# .......$170.00
GRADY BRUNSCH, INTERIOR
5 ........................RD/BLK STR 469# .....$1963.00
11 ...........................BLK STR 563# .......$171.00
LEONARD REMER, HERMOSA
9 ..................BLK STF (NO FS) 640# .......$160.50
7............RD/BLK HFR (NO FS) 471# .......$174.50
7..................BLK HFR (NO FS) 651# .......$143.25
YEARLINGS
THE NATURE CONSERVANCY, SCENIC
26 ............................BLK STR 702# .......$171.75
ERIC HANSEN, WALL
6 ......................BLK/BWF STR 870# .......$151.00
31.....................BLK/BWF STR 979# .......$149.00
GERALD & SHARLA JULSON, QUINN
12....................BLK/BWF HFR 890# .......$150.75
FORREST STEWART, CODY
16 ...................CHAR/BLK STR 801# .......$147.50
WEIGH-UPS
1 .............................BLK COW 1,486# ......$92.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,366# ......$92.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,571# ......$91.50
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,576# ......$90.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,481# ......$90.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,491# ......$89.50
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,336# ......$89.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,516# ......$88.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1,471# ......$87.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,706# ......$85.50
1.............................RED COW 1, 416# ......$85.00
1 ...........................HERF COW 1, 486# ......$84.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,456# ......$83.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 231# ......$89.00
1 ...........................CHAR COW 1, 531# ......$87.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 416# ......$89.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 486# ......$86.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,356# ......$85.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1,336# ......$84.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1, 361# ......$87.50
1 .............................BLK COW 1,341# ......$85.00
1 .............................BLK COW 1,446# ......$84.50
1.............................BLK BULL 2,106# ......$97.00
1...........................CHAR BULL 1,906# ......$95.00
1.............................BLK BULL 1,996# ......$92.00
1 ............................BLK HFRT 1,021# ....$100.00
1.......................BLK COWETTE 1,006# ......$99.00
1 .....................BLK COWETTEE 1,171# ......$91.00
Pennington County Courant • October 17, 2013 • 12
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding
& engagement
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NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Dudley and Ila LaPointe have applied for
a Conditional Use Permit to allow a sin-
gle-wide manufactured home to be used
as a permanent residence in a Suburban
Residential District located on Lot 25,
Block 7, Green Valley Estates, Section
23, T1N, R8E, BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota, 4667 Anderson Road, in
accordance with Sections 208 and 510 of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 28th day of October 2013. At this
time, any person interested may appear
and show cause, if there be any, why
such requests should or should not be
granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $16.20.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Larry Teuber / School House, LLC; Ren-
ner & Associates – Agent, has applied for
a Rezone to rezone 2.1 acres from Sub-
urban Residential District to Limited Agri-
culture District and to amend the Pen-
nington County Comprehensive Plan to
change the Future Land Use Map from
Suburban Residential District to Limited
Agriculture District located on the follow-
ing metes and bounds description: A por-
tion of Lot 2R, Block 4, Spring Canyon
Estates, Section 5, T1S, R7E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota, more fully
described as follows: Commencing at a
corner on the northerly boundary of Lot
2R, Block 4, Spring Canyon Estates,
common to the northeasterly corner of Lot
1, Block 4,Spring Canyon Estates, com-
mon to a point on the southerly edge of
Clarkson Road right-of-way, and the point
of beginning; Thence, first course:
S54°32’59”E, along the northerly bound-
ary of said Lot 2R, common to the
southerly edge of said right-of-way, a dis-
tance of 142.05 feet; Thence, second
course: S03°31’20”E, a distance of 78.16
feet; Thence, third course: S40°44’38”W,
a distance of 192.59 feet; Thence, fourth
course: S63°27’08”W, a distance of
169.92 feet; Thence, fifth course:
S26°00’49”W, a distance of 33.00 feet, a
point on the southerly boundary of said
Lot 2R; Thence, sixth course:
N63°59’40”W, along the southerly bound-
ary of said Lot 2R, a distance of 97.52
feet, to a corner on the westerly boundary
of said Lot 2R; Thence, seventh course:
N26°00’15”E, along the westerly bound-
ary of said Lot 2R, a distance of 33.00
feet, to a corner on the westerly boundary
of said Lot 2R; Thence, eighth course:
N10°53’21”W, along the westerly edge of
Lot 2R, a distance of 200.55 feet, to a cor-
ner on the westerly boundary of said Lot
2R, common to the southeasterly corner
of said Lot 1; Thence, ninth course:
N76°55’43”E, along the westerly edge of
said Lot 2R, common to the easterly
boundary of said Lot 1, a distance of
231.09 feet, to a corner on the westerly
boundary of said Lot 2R, common to a
corner on the easterly boundary of said
Lot 1; Thence, tenth course:
N32°32’36”E, along the westerly edge of
said Lot 2R, common to the easterly edge
of said Lot 1, a distance of 107.11 feet, to
the said point of beginning. Said Parcel
contains 2.100 acres more or less, 9699
Clarkson Road, in accordance with Sec-
tions 206 and 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
James and Charlette Steele; Fisk Land
Surveying – Agent, has applied for a Re-
zone to rezone 25 acres from General
Agriculture District to Limited Agriculture
District located on NW¼SE¼SE¼;
NE¼SE¼SE¼; and S½SE¼NE¼SE¼,
in Section 25, T2N, R6E, BHM, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota, approximately
two (2) miles northwest of Rapid City,
near the intersection of Sun Ridge Road
and Pushing Place, in accordance with
Sections 206 and 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
8th day of November 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published October 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $38.12.
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTION: My husband is bipo-
lar but he refuses to seek treatment
– what should I do? I want our mar-
riage to work, but the strain on our
relationship is becoming too much to
bear.
ANSWER: Bipolar Disorder is a
serious and extremely complex psy-
cho-physical condition. Causes can
include genetic, environmental, and
medical factors, as well as poor life
choices. For these reasons, optimal
treatment consists of a combination
of physical, psychological, and spiri-
tual intervention and support. In
most cases, appropriate medication
(usually mood stabilizers and anti-
depressants) is indispensable, along
with Christian counseling for the
sufferer, his spouse, and sometimes
his family.
If your spouse is unwilling to sub-
mit to this kind of treatment, your
response will have to focus primarily
on the need to protect yourself and
the other members of your family
from the negative fallout of his poor
choices. This could mean a number
of different things: “tough love,” in-
tervention, possibly even a tempo-
rary separation, designed to “force a
crisis” in your husband’s life. With-
out detailed information we really
aren’t in a position to suggest a more
specific plan.
Focus on the Family makes avail-
able an excellent online list of re-
sources designed to help families
like yours. One of the best books
available on the subject of depres-
sion, mental illness, and Bipolar dis-
ease is Dr. Paul Meier’s Mood
Swings. In it, Dr. Maier suggests
that you nurture, support, and en-
courage the bipolar sufferer while
also maintaining realistic expecta-
tions and setting appropriate bound-
aries. Such limits will depend on
your individual situation. They
might include:
•Taking away all credit cards.
•Assuming legal control over
banking privileges.
•Taking away car keys during a
mood-swing episode.
•Insisting on hospitalization (in
spite of resistance) whenever the
sufferer is out of control. Obviously,
this may require the intervention
and physical assistance of a group of
friends.
Meanwhile, both you and your
spouse need to understand that
there is nothing sinful or shameful
about seeking professional psycho-
logical and medical assistance in
cases of genuine Bipolar Disorder.
It’s a condition that arises directly
from an imbalance between three
important chemical neurotransmit-
ters which function to control de-
pression and euphoria within the
brain: serotonin, dopamine, and
norepinephrine. As such, it’s a prob-
lem that can and should be dealt
with medically. There are many
other diseases associated with simi-
lar chemical imbalances – for exam-
ple, diabetes, migraine headaches,
cancer, and thyroid disease – but few
carry the social stigma that is often
attached to Bipolar Disorder. As
you’re probably aware, many unin-
formed people draw a connection be-
tween this particular disorder and
the sufferer’s moral and spiritual
character. This is a dangerous mis-
understanding that needs to be cor-
rected. Here again Dr. Paul Meier
has written a book, Blue Genes, that
can be extremely helpful in dis-
pelling some of the more common
myths and misconceptions about
Bipolar Disorder.
You are in a difficult position, and
you need all the outside help you can
get. We’d strongly encourage you to
seek out the fellowship of a support
network, possibly through your
church or a special interest group.
You should also consider the option
of getting assistance from a licensed
Christian counselor, with or without
your husband’s willing participation.
QUESTION: What’s the best way
to bring up sensitive issues with my
spouse? I’m concerned about things
that are going in our marriage, but
I’m afraid to talk to my spouse about
them because I don’t want to start a
fight and make things worse.
ANSWER: When tough topics
come up, couples can find lots of
places to veer into the ditch. Some
pitfalls are dug before marriage – if
you didn’t develop the right skills in
your family of origin, it’s hard to
learn how to manage conflict with a
spouse. Other mistakes can be
traced to simple inexperience.
Whatever your situation, there
will always be some topics that are
trickier to address with your spouse
than others. Even in the happiest
marriages issues like in-laws, fi-
nances, sex, major purchases, or hol-
iday traditions can quickly shake
things up. Handling these matters
can be difficult, but it’s not impossi-
ble. The important thing is to stay
away from the twin errors of 1)
avoiding conflict at any cost, and 2)
escalating conflict into unmanage-
able chaos. You need to find ways to
talk about your concerns calmly, ra-
tionally, and constructively. There
are a number of practical ways you
can do this.
Begin by acquiring the skills you
need in order to discuss sensitive is-
sues in a civilized manner. Chris-
tian bookstores are loaded with
books all about the role of communi-
cation in marriage. In cases like
yours, utilizing the right body lan-
guage, word choice, and tone of voice
can make a huge difference. It’s also
important to time your discussion
appropriately. Get rid of distractions
like television, cell phones, pagers,
and interruptions from kids. And
make a point of starting every dis-
cussion with prayer – this habit can
literally transform your marriage.
Once you start talking, take delib-
erate measures to keep the conver-
sation principle-centered. Don’t ask
who’s right. Ask what’s right. If you
attack the problem instead of the
other person, you’ll help to create a
safe environment that’s conducive to
sharing at a deep, effective level on
any topic.
Throughout the process, make it
your priority to partner with your
spouse in any way you can. While
it’s critical to find the truth about is-
sues affecting your marriage, rela-
tionship is always more important
than issues. You’re partners, not
prosecutors, and that partnership
doesn’t end when you discuss sensi-
tive topics. It can be helpful to stop
and ask yourself whether you’re
showing your spouse the same re-
spect you’d show your co-workers or
friends. If you’re Christians, ask
yourself whether you’re acting first
as a brother and sister in Christ and
second as husband and wife.
Remember this: if the thought of
discussing a sensitive subject has
you fearing your spouse’s reaction,
you’re losing focus. Your agenda
should be to please God and speak
the truth in love. If that’s your goal,
you won’t hesitate to bring up the is-
sues that are threatening the health
of your marriage, regardless of the
potential for conflict.
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler

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