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Pennington Co. Courant, November 8, 2012

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Number 45
Volume 107
November 8, 2012
Cedar Canyon School located
along Anderson Hill Road was one
of many country schools that dot-
ted the prairie in Eastern Penning-
ton County. The school probably
started out as a tar paper shack
like many of the homes, but as
more settlers came to the area the
school was remodeled to look like a
typical country school.
Carrol McDonald whom the Wall
American Legion Post is named
after was one of many teachers at
this school. His sister Mary Mc-
Donald attended Cedar Canyon
School and his mother Sarah Mc-
Donald was also a teacher at the
school. Carrol was killed in 1918 in
France. From this bit of history one
can only assume that the school
was built around the early part of
the 1910’s.
Joseph T. and Myrtle M. Haynes
taught at the Cedar Canyon and
Lake Flatt Schools in 1918. They
taught at these schools for several
years. Students at the Cedar
Canyon School around 1920 were
Chuck, Ona, Cliff and Ada Collins;
Fred, Margaritte, Freda and Otto
Batterman; Agnes, Albert and Clay
Simpson; Leo, Jim, Naomi and
May Foster. Mrs Haynes was the
teacher.
The Batterman children be-
longed to Friedrich and Minnie
Batterman who lived along Bull
Creek. The children would either
ride horses or walk to school. They
had to climb Surveyor’s Hill which
was a mile long and pretty much
straight up and down.
The Foster home set a mile south
west of the school. The Foster chil-
dren would walk to school. They
had to cross a creek and used a
fallen tree as their foot bridge. A
road was established in 1930’s to
the school.
Other children that went to
school were Van Campens, McDon-
alds and Wilkinsons.
Bernard Foster has complied a
list of students who attended Cedar
Canyon School. Students through
1932 included: Vernie, Irma and
Delos Foster; Wanda and Verle
Kellem; Ward, Homer and Glen
Albin; Sheren; Van Campen; Mc-
Donald and Wilkerson children.
Bernard went to school with the
ERY COURAGEOUS PEOPLE
NTANGLED IN HOPE
HEY KEPT OUR FREEDOM
NDURED HARD CONDITIONS
ISKED THEIR LIVES
LWAYS RESPECT THEM
EVER DISRESPECT THEM
O VERY BRAVE
Carson Johnston
Nov. 2010
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
salutes our veterans on
Jeterans Day, November 11
Winners of the National FFA
Agricultural Issues Forum Career
Development Event (CDE) were
announced Friday, October 26 at
the annual awards banquet. The
event was held in conjunction with
the 85th National FFA Convention
and Expo in Indianapolis, Ind. Dr.
Jerry Peters of Indiana served as
the superintendent of the event.
The members of the top four
teams in the nation received cash
awards to recognize their success
in the event. The cash awards and
the agricultural issues forum
event are sponsored by Elanco as
a special project of the National
FFA Foundation. Elanco Animal
Health is proud to sponsor the
agricultural issues forum CDE.
Elanco is a world leader in devel-
oping products and services that
enhance animal health, wellness
and performance.
The National FFA Agricultural
Issues Forum CDE is a competi-
tive event that tests students’
knowledge of agriculture issues
and evaluates how well they can
apply classroom knowledge to real-
life situations. To qualify for the
National Agriculture Issues Forum
CDE, team must design a presen-
tation that addresses multiple
viewpoints of a contemporary agri-
culture issue and present it to a
number of audiences in their com-
munity. For the national event,
they present a portfolio based on
their local audiences’ feedback and
deliver their presentation to a
Wall FFA Ag Issue Team receives
Silver at National FFA Convention
Wall FFA Ag Issue Team dressed in their costumes after giving their presentation at the National
FFA Convention held in Indiana. Pictured back row from left to right ... Jennifer Emery, Elsie For-
tune, Kaden Eisenbraun, Josie Blasius and Brett Gartner. Front row ... Emily Linn and Kailey Rae
Sawvell. ~Courtesy Photo
panel of judges.
This event, held at the Westin
Hotel in Indianapolis, Ind., is one
of many educational activities at
the National FFA Convention and
Expo in which FFA members prac-
tice the lessons learned in agricul-
tural education classes.
Top Placing Teams
•First Place: Wyoming
•Second Place: Texas
•Third Place: Oklahoma
•Fourth Place: Indiana.
Team Emblems
•Gold Emblems Teams:
Shenandoah FFA, Indiana; King-
fisher FFA, Oklahoma; Madis-
onville FFA, Texas; Cheyenne East
Frontier FFA, Wyoming.
•Silver Emblem Teams: Galt
FFA, California; Platte Valley
FFA, Colorado; American Falls
FFA, Idaho; Spring Hill FFA,
Kansas; Cassopolis Ross Beatty
FFA, Michigan; Troy FFA, Mis-
souri; Aurora FFA, Nebraska; Dex-
ter FFA, New Mexico; Felicity-
Franklin FFA, Ohio; Bend FFA,
Oregon; Wall FFA, South Dakota
and Central FFA, Virginia.
•Bronze Emblem Teams:
Mountain Home FFA, Arkansas;
Millennium FFA, Arizona;
Lebanon FFA, Connecticut;
Seaford FFA, Delaware; Elton
Hinton Strawberry Crest Junior
FFA, Florida; Eddyville-Blakes-
burg FFA, Iowa; Hartsburg-
Emden FFA, Illinois; Lone Oak
FFA, Kentucky; Natchitoches Cen-
tral FFA, Louisiana; Smithsburg
FFA, Maryland; Plainview-Elgin-
Millville FFA, Minnesota; Byhalia
FFA, Mississippi; Cascade FFA,
Montana; Madison FFA, North
Carolina; South Hunterdon FFA,
New Jersey; Spring Creek FFA,
Nevada; Pioneer FFA, New York;
Conococheague FFA, Pennsylva-
nia; White House FFA, Tennessee;
Riverton FFA, Utah; Onalaska
FFA, Washington; Big Foot FFA,
Wisconsin and Roane County FFA,
West Virginia.
About National FFA Organi-
zation: The National FFA Organ-
ization is a national youth organi-
zation of 557,318 student members
as part of 7,498 local FFA chapters
in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and
the Virgin Islands.
The FFA mission is to make a
positive difference in the lives of
students by developing their po-
tential for premier leadership, per-
sonal growth and career success
through agricultural education.
The National FFA Organization
operates under a federal charter
granted by the 81st United States
Congress and it is an integral part
of public instruction in agriculture.
The U.S. Department of Educa-
tion provides leadership and helps
set direction for FFA as a service to
state and local agricultural educa-
tion programs.
For more, visit the National FFA
Organization online at www.
ffa.org, on Facebook, Twitter and
the official National FFA Organi-
zation blog.
following students: LeRoy and
Dorothy Albin; Louise, Wendell
and Margret Smith; Marvel, Dal-
las and Donald Kellem; Helen
Carstenson; Ruby Baxter; Walter
Batterman; Bernard, Dixie and
Dennis Foster.
Other teachers at the school
were: Hazel Carstensen; Mabel
Sparlings; Mrs. McDonald; Frieda
Overton; Bill Winters; Clarence
Mills; Gail, Lysle, Burle and Norris
Dartt; Robert Marsden and Mrs
Backman. Robert Marsden taught
Bernard at Cedar Canyon School
while he was in the fourth grade.
Superintendent for the school dis-
trict was Amas Grothe.
The school was used for Sunday
School unless a visiting preacher
was in the area, then church would
be held.
Even though the school no
longer stands the memories of
going to Cedar Canyon school will
remain with those who attended
school there.
Thank you to Bernard Foster for
providing students and teachers
names for this article.
First Interstate Bank employees present the Local Meals on Wheels with a check for $2303.25 that
they raised by donating and preparing a free will luncheon at the bank recently. A portion of their
efforts was matched by the First Interstate Bank Foundation. Pictured back row from left to right
... Carol Hahn, Marilyn Huether, Janet Lurz, Lori Geigle and Kent Jordan. Front row from left to
right ... Frances Poste, Mary Jane Doyle, Loretta White, Pam Johnston and Brett Blasius.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
First Interstate Bank donates
to local Meals on Wheels
Cedar Canyon School
The only reminder that a school once sat at this site is a cistern. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
Honoring our veterans
On the 11th hour, of the 11th day,
of the 11th month in 1918, an
armistice, or agreement to stop
fighting, was reached between the
Allied nations and Germany in
World War I.
One year later, President
Woodrow Wilson declared that No-
vember 11, 1919 was a day to re-
member Americans for their mili-
tary service in World War I. He
called it Armistice Day. He sug-
gested that Americans celebrate
with parades and perhaps a “brief
suspension of business” around 11
a.m. President Wilson also hoped
it would be a time when Americans
offered prayers of thanksgiving for
those who had served and for
peace for all times.
•President Wilson originally in-
tended Armistice Day to be ob-
served one time, but many states
decided to observe it every year to
honor World War I veterans.
•Congress followed the states’
lead and in 1938 declared that
every November 11 would be ob-
served as Armistice Day.
•Congress changed the name to
Veterans Day in 1954 to honor vet-
erans of all wars.
•For a brief time, 1971-1974,
Veterans Day was observed on the
4th Monday in October. Since
1975, Veterans Day is always ob-
served on November 11.
• If November 11, falls on a Sat-
urday or Sunday, the federal gov-
ernment observes the holiday on
the previous Friday or following
Monday, respectively.
•November 11, 1921, when the
first of the unknown soldiers was
buried in Arlington National
Cemetery, unidentified soldiers
also were laid to rest at Westmin-
ster Abbey in London and at the
Arc de Triomphe in Paris.
•Memorial Day, the fourth Mon-
day in May, honors American serv-
ice members who died in service to
their country.
•Veterans Day pays tribute to
all American veterans, living or
dead, but especially gives thanks
to living veterans who served their
country honorably during war or
peacetime.
•States designate their own hol-
idays, so there are no official U.S.
national holidays. The government
can only designate holidays for
federal employees and for the Dis-
trict of Columbia. But states al-
most always follow the federal
lead.
Time line for Veterans Day ob-
servance.
•November 11, 1918. The fight-
ing in World War I ended. (The
Treaty of Versailles formally ended
the war on June 28, 1919).
•November 1919. President
Woodrow Wilson proclaimed that
November 11, 1919, would be ob-
served as Armistice Day—a day to
honor the veterans of World War I.
•November 11, 1921. The first of
the unknown soldiers, a veteran of
World War I, was buried in Arling-
ton Cemetery in Virginia in what
has become known as the Tomb of
the Unknown Soldier. On the same
day, unidentified soldiers were laid
to rest at Westminster Abbey in
London and at the Arc de Triom-
phe in Paris.
•June 4, 1926. Twenty-seven
states had made Armistice Day a
holiday so Congress declared it to
be a recurring day of remem-
brance.
•May 13, 1938. Congress makes
Armistice Day a national holiday.
•June 28, 1968. Congress
changed Veterans Day to the
fourth Monday in October.
•September 20, 1975. President
Gerald Ford changed Veterans
Day back to November 11.
Due to the Veterans Day hoIiday,
we wiII have an EARLY DEADLINE
for the PROFIT
Thursday, November 8, at NOON
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012 • Page 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding
Monday at 4:30 p.m. We do have the right to reject any or all letters to the
Editor.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper
should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office.
All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number
of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run
the two weeks prior to an election.
The "Letters¨ column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to
express their opinions. Ìt is not meant to replace advertising as a means
of reaching people.
This publication's goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of
free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review Pennington Co. Courant
P.O. Box 788 P.O. Box 435
Philip, SD 57567-0788 Wall, SD 57790-0435
605-859-2516 605-279-2565
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P.O. Box 309 P.O. Box 38
Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 Faith, SD 57626-0038
605-837-2259 605-967-2161
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P.O. Box 429 P.O. Box 465
Bison, SD 57620-0429 Murdo, SD 57559-0465
605-244-7199 605-669-2271
New Underwood Post
P.O. Box 426 · New Underwood, SD 57761-0426
605-754-6466
Bavellette Publ¡cat¡oas, Iac.
Letters Pol¡cy
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
ANTHONY £MAN\£I JR.
A IoIony Wnrrnnf hns boon Is-
suod for Anfhony ImnnuoI Jr.
chnrgIng hIm wIfh InIIuro fo Aµ-
µonr for Ð!I 3.
ImnnuoI Is n bInck mnIo, 53
yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 6`0l¨
fnII, 205 µounds, bInck hnIr wIfh
brown oyos. ImnnuoI mny bo
wonrIng gInssos.
ImnnuoI Is boIIovod fo bo In or
nround fho !nµId CIfy, SÐ Aron.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco
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fho nonrosf Inw onforcomonf
ngoncy If you hnvo nny Informn-
fIon whIch wouId rosuIf In fho nr-
rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
Social Security News
By Kathy Petersen
Social Security
Public Affairs Specialist
Are you looking to replace your
Social Security card just because
you don’t have it? Then rest as-
sured: you really don’t need to re-
place it. What’s most important is
that you remember your Social
Security number.
Remember, during your formal
education, when you used to
memorize passages from a book,
or answers for a test? In the same
way, you should memorize your
Social Security number. Knowing
your Social Security number is
important when it comes to work,
taxes, banking, and other types of
business.
Treat your number as confiden-
tial information and keep it pro-
tected. Memorizing your number
means you don’t need to carry
your Social Security card with you
unless you need to show it to your
employer. Keep it in a safe place
with your other important papers.
If you really do need to get a re-
placement card, it’s easy to apply
for a new one. Simply complete an
Application for a Social Security
Card (Form SS-5) and show us
original documents proving your
U.S. citizenship or immigration
status, age, and identity. The ap-
plication includes examples of
documents you may need; you can
find the application at www.so-
cialsecurity.gov/ssnumber. Then,
take or mail your completed appli-
cation and documents to your
local Social Security office. We
will mail your Social Security card
to you.
If your card is lost or stolen, you
can apply for a replacement for
free. However, with some excep-
tions, you are limited to three re-
placement cards in a year and 10
during your lifetime.
Kathy Petersen is a public af-
fairs specialist for Social Security,
Denver Region. You can write her
c/o Social Security Administra-
tion, 605 Main, Suite 201, Rapid
City, SD, 57701 or via e-mail at
kathy. petersen@ssa.gov.
A Social Security card and number lesson
Need a Christmas gift idea for
that hard-to-buy person on your list?
How about a gift that keeps on giving all year? A sub-
scription to the Pennington County Courant. Call to
start your subscription gift! (605) 279-2565
or subscribe online at:
www.RavellettePublications.com.
Storm Tracker App Surpasses
10,000 downloads
The KELOLAND Storm Tracker
app is now the 65th most popular
weather app in the nation. The
KELOLAND Storm Tracker app
has recorded 11,121 downloads
and counting since it launched on
October 16, 2012. That’s an aver-
age of nearly 800 downloads a day.
“We are gratified that the view-
ers and users of our weather cov-
erage, whether on television, on-
line or mobile, choose KELOLAND
as their main source. Not only are
we the most popular source for im-
portant weather information here
in KELOLAND, it looks like our
popularity competes with some of
the best apps in the country.” said
Jay Huizenga Vice President and
General Manager for KELOLAND
Television.
Ruland Arena LLC held a rifle,
drawpot incentive and novice
number one roping on Sunday, Oc-
tober 28.
Rifle Roping: Four Go Arounds
- 20 contestants. Go Winners - Ty
Clarke/Shaun Ruland. Average
Winners: first - Shaun Ruland
(Rifle Winner) - 34.04 on four head;
second - Jason Thorstenson - 16.69
on three head; third - Ty Clarke -
28.36 on three head; fourth - Wyatt
Treeby - 31.01 on three head; fifth
- Klay O’Daniel - 49.24 on three
head.
Draw Pot Incentive: Three Go
Arounds - 62 teams. Go Winners -
Ruland Arena holds rifle roping
Jason Thorstenson/Klay O’Daniel
- 6.08. Average Winners: first - Ty
Clarke/Bodie Mattson - 18.60; sec-
ond - Shadow Jensen/Galen Means
- 19.66; third - Allen Cuny/Heidi
Cuny - 24.26; fourth - Larry Ru-
land/John Ward - 26.18; fifth -
Wyatt Treeby/Shadow Jensen -
27.77.
Novice Number One: Two Go
Arounds - 11 teams. Average Win-
ners: first - Bodie Mattson - 28.02
on two head; second - Garrett
Dockter - 33.94 on two head; third
- Brooke Lillis - 15.41 on one head;
fourth - David Stangle - 17.92 on
one head.
Rifle Roping Winners. Pictured from left to right ... Rifle winner
Shaun Ruland, Jason Thorstenson, Ty Clarke, Wyatt Treeby and
Klay O’Daniel. ~Courtesy Photo
America’s 398 national parks
will offer everyone free admission
during the Veterans Day weekend
in honor of those that serve and
have served in the United States
military.
“National parks preserve places
that commemorate our country’s
collective heritage – our ideals, our
majestic lands, our sacred sites,
our patriotic icons – which our mil-
itary has defended through the
years,” said National Park Service
Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “We
are grateful for the service and
sacrifice of military members, past
and present, and honored to tell
their story at many of our national
parks.”
From frontier forts to World War
II battlefields, more than 70 na-
National Parks waive entrance
fees for Veterans Day weekend
tional parks have direct connec-
tions to the military. These include
our earliest national parks where
army engineers designed park
roads and buildings and the cav-
alry enforced regulations from
1886 until the National Park Serv-
ice was established in 1916.
National parks throughout the
country will hold special events to
commemorate Veterans Day. High-
lights include evening candlelight
tours of Vicksburg National Ceme-
tery where visitors will encounter
historical personalities, the sev-
enth annual illumination of 6,000
graves at Poplar Grove National
Cemetery in Petersburg National
Battlefield, a Continental soldier
encampment at Independence Na-
tional Historical Park, a talk on
the African American Civil War ex-
perience at Natchez National His-
torical Park, and an exhibit and
talks about the Roosevelts in the
World Wars at Sagamore Hill Na-
tional Historic Site.
The Veterans Day weekend is
the last of the National Park Serv-
ice entrance fee free days for 2012.
More information is available at
http://www.nps.gov/findapark/feefr
eeparks.htm.
Weather app popularity exploding
The Baron-powered weather app
is the most sophisticated on the
market. The free KELOLAND
Storm Tracker app features access
to the KELOLAND Live Doppler
HD radar network, location-spe-
cific current conditions and an
easy-to-use hour-by-hour forecast.
“This app contains features usu-
ally only found in paid apps. Plus,
we have KELOLAND Live
Doppler HD – priceless!” added
Jay Trobec Chief Meteorologist for
KELOLAND TV.
The KELOLAND Storm Tracker
app is available in both the Apple
App Store for iDevices and the
Google Play Store for Android de-
vices. Search KELOLAND to find
both the KELOLAND app for news
and weather and the new
KELOLAND Storm Tracker app.
One was broken when hit by a
running horse on a cold winter
night. Others gave way to road
construction or now stand by
driveways and sidewalks.
Of the 720 quartzite monuments
that once marked the border be-
tween North Dakota and South
Dakota, officials at the South
Dakota State Historical Society
have said that about half remain.
After North Dakota and South
Dakota were admitted to the
Union on November 2, 1889, a law
passed by Congress the next year
authorized the secretary of the in-
“The Quartzite Border”
terior to have the seventh stan-
dard parallel between the two
states surveyed and marked by
suitable and permanent monu-
ments.
According to The Quartzite Bor-
der by Gordon L. Iseminger, South
Dakota Sen. Richard F. Pettigrew
wrote the secretary of the interior
recommending that the boundary
be marked with quartzite monu-
ments available from quartzite
quarries near Sioux Falls. Among
the reasons Pettigrew made for
having the markers be of a large
size was that a distinctly marked
boundary would allow for easier lo-
cation of land claims. Also, stone
monuments would last longer than
iron posts and would cost less.
Quartzite was attractive, durable
and comparable in costs to such
building materials as brick. What
Pettigrew probably did not state
was that he was a promoter of the
use of Sioux Falls quartzite.
The contract for surveying and
marking the boundary was
awarded to Charles H. Bates of
Yankton for $21,300. Markers
were to be placed every half mile.
Bates’ being awarded the con-
tract enraged Pettigrew, who
wanted another to receive the bid.
Bates and his crew of chainmen,
moundmen and flagmen began
work near the juncture of North
Dakota, South Dakota and Min-
nesota boundaries in September
1891. After stopping for the winter,
Bates reached the eastern bound-
ary of Montana in August 1892.
The boundary, as measured by
Bates, was 360 miles, 45 chains
and 35 links. It was described as
“the most perfect and comprehen-
sive boundary line in the United
States” by the Steele Ozone, a
North Dakota newspaper.
The markers Bates and his crew
buried every half mile were seven
feet long and 10 inches square, set
three-and-a-half feet in the
ground. They were marked at the
quarry on the east side with M to
signify a half mile or 1M to signify
a mile. All posts had the letters
N.D. on the north side and S.D. on
the south side. Markers across the
Sisseston-Wahpeton Reservation
and west of the Missouri River
contained additional markings.
Pettigrew continued to believe
that Bates had secured the con-
tract by underhanded means.
Bates’ work had to be examined
and approved, and Pettigrew rec-
ommended that North Dakota sur-
veyor George Beardsley examine
Bates’ work.
After examining Bates’ work
east of the Missouri River, Beard-
sley reported that every monu-
ment was in its proper place, cor-
rectly and well-marked, and the
“the surveyor did an honest piece
of work.”
It was expected that the mark-
ers would stand on the border for-
ever. Such was not the case, how-
ever, as some suffered at the hands
of the elements, road builders, col-
lectors and vandals.
Bates’ name lives on in South
Dakota. The town of Batesland is
named in his honor.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Founda-
tion, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society. Find us on the
web at www.sdhsf.org.
The picture is of surveyor Charles Bates and one of his workers
at the terminal monument that marks the juncture of the North
Dakota, South Dakota and Montana boundaries, set in August
1892. Bates is on the left, while the other man in unidentified.
~Photo South Dakota State Historical Society Archives
By Linda M. Hiltner
In celebration of the one year an-
niversary as the Wall Writers
Group, participants plan to have
lunch after the November 10
meeting. The lunch location will
be determined then. Each partici-
pant is reponsible for their own
meal and drink expenses.
Please bring something you
have written or select from the fol-
lowing topics:
(a) A second topic option is “On
the back roads of my mind,” or
(b) Writer’s Choice.
Meeting reminder
We will discuss attending the
Black Hills Writers Anthology at
the Journey Museum in Rapid
City on November 17, from 7:00 to
10:00 p.m.
The next meeting of the Wall
Writers Group is Saturday, No-
vember 10 at 9:30 a.m., at 416
Sixth Avenue, Wall. Everyone in-
terested in writing is welcome.
If you have any questions about
the Writers Group, please call
Dave at 279-2952 or Linda at 786-
6937. Please be sure to bring note-
book and pen.
A Veteran Day Program will be
held at the Wall School Gym on
Monday, November 12 at 10:00
a.m.
The Wall School Senior Class is
in charge of the program with the
whole school participating.
Veterans will post the colors and
each branch of the military will be
honored.
A sign-up sheet will be at the
doorway for all veterans to sign.
Please indicate which branch of
the military you served in. Veter-
ans will be introduced during the
program.
Please attend the program and
honor those who served so bravely
to protect us and the United States
of America.
Veterans program to be
held at Wall School Gym
The Bad River Sportsman’s Club
held its annual West River coyote
calling contest, Saturday, October
27.
There were 23 two-person teams
entered, with 20 returning with a
total of 90 coyotes. The first place
team of Jeff Nelson, Philip, and
Jake Nelson, Creighton, brought
in 11 coyotes.
The second place team of Calvin
Ferguson, Kyle, and Darrell
Hunter, Kyle, brought in nine coy-
otes. The third place team of Tan-
ner Lolley, White River, and Matt
Glynn, Belvidere, brought in eight
coyotes.
Three teams each brought in
seven coyotes. Those team were
Coyote calling contest
Joe Reddest and Cornell Reddest,
Kyle, Rod Kirk, Tuthill, and Jared
Schofield, Okaton, and Bryce Van-
derMay, Long Valley, and Chad
Cerney, Wall.
Winners of the big dog contest
were Lonnie Lesmeister, Dupree,
and Dakota Longbrake, Dupree,
who got a coyote weighting 40.5
pounds. This dog outweighed the
next heaviest one by four and one
half pounds.
The little dog contest was a tie.
The team of Jace Shearer, Wall,
and his partner Neal Muscat, Sun-
dance, Wyo., and the team of J.
Reddest and C. Reddest each
brought in a coyote weighing 16
pounds.
courant@
gwtc.net
Email us with your news item or photo to courant@gwtc.net
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012• Page 3
November 9-10-11-12:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
November 16-17-18-19:
Taken 2 (PG-13)
November 23-24-25-26:
Here Comes the Boom (PG)
November 30-December 1-2-3:
Wreck It Ralph (PG)
December 7-8-9-10: The Twilight
Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (PG-13)
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
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SpecIaIs DaIIy
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Nov. S - Nov. 14
Tbursday, November S
·CIiclcn Drcasi ovcr Ficc w/Jcllo. . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dccf Darlcy Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
FrIday, November 9
·CIili CIccsclurgcr w/Curlcy Frics . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Noodlc Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . $S.29
Saturday, November 10
·Hoi Dccf SandwicI
or Foasi Dccf Dinncr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Tonaio Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Sunday, November 11
·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci . . . . . . . . $?.39
·CIild's Drcalfasi Duffci (12 & undcr} . . . . . $3.S9
Scrvcd 7.00 io 10.30 a.n.
·Porl CIo¡ Dinncr
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallcs . . . . . $6.29
·Dacon CIcddar Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Monday, November 12
·Lasagna w/Carlic Twisi & Tosscd Salad . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Dun¡ling Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . $S.29
Tuesday, November 13
·Turlcy Clul Wra¡
w/Macaroni Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Droccoli CIccsc Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Wednesday, November 14
·Mcai Loaf
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallcs . . . . . $6.29
·Poiaio Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
279-2175 · Wall, SD
Need a gift idea for that hard-to-buy someone?
How about a gift that keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the Pennington County Courant.
Call to start your subscription gift!
(605) 279-2565 or subscribe online at:
www.RavellettePublications.com
Dairy Queen Athletes of the month
Tayah Huether
Volleyball
Austin Huether
Cross Country
Lane Blasius
Football
Class B - Girls Cross Country
All-State – 2012
This honor is awarded each year
to the Top nine finishes in the B di-
vision at the State Cross Country
Meet.
Genevieve Clark - Ninth grade -
Gayville-Volin, Macy Heinz -
Eighth grade - Ipswich, Taylor
Loken - Sophomore - Ipswich, Tori
Moore - Sophomore - Ipswich,
Laura Nelson - Eighth grade -
Gayville-Volin, Hannah Flatt -
Eighth grade - Potter County,
Charley Gross - Senior - James
Valley Christian, Ellie Coyle -
Freshmen - Philip, Cailey Roth -
Sophomore - Freeman.
Huether named to 2012 All
State Cross Country team
Class B - Boys Cross Country
All-State – 2012
This honor is awarded each year
to the Top nine finishes in the B di-
vision at the State Cross Country
Meet.
Duane Jongeling - Senior -
Parker, Jase Kraft - Junior - Wess-
ington Springs, Trevor Ward - Sen-
ior - Estelline, Matt Zirbel - Senior
- Summit, Daniel Burkhalter -
Seventh grade - Bison, Jordan
Houdek - Senior - Highmore-Har-
rold, Donnie Decker - Senior -
James Valley Christian, Austin
Huether - Sophomore - Wall, Seth
Engen - Senior - Viborg-Hurley.
Emilee Pauley has been selected
to participate in the Junior High
Rodeo at the NRCA (Northwest
Ranch Cowboys Association) Fi-
nals!
This is the second year that
NRCA has invited the junior high
contestants to showcase their tal-
ents in their very own rodeo on
Saturday, November 24. Eight jun-
ior high contestants are invited in
each event along with the top eight
teams in ribbon roping and team
roping. This invitation includes
the outgoing eighth graders from
our competition year of 2012.
The NRCA Finals Rodeo/Junior
High Rodeo will be held at the
Pennington County Events Center
(Central States Fairground) in
Rapid City, South Dakota.
Emilee will compete in Break-
away roping and Ribbon Roping.
She has also been selected as a
Cinch Team Captain for the event.
Pauley invited to
NRCA Finals to
compete in junior
high rodeo
By Coach Dani Herring
In the District Championship
match, held on Friday, November
2 at Wall High School, the Eagles
played the Rapid City Christian
Comets team that they had not
played since the first week of the
season.
Both teams have gotten a lot
better throughout the season, and
after dropping the second set, Wall
was able to hold on to a 3-1 advan-
tage and advance on to the Region
game against Lyman on Tuesday,
November 6th at Philip.
Once again, Autumn Schulz led
the team in kills with 10, while
Kim Billings added four. Kaitlin
Schreiber added nine assists to her
season tally, and Josie Blasius was
able to land six aces in the winning
effort.
Stats:
G1 G2 G3 G4 Final
Wall: 25 18 25 26 3
RCC: 19 25 16 24 1
•Serve Attempts: Bailey Lytle
Subway
Musician
of the
month
Analise Garland
- 18, Tayah Huether - 8, Josie Bla-
sius - 19, Emily Linn - 16, Kaitlin
Schreiber - 16, Autumn Schulz -
16. Team Total: 93.
•Assists: Lytle - 2, Blasius - 6,
Linn - 1, Schreiber - 2, Schulz - 6.
Team Totals: 17.
•Points: Lytle - 11, Huether - 3,
Blasius - 12, Linn - 8, Schreiber -
7, Schulz - 10. Team Totals: 51.
•Attack Attempts: Lytle - 4,
Huether - 1, Monica Bielmaier -
10, Carlee Johnston - 15, Kim
Billings - 17, Schreiber - 11, Schulz
- 27. Team Total: 85.
•Kills: Lytle - 1, Bielmaier - 1,
Johnston - 2, Billings - 4, Schreiber
- 2, Schulz - 10. Team Total: 20.
•Ball Handling Attempts:
Lytle - 55, Huether - 20, Bielmaier
- 9, Johnston - 11, Billings - 9, Bla-
sius - 1, Linn -11, Schreiber - 74,
Schulz - 36. Team Total: 226.
•Assists: Lytle - 8, Billings - 1,
Schreiber - 9. Team Total: 18.
•Receiving: Lytle - 1, Huether
- 25, Linn - 8, Schulz - 27. Team
Total: 61.
•Blocking Solo: Billings - 4,
Schreiber - 1. Team Total: 5.
•Digs: Lytle - 1, Bielmaier - 2,
Johnston - 1, Schreiber - 2, Schulz
- 7. Team Total: 14.
Lady Eagles are District 14B 2012 Champions. Pictured back row: from left to right ... Assistant
Coach Mary Roeder, MiKaylee and Assistant Coach Dana Luedeman, Jennifer Emery, Nicole Eisen-
braun, Carlee Johnston, Monica Bielmaier, Kaitlin Schreiber, Tayah Huether, Josie Blasius, Emily
Linn, Manager Analise Garland and Head Coach Dani Herring. Front row: from left to right ... Man-
ager Maddi Bauer, Autumn Schulz, Bailey Lytle, Kim Billings and Kailey Rae Sawvell.
~Photo by Heather Schreiber
Lady Eagles District 14B Champions
By Coach Dani Herring
The Wall Lady Eagles played host
to a pair of District 14B games last
week at home.
In the second round action, Wall
took on a tough Philip Scotties
team that has done nothing but
improve throughout the season.
After losing the first set, 25-18,
the Eagles came back to win the
next three and advance to the Dis-
trict with Finals being the follow-
ing night.
Wall was led by Autumn Schulz,
with 17 kills and 12 digs. Kaitlin
Schreiber and Bailey Lytle both
had 16 assists on the night.
Stats:
G1 G2 G3 G4 Final
Wall: 15 25 25 28 3
Philip: 25 16 22 26 1
•Serves Attempted: Bailey
Lady Eagles knock off Philip in first round
Lytle - 20. Tayah Huether - 10,
Carlee Johnston - 2, Josie Blasius
- 19, Emily Linn - 13, Kaitlin
Schreiber - 20, Autumn Schulz -
11. Team Total: 95.
•Assists: Lytle - 2, Huether - 1,
Blasius - 3, Schulz - 2. Team
Total: 8.
•Points: Lytle - 12, Huether - 3,
Blasius - 11, Linn - 5, Schreiber -
10, Schulz - 4. Team Total: 45.
•Attack Attempts: Lytle - 8,
Bielmaier - 11, Johnston - 15, Kim
Billings - 26, Schreiber - 11, Schulz
- 34. Team Total: 105.
•Kills: Johnston - 3, Billings - 8,
Schreiber - 4, Schulz - 17. Team
Total: 32.
•Ball Handing Attempts:
Lytle - 71, Huether - 15, Bielmaier
- 19, Johnston - 8, Billings - 6, Bla-
sius - 2, Linn - 10, Schreiber - 78,
Schulz - 34. Team Total: 243.
•Assists: Lytle - 16, Schreiber -
16. Team Total: 32.
•Receiving: Lytle - 1, Huether
- 32, Linn - 11, Schreiber - 7,
Schulz - 17. Team Total: 68.
•Blocking Solo: Bielmaier - 1,
Johnston - 1, Billings - 1. Schulz -
1. Team Total: 4.
•Digs: Lytle - 4, Huether - 2,
Bielmaier - 1, Johnston - 1, Linn -
4, Schreiber - 1, Schulz - 12. Team
Total: 25.
Autumn Schulz goes for a kill over the hands of Philip players
during the first round of Districts held in Wall on Thursday, No-
vember 1. Wall beat Philip three games to one.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Wall Building Center
& Construction
Christmas Open House
Thursday, November 15th
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Come & enjoy reduced prices &
free refreshments & goodies!
• Select Christmas Items 50% off •
• All Carhartt & Toys 25% off •
annc@
gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
“Theme” meal was on Tuesday
at Prairie Village with 30 partak-
ing of the meal of Swiss Steak. It
was great weather.
Congratulations to the Wall Ea-
gles Football Team! You did great
but the season has come to an end.
Lady Eagles Volleyball Team
has had a great season also. They
play Lyman County in Philip on
Tuesday night, November 6th —
the regional tourney. Way to go
girls!
Tuesday is “Election Day 2012”.
Hope you get out and vote! One
thing nice will be the absence of all
the political ads!
Shawna, Luke, Remmington
and Marlee Kay Meyerink of
Platte, were visitors at the
Williamses over the weekend.
Terry (Trask) Karrels of
Broadus, Mont., died at the Philip
Hospital last week. Services were
held at the American Legion Hall
in Philip on Monday, November
5th, with burial in the Elm
Springs Cemetery. We offer our
condolences to her husband Mike
and the rest of her family.
You couldn’t have asked for bet-
ter weather than what we were
given for the “Trick or Treaters” on
Halloween evening! Some streets
seem to attract them more than
others, but they were out in full
force!
Note on your calendar that the
Haakon County Crooners will give
a concert at the Wall Community
Center on December 2nd at 4:30
p.m. What a good way to start the
Advent season!
Senior Citizen Potluck supper
will be November 15th at 6 p.m.
The Mighty Mite team and Jun-
ior Pee Wee age division of Wall
Eagles Youth Football will play
their “Super Bowl” at Rapid City
on Sunday, November 4th, at the
SDSM&T football field. They are
very excited, as well as the par-
ents. (This is written before they
play — so don’t know the outcome.)
Lavern and Dianne Terkildsen
went to the home of their daugh-
ter, Diana Olivier in Philip, for
supper on Halloween for birth-
days. Also attending were Terkild-
sen’s son Darrel and his wife
Deeta; Heather Nelson and her
daughters; grandson Zane; grand-
son Colt, his wife Jenny and their
family.
Bob and Kathy Hamann helped
Kathy’s brother and nephew, Dan
and John Oldenberg, move cattle
from summer pasture near
Kadoka to their home place the
weekend of October 26, 27 and 28.
They had about 20 riders and
helpers. Bob and Kathy were the
cooks for the weekend.
This past weekend, Bob and
Kathy were in Gillette, Wyo., visit-
ing Kathy’s sister and family, Nel-
lie and Henry Chapell, and cele-
brating their birthdays. Roger
Eisenbraun met them in Gillette,
Monday morning for breakfast and
visited with them.
Roy Hamann is in the Rapid
City Regional Hospital with some
stomach problems. He is in room
926 and I’m sure would enjoy
cards.
“A woman is like a tea bag — you
can’t tell how strong she is until
you put her in hot water.”
~Eleanor Roosevelt
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
0wncr Ir|r Hznscn · 505-2Î8-2881 · Wz||, 8P
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
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Space Ior Rent
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2?9-2S6S
Cedur Butte Air, 1nc.
AeriaI AppIication Service
Your IocoI
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Sfocy 8ieImoier
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Space Ior Rent
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2?9-2S6S
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Now that chilly mornings have
us tucked inside we haven’t been
hearing the church bell on Sun-
days and we miss it. No, we’re not
asking Bud to turn up the volume,
we just decided to open the back
door for either the 8:15 reminder
bell or the 8:30 “for reals” bell.
Somebody has to make sure there
are 31 pulls and peels each time.
Thanks, we do enjoy this Wasta
way of starting the week!
For those of you who have been
looking for information on a Medi-
gap insurance policy, you know it
can be a tedious process. A group
called S.H.I.N.E. (Senior Health
Information Education) is a no cost
service of Health and Human
Services, you speak with real peo-
ple who answer questions (pa-
tiently) and send a useful package
that is truly helpful.
Halloween fun — youngsters
and oldsters.
Lloyd’s Wednesday morning
group of Rapid City buddies had a
couple show up for their weekly
breakfast meet that even they
found strange. A fellow dressed for-
mally in top hat and tuxedo, side
burned and bearded, a very distin-
guished looking chap and a woman
of uncertain age and occupation
were at the opposite end of the
room. The woman did have a sug-
gestion of past glamour — long
flowing auburn locks, eye lashes
that operated like “wipers” on her
glasses, decked out in a stylish
dress with accessories, had the
cafe customers grinning and/or be-
wildered. Lloyd Willey and his
high school prankster friend Bob
Leonard cooked up this scheme to
trick their breakfast buddies. A
successful trick and a good laugh
was had by all! Wonder how this
bunch will retaliate? You can bet it
will be good!
Evening Halloween trick or
treaters came in a variety of ap-
pearances — pirates, zombies,
skeletons, an orange haired rock
star, gypsies, ghoulish, long legged
beasties, things that go bump in
the night and a spotted chicken
but this was an “udder” kind of
chicken! It’s always a treat to have
you all come by. The youngest trick
or treater was Kylee Smid and the
oldest Joel Deering!
The Black Hills Little League
Football had their Super Bowl
games Saturday and Sunday. The
Mitey Mites Wall Eagles had a
great season, made it through the
play-off games and went on to rep-
resent Wall in their division. It
was a great game on Sunday of
two well matched teams. The
cheerleaders were on hand to keep
the crowd actively involved.
Coaches and players did their best
but the Wall Eagles lost by a touch
down. To have made it to the
Super Bowl tells the world the
Mitey Mite Wall Drug Store EA-
GLES are winners!
Moms and dads, brothers and
sisters, grandparents, aunts and
uncles, cousins and neighbors are
proud of you, Dayton Skillingstad,
Kaylen Spotted Bear and Brody
Bryan and all the Wall Drug Store
Mitey Mite Eagles and their cheer-
leaders with Natalee Skillingstad
and Sheridan Deering as two
Wasta gals.
Happy Trails!
Wasta Wanderings
SNOW REMOVAL POLICY
It is the policy of the City of Wall to conduct snow removal
upon accumulations of 2 inches or more of snowfall. Parking
on any public street of the City will be completely prohibited
during the existence of a snow removal alert from two a.m.
and until the street has been plowed. Cars will be ticketed.
The City of Wall will plow the snow to the curb, and will not
remove snow from driveways.
It is in violation of Ordinance 12.16.020 for property own-
ers to deposit snow onto city streets, alleys or right of ways
after such areas have been cleared of snow by the City. A
fine up to $500.00 shall be accessed if found guilty of this
violation.
Thank you, City of Wall
Published November 1 & 8, 2012, at the total approximate cost of
$96.00.
Annual Methodist Men
Thanksgiving Supper
Thurs., November 14th
Serving 5:30 - 7 p.m. • Wall Methodist Church
Everyone welcome! Bring a Friend!
!¯/r /. !¯/r
|···· /·|/·|.¸·
.|¡· ·¡ r··/·· !···|. /·|/·|.¸·
|···· .||| /· |··,|/·||·. ¡·· ¯ /· o .··|·
···.··|·¸ ¡··r |··· |·¡·/|·· ¯|·¸
··r·.·. |·· ·|. ··/|¡||·| |··· ··. ··.
··· .·|/|·¸ ·/|| /··r/·· /·¡··· /|·¸ ··
··,|·· |/ .|/| · ··. ···
/·/· !¯/r /|·r ·/ .|/| ·,·····
Account set up at:
First Interstate Bank
Karen DeIbridge Benefit Acct.
Box 9
Sturgis, SD 57785
or drop off any help you have:
Cheryl Hammerstrom
PrHairie Country Cut & Curl
Union Center Mall
Union Center, SD
Wall Drug Pharmacy
Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
•November 20th, the pharmacy will be
closed from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
•November 22nd & 23rd, the pharmacy
will be closed.
•December 4th, the pharmacy will be
closing at 3:00 p.m.
•December 18th, the pharmacy will be
closing at 3:00 p.m.
Sorry for any inconvenience
279-1931 • Wall, SD
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thurs., Nov. 8
- Sat., Nov. 17, 2012
Thursday, November 8:
State FB, TBD, 9A - 11:00 a.m.
CST, 9AA - 2:30 p.m., 9B -
7:30 p.m.
Friday, November 9: State
FB, TBD, 11B - 2:30 p.m., 11A
- 7:30 p.m.; JH GBB
w/Kadoka, 5 p.m..
Saturday, November 10:
State FB, TBD, 11AA - 7:30
p.m.
Monday, November 12: JH
GBB @ Philip, 5 p.m.; Vet-
eran’s Day Program in Gym,
10-11 a.m.; FFA District CDE
@ Lemmon, 4 p.m.
Tuesday, November 13:
Recorder Karate from 3:30-4
p.m.
Wednesday, November 14:
School Board Meeting @ 7
p.m.
Thursday, November 15:
State VB @ Mitchell; JH GBB
w/Jones Co., 4 p.m. MST; Fi-
nancial Aid webinar for inter-
ested Jrs/Srs & parents, 6 p.m.
Friday, November 16: State
VB @ Mitchell
Saturday, November 17:
State VB @ Mitchell
FINANCIAL FOCUS
STILL TIME TO SET
UP OWNER-ONLy 401(K)
FOR 2012
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
If you’re a small-business owner,
with no full-time employees (ex-
cept possibly your spouse or busi-
ness partner), you’re probably
used to taking care of just about
everything on your own. So, if
you’re thinking of establishing a
retirement plan — and you should
— you might also be attracted to
“going solo” with an “Owner-only”
401(k).
An Owner-only 401(k), some-
times known as an Individual
401(k), has been around for a few
years now, and has proven quite
popular — and with good reason.
This plan is easy to establish, easy
to administer and, most impor-
tantly, gives you many of the same
benefits enjoyed by employees of a
company that offers a traditional
401(k) plan.
These benefits include the fol-
lowing:
•Tax deferred earnings — Your
earnings aren’t taxed as they accu-
mulate.
•Tax deductible contributions —
An Owner-only 401(k) consists of
two components — salary deferral
and profit sharing contributions,
both of which are generally 100
percent tax deductible. If you
choose to make Roth salary defer-
rals to your Owner-only 401(k),
your contributions aren’t de-
ductible, but you won't pay taxes
on your earnings, provided you
don’t take withdrawals until you’re
59-1/2 and it's been five years since
your first year of Roth deferral.
•Variety of investment choices
— You can choose to fund your
Owner-only 401(k) with a wide
range of investments. And you can
construct an investment mix that’s
appropriate for your risk tolerance
and long-term goals.
Furthermore, an Owner-only
401(k) can potentially allow you to
make greater contributions, at an
identical income level, than other
small-business retirement plans,
such as a SEP IRA. In 2012, you
can defer up to $17,000, or $22,500
if you’re 50 or older (as long as you
don’t exceed 100 percent of your in-
come). Then, in addition, you can
make a profit-sharing contribution
equal to 25 percent of your income
(slightly less if you are unincorpo-
rated). So, by combining the salary
deferral and profit-sharing compo-
nents, you can potentially con-
tribute up to $50,000 to your
Owner-only 401(k) in 2012, or
$55,000 if you’re 50 or older. And
these figures are doubled if your
spouse also contributes to the
Owner-only 401(k).
However, you’re not obligated to
contribute anything to your plan.
So, if your business is slow one
year, you might scale back your
contributions, or put in nothing at
all. Then, when business picks up
again, you can get back toward
contributing whatever you can af-
ford, up to the maximum.
Clearly, the Owner-only 401(k)
can offer you some key advantages
in building resources for retire-
ment. But it’s not the only small-
business retirement plan on the
market, so, before you make a de-
cision, you may want to consult
with your tax and financial advi-
sors to determine if an Owner-only
401(k) is indeed the right plan for
you.
But don’t wait too long. You’ll
have to establish your Owner-only
401(k) by Dec. 31 if you want to re-
ceive any tax deductions for 2012.
And in any case, the sooner you
start putting money away, the
faster the progress you will make
toward the retirement lifestyle
you’ve envisioned.
Mountain lion licenses
available
The 2013 South Dakota moun-
tain lion hunting licenses are now
available.
The season will be open to South
Dakota residents, who may apply
for and receive one license.
The 2013 mountain lion license
is valid statewide from December
26, 2012 through December 31,
2013. However, within the Black
Hills Fire Protection District the li-
cense is valid December 26, 2012
through March 31, 2013; or when a
harvest limit of 100 mountain lions
or 70 female mountain lions is met
within the Black Hills Fire Protec-
tion District.
Application for a mountain lion
hunting license may be made
through the GFP big game applica-
tion website at
https://appsf5.sd.gov/applications/g
f79biggame/login.asp or by submit-
ting the completed paper applica-
tion and fee to the GFP License Of-
fice. Licenses are sold throughout
the hunting season.
In addition to the regular license,
hunters who wish to have the op-
portunity to hunt within Custer
State Park may apply for a limited
number of free Custer State Park
Access Permits.
Hunters may apply for one or
more of the eight designated inter-
vals: Dec. 26-Jan. 8 (30 permits),
Jan. 9-22 (30 permits), Jan. 23-Feb.
6 (30 permits), Feb. 7-13 (4 per-
mits, dogs allowed for hunting),
Feb. 14-March 1 (30 permits),
March 2-8 (4 permits, dogs allowed
for hunting), March 9-24 (30 per-
mits), and March 25-31 (4 permits,
dogs allowed for hunting).
These limited Custer State Park
Access Permits will be issued by
random drawing. The deadline for
applying for the permits is 12 noon
CST on December 5.
Application must be made online
through the Game, Fish and Parks
website at http://apps.sd.gov/appli-
cations/gf70rbgdepredation/Custer
StateParkMountainLionHunt.aspx
Individuals who draw a Custer
State Park Access Permit are also
entitled to hunt in other areas open
to mountain lion hunting.
we don’t
charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565 or
e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Church
Wall Rodeo Grounds
Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
Men have given many gifts to each other down
through the ages, but in James 1:17 we read that
“every good gift and every perfect gift is from above,”
and comes to us from God. The greatest of these
gifts is our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and the re-
demption He has purchased for us. In speaking to the
sinner-woman at Sychar’s well, our Lord drew a pic-
ture, contrasting the barrenness of her own life with
the refreshing joy of salvation, saying:
“If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is that
saith to thee, Give Me to drink; thou wouldest have
asked of Him, and He would have given thee living
water… Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst
again, but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall
give him shall never thirst…” (John 4:10-14).
By nature we are all sinners, but by the grace of
God we all may be saved.
“For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is
eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Rom.
6:23).
“For by grace are ye saved, through faith, and that
not of yourselves; it is the gift of God: not of works,
lest any man should boast” (Eph. 2:8,9).
Thus St. Paul speaks of “the gift of the grace of
God” (Eph. 3:7) and constantly emphasizes the fact
that salvation is a free gift.
But a gift is not possessed until it is accepted. Thus
the Apostle, in Rom. 5:17, refers to those who “re-
ceive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteous-
ness.” Those who receive Christ and the salvation He
has wrought for them, find it natural to exclaim with
Paul-
“THANKS BE UNTO GOD FOR HIS UNSPEAK-
ABLE GIFT!” (II Cor. 9:15).
THE GIFT OF GOD
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
Cecil W. Nelson________________________________
1990, and they were married for 15
years until Dakota's death in 2005.
As a young man during the de-
pression years, Cecil held several
jobs, sometimes more than one at
a time, to support his family. He
farmed near Artesian until 1960,
when he moved his family to Lead,
where he became a member of the
Trinity Methodist Church, and en-
tered into a new career as the
owner-operator of a Sinclair sta-
tion, and later as the owner-oper-
ator of the 76 Liquors in Dead-
wood. After selling the liquor store
he went into a home remodeling
business with a lifelong friend,
Ross O'Riley Jr., until Ross's
death.
Cecil then started enjoying his
two favorite hobbies: woodworking
and fishing. Cecil loved making
wood projects for his family until
his eyesight failed. He was an avid
fisherman into his mid 90s, always
challenging his fellow fishermen!
He is survived by his daughters,
Shirley (Alan) Raby, Atlanta, Ga.,
and Sharon (John) Narem, Lead; a
son, David (Linda) Nelson, Golden,
Colo.; a stepdaughter, Wanita Gra-
vatt, Rapid City; and a stepson,
Wayne (Linda) Hildebrandt, May-
wood, Neb. Cecil had five grand-
children, Randy Raby, Shelly
Parker, Kristi Sandal, Kathleen
Palamara, and Chad Nelson; two
step-grandchildren, Coral Erick-
son and Amber Miller; 10 great-
grandchildren; seven step-great-
grandchildren; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
In addition to Thelma and
Dakota, Cecil was preceded in
death by his brothers, Earl, Elmer
"Curly," Charles, Grover, Mered-
ith, and Milo; his sisters, Bessie
and Louise; and his stepson, Scott
Hildebrandt.
Funeral services were held Sat-
urday, November 3, 2012, at the
Trinity United Methodist Church
in Lead, with Pastor Mark Phillips
officiating. Burial followed at Oak
Ridge Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished for the Trinity United
Methodist Church in Lead.
Condolences may be sent to the
family at www.kinkadefunerals.
com.
Cecil Woodrow Nelson, 97,
passed away Wednesday, October
31, 2012, at Rapid City Regional
Hospital from a brief illness.
Cecil was born January 28,
1915, to Charles M. and Cordelia
(Burnett) Nelson in Artesian. He
was one of nine children. He was
married to Thelma (Sanmark) for
49 years until her death in 1986.
He married Dakota (Threadgold)
Hildebrandt on September 29,
Wall School
District #51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
November 8 to
November 14, 2012
Thursday: Breakfast: Cof-
fee Cake, Cheese Stick, Milk
or Juice.
Lunch: Scalloped Potatoes
with Ham, Whole Grain Roll,
Country Style Vegetables,
Apple Slices, Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast: Pan-
cake, Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Salad, Peaches, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast:
Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Milk
or Juice.
Lunch: Tomato Soup,
Grilled Cheese Sandwich,
Applesauce, Carrots, Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast:
French Toast, Sausage, Milk
or Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Fajitas
with Cheese, Lettuce, Black
Beans and Refried Beans,
Green Beans, Pears, Milk.
Leonard L. Tax________________________________
Leonard LeRoy Tax left this
earth and went to his eternal home
Wednesday morning, October 31,
2012.
Leonard, son of James and Net-
tie (Amling) Tax, began his life in
Wasta on July 27, 1918. He grew
up in Bonita Springs and attended
the Enning School, District 35, ei-
ther riding a horse or walking two
miles to school. After he finished
grade school, he began working for
the neighbors. As payment for his
work, one neighbor gave him a few
lambs and that began a life time of
raising Rambouillet sheep. It was
while herding sheep that he began
finding arrowheads, a hobby he en-
joyed for years.
In March 1942, Leonard pur-
chased a ranch on Sulphur Creek
near Marcus, where he continued
raising sheep and some cows. He
married Mary Kalesh of Faith in
August 1944. They had three chil-
dren: Cheryl Faye, Larry LeRoy
and Beverly Anne. Mary died De-
cember 11, 1956.
On August 9, 1958 at St. John
the Evangelist Catholic Church in
Rapid City, Leonard married Rose
Burk of Vale. Six children com-
pleted their family: Cindy Rose,
Richard Duane, Theresa Marie,
Loretta Ellen, Leonard John and
Jeania Dawn. Leonard continued
to ranch on Sulphur Creek for 47
years where he enjoyed hunting,
fishing, gardening and rock hunt-
ing. He was an avid reader.
Leonard was a 73-year member of
St. Anthony's Catholic Church at
Red Owl, where he served as an
extraordinary minister of com-
munion.
In May 1991, he moved to Belle
Fourche, where he enjoyed fishing
at Orman Dam, visiting with
friends and going to the library. He
was a member of St. Paul's
Catholic Church and attended
daily mass until his health began
to fail.
December 26, 2011, Leonard
moved to Rapid City to be closer to
family. Even though he was in a
wheelchair, he enjoyed going to the
park with his daughters, Jeania
and Cindy, along with his dog
Lady, who was the love of his life.
He loved returning to the ranch
with his son Larry and was able to
take one last fishing trip with him
in August 2012.
Leonard suffered a massive
heart attack on October 4, 2012,
but with the help of his loving fam-
ily, he was able to remain at home
where he died.
Leonard was a kind and gentle
yet strong man. He was a great
husband, dad and grandpa.
Blessed for having shared his life
are Rose, his wife of 54 years; his
nine children: Cheryl McCauslin,
Glendale, Ariz., Larry (Marja),
Prescott Valley, Ariz., Beverly Tal-
ley, Rapid City, Cindy (Les) Bon-
rud, Black Hawk, Rick (Patricia),
Cary, N.C., Theresa Sheppard,
Mesa, Ariz., Lori (Jerry) Afdahl,
Kingwood, Texas, Len, Newell,
Jeania (Curtis) Middleton, Rapid
City; his sister, Vera Rapp and her
son, Rockey, Rapid City; 13 grand-
kids; 11 great-grandkids; two
great-great-granddaughters; three
sisters-in-law: Alice (Duane)
Queen, Sundance, Wyo.; Marian
Young, Rapid City, and Kathy
Glaze, Titusville, Fla.; numerous
nieces and nephews; and his little
Maltese dog, Lady.
He was preceded in death by his
first wife Mary; his parents; five
brothers-in-law; and two sisters-
in-law.
Christian Mass Service was held
Tuesday, November 6, 2012, at
Blessed Sacrament Church, Rapid
City, with the Rev. Michel Mulloy
officiating.
Burial follow at Mount Calvary
Cemetery at Rapid City.
His online guestbook may be
signed at www.osheimschmidt.
com.
Virginia M. Tanner______________________________
Virginia M. (Neumann) Tanner,
70, formerly of Rapid City, SD,
passed away Sunday, October 28,
2012, in Glendale, Ariz., sur-
rounded by her loving family. She
was born August 10, 1942, in Cot-
tonwood, SD.
Her parents, Ernest and Mar-
jorie and sister, Dorothy preceded
her in death.
She is survived by her husband,
Chestten H. Tanner, Glendale;
daughters, Marjorie Ray, Indi-
anapolis, Ind., Abbie Tanner,
Rapid City, and Debora Cimrhakl,
Glendale; grandchildren, Sarah
Bond, T.J. Ales, Alex Hopkins,
Aaron Ales, Chrystal Keogh, Eric
Hopkins, Robert Cimrhakl, and
Juliann Cimrhakl; five great-
grandchildren; brothers, Jimmy,
George and Dale; and sisters,
Mary Ann Hadlock, Custer, SD,
and Bonnie.
Virginia was a kindred soul, lov-
ing and devoted wife, mother,
grandmother and friend. She has
gone to be with her Lord and Sav-
ior Jesus Christ. All that had the
privilege of knowing her will miss
her dearly!
26th Annual
Wall Community
Center
Craft Show
Sunday, November 11
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Wall Community Center
•Door Prizes
•Celebration Committee Turkey Bingo
•Concessions provided by
Wall NeighborWorks
Many of your favorite vendors
returning and many
new ones too!
The family of
Marvin &
Norma
Williams
invite you to a
40th Anniversary Celebration
Saturday, November 10, 2012
New Underwood Community Center
5:30-7:30 dinner • after 7:30 open house
No gifts please.
Cards can be sent to:
17401 232nd St., Owanka, SD 57767
ATTENTION
All Walker Refuse
Customers
Walker Refuse will be
picking up Wall and
Philip residential &
commercial trash on
Wed., Nov. 21st.
Walker Refuse will be
closed Thurs., Nov. 22nd
& Fri., Nov. 23rd for the
Thanksgiving Holiday.
Terry A. Karrels_________________
Terry A. Karrels, age 58, of
Broadus, Mont., died Wednesday,
October 31, 2012, at the Hans P.
Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip.
Terry A. Trask was born June
10, 1954, at Rapid City, the daugh-
ter of Mark and Winifred “Winnie”
(O’Connell) Trask. She grew up on
the Spanish Five Ranch in the
Cheyenne River breaks and Elk
Creek in the Elm Springs commu-
nity.
Terry attended country school in
that area and high school at St.
Martin’s Academy in Rapid City
where she graduated in 1972. She
then attended South Dakota State
University in Brookings.
Terry was united in marriage to
Michael H. Karrels on December
27, 1990, on the Spanish Five
Ranch, and to this union was born
a son, James Michael Karrels.
They made their home on a
ranch south of Belvidere which
they operated until 2003 when they
moved to a ranch in Montana. They
continued to reside on the ranch
until her death.
Terry was generous and enjoyed
doing acts of kindness for people
privately, never wanting recogni-
tion, but ranching was the biggest
part of her life. The spring season
was her favorite, especially enjoy-
ing new colts being born and nam-
ing them, and baby calves being
born and watching them grow up.
Terry was her dad’s cowboy, and in-
herited his eye for good livestock
and her uncle Milton’s passion for
raising good horses.
Grateful for sharing her life are
her husband, Michael H. Karrels of
Broadus; her two brothers, Patrick
and Rose Mary Trask and their
family of Elm Springs, and Tom
and Shelia Trask and their family
of Elm Springs; special friends,
Chuck and Charlotte Hubing of
Miles City, Mont.; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Terry was preceded in death by
her son, James Michael Karrels,
and her parents, Mark and Winnie.
Funeral services were held Mon-
day, November 5, at the American
Legion Hall in Philip with Jim
Scott officiating.
Graveside services were held at
the Elm Springs Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorials directed to the
Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospi-
tal, or the Silverleaf Assisted Liv-
ing Center, both of Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Darwin “Duke” Dean Hocking_______________________
Darwin “Duke” D. Hocking, 76,
of Holmen, Wis., died unexpectedly
while on vacation in Williamsburg,
Va., on September 29, 2012. Duke
was born in Iowa on June 23, 1936,
to Glen and Christina Hocking. He
was born again in baptism and con-
firmed his faith in Jesus.
Duke married Ann Noble on Au-
gust 24, 1991, in Anchorage,
Alaska.
Duke graduated from the South
Dakota School of Mines in Rapid
City, with a degree in engineering.
He served in the United States
Army and United States Army Re-
serve. Duke concluded his profes-
sional career at Milwaukee Area
Technical College where he taught
Industrial Electronics.
Duke is survived by his wife,
Ann; four daughters, Cathy Forma,
Carolyn Perry, Dana Hocking and
Danielle Bosworth. Duke is further
survived by three stepsons, Daniel
Scott, Roy Kupczyk and David
Kupczyk; two grandsons, Curtis
Forma and Christian Forma; and
many other relatives and friends.
He was preceded in death by his
parents; his brother; and two sis-
ters.
A memorial service was held
Sunday, October 28, 2012, at Shep-
herd of the Hills Lutheran Church,
Onalaska, Wis. The Rev. Donald
Stein officiated with military hon-
ors following the service at the
church.
Sports
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012• Page 6
Need a gift idea for that
hard-to-buy someone?
How about a gift that
keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the
Pennington County
Courant.
Call to start your
subscription gift!
(605) 279-2565
Our own Wall Rodeo athletes did
very well at the 2012 Fall Extrav-
aganza held in Rapid City on Sat-
urday, October 20.
As a whole Wall was well repre-
sented. Wall Rodeo Club State
High School Rodeo Queen Elsie
Fortune competed as one of the top
athletes in high school rodeo in the
breakaway roping event along
with Mattee Pauley. Mattee was
leading the average with a 3.37
until Elsie her teammate roped
her calf in a quick time of 2.68 to
take first place.
Carson Johnston wrestled his
steer in a time of 7.36. He had ex-
By Coach Kent Anderson
The Wall Eagles Football Team
traveled to Canistota for their
quarter-final play-off game on
Monday, October 29th.
Canistota had won 34 games in
a row over the past three seasons.
They were State 9B Champions
two years ago and the State 9A
Champions last year. This year
was not any different. The Eagles
went in to the game with optimism
that possibly we could end this 34
game win streak.
In the first quarter the Eagles
were playing a competitive game.
Defensively we had some stops
and before you knew it they hit a
pass for a big touchdown and took
the early 8 to 0 lead. The Eagles
came back and threatened offen-
sively to put the ball in the end-
zone. Off play-action the Eagles
threw to the corner of the endzone
in hopes to score. With an impres-
sive play, the Canistota player
reached over the Wall receiver and
intercepted the pass. It was a
pretty athletic play! This ended
the chance to match touchdowns
with the Hawks. They took the
ball and moved it downfield for
their second score of the game. The
first quarter of the game ended
with Canistota leading 14 to 0.
The Hawks game seemed to in-
tensify and the second quarter was
completely dominated by Canis-
tota. Every effort of the Eagles
seemed to go the wrong direction.
Canistota was very opportunistic
in turning the Eagles turnovers
into touchdowns. Before you could
blink, Canistota had put 50 points
on the board. Due to the State’s 50
point rule, the game would be over
at half.
The Eagles came in to the game
thinking upset! This challenge to
the Hawks resulted in the same
outcome as many of their previous
games. The coaching staff was
proud of how our team still com-
peted even though the game was
not going as planned. It’s not a
pretty way to end the season, but
we played hard and didn’t give up.
The loss gave the Eagles a sea-
son record of six wins and four
losses. There were many great
highlights to the season. The
coaching staff was impressed with
how we improved in many ways
lnformationaI kick-Off fvcnt
Wcst Rcgion
Strongcr fconomics Togcthcr
Wcd., Nov. 14 º Club 27, Kadoka
S:30 lo 7:30 µ.m. mcclìng
)oìn us lo...
-Ieatn abou| |he SI1 ptogtam.
-Indets|and hov you can be |nvo|ved.
-!e|votl v||h o|het commun|||es |n yout teg|on.
-Bu||d en|hus|asm |ot a s|tonget, success|u| teg|on.
Contuct }uckíe Stííveíí ut
488-0334 íor more
íníormutíon.
Wall Rodeo Club competes at Fall Extravaganza
cellent form and did a great job
when he got his hands on his steer.
Working through his nerves of
having to get mounted on another
competitors horse (since his
brother in college had the horses at
his college rodeo at Fargo, N.D.)
Johnston was a little late leaving
the box and had to run down the
arena further than liked to win
fourth place.
Trey Richter competed in team
roping with Caleb Schroth (who
had also finished second in team
roping on the national team to rep-
resent S.D. in Rock Springs last
year.)
Wall Rodeo Club members. Back row pictured from left to right ... Trey Richter, Mazee Pauley,
Elsie Fortune and Carson Johnston. Front row ... Lane Blasius, Emilee Pauley and Mattee Pauley.
~Courtesy Photo
Lane Blasius team roped with
Jade Schmidt from Box Elder.
They had a time of 11.87 for fourth
place.
Mazee Pauley was unfortunate
to tip a pole in the pole bending
which added five seconds to her
time of 21.682.
Emilee Pauley the only one
qualifying for the Jr High Rodeo
Association showcasing the top
two in the state. She did very well
considering she is a seventh
grader competing with the top
high school girls in the State of
South Dakota. She ended up six
with a time of 9.88.
throughout the year. The Hawks
ended the Eagles four game win
streak with the loss to end the sea-
son.
Scoring:
1st 2nd Final
Wall: 0 0 0
Canistota: 14 36 50
Team Statistics
•First Downs: Wall - 3, Canis-
tota - 9.
•Rushing Attempts: Wall - 18,
Canistota - 35.
•Rushing Yards: Wall - 73,
Canistota - 240.
•Passes Complete: Wall - 1,
Canistota - 1.
•Passes Attempted: Wall - 6,
Canistota - 4.
•Passes Intercepted: Wall - 3,
Canistota - 0.
•Completion Percentage:
Wall - 16.7, Canistota - 25.0.
•Passing Yards: Wall - 9, Can-
istota - 59.
•Fumbles: Wall - 3, Canistota -
0.
•Fumbles Lost: Wall - 1, Canis-
tota - 0.
•Punt Attempts: Wall - 3, Can-
istota - 1.
•Return Yards (punt & kick):
Wall - 10, Canistota - 27.
•Number of Penalties: Wall -
2, Canistota - 1.
•Penalty Yards: Wall - 25, Can-
istota - 5.
•Total Offensive Plays: Wall -
27, Canistota - 39.
•Total Yards Offense: Wall -
82, Canistota - 299.
•Average Per Play: Wall - 3.0,
Canistota - 7.7.
•Wall Eagle Quarterback:
Lane Blasius, Completions - 1,
Attempts - 6, Interceptions - 3,
Yards - 9, Touchdowns - 1, Percent-
age - 16.7.
•Receiving: Lane Hustead,
Catches - 1, Yards - 9, Touchdowns
- 0, Average - 9.0.
•Rushing: Tyler Trask, At-
tempts - 13, Yards - 51, Touch-
downs - 0, Average - 3.0. Taran
Eisenbraun, Attempts - 3, Yards -
22, Touchdowns - 0, Average - 7.3.
Cade Kjerstad, Attempts - 1,
Yards - 0, Touchdowns - 0, Average
- 0.0. Trevor Anderson, Attempts
- 1, Yards - 0, Touchdowns - 0, Av-
erage - 0.0.
•Kickoff: Anderson, Attempts
- 1, Yards - 47.0, Average - 47.0.
Hawks down the Eagles to go to state
Wall “Eagles” Football
2012 Season Statistics
Scoring:
1st 2nd 3rd 4th Final
Wall: 37 71 74 54 236
Opponents: 82 87 41 64 274
Team Statistics
•First Downs: Wall - 122, Op-
ponents - 124.
•Rushing Attempts: Wall -
410, Opponents - 398.
•Rushing yards: Wall - 2599,
Opponents - 1741.
•Passes Complete: Wall - 38,
Opponents - 81.
•Passes Attempted: Wall - 82,
Opponents - 150.
•Passes Intercepted: Wall - 6,
Opponents - 4.
•Completion Percentage:
Wall - 46.3, Opponents - 54.0.
•Passing yards: Wall - 529,
Opponents - 1197.
•Fumbles: Wall - 31, Oppo-
nents - 10.
•Fumbles Lost: Wall - 10, Op-
ponents - 3.
•Punt Attempts: Wall - 19, Op-
ponents - 27.
•Return yards (punt & kick):
Wall - 506, Opponents -1001.
•Number of Penalties: Wall -
39, Opponents - 44.
•Penalty yards: Wall - 332, Op-
ponents - 370.
•Total Offensive Plays: Wall -
507, Opponents - 548.
•Total yards Offense: Wall -
3128, Opponents - 2938.
•Average Per Play: Wall - 6.2,
Opponents - 5.4.
•Eagles Quarterbacks: Lane
Blasius, Completions - 22, At-
tempts - 46, Interceptions - 5,
Yards - 364, Touchdowns - 2, Per-
centage - 47.8. Trevor Anderson,
Completions - 16, Attempts - 36,
Interceptions - 1, Yards - 165,
Touchdowns - 0, Percentage - 44.4.
•Receiving: A n d e r s o n ,
Catches - 7, Yards - 142, Touch-
downs - 1, Average - 20.3. Lane
Hustead, Catches - 8, Yards - 129,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 16.1.
Cade Kjerstad, Catches - 6, Yards
- 81, Touchdowns - 0, Average -
13.5. Ben Linn, Catches - 5, Yards
- 70, Touchdowns - 1, Average -
14.0. Tyler Trask, Catches - 6,
Yards - 52, Touchdowns - 0, Aver-
age - 8.6. Blasius, Catches -
5,Yards - 35, Touchdowns - 0, Aver-
age - 7.0. Clancy Lytle, Catches -
1, Yards - 13, Touchdowns - 0. Av-
erage - 13.0.
•Rushing: Trask, Attempts -
185, Yards - 1654, Touchdowns -
20, Average - 8.9. Taran Eisen-
braun, Attempts - 105, Yards -
488, Touchdowns - 3, Average - 4.7.
Kjerstad, Attempts - 37, Yards -
234, Touchdowns - 1, Average - 6.3.
Carson Johnston, Attempts - 13,
Yards - 102, Touchdowns - 2, Aver-
age - 7.9. Anderson, Attempts -
24, Yards - 90, Touchdowns - 1, Av-
erage - 3.8. Blasius, Attempts -
35, Yards - 73, Touchdowns - 2, Av-
erage - 2.1. Trey Richter, At-
tempts - 1, Yards - 4, Touchdowns
- 0, Average - 4.0. Hustead, At-
tempts - 4, Yards - 0, Touchdowns
- 0, Average - 0.0. Les Williams,
Attempts - 1, Yards - 0, Touch-
downs - 0, Average - 0.0. Dusty
Dartt, Attempts - 1, Yards - (-12),
Touchdowns - 0, Average - (-12.0).
Tucker O’Rourke, Attempts - 4,
Yards - (-15), Touchdowns - 0, Av-
erage - (-3.8).
•Scoring: Trask, Touchdowns -
21, PAT-2: 1, Total Points - 128.
Anderson, Touchdowns - 2, PAT-1-
22/28, Field Goals - 4/7. Total
Points - 46. Eisenbraun, Touch-
downs - 3, Total Points - 18. Bla-
sius, Touchdowns - 2, Totals
Points - 14. Kjerstad, Touchdowns
- 1, Total Points - 6. Linn, Touch-
downs - 1, Total Points - 6. Lake-
ton McLaughlin, Touchdowns - 1,
Total Points - 6.
•Kickoff: Anderson, Attempts
- 43, Yards - 1924, Average- 44.7,
One onside kick - successful.
McLaughlin, Attempts - 2, Yards
- 90, Average - 45.0, one onside
kick - unsuccessful.
•Punt: Anderson, Attempts -
16, Yards - 738, Average - 46.1,
Williams, Attempts - 1, Yards - 42,
Average - 42.0.
•Punt Return: Johnston, At-
tempts - 3, Yards - 29, Touchdowns
- 0, Average - 9.7. Trask, Attempts
- 1, Yards - 16, Touchdowns - 0, Av-
erage - 16.0. Anderson, Attempts
- 1, Yards - 10, Touchdowns - 0, Av-
erage - 10.0.
•Kick Return: Trask, At-
tempts - 13, Yards - 251, Touch-
downs - 1, Average - 19.3. Hus-
tead, Attempts - 9, Yards - 109,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 12.1.
Johnston, Attempts - 3, Yards -
60, Touchdowns - 0, Average - 20.0.
Lytle, Attempts - 2, Yards - 24,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 12.0.
O’Rourke, Attempts - 2, Yards -
10, Touchdowns - 0, Average - 5.0.
Ridge Sandal, Attempts - 1,
Yards - 0, Touchdowns- 0, Average
- 0.0. Kjerstad, Attempts - 1,
Yards - 0, Touchdowns - 0, Average
- 0,0. C.J. Schulz, Attempts - 1,
Yards - 0, Touchdowns - 0, Average
- 0.0.
Defensive Statistics
•Fumble Recoveries: Trask -
1, McLaughlin - 1, Eisenbraun -
1.
•Blocked Field Goals: Tyler
Peterson - 1.
•Interceptions: Anderson - 2,
Blasius - 1, Tyrel Clark - 1.
•Tackles: Blasius, Solo - 43,
Assists - 53, Sacs - .5, Total - 96,
Points - 139. Williams, Solo - 29,
Assists - 44, Sacs - 0, Total - 73,
Points - 102. Trask, Solo - 38, As-
sists - 31, Sacs - .5, Total - 69,
Points - 107. Johnston, Solo - 33,
Assists - 31, Sacs - 0, Total - 64,
Points - 97. Peterson, Solos - 22,
Assists - 42, Sacs - 3, Total - 64,
Points - 86. Lytle, Solo - 38, Sacs -
1, Total - 60, Points - 82. Eisen-
braun, Solo - 19, Assists - 32, Sacs
- 4, Total - 51, Points - 70. Dartt,
Solo - 14, Assists - 27, Sacs - 2.5,
Total - 41, Points - 55. Anderson,
Solo - 10, Assists - 29, Sacs - 0,
Total - 39, Points - 49. McLaugh-
lin, Solo - 15, Assists - 18, Sacs - 1,
Total - 33, Points - 48. Luke
Wilkins, Solo - 6, Assists - 24, Sacs
- 0, Total - 30, Points - 36. K j e r -
stad, Solo - 8, Assists - 13, Sacs -
1, Total - 21, Points - 29. Clark,
Solo - 1, Assists - 7, Sacs - 0, Total
- 8, Points - 9. Linn, Solo - 2, As-
sists - 4, Sacs - 1.5, Total - 6, Points
- 8. Cody Harris, Solo - 1, Assists
- 5, Sacs - 0, Total - 6, Points - 7.
Ridge Sandal, Solo - 3, Assists -
1, Sacs - 0, Total - 4, Points - 7.
Gabe Sandal, Solo - 0, Assists - 4,
Sacs - 0, Total - 4, Points - 7. Hus-
tead, Solo - 1, Assists - 1, Sacs - 0,
Total - 2, Points - 3. Richter, Solo
- 1, Assists - 1. Sacs - 0, Total - 2,
Points - 3. Ryder Wilson, Solo - 1,
Assists - 1, Sacs - 0, Total - 2,
Points - 3. Schulz, Solo - 0, Assists
- 2, Sacs - 0, Total - 2, Points - 2.
O’Rourke, Solo - 0, Assists - 1,
Sacs - 0, Total - 1, Points - 1.
Eagles 2012 season stats
•Punt: Anderson, Attempts - 3,
Yards - 138, Average - 46.0.
•Kick Return: Trask, At-
tempts - 3, Yards - 10, Touchdowns
- 0, Average - 3.3.
•Tackles: Eisenbraun, Solo -
1, Assists - 2, Sacs - 1, Total - 3,
Points - 4. Tyler Peterson, Solo -
1, Assists - 5, Sacs - 0, Total - 6,
Points - 7. Laketon McLaughlin,
Solo - 2, Assists - 2, Sacs - 0, Total
- 4, Points - 6. Blasius, Solo - 4,
Assists - 2, Sacs - 0, Total - 6,
Points - 10. Trask, Solo - 1, Assists
- 2, Sacs - 0, Total - 3, Points - 4.
Carson Johnston, Solo - 2, As-
sists - 2, Sacs - 0, Total - 4, Points -
6. Dusty Dartt, Solo - 1, Assists -
0, Sacs - 0, Total - 1, Points - 2. An-
derson, Solo - 0, Assists - 3, Sacs -
0, Total - 3, Points - 3. Les
Williams, Solo - 3, Assists - 5, Sacs
- 0, Total - 8, Points - 11. Luke
Wilkins, Solo - 0, Assists - 4, Sacs
- 0, Total - 4, Points - 4. Tyrel
Clark, Solo - 0, Assists - 1, Sacs -
0, Total - 1, Points - 1.
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012 • Page 7
80 years ago…
Someone broke in the Farmers
Union Store in Quinn, some time
during Thursday night or early
Friday morning. The robbers man-
aged to get away with quite a bit of
the merchandise, but were evi-
dently frightened away before fin-
ishing the job, as some of the goods
that was bundled up for removal
was left behind, giving evidence
that the prowlers left in a hurry.
The thieves entered by breaking
the glass in a couple of doors at the
rear of the store.
An airplane with four passen-
gers and pilot, going from Sioux
Falls to Rapid City last week was
forced down on account of fog and
sleet. It was impossible to pick out
a landing place and the plane
landed in John Guethlein’s corn
field. They were badly shaken in
landing but no one was hurt and
no damage done to the plane. The
passengers went on to Rapid City
by automobile and the pilot re-
mained with the plane and waited
for decent weather to resume his
journey.
The Wall Fire Department
averted what might have been a
very serious fire Friday afternoon
when they quickly extinguished
the blaze which was eating its way
through the side walls of Stran-
dell’s Cottage just east of their
cafe. The fire started from an over-
heated stove, and when noted had
already caught fire to the wood-
work and the wardrobe containing
their clothes. The fire squad ar-
rived just as the blaze had pene-
trated through to the outside.
Water and chemicals quickly put
an end to the grasping flames. Ira
says their loss amounted tothe
complete destruction of all of their
clothes except what they were
wearing, and that the water
greatly damaged all of their house-
hold goods.
The Wall high school football
players lost to the Rapid City Re-
serves to the tune of 27 to 0 on the
local field, Saturday. This was the
last game of the season for the
local boys.
Miss Florence Sorenson and
Stanley J. Teeters, both of Wall,
were married at the Presbyterian
manse Saturday evening, Rev.
Rew Walz officiating. The double
ring ceremony was used. The cou-
ple was attended by Tobe Kilian
and Clara Lurz, also of Wall. Mr.
and Mrs. Teeters will make their
home at Wall.
70 years ago…
Fire of unknown source burnt
the barn and all its contents of hay
and feed at the Irvin Paulsen’s
place late Sunday afternoon. The
family were in the house when
they noted the barn was blazing.
The Wall fire department was
called and a number from town
went along with the fire equip-
ment, but there was very little that
could be done. One horse was in
the barn and got singed, but other-
wise it was uninjured.
Isadore J. Stuntebeck, St. Cloud,
Minn., was sentenced to a year in
the state penitentiary Tuesday by
Circuit Judge A. R. Denu on his
plea of guilty to a charge of third
degree forgery. Stuntebeck who
was arrested recently in St. Cloud
for Pennington County authorities,
admitted forging a $30 check on
his former employer, W. Geigle at
Wall, and cashing it to get cash to
return to his home.
Leslie Allen Bryan, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Marion Bryan of Wall,
and Miss Mavis Fern VanVleck,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred
VanVleck of Wall, were married at
the Presbyterian Manse of Rapid
City, Rev. Rew Walz officiating,
with the ring ceremony on Satur-
day afternoon. They were attended
by Floyd A. Schell and Beaulah
VanVleck, both of Wall. They will
make their home in Wall, where
the groom is employed by the West
River Electric Association.
60 years ago…
In a hard fought battle at Quinn,
Thursday afternoon, the Wall Ea-
gles won over the Quinn Tuplets,
55 to 32. Quinn led for most of the
first half. On the first play after
the opening kick-off, the Quinn
boys intercepted a pass and went
over for a TD along with the point
after touchdown. This was the only
scoring in the first period. Then at
the beginning of the second quar-
ter, Quinn was quick to recover a
fumble on their own twenty yard
line and in the next few plays
added their second TD, giving
them a 12 to 0 lead. By half time,
the Eagles had succeeded in get-
ting two touchdowns and Quinn
another one, still leaving Quinn
leading 19 to 13. The last half,
however, saw the Quinn boys tir-
ing and the Eagles scoring seven
times.
The Wall Eagles finished their
1952 football season in second
place in the Badlands Conference
standings as the result of their de-
feat here Friday afternoon, 25 to
20 by Kadoka. This loss made two
for the Eagles during the season
against only one for Kadoka, the
League’s top team.
The election trend which started
when the first ballots were
counted gave Dwight D. Eisen-
hower a majority of well over
5,000,000 votes. Eisenhower led
his party candidates and helped
sweep into office an apparent ma-
jority of 221 House seats and at
least 48 seats in the senate. Wall
had out a record number of 290
voters with 227 for the GOP win-
ner against 61 for Stevenson.
There were 177 straight Republi-
can ballots against 22 for Democ-
rats.
The children of Albert Eisen-
braun gave their parents a sur-
prise party Monday evening hon-
oring their fortieth wedding an-
niversary. They were married in
1912 at Wolsey by Rev. F. W.
Leyhe.
50 years ago…
The Sterling Drilling Co. of Ster-
ling, Kansas will make a number
of oil tests in the area from Scenic,
southwest, according to word from
L. A. Sinykin. The Sterling Co. has
been granted a permit to drill on
land owned by Marie Seism near
Scenic and a permit for a test on
land owned by Oscar W. Moden,
near Box Elder. Five other tests
will be made on locations around
Folsom.
The Wall Eagles football boys
were unable to gain ground
against the first string players of
the Kadoka Kougars on the home
field Friday afternoon and settled
for a 27-13 final score. It was only
after the second team were in the
visiting line-up that the Eagles
were able to push across for their
two touchdowns — one in the sec-
ond period and the second in the
final period. Larry Walker scored
Wall’s first touchdown with Glenn
Kjerstad carrying for the extra
point. Wayne Hildebrandt went
over for the second TD. This home-
coming game ended the football
season for the Wall Eagles.
1962 Homecoming King and
Queen were Glenn Kjerstad and
Pam McHan.
White and bronze mums
adorned the alter of the First
Lutheran Church of Wall as Miss
Velda Mae Kjerstad and Kenneth
A. Bodkin exchanged marriage
vows on Sunday, November 4. The
Rev. Eberhard Klatt officiated at
the double ring ceremony. Mr. and
Mrs. Peder Kjerstad of Quinn are
the bride’s parents; and Mrs. Rose
Bodkin and the late Pete Bodkin of
Philip, are the parents of the
groom.
40 years ago…
BIRTH: Mr. and Mrs. Eddie
Eisenbraun are the proud parents
of a boy, Clay Matthew, born Octo-
ber 27. The proud grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Eisen-
braun and Mr. and Mrs. Julian Ch-
eney.
“Four More Years” was almost
the unanimous voters decision
Tuesday as 49 of the 50 states en-
dorsed President Nixon. He re-
ceived 61 percent of the nation’s
votes — 53 percent of South
Dakota’s vote.
Gary Stone’s wrecking crew
made short work of tearing down
the theatre and other buildings on
east Main Street and hauling
away the rubbish. They now have
completed digging the basement
for the new Drug Store addition
and ready for the footings and
basement walls.
State Highway District Engi-
neer Travis J. Bunn was one of
three person injured in a head-on
collision near Farmingdale,
Wednesday. Cars driven by Bunn,
65, and Marcella A. Pipal, 58, Wall,
slammed together on Highway 40
Bbunn and a passenger in the
Pipal car were taken to St. John’s
McNamara Hospital with what au-
thorities described as “serious” in-
juries. Mrs. Pipal sustained minor
injuries. According to the Penning-
ton County Sheriff ’s Office, Bunn
was traveling west and was pass-
ing another vehicle when the
state-owned car he was driving
met the eastbound Pipal car. Both
vehicles were demolished, the
sheriff ’s office said.
30 years ago…
Demolition of the old Oddfellows
Hall began late last week on Main
Street. Situated between the Hot
and Cold Shop and the Cactus, it
has been vacated for several years.
Bill Hustead, speaking for Wall
Drug which has owned the build-
ing for some time, stated that they
had received pressure from busi-
nessmen on the west side of the
street for some time to do some-
thing about the condition of the
building. Tentative plans are to
erect a building to house some type
of seasonal business with a good
possibility the space will be leased
out to an enterprise not associated
with the drug store. Butch Kitter-
man will be in charge of the con-
struction once plans are finalized.
Four outstanding vocal students
have been selected this year to rep-
resent Wall High School in the an-
nual All State Chorus. These stu-
dents will be joining approxi-
mately 900 other high school stu-
dents in Rapid City this month.
The four students selected are
Tami Holsether, alto; Kara Jarvis,
soprano; James Babcock, tenor;
and Jim Sautter, bass.
In their final game of the 1982
season, the Wall Eagles were
handed a loss by the Philip Scot-
ties. The final score was 20-8. The
loss brought the Eagles record to
three wins and five losses.
A free throw shot by Leslie
Lentz during the last seconds of
the game reassured a Wall victory
over Philip on November 2. The
final score was 50-49.
20 years ago…
Thursday, October 22, the Wall
Volunteer Firemen’s pagers went
off and within minutes the Depart-
ment was responding to a call of a
grass fire located at the site of
Walker Refuse Landfill. Combat-
ing extremely dry conditions and
high winds the firefighters battled
the blaze. Shortly the Quinn Vol-
unteer Fire Department arrived
and assisted. The rapidly moving
fire burned about 80 acres before it
was brought under control. During
mop up, their pagers went off
again and the Wall firefighters
headed for a fire reported at the
Johnny McGriff Ranch, south of
Wasta. Extremely dry conditions,
warm temperatures and winds
blowing a steady gale, made it dif-
ficult for the firefighters to gain
control and contain the fire. The
McGriff fire having started by an
old house with no apparent cause,
burned 100 acres of grass and
trees before it finally got to the
Cheyenne River and firemen were
able to knock it down. As they
began their mop up activities, once
again another call came. A prairie
fire that had started just east of
New Underwood, was rolling and
roaring across the hills and valleys
of that area. The New Underwood
Fire burned out of control through-
out the afternoon and night on
Thursday. As the fire made its way
to the Cheyenne River, it was
brought under control on Friday,
leaving in its wake 36,000 acres of
scorched grassland, many tons of
destroyed hay, and many, many
thankful area residents, that the
fire was out.
On their home field on October
23, the Wall Eagles defeated the
Hill City football team, 36-0.
The Wall Lady Eagles traveled
to Hill City on Oxctober 20 and 22
and to RApid CIty on October 24 to
compete in the West River Girls
Basketball Torunament. In the
first game held at hIll City on
Tuesday night, the Lady Eagles de-
feated Hot Springs, 58-48. In the
second game on Thursday, the Wall
Lady Eagles defeated Hill City, 58-
47. On Saturday, the Lady Eagles
met the Newell team in Rapid City.
Newell defeated Wall, 41-60.
Tammera Lea Holsether and
Brian Udell Bjerkaas were united
in marriage on September 12th at
the First United Methodist Church
in Yankton. Pastor Howard Gri-
nager and Pastor Kevin Kline offi-
ciated.
10 years ago…
Shari Swan, Grant Andrews,
Mark Swan and Catherine Gra-
ham will represent Wall High
School this year in Sioux Falls, for
the 2002 All-State Choir.
The Eagles ended the regular
season Friday with a huge win
over White River and are on their
way to the playoffs. Last Fridays
game was an important game for
the Eagles for two reason; first,
they had to win in order to recap-
ture the title of conference champi-
ons for the fourth year in a row
and secondly, it was the last game
before going into playoffs. Wall de-
feated White River 52-6. The Ea-
gles head into the playoffs seated
third, to play the second seated
team, Jones County.
Black Hills Financial Services is
proud to announce Stacey Denke
as the recipient of the Black Hills
Financial Services September
2002 Student of the Month award
at Wall High School. Stacey is the
daughter of Cherry and Bryon
Denke and is currently a senior at
Wall High School.
The Looking Glass of Time
REMINDER
Per Ordinance 12.16, residents and businesses
are required to remove snow and ice from
sidewalks within 12 hours of daylight after the ice
and snow have accumulated. If the ice and snow
is not removed in the time indicated, the city will
do so and bill the property owner a $50 service
fee, a $50 fine and the current
manpower hourly rate multiplied by 150%.
Thank you, City of Wall
Published November 1 & 8, 2012, at the total approximate cost of
$96.00.
Obituaries More obituaries on page 5
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
SNOWPLOW OPERATOR
The Department of Transportation is recruiting local in-
dividuals for the Snowplow Operator Program. Those hired
will be employed on a temporary basis and be responsible
for operating snow and ice removal equipment during in-
clement weather and completing general maintenance as-
signments. Hours could include weekdays, weekends, holi-
days, early morning or evening.
Two types of temporary positions are available. Reserve
Operators will only work on an as needed basis determined
by weather conditions. Winter Seasonals will generally
work a 40 hour week and will be involved in additional du-
ties beyond snowplowing (i.e. guardrail repair, signing,
roadway patching, etc.).
Operators are needed in the Wall area.
Starting rate of pay is $13.00 per hour. Applicants must
have the ability to operate heavy equipment and must pos-
sess a Commercial Drivers License.
Interested parties should contact:
Gary D. Engel, Area Engineer
S.D. Department of Transportation
P.O. Box 1970
Rapid City, South Dakota 57709
605-394-2248
(Includes Rapid City, and Wall)
EQUAL OPPORTUNITy EMPLOyER
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Victoria Sue Goodsell______________
Victoria Goodsell, 68, passed
away Thursday, November 1,
2012.
Sue is survived by her husband,
Donald; children, Jeff (Angie) Van
Note, Joni (Kent) Brandsted, Ger-
ald (Tina) Goodsell, Dennis Good-
sell and Jay (Heidi) Goodsell; 12
grandchildren; eight great-grand-
children; and five siblings, Martha
Smith, Lester (Darlene) Scribner,
Dwaine (Sandy) Scribner, Willis
(Betty) Scribner and Beverly
Ward.
Visitation will be held Thursday,
November 8, 2012, from 3:00 to
7:00 p.m. at the Crown Hill Mortu-
ary in Wheat Ridge, Colo.
Funeral services will be held
Friday, November 9, at 12:00 p.m.
at the Crown Hill Mortuary. Burial
to follow at Crown Hill Cemetery.
Following Sue’s services, there
will be a reception at the Arvada
Elks Club, 5700 Yukon, Arvada,
Colo. All are invited to attend.
In lieu of flowers, the family sug-
gests donations be made to the
Multiple Myeloma Denver Rocky
Mountain Chapter, 720 S. Col-
orado Blvd., Suite 500 S, Denver,
CO 80246 or The Denver Hospice,
501 South Cherry St. #700, Den-
ver, CO 80246
Looking forward to what's ahead,
as we did last week when we talked
about painting the vision is an im-
portant part of the planning
process. Likewise, looking back
helps us to recognize what has
brought us to where we are. Today
we will focus on the "current situa-
tions" of the here and now which
gets us ready to set goals. (We'll
talk about goal-setting next week).
It's always good to take an hon-
est survey of the various areas of
your life-to recognize the areas
where you are succeeding and
those areas where you may be
falling short and needing to im-
prove. Here's a quick way to get an
honest assessment in any one-or
all-of the areas of your life.
First, pick an area of your life
you want to work on. (How about
what you have been working on the
last couple weeks after our talks
about purpose and vision?) Next,
take a piece of paper and make
three columns. Label the first col-
umn "The Good" and the second
one "The Bad" and the third one
"The Ugly".
Considering your current situa-
tion in that area of you life, start
listing under the appropriate col-
umn, those things you feel are good
and right, what you think is not so
good, and the stuff that is down-
right ugly.
In order to really be successful
with this step you must be brutally
honest with yourself. I know this is
the hard part for me. It can be
quite painful when you are looking
at the decisions that you made that
went belly up. I also know that this
is good medicine for me to take be-
cause I really want to learn from
my mistakes so I can make better
decisions in the future. I know that
this is what you want too.
Let me encourage you to con-
tinue with this process of planning
your Life Strategies. Planning will
certainly be challenging and take
some self-discipline. There is no
question in my mind about how dif-
ficult this process can be, and yet,
planning can also be the most re-
warding and result-producing
thing you can do to live your life to
the fullest and maximize your per-
sonal potential.
The best advice I can give you as
you go through this step in the
planning process, is to have fun
with it. Whatever you do, do not let
it become a chore! Get those close
to you involved in the process and
gather their input. Keep looking
forward! Do not let anyone steal
your dreams.
Focus on the Here & the Now
Due to the Veterans Day holiday,
we will have an EARLY DEADLINE
for the PROFIT
Thursday, November 8, at NOON
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka,
SD, or call 837-2690. Craig
cell: 390-8087, Sauntee cell:
390-8604; wrex@gwtc.net
K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: Hereford bull
calves. Will keep until Decem-
ber 1, 2012. Hovland Here-
fords, Allen Hovland, 544-
3236, or Miles Hovland, 544-
3294. PR10-2tc
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
local delivery included, semi-
load lots, no mold or weeds,
large rounds put up right. Call
Rob, 390-5535; Charles, 390-
5506. P47-4tc
SELLING: 10 Black Angus
commerical bred heifers Satur-
day, November 3, at Philip (SD)
Livestock Auction. AI bred
Angus to DL Incentive 228
(EPDs BW 0, WW 81, YW 133,
M 28). Pasture bred to Green
Mountain Front Man (EPDs
BW -.7, WW 61, YW 99 M 28).
These heifers originated out of
the 2012 BHSS pen of five.
These very fancy bred heifers
will weigh 1,050 lbs. and are
bred to start calving March 1
for 45 days. Ravellette Cattle,
685-5147 or home, 859-2969.
PR6-5tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-
ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GARAGE SALES
MOVING SALE: Must down-
size! Forty years collection of
household items. Some furni-
ture, antiques, collectibles, va-
riety of adult clothing (some
name brand), sizes vary, 0-5
and 10-12, small appliances
and much more! Friday Nov.
16, 5:00 - 7:30 p.m. and Sat-
urday Nov. 17, 10 a.m. - noon.
Glenn & Rita O'Connell resi-
dence 615 N Wood Ave., just
north of the WR/L-J building.
PR11-2tc
HELP WANTED
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED
at Days Inn, Wall. Possibly per-
manent year-round position,
starting immediately. Contact
Theresa, 279-2000.
PW46-tfn
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2001 GMC
Sonoma, approx. 147K miles,
dependable, good tires,
$5,000. 441-1364. PR11-2tp
FOR SALE: 1979 Chevrolet
Silverado 30, dually with Du-
ralist DSS 30, 25’ bucket lift.
$1,800. 441-9669, Wall.
WP11-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats,
power windows, locks & seats,
good tires. Call 685-8155.
PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O’CONNELL CONSTRUC-
TION, INC., PHILIP: Rock,
Sand, Gravel (screened or
crushed). We can deliver.
Dams, dugouts, building sites.
Our 37th year. Glenn or Trace,
859-2020. PR11-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAY-
ING: Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-
2888, Midland. PR20-52tp
COOK WANTED: Good Samar-
itan Society, New Underwood,
Part-time for 4-8:30 p.m. shift.
Contact: Lorraine, 754-6489 or
apply online www.good-sam.
com. CHECK OUT OUR NEW
WAGE SCALE, INCLUDING
COMPENSATION FOR EXPE-
RIENCE. EOE/AA/M/F/V/H.
PW48-4tc
CLASS A CDL DRIVER:
Dakota Mill & Grain is looking
for drivers. Late model equip-
ment. Clean driving record.
Doubles, Triples and overnight
stays required, in the South
Dakota area. Competitive pay
with benefits. Stop by any of
our 10 locations and pick up
an application or e-mail re-
sume to jackh@
dakotamill.com. E.O.E.
PW48-2tc
HELP WANTED: Dakota Mill &
Grain, Inc. is looking for an ag-
gressive, team-minded, for-
ward-thinking individual to be
a Location Manager at our
Philip, SD location. All appli-
cants and information is 100%
confidential. Apply to Jack
Haggerty at jackh@dako-
tamill.com or fax resumé to
605-718-2844.
WP10-2tc
POSITION AVAILABLE: The
Kadoka Area School District is
looking for a bus monitor at an
hourly rate of $11. The hours
for this position would be ap-
proximately 6:15 to 8 a.m. and
3:30 to 5:15 p.m. on all school
days with the possibility of ad-
ditional days as assigned. An
application may be obtained
from the school or on the
school district’s website;
kadoka.k12. sd.us. Please feel
free to contact the school with
further questions about this
position. Completed applica-
tion may be dropped off at the
school or sent it to: Kadoka
School, Attn: Supt. Jamie Her-
mann, PO Box 99, Kadoka, SD
57543 or call 837-2175. EOE.
K47-2tc
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE IN QUINN: Flota-
tion waterbed in a self-con-
tained foam bag (uses regular
queen sheets) with baffles, in-
cludes entire bed, $100. Call
386-2372. PW47-2tc
FOR SALE: Several nice used
refrigerators with warranties.
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder.
390-9810. WP9-4tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
FOR SALE: Several nice used
refrigerators with warranties.
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder.
390-9810. P46-4tp
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: Old Indian items,
beadwork, quillwork, old guns,
old painted buffalo hides, old
photographs. Cash paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802.
F46-4tc
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myr-
tle Ave Philip. 3 bedroom 1.5
bath, central air, fuel oil heat
and wood stove. Open concept,
stainless steel fridge and stove.
washer and dryer included.
Hardwood laminate floors, sep-
arate dining room. Mostly fin-
ished basement. Ceiling fans
throughout. New windows and
roof. Fenced in, large backyard
with cover patio and storage
shed. Can email photos. Call
859-2470 or (785) 259-4207.
P48-8tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, attached 2-car
garage, large lot. Call 859-
2403, Philip. PR10-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment in Wall. Call 386-
2222. WP9-4tc
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan,
381-2861 or 279-2861.
WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we
can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an applica-
tion. Gateway Apartments,
Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Rav-
ellette Publications, Inc. re-
quests all classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid
at the time the order is placed.
All phone numbers are with
an area code of 605, unless
otherwise indicated.
annc@
gwtc.net
EMPLOYMENT
KTC CONSTRUCTION SEEKS
EMPLOYEES, both part-time
and full-time. Excellent
pay/benefits! Underground
plumbing, digging, trenching,
operating equipment. Willing
to train. Submit resumes to
rodb@kennebectelephone.com
. Questions, call 605-869-
2220.
SALES AGRONOMIST/PRECI-
SION AG position at Howard
Farmers Coop, Howard SD.
Sales experience, knowledge of
Ag chemicals and precision
Ag/VRT is preferred. Call
Colby 605-772-5543.
ADOPTION
ADOPT - WE WILL PROVIDE a
happy, loving home, beautiful
life for your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid. Married
couple Walt/Gina. Call for info:
1-800-315-6957.
AUCTION
LARGE NATIVE AMERICAN
collection of prints, pictures,
plates and decorative items for
sale at in-doors Two-Ring Auc-
tion, Carpenter Auction Cen-
ter, Lake Benton, MN, Satur-
day, Nov. 10, 9:30 a.m. Pick-
ups, boat, firearms, antiques,
furniture, household, miscella-
neous. www.carpenterauc-
tion.com.
FOR SALE
AKC black and yellow lab pup-
pies, male and female, ready to
go Nov. 14, good hunting par-
ents, dew claws removed,
$250.00. Ringneck Roost, Gre-
gory. Ph: (605) 835-9629.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for
SALE (serious inquires only).
Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern,
central, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00.
Put the South Dakota
Statewide Classifieds Network
to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each addi-
tional word $5.) Call this news-
paper or 800-658-3697 for de-
tails.
OTR & DRIVER
OPPORTUNITY
DRIVERS: $1,000 SIGN-ON
BONUS. New Pay Program!
*Earn up to 50 cpm *Home
Weekly *2500+ miles, 95% no-
tarp. Must be Canadian eligi-
ble (888) 691-5705.
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health
ins., credit, 03¢ safety bonus,
Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.
com.
No one reads the ads?
yOU jUST DID!
We design this newspaper with news
and advertising to fit the reader’s eye.
The Pennington County Courant
your news and advertising source
for over 100 years.
Let us help you promote your product.
Thanks for taking the time to read our entire newspaper.
IT HAS BEEN SAID THAT…
THANK YOUS
The Quinn Volunteer Fire De-
partment would like to thank
everyone for the support and
donations during our pancake
supper.
We would like to thank all
our friends and family who
sent cards, called, celebrated
with us and entertained at our
25th anniversary. A very
heartfelt thank you to those
who helped pull off this great
party and to our kids, Pastor
Ron and Tami Burtz for mak-
ing our vow renewal so spe-
cial.
We love you all.
Mitch & DeAnna Kammerer
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRO/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
FOR
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Four (4) Used 2011 or newer four door
sedan passenger vehicles and two (2)
Used 2011 or newer passenger vans for
which the County will offer for trade the
following vehicles:
Trade in Vehicles:
2001 Chrysler Town & Country Mini Van
2002 Ford Taurus
2005 Chevrolet Impala
2007 Ford Crown Victoria
2006 Dodge Caravan
2008 ford Crown Victoria
To be furnished to
County of Pennington
Rapid City, South Dakota
Sealed bids will be received by the Pen-
nington County Sheriff’s Office on behalf
of the Board of Commissioners for the
above referenced items at the Sheriff’s
Office in the Public Safety Building at 300
Kansas City Street, Suite 100, Rapid City,
SD 57701 until 12:00 pm November 19,
2012. Bidders to guarantee delivery of
vehicles within 30 days of the bid accept-
ance on November 20, 2012.
Bids will be passed upon by the Board of
Commissioners at their meeting on No-
vember 20, 2012 in the Commissioner’s
Meeting Room in the Pennington County
Courthouse.
Copies of the specifications are on file at
the Sheriff’s Office, 300 Kansas City
Street, Rapid City, SD 57701. Please
contact Captain Corey Brubakken at
(605)394-6113 to arrange inspection of
trade-in vehicles.
By virtue of statutory authority, preference
will be given to materials, products and
supplies found or produced within the
State of South Dakota.
The Board of Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities therein and re-
serves the right to award the contract to
the lowest responsible bidder as they so
determine.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published November 8, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $21.29.
NOTICE OF AUDIT
OF THE FISCAL AFFAIRS OF THE
CITY OF WALL
Notice is hereby given that the records
and books of account of the City of Wall,
South Dakota, have been audited by
Casey Peterson & Associates, Ltd., Cer-
tified Public Accountants of Rapid City,
South Dakota, for the year ended Decem-
ber 31, 2011. A detailed report thereon is
filed with the City of Wall and the Depart-
ment of Legislative Audit in Pierre, South
Dakota, for public inspection.
The following findings and recommenda-
tions referred to in the report are hereby
listed in accordance with the provisions of
SDCL 4-11-12.
CURRENT AUDIT FINDINGS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS
Finding:
Internal controls are designed to safe-
guard assets and prevent or detect losses
from employee dishonesty or error. The
City has a general lack of segregation of
duties, which is a fundamental concept in
a good system of internal controls. Al-
though the number of employees may
limit the ability to separate specific func-
tions, proper monitoring of reconciliations
and other activities is critical in a small or-
ganization.
We specifically noted a lack of review and
approval of reconciliations related to gen-
eral journal entries, capital assets, pre-
paid expenses, capital credit receivable,
long-term debt, and accounts receivable
(and related allowance and deferred rev-
enue accounts). Although the City has im-
plemented procedures to involve the
Chamber of Commerce Director in the
cash receipts process, the finance office
will also collect cash at times. The finance
officer is also responsible for reconciling
bank accounts and other conflicting re-
sponsibilities. This finding has been re-
ported in the three previous audits.
Recommendation:
Management of the City should con-
stantly be aware of this condition and re-
alize that the concentration of duties and
responsibilities in a limited number of in-
dividuals is not desirable from a control
perspective. Under these conditions, the
most effective controls lie in manage-
ment’s knowledge of matters relating to
the operations of the City. We specifically
recommend all reconciliations and sub-
sidiary ledgers related to capital assets,
investments, long-term debt, receivables
and the related deferred revenue and
other significant balance sheet accounts
be reviewed by someone other than the
person primarily responsible for perform-
ing the reconciliations or maintaining the
subsidiary ledger to ensure accuracy and
agreement with the general ledger. The
review should be documented by initialing
the reconciliations and/or other support-
ing documentation. In addition, whenever
possible, the individual responsible for
posting cash receipts and reconciling
cash accounts should refrain from han-
dling cash. Segregating duties may be
accomplished by hiring an additional part-
time employee to perform the reconcilia-
tions and posting cash receipts, which
may be reviewed and approved by the
City Finance Officer. If the City does not
have adequate staff resources, or an in-
dividual internally that possesses the
proper accounting knowledge, we recom-
mend that the City engage a third party to
perform annual surprise audits related to
the cycles described above.
Management’s Response:
Management agrees with the finding and
related recommendations. The City has
begun having the chamber director main-
tain a mail log of cash receipts and com-
paring the mail log to the deposit slip pre-
pared by the City Finance Officer and the
deposit receipt from the bank. The Mayor
reviews the bank reconciliation which in-
cludes the money receipts, the money
transfers from the money market account
to the checking account and the journal
entries made in the money market ac-
counts. He also reviews any adjustments
made in the utility billing and any journal
entries made to correct errors to fund ac-
counts. All documents are initialed by the
person reviewing them.
Finding:
As auditors, we were requested to draft
the financial statements and accompany-
ing notes to the financial statements. Es-
tablishing internal controls over the
preparation of the financial statements,
and drafting the financial statements is
the responsibility of management. This
finding has been reported in the three
previous audits.
Recommendation:
It is the responsibility of management and
those charged with governance to make
the decision whether to accept the degree
of risk associated with this condition be-
cause of cost or other considerations. If
management is unwilling to accept risks
associated with this condition, we recom-
mend that management develop a sys-
tem of internal controls to ensure proper
reporting of the financial statements and
notes to the financial statements. Training
should also be provided to the individual
responsible for the accounting function to
help prevent or reduce the likelihood of
accounting errors. Management could
also engage a separate accounting firm
to assist in the preparation of the annual
financial statements.
Management’s Response:
Management will continue to work on de-
veloping a system of internal controls to
ensure proper reporting of the financial
statements. Management believes be-
cause there is a single person that is re-
sponsible for all the duties in the office
more time is needed to achieve this goal.
Finding:
During our review of statutory compliance
we noted that the City over-expended the
budgeted appropriations for the Public
Works Department in the General Fund.
According to SDCL 9-21-9, expenditures
are limited to the amount appropriated for
such purposes in the annual appropria-
tion ordinance.
Recommendation:
We recommend that the City continue to
evaluate compliance with the budget prior
to year-end and make budget amend-
ments considered necessary, as done in
prior years. City Council should continue
to review budget to actual reports each
month to determine if supplemental ap-
propriations are necessary. Year-end ac-
crual adjustments should be taken into
consideration when City Council reviews
the budget reports in December of each
year.
Management’s Response:
The City will keep more money in the
budget for a cushion for this purpose
and/or to restrict any spending unless it is
an emergency after the 15th of December
to try and alleviate the problem.
Finding:
During our review of expenditures, we
noted improprieties within the cash dis-
bursement cycle that were in noncompli-
ance with state statutes and City policy.
According to SDCL 9-23-1, itemized in-
voices are required to accompany a
voucher of payment and filed in the office
of the municipal finance officer. Accord-
ingly, the City implements the use of pur-
chase orders prior to payment for goods
and services. We noted instances of
missing invoices that were not properly
filed. Additionally, several purchase or-
ders were not properly completed prior to
payment when required by City policy.
Recommendation:
We recommend that the City continue to
monitor departmental expenditures and
communicate the importance of statutory
compliance and City policy to responsible
officials.
Management’s Response:
The City will keep more money in the
budget for a cushion for this purpose
and/or to restrict any spending unless it is
an emergency after the 15th of December
to try and alleviate the problem.
Martin L. Guindon, CPA
Auditor General
Department of Legislative Audit
Published November 1 & 8, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $150.75.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Pennington County Planning Commission
and the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners will hold a public hearing
to consider the following proposed ordi-
nance amendment to the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance adopted as an
adjunct to the Pennington County Com-
prehensive Plan:
OA 12-05 – Amendment to Section 400.3-
1-n-3(b), 6, and 10; Section 500.5-1-a-3-
a; and Section 500.5 - Table 1 of the Pen-
nington County Subdivision Regulations.
Said hearing will be held by the Planning
Commission on Monday, November 26,
2012, at 9:00 a.m. and the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners on
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 10:30
a.m. in the Commissioners’ Meeting
Room at the Pennington County Court-
house, Rapid City, South Dakota. Any in-
terested party may appear and be heard.
Copies of the proposed amendments
may be viewed at the Planning Depart-
ment located at 315 St. Joseph Street,
Suite 118, Rapid City, South Dakota, dur-
ing regular business hours.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published November 8, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $18.43.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
John Majchrzak has applied to amend the
existing Planned Unit Development for
High Country Guest Ranch located on
Tract A less High Country Ranch Subdi-
vision and less Right-of-Way, Ray Smith
Placer MS 995, Section 15, T1S, R4E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota,
12138 Ray Smith Drive, in accordance
with Section 213 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Nina McBride has applied for a Rezone
to rezone 3.046 acres from General Agri-
culture District to Low Density Residential
District located on the following metes
and bounds: A parcel of land located in
NE1/4 of SE1/4 of Section 15, T2N, R6E,
BHM and in Lot B of SE1/4 of SE1/4 of
Section 15, T2N, R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, said parcel of land
is described as follows: Beginning at NE
corner of said parcel from whence the
E1/4 corner of said Section 15 bears N
13°13’34” E a distance of 1188.44’;
thence S 24°15’00” E a distance of
79.85’; thence S 8°22’00” E a distance of
199.97’; thence along the arc of a curve
to the left whose angle is 22°20’44” and
whose radius is 418.80’ a distance of
163.33’; thence S 72°34’26” W a distance
of 374.19’; thence N 6°00’00” W a dis-
tance of 254.55’; thence N 73°03’00” E a
distance of 505.00’ to the Point of Begin-
ning. Said parcel of land contains 3.046
acres more or less, located at 10000
Nemo Road, in accordance with Sections
207 and 508 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
20th day of November 2012. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published November 8, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $26.05.
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTION: How should I respond
to my spouse’s verbal and emotional
abuse? This has been a problem for the
greater part of our marriage. I have
never been physically harmed in any
way, but the constant put-downs and
mind games have made my life miser-
able. Some of my friends say I should
pursue a divorce, but others have sug-
gested that I don’t have biblical
grounds. A few folks in this second
group have even told me that my only
concern is to “submit” and continue lov-
ing my spouse in spite of the mistreat-
ment. What do you think I should I do?
ANSWER: There are two things you
need to understand about your situa-
tion. First, it’s more common than you
may suspect. There’s a surprising
amount of emotional and verbal abuse
going on behind closed doors, even in
Christian marriages. This suggests: 1)
that you’re not alone; and 2) that many
people have devoted a great deal of
time, thought, and energy to coming up
with solutions. Among them are some of
our most gifted and highly qualified
marriage therapists and counselors. In
other words, answers are available if
you’ll take the time and trouble to look
for them.
The second point is this: the state of
affairs you’ve described isn’t good for ei-
ther of you—not you or your spouse. It’s
harmful and destructive to everyone
concerned. That includes any children
who may be part of the picture. This
means that something must be done to
change it as quickly as possible. We can
almost guarantee that the change won’t
come about as a result of adopting a
“submissive” attitude toward abuse.
In connection with this last thought,
we’ve observed that there are generally
two kinds of people who advise “submis-
sion” in cases like this: 1) a few male
pastors, counselors, and friends who
take a simplistic view of passages like
Ephesians 5:22-33 and Colossians 3:18-
25; and 2) abusive husbands. Our re-
sponse, especially to the latter group, is
that it isn’t up to a man to see to it that
his wife “submits.” The apostle has
given tasks to each partner in the rela-
tionship. Each partner is responsible
only for his or her own assignment. To
put it bluntly, men need to forget about
“submission.” Their job is to learn what
it means to love their spouses “as Christ
loved the church.”
So much for theology. Let’s move on
to something more practical. What can
you do to take your marriage in a more
positive direction? We suggest you begin
by investigating your options. All too
often people in your position assume
that they have only two alternatives: to
stay put and suffer, or file for divorce.
This isn’t necessarily true. As a matter
of fact, there may be a number of other
ways to break the negative cycle.
You can find out more by setting up
an appointment with a Christian mar-
riage and family counselor. Naturally, it
would be ideal if your spouse agreed to
join you. You should definitely urge him
to do so if at all possible. But if you en-
counter opposition, don’t hesitate to
keep the appointment alone. If the
thought of professional counseling is too
overwhelming, consider talking to a
pastor or a good friend. You might also
get a neighbor to take you to a commu-
nity center where there are people
trained to deal with domestic abuse is-
sues. The idea is to find out what you
can do, not what you can’t do, and to act
accordingly.
In the meantime, you may want to
have a conversation with an attorney—
not to talk about divorce, but simply to
gather information about your options.
Among other things, find out what’s in-
volved in arranging a legal separation.
In many cases, a temporary separation
is exactly what’s needed in a situation
like yours. Marriages get stuck in
deadly ruts when spouses become blind
to the hurtful nature of their words and
actions. If separation is what it takes to
open your husband’s eyes and stimulate
some self-examination on his part, then
so be it. An abuser can sometimes be
persuaded to make a change if his part-
ner has the courage to bring about a cri-
sis in the relationship—in other words,
to say, “I’ve had enough.”
Before closing, perhaps it would be
helpful to say a few words about the un-
derlying causes of abuse and list some
of the identifying marks of genuinely
“abusive” speech and behavior. Domes-
tic abuse is almost always a technique
for gaining and maintaining control. An
emotional abuser keeps others under
his thumb by blaming and shaming. He
uses name-calling, swearing, and other
forms of contemptuous speech to con-
vince his partner that she is unworthy
of better treatment. In most cases he is
highly manipulative, displays narcissis-
tic tendencies, and flatly refuses to ac-
knowledge any personal responsibility
for difficulties in the marriage. If any of
this sounds familiar, you are more than
justified in taking whatever steps are
necessary to reverse the situation. A
good counselor can help you recognize to
what extent you may have become
brainwashed by your spouse’s behavior
and thus lulled into a state of resigna-
tion and silent acceptance of your lot.
QUESTION: I just lost my job, and
without my income I can't see how my
spouse and I are going to make ends
meet. How am I going to break this ter-
rible news? What will we do if I can't
find another job? Can you help us
weather this storm?
ANSWER: It's important to begin by
looking at the implications of your situ-
ation squarely in the face. Don't be
blindsided or caught off-guard — under-
stand that unemployment will impact
your emotional and mental well-being
in a very real way. It can also be a for-
midable challenge to the health of your
marriage. If you realize this, you'll know
where the stress is coming from, and
you'll be less likely to take out your frus-
trations on your spouse or other mem-
bers of the family.
There are good reasons for the stress,
of course. Job loss can be a serious blow
to an individual's sense of identity. This
is especially true for husbands, since
many men define themselves in terms
of their work. That's not to mention
that, in some cases, their earnings are
the family's primary source of income
(even when this isn't true, a man still
tends to perceive his own worth in
terms of his ability to function as a
breadwinner). Without that income,
running out of money becomes a very
real possibility, since many couples
haven't saved enough to get them
through a prolonged period of unem-
ployment. All this weighs heavily on
both partners, especially the one who
feels most responsible to "bring home
the bacon."
So what should you do when unem-
ployment hits your household and rat-
tles your marriage? We have several
suggestions.
First, if you've been providing for
your family but have lost your job, do
everything you can to jump right back
into the job market. Don't wait and
don't delay. Try to find a position you
can get enthused about, but if that's not
available take anything that will pro-
vide your family with a living wage. You
can work on longer-term career goals on
the side.
Second, though moving away from
your support system may sound scary,
don't rule out the possibility of relocat-
ing. Here again, the principle is to be
humble, diligent and disciplined enough
to take whatever you can get until
something better presents itself. If you
have to move, you can look at it as a
fresh start and as an opportunity for the
two of you to nurture your couple rela-
tionship away from the demands of fam-
ily and friends.
Third, be flexible about the "bread-
winner" role. Sometimes a wife may
have greater earning potential than her
husband — this is just a fact of the
world we live in. If she's taken a part-
time job in order to care for her children,
that arrangement may need to be re-
evaluated. At least for the time being,
dad may need to be willing to play "Mr.
Mom" while his wife takes on the task
of supporting the family in a full-time
position.
Fourth, look for ways to cut expenses.
Identify habits that can be changed and
plans and activities that can be put on
hold. Do without restaurant lunches.
Avoid buying new clothes for six
months. Turn down the heat and wear
more sweaters. Shop at thrift stores or
yard sales.
In all of this, take pains to maintain
your marriage and keep your relation-
ship on a sound footing. Go out of your
way to have fun and keep things light
as much as possible - it's crucial to keep
up your morale while waiting for cir-
cumstances to improve. If your spouse
loses his or her job, avoid the tempta-
tion to ask a million questions or deliver
a lecture about family responsibility.
Support your mate in this crisis by help-
ing with the job search and expressing
your willingness to cut costs. A cheerful,
positive attitude will go a long way in a
situation like this.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE. YEARLINGS: 10 A.M. CALVES: 1 P.M.
(MT}. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING ?S00 HEAD
YEARLINGS:
STEVE NELSONJLA2Y 3 LIVESTOCK - CONSCINMENT OF 3300 HEAD
OF YFLCS
-2400 DLK SPAY HFFS
-680 FED ANC & CHAF X SPAY HFFS
-220 DLK, FED, & CHAF X STFS...............................................800-950=
SHEARER - 30 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS.....................................750-850=
SIMONS - 25 DLK STFS ................................................................800-900=
LONG - 20 DLK SPAY HFFS .............................................................7-750=
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE
ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
SANDERS RANCH - 550 DLK & CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI,AN..............500-600=
ROBERTSON & ROBERTSON - 450 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI.......475-575=
R. PORCH & S. PORCH - 350 DLK CLVS; FS ................................400-525=
GUPTILL - 325 DLK CLVS; FS.......................................................550-650=
M. JONES & SONS - 220 DLK & FED STFS FS, NI........................450-550=
KNECHT - 160 DLK CLVS; FS .......................................................450-550=
LONG - 150 DLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................400-500=
ENDERS - 125 DLK CLVS; FS........................................................500-600=
SHEARER - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI.................................................450-550=
LANTIS - 120 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .........................................400-500=
HOWIE - 110 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI, WEANED .........................500-600=
CAPP RANCH - 100 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI,AN..........................350-450=
TAYLOR - 100 DLK STFS; FS........................................................500-600=
GARTNER & GARTNER - 100 DLK ANC STFS; FS,NI,AN .....................575=
STOVER - 80 DLK STFS; FS,NI ............................................................550=
PRICE - 80 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,WEANED.........................................550-600=
BRUNSON - 75 DLK CLVS; FS,NI..........................................................550=
BAKER - 75 DLK CLVS; FS,ASV ....................................................500-575=
CARLSON - 70 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................500-550=
MAILLOUX - 70 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-600=
SAMPSON - 70 DLK CLVS; FS,NI...................................................400-550=
SINKEY - 70 DLK CLVS; FS, NI .....................................................500-550=
RICHARDS - 60 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI......................................550-600=
SIELER & SIELER - 60 DLK STFS; FS,NI ......................................450-500=
BERRY - 50 FED & DLK AND STFS; FS,NI ...........................................600=
CARROLL - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................475-575=
HALEY - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................400-500=
EISENBRAUN - 45 DLK STFS; FS..................................................500-600=
WEISER - 40 DLK STFS; FS,AN............................................................600=
ADDISON - 40 DLK CLVS; FS,NI....................................................500-550=
PATTERSON - 35 DLK STFS; FS,NI...............................................500-550=
ELSHERE - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................500=
SMITH - 30 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS, NI ...........................................550-600=
ANDERSON - 25 FED X CLVS; FS.................................................500-575=
IRELAND - 25 DLK CLVS; FS, NI ..........................................................550=
WOODFORD - 20 DLK CLVS; NI ....................................................550-600=
ELLENS - 14 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................500-550=
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
PAULSEN - 12 HEFF STFS; FS,NI .................................................400-550=
MERCHEN - 7 DLK CLVS; FS ...............................................................500=
CROWSER - 7 DLK & FED HFFS; FS,NI,WEANED................................400=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT tDS-
SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE. SALE
TIME 10:00 A.M. (MT)
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-
WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11. SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2. NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATE:
NOVEMBER 14.
CATTL£ R£PORT -
SATURDAY, NOV£MB£R S, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run ]or our onnuo1 November s1ooK
oou ond bred Þe1]er so1e. TÞere uos o b1g oroud
on Þond ond oo11ve b1dd1ng 1ÞrougÞou1 1Þe so1e.
BRED CATTLE:
JON & BREE2Y MILLAR - NEWELL
21 ...................................DLK ANC PUFE DFED AI'D HFFS
(2-15 FOF 3 DAYS}.......................................................... 1015= .........$2,000.00
39..........................................DLK ANC PUFE DFED HFFS
(2-15 FOF 3 DAYS}.......................................................... 1015= .........$1,850.00
37..........................................DLK ANC PUFE DFED HFFS
(3-1 FOF 20 DAYS}.......................................................... 1059= .........$1,650.00
DON RAVELLETTE - PHILIP
7 ...................................................................DLK HFFS 1066= .........$1,950.00
KENNY MATT - ELM SPRINGS
53.................................................................DWF HFFS 1018= .........$1,650.00
11.................................................................DWF HFFS 983= ...........$1,600.00
29.................................................................DWF HFFS 996= ...........$1,610.00
31.................................................................DWF HFFS 1004= .........$1,560.00
DAVE & TANYA BERRY - MILESVILLE
11 ..........................................................FED AI'D HFFS 999= ...........$1,635.00
6...................................................................FED HFFS 948= ...........$1,485.00
RISSE UV RANCH - MARTIN
21............................................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1192= .........$1,650.00
5..............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1305= .........$1,525.00
LARRY SMITH - PHILIP
101 .............................DLK COMINC 3 TO 4 YF OLD COWS 1186= .........$1,610.00
61 ...............................DLK COMINC 3 TO 4 YF OLD COWS 1024= .........$1,620.00
100 .............................DLK COMINC 5 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1324= .........$1,510.00
21 ...............................DLK COMINC 5 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1285= .........$1,525.00
30...........................................................DLK AI'D HFFS 971= ...........$1,500.00
39...........................................................DLK AI'D HFFS 974= ...........$1,425.00
50..................................................................DLK HFFS 973= ...........$1,420.00
63.............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1387= .........$1,410.00
23..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1390= .........$1,050.00
LARRY GABRIEL - QUINN
32........................................DLK COMINC 4 YF OLD COWS 1166= .........$1,550.00
13 .....................................DWF COMINC 4 YF OLD COWS 1159= .........$1,525.00
12 .....................................DWF COMINC 4 YF OLD COWS 1145= .........$1,500.00
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
53..................................................................DLK HFFS 1009= .........$1,485.00
49..................................................................DLK HFFS 998= ...........$1,460.00
GARTNER & KJERSTAD - INTERIOR
28........................................DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS 1001= .........$1,480.00
MARVIN COLEMAN - QUINN
72........................................DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS 1066= .........$1,480.00
TIM NELSON - MIDLAND
56 .................................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1014= .........$1,470.00
NICK CASPERS - NEW UNDERWOOD
24..................................................................DLK HFFS 909= ...........$1,435.00
PETE REINERT - HOWES
24 ...................................................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 944= ...........$1,430.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
9 ...................................................................DLK HFFS 883= ...........$1,425.00
8 ...................................................................DLK HFFS 948= ...........$1,410.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE - QUINN
21............................................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1319= .........$1,410.00
60............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1326= .........$1,400.00
25............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1318= .........$1,390.00
37.............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1369= .........$1,260.00
MARLIN & LINDA BRINK - UNION CENTER
19..................................................................DLK HFFS 931= ...........$1,400.00
MORTENSON CATTLE - HAYES
50.......................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1058= .........$1,370.00
17.......................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1005= .........$1,325.00
28.......................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1016= .........$1,300.00
JOE CARLEY - PHILIP
30........................................DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS 987= ...........$1,370.00
14 .............................DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1276= ............$935.00
CAPUTA LAND & CATTLE - CAPUTA
19 ...............................................DLK 3-4 YF OLD COWS 1052= .........$1,350.00
4 .................................................DLK 5-6 YF OLD COWS 1301= .........$1,250.00
LEONARD WOOD - PRINGLE
13 .................................................................FED HFFS 901= ...........$1,335.00
18............................................FED 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1033= .........$1,380.00
11 .................................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1040= .........$1,325.00
11 .................................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1182= .........$1,300.00
15...................................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1203= .........$1,235.00
JOHN MCGRIFF - QUINN
25.................................................................DWF HFFS 930= ...........$1,310.00
39..................................................................DLK HFFS 918= ...........$1,285.00
88..................................................................DLK HFFS 894= ...........$1,260.00
35..................................................................DLK HFFS 864= ...........$1,175.00
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
5.........................................................DLK & DWF HFFS 912= ...........$1,235.00
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
18..................................................FED 8 YF OLD COWS 1396= .........$1,275.00
6 ...........................................FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1424= ............$990.00
6 ..............................................FED SOLID MOUTH COWS 1393= ............$940.50
ALAN RISLOV - PHILIP
47...................................DLK & DWF SOLD MOUTH COWS 1317= .........$1,235.00
WILLIAM DAVEY - RAPID CITY
6 .................................................DLK 3-4 YF OLD COWS 963= ...........$1,235.00
2.......................................DLK & DWF 5-6 YF OLD COWS 1100= .........$1,200.00
1 ................................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COW 1115= .........$1,100.00
2 ....................................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1218= .........$1,000.00
LEE BALDWIN - ELM SPRINGS
31.............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1455= .........$1,225.00
19..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1414= ............$960.00
DAVE JENNINGS - OELRICHS
3 ...................................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1188= .........$1,210.00
2..............................................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1358= .........$1,150.00
7...............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1368= ............$975.00
5............................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1405= ............$960.00
BILL GOTTSLEBEN - PHILIP
13 ...............................................DLK 3-4 YF OLD COWS 1030= .........$1,200.00
B LA2Y T RANCH - HOT SPRINGS
6 ....................................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1372= .........$1,000.00
3.................................................FED 3-4 YF OLD COWS 1045= .........$1,235.00
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
10..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1422= ............$985.00
GALE BRUNS - NEW UNDERWOOD
8............................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1369= ............$975.00
JOHN & PAULINE STABEN - ORAL
13...................FED & DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1382= ............$960.00
JAMES WILSEY - OWANKA
19 ...............................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1362= ............$960.00
4...............................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1398= ............$975.00
DAN & SUSAN TAFT - NORRIS
31................................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1352= ............$950.00
12................................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1186= ............$950.00
KELLY RIGGINS - PHILIP
17..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1392= ............$950.00
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
30..........................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1229= ............$875.00
8..................................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1451= ............$950.00
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT -
TU£SDAY, NOV. t, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run o] oo1ves ond o
reo1 b1g oroud o] bugers. MorKe1
uos good. Reo1 b1g so1e Þere Tues-
dog u11Þ SDDD Þeod oo1ves ond
geor11ngs.
FEEDER CATTLE:
MATT, STANLEY & COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
119 .................................DLK STFS 548= ....$176.00
95 ...................................DLK STFS 617= ....$164.00
TRIPLE T ENTERPRISES - NEWCASTLE, WY
96 ...................................DLK STFS 597= ....$166.00
39 ...................................DLK STFS 509= ....$172.50
30...................................DLK HFFS 501= ....$154.00
MILES WHEELER - PHILIP
46.........................DLK & DWF STFS 538= ....$170.25
13 ...................................DLK STFS 455= ....$173.50
38 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 478= ....$153.25
SHARON HERRON - UNION CENTER
105.......................DLK & DWF STFS 514= ....$170.00
33.........................DLK & DWF STFS 391= ....$185.25
108 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 484= ....$154.25
41 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 403= ....$167.50
JOE WISHARD - LANTRY
102.......................DLK & DWF STFS 500= ....$170.00
58.........................DLK & DWF STFS 414= ....$189.50
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 334= ....$192.25
40....................................DWF HFF 494= ....$156.50
47 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 374= ....$167.00
BCR INC - HERMOSA
109.......................DLK & DWF STFS 516= ....$172.00
62.........................DLK & DWF STFS 418= ....$185.00
24 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 432= ....$163.00
RICK JOHNSTON - UNION CENTER
97 ...................................DLK STFS 446= ....$186.25
21 ...................................DLK STFS 365= ....$206.50
86...................................DLK HFFS 425= ....$165.00
24...................................DLK HFFS 351= ....$175.00
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
127.......................DLK & DWF STFS 489= ....$175.75
104.......................DLK & DWF STFS 559= ....$168.00
31.........................DLK & DWF STFS 400= ....$198.00
99 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 524= ....$155.00
38 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 390= ....$167.00
KELLY BLAIR - MILESVILLE
91.........................DLK & DWF STFS 606= ....$163.75
18 ...................................DLK STFS 517= ....$171.50
94 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 570= ....$147.00
19...................................DLK HFFS 456= ....$155.50
TRAVIS & TATE THOMPSON - WANBLEE
115.......................DLK & DWF STFS 535= ....$168.25
92.........................DLK & DWF STFS 458= ....$185.50
107 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 464= ....$161.25
30 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 395= ....$164.00
DENNIS HULM - MEADOW
79 .................................CHAF STFS 750= ....$149.75
31 .................................CHAF STFS 662= ....$150.00
79.................................CHAF HFFS 723= ....$142.75
31.................................CHAF HFFS 647= ....$136.25
220 ...HEAD OF STEEFS & HEIFEFS AVC ....$1037.75/HD
JIM EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
98.........................DLK & DWF STFS 579= ....$166.50
41 ...................................DLK STFS 501= ....$174.00
113 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 531= ....$154.00
36 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 457= ....$154.50
PHILIPSEN & STOVER - NEW UNDERWOOD
95.........................DLK & DWF STFS 576= ....$165.00
42.........................DLK & DWF STFS 464= ....$174.75
11 .................................CHAF STFS 597= ....$156.00
45...................................DLK HFFS 574= ....$142.50
18...................................DLK HFFS 476= ....$146.00
TROY & DAWN RICHTER - QUINN
102 ...............................CHAF STFS 564= ....$167.00
31 .................................CHAF STFS 451= ....$180.75
105...............................CHAF HFFS 544= ....$150.75
30.................................CHAF HFFS 468= ....$153.00
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
105 .............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 592= ....$164.25
19 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 518= ....$170.50
27...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 512= ....$153.00
10.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 463= ....$150.00
DAYCO LTD INC - SCENIC
43 ...................................DLK STFS 529= ....$167.50
22 ...................................DLK STFS 437= ....$176.50
17 ...................................DLK STFS 333= ....$196.00
28...................................DLK HFFS 418= ....$163.50
ROGER LARSON FAMILY - MURDO
80.........................DLK & DWF STFS 554= ....$167.00
18 ...................................DLK STFS 438= ....$189.00
KEITH SMITH - MILESVILLE
42.........................FED & DLK STFS 524= ....$167.00
30.........................FED & DLK STFS 440= ....$178.00
25 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 474= ....$144.00
15 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 404= ....$166.00
JAY VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
26.........................DLK & DWF STFS 533= ....$166.00
52.........................DLK & DWF STFS 435= ....$185.00
37 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 469= ....$159.00
15 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 384= ....$156.00
SCOTT EDOFF - HERMOSA
97.........................DLK & DWF STFS 525= ....$166.00
53.........................DLK & DWF STFS 435= ....$188.00
94 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 482= ....$154.00
31 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 408= ....$155.00
GORDON & KURT FLESNER - MILESVILLE
60.........................DLK & DWF STFS 547= ....$165.00
27 ...................................DLK STFS 447= ....$177.75
55...................................DLK HFFS 497= ....$156.00
14...................................DLK HFFS 394= ....$164.00
ROCKY WILLIAMS - PHILIP
66 ...................................DLK STFS 473= ....$176.50
20 ...................................DLK STFS 397= ....$193.50
50...................................DLK HFFS 460= ....$159.50
15...................................DLK HFFS 397= ....$163.00
WAYNE MICKELSON - WHITE OWL
34.........................FED & DLK STFS 500= ....$170.00
18.........................FED & DLK STFS 411= ....$174.00
32 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 451= ....$150.00
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
14 ...................................DLK STFS 537= ....$165.00
16...................................DLK HFFS 493= ....$153.00
GEORGE GITTINGS - PHILIP
24.........................DLK & DWF STFS 537= ....$164.00
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 423= ....$180.75
8 .....................................DLK STFS 367= ....$190.00
7 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 364= ....$164.50
DALE SAWVELL - QUINN
33 ...................................DLK STFS 543= ....$164.25
37...................................DLK HFFS 508= ....$146.50
BLOOM RANCH LLC - RAPID CITY
47 .................................CHAF STFS 498= ....$170.00
10 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 384= ....$185.00
42.................................CHAF HFFS 492= ....$147.00
14.................................CHAF HFFS 414= ....$160.00
CHASE STRAND - TUTHILL
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 507= ....$169.50
20.........................DLK & DWF STFS 406= ....$179.00
8.....................................DLK HFFS 459= ....$152.00
TK SAMPSON - INTERIOR
29 ...................................DLK STFS 470= ....$173.00
66...................................DLK HFFS 466= ....$155.50
KELVIN POPPEN - RAPID CITY
10 ...................................DLK STFS 491= ....$166.00
GEORGE PAUL MICHAEL - WALL
16 ...................................DLK STFS 527= ....$165.00
DOUG HAUK - PHILIP
9 .....................................DLK STFS 566= ....$160.00
9.....................................DLK HFFS 534= ....$142.50
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
64.........................FED & DLK STFS 597= ....$159.25
28.........................FED & DLK STFS 510= ....$169.00
20...................................DLK HFFS 559= ....$143.50
HOWIE & PAULTON - NEW UNDERWOOD
55.........................DLK & DWF STFS 457= ....$166.75
15 ...................................DLK STFS 350= ....$184.50
39...................................DLK HFFS 446= ....$152.00
27...................................DLK HFFS 355= ....$162.00
BROKEN BRIDGE LIVESTOCK - STURGIS
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 364= ....$189.00
19 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 331= ....$190.50
9.................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 442= ....$135.00
24...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 305= ....$165.00
R&G SMITH RANCH LLC - PHILIP
42 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 586= ....$159.75
15 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 500= ....$170.50
50.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 560= ....$143.00
18.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 463= ....$151.00
KURT KETELSEN - BOX ELDER
57 ...................................DLK STFS 588= ....$157.50
52 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 565= ....$143.50
STEVE DODSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
33 ...................................DLK STFS 502= ....$157.50
31...................................DLK HFFS 515= ....$137.50
C & J RANCH - NORRIS
35 ...................................DLK STFS 611= ....$151.50
29...................................DLK HFFS 584= ....$138.25
TOM COOLAHAN - HERMOSA
17 ...................................DLK STFS 641= ....$150.25
15 ...................................DLK STFS 560= ....$161.50
KELLY FEES - PHILIP
29.........................DLK & DWF STFS 626= ....$147.50
24 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 602= ....$139.50
JERAMY WARD - MARTIN
3 .........................CHAF & DLK STFS 662= ....$136.00
7...........................DLK & DWF STFS 421= ....$177.50
8 .....................................DLK STFS 325= ....$190.00
Pennington County Courant • November 8, 2012 • Page 10
Email your social
news, obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements to:
annc@gwtc.net
Feeding wild birds is one of the
most popular outdoor activities in
the U.S., with widespread and
evenly-distributed fans among all
age groups. Nearly 45% of South
Dakotans watch wildlife around
their homes, which can include
feeding, observing, and photo-
graphing wildlife. You don’t need a
license or any special skills to enjoy
feeding or watching wildlife – just
an interest and a commitment to
doing it right.
If you choose to partake in this
fun and fulfilling activity, keep a
few things in mind. Place feeders
where you can watch, enjoy, and
photograph feeding visitors. If
bothered by squirrels at feeders,
place your feeder on a pole away
from trees. Place feeders near cover
to protect feeding birds from
weather and predators, such as
free-roaming cats. Move feeders if
you notice birds striking windows.
Some birds, such as sparrows, jun-
cos, doves, and pheasants, feed on
the ground or on a flat platform.
Offer several feeding sites to avoid
overcrowding and disease trans-
mission.
If you’re only offering one menu
item, black oil sunflower seed ap-
peals to many birds. Ground-feed-
ing birds may prefer corn, milo or
millet to sunflower seed. Pine
siskins, goldfinches and redpolls
prefer niger seed (also called finch
or thistle seed), which you can offer
in feeders designed for this seed.
Suet or peanut butter may attract
woodpeckers, chickadees,
nuthatches and brown creepers.
Offer year-round water by adding a
bird bath heater. Avoid offering
human “table scraps,” which may
attract rodents or raccoons.
Remember to keep feeders and
feeding areas clean by regularly
raking up seed hulls and cleaning
feeders by scrubbing with soapy
water and rinsing in water diluted
with a small amount of bleach.
Store seed in tight, waterproof con-
tainers to prevent mold and to dis-
courage rodents that may be at-
tracted to accessible seed. Once you
begin feeding, try to continue
through the winter, but don’t worry
about missing a few days, since
feeding birds typically visit other
feeding stations besides yours. If
you notice sick or diseased birds,
disinfect your feeders and stop
feeding for 10-14 days to avoid fur-
ther spreading diseases.
If you’re just beginning to learn
to identify birds at your feeders,
Game, Fish and Parks offers a free
publication that can help. Request
“Backyard Birds of South Dakota”
at this website: http://gfp.sd.gov/
wildlife/critters/birds/default.aspx
Project FeederWatch is a citizen
science project led by the Cornell
Lab of Ornithology. The project
helps track wintering bird patterns
and has provided extremely valu-
able information about diseases
that affect wild birds. To become a
FeederWatch citizen scientist, visit
this website to join in this winter’s
count: http://www.birds.cornell.edu
/pfw/.
Feed winter
birds and be a
citizen scientist
Grant hits a
bullseye in
South Dakota
The South Dakota Department
of Game, Fish & Parks says a
$6,000 grant has been awarded to
South Dakota for the purchase of
archery equipment.The grant is
provided by the Easton Foundation
and the National Archery in the
Schools organization. Equipment is
to be used in schools to implement
the National Archery in the Schools
Program (NASP) at their location.
“South Dakota Game, Fish &
Parks is excited to partner with
local schools and the archery indus-
try to provide archery equipment to
students in South Dakota,” said
Jason Kool, NASP coordinator for
South Dakota. “NASP provides a
great opportunity for our kids to
learn a shooting sport in a safe, se-
cure environment.”
Schools receiving grant money
include Hamlin County, Lower
Brule, Central High School and
Stevens High School in Rapid City,
and Williams Middle School in
Sturgis and Whitewood.
To become eligible for the equip-
ment, each school had staff attend
rigorous eight-hour safety and pro-
ficiency training. South Dakota
Game, Fish & Parks provides
training free of charge to all inter-
ested schools and individuals.

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