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Pennington Co. Courant, November 29, 2012

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Number 48
Volume 107
November 29, 2012
by Laurie Hindman
President Mary Williams of the
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of
Commerce called the November
19, meeting to order.
Minutes of the previous meeting
were approved.
Guest speaker for the meeting
was South Dakota High School
Rodeo Queen Elsie Fortune.
Williams informed the chamber
that Fortune who is a senior at
Wall High School drives 38 miles
one-way to school every day and
has competed in the high school
queen competion since she was a
freshmen.
Fortune presented her speech
that she gave at the national com-
petition. She then went on to say
that rodeo has a financial impact
on the Wall community by bring-
ing in tourist and rodeo partici-
pants.
Mike Huether made a motion to
approve Dawn Hilgenkamp,
Jackie Heathershaw and Donna
Curr to retain their seats on the
chamber. The motion was ap-
proved and passed.
Business Manager of the Wall
School Niki Mohr reported on the
upcoming holiday programs for the
school and Big White which will
be:
•Wall Elementary – December
10th at 7:00 p.m.
•Big White School – December
11th at 6:30 p.m., at Creighton
Hall.
•Middle School/High School on
December 17th at 7:00 p.m.
Mohr reminded everyone that
winter sports are beginning. She
also added that grades third -
eighth and the 11th grade will be
participating the Benchmark As-
sessment the first week in Decem-
ber. Wall School is one of the pilot
schools for assesments in South
Dakota.
Badlands National Park Super-
intendent Eric Brunnemann in-
formed members that last month
they held a Buffalo round-up. He
added the park can range 700 head
but due to not holding the round-
up for several years they had 1,200
Buffalo in the park. They culled
421 head. The Department of Inte-
rior was also present one afternoon
for the round-up. Brunnemann
noted that visitation is up 1.41
percent for the year.
Jenny Albrinck Acting Superin-
tendent of MinuteMan Missile Na-
tional Historic Site reported she is
continuing to work on the new vis-
itor center in Ruben Andrade’s ab-
sence. They are still busy giving
tours twice a day and are planning
to put up new exhibits at the visi-
tor center.
District Ranger Alan Anderson
of the Forest Service noted that
their visitation has been up for the
year. He also attended the Buffalo
Round-Up at the Badlands Na-
tional Park. The Forst Service has
laid off their seasonal employees
and due to the drought conditions
they may have to reduce the num-
ber of permits for grazing.
Jody Bielmaier with Golden
West Telecommunications an-
nounced they are offering holiday
specials and to stop by the Wall of-
fice and sign up for prizes.
Black Hills Frederal Credit
Union will be hosting an Open
House, December 14 noted Carol
Hoffman.
Brett Blasius with First Inter-
state Bank related the bank is also
hosting an Open House on Decem-
ber 14.
Blaius also noted that the Wall
The annual Fall Awards were
held on Tuesday, November 20 in
the Wall School Multi-purpose
room.
Music Director Andrea Chris-
tiansen, Coaches Dani Herring,
Karol Patterson and Kent Ander-
son presented the following award:
Music
•All-State Quartet: Analise
Garland, Austin Huether,
Michaela Schaefer and Ryder Wil-
son. They had a combined GPA of
3.87 to recieve the Academic Team
Award from SDHSAA.
•Four Year Honor Band
members: Analise Garland and
Libbi Sykora.
SDHSRA Queen Elsie Fortune speaks at
Wall Badlands Chamber of Commerce
Clinic has flu vaccine for those who
haven’t gotten their flu shots yet.
Hoffman gave the Country Cup-
board update. They handed out 39
Thanksgiving baskets and are
planning to do something different
for Christmas rather than the bas-
kets. They have 20 students who
are in the Back Pack program. She
also informed the chamber of the
upcoming Blue Bag program. Bags
will be handed out to homes on
Saturday, December 1 and picked
up on Saturday, December 8 be-
tween the hours of 9:00 a.m. -
10:00 a.m.
The Retail Committee will hold
their annual pancake supper on
Wednesday, December 12. They
are asking for volunteers to help
during the supper.
Chamber Director Lindsey
Hildebrand explained what the
Black Hills Business Council pur-
pose is. They are a group of differ-
ent committees who get together to
discuss government issues and
what is going on in our area.
Announcements for the chamber
are:
•December 2; Haakon County
Crooners will host a holiday con-
cert at the Wall Community Cen-
ter at 4:30 p.m.
•December 6, Wall City Council
meeting at the Wall Community
Center meeting room beginning at
6:30 p.m.
•December 11; Chamber holiday
mixer at the Days Inn meeting
room at 5:30 p.m.
•December 12; Pancake Supper
at the Wall Drug, 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.
•December 16; Celebration
Committee holiday event at the
Wall Community Center.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned.
Cross Country
•Most Valuable, All Confer-
ence, Letter, S.D. Cross Country
and Track and Field Coaches
Association eighth place honor:
Austin Huether.
•Captain, Running Eagle,
Letter, S.D. Academic All-State
award: Nathan Patterson.
•Most Improved, Letter: Alex
Tysdal.
Volleyball
•Rookie of the Year: Josie Bla-
sius.
•Defense Award: Tayah
Huether.
•Most Improved: Carlee John-
ston.
•Most Valuable Player: Au-
tumn Schulz.
•Western Great Plains Con-
ference Most Valuable Player:
Autumn Schulz.
•Western Great Plains All
Conference: Autumn Schulz.
•Western Great Plains All
Conference Honorable Men-
tion: Kaitlin Schreiber, Tayah
Huether and Bailey Lytle.
•Academic All State: Autumn
Schulz and Libbi Sykora.
Football
Seniors
•Letter winners: Taran Eisen-
braun, Trey Richter, Cody Harris,
Wall High School presents fall awards
Cross Country team. Pictured from left to right ... Austin Huether,
Nathan Patterson and Alex Tysdal.
All-State Quartet. Pictured from left to right ... Analise Garland,
Ryder Wilson, Michaela Schaefer and Austin Huether.
~Photos Laurie Hindman
Four year honor band. Pic-
tured from left to right ... Libbi
Sykora and Analise Garland.
Lane Hustead, Tyler Trask, Ryder
Wilson, Tyrel Clark, Laketon
McLaughlin and Thomas Van
Osdol.
Juniors
•Letter winners: Dusty Dartt,
Trevor Anderson, Les Williams,
Clancy Lytle, Lane Blasius, Ben
Linn, CJ Schulz, Cade Kjerstad,
Tyler Peterson, Ridge Sandal,
Tucker O’Rourke and Luke
Wilkins.
Sophomores
•Letter winner: Carson John-
ston
•Participant: Will Housman
Freshmen
•Letter winner: Gabe Sandal
•Participants: Candem
Sawvell, Rylee Schreiber, Riley
Fortune, Raedon Anderson and
Travis Brenner.
Eighth Grade
•Participants after Junior
High season: Cass Lytle and
Allan McDonnell.
Team Awards
Player of the Game
•White River game: Offense -
Laketon McLaughlin; Defense -
Taran Eisenbraun; Special Teams
- Carson Johnston.
•New Underwood game: Of-
fense - Tyler Trask; Defense - Car-
son Johnston; Special Teams -
Trevor Anderson.
•Kadoka game: Offense -
Clancy Lytle; Defense - Tyler
Trask; Special Teams - Trevor An-
derson.
•Stanley County game: Of-
fense - Tyler Trask; Defense - Lane
Blasius; Special Teams - Trevor
Anderson.
•Harding County game: Of-
fense - Tyler Trask; Defense - Lane
Blasius; Special Teams - Tyler
Trask.
•Jones County game: Offense -
Tyler Trask; Defense - Lane Bla-
sius; Special Teams - Trevor An-
derson.
•Philip game: Offense - Lane
Blasius; Defense - Tyler Peterson;
Special Teams - Trevor Anderson.
•Lyman County game: Offense
- Tyler Trask; Defense - Carson
Johnston; Special Teams - Trevor
Anderson.
Hit of the Week
•White River Tigers: Les
Williams.
•New Underwood Tigers:
Cade Kjerstad.
•Kadoka Kougars: Clancy
Lytle.
•Stanley County Buffaloes:
Lane Blasius.
•Harding County Ranchers:
Les Williams.
•Jones County Coyotes: Taran
Eisenbraun.
•Philip Scotties: Tyler Trask.
•Lyman County Raiders:
Lane Blasius.
•New Underwood Tigers:
Trevor Anderson.
•Canistota Hawks: Tyler Pe-
terson.
Eagle Football Awards
•Scout Player of the Year:
Gabe Sandal.
•Outstanding Offensive Line-
man: Laketon McLaughlin.
•Outstanding Defensive
Lineman: Tyler Peterson.
•Special Teams Awards:
Trevor Anderson.
•Defensive Most Valuable
Player: Lane Blasius.
Western Great Plains
Conference Awards
•All Conference First - Team:
Tyler Trask, Taran Eisenbraun,
Laketon McLaughlin, Trevor An-
derson and Lane Blasius.
•Honorable Mention: Tyler
Peterson, Clancy Lytle and Cade
Kjerstad.
South Dakota Football
Coaches Association Awards
•Academic All-State (3.5
GPA/played for at least three
years.): Tyler Trask, Ryder Wil-
son, Trey Richter, Laketon
McLaughlin and Taran Eisen-
braun.
9A All-State
Honorable Mention:
•Offensive Center: Laketon
McLaughlin.
•Kicker: Trevor Anderson.
•Punter: Trevor Anderson.
9A All-State Selection
•Snapper: Tyler Trask.
•Friend of Football Award:
Walker NAPA - Chad Walker.
Members of the Wall Football team who received awards at the
annual Fall Award night held at the Wall School Multi-purpose
room on Tuesday, November 20. Back row: pictured from left to
right ... Laketon McLaughlin, Taran Eisenbraun and Tyrel Trask.
Front row: pictured from left to right ... Trevor Anderson, Lane
Blasius, Gabe Sandal and Tyler Peterson.
Members of the Wall Lady Eagles Volleyball team. Back row: pic-
tured from left to right ... Autumn Schulz, Carlee Johnston and
Josie Blasius. Front row: pictured from left to right... Kaitlin
Schreiber and Tayah Huether.
Autumn Schulz pictured with
the many awards she received
for volleyball.
The Wall Angel Tree Program is a non-profit organization with
children serving as their primary focus. For the past several
years the organization’s committee has worked at making chil-
dren’s Christmas wishes and needs a reality. The angels are dec-
orated and hung on the Christmas tree at the First Interstate
Bank. Those wishing to give will choose an angel, fulfill the
Christmas wish and then return it to the bank by Thursday, De-
cember 13, 2012. The Wall angel Tree committee wishes you and
yours a great 2012 holiday season!!!
Photo by Laurie Hindman
Angel Tree on display
at First Interstate Bank
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
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tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012 • Page 2
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Social Security News
By Kathy Petersen
Social Security
Public Affairs Specialist
Question:
What are some of the docu-
ments Social Security will accept
as proof of identity for a child?
Answer:
While you can use a birth cer-
tificate to prove age or citizenship,
you cannot use it as proof of iden-
tity. For identity, we prefer to see
the child’s U.S. passport. If you
don’t have a passport, we may ac-
cept the child’s:
•Adoption decree;
•Doctor, clinic, or hospital
record;
•Religious record (e.g., bap-
tismal record);
•Daycare center or school
record; or
•School identification card.
We generally can accept a non-
photo identity document if it has
enough information to identify
the child (such as the child’s name
and age, date of birth and parents’
names). All documents must be ei-
ther originals or copies certified
by the issuing agency. We cannot
accept photocopies or notarized
copies of documents. To find out
more, visit www.socialsecurity.gov
/ssnumber.
Question:
What is Supplemental Security
Income (SSI)?
Answer:
SSI provides monthly income to
people 65 or older, blind or dis-
abled, who also have limited in-
come and financial resources. To
be eligible, an individual also
must be a U.S. citizen and resi-
dent of the United States or a
noncitizen lawfully admitted for
permanent residence. There are,
however, some noncitizens
granted a special immigration
status who are eligible. To get
SSI, an individual’s financial re-
sources (savings and assets) can-
not be more than $2,000 ($3,000,
if married). For more information,
read our publications, Supple-
mental Security Income or Under-
standing Supplemental Security
Income.
Question:
Do disabled children qualify for
disability benefits?
Answer:
There are two Social Security
disability programs that provide
benefits for disabled children.
Under the Supplemental Security
Income (SSI) program, a child
from birth to age 18 may receive
monthly payments based on dis-
ability or blindness if:
•The child has an impairment
or combination of impairments
that meets the definition of dis-
ability for children; and
•The income and resources of
the parents and the child are
within the allowed limits.
Under Social Security, an adult
child (a person age 18 or older)
may receive monthly benefits
based on disability or blindness if:
•The adult child has an impair-
ment or combination of impair-
ments that meet the definition of
disability for adults;
•The disability began before
age 22; and
•A parent of the adult child
worked long enough to be insured
under Social Security and is re-
ceiving retirement or disability
benefits, or is deceased.
Under both of these programs,
the child must not be doing any
substantial work. The child also
must have a medical condition
that is expected to last at least
one year or result in death. Learn
more at www.socialsecurity.gov/
applyfordisability.
Your Questions, Social Security’s Answers
Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
The South Dakota Stockgrowers
Association, joined with R-CALF
USA and the Made in the USA
Foundation to become co-plaintiffs
in the lawsuit to challenge the
World Trade Organization's
(WTO's) ruling that found the
United States' Country of Origin
Labeling (COOL) law to be in vio-
lation of international trade rules.
Shane Kolb, President of the
South Dakota Stockgrowers said,
"Stockgrowers does not accept that
a world court can dictate what
laws we pass in our own country
and we feel that this lawsuit is the
way for us to force USDA and our
lawmakers to stand up to the WTO
and defend our producers by de-
fending COOL."
"Stockgrowers have been in-
volved with COOL since before it
was included in the 2000 Farm Bill
because we believe that given the
choice, customers will buy USA
raised products," said Stockgrow-
ers President Shane Kolb,
Meadow, SD. "COOL has given us
the ability to differentiate our
product from that of another coun-
try and our customers look for that
'USA' label when they go to the
grocery store."
The original complaint filed Sep-
tember 1, 2012 in the federal dis-
trict court in Denver, Colorado, al-
leged the WTO ruling against
COOL is null and void because
Congress entered the WTO under
the proviso that WTO rulings in-
consistent with U.S. law shall
have no effect. In addition, the suit
alleged that the U.S. Agriculture
Secretary and U.S. Trade Ambas-
sador failed their respective re-
sponsibilities to uphold U.S. sover-
eignty by their failure to invoke
Congress' proviso.
Stockgrowers joins
lawsuit to defend COOL
The original complaint also
pointed out that it was a clear con-
flict of interest for the WTO to
have appointed a Mexican na-
tional, who has represented Mex-
ico in trade matters, to serve as a
"judge" in the complaint that Mex-
ico filed against the United States.
Along with the South Dakota
Stockgrowers Association, the In-
dependent Cattlemen of Wyoming,
Cattle Producers of Washington,
Independent Mississippi cattle
ranchers and R-CALF USA mem-
bers Stanley, Chad and Tyler
Scott, and the Organization for
Competitive Markets also joined
the suit.
The amended complaint adds a
new cause of action: the failure of
the U.S. Agriculture Secretary to
properly follow his agency's rule-
making procedures. The suit al-
leges the U.S. Agriculture Secre-
tary improperly included a loop-
hole in the final COOL rule that
allows meat exclusively produced
from animals exclusively born,
raised, and slaughtered in the
United States to nevertheless be
labeled as if it were a product of
mixed origin, such as a product of
the United States, Canada and/or
Mexico.
"COOL is the law of our land
and was passed into law by the
Congress of the United States of
America," said Kolb. "If other
countries want to market their
product here then they need to
comply with our laws and label
their products accordingly. Stock-
growers will continue to fight for
the right to label our products."
The U.S. government and other
defendants in the suit now have
60-days within which to formally
respond to the complaint.
Senator John Thune (R-S.D.)
was re-elected chairman of the
Senate Republican Conference,
November 14, by his fellow Repub-
lican Senators.
Thune was originally elected to
the post in December of 2011, but
officially assumed the position in
January of 2012 when Senator
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.)
stepped down from the position.
The chairman is the number three
leadership position for Senate Re-
publicans and is tasked with
spearheading messaging efforts for
the conference.
“I thank my Republican Senate
colleagues for again electing me to
serve as chairman of the Senate
Republican Conference,” said
Thune. “Our country is at a critical
point and the stakes have never
been higher. As our conference
works to address the major chal-
lenges facing our nation, including
the fiscal cliff, rampant unemploy-
Senator Thune re-elected Senate
Republican Conference Chairman
ment, and the crippling debt, we
also stand ready and willing to
work across the aisle in order to
meet these challenges. I will con-
tinue to work hard to ensure that
issues important to our nation and
to South Dakota, like agriculture,
transportation and defense are
brought to the forefront of policy
discussions, and that Republicans
help shape the national conversa-
tion to make the case for these and
other South Dakota priorities.”
Prior to being elected chairman
of the Senate Republican Confer-
ence, Thune previously served as
chairman of the Senate Republi-
can Policy Committee and as vice
chairman of the Senate Republi-
can Conference, which helps sena-
tors communicate their priorities
to the American people through a
wide variety of communications,
including television, radio and web
technology, among other services.
The regular West River Deer
season closes on November 25, and
the regular East River Deer season
closes on December 2. Nine addi-
tional days will be available to har-
vest antlerless deer, beginning De-
cember 29 and ending on January
6.
“We want to remind both West
River and East River deer hunters
that their ‘any deer’ and ‘any
whitetail deer’ tags are only valid
during the regular 16-day season,
and that they will not convert to
‘antlerless tags’ like in previous
Antlerless deer tags
have extended season
years,” said Tom Kirschenmann,
chief of terrestrial resources for
the South Dakota Game, Fish and
Parks Department. “Only unfilled
‘any antlerless deer’ and ‘antler-
less whitetail deer’ tags will be
valid for the late-season dates.”
The changes were made to ac-
complish additional antlerless
deer harvest in areas of the state
that need it most while curtailing
the doe harvest where deer popu-
lations are at or below population
objectives.
The South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Commission has pro-
posed a slight reduction in licenses
for the 2013 Spring Prairie Turkey
Season.
The commission has recom-
mended a reduction in one-tag
“male” turkey licenses by 105 and
reduce the two-tag “any turkey” li-
censes by 200 compared to 2012.
The commission also is propos-
ing 10 resident archery turkey li-
censees for the Blood Run Nature
Area and 10 resident archery li-
censees to hunt at the Adams
Homestead and Nature Preserve
through the issuance of “access
permits” via a lottery drawing.
GFP commission proposes
spring turkey season
A modification of the spring unit
boundaries for the Black Hills and
49A to be consistent with the fall
turkey unit boundaries was also
proposed.
The proposals will be finalized
at the December 6-7 GFP meeting
at the Pierre Ramkota.
To comment, e-mail wild.info@st
ate.sd.us with your name and city.
You can also comment in person at
the December meeting. Proposals
will begin at 2:00 p.m., CST on
Thursday, December 6.
For view the full proposals, visit
http://www.gfp.sd.gov/agency/com-
mission/proposals.aspx
The Girl Scouts Blue Bag Food
Drive gets underway Saturday,
December 1st. The three older Girl
Scouts covering Wall are asking for
your help in hanging Blue Bags on
doors.
If you are interested in walking
door to door for 30 to 60 minutes
Saturday morning, Mickie Abell
will assign an area to you. This is
Blue Bag food drive needs volunteers
a great opportunity to volunteer
and exercise; multi-tasking at its
best.
The three Girl Scouts will pick
up the Blue Bags on Saturday, De-
cember 8th.
Contact Mickie Abell for an as-
signed area and bags at 279-2246
or mickfinn66@gmail.com.
Pertussis, also known as whoop-
ing cough, is a highly-contagious
and vaccine-preventable disease
that has made a startling come-
back across the country. It is cur-
rently responsible for causing the
worst epidemic the U.S. has seen
in 50 years, according to the U.S.
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC), including 13
deaths.
“Immunization is still the best
way to help prevent the spread of
pertussis”, says Siobhan Dolan,
MD, MPH, an obstetrician/gyne-
cologist and medical advisor to
March of Dimes. “It’s important for
both children and adults to be up-
to-date with their pertussis immu-
nization.”
Researchers have found that im-
munity from childhood pertussis
vaccinations wears off over time,
so the pertussis shots that most
adults received as children may no
longer fully protect them. The
adult Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria
and acellular pertussis) booster
vaccine is recommended for adults
to help keep them healthy and
help prevent them from spreading
diseases to others, especially chil-
dren. The CDC recently updated
its immunization guidelines,
which now state that all adults
aged 19 years and older who have
not yet received a dose of Tdap
should receive a single dose.
“Research has shown that when
the source of a baby’s pertussis can
be identified, it’s traced back to
family members in up to 80 per-
cent of cases,” Dr. Dolan explained.
“So it’s imperative for parents to
Whooping cough on the rise:
How to protect your family
know that everyone around their
baby: parents, friends, caregivers
and grandparents needs to have
an adult Tdap booster vaccine.”
According to a survey conducted
online in May 2012 by Harris In-
teractive on behalf of the Sounds of
Pertussis Campaign, a joint initia-
tive from Sanofi Pasteur and
March of Dimes, more than four
out of five parents with children
ages two and younger (83 percent)
believe adult vaccination is impor-
tant to help protect against the
spread of pertussis, but only 19
percent reported asking those in
regular contact with their child to
get a Tdap booster shot.
“The reason is probably because
most parents -- 61 percent -- said
they would feel awkward asking
those in close contact with their in-
fants to get an adult Tdap booster
shot, according to the survey,” said
Dr. Dolan.
“Parents want to do all they can
to keep their babies healthy and to
protect them from danger,” she
added. “Speak to your friends and
family about getting a pertussis
booster. That simple ‘ask’ will help
protect them and your baby from
this potentially fatal disease.”
More information about pertus-
sis and the Sounds of Pertussis
Campaign can be found online at
www.SoundsofPertussis.com.
And remember, although whoop-
ing cough may be on the rise na-
tionwide, there are simple steps
you can take to help protect your
family: get your booster shot now
and encourage those around you to
do the same.
By Linda M. Hiltner
When we write, an important el-
ement of a story is place or loca-
tion. This isn’t only about a place
within the story or poem. The
place where we actually do the
writing can also act as inspiration.
For the December meeting, Wall
Writers Group participants are
going to change the place of their
meeting.
On Saturday, December 8, we
will meet at Prairie Village, 416
Sixth Avenue in Wall, at 8:15 a.m.
and leave from the parking lot at
8:30. We will depart as a caravan
if more people are interested in
joining the writers on their road
trip to Pierre. We anticipate re-
turning to Wall by dark.
From 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
December Wall Writers
to take road trip
(Central Time), in the South
Dakota State Capitol Rotunda, the
Attorney General’s office hosts the
traditional free Pie Day. This event
is in conjunction with the Christ-
mas at the Capitol where approxi-
mately 100 trees have been deco-
rated by organizations and are on
display until December 26. For
more information, see the Pierre
Chamber of Commerce website
under “Events.”
The topics for the December 8
meeting are:
(a) Write about your favorite
trip,
(b) Write about your expecta-
tions for his holiday season, or
(c) Writers Choice. We will share
the writings from these topics on
the trip to Pierre and, if so in-
clined, find a place to write while
at the State Capitol building in the
warmth and glow of the Holiday
Season.
If you have any questions about
the road trip or the Wall Writers
Group, please contact Linda (605-
786-6937) or Dave (279-2952).
Happy Holidays and Happy Writ-
ing!
Subscription Rates:
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or
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South Dakota may have experi-
enced its first highway fatality-
free Thanksgiving holiday in a
decade, preliminary reports to the
Department of Public Safety indi-
Highway Patrol ‘Operation
safe’ campaign successful
cate.
Statistics from Public Safety’s
Office of Accident Records show
that 2003 was the last Thanksgiv-
ing travel period without a
recorded highway fatality in South
Dakota. Late reports from the past
weekend could change this year’s
outcome, but as of mid-day Mon-
day, November 26, the Office of Ac-
cident Records had received no re-
ports of fatal crashes in South
Dakota during the period.
“The Thanksgiving travel period
starts a full month of holiday
travel, meaning more people going
more places,’’ said Col. Craig Price,
superintendent of the South
Dakota Highway Patrol. “It’s a fes-
tive time, but it also can be stress-
ful and hectic. That makes it more
important than ever for all of us to
be safe. Please wear seatbelts,
obey speed laws and don’t drink
and drive.’’
To drive that point home, the
Highway Patrol kicked off the hol-
iday travel period on Wednesday,
November 21, with a high-visibil-
ity Operation Safe campaign. That
statewide effort involved nearly
every uniformed Highway Patrol
member. The primary purpose of
Operation Safe was to remind mo-
torists to make safe and responsi-
ble driving decisions during their
holiday travel.
Statewide during the day-long
Operation Safe campaign on No-
vember 21, troopers responded to
31 crashes during the operation,
made six DUI arrests and nine
drug arrests and assisted 38 mo-
torists on the highway.
Area News
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012• Page 3
courant@gwtc.net
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the pain of the loss. In that sense,
I know I will never have closure
and that’s good.
Some 14 years after her death,
while I was on the faculty of a
medical school in Georgia, I found
myself having to advise medical
students how to talk to patients or
family about sad news. I reviewed
the medical literature on the sub-
ject at the time, and concluded
that there is no right way to do it
except to be 100 percent honest,
and to say whatever is needed
with compassion. Through the
years those guidelines have sus-
tained me while I have had the
burden of sharing awful news.
Bottom line, it is being there,
more than words, that consoles.
Never worry about what to say,
just show up, be honest, and care.
Dr. Rick Holm wrote this Prairie
Doc Perspective for “On Call®,” a
weekly program where medical
professionals discuss health con-
cerns for the general public.
“On Call®” is produced by the
Healing Words Foundation in as-
sociation with the South Dakota
State University Journalism De-
partment. “On Call®” airs Thurs-
days on South Dakota Public
Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m.
Central, 6:00 p.m. Mountain. Visit
us at OnCallTelevision.com.
The Prairie Doc Perspective
By Richard P. Holm MD
Before my junior year in high
school, I returned from a Boy
Scout canoeing trip to discover my
sister had been killed in a car
crash. I will never forget the sad-
ness of the moment when I walked
into the house, which was filled
with what seemed like half the
caring and wonderful town of
DeSmet, to find my Mom and Dad
there grieving. It was near the end
of that summer, but the beginning
of a long period of mourning for
my family and me.
There were lessons that came to
me after my sister’s death. I real-
ized how important support from
a community could be. Consola-
tion came from our friends, neigh-
bors, church community, as well as
people who we barely knew. It
seemed more about their presence,
and not their words. I noticed
there were people who had trouble
themselves dealing with such loss,
and they sort of disappeared.
Also I realized that a funeral is
not exactly a time of closure for a
family, but really just the begin-
ning of a time to accept reality and
forge ahead with the difficult
changes that life can and does deal
out. It took me years to think
about my sister and relish in her
memory rather than cringe from
What do you say?
For the the past 27 years, Las
Vegas has gone country for 10 days
in December as the city hosts the
Wrangler National Finals Rodeo
where world championships are
decided.
This year’s rodeo is December 6-
15 and will feature 10 nights of the
best contestants from the Profes-
sional Rodeo Cowboys Association
and Women’s Professional Rodeo
Association. Up for grabs is over
six million dollars in prize money
and world championships in bare-
back riding, steer wrestling, team
roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-
down roping, women’s barrel rac-
ing and bull riding.
South Dakota will be well repre-
sented with six qualifiers for this
year’s WNFR. There are two qual-
ifiers in saddle bronc riding, Chad
Ferley, Oelrichs, who won the
world championship in 2006, and
Cole Elshere, Faith, who has qual-
ified for the first time. Ferley is
making his sixth appearance at
the WNFR and will enter the rodeo
in sixth place with $76,366.
Elshere is in 13th with $65,837.
Todd Suhn, Hermosa, has quali-
fied for the 16th time in ninth
place with $66,136. This year’s
qualification ties him with Byron
Walker, Ennis, Texas, for the sec-
ond most WNFR qualifications in
steer wrestling. Roy Duvall, Boyn-
ton, Okla., is first with 24.
Representing the barrel racers
will be Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs,
and Nikki Steffes, Vale. Lockhart
has qualified for the sixth consec-
utive time. She will start the rodeo
in ninth place with $72,462. This
is Steffes’ first qualification. She
started the year with a big win at
the Fort Worth Stock Show and
Rodeo and over $10,000 last Feb-
ruary. Steffes had an outstanding
college career while attending the
University of Wyoming, where she
won the women’s national all-
around title twice. She will be at-
Area riders to compete in Wrangler
National Finals Rodeo in December
tending dental school in the future
but has put that on hold to take
advantage of having an outstand-
ing horse, Dash Ta Vanilla, that
she calls “Nilla.” They are in sixth
place in the regular season stand-
ings with $86,722.
Making his second appearance
in the bull riding will be Timber
Lake’s Ardie Maier. Maier quali-
fied in 2010, but injuries kept him
from making the trip in 2011. This
year he is in sixth place in the
world standings with $90,191.
To compete at the WNFR, con-
testants had to be among the top
15 in the world standings. They
traveled across the United States
paying their own entry fees and
expenses hoping to earn enough
money to be among the elite ath-
letes who advance to rodeo’s cham-
pionship event. The WNFR has
seen continued growth in prize
money and fan support since it
moved to Las Vegas. Each contest-
ant will compete in 10 individual
rounds which will pay the winner
$18,257. On December 15, their
total scores and times will be
added together for average plac-
ings. First place in that category
will win $46,820 and a saddle as
the WNFR champion.
World championships are deter-
mined by adding a contestant’s
WNFR and regular season earn-
ings together. Those champions
have the esteemed honor of wear-
ing the traditional gold buckle that
signifies they are the world’s best
in the sport of rodeo.
Jess Tierney, Hermosa, sits 12th
in the all-around standing. He
qualified for the steer roping by
taking the seventh place spot. The
National Finals Steer Roping, held
separately from the WNFR, was
November 8-9 in Guthrie, Okla.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
Call us for your print-
ing needs! 859-2516
Email your social news, obituaries,
wedding & engagement
announcements to: annc@gwtc.net
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Shirrise Linn
Sunday, Mel and Dorothy Ander-
son spent their 31st anniversary
eating out and enjoying a movie in
Rapid City. Wednesday, the Ryan
Anderson Family from Cheyenne,
and Leslie Deering of Wildrose,
N.D., as well as Lisa and Ben Craft
of Miles City, joined them for a pre
Turkey Day dinner. The highlight
of the day was enjoying their year-
old great-granddaughter, Karring-
ton Anderson. Thursday, Chance
and Meretta Anderson, as well as
Meretta's dad, Calvin Kahl, all of
Isabel, along with Audey Anderson
and Lisa and Ben Craft spent
Thanksgiving Day at Mel and
Dorothy's. Saturday, they met Tay-
lor Anderson of Williston, N.D., for
brunch in Rapid City. Lisa and
Ben joined them. Saturday after-
noon was spent at the Event Cen-
ter attending the NRRCA junior
rodeo.
Alan and Marcus Mann came
Sunday to visit and do a little tree
shopping at Clyde's. Clyde trav-
eled to New Underwood, Thursday,
for Thanksgiving with his family
and some of Connie's family from
Belle Fourche.
Saturday, Teri Ann Arneson
went to Rapid City to celebrate her
oldest daughter, Lauren's, 25th
Birthday with her sister Kylie and
Teri Ann's friend Judy Deyo.
Sunday, Teri Ann fought all day
with Christmas lights. It was re-
ported that she won! (Oh, contrare
~ It seems there was something on
facebook about the lights being in
the burn barrel....??? I guess that
would be considered winning).
Lonnie and Teri hosted the Elshere
crew for supper Sunday.
Shannon Burke of Ariz., and
Skylar Burke of Ft Louis, Wa., vis-
ited Lawrence Burke during deer
season. Melisa Burke also visited
while the boys were out. Lawrence
was in attendance, as always, in
support of the Elm Springs School
students Thursday to listen to the
students recite their monthly
poems. Clyde Arneson stopped by
Saturday for coffee. Matt Trask
also visited Saturday, originally to
borrow wire stretchers, but stayed
for coffee too. Lawrence visited
Russel Burmeister, Saturday af-
ternoon in Wall. They then enjoyed
a drive around Wall and surround-
ing area.
Freddie Ferguson reported he
ate too much on Thanksgiving. He
traveled to Whitewood to cousin
Dan and Anna Marrs's on Thurs-
day. He once made a resolution to
never eat that much ever again,
but after this year he decided his
new resolution is to be sure and
eat too much every year from now
on.
With no kids home for Thanks-
giving, the Gravatt's and the
Fields had a "non-traditional"
Thanksgiving in Deadwood.
The Sam and Cary Johnston's
spent Thanksgiving Day in Belle
Fourche at Chris and Judy Kling's
home. After a bountiful meal, the
afternoon was spent bowling.
Needless to say, one of the biggest
challenges was just bending over
to throw the ball! Lots of laughter
and fun was had by all. On Sun-
day, Carson, Carlee, Savana and
Cary attended a 4-H meeting at
Kassandra Linn's house.
John, Jim and Jean Linn were
Thanksgiving guests at Charlie
and Carol Linn of Rapid City.
Shirrise and Laken Linn went to
Rapid City, Monday, for errands
before attending a stamp meeting
at Peg Ireland's, near Box Elder.
Morris Linn visited Ray Olsen,
Tuesday afternoon. The Scott and
Lynn Simons family were dinner
guests at the Linn's for Thanksgiv-
ing.
Sunday, Tomilyn Trask headed
back to Chadron to college after
being home to help during hunting
season. A successful season ended
on Sunday. Whew!! Sunday after-
noon visitors at Tom and Shelia
Trask's were Lisa and Ben Craft,
Morris Linn, Tyler and Jaymie
Trask and friend Kayne.
Jim, Myrna, and Maxine Smith
spent Thanksgiving at Leslie and
Troy Brown's near Harold, S.D.
Wes and Gladys Wilburn had a
house full of family for Thanksgiv-
ing will all their kids and families
home for the day.
Jim and Caroline Wilsey had
brother, Wes Wilsey from
Haysprings, Neb., visit and stay
Wednesday through Saturday. Wes
and Jim went to visit their sister,
Carol Price, in Philip. Tom, Kelly,
and Ashley Wilsey from Tea, were
at the Wilsey’s from Wednesday
through Sunday.
Thanksgiving brought a full
house to the Wilson's. Amy and
Josh Wolberg and the three little
ones arrived on Wednesday night
and stayed until Sunday. On
Thanksgiving Day, Kenny, Janet,
Kelli and her friend Tom, Mandy
and Justin Tschetter and kids,
Tyler Wilson, Sally Wolberg and
Patrick and Lane Wilson came for
dinner. Kenny treated us all by
cooking the turkey and biscuits in
his Dutch Ovens. Mary was quoted
as saying, "Gee, this is just like the
Pilgrims." On Saturday, the Wil-
son's traveled to Rapid City and
took the kids to Dinosaur Park and
Story Book Island. Afterwards,
Joan and Kevin Howland joined
Phil and Mary Kay for supper at
Patrick and Lane's.
School News: The Elm Springs
School Christmas program will be
Wednesday, December 19th at the
Elm Springs Hall at 6 p.m. There
will be a soup supper to follow. The
school has been working on a quilt
which will be auctioned off by Lon-
nie Arneson during the program.
The school will be accepting non-
perishable food items the night of
the program that they will donate
to the food pantry in Wall.
The Elm Springs School will be
caroling Thursday, December 20th.
Mrs. Mickelson and the school
children would like to ask folks to
call the school (798-2492) if you
will be home the 20th and would
like to be caroled to. It will be first
come, first served as they cannot
go everywhere.
Reminder: There will be a bene-
fit supper, entertainment, and live
auction for Karen Delbridge at the
Wall Community Center, Satur-
day, December 1st starting at 4:00
p.m.
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
The Drug Store has been getting
a “face life”. There is new siding on
the façade of the “mall”.
Some dates to remember: De-
cember 2nd at 4:30 p.m., the
Haakon County Crooners Concert
at the Wall Community Center.
There will be snacks following
their singing.
December 3rd and 1 p.m., the
Young At Heart (YAH) Senior Citi-
zens will have their Christmas
party at Prairie Village. Bring an
inexpensive gift for exchange, a
Christmas card to send to a “shut-
in” and a plate of goodies. See you
there!
Dave Custis and family are
home but just for two weeks when
he has to go back to Rochester. But
this is encouraging! We’ll keep him
in our prayers!
It was a nice picture of the
Brucklacher family in last week’s
Courant. What a keepsake!
Again we have many obituaries
printed: Marlene Rembold, sister
of Lillian Helms; Wanda Heeb of
Philip; Roy Roseth of Midland and
Bart Clennon, who almost reached
the age of 102 (missing by two
hours and forty minutes). Often he
was mentioned by the Poste family
but I had never met him. Our con-
dolences to all of the families.
The list of students from the
Wall School District that are on
the honor roll or have perfect at-
tendance is very impressive. Con-
gratulations and keep up the good
work!
Jeramy Croell and Tasha Tonne
of Lawler, Ia., spent Saturday
night with Grandpa Merlin and
Grandma Mary Jane Doyle, leav-
ing on Sunday morning for home.
Norman and Diane Geigle had a
houseful on Saturday for an early
birthday party for their twin
granddaughters, Elizabeth and
Addison Jorgen. Other guests at-
tending, besides the twin’s parents
Jason and Sara and siblings,
Rachel and Colin, all of Boyd,
Minn., were Gerald and Esther
Wolford; Josh, Shasta, Owyn and
Mariah Geigle; Heidi and Randy
Kopren and family of Bison; Amy
and Terry Beers of Howard; and
Roger and Chris Stevens of
Chadron. Congratulations to the
twins on their 4th birthday!
Hope you had a nice Thanksgiv-
ing. Here are a few of the family
gatherings that took place:
Adam and Megan Rislov and
family were here from Colorado di-
viding their time with family in
Philip and Wall. They returned
home on Monday.
Jess Williams was home from
college for the holiday. He left on
Sunday to return to Sioux Falls.
Leslie and Kay Williams spent
over Thanksgiving with Gwen,
Mike and Aby Hamilton of Casper.
Marcia Williams also came from
Cody, Wyo.
Lyle and Viola Williams went to
Myron and Mary’s. Other guests
were Jeff, Misty, Hayden and
Brynley Mattox of Kearney, Neb.;
Monty, Bobbi and Pacey Williams
of Box Elder; Della and Lee Am-
dahl of Woonsocket; and Gene,
Monica and Trevor Williams of In-
terior.
Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle
spent Thanksgiving at Joe and
Barb Croell’s home near Sun-
dance, Wyo. Others joining them
were Jim Doyle from Spearfish,
Jeramy Croell and Tasha Tonne
from Lawler, Ia., and Josh, Darcy
and Max Croell of Gillette.
Donna Jedlicka fixed Thanks-
giving dinner for David, Kathy and
family of Rapid City, and for her
brother, Dwight Hempel of Lake
Andes. He had come on Wednes-
day and left Friday morning.
Edith Paulsen went to Philip on
Wednesday evening with grandson
Landon Peterson when he got off
work at Golden West. On Thanks-
giving Day, Darrell and Anita Pe-
terson, Edith, Landon, Dustin and
Carmin Peterson family and Ash-
ley Peterson from Sioux Falls,
Michael and Tanya Peterson and
family all had dinner at the Fitch
place in the country with Burjes
and Cheryl, host and hostess. Also
attending were some of the Fitch
relatives!
Dusty Botz and a friends were
home from college at Brookings.
They and Marv and Jean went to
have dinner with the Kevin Biel-
maier family.
Frances Poste had for her guests
on Thanksgiving Mark, Darlene,
Amanda and Kristina Poste and
Michelle Lamphere.
On Saturday, Tanya, Kale and
Carmin Peterson came from Philip
to visit with Edith Paulsen.
Roy Hamann got home from the
hospital on Monday, the 26th.
They told him to stay home for a
few days so don’t expect him for
coffee right away. Welcome home,
Roy! It has been almost a month!
Our beautiful temperatures
cooled off starting on Thanksgiv-
ing Day. Had just a cover of snow
on Sunday evening. Sun was out
some on Monday but didn’t cause
the thermometer to raise much,
but warmer temperatures are
promised for later in the week so
that is encouraging.
Have a good week!
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2?9-2S6S
The family of
Shari Ochs
requests a
card shower
in honor of her
70th Birthday
December 1, 2012
Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 952
Crosslake, MN 56442
The Eastern Pennington County Transit offers transportation
service Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. –
4 p.m., and is open to the general public for residents of Wall,
Quinn, Wasta and the surrounding local area. Calls should be
made at least one day in advance to schedule your ride.
Prescheduled rides are $1 one way per person. Same day rides
are $3 one way per person.
Wednesday, there is a round-trip shuttle available to Rapid City
for $10 per person. Thursday is the day to schedule your trip to
Ft. Meade in Sturgis. There is no bus service in Wall on Tuesday.
You can schedule a ride on the Philip Transit bus for trips to Rapid
City on Tuesday and Thursday, but please make your appoint-
ments between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Call 279-2430 or toll free
at 1-877-587-5776, to schedule your ride or for more information.
Mention to the driver that you saw this ad and you
will receive a free ride (In town rides only).
Limit of one free ride per person.
EASTERN PENNINGTON
COUNTY TRANSIT SERVICE
Wall Drug Pharmacy
Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
•December 4th, the pharmacy will be
closing at 3:00 p.m.
•December 18th, the pharmacy will be
closing at 3:00 p.m.
Sorry for any inconvenience
279-1931 • Wall, SD
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
November 29 to
December 5, 2012
Thursday: Breakfast: Bis-
cuit w/Egg & Sausage, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Taco Salad, Cheese,
Lettuce, Garlic Bread, Refried
Beans, Black Beans, Pears,
Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast: French
Toast, Egg Patty, Fruit Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza, Let-
tuce Salad, Peaches, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Cereal,
Toast, Cheese Stick, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Teriyaki Chicken &
Oriental Rice, Peas & Carrots,
Fruit, Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast: Cof-
fee Cake, Cheese Stick, Apples,
Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Steamburger, Baked
Beans, Cheese Slice, Macaroni
Salad, Cookie, Fruit, Milk.
I hate to admit it, but sometimes
I can easily slip into the habit of
speaking negatively about people. I
do not like this about myself, and I
normally feel embarrassed once I
realize what I have done, and I
quickly take responsibility for my
shortcoming and try to make
things right.
Everybody knows that tearing
others down, being derogatory, and
spreading nasty negative things
are simply not the traits of a person
of good character and moral fiber.
Still, it often seems so much easier
for us to find the negative in other
people, but it doesn't have to be
that way.
We can learn to stop tearing oth-
ers down and become 'people
builders.' I believe that whenever
people invest their time thinking of
healthy and positive ways to build
people, it makes it a lot harder to
be so critical of others. When we ac-
tively look for ways to say some-
thing positive to, or about someone
else, and take time to recognize
people's strengths, we are ready to
'expose' the good we know when-
ever the opportunity presents it-
self. And that is people building!
When we have taken time to no-
tice the good and positive about
people, rather than the negative, it
is much easier to steer negative
conversations in the right direc-
tion. I often do this by saying some-
thing like, "Let's get to the good
news!" and then proceed to say
something uplifting about the per-
son who was being bashed.
Face it. All of us are 'a work in
progress' and none of us can say we
don't need to improve in one area
or another. And yet, don't we all
want people to think and say the
best about us anyway? Shouldn't
that make us all the more willing
to look for ways to be building oth-
ers rather than tearing them
down?
I encourage you, this week, to
recommit to being a person of high
standards and quality-one who
looks for and exposes the good in
others. Determine right now that
from now on you will be a "people
builder."
Be a People Builder
we don’t
charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565
or e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
annc@
gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Church
Wall Rodeo Grounds
Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
Many people suppose that salvation is God’s reward
to those who do their best to live good lives. This is not
so, for God’s Word says of those who are saved:
“Who hath saved us, and called us with an
holy calling, not according to our works, but ac-
cording to His own purpose and grace, which
was given us in Christ Jesus before the world
began” (II Tim. 1:9).
Referring to this “salvation which is in Christ Jesus,”
St. Paul says:
“It is a faithful saying, for if we died with Him,
we shall also live with Him” (II Tim. 2:10,11).
In other words: The believer, viewing Calvary aright,
has “died with Christ.” Viewing the Cross, he has said:
“This is not Christ’s death. He was no sinner. He had no
death to die. He is dying my death!” And so by faith he is
“crucified with Christ” (Gal. 2:20). The penalty for all his
sins has been fully paid, for he died — in Christ, and thus
has also risen with Christ “to walk in newness of life”
(Rom 6:3,4).
This is all God’s doing, and only now is the believer in
a position to do good works that will please God. Thus
the Apostle writes of believers, in II Tim. 2: “If we suffer,
we shall also reign with Him: if we deny Him, He also will
deny us” (Ver. 12). When the believer’s service for Christ
is reviewed some, indeed, will “receive a reward,” but
others will “suffer loss,” though they themselves will “be
saved, yet so as by fire” (I Cor. 3:14,15).
It will be deeply embarrassing, in that day, for unfaithful
Christians to face empty-handed the One who gave His
all, Himself, to save them. Yet salvation is by grace, thus
the Apostle hastens to conclude his statement in II Tim-
othy 2, with the words:
“If we are unfaithful, yet He abideth faithful:
He cannot deny Himself” (Ver. 13)
Thus our rewards as believers depend upon our faith-
fulness, but our salvation, thank God, on His!
GOD’S FAITHFULLNESS & OURS
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
West River Pioneer
10% off before December 10th
We have a good supply
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information on Optimum AQUAmax hybrids, contact your Dupont Pi-
oneer or Benchmark Seeds sales professional.
Jan Bielmaier • 605-685-3760 • Wall
Alice C. (Hamm) Leberknight_______________________
ice. After her dad passed away she
worked as a bookkeeper for Pier
Motors and Bradsky Motors. Later
in life she worked at Rapid City
National Bank for 23 years which
it is now U S Bank. It had four
name changes while she was work-
ing there.
She was a life member of Amer-
ican Legion Auxiliary, Wall #246
and the VFW Auxiliary Rapid City
and an avid quilter.
Alice married Harry “Hank”
Leberknight on June 13, 1946 in
Rapid City, S.D. They lived for a
time in Sundance, and New Cas-
tle, Wyo., where Harry worked for
Johnson Fuel Lines and then to
Buffalo, Wyo. The couple then
moved back to Rapid City near Vic-
toria and for most years they lived
on Sheridan Lake Road and were
tree farmers and raised chicken
broilers. They camped and rode
horse back in many places in S.D.,
Wyo. and Mont.
Alice sewed most all her own
clothes, made quilts and learned to
play the organ. She had no chil-
dren but always kept in touch with
her nieces and nephews and all re-
ceived a quilt that she had made.
She is survived by two brothers:
Warren Hamm of Rockport, Texas,
and Robert L (Rita) Hamm; two
sisters: Janis Wickard and Lourine
(Orlin) Winkowitsch all of Rapid
City; sister-in-law, Mildred Hamm
of Hill City; and numerous nieces,
nephews and extended family
Alice was preceded in death by
her husband Harry “Hank” in
1986; her parents; and brothers,
Glen L. and Gene Hamm
A memorial has been estab-
lished for the Whispering Pines
Volunteer Fire Dept. and Canyon
Lake Senior Center.
Services were held Friday, No-
vember 23, 2012, at Osheim &
Schmidt Funeral Home, with Rev.
Herb B. Cleveland officiating.
Burial followed at Black Hills
National Cemetery near Sturgis.
An online guestbook may be
signed at www.osheimschmidt.com
Alice Christine Hamm
Leberknight was born in Sargent
County, N.D. on her grandfather’s
homestead near Oakes, N.D., Au-
gust 24, 1920. At the age of two,
she moved with her parents, Claud
and Tillie Hamm to the Black Hills
of S.D.
She passed away on Wednesday,
November 2, 2012, after a brief ill-
ness at Rapid City Regional Hospi-
tal.
The family moved to the Black
Hills in South Dakota settling on
Butterfield Flats near Rockerville
in 1923. In 1924, they moved to
Deadman Creek where her dad op-
erated a sawmill. In 1934, they
moved to the Perli Place on Sheri-
dan Lake Road. She attended Vic-
toria School for eight years and
Alice graduated from Rapid City
High School in 1938 and attended
one year Business College in Rapid
City.
She worked for her dad as a
bookkeeper at Valley Motor Serv-
Elm Springs
Fire Department
Annual Pancake Feed
Sunday, December 2nd
4:00 to 7:00 p.m.
Elm Springs Fire Hall
•Free Will Donation •Prize Drawings
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Babcock 60th
Wedding Anniversary
Gordon and Gladys Babcock
will celebrate their 60th wedding
anniversary with an open house
from 2:00-4:00 pm on
Saturday, December 1, 2012
at Holiday Hills Estates.
Gordon and Gladys were married November 30, 1952 in Wall, SD.
Please join them in the activity room, located just off the lobby,
for coffee and cookies. Holiday Hills Estates is located on
Sheridan Lake Road just across from Arrowhead Country Club.
No gifts please!
Cards may be sent to:
Gordon & Gladys Babcock
Holiday Hills Estates, 2620
Holiday Lane, Apt. 331
Rapid City, SD 57702
Pauline “Polly” Kujawa__________________________
Pauline “Polly” Kujawa, age 89
of Kadoka, S.D., died Friday, No-
vember 23, 2012, at the Kadoka
Nursing Home.
Pauline “Polly” Heid was born
May 27, 1923, in Kimball, Minn.,
the second of four children born to
John and Gertrude (Bach) Heid.
She grew up and attended
Cathedral High School in St.
Cloud, Minn., and later worked as
a telephone switchboard operator
for a transportation company. As a
young lady, Polly enjoyed boating,
swimming in the lake, roller skat-
ing, playing the accordion and vio-
lin, movies and dancing.
Polly met Ed Kujawa when her
good friend, Retta (Ed’s sister), in-
troduced them. They were married
November 24, 1949, in Luxem-
burg, Minn. They made their way
to Kadoka when Ed worked for J.F.
Anderson Lumber Company. They
purchased the business in 1961,
and renamed it to Kadoka Lumber
and Supply Company. They oper-
ated this until 1991 when they
sold the business to their son, Jim,
and his wife, Arlene.
Polly not only cooked for her
family, but she was a cook at the
nursing home for many years. She
was a devoted mother who was
home for her children and at-
tended sporting events for all six of
her children.
Polly was a member of Our Lady
of Victory Catholic Church, the
Altar Society, and taught CCD
classes. She was also a member of
the American Legion Auxiliary,
PTA and helped organize blood
drives. She enjoyed sewing, bridge
club and planting flowers. For over
20 years, she walked two or more
miles every morning. And, she
made time to go to daily Mass
early in the morning before mak-
ing breakfast for her family.
Polly’s husband, Ed, preceded
her in death on April 10, 2006. She
continued to make her home in
Kadoka. She moved into the
Kadoka Nursing Home on Decem-
ber 14, 2010, where she has since
resided.
Survivors include her six chil-
dren, Joanne Berheim and her
husband, Tom, of Forbes, N.D.,
Jim Kujawa and his wife, Arlene,
of Kadoka, Ken Kujawa and
Denise of Huntsville, Mo., Karen
Kujawa and her husband, Jack
Henderson, of Littleton, Colo., Rita
Endres and her husband, Scott, of
Maple Grove, Minn., and Rhonda
Schultz of Gilbert, Ariz.; 12 grand-
children; 15 great-grandchildren;
one sister, Delores Gunderson of
St. Paul, Minn.; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
In addition to her husband, Ed,
Polly was preceded in death by her
parents; one brother, Jerry Heid;
and one sister, Christine Scheeler.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Wednesday, November
28, at Our Lady of Victory Catholic
Church in Kadoka, with Father
Bryan Sorensen as celebrant.
Music was provided by JoAnne
Stilwell, pianist, Mary Graup-
mann, guitarist, and Diane Hogen,
vocalist. “Amazing Grace” was
sung by Polly’s granddaughters,
Colette Jones, Stephanie Beynon,
Trista Hedderman, Chelsea
McBride, Britni Schnabel, Abby
Endres, Jodi Leeper and Trina
Thorn.
Readers were Deontae Thorn,
Caleb Jones and Jack Henderson.
Ushers were Joe Leutenegger and
Bud Olney. Gift bearers were Pay-
ton and Aidan Hedderman.
Pallbearers were Jeremy Ku-
jawa, Nicholas Rhinehart, Chase
Endres, Chad Beynon, Matt
Berheim, Travis Thorn, B.J.
Leeper, Chase McBride and Scott
Jones.
Interment was at the Kadoka
Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to Our Lady of Victory
Catholic Church and the Kadoka
Nursing Home.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
M. Roger Westerberg______________
M. Roger Westerberg, 78, of
Sturgis, S.D., and formerly of
Faith, died, Monday, November 19,
2012, at his home in Sturgis.
He lived in Mitchell from age
three to 25 years, except for the
three years in the U.S. Marine
Corps. He graduated from high
school in 1951 and from Dakota
Wesleyan University in 1958 and
earned two master’s degrees from
South Dakota State University.
He was married in 1956 and
later divorced in 1988. He was
blessed with four sons, Duke, Bill,
Jim, and Curtis, who was born and
died in 1961.
Survivors include three sons, M.
Roger “Duke” Westerberg and his
wife, Patricia, of Philip, William R.
Westerberg, Philippines, and
James B. Westerberg, Redding,
Calif.; and four grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, and a son, Curtis.
Arrangements were under the
direction of Black Hills Funeral
Home.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
DoN'T TAkE A "HoLiDAY"
FroM WorkiNG ToWArD
FiNANCiAL GoALS
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
We’re well into the holiday sea-
son now. And while the holidays
are joyous, they can also be expen-
sive. In fact, at this time of year,
many people make spending deci-
sions they end up regretting. But
you can enjoy the holidays and still
stay on track toward your financial
goals by following a few simple
guidelines, including the following:
•Set a budget — and stick to it.
Whether you’re buying gifts or
hosting holiday parties, you need
to establish a budget and not ex-
ceed it. The people to whom you’re
giving gifts and entertaining do
not expect you to dig yourself into
a financial ditch on their account
— and they wouldn’t want you to
do so, either.
•Compare prices. With some
searching, you can almost always
find less expensive versions of
those gifts you’re considering. But
a word of caution: The earlier you
start hunting for bargains, the bet-
ter your chances of finding good
prices.
•Watch for “after-holiday” sales.
The best bargains typically appear
when the holidays are over. While
these sales may not benefit you
this year, they can prove quite
valuable if you decide to “stock up”
on gifts for the next holiday sea-
son.
•Don’t over-use your credit
cards. Try to limit your credit card
purchases over the holidays. If you
must use a card, at least pick the
one with the lowest interest rate
— and do the best you can to pay
off the card quickly. Over the last
few years, Americans have actu-
ally done a pretty good job of low-
ering their household debt levels
— and that’s definitely a move-
ment in which you’ll want to par-
ticipate. Keep in mind that the
higher your debts, the less money
you’ll have available each month
to invest for retirement, college for
your children or any of your other
financial goals.
•Avoid dipping into long-term
investments. If you find yourself
coming up short when dealing
with holiday expenses, you may be
tempted to cash out at least a por-
tion of your long-term invest-
ments. But this should be avoided,
for at least two reasons. First, de-
pending on the account you’re tap-
ping into, you may face penalties,
fees and taxes. Second, and per-
haps even more importantly, you’ll
be depriving yourself of resources
you had earmarked for your key
goals, such as a comfortable retire-
ment. Of course, you may eventu-
ally be able to replace the funds
you’ve withdrawn. But in the
meantime, you’ve lost out on the
growth potential these invest-
ments may have provided — and
that period of lost opportunity typ-
ically cannot be regained.
•Build a “holiday fund.” It might
be too late for this year but, once
the holidays are over, set up a spe-
cial account for next holiday sea-
son. Even if you put in only a small
amount each month, you’ll be
pleased with how much you can ac-
cumulate in a year. Keep the
money in a liquid, low-risk account
— one that’s separate from any
money you use for your normal
day-to-day expenses.
By following these suggestions,
you may be able to take some of
the stress out of this holiday sea-
son — and possibly even brighten
all the other seasons of the year,
too.
School & Area News
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012• Page 6
Need a gift idea for that hard-to-buy someone?
How about a gift that keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the Pennington County Courant.
Call to start your subscription gift!
(605) 279-2565
reducing Wind Erosion
Seeing local crop fields that suf-
fered from wind erosion during the
high winds in late-October seems
mild compared to the dust bowl
days of the dirty thirties, recently
portrayed in the PBS documen-
tary, “The Dust Bowl.” If you
missed the documentary, pre-
miered November 18 and 19, 2012
on PBS, you can download it from
iTunes, and/or read about, view
pictures and video clips on the
PBS website:
http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/dust-
SDSU Extension
Bob Fanning
Plant Pathology Field Specialist
E-mail: robert.fanning@sdstate.edu
SDSU Extension regional Center
bowl/.
The question was raised in the
documentary, and occasionally in
discussions, could it happen again?
The general feeling is, thanks to
conservation practices that have
been applied, the advent of no-till
farming practices, and other ad-
vances, certainly not to the scale
that it did in the 30’s. In localized
areas, however, wind erosion can
be severe, lower soil productivity
and increase the costs of producing
crops.
Wind erosion physically removes
the most fertile part of the soil (or-
ganic matter, clay, and silt). Blow-
ing soil can reduce seedling sur-
vival and growth, depress crop
yields, and increase the suscepti-
bility of plants to certain types of
stress, including diseases. Wind
erosion also adversely affects peo-
ple not directly connected to the
land, by polluting the air, filling
road ditches, deteriorating water
quality, causing automobile acci-
dents, and many other problems.
Although the 2012 drought has
left few options available to farm-
ers with little or no residue on crop
fields, over the long term, there
are three main practices that have
been identified to reduce wind ero-
sion.
Reduce the wind velocity at the
soil surface. Wind speed as low as
six mph one foot above the soil sur-
face can start the movement of soil
particles with highly erodible field
conditions (smooth, bare, loose, dry
and finely granulated particles).
Wind speed increasing from 20
mph to 30 mph triples the rate of
erosion. Wind velocity at the soil
surface can be reduced with wind-
breaks, crop residue, cover crops,
surface roughness and strip crop-
ping.
Maintaining crop residue on the
soil surface and/or ridging or
roughing the soil surface will trap
moving soil particles and reduce
erosion. The smallest soil particles
can be lifted from the soil surface,
suspended, and carried many
miles before falling. Larger parti-
cles can be dislodged and moved
across the soil surface in a bounc-
ing or jumping manner, often dis-
lodging other particles from the
surface, causing a cumulative ef-
fect.
Finally, increasing the size of
soil aggregates requires a stronger
wind to move soil and cause soil
erosion. The size of soil aggregates
can be increased by using crop ro-
tations that include grasses and
legumes, growing high-residue
crops and returning the residue to
the soil, or leaving it on the soil
surface, applying manure, and re-
ducing or eliminating tillage. If
wind erosion is occurring, and/or
conditions are such that the occur-
rence seems inevitable, emergency
tillage can bring large, stable clods
to the soil surface if soil moisture
and texture allow it.
Online resources containing
more information include: SDSU
ExEx 1004, “Wind And Emergency
Erosion Control”: http://pubstor-
age.sdstate.edu/AgBio_Publica-
tions/articles/ExEx1004.pdf, and
University of Nebraska, G1537,
“Wind Erosion and Its Control”:
http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epub-
lic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publica-
tionId=130.
Calendar
•December 12: Soil Health Info
Day - Davison County Extension
Complex, Mitchell, S.D.
These honor roll recipents were
accidentially left off of last weeks
list. We apologize for any incon-
venience this may have caused.
Honor roll - First Quarter
Wall High School
Silver (3.37 - 3.749)
•Freshmen: Monica Bielmaier,
Jade Hertel and Alex Tysdal.
•Sophomores: Logan Bowers,
Emily Linn, ShyAnn Mordecai,
Residents from three western
counties met November 14 in
Kadoka to learn more about a
year-long training program de-
signed to assist rural regional
teams in developing new ap-
proaches to strengthen and en-
hance regional economic develop-
ment activities.
Philip’s Mary Burnett and
Becky Brech were present. Bur-
nett had initially explained the
year-long Stronger Economies To-
gether program to the Philip
Chamber of Commerce.
“SET organizers were very
pleased to hear the commitment of
participants in working together
as a region to strengthen the local
economy. They seemed to under-
stand the power of individual com-
munities uniting under one eco-
nomic development plan for the
three counties,” said Kari O’Neill,
Midland. Other Midland partici-
pants at this meeting were David
and Beth Flom and Andy Blye.
Haakon, Jackson and eastern
Pennington counties have part-
nered to become the West Region
team, one of only two regions in
South Dakota selected to partici-
pate in the SET program. Adminis-
Stronger Economies Together
tered by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture – Rural Devel-
opment and South Dakota State
University Extension, the SET
program is an opportunity for cur-
rent or newly formed rural, multi-
county teams to receive the latest
tools, training and technical assis-
tance to help their region move for-
ward and take advantage of posi-
tive growth and quality of life op-
portunities.
During the year-long program,
the selected regions will receive in-
tensive strategic planning training
for their regional team. They will
also receive data base tools de-
signed to examine the critical driv-
ers of their region and identify
emerging growth sectors and re-
gional competitive advantages.
The teams will also receive techni-
cal assistance and educational
support. The teams will share ed-
ucation and information with more
than 40 other SET regions around
the country.
“The SET program is an unique
opportunity for participants to
learn how to determine what eco-
nomic opportunities exist in the re-
gion and then develop a practical
plan to capitalize on their poten-
tial,” said Christine Sorensen, SET
program coordinator with USDA –
Rural Development.
“In addition, the SET program
encourages involvement from all
regional residents as their diverse
personal and professional experi-
ences can add valuable perspective
to an economic development plan,”
Sorensen added.
All Haakon, Jackson and east-
ern Pennington county residents,
including business owners, farm-
ers/ranchers, employees, parents,
educators, healthcare profession-
als, elected leaders, seniors, clergy
and youth are invited to partici-
pate in SET training sessions,
which will be held monthly in var-
ious locations in the west region.
The next training session is
scheduled for January 2 in Philip
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The lo-
cation will be announced later. At
the January 2 session, partici-
pants will examine regional demo-
graphic date and its impacts on
their economy.
For more information, contact
Burnett at 441-2059 or at mary@
fnbphilip.com.
Danny Muzik and Celine Trask.
•Juniors: Dusty Dartt, Kaden
Eisenbraun, Jennifer Emery, Kelly
Green, Leighah Hertel, Sadie
O’Rourke and Michaela Schaefer.
•Seniors: Kim Billings, Tyrel
Clark, Shanda-Rae Enriquez, Bai-
ley Hapney, Cody Harris, Bailey
Lytle, Laketon McLaughlin, Au-
tumn Schulz and Ryder Wilson.
Bronze (3.0 - 3.369)
Wall High School honor roll
The Hereford Volunteer Fire De-
partment station was broken into
and an estimated $18,000 worth of
equipment was stolen.
The incident occurred approxi-
mately two weeks ago. Stolen
items include Johnson inter-
agency radios, portable generator,
flotation water pump, medical kit,
self contained breathing apparatus
and its spare bottles, and an older
light bar.
According to Walt Haley, Here-
ford fire chief, the equipment was
pretty much brand new, used only
Hereford Volunteer Fire
Department burglarized
in training. The light bar was the
only older item.
“Basically, you steal from every-
one when you do that,” said Haley.
“That’s what ticked everyone off,
not what they stole, but that they
stole from the fire department.”
A passing resident was taking
her children to school and noticed
that the walk-in door was ajar. She
then contacted a fire department
member. The building has no win-
dows, and in gaining entry, the
thieves destroyed the door. The
perpetrator(s) went through the
fire trucks, taking some items
from the building and leaving oth-
ers.
“You accumulate stuff and it
gets to be a really big number,”
said Haley. “I’ve been at this for
over 25 years, and I haven’t got
fired yet. I think I got the job be-
cause I can do the paperwork.”
If anyone can supply any infor-
mation concerning the break-in,
contact the South Dakota Fire
Marshal’s Office at 605-773-3562.
The holidays are all about
spending time with loved ones.
With so many big holiday meals to
plan and prepare, you may be look-
ing for ways to save time in the
kitchen. Luckily, there are plenty
of easy strategies and recipes that
can help.
The key is to simplify your holi-
day menu by planning to use some
of the same ingredients in your ap-
petizers, main dishes and even
breakfast. For example, Pillsbury
Crescent Rolls offer a great base
for a variety of traditional recipes
-- from Ham and Cheese Crescent
Roll-Ups for brunch, to Pinwheel
appetizers in the evening.
With Pillsbury Crescent Rolls,
you can plan ahead and greet
guests with warm, inviting appe-
Quick and delicious holiday appetizers
tizers that have a short prep time
– like Bacon-Cheddar Pinwheels.
So instead of chips and dip this
holiday season, try this recipe
that’s big on taste, easy on effort
and sure to fly off the tray:
Bacon-Cheddar Pinwheels
(Makes 16 pinwheels)
One can (eight oz.) Pillsbury re-
frigerated crescent dinner rolls or
1 can (eight oz.) Pillsbury Crescent
Recipe Creations refrigerated
seamless dough sheet.
Two tablespoons ranch dressing
One-fourth cup cooked real
bacon pieces or four slices bacon,
crisply cooked, crumbled
One-half cup finely shredded
cheddar cheese (two oz.)
One-fourth cup chopped green
onions (four medium)
•Heat oven to 350 degrees F. If
using crescent rolls: Unroll dough;
separate into two long rectangles.
Press each into 12x4-inch rectan-
gle, firmly pressing perforations to
seal. If using dough sheet: unroll
dough; cut lengthwise into two
long rectangles. Press each into
12x4-inch rectangle.
•Spread dressing over each rec-
tangle to edges. Sprinkle each with
bacon, cheddar cheese and onions.
Starting with one short side, roll
up each rectangle; press edge to
seal. With a serrated knife, cut
each roll into eight slices; place cut
side down on ungreased cookie
sheet.
•Bake 12 to 17 minutes or until
edges are deep golden brown. Im-
mediately remove from cookie
sheet. Serve warm.
Save time and please the crowd
with the simple addition of appe-
tizers like Bacon-Cheddar Pin-
wheels to your menu this year.
More holiday and everyday recipes
can be found at www.Pillsbury.
com.
Nothing is more welcoming than
having delicious foods baking in
the oven. Just remember, truly de-
licious food can be quick and easy
to prepare, giving you more time to
spend with your family and guests.
•Freshmen: Raedon Anderson,
Travis Brenner, July Kammerer,
Michael Mordecai, Rylee Schreiber
and Chris Schulz.
•Sophomore: Sterling Ellens,
Andrew Ferris and Will Housman.
•Juniors: Ashley Dauksavage,
Brett Gartner, Renatta Lanfear,
Dusty Leach, Tucker O’Rourke
and Tyler Peterson.
•Senior: Thomas Van Osdol.
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012 • Page 7
annc@
gwtc.net
80 years ago…
Reports were current that mem-
bers of the gang of Al Capone are
planning to attempt to control the
legal beer business in Chicago, if
and when beer is legalized. The
Chicago Herold and Examiner said
it has heard that gangsters hold
options on two brewers, and that
they were negotiating for more
plants. The newspapers said its in-
formation was that the gang’s
“muscle men” have been intimidat-
ing speakeasy proprietors, forming
a bartenders union, and warning
all concerned that they must stand
by the hoodlums or take the conse-
quences.
BirTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Osborne Kitterman, Thursday, No-
vember 10, a girl.
Gus Salee shot a deer one mile
north of Creighton on Tuesday of
last week. It may not be news to
say that Gus shot a deer, but it is
news when one is shot in this sec-
tion of the country. Deer have been
seen in the breaks north of town at
different times but they are very
few and none has been seen, in
open season for a good many years.
This was a fine specimen and was
in fine flesh. Gus was in luck to get
a deer so early in the season and
without leaving his home commu-
nity.
On Wednesday, the 18th of No-
vember, Ethel L. Galbraith and
Joseph Wernig were united in
marriage at the Presbyterian
church in Rapid City, with Rev.
Rew Walz officiating.
70 years ago…
BirTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Ted Huether of Creighton, a
daughter, Saturday, November 21.
Mr. and Mrs. Jess Benson of
Owanka, have received the an-
nouncement of their son’s, Sgt.
Arnold Benson, engagement to
Miss Marie Winans of Carthage,
Mo. The wedding date will not be
set until after the war. Sgt. Benson
enlisted shortly after the declara-
tion of war and has had most of his
training with the United State
Army Air Force at Drane Field,
Fla.
A recount of votes cast in the No-
vember 3, election for the offices of
clerk of courts and register of
deeds has been ordered by the
board of county commissioners and
will be started November 30. The
recount board will consist of
County Judge James Bellamy,
County Treasurer Merle McCain
and County Auditor Thomas
Thompson, any of whom maybe
disqualified by the parties in-
volved. Petitions asking the re-
count were filed Tuesday with the
county auditor by Erma Kluthe
and Stanley Beck, defeated candi-
dates for register of deeds and
clerk of courts, respectively.
The birth last week of nine
brothers and sisters in the south
end of town has been creating a
great deal of comment, especially
since no one will claim ownership
to either the mother or the pups.
South Dakota will experience its
first blackout on the night of De-
cember 14, according to word from
civilian defense officials. This state
will be one of 14 others, including
Iowa, Colorado, Kansas, Min-
nesota, and Wyoming. The test will
affect one-fourth of the total area
of the United States, and a total
population of 15,000,000 people
will be affected.
60 years ago…
The million dollar high-line of
the Bureau of Reclamation run-
ning from Rapid City to Midland
has not been energized as was an-
nounced by radio and press the
past weekend, according to O.S.
Soma, manager of the local WREA.
There is still a section to be com-
pleted that connects this new
power line to the source of power
of the Black Hills Light and Power
Company, says Soma. A temporary
sub-station is being constructed by
WREA near Box Elder, which will
enable a part of WREA’s load to be
carried on this new line as soon as
it becomes energized. This will re-
lieve some of the overload of the
present lines, but still will not give
the full benefits until the perma-
nent high voltage sub-stations are
in operation.
BirTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Clifford Sieh at a Rapid City hos-
pital, a girl, November 19.
Kadoka Press: The South
Dakota State Highway Depart-
ment’s new building in Kadoka is
under construction at present with
the block layers nearing comple-
tion on their part of the building.
Kyberz Construction Company of
Aberdeen has the contract for con-
structing the 46 x 50 cement block
structure. The entire building will
be coated with stucco when com-
pleted. Most of the new building, a
section 32 x 50, will be used for
equipment storage with the re-
mainder being taken up with office
space.
A half-million dollar telephone
company that plans to build 3000
miles of line in Pennington,
Meade, Haakon and Jackson coun-
ties filed corporate papers with the
secretary of state. The Golden
West Telephone Company will
headquarter at Quinn. Named as
director are Melvin Kjerstad, E.G.
Geigle, Tony Krebs, Ingelbert
Fauske and Harvey S. Hilde-
brandt, all of Quinn; Alva Sims,
Wall; Austin O’Dea, Cottonwood;
Adolph Eisenbraun, Creighton;
Thomas J. McNenny, Sturgis;
Richard Kulesza, Haydraw; and
Dale Keyser, Dowling.
50 years ago…
Four Wall High School students,
Anne Schroeder, Judy Barber,
Larry Walker and Gary Welsh,
joined the Choral Group last week-
end in Huron where they partici-
pated in the 1400 voice concert by
the All-State High School Chorus
and Orchestra.
Larry Walker and Darla Wolf,
seniors at the Wall High School,
were crowned King and Queen of
the 1962 School Carnival, Friday
night.
BirTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Zubke (Donna Muller) a daughter,
November 26, at Glasgow, Mont.
Eddie Eisenbraun had the mis-
fortune of fracturing his right
ankle when a horse fell with him
while at work at the Wall Sale
Ring, last Monday. He is hospital-
ized at Quinn.
Four bowling ladies of Wall tried
their bowling skill in Rapid City,
Tuesday. They have entered a Sat-
urday tournament there and
thought they needed a little prac-
tice on the Rapid City lanes. The
group were Mrs. G. W. Shelton,
Mrs. Orval Doyle, Mrs. James
Clark and Mrs. W. A. Joyce.
Over a thousand head of live-
stock were sold at the Wall Live-
stock Auction, Monday, according
to Emil Sieler. Next Monday, 30
head of registered Hereford two-
year old bulls of the W.H.K.
Williams Triangle Hereford Ranch
at Cottonwood; and 50 to 60 young
Hereford cows from the Ralph
Beckwith herd, will be offered for
sale.
40 years ago…
Ross Renner, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Renner, won first place at
the prairie dog hunt in the Conata
area. He shot 53 dogs winning $10,
and Ted Knodel was second with
36 dogs and a $5 prize.
Bob Simpfenderfer, Jr. rammed
into Merlin Doyle early Wednes-
day morning on the Creighton
Road corner in Wall. Doyle’s Ford
pickup has its fender, grill and
hood damaged. Simpfenderfer’s
Dodge Charger has about $300
damage. No one was injured.
Thanksgiving Day: At 9:45
a.m. a car and house-trailer rolled
two miles east of Wasta blocking
both lanes of the west bound traffic
on I-90. Albert Filupeit of Wall, a
Boeing worker, driving his ‘67 Ford
car and pulling his 30 foot trailer
house lost control and rolled. The
car was a total loss and extensive
damage was done to the trailer.
Patrolman Steve Kenoyer investi-
gated the accident. Sunday at
7:15 a.m. there was another acci-
dent on the interstate near Wasta.
Gordon Collins, driving a ‘71
Chevrolet van and pulling a U-
Haul trailer hit some ice on the
Cheyenne River bridge. Lost con-
trol as he came off the bridge and
rolled it into the median. Minor in-
juries were suffered by the Dennis
Collins family, who were riding in
the van. Sunday at 3:30 p.m.
there was an accident four miles
east of Wall on Highway 16.
Charles Foster of Rapid City was
driving a ‘69 Chevrolet pickup and
towing a 1939 pickup when some
of the bolts broke lose on the towed
vehicle causing it to swerve,
mowed off two guard posts and
rolled one complete turn in the
ditch. Steve Street, a passenger in
the pickup, was thrown out of the
vehicle. They suffered minor in-
juries but did not need an ambu-
lance.
30 years ago…
This past Saturday, the Wall
Jaycettes presented a Fall Fashion
Show and Salad Luncheon in the
Methodist Church basement.
Fashions were provided by
Braun’s, Shelton’s, The Fashion
Shoppe in Philip, Young Genera-
tion and Herberger’s. Over 100
area women attended this event.
Besides local women and children
modeling the clothing, entertain-
ment was provided by Tami
Holsether, who sang “Send In The
Clowns”; Kelly Ruland, who pres-
ent the speech on South Dakota
that she will present at the Miss
Rodeo America Contest in Okla-
homa City; and Jamie Benne, who
sang “Endless Love”.
BirTH: Born November 14th, a
daughter, Amanda Joy Wilson, to
Kenneth and Janet Wilson of Elm
Springs. Little Amanda weighed 7
lbs. 5 1/2 oz., and measured 20 1/2
inches long. Grandmothers are
Bonnie Curtis of Quinn and Mary
Ann Wilson of Elm Springs.
Amanda joins an older brother,
Bryan.
The 1982 girls basketball season
came to an end for the Wall Eagles
last week when they defeated the
Philip Scotties, 37-35. The victory
followed a Thursday night defeat
by Kadoka Kougers, 46-49. Both
games were played during the Dis-
trict 20 Basketball Tournament at
Kadoka. Bennett County traveled
to Rapid City this week to repre-
sent the district in the Region 8
tourney.
20 years ago…
On Tuesday evening, November
10, 1992, the Wall Lady Eagles
met the Philip Scotties on Wall’s
home court. Wall lost to Philip by
a final score of 66-67. Thursday
evening, on Wall’s own floor, the
Lady Eagles defeated the Hill City
girls by a score of 63-45.
Janet Carmichael, a senior at
the Wall High School, was the Sep-
tember Student of the month. Her
parents are Lyle and Brenda
Carmichael of Wall.
The Wall Lady Eagles’ road to
the district basketball champi-
onship began last week in New
Underwood against Crazy Horse.
The Lady Eagles wounded Crazy
Horse, 98-27. In the next game,
Wall defeated Jones County, 55-53.
In the final game of the districts,
Wall defeated Kadoka with a final
score of 64-60. The Lady Eagles
move on to Regions and will go up
against Bison.
10 years ago…
The Wall Eagles volleyball team
played a tough Harding County
team for Regions last Tuesday in
Sturgis. The girls played three
matches against Harding County
and came up short.
At the age of 25, the height of 6
foot 3 inches and weighin gin at
264 lbs., Brady McDonnell is now
on the active roster for the Buffalo
Bills, playing on the special teams
and as a tight end. The Bills
signed McDonnell on April 3, 2002,
but he spent his first months on
the practice team. Last week,
though, the Bills activated him to
the traveling roster. He will be
playing against the Miami Dol-
phins this Sunday in Miami.
Presentation of awards spon-
sored by the East Pennington Con-
servation District and several local
Wall businesses was the highlight
of the supper and awards presen-
tation held on November 17. Pre-
sented with awards were: the
Clark Family, winners of the
Farmstead Award presented by
Brett Blasius of First Western
Bank; Dale and Jackie Sawvell,
winners of the Shelterbelt Award
presented by Gary Beck of Dakota
Mill and Grain; Butch and Kathy
Beach, winners of the Environ-
mental Green Yard Award pre-
sented by Kirby Keyser, Manager
of the District; and Evan and Stacy
Deutscher, winners of the Natural
Resources Management Award
presented by George Langendorfer
of Johnson’s Ranchers Supply.
The Looking Glass of Time
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O’CONNELL CONSTRUC-
TION, INC., PHILIP: Rock,
Sand, Gravel (screened or
crushed). We can deliver.
Dams, dugouts, building sites.
Our 37th year. Glenn or Trace,
859-2020. PR11-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAY-
ING: Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-
2888, Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka,
SD, or call 837-2690. Craig
cell: 390-8087, Sauntee cell:
390-8604; wrex@gwtc.net
K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: 2000 Doonan
Stepdeck, 48x102, 22.5 steel
wheels, 2 tool boxes, $17,500;
’02 Timpte grain trailer,
51x102 x78, Low Pro 24.5 all
alum. 3 axle with lift, elect.
tarp, $28,500; 1995 Marquez
double belly dumps, 3 axle
front, 5 axle pup, Low Pro 24.5
all alum., $52,500. Call CK
Dale, Philip, 859-2121 or 685-
3091. PR14-2tp
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
some alfalfa, big rounds, semi-
load lots, delivered pricing, no
mold. Call Rob, 390-5535, or
Charles, 390-5506. P50-5tp
FOR SALE: 320 acres of crop-
land, 14 miles north of Mid-
land. NE1/4 Sec. 3, NW1/4
Sec. 2, 3N24E. Call 222-6261.
PR12-4tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-
ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1995 Pontiac Fire-
bird, excellent condition, low
miles, excellent gas mileage.
Asking $2,900. Call 515-1460.
PR13-2tp
FOR SALE: 1979 Chevrolet
Silverado 30, dually with Du-
ralist DSS 30, 25’ bucket lift.
$1,800. 441-9669, Wall.
WP11-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats,
power windows, locks & seats,
good tires. Call 685-8155.
PR10-tfn
LOST
LOST: Silver bracelet with
great sentimental value; lost at
our wedding reception at the
legion hall in Philip on Novem-
ber 23rd. If found, please call
me, Crystal Martinez, at 859-
3941 or 515-0293. PR14-1tc
HELP WANTED
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Department
Worker. Experience in road /
bridge construction / mainte-
nance preferred. CDL Pre-em-
ployment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted. In-
formation (605) 837-2410 or
(605) 837-2422, fax (605) 837-
2447.
K51-3tc
FIRE MITIGATION SPECIAL-
IST: Meade County,SD (Stur-
gis) Responsible for the mark-
ing, thinning, and removal of
trees from private land owner’s
property. This is a jobs training
employment effort for Veteran
qualified individuals. Closes
November 30, 2012. See: www.
meadecounty.org for applica-
tion instructions and complete
job description. Contact: Jerry
Derr @ 605.720.1625 / jderr@
meadecounty.org P50-2tc
COOK WANTED: Good Samar-
itan Society, New Underwood,
Part-time for 4-8:30 p.m. shift.
Contact: Lorraine, 754-6489 or
apply online www.good-sam.
com. CHECK OUT OUR NEW
WAGE SCALE, INCLUDING
COMPENSATION FOR EXPE-
RIENCE. EOE/AA/M/F/V/H.
PW48-4tc
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED
at Days Inn, Wall. Possibly per-
manent year-round position,
starting immediately. Contact
Theresa, 279-2000.
PW46-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 14’x20’ Menard’s
shed kit for sale. It has light
gray siding with slate gray
trim. Asking $3,000 for it; paid
$3,700 for it a couple months
ago. The kit has never been
touched and stored out of the
weather. If interested, contact
685-4608. PR14-2tc
FOR SALE BY SEALED BIDS:
1984 Bluebird bus and 1987
IHC bus. Sold as is. Bids will
be opened on Friday, Novem-
ber 30 at 1 p.m. MT at the
Kadoka School Business Of-
fice. Question contact Supt.
Jamie Hermann at 837-2175
or e-mail at
jamie.hermann@k12.sd.us.
Bids may be submitted to
Kadoka Area School District,
PO Box 99, Kadoka, SD 57543.
K51-1tc
NATIVITY COLLECTIONS: I’m
selling all my nativities I have
cherished and collected for
many years: Tuesday, Nov. 27,
at the Senechal in Philip, 1 to
5 p.m. P51-1tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: Complete driving
harness for miniature horses,
36” - 40” tall. Call 484-5409.
PR14-2tp
TRIANGLE RANCH BED &
BREAKFAST is available for
brunches, luncheons, dinner
parties and retreats, December
- April. Contact Lyndy, 859-
2122, triangle@gwtc.net, www.
triangleranchbb.com
P51-8tc
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myr-
tle Ave Philip. 3 bedroom 1.5
bath, central air, fuel oil heat
and wood stove. Open concept,
stainless steel fridge and stove.
washer and dryer included.
Hardwood laminate floors, sep-
arate dining room. Mostly fin-
ished basement. Ceiling fans
throughout. New windows and
roof. Fenced in, large backyard
with cover patio and storage
shed. Can email photos. Call
859-2470 or (785) 259-4207.
P48-8tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, attached 2-car
garage, large lot. Call 859-
2403, Philip. PR10-tfn
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 High
St. in Philip, 2 bedrooms, full
basement, great view off back
deck. Call 859-2783 or 859-
3249 or 567-3515 to view.
P49-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment in Wall. Call 386-
2222. PW51-4tc
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan,
381-2861 or 279-2861.
WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we
can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an applica-
tion. Gateway Apartments,
Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Rav-
ellette Publications, Inc. re-
quests all classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid
at the time the order is placed.
All phone numbers are with
an area code of 605, unless
otherwise indicated.
Deadline for Classifieds & Cards of Thanks
is 11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Center for Cultural Interchange
seeks volunteer Local Coordina-
tors for exchange students in
South Dakota. Some compensa-
tion. Contact Mary Armstrong
for info: 1-888-440-8750 MArm-
st rong@cci - exchange. ORG
www.cci-exchange.ORG.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for
SALE (serious inquires only).
Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
BIDS
ACCEPTING BIDS THROUGH-
OUT DECEMBER: 1992 Ford
E350, 7.3 diesel ambulance (un-
equipped), 110,287 approximate
miles. For additional informa-
tion or photos, email jocoamb@
goldenwest.net or leave message
at 605-669-3125. Mail bids to:
Jones County Ambulance, P.O.
Box 305, Murdo, S.D. 57559.
EMPLOYMENT
CENTRAL PARK MANAGER -
Huron SD Park & Rec. Dept. See
duties and applications avail-
able at www.huronsd.com. Click
on “City Government,” then
“City Employment.”
LIVE, INC., an accredited
agency supporting people with
disabilities, has FT evening and
supervisory positions available.
Call (605) 374-3742 or e-mail
resumeí to julielive@sdplains.
com.
SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOL-
OGIST ASSISTANT: immediate
opening in NW SD, great bene-
fits and educational cost reim-
bursement: contact Cris Owens,
Northwest Area Schools
(605)466-2206 Christine.Owens
@k12.sd.us.
DRIVERS: OWNER OPERA-
TORS NEEDED Refrigerated Di-
vision, join our experienced
team of seasoned professionals.
Terminals in KS, SD, TN, NM. 2
years OTR experience. Call 800-
796-8200 x103.
SKILLED MEAT CUTTER POSI-
TION available at West Side
Meats, Mobridge, SD. Competi-
tive wages, good benefits, afford-
able housing available. For ap-
plication or more information
call 605-845-2271 or email
grandriverbison@yahoo.com.
FOR SALE
MUST SELL: 2012 Chevrolet
Suburban LT 4x4, 29,000 miles,
$38,000; 2010 GMC Yukon XL
4x4, 66,000 miles, $30,500;
2000 Chevrolet Suburban 4x4,
$4,500. 605-871-9996.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
PETS
CHESAPEAKE PUPPIES: In
Time For Christmas!!! Cham-
pion Bloodlines! Excellent
Hunters! Great Personalities!
605-730-2088.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER
OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health ins.,
credit, 03¢ safety bonus, Call
Joe for details, 800.456.1024,
joe@tbitruck.com.
DRIVERS: $1,000 SIGN-ON
BONUS. New Pay Program!
*Earn up to 50 cpm *Home
Weekly* 2500+ miles, 95% no-
tarp. Must be Canadian eligible
(888) 691-5705.
“We have sold the house and no longer
need these items”
* * * HIGHLITES INCLUDE * * *
~ 1999 Ford F-250
powerstroke pickup, crew
cab ~ 2003 Titan
“Renegade” 3 horse slant
w/living quarters ~ horse
feeders & water tanks ~ antique tack &
collectible items ~ shop tools & like new
adjustable shelving ~ upright gun safe -
double door ~ lawn & garden items
~ power tools & shop items ~ railroad
ties & fence items
A very nice, well kept offering.
Not a large auction.
It will be completed by very
early afternoon.
We can be in the heated shop
if it’s cold!
THANK YOUS
I want to thank everyone who
has shown concern for me pre
and post surgery. Whether it
was with a card, a call or per-
sonal contact, it has meant so
much. I want to specially thank
those who have held me up in
your prayers. It makes so much
difference. God bless you all.
Gale Patterson
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
Pro/rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
For all the details: www.mcphersonauction.com
WALL CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
MINUTES
NOVEMBER 16, 2012
The Wall City Council met for a special
meeting November 16th at 9:00am in the
Community Center meeting room.
Members present: David L. Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Pete Dunker,
Councilman; Jerry Morgan, Councilman;
Bill Leonard, Councilman; Mike Ander-
son, Councilman; Stan Anderson, Coun-
cilman
Others present: Carolynn Anderson, Fi-
nance Officer; Laurie Hindman, Penning-
ton Co. Courant
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by S Anderson, second by
Leonard to approve the agenda. Motion
carried.
The recommendation from Brosz Engi-
neering on who to award the bid on the
Airport snow removal equipment was pre-
sented. The low bidder was Grossenberg
Implement from Philip but the specifica-
tions were not met; therefore, the next
lowest bidder was Jenner Equipment
from Rapid City for $152,791.00. Motion
by S Anderson, second by Dunker to
award the bid to Jenner Equipment. Mo-
tion carried.
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
go into executive session for the purpose
of discussing personnel issues according
to SDCL 1-25-2 at 9:04am. Motion car-
ried.
Mayor Hahn called the meeting out of ex-
ecutive session at 10:13am.
The meeting was adjourned at 10:13am.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published November 29, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $20.14.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Ken and Cory Tomovick have applied for
a Conditional Use Permit to allow a
Recreational Resort, including assem-
blies of people for weddings and small
events and a Vacation Home Rental on
the subject property in a General Agricul-
ture District located on Lot 1 of Bonanza
Bar MC 970 and the unplatted part of Bo-
nanza Bar MC 970 (also in Section 1),
Section 12, T1S, R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, located at 23632
Strato Bowl Road, in accordance with
Sections 205 and 510 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 10th day of December 2012. At this
time, any person interested may appear
and show cause, if there be any, why
such requests should or should not be
granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published November 29, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $17.15.
NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
ONE (1) NEW SINGLE DRUM
VIBRATORY ROLLER
To Be Furnished To
County of Pennington
Rapid City, South Dakota
Sealed bids will be received by the Pen-
nington County Highway Department on
behalf of the Board of Commissioners for
the above-referenced item at the Pen-
nington County Highway Department,
3601 Cambell Street, Rapid City, SD,
57701, until 2:00 PM on Wednesday, De-
cember 12, 2012. Any bids received after
2:00 PM will be returned unopened.
Copies of the minimum specifications are
on file at the Pennington County Highway
Department, 3601 Cambell Street, Rapid
City, South Dakota 57701, and may also
be obtained from the Pennington County
Website at
http://www.co.pennington.sd.us/high-
way/hwy.html. For questions and com-
ments, please contact the Pennington
County Highway Department at (605)
394-2166.
By virtue of statutory authority, preference
will be given to materials, products, and
supplies found or produced within the
State of South Dakota.
The Board of Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities therein and re-
serves the right to award the contract to
the lowest responsible bidder as they so
determine.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published November 29, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $15.57.
NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
TWO (2) NEW LOADERS
To Be Furnished To
County of Pennington
Rapid City, South Dakota
Sealed bids will be received by the Pen-
nington County Highway Department on
behalf of the Board of Commissioners for
the above-referenced item at the Pen-
nington County Highway Department,
3601 Cambell Street, Rapid City, SD,
57701, until 2:00 PM on Wednesday, De-
cember 12, 2012. Any bids received after
2:00 PM will be returned unopened.
Copies of the minimum specifications are
on file at the Pennington County Highway
Department, 3601 Cambell Street, Rapid
City, South Dakota 57701, and may also
be obtained from the Pennington County
Website at
http://www.co.pennington.sd.us/high-
way/hwy.html. For questions and com-
ments, please contact the Pennington
County Highway Department at (605)
394-2166.
By virtue of statutory authority, preference
will be given to materials, products, and
supplies found or produced within the
State of South Dakota.
The Board of Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities therein and re-
serves the right to award the contract to
the lowest responsible bidder as they so
determine.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published November 29, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $15.258.
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Public Notice
Regarding
“Thank Yous”
submitted as
“Letters to the Editor”
The position of this newspaper to accept “Thank
Yous”, whether directed to a person, any institution,
affiliation or entity for placement in anything other
than the “Cards of Thanks” column located in the
Classified Section of this newspaper:
THERE WILL BE A CHARGE!
Letters of thanks or congratulations shall be con-
strued as advertising and will be inserted for place-
ment in the proper location of this newspaper.
PLEASE ASK IF IN DOUBT
If you are in doubt about whether material sent in or
brought in to this newspaper, be sure to ask for assis-
tance at the counter or please leave a phone number
so that you may be contacted. There is a difference
between news and advertising.
Pennington County Courant
PO Box 435, 212 4th Ave., Wall, SD 57790
• (605) 279-2565 •
• annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net •
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTioN: As a young couple
just starting out, we're eager to ac-
quire good communication skills
that will help us build a successful
lifelong marriage. In particular,
we'd like to learn how to make
major decisions together with the
least amount of conflict and misun-
derstanding. Can you help us?
ANSWEr: The most successful
marriages are those in which hus-
band and wife learn how to function
as a team and lean on one another's
strengths. If the woman is better at
finances, then she's in charge of the
budget. If the man is better at plan-
ning, he maps out family outings,
vacations and family devotions. As
on a football squad, each player
uses his talents and works with the
others for the good of the whole
team. If one player tries to do it all,
the team suffers. If one player in-
sists on playing a position he's not
gifted for, the same thing happens.
This analogy bears special appli-
cation to an appropriate under-
standing of Ephesians 5:22-30,
where the apostle Paul writes that
the husband has a special position
to play as "head" of the wife. This
doesn't mean that the man is
granted free rein to dominate the
woman in an authoritarian manner.
Instead, he's supposed to act as a
wise "team captain," recognizing his
wife's strengths and using them for
the benefit of the entire family.
If the "captain" is truly looking
out for the best interests of the rest
of the team, and if he's willing to
sacrifice for the common good, wise
decisions will be made. Those deci-
sions may be made jointly, or by
each spouse in his or her area of ex-
pertise. Either way, your goal as a
couple should be to make decisions
that strengthen and benefit your re-
lationship.
Here are some guidelines for
making decisions that you can fol-
low individually and together:
1. Apply sound judgment. God
has given the two of you rational
minds and the ability to investigate.
He expects you to use them in your
decision making.
2. List pros and cons. Sometimes
seeing on paper the benefits and
detriments of possible choices helps
to put things in perspective.
3. Consult God's Word. When
making a decision, study the Bible
and see what God has to say on the
subject specifically or in principle.
4. Pray. Many couples find that if
both spouses are praying about a
decision, God gives them a "peace"
about taking one direction over an-
other.
5. Seek wise counsel. "Pride only
breeds quarrels, but wisdom is
found in those who take advice"
(Proverbs 13:10). Don't be afraid to
talk to other couples, a pastor or a
mentor about your decision. Some-
times others can see more objec-
tively than you can. This is espe-
cially helpful when the two of you
have different points of view and
can't seem to agree or compromise.
One last point: when couples who
share a Christian commitment
come to a fork in the road, they usu-
ally want to know if their choice of
direction reflects God's will. Some-
times they're burdened by fears
that they may miss the "one and
only right choice." But decisions
aren't always a matter of absolute
right or wrong; sometimes they're
about preference. If consulting
Scripture and other mature believ-
ers doesn't turn up a spiritual prin-
ciple to follow, you're probably pick-
ing between two or more equally
valid choices. In that case, the Lord
promises to guide you - often invisi-
bly and imperceptibly - as you take
your concerns to Him in prayer. Re-
member the words of the apostle
James: "If any of you lacks wisdom,
he should ask God, who gives gen-
erously to all without finding fault,
and it will be given to him" (James
1:5).
QUESTioN: Is it important for
families to share meals together?
Everyone in our household is busy
with outside activities—school
sports, church youth group outings,
committee meetings, late nights at
the office, ballet lessons, band prac-
tice, etc., etc. We rarely have time to
sit down at the dinner table to-
gether. Meals are usually squeezed
into the brief moments between
other commitments and eaten on
the run. Is this a problem? If so,
what do you think we should do
about it?
ANSWEr: Your situation is not
unusual. In fact, it’s a growing con-
cern for many families today. But
viewed from the right angle, it could
represent a hidden opportunity. Be-
lieve it or not, there’s tremendous
potential here to raise the quality of
life in your home and enhance the
depth of your family relationships.
The importance of food to the
health of our physical bodies is ob-
vious. but the context in which we
take this nourishment is equally
crucial to our overall well-being. We
are not animals that graze in a field
or gather at a trough. We do not in-
hale our food and then wander
away. We are supposed to get fed at
the table in more ways than one.
Meals are a time for socializing,
conversation, sharing, and celebra-
tion. Family meals can be powerful
events in the lives of both children
and adults. They can and should be
an occasion for sharing the day’s
events, decompressing, commiserat-
ing, and encouraging one another.
They’re a time to laugh, learn how
to speak and listen politely, instill
values, establish one’s identity as a
member of the family, welcome
guests, and acknowledge God’s pro-
vision on a day-to-day basis.
How important and powerful is
this experience of family together-
ness at the dinner table? In a classic
case of scientific research corrobo-
rating common sense, a 2010 study
on “The Importance of Family Din-
ners” (published by Columbia Uni-
versity’s National Center on Addic-
tion and Substance Abuse) found
that teens who have five to seven
family dinners per week are twice
as likely to receive higher grades in
school (A’s or B’s) and three times
likelier to say that they have excel-
lent relationships with their par-
ents. They’re also many times less
prone to experiment with smoking,
drinking, and drug abuse as com-
pared with those who have fewer
than three family meals a week.
Unfortunately, family dinners are
an endangered species. As in your
case, they are widely threatened by
over-commitment, crowded calen-
dars, and electronic distractions
such as TVs, computers, and
phones. The good news is that this
trend can often be resisted. But this
requires intentionality. To be spe-
cific, it takes a deliberate decision
on the part of every family member
to make shared meals a priority.
Here are some practical strategies
you may want to consider:
•Set aside three, if not more,
nights per week (perhaps including
a “cook’s day off” meal after church
on Sunday) to be designated for
family meals. The expectation is
that “all hands will be on deck,”
even young children, unless prior
notice is given.
•After considering the ages and
abilities represented in your family,
establish routines that will spread
the work around, thus relieving
mom of some of the burden of prepa-
ration. The tasks involved in plan-
ning the menu, preparing the vari-
ous components of the meal, and
cleaning up can be rotated among
the able-bodied family members
who are living at home. Younger
children can learn to set the table.
Everybody should help clear it.
•Table manners (including such
niceties as pulling out chairs for the
ladies and waiting to eat until
everyone is seated and grace has
been said) can and should be en-
couraged.
•Televisions should be turned off.
Phones should be turned off, taken
off the hook, or left unanswered.
This is a time to talk to one another
unhindered by the yammering of
the tube or the demands of
whomever decides to text or call
you.
•Speaking of talking: you don’t
want to restrict topics of conversa-
tion too severely, but it’s wise to ad-
dress hot family issues at some
other time. If mealtimes become a
hotbed of constant bickering and
animosity, no one will want to show
up. Ideally, the family table should
be a place of warmth, respect,
safety, genuine interest in what
everyone has to say, and mutual
support. If the kids are having trou-
ble with this, some role-modeling of
respectful conversation from Mom
and Dad will speak volumes. If no
one seems to have much to say, you
can stir the pot with a few open-
ended questions, such as, “What
was the highlight of your day?” or
“What didn’t go well today?”
•While you’re at it, mealtimes
can also provide opportunities to
talk with your children about the
foods they (and you) eat, and why
some are definitely better than oth-
ers. Obviously, learning by example
at the table—sampling the foods
you’re discussing—can help set pat-
terns that will last a lifetime.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer is
excerpted from books authored by
Dr. James Dobson and published by
Tyndale House Publishers. Dr. Dob-
son is the Chairman of the Board of
Focus on the Family, a nonprofit or-
ganization dedicated to the preser-
vation of the home. Copyright 2003
James Dobson, Inc. All rights re-
served. International copyright se-
cured.
The Perfect Gift!
Here’s a gi that says
“Merry Christmas” every week of the year!
Order a gi subscription to one of our
newspapers and just before Christmas, we’ll send the
recipient a card announcing your gi and start the
subscription with the holiday issue of December 20.
Buy or renew as many subscriptions as you like.
It’s the “Perfect Gi.”
$5.00 OFF EACH SUBSCRIPTION OF (2) OR MORE NEW
SUBS OR RENEWALS PURCHASED!
Pennington Co. Courant ($35 + tax local) ($42 out of area)
(605) 279-2565 • PO Box 435, Wall, SD 57790
$1.00
(lax |rc|uded)
Number 4ô
Vo|ume 107
November 15, 2012
Tho gonornI oIocfIon wns hoId on
Tuosdny, Þovombor 6.
!osuIfs for fho oIocfIon from
IonnIngfon Counfy nro ns foIIows:
PvecIncts counted - 45
(out 45)
:!ogIsforod vofors - 64,26?
:InIIofs cnsf - TofnI - 44,8?9
:InIIofs cnsf - IInnk - l0
:Vofor Turnouf - TofnI - 69.83
µorconf
:Vofor Turnouf - IInnk - .02
µorconf
PvesIdentIu! £!ectovs
:Obnmn nnd IIdon IIocfors
(ÐIM) - l5,l25 - 34.02 µorconf
:Coodo nnd CIymor IIocfors
(COÞ) - 29l - .65 µorconf
:!omnoy nnd !ynn IIocfors
(!II) - 28,232 - 63.49 µorconf
:Johnson nnd Crny IIocfors
(!II) - 8l6 - l.84 µorconf
\nIted Stutes RepvesentutIve
Iov PennIngton County
(vofors couId vofo for uµ fo ono)
:Mnff VnrIIok (ÐIM) - l5,5l6 -
35.32 µorconf
:KrIsfI Þoom (!II) - 28,4l8 -
64.68 µorconf
Pub!Ic \tI!ItIes CommIssIonev
SIx-yeuv
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:Mnff McCovorn - (ÐIM) -
l3,08? - 3l.65 µorconf
:KrIsfIo IIogon (!II) - 25,3?2 -
6l.35 µorconf
:!ussoII CInrk (!II) - 2,894 -
?.00 µorconf
Pub!Ic \tI!ItIes CommIssIonev
Iouv-yeuv
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:ÞIck Þomoc (ÐIM) - l2,93? -
3l.96 µorconf
:ChrIs ÞoIson (!II) - 2?,536 -
68.04 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 2?
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:JIm Irndford (ÐIM) - 8l - l00
µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 29
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:!nrry !hodon (!II) - l84 - l00
µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 30
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:Iruco !nmµoIborg (!II) -
3,350 - l00 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 32
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:Sfnn AdoIsfoIn (!II) - 6,409 -
l00 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 33
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:IhII Jonson (!II) - 4,569 5?.44
µorconf
:Mnff McCrnfh (IÞÐ) - 3,385 -
42.56 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 34
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:CrnIg TIoszon (!II) - 8,283 -
l00 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 35
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo ono)
:Mnrk KIrkoby (!II) - 5,382 -
l00 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 2?
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo fwo)
:KovIn KIIIor (ÐIM) - 53 - l4.60
µorconf
:IIIznbofh Mny (!II) - 235 -
64.?4 µorconf
:KnfhIoon Ann (IÞÐ) - ?5 -
20.66 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 29
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo fwo)
:Cnry ! Cnmmnck (!II) - l46 -
53.28 µorconf
:Ðonn WInk (!II) - l28 - 46.?2
µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 30
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo fwo)
:MIko VorchIo (!II) - 2,950 -
54.62 µorconf
:!nnco !ussoII (!II) - 2,45l -
45.38 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 32
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo fwo)
:JnckIo Swnnson (ÐIM) - 4,0?5
- 29.48 µorconf
:KrIsfIn Conzof (!II) - 5,004 -
36.2l µorconf
:IrInn Cosch (!II) - 4,?42 -
34.3l µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 33
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo fwo)
:!obIn A. Ingo (ÐIM) - 2,?98 -
23.92
:JncquoIIno SIy (!II) - 5,008 -
42.82 µorconf
:Scoff W. CrnIg (!II) - 3,890 -
33.26 µorconf
Stute Senutov ÐIstvIct 34
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo fwo)
:John C WIIImnn (ÐIM) - 2,9??
- l6.56 µorconf
:Ðnn Ðrydon (!II) - 6,l45 -
34.l8 µorconf
:ÐnvId !usf (!II) - 6,355 -
35.35 µorconf
:MIko !onrdon (IÞÐ) - 2,500 -
l3.9l µorconf
Stute RepvesentutIves
ÐIstvIct 35
(vofors couId vofo uµ fo fwo)
:Jny Iond (ÐIM) - 2,208 - l?.?6
µorconf
:Shnno !IobIg (ÐIM) - 2,538 -
20.42 µorconf
:Ðon Koµµ (!II) - 4,305 - 34.63
µorconf
:IInIno ¨ChIµ¨ CnmµboII (!II)
- 3,3?9 - 2?.l8 µorconf
County CommIssIonev
ÐIstvIct 2
(vofors couId vofo for ono)
:Shnron Croon (ÐIM) - 2,238 -
42.59 µorconf
:Þnncy Trnufmnn (!II) - 3,0l?
- 5?.4l µorconf
JustIce G!en A. Sevevson
:Yos - 2?,596 - ?8.23 µorconf
:Þo - ?,6?8 - 2l.?? µorconf
West Ðukotu Wutev Ðev ÐIst
ÐIv Aveu 4
:!nrry Ð. Inkor - l,2l4 - 46.6?
µorconf
:!nvorn I. Koch - l,38? - 53.33
µorconf
ConstItutIonu! Amendment M
:Yos - ll,00? - 2?.99 µorconf
:Þo - 28,3l9 - ?2.0l µorconf
ConstItutIonu! Amendment N
:Yos - l5,868 - 38.3l µorconf
:Þo - 25,555 - 6l.69 µorconf
ConstItutIonu! Amendment O
:Yos - 24,20? - 60.l5 µorconf
:Þo - l6,040 - 39.85 µorconf
ConstItutIonu! Amendment P
:Yos - 2?.6?5 - 68.2l µorconf
:Þo - l2,900 - 3l.?9 µorconf
InItIuted Meusuve 15
:Yos - l8,523 - 43.6l µorconf
:Þo - 23,952 - 56.39 µorconf
ReIevved Iuw 14
:Yos - l8,?89 - 49.65 µorconf
:Þo - 2l,226 - 53.05 µorconf
ReIevved Iuw 16
:Yos - l?,2l8 - 40.?3 µorconf
:Þo - 25,055 - 59.2? µorconf
by IuuvIe HIndmun
Tho WnII CIfy CouncII mof on
Thursdny, Þovombor 8, nf 6:30
µ.m. nf fho WnII CommunIfy Con-
for moofIng room.
Sgf. Ðnn WnrdoI wIfh fho Ion-
nIngfon Counfy ShorIff`s Ðoµnrf-
monfs Informod fho bonrd fhnf fho
ShorIff`s offIco hns oxcoodod fho
mInImum hours roquIrod nnd nro
µrovIdIng qunIIfy sorvIcos fhnf fho
cIfy µnys for.
!nndy CrIoboI wIfh fho Youfh
IoofbnII grouµ nskod fho councII
for uso of fho Crnnd HnII nnd fo
nIso wnIvo fho foos for fho grouµ fo
hnvo n µofIuck suµµor nnd hnnd
ouf nwnrds. Tho councII nµµrovod
hIs roquosf.
IuIIdIng µormIf for fho ÐIscounf
MnII fo consfrucf n fonco bohInd
fhoIr buIIdIng wns dIscussod.
CouncII mombors fooI fho fonco
wouId bo n snfofy Issuo nnd wIII
comµIIcnfo µnrkIng Issuos In fho
bnck of fho µosf offIco. Tho ownor
nnd ronfor of fho µroµorfy wIII bo
nskod fo nffond fho Ðocombor
councII moofIng.
:WnII Ðrug wns nµµrovod fo In-
sfnII n now fncndo for fho WnII
Ðrug MnII.
:CondIfIonnI !so for fho IoI-
Ishod IInky wns ronowod for nn-
ofhor fhroo yonrs.
An ordInnnco wIII bo drnwn uµ
whIch wIII IncIudo fIorod fInos for
commorcInI busInossos cnughf
usIng nnofhor commorcInI busI-
noss` dumµsfor.
Mnyor Ðnvo Hnhn nskod If Iro-
sfon Johnson, IInnnco OffIcor Cnr-
oIynn Andorson, fwo councII mom-
bors nnd hImsoIf nµµrovo bIds for
fho nIrµorf snow romovnI oquIµ-
monf. Hnhn dIdn`f wnnf fo cnII n
sµocInI moofIng for fhIs µurµoso.
TrnffIc hns boon sµoodIng
fhrough fho grnvoI µnrkIng Iof nnd
Hnhn nskod, ¨How do wo hnndIo
fhIs Issuo¨¨ SIgns hnvo boon µosfod
for ¨Þo OvornIghf CnmµIng¨ nnd
¨Iroo CIfy InrkIng,¨ buf fho sIgns
nron`f boIng onforcod. If wns do-
cIdod fo µosf sµood IImIf sIgns nf
fho grnvoI µnrkIng Iof nnd fho oId
schooI µnrkIng Iof nnd hnvo fho µo-
IIco onforco fho now sµood IImIf.
An ngroomonf hns boon drnwn
uµ nnd nµµrovod fo nIIow doµufIos
fo µnrk fhoIr µorsonnI vohIcIos In
fho µoIIco sfnfIon gnrngo.
IubIIc Works ÐIrocfor Joff CInrk
roµorfod duo fo fho bIg wInd fhnf
wo hnd n couµIo of wooks ngo fho
scrows In n couµIo of fho now sfroof
IIghfs hnvo boon sfrIµµod ouf. Ho
nofod fho mnffor hns boon furnod
ovor fo fho cIfy ongInoor. CInrk Is
wnIfIng fo honr bnck from fho ongI-
noor nf fhIs fImo.
Hnhn roµorfod ho roconfIy nf-
fondod nn Imorgoncy Mnnngo-
monf moofIng nnd sfnfod, ¨Thoro
nro Issuos concornIng fho cIfy.¨ Ho
nskod fho councII whnf wouId hnµ-
µon If fho cIfy Iosf µowor nnd fho
WnII CommunIfy Confor Crnnd
HnII wns fIIIod wIfh µooµIo¨ Ho
wonf on fo sny fhnf fho cIfy hns nn
oµµorfunIfy fo buy nn omorgoncy
gonornfor nnd fhoIr cosf wouId
mnybo bo 25 µorconf. Ho doosn`f
hnvo nn osfImnfo yof buf fho
Imorgoncy Mnnngomonf ÐIrocfor
wIII bo nf fho Ðocombor moofIng.
CInrk wIII gof osfImnfos nnd brIng
bnck fo fho Ðocombor moofIng.
CInrk gnvo nn uµdnfo on fho
sowor/Ingoon µrojocf. AII fho onso-
monfs buf ono hnvo boon sIgnod
who wouId soII fho cIfy fho µroµ-
orfy fhnf fhoy nood. Tho Wnfor
nnd Wnsfo CommIffoo rocom-
mondod fhnf fho cIfy buy fho µroµ-
orfy. A mofIon wns mndo nnd nµ-
µrovod fo nIIow fho commIffoo fo
µurchnso fho µroµorfy.
Tho AmbuInnco ÐIsfrIcf Ionso
ngroomonf wns rovIowod. If wns
docIdod fo gof fho squnro foofngo of
fho buIIdIng fhnf housos fho nmbu-
Inncos nnd fIro frucks nnd dofor-
mIno fho squnro foofngo In ordor fo
µrofocf fho fIro doµnrfmonf In fho
Ionso ngroomonf.
Tho councII nµµrovod fho bIIIIng
for fho nmbuInnco fo sfnrf by Ðo-
combor l.
CnroIynn Andorson wns gIvon
nµµrovnI fo uso hor oId comµufor
for fho nmbuInnco dIsfrIcf.
Tho AmbuInnco CÐ hns como
duo nnd CnroIynn Andorson nskod
whnf sho shouId do wIfh fho
monoy. Sho hns µuf fho monoy Info
fho gonornI fund for fho fImo
boIng. CouncII nµµrovod fo Ionvo
fho monoy In fho fund unfII fho
AmbuInnco ÐIsfrIcf Is uµ nnd run-
nIng.
IIrsf rondIng of SuµµIomonfnI
AµµroµrInfIon OrdInnnco wns nµ-
µrovod.
!osoIufIon l2-l2: ConfIngoncy
frnnsfors wns nµµrovod.
SIck Ionvo µoIIcy whIch wns dIs-
cussod nf fho ond of Insf yonr wns
broughf uµ ngnIn. JIm KIfformnn
mndo n fow chnngos fo fho µoIIcy
for fho councII fo rovIow. Hnhn
sfnfod, ¨Tho ronson fho µoIIcy wns
chnngod wns duo fo If boIng mIs-
usod.¨ CnroIynn Andorson nofod If
wIII sfIII gof mIsusod nnd wo cnn`f
kooµ fwonkIng fho µoIIcy nnd om-
µIoyoos cnn uso fhoIr comµ fImo for
fhIs ronson. JIm KIfformnn In-
formod fho councII ho wIII bo gof-
fIng hIs knoos roµIncod nnd cnn`f
uso sIck Ionvo whIch Is sfuµId.
CouncII docIdod fhoy wIII grnnf nµ-
µrovnI on n cnso-by-cnso bnsIs nnd
nµµrovod fo Ionvo fho µoIIcy ns If
Is. JIm KIfformnn wns grnnfod n
vnrInnco fo uso fho sIck Ionvo µoI-
Icy fo gof hIs knoos fIxod.
KIfformnn µInf wns nµµrovod fo
bo µInffod Info fwo dIfforonf µroµ-
orfIos.
!ofnII (On-SnIo) IIquor IIconsos
woro nµµrovod for: WnII CoIf
Courso, IndInnds Inr, Inc., Cncfus
Cnfo, Inc. nnd WnII Ðrug Sforo.
Inckngo (Off-SnIo) IIquor II-
consos woro nµµrovod for: !osoboII,
Inc., WnII Iood Confor nnd Jody
CnIIIno, Cornor Innfry.
!ofnII (On-Off SnIo) WIno II-
consos woro nµµrovod for: Inf
Ioy`s IIQ nnd Ð & W µroµorfIos,
Inc., !od !ock !osfnurnnf.
CouncII nµµrovod fho foIIowIng
mInufos for: CIfy of WnII, IIro Ðo-
µnrfmonf, AmbuInnco nnd !Ibrnry.
Iny roquosf numbor fwo for
Cusfom InvIronmonfs for fho now
buIIdIng nf fho nIrµorf In fho
nmounf of $3l,225.l3 wns nµ-
µrovod.
CIfy of WnII bIIIs wns nµµrovod.
IIro doµnrfmonf bIIIs broughf n
dIscussIon bofwoon fho councII nnd
fIro doµnrfmonf mombors who
wouId IIko fo µurchnso n now com-
µufor for fho fIro doµnrfmonf. Cnr-
oIynn Andorson oxµInInod fhnf
fhoIr budgof hns boon sµonf nnd
fhoy hnvo no monoy nf fhIs fImo fo
µurchnso fho comµufor. IIro do-
µnrfmonf mombors nskod fho
councII how fhoy cnn mnko µur-
chnsos whon corfnIn Issuos nrIso
fhnf nron`f In fhoIr budgof¨ Tho
fIro doµnrfmonf mombors wonf on
fo sny fhnf ovoryono noods fo bo
fronfod fnIrIy whon If comos fo
budgofs. Tho fIro doµnrfmonf
mombors nskod, sInco fhoy hnvo no
monoy, cnn fhoy fnko fho fIro
frucks ouf¨ CouncII nskod If fho
comµufor couId wnIf unfII noxf
yonr, fo whIch fhoy roµIIod fhnf If
couId.
Iurchnso ordors for fho fIro do-
µnrfmonf nro nof boIng comµIofod
boforo Ifoms nro boIng µurchnsod.
CnroIynn Andorson snId fhnf sho
Is fho ono who fnkos fho honf for
fhIs Issuo whon fho nudIf Is boIng
µorformod. JIm KIfformnn snId ho
hnd µurchnsod Ink for fho fIro do-
µnrfmonf comµufor nnd usod fhoIr
crodIf cnrd nnd fIIIod ouf fho µur-
chnso ordor whon ho gof homo.
Iurchnso ordors wIII bo fIIIod ouf
fIrsf from now on.
ICC!A roquosfod fo hnvo fho
foos wnIvod for fhoIr HnIIowoon
CnrnIvnI nnd crnff show fnbIo nf
fho Crnnd HnII. CouncII nµµrovod.
IInnnco OffIcor CnroIynn Andor-
son roµorfod on fho !Isk Mnnngo-
monf Workshoµ sho roconfIy nf-
fondod. Sho hns sonf ouf n IIsf of II-
nbIIIfy Issuos fhnf fho cIfy shouId
ImµIomonf. Thoy wIII bo rovIowod
nnd dIscussod nf fho noxf moofIng.
IubIIc Works ÐIrocfor Joff CInrk
Informod fho councII fhnf WoII ? Is
sfIII down nnd ho Is wnIfIng for
Wosforn IngInoorIng ConfrnI fo
gof In fouch wIfh hIm. CoII l fosf
rosuIfs nro bnck In nnd fho nornfor
fhnf fho cIfy ongInoor hns µroµosod
fo fho cIfy wouId hoIµ fho coII
mnko boffor wnsfo wnfor.
A mofIon fo onfor Info oxocufIvo
sossIon for fho µurµoso of dIs-
cussIng µorsonnoI Issuos nccordIng
fo SÐC! l-25-2 wns nµµrovod.
CouncII onforod ouf of oxocufIvo
sossIon nnd fho moofIng wns nd-
journod.
Tho noxf councII moofIng wIII bo
hoId on Thursdny, Ðocombor 6, nf
6:30 µ.m. nf fho WnII CommunIfy
Confor moofIng room.
City CounciI approves Iiquor Iicense appIications renewaIs
Official 2012 Pennington
County election results
May this day be fiIIed with aII
of the things you hoId dear.
hanksglvlng
rcctlngs
Peaa¡agtoa Couaty
Couraat
Don, 1ami, Pnn, Laurie ö Correspondents
Vofornn`s Ðny 20l2 wns coIo-
brnfod nf fho WnII SchooI on Mon-
dny, Þovombor l2.
Tho SonIor CInss of 20l3 wns In
chnrgo of fho µrogrnm. VIoIInIsf
!IbbI Sykorn nnd MnddI Inuor
µorformod fho Sfnr SµnngIod Inn-
nor. Tho WnII KIndorgnrfon CInss
Iod fho IIodgo of AIIogInnco.
Tnrnn IIsonbrnun nnd !ydor
WIIson woIcomod fho crowd nnd
fho hIsfory of Vofornn`s Ðny wns
gIvon.
!oII cnII wns gIvon by Iornnrd
Iosfor nnd vofornns sfood ns fhoIr
nnmos woro cnIIod.
!omombrnnco of InIIon Horoos
wns gIvon for fho foIIowIng:
:Ðwnyno M. CoIomnn wns born
Ocfobor 2?, l924 In Wnsfn. Ho
grndunfod from Wnsfn nnd nf-
fondod Tho !nIvorsIfy of
WyomIng. CoIomnns sorvod ns nn
offIcor In fho !S Army AIr Corµs
ns n nnvIgnfor on fho I-24 bombor
wIfh ncfIon In Iurmn, SInm nnd
IndIn. IunornI sorvIcos for Ðwnyno
M. CoIomnn woro hoId AµrII 24,
20l2, wIfh mIIIfnry honors nf
MounfnIn VIow Comofory.
:MIchnoI J. ChnµoII grow uµ
nnd nffondod schooI In WnII, Soufh
Ðnkofn. Ho sorvod fhroo yonrs In
fho Army MIIIfnry from l9?l -
l9?4. Ho wns sfnfIonod In mnny Io-
cnfIons, bofh foroIgn nnd fho
!nIfod Sfnfos. A momorInI sorvIco
wns hoId on IrIdny, Juno l3, wIfh
Inuromonf nf fho IInck HIIIs Þn-
fIonnI Comofory.
:Konnofh C. !ovIk wns good
frIonds wIfh ÐnvId WhIfwor. Ho
IIvod In WnII unfII ho joInod fho
Army Is l952. Affor bnsIc frnInIng
ho wns sfnfIonod for fhroo yonrs In
Cormnny, nnofhor fhroo yonrs In
HnwnII, nnd ono yonr In VIofnnm.
Ho wns nssIgnod fo fho SIgnnI
Corµs nnd hnd foµ socrof cIonrnnco
unfII ho nffnInod fho rnnk of ChIof
Wnrrnnf OffIcor. Affor sorvIng
ovor 20 yonrs ho rofIrod from fho
Army. !ovIk µnssod nwny on Ðo-
combor 25, 20ll. Inuromonf wIfh
mIIIfnry honors wns hoId nf fho
IInck HIIIs ÞnfIonnI Comofory.
:IrwIn I. IIsonbrnun nnd hIs
fnmIIy omIgrnfod from IIfzbock
Cormnny whon IrwIn wns fwo
yonrs oId. Ho wns drnffod nf fho
ngo of 20 nnd sorvod In fho !S
Army nf vnrIous IocnfIons boforo
rocoIvIng hIs honornbIo dIschnrgo.
CommIffnI sorvIcos wIfh mIIIfnry
honor wns hoId on Mny l, 20l2 nf
fho IInck HIIIs ÞnfIonnI Como-
fory.
:CIIfford Ð. SznrkowskI joInod
fho Army ÞnfIonnI Cunrd In l94l.
In l942 ho wns doµIoyod fo fho Iu-
roµonn nnd AfrIcnn Wnr nrons
whoro ho sorvod In combnf sIfun-
fIons for fwo yonrs. Ho wns µuf fo
rosf In fho IInck HIIIs ÞnfIonnI
Comofory on Jnnunry 2, 20l2,
:Iurfon Iugono Crnwford on-
IIsfod In fho Þnvy AIrs Corµs In
l942 nnd wns honornbIy dIs-
chnrgod In l946. IunornI sorvIcos
woro hoId on Iobrunry 24, 20l2.
Informonf foIIowod nf IInck HIIIs
ÞnfIonnI Comofory wIfh mIIIfnry
honors.
:!ynn WIIIInms onforod Info fho
Army In l945. Ho fook hIs bnsIc
frnInIng nf Cnmµ !IvIngsfon,
!ouIsInnn. Ho wns nssIgnod fo fho
nrmy bnso In fho AIoufInn IsInnds
nonr Adnk, AInskn, whoro ho
sorvod ns mnII cIork nnd wns fho
comµnny bnrbor for fho l583 IngI-
noor Infnnfry ÐIvIsIon. WIIIInms
µnssod nwny on Mny 28, 20l2. In-
formonf wIfh mIIIfnry honors wns
hoId nf fho IInck HIIIs ÞnfIonnI
Comofory.
:!oborf M. Knufson joInod fho
Army AIr Corµs In l943 nnd
sorvod durIng WorId Wnr II. In-
fornmonf fook µInco on JuIy 2? nf
fho MounfnIn VIow Comofory In
!nµId CIfy. Tho VIW Iosf l2?3
nnd Soufh Ðnkofn ÞnfIonnI
Cunrds µrosonfod MIIIfnry Hon-
ors.
:!Ichnrd !. WIIIuwoIf wns
drnffod Info fho Army nnd wns sfn-
fIonod nf If. !owIs, WnshIngfon
for fwo yonrs. In l990, ho wns
cnIIod uµ fo sorvo hIs counfry wIfh
hIs ÞnfIonnI Cunrd !nIf fo Oµorn-
fIon Ðosorf Sform. Ho µnssod
nwny on Mny l, 20l2 nnd wns
burIod nf fho IInck HIIIs ÞnfIonnI
Comofory.
:ChnrIos W. Johnson sorvod In
fho !S Þnvy on fho AIrcrnff Cnr-
rIor !SS IhIIIµµIno Son. HIs nnvnI
grouµ oscorfod AdmIrnI IIrd fo
AnfnrcfIcn on fho l94? oxµIo-
rnfIons. ChnrIos µnssod nwny on
Augusf 3l, 20l2.
:Ioyd Ð. Sobndo joInod fho
Þnvy nnd sorvod durIng WorId
Wnr II, nbonrd fho ¨AIoxnndor ÐnI-
Ins¨ Ðosfroyor, mosfIy In fho Soufh
IncIfIc. Ioyd µnssod nwny on Þo-
vombor 26, 20ll nf fho ngo of 88.
:Konnofh ¨KonnIo¨ Wood sorvod
sIx yonrs wIfh fho !S Þnvy In bofh
fho AfInnfIc nnd IncIfIc Wnr
Zonos. Ho µnssod nwny on AµrII 2,
20l2. IunornI sorvIcos woro hoId
nf fho !nIfod MofhodIsf Church In
WnII, wIfh burInI nnd mIIIfnry hon-
ors In fho WnII Comofory.
:ÐnrwIn Ð. HockIng sorvod hIs
counfry In fho !nIfod Sfnfos Army
nnd confInuod fhnf sorvIco In fho
Army !osorvos. MomorInI sorvIcos
woro hoId on Ocfobor 28, 20l2 nf
fho Shoµhord of fho HIIIs !ufhornn
Church In OnnInskn, WIsconsIn.
MIIIfnry honors foIIowod sorvIcos
nf fho church.
MusIc wns µorformod by fho
WnII HIgh SchooI bnnd nnd choIr.
Vnn SImµfondorfor hnndod ouf
Ioys Sfnfo nwnrds fo !ydor WII-
son nnd Cody HnrrIs.
IIII Hnmnnn Infroducod fho In-
frIofs Ion wInnors: fIrsf - ImIIy
IorrIs, socond - Snvnnnn
Ðoufschor nnd fhIrd - AIInn Mc-
ÐonnoII. VoIco of Ðomocrncy wns
gIvon fo: fIrsf - SforIIng IIIons, soc-
ond - CnrIoo Johnsfon, fhIrd - Co-
IIno Trnsk.
CoromonInI foIdIng of fho IIng
wns gIvon by fho cInss of 20l2 nnd
fho oIomonfnry vIdoo cIosod fho
µrogrnm for 20l2.
Veteran's Day 2012 ceIebrated at WaII SchooI
Veteran's Day program was heId at the WaII SchooI Gym on Mon-
day, November 12. Pictured from Ieft to right: back row ... Taran
Eisenbraun, Ryder WiIson, BiII Leonard, Wayne ShuII and Pete
Dunker. Front row: from Ieft to right ... Bernard Foster, BiII
Hamann, Van Simpfenderfer and BiII BieImaier.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
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Deadline is
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FRIDAY
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thurs., November 29
- Sun., December 8
Thursday, November 29: Ten-
tative Portrait Retake Day.
Friday, November 30: JH GBB
w/New Underwood, 4 p.m.
Saturday, December 1: JH
GBB WGPC Tournament @ Wall,
9 a.m.; WR @ Kimball Inv., 9:30
a.m. CST.
Sunday, December 2: State
FFA Leadership @ Pierre.
Monday, December 3: State
FFA Leadership @ Pierre.
Tuesday, December 4: AAU
Wrestling meeting/practice @ 5:15
p.m. in the MP Room; Recorder
Karate 3:30-4 p.m.
Thursday, December 6; GBB
w/Philip, 6:00 p.m.
Friday, December 7: BBB @
Philip, 6:00 p.m.; GYM @ Hot
Springs, 5:00 p.m.; WR @ RC,
TBA; Teacher In-Service.
Saturday, December 8:
GBB/BBB @ Edgemont, 2:00
p.m.; WR @ RC, TBA.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-
WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}. CALVES: 11.00 A.M. (MT}
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: £ST1MAT1NG ?DDD H£AD.
CALVES: NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL, ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE
VEFIFIED
HOSTUTLER RANCH - 400 CHAF X CLVS . 550-700; SEVEN BLACKFOOT
RN - 380 DLK CLVS; NI (CFEEN} . 450-575=; SHAW RANCH - 250 DLK &
DWF STFS; NI . 550-675=; KROETCH & KROETCH - 240 DLK & CHAF X
CLVS . 500-600=; TENNIS - 237 HEFF, DLK, & DWF STFS; ASV . 700-
750=; BENNETT RANCH - 220 DLK CLVS ALL HFFS IN TOWN . 550-650=;
KISSACK - 215 DLK STFS; HOME FAISED . 560-570=; HERBER RANCH -
200 DLK & DWF STFS . 500-600=; NEUHAUSER - 200 DWF & HEFF (140
STFS & 60 DLK HFFS} . 550-625=; LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT - 200 DLK
CLVS; NI, ALL HFFS IN TOWN . 500-600=; HEATHERSHAW - 200 LH X
CLVS; NI . 400-500=; A CONSIGNMENT - 180 DLK STFS . 500-550=;
STOUT - 170 CHAF X CLVS . 600-650=; DENKE - 150 DLK CLVS . 500-
600=; KC BIELMAIER RANCH - 150 DLK MOSTLY STFS . 650=;
SHEARER - 150 DLK ANC STFS . 600-650=; DICKSCHAT - 140 DLK
STFS . 500-600=; SANDER - 120 DLK, DWF, & FWF CLVS; NI . 650-700=;
PIROUTEK - 120 CHAF X CLVS . 550-600=; SMITH & SMITH - 115 DLK
& DWF CLVS; NI,AN . 550=; CAMMACK - 100 DLK & DWF HFFS . 575-
600=; GRUBL & GRUBL - 100 DLK & FED CLVS . 600=; CAPP RANCH -
100 DWF & FWF STFS; NI & NOT WEANED . 500-550=; BONENBERGER
RANCH - 80 DLK ANC FEPLC HFFS; NI ALL HFFS IN TOWN . 600-650=;
FUGIER - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; NI,AN . 500=; TRASK & TRASK -
80 DLK & DWF STFS . 550-600=; STILWELL - 80 DLK, FED & CHAF X
CLVS . 550-650=; PATTERSON CATTLE - 76 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI .
550-600=; COLEMAN - 75 DLK CLVS; NI . 450-800=; TRIPLE T RN - 75
DLK HFFS . 550=; EYMER - 70 FED STFS . 450-500=; WHITCHER &
WHITCHER - 70 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 450-500=; SMITH - 70 DLK CLVS
. 700=; TRASK - 70 DLK STFS; NI . 550-600=; COE - 65 DLK & DWF
CLVS; NI . 550=; SWIFT - 65 DLK CLVS; NI . 450-550=; FINN RANCH -
65 FED STFS; NI,ASV . 750-800=; VALLERY - 65 DLK STFS; NI,ASV .
550-650=; MORTENSON CATTLE CO - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 500-
550=; DEERING - 60 CHAF HFFS . 600=; FRINK - 60 DLK CLVS; NI .
600=; BRENNAN - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 500-550=; ROUNDS - 55 DLK
MOSTLY STFS; NI . 500-525=; STARR - 50 DLK CLVS . 500-600=; JOR-
GENSON - 50 FED STFS . 700-750=; SINKEY - 50 DLK STFS . 550=;
UHERKA - 50 DLK CLVS; NI . 600-650=; MADER - 50 DLK & DWF HFFS;
NI . 475=; MCLELLAN - 50 DLK CLVS . 450-550=; DARTT ANGUS - 50
DLK ANC CLVS; NI . 700=; PETRIK - 50 DLK CLVS . 400-600=; TRASK,
TIMMONS & BRUCH - 45 HEFF, FIFST X DWF, & DLK CLVS; NI . 400-
550=; THORSON HEREFORDS - 40 DLK & DWF STFS . 600-700=;
CLEMENTS - 40 DLK HFFS; NI . 550=; JOHANNESEN - 40 DLK & DWF
STFS; NI . 500-600=; HEINRICH RANCH - 40 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI .
600=; BERRY - 40 DLK CLVS; NI . 450-550=; BOOMSMA - 40 DLK CLVS;
AN . 600=; SMITH - 40 DLK & DWF HFFS; NI . 460=; REINERT - 40 DLK
& DWF CLVS; NI . 400-500=; WILLERT - 37 DLK & A FEW FED CLVS .
550-600=; GABRIEL - 35 DLK CLVS . 600-700=; ALBERS - 30 DLK & DWF
CLVS; NI . 400-500=; SHEARER - 30 DLK HFFS . 450=; GRUBL - 25
DLK & FED CLVS; NI . 450-550=; LONG - 25 DLK CLVS; NI . 600-700=;
FINN RANCH - 20 FED FALL CLVS; NI . 550-600=; MEINEN - 20 DLK
CLVS . 500=; DEJONG - 20 DLK STFS;NI . 600=; HENRY - 20 DLK &
DWF CLVS . 550-560=; REMER - 15 DLK X CLVS; NI . 700=; BROWN -
12 DLK STFS; NI . 600-700=; HOWIE - 10 DLK & DWF CLVS; NI . 450-
550=; SLOVEK - 10 DLK CLVS . 500=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. S: WEICH-UP COW, DULL, & HEIFEFETTE SALE-
10.00MT
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. WELLER RANCH: 1 P.M. BRED CATTLE TO FOL-
LOW. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
WELLER RANCH 32ND ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE - 50 DLACK
ANCUS 2 YF OLD DULLS; 4 FED ANCUS DULLS; 40 HOMES FAISED HFFS;
AI DFED TO SITZ DULL DUFHAM 9935; 100 YOUNC PUFEDFED ANCUS
COWS; DFED. WELLEF ANC; CLV. MAF & APF (ALL FEMALES WILL DE UL-
TFASOUND TESTED & DFOKE INTO SHOFT ALVINC CFOUPS.}
DISPERSIONS.
MYRON & MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-5 FOF 60 DAYS
BRED HEIFERS:
MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW DLK;
CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO TWO 20 DAY CLVC PEFIODS}
JOHN & MAGGIE AYER - 75 HEFF HFFS (1065=} (STUDEF DFEEDINC};
DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS (90% WILL CLV IN 21 DAYS}; 40
DLK HFFS (1100=}; DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS
CLAYTON SANDER & ESTEL DEAN - 25 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-1 FOF 35 DAYS
TUCKER HUDSON - 14 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW MILLAF
ANC DULLS; CLV. 3-25 FOF 45 DAYS (SOFTED INTO SHOFT CLVC PEFI-
ODS}
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
JASON HAMILL - 50 DLK & DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAMSEY & RAMSEY - 45 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-15 FOF 45 DAYS
NEWTON BROWN - 45 FED & FWF 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. FED ANC; CLV.4-5
ARLEN CARMICHAEL - 16 DLK 4 TO 5 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-20 FOF 30 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 16 DLK HFF TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CLAYTON SANDER - 15 DLK, FED, CHAF, & HEFF FUNNINC ACE
COWS; FED & HEFF DFED.DLK; DLK & CHAF DFED. HEFF; CLV. 3-1 FOF
60 DAYS
JIGGS O'CONNELL - 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
28
TUCKER HUDSON - 12 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
BART CARMICHAEL - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 4-15 FOF 45 DAYS
EXPOSED COWS:
BRUCE SIMMONS - 25 LH COWS. DFED. HOFNED HEFF; CLV. 4-15
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & SPECIAL
STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: MCPHEFSON ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFD 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC
DULL SALE 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS 12.00MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS 1.00MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS 12.00MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
CATTL£ R£PORT : TU£S., NOV. 2?, 2DJ2
We Þod o smo11er run o] ]eeders ]or our so1e
u11Þ o11 o] 1Þe oo111e 1n por1 1oods ond pooK-
oges. Qu11e o ]eu 1ooo1 peop1e oround 1rg1ng
1o bug 1Þe oo111e. B1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups. TÞ1s
morKe1 1s verg o1ose 1o mov1ng Þ1gÞer. B1g
so1e ne×1 ueeK u11Þ 1Þe Speo1o1 Preoond1-
11oned & Weoned Co1] So1e u11Þ over ?DDD
Þeod. Lo1s o] 1ong s1r1ngs ond po1 1oods.
We1gÞ-ups u111 se11 ne×1 Wednesdog.
FEEDER CATTLE:
DIANNE GREGG - FT. PIERRE
21 ....................................DLK STFS 502=......$178.50
11 ....................................DLK STFS 452=......$190.00
TODD & NANCY COLLINS - STURGIS
14..........................DLK & DWF STFS 443=......$193.50
11 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 438=......$157.50
6......................................DLK HFFS 405=......$163.00
BRAD & SHAWNA ROGHAIR - OKATON
48..........................DLK & DWF STFS 468=......$180.25
28..........................DLK & DWF STFS 400=......$200.00
44....................................DLK HFFS 453=......$156.25
28....................................DLK HFFS 412=......$161.00
BUD MANKE - MIDLAND
24 ....................................DLK STFS 535=......$167.50
6 ......................................DLK STFS 464=......$188.00
JOHN CAPP RANCH - FAITH
73..........................DLK & DWF STFS 543=......$167.25
21..........................DLK & DWF STFS 451=......$184.75
BILL & SUSAN PAULTON - EDGEMONT
34..........................DLK & DWF STFS 458=......$179.75
28 ....................................DLK STFS 605=......$154.25
35....................................DLK HFFS 452=......$151.25
23....................................DLK HFFS 552=......$144.25
NORDINE BRINK - MIDLAND
30..........................FED & DLK STFS 613=......$153.50
17....................................DLK HFFS 587=......$138.00
10....................................DLK HFFS 496=......$147.25
LANDON & TRISTA BORK - OKATON
6 ...........................FED & FWF STFS 498=......$168.50
3............................FED & DLK STFS 393=......$193.00
5...........................FED & FWF HFFS 444=......$149.00
2 ...........................FED & DLK HFFS 385=......$162.00
WILMA TOPE - ALADDIN, WY
16..........................DLK & DWF STFS 520=......$167.00
15 ....................................DLK STFS 438=......$194.50
CHARLOTTE GIBBONS - MANDERSON
4............................DLK & DWF STFS 556=......$164.00
8 ......................................DLK STFS 428=......$191.00
SCOTT & ALEX BRECH - QUINN
6 ......................................DLK STFS 558=......$162.25
2............................DLK & DWF STFS 378=......$188.00
2......................................DLK HFFS 515=......$141.00
2......................................DLK HFFS 408=......$162.00
ELMER GOOD - LONG VALLEY
8............................DLK & DWF STFS 644=......$146.25
5............................DLK & DWF STFS 468=......$181.50
8 ...........................DLK & DWF HFFS 592=......$135.00
WEIGH-UPS:
RON GRUBL - STURGIS
1 ....................................CHAF COW 1745=......$81.50
CARL BAUMAN - KADOKA
2 .....................................FED HFFS 810=......$129.50
5 ..............................FED COWETTES 953=........$94.00
ED HEEB - MIDLAND
1......................................DLK DULL 2055=......$95.00
1......................................DLK DULL 2305=......$94.00
SHANE SWEET - NEWCASTLE, WY
1......................................FWF COW 1520=......$78.50
1......................................FED DULL 1945=......$93.50
1......................................FED DULL 1810=......$93.00
1......................................FED DULL 2240=......$90.00
1......................................FED DULL 1720=......$89.00
MILES WHEELER - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1640=......$80.00
1.....................................DWF HFFT 920=......$126.00
EVAN DEUTSCHER - WALL
2....................................DLK HFFTS 923=......$123.00
ROGER KEFFELER - ENNING
2.....................................DLK COWS 1713=......$79.50
1......................................DLK DULL 2025=......$93.50
MARK HANRAHAN - MILESVILLE
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1443=......$76.50
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
48........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 1023=....$100.25
4....................................DLK HFFTS 860=......$110.00
BRUCH RANCH - STURGIS
32 ..................................DLK HFFTS 817=......$119.50
8...............................DLK COWETTES 898=........$97.00
3.....................................DLK COWS 1328=......$75.00
HOWARD & DELORES KNUPPE-NEW UNDERWOOD
21........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 819=......$119.50
SANDERS RANCH PARTNERSHIP - RAPID CITY
38 ..................................DLK HFFTS 884=......$116.50
26.............................DLK COWETTES 1015=......$99.50
6...................CHAF & DLK COWETTES 939=........$81.00
1 ....................................CHAF COW 1330=......$76.00
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
38....................................DLK HFFS 910=......$112.50
KERRY BISHOP - HERMOSA
2 .....................................FED HFFS 818=......$126.50
DENNIS SHARP - INTERIOR
2....................................DLK HFFTS 820=......$105.00
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
12 ..................................DLK HFFTS 1041=....$100.25
CHUCK ENDERS - KADOKA
1 ......................................DLK COW 1305=......$77.00
5....................................DLK HFFTS 945=......$107.50
TODD & NANCY COLLINS - STURGIS
5...........................FED & DLK COWS 1343=......$76.25
4......................................DLK HFFS 911=......$125.00
6 .........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 993=......$101.00
1 ................................DLK COWETTE 930=......$100.00
NEWTON BROWN - FAITH
1 ....................................FED COWS 1360=......$75.50
2 ....................................FED COWS 1300=......$73.50
5 ..............................FED COWETTES 1031=......$99.00
2 ..............................FED COWETTES 1058=......$86.00
ALLEN & FLOY OLSON - BOX ELDER
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1305=......$75.50
2...........................FED & DLK COWS 1225=......$74.50
1......................................DWF COW 1340=......$73.00
CASEY BRINK - UNION CENTER
3 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1655=......$75.00
17 ........................DLK & DWF COWS 1279=......$71.75
1 ......................................DLK COW 1215=......$70.50
TIA GUPTILL - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1520=......$75.00
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - KADOKA
1 ......................................DLK COW 1575=......$74.50
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1340=......$74.50
LARRY JOHNSTON - BELVIDERE
1......................................FED COW 1325=......$74.00
4 ..............................FED COWETTES 948=........$96.00
PAUL BORK - MIDLAND
1 ......................................DLK COW 1190=......$73.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1275=......$72.00
BOYDSTON INC. - BOX ELDER
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1315=......$73.00
1 ......................................DLK COW 1335=......$72.00
1 ......................................DLK COW 1180=......$70.50
2....................................DLK HFFTS 805=......$111.00
2......................................DLK HFFS 853=......$129.50
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
3 ....................................FED COWS 1297=......$73.00
1................................FED COWETTE 1095=......$88.00
2 ..............................FED COWETTES 1070=......$85.00
SHIRLEY O'CONNOR - PHILIP
1......................................DWF COW 1235=......$73.00
ROCKY WILLIAMS - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1410=......$72.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1335=......$70.00
8....................................DLK HFFTS 989=........$99.00
LANCE LESMEISTER - EAGLE BUTTE
1 ......................................DLK COW 1575=......$72.00
2...............................DLK COWETTES 903=........$96.00
8...............................DLK COWETTES 1008=......$90.00
TIM NEMEC - MIDLAND
1 ......................................DLK COW 1415=......$70.00
KELLY BLAIR - MILESVIILLE
1......................................DLK DULL 1905=......$89.50
TK SAMPSON - INTERIOR
1......................................DLK DULL 1765=......$87.50
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
SELLING TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 11,
AT 12:00 MT
RH CATTLE
Pennington County Courant • November 29, 2012 • Page 10
4-H Club
Notes
ELM SPriNGS rANCHEr'S
4H CLUB
Submitted by Carter Elshere
The Elm Springs Ranchers 4H
Club met Sunday, November 25th
at noon at Kassandra Linn's house
in Elm Springs. Members present
were Carter and Camri Elshere,
Savana, Carlee, and Carson John-
ston, and Kassandra Linn.
Election of officers were held.
President - Mazee Pauley, VP -
Carlee Johnston, Secretary -
Carter Elshere, Treasurer - Kas-
sandra Linn.
Other business: Membership
forms were filled out online. The
member roster and Leader paper-
work was also completed. Dues
will be mailed this week. Each club
is required to re-charter this year.
That paperwork was also filled out
and readied for the mail.
The club members discussed
community service. The members
will help undecorate the church
after the program in December.
The club members also agreed to
clean road ditches sometime after
the holidays.
The meeting adjourned 2pm.
Kassandra provided treats.
Just because the season has
changed, it doesn't mean that you
have to give up on your workout
routine. Here are a few winter
workout tips from Aaron Ruth,
strength and conditioning coach at
St. Vincent's Sports Performance in
Indianapolis, which works with
more than 300 professional and
amateur athletes. You can stay fit
no matter what the temperature is
outside.
Don't Skip the Warm Up - In
colder weather, your muscles are
tighter, making them more prone
to muscle pulls and strains. Spend
a little more time warming up your
body to help you avoid injury.
Stay Hydrated - When it's cooler
outside, you generally drink less
water - but when you exercise, you
still sweat and lose fluids and elec-
trolytes. Be sure to drink plenty of
water before and during your work-
out to avoid dehydration.
Dress in Layers - Exercising gen-
erates body heat and sweat, and
when sweat starts to dry in cold
weather you can get chilled. Dress
in layers that can be removed when
you start to sweat. Start with a
thin layer of synthetic material
which will draw sweat away from
your body. Then add a layer of
fleece or wool, and top it all off with
a waterproof and breathable outer
layer.
Protect Your Extremities - When
it's cold outside, the body tends to
concentrate blood flow to the core,
which can leave your hands, feet
and ears susceptible to frostbite.
Wear gloves, warm socks and a hat
or headband.
Have a Post-Workout Refueling
Plan - What you put in your body
after you work out is just as impor-
tant, if not more, than what you
put in it before. After exercising, re-
fuel and rebuild your muscles with
essential carbs and protein by
drinking great tasting Rockin' Re-
fuel(r) Intense Recovery protein
fortified milk. Made with 100 per-
cent real milk, Intense Recovery is
packed with 20 grams of natural
protein and features a 2:1 carb to
protein ratio, which is ideal for op-
timal muscle recovery.
Wear Sunscreen - It might be
cooler outside, but you can still get
sunburned. Choose sunscreen that
blocks both UVA and UVB rays,
and has an SPF of at least 30. Don't
forget to protect your lips with a lip
balm that has sunscreen.
Vary Your Routine - Beat the
winter workout blues by changing
up your routine - and by having
fun. Get the whole family moving
by doing things together such as
building a snowman, going ice
skating or sledding, making snow
angels, and having a snowball
fight.
Winter workout tips
Badlands Quilters Annual Christmas Tea
Tuesday, December 11, 2012
1:00 p.m. • Wall Community Center
All area quilt enthusiasts are invited to join in
the festivities and Christmas goodies.
Call Judy Yocum, 279-2889, for more information.
Please come!
When the temperatures drop, the
last thing you need is for your heat-
ing or plumbing system to act up.
Some basic maintenance can help to
ensure your home plumbing and
heating systems are functioning
properly.
A regular maintenance schedule
helps protect you against system or
appliance failures that leave you
with a crisis requiring urgent - and
potentially very costly - solutions.
To help protect your home during
the cold winter months, American
Home Shield, one of the nation's
leading providers of home warranty
services, shares some tips for mak-
ing sure your heating unit and
plumbing system are in good condi-
tion to handle extreme tempera-
tures.
Heating Maintenance:
•Check filters every month.
•Make sure floor vents are not
blocked to ensure clear air flow.
•Visually inspect exhaust vent for
rust, damage or deterioration.
•Be familiar with the manufac-
turer's maintenance recommenda-
tions for your specific unit. This in-
formation is typically available on-
line and in your owner's guide.
Plumbing maintenance:
•Only flush toilet paper down a
toilet.
•Maintain water softener accord-
ing to manufacturer's recommenda-
tions.
•Water filters and icemaker fil-
ters should be changed according to
the manufacturer's recommenda-
tions.
•Avoid using your garbage dis-
posal if you're on a septic system.
•Drain sediment from water
heater tank according to manufac-
turer's recommendations.
•If you aren't familiar, locate your
master valve so you can quickly
turn your home's water off if a line
breaks. In most homes, the valve is
located near the water heater, the
clothes washer, or where the water
service line enters your home.
•Check the hose bibs to clothes
washers to ensure they are tightly
connected to minimize leaks and
overuse of the system.
Taking these steps can help keep
your home systems in good working
order throughout the winter. But
not everyone has the time or skills
to do the maintenance required.
A professional preventative main-
tenance program can be a time- and
money-saver for homeowners. Qual-
ity service providers perform a thor-
ough check of your home's systems
and appliances to help ensure they
are operating efficiently.
Protect your home from winter’s chill
The holidays are back, and with
them comes a host of new video
games on store shelves. Picking out
the right video game for your kids –
or any other family member or
friend – can feel like a daunting
task. To help lighten the load, here
are three tips to make your holiday
video game search easier:
Check out the rating. Nearly
every video game found in stores
has rating information from the En-
tertainment Software Rating Board
(ESRB) on the box. This rating is
similar to the Motion Picture Asso-
ciation of America’s (MPAA) ratings
for movies. Check the front of the
box for a rating icon representing
one of the following Rating Cate-
gories:
E (Everyone)
E10+ (Everyone 10 and older)
T (Teen) or M (Mature), meaning
17 or older
Flip the box to find Content De-
scriptors, which offer more detail as
to why the game earned a particular
rating (via phrases like “Suggestive
Themes” and “Fantasy Violence”).
The ESRB’s retail partners, such as
GameStop, only sell ESRB-rated
games, giving you a head start to-
ward finding age-appropriate titles.
Go online. The ESRB website,
www.ESRB.org, and their free mo-
bile app offer game rating informa-
tion along with more detailed Rat-
ing Summaries, which give a more
in-depth explanation of the content
that factored into the game’s rating.
You can also visit www.Respect-
TheRatings.com for tips to help you
be more aware of and involved in
children’s gaming experiences. Tips
include how to discuss gaming
habits and online content, and how
to activate game consoles’ parental
controls. There is also a Gaming 101
section that explains video game
terms like “FPS” (first person
shooter) and “RPG” (role-playing
game).
Talk to experts. According to the
Entertainment Software Associa-
tion, 73 percent of all video games
sold last year were rated E through
T. Though the majority of titles are
likely okay for most gamers, you
may want to do additional research
to find ones that best match your
gamers’ particular interests and
abilities.
This is where experts come in
handy, and finding one can be sur-
prisingly simple. For example, the
Game Advisors at every GameStop
are avid gamers who are educated
on the latest titles and trends and
often have first-hand experience
with most games, whether having
played them themselves or watched
their children play. If your kids like
creative fantasy, ask about Skylan-
ders Giants or Epic Mickey 2: The
Power of Two. And if physically ac-
tive gaming is important to you, ask
for more details on Kinect for the
Xbox 360, or Nintendo’s new Wii U
console.
Searching for the right video
game gift can not only be easy, but
fun, too, for kids and parents alike.
Ask to try out a particular game or
console, and see what you like best.
After all, one of the best ways to
make sure your children have a
safe, enriching video game experi-
ence is to play along with them.
How to pick the right gifts for gamers

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