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Pennington Co. Courant, November 15, 2012

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Number 46
Volume 107
November 15, 2012
The general election was held on
Tuesday, November 6.
Results for the election from
Pennington County are as follows:
Precincts counted - 45
(out 45)
•Registered voters - 64,267
•Ballots cast - Total - 44,879
•Ballots cast - Blank - 10
•Voter Turnout - Total - 69.83
percent
•Voter Turnout - Blank - .02 per-
cent
Presidential Electors
•Obama and Biden Electors
(DEM) - 15,125 - 34.02 percent
•Goode and Clymer Electors
(CON) - 291 - .65 percent
•Romney and Ryan Electors
(REP) - 28,232 - 63.49 percent
•Johnson and Gray Electors
(LIB) - 816 - 1.84 percent
United States Representative
for Pennington County
(voters could vote for up to one)
•Matt Varilek (DEM) - 15,516 -
35.32 percent
•Kristi Noem (REP) - 28,418 -
64.68 percent
Public Utilities Commissioner
Six-year
(voters could vote up to one)
•Matt McGovern - (DEM) -
13,087 - 31.65 percent
•Kristie Fiegen (REP) - 25,372 -
61.35 percent
•Russell Clark (LIB) - 2,894 -
7.00 percent
Public Utilities Commissioner
Four-year
(voters could vote up to one)
•Nick Nemec (DEM) - 12,937 -
31.96 percent
•Chris Nelson (REP) - 27,536 -
68.04 percent
State Senator District 27
(voters could vote up to one)
•Jim Bradford (DEM) - 81 - 100
percent
State Senator District 29
(voters could vote up to one)
•Larry Rhoden (REP) - 184 - 100
percent
State Senator District 30
(voters could vote up to one)
•Bruce Rampelberg (REP) -
3,350 - 100 percent
State Senator District 32
(voters could vote up to one)
•Stan Adelstein (REP) - 6,409 -
100 percent
State Senator District 33
(voters could vote up to one)
•Phil Jensen (REP) - 4,569
57.44 percent
•Matt McGrath (IND) - 3,385 -
42.56 percent
State Senator District 34
(voters could vote up to one)
•Craig Tieszen (REP) - 8,283 -
100 percent
State Senator District 35
(voters could vote up to one)
•Mark Kirkeby (REP) - 5,382 -
100 percent
State Senator District 27
(voters could vote up to two)
•Kevin Killer (DEM) - 53 - 14.60
percent
•Elizabeth May (REP) - 235 -
64.74 percent
•Kathleen Ann (IND) - 75 -
20.66 percent
State Senator District 29
(voters could vote up to two)
•Gary L Cammack (REP) - 146 -
53.28 percent
•Dean Wink (REP) - 128 - 46.72
percent
State Senator District 30
(voters could vote up to two)
•Mike Verchio (REP) - 2,950 -
54.62 percent
•Lance Russell (REP) - 2,451 -
45.38 percent
State Senator District 32
(voters could vote up to two)
•Jackie Swanson (DEM) - 4,075
- 29.48 percent
•Kristin Conzet (REP) - 5,004 -
36.21 percent
•Brian Gosch (REP) - 4,742 -
34.31 percent
State Senator District 33
(voters could vote up to two)
•Robin A. Page (DEM) - 2,798 -
23.92
•Jacqueline Sly (REP) - 5,008 -
42.82 percent
•Scott W. Craig (REP) - 3,890 -
33.26 percent
State Senator District 34
(voters could vote up to two)
•John C Willman (DEM) - 2,977
- 16.56 percent
•Dan Dryden (REP) - 6,145 -
34.18 percent
•David Lust (REP) - 6,355 -
35.35 percent
•Mike Reardon (IND) - 2,500 -
13.91 percent
State Representatives
District 35
(voters could vote up to two)
•Jay Pond (DEM) - 2,208 - 17.76
percent
•Shane Liebig (DEM) - 2,538 -
20.42 percent
•Don Kopp (REP) - 4,305 - 34.63
percent
•Blaine “Chip” Campbell (REP)
- 3,379 - 27.18 percent
County Commissioner
District 2
(voters could vote for one)
•Sharon Green (DEM) - 2,238 -
42.59 percent
•Nancy Trautman (REP) - 3,017
- 57.41 percent
Justice Glen A. Severson
•Yes - 27,596 - 78.23 percent
•No - 7,678 - 21.77 percent
West Dakota Water Dev Dist
Dir Area 4
•Larry D. Baker - 1,214 - 46.67
percent
•Lavern E. Koch - 1,387 - 53.33
percent
Constitutional Amendment M
•Yes - 11,007 - 27.99 percent
•No - 28,319 - 72.01 percent
Constitutional Amendment N
•Yes - 15,868 - 38.31 percent
•No - 25,555 - 61.69 percent
Constitutional Amendment O
•Yes - 24,207 - 60.15 percent
•No - 16,040 - 39.85 percent
Constitutional Amendment P
•Yes - 27.675 - 68.21 percent
•No - 12,900 - 31.79 percent
Initiated Measure 15
•Yes - 18,523 - 43.61 percent
•No - 23,952 - 56.39 percent
Referred Law 14
•Yes - 18,789 - 49.65 percent
•No - 21,226 - 53.05 percent
Referred Law 16
•Yes - 17,218 - 40.73 percent
•No - 25,055 - 59.27 percent
by Laurie Hind-
man
The Wall City Council met on
Thursday, November 8, at 6:30
p.m. at the Wall Community Cen-
ter meeting room.
Sgt. Dan Wardel with the Pen-
nington County Sheriff ’s Depart-
ments informed the board that the
Sheriff ’s office has exceeded the
minimum hours required and are
providing quality services that the
city pays for.
Randy Griebel with the Youth
Football group asked the council
for use of the Grand Hall and to
also waive the fees for the group to
have a potluck supper and hand
out awards. The council approved
his request.
Building permit for the Discount
Mall to construct a fence behind
their building was discussed.
Council members feel the fence
would be a safety issue and will
complicate parking issues in the
back of the post office. The owner
and renter of the property will be
asked to attend the December
council meeting.
•Wall Drug was approved to in-
stall a new facade for the Wall
Drug Mall.
•Conditional Use for the Pol-
ished Pinky was renewed for an-
other three years.
An ordinance will be drawn up
which will include tiered fines for
commercial businesses caught
using another commercial busi-
ness’ dumpster.
Mayor Dave Hahn asked if Pre-
ston Johnson, Finance Officer Car-
olynn Anderson, two council mem-
bers and himself approve bids for
the airport snow removal equip-
ment. Hahn didn’t want to call a
special meeting for this purpose.
Traffic has been speeding
through the gravel parking lot and
Hahn asked, “How do we handle
this issue?” Signs have been
posted for “No Overnight Camp-
ing” and “Free City Parking,” but
the signs aren’t being enforced. It
was decided to post speed limit
signs at the gravel parking lot and
the old school parking lot and have
the police enforce the new speed
limit.
An agreement has been drawn
up and approved to allow deputies
to park their personal vehicles in
the police station garage.
Public Works Director Jeff Clark
reported due to the big wind that
we had a couple of weeks ago the
screws in a couple of the new
street lights have been stripped
out. He noted the matter has been
turned over to the city engineer.
Clark is waiting to hear back from
the engineer at this time.
Hahn reported he recently at-
tended an Emergency Manage-
ment meeting and stated, “There
are issues concerning the city.” He
asked the council what would hap-
pen if the city lost power and the
Wall Community Center Grand
Hall was filled with people? He
went on to say that the city has an
opportunity to buy an emergency
generator and their cost would
maybe be 25 percent. He doesn’t
have an estimate yet but the
Emergency Management Director
will be at the December meeting.
Clark will get estimates and bring
back to the December meeting.
Clark gave an update on the
sewer/lagoon project. All the ease-
ments but one have been signed
who would sell the city the prop-
erty that they need. The Water and
Waste Committee recommended
that the city buy the property. A
motion was made and approved to
allow the committee to purchase
the property.
The Ambulance District lease
agreement was reviewed. It was
decided to get the square footage of
the building that houses the ambu-
lances and fire trucks and deter-
mine the square footage in order to
protect the fire department in the
lease agreement.
The council approved the billing
for the ambulance to start by De-
cember 1.
Carolynn Anderson was given
approval to use her old computer
for the ambulance district.
The Ambulance CD has come
due and Carolynn Anderson asked
what she should do with the
money. She has put the money into
the general fund for the time
being. Council approved to leave
the money in the fund until the
Ambulance District is up and run-
ning.
First reading of Supplemental
Appropriation Ordinance was ap-
proved.
Resolution 12-12: Contingency
transfers was approved.
Sick leave policy which was dis-
cussed at the end of last year was
brought up again. Jim Kitterman
made a few changes to the policy
for the council to review. Hahn
stated, “The reason the policy was
changed was due to it being mis-
used.” Carolynn Anderson noted it
will still get misused and we can’t
keep tweaking the policy and em-
ployees can use their comp time for
this reason. Jim Kitterman in-
formed the council he will be get-
ting his knees replaced and can’t
use sick leave which is stupid.
Council decided they will grant ap-
proval on a case-by-case basis and
approved to leave the policy as it
is. Jim Kitterman was granted a
variance to use the sick leave pol-
icy to get his knees fixed.
Kitterman plat was approved to
be platted into two different prop-
erties.
Retail (On-Sale) liquor licenses
were approved for: Wall Golf
Course, Badlands Bar, Inc., Cactus
Cafe, Inc. and Wall Drug Store.
Package (Off-Sale) liquor li-
censes were approved for: Rose-
bell, Inc., Wall Food Center and
Jody Gallino, Corner Pantry.
Retail (On-Off Sale) Wine li-
censes were approved for: Fat
Boy’s BBQ and D & W properties,
Inc., Red Rock Restaurant.
Council approved the following
minutes for: City of Wall, Fire De-
partment, Ambulance and Library.
Pay request number two for
Custom Environments for the new
building at the airport in the
amount of $31,225.13 was ap-
proved.
City of Wall bills was approved.
Fire department bills brought a
discussion between the council and
fire department members who
would like to purchase a new com-
puter for the fire department. Car-
olynn Anderson explained that
their budget has been spent and
they have no money at this time to
purchase the computer. Fire de-
partment members asked the
council how they can make pur-
chases when certain issues arise
that aren’t in their budget? The
fire department members went on
to say that everyone needs to be
treated fairly when it comes to
budgets. The fire department
members asked, since they have
no money, can they take the fire
trucks out? Council asked if the
computer could wait until next
year, to which they replied that it
could.
Purchase orders for the fire de-
partment are not being completed
before items are being purchased.
Carolynn Anderson said that she is
the one who takes the heat for this
issue when the audit is being per-
formed. Jim Kitterman said he
had purchased ink for the fire de-
partment computer and used their
credit card and filled out the pur-
chase order when he got home.
Purchase orders will be filled out
first from now on.
FCCLA requested to have the
fees waived for their Halloween
Carnival and craft show table at
the Grand Hall. Council approved.
Finance Officer Carolynn Ander-
son reported on the Risk Manage-
ment Workshop she recently at-
tended. She has sent out a list of li-
ability issues that the city should
implement. They will be reviewed
and discussed at the next meeting.
Public Works Director Jeff Clark
informed the council that Well 7 is
still down and he is waiting for
Western Engineering Central to
get in touch with him. Cell 1 test
results are back in and the aerator
that the city engineer has pro-
posed to the city would help the
cell make better waste water.
A motion to enter into executive
session for the purpose of dis-
cussing personnel issues according
to SDCL 1-25-2 was approved.
Council entered out of executive
session and the meeting was ad-
journed.
The next council meeting will be
held on Thursday, December 6, at
6:30 p.m. at the Wall Community
Center meeting room.
City Council approves liquor license applications renewals
Official 2012 Pennington
County election results
Veteran’s Day 2012 was cele-
brated at the Wall School on Mon-
day, November 12.
The Senior Class of 2013 was in
charge of the program. Violinist
Libbi Sykora and Maddi Bauer
performed the Star Spangled Ban-
ner. The Wall Kindergarten Class
led the Pledge of Allegiance.
Taran Eisenbraun and Ryder
Wilson welcomed the crowd and
the history of Veteran’s Day was
given.
Roll call was given by Bernard
Foster and veterans stood as their
names were called.
Remembrance of Fallen Heroes
was given for the following:
•Dwayne M. Coleman was born
October 27, 1924 in Wasta. He
graduated from Wasta and at-
tended The University of
Wyoming. Colemans served as an
officer in the US Army Air Corps
as a navigator on the B-24 bomber
with action in Burma, Siam and
India. Funeral services for
Dwayne M. Coleman were held
April 24, 2012, with military hon-
ors at Mountain View Cemetery.
•Michael J. Chapell grew up
and attended school in Wall, South
Dakota. He served three years in
the Army Military from 1971 -
1974. He was stationed in many lo-
cations, both foreign and the
United States. A memorial service
was held on Friday, June 13, with
inurement at the Black Hills Na-
tional Cemetery.
•Kenneth G. Lovik was good
friends with David Whitwer. He
lived in Wall until he joined the
Army is 1952. After basic training
he was stationed for three years in
Germany, another three years in
Hawaii, and one year in Vietnam.
He was assigned to the Signal
Corps and had top secret clearance
until he attained the rank of Chief
Warrant Officer. After serving over
20 years he retired from the Army.
Lovik passed away on December
25, 2011. inurement with military
honors was held at the Black Hills
National Cemetery.
•Erwin E. Eisenbraun and his
family emigrated from Fitzbeck
Germany when Erwin was two
years old. He was drafted at the
age of 20 and served in the US
Army at various locations before
receiving his honorable discharge.
Committal services with military
honor was held on May 1, 2012 at
the Black Hills National Cemetery.
•Clifford D. Szarkowski joined
the Army National Guard in 1941.
In 1942 he was deployed to the Eu-
ropean and African War areas
where he served in combat situa-
tions for two years. He was put to
rest in the Black Hills National
Cemetery on January 2, 2012,
•Burton Eugene Crawford en-
listed in the Navy Airs Corps in
1942 and was honorably dis-
charged in 1946. Funeral services
were held on February 24, 2012.
Interment followed at Black Hills
National Cemetery with military
honors.
•Lynn Williams entered into the
Army in 1945. He took his basic
training at Camp Livingston,
Louisiana. He was assigned to the
army base in the Aleutian Islands
near Adak, Alaska, where he
served as mail clerk and was the
company barber for the 1583 Engi-
neer Infantry Division. Williams
passed away on May 28, 2012. In-
terment with military honors was
held at the Black Hills National
Cemetery.
•Robert M. Knutson joined the
Army Air Corps in 1943 and
served during World War II. In-
ternment took place on July 27 at
the Mountain View Cemetery in
Rapid City. The VFW Post 1273
and South Dakota National
Guards presented Military Hon-
ors.
•Richard L. Willuweit was
drafted into the Army and was sta-
tioned at Ft. Lewis, Washington
for two years. In 1990, he was
called up to serve his country with
his National Guard Unit to Oper-
ation Desert Storm. He passed
away on May 1, 2012 and was
buried at the Black Hills National
Cemetery.
•Charles W. Johnson served in
the US Navy on the Aircraft Car-
rier USS Philippine Sea. His naval
group escorted Admiral Bird to
Antarctica on the 1947 explo-
rations. Charles passed away on
August 31, 2012.
•Boyd D. Sebade joined the
Navy and served during World
War II, aboard the “Alexander Dal-
las” Destroyer, mostly in the South
Pacific. Boyd passed away on No-
vember 26, 2011 at the age of 88.
•Kenneth “Kennie” Wood served
six years with the US Navy in both
the Atlantic and Pacific War Zones.
He passed away on April 2, 2012.
Funeral services were held at the
United Methodist Church in Wall,
with burial and military honors in
the Wall Cemetery.
•Darwin D. Hocking served his
country in the United States Army
and continued that service in the
Army Reserves. Memorial services
were held on October 28, 2012 at
the Shepherd of the Hills
Lutheran Church in Onalaska,
Wisconsin. Military honors fol-
lowed services at the church.
Music was performed by the
Wall High School band and choir.
Van Simpfenderfer handed out
Boys State awards to Ryder Wilson
and Cody Harris.
Bill Hamann introduced the Pa-
triots Pen winners: first - Emily
Ferris, second - Savanna
Deutscher and third - Allan Mc-
Donnell. Voice of Democracy was
given to: first - Sterling Ellens, sec-
ond - Carlee Johnston, third - Ce-
line Trask.
Ceremonial folding of the Flag
was given by the class of 2012 and
the elementary video closed the
program for 2012.
Veteran’s Day 2012 celebrated at Wall School
Veteran’s Day program was held at the Wall School Gym on Mon-
day, November 12. Pictured from left to right: back row ... Taran
Eisenbraun, Ryder Wilson, Bill Leonard, Wayne Shull and Pete
Dunker. Front row: from left to right ... Bernard Foster, Bill
Hamann, Van Simpfenderfer and Bill Bielmaier.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
May this day be filled with all
of the things you hold dear.
T
G
Thanksgiving
Greetings
Pennington County
Courant
Don, Tami, Ann, Laurie & Correspondents
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County Courant
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General Manager of
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Office Manager/Graphics:
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Staff Writer:
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Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
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Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
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Courant office is located on the corner of
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Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012 • Page 2
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
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Social Security News
By Kathy Petersen
Social Security
Public Affairs Specialist
Let the shopping season begin!
The day after Thanksgiving has
virtually become a holiday of its
own. “Black Friday” is the busiest
shopping day of the year, with
people lining up at midnight for
door-busting deals as they begin
the busy holiday shopping season.
And the Monday after that has
become a virtual holiday, so to
speak. “Cyber Monday” is the day
web-savvy people search for deals
on the Internet.
But there is more than one way
to find value on the Internet. For
example, Social Security offers
many online services to the gen-
eral public — and they are free!
Not only that, but doing business
online with Social Security will
save you time and money. And it’s
so easy to do. Here are some of the
most popular services you’ll find
at www.socialsecurity.gov.
The online Social Security
Statement is a hot new service
that is a big hit with the millions
of people who’ve used it since its
launch last May. Your online
Statement provides you with a
record of your past earnings, and
it uses those earnings along with
projected earnings for future
years to give you accurate esti-
mates of future Social Security
benefits. Get your Statement at
www.socialsecurity.gov/mystate-
ment.
The Retirement Estimator is
an easy way to get an instant, per-
sonalized estimate of your future
Social Security benefits. Just key
in some basic information and the
Estimator will use information on
your Social Security record, along
with what you input, to give you a
benefit estimate on the spot. You
even can experiment with differ-
ent scenarios, such as changing
your future earnings and retire-
ment date. Check it out in English
at www.socialsecurity.gov/estima-
tor or in Spanish at www.se-
gurosocial.gov/calculador.
The online Retirement Appli-
cation is the most convenient
way to apply for Social Security
retirement benefits. You can apply
from the comfort of your home —
it’s fast, easy, and secure. It’s so
easy, in fact, that it can take you
as little as 15 minutes to apply on-
line. In most cases, after your ap-
plication is submitted electroni-
cally, you’re done. There are no
forms to sign and usually no doc-
umentation is required. Social Se-
curity will process your applica-
tion and contact you if any further
information is needed. When
you’re ready to retire, apply at
www.socialsecurity.gov/applyon-
line.
Business Services Online is our
one-stop shop for small business
owners. The site allows organiza-
tions and authorized individuals
to conduct business with and sub-
mit confidential information to
Social Security. Employers can
use it to file W-2s for their em-
ployees the fast, convenient, and
paperless way — online. Visit
Business Services Online at "
www.socialsecurity.gov/bso.
To learn more about all you can
do on Cyber Monday, or any day,
visit www.socialsecurity.govonli-
neservices. Kathy Petersen is a
public affairs specialist for Social
Security, Denver Region. You can
write her c/o Social Security Ad-
ministration, 605 Main, Suite
201, Rapid City, SD, 57701 or via
e-mail at kathy. petersen@ssa.
gov.
Find true value this Cyber Monday at
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Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
Ruland Arena, LLC held a Black
Hills Roping Club team roping on
Saturday, November 3. The roping
drew in 330 teams.
Open Incentive roping - 63
teams:
•Go winners: First - Troy
Wilcox/Brett Wilcox - 6.01, Second
- Jess Harris/Melvin Arneson -
6.12.
•Average winners: First - Troy
Richter/Shaun Ruland - 27.28,
Second - Jason Thortenson/Shaun
Ruland - 31.25, Third - Brett
Wilcox/Clint Cobb - 31.99, Fourth
- Shaun Ruland/Jake Nelson -
34.42, Fifth - Levi Lord/Paul
Griemsman - 34.51.
Number Nine roping - 57
teams:
•Go winners: First - Levi
Lord/Daine McNenny - 6.01, Sec-
ond - Dustin Dailey/Daine Mc-
Nenny - 6.72.
•Average winners: First -
Trina Arneson/Paul Griemsman -
22.05, Second - Levi Lord/Melvin
Arneson - 22.62, Third - Brett
Wilcox/Clint Cobb - 25.50, Fourth
- Jake Nelson/Matt Jones - 25.84,
Fifth - Brett Wilcox/Melvin Arne-
son - 26.57.
Number Five roping - 109
teams:
•Go winners: First - Cody
Hilzendeger/Kelly Roshau - 6.97,
Second- Dewey Ertz/Bryce Sigman
- 7.31.
•Average winners: First -
Wyatt Mann/Klay O’Daniel -
24.20, Second - River Voigt/Patrick
Manson - 26.08, Third - Bruce
Berry/Carson Good - 27.61, Fourth
- Klay O’Daniel/Bruce Berry -
32.60, Fifth - Dewey Ertz/Bryce
Stigman - 32.98, Sixth - Dewey
Ertz/Daine McNenny - 33.28.
Drawpot Incentive roping -
101 teams:
•Go winners: First - Jess Har-
ris/Levi Lord - 4.78, Second - Levi
Lord/Shaun Ruland - 5.20.
•Average winners: First -
Brett Wilcox/Matt Jones - 17.65,
Second - Wyatt Treeby/Daine Mc-
Nenny - 22.23, Third - Randy
Johnson/Clint Cobb - 24.15,
Fourth - Shaun Ruland/Jake Nel-
son - 24.24, Fifth - Myron
Mann/Rowdy Curr - 24.28, Sixth -
Levi O’Keefe/Glen King - 25.88.
Black Hills Roping Club holds
roping at Ruland Arena
Effective November 19, 2012,
the Rapid City Social Security of-
fice will be open to the public Mon-
day through Friday from 9:00 a.m.
to 3:00 p.m. – a reduction of 30
minutes each weekday. In addi-
tion, beginning January 2, 2013,
the office will close to the public at
noon every Wednesday.
While agency employees will
continue to work their regular
hours, this shorter public window
will allow them to complete face-
to-face interviews and process
claims work without incurring the
cost of overtime. The significantly
reduced funding provided by Con-
gress under the continuing resolu-
tion for the first six months of the
fiscal year makes it impossible for
the agency to provide the overtime
needed to handle service to the
public as it has done in the past.
In addition, on November 23,
Rapid City Social Security
Office to change hours
the day after Thanksgiving, all So-
cial Security field offices will be
closed to the public. As we did last
year, employees working that day
will focus on reducing backlogged
workloads.
Most Social Security services do
not require a visit to a local office.
Many services, including applying
for retirement, disability or
Medicare benefits, signing up for
direct deposit, replacing a
Medicare card, obtaining a proof of
income letter or informing us of a
change of address or telephone
number are conveniently available
at www.socialsecurity.gov or by di-
aling our toll-free number, 1-800-
772-1213. People who are deaf or
hard of hearing may call our TTY
number, 1-800-325-0778. Many of
our online services also are avail-
able in Spanish at www.seguroso-
cial.gov.
Deer hunting seasons in South
Dakota are in full swing during
November and the Game, Fish and
Parks Department is reminding
hunters that fire danger still ex-
ists.
Fire danger has been extremely
high throughout the summer, and
despite some recent moisture and
cold temperatures remains so
throughout much of the state.
With that in mind, hunters are
being asked to take precautions to
help prevent range fires.
GFP asks hunters to take these
basic precautions:
•Equip their vehicles with a
Fire precautions needed
during Deer seasons
large fire extinguisher, shovel and
water they’ll need to fight a fire.
•Extinguish cigarettes with
water or dirt or use an ashtray in-
side their vehicle.
•Limit vehicle traffic to desig-
nated roads and trails.
•Never park a vehicle over dry
grass.
In addition, hunters can provide
an extra safety measure by carry-
ing a cell phone and being alert for
possible fires. If smoke or fire is
seen, hunters should report the
fire location to local law enforce-
ment or call 911 immediately.
Fall is well underway and there
are many new books at the Wall
Community Library. We have new
bestsellers like John Grisham’s
The Racketeer and Gone Girl by
Gillian Flynn. For teens we have
Rick Riordan’s Mark of Athena,
and for the younger crowd we have
Mo Willem’s latest, Let’s Go For a
Drive. Come in check out our new
offerings.
Now that things have slowed
down on the tourist front, some of
you may have some spare time on
your hands. Everyone is welcome
at the Wall Community Library
Book Club meetings. They are held
on the last Wednesday of the
month at 6:00 p.m.
The book for this month is Room
by Emma Donoghue. This book is
told from the perspective of Jack.
To five-year-old Jack, Room is
the entire world. It's where he was
born, where he and his Ma eat and
play and learn. At night, Ma puts
him safely to sleep in the
wardrobe, in case Old Nick comes.
Wall Community Library
Room is home to Jack, but to Ma,
it's the prison where she's been
held for seven years, since the age
of 19. Through determination and
ingenuity, Ma has created a life for
her son. But Jack's curiosity is
building alongside Ma's despera-
tion and she knows Room cannot
contain either for much longer.
Told in the inventive, funny, and
poignant voice of Jack, Room is a
powerful story of a mother and son
whose love lets them survive the
impossible. The discussion group
will meet on Wednesday, Novem-
ber 28 at 6 p.m. Join us!
Please take note of our special
hours for the week of Thanksgiv-
ing:
•Wednesday, November 21
– 12 to 5 pm
•Thursday, November 22
– Closed
•Friday, November 23
– Closed
We will resume normal hours
the following week. Sorry for any
inconvenience.
Participating flower shops along
with Petals and Posts will gather
canned goods for distribution by
their local food pantries during
National Hunger and Homeless-
ness Awareness Week. During Car-
ing Rose Week, November 12 -17,
donors who bring two cans of food
can buy one dozen long-stemmed
roses to grace their tables over
Thanksgiving for only $10.
Demand for food from charity
providers is up by as much as 40
percent due in part to America re-
covering from the greatest eco-
nomic downturn since the Great
Depression. To help, florists across
the central United States will
gather over 32 tons of food for
those in need during Caring Rose
Week November 12 -17. Now in its
14th year, the program will likely
surpass three quarters of a million
pounds of donated food over the
life of the event.
Florists in each community
choose a local food-distribution
charity. Collected canned goods are
then distributed through the char-
ity to feed those within the com-
munity who cannot otherwise
meet their nutritional needs.
Coming at the onset of
seasonally cold weather, the pro-
gram helps food-distribution pro-
grams when families begin to ex-
perience the greatest financial
pressure.
According to Brian Barks,
spokesperson for Foodbank for the
Heartland in Omaha, Neb., their
member agencies such as emer-
gency shelters and church pantries
are reporting new faces at their lo-
cations, often seeking help for the
first time due to the sour economy.
“While the economy is improving,
the job status for many people
without work isn’t changing, “ he
said. “Until it does, there’s no end
in sight for the skyrocketing need.”
Caring Rose Week’s timing –
and that of National Hunger and
Homelessness Awareness Week –
Flower Shops to deliver over 32
tons of food to those in need
is appropriate.
“I think people at this time of
year are in a reflective mood,” said
Matt Gasson, Executive Director
of Feeding South Dakota, with of-
fices in Sioux Falls, Pierre and
Rapid City and about 450 non-
profit affiliates in every county
across the state.“People reflect on
all that we have and are thankful
for. This is a time of great connec-
tion.”
Jill Henessy of Flower Box in
Graceville, Minn., reports that cus-
tomers bring in bags of food rather
than just the two cans needed.
“Their generosity is overwhelming.
The food stays local, where we
need it.”
“The fact that we are doing
something to help so many unfor-
tunate people is reason enough to
participate, especially now,” said
Irene Arnold of Chariton Floral in
Chariton, Iowa.
Tammy Holen at Artistic Am-
biance in Minot, N.D., noted that
Caring Rose Week was responsible
for the largest amount of food ever
picked up by the food pantry in the
Minot area.
Conceived in 1998, Caring Rose
Week was created by Harry
Whelden, General Manager of
North American Wholesale Florist
in Sioux Falls, S.D., and now in
Roseville, Minn. A former food-in-
dustry businessman, Whelden
took an interest in “National
Hunger and Homelessness Aware-
ness Week” sponsored by the Na-
tional Coalition for the Homeless
and the National Student Cam-
paign Against Hunger and Home-
lessness which takes place each
year one week before Thanksgiv-
ing.
“I am deeply grateful for the par-
ticipation of the literally hundreds
of flower shops across the Great
Plains for taking the time and en-
ergy to help meet this need,” says
Whelden.“It’s a time of year when
food is needed and appreciated.
While many people are buying toys
and other Christmas gifts, many
others across America are without
food.”
For more information about Na-
tional Hunger and Homelessness
Awareness Week, see the National
Coalition for the Homeless web-
site: http://www.nationalhomeless.
org/projects/awareness/index.html
For more information, contact a
local participating florist who can
be found here: http://www.caring
rose.org/Find.php.
October 2012 Pennington
County Sheriff’s report
During the month of October
2012, the Pennington County Sher-
iff's Office recorded the following
statistics in and around the com-
munity of Wall:
Time
City hours: . . . . . . . . . . . . .402.00
City hrs other deputies . . . .14.00
Total City hours . . . . . .416.00
Training hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.50
Vacation/Sick hrs . . . . . . . . .88.00
County hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.00
# of times called out/Hrs . . . .0.00
Arrest
Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Non-Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Calls For Service
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Alcohol Violations . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Animal Complaints . . . . . . . . . . .9
Assaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Assist Other Agencies . . . . . . . . .4
Attempt to Locate . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Civil Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Community Activity . . . . . . . . .27
Coroner Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Court . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
DPP/Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Extra Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Fire Medical Assist . . . . . . . . . . .2
Follow-up Investigation . . . . . .25
Found or Lost Property . . . . . . .0
Calls for Service
Keep the Peace . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Minor Consuming . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Murder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Runaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
School Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
SOLV Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Suspicious Activity . . . . . . . . . . .5
Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Weapons Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Welfare Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
911 Hang up Calls . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Civil Patrol
Attempted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
City Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Traffic Activity
Citations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Injury Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Non-Injury Accident . . . . . . . . . .3
DUI's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Motorist Assist . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
School Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Skate/Bike Citation . . . . . . . . . .0
Skate/Bike Warning . . . . . . . . . .0
Speed Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Vehicle/Parking Comp . . . . . . . .5
Please feel free to visit with
Deputies Louis Lange, Darren
Ginn, Jamin Hartland, Sgt. Dustin
Morrison, Lt. Kraig Wood or Capt.
Corey Brubakken with any ques-
tions or concerns related to law en-
forcement in and around the Wall
Community.
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012• Page 3
Need a gift idea
for that
hard-to-buy
someone?
How about a gift
that keeps on
giving all year? A
subscription to the
Pennington
County Courant.
Call to start your
subscription gift!
(605) 279-2565
courant@gwtc.net
By Coach Dani Herring
The Wall Lady Eagles season
came to an end in the Region 7B
game as they lost to Lyman 21-25,
21-25, 25-22, 15-25.
In a game that was all about mo-
mentum, Lyman kept most of it
throughout three of the four sets.
Wall was led by Autumn Schulz
who had 16 kills and six digs.
Schulz finished the season with
281 kills, 68 aces and 133 digs.
Lady Eagles finish season 19 - 9
Josie Blasius serving the ball.
Monica Bielmaier goes for a
kill during the Lyman Co.
game.
Tayah Huether receiving a
serve from Lyman Co.
Bailey Lytle serving the ball.
Kaitlin Schreiber, Bailey Lytle watch as Autumn Schulz bumps
the ball back over the net. Carlee Johnston stands by ready to
help.
Carlee Johnston hits the ball
back over the net during Re-
gions held in Philip on Tues-
day, November 6.
Kim Billings goes up for a kill
against Lyman Co.
~Photos by Del Bartels
Pioneer Review
SampIe Our
SpecIaIs DaIIy
Luncb
SpecIaIs
Nov. 1S - Nov. 21
Tbursday, November 1S
·1/3 ll. Dacon CIccsclurgcr w/Curlcy Frics. . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Darlcy Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
FrIday, November 16
·DDQ Porl Fils w/Dalcd Poiaio & Dalcd Dcans . . $6.29
·Dccf Noodlc Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Saturday, November 1?
·Hoi Darlccuc
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs & Cravy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Ficc Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Sunday, November 1S
·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci. . . . . . . . . . . $?.39
·CIild's Drcalfasi Duffci (12 & undcr} . . . . . . . $3.S9
Scrvcd 7.00 io 10.30 a.n.
·Ovcn Dalcd CIiclcn
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs & Cravy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dacon CIccsclurgcr Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . $S.29
Monday, November 19
·Indian Taco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Dun¡ling Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Tuesday, November 20
·CIiclcn Fricd Sical
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Crccn Dcans . . . . . . $6.29
·CIili & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Wednesday, November 21
·DDQ Pullcd Porl SandwicI
w/Colcslaw & CIi¡s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Poiaio Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
279-2175 · Wall, SD
BreakIast: Mon. - Sat.
2 Eggs & Toasi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.19
2 Pancalcs & Sausagc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.19
November 16-17-18-19:
Taken 2(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
November 23-24-25-26:
Here Comes the Boom (PG)
November 30-December 1-2-3:
Wreck It Ralph (PG)
December 7-8-9-10: The Twilight
Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2
(PG-13)
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Happq TnanksgIvIngl
Here`s to a gobblin` good time at this festive time of year!
GoIden Veterinary Services
Dr. Jim Stangle
Heather,
Linda &Jen
Milesville, SD
Dr. Jim McConaghy
Heather
&Megan
Wall, SD
Kaitlin Schreiber led the setters
with 16 assists and Josie Blasius
led servers with 10 points and two
aces.
The Eagles finished the season
19-9, were Western Great Plains
Conference champions, District
14B Champions and Runner-Up at
the Lead Invitational Tournament.
I appreciate everyone in the
community for their support this
season, it was a great year. Go Ea-
gles!
Stats
G1 G2 G3 G4 Final
Wall: 21 21 25 15 1
Lyman: 25 25 22 25 3
•Service Attempts: Bailey
Lytle - 14. Tayah Huether - 13,
Josie Blasius - 18, Emily Linn - 18,
Kaitlin Schreiber - 10, Autumn
Schulz - 10. Team Total: 83.
•Aces: Lytle - 2, Blasius - 2,
Linn - 1, Schreiber - 1, Schulz - 1.
Team Total: 7. Team Total: 7.
•Points: Lytle - 6, Huether - 6,
Blasius - 10, Linn - 10, Schreiber -
1, Schulz - 3. Team Total: 36.
•Attacks: Lytle - 8, Huether - 1,
Monica Bielmaier - 7, Carlee John-
ston - 16, Kim Billings - 27,
Schreiber - 17, Schulz - 41. Team
KEVN Black Hills FOX is
pleased to announce its seventh
annual Rising Star of the West
Scholarship contest. This year,
thanks to First Interstate Bank,
the total value of scholarships is
once again at $7,500. The first
place winner will receive a $4,000
college scholarship, with $2,000 for
second place, $1,000 for third place
and $500 for fourth place.
High school students will have
the opportunity to present com-
mentaries on KEVN Black Hills
FOX News on topics important to
them. Viewers will then be able to
view those videos at
blackhillsfox.com and help pick the
four finalists and the eventual
winner.
Students who wish to partici-
pate need to shoot a short (one
minute) video of them talking
about any subject that interests
them. They don’t need to be elabo-
rate productions, since those
videos won’t run on air. The videos
KEVN announces Rising Star of
the West scholarship contest
need to be submitted to KEVN
Black Hills FOX, along with an
entry form, by December 31st. The
20 students selected for the contest
will tape their commentaries at
the KEVN Black Hills FOX stu-
dios to air beginning in February.
The four weekly winners will be-
come finalists and will tape four
more commentaries on four com-
mon topics to air during the finals
of the contest beginning in April.
Interested students can get
entry forms and rules at
www.blackhillsfox.com. They could
join our previous winners, Shad
Christman of Lemmon High
School along with Kaitlyn Hem-
mingson, Annelise Ewing and
Janesa Bakeberg of Spearfish
High School, Caila Brennan of St.
Thomas More High School and
Jordan Barthel of Lead-Deadwood
High School as the latest Rising
Star of the West.
This year, give thanks by giving blood
Every year, most of us celebrate
Thanksgiving the same way: fam-
ily, feasting and football. These are
all good, of course. But there is an-
other tradition we might consider
adding. We can donate blood!
“As we know, hospitals don’t
close for the holidays,” said Lori
Liebman, Donor Recruitment Di-
rector at United Blood Services.
“The blood you donate now can
save someone’s life over the
Thanksgiving and Christmas sea-
sons. Could there be a better gift to
give?” Liebman adds, “Donating in
November is a great way to start
the holiday season because it re-
minds us that one person can truly
make a difference.”
Good health and safety can
never be taken for granted. Any
day might bring an illness - or any
moment, an injury. Giving blood is
one way of pausing to reflect on
our good fortune, while helping to
assure that those in need of life-
saving transfusions can depend on
that blood remaining available.
Blood can be stored for only 42
days and accidents tend to happen
more frequently during the holi-
day season. Influenza is also more
prevalent at this time of the year.
This impacts the blood supply be-
cause people who are ill cannot do-
nate.
United Blood Services will be in
Wall at the Wall High School Gym
on Monday, November 19 from
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Make your
appointment to give blood at
www.UnitedBloodServices. org or
by calling 342-8585 in Rapid City,
996-3688 in Mitchell or 279-2156
and ask for Randall Poste or you
can e-mail to www.bloodhero.com
and enter code: wallsd.
With each donation, donors re-
ceive a free total cholesterol test
and earn points in United Blood
Services’ Hero in Me reward pro-
gram. Volunteer blood donors must
be at least 16, weight a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in good
Total: 117.
•Kills: Lytle - 1, Bielmaier - 1,
Johnston - 5, Billings - 6, Schreiber
- 5, Schulz - 6. Team Total: 34.
•Ball Handling: Lytle - 97,
Huether - 32, Bielmaier - 16, John-
ston - 17, Billings - 14, Blasius -
2, Linn - 13, Schreiber - 117,
Schulz - 61. Team Total: 369.
•Ball Handling Assists: Lytle
- 14, Schreiber - 16, Schulz - 1.
Team Total: 31.
•Receiving: Lytle - 4, Huether -
43, Linn - 10, Schulz - 26. Team
Total: 83.
•Digs: Lytle - 5, Huether - 4,
Johnston- 1, Linn - 2, Schreiber -
6, Schulz - 6. Team Total: 24.
health. Additional height/weight
requirements apply to donors 22
and younger and donors who are
16 (or 17, some areas) must have
signed permission from a parent or
guardian. For more information,
visit www.UnitedBloodService.org.
annc@
gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Marilyn Keyser’s health has im-
proved. She is now living in her
motor home close to her son in Dal-
las, Texas. Good news!
Remember that the Haakon
County Crooners concert will be at
4:30 p.m., Wall Community Cen-
ter, on December 2nd. Hope to see
you there!
Really had a taste of winter over
the weekend. Wind, snow (maybe
two inches) and COLD! It was the
beginning of prairie deer season so
hope all hunters kept warm and
lucky to get their deer.
If you take part in all the activi-
ties this week that involve eating,
you may feel like a “stuffed”
turkey. The “Theme” meal is on
Tuesday at Prairie Village, the
Methodist Men’s Thanksgiving
supper is on Wednesday evening
and Senior Citizen’s potluck sup-
per falls on Thursday evening.
Gobble, gobble!!
The Senior Citizens met last
Monday, the 5th, for their regular
monthly meeting. We have no local
servicemen overseas at this time,
so we will not do packages. Arla
Olson and Mavis Jeppesen were
hostesses. Next meeting will be
December 3rd.
Michelle Lamphere had gall-
bladder surgery last Monday
morning at the Rapid City Re-
gional Hospital. She was released
the same day to go home.
Grandma Frances Poste had gone
to Rapid City on Sunday so she
could spend a few days with her.
Michelle is doing very well and
plans to go back to work, maybe
half days, the week of the 12th.
Frances came back to Wall as
she had an appointment in Philip
on Thursday. While there, she also
got to visit a bit with Dolly
Blucher, Florence Dean and Lucile
Peterson.
Monday, the 12th, was a day off
for some businesses (city officers,
bank, WREA, BHFCU, GWTC and
the post office) as Veteran’s Day
fell on Sunday. Kids had school but
helped the American Legion with
their program to honor all service-
men and women, who served our
country.
Coming from Douglas, Wyo., last
week were George Moore’s three
daughters, Nancy Jourdan, Jill
Zenick and JoAnn Lurz. Coming
from Spearfish were Daphne and
Jackie Bennet. They all came to
help George celebrate his birthday.
(We will add our belated birthday
greetings to George.)
The Craft Fair at the Wall Com-
munity Center had a good crowd
on Sunday, considering the
weather. There certainly was a va-
riety of goods for sale.
Frances Poste met Evelyn Kjer-
stad at her apartment on Friday.
They went out for lunch and got in
one game of Scrabble. Evelyn’s
past-time is knitting scarves - they
must be for Christmas gifts as she
already had several done.
Roy Hamann is still in the Rapid
City Regional Hospital. We send
him “get well soon” messages.
Keep him in your prayers.
Dave Custis has been doctoring
with the doctors at the Mayo
Clinic, Rochester, Minn. He has
been in a hospital there for quite a
lengthy stay. His family is with
him. Rose White has gone to stay
with the girls. The community
would like to do a “Bake Sale” as a
fundraiser for the Custis family. It
is scheduled for Sunday, November
18th, at Wall Drug Store, starting
at 8 a.m. All donations, monetary
or food, are welcome. We miss you,
Dave! Our prayers are with you.
Renee Michaud, daughter of Ron
Ochs, is having problems with can-
cer again. Her baby was taken by
C-section and he is doing fine. May
we keep her in our prayers.
Saturday, November 10, the
Brucklacher family met in Philip
at Pastor Al and Lenore’s home.
The whole entire family was there.
This was the first time in forty
years that the whole family has
been together. Four generations
with all Al and Lenore’s children
grandchildren and great-grand-
children were there. Forty-four
people gathered and we did a huge
family picture in Al’s music room
in his barn that he built for the
Bible School activities.
Forecast looks like a good one —
more seasonal temperatures but
not that cold. We’ll take it.
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Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
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Submitted by
Larry & Peggy Gravatt
News was a little slow around
here this past week. Everyone
seems to be busy with hunters
from all over. Sounds like there
have been enough nice bucks to go
around.
We are thankful for the moisture
in any form, but not sure we were
quite ready for the blowing snow.
Most of the community attended
the service and or the buriel of
Terry Karrels on Monday. She will
be missed and we extend our sym-
pathies to the families.
Kenny and Janet Wilson trav-
eled to Rapid City on Tuesday and
picked up grandson Logan Tschet-
ter. Grandma took him back home
on Thursday.
John, Jean, Jim, Andy, Kellie
and Morris Linn attended the fu-
neral of Wesley Printz in Sturgis
on Thursday. Our sympathies to
the family.
Clyde Arneson was making his
usual rounds and was a coffee vis-
itor at the Morris Linn’s on Mon-
day morning. Kassandra Linn at-
tended the Wall volleyball game in
Philip Tuesday night. Morris Linn
had lunch with Gene Pluth Thurs-
day in Rapid City.
Mel and Dorothy Anderson seem
to have had a pretty full week. On
Monday they traveled to Rapid
City to pick up their new book,
SAINTS AND SINNERS for the
final editing. The target date for
publication is December 1st. We
can’t wait to read it Mel!
Several Elm Springs citizens are
working on a benefit fund raiser
for Karen Delbridge. Karen has
been hospitalized in Rapid City
and now Sturgis for a long drawn
out battle to heal her knee. More
details will be announced at a later
date.
The Anderson home has in-
creased greatly in population by
one daughter, Lisa, grandson Ben,
four dogs (two big and two small)
and four cats (mostly black and
ready for adoption to a loving
home). Lisa plans on staying in the
area for a while to help Tom and
Shelia Trask at the hunting camp.
Ben, has by now, departed to go
back to Casper College in
Wyoming where he is a student.
Friday, Charles Karp, Fred,
Laramie Opstadahl and Tucky
Tifft gathered cows and trailed
them home. Tucky was riding a
green broke horse. Mel said he was
getting along very well with the
horse, but thought he could have
been using a better bridle!
Lawrence Burke had company
this past week. Melissa Burke,
Shannon Burke and grandson
Skyler, who was home on leave,
spend some time visiting and
doing a little deer hunting.
Freddie Ferguson had deer
hunters from Sioux Falls and re-
ports they had very good luck.
Peggy Gravatt spent last Mon-
day thru Friday in Rapid City
staying with grandkids Madi and
Steele while their folks were gone.
Peggy was grateful that Madi now
has a driver’s license, even though
it made her a little nervous. The
kids are going in ten different di-
rections and then of course, there
is also school. It was a fun week.
Hopefully, we will be able to get
back on track with the news from
out here.
Elm Springs News Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
It is the tiniest bit chilly this
morning. Still some snow on the
ground, enough to get feet wet but
far from the amount needed for
snow “person” construction!
Anna Mae Allread’s daughter,
Penny and husband Rodger Rous-
sell form Regina, Saskatchewan,
arrived Monday, November 5, in
Wasta. They planned for time with
friends, time for house chores and
most importantly time with Anna
Mae who is now in a care facility
in Belle Fourche. Penny said her
mom still misses Wasta. When I
think of Anna Mae, I think of her
pleasure in attending the Easter
Egg Hunts held here. She espe-
cially enjoyed it when she had
grandkids and great-grandkids
come for the fun.
Election turn-out was good. we
had some re-districting of our
precinct so there were new faces.
New faces also because of first
time eligible voters — Matthew
Rausch and Tyler Trask.
We had people jokingly ask
where was the pie and coffee. We
answered back with, “Here’s a nice
‘I have voted’ sicker!”
Kelly Green is part of the Wall
gymnastics team and enjoying it
again this year. the first meet will
be December 7, in Hot Springs at
5:00 p.m.
Whoa, December! Well, ready or
not it is coming at a great speed!
Madi Grenstiner is on the bas-
ketball team and they have a home
game scheduled December 6, at
6:00 p.m., when they will be play-
ing Philip. I’m sure she would hap-
pily invite everyone to the game so
all Wasta friends and neighbors
would show up to cheer the Lady
Eagles to victory! So, in her stead
I will happily invite all of you. It is
good fun.
Raiden Crawford’s winning foot-
ball season moved quickly to a
winning hunting season. He got a
nice two point buck. Are you the
provider and the cook, Raiden?
Rumor has it that your G-mom
Barb has great recipes and some
are just waiting for a grandson to
try. Congratulations — what luck
did you dad have?
Faye Bryan’s long time friends
form Madison, S.D. spent the
weekend at Faye’s cabin hunting.
DeLon Mock and Doug O’Connell
come periodically, sometimes to
visit and sometimes to hunt. It’s
good to have these second-genera-
tion friends.
Kathy and Stanley McNabb are
having an auction at their home,
Saturday, December 1. Various
treasures will be available for the
discerning buyers bid. The sale
will begin at 10:00 a.m. so come
have a look and take home what
you must have!
Anna Lee and Carl Humphrey’s
son-in-law Ron Opstedahl is in
Rapid City Regional Rehab after
suffering a second and more severe
stroke about two weeks ago. Ron is
married to Humphrey’s daughter,
Linda. Please send out your
thoughts and prayers.
Wasta’s annual Christmas
potluck supper will be held Satur-
day, December 8th at the Wasta
Community Hall at 5:00 p.m. Good
food in abundance, good people
and awesome entertainment is
what is in store. We’re always glad
to see your so mark your calendar
and come along over the river and
through the trees!
Happy Trails!
Wasta Wanderings
Our best
wishes for a
Happy Thanksgiving!
Dr. Ron & Laurie Mann
& Staff
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First National
Agency
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ATTENTION
All Walker Refuse
Customers
Walker Refuse will be
picking up Wall and
Philip residential &
commercial trash on
Wed., Nov. 21st.
Walker Refuse will be
closed Thurs., Nov. 22nd
& Fri., Nov. 23rd for the
Thanksgiving Holiday.
YOUNG AT HEART
SENIOR CITIZEN GROUP
Young at Heart Senior Citizens
met at Prairie Village Monday, No-
vember 5th with 12 members pres-
ent.
Carol called the meeting to order
and read a neat version on cre-
ation. Pledge to the flag was said.
A moment of silence was held for
those with prayer needs.
New business: We are going to
have a Christmas Party with our
regular meeting in December. We
will be getting Christmas cards
ready to send.
Upcoming events:
•November 6: VOTE
•November 7: VFW Bingo, 7
p.m.
•November 12: Craft Show at
Wall Community Center, Neigh-
borhood Housing will be serving
hot dogs and bars.
•November 13: Theme Meal
•November 14: UMC Thanks-
giving Supper.
•November 15: Senior Potluck
•December 2: Haakon County
Crooners in concert at the Commu-
nity Center at 4:30 p.m.
The group is asking anyone who
has someone serving overseas to
please get their name and address
to us. Call 279-2089.
Club Notes
Wall School
District #51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
November 15 to
November 21, 2012
Thursday: Breakfast:
Omelet, Toast, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Turkey, Mashed Po-
tatoes, Gravy, Roll, Sweet Pota-
toes, Pineapple, Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast: Waffle,
Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Goulash, Corn,
Whole Grain Roll, Pears, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Ba-
nana Bread, Cheese Stick,
Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Whole Grain Roll, French
Fries, Carrots, Mixed Fruit,
Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast:
Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Stromboli, Green
Beans, Broccoli, Oranges, Milk.
Community
Sponsored
Benefit Bake Sale
for
Dave Custis Family
November 18, 2012
8:00 a.m. until ??
Wall Drug Store
Your donations
will be appreciated
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Church
Wall Rodeo Grounds
Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
God’s verdict upon the pagan world is that “they are
without excuse, because that, when they knew God, they
glorified Him not as God, neither were thankful…” (Rom.
1:20,21).
The Psalmist, on the other hand, declares:
“IT IS A GOOD THING TO GIVE THANKS
UNTO THE LORD, AND TO SING PRAISES
UNTO THY NAME, O MOST HIGH:
“TO SHOW FORTH THY LOVINGKINDNESS
IN THE MORNING. AND THY FAITHFULNESS
EVERY NIGHT” (Psa. 92:1,2).
Believers today have even more to be thankful for than
did the Psalmist, for we can rejoice in what God has done
for us through Christ and His redeeming work. Thus Paul,
by divine inspiration, speaks of…
“GIVING THANKS UNTO THE FATHER, WHO
HATH MADE US MEET [FIT] TO BE PARTAK-
ERS OF THE INHERITANCE OF THE SAINTS IN
LIGHT:
“WHO HATH DELIVERED US FROM THE
POWER OF DARKNESS, AND HATH TRANS-
LATED US INTO THE KINGDOM OF HIS DEAR
SON” (Col. 1:12,13).
It is because of this “deliverance” that the humblest be-
liever can cry with Paul: “Thanks be unto God, who always
causeth us to triumph in Christ!” (II Cor. 2:14) and “Thanks
be to God, who giveth us the victory through our Lord
Jesus Christ!” (I Cor. 15:57). How appropriate, then, are
the following exhortations:
“In everything give thanks” (I Thes. 5:18) and
“By [Christ], therefore, let us offer the sacrifice of
praise… giving thanks to His name” (Heb. 13:15).
“For all things are for your sakes, that the abun-
dant grace might through the thanksgiving of
many redound to the glory of God” (II Cor. 4:15).
Most of all, “THANKS BE UNTO GOD FOR HIS UN-
SPEAKABLE GIFT,” our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ! (II
Cor. 9:15).
THANKSGIVING
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
More obituaries on page 6
Wesley Bruce Printz______________________________
Wesley Bruce Printz, 82, Sturgis,
died Monday, November 5, 2012, at
Sturgis Regional Hospital.
Memorial services were held
Thursday, November 8, 2012, at
Grace Lutheran Church in Sturgis,
with Pastor Will Olsen officiating.
Inurnment with military honors
followed at Black Hills National
Cemetery near Sturgis.
Wes was born January 24, 1930,
at Wasta, SD, to Oscar and Theresa
(Napier) Printz. He was raised in
the Elm Springs area during the
very dry 30's with his brothers and
sister until he joined the Navy in
1947. He served in the Far East
and Korea aboard the USS Wiltsie
until his honorable discharge in
1951. Following his return to South
Dakota, he was employed at the
Black Hills VA Health Care Center
at Fort Meade until his retirement.
Wes served on the Sturgis town
council and was a city magistrate.
Wes was also a Boy Scout troop
leader (#16).
After his retirement, Wes worked
as a contract electrician in the
Sturgis area. Wes also enjoyed
working in his woodshop.
Wes was a former member of the
South Dakota Army National
Guard, the Korean War Veterans
Association, the USS Wiltsie Asso-
ciation, and the VFW.
Survivors include his wife, Au-
drey Printz, Sturgis; sons, James
(Nancy) Printz, Rockford, Ill., and
Trent (Maggie) Printz, Culpepper,
Va.; daughters, Debra (Rick)
Palamino, Herndon, Va., Carol
(Hugh) Brechtel, Rapid City, and
Cheryl (Henry) Wiechern, Emerson
Manitoba, Canada; brothers, Mar-
tin (Shirley) Printz, New Under-
wood, and Bill (Pat) Printz, Sidney,
Neb.; 12 grandchildren; and 11
great-grandchildren. Survivors
also include step-children, Greg
(Jacque) Lee, Lincoln, Neb., Pam
(Alan) Williams, Sturgis, and Deb-
bie Johnston, Justin, Texas; and
five step-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, one brother, and two sis-
ters.
A memorial has been established
to the Sturgis Ambulance Service.
Harry A. Severson______________________________
gion - Baker Post 209 and served
as post commander during 1966-
1967.
After his discharge from the
service, Harry graduated from
Reisch Auctioneer School in Mason
City, Iowa. He held farm sales in
the area and worked at sale barns
in Britton, Clark, DeSmet, Timber
Lake, Sisseton, Watertown and
elsewhere, including the last sale
at the Clark Sale Barn and many
Clark County 4-H Beef Sales. The
Severson brothers – Bud, Harry
and Harold - began a partnership
raising Angus cattle in 1951.
Later, they each started their own
cattle operations.
Harry was united in marriage
with Clarice Christianson on April
15, 1952. The couple celebrated
their 60th wedding anniversary
earlier this year. Harry and
Clarice lived their entire married
life on the farm in Garfield Town-
ship, where the kitchen table
served as a café and an office for
Harry’s cattle buying business for
many years.
Harry enjoyed following the ac-
tivities of his six children and 19
grandchildren – attending sport-
ing events, rodeos, 4-H Achieve-
ment Days, concerts, confirma-
tions, high school and college grad-
uations, and weddings. He was
also blessed with 11 great-grand-
children and one great-great
granddaughter.
Harry was baptized in the
Methodist faith and was a long-
time member of the St. Paul
Lutheran Church.
Grateful for having shared his
life are his children Jolene (Ron)
Volek of Highmore, Terry (Cheryl)
of Raymond, Brad of Vale, SD,
Kirk (Terri) of Clark, Candice
(Lance) Mason of Doland, and
Scott (Monica) of Waverly, Iowa.
Grandchildren are Kyla Parrish
and Allen, Billy and Eric Volek;
Kaci Bechen and Jennifer, Jason,
David, Lane and Cheyenne Sever-
son; Cody and Cole Severson; Traci
Smith, Michele Benike, and Jerald
and Jacob Severson; Paige Her-
manson and Bailey Mason; and
Ryan Severson. Great-grandchil-
dren are Shaelee and Connor Par-
rish, Amber Christman, Brandi
Harrington, Michael Severson,
Damian Thyen, Mason Severson,
Cortney and Garret Smith, and
Tyson and Abigail Benike; and a
great-great granddaughter, Abby
Christman. Harry’s surviving sib-
lings include Harold (Nyla) of
Rapid City and Helen Johnson of
Watertown; and a sister-in-law, Vi-
oletta Severson of Clark.
Preceding Harry in death are his
parents; wife, Clarice, in April; a
sister, Bertha (Fred) Farnum; two
brothers, Gerald and Swen “Bud”
and a brother-in-law, Lester John-
son.
Funeral arrangements are
under the direction of Furness Fu-
neral Home at Clark, where there
is an on-line registry at www.fur-
nessfuneralhome.com
Harry A. Severson, age 86,
Clark, died Saturday evening, No-
vember 3, 2012, surrounded by
many family members in the
Prairie Lakes Hospital at Water-
town, SD.
Funeral services were held
Thursday, November 8, 2012, at
the St. Paul Lutheran Church at
Clark, with The Reverend Robin
Schaunaman officiating. The hon-
orary casketbearers were his
granddaughters and great-grand-
children with the active casket-
bearers being his grandsons.
Dorothy Fuller was organist with
Roger Nordhus the soloist.
Burial with full military honors
followed in the Rose Hill Cemetery
at Clark.
Harry Allen Severson and broth-
ers Harold and Gerald were born
on July 12, 1926, near Clark, S.D.,
to Swen Sr. and Ida (Keyes) Sever-
son. Gerald died shortly after the
triplets were born.
Harry and his siblings were born
in the “stone house” his father
built of hand-made cement blocks
which still stands south of High-
way 212 west of Clark. The family
lived there until 1938, a year after
the death of Harry’s father, when
they moved to another farm three-
and-a-half miles to the northeast.
The stone house has remained
empty since that time and stands
as a testament to the skill and
hard work of early Clark County
residents.
Harry attended Lorenz School in
Lincoln Township for six years and
the Eubank country school in
Garfield Township for two years.
In July 1945, at the age of 19,
Harry entered the Army. He re-
ceived infantry training and be-
came a qualified rifleman at Camp
Joseph T. Robertson in Arkansas.
During Harry’s military service he
traveled to Camp Picket in Vir-
ginia, Fort Dix in New Jersey,
France, Switzerland and Germany.
He was honorably discharged from
the Army on May 13, 1947. Harry
was a member of the Raymond Le-
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd sieler
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Account set up at:
First Interstate Bank
Karen DeIbridge Benefit Acct.
Box 9
Sturgis, SD 57785
or drop off any help you have:
Cheryl Hammerstrom
PrHairie Country Cut & Curl
Union Center Mall
Union Center, SD
Wall Drug Pharmacy
Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
•November 20th, the pharmacy will be
closed from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
•November 22nd & 23rd, the pharmacy
will be closed.
•December 4th, the pharmacy will be
closing at 3:00 p.m.
•December 18th, the pharmacy will be
closing at 3:00 p.m.
Sorry for any inconvenience
279-1931 • Wall, SD
TREEs...
sHRubs...
PERENNIAls...
Order by
November 30th
for spring delivery.
Call East Pennington
Conservation District
at 279-2519
or stop by our office at
24 Creighton Rd. in Wall, SD
for complete list and prices.
Kathleen Walsh McEntee__________________________
Kathleen “Kit” Walsh McEntee,
age 91, of Puyallup, Wa., formally
of Philip and Wall, S.D., passed
away November 8, 2012, at home
in the Willow Garden retirement
center.
Kit was born August 19, 1921, at
Ash Creek, S.D., the daughter of
WJ “Bill” and Mary “Mayme” Fen-
nell Wilson. The Wilson family
moved to Philip in 1938, operating
the Philip Dairy. Kit graduated
from Mount Marty High School in
Yankton in 1941. She worked at
the Cedar Pass Lodge and then for
a dentist in Norfolk, Neb., for two
years after high school.
Kit was united in marriage to
WJ “Bill” Walsh at Philip in 1942.
For a portion of the Second World
War, Kit worked for Douglas Air-
craft Company in Long Beach,
Calif. Bill and Kit bought and op-
erated the Midway and B&M cafes
in Philip for a number of years.
They moved to Murdo in 1948 and
to Wall in 1952. They owned and
operated the Walsh Funeral Home
until 1968, moving to the Washing-
ton area at that time. Bill passed
away in 1972.
Kit lived in Puyallup, Wa., area
for 43 years. She married Robert
“Mac” McEntee 1976. They spent
some time in Atlanta, Ga., and Kit
moved back to Puyallup when Mac
passed away in 1985.
Kit was a long time member of
the All Saints Catholic Church in
Puyallup.
She is survived by three chil-
dren, Dennis Walsh and his wife,
Susan, (Todd and Tara) of Miami,
Fla., Dan Walsh and his wife,
Jeanne, (Jason and Ryan) of Mar-
tinsburg, W.Va., and Colleen
Walsh Lipscomb and her husband,
Brad, (Tamora and Scott) of Rock
Mart, Ga.; six grandchildren; 10
great-grandchildren; sisters-in-
law, Peg Wilson (Bill), Tiny Wilson
(Kenny), Pat Walsh and Audra
Cole; and many nieces and
nephews.
In addition to her husbands, Bill
and Robert “Mac”, Kit was pre-
ceded in death by her parents, Bill
and Mayme Wilson; sister, Mary
Smith; and five brothers, Ambrose
“Joe”, Jim, Bill, Frank and Kenny.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Tuesday, November 13,
at the All Saints Catholic Church
in Puyallup.
Memorials may be made to
Franciscan Hospice, 2901 Bridge-
port Way W, University Place, WA
98466.
Arrangements were under the
direction of Hill Funeral Home in
Puyallup.
Juanita Goodsell________________________________
Juanita (Snell) Goodsell, 82, of
Spearfish, passed away November
8, 2012 at the David M. Dorsett
Home in Spearfish, SD.
Memorial services were held
Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at
the Nemo Community Church,
Nemo, SD. Burial followed at
Black Hills National Cemetery
near Sturgis, SD.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to Hospice of the Northern
Hills.
Juanita was born February 21,
1930 in Wall, SD, the second of five
children of George and Johanna
(Bastian) Snell. She grew up in the
Quinn, Pedro and Cottonwood
areas. She went to grade school at
the Miller Country School. Her
transportation was her horse. She
attended high school in Quinn, liv-
ing in the boarding house.
While in high school, she met
the love of her life, Carrol W. Good-
sell. They were married August 23,
1947 in Gillette, WY. To this union
six children were born.
Carrol talked Juanita into mov-
ing to the Black Hills in 1953.
Juanita spent the early years of
their marriage being a wife and
mother. In the late 1960's, she
started working outside the home.
The majority of her career was in
the medical field starting out as a
nurses aide, retiring February
2010 as a Ward Secretary.
Juanita is survived by her chil-
dren, Carrol D. (Jan) Goodsell,
Spearfish, Gerald Goodsell, Ar-
vada, Colo., Janice (Gary)
Kaberna, Nemo, Jeannette (John)
Rebman, Sheridan, Mont., Carleen
(Greg) Brownlow, Deadwood; 10
grandchildren, five great-grand-
children; and brothers, Sam, Paul
and Kenneth Snell.
She was preceded in death by
her husband; a brother; son, Ken-
neth; a grandchild; and a great-
grandchild.
Arrangements are in the care of
Fidler-Isburg Funeral Chapels &
Crematory Services, Spearfish,
S.D.. Online condolences may be
written to www.fidler-isburgfuner-
alchapels.com.
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012 • Page 6
80 years ago…
BIRTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Neilson of Scenic, a baby girl,
Mary Zelle, Wednesday, November
2, 1932. Mrs. Neilson was formerly
Neme Lewis.
Walter Jones, Principal of our
local high school, has been selected
as Secretary-Treasurer of the Vo-
cational Agriculture round table of
the South Dakota Educational As-
sociation. Mr. Jones has been in-
structor in Agriculture in the Wall
High School for the past two years.
This being his third year. He also
is instructor of Music and of excep-
tional ability and has placed the
Wall school in a very high rank
both in Agriculture and Music.
In Sioux Falls the mercury was
in the low 20’s and the snow badly
drifted halting automobile traffic
in many places. In Watertown the
storm was quite severe and snow
drifted badly. In Clear Lake and
Gary districts snow drifts were
heavy and a little snow fell in
Pierre, while we are having only
cold and some what windy
weather.
70 years ago…
BIRTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Leroy Campbell, a girl, at the Wall
Community Hospital, November
10, 1942.
A cut over in the Town’s water
system was made Friday, and now
Wall’s water must go through the
complicated filtration process be-
fore it gets to the water tower. The
first part of the filtration process is
the mixing of the unfiltered water
with a solution of alum, two ounces
for each 100 gallons, in the first of
the three large vats. A separate
motor keeps the water in this tank
in constant agitation. From here
the water may go into one or the
other of the remaining wooden fil-
tering tanks. The water passes
through the deep layers of fine
sand and into the clear water
basin below. The chlorinator comes
into action as the water enters this
clear well. This important step in
the purification process is operated
by a small motor which accurately
measures the correct amount of
chlorine and forces it by small
drops into the filtered water. From
the clear well a large electric motor
pushes the purified water with a
pump into the water town making
it ready for consumption.
The regular monthly meeting of
the trustees of the Town of Wall
was held in the Council rooms on
Monday evening, November 2,
1942, with the following members
present: Best and Hustead. Motion
was made and seconded to approve
the payment of the bills and to
purchase an oil stove for the filtra-
tion plant and a tool shed from L.
M. Jensen. Meeting was ad-
journed.
60 years ago…
At the election last week, 113
votes were cast — 82 republicans
and 31 democrats. The question of
whether 18 year olds should vote
lost by a small majority.
Frank Kleinschmit has made a
great improvement on Wall’s Main
Street. He has filled the ditches on
both sides with about eight or ten
inches of road mix. Bumpers on
the west side will no longer scrape
over the curbing. Eliminating this
first step gave the street an addi-
tional foot or so in width, and the
step-up to the sidewalk will be
much easier for everyone.
The Oscar Eisenbraun school,
Mrs. F. Schroeder teacher, had a
pie social and card party Friday
evening. There was a large turnout
and over $100 was taken in. The
Rudy Eisenbraun school, Mrs.
Reinhold Eisenbraun teacher, had
their affair October 30 and real-
ized $83.
A regular meeting of the Board
of Education of Wall, Independent
School District No. 58, Wall, South
Dakota, was held at the school on
the 7th day of October, 1952, with
the following members present:
Mrs. Eisenbraun. Mr. Bielmaier,
Harold Welsh, Mrs. Tivis, Mrs. Se-
bade. The minutes of the previous
meeting were read and on motion
approved. It was moved, seconded
and carried that the bills were
paid, the budget was approved and
the gym be rented to Kennedy Im-
plement, October 17; Republican
Party, October 24; Methodist
Ladies, October 25; and Legion,
November 27th for $20.00 plus
$5.00 for cleaning.
50 years ago…
Veterans Day was observed by
the Wall Legion Post, Saturday,
with a dinner at the Lutheran
Church dining hall and attended
by 150 Legion members, wives and
friends. Honored at the event were
twenty-four Veterans of World War
I and their wives. Commander Ed
Deutscher turned over this part of
the meeting to Veteran Alfred
Strandell who in turn introduced
the other honored guests: Mr. and
Mrs. Lee Albin, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Doughty, Mr. and Mrs.
Herb Eisenbraun. H. M. Hatton,
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hildebrandt,
Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Paulsen, Mr.
and Mrs. Myrle Rickert, Mr. and
Mrs. August Sallee, Mr. and Mrs.
A. M. Smith, Mrs. Ora Paulsen,
Mr. and Mrs.. M. J. Sundquist,
Mrs. Jacob Denke, and Mrs. Ira
Pierce.
Rural mail carriers under the
new postal salaries and pay act
which went into effect October 15
are given 12¢ per mile for the use
of their car. This should give an in-
dication as to what it costs to drive
your car — to Rapid City, for exam-
ple, $13.54.
The State highway reported this
week that 57 miles of gravel sur-
facing on missile site roads in Pen-
nington County have been com-
pleted. South Dakota will received
$258,535 in federal funds during
the fiscal year 1964 for improve-
ments on highways in an adjacent
to national forests. This is a part of
the $33,000,000 allocation author-
ized by Congress in the Federal
Aid Act of 1962 which was signed
by the President last month.
40 years ago…
Miss Norma Jean Waterland,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wa-
terland of Marcus, and Marvin L.
Williams, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lyle
L. Williams of Owanka were mar-
ried at the Grace Lutheran Church
in Sturgis, October 21 with Rev.
Gerald Christopherson officiating.
The bride is a 1970 graduate of
Sturgis High School and the groom
is a 1969 graduate of the Wall
High School. Both are now attend-
ing the Black Hills State College in
Spearfish with his major in biology
and her major in business educa-
tion.
Richard G. Kjerstad, Quinn, and
his wife, Patricia, were named
South Dakota Farm Bureau’s Out-
standing Young Farmers for 1972
at the Farm Bureau convention
held in Rapid City. Mr. and Mrs.
Kjerstad rach in eastern Penning-
ton County. They have four sons
ages 11, 10 and twins 8.
BIRTH: Mr. and Mrs. Virgil
Kjerstad are the proud parents of
a baby girl, Angela Rae. She is still
in the hospital as she weighed only
two pounds, thirteen ounces.
30 years ago…
The Wall Fire Department re-
sponded to a call at 3:30 a.m. last
Wednesday morning to find the
fire burning right behind the fire
hall. In flames was a quonset style
machine shop owned by Lee John-
son. According to fire Chief Al
Drewitz the blaze started in a tel-
evision set that was left on and ap-
parently shorted out. Several vehi-
cles and a trailer house were lo-
cated close to the building as are
the fire hall and city shop. Drewitz
estimated the damage to be be-
tween $60,000 and $70,000 with
everything in the building de-
stroyed.
BIRTH: Born November 4,
1982, a son, Matthew James, to
Charles and Esther Hustead of
Topeka, Kansas. Master Matthew
weighed in at 8 lbs. 5 oz. Proud
grandparents are Ted and Dorothy
Hustead.
Little Joshua Alan Morgan’s en-
trance into the world will not be
forgotten by his parents, Jerry and
Kim Morgan of Wall, and the citi-
zens of Wasta. Early Sunday
morning, Kim woke Jerry, saying
it was time to go. By the time they
reached Wasta, Kim was urging
Jerry to “turn in somewhere, there
isn’t time to get to Rapid City.”
Jerry pulled in at Wasta Standard
Station and seeing Glen
Williamson, manager, asked for
help. Glen called his wife Barb and
she, Barbara Crawford and Mari-
lyn Keyser were soon aiding Kim.
Jerry had called the ambulance.
About five minutes after their ar-
rival, Dave Hahn and Mary Kjer-
stad, with some assistance from
Marilyn Keyser, delivered the
eight pound five ounce boy in the
ambulance at the station’s parking
lot. Joshua Alan Morgan was born
at 1:31 a.m. November 14 and both
mother and son are reported doing
fine. He joins a three-year-old sis-
ter, Jamie. Proud grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Morgan
and Raymond Knutson and great-
grandmother Alice Larsen, all of
Wall.
20 years ago…
Golden West Telecommunica-
tions, Inc. Wall, began the con-
structure of a new 48’ x 90’ build-
ing addition in October. The new
building will house the Coopera-
tive’s new central office switch-
board for the 279 Wall exchange
and will eventually replace current
facilities now located north of the
High School in Wall. The structure
will also contain a new power dis-
tribution panel for both the new
addition and old business office
along with a larger standby power
generator and Halon fire suppres-
sant system. Scull Construction of
Rapid City will be constructing the
building with a scheduled comple-
tion date of January 1993.
BIRTH: William Vincent
Thompson was born August 24,
1992 at Vail Valley Medical Center
in Vail, Colo., to Keith and Cathy
Thompson of Edwards, Colo. Little
William weighed in at 6 lbs. 15 oz.
and measured 18 1/2 inches long.
Grandparents are Vincent and Au-
drey Thompson, Midland, Mich.,
and William J. and Joan Biel-
maier, Wall; great-grandparents
are Joseph and Nora Fritz, New
Effington, S.D., and Sophie Day,
Midland, Mich.
On Tuesday night, November 3,
the Wall Lady Eagles met the
Kadoka Kougars on Wall’s home
court. Wall outscored Kadoka 70 to
62. On Thursday evening, Novem-
ber 5, the Wall Lady Eagles met
Midland at home. Wall defeated
Midland 77 to 62.
10 years ago…
First round of football play-
offs: Revenging a regular season
loss to Jones County-Midland, in
which the Eagles were on the re-
ceiving end of a 34-0 blowout, Wall
returned to Murdo to play spoiler
for the Rebels with a gratifying
payback 18-0 shutout. This time, it
was Wall who did the receiving,
feeding off the strength of a well-
synchronized performance from
quarterback Eric Johnston and
Tyrel Carson, whose tandem pro-
duced three touchdown strikes in
the air.
The Lady Eagles volleyball team
placed first at the 15B District
tournament held in Wall, Novem-
ber 4th and 5th. The tournament
had six teams participating and
the Eagles played two games. They
defeated Edgemont in the first
game 3-0. The girls defeated the
New Underwood Tigers in their
win for the district title 4-1.
The Looking Glass of Time
Obituaries More obituaries on page 5
Email your social news, obituaries, wedding & engagement
announcements to: annc@gwtc.net
You’re invited to an
Open House on Sunday, November 18th
from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Rush Funeral Home’s new location:
165 E. Hwy. 14 in Philip (east of the bowling alley)
Come see an exact replica of Abraham Lincoln`s casket on display during the open house!
R
efreshm
ents
w
ill be served!
Rush Funeral Home
859-2400
Chapels in Philip ~ Wall ~ Kadoka
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDt CÞrgs1er Sebr1ng
Pouer £verg1Þ1ng, £oonom1oo1
N1oe C1eon Cor!
Informational Kick-Off Event
West Region
Stronger Economies Together
Wed., Nov. 14 • Club 27, Kadoka
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. meeting
Join us to...
•Learn about the SET program.
•Understand how you can be involved.
•Network with other communities in your region.
•Build enthusiasm for a stronger, successful region.
Contact Jackie Stilwell at
488-0334 for more
information.
With a Round of
Thanks
At the Holidays
We’d like to wish all of
those who’ve come ’round
our way, a happy and
healthy anksgiving
holiday!
From everyone at
Cowboy
Corner
Interior
Peggy I. Sigman________________
Peggy Irene Sigman, 76, Stur-
gis, died Friday, November 9,
2012.
Funeral services were held Tues-
day, November 13, 2012, at the
First Presbyterian Church in Stur-
gis with Rev. Denzel Nonhof and
Pastor Harold Delbridge officiat-
ing. Burial followed at the Bear
Butte Cemetery in Sturgis.
Peggy was born December 21,
1935, at Wasta, SD, to Les and Is-
land (Kirkham) Horton. She grad-
uated high school and received her
teaching certificate after one year
of college.
Peggy married Jim Sigman at
Sturgis, on September 19, 1953.
The couple lived in Alzada, Mont.,
where Peggy taught school and
Jim trucked for the Bentonite
Mines. They returned to the family
ranch east of Sturgis, where Peggy
was involved on the Election
She was president of Meade
County Easter Seals, member of
Thursday Ann Club and 4-H for
many years. She timed for the
Head and Heels Roping Club and
timed for many high school rodeos.
She enjoyed bowling.
Peggy had a very strong faith
and was a member of the First
Presbyterian Church, where she
played in the church bell choir for
many years and served as an Elder
and Deacon. She also delivered
meals on wheels and enjoyed a
good game of cards.
Survivors include her husband,
Jim Sigman, Sturgis; son, Bryce
(Sandi) Sigman, Sturgis; daugh-
ters, Teena Sigman, Sturgis,
Teresa Sigman, Rapid City, and
Bekki Reinert, Wall; one sister,
Marcella "Pat" (Joe) Nonnast,
Sturgis; five grandchildren; and
eight great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; one son, Rick; one
brother, Arnold "Tuffy" Horton;
two sisters, Della Courtney and
Ada Mae O'Grady; and one infant
brother, Archie.
Memorials have been estab-
lished to Easter Seals and the
South Dakota Children's Care
Hospital and School.
In the last few editions of MMM
we have been dissecting the plan-
ning process. We discussed the im-
portance of having a mission state-
ment and objectives, clarification of
your vision, being honest with
yourself as you assess the current
situation relating to the plan.
Now we are ready to roll up our
sleeves and look at the next pivotal
step-or rather three steps-in the
planning process. These steps are:
Goals: What are you going to do
to make your mission and vision
become a reality?
Methods: How will you make
your goals become a reality?
Timetables/Deadlines: When
do you plan to accomplish your
goals?
I will share with you a couple of
examples out of my business plan,
so you can see how simple this can
be. (Notice the what, how and
when.)
Goal # 1: I will follow up on my
customers more effectively this
year. I will achieve this by making
phone calls, writing letters, and
emails, and personally stopping by
to visit if possible. This will be done
for two to three hours each busi-
ness day.
Goal # 2: I will become more ef-
fective in my writing skills this
year. I will achieve this by having
more of my writing critiqued by
people who will be tough on me,
and finish reading, "Writers Inc."
as a writing resource and continue
to submit my articles and other
writing to www.writing.com for the
members to view and proof my
writing. I will invest a minimum of
10 hours per week working dili-
gently on developing my writing
skills.
I hope this process helps you as
you put the finishing touches on
your goals, plans and expectations
for the future. As you take a look at
each "Key Result Area" of your life
and start writing down and/or re-
vise the goals, methods and timeta-
bles, you will definitely have a bet-
ter idea of how you will be able to
make your dreams become a real-
ity.
Honestly, the real key to plan-
ning is just to have fun with it. Do
not let planning be a burden or a
hassle. Just start spilling your
thoughts and ideas out on paper
and then put it into the format that
I have been sharing with you.
Note: Next time, I'll share more
about the planning process, and
how you know how to take your
plans, goals, hopes and dreams and
bring them to life.
Goals, Methods & Timetables
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly mo-
tivational seminars each
year. Call Bob for more de-
tails at 800-437-9715 and be
sure to check out Bob’s web-
site at: www.mrattitudes-
peaks.com
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2011 • Page 7
These sponsors are proud to support the Wall Eagles...
Congratulations
Lady Eagles Volleyball Team
on a Great Season!
2012 Wall High school Volleyball Team …
Back row from left: Assistant Coach Mary Roeder, MiKaylee and Assistant Coach Dana
Luedeman, Jennifer Emery, Nicole Eisenbraun, Carlee Johnston, Monica Bielmaier,
Kaitlin Schreiber, Tayah Huether, Josie Blasius, Emily Linn, Manager Analise Garland
and Head Coach Dani Herring. Front row from left: Manager Maddi Bauer, Autumn Schulz,
Bailey Lytle, Kim Billings and Kailey Rae Sawvell.
Badlands Automoti ve
Black Hills Federal Credi t Union
Common Cents
Corner Pantry/Subway
Crown Oil Co.,
Dakota Mill & Grain
Dartt Angus
Days Inn Motel
De’s Oil Co. /SanDee’s
Econo Lodge
First Interstate Bank
Golden West Telecommunications
Hildebrand Concrete
Ken’s Refrigeration
Pennington County Courant
Polished Pinky
Rush Funeral Home
Super 8
TLC Electric
Two Bi t Saloon & Steakhouse
Walker NAPA/Red Rock Restaurant
Wall Auto Li very
Wall Booster Club
Wall Building Center & Construction
Wall Dairy Queen
Wall Drug Store
Wall Food Center
Wall Lube & Espresso Bar
West Ri ver Electric Assoc.
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2001 GMC Sonoma,
approx. 147K miles, dependable,
good tires, $5,000. 441-1364.
PR11-2tp
FOR SALE: 1979 Chevrolet Sil-
verado 30, dually with Duralist
DSS 30, 25’ bucket lift. $1,800.
441-9669, Wall. WP11-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: 320 acres of crop-
land, 14 miles north of Midland.
NE1/4 Sec. 3, NW1/4 Sec. 2,
3N24E. Call 222-6261.
PR12-4tp
WANTED: Summer pasture for
up to 100 pair within 50 miles of
New Underwood. 754-6166.
PR12-1tp
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
local delivery included, semi-
load lots, no mold or weeds,
large rounds put up right. Call
Rob, 390-5535; Charles, 390-
5506. P47-4tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-ply,
235/85/16R. $160, mounted.
Les’ Body Shop, 859-2744,
Philip. P40-tfn
GARAGE SALES
MOVING SALE: Must downsize!
Forty years collection of house-
hold items. Some furniture, an-
tiques, collectibles, variety of
adult clothing (some name
brand), sizes vary, 0-5 and 10-
12, small appliances and much
more! Friday Nov. 16, 5:00 - 7:30
p.m. and Saturday Nov. 17, 10
a.m. - noon. Glenn & Rita O'-
Connell residence 615 N Wood
Ave., just north of the WR/L-J
building. PR11-2tc
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Full and part-
time positions available. Will
train. Stop in to apply at Philip
Custom Meats, 501 E. Pine St.,
Philip. PR12-2tc
CLASS A CDL DRIVER: Dakota
Mill & Grain is looking for driv-
ers. Late model equipment.
Clean driving record. Doubles,
Triples and overnight stays re-
quired, in the South Dakota
area. Competitive pay with ben-
efits. Stop by any of our 10 loca-
tions and pick up an application
or e-mail resume to jackh@
dakotamill.com. E.O.E.
PW48-2tc
COOK WANTED: Good Samari-
tan Society, New Underwood,
Part-time for 4-8:30 p.m. shift.
Contact: Lorraine, 754-6489 or
apply online www.good-sam.
com. CHECK OUT OUR NEW
WAGE SCALE, INCLUDING
COMPENSATION FOR EXPERI-
ENCE. EOE/AA/M/F/V/H.
PW48-4tc
FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER /
LAUNDRY PERSON NEEDED at
Days Inn, Wall. Possibly perma-
nent year-round position, start-
ing immediately. Contact
Theresa, 279-2000. PW46-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: White porcelain
daybed, complete; and a china
hutch. Call Diane Walker, 859-
2901, Philip. P49-2tc
FOR SALE: Several nice used re-
frigerators with warranties.
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder.
390-9810. WP9-4tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
FOR SALE: Several nice used re-
frigerators with warranties.
Del’s, I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder.
390-9810. P46-4tp
NOTICES/WANTED
SEALED BIDS BEING AC-
CEPTED ON 2003 John Deere
1590 no-till drill, 15’ working
width, 7-1/2” spacing, grass
seeder, agitator, fertilizer box,
dolly wheel. Bids for the drill will
be accepted by East Pennington
Conservation District until Jan-
uary 1, 2013, at 24 Creighton
Road in Wall, SD, or they can be
mailed to: PO Box 308, Wall, SD
57790. Please call 279-2519 for
information or viewing of the
drill. We reserve the right to re-
ject any and all bids.
WP12-1tc
LOOKING FOR A GOOD USED
color television. Call 859-2184 or
441-3024. P49-2tp
WANTED: Old Indian items,
beadwork, quillwork, old guns,
old painted buffalo hides, old
photographs. Cash paid. Call
748-2289 or 515-3802. F46-4tc
PETS/SUPPLIES
FOR SALE: 1-year-old female
7/8 Mountain Cur, 1/8 Airedale
cross dog. Bred for a coyote
hunting and/or trap line dog.
Very friendly. Blonde color and
wire-haired, about 50 lbs. Rea-
son for selling: have too many
dogs. $50. Call 462-6390,
evenings after 7 p.m. PR12-2tc
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: Multiple houses at
multiple prices. Call Jim Coats,
685-3990 if interested, Wall.
WP12-2tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 High St.
in Philip, 2 bedrooms, full base-
ment, great view off back deck.
Call 859-2783 or 859-3249 or
567-3515 to view. P49-tfn
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrtle
Ave Philip. 3 bedroom 1.5 bath,
central air, fuel oil heat and
wood stove. Open concept, stain-
less steel fridge and stove.
washer and dryer included.
Hardwood laminate floors, sepa-
rate dining room. Mostly finished
basement. Ceiling fans through-
out. New windows and roof.
Fenced in, large backyard with
cover patio and storage shed.
Can email photos. Call 859-2470
or (785) 259-4207. P48-8tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, attached 2-car garage,
large lot. Call 859-2403, Philip.
PR10-tfn
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
ADOPTION
ADOPT - WE WILL PROVIDE a
happy, loving home, beautiful
life for your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid. Married
couple Walt/Gina. Call for info:
1-800-315-6957.
BASKETBALL
The Cougar Classic Basketball
Tournament in Rapid City is
December 1 & 2. Open to girls
and boys teams grades 4-8.
Registration is $135/team,
three game guarantee. Rosters
due November 21. For informa-
tion: www.rapidcitycourgarclas-
sic.com.
CELEBRATIONS
WANTED FOOD VENDERS for
the Rosholt, Centennial, August
16-18th 2013. For more infor-
mation call 605-537-4426 ask
for Mary.
EMPLOYMENT
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. — Com-
petitive wages, benefits, train-
ing, profit sharing, opportuni-
ties for growth, great culture
and innovation. $1,500 Sign on
Bonus available for Service
Technicians. To browse oppor-
tunities go to www.rdoequip-
ment.com. Must apply online.
EEO.
DENTAL ASSISTANT Delta
Dental is looking for a Dental
Assistant to join a dedicated
team of professionals aimed at
improving oral health and keep-
ing kids across the state of
South Dakota smiling. The po-
sition will work directly out of a
40-foot-long, state-of-the-art
mobile dental unit. Responsibil-
ities will include: providing
chair side assistance, taking x-
rays, patient charting, and
equipment sterilization. Posi-
tion is based out of Pierre. Ex-
tensive travel is required (75%
of the time M-F). Person must
have graduated from an accred-
ited dental assisting education
program or have at least one
year of experience working in
the dental assisting field. Cur-
rent CPR & x-ray certifications
are required. Excellent salary
and benefits package. Email
cover letter, resume and profes-
sional references to
summer.sporrer@ deltaden-
talsd.com or for more informa-
tion please contact Summer
Sporrer at 605-494-2569.
LICENSED INSURANCE
AGENTS - A+ Rating, Great Pay.
Lifetime Renewals. Offer great
training! Call today. Tucker
Tonkel 605-645-7502.
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for Me-
chanic and Equipment opera-
tors. Good Benefits. Applica-
tions are available at Court-
house in Bison, SD or call 605-
244-5629.
LIVESTOCK
FOR SALE: PURE BRED Ram-
bouillet Rams. Yearling or
Lambs. Big, Hardy, Fine
Fleeces. Call evenings: 605-
466-2370.
FOR SALE
2009 POLARIS 850XP 4x4. 50K
miles, Green. $5500.00 or
OBO. Call evenings: 605-466-
2650.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for
SALE (serious inquires only).
Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern,
central, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER
OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health ins.,
credit, 03¢ safety bonus, Call
Joe for details, 800.456.1024,
joe@tbitruck. com.
DRIVERS: $1,000 SIGN-ON
BONUS. New Pay Program!
*Earn up to 50 cpm *Home
Weekly *2500+ miles, 95% no-
tarp. Must be Canadian eligible
(888) 691-5705.
REAL ESTATE
INCOME PROPERTIES. Stable,
fully managed properties in the
Black Hills, great condition and
locations. Would make good ex-
change properties. Call Todd
Young, SDRE broker, 605-645-
4917.
THANK YOUS
As a wife and a mother of
the Honored Firemen, I would
like to say thank you and how
proud I am of all of you for the
support and endless hours
you do for our community and
surrounding areas. Thanks go
out to Mayor Sam Kooiker of
Rapid City for his kind words
to each of the honored firemen.
Thanks to Hugh and Amy
Estes for these kind words
“Congratulations to your entire
family. You’ve done so much
work for the fire department
and about anything else that
needs help in Wall. You’re
great citizens and we’re proud
to call you friends”. Thanks to
all the people who offered con-
gratulations.
Ann Kitterman
APARTMENTs
AVAIlAblE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRO/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
SNOWPLOW OPERATOR
The Department of Transportation is recruiting local in-
dividuals for the Snowplow Operator Program. Those hired
will be employed on a temporary basis and be responsible
for operating snow and ice removal equipment during in-
clement weather and completing general maintenance as-
signments. Hours could include weekdays, weekends, holi-
days, early morning or evening.
Two types of temporary positions are available. Reserve
Operators will only work on an as needed basis determined
by weather conditions. Winter Seasonals will generally
work a 40 hour week and will be involved in additional du-
ties beyond snowplowing (i.e. guardrail repair, signing,
roadway patching, etc.).
Operators are needed in the Wall area.
Starting rate of pay is $13.00 per hour. Applicants must
have the ability to operate heavy equipment and must pos-
sess a Commercial Drivers License.
Interested parties should contact:
Gary D. Engel, Area Engineer
S.D. Department of Transportation
P.O. Box 1970
Rapid City, South Dakota 57709
605-394-2248
(Includes Rapid City, and Wall)
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
QUINN TOWN BOARD
OF TRUSTEES
REGULAR MEETING
NOVEMBER 5, 2012
The Quinn Town Board met at 7 pm,
Monday, November 5, at the Quinn Com-
munity Center. Board members present
were Kevin Wenzel and Patty Coleman,
Juston Eisenbraun was absent. Others
present were Michael Luedeman, Jerry
Pabst, Lorna Moore and Finance Officer
Deborah Bryan.
Motion by Kevin, seconded by Patty to
approve the agenda, motion carried.
Kevin made a motion, seconded by Patty
to approve the minutes of the last meet-
ing, motion carried. Motion by Kevin, sec-
onded by Patty to approve the financial
statement, motion carried.
Deborah reported that the Two Bit
liquor license has been signed and re-
turned to her, there will be a public hear-
ing on December 3. Kevin has obtained a
copy of two towns city ordinances, we will
be talking about that at the December
meeting. Jerry Pabst mentioned that the
town should be paying George Moore for
trapping skunk in town, no motion was
made.
Patty made a motion to approve the
vouchers, seconded by Kevin, motion
carried. The following vouchers were
paid: WREA, $80.00; Pennington County
Courant, $19.49; WRLJ Rural Water,
$50.00; Wall Building Center, $33.95;
Kevin Wenzel, $25.00; Patty Coleman,
$25.00; Deborah Bryan, $200.00; SDML
Workers Comp, $567.00; De’s Oil,
$49.00; WRLJ Rural Water, $72.50; Wall
Building Center, $15.99; SD Municipal
League, $43.89; SD Association of Code
Enforcement, $40.00.
With all business complete, the meet-
ing was adjourned.
Deborah Bryan
Finance Officer
Town of Quinn
Published November 15, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $17.22.
WASTA TOWN
BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
OCTOBER 1, 2012
The Wasta Town Board held their reg-
ular meeting on Monday, November 5,
2012 at the community building. Board
Chairman Justin Crawford called the
meeting to order at 7:01pm with board
members Dorreen Skillingstad and Stan
McNabb present. Others present were
Gay Hadlock, Barb Crawford, Dorothy
Bathel, Joyce Heriger, Daneene and Ken
Skillingstad, Tom Rancour, Billie Hulm,
and Kari Kjerstad.
At this time Jeffrey Connolly, an attor-
ney with Gunderson, Palmer, Nelson &
Ashmore entered the meeting. Connolly
explained there was a need to enter into
executive session to update the board on
the litigation with the Dix family. The
board entered into executive session at
7:05pm for the purpose of discussing
legal issues according to SDCL 1-25-2.
Justin declared the board out of exec-
utive session at 7:37pm.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the October 1st minutes as read
with the correction made by Carolynn on
the Waste Connection bill. Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the financial statement as given.
Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the bills as follows: Justin Craw-
ford, October wages, $28.30; Dorreen
Skillingstad, October wages, $23.59;
Tammy Green, October wages, $566.10;
Carolynn Anderson, October wages,
$278.33; WREA, electricity, $451.06;
Pennington Co. Courant, publishing,
$22.74; Energy Laboratories, water test-
ing, $392.50; SDML, work comp,
$523.00; SDML, 2013 dues, $47.58; SD
Governmental Finance Officer’s Assoc,
2013 dues, $40.00; EFTPS, payroll tax,
$126.36; WBC, water leak repair, $13.95;
SD Public Assurance Alliance, addition to
liability, $126.00; Plumdone Co., chlorine
pellets, $160.68; Walker Refuse, garbage
pickup & dumpster, $1,207.52. This
dumpster shall be picked up and not
brought back. Motion carried.
Carolynn made comment that a letter
she mailed out for the annual liquor li-
cense renewal notice was questioned on
whether the board gave their approval for
this at the prior meeting. It was the con-
sensus of the board that some letters are
normal protocol and does not need prior
approval and this would be such an ex-
ample.
Resolution 12-4; water loader in-
crease, was tabled again since Tammy
was absent and some questions could
not be answered. It will be discussed
again next month.
Carolynn explained she was in error
with not including the resolution to limit
liquor licenses on the September agenda.
Therefore another option for limiting the
liquor license for 2013 would be to draft
an ordinance. There was discussion on
whether the number should be limited.
Carolynn gave the board a rough draft or-
dinance and suggested the board think
about it and bring it back for discussion
next month. Anyone wanting a copy of the
proposed ordinance should email wall-
city@gwtc.net and request it.
There was discussion on how long it
had been since there was an increase to
the liquor license fee. Carolynn stated
she was only able to check back as far as
2007 with records she has on her com-
puter and the fee has been the same over
that period of time. Motion by Dorreen,
second by Stan to increase each the on-
sale and off-sale licenses $25.00. Motion
carried.
With all business complete, Justin ad-
journed the meeting at 8:25pm.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
Town of Wasta
Published November 15, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $33.14.
NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
PENNINGTON COUNTY PUBLIC
SAFETY
RADIO TOWER (WEST)
CONSTRUCTION PROJECT
Bid Opening:
The Pennington County Board of Com-
missioners will receive sealed bids at their
Administrative Office for the above refer-
enced project until 3:00 PM on November
26th, 2012. Bids will be opened there-
after. Allow time to pass through building
security.
Board of Commissioners Administrative
Office, Suite 156
Pennington County Courthouse
315 Saint Joseph Street (Entrance of
south side of building)
Rapid City, SD 57701
The Bids shall be reviewed for compli-
ance with requirements and it is antici-
pated that the Board of Commissioners
will give notice of intent to award at their
regular meeting on December 4th, 2012,
which commences at 9:00 AM. The suc-
cessful bidder shall enter into a single
General Contract with Pennington County
once all pre-contract requirements are
completed.
Project Description:
The Pennington County Public Safety
Radio Tower (West) Construction Project
is located at the corner of Hillsview Drive
and Raider Road, inside the city limits of
Rapid City south of Stevens High School.
The project involves site work and con-
struction of a new radio tower facility to in-
clude an access road, self-supporting
radio tower, prefabricated equipment
shelter, security fence and other ele-
ments.
Procurement Documents and
Pre-bid Questions:
Procurement documents have been
placed on file in the Pennington County
Commission Administrative Office and
may be examined there. Requests for
Documents (complete sets only) and pre-
bid questions can be directed to County
Project Manager Ted Rufledt, Jr. by e-
mail to ted@co.pennington.sd.us; or by
phone to 605-394-6794.
By virtue of statutory authority, preference
will be given to resident businesses and
materials, products, and supplies found
or produced within the State of South
Dakota.
The Pennington County Board of Com-
missioners reserves the right to reject any
or all bids and to waive any irregularities
therein. They also reserve the right to
award the contract to the lowest respon-
sible bidder as they so determine.
Julie A. Pearson,
Pennington County Auditor
Published November 15, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $24.78.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Pennington County Planning Commission
and the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners will hold a public hearing
to consider the following proposed ordi-
nance amendment to the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance adopted as an
adjunct to the Pennington County Com-
prehensive Plan:
OA 12-05 – Amendment to Section 400.3-
1-n-3(b), 6, and 10; Section 500.5-1-a-3-
a; and Section 500.5 - Table 1 of the Pen-
nington County Subdivision Regulations.
Said hearing will be held by the Planning
Commission on Monday, November 26,
2012, at 9:00 a.m. and the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners on
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 10:30
a.m. in the Commissioners’ Meeting
Room at the Pennington County Court-
house, Rapid City, South Dakota. Any in-
terested party may appear and be heard.
Copies of the proposed amendments
may be viewed at the Planning Depart-
ment located at 315 St. Joseph Street,
Suite 118, Rapid City, South Dakota, dur-
ing regular business hours.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published November 15, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $18.43.
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
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People read the
newspaper for many
different reasons. Some want to
stay abreast of the latest local, state and
national news, while others read the sports
pages word-for-word. Still others scan
the latest classifieds.
Call or stop by your local newspaper
office today to subscribe.
Pennington Co. Courant
Box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
FINANCIAL FOCUS
DON'T OVERLOOk
FINANCIAL RISkS IN
RETIREMENT
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
When you retire, you may well
have accomplished some impor-
tant financial goals, such as send-
ing your children through college
and paying off your mortgage. Yet,
you can’t relax just yet, because
your retirement could easily last
two or three decades, which means
you’ll need at least two or three
decades’ worth of income — which,
in turn, means you’ll need the
proper savings and investment
strategies in place. And, just as im-
portantly, you’ll also need to be
aware of the types of risk that
could threaten these strategies.
Let’s consider some of these
risks:
•Longevity — None of us can
say for sure how long we’ll live.
But it's still important to have an
estimate, based on your health and
family history. So if you think you
may live, for 25 years in retire-
ment, you’ll want to withdraw
enough from your investments
each year to enjoy a comfortable
lifestyle — but not so much that
you deplete your funds before the
25 years have passed.
•Inflation — We’ve experienced
pretty mild inflation over the past
few years. But over time, even a
low rate of inflation can seriously
erode your purchasing power. To il-
lustrate: If your current monthly
costs are $3,000, with only a 3%
annual inflation rate, that would
be about $4,000 in 10 years. And in
25 years at that same rate, your
monthly costs will have more than
doubled, to about $6,200. To help
protect yourself against inflation
risk, it's important to have at least
some investments that offer
growth potential, rather than only
owning fixed-income vehicles, such
as certificates of deposit (CDs).
You’ll also want to consider sources
of rising income potential, such as
dividend-paying stocks. (Keep in
mind, though, that stocks can re-
duce or discontinue dividends at
any time and are subject to market
fluctuation and loss of principal.)
•Market Fluctuations — When
you retire and begin taking with-
drawals from your investment
portfolio — that is, when you begin
selling off investments — you’d ob-
viously like prices to be high. After
all, the classic piece of investment
advice is “buy low, sell high.” But
it’s impossible to try to “time” the
market this way, as it will always
fluctuate. That’s why you may
want to consider sources of income
whose value is not dependent on
what’s happening in the financial
markets. Your financial advisor
may be able to recommend invest-
ments that can provide you with
this type of income stream.
•Low interest rates — Many re-
tirees depend on fixed-rate invest-
ments for a good portion of their
retirement income — so it’s a real
challenge when interest rates are
low. Consequently, when you re-
tire, you’ll certainly need to be
aware of the interest-rate environ-
ment and the income you can ex-
pect from these investments.
Longer-term fixed-rate vehicles
may be tempting, as they typically
offer higher rates than shorter-
term ones, but these longer term
investments may have more price
fluctuation and inflation risk than
shorter-term investments. Conse-
quently, you'll still likely need bal-
ance between short, intermediate,
and long-term investments to pro-
vide for a portion of your income in
retirement.
Retirement can be a rewarding
time in your life. And you can help
make your retirement years even
more enjoyable by understanding
the relevant investment risks and
taking steps to address them.
Email your
social news,
obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
Legal
Publication
Deadline is
11:00 a.m. on
FRIDAY
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14: WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE. SALE TIME: WEIGH-UPS:
10:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12:00 P.M. (MT).
EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. 1?00 HD
DISPERSIONS:
KUDRNA RANCH: ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 280 DLK & A
FEW FED 2 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK &
HEFF; CLV. 3-1
JEFF MADSEN: ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION OF 240 HD" - 110
DLK 4 TO 9 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 45 DAYS;
50 DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 45
DAYS; 40 FED ANC COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK & FED;
CLV. 3-20 FOF 45 DAYS; 40 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW FINAL AN-
SWEF; CLV. 3-20 FOF 45 DAYS
BRED HEIFERS:
CLEVE PRICHARD - 180 DLK HFFS (CAKE DFOKE & CENTLE};
DFED.LOW DIFTH WEICHT DLK ANCUS; CLV.2-20 (SOFTED INTO
2, 15 DAY CALVINC CFOUPS}
HOWARD INGALLS & SONS - 84 HOME FAISED DLK ANCUS
HFFS; DFED; LOW DIFTH WT. ANCUS; CLV. 3-10 FOF 30 DAYS
DALLIS BASEL - 40 FED ANCUS HFFS; DFED. LOW DIFTH
WEICHT FED ANCUS; CLV. 3-1 FOF 50 DAYS
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
BLAINE KROGMAN - 150 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20
TODD MORTENSON - 100 DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN
MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLKS DFED HEFF, DWF DFED DLK; CLV.
3-10
JOE HARMON - 65 DLK 5 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-1; 10 DLK FALL CALVINC 5 YF OLD TO DFO-
KEN MOUTH PAIFS
MARK RADWAY - 55 DLK & DWF SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-15
A CONSIGNMENT - 30 DLK FUNNINC ACE COWS DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-20; 29 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
20
TROY RICHTER - 40 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
CHAF; CLV. 3-15 FOF 60
SCOTT PHILLIPS - 40 DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK
BRAD STOUT - 40 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-1
STERLING RIGGINS - 40 DLK 8 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK & HEFF; CLV. 3-27
CHRIS & LEO GRUBL - 20 FANCY DLK & FED ULTFASOUND
HFFS (1050-100=}; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-10 FOF 30 DAYS; 18 DLK
& FED FUNNINC ACE COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV.3-10
MIKE HEATHERSHAW - 30 DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-1
PAUL SCHNOSE - 29 DLK ANC COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 50 DAYS
RON HOWIE - 27 DLK & HEFF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-25
2EB HOFFMAN - 25 FED SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. FED; CLV. 4-1
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
MADSEN RANCH - 25 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK, FED & HEFF; CLV. 4-1
HELEN PFEIFER - 15 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-1
PHIL VANDERVOORT - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-1 FOF 60 DAYS
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-28 FOF 55 DAYS
BOB SCOTT - 6 HEFF & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
INCALLS ANC; CLV. 3-1 FOF 45 DAYS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE,
MUST DE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITION-
INC SHOTS (FOUF-WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11. SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL
& FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S. NO SALE
CATTL£ R£PORT - TU£S., NOV. JS, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run o] oo111e ]or our speo1o1
Þere Tuesdog, Nov. JS1Þ, se111ng SDtJ
Þeod. B1g oroud o] bugers, morKe1 oo11ve,
bu1 so]1er on 1Þe ]1esÞg t ue1gÞ1 oo1ves
ond s1rong on 1Þe geor11ngs.
YEARLINGS:
LA2Y 3 LIVESTOCK - BILLINGS, MT
1558 .....................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 918= ......$139.40
735 .......................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 839= ......$141.10
346.......................FED & FWF SPAY HFFS 888= ......$141.50
180................................CHAF SPAY HFFS 893= ......$141.50
JACK SIMONS - ENNING
18............................................DLK STFS 805= ......$151.00
GLENDON SHEARER - WALL
24...................................DLK OPEN HFFS 731= ......$142.25
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
8.....................................DLK OPEN HFFS 897= ......$136.00
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
11..................................FED & DLK STFS 892= ......$140.25
12 .................................HEFF OPEN HFFS 813= ......$133.75
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
22...............................X DFED SPAY HFFS 705= ......$138.00
JOHN & PAT SOLON - KADOKA
22 .................................HEFF OPEN HFFS 732= ......$132.00
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
3.....................................FED OPEN HFFS 917= ......$133.50
A & B RANCH INC - HERMOSA
15.........................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 859= ......$130.50
MORTENSON CATTLE CO. - HAYES
5...........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 1068= ....$119.50
CALVES:
ROBERTSON FAMILY - CAPUTA
96 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 506= ......$171.75
91 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 516= ......$171.00
24 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 413= ......$190.50
100 ...............................DLK & DWF STFS 582= ......$164.25
175...............................DLK & DWF HFFS 523= ......$156.50
66.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 426= ......$158.00
RALPH & SHAYNE PORCH - WANBLEE
100................................FED & DLK STFS 521= ......$170.75
41..................................FED & DLK STFS 438= ......$187.50
112...............................DLK & DWF HFFS 514= ......$170.50
HERB & MIKE SIELER - WALL
52............................................DLK STFS 408= ......$190.00
10............................................DLK STFS 334= ......$209.00
18 ...........................................DLK HFFS 302= ......$186.00
DAVE STOVER - OWANKA
86 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 510= ......$171.50
8..............................................DLK STFS 416= ......$184.00
JOHN CAPP RANCH INC - FAITH
100................................FED & DLK STFS 436= ......$187.00
10..................................FED & DLK STFS 342= ......$220.00
CHUCK ENDERS - KADOKA
49............................................DLK STFS 521= ......$172.50
20............................................DLK STFS 436= ......$179.00
26 ...........................................DLK HFFS 460= ......$154.00
13 ...........................................DLK HFFS 401= ......$163.00
BRETT GUPTILL - INTERIOR
53 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 473= ......$180.25
109 ...............................DLK & DWF STFS 578= ......$163.75
105...............................DLK & DWF HFFS 554= ......$157.00
50 ...............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 459= ......$153.00
HARLEY PRICE - OPAL
65 ...........................................DLK HFFS 574= ......$157.25
10 ...........................................DLK HFFS 467= ......$164.00
MICHAEL KNECHT - LODGEPOLE
60............................................DLK STFS 531= ......$168.50
30............................................DLK STFS 419= ......$189.00
61.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 448= ......$155.50
11 ...........................................DLK HFFS 348= ......$175.00
MARK LANTIS - BOX ELDER
40............................................DLK STFS 513= ......$171.25
23..................................FED & DLK STFS 370= ......$206.00
20.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 394= ......$162.00
24 ...........................................DLK HFFS 474= ......$151.00
SHANNON GARTNER - INTERIOR
36............................................DLK STFS 547= ......$169.75
SANDERS RANCH PARTNERSHIP - RAPID CITY
97..........................................CHAF STFS 590= ......$164.00
96 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 544= ......$163.00
48..........................................CHAF STFS 503= ......$169.50
39 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 434= ......$190.00
101 .......................................CHAF HFFS 576= ......$146.75
100..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 536= ......$153.25
118..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 461= ......$156.50
DARRIN KLAPPERICH - RAPID CITY
37 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 559= ......$169.50
32.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 506= ......$149.00
JOHN NEUMANN - PHILIP
40............................................DLK STFS 526= ......$170.50
27 ...........................................DLK HFFS 538= ......$146.00
GLENDON SHEARER - WALL
80............................................DLK STFS 481= ......$179.00
38............................................DLK STFS 363= ......$209.00
CHRIS HOWIE - HERMOSA
48 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 518= ......$170.75
12 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 461= ......$167.00
28.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 484= ......$146.00
RON GARTNER - INTERIOR
45............................................DLK STFS 493= ......$173.00
25............................................DLK STFS 396= ......$186.00
13 ...........................................DLK HFFS 385= ......$173.50
MORRIS JONES & SONS - MIDLAND
105................................FED & DLK STFS 537= ......$163.50
116................................FED & DLK STFS 473= ......$171.00
29..................................FED & DLK STFS 375= ......$185.00
DENNIS SINKEY - MIDLAND
34............................................DLK STFS 548= ......$169.50
KENNY IRELAND - PHILIP
17............................................DLK STFS 509= ......$170.50
5...................................DLK & DWF HFFS 442= ......$153.00
ROBERT SMITH - BOX ELDER
20 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 595= ......$161.00
8 .............................................DLK HFFS 566= ......$147.00
CORY ELSHERE - QUINN
11............................................DLK STFS 515= ......$167.00
5..............................................DLK STFS 446= ......$185.00
JIM & KRISTI FARLEY - CODY, NE
28 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 698= ......$151.00
16 ...........................................DLK HFFS 669= ......$138.75
EDDIE TAYLOR - CAPUTA
54 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 618= ......$153.00
20 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 483= ......$169.00
24.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 531= ......$150.00
21.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 465= ......$152.00
RON RICHARDS - HERMOSA
25..................................FED & DLK STFS 613= ......$147.50
20 .................................FED & DLK HFFS 575= ......$138.75
STEVE MACLEAY - FAIRBURN
13 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 699= ......$141.00
9 ...................................DLK & DWF STFS 615= ......$150.00
25 ...........................................DLK HFFS 615= ......$138.50
JERRY PATTERSON - KADOKA
20............................................DLK STFS 591= ......$154.25
8....................................FED & DLK STFS 499= ......$162.00
CHARLIE CARLSON - KADOKA
30............................................DLK STFS 604= ......$153.25
28 ...........................................DLK HFFS 554= ......$144.00
ADDISON RANCH - BEVIDERE
26 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 560= ......$161.00
19.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 540= ......$145.00
SUE EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
35............................................DLK STFS 569= ......$148.00
19............................................DLK STFS 482= ......$161.00
27 ...........................................DLK HFFS 514= ......$142.00
JACK WIESER - OWANKA
33 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 586= ......$159.00
13 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 482= ......$166.00
JERRY SAMPSON - INTERIOR
19..................................FED & DLK STFS 406= ......$171.50
36.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 451= ......$146.00
14.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 376= ......$163.50
DAVE & TANYA BERRY - MILESVILLE
37..................................FED & DLK STFS 604= ......$151.50
11..................................FED & DLK STFS 523= ......$162.00
BRYCE BAKER - FT. PIERRE
30................................CHAF & DLK STFS 609= ......$155.00
7..................................CHAF & DLK STFS 496= ......$169.00
25 ...............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 577= ......$143.50
7 ...........................................CHAF HFFS 479= ......$155.00
DAN ANDERSON - MEADOW
15..................................FED & DLK STFS 620= ......$145.00
5..............................................DLK STFS 529= ......$161.00
7 .............................................DLK HFFS 494= ......$141.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
34..................................FED & DLK STFS 638= ......$150.50
13..................................FED & DLK STFS 540= ......$151.00
17.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 583= ......$143.00
9...................................FED & DLK HFFS 483= ......$145.00
GARY WOODFORD - CUSTER
9....................................FED & DLK STFS 633= ......$147.50
8 .............................................DLK HFFS 603= ......$139.25
HALEY RANCH - STURGIS
23............................................DLK STFS 395= ......$194.00
17 ...........................................DLK HFFS 404= ......$167.00
RUSS SINKEY - MIDLAND
18 .................................FED & DLK HFFS 457= ......$154.00
6...................................FED & DLK HFFS 380= ......$164.50
JERRY ELLENS - PHILIP
10............................................DLK STFS 574= ......$153.00
RALPH MERCHEN - CUSTER
5..............................................DLK STFS 606= ......$156.00
DON HINSON - MIDLAND
18..................................FED & DLK STFS 480= ......$160.00
5....................................FED & DLK STFS 416= ......$173.00
Pennington County Courant • November 15, 2012 • Page 10
we don’t
Charge…
Obi tuaries,
engagements and
wedding wri te-ups
are published free
of charge.
Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTION: I'm concerned
about my young daughter's selfish
attitude. She recently had a birth-
day, and as soon as she was fin-
ished unwrapping her gifts she
started looking around for more!
How do I discourage this kind of
behavior and help her develop a
grateful heart?
ANSWER: That's an excellent
question. To a great extent, the an-
swer depends upon your daugh-
ter's age. Smaller kids — toddlers,
preschoolers and even some chil-
dren in the lower elementary
grades — may be a bit too young to
grasp ideas like unselfishness and
gratitude. They're still in the
process of rounding out their self-
concept and grasping what it
means to be an individual "self" as
distinguished from the rest of the
world around them. If your child is
only five or six years old, there's
probably no reason to be overly
concerned about her behavior.
Of course, it's a different matter
where older children are con-
cerned. This is where many par-
ents come face to face for the first
time with the impact of our mate-
rialistic, consumer-driven culture.
Advertisers and toy manufactur-
ers aren't in the business of help-
ing moms and dads teach concepts
like contentment and thankful-
ness. From their perspective, kids
are primarily a lucrative sector of
the "market," and they design
their publicity campaigns accord-
ingly. As a result, children growing
up in our society are conditioned to
believe that they're entitled to
have everything they want — right
now!
One of the best ways you can
counter this mentality is by mod-
eling a grateful and selfless atti-
tude yourself. Actions and example
always speak louder than words.
As you go through your daily rou-
tine, remember to express thank-
fulness to God on a regular basis
— even for simple things like a
roof over your head and food on the
table. Model gratitude in your re-
lationships with others. Make sure
to express thankfulness to friends,
relatives and co-workers, and not
merely when they do something
special for you. Let people know
how much you appreciate them
just for who they are. While you're
at it, express that kind of uncondi-
tional gratitude to your daughter
as well.
Another way to help your child
develop a grateful heart is by serv-
ing others who are less fortunate.
Volunteer to serve meals at a local
rescue mission. Visit shut-ins at a
nursing home. Consider signing up
to sponsor a poor child in a third-
world country through a ministry
like World Vision or Compassion
International. This is a wonderful
way to increase your entire fam-
ily's awareness of God's goodness
and graciousness while getting in
touch with the needs of people
around the world.
QUESTION: I'm the kind of
person who needs to "vent" from
time to time, but whenever I start
airing my emotions, my spouse
just cuts me off and gives me a list
of things I should do to "fix" my
problems. This is incredibly frus-
trating. I'm not looking for "an-
swers" — just a listening ear. How
do I get that across?
ANSWER: Talking effectively
with another person about your
feelings and emotions is a delicate
art. It's especially delicate in mar-
riage, where differences in tem-
perament and contrasting male
and female styles of communica-
tion tend to increase the potential
for misunderstanding. The bottom
line is that both spouses, whether
male or female, pragmatic or intro-
spective, "right-brain" or "left-
brain," have moments when they
simply want a partner who is ca-
pable of listening instead of offer-
ing advice. When this doesn't hap-
pen, the relationship can feel un-
safe and the depth of conversation
can become shallow and unsatisfy-
ing.
Genuine intimacy in marriage
begins when each spouse takes re-
sponsibility for his or her emotions
and behaviors. This is more likely
to happen in a climate free from
judgment, defensiveness and
blame.
If your spouse responds as a
"problem solver" when you're sim-
ply "venting," thinking out loud or
airing your feelings, we suggest
that you counter with a straight-
forward and honest reply. Say
something like, "When I'm not al-
lowed to finish my sentences, I feel
discounted and unimportant to
you. What I need is to be heard."
When you have emotions you'd
like to express, it may be helpful to
pray or journal about them before
doing anything else. Tell your
heavenly Father how you're feel-
ing before you address the issue
with your mate. You'll find comfort
in looking to Him first, and this in
turn may enable you to voice your
concerns more circumspectly and
with greater perspective when you
finally get around to talking with
your spouse.
If the feelings you want to ex-
press seem likely to spark an argu-
ment, you can actually pave the
way to conflict resolution by own-
ing up to your emotions and as-
suming responsibility. Clarifica-
tion is essential here, since many
arguments arise out of a misun-
derstanding of the actual issue. If
a husband says, "We're really short
on money this month," it's less
than helpful for the wife to re-
spond defensively by saying, "It's
not my fault!" It would be much
better if she were to clarify the
issue by asking, "What are you try-
ing to tell me?" She may not like
the answer she gets, but at least a
meaningful step will have been
taken in the direction of mutual
understanding.
Here are some key principles to
bear in mind when talking about
feelings:
1) Be respectful and honoring
when your spouse takes responsi-
bility for his or her emotions and
behaviors.
2) Understand that men and
women have different communica-
tion styles.
3) Develop conflict resolution
strategies before attempting to
bare your soul.
4) Be intentional about adopting
a mutually nurturing approach to
your conversations.
5) Commit yourselves to make
your marriage as enjoyable as pos-
sible.
6) Keep a prayer journal to re-
lease frustration.
All of this sets the stage for safe
self-disclosure. What happens next
is up to you and your spouse.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer
is excerpted from books authored
by Dr. James Dobson and pub-
lished by Tyndale House Publish-
ers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman of
the Board of Focus on the Family,
a nonprofit organization dedicated
to the preservation of the home.
Copyright 2003 James Dobson,
Inc. All rights reserved. Interna-
tional copyright secured.
Recreational trails receive funding
Gov. Dennis Daugaard has
awarded about $1.5 million in
Recreational Trails Program fund-
ing to several projects.
The Governor selected the proj-
ects based on input from a five-cit-
izen Recreational Trails Program
Advisory Council.
The federal assistance program
provides up to 80 percent reim-
bursement for trail-related devel-
opment and maintenance projects.
The following cities were
awarded grants for trail construc-
tion and upgrades:
•Aberdeen – Baird Park Recre-
ational Trail, Phase II, $125,600
•Belle Fourche – Riverwalk/Hay
Creek to Pine Street, $51,130
•Custer – Big Rock Lookout,
Phase II, $80,000
•Deadwood – George S. Mickel-
son Trailhead, $45,000
•Dell Rapids – Ace Park Dells
scenic hiking trail, $21,940
•Lake County – Public access
trail, $72,100
•Murdo – City Park shared-use
path, $177,848
•Watertown – Big Sioux Recre-
ational Trail reconstruction,
$65,000
•Winner – Phase I McDonald
Park trail development, $62,799
Additional grants were awarded
for trail improvement projects at
Blood Run Nature Area, the
George S. Mickelson Trail,
LaFramboise Island Nature Area,
Black Hills Snowmobile Trail Sys-
tem, and the Black Hills National
Forest for Off-Highway Vehicle
Trail System Implementation.
“These project sponsors have
shown a strong commitment to im-
proving their communities, our
state and federal parks and our
recreation areas,” Gov. Daugaard
said. “Their efforts will make
South Dakota an even better
place.”
The Recreational Trails Pro-
gram is funded by the Federal
Highway Administration and ad-
ministered by the South Dakota
Department of Game, Fish and
Parks. The funds come from the
Federal Highway Trust Fund, and
represent a portion of the motor-
fuel excise taxes collected from
non-highway recreational fuel use.
For more information on the
program, contact Randy Kittle,
grants coordinator, at 605-773-
5490 or by e-mail:
randy.kittle@state.sd.us.
Outdoor recreation projects funding
Gov. Dennis Daugaard has
awarded a total of $358,310 in
Land and Water Conservation
Fund (LWCF) money to several
communities. The federal assis-
tance program provides up to 50
percent reimbursement for out-
door recreation projects.
The following local sponsors
were awarded LWCF grants for
outdoor recreation projects:
•Beresford – Burlow Park play-
ground equipment, $18,310
•Box Elder – playground equip-
ment safety remediation project,
$50,000
•Brandon – Aspen Park land ac-
quisition, $50,000
•Brookings – Valley View Park
development, $45,000
•Dell Rapids – city park play-
ground project, $38,000
•Gettysburg – Little Angels
Playground improvements,
$20,000
•Gregory – Memorial Sports
Park playground project, $27,000
•Groton - park equipment re-
placement project, $12,000
•Lennox – pool and bathhouse
improvements, $46,000
•Pierre – Fourth Street Park
playground and shelter, $24,000
•Sturgis – Starline Park,
$28,000
“I commend project sponsors for
their strong commitment to im-
prove their communities and make
South Dakota a better place to
live, work and play,” Gov. Dau-
gaard said. “Their efforts will ben-
efit many future generations of
South Dakotans.”
Land and Water Conservation
Funds come from the National
Park Service and are administered
in South Dakota by the state De-
partment of Game, Fish and
Parks.
For more information on the
LWCF program, contact grants co-
ordinator Randy Kittle by calling
605-773-5490 or e-mail him at:
randy.kittle@state.sd.us.

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