Login

Pennington Co. Courant, July 4, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

$1.00
(tax included)
Number 27
Volume 108
July 4, 2013
According to www.holidays.net/i
ndependence/story.htm this is the
story of our independece that we
celebrate each year on the Fourth
of July.
“Independence Day is the na-
tional holiday of the United States
of America commemorating the
signing of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence by the Continental Con-
gress on July 4, 1776, in Philadel-
phia, Pennsylvania.
At the time of the signing the
US consisted of 13 colonies under
the rule of England's King George
III.
There was growing unrest in the
colonies concerning the taxes that
had to be paid to England. This
was commonly referred to as "Tax-
ation without Representation" as
the colonists did not have any rep-
resentation in the English Parlia-
ment and had no say in what went
on.
As the unrest grew in the
colonies, King George sent extra
troops to help control any rebel-
lion. In 1774 the 13 colonies sent
delegates to Philadelphia, Penn-
sylvania to form the First Conti-
nental Congress. The delegates
were unhappy with England, but
were not yet ready to declare war.
In April 1775, as the King's
troops advanced on Concord Mas-
sachusetts Paul Revere would
sound the alarm that "The British
are coming, the British are com-
ing" as he rode his horse through
the late night streets.
The battle of Concord and its
"shot heard round the world"
would mark the unofficial begin-
In a speech at Georgetown Uni-
versity, President Obama an-
nounced a broad new federal man-
date to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions from electric power
plants.
The President will instruct fed-
eral regulators to apply the Clean
Air Act to carbon dioxide issued
from power plants, effectively out-
lawing coal-burning facilities.
South Dakota’s electric coopera-
tives are especially concerned
about this proposal because rural
and low-income Americans already
spend disproportionately more on
energy than others.
“The impact of the President’s
plan on co-op-served families and
businesses could be significant in
South Dakota,” said Ed Anderson,
general manager of the South
Dakota Rural Electric Association
in Pierre, S.D. “Rural communities
have been put through an eco-
nomic wringer for the better part
of a decade; they’ve made incredi-
ble sacrifices.”
“The President’s plan fails to
take into account electric coopera-
tives existing efforts to protect the
environment in a responsible and
S.D. Electric Cooperatives alarmed
by President Obama’s proposal to
increase regulations and costs
cost effective manner.
With more than 1,060
megawatts of installed renewable
generation capacity in our portfo-
lio, South Dakota electric coopera-
tives are doing a lot more than just
talking about our commitment to
the environment.
That, coupled with the fact that
electric cooperatives have been
leaders in encouraging energy effi-
ciency and conservation for
decades, should serve as a model
for a responsible approach to ad-
dressing climate concerns,” said
Anderson
“We can move forward in our col-
lective efforts to protect and im-
prove the environment. And we
can do it in an effective and afford-
able manner.
Using the Clean Air Act to tax
every coal-fired generation facility
in the United States out of busi-
ness is not a responsible solution.
It is only expedient,” Anderson
said.
“I hope we can work with the
President to form a more reason-
able and sustainable plan,” said
Anderson.
ning of the colonies war for Inde-
pendence.
The following May, the colonies
again sent delegates to the Second
Continental Congress. For almost
a year the congress tried to work
out its differences with England,
again without formally declaring
war.
By June 1776, their efforts had
become hopeless and a committee
was formed to compose a formal
declaration of independence.
Headed by Thomas Jefferson, the
committee included John Adams,
Benjamin Franklin, Robert R. Liv-
ingston and Roger Sherman.
Thomas Jefferson was chosen to
write the first draft which was pre-
sented to the congress on June 28.
After various changes, a vote
was taken late in the afternoon of
July 4th.
Of the 13 colonies, nine voted in
favor of the Declaration, two -
Pennsylvania and South Carolina
voted No, Delaware undecided and
New York abstained.
To make it official John Han-
cock, President of the Continental
Congress, signed the Declaration
of Independence. It is said that
John Hancock signed his name
"with a great flourish" so "King
George can read that without spec-
tacles!"
The following day copies of the
Declaration were distributed. The
first newspaper to print the Decla-
ration was the Pennsylvania
Evening Post on July 6, 1776.
On July 8th, the Declaration
had its first public reading in
The story of Independence
Day and America's birthday
by Laurie Hindman
Wall School Board met for a spe-
cial meeting on Thursday, June 27.
Business Manager Niki Mohr
presented the board with the Sup-
plemental Budget.
She noted this was an estimate
for the upcoming fiscal year. The
General fund will be supplemented
$100,000 for the year due to proj-
ects that weren’t in the budget.
After discussing the budget the
board made a motion and ap-
proved the Supplemental budget
resolution.
As of June 1, 2013 the school is
eligible to pay off the Capital Out-
lay Certificates. Mohr explained
the school will have to give a 30
day notice and payment can then
be made on September 1, 2013.
The amount owed is $442,938.75
and if the board approves to pay
the certificates off early they will
save over $33,000 in interest. Su-
perintendent Dennis Rieckman
said the money is just sitting there
and if we can pay if off five years
sooner then we should.
Mohr noted that with the Im-
pact Aid money coming in the
On June 20, 2013, six men in
their mid-60’s embarked on a bicy-
cle ride across the Northern Tier of
the United States to raise money
and awareness for the Wounded
Warrior Project.
The 6 over 60 Team hopes to
raise $50,000 for this amazing
group of unsung American heroes.
All of the money donated goes di-
rectly to the Wounded Warrior
Project.
The team is self-funding all ride
expenses.
Donations can be made directly
on the Wounded Warrior web site
that has a direct link from the
Team web site www.6over60raa.co
m.
The Team will begin its journey
in Astoria, Oregon by dipping their
rear wheels in the Pacific Ocean
and conclude 60 days and 3,667
miles later in Portsmouth, New
Hampshire by dipping their front
wheels in the Atlantic Ocean.
Their support vehicle during
this adventure will be driven by
their longtime good friend and re-
tired pastor.
The six riders range in age from
64 to 68. They will all be retired at
“6 over 60 riding Coast to
Coast for Wounded Warriors”
the time of the ride from varied ca-
reers that include a high school
principal in Irvine, an Irvine police
officer, a director of a local water
district, a real estate developer, a
software developer and an execu-
tive from the oil industry.
The members of the 6 over 60
Team are longtime residents of
Irvine. They attend the same
church and have ridden together
for many years and many miles.
The individual riders have a va-
riety of personal reasons for doing
this ride but they all have a com-
mon purpose, to generate support
for the Wounded Warrior Project.
This 6 over 60 Team does not
take their lives for granted. They
are reminded every day of their
mortality by the evening news, the
aging of their parents and the re-
flection in the mirror.
All six realize how fortunate
they are to be blessed with good
health and great friendships.
They also recognize our
Wounded Warriors made a choice
to defend what we should never
take for granted.
The team will be in the Wall
area on Saturday, July 13.
Guptill family hosts South Dakota
Leopold Conservation ranch tour
funds were available to pay off the
certificates. The board approved a
motion to pay of the Capital Out-
lay Certificates.
The Digital Sign advertising
which was discussed at the last
meeting was reviewed by the
board. A concensus by the board
was made to offer businesses who
have been advertising a three year
contract at $400. New businesses
will be offered a three year con-
tract at the full price. The money
for the advertising will be used to
pay for the security upgrades at
Big White and the Wall School.
Other Business:
•Agenda for the meeting was
approved.
Consent agenda was approved
for the following:
•Minutes of June 12, 2013 board
meeting.
•Additional June claims.
•2013 -2014 activity contracts
for Kent Anderson, Assistant
Track Coach and Rusty Lytle,
Head MS Girls Basketball Coach.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned.
School board approves full payment
of Capital Outlay Certificates
by Laurie Hindman
For the past 25 years the Pat
Guptill family from Quinn has
ranched on their 7,000 acre
spread. The Guptills decided in
2000 they needed to change the
way they managed their land.
They became caretakers of the
land which has improved the over-
all health of their ranch and in
turn has improved the health of
their cattle, wildlife and them-
selves.
Their conservation efforts have
earned the Guptill family the 2013
Leopold Conservation Award.
“The Leopold Conservation
Award recognizes extraordinary
achievement in voluntary conser-
vation, inspire other landowners
through their example and helps
the general public to understand
the vital role private landowners
can and do play in conservation
success.”
A tour of their ranch was held on
Friday, June 28.
Brent Heglund, who represents
the Sand County Foundation
opened the program and informed
the guests that the Guptills
through the years have achieved
high standards with their land and
by telling the story to urban and
suburban people who don’t have
the due awareness or interest they
need to know how high performing
landowners deliver clear water,
clean food and prosperous wildlife
to their table.
Guptill said it was a huge shock
to hear they were even nominated
and it is quite an honor to be
picked.
He noted we were pretty excited
to prepare for this day in awe of
people who never knew what we
were doing.
He went on to say it is important
for us to take care of the land, if we
don’t the health of the land will de-
teriorate and then the health of
people will also.
Jeffrey Zimprich, State Conser-
vationist of USDA’s Natural Re-
sources Conservation Service,
thanked the Guptills for the work
they do to protect our land and this
is what NRCS is all about. Work-
ing on the private land to protect
the people. Thank you for the will-
ingness to share with other pro-
ducers and we hope this day will
inspire them to make a change on
their land.
South Dakota Secretary of Ag
Lucas Lentsch who is nine weeks
into this new job stated it is a great
honor to leave the ground better
than you found it. Today we are
here to honor the Guptill family
and today it is about those of us
who are in agriculture. Lentsch
hand delivered a letter from Gov-
ernor Dennis Daugaard on their
accomplishments.
Cory Eich, president, South
Dakota Cattlemen’s Association
said ranchers who run straight
grass have a lot of gumption to
alter their year long plans.
Along with the 2013 Leopold
Conservation award, a $10,000
check will be presented to them at
the South Dakota Cattlemen’s
Convention to be held in Pierre on
December 11. The family also re-
ceived a sign to put out by their
driveway that designates their
achievement.
A video was made of Pat and
Mary Lou where Pat was noted
saying, “God gave us this world to
live on. We need to improve our
land so we are in sync with na-
ture.”
South Dakota Leopold Conservation Award ranch tour. Pictured back row: from left to right ...
Representative for Sand County Foundation Brendt Heglund, Tate Guptil, Paul Guptil, Josie Gup-
till. Front row: from left to right ... Cory Eich, President of S.D. Cattlemens Assoc., Mary Lou Guptill,
Pat Guptill, Tia Guptill, Marla Kelly and Jim Faulstich, Chaiman of South Dakota Grassland Coali-
tion. (Not pictured Troy Guptill.) ~Photo Laurie Hindman
First Interstate Greater Wall
Fund makes donations
First Interstate Greater Wall Fund awarded the Wall Rodeo
Booster Club with a check for $3,400 for grand stand improve-
ments at the Wall Rodeo arena. Picture from left to right ... Dan
Curr, President of the Wall Rodeo Booster Club and Brett Bla-
sius, president of the First Interstate Greater Wall Fund.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
The First Interstate Greater Wall Fund presented a $10,000 check
to the City of Wall for the Wall City Pool. Pictured from left to
right ... Dick Johnson, Denny Law, Brett Blasius, Patty Kjerstad,
Mayor Dave Hahn, Terry Peters and John Tsitrian.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
(continued on page 3)
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding
Monday at 4:30 p.m. We do have the right to reject any or all letters to the
Editor.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper
should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office.
All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number
of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run
the two weeks prior to an election.
The "Letters¨ column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to
express their opinions. Ìt is not meant to replace advertising as a means
of reaching people.
This publication's goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of
free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review Pennington Co. Courant
P.O. Box 788 P.O. Box 435
Philip, SD 57567-0788 Wall, SD 57790-0435
605-859-2516 605-279-2565
The Kadoka Press The Faith Ìndependent
P.O. Box 309 P.O. Box 38
Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 Faith, SD 57626-0038
605-837-2259 605-967-2161
The Bison Courier The Murdo Coyote
P.O. Box 429 P.O. Box 465
Bison, SD 57620-0429 Murdo, SD 57559-0465
605-244-7199 605-669-2271
New Underwood Post
P.O. Box 426 · New Underwood, SD 57761-0426
605-754-6466
Bavellette Publ¡cat¡oas, Iac.
Letters Pol¡cy
1cuu:uqrcu Ccuur¸ Sícr:jj's 1cjarr¤cur
PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
AII NICOI£ WIGI£Y
A IoIony Arrosf Wnrrnnf hns
boon Issuod for AII ÞIcoIo WIgIoy
chnrgIng hor wIfh IossossIon of n
ConfroIIod Subsfnnco.
WIgIoy Is n whIfo fomnIo, 28
yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 5`4¨
fnII, l30 µounds, bInck hnIr wIfh
brown oyos.
WIgIoy Is boIIovod fo bo In or
nround fho !nµId CIfy or SfurgIs,
SÐ nrons.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hor
whoronboufs, µIonso do nof nµ-
µronch. IIonso confncf fho Ion-
nIngfon Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf
605-394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy Io-
IIco Ðoµnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l
or fho nonrosf Inw onforcomonf
ngoncy If you hnvo nny Informn-
fIon whIch wouId rosuIf In fho nr-
rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
courant@
gwtc.net
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
Subscription Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax; Out-of-Area: $42 plus
tax; Out of-State: $42 or subscribe
online at: www.RavellettePublications.com
Day-of-appointment service will
decrease length of interviews at
blood drives.
United Blood Services donors
now have the ability to complete
their donation interview online the
same day of their blood donation
appointment.
With this new service, United
Blood Services can reduce the
length of interviews on-site at a
center or mobile drive to only es-
sential follow-up questions.
Donors can visit the United
Blood Services website, access the
interview and print out a barcoded
Fast Track Donation Ticket that
they must bring with them to their
appointment.
“Whenever we survey donors
about how we can make their ex-
perience better, they usually say
that the interview process should
be simplified, shortened or auto-
mated,” said Jennifer Bredahl, Re-
gional Donor Recruitment Director
for United Blood Services.
“We took these suggestions to
heart and now are happy to pro-
vide this new, shortened interview
process for our dedicated donors.”
United Blood Services encour-
ages donors to give the online
health history questionnaire a try
for their next donation.
There are some important
guidelines to note, especially the
fact that donors must complete the
questionnaire the same day as
their donation.
Donors still have the option to
Introducing online interviews for
United Blood Services blood donors
have one of our staff members ask
the health history questions, like
we currently do.
All donors have to do is simply
request this option when they ar-
rive to donate.
Instructions can be found online
at www.UnitedBloodServices.org
and by clicking the “Health His-
tory Questionnaire” link on the
left.
Answers cannot be saved, so
donors must complete the 10-15
minute interview in one sitting.
Donor data is stored only in the
barcoded “Fast Track Donation
Ticket” that a donor will print fol-
lowing the interview, so a login is
not required.
The online donor interview was
developed by Calimex USA Corp.,
a software developer based in San
Francisco.
People who are 16 or older,
weigh at least 110 pounds and are
in good health are eligible to do-
nate blood.
Additional height/weight re-
quirements apply to donors 22 and
younger, and donors who are 16
must have a signed permission
from a parent or guardian.
United Blood Services will be in
Wall on Monday, July 15 from 10
a.m. - 4 p.m., at the Wall Commu-
nity Center. Contact Hannah
Huether at 685-8135 or go to
www.bloodhero.com and enter
code: wallsd to schedule an ap-
pointment.
South Dakota Landowners React
to President Obama’s Climate
Speech
President Barack Obama gave a
speech presenting his plan to cut
carbon emissions and lead the
global charge to fight climate
change, starting with the way we
use energy.
With a focus on renewables and
less waste, President Obama has
promised to bring Washington,
D.C. up to speed with the rest of
the country.
Part of President Obama’s ini-
tiative is to make sure the Key-
stone XL pipeline is not built if it
raises greenhouse gas emissions.
In speaking about the controver-
sial Keystone XL pipeline, Presi-
dent Obama stated, “I do want to
be clear: allowing the Keystone XL
pipeline to be built requires find-
ing doing so would be in our na-
tional interest.”
He went on to say the only way
to find the pipeline is in the na-
tional interest is to find it will not
exacerbate this country’s issues
with carbon emissions.
“The EPA has commented that
the State Department DSEIS is se-
riously flawed and that in fact the
development of tar sands will in-
crease greenhouse gas emissions
at a much greater rate than con-
ventional oil,” notes Paul Sea-
President Obama says Keystone XL
Pipeline should not be approved if it
raises greenhouse gas emissions
mans, Dakota Rural Action board
chair and landowner crossed by
the Keystone XL route.
While the Draft Supplemental
Environmental Impact Statement
released by the US State Depart-
ment notes the pipeline will not in-
crease greenhouse gas emissions,
this finding has been heavily dis-
puted.
In-depth analysis by the Natural
Resource Defense Council and the
Environmental Protection Agency
have concluded that tar sands
mining and the resulting diluted
bitumen will, in fact, increase
greenhouse gas emissions; and the
Keystone XL pipeline is the major
proposed vehicle for tar sands di-
luted bitumen.
President Obama’s speech was
met with skepticism by some, how-
ever; Bret Clanton, a Harding
County landowner and Dakota
Rural Action member said, “I don’t
know how to take him anymore. I
feel like he’s prepping us for the
okay of it, but I don’t know. I wish
our President would quit being a
politician on the Keystone XL
issue.
There are literally millions of
people whose lives are in limbo on
both sides of this controversial
project. I have kind of lost faith in
his openness and hope and change
theme.”
Grasshopper inspection
critical for control
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture is urging land own-
ers to take the necessary steps now
to manage grasshopper popula-
tions.
“Since April snowstorms led to a
late onset of spring and May rains
pushed back planting, producers
now find themselves at the start of
haying season,” said South Dakota
Secretary of Agriculture Lucas
Lentsch.
“In the hustle and bustle of the
next month, it is important to re-
member that now is the best time
to scout for grasshoppers.”
Each summer, South Dakota
faces the possibility of destructive
grasshopper outbreaks.
Predicting these outbreaks be-
fore they occur is very challenging
and early scouting is the key to
grasshopper management.
“The dry conditions in the sum-
mer of 2012 may have actually
helped reduce the outbreak poten-
tial for this summer,” said Mike
Stenson with the South Dakota
Department of Agriculture
(SDDA).
Later hatching species had lim-
ited green vegetation needed for
growth and eventually egg laying.
In some cases, extreme heat can
actually lead to nymphal mortal-
ity. This year’s cool wet spring will
aid in the suppression of early
hatching species by increasing the
presence of bacteria and disease
within the grasshopper popula-
tion.
“Even though Mother Nature
has been on our side and a large
scale outbreak is unlikely, it is still
important to check your own fields
and pastures for newly hatching
grasshoppers,” said Stenson.
Grasshoppers go through five
nymphal or instar stages before
they reach adulthood and sexual
maturity. During the nymphal
stages the grasshoppers are very
susceptible to environmental con-
ditions as well as pesticide treat-
ment practices.
Once they reach adulthood they
begin laying eggs almost immedi-
ately and become much harder to
kill.
Although treating adults that
are actively laying eggs might curb
current feeding damage, it will not
break the life cycle or produce ben-
efits in subsequent years.
“Reports are coming in of
grasshoppers hatching in the
southern most South Dakota coun-
ties,” said Stenson.
“If the hatch continues at a nor-
mal pace, the last two weeks of
June will be the perfect time for
grasshopper control activities.”
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture and USDA - Animal
and Plant Health Inspection Serv-
ice will be collaborating to keep the
public abreast of the current
grasshopper situation and provide
producers with information on
grasshopper treatment options
specific to their operation.
For more information on
grasshopper control in South
Dakota, please contact Mike Sten-
son with the SD Department of
Agriculture at 605.773.3796.
Agriculture is South Dakota's
No. 1 industry, generating over
$21 billion in annual economic ac-
tivity and employing more than
122,000 South Dakotans.
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture's mission is to pro-
mote, protect, preserve and im-
prove this industry for today and
tomorrow. Visit us online at
http://sdda.sd.gov or find us on
Facebook and Twitter.
Unneeded/Excessive
Pesticide Use?
Although my “title” is Plant
Pathology Field Specialist, being
the only Agronomy Extension staff
person at the Winner Regional Ex-
tension Center,
I deal with more than plant dis-
eases. I consider that broader per-
spective to be a good thing, as
there are often common themes
across other aspects of agronomy.
A local producer recently
brought in a “weed” that was pres-
ent in his pasture, and more obvi-
ous in his neighbors’.
With the aid of the SDSU Taxon-
omist’s expertise, the “weed”
turned out to be a native wild-
flower.
The Taxonomist knew the pro-
ducer wanted to know what the
“weed” was, mainly so he could
find out which herbicide would
control it.
Being the expert in his field that
he is, he provided the plant
species, but also added a concern.
In his words, “Native forbs like
this one are being extinguished
through wholesale herbicide appli-
cation to grasslands.
Native bees important for polli-
nating native and cultivated fruits,
etc., are being decimated as natu-
ral nectar sources needed through
the growing season are lost. I'm
seeing far fewer bees and less fruit
set in pollinator-dependent fruits
in corn/soybean/pasture country
here in the eastern part of the
state.
We have a pollinator crisis that
is intensifying. I'm not a tree hug-
ging true environmentalist, just an
observant realist. How do we de-
bunk the notion that anything not
grass is a weed?”
By: Bob Fanning,
Plant Pathology
Field Specialist
605-842-1267
This “theme” carries over to
other areas.
Entomologists promote that
there are other ways to control in-
sects than just insecticides.
Wheat producers are likely
hearing of aphids in their fields.
There are also lady beetles and
other predatory insects there too,
and if at high enough populations,
can keep aphid numbers below the
thresholds.
Applying insecticides when in-
sect pest thresholds haven’t been
reached may not be economical,
and the predators will also be “con-
trolled”.
Insecticides are also not the only
solution for alfalfa weevils.
Granted, the weather doesn’t al-
ways cooperate to allow early cut-
ting, and even so, the weevils
sometimes survive to feed on the
regrowth and justify an insecticide
application.
Alfalfa weevils have natural en-
emies and insecticides should be
used with care to minimize the ef-
fect on these beneficials.
There are situations where in-
cluding an insecticide with an-
other pesticide application because
there are a few undesirable insects
present may require coming back
for another application because
the beneficial insects were taken
out in the first application.
A similar phenomena occurs
with fungicides. In addition to
killing harmful fungi, fungicides
also kill good fungi.
These good fungi help to control
aphids, grasshoppers, and other
insects as well as plant diseases
such as bacterial.
Extensive fungicide use has also
shown to be detrimental to micro-
bial activity in the soil.
Integrated Pest Management, or
IPM, practices have been encour-
aged for several years.
IPM principles stress crop scout-
ing, following economic thresholds
and considering alternative control
methods.
It’s important to recognize that
a healthy grassland contains more
plants than just grass, not all in-
sects are pests, and not all fungi
are bad.
After the wet spring, the South
Dakota Division of Parks and
Recreation is reminding people to
take measures to protect them-
selves from mosquitoes while out-
doors this summer.
“The best prevention is to be-
come knowledgeable on the sub-
ject,” says Doug Hofer, director of
the Division of Parks and Recre-
ation.
“By implementing just a few
steps to decrease personal contact
with mosquitoes, we can make out-
door experiences much more enjoy-
able this summer.”
To prevent mosquito bites, the
South Dakota Department of
Health suggests the following
steps:
S.D. State Parks remind visitors to
practice mosquito prevention
•When outdoors, use mosquito
repellent containing DEET, ac-
cording to directions.
•Spray repellent on both skin
and clothes, but avoid applying re-
pellent to the hands of children, as
it may irritate the eyes and mouth.
•Wear light colored long-sleeve
shirts and pants.
•Be aware that mosquitoes are
most active between dusk and
dawn and when the air is calm.
For more information on mos-
quitoes and West Nile Virus, visit
the Department of Health’s web-
site at www.doh.sd.gov. Informa-
tion on South Dakota state parks
can be found online at www.gfp.sd.
gov or by calling 605-773-3991.
Chubb Wilcox from Hot Springs was in Wall on Friday, June 26.
He brought his buggy and Miss Kitty down so she could get ac-
quatined with different vechicles and tourists. Wilcox said his
horse is three years old and still needs a lot of training and why
don’t spend the evening in Wall. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
by Senator John Thune
As we prepare to celebrate the
Fourth of July, families and busi-
nesses throughout the country will
unfurl the stars and stripes and
proudly display the American Flag
in honor of our great nation.
The importance of this waving
symbol of liberty and justice is
epitomized in the famous World
War II photo depicting U.S.
Marines and a Navy corpsman
raising the flag atop Mount Surib-
achi on Iwo Jima. Stories such as
this, depicting the patriotic hero-
ism of our military, cause us to
pause and reflect upon the sacri-
fices that our men and women in
uniform have made and continue
to make on behalf of our country.
I have had the honor of listening
to many of our state’s great war
heroes tell stories of battles won
and fought, and some of my fa-
vorite stories are of the USS South
Dakota, a famous World War II
battleship that found great success
throughout its career. Nicknamed
“Old Incredible,” it played an ac-
tive role in 15 major U. S. military
operations, 50 air strikes, and the
downing of over 64 Japanese air-
craft. It was one of the fastest and
most expensive ships of its time,
and was truly feared in the Pacific.
Remembering the USS
S.D., the “Old Incredible”
The USS South Dakota also took
part in a number of historic World
War II events. It was one of the
first ships to bomb the Japanese
homeland and was present at the
Japanese surrender signing.
At the conclusion of its illustri-
ous career, the USS South Dakota
had traveled almost 250,000 miles
– roughly the distance from the
earth to the moon. It crossed the
equator and the international date
line 30 times, as well as the Arctic
Circle twice. This mighty battle-
ship truly became a legend before
it was even one year old. For its ef-
forts, the USS South Dakota and
its crew were awarded 13 battle
stars by the United States Navy
after less than five years at sea.
We are eternally grateful to the
heroes of the USS South Dakota
and their families for their contri-
butions and sacrifice to our coun-
try. I invite all South Dakotans
this Fourth of July to join me in
honoring the service of our veter-
ans and to keep the brave mem-
bers of our military and their fam-
ilies in our thoughts and prayers
as they continue to serve on our
behalf.
Kimberley and I wish all South
Dakotans a very happy and safe
Independence Day.
Area News
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013• Page 3
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
July 5-6-7-8:
Monsters
University PG
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
July 12-13-14-15:
Now You See Me
PG-13
Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
High school finals rodeo results
The 2013 South Dakota High
School Rodeo finals were held last
week, June 19-23 at the Roundup
grounds in Belle Fourche.
Area contestants fought hard for
the spots to go to the national fi-
nals in Rock Springs, Wyo. in July.
Scores were affected by the heavy
rains, especially for the short go.
Point scoring for the finals in-
cludes 15 places. First place is
given 15 points down to 15th place
which is awarded one point. In in-
stances where there is the same
score the points are totaled and
then divided equally. The first and
second rounds each had 15 plac-
ings; the short go had 10. Average
winners are based upon totaled
scores from the three rounds.
The champion and runner-up
spots are chosen by the total of all
the points earned during the sea-
son plus, those at the finals. The
top four contestants from each
event move on to the national fi-
nals.
In some cases, while a contest-
ant may not have had the best
state finals, the had enough season
points to place them in the top 15
of total points for the year.
First Go
•Bareback Riding: 1. Shane O’Connell,
Rapid City, 61; 2. Casey Reder, Philip, 52
•Barrel Racing: 1. Taylor Engesser,
Spearfish, 17.397; 2. Fehrin Ward, Fruit-
dale, 17.440; 3. Mazee Pauley, Wall, 17.531;
4. Jorry Lammers, Hartford, 17.586; 5.
Kendra Kannas, Hayti, 17.594; 6. Madison
Rau, Mobrdige, 15.595; 7. Laura O’Leary,
Timber Lake, 17.708; 8. (tie) Taylor Both-
well, Pierre, and Tearnee Nelson, Faith,
17.763; 9. Brandi Wolles, Dell Rapids,
17.815; 10. Cassy Woodward, Dupree,
17.893; 11. Vanzi Knippling, Chamberlain,
17.905; 12. Bailey Tibbs, Ft. Pierre, 17.908;
13. Keenie Word, Hermosa, 17.910; 14.
Peedee Doyle, St. Onge, 17.964
•Breakaway Roping: 1. Vanzi Knip-
pling, Chamberlain, 2.790; 2. Katy Miller,
Faith, 2.810; 3. (tie) C.Y. Christensen, Ken-
nebec, and Tawny Barry, Carter, 2.910; 4.
Harlee Jo McKenney, Parker, 2.960; 5. Mo-
riah Glaus, Chamberlain, 2.970; 6. Keanna
Ward, Fruitdale, 3.220; 7. Kassi McPherson,
Rapid City, 3.320; 8. Brooke Howell, Belle
Fourche, 3.390; 9. Alyssa Lockhart, Oel-
richs, 3.400; 10. Bridget Howell, Belle
Fourche, 3.410; 11. Caitlyn Dowling,
Newell, 3.580; 12. Katie Lensegrav, Interior,
3.620; 13. Bailey Hapney, Quinn, 3.660;14.
Sierra Correll, Edgemont, 3.750
•Bull Riding: 1. Dayton Spiel, Parade,
70; 2. Reder, 69; 3. Nolan Hall, Timber Lake,
65
•Goat Tying: 1. Rickie Engesser,
Spearfish, 8.850; 2. Becca Lythgoe, Colton,
8.130; 3. Kailey Rae Sawvell, Quinn, 8.220;
4. Carlee Johnston, Elm Springs, 8.300; 5.
Cedar Jandreau, Kennebec, 8.450; 6.
Pauley, Wall, 8.600; 7. Tricia Wilken,
Meadow, 8.20; 8. Cheyenne Severson, Ray-
mond,, 9.010; 9. Knippling, 9.150; 10. Ryder
Heitz, Newell, 9.170; 11. Tibbs, 9.240; 12.
Taya Heisinger, Parkston, 9.430; 13. F.
Ward, 9.540; 14. Kaitlin Peterson, Sturgis,
9.590
•Pole Bending: 1. Sierra Price, Mud
Butter, 20.530; 2. Kellsey Collins, Newell,
20.796; 3. Joeni Lueders, Spearfish, 10.819;
4. Jordan Bickel, Trail City, 20.820; 5. Bail-
lie Mutchler, Whitewood, 20.930; 6. Becca
Lythgoe Colton, 20.976; 7. Maddie Garrett,
Nisland, 21.044; 8.Rau, 21.051; 9. O’Leary,
21.068; 10. Pauley, 21.080; 11. Josey Aasby,
Highmore, 21.124; 12. Brandi Cwach, Ged-
des, 21.251; 13. Maddie Schaack, Clark,
21.261; 14. Bailey Moody, Letcher, 21.289;
15. Kaycee Monnens, Watertown, 21.409
•Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Kash Deal,
Dupree, 71; 2. Teal Schmidt, Sturgis, 64; 3.
Jordan Hunt, Faith 62; 2. (tie) Collin Car-
roll, Harrold and Reece Jensen, Newell, 54
•Steer Wrestling: 1. Jace Christiansen,
Flandreau, 5.920; 2. Jake Fulton, Valentine,
Neb., 5.970; 3. Prestyn Novak, Newell,
6.050; 4. Andy Nelson, Spearfish, 6.630; 5.
Nolan Richie, Bristol, 6.780; 6. Tucker
Chytka, Belle Fourche, 7.040; 7. Cameron
Fanning, Olivet, 7.670; 8. Connor McNenny,
Sturgis, 7.770; 9. Casey Heninger, Ft.
Pierre, 8.440; 10. Wyatt Schaack, Wall,
8.470; 11. Max Teigen, Camp Crook 9.230;
12. Tyler Gaer, Newell, 10.530; 13. Jacob
Kammerer, Philip, 11.300; 14. Clint Stangle,
Caputa, 12.840; 15. Wyatt Fulton, St.
Lawrence, 13.670
•Team Roping: 1. Gaer/Carson Musick,
Pierre, 7.250; 2. T. Schaack/Levi Lord, Stur-
gis, 7.470; 3. Dalton Sheridan, Faith/Lane
Foster, Meadow, 8.260; 4. Klay O’Daniel,
Kadoka/Samuel Boldon, Oglala, 8.360; 5.
Colby Hetzel, Lemmon/Cash Hetzel, Lem-
mon, 9.340; 6. Grady Egly, Oelrichs/James
Kirwan, Bonesteel, 10.350; 7. Kaiden White
Bear, Sturgis/Till Olson, Whitewood, 11.400;
8. Lee Sivertsen, Ree Heights/Dean Chris-
tensen, Beresford, 11.610; 9. Thomas Doolit-
tle, Midland/ Gunner Hook, Kadoka, 13.120;
10. Taylor Tupper, St. Onge/Cyler Dowling,
Newell, 14.440; 11. Lane Blasius, Wall/Car-
son Johnston, Elm Springs, 14.630; 12. Jace
Christiansen, Flandreau/Kayla Hemming-
son, Bradley, 15.000; 13. Max Teigen, Camp
Crook/Alex Giannonatti, Buffalo, 15.020; 13.
Elsie Fortune, Interior/Herbie O’ Daniel,
Kadoka, 15.470; 15. 6. Sloan Anderson,
White Horse/Nolan Hall, Timber Lake,
15.500;
•Tie Down Roping: 1. T. Schaack,
10.370; 2. Sivertsen, 11.460; 3. Tyus Olson,
Mud Butte, 12.070; 4. J. Fulton, 12.240; 5.
Jade Schmidt, Box Elder, 12.320; 6. Matt
Nelson, Colman, 12.560; 7. Blasius, 12.620;
8. Tyen Palmer, Dupree, 13.230; 9. Cyler
Dowling, 13.430; 10. W. Fulton, 13.870; 11.
Jace Philipsen, New Underwood, 14.530; 12.
Pearson Wientjes, Mound City, 14.840; 13.
Kenneth Carmichael, Faith, 15.360; 14.
Seth Anderson, Hurley, 15.900; 15. Musick,
16.030
Second Go
•Bareback Riding: 1. Tayte Clark,
Meadow, 69; 2. O’Connell, 66; 3. Trig Clark,
Meadow
•Barrel Racing: 1. Alyssa Lockhart,
Oelrichs, 17.173; 2. Rau, 17.435; 3 Vinson,
17.468; 4. Joeni Lueders, Spearfish, 17.479;
5. Brooke Howell, Belle Fourche, 17.574; 6.
Word, 17.623; 7. T. Engesser, 17.632; 8.
Lammers, 17.643; 9. O’Leary, 17.700; 10.
Bothwell, 17.905; 11. Torrie Michels,
Mitchell, 17.959; 12. Kaitlin Peterson, Stur-
gis, 18.080; 13.Webb, 18.140; 14. Leonhart,
18.159; 15. Kara Robbins, Aurora, 18.196
•Breakaway Roping: 1. Tibbs, 2.250;
2. Woodward, 2.510; 3. Rutten, 2.560; 4.
Barry, 2.660; 5. Cassidy Mutchler, White-
wood, 2.770; 6. Lamphere, 2.790; 7. Lenseg-
rav, 2.930; 8. Howell, 3.210; 9. Jayce Hupp,
Huron, 3.330; 10. Lockhart, 3.360; 11. C.
Christensen, 2.650; 12. Miller, 3.670; 13.
Ferguson, 2.720; 14. Jandreau, 3.810; 15.
Jordan Tierney, Oral, 3.910.
•Bull Riding: 1. Casey Heninger, Ft.
Pierre, 74; 2. Jake Frazier, White Horse, 73;
3. (tie) Hall and Jake Rozell, Mansfield, 69;
4. Dylan Riggins, Kadoka, 60
•Goat Tying: 1. R. Engesser, 7.710; 2.
F. Ward, 8.250; 3. Johnston, 8.520; 4.
Hupp, 8.590; 5. Mazee Pauley, 8.750; 6.
Lockhart, 8.800; 7. Jandreau, 8.880; 8.
Knippling, 9.100; 9. (tie) Smith, Mattee
Pauley, 9.300; 10. Allison Vizecky, Brandt,
9,340; 11. R.J. Rutten, 9.370; 12. Lythgoe,
9.650; 13. Michels, 9.740
•Pole Bending: 1. Howell, 20.282; 2.
Jana Hunt, 10.426; 3. Moody, 20.584; 4. Vin-
son, 20.586; 5. Webb, 20.739; 6. Bickel,
20.952; 7. Johnston, 20.993; 8. Mazee
Pauley, 21.131; 9. Maclyn Hauck, Belle
Fourche, 21.846; 10. Kendra Kannas, Hayti,
21.197; 11. Kassidy Boyd, Sioux Falls,
21.214; 12. Ryan, 21.447; 13. T. Engesser,
21.493; 14. Monnens, 21.530; 15. Leonhart,
21.583
•Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Tayte Clark,
Meadow, 70; 2. Jordan Hunt, 61; 3. Kash
Deal, Dupree, 56; 4. Maier, 48; 5. Paul
Kruse, Interior, 41
•Steer Wrestling: 1. Gaer, 4.610; 2.
Novak, 5.020; 3. A. Nelson, 5.490; 4. Justin
Boll, Hartford, 5.720; 5. Fanning, 7.530; 6.
Michael Deichert, Spearfish, 8.410; 7.
Kaiden White Bear, Sturgis, 8.560; 8. Kam-
merer, 10.270; 9. Richie, 12.040; 10. (tie) R.
Rutten and Brendon Porch, Kadoka, 15.130;
11. Tyus Olson, Mud Butte, 15.200; 12. Tay-
lor Tupper, St. Onge, 19.950; 13. Herbie O’-
Daniel, Kadoka, 21.770; 14. Clay Bernstein,
23.849
•Team Roping: 1. Tate Thompson,
Ethan/Braden Pirrung, Hartford, 6.430; 2.
T. Engesser/Deichert, 7.330; 3. Seth Ander-
sen Hurley/Wyatte Andersen Hurley, 8.370;
4. Tupper/Cyler Dowling, 8.680; 6. T.
Schaack/L. Lord, 10.970; 7. Wyatt Mann,
Box Elder/ Novak, 13.250; 8. Reed John-
son/Jones, 13,050; 9. Gaer/Musick, 13420;
Doolittle/ Hook, 14.330; 10. Anderson/Hall,
14.640; 11. (tie) Rance Johnson/Kammerer,
and Fischer/M. Nelson, 15.080; 12. Jordan
Hunt/ Josh Hunt, 15.230; 13. Carter Kud-
luck, Belle Fourche/T. Chytka,19.460; 14.
Colby Hetzel/ Cash Hetzel, 20.290
•Tie Down Roping: 1. T. Schaack,
9.620; 2. S. Andersen, 12.010; 3. Caden
Packer, Sturgis, 12.760; 4. Reed Johnson,
12.800; 5. W. Andersen, 13.370; 6. Egly,
13.620; 7. L. Blasius, 13.940; 8. Carson
Johnston, Elm Springs, 14.710; 9. Trainor,
15.000; 10. R. Rutten, 15.200; 11. K. O’-
Daniel, 16.410; 12. Sterling Gehrke, Castle-
wood, 16.510; 13. Cole Schneider, Brookings,
17.040; 14. J. Fulton, 17.100; 16. Lathan
Lauing, Oral, 17.140
•Boys Cutting: 1. Josh Hunt, 144; 2.
Kenneth Carmichael, Belle Fourche, 141; 3.
(tie) Schaack and H. O’Daniel, Kadoka, 140;
4. (tie) Christensen, Peterson, and True
Buchhoz, Kadoka, 139; 5. Stangle, 137; 6. J.
Crago, 136; 7. (tie) Baker, Musick and Jeb
Hunt, Faith, 135; 8. (tie) Whitney, and
Maier, 131; 9. Sawyer Strand, Harrisburg,
130
•Girls Cutting: 1. (tie) Lensegrav and
Webb, 145; 2. Kenzy, 144; 3. Bothwell, 143;
4. Strand, 142; 5 (tie) Ryan and K. Peterson,
Sturgis, 141; 6. (tie) Lamphere and Karisa
Odenbach, Hamill, 1239; 7. (tie) T. Nelson,
Keanna Ward, Fruitdale, and Batie, 137;
8.(tie) March and Emma Lutter, Zell, 136
Short Go
•Bareback Riding: 1. O’Connell, 66; 2.
Trig Clark, 62; 3. J.D, Anderson, Hill City,
53; 4. Reed Johnson, 48
•Average: 1. O’Connell; 2. Trig Clark; 3.
Tayte Clark; 4. Anderson; 5. Reder; 6. John-
son
•Total Points: 1. O’Connell, 2. Trig
Clark, 3. Tayte Clark, 4. Anderson, 5. Reder,
6. Johnson
•Barrel Racing: 1. T. Engesser,
17.325; 2. Bothwell, 17.329; 3. Webb, 17.487;
4. Vinson, 17.544; 5. Lammers, 17.622; 6. T.
Nelson, 17.660; 7. F .Ward, 17.847; 8. Rau,
17.907; 9. Word, 18.187; 10. Lockhart,
18.255
•Average: 1. T. Engesser, 2. Lammers, 3.
Rau, 4. Bothwell, 5. O’Leary, 6. Word, 7. T.
Nelson, 8. Vinson, 9. Lockhart, 10. Webb
•Total Points: 1. T. Engesser, 2. Lam-
mers, 3. Rau, 4. O’Leary, 5. Bothwell, 6.
Vinson, 7. Word, 8. T. Nelson, 9. Webb, 10.
Mazee Pauley, 11. Lockhart, 12. Wolles, 13.
F. Ward, 14. R. Engesser, 15. Mattee Pauley
•Breakaway Roping: 1. Knippling,
2.220; 2. Woodward, 2.710; 3. Lockhart,
4.220; 4. Elsie Fortune, Interior, 4.900; 5.
Howell, 5.290; 6. Hupp, 8.360; 7. Chris-
tensen, 12.130; 8. Barry, 14.950; 9. Lam-
phere, 18.050; 10. R.J. Rutten 19.590
•Average: 1. Lockhart, 2. Howell, 3.
Hupp, 4. Christensen, 5. Barry, 6. Lam-
phere, 7. Knippling, 8. Woodward, 9. Miller,
10. Lensegrav
•Total Points: 1. Woodward, 2. Chris-
tensen, 3. Lockhart, 4. Howell, 5. Barry, 6.
Knippling, 7. Hupp, 8. Lamphere, 8. R.J.
Rutten, 10. Fortune, 11. Miller, 12. K. Ward,
13. Lensegrav, 14. Hapney, 15. Tibbs
•Bull Riding: 1. Scott Shoemaker, Greg-
ory, 67
•Average: 1. Hall, 2. Heninger, 3. Fra-
zier, 4. Spiel, 5. (tie) Reder and Rozell; 6.
Riggins •Total Points: 1. Hall, 2. Fra-
zier, 3. Heninger, 4. Spiel, 5. Shoemaker, 6.
Reder, 7. Rozell, 8. J. Peterson, 9. Riggins;
10, J.D. Phelps, Porcupine
•Goat Tying: 1.Barry, 7.690; 2. T. En-
gesser, 7.850; 3. Johnston, 8.160; 4. Mazee
Pauley, 8.170; 5. Sawvell, 8.480; 6. Hupp,
8.490; 7. Jandreau, 9.100; 8. K. Peterson,
9.540; 9. Smith, 14.130; 10. Remi Wientjes,
Onida, 16.370
•Average: 1. Johnston, 2. Mazee Pauley,
3. Jandreau, 4. K. Peterson, 5. Hupp, 6. T.
Engesser, 7. Smith, 8. Wientjes, 9. R. En-
gesser, 10. Sawvell
•Total Points: 1. Johnston, 2. Jandreau,
3. Mazee Pauley, 4. R. Engesser, 5. Hupp, 6.
T. Engesser, 7. F. Ward, 8. K. Peterson, 9.
Smith, 10. Knippling, 11. Sawvell, 12. Barry,
13. Wientjes, 14. Heiberger, 15. Wilken
•Pole Bending: 1. Collins, 20.212; 2.
Howell, 20.583; 3. Mazee Pauley, 20.678; 4.
Hunt, 20.843; 5. Monnens, 20.849; 6. Lyth-
goe, 20.885; 7. Moody, 20.877l; 8. Wientjes,
21.060; 9. Lockhart, 21.244. 10. Logan
Moody, Letcher, 21.30
•Average: 1. B. Moody, 2. Mazee Pauley,
3. Bickel, 4. Monnens, 5. L. Moody, 6. How-
ell, 7. Hunt, 8. Collins, 9. Lythgoe, 10. Vin-
son
•Total Points: 1. Bickel, 2. Mazee
Pauley, 3. (tie) B. Moody and Hunt, 4. How-
ell, 5. Lythgoe, 6. Collins, 7. Monnens, 8.
Vinson, 9. L. Moody, 10. Sierra Price, Mud
Butte, 11. Lueders, 12. (tie) Lockhart and
Johnston, 13. B. Mutchler
•Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Hunt, 67; 2.
Teal Schmidt, Sturgis, 56; 3. Tayte Clark,
55; Carroll, 48
•Average: 1. Hunt, 2. Deal, 3. Tayte
Clark, 4. T. Schmidt, 5. Carroll, 6. Jensen,
7. Maier, 8. Kruse
•Total Points: 1. Hunt, 2. Deal, 3. Tayte
Clark, 4. T. Schmidt, 5. Carroll, 6. Kruse, 7.
Maier, 8. Bill Chauncey, Mission; 9. Jensen,
10. Miles Kreeger, Lake Andes
•Steer Wrestling: 1. Gaer, 6.520; 2. J.
Fulton, 8.180; 3. Christiansen, 8.930; 4.
Clay Bernstein, 15.400; 5. T. Chytka,
19.440; 6. Fanning, 21.30; 7. A. Nelson,
21.860; 8. Kammerer, 24.220
•Average: 1. Gaer, 2. A. Nelson, 3. Fan-
ning, 4. Kammerer, 5. Clay Bernstein, 6.
Novak, 7. J. Fulton, 8. Christiansen, 9.
Richie, 10. White Bear
•Total Points: 1. Fanning, 2. A. Nelson,
3. Gaer, 4. J. Fulton, 5. Kammerer, 6. Chris-
tiansen, 7. Clay Bernstein, 8. Novak, 9.
Richie, 10. T. Chytka, 11. Boll, 12. White
Bear, 13. Stangle, 14. Deichert, 15. W. Ful-
ton
•Team Roping: 1. Fischer/M. Nelson,
9.560; 2. Tupper/Cyler Dowling, 18.560; 3.
Gaer/Musick, 21.600; 4. Sheridan/Foster,
22.860; 5. T. Schmidt/Baker, 29.870
•Average: 1. Tupper/Cyler Dowling, 2.
Gaer/Musick, 3. Fischer/M. Nelson/ 4. T.
Schaack/L. Lord; 5. Doolittle/Hook, 6. Sheri-
dan/Foster, 78. Thompson/Pirrung, 8. T. En-
gesser/Deichert, 9.K. O’Daniel/Bolton, 10.
S. Andersen/W. Andersen
•Total Points: Gaer/Musick, 2. T.
Schmidt/L. Lord, 3. Tupper/Cyler Dowling,
4. Fischer/M. Nelson, 5. Sheridan/Foster, 6.
Thompson/Pirrung, 8. Doolittle/Hook, 9. S.
Andersen/W. Andersen, 10. T. Engesser/De-
ichert, 11. Mann/Novak, 12. T. Schmidt/
Baker, 13. Rance Johnson/Kammerer, 14.
Connor McNenny, Sturgis/Jade Schmidt,
Sturgis, 15. Reed Johnson/Jones
•Tie Down Roping: 1. Egly, 10.920; 2.
Lee Sivertson, Ree Heights, 12.780; 3. Reed
Johnson, 13.510; 4. J. Fulton, 13.650; 5.
Johnston, 14.970; 6. Packer, 16.790; 7. T.
Schaack, 17.900;8. Pearson Wientjes,
Mound City, 17.900; 9. S. Andersen, 20.640;
10. Cody Bernstein, 20.890
•Average: 1. T. Schaack, 2. Egly, 3. J.
Fulton, 4. Johnston, 5. S. Andersen, 6. P.
Wientjes, 7. Packer, 8. Sivertson, 9. Reed
Johnson, 10. Blasius
•Total Points: T. Schaack, 2. Egly, 3. J.
Fulton, 4. Johnston, 5. S. Andersen, 6. Reed
Johnson, 7. Blasius, 8., 9. Sivertson, 10. P.
Wientjes, 11. Richie, 12. J. Schmidt, 13.
Cody Bernstein, 14. Carmichael, 15. Trainor
•Boys Cutting: 1. C. Crago, 144; 2.
Buchholz, 140; 3. T. Schaack, 138; 4. Escott,
136; 5. Baker, 133; 6. Stangle, 125; 7. J. Pe-
terson, 125; 8. H. O’Daniel, 124; 9.
Carmichael, 123; 10. J. Crago, 63
•Average: 1. T. Schaack, 2. Stangle, 3. J.
Peterson, 4. (tie) J. Crago and Buchholz, 45.
Escott, 6. Baker, 7. Josh Hunt, 8. Chris-
tensen, 9. C. Crago
•Total Points/Season Winners: 1.
Schaack, 2. Josh Hunt, 3. J. Crago and
Buchholz, 4. Stangle, 5. Escott, 6. Chris-
tensen, 7. Peterson, 8. C. Crago, 9. Whitney,
10. Baker
•Girls Cutting: 1. Kenzy, 147; 2. T.
Nelson, 144; 3. Lutter, 141; 4. Ryan, 140; 5.
Bothwell, 136; 6 (tie) March and K. Ward,
133; 7. Robertson, 129; 8. Peterson, 126; 9.
F. Ward, 125
•Average: 1. Kenzy, 2. (tie) Bothwell and
Ryan, 3. T. Nelson, 4. March, 5. Robertson,
6. K. Ward, 7. F. Ward, 8. Strand, 9. Webb
•Total Points/Season Winners: 1.
Kenzy, 2. Bothwell, 3. Ryan, 4. (tie) Lenseg-
rav and Strand; 5. T. Nelson, 6. March, 7.
Webb, 8. K. Ward, 9. Robertson
For complete results go online to
www.sdhsra.com; click on Regional
and State Results.
A new law making it illegal for
young drivers to use a cell phone
while driving takes effect on Mon-
day, July 1, South Dakota Depart-
ment of Public Safety officials re-
mind citizens.
The law, passed by the 2013 Leg-
islature, prohibits anyone who
holds a learner’s permit or a re-
stricted minor’s permit from using
any handheld communication de-
vice while driving. Generally, such
permits are issued to persons be-
tween the ages of 14 and 18.
“Young people still gaining expe-
rience with driving really need to
avoid any distractions,’’ said Jenna
Howell, director of Legal and Reg-
ulatory Services for Public Safety.
“Driving is a full-time responsibil-
ity for all of us. That is especially
true for our younger drivers who
are still trying to get comfortable
behind the wheel of a vehicle. The
law emphasizes the need to pay at-
tention to the road.’’
Legal sale of fireworks in South
Dakota began on Thursday, June
27, and Fire Marshal Paul Merri-
man is urging residents to be safe
and sensible as they celebrate In-
dependence Day.
“Fireworks have long been a tra-
ditional part of the Fourth of July
celebration in South Dakota, but
every year we have a few injuries
and some unintentional fires,’’
Merriman said.
“While much of the state has ex-
perienced much-needed moisture
in recent months, we still caution
anyone using fireworks to cooper-
ate in keeping us all safe and fire-
free. Common sense goes a long
way.’’
The 2013 South Dakota Legisla-
ture changed state law to allow the
discharge of fireworks from June
27 until the Sunday after July 4.
This year, that means it’s legal to
discharge fireworks through Sun-
day, July 7. Previously, July 5 was
the legal end date for use of fire-
works in the state.
Individual cities may adopt
stricter limits on use of fireworks,
and Merriman suggests citizens
check local ordinances and regula-
tions.
He also said staff with the State
Fire Marshal’s Office will be out
during the legal sales period in-
specting retail fireworks stands to
Fire marshal urges Fourth
of July fireworks safety
make sure the products being of-
fered for sale in South Dakota are
legal consumer fireworks.
“We aren’t trying to take the fun
out of the holiday, but we do want
to make sure the fireworks being
sold meet legal requirements,’’
Merriman said.
The National Fire Protection As-
sociation says recent statistics
show that nationally in 2010 fire-
works caused an estimated 1,100
structure fires, 300 vehicle fires
and 14,100 outside and other fires
with eight civilian deaths and $36
million in property damage. The
risk of fireworks injury was high-
est for children age 5 - 14, the as-
sociation said.
Merriman offered a few simple
safety tips:
•Follow the instructions on the
product, avoid using fireworks in
places where a fire could start and
keep a source of water handy.
•Sparklers are popular with
younger children, but they can
cause painful burns and should be
used with adult supervision, Mer-
riman said.
Cell phone ban for young
drivers takes effect on July 1
A learner or instruction permit
allows the holder to drive between
the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. if
accompanied by a person who has
a valid driver license, is at least 18
years old and has at least one year
of driving experience. That person
must occupy a seat beside the
young driver.
A restricted minor’s permit al-
lows the holder to drive between 6
a.m. and 10 p.m. with permission
of a parent or guardian. The holder
of a restricted minor’s permit may
drive between the hours of 10 p.m.
and 6 a.m. if the parent or
guardian is in a seat next to the
driver.
The Legislature directed that
the new law be enforced as a sec-
ondary offense, meaning a young
driver would have to be stopped for
another offense before a ticket
could be issued for driving while
using a handheld communications
device.
Philadelphia's Independence Squ-
are. Twice that day the Declara-
tion was read to cheering crowds
and pealing church bells. Even the
bell in Independence Hall was
rung.
The "Province Bell" would later
be renamed "Liberty Bell" after its
inscription - Proclaim Liberty
Throughout All the Land Unto All
the Inhabitants Thereof.
And although the signing of the
Declaration was not completed
until August, the 4th of July has
been accepted as the official an-
The story of Independence Day and
America's birthday continued from page 1
niversary of United States inde-
pendence.
The first Independence Day cel-
ebration took place the following
year - July 4, 1777.
By the early 1800s, the tradi-
tions of parades, picnics, and fire-
works were established as the way
to celebrate America's birthday.
And although fireworks have
been banned in most places be-
cause of their danger, most towns
and cities usually have big fire-
work displays for all to see and
enjoy.
Subscription Rates:Local: $35
plus tax; Out-of-Area: $42 plus tax:
Out of-State: $42 or subscribe on-
line at:
www.RavellettePublications.com
South Dakotans who head to the
beach and the pool this summer
should take common sense precau-
tions to prevent water-borne ill-
nesses such as cryptosporidiosis,
says a state health official.
"Water sports are great physical
activities and we don't want to dis-
courage them but we do want peo-
ple to practice healthy swimming,"
said Bill Chalcraft, health protec-
tion administrator for the Depart-
ment of Health.
In 2012, South Dakota reported
113 cases of the diarrheal illness
caused by Cryptosporidium para-
sites. Through May of this year, 37
cases have been reported.
Chalcraft said beaches, pools,
hot tubs and waterparks can be
contaminated by runoff, the pres-
ence of chlorine resistant germs, or
poor maintenance. Contamination
can also result when individuals
with diarrhea use recreational wa-
ters. People at high risk for recre-
ational water illnesses include the
young, the elderly, pregnant
women, and the immunosup-
pressed.
Chalcraft offered the following
Prevent recreational
water illness this summer
prevention tips for all swimmers:
•Shower with soap before swim-
ming and wash your hands after
using the toilet or changing dia-
pers. Wash your children thor-
oughly with soap before swim-
ming.
•Don’t swim when you have di-
arrhea.
•Don’t swallow pool water.
•Take young children on bath-
room breaks and check diapers at
least every hour.
•Change diapers in a bathroom
or a diaper-changing area and not
poolside.
•Use sunscreen with at least
SPF 15 and UVA and UVB protec-
tion, reapplying after swimming.
•Change out of wet swimwear
and shower thoroughly after swim-
ming.
Parents should keep an eye on
children at all times when near the
water and avoid using water wings
and other swimming aids in place
of life jackets.
Learn more about healthy swim-
ming at www.cdc.gov/healthyswim
ming.
Two BiT Saloon &
STeakhouSe SpecialS
happy hour
4:30 p.m.-6 p.m. & 9 p.m.-10 p.m.
Monday through Thursday
$2 Beers (Standard Beers)
50¢ off Mixed Drinks,
Specialty Beers & wine
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Daily Specials
Serving 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Mondays & Tuesdays:
Hamburger or Brat, Salad
& Chips…$6.00
(with a FREE reg. beer or pop)
Wednesdays: Prime Rib Sandwiches
Thursdays: Steak Tips or Pig Wings
Fridays & Saturdays: Full Menu
386-2115 • Quinn, SD
$12 Beer Bucket
Special ~ Fridays & Saturdays
(5 regular beers)
Must be purchased by the Bucket.
annc@
gwtc.net
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Shirrise Linn
Tuesday, Clyde Arneson at-
tended Ernest Delbridge’s funeral
at Union Center. Sunday, Clyde
was a supper guest at Morris
Linn’s and partook in Laken Linn’s
first birthday party with cake and
ice cream.
Visitors Sunday at Lonnie and
Teri Arneson’s was Teri’s daughter
Kylie from Rapid City with her
friend Jesse and Nathan (Jesse's
son). Town kids sure want to do a
lot in one day! We had a barbecue,
fished, swam the river, toured part
of the ranch…just not enough time
in the day! Lonnie was busy hay-
ing this weekend, and we are so
thankful for having hay to put up.
Teri reports she finally got caught
up on the yard work.
Freddie Ferguson’s only news
was, he reports, delicious Laken
Linn birthday cake he received
Monday.
Peggy Gravatt has been busy
working in Wasta, haying, and get-
ting ready for more company.
John and Jean Linn attended
Mary Wilson’s 80th birthday open
house in Piedmont, Sunday after-
noon. They spent Sunday night in
Rapid City with Charlie and Carol
Linn before keeping appointments
Monday. They also visited Char-
lotte Wilsey.
There were lots of milestones in
the Linn household this week.
Along with Laken Linn’s first
birthday celebration on Sunday,
Laken also took her very first
steps. Kassandra Linn spent Tues-
day at Ashlyn Simons’ house. She
then spent Wednesday afternoon
visiting Celine Trask. Conner and
Tiff Knuppe accompanied Shirrise
and the girls to Rapid City, Friday,
for errands and lunch. Shirrise
and the girls attended Conner
Knuppe’s last baseball game in
Box Elder, Saturday morning, be-
fore having lunch with all the
Knuppe family.
Stephanie Trask was joined by a
gaggle of Trasks and Bruchs for
the Baptism of her new little girl,
Winifred Esther, Saturday evening
after Mass at St. Margaret's
Church in Lakeside. Afterwards,
Fr. Hausmann, Ray Olson, and
Tyler Wilson, as well as the Elk
Creek Trasks, came over to Pat
and Rose Mary's for supper. Dr.
Dana Lagaly, DVM, of Mobridge
came to visit Dr. Julie Trask Sun-
day, on her way back home from
the Hills.
Nena, Wade, Trey, and Laynie
Nyberg visited Wes and Gladys
Wilburn, Sunday.
Keith and Darlene Wilson from
Harlingen, Texas, visited at the
Jim Wilsey home on Saturday.
Zack Wilsey and Caroline visited
Marion and Betty Wilson at the
New Underwood Care Center on
Wednesday.
Saturday, Kenny and Janet Wil-
son attended a family picnic at
Canyon Lake Park to help Mary
Wilson celebrate her 80th Birth-
day. They also had a great motor-
cycle ride through the Black Hills
on Sunday.
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Ahhh! Wasta on a beautiful
summer sunday morning. A cloud
check early this morning put me in
mind of a favorite kindergarten
artwork project.
Maybe you remember the bits of
cotton pasted on construction
paper to represent snow? Little
bits of white cotton fluff — that’s
how the clouds appeared to me
early this morning.
Ahhh! If everyone in the world
felt as blessed to be in their world
as I feel to be in mine, do you think
we would ever need to go to war?
The necessary activities toward
the July 4th Independence Day
gathering is taking up much of my
time these past weeks, but there is
some news to share in addition to
upcoming plans for the Fourth.
The Hadlocks had visiting
“kids”. Melody and Pad O’Neil ar-
rived Friday, the 21st, for time
with Gay and Dick and to cele-
brate their 28th anniversary. Their
choices of places to go included the
Black Hills and a helicopter ride
(Melody’s) first to see Mt. Rush-
more up close and personal. Dick
said that it’s a real thrill for
Melody. A good time for the four of
them. The days were good, but too
soon the O’Neils returned home to
Rockford, Ill.
Ash Grenstiner had a birthday
on Friday, the 28th. Plans included
friends who came to Wasta and a
backyard camp-out that night.
Dad, Travis, brought pizza and
Ash, Madi and friends, Kassidy
Sawvell and Abby Moon, helped
celebrate Ash’s twelfth birthday.
Plans for some family activities
over the next few days were also
part of the birthday. Happy
Twelfth Birthday from us, Ash. We
love you — Lloyd and Margee.
Speaking of Wasta kids, I
haven’t seen Kelly Green all sum-
mer! Where are you, Kelly?
I hope to have seen or we’ll see
all of you in Wasta, July 4th, as we
celebrate our country’s Independ-
ence Day!
Happy Trails!
P.S. It seems strange to be get-
ting ready for Wasta’s July 4th
without Dorothy Bathel, who was
always such a big part. Hope you
are enjoying living in Philip. We
may just come over!
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Steve Eisenbraun’s sister and
brother-in-law, Claudia and Dave
Keyser, from New Braunfels,
Texas, their daughter, Jennifer
Neary and her two girls, Celestine
and Annaliese of Seattle, Wa., ar-
rived for a visit in the Steve and
Gayle Eisenbraun home on Mon-
day, June 17th. They attended the
Albert Eisenbraun Reunion in
Rapid City on Wednesday, June
19th, and the Peter Eisenbraun
Reunion the following Saturday at
the Creighton Hall. On Sunday,
June 23rd, Marilyn Keyser joined
everyone for a barbecue at the
Gary and Ruby Keyser home, and
on Wednesday, June 26th, Nadia,
Noah and Emma Eisenbraun, who
had just returned from visiting
Nadia’s family in the Slovak Re-
public the night before, joined
everyone for supper in the Norman
and Marsha Eisenbraun home. On
Friday, June 28th, Claudia and
Dave’s son Nick Keyser, his wife
Jamie and their two sons, Tate and
Jackson; and their daughter Misty
Keyser Wartsbaugh, her husband
Kevin and two daughters, Maddie
and Katie, arrived for a barbecue
with Todd, Nadia, Noah and
Emma Eisenbraun at Steve and
Gayle’s home. The Keysers all then
attended the Keyser Reunion at
Spokane Creek in the Black Hills.
They left for home on Sunday,
June 30th.
The Keyser family reunion of
the Clarence Keyser who gets to-
gether every other year on odd
numbered years gathered this past
weekend of June 28, 29 and 30,
2013. They all went to a location
on the edge of Custer State Park to
be together. The families came
from California, Iowa, Minnesota,
Missouri, Texas, Washington, Wis-
consin and all corners of South
Dakota. The oldest was Dale
Keyser (the youngest of the origi-
nal family) at the age of 94 and the
youngest was 18 months. There
were several families of four gen-
erations.
Saturday, a local photographer
(Carla Brucklacher) came and took
some radom pictures and of some
of the four generations who were
there. These will be in a memory
book later.
Then in the afternoon, the
Haakon County Crooners came by
to entertain us and were invited
for the evening meal. Sunday, after
breakfast, together the group
broke up to continue vacations,
visiting other relations and to re-
turn to homes and work. We will
return in two years 2015.
Pam Blakesley, Lalainya Ren-
npferd and girls stopped in Wall on
their way back to Minnesota.
Al and Carol Hodge attended
the Keyser family reunion in the
hills this past weekend. Carol
Anne is the daughter of Wayne
Keyser.
The Keyser family had a reunion
south of Keystone, Friday, Satur-
day and everyone left Sunday after
breakfast. Family came from
Longbeach, California, Washing-
ton state, Texas, Missouri and
Iowa. About 73 people were in at-
tendance.
Have a safe and wonderful 4th
of July!
Linda Eisenbraun’s brother, sis-
ter-in-law and niece from Okla-
homa visited them last week, stay-
ing three days.
For July, Wall Art Guild’s se-
lected “Artist of the Month” is
Jereanne Hanks of Cottonwood.
Her work is displayed at the First
Interstate Bank, Wall. Congratu-
lations, Jereanne.
Sunday, a group of young people
and their chaperones from North
Carolina stopped for worship serv-
ices at the Methodist Church.
They were on their way to Pine
Ridge.
John and Renee Rhynard of
Newell visited George and Lorna
Moore on Wednesday.
Gerald and Esther Wolford vis-
ited their daughter Amy and Terry
Beers at Howard, last week.
Lloyd, Patsy Williams and fam-
ily of Texas, spent last week here
visiting relatives — Leslie, Lyle
and Marvin Williams and families.
Lloyd and Patsy used to live in
Quinn and hadn’t been here in
many years. Lloyd’s parents were
the late Bud and Cecile Williams.
This is probably old news but
Elmer “Bud” Estes and his daugh-
ter Dawna Tsitrian attended the
funeral for Rosie Lejeune in Philip
a while back. Rosie’s last name
was “Humphrey” at the time the
Estess knew her and she was an
employee of theirs at the Gamble
Store. That has been a few years!
Orlin and Lourine Winkowitsch,
along with Lourine’s daughter
Renee, attended church in Wall on
Sunday. It was good to see Orlin
“out and about”.
The Methodist Church had a
“family fishing day” after church
and fellowship time on Sunday. It
was a great day for it, weather-
wise — boat rides for kids, fishing
was good and plenty to eat. The
deer flies might have wanted in on
the “eat” part.
It has been reported that Jim
Estes of St. Paul, Minn., plans to
attend the Badlands Alumni pro-
gram during Wall’s Celebration,
July 13th. George and Marge Ten-
nyson of Rapid City also plan to at-
tend. Others just haven’t contacted
us but may be in other news items.
Jess Williams is home for a week
from Sioux Falls. It bet that time
will go by quickly for him.
Deb Williams’ daughter, Tara
and granddaughter Allyna of Geor-
gia, flew into the Denver airport.
Deb picked them up there so they
will spend a little time in South
Dakota.
Conrad and Kalie Kjerstad have
a baby boy born on Saturday
morning, June 29th. He has been
named Carsten Clayton, weighed
6 lbs. 5.4 oz. and measured 18 1/2
inches long. Grandparents are
Charlene and Clayton Kjerstad of
Wall; Carolyn Anders of Sturgis
and Stan Anders of Union Center.
Our congratulations and best of
wishes go out to the family.
Barb Coy of Sundance, stopped
to visit Charlene Kjerstad on her
way to Philip on Monday.
Muriel Kjerstad and her
boyfriend, Steve Yenulonis of
Custer, left for Ohio on Sunday
morning where Steve’s folks live.
Steve works for the Star Academy
in Custer.
Clayton and Charlene Kjerstad
celebrated their 40th wedding an-
niversary on Saturday. They were
joined by their immediate family
(except Conrad and Kalie) and all
went to Hill City. Our heartiest
congratulations go out to them.
Sunday, Darrell and Anita Pe-
terson of Philip had all of their
family home. Kelsie Naescher
came to Wall to get her grandma
Edith Paulsen so she could join
them.
Every week in the news there
seem to be reports of tragedies
that have happened. It is what
gets people to buy newspapers,
watch a certain channel of TV or
listen to a certain radio station.
They didn’t have to “build up” this
story — the bare facts made me
sick at heart…the death of 19 elite
firefighters in a wild fire in Ari-
zona is one of the worst things that
could happen. All of our firemen
are volunteers — let us tell them
they are appreciated!
“I do not think we have a ‘right”
to happiness. If happiness hap-
pens, say thanks.”
~Marlene Dietrich
Weather forecast doesn’t sound
to bad — no 100s forecast. May be
somewhat warmer for the 4th of
July — what did we expect?
Have a good week!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
0wncr Ir|r Hznscn · 505-2Î8-2881 · Wz||, 8P
Cedur Butte Air, 1nc.
AeriaI AppIication Service
Your IocoI
consuIfonf:
Sfocy 8ieImoier
ceII: 44I-ZZ09, home: Z79 -Z99o
SfocybieImoier.norwex.bi;
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
2?9-2S6S
/-ccnd /g lnc.
lrc-lcn Jchn-cn
27ÿ-55C5 · ¡¡ègwlc.ncl
· wall, ¬l ·
BeoK1 Po1rzebo, Agen1
lJl5 E. Vcíís Auc., Píc¡¡c, SD 5?5Ul
Hus. 224-4l?J Toíí F¡cc. S??-224-4l?J
IccIí¸IccIí¡ot¡zcIu.con
Summer nature camps for kids
Three state parks are hosting na-
ture day camps for kids ages 7-12.
The camps are a great way for kids
to explore the surrounding recre-
ation area and focus on the out-
doors.
Oakwood Lakes State Park near
Volga is hosting a day camp from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. CDT on Tuesday, July
9. Prepare for games, crafts and
campfire cooking! Call 605-627-
5441 to register.
“Track Detectives” at Angostura
Recreation Area near Hot Springs is
Wednesday, July 10, from 9:30 a.m.
to noon MDT. Learn about the many
animals of the area, how to identify
common animal tracks, and make
an animal track to take home. Call
605-745-6996 for more information
or to register.
Palisades State Park near Garret-
son will teach participants about
nocturnal animals with a hands-on
lesson, craft project, hike/walk and
games on July 11 at 9 a.m. CDT.
This qualifies as a Junior Naturalist
program. Call 605-394-3824 for
more information and to register.
While the camps are geared for
kids ages 7-12, younger children
may attend if accompanied by an
adult. Kids are reminded to wear
clothing appropriate for the
weather, and also bring bug spray,
drinking water and shoes comfort-
able for walking. Sandals are not
appropriate. No snacks or refresh-
ments will be provided, but kids are
welcome to bring their own. There is
no fee for the camp; however a park
entrance license is required to enter
state parks and recreation areas.
hair Bow Sale 3 for $5
New Western Style Purses
& Sandals just arrived
Snow ConeS
Buy 1 Get 1 FRee
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
July 4th: Closed
July 5th: Tacos
w/Chips
July 8th: Crispy Chicken Wrap
w/Fog Eye Salad
July 9th: Lasagna
w/Tossed Salad & Garlic Bread
July 10th: Indian Taco
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
You are invi ted to a baby shower
for
Carsten Clayton Kjerstad
(newborn son of Conrad & Kalie Kjerstad)
Sun., July 14, 2013 • 1:00 p.m.
Wall Golf Course Clubhouse
Everyone Welcome. No invitations are being sent.
Hosted by Aunt Rachel B., Aunt Laurie,
unt Muriel and Aunt Rachel K.
Registered at Target
Wall Drug Store
Now hiring…
•Food Service Cook
Full time position
Excellent Wages & Benefits
Contact Rick or Mike at:
605-279-2175 or pick-up an
application at www.walldrug.com
e-mail: Walldrug2@gwtc.net
Equal Opportunity Employer
Email your
social news,
obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Obituaries
wall Bldg.
center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship,
9 a.m., Sunday Worship Service,
10:30 a.m.; Mondays: Women’s Bible
Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann
279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community
Church • Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Dowling
Community Church
Memorial Day through
Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James
Harbert
Bible Study,
9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services,
10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic
Church
New Underwood
Father William
Zandri
Mass: Sundays at
11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at
9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan
Nursing Home;
Reconciliation
before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical
Lutheran Church Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m.,
Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd
number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even
number months
In lìkc manncr also, lhal
womcn adorn lhcmsclvcs
ìn modcsl aµµarcl, wìlh
shamclaccdncss and
sobrìcly; nol wìlh broìdcd
haìr, or gold, or µcarls, or
coslly array; Bul (whìch
bccomclh womcn
µrolcssìng godlìncss) wìlh
good works.
1 7ìmolhy 2:9-10
With so much focus on
fashion thcsc days, it can bc
casy to gct caught up in our
Iooks. Our Iooks, howcvcr,
arc not going to gct us into
hcavcn. lt's thc bcauty on thc
insidc that counts with God.
BcIicvc in Him, Iivc for Him
and ctcrnaI Iifc wiII bc yours.
279-2175
In this nation we are free to
enjoy so many wonderful opportu-
nities. Ponder this if you will:
We have the freedom to think.
We have the freedom to believe as
we wish. We have the freedom to
dream and aspire to reach out and
touch those dreams. We have the
freedom to take a risk and fail. We
have the freedom to take a risk and
succeed. We have the freedom to
worship as we please. We have the
freedom to celebrate life in most
any manner that we can think up.
Let Freedom Ring!
With freedom comes responsibil-
ity. We must understand that this
freedom comes at a very high price.
The men and women who sacrificed
their lives so that we can be free is
a mighty price to pay. Let Freedom
Ring!
Freedom of choice is my favorite.
Our choices and decisions chart the
course for our lives and the paths
that we follow. If we ever lose our
freedom of choice we would be in a
very sad state of affairs. Let Free-
dom Ring!
Be of good cheer. The time is now
to pause and count the many free-
doms and opportunities that come
with those freedoms. Let Freedom
Ring!
This week, join me in celebrating
freedom, and when you do, take
time to reflect on what freedom re-
ally means to you. Let Freedom
Ring!
Let Freedom Ring!
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly moti-
vational seminars each year. Call
Bob for more details at 800-437-
9715 and be sure to check out
Bob’s website at: www.mratti-
tudespeaks.com
Note: The following article was printed in the July 3, 1969
Pennington County Courant.
“i pledge
allegiance…”
A memorable moment for all America occurred earlier
this year when Red Skelton, on his CBS-TV program, gave
the Pledge of Allegiance. As he repeated the Pledge, he
described this special meaning of each word as he was
once taught. Since then he has received thousands of re-
quests for copies. Here is the Pledge as he gave it. As you
read these words and explanations, the Pledge may have
a deeper meaning for you, too.
“I remember this one teacher, Mr. Lasswell was his
name. To me, he was the greatest teacher, a real sage of my
time. He had such wisdom. We were all reciting the Pledge
of Allegiance, and he walked over. He said: “I’ve been listen-
ing to you boys and girls recite the Pledge of Allegiance all
semester and it seems as though it is becoming monotonous
to you. If I may, may I recite it and try to explain to you the
meaning of each word:
I—me, an individual, a committee of one.
Pledge—dedicate all of my worldly goods to give without
self-pity.
Allegiance—my love and my devotion.
To the Flag—our standard, Old Glory, a symbol of free-
dom. Wherever she waves, there is respect because your loy-
alty has given her a dignity that shouts freedom is every-
body’s job.
Of the United—that means that we have all come to-
gether.
States—individual communities that have united into 48
great states. 48 individual communities with pride and dig-
nity and purpose, all divided with imaginary boundaries,
yet united to a common purpose, and that’s love for coun-
try.
Of America.
And to the Republic—a state in which sovereign power
is invested in representatives chosen by the people to gov-
ern. And government is the people and it's from the people
to the leaders, not from the leaders to the people.
For which it stands.
One nation—meaning, so blessed by God.
Indivisible—incapable of being divided.
With liberty—which is freedom and the right of power to
live one’s own life without threats or fear of some sort of re-
taliation.
And justice—the principal or quality of dealing fairly
with others.
For all—which means it’s as much your country as it is
mine.”
Since I was a small boy, two states have been added to
our country and two words have been added to the Pledge
of Allegiance—“under God.” Wouldn’t it be a pity if someone
said, “That’s a prayer” and that would be eliminated from
schools, too?
~Red Skelton
Melodee G. Bartsch_______________
Melodee Gay Bartsch, 58, of
Gillette, Wyo., died Friday, June
28, 2013 at Pioneer Manor, due to
complications from M.S.
Memorial Services were held
Tuesday, July 2, 2013 at Pioneer
Manor in Gillette, with Pastor Tom
Frey of Prince of Peace Church of-
ficiating.
Melodee was born on February
21, 1955 in McLaughlin, S.D. to
Elmer Schulz and Dorothy Herron.
Melodee enjoyed playing scrab-
ble, bingo, jenga and various other
games. She loved watching football
and good movies. Arts and Crafts
were one of her favorite activities
as well as reading books and she
always loved getting her nails
done.
A great passion she had was her
job as a greeter at Campbell
County Hospital where she always
had a big smile on her face and
constantly had a way of making
others smile as they passed her.
She was proud of her role as Pres-
ident for the Residential Council at
Pioneer Manor.
Melodee also enjoyed her work
she did in early childhood educa-
tion and substitute teaching. In
Beloit, Kansas she worked for the
Youth Center and also OCCK
which she enjoyed also. Melodee’s
top priority was being a great mom
to her daughters.
She is survived by her daugh-
ters: Amber (Adam) Loomis of
Jewell, Kan., Lacey (Mike) Villa-
mar of Lawrence, Kan; her grand-
children: Ayden, Ashlyn, and Avery
Loomis of Jewell, and Arabella Vil-
lamar of Lawrence; her brothers:
Tim (June) Schulz of Brandon,
S.D., Guy Schulz of Gillette, Tony
(Holly) Schulz and Troy (Gina)
Schulz, both of Wall, S.D.; her sis-
ters: Spring (Jerry) Walker of
Gillette, Holly (Steve) Keller of
Trail City, S.D., Stacey (Kevin)
Byrum of Gillette, Lisa (John)
Ocilka of Rapid City, S.D.
Melodee is preceded in death by
her husband, Tom Bartsch; her
parents, Elmer and Dorothy
Schulz; as well as several aunts,
uncles and grandparents.
Her final resting place will be in
Jewell, Kan., as a graveside serv-
ice is planned for a later date.
A memorial has been estab-
lished in Melodee’s name to benefit
Pioneer Manor. Memorials and
Condolences may be sent in care of
Walker Funeral Home, 410 Med-
ical Arts Court, Gillette, Wyoming
82716.
Condolences may also be sent
via the website www.walkerfuner-
algillette.com.
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
We want to thank everyone who
has shown their support while we
continue to apply for our
SD Farm Wine License.
With this license, we will only
have off-sale SD Wine. For those who might not
know or have not been in the Mocha Moose lately,
we are now carrying locally and SD made items.
Along with the Coffee Shop theme, we
thought bringing in SD Farm Wine we could
offer Gift Baskets to include coffee, wine and choco-
lates. Giving our locals a great gift idea
and offering our travelers a bit of South Dakota
to take home. We welcome everyone
in to see our plans and ideas.
Thank you again for your continued support,
and we will continue to support our locals.
Mocha Moose Family ~ “The Tices”
Thank You
CoNgratulatioNS & good luCk
to the kids who qualified for the
High School National Finals Rodeo
July 14-20, 2013
in Rock Springs, Wyoming.
Carson Johnston,
Carlee Johnston
& Mazee Pauley
We are proud of you!
WHS Rodeo Team
FINANCIAL FOCUS
PLAN AHEAD FoR YoUR
owN FINANcIAL
INDEPENDENcE DAY
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
This week, we celebrate Inde-
pendence Day with fireworks,
sparklers, picnics and parades.
Amidst the hoopla, though, it’s al-
ways important to reflect on the
many freedoms we enjoy in this
country. And as an individual, you
may want to use the occasion to
think of another type of independ-
ence you’d like to enjoy — financial
independence.
In some ways, we are living in a
time when attaining financial free-
dom is more difficult than it has
been for quite a while. We’re still
recovering from the bursting of the
housing bubble and the lingering
effects of the Great Recession. Fur-
thermore, wage stagnation is a
real problem. In fact, median in-
come for working-age households
— those headed by someone under
age 65 — actually slid 12.4 percent
from 2000 to 2011. Taken together,
these factors certainly impose
challenges on anyone seeking to
become financially independent
and eventually enjoy a comfortable
retirement.
Still, you need to do everything
you can to put yourself on the path
to financial independence. For
starters, make full use of whatever
resources are available to you. If
you have a 401(k) or similar retire-
ment plan at work, try to con-
tribute as much as you can possi-
bly afford — and every time you
get a raise in salary, increase your
contributions. At the very least,
put in enough to earn your em-
ployer’s matching contribution, if
one is offered. Also, within your
401(k) or similar plan, choose an
investment mix that offers you the
chance to achieve the growth you
will need to make progress toward
the type of retirement lifestyle
you’ve envisioned.
In addition to contributing to
your 401(k), you can also take ad-
vantage of another retirement ac-
count: a traditional or Roth IRA.
Like a 401(k), a traditional IRA
grows tax deferred, while a Roth
IRA can grow tax free, provided
you meet certain conditions. Plus,
you can fund your IRA with virtu-
ally any type of investment, in-
cluding stocks, bonds, certificates
of deposit and Treasury securities.
What else can you do to help
yourself move toward financial in-
dependence? For one thing, don’t
become dependent on “hot tips” or
other questionable financial advice
about The Next Big Thing in the
investment world from so-called
experts who often have poor prog-
nostication records. Even more im-
portantly, though, their advice
may simply be inappropriate for
your needs and risk tolerance.
Finally, consider these two sug-
gestions: Maintain adequate liq-
uidity and keep your debt levels as
low as possible. By having enough
cash reserves to cover unexpected
costs, such as a major car repair or
a new air-conditioning unit, you
won’t have to dip into your long-
term investments. And by keeping
your debt payments down, you’ll
have a stronger cash flow, which
means you’ll have more money
available to save and invest for
your future.
Each one of these suggestions
will require a commitment on your
part, along with a clear focus on
your goal of financial independ-
ence — there just aren’t any “short
cuts.” But with a consistent effort,
you can keep moving along on your
journey toward your own Financial
Independence Day.
Area News
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 6
Subscription Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax;
Out-of-Area: $42 plus
tax:
Out of-State: $42
or
subscribe online at:
www.Ravellette
Publications.com
The Spirit of Dakota Award So-
ciety is seeking nominations for
their 27th Anniversary award
presentation and celebration.
The recipient of this award will
be announced at a banquet at the
Email us with your news item or
photo to courant @ gwtc.net
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
Highlights from the Guptill family ranch tour
People gathered around the Belle Fourche Watershed Partner-
ship, rainfall simulator demonstrated by Matt Stollenberg.
One of the afternoon presentations at the Guptill 2013 ranch tour
was a rainfall simulatior demonstration presented by Matt Stol-
lenberg.The simulator looks at the impact and water runoff into
water relationships on crop land and rangeland. Different soil
samples are taken from croplands and pastures. They are
placed on trays where two inches of simulated rainfall is sprayed
on the samples. Runoff is then collected in jars where viewers
can see what happens to the landscape and better answer why
there is runoff. ~Photos Don Ravellette
This ground was completely dry on the bottom of about six
inches of soil you can tell in the gallon jug under the tilled
ground (second jug from the left) that the run off was the most
extreme.
Three trailers were taken out in the pastures for a ranch tour
after the welcome and awards presentation.
Guptills cattle graze in a controlled environment that is about as
wide as the cattle are in the picture and Guptill, said they are
moved approximately every two days. They use electric fences
to control them and water tanks are moved into the next pasture
where cattle follow easily.
Governor Dennis Daugaard has
received a report from Secretary
Pam Roberts, head of the South
Dakota Department of Labor and
Regulation, on the state Division
of Insurance (DOI).
Earlier this month the Governor
had requested a review of the divi-
sion’s investigative procedures for
consumer complaints on long term
care insurance providers.
After reviewing the report, Gov-
ernor Daugaard has accepted the
recommendations and directed
that they be implemented.
“I thank Secretary Roberts and
the division for their efforts,” said
Governor Daugaard. “The Division
of Insurance has the difficult task
of balancing consumer protection
and business needs. While perfect
equilibrium will never be possible,
implementing these recommenda-
tions will increase the balance be-
tween the division’s priorities.”
Recommendations from the re-
port include increasing oversight
from supervisors and the Secre-
tary, enhancing communication be-
tween DOI staff members, estab-
Sec. of Labor and Regulation
issues report to Governor
on Division of Insurance
lishing an informal settlement
process, setting new timelines and
posting completed market conduct
examination reports on the depart-
ment’s website.
Some of the proposed changes
would require legislation.
Under existing law, the division
can suspend, revoke or refuse to
renew a license until fines are
paid, but cannot independently
fine insurers or agents without
their consent.
“Once DOI has revoked a li-
cense, they no longer have lever-
age over a licensee to ensure fu-
ture compliance with South
Dakota law and regulations,”
Roberts says in the report. “Con-
sumers are then left with insur-
ance contracts that are still in
force with an insurance company
DOI no longer has authority to
regulate.”
Roberts will draft legislation for
the Governor to consider introduc-
ing in 2014 to allow the division to
independently fine companies and
order restitution to consumers.
Wall certainly becomes a
bustling metropolis in the sum-
mertime! It is wonderful to see
everyone having fun!
We have more visitors in the
summer who are looking for public
computers and wifi. Most of them
seem to know that the Library is
the place to be!
We have free brand new public
computers and free wifi so you can
check your e-mail, download im-
portant information, and even pay
those pesky traffic fines on-line.
Speaking of summer visitors, we
were fortunate to receive a visit
from Virginia Blom at the Library.
She was one of the first “official”
Wall Librarians and made enor-
mous contributions to the Wall
Community Library. We appre-
icate your legacy Mrs. Blom!
Looking for some community in-
teraction? The Book Discussion
Group for July will be meeting on
Wednesday, July 31 at 6:00 p.m.
Wall Community Library summer fun
We will be reading The Four
Corners of the Sky by Michael Mal-
one.
This book can be checked out
from our online system for ebooks,
South Dakota Titles To Go. Make
time in your schedule and join us!
It’s always so good to read with
friends!
As always, keep reading for the
Summer Reading Program. Stop
by the Library and pick up a book
log if you haven’t already.
If you would prefer, you can also
print off a copy at home by going to
our blog at: www.wallcommunityli-
brary.blogspot.com.
The Library is open Wednesdays
from 12 – 7 p.m., Thursdays from
9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 – 5
p.m., and Fridays from 8 a.m. – 1
p.m.
More information can be found
on our website: www.squidoo.com/
wall-community-library.
Premier Woman’s award
seeking nominations
Huron Event Center on Saturday,
October 5.
The Society will again be honor-
ing and hosting outstanding
women from every corner of the
state.
The 2013 Spirit of Dakota Award
winner will be chosen by a state-
wide Selection Commission includ-
ing First Lady Linda Duagaard of
Pierre; Glenna Fouberg, Aberdeen;
Julie Garreau, Eagle Butte; Jean
Hunhoff, Yankton; Bette Poppen,
Chairman, DeSmet; Tona Rozum,
Mitchell; Suzette Kirby, Sioux
Falls; Marsha Sumpter, Kadoka;
Ginger Thomson, Brookings; Judy
Trzynka, Watertown; and Bev
Wright, Turton.
The nomination process is open
to all interested individuals or or-
ganizations who wish to recognize
an outstanding woman in their
community.
This award is presented to an
outstanding South Dakota woman
who has demonstrated vision,
courage and strength in character
and who has made a significant
contribution to the quality of life in
her community and state.
Past recipients have included
community leaders in business,
government and civic organiza-
tions and have been described in
newspaper articles as “the cream
of the crop in terms of South
Dakota’s best.”
The 2012 award recipient was
Mary J Milroy, MD, FACS of Yank-
ton.
She is called a modern-day pio-
neer seeking answers to health is-
sues facing so many women today.
Dr. Milroy is a shining example
of the qualities that serve as a
guidepost for this generation and
beyond.
Nomination forms are available
by contacting the Huron Area
Chamber of Commerce, 1725
Dakota Ave S, Huron, SD 57350 (1-
800-487-6673) or online at www.sp
iritofdakota.org.
Wall Golf Course
Upcoming Events
Kids Golf Clinic
July 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2013
Boys & Girls: Grades K-6 ~ Please pre-register
$40.00 per person • Time: 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Call Dean 441-0666 or Tanner 641-1360 to register.
Summer Tournament
Schedule:
Call Clubhouse for details
• July 6: Mystery Tournament • July 19: Glow Ball •
• July 27: 3 Man Tournament • August 17: The Big One •
• September 7: Club Championship •
Clubhouse Hours: Mon.-Thurs. at 1:00 p.m.
Fri.-Sun.: 11:00 a.m.
Menu includes Hamburgers,
Hot Dogs, Pizza.
Call to schedule your private
party or special event.
279-GolF • wall
Stop out for Happy Hour
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Every Day
and meet the Clubhouse Manager Carol Steffen
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 7
Religious
106
th
Annual
W
A
L
L
C
E
L
E
B
R
A
T
I
O
N
W
A
L
L
C
E
L
E
B
R
A
T
I
O
N
“Wall’s Wild West Celebration”
THURSDAY - SATURDAY, JULY 11TH - 13TH
Buttons can be purchased at the following locations for $15.00
(that gets you into everything under the tent for Friday and Saturday night).
First Interstate Bank, Ann’s Motel, Days Inn, Black Hills Federal Credit Union, Wall Food Center
& the Wall Chamber of Commerce Office. 10 & under free admission
Thursday, July 11th
5 PM
Tent Setup by T & K Rentals, LLC
(Help is needed to set up tables & fence)
7 PM
SDRA Rodeo (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
Family Night — Candy Scramble for the Kids
Friday, July 12th
10 AM
SDRA Rodeo Slack (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
5 PM
Beer Garden opens
7 PM
SDRA Rodeo (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
Military Night — Business Men “Dress The Calf Contest”
9 PM-1 AM Live Music “Eclipse”
Saturday, July 13th
6:30 AM
Registration for Relay For Life
5K Run/Walk
7 AM
Relay For Life Run/Walk Begins
10 AM
Parade “Wall’s Wild West Celebration” on Main Street*
Parade Marshalls: 7th Grade Class
11 AM
Beer Garden opens
Immediately Following Parade
•Wall Youth Baseball at Community Center (Ryan Dinger)
•Stick Horse Rodeo (kids bring your stick horse)
sponsored by Days Inn of Wall
•Lutheran Church Ice Cream Social (Bev Dartt)
•Sand Dig & other games sponsored by Wall Celebration Committee
1:30 PM
Horseshoes
1:30 PM
Alumni Registration at the Community Center
(Deb Bryan)
2 PM
Alumni Program at the Community Center (Deb Bryan)
7 PM
SDRA Rodeo (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
Christy Willert - Trick Rider
9 PM - 1 AM Live Music “Crash Wagon”
Concessions provided by SanDee’s
*9 AM Parade line-up at south end of
Main Street between
Wall Building Center & Wall Food Center
*All events are under the tent unless otherwise specified.
Ad Sponsored by
Wall Celebration Committee
TDM excavation
& heavy haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
S.D.’s definition of marriage
survives U.S. Supreme Court
S.D.’s definition of marriage sur-
vives U.S. Supreme Court
Attorney General Marty Jackley
announced June 26 that South
Dakota’s definition of marriage,
which is limited to a man and a
woman, is still valid.
“After today’s United States
Supreme Court decisions, South
Dakota constitution and legislative
enactments defining marriage to be
between a man an a woman remain
in effect as a matter of law,” said
Jackley.
In November 2006, South
Dakota voters approved a constitu-
tional amendment making mar-
riage valid only between a man and
a woman. South Dakota voters ap-
proved this amendment by a vote of
172,242 to 160,173. South Dakota
Constitution Article XXL, Section
9, defines only marriage between a
man and a woman shall be valid or
recognized in South Dakota. In ad-
dition, SDCL 25-1-1 defines mar-
riage as a personal relation be-
tween man and a woman.
In the first decision the United
States Supreme Court handed
down, the court found that private
parties lack standing to defend the
constitutionality of a California law
defining marriage as between a
man and a woman. When Califor-
nia state officials refused to defend
a constitutional amendment that
defined marriage as a union be-
tween a man and a woman, private
parties sought to enforce its consti-
tutional amendment. The court
held that only state officials and
not private parties have standing
in federal court to defend the con-
stitutionality of the law. Based
upon South Dakota voters’ decision
to define marriage as between a
man and a woman in South
Dakota, the state of South Dakota
joined numerous states as Amicus
Curie or Friend of the Court, de-
fending the constitutionality of
California’s definition of marriage.
In the second decision, the U.S.
Supreme Court recognized each
state’s responsibility for defining
and regulating marriage. When
United States Attorney General
Eric Holder refused to defend or
enforce a federal statue that de-
fined marriage as excluding same
sex partners, the House of Repre-
sentatives stepped in to defend the
federal stature. As to those states
that define marriage to include
same sex couples, the federal
statute violated basic due process
and equal protection principles.
The federal statute did not recog-
nize or accept 12 states’ and the
District of Columbia’s definitions of
marriage. The decision did not re-
solve challenges to state marriage
definitions affecting same sex mar-
riages. The opinion and its holding
are confined to only same sex mar-
riages made lawful under state
law.
One year after Supreme Court’s
ObamaCare decision
Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) re-
leased the following statement on
the one year anniversary of the
Supreme Court’s decision to uphold
portions of ObamaCare.
“ObamaCare has been built on a
series of broken promises, and is
deepening the administration’s
trust deficit and credibility gap
with the American public. Despite
Democrats’ assurances that the bill
would lower premium costs and
allow Americans to keep the insur-
ance they liked, ObamaCare has
instead resulted in higher premi-
ums, higher taxes, fewer jobs, more
regulations and more government
spending.
“The individual mandate, one of
the chief taxes scheduled to hit
middle class families across the
country in 2014, was upheld by the
Supreme Court based on Congress’
authority to tax. Ironically, the In-
ternal Revenue Service, which has
been charged with overseeing the
implementation of ObamaCare’s
tax policies, is embroiled in a seri-
ous investigation for abusing its
power to target conservative politi-
cal groups. The release of this sen-
sitive information also calls into
question the ability of the IRS to
impartially oversee the implemen-
tation of ObamaCare. Whether the
IRS can be trusted to administer
the tax laws while handling sensi-
tive health insurance information
is seriously in doubt.
“Additionally, it will be middle
class families, union employees
and low-wage workers who will be
the hardest hit by the long term
impacts of this bill. Since Oba-
maCare was enacted, premiums
have increased by an average of
nearly $2,400. Nearly four in 10
small business owners are holding
back hiring because of costs associ-
ated with implementing Oba-
maCare. According to the nonpar-
tisan Congressional Budget Office,
seven million Americans will lose
the coverage they have today – de-
spite the president’s famous line ‘if
you like your plan you can keep it.’
“It is time for Congress to repeal
ObamaCare and enact common-
sense, step by step reforms that ac-
tually reduce health care costs and
increase access to quality care.”
Of Interest to Veterans
- No amnesty for illegal immigrants -
by Norris Preston
past national vice-commander
the American Legion
The American Legion oppose leg-
islation that would result in the
granting of amnesty and legal res-
idence, in any form or by any name,
to illegal immigrants currently in
the United States.
The truth is, The American Le-
gion’s position is similar to immi-
gration policies shared by most
countries around the world.
The American Legion sees immi-
gration policy as a national secu-
rity issue that affects public safety,
economics, and good federal gover-
nance. In order to be effective, the
government must be able to ac-
count for the needs of its people. In
order to accomplish that, it needs
to know how many people it has
within its jurisdiction. People who
reside in the United States illegally
of the expense and hard work it
took for the millions of American
citizens who abided by the law, and
assimilated into the American fam-
ily of citizens legally.
Lastly, The American Legion be-
lieves that blanket amnesty would
send the message that American’s
immigration laws are to be scoffed
at, encouraging future prospective
citizens to seek illegal shortcuts
rather than abide by federal law.
While The American Legion under-
stands that there will never be a
perfect solution, we do believe that
the citizens of the United States
have a right to expect that our fed-
eral government is as fair and as
prudent as possible when ensuring
the safety and economic security of
our nation, and properly enforced
immigration law is part of that re-
sponsibility.
are undocumented, and undocu-
mented people make it impossible
for local and federal governments
to properly plan for, budget for, and
provide for its citizens.
Further, The United States of
America should be free to monitor
and evaluate the applications of
people who wish to live among our
citizens. This policy is no different
from that of any other developed
nation. When people reside in the
The United States illegally, or any
other country for that matter, they
thwart the entire process and un-
dermine our legal, social, and eco-
nomic system.
Immigrants found to be living
here illegally, in the opinion of The
American Legion, must not be
granted amnesty because, as men-
tioned earlier, it not only under-
mines our legal and judicial sys-
tem, but it also cheapens the value
annc@gwtc.net
State Park visitors should leave
fireworks at home
The upcoming Fourth of July
holiday is always a busy time in
South Dakota's state parks and
recreation areas. If you plan to cel-
ebrate at the parks, Game, Fish
and Parks Department officials ask
you to please leave fireworks at
home.
According to Doug Hofer, state
parks and recreation director,
campgrounds are traditionally very
busy with campers and other visi-
tors enjoying the parks during the
Independence Day period.
“Combining fireworks and large
numbers of people creates a dan-
gerous situation,” said Hofer. “We
appreciate your help to keep the
parks safe and fun this Fourth of
July.”
Discharging fireworks is prohib-
ited on all lands owned or leased by
the South Dakota Department of
Game, Fish and Parks. The ban in-
cludes state parks, recreation
areas, lakeside use areas, game
production areas and nature areas.
Discharging fireworks is also ille-
gal within the boundaries of the
Black Hills Forest Fire Protection
District, national forests and na-
tional parks in South Dakota.
For more information on the
South Dakota State Parks, visit
www.gfp.sd.gov or call 605-773-
3391.
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
ANGuS BuLLS: Net Worth, Free-
dom bloodlines. Good calving
ease, gentle, poured. Ones and
twos - $2,000-$3,000. Also bull
rack hauler for sale. 390-5335,
515-1502. Schaaf Angus Ranch.
P30-4tp
FOR SALE: 660 New Holland
Baler, $3,500. Also, 1990 Dia-
mond D 6x20 stock trailer,
$2,500 Sterling Riggins, 462-
6555 or cell 441-4363. P30-3tc
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
WANTED: Summer pasture for
40 to 500 cow-calf pairs. Phone
859-2889. P27-4tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
HAAKON SCHOOL DISTRICT
IN PHILIP is accepting bids to
replace the roof with steel, doors,
and windows at Deep Creek
School in northern Haakon
County. See Britni at the Admin-
istrative Offices or send an email
to Britni.Ross@ k12.sd.us to re-
quest a list of specifications and
materials. Completion date on
or before August 9th is pre-
ferred. P30-2tc
POSITION OPEN: HAAKON
COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY
is accepting applications for of-
fice help. Position involves work-
ing with Insurance and Land
title work. Applicant must be
willing to get licensed. Accurate
Typing and Computer skills re-
quired. Pick up application at
145 S. Center Ave. Philip, SD.
P30-tfn
OPTIMETRIC TECHNICIAN:
One day per week (Tuesdays), 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Medical experi-
ence preferred, but not required.
Mail resumé to: Philip Eye
Clinic, 810 Mountain View Road,
Rapid City, SD 57702. Ques-
tions, call Angie, 342-0777.
P28-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-
2447. K28-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County is accepting applications
for full-time Deputy Director of
Equalization. Selected applicant
may be required to become cer-
tified as per SDCL. Must work
well with the public, and have
clerical and computer skills.
Jackson County benefits include
health insurance, life insurance,
S.D. Retirement, paid holidays,
vacation and sick leave. Position
open until filled. Beginning wage
$9.00 per hour. Applications are
available at the Jackson County
Auditor’s office or send resumé
to Jackson County, PO Box 280,
Kadoka, SD 57543. Ph: 837-
2422. K28-4tc
AuTOMOTIVE
QuINN FIRE DEPARTMENT IS
ACCEPTING BIDS on a 1961
C50 Chevy Viking Truck. It has
a 350 motor and comes with 500
gallon tank, 100 gallon per
minute pump with motor, 100
feet of 1 1/4 hose on a hose reel.
Bids may be sent to: Dave
Humphrey, PO Box 184, Wall,
SD 57790. Any questions, call
Dave 685-3987 or Michael 685-
8524. WP44-4tc
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BuSINESS & SERVICES
BuSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie,859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
ROuGH COuNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRuCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Philip Ambu-
lance Service is seeking appli-
cants for the position of Ambu-
lance Service Director. Serious
inquires may call 859-2109 to
obtain an application. P30-1tc
POSITION OPEN: Part-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Tractor opera-
tor to mow county road right of
way, and perform other duties as
directed. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Applications / resumés ac-
cepted. Information 837-2410 or
837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K28-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employment
spraying county highway right of
way. Commercial herbicide li-
cense required or to be obtained
before start of work. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Applications / resumés
accepted. Information 837-2410
or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K28-4tc
HOuSEKEEPERS AND LAuN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED:
High school and college students
are welcome to apply. Will train.
Apply at either America’s Best
Value Inn and Budget Host Sun-
downer in Kadoka or call 837-
2188 or 837-2296. K26-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax resumé
to 279-2314.
PW24-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Complete reloading
equipment, including bench.
Call 515-1460. PR44-2tp
FOR SALE: Floor oxygen con-
centrator, Invacare Platinum XL.
12,500 hours. Serviced by PSI.
$400 cash OBO. Michelle Ander-
sen 859-3095.
PR43-4tc
FOR SALE: 6500 watt Titan In-
dustrial generator, electric start
with pull start, 8 hp. diesel en-
gine, (2) 110v plug-ins, 1-RV
plug, 1-220 plug, new Interstate
battery, cover. 280-0351.
P20-tfn
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: CLEAN COTTON
RAGS; i.e. sheets, t-shirts,
socks. NO FLANNEL OR CUR-
TAINS. 25¢ lb. Pioneer Review,
221 E. Oak St., Philip.
P28-tfn
PETS/SuPPLIES
FREE: Airedale/Jack Russell
cross. 9 months old, female. Very
nice. Call 907-738-3077, leave
message. PR45-1tp
FOR SALE: 20-gallon aquarium
plus equipment and supplies, in-
cluding cabinet and top. Great
condition, in working order, fish
included. $250/ OBO. 360-
4241, Wasta.
P30-2tc
KITTENS: Ready for new homes!
Would make good barn cats or
house cats. Call 685-5327 for
more info. P30-2tc
REAL ESTATE
HOuSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP: 2
bedrooms, central location.
Make an offer! 859-3095 or 859-
2483. P28-4tc
HOuSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
3 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1,100
sq. ft. open floor plan, vaulted
ceilings, fenced backyard, estab-
lished lawn, oversized detached
garage. Appliances included, all
new in 2008. Call 840-2257 or
307-251-2474.
PR45-6tp
FOR SALE: Nice 2 bedrooom
home with washer, dryer,
kitchen stove, refrigerator. Also
30’x46’ garage and shop build-
ing. All electric on three city lots.
Spring water. Shop comes with
riding lawn mower, vice, air com-
pressor, electric welder and
more, in Wasta. Call Russell
Burmeister, 279-2377, 413 6th
Ave., Wall, SD 57790. Price -
$72,000. WP45-1tc
HOME FOR SALE IN PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new roof,
windows, siding, high efficiency
heat/air with heat pump, on-de-
mand hot water, nice propane
fireplace, nice backyard, deck
and more. Would consider con-
tract for deed. Contact for show-
ing: Don or Tami Ravellette, 685-
5147 (cell) or 859-2969 (home).
P27-tfn
2-STORY HOuSE FOR SALE IN
WALL: Will consider any reason-
able offer. Please call 279-2858.
PW27-8tc
RECREATION
FOR SALE: 2000 32 ft.
Alumalite 5th wheel, large slide-
out with table & chairs. Like new
condition, (2) air conditioners,
queen bed, good tires. Asking
$14,600 or will talk. Phone 712-
542-0625. PR42-4tc
FOR SALE: 2004 Honda Fore-
man Rubicon 4WD 4-wheeler,
new tires, new plastic, with
windshield. 280-0351. P20-tfn
RENTALS
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
Deadline for Classifieds & Cards of Thanks
is 11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
BuSINESS OPPORTuNITY
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Russell
Spaid 605-280-1067.
EMPLOYMENT
WILMOT CITY ACCEPTING APPLI-
CATIONS for MFO. Strong book-
keeping, office and customer serv-
ice skills. QuickBooks a plus. Send
resume and 3 work references to
PO Box 78, Wilmot, SD 57279 or
email: Wilmot@tnics.com. Open
until filled.
FULL TIME RN POSITION. Rural
11 bed Critical Access Hospital
seeking full-time RN’s. Contact
Misti Broyles 605-685-6622. Appli-
cations at website www.ben-
nettcountyhospital.com. Competi-
tive wage, health benefits, loan re-
payment. New graduates welcome!
TEACHING POSITIONS OPEN AT
MOBRIDGE-POLLOCK School Dis-
trict #62-6 for 2013-2014 School
Year: HS Math; MS Special Educa-
tion; and Birth to 2nd Grade Spe-
cial Education. Contact Tim Fred-
erick at 605-845-9204 for more in-
formation. Resumes and applica-
tions can be mailed to the school
Attn: Tim Frederick at 1107 1st Av-
enue East in Mobridge SD 57601.
Open until filled. EOE, Signing
Bonus available.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A
Driver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance. For application contact:
Douglas County Auditor (605) 724-
2423.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota.
Scott Connell, 605-530-2672,
Craig Connell, 605-264-5650,
www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.
MISCELLANEOuS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
SAVE ON CABLE TV-Internet-Digi-
tal Phone-Satellite. You’ve Got A
Choice! Options from ALL major
service providers. Call us to learn
more! CALL Today. 888-337-5453.
HIGHSPEED INTERNET every-
where By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.)
Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW
& GO FAST! 1-888-518-8672.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classi-
fieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this news-
paper or 800-658-3697 for details.
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT Listings, sorted by rent, lo-
cation and other options. www.sd-
housingsearch.com South Dakota
Housing Development Authority.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up
to 48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call
Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-
3549.
DRIVERS $1000 SIGN-ON BONUS.
*Home Weekly *Excellent Benefits
*Regional Dedicated. Routes *Up to
47 CPM *2500 Miles weekly $50
Tarp Pay. (888) 691-5705
apaRTMenTS
aVailaBle
wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
THANK YOuS
Our hearts have been touched
by the out pouring of love to our
family during this difficult time.
Thank you for the generosity of
memorials, food, phone calls,
cards, visits and especially
prayers. We are over whelmed by
your caring support and concerns.
Thank you to Pastor Garland for
his comforting message, First
Lutheran choir for the beautiful
hymn sung during the service,
Emmanuel Lutheran members for
the meal served and fellowship
provided to family and friends. DJ
Rush and staff are to be com-
mended for their professionalism,
excellent service and caring de-
tail. Norman's smile and caring
concerns for his family will be
greatly missed. Blessings!
Lorraine Fauske
Jana Fauske Nelson
Lisa, David, Noah & Levi Schalk
Mark, Alyson, Caitlin
& Callie Fauske
EMPLOyMENT
OPPORTUNITy
West River Electric Associa-
tion, Inc. currently has an Ac-
counting Clerk/CSR position
open at its Headquarters Office
located in Wall, SD. Applicant
must possess excellent organiza-
tional, oral, and written communi-
cation skills. Must have a strong
attention to detail and the ability
to multi-task. A thorough working
knowledge of general office prac-
tices and Microsoft Office soft-
ware is required.
High school graduate or equiv-
alent required with college or
technical degree in accounting
preferred along with at least 1
year of customer service or busi-
ness related experience pre-
ferred. Salary is commensurate
with experience and qualifica-
tions.
Applications can be picked up
at the Wall office, downloaded
from www.westriver.com, or ob-
tained from the SD Career Cen-
ter. Applications will be accepted
at the Wall Headquarters office
until July 15, 2013. For more in-
formation contact Jenny Patter-
son at 605-279-2135.
WREA is an Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action employer.
PENNINGTON
COUNTy BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
JUNE 18, 2013
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in the Commis-
sioners' meeting room of the Pennington
County Courthouse. Chairperson Lyndell
Petersen called the meeting to order at
9:00 a.m. with the following Commission-
ers present: Ron Buskerud, Ken Davis,
Don Holloway and Nancy Trautman.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis to remove Item 17, Bureau of
Land Management Update, and approve
the agenda as amended. Vote: Unani-
mous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-13 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the June 6,
2013, Board of Commissioners’ meeting.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$2,256,575.99.
7. Acknowledge the Order for Organi-
zation and Incorporation for the Dream-
scape Road District effective for tax year
2013 and authorize the Chairperson’s sig-
nature on the Order.
ORDER FOR
ORGANIZATION AND
INCORPORATION
OF THE DREAMSCAPE
ROAD DISTRICT
PENNINGTON COUNTy,
SOUTH DAKOTA
WHEREAS, all resident reg-
istered voters and property
owners that are within the pro-
posed district boundaries have
agreed to and petitioned for the
organization of the DREAM-
SCAPE ROAD District.
AND WHEREAS, said peti-
tions indicate the desire of all
qualified voters and landown-
ers within the proposed bound-
aries to organize the DREAM-
SCAPE ROAD District
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
ORDERED, that the Penning-
ton County Commission ac-
knowledge and declare the
DREAMSCAPE ROAD District
to be organized and estab-
lished as a governmental sub-
division of the State of South
Dakota and a public body, cor-
porate and political to be effec-
tive as of today’s date with tax-
ing authority for the 2013 pay
2014 tax year and after.
BE IT FURTHER OR-
DERED, that the DREAM-
SCAPE ROAD District be de-
scribed as follows: TRACT 5R,
TRACTS 12-13 AND TRACTS
15-18 OF HIGH VIEW SUBDI-
VISION, BHM, Pennington
County, SD.
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
Pennington County Board of
Commissioners
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
8. Acknowledge the Order for Organi-
zation and Incorporation for the Deer
Creek Lane #2 Road District effective for
tax year 2013 and authorize the Chairper-
son’s signature on the Order.
ORDER FOR
ORGANIZATION AND
INCORPORATION
OF THE DEER CREEK
LANE #2 ROAD DISTRICT
PENNINGTON COUNTy,
SOUTH DAKOTA
WHEREAS, all resident reg-
istered voters and property
owners that are within the pro-
posed district boundaries have
agreed to and petitioned for the
organization of the DEER
CREEK LANE #2 ROAD Dis-
trict.
AND WHEREAS, said peti-
tions indicate the desire of all
qualified voters and landown-
ers within the proposed bound-
aries to organize the DEER
CREEK LANE #2 ROAD Dis-
trict
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
ORDERED, that the Penning-
ton County Commission ac-
knowledge and declare the
DEER CREEK LANE #2
ROAD District to be organized
and established as a govern-
mental subdivision of the State
of South Dakota and a public
body, corporate and political to
be effective as of today’s date
with taxing authority for the
2013 pay 2014 tax year and
after.
BE IT FURTHER OR-
DERED, that the DEER
CREEK LANE #2 ROAD Dis-
trict be described as follows:
LOT 36, LOT 38, LOT 40-41,
LOT 42R, LOT 44R, LOT 45,
AND LOT R-1 OF LOT 45 OF
MELCOR ACRES SUBDIVI-
SION, BHM, Pennington
County, SD.
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
Pennington County Board of
Commissioners
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
9. Authorize the Chairperson’s signa-
ture on the letter to South Dakota Retire-
ment System approving the participation
of the SDRS Roth 457 for Pennington
County.
10. Approve the Adopt-A-Highway Ap-
plication for WL Plastics to clean a portion
of Dyess Avenue and authorize the Chair-
person’s signature on a letter to the appli-
cant.
11. Recognize and thank Pennington
County volunteers for the month of May
2013. The list of volunteers is on file in
the Human Resources office and is
posted on the County Bulletin Board.
12. Authorize the Chairperson’s signa-
ture on the Joint Powers Agreement be-
tween the South Dakota Department of
Transportation and the Pennington
County Weed & Pest Department to
spray the railroad right-of-way from Rapid
City to Interior, South Dakota.
13. Approve the request to withdraw
the application for a right-of-way for an
isolated tract to a public highway submit-
ted by David F. Morrow.
End of Consent Agenda
Items From Public: MOVED by Traut-
man and seconded by Buskerud to limit
discussion during Items From Public to
one half hour. Vote: Unanimous.
Lien Release Request – JAM (Name
withheld per SDCL 28-13-42)
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to release and remove Pen-
nington County Lien # 202L dated April
27, 2010 in the amount of $600.00 filed in
the name of JAM from and against the
real property legally described as: Lot B
of Block One Hundred Four (104) of Ma-
honey Addition to the City of Rapid City,
as shown by the plat recorded in Book 15
of Plats on Page 173 in the office of the
Register of Deeds, Pennington County,
South Dakota, together with all improve-
ments and appurtenances thereon and
subject to easements, rights-of-way, re-
strictions, reservations, declarations, and
covenants of record and otherwise known
as 143 MacArthur Street, Rapid City,
South Dakota.
The lien described herein shall remain
of record and continue upon all other
property, both real and personal, includ-
ing joint tenancy and homestead interests
belonging to JAM or to be hereafter ac-
quired by JAM or in which he has any in-
terest. Vote: Unanimous.
Rapid City Public Library Update –
Vera Kowal, County Liaison
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve the alcohol bever-
age license renewals, transfers and new
applications in Items A, B, and C as pre-
sented and authorize the Chairperson’s
signature thereto. Vote: Unanimous.
A. MALT BEVERAGE LICENSE RE-
NEWALS:
Retail (on-off sale) Malt Beverage
Black Forest Inn, IKENCINDY Inc.
Black Hills Speedway, Cross Country
Real Estate
Crooked Creek Resort, Crooked Creek
Resort Inc.
Mike’s Laundry Mat, Wolfman Enter-
prises LLC
Original Hal/Fireside, Ashley Ginsberg
Prairie Berry, Prairie Berry LLC
Summer Creek Inn, Summer Creek Inn
LLC
Package (off-sale) Malt Beverage &
SD Farm Wine
Mount Rushmore National Memorial,
Xanterra Parks & Resort
B. MALT BEVERAGE LICENSE
TRANSFER
From Ponderosa Restaurant &
Lounge, Melrose Enterprises Inc., to Pon-
derosa Restaurant & Lounge, Jaegyn En-
terprises, Inc.
C. NEW PACKAGE MALT BEVER-
AGE AND SD FARM WINE LICENSE
Pactola Pines Marina, David & Nancy
Fisher.
ITEMS FROM EQUALIZATION
A. ABATEMENT APPLICATION –
PAMELA SCHERR: MOVED by Traut-
man and seconded by Holloway to ap-
prove the abatement application for 2012
taxes for Pamela Scherr, Parcel ID
26070, in the amount of $8470.97. Vote:
Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM FIRE ADMINISTRATOR
A. PUBLIC FIREWORKS DISPLAY –
BLACK HILLS SPEEDWAY: MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Trautman to
approve the public fireworks display to be
held at Black Hills Speedway on July 5,
2013, provided all requirements of the
Fire Administrator are met. Vote: Unan-
imous.
ITEMS FROM HIGHWAy DEPARTMENT
Commissioner Buskerud left the meet-
ing at this time.
A. AWARD RECOMMENDATION FOR
BRIDGE REPAIRS: MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Trautman to award
Bridge Repairs; Str. No. 52-310-306; Str.
No. 52-312-311 and Str. No. 52-316-317
to the low bidder, Ainsworth-Benning
Construction Inc., 345 Industrial Drive,
Spearfish, SD 57783, in the amount of
$128,970. Vote: Unanimous.
Commissioner Buskerud returned to
the meeting.
ITEMS FROM PUBLIC DEFENDER
A. APPROVAL OF OFFICE MAN-
AGER JOB DESCRIPTION: MOVED by
Davis and seconded by Trautman to ap-
prove the job description for Office Man-
ager at Grade 18 as recommended by
Human Resources. Vote: Unanimous.
B. APPROVAL OF RECLASSIFICA-
TION OUTSIDE OF WAGE POLICY:
MOVED by Trautman and seconded by
Buskerud to continue this item to the July
2, 2013, Board of Commissioners’ meet-
ing. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM WEED & PEST
A. BLACK HILLS REGIONAL MOUN-
TAIN PINE BEETLE COORDINATOR
DONATION: MOVED by Trautman and
seconded by Buskerud that Pennington
County donate $5,000 from the MPB
Emergency Disaster Fund to help fund
the Black Hills Regional Pine Beetle Co-
ordinator position. Vote: Unanimous.
B. PESTICIDE I & II JOB DESCRIP-
TIONS AND RE-GRADE: MOVED by
Trautman and seconded by Petersen to
approve the updated job descriptions with
Pesticide Applicator I replaced by Weed
& Pest Technician and Pesticide Applica-
tor II replaced by Weed & Pest Crew
Leader, and further moved to approve the
re-grade of the Weed & Pest Crew
Leader position to Grade 14 effective July
1, 2013. The motion carried 4-1 with
Davis opposing.
Request to Waive Administrative and
Penalty Fees – Donald Johnson
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to waive and refund penalty
and administrative fees for Donald John-
son totaling $1079 for Conditional Use
Permit 13-12 and Building Permit 13-
0227. The motion failed 3-2 on a roll call
vote: Buskerud – no, Davis – no, Hol-
loway – no, Trautman – yes, Petersen –
yes.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to take a short recess. Vote:
Unanimous. The Board recessed at
11:28 a.m. and reconvened at 11:37 a.m.
PLANNING & ZONING
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to convene as the Board of Ad-
justment. Vote: Unanimous.
A. VARIANCE / VA 13-08: Donald Per-
due. To exceed the maximum height re-
quirement in a Highway Service District
(35 feet) in order to allow a 126 foot tall
structure in accordance with Sections 210
and 509 of the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
Lot A of SW1/4SW1/4, Section
3, T1S, R7E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve Variance / VA 13-08
with three conditions. Vote: Unanimous.
1. That the applicant address the South
Dakota Department of Transportation’s
comments and obtain approval for the ac-
cess onto S. Highway 16 prior to issuance
of a Building Permit;
2. That this Variance request only ap-
plies to the maximum height requirement
that will be exceeded by the proposed
replica of Independence Hall (126 feet).
All other structures must maintain the
proper height requirements or obtain sep-
arate Variance(s) for that structure; and
3. That prior to any further expansion
of the proposed building, including the fu-
ture additions shown on the site plan, the
Fire Coordinator and a representative
from the Rockerville Volunteer Fire De-
partment meet with the applicant to re-
view the construction plans and make
recommendations for fire safety.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn as the Board of Ad-
justment and reconvene as the Board of
Commissioners. Vote: Unanimous.
Planning & Zoning Consent Agenda
The following items have been placed
on the Planning & Zoning Consent
Agenda for action to be taken on all items
by a single vote of the Board of Commis-
sioners. Any item may be removed from
the Consent Agenda for separate action.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis that Planning & Zoning Consent
Agenda Items B-E be approved as pre-
sented. Vote: Unanimous.
B. SECOND READING OF REZONE /
RZ 13-06: Doug Sletten. To rezone two
(2) acres from Limited Agriculture District
to Suburban Residential District in accor-
dance with Sections 210 and 508 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
ORDINANCE NO. RZ 13-06
AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING SECTION 508 OF THE
PENNINGTON COUNTY
ZONING ORDINANCE, RE-
ZONING THE WITHIN DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY:
BE IT HEREBY ORDAINED
BY THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY COMMISSION
THAT THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY ZONING ORDI-
NANCE BE AND HEREBY IS
AMENDED BY AMENDING
THE ZONING OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PROP-
ERTY:
Parcel A of S1/2SW1/4, Sec-
tion 14, T1N, R8E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota.
The above-described prop-
erty is hereby rezoned from
Limited Agriculture District to
Suburban Residential District.
Dated this 18th day of June,
2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
C. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-10: U
Lazy Two, LLC (Robert Schmitz); Fisk
Land Surveying – Agent. To rezone 10.29
acres from General Agriculture District to
Limited Agriculture District in accordance
with Section 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
A portion of Lot 2 (Two) of U
Lazy Two Ranch Estates lo-
cated in the Northeast One-
Quarter of the Northwest One-
Quarter (NE¼NW¼) and in the
North One-Half of the North-
east One-Quarter (N½NE¼) of
Section Twenty Three (23) of
Township Two North (T2N),
Range Six East (R6E), of the
Black Hills Meridian (BHM),
Pennington County, South
Dakota, more fully described
as follows: Beginning at the
southwest corner of said Lot 2
(Two) of U Lazy Two Ranch
Estates located in the North-
east One-Quarter of the North-
west One-Quarter (NE¼NW¼)
and in the North One-Half of
the Northeast One-Quarter
(N½NE¼) of Section Twenty
Three (23) of Township Two
North (T2N), Range Six East
(R6E) of the Black Hills Merid-
ian (BHM), Pennington County,
South Dakota as shown on the
plat recorded on December 10,
2008, and filed in Book 35 of
Plats on Page 94, said corner
being marked by a rebar with
survey cap “RW Fisk 6565”;
thence, northeasterly on the
westerly line of said Lot 2 (Two)
of U Lazy Two Ranch Estates
Subdivision and on the easterly
right-of-way line of Nemo
Road, North 25 degrees 53
minutes 13 seconds East a dis-
tance of 9.37 feet more or less
to a point of curvature, said
point being marked by a rebar
with survey cap “RW Fisk
6565”; thence, curving to the
left and on the westerly line of
said Lot 2 (Two) of U Lazy Two
Ranch Estates Subdivision and
on the easterly right-of-way line
of Nemo Road, on a curve with
a radius of 750.00 feet, and
delta of 11 degrees 34 minutes
18 seconds, an arc length of
151.47 feet and a chord bear-
ing of North 20 degrees 06
minutes 04 seconds East and
chord distance of 151.22 feet
more or less to a point marked
by a rebar with survey cap “RW
Fisk 6565”; thence, North 90
degrees 00 minutes 00 sec-
onds East a distance of 650.00
feet more or less to a point
marked by a rebar with survey
cap “RW Fisk 6565”; thence,
North 26 degrees 33 minutes
54 seconds East a distance of
223.61 feet more or less to a
point marked by a rebar with
survey cap “RW Fisk 6565”;
thence, North 65 degrees 37
minutes 59 seconds East a dis-
tance of 505.58 feet more or
less to a point marked by a
rebar with survey cap “RW Fisk
6565”; thence, South 83 de-
grees 38 minutes 54 seconds
East a distance of 69.41 feet
more or less to a point marked
by a rebar with survey cap “RW
Fisk 6565”; thence, South 26
degrees 05 minutes 26 sec-
onds East a distance of 411.99
feet more or less to a point
marked by a rebar with survey
cap “RW Fisk 6565”; thence,
South 13 degrees 51 minutes
07 seconds East a distance of
53.56 feet more or less to a
point marked by a rebar with
survey cap “RW Fisk 6565”;
thence, South 16 degrees 45
minutes 15 seconds West a
distance of 40.92 feet more or
less to a point marked by a
rebar with survey cap “RW Fisk
6565”; thence, South 00 de-
grees 00 minutes 00 seconds
East a distance of 101.16 feet
more or less to a point located
on the south line of said Lot 2
(Two) of U Lazy Two Ranch
Estates Subdivision, said point
being marked by a rebar with
survey cap “RW Fisk 6565”;
thence, westerly on the south
line of said Lot 2 (Two) of U
Lazy Two Ranch Estates Sub-
division, North 89 degrees 30
minutes 02 seconds West a
distance of 1,222.73 feet more
or less to a point marked by a
rebar with survey cap “RW Fisk
6565”; thence, continuing
westerly on the south line of
said Lot 2 (Two) of U Lazy Two
Ranch Estates Subdivision,
North 89 degrees 56 minutes
00 seconds West a distance of
295.12 feet more or less to the
point of beginning. Said tract
of land contains 10.29 acres
more or less.
Approve the first reading of Rezone /
RZ 13-10.
D. COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMEND-
MENT / CA 13-04: Jarvis and Frances
Olson; Fisk Land Surveying – Agent. To
amend the Pennington County Compre-
hensive Plan to change the Future Land
Use from Planned Unit Development
Sensitive to Low Density Residential Dis-
trict in accordance with Section 508 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Located on a parcel of land lo-
cated in the South One-Half of
the Northeast One-Quarter of
the Southeast One-Quarter
(S½NE¼SE¼) of Section
Thirty-Five (35) in Township
One North (T1N), Range Three
East (R3E) of the Black Hills
Meridian (BHM), Pennington
County, South Dakota, more
fully described as follows: Be-
ginning at the southwest corner
of said South One-Half of the
Northeast One Quarter of the
Southeast One Quarter
(S½NE¼SE¼) of Section
Thirty-Five (35) in Township
One North (T1N), Range Three
East (R3E) of the Black Hills
Meridian (BHM), Pennington
County, South Dakota, said
point being located on a 1/16th
section line of said Section
Thirty-Five (35) and being
marked by a US Forest Service
Monument; thence, northerly
along the 1/16th section line of
said Section Thirty-Five (35),
North 00 degrees 09 minutes
00 seconds West, a distance of
260.00 feet more or less to a
point marked by a rebar with
survey cap RW FISK 6565;
thence, South 89 degrees 51
minutes 02 seconds East a dis-
tance of 1,282.70 feet more or
less to a point located on the
westerly line of the section line
right-of-way for said Section
Thirty-Five (35), said right-of-
way being known as Paradise
Drive, and said point being
marked by a rebar with survey
cap RW FISK 6565; thence,
southerly on the westerly line
of said section line right-of-way
and on the westerly line of Par-
adise Drive right-of-way, South
00 degrees 00 minutes 43 sec-
onds East a distance of 260.00
feet more or less, said point
being located on a 1/16th sec-
tion line and coincident with the
northeast corner of Tract 14 of
Leisure Hills Estates, and said
point being marked by a mon-
ument with survey cap LS
2196; thence, westerly on said
1/16th section line and on the
north line of said Tract 14 of
Leisure Hills Estates, North 89
degrees 53 minutes 45 sec-
onds West a distance of
549.64 feet more or less to the
northwest corner of said Tract
14 of Leisure Hills Estates, said
point being coincident with the
northeast corner of Tract 15 of
Leisure Hills Estates and said
point being marked by a mon-
ument with survey cap LS
2196; thence, continuing west-
erly on said 1/16th section line
and on the north line of said
Tract 15 of Leisure Hills Es-
tates, North 89 degrees 43
minutes 18 seconds West a
distance of 542.94 feet more or
less to the northwest corner of
Tract 15 of Leisure Hills Es-
tates, said point being coinci-
dent with the northeast corner
of Tract 21 of Leisure Hills Es-
tates and said point being
marked by a monument with
survey cap LS 2196; thence,
continuing westerly on said
1/16th section line and on the
north line of said Tract 21 of
Leisure Hills Estates, South 89
degrees 54 minutes 44 sec-
onds West 189.50 feet more or
less to the point of beginning.
Said tract of land contains 7.65
acres, more or less.
Approve Comprehensive Plan Amend-
ment / CA 13-04.
E. VACATION OF EASEMENT / VE
13-01: Jerry and Michele Sowards. To
vacate a portion of the access easements
located along the interior of Lots 13, 14,
17, and 18 of Tract A of Sunnyside Acres
Subdivision in accordance with the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Lots 13, 14, 17, and 18 of Tract
A, Sunnyside Acres Subdivi-
sion, Section 25, T2N, R4E,
and Section 30, T2N, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Postpone Vacation of Easement / VE
13-01 in order for the applicant to work
with the neighboring landowners.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1)
B. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL 1-
25-2(3)
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to convene in executive ses-
sion. Vote: Unanimous. The Board re-
mained in executive session from 11:58
a.m. until 12:45 p.m. MOVED by Traut-
man and seconded by Davis to adjourn
from executive session. Vote: Unani-
mous.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to enter into a Memorandum
of Understanding (MOU) with Black Hills
Community Health Services to pursue
planning of a joint building for Health and
Human Services and Community Health,
stating that Pennington County will be re-
sponsible for one third of the initial
$25,000. It was further moved to author-
ize the Chairperson’s signature on the
MOU. Vote: Unanimous.
PERSONNEL
Emergency Management: Effective
6/10/2013, C. Kruse, $11.48/hr.
Information Technology Services: Ef-
fective 6/17/2013, S. Cales, $19.65/hr.
and C. Herman, $23.90/hr.
Weed & Pest: Effective 5/27/2013 – D.
Ames, $12.98/hr.
CCADP: Effective 6/1/2013 – A. Stec,
$3405.95; Effective 6/17/2013 – J.
Kendall, $4139.67.
WSDJSC: Effective 6/1/2013 - R.
MacLanders, $2400; H. Clausen, $2400.
Jail: Effective 6/3/2013 at $19.65/hr. –
T. Clemmons, V. Herz, K. Allison, T. Little-
field, J. Philippe, I. Small and N. Nielsen.
Effective 6/3/2013 – M. Houston,
$15.39/hr.; Effective 6/1/2013 – R. Stand-
ing, $2848.51
Highway: Effective 6/1/2013 - Colon,
Carlos, $4,687.00
JULy 2013 MERIT INCREASES
Beachem, Bryce K, $4,019.00;
Bertolotto, Connie J, $3,406.00; Bintliff,
Glenn D, $5,797.00; Burleson, David W,
$3,552.00; Casjens, Michael D Jr,
$3,063.00; Fogelman, Brandon, $17.24;
Hand, Larry R, $2,988.00; Jannusch,
Brian J, $1,641.00; Jobgen, Jacob T,
$1,641.00; Kirksey, Raymond E,
$3,381.00; Nelson, Danny L, $3,732.00;
Rice, Ralph E, $16.41; Sutterer, Michael
W, $4,223.00; Townley, Robert H,
$2,988.00; Schmit, Jessica J, $21.99; Ot-
toson, Peter W, $3,813.00; Abernathie,
Trevor J, $15.62; Caster, Patricia J,
$3,756.00; Doran, Joseph J, $17.83;
Puckett, Dawn N, $3,665.00; Wendell,
Gordon P, $3,575.00; Dieball, Michelle L,
$4,109.00; Drexler, Jacob T, $14.17;
Faber, Leann, $2,711.00; Schlesselman,
Robert L, $14.17; Groote, Kinsley P,
$4,862.00; McCormick, Michael D,
$19.96; Bearden, Hope L, $19.94; Camp-
bell, Nicholas R, $19.94; Collins, Mandi
M, $15.62; Cook, Ryan L, $3,755.00;
House, James D, $15.62; Jackson,
Matthew L, $19.94; McCoy, Stephanie,
$4,632.00; Mitzel, Jason A, $4,005.00;
Novak, Nick A, $15.62; O'Cilka, Jason J,
$4,310.00; Osborne, Mark, $4,995.00;
Patterson, Bridget R, $19.94; Rochleau,
Chad S, $19.94; Schulz, Edwin L,
$4,642.00; Spear, Troy A, $19.94; Veal,
Matthew E, $20.95; Wardle, Daniel R,
$4,525.00; White, Anthony R, $19.94;
Allen, Dwayne L, $19.94; Arritola, Dachia
F, $19.94; Arritola, Shaun L, $19.94; Cou-
ture, Adam F, $19.94; Diro, Andrew W,
$4,002.00; Good, Laurie J, $5,113.00;
Groseth, Craig C, $3,755.00; Haga,
Brooke M, $5,924.00; Holloway, Sean R,
$19.94; Kath, Tyler J, $19.94; Kirby, Erica
R, $18.09; Keogh, Christal, $19.94; Koch,
Pamela J, $3,299.00; McNelley, Jon C,
$19.94; Miller, Jeremy, $4,002.00;
Morem, Natalie J, $19.94; Munsch,
Casey L, $4,202.00; Severson, Peggy J,
$5,929.00; Steele, Mark A, $4,644.00;
Van Berkum, Roy A, $4,205.00; Vanek,
Ian J, $18.09; White, Joshua A, $19.94;
Williamson, Angela D, $16.41; Wilson,
Kenneth R, $4,205.00; Wojcik, Michael S,
$4,307.00; Wolfe, Brady K, $19.94; Yan-
tis, Robert W, $5,780.00; Lange, Louis H,
$3,907.00; Buffington, Shiloh M,
$4,862.00; Becker, Erin V, $3,755.00;
Buhler, John M, $4,005.00; Gerry, Loren
L, $3,755.00; Jaure, Miranda R, $19.94;
Kaiser, Michele M, $4,420.00; Oyler,
Lucas J, $4,414.00; Pinkowski, Ryan D,
$4,002.00; Rodgers, Michael W,
$3,755.00; Schunneman, Gregory J,
$3,755.00; Silvernail, Tara E, $24.27;
Weathers, Allison L, $4,002.00; Weath-
ers, Martin J, $3,755.00; Brown, Scott A,
$16.41; Deblieck, Melodie A, $16.41;
Dolor, Art R, $16.41; Flagg, Connie L,
$16.41; Kemp, Amber K, $4,140.00;
Luthy, Anna L, $3,136.00; Maxon, Chad
M, $17.22; McGlade, Amy M, $17.22;
Meyers Nau, Rebecca S, $3,406.00; Pe-
terson, Patricia N, $3,457.00; Pratt, Linda
L, $4,109.00; Scott, Shawnda L, $16.41;
Smith, Craig, $3,410.50.
VOUCHERS
A & B Business Equipment, 76.40; A &
B Welding Supply Co, 316.98; A To Z
Shredding Inc, 157.35; Trevor Abernathie,
26.00; Ace Hardware-East, 67.69; Ace
Steel And Recycling, 9.00; Active Data
Systems Inc, 7,865.45; Adams-Isc Llc,
235.19; Advanced Drug Testing Inc,
36.00; Air Works, 183.19; Al's Metal Work
Inc, 235.42; Ahmed Al-Asfour, 200.00;
Jay Alderman, 87.95; Linette Alexander,
190.00; American Correctional Associa-
tion, 310.00; Americinn Motel, 1,081.00;
Amy L Zoller Reporting Inc, 89.65; Mary
Anderson, 17.60; Apria Health Care Inc,
365.55; Arc Internationa Inc, 10,405.15;
Armstrong Extinguishers, 1,783.00; John
Ashley, 540.00; Atlas Business Solutions,
600.00; Atrix International Inc, 319.45;
William Atyeo, 211.60; Audra Malcomb
Consulting, 11,648.76; Avenet Llc,
3,000.00; Badlands Automotive, 681.23;
Bailey Jd & Mp Merryman, 2,059.50; Bai-
ley Jd & Mp Merryman, 1,699.63; Lisa
Ball, 945.00; Bridgette R Banks, 692.65;
Bargain Printing, 1,219.05; Greg Barnier,
1,963.50; Batteries Plus, 283.48;
Lawrence D Beezley, 150.00; Behavior
Management Systems Inc, 3,251.00; Be-
havior Management Systems Inc,
5,909.00; Belgarde Enterprises Inc,
381.30; Lori Benson, 19.20; Best West-
ern Ramkota Inn, 1,771.96; Bettmann
Hogue & Diedrich, 2,439.65; Bh Ammuni-
tion Inc, 1,890.00; Bh Chemical Company
Inc, 4,756.24; Bh Oral & Maxillofacial Sur-
gery Pc, 1,276.83; Bh Orthopedic &
Spince Cneter Pc, 139.34; Bh Power Inc,
3,946.78; Bh Reg Eye Institute Llp,
144.50; Bh Services Inc, 259.39; Bh Sur-
gical Hospital Llc, 18,873.95; Bh Vision,
10,000.00; Bh Wilbert Vault, 330.00; Bhe
Industries Inc, 105.29; Bhp Inc, 2,727.12;
Biegler Greg Lpc Ccdc Ii, 120.00; Bier-
schbach Equipment, 257.55; Big D Oil
Co, 262.54; Tracy Lynn Binder, 71.40;
Blackstrap Inc, 17,898.03; Bob Barker
Company Inc, 3,595.20; Border States
Electric, 158.74; Boy Scouts Of America,
208.75; Raquel Bradford, 157.50; Annette
Brant, 178.00; Roger Braunstein,
4,583.33; Brevard Extraditions Inc,
3,078.45; Kaycee Brimm, 26.00; Amy
Bristol, 27.20; Earl W Buck, 150.00; Bu-
reau Of Human Resources, 450.00; But-
ler Machinery Company, 257.46; Ca-
bela's Retail Inc, 64.97; Caldwell Com-
mercial Real Estate, 760.00; Carquest
Auto Parts, 198.36; Cash-Wa Distribut-
ing, 797.96; Cbcinnovis Inc, 117.00; CBM
Food Service, 41,824.78; CDW Govern-
ment Inc, 6,606.02; Central States Fair
Inc, 36,292.82; Channing Bete Co Inc,
414.42; Chemsearch, 788.35; Children's
Home Society, 625.00; Chivukula
Venkata, Aditya, 1,567.02; Chris Supply
Co Inc, 731.13; City Of Hill City, 460.00;
City Of Rapid City, 20,628.21; City Of
Rapid City -Water, 191.76; Clark Printing,
683.00; Jean M Cline, 1,840.65; Jean M
Cline, 1,633.80; Denise Cody, 45.00; An-
gela M Colbath, 2,932.72; Communica-
tion Services For The Deaf, 2,083.65;
Community Health Center Of The Black
Hills Inc, 130.00; Randal E Connelly,
1,653.62; Contractors Insulation And Dry-
wall Supply, 67.20; Contractors Supply
Inc, 23.80; Copy Country, 318.49; Coram
Alternate Site, 5,709.92; Correctional
Technologies Inc, 361.00; Countryside
Property Management Llc, 1,425.00;
County Of Niobrara, 300.00; Crescent
Electric Supply, 1,148.64; Crop Produc-
tion Service, 1,094.40; Csrx Inc, 121.74;
Custom Stamping & Mfg Co, 915.11;
Cwd-Aberdeen (Hrs), 188.68; Dakota
Battery & Electric, 24.65; Dakota Fluid
Power Inc, 569.65; Dakota Plains Legal
Services, 16,333.33; Dakota Radiator,
850.00; Dakota Security Systems Inc,
1,058.67; Dakota Supply Group Inc,
93.35; Dakota Typewriter Exchange,
1,562.29; Dale's Tire & Retreading Inc,
2,720.21; David M Hosmer Law Office
Pc, 167.62; Lester Davis, 451.62; Robert
A Dawson, 451.20; De's Oil Inc, 66.00;
Dennis Supply - Rc, 1,047.98; DHD Con-
struction Inc, 33.46; Diamond Pharmacy
Services, 24,309.48; Diamond Vogel
Paint Center, 239.42; Diesel Machinery
Inc, 373.85; Dodge Town Inc, 90.00; Joe
Doran, 26.00; Conor Duffy, 474.20; Eagle
Ridge I Llp, 270.00; Ecolab Pest Elimina-
tion, 92.00; Eco_Scapes Llc, 252.50; Ed
Roehr Safety Products, 180.23; Eddie's
Truck Sales Inc, 6,179.22; Marv Ekeren,
45.00; Shawn Elshere, 20.00; Eprovider
Solutions, 206.20; John Evans, 270.00;
Evergreen Office Products, 1,921.57; Ex-
ecutive Mgmt Fin Office, 42.00; Fall River
Co Auditor's Office, 484.00; Farmer
Brothers Coffee, 707.52; Fast Health Cor-
poration, 8,016.00; Fastenal Company,
436.24; Federal Express, 31.77; Fennell
Design Inc, 1,192.88; Leslie Ph.D. Fifer-
man, 1,125.00; Teresa L Fink, 878.10;
First American Title Co, 2,700.00; First
American Title Co, 2,565.00; First Ameri-
can Title Co, 2,970.00; First American
Title Co, 810.00; Flooring America, 33.00;
Foley's Custom Print, 32.50; Kimberly L
Foster, 30.00; Franz Reprographics Inc,
285.80; Fred Pryor Seminars, 210.90;
Fremont Industries Inc, 1,565.19; Cora
Fried, 188.80; Joshua D Friedman, Dr,
787.50; Frontier Auto Glass Llc, 45.00;
Frontier Commercial, 8,540.53; Frontier
Precision Inc, 101.54; Larry D Fuss,
1,015.00; G & H Distributing - Rc, 365.00;
Gardner Denver Nash Llc, 181.40; Geib
Elston Frost Pa, 12,878.00; Tim Giago,
20.00; Michael Gilleland, 492.75; Kayla L
Glasshoff, 588.75; Elizabeth Glynn,
1,231.20; Godfrey Brake Service And
Supply Inc, 6,387.34; Golden West Com-
panies, 268.73; Golden West Technolo-
gies, 5,984.24; Great Western Tire Inc,
315.15; Green Star Camper Center,
45.00; Grimm's Pump Service Inc,
1,149.50; William R Grode, 665.50; Den-
nis A Groff, 820.00; Kinsley Groote,
258.40; Gunderson Palmer Nelson And
Ashmore Llp, 136.35; Gustave A Larson
Company, 2,815.88; Harmelink Fox &
Ravnsborg Law Office, 92.00; Suzie Har-
ris, 31.20; Harveys Lock Shop, 768.49;
Keith A Hautala, 185.00; Leslie Have-
meier, 13.60; Heartland Paper Company,
771.06; Cheryl Hein, 280.00; Josh Hen-
drickson, 43.14; Herd's Ribbon & Laser
Service, 320.77; Hewlett-Packard,
16,094.82; Lillian High Eagle, 177.00;
Highway Improvement Inc, 23,377.80; Hill
City Hardware Inc, 63.66; Hills Materials
Co, 3,059.82; Hillyard/Sioux Falls,
12,910.61; Honeywell Inc, 51,828.08;
Garrett J Horn, 199.20; Horwath Laundry
Equipment, 273.65; Jack K Howell,
200.60; Howes Oil Company Inc,
53,699.48; Sue Hudgens, 12.60; Humane
Society Of The Black Hills, 4,166.67;
Huron Culvert & Tank Co, 35,920.25; Hy-
drolux Testing & Consulting Inc,
14,382.11; Icehouse/Artic Glacier, 50.79;
Indoff Inc, 779.46; Industrial Electric And
Supply, 533.50; Innovative Laboratory
Systems Inc, 15,401.94; Interstate All
Battery Center, 76.77; Interstate Batter-
ies, 65.98; Intoximeters Inc, 2,000.00;
Kacey Ireland, 21.60; Isi Llc, 1,243.08; J
Scull Construction, 906,304.90; Jackson
Lewis Llp, 593.00; Donald A Janz,
1,100.00; Jay's Welding Inc, 25.00; Jc
Supply Co, 299.50; Jefferson Partner Lp,
214.60; Jenner Equipment Co, 424.72;
Jimmy John's Catering, 162.81; Johnson
Machine Inc, 738.25; Johnson Machine
Inc, 412.07; Johnson Machine Inc,
399.17; Johnson's Carpet Cleaning Serv-
ice, 2,285.00; Jrs Logging Inc, 7,820.00;
Continued on page 10
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
K & D Appliance Service, 90.50; Jean
Kappedal, 1,143.75; Karl's Appliance,
126.00; Kaw Valve & Fitting Co Inc,
108.32; Kieffer Sanitation/A Waste Man-
agement Co, 171.00; Kevin E Kirschen-
mann, 840.00; Aaron Klapkin, 420.00;
Donna Klapperich, 2,000.00; Knecht
Home Center Inc, 1,406.02; Knollwood
Development Lp, 960.00; Knology,
349.58; Kone Inc, 17,802.97; Kyle
Krause, 1,327.20; Roman Kurylas,
160.00; Laboratory Corporation Of Amer-
ica Holdings, 39.99; Lakota Community
Homes Inc, 620.00; Language Line Serv-
ices, 50.16; Latta Technical Services Inc,
6,335.25; Lattice Incorporated,
23,999.42; Lawson Products Inc,
1,479.23; Leo A Daly, 19,573.83; Lewis &
Clark Mental Health, 298.00; Lucille M
Lewno, 447.88; Lincoln County Auditor,
181.50; Lindquist & Vennum Pllp,
1,200.00; Daniel E Lomelin, 270.00;
Danielle Love, 190.00; Neal Lutke, 88.80;
M&M Extendo Llc, 4,269.00; William
Maher, 240.00; Amanda Mailloux, 180.00;
Manlove Psychiatric Group, 4,125.15;
Stath S Mantzeoros, 270.00; Maple
Green Llc, 270.00; Marco Inc, 1,693.77;
Eric Martens, 20.00; Cathy Mattson-Cas-
teel, 4,430.79; Donna Mayer, 194.60;
Mike Mccormick, 461.98; Mcgas Propane
Llc, 201.83; Wendy T Mcgowan,
2,182.16; Mckie Ford Inc, 558.30;
Mcleod's Printing Inc, 201.07; Mcmaster-
Carr Supply Company, 183.91; Medical
Waste Transport Inc, 369.15; Medline In-
dustries Inc, 106.35; Douglas Mednan-
sky, 2,119.18; Menards, 1,261.75; Mercy
Housing Sdi-Llc, 630.00; Mary Anne
Meyer, 54.40; Tiffany Meyer, 139.49; Mg
Oil Company, 1,259.92; Midcontinent
Testing Lab, 240.00; Midwest Motor Sup-
ply Co, 589.36; Midwest Tire & Muffler
Inc, 15.45; Mitchell Clinic Ltd, 99.00;
Moore Medical Corp, 124.36; Sarah Mor-
rison, 611.94; William A Moss, 520.00;
Motive Parts & Supply Inc, 33.00; Moyle
Petroleum, 19,547.43; Mro Corporation,
62.25; Murphy Law Office Pc, 950.41;
Nacrc, 175.00; Nat'l Medical Services,
207.00; Native Sun News, 198.60; Neu-
rosurgical & Spinal Surgery Associates,
5,807.89; Neve's Uniforms Inc, 7,492.04;
Newkirk's Ace Hrdwre-East, 999.68;
Newkirk's Ace Hrdwre-West, 598.77; Lam
Nguyen, 200.00; Linda J Nohr, 875.00;
Nooney Solay & Van Norman, 2,385.60;
North Central Supply Inc, 80.00; Northern
Truck Equipment, 2,889.30; Northwest
Pipe Fitting Inc, 14,184.99; Notable Cor-
poration, 491.47; Npc International,
155.47; Valarie O'Day, 342.00; Office Of
Attorney General, 43.25; Officemax Incor-
porated, 1,125.96; Orion Healthcare Tech
Inc, 660.00; Pacific Hide & Fur Depot,
516.40; Paradis Properties Llc, 530.00;
Thomas F Peckosh, 270.00; Penn Co
Bldgs & Grds, 55.84; Penn Co Emerg
Management, 107.03; Penn Co Health &
Human Sv, 539.12; Penn Co Highway,
57.19; Penn Co Jsc, 101.63; Penn Co
Juv Diversion, 102.33; Penn Co Sheriff,
2,375.98; Penn Co States Atty, 286.44;
Pennington County Housing, 149.00;
Michael R Pesicka, 240.00; Pete Lien &
Sons Inc, 1,717.06; Katie Petersen,
26.40; Pheasantland Industries, 151.76;
Pheasantland Industries, 2,053.45; Terri
Phelps, 700.00; Phoenix Supply Llc,
368.18; Pioneer Enterprises Inc,
3,660.00; Jerry Pollard, 174.00; Power
House Honda, 89.41; Pressure Services
Inc, 105.00; Price Enterprises Inc,
5,250.00; Shirley J Printz, 270.00; Pro
Windmill Inc, 112.00; Psychological Eval-
uations, 357.50; Quality Transmissions
Inc, 80.00; Radiation Detection Co,
140.00; Radiology Assoc. Prof. Ll,
1,345.18; Rapid Chevrolet Co Inc,
1,143.44; Rapid Collision, 1,667.46;
Rapid Creek Partners, 270.00; Rapid De-
livery Inc, 44.00; Rapid Leasing, 860.49;
Rapid Rooter, 135.00; Rapid Tire & Align-
ment, 768.75; Rapid Transit System,
30.00; Rapidcare, 79.00; Ravellette Pub-
lications, 2,280.43; RC Area School Dist
51-4, 1,983.84; RC Chamber Of Com-
merce, 258.00; RC Emergency Services,
290.34; RC Fire & Emergency Services,
425.28; RC Journal, 4,192.84; RC Pizza
Ranch, 325.15; RC Police Dept-Evi-
dence, 250.51; RC Public Library,
101,785.50; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
58,720.94; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
1,724.88; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
3,910.05; RC Winsupply, 59.67; RDO
Equipment Co, 2,537.51; Record Storage
Solutions, 730.58; Don Red Leaf, 270.00;
Red River Service Corp, 54.22; Redwood
Toxicology Inc, 3,541.23; Redwood Toxi-
cology Laboratory Inc, 135.97; Regional
Health Physician, 3,400.33; Rensch Law
Office, 11,802.53; Allen Reuer, 945.00;
Ricoh USA Inc, 1,557.91; Richard R
Rieck, 26.00; Shannon Rittberger, 52.00;
Robotronics Inc, 35.00; Rochester Ar-
mored Car Company Inc, 408.40; Lara
Roetzel, 43.14; Roger Frye's Paint Sup-
ply, 172.23; Ron Smith & Associates Inc,
875.00; Rooks Works Llc, 1,700.00; Ted
Jr Rufledt, 37.33; Runnings Supply Inc,
50.55; Dawn Russell, 32.44; Ryan Ryder,
208.80; Richard Rylance Ii, 43.14; Safar-
iland Llc, 300.00; Janet Sayler, 197.60;
Schmidt Funeral Home Llc, 1,910.00;
Schreiner Enterprises Inc, 150.68; Scott
Schuft, 695.92; Todd Schweiger,
1,309.00; SD Dept Of Public Safety,
20.00; SD Dept Of Revenue, 706.00; SD
Dept Of Transp-Finance, 5,021.65; SD
Div Of Motor Vehicles, 58.00; SD Federal
Property Agency, 3,097.50; SD Fire & Life
Safety Committee, 40.00; SD Invasive
Species Mgmt, 120.00; Sentinel Offender
Service, 1,772.48; Servall Uniform/Linen
Co, 3,361.54; Peggy Severson, 99.00;
Sheehan Mack Sales, 9,169.05; Shep-
herd Reporting Llc, 110.00; Sherwin
Williams Paints, 1,061.72; Shoener Ma-
chine & Tool Supply Inc, 148.10; Shreves
Law Office, 319.20; Simon Contractors,
4,004.01; Site Work Specialists Inc,
12,777.50; Matthew L Skinner, 3,340.69;
Lori Slathar, 20.00; Smart Choice Homes
Lll, 270.00; Jeromey Smith, 256.40;
Kendra Smith, 1,394.70; Smoot & Utz-
man, 947.10; Southern Hills Publishing,
1,958.74; Spacesaver Storage System,
19,696.77; Spizzirri Press Inc, 75.00;
Springbrook Software Inc, 16,775.00;
Stan Houston Equipment, 656.15;
Matthew Stephens, 7,936.00; Cathy L
Stewart, 40.00; Sturdevant's- Rapid City,
132.56; Summit Signs & Supply Inc,
697.15; Technology Center, 92.99; Telco
FCU - Rapid City, 270.00; Tessco Incor-
porated, 2,455.29; Tessier's Inc, 139.25;
The Little Print Shop Inc, 354.81; The Re-
pair Shop, 610.11; Kelly Thomas, 12.80;
Creighton Thurman, 325.95; Barry Tice,
14.00; Nina Tidd, 29.60; Kara Tines,
57.00; Tow Pros, 218.00; Trail King Ind.
Inc, 54.66; Jolene Treloar, 190.00; Tw
Vending Inc, 7,197.06; Twilight Inc,
1,108.80; UHS Of Savannah Llc, 127.38;
US Chemical Procurement, 589.72; US
Postal Service, 1,758.18; Valley Green
Sod Farm, 65.85; Vanway Trophy &
Awards, 112.50; Tom Vlieger, 203.60; Ja-
rauldine Y Walenta, 380.00; Walworth Co
Sheriff, 77.40; Warne Chemical & Equip-
ment Co Inc, 1,523.36; Watertree Inc,
724.50; Watson Law Office Pc, 63.00;
Cynthia Weichmann, 947.65; Wells
Fargo, 12,262.91; Wellspring Inc,
1,474.65; Gordon Wendell, 26.00; Al Jr
Md Wessel, 4,975.00; West Payment
Center, 4,427.53; West River Interna-
tional Inc, 2,153.36; Western Communi-
cation Inc, 1,945.20; Western Mailers,
624.88; Western Stationers Inc, 1,092.98;
Western Stationers Inc, 517.40; Western
Thrifty Inn Llc, 1,384.25; Wex Bank,
346.92; Whisler Bearing Co, 37.61;
Jeanne Wing, 12.54; Winter Law Office
Pc, 877.60; Wkc Enterprises, 415.80;
Ione Wolf, 628.50; Brenda Wood, 26.00;
Jamie Wood, 770.00; Wood Stock Sup-
ply, 46.75; Cynthia Woods, 11.28; Yank-
ton Co Sheriff Office, 125.00; Yankton
County Treasurer, 212.50; Michael
Young, 20.00; Z & S Dust Control Sys-
tem, 1,999.49; Joshua Zellmer, 97.14;
Edmund W Zenker, 240.00; Zep Sales &
Service, 364.02; Ziegler Building Center
Inc, 124.73; SD Dept Of Revenue,
9,812.81; Att Mobility, 219.94; BH Power
Inc, 240.41; BH Power Inc, 1,078.94;
CBM Food Service, 3,880.69; Cetec En-
gineering, 9,214.69; City Of Box Elder,
174.50; City Of Rapid City Water,
1,438.40; First Interstate Bank, 631.20;
Golden West Companies, 301.69;
Golden West Technologies, 763.08; Kief-
fer Sanitationa Waste Management Co,
419.96; Knology, 2,703.66; Knology,
37.07; Midcontinent Communicatio,
916.13; Montana Dakota Utilities,
2,779.52; Mt Rushmore Telephone Co,
102.19; Verizon Wireless, 505.18; Wex
Bank, 7,356.82; Att Mobility, 274.48; Bh
Power Inc, 8,255.34; City Of Rapid City
Water, 1,630.79; First Administrators Inc,
52,287.86; First Interstate Bank, 8.00; Ki-
effer Sanitationa Waste Management Co,
2,748.52; Knology, 37.07; Medical Waste
Transport Inc, 145.19; Wells Fargo Pay-
ment: 123.00; Securityproducts.C,
509.72; Agent Fee - All Continent, SD
US, 150.00; Amazon Mktplace Pmts,
522.69; Amazon.Com, 25.65; Americinn
Ft Pierre, 50.00; Batteries Plus, 9.95;
Black Hills Chemical, 2,247.69; Bob
Barker Company, 2,376.00; City Of Box
Elder, 50.00; Cribbagesupply.Com,
54.54; Dakota Radiator, 84.80; Dash
Medical Gloves, 1,522.90; Delta Air,
3,570.10; Dollar Rent A Car, 192.62; Dri
Nuance - Orderfind.Com, 109.94; Eileens
Colossal Cookies, 42.50; Enterprise
Rent-A-Car, 110.62; Exxonmobil, 27.19;
Fedex, 39.23; Fredpryor Careertrack,
596; Hampton Inn & Suites, 543.80;
Hampton Inns, 246.34; Harbor Freight
Catalog, 166.97; Hilton Hotels, 184.44;
Hilton Hotels, 437.31; Hyatt Place,
223.12; Jolly Lane Greenhouse, 136.22;
Kmart, 12.96; Loaf N Jug, 21.73; Lowes,
221.97; Mcdonald's, 8.91; Menards,
197.17; National Sheriffs Assoc, 235; Net-
work Solutions, Llc, 80; Officemax Ct,
331.4; Officemax, 119.3; Onlinefabric-
store.Net, 355; Patc, 35; Probuild,
2,004.29; Qc Supply, 354.58; Rapid City
Regional Arprt, 40; Robinson Textiles,
775.1; Rockhurst Univers, 210.94; Rock-
hurst University Cont, -11.94; Runnings
Farm & Fleet, 2,153.09; Sturdevant's
Auto Parts, 653.94; Target, 75.93; Tea
The Great Courses, 494.55; Technology
Center, 282.00; The Connection, 59.80;
Todays Classroom, 304.00; Tractor Sup-
ply, 394.44; Ultimate Office Solution,
271.57; United 0162609581268 - 800-
932-2732, Tx US, 1480.80; Wal-Mart,
590.18; Wal-Mart, 520.15; Walgreens,
18.28; Wawa 8605, 25.25; Zoro Tools Inc,
74.97; Total Wells Fargo Credit Card Set-
tlement: 26,620.70;
ADJOURN
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 12:46
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $476.62.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Holy Smoke, Inc. has applied for a Re-
zone to rezone 11.85 acres from Low
Density Residential District to Highway
Service District and to amend the Pen-
nington County Comprehensive Plan to
change the Future Land Use from
Planned Unit Development Sensitive to
Highway Service District located on All of
Ben Bolt Lode, MS; Section 6, T2S, R6E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota,
one-half mile south of the Keystone Y on
Highway 16A, in accordance with Section
508 of the Pennington County Zoning Or-
dinance.
William Bennett; Renner & Associates –
Agent, has applied for a Rezone to re-
zone 12.54 acres from Limited Agriculture
District to Low Density Residential District
and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Planned Unit Devel-
opment Sensitive to Low Density Resi-
dential District located on Jolly No. 1 Lode
M.S. 527, less Tracts 2, 3, and 4 of Sum-
mit Peak Estates Subdivision and less
right-of-way; Jolly No. 2 Lode M.S. 528,
less Tracts 2 and 3 of Summit Peak Es-
tates Subdivision and less right-of-way;
and, Jolly No. 3 Lode M.S. 529, less
Tracts 1, 2 and 4 of Summit Peak Estates
Subdivision and less right-of-way; all of
Sections 32 and 33, T1S, R5E, BHM,
Pennington County, South Dakota, two
miles east of Hill City, along Old Hill City
Road, in accordance with Section 508 of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
16th day of July 2013. At this time, any
person interested may appear and show
cause, if there be any, why such requests
should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $26.05.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Mitch Morris has applied to Rezone from
General Agriculture District and Light In-
dustrial District to General Commercial
District and to amend the Comprehensive
Plan to change the Future Land Use from
Limited Agriculture District to General
Commercial District located on the follow-
ing metes and bounds descriptions:
Being 151.36 acres of land located in the
E1/2 of Section 32, Township 1 North,
Range 8 East of the Black Hills Meridian,
Pennington County, South Dakota, said
151.36 acres of land being more particu-
larly described by metes and bounds as
follows, all measurements are to be con-
sidered as being followed by the words
“more or less”; BEGINNING at the south-
west corner of Lot 1 of the SW1/4 SE1/4
of Section 32, Township 1 North, Range
8 East of the Black Hills Meridian, on the
south line of Section 32 at the intersection
of the east right-of-way line of South
Dakota Highway 79; Thence, North
06°32'53" West, along the west line of
said Lot 1 of the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section
32 and east right-of-way line of SD High-
way 79, a distance of 4310.98 feet to a
point on the easterly line of Lot A of the
NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32 as shown on
plat recorded in Highway Plat Book 9,
Page 93, in the office of the Pennington
County Register of Deeds, in a curve from
which the center of curvature bears North
48°17'34” West a distance of 103.00 feet;
Thence, southwesterly, following the
easterly line of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, along a curve to the
right having a radius of 103.00 feet, a
central angle of 35°53', for an arc dis-
tance of 64.51 feet to a point of tangency;
Thence, South 77°35'27” West, continu-
ing to follow the easterly line of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, a dis-
tance of 4.12 feet to a point for corner on
the east right-of-way line of SD Highway
79, in a curve from which the center of
curvature bears South 73°13'38” West a
distance of 3920 feet; Thence, northwest-
erly, along a curve to the left having a ra-
dius of 3920 feet, a central angle of
00°29'02", for an arc length of 33.11 feet
to point for corner on the centerline of the
alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32; Thence, North
77°35'27” East, following the centerline of
the alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, a distance of 6.78
feet to a point of curvature; Thence,
northeasterly, continuing to follow the
centerline of the alignment of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, along
a curve to the left having a radius of 70.00
feet, a central angle of 84°05'03", for an
arc length of 102.73 feet to a point of tan-
gency; Thence, North 06°29'36” West,
continuing to follow the centerline of the
alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, a distance of 606.16
feet to a point of curvature; Thence,
northwesterly, continuing to follow the
centerline of the alignment of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, along
a curve to the left having a radius of
1432.39 feet, a central angle of
05°45'52", for an arc length of 144.11 feet
to point for corner on the west line of the
E1/2 of Section 32; Thence, North
00°01'24” East, along the west line of the
E1/2 of Section 32, a distance of 206.71
feet to the northwest corner of the E1/2 of
Section 32; Thence, South 89°48'35”
East, along the north line of the E1/2 of
Section 32, a distance of 2656.84 feet to
the northeast corner of Section 32;
Thence, South 00°04'45” West, along the
east line of Section 32, a distance of
500.00 feet to a point for corner; Thence,
North 89°48'35” West, parallel to and 500
feet distant from the north line of the E1/2
of Section 32, a distance of 1514.54 feet
to a point for corner; Thence, South
06°22'35” East, a distance of 4844.00
feet to a point for corner on the south line
of the E1/2 of Section 32; Thence, North
89°36'35” West, along the south line of
the E1/2 of Section 32, a distance of
1088.72 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING and containing 151.36 acres, more
or less, of land, one-half mile south of
Rapid City on Highway 79, in accordance
with Section 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Being 30.49 acres of land located in the
N1/2 NW1/4 of Section 33, Township 1
North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, said 30.49 acres of land being
more particularly described by metes and
bounds as follows, all measurements are
to be considered as being followed by the
words “more or less”; BEGINNING at the
northwest corner of Section 33, Township
1 North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian; Thence, South 89°51'35" East,
along the north line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 2656.84 feet to the
northeast corner of the NW1/4 of Section
33; Thence, South 00°08'05” West, along
the east line of the NW1/4 of Section 33,
a distance of 500.00 feet to a point for
corner; Thence, North 89°51'35” West,
parallel to and 500 feet distant from the
north line of the NW1/4 of Section 33, a
distance of 2656.35 feet to a point for cor-
ner on the west line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33; Thence, North 00°04'45” East, a
distance of 500.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING and containing 30.49 acres,
more or less, of land, one-half mile south
of Rapid City on Highway 79, in accor-
dance with Section 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Mitch Morris has applied to Rezone
200.73 acres from General Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District
and to amend the Comprehensive Plan to
change the Future Land Use from Limited
Agriculture District to Suburban Residen-
tial District located on the following metes
and bounds description: Being 200.73
acres of land located in the NE1/4 of Sec-
tion 32 and in the NW1/4 of Section 33,
Township 1 North, Range 8 East of the
Black Hills Meridian, Pennington County,
South Dakota, said 200.73 acres of land
being more particularly described by
metes and bounds as follows, all meas-
urements are to be considered as being
followed by the words “more or less”;
COMMENCING, for location purposes
only, at the northeast corner of Section 32
also being the northwest corner of Sec-
tion 33, Township 1 North, Range 8 East
of the Black Hills Meridian; Thence, South
00°04'45" West, along the common line
between Section 32 and Section 33, a
distance of 500.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING of the herein described
tract; Thence, South 89°51'35" East, par-
allel to and 500 feet distant from the north
line of the NW1/4 of Section 33, a dis-
tance of 2656.35 feet to a point for corner
on the east line of the NW1/4 of Section
33; Thence, South 00°08'05” West, along
the east line of the NW1/4 of Section 33,
a distance of 2165.91 feet to a point for
corner; Thence, North 89°41'05” West,
along the south line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 2654.26 feet to the
southwest corner of the NW1/4 of Section
33 also being the southeast corner of the
NE1/4 of Section 32; Thence, North
89°42'51” West, along the south line of
the NW1/4 of Section 32, a distance of
1270.58 feet to a point for corner;
Thence, North 06°22'35” West, a distance
of 2169.92 feet to a point for corner, 500
feet south of the north line of the NE1/4
of Section 32; Thence, South 89°48'35"
East, parallel to and 500 feet distant from
the the north line of the NE1/4 of Section
32, a distance of 1514.54 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING and containing
200.73 acres, more or less, of land, one-
half mile south of Rapid City on Highway
79, in accordance with Section 508 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 22nd July 2013. At this time, any per-
son interested may appear and show
cause, if there be any, why such requests
should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $73.38.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Pennington County Planning Commission
and the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners will hold a public hearing
to consider the following proposed ordi-
nance amendment to the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance adopted as an
adjunct to the Pennington County Com-
prehensive Plan:
OA 13-02 – Amendment to Section 103
“Construction Permit Definitions” and
Section 507(A) “Construction Permits” of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
Said hearing will be held by the Planning
Commission on Monday, July 22, 2013,
at 9:00 a.m. and the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners on Tuesday, Au-
gust 6, 2013, at 10:30 a.m. in the Com-
missioners’ Meeting Room at the Pen-
nington County Courthouse, Rapid City,
South Dakota. Any interested party may
appear and be heard. Copies of the pro-
posed amendments may be viewed at the
Planning Department located at 315 St.
Joseph Street, Suite 118, Rapid City,
South Dakota, during regular business
hours.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $18.43.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
ON LICENSE
APPLICATIONS FOR SALE
OF MALT BEVERAGE
The Board of County Commissioners of
Pennington County, South Dakota on
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at their meeting
that commences at 9:00 A.M., in the
County Commissioners’ Meeting Room in
the Pennington County Courthouse at
Rapid City, South Dakota, will consider
the following malt beverage license appli-
cations to operate outside of municipali-
ties:
NEW RETAIL (ON-OFF SALE) MALT
BEVERAGE LICENSE
COUSINS BIG CHAIR, Reynolds & Liv-
ingston LLC, 22491 US Highway 385 S,
Deadwood 57732, Lot L of SW ¼, SW ¼,
Section 7, T2N, R5E, BHM Pennington
County, South Dakota; Boyle S/D that
Part of Lot L, located in Pennington
County, South Dakota.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE AP-
PROVAL OR REJECTION OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LICENSES MAY
APPEAR AND BE HEARD.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $12.39.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
SPECIAL ASSESSMENT
EASTERN PENNINGTON COUNTy
AMBULANCE DISTRICT
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE as a result of
certain properties being exempt from
taxes collected for the Ambulance District
a change from a tax levy to a special as-
sessment is required. The Eastern Pen-
nington County Ambulance District Board
of Directors will hold a public meeting on
Tuesday, July 16th at 7:00pm at the Wall
Community Center meeting room, 501
Main Street, Wall, SD 57790. The pur-
pose of this meeting will be to inform the
members of the district of this required
change. All membership of the District is
encouraged to attend.
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $8.66.
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 10 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Proceedings of Pennington
County Commissioners
(cont. from previous page)
Need a print job
done fast?
Call us for all your printing needs.
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
279-2565 or 859-2516.
Offices in Philip, Wall, Kadoka, Murdo,
Faith, Bison, & New Underwood.
(First Notice)
WEST RIVER WATER DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING TO ADOPT Fy 2014, BUDGET
A public hearing will be held at the Murdo Project Office, 307 Main St., Murdo, SD
on July 17, 2013, at 10:45 AM (CDT) to consider the proposed Water Development
District budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014, beginning January 1, 2014.
PRELIMINARy Fy 2014, BUDGET:
GENERAL
APPROPRIATIONS: FUND
01 Board of Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,600
02 Administration & Technical Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,660
03 Legal and Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,500
04 Capital Outlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
05 Project Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156,570
06 Contingency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,000
07 WDD Revolving Fund Repayment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
09 Capital Reserve Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
TOTAL FY 2014, APPROPRIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188,330
MEANS OF FINANCE:
310 Taxes (except FY 2013 Levy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,800
350 Intergovernmental Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
360 Miscellaneous Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500
370 Other Financing Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76,280
SUBTOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78,580
WDD Tax Levy Request for FY 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109,750
TOTAL MEANS OF FINANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188,330
The purpose of holding this hearing is to provide the public an opportunity to con-
tribute to and comment on the Water Development District proposed operating budget
for Fiscal Year 2014.
Persons interested in presenting data, opinions, and arguments for and against the
proposed budget may appear, either in person or by representative, at the hearing and
be heard and given an opportunity for a full and complete discussion of all items in the
budget.
Published July 4, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $51.14.
WALL SCHOOL
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
JUNE 12, 2013
The Board of Education of the Wall
School District #51-5 met in regular ses-
sion on Wednesday, June12, 2013, in the
Library of Wall School. Members present:
Chairperson Eisenbraun, Vice-Chairper-
son Johnson, Members Cordes, Williams,
Bielmaier, and Trask. Also attending
were Superintendent Rieckman, Busi-
ness Manager Mohr, Elementary Princi-
pal Sykora, Pandi Pittman, Samra Trask,
Kent Anderson, John Hess, and Laurie
Hindman. Chairperson Eisenbraun
called the meeting to order at 7:01 p.m.
All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.
Business Manager Mohr took a roll call of
the board members. Member Anderson
was absent.
The Pledge of Allegiance was recited.
4802. Trask moved to approve the
agenda. Seconded by Bielmaier. Motion
carried.
4803. Johnson moved to approve the
consent agenda as follows: Seconded by
Cordes. Motion carried.
•Approve minutes of May 8, 2013
board meeting.
•Approve June claims.
•Approve 2013-14 Summer School
Contracts: Ashley Kier, Title I - $2,552.55;
Rachel McConaghy – Title I - $3,057.60;
Susan Willis, Special Education -
$2,558.64.
•Approve 2013-14 Staff Contracts: Jes-
sica Kroells, Secretary - $9.50/hr.
•Approve 2013-14 Activity Contracts:
Heidi Coller, Head Gymnastics -
$2,728.00; Ryan Dinger, Head Boys Bas-
ketball - $2,528.00; Tracy Enders, Assis-
tant Gymnastics - $1,866.00; Connie
Wolf, FCCLA Advisor - $1,344.00.
•Approve lane change for Pandi
Pittman from MA12 to MA30 in the
amount of $750.00.
•Approve resignation from Susie
Westby, with regret.
•Approve resignation from Amy Ze-
broski, with regret.
•Congratulations to Tyler Peterson for
placing 2nd in Triple Jump and to Laketon
McLaughlin for placing 5th in Shot Put at
the State Track Meet.
•Congratulations to the Boys Golf
Team for placing 6th at State and to Lane
Hustead for placing 4th individually.
•Congratulations to Mark Ammann for
being named Region Coach of the Year.
GENERAL FUND
A & B WELDING CO, AG SUPPLIES,
30.30; ARTISTOCRAFT, SUPPLIES,
42.00; BARNETT, SHARON, MAY MLG,
142.45; BLACK HILLS CHEMICAL CO.,
SUPPLIES, 20.00; BLASIUS, BRETT OR
PAULA, APR-MAY MLG, 68.82; CAMP-
BELL, ELLA, REIMBURSEMENT, 43.25;
CARTER, ANGELA, MAR-MAY MLG,
572.77; CITY OF WALL, VACANCY PUB-
LICATION, 14.30; CORDES, PAIGE,
SEPT-MAY MLG, 399.60; CRAWFORD,
TRACIE, APR-MAY MLG, 275.28;
CROWN OIL CO., FUEL, 1,670.00;
DAYS INN, STATE GOLF ROOMS,
414.00; DELGER, JACQUELYN, REIM-
BURSEMENT, 43.25; DOUGLAS HIGH
SCHOOL, FRESHMAN IMPACT
LUNCHES, 31.20; EARTHGRAINS BAK-
ING COMPANIES, INC., AWARDS BAN-
QUET FOOD, 24.00; ELSHERE, STACY,
MAY MLG, 64.75; FAUSKE, TIM OR
ERIN, MAY MLG, 248.64; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, MAINT/GAS/STATE
GOLF/TRAVEL, 1,338.17; FRINK,
AMANDA, MAY MLG, 105.82; GABRIEL,
HEATHER, JAN-MAY MLG, 987.75; GIB-
SON, JANELLE, MAY MLG, 159.84;
GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLOGIES,
TELEPHONE MAINT, 418.44; GOLDEN
WEST TELEPHONE COOP., TELE-
PHONE, 184.91; GRENSTINER, RA-
MONA, DEC-MAY MLG, 633.44;
HEATHERSHAW, VERONICA, MAY
MLG, 79.92; HILL CITY SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, REGION GOLF SHARE, 72.00;
HILLYARD FLOOR CARE, SUPPLIES,
161.12; KADOKA SCHOOL DISTRICT
35-1, REGION TRACK DUES, 180.00;
KELLY RICHTER, DAWN, APR-MAY
MLG, 124.32; KEN'S REFRIGERATION,
PH - WATER FOUNTAIN REPAIR, 87.56;
KIER, ASHLEY, MAY MLG, 130.24;
KROGMAN, CAROLYN, APR-MAY MLG,
66.60; LUEDEMAN, DANA, MAY MLG,
113.96; LURZ PLUMBING, FOOTBALL
FIELD SPRINKLERS, 209.18; MARCO,
INC., COPIER CONTRACT, 936.18; Mc-
CONNELL, GWEN, MAY MLG, 165.76;
MCKAY, LYNN, SEPT-MAY MLG,
1,918.08; MOON, LISA, APR-MAY MLG,
439.56; PAULSEN, AIMEE, MAY MLG,
83.92; PENNINGTON COUNTY
COURANT, MAY MINUTES, 200.03;
PHILLIPS66, CONOCO, 76, GAS,
311.11; RANCOUR, ROBERTA, JAN-
MAY MLG, 619.67; RAUSCH, ANNE JO,
MAY MLG, 91.76; REINHART FOOD-
SERVICE, L.L.C., AWARDS BANQUET
FOOD, 93.40; RIECKMAN, DENNIS,
TRAVEL, 936.82; RULAND, MICHELLE,
SEPT-MAY MLG, 368.52; SAM'S CLUB,
ERROR IN PYMT AMT, 0.01; SAWVELL,
JACKIE, MAR-MAY MLG, 383.50;
SAWVELL, LANIECE, MAR-MAY MLG,
153.92; SDSSA, CONF FEE, 150.00;
SHEARER, MEGHAN, MAY MLG,
400.19; SHIFFLER EQUIPMENT
SALES, SUPPLIES, 18.25;
SKILLINGSTAD, DORREEN, MAY MLG,
141.26; SKILLINGSTAD, KORTNEY,
MAY MLG, 103.60; SUNDALL, KELLI,
MLG, 74.37; SUPER 8 MOTEL - SIOUX
FALLS, STATE TRACK ROOMS, 800.00;
US FOODSERVICE, AWARDS BAN-
QUET FOOD, 83.36; VANWAY TROPHY
& AWARD, AWARDS, 1,055.12; VERI-
ZON WIRELESS, CELL PHONE, 125.10;
WAGNER, TOBY OR JESSICA, SEPT-
MAY MLG, 710.40; WALKER REFUSE,
GARBAGE, 569.40; WALL BUILDING
CENTER, SUPPLIES, 225.27; WALL
FOOD CENTER, STAFF APPRECIA-
TION SUPPER, 813.32; WALL GOLF
COURSE, STAFF APPRECIATION SUP-
PER, 392.54; WALL POST OFFICE-
USPS, PO BOX RENT, 106.00; WALL
WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER,
1,003.92; WEST RIVER ELECTRIC
COOP., ELECTRICITY, 7,179.43; WEST-
ERN STATES FIRE PROTECTION CO.
, FIRE INSPECTION, 260.00; WILSON,
RONDA, SEPT-MAY MLG, 198.32;
YOUNGS, WINDOW OPERATOR,
64.25; ZELFER, BRANDON OR JES-
SICA, MAY MLG, 253.82.
FUND TOTAL: 30,588.04
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND
BLACK HILLS SPECIAL SERVICES,
SERVICES, 424.00; CHILDREN'S CARE
HOSPITAL & SCH, SERVICES,
9,588.20; CHILDREN'S CARE HOSPI-
TAL, SERVICES, 423.00, PHILLIPS66,
CONOCO, 76, GAS, 21.14.
FUND TOTAL: 10,456.34
FOOD SERVICE FUND
CLARK, ANNE JO, LUNCH REFUND,
2.10; DEAN FOODS-NORTH CENTRAL,
MILK, 446.93; EARTHGRAINS BAKING
COMPANIES, INC., FOOD, 57.00; EN-
RIQUEZ, SHANDA RAE, LUNCH RE-
FUND, 7.76; GARLAND, CURTIS,
LUNCH REFUND, 2.00; GOLDEN WEST
TELEPHONE COOP., TELEPHONE,
9.61; HAPNEY, DEB, LUNCH REFUND,
27.50; OLSON, DAVE, LUNCH RE-
FUND, 13.90; REINHART FOODSER-
VICE, L.L.C. , FOOD, 931.07;
SCHULZ, GINA, LUNCH REFUND,
62.60; US FOODSERVICE, FOOD,
770.75; WALL FOOD CENTER, FOOD,
46.32; WALL WATER DEPARTMENT,
WATER, 13.71; WEST RIVER ELEC-
TRIC COOP., ELECTRICITY, 293.04.
FUND TOTAL: 2,684.29
WALL AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
CLASSROOM DIRECT, WASP SUP-
PLIES, 204.29; DAKOTA INK & TONER,
INK FOR PRINTER, 114.50; DISCOUNT
SCHOOL SUPPLY, WASP CRAFTS,
295.55; EARLY CHILDHOOD CONNEC,
5.00; GOLDEN WEST TELEPHONE
COOP., TELEPHONE, 27.22; SAM'S
CLUB, WASP GROCERIES, 425.87;
WALL BUILDING CENTER, RAISED
GARDEN BED, 660.00; WALL FOOD
CENTER, GROCERIES, 465.85; WALL
WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER, 38.85;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELEC-
TRICITY, 830.27.
FUND TOTAL: 3,067.40
CHECKING ACCOUNT TOTAL:
46,796.07
Mohr discussed the changes in coverage
values for the property/liability insurance.
The next item on the agenda was ‘Ap-
prove Resolution 13-3, Property/Liability
Insurance Renewal’.
Resolution 13-3.
ASB Property Liability
Adoption and Renewal
Motion
‘BE IT HEREBY MOVED
AND RESOLVED by the Wall
School Board of the Wall
School District, acting pursuant
to SDCL ch. 1-24 and SDCL
13-10-3, 13-8-39, and the gen-
eral authority of SDCL title 13,
and hereby adopts, approves,
and ratifies the ASB Property
and Liability Trust Fund Partic-
ipation Agreement, effective as
of the time of adoption of this
Motion.
BE IT FURTHER MOVED
AND RESOLVED that actions
taken under prior versions of
the Protective Trust Joint Pow-
ers Agreement and Bylaws and
the ASB Property and Liability
Trust Fund Participation Agree-
ment since the time and date
the District initially joined said
Trust are hereby ratified and
approved to the same extent
and effect as if each amend-
ment thereto had been sepa-
rately submitted and approved
at the time of its adoption.
BE IT FURTHER MOVED
AND RESOLVED that the Su-
perintendent and Business
Manager are hereby author-
ized to execute, on behalf of
the District, the present ASB
Property and Liability Fund
Participation Agreement as it
presently exists and may from
time to time be amended and
approved pursuant to the By-
laws herein adopted. Each
succeeding Participation
Agreement changing the obli-
gations arising under the Prop-
erty and Liability Fund shall be
submitted to the Board for ap-
proval prior to execution by the
Superintendent and Business
Manager.
IT IS FURTHER MOVED
AND RESOLVED that cover-
age provided in the ASB Prop-
erty and Liability Fund Partici-
pation Agreement shall extend
from 12:01 a.m. CST, July 1,
2013, to 12 midnight CST,
June 30, 2014. The contribu-
tion required for such coverage
is:
1. For PROPERTY
LOSS, replacement cost cov-
erage, $250,000,000.
2. For BOILER and MA-
CHINERY coverage,
$50,000,000.
3. For AUTOMOBILE and
SCHOOL BUS coverage,
$2,000,000 per occurrence/No
annual aggregate.
4. For PERSONAL, BOD-
ILY INJURY, and PROPERTY
DAMAGE, $2,000,000 per oc-
currence/No annual aggregate.
5. For BLANKET
SURETY BOND and CRIME
LOSS, $200,000.
6. For SCHOOL BOARD
LEGAL LIABILITY coverage,
$2,000,000 per occurrence/No
annual aggregate.
TOTAL CONTRIBUTION FOR
ALL COVERAGES, INCLUD-
ING LOSS FUND, ADMINIS-
TRATIVE FEES, LOSS CON-
TROL, AND LOCAL AGENT
COMMISSIONS, IF APPLICA-
BLE, UNDER THE PROP-
ERTY AND LIABILITY FUND
PARTICIPATION AGREE-
MENT IS $25,481.
There is hereby dele-
gated to the Superintendent
the authority to carry out, or to
further delegate subject to his
supervision and responsibility,
the obligations of the District
identified in the Bylaws ap-
proved herein, the Participation
Agreement, and the Master
Contracts provided by the Trust
Administrator. Finally, the
Board hereby agrees to indem-
nify the Trust and its members,
pursuant to the process estab-
lished in the Bylaws approved
herein, the full amount of any
assessment levied by the Trust
Board pursuant to the Bylaws
and the full amount of any con-
tribution agreed to in the cur-
rent or subsequent Participa-
tion Agreements approved by
the Board as submitted upon
proper vouchers.’
4804. Trask moved to approve Resolu-
tion 13-3. Seconded by Johnson. Motion
carried.
The next item on the agenda was ‘Ap-
prove Resolution 13-4, Workers’ Com-
pensation Insurance Renewal’.
Resolution 13-4.
ASB Workers’
Compensation Fund
Adoption and Renewal
Motion
‘BE IT HEREBY MOVED
AND RESOLVED by the Wall
School Board of the Wall
School District, acting pursuant
to SDCL ch. 1-24 and SDCL
13-10-3, 13-8-39, and the gen-
eral authority of SDCL title 13,
and hereby adopts, approves,
and ratifies the ASB Workers’
Compensation Trust Fund Par-
ticipation Agreement as at-
tached hereto as EXHIBIT A,
effective as of the time of adop-
tion of this Motion.
BE IT FURTHER MOVED
AND RESOLVED that actions
taken under prior versions of
the ASB Protective Trust Joint
Powers Agreement and Bylaws
and ASB Workers’ Compensa-
tion Trust Fund Participation
Agreement since the time and
date the District initially joined
said Trust are hereby ratified
and approved to the same ex-
tent and effect as if each
amendment thereto had been
separately submitted and ap-
proved at the time of its adop-
tion.
BE IT FURTHER MOVED
AND RESOLVED that the Su-
perintendent and Business
Manager are hereby author-
ized to execute, on behalf of
the District, the present ASB
Workers’ Compensation Fund
Participation Agreement as it
presently exists and may from
time to time be amended and
approved pursuant to the By-
laws herein adopted. Each
succeeding Participation
Agreement changing in any
manner the benefits, contribu-
tions, or obligations arising
under the Workers’ Compensa-
tion Fund shall be submitted to
the Board for approval prior to
execution by the Superintend-
ent and Business Manager.
IT IS FURTHER MOVED
AND RESOLVED that cover-
age provided in the ASB Work-
ers’ Compensation Fund Par-
ticipation Agreement shall ex-
tend from 12:01 a.m. CST, July
1, 2013, to 12 midnight CST,
June 30, 2014. The projected
contribution required for such
coverage as provided in the
ASB Workers’ Compensation
Fund Participation Agreement
is $14,543.
There is hereby dele-
gated to the Superintendent
the authority to carry out, or to
further delegate subject to his
supervision and responsibility,
the obligations of the District
identified in the Bylaws ap-
proved herein, the Participation
Agreement, and the Master
Contracts provided by the Trust
Administrator. Finally, the
Board hereby agrees to indem-
nify the Trust and its members,
pursuant to the process estab-
lished in the Bylaws approved
herein, the full amount of any
assessment levied by the Trust
Board pursuant to the Bylaws
and the full amount of any con-
tribution agreed to in the cur-
rent or subsequent Participa-
tion Agreements approved by
the Board as submitted upon
proper vouchers.’
4805. Trask moved to approve Resolu-
tion 13-4. Seconded by Johnson. Motion
carried.
Next, Rieckman informed the board of the
SDHSAA run-off election for the Division
II Representative and the Large School
Group positions.
4806. Williams moved to support Clay
Anderson of Belle Fourche for the Divi-
sion II position and James Hanson of
Rapid City for the Large School Group
position. Seconded by Bielmaier. Motion
carried.
Rieckman passed around Open Enroll-
ment applications for the board to review.
4807. Trask moved to approve open
enrollment applications for Jacob Linn
and Carter Elshere. Seconded by John-
son. Motion carried.
Rieckman discussed applying for SD De-
partment of Education waivers for Span-
ish II and Algebra I. These waivers would
allow incoming students to take an exit
exam for these classes and receive credit
without being in the class all year.
4808. Trask moved to approve applying
for a waiver for Spanish II. Seconded by
Williams. Motion carried.
4809. Trask moved to approve applying
for a waiver for Algebra I. Seconded by
Cordes. Motion carried.
Next, Rieckman discussed with the board
the possibility of changing the District’s
graduation requirement of 1 credit of
computers. It was discussed at length
that computer skills are integrated in the
regular classroom due to our students
having laptops to utilize. The computer
class will still be offered for those students
who are interested, but the graduation re-
quirement will no longer be in place.
4810. Trask moved to approve remov-
ing the Wall High School graduation re-
quirement of 1 credit of computers. Sec-
onded by Johnson. Motion carried.
Elementary Principal Sykora asked the
Board to agree to the Statement of Assur-
ances required by our federal funding and
to assign the Superintendent to oversee
that the assurances will be followed by
the District.
4811. Johnson moved to approve that
the assurances for the Consolidated Ap-
plication will be followed by the District.
Seconded by Cordes. Motion carried.
Elementary Principal Sykora handed out
copies of the Big White and K-6 hand-
books for the board to review.
Sykora asked the Board for a decision on
whether deposits for Power House card
deposit should be raised from $5 to $10
starting July 1, 2013.
4812. Bielmaier moved to approve rais-
ing the Power House card deposit to $10
beginning July 1, 2013. Seconded by
Johnson. Motion carried.
Business Manager Mohr discussed pay-
ing off the Capital Outlay Certificates
which were used to finance the new
school. It was determined a decision
would be made at the year-end board
meeting on July 27th. The digital sign ad-
vertising was also discussed since the
contracts are completed. It was deter-
mined a decision would be made at the
year-end board meeting of how to move
forward with the advertising.
Superintendent Rieckman discussed the
Golden West security proposals which
were presented at the last meeting.
4813. Cordes moved to approve Rieck-
man’s recommendation of putting in a
buzzer to enter the new school and a
panic button at Big White. Seconded by
Bielmaier. Motion carried with Trask and
Eisenbraun opposed.
Next, Rieckman discussed changing
American Government from 1 credit to a
½ credit and adding a ½ credit of South
Dakota Government/History.
4814. Williams moved to approve
changing American Government from 1
credit to a ½ credit and adding a ½ credit
of South Dakota Government/History.
Seconded by Johnson. Motion carried.
The year-end meeting date was dis-
cussed and was decided as follows:
Thursday, June 27th at 8 pm.
The school year attendance was pre-
sented and discussed.
Rieckman asked for the board to surplus
old desks being stored in the bus barn.
4815. Cordes moved to surplus 95 el-
ementary and 35 high school desks.
Seconded by Trask. Motion carried.
4816. At 8:10 p.m., Johnson moved to
go into Executive Session for the purpose
of discussing personnel, according to
SDCL 1-25-2. Seconded by Trask. Mo-
tion carried.
With no further business brought to the
board Chairperson Eisenbraun declared
the meeting adjourned at 9:32 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Niki Mohr,
Business Manager.
______________
Scot Eisenbraun,
Chairperson
________________
Niki Mohr,
Business Manager
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $321.60.
WALL SCHOOL
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
SPECIAL BOARD MEETING
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
JUNE 27, 2013
The Board of Education of the Wall
School District #51-5 met in special ses-
sion on Thursday, June 27, 2013, in the
Wall School Library. Members present:
Vice-Chairperson Johnson, Members
Cordes, Anderson, Williams, Bielmaier,
and Trask. Also attending were Superin-
tendent/7-12 Principal Rieckman, Busi-
ness Manager Mohr, Elementary Princi-
pal Sykora, Glen Lakner, Glen Alishouse,
Betty Alishouse, and Laurie Hindman.
Vice-Chairperson Johnson called the
meeting to order at 8:00 p.m.
All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.
Business Manager Mohr took a roll call of
the board members. Chairperson Eisen-
braun was not present.
The Pledge of Allegiance was recited.
4817. Trask moved to approve the
agenda. Seconded by Cordes. Motion
carried.
4818. Anderson moved to approve the
consent agenda as follows: Seconded by
Bielmaier. Motion carried.
•Approve minutes of June 12, 2013
board meeting.
•Approve additional June claims.
•Approve 2013-2014 activity contracts:
Kent Anderson, Assistant Track Coach -
$1,986.00; Rusty Lytle, Head MS Girls
Basketball Coach - $1,956.00
GENERAL FUND
ASBSD PROPERTY/LIABILITY FUND,
2013-14 PROPERTY LIABILITY,
26,308.00; BLACK HILLS STATE UNI-
VERSITY, CAMSE SERVICES, 717.19;
CABANA BANNERS, BANNER UP-
DATES, 24.00; DEUTSCHER, EVAN,
SEPT-MAY MLG, 1,849.26; FIRST IN-
TERSTATE BANK, TRAVEL/MEMBER-
SHIP, 331.00; GOLDEN WEST TECH-
NOLOGIES, KEY CARDS, 293.50; MER-
RILL, LESLIE, SEPT-MAY MLG,
1,642.80; MOON, JAMI, SEPT-MAY
MLG, 1,274.73; PHILLIPS66, CONOCO,
76, GAS, 235.77; RIECKMAN, DENNIS,
MILEAGE, 44.40; SD DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH, NURSING SERVICES, 160.00;
TRUST AND AGENCY, REIMBURSE IM-
PREST, 2,392.53; TWILIGHT FIRST
AIDS, AED PADS, 452.00; WALL BUILD-
ING CENTER, SUPPLIES, 94.49;
WARNE CHEMICAL & EQUIPMENT
CO., LAWN PRO 5 ROUND 2, 256.00;
WEX BANK, GAS, 42.51; WORKERS
COMP FUND, WORKERS COMP INS,
11,692.37.
FUND TOTAL: 47,810.55
CAPITAL OUTLAy
WARNE CHEMICAL & EQUIPMENT
CO., PLAYGROUND GRASS SEED,
974.80.
FUND TOTAL: 974.80
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND
PARENT, MILEAGE, 652.44; CHIL-
DREN'S CARE HOSPITAL & SCH,
SERVICES, 9,995.34; CHILDREN'S
CARE HOSPITAL, SERVICES, 274.00;
TRUST AND AGENCY, AUTISM WORK-
SHOP REG, 375.00; WORKERS COMP
FUND, WORKERS COMP INS, 960.03;
PARENT, MILEAGE, 177.60.
FUND TOTAL: 12,434.41
FOOD SERVICE FUND
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, SNA MEM-
BERSHIP, 36.25; SNA OF SD, SCHOOL
NUTRITION REG, 190.00; WORKERS
COMP FUND, WORKERS COMP INS,
1,890.60.
Fund Total: 2,116.85
WALL AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, WASP
PRINTER, 200.26; HILDEBRAND CON-
CRETE CONSTRUCTION, KID'S GAR-
DEN TOP SOIL, 178.00; SYKORA, JEA-
NINE, KIDS GARDEN SUPPLIES, 32.18;
WALMART COMMUNITY BRC, KIDS
GARDEN SUPPLIES, 65.00.
FUND TOTAL: 475.44
CHECKING ACCOUNT TOTAL:
63,812.05
Mohr referred the board to a copy of the
budget supplement.
4819. Bielmaier moved to approve
Resolution No. 13-5. Seconded by Trask.
Motion carried.
Mohr discussed paying off the capital out-
lay certificates used to finance the new
school. The district is eligible to pay them
of on September 1, 2013 and would save
approximately $30,000 in interest.
4820. Trask moved to approve paying
off the district’s capital outlay certificates.
Seconded by Cordes. Motion carried.
Next, Mohr discussed the digital sign ad-
vertising. There was a consensus by the
board to offer current advertisers the op-
tion for a 3 year contract at $400 per year
and to offer new advertisers the option for
a 3 year contract at $800 per year. Each
of our current businesses advertising on
the digital sign have already completed a
5 year contract at $800 per year.
With no further business brought to the
board, Chairperson Eisenbraun declared
the meeting adjourned at 8:19 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Niki Mohr,
Business Manager.
______________
Scot Eisenbraun,
Chairperson
________________
Niki Mohr,
Business Manager
Published July 4, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $95.06.
Pennington County Courant • July 4, 2013 • Page 11 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
People read the
newspaper for many
different reasons. Some want to
stay abreast of the latest local, state and
national news, while others read the sports
pages word-for-word. Still others scan
the latest classifieds.
Call or stop by your local newspaper
office today to subscribe.
Pennington Co. Courant
Box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
GENERAL CAPITAL SPEC. ED. IMPACT AID LUNCH WASP TOTAL
OUTLAy FUNDS
BEGINNING BALANCE:
04-30-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$215,120.3 . . . . . . .$371,683.02 . . . . . . .$20,846.4 . . . . . . . . . .$3,421,083.87 . . . . . .$7,086.24 . . . . . . . . .$5,906.76 . . . . . .$4,041,726.64
Receipts:
Local Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$246,613.92 . . . . . .$130,358.93 . . . . . . .$91,503.28 . . . . . . . . .$508.60 . . . . . . . . . . .$3,770.80 . . . . . . . . .5,685.73 . . . . . . . .$478,441.26
County Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,882.93 . . . . . . .$157.14 . . . . . . . . . .$110.71 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,150.78
State Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,343.00 . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,343.00
Federal Sources: . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$602,597.82 . . . . . . . .$4,146.61 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$606,744.43
Other Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
General Journal Revenue: . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
Total to be
accounted for: . . . . . . . . . . .$516,960.17 . . . . . .$502,199.09 . . . . . . .$112,460.42 . . . . . . . .$4,024,190.29 . . . . . .$15,003.65 . . . . . . . .$11,592.49 . . . . .$5,182,406.11
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . . .$205,774.29 . . . . . .$15,496.52 . . . . . . . .$29,219.03 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,050.79 . . . . . . . .$2,069.32 . . . . . . .$262,609.95
General Journal
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
EOM BALANCE:
05-31-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$311,185.88 . . . . . .$486,702.5 . . . . . . . .$20,846.43 . . . . . . . . .$4,024,190.2 . . . . . . .$7,917.4 . . . . . . . . . .$9,523.17 . . . . . .$4,919,796.16
SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET RESOLUTION
RESOLUTION NO. 13-5.
ADOPTION OF SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET:
Let it be resolved, that the school board of the Wall School District #51-5, in accordance
with SDCL 13-11-3.2 and after duly considering the proposed supplemental budget,
hereby approves and adopts the following supplemental budget in total:
General SPED C.O. F.S. WASP
Fund Fund Fund Fund Fund
Appropriations:
Elementary
Program............$25,000.00.....................................................................................
Title I Program ......35,000.00.......................................................................................
REAP Program.....20,000.00.......................................................................................
Superintendent .....7,000.00.........................................................................................
Custodial ...............13,000.00.......................................................................................
Special Education
Program..................................$15,000.00 ..............................................................
Capital Outlay ....................................................$31,500.00........................................
Food Service
Program.................................................................................$5,000.00..................
WASP Program............................................................................................$5,000.00
Total
Appropriations...$100,000.00..$15,000.00 ....$31,500.00 .....$5,000.00..$5,000.00
Means of Finance:
National Minerals ..$45,000.00...........................$22,000.00........................................
Title I Program ......35,000.00.......................................................................................
REAP Program.....20,000.00.......................................................................................
Budgeted
Revenue/FB......0.00...............$15,000.00 ....31,500.00 .......$5,000.00..$5,000.00
Total Means
of Finance.........$100,000.00..$15,000.0 ......$31,500.00 .....$5,000.00..$5,000.00
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEF-
SAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY
DDQ
TUESDAY, AUG. 6: FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 13: SPECIAL YEAFLINC
& EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC
& EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC
& SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF
CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK
COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE & WEICH-
UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK
COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|-
f|ed NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
WEANED CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE
PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK
COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL
DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-
DFEEDS CALF & STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE &
THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 16: OPEN CONSICN-
MENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE CAT-
TLE SALE.
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICN-
MENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE CAT-
TLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF
FALL EXTFAVACANZA HOFSE SALE. CAT-
ALOG DEADLINE: MON., AUCUST 5. CO TO
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com FOF CONSICN-
MENT FOFMS.
Pennington County Courant • July 4 2013 • Page 12
Email your
social news,
obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDt CÞevg 1mpo1o
V-b uuto Ic¸ícss cnt¡¸ CD ¡íu¸c¡
Cuíí EtIun, ussístunt suícs nunugc¡
CUSTOM
HAYING
Call
Jace Shearer
685-5964 • Wall
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTIoN: How do I teach my
young daughter to be grateful? I’m
concerned about her selfish atti-
tude. She recently had a birthday,
and as soon as she was finished
unwrapping her gifts she started
looking around for more!
ANSwER: The answer largely
depends on your daughter’s age.
Smaller kids – toddlers, preschool-
ers, and even some children in the
lower elementary grades – may be
a bit too young to understand ideas
like unselfishness and gratitude.
They’re still in the process of
rounding out their self-concept and
grasping what it means to be an
individual “self” as distinguished
from the rest of the world around
them. If your child is only five or
six years old, there’s probably no
reason to be overly concerned
about her behavior.
Of course, it’s a different matter
where older children are con-
cerned. This is where many par-
ents come face to face for the first
time with the impact of our mate-
rialistic, consumer-driven culture.
Advertisers and toy manufactur-
ers aren’t in the business of help-
ing moms and dads teach concepts
like contentment and thankful-
ness. From their perspective, kids
are primarily a lucrative sector of
the “market,” and they design
their advertising campaigns ac-
cordingly. As a result, children
growing up in our society are con-
ditioned to believe that they’re en-
titled to have everything they
want – right now!
One of the best ways you can
counter this mentality is by mod-
eling a grateful and selfless atti-
tude yourself. Actions and example
always speak louder than words.
As you go through your daily rou-
tine, remember to express thank-
fulness to God on a regular basis –
even for simple things like a roof
over your head and food on the
table. Model gratitude in your re-
lationships with others. Make sure
to express thankfulness to friends,
relatives, and co-workers, and not
just when they do something spe-
cial for you. Let people know how
much you appreciate them just for
who they are. While you’re at it,
express that kind of unconditional
gratitude to your daughter as well.
Another way to help your child
develop a grateful heart is by serv-
ing others who are less fortunate.
Volunteer to serve meals at a local
rescue mission. Visit shut-ins at a
nursing home. Consider signing up
to sponsor a poor child in a third-
world country through a ministry
like World Vision or Compassion
International. This is a wonderful
way to increase your entire fam-
ily’s awareness of God’s goodness
and graciousness while getting in
touch with the needs of people
around the world.
If you need further ideas or ad-
ditional information, feel free to
call and speak with a member of
Focus on the Family’s Counseling
Department. Our counselors are
available Monday through Friday
between 6:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.
Mountain-time at 855-771-HELP
(4357) and they’d be happy to as-
sist you in any way they can.
QUESTIoN: What should we
be aware of before adopting a child
who has been abused? We're con-
sidering adopting a child under the
age of two who has been in the fos-
ter-care system for the past year.
At just a few months old he was re-
moved from his birth home be-
cause of abuse. What kind of risks
are we facing?
ANSwER: You deserve a great
deal of credit for your willingness
to adopt a child from such a trou-
bled background. James 1:27 tells
us that genuine godliness – or
“pure and faultless religion,” as
some translations have it – means
looking after orphans and widows
in their distress. It’s obvious that
you’re acting on the basis of a
heartfelt zeal for true righteous-
ness; and with that in mind, we’d
like to encourage you to move for-
ward with your plans. But we also
want to advise you to proceed with
your eyes wide open.
We have good reasons for offer-
ing this kind of warning. The first
two years of life are critical for any
child. Kids who are abused, neg-
lected, or moved from care-giver to
care-giver during this period can
develop significant emotional and
behavioral problems. Some also
suffer from a phenomenon known
as Reactive Attachment Disorder.
This condition is characterized by
an inability to bond with others –
even with adoptive parents who
are extremely loving and nurtur-
ing. Children with this disorder
may also exhibit aggressive ten-
dencies and display little compas-
sion or empathy for others. (Note:
this information is offered purely
for purposes of parental enlighten-
ment. Parents should be careful
about labeling kids too quickly.
The first two years are crucial, but
children who have been placed in
good foster homes have a much
better chance to thrive than those
who haven’t.)
That said, it’s important to add
that every situation is unique. A
great deal depends on the individ-
ual circumstances of the child
you’re planning to adopt and the
type of foster care he received after
he was removed from his home.
There’s no one-size-fits-all pattern
here. Some abused and neglected
children are extremely resilient
and display an astounding ability
to thrive and grow once they’re set-
tled in a stable environment.
We’d suggest that you gather as
much information as you can from
the child’s social worker. If possi-
ble, it would also be a good idea to
talk to the foster parents. This will
give you some indication of the
kind of care he has been receiving
and whether or not he appears to
have any emotional or behavioral
problems. Remember, too, that
problems of this nature are not
necessarily reasons to forgo adop-
tion. True healing comes from God,
and Christian families are in the
best position to provide that for a
hurting child.
If you do decide to adopt this
child, it would be wise to consult
with a psychologist who specializes
in early childhood attachment. He
or she can work with you, the cur-
rent foster parents, and the social
worker to help ease the transition
from the foster care system to your
home.
QUESTIoN: When should we
tell our child that she was
adopted? What’s the best and most
sensitive way to approach this sub-
ject?
ANSwER: A child who was
adopted at birth should be told
about it from a very early age. This
should happen almost as soon as
he or she is capable of understand-
ing language. What’s more, it
should be a recurring theme in
conversations with your child
throughout the growing up years.
Unfortunately, some parents
avoid bringing the issue up when
their kids are young. Why? Be-
cause it makes them uncomfort-
able. Then, as the years go by, they
find themselves faced with the
task of telling an older child some-
thing they’ve been keeping secret.
This can undermine the child’s
sense of security and may result in
feelings of rejection or betrayal.
Naturally, the facts should be re-
vealed and discussed using age-ap-
propriate words and imagery. The
adoption should always be pre-
sented in a highly positive light.
For example, a parent might tell a
two or three-year-old that mommy
and daddy chose her over all the
other children in the world. This
will let her know how special she
is.
When the child is slightly older
– four or five, maybe – you can ex-
plain the difference between a bio-
logical parent and an adoptive par-
ent. Explain that your child has
actually had two different moth-
ers. Her first mommy took care of
her when she was very, very tiny,
inside of her tummy. Then, after
she was born, you brought her
home from the hospital to live with
you because she was so extra-spe-
cial.
Many kids express an interest in
meeting their birth mother during
the teen years. This can often be
arranged in the case of open adop-
tions. It can be a positive experi-
ence for the child, but it has to be
handled sensitively. It isn’t always
a good idea to connect with the
birth family.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer
is excerpted from books authored
by Dr. James Dobson and pub-
lished by Tyndale House Publish-
ers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman of
the Board of Focus on the Family,
a nonprofit organization dedicated
to the preservation of the home.
Copyright 2003 James Dobson,
Inc. All rights reserved. Interna-
tional copyright secured.
by Representative
Kristi Noem
On July 2, 1776, John Adams
sent a letter to his wife Abigail:
“The second day of July, 1776, will
be the most memorable epoch in
the history of America. I am apt to
believe that it will be celebrated by
succeeding generations as the
great anniversary festival.” Al-
though his prediction was two days
premature, Adams’s sentiment was
100 percent accurate.
People all across the state of
South Dakota are preparing for
this upcoming week’s celebration.
Whether you decide to spend it at
the ball fields, on the lake or with
friends and family in your commu-
nity, the Fourth of July is a great
opportunity to pause and give
thanks to all the men and women
who fought for the idea that was
America, as well as all of those who
have sacrificed to protect our coun-
try since its founding.
One of the most inspiring parts
of our nation’s story of independ-
ence is that the Declaration of In-
dependence, which so eloquently
proclaimed our freedom, is still on
display today in the National
Archives in Washington, D.C. If
you ever have the opportunity to
visit our nation’s capital, I encour-
age you to make a point to see this
historic document. The words on
that parchment inspired a revolu-
tion, inspired a movement and
crafted a vision for what a United
States should truly look like.
As President Ronald Reagan
once said, “Freedom is never more
than one generation away from ex-
tinction. We didn’t pass it to our
children in the bloodstream. It
must be fought for, protected and
handed on for them to do the same,
or one day we will spend our sunset
years telling our children and our
children’s children what it was
once like in the United States
where men were free.”
I wish all of you a happy and safe
Fourth of July holiday and hope
you’ll take this opportunity to
share your celebrations with me.
Feel free to send me a tweet @Rep-
KristiNoem or an email through
my website (http://noem.house.gov)
and tell me how you plan on cele-
brating.
Celebrate Independence Day
Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) is
currently seeking intelligent, hard-
working college students to serve as
fall interns in his office in Washing-
ton, D.C., as well as in his offices in
Aberdeen, Rapid City, and Sioux
Falls.
Interns in Senator Thune’s state
offices will participate in constituent
service and state outreach activities,
while students in the Washington,
D.C., office will have the opportunity
to witness the legislative process,
give Capitol tours, and attend Sen-
ate votes and hearings. Both in-state
and Washington, D.C., internships
will allow students to work closely
with constituents, hone their re-
search and writing skills, and learn
a multitude of valuable office skills.
“Interning in a Senate office pro-
vides students with an excellent op-
portunity to experience democracy
in action,” said Thune. “Interns gain
valuable knowledge about both state
and national issues and an under-
standing of the inner workings of a
Senate office. I encourage all stu-
dents to consider applying for this
rewarding experience.”
Senator Thune is a member of the
Senate Committees on Agriculture,
Nutrition, and Forestry; Commerce,
Science, and Transport- ation; and
Finance.
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in Senator
Thune’s Washington, D.C., office
should submit a resume and cover
letter, by July 31, to Senator John
Thune. Attn: Allie Ryan, 511 Dirk-
sen Senate Office Building, Wash-
ington, D.C. 20510. By fax to: 202-
228-5429, or by email to
Allie_Ryan@thune.senate.gov.
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in Senator
Thune’s Sioux Falls, Rapid City, or
Aberdeen offices should submit a re-
sume and cover letter, by July 31,
2013, to Senator John Thune, Attn:
Robin Long, 320 North Main Av-
enue, Suite B, Sioux Falls, SD
57104. Or by email to robin_long@
thune.senate.gov. For more informa-
tion, call 202-224-2321.
Thune’s office accepting fall
internship applications

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
Courant_7-4-13.pdf5.29 MB