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Pennington Co. Courant, July 25, 2013

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Number 30
Volume 108
July 25, 2013
Youth Business Adventure
(YBA) recently completed its 34th
anniversary sessions, hosting 197
high school seniors, along with ed-
ucators and business executives
from across the state of South
Dakota during two week-long ses-
sions.
The first session was held at
Black Hills State University in
Spearfish while the second session
was held at the University of
South Dakota.
Local participants included
Nicole Eisenbraun, Kaitlin
Schreiber and Tyler Peterson.
At YBA, the students and educa-
tors gained vital information about
the business world from those who
work and live in that world, the
business executives or “Company
Advisors” and volunteer speakers.
YBA hosts 34th anniversary sessions
Culex tarsalis mosquito num-
bers are increasing across the
state and more of the mosquitoes
are positive for the West Nile virus
(WNV), says a state health official.
The Culex tarsalis is the pri-
mary carrier of WNV in South
Dakota.
“From the first week of July to
the second, we saw a substantial
increase in Culex mosquitoes and
also a rise in the number of West
Nile positives,” said Lon
Kightlinger, state epidemiologist
for the Department of Health.
“Those higher numbers mean an
increased risk of disease transmis-
sion so it’s important that people
protect themselves with appropri-
They also had the opportunity to
gain college credits for their partic-
ipation in the YBA sessions.
In addition, the schedules in-
cluded a tour of area businesses,
Spearfish Forest Products in
Spearfish and Kolberg Pioneer in
Yankton.
Companies competed in a busi-
ness management simulation, a
Business Quiz Bowl, produced a
one minute TV commercials, de-
signed a company logo, partici-
pated in a problem solving activity
and presented business plans be-
fore a panel of volunteer judges.
Students also were entertained
with evening activities of bowling,
swimming and dancing.
Since its inception in 1980,
Youth Business Adventure has
been sponsored by the South
Nicole Eisenbraun Kaitlin Schreiber Tyler Peterson
Dakota Chamber of Commerce
and Industry, a statewide business
organization located in Pierre. The
program is completely funded
through contributions from gener-
ous South Dakota business, corpo-
rate and individual sponsors.
Preparations are currently un-
derway for the 35th annual ses-
sions of the Youth Business
Adventure program.
The first session will be held at
the Black Hills State University
from June 1 - June 6, 2014 and the
second at the University of South
Dakota in Vermillion, June 15 -
June 20, 2014.
For further information about
Youth Business Adventure, contact
the local participants or call the
YBA office at 1-800-742-8112.
Mosquito numbers, WNV positives
increasing across South Dakota
ate repellent.”
Kightlinger noted that histori-
cally 90 percent of South Dakota’s
WNV cases have occurred from
mid-July to mid-September.
To date, South Dakota has re-
ported four cases of human West
Nile (Brookings, Buffalo, Jones
and Spink counties) and 23 posi-
tive mosquito pools.
To prevent mosquito bites and
reduce the risk of WNV:
•Use mosquito repellents
(DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eu-
calyptus, or IR3535) and limit ex-
posure by wearing pants and long
sleeves in the evening.
•Limit time outdoors from dusk
to midnight when Culex mosqui-
toes are most active.
•Get rid of standing water that
gives mosquitoes a place to breed.
•Support local mosquito control
efforts.
Personal precautions are espe-
cially important for those at high
risk for WNV – people over 50,
pregnant women, transplant pa-
tients, individuals with diabetes or
high blood pressure, and those
with a history of alcohol abuse.
People with severe or unusual
headaches should see their physi-
cians.
Find WNV prevention informa-
tion on the Web at http://westnile.
sd.gov.
by Laurie Hindman
Eastern Pennington County Am-
bulance District President Wally
Hoffman called their Tuesday, July
16 meeting to order.
A special hearing was held to no-
tify members of the district on the
need to change the tax levy
process. Secretary/Treasurer Car-
olynn Anderson explained to the
audience when the district was
first setup they were working with
the county who said they could im-
plement a tax levy which would ex-
empt ag land from being taxed.
She went on to say when the
state reviewed the plan they said
it’s not possible to go with a tax
levy but with a special assessment.
Anderson has completed a new
spread sheet marking only the
owner/occupied property that was
originally voted on to form the dis-
trict for the county auditor to re-
view.
Anderson noted the special as-
sessment can’t exceed 60 cents of
the total amount to be taxed. She
calculated the district would re-
ceive $56,957.00 for 2014, which is
a slight decrease since they don’t
have a mill levy for capital outlay
anymore.
Butch Kitterman wanted to
know if they could do this since it
wasn’t voted on.
Anderson passed out the official
ballot that was used to form the
district. In the state’s attorney ex-
planation it states, “The District,
as a governmental entity, will have
the authority to organize, estab-
lish, equip, maintain, and super-
vise an ambulance service to serve
the District and to finance its ac-
tivities through taxes, assess-
ments, and other financing
mechanism authorized by South
Dakota law.”
Hoffman expressed the district
should stay with the six mills with
other board members also agree-
ing. A motion was made and ap-
proved to keep the special
assessment at 60 cents per thou-
sand of the total owner/occupied
valuation of the district.
The 2014 budget will be tabled
until next month so Anderson and
Dawn Hilgenkamp can get to-
gether to see if there are any other
items that will need to be factored
into the 2014 budget.
Hilgenkamp brought an infor-
mational item to the board. She
asked, since EMTs have been is-
sued W2s which makes them ac-
tual employees of the ambulance
district will they fall under the
Obama Health Care law? Ander-
son who has researched the issue
passed out information that she
had found on the computer. Hoff-
man will call Thune or Noem’s of-
fice to see whether the ambulance
district would fall under the
Obama Health Care plan.
Overtime was also discussed for
EMTs, Paramedics and drivers.
Anderson called the Department of
Labor in Rapid City and was in-
formed since the district is a Non-
Profit Organization and they don’t
have an annual income of
$500,000 they are exempt from
paying any overtime.
Mary Kay Wilson came before
the board with a request to in-
crease the wages for the Wall Am-
bulance crew.
She was under the impression
that this matter had already been
discussed and feels that it is not
fair that out-of-town EMTs get
paid more than the Wall crew.
She went on to say its not con-
ducive for a good work environ-
ment and the system is grossly out
of balance.
Wilson noted the Wall crew can
decline the increase if they want
but feels its not fair to them since
they also give up their time for the
ambulance service.
Wilson said if the town EMTs
took the pay increase the total
amount for wages would increase
by $2,700 a month.
Anderson who is looking from
the financial side informed the
board it would increase the wages
by $34,000 or more a year.
Hoffman didn’t disagree with
anything that Wilson said but
noted they are already $10,000
over budget right now for labor
and wondered how they can pay
for the extra wages.
Kitterman will attend the next
ambulance service meeting and
ask whether the town crew would
be willing to drop the run and meal
money to make it a little easier fi-
nancially for the district.
Anderson will call the county to
put a hold on the list of properties
she had submitted to them.
A motion was made and ap-
proved to get an interpretation
from the attorney on the state
statute to see if the special assess-
ment amount can be raised.
The board approved the minutes
with corrections for the June 17
meeting.
The bills and financial report
were approved.
The next ambulance district
meeting will be held on Thursday,
August 15 at 7:00 p.m. at the Wall
Community Center meeting room.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned.
Ambulance district approves
special assessment resolution
Schulz receives
NSU WolfPACT
scholarship
Autumn Schulz, of Wall, S.D.,
has been awarded a $5,000
WolfPACT Scholarship from
Northern State University in
Aberdeen, S.D. Schulz is the
daughter of Troy and Gina
Schulz. She is a graduate of
Wall High School and will
begin classes at NSU in fall
2013. She plans to major in
pre-mortuary science and
business.
~Courtesy Photo
The Relay For Life of Quad
County (RFLQC) is just around
the corner. The event is being held
this year in Wall on September 14
and 15. The West end of South
Boulevard is where the action will
be.
As part of the ceremonies,
RFLQC will be presenting an “in
memory of” or “in honor of” video
during the relay (weather permit-
ting). This will honor people who
are fighting the battle against can-
cer or those that have lost the fight
to cancer. Photos can be submitted
electronically of someone you
would like to honor or remember
in the video.
When submitting a photo please
indicate if the photo is ‘in honor of ’
or “in memory of.” If the photo is
“in memory of” a loved one please
include their birth date and date of
death.
Example of information re-
quired with the photo:
•In Memory of: Name: (As you
want listed with their photo),
Birth Date: and Date of Death: (If
you do not want these dates listed,
please specify that)
•In Honor Of: Name: (As you
Relay For Life of
Quad County — In
Honor/In Memory
of tribute video
want listed with their photo)
To be included in the video all
we ask is that luminaria bags be
purchased … there will be no addi-
tional charge. Luminaria bags can
be purchased from any Relay For
Life team member. Several busi-
nesses in Wall have them avail-
able: Golden West, West River
Electric, Wall Building Center and
Wall Food Center. The luminaria
are $5.00 each. If you need help
scanning a photo, let us know and
we can help with that.
The deadline for submitting photos
is August 12. Please send your
photo as an attachment to:
tkpeters@gwtc.net or lurzcamp@
gwtc.net. If you have any ques-
tions, please contact Sue Peters at
279-2211 or Kelly Lurz at 279-
2249.
The American Cancer Society
Relay For Life is a life-changing
event that gives everyone in com-
munities across the globe a chance
to celebrate the lives of people who
have battled cancer, remember
loved ones lost, and fight back
against this disease. Help us make
this a video to remember!
Teachers and students to partic-
ipate in Foundation’s Park Stew-
ards youth-focused
service-learning program
The National Park Foundation
(NPF), the official charity of Amer-
ica’s national parks, and Univer-
sity of Phoenix® announced that
Badlands National Park is one of
eighteen national parks to receive
a 2013 Park Stewards program
grant.
Now in their second year of pro-
gram sponsorship, the University
provided $187,000 in program
funding to the NPF to help high
school teachers and their students
across the country build a deeper
connection and sense of steward-
ship for their national parks
through curriculum and service
learning projects.
“This innovative program pro-
vides critical support and access to
teachers so that parks nationwide
can be utilized as the living class-
rooms they are,” said Neil Mulhol-
land, President and CEO of the
National Park Foundation.
“Through this unique collabora-
tion, and subsequent development
of rich, relevant curriculum, the
Park Stewards teachers create a
life-long connection to America’s
national parks for their students.”
Badlands National Park is using
the grant to develop stronger part-
nerships with teachers and stu-
dents on the Pine Ridge Indian
Reservation.
Two teachers recently completed
five week residencies in the park,
developing creative ways to con-
nect park resources to their class-
rooms.
Recognizing the importance of
experiential education, the teach-
ers intend to bring their students
to the park to complete service-
learning projects in the coming
school year.
This is an expansion of the
Youth Camp initiative that began
in 2011 Badlands recently released
a video series that explores the im-
pact of national parks in the lives
of students who experience and
learn from nature.
The Park Stewards grant con-
tinues to fund this and other youth
programming.
Grant to engage next generation
of National Park stewards
“Engaging local tribal youth is a
critical component of the tribal na-
tional park that is proposed for the
South Unit of Badlands,” said park
superintendent Eric Brunnemann.
“Someday these students will be
the leaders in their communities
and may even pursue careers in
the National Park Service or part-
ner agencies.”
Since 2009, the Park Stewards
program has made it possible for
88 high school teachers to work in
parks over the summer break, cre-
ating curriculum that will then be
taught to their students in the
coming school year.
During the summer, the teach-
ers and park staff also develop
service-learning projects that will
be implemented by high school
students throughout the course of
the school year.
The projects range from moni-
toring toxic mercury levels or
water quality to repairing historic
forts to creating digital park sto-
ries, and all tie to state academic
standards and are meaningful to
the national parks.
The 2013 Park Stewards pro-
gram will also select one student
from each grantee school team for
a summer internship to help sup-
port and build their interest in
their national parks and the Na-
tional Park Service.
“University of Phoenix is proud
to once again support the National
Park Foundation’s mission to en-
rich America’s national parks and
programs by inspiring generations
of national park enthusiasts,” said
Pat Gottfried, vice president of
Corporate Social Responsibility for
Apollo Group, parent company of
University of Phoenix.
“University of Phoenix is com-
mitted to environmental steward-
ship in our operations, our
sustainability-related degree pro-
grams and our environmental phi-
lanthropy, and we are glad to help
reinforce this commitment
through our support of the Na-
tional Park Foundation and the
teachers and students it impacts.”
For more information about the
participating parks, please visit
the National Park Foundation
website. For more information on
the work of the National Park
Foundation or how you can sup-
port and protect America’s na-
tional parks, please visit
www.nationalparks.org.
Apollo Group, parent company
of University of Phoenix, is dedi-
cated to being a good corporate cit-
izen by serving communities and
individuals across the country.
Through its corporate social re-
sponsibility efforts, Apollo Group
focuses on giving in the areas of
education, workforce readiness
and sustainability. To learn more
about the impact of these efforts,
please visit www.csrreport.s.apollo
.edu/.
About the National
Park Foundation
You are the owner of 84 million
acres of the world’s most treasured
memorials, landscapes, ecosys-
tems, and historic sites -- all pro-
tected in America’s more than 400
national parks.
Chartered by Congress, the Na-
tional Park Foundation is the offi-
cial charity of America’s national
parks.
We work hand in hand with the
National Park Service to connect
you and all Americans to the
parks, and to make sure that they
are preserved for the generations
who will follow.
Join us in supporting your na-
tional parks -- this is your land.
www.nationalparks.org
About University of Phoenix
University of Phoenix is con-
stantly innovating to help students
balance education and life in a rap-
idly changing world.
Flexible schedules, challenging
courses and interactive learning
can help students pursue personal
and career aspirations without
putting their lives on hold.
As the flagship university of
Apollo Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:
APOL), University of Phoenix
serves a diverse student popula-
tion, offering associate, bachelor’s,
master’s and doctoral degree pro-
grams from campuses and learn-
ing centers across the U.S. as well
as online throughout the world.
For more information, visit
http://www.phoenix.edu.
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
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be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
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publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • July 25, 2013 • Page 2
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
JORÐAN TYI£R PARSONS
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bIuo oyos.
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nround fho !nµId CIfy, SÐ nron.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco
Ðoµnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l or
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rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
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SDSU Graduate Student Re-
ceives $2,500 Scholarship from
The Philip American Legion
baseball team won the Belle
Fourche tournament held Friday
and Saturday, July 12-13.
They first defeated the Pied-
mont team 10-9 on Friday. Early
Saturday, they got by the Gillette,
Wyo., team with a 3-2 victory. The
final game was a 12-10 win over
Belle Fourche.
The tournament came after
Philip defeated the Pierre White
Sox 15-8 on Monday, July 8.
On Saturday, August 3, the
South Dakota Game, Fish and
Parks Department will host a free
youth event day at Lake Wag-
goner, north of Philip.
Youth, depending on their ages,
can participate in all four of the
stations. State GF&P officials and
local volunteers will work with
youth on learning and practicing
archery, pellet gun shooting, fish-
ing and viewing demonstrations on
Legion baseball ready for districts
The Philip American Legion baseball team is on a winning streak. It consists of players from a
number of surrounding communities. Back row, from left: coach Kory Foss, Philip, Avery Johnson,
Philip, Zac Stone, Kadoka, Bubba Young, White River, A.J. Bendt, Kadoka, and Nick Young, White
River. Front: Jed Brown, Kadoka, Trevor Anderson, Wall, Chandlier Sudbeck, Kadoka, Clint Stout,
Kadoka, Aaron Janis, Kadoka, and Storm Wilcox, Kadoka. Not pictured: Riley Heltzel, Philip, Cass
Lytle, Wall, and Ryan Van Tassel, Philip. ~Courtesy photo
Though high scoring at its end,
that game’s early score was only 3-
1 going into the seventh inning.
“It (the Belle Fourche tourna-
ment) was very big for the kids,”
said Foss. “They’ve worked hard
for three years, and it paid off.
Winning the tournament was a
very big thing for our program,
with the quality of the teams.”
Foss believes that two years ago
the team had only two wins during
the season. Last year, he believes,
they had only three wins. Now,
“We’ve done okay. We’ve actually
won five in a row,” said Foss.
“We are definitely playing our
best games lately. Which is what
you want to be doing as you go into
regions,” said Foss.
The Philip team went into the
Region 7B Tournament in Winner
on July 18-20 with a 8-12 record so
far this season. The state class B
tournament will be in Webster,
July 26-30.
Sage Gabriel and Emilee Pauley
earned the right to compete at the
National Junior High Finals in
Gallup, N.M. June 20-27, 2013.
The two girls, horses and their
families traveled 1,000 miles to
compete at the Red Rock State
Park, New Mexico.
Over 1,000 contestants from all
over the United States, Canada
and Australia came together to
compete for the National Junior
High title.
The girls also had the opportu-
nity to enjoy other activities as
well: Tug of War competition and
volleyball games against other
states and dances.
Sage and Emilee will have a
chance next spring to compete
again in the junior high division
and try to repeat their trip to Na-
tionals.
Emilee Pauley placed third in
the second go around in the break-
S.D. Farmers Union Foundation
Emily Helms of Creighton, S.D.,
has been selected to receive a
$2,500 agricultural graduate
school scholarship from the South
Dakota Farmers Union Founda-
tion.
Helms is currently a graduate
student in South Dakota State
University’s Natural Resources
Management Department.
She’s expected to graduate with
a master’s degree in biological sci-
ences in December 2014 and plans
to stay in South Dakota and work
in either the range management or
soil conservation field.
Helms earned undergraduate
degrees in agronomy and range
science and a double minor in soil
science and animal science from
SDSU.
She has spent the last year
working as an intern for the Natu-
Philip youth day by local Game, Fish and Parks
trapping. The trapping station will
be run by a state trapper. All sup-
plies will be provided.
Each station is anticipated to
last about an hour, though youth
may pick and chose, or repeat.
Wildlife Conservation Officer Zach
Thomsen said that it will be fine if
some kids want to, for example,
fish the entire time.
A free lunch will be provided,
but it is recommended that indi-
viduals bring extra water to drink.
Though preregistration is not re-
quired, a head count would be ap-
preciated for the needed number of
lunches.
The day’s activities will begin
with registration from 8:00 a.m. to
8:30 a.m.
For more information and to
preregister, call Wildlife Conserva-
tion Officer Zach Thomsen at 859-
3006.
ral Resources Conservation Serv-
ice in Milbank and Brookings. She
grew up on a family farm in west-
ern South Dakota near Creighton
where her family raises commer-
cial beef cattle and wheat.
The Agricultural Graduate
School Scholarship Program was
created in 2013 by the South
Dakota Farmers Union Founda-
tion to offer one $2,500 scholarship
annually to a graduate student
pursuing an advanced degree in an
agricultural field.
The recipient is chosen based on
several criteria including academic
achievement, community involve-
ment, and the applicant’s commit-
ment to improving South Dakota
agriculture.
For more information on the
South Dakota Farmers Union
Foundation, visit www.sdfufoun-
dation.org.
Gabriel and Pauley compete at NJHF
By Wendy Brunnemann
We really enjoyed participating
in the Wall Celebration Parade!
The Library is fortunate to have
the support of many loyal patrons
who volunteered to make this
entry possible. Well Done!
Congratulations to the Wall
Community Library “Not So Preci-
sion Drill Team”!
July is drawing to a close. Don’t
let this month go by without mak-
ing a point to stop by the Library
and participate in at least one of
our summer activities. Story Time
is Fridays at 9 a.m.
We are celebrating Summer
Reading throughout the summer
Emily Pauley
~Courtesy Photo
Sage Gabriel
~Courtesy Photo
away roping with a 2.8 and was
ninth in the first go in goat tying
with a 9.4.
Results:
Round one
•Emilee Pauley: Barrels - 16.8;
Goats - 9.4 in Goats; Breakaway -
no time.
•Sage Gabriel: Pole Bending -
22.2.
Round two
•Emilee Pauley: Barrels - 16.7
+10; Goat Tying -13.8+10; Break-
away - 2.8.
•Sage Gabriel: Pole Bending -
21.9+5.
Wall Community Library
Don’t let summer pass you by!
and Story Time has featured some
neat programs courtesy of our
community partners, the US For-
est Service, Badlands National
Park, SD Game Fish and Parks,
and Head Start.
In August we will welcome the
folks from Minuteman Missile to
round out our Summer Reading
Program.
It has been great to have so
many members of our community
join with us in promoting summer
reading!
Don’t forget our Summer Read-
ing Program features reading logs
to keep track of your reading. All
ages are encouraged to join us!
If you haven’t picked up a reading
log, stop by the Library and get
started!
We have some very cool prizes
donated by our sponsors, Crescent
Lodge #210 F&AM and Hired
Hands Massage and Bodywork.
For the little ones, we have a
Plasmacar, for older readers we
have a Kindle, and for adults we
have a one-hour massage!
How do you win? Finish your
reading log and you will be entered
into a drawing for nifty prizes –
couldn’t be easier!
Our Book Club Meeting is com-
ing up Wednesday, July 31 at 6 pm
at the Library.
For this month we are reading
The Four Corners of the Sky by
Michael Malone. Join us for an
evening of interesting discussion
and interaction.
This e-book can be checked out
from our online system, South
Dakota Titles To Go.
As always, come by and see us
anytime! We are located at 407
Main Street in the historic “Wall
Hut”.
We are open Wednesdays from
12 to 7 p.m., Thursdays from 9
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 – 5
p.m, and Fridays from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m.
Like us on Facebook, Wall Com-
munity Library, or check out our
blog at www. wallcommunityli-
brary.blogspot.com to keep abreast
of upcoming events.
Noem’s Impact Aid Legislation
Passes House Legislation Passed
as Part of the Student Success Act
The U.S. House of Representa-
tives passed H.R. 5, the Student
Success Act, by a vote of 221-207.
Included in the legislation
were provisions previously intro-
duced by Rep. Kristi Noem to reau-
thorize the Federal Impact Aid
Program.
The Student Success Act would
reauthorize the Elementary and
Secondary Education Act, com-
monly referred to as No Child Left
Behind.
This legislation will restore local
control, support effective teachers,
reduce the federal footprint and
empower parents.
Noem’s bipartisan legislation,
which she introduced with Rep.
Rick Larsen (D-WA), improves the
Impact Aid program by increasing
efficiency, eliminating subjectivity,
and providing greater flexibility to
school districts.
Impact Aid helps many South
Dakota school districts with costs
resulting from large amounts of
federally impacted land including
military bases, Indian lands and
federal property. Many of these
provisions were included in the
final bill.
“I believe it’s important that we
maintain a level playing field for
our South Dakota school districts
that are on or near federally im-
pacted land, such as Ellsworth Air
Force Base, nine Indian Reserva-
tions or other federal lands,” said
Rep. Noem. “I’m thankful to my
colleagues in the House for their
support of this common-sense bill
that supports our schools and stu-
dents.”
Impact Aid helps local taxpayers
by reimbursing school districts for
the costs associated with federal
property and educating federally
connected children.
Together, over 1,300 of these im-
pacted school districts educate
more than 11 million children
across the country.
List of South Dakota School Dis-
tricts Receiving Impact Aid:
Andes
Bennett County
Bison
Bon Homme
Chamberlain
Colome Consolidated
Custer
Douglas
Dupree
Eagle Butte
Flandreau
Highmore Harrold
Hill City
Hot Springs
Kadoka Area
Lemmon
Lyman
McIntosh
McLaughlin
Oelrichs
Pierre
Shannon County
Sisseton
Smee
South Central
Stanley Country
Summit
Timber Lake
Todd County
Wagner
Wall
Waubay
White River
Winner
Yankton
Source: Department of Educa-
tion, Fiscal Year 2010
Area News
Pennington County Courant • July 25, 2013• Page 3
ALL types!
Backhoe
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Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
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July 26-27-28-29:
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The South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Commission has pro-
posed a change to the format for
big game depredation pool applica-
tions.
Interested big game hunters
may apply each year for a spot in
a pool of hunters who may be
called upon to help alleviate depre-
dation on agricultural land caused
by big game animals.
While hunters could apply for an
unlimited number of counties in
the past, the change proposed by
the Commission will limit hunters
to a maximum of 10 counties.
In recent years it has been diffi-
cult for GFP to find registered in-
dividuals that are willing to
respond to GFP's request for a
depredation hunt in an adequate
timeframe, primarily because of
weather conditions or the distance
needed to travel.
By limiting the number of coun-
ties to a maximum of 10 counties
per individual, GFP anticipates
that individuals that entered
themselves for depredation hunts
will participate at a higher level
when called upon.
Last winter there were 147
hunting permits issued for turkey
and 195 for deer.
The GFP Commission also final-
ized provisions for potential elk
depredation hunting seasons with
no changes from 2012.
Unlike deer and turkey depreda-
tion hunts, unsuccessful elk li-
cense holders are used if elk
depredation hunts are needed.
In 2012, no elk depredation per-
mits were issued.
The big game depredation hunt
proposals will be finalized at the
August 1-2 GFP Commission
meeting, which will be at the
Framework for winter big
game depredation hunts
Event Center in Watertown. To
view the full proposals on those
seasons, visit: www.gfp.sd.gov/age
ncy/commission/default.aspx and
look under the "rule proposals"
heading.
To comment on the proposal,
send a letter to South Dakota
Game, Fish and Parks Commis-
sion, 523 E. Capitol Ave., Pierre,
SD 57501; or email wild.info@stat
e.sd.us.
Comments on proposal will be
taken until 5 p.m. CDT on July 31.
To be included in the public
record, please include your full
name and city of residence.
To comment in person on these
proposed rule changes, the GFP
Commission will host a public
hearing beginning at 2 p.m. CDT
as part of their meeting on Thurs-
day, August 1.
Interior Frontier Days Rodeo
July 4-5
Bareback Riding: 1. Corey Evans,
Valentine, Neb., 74; 2. Joe Wilson, Long Val-
ley, 72; 3. Chance Englebert, Burdock, 71; 4.
(tie) Lonny Lesmeister, Rapid City, and Wes-
ley Cole, Atkinson, Neb., 67; 5. Shayne O’-
Connell, Rapid City, 66
Barrel Racing: 1. Shelby Vinson, Wor-
thing, 17.04; 2. Jorry Lammers, Carpenter,
Wyo. 17.08; 3. Wendy Suhn, Hermosa, 17.31;
4. (tie) Lana Shorb, Belle Fourche, and Katie
Lensegrav, Interior, 17.36; 5. Kylee Cohoy,
Sheridan, Wyo., 17.38
Breakaway Roping: 1. (tie) Jill Jan-
dreau, Kimball, and Toree Gunn, Wasta,
2.10; 2. Syerra (C.Y.) Christensen, Kennebec,
2.40; 3. Samantha Nelson, Creighton, 2.60;
4. Jacque Murray, Isabel, 3.10; 5. Katie Jo
Morgan, Valentine, Neb., 4.20; 6. Tana Bon-
net, Rapid City, 4.60; 7. Brenda White, Oel-
richs, 4.70
Bull Riding: 1. Casey Heninger, Ft,
Pierre, 75; 2. Chasen Cole, Hermosa, 72; 3.
Tyson Donovan, Sturgis, 67
Calf Roping: 1. Chad Pelster, Belle
Fourche, 13.60; 2. Carson Musick, Pierre,
14.90; 3. Treg Schaack, Edgemont, 15.10; 4.
Mark Cuny, Porcupine, 16.50; 5. Jayce Doan,
McKenzie, N.D., 18.00; 6. Rex Treeby, Hecla,
22.20
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Lane Stirling,
Buffalo, 75; 2. (tie) Travis Schroth, Buffalo
Gap, and Trell Etbauer, Grover, Texas, 73; 3.
(tie) Eric Addison, Caputa, and Seth Long-
brake, Howes, 69; 4. Cole Hindman,
Belvidere, 66
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Lynn Williams,
Faith, 1.70; 2. Terry McPherson, Piedmont,
1.90; 3. Jerry Sharp, Long Valley, 2.10; 4.
John Hoven, McLaughlin, 2.40; 5. (tie) Lyle
Wilcox, Red Owl, and Mark Schumacher,
Wolsey, 2.70
Steer Wrestling: 1. (tie) Ty Melvin,
Tryon, Neb., and J.B. Lord, Sturgis, 4.30; 2.
Troy Wilcox, Red Owl, 5.40; 3. Jerod
Schwarting, White River, 6.00; 4. Tye Hale,
Faith, 6.50; 5. Doan, 7.40
Team Roping: 1. Eli Lord, Sturgis/Jade
Nelson, Midland, 5.30; 2. Tucker Dale, Tim-
ber Lake/Levi Lord, Sturgis, 5.70; 3. Devin
McGrath, Belle Fourche/Dalton Richter,
Quinn, 5.80; 4. Don Bettelyoun, Eagle
Butte/Williams, 5.90; 5. Tyrell Moody, Edge-
mont/Rory Brown, Edgemont, 6.10; 6. Jake
Nelson, Creighton/Jeff Nelson, Philip, 6.20
Wall Celebration Rodeo
July 11-13
SDRA rodeo results – Interior, Wall, Dupree, Lemmon
Bareback Riding: 1. Englebert, 78; 2.
Wilson, 77; 3. Kenny Feidler, Philip, 74; 4.
O’Connell, 73; 5. Ryan Burkinshaw, Her-
mosa, 69; 6. Stetson Murphy, Rapid City, 68
Barrel Racing: 1. Vinson, 15.07; 2.
Kaylee Gallino, Wasta, 15.32; 3. Jill Moody,
Pierre, 15.37; 4. Kailee Webb, Isabel, 15.53;
5. Brooke Steckelberg, Chamberlain, 15.62;
6. Wanda Brown, Edgemont, 15.65; 7. Jor-
dan Tierney, Oral, 15.66; 8. Georgia Diez,
Timber Lake, 15.68; 9. Pam Hannum, Ft.
Pierre, 15.68
Breakaway Roping: 1. (tie) Jessica
Holmes, Buffalo, and Joey Painter, Buffalo,
2.50; 2. (tie) Jenny Belkham, Blunt and
Megan Belus, Buffalo, Wyo., 2.70; 3. (tie)
Kayla Nelson, Bowman, N.D., and Murray,
2.90; 4. Tomie Peterson, Parade, 3.00; 5. (tie)
Cedar Jandreau, Kennebec, and Mercedes
Williams, Faith, 3.10
Bull Riding: 1. Jared Schaefer, Leola, 76;
2. C.J. Pesicka, Timber Lake, 75; 3. Taygen
Schuelke, Newell, 74
Calf Roping: 1. Trey Young, Dupree,
10.00; 2. Treeby, 11.00; 3. Owen Fagerhaug,
Plankinton, 11.40; 4. Colton Musick, Pierre,
11.70; 5. (tie) Calder Johnston, Elm Springs
and Pelster, 12.10; 6. Logan Murphey, Tor-
rington, Wyo., 12.30; 7. Shadow Jensen,
Martin, 12.50
Goat Tying: 1. (tie) Diez and Lacey Tech,
Fairfax, 6.90; 2, Krystal Marone, Isabel,
7.00; 3. (tie) Shaylee Hance, Circle, Mont.,
and Belus, 7.30; 4. (tie) Katy Miller, Faith
and Kelsey Arthur, Fairfax, 7.40
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Devin Cordova,
Moorcroft, Wyo., 6.40; 2. Catie Lohse, Sun-
dance, Wyo., 6.60; 3. B. Nelson, 7.40; 4.
White, 7.50; 5. Painter, 7.60; 6. S. Nelson,
7.90
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Marty Hebb,
Cherry Creek, 83; 2. S. Jensen, 81; 3. Shorty
Garrett, Dupree, 77; 4. Addison, 76; 5. Hind-
man, 75; 6.(tie) Eric Geweck, Red Owl, and
Schuelke, 74
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Bryce Sigman,
Sturgis, 1.90; 2. Chuck Nelson, Hartford,
2.10; 3. John Dean, Platte, 2.20; 4. (tie) Bob
Burke, Sundance, Wyo., and Scott Lammers,
Hermosa, 2.60; 5. (tie) Kirk Ford, Huron and
Harold Gerdes, Hecla, 3.20
Steer Wrestling: 1. J.B. Lord, Sturgis,
3.80; 2. (tie) Casey Olson, Prairie City, and
Mike Wiedman, St. Charles, 4.50; 3. (tie)
Jason Hapney, Harrold, and Wyatt Schaack,
Wall, 5.80; 4. (tie) Doan, and Jace Melvin, Ft.
Pierre, 6.40
Team Roping: 1. Musick/Musick, 4.80; 2.
Lord/Jesse Fredrickson, Menoken, N.D.,
5.20; 3. TroyWIlcox, Red Owl/Melvin Arne-
son, Enning, 5.50; 4. Jason Thorstenson,
Rapid City/Paul Tierney, Oral, 5.80; 5. Mar-
lin Wiedman, St. Charles/Mike Wiedman, St.
Charles, 6.90; 6. Brett Wilcox, Red Owl/Clint
Cobb, Red Owl, 10.00; 7. Layne Livermont,
Martin/Kolton Kastl, Martin, 10.20; 8. Terry
McPherson, Piedmont/Michael McPherson,
Box Elder, 11.40
Dupree Pioneer Days Rodeo
July 13-14
Bareback Riding: 1. Englebert, 74; 2.
Feidler, 72; 3. Burkinshaw, 70; 4.
Lesmeisiter, 69
Barrel Racing: 1. Moody, 117.34; Vinson,
17.44; 3. Deena Grieves, Upton, Wyo., 17.58;
4. Macy Fuller, Buffalo, Wyo., 17.67; 5. Al-
lene Nelson, Grassy Butte, N.D. 17.72; 6.
Lacy Cowan, Highmore, 17.74; 7. ReAnn
Crane, Whitewood, 17.91; 8. Haley Ander-
son, Miles City, Mont., 17.97
Breakaway Roping: 1. Fuller, 2.60; 2.
Laura Hunt, Ridgeview, 2.70; 3. Webb, 2.90;
4. Shaldon Osterby, Kildeer, N.D., 3.00; 5.
(tie) Teddi Schwagler, Mandan, N.D. Belus,
Thurston, and Dawn Carson, Kildeer, N.D.,
3.10
Calf Roping: 1. Kean Edwards, Gillette,
Wyo., 9.10; 2. Logan Brown, Miles City,
Mont., 9.50; 3. Chase Lako, Arhtur, N.D.,
10.00; 4. (tie), Cole Robinson, Moorcroft,
Wyo., Jed Davison, Miles City, Mont., and
Young, 10.10; 5. Fagerhaug, 1050; 6. Jess
Woodward, Dupree, 10.70
Goat Tying: 1. Amy Tierney, Oral, 7.00;
2. Tech, 7.40; 3. (tie) Miller, 7.50; 3. Jordan
Thurston, Gillette, Wyo., and Kristi Birke-
land, Dupree, 7.50; 4. Katie Doll, Prairie
City, 7.50
Mixed Team Roping: 1. L. Hunt, 5.30;
2. Elizabeth Baker, Box Elder, 7..10; 3.
Lorita Nelson, Philip, 8.10; 4. (tie) Abby Jo
Eckstaine, Kennebec and Alisa McGrath,
Belle Fourche, 8.20; 5. Jana Jasper, St.
Charles, 8.80
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Schuelke, 78;
2. Wyatt Kammerer, Philip, 75; 3. Garrett,
73; 4. (tie) Tyrell Bachman, Faith, and Jay
Longbrake, Dupree, 71; 5. Kaden Deal,
Dupree, 70
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Steve Klein,
Sioux Falls, 2.10; 2. Burke, 2.30; 3. (tie) Dean
and Lord, 2.50; 4. S. Lammers, 2.90; John
Hoven, McLaughlin, 3.60
Steer Wrestling: 1. J.D. Johnson, Stur-
gis, 4.60; 2. Eli Lord, Sturgis, 5.50; Jeremy
Stadheim, Reeder, N.D., 6.00; 4. (tie) Ryne
By Carla Brucklacher
Maylin and Alissa Brucklacher,
daughters of Matthew and Sonja
Brucklacher of Greeley, Colo., and
granddaughters of Mark and
Carla Brucklacher have both qual-
ified for Colorado State Champion
events.
Alissa, age nine, qualified in
Gymnastics and Maylin, age 12,
qualified in swimming.
Alissa qualified for Regionals at
her first event of the season with
high scores.
She then scored so high on June
29 that she automatically earned a
spot in the State Championships.
On Saturday, July 20 she was
bumped up a level by her coaches
to see how she could compete
against all ages of completion in
Brucklacher girls qualify for
Colo. State Champion events
WAII MEA1
ÏR0CESSING
uill no longer
Ie open on So/urJo,e.
CaII 279-2348 · WaII, SD
Alissa Brucklacher took fourth place in All Around at the gym-
nastice regions held in Colorado. ~Courtesy Photo
Baier, Rhame, N.D., Tom Hunt, Eagle Butte
and Calder Johnston, Elm Springs, 6.80
Team Roping: 1. Turner Harris, Kildeer,
N.D./Ross Carson, Kildeer, N.D., 5.40; 2. (tie)
Chad Nelson, Bowman, N.D./Billy Myers, St.
Onge, and Roper Kosel, Bismarck,
N.D./Jesse Dale, Timber Lake, 5.70; 3. T.
Wilcox/Arneson, 6.10; 4. Casey Holmes, Buf-
falo/Parker Murnion, Bowman, N.D., 6.50; 5.
(tie) Tucker McDaniel, Midland/T. Schaack,
and Clay Edgar, Oral/Matt Peters, Hot
Springs, 6.60; 6. Neil Tolton, Midland/Robert
Tolton, Ft. Pierre, 7.30
Lemmon Boss Cowman Rodeo
July 12-14
Bareback Riding: 1.Mark Kenyon,
Hayti, 74; 2. Murphy, 71; 3 . O’Connell, 69;
4. (tie) Feidler, and Thomas Kronberg,
Forbes, N.D., 68; 5. Wilson, 67
Barrel Racing: 1. Webb, 16.29; 2. (tie)
Cowan, and Vinson, 6.33; 3. Cathy Roesler,
Miles City, Mont., 16.34; 4. Crystal Hershey,
Newcastle, Wyo., 16.35; 5. Allene Nelson,
Grassy Butte, N.D., 16.53; 6. Brown, 16.61;
7. Debra Bixler, Hitchcock, 16.66
Breakaway Roping: 1. Brandi Futtorm-
son, Beulah, N.D., 2.30; 2. (tie) C. Woodward,
Kaylee Nelson, Trisha Price, Faith, l2.60; 3.
(tie) Fuller and Callie Eckroth, Watford,
N.D., 2.70; 4. (tie) Toby Dynlavy, Gillette,
Wyo., and Jessica Holmes, Buffalo, 2.80
Calf Roping: 1. Cole Robinson, Moor-
croft, Wyo., 7.50; 2. Edwards, 8.30; 3. Jon
Peek, Williston, N.D., 8.80; 4. Preston Bil-
ladeau, Parshall, N.D., 9.60; 5. Daine Mc-
Nenny, Sturgis, 10.30; 6. Wade Eckroth,
Flasher, N.D., 10.40; 7. Young, 10.50; 8. Tyler
Thorson, NA, 11.40
Goat Tying: 1. Fuller, 6.60; 2. Thurston,
6.90; 3. (tie) Diez and Doll, 7.00; 4. (tie)
Lensegrav and Marone, 7.10
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Devin Cordova,
Moorcroft, Wyo., 5.60; 2. White, 7.10; 3.
Tearnee Nelson, Faith, 7.30-; 4. Ashley Day
Volberg, Mont., 7.40; 5. (tie) Christensen,
and Kaylee Nelson, 7.70; 6. Kelsey Shaffner,
Starr, Texas, 8.10; 7. L. Nelson, 8.20
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Billy Gallino,
Wasta, 2.70; 2. Delbert Cobb, Red Owl, 3.10;
3. S. Lammers, 3.20; 3. Kelly Eggl, Minot,
N.D, 3.20; 4. Les Haugen, Alexander, N.D.,
3.50; 5. Dana Sippel, Pierpont, 3.80; 6. J.
Lord, 4.40
Steer Wrestling: 1. Sam Olson, Buffalo,
4.70; Stadheim, 5.30; 3. Del Pete Day, Lem-
mon, 5.40; 4. J. Melvin, 5.80; 5. Clint Nelson,
Philip, 6.10; 6. J. Johnson, 6.20; 7. Wilson,
6.70; 8. B. Gallino, 7.10
Team Roping: 1. L. Carson/Josh Hodge,
Volberg, Mont, 5.60; 2. J. Lord/Fredrickson,
6.10; 3. Tucker Dale, Timber Lake,/Paul
Griemsman, Piedmont, 6.20; 4. McPherson/
Ora Taton, Rapid City, 6.30; 5. Tyson Holden,
Gillette, Wyo./Luke Groth, Stephenville,
Texzs, 6.40; 6. (tie) Brady Williams, Ham-
mond, Mont./Seth Weishaar, Belle Fourche
and Jason Handy, Gillette, Wyo.,/Craig
Mader, Gillete, Wyo. 6.50; 7. (tie) E.
Lord/Jade Nelson, Midland, and T.
Wilcox/Arneson, 6.60.
Regionals.
She scored 9.0 in both bars and
floor exercise and 8.9 in vault and
beam and took fourth in All
Around for all ages, which in-
cluded from age seven to age 18.
Maylin will compete in two relay
events, swimming butterfly por-
tion of the relays.
Grandma Carla will leave for
Greeley on Thursday to attend the
events.
Both events are scheduled on
the same day, so Matthew and
Sonja will have to split up to get
the girls to their events.
On Sunday, the 28th, Grandma
will bring both girls home with her
for some hard earned vacation
time in South Dakota.
Contractors are working on the new sewer line for the City of Wall. A hold was dug at the city park
so a new sewer pipe could be laid under the Creighton road. Work is expected to be completed
on that section of the line on Friday, July 19. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
New sewer line being installed in Wall
College briefs
Southeast Technical Institute in
Sioux Falls, S.D. has announced
its Spring 2013 Graduates.
These students have completed
all requirements necessary to earn
a diploma or Associate of Applied
Science degree from STI.
The following student has grad-
uated from STI after the Spring
2013 semester:
•Taunia LeAnn (Holsether)
Vande Stouwe - Inwood, Ia., Major
in Business Administration.
The Wall After
School Program
is looking for an
enthusiastic, energetic,
reliable individual to
work part-time.
Must be 18 with a
high school diploma.
Please contact
Mandi McDonnell or
Niki Mohr at 279-2156
for more information.
Deadline is August 9th.
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Holy Moley! We’re about done
with July! Are we now into the
“Dog Days of Summer”? I’m not
sure of the exact definition but
some days the past couple weeks
just might fit in that category.
Mary Lewis was welcomed home
Sunday by her cats and her neigh-
bors. We’ll give her a few days to
settle in and then ask for particu-
lars of her trip — “Stay tuned” as
Paul Harvey would say.
As promised last week we will
touch on July 4th, Part III. The
Talent Show.
From the beginning with Regan
Simons National Anthem to the
last with Dorothy Shearer calling
all to stand and join in “America
the Beautiful”, it was just a great
evening. The talent in our little
corner of South Dakota is just top
notch and their willingness to
come to Wasta and share their tal-
ent is so appreciated. Oldsters,
youngsters, in-betweensters,
songs, poems, patriotic readings,
accordions and piano players left
me thinking, “Dale Lewis would be
PROUD”!
We thank you all, participants
and audience for continuing this
fine July 4th tradition that Dale
started.
Big thanks to partner, Dorothy
Shearer, Tom and Angela Carter
for use of their sound equipment
and their technical expertise.
Lloyd and I appreciate so much
all of you who make the 4th of July
evening so great in Wasta.
More recent news: Marilyn
Keyser visited brother Greg Rol-
land’s Nemo hideaway two weeks
ago. Also visiting was sister,
Jeanne and Jeanne’s husband Bob
Kelly. Marilyn said they had a
good visit and continued family
time with cousins Gary and Ruby
Keyser at their home in Wall, Fri-
day night for dinner.
Ash and Madi Grenstiner re-
turned with friends, Ruth Bryan
and Kassidy Sawvell, from church
camp at Storm Mountain, Friday
evening. Talking with Ash and
Madi, they each shared their var-
ied stories of all they had done,
what fun and what a good experi-
ence.
When you see either or both
girls, ask them about their experi-
ences. You will enjoy it!
Kelly Green is indeed back
working at the Badlands Visitors
Center. She said she is enjoying it
a lot as she did last year. This past
weekend she was at the Game
Fish and Park Outdoor Campus in
Rapid City. She was there to tell
visitors about all the Badlands of-
fered. Good job Kelly! Kelly’s birth-
day is Tuesday, the 22nd — so
happy 18th to you, Kelly!
Wasta will have a team partici-
pating in the “Relay For Life” help-
ing raise funds to research cures
for cancer in all its many and var-
ied ugly disguises. If you would
like to participate in some way,
please call 993-3149. We would
love to hear from you. The relay
teams “walk’ the laps but there are
other ways to participate. We will
be selling “Luminaries” which are
the paper bags with candles set in
sand, lighted at the event in mem-
ory of those loved ones who died of
cancer or those loved ones who
survived cancer. We must have
fundraisers to raise money and are
planning a “picnic in the park” for
one mid-August. Who knows the
Wasta school’s mascots name? It’s
all part of the Relay For Life
team’s organization so for now.
Happy Trails!
Pennington County Courant • July 25, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
We have some anniversaries to
acknowledge. Harlan and Linda
Eisenbraun celebrated their 48th
anniversary on July 4th. Mark and
Carla Brucklacher were married
41 years ago on July 14th. Our
congratulations and the best of
wishes go out to each couple.
The Senior Citizens canceled
their potluck supper last Thursday
evening as there was no air-condi-
tioning in the dining room at
Prairie Village, seems they had to
order a part. The apartments do
have air conditioning. Theme meal
for July is also canceled.
Clayton and Charlene Kjerstad
have a cherry tree that produces a
lot of tart pie cherries. Lee Neville
of Milesville came on Monday and
picked around five gallons of them.
Wouldn’t those pies be nice to have
in your freezer?
Karol Patterson, Karen Gunn
and Les Hammerstrom went to
Sioux Falls this past weekend to
help Gene and Velma Hammer-
strom celebrate their 50th an-
niversary.
We offer our condolences to the
families of Floyd “Speed” Bendick-
son and Don Thorson, whose obit-
uaries were in last week’s Courant.
Charlene Kjerstad went to
Spearfish on Thursday and had
lunch with her mother Bea Ram-
sey, brother Claude and Aunt
Hazel Thompson. After lunch, she
took Hazel to Ft. Meade to the
“Long Term Care” unit to visit
Eddie Colvin. Hazel and Eddie are
alumni of Philip High School.
Charlene spent overnight with
Claude’s and came home on Fri-
day.
On Saturday afternoon, Char-
lene Kjerstad took Sue Eisenbraun
and Sue’s friend Mary to Pierre to
get parts. On the farm, summer-
time seems to be “break down and
fix it” time.
Last Sunday, July 14th, a baby
shower was held at the Wall Golf
Course Clubhouse for Carsten
Kjerstad, son of Conrad and
Kallie. It was well attended, but
we must mention close relatives
that were there: Mary Kjerstad,
Marge Winkowitsch, Bea Ramsey,
Hazel Thompson, Cleo Rowe, Car-
olyn Anders, Gloria Hunt, Joann
Martin, Jo Strong and Grandma
Chris.
Our congratulations and “good
luck” go out to Donna Fauske as
she has retired from her position
at Golden West. Randy Shepard
retired a while ago — we wish the
same for him, also.
We have been fortunate to have
some showers now and then. The
Ash Creek Community has been
blessed with some very good
amounts the last couple weeks.
Dorothy Shearer announced
that she and Lavon have another
great-grandchild. A girl, Paris Ella,
was born to Jace and Tisha. Greg
and Lori are the grandparents.
Douglas and Ruth Sisk of Rapid
City, hosted a family gathering at
their home on Sunday for extended
family members. Bill and Kay
Leonard attended. People were
there from Arizona, Alaska and
Illinois. Lots of visiting took place.
The Carmichael “kids” were at
Dave and Arla Olson’s for supper
Friday, July 12th. Out of towners
included the families of Tom and
Kamie from Nebraska; Sherri and
Jon Nelson from Indianapolis. Jon,
Sherri, James and Claire spent
last week with the Olsons, also.
Heard last Tuesday, July 16th
was Rita Haney’s birthday, a for-
mer resident of Wall, now Rapid
City. All good wishes go out to her.
Alice Mettler, along with grand-
daughter Emily Carstensen,
hosted a surprise baby shower for
granddaughter Katie LaRue from
Whispering Pines, N.C., Friday,
July 19th. A host of friends and rel-
atives attended. This will be Met-
tler’s first great-grandchild —
what a joy!
Visitors in Annetta Geigle's
home, in Wall, on Monday were,
Marian Eisenbraun of Riverside,
Calif., Esther and Guy Carsten,
and Wanda and Steve Goodrich of
Rapid City, Ivan Eisenbraun,
Kathy Davis, Nan Miller, Wade,
Bena and Siene Geigle of Wall.
A group of young people from
Epworth United Methodist
Church from St. Paul, stayed
overnight Saturday in the Wall
Church. They also attended
church services on Sunday. They
were on a mission trip.
Last year, about this time in
July, we had HOT temperatures —
upper 90s and 100° and over. In
face, July 19th we had 112°! So
this year is considerably better.
The forecast for the week shows a
lot of days with showers — hope it
comes!
“Do it this very moment!
Don’t put it off — don’t wait.
There’s no use in doing a kind-
ness
If you do it a day too late!”
~Kingsley
Have a good week.
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
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General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
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2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
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Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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Sponsored by:
Pennington
County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
…continued next
week.
Taylee, 7 years & Kylie, 4 years
children of
BJ & Bobbie Dartt, Wall.
Logan Wayne, 3 years &
Myer Allen, 4 months,
children of
Tucker & Jess Smith, Quinn.
Brodi, 7 years & Carter, 4 years
children of
Lance & Kelly Sundall, Wall
Tomorrow’s
Leaders
NEW ARRIVALS
Purses, Wallets
& Scarves
Locals receive an
additional 20% off.
279-2023 • Wall, SD
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
July 25th: Steak Tips over Rice
w/Veggies
July 26th: Super Nachoes
July 29th: Patti Melt
w/Corn Salad
July 30th: Philly Cheese Steak
w/French Fries
July 31st: Meat Balls w/Rice
w/Veggies
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Wall Youth
Basketball Camp
July 29, 30 & 31 •WHS Gym
for boys & girls • $20 per athlete
5th - 8th grade — 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
K - 4th grade — 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Contact Ryan Dinger to register, 605-944-1004.
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053 — let it ring
Welcome aboard…
I am strongly thinking of doing
the Countryside news. My phone
number is 837-2053. If you don’t
let it ring, please say your name on
the answering machine and num-
ber.
Delmer and Mary Paulsen trav-
eled to Minn., the last part of June
for a nephews wedding and a big
brother/sister reunion at the fam-
ily farm. All of Mary’s siblings
were there. Mary is the oldest of
eight. It was such an enjoyable
time.
Delmer and Mary’s children and
grandchildren are so busy and
growing so fast. Their youngest
grandson, Dreyson of Belle
Fourche, was six the 4th of July.
Mary’s youngest sister, Lucille
Murname, is presently visiting
Mary and Delmer. Her husband
Jim passed away from cancer two
years ago.
Mary is busy in her huge gar-
den.
Thought: Great works are per-
formed not by strength but by per-
severance.
Countryside News
State parks host outdoor activities
Several state parks and recre-
ation areas in South Dakota are
hosting outdoor events and educa-
tional programs at the end of the
month for visitors. The activities
are a great opportunity to enjoy the
outdoors.
Christmas in July Campsite Dec-
orating Contest, Lake Thompson
Recreation Area near Lake Preston,
July 26-28. Celebrate Christmas in
July! Bring along your Christmas
lights, trees, wreaths and inflatable
snowmen to decorate your camp-
site. Prizes will be awarded Satur-
day night at 7 p.m. CDT to the
campsites with the most holiday
cheer. Info: 605-847-4893
•Christmas in July, Lake Her-
man State Park and Walker’s Point
Recreation Area near Madison, July
26-28. Join these parks for a festive
weekend of Christmas fun! Info:
605-256-5003
•Halloween in July, Lake
Poinsett Recreation Area near Ar-
lington, July 26-28. Get in the
spooky mood with a Halloween
campsite decorating display, cos-
tume parade and even trick-or-
treating! Be sure to bring candy for
your guests. Sign up at the welcome
center to take part in the fun! Info:
605-983-5085
•Walk in the Woods, Good
Earth State Park at Blood Run near
Sioux Falls, July 26, 10 a.m. CDT.
Join us for a wonderful walk in the
woods and a mosaic craft. All ages
welcome and children and their
parents are especially invited to
join. Info: 605-987-2263
•Christmas in July, Chief
White Crane Recreation Area near
Yankton, July 27. It's Christmas in
July! Pack an extra set of lights and
decorate your campsite or a neigh-
boring Ponderosa Pine and partici-
pate in our contest. Even Santa
likes to camp at South Dakota State
Parks! Info: Chief White Crane,
605-668-2985
•Tee Walk and Leaf Book-
marks, Newton Hills State Park
near Canton, July 27, 10 a.m. CDT.
Join us in the parking lot by the
double shelters on Sargeant Creek
Road to take a hike and learn about
the trees in Newton Hills State
Park. We will end at the Interpre-
tive Shelter at the end of Sargeant
Creek Road where we will make
bookmarks from leaves collected
along the way. Info: 605-987-2263
•The Dam Program, Palisades
State Park near Garretson, July 27,
2 p.m. CDT. Learn how nature, an-
imals and humans build dams, and
just why they are so important.
Info: 605-594-3824
•Hug a Tree, Newton Hills
State Park near Canton, July 27, 2
p.m. CDT. Bring a friend and come
hug some trees. We are going to see
how well you can use your senses.
Info: 605-987-2263
•Lantern Tour, Fort Sisseton
Historic State Park near Lake City,
July 27, 9:30 p.m. CDT. Come and
tour the Fort by lantern light.
Lanterns provided. Info: 605-448-
5474.
•Constellations and Stories,
Good Earth State Park at Blood
Run near Sioux Falls, July 27, 9:30
p.m. CDT. Learn constellation sto-
ries from cultures around the world
while looking at the Good Earth
night sky through a telescope. Info:
605-987-2263
•Umonhon Culture, Good
Earth State Park at Blood Run near
Sioux Falls, July 28, 2 p.m. CDT.
Join Verna and learn the history of
this culturally rich site where sev-
eral thousand American Indians
settled between the 12th and 17th
Centuries, told from the Umonhon
(Omaha) tribe perspective. Samples
of pottery and tools used in this In-
dian Village will be available. Info:
605-987-2263 or newtonhills@state.
sd.us Pre-register: 605-362-2777 or
www.outdoorcampus.org.
•Outdoor Cooking and Na-
ture Hike, Good Earth State Park
at Blood Run near Sioux Falls, July
31, 7 p.m. CDT. Join the naturalists
around the campfire to learn some
simple outdoor cooking, and take a
guided hike through the park. Info:
605-987-2263
There is no cost to participate in
any of the programs, but park en-
trance licenses are required for all
vehicles entering the park.
annc@
gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • July 25, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship,
9 a.m., Sunday Worship Service,
10:30 a.m.; Mondays: Women’s Bible
Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann
279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community
Church • Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Dowling
Community Church
Memorial Day through
Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James
Harbert
Bible Study,
9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services,
10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic
Church
New Underwood
Father William
Zandri
Mass: Sundays at
11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at
9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan
Nursing Home;
Reconciliation
before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical
Lutheran Church Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m.,
Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd
number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even
number months
For I am ìn a
slraìl bclwìxl lwo,
havìng a dcsìrc lo
dcµarl, and lo bc
wìlh Chrìsl; whìch
ìs lar bcllcr:
lmaginc thc most pcrfcct pIacc in
thc worId-thc tropicaI oasis whcrc
you honcymooncd, thc cIaw foot
tub whcrc you soak away Iifc's
troubIcs. Now imaginc it bcing a
thousand timcs bcttcr. That is
hcavcn. Hcavcn is purc
pcrfcction, and dcath is
mcrcIy a way to gct
thcrc for thosc who
bcIicvc in God.
Phìlìµµìans 1:23 (K)V)
:.z¿..1.zz
279-2175
Come & Go Baby Shower
for
Mary & Joey Roeder
Saturday, July 27th
1:00 p.m.
Wall Community Center
meeting room
The family of
Harold Benson
invite you to an Open House
in honor of his
100th Birthday
Saturday, August 3rd
2:00 to 4:00 p.m.
New Underwood Community Center
If you cannot attend, cards may be sent to:
1205 Milwaukee St., Rapid City, SD 57701
Harold’s children are:
Kenneth Benson, Donna
Coyle, Beverly Mooney,
Dean Benson & Jean Treloar
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DD? Bu1oK LoCrosse CX
S.S, ou1o, pouer everg1Þ1ng.
Co11 one o] 1Þe bogs!
80 years ago…
The hail last Saturday after-
noon, although not as extensive as
was first reported, literally wiped
out fields of grain in spotted areas
north of Wall. Tuebers, Bielmaiers,
Kellems, Smittens and Renners
were some who had losses. Mrs.
Smitten was badly bruised while
attempting to get her small chick-
ens to safety. A great number of
chickens at various places were
killed. The wind broke several
windows for MacGregor, while hail
destroyed many more at other
places. Another destructive hail
storm visited the Geigle neighbor-
hood, destroying large number of
chickens and a great deal of grain.
A fight with knives during the
night of July Fourth ended with
two men, Roy and Burnard Janis,
being brought to Wall where Dr.
Mills took twenty odd stitches to
sew up the gashes. A warrant is
out for the arrest of the third party,
Guy Bradford. The men live near
Conata.
R.P. Campbell lost five of his
milch cows last week when he
turned his cows from his short
eaten pasture into a field contain-
ing small patches of cane. It took
only about ten minutes, says Mr.
Campbell, for five of his best cows
to be stretched out dead. Some of
the contents of their stomachs
were sent to Brooking for analysis.
The returns from there stated that
growing cane was nearly always
dangerous for pasturage because
of the presence of a certain acid.
70 years ago…
The strong wind which lasted
only a short while Saturday
evening, did considerable damage
to trees and small buildings in
Wall and surrounding area. A
number of buildings in the Geigle
neighborhood were leveled to the
ground. Clair Knutson had one of
his sheep wagons scattered over
an acre of ground. His herder,
Frank Milgen, feeling that his
wagon was about to take wings,
stepped from his living quarters
just in the nick of time. He was left
without a home but uninjured. Ac-
cording to the Tri-State rain
guage, Wall received .38 of an inch
of rainfall Saturday night, and .12
for Sunday. Mrs. Art Richards
stated that at their place, about
five miles west of Creighton, they
had four inches of rain in just a
few minutes Saturday evening.
Dams on their place filled, and the
Pierce dam ran over the spillway
taking a great many fish along
with the run-off. The lights went
out over the WREA system during
the storm, and the Quinn and Wall
Theatres had to refund tickets to
their customers.
A lighted cigarette probably
rolled between the walk and the
Courant office building shortly af-
ternoon Saturday, causing a fire to
start under the floor of the build-
ing. A light breeze from the east
caused the smoke to drift under
the floor to the west cellar en-
trance, and the fire was not no-
ticed until a billow of smoke
happened to puff out the east end.
An alarm quickly brought the fire-
men, and after a few boards were
cut out of the floor, water was
played upon the burning joists,
and the fire was brought under
control. The damage was slight,
but for a time all Main Street
Property owners were wondering if
their insurance policies were still
in force.
Word was received Friday of the
tightening of the tire restrictions
to where a person who has four
tires will not be allowed a certifi-
cate for a new tire. This means
that anyone who has a tire fail will
thereafter have to drive without a
spare, as only tires enough to serve
for each wheel will be allowed.
60 years ago…
Seventy-nine year old Fred
Kneebone was robbed and tied late
Sunday evening by a trio of men
who fled in a stolen truck from the
Birdsall Sand Co. Kneebone was a
watchman for the company at
Wasta. Three men walked into the
shack about five, Sunday after-
noon. They took about $35 from
his personal effects and tied him
up. Monday morning, Kneebone
was discovered when workmen
came to work. The truck was found
near Martin. Three men of the
same description stopped earlier
Sunday at the Louis Jensen ranch.
They were walking and asked for
water.
Two minor accidents happened
because of the celebration July 10
and 11. Max Hauk suffered a
shoulder injury when a bomb he
was getting ready for the fire-
works, exploded and caught him
on the shoulder, knocking him
down. A couple in a tub of the C
Cruise got it spinning too fast and
they landed on the ground. They
were not injured but the tub was
damaged.
NOTICE TO DOG OWNERS:
Dog licenses are past due. Due to
the numerous complaints received
by the city council about dogs de-
stroying gardens and trees, all dog
owners are hereby ordered to keep
their dogs on a leash or on their
own premises.
50 years ago…
The Wall Fire Department were
called yesterday afternoon when
the Kelly’s Fireworks Stand went
up in a quick blaze of smoke, and
smoke was all that was left when
the fire equipment arrived. Mrs.
Kelly reports a loss of $500 worth
of fireworks and $150 in currency.
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Clark of
Wall, announce the engagement of
their daughter, Jean Mathilda to
Lanny B. Myers, son of the late
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Myers of Thomp-
son, Iowa. Miss Clark is a gradu-
ate of South Dakota State College
and is presently teaching in the
Rapid City Pubic Schools. Her fi-
ance is presently employed by
American Air Filter. An August
wedding is planned.
The Wall Firemen were called
Saturday afternoon to the highway
at the east edge of Wall to put out
a fire that nearly destroyed a
tourist car and perhaps a heavily
loaded U-Haul trailer. The damage
was confined to the tire, brake lin-
ing, and paint. the occupants of the
car had removed the contents of
the trunk. City Marshall, Norman
Klingbile, who assisted the owner
of the car, stated that the cause of
the blaze was probably a faulty
wheel bearing.
A $41,000 contract was signed
last week with the American Pool
Company of Billings, Montana, for
the construction of a swimming
pool in Wall according to the com-
mittee chairman, G. W. Shelton.
Harry Vincent represented the
American Pool Co. The contract
reads that construction will start
within 60 days after the contract is
signed. “The pool should be in use
Wall for the season” at the Church
of St. Patrick Catholic Church in
Wall. Father Corry, notified of his
appointment to Wall on April 15
and assuming the pastorate on
June 24, relieved the Rev. William
Philbin. Father Philbin, priest at
the Catholic Church in Wall for the
past two years, is semi-retired and
living in Rapid City. He is cur-
rently doing supply services for
parishes around the diocese on
weekends and when needed.
BIRTH: Born June 22, a daugh-
ter, Stefanie Rose, to Mr. and Mrs.
Darwin Geigle of Owanka. She
weighed 10 lbs. and was 22 inches
long. The proud grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Don Simmons of New
Underwood and Lucille Geigle of
Wall. Great-grandparents are Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Simmons of New Un-
derwood and Mrs. Klara Geigle,
Wall.
Governor William J. Janklow
has appointed Berniece Chapelle,
Wall, local chairperson for the
1983 Coffee Day for crippled chil-
dren and adults. Coffee Day has
been sponsored by South Dakota
restaurants since 1957 when seven
restaurant owners in Huron used
the day to honor the handicapped
daughter of Governor Joe Foss.
Since then, proceeds from the
statewide event have been given to
the South Dakota Easter Seal So-
ciety to help crippled children. Cof-
fee Day is set for August 18. Over
the 26-year period, participating
restaurants have raised more than
$207,000 for crippled children. In
1982, Coffee Day proceeds topped
the $12,000 mark.
Casey Fortune, Cottonwood, is
among seven nominees from the
state of South Dakota for Star
American Farmer. A member of
the Wall F.F.A. Chapter, Fortune
will be honored in November at
Kansas City, according to his advi-
sor, Dave Van Laarhoven. If
named the state’s Star American
Farmer, he will compete against 12
other state representatives at re-
gional competition.
20 years ago…
Wall Fire Chief Boyd Kitterman
and the Wall Volunteer Fire De-
partment presented on Monday,
the Community Service Award to
Wholesale Fireworks, Wall, for the
outstanding help they have given
in maintaining and expanding the
Fire Education Program the Fire
Department set up years ago.
Each year this award will be pre-
sented to the person or business
that has helped in making Wall a
safer community to live in.
BIRTH: Born May 19, 1993, a
son, Christopher Scott, to Jeff and
Darlene Sorensen, Rapid City. Lit-
tle Christopher weighed 7 lbs. 13
oz. Proud grandparents are Milton
and Mary Lou Sorensen, Wall, and
Roger and JoAnn Hines, Miller.
Great-grandparents are Mary
Sorensen, Philip, Bill and Elma
Hines, Broadus, Mont., and
Blanche Roberson, Belle Fourche.
BIRTH: Born June 15, 1993, a
girl, Kaitlyn Alyssa, to Jimmy and
Amy Hayes, Wichita, Kan. Little
Kaitlyn weighed 8 lbs. 7 oz. and
measured 19 1/2 inches long. She
joins big sister Lauren at home.
Proud grandparents are Bob and
Della Hayes, Wall, and Larry and
Jean Gwen, Wichita. Great-grand-
mothers are Cly Knapp, Wall, and
Marie Hays, Rapid City.
The Wall baseball team beat two
Philip teams in both games of a
double header July 19, 12-9 and 6-
3.
The Wall Girls’ softball teams
traveled to Union Center, July
18th, for a Round Robin Tourna-
ment. The 5-6th team defeated
Philip 15-6 in game one and lost to
Union Center in the second game.
Union Center went on to win the
tournament. Philip took first in
the tournament for the 7-8th grade
teams.
Wall teeners split a double
header with Martin, Tuesday, July
13, losing the first game 8-2 and
coming back to win the second
game 9-3.
10 years ago…
Sandra Livermont and Cole
Weaver were married June 21,
2003, at the Interior Presbyterian
Church in Interior, by Pastor Jeff
Tippner. The bride’s parents are
Galen and Linda Livermont of In-
terior. The groom’s parents are
Casey and Cindy Weaver of Wall.
The bride attends Augustana Col-
lege in Sioux Falls. The groom
graduated from Mitchell Technical
Institute, Mitchell, in May, 2003
and is employed as a carpenter at
Badlands National Park.
Sommerlyn Mortensen and
Gary Naescher were married May
24, 2003, at First Lutheran
Church, Wall, by the Rev. Monte
Dell. Their parents are Clark and
Audrey Mortensen, and John and
Twila Naescher, all of Wall. The
bride graduated from Black Hills
State University, Spearfish, in
2003. She is an accounting assis-
tant at First Administrations. The
groom graduated from Western
Dakota Technical Institute in
2002. He is an automotive techni-
cian at AAMCO Transmissions.
by August 15” said Vincent who
wished not to be quoted. Unless
plans are changed before construc-
tion starts, the pool will be located
in north Wall, on the athletic field,
north of the Highway building.
40 years ago…
Patricia Stacey and Roger Hauk
were married Sunday, June 24, in
the United Methodist Church in
Rapid Valley. Rev. Walker per-
formed the ceremony. The newly-
weds will make their home in
Germany where the groom is sta-
tioned with the U.S. Army.
Mrs. Marge Willuweit smashed
her new 1973 Chevy Tuesday af-
ternoon when she hit the back end
of Mrs. Walt Hoffman’s pickup.
The damage was estimated to be
$800. The accident occurred in
front of the Wall Motel.
Miss Charlene Ramsey and Mr.
Clayton Kjerstad were united in
marriage, June 23. Rev. Alvin
Brucklacher from Philip, per-
formed the double ring evening
ceremony in the Methodist Church
in Wall, decorated with flower
arrangements of mint green and
yellow. Parents of the couple are
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Ramsey,
Wall, and Mr. and Mrs. Konrad
Kjerstad, Quinn. The bride gradu-
ated from Philip High School in
1972 and is employed at the First
National Bank in Philip and the
groom is a 1968 graduate of Wall
High School. He attended S. D.
State University and Black Hills
State College and is in the farming
and ranching business.
BIRTH: Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Kjerstad are the proud parents of
a baby girl born at the Philip hos-
pital, Saturday, July 14. She
weighed 9 lbs. 2 oz.
The Creighton community re-
ceived three and one half inches of
rain on Sunday during severe elec-
trical storms. John Denke lost a
stack of baled hay Sunday night
when it was struck by a lightning
bolt and burst into flames.
30 years ago…
BIRTH: Born June 29th, a
daughter, Sheila Rae, to Clark and
Audrey Mortensen of Wall. Little
Miss Sheila Rae reached 8 lbs. 14
oz. at birth and measured 22 1/2
inches in length. Her proud grand-
mothers are Elsie Mortensen, Wall
and Betty Hulbert of Rapid City.
The Rev. John J. Corry has as-
sumed the duties of “pastor to the
people of God for the community of
Wall and serving the pilgrim
tourist people who come through
The Looking Glass of Time
CUSTOM
HAYING
Call
Jace Shearer
685-5964 • Wall
Pennington County Courant • July 25, 2013 • Page 6 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
RouGH CounTRY sPRaY-
InG: Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
o’ConnELL ConsTRuC-
TIon, InC., PHILIP: Rock,
Sand, Gravel (screened or
crushed). We can deliver.
Dams, dugouts, building sites.
Our 38th year. Glenn or Trace,
859-2020. PR11-tfn
TETon RIVER TREnCHInG:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-
2888, Midland. PR20-52tp
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIoN
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka,
SD, or call 837-2690. Craig
cell: 390-8087, Sauntee cell:
390-8604; wrex@gwtc.net
K50-tfn
FarM & raNcH
FoR saLE: 8820 John Deere
Titan II combine, lots of new
parts, good tires, good usable
machine. Call 488-0257.
P32-2tc
FoR saLE: 258 Farmhand, 8’
bucket, new-style grapple fork,
no welds. Call 488-0257.
P32-2tc
WanTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or pur-
chase in field or windrow. Call
Joel Deering, 381-0885 or 993-
3151. PR45-tfn
anGus BuLLs: Net Worth,
Freedom bloodlines. Good calv-
ing ease, gentle, poured. Ones
and twos - $2,000-$3,000.
Also bull rack hauler for sale.
390-5335, 515-1502. Schaaf
Angus Ranch. P30-4tp
FoR saLE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GaraGe sales
YaRD saLE: Saturday, July
27, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Girls’
clothes: size 2T-4T; boys: size
5-6; toys, misc. 409 Glenn St.,
Wall, Polished Pinky.
WP48-1tc
MuLTI-FaMILY YaRD saLE:
July 26 from 4 to 8 p.m.; July
27 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cloth-
ing, baby girl, men and
women; games; household;
movies; a few tools; books.
409-1/2 4th Ave., Wall.PW33-
1tc
GaRaGE saLE: 511 Hone St.,
Philip. 9 to 5, July 26-27-28.
Shop - shelves - fishing - crafts
& more. P33-1tp
2-FaMILY RuMMaGE saLE:
August 2, 12-7; August 3, 8-2,
K-gee’s Bldg., Main St. Philip.
Clothes - men’s, women’s,
Scottie, shoes, household,
décor, kitchen, board games,
books, cookbooks, (2) decora-
tor tables, discontinued
Princess House, holiday décor.
P33-2tc
MuLTI-FaMILY RuMMaGE
saLE: 708 Norris St., Wall,
Saturday, July 27, 7 a.m. - 5
p.m.; Sunday, July 28, 8 a.m.
- 12 p.m. PW32-2tc
autoMotive
FoR saLE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats,
power windows, locks & seats,
good tires. Call 685-8155.
PR10-tfn
BusiNess & service
nEED a PLuMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all
your indoor plumbing and out-
door water and sewer jobs call
Dale Koehn 441-1053 or leave
a message at 837-0112.
K31-4tp
BusInEss FoR saLE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year
in newly remodeled building,
lots of possibilities for expan-
sion. Contact Kim or Vickie,
859-2365. PR45-tfn
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & Con-
CRETE will do all your con-
crete construction jobs. Call us
and we will give you a quote.
Office, 837-2621, Rich’s cell,
431-2226, toll free, 877-867-
4185.
K25-tfn
HelP WaNted
aMERICa’s BEsT VaLuE Inn
In WaLL has positions open
for housekeeping, laundry and
maintenance. Call Joseph at
279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
PosITIon oPEn: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employ-
ment spraying county highway
right of way. Commercial her-
bicide license required or to be
obtained before start of work.
Pre-employment drug and al-
cohol screening required. Ap-
plications / resumés accepted.
Information 837-2410 or 837-
2422, Fax 837-2447.
K33-4tc
HELP WanTED: Cooks,
counter personnel, wait staff,
and assistant manager posi-
tion(s) are available for Aw!
Shucks Café opening soon at
909 Main Street in Kadoka.
Please apply within or contact
Teresa or Colby Shuck for
more information: 837-2076.
K33-tfn
EMPLoYMEnT oPPoRTu-
nITY: Kadoka Area School Dis-
trict is accepting applications
for a middle school special ed-
ucation teacher and an assis-
tant cook. Applications are
available on the website at
www.kadoka. k12. sd.us or
contact Supt. Jamie Hermann
at 837-2175 for more informa-
tion.
K32-2tc
PosITIon oPEn: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator,
light equipment operator. Ex-
perience preferred, but will
train. CDL required, or to be
obtained in six months. Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Benefits
package. Applications / re-
sumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. K33-4tc
PosITIon oPEn: Part-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Tractor op-
erator to mow county road
right of way, and perform other
duties as directed. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screen-
ing required. Applications /
resumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. K33-4tc
oPTIMETRIC TECHnICIan:
One day per week (Tuesdays),
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Medical expe-
rience preferred, but not re-
quired. Mail resumé to: Philip
Eye Clinic, 810 Mountain View
Road, Rapid City, SD 57702.
Questions, call Angie, 342-
0777.
P28-tfn
HousEkEEPERs anD Laun-
DRY PERsonnEL WanTED:
High school and college stu-
dents are welcome to apply.
Will train. Apply at either
America’s Best Value Inn and
Budget Host Sundowner in
Kadoka or call 837-2188 or
837-2296. K26-tfn
HELP WanTED: Sales person
to sell the historic Black Hills
Gold jewelry, in Wall. Meet
travelers from all over the
world. Salary + commission.
Call Connie at 279-2354 or
939-6443, or fax resumé to
279-2314.
PW24-tfn
HELP WanTED: CDL driver,
Class A, two years flatbed OTR
experience, clean record, refer-
ences. Rapid City area based
company. 390-5535.
P32-4tp
Misc. For sale
FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
Notices/WaNted
WanTED: CLEan CoTTon
RaGs; i.e. sheets, t-shirts,
socks. no FLannEL oR CuR-
TaIns. 25¢ lb. Must be in-
spected before purchase.
Pioneer Review, 221 E. Oak
St., Philip. P28-tfn
Pets/suPPlies
akC GERMan WIREHaIR
PoInTER PuPPIEs: Available
in Milesville for viewing now,
pickup Second week of August.
One male, five females. Will
have first shots, wormed, mi-
crochip implants, and registra-
tion documentation. 544-3016.
P31-4tp
real estate
HousE FoR saLE In PHILIP:
3 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1,100
sq. ft. open floor plan, vaulted
ceilings, fenced backyard, es-
tablished lawn, oversized de-
tached garage. Appliances
included, all new in 2008. Call
840-2257 or 307-251-2474.
PR45-6tp
HoME FoR saLE In PHILIP:
4 bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new
roof, windows, siding, high ef-
ficiency heat/air with heat
pump, on-demand hot water,
nice propane fireplace, nice
backyard, deck and more.
Would consider contract for
deed. Contact for showing: Don
or Tami Ravellette, 685-5147
(cell) or 859-2969 (home).
P27-tfn
2-sToRY HousE FoR saLE
In WaLL: Will consider any
reasonable offer. $23,000 cash
or will consider contract for
deed. Please call 279-2858.
PW27-8tc
reNtals
aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we
can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an applica-
tion. Gateway Apartments,
Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
classiFied Policy
PLEasE REaD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. re-
quests all classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid
at the time the order is placed.
All phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
CaTTLE saLE
LAGRAND SCOTCHCAP ANGUS
RANCH Complete dispersal of 450
Registered and Commercial Fall Calv-
ing Cows including some spring
calvers, 90 2012 Fall Heifers and 50
Fall Bulls. August 10th at Sioux Falls
Regional Worthing Sale barn. High
health, performance and phenotype.
Past National breeder of the year
award. Call for catalogue to Dan Nel-
son, Manager 701-351-1795 or
Duane Pancratz, Owner 605-359-
9222, or check website www.lagrand-
scotchcapranch.com.
EMPLoYMEnT
THE DUPREE SCHOOL DISTRICT is
seeking applications for a HS Math
Instructor (w/wo Head Boys BB
Coach); Base Pay - $34,150 plus
signing bonus. Contact Supt. Lenk at
Dupree School (605) 365-5138.
QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ENGI-
NEER - Imagine working for a com-
pany where integrity is a valued core
principle, team members inspire oth-
ers, employees are driven to deliver
an exceptional experience and all
share in the success. For full descrip-
tion, go to www.LARSONdoors.com.
CENEX AT KILLDEER, ND is seeking
a qualified General Manager. A en-
ergy supply cooperative with sales of
$42 million. Successful agricultural
business management experience de-
sired. Send or fax (866-653-5527) re-
sume ASAP to: Larry Fuller, 5213
Shoal Drive, Bismarck ND 58503,
Email larry.fuller@chsinc. com.
ARLINGTON SCHOOL IS SEEKING a
9-12 Science Teacher, W/WO ex-
tracurricular duties as needed, for
the 2013-14 school year. To obtain a
certified application
www.arlington.k12.sd.us or the busi-
ness office. To apply send applica-
tion, a copy of college transcript and
teaching certificate, with resume to:
Chris Lund, Superintendent, 306 S.
Main, PO Box 359, Arlington, SD
57212. Open until filled. EOE.
TEACHING POSITIONS OPEN AT
MOBRIDGE-POLLOCK School Dis-
trict #62-6 for 2013-2014 School
Year: HS Math; MS Special Educa-
tion; and Birth to 2nd Grade Special
Education. Contact Tim Frederick at
605-845-9204 for more information.
Resumes and applications can be
mailed to the school Attn: Tim Fred-
erick at 1107 1st Avenue East in Mo-
bridge SD 57601. Open until filled.
EOE, Signing Bonus available.
NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOLS EDU-
CATION Cooperative opening: part-
time early childhood special
education paraprofessional for the
2013-2014 school year: Contact Di-
rector Cris Owens 605-466-2206,
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION is
taking applications for full- time Dou-
glas County Highway Superintend-
ent. Must have valid Class A Driverís
License. Experience in road/bridge
construction/maintenance. For ap-
plication contact: Douglas County
Auditor (605) 724-2423.
FoR saLE
COULD IT HAPPEN? Terrorists de-
stroy the Internet, collapsing civiliza-
tion. Get Michael Tidemannís South
Dakota-based novel, Doomsday: A
tale of cyber terror, for $2.99 on Ama-
zon Kindle at:
http://www.amazon.com/ Michael-
Tidemann/e/ B008THMTIW.
LanD auCTIon
BLACK HILLS ABSOLUTE LAND
AUCTION. Selling without reserve,
deluxe condominium at Terry Peak, 3
lots at Lead Country Club & 6
acreages at Rochford Ridge Estates.
Seller financing. Details at
WWW.BRAD-EENAUCTION.COM
605-673-2629.
NORTHERN BLACK HILLS AB-
SOLUTE LAND AUCTION. SELLING
WITHOUT RESERVE, 80 Prime Acres
completely surrounded by USFS,
near Whitewood, Sturgis & Spearfish.
DETAILS AT WWW.BRADEENAUC-
TION.COM 605-673-2629.
MIsCELLanEous
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
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SAVE ON CABLE TV-Internet-Digital
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Options from ALL major service
providers. Call us to learn more!
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HIGHSPEED INTERNET everywhere
By Satellite! Speeds up to 12mbps!
(200x faster than dial-up.) Starting at
$49.95/mo. CALL NOW & GO FAST!
1-888-518-8672
noTICEs
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
oTR/DRIVERs
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner op-
erators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
APARtmENtS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
THank Yous
Thank you Wall Building Cen-
ter for the prizes we won at your
open house.
Bob & Della Hays
ComBINES foR RENt
OR
CuStom HARVEStINg
979-758-4521
WALL CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
COMMUNITY CENTER
MEETING ROOM
JULY 8, 2013 6:30PM
Members Present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Dan Hauk,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Stan Anderson, Councilman; Jerry
Morgan, Councilman; Gale Patterson,
Councilman
Carolynn Anderson, Finance Officer; Gar-
rett Bryan, Public Works; Lindsey Hilde-
brand, Chamber/Assistant FO; Sergeant
Dan Wardle, Pennington County Sheriff;
Ann Clark and Laurie Hindman, Penning-
ton Co. Courant; Annie Tice-Posley, CJ
Tice, Mocha Moose; Carol Hodge; Alan
Anderson, Grazing District; Eric Brunne-
mann, Badlands Nat’l Park; Jim Kitter-
man; Sue Peters, Kelly Lurz, Relay for
Life; Jim Barber; Fred Folsom, Waste
Connections; Clayton Nickel, Sleepy Hol-
low Campground
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to approve the agenda. Motion car-
ried.
Sgt Wardle gave the police report. They
will provide increased man power for the
Wall Celebration, with extra deputies on
duty on Friday and Saturday nights. Or-
dinance enforcement issues have started
to be addressed, notably the music at the
Wall Discount Outlet, it seems that the
noise is significantly lower. The deputies
have also been instructed to use common
sense enforcement on camping in the
parking lot. Some panhandling and ped-
aling issues have been resolved.
Eric Brunneman and Alan Anderson pre-
sented banner proposal with Wall, Na-
tional Park Service (NPS) and Forest
Service logos. The idea is to indicate to
visitors that Wall is a full service commu-
nity and a gateway to Badlands National
Park and Buffalo Gap National Grass-
lands. Motion by Patterson, second by S
Anderson to approve design of banners
and location at Seventh Avenue and Main
Street. Motion carried.
Fred Folsom with Waste Connections ad-
dressed the council over commercial
garbage concerns. Waste Connections
does not want to be an enforcement
agency; and is contracted to take all the
garbage at the curb with a reasonable
limit. It was agreed that the issue would
be dropped.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Patter-
son to approve the Relay for Life Group’s
request to use the west end of South
Boulevard on the evening of September
14th and morning of September 15th and
also to waive the fee for a noise permit.
Motion carried.
Annie Tice-Posley and CJ Tice ap-
proached the council on the issue of
granting a package off sale SD Farm
Wine and malt beverage license. Hus-
tead commented that the community has
shown support; and Tice’s have shown
their interest and that they only want to
sell the SD Farm Wine. Motion by Hus-
tead to send the issue to a vote of the cit-
izens to increase. No second, motion
died.
The council directed Tice's to contact their
attorney to bring a referendum petition
back to the city for a vote of the citizens.
Carol Hodge approached the council on
the lack of flags displayed throughout
town on Flag Day, Memorial Day, or on
July 4th. Although she knows the City
cannot demand it, she thinks the City
should encourage businesses to do it as
she wants Wall to be proud of the people
who serve our country. Hodge was very
upset on those days and thinks the City
should be ashamed.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Patter-
son to approve a building permit for Jim
Tice to build a fence at 407 Glenn Street
within setback requirements with a com-
pletion deadline of August 1st. Motion
carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve Wounded Knee’s building
permit to reconstruct the roof at 207 Tenth
Avenue (former Wounded Knee Mu-
seum). Motion carried. Contractor, Tim
Eisenbraun had given a start of July 20th
for the project.
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
approve Mike and Marilyn Huether’s
building permit to replace roof material
and remodel the deck at 604 Golf Course
Road. Motion carried.
Motion by Patterson, second by Hauk to
approve building permit for Baxter Anders
fence at 608 Dorothy Street. Motion car-
ried.
At this time building permits were re-
viewed for:
Casey McMillan – back patio at 711
Dorothy Street; Bob Hamann – replace
shingled roof with steel material at 303
Creighton Road; Chad Cerney – move in
storage shed at 708 Hustead Street.
Results from the recent land auction at
601 Glenn Street was, one person inter-
ested in the land. Jay McDonnell pur-
chased it for $12,500. Building permit
was approved at a prior meeting pending
the sale, and construction on the lot will
start as soon as possible.
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to approve first reading of Ordinance
13-02: Alcohol Beverage. Motion carried.
Discussion on changing stated fees to
listing that the state statute maximum will
be charged and also striking the Sunday
sales portion of the ordinance.
Discussion on limiting parking on both
sides of the street in commercial areas to
just one side of the street. Vote on Ordi-
nance 13-01; Main Street Parking was
tabled until next month.
Proposed Ordinance 13-03; Flood Plan
was tabled and will be dropped.
Motion by Hauk, second by M Anderson
to approve final plat for Sleepy Hollow
campground and resolution 13-06. Mo-
tion carried.
RESOLUTION 13-06
WHEREAS, a plat showing
Tract A and Tract B of Dartt Ad-
dition (Formerly All of Tract 2 of
Dartt Addition) located in the
SW1/4 of Section 31, 1N, 16E,
B.H.M, City of Wall, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota, has
been presented for approval;
and,
WHEREAS, it appears that all
municipal special assessments
have been fully paid, an ease-
ment for legal access to said
property will be established
and filed, and that the plat of
said tract has been executed
according to law;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RE-
SOLVED, that the plat showing
Tract A and Tract B of Dartt Ad-
dition (Formerly All of Tract 2 of
Dartt Addition) located in the
SW1/4 of Section 31, 1N, 16E,
B.H.M, City of Wall, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota, has
been presented for approval; is
hereby approved and the Fi-
nance Officer is authorized to
endorse on such plat a copy of
the resolution and certify to its
correctness.
Dated this 8th day of July
2013.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
__________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
CERTIFICATE
I, Carolynn M. Anderson, the
duly appointed Finance Officer
of the City of Wall, South
Dakota, do hereby certify that
the foregoing is a true and cor-
rect copy of a resolution
recorded in the Minutes of the
Wall City Council held on the
8th of July, 2013 and appears
upon the files in my office.
Dated at Wall, South Dakota,
this 8th day of July 2013.
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Motion M Anderson, second by Hauk to
approve the $2 per acre annual cost for
renewal on the Bloom lease. Motion car-
ried.
The direct bury wire has gone bad on two
of the I-90 lights. Three options were dis-
cussed: 1) $2,950 for one connection be-
tween one pole and the next pole with
same kind of wiring that is now in use. 2)
$5,973 for more expensive, longer lasting
fix between two poles 3) Wait until next
year and budget for a complete replace-
ment on all poles.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hauk
to proceed with using contingency fund
money and repair half of the complete
system with the more durable option. Mo-
tion carried.
Motion by Hauk, second by M Anderson
to transfer 2010 FAA Grant Funds in the
amount of $110,266 to Winner Airport.
Motion carried.
Hahn commented that the airport commit-
tee will most likely request $10,000 for
city budget for 2014, an increase of
$5,000 than previous requests as they
begin to plan for the expanded runway.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Patter-
son to approve the City minutes for June
6, 2013. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hauk
to approve Fire Department June 2013
minutes. Motion carried.
Motion by Patterson, second by M Ander-
son to approve pay request #1 for Site
Works in the amount of $177,924.17 for
the Sewer Project. Motion carried.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to approve the remaining July City of
Wall bills. Motion carried.
CITY BILLS
JULY 8, 2013
Gross Salaries – June 30, 2013:
Gross Salaries: Adm. - $5,653.63; PWD -
$7,070.16; Seasonal - $3,758.00
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ins.,
$202.41; HEALTH POOL, Health/Life In-
surance, $3,155.30; SDRS, Employee
Retirement, $1,405.56; SDRS-SRP, Em-
ployee Supp Retirement plan, $150.00;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $3,775.19.
July 8, Bills
ANDERSON, CAROLYNN, mileage &
meals for FO school, $119.50; BAD-
LANDS AUTOMOTIVE, mini lamp for
pickup, $1.14; BEST WESTERN
RAMKONTA INN, lodging for FO school,
$263.97; BLACK HILLS CHEMICAL, CC
supplies/garbage bags-Main St, $273.94;
BUCHHOLZ CARRIE, water deposit re-
fund, $80.25; BAKER TIMBER PROD-
UCTS, INC., rails for Library fence,
$61.00; BRYAN, GARRETT, reimburse-
ment for Jim & Garrett's shirts, $204.69;
CETEC, Sewer Outfall project, $4,865.10;
DAKOTA BACKUP, backup service,
$180.72; CLARK, JEFFREY, insurance
and Afflac reimbursement, $207.24;
DAKOTA BUSINESS CENTER, copier
contract, $40.00; WALL AMBULANCE,
CD #16390 reimbursement, $53,724.48;
ENERGY LABORATORIES, water test-
ing, $12.50; FIRST AMERICAN TITLE
CO. OF SD, Insurance & deed prep for
601 Glenn Street lot, $231.25; FIRST IN-
TERSTATE BANK, ach fees, $12.35;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, sales tax,
$550.42; FRENTZ GARY, CC deposit re-
fund, $255.00; GOLDEN WEST TELE,
phone bill, $614.20; GOLDEN WEST
TECHNOLOGIES, security monitoring,
$260.91; HAWKINS WATER TREAT-
MENT GROUP, pool & water treatment,
$5,270.17; H-C GALLOWAYS, Scada up-
grade, $6,479.30; GUNDERSON,
PALMER, GOODSELL, attorney fees,
$510.00; HAUFF MID-AMERICA
SPORTS, baseball supplies, $377.50;
JENNER EQUIP., mower blades,
$137.40; KIEFER & ASSOCIATES, life-
guard trunks, $107.80; KITTERMAN,
JIM, insurance reimbursement, $414.61;
KITTERMAN CONSTRUCTION, Culvert
on N Creighton Rd, $234.60; LURZ
PLUMBING, install faucet in women's rest
room at pool, $136.73; ONE CALL SYS-
TEMS, INC., locate requests, $21.09;
PENNINGTON COUNTY COURANT,
publishings, $445.50; PICTURE THIS
QUILT, lifeguard t-shirts, $69.00; POST-
MASTER, stamps, $399.00; RAPID DE-
LIVERY INC, shipping for water test,
$10.80; SERVALL UNIFORM, CC rugs,
$58.66; SMITH PHILLIP, water deposit
refund, $80.25; SDML, Elected Official
workshop for Dan H & Gale P., $40.00;
SITE WORK SPECIALISTS, Pay Re-
quest #1 for Sewer Project, $177,924.17;
TLC ELECTRIC, baseball lights, $94.83;
WALKER REFUSE, garbage contract,
$7,735.63; WALL BADLANDS AREA
CHAMBER, BBB funds, $7,739.76;
WALL BUILDING CENTER & CONST,
supplies, $968.33; SECRETARY OF
STATE, notary public fees for filing,
$30.00; WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity,
$11,704.28; WEST RIVER ELECTRIC
ASSOC, INC, Main St loan, $7,500.00;
WEST RIVER/LYMAN-JONES RURAL,
water purchases, $3,500.00; GENPRO
POWER SERVICES, repair on fuel lift
pump on generator for Well #7,
$4,207.94; POOL & SPA CENTER, Burn
Out for pool - 48 cases, $190.08.
TOTAL BILLS: $298,346.09
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 8th day of July 2013.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hauk
to approve July Fire Department bills.
Motion carried.
FIRE DEPT BILLS
JULY 8, 2013
July 8, Bills 2013:
CORNER PANTRY, fuel for trucks/cook-
ies for meeting, $260.40; WALL AMBU-
LANCE, electricity at garage, $44.23;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, fuel for
trucks, $64.16; GOLDEN WEST TELE,
phone-internet, $131.17; LIGHT &
SIREN, Redline HP LED flashlight,
$61.00; VERIZON WIRELESS, mobile
broadband, $52.08; WALL BUILDING
CENTER & CONST, plug w/connector,
$31.98; WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity,
$153.02.
TOTAL BILLS: $798.04
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 8th day of July 2013.
Motion by Hustead, second by Patterson
to approve July Library bills. Motion car-
ried.
LIBRARY BILLS
JULY 8, 2013
Gross Salaries – June 30, 2013:
Gross Salaries: $690.01
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employ,
$105.58
July 8, Bills 2013:
BRUNNEMANN WENDY, reimbursement
for books, $36.92; DIAMOND LAKE
BOOK CO, books, $96.52; FIRST IN-
TERSTATE BANK, banners for parade,
$50.47; FOLLETT SOFTWARE CO, Des-
tiny Library Manager, $2,470.74;
GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLOGIES, se-
curity monitoring, $179.94; GOLDEN
WEST TELE, phone, $48.51; LESTER
CHERYL, repainting of sign, $50.00;
MINITEX, bar code labels, $74.00; SD
MAGAZINE, 2-yr magazine subscriptio,
$39.00; WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity,
$49.40.
TOTAL BILLS: 3,095.50
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 8th day of July 2013.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve July Cemetery bills. Mo-
tion carried.
CEMETERY BILLS
JULY 8, 2013
Gross Salaries – June 30, 2013:
Gross Salaries: $774.00
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $144.99
June 6, Bills 2013:
BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE, V-Belt for
mower, $18.39; CORNER PANTRY, fuel
for mowers, $103.22; WALL BUILDING
CENTER & CONST, v-belt/oil/trim line,
$40.77.
TOTAL BILLS: $162.38
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 8th day of July 2013.
At this time the On-call schedule, Com-
munity Center report, Compensatory re-
ports were reviewed.
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
increase lifeguard, Elle Moon's pay to $8
per hour and retroactively pay her $8.00
for June's hours. Motion carried.
FO Anderson noted that there is an
elected officials training in Pierre on July
24th for those councilmen interested.
Councilman Hauk and Patterson are
planning to attend.
Motion by Patterson, second by M Ander-
son to approve moving forward with a
contract for mosquito spraying for the
town of Wasta. Motion carried.
PW Director Bryan gave a report on pub-
lic works items:
Well 2, is completely operational again. It
was dug in the 1960’s and it is recom-
mended to be converted to a pit less
adapter. Rough cost estimate at
$350,000 for this option. It was ques-
tioned whether this would be practical be-
cause of the age of the Well and the
ability to get water through West River
Lyman Jones.
Well 7, is back on line and the generator
is ready for winter. The fuel pump in the
generator and the pump in well 7, had
failed.
Bulk water usage needed for the Inter-
state work was discussed. It is loaded
through a metered fire hydrant near the
BH Credit Union. PW Bryan would feel
more comfortable if there were more se-
cure measures. Mayor Hahn asked him
to put together a proposal for individual
meters.
A new chlorine pump has been installed
at Well 4; Well 1, 6 and 7 still have di-
aphragm pumps.
Motion by Patterson, second by S Ander-
son to offer seasonal employee, Colton
Kelly, employment until October 15th.
Motion carried.
Councilman S Anderson was approached
with putting in a street light on Spur Drive.
PW Bryan will look into the cost and bring
back to the August meeting.
The next City Council meeting will be
Tuesday, August 6th at 6:30pm.
With no further business the meeting was
adjourned at 8:32 pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published July 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $195.59.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Rochford Community Club; Anna
Burleson – Agent has applied for a Zon-
ing Variance to reduce the minimum lot
size and setback requirements in a Sub-
urban Residential District and to waive
the minimum off-street parking require-
ments for the subject property located on
Lot 4, Block 2 of Dakota Lode M.S. 2109,
and Part of Lot 1 (26’ x 60’ in NE Corner),
Block 3 of Dakota Lode M.S. 2109, Sec-
tion 23, T2N, R3E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, 11676 Rochford
Road, in accordance with Sections 208,
310, and 509 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
Larry Teuber / School House, LLC; Ren-
ner & Associates – Agent, has applied for
a Zoning Variance to allow a Guesthouse
to exceed the maximum square footage
requirement specified in Section 318 in a
Limited Agriculture District/Suburban
Residential District located on Lots 2 and
3 (inclusive of one-half vacated Clarkson
Road adjacent to said lots), Block 4 of
Spring Canyon Estates, and Lot 4, Block
4 of Spring Canyon Estates, Section 5,
T1S, R7E, BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota, 9701 Clarkson Road, in
accordance with Sections 206, 208, 318,
318, and 509 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
6th day of August 2013. At this time, any
person interested may appear and show
cause, if there be any, why such requests
should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published July 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $21.92.
Pennington County Courant • July 25, 2013 • Page 7 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Pennington County Courant
279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. BBQ: 11.00-1.00 FEEDER CATTLE: 12 P.M.
(MT}. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 25UU HEAD.
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷ FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, V÷VEANED
REEDY - 250 DLK STFS ..............................................900-1000=
KNUPPE - 250 DLK, HEFF & X DFED STFS & OPEN HFFS
(200 HFFS, 50 STFS} ..................................................550-700=
PALMER - 200 DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS ........................700-800=
LANDERS LIVESTOCK - 200 DLK & X DFED STFS .....900-1000=
LONG - 165 CHAF X FANCY HF SPAY HFFS ..................850-950=
PETERSON - 120 DLK OPEN HFFS ......................................700=
ROSETH BROTHERS - 100 DLK HOME FAISED TESTED OPEN
HFFS .........................................................................800-850=
WILLIAMS RN - 70 DLK & FEW FED STFS ....................800-850=
EISENBRAUN - 70 DLK STFS & OPEN HFFS .................700-750=
HAMM - 65 DLK & DWF FALL CLVS; FS,NI,
NOT WEANED ............................................................700-750=
YOUNG - 55 DLK & DWF STFS; NI ...............................900-1000=
CASPERS - 50 DLK STFS & TESTED OPEN HFFS .........700-800=
MARTI - 40 DLK STFS & OPEN HFFS ...........................700-750=
CASSENS - 40 DLK & DWF STFS & OPEN HFFS; NI ......700-750=
SANDER - 40 DLK & DWF TESTED OPEN HFFS ...................800=
NESS - 30 DLK STFS ............................................................900=
PRICHARD - 30 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS ...........................800=
HALL - 20 DLK STFS .....................................................600-650=
WELLER - 20 DLK STFS .......................................................850=
BARRY - 15 DLK STFS & OPEN HFFS ...........................700-800=
JOHNSTON - 15 DLK FALL CLVS; FS,W ...............................600=
LARSON - 15 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS ........................750-800=
RIGGINS - 13 DLK FALL CLVS & YFLCS .......................600-800=
RADWAY - 10 DLK ULTFASOUND OPEN HFFS .............900-950=
WILLERT - 9 XDFED STFS & HFFS ..............................800-900=
PAIRS & SPRING CALVES:
CONSIGNMENT - 70 DLK 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS
W/DLK & FED CLVS AT SIDE (EXPOSED DLK; JULY 1}
GRAVATT - 30 DLK SPFINC CLVS 300=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH
AT tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, AUG. 6: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 13: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF & STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAVA-
CANZA HOFSE SALE. CATALOG DEADLINE: MON., AUCUST 5. CO
TO www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com FOF CONSICNMENT FOFMS.
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JULY 2S, 2DJS
Ano1Þer b1g run o] ue1gÞ-up oous, bu11s,
ond Þe1]ere11es. MorKe1 uos verg s1rong!
Ne×1 ueeK: Speo1o1 Yeor11ng & Fo11 Co1]
So1e ond Regu1or Co111e So1e & Ann1ver-
sorg BBQ. So1e 11me JD:DD MT & ]ree
BBQ JJ:DD MT. Come on 1n ond uo1oÞ
1Þe so1e ond ]o1n us ]or 1unoÞ.
SPRING CALVES:
TERRY GREGG - HARROLD
10 .................................DLK CALVES 342=......$640.00/HD
ACE KARY - NORRIS
8 ...................................DLK CALVES 314=......$600.00/HD
WEIGH-UPS:
MIKE NOTEBOOM - PHILIP
1.......................................FED COW 1160= ...........$88.00
1 .......................................DLK COW 1300= ...........$87.50
1.......................................FED COW 1280= ...........$85.00
STEVE CULLUM - CUSTER
1.......................................DLK DULL 1985= .........$110.00
SHAW RANCH INC - WHITE OWL
1.......................................DLK DULL 2030= .........$109.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 2050= .........$108.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 2170= .........$107.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 2090= .........$105.50
BAXTER ANDERS - WALL
1 .......................................DLK COW 1490= ...........$86.00
1 ......................................DWF COW 1355= ...........$85.50
1 .....................................HEFF COW 1245= ...........$84.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1405= ...........$84.00
8 ...........................FED & DLK COWS 1316= ...........$82.00
1.......................................FED COW 1365= ...........$81.50
1 ......................................DWF COW 1205= ...........$80.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1510= ...........$77.50
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ......................................DWF COW 1115= ...........$85.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1245= ...........$84.00
KENNETH MCILRAVY - PHILIP
1.....................................CHAF COW 1375= ...........$85.00
BART & JANICE PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 .......................................DLK COW 1845= ...........$84.50
MATT BROTHERS - ELM SPRINGS
1.....................................CHAF DULL 1775= .........$108.00
ROALD MITCHELL - DUPREE
1.......................................DLK DULL 1890= .........$107.50
TERRY HOTCHKISS - REVA
1 .......................................DLK COW 1330= ...........$84.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1570= ...........$81.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 2000= .........$107.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1860= .........$105.50
EARL PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 .......................................DLK COW 1130= ...........$84.00
10....................................DLK COWS 1581= ...........$81.50
3......................................DLK COWS 1310= ...........$81.00
DOUG THORSON - QUINN
1 .....................................HEFF COW 1290= ...........$82.50
1 .....................................HEFF COW 1285= ...........$81.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1890= .........$101.50
CINDY NU2UM - PHILIP
1.......................................DLK DULL 1845= .........$107.00
LYNN DENKE - CREIGHTON
1.......................................DLK DULL 1735= .........$105.50
BRUCE JENSEN - OWANKA
1.......................................DLK DULL 2145= .........$105.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 2300= .........$101.50
HOWARD & DELORES KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 .......................................DLK COW 1435= ...........$82.00
1 ......................................DWF COW 1545= ...........$77.50
STEVE CLEMENTS - PHILIP
1 ..............................DLK COW (WET} 1415= ...........$82.50
1 .............................DWF COW (WET} 1410= ...........$81.50
1 .............................DWF COW (WET} 1350= ...........$78.00
1 .............................DWF COW (WET} 1555= ...........$74.00
1 .............................FWF COW (WET} 1530= ...........$73.00
LYLE O'BRYAN - BELVIDERE
2...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1398= ...........$82.00
5...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1429= ...........$78.75
KENNY MATT - ELM SPRINGS
1.......................................DLK DULL 1595= .........$104.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1680= .........$103.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1710= .........$101.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1795= .........$101.00
RON TWISS - INTERIOR
1.......................................DLK DULL 2095= .........$104.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1 .......................................DLK COW 1455= ...........$81.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1360= ...........$79.50
5...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1300= ...........$79.00
3...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1315= ...........$78.00
1.............................DLK & DWF COW 1465= ...........$77.50
BILL MUNROE - UNION CENTER
1.......................................FED COW 1330= ...........$81.50
A CONSIGNMENT
2....................................HEFF COWS 1433= ...........$81.00
1 .......................................DLK COW 1925= ...........$79.00
1 .......................................DLK COW 1795= ...........$75.00
LINDA ANDERS - MUD BUTTE
1 .......................................DLK COW 1400= ...........$81.00
MEL DUTTON - FAITH
1 .......................................DLK COW 1415= ...........$80.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1525= ...........$80.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 2115= .........$104.00
DON RAVELLETTE - PHILIP
1 .......................................DLK COW 1540= ...........$80.00
1.................................DLK COWETTE 1055= ...........$97.00
DAN LEWIS - RAPID CITY
1 .......................................DLK COW 1355= ...........$80.00
STERLING RIGGINS - WANBLEE
1.......................................DLK DULL 1860= .........$103.50
JASON FANNING - MARTIN
1.......................................DLK DULL 1710= .........$102.50
1.....................................CHAF DULL 1620= .........$100.50
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1.......................................DLK DULL 1765= .........$102.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 1970= .........$101.00
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
2.....................................DLK HFFTS 978= .............$96.00
Pennington County Courant • July 25 2013 • Page 8
I am reminded that achieving a
short-term goal is like winning a
game, but achieving a long-term
goal is like winning the tourna-
ment. Are you setting your goals
down in black and white? We
should be establishing a daily habit
of getting our goals out of our heads
and down on paper, because it will
help us see things from a different
perspective. I am constantly look-
ing for ways to reach a higher goal-
achieving ratio. This is such a
simple solution to greater success.
It is never too late to get into the
habit of putting your goals down on
paper. Establishing specific timeta-
bles, and deadlines really causes us
to have some serious motivation. A
little self- imposed pressure-moti-
vations that will propel us towards
our dreams and desires each day
we are alive-is good for us.
Take the time today to get your
goals down. Share them with some
who can really hold you account-
able to there result. Go to someone
who will be tough on you-someone
who will really hold your feet to the
fire. Please do not put this off.
There is no reason to live in the
"should've or could've". Grasp life
with a gusto today and do not let
go. Jump up and down and shake
it all about if you have to. I am se-
rious. It is never too late to live the
life you dream about. Make it a re-
ality. True joy comes from living life
with a passion.
Caution: Do not let anyone steal
your dreams. There are people on
this planet who are DREAM
THIEVES. They want to pull you
back into their bucket of muck.
Strive to achieve your heart's de-
sire. It truly is never too late to live
the life that you are dreaming
about. How about starting today?
It’s Never Too Late
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly mo-
tivational seminars each year.
Call Bob for more details at
800-437-9715 and be sure to
check out Bob’s website at:
www.mrattitudespeaks.com
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todd Sieler
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTION: What can I do
when my spouse avoids conflict
and seems to want “peace at any
price”? Unresolved issues are boil-
ing beneath the surface, and we’re
growing more emotionally distant
with every passing day. How can I
turn things around before it’s too
late?
ANSWER: Not too many people
actually enjoy conflict, especially in
marriage. So it’s not surprising
that your spouse may prefer to
avoid it.
Still, some clashes are inevitable
in any marriage. No matter how
similar you and your mate may be
in terms of basic interests, values,
and personalities, men and women
are wired differently. Many women
want to deal with problems by
talking them out while their hus-
bands prefer to withdraw – which
the wives find maddening. Occa-
sionally it’s the opposite, with the
wife doing the avoiding.
This can be explained in a num-
ber of ways. A woman may be bet-
ter with language, better at
articulating her thoughts and
making convincing arguments.
Her husband may feel over-
whelmed by the onslaught of her
verbiage and reluctant to “lose” in
a straightforward exchange of
opinion. It’s also possible that the
avoiding partner has grown up in
a home where one parent verbally
abused the other, or where the par-
ents never argued at all, leaving
them without a model of construc-
tive and honest conflict resolution.
Reduplicating this situation is un-
desirable and unhealthy, since un-
resolved anger, bitterness, and fear
can have serious medical and emo-
tional consequences.
Whatever the scenario, it stands
to reason that spouses won’t al-
ways agree. They have their own
expectations and needs. So when
the honeymoon is over and ten-
sions come to the surface, how do
you handle conflict when one part-
ner wants to avoid it?
If this is your situation, we sug-
gest you ask your spouse to try an
experiment with you. It will take
just twenty minutes once or twice
a week. During the first ten min-
utes of that time, one of you will
talk about issues that are bother-
ing you. The other will agree to lis-
ten without argument or debate –
no seeking to set the other person
straight or change anyone’s mind.
The only response allowed is to ask
for clarification. During the second
ten minutes the other spouse will
talk. Again, a request for clarifica-
tion is the only response permitted.
At the end of the twenty minutes
take a time-out from each other.
Reflect on what your spouse has
said. Does it help you understand
some of the reasons for his or her
feelings?
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer is
excerpted from books authored by
Dr. James Dobson and published
by Tyndale House Publishers. Dr.
Dobson is the Chairman of the
Board of Focus on the Family, a
nonprofit organization dedicated to
the preservation of the home.
Copyright 2003 James Dobson,
Inc. All rights reserved. Interna-
tional copyright secured.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
HOW CAN YOUNGER
INvESTORS COPE WITH
TOUGH TIMES?
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
As Americans, we’re used to
thinking that we will inevitably do
better than our parents’ genera-
tion. But, for now at least, this type
of progress may be facing some
roadblocks — and this inability to
gain ground, financially, can have
real implications for today’s
younger people and their approach
to investing.
Before we get to the investment
component, though, let’s quickly
review the nature of the problem.
In a nutshell, younger Americans
— those in their twenties and thir-
ties — have accrued significantly
less wealth than their parents did
at the same age, according to a re-
cent study by the Urban Institute.
Here’s why:
•Bursting of housing “bubble” —
Many younger people who bought
houses shortly before the housing
“bubble” began deflating in 2006
now find themselves to be “under-
water” on their mortgages — that
is, they owe more than their
houses are worth. Consequently,
they have less opportunity to build
home equity — which has been an
important means of building
wealth for past generations.
•Student-loan debt — The me-
dian balance among all households
with student loan debt is now more
than $13,000, according to the Pew
Research Center — and debt levels
are much higher for recent gradu-
ates. It can take years to pay off
these debts — and the money
being used for debt payments is
money that can’t go toward build-
ing wealth for long-term goals.
•Wage stagnation — For several
years, the job market has been
pretty bad for younger workers.
And even those with jobs aren’t
making much headway, because
wages, adjusted for inflation, have
largely stagnated for over a
decade. Less income clearly
equates to less opportunities for in-
vesting and creating wealth.
Still, even given these somewhat
grim realities, younger people can
help themselves build resources for
the future and make progress to-
ward their long-term goals. If
you’re in this group, what can you
do?
For starters, pay yourself first.
Set up an automatic payment each
month from your checking or sav-
ings account into an investment
vehicle, such as an IRA. At first,
you may only be able to afford
small sums — but, over time, you
may be pleasantly surprised at the
amount you’ve saved.
Next, every time your salary
goes up, try to increase the amount
you put into your 401(k) or other
employer-sponsored retirement
plan. Because you typically con-
tribute pretax dollars to your
401(k) or other plan, the more you
put in, the lower your taxable in-
come. Plus, your money can grow
on a tax-deferred basis.
Here’s another suggestion: Don’t
be “over-cautious” with your in-
vestments. Many younger in-
vestors, apparently nervous due to
market volatility of recent years,
have become quite conservative,
putting relatively large amounts of
their portfolio into vehicles that
offer significant protection of prin-
cipal but little in the way of growth
potential. Of course, the financial
markets will always fluctuate, and
downturns will occur — but when
you’re young, and you have many
decades in which to invest, you
have time to overcome short-term
declines. To achieve your long-term
goals, such as a comfortable retire-
ment, you will unquestionably
need some growth elements in
your portfolio, with the exact
amount based on your risk toler-
ance and specific objectives.
These aren’t the easiest times for
young people. Nonetheless, with
diligence, perseverance and a
measure of sacrifice, you can gain
some control over your financial
fortunes — so look for your oppor-
tunities.

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