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Pennington Co. Courant, July 11, 2013

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Number 28
Volume 108
July 11, 2013
Grand Marshal for the annual July 4th parade held in Wasta was Celine Trask. Celine rode a three
wheel bike in the parade with her sisters walking along side her. Despite some rain the parade
was a huge success. Pictured from left to right ... Emily Linn, Maria Trask, Gemma Trask, Celine
Trask, Julie Trask and Kassandra Linn. (More pictures on page 2.) ~Photo Ann Clark
Wasta celebrates July
4th with annual parade
PVFD delivers another
dazzling July 4 show
The Wall Rodeo Booster Club
has a big three day line up for the
Wall SDRA Celebration rodeo.
The South Dakota Rodeo Associ-
ation brings in the top cowboys
and cowgirls of South Dakota and
the surrounding states.
Each contestant will compete in
their respective events to receive
prize money to be earned to com-
pete as one of the top twelve cow-
boys and cowgirls at the SDRA fi-
nals at the end of the rodeo season.
Hollenbeck Rodeo Company
from Winner, S.D., will bring in
their stock for the celebration
rodeo.
Thursday night will be family
SDRA Rodeo and other attractions
highlight Wall Celebration days
Trick Rider Christy Willert from Kadoka will be performing at the
SDRA Rodeo held at the Wall Rodeo grounds on Saturday, July
13. ~Photo Courtesy PinkPineapples.SmugMug.com
night. The Naja Shrine Clowns
will tie balloons and be clowning
around at the rodeo enteraining
kids of all ages. “Katchup” aka Joel
Stephens and his fellow Shrine
clowns “Giddy” Howard Mehriner
and “Dirtee” John Miller will be at
the rodeo from 6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
In addition to the candy scrabble
sponsored by Days Inn and muttin
busting for the kids all three
nights.
Friday night will be Military
night. All military men and women
with a military pass will get into
the rodeo free. In additon there
will be “The Businessman's Dress”
the calf contest, each team will
have to dress a calf.
Saturday night will be Christy
Willert the trick rider.
Willert has been trick riding for
13 years, she learned how to trick
ride from her aunt that lives in
western New York.
When performing she does the
sucide ride, hipodrome, and the
vault on her horse named Flash.
Willert lives in Kadoka, S.D. and
is married to Jamie Willert.She
will be performing at the Wall
SDRA Celebration rodeo on Satur-
day night. Performances begin at
7 p.m.
Activities for the Wall Celebra-
tion are:
•Thursday, July 11. Tent setup
by T & K Rentals, LLC at 5:00
p.m. SDRA Rodeo, Candy Scram-
ble for the kids at 7:00 p.m.
•Friday, July 12. SDRA rodeo
slack at 10:00 a.m. Beer Garden
opens at 5:00 p.m. SDRA Rodeo,
Business Men “Dress the Calf Con-
test” at 7:00 p.m. Live Music
“Eclipse” from 9:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
•Saturday, July 12. Registration
for Relay For Life 5K Run/Walk
starting at 6:30 a.m. Relay For
Life Run/Walk begins at 7:00 a.m.
Parade “Wall’s Wild West Celebra-
tion” on main street starts at 10:00
a.m. The seventh grade class will
be the parade marshalls. (9:00
a.m. parade line-up at south end of
main street between Wall Building
Center and Wall Food Center.)
Beer Gardens opens at 11:00 a.m.
Lions Club Lunceon at Wall Com-
munity Center, Stick Horse Rodeo,
Lutheran Church Ice Cream So-
cial, and Sand Dig and other
games following the parade. Horse
shoes at 1:30 p.m. Alumni registra-
tion at the Wall Community Cen-
ter beginning at 1:30 p.m. Alumni
program at the Wall Community
Center starts at 2:00 p.m. SDRA
Rodeo, Christy Willert - Trick
Rider at 7:00 p.m. Live Music
“Crash Wagon” from 9:00 p.m. -
1:00 a.m.
The Philip Volunteer Fire De-
partment (PVFD) presented its an-
nual fireworks display at dusk,
Wednesday, July 3, over Lake
Waggoner.
Over a dozen members of the
Philip Volunteer Fire Department
helped prepare and present the de-
partment’s annual fireworks dis-
play.
Patriotic music was played over
96.7 radio during the fireworks
display.
Fire Chief Matt Reckling said
that the crowd seemed to be pretty
good sized.
The free will donations helped
support the $5,000 cost for the fire-
At approximately 4:30 p.m. on
Thursday, July 4, park rangers re-
ceived a report that a helicopter
had made a precautionary landing
southeast of the Big Badlands
Overlook.
The pilot landed the helicopter
safely and no one was injured.
The helicopter was on a sight-
seeing tour over Badlands Na-
tional Park at the time of the inci-
dent.
In addition to the pilot, two pas-
sengers were on board the Bad-
lands Helicopters flight.
The passengers were flown out
of the park on another helicopter.
The grounded aircraft remains
in the park at this time but is not
readily visible from viewpoints
along the Badlands Loop Road.
Badlands Helicopters is an au-
thorized park concessionaire that
takes visitors on scenic overflights.
Owner Mike Jacobs is working
closely with park rangers to repair
the aircraft and remove it without
damaging park resources.B o t h
the FAA and the NTSB were noti-
fied of the incident.
Class of 1983
Wall High School graduating class of 1983. Pictured back row: from left to right ... Tim Griffin,
Denise Gunn, Kara Jarvis, Tami Holsether, Jamie Benne, Kathy Poppe, Leslie Heathershaw, Cindy
St. Clair, Barry Severson. Middle row: Lori Alishouse, Lloyd Garrison, Lois Stverak, Sherri Knut-
son, Jeannie Stotts, Ed Dartt, Leslie Lentz, Carolyn Fortune, Susan Amiotte, Arlan Geigle. Front
row: Marty Huether, Robin Denke, Mark Chisum, Henry Hanson, Gene Drewitz, James Babcock.
~Courtesy Photo
Helicopter
makes
emergency
landing in
Badlands
works and will help to make next
year’s display even larger.
PVFD also covered the cost of in-
surance.
Early ordering earns a discount
so the PVFD can bring in the vari-
ous single shots, including some
six inchers, and the many multi-
shot batteries commonly called
“cakes.” Before and after the huge
main event, kids shot off their own
fireworks.
Many boats dotted the lake dur-
ing the show. Afterwards, many
viewers left, though many stayed
behind in campers.
~Photo Del Bartels
by Laurie Hindman
The Wall Celebration Commit-
tee were the guest speakers for the
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of
Commerce meeting held on Mon-
day, July 8.
Kim Handcock and Niki Mohr
gave a run down on the Wall Cele-
bration and noted the Wall Youth
Baseball will be taking over the
luncheon in the Community Cen-
ter after the parade this year.
There will be two new bands for
the dances this year along with
kids events under the tent.
A smaller tent will be set up this
year for events that are outside of
the larger tent.
The Wall Seventh grade class
will be the marshall's for the pa-
rade and buttons can be purchased
through different businesses in
Wall.
Donna Curr also gave a run
down on the rodeos and encour-
ages everyone in Wall to dress in
western attire. There are 500 con-
testants in the rodeo and a cal-
cutta of businesses who are in
“Dress the Calf” contest will be
held before the event.
Reports
Wall City Council will hold their
August meeting on Tuesday the
6th at 6:30 p.m. Organizations
need to make sure they get their
requests in for the budget before
the August meeting.
The school will hold their budget
meeting on Wednesday, July 10.
Badlands National Parks noted
their visitation is up for June and
July and road construction on the
loop road will begin after the Stur-
gis Motorcycle Rally.
Minuteman Missile National
Historic Site had 1,100 visitor on
July 4 and construction on their
new visitor building will start in
September.
Forest Service is also seeing vis-
itation up. Their kids fishing day
was a success and they have six
firefighters gone to fight fires out
of the state.
Golden West has new techni-
cians working in the Wall area.
West River Electric’s annual
meeting will be held October 5. Pe-
titions are available for anyone
who would like to run for a board
position
First Interstate Bank is sponsor-
ing the Wall Relay for Life "Park-
ing Lot Picnic" in their parking
lot on Friday from 11:30 a.m. -
1:30 p.m.
Country Cupboard is in need of
cereals and meal packets. Any do-
nations can be dropped off at the
local churches, Wall Food Center
or to Carol Hoffman at the Black
Hills Federal Credit Services.
Once again the “Kid’s Garden” pro-
ceeds will go the the Back Pack
Program.
Black Hills and Badlands
Tourism Association noted that the
index tourism is down less than
one percent but taxable sales are
up.
The 2014 budget was reviewed
and approved.
Announcements
• July 11 -13; Wall Celebration
and Rodeo.
• July 15; Blood drive at the
Wall Community Center.
• July 17; SET meeting in Inte-
rior.
•August 6; Wall City Council
meeting at the Wall Community
Center at 6:30 p.m.
•No August Chamber luncheon
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of
Commerce holds July meeting
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013 • Page 2
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
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nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
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rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
Email us with
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By:Ann Schwader,
Nutrition Field SpecialistSDSU Extension
Winner Regional Extension Center
Phone: 605-842-1267
A Buffalo County child is South
Dakota’s first human West Nile
virus (WNV) detection of the sea-
son, the state Health Department
reported today. The person is in
the 10 to 19 age group.
“West Nile positive mosquitoes
and now a sick individual indicate
the active transmission of West
Nile virus in South Dakota and
people need to protect themselves,
especially during evening outdoor
activities, such as 4th of July fire-
works shows” said Dr. Lon
Kightlinger, State Epidemiologist
for the department.
To prevent mosquito bites and
reduce the risk of WNV, the de-
partment recommends the follow-
First human West Nile case of 2013 reported
ing personal precautions:
•Use mosquito repellents
(DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eu-
calyptus, or IR3535) and limit ex-
posure by wearing pants and long
sleeves in the evening.
•Limit time outdoors from dusk
to midnight when Culex mosqui-
toes are most active.
•Get rid of standing water that
gives mosquitoes a place to breed.
•Support local mosquito control
efforts.
Personal precautions are espe-
cially important for those at high
risk for WNV – people over 50,
pregnant women, transplant pa-
tients, individuals with diabetes or
high blood pressure, and those
with a history of alcohol abuse.
People with severe or unusual
headaches should see their physi-
cians.
Three mosquito pools have
tested positive for WNV so far this
season in South Dakota, two in
Brookings County and one in
Hughes County. All of the positive
pools were Culex tarsalis, the pri-
mary carrier of the virus in South
Dakota.
Find WNV prevention informa-
tion on the Web at http://westnile.
sd.gov.
Information is also available
from the SDSU Cooperative Ex-
tension Service at http://www.sd-
state.edu/sdces/issues/wnv.cfm.
Educational and recreational
programming in South Dakota's
state parks will be increasing dur-
ing the busy summer camping sea-
son. A number of parks are offering
programs that allow visitors to join
a guided hike, cook over the camp-
fire or learn the history of a fa-
vorite park.
•Walk in the Woods, Good Earth
State Park at Blood Run near
Sioux Falls, Friday, July 12 at 10
a.m. CDT. Info: 605-987-2263
•Little Naturalist Program:
Cool Summertime Treats
During summer months,
whether we’re young or young at
heart, most of us look forward to a
cool dairy treat on a warm day.
Dairy treats, like low-fat frozen
yogurt, are not only “dairy-licious”-
they are a way to consume dairy
foods that provide many health
benefits.
Consuming dairy products can
reduce the risk of cardiovascular
disease, osteoporosis, high blood
pressure and type-2 diabetes.
Adult men and women need
enough dairy foods to equal three
cups of milk a day.
The American Academy of Pedi-
atrics (http://www.aap.org) recom-
mends that infants drink breast
milk or iron-fortified formula dur-
ing their first year of life. Children
between one and two years should
drink whole milk. Children older
than two years should drink low-
fat milk.
The dairy group provides nutri-
ents that are vital for health and
maintenance of our bodies. They
include calcium, vitamin D, pro-
tein and potassium. Calcium is the
most important nutrient found in
dairy foods. It helps grow healthy
bones and teeth in young children
and youth.
In later years, it helps adults
keep their bone mass high, de-
creasing the risk of developing
weak bones and future bone health
problems. Calcium is also needed
for muscle function, nerve function
and blood clotting.
Protein is an energy source that
helps build and repair muscles.
Vitamin D in some dairy foods
helps your body use calcium better.
Potassium helps maintain a
healthy blood pressure and re-
duces the risk of having a stroke.
Foods made from milk that re-
tain their calcium content are part
of the dairy group.
Foods made from milk with lit-
tle or no calcium such as cream,
cream cheese and butter are not
part of the dairy group.
By choosing low-fat and fat-free
versions of dairy foods, you can cut
back on your fat intake while en-
joying the health benefits of these
foods.
Always check food labels to
make sure you are purchasing
healthy dairy choices.
Healthy dairy snack ideas for
summertime include:
•Mix fat-free milk, frozen or
fresh fruit and ice cubes in a
blender for a simple smoothie
•Low-fat frozen yogurt
•Low-fat or fat-free ice cream
•Berries blended in low-fat milk
•Frozen yogurt pops
•Smoothie pops (use your fa-
vorite fruit, low-fat milk or yogurt)
•Mix low-fat yogurt with fresh
fruit
There are milk alternatives for
individuals who do not digest lac-
tose very well.
Try lactose-free milk products,
soy milk, almond milk fortified
with calcium or rice milk.
To obtain a delicious, easy
smoothie recipe check out the Uni-
versity of Vermont Extension’s
publication, “Fruit Smoothies” (ht
tp://bit.ly/190LHyO).
For more information contact
SDSU Nutrition Field Specialist
Ann Schwader at the Winner Re-
gional Extension Center at 605-
842-1267 or ann.schwader@sdstat
e.edu.
Upcoming S.D. State Park programs provide family recreation and education
Pretty Plants, Adams Homestead
and Nature Preserve near North
Sioux City, Friday, July 12 at 10
a.m. CDT. Pre-register/Info: 605-
232-0873
•Legend and Lore, Chief White
Crane Recreation Area near Yank-
ton, Friday, July 12 at 7 p.m. Info:
605-668-2985
•Youth Duathlon, Big Sioux
Recreation Area near Brandon,
Saturday, July 13 at 8:15 a.m.
CDT. Info: 605-582-7243
•Nature Hike, Good Earth State
Batting for a Cause
Like many South Dakotans, I
enjoy spending the summer
evenings outside and at the ball
fields on the weekends.
Although I’m away from family
while I’m in D.C., I do try to run
outside to get a breath of fresh air
or find an opportunity to spend
some time outdoors.
I recently had the opportunity to
play in the Congressional Women’s
Softball Game, an annual event
where female lawmakers team up
and play female members of the
media in a softball game for char-
ity.
This wasn’t a task we took
lightly. Starting months ago, we
began practices at 7 a.m., Tuesday
and Thursday mornings to work
on our fundamentals, such as hit-
ting, grounding, throwing and
pitching.
It was also a great opportunity
for all of us to get to know one an-
other and to learn how to work to-
gether as a team.
When we took the field on game
day, more than 1,000 people were
in attendance.
All proceeds of the ticket sales
went to benefit the Young Survival
Coalition (YSC), a global organiza-
tion dedicated to critical issues
unique to young women who are
diagnosed with breast cancer. In
particular, the YSC offers re-
sources, connections and outreach
to young women with breast can-
cer.
While we may not agree on
every policy considered in Con-
gress, both Democratic and Repub-
lican women came together and
united for an incredible cause.
We can even agree with the
media on this one! According to the
American Cancer Society, about 12
percent of women in the United
States will develop invasive breast
cancer during their lifetime. Pre-
ceded by only lung cancer, breast
cancer is the second leading cause
of cancer death in women.
We ended up losing the game 11-
8, but at the end of the night it did-
n’t matter who came out victori-
ous, because roughly $125,000 was
raised for the Young Survival
Coalition and a new coalition of fe-
males from both the House and
Senate was created.
I hope you’ll visit this website for
some photos of the game: http://ww
w.congwomensoftball.org/.
Relay For Life members Jamy and Mavrick Williams along with
Sue Peters participated in the Wasta parade.
~Photo Ann Clark
Flag bearers for the Wasta July 4 parade. Pictured from left to
right ... Melanie Weber and her dog Raven, Katie Humphrey and
Billie Humphrey. ~Photo Ann Clark
Wasta celebrates July 4th with annual parade
By Libbi Sykora
Summer is in full swing! As al-
ways, it is a great time to pick up
a book and read.
Through many recent conversa-
Get involved at the Wall Library
tions, I have discovered that many
people don’t know how to get in-
volved with Wall Community Li-
brary. I decided that it might be
beneficial to inform everyone how
to join in on all of the fun:
Firstly, it’s important for you to
know that anyone can use our
computers and wi-fi.
You are not required to have a li-
brary card to use our brand new
computers.
Secondly, if you do want to check
out books, you need to have a li-
brary card.
All that you need to do to get a
library card is come into the li-
brary and let us know your contact
information.
If you already have a library
card but haven’t used it in a while,
check and make sure that all of
your information is updated to
match your current circumstances.
That’s all that you have to do!
Park at Blood Run near Sioux
Falls, Saturday, July 13, 9 a.m.
CDT. Info: 605-987-2263
•Dutch Oven Cooking, Randall
Creek Recreation Area near Pick-
stown, Saturday, July 13 at 10
a.m. CDT. Info: 605-487-7046
•Outdoor Cooking from A to Z,
Oahe Downstream Recreation
Area near Fort Pierre, Saturday,
July 13 at 10 a.m. CDT. Info: 605-
223-7722
•Birding Basics, Newton Hills
State Park near Canton, Saturday,
July 13 at 10 a.m. CDT. Info: 605-
987-2263
•Parrot Program, Newton Hills
State Park near Canton, Saturday,
July 13 at 11 a.m. CDT. Info: 605-
987-2263
•Family Sand Volleyball Tour-
nament, Lake Thompson Recre-
ation Area near Lake Preston, Sat-
urday, July 13 at 3 p.m. CDT. Info:
605-847-4893
•Insect Hike, Fort Sisseton His-
toric State Park near Lake City,
Saturday, July 13 at 3 p.m. CDT.
Info: 605-448-5474
•Dutch Oven Gathering, Big
Sioux Recreation Area near Bran-
don, Saturday, July 13 at 3:30 p.m.
CDT. Info: 605-582-7243
•History Hike, Newton Hills
State Park near Canton, Saturday,
July 13 at 7 p.m. CDT. Info: 605-
987-2263
•Constellations and Stories,
Good Earth State Park at Blood
Run near Sioux Falls, Saturday,
July 13 at 9:30 p.m. CDT. Info:
605-987-2263
•Umonhon Culture Program,
Good Earth State Park at Blood
Run near Sioux Falls, Saturday,
July 13 at 7:30 p.m. CDT and Sun-
day, July 14 at 2 p.m. CDT. Info:
605-987-2263, Pre-register: 605-
362-2777
All programs are free; however,
a park entrance license is required
to enter most parks.
For more information on activi-
ties in the S.D. state parks, visit
www.gfp.sd.gov, contact the indi-
vidual park office or call 605-773-
3391.
After you have your card, you can
start to check out books both in the
library and via South Dakota Ti-
tles to Go (downloadable eBooks
and audiobooks)!
Don’t have any ideas about what
you want to read? We have some of
the hottest new titles in physical
and digital copies, so you have a
wide selection of interesting liter-
ature.
Our Books of the Month show-
case entertaining reads for youth,
teens, and adults, and they can be
found on our blog at
http: / / www. wallcommunityli-
brary.blogspot.com, or you can ask
for a personal recommendation
from a librarian in the Wall Com-
munity Library. There are so many
ways to find a book that is perfect
just for you!
In addition to all the great reads
we have available, there are lots of
fun activities to join.
Story time is every Friday at 9
a.m. and during the summer, we
will have special guests almost
every week.
We have a summer reading pro-
gram available for all ages. For
teens and adults, a writing club
and a book club each meet here
once monthly.
If you have any questions,
please contact Wall Community Li-
brary by any of the following
means. We are open at 407 Main
Street on Wednesdays from 12 - 7
p.m., Thursdays from 9 a,m. -
12:30 p,m,and 1:30 - 5 p.m. and
Fridays from 8 a.m. - 1p.m.
Feel free to call us at (605)-279-
2929 or email us at wallcomlib@gw
tc.net.
Don’t forget to like us on Face-
book! Our name in this venue is
Wall Community Library.
We hope to be able to serve you
soon!
Area News
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013• Page 3
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PG-13
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
The long prairie grass swayed in
the hot summer sun. The young
American Indian man, fasting and
praying as he watched the grass
dance in the wind, soon saw him-
self dancing in a similar manner.
But how could this be, since he
had been born without the full use
of his legs? The Medicine Man in
his village interpreted his vision.
The boy asked his mother to
make an outfit in which to dance
using the prairie grass. He was
covered from shoulder to ankle
with long, thick, bright multi-col-
ored fringes made of yarn or rib-
bon.
He showed his father how he
would dance, using much shoulder,
arm and head movements.
His footwork would appear like
he was stumbling. A song was com-
posed for him. He showed the vil-
lage his style of dance.
This is how the grass dance orig-
inated, according to American In-
dians in the Northern Plains.
The grass dance is one of the
dance styles common at a modern
powwow.
While a powwow is defined as a
gathering of American Indians and
can take place for many reasons, it
is often associated with dance.
Each session of a wacipi (the
Lakota word for powwow, pro-
nounced “wah chee pea”) begins
with the grand entry.
The eagle staff and various flags
lead the way into the dance arena.
The flags represent nations, fami-
The dancing feet of the powwow
lies and communities.
When the eagle staff is brought
into the area, powwow etiquette
requires spectators to stand and
remove their hats in respect.
Wacipi are open to visitors, but
everyone attending should follow
proper etiquette.
“Veterans have an integral part
in powwows as they are honored
by leading the dancers into the
arena,” said Francis Whitebird of
Saint Francis, an Indian educator
and former director of the South
Dakota Office of Tribal Relations.
Once all the dancers are in the
dance arena and while the specta-
tors are still standing, the flags are
raised and the flag song is sung.
This is followed by a veterans
honoring song.
The master of ceremonies is the
voice of the wacipi. This person
keeps the singers, dancers and the
general public informed as to what
is happening.
The oldest form of dancing is the
traditional dance. The men danced
in the middle of the dance arena
and the women stood on the side,
according to Whitebird.
“In the mid to late 1950s, the
shawl dance for women and the
fancy dance for the men made
their appearance in Lakota coun-
try. The women joined the men
and danced in the middle of the
dance area,” he said.
The men’s northern traditional
style of dance was a form of story-
telling in which each warrior acted
out deeds committed during a bat-
tle or hunt.
Men’s fancy dance is the most
contemporary style of dance. It is
the most strenuous and athletic of
the dances.
The dance is fast and features
jumps and twirling. The regalia is
said to represent the rainbow spir-
its with its bright colors and flying
feathers and ribbon.
The women’s traditional dance
requires enormous stamina, con-
centration and grace. Dancers
stand on the outer edge of the
dance arena.
They barely move their feet and
gently bend their knees as they
move up and down in rhythm with
the drum.
Originating with the Ojibwe, the
women’s jingle dress dance is a
healing dance.
According to one legend about
the jingle dress, a medicine man
was given a vision in which he saw
his daughter and three of her
friends dancing in dresses adorned
with “jingles.”
The jingle dress is made of a
cloth, velvet or leather base
adorned with jingles made out of a
shiny metal, usually chewing to-
bacco lids.
The dance is in a “side-step”
fashion designed to incorporate the
sound of the jingles by allowing
them to move.
The fancy shawl dance is the
most modern of the women’s dance
styles.
It began when women started
wearing their shawls instead of
draping them over their arms
when dressed in their regalia.
Fancy does not refer to the shawl,
but to the foot work which involves
Modern dance.
~Photo Courtesy of South Dakota State Historical Society Archives.
kicks, twirls and fast movement.
The music in a wacipi comes pri-
marily from the drum groups who
circle the arena and play large,
specially designed drums and sing
traditional songs.
The clothing worn by dancers is
referred to as regalia, never cos-
tumes.
Good guests at a wacipi do not
touch the dancers’ regalia. The
master of ceremonies will make
announcements about etiquette
and the types of dances being per-
formed.
“Indian dancing almost faded
out until contest dancing appeared
in the mid-1960s.
The interest in money and danc-
ing caught like wildfire and a
resurgence in dancing occurred,”
Whitebird said.
What one sees at a powwow are
dancing feet, colorful regalia and
smiling faces.
Information about powwows in
South Dakota can be found at the
South Dakota Department of
Tourism’s website, www.travelsd.c
om/Events.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Founda-
tion, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society. Find us on the
web at www.sdhsf.org. Contact us
at info@sdhsf.org to submit a story
idea.
A flurry of thunderstorms
sparked several small wildfires
throughout the Black Hills Na-
tional Forest on Thursday, July 4
prompting Federal, State and local
fire crews to take immediate ac-
tion to contain and control the in-
cidents.
Matters were complicated fur-
ther by a couple of small campfires
left burning and unattended.
The largest wildfire, the Horse
Trap Fire, occurred in very rugged
Forest Service terrain near Min-
nekahta Junction on Highway 18.
While this fire was initially esti-
mated at 3.5 acres, gusty winds
caused the fire to grow to 11 acres
overnight.
As of Friday, July 5 the fire was
estimated at 20 percent contained,
with control estimated sometime
tomorrow.
Other lightning-caused South-
ern Hills fires starting last night
included:
• The Red Star Fire, occurring
near Pringle and burning a tenth
of acre
• The 313 Fire, burning a third
of an acre near Carrol Creek Road
•The Richardson Fire, located
west of Highway 89 near Pleasant
Valley
Wildfire threat still persists
All three of those incidents were
located on Forest Service land and
were quickly contained and con-
trolled by responding Federal,
State and local resources.
Additionally, two separate camp-
fires were left burning and unat-
tended on Forest Service land in
the Central Hills, but were imme-
diately put out upon detection by
responding Federal, State and
local resources.
In the Northern Hills, the Dog-
house Fire burned in an area three
miles southwest of Crow Peak,
while the Grand Canyon fire was
located between Grand Canyon
and Wagon Canyon along the
South Dakota/Wyoming border.
Both fires were located on Forest
Service land, grew to less than a
tenth of an acre in size, and were
quickly contained and controlled
by responding Federal, State and
local resources.
Visitors on the forest are re-
minded to please make sure your
campfires are dead-out and cold to
the touch before leaving them un-
attended.
Also, wet forests can dry quickly
and fires can still burn when com-
bined with significant amounts of
rain.
106
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“Wall’s Wild West Celebration”
THURSDAY - SATURDAY, JULY 11TH - 13TH
Buttons can be purchased at the following locations for $15.00
(that gets you into everything under the tent for Friday and Saturday night).
First Interstate Bank, Ann’s Motel, Days Inn, Black Hills Federal Credit Union, Wall Food Center
& the Wall Chamber of Commerce Office. 10 & under free admission
Thursday, July 11th
5 PM
Tent Setup by T & K Rentals, LLC
(Help is needed to set up tables & fence)
7 PM
SDRA Rodeo (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
Family Night — Candy Scramble for the Kids
Friday, July 12th
10 AM
SDRA Rodeo Slack (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
5 PM
Beer Garden opens
7 PM
SDRA Rodeo (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
Military Night — Business Men “Dress The Calf Contest”
9 PM-1 AM Live Music “Eclipse”
Saturday, July 13th
6:30 AM
Registration for Relay For Life
5K Run/Walk
7 AM
Relay For Life Run/Walk Begins
10 AM
Parade “Wall’s Wild West Celebration” on Main Street*
Parade Marshalls: 7th Grade Class
11 AM
Beer Garden opens
Immediately Following Parade
•Wall Youth Baseball at Community Center (Ryan Dinger)
•Stick Horse Rodeo (kids bring your stick horse)
sponsored by Days Inn of Wall
•Lutheran Church Ice Cream Social (Bev Dartt)
•Sand Dig & other games sponsored by Wall Celebration Committee
1:30 PM
Horseshoes
1:30 PM
Alumni Registration at the Community Center
(Deb Bryan)
2 PM
Alumni Program at the Community Center (Deb Bryan)
7 PM
SDRA Rodeo (Rodeo Grounds South Blvd)
Christy Willert - Trick Rider
9 PM - 1 AM Live Music “Crash Wagon”
Concessions provided by SanDee’s
*9 AM Parade line-up at south end of
Main Street between
Wall Building Center & Wall Food Center
*All events are under the tent unless otherwise specified.
Ad Sponsored by
Wall Celebration Committee
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement
announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
annc@
gwtc.net
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Peggy Gravatt
Our congratulations go out to
Kelsey Arneson and Justin
Hansen on their marriage, Phil
and Mary Kay Wilson on becoming
grandparents again and to Stephie
Trask on the birth of little Winnie.
So many happy blessings happen-
ing in our little community.
It seems that the community of
Elm Springs managed to cram
their whole summer in to this past
week with all of the different
events and happenings.
Freddie and Sparky Ferguson
made their 13th annual appear-
ance portraying the Pony express
mail service in the Wasta 4th of
July parade. Fred reports that
Sparky may be holding out better
than he is. They also had a nice
bonus of a much welcomed rain
shower that delayed the start of
the parade for a few minutes.
Fred, without Sparky, attended
the Arneson – Hansen wedding at
the Elm Springs Church on Friday
night. He also attended the annual
Ronald Regan Day Celebration at
the Pat Trask’s Saturday enjoying
some good food and great fire-
works display. He reports that
Patrick Wilson can sure grill a
very, very good hamburger.
Lawrence Burke traveled to
Texas for a Burke family reunion
that was hosted by his niece in
Amarillo, Texas. A large number of
family members were present.
Lawrence was gone for 8 days and
reports that he was glad to be back
in sparsely populated S.D. gravel
roads and all! He also attended the
Arneson – Hansen wedding.
The Morris Linn family at-
tended a Post 22 baseball game in
Rapid City on Wednesday night
with the Knuppe’s of New Under-
wood. Thursday they went to
Wasta for the parade. Shirrise and
the girls attended baby Winnie
Trask’s “meet and greet” at Tom
and Shelia Trask’s on Friday after-
noon before gathering up Morris to
attend the Arneson – Hansen wed-
ding. The Linn’s attended the Si-
mons family reunion on Saturday
afternoon up at Union Center.
They then joined in fellowship on
the rim of the river for supper and
fireworks hosted by Pat and Rose-
Mary Trask. Shirrise said it was a
fabulous show of patriotism.
John and Jean Linn also were
guests at Kelsey and Justin’s wed-
ding and went on to the reception,
which was held in New Under-
wood. They also attended the pic-
nic and fireworks at the Trask’s.
It was a busy week for the Philip
Wilson’s as well complete with a
surprise trip to Coon Rapids,
Minn., on Sunday. Beth (Wilson)
and David Laschinger made Mary
Kay and Phil grandparents for the
fourth time. Little Penny Jean was
a little early, weighed 5 lbs. 11 oz.
Mother and baby are doing well.
Congratulations to the family!
The beginning of the week found
Mary Kay returning on Monday
from a 10 day trip to Minneapolis
and Pittsburg, Pa. She picked up
granddaughter Mary Wolberg in
Minn., and brought her home with
her for the week. On Wednesday,
they went to Rapid City to the
movies and on the 4th, they took in
the parade in Wasta and then took
a drive thru the Badlands. On Fri-
day, they also attended the “meet
and greet” for little Winnie Trask
followed by the wedding and recep-
tion for Kelsey and Justin. On Sat-
urday, Patrick and Lane Wilson
along with Joanie and Kevin How-
land spent the night after enjoying
the picnic and fireworks at the
Trask’s.
The Gravatt’s were not able to
take in any of the local events, due
to working, haying and grandkids.
Amber Miller and family were
here for the week from Denver,
Colo. We did manage to go fossil
hunting down on the creek, tubing
on the Belle Fourche River and
even swimming in the stock tank.
Grant and Abby thought that was
pretty cool. We also took in grand-
son Steele’s baseball game in
Rapid City on Saturday afternoon.
We have also been blessed to re-
ceive some more much needed rain
to keep things green.
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Wasta’s July 4th, Life’s lessons:
the rain that pounds down on your
parade may be the same rain that
puts out the fire on your neighbor’s
property.
The rain that delayed our pa-
rade for ten minutes did put out
the fire on the property of Malcolm
and Nola Price.
David Humphrey, driving the
Quinn fire truck, left the parade
line-up and headed out but re-
ceived the call that the fire was
out.
Darren Nachtigall waited pa-
tiently on the hotel front porch and
commented on how badly we
needed the rain and how he was
enjoying it!
Freddie Ferguson handed “horse
candy” to anyone near and kept
Sparky content.
No grumbling, no whining out of
these South Dakotans who showed
up here on the Day of Independ-
ence!
On the back porch were Celine
Trask, Parade Marshal, and her
crew, sisters Julie and Gemma,
sidekick Emily Linn and banner
bearers, Kassandra Linn and
Maria Trask. Morris and Shirrise
and baby Laken were also there,
as well as Kelly Linn and Jamy
Williams and baby Mavrick. They
were content to visit and watch the
rain!
Dick Hadlock reported his rain
gage had one half inch, (each). So
he was questioned if he had three
rain gages with one half inch each
did that total one and one half
inches?
Our flag bearers, Melanie
Weber, Billie and Katy Humphrey
found a good spot under Faye
Bryan’s tree. Faye had her ‘mule’
ready to go, but I think I saw her
waiting on her porch!
The rain just seemed to improve
peoples sense of fun — it was
great! Anne Jo Clark from the Pen-
nington County Courant, was pres-
ent to take photos for the newspa-
per and while some ran for cover,
some just hung out.
Ron Racicky, wife Joan and mom
Natalie were enjoying the Junior
New Underwood Fire Department
and driver’s pint size fire truck
and big sister (probably) with the
job of carrying the banner an-
nouncing same. Great kids!
Thank you all and special
thanks to DeLynn Willets for
bringing Good Samaritan resi-
dents to view the parade and then
to join the line-up! What troopers!
The parade was ready to march
at 10:40 — ten minutes late but a
great morning! Lunch in the park
and games after and talent show
that evening finished the day.
More names will come to me as
my brain spot lights more happen-
ings to keep me smiling and full of
July 4th memories.
You are all so great and Lloyd
and I appreciate you so much.
Happy Trails!
PS: The talent show was won-
derful as is Dorothy Shearer —
you are all greatly appreciated.
More next week.
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
On Thursday, July 4th, Steve
and Gayle Eisenbraun and two of
their grandchildren, Noah and
Emma Eisenbraun, went to
Mitchell, S.D., and Norfolk, Neb.
In Mitchell, they visited Travis,
Beth and Isaiah Eisenbraun, and
in Norfolk, Tyler, Wendi, Axton
and Alyvia Eisenbraun. On Sun-
day, they helped Alyvia celebrate
her second birthday. Norfolk has
great parks (one is a waterpark)
and magnificent displays of fire-
works.
Hope you had an enjoyable
Fourth of July. The towns of Inte-
rior and Wasta each had celebra-
tions which they do annually. All
reports were favorable from both
places. Wasta had their parade
disrupted by rain! Very unusual,
but bet the people didn’t begrudge
the intrusion.
Kay and Leslie Williams had a
week with company, mostly Gary’s
family. Shauna, Luke, Remington
and Marlee Meyerink from Platte;
Tara and Allyna Andes from Geor-
gia; Jess of Sioux Falls and Gary,
Deb and Les.
We want to offer our condolences
to the Schulz families with the loss
of their sister Melodee Bartsch of
Gillette.
Monday morning, the Tiger
Band of Lake City, Minn., gave an
impromptu free concert on the
lawn in front of St. Patrick’s rec-
tory, Wall. There were 56 in the
band. They do competitive march-
ing and had won first place in
Rochester, Minn., before coming to
Wall. They had to get up early as
the Catholic women served them
all breakfast before their 8:00 a.m.
appearance to perform. From Wall,
they were on their way to Cody,
Wyo.
Congratulations go out to the
Pat Guptill family for receiving the
2013 South Dakota Leopold Con-
servation Award!
Mark and Darlene Poste stopped
on Sunday. They brought their
camper to set up so they are all
ready for Wall’s Celebration week-
end.
Mr. Bartling, with the Gideons,
was the speaker at the Methodist
Churches, Wall and Wasta, on
Sunday. Pastor Darwin Kopfmann
had prior commitments.
Dawna Estes Tsitrian reports
that Pat O’Neill of Rapid City
plans to attend Wall’s Celebration
and Badlands Alumni program. He
hopes he sees a lot of people there.
He graduated from Wall with the
Class of 1938 — 75 yeas ago. Dave
and Pam Fischer also plan to at-
tend as Pam’s Class of 1963 will
celebrate 50 years.
Great news! The 7th Cavalry
Band will be playing in the parade
in Wall on July 13th and will also
perform at noon at the Community
Center. Their plans to be here for
the Memorial Day Service did not
come through but they may have a
bigger audience to appreciate their
music on Saturday.
No much to write about this
week — news is scarce. It was nice
last week that some people con-
tributed news items.
Happy Birthday, Wall! May you
be able to attend the Celebration!
Wisdom is a divine endowment
and not a human acquisition.
~Anonymous
Have a good week!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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It’s A Boy!
Born: February 1, 2013
Weight: 8 lbs. 9 oz. 19 1/2”
Parents: Jake & Chastity Julson,
New Underwood, SD
Big Sister: Chaisie
Paternal Grandparents:
Gerald & Sharla Julson, Quinn
Maternal Grandparents:
David & Sandra Holland, Moorcroft, WY
Paternal Great-Grandparents:
Mary Kjerstad, Quinn
& the late Konrad Kjerstad
The late Vernon & Elaine Julson, Garretson
Paternal Great-Aunt:
Marjorie Winkowitsch, Quinn
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
Roy & Jackie Holland, Spearfish
Ronald & Faith Miller, Mud Butte
Piers Wesley Julson
Ruffle
Rompers
just arrived
Special this week only...$9.99
Coffee SpeCial: frappeS…$3.25
Welcome to Wall’s 106th Celebration
Wall Meat Processing
279-2348 • Wall, SD
We want everyone
to have a safe
and enjoyable
celebration!
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
July 11th: Bacon Cheeseburger
w/French Fries
July 12th: Taco Salad
w/Garlic Bread
No deep fryer today!
July 15th: Grilled Ham & Cheese
w/Grape Salad
July 16th: Fried Chicken
w/Mashed Potatoes & Corn
July 17th: Sloppy Joe
w/Baked Beans & Deviled Eggs
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Sponsored by:
Pennington
County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
…continued next
week.
Bria, 6 years, Breckin, 3 years
& Chessa, 2 months
children of
Darin & Rachel Buhmann, Wall.
Ruth, 12 years, Brody, 6 years &
Hadley, 5 years, children of
Garrett & Holly Bryan, Wall.
Levi, 6 years & Colt, 14 months
children of
Dennis & Sara Sharp, Interior.
Chase, 4 years
& Reagan, 2 years,
children of
Mike & Kim Carlbom, Interior.
Tomorrow’s
Leaders
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Obituaries
We Don’t
Charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements
and wedding wri te-ups
are published free of
charge. Call 279-2565 or
e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship,
9 a.m., Sunday Worship Service,
10:30 a.m.; Mondays: Women’s Bible
Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann
279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community
Church • Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Dowling
Community Church
Memorial Day through
Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James
Harbert
Bible Study,
9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services,
10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic
Church
New Underwood
Father William
Zandri
Mass: Sundays at
11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at
9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan
Nursing Home;
Reconciliation
before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical
Lutheran Church Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m.,
Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd
number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even
number months
7akc lhcrclorc no
lhoughl lor lhc morrow:
lor lhc morrow shall
lakc lhoughl lor lhc
lhìngs ol ìlscll. Sullìcìcnl
unlo lhc day
ìs lhc cvìl lhcrcol.
Mallhcw 6:34
lt's amazing how onc IittIc issuc at
thc start of a day can crcatc a
mound of worry for wccks on cnd.
Conccrn yourscIf too much with
tomorrow, howcvcr, and you'II miss
out on thc triaIs and thc tribuIations
of today. Takc cach day as it comcs!
279-2175
We must look deep into our lives
to see what our true potential is.
Each of us has an incredible
amount of untapped potential, and
it is definitely to our advantage to
do whatever we can to tap into that
potential so we can be the best we
can be. Imagine the good each of us
could do in this world if we were to
be able to step out of the muck of
mediocrity and begin tapping into
more of our human potential.
Many times in a week it comes to
my attention that there is a need
for some "quantum leaps" in my
own personal and professional
growth if I am going to be the per-
son I want to be. As a leader in my
home and in my business, I must
continually and consistently chal-
lenge myself to change and con-
tinue to grow in these areas-even
when it hurts.
Changing for the better is a goal
each of us should be striving after
on a daily basis, and is a great place
to start tapping into ones potential.
Our goal is to be able to honestly
say: "Every day in every way I am
getting better and better!"
Often this growth-and the ability
to live up to our fullest potential-
can only occur when we come to the
place where we are willing to give
up those things that we have come
to enjoy, out of habit, that we know
are not the best for us. (Believe me,
there is quite a list of these kinds of
things in my life.) Making effective
change is a process that involves
transforming our thinking about
these "second-best" habits and atti-
tudes and a willingness to replace
them with the healthiest and most
positive habits possible. Even if we
only take baby steps to our goal,
this is much better than staying in
the muck of mediocrity.
Today, consider taking a step or
two to get out of the muck. If you
find that you are "stuck in the
muck" review your priorities in life.
Stop making wrong choices and
start making right ones. Start read-
ing things that are good for you to
read. Give of yourself to others.
Whatever you do, don't stay stuck
in the muck. Build yourself a life
that is worthy, focused and produc-
tive, and never allow yourself to be
satisfied with anything less than
being your best.
Get Out of the Muck
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands
of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for
more details at 800-437-9715 and
be sure to check out Bob’s website
at: www.mrattitudespeaks.com
Welcome Back
Alumni, Family
& Friends
We hope you enjoy the
Wall Celebration activities.
Red Rock Restaurant
The Rock Lounge &
Casino & Beer Garden
279-2387 • 279-2388
506 Glenn St., Wall, SD
Wall Drug
welcomes returning
alumni and Visitors
to
Wall
Celebration
Days!
Wall Drug Store
279-2175
Jean M. Burns, age 90 of Philip,
S.D., died July 7, 2013, at the Hans
P. Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip, surrounded by her family.
Jean Mae Burns, the first child
of Frank and Joy Keve Hauk, was
born May 18, 1923. Her childhood
was spent with her siblings,
George, Max and Mary Joy Hauk
on a farm northwest of Grindstone.
She worked her way through
high school by being a mother's
helper to the Bartholmew family
and roomed at the old Winchester
Hotel.
Shirley Burns introduced her to
Homer Burns at a dance in
Milesville and they married several
months later. Dancing remained a
lifelong source of happiness. Jean
and Homer had four children:
Bobby, Jack, Charlotte and Mara-
lynn.
Jean took great pride in her
homemaking skills. Keeping her
home clean and tidy was of great
importance to her. In fact, her
nephews were pretty sure that
when she wiped their faces there
was Clorox on the washcloth! She
loved making pies, bread, jelly, and
pickles. Her garden was her special
passion. Canning and freezing the
produce gave her great joy. Her
hobbies included embroidering and
making rugs. A local lady who
roomed with Jean and Homer
when she went to high school, re-
called that Jean always "freshened
up" and changed her housedress
when it was time for Homer to
come home from work.
A true child of the 1930s, Jean
frugally saved and stored anything
that might have value or serve a
practical purpose in the future.
When faced with a new domestic
challenge there was always some
stored item that could be modified
or adapted to solve the problem.
The variety of uses for a popsicle
stick was endless! No need to run
out and buy something new!
In her younger years, she was
active in community efforts to im-
prove the quality of life in Philip.
Among her activities she served as
the first president of the hospital
auxiliary.
When Homer died suddenly, she
carried on with her family respon-
sibilities since her four children
were all still at home. In addition,
she ran Homer's business with the
help of Red Couch.
Howard Pihlaja, Jean's compan-
ion of many years, survives her.
Jean is also survived by her chil-
dren, Bobby (Gerry) Sloat, Jack
(Marlene) Burns, Charlotte (Larry)
Gabriel and Maralynn Burns. In
addition, she is survived by 12
grandchildren, John (Carol) Os-
burn, Doug (Krista) Osburn, Julie
(Chad) Callahan, Andy (Samantha)
Sloat, Chris (Misti) Burns, Jeff
(Heather) Burns, Robyn (Steve)
Brazelton, Mindy (Lloyd) Metzger,
Jeff (Heather) Gabriel, Danielle
(Josh) Carlson, Dustin (Lynette)
Hummel, and Cassi (Alan) Rislov;
her great-grandchildren include,
Eddie and Jannine Osburn; Anak-
toria, Shane and Baylee Callahan;
Makenzie, Anthony and Zachary
Sloat; Nathan and Jace Brazelton;
Patrick and Will Burns; Taylor,
Brooke and Katie Burns; Sage,
Cedar, Ember and Latham Gabriel;
Cadan and Gage Carlson; Brayden
and Maelee Hummel; and Rio and
Ali Rislov; her brother, Max
(Nancy) Hauk; sister, Mary Joy
Hauk; two sisters-in-law, Peggy
Hauk and Mary Martha Burns;
and numerous nephews and nieces.
Jean was preceded in death by
her husbands Homer Burns and
Jud Fennell; her parents Frank
and Joy (Keve) Hauk; her brother
George Hauk; grandchildren
Christy and Bill Osburn; and
great-grandchildren Brace Allen
and Paxton Ryder Gabriel.
Services were held Wednesday,
July 10, at the United Church in
Philip with Pastor Kathy Chesney
officiating.
Music was provided by Marilyn
Millage, pianist, and Cindy
Nuzum, vocalist.
Ushers were Josh Carlson, Andy
Sloat, Alan Rislov and Chad Calla-
han.
Pallbearers were Chris and Jeff
Burns, John and Doug Osburn, Jeff
Gabriel and Dustin Hummel.
Interment was be at the Ma-
sonic Cemetery in Philip.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
has been established.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Jean’s online guestbook can be
signed at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Jean M. Burns_________________________________
The family of
Jim Bloom
invite you to an Open House
in honor of his
80th Birthday
Sunday, July 14th
2:00 to 6:00 p.m. • his residence
4370 Reservoir Rd.,
Rapid City, SD 57703
Jim & his wife Maggie will also be celebrating their
59th Wedding Anniversary the same day.
Four South Dakota state parks
are hosting nature day camps for
kids ages 7-12. The camps are a
great way for kids to explore sur-
rounding recreation areas and
focus on the outdoors.
North Point Recreation Area
near Wagner is hosting a camp at
Wagner Lake City Park on Mon-
day, July 15 at 6:30 p.m. CDT. Par-
ticipants will have an opportunity
to kayak! Call 605-487-7046 for
more information.
Lake Poinsett Recreation Area
near Arlington is hosting a day
camp from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. CDT
on Tuesday, July 16. Bring a sack
lunch and enjoy a day of outdoor
activities. Call 605-983-5085 to reg-
ister.
“Nature Explorers” is the theme
at Rocky Point Recreation Area
near Belle Fourche on Wednesday,
July 17 from 9:30 a.m. to noon
MDT. Campers will have the oppor-
tunity to catch insects, discover
tracks, smell flowers, identify ani-
mal droppings and look at birds
through binoculars. Call 605-641-
0023 for more information or to
register.
Big Sioux Recreation Area near
Brandon is hosting a day camp
from 9-11 a.m. CDT on Thursday,
July 18. Participants will learn
about nocturnal animals with a
hands-on lesson, complete a crafts
project, hike and participate in
games. Pre-registration is encour-
aged. Call 605-594-3824.
While the camps are geared for
kids ages 7-12, younger children
may attend if accompanied by an
adult. Children are reminded to
wear clothing appropriate for the
weather and to bring bug spray,
drinking water and shoes comfort-
able for walking. Sandals are not
appropriate. No snacks or refresh-
ments will be provided, but chil-
dren are welcome to bring their
own.
There is no fee for the camps;
however, a park entrance license is
required to enter state parks and
recreation areas.
For a complete list of state park
events, visit South Dakota state
parks on the web at
www.gfp.sd.gov
State parks offer summer
nature camps for kids
Area News
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013 • Page 6
Ravellette
Publications,
Inc.
Call us for your
printing needs!
859-2516
Here are some interesting facts
about South Dakota from:
http://www.50states.com/facts/sda
kota.htm#
1. Sculptor Gutzon Borglum
began drilling into the 6,200-foot
Mount Rushmore in 1927. Cre-
ation of the Shrine to Democracy
took 14 years and cost a mere $1
million, though it's now deemed
priceless.
2. The faces of George Washing-
ton, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore
Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln
are sculpted into Mount Rushmore
the world's greatest mountain
carving.
3. Fossilized remains of life 50
million years ago have been
arranged in unusual forms, which
is Lemmon's mark of distinction at
the world's largest petrified wood
park.
4. Perhaps the most significant
fur trade/military fort on the west-
ern American frontier, Fort Pierre
Chouteau was the largest (almost
300' square) and best equipped
trading post in the northern Great
Plains. Built in 1832 by John
Jacob Astor's (1763-1848) Ameri-
can Fur Company as part of its ex-
pansion into the Upper Missouri
region, the trading activities at the
site exemplified the commercial al-
liance critical to the success of the
fur business.
5. Jack McCall was tried, con-
victed and hanged two miles north
of Yankton in 1877 for the shooting
of Wild Bill Hickok. He is buried in
an unmarked grave in the Yankton
cemetery.
6. The site of a rich gold strike in
1875, Deadwood retains its mining
town atmosphere. While Dead-
wood is one of the most highly pub-
licized mining towns of the trans-
Mississippi West, much of its fame
rests on the famous or infamous
characters that passed through.
7. Tom Brokaw of NBC gradu-
ated from Yankton High School
and the University of South
Dakota.
8. Belle Fourche is the geograph-
ical center of the United States of
America, designated in 1959 and
noted by an official marker and
sheepherder's monument called a
"Stone Johnnie".
9. Bowdle is known for the
tallest water tower in South
Dakota.
10. Clark is the Potato Capital of
South Dakota. Clark is home to
the world famous Mashed Potato
Wrestling contest.
11. In 1803, U.S. President
Thomas Jefferson purchased the
Louisiana Territory from France, a
real-estate deal that at the time
doubled the size of the United
States.
12. South Dakota is the home of
the Dakota, Lakota and Nakota
tribes, which make up the Sioux
Nation.
13. Custer State Park is home to
a herd of 1,500 free-roaming bison.
Bison can weigh as much as 2,000
pounds. Historically, the bison
played an essential role in the lives
of the Lakota (Sioux), who relied
on the "tatanka" for food, clothing
and shelter.
14. Jewel Cave is the third-
longest cave in the world. More
than 120 miles of passages have
been surveyed. Calcite crystals
that glitter when illuminated give
the cave its name.
15. With more than 82 miles of
mapped passages, Wind Cave con-
tains the world's largest display of
a rare formation called boxwork.
16. The Crazy Horse mountain
carving now in progress will be the
world's largest sculpture (563'
high, 641' long, carved in the
round). It is the focal point of an
educational and cultural memorial
to and for the North American In-
dian.
17. Badlands National Park con-
sists of nearly 244,000 acres of
sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles
and spires blended with the
largest, protected mixed grass
prairie in the United States.
18. Badlands National Park con-
tains the world's richest Oligocene
epoch fossil beds, dating 23 to 35
million years old.
19. Sage Creek Wilderness is the
site of the reintroduction of the
black-footed ferret, the most en-
dangered land mammal in North
America.
20. The name "Black Hills"
comes from the Lakota words
Paha Sapa, which mean "hills that
are black". Seen from a distance,
these pine-covered hills, rising sev-
eral thousand feet above the sur-
rounding prairie, appear black.
21. In 1898, the first commercial
timber sale on Federal forested
land in the United States was au-
thorized in the area of Jim and
Estes Creeks (near the town of
Nemo).
22. Woonsocket is known as The
Town with the Beautiful Lake.
Lake Prior sits in the middle of
town.
23. Harney Peak, at 7242 above
sea level, is the highest point in
the United States east of the Rock-
ies.
24. The 9824-acre Black Elk
Wilderness in the center of the
Norbeck Wildlife Preserve was
named for Black Elk, an Oglala
Lakota holy man.
25. Sturgis is home of the an-
nual Black Hills Classic Motorcy-
cle Rally.
26. The Mammoth Site of Hot
Springs contains the largest con-
centration of Columbian and
woolly mammoth bones discovered
in their primary context in the
world! This National Natural
Landmark is the only in-situ
(bones left as found) display of fos-
sil mammoths in America.
27. The Pioneer Auto Museum in
Murdo details more than 250 rare
automobiles including the infa-
mous Tucker and Edsel.
28. Near the shore of Lake Her-
man, Prairie Village includes the
original townsite of Herman,
Dakota Territory. It is also home of
the Art B. Thomas Hershell-Spill-
man Carousel that is complete
with its operating coal fired boiler
and steam engine.
29. The abundant water flow of
Spearfish Creek favored the estab-
lishment of a Federal Fish Hatch-
ery in 1898. It is known today as
the D.C. Booth Historic Fish
Hatchery.
30. Sioux Falls exists as a city
today because the land speculators
who staked town site claims there
in 1857 came in search of the cas-
cades of the Big Sioux River.
31. Mitchell is the home of the
world's only Corn Palace.
32. The Flaming Fountain on
South Dakota State Capitol Lake
is fed by an artesian well with nat-
ural gas content so high that it can
be lit. The fountain glows perpetu-
ally as a memorial to all veterans.
33. The George S. Mickelson
Trail is South Dakota's premier
rails-to-trails project. This award
winning tail stretches 114 miles
from Deadwood to Edgemont.
34. The Crystal Springs Ranch
rodeo arena in Clear Lake was
built on a drained duck pond. The
former duck pond is now known as
"America's Most Natural Rodeo
Bowl".
35. Faith is famous to paleontol-
ogists. Several Hadrosaur, Edmon-
tosaurus annectens were exca-
vated on a ranch north of Faith
and one of the largest, most com-
plete, and best preserved Tyran-
nosaurus Rex was excavated
nearby.
36. The Silent Guide Monument
in Philip was built in the late
1800s by a sheepherder to mark a
waterhole that never went dry.
Made of flat stones, the guide orig-
inally stood fourteen feet high, and
could be seen as far as thirty five
miles away.
37. The largest underground
gold mine is the Homestake Mine
in Lead.
38. Mato Paha "Sacred Moun-
tain" is the origin of many Native
American legends. Rising 1400
feet above the surrounding prairie
near Sturgis, and standing all by
itself, Bear Butte isn't hard to find.
It was used as a landmark by the
plains Indians and even today it is
considered sacred by the plains
peoples.
39. Black Hills National Ceme-
tery "The Arlington of the West" is
a final resting place of our nation's
veterans.
40. The Anne Hathaway Cottage
at Wessington Springs is the only
structure in the Midwest US that
features a thatched roof. The cot-
tage is styled after the original
Anne Hathaway home in England.
41. Brookings is the home of
South Dakota State University,
the state's largest university, with
8100 students, and a staff of
nearly 2000.
42. Rivers were the highways in
settling the western territory.
Lewis and Clark named American
Creek when they passed through
the Chamberlain - Oacoma area
while exploring the territory for
President Jefferson in 1804.
43. Yankton was the original
Dakota Territorial capital city.
44. Henry Holland built an Eng-
lish-style mill in Milbank in 1886,
three years before South Dakota
became a state. Until 1907 it was
used by settlers to grind wheat
and corn and to saw wood.
45. The first and oldest Dakota
daily newspaper, published in
1861 is the Yankton Daily Press &
Dakotan.
46. The Meridian Bridge built in
1924 was the first structure built
across the Missouri River in South
Dakota.
47. The Prairie Rattlesnake is
the only venomous snake native to
South Dakota. The color of the
Prairie Rattlesnake varies from
light brown to green, with a yel-
lowish belly. Dark oval blotches
with light colored borders run
along the center of its back.
48. The U.S.S. South Dakota
was the most decorated battleship
during World War II.
49. Newton Hills State Park,
south of Canton, is part of a geo-
logical feature called the Coteau
des Prairie. This narrow strip of
rolling hills and forests was cre-
ated by glaciers and extends along
the eastern edge of South Dakota.
At its highest point, the Coteau
rises to more than 2,000 feet above
sea level.
50. For millions of years, Split
Rock Creek near Garretson cut
deep gorges through Palisades
State Park. Geologists say the
Sioux quartzite spires are 1.2 bil-
lion years old! Glaciers deposited a
thin layer of debris atop the
quartzite. Beds of dark red pipe-
stone can be found between the
layers. This is one of the few areas
in the nation where pipestone is
found. The mineral is considered
sacred by American Indians.
we/ceqe /tieqds, /aqi/, q
J/aqqi le wa//'s 70blq Ce/ebtalieq
Cetqet Faqlt,Z5abna,
b0J·27º·2JJJ · b0JZ27º·2722 · wa//, 50
Located in the Phillips 66 Station at the corner of Glenn St. & South Blvd.
Facts about South Dakota
Employer Mandate Delay Sig-
nals Larger Problems for Oba-
maCare
Recently, the Obama adminis-
tration announced its plans to
delay implementation of one of the
key components of the president’s
signature health care legislation,
the employer mandate.
This provision, which mandates
financial penalties to businesses
with more than 50 employees that
fail to provide government-ap-
proved health insurance to its em-
ployees, will be delayed from 2014
until 2015.
For more than three years, Pres-
ident Obama has been assuring
the American people that provi-
sions in ObamaCare such as the
employer mandate will help lower
premium costs and allow Ameri-
cans to keep the insurance they
preferred.
Yet, businesses across South
Dakota and the rest of the country
have lamented that the legislation
is stifling hiring decisions and tak-
ing away financial resources that
would normally be invested in
their business.
According to a Wells
Fargo/Gallup Small Business
Index survey, nearly four in 10
small business owners are holding
back hiring because of costs asso-
ciated with implementing Oba-
maCare.
Not only does the health care
law mandate coverage for employ-
ees, but the law also includes a
provision that mandates employ-
ers include certain government-de-
termined “essential benefits” for
any employer-sponsored health
plan, leaving almost no flexibility
for an employer to determine what
is best for his or her employees.
Many of these required benefits
increase the cost of plans for em-
ployers and employees alike.
According to a recent Gallup poll
from June of 2013, 52 percent of
respondents said they disapprove
of ObamaCare, up from 48 percent
last fall. The same poll revealed
that for every one person who be-
lieves they will be better off under
ObamaCare, two believe they will
be worse off.
Opposition to the president’s
health law is growing, and will
continue to grow, as Americans re-
alize that the law is built upon bro-
ken promises that will result in
higher health care costs and more
taxes.
While I am pleased that busi-
nesses will be shielded for another
year from the onerous and costly
requirements associated with em-
ployer mandate, the delay provides
further evidence that ObamaCare
is not the solution to our health
care problems and that this mas-
sive expansion of government is a
step in the wrong direction.
Rather than unilaterally break-
ing a law that the president and
his allies in Congress proposed,
the administration should have
worked with Congress to devise a
solution.
It’s time to repeal this broken
legislation and replace it with real
health care reforms that will give
Americans access to the health
care they need, from the doctor
they choose, at a lower cost.
A fundraiser was held at the
Wall Rodeo grounds for Mazee
Pauley, Carlee and Carson John-
ston who will be competeing at the
High School National Finals Rodeo
in Rock Springs, Wyo., July 14 - 20.
Breakaway roping Youth 3D,
Open 4D were held. Winners are:
Breakaway roping
•First - Mattee Pauley; Second -
Mazee Pauley; Third - Emilee
Pauley.
•Fast times: First - Emilee
Pauley - 2.62; Second - Carlee
Johnston - 2.54; Third - Mattee
Pauley - 3.28.
Youth 3D
•1D: First - Mattee Pauley,
17.180; Second - Savannah John-
ston, 17.554.
•2D: First - Trista Reinert,
Fundraiser held for
HSNFR contestants
17.681; Second - Josie Blasius,
17.748.
•3D: First - Emilee Pauley,
18.243; Second - Camri Elshere,
19.690.
Open 4D
•1D: First - Mattee Pauley,
16.924; Second - Lana Shorb.
16.929; Third - Laura O’Leary,
16.986.
•2D: First - Emilee Pauley,
17.500; Second - Becky Amio,
17.532; Third - Becky Amio,
17.677.
•3D: First - Brandee Wardell,
18.046; Second - TaTe Fortune,
18.054; Third - Kelsi Muks, 18.055.
•4D: First - Kelly Anders,
18.456; Second - Kaylee Gallino,
18.505; Third - Ethel Whitcher,
18.643.
High School National Finals Rodeo qualifers. Pictured from left
to right ... Mazee Pauley, Carlee Johnston and Carson Johnston.
~Courtesy Photo
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013 • Page 7
Religious
West Ri ver Electric
would like to
congratulate the
Wall Communi ty on
i ts 106th Birthday.
We are proud to
be a part of i t.
Two Bit Saloon
& Steakhouse
would like to welcome everyone
to the Wall Celebration. Stop in
for a great steak and a cold drink.
Steak tIPS & PIg WINgS:
thurs., July 11 ~ Serving at 6 p.m.
SPeCIal ~ PRIme RIb:
Fri., July 12 & Sat., July 13
Open at 6:00 p.m. for service
Quinn • 386-2115
Wall Lube & Espresso Bar
welcomes you back to
Wall’s Celebration!
•Oil Changes •16 Point Check
•Wiper Blades •Batteries
•Windshield Repair •Traeger Grills
•Cappuccino •Latté •Smoothies
•Coffee Crunch
FREE Dark Canyon Coffee
while your car is being serviced!
Wall Lube & Espresso Bar
201 South Boulevard, Wall, SD • 279-2227
80 years ago…
Violet Kitterman, daughter of
Mrs. Wm. Kitterman, was recently
married to Clifford Emerson Doud
of Quinn. They received their li-
cense from Deadwood. At present
the young couple are living with
his parents north of Quinn.
The Wall Light and Power Co.
are putting up sixty-seven new
light poles. Formerly they have
been using mostly the poles be-
longing to the Telephone Co. Bet-
ter service is expected to the users
as there will be less loss of voltage
after the wires have been restrung.
In an exceptionally good game
the baseball team of Quinn lost to
Kadoka, 5 to 4. Quinn led all
through the game up to the last
two innings. Green, their new
pitcher, struck out thirteen men.
70 years ago…
A delegation from Cottonwood
and vicinity held a protest meeting
in the W.R.E.A. office Monday
evening. These folks feel that they
are being purposely left out from
the completion of their REA lines.
They claim membership in the As-
sociation almost since its very be-
ginning and feel that they should
have preference over those living
north of Box Elder. Many of those
present Monday night told that
they had gone to considerable ex-
pense getting their places wired to
receive electricity over a year ago.
The Wall firemen were breaking
a record as the Courant was going
to press last week. Before they
were able to get their fire equip-
ment home from one fire they were
called to another. Fire Chief Con-
nolly believes this to be a new
record for the Wall Fire Depart-
ment. The first alarm was sent in
when the pump house of the Miller
Hotel caught fire from an electrical
short circuit. Some oiled rags
caused considerable smoke to pour
from the building. The damage
was confined simply to that of the
electric pump motor. The second
fire about fifteen minutes later
came when the Floyd Flatt’s
brooder house caught fire. The loss
there amounted to thirty-five
chicks and the tramping down of
their garden by the firemen and
their equipment.
Better than half an inch of rain
fell in the course of a few minutes
in Wall, Sunday afternoon. This
same twisting and heaving cloud
which brought the downpour here
produced devastating hail east of
Quinn and developed into a tor-
nado between Cottonwood and
Philip. The hail storm was cen-
tered over the farms of Merle
Farnsworth and Russell Kitter-
man about four miles east of
Quinn. Windows on the north
sides of both their homes were
smashed even through the screens.
Stones an hour after the storm
were so large around that you
were unable to grip them with one
outspread hand. Hail as large as
any grapefruit that he had ever
seen, is Tony Krebs description of
the hail. Ike Kelly claims that he
saw stones as large as saucers.
Chunks as large as hen’s eggs an
hour after they fell were claimed to
have been seen by Mrs. Norton.
The prize description, however,
came from Herman Melchert, who
witnessed a piece of ice as large as
a water pail.
60 years ago…
Quinn: Mrs. C. E. Lyle has an-
nounced the Lyle Cafe will close
June 1. Mrs. Lyle has operated the
business for several years and clos-
ing the business will leave Quinn
without either a cafe or hotel.
There has been no indication of a
purchaser.
Hugh Hiller, clerk of the Wall In-
dependent School District, reports
that no one filed for the one posi-
tion on the Board whose term ex-
pired this year, so Bill Bielmaier
will be asked to continue to serve
as hold-over member. The other
members are Harold Welsh, Helen
Eisenbraun, Margie Tivis and Eva
Sebade.
Lorna Hoffman was pictured in
Monday’s Rapid City Journal as
the winner of the top cowgirl hon-
ors at the high school rodeo in
Rapid City, last Saturday and Sun-
day. Lorena Berry of Norris, tied
with Lorna for first place. The
girl’s received gifts of luggage.
Charlene Hayes of Wasta, posted
the best time in girl’s barrel race
with Lorna second. Lorna won
third in showing of the best cutting
horse. Engraved buckles were
given for individual winners.
50 years ago…
A break-in at the Wall School
netted the thief about $100 in bills
and checks. Footprints show that
the burglar entered the office by
climbing and prying open the win-
dow. Nothing was disturbed in the
office except the locked filing cabi-
net. A screw driver had apparently
been used for a pry. A roll of bills
was taken, leaving the coins that
were in the same money box un-
touched as well as another small
stack of bills. Supt. Vernice Hilde-
brandt stated that the money
came mostely from the sale of ads
for the school annual and the
school lunch fund. Friday morning
deputy sheriff Geo. Tennyson and
state Motor Patrolman Jerry
Boyer, investigated the break-in.
Commencement at Colorado
State University was family night
for the Pattersons of Wall. Dean,
Marcene and Gene Patterson all
received Bachelor Degrees at CSU.
The twin brothers received Bache-
lor degrees in general agriculture,
and Marcene was awarded a Bach-
elor of Science degree in Home
Economics. All three have re-
turned to Wall where Dean and
Gene are at work on the family
(Merritt Patterson) farm, and
Marcene will teach in the Wall
High School.
Two new members were elected
in Wall School Board in Tuesday’s
annual election. Donald Strandell
and O. S. Soma were elected to
take the place of Howard Johnson
and Deane Joyce. There were 159
votes cast. The candidates received
the following votes: Don Strandell,
102; O. S. Soma, 93; Dean Joyce,
61; Howard Johnson, 50.
40 years ago…
Keith Moler received his Doctor-
ate Degree in Dentistry from the
University of Nebraska, Saturday,
May 19. Attending the graduation
exercises in Lincoln were Mr. and
Mrs. Bill Moler and Pam, Douglas
Kleinschmit and Boyce Kennedy.
Keith was a 1967 graduate of the
Wall High School.
Leonard Kjerstad’s place is the
winner of this years Farmstead
Award of the Eastern Pennington
County Conservation District.
Other places judged this year were
Dan Dartt’s place north of Wall
and the Robert Marsden farm-
stead west of Wall. Judges were
Steve Heilman, Dale Lewis and
Ray Knuppe. Dennis Anderson ac-
companied the group on the tour.
Darla Talty, 1973 graduate of
Wall High School and daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Dean Talty, left on
Monday for Sioux Falls. She left
from there for Fort McClellan, Al-
abama, where she will be spending
eight weeks of basic training for
their United State Women Army
Corps. After basic training, she
will go to Fort Benjamin Harrison
in Indiana for eight weeks of
school in Personnel Management.
During the past week, this area
has received over an inch of mois-
ture, while in the Hills snow was
reported. All of the crops here are
looking excellent. Some farmers
are concerned that they are get-
ting too much moisture to harvest
their hay. Corn, although not a
major crop, is looking good, reports
Tom McDonnell. Wheat fields are
in the beading stage and is ex-
pected to be another good yield.
30 years ago…
On Friday, May 27th, Gail John-
son and boys and Wanda White
and girls became a family, Deane
Joyce presided. Rick and Marilyn
Sutter were attendants.
Forty former students, along
with dozens of friends and rela-
tives, gathered Sunday, May 29, to
honor Iva Eisenbraun. The occa-
sion was her retirement after 36
years of teaching in the rural
schools of the Wall and Creighton
areas. Iva taught a total of 126 stu-
dents in the Lake Hill, Squaw
Creek, Hamann, Pleasant Ridge,
South Creighton and North
Creighton schools. Beginning her
teaching career in 1940, she took
only a brief time off to rear her
children. She has taught each of
her children as well as several
grandchildren.
Kirk Cordes and Melanie Flatt
were the top two vote-getters in
the Wall School District #51-5
school board election held Tuesday,
June 21. The two new members of
the board will be seated on the
July 13 regular meeting of the
Board of Education. Cordes, Flatt
and Robert Hays sought election to
the school board for two vacancies
left by Dick Kjerstad and Bill
Leonard, who both chose not to
seek re-election. Both positions are
three-year terms.
Shannon Biers, Scenic, daughter
of Darryl and Lynda Biers, was
crowned South Dakota High
School Rodeo Queen for 1983 at
the South Dakota High School
Rodeo held in New Underwood
June 24-26. She will represent
South Dakota at the national
rodeo to be held in Douglas, Wyo.,
july 18-24. Biers won all categories
in the field of 15 en route to the
title, which netted her a plaque, a
brand new saddle, a buckle with
four rubies in it, and a crown made
of Black Hills gold. Her year as
Queen of High School Rodeos will
entail traveling around to the var-
ious High School Rodeos in South
Dakota.
20 years ago…
BIRTH: Born May 7, 1993 to
Richard and Lorayna Papousek of
Quinn, a daughter, Lissa Elaine.
Little Lissa weighed 7 lbs. 8 oz.
and measured 19 1/2 inches long.
Proud grandparents are LaVerle
Papousek, Carmichael, Calif.,
Judd and Sharon Lanfear, Quinn;
and Great-grandmother Ellen
Burnside, Kalispell, Mont.
Theresa Guthmiller and Lee
Renner are proud to announce
their engagement with plans to
marry on July 3, 1993, in
Spearfish, S.D. Theresa is em-
ployed by the Unified Judicial Sys-
tem as an official court reporter in
the Eighth Judicial Circuit. Lee is
employed by Black Hills Federal
Credit Union as a loan officer.
BIRTH: Born March 9, 1993, a
daughter, Elizabeth Marie, to
Jason and Tammy Goodreau of
Box Elder. Little Elizabeth
weighed 8 lbs. and measured 21
1/2 inches long. Proud grandpar-
ents are Skip and Elaine
Goodreau, Coudersport, Pa., and
Gallyn and Marlene Wolf, Quinn;
and great-grandparents are Cleo
Adams, Hot Springs, Deloris Wolf,
Wall, and Bob and Kit Crosby,
Coudersport.
The Wall Teeners went to the
Martin Tournament June 11 and
12 and heat Philip B, 10-0 in the
first game. In the second game,
Wall beat Winner 7-4. In the third,
and championship game, Wall beat
Martin 6-5.
10 years ago…
BIRTH: Born April 8, 2003, a
son, Layton Craig, to Darren and
Canada Lytle, Las Vegas, Nev. Lit-
tle Layton weighed 7 lbs. 7 oz. and
measured 21 1/2 inches long.
Grandparents are Audrey Rudd,
Bloomfield, N.M., Vonna and the
late Sandy Hlavka, Las Vegas,
Marsha Lytle, Reva and Bob Lytle,
Denver, Colo. Great-grandparents
are Glenn and Mildred Evans, Col-
orado Springs, Colo., Delbert and
Armista Sebade, Wall and Glen
and Irish Lytle, Yuma, Ariz.
Two recent donations have
helped the Cheyenne River Breaks
4-H Club inch closer to their goal
of building a training center/con-
cession stand at the 4-h rodeo
grounds. West River Electric Asso-
ciation’s “Operation Round-up”
provided $400 to the group, and
First Western Bank donated $100.
This money will be added to the
$1,000 the club has already gener-
ated through fundraisers. The club
felt their was a need to replace the
camper and awning that is cur-
rently being used for concessions.
Codi Kuhn and Jebediah Rieb
will marry July 5, 2003. Kuhn’s
parents are Debbie and Johnny
Kuhn, Laramie, Wyo. Rieb’s par-
ents are Tim and Roxy Dix, Wasta
and the late Kenneth Rieb.
The Looking Glass of Time
We Don’t
Charge…
Obi tuaries,
engagements
and wedding
wri te-ups
are published
free of charge.
Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@
gwtc.net.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
DON'T GeT TRAmPLeD BY
THe "HeRD"
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
Every year in early July, thou-
sands of people “run with the
bulls” in Pamplona, Spain. While
the event is exciting, it is also haz-
ardous, and many runners have
gotten badly injured over the
years. As an investor, you may find
that running with the herd is dan-
gerous to you, too — because if
you’re constantly following what
everyone else is doing, your own fi-
nancial goals could end up getting
“trampled.”
The urge to run with the herd, or
follow the crowd, may have been
hard-wired into our psyches, ac-
cording to anthropologists. In pre-
historic times, running with the
pack may have helped people min-
imize danger or increase their
chances for finding food. But today,
there are far fewer rewards for fol-
lowing a herd mentality — espe-
cially in investing.
For example, consider what hap-
pens when the financial markets
go through a period of volatility.
Virtually every time this happens,
many investors flock to gold, ap-
parently believing that the shiny
yellow metal will always be valu-
able and that its price will never
drop. Yet, the fact is that gold
prices, like those of other financial
assets, do fluctuate. Furthermore,
certain types of gold-based invest-
ments can be quite risky in their
own right.
What other “follow the herd”
movements should you avoid when
you invest? For one thing, try to
stay away from “feeding frenzies.”
If you look back about 15 years
ago, you may remember the buzz
surrounding speculative technol-
ogy stocks — many of which were
companies that had futuristic
names but lacked some useful ele-
ments, such as profits or business
strategies. For a few years, the
prices of these companies soared,
but in 2000 and 2001, the “dot-
com” bubble burst, splattering in-
vestors with big losses that were
either irreversible or, at the least,
took years from which to recover.
The herd mentality often applies
even when investors know the
right moves to make. To illustrate:
One of the most basic rules of in-
vesting is “buy low, sell high” —
and yet many investors do the
exact opposite. When prices drop,
they sell, so that they can cut their
losses — even though they may be
selling investments that, while
temporarily down, still have
strong potential. On the other
hand, when an investment’s price
has shot up, these same investors
will often keep buying more
shares, hoping to reap even bigger
gains — even if the investment has
now become quite expensive, as
measured by the price-to-earnings
ratio, and has little upside poten-
tial remaining.
Instead of emulating other in-
vestors, think about your own fi-
nancial goals and create a viable
strategy for achieving them, tak-
ing into account your risk toler-
ance and time horizon. Look for
quality investments and hold them
for the long term. Don’t be discour-
aged by the inevitable market
downturns, but be ready to adjust
your portfolio as needed. Above all
else, be patient and disciplined, al-
ways keeping your eye on your ul-
timate objectives.
It can feel comfortable when
you’re in the midst of a herd — but
it can lead you to places where, as
an investor, you don’t want to go.
Steer clear of the crowds and go
your own way.
Need a
print
job
done
fast?
Call us for all
your printing
needs.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
605-859-2516
Offices in Philip,
Wall, Kadoka, Murdo,
Faith, Bison,
& New Underwood.
Congratulations
Wall
& welcome to the
106th celebration
Stop in for all your
automotive needs.
Badlands Automotive
Jerry & Bev Mooney
605/279-2927 or 605/279-2733 • Wall, SD
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIon will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FaRM & RanCH
WanTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
anGus BuLLs: Net Worth, Free-
dom bloodlines. Good calving
ease, gentle, poured. Ones and
twos - $2,000-$3,000. Also bull
rack hauler for sale. 390-5335,
515-1502. Schaaf Angus Ranch.
P30-4tp
FoR saLE: 660 New Holland
Baler, $3,500. Also, 1990 Dia-
mond D 6x20 stock trailer,
$2,500 Sterling Riggins, 462-
6555 or cell 441-4363.
P30-3tc
FoR saLE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WanTED
PosITIons oPEn: Sunset Grill
and Subway (former Happy Chef
buidling) in Kadoka have posi-
tions open for cooks and sand-
wich artists with a variety of du-
ties. All shifts available. Begin
work mid-July. Apply in person
at Subway. K31-2tc
Haakon sCHooL DIsTRICT
In PHILIP is accepting bids to
replace the roof with steel, doors,
and windows at Deep Creek
School in northern Haakon
County. See Britni at the Admin-
istrative Offices or send an email
to Britni.Ross@ k12.sd.us to re-
quest a list of specifications and
materials. Completion date on
or before August 9th is pre-
ferred. P30-2tc
PosITIon oPEn: HAAKON
COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY
is accepting applications for of-
fice help. Position involves work-
ing with Insurance and Land
title work. Applicant must be
willing to get licensed. Accurate
Typing and Computer skills re-
quired. Pick up application at
145 S. Center Ave. Philip, SD.
P30-tfn
PosITIon oPEn: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-
2447. K28-4tc
PosITIon oPEn: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employment
spraying county highway right of
way. Commercial herbicide li-
cense required or to be obtained
before start of work. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Applications / resumés
accepted. Information 837-2410
or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K28-4tc
auToMoTIVE
QuInn FIRE DEPaRTMEnT Is
aCCEPTInG BIDs on a 1961
C50 Chevy Viking Truck. It has
a 350 motor and comes with 500
gallon tank, 100 gallon per
minute pump with motor, 100
feet of 1 1/4 hose on a hose reel.
Bids may be sent to: Dave
Humphrey, PO Box 184, Wall,
SD 57790. Any questions, call
Dave 685-3987 or Michael 685-
8524. WP44-4tc
FoR saLE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155.
PR10-tfn
BusInEss & sERVICEs
nEED a PLuMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn 441-1053 or leave a mes-
sage at 837-0112.
K31-4tp
BusInEss FoR saLE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & Con-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
RouGH CounTRY sPRaYInG:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
o’ConnELL ConsTRuCTIon,
InC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETon RIVER TREnCHInG:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
PosITIon oPEn: Jackson
County is accepting applications
for full-time Deputy Director of
Equalization. Selected applicant
may be required to become cer-
tified as per SDCL. Must work
well with the public, and have
clerical and computer skills.
Jackson County benefits include
health insurance, life insurance,
S.D. Retirement, paid holidays,
vacation and sick leave. Position
open until filled. Beginning wage
$9.00 per hour. Applications are
available at the Jackson County
Auditor’s office or send resumé
to Jackson County, PO Box 280,
Kadoka, SD 57543. Ph: 837-
2422. K28-4tc
oPTIMETRIC TECHnICIan:
One day per week (Tuesdays), 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Medical experi-
ence preferred, but not required.
Mail resumé to: Philip Eye
Clinic, 810 Mountain View Road,
Rapid City, SD 57702. Ques-
tions, call Angie, 342-0777.P28-
tfn
PosITIon oPEn: Part-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Tractor opera-
tor to mow county road right of
way, and perform other duties as
directed. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Applications / resumés ac-
cepted. Information 837-2410 or
837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K28-4tc
HousEkEEPERs anD Laun-
DRY PERsonnEL WanTED:
High school and college students
are welcome to apply. Will train.
Apply at either America’s Best
Value Inn and Budget Host Sun-
downer in Kadoka or call 837-
2188 or 837-2296.
K26-tfn
HELP WanTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax resumé
to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
MIsC. FoR saLE
FoR saLE: Complete reloading
equipment, including bench,
$350. Call 515-1460.
PR46-1tp
FoR saLE: Floor oxygen con-
centrator, Invacare Platinum XL.
12,500 hours. Serviced by PSI.
$400 cash OBO. 859-3095.
PR43-4tc
FoR saLE: 6500 watt Titan In-
dustrial generator, electric start
with pull start, 8 hp. diesel en-
gine, (2) 110v plug-ins, 1-RV
plug, 1-220 plug, new Interstate
battery, cover. 280-0351.
P20-tfn
FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
noTICEs/WanTED
WanTED: CLEan CoTTon
RaGs; i.e. sheets, t-shirts,
socks. NO FLANNEL OR CUR-
TAINS. 25¢ lb. Pioneer Review,
P28-tfn
PETs/suPPLIEs
akC GERMan WIREHaIR
PoInTER PuPPIEs: Available in
Milesville for viewing now,
pickup Second week of August.
One male, five females. Will have
first shots, wormed, microchip
implants, and registration docu-
mentation. 605-544-3016.
P31-4tp
FoR saLE: 20-gallon aquarium
plus equipment and supplies, in-
cluding cabinet and top. Great
condition, in working order, fish
included. $250/ OBO. 360-
4241, Wasta. P30-2tc
kITTEns: Ready for new homes!
Would make good barn cats or
house cats. Call 685-5327 for
more info. P30-2tc
REaL EsTaTE
HousE FoR saLE: Asking
$25,000. 406 Norris St., Wall.
Call 279-2825, PW31-2tc
FoR saLE/REnT: 3 bedroom, 2
bath, full basement, central air,
stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer.
302 W. Oak. Philip. Call 602-
509-5355. K31-1tp
HousE FoR saLE In PHILIP:
3 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1,100
sq. ft. open floor plan, vaulted
ceilings, fenced backyard, estab-
lished lawn, oversized detached
garage. Appliances included, all
new in 2008. Call 840-2257 or
307-251-2474.
PR45-6tp
HousE FoR saLE In PHILIP: 2
bedrooms, central location.
Make an offer! 859-3095 or 859-
2483. P28-4tc
HoME FoR saLE In PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new roof,
windows, siding, high efficiency
heat/air with heat pump, on-de-
mand hot water, nice propane
fireplace, nice backyard, deck
and more. Would consider con-
tract for deed. Contact for show-
ing: Don or Tami Ravellette, 685-
5147 (cell) or 859-2969 (home).
P27-tfn
2-sToRY HousE FoR saLE In
WaLL: Will consider any reason-
able offer. Please call 279-2858.
PW27-8tc
RECREaTIon
FoR saLE: 2004 Honda Fore-
man Rubicon 4WD 4-wheeler,
new tires, new plastic, with
windshield. 280-0351.
P20-tfn
REnTaLs
aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
CLassIFIED PoLICY
PLEasE REaD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. all
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
Deadline for
Classifieds and Cards
of Thanks is 11:00
a.m. on Tuesdays
EMPLoYMEnT
TEACHING POSITIONS OPEN AT
MOBRIDGE-POLLOCK School Dis-
trict #62-6 for 2013-2014 School
Year: HS Math; MS Special Educa-
tion; and Birth to 2nd Grade Spe-
cial Education. Contact Tim Fred-
erick at 605-845-9204 for more in-
formation. Resumes and applica-
tions can be mailed to the school
Attn: Tim Frederick at 1107 1st Av-
enue East in Mobridge SD 57601.
Open until filled. EOE, Signing
Bonus available.
HUTCHINSON COUNTY HIGHWAY
SUPERINTENDENT POSITION.
Duties include supervising staff,
scheduling shifts, planning and or-
ganizing department activities,
preparing budget, representing de-
partment at public meetings. Must
maintain valid SD Driver’s and
Commercial Driver’s License.
Salary dependent on experience.
Applications from Hutchinson
County Auditor’s Office, 140 Euclid
Room 128, Olivet SD 57052 (605)
387-4212. Applications close 4:30
p.m. July 26, 2013.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A
Driver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance. For application contact:
Douglas County Auditor (605) 724-
2423.
STORE MANAGER - JOHN DEERE
DEALERSHIP. Store manager
sought by multi-store John Deere
dealership operation. Position cur-
rently open is at Greenline Imple-
ment, Miller, SD, a part of C&B Op-
erations, headquartered out of Get-
tysburg, SD. Applicants should
possess the ability to manage sales,
parts, and service personnel in a
growth oriented dealership. We
offer progressive marketing plans,
competitive pay, full benefit pack-
age, including bonus plan. Please
send resume to Mark Buchholz, at
buchholzm@deerequipment.com or
call Mark at 605-769-2030.
HEaLTH/BEauTY
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR
WYLIE? $1000 Flatbed Sign-on
*Home Weekly *Regional Dedicated
Routes *2500 Miles Weekly *$50
Tarp Pay (888) 692-5705.
www.drive4ewwylie.com.
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?
Did you undergo transvaginal
placement of mesh for pelvic organ
prolapse or stress urinary inconti-
nence between 2005 and the pres-
ent? If the mesh caused complica-
tions, you may be entitled to com-
pensation. Call Charles H. Johnson
Law and speak with female staff
members 1-800-535-5727.
FoR saLE
10 CHOICE COMMERCIAL
ACRES. Any business will work
here. Between Hill City and Custer
on Highway 16. Has two wells, two
homes, six good out buildings.
CFD. $100,000 down. Vaun H.
Boyd. 605-673-5503.
MIsCELLanEous
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
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1892
SAVE ON CABLE TV-Internet-Digi-
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service providers. Call us to learn
more! CALL Today. 888-337-5453
HIGHSPEED INTERNET every-
where By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.)
Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW
& GO FAST! 1-888-518-8672.
noTICEs
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classi-
fieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this news-
paper or 800-658-3697 for details.
The PDR Hunt is a FREE deer hunt
for physically disabled children
ages 12-18, September 13-15,
2013. Clark, South Dakota. Call
Dean Rasmussen (605) 233-0331,
www.pdryouthhunt.com.
oTR/DRIVERs
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up
to 48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call
Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-
3549.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
metroPlains management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
THank Yous
Thank you to all who helped
and/or participated in the
fundraiser for the Wall High
School Rodeo qualifiers.
Mazee Pauley representing our
state second in poles and third in
goat tying.
Carlee Johnston representing
us as State Champion goat tyer.
Carson Johnston fourth in tie-
down calf roping.
A special thank you to the
Wasta Fire Department for their
quick response of “half hour no-
tice” to water the arena. You were
a life saver.
Thanks,
Mazee Pauley
Carson & Carlee Johnston
EMPLOyMENT
OPPORTUNITy
West River Electric Associa-
tion, Inc. currently has an Ac-
counting Clerk/CSR position
open at its Headquarters Office
located in Wall, SD. Applicant
must possess excellent organiza-
tional, oral, and written communi-
cation skills. Must have a strong
attention to detail and the ability
to multi-task. A thorough working
knowledge of general office prac-
tices and Microsoft Office soft-
ware is required.
High school graduate or equiv-
alent required with college or
technical degree in accounting
preferred along with at least 1
year of customer service or busi-
ness related experience pre-
ferred. Salary is commensurate
with experience and qualifica-
tions.
Applications can be picked up
at the Wall office, downloaded
from www.westriver.com, or ob-
tained from the SD Career Cen-
ter. Applications will be accepted
at the Wall Headquarters office
until July 15, 2013. For more in-
formation contact Jenny Patter-
son at 605-279-2135.
WREA is an Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action employer.
Wall, SD
279-2325
Welcomes Back
Alumni & Friends to
the Wall Celebration!
We hope you have a safe
and enjoyable weekend!
Wall Auto
Livery
CUSTOM
HAYING
Call
Jace Shearer
685-5964 • Wall
WASTA TOWN
BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
JULy 1, 2013
The Wasta Town Board held their reg-
ular meeting on Monday, July 1, 2013 at
the community building. Board Chairman
Justin Crawford called the meeting to
order at 7:02pm with board members
Dorreen Skillingstad and Norm Current
present. Persons attending the meeting
were Kari Kjerstad, Barb Crawford, Da-
neene Skillingstad and Tammy Green.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the June 10th minutes as read.
Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the financial statement as given.
Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the bills as follows: Justin Craw-
ford, June wages, $27.70; Dorreen
Skillingstad, June wages, $23.09; Norm
Current, June wages, $23.09; Tammy
Green, June wages, $554.10; Carolynn
Anderson, June wages/election, $295.52;
Walker Refuse, garbage pickup, $602.48;
WREA, electricity, $701.24: Pennington
Co. Courant, publishing, $27.46; Energy
Laboratories, water test, $12.50; Dakota
Supply Group, meters, $207.96; Racicky
Plumbing, FH leak, $1,066.66; SD Dept.
of Labor, unemployment tax: $5.42;
Northwest Pipe, curb box/stops, $422.18;
EFTPS, payroll tax, $153.00. Motion car-
ried.
The Flood Plan Ordinance was dis-
cussed. It was the consensus of the
board to give residents an opportunity to
review and make comment on their
thoughts of the ordinance. Motion by Dor-
reen, second by Justin to post copies of
the ordinance on the community bulletin
board with a signature page for residents
to sign if they are in favor of the ordi-
nance. Motion carried.
Dorreen commented she was unable
to talk with Racicky while he was repair-
ing the Fire Hall leak, but will contact him
after the 4th to smooth down the mound
of dirt from the repair near the Café.
Kari commented she has been review-
ing the Town’s ordinances and feels there
needs to be some updating done. Ordi-
nance #1 states a committee should be
approved for zoning issues in the town.
The board directed Kari to contact other
residents who are willing to be a part of
the committee who can help with the up-
dating and bring them back next month
for board approval.
There was discussion on the mosquito
issues this summer. The board directed
Carolynn to research options for having
the town sprayed and with a change in
legislation, two board members can ap-
prove having it done without calling a spe-
cial meeting since it is a safety issue.
Ordinance 13-2, the initiative amend-
ing Ordinance 40 to allow chickens in
town was presented for board approval.
It was discussed to add a limit to the num-
ber of chickens allowed as well as roost-
ers. Carolynn will add the changes and
bring back next month for approval.
Norm expressed interest in attending
the Elected Officials workshop that will be
held July 24th in Pierre. Motion by Dor-
reen, second by Justin to approve Norm
attending the workshop. Motion carried.
It was the consensus of the Board to
contact the Wasta Fire Chief for a recom-
mendation on whether fireworks should
be allowed in town and post the notice at
the Post Office and Bulletin Board.
With all business complete, Justin ad-
journed the meeting at 8:20pm.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
Town of Wasta
Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $31.52.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Rochford Community Club has applied
for a Conditional Use Permit to allow a
Community Center in a Suburban Resi-
dential District located on Lot 4, Block 2
of Dakota Lode M.S. 2109, and Part of
Lot 1 (26’ x 60’ in NE Corner), Block 3 of
Dakota Lode M.S. 2109, Section 23, T2N,
R3E, BHM, Pennington County, South
Dakota, 11676 Rochford Road, in accor-
dance with Sections 208 and 510 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 22nd day of July 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $16.52.
QUINN TOWN
BOARD
OF TRUSTEES
REGULAR MEETING
JULy 1, 2013
The Quinn Town Board met at 7 pm,
Monday, July 1, at the Quinn Community
Center. Board members present were
Juston Eisenbraun and Jerry Pabst,
Kevin Wenzel was absent. Others pres-
ent were Lorna Moore, Mike Luedeman,
Dennis Terry and Finance Officer Debo-
rah Bryan.
Motion by Juston, seconded by Jerry
to approve the agenda, motion carried.
Juston made a motion, seconded by Jerry
to approve the minutes of the last meet-
ing, motion carried. Motion by Juston,
seconded by Jerry to approve the finan-
cial statement, motion carried.
Income survey were all delivered, they
were due back to Jan on June 30, 2013.
The subject of a new attorney was tabled
until the August meeting. Debbie reported
that DOT will look at the turning lane on
Hwy 14-16 at Quinn.
Debbie reported that Trustee have
been paid $25.00 per meeting since Sep-
tember 2002 and the Finance Officer has
been paid $225.00 since July of 2007.
motion by Juston, seconded by Jerry to
raise the Finance Officers wages to
$250.00 per month, motion carried.
Motion by Jerry, seconded by Juston to
approve the following vouchers for pay-
ment, motion carried: WREA, $207.00;
Pennington County Courant, $19.82;
WRLJ Rural Water, $22.50; Juston Eisen-
braun, $25.00; Jerry Pabst, $25.00; Deb-
bie Bryan, $200.00; Wall Building Center,
$22.98; Ruby Fortune, $30.00; Michael
Luedeman, $162.08; Lorna moore,
$42.23; SD Unemployment, $2.17.
With all business complete, the meet-
ing was adjourned.
Deborah Bryan
Finance Officer
Town of Quinn
Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $17.54.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Pennington County Planning Commission
and the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners will hold a public hearing
to consider the following proposed ordi-
nance amendment to the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance adopted as an
adjunct to the Pennington County Com-
prehensive Plan:
OA 13-02 – Amendment to Section 103
“Construction Permit Definitions” and
Section 507(A) “Construction Permits” of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
Said hearing will be held by the Planning
Commission on Monday, July 22, 2013,
at 9:00 a.m. and the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners on Tuesday, Au-
gust 6, 2013, at 10:30 a.m. in the Com-
missioners’ Meeting Room at the Pen-
nington County Courthouse, Rapid City,
South Dakota. Any interested party may
appear and be heard. Copies of the pro-
posed amendments may be viewed at the
Planning Department located at 315 St.
Joseph Street, Suite 118, Rapid City,
South Dakota, during regular business
hours.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $18.43.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
ON LICENSE
APPLICATIONS FOR SALE
OF MALT BEVERAGE
The Board of County Commissioners of
Pennington County, South Dakota on
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at their meeting
that commences at 9:00 A.M., in the
County Commissioners’ Meeting Room in
the Pennington County Courthouse at
Rapid City, South Dakota, will consider
the following malt beverage license appli-
cations to operate outside of municipali-
ties:
NEW RETAIL (ON-OFF SALE) MALT
BEVERAGE LICENSE & SD FARM
WINES
HIGH COUNTRY GUEST RANCH,
Blended Arrow, LLC, 12138 Ray Smith
Dr., Hill City 57745, Located in the North
½, Section 15, T1S, R4E, BHM, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE AP-
PROVAL OR REJECTION OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LICENSES MAY
APPEAR AND BE HEARD.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $12.07.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Mitch Morris has applied to Rezone from
General Agriculture District and Light In-
dustrial District to General Commercial
District and to amend the Comprehensive
Plan to change the Future Land Use from
Limited Agriculture District to General
Commercial District located on the follow-
ing metes and bounds descriptions:
Being 151.36 acres of land located in the
E1/2 of Section 32, Township 1 North,
Range 8 East of the Black Hills Meridian,
Pennington County, South Dakota, said
151.36 acres of land being more particu-
larly described by metes and bounds as
follows, all measurements are to be con-
sidered as being followed by the words
“more or less”; BEGINNING at the south-
west corner of Lot 1 of the SW1/4 SE1/4
of Section 32, Township 1 North, Range
8 East of the Black Hills Meridian, on the
south line of Section 32 at the intersection
of the east right-of-way line of South
Dakota Highway 79; Thence, North
06°32'53" West, along the west line of
said Lot 1 of the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section
32 and east right-of-way line of SD High-
way 79, a distance of 4310.98 feet to a
point on the easterly line of Lot A of the
NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32 as shown on
plat recorded in Highway Plat Book 9,
Page 93, in the office of the Pennington
County Register of Deeds, in a curve from
which the center of curvature bears North
48°17'34” West a distance of 103.00 feet;
Thence, southwesterly, following the
easterly line of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, along a curve to the
right having a radius of 103.00 feet, a
central angle of 35°53', for an arc dis-
tance of 64.51 feet to a point of tangency;
Thence, South 77°35'27” West, continu-
ing to follow the easterly line of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, a dis-
tance of 4.12 feet to a point for corner on
the east right-of-way line of SD Highway
79, in a curve from which the center of
curvature bears South 73°13'38” West a
distance of 3920 feet; Thence, northwest-
erly, along a curve to the left having a ra-
dius of 3920 feet, a central angle of
00°29'02", for an arc length of 33.11 feet
to point for corner on the centerline of the
alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32; Thence, North
77°35'27” East, following the centerline of
the alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, a distance of 6.78
feet to a point of curvature; Thence,
northeasterly, continuing to follow the
centerline of the alignment of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, along
a curve to the left having a radius of 70.00
feet, a central angle of 84°05'03", for an
arc length of 102.73 feet to a point of tan-
gency; Thence, North 06°29'36” West,
continuing to follow the centerline of the
alignment of said Lot A of the NW1/4
NE1/4 of Section 32, a distance of 606.16
feet to a point of curvature; Thence,
northwesterly, continuing to follow the
centerline of the alignment of said Lot A
of the NW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 32, along
a curve to the left having a radius of
1432.39 feet, a central angle of
05°45'52", for an arc length of 144.11 feet
to point for corner on the west line of the
E1/2 of Section 32; Thence, North
00°01'24” East, along the west line of the
E1/2 of Section 32, a distance of 206.71
feet to the northwest corner of the E1/2 of
Section 32; Thence, South 89°48'35”
East, along the north line of the E1/2 of
Section 32, a distance of 2656.84 feet to
the northeast corner of Section 32;
Thence, South 00°04'45” West, along the
east line of Section 32, a distance of
500.00 feet to a point for corner; Thence,
North 89°48'35” West, parallel to and 500
feet distant from the north line of the E1/2
of Section 32, a distance of 1514.54 feet
to a point for corner; Thence, South
06°22'35” East, a distance of 4844.00
feet to a point for corner on the south line
of the E1/2 of Section 32; Thence, North
89°36'35” West, along the south line of
the E1/2 of Section 32, a distance of
1088.72 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING and containing 151.36 acres, more
or less, of land, one-half mile south of
Rapid City on Highway 79, in accordance
with Section 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Being 30.49 acres of land located in the
N1/2 NW1/4 of Section 33, Township 1
North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian, Pennington County, South
Dakota, said 30.49 acres of land being
more particularly described by metes and
bounds as follows, all measurements are
to be considered as being followed by the
words “more or less”; BEGINNING at the
northwest corner of Section 33, Township
1 North, Range 8 East of the Black Hills
Meridian; Thence, South 89°51'35" East,
along the north line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 2656.84 feet to the
northeast corner of the NW1/4 of Section
33; Thence, South 00°08'05” West, along
the east line of the NW1/4 of Section 33,
a distance of 500.00 feet to a point for
corner; Thence, North 89°51'35” West,
parallel to and 500 feet distant from the
north line of the NW1/4 of Section 33, a
distance of 2656.35 feet to a point for cor-
ner on the west line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33; Thence, North 00°04'45” East, a
distance of 500.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING and containing 30.49 acres,
more or less, of land, one-half mile south
of Rapid City on Highway 79, in accor-
dance with Section 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Mitch Morris has applied to Rezone
200.73 acres from General Agriculture
District to Suburban Residential District
and to amend the Comprehensive Plan to
change the Future Land Use from Limited
Agriculture District to Suburban Residen-
tial District located on the following metes
and bounds description: Being 200.73
acres of land located in the NE1/4 of Sec-
tion 32 and in the NW1/4 of Section 33,
Township 1 North, Range 8 East of the
Black Hills Meridian, Pennington County,
South Dakota, said 200.73 acres of land
being more particularly described by
metes and bounds as follows, all meas-
urements are to be considered as being
followed by the words “more or less”;
COMMENCING, for location purposes
only, at the northeast corner of Section 32
also being the northwest corner of Sec-
tion 33, Township 1 North, Range 8 East
of the Black Hills Meridian; Thence, South
00°04'45" West, along the common line
between Section 32 and Section 33, a
distance of 500.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING of the herein described
tract; Thence, South 89°51'35" East, par-
allel to and 500 feet distant from the north
line of the NW1/4 of Section 33, a dis-
tance of 2656.35 feet to a point for corner
on the east line of the NW1/4 of Section
33; Thence, South 00°08'05” West, along
the east line of the NW1/4 of Section 33,
a distance of 2165.91 feet to a point for
corner; Thence, North 89°41'05” West,
along the south line of the NW1/4 of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 2654.26 feet to the
southwest corner of the NW1/4 of Section
33 also being the southeast corner of the
NE1/4 of Section 32; Thence, North
89°42'51” West, along the south line of
the NW1/4 of Section 32, a distance of
1270.58 feet to a point for corner;
Thence, North 06°22'35” West, a distance
of 2169.92 feet to a point for corner, 500
feet south of the north line of the NE1/4
of Section 32; Thence, South 89°48'35"
East, parallel to and 500 feet distant from
the the north line of the NE1/4 of Section
32, a distance of 1514.54 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING and containing
200.73 acres, more or less, of land, one-
half mile south of Rapid City on Highway
79, in accordance with Section 508 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
6th day of August 2013. At this time, any
person interested may appear and show
cause, if there be any, why such requests
should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $74.98.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
ON LICENSE
APPLICATIONS FOR SALE
OF MALT BEVERAGE
The Board of County Commissioners of
Pennington County, South Dakota on
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at their meeting
that commences at 9:00 A.M., in the
County Commissioners’ Meeting Room in
the Pennington County Courthouse at
Rapid City, South Dakota, will consider
the following liquor license applications to
operate outside of municipalities:
RENEWAL OF RETAIL (ON-SALE) Malt
beverage LICENSE
SIC VIC’S HOUSE OF HORSEPOWER,
Michelle Fuhrmann, 23854 Highway 385,
Hill City, SD 57745, a portion of Lot 2 of
Track B, Gillespie Subdivision, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE AP-
PROVAL OR REJECTION OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LICENSES MAY
APPEAR AND BE HEARD.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $11.44.
Pennington County Courant • July 11, 2013 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Pennington County Courant
279-2565
No one reads the ads?
YOu juST DID!
We design this newspaper with news
and advertising to fit the reader’s eye.
The Pennington County Courant your news
and advertising source for over 100 years.
Let us help you promote your product.
Thanks for taking the time to read our entire newspaper.
IT HAS BEEN SAId THAT…
(Second Notice)
WEST RIVER WATER DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING TO ADOPT Fy 2014 BUDGET
A public hearing will be held at the Murdo Project Office, 307 Main St., Murdo, SD
on July 17, 2013, at 10:45 AM (CDT) to consider the proposed Water Development
District budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014, beginning January 1, 2014.
The purpose of holding this hearing is to provide the public an opportunity to con-
tribute to and comment on the Water Development District proposed operating budget
for Fiscal Year 2014.
Persons interested in presenting data, opinions, and arguments for and against the
proposed budget may appear, either in person or by representative, at the hearing and
be heard and given an opportunity for a full and complete discussion of all items in the
budget.
Published July 11, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $14.29.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE
SALE. SALE TIME: 10:00 A.M. (MT)
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC
& FALL CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEF-
SAFY DDQ
TUESDAY, AUG. 6: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 13: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY
SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY
SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT.
17÷ FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED
HEIFEF SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS
SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE
PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|-
f|ed NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS
ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF &
STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 16: OPEN CONSICN-
MENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE CAT-
TLE SALE.
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAV-
ACANZA HOFSE SALE. CATALOG DEADLINE: MON., AU-
CUST 5. CO TO www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com FOF CONSICN-
MENT FOFMS.
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JULY 9, 2DJS
A b1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups. MorKe1 s1rong. TÞe oous
Þove reo11g 1oged on 1Þe ue1gÞ1 u11Þ 1Þ1s good
gross. TÞese oous ore br1ng1ng good moneg per
Þeod.
WEIGHUPS:
JOEL DEERING - WASTA
1................................................CHAF COW 1305=..................$89.00
2 ..............................................CHAF COWS 1463=..................$87.00
6 ..............................................CHAF COWS 1301=..................$86.00
1..................................................FED COW 1310=..................$82.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1340=..................$81.50
SEAN DEAL - DUPREE
1..................................................FED COW 1320=..................$88.00
1..................................................FED COW 1195=..................$84.50
7......................................DLK & DWF COWS 1471=..................$81.00
WILLERT RANCH INC - BELVIDERE
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2190=................$108.50
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 1940=................$107.00
TK SAMPSON - INTERIOR
1..................................................DLK COW 1410=..................$86.50
2......................................DLK & DWF COWS 1430=..................$80.25
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
1 .................................................FED DULL 1970=................$108.00
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2140=................$107.00
1 .................................................FED DULL 1910=................$105.50
JIM WILLERT - BELVIDERE
1..................................................FED COW 1370=..................$84.50
GARY HOWIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
6................................................DLK HFFTS 889=..................$105.50
BAXTER ANDERS - WALL
1..................................................DLK COW 1320=..................$83.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1255=..................$82.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1240=..................$82.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1490=..................$81.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1340=..................$80.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1265=..................$80.00
1.............................................X DFED COW 1440=..................$79.50
JOE WISHARD - LANTRY
1..................................................DLK COW 1235=..................$83.00
1................................................HEFF COW 1130=..................$82.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1155=..................$80.50
SHANE & SHAD FINN - MIDLAND
1 .................................................FED DULL 1865=................$107.50
TRIPLE T RANCH - RAPID CITY
1..................................................DLK DULL 1860=................$107.00
TRAVIS & JONE ENRIGHT - UNION CENTER
1..................................................DLK DULL 1990=................$106.50
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
4..................................................DLK COW 1301=..................$82.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1460=..................$80.50
3 ................................................DLK COWS 1177=..................$78.00
3 ................................................DLK COWS 1443=..................$76.00
RANDY VOLMER - OWANKA
1..................................................DLK COW 1200=..................$82.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 1745=................$106.50
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
1................................................HEFF DULL 2085=................$105.00
CHARLIE PROKOP - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK DULL 1930=................$105.00
GENE FERGUSON - HERMOSA
6......................................DLK & DWF COWS 1146=..................$81.75
1..................................................DLK COW 1105=..................$80.00
LARRY SCHELL- WALL
1..................................................DLK COW 1185=..................$81.50
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1400=..................$81.00
RYAN VIG - OPAL
5 ................................................DLK COWS 1265=..................$80.75
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK COW 1655=..................$80.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1570=..................$78.50
ANDY LINN - ELM SPRINGS
10....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1435=..................$80.25
COLBY SHEARER - WALL
1..................................................DLK COW 1550=..................$80.00
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK DULL 1815=................$104.50
EARL PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 .................................................FED DULL 2350=................$104.00
DAN SCHOFIELD - PHILIP
1..................................................DLK DULL 2080=................$104.00
LONNIE ARNESON - ELM SPRINGS
1..................................................DLK DULL 1930=................$104.00
14 ...................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 995=....................$94.00
1............................................DLK COWETTE 980=....................$86.00
CASEY SLOVEK - PHILIP
5................................................FED COWS 1425=..................$79.75
LARRY SWIFT - PHILIP
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1343=..................$79.75
1..................................................DLK COW 1215=..................$79.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1340=..................$77.00
CHAD HANRAHAN - MILESVILLE
1..................................................DLK COW 1475=..................$79.50
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1653=..................$79.25
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2130=................$103.50
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
1..................................................DLK DULL 1905=................$103.50
JOHN & PAULINE STABEN - ORAL
1 .................................................FED DULL 1755=................$103.50
1 .................................................FED DULL 2090=..................$98.50
HOVLAND HEREFORDS - PHILIP
1................................................HEFF DULL 2055=................$103.00
HOSTUTLER RANCHES INC - MIDLAND
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2050=................$103.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
1..................................................DLK DULL 1920=................$103.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST - HOWES
1 .................................................DWF COW 1605=..................$79.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1220=..................$78.50
1 .................................................DWF COW 1315=..................$78.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
1..................................................DLK COW 1330=..................$79.00
1................................................CHAF COW 1540=..................$77.50
1................................................CHAF COW 1440=..................$76.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1635=..................$75.50
HARLAN & LINDA EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
7 ................................................DLK COWS 1329=..................$78.75
MARY JOHNSTON - BELVIDERE
2..............................................CHAF DULLS 2115=................$102.50
PAUL & GWEN MCCONNELL - CREIGHTON
1..................................................DLK COW 1345=..................$78.50
DAVE JENNINGS - OELRICHS
1..................................................DLK COW 1610=..................$78.00
JACK KERSTENS - PIEDMONT
1..................................................DLK COW 1470=..................$77.50
JERRY WILLERT - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK COW 1475=..................$77.00
KENNY MCILRAVY - PHILIP
4 ....................................CHAF & FED COWS 1518=..................$76.75
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1528=..................$76.25
4 ..........................................DLK COWETTES 1081=..................$86.00
CHARLES TIPTON - BOX ELDER
1..................................................DLK COW 1815=..................$75.00
MATT JONES - MIDLAND
1 .................................................DLK HFFT 805=....................$99.00
TRENT SHEARER - WALL
1 .................................................DLK HFFT 975=....................$94.00
Pennington County Courant • July 11 2013 • Page 10
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QueSTION: How can I get my
spouse to forgive me for the ways
I’ve hurt her over the past couple
of years? She’s withdrawn from me
emotionally, and I’m not sure how
to convince her I’ve changed.
ANSWeR: Simply realizing and
acknowledging your own failure is
a huge step in the right direction.
There are many people who find it
extremely difficult to humble
themselves in this way, especially
in a marital situation. So take
heart: you’re on the right track. If
you’ve confessed your faults to
your spouse and he or she is still
having a hard time forgiving you,
there are some things you can do
to help.
In the first place, you can recog-
nize that forgiveness is a process.
It ebbs and flows; it starts, stops,
and starts again; it gets better and
gets worse. No matter what the
issue that caused the hurt, forgive-
ness can be more than just a one-
shot decision. Understand that
forgiving you may take time, and
that if your mate occasionally
seems to wrestle with or dwell on
what you did, that doesn’t neces-
sarily amount to a refusal to for-
give. Sights, sounds, and memo-
ries can trigger an episode of
struggle. If you’re impatient or in-
considerate, it will only cause more
hurt.
Next, you should keep in mind
that fear can be a barrier to for-
giveness. Fear often blocks mercy.
There are at least three kinds of
fear that may be making it difficult
for your spouse to complete the
process of forgiveness.
First, they may be afraid of los-
ing control or power. If this is the
case, you can help your mate let go
of the need for control by demon-
strating your trustworthiness and
showing that you understand the
seriousness of what you’ve done.
Let your spouse see that you have
to live with the consequences every
day. Assure them regularly that
you’ve learned a great deal about
how deeply your actions have af-
fected the marriage. Show how
you’re taking steps to prevent the
mistake from occurring again.
Second, your partner may fear
being unable to punish the wrong-
doing. Maybe your spouse is still
in the anger stage and wants you
to experience some of the hurt that
they have felt. You must be pa-
tient during this stage of the
process, whether your mate is
right or wrong. Pray for your
spouse. Ask God to reveal your
broken heart and your desire to
make things right. If you’re hum-
ble about it, he or she may eventu-
ally begin to wonder, Why can’t I
forgive? What payoff am I getting
out of withholding forgiveness?
Questions like these often lead to
healing, but it takes time.
Third, it’s possible that your
mate is afraid of forgetting what
occurred. You can deal with this
by helping your spouse understand
that you don’t expect them not to
remember what happened. That’s
impossible. Explain that you sim-
ply look forward to the day when
he or she will no longer be so
deeply affected by your actions,
and to the opportunity of proving
your commitment to make your
marriage healthy again. Be as un-
derstanding as possible. Impa-
tience will only underline the sus-
picion that you don’t care about
your partner’s struggles.
Throughout this process, make a
special effort to be honest with
yourself. It’s easy to blame your
spouse for failing to forgive when
you’re confident that your heart is
genuinely remorseful. But there’s
a need here for constant self-exam-
ination. Keep checking your own
attitude and actions. Ask ques-
tions like, What exactly caused the
hurt in the first place? What be-
haviors or attitudes do I hold on to
that cause more hurt? How do I
plan to make the necessary
changes? What might God be
showing me through my spouse’s
inability to forgive?
If necessary, ask a professional
counselor or older Christian to
help you and your spouse through
the process. You might be sur-
prised to learn how many people
you respect have actually walked
this path before you.
QueSTION: How can I get my
husband to help more with the
kids? He likes the “fun” part of
raising kids – he’s great at getting
down on the floor and “wrestling”
with our toddler. But when it
comes to the practical side of par-
enting, I don’t think he’s pulling
his weight.
ANSWeR: Here, as in every
other area of married life, open
communication is critical to mu-
tual understanding and a success-
ful relationship. Many couples
never talk to each other about
their parenting expectations.
Some are reluctant to open up and
share the fears and struggles
they’re facing as they take on the
challenge of caring for a child. In
most cases, both of them are doing
the best they can, and both of them
are feeling insecure. The first step
toward resolving this difficulty is
to air these thoughts and feelings
in an honest and non-threatening
way.
It’s also important to under-
stand how the God-ordained dis-
tinction between male and female
comes into play in this particular
instance. Nature has delegated
the functions of pregnancy, child-
bearing, nursing, and nurturing to
the woman. As a result, mothers
tend to have an immediate and in-
tuitive connection with a new
baby, whereas fathers sometimes
feel uncomfortable and “out of
their element” when asked to step
in and lend a hand. Women often
say they want their husbands to
help with parenting tasks like dia-
pering and feeding the baby, but
when Dad tries to lend a hand,
Mom jumps in to correct every-
thing he’s doing. This leads to
greater irritation on both sides,
and the husband shrinks from try-
ing to help next time, fearing that
his attempts will be criticized.
These are only general observa-
tions, of course. You will know best
how relevant they are to the situa-
tion in your home.
The solution, as we’ve already
indicated, is to discuss your feel-
ings and expectations. If you and
your husband share the traditional
view that Mom should stay home
with the kids while Dad goes out to
earn the income, consider the prac-
tical ways how this arrangement
might play itself out on a daily
basis. Does it mean that the wife
is supposed to tend to the children
all day and all night? Does it in-
clude a condition that she must
also keep the home spotless and
have dinner ready when her hus-
band gets home from work? If you
have a less traditional perspective
of gender roles, it’s even more im-
portant that each of you clearly
understands what the other is
thinking.
These days it’s common for
spouses in our culture to share
child-rearing tasks to a greater
degree than their grandparents
did. This is largely because it’s
also common for both husband and
wife to be employed outside the
home. Many contemporary cou-
ples are convinced that it is impos-
sible to live on one income. We
would suggest that this is an as-
sumption worth challenging. If
you have enough courage to give it
a try, you may possibly discover
that you can cut back on expenses
and stretch your resources so that
Mom is able to stay home with the
kids. This arrangement could go a
long way toward resolving some of
your conflicts over the question of
sharing child-care responsibilities.
Whatever approach you take, it’s
important that you and your hus-
band learn how to function as a
team. God designed babies to ben-
efit from the love and care of both
parents, and you and your spouse
were designed to fall in love with
your child. None of this can hap-
pen unless you spend time to-
gether. Some parents, especially
dads, avoid spending time with
their little ones, protesting that
they’re unfamiliar with the rou-
tine. But child-care skills can be
learned. No one should use inex-
perience as an excuse for abdicat-
ing responsibility. This is yet an-
other area in which husband and
wife need to be patient with one
another and cut each other some
slack.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer
is excerpted from books authored
by Dr. James Dobson and pub-
lished by Tyndale House Publish-
We Wish Everyone
a Happy & Safe
Celebration!
Wall Food
Center
Kent & Eileen
Jordan
279-2331
Kent & Eileen
Jordan
Owner
TdM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
To all Alumni, Family & Friends:
Welcome to
Wall’s Celebration!
Have a safe & enjoyable weekend.
Stop by
De’s Oil for
all your tire
needs.
De’s Oil, Inc.
279-2168
SanDee’s
515-0084
Stop to see us
under the tent!
ers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman of
the Board of Focus on the Family,
a nonprofit organization dedicated
to the preservation of the home.
Copyright 2003 James Dobson,
Inc. All rights reserved. Interna-
tional copyright secured.

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