Login

Pennington Co. Courant, January 31, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

$1.00
(tax included)
Number 5
Volume 108
January 31, 2013
By David Bordewyk
South Dakota
Newspaper Association
High school football games
under Friday night lights and bas-
ketball gyms jam-packed with fans
are as much a part of South
Dakota as coffee-shop talk about
the weather and crops. High school
sports and other interscholastic ac-
tivities such as drama and music
events fuel intense civic pride in
our communities and schools.
The feats and accomplishments
of students on the field of competi-
tion or the performance stage are
celebrated by an entire community
of family, friends and school fans.
The hometown newspaper is
there as well, chronicling the
games and school activities. Cover-
ing local school sports and school
activities such as plays and con-
certs are a big part of what goes
into the local newspaper. The com-
munity expects it and a good news-
paper meets that expectation.
by Del Bartels
Philip, a one-third partner of the
continuing Stronger Economies To-
gether project, hosted the Wednes-
day, January 9, multi-community
session.
The first meeting, in December,
was held in Kadoka. The third
meeting, in February, will be held
in Wall. Attendees are still con-
tributing toward a growing kitty of
possible names for this specific
SET region. Made up of Haakon
County, Jackson County and the
eastern portion of Pennington
County, the economic partnership
could vote to be called the Bad-
lands/Bad River Region, Western
Plains Region, Central Plains Con-
nection, Old West Region or some
other name that was in the sugges-
tion jar.
This two-year federal program is
currently in its third round. The
two-year program’s first year is the
Stronger Economies Together
The Wall School Board has been
selected the 2013 ASBSD School
Board Award of Excellence recipi-
ent for providing the leadership
necessary to improve achievement
for all students and exemplifying
the traits of an effective school
board.
Wall School Board was chosen
by an independent, four-person
panel and will receive a recogni-
tion plaque and a $1,000 cash
award, which was generously pro-
vided by BankWest.
“It’s been a total team effort by
the Wall School Board to achieve
the goals they’ve set for the school
district,” ASBSD Executive Direc-
tor Wade Pogany said. “The award
is affirmation of their efforts to
meet those goals.”
To be considered for the award,
school boards must provide data
and evidence that board actions
led to improved student achieve-
ment. Applicants were also asked
to detail how the school board em-
bodied five widely- recognized and
research-based traits of an effec-
tive school board: setting clear ex-
pectations, creating the conditions
for success, holding the system ac-
countable, building public support
and learning as a board team.
Wall School Board developed a
vision of “a district of innovation
and inspiration striving for aca-
demic excellence.”
As part of the vision, the board
has focused on continued support
of technology by putting a laptop
computer in the hands of each stu-
dent in the 6-12 grades, provided a
monthly magazine for parents and
community members detailing
classroom projects and continued
to develop as a board through
Wall School Board honored
with ‘Award of Excellence’
training.
The board’s work has resulted in
a variety of distinguished awards,
including being recognized by the
South Dakota Department of Edu-
cation as an Exemplary Elemen-
tary and High School and as a Na-
tional Blue Ribbon School by the
United States Department of Edu-
cation.
Pogany said the Wall School
Board’s progressive thinking has
produced great results and their
achievements should be shared
with the community.
“The effort of the school board
can clearly be seen in the recogni-
tion their schools have received,”
Pogany said.
“Everyone’s hard work, from
school board members to students
to community members, should be
celebrated with this award.”
The announcement of the award
comes one week before the start of
South Dakota School Board Recog-
nition Week, an annual event
highlighting the contributions of
locally elected school leaders. The
board will be recognized in August,
at the association’s annual conven-
tion.
ASBSD is a private, non-profit
association representing more
than 880 South Dakota school
board members, the 150 school dis-
tricts they govern and the students
they serve. Our mission is to ad-
vance public education by empow-
ering local school board leaders
and advocating for a thriving pub-
lic education system.
creation of an economic plan for a
given region. The second year is for
the “fun work” of putting that plan
into action.
After a supper social provided by
the Philip Chamber of Commerce,
the attendees of this session fo-
cused on three main topics. The
first point discussed was the cur-
rent demographics of this region,
not only what they look like today
but what they are projected to look
like in the future. It was stressed
by speaker Dr. David Olson, com-
munity development program di-
rector, and video-taped Dr. Michael
McCurry, state demographer, that
projections, even from the Census
Bureau and other fact-based
sources, can change. Haakon
County has been losing population
for years. Currently, over 20 per-
cent of its population is over 65
years of age. Communicable dis-
eases, such as whooping cough and
others, have been diminishing,
while degenerative diseases, such
as cancer and those associated
with old age, have been increasing.
In Haakon County, the average in-
come has increased, yet the num-
ber of people considered under the
poverty line has also increased.
Things can change.
The second main topic was an
attempt to determine what makes
a strong region, particularly this
region. Differences between the
Philip, Kadoka and Wall communi-
ties are numerous. The similarities
can be used to strengthen their
partnership.
The third main topic was an ex-
amination of existing economic de-
velopment plans in the region. One
of these was a new idea promoted
by residents from the Kadoka
area. Several plans were revisited
plans from Horizons meetings held
in the individual communities
from previous years.
Kari O’Neil, community develop-
ment field specialist, stated that
the kickoff session produced some
great thoughts on how this region
can gain a competitive advantage
by working together, pooling re-
sources and building relationships.
As the sessions move forward, at-
tendees are to invite those diverse
and committed people they know
who would be assets to this group.
The only real requirement is an
openness to this process and a pas-
sion for this region.
The Philip session discussed the
Creation, Attraction, Retention,
Expansion model. Communities
can grow from the creation of new
businesses, from the attraction of
new industry or businesses, from
the retention and strengthening of
existing businesses, and from the
expansion of existing firms in the
region.
By CBW Staff
Dillon Kjerstad, a native of Wall,
SD, and now currently working in
banking in Mesa, Arizona won the
Discussion Meet at the American
Farm Bureau Federation annual
By Kindra Gordon
More than 6,000 Farm Bureau
members from across the country
gathered in Nashville for the
American Farm Bureau Federa-
tion’s 94th Annual Meeting held
Jan. 13-16.
In the opening session address,
AFBF President Bob Stallman, a
farmer from Texas, noted the
meeting’s theme “Many Voices,
One Vision,” saying, “While there
is much diversity in agriculture,
it’s important to sing from the
same songbook.”
Stallman noted that American
agriculture faced the challenge of
drought in 2012, but scored major
policy victories, including perma-
nent estate and capital gains tax
changes.
Regarding the Farm Bill, he
stated, “What Congress did on the
Farm Bill is not perfect, but at
least it gives us certainty for
2013.” Stallman also noted that
with needed reform in key areas
Wall School Board receives 2013 ASBSD School Board Award
of Excellence. Pictured from left to right ... Leadership Develop-
ment Director Julie Ertz, School Board members: Todd Trask,
Scot Eisenbraun, Carolynn Anderson, Kevin Bielmaier and
ASBSD Executive Director Wade Pognay.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Kjerstad of South Dakota
wins Discussion Meet
meeting in Nashville Jan. 13-15.
The Discussion Meet simulates
a committee meeting in which ac-
tive discussion and participation
are expected.
Participants are evaluated on
From left, Dr. David Olson – community development program
director, Christine Sorensen – rural development coordinator,
Kari O’Neil – community development field specialist, and Mary
Burnett – Philip coordinator in the Stronger Economies Together
program. ~Photo Del Bartels
Bill bolsters news media's ability
to cover high school sports
Technology today has allowed
newspapers to expand the tools
they use to cover high school
sports and events. Newspapers are
going beyond the traditional sto-
ries and photos printed in the
paper to innovations such as
broadcasting football or basketball
games over the internet and up-
dating readers through social
media tools. Readers have come to
expect that type of expanded cov-
erage and newspapers of all sizes
in South Dakota are delivering on
those expectations.
All good, right? Yes, except that
some schools are now putting re-
strictions and limitations on how
the local news media can cover
their school sporting events and
activities.
In Pierre, an exclusive contract
between the school and a local
radio station prohibits a competing
local radio station or the local
newspaper from broadcasting
Pierre school athletic events. How-
AFBF holds 94th Annual meeting in Nashville
such as fiscal, environmental and
labor policy hanging in the bal-
ance, agricultural unity will be es-
sential in 2013.
Stallman added that it is time
for America’s elected leaders to put
political differences aside for the
good of the nation.
Regarding the issue of agricul-
tural labor, Stallman said farmers
need a workforce that is “legal, sta-
ble and reliable.” He stated, “For
too long, we have dealt with the
shortcomings of a broken farm
labor system…The results have
been labor shortages, lost crops
and bureaucratic nightmares. Our
nation’s leaders can’t continue to
avoid this issue. We need solu-
tions.”
Stallman said Farm Bureau,
working in conjunction with the
Agriculture Workforce Coalition,
will this year offer “a reasonable,
practical and common-sense farm
labor option that works for grow-
ever, the restrictions don't apply to
any out-of-town news media out-
lets.
In Sioux Falls, the public school
district sought to specifically pro-
hibit the local newspaper from
broadcasting high school football
and basketball games on the inter-
net.
Elsewhere, newspaper photogra-
phers are being unreasonably re-
stricted on how they can cover
high school competitions. Re-
porters are limited on how they
can use social media such as Twit-
ter and Facebook to report live
from a high school game.
Schools offer a variety of reasons
for these restrictions. Mostly, it
boils down to money. Schools look-
ing to make additional revenue
from the performances of students
on the field by placing restrictions
on how the local news media may
cover these events.
Incredible as it may sound, there
is a real trend toward more mone-
tization of high school sports.
That is why we are working for
passage of a bill in this legislative
session that would prohibit schools
from unreasonably restricting the
ability of local news media to do
their job. Senate Bill 119 would not
prohibit schools from generating
revenue through certain contracts
with media, so long as those con-
tracts do not restrict other media
from being able to do their job.
SB119 is not about creating any
special or new privilege for news
media in South Dakota. It only
tries to ensure the news media in
South Dakota can do what they
have always done when it comes to
reporting about high school sports
and activities.
Fans and supporters of high
school sports and activities expect
the local news media to be there,
creating a chronology and scrap-
book of memories and achieve-
ments through their stories, pho-
tos and other media.
Urge your legislators to support
Senate Bill 119. Let's make sure
the hometown news media can
continue to do their job and live up
to the expectations of their readers
and viewers. Nothing more, noth-
ing less.
ers and workers alike.”
During his remarks, Stallman
also praised farmers and ranchers
for their innovation and productiv-
ity, sufficient to “meet the diverse
and growing food demands” of
today’s consumers. “Consumer
tastes are all over the map, and
they continue to change,” he said.
He noted that agriculture must
continue to address consumers
concerns. He encouraged Farm
Bureau members to tell their per-
sonal stories about how they are
using fewer resources to grow
crops and produce meat, milk and
eggs.
“Consumers really listen when
we talk about our desire to contin-
ually improve sustainability, qual-
ity and safety on our farms,” he
said. “We must open our doors—
and maybe more importantly, open
our minds—to consumers and
their perspectives about food and
agriculture.”
Kjerstad wins Discussion Meet. Pictured from left to right ... Kelly,
Courtney, Dillion and Patty Kjerstad. ~Courtesy Photo
their ability to exchange ideas and
information on a predetermined
topic.
For the final round of the compe-
tition, the topic discussed was es-
tate and succession planning and
Farm Bureau’s role in helping
farm families take action.
Kjerstad is the son of Jem and
Kelly Kjerstad and the grandson of
Patty and the late Dick Kjerstad of
Wall.
Dick Kjerstad was active in SD
Farm Bureau and served as it's
president for four years; he also
competed in the national discus-
sion meet at AFBF forty-one years
ago.
As the national winner, Dillon
will have his choice of either a
2013 Chevrolet Silverado or a 2013
GMC Sierra, courtesy of GM, plus
free registration to the 2013 AFBF
YF&R Leadership Conference.
Governor proposes balanced fis-
cal year 2014 budget.
Philip Area Wrestling Team
scores a win at Kimball.
Wall Eagles Boys Basketball
team 1 - 1 for the season.
Deaths: Harley Henderson, Vern
McDonnell, Ruby Ann Cadman,
Harold Schnee and Robert “Bar-
ney” Pfiefer.
December 20:
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of
Commerce Retail Committee tra-
ditional free pancake supper.
Wall School Board meets with
Rumpelberg and Russell before
school board meeting.
Eastern Pennington County Am-
bulance District will sign lease
with city at January 8 council
meeting.
Wall Elementary students hold
2012 Christmas concert.
Big White School draws huge
crowd for their Christmas pro-
gram.
Grapplers score second place at
Valentine Tournament.
Reflections on the second
half of 2012continued from last week
(continued on page 2)
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013 • Page 2
1cuu:uqrcu Ccuur¸ Sícr:jj's 1cjarr¤cur
PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
ANG£IO УON POOR B£AR
A IoIony Arrosf Wnrrnnf hns
boon Issuod for AngoIo Ðoon Ioor
Ionr chnrgIng hIm wIfh Iorgory
nnd IossossIon of n Iorgod In-
sfrumonf.
Ioor Ionr Is nn IndInn mnIo, 28
yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 6`
fnII, 224 µounds, bInck hnIr wIfh
brown oyos.
Ioor Ionr Is boIIovod fo bo In or
nround fho !nµId CIfy, SÐ nron.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco
Ðoµnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l or
fho nonrosf Inw onforcomonf
ngoncy If you hnvo nny Informn-
fIon whIch wouId rosuIf In fho nr-
rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
Lady Eagles are 3-1 for the sea-
son.
Deaths: Wilma Daniel, Harold
E. Johnson, Ida Mae “Patty” Pat-
terson and Jessie Tibbs Keckler.
December 27:
First Interstate Bank receives
honor from Department of Agricul-
ture.
Elm Springs students know the
gift of giving.
Grady and Bernice Crew hon-
ored with “Aggie of the Year”
award.
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of
Commerce Retail Committee held
a drawing during their annual
pancake supper. Winners of the
shopping spree were: Bill Leonard,
It’s still very quiet but many of
the controversial bills have not
cleared committee yet.
I voted no on the floor on HB
1079 which included a fee in-
crease, however, it did pass.
I was sorry to see that HB 1010,
constitutional carry, failed in com-
mittee by one vote. We need that to
come to the floor where I think it
has a chance of passing.
Although I am a supporter of
open government I did vote
against two of the Governor’s task
force bills.
HB1109 that would have re-
leased booking photos to the
media. Because I believe in the
presumption of innocence, at the
time of booking, you are not con-
victed of any crime.
HB 1111 would have repealed
the five year sealing of pardon
records. If a person is given a sec-
ond chance I feel they deserve
some time to turn their lives
around.
I flew to Hot Springs with the
Governor, Secretary of Veteran’s
affairs and Senator Rampelberg to
meet with the save the V.A. com-
mittee members who are meeting
in Washington to present our case.
They have a solid presentation
that should get our point across in
a very positive way. We also toured
the V.A. dorm and hospital with
the Governor so that he could see
the actual condition of the facility.
Again very positive. Please keep
in touch.
Rep Mike Verchio
Rep.verchio@state.sd.us
mjverchio@aol.com
Cellphone- (605)391-5093
Hall Phone-(605)574-2466
Home Address- P.O. Box 205 Hill
City, SD 57401
From the Floor
By District 30
Representative Mike Vericho
by SDSU iGrow
The winter months have
brought little relief to the devas-
tating drought in the state of
South Dakota. Ranchers are faced
with another challenging year.
In an effort to make prepara-
tions for the possibility of contin-
ued drought in 2013, SDSU Exten-
sion is working to provide cattle
producers with needed tools to
cope with the issues associated
with the drought, says Kalyn Wa-
ters, SDSU Extension Cow/Calf
Field Specialist.
"Management and preparedness
is what it will take to make it
through another year if the
drought continues," Waters said.
It is the goal of Waters and other
SDSU Extension Livestock staff to
help producers be as prepared as
possible to make critical manage-
ment decisions if the drought con-
tinues to progress through 2013.
As part of their plan to help South
Dakota livestock producers, SDSU
Extension has partnered with Uni-
versity of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL)
Extension to host a five-part webi-
nar series with the focus of helping
ranchers across the state prepare
for the possibility of the drought
continuing in 2013. This series of
meetings is titled "Managing
Drought Risk on the Ranch."
"UNL Extension and the
Drought Mitigation Center have
done an outstanding job putting
together this program. They have
slated some of the best speakers
available to provide critical infor-
mation to producers. Attending
these meetings will provide ranch-
ers with the tools they need to set
critical trigger dates, and begin to
develop a long term management
plan," Waters said.
She adds that these meetings
are also intended to educate pro-
fessionals and consultants who
work with ranchers as a profes-
sional development series.
The webinars will be presented
the last Wednesday of each month
beginning January 30, and con-
cluding in May. One hour webinars
will begin at 9:00 a.m. MST or
10:00 a.m. CST at the SDSU Ex-
tension Regional Centers.
Each session will include cur-
rent drought updates, forecasts
and presentations about specific
information or tools.
Following each webinar, the re-
Drought Risk on the Ranch
gional centers will join together
via video conference for a question
and answer session where SDSU
Extension State and Field Special-
ists will provide additional infor-
mation relevant to South Dakota
producers.
Topics each month will consider
drought planning information and
tools available to producers. In ad-
dition to University and Extension
presenters, a number of ranchers
will also be featured. These ranch-
ers will describe the development
and execution of their drought
management plans.
The topic of the January 30, we-
binar is Managing Drought Risk
on the Ranch: The Planning
Process. The keynote speaker of
the meeting will be Jerry Volesky,
UNL Range and Forage Specialist
at the West Central Research and
Extension Center.
Drought Risk on the Ranch is a
program that has been put to-
gether by range professionals and
ranchers with instruction for de-
veloping individualized plans that
includes ways ranchers can better
prepare for and respond to
drought. The first webinar will
provide an overview of the differ-
ent steps in putting together that
drought plan," said Voleksy.
Scheduled dates and topics for
the series include:
•January 30: Managing
Drought Risk on the Ranch: The
Planning Process.
•February 27: Avoiding Analysis
Paralysis: Monitoring and Setting
Critical Dates for Decision Making
During Drought
•March 27: The New Cumula-
tive Forage Reduction (CFR)
Index: Assessing Drought Impacts
and Planning a Grazing Strategy
•April 24: Using a Drought Cal-
culator to Assist Stocking Deci-
sions
•May 29: Economic Factors to
Weigh in Making Decisions during
Drought meetings are sponsored
by the National Drought Mitiga-
tion Center at the University of
Nebraska-Lincoln.
The series was developed with
support from the Sustainable Agri-
culture Research and Education
(SARE) program, which is funded
by the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture - National Institute of Food
and Agriculture (USDA-NIFA).
For more information, visit
iGrow or contact the local SDSU
Extension Regional Center, or con-
tact Kalyn Waters at the SDSU
Extension Regional Center in Win-
ner at 605-842-1267.
Jerry Maas, Martha Johnston and
James Reynolds.
Other winners of the drawings
were: Kids - Kassidy Sawvell,
Braylee Walker, Carter Sundall,
Deacon Haerer, Cass Lytle, Kailey
Sawvell, Harmony Nelson and
Kaitlyn Kitterman. $100 winners
were: Merlin Crown, Max Hauk,
Stuart Kitterman and Charity
Northrup. $50 winners were: Don
Sawvell, Kent Anderson, Jerrie
Heinrichs and Gina Ferris.
An accomplished concert was
give by Wall chorus and band stu-
dents.
Deaths: Delbert Sebade and
William John Goldhammer.
Reflections on the second
half of 2012continued from page 1
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
It may be a crime to speed in
South Dakota, but it hasn’t been
adding penalty points to a driver’s
record for the past 20-some years.
Action by the House Transporta-
tion Committee Jan. 22 during the
Speeding penalty bill pulled over in House committee
S.D. Legislature ensures that
practice will continue for the fore-
seeable future.
Rep. Steve Hickey, Sioux Falls
Republican, was trying again this
year to add speeding back into the
points system as it was prior to
1986. He called it “a kinder, gen-
tler version” of last year’s bill that
also had been defeated.
Every other moving violation
has points that are applied to a
driver’s record. However, the joke,
he said, about speeding is that mo-
torists can “drive as fast as you can
afford.”
The purpose, Hickey said, was
“not to suspend licenses, but to
slow people down.” Fines, he said,
have not done that. The bill would
only affect a small fraction of the
state’s driver’s, he said.
“Speeding is no laughing mat-
ter,” said Sen. Craig Tieszen,
Rapid City Republican, adding,
“speed is the leading cause of acci-
dents in this state.”
It is “ironic,” he said, “that you
can get a point for driving too slow,
but not for driving too fast.”
While the Department of Public
Safety had indicated to Hickey
that they did not oppose the bill,
some members thought it odd that
the DOT was not testifying for the
bill.
Rep. Manny Steele, R-Sioux
Falls, said he originally had signed
on the bill as a sponsor, but was
changing his mind and voting
against it, saying it was “a bill
aimed at a few hundred people
who are abusive.” He called it
“overkill,” citing the effort to keep
track of the records.
The committee voted to kill the
bill, 9-4, by moving it to the ses-
sion’s 41st day.
Ruland Arena LLC held a rifle
roping on Sunday, January 6.
Rifle roping - 35 contestants -
four go arounds.
Go winners: Klay
O’Daniel/Allen Good- 7.47.
Average winners: Rifle winner
and average winner - Brooke Nel-
son - 31.71 on three head; Second -
Clint Nelson - 32.28 on three head;
Third - Klay O’Daniel - 37.96 on
three head; Fourth - Shannon
Gartner - 19.32 on two head; Fifth
- Trent Byrne - 20.77 on two head;
Sixth - Denton Good - 27.22 on two
head.
Novice Beginners #1 - 18 con-
testants.
Average winners: First- Den-
Ruland Arena holds rifle roping
ton Good - 28.69 on two head, Sec-
ond - Dalton Porch - 14.58 on one
head, Third - Trey Elshere- 18.00
on one head.
Incentive Drawpot - 62 teams
- three go arounds.
Go winners: First - Troy
Richter/Austim Grimes - 6.91; Sec-
ond - Troy Richter/Shaun Ruland -
6.91.
Average winners: First -
Shaun Ruland/Red Lemmel -
18.99; Second - Shadow
Jensen/Dalton Richter - 22.03;
Third - Shawn Porch/Guy Fransua
- 24.23; Fourth - Shannon Gart-
ner/Guy Fransua - 26.51; Fifth -
Shawn Porch/Shaun Ruland -
27.41.
Kitterman takes one for Celine
Walls MSY2Y sponsored a teachers “pie facial” on Thursday,
January 24. Stuart Kitterman was the choosen one to take a pie
in the face for Celine Trask. Raedon Crawford was the lucky win-
ner and was quite happy to have the honor of giving Kitterman
a “pie facial.” MSY2Y earned between $200 and $300 for Celine.
~Photos Laurie Hindman
by Linda M. Hiltner
Our next scheduled meeting is
Saturday, February 9. The Writ-
ers Group meets at 416 Sixth Av-
enue in Wall, from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m.
The topics for the February
meeting are:
(a) If you were going to predict
the end of the world, what would
be the reason, when would this
February meeting of
Wall Writers Group
world end and why? Make some-
thing up, such as a political, reli-
gious or other reason the world
would end. Or you could select
(b) and write on: How much
snow is too much snow? Or,
(c) Writers Choice.
If you have any questions about
the Wall Writers Group, please
contact Linda (605-786-6937) or
Dave (279-2952).
“Beyond all half-answers and
evasions one question had per-
sisted, since forever, and it was
why.
In Dellarobia’s childhood it
plagued and compelled her, one
word, like one silver dollar on the
floor of a wishing well, begging to
be plucked up but strategically un-
touchable.
Unsatisfactory answers crowded
the waters around it, she could
measure her life in those…” from
Flight Behavior by Barbara King-
solver, now on the shelf at the Wall
Library.
Barbara Kingsolver is a contem-
porary American novelist who was
raised in rural Kentucky, lived
briefly in the former Republic of
the Congo, and went on to obtain a
Master’s degree in ecology and
evolutionary biology.
She is an engaging writer who
frequently explores social strug-
gles in today’s world. Some themes
found in many of her books include
the hardships faced by working
poor, single mothers and illegal im-
migrants.
She also writes of the interaction
and conflict between humans and
the ecosystems in which they live.
She is poised to become one of the
great authors of our time.
Other books by Barbara King-
solver that can be found at the
Wall Community Library include
The Lacuna, The Poisonwood
Bible, Prodigal Summer, Animal
Dreams, The Bean Trees, and Pigs
in Heaven. Come by, check them
out, and let us know what you
think.
Wall Community Library news
courant@gwtc.net
Subscription Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax;
Out-of-Area: $42 plus tax;
Out of-State: $42 or
subscribe online at:
www.RavellettePublications.com
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar..................................11-5
Handrahan Const .......................10-6
Shad’s Towing ...............................7-9
Rockers..........................................7-9
Petersen’s ......................................7-9
Badland’s Auto..............................6-6
Hightlights:
Neal Petersen..............279 clean/606
Harvey Byrd ..........2-9 split; 177/470
Ronnie Coyle .........................209/574
Trina Brown.................................185
Jason Petersen......................201/575
Vickie Petersen .....................180/481
Kim Petersen ...............................476
Wendell Buxcel ...................3-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor..................................8-0
Peoples Market .............................5-3
Philip Health Service ...................4-4
G&A Trenching.............................4-4
Kennedy Impl ...............................4-4
George’s Welding ..........................3-5
Bear Auto ......................................3-5
Kadoka Tree Service.....................1-7
Highlights:
Fred Foland.......6-7-10 & 3-10 split;
.....................230 clean, 202, 201/633
Bryan Buxcel .......3-10 split; 213/595
Randy Boyd .........5-10 split; 201/583
Alvin Pearson........................213/568
Matt Schofield.............200 clean/548
Tony Gould..................3-10 split; 542
Cory Boyd......................5-7 split; 511
Jim Larson ...................................511
Earl Park......................................503
Terry Wentz ................3-10 split; 502
Todd Radway ......................3-10 split
Wendell Buxcel ...................3-10 split
Ed Morrison.......................3-5-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge Salon ....................14-6
Invisibles.....................................13-7
State Farm..................................12-8
Bowling Belles ..........................10-10
Jolly Ranchers ............................8-12
Highlights:
Christy Park........................2-7 split;
...............................201, 200, 168/569
Shirley O’Connor ..........161, 150/448
Judy Papousek ....3-10 split; 162/442
Audrey Jones.........................167/429
Vonda Hamill ........................157/413
Kay Kroetch.......................7-2-8 split
Deanna Fees.........................4-5 split
Sandra O’Connor..................4-5 split
Joy Neville.............5-6 & 5-6-10 split
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar....................................9-3
Just Tammy’s................................9-3
Morrison’s Haying ........................8-4
Dorothy’s Catering........................6-6
First National Bank .....................5-7
Hildebrand Concrete ....................4-8
Wall Food Center ..........................4-8
Chiefie’s Chicks.............................3-9
Highlights:
Rachel Kjerstad..........3-10 split; 213
Linda Stangle ......3-10 split; 189/506
Lindsey Hildebrand..............199/541
Brenda Grenz .............3-10 split; 178
Marlis Petersen.....................173/490
Amy Morrison .......................175/476
Val Schulz.....................................174
Tena Slovek..................................173
Annette Hand .........5-10 & 7-9 splits
Christy Park...................5-7 split x 2
Brittney Drury .....................6-7 split
MaryLynn Crary ..................4-6 split
Debbie Gartner...................3-10 split
Karen Iwan.........................3-10 split
Thursday Men
The Steakhouse ..........................12-0
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................10-2
O’Connell Const ............................7-5
A&M Laundry...............................4-8
WEE BADD...................................4-8
Dakota Bar....................................3-9
McDonnell Farms......................NA-6
West River Pioneer Tanks ........NA-6
Highlights:
Mike Moses..................234 clean/590
Jason Petersen......................214/569
Rick Coyle....................213 clean/562
Bryan Buxcel.................3-10 x 2; 213
Cory Boyd ....................213 clean/559
Wendell Buxcel ...............3-7-10, 3-10
.........................................& 5-6 splits
Doug Hauk ...................................541
Jack Heinz....................................202
Alvin Pearson.....................193 clean
Matt Schofield ........5-7 & 3-10 splits
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service................15-1
Lee & the Ladies.........................11-4
Cristi’s Crew .................................8-8
King Pins.....................................6-10
Roy’s Repair ................................6-10
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Theresa Miller..............................179
Duane Hand ................5-6 split; 201,
.....................................197 clean/589
Aaron Richardsen .................209/556
Alvin Pearson...............................205
John Heltzel .......................3-10 split
Ed Morrison........................3-10 split
School & Area News
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013• Page 3
courant@gwtc.net
Need a gift idea for that
hard-to-buy someone? How about a gift that
keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the
Pennington County Courant.
Call to start your subscription gift! (605) 279-2565
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
SampIe Our
SpecIaIs DaIIy
Luncb
SpecIaIs
Jan. 31 - Feb. 6
Tbursday, January 31
·Funza Durgcr w/Frics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIili & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
FrIday, February 1
·Turlcy Mcli w/Curlcy Frics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Poiaio Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Saturday, February 2
·CIiclcn Fricd CIiclcn
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallc . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Vcgciallc Dccf Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Sunday, February 3
·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci. . . . . . . . . . . $?.39
·CIild's Drcalfasi Duffci (12 & undcr} . . . . . . . $3.S9
Scrvcd 7.00 io 10.30 a.n.
·Hoi Dccf or
Foasi Dccf Dinncr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Dun¡ling Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Monday, February 4
·Lasagna
w/Tosscd Salad & Carlic Twisi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dacon CIcddar Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Tuesday, February S
·Taco Salad w/Edillc SIcll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Tonaio Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Wednesday, February 6
·Crand Slo¡¡y Joc
w/Mac 'N CIccsc & Colc Slaw. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Droccoli CIccsc Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . $S.29
279-2175 · Wall, SD
BreakIast: Mon. - Sat.
2 Eggs & Toasi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.19
2 Pancalcs & Sausagc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.19
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
February 1-2-3-4:
Parental Guidance
(PG)
NOTICE:
Sunday, Feb. 3, movie
will show at Noon
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 12:00 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Sierra Wilson is the Wall Middle School Student of the Month for
January 2013. Sierra is in the seventh grade and is a great stu-
dent! She is very active in many organizations but still finds time
to volunteer to catalog new and donated books in our school li-
brary. She also volunteered to perform at her brother’s senior
project concert to help raise money for the Special Olympics
and sings the National Anthem at sporting events. Sierra partic-
ipates in FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes), Youth to Youth,
Student Council, band, basketball, volleyball, and golf. She is
the daughter of Kevin and Ronda Wilson. Janet Lurz from First
Interstate Bank presented Sierra with a First Interstate Bank
sweatshirt and bag. Congratulations Sierra!
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Wall Middle School
student of the month
Black Hills Financial Services located at Black Hills Federal
Credit Union is pleased to announce that Carson Johnston has
been selected as January’s student of the month. Carson is a
busy sophomore at Wall High School. He is very active in foot-
ball, basketball and rodeo where he will participate in Calf Rop-
ing, Team Roping and Steer Wrestling. Last year Carson made
it to the State Finals in High School Rodeo. Carson is busy in
school involved in the FOR Club and the National Honor Society
volunteering to help at the Blood Drive, Ag Banquet and helping
with the Back Pack Program. Carson enjoys working on the
ranch in his spare time. After he graduates from High School,
Carson looks forward to attending college for Agri Business.
Carson is the Son of Sam and Cary Johnston, Elm Springs, SD.
Congratulations Carson from Black Hills Financial Services!
~Courtesy Photo
BH Financial Services
student of the month
Wall Elementary/Big White
School
Second Quarter
Principal Honor Roll
3.75 - 4.0 (No C, D, or F)
Fourth Grade: Brycen Cheney,
Cedar Gabriel and Lillyanna Wag-
ner.
Fifth Grade: Samantha
Deutscher, Alexa Dunker, Ash
Grenstiner, Abby Moon, Tacia Os-
terberg and Gavin Sandal.
Sixth Grade: Jayton McKay
and Sage Gabriel.
Wall Elementary School
Second Quarter
Honor Roll
3.00 - 3.74 (No D or F)
Fourth Grade: Bridger
Amiotte, Laeton Anderson,
Cameron Ausmann, Brody Carter,
Jenna Elshere, Reid Hansen,
Charlie Heathershaw, Dayton
Hertel, Katy Humphrey, Aaden
Kroells, Marissa Lanfear, Levi
Love Joy and Samuel Swanson.
Fifth Grade: Cale Baus, Aiden
Brunnemann, Enoch Cuny, John
Deering, Stacy Fischer, Luke Har-
ris, Zachary Hout, Dylan Huether,
Andrew Law, Kassidy Sawvell,
Korra Westby and Rheagan Ze-
broski.
Wall Elementary/Big White
School
Second Quarter
Improvement Honor Roll
Fourth Grade: Bridger
Amiotte, Cedar Gabriel, Dayton
Hertel, Katy Humphrey, Aaden
Kroells and Lillyanna Wagner.
Fifth Grade: Cale Baus, Enoch
Cuny, John Deering, Samantha
Deutscher, Ash Grenstiner, Dylan
Huether, Andrew Law, Tacia Os-
terberg, Gavin Sandal and Korra
Westby.
Sixth Grade: Jayton McKay
and Sage Gabriel.
Middle School Honor Roll
Second Quarter
Gold (3.75 - 4.0):
Sixth grade: Jacob Bielmaier,
Terel Eisenbraun, Derek Griebel,
Mercede Hess, Cooper McConaghy,
Meghan Patterson, Victoria Poor
Bear, Shelby Ruland and Jaicee
Williams.
Seventh grade: Madisen Gren-
stiner and Emilee Pauley.
Eighth grade: Katy Bielmaier,
Jessica Casjens, Sidney Dunker,
Emily Ferris, Elle Moon and Tay-
lor Richter.
Silver (3.37 - 3.749):
Sixth grade: Bradan McDon-
nell and Cash Wilson.
Seventh grade: Damion Bre-
see, Preston Eisenbraun, Paisley
Godfrey, Emma Michael and
Mason Sandal.
Eighth grade: Savanna
Deutscher and Cameron Richter.
Bronze (3.0 - 3.369):
Sixth grade: Tadan Casjens,
Karlie Dartt and Cooper
McLaughlin.
Seventh grade: Tate Eisen-
braun, Trista Reinert, Brianna
Schreiber and Sierra Wilson.
Eighth grade: Winter Godfrey,
Branden Hamann, Cass Lytle,
Alan McDonnell, Riley Ruland and
Elyssa Westby.
Wall School District honor roll and perfect attendance
Wall High School Honor Roll
Second Quarter
Gold (3.75 - 4.0):
Ninth grade: Caitlin Ausmann,
Josie Blasius, Catriona Brunne-
mann, Autumn Deering, Anika
Eisenbraun, Gabe Sandal, David
Sykora and Alex Tysdal.
10th grade: Austin Huether,
Tayah Huether, Carlee Johnston,
Carson Johnston, ShyAnn Morde-
cai, Danny Muzik and Celine
Trask.
11th grade: Lane Blasius,
Dusty Dartt, Nicole Eisenbraun,
Ben Linn, Clancy Lytle, Sadie
O’Rourke, Ridge Sandal, Kaitlin
Schreiber, CJ Schulz and Les
Williams.
12th grade: Kim Billings,
Taran Eisenbraun, Analise Gar-
land, Lane Hustead, Laketon
McLaughlin, Nathan Patterson
and Libbi Sykora.
Silver (3.37 - 3.749):
Ninth grade: Monica Bielmaier
and Travis Brenner.
10th grade: Logan Bowers.
11th grade: Ashley Dauksav-
age, Kaden Eisenbraun, Jennifer
Emery, Shelby Feldman, Leighah
Hertel, Renatta Lanfear, Dusty
Leach, Tyler Peterson and
Michaela Schaefer.
12th grade: Maddi Bauer, Elsie
Fortune, Bailey Hapney, Mazee
Pauley, Trey Richter, Kailey
Sawvell, Autumn Schulz, Bobbie
Steffen and Tyler Trask.
Bronze (3.0 - 3.369):
Ninth grade: Jade Hertel,
Rylee Schreiber and Chris Schulz.
10th grade: Sterling Ellens,
Will Housman and Emily Linn.
11th grade: Joaquin Contreras,
Kelly Green, Cade Kjerstad and
Tucker O’Rourke.
12th grade: Shanda-Rae En-
riquez, Cody Harris, Bailey Lytle,
Ryder Wilson.
Wall Elementary/Big White
School
Perfect Attendance
Second Quarter
Kindergarten: Taylee Dartt
and MaKenna Kroells.
First Grade: Cassidy Albrink,
Natalee Armenta, Burk Blasius,
Bridger Casjens, Nora Dinger,
Owen Fauske, Rebecca Griebel,
Paige Kjerstad, Kadence Kusser,
Thane Simons and Brodi Sundall.
Second Grade: Blair Blasius,
Sheridan Deering and Searra-
Sioux Deutscher.
Third Grade: Conner Craw-
ford, Sierra Hilgenkamp, Saman-
tha Rancour and Regan Simons.
Fourth Grade: Cameron Aus-
mann, Charlie Heathershaw and
Aaden Kroells.
Fifth Grade: Samantha
Deutscher and Dylan Huether.
Sixth Grade: Jayton McKay.
Wall Middle School
Perfect Attendance
Second Quarter
Sixth Grade: Jack Ermish.
Seventh Grade: Tate Eisen-
braun, Kyla Sawvell and Brianna
Schreiber.
Eighth Grade: Katy Bielmaier,
Jessica Casjens, Heather Dauk-
savage, Cody Huether and Jesse
Sawvell.
WallHigh School
Perfect Attendance
Second Quarter
Ninth Grade: Josie Blasius,
Gabe Sandal and Rylee Schreiber.
10th Grade: Emily Linn.
11th Grade: Ashley Dauksav-
age, Kelly Green and Clancy Lytle.
12th Grade: Nathan Patterson.
After a study that started this
past summer, the Criminal Justice
Initiative (SB 70) was released to
Legislators on the first day of the
Legislative Session – three weeks
ago. SB 70 consists of over thirty
pages and more than eighty sec-
tions.
The Senate passed it last week
on a 32-2 vote with little debate,
and our state’s major newspapers
seem satisfied with simply print-
ing press releases from propo-
nents.
As a former State’s Attorney, I
have serious concerns about the
entire bill, including its very prem-
ise. The media has regurgitated
press releases that our state incar-
cerates more people per capita
than most of our surrounding
states.
Four of our surrounding states
are ranked in the bottom eleven
nationally in their rates of incar-
ceration, with Minnesota ranked
49th.
Other statistics you likely
haven’t heard from proponents of
SB 70 are:
•South Dakota’s per capita in-
carceration rate has consistently
hovered below or around the na-
tional average.
•North Dakota has been ranked
last in per capita murders, while
South Dakota has been nearer the
average.
•South Dakota has been ranked
third in the number of rapes per
capita.
•North Dakota, Wyoming and
Montana are considered safer
states than South Dakota accord-
ing to 2010 CQ Press’ annual State
Crime Rankings.
The belief that our state dispro-
portionately incarcerates more
people, and therefore, is somehow
unfair to convicted felons is unfor-
tunate as we consider one of the
most radical changes to our state’s
criminal justice system in decades.
The premise of SB 70 takes me
back to Governor Daugaard’s re-
cently failed education reform bill,
which was passed by the Legisla-
ture and overridden by a vote of
the people.
Much like that legislation, SB
70 contains many disjointed sec-
tions designed to appease different
special interests to gain support.
First, SB 70 eliminates prelimi-
nary hearings for class one misde-
meanors. As a former prosecutor,
the preliminary hearing provides a
valuable prosecutorial judgment
tool for settling cases.
Once the defendant, their attor-
ney and the prosecutor hear the
witnesses in front of a judge, the
defendant has the option of plead-
ing guilty or not, and the prosecu-
Week in Review
By District 30
Representative Lance Russell
tor can choose to offer an appropri-
ate plea agreement to settle the
case. The elimination of the pre-
liminary hearing, I believe, will re-
duce judicial efficiency.
Second, SB 70 cuts in half many
of current maximum sentences for
certain crimes.
From my prosecutorial experi-
ence, seemingly non-violent
crimes, such as drug and alcohol
offenses, are typically interspersed
with other crimes, like thefts and
assaults.
Many times, these victims, who
are friends and family of the of-
fender, are reluctant to prosecute
and/or cooperate. Therefore, the
non-violent offenses can typically
be the crime upon which offenders
are convicted.
Third, in SB 70 the Legislature
delegates its authority to set sanc-
tions without knowing what the
sanctions are going to be.
The legislation contemplates
fixed sanctions that are of short
durations. The judge may deviate
from the tiered system to increase
the sentence up to the maximum
for the protection of the public by
making findings and conclusions
to justify the deviation.
I believe the Legislature should
not abdicate its Constitutional re-
sponsibility to set the range of sen-
tences and/or sanctions for con-
victed felons in South Dakota.
Fourth, SD 70 requires initial,
up-front cost of over eight million
dollars over the next two years in
additional personnel to supervise
all of the offenders who would nor-
mally be sent to prison.
Many local jails are currently at
capacity. Therefore, additional
jail space will most likely be
needed to be built, mostly at the
expense of property taxpayers.
I believe this proposal will result
in a significant cost shift onto local
governments. I believe it is almost
impossible to measure the poten-
tial costs of additional crimes that
could be perpetrated in communi-
ties, even with the additional su-
pervision provided for in the legis-
lation.
South Dakotans should be con-
cerned about SB 70. South
Dakotans should also be concerned
about efforts to decriminalize drug
offenses.
A judge’s sentencing discretion
should not be limited. A dramatic
change from our current judicial
system requires a meaningful de-
bate to evaluate the consequences
this legislation will have on the cit-
izens of South Dakota.
Please take the time to educate
yourselves and make contact with
your State Representatives.
Need a print
job done fast?
Call us for all your
printing needs.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
859-2516
Offices in Philip, Wall,
Kadoka, Murdo, Faith, Bison,
& New Underwood.
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Glad to see Kay Leonard out and
about again. She had been “under
the weather” but was thoughtful of
others and was a recluse until all
was better.
The “One Act Play” with Wall’s
actors was at the Power House on
Sunday, the 27th. Philip’s drama
group had their performance first
— “Discovering Rogue”. Both
groups performed later that same
day at Philip. Philip and Wall are
both going to the Brandon Valley
Performing Arts Center the end of
this week to compete at the State
level. Good luck to both schools.
Birthday cake was served after
Sunday services at the Methodist
Church to acknowledge Dale
Keyser’s 94th birthday. Actual
date is February 1st. Even getting
up in years, Dale likes to visit.
Congratulations to him.
Virginia Poste of Casper, called
last week from Rapid City where
she was staying with her sister
Shirley Tennyson. Their sister,
Marilyn Madsen, is in Hospice
Care at Ft. Meade, so Virginia had
come to see her also.
Lyle and Viola Williams took
Loy Hamm to Sturgis on January
22 so they could attend the funeral
of Delores O’Dea Hercher.
Jess Williams came home on
Saturday from Sioux Falls, where
he attends the University. He has
the week off for semester break
and will go back on Sunday, Febru-
ary 3rd.
The Black Hills Stock Show is
on — will be through Saturday,
February 2nd. Is this what
brought our snow on Monday and
Tuesday?
Carl Harnisch, 95, of Kingman,
Ariz., passed away last week — fu-
neral services will be on February
9th at Kingman. Her was married
to Audrey Pederson, who is also
deceased. Both had been from the
Wall area. They had four sons. Our
condolences go out to the family.
Michelle Lamphere and Frances
Poste took a flight to Mesa, Ariz.,
on Friday to spend the weekend
with Rick and Tracy Seutter at
Scottsdale. Barry and Terry Poste
of Littleton, were in the Scotts-
dale/Phoenix area for the weekend
also — a mini family reunion.
Would you believe that desert had
rain every day we were there and
also raining when we went to the
airport on Monday. At the Seut-
ter’s they had more than four
inches so things will green up al-
most overnight.
Mavrick Williams was baptized
Sunday at the Methodist Church
in Wasta. He had many family and
friends attending. His parents,
Jamie and Ray, hosted a brunch
following at their home.
We are back to winter again!
Our snow probably won’t last long
as forecast is for warmer days to
come.
Have a good week!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
0wncr Ir|r Hznscn · 505-2Î8-2881 · Wz||, 8P
Cedur Butte Air, 1nc.
AeriaI AppIication Service
Your IocoI
consuIfonf:
Sfocy 8ieImoier
ceII: 44I-ZZ09, home: Z79 -Z99o
SfocybieImoier.norwex.bi;
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
2?9-2S6S
/-ccnd /g lnc.
lrc-lcn Jchn-cn
27ÿ-55C5 · ¡¡ègwlc.ncl
· wall, ¬l ·
BeoK1 Po1rzebo, Agen1
lJl5 E. Vcíís Auc., Píc¡¡c, SD 5?5Ul
Hus. 224-4l?J Toíí F¡cc. S??-224-4l?J
IccIí¸IccIí¡ot¡zcIu.con
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Just a note from the “Wastan”
wandering in southern Florida.
The weather here has been warm
and pleasant. Not yet so warm and
humid as sometimes. Yesterday,
Tuesday, the 22nd, the news
showed wide spread blizzard con-
ditions across most of the northern
states east to west. By the time I
get this off to you that will have
changed or perhaps, in South
Dakota, by tomorrow!
It is amazing how the days are
full and time goes by rather
quickly. A few helpful tasks around
the house, a dog walk or two, a sit
in the back yard and the girls are
home from school! Then the fun be-
gins.
Olivia is 16 and a junior in high
school She swims with the high
school team and their season ends
before Christmas. She has been for
six or seven years now, has enjoyed
it and has done very well. This
past season was an extremely good
year for Olivia, though she did
have some physical problems that
caused great pain in her hip when
swimming. In spite of that and the
small school swim team, volunteer
coaches and “borrowed” pool, her
team went through the qualifying
rounds and all the way to state to
compete. The team did well and
Olivia came through with a per-
sonal time that put her as #11
competitive swimmer in the State.
Well done, Olivia!
Sofia’s ports interest is still in
soccer and last weekend we all
traveled to Naples, Florida, a
smallish town (though is a relative
description as they don’t really
know small towns) to the north of
Miami just over 100 miles. We
drove up on a Friday, early evening
and found our motel and other
teammates and their parents. Sat-
urday morning was a perfect soc-
cer day — a little cooler, cloudy
and armed with water bottles,
comfy chairs, jackets and umbrel-
las (just in case) off we went a soc-
cering! Thirteen little girls played
their hearts out for an hour. The
score was tie — zero to zero — I
was pleased. It was a good game.
The afternoon the opposing team
was heard to be really good. Our
girls, team name the “Storm” took
the field. Another hour of determi-
nation, skill and teamwork and
playing their hearts out brought
victory!It was pleased. It was a
good game.
One more to go Sunday morn-
ing. Probably there were as many
prayers as fervently said as in the
churches surrounding the soccer
field.
Same comfy chairs, water bot-
tles, jackets and umbrellas. Greet-
ings to other parents. Thirteen lit-
tle girls played their hearts out for
an hour. An hour of determination,
skill and teamwork and playing
their hearts out brought victory —
but not to the “Storm”. Two scores
in the last five minutes granted
victory to the opposers and loss to
us. They played a great game, our
little girls. I was pleased. It was a
good game.
We consoled as best we could,
but such is the stress of life and
maybe there is a good lesson amid
the thrill of one minute and the
disappointment of the next.
Well, next time we “visit” you
can maybe hear about the dog.
Happy Trails!
Wasta Wanderings
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thurs., January 31
- Sat., February 9
Thursday, January 31:
GBB/BBB w/White River, 4:30
p.m. (JV Boys @ PH).
Friday, February 1:
GBB/BBB @ Kadoka, 2 p.m.
(Boys C Game @ 12:45 p.m.);
GYM @ Wall, 12:00 p.m. Par-
ent’s Night; State One Act,
Brandon Valley.
Saturday, February 2: WR
@ Hill City, 9 a.m.; State One
Act, Brandon Valley; JH BBB
WGPC Tourney @ Philip, 8
a.m.
Monday, February 4: BBB
w/Philip, 6 p.m. (C Game @ 5
p.m.).
Tuesday, February 5: GBB
@ RC Central JV, 6 p.m.; AAU
Practice @ MP 5:15 & 5:45
p.m.
Wednesday, February 6;
Parent Teacher Conf. @ 3:45-
6:30 p.m.; AAU Practice @ MP,
5:15 & 5:45 p.m.
Thursday, February 7: Par-
ent Teacher Conf. @ 3:45-6:30
p.m.; AAU Practice @ MP 5:15
& 5:45 p.m.
Friday, February 8: JH BBB
w/Kadoka, 4 p.m.; GBB @
Dupree, 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, February 9:
Philip WR Tourney @ Wall, 9
a.m.; Wall GYM Invite @ 12
p.m.
NOTICE
ANNUAL
ELM SPRINGS
FIRE DISTRICT
MEETING
Wed., Feb. 6
4:00 p.m. at the
Elm Springs Fire Hall
Four Generations
Back row: Great-grandpa Merlin Doyle, Wall; Dad Josh Croell,
Gillette, Wyo. Front row: Grandma Barb Croell, Sundance, Wyo;
Great-grandson Max Merlin Croell, Gillette; and Great-grandma
Mary Jane Doyle, Wall.
It’s A Boy!
Born: October 22, 2012
Weight: 7 lbs. 11 oz. 21”
Parents: James & Lyndsay Lunders,
Clarksville, Tenn.
Maternal Grandparents:
Jim Doyle, Spearfish
Patty Doyle, Rapid City
Paternal Grandparents:
Leon & Mary Lunders, Rapid City
Great-Grandparents:
Merlin & Mary Jane Doyle, Wall
Julius & Linda Schmidt, Ariz.
Sponsored by: Great-Grandpa
& Great-Grandma Doyle
Connor
Mark
Lunders
Valentine’s Day
is just around
the corner!
Give that special someone a
“Sweet Deal”
unwind with a wonderful
calorie-free Chocolate
Cream Body Massage
OR
experience a relaxing
Champagne and Rose
Foot Massage!
Call for your gift certificate
today!
(Offer good thru February 28, 2013)
New Horizons
Massage Therapy
Wall & Murdo, SD
Marlene McMillan, LMT
685-5718
Just when you think the world could not get any crazier.
The Wasta Methodist Church goes and changes their
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper to Monday.
Yes it is true!
Wasta Methodist Church
Pancake Supper
Mon., Feb. 11, 2013 • 5-7
Pancakes, Sausage, Eggs
Free Will Offering • See you there!
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
January 31 to
February 6, 2013
Thursday: Breakfast: Bis-
cuit w/Cheese, Egg & Sausage,
Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Teriyaki Chicken &
Oriental Rice, Pease/Carrots,
Fruit, Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast: Pan-
cake, Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Steamburger on a
Whole Grain Bun, Sweet Potato
Fries, Green Beans, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Yogurt
w/Granola, Cheese Stick, Milk
or Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Noodle Hot
Dish, Roll, Broccoli/Cauliflower,
Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast: Waf-
fle, Egg Patty, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Stromboli, Baby Car-
rots, Lettuce Salad, Peaches,
Milk.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
AvoID BECoMING A
"GRoUNDHoG DAy"
INvESToR
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
Groundhog Day is almost here.
For most of its history — which,
according to some reports, dates
back to the first celebration in
1886 or 1887 in Punxsutawney, Pa.
— Groundhog Day held little sig-
nificance for most Americans.
But that changed in 1993 with
the release of the movie Ground-
hog Day, in which a semi-embit-
tered meteorologist, played by Bill
Murray, is forced to re-live the
same day over and over again. He
repeatedly makes poor choices,
until he finally learns from his
mistakes and is granted the ability
to move on with his life. Since the
movie came out, the term
“Groundhog Day” is often used to
refer to a situation in which some-
one repeats the same mistakes. It’s
a phenomenon that happens in
many walks of life — including in-
vesting.
So, how can you avoid becoming
a “Groundhog Day” investor? Here
•Don’t chase after “hot invest-
ments.” Many investors make this
same mistake over and over —
they hear about a “hot” investment
from a friend, relative or television
commentator, and they buy it. Too
often, though, by the time they
purchase this investment, it’s al-
ready cooling down. Even more im-
portantly, it just might not be suit-
able for them. So instead of pursu-
ing “hot” choices, pick those invest-
ments that are appropriate for
your needs, goals and risk toler-
ance.
•Don’t over-analyze short-term
price fluctuations. Some investors
check their portfolios' performance
every day, or even several times a
day. But if you’re constantly eval-
uating how your investments are
doing over short intervals, you
may be tempted to make unwise
decisions in response to sudden
drops or jumps. You can get a good
sense of the progress you’re mak-
ing toward your goals by checking
your portfolio once a month.
•Don’t let fear and greed drive
your choices. “Buy low and sell
high” is the classic piece of invest-
ment advice. But too many in-
vestors only buy investments
when they’re on the rise and sell
them when they’re falling. In other
words, they’re doing the opposite
of “buy low and sell high” — and
they’re being driven by fear and
greed. Keep these emotions out of
your investment strategy, and
you’ll help yourself greatly.
•Don’t maintain unrealistic ex-
pectations. Some people consis-
tently put off investing until
“later,” figuring they can always
catch up by putting away more
money during their peak earning
years. Don’t make that mistake. To
achieve your long-term goals, such
as a comfortable retirement, you
need to invest early and keep in-
vesting, rather than wait for a
time in your life when you may
suddenly have more money “freed
up” for investment purposes. Also,
don’t anticipate that you’ll steadily
earn a good rate of return on your
investments. Although the finan-
cial markets have trended up in
the long term, we’ve seen many
down markets that have lasted for
a year or longer. Factor in these
fluctuations when estimating the
rate of return you’ll need to
achieve your goals. For these types
of calculations, you may want to
work with an experienced finan-
cial professional.
These and other “Groundhog
Day”-type investment mistakes
can be costly. But you can avoid
them if you maintain a solid in-
vestment strategy, if you’ve got pa-
tience and perseverance — and if
you stay focused on the long-term
horizon.
we don’t
charge…
Obituaries,
engagements and
wedding write-ups
are published free
of charge.
Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
In Rom. 8:26 we read what our hearts must often con-
fess to be true:
“…We know not what we should pray for as
we ought…”
But the Apostle hastens to explain that the Spirit
makes intercession for us according to the will of God,
adding:
“And we know that all things work together for
good to them that love God, to them who are the
called according to His purpose” (Rom.8:28).
Believers may not receive whatever they ask for in the
darkness of this age, but
“God is able to make all grace abound toward
you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all
things, may abound to every good work” (II Cor.
9:8).
We may not receive whatever we ask for, but by His
grace we may have so much more than this, that the
Apostle, in contemplating it, breaks forth in a doxology:
“Now unto Him that is able to do exceeding
abundantly above all that we ask or think, ac-
cording to the power that worketh in us,
“Unto Him be glory in the Church by Christ
Jesus throughout all ages, world without end.
Amen” (Eph. 3:20,21).
In the light of all this the highest expression of faith
today is found in the words of Paul in Phil. 4:6,7:
“Be careful [anxious] for nothing — but in
everything — by prayer and supplication — with
thanksgiving — let your requests be made
known unto God — and…”
“And” what?
“And whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye
shall receive”?
NO!!
“…and the peace of God, which passeth all
understanding, shall keep [garrison] your hearts
and minds through Christ Jesus.”
THE HIGHEST EXPRESSION OF FAITH
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
Email your social
news, obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
MAkE PLANS TO ATTENd
Wall Health Services
Annual Meeting
The Annual Meeting of the Wall Health Services, Inc., will be held at the Wall
Drug Art Gallery Dining Room, Wall, SD on Saturday, February 9, 2013, starting
at 9:00 a.m. The purpose of the meeting will be as follows:
1. Presentation of reports covering the business of the Wall Health Services, Inc.,
for the preceding year.
2. Election of three (3) DIRECTORS.
3. To transact any business which may be necessary, convenient or desirable in
the connection with any of the foregoing at said meeting or at any
adjournments thereto.
• Free Coffee and Donuts • Door Prizes
Dated at Wall, South Dakota, this 18th day of January, 2013.
Donna Fauske, Secretary
Wall Health Services, Inc.
HOUSE FOR SALE
410 Glenn St., Wall, SD.
4+ car shop/garage,
BRAND NEW POURED
CONCRETE BASEMENT.
3 bed/1 bath. 2100 sf.
Completely remodeled.
Just reduced $7,000.
Now only $129,000.
Call Duane Hosek
605/391-8424.
Coldwell Banker - LKH
Real Estate Inc.
Marie Hansen__________________________________
Marie Hansen, age 95, of Philip,
S.D., died Wednesday, January 23,
2013, at the Philip Nursing Home.
Marie Gladys Plasschaert was
born May 22, 1917, at Lucerne, the
daughter of Richard and Pauline
(Lee) Plasschaert. She grew up in
the area and received her educa-
tion at the Lucerne Rural School.
She then attended Philip High
School.
Marie was united in marriage to
Wallace E. “Bud” Hansen on April
10, 1934, in Kadoka. They made
their home on his parents’ home-
stead 26 miles northeast of Philip.
They continued to operate the
ranch until retiring in 1967 and
leasing the ranch out. They re-
mained at the ranch during the
summer months and operated an
antique business and the winter
months were spent traveling
throughout the United States and
Mexico.
Bud became ill in July 1985, and
they decided to build their home
and move into Philip. Bud pre-
ceded her in death on October 21,
1985. Marie continued to reside at
her home in Philip until moving
into the Philip Nursing Home after
suffering a stroke in August 2009.
During her lifetime, Marie played
for numerous dances, starting at
the age of 10. She enjoyed playing
in the “Philip 5 Band” for many
years.
Survivors include three sons,
Jack Hansen of Philip, Darryl
Hansen and his wife, Kaye, of
Stockton, Calif., and Bob Hansen
and his wife, LaVonne, of Howes;
three daughters, Shirley Raue of
Pierre, Paula Poss and her hus-
band, Bill, of Perris, Calif., and
Charlene “Chuckie” Reed and her
husband, Sonny, of Pierre; 27
grandchildren; numerous great-
grandchildren and great-great-
grandchildren; one sister, Rosie
Lejeune, of Philip; a daughter-in-
law, Sandy Hansen, of Winner; a
son-in-law, Bob Neville, of Philip;
and host of other relatives and
friends.
In addition to her husband, Bud,
Marie was preceded in death by
two sons, Richard “Zip” Hansen
and Gene Hansen; one daughter,
Arlys Neville; one granddaughter,
Marilyn Neville; one grandson,
Billy Joe Poss; two grandchildren
in infancy; and a great-grandchild
in infancy; her brother, Richard
Plasschaert; a son-in-law, Fred
Raue; a daughter-in-law, Donna
Hansen; and her parents.
Services were held Tuesday,
January 29, at the American Le-
gion Hall in Philip, with Pastor
Kathy Chesney officiating.
Music was provided by Memory
Neville, pianist. Eulogy was given
by Dylan Peck. Ushers were Jim
Humphrey and Eric Hansen.
Pallbearers were Jesse, Marty,
Todd, Doug and Dennis Hansen,
Kenny, Bobby Gene and Randy
Neville, Cam and Stan Reed,
Mike, David and Scott Raue, and
Tim and Doug Poss.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
James Dennis “Jim” Hewitt, Sr._____________________
James Dennis “Jim” Hewitt, Sr.,
age 74, of Philip, S.D., died Thurs-
day, January 24, 2013, at the Hans
P. Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip.
James Dennis “Jim” Hewitt, Sr.
was born on March 18, 1938 in
Valentine, Neb., to Hazel Ellen
(Thomas) and L.H. Hewitt. Jim
went to country school north of
Valentine, his first seven years. He
attended eighth grade in Phoenix,
Ariz., after which he returned
home and attended Valentine High
School, graduating in 1956. After
graduation, he attended one year
of college at the University of Ne-
braska in Lincoln and then re-
turned home to help his mother
run the two ranches after the
death of his father.
He married his high school
sweetheart, Jan Vanderheiden, in
1958 and moved to the Philip
ranch. To this union were born
three children, Tamera, James
Dennis, Jr. “J.D.” and Scott.
Jim was a rancher all his life
and gained a great deal of knowl-
edge from older mentors in the
Philip area. He developed a keen
knowledge of cattle that was
passed on to his sons and grand-
sons.
During his adult years, he was a
member of the First Presbyterian
Church in Philip, the South
Dakota Stockgrowers, also serving
on the S.D. Brand Board, Past
Master of Philip Lodge #153 AF &
AM, Royal Arch Masons & Yank-
ton Consistory, Past Patron of the
Order of the Eastern Star #100 in
Philip, Philip Jaycees, and the
Elks Club in Pierre. Jim served as
a Haakon County School Board
member and a state committee-
man of Haakon County Republi-
cans.
Grateful for having shared his
life are his wife, Jan, of 54 years;
three children, Tamera (Steve)
Stickler, Omaha, Neb., J.D. (Julie)
Hewitt, Piedmont, and Scott (Ann)
Hewitt, Long Beach, Calif.; nine
grandchildren, Stephanie, Bran-
dea, Kara and Jennifer Stickler,
Omaha, Neb., Tyson (Shiloh) He-
witt, Opal, Tanner (Lacey) Hewitt,
Sheridan, Wyo., Audra Hewitt,
Belle Fourche, Caleb Hewitt,
Omaha, Neb., and Nathan Hewitt,
Long Beach, Calif.; four great-
granddaughters, Adessa Jade,
Jalee Teal, Samera Jo and Allie
Grace Hewitt, Opal; two sisters,
Betty (Jack) Carr of White River
and Margie Cunningham of Den-
ver, Colo.; one brother-in-law, Jim
(Cheryl) Vanderheiden of
Rochester, Minn.; several nieces
and nephews; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Jim was preceded in death by
his parents, L.H. and Hazel He-
witt; his father and mother-in-law,
S.T. and Hermina Vanderheiden; a
sister, Marie Lovejoy; three broth-
ers-in-law, Irish Lovejoy and Don
and Tom Vanderheiden; and a sis-
ter-in-law, Donna Vanderheiden.
Services were held Monday, Jan-
uary 28, at the United Church in
Philip with Pastor Kathy Chesney
officiating. Graveside services
were held Monday at Mt. Hope
Cemetery in Valentine, Neb.
Music was provided by Barb
Bowen, pianist, and Tim Vander-
heiden, vocalist.
Ushers were Martie Ryno, Jay
Lovejoy and Jack Hansen.
Pallbearers were J.D., Scott,
Tyson, Tanner, Caleb and Nathan
Hewitt, Steve Stickler, Alan
Aanerud and Alex Morton.
Honorary pallbearers were
Stephanie, Brandea, Kara and
Jennifer Stickler and Audra He-
witt.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Carl A. Harnisch________________
Carl August Harnisch passed
away peacefully in Kingman, Ariz.,
on January 17, 2013, surrounded
by family.
Carl was born on May 14, 1927
on a farm near Milltown, S.D., to
Anton and Lydia Harnisch. He
married Audrey Jean Pederson in
1951, with whom he had four sons.
In 1966, the family moved to
Kingman, Ariz. He worked as a
telephone engineer with Citizens
Utilities Telephone Company in
Kingman, where he worked until
his retirement.
He was very active in the com-
munity and church. He served on
the city planning and zoning com-
mission, and was Lieutenant Gov-
ernor of the Kiwanis Club. He and
wife Audrey were active members
of Grace Lutheran Church.
He is survived by his four sons
and their wives, Carl (Diane),
Marc (Barbara), Paul (Teri) and
Marty (DeAnna); six grandchil-
dren: Andy and Mallory to Marc
and Barb; Kara, Jenna and Joel to
Marty and DeAnna; Bennett to
Paul and Teri; and two great-
grandchildren, Dahlia and Finley
to Andy and Jessica.
A memorial service is planned
for February 9, 2013 at Grace
Lutheran Church in Kingman,
Ariz.
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013• Page 6
AAU wrestlers. Pictured back row: from left to right ... Coach Taylor Mohnen, Cedar Gabriel, Mal-
com Heathershaw, Cayne Krogman, Cale Baus, Bridger Amiotte, Cash Wilson, Lillyanna Wagner,
Nathan Law, Cedar Amiotte, Matthew Heathershaw, Stran Williams, Thane Simons, Brodi Sundall,
Reid Hansen and Coach Brett Blasius. Middle row: from left to right ... Coach Toby Wagner, Latham
Gabriel, Trevor Schulz, Drew Griebel, Blair Blasius, Rylan McDonnell, Jett Mohr, Burke Blasius,
Levi Sharp, Jace Blasius, Kipp Cordes and Coach Sanden Simons. Front row: from left to right ...
Nash Delger, Dawson Handcock, Brayden Lange, Younger Amiotte, Austan Kjerstad, Emmet
Dinger, Owyn Geigle, Carter Sundall, Jace Mohr, Gatlin Cordes, Kyler Kjerstad, Tyson Dartt and
Talon Anderson. (Not pictured, Noah Eisenbraun.)
~Photo courtesy of Heather Gabriel and Frontier Images
Wall Eagles 2013 AAU Wrestlers
By Coach Kier
The Lady Eagles played the last
game of the day against Lyman
Raiders on Saturday, January 26
on their home court.
The Lady Eagles team came
Lady Eagles take varisty win over Lyman
away with a win over the Raiders
with a final score of 43 to 35.
Senior Autumn Schulz, was the
team's leader in scoring with a
whopping nineteen points. She
also was the co-leader in rebound-
ing as her and Josie Blasius both
contributed seven rebounds.
"The girls played a quick paced
game with lots of high quality mo-
ments; although we won, we have
a lot of things we anticipate
"brushing up" on as we continue to
work hard day in and day out in
order to meet our team goals," said
Coach Hess.
Stats:
Wall: 14 9 2 18 = 43
Lyman: 6 2 6 21 = 35
Scoring: Sadie O’Rourke 3-9 0-
0 7, Carlee Johnston 3-7 0-0 6, Bai-
ley Lytle 0-1 0-0 0, Kaitlin
Schreiber 1-4 0-0 2, Josie Blasius
2-8 0-1 9, Monica Bielmaier 0-1 0-
0 0, Autumn Schulz 7-14 0-0 19.
Totals: 16-44 0-1 11-17 43.
Field goal percentage: Lady
Eagles .364.
3-point field goal percentage:
Lady Eagles .000.
Offensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 10 (Blasius 3.)
Defensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 16 (Schulz 5.)
Fouls: Lady Eagles 20.
Assists: Lady Eagles 9
(O’Rourke 3, Schulz 3.)
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 28.
Steals: Lady Eagles 16
(O’Rourke 7.)
Lady Eagles Sadie O’Rourke passing the ball to Autumn Schulz
during the Wall vs. Lyman game played on Saturday, January 26
in Wall. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
By Coach Dinger
Wall vs. Hot Springs
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team traveled to Hot Springs on
Tuesday, January 22nd and fell
short 40-49 in a rematch game
from the West River Tournament.
The Eagles started out slow in
the first half, but they were still
able to secure a 15-13 halftime
lead.
By the end of the third quarter
the Eagle’s continued to struggle
on offense and trailed 28-33.
In the fourth quarter, the Eagles
put the Hot Spring players on the
free throw line to try to get back
into the game, but Hot Spring se-
cured the win with several made
free throws.
Trevor Anderson led all scorers
for the Eagles with 11 points,
while Lane Hustead and Tyler Pe-
terson each added eight points re-
spectively.
Anderson, Hustead, and Peter-
son also led the team with six re-
bounds each.
Tyler Trask led the offense with
six assist, while Hustead led the
defense with four steals.
The team was 16-54 from the
field for 30 percent, 6-23 from the
three point line for 26 percent, and
2-10 from the free throw line for 20
percent.
Stats
Wall: 8 7 13 12 = 40
HS: 7 6 20 16 = 49
Scoring: Tyler Trask 0-3 0-0 0,
Trevor Anderson 4-9 0-2 11, Lane
Hustead 3-11 1-1 8, Carson John-
son 0-1 0-0 0, Laketon McLaughlin
2-4 1-2 5, Tyler Peterson 4-6 0-0 8,
Les Williams 0-2 0-0 0. Totals: 16-
54 2-10 40.
Field Goal percentage: Eagles
.296.
3-point field goals: Eagles 6-23
(Trask 0-3, Anderson 3-7, Hustead
1-4, Lytle 2-7, O’Rourke 0-1, John-
ston 0-1.)
Rebounds: Eagles 31 (Anderson
6, Hustead 6, Peterson 6.)
Fouls: Eagles 19.
Assists: Eagles 12 (Trask 6.)
Steals: Eagles 12 (Hustead 4.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 1
(O’Rourke 1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 19.
Wall vs. Hill City
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team hosted Hill City on Thursday,
January 24th and snapped their
four game losing streak with a 80-
34 win.
The Eagles played tough defense
to start the game and were patient
on offense and led 13-3 at the end
of the first quarter.
The Eagles extended their lead
in the second quarter as they led
32-18 by halftime.
The Eagles came out of the
locker room and exploded in the
second half and by the end of the
third quarter the Eagles had a 63-
24 commanding lead.
The bench players played most
of the fourth quarter and secured
the victory.
Trevor Anderson led all scorers
with 23 points, while Lane Hus-
tead and Tucker O’Rourke finished
with 14 points and 10 points re-
spectively.
Laketon McLaughlin led the
team with six rebounds, while
Clancy Lytle and Tyler Peterson
each had four rebounds.
Hustead led the offense with six
assist, while McLaughlin led the
defense with three steals.
The team was 31-65 from the
field for 48 percent, 5-13 from the
three point line for 39 percent, and
13-18 from the free throw line for
72 percent.
Stats:
Wall: 13 19 33 15 = 80
HC: 3 15 8 8 = 34
Scoring: Anderson 9-13 1-1 23,
Hustead 6-8 1-1 14, Lytle 0-2 0-0 0,
O’Rourke 5-8 0-0 10, Dusty Dartt
0-2 0-0 0, Carson Johnston 4-6 0-0
8, McLaughlin 1-7 1-4 3, Danny
Muzik 0-1 2-2 2, Ryder Wilson 1-2
0-0 2, Ben Linn 0-3 3-4 3, Austin
Huether 0-1 0-0 0, CJ Schulz 1-2 0-
0 2, Peterson 2-7 3-4 7, Les
Williams 2-3 2-2 6. Totals: 31-65
13-18 80.
Field goals percentage: Ea-
gles .477.
3-point field goals: Eagles 5-13
(Anderson 4-8, Hustead 1-1, Lytle
0-2, Johnston 0-1, Peterson 0-1.)
Rebounds: Eagles 34
(McLaughlin 6.)
Fouls: Eagles 15.
Assists: Eagles 15 (Hustead 6.)
Steals: Eagles 9 (McLaughlin
3.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 2
(O’Rourke 2.)
Turnovers: Eagles 10.
Wall vs. Lyman
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team hosted Lyman on Saturday,
January 26th and continued their
hot shooting from the field and
came away with a 61-48 win.
The Eagles played tough defense
in the first half along with shoot-
ing 50 percent from the three point
line to lead 26-23 at halftime.
The Eagles continued to shoot
50 percent from the three point
line in the second half and the de-
fense continued to play well as a
team.
The Eagles secured the win with
several made free throws in the
fourth quarter for a 61-48 victory.
Lane Hustead and Trevor An-
derson led all scorers with 20
points each, while Tyler Trask fin-
ished the game with eight points.
Tucker O’Rourke led the team
with seven rebounds.
Trask also led the offense with
six assist and he also led the de-
fense with five steals.
The team was 21-45 from the
field for 47 percent, 7-14 from the
three point line for 50 percent, and
12-23 from the free throw line for
52 percent.
The team enjoyed back to back
victories, but they will have their
biggest challenge of the year when
number one ranked White River
comes to Wall on Thursday, Janu-
ary 31st.
Stats:
Wall: 19 7 20 15 = 61
Lyman: 9 14 11 14 = 48
Scoring: Trask 3-7 0-0 8, Ander-
son 8-10 2-3 20, Hustead 7-12 4-6
20, Lytle 2-6 0-0 4, O’Rourke 0-5 2-
9 2, Johnston 1-3 0-0 3, McLaugh-
lin 0-1 0-0 0, Peterson 0-1 0-0 0,
Williams 0-0 4-5 4. Totals: 21-45
12-23 61.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.467.
3-point field goals: Eagles 7-14
(Trask 2-4, Anderson 2-4, Hustead
2-3 Lytle 0-1, Johnston 1-2.)
Rebounds: Eagles 20 (O’Rourke
7.)
Fouls: Eagles 17.
Assists: Eagles 16 (Trask 6.)
Steals: Eagles 15 (Trask 5.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 1
(O’Rourke 1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 11.
Eagles lose to Hot Springs and
take wins over Hill City and Lyman
Eagles Tyler Trask downs a three point during the Lyman game
played in Wall on Saturday, January 26.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
It was a tough Saturday on Jan-
uary 26 for the Philip Area grap-
plers as they placed seventh at the
Wagner Invitational Wrestling
Tournament.
Coach Matt Donnelly noted the
trouble came from wrestlers sit-
ting out due to injury and illness
and from some wrestlers not
wrestling to their top ability. Philip
Area wasnot represented in five
weight classes.
Team placings were Parkston
(257), Tri-Valley (168). Wagner
(164.5), Beresford (159), Bon
Homme (156), Garretson (137.5),
Philip Area (134.5), Flandreau
(127), Faulkton Area (102), Elk
Grapplers fall at Wagner tournament
Point/Jeffferson (84), Stanley
County (54), Kimball/White Lake-
Platte-Geddes ( (51), Parkston Un-
attached (28), Andes Central (18),
Stanley County Unattached (13),
Alcester-Hudson and Marion/Free-
man (8). Other schools had unat-
tached wrestlers who earned point
standings below eight.
106 lbs: Jed Brown 2nd,
20-9 record
•Pinned Matt Ambrose (EPJ) 2:43
•Pinned Parker Ramstad (TV) :29
•Decisioned Kyler Holzbauer (PKST) 3-2
•Decisioned byDuncan Stoebner (BH) 2-4
OT
126 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 4th,
25-8 record
•Pinned Dalton Kotlolinik M/F 2:26
•Decisioned by Thomas Howe (GAR) 4-6
•Pinned John Kanter (WAG-Un) 4:22
•Decisioned Lukas Chase (SC) 6-0
•Decisioned Sage Zephier (WAG) 6-4
•Lost by default to Howe
132 lbs: Grady Carley,
19-14 record
•Decisioned Dylan Manas (BH) 7-1
•Pinned by Austin Oyen (TV) 1:30
•Pinned Cash Hemmingson (AH) :45
•Pinned by Colby Pierret (GAR) 1:56
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 3rd,
24-3 record
•Pinned Tony Weiland (PKST) 1:44
•Decisioned Nick Weis (EPJ) 4-1
•Decisioned by Zach Schuman (TV) 2-5
•Pinned Brady Soulek (WAG) 2:57
•Decisioned Kent Hall (FAU) 6-1
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 3rd,
23-7 record
•Pinned Eli Orr (BER-Un) 1:00
•Pinned Sean McPadden (GAR) 4:30
•Decisioned by Blase Vanecek (BH) 5-10
•Major dec. Brandon Potter (FAU) 10-2
•Pinned McPadden 1:57
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 5th,
25-7 record
•Pinned Matt Holsing (FAU-Un) 1:02
•Decisioned by Turner Blasius (KWLPG)
6-8
•Pinned Austin Thomas (FAU) 2:23
•Pinned Chandler Baumgart (PKST-Un)
1:54
•Decisioned by Josh Casperson (BER) 7-
12
•Tech. fall over Miles Semmler (PKST)
19-4
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 2nd,
19-8 record
•Bye
•Pinned Chris Andrews (BER) 1:00
•Decisioned Dakota Zephier (WAG) 4-1
•Decisioned by Dakota Petersen (FLA) 2-
3
195 lbs: Logan Ammons, 3rd,
18-6 record
•Bye
•Pinned Ray Edgar (FAU) 1:58
•Decisioned by C.J. Geary (EPJ) 2-8
•Pinned Jacob Kvigne (WAG) 1:25
•Decisioned Ezra Bartlett (BH) 7-2
The team will head to Hill City
February 2 for the Black Hills In-
vitational Tournament.
Donnelly said with region action
almost upon them the wrestlers
need to place well at this tourna-
ment, to help them in the region’s
seed placings. District action has
been eliminated.
courant@
gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013 • Page 7 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
FOR SALE: 2006 Featherlite all
enclosed 4-horse gooseneck
trailer. 7x22x7 aluminum/ white
smooth skin. Has nice enclosed
tack up front with (5) saddle
racks and (8) bridle holders.
Great condition! $14,200 OBO.
Call for pictures and more de-
tails: 454-6914, Murdo. P8-5tc
FOR SALE: 2000 Doonan step
deck, 48’, $15,000. 1984 Wilson
grain trailer, 42’, $8,000. Call
C.K. Dale, 685-3091. P7-3tc
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease whole
ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or 859-
2059 (home). P7-tfn
PASTURE WANTED for summer
2013 for 50-60 pair. Call Jerry
Willert, 837-2459. K6-tfn
HELP WANTED
THE USDA FOREST SERVICE
is planning on filling 3 tempo-
rary Fire, (2) temporary Range
Technician, (2) temporary Bio-
logical Science Technician sum-
mer positions on the Wall Ranger
District and (3) temporary sum-
mer positions in the National
Grasslands Visitor Center
(NGVC) for the 2013 season. For
information concerning any of
the current vacancies please
contact personnel at the NGVC
located at 708 Main Street in
Wall or by calling 279-2125.
PW8-2tc
PART-TIME TELLER/BOOK-
KEEPER POSITION OPEN: This
position is a part-time bookkeep-
ing/teller position (approxi-
mately 2 days a week). During
summer vacations, more hours
are possible. Duties include
making up statements, answer-
ing telephone inquiries & using
a computer, operating a Pitney-
Bowes mailing machine and
other misc. duties are required.
Physical requirements would in-
clude lifting boxes of paper
weighing up to 40 lbs. 859-2525,
Pam or Rick. P7-2tc
HELP WANTED: Maintenance
Dept. at Cedar Pass Lodge is
looking for a hard working, de-
pendable maintenance worker.
Must have carpentry, plumb-
ing and flooring experience.
Please contact Sharon at 433-
5562 and/or complete an appli-
cation online at cedarpass
lodge.com P5-4tc
WANTED: Hostess to set tables
for the prime rib dinner and auc-
tion on April 20, 2013. Please
contact Nikki, Heidi or Ruby,
837-2270, Kadoka. K8-2tc
FULL-TIME/PART-TIME HELP
WANTED at Ingram Hardware in
Philip. 859-2521. Some com-
puter skills required. P8-2tc
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2004 Pontiac Grand
Prix GT, gray with gray interior,
107,300 miles, looks and runs
great. $7,000 is the asking price,
but I will consider reasonable of-
fers. Call Keith at 454-3426 or
859-2039 for information or any
questions. PR22-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
FITCH FENCING: Line your
summer projects up now! For all
your corral, windbreak and pas-
ture fencing needs, call Truett at
859-2334. PR23-tfn
TAX PREPARATION SERVICE:
Contact Eileen Stolley, Register
Tax Return Preparer, after 5:00
p.m., 837-2320. K8-3tc
NEED PAINTING DONE? Inte-
rior/exterior painting, staining,
minor repair work. Openings still
available for winter/summer.
Free estimates. Licensed. Refer-
ences. Call 488-0008. Kusick’s
Painting & More. K8-1tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: 2005 Case 580,
price $9,400; 4014 hours, 80
hp., backhoe and loader, 4x4.
Email or call prater77@msn.
com / 299-1788. P8-3tp
PASTURE WANTED: Summer
pasture for 100-250 cow/calf
pairs, preferably in the Jack-
son/Haakon/Jones County
area, but would consider other
areas. With full maintenance.
Call 843-2869. P8-tfn
MANAGER POSITION: East
Pennington Conservation Dis-
trict in Wall, SD, is seeking to fill
a permanent, part-time manage-
ment position. It is an adminis-
trative position with occasional
light outside work. Please con-
tact the office at 279-2519 or
stop by at 24 Creighton Road for
an appication and/or more in-
formation. EOE. PW6-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Solid oak hand-
crafted china cabinet, excellent
shape, $300. Call 859-2654 or
685-3152, leave message.
P8-tfn
FOR SALE: 5x8 enclosed cargo
trailer, like new. Also: Power-
mate 5000 watt generator with
about 40 hours. Call or text 660-
3053, Interior. P8-2tp
FOR SALE: (40) 27” TV sets with
remotes, $20 each. These are
NOT flatscreens. Best Western
Plains, Wall, 279-2145 or 685-
3915. PW8-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: Once fired 45 ACP
brass. Call 279-2195 or 441-
7049. WP7-tfn
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 307 Myrtle Ave.,
Philip. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
partially finished basement,
large back yard, new roof and
windows, stainless steel fridge
and stove, washer and dryer in-
cluded. Close to schools. Call
859-2470. Can email pictures.
P7-4tc
RENTALS
FOR RENT: Two bedroom trailer
house for rent in Philip. 685-
3801 or 859-2204. P3-tfn
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
BULL SALES
WILKINSON RANCH BLACK
ANGUS Yearling Bull Private
Treaty Sale with equal opportu-
nity to bid on each bull. Begin-
ning Sat. Feb. 16. For more infor-
mation and a catalog, call Bill
Wilkinson, 605-203-0379 or
Mark Wilkinson, 605-203-0380
De Smet, S.D.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
GROWING BUSINESS OPPOR-
TUNITY in Platte SD: Ground
floor entry in firmly established
food service business, tailor
made for enterprising single per-
son or couple. New equipment
just added for continued expan-
sion into the future. Present
owner seeking retirement but not
at new buyer’s expense (priced
exceptionally reasonable). Seller
willing to stay on to train during
transition period. Contact Travis
Agency for details 605 337-3764.
EMPLOYMENT
VACANCY: FAITH SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, Faith, SD seeking candi-
dates for the position of superin-
tendent of schools with Special
Education Directors duties to be
determined. Application materi-
als available at www.faith.k12.
sd.us or contact Dr. Julie Ertz at
605.391.4719 or jertz@asbsd.
org.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL-
Custer Clinic and Custer Re-
gional Senior Care in beautiful
Custer, SD, have full time and
PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN and Li-
censed Medical Assistant posi-
tions available. We offer compet-
itive pay and excellent benefits.
New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-2229 ext. 110 for more
information or log onto www.re-
gionalhealth.com to apply.
HEAD CUSTODIAN AND Custo-
dian for the Edgemont School
District. 12-month, full-time po-
sitions with benefits: health /
dental insurance, state retire-
ment, sick leave, paid holidays,
vacation. Open until filled. Con-
tact Dave Cortney (605) 662-
7254 or Dave.Cortney@k12.sd.
us.
FACILITY MAINTENANCE/CUS-
TODIAN POSITION: Salem City
accepting applications. Closing
02/15/13. Contact: City of
Salem, PO Box 249, Salem, SD
57058, 425-2301; citysalem@tri-
otel.net. EOE.
FULL-TIME ELEMENTARY Spe-
cial Education Teacher or Full-
Time Special Education Adminis-
trator/Teacher at the Edgemont
School District for the 2013-2014
school year. 4 day school week.
Contact Dave Cortney at (605)
662-7254 or email Dave.Cort-
ney@k12.sd.us.
TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR
at the Edgemont School District
for the 2013-2014 school year.
Salary/benefits to be negotiated.
Contact Dave Cortney at 605-
662-7254 or email Dave.Cort-
ney@k12.sd.us.
MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY
$3997.00. Make & save money
with your own bandmill. Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-
800-578-1363 Ext.300N.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
SEEKING CLASS A CDL drivers
to run 14 central states. 2 years
over the road experience re-
quired. Excellent benefit pack-
age. Call 701-221-2465 or 877-
472-9534. www.pbtransporta-
tion.com.
EW WYLIE TRUCKING is now
hiring Truck Mechanic. West
Fargo, ND Needs: 3 years shop
experience Certified Diesel Me-
chanics preferred!! Great benefits
package! Apply at: www.wyli-
etrucking.com.
EW WYLIE TRUCKING is now
hiring a Parts Coordinator. West
Fargo, ND Needs: 1 year experi-
ence & HS Diploma/GED. Great
benefits package! Apply at:
www.wylietrucking.com.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter
discounts for spring delivery.
50x80, 62x100, 68x120, 68x200,
100x200. Take advantage of tax
deductions. Limited Offer. Call
Jim 1-888-782-7040.
No one reads the ads?
yoU JUST DID!
We design this newspaper with news
and advertising to fit the reader’s eye.
The Pennington County Courant your news
and advertising source for over 100 years.
Let us help you promote your product.
Thanks for taking the time to read our entire newspaper.
IT HAS BEEN SAID THAT…
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRo/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
THANK YOUS
I want to thank First Interstate
Bank for the $25 gift certificate I
won at their holiday drawing.
Clayton Kjerstad
Thank you to the sponsors of
the Wall Agricultural Apprecia-
tion Day for the $250 gift certifi-
cate I won at the drawing during
the banquet on January 25. I
am eagerly looking forward to
using it at one of the local busi-
nesses.
Joanne Kruse
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
JANUARY 15, 2013
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, January 15, 2013, in the Com-
missioners' meeting room of the Penning-
ton County Courthouse. Chairperson
Lyndell Petersen called the meeting to
order at 9:00 a.m. with the following Com-
missioners present: Ron Buskerud, Ken
Davis, Don Holloway and Nancy Traut-
man.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to remove the Order For Or-
ganization and Incorporation of the
Sawmill Road District from the Consent
Agenda and ITS Program Update under
Items From the Auditor and approve the
agenda as amended. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5, 6, 8 & 9 as presented with Item
7 and Item 10 removed for separate con-
sideration. Vote: Unanimous.
5. Approve the minutes of the Janu-
ary 3, 2013, Board of Commissioners’
meeting.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at
the end of the minutes for expenditures
for insurance, professional services, pub-
lications, rentals, supplies, repairs, main-
tenance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$1,919,797.53.
8. Approve the Permit to Occupy
Right-of-Way for a portion of Deerfield
Road on July 13-14, 2013, and authorize
the Highway Superintendent to sign the
application.
9. Approve the 2013 Employee As-
sistance Program Agreement with Behav-
ior Management Systems Inc., and au-
thorize the Chairperson’s signature
thereto.
Items Removed for Separate Consid-
eration
7. Order For Organization And In-
corporation Of The Sawmill Road District:
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to continue this item to the next
meeting at the request of the Auditor’s Of-
fice. Vote: Unanimous.
10. General Fund Supplement
(SP13-002): MOVED by Holloway and
seconded by Trautman to schedule a
public hearing at 9:15 a.m. on February
5, 2013, to supplement the 2013 Register
of Deeds Modernization and Preservation
Fund Equipment budget in the amount of
$48,000 from non-budgeted revenue re-
ceived in the current year. Vote: Unani-
mous.
End of Consent Agenda
REQUEST FOR EXCEPTION TO THE
2012 ASSESSMENT FREEZE FOR
ELDERLY & DISABLED: MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Holloway to
grant an exception and accept the appli-
cation for the 2012 Senior Citizen’s Tax
Freeze for property owner V.P. Vote:
Unanimous.
Commissioner Buskerud left the meet-
ing at this time.
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
BUDGET SUPPLEMENT HEARING
SP13-001 – GENERAL FUND JOHN T
VUCUREVICH BUDGET: MOVED by
Davis and seconded by Trautman to ap-
prove the supplement to the 2013 Gen-
eral Fund John T. Vucurevich budget in
the amount of $30,000 from non-bud-
geted revenue received in the current
year. Vote: Unanimous.
NEW RETAIL ON-OFF SALE WINE LI-
CENSE: MOVED by Holloway and sec-
onded by Trautman to approve the new
retail (on-off sale) wine license for The
Fireside, Ashley Ginsberg. Vote: Unani-
mous.
Commissioner Buskerud returned to
the meeting.
ITEMS FROM EXTENSION
A. 2013 MEMORANDUM OF UN-
DERSTANDING WITH SDSU 4-H PRO-
GRAM: MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Holloway to approve the Mem-
orandum of Understanding between
SDSU Extension and Pennington County
with the insertion of language stating that
Pennington County will be responsible for
two-thirds split for telephone/technology
charges and the copier maintenance
agreement and authorize the Chairper-
son’s signature thereto. Vote: Unani-
mous.
B. 2013 MEMORANDUM OF UN-
DERSTANDING WITH SDSU – EFNEP
PROGRAM: MOVED by Trautman and
seconded by Holloway to approve the
Memorandum of Understanding between
Pennington County and SDSU Extension
Expanded Food and Nutrition Education
Program. Vote: Unanimous.
C. APPOINTMENT OF 2013 EX-
TENSION ADVISORY BOARD MEM-
BERS: MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Holloway to appoint Richard
Bray, Mary Williams, Patty Brunner, An-
gela Lytle and Kathy Andersen to the
2013 Pennington County Extension Advi-
sory Board, and further moved to re-ad-
vertise for the unfilled position with appli-
cations to be considered by the Board of
Commissioners during the February 5,
2013, meeting. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
A. AMENDED RESOLUTION 2012-
10-16 and RESOLUTION 2013-01-15:
MOVED by Trautman and seconded by
Buskerud to approve the amended Res-
olution 2012-10-16 and authorize the
Chairperson’s signature thereto. Vote:
Unanimous.
AMENDED RESOLUTION
2012-10-16
WHEREAS, Resolution
2012-10-16 approved by the
Pennington County Commis-
sioners on November 9, 2012
contains incomplete descrip-
tions of the deletion of Chapel
Lane, Highway 14/16, Howard
St, and N Berry Pine Rd; and
WHEREAS, the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers have also determined that,
186 AVE, 173 AVE, and SAGE
CREEK RD be removed from
the list of deletions; and
WHEREAS, the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers have also determined that
222 ST be removed from the
list of additions to the County
Primary Highway System; now
THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED by the Pennington
County Commissioners that
Resolution 2012-10-16 be
amended to correct the de-
scription of CHAPEL LN on
page 2, HIGHWAY 14/16 on
page 3, HOWARD ST on page
3, N. BERRY PINE RD on
page 4. That 186 AVE, 173
AVE on page 1, and SAGE
CREEK RD on page 5, be re-
moved from the deletion list,
and 222 ST on page 6 be re-
moved from the list of additions
to the County Primary Highway
System.
RESOLUTION 2012-10-16
AS AMENDED
WHEREAS, the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers have determined that it
would be in the best interest of
the residents of Pennington
County for the safe and effi-
cient movement of traffic, that
revisions to the County Primary
Highway System are neces-
sary to correct the deficiencies
in the data utilized by the South
Dakota Department of Trans-
portation; and
WHEREAS, annexation of
territory by the City of Rapid
City and the City of Box Elder
within the County, and agree-
ments transferring jurisdiction
of certain roads to the City of
Rapid City and the City of Box
Elder; and
WHEREAS, roads classified
as Rural Local Roads and
Urban Local Roads do not
meet the criteria to be placed
on the County Primary High-
way System; now
THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED by the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers, that the following roads be
deleted from the Pennington
County Primary Highway Sys-
tem:
• 143 AVE: Beginning at
Country Rd south to Seger Dr,
for a distance of 1.00 miles.
• 154 AVE: Beginning at
225th St south to Highway
14/16, for a distance of 2.00
miles.
• 156 AVE: Beginning at
226th St north to a private
driveway, for a distance of 0.83
miles.
• 158 AVE: Beginning at
226th St south to Highway
14/16; and beginning at 232nd
St south to E Highway 44, for a
distance of 6.38 miles.
• 167 AVE: Beginning at
226th St south to Highway
14/16, for a distance of 2.00
miles.
• 169 AVE: Beginning at
Meade County Line south to
Highway 14/16, for a distance
of 3.00 miles.
• 171 AVE: Beginning at
Meade County Line south to
229th St, for a distance of 4.03
miles.
• 195 AVE: Beginning at I
90 west for 2,112 feet, for a dis-
tance of 0.40 miles.
• 196 AVE: Beginning at
Highway 14 south to 239th St,
for a distance of 3.46 miles.
• 225 ST: Beginning at
Dyess Ave east to N Elk Vale
Rd, 1 mile; and beginning at N
Ellsworth Rd east to 154th Ave,
5 miles for a distance of 6.00
miles.
• 226 ST: Beginning at
154th Ave east to 161st Ave,
for a distance of 6.99 miles.
• 230 ST: Beginning at
173rd Ave west to 172nd Ave,
for a distance of 1.00 mile.
• 232 ST: Beginning at
158th Ave east to 161st Ave,
for a distance of 3.02 miles.
• 239 ST: Beginning at I 90
east to 196th Ave, for a dis-
tance of 0.59 miles.
• ANDERSON RD: Begin-
ning at E Highway 44 south to
South Side Dr; and beginning
at Long View Rd north for .35
miles, for a distance of 1.39
miles.
• ANTELOPE CREEK RD:
Beginning at E Highway 44
south to Dawkins Rd, for a dis-
tance of 0.37 miles.
• ASHLAND RD: Begin-
ning at Sunnyside Dr south to
Country Rd, for a distance of
0.51 miles.
• ATLANTIC DR: Begin-
ning at Twilight Dr south to end
of road, for a distance of 0.14
miles.
• BABCOCK RD: Begin-
ning at Creighton Rd west and
north to end of road, for a dis-
tance of 8.80 miles.
• BASE LINE RD: Begin-
ning at 173rd Ave east to
Wasta Township Line, for a dis-
tance of 5.63 miles.
• BEAR CREEK RD: Be-
ginning at E Highway 44 north-
east to Sage Creek Rd, for a
distance of 5.37 miles.
• BENNETT RD: Begin-
ning at Hurst Dr south to Coun-
try Rd, for a distance of 1.01
miles.
• BONNIE LN: Beginning
at Plateau Ln east to end of
road, for a distance of 0.16
miles.
• BRIGGS ST: Beginning
at 225th St south to Patriot Dr,
for a distance of 0.40 miles.
• CABOT HILL RD: Begin-
ning at Mount Carmel St west
to a distance of 141 feet west
of Kimbell Pl, for a distance of
0.39 miles.
• CANYON DR: Beginning
at Cliff Dr southwest to Car-
riage Dr, for a distance of 0.35
miles.
• CAROL ST: Beginning at
Plateau Ln west to end of road,
for a distance of 0.15 miles.
• CAVERN RD: Beginning
at W Highway 44 north to end
of road, for a distance of 0.44
miles.
• CEDAR BUTTE RD: Be-
ginning at Trask Rd southeast
to NE 1/4 Corner Section 27,
T2N, R15E, for a distance of
9.64 miles.
• CENTENNIAL EAST CT:
Beginning at Mystic Dr east to
end of road, for a distance of
0.05 miles.
• CENTRE ST: Beginning
at Cambell St southeast to
Kennel Dr, for a distance of
0.48 miles.
• CHAPEL LN: Beginning
at Jackson Blvd south and
west to Chapel Valley Rd, for a
distance of 1.13 miles.
• CLEGHORN CANYON
RD: Beginning at Jackson
Blvd northwest to end of road,
for a distance of 1.20 miles.
• CLIFF DR: Beginning at
Falls Dr west, south, and east
to Wonderland Dr, for a dis-
tance of 1.12 miles.
• CORBIN DR: Beginning
at Reservoir Rd east to Lunar
Dr, for a distance of 0.20 miles.
• CORRAL DR: Beginning
at Sheridan Lake Rd west for
2,693 feet, for a distance of
0.51 miles.
• COUNTRY RD: Begin-
ning at N Elk Vale Rd east 3
miles; and south on 148 Ave
for 0.5 miles, for a distance of
3.50 miles.
• CRANE DR: Beginning
at Long View Rd north for
1,320 feet, for a distance of
0.25 miles.
• CRAZY HORSE ST: Be-
ginning at Red Cloud St east to
Haines Ave, for a distance of
0.25 miles.
• CREEK DR: Beginning at
E Highway 44 south to E Saint
Patrick St, for a distance of
0.81 miles.
• DARK CANYON RD: Be-
ginning at W Highway 44
southwest to a private drive-
way, for a distance of 1.35
miles.
• DENKE RD: Beginning at
Creighton Rd east and south to
599 feet east of Quinn Rd, for
a distance of 11.49 miles.
• DOROTHY DR: Begin-
ning at Twilight Dr north to
Macks Dr, for a distance of
0.22 miles.
• DUNN RD: Beginning at
Anderson Rd east to Radar Hill
Rd, for a distance of 0.98
miles.
• DYESS AVE: (Dyess Rd)
Beginning at 225th St south to
Seger Dr, for a distance of 2.00
mile.
• E SAINT FRANCIS ST:
(East Saint Francis St) Begin-
ning at Pecan Ln east to S Val-
ley Dr, for a distance of 0.13
miles.
• EASY ST: Beginning at
Corral Dr south to end of street,
for a distance of 0.21 miles.
• EDEN LN: Beginning at
S Valley Dr east to end of
street, for a distance of 0.13
miles.
• FAIRHAVEN DR: Begin-
ning at Red Road Dr southwest
to Cliff Dr, for a distance of 0.28
miles.
• FAIRVIEW DR: (Farview
Dr) Beginning at Cliff Dr east
and south to Fairhaven Dr, for
a distance of 0.26 miles.
• FALLS DR: Beginning at
Wonderland Cutoff southwest
to Red Road Dr, for a distance
of 0.17 miles.
• GEMINI ST: Beginning at
Reservoir Rd east to Saturn Dr,
for a distance of 0.21 miles.
• GOLF COURSE RD: Be-
ginning at Highway 240 west
and south to Sage Creek Rd,
for a distance of 1.96 miles.
• GUEST RD: Beginning at
West Park Ln west for 1,214
feet, for a distance of 0.23
miles.
• HART TABLE RD: Begin-
ning at Indian Creek Rd east to
Spring Draw Rd, for a distance
of 2.00 miles.
• HELIOS DR: (Helois Dr)
Beginning at Twilight Dr south
to end of road, for a distance of
0.22 miles.
• HICKORY DR: Beginning
at Bennett Rd west to end of
road, for a distance of 0.25
miles.
• HIGHWAY 14 16: Begin-
ning at 173 Ave east and
southeast to Base Line Rd, for
a distance of 7.97 miles.
• HOWARD ST: Beginning
at Haines Ave west to end of
street, for a distance of 0.21
miles and beginning at Mount
Carmel St east 1,017 ft.
• HURST AVE: (Hurst Dr)
Beginning at Bennett Rd west
to end of road, for a distance of
0.12 miles.
• IDLEHURST LN: Begin-
ning at 0.4 miles north of Jack-
son Blvd south to end of road,
for a distance of 0.10 miles.
• INDIAN CREEK RD: Be-
ginning at Hart Table Rd south
and east to Spring Draw Rd,
for a distance of 4.50 miles.
• JACKSON BLVD: Begin-
ning at Sylvan Ln southwest to
Idlehurst Ln, for a distance of
0.09 miles.
• JOLLY LN: Beginning at
Twilight Dr north to Neff Dr, for
a distance of 0.27 miles.
• KENNEL DR: Beginning
at Centre St south to end of
street, for a distance of 0.20
miles.
• KNUTSON LN: Begin-
ning at Sturgis Rd west to end
of street, for a distance of 0.15
miles.
• LEROY ST: (Apollo St)
Beginning at Reservoir Rd east
to Lunar Dr, for a distance of
0.37 miles.
• LONG ACRE DR: (Long
Acre Rd) Beginning at S Valley
Dr west to end of street, for a
distance of 0.11 miles.
• LUNAR DR: Beginning at
Apollo St south to Corbin Dr,
for a distance of 0.11 miles.
• MAGIC CANYON RD:
Beginning at W Highway 44
southwest for 1,892 feet, for a
distance of 0.37 miles.
• MALL DR: Beginning at
Mount Carmel St east to
Haines Ave, for a distance of
1.10 miles.
• MELODY LN: Beginning
at S Valley Dr southeast for
1,268 feet, for a distance of
0.24 miles.
• MERCURY DR: Begin-
ning at Reservoir Rd east to
Stellar St, for a distance of 0.25
miles.
• MESA DR: Beginning at
Sunnyside Dr south to Country
Rd, for a distance of 0.51
miles.
• METEOR ST: Beginning
at Reservoir Rd east and south
to Gemini St, for a distance of
0.16 miles.
• MORNINGSIDE RD: Be-
ginning at Guest Rd south to
Chapel Ln, for a distance of
0.16 miles.
• MORRIS LN: Beginning
at Anderson Rd east to Radar
Hill Rd, for a distance of 1.00
mile.
• MT CARMEL ST: Begin-
ning at Van St southwest to
Howard St, for a distance of
0.28 miles.
• MURPHY RD: Beginning
at S Highway 79 northwest to a
private driveway, for a distance
of 4.07 miles.
• MYSTIC DR: Beginning
at Centennial East Ct south
and east to Bennett Rd, for a
distance of 0.31 miles.
• N BERRY PINE RD: Be-
ginning at South Canyon Rd
southeast and west to 606
feet west of Soldier Rd, for a
distance of 1.28 miles.
• NAMELESS CAVE RD:
(Nameless Canyon Rd) Begin-
ning at W Highway 44 north-
west to end of road, for a dis-
tance of 2.04 miles.
• NEEL ST: (N Neel St) Be-
ginning at Twilight Dr north to
Macks Dr, for a distance of
0.63 miles.
• OAK MEADOWS RD:
Beginning at Playhouse Rd
southeast for 4,963 feet, for a
distance of 0.94 miles.
• ORCHARD LN: (Orchard
St) Beginning at S Valley Dr
east to end of street, for a dis-
tance of 0.24 miles.
• PACIFIC LN: (Pacific Dr)
Beginning at Twilight Dr south
to end of road, for a distance of
0.15 miles.
• PATRIOT DR: Beginning
at Briggs St west for 181 feet,
for a distance of 0.03 miles.
• PEANUT LN: Beginning
at Twilight Dr south to Peanut
St, for a distance of 0.13 miles.
• PECAN LN: (E Saint
Francis St) Beginning at E St
Patrick St south to E Saint
Francis St, for a distance of
0.10 miles.
• PINEDALE CIR: Begin-
ning at W Main St south to
Pinedale Heights Dr, for a dis-
tance of 0.12 miles.
• PINEDALE HEIGHTS:
Beginning at Pinedale Cir
northeast to W Main St, for a
distance of 0.32 miles.
• PLUTO ST: (Pluto Dr)
Beginning at Reservoir Rd east
to Stellar St, for a distance of
0.25 miles.
• RAPP ST: Beginning at
Latrobe Ave south for 519 feet,
for a distance of 0.10 miles.
• RED CLOUD ST: Begin-
ning at Mall Dr north for 686
feet, for a distance of 0.13
miles.
• RED ROAD DR: Begin-
ning at Cliff Dr southeast to
Falls Dr, for a distance of 0.20
miles.
• RED ROCK CANYON
RD: Beginning at Guest Rd
southwest for 3,547 feet to end
of Rapid City Limits, for a dis-
tance of 0.66 miles.
• ROBERTS CT: Begin-
ning at Plateau Ln east to end
of road, for a distance of 0.19
miles.
• S AIRPORT RD: Begin-
ning at E Highway 44 south to
end of road, for a distance of
0.68 miles.
• S ELLSWORTH RD: Be-
ginning at Highway 14/16
south to 158 feet south of Edel-
weiss Ln, for a distance of 0.72
miles.
• S SUNNYSIDE DR: Be-
ginning at W Sunnyside Dr
east to Bennett Rd, for a dis-
tance of 0.38 miles.
• S VALLEY DR: Begin-
ning at E Fairmont St south to
end of road, for a distance of
0.61 miles.
• SATURN DR: Beginning
at Reservoir Rd southeast to
Gemini St, for a distance of
0.29 miles.
• SCHROEDER RD: Be-
ginning at Nemo Rd southwest
to Wild Irishman Rd, for a dis-
tance of 1.90 miles.
• SHARPE RD: Beginning
at Highway 14/16 south to
Base Line Rd, for a distance of
7.39 miles.
• SHERMAN DR: Begin-
ning at Melody Ln north to end
of street, for a distance of 0.04
miles.
• SITTING BULL ST: Be-
ginning at Red Cloud St east to
Haines Ave, for a distance of
0.24 miles.
• SLATE PRAIRIE RD: Be-
ginning at S Rochford Rd
southeast to Deerfield Rd, for a
distance of 6.02 miles.
• SOUTH SIDE DR: Begin-
ning at Reservoir Rd east to
Redemption Rd, for a distance
of 1.52 miles.
• SUNNYSIDE DR: Begin-
ning at Bennett Rd west to end
of road, for a distance of 0.39
miles.
• SWEETBRIAR ST: Be-
ginning at Macks Dr south to
Twilight Dr; and beginning at
Twilight Dr south to Peanut St,
for a distance of 0.34 miles.
• SYLVAN LN: Beginning
at Jackson Blvd south to end of
road, for a distance of 0.10
miles.
• TERRY DR: Beginning at
Twilight Dr southeast to Neel
St, for a distance of 0.18 miles.
• TRASK RD: Beginning at
Cedar Butte Rd north to end of
road, for a distance of 4.08
miles.
• TWILIGHT DR: Begin-
ning at Reservoir Rd east to
Helios Dr, for a distance of 0.19
miles.
• UNA DEL DR: Beginning
at the north portion of Wild-
wood Dr south to Wildwood Dr,
for a distance of 0.45 miles.
• UNNAMED: Beginning at
Bombing Range Rd between
Sec 15 and 22, T3S, R13E
east to E Highway 44, for a
distance of 0.53 miles.
• VALLEY DR: Beginning
at 120 feet north of Windhaven
Dr south to E Highway 44, for
a distance of 0.53 miles.
• VILLA DR: Beginning at
N Ellsworth Rd east to Briggs
St, for a distance of 0.20 miles.
• VISTA DR: Beginning at
Bennett Rd west to end of
road, for a distance of 0.25
miles.
• VISTA HILLS DR: Begin-
ning at Sheridan Lake Rd
southwest to end of road, for a
distance of 0.19 miles.
• W MAIN ST: Beginning at
Pinedale Cir east to S Berry
Pine Rd, for a distance of 0.28
miles.
• W SUNNYSIDE DR: Be-
ginning at S Sunnyside Dr
south to Country Rd, for a dis-
tance of 0.25 miles.
• WILDWOOD DR: Begin-
ning at the north end of Una
Del Dr east to Sheridan Lake
Rd; and beginning at the south
end of Una Del Dr east to
Sheridan Lake Rd, for a dis-
tance of 0.40 miles.
• WONDERLAND CIR:
(Wonderland Cutoff) Beginning
at Falls Dr southeast to Won-
derland Dr, for a distance of
0.10 miles.
• WONDERLAND DR: Be-
ginning at Wonderland Cutoff
south to Starlite Dr, for a dis-
tance of 0.65 miles.
• ZINNIA ST: (Zinnia Dr)
Beginning at Twilight Dr north
to end of road, for a distance of
0.18 miles.
BE IT FURTHER RE-
SOLVED by the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers, that the following roads be
added to the Pennington
County Primary Highway Sys-
tem:
• 154 AVE: Beginning at
Long View Rd south to 233 St,
for a distance of 2.0 miles.
• 236 ST: Beginning at
Jensen Rd east to 185 Ave, for
a distance of 1.54 miles.
• BIG FOOT ROAD: Begin-
ning at 222 St south to 237 St,
for a distance of 15.4 miles.
• BOMBING RANGE RD:
Beginning at Railway St south
to Shannon County Line, for a
distance of 6.77 miles.
• JENSEN RD: Beginning
at 236 St north to 233 St, for a
distance of 3.8 miles.
• SAGE CREEK RD: Be-
ginning at 182 Ave east to 186
Ave, for a distance of 6.76
miles.
Dated this 15th day of January,
2013.
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
Pennington County Board
of Commissioners
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie Pearson,
Auditor
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to approve Resolution 2013-
01-15 and authorize the Chairperson’s
signature thereto. Vote: Unanimous
RESOLUTION 2013-01-15
COUNTY SECONDARY
HIGHWAYS
WHEREAS, the Pennington
County Board of Commission-
ers have determined that it
would be in the best interest of
the residents of Pennington
County for the safe and effi-
cient movement of traffic, that
certain County Secondary
Roads receive needed mainte-
nance; and
WHEREAS, this Board has
the authority to determine
which County Secondary
Roads receive maintenance
pursuant to SDCL 31-12-26;
and
THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED that the following list
of County Secondary Roads
are hereby classified and
placed on the Pennington
County Secondary Highway
System of roads for mainte-
nance purposes:
• 158TH AVENUE: Begin-
ning at 226 St south to 585 feet
south of Hwy 1416, for a dis-
tance of 1.68 miles.
• ANDERSON ROAD: Be-
ginning at E Hwy 44 south to
South Side Dr, for a distance of
1.03 miles.
• ANTELOPE CREEK
ROAD: Beginning at Dawkins
Rd north to E Hwy 44, for a dis-
tance of 0.37 miles.
• FOREST RD: Beginning
at Sonquist Ln southeasterly to
W Hwy 44 for a distance of
1.37 miles
• SCHROEDER ROAD:
Beginning at Ridgeland Loop
northeast to Nemo Rd, for a
distance of 1.65 miles.
Dated this 15th day of January,
2013
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
Pennington County Board
of Commissioners
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
B. BID AUTHORIZATION FOR
MAINTENANCE PROJECTS AND AN-
NUAL SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS FOR
2013: MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Davis to authorize the Highway
Department to advertise for bids for the
following items: Item 1) Asphalt Concrete
Overlay Project AC 2013-1; Item 2) As-
phalt Concrete Overlay Project AC 2013-
2; Item 3) Asphalt Surface Treatment
Project AST 2013; Item 4) Aggregate
Stockpile Project AGG 2013-1; Item 5)
Asphalt Surface Crack Sealing Project
ASC 2013; Item 6) Aggregate Materials,
Asphalt Maintenance Materials, Compos-
ite Asphalt Concrete, Concrete Products,
Corrugated Metal Pipe, Cutback and
Emulsified Asphalt, De-icing Sand, Equip-
ment Rental, Fencing, Guardrail, Magne-
sium Chloride Solution, Seeding, Fertiliz-
ing, Mulching and Erosion Control Blan-
ket, Timber Bridge Materials, Traffic Con-
trol Materials. Vote: Unanimous.
C. ROAD SAFETY AUDIT (RSA) –
NEMO ROAD AND NORRIS PEAK
ROAD: MOVED by Trautman to select
CETEC Engineering Services Inc. as
consultant on the Nemo Road and Norris
Peak Road safety projects. The motion
died for lack of a second.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to select CETEC Engineering
Services Inc. as consultant on the Nemo
Road and Norris Peak Road safety proj-
ects. The motion carried 4-1 on a roll call
vote: Buskerud – no, Davis – yes, Hol-
loway – yes, Trautman – yes, Petersen –
yes.
ITEMS FROM WEED & PEST
A. 2012-2013 PENNINGTON
COUNTY FIRE PROTECTION AND
MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE SUPPRES-
SION PROJECT UPDATE
Commissioner Holloway left the meet-
ing.
2012 CONTINGENCY FUND DOLLARS
– COMMISSIONER TRAUTMAN
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to postpone Item 15A (under
Weed & Pest) and Item 16 (2012 Contin-
gency Fund Dollars) to the next meeting
so the Auditor, County Fire and Weed &
Pest can prepare funding recommenda-
tions for combating the Mountain Pine
Beetle.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to recess for five minutes. Vote:
Unanimous. The Board recessed at
10:20 a.m. and reconvened at 10:25 a.m.
with all Commissioners present.
Vote on the motion made prior to re-
cess: Unanimous.
ADDITONAL 2013 FUNDING REQUEST
FOR KEEP ELLSWORTH PROJECT:
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to transfer $10,000 from the
2013 Contingency Fund to the General
Fund Keep Ellsworth budget for an addi-
tional allocation to the Ellsworth Task
Force. Vote: Unanimous.
CREATION OF A REGIONAL RAIL AU-
THORITY IN PENNINGTON COUNTY
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Holloway to allow Ben Snow, Presi-
dent of Rapid City Economic Develop-
ment Partnership, to contact Jay Alder-
man, Chief Deputy State’s Attorney and
Auditor Julie Pearson to begin preliminary
work on agreements for a regional rail au-
thority in Pennington County. Vote:
Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM CHAIR
A. 2013 DEPARTMENT HEAD
MERIT AWARDS: MOVED by Holloway
and seconded by Trautman to approve
department head merit raises effective
January 1, 2013. Substitute motion:
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded by
Davis to remove IT Director Russ
Tiensvold from this list since he has been
employed by Pennington County less
than one year. Substitute motion:
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Trautman to approve department head
merit raises effective January 1, 2013,
with exception of the IT Director, and fur-
ther moved that his merit raise will be ef-
fective July 1, 2013. Vote: Unanimous.
Effective January 1, 2013: D. Gorton,
$5,647; S. Guffey, $5,236; L. Hollinshead,
$5,366; D. Jennissen, $5,924; H. Junge,
$7,529; M. Peterson, $7,041; S. Rit-
tberger, $6,201; K. Romey, $7,016; N. St-
root, $4,748.
Effective July 1, 2013: R. Tiensvold,
$6,677.
ITEMS FROM THE BOARD OF AD-
JUSTMENT
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to convene as the Board of
Adjustment. Vote: Unanimous.
A. VARIANCE / VA 12-11: William
Young. To reduce the minimum required
front yard and side yard setbacks from 25
feet to zero (0) feet and to reduce the
minimum required lot size in a General
Agriculture District and Limited Agricul-
ture District from 40 acres and 10 acres
to 0.35 acre in accordance with Sections
205, 206, and 509 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Lot 44 of the SW1/4NW1/4,
Dolomite Placer No. 1, Sec-
tions 13 and 14, T1N, R6E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to approve Variance / VA 12-11
to reduce the required front yard and side
yard setbacks from 25 feet to 5 feet in the
NW corner of the lot.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to amend the previous motion
to include that Variance / VA 12-11 only
applies to the dimensions of the shed cur-
rently under construction. Vote: Unani-
mous.
Vote on the motion as amended:
Unanimous.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Holloway to adjourn as the Board of Ad-
justment and reconvene as the Board of
Commissioners. Vote: Unanimous.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1)
B. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL
1-25-2(3)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Continued on page 9
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013 • Page 8 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Trautman to convene in executive ses-
sion. Vote: Unanimous. The Board re-
mained in executive session from 11:55
a.m. until 12:18 p.m. MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Buskerud to adjourn
from executive session. Vote: Unani-
mous.
PERSONNEL
Extension: Effective 1/7/2013 – A.
Bristol, $16.17/hr.
Health & Human Services: Effective
1/8/2013 – K. Thomas, $21.67/hr.
WSDJSC: Effective 1/1/2013 – K.
DeNeui, $3943.25.
CCADP: Effective 1/4/2013 – M.
Goetz, $16.17/hr.
Law Enforcement: Effective 1/28/2013
– W. Eichler, $16.17/hr.
Jail: Effective 1/14/2013 – T. Erickson
and M. Rivera, $15.39/hr.; N. Jacobs, C.
Daniel, S. Seiler, N. Herman, T.
Muhlbeier, B. Sachs at $19.65/hr.; J.
Horinka, $3406.00; Effective 1/1/2013 –
K. Blosser, 5001.16 + FTO $60.67, D.
Feller, $4207.26 + FTO $60.67; M. Cole,
$20.29/hr.; A. McGhee, $3543.45 + FTO
$60.67; C. Trevillyan, $20.29/hr.
Weed & Pest: Effective 1/1/2013 – L.
Blain, $14.17/hr.
AUDITOR’S ACCOUNT OF THE
TREASURER
To the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners, I hereby submit the fol-
lowing report of my examination of the
cash and cash items in the hands of the
County Treasurer as of December 31,
2012: Total balances of checking/savings
accounts, $28,450,695.93; Total balance
of Treasurer’s Office safe cash,
$9,400.00; Total certificates of deposit,
$2,581,162.32; Total Prime Value Invest-
ment, $2,374,818.31; Total petty cash,
$111,470.00; Total Cash Items, $165.91;
Total long/short, (640.36); Total,
$33,527,072.11. Submitted by Lori Wes-
sel, Deputy Auditor.
VOUCHERS
A & B Business Equipment, 71.10; A To
Z Shredding Inc, 237.15; Advanced Se-
curity Product, 2615.07; Agren Blando
Court, 255.97; Alcohol Monitoring,
107.20; Alexander, Rodney J, 865.00;
American Correctional, 2239.55;
Americinn Motel, 924.00; Apria Health
Care, Inc, 430.20; Atmosphere Hospitality
M, 300.00; Audio Video Solutions,
1256.86; Audra Malcomb Consulting,
13298.90; Bailey JD & MP Merryman,
3600.76; Ball, Joshua J, 6015.00; Banks,
Bridgette R, 110.20; Barnier, Greg,
1493.20; Batteries Plus, 105.90; Beezley,
Lawrence D, 270.00; Belgarde Enter-
prises, Inc, 240.00; Bennett, Robert,
825.00; BH Chemical Company Inc,
2521.67; BH Industries, Inc, 99.50; BH
Orthopedic &, 265.74; BH Services Inc,
190.33; BH Wilbert Vault, 330.00; Binder,
Tracy Lynn, 617.40; Blackstrap Inc,
6032.94; Blockbuster, 35.91; Bob Barker
Company Inc, 4528.05; Buhler, Alan L,
100.00; Buskerud, Ronald, 40.70; Butler
Machinery Company, 192.58; CBCinno-
vis, Inc, 99.00; CBM Food Service,
40109.82; CDW Government Inc,
6346.04; Chapman, Malcom, 1000.00;
Chemsearch, 338.05; City Of Rapid City,
1564.79; City Of Wall, 6695.33; Clark
Printing, 168.85; Clifford, Brandon,
825.00; Climate Control Systems,
1468.00; Colbath, Angela M, 2148.00;
Community Health Center, 504.50; Con-
tractors Insulation, 858.90; Costello,
Porter Et Al, 178.35; Dakota Fluid Power
Inc, 892.88; Dakota Pine Thinning,
1365.00; Dakota RV, 2948.00; Dakota
Supply Group Inc, 5.28; Dakota Type-
writer Exchang, 3173.99; Dakotaland Au-
toglass Inc, 316.00; Dalmation Fire
Equipement, 1215.00; Dash Medical
Gloves, Inc, 688.80; Davis, Kenneth,
1405.26; Davis, Lester, 644.41; Dennis
Supply - RC, 70.87; Diamond Pharmacy
Services, 16497.42; Door Security Prod-
ucts, 79.08; Ed Roehr Safety Products,
999.85; Eddie's Truck Sales Inc, 396.03;
Edelweiss Mtn Improv Assc, 1060.50; En-
ders, Jason, 32.00; Eprovider Solutions,
100.60; Evergreen Office Products,
6944.46; Fairchild, Gene A, 100.00;
Farmer Brothers Coffee, 248.95; Feehan
& Cline, PC, 992.20; Fink, Teresa L,
168.75; Firesteel Technologies, I,
11200.00; First Interstate Bank, 4313.81;
Fischer, Cory, 1125.00; Flooring America,
2111.36; Foley's Custom Print, 32.50;
Frederick, Elizabeth M, 190.95; Fried-
man, Joshua D Dr, 862.50; Fye, Tana,
73.80; G & H Distributing - RC, 194.99;
Geib, Elston, Frost PA, 6839.00; Genpro
Energy Solutions, 5692.57; Gittings, Holly
L, 172.50; Glasshoff, Kayla L, 40.00;
Godfrey Brake Service, 309.25; Golden
West Technologies, 753.19; Gomez, Vic-
tor, 2550.00; Gore, Andrew G, 2070.00;
Great Western Tire, Inc, 1864.09; Green-
field, Colin, 105.00;
Gunderson,Palmer,Nelson, 304.60;
Hamann, William G, 162.00; Hanna,
Dana L, 4395.20; Harveys Lock Shop,
85.00; Hasler, Inc, 409.50; Health Educa-
tion Design, 54.00; Heartland Paper
Company, 278.04; Hein, Cheryl, 980.00;
Hendrickson, Kristina, 390.00; Hess,
Brandon, 4065.00; Hewlett-Packard,
17743.31; Hobby Lobby, 179.94; Hol-
loway, Don, 310.80; Indoff Inc, 161.88; In-
terstate All Battery, 135.45; Interstate Bat-
teries, 107.95; Jackson Lewis, LLP,
1175.00; Janis, Gerry, 2415.00; Janz,
Donald A, 1950.00; Jefferson Partner LP,
927.90; Johnson Controls, 57500.00;
Johnson Machine Inc, 309.99; Johnston,
Oatin, 780.00; Kappedal, Jean, CSR,
118.00; Kea Properties, 190.00; Kieffer
Sanitation/A Wste, 60.33; Klapkin, Aaron,
168.00; Knecht Home Center Inc, 141.87;
Knology, 318.43; Laboratory Corporation
Of, 180.27; Laboratory Corporation Of,
23.50; Laminex Inc, 731.97; Lattice Incor-
porated, 25531.03; Lewis, Paul A,
840.50; Lewno, Lucille M, 83.25; Light &
Siren, 192.51; Lincare Inc, 64.73; Lockup
USA, 596.50; Manlove Psychiatric Group,
1083.38; Marco, Inc, 125.35; Martin Fire
Department, 1796.81; Martin, John,
167.47; Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc, 2.52;
Mathison Company, 630.00; Mattson-
Casteel, Cathy, 2514.05; McCloskey,
Sheena, 318.80; McGowan, Wendy T,
737.26; McLane,Terry, 38.40; Medical
Waste Transport, 462.48; Medicap Phar-
macy - St Pat, 2646.39; Medline Indus-
tries Inc, 747.84; Melone, Lorie D PC,
37.80; Menards, 13.76; Meyer, Robert W,
7470.00; Meyer, Tiffany, 53.92; Midzak,
Gregory, 3855.00; Moore Medical Corp,
34.47; Moran, Patty, 910.00; Moss,
William A, Psyd,LLC, 1170.00; Mueller,
Brian, 132.50; Murphy Law Office, P.C.,
866.20; Nelson, Dana K, 100.00; Nelson,
Diana, 1975.00; Neve's Uniforms Inc,
3399.74; Newkirk's Ace Hrdwre-East,
610.97; Newkirk's Ace Hrdwre-West,
45.12; Nohr, Linda J, 735.00; Northwest
Pipe Fitting In, 215.64; O'Leary, Margaret,
61.72; Orrock, Kenneth Eby, 606.80; Otis
Elevator Co, 13928.05; Outdoor Motor
Sports, 12460.00; Paradis Properties
LLC, 125.00; Parker Drive Development,
66.00; Parr Law PC, 600.80; Penn Co
Health & Human Sv, 85.95; Penn Co
Highway, 175.61; Penn Co Jail, 166.49;
Penn Co Sheriff, 1901.15; Petersen, Lyn-
dell, 1512.56; Phelps, Terri, 170.00; Pio-
neer Enterprises, Inc, 3395.00; Plumb-
master Inc, 441.90; Pollard, Jerry, 205.00;
PSI Health Care Inc, 30.00; Psychologi-
cal Evaluations, 780.00; Quality Trans-
missions, In, 15.50; Quill Corporation,
39.21; Radiology Assoc. Prof. LL, 346.09;
Radke, Eric, 100.00; Rapid Delivery Inc,
120.00; Rapid Rooter, 295.00; Rapid
Transit System, 20.00; Ravellette Publi-
cations, 777.92; RC Area School Dist 51-
4, 1792.66; RC Emergency Services,
735.30; RC Fire & Emergency Srvcs,
640.09; RC Journal, 3417.23; RC Police
Dept-Evidence, 3221.00; RC Regional
Hospital, Inc, 21872.36; RC Regional
Hospital, Inc, 22.75; RC Regional Hospi-
tal, Inc, 236.78; RC Regional Hospital,
Inc, 4144.66; RC Winair, 144.20; RDO
Equipment Co, 26.16; RDO Equipment
Co, 244.18; Record Storage Solutions,
644.98; Red River Service Corp, 49.48;
Redwood Toxicology, 499.00; Regional
Health Physician, 39.61; Regional Health
Physician, 3785.65; Rensch Law Office,
18522.87; Reuer, Allen, 1575.00;
Rochester Armored Car, 50.00; Roesler,
Eric, 795.00; Romano, Larry V, 100.00;
Rush Funeral Home, 235.32; Salamun,
Dalaina, 190.00; Saldanha, Claude R,
240.00; Schiley, Buck, 490.00; Schmidt
Funeral Home, Llc, 1700.00; Schreiner
Enterprises, In, 159.70; Schuft, Scott,
537.47; Scotts Bluff County Court, 3.00;
SD Dept Of Labor, 2255.70; SD Dept Of
Revenue, 35.00; SD Dept Of Transp-Fi-
nance, 7278.85; Sentinel Offender Serv-
ice, 5085.22; Servall Uniform/Linen Co,
1890.39; Shepherd Reporting Llc, 27.50;
SHI International Corp, 29784.29; Site
Work Specialists Inc, 59079.60; Skinner
& Winter Prof, LL, 2907.76; Smoot & Utz-
man, 1321.95; Snelling, David J,
1455.00; Solano, Tracy A, 100.00; South-
ern Hills Publishing, 2563.09; Speck,
Jody H, 635.50; Spizzirri Press, Inc,
25.00; Stephens, Matthew, 11250.00;
Stewart, Cathy L, 50.00; Street Image II,
Inc, 1978.00; Streicher's, 1383.98;
Tessier's Inc, 2737.91; Tractor Supply
Credit Pla, 69.98; Troxel, Timothy E,
4275.00; TW Vending Inc, 8605.08; Two
Wheeler Dealer, 45.00; US Bank,
9550.00; US Postal Service, 200.75; Van-
way Trophy & Awards, 12.50; Vemco,
3650.25; Verizon Wireless, 90.49; Ver-
meer High Plains, 43.04; Voet, John,
240.00; Vugate, Inc, 2577.22; Walker Re-
fuse, 107.25; Watson Law Office, P.C.,
90.20; Wells Fargo, 28083.14; Well-
spring, Inc, 5451.85; Wessel, Al Jr, MD,
2850.00; West Payment Center, 1802.65;
West River Intrntnl Inc, 94.17; Western
Mailers, 24.76; Western Stationers Inc,
4043.45; Wex Bank, 140.32; Wex Bank,
4454.79; Why Not Invest, LLC, 165.00;
Wolf, Ione, 400.00; Wolff, Jacob, 2415.00;
Wood, Jamie, 385.00; Working Against
Violence, 9086.50; Zacharias, Jerome C,
162.50; Ziggy's, 36.76; Zuercher Tech-
nologies Llc, 90750.00; Ace Hardware-
East, 45.99; BH Chemical Company Inc,
149.95; CBM Food Service, 3750.92;
Dakota Supply Group Inc, 179.61; Fifer-
man, Leslie, Ph.D., 180.00; Harveys Lock
Shop, 703.50; Hauff Mid-America Sports,
1381.71; Industrial Electric, 360.00; Lat-
tice Incorporated, 344.84; Lighting Main-
tenance Co, 236.09; Marco, Inc, 131.68;
Morse Watchmans Inc, 624.50; North
Central Supply Inc, 75.00; Officemax In-
corporated, 1905.33; Penn Co JSC,
48.08; RC Area School Dist 51-4, 262.92;
SHI International Corp, 5264.32; Smith,
Kendra, 669.75; Swanson Services Corp,
21.70; TC Custom Woodworking LLC,
701.00; Twl Billing Service &, 577.10;
Wessel, Al Jr, Md, 850.00; Wex Bank,
81.28; Zuercher TechnologiesLLC,
13250.00; A & A Property Management,
270.00; A-1 Sewer & Drain, Inc, 120.00;
Adams-ISC, LLC, 57.50; American Soci-
ety Of Farm, 525.00; American Tech
Srvcs Inc, 6497.00; Apco International
Inc, 577.00; Arc International, Inc,
5006.92; Atkinson, Don, 83.00; Badlands
Automotive, 989.83; Beeson, Dennis R,
100.00; Behavior Management,
50474.00; BH Chemical Company Inc,
2100.60; Binder, Tracy Lynn, 127.50;
Braunstein, Roger, 4583.33; Buck, Earl
W, 100.00; Buffington, Shiloh, 99.99; But-
ler Machinery Company, 69.20; Capital
Holdings LLC, 150.00; City Of New Un-
derwood, 586.20; City Of Rapid City,
9333.33; Community Health Center,
21250.00; Contractors Supply, Inc, 60.00;
D & F Truck And Auto, 214.90; Dakota
Plains Legal Srvs, 16333.33; Dakota
Typewriter Exchang, 141.20; DHD Con-
struction Inc, 13.66; Eddie's Truck Sales
Inc, 320.17; Edgewood Estates, LP,
233.00; Ellsworth Task Force, 15000.00;
Evergreen Office Products, 22.48; Exec-
utive Mgmt Fin Office, 849.54; Fennell
Design, Inc, 1429.14; Fisk Land Survey-
ing &, 4387.50; Foley's Custom Print,
32.50; Fred Pryor Seminars, 199.00;
Fuss, Larry D, 240.00; Geske, Loren T,
100.00; Glissman, Dennis D, 100.00;
Godfrey Brake Service, 2330.34; Golden
West Technologies, 1395.00; Grabar
Voice And Data Inc, 3697.00; Great West-
ern Tire, Inc, 219.40; Gregory, Donald L,
100.00; Grimm's Pump Service Inc,
242.78; Guttierez, Joe, 180.00;
Hainesway Limited Partner, 240.00; Har-
veys Lock Shop, 85.20; Hill City Public Li-
brary, 6548.25; Hoback, Larry, 270.00;
Honeywell, Inc, 89275.75; Horwath Laun-
dry Equipment, 582.24; Howell, Jack K,
74.80; Humane Society Of The BH,
4166.67; Iowa Sex Crimes Analysis,
150.00; Jadari, Jennifer, 176.00; Jeffer-
son Partner LP, 194.00; Jenner Equip-
ment Co., 297.91; Johnson Machine Inc,
1133.87; Johnson's Carpet, 1110.00;
Karl's Appliance, 471.96; Keystone City
Hall, 2275.00; Kivi, Daniel, 25.60; Knecht
Home Center Inc, 63.34; Knollwood
Townhouse, 427.00; Knology, 678.79;
Leo A Daly, 17961.56; Login, 1400.00;
Macomber, Marjorie J, 100.00; Marco,
Inc, 523.59; Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc,
129.00; McNight, Joyce N, 100.00;
Mehrer, Michelle, 180.00; Menards,
120.70; Mercy Housing Sd2, Llc, 190.00;
MG Oil Company, 1049.65; Mid-States
Organized, 250.00; Midwest Motor Sup-
ply Co, 239.27; Mobil Satellite, 3010.00;
Morphotrak, 12766.00; NACE, 275.00;
NACO, 1857.00; NAED, 650.00; Neve's
Uniforms Inc, 239.00; Newkirk's Ace Hrd-
wre-East, 18.98; Nohr, Linda J, 350.00;
Otis Elevator Co, 4249.95; Pacific Hide &
Fur Depot, 19.96; Peckosh, Thomas F,
145.00; Penn Co Juv Diversion, 28.36;
Penn Co States Atty, 75.90; Penn Con-
servation Dist, 6787.50; Pennington
County Housing, 380.00; Pioneer Enter-
prises, Inc, 1935.00; Rapid Leasing,
919.47; Rapid Transit System, 290.00;
RC Area School Dist 51-4, 235.15; RC
Chamber Of Commerce, 475.00; RC
Journal, 651.16; RCS Construction Inc,
63969.58; RDO Equipment Co, 50.40;
Ricoh Usa Inc, 170.00; Robert Sharp &
Associates, 240.00; Ruff, Kathy, 83.00;
Schnider, Patricia Jo, 270.00; SD Assoc
Of Cnty Hwy Supt, 450.00; SD Dept Of
Health, 100.00; SD Div Of Motor Vehi-
cles, 28.00; SD Sheriff's Association,
3378.44; SD State's Attys Assoc,
2250.00; SDAAO, 55.00; SDACC,
14632.72; SDEMA, 60.00; Servall Uni-
form/Linen Co, 27.51; Simplexgrinnell,
19120.00; Sturdevant's Refinish, 133.18;
Sturdevant's- Rapid City, 166.87; Terra-
con Consultants Inc, 1037.85; Tri-State
Tire & Auto, 191.83; Trugreen - Chem-
lawn, 4621.08; Tyler Technologies,
32907.00; US Postal Service, 2250.00;
Verizon Wireless, 158.36; Vermeer High
Plains, 32.00; Wall Badlands Chamber,
50.00; Wall Community Library, 3875.00;
Weed & Pest Conference, 170.00; Weis-
beth Enterprise, Inc, 805.00; Wessel, Al
Jr, MD, 1150.00; West Payment Center,
639.52; West River Intrntnl Inc, 149.79;
West River Welding, 520.00; Western
Communication Inc, 19855.00; Western
Dakota Insrs Inc, 3522.00; Western
Thrifty Inn LLC, 550.00; Whisler Bearing
Co, 54.82; Woolridge, Gregory R, 270.00;
Zacharias, Jerome C, 228.35; Zuercher
Technologies LLC, 246100.83; Behavior
Management, 400.00; BH Power,
39,562.79; Cetec Engineering, 9,091.13;
City of Box Elder, 329.55; City of New Un-
derwood, 330.00; City of Rapid City,
5,320.00; City of Rapid City-Water,
1,404.97; Conexis Benefit Admin, 838.02;
First Administrators, 249,586.21; First In-
terstate Bank, 501.95; Golden West Co,
1,357.57; Knology, 1,451.88; Kieffer San-
itation, 2,241.79; Midcontinent Communi-
cations, 918.71; Mt Rushmore Telephone,
102.23; Orbitcom Inc, 45.86; Qwest Corp,
7,606.24; Rainbow Gas Co, 6,905.17; SD
Risk Pool, 3,718.00; SD Dept of Rev-
enue, 11,104.49; Wells Fargo Settlement,
26,100.23; West River Electric, 76.08;
Verizon, 562.37; Wex Bank, 1,231.58.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 12:18
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published January 31, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $502.92.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Loretta Daigle has applied for a Condi-
tional Use Permit to allow a Vacation
Home Rental on the subject property in a
General Agriculture District located on Lot
1 of the NW1/4NE1/4, Section 22, T2S,
R4E, BHM, Pennington County, South
Dakota, 12175 White Horse Road, in ac-
cordance with Sections 205, 319, and
510 of the Pennington County Zoning Or-
dinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 11th day of February 2013. At this
time, any person interested may appear
and show cause, if there be any, why
such requests should or should not be
granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published January 31, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $15.88.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that John Preston
has petitioned the Pennington County
Planning Board of Commissioners for va-
cation of the following described un-
opened Section Line Highway under the
provisions of SDCL 31-3-6.1:
Legal Description: That portion of Section
Line Right-of-Way lying in Lots 3, 5, and
6 of Forty Oaks Ranch Subdivision, lo-
cated between Sections 18 and 19, T2S,
R7E, BHM, Pennington County, South
Dakota.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tion will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners, in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
5th day of February 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $13.97.
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Proceedings of Pennington
County Commissioners
(cont. from previous page)
Pennington County Courant
279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net
Making the time and finding the
energy to improve one's self is, in
my opinion, a very wise invest-
ment, and yet I am amazed at how
many people I meet who do not
fully understand the importance of
personal and professional develop-
ment and training for themselves.
Investing one's time and money
in learning is a powerful thing. We
each have so much potential that
could and should be tapped. I have
found that investing in my own
continuing education is far more
profitable to me than investing in
the stock market.
Gaining knowledge is one thing,
however learning the skills to
think, plan, and make dreams turn
into realities, is entirely another
matter. This can be accomplished
by taking the time to sharpen our
axe. I personally choose not to be
dull. I want to be sharp. I want to
be ready at all times to cut wood-
that is, to make things happen in
life.
I encourage everyone I meet to
become a person who craves more
education and hungers for learn-
ing. Taking seminars and classes,
reading books and listening to
CD's, talking to others and asking
a ton of questions are all ways one
can sharpen their axe.
You may benefit from this four-
step process I use quite often to
sharpen my own axe. Keep in mind
that the primary reason for im-
proving oneself is so to be more ef-
fective in getting along, uplifting
and contributing to others' lives in
a positive manner.
Step One. I CAN! Make a list of
all your skills and abilities.
Step Two. I AM! Make a list of all
your roles and responsibilities.
Step Three. I HAVE! Make a list
of all your assets.
Step Four. I WILL! Make a list of
all you goals, dreams and desires.
Apply this process in your every-
day life and you will be amazed at
the results. Indeed, you will dis-
cover a definite sharpening of your
axe!
Sharpening Your Axe
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands
of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for
more details at 800-437-9715 and
be sure to check out Bob’s web-
site at: www.mrattitudespeaks.
com.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS:
10:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12:00 P.M. (MT)
DISPERSIONS:
GLEN RADWAY - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 100
DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DEEP CFEEK ANC; CLV. 3-2
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG - ºAGE DISPERSION" - 35
DLK 8 YF OLD & OLDEF COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-27
DAN PETRIK - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 27 DLK 3
YF OLD TO SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-22
BRED HEIFERS:
RON MAHAFFY - 190 FANCY DLK ANC HFFS; DFED.
LDW SONS OF PFIMETIME & IN FOCUS; CLV. 3-15 FOF 15
DAYS
MONTY WILLIAMS - 49 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW FUSH-
MOFE ANC & FAFTEF U+; CLV. 4-1 FOF 25 DAYS
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
JIM GOOD - 50 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK & HEFF; CLV. 4-1
EDDIE TAYLOR - 40 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-25
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FE-
PLACEMENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF &
PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: JAN. 29, 2DJS
We Þod o b1g run o] oo111e ]or our S1ooK
SÞou Speo1o1 Feeder Co111e So1e. B1g
oroud o] peop1e ond o good s1rong mor-
Ke1. We1gÞ-ups Þ1gÞer. B1g Speo1o1 S1ooK
Cou & Bred He1]er So1e Þer ne×1 Tues-
dog.
FEEDER CATTLE:
NEWTON BROWN - FAITH
87............................FED STFS 713= ..........$164.00
18..................FED & DLK STFS 632= ..........$164.00
ARNESON & ELSHERE - ELM SPRINGS
85............................DLK STFS 654= ..........$170.00
54............................DLK STFS 560= ..........$174.00
6..............................DLK STFS 475= ..........$186.00
90............................DLK HFFS 551= ..........$157.50
12............................DLK HFFS 458= ..........$172.00
H&S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
79............................DLK STFS 606= ..........$175.00
80............................DLK STFS 628= ..........$171.00
KIETH SMITH & SONS - QUINN
288........................CHAF STFS 821= ..........$147.35
95..........................CHAF STFS 738= ..........$153.50
297........................CHAF HFFS 774= ..........$140.10
82..........................CHAF HFFS 687= ..........$143.25
BUTCH & NEAL LIVERMONT - INTERIOR
55............................DLK STFS 547= ..........$177.00
20............................DLK STFS 476= ..........$185.00
42............................DLK HFFS 496= ..........$162.75
LLOYD MARTI - NEW UNDERWOOD
28............................DLK STFS 543= ..........$177.50
24............................DLK STFS 463= ..........$191.00
28............................DLK HFFS 494= ..........$161.75
15............................DLK HFFS 448= ..........$172.00
JIM & LEVI GARRETT - PIERRE
22............................DLK HFFS 547= ..........$157.00
K BAR C RANCH LLC - STURGIS
59 .................DLK & DWF STFS 660= ..........$166.25
48 ..........................HEFF STFS 595= ..........$165.75
15.................FWF & DWF STFS 583= ..........$166.00
63 ................FWF & DWF HFFS 634= ..........$149.50
26 ................FWF & DWF HFFS 537= ..........$156.50
19..........................HEFF HFFS 496= ..........$158.50
JERRY & TRAVIS NELSON - PHILIP
82 .................DLK & DWF STFS 760= ..........$152.50
53 .................DLK & DWF STFS 697= ..........$154.25
76...........................DWF HFFS 707= ..........$141.50
44.................DLK & DWF HFFS 614= ..........$143.00
OFM PARTNERSHIP - CREIGHTON
88............................DLK STFS 674= ..........$160.00
49............................DLK HFFS 641= ..........$143.75
WELLER RANCH - KADOKA
75............................DLK STFS 703= ..........$157.75
48 .................DLK & DWF STFS 601= ..........$167.00
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
18............................DLK STFS 559= ..........$177.25
DENNY & DORIS LAUING - STURGIS
15.................DLK & DWF HFFS 620= ..........$155.00
29............................DLK HFFS 730= ..........$146.00
RUSS BALLARD - BUFFALO GAP
15 ................CHAF & DLK STFS 601= ..........$169.50
7..................CHAF & DLK STFS 463= ..........$178.00
BRIAN & JENNIFER PHILIPSEN-NEW UNDERWOOD
31.................DLK & DWF HFFS 556= ..........$157.00
11.................DLK & DWF HFFS 480= ..........$158.50
JERRY ROSETH - PHILIP
42..................FED & DLK STFS 724= ..........$157.00
BILL KOPP - BOX ELDER
55 .................DLK & DWF STFS 630= ..........$166.00
10 .................DLK & DWF STFS 536= ..........$173.00
51.................DLK & DWF HFFS 597= ..........$146.75
BILL GOTTSLEBEN - PHILIP
80............................DLK STFS 754= ..........$151.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
138 ..........................DLK STFS 865= ..........$141.50
80............................DLK STFS 791= ..........$146.00
GLEN RADWAY - MILESVILLE
54 .................DLK & DWF STFS 910= ..........$138.85
HOSTUTLER RANCH - MIDLAND
159........................CHAF HFFS 780= ..........$138.60
94..........................CHAF HFFS 705= ..........$139.50
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
73..........................CHAF HFFS 894= ..........$133.10
75..........................CHAF HFFS 822= ..........$134.10
SLOVEK & EISENBRAUN - PHILIP
63..........................CHAF STFS 878= ..........$139.50
75..........................CHAF STFS 784= ..........$143.50
73..................FED & DLK STFS 856= ..........$142.35
80..................FED & DLK STFS 769= ..........$147.10
75..........................CHAF HFFS 801= ..........$134.00
85........DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 720= ..........$139.50
NOTEBOOM CATTLE - PHILIP
60 ........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 774= ..........$147.25
IRWIN FERGUSON - KADOKA
18..........................HEFF HFFS 613= ..........$145.00
CAPUTA LAND & CATTLE - CAPUTA
38............................DLK HFFS 651= ..........$141.00
21............................DLK HFFS 569= ..........$150.50
A&O FARMS - HERMOSA
25..................FED & DLK STFS 674= ..........$157.00
24 .................FED & DLK HFFS 612= ..........$142.00
BOB THORSON - PHILIP
41 .................DLK & DWF STFS 840= ..........$139.75
43.................DLK & DWF HFFS 780= ..........$133.10
PAT & GARY DEERING - STURGIS
18............................DLK STFS 662= ..........$159.00
MARK WILLIAMS - KADOKA
14 ........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 639= ..........$156.00
11 ...............CHAF & FED HFFS 569= ..........$150.00
JON ANDERSON - RAPID CITY
7..............................DLK STFS 667= ..........$160.00
5..............................DLK HFFS 592= ..........$146.50
HELEN PFEIFER - PHILIP
10................CHAF & DLK HFFS 554= ..........$152.00
ED MILLER - FAITH
35 .................FED & DLK HFFS 563= ..........$152.50
MATT MILLER- FAITH
14 .................FED & DLK HFFS 501= ..........$151.00
GREG SHEARER - WALL
31............................DLK HFFS 582= ..........$142.00
MARK & CASEY SAMMONS - MIDLAND
8 ..........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 592= ..........$161.50
KEITH SMITH - MILESVILLE
5....................FED & DLK STFS 614= ..........$160.00
11 .................FED & DLK HFFS 534= ..........$144.00
RAYMOND LONGBRAKE - HOWES
7..............................DLK STFS 560= ..........$170.00
12.................DLK & DWF HFFS 477= ..........$160.75
WEIGHUPS:
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
3 ............................FED COWS 1398= ..........$90.25
1..............................FED COW 1575= ..........$89.00
5 ............................FED COWS 1530= ..........$85.25
1........................FED COWETTE 1025= ..........$96.00
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
1..............................DLK DULL 1850= ........$103.00
ED HEEB - MIDLAND
1 ..............................DLK COW 1345= ..........$86.00
ALBERS RANCH LLC - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ..............................DLK COW 1360= ..........$85.00
1..............................FED COW 1300= ..........$83.00
4 ..................FED & DLK COWS 1095= ..........$82.50
2 ............................FED COWS 1218= ..........$80.00
DUANE & SHARON KEFFELER - UNION CENTER
1..............................DLK DULL 1845= ........$100.00
BENNETT RANCH - PHILIP
1 ..............................DLK COW 1265= ..........$85.50
1 ..............................DLK COW 1140= ..........$85.00
1 ..............................DLK COW 1475= ..........$84.50
HOTCHKISS RANCH - REVA
1 ..............................DLK COW 1385= ..........$84.50
12...........................DLK COWS 1287= ..........$84.25
14..........................DLK HFFTS 961= ..........$106.00
3..............................DLK HFFS 983= ..........$121.50
BARBARA NARO2ONICK - OLYMPIA, WA
1 ..............................DLK COW 1200= ..........$82.00
1 ..............................DLK COW 1415= ..........$81.50
1 ..............................DLK COW 1260= ..........$81.00
1 ..............................DLK COW 1500= ..........$80.50
RUSSELL BALLARD - BUFFALO GAP
1 ..............................DLK COW 1240= ..........$81.00
DAN GRUBL - STURGIS
1........................DLK COWETTE 1070= ..........$85.50
TONI LAFFERTY - PARMELEE
2 .................DLK & DWF HFFTS 1008= ........$112.00
1 .............................DLK HFFT 1170= ..........$93.00
BERNARD BEER - RAPID CITY
2............................DLK HFFTS 898= ..........$104.00
RICK KING - PHILIP
1 .............................DLK HFFT 995= ............$91.00
Pennington County Courant • January 31, 2013 • Page 10
ATTENTION:
2013 SENIORS & PARENTS
The Pennington County Courant would like to use a
senior picture for the graduation pages that will run in
May. You may drop them off at the office
(212 4th Ave.), mail them to PO Box 435, Wall, SD
or email to annc@gwtc.net.
All pictures will be returned. Thank you, Anne Jo
The Looking Glass of Time
80 years ago…
Senate Bill No. 37, introduced
by Senator Otto L. Kaas of Britton,
proposed to repeal the law requir-
ing rural districts to pay high
school tuition. The bill has been re-
ferred to committee and will prob-
ably remain there for a few days.
This bill, if passed, would elimi-
nate high school tuition and deny
to children of rural districts the
right and privilege of secondary
education at public expense.
On Friday evening, late, the
west school house in Peno Basin
district was burned to the ground
with all the contents. About mid-
night a fire was noticed at the
building and before anyone could
reach it the north half of the build-
ing had fallen in. Investigation has
so far been unable to find any
cause for the fire at that time of
night. Mrs. Stanley Teeters is the
teacher and since the fire she has
taken her students over to the east
school in the same district and the
two teachers and twenty four stu-
dents are somewhat crowded in
the one building. The burned
building was built a year ago last
summer.
Amos Reynolds was en route to
the C.P. Kitterman place to get a
load of wood. He left his truck at
the top of a hill and went to the
bottom to find a place to drive
down. While he was investigating,
the truck started down the hill
without a driver and went over the
edge of the breaks and upset, dam-
aging the cab, breaking the wind-
shield and springing the axel. It
took several of the neighbors to get
the truck out.
At 5 o’clock Sunday afternoon,
the Quinn fire bell rang giving the
usual dreaded alarm. The barn
and straw at the Carmichael
home, in town, was on fire. The
fire department acted promptly
and succeeded in checking the fire.
It was thought that the fire was
entirely extinguished but at mid-
night it blazed again and the fire
department was again called out.
Mr. and Mrs. Harrel Warner are
living in the house and it is
thought that one of the small chil-
dren succeeded in slipping out
doors with a match and starting
the straw on fire. Some chickens
and a harness were burned also.
70 years ago…
The Eagles of the Wall high
school trimmed the Owanka five,
19 to 13 in the Owanka hall, Tues-
day evening.
Fire razed the Camp Crook
schoolhouse, also destroying much
of the equipment, shortly after
class convened Wednesday morn-
ing. The blaze apparently started
by sparks from a flame which the
janitor was using to thaw out
frozen pipes in the basement.
Burning between the walls of the
building, it was impossible to con-
trol by the few fire fighters who
could be summoned immediately.
Within two hours the wooden
building was charred ruins. Suffi-
cient help to combat the flames
could not be obtained quickly, be-
cause the fire siren had been
frozen and could not be sounded.
None of the approximately 75 chil-
dren in the building was injured.
60 years ago…
The Wall Eagles evened their
score with Interior Monday
evening by winning from them on
the home floor, 62 to 46. In an ear-
lier season game, Interior had won
from the Wall boys.
Phil Logan of Kadoka, broke his
ankle last week when a horse he
was riding fell with him. They
were just preparing to move to a
farm near Belvidere and the injury
is quite a hindrance to him. Her-
man Denke is assisting with the
moving.
The Belvidere “B” and “A” bas-
ketball teams played the Quinn
teams last week and were defeated
in both encounters.
The weekly Wall livestock sales
are being discontinued until some
future notice, according to an an-
nouncement from E. C. Smoot.
Marion Renner of Wall, had a
shipment of 19 head of good qual-
ity whiteface steers that had seen
a little grain was sold Monday
through Sioux City Stock Yards in
Sioux City, Iowa, to an eastern cat-
tle feeder. The 19 head of two-year
olds crossed the scales weighing
1000 pounds and commanded
$22.00 per cwt. (He had been of-
fered $21.50 in Wall). Every mar-
ket in the nation that day had a
sharply lower market. Cattle
prices broke 50¢ to $1 and more.
The Renner cattle sold at the top
of the feeder market. Also with Mr.
Renner were Berle Dartt and
Merle Crown.
50 years ago…
Starting Monday, Wall first
graders will be on half day ses-
sions. The first group will attend
school from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 with
a milk break and the second group
will go from 12:30 until 4:00 p.m.
Mrs. Melvin Kjerstad has been
hired to teach one group. Kinder-
garten will be held from 9:00 until
10:00 as usual with second grade
starting school at 10:00 a.m. The
first grade will move to the corner
room (band room) and the second
grade to the present first grade
room.
Wall’s A and B teams eeked out
wins in a double header here Fri-
day night against New Under-
wood. It took an overtime period in
each game to score the wins. The
regulation time in the “A” game
ended in a 40-40 tie. Two free-
throws in the extra period were
made by Glenn Kjerstad to give
the local boys their win. The “B”
game was won in the overtime
with the final score 25-23.
A dish fell to the floor and star-
tled all who were in the Drug Store
coffee shop. Bernice Chapell hur-
riedly exclaimed, “My diamond
setting has fallen out of my ring”.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hustead are
enjoying their tour of Europe, ac-
cording to letters received by home
folks. After driving to Omaha, they
flew to Copenhagen, Denmark,
then on to Rome. A cousin of Mrs.
Hustead, Steve Pardy, was their
guide in that city. From here they
rented a car and made a tour along
the Italian and French Rivera and
stopping at Nice, France. Their
last stops will be in London and
Dublin.
40 years ago…
The Golden West Telephone Co-
Op awarded a $366,000.00 con-
tract Tuesday to the Hutton Con-
struction Co., Towner, North
Dakota to install over three hun-
dred miles of underground tele-
phone lines this summer. Con-
struction work will include the
completion of stormproofing in the
Enning Exchange with minor work
in the Creighton, Wall, Wicksville
and New Underwood exchanges.
All work fits into the Cooperative’s
One-Party service program using
underground lines. The Corpora-
tive will finance construction using
remaining prior loan funds along
with other general fund sources.
The Pennington County Crop
Improvement Association at its an-
nual meeting Friday elected
Richard Kjerstad, Quinn, presi-
dent. Other officers elected for the
coming year are Gene Patterson,
Wall, vice-president; Ray Knuppe,
New Underwood, secretary; and
Bill Bielmaier, Wall, treasurer. Les
Bryan, Wall, was re-elected as a di-
rector.
Dallas Matthews had two of the
ends of his fingers on the left hand
severed when a railroad boxcar
door slammed against them, Fri-
day. He was taken to Rapid City in
the Wall ambulance where he re-
mained until yesterday when he
returned home. He is employed at
the Hubbard Milling elevator in
Wall.
30 years ago…
Just when you have your fa-
vorite television schedule memo-
rized Golden West Telecommuni-
cations confuses the issue by
adding another channel. That’s
right, Golden West has, just like
they promised, started the process
to add another channel to the pres-
ent nine channel basic cable TV
(CATV) package. “We said several
weeks ago that we’d let the public
choose another channel to add to
the basic CATV package and the
first of three channels which will
be available for approximately 10
days to watch is WGN of Chicago,”
said Golden West Member Rela-
tions Representative Dwight Flatt.
The Wall high school mixed
choir has received official confir-
mation on their trip to Estes Park,
Colorado in May to participate in
the International Festival of The
Rockies. The choir had to make an
audition tape consisting of twelve
minutes of music to be sent to the
International Music Festival
Headquarters in Michigan, where
it was judged by Dr. Wilfred Bain,
Dean and Professor of Music, Indi-
ana University. They will spend
three days at the YMCA of the
Rockies, Estes Park, Colorado,
where they will perform for the
judges panel and be rated, and do
some sightseeing. They will return
home on Monday, the 16th.
The Wall high school one-act
play received the Superior trophy
at the Division 8 contest held in
Rapid City, Wednesday, January
26. Mike Carlbom, Kelly White
and Kathy Poppe also received Su-
perior acting awards for their per-
formances in the play. Other cast
members include Lori Alishouse,
Kari Goldhammer, Rhonda Lurz,
Denise Gunn, Margaret Sautter
and Lois Stverak. This is the
fourth time that the Wall one-acts
have gone to state in the last six
years. Pat Peterson, director,
stated that the other three plays
won Excellents at state and hopes
this is the one-act that will bring
home a Superior rating.
The boards weren’t in Wall’s
favor when they took on Kadoka
on Tuesday, January 25. The Ea-
gles were defeated by a score of 56-
34.
The Bennett County Warriors
handed Wall a 50-41 loss at Martin
on January 28.
20 years ago…
In a letter dated January 29,
1993, Wall Police Chief Jerry
Miller resigned his position, effec-
tive immediately. Jerry Miller has
been a member of the Wall Police
Department since 1971. In 1986,
he was appointed Police Chief and
has held that position until the
present. At this time no decision
has been made by the Wall City
Council concerning a replacement
for Miller.
BIRTH: Born November 2,
1993, a son, Collin Anthony, to
Mike and Marilyn Huether. Little
Collin joins siblings Bryant and
Hannah at home. Proud grandpar-
ents are Sonny and Patty Huether,
Wall, and Don and Joyce Chord,
White Owl. Great-grandfather is
Clarence Lyle, of Wall and great-
grandmother is Edith E. Chord,
Spearfish.
On January 26, 1993, the
Wall/Kadoka JV Gymnastics team
met with the Sturgis JV team in
Wall. The Wall/Kadoka team did a
very respectable job with a score of
92.5. Sturgis JV scored 97.2.
The Wall Eagle Wrestlers com-
peted in the Stanley County Trian-
gular Dual Tournament on Thurs-
day 26 and in the Belle Fourche
Invitational on Friday and Satur-
day, January 29 and 30. Wall lost
two duals and won one in Stanley
County. At the Belle Fourche Invi-
tational, the team finished a re-
spectable sixth place out of 20
teams. Most of the teams are A
schools from the five state region.
10 years ago…
A green light was given to Abdol-
lah Farrohki for his proposed $1.8
million complex on the corner of
Main Street and Sixth Avenue.
Farrohki had requested the build-
ing permit at a special Wall City
Council meeting January 16. The
council wished to resolve questions
concerning parking and what area
entailed the central business dis-
trict. The council also wished to
see blueprints of the building.
After reviewing the Wall ordinance
with legal counsel, it was deter-
mined that the lot was within the
central business district and that,
as such, additional parking was
not required by the business.
After having five days with no
games the Eagles came out Friday
night against Kadoka wanting a
win. Ammann’s game plan for the
night was to keep the Kougars
from running up and down the
floor and only play a half court
game with the height advantage
we had over Kadoka. Wall defeated
Kadoka in overtime 66-64. On Sat-
urday, the Eagles played against
the New Underwood Tigers. The
final score was Wall 38, New Un-
derwood 42.
With the Lady Eagles at home
for the last three games, it was
keeping the fans very busy. On
Thursday, January 23, the Lady
Eagles went up against Midland
Vikings. Wall defeated Midland
55-51. On Saturday, the Lady Ea-
gles went against the New Under-
wood Tigers. The girls played hard
but with too many mistakes lost,
36-52. Monday evening, the Lady
Eagles went against the Kadoka
Kougars. With the girls feeling bet-
ter and ready to play, they marked
up another victory, Wall 37,
Kadoka 30.

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
Courant_1-31-13.pdf4.69 MB