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Pennington Co. Courant, January 24, 2013

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Number 4
Volume 108
January 24, 2013
by Laurie Hindman
Nort Johnson, President of the
Black Hills Badlands and Lakes
was the featured speaker at the
January 14, Wall Badlands Area
Chamber of Commerce meeting.
Johnson informed the chamber
that the organization is 73 years
old and have a membership of 500
businesses.
Their budget for 2013 is two mil-
lion dollars in which Johnson gave
a breakdown on how the money
will be spent. He also noted that
apps for electronic devices are now
available for tourist to help plan
their vacation stay in S.D.
Wall Mayor Dave Hahn re-
minded the chamber that the next
city council meeting will be held on
Tuesday, February 5. If anyone in
the community has anything for
the meeting please give Finance
Officer Carolynn Anderson a call
at the city office.
Dennis Rieckman with the Wall
School announced that the Wall
School Board received the School
Board Excellence Award. The pres-
entation was held on Saturday,
January 19 during half time of the
boys basketball game.
Rieckman said, “The Wall School
Impact Aid applications for the
South Dakota’s electric coopera-
tives gathered in Pierre, January
10 and 11 for the South Dakota
Rural Electric Association’s 71st
annual meeting.
During the meeting, the 317 co-
operative leaders, which repre-
sented each of the state’s 31 elec-
tric cooperatives, heard presenta-
tions that focused on grassroots
advocacy, the importance of an en-
ergized cooperative culture and
other aspects impacting electric co-
operatives.
On Thursday, cooperative direc-
tors attended an “In the Board-
room” training session presented
by NRECA focusing on Planning
Among Regulatory Uncertainty. A
session on the importance of grass-
roots advocacy was also held,
which included a state legislative
update prior to the evening’s Leg-
islative Dinner, which saw more
than 420 people attend.
“This year will be a great oppor-
tunity to know the new legisla-
tors,” said SDREA board president
Don Heeren. “Our Co-op Day at
the Capitol on February 26 will
provide an additional occasion for
past three years have been final-
ized for payment. The wrestling
tournament that was to be held in
Philip and cancelled due to
weather will be held in Wall on
Saturday, February 9.
Jeanie Albrinck with the Bad-
lands National Park reported that
visitation for the park is up and
they kept their doors open during
Nort Johnson President of Black Hills Badlands and
Lakes was guest speaker at Wall Chamber meeting
Guest speaker Nort Johnson
gives a Joint Board report on
the Black Hills Badlands and
Lakes to the Wall Badlands
Area Chamber of Commerce
meeting held on Monday, Jan-
uary 14 at the Red Rock
Restaurant.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Farm Credit Services of America
continues its commitment to sup-
port youth in agriculture by en-
couraging participation in FFA.
Farm Credit Services of America
donated funds to the District V
FFA. The district used the money
to host the first annual Rushmore
Leadership Roundup.
District V FFA chapters consist
of members from the following
FFA chapters: Lemmon, Bison,
Harding County, Eagle Butte,
Newell, Sturgis, Rapid City, Wall,
Kadoka and Philip.
“Farm Credit Services of Amer-
ica is pleased to make this invest-
ment in the youth of tomorrow’s
agriculture,” stated Doug Theel,
Vice President of the Rapid City
Marketplace. “The future of agri-
culture lies within its youth. That
is why Farm Credit Services of
America is so heavily involved in
FFA, 4-H and other local, state and
national agricultural youth pro-
grams.”
The Rushmore Leadership
Governor’s Tourism Advisory
Board re-elects officers
The Governor’s Tourism Advi-
sory Board has re-elected new offi-
cers for the coming year.
Jim Schade of Volga, was re-
elected board president during a
board meeting in Pierre. Julie
Ranum of Watertown, was re-
elected vice president.
“The Governor’s Tourism Advi-
sory Board members add expertise
and insight to the campaigns, pro-
grams, and cooperative marketing
efforts that we have in our depart-
ment,” said Jim Hagen, Secretary
of the South Dakota Department
of Tourism. “We want to thank
them for their service to this in-
dustry and are fortunate to have
leaders like these who help ad-
vance the visitor industry in our
state.”
The Tourism Advisory Board is
appointed by the Governor and in-
Pictured left to right: Mark Schilling, Frank Smith, Ivan Sorbel,
Ted Hustead, Stan Anderson, Julie Ranum, Jim Schade, Kristi
Wagner, John Brockelsby, Jim Entenman, and George Kessler.
~Courtesy Photo
cludes visitor industry and citizen
representatives from across the
state. Board members serve as li-
aisons between businesses in their
area and the South Dakota De-
partment of Tourism. The board
also offers input about marketing
strategies for the department.
Current Tourism Advisory
Board members include Stan An-
derson, Ted Hustead, Jim Enten-
man, John Brockelsby, Jim
Schade, Frank Smith, Mark
Schilling, Julie Ranum, Ivan Sor-
bel, George Kessler and Kristi
Wagner.
The South Dakota Department
of Tourism is comprised of
Tourism, the South Dakota Arts
Council, and the South Dakota
State Historical Society. The De-
partment is led by Secretary
James D. Hagen.
the recent winter storm. She also
noted that Eric Brunnemann is in
Omaha, Neb. visiting about the
Bison and the parks vision state-
ment.
Jeanne Berry with the Minute-
man Missile National Historic Site
informed the chamber that
Reuben Andrade is still in Califor-
nia and his return is still undeter-
mined. Construction bids are in
and they are hoping to begin their
project in April.
District Ranger of the Forest
Service Alan Anderson said, “They
didn’t go over the fiscal cliff and
are still open.” They are finishing
up projects and hopefully will be
starting on the rehabilitation proj-
ect for the visitor center and offices
this late summer or fall.
Greg Olson with Golden West in-
formed the chamber that they are
adding more sports events to their
cable programs and starting
within the next couple of weeks all
cable viewers with Golden West
will have digital conversion boxes
so they can expand their program-
ming.
Dawn Hilgenkamp from West
River Electric announced that they
are not planning to increase rates
for 2013. They are developing an
app for smart phones and other de-
vices to view your bill and usage.
Black Hills Federal Credit
Union manager Robyn Miller re-
ported they are participating in
“Share the Warmth Blanket”
drive. They are accepting gently
used blankets for the Cornerstone
Mission.
Brett Blasius reported the Ag
Appreciation supper will be held
on Friday, January 25. Twenty-six
businesses sponsor the supper and
dance.
Blasius also reported for the
Medical Board. Booster shots are
advised for anyone who had gotten
a shot 90 days before. And, to call
the clinic and set up an appoint-
ment if you haven’t received a flu
shot yet.
Carol Hoffman with the Country
Cupboard informed the chamber
that the board is working with
Haakon and East Pennington
County transit bus service to help
clients get to the cupboard.
The Economic Development
Committee is working with
Haakon and Jackson counties on
Stronger Economics Together pro-
gram. A meeting will be held in
Certainty in Uncertain Times
co-op members, directors and em-
ployees to get to know our law-
makers and become more familiar
with the legislative process.”
The importance of co-op mem-
bers being involved in their coop-
eratives was stressed by SDREA’s
general manager.
“There is so much going on in
our industry right now that these
meetings take on special mean-
ing,” said SDREA general man-
ager Ed Anderson. “Bringing elec-
tric co-op leaders from around the
state to discuss issues and spend
time with their local legislators
adds tremendous value to our or-
ganization.”
Governor Dennis Daugaard
spoke to the group on Friday
morning and commended their
work in the state.
“You go the extra mile for your
members and you’re persistent.
We, as a state, need to be persist-
ent in solving our budget issues,”
said Daugaard.
On Friday morning, representa-
tives of Sen. Tim Johnson, Sen.
John Thune and Rep. Kristi Noem
spoke to the group and gave an up-
Farm Credit Services of America
donates to local FFA Chapters
Roundup gave students the oppor-
tunity to participate in a local
Leadership Career Development
Event before advancing onto the
district level for competition.
Students competed in eight dif-
ferent areas including Job Inter-
view, Agriculture Sales, Public
Speaking, Parliamentary Proce-
dure, Ag Broadcasting, Extempo-
raneous Speaking, Junior Parlia-
mentary Procedure and Creed
Speaking.
Farm Credit Services of America
is proud to finance the growth of
rural America, including the spe-
cial needs of young and beginning
producers.
With over 76,500 customers, as-
sets of $13 billion, and a patronage
program, FCSAmerica is the lead-
ing provider of credit and insur-
ance services to farmers, ranchers,
agribusiness and rural residents in
Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota
and Wyoming. Learn more at
www.fcsamerica.com.
Local FFA Chapter receive dontation from Farm Credit Services
of America. Picture from left to right ... Doug Theel, Vice Presi-
dent of Farm Credit Services of America; Kaden Eisenbraun,
Wall FFA Member; Gavin Snook, Philip FFA Member; Jennifer
Emery, Wall FFA Member; Kailey Sawvell, Wall FFA Member;
David Strain, Sturgis FFA Member; Krista Hofer, Farm Credit
Services of America; Bobbie Jo Donovan, Rapid City FFA Advi-
sor. ~Courtesy Photo
West River Board Members attended the South Dakota’s electric
cooperative rural electric meeting held in Pierre. Pictured from
left to right ... Stan Anders, Larry Eisenbraun and Bill Bielmaier.
~Courtesy Photo
United States Attorney Brendan
V. Johnson announced that a
Green Bay, Wisconsin man
charged with Unlawful Taking of
Wildlife was sentenced on January
7, 2013, by U.S. Magistrate Judge
Veronica L. Duffy.
Keith Jorgenson, age 37, was
sentenced to one year of probation
and a $1,000 fine. He was ordered
to pay $25 to the Victim Assistance
Fund and $2,500 in restitution.
On November 15, 2010, Jorgen-
son shot and killed a buck mule
deer in Pennington County, South
Dakota and attempted to trans-
port it over state lines. Jorgenson
took possession of the buck mule
deer and was leaving for Green
Bay on that same date.
However, the discovery of a par-
tially butchered buffalo in the Bad-
lands National Park on November
15, 2010 led local authorities to a
trailer in the parking lot of a hotel
in Wall, South Dakota where law
enforcement found buffalo
hindquarters and seven deer, none
of which were tagged.
An investigation determined
that Joseph Wilmet of Green Bay,
Wisconsin owned the trailer and
that Wilmet shot the buffalo in
Badlands National Park.
Jorgenson disclosed that he and
Wilmet had been scouting for ani-
mals in the days leading up to the
November 15, 2010 discovery of
the buffalo and deer.
Jorgenson admitted that he and
Wilmet shot and killed mule deer
bucks in and around Scenic, South
Dakota.
Wisconsin man sentenced for unlawful taking of wildlife
Wilmet was previously sen-
tenced on October 5, 2012.
"This investigation was a reflec-
tion of the tremendous cooperation
that exists between local, state,
and federal law enforcement offi-
cers in anti-poaching efforts," US
Attorney Johnson said. "Individu-
als thinking about poaching in
South Dakota better think twice.
The prosecution of these two
Seven deer that were shot by Jorgenson loaded in the back of a Game Fish and Parks pickup.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
men should serve as a notice to
anyone involved in poaching in our
state.
We take wildlife crime seriously
and we will continue our efforts to
work with our law enforcement
partners to investigate and prose-
cute these offenses.”
Superintendent of Badlands Na-
tional Park, Eric Brunnemann
stated, “Anyone that has seen
bison on the prairies know that
these majestic animals are iconic
of the American landscape.
We salute the hard work of all
the partners that made these con-
victions possible, the South
Dakota Game, Fish and Parks,
Pennington County Sheriff ’s Of-
fice, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, U.S.
Attorney's Office, and the National
Park Service.”
date on issues from a national per-
spective.
Board Reorganizes – Following
the meeting, the board of directors
held its re-organizational meeting.
Southeastern Electric director
Don Heeren of Parker was re-
elected as the association’s presi-
dent while Lacreek Electric direc-
tor Butch Livermont of Martin was
re-elected as the association’s vice
president. West River Electric di-
rector Bill Bielmaier of Wall was
re-elected secretary of the associa-
tion and West Central Electric di-
rector D.J. Mertens of Kennebec
was elected as the association’s
treasurer.
(continued on page 2)
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013 • Page 2
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Email us with your news item or photo to
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College briefs
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
JOS£PH TIMOTHY
TH\NУR HAWK
A IoIony Arrosf Wnrrnnf hns
boon Issuod for Josoµh TImofhy
Thundor Hnwk chnrgIng hIm
wIfh IossossIon of n ConfroIIod
Subsfnnco.
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mnIo, 28 yonrs of ngo, nµµroxI-
mnfoIy 5`8¨ fnII, l50 µounds,
bInck hnIr wIfh brown oyos.
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In or nround fho !nµId CIfy, SÐ
nron.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco
Ðoµnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l or
fho nonrosf Inw onforcomonf
ngoncy If you hnvo nny Informn-
fIon whIch wouId rosuIf In fho nr-
rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
The national PRCA Xtreme
Bulls Tour returns to Rapid City
on January 25-26 at the Black
Hills Stock Show and Rodeo® for
the seventh Annual Rapid City
Xtreme Bulls.
Seventy of the world’s top bull
riders will converge on the Rush-
more Plaza Civic Center to com-
pete for $52,000.
The star-studded field will fea-
ture 70 riders competing in a two-
day event. Each night, 35 cowboys
will participate in a long-go with
the top 10 riders brought back for
a short round.
The Rapid City champion will be
crowned based on the highest av-
erage score from both nights of
competition.
Performances on Friday, Janu-
ary 25 and Saturday, January 26
begin at 7:30 p.m. (CT).
The Rushmore Plaza Civic Cen-
ter is located at 444 Mt. Rushmore
Road North in Rapid City.
PRCA Xtreme Bulls Tour returns to Black Hills Stock Show Rodeo®
January 25-26; 70 of nation’s top bull riders converge on Rapid City
The 2013 program will feature
eight televised events scheduled
throughout the year across the
U.S., with combined purses of
$400,000.
Money earned at Xtreme Bulls
events count toward the PRCA
World Standings, which determine
Wrangler NFR qualifiers.
The 2013 event schedule is as
follows:
•January 25-26, Rapid City,
(SD) Xtreme Bulls - Rushmore
Plaza Civic Center
•February 17, Seminole Classic
Xtreme Bulls - Brighton, (Fla.)
Rodeo Arena
•February 23, San Antonio
(Texas) Xtreme Bulls - AT&T Cen-
ter
•March 23-24, Fort Mojave,
(AZ) - Classic Mojave Crossing
Event Center
•June 20, Reno-Tahoe Xtreme
Bulls - Reno, (Nev.) Rodeo Arena
•June 30, Cody -Yellowstone
Xtreme Bulls - Cody (Wyo.) Stam-
pede Rodeo Arena
•August 6, Lea County, (NM)
Xtreme Bulls - Lea County Fair-
grounds
•August 31, Ellensburg Tour Fi-
nale - Ellensburg (Wash.) Rodeo
Arena.
The PRCA Xtreme Bulls Tele-
vised Tour provides ProRodeo en-
thusiasts a national schedule that
brings the excitement of PRCA
bull riding to millions of fans. GAC
Network will provide eight original
airings of coverage of 2013 Xtreme
Bulls events.
About the PRCA
The PRCA, headquartered in
Colorado Springs, Colo., is the
largest and oldest professional
rodeo-sanctioning body in the
world.
The recognized leader in Pro-
Rodeo, the PRCA is committed to
maintaining the highest stan-
dards.
PhIIIp League BcwIIng
Lucky StrIke
0PBN B0wL1N0:
Sunday-FrIday, 1B tc B p.m. · Saturday, 1B p.m. tc cIcsIng
The kItchen Is cpen - we have crders tc gc!!
SS9-B4ß0 · PhIIIp
Monduy NIgLt MIxed
!ockors..........................................?-5
Ðnkofn Inr....................................?-5
Hnndrnhnn Consf .........................?-5
Shnd`s TowIng ...............................6-6
IndInnd`s Aufo..............................6-6
Ioforson`s ......................................3-9
HIgLt!IgLts:
!onnIo CoyIo........3-l0 sµIIf; 23?/560
Mnff !ockIIng...3-9-l0 sµIIf; 236/580
Knron Iyrd...................................l33
TrInn Irown..........................l8?/4??
ÞonI Ioforson........4-5 sµIIf; 203/5?8
VIckIo Ioforson ............................l8?
Jorry Moonoy ...............................208
MnrnIynn Iurns...........................l?0
Jnson Ioforson......................203/5??
ArIono Kujnwn......................2-? sµIIf
WondoII IuxcoI .....................2-? sµIIf
Tuesduy Men's £uv!y
IooµIos Mnrkof .............................4-0
IhIIIµ HonIfh SorvIco ...................4-0
IhIIIµ Mofor..................................4-0
Ionr Aufo ......................................3-l
Konnody ImµI ...............................l-3
Coorgo`s WoIdIng ..........................0-4
C&A TronchIng.............................0-4
Kndokn Troo SorvIco.....................0-4
HIgL!IgLts:
!nndy Ioyd..............................2l4 &
.............................2l0 bofh cIonn/60l
Tony CouId ............................200/546
InrI Inrk .............2-l0 sµIIf; 2l9/533
Ðnno HoIIokson ....................2-? sµIIf
Ðnn AddIson .........................2-? sµIIf
!os SfrubIo .........................3-l0 sµIIf
Wednesduy MovnIng CoIIee
Sfnfo Inrm..................................ll-5
CuffIng Idgo SnIon ....................l0-6
IowIIng IoIIos ............................l0-6
InvIsIbIos.......................................9-?
JoIIy !nnchors.............................5-ll
HIgL!IgLts:
ChrIsfy Inrk..........l8?, l?5, l65/523
ÐobbIo Cnrfnor .....................l?9/44?
Ðonnnn Ioos..................l68, l50/438
Wednesduy NIgLt £uv!y
MorrIson`s HnyIng ........................6-2
Ðorofhy`s CnforIng........................6-2
Ðnkofn Inr....................................5-3
IIrsf ÞnfIonnI Innk .....................5-3
Jusf Tnmmy`s................................5-3
ChIofIo`s ChIcks.............................2-6
HIIdobrnnd Concrofo ....................2-6
WnII Iood Confor ..........................l-?
HIgL!IgLts:
AshIoy !ockIIng ....................l92/524
Knfhy Arfhur.........................l82/504
Shnr Mosos...................................l??
IrIffnoy Ðrury.............................l?2
Sfncoy SchuIz......................5-l0 sµIIf
TLuvsduy Men
Tho Sfonkhouso ............................8-0
CoyIo`s SuµorVnIu.........................?-l
O`ConnoII Consf ............................6-2
Ðnkofn Inr....................................3-5
A&M !nundry...............................2-6
McÐonnoII Inrms .........................2-6
WII IAÐÐ...................................2-6
Wosf !Ivor IIonoor Tnnks............2-6
HIgL!IgLts:
MIko Mosos..........20l, l90 cIonn/589
Cory Ioyd..............................20?/58l
!onnIo WIIIInms...........................2l8
Jnson Ioforson......................2l0/564
HnrInn Moos..........................l94/5?5
IrInn Ionrson ..5-6 & 3-l0 sµIIf; 552
!Ick CoyIo...................5-l0 sµIIf; 20l
Mnff !ockIIng.......................5-? sµIIf
Irynn IuxcoI ................3-l0 sµIIf x 2
Jny McÐonnoII ................3-9-l0 sµIIf
Conrnd Kjorsfnd.................9-l0 sµIIf
AIvIn Ionrson .....................3-l0 sµIIf
Jordon Kjorsfnd..................3-l0 sµIIf
Chnd WnIkor.......................3-l0 sµIIf
Ðoug Hnuk..........................3-l0 sµIIf
Ðonn SchuIz........................3-l0 sµIIf
IvIduy NIte MIxed
!nndy`s Sµrny SorvIco ................ll-l
!oo & fho !ndIos.........................ll-l
CrIsfI`s Crow .................................?-5
KIng IIns.......................................3-9
!oy`s !oµnIr ................................2-l0
Tho Chosf Tonm............................0-0
HIgL!IgLts:
Tnnnor Þormnn.....................203/559
!obIn IIorIo .................................4l?
Anron !Ichnrdson .................2l6/595
Joromy Iron MoccnsIn .................2l3
Ðunno Hnnd.................................202
AngoI Þomoc .......5-l0 & 2-6-l0 sµIIf
!oo ÞovIIIo............................2-? sµIIf
Id MorrIson..........................5-6 sµIIf
Thorosn MIIIor....................3-l0 sµIIf
Ðob Cnrfnor........................3-l0 sµIIf
The PRCA, a membership-based
organization, sanctions approxi-
mately 600 rodeos annually, and
there are nearly 30 million fans in
the U.S.
The PRCA showcases the world’s
best cowboys in premier events
through the Wrangler Million Dol-
lar Tour presented by Justin
Boots, and its subsequent Justin
Boots Playoffs, the PRCA Xtreme
Bulls Tour; and the world-
renowned Wrangler National Fi-
nals Rodeo. Ac t i o n
from PRCA-sanctioned rodeos and
its premier events appears on
Great American Country (DISH
Network 167, DirecTV 326) and
Pursuit (DISH Network 240, Di-
recTV 608).
Each year, PRCA-sanctioned
rodeos raise more than $26 million
for local and national charities.
www.prorodeo.com.
Twenty-six Community Anchor
Institutions (CAI) across the state
will receive funding from the
South Dakota Broadband Initia-
tive (SDBI) for a wide variety of
technology improvements and ex-
pansions to continue improving
their computer infrastructure. The
funding is part of the federal De-
partment of Commerce’s National
Telecommunication and Informa-
tion Administration’s (NTIA) State
Broadband Initiative (SBI).
“The projects funded through
these grants provide local service
organizations with the tools and
infrastructure they need to con-
tinue improving their technology
environments to better serve com-
munity members,” said Jim
Edman, Deputy Commissioner for
the state Bureau of Information
and Telecommunications and Proj-
ect Manager for the SDBI. “When
communities continue to invest,
improve and expand their com-
puter infrastructure; they increase
broadband services, usage and
adoption; a key goal for the State
Broadband Initiative.”
In July, the SDBI first awarded
technology grants to 15 CAIs for
projects exceeding $112,000 in
total. Today, 26 CAIs are receiving
awards for projects totaling over
$205,000.
Included for each CAI is the total
cost of the proposed project which
reflects a required 20 percent
matching investment through
cash, in-kind or both.
Wall Community Library, Wall
($3,441.31)
These awards provide funding
South Dakota’s Broadband Initiative
awards 26 technology grants
for technology improvements in
the areas of:
•Firewalls (a form of cyber secu-
rity) to protect computers against
malware, spyware, viruses and
other threatening content.
•Network switches to ensure
uptime and stability as well as in-
crease network speeds and per-
formance.
•Wireless equipment for mobile
connectivity and increased per-
formance.
•New or additional laptops and
desktops to provide access to
broadband services.
Upon request, the SDBI Tech-
nology Planning team will assist
the CAI staff and their technology
partners with the implementation
of the equipment into their infra-
structure.
The Technology Planning and
Computer Ownership program is
one segment of the overall SDBI.
The primary purpose is to provide
CAIs with technology consulting
and solutions pertaining to their
technical infrastructure and
broadband connectivity. Eligible
institutions include libraries, med-
ical and healthcare facilities, K-12
schools, institutions of higher edu-
cation, public safety offices, gov-
ernment and tribal offices, and
community support locations.
About South Dakota Broadband
Initiative (SDBI): The purpose of
the SDBI is to inventory, enhance
and increase the adoption of high-
speed broadband. Visit http:/broad
band.sd.gov/, or e-mail broad-
band@state.sd.us, or call 605-773-
4165 for more information.
Reflections on the second half of 2012 continued from last week
Twenty-three elementary and
middle schools and seven high
schools have earned top spots
under the state’s new accountabil-
ity system.
EXEMPLARY SCHOOLS (top
five percent of schools based on
School Performance Index scores)
•Elementary/Middle
Wall Elementary, Wall School
District
•High School
Wall High School, Wall School
District.
The most critical need we have
is getting locales to volunteer to
become EMTs was the main focus
of the Wall Ambulance meeting
held on Monday, October 15.
Board members with the help of
Dick Johnson reviewed several ads
that had been placed in the Pen-
nington County Courant. The ad
will run for the next two weeks
and will include “Critical need of
EMTs” in the wording.
Austin Huether places eighth at
state meet in Huron.
Deaths: Russell Means and
Senator George S. McGovern.
Engagements: Amy Jobgen and
Rustin Bertram.
November 1:
The Pennington County Fire-
fighters held their annual Recogni-
tion and Awards Banquet on Sat-
urday night, October 20 at the
New Underwood Community Cen-
ter. It is held yearly to recognize
the Pennington County Firefighter
and Pennington County Fire Offi-
cer of the Year and to pay their re-
spects to firefighters who have
passed away the past year.
The Fire Officer of the Year went
to Butch Kitterman, Jim Kitter-
man and John Kitterman as Offi-
cers of the Year.
Lifetime Achievement Awards
were presented to Butch Kitter-
man, Wall VFD for his 56 years of
serviced to the Wall VFD and Don
Kobes, Rapid Valley VFD for his 55
years of service to the Rapid Valley
VFD.
Wall Y2Y celebrates Red Ribbon
Week.
Wall Eagles off to second round
playoffs.
Wall Ambulance District will
hold a public meeting.
Eagles tame the Tigers during
first round of playoffs.
Lady Eagles subdue Bennett Co.
Hunters cautioned on fire dan-
ger.
Deaths: Adella Bertha (Denke)
Sorensen, Linda L. Wilkie, Bar-
bara Stone, Jacob Tsitrian. Harold
C. Finck and Wendell R. Hagan.
Engagements: Kristin Marie
Kellar and Eric Ronald Matt.
November 8:
Wall FFA Ag Issue Team re-
ceives Silver at National FFA Con-
vention.
First Interstate Bank donates to
local Meals on Wheels.
Hawks down the Eagles to go to
State Football Championship.
Lady Eagles District 14B Volley-
ball Champions.
Austin Huether named to 2012
All State Cross Country Team.
Emilee Pauley has been selected
to participated in the Junior High
Rodeo at the NRCA Finals.
Deaths: Victoria Sue Goodsell,
Darwin “Duke” Dean Hocking, Vir-
ginia M. (Neumann) Tanner, Cecil
W. Nelson, Leonard L. Tas and
Terry A. Karrels.
November 15:
Wall City Council approves
liquor license applications re-
newals.
Veteran’s Day 2012 celebrated at
Wall School.
Pennington Country releases of-
ficial 2012 county election results.
Lady Eagles finish season 19 - 9.
Deaths: Peggy I. Sigman, Wes-
ley Bruce Printz, Kathleen Walsh
McEntee, Harry A. Severson and
Juanita (Snell) Goodsell.
November 22:
Eastern Penning County Ambu-
lance District Service approves by-
laws.
4-H members attend Penning-
ton County 4-H recognition event.
Wall School Board gives consen-
sus to Williams to move forward
with a school nutrition resolution.
Deaths: Marlene L. Rembold,
Roy Roseth, Bart Clennon and
Wanda Heeb.
November 29:
Wall High School holds fall
awards night.
Angle Tree on display at First
Interstate Bank.
SDHSRA Queen Elsie Fortune
speaks at Wall Badlands Chamber
of Commerce.
Deaths: Pauline “Polly” Ku-
jawa, M. Edger Westerberg and Al-
lice c. (Hamm) Leberknight.
December 6:
East Pennington Conservation
District presents awards.
Wall Elementary Student Coun-
cil hosts food drive.
Deaths: Eva C. Forkner, Thomas
S. “Tom”McDonnell and Robert
John Reedy.
December 13:
Wall City Council approves to
purchase new well monitoring sys-
tem.
Local Modern Woodmen reach
out to those in need.
Senator John Thune introduces
bill to aid Impact Aid Schools.
“Chutes of Charity” donates to
Delbridge benefit in Wall.
University of South Dakota stu-
dents have been honored for their
academic success during the 2012
Fall Semester.
USD students achieving Dean’s
List honors this spring total 1,673
students while 402 part-time stu-
dents have been cited with Aca-
demic Recognition honors.
Students earn Dean’s List dis-
tinction by achieving a GPA of at
least 3.5 while maintaining a
course load of 12 or more credit
hours with no incomplete or failing
grades.
Students receiving academic
honors for the 2012 Fall Semester
are listed below:
Wall - Amanda R Fischer and
Laura Anderson.
Want to have a great feeling all
day on January 28? Plan to stop by
the Wall Badlands Chamber of
Commerce blood drive, from 11:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Wall Com-
munity Center.
By giving blood, a donor helps
replenish a community resource
used by a neighbor, relative,
friend, or even complete stranger.
The donation gives a future pa-
tient the same recovery opportu-
nity as current patient, because it
assures blood will be on hospital
shelf when it’s needed.
Only when a significant number
of people donate on a regular basis
can a community maintain ade-
quate blood supplies. “If everyone
waited for an emergency to donate,
many lives would be jeopardized,”
said Lori Liebman, United Blood
Services,” Donor Recruitment Di-
rector. “Waiting to donate in an
emergency only creates more
emergencies. Blood must be avail-
able at all times in sufficient
amounts to meet the needs of a
community.”
Volunteer blood donors must be
at least 16 years old, weigh at least
110 pounds and be in good health.
Additional height/weight require-
ments apply to donors 22 and
younger and donors who are 16 or
17 in certain areas, must have
signed permission from a parent or
guardian.
Potential donors can make an
appointment to give at www.blood-
hero.com or by calling 342-8585 in
Rapid City or 996-3688 in
Mitchell. Donors will receive a free
cholesterol test.
Blood drive planned to
stock hospital shelves
Wall Chamber meeting
continued from page 1
Wall on Tuesday, February 12 at
5:30 p.m. in the Wall Community
Center meeting room.
President Mary Williams read
the following announcement:
•January 25: Wall Ag Apprecia-
tion Banquet at the Wall Commu-
nity Center.
•January 28: Chamber spon-
sored blood drive at the Wall Com-
munity Center from 11:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m. Call the Chamber Direc-
tor Lindsay Hildebrand for an ap-
pointment.
January 28-30: Badlands Na-
tional Park Long Range Interpre-
tative planning.
•January 29: Chamber Board of
Directors meeting at the Wall
Community Center, 7:30 a.m.
•February 5: City Council meet-
ing at the Wall Community Center
meeting room, 6:30 p.m.
•February 16: Legislative
Cracker Barrel at the Wall Drug,
9:00 - 11:00 a.m.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned.
(continued next week)
School, Sports & Area News
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013• Page 3
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
SampIe Our
SpecIaIs DaIIy
Luncb
SpecIaIs
Jan. 24 - Jan. 30
Tbursday, January 24
·Ovcn Dalcd Sical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Noodlc Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . $S.29
FrIday, January 2S
·Dacon CIccsclurgcr w/Curlcy Frics . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Vcgciallc Dccf Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Saturday, January 26
·Hoi Dccf or
Foasi Dccf Dinncr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dacon CIcddar Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Sunday, January 2?
·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci. . . . . . . . . . . $?.39
·CIild's Drcalfasi Duffci (12 & undcr} . . . . . . . $3.S9
Scrvcd 7.00 io 10.30 a.n.
·Hoi Dccf or
Foasi Dccf Dinncr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Dun¡ling Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Monday, January 2S
·DDQ Fils
w/Dalcd Poiaio & Dalcd Dcans . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dccf Darlcy Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Tuesday, January 29
·Paiiy Mcli w/Curlcy Frics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Tonaio Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Wednesday, January 30
·Hoi Turlcy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dacon CIccsclurgcr Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . $S.29
279-2175 · Wall, SD
BreakIast: Mon. - Sat.
2 Eggs & Toasi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.19
2 Pancalcs & Sausagc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.19
February 1-2-3-4:
Parental Guidance (PG)
(Sunday, Feb. 3, movie
will show at Noon)
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
January 25-26-27-28:
This Is 40
(R)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Finally, Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy
will get their day when the Li-
brary’s Book Discussion Group
meets on Wednesday, January 30
at 6:00 p.m. The last meeting was
rescheduled due to inclement
weather.
Join us and we will discuss
Louisa May Alcott’s book, Little
Women. Published in the late
1860s, the novel follows the lives of
four sisters and is loosely based on
the author's childhood experiences
with her three sisters.
The book was an immediate
commercial and critical success,
and continues to be a classic of
American literature.
Wall Community Library Book Club
to meet Wednesday, January 30
It delves into the themes of do-
mesticity, work, and true love and
how each is a critical facet of a
woman’s identity. Some have ar-
gued that within Little Women can
be found the first vision of the
“American Girl” and how her mul-
tiple aspects are embodied in the
individual March sisters.
Alcott followed Little Women
with two sequels, also featuring
the March sisters: Little Men
(1871) and Jo’s Boys (1886). All of
these titles can be checked out at
the Library, especially if you are
anxious to find out what happened
in the lives of the March sisters.
The cast and crew of Wall High School’s production of Orphan Trains. Pictured back row: left to
right ... Nicole Eisenbraun, Sterling Ellens, Emily Linn, Autumn Deering, Michaela Schaefer,
Shanda Rae Enriques, Catriona Brunnemann and Thomas Van Osdol. Middle row: left to right ...
Austin Huether, Travis Brenner, Ryder Wilson, Cody Harris and Andrew Ferris. Front row: left to
right ... Libbi Sykora, Analise Garland and Maddie Bauer. (Not pictured Autumn Schulz.)
~Courtesy Photo
The Mighty Wall Players Drama
Team is state festival bound for the
sixth year in a row.
Wall and Philip took top honors
at the Region 7 One Act Play Con-
test in Pierre on January 16 to ad-
vance to the State One Act Play
Festival in Brandon next week.
Wall will present their historical
drama Orphan Trains at 8:15 p.m.
Oprhan Trains play victorious at regional contest
on Friday, February 1 at the state
festival.
Two Wall actors -- Libbi Sykora
and Ryder Wilson -- also received
individual acting medals at the re-
gional competition.
Again this year the Wall Players
will be teaming up with the cast
and crew from Philip to present a
double-feature with encore per-
formances of their productions on
Sunday, January 27th.
The road show will begin in Wall
at 1:30 p.m.
Philip will present their show
Discovering Rogue first followed by
Wall’s production of Orphan
Trains.
At 5:00 p.m. both shows will be
presented at Philip High School as
well.
Orphan Trains is written by
Deborah Crain and produced by
special arrangement with
Playscripts, Inc. (www.playscripts
.com)
The play is directed by Ron
Burtz and Kathy Swan.
It was a good road trip to the
Winner Invitational Wrestling
Tournament for the Philip Area
team as they brought back the first
place team award, eight first and
second individual awards, along
with five other placings, and
Rance Johnson was voted “Most
Outstanding Wrestler.”
Head coach Matt Donnelly noted
that everyone wrestled well and
the team is almost back to full
strength. Some are coming back
from injuries and illness and he
looks forward to them being better
for the next tournament.
Donnelly said that some schools
are noted for certain techniques
which give the wrestlers more ex-
perience. “The only way you’re
going to get better is to find the
best and go after them,” said Don-
nelly.
Twelve teams participated in the
January 19 tournment with Philip
scoring more than 45 points over
their nearest competitor. Final
team placings were Philip (278.5),
Winner (233), Bon Homme (191.5),
Mobridge-Pollock (155), Redfield/
Doland (115), Sunshine Bible
Academy (90.5), Mt.
Vernon/Plankinton/Corsica (72),
Todd County (69), St. Thomas
More (49), Andes Central (29),
Cheyenne-Eagle Butte/ Dupree
(20) and Pine Ridge (0).
106 lbs: Jed Brown, 2nd,
17-8 record
•Won by forfeit
•Pinned Stone Durham (STM) 1:38
•Tech. fall over Leo Hopkins (ANC) 18-0
•Decisioned by Duncan Stoebner (BH) 4-
9
106 lbs: Paul Smiley, 6th,
6-7 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Marcus Urban (MVPC) 1:43
•Won by forfeit (WIN)
•Pinned Riley Binger (RED) :20
•Pinned by Leo Hopkins (ANC) 3:50
•Pinned by Tobias Weddell (TC) :44
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 1st,
14-9 record
•Pinned Teigan Gray (CEB) 1:48
•Tech. fall over Carter Wegner (RED) 17-
1
•Decisioned Patrick Aeschbacher (WIN)
5-4
•Decisioned Isreal Appel (SBA) 13-11
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 1st,
21-6 record
•Bye
•Pinned Hudson Peaman (TC) 1:53
•Pinned Zach Ayers (WIN) 1:41
•Pinned Jaden Madison (MP) 1:15
126 lbs: Kaylor Pinney, 4th,
3-2 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Tyrel Haley (WIN) 3:34
•Won by forfeit (ANC)
•Pinned Avery Gilchrist (WIN) 3:24
•Major dec. Caleb McNeill (RED) 18-9
•Major dec. by Taylor Colombe (TC) 5-14
126 lbs: Preston Eisenbraun,
1-2 record
•Won by forfeit (ANC)
•Major dec. by McNeill (RED) 4-12
•Bye
•Pinned by Colombe (TC) :42
132 lbs: Grady Carley, 4th,
17-12 record
•Bye
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Sean Bice (WIN) 2:24
•Decisioned Dominic Paulson (WIN) 6-0
•Decisioned by Tayte Clark (SBA) 0-8
138 lbs: Raedon Anderson, 3rd,
4-10 record
•Bye
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Dustin Cuka (BH) 5:39
•Won by forfeit
•Decisioned Jordan Fiest (MP) 9-4
145 lbs: Reed Johnson, 2nd,
8-4 record
•Pinned Moises Lozano (BH) 3:47
•Major dec. Hayden Medicine Horn
(ANC) 18-8
•Pinned Trig Clark (SBA) 2:42
•Decisioned by Adam Farner (WIN) 0-9
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st,
20-2 record
•Bye
•Pinned Grant Brewer (MP) 1:53
•Pinned David Paul (SBA) 1:34
•Tech. fall over Brandyn Middlesworth
(WIN) 18-3
152 lbs: Paul Kary,
1-8 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Jacob Standfield (MVPC) :28
•Pinned Andrew Mitzel (BH) 2:52
•Pinned by Cooper Baloun (RED) 4:07
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 2nd,
19-6 record
•Bye
•Pinned Bailey Denoyer (TC) :29
•Major dec. Ryan Yost (RED) 12-1
•Major dec. by Blase Vanecek (BH) 5-14
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 1st,
21-5 record
•Pinned Jeremy Long (TC) 3:49
•Pinned Ryan Sherman (WIN) 1:55
•Pinned Jayson Van Vugt (MP) 2:56
•Decisioned Tate Novotny (WIN) 2-1
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 1st,
17-7 record
•Pinned Tanner McCloskey (TC) 3:45
•Pinned Kingston LaFronboise (MVPC)
1:20
•Pinned Teddy Lopez (MP) 1:57
•Pinned David Jensen (MP)?:49
195 lbs: Gavin DeVries,
8-11 record
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Ezra Bartlett (BH) 1:16
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Cameron Kostal (MVPC) 4:31
220 lbs: Logan Ammons, 2nd,
15-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned Geoffrey DeVries (PHI) 1:00
•Pinned Alan Haataja (BH) 1:03
•Major dec. by Brady Spiry (MP) 0-8
220 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries, 6th
2-11 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Ammons (PHI) 1:00
•Bye
•Pinned Cole Hottel (STM) 1:32
•Pinned by Kyle Blume (RED) :48
•Pinned by Colton Best (WIN) 2:08
Next Saturday, January 26, the
wrestlers will head down to Wag-
ner for their invitational tourna-
ment. Always a tough tournament,
the Scotties will have their work
cut out for them.
The Philip Invitational
Wrestling Tournament has been
rescheduled for Saturday, Febru-
ary 9, and it will be held in Wall.
Start time will be 9:00 a.m. Don-
nelly said the switch from two
days to one will make for one long
day, but is glad it could be resched-
uled. Twelve schools have commit-
ted to the tournament.
By Coach Dinger
Wall vs. New Underwood
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team suffers a second straight loss
to New Underwood Tigers Satur-
day night, January 19th in Wall
when they lost in overtime 50-52.
The Eagles found themselves in
foul trouble in the second quarter,
but they were able to keep the
game close and only trailed by six
24-30 at halftime.
The momentum turned in the
third quarter in favor of the Wall
Eagles as they reduced the Tigers
lead to just two points and only
trailed 34-36 by the end of the
quarter.
In the fourth quarter, the Eagles
took their first lead of the game
and with only 1.5 seconds left on
the clock, the Eagles led 42-40.
The Tigers hit a last second shot
to send the game into overtime
with a score of 42-42.
The Eagle’s trailed early into the
overtime period, but tied the game
at 50-50 with only a few seconds
remaining on the clock.
Eagles lose to New Underwood in overtime
The Tigers once again hit a last
second shot, but this time it was
the game winner.
The Eagles never gave up and
will take the lessons learned in
this game to improve over the sec-
ond half of their season.
Tucker O’Rourke led the Eagles
offense with 12 points off the
bench, while Tyler Trask, Trevor
Anderson, Laketon McLaughlin,
and Clancy Lytle all finished with
seven points each.
Anderson led the Eagles with
eight rebounds and six assist,
while O’Rourke and Trask finished
with seven rebounds each.
Trask also led the defense with
four steals on the night.
The team was 20-55 from the
field for 36 percent, 4-16 from the
three point line for 25 percent, and
6-9 from the free throw line for 67
percent.
I am very proud of how well the
team played together and they did-
n’t panic as they trailed most of the
game. The boys will continue to
improve over the next six weeks as
they move into the back half of
their schedule and prepare for the
district tournament.
Stats:
Wall: 15 9 10 8 8 = 50
NU: 15 15 6 6 10 = 52
Scoring: Trask 2-8 1-2 7, Ander-
son 2-9 2-2 7, Lane Hustead 3-9 0-
1 6, Lytle 3-10 0-1 7, O’Rourke 6-8
0-0 12, Laketon McLaughlin 2-6 3-
3 7, Tyler Peterson 2-4 0-0 4, Les
Williams 0-1 0-0 0. Totals: 20-55
6-9 50.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.364.
3-point field goal percentage:
Eagles 4-16 (Trask 2-3, Anderson
1-5, Hustead 0-3, Lytle 1-5.)
Free Throw percentage: Ea-
gles .667.
Rebounds: Eagles 34 (Anderson
8.)
Fouls: Eagles 18.
Assists: Eagles 14 (Anderson 6.)
Steals: Eagles 15 (Trask 4.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 2 (Hus-
tead 1, Lytle 1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 18.
First place at Winner for area wrestlers
Clancy Lytle goes up for a
basketball against the New
Underwood Tigers. The Ea-
gles lost the game in overtime.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Lane Blasius going against an opponent. ~Courtesy Photo
Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Tyler, Wendi, Axton and Alyvia
Eisenbraun of Norfolk, Neb., ar-
rived at the Stephen Eisenbraun
home Thursday, January 10th, to
celebrate a late Christmas. Other
guests in their home over the
weekend were Todd, Nadia, Noah
and Emma Eisenbraun and Sheri
Heinzelman. Tyler and his family
left for home on Monday, January
14th.
Gerald and Esther Wolford and
Brenda Carmichael spent the
weekend with Terry and Amy
Beers in Howard. Thursday night
and all day Friday, Brenda, Amy
and Esther attended the “Woman
in Blue Jeans” Conference in
Mitchell.
A correction to an item in last
week’s news — I had put that
Lorna Moore was president of the
Wall Art Guild, she is the secre-
tary/treasurer. My apology to the
acting president.
The One Act Play did very well
in their competition at Pierre last
Wednesday. As a result they will go
on to State competition. Ryder Wil-
son and Libbi Sykora were given
recognition by receiving “Superior”
ratings. Good news — the drama
group will do a repeat performance
for the public on January 27th at
the Power House at 1:30 p.m. So if
you missed it the first time, or just
want to see it again, here’s your
chance.
“Thirty some” people went to
Prairie Village last Tuesday to par-
take of the bountiful roast pork
dinner. It was very good.
Joann Moore of Lusk, Wyo., is
visiting a few days with her dad
George and Lorna Moore in Quinn.
Thursday, the 17th, was a busy
day. The Meals Program served
caramel rolls and coffee in the
morning. Quite a few people
turned out despite the morning
hour (starts at 8:30 a.m.) too early
for some. There will still be rolls
served for a few more weeks.
Senior Citizens had their
potluck supper that evening. Had
plenty of food but only eighteen
guests. Carol Hahn called the
numbers for “Penny Bingo” after
supper.
The United Methodist Women
are again having their “Valentine
Tea”. It is scheduled for February
2nd at 1:00 p.m. All women of the
community are invited to come to
this fun event — have tea, goodies
and lots of conversation. See you
there!
Randy, Mary, Amanda and Jami-
son Williams came from Lincoln on
Friday to spend the weekend with
Randy’s parents, Les and Kay
Williams. They left for home early
Monday morning.
Luke and Shauna Remmington
and family of Platte, spent the
weekend with her mom, Deb
Williams, in Rapid City. Luke
joined the mountain lion hunters
but didn’t get one. The season isn’t
over, so better luck next time out.
Charlene Kjerstad visited with
her sister Cleo Rowe in Spearfish
this last weekend. She also spent
time with Hazel Thompson, her
aunt.
The Senior Citizens served pan-
cakes and ham at Prairie Village
on Monday as the regular meal
was not served — Martin Luther
King Jr. day. There was a nice
group attending.
Obituaries in the paper last
week were for Arnold Wolden and
Clifford Ramsey, both of Philip. We
offer our sympathy to their fami-
lies.
Marvin McDaniel, 54, died on
Saturday, January 19th, at Casper
where he lived. Our condolences go
out to his mother, Bev McDaniel,
his sisters and all of his family. Fu-
neral arrangement pending at
time of this writing.
Dolores O’Dea Hercher of Stur-
gis, was buried on Tuesday after
services at St. Francis of Assisi
Church. She was 85 and had grad-
uated with the Class of 1946,
Quinn. One of her sisters, Mary
Hansen, lives in Wall. Our sympa-
thy to the family.
Washington, D.C. was crowded
on Monday for the second inaugu-
ration of President Barack Obama.
It was a very pleasant day, sun-
shine and 47°! The motorcade
went from the Capitol to the White
House with the President and the
first lady walking part of the way.
A lot of melting went on last
week so the snow banks were re-
duced in size. Now they are more
ice than snow. Temperatures went
down on Saturday with wind and
on Sunday and Monday some
snow. Really not much snow —
just kept filtering down off and on
to let us know it is winter. No dras-
tic changes in weather are show-
ing in the weekly forecast.
Since Monday was Martin
Luther King Jr. Day — it is fitting
we have a quotation from him —
“If a man is called to be a
streetsweeper he should sweep
streets even as Michelangelo
painted, or Beethoven composed
music, or Shakespeare wrote po-
etry. He should sweep streets so
well that all the hosts of heaven
and earth will pause to say, here
lived a great streetsweeper who
did his job well.”
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
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Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
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•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Valentines
Day Tea
Sat., Feb. 2nd
1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
United Methodist
Church in Wall
Come & enjoy entertainment
& a cup of tea with friends
Sponsored by Wall United
Methodist Women
Kelly Marie Frentz and Eric Levi McMillan, both of Wall, S.D., are
pleased to announce their engagement and forthcoming wedding.
Kelly is the daughter of Gary and Nancy Frentz, Watertown. She grad-
uated from Northern State University and is currently a teacher with
Wall School District.
Eric is the son of Casey and Marlene McMillan, Wall. He graduated
from Western Dakota Tech and is currently employed with the Wall Build-
ing Center and Construction.
A 2013 Summer wedding is being planned.
Engagement
FOR SALE:
The City of Wall is offering for sale through “sealed bid”
a 1978 Case Backhoe. It is a 580C model, serial
#8953538 with 5,184.5 hours. It is considered to be in
fair condition. Bids will be accepted at the Wall City Fi-
nance Office, 501 Main Street, PO Box 314, Wall SD
57790 until February 4th at 4:00 pm. The sealed bids
will be opened on February 5th at 6:30 pm during the
regular City Council meeting.
The City of Wall reserves the right to reject any or all
bids. For more information call 605-279-2563 or 605-
441-9157 and ask for Jeff.
Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $98.40.
ATTENTION:
All Township Clerks
Now is the time to get your Annual Meeting
notices in to the Pennington County Courant.
Notices may be faxed to 279-2965,
e-mailed to annc@gwtc.net, or
mailed to P.O. Box 435, Wall, SD 57790.
Deadline for ALL legals is FriDAy at 11:00 a.m.
for them to run in the following week.
Clayton and Lineen Nickel of Wall, S.D., are pleased to announce the
engagement of their daughter, Shawna Renee Nickel to Jason Baldwin
Brown, son of Dan and Suzanne Brown of Charles City, Iowa.
Jason graduated from Charles City High School. He studied at Coe Col-
lege, where he also played football, then later attended the University of
Iowa where he studied Economics. Jason is employed as a Financial Re-
source Representative at ING Financial Partners in Des Moines.
Shawna graduated from Newton High School. She has a bachelor’s de-
gree in Finance from Iowa State University College of Business. She is
employed as a Compliance Coordinator at ING Financial Partners.
Shawna and Jason are planning a beach wedding at Lauderdale by the
Sea in March.
NOTICE
ANNUAL
ELM SPRINGS
FIRE DISTRICT
MEETING
Wed., Feb. 6
4:00 p.m. at the
Elm Springs Fire Hall
Making the time and finding the
energy to improve one's self is, in
my opinion, a very wise invest-
ment, and yet I am amazed at how
many people I meet who do not
fully understand the importance of
personal and professional develop-
ment and training for themselves.
Investing one's time and money
in learning is a powerful thing. We
each have so much potential that
could and should be tapped. I have
found that investing in my own
continuing education is far more
profitable to me than investing in
the stock market.
Gaining knowledge is one thing,
however learning the skills to
think, plan, and make dreams turn
into realities, is entirely another
matter. This can be accomplished
by taking the time to sharpen our
axe. I personally choose not to be
dull. I want to be sharp. I want to
be ready at all times to cut wood-
that is, to make things happen in
life.
I encourage everyone I meet to
become a person who craves more
education and hungers for learn-
ing. Taking seminars and classes,
reading books and listening to
CD's, talking to others and asking
a ton of questions are all ways one
can sharpen their axe.
You may benefit from this four-
step process I use quite often to
sharpen my own axe. Keep in mind
that the primary reason for im-
proving oneself is so to be more ef-
fective in getting along, uplifting
and contributing to others' lives in
a positive manner.
Step One. I CAN! Make a list of
all your skills and abilities.
Step Two. I AM! Make a list of all
your roles and responsibilities.
Step Three. I HAVE! Make a list
of all your assets.
Step Four. I WILL! Make a list of
all you goals, dreams and desires.
Apply this process in your every-
day life and you will be amazed at
the results. Indeed, you will dis-
cover a definite sharpening of your
axe!
Problems vs. Challenges
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands
of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for
more details at 800-437-9715 and
be sure to check out Bob’s web-
site at: www.mrattitudespeaks.
com.
The Pennington County Board
of Commissioners is now accepting
applications to fill one at large po-
sition on the SDSU/County Exten-
sion Advisory Board. The Board
provides guidance and direction to
the County Commissioners in the
development, delivery, and evalu-
ation of 4-H programs and serv-
ices.
Service in this position is volun-
tary and no compensation will be
derived. Board members are ex-
pected to attend four to six regu-
larly scheduled meetings per year,
as well as any special meetings
which may be called if needs arise.
Per SDCL 13-54-11; the member-
ship shall be representative of the
racial population mix in the county
and of the various interest groups
served by Extension. In order to
fill this requirement, we are look-
ing for White and American Indian
persons with the majority being
between the ages of 18-65 per the
2010 Census results for Penning-
ton County.
Those who want to be considered
for an appointment are asked to
submit a written statement of in-
terest including your agency or
community affiliation (if applica-
ble), your particular interests as
related to a board of this kind, and
what you can contribute to such a
board to the Commission Office,
315 Saint Joseph Street, Suite
156, Rapid City, SD 57701.
All statements must be received
in the Commission Office by 4:00
p.m. on Wednesday, January 30,
2013. The applicant will be ap-
pointed at the February 5, 2013
Commission meeting.
For more information contact
Tiffany Meyer, 4-H Youth Program
Advisor, at (605) 394-2188.
Commissioners accepting
applications
ATTENTION:
2013 SENIORS
& PARENTS
The Pennington County
Courant would like to use
a senior picture for the
graduation pages that will
run in May. You may drop
them off at the office
(212 4th Ave.),
mail them to PO Box 435,
Wall, SD or email to
annc@gwtc.net
All pictures will be returned.
Thank you, Anne Jo
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
A Bible test was sprung recently on five classes of col-
lege-bound 11th and 12th graders in an American public
school.
Some thought Sodom and Gomorrah were lovers; that
the Gospels were written by Matthew, Mark, Luther and
John; that Eve was created from an apple; and that the
stories which Jesus told were called parodies.
Eighty to ninety percent of the students could not com-
plete the most familiar quotations from Scripture.
The teacher, Thayer S. Warshaw, was understandably
upset and rightly asked: “Is the student to study mythol-
ogy and Shakespeare and not the Bible? Is it important
for him to learn what it means when a man is called an
Adonis or a Romeo, yet unimportant for him to be able to
tell a Jonah from a Judas?”
This writer’s heart is with that teacher and all who are
awake enough to see that the Bible is disappearing more
and more from American life. How can we expect any-
thing but juvenile delinquency, the rapid general rise in
the crime rate, the growing divorce rate, increasing dis-
honesty at every level of business and social life — how
can we expect anything but these conditions when the
Bible is flaunted and despised? This departure from the
Word of God is bound to get us deeper and deeper into
trouble.
But whatever the conditions about you, you may have
the joy and peace and light that comes from that Blessed
Book. The Bible tells us frankly that “all have sinned”
(Rom.3:23) and that “the wages of sin is death”
(Rom.6:23) since a just God must deal with sin. Ah, but it
tells us also that “Christ died for our sins” (ICor.15:3), and
that the believer may have “peace with God through our
Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom.5:1).
Read the Bible, especially the Epistles of Paul, who was
raised up to proclaim “the gospel [good news] of the grace
of God” (Acts 20:24). You will never cease to thank God
for having given your attention to this wonderful Book.
BIBLE TEST
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
Dolores Anne Hercher_____________________________
Dolores Anne Hercher, 85, Stur-
gis, died Friday, January 18, 2013
at the Sturgis Regional Hospital.
Mass of Christian Burial was
held Tuesday, January 22, at the
St. Francis of Assisi Catholic
Church in Sturgis, with Fr. Arnold
Kari officiating. Burial followed at
the Pine Lawn Cemetery in Rapid
City.
A memorial has been established
to the St. Francis of Assisi Catholic
Church.
Dolores was born July 27, 1927,
at Grindstone, to Austin and Anna
(Theel) O'Dea. She was raised near
Cottonwood, and graduated from
High School at Quinn.
On September 13, 1947, she mar-
ried William "Bill" Hercher at Cot-
tonwood. The couple ranched in the
Kadoka and Interior areas before
moving to Rapid City in the early
1960's.
Dolores worked as a dental assis-
tant for several years before keep-
ing books for Coast to Coast and
Miller Equipment in Rapid City. In
2009, she moved to Sturgis where
she enjoyed a good game of cards
and visiting with her neighbors.
She liked to read and put together
jigsaw puzzles. Family, especially
grandchildren, were the most im-
portant part of her life.
Survivors include her daughters,
Mary Hercher, Black Hawk, and
Nancy Flagler, Sturgis; brothers,
Raymond O'Dea, Brownsburg, In-
diana, and Francis "Bud" O'Dea,
Pahrump, Nev.; sisters, Eva Trim-
ble, Fruita, Colo., Mary Hansen,
Wall, Rose Marie Richmond, Rapid
City, and Shirley Baye, Box Elder;
four grandchildren, and two great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, four brothers, and
one son-in-law.
Condolences may be sent to the
family at www.kinkadefunerals.
com.
Marvin McDaniel_______________________________
Marvin McDaniel, age 54, of
Casper, Wyo., formerly of Philip,
S.D., died Saturday, January 19,
2013, at the Wyoming Medical
Center in Casper.
Marvin Fred McDaniel was born
August 2, 1958, in Philip, the son
of Fred Q. and Beverly I. (Mc-
Clure) McDaniel. He grew up in
Philip, graduating from Philip
High School in 1976.
While in high school, Marvin
worked for Jack Hansen at his fur
plant. After graduation, Marvin
worked for Dorothy Brothers,
where he worked on vehicles. Mar-
vin then attended Mitchell Vo-
Tech, where he earned his electri-
cian’s license. He moved to
Wyoming where he served as an
apprentice, journeyman, and later
as a master electrician for various
mining companies.
Marvin has made his home in
Casper for a number of years, but
always looked forward to coffee at
Rich Smith’s, when he made it
home to the ranch near Philip.
Marvin was a hard worker, and
able to fix anything that needed re-
pairs. Marvin also became quite a
gardener, and enjoyed canning his
produce he raised. He will be
greatly missed by his family and
friends.
Survivors include his mother,
Beverly McDaniel of Quinn; three
sisters, Kerry Wahlquist and her
husband, Peter, of Las Vegas, Nev.,
Kathy McDaniel of Rapid City, and
Patricia Hauk and her husband,
Phillip, of Piedmont; nephew Sean
Wahlquist and niece Kersey
Wahlquist both of Las Vegas; and
a host of other relatives and
friends.
Marvin was preceded in death
by his father, Fred McDaniel, on
April 6, 2005.
Memorial services will be held at
2:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 2,
at the American Legion Hall in
Philip, with Pastor Frezil Wester-
lund officiating.
Interment will be at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com.
Lessons from the garden
The spring and summer of 2012
brought exciting new learning op-
tions to the students of Wall Ele-
mentary. As the days grew longer
and warmer and students eagerly
counted down the days until sum-
mer vacation, teachers took the les-
sons and learning outside. Brenda
Carmichael and Jackie Roseth
guided students from second grade
and WASP through lessons in life
science, but by the end of the grow-
ing season the lessons would have
an even greater significance.
The project started with a grant
application to KidsGardening.org,
an organization of the National
Gardening Association. The staff
found research on the benefits of
gardening in a school setting. The
research showed that students
working together in the garden
helps to develop and improve
“problem solving skills, school atti-
tudes, communication skills, ap-
preciation of culturally different
peers, and an increased willingness
to try new tasks” (Robinson and Za-
jicak p.456) As staff waited for com-
munication of a grant award, they
came to a collective realization that
waiting to receive confirmation of
grant acceptance would be too late
to begin a teaching garden before
school was dismissed for the sum-
mer. At that point they began gath-
ering extra tools and supplies from
their own gardens to get the pro-
gram started.
Second graders were the first to
get their hands dirty in this new
endeavor. Each day they would
come to school eager to see what
had spouted. There were surprises
and disappointments as students
began moving their fragile charges
into the raised bed. As the days
passed and summer began the stu-
dents of WASP under the guidance
of Jackie Roseth continued caring
for the raised bed and put in a
small pumpkin patch and hillside
garden near the practice football
field. They had many surprises and
disappointments too as they
watched the small garden patches
struggle through heat, drought,
and grasshoppers.
Beginning in June, the Kids’
Garden added another exciting
learning experience—the Kids’
Garden Market. The third Wednes-
day of each month through the
growing season students harvested
and prepared foods. Concessions as
well as recipes for in-season pro-
duce were made available to the
community through the Kids’ Gar-
den Market. At first the students
didn’t really understand the con-
cept of a market. The aha moment
arrived in August when the bounty
was rolling in from the school and
staff gardens. There was a real
sense of pride and accomplishment.
All produce and concessions were
made available for a free will dona-
tion. Each market day staff would
talk with the students about help-
ing and serving others.
With the return of school in the
fall, Mrs. Carmichael’s new second
graders joined with Mrs. Ruland’s
third graders, the kids who started
the project the previous spring, for
a salsa party. Students made salsa
and sampled vegetables like
kohlrabi which were new to them.
The most inspiring moment of the
teaching garden happened as
WASP students gathered to cele-
brate the season of growing and
learning. Their little eyes popped
and their faces lit with surprise
and joy when the students learned
that their efforts along with those
of a very generous community al-
lowed them to donate $500 to the
Country Cupboard food pantry to
be used with the Back Pack Pro-
gram, a program that provides food
for the weekend for children of fam-
ilies qualifying for food assistance.
A project which began with les-
sons in life science grew to encom-
pass life lessons-- perseverance,
creativity, compassion and generos-
ity. Students and staff would like to
gratefully acknowledge for follow-
ing people and organizations for
their support: Eastern Pennington
Country Conservation District and
Lillian Helms along with Cindy
Weaver for providing educational
materials, Dan Hauk and Butch
Kitterman for moving dirt, Rose
Ludeman and the Wall Building
Center for the donation of seeds,
Karol and Gale Patterson for the
donation of pumpkins for the end of
the season garden party, all indi-
viduals who so generously and
faithfully through wind and heat (
… and did we mention wind?) par-
ticipated in the Kids’ Garden Mar-
ket, and the Wall School District
and School Board for their support
through planning and implementa-
tion of the project. Currently fund-
ing is being sought to expand the
Kids’ Garden. Anyone who would
like to support this work with this
project should contact Jeanine
Sykora at 279-2285 or
Jeanine.Sykora@k12.sd.us.
NOTICE
Dog & Cat licenses need to be
renewed for the year 2013.
Current rabies vaccination is required for
license. Tags can be picked up for $1.00
at the Wall Finance Office, 501 Main Street.
Call 279-2663 with any questions.
* A $25 fine may be assessed if an
animal is found without proper licensing.
Myrtle Alma Rose Holst____________
Myrtle Alma Rose Holst, age 89
of Denton, Texas, died January 15,
2013, at the Silver Stone Home in
Denton.
Myrtle Alma Rose Holst was
born on November 20, 1923 in a log
cabin in Pennington County, SD to
Freeman and Penila (Potter) Rose.
She married Roger Duane Holst on
June 21, 1951 in Rapid City, SD.
She worked in a variety of areas
but principally as a long distance
operator for Bell Telephone, an air-
plane relay tech during World War
II and most recently custodian for
her church. She also was a home-
maker and mother of four.
She is survived by her four chil-
dren: Diana Reaves and husband
Bernard (Jack) of Aubrey, Duane
Holst of Midland, Debra Holst of
Dallas, and Dawne Holst Adamson
of Roseville, CA; four grandchil-
dren: Troy Reaves of Flower
Mound, Denise Chambers of Den-
ton, Michael Gratzinger of Bluff-
dale, Utah, and Michelle Ross of
Washington, D.C.; and nine great-
grandchildren.
There will be a Memorial Service
at The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints Chapel at 4805
Gateway in Midland, to celebrate
her life. There will be a gravesite
ceremony June/July, 2013 at the
Rose Cemetery, SD.
Valentine’s Day
is just around
the corner!
Give that special someone a
“Sweet Deal”
unwind with a wonderful
calorie-free Chocolate
Cream Body Massage
OR
experience a relaxing
Champagne and Rose
Foot Massage!
Call for your gift certificate
today!
(Offer good thru February 28, 2013)
New Horizons
Massage Therapy
Wall & Murdo, SD
Marlene McMillan, LMT
685-5718
Sports
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013• Page 6
By Coach Dinger
Wall vs. Edgemont
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team came away with an ugly win
on Thursday night, January 10th
in the first round of the West River
Tournament against Edgemont 56-
40.
The Eagles started out slow in
the first half, but they were still
able to secure a 30-14 halftime
lead.
By the end of the third quarter
the Eagle’s extended their lead
with a score of 46-26.
In the fourth quarter, the Eagles
were able to get several bench
players into the game and came
away with a 56-40 win.
Laketon McLaughlin and Tyler
Trask were the leading scorers for
the Eagles with 14 points and 10
points respectively.
Trevor Anderson added nine
points, while Lane Hustead had
eight points.
McLaughlin also led the team
with 13 rebounds, while Clancy
Lytle pulled down 10 rebounds.
The team was 22-75 from the
field for 29 percent, 3-10 from the
three point line for 30 percent, and
9-12 from the free throw line for 75
percent.
Stats:
Wall: 14 16 16 10 = 56
Edgemont: 4 10 14 12 = 40
Scoring: Trask 3-8 2-2 10, An-
derson 4-9 0-0 9, Hustead 3-12 2-2
8, Lytle 1-7 0-1 2, Tucker O’Rourke
1-6 2-3 4, Dusty Dartt 0-2 0-0 0,
Carson Johnston 1-6 1-2 3,
McLaughlin 6-14 2-2 14, Ryder
Wilson 0-1 0-0 0, Ben Linn 0-2 0-0
0, Tyler Peterson 3-6 0-0 6, Les
Williams 0-2 0-0 0. Totals: 22-75
9-12 56.
Wall Eagles struggle in West River
Tournament to a fourth place finish
Field goal percentage: Ea-
gles.293.
3-point field goals: Eagles 3-10
(Trask 2-3, Anderson 1-3, Lytle 0-
1, Johnston 0-3.)
Rebounds: Eagles 44
(McLaughlin 14.)
Fouls: Eagles 25.
Assists: Eagles 11 (Trask 3,
O’Rourke 3.)
Steals: Eagles 14 (Huestead 5.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 3
(Williams 2.)
Turnovers: Eagles 18.
Wall vs. Hot Springs
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team played Hot Springs on Satur-
day, January 12th in the second
round of the West River Tourna-
ment and fell short in overtime 64-
70.
The Eagles set the fast paced
tone of the game with a 17-10 first
quarter lead.
The Eagles extended their lead
in the second quarter as they led
34-26 by halftime.
The Eagles struggled in the sec-
ond half and by the end of the
game the Eagle’s missed a last sec-
ond shot that would have won the
game in regulation.
In overtime, the Eagle’s contin-
ued to struggle and they came up
short 64-70.
Hustead led all scorers with a
game high 26 points, while Ander-
son finished with 16 points.
Peterson led the team with 10
rebounds, while Anderson lead the
defense with five steals.
The team was 22-60 from the
field for 37 percent, 5-15 from the
three point line for 33 percent, and
15-21 from the free throw line for
71 percent.
Stats
Wall: 17 17 9 13 8 = 64
HS: 10 16 13 17 14 = 70
Scoring: Trask 2-7 1-2 6, Ander-
son 5-12 4-5 16, Hustead 8-16 9-10
26, Lytle 1-7 1-2 4, O’Rourke 2-6 0-
0 4, Johnston 1-2 0-0 2, McLaugh-
lin 1-2 0-0 2, Peterson 2-8 0-2 4.
Totals: 22-60 15-21 64.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.367.
3-point field goals: Eagles 5-15
(Trask 1-3, Anderson 2-4, Hustead
1-5, Lytle 1-3.)
Rebounds: Eagles 31 (Peterson
10.)
Fouls: Eagles 25.
Fouled out: O’Rourke.
Assists: Eagles 10 (Anderson 2,
Hustead 2, Lytle 2, O’Rourke 2.)
Steals: Eagles 14 (Anderson 5.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 1 (Lytle
1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 12.
Wall vs. New Underwood
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team finished the tournament
against their rival New Under-
wood to play for third place.
New Underwood slowed down
the pace of the game with a 2-3
zone defense and forced the Eagles
into shooting from the perimeter.
The Eagles struggled shooting in
the first half and trailed 24-30 at
halftime.
The third quarter was a disaster
as the Eagle’s failed to score a sin-
gle point, but they only found
themselves trailing 24-34.
The Eagles rallied in the fourth
quarter and actually had a one
point lead before missing a last
second shot to lose 41-42.
Anderson led all scorers with 14
points, while Trask and Lytle had
nine and eight points respectively.
Anderson also led the team with
eight rebounds, while O’Rourke
finished with six rebounds.
Hustead led the offense with
four assist.
The team was 15-53 from the
field for 28 percent, 9-31 from the
three point line for 29 percent, and
2-3 from the free throw line for 67
percent.
The team recognized their mis-
takes after the game, and will get
a chance to redeem themselves as
they host New Underwood on Sat-
urday, January 19th and travel to
Hot Springs on Tuesday, January
22nd.
Stats
Wall: 11 13 0 17 = 41
NU: 11 19 4 8 = 42
Scoring: Trask 3-13 0-0 9, An-
derson 5-13 1-1 14, Hustead 1-9 0-
0 3, Lytle 3-8 0-0 8, O’Rourke 2-3
0- 04, Johnston 0-1 0-0 0,
McLaughlin 0-3 1-2 1, Peterson 1-
3 0-0 2. Totals: 15-53 2-3 41.
Field goal percentage; Eagles
.283.
3-point field goals: Eagles 9-31
(Trask 3-9, Anderson 3-9, Hustead
1-6, Lytle 2-7.)
Rebounds: Eagles 25 (Anderson
8.)
Fouls: Eagles 22.
Assists: Eagles 9 (Hustead 4.)
Steals: Eagles 6 (O’Rourke 2.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 1
(O’Rourke 1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 11.
The AAU Wall youth wrestlers
had a strong showing at the West-
side tournament held at Stevens
high school on Sunday, January
13th.
Over 300 area youth wrestlers
participated including 15 Wall
wrestlers under the guidance of
head coach Bret Blasius and as-
sisting coaches: Taylor Mohnen,
Sanden Simons, Toby Wagner,
Kyle Amiotte and Spencer Cordes.
The results for Wall kids in their
individual weight classes are:
•Six and Under: Younger
Amiotte - first place; Talan Ander-
AAU Wall wrestler participate in Westside tournament
AAU Wall youth wrestlers. Pictured back row: from left to right ... Blair Blasius, Thane Simons,
Rylan McDonnell, Bridger Amiotte, Cedar Amiotte and Burke Blasius. Front row: from left to right
... Younger Amiotte, Jace Blasius, Kipp Cordes and Levi Sharp. (Not pictured: Cash Wilson and
Lily Wagner.) ~Photos Paige Cordes
son - second place; Gatlin Cordes -
third place; and Austan Kjerstad -
first place.
•Seven/eight age group: Jace
Blasius - first place; Levi Sharp -
fifth place; and Thane Simmons -
second place.
•Nine/10 age group: Cedar
Amiotte - first place; Blair Blasius
- first place; Burke Blasius - first
place; Kipp Cordes - second place;
Rylan McDonnell - first place; and
Lillyanna Wagner - second place.
•11/12 age group: Bridger
Amiotte - first place; and Cash Wil-
son - first place.
Six and under AAU wrestlers.
Austan Kjerstad, Talan Ander-
son and Gatlin Cordes
By Coach Kier
Wall vs. Philip
The Lady Eagles varsity walked
away with a win over Philip on
Monday, January 14 with a final
score of 46 to 40.
Kaitlin Schreiber led the team
in points with her twelve followed
by Autumn Schulz with eleven.
Schreiber also led the team in
rebounds with her eight boards
and her teammate Josie Blasius
contributed with six.
The girls played a fast pace
game and fought a hard battle till
that final buzzer.
John Hess said, “I was very
pleased with how the girls handled
the pressure and poise as Schulz,
Carlee Johnston, and Blasius
knocked down crucial pressure
free throws in the final minutes,
which helped carry the entire team
for the win."
Stats:
Wall: 15 10 6 15 = 46
Philip: 8 8 10 14 = 40
Scoring: Sadie O’Rourke 3-8 0-
0 6, Johnson 2-9 0-1 7, Schreiber 4-
7 0-0 12, Blasius 3-5 0-0 8, Tayah
Huether 0-1 0-0 0, Monica Biel-
maier 0-2 0-0 3, Schulz 3-11 0-0 10.
Totals: 17-42 0-1 6-19 40.
Field goal percentage: Lady
Eagles .349.
3-point field goal percentage:
Lady Eagles .000.
Free throw percentage: Lady
Eagles .696.
Offensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 11 (Schreiber 5.)
Defensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 12 (Blasius 4.)
Fouls: Lady Eagles 20.
Assists: Lady Eagles 9 (Bailey
Lytle 2, Blasius 2.)
Steals: Lady Eagles 15 (Schulz
6.)
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 22.
Wall vs. Newell
The Varsity Eagles also had a
successful night of basketball with
a win over Newell.
The Eagles played a full game
plus one round of overtime with a
final score reaching 47 to 40.
Johnston lead the team in points
with 15 and O'Rourke and Blasius
pitched in 10 points each as well.
The Lady Eagles out rebounded
the Irrigators with 32 boards over
27.
The top two rebounders for the
game were O'Rourke and
Schreiber both with nine.
"I could not be any more proud
of the girls for the way they had
played. The entire team did a
great job keeping their focus and
determination as we all knew it
would be a strong battle till the
end. Even with going into over-
time, the girls played with tenacity
and drive as they all wanted to
reach their goal of beating the Ir-
rigators," said Coach Hess.
Stats:
Wall: 8 9 10 8 12 = 47
Newell: 8 4 16 7 5 = 40
Scoring: O’Rourke 3-13 2-3 10,
Johnston 6-16 0-1 15, Lytle 0-1 0-0
0, Schreiber 1-4 0-0 4, Blasius 4-7
0-0 10, Huether 0-1 0-0 0, Biel-
maier 0-3 0-0 2, Schulz 3-8 0-0 6,
Samantha Steffen 0-1 0-0 0. To-
tals: 17-54 2-4 11-13 47.
Field goal percentage: Lady
Eagles .315.
3-point field goal percentage:
Lady Eagles .500.
Total free throw percentage:
Lady Eagles .846.
Lady Eagles basketball games results
Offense Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 10 (Johnston 3, Schreiber 3.)
Defensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 22 (O’Rourke 7.)
Fouls: Lady Eagles 16.
Assists: Lady Eagles 14
(O’Rourke 4.)
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 20.
Steals: Lady Eagles 11
(O’Rourke 3, Schulz 3.)
Wall vs. New Underwood
The Varsity Eagles took a win
with a final score of 34 to 25 over
New Underwood on Saturday, Jan-
uary 19.
Blasius came off of the bench
leading the team with 11 points.
Schulz pitched in her eight as
well as O'Rourke with her six.
Johnston helped the team by
getting eight rebounds, and
O'Rourke and Schulz each had five
total boards for the night.
"I am very pleased with how the
girls continued to play with confi-
dence even if some parts of the
game were somewhat of a struggle
at times. Each girl played off of
each other's strengths on the par-
ticular night, and this is team bas-
ketball. We will continue to play a
team game, and play off of each
other's strengths on a night to
night basis," added Coach Hess.
Stats:
Wall: 10 7 7 10 = 34
NU: 5 10 8 2 = 25
Scoring: O’Rourke 2-13 1-3 6,
Emily Linn 0-1 0-0 0, Johnston 2-
16 0-0 5, Lytle 1-3 0-02, Schreiber
1-8 0-0 2, Blasius 4-5 1-1 11,
Huether 0-1 0-0 0, Bielmaier 0-2 0-
0 0, Schulz 2-5 0-0 8. Totals: 12-54
2-4 8-10 31.
Field goal percentage; Lady
Eagles .222.
3-point field goal percentage:
Lady Eagles .500.
Free throw percentage: Lady
Eagles .800.
Offensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 13 (O’Rourke 3, Schulz 3.)
Defensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 14 (Johnston 6.)
Fouls: Lady Eagles 12.
Assists: Lady Eagles 5
(O’Rourke 3.)
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 8.
Steals: Lady Eagles 16
(O’Rourke 5.)
Email us
with your
news item or
photo to
courant @
gwtc.net
Tayah Huether handling the
ball during the New Under-
wood game. Lady Eagles won
the game 34-25.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013 • Page 7 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
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FaRM & RanCH
FoR saLE: 2000 Doonan step
deck, 48’, $15,000. 1984 Wil-
son grain trailer, 42’, $8,000.
Call C.K. Dale, 685-3091.
P7-3tc
suMMER PasTuRE WanTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease
whole ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or
859-2059 (home). P7-tfn
FoR saLE: 30’ Donahue
gooseneck trailer, dovetail,
spare tire, oil bath, 10,000#
axles, rear ramps, $6,000.
685-3430 or (nights) 859-
2217. P6-2tp
FoR saLE: 1780 JD corn
planter, 24-row, 20” big boxes,
fertilizer tanks, monitors, re-
built 2700 acres ago, shedded.
685-3430 or 859-2217.
P6-2tp
PasTuRE WanTED for sum-
mer 2013 for 50-60 pair. Call
Jerry Willert, 837-2459.
K6-tfn
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WanTED
PaRT-TIME TELLER/Book-
kEEPER PosITIon oPEn:
This position is a part-time
bookkeeping/teller position
(approximately 2 days a week).
During summer vacations,
more hours are possible. Du-
ties include making up state-
ments, answering telephone
inquiries & using a computer,
operating a Pitney-Bowes mail-
ing machine and other misc.
duties are required. Physical
requirements would include
lifting boxes of paper weighing
up to 40 lbs. 859-2525, Pam or
Rick. P7-2tc
HELP WanTED: Janitor for
the Kadoka Area School Dis-
trict. Applications available on
the website
www.kadoka.k12.sd. us or
may be picked up at the
school. Open until filled. Con-
tact Jamie Hermann at 837-
2174, ext. 100. EOE. K6-2tc
HELP WanTED: Maintenance
Dept. at Cedar Pass Lodge is
looking for a hard working, de-
pendable maintenance worker.
Must have carpentry, plumb-
ing and flooring experience.
Please contact Sharon at 433-
5562 and/or complete an ap-
plication online at cedarpass
lodge.com P5-4tc
auToMoTIVE
FoR saLE: 2004 Pontiac
Grand Prix GT, gray with gray
interior, 107,300 miles, looks
and runs great. $7,000 is the
asking price, but I will consider
reasonable offers. Call Keith at
454-3426 or 859-2039 for in-
formation or any questions.
PR22-tfn
FoR saLE: 1994 Chevy
pickup for salvage. Call 859-
2975 or (cell) 685-8856, Tom
Foley. P7-1tc
FoR saLE: 1996 Ford F150
302ci, automatic, rear door
lock, power windows, long box,
high mileage, good farm
pickup. 685-3430 or 859-
2217. P6-2tp
FoR saLE: 1996 Dodge 1500
Sport, 5 speed, power locks/
windows, shortbox, 125 gal.
fuel tank built for pickup, high
miles, good farm truck. 685-
3430 or 859-2217.
P6-2tp
FoR saLE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats,
power windows, locks & seats,
good tires. Call 685-8155.
PR10-tfn
BusInEss & sERVICEs
o’ConnELL ConsTRuC-
TIon, InC., PHILIP: Rock,
Sand, Gravel (screened or
crushed). We can deliver.
Dams, dugouts, building sites.
Our 37th year. Glenn or Trace,
859-2020. PR11-tfn
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & Con-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETon RIVER TREnCHInG:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-
2888, Midland.
PR20-52tp
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIon
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka,
SD, or call 837-2690. Craig
cell: 390-8087, Sauntee cell:
390-8604; wrex@gwtc.net
K50-tfn
ManaGER PosITIon: East
Pennington Conservation Dis-
trict in Wall, SD, is seeking to
fill a permanent, part-time
management position. It is an
administrative position with
occasional light outside work.
Please contact the office at
279-2519 or stop by at 24
Creighton Road for an appica-
tion and/or more information.
EOE. PW6-tfn
MIsC. FoR saLE
WEsTERn GoEs RuFFLEs:
See “friendship” scarves and
hatbands. Pocketful of Posies
in Kadoka. Orders taken at yel-
lowroseofkadoka@webtv.net.
K6-2tp
FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
noTICEs/WanTED
WanTED: Once fired 45 ACP
brass. Call 279-2195 or 441-
7049. WP7-tfn
REaL EsTaTE
FoR saLE: 307 Myrtle Ave.,
Philip. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
partially finished basement,
large back yard, new roof and
windows, stainless steel fridge
and stove, washer and dryer
included. Close to schools. Call
859-2470. Can email pictures.
P7-4tc
FoR saLE: (2) lots with small
house, 201 Ash St., Philip.
After 4:00 p.m., call 441-4763.
PR21-3tc
REnTaLs
FoR REnT: Two bedroom
trailer house for rent in Philip.
685-3801 or 859-2204. P3-tfn
4-BEDRooM HousE FoR
REnT In WaLL: Call Stan,
381-2861 or 279-2861.
WP5-tfn
aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we
can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an applica-
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Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
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BusInEss oPPoRTunITY
GROWING BUSINESS OPPOR-
TUNITY in Platte SD: Ground
floor entry in firmly established
food service business, tailor
made for enterprising single per-
son or couple. New equipment
just added for continued expan-
sion into the future. Present
owner seeking retirement but not
at new buyerís expense (priced
exceptionally reasonable). Seller
willing to stay on to train during
transition period. Contact Travis
Agency for details 605 337-3764.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for SALE
(serious inquires only). Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
EMPLoYMEnT
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR/MAIN-
TENANCE WORKER: Haakon
County Highway Department.
Must have a commercial driverís
license or be able to obtain one
within three months of hire date.
Benefits package offered. Open
until filled. Apply: HC Highway
Department, 22260 Lake Wag-
goner Road, Philip, SD 57567.
605/859-2472. Haakon County
is an EOE.
FULL-TIME DEPUTY SHERIFF,
Hyde County, Highmore, SD:
Must be certified in law enforce-
ment or willing to be trained and
certified within one year of hire
date. Application available from
Hyde County Auditorís Office,
605-852-2519, or Box 379, High-
more, SD 57345. Closing date:
Feb. 1, 2013. Hyde County is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL-
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gional Senior Care in beautiful
Custer, SD, have full time and
PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN and Li-
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New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-2229 ext. 110 for more
information or log onto www.re-
gionalhealth.com to apply.
FAMILY COUNSELOR (RAPID
CITY, SD) Counsel children with
severe emotional disturbances.
Work with families towards treat-
ment goals. Masterís degree
Counseling, Social work. Experi-
ence preferred. Details/Applica-
tion: BMSCares.ORG.
VACANCY: FAITH SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, Faith, SD seeking candi-
dates for the position of superin-
tendent of schools with Special
Education Directors duties to be
determined. Application materi-
als available at
www.faith.k12.sd.us or contact
Dr. Julie Ertz at 605.391.4719 or
jertz@asbsd.org.
VaCaTIon REnTaLs
ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION
PROPERTY, to more than
700,000 South Dakota readers.
Your 25-word classified ad will
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for only $150. Call Cherie Jensen
at the S.D. Newspaper Associa-
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local newspaper for more infor-
mation.
LoG HoMEs
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
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Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneaglel-
oghomes.com.
MIsCELLanEous
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY
$3997.00. Make & save money
with your own bandmill. Cut
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ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-
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oTR & DRIVER oPPoRTunITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢,
$375 mo., health ins., credit, 03¢
safety bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
sTEEL BuILDInGs
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter
discounts for spring delivery.
50x80, 62x100, 68x120, 68x200,
100x200. Take advantage of tax
deductions. Limited Offer. Call
Jim 1-888-782-7040.
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Let us help you promote your product.
Thanks for taking the time to read our entire newspaper.
IT HAS BEEN SAID THAT…
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRO/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
THank Yous
Larry and I want to thank
everyone for their thoughts and
prayers, calls, emails, etc. thru
my health issues the past cou-
ple of months. There is definitely
something to be said for the
power of prayer. My surgery
came out much better than ex-
pected and looks like I will be
good to go shortly.
Larry & Peggy Gravatt
WALL SCHOOL
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
JANUARY 9, 2013
The Board of Education of the Wall
School District #51-5 met in regular ses-
sion on Wednesday, January 9, 2013, in
the Library of Wall School. Members
present: Chairperson Eisenbraun, Vice-
Chairperson Johnson, Members Cordes,
Anderson, Williams, Bielmaier, and Trask.
Also attending were Superintendent
Rieckman, Business Manager Mohr, Ele-
mentary Principal Sykora, JT Moon, Jami
Moon, Pandi Pittman, Janelle Gibson,
Jeff Gabriel, Heather Gabriel, Carolyn
Krogman, and Laurie Hindman. Chair-
person Eisenbraun called the meeting to
order at 6:03 p.m.
All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.
Business Manager Mohr took a roll call of
the board members. All members were
present.
The Pledge of Allegiance was recited.
4757. Trask moved to approve the
agenda. Seconded by Johnson. Motion
carried.
4758. Cordes moved to approve the
consent agenda as follows: Seconded by
Anderson. Motion carried.
•Approve minutes of December 12,
2012 board meeting.
•Approve January claims.
•Accept the retirement of Lola Klein-
schmit and Mary Ellen Grayot, with re-
gret.
GENERAL FUND
95 PERCENT GROUP INC., SUPPLIES,
125.00; ACT, SUPPLIES, 168.75; BAR-
NETT, SHARON, DEC MLG, 166.87;
BLACK HILLS CHEMICAL CO., MAINT
SUPPLY, 20.00; BLASIUS, BRETT OR
PAULA, DEC MLG, 28.86; CABANA
BANNERS, BANNERS, 578.00;
CARTER, ANGELA, DEC MLG, 165.46;
CEDAR SHORE RESORT, SUPT
TRAVEL, 81.95; COLLER, HEIDI, GAS
REIMB, 63.54; CRAWFORD, TRACIE,
DEC MLG, 142.08; DAUKSAVAGE, RE-
BECCA, DEC MLG, 159.69; ELSHERE,
STACY, DEC MLG, 67.34; FAUSKE, TIM
OR ERIN, DEC MLG, 230.88; FIRST IN-
TERSTATE BANK, SUPPLIES/TRAVEL/
REPAIRS, 795.55; FRINK, AMANDA,
DEC MLG, 105.82; GOLDEN WEST
TECHNOLOGIES, REPAIRS/PHONE
MAINT., 756.24; GOTTLOB, MATT,
GBB/BBB OFFICIAL, 150.00; J.W. PEP-
PER & SON, INC., SUPPLIES, 210.99;
JAYMAR BUSINESS FORMS, SUP-
PLIES, 88.9; KIER, ASHLEY, DEC MLG,
195.36; LOWE, ERIC, GBB/BBB OFFI-
CIAL & MLG, 140.70; LUEDEMAN,
DANA, DEC MLG, 195.36; MARCO,
INC., COPIES, 393.75; McCONNELL,
GWEN, NOV-DEC MLG, 343.36;
MOORE, JOE, COACHING CLASSES,
75.00; NORTH CENTRAL SUPPLY,
SUPPLIES, 57.00; OFFICE MAX, SUP-
PLIES, 70.51; OLIVER, DEREK,
GBB/BBB OFFICIAL, 200.00; PACIFIC
STEEL & RECYCLING, METAL, 101.18;
PAULSEN, AIMEE, DEC MLG, 77.92;
PENNINGTON COUNTY COURANT,
PROCEEDINGS, 131.87; PHILLIPS, JIM,
GBB OFFICIAL & MLG, 433.68;
PHILLIPS66, CONOCO, 76, GAS,
637.46; RANCOUR, ROBERTA, SEPT-
DEC MLG, 485.22; RIECKMAN, DEN-
NIS, MILEAGE, 38.48; SASD, REGIS-
TRATION FEE, 30.00; SCHOOL SPE-
CIALTY SUPPLY, SUPPLIES, 17.07; SD
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, SERV-
ICES, 280.00; SKILLINGSTAD, DOR-
REEN, DEC MLG, 147.41;
SKILLINGSTAD, KORTNEY, DEC MLG;
93.24; SLAMA, TIM, GBB/BBB OFFI-
CIAL, 100.00; SPECIALTY INSTALLA-
TION LLC, REPAIRS, 479.47; TAYLOR
MUSIC, INC, SUPPLIES, 38.00;
THOMAS, RANDY, GBB/BBB OFFICIAL
& MLG, 374.64; TLC ELECTRIC, SERV-
ICES, 226.68; TRUST AND AGENCY,
REIMBURSE IMPREST - VARIOUS,
930.13; VANWAY TROPHY & AWARD,
AWARDS, 187.50; VERIZON WIRE-
LESS, CELL PHONE, 19.77; WALKER
REFUSE, GARBAGE SERVICES,
535.25; WALL BUILDING CENTER,
SUPPLIES, 320.54; WALL WATER DE-
PARTMENT, WATER, 264.56; WEST
RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELECTRIC-
ITY, 6,237.09; ZELFER, JESSICA, DEC
MLG, 217.56.
FUND TOTAL: 18,181.69
CAPITAL OUTLAY
EISENBRAUN, SCOT, FUEL FOR
HAULING BLEACHERS, 552.34; G & R
CONTROLS, MAINT, 5,076.54.
FUND TOTAL: 5,628.88
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND
APPLE INC., IPAD MINI, 329.00; BLACK
HILLS WORKS, SERVICES, 194.16;
CHILDREN'S CARE HOSPITAL & SCH,
SERVICES, 9,992.20; CHILDREN'S
CARE HOSPITAL, SERVICES, 572.00;
FUNSHINE PRESCHOOL, SERVICES,
80.00; PHILLIPS66, CONOCO, 76, GAS,
37.36; RIECKMAN, KATHY, TRAVEL,
57.84; TRUST AND AGENCY, GAS,
21.14.
FUND TOTAL: 11,283.70
FOOD SERVICE FUND
AMIOTTE, CORINN, LUNCH MONEY
REFUND, 31.35; CHILD & ADULT NU-
TRITION SERVICES, FOOD, 329.93;
DEAN FOODS-NORTH CENTRAL,
MILK, 845.86; REINHART FOODSER-
VICE, L.L.C., FOOD, 1,073.91;
ROEDER, MARY, MEAL, 7.00; TRUST
AND AGENCY, FRUIT, 276.83; US
FOODSERVICE, FOOD, 585.06; WALL
FOOD CENTER, FOOD, 51.85; WALL
WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER, 37.80;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELEC-
TRICITY, 697.70.
FUND TOTAL: 3,937.29
WALL AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
WALL FOOD CENTER, WASP GRO-
CERIES, 95.34; WALL WATER DEPART-
MENT, WATER, 13.34; WEST RIVER
ELECTRIC COOP., ELECTRICITY,
246.25.
FUND TOTAL: 354.93
CHECKING ACCOUNT TOTAL:
39,386.49
Eisenbraun thanked Alex Tysdal for
videotaping for Teen 19.
Wall School Board was awarded the
School Board Excellence Award for the
State of South Dakota. Wade Pogany
and Julie Ertz from Associated School
Boards of South Dakota will present the
Board with their award on Saturday, Jan-
uary 19, at the basketball games in Wall.
This award includes $1,000 to be used by
the board. Our Board will also be hon-
ored on February 19 at the South Dakota
Legislature. The week of January 14 is
school board recognition week. Rieck-
man handed each board member a cer-
tificate and thanked them for all the work
they do for our district and students.
Next, was the discussion about restruc-
turing Big White to a K-5 school instead
of K-8. Rieckman is concerned about
new statewide/nationwide standards and
what is expected of kids academically.
He feels the middle school years are cru-
cial with the new standards. Due to the
common core standards there are
changes in what grade level things are
learned. Cordes asked if Big White would
close if the numbers got lower due to
some of the students coming to school in
town. Rieckman responded that there is
no plan to close Big White. Parents of Big
White students gave the board their opin-
ions about restructuring Big White. The
board will make their decision at the
March 13 board meeting.
Elementary Principal Sykora updated the
board on the happenings in the elemen-
tary. He noted report cards will be going
home with the students the week of Jan-
uary 14. The elementary students are still
working on their follow up activity to
Rachel’s Challenge. They are making a
paper chain where a link gets added for
an act of kindness. The chain is about 85
feet long with approximately 250 kind
acts. They hope to display the chain in
the hallway and possibly display the chain
during a basketball game.
Sykora is looking for community mem-
bers and parents to serve on the Title I
committee and/or the Consolidated Appli-
cation Committee. He will be sending no-
tices and if you are interested please con-
tact him.
Mohr discussed the option of combining
our election with the City of Wall and
Wasta this year. The number of polling
places was also discussed.
4759. Williams moved to approve com-
bining the school election with the City of
Wall and the Town of Wasta and having
Wall as the only polling place. Seconded
by Cordes. Motion carried.
The board had the first reading of the staff
development policy.
The board had the first reading of the vol-
unteer policy.
The administration and board had a dis-
cussion on our school security. Sykora
discussed the different levels of the crisis
plan. Rieckman explained the plan for
evacuation if needed. Rieckman also dis-
cussed looking into cyber locks for class-
rooms.
Rieckman notified the board that the Im-
pact Aid technical amendment passed
and was signed by President Obama on
January 2, 2013. We still aren’t sure
about what will happen with sequestration
and our funding.
Pandi Pittman and Samra Trask have
been selected to present at the Math and
Science Convention.
Rieckman discussed purchasing a new
multi-media camera as one of the dis-
trict’s needs to be replaced.
At 7:40 p.m. Chairperson Eisenbraun de-
clared a recess.
At 7:46 p.m. Chairperson Eisenbraun de-
clared the meeting back in regular ses-
sion.
4760. At 7:46 p.m., Johnson moved to
go into Executive Session for the purpose
of discussing personnel and student is-
sues, according to SDCL 1-25-2. Sec-
onded by Bielmaier. Motion carried.
At 8:59 p.m., Chairperson Eisenbraun de-
clared the meeting out of Executive Ses-
sion.
With no further business brought to the
board, Chairperson Eisenbraun declared
the meeting adjourned at 8:59 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Niki Mohr,
Business Manager
______________
Scot Eisenbraun,
Chairperson
________________
Niki Mohr,
Business Manager
Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $142.25.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Tim and Vickie Griffin have applied for a
Setback Variance to reduce the minimum
required side yard setback from 25 feet to
6 feet in a Limited Agriculture District lo-
cated on Lot 6 and the E1/2 of Lot 5,
Harms Tract, Section 8, T1N, R7E, BHM,
Pennington County, South Dakota, 5245
Power Street, in accordance with Sec-
tions 206 and 509 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
5th day of February 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $14.93.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that John Preston
has petitioned the Pennington County
Planning Board of Commissioners for va-
cation of the following described un-
opened Section Line Highway under the
provisions of SDCL 31-3-6.1:
Legal Description: That portion of Section
Line Right-of-Way lying in Lots 3, 5, and
6 of Forty Oaks Ranch Subdivision, lo-
cated between Sections 18 and 19, T2S,
R7E, BHM, Pennington County, South
Dakota.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tion will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners, in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
5th day of February 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $13.97.
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013 • Page 8 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Public Notice
Regarding
“Thank Yous”
submitted as
“Letters to the Editor”
The position of this newspaper to accept “Thank
Yous”, whether directed to a person, any institution,
affiliation or entity for placement in anything other
than the “Cards of Thanks” column located in the
Classified Section of this newspaper:
THERE WILL BE A CHARGE!
Letters of thanks or congratulations shall be con-
strued as advertising and will be inserted for place-
ment in the proper location of this newspaper.
PLEASE ASK IF IN DOUBT
If you are in doubt about whether material sent in or
brought in to this newspaper, be sure to ask for assis-
tance at the counter or please leave a phone number
so that you may be contacted. There is a difference
between news and advertising.
Pennington County Courant
PO Box 435, 212 4th Ave., Wall, SD 57790
• (605) 279-2565 •
• annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net •
GENERAL CAPITAL SPEC. ED. IMPACT AID LUNCH WASP TOTAL
OUTLAY FUNDS
BEGINNING BALANCE:
11-30-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$532,761.94 . . . . . .$332,836.92 . . . . . . .$79,581.73 . . . . . . . . .$1,942,956.97 . . . . . .$7,433.06 . . . . . . . . .$2,009.51 . . . . . .$2,897,580.13
Receipts:
Local Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,322.73 . . . . . . .$21,520.66 . . . . . . . .$17,939.37 . . . . . . . . .$347.28 . . . . . . . . . . .$4,842.0 . . . . . . . . . .2,565.43 . . . . . . . . .$89,537.48
County Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,480.74 . . . . . . . .$272.16 . . . . . . . . . .$193.23 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,946.13
State Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$54,112.00 . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$54,112.00
Federal Sources: . . . . . . . . . . .$69,090.00 . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,771.00 . . . . . . . . .$81.24 . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,618.59 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$98,560.83
Other Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
General Journal Revenue: . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
Total to be
accounted for: . . . . . . . . . . .$700,767.41 . . . . . .$354,629.74 . . . . . . .$123,485.33 . . . . . . . .$1,943,385.49 . . . . . .$15,893.66 . . . . . . . .$4,574.94 . . . . . .$3,142,736.57
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . . .$190,208.46 . . . . . .$2,703.35 . . . . . . . . .$32,166.77 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,624.27 . . . . . . . .$2,510.45 . . . . . . .$238,213.30
General Journal
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
EOM BALANCE:
12-31-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$510,558.95 . . . . . .$351,926.39 . . . . . . .$91,318.56 . . . . . . . . .$1,943,385.49 . . . . . .$5,269.39 . . . . . . . . .$2,064.49 . . . . . .$2,904,523.27
Pennington County Courant
279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net
annc@
gwtc.net
WALL CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
MINUTES
JANUARY 8, 2013
The Wall City Council met for a regular
meeting January 8, 2013 at 6:30 pm in
the Community Center meeting room.
Members present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Pete Dunker,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Jerry Morgan, Councilman; Stan
Anderson, Councilman
Absent: Bill Leonard, Councilman
Others present: Carolynn Anderson, Fi-
nance Officer; Jeff Clark, Public Works
Director; Pandi Pittman, Teen 19 Advisor;
Sgt. Dan Wardle, Penn. Co. Sheriff’s
Dept.; Anne Clark and Laurie Hindman,
Pennington Co. Courant; Bruce and Lynn
Dunker; Mike Casjens; David Eisenbraun
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
approve the agenda. Motion carried.
Sgt. Dan Wardle presented the police re-
port. Sgt. Wardle commented the new
deputy should be ready to start work in
Wall in approximately three weeks but will
keep us updated with any delays should
they occur.
The council approved a policy for surplus
property in 2010. The policy states that an
elected official or city employee cannot
serve on the appraisal committee. There-
fore, someone else will need to be ap-
pointed in Pete Dunker’s place. Motion by
Dunker, second by M Anderson to appoint
Dar Haerer Jr., to replace Pete. Motion
carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve the 2nd reading of Ordi-
nance 12-07; amending Garbage Collec-
tion and Disposal. Motion carried.
ORDINANCE 12-07
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND
ORDINANCE 8.16 – Garbage
Collection and Disposal
BE IT ORDAINED by the City
of Wall, South Dakota that
Chapter 8.16.055 be added
and read as follows:
8.16.055 Unlawful usage of
other dumpsters.
No commercial establish-
ment or resident shall throw
any garbage, trash or refuse,
generated out of the commer-
cial establishment or resi-
dence, into any container ex-
cept for their own container
designated for such use. The
unlawful usage of other dump-
sters shall be punishable under
the City of Wall Chapter 1.12
and/or South Dakota State
Law.
This ordinance shall take effect
twenty (20) days after the date
of publication pursuant to
SDCL-9-19-13.
Dated at Wall, South Dakota
this 28th day of December,
2012.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
__________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
First Reading: December 28,
2012
Second Reading: January 8,
2013
Publish: January 24, 2013
Effective: February 12, 2013
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
approve the First Interstate Bank as the
official depository for the City. Motion car-
ried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve June 4, 2013 for the municipal
election date. Motion carried.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to approve the combined election
agreement with the Wall School District
and the Town of Wasta. Motion carried.
Motion by S. Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve Resolution 13-01; 2013
Salaries. Motion carried.
RESOLUTION 13-01
CITY OF WALL – SALARIES
BE IT RESOLVED that the fol-
lowing 2013 annual salary
schedule be adopted effective
January 8, 2013:
Jeff Clark, $46,315.00 Plus
Insurance
Garrett Bryan, $30,599.00
Plus Insurance
Jim Kitterman, $38,347.00
Plus Insurance
Carolynn Anderson,
$34,784.00 Plus Insurance
Lindsey Hildebrand,
$27,800.00 Plus Insurance
Mayor, $70.00 per meeting
City Council, $60.00 per
meeting
Custodial position, $12.75
per hour
Seasonal Employees,
$7.50-$12.75 per hour
Librarian, $7.75 - $9.25 per
hour
Cemetery maintenance,
$10.75 per hour
Adopted and dated this 8th day
of January, 2013.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
__________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Finance Officer (FO) Anderson explained
a Library Board position will be vacant
with the term expiration and the board
member is not going to run another term.
The remaining board gave a recommen-
dation for Dave Jones as the replace-
ment. Motion by Morgan, second by
Dunker to approve Dave Jones for the va-
cant Library board position. Motion car-
ried.
FO Anderson commented the new Airport
Building has a water meter installed and
questioned if it would be considered an
In-Kind usage account like other city
buildings are. Motion by S Anderson, sec-
ond by M Anderson to approve the water
meter as In-Kind usage. Motion carried.
There was discussion on the utility cost
for the Stratton building. It was high in
CY2012 for a vacant storage building. A
heating unit was left on, but has been
turned off now and other action will be
taken to reduce the cost.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve city minutes for December
28th. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve Fire Department min-
utes from December 11th. Motion car-
ried.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve paying the January City
of Wall bills. Motion carried.
CITY BILLS
January 8, 2013
BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE, oil/air filter,
20.80; BLACK HILLS CHEMICAL, freight,
4.99; DAKOTA BACKUP, backup service-
balance from December, 5.60; EASTERN
PENN. CO. AMBULANCE DISTRICT, re-
imburse CD's cashed out, 71,983.94; EN-
ERGY LABORATORIES, water testing,
12.50; DEAVER, DWIGHT, balance left
on water deposit, 81.75; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, sales tax, 459.31; FIRST
INTERSTATE BANK, ach fees, 12.20;
GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLOGIES, TS
security monitoring, 80.97; GUNDER-
SON, PALMER, GOODSELL, Baxter
property-easement issues, 870.00;
RAPID DELIVERY INC, freight for water
testing, 10.80; WALKER REFUSE, De-
cember garbage service, 7,487.98; WALL
FIRE DEPT, reimburse revenue from
Westberry Trails fire-deposited in error,
611.36.
TOTAL BILLS: $81,642.20
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 8th day of January 2013.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve paying the January Fire De-
partment bills. Motion carried.
FIRE DEPARTMENT BILLS
January 8, 2013
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, plaque-fuel,
152.28; GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone-
internet, 122.85; VERIZON WIRELESS,
broadband fee, 114.16.
TOTAL BILLS: $389.29
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 8th day of January 2013.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve the January Ambulance
bills. Motion carried.
Note: Most Ambulance bills will now be
paid by the recently formed Ambulance
District.
AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT BILLS
January 8, 2013
WALL AMBULANCE, pay out the Decem-
ber bank rec balance to the District,
27,662.51.
TOTAL BILLS: $27,662.51
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 28th day of December 2012.
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
approve the January Library bills. Motion
carried.
LIBRARY BILLS
January 8, 2013
FELLER, SANDY, reimburse expense for
Christmas activity, 20.34; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, books from Amazon,
426.04.
TOTAL BILLS: $446.38
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 8th day of January 2013.
FO Anderson commented on the handout
for the Motor Vehicle Record policy and
report. This is a starting point and wel-
comes suggestions and recommenda-
tions. It will be brought back to the Feb-
ruary meeting. Anderson stated the only
change recommended for the Pennington
County Emergency Management
(PCEM) agreement was to change the
30-day billing to a 45-day billing. The rec-
ommended change will be given to
PCEM and brought back pending their
approval.
Public Works Director (PWD) Clark re-
quested approval for the Engineer to
begin working on a proposed street proj-
ect of curb & gutter replacement along
with some chip & seal. There is
$250,000.00 in the budget for the project.
Councilman Dunker questioned whether
some of the curb & gutter work could be
done by the public works employees to
reduce the cost. Clark stated it would be
difficult without a backhoe along with one
employee recovering from knee surgery.
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
have the engineer propose some options
for review at the February meeting. Mo-
tion carried.
PWD Clark explained there are no other
reputable companies to purchase well
motors from other than Central Lift.
Therefore, the only options for motor re-
placement at Well #7 are a used one for
$30,000 installed or a new motor for
$50,000 installed. West River Lyman
Jones will have all the generators in-
stalled for a couple more weeks. Well #7
is the only water source with a generator
if we lost power due to a storm. Motion by
Morgan, second by M Anderson to pro-
ceed with purchasing the used motor
pending only if the age of the motor is not
over a year. Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by M Anderson
to change the next city council meeting to
Tuesday, February 5th, at 6:30 pm.
Bruce Dunker spoke to the council on
purchasing the land from him for the
sewer easement that is needed to move
forward on the sewer project. He has
talked with his mortgage company and
they are willing to release that portion of
the land and will draw up the needed pa-
perwork as soon as practical. The point
was made that the property is still land
locked for access to maintain other than
the sewer maintenance. Motion by S An-
derson, second by M Anderson to ap-
prove the sewer committee meeting with
Hildebrand’s to negotiate an easement for
access to the property if purchased from
Dunker’s. Motion carried.
With no further business, the meeting
was adjourned at 7:57 pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $133.21.
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
DECEMBER 20, 2012
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb
called the meeting to order at 10:25 a.m.
(CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Krogman, seconded by Director Smith to
approve the agenda. Motion carried
unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the November 15, 2012, meeting were
previously mailed to the Board for their re-
view. Motion by Director Matt, seconded
by Director Prokop to approve the No-
vember minutes. Motion carried unani-
mously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph
Hieb, $56.61; Casey Krogman, $56.61;
Marion Matt, $56.61; Veryl Prokop,
$56.61; Lorne Smith, $56.61; West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS, $1,000.00;
Kadoka Press, $32.81; Lyman County
Herald, $27.11; Murdo Coyote, $31.41;
Pennington County Courant, $26.64; Pi-
oneer Review, $26.00; Todd County Trib-
une, $29.76. Motion by Director Smith,
seconded by Director Matt to approve the
District bills. Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT: The financial status of the District
to date was previously sent to the Board.
A copy of the November Financial Report
is on file at the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the November
Financial Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his December report
to the Board. Motion by Director Smith,
seconded by Director Krogman to ap-
prove the Manager’s Report. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
JOYCE WILLIAMSON - USGS: Joyce
Williamson with the United States Geo-
logical Survey was present to give an
overview and answer any questions on
the monitoring, operation and funding of
the streamflow gages. They are seeking
funding in the amount of $11,280 for two
gaging stations: White River near
Kadoka and White River near White
River. It was requested that Joyce try to
find a cost share partner for the White
River near Kadoka station, and she
agreed to work on this for the 2014 fund-
ing agreement. Motion by Director Matt,
seconded by Director Krogman to ap-
prove the agreement with USGS for FFY
2013 on the condition that next year they
find someone to cost share the project to
help lower costs. Motion carried unani-
mously.
CASEY PETERSON & ASSOCIATES –
2012 ANNUAL REPORT: Due to a re-
cent law change that no longer requires a
formal audit, an annual report will be com-
pleted which Casey Peterson & Associ-
ates, LTD. has agreed to review at an
hourly rate that is not expected to exceed
$300. Motion by Direct Matt, seconded
by Director Smith to authorize Casey Pe-
terson & Associates, LTD. to review the
2012 Annual Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
UPPER MISSOURI DUES - $145: Man-
ager Fitzgerald presented an invoice from
Upper Missouri Water Association for
2012 membership dues in the amount of
$145. Motion by Director Krogman, sec-
onded by Director Prokop to approve pay-
ment of $145 for the 2012 membership
dues. Motion carried unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 11:07 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_________________
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
______________
Joseph Hieb,
Chairman
Published January 24, 20123, at the total
approximate cost of $38.34.
NOTICE
THE PUBLIC TITLE III FUNDS
Pennington County is proposing to ex-
pend Title III funds for the following proj-
ects during calendar year 2013. The proj-
ects may consist of the following: wildland
firefighter training classes; wildland fire-
fighter training simulator; fire retardant gel
application system(s); radio communica-
tions equipment; increasing the protection
of people and property from wildfire and
insect infestations; emergency response
equipment or vehicles; wildland firefight-
ing equipment; search & rescue; and
other emergency services as allowed by
the Secure Rural Schools and Self Deter-
mination Act of 2000 and 2008. The total
estimated cost of these projects is
$300,000.
Any persons desiring to make a comment
may do so to the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners, 315 Saint
Joseph Street, Rapid City, South Dakota,
57701 at a public hearing on March 19,
2013 at 9:15 AM. Written comments
should be identified as pertaining to the
above referenced projects and received
prior to the public meeting.
Dated January 23, 2013
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $12.39.
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
HELP YOUR CHiLDREN
AVOiD STUDENT DEBT
BURDEN
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
It’s not so easy being a college
kid these days. The job market for
recent graduates has been shaky
while, at the same time, students
are leaving school with more debt
than ever before. If you have chil-
dren who will someday be attend-
ing college, should you be worried?
You might indeed have cause for
concern. Americans now owe more
on student loans than on credit
cards, according to the Federal
Bank of New York, the U.S. De-
partment of Education and other
sources. For the college class of
2011, the most recent year for
which figures are available, the av-
erage student loan debt was about
$26,500, according to the Institute
for College Access and Success’s
Project on Student Debt.
This type of debt load, coupled
with the struggles to find a well-
paying job commensurate with
their education, is causing many
recent graduates to get off on the
wrong foot in terms of developing
savings and investment strategies
that could help them throughout
their lives.
So, what can you do?
If you want to help your kids pay
for college, you may want to con-
sider a 529 plan. When you invest
in a 529 plan, all withdrawals will
be free from federal income taxes,
as long as the money is used for
qualified college expenses. (How-
ever, non-qualified withdrawals
may be subject to ordinary income
tax plus a 10% penalty on the
earnings portion.) Contribution
limits are high, and, contributions
may be eligible for a tax deduction
or credit for residents in certain
states.
A 529 plan, while valuable, is
not the only college savings vehicle
available. You may also want to
consider a Coverdell Education
Savings Account, which, like a 529
plan, can generate tax-free earn-
ings if the money is used for higher
education expenses. However, a
Coverdell account’s contribution
limits are much lower than those
of a 529 plan. You could also estab-
lish a custodial account, known as
an UGMA or UTMA, which offers
some tax benefits and no contribu-
tion limits.
Nonetheless, while these vehi-
cles may help you save and invest
for college, they may also divert re-
sources that you might have used
for other financial goals — such as
a comfortable retirement. Of
course, it’s not an “either-or” situ-
ation — there’s nothing stopping
you from contributing to a 529
plan, Coverdell account or custo-
dial account along with your
401(k) and IRA.
Clearly, though, it will take dis-
cipline and perseverance on your
part to save and invest for both
your children’s education and your
own retirement. Like everyone
else, you don’t have unlimited re-
sources. But you do have another
ally — time. The earlier you begin
investing for education and retire-
ment, the greater your chances of
achieving your goals in these
areas. And by understanding how
your goals interact, you can work
to make sure you don't inadver-
tently derail one when saving for
another.
Avoiding the student loan “debt
trap” while still making progress
toward your retirement savings
will require creative thinking —
and both you and your children
may have to make some sacrifices
along the way. But the ultimate
goals — a college degree that isn’t
one big IOU and a comfortable re-
tirement — are worth the effort.
Legal Publication
Deadline is
11 a.m. on FRIDAY
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EARLY
CONSIGNMENTS: EXPECTINC 5000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE
ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
SMITH & SONS - 780 CHAF X CLVS; FS ......................................650-775=
SLOVEK & EISENBRAUN - 500 CHAF X CLVS; FS.......................800-900=
HOSTUTLER RANCH - 300 CHAF X HFFS; FS.............................650-750=
NELSON - 290 DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS,NI, HFFS DV
& ALL IN TOWN.........................................................................600-750=
ARNESON & ELSHERE - 260 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ............................500-650=
K BAR C RANCH - 250 HEFF, DWF, & FWF CLVS;
FS,NI,AN,HFFS DV....................................................................600-700=
ROSETH BROTHERS - 210 FANCY HOME FAISED STFS
(1 LOAD ¸ 850= 2 LOADS ¸800=} .............................................800-850=
WILLIAMS - 190 CHAF X HFFS; FS..............................................700-850=
OFM PART - 160 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................650-725=
GOTTSLEBEN - 150 DLK & FED CLVS (120 STFS, 30 HFFS} FS .600-700=
KENNEDY'S H & S PART - 150 DLK STFS; FS,AN,ASV- SOUTH DAKOTA
CEFTIFIED ......................................................................................600=
TRASK FAMILY - 150 DLK CLVS; FS............................................600-650=
BROWN - 140 FED CLVS; FS (115 STFS & 25 FWF HFFS ALL IN TOWN}
600-700=
WELLER RANCH - 140 DLK STFS; FS,ASV..........................................700=
LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT - 130 DLK CLVS; FS........................350-450=
KOPP - 120 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................600=
MILLER - 95 DLK & A FEW CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .........................550-600=
THORSON - 80 DLK & DWF CLVS;FS ..................................................750=
MARTI - 80 DLK CLVS;FS.............................................................400-550=
RADWAY - 72 DLK MOSTLY STFS; FS..........................................750-850=
NOTEBOOM CATTLE CO - 70 FED & CHAF X STFS; FS..............750-800=
FREELAN - 60 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ..................................................500-650=
NEUGEBAUER - 60 FED ANCUS CLVS; FS,W...............................600-650=
PHILIPSEN - 50 DLK DV HFFS; FS,NI...........................................550-575=
MILLER - 50 FED ANC HFFS; FS.................................................500-550=
LAUING - 50 DLK HFFS; FS,NI,SOME DV .....................................550-650=
COUCH - 24 FED DV HFFS; FS NI ASV................................................600=
NIXON - 20 DLK STFS; FS...................................................................475=
DEERING - 20 DLK STFS; FS,ASV................................................500-600=
FERGUSON - 20 HEFF FEPLC DV HFFS; FS ................................550-600=
BALLARD - 20 DLK CLVS; FS.......................................................500-600=
PFEIFER - 10 DLK HFFS; FS,NI...........................................................600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
"The Next Cenerat|on of L|vestock Product|on"
Event: Thursday, January 24, at ô:30 p.m. at
Ph|||p L|vestock Auct|on
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND SELLING
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, AT 12:00 P.M. (MT)
RH CATTLE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JANUARY 22, 2DJS
We Þod o 111e run o] bred oo111e ]or our so1e. TÞe A1
bred Þe1]ers so1d u11Þ o prem1um. Ne×1 ueeK, Tuesdog,
Jon. 291Þ, b1g Speo1o1 Feeder Co111e So1e e×peo11ng
SDDD Þeod.
BRED CATTLE:
MCPHERSON ANGUS- STURGIS
38.........................DLK & DWF AI'D HFFS 10-MAF 1120= .....$1,725.00
10..........................................DLK HFFS 10-MAF 1187= .....$1,650.00
8 ...........................................DWF HFFS 10-MAF 1038= .....$1,550.00
SHAWN FUGIER - BUFFALO GAP
13 .........................................DWF HFFS 4-MAF 1095= .....$1,540.00
16..........................................DLK HFFS 4-MAF 1057= .....$1,400.00
DOOLITTLE WAGNER RANCH - BELLE FOURCHE
77..........................................DLK HFFS 1-MAF 1061= .....$1,525.00
RONNIE MAHAFFY - VALE
17..........................................DLK HFFS 1-MAF 1009= .....$1,450.00
180........................................DLK HFFS 1-MAF 1005= .....$1,400.00
BO SHARP - NORRIS
11..........DLK & DWF 3 TO 4 YF OLD COWS 1-APF 1295= .....$1,410.00
KEN COUCH - BUFFALO GAP
28..........FED & FWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 25-FED 1088= .....$1,410.00
RITTBERGER BEEF - HERMOSA
5............................................DLK HFFS 8-FED 1083= .....$1,400.00
6 .......................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 25-MAF 1258= .....$1,200.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
33 ........DLK 6 YFS TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1-APF 1399= .....$1,350.00
LYNN MILLER - FAITH
44..........................................DLK HFFS 10-MAF 973= .......$1,325.00
14 .........................................DWF HFFS 10-MAF 976= .......$1,320.00
22........DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1-APF 1415= .....$1,090.00
CHARLES BELTCH - UPTON, WY
7 .......................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 20-MAF 1343= .....$1,310.00
27 .....................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 20-MAF 1388= .....$1,210.00
5 ....................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 20-MAF 1244= .....$1,060.00
CHRIS GLINES - CHADRON, NE
22..........................................DLK HFFS 15-FED 910= .......$1,210.00
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
6 ....................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 25-MAF 1334= .....$1,020.00
WEIGHUPS:
RYAN & CHRISSY ELSHERE - ELM SPRINGS
1.........................................................DLK COW 1710= ..........$83.00
JAKE JULSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.........................................................DLK COW 1520= ..........$82.50
MIKE LUDEMAN - QUINN
1........................................................DWF COW 1450= ..........$82.50
3.................................................DLK COWETTES 1033= ..........$94.00
RICHARD & LORAYNA PAPOUSEK - QUINN
8 .......................................................DLK COWS 1388= ..........$82.50
19 ....................................................DLK HFFTS 1013= ........$100.50
GARY BIRKELAND - DUPREE
1.........................................................DLK COW 1395= ..........$81.50
1 ........................................................DLK DULL 2235= ........$101.50
MANDY MCGRIFF - QUINN
1.........................................................DLK COW 1260= ..........$86.00
1.........................................................DLK COW 1290= ..........$83.00
9 ......................................................DLK HFFTS 866= ..........$109.50
1 ..................................................DLK COWETTE 1020= ..........$98.00
LYNN MILLER - FAITH
1........................................................DWF COW 1080= ..........$83.50
1........................................................DLK HFFT 970= ..........$100.00
DON HECK - KADOKA
1 ........................................................FED COW 1270= ..........$82.50
ED THOMPSON - STURGIS
6 .......................................................DLK COWS 1303= ..........$82.25
3.................................................DLK COWETTES 1117= ..........$94.00
MIKE NOTEBOOM - PHILIP
4.............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1415= ..........$82.00
1........................................................DLK HFFT 1020= ........$108.00
BEAU BENDIGO - HOWES
1.........................................................DLK COW 1330= ..........$82.00
1........................................................FED DULL 1630= ..........$95.00
CHUCK SPRING - UNION CENTER
12...........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1485= ..........$81.75
20 ...................................................HEFF COWS 1253= ..........$78.00
20 ....................................DLK & DWF COWETTES 1036= ..........$90.25
CHRIS IVERSEN - MURDO
5.............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1361= ..........$81.00
BRIAN WEAVER - HERMOSA
2 .......................................................DLK COWS 1450= ..........$80.50
BILL BRUNSKILL - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.........................................................DLK COW 1265= ..........$80.50
1.........................................................DLK COW 1565= ..........$79.00
CARL & JUDY KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ........................................................DLK DULL 1870= ..........$97.50
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
5 .......................................................DLK COWS 1344= ..........$80.25
1.........................................................DLK COW 1660= ..........$79.00
DARRIN KLAPPERICH - RAPID CITY
4.............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1335= ..........$80.00
FLOYD GABRIEL EST - CREIGHTON
14...........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1576= ..........$79.25
1.........................................................DLK COW 1235= ..........$79.00
BRANDON ROCK - LONG VALLEY
1 ........................................................DLK DULL 2220= ..........$96.50
GUY LEONARD ANKER - MURDO
2 .......................................................DLK COWS 1548= ..........$78.00
1........................................................DLK HFFT 980= ..........$111.00
RITTBERGER BEEF INC - HERMOSA
13 .....................................................DLK COWS 1294= ..........$78.00
CAROLYN ANDERS - ELM SPRINGS
1.........................................................DLK COW 1720= ..........$75.50
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
1 ................................................CHAF COWETTE 1125= ..........$86.00
MARK LANTIS - BOX ELDER
10 ....................................................DLK HFFTS 850= ..........$111.00
RONNIE MAHAFFY - VALE
1........................................................DLK HFFT 915= ..........$106.00
RON TWISS - INTERIOR
1..................................................FED COWETTE 1190= ..........$92.00
MCPHERSON ANGUS- STURGIS
37 .......................................DLACK ANCUS DULLS AVC. .......$4,811.00
HORSE SALE:
UNDEF 1000=..................................................................11.00 - 19.00
1000= - 1099=....................................................................20.00-28.00
1100= & OVEF.................................................................25.00 - 33.00
SADDLE PFOSPECTS...................................................575.00 - 975.00
SADDLE HORSE:
M & N CRONIN - GETTYSBURG
1 ÷ DAY 15 YF OLD CELDINC......................................................$1,500.00
Pennington County Courant • January 24, 2013 • Page 10
annc@gwtc.net
The Looking Glass of Time
80 years ago…
Complete publicity showing re-
ceipts and expenditures in all
county and local units of govern-
ment is one of the most effective
means of keeping public expense
down, James P. McDonnell of Buf-
falo, vice-president of the Min-
nesota Taxpayers Association, de-
clared in an address. Published re-
ports in newspapers give every
taxpayer a chance to “check up” on
public transactions, and taxpayers
can follow up with protest when
these appear necessary.
Women visitors to hospitals are
permitted to kiss male patients,
even if these are married, a court
in Vienna ruled. Paul Johannes,
lying in a Viennese hospital, where
he had been operated on, fre-
quently was visited by a girl friend
of his wife. His visitor, a good look-
ing widow of about thirty, always
kissed the man when coming and
leaving. His wife considered the
widow’s behavior to be too “chari-
table” and filed a suit of divorce.
The court, however, did not see a
default in the kisses of the young
widow and dismissed the case.
Senate Bill No. 37, introduced
by Senator Otto L. Kaas of Britton,
proposes to repeal the law requir-
ing rural districts to pay high
school tuition. The bill has been re-
ferred to committee and will prob-
ably remain there for a few days.,
This bill, if passed, would elimi-
nate high school tuition and deny
to children of rural districts the
right and privilege of secondary
education at public expense.
70 years ago…
Lysle T. Dartt, 33, of Wall, is one
of more than 500 U. S. Naval Re-
serve Officers who graduated from
this indoctrination school, January
11, 1943. Lieutenant Dartt has
concluded an intensive 60-day
course, designed to acquaint him
with Navy life. Officers receive in-
struction in seamanship, ord-
nance, correspondence, navigation,
naval regulations and customs and
other allied subjects. He attended
Wall high school, graduating in
1927, and received his bachelor’s
degree in 1933 at the University of
South Dakota, Vermillion.
Fire stricking in the bitterly-cold
early morning hours Tuesday de-
stroyed the Quinn school dormi-
tory, forming students and teach-
ers to flee in their night clothes.
Cause of the fire, which started in
the basement, is undetermined,
but it did not burst into flames in
the upper stories until the children
started rushing out of the old two-
story school building.
60 years ago…
The Pennington County
Courant, along with the Rapid
City Journal and Gate City Guide,
was designated last week by the
Board of County Commissioners to
continue to serve as a county offi-
cial paper for 1953.
Sonny Huether won a technical
knock out in the Legion boxing
card held last week in Rapid City.
He is expected to enter the Golden
Glove tournament that is being
stagged in Rapid City, February 2,
3, and 4, according to his trainers,
George Tivis and Roy Pederson.
The largest banquet ever held in
Wall was given Sunday evening in
the new WREA building by the
Chamber of Commerce in recogni-
tion and appreciation of the new
WREA headquarters and for sev-
eral farmers who had achieved
records in soil conservation prac-
tice. The ladies served one hun-
dred fifty persons, about half of
them being guests of the Club.
50 years ago…
Bouquet of blue and white car-
nations adorned the altar of the
First Lutheran Church in Wall, in
which Miss Margy White became
the bride of Jerald Kjerstad at an
evening ceremony, January 12.
The bride is the daughter of Mrs.
Donald Cress of Sturgis, and the
groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Elnoris Kjerstad of Quinn.
In spite of regular tests, rumors
still persist that Wall’s deep well
water supply is contaminated.
Tests were made from water taken
from different taps in Wall —
Crown residence, Fountain Motel,
at the pump house and Jensen
Trailer Court. All samples were
marked satisfactory. The tests
were for organic matter or bacteria
and made January 4, 1963.
A drama that could have ended
in tragedy occurred Thursday
night in this age of modern two-
way radios, cars, planes and
‘copters, that would never have
been so serious back in homestead
days when everyone knew that the
latch string was always out for any
stranger that happened along
whether owners were home or not
— and the Carl Ericksons are still
just that type. Two missile workers
became stalled with their truck in
the Deep Creek country about 5:00
o’clock in the afternoon. After
working two or three hours trying
to get their truck and trailer
(which was loaded with expensive
welding equipment) out, they
walked about two miles to the Carl
Erickson place. Finding no one at
home they finally entered and
used the phone. However, they
were afraid to “make themselves
at home” as would have happened
in early days. So after notifying
home base (Sturgis) that they were
stalled, the men went back to their
truck where they were found the
next morning after an all-night
search. The stranded men had
given such poor description of their
location, that the search covered
the entire area from Cottonwood to
Pedro and Creighton to Grind-
stone.
40 years ago…
The City Council at their regu-
lar meeting last week voted to se-
cure the services of the Sixth Plan-
ning and Development District to
draw up plans for a Clinic to re-
place the old hospital building on
South Main Street. The old hospi-
tal building was formerly the resi-
dence of A. C. Kingsbury and was
moved here from Cottonwood
about thirty years ago, equipped
for use as a hospital and operated
by the late Dr. G. W. Mills. Today,
a few of the rooms on the lower
floor are being used as office space
for the Wall nurse, a dentist and
an optometrist, and occasionally
for a doctor. The proposed building
would be located on these two lots,
100 ft. by 150 ft. and would contain
offices and examination rooms to
be used by a doctor, and nurses, a
dentist and optometrist, emer-
gency rooms for patients, and per-
haps a garage for the Wall Ambu-
lance.
Fire Tuesday afternoon de-
stroyed a workshop and contents
at the Robert Marsden place west
of Wall. The Wall firemen were
able to save the truck that had
started to burn and a chicken
house adjacent to the work shop.
Sparks from welding set fire to
some gasoline which was the cause
of the fire.
Calene Beth Knock and Randy
Gene Babcock were united in mar-
riage at a firelight ceremony in the
home of the bride’s parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Calvin N. Knock in
Billings, Mont. on New Year’s Eve.
Parents of the groom are Mr. and
Mrs. Gordon Babcock.
Miss Anita Paulsen and Darrel
Peterson were married December
27 in the St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church in Wall, with Fr. Craig
Cower officiating at the double
ring ceremony. Parents of the cou-
ple are Mr. and Mrs. Raynold
Paulsen, Wall, and Mr. and Mrs.
James Peterson, Philip.
30 years ago…
BiRTH: Born January 2 to
Casey and Cindy Weaver, a son,
Cole Justin, in Rapid City. Arriv-
ing nine weeks early, baby Cole
weighed in at 3 lbs. 5 oz. and meas-
ured 17 inches long. Maternal
grandparents are Roald and Bon-
nie Mitchell, Dupree, and paternal
grandparents, Pat and Monica
Weaver, Wanblee. Great-grand-
mother is Mrs. Margaret Harty in
Milesville; and Loyd Weaver of
Kadoka is great-grandfather.
Although Stanley County took
home first place in the 3-Rivers
Wrestling Tournament on Satur-
day, January 15, two of Wall’s
wrestlers received firsts in their
individual weight classes. Eddie
Dartt (105 lbs.) received a first and
Marty Huether (119 lbs.) took a
first home along with honors as
Outstanding Wrestler. As a team,
Wall placed fifth in the conference.
Wall danced away with nearly
all the first places in the gymnas-
tics meet against Sturgis on Mon-
day night, January 17. Wall’s team
score was an impressive 85.9 with
Sturgis scoring 75.6 points.
If the Chicago and North West-
ern Railroad has its way, it won’t
be long before people in western
South Dakota neither hear the
train a-comin’ nor see it rollin’
‘round the bend. The Chicago and
North Western, the only railroad
in western South Dakota, last
week gave official notice that the
line running between Rapid City
and Pierre will be subject to aban-
donment or discontinuance within
three years.
Absentees from the starting
lineup were a factor in the Wall
basketball game against Lyman
County on Friday, January 21, but
the major contributor for their loss
was uncontrolled ball handling
which produced 31 Wall turnovers
during the game. Wall was de-
feated by a score of 77-55. Scoring
the most points for Wall was junior
Jim Tines with 16. Although Andy
Linn didn’t shoot many from the
field, his free throw attempts were
very accurate. Linn landed all 10
of his free throw shots and ended
up with 12 points during the game.
Tim Griffin is back in the game
after recovering from his injury
and he scored 10 points for the
team.
20 years ago…
On Tuesday morning, January
19, 1993 at about 11:30 a.m. the
Wall Volunteer Fire Department
responded to a fire at the home of
Veryl and Juanita Schroeder. The
fire which according to the deter-
mination of the State Fire Mar-
shall was caused by electrical
wiring in a wall leading to an out-
let, totally gutted the kitchen and
the laundry room of the home. The
fire spread to the ceiling and when
the firemen used water to extin-
guish the blaze, the ceiling and
sheetrock came down. Damage to
the home, according to Veryl
Schroeder, is about $50,000.00 in-
cluding personal belongings.
BiRTH: Born January 1, 1993
to Kent and Stephanie Kjerstad of
Quinn, a daughter Tiana Dee. Lit-
tle Tiana weighed 7 lbs. 14 oz. and
joins brother Quincy and sisters,
Natasha and Katrina at home.
Grandparents are Richard and
Patty Kjerstad, Quinn, Curtis and
Peggy Coomes, Manderson and
Don Saunders, Piedmont. Great-
grandparents are Elnoris and Ila
Kjerstad, Quinn, Merle and Verle
Crown, Wall, Cricket and Elloween
Saunders, Rapid City and Isabelle
Pourier, Kyle.
The Wall Eagle Wrestlers trav-
eled to Philip on Saturday, Janu-
ary 16, 1993 to compete in the
Philip Invitational Tournament.
Wall had three place winners
which include: Sean Patterson at
119 lbs., who came out of retire-
ment to take a respectable fourth
place; Chris Lurz at 145 lbs., who
wrestled exceptionally well and
placed third; and Matthew Bruck-
lacher at 171 lbs., who repeated
the State Finals match again with
Stu Larson of Stanley County and
god a disappointing second place.
Shannon Sampson was chosen
as the December Student of the
Month. Shannon is a junior at the
Wall High School.
10 years ago…
The bake sale for the Kevin Biel-
maier family, that was organized
by Little People Productions, was
a huge success. The bake sale
raised $5,662, which does not in-
clude the matched money from
Thrivent.
Wall basketball player Conrad
Kjerstad was selected for the All-
Tournament Team during the West
River Tournament held January
16-18. Kjerstad helped his team to
a win against Edgemont (79-30)
during the tourney, but the Eagles
were defeated by Rapid City Chris-
tian (80-32) and Faith (73-52).
The Wall/Kadoka wrestling
team traveled to the Bennett
County Invitational, Saturday,
January 18, and returned with five
champions but no team title. With
illnesses and absences we were
out-numbered but still ended the
day in third place. Curtis Huff-
man, Jake Julson and Zane Hoff-
man all collected their first high
school championships while Joe
Wilson and Tyrel Carson added to
their collection. Matthew Eisen-
braun ended up second and Lukas
Fite ended in third to finish off the
placings for us.
Beginning with this week’s
issue, January 23, Ravellette Pub-
lications’ weekly newspaper group
begins a new era — the printing of
its’ newspapers on a five-unit Goss
Suburban web newspaper press in
Philip.

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