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Pennington Co. Courant, February 7, 2013

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Number 6
Volume 108
February 7, 2013
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
An attempt to set up misde-
meanor charges for adults who
provide parties for under-age
drinkers failed to pass out of the
Senate State Affairs Committee
Jan. 23 at the S.D. Legislature in
Pierre.
The measure failed by one vote,
following sometimes emotional de-
bate, but backers vowed to keep
working on the bill to make it ac-
ceptable to lawmakers.
Sen. Larry Lucas, D-Mission,
said there currently is no defini-
tion for the term “social host,” but
is generally agreed that it refers to
someone who provides the location
but not necessarily the alcohol for
a party.
It is not a defense, said Lucas,
for the adult to say that he was not
present at the party.
Joyce Glynn, West River rancher
with her husband, Roger, related
the story of how their son, Michael,
lost his life following his 2006 high
school graduation and attending
the subsequent party where
under-age teens were drinking.
He died as the result of a one-ve-
hicle rollover where he was ejected
from the car.
That spring, Glynn said, 13
South Dakota Legislators met
with District and State FFA Offi-
cers at the 2013 South Dakota FFA
Legislative Breakfast and District
Officer Training hosted by the
South Dakota FFA Association on
Wednesday, January 23 and
Thursday, January 24 at the
AmericInn in Fort Pierre, S.D.
The purpose of the event was to
promote the FFA’s mission of pre-
mier leadership, personal growth
and career success by bringing to-
gether South Dakota’s governmen-
tal leaders with leaders of the
South Dakota FFA.
The event was hosted by the
2012-2013 State FFA Officer
Team, including: Taylor Leon-
hardt, Groton; Andrew Rausch,
Hoven; Ashley Tonak, Willow
Lake; Tyler Swan, Newell; Kelli
Garry, Lake Preston; and Savanna
Sperle, Reva. The SD FFA Ambas-
sadors, Darin Stoecker, Hoven,
and Liz Dahl, Beresford, also as-
sisted with the program. The State
FFA Officers conducted a break-
Legislative Districts 30, 32, 34, 35: District 5 FFA President
Kaden Eisenbraun; Senator Mark Kirkeby; District 5 FFA Secre-
tary Jennifer Emery; State FFA Treasurer Tyler Swan.
~Courtesy Photo
South Dakota FFA Association hosts
legislative breakfast and training
fast program focusing on the three-
part model of Agriculture, Food
and Natural Resources education
which includes: classroom instruc-
tion, Supervised Agricultural Ex-
perience (SAE) projects and FFA.
District FFA Officers and advisors
took advantage of the opportunity
to visit one-on-one with legislators,
sharing how local agriculture edu-
cation programs and FFA provide
hands-on, career-relevant experi-
ence for students.
During the evening of January
23 and following the Legislative
Breakfast on January 24, the
State FFA Officer Team facilitated
leadership training workshops for
the District Officers. Training fo-
cused on a variety of areas, includ-
ing: communication, personal de-
velopment, team growth, service,
career and technical education,
and agricultural advocacy. District
Officers also discovered what their
role is in the upcoming State FFA
Convention scheduled for April 14
- 16, 2013 in Brookings, S.D.
The South Dakota FFA Legisla-
tive Breakfast and District Officer
Training is sponsored by the South
Dakota Wheat Commission, South
Dakota Farm Bureau, South
Dakota Bankers Association,
Thunder Road, South Dakota As-
sociation of Cooperatives, South
Dakota Crop Improvement Associ-
ation, South Dakota Association of
Agriculture Educators, South
Dakota Farmers Union, Citibank,
South Dakota Soybean Processors,
LLC, and our Star Partners:
Northland Ford, East River Elec-
tric Cooperative, South Dakota
Soybean Research and Promotion
Council, South Dakota Wheat
Growers Association, ADM Grain
of Tulare, Butler Machinery Com-
pany, Wilbur-Ellis, Monsanto,
CHS Foundation, Farm Credit
Services of America, RDO Equip-
ment Company, C & B Operations,
North Central Farmers Elevator
and DuPont Pioneer, all as a spe-
cial project of the South Dakota
FFA Foundation.
About the South Dakota FFA As-
sociation:
The South Dakota FFA Associa-
tion is a state branch of the Na-
tional FFA Organization. The Na-
tional FFA Organization is a na-
tional youth organization of
557,318 student members as part
of 7,498 local FFA chapters in all
50 states, Puerto Rico and the Vir-
gin Islands. As part of the National
FFA Organization, the South
Dakota FFA Association encom-
passes 77 FFA chapters with over
3,900 South Dakota FFA members.
FFA strives to make a positive
difference in the lives of students
by developing their potential for
premier leadership, personal
growth and career success through
agricultural education. To discover
more about the South Dakota FFA
Association or the South Dakota
FFA Foundation, visit them both
at www.aged.sdstate.edu or on
Facebook or Twitter.
The Wall Ag Appreciation supper was held on Friday, January 25 at the Wall Community Center.
The event was sponsored by the Wall area business owners to show their appreciation to their
rural customers. Four hundred people registered for $1400 in Wall merchants gift certificated and
two Carhartt jackets. The Wall National Honor Society was the entertainment for the kids and Twin
Rivers played for the dance which began at 7:30 p.m. and lasted until 11:30 p.m.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Area merchants host Ag Appreciation supper
‘Social host’ bill defeated in Senate committee
other teenagers died under similar
circumstances.
President Obama, noted Glynn,
has said that “the first task of so-
ciety is to keep our children safe.”
She questioned whether we are
doing everything possible to do
that.
She discussed the three compo-
nents to keep children safe as edu-
cation, legislation and enforce-
ment. It is clear, she said, that it is
illegal for anyone under the age of
21 to drink alcohol, and called this
bill “another tool” to be used.
With 5,894 minors charged with
possession and 416 misdemeanor
charges against adults, and 200 of
those dismissed, Glynn said “we
are sending a bad message to
kids.”
Glynn said the Attorney Gen-
eral’s office has voiced its support
for the bill, as well as the South
Dakota States Attorneys Associa-
tion.
Supporting testimony came
from the Concerned Women of
South Dakota.
However, the bill’s current lan-
guage was criticized by the State
Farm Insurance Company lobbyist
Dick Tieszen, and Roger
Tellinghuisen, lobbyist for S.D.
Trial Lawyers Association, as well
as several members of the commit-
tee.
Sen. Corey Brown, R-Gettys-
burg, questioned whether that one
additional law would have
changed anything that happened
the night that Glynn’s son died.
Sen. Larry Rhoden, R-Union
Center, also questioned whether
the law would be effective.
The bill died 5-4 and was moved
to the 41st day.
After the meeting, Glynn said “I
really thought with the State’s At-
torney Association and the Attor-
ney Generals’ Association, the peo-
ple who have to enforce these laws
and know the laws inside and out
that are on the books, and whether
they are enforceable or not and
whether they are enough or not, I
really thought their backing to the
legislators would say ‘you folks are
the expert in this field and so we
are going to rely on your recom-
mendation.’”
That didn’t happen, she said.
However, Glynn said “we will
never know if this would keep
someone from having a party at
their house.”
She said she will continue to
fight for a law such as this.
The Wall High School produc-
tion of Orphan Trains earned a su-
perior rating at the South Dakota
One Act Play Festival in Brandon
on Saturday, February 2.
The historical drama brought
glowing comments from all three
judges who also awarded the cast
a record six individual acting
awards.
Receiving individual medals
were: Libbi Sykora, Analise Gar-
land, Ryder Wilson, Maddie Bauer,
Nicole Eisenbraun and Cartriona
Wall Players Orphan Trains receives top
honors at S.D. One Act Play Festival
The award winning cast and crew of the superior rated one-act play Orphan Trains share a moment
following their critique by the state festival judges. Pictured back row: from left to right ... Thomas
Van Osdol, Travis Brenner, Ryder Wilson, Cody Harris and Austin Huether. Pictured front row:
from left to right ... Catriona Brunnemann, Sterling Ellens, Analise Garland, Autumn Deering, Libbi
Sykora, Michaela Schaefer, Nicole Eisenbraun, Emily Linn, Shanda Rae Enruquez, Maddie Bauer,
Nathan Patterson and Andrew Ferris. ~Photo courtesy of Gerald Julson
Brunnemann.
Orphan Trains and Philip High
School’s production of Discovering
Rogue were among the eight Class
B schools receiving superior rat-
ings in a field of 14 plays.
Also included in the cast were:
Travis Brenner, Sterling Ellens,
Michaela Schaefer, Cody Harris,
Thomas Van Osdol, Austin
Huether, Emily Linn and Autumn
Deering.
Running lights and sound for
the Wall team were Andrew Ferris,
Nathan Patterson and Shanda
Rae Enriquez. The play was di-
rected by Ron Burtz and Kathy
Swan.
Wall’s plays have received supe-
rior ratings at the State Festival in
four of the six years. Last years
production -- Something’s Rotten in
the State of Denmark -- received
postivie critiques from the judges
but was disqualified because it ex-
ceeded the 45 minute time limit.
A healthy herd of about 800
bison can be found within Bad-
lands National Park, about 10
miles west of Wall, S.D.
The expanse of prairie grasses
and rugged spires of Badlands Na-
tional Park inspires reverence and
nostalgia, and these bison are an
integral part of Badlands history.
An iconic symbol of the National
Park Service, American bison can
still face threats even in these pro-
tected places.
On November 15, 2010, Keith
Jorgenson of Green Bay, Wisc., il-
legally shot and killed a mule deer
buck in Pennington County, S.D.
This started an investigation
which uncovered how Joseph Wil-
met, also of Green Bay, shot,
killed, and butchered a large bull
bison in Badlands National Park.
A cooperative law enforcement
effort with Pennington County
Sheriff ’s Department, South
Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks,
United States Fish and Wildlife
Service, United States Attorney’s
Office, and National Park Service
resulted in Wilmet being sen-
tenced on October 5, 2012, and
Jorgenson being sentenced on Jan-
uary 7, 2013, for the unlawful tak-
ing of wildlife.
Badlands Superintendent Eric
Brunnemann stated, “We salute
the agencies that investigated this
case, prosecuted and gave us these
Wisconsin man sentenced in
unlawful taking of wildlife
convictions. Two years and count-
less hours of investigative work ex-
emplifies the dedication of these
officers. This is government that
works.”
Jorgenson disclosed that he and
Wilmet had been scouting for ani-
mals in the days leading up to the
November 15, 2010 discovery of
the buffalo and deer.
"The prosecution of these two
men should serve as a notice to
anyone involved in poaching in our
state. We take wildlife crime seri-
ously and we will continue our ef-
forts to work with our law enforce-
ment partners to investigate and
prosecute these offenses,” said US
Attorney Brendan Johnson.
Badlands Chief Ranger Casey
Osback believes that “solid police
work in the early phases of this
case resulted in this victory over
poaching in our national parks.”
Jorgenson and Wilmet were also
found with carcasses from several
additional deer. They stated they
took the wildlife in the vicinity of
Badlands and the town of Scenic,
S.D.
The possession of traps or nets is
not allowable within Badlands.
The taking of wildlife is an illegal
act, as is “[p]ossessing unlawfully
taken wildlife or portions thereof
(36 CFR§2.2(a)(3)). The National
Park Service mission, as identified
in the 1916 Organic Act is charged
with the protection of “natural and
historic objects and the wild life” in
national parks. In most park units,
hunting is specifically called out as
a prohibited recreational use.
Hunting is welcomed on some fed-
eral and state properties. Respon-
sible hunters research regulations
and follow appropriate guidelines,
a practice Jorgenson and Wilmet
did not honor.
Jorgenson was sentenced to one
year of probation and a $1,000
fine. He was ordered to pay $25 to
the Victim Assistance Fund and
$2,500 in restitution.
Wilmet was previously sen-
tenced on October 5, 2012.
By working together, the various
land management and law en-
forcement agencies involved were
able to successfully work within
their differing missions to bring
these poachers to justice. Badlands
staff is extremely grateful that the
perpetrators of the buffalo slaugh-
ter were convicted.
Badlands is one of four mid-west
NPS units with American bison on
the landscape.
Brunnemann stated that “Any-
one who has seen these majestic
animals knows they are looking at
our national history, our national
icon.”
For more information, see
http://www.nps.gov/badl or on
Facebook at BadlandsNPS.
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College briefs
From the Senators Desk
By District 30
Senator Bruce Rampelberg
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
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MORRIS
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yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 6`l¨
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brown oyos.
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nround fho !nµId CIfy, SÐ nron.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco
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rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
From the Floor
By District 30
Representative Mike Vericho
Cort Scheer of Elsmere, Neb.,
takes the first championship title
at the Battle of the Borders U.S.
vs. Canada Saddle Bronc Futurity
held during the Black Hills Stock
Show Rodeo.
Scheer turned in a total score of
165 on two rides. He secured his
win in the short-go on
Vold/Kling/Wageen stock contrac-
tor’s horse Stroker Ace with a score
of 85.5.
Tyrell Smith of Cascade, Mont.,
fell short and landed in second
place with a combined score of
159.2. He rode Power River’s 2x
Horse of the Year Miss Congenial-
ity for a score of 82.5 in the short-
go, but it still wasn’t enough to
overcome Scheer for the champi-
onship title.
Ryan Elshere of Quinn, S.D.,
and Sterling Crawley of College
Station, Texas, were the only other
riders to complete two rides.
Complete results from the area
are:
•Spencer Wright – Milford, UT:
No score on Sutton Rodeo’s Chuck-
ulator
•Jesse Wright – Milford, UT: No
score on Burch’s Rodeo Slash of
A scholarship honoring longtime
South Dakota journalist David
Kranz will be awarded this spring
to a South Dakota journalism stu-
dent.
The David Kranz-Argus Leader
Media Scholarship recognizes
Kranz's more than four-decade ca-
reer as a reporter, editor and polit-
ical columnist. He retired from the
Argus Leader in 2010.
"When you have had the oppor-
tunity to work with a veteran jour-
nalist like David Kranz, you can't
help but be excited about honoring
his legacy. To be able to help stu-
dents prepare for journalism ca-
reers at the same time is even
more satisfying," said Randell
Beck, president and publisher,
Argus Leader Media.
The $1,200 scholarship will be
awarded annually to a South
Dakota student who has com-
pleted at least one year in a jour-
nalism or media studies program
at a South Dakota college or uni-
Scholarship honors David Kranz
versity. The recipient must have
achieved a 2.5 GPA in the previous
semester and should submit exam-
ples of his or her writing as part of
the application. A letter of recom-
mendation from an academic or
journalism professional is also re-
quired.
Students can e-mail application
materials to: mdiehl@arguleader.c
om.
Or mail to:
Michelle Diehl
Argus Leader
PO Box 5034
Sioux Falls, SD 57117-5034
The deadline for applications is
April 15. A committee will select
the winner and the scholarship
will be awarded for the 2013-2014
school year.
If you'd like additional informa-
tion, contact Maricarrol Kueter,
mkueter@argusleader.com, or
Randell Beck at gusleader.com, or
Randell Beck at rabeck@ar-
gusleader.com.
NSU releases fall
2012 dean’s list
Northern State University in
Aberdeen, S.D., has released the
dean’s list for the fall 2012 semes-
ter.
Students who have earned at
least a 3.5 grade point average for
the semester are eligible for the
dean’s list.
Making the deans list is:
•Lincoln Smith - Quinn, S.D.
Cort Sheer won first “Battle of the Borders” saddle
bronc futurity at Black Hills Stock Show Rodeo®
Lunatic
•Tyrell Smith – Cascade, MT:
82.5 on Powder River’s Miss Con-
geniality (Total score of 159.2 on
two rides)
•Jade Blackwell – Rapid City,
SD: No score on Mosbrucker’s War
and Peace
•Brady Nicholes – Hoytsville,
UT: No score on Burns Rodeo’s
Midnight Fantasy
•Louie Brunson – Interior, SD:
No score on –C5’s Biff
•Ryan Elshere – Quinn, SD: 75
on Two Good’s Lady Luck (Total
score of 146.5 on two rides)
•Cort Sheer – Elsmere, NE: 85.5
on Vold/Kling/Wageen’s Stroker
Ace (Total score of 165 on two
rides)
•Jake Wright – Milford, UT: No
Score on Outlaw Buckers’ F Bomb
•Sterling Crawley – College Sta-
tion, TX: 81.5 on Wyoykoski’s Mud
Pie (Total score of 154 on two rides)
This is the first year for the
“Battle of the Borders” event. It
not only featured many of the Pro-
fessional Rodeo Cowboys Associa-
tion (PRCA) Wrangler National Fi-
nals Rodeo equine stars, but 30 of
today’s current top riders, includ-
ing many who just competed in the
Wrangler NFR.
The event matched up stock con-
tractors from the U.S. and Canada
to settle bragging rights as to
which country raises the best
bucking stock.
Five contractors from both the
U.S. and Canada had four horse
teams each composed of three
young colts aged six or under, plus
one experienced bronc from their
top string.
The battle consisted of a long-go
ride during which 30 top cowboys
rode inexperienced colts. The top
10 riders by score from the long-go
advanced to the short round and
paired up with some of the best
horses on the PRCA circuit includ-
ing Sutton Rodeo’s Chuckulator,
the 2012 PRCA Horse of the Year.
The winning horses earned a
spot in the World Futurity Finale
which is held in Las Vegas during
the Wrangler NFR.
About Sutton Rodeo:
Long recognized as one of the
country’s outstanding ranch and
rodeo families, the Suttons of
South Dakota attribute much of
their success to bloodlines and
breeding. For more information,
connect with us at Facebook.com/
SuttonRodeo.
About Black Hills Stock Show
Rodeo:
The 36th Annual Black Hills
Stock Show and Rodeo® will fea-
ture over 680 top PRCA contest-
ants in Rapid City, S.D. for the
five-performance rodeo held Janu-
ary 26 - February 2. One of the
best PRCA rodeos in the nation,
nominated 15 times as PRCA's
"Large Indoor Rodeo of the Year",
winning this award twice!
Top PRCA contestants compet-
ing for over $200,000, award win-
ning rodeo personnel and top buck-
ing stock including "Chuckulator",
the 2012 Saddle Bronc Horse of
the Year, make this rodeo a must
see event.
For more information, visit:
www.suttonrodeo.com and www.go
tmine.com.
Now it’s getting more interest-
ing. HB1087 the school sentinel
bill resulted in a lively and long de-
bate. I supported this bill because
of the local control and the flexibil-
ity of allowing more isolated
schools to take advantage of this
with the larger districts that al-
ready have resource officers to just
keep on going on as they are.
No teacher or school employee is
forced to arm themselves. I could
go on forever but e-mail or call me
if you would like to get into more
detail on why I voted like I did or
come to the crackerbarrels in
Rapid on the 2nd, or in Edgemount
and Hot Springs on the 9th.
I went against HB 1113 because
no one could say that if it would
not apply to all your social media
uses that could lead to a fishing ex-
pedition or just plain being too
nosey.
On today’s calendar HB 1126
has stirred an amazing amount of
controversy. It would repeal mas-
sage therapy licensing. As we get
into it, it appears that the head of
the licensing board was the prob-
lem, so my position is fix it. We
don’t need to throw the baby out
with the bath water.
Of course SB 70 the judicial re-
form bill will eventually work its
way to the house, so let me know
what you think of that one. We
have education funding bills com-
ing up this week in committees
and of course that will also spark
a lot of conversation.
Please keep in touch.
Rep Mike Verchio
Rep.verchio@state.sd.us
mjverchio@aol.com
Cellphone - (605)391-5093
Hall Phone - (605)574-2466
Home Address - P.O. Box 205 Hill
City, SD 57401
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture (SDDA) would like
to remind producers who are inter-
ested in signing up for South
Dakota Certified Enrolled Cattle
™ Program to make sure they are
Beef Quality Assurance (BQA)
Trained before their first calf is
born.
Prior to submitting an applica-
tion for participation in the South
Dakota Certified Enrolled Cattle™
program, producers must first
have a South Dakota BQA/Critical
Management Plan certification.
Please contact the South Dakota
Beef Industry Council, BQA Coor-
dinator, Tracey Walsh at
By Walt Bones,
S.D. Secretary of Agriculture
I was born on a livestock farm
and have cared for animals for as
long as I can remember.
We had cats, dogs, horses, and
cows. They all needed to be fed,
watered, and cared for and most
times that meant I took care of
those animals before I was fed, wa-
tered and cared for!
So, from an early age, my father
and grandfather instilled in my
siblings and I that we had a moral
and ethical responsibility to care
for our animals.
One summer, my Dad came to
me with a glass of water and won-
dered if I needed a drink. I was hot
and thirsty, but looking at this
murky, discolored water with some
chunks floating in it was not what
I was looking for and turned it
down.
My Dad told me he had just
taken that water from the cattle’s
water tank and wondered, “If you
won’t drink it, why would you
make the cattle drink it?” Lesson
learned!
I am intrigued by the current de-
SDSU Graudate
The following student was a
candidate for graduation after the
Fall 2012 session at South Dakota
State University.
•*Emily Ruth Helms -
Creighton, S.D. Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Agriculture and Biological
Sciences.
•Kelli J. Sundall - Wall, S.D.
Master of Science in Graduate
School.
South Dakota Certified ™ program
The 2012 South Dakota hunting
and fishing licenses expired on
January 31st and 2013 licenses
are now available at local Game,
Fish and Parks license agents or
online.
Information on license agents
can be found on the GFP website
at http://www.gfp.sd.gov/hunting/l
icenses/general/agents/default.asp
605.224.4722.
For more details please contact
Sarah Caslin, Livestock Develop-
ment Specialist at SDDA at
605.773.5436 or visit http://www.s
dcec.sd.gov/
Agriculture is South Dakota's
No. 1 industry, generating over
$21 billion in annual economic ac-
tivity and employing more than
122,000 South Dakotans. The
South Dakota Department of Agri-
culture's mission is to promote,
protect, preserve and improve this
industry for today and tomorrow.
Visit us online at
http://sdda.sd.gov or follow us on
Facebook and Twitter.
GFP announces hunting and
fishing liceses are now available
x.
Licenses may be purchased on-
line at http://www.gfp.sd.gov/lic
e n s e s / g e n e r a l - h u n t -
fish/default.aspx.
New for 2013, the SD GFP is of-
fering a new resident Senior Com-
bination License for resident
sportsmen, ages 65 and up.
An Ear to the Ground
bate on issues like gun control and
animal welfare because I see them
as the same discussion.
Unless we have engrained moral
values, is it productive to attempt
the legislation of behavior?
We have a whole myriad of laws
and rules that try to deter humans
from hurting or abusing other hu-
mans. Many of these laws are
felony convictions and in the most
severe cases, the death penalty is
invoked. With all these penalties
(deterrents) in place, our prisons
still house people that do not value
human life.
I am confident our ranchers and
livestock producers share my core
values on the animal stewardship
and husbandry practices required
to be in the livestock business
these days.
Proper nutrition, housing, vet-
erinarian-approved animal health
protocols and technology may be
the tools they use today, but it
comes right back down to the fact
that they care about the well-being
of their animals.
South Dakotans cannot and
should not condone any form of
abuse to the animals we have in
our care and custody regardless if
they are a farm animal, work ani-
mal, companion animal, or a pet. If
simply putting additional or more
severe laws on the books changes
human behavior to other living
things, controlling bad things in
our world would be easy. So, I ask
again, can society legislate moral-
ity, core values, or behavior?
We need to respect all life and
there in is our challenge, I believe.
The first bill of the 2013 South
Dakota Legislature, signed by Gov.
Dennis Daugaard, was HB1066,
which continues the current tax
rate on tourism-related businesses
during the June-September pe-
riod.
The tax on the gross receipts of
most tourism-related goods and
services was one percent until it
was raised to 1.5 percent for two
years in 2009. A two-year exten-
sion was granted by the Legisla-
ture in 2011 and was due to expire
this coming June 30.
HB1066, which passed the state
Governor Daugaard signs first
bill of lawmaking session
House 64-4 and the Senate by 33-
2, makes the 1.5 percent rate per-
manent. The measure had wide
support from the state’s visitor in-
dustry.
Money raised by the tax is used
to promote tourism, and the lion’s
share of it is paid by out-of-state
visitors, Gov. Daugaard said.
“I’m heartened by the South
Dakota visitor industry’s accept-
ance of this revenue source, which
paves the way for increased
tourism spending and boosts the
entire state economy,” the Gover-
nor said.
The Public Safety Improvement
Act, perhaps the most comprehen-
sive bill this session, has been ap-
proved by both houses and now
goes to the Governor for signature.
The bill was developed this past
year by over 400 South Dakotans
who are involved in various as-
pects of law enforcement.
It parallels my belief that we
need better methods to address a
growing prison population.
It increases penalties for violent
and career criminals and provides
mechanisms to hold other offend-
ers more accountable. The bill is
not perfect but represents a good
start.
Those of us in the tourism busi-
ness were happy to see the cent tax
for co-op marketing move to per-
manent status.
The data positively shows that
this investment generates more
revenue for our state and that 73
percent of it is paid by out-of-state
folks.
The Hot Springs community has
some dedicated volunteers who
have spent the past year develop-
ing a progressive plan for expand-
ing services to veterans and try-
ing to get an audience with the VA
Secretary to present it.
The planets aligned and thanks
to the efforts of our Congressional
Delegation and their staffs, five
members of the Executive Com-
mittee, our Governor and our three
Congressional Delegates met with
him for an hour and a half. I un-
derstand the presentation went
well and now the ball is in the Sec-
retary’s hands.
Uranium continues to be the
subject I hear about the most in
my emails.
I spent time with three people
from DENR this past week to get
more of my questions answered.
While it is far from simple, an
overall picture is starting to
emerge.
The three agencies; NRC, EPA
and SD DENR all have assigned
areas of responsibility. NRC has
permitted a number of other ura-
nium sites and has expertise in
monitoring compliance with the
regulations and the power to en-
force them.
EPA has responsibility for Class
III and Class V injection wells and
has a proven track record of en-
forcing regulations. Both of these
agencies will require adequate
bonding before any mining opera-
tion can be started.
SD DENR is processing permit
applications for ground water re-
lating to volume used and a dis-
charge plan for treated mine waste
water. If all permits are issued,
DENR will come on board to work
closely with the federal agencies in
ensuring all regulations are fol-
lowed.
Contact people are: NRC –
Ronald Burrows 301-415-6443 –
ronald.burrows@nrc.gov; EPA –
Valois Shea – 303-312-6276 –
shea.valois@epa.gov; Eric Gron-
lund – 605-773-3352 – eric.gron-
lund@state.sd.us
Please contact me with your
comments and questions. By email
in Pierre is sen.rampelberg@state.
sd.us and my cellphone is 605-390-
2165.
Area News
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013• Page 3
Need a gift idea for that hard-to-buy someone? How about a gift that keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the Pennington County Courant.Call to start your subscription gift! (605) 279-2565
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Feb. ? - Feb. 13
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FrIday, February S
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·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci. . . . . . . . . . . $?.39
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w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallc . . . . . . . . $6.29
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Monday, February 11
·Sironloli w/Tosscd Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
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Tuesday, February 12
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Wednesday, February 13
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BreakIast: Mon. - Sat.
2 Eggs & Toasi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.19
2 Pancalcs & Sausagc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.19
Gem Thea¡re
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February 8-9-10-11:
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Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
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February 15-16-17-18:
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February 22-23-24-25:
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March 1-2-3-4:
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March 8-9-10-11:
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Marvin Maude
Marvin Maude grew up on a
ranch near Scenic as the oldest of
four children of Walter and Gen
Maude. He was active in 4-H while
growing up. Marvin stepped in as
the 4-H leader for the Rangers 4-H
Club at the age of 17 to prevent the
club from closing down. It began a
lifetime of volunteer work that re-
volved around helping kids im-
prove themselves.
In 1968, Marvin maried Mae
Scism. They raised three daugh-
ters on the ranch near Hermosa,
S.D. Marvin has contributed thou-
sands of volunteer hours to 4-H
programs in Pennington and
Custer counties. He and Mae
hosted livestock and horse judging
schools for more than 15 years. To-
gether they served as leaders of
the club. Marvin retired as a 4-H
leader after serving for 42 years.
His volunteerism continues with
the Western Junior Livestock
Show. Marvin has seved as a direc-
tor for the Western Junior Live-
stock Show for more than three
decades and he conintues as a di-
recto today. Marvin also served as
president for the organization.
Marvin has worked with the
Black Hills Stock Show both as a
volunteer and as a contract em-
ployee. He was instumental in
helping establish the Youth Day
with the Black Hills Stock Show
and assisted with putting together
the livestock juding contest up
through last year. He can also be
found running the Bobcat loader
helping take down panels and in-
stall tie-stalls to make the transi-
tion from the horse weekend activ-
ities to the beef cattle shows.
When not busy with ranching,
Marvin contracts goats for goat
tying at 4-H, high school, and Lit-
tle Britches rodeos. He is also a
local inspector for the South
Dakota Brand Broad and keeps
busy during fall shipping.
Marvin’s crowning achievement
is passing his volunteer spirit on to
all three daughters. Julie and
LeAnn are active 4-H leaders in
Custer County while Lori has vol-
unteerd in multiple organizations
during her career. The learned
early that if you are going to be
part of something, you need to give
back of your time and leadership.
Dale Hendrickson
Dale Hendrickson was born
March 9, 1933, in Buffalo County,
Neb., but moved with his family to
the Riverton, Wyo., area when he
was eight.
After graduating from high
school in 1950, he worked on a
Wyoming ranch until 1953, when
he went into the Army, serving two
years in Germany.
BHSS Foundation honors western pioneers
After his military service, Dale
received his doctor of veterinary
medicine degree from Colorado
State University in Fort Collins in
1962 and went to work for the
state of Wyoming and a private
practice in Casper, Wy. In 1964, he
joined Norris Vet Clinic in Rapid
City and in 1969 started his own
veterinary clinic. In 1979, he
opened the Animal Clinic in Rapid
City. He retired after 40 years of
service on January 1, 2003. As his
old friend, Lyndell Petersen said,
“He was one of the few large ani-
mal veterinarians in the area who
was willing to go any place almost
any time to serve his clients.”
Dale helped found the Black
Hills Roping Club and is a past
president. He is also a member of
the Western South Dakota Bucka-
roos. He has also supported the
Rapid City Kennel Club and its
major dog show, along with volun-
teer work with 4-H and FFA and
the Western Junior Livestock
Show in Rapid City.
Dale lives on a small ranch near
Caputa with his wife Alice. They
have three grown children, Shelly
and Mark Middleton, Rob and
Jody Hendrickson who have two
girls-Ollie and Scout, and Roy and
Christie Hendrickson who have
two children, Seth and Ari.
These days you can probably
find Dale at the Caputa Coffee
Shop talking over the old days.
Harold Delbridge
Harold Dean Delbridge was
born and raised in the Howes area.
He married Karen Smith on Janu-
ary 16, 1966, and they went to
work for the Bar VO ranch at
Quinn. In the fall of 1967, Karen’s
father needed help on his ranch so
they moved there to help him.
After her father passed away in
1968, her brothers took over the
operation of the ranch and Harold
and Karen moved to his grandfa-
ther Kellog’s place south of Union
Center, where they ranched for the
next eight years.
Harold left the ranch in 1976 to
attend Bible College in Cleveland,
Tenn. He studied there until 1979.
At that time they moved to Coal
Springs and began pastoring a
church there. This was Harold’s
first pastorate and they were there
until 1985 when they moved from
Coal Springs to the Prairie Bible
Community Church where he pas-
tored for 23 years. Three years ago
he started the Stoneville Country
Church where he is still pastoring.
Harold has also pastored the Elm
Springs Community Church since
1987.
Harold started rodeo announc-
ing and auctioneering in 1983.
Dave Lensegrav encouraged him
to go to auctioneer school at Bis-
marck, N.D., where Truman Kon-
sile had the River Basin Auction
School, an auctioneering and rodeo
announcing college. Harold and
Les Lensegrav went to that school.
When they came back they started
the Open Meadow Auction Service
which they operated for 13 years.
In 1984, the Faith Stock Show con-
tracted Harold to announce their
rodeo. That was the rodeo that
Truman Konsile had announced
for years, and he said, “Isn’t that
life, you train somebody and they
take your job”. Harold announced
Faith Stock Show for 24 years. His
favorite part of announcing rodeos
was encouraging the young people
in the sport. In the year 2000,
Harold and Karen had the oppor-
tunity to go to the National Finals
Rodeo and had the pleasure of
watching the final performance. In
the saddle bronc event there were
four young cowboys that Harold
had watched grow up. That was a
very satisfying experience for him.
Harold said, “The greatest fun I
had was young people’s rodeos. En-
couraging the young cowboys and
cowgirls.”
Harold and Karen have lived at
Red Owl for the past 18 years.
Since 1979, Harold has had a full
time ministry. In his spare time he
day works for ranchers in the area.
He says this has been a better
ministry than the pulpit. It has af-
forded him the opportunity to min-
ister at weddings and funerals.
Being a minister in the rodeo an-
nouncing field, watching the cow-
boys and cowgirls grow up, has led
to many weddings.
In reminiscing, Harold tells of a
wedding he was to perform. When
he arrived to perform the wedding,
the bride had forgotten to bring
the marriage license. When Harold
asked her what she planned to do
about that, she told him that they
would be at the rodeo next week.
They could go ahead with the wed-
ding today and then they would
bring the marriage license and
their witnesses and get it signed at
the rodeo, one week later. Things
like that only happen in cowboy
country.
One of the most challenging
points in Harold’s life was while he
was pastoring at Coal Springs. He
went there in June, and in August
performed his first wedding. Two
years later he had to bury that
couple’s 18 month-old-daughter.
He said, “It lets you know the
power of God, how you get through
some of those deals.”
Harold is an active member in
several organizations in the area.
The Catalyst Club in Rapid City,
South Dakota Stock Growers,
South Dakota Farm Bureau, Fel-
lowship of Christian Cowboys, and
Central Meade County Commu-
nity Center Board.
Harold had a funny story to tell
on himself. He was co-announcer
at the South Dakota Rodeo Finals
in Sioux Falls. His job was to plug
the sponsors while horseback in
the arena. A bareback rider had
just completed his ride, so Harold
rode in to announce the sponsor of
the bareback riding and the bronc
came alongside Harold’s horse and
started bucking. In trying to pull
his horse up, hang on to the micro-
phone, and juggle a handful of pa-
pers, things got away from him.
Papers all over the arena floor. The
audience loved it and have proba-
bly never forgot it, and the other
announcer had a big time with it.
But, like Harold said, at least he
didn’t fall off.
Having retired from his rodeo
announcing career, Harold looks
back on a couple highlights of that
career. One was when the Wall Re-
gional High School Rodeo Club
gave him a belt buckle when he re-
tired after announcing their rodeo
for 23 years. Another was when
the Faith Stock Show also gave
him a buckle after 24 years of an-
nouncing their rodeo. Harold said,
“It really lets you know how much
people appreciate your work.”
Harold and Karen have four
children, two boys and two girls,
and 12 grandchildren. Arlen, Black
Hawk, Chad, Cheyenne, Wyo.,
Amanda, Anchorage, Alaska; and
daughter, Candace, Thunder
Butte.
In looking to the future, Harold
said that in his ministry he wants
to prepare people for the life
ahead. By that, he means he wants
them to come to know the power of
God and the relationship they can
have with Him.
When we look back over the
years at Harold’s reputation, it
show us that he has given above
and beyond of himself, assisting
spiritually and physically, a large
number of families in our end of
the state. I got the feeling from
just visiting with Harold, that to
be ministering to and working
with the children and grandchil-
dren of those parents he minis-
tered to and worked with years
ago, gives him a real feeling of
thankfulness and satisfaction. In
all fairness to Harold, I must tell
you that in this short presentation
it is not possible for me to paint a
complete picture of his accomplish-
ments. But for just a normal look-
ing cowboy, he has sure made an
impression in our communities.
Chances are, if you receive So-
cial Security benefits, Supplemen-
tal Security Income (SSI), or any
federal payment, you receive it
electronically. More than 90 per-
cent of people getting monthly So-
cial Security benefits already re-
ceive electronic payments. If you
don’t yet, that’s about to change.
There is a U.S. Department of
Treasury rule that does away with
paper checks for most federal ben-
efit and non-tax payments by
March 1, 2013. With a few excep-
tions, this mandate includes Social
Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs,
Railroad Retirement Board, Office
of Personnel Management bene-
Electronic payments are a
must for federal benefits
fits, and other non-tax payments.
People required to switch have
the option of direct deposit to a
bank or credit union account or
they can have their monthly pay-
ment directed into a Direct Ex-
press debit card account (Trea-
sury’s debit card program). Please
visit www.godirect.org to learn
more.
If you still get your check in the
mail, sign up for electronic pay-
ments now. Please visit www.godi-
rect.org today and begin getting
your Social Security and SSI pay-
ments the safe, easy, reliable way
— electronically.
By Wendy Brunnemann
Wall Community Libriarn
I often find myself thinking
longingly of warm places about
this time of year. I think of deserts
and tropical islands and those
lucky countries in the southern
hemisphere currently enjoying the
long days of summer. I know our
time will come, sooner rather than
later, but the cold winter days can
go so slowly.
If you too are yearning for warm
summer days, perhaps we can
offer you a small mini-vacation at
the Library. We have lots of books
about summer and warm places.
I’d like to call out special notice
to In a Sunburned Country by Bill
Bryson.
This is a wonderful book that is
part travelogue, part comedy, part
encyclopedia about the author’s
visit to Australia.
Australia is a country that also
enjoys its designation as an island
Wall Community Library news
continent. The people are warmly
welcoming and the history is var-
ied and interesting.
Perhaps one of the most striking
parts of Australia is its peculiar
wildlife. Australia has some of the
most lethal animals found on the
planet.
Bryson delights in exploring the
land, including its cultural and
natural history. His delightful, en-
gaging writing style will have you
laughing along with him and you
won’t even realize how much you
are learning about the land down
under.
And just perhaps, you will feel a
little bit warmer when you finish.
Catch of the day
Sean Dunker son of Bruce and Lynn Dunker of Wall, caught this
11 pound Northern Pike ice fishing Sunday morning. Sean who
is six years old won’t disclose his favorite spot to fish nor will
his dad!!! ~Courtesy Photo
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Shelia Trask
Last week’s news
News is very scarce in the Elm
Springs for the last 2 weeks! So
scarce in fact the writer can not
even threaten to make up stuff and
get news.
Wednesday evening supper
guests last week and this week at
the Tom and Shelia Trask were
Pat, Julie, Matt Trask and Jerry
Trinone. Entertainment besides
visiting was playing cards.
Jim and Myrna Smith returned
on Wednesday from Rochester
from a checkup and mini vacation.
Jim is reportedly a very pleasant
60 year old man! I guess that
means a good checkup!
Thursday this week Shelia
Trask and friend Mary Nelson took
grandson Levi to Sioux Falls to
meet his mother. They stayed with
Mary's daughter Loni then went to
Rochester for Shelia's appointment
and returned that night to Sioux
Falls. They returned on Saturday
back to the west side of the state.
Weekend guests of Tom and She-
lia Trask were Joel and Bonnie
Foster and girls (Lynn, 9, Paige, 7,
Gayle, 3) of Brookings. Joel and
Bonnie took in the stock show on
Sunday and Shelia and the girls
went to Quinn to Mary Lou Gup-
till’s 50th birthday party! Prior to
heading back to Brookings the
Fosters took a tour of the Elm
Springs school and the girls partic-
ipated in some activities.
Julie Trask returned on Tuesday
from a weekend in Denver visiting
Celine Trask. Also in Denver was
John Paul Trask of Washington
DC. Julie reports Celine is making
progress. Thanks to all the prayers
and support from family and
friends. Check out her Caring
Bridge site!
This week’s news
by Peggy Gravatt
Sounds like everyone made at
least one trip to the Black Hills
Stock Show last week. The
weather was pretty good for get-
ting out and about.
Pam and Matt Tesch from
Fargo, N.D., were at the Philip
Wilson’s over the weekend. They
all met at Patrick and Lane Wilson
on Saturday to go to the Stock
Show. On Sunday, Shelia and
Tomilyn came over and visited for
a while. Also on Sunday, Kenny,
Janet and Kellie Wilson were over
to watch the Super Bowl.
Lawrence Burke attended the
Western Collectible Auction at the
Stock Show last Saturday, the 26th
and went back to the Stock Show
this past Saturday to browse
around. He went to Sturgis on
Wednesday for a tax appointment
and to get his vehicles registered
for the year.
Freddie Ferguson said he hasn’t
done a whole lot this past week if
you don’t count doing his taxes.
Just one of life’s necessary evils.
Lonnie and Teri Ann Arneson at-
tended the Stock Show on Satur-
day then went to the Winter Party
for the buckaroos that night at the
Adobe Hotel. She said that it
seems like all they do is work, so
don’t have a lot of news.
Mel and Dorothy Anderson at-
tended the 20X High School Rodeo
on Sunday, the 27th. On Wednes-
day they went to the Matched
Bronc Ride. Mel had two book
signings during the week. Satur-
day they attended the annual Pio-
neer Breakfast at the Fine Arts
Building at the fairgrounds. On
Saturday evening they met the
grandkids and great-grandkids
from Aurora, Colo. for dinner. This
past Sunday they enjoyed brunch
with Sam and Bruce Leibold of
Gold Creek, Mont. and Bruce’s
parents from Ill. That afternoon
they joined the crowd gathered for
a farewell for Buster Maynard. I
would say the Anderson’s get the
prize this week for attending the
most activities!
Morris Linn attended the Stock
Show on Wednesday and met up
with Roger Shull and Gene Pluth.
Chase Arneson stopped by the
Linn’s on Monday. Matt Trask vis-
ited on Thursday. Clyde Arneson
was a coffee and cookie visitor on
Saturday and Sunday. The Morris
Linn’s hosted the annual Super
Bowl party on Sunday with many
attending including John and Jean
Linn. Kassandra attended a couple
of basketball games in Wall during
the week. Little Laken Linn
turned seven months old this
week!
Tom and Shelia Trask along
with their kids attended Shelia’s
cousin Marvin McDaniel’s funeral
on Saturday in Philip. Our condo-
lences to the family. That evening
they went to New Underwood to
help Nichols Casper celebrate his
40th birthday! On Sunday, Shelia’s
cousin, Terry Kelly of Phoenix was
an afternoon and overnight guest.
Tomilyn Trask and Kellie Wilson
took her to the airport on their way
back to school on Monday morn-
ing.
Congratulations go out to Lynn
and Sandy Fields! They are the
proud great-grandparents of a
baby girl, Berklyn Saige. The fam-
ily lives in Sioux Falls and Sandy
is hoping to get down there to
snuggle her soon.
Peggy Gravatt is getting back in
the swing of things. She and Larry
along with Lynn and Sandy Fields
went to the afternoon rodeo on
Saturday followed by a wonderful
supper. On Sunday, Peggy and
Larry went over to the Fields to
watch the Super Bowl. They won
the bet and are looking forward to
another great supper!
That seems to be it for this
week. Now that the Stock Show is
over, so is the vacation. Now it’s
time to get ready for calving.
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Gerald and Esther Wolford and
Amy Beers went back to Ohio to
attend Gerald’s sister’s funeral. On
the way home, they spent a night
with a friend in Elk Grove Village,
Ill. She and Esther were in high
school together.
Family and friends of Dale
Keyser met at Wall Drug, Sunday,
February 3, to celebrate Dale’s
94th birthday. Everyone was
treated to hot beef dinners or a
hamburger basket. Also along with
Dale’s birthday, the group helped
Dan and Mary Alice Keyser cele-
brate their anniversary of 57
years.
Times have changes — years ago
we would have very cold tempera-
tures over Christmas and into Jan-
uary. We looked forward to “the
January thaw”. Almost half of the
days of January this year were
above or at 32° or more. Who can
figure?
Mary Henriksen had a birthday
on January 31st. People having
caramel rolls at the Village that
morning sang “Happy Birthday” to
her. Many, many more, Mary.
In case you didn’t know — regu-
lar first class postage on a letter is
now 46¢.
“Theme” meal at Prairie Village
has been scheduled for February
12th. Menu will be roast turkey,
mashed potatoes with gravy, broc-
coli, tropical fruit, cranberry sauce
and cake. See you there!
The Valentine Tea, an annual
event by the Methodist Women,
took place on Saturday. Those who
attended had a good time. Alma
Crosbie and Alice Richter enter-
tained the group with music; Dave
Jones had a reading. Decorations
were beautiful, plenty of food and
plenty of tea.
Frances Poste was at the well
attended memorial service for
Marvin McDaniel on Saturday at
the American Legion Hall, Philip.
It was anice day, temperature-
wise, but windy. After the service,
Frances went to the Senechal
Apartments to visit with Lucile
Peterson and Dolly Blucher. Lucile
had a birthday the day before but
was still celebrating — was having
people in for cake and coffee.
Dolly’s birthday had been on Jan-
uary 31st. Congratulations to both
of them.
Ruby and Gary Keyser went to
the Black Hills Stock Show on Fri-
day. They also attended “the
mixer” at the Adoba for Western
South Dakota Buckaroos coming
home on Saturday.
Sunday, the 3rd, was “Super
Bowl Sunday”. Suppose a lot of
people were glued to their TV to
watch San Francisco and Balti-
more play in Super Bowl XLVII in
New Orleans. Some tune in to see
the commercials! Despite the
power outage, hope the game
ended to your satisfaction.
“Souper” bowl at the Methodist
Church received an offering in a
soup kettle to aid the Country
Cupboard Food Pantry.
LeRoy Hardy, Cheryl Renner’s
dad, passed away. He lived in Stur-
gis. We offer our sympathy to the
family.
The Two Bit Saloon and Steak-
house is back in business after re-
building, having lost everything in
a fire. Open full swing on February
14th and 15th, at 5 p.m. Open oth-
erwise Monday through Saturday
opening at 4 p.m., food specials be-
ginning February 18th.
Congratulations to the Wall
Drama Group for receiving a Supe-
rior rating at the State Competi-
tion. At least six of the cast re-
ceived “superior” on their acting
skills. Way to go!
Congratulations to Jessica and
Tucker Smith, who have a new
baby boy. They named him Myer
Allen; he weighed 8 lbs. 3 oz., was
19 1/2 inches long and was born on
January 29th. Grandparents are
Rose and Mike Luedeman and
Kieth and Debbie Smith; great-
grandparents are Lauren Luede-
man and Richard Smith.
Chris Sorensen was home on
leave a while back. He left on the
27th to go back to Utah. It was the
first time since June, 2011, that he
and his dad Jeff were together.
Senior Citizens (YAH) met at
Prairie Village on February 4th for
their regular meeting. A list was
made of the people who are in
nursing home, etc. to send Valen-
tines to. A box was readied to send
to Tim Grimmett, as he is in serv-
ice overseas.
Ryan and Cindy Dinger have a
new baby boy born on February 1,
2013, and has been named Ethan
Ryan. He has an older brother and
two sisters. Our congratulations to
the family.
Daniel Sisk of Rapid City passed
away this past week. He was a
nephew of Kay Leonard. His fu-
neral was on Monday morning at
the Osheim/Schmidt Funeral
Home. Our condolences go out to
the family.
A good traffic rule on the road of
life: when you meet temptation,
keep to the right.
~Author Unknown
Have a good week.
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
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General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
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A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
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2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
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Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
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Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
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Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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Wall school
upcoming
events
Thurs., February 7
- Sat., February 16
Thursday, February 7:
Book Fair in the Library;
Parent Teacher Conf. @
3:45-6:30 p.m.; AAU Prac-
tice @ MP 5:15 & 5:45 p.m.
Friday, February 8: JH
BBB w/Kadoka, 4 p.m.;
GBB @ Dupree, 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, February 9:
Philip WR Tourney @ Wall,
9 a.m.; Wall GYM Invite @
12 p.m.
Monday, February 11:
AAU Practice @ MP 5:15 &
5:45 p.m.; JH BBB @ NU, 6
p.m.
Tuesday, February 12:
JH BBB w/Philip, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, February
13; District FCCLA mtg;
AAU Practice @ MP, 5:15 &
5:45; School Board meeting
@ 4:45 p.m.
Thursday, February 14:
GBB/BBB w/Stanley Co.,
3:30 p.m. MST, all games at
school; Parents Night.
Friday, February 15:
GBB @ Hill City, 5:30 p.m.;
GYM State @ RC, TBD; Fa-
ther/Daughter Dance @ MP
Room, 6-9; Teacher In-Ser-
vice.
Saturday, February 16:
BBB w/Newell, 5 p.m.; WR
Regions @ RC, TBD; Leg-
islative Cracker Barrel
w/Dist. 30 & Dist. 27 Legis-
lators, 9-11 a.m. @ Wall
Drug.
Wall Rodeo BooSteR CluB
annual Meeting
Wednesday, February 20, 2013
5:30 p.m. • Rodeo grounds building
We encourage new members to join.
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Wasta Volunteer Fire Dept.
annual steak supper
Sun., February 17th
5:00 p.m. • Wasta Fire Hall
(If weather doesn’t permit, it will be cancelled.)
•Chicken Bingo •Bingo •Card games
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
February 7 to
February 13, 2013
Thursday: Breakfast:
Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Milk
or Juice.
Lunch: Ham & Cheese Pock-
ets, Peas, Banana, Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast: French
Toast, Egg Patty, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Hamburger on a
Whole Grain Bun, Cheese
Slice, Baked Beans, Mixed
Fruit, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Pan-
cake, Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Sausage & Gravy
over Biscuits, Cinnamon Ap-
ples, Peas, Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast:
Waffle, Egg Patty, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Taco Salad, Garlic
Bread, Fresh Peppers, Refried
Beans/Black Beans, Milk.
It occurred to me several years
ago that while 80 to 90% of my de-
cisions had turned out to be quite
positive, there was still the other
10 to 20% that did not have such a
great outcome. I could see there
was room for improvement, and be-
came quite motivated to learn how
to make more effective decisions. I
began to seriously study how other
people make their decisions. look-
ing for any tool or system that I
could use to aid me in becoming a
better decision maker.
Over the years, I have adopted,
adapted and applied a number of
tools and systems that have re-
sulted in making better decisions.
I am eager to share a couple of my
discoveries with you.
First of all, I have learned never
to jump into making a decision,
without first taking time to gather
all the facts. I must do my due dili-
gence, to make sure there is noth-
ing hiding under the rocks, if I am
to make really good decisions.
Secondly, I have realized the ad-
vantage of looking at the issue from
a number of different perspectives.
If a decision will affect others-and
most of them do-I make it a point
to get their opinions, thoughts, and
suggestions regarding the decision
I have to make. The smartest thing
I have learned to do is trust my
wife and daughters' intuition. I re-
ally do believe that females have
been given a special gift of intu-
ition, and it is my job as a husband
and father to listen to their gut
feeling about things. Honestly,
trusting Vicki's, Tasha's, and Elie's
intuition has never failed me yet.
Making well thought out deci-
sions and taking action on them is
much easier, and the outcome more
profitable, when I have the confi-
dence and assurance that comes
with
taking all the facts into considera-
tion and engaging others in the
process. Being humble enough to
hear and listen to what others
share may be a bit difficult at
times, and yet it is so vital to hav-
ing success in the decision making
process.
Take time to apply these simple
strategies to your decision making
process and you too, will be empow-
ered to make even better decisions
than you did before.
Empowered Decision Making
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly mo-
tivational seminars each year.
Call Bob for more details at
800-437-9715 and be sure to
check out Bob’s website at:
www.mrattitudespeaks.com
we don’t charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565
or e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
ATTEnTion:
2013 SEniorS
& PArEnTS
The Pennington County
Courant would like to use
a senior picture for the
graduation pages that will run
in May. You may drop them off
at the office (212 4th Ave.),
mail them to PO Box 435,
Wall, SD or email to
annc@gwtc.net
All pictures will be returned.
Thank you, Anne Jo
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
Posted By Pastor Ricky Kurth
“… Jesus Christ… was… declared to be the Son
of God… according to the spirit of holiness, by the
resurrection from the dead” (Rom. 1:3,4).
What does it mean that the Lord’s resurrection declared Him
to be the Son of God according to the spirit of holiness? Well,
have you ever heard it said that there is a difference between
the letter of the law and the spirit of the law? When you drive
66 m.p.h. in a 65 m.p.h. zone, you are breaking the letter of
the law, but you are not breaking the spirit of the law. The spirit
of the law is for you to drive safely and responsibly. This is
why most police officers will not ticket you for going one mile
per hour over the speed limit.
The letter of the law of holiness is expressed well in
Proverbs 17:15:
“He that justifieth the wicked, and he that condem-
neth the just, even they both are abomination to the
Lord.”
But isn’t that what God did at the Cross, when He con-
demned “that Just One” (Acts 22:14) and justified wicked sin-
ners such as ourselves? In so doing, He surely broke the letter
of the law of holiness.
Or did He? For those who would argue that God was not
acting in accord with the law of holiness, we would reply that
when God the Father took your sins and placed them on the
Lord Jesus Christ at Calvary, He justly condemned the One
who was made wicked (II Cor. 5:21). Then when you believed
the gospel, God took His righteousness and put it on you, en-
abling Him to justify the ones who were made the very right-
eousness of God in Christ (II Cor. 5:21). The resurrection of
Christ then proved that this was also done in perfect accord
with the spirit of holiness, for Christ’s sacrifice surely satisfied
the just demands of God’s righteousness.
If you haven’t yet trusted Christ as your Savior, however,
God has not yet given you the righteousness that is available
only in Christ. Speaking of the Lord Jesus, the Apostle Paul
says,
“In whom we have redemption through His blood,
the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of His
grace” (Eph. 1:7).
The forgiveness of sins purchased by Christ’s blood is only
available in Him. If you are not in Christ, you are still “in tres-
passes and sins” (Eph. 2:1). “Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ,
and thou shalt be saved” (Acts 16:31).
THE SPiRiT OF HOLiNESS
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
Make plans to attenD
Wall Health Services
Annual Meeting
The Annual Meeting of the Wall Health Services, Inc., will be held at the Wall
Drug Art Gallery Dining Room, Wall, SD on Saturday, February 9, 2013, starting
at 9:00 a.m. The purpose of the meeting will be as follows:
1. Presentation of reports covering the business of the Wall Health Services, Inc.,
for the preceding year.
2. Election of three (3) DIRECTORS.
3. To transact any business which may be necessary, convenient or desirable in
the connection with any of the foregoing at said meeting or at any
adjournments thereto.
• Free Coffee and Donuts • Door Prizes
Dated at Wall, South Dakota, this 18th day of January, 2013.
Donna Fauske, Secretary
Wall Health Services, Inc.
Just when you think the world could not get any crazier.
The Wasta Methodist Church goes and changes their
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper to Monday.
Yes it is true!
Wasta Methodist Church
Pancake Supper
Mon., Feb. 11, 2013 • 5-7
Pancakes, Sausage, Eggs
Free Will Offering • See you there!
LeRoy Edward Harty____________________________
LeRoy Edward Hardy, 91, Stur-
gis, died Saturday, February 2,
2013 at the Sturgis Regional
Health Care Center.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at
the First Presbyterian Church in
Sturgis, with Pastor Denzel Non-
hof officiating. Burial followed at
the Bear Butte Cemetery in Stur-
gis.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to the First Presbyterian
Church and the Western Dakota
Antique Club.
LeRoy was born March 5, 1921
at Sturgis, to Roy Ellsworth and
Ruth Elaine (Casteel) Hardy. He
grew up on the family farm and at-
tended North Middle Alkali
School. After graduating from
Sturgis High School he returned to
the family farm to help his father.
LeRoy married Laila "Virginia"
Wilkinson at Sturgis on December
18, 1945.
LeRoy worked for the John
Deere Implement where he assem-
bled farm equipment. During the
spring and summer he worked for
the Agriculture Stabilization Con-
servation Service. He also worked
for Farmers Union Insurance as
an agent from 1955 until 1967. He
also worked as a fieldman and lob-
byist for Farmers Union. He man-
aged the State Fair booth for 18
years.
After retiring from Farmers
Union in 1984 he enjoyed photog-
raphy, growing roses, gardening,
hunting deer for 40 years and fish-
ing.
LeRoy was a member of the
First Presbyterian Church where
he served as a deacon and on the
board of elders.
Survivors include his daughters,
Cheryl (Rod) Renner, Wall, Phyllis
(Fred) Venners, Plano, TX, Marcia
Hardy and her partner Roy
Mogharabi, Beaumont, CA, and
Linda Paulson, Buffalo, SD; step-
brother, Richard Todd; step-sister,
Coral Etta Todd Stevens; special
friend, Freda Wilson; also 7 grand-
children and 12 great grandchil-
dren.
He was preceded in death by his
wife of 60 years, Virginia; sisters,
Edna Kettelson and Delores
Beehler; one brother, Glen Hardy;
one step-brother, Robert Todd; and
one grandson, Forrest Paulson.
Condolences may be sent to the
family at www.kinkadefunerals.
com.
FinanCial FoCus
Look PAST "FoG oF
UNCErTAiNTy" WHEN
iNvESTiNG
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
In Europe, the financial crisis
drags on. China’s economic growth
has slowed from “wow” to “ho-
hum.” Here at home, we’ve seen
heated political debates over taxes,
spending and deficit reduction.
Taken together, these factors have
created a “fog of uncertainty” that
has left many investors in the dark
about their next moves. But is this
“fog” really impenetrable — or can
you, as an individual investor, see
through it to a place of clarity?
To do so, you first need to realize
that while the events mentioned
above are certainly not insignifi-
cant, they also aren’t the key de-
terminants of investors’ success.
While these types of stories domi-
nate the headlines, they also tend
to obscure some of the factors that
frequently do play a bigger role in
the investment world. And right
now, these factors are actually
somewhat encouraging.
Consider the following:
•The economy continues to
grow. The economy isn’t going
“gangbusters,” but it is growing.
And thanks to historically low in-
terest rates, consumer debt pay-
ments have dropped significantly,
leaving people with more money to
spend elsewhere. Typically, this
higher spending tends to con-
tribute to future economic growth.
•Corporate earnings remain
solid. Many companies have
shown strong earnings over the
past couple of years — and earn-
ings tend to be a key driver of stock
prices. When their earnings are
strong, companies may use some of
the profits to repurchase shares of
their own stock, thereby reducing
the number of shares held by the
public — which means that even if
profits remain the same, the earn-
ings per share should increase.
•Stocks are still attractively
priced. As measured by the price-
to-earnings ratio (P/E), stocks are
still priced relatively well. While
no one can predict stock market
performance, this may be a good
buying opportunity.
Of course, all these indicators of
today’s investment environment
can change over time; at some
point, they may well be not so pos-
itive. But if you truly want to see
through the fog of uncertainty that
always develops with unsettling
political or economic news, you’ll
want to follow these basic, “all-
weather” guidelines:
•Stay diversified. A diversified
portfolio can help protect you from
the harshest effects of market
volatility. (Keep in mind, though,
that diversification, can’t guaran-
tee profits or protect against loss.)
•Rebalance your portfolio. Over
time, your investment mix can
shift, even without your intent.
For example, some of your hold-
ings can appreciate so much in
value that they take on a greater
percentage of your portfolio than
you had intended. That’s why it’s
important to periodically rebal-
ance your portfolio so that it fits
your investment objectives and
risk tolerance.
•Stay focused on the long term.
When confronted with short-term
market fluctuations or scary head-
lines, many people overreact and
make ill-advised investment deci-
sions. You can avoid these behav-
iors by staying focused on the long
term.
•Invest in companies that are
charting their own course. When
investing for the equity portion of
your portfolio, look for companies
with the ability to prosper in all
economic environments.
With patience and perseverance,
and by focusing on the key factors
outlined above, you can navigate
the fog of uncertainty and concen-
trate on your long-term invest-
ment goals. So don’t be afraid to
“set sail.”
Leslie E. “Les” Johnson__________________________
Leslie E. Johnson, age 83, of
Wall, S.D., died Tuesday, February
5, 2013, at his home.
Survivors include three sons,
Lee Johnson of Wall, Kenton John-
son and his wife, Becky, of Granby,
Colo., and Kevin Johnson and his
wife Delphia of Elko, Nev.; seven
grandchildren; several great-
grandchildren; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Les was preceded in death by his
wife, Phyllis Jeann (Dorn) John-
son, on March 2, 2004.
As per Les’ wishes, no services
will be held.
Private family interment will
take place at the Wall Cemetery at
a later date.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
William E. “Ed” Cudmore_________________________
William E. “Ed” Cud-
more, 89, passed away
at his home in
Spearfish, S.D., on Jan-
uary 28, 2013 sur-
rounded by his loving
family.
Ed was born Febru-
ary 14, 1923, to Ed and
Ella (Gossard) Cud-
more, the youngest of
12 children. He was
raised on a farm north
of White Lake, SD. Ed
entered the U.S. Army
on June 10, 1946, and
served in the Philippine
Islands during World
War II. He was awarded
the World War II Vic-
tory medal for his serv-
ice to his country. Ed re-
turned home from the
service and helped his
dad on the family farm.
He married Lucille
Moe in December of
1948. They moved to a
ranch at New Under-
wood where they
ranched until 1956. Ed,
Lucille and family
moved to Philip where
Ed operated a Mobile
service station, “Eddie’s
Friendly Service”. In
addition, Ed was a master sales-
man during the course of his life
which included sales in a number
of businesses-including field su-
pervisor in several sales related
businesses. The family moved to
New Underwood in 1972 where Ed
was a field supervisor for Insta-
Gro International. In 1979, the
family moved to Spearfish where
Ed practiced as a reflexologist
until his retirement – as he loved
helping people. Ed loved animals
and raised chickens, geese, goats
and turkey’s. He was also an avid
gardener – he was a master at
growing all things; he loved to care
for the garden and made certain it
was well cared for. He was gener-
ous with his produce as he shared
the fruits of his harvest with all
family and friends.
Ed was most proud of his six
children and loved spending each
and every holiday and family
event with his family. He was hap-
piest when the children and grand-
children were at their home for the
various family gatherings over the
years. He also loved hunting and
fishing with his son, grandchildren
and other family mem-
bers. Ed and Lucille cel-
ebrated their 64th wed-
ding anniversary on De-
cember 21 with family
present for the celebra-
tion.
Ed is survived by his
loving wife, Lucille, and
their six children; five
daughters and one son,
they were his greatest
love, Diana Berkland
(Tom), Sioux Falls,
Gayle Lobdell (Barry),
Gillette, Wyo., Barbara
Nordquist (Mike), Har-
risburg, Bill Cudmore,
Gillette, Julie Cudmore,
Gillette, and Lisa Bea-
gle (Jay), Lead. Ed had
11 grandchildren and
six great grandchildren
and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Ed was preceded in
death by his mother, fa-
ther and 11 siblings and
one grandchild.
Graveside memorial
services were held Feb-
ruary 1, 2013, at Black
Hills National Ceme-
tery with full military
honors by the Spearfish
Honor Guard.
A memorial will be established
to benefit the American Cancer So-
ciety.
Online condolences may be writ-
ten at www.fidler-isburgfuner-
alchapels.com
Sports
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013• Page 6
By Coach kier
On Monday, January 28th Hot
Springs traveled to Wall to play
our Lady Eagles.
The Junior Varsity team got
themselves a win with a final score
reaching 27 to 15.
Monica Bielmaier earned herself
ten points, and several of her
teammates chipped in as well with
Sam Steffen with four, and Emily
Linn, Taylor Richter, Savanna
Deutscher, Josie Blasius, Tayah
By Coach kier
Jv
On Thursday, January 31st the
White River Tigers came to Wall
for a double header. Junior Varsity
started off the day with a loss of 29
to 35.
Josie Blasius lead the team in
scoring with 10 points as Monica
Bielmaier and Elle Moon each
added four points as well.
Katy Beilmaier lead the team in
rebounds with six and Blasius
helped by adding five.
"Although we did not win the
game, the girls were put into new
situations against White River's
defense, and it was great to see
how the girls adjusted to it. It is a
sign they are ready to take their
skills to new levels," added Coach
Kier.
Huether, Katy Bielmaier, all with
two, and Elle Moon adding one.
Katy Bielmaier was the team's
leader in rebounding with six, and
her three teammates, Linn,
Huether, and Steffen, all helped
with getting four rebounds a piece
as well, which helped the Eagles
out-rebound Hot Springs 29 to 24.
"The girls played overall a
great game. Each player on the
team contributed in one way or an-
other, which is the reason the girls
were successful.
It is great to look over the stats
and see about even statistics
across the board, and that is a sign
of a deep solid basketball team,"
said Coach Kier.
Stats:
Wall Jv: 6 8 5 8 = 27
HS Jv: 4 4 1 6 = 15
Scoring: Emily Linn 0-3 0-0 2,
Jessica Casjens 0-3 0-0 0, Taylor
Richter 1-2 0-0 2, Savanna
Deutscher 1-2 0-0 2, Josie Blasius
1-2 0-0 2, Tayah Huether 1-4 0-1 2,
Monica Bielmaier 4-13 0-1 10,
Katy Bielmaier 0-8 0-0 2, Sam
Steffen 2-7 0-0 4, Elle Moon 0-3 0-
0 1. Totals: 10-47 0-2 7-11 27.
Field goal percentage: Wall
JV .213.
3-point field goal percentage:
Wall JV .000.
Offensive Rebounds: Wall JV
13 (Linn 2, Katy Bielmaier 2, Sam
Steffen 2, Moon 2.)
Defensive Rebounds: Wall JV
16 (Katy Bielmaier 4.)
Fouls: Wall JV 9.
Assists: Wall JV 6 (Katy Biel-
Lady Eagles JV and Varsity
each win over Hot Springs
By Coach kier
Jv
On Friday, February 1st, the Ea-
gles traveled to Kadoka for an-
other double header.
The Junior Varsity was a very
close game that ended in overtime
with the Eagles coming up short
31 to 33.
Emily Linn was the leading
scorer with eight points followed
by Monica Bielmaier and Sam
Steffen with five, and Tayah
Huether with four.
Lady Eagles outshoot White River
Stats:
Wall Jv: 13 0 12 4 = 29
Wr Jv: 13 0 8 14 = 35
Scoring: Emily Linn 1-4 0-0 3,
Blasius 5-7 0-0 10, Tayah Huether
1-5 0-1 2, Monica Bielmaier 2-7 0-
0 4, Katy Bielmaier 1-7 0-0 4, Sam
Steffen 1-10 0-0 2, Elle Moon 2-3 0-
0 4. Totals: 13-45 0-1 3-12 29.
Field goal percentage: Wall
JV .289.
3-point field goal percentage:
Wall JV .000.
Offensive Rebounds: Wall JV
11 (Monica Bielmaier 3.)
Defensive Rebounds: Wall JV
15 (Katy Bielmaier 5.)
Fouls: Wall JV 19.
Assists: Wall JV 8 (Monica Biel-
maier 3, Moom 3.)
Steals: Wall JV 15 (Monica Biel-
maier 4, Katy Bielmaier 4.)
Turnovers: Wall JV 27.
varsity
The Varsity Lady Eagles were
successful for another game
against the Tigers with a score of
46 to 34.
Autumn Schulz had a huge im-
pact on the game by being the lead
scoring between both teams with
16 points, and Sadie O'Rourke also
added nine points to her team's
total.
The Lady Eagles out rebounded
the Lady Tigers 34 to 24.
Blasius had eleven rebounds,
and Kaitlin Schreiber had seven
and Schulz had six.
"The gym was a packed house,
which made the gym loud with
maybe some distractions. How-
ever, the girls stayed very focused
and did not let anything impair
their vision of beating the Tigers.
As our seasons reaches the final
weeks of our regular season, we
have made great strides on im-
provements, and yet, we have sea-
son goals that we are working to-
wards and will need to continue to
work hard to meet both in game
situations and in practice," said
Coach Hess.
Stats:
Wall: 18 3 7 18 = 46
Wr: 1 9 14 10 = 34
Scoring: O’Rourke 4-17 0-2 9,
Bobbie Steffen 2-3 0-0 1, Carlee
Johnston 3-6 0-0 4, Kaitlin
Schreiber 1-8 0-0 4, Josie Blasius
2-6 0-15, Schulz 6-12 0-0 16. To-
tals: 18-56 0-3 10-21 46.
Field goal percentage: Lady
Eagles .321.
3-point field goal percentage:
Lady Eagles.000.
Offensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 15 (Blasius 5.)
Defensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 19 (Blasius 6.)
Fouls: Lady Eagles 24.
Assists: Lady Eagles 13
(O’Rourke 6.)
Steals: Lady Eagles 14
(O’Rourke 6.)
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 25.
Autumn Schulz going up for a basket against White River. Lady
Eagles won on their home court Thursday, January 31 by a score
of 46 - 34. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
Lady Eagles bring home a win over Kadoka
Monica Beilmaier and Elyssa
Westby were the team's leaders in
rebounding too as each player had
five; the Eagles out rebounded the
Kougars 33 to 26.
"It is never easy when you go
into overtime in a game, and end
up losing by just a couple points. I
know the girls were disappointed
that we came up short, as that is a
normal reaction when you have a
group of girls who care so much
about not only the game of basket-
ball but how their personal per-
formances were too.
No basketball team is perfect, as
we all make mistakes, but the girls
need to focus on the good things
that happened throughout the
game and maybe even ask them-
selves what we can even do better
next time," added Coach Kier.
Stats:
WJv: 12 7 4 5 3 = 31
kJv: 9 2 4 13 5 = 33
Scoring: Linn 4-7 0-1 8, Josie
Blasius 1-1 0-0 1, Huether 2-7 0-0
4, Monica Bielmaier 1-10 0-0 5,
Katy Bielmaier 0-3 0-0 1, Sam
Steffen 2-12 1-2 5, Westby 1-2 0-0
3, Taylor Richter 1-2 0-0 3. Totals:
12-48 1-3 6-12 31.
Field goal percentage: Wall
JV .250.
3-point field goals: Wall JV 1
(Steffen 1.)
Offensive Rebounds: Wall JV
16 (Monica Bielmaier 4.)
Defensive Rebounds: Wall JV
17 (Westby 6.)
Fouls: Wall JV 19.
Assists: Wall JV 6 (Sam Steffen
2.)
Steals: Wall JV 18 (Linn 5.)
Turnovers: Wall JV 38.
varsity
The Varsity team had another
successful night of basketball as
they were victorious over the
Kougars with a final score of 55 to
46.
Autumn Schulz dominated
boards as she earned herself 26
points and 13 rebounds.
Kaitlin Schreiber also impacted
the boards as she came up with
nine points and 12 rebounds.
"From the beginning jump ball,
this basketball game was very
rough and upbeat.
The girls held their composure
very well, and I believe this has a
lot to do with our team's leader-
ship. Our seniors Schulz, Bailey
Lytle and Bobbie Steffen help keep
the entire team focused and
grounded on the specific tasks at
hand no matter if it is at practice
or in a game.
Our Juniors Sadie O’Rourke and
Schreiber also are great leaders as
they help keep the team "hungry"
for success.
Coach Kier and I, are very
blessed to have such ambitious
and well rounded girls on our team
that want to be successful in every-
thing they strive for," said Coach
Hess.
Stats:
Wall: 16 14 12 13 = 55
kadoka: 10 10 10 16 = 46
Scoring: O’Rourke 1-13 0-25,
Carlee Johnston 2-10 0-2 8,
Schreiber 3-9 0-0 9, Josie Blasius
2-5 0-0 6, Tayah Huether 0-1 0-0 1,
Schulz 11-16 0-0 26. Totals: 19-57
0-5 17-30 55.
Field goal percentage: Lady
Eagles .333.
3-point field goal percentage:
Lady Eagles .000.
Offensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 20 (Schulz 9.)
Defensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 19 (Schreiber 6.)
Fouls: Lady Eagles 21.
Assists: Lady Eagles 27 (Blasius
3.)
Steals: Lady Eagles 20
(O’Rourke 5, Johnston 5.)
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 27.
Ravellette Publications, inc.
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A second place team slot is
where Philip Area wrestlers
landed following the Black Hills
Invitational Wrestling Tourna-
ment in Hill City, February 2.
Head coach Matt Donnelly noted
that two wrestlers, Grady Carley
and Raedon Anderson, were both
injured at the tournament. He
noted the difference between first
and second place was one match’s
points.
Team standings were Douglas
(202.5), Philip Area (195), Custer
(150), Spearfish-Lead/Deadwood
(142), Hot Springs (140.5), Sturgis
Junior Varsity (106), Rapid City
Central Junior Varsity (99.5),
Newell (92.5), Lemmon/McIntosh
(84.5), Newcastle, Wyo., ( 62), Sully
Buttes (58), Rapid City Stevens
Junior Varsity (52), St. Thomas
More (44.5), Belle Fourche (40.5),
Hill City (38), Sundance, Wyo.,
(321), Upton, Wyo., (11.5), and Red
Cloud (10).
106 lbs: Jed Brown 1st,
24-9 record
•Pinned Wyatt Pulscher (HS), 3:23
•Pinned Dillon Jeppesen, (NEWC), 1:34
•Pinned Brandon Delzer (STU), 1:14
•Decisioned Dirk Wolf (L/M), NA
113 lbs: rance Johnson, 1st,
17-9 record
Philip Area earns second at Hill City
•Bye
•Pinned Cole Thurness (STM), 1:42
•Major dec. Devin Blasius (DOU), NA
•Decisionedd Josh Simunek (HS), NA
126 lbs: kaylor Pinney, 5th,
9-6 record
•Tech. fall by Makoa Runs Against
(RCCJV), NA
•Pinned Josh Gilland (SB), 3:37
•Pinned Kyle Shaver (DOU), 1:24
•Pinned Trent Bush (SUN), 2:31
•Decision by James Karrels (STU), NA
•Pinned Henry Orban (UP), 4:32
132 lbs: Grady Carley,
19-16 record
•Pinned Ethan Kulm (RCCJV), :45
•Default to Cody Jackson (DOU)
•Forfeited due to injury
138 lbs: raedon Anderson,
5-12 record
•Pinned Tabon Elmore (CUS), 5:46
•Decisioned by Nick Bock (NEWC), NA
•Forfeited due to injury
152 lbs: Paul kary,
1-9 record
by Tristen Madsen (HS) 1:18
•Bye
•Pinned Kyler Schmidt (SLD), 4:32
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 1st,
26-7 record
•Bye
•Pinned Quinn Lewis (STM), :55
•Pinned Francisco Escobar (HC), 3:36
•Decisioned Jared Harkless (HS), NA
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 2nd,
28-8 record
•Pinned Jeb Hunt (DOU), 1:57
•Pinned Nathan Abramson (RCSJV), 2:43
•Pinned Jordan Hunt (DOU), 5:59
•Decisioned by Clayton Wahlstrom
(CUS), NA
182 lbs: Chance knutson, 1st,
23-8 record
•Pinned Reed Ashmore (CUS), 1:20
•Pinned Jon Hanson (STM), 1:40
•Pinned Casey Seidler (CUS), 1:50
•PinnedRobbie Nelson (DOU), 1:52
195 lbs: Logan Ammons, 2nd,
20-7 record
•Bye
•Pinned Austin Wyss (RCSJV), :52
•Decisioned Marquis Trujillo (RCCJV),
NA
by Witt Dobesh (STM), 2:59
220 lbs: Gavin Devries, 3rd
14-15record
•Bye
•Pinned Spencer Holt (RCCJV). :39
•Pinned by Brody Peterson (L/M), :38
•Pinned Carrell Haines (HS), 2:29
•Pinned Mike Murray (CUS), :47
285 lbs: Geoffrey Devries,
2-12 record
•Bye
•Decisioned by Lane Green (DOU ), NA
The Philip Invitational
Wrestling Tournament is next on
the table for the wrestlers. The
event will be in Wall Saturday,
February 9.
Particpating teams are Belle
Fourche, Newell, Douglas, Ab-
erdeen Roncalli, Harding County,
Hill City, Hot Springs, Lemmon,
Rapid City Central, Sully Buttes,
St. Thomas More.
Lady Eagles Kaitlin Schreiber goes up for a shot as teammates
Sadie O’Rourke and Bailey Lytle watch. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
maier 2.)
Turnovers: Wall JV 22.
Steals: Wall JV 13 (Blasius 5.)
The Varsity team took the court,
and also got themselves a win over
Hot Springs. Their final score was
56 to 34.
Carlee Johnston lead the team
in points with 17 followed by Au-
tumn Schulz and Sadie O'Rourke
whom both added 10.
Several girls did a great job re-
bounding as Johnston earned her-
self four, Blasius, M. Bielmaier,
and Schulz each had three, Linn
and O'Rourke each had two, and
Bobbie Steffen and Huether both
got one.
"The girl's intensity was pretty
high throughout the game. We
played a very strong defense which
caused Hot Springs to turn over
the ball to us thirty times, and 22
of those times were steals.
"Both our point guard,
O’Rourke, and our main post,
Schulz, lead our team in steals as
O’Rourke had seven and Schulz
had five.
I am very proud how we got
after things, and made sure we
were in control of the basketball
game," said Coach Hess.
Stats:
Wall: 12 19 20 5 = 56
HS: 5 12 13 4 = 34
Scoring: Sadie O’Rourke 4-11 0-
0 10, Bobbie Steffen 0-5 0-0 1, Car-
lee Johnston 6-12 1-1 17, Bailey
Lytle 1-2 0-0 2, Kaitlin Schreiber
2-2 0-0 4, Josie Blasius 2-4 0-0 5,
Tayah Huether 0-1 0-0 2, Monica
Bielmaier 2-7 0-0 5, Autumn
Schulz 5-9 0-0 10. Totals: 22-53 2-
2 10-15 56.
Field goal percentage: Lady
Eagles .415.
3-point field goals: Lady Ea-
gles 2 (Johnston 1, Blasius 1).
Offensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 6 (Monica Bielmaier 2.)
Defensive Rebounds: Lady Ea-
gles 13 (Johnston 3, Schulz 3.)
Fouls: Lady Eagles 15.
Assists: Lady Eagles 12
(O’Rourke 4.)
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 14.
Steals: Lady Eagles 22
(O’Rourke 7.)
courant
@
gwtc.net
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013• Page 7
By Coach Dinger
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team hosted number one rated
White River on Thursday, January
31st.
The Eagles played aggressive in
the first half and shot the basket-
ball well, but had several
turnovers that gave White River
an 18-46 half-time advantage.
By the end of the third quarter
the Eagle’s continued to trail by a
score of 31-61.
In the fourth quarter, the Eagles
were able to get several bench
players into the game and the Ea-
gles lost by a final score of 46-88.
The Eagles finished the game with
a higher field goal shooting per-
centage than White River, but the
39 turnovers were very costly.
Tucker O’Rourke and Trevor An-
derson were the leading scorers for
the Eagles with 12 points and 10
points respectively.
Laketon McLaughlin and Tyler
Trask each had eight points.
O’Rourke also led the team with
seven rebounds, while Anderson
pulled down five rebounds.
Anderson also led the offense
with four assist. The team was 20-
Peaa¡agtoa Couaty Couraat
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Sadie O’Rourke
Girls Basketball
Trevor Anderson
Boys Basketball
Raedon Anderson
Wrestling
Jerica Coller
Gymnastics
Subway
Musician
of the
month
Autumn Deering
By Coach Dinger
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team traveled to Kadoka on Fri-
day, February 1st and came away
with a 55-30 victory.
The Eagles started out slow and
struggled shooting the basketball,
but still had a 24-19 by halftime.
The Eagles played good defense
in the third quarter and were able
to build their lead to a 39-23 ad-
vantage.
The bench came in and played in
the fourth quarter and they were
able to secure the win for the Ea-
gles 55-30.
The Eagles were a little tired
after playing White River the pre-
vious night, but they played excel-
lent team defense to make up for
their low shooting percentage.
Tucker O’Rourke led all scorers
with 11 points, while Lane Hus-
tead and Trevor Anderson each
had 10 points.
O’Rourke also led the team with
Eagles fought hard game against White River
Eagles Lane Hustead goes up for a basket against White River.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
47 from the field for 43 percent, 2-
7 from the three point line for 29
percent, and 4-4 from the free
throw line for 100 percent.
Stats
Wall: 8 10 13 15 = 46
Wr: 21 25 15 27 = 88
Scoring: Trask 3-6 0-0 8, Ander-
son 3-10 4-4 10, Lane Hustead 35-
0-0 6, Clancy Lytle 0-6 0-0 0,
O’Rourke 6-8 0-0 12, Carson John-
ston 0-1 0-0 0, McLaughlin 4-6 0-0
8, Ryder Wilson 0-2 0-0 0, Ben
Linn 0-1 0-0 0, CJ Schulz 0-1 0-0 0,
Tyler Peterson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals:
20-47 4-4 46.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.426.
3-point field goals: Eagles 2-7,
(Trask 2-3, Anderson 0-2, Lytle 0-
1, Linn 0-1.)
Rebounds: Eagles 27 (O’Rourke
7.)
Fouls: Eagles 26.
Fouled out: Trask
Assists: Eagles 12 (Anderson 4.)
Steals: Eagles 10 (Trask 2, An-
derson 2, Lytle 2, McLaughlin 2.)
Blocked shots: Eagles 1
(O’Rourke 1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 39.
Eagles outscore Kadoka for a win
seven rebounds and Anderson fin-
ished with five rebounds.
Hustead also led the offense
with four assist.
The team was 22-63 from the
field for 35 percent, 4-23 from the
three point line for 17 percent, and
7-17 from the free throw line for 41
percent.
The team is playing well to-
gether, but there is still room for
improvement as the Eagles pre-
pare for a district tournament run
the end of February.
Stats:
Wall: 6 18 15 16 = 55
kadoka: 8 11 4 7 = 30
Scoring: Tyler Trask 2-8 1-2 5,
Carson Johnston 0-5 0-4 0, Les
Williams 1-1 0-0 2, Anderson 4-10
1-5 10, Laketon McLaughlin 3-7 0-
0 7, Hustead 3-10 0-5 7, Clancy
Lytle 1-6 1-3 3, Danny Muzik 1-1
1-1 3, O’Rourke 5-8 0-0 11, Ben
Linn 0-1 0-0 0, Tyler Peterson 2-6
0-0 4. Totals: 22-63 4-23 7-17 55.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.349.
3-point field goals: Eagles 4
(Anderson 1, Lytle 1, Muzik 1,
Trask 1.)
Offensive Rebounds: Eagles 11
(O’Rourke 3, Peterson 3.)
Defensive Rebounds: Eagles
13 (O’Rourke 4.)
Fouls: Eagles 26.
Assists: Eagles 17 (Hustead 4.)
Steals: Eagles 18 (Trask 3, An-
derson 3, McLaughlin 3, Hustead
3, Lytle 3.)
Blocked Shots: Eagles 1
(O’Rourke 1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 16.
The South Dakota Association of
Towns and Townships is now of-
fering one $1000 and one $500
scholarship to senior high school
students who abide in South
Dakota, are currently attending a
South Dakota public, private,
parochial high school or a home
school program, and lives in a
town or township who is a current
member of SDATAT (Call our office
if you are unsure of membership
status).
Graduates of the class of 2013
are eligible to apply for the schol-
arship. The student must use the
scholarship for a college, univer-
sity, or vocational school which has
a physical presence in South
Dakota.
Applicants must complete an ap-
plication form and submit it along
with a written essay on the topic:
"Year after year more young peo-
ple leave South Dakota. What does
South Dakota need to do in order
to encourage the younger genera-
SDATAT scholarship program
tion to remain in the state? Write
an essay on your ideas on how to
keep future generations in South
Dakota."
These forms are available on our
website at www.sdtownships.com,
by emailing us at sdtstaff@santel.
net, or by contacting the office at
605-353-1439.
The winner will be announced in
May. However, the actual scholar-
ship money will be paid to the fi-
nancial office of the chosen school
in the fall of 2014. Seniors gradu-
ating in 2013 are eligible. The
winner and their family will be
guests at the SDATAT annual
meeting in December of 2013.
Deadline for application is April 1,
2013.
For more information contact:
SDATAT 2013 Scholarship Pro-
gram, P.O .Box 903, Huron, S.D.
57350; Website: www.sdtownships
.com or sdtstaff@santel.net. Phone:
605-353-1439, Fax: 605-352-5322.
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar..................................14-6
Handrahan Const .......................14-6
Shad’s Towing .............................11-9
Rockers........................................7-13
Petersen’s ....................................7-13
Badland’s Auto..............................7-9
Hightlights:
Jason Petersen......................269/629
Maralynn Burns..........200 clean/477
Carl Brown............................200/540
Jerry Mooney...............216 clean/579
Lee Sundall ...........................205/532
Trina Brown..........................172/499
Jackie Shull..................................174
Vickie Petersen .....................173/491
Brian Buxcel ....4-7-9 split; 198 clean
Neal Petersen............4-7-9 split; 200
Kim Petersen........................5-6 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor................................12-0
Peoples Market .............................8-4
Philip Health Service ...................8-4
Kennedy Impl ...............................7-5
G&A Trenching.............................5-7
Bear Auto ......................................4-8
George’s Welding ..........................3-9
Kadoka Tree Service...................1-11
Highlights:
Earl Park...............................232/601
James Mansfield ...................211/567
Jim Larson...........9-10 split; 203/554
Randy Boyd...........................214/553
Steve Varner..........................219/548
Fred Foland...........................210/545
Cory Boyd.....................................544
Terry Wentz ..................5-7 split; 529
Craig Burns...........................201/511
Tony Gould ...................................504
Jerry Iron Moccasin.....................214
Dan Addison .........................2-7 split
Christy Park.........................5-7 split
Bill Bainbridge ...................5-10 split
Dale O’Connell....................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge Salon ....................18-6
Invisibles...............................16.5-7.5
State Farm..................................16-8
Bowling Belles ....................10.5-13.5
Jolly Ranchers ............................8-16
Highlights:
Christy Park..........................189/448
Dody Weller...........................162/431
Kay Kroetch.........3-10 split; 159/429
Deanna Fees.......................3-10 split
Audrey Jones........................5-6 split
Donna King ..................3-6-10-7 split
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................13-3
Morrison’s Haying.......................11-5
Just Tammy’s..............................10-6
Wall Food Center ..........................8-8
Hildebrand Concrete ....................7-9
First National Bank ...................6-10
Dorothy’s Catering......................6-10
Chiefie’s Chicks...........................3-13
Highlights:
Stacey Schulz ........................189/512
MaryLynn Crary..........................150
Jessica Wagner.............................134
Chelsea Moos ...............................127
Brittney Drury ................4-7-10 split
Marlis Petersen.....2-7 split; 182/515
Shar Moses...................................485
Val Schulz ...................3-10 split; 175
Christy Park..........................172/480
Jackie Shull..................................173
Annette Hand.......................4-5 split
Thursday Men
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................14-2
The Steakhouse ..........................14-2
O’Connell Const ............................9-7
WEE BADD...................................8-8
West River Pioneer Tanks............8-8
A&M Laundry.............................4-12
Dakota Bar..................................4-12
McDonnell Farms .......................3-13
Highlights:
Ronnie Williams...........................248
Ronnie Coyle.................4-7 split; 241
Jordon Kjerstad............7-8 split; 214
Andrew Reckling.........216 clean/606
Randy Boyd..................................223
Nathan Kjerstad...................210/563
Neal Petersen...............5-7 split; 202
Harlan Moos.................................202
Don Weller....................................200
Bart Ramsey.........................2-7 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service................16-4
Cristi’s Crew ...............................12-8
Lee & the Ladies.........................11-9
King Pins...................................10-10
Roy’s Repair ................................9-11
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Theresa Miller..............................205
John Heltzel ..........................202/524
Jason Schofield ............................180
Annette Hand...............4-5 split; 154
Aaron Richardson .................212/564
Alvin Pearson .......................2-7 split
Kelly Fees .............................4-5 split
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
DARTT ANGUS RANCH PRI-
VATE TREATY SALE: Saturday,
March 9, 10 a.m. at the ranch,
Wall, SD. 35 yearlings and 10
two-year-old Angus bulls. Many
bulls suitable for heifers. Dan,
279-2242, or Daryl, 441-7408.
PR24-2tp
FOR SALE: A.I. bull calves out of
BT Right Time 24J, out of our
best commercial cows. Will feed
until March 1st. Call 859-3082.
P9-2tc
FOR SALE: 140 straws of semen
out of a Final Answer son and a
Larks Canyon daughter. Call
859-3082. P9-2tc
FOR SALE: 2005 Case 580,
price $9,400; 4014 hours, 80
hp., backhoe and loader, 4x4.
Email or call prater77@msn.
com / 299-1788. P8-3tp
PASTURE WANTED: Summer
pasture for 100-250 cow/calf
pairs, preferably in the Jack-
son/Haakon/Jones County
area, but would consider other
areas. With full maintenance.
Call 843-2869. P8-tfn
FOR SALE: 2006 Featherlite all
enclosed 4-horse gooseneck
trailer. 7x22x7 aluminum/ white
smooth skin. Has nice enclosed
tack up front with (5) saddle
racks and (8) bridle holders.
Great condition! $14,200 OBO.
Call for pictures and more de-
tails: 454-6914, Murdo. P8-5tc
FOR SALE: 2000 Doonan step
deck, 48’, $15,000. 1984 Wilson
grain trailer, 42’, $8,000. Call
C.K. Dale, 685-3091. P7-3tc
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease whole
ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or 859-
2059 (home). P7-tfn
PASTURE WANTED for summer
2013 for 50-60 pair. Call Jerry
Willert, 837-2459. K6-tfn
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2001 Chrysler Town
& Country van, all electric, runs
good, $2,800. Call 430-5051.
PR24-2tp
FOR SALE: 2004 Pontiac Grand
Prix GT, gray with gray interior,
107,300 miles, looks and runs
great. $7,000 is the asking price,
but I will consider reasonable of-
fers. Call Keith at 454-3426 or
859-2039 for information or any
questions. PR22-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
FITCH FENCING: Line your
summer projects up now! For all
your corral, windbreak and pas-
ture fencing needs, call Truett at
859-2334. PR23-tfn
TAX PREPARATION SERVICE:
Contact Eileen Stolley, Regis-
tered Tax Return Preparer, after
5:00 p.m., 837-2320. K8-3tc
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: S.D. printing
company looking for an offset
press operator. Previous experi-
ence a plus. Willing to train.
Must be mechanically inclined.
Full time. Excellent wages and
benefits. Call Tom Dalton at 224-
9999, 1-800-675-4656, or email
to: tdalton@pryntcomm. com
PR24-2tc
BADLANDS HARLEY-DAVID-
SON, WALL, SD has an immedi-
ate opening for a full-time expe-
rienced, professional Store Su-
pervisor. Individuals with strong
customer service and leadership
skills should apply. Retail expe-
rience is preferred. If you enjoy
working in an exciting environ-
ment please send your resume
to: Melonie Rymer, e-mail to:
mel@blackhillshd.com. (No
phone calls or walk-ins please).
PW9-2tc
THE USDA FOREST SERVICE is
planning on filling 3 temporary
Fire, (2) temporary Range Techni-
cian, (2) temporary Biological Sci-
ence Technician summer posi-
tions on the Wall Ranger District
and (3) temporary summer posi-
tions in the National Grasslands
Visitor Center (NGVC) for the
2013 season. For information
concerning any of the current va-
cancies please contact personnel
at the NGVC located at 708 Main
Street in Wall or by calling 279-
2125. PW8-2tc
WANTED: Hostess to set tables
for the prime rib dinner and auc-
tion on April 20, 2013. Please
contact Nikki, Heidi or Ruby,
837-2270, Kadoka. K8-2tc
FULL-TIME/PART-TIME HELP
WANTED at Ingram Hardware in
Philip. 859-2521. Some com-
puter skills required. P8-2tc
MANAGER POSITION: East Pen-
nington Conservation District in
Wall, SD, is seeking to fill a per-
manent, part-time management
position. It is an administrative
position with occasional light
outside work. Please contact the
office at 279-2519 or stop by at
24 Creighton Road for an appica-
tion and/or more information.
EOE. PW6-tfn
HELP WANTED: Maintenance
Dept. at Cedar Pass Lodge is
looking for a hard working, de-
pendable maintenance worker.
Must have carpentry, plumbing
and flooring experience. Please
contact Sharon at 433-5562
and/or complete an application
online at cedarpass lodge.com
P5-4tc
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Underwater camera
with extras, $150; ice auger,
$200; portable fish house (trap),
$225; 2005 Polaris 3.30 Mag-
num, all wheel drive, automatic,
very good shape, $2,800. Call
Bob Totton, 669-2941. M24-1tp
GUN FOR SALE: Mossburg AR
semi-automatic 22 cal., new in
box, never fired. Extra clip. First
come, first served at $350. Call
431-0928. P9-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each. Call
685-3317 or 837-2917. K44-tfn
FOR SALE: 3-piece furniture
set – couch, loveseat & chair.
Very good condition, like new!
Southwestern pattern in reds &
blues. Call 279-2222. PW9-2tc
FOR SALE: Solid oak hand-
crafted china cabinet, excellent
shape, $300. Call 859-2654 or
685-3152, leave message.
P8-tfn
FOR SALE: 5x8 enclosed cargo
trailer, like new. Also: Powermate
5000 watt generator with about
40 hours. Call or text 660-3053,
Interior. P8-2tp
FOR SALE: (40) 27” TV sets with
remotes, $20 each. These are
NOT flatscreens. Best Western
Plains, Wall, 279-2145 or 685-
3915. PW8-2tc
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED: Once fired 45 ACP
brass. Call 279-2195 or 441-
7049. WP7-tfn
REAL ESTATE
2007 MOBILE HOME FOR
SALE: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, garden
tub in master bath, new stove,
refrigerator one year old, and
dishwasher. Very spacious living
room and kitchen. Never had
pets or smoke. Call 515-4138 or
515-4139. WP24-4tc
FOR SALE: 307 Myrtle Ave.,
Philip. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
partially finished basement, large
back yard, new roof and win-
dows, stainless steel fridge and
stove, washer and dryer in-
cluded. Close to schools. Call
859-2470. Can email pictures.
P7-4tc
RECREATION
FOR SALE: 1994 Honda 125 dirt
bike, new plastics kit, just
cleaned the carburetor and gone
through by mechanic. Needs to
go! $600 firm. Call Lonna at 669-
2040 or 669-2271. M24-tfn
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need rental
assistance or not, we can house
you. Just call 1-800-481-6904 or
stop in the lobby and pick up an
application. Gateway Apart-
ments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified ad
the first week it runs. If you see
an error, we will gladly re-run
your ad correctly. We accept re-
sponsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be added
if ad is not paid at the time the
order is placed. All phone num-
bers are with an area code of
605, unless otherwise indi-
cated.
BULL SALES
WILKINSON RANCH BLACK
ANGUS Yearling Bull Private
Treaty Sale with equal opportu-
nity to bid on each bull. Begin-
ning Sat. Feb. 16. For more infor-
mation and a catalog, call Bill
Wilkinson, 605-203-0379 or
Mark Wilkinson, 605-203-0380
De Smet, S.D.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
RESTAURANT FOR LEASE: A
great opportunity to start your
own business. Located in Budís
Bar, Jefferson, SD. Small Town
atmosphere, small deposit, rea-
sonable rent. Drawing from Tri
State area. Call 712-281-3349.
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
$2,000 SCHOLARSHIPS, Better
Business Bureau Foundation
Student of Integrity Awards.
http://southdakota.bbb.org/stu
dentaward/, 605-271-2066 /
800-649-6814 #8526. Applica-
tion deadline: 3-08-13.
EMPLOYMENT
BELLE FOURCHE, a growing
South Dakota community of
6,500, seeks Economic Develop-
ment Executive Director. Excel-
lent wages and benefits. Full job
description and application at
www.bellefourche.org. Closing
date: March 1, 2013.
THE BISON SCHOOL DISTRICT
has an opening for a full time Su-
perintendent/K-12 Principal.
Salary and benefits shall be ne-
gotiable. Send letter of applica-
tion to Bison School District #52-
1 Attn: Bonnie Crow, P O Box 9,
Bison, SD. 57620.
FACILITY MAINTENANCE/CUS-
TODIAN POSITION: Salem City
accepting applications. Closing
02/15/13. Contact: City of
Salem, PO Box 249, Salem, SD
57058, 425-2301; citysalem@tri-
otel.net. EOE.
SEEKING FARM MANAGER. In-
dividuals that are qualified to
manage a 30,000 acre small
grain operation with motivation
to keep economically competitive.
E-mail confidential resume to
gchapman@rdoffutt.com.
VACANCY: FAITH SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, Faith, SD seeking candi-
dates for the position of superin-
tendent of schools with Special
Education Directors duties to be
determined. Application materi-
als available at www.faith.k12.
sd.us or contact Dr. Julie Ertz at
605.391.4719 or jertz@asbsd.
org.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL-
Custer Clinic and Custer Re-
gional Senior Care in beautiful
Custer, SD, have full time and
PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN and Li-
censed Medical Assistant posi-
tions available. We offer compet-
itive pay and excellent benefits.
New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-2229 ext. 110 for more
information or log onto www.re-
gionalhealth.com to apply.
SEEKING EXPERIENCED AUTO
BODY TECHNICIAN: Family-
owned business, established in
western S.D. for 63 years. Shop
is busy all year round. Lesí Body
Shop, Philip, 605-859-2744.
MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY
$3997.00. Make & save money
with your own bandmill. Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-
800-578-1363 Ext.300N.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneaglel-
oghomes. com
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter
discounts for spring delivery.
50x80, 62x100, 68x120, 68x200,
100x200. Take advantage of tax
deductions. Limited Offer. Call
Jim 1-888-782-7040.
APArTMEnTS
AVAiLABLE
Wall ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
Pro/rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
THANK YOUS
I want to thank the sponsors
fo the Wall Agricultural Appreci-
ation Day for the $250 gift cer-
tificate I won. Thank you also
for the great meal and fine
music to dance to.
Dean Patterson
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DD4 Ford F-2SD
4x4, VS, Gus, Auto, Long Hox
Greo1 uorK 1ruoK!
No one reads the ads?
yoU JUST DiD!
We design this newspaper with news
and advertising to fit the reader’s eye.
The Pennington County Courant your news
and advertising source for over 100 years.
Let us help you promote your product.
Thanks for taking the time to read our entire newspaper.
iT HAS BEEn SAiD THAT…
NOTiCE TO
BiDDERS
Sealed bids will be received by the Pen-
nington County Highway Department on
behalf of the Board of Commissioners for
the following projects at the Pennington
County Highway Department, 3601 Cam-
bell Street, Rapid City, SD 57701, until
10:00 AM on Wednesday, February 20,
2013. Any bids received after 10:00 AM
will be returned unopened.
Asphalt Concrete Overlay Proj-
ect AC 2013-1
Asphalt Concrete Overlay Proj-
ect AC 2013-2
Asphalt Surface Treatment
Project AST 2013
Aggregate Stockpile Project
AGG 2013-1
Aggregate Stockpile Project
AGG 2013-2
Asphalt Surface Crack Sealing
Project ASC 2013
Annual Supplies:
Aggregate Materials; Asphalt
Maintenance Materials; Com-
posite Asphalt Concrete; Con-
crete Products; Corrugated
Metal Pipe; Cutback and Emul-
sified Asphalt; De-Icing Sand;
Equipment Rental; Fencing;
Guardrail; Magnesium Chloride
Solution; Seeding, Fertilizing,
Mulching, and Erosion Control
Blanket; Timber Bridge Materi-
als; Traffic Control Materials
Copies of the minimum specifications are
on file at the Pennington County Highway
Department, 3601 Cambell Street, Rapid
City, South Dakota 57701, and may also
be obtained from the Pennington County
Website at http://www.co.pennington.
sd.us/highway/hwy.html. For questions
and comments, please contact the Pen-
nington County Highway Department at
(605) 394-2166.
By virtue of statutory authority, preference
will be given to materials, products, and
supplies found or produced within the
State of South Dakota.
The Board of Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities therein and re-
serves the right to award the contract to
the lowest responsible bidder as they so
determine.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published February 7, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $33.99.
NOTiCE OF
VACANCY
EASTERN PENNiNGTON COUNTY
AMBULANCE DiSTRiCT
The following offices for the Eastern
Pennington County Ambulance District
will become vacant due to the expiration
of the present term of office on the follow-
ing board of directors:
Three Year Term – Norman Eisenbraun
Three Year Term – Jem Kjerstad
Nominations for these vacancies will be
voted on at the annual meeting on the
21st day of March, 2013, at 7:00pm. The
annual meeting will be held in the Wall
Community Center, located at 501 Main
Street, Wall, SD.
Carolynn Anderson
Secretary/Treasurer
Eastern Pennington County
Ambulance District
Published February 7 & 14, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $18.85.
NOTiCE OF
HEARiNG
BEFORE THE PENNiNGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Marsha Leininger has applied for a Set-
back Variance to reduce the minimum re-
quired side yard setback from 25 feet to
20 feet in a Low Density Residential Dis-
trict located on Lot B of Tin Mine Subdivi-
sion, Section 6, T2S, R5E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota, 24180 Tin
Horse Trail, in accordance with Sections
207 and 509 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
19th day of February 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published February 7, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $14.93.
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
ATTENTION:
All Township Clerks
Now is the time to get your
Annual Meeting notices in to the
Pennington County Courant.
Notices may be faxed to 279-2965,
e-mailed to annc@gwtc.net, or
mailed to P.O. Box 435, Wall, SD 57790.
Deadline for ALL legals is FRIDAY at 11:00 a.m.
for them to run in the following week.
PENNiNGTON CONSERVATiON DiSTRiCT
PROFiT & LOSS
JANUARY THROUGH DECEMBER 2012
ORDiNARY iNCOME/EXPENSE
Income
40-intergovernmental Revenue
4000-County Appropriation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,078.00
Total 40 – Intergovernmental Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,078.00
41 – Charges for Goods & Services
4100 Machine Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,363.77
4100 Handplants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,840.93
Total 41-Charges for Goods & Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14,204.70
4130 – Tree Protector Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,325.05
4201 – No-Till grass seeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17,830.00
4351 - Plants & Grasses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .762.94
45 – Other Revenue
4512 – Interest on CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .884.37
4518 – Interest to Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..83
4519 – Interest Invest Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194.97
4520 – Advertising Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280.00
Total 45 – Other Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,360.17
4511- Interest Invest Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154.51
Total Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67,715.37
Cost of Goods Sold
6120 – Tree Fabric Stock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,895.00
Total COGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,895.00
Gross Profit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56,820.37
Expense
Payroll Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,200.00
600 – Office Expenses
6001 – Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97.49
6002 – Postage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552.39
6003 – Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,423.51
6004 – Printing & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597.69
6005 – Insurance, Bond, & Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,499.00
600 - Office Expenses – Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .418.70
Total 600 – Office Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,588.78
601 – Supervisor Expenses
6010 –Supervisor Per Diem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,380.00
6012 - Supervisor Mileage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,538.00
6013 – Supervisor Meals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43.17
6014 – Supervisor Lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .398.72
6015 – Supervisor General Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100.00
Total 601 – Supervisor Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,459.89
602 – Employee Expenses
6020 Employee Wages Salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15,263.28
6030 – Employer Payroll Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,294.79
6037 – Employee Lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.00
Total 602 – Employee Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19,593.07
605 – Other Expenses
6050 Membership & Dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,039.00
6051 Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300.00
6056 Miscellaneous Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.00
Total 605 – Other Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,341.00
607 – Information & Education
6073 – Awards and Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,473.32
6074 – Camps/Educational Opportunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .600.00
6075 – Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44.08
6076 – Promotional Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51.63
Total 607 – Information & Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,169.03
611 – Tree Planting
6110 – Tree Stock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,103.55
6113 – Tree Planting Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33.92
6115 – Tree Planting Refund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189.53
6116 – Tree Planting Misc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .354.00
Total 611 – Tree Planting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,681.00
6111A – Tree Planter Wages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00
6118 – Tree Storage Facility Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .850.00
6122 – Mileage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-34.00
6123 – Tree Fabric Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65.08
6125 – Tree Fabric Refund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296.66
6126 – Tree Fabric Misc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,534.20
6170 – Equipment Rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,737.79
620 - Grass Drills
6201 – Grass Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,455.20
Total 620 – Grass Drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,455.20
6202 – Grass Drill Gas/Mileage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228.50
6203 – No-Till Drill Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,812.48
6205 – Grass Drill Miscellaneous Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,474.80
6302 – Miscellaneous Gas/Mileage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349.00
66900 – Reconciliation Discrepancies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.30
Total Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71,823.78
Net Ordinary Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-15,003.41
Other Income/Expense
Other Income
7500 – District generated fund Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,572.77
Total Other Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,572.77
Other Expense
8500 – District Generated Fund Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,701.52
Total Other Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,701.52
Net Other Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,871.25
Net Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-13,132.16
Published February 7, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $122.09.
EAST PENNiNGTON CONSERVATiON
DiSTRiCT
BALANCE SHEET
AS OF JANUARY 1, 2012
ASSETS
Current Assets
Checking/Savings
1000.1 – First Interstate Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,698.26
1002 – Petty Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.82
1003 – Savings & Investment Accounts
1003.1 – B H Fed Credit U Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .617.26
Total 1003 – Savings & Investment Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617.26
1003.3 – First Interstate Bank Money Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103,166.21
1004 – Savings & Investment Account
1004.3 – BHFCU-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15,682.83
1004-4 – BHFCU- 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,148.51
1004-2 – BHFCU-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38,614.33
Total 1004 – Savings & Investment Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65,445.67
1402 – FEB-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30,818.32
1404 – FIB - 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17,893.91
Total Checking/Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229,646.45
Accounts Receivable
1200 – Accounts Receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-122.92
Total Accounts Receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-122.92
Other Current Assets
1499 – Undeposited funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26.50
Total Other Current Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26.50
Total Current Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229,550.03
Fixed Assets
1610 – Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,208.00
1611 – Building – No-Till Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,300.00
1620 – Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,300.00
1650 – No-Till Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33,228.00
1680 – Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,500.00
1690 – Office Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,221.00
Total Fixed Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56,757.00
Liabilities & Equity
Liabilities
Current Liabilities
Other Current Liabilities
2020 – Payroll Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360.38
2100 – Sales Tax Payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37.89
Total Other Current Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .398.27
Total Current Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .398.27
Total Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .398.27
Equity
3000 – Opening Bal Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71,292.79
3999 – Retained Earnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214,615.97
Total Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .285,908.76
Total Liabilities & Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .286,307.03
Published Feburary 7, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $65.84.
Pennington County Courant
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TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10.00 A.M.; THORSON HEREFORD BULL SALE:
12.00 P.M. (MT}. FEEDEF CATTLE TO FOLLOW
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EXPECTING J5UU HEAD
THORSON HEREFORDS - 30 HEFF TWO YEAF OLD DULLS
40 HEFF-INFLUENCED DLACK-HIDED DV HFF CLVS...........650=
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL,
ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
BUCHHOL2 & RISLOV - 250 DLK DV HFFS; FS,NI.........500-600=
MORRIS - 200 DLK STFS; FS .........................................700-800=
TRASK FAMILY - 200 DLK DV HFFS; FS, NI ..................600-650=
LONG & LONG - 200 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI ...............575-675=
BROWN - 195 CHAF X & A FEW DLK CLVS; FS,NI.................700=
JOHNSON - 175 FANCY DLK STFS & FEPLC. HFFS; FS, ALL
HFFS IN TOWN...............................................................600-700=
SCHUL2 - 150 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI .........................600-700=
NOTEBOOM CATTLE CO. - 150 STFS (1 LOAD DLK & 1 LOAD
FED ANC CHAFX} .................................................................750=
BLOOM - 125 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI............500-600=
DENNETT FANCH110 DLK FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI, ALL HFFS IN
TOWN .............................................................................600-650=
GOOD - 100 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI.............................650-750=
HAMAR - 100 DLK DV HFFS; FS, NI ...............................550-650=
HAMILL - 100 DLK & DWF DV HFFS; FS, NI ALL IN TOWN600-
750=
WELLER RANCH - 100 DLK & DWF DV HFFS; FS,NI .............700=
MILLER - 95 DLK & A FEW CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI ...........550-650=
D. HICKS - 90 FANCY FFONT END DV HFFS; FS, NI, ALL SIFED
DY FISSE UV DULLS, ALL IN TOWN................................650-750=
SWIFT - 80 DLK CLVS; FS,NI..........................................400-600=
MILLAR - 80 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS.......................................650=
TRASK - 60 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ........................................550-600=
SMITH & SONS - 55 CHAF X & DLK CLVS; FS ......................650=
BERRY - 50 DLK CLVS; FS,NI.........................................500-600=
WHITCHER - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI.........................................500=
RIGGINS - 25 DLK HFFS; FS..........................................550-650=
COUCH - 25 FED DV HFFS; FS,NI,ASV .................................600=
PAULSEN & PAULSEN - 25 DLK CLVS; FS .....................500-600=
BOOMSMA - 20 DLK CLVS; FS .......................................500-600=
BRUNSKILL - 15 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................500-550=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FE-
PLACEMENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF &
PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: F£B. S, 2DJS
B1g run o] Bred Co111e & We1gÞ-ups ]or our speo1o1 so1e
Þere Tuesdog. MorKe1 s1rong on o11 o1osses o] oo111e.
B1g Feeder & Rep1ooemen1 He1]er So1e ne×1 Tuesdog,
Feb. J21Þ u11Þ SDDD-SSDD Þeod. A1so TÞorson Here]ord
Bu11 So1e o1 noon.
BRED CATTLE:
GLEN RADWAY - MILESVILLE (DISPERSION)
15..........................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1386=........$1,660.00
7..................................DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD COWS 1283=........$1,620.00
12..........................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1440=........$1,600.00
28 .........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1410=........$1,400.00
33 ......................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1422=........$1,385.00
MONTY WILLIAMS - BIX ELDER
14..............................................DLK HFFS (APF 1} 1109=........$1,525.00
18..............................................DLK HFFS (APF 1} 1079=........$1,510.00
11...................................DLK & DWF HFFS (APF 1} 1116=........$1,475.00
JAMES GOOD - MARTIN
14.........................FED & DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1343=........$1,375.00
11..........................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1434=........$1,250.00
24.................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1332=........$1,110.00
DAN PETRIK - MARTIN
10....................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1507=........$1,350.00
3......................................DLK AI'D 3 YF OLD COWS 1417=........$1,685.00
13.................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1455=........$1,225.00
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG - KADOKA
30....................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1423=........$1,275.00
6...................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1289=........$1,110.00
EDDIE TAYLOR - CAPUTA
15....................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1395=........$1,275.00
26.................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1368=........$1,150.00
HOWARD WIESINGER - SHADEHILL
27.......................DLK & FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1339=........$1,085.00
WEIGHUPS:
TUCKER SMITH - QUINN
1.........................................................CHAF DULL 2115=...........$107.00
1.........................................................CHAF DULL 1735=...........$103.50
KRISTAL KEFFELER - ENNING
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1455=.............$88.00
GUY LEONARD ANKER - MURDO
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1425=.............$87.00
KIETH SMITH - QUINN
1.........................................................CHAF DULL 2070=...........$104.50
1.........................................................CHAF DULL 2375=...........$103.50
1.........................................................CHAF DULL 2060=...........$103.00
DEAN LIVERMONT - MARTIN
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1335=.............$87.00
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1340=.............$81.50
LIVERMONT BROTHERS - MARTIN
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1135=.............$86.50
2..........................................................DLK COWS 1273=.............$85.00
2..........................................................DLK COWS 1208=.............$84.75
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1395=.............$84.00
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1020=.............$83.00
1.....................................................DLK COWETTE 1050=.............$92.00
C & J RANCH - NORRIS
1...........................................................DLK DULL 1960=...........$105.00
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1400=.............$85.00
1.....................................................DLK COWETTE 1045=.............$95.00
1...........................................................DLK DULL 1780=...........$100.00
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1465=.............$82.00
TOM GRIMES - KADOKA
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1515=.............$85.00
DAHLKE RANCH - MURDO
5 ................................................FED & DLK HFFS 766=.............$130.50
26 ............................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 858=.............$109.50
4....................................................DLK COWETTES 1031=.............$91.50
5..........................................................DLK COWS 1294=.............$82.00
5........................................................CHAF COWS 1377=.............$80.00
JAMES GOOD - MARTIN
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1350=.............$84.50
1...........................................................DWF COW 1110=.............$83.50
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1270=.............$83.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
12 .............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1151=.............$84.25
3 ...............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1468=.............$81.00
RANKIN & SONS INC - DRAPER
3........................................................HEFF COWS 1567=.............$84.00
8........................................................HEFF COWS 1294=.............$82.75
1 .........................................................HEFF COW 1455=.............$82.50
1 .........................................................HEFF COW 1520=.............$80.00
9.......................................................HEFF HFFTS 949= ..............$92.50
JAMES ROCK - LONG VALLEY
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1475=.............$84.00
TOM WILLIAMS - PHILIP
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1540=.............$83.00
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1330=.............$82.00
BILLIE PARSONS - MILESVILLE
6..........................................................DLK COWS 1523=.............$83.00
10........................................................DLK COWS 1248=.............$81.25
2....................................................DLK COWETTES 1130=.............$90.50
2....................................................DLK COWETTES 1285=.............$87.50
15.......................................................DLK HFFTS 1101=.............$91.00
BART & JANICE PARSONS - MILESVILLE
30 .............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1427=.............$83.00
GLEN RADWAY - MILESVILLE
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1260=.............$82.50
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1425=.............$81.00
2 .........................................................DLK DULLS 1750=...........$105.00
JEFF WILLERT - BELVIDERE
1...........................................................DWF COW 1225=.............$82.50
JIM WHEELER - PHILIP
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1450=.............$82.00
TRENT MANECKE - MURDO
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1385=.............$82.00
1 ..........................................................DLK HFFT 795=.............$100.00
1 ..........................................................DLK HFFT 905= ..............$98.50
THOMAS SIMONS - WHITE OWL
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1530=.............$82.00
RITTBERGER BEEF INC - HERMOSA
2....................................................DLK COWETTES 1030=.............$98.00
1...........................................................DLK DULL 1725=.............$98.00
DAVE VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1365=.............$81.50
H & K RANCH - WALL
17 .............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1301=.............$81.00
JUSTIN WHEELER - PHILIP
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1350=.............$80.00
RICH SYLVA - MURDO
1 ...........................................................DLK COW 1565=.............$76.00
KAREN PINNEY - PHILIP
2....................................................DLK COWETTES 1023=.............$94.50
LAVERNE KOCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
2....................................................DLK COWETTES 1040=.............$90.00
GARY ALLISON - CREIGHTON
1 ............................................................DLK HFF 935=.............$119.00
MONTY WILLIAMS - BOX ELDER
3...........................................................DLK HFFS 1012=...........$113.50
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
1 ............................................................DLK HFF 1235=...........$103.00
Pennington County Courant • February 7, 2013 • Page 10
ATTEnTion:
2013 SEniorS & PArEnTS
The Pennington County Courant would like to use a
senior picture for the graduation pages that will run in
May. You may drop them off at the office
(212 4th Ave.), mail them to PO Box 435, Wall, SD
or email to annc@gwtc.net.
All pictures will be returned. Thank you, Anne Jo
The Looking Glass of Time
80 years ago…
The local High School quintette
scored two Journal cup victories in
weekend games with Midland and
Scenic High School. In their inva-
sion of the Midland court, the lo-
cals showed too much defense for
the easterners besides laying a
strong offensive game and they
meted the Midlanders a 21 to 5 de-
feat. In their Saturday night en-
gagement with Scenic, the Wall
boys started out strong and by
half-time had a 17 to 7 lead on the
invaders. But in the second half,
the cagers showed signs of weak-
ening and tired from their long
trek of the previous evening they
barely stove off a desperate Scenic
rally to eek out a 21 to 20 victory.
Floyd Ritzman is reported to be
improving. It was thought that he
had pneumonia and appendicitis
and he was taken to a Rapid City
hospital. Later it was learned that
he had pleurisy and pneumonia in-
stead of appendicitis.
The debate team met their first
defeat of the year Friday, February
3, when our affirmative team com-
posed of Kenneth Parkins and
James Ramey lost to Midland high
school, however on the same after-
noon our negative team composed
of James Allburn and Margaret
Noble won over Midlands’ affirma-
tive team.
70 years ago…
Mrs. Anna Sebade was painfully
burned about the face and arms
Sunday morning when her bottle
gas stove exploded. She was at-
tempting to re-light the oven when
the previously escaped gas ex-
ploded. Dr. Mills treated the in-
juries and stated that the burns
were first degree and should not
prove to be too serious.
The Quinn boys basketball team
beat Interior, Friday, at Interior,
17 to 15, in their first victory this
year.
Wall high school boys basketball
team went to Philip for a four team
tournament Tuesday, and were de-
feated in the first game by the
Philip team and won from Kadoka
in the evening match.
Three basketball teams from In-
terior met teams in their respec-
tive classes on the local floor, Mon-
day evening and were all defeated
by the Wall basketeers by large
scores. They were the boys high
school, the girls high school and
the grade school teams.
60 years ago…
BirTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Otto Eisenbraun at the hospital in
Wall, a girl, February 1.
The Wall school property, about
a block square, was sold Tuesday
to Ted Hustead for the bid price of
$5,310. The only other bid was for
$2,650. The property had been ap-
praised at $2,500.
BirTH: Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Henriksen, a daughter,
Mary Margaret, January 31 at the
Quinn hospital.
The Wall school district received
$2,061 from the State General
fund which is distributed on a
pupil-teacher basis. Other schools
and the amounts they received
were: Quinn, $1,631; Wasta,
$1,000; New Underwood, $2,183;
Rapid City, $61,286.
50 years ago…
The Quinn-Wall Independent
basketball team edged Martin in
the finals of the District Independ-
ents tournament held at Kadoka,
Sunday afternoon and evening. To
get to the finals the Quinn-Wall
team eliminate Philip by the slim
margin of one point. Martin won
from Kadoka, 78-57, to get into the
finals. Jim Parke, Corky Johnson
and Don Kelly were the top scorers
for the local boys.
As the Courant goes to press,
the Wall School Board is meeting
in special session to try to iron out
two big problems — (1) relieve the
over crowded condition in the Wall
school, the 1st grade in particular;
(2) and consider the financially dis-
tressed problems of the Quinn Dis-
trict. Last week, Supt. Vernice
Hildebrandt announced the split-
ting of the first grade and holding
half-day session for them. Some
parents objected so at a meeting of
the Methodist Church members,
the school was given permission to
use the church basement for a
classroom. Tonight’s school board
meeting will decide if this room
will be used. The Quinn problem is
much more serious, and an answer
will be hard to find. The point has
apparently been reached where ex-
penditures for the current school
year has reached the estimated in-
come of the District. So, if true,
warrants issued between now and
June 30 would be illegal, and
Board members could be held li-
able for their payments. Further-
more, it has been stated that any-
one knowingly accepting an illegal
warrant would be assisting in an
illegal act.
Wall firemen were called Friday
morning to the Hill Crest Court
where an electrical short had
caused a smoldering fire in a par-
tition in one of the cabins. No dam-
age was reported.
BirTH: Mr. and Mrs. Bill For-
tune are the proud parents of a
new baby daughter, born at the
Quinn hospital January 31. The
little Miss has been named Mary
Lou.
40 years ago…
A break-in occurred at Kelly’s
Motel in Wall which had been
closed for the winter months, ac-
cording to Norman Klingbile. The
time is not exactly known. Taken
from two of the rooms which were
broken into were two TV sets.
These were portable 17” sets in
oak and white finish. Unsuccessful
attempts were made to break into
four other rooms of the motel. Wall
Meat Processing was broken into
Monday evening. Taken was a .22
pistol and $5 to $10 in change.
A Jack Pot Roping was held last
Sunday at the Milton Trask ranch
arena. Winners in the first round
were Milton Trask and Larry Ru-
land; Roger Fortune and Bob
Helms. In the second round, win-
ners were Roger Fortune and Scott
Shoun and Scott Pippert and
Robert Fortune. In the third
round, Casey Trask and Scott
Shoun, Scott Pippert and Bob
Helms. and Roger Fortune and
Larry Ruland; Todd Trask and
Greg Shearer, Casey Trask and
Bob Helms were winners.
The Public Utilities Commission
has notified the Golden West Tele-
phone Coop. that the One-Party
rate application for the Creighton
and Wall exchanges has been ap-
proved. The Cooperative can-
vassed members, stated manager
Don Paulsen, in both exchanges
last December requesting their
opinion of the new system wide
one-party system. They approved
the rate monthly local service at
$6.50 for residents; $7.50 for com-
bination (farm-ranch); and $10.00
for business.
30 years ago…
Wall’s one-act play cast returned
home Saturday, February 5 from
state competition with a Superior
trophy for the presentation of
“Magic Theater”. The Superior was
one of only eight Superiors won by
Class “B” schools at the three-day
event held in Sioux Falls. The fol-
lowing students also won Superior
acting awards: Kathy Poppe, Su-
perior leading actress; Lori Al-
ishouse, ensemble; Denise Gunn,
ensemble; Mike Carlbom, ensem-
ble; Rhonda Lurz, ensemble; Lois
Stverak, ensemble; and Margaret
Sautter, ensemble. This is the first
State Superior ever won by a play
from Wall High School.
Wall Eagles went through a
tough 1-1 week in high school bas-
ketball, as they got back into the
win column on Tuesday, February
1, with a 68-61 victory over the
Philip Scotties. Unfortunately, the
Eagles were unable to run their
victory string to two games, as St.
Martin’s handed the Eagles a 59-
52 loss on Friday, February 4.
The Eagles qualified seven out
of ten wrestlers at the District 8
wrestling finals on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 5, in Custer. The seven now
advance to the Regional tourna-
ment to be held this Saturday, Feb-
ruary 12, here in Wall. Those qual-
ifying for Wall were: Shannon
Burke (98 lb.), placed 4th along
with Eddie Dartt (105), Shaun Ru-
land (112) placed 3rd, and both
Jim Eisenbraun (138) and Kevin
Wilson (145) placed 4th in their
weight division. Two Wall
wrestlers were champions at the
Districts: Barry Severson, Heavy-
weight and Marty Huether at 119
lbs. Huether broke Wall’s existing
school record of 101 career varsity
victories during the finals of the
district tournament with his
192nd career victory. He is Wall’s
only undefeated wrestler with a
17-0 record.
20 years ago…
On Sunday afternoon, February
7, 1993, the Wall Community Cen-
ter held within its arms, the music,
voices, laughter and spirit of amaz-
ing musical talent, provided by
area performers as they gave their
hearts to the cause fo the East
Pennington Transit Bus. The
“Prairie Memories” show is pre-
sented annually to raise funds for
the East Pennington Transit Bus.
The bus makes rides accessible
and affordable for the elderly of
our community. Funds raised from
the show were $468.50 and will be
used toward the purchase of a new
Transit Bus in three to four years.
The State One-Act Play Contest
was held in Vermillion on Friday,
February 5th at the Lee Center for
Fine Arts on the University of
South Dakota campus. The Wall
team, did an outstanding job in the
state contest in Vermillion with
the group receiving three individ-
ual outstanding actor awards.
Those awards went to MeLisa Bar-
nett, Misty Keyser and Rachel
Kjerstad.
On February 6, 1993, the Wall
Wrestlers traveled to Onida for the
Invitational tournament. The
wrestlers brought home their sec-
ond team trophy of the season. The
Eagles were impressive with five
of their nine wrestlers champs, one
second place, and one third place.
Most of these matches were won
by pins which gave the Eagles an
impressive score. The five champi-
ons were Sean Patterson, Ryan
Patterson, Chris Lurz, Dustin
Lurz and Matthew Brucklacher.
Dain Patterson was injured in the
finals and Chad Eisenbraun came
off his injury to place third.
10 years ago…
This past week has been a busy
one for the Wall/Kadoka Grap-
plers, finishing second at the
Newell Invitational, wining all
three duals at Pine Ridge and get-
ting fourth at Sully Buttes on Sat-
urday.
Defense played a big roll in the
Wall Vs. Midland game held Janu-
ary 31, Coach Mark Ammann said.
Rebounds were also a key to their
victory of 75 to 59.

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