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Pennington Co. Courant, February 21, 2013

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Number 8
Volume 108
February 21, 2013
by Laurie Hindman
Badlands National Park Stew-
ard program was the topic for the
guest speakers at the Wall Bad-
lands Area Chamber of Commerce
meeting.
Park Ranger Alison Shoup and
Wall School Science Teacher Pandi
Pittman are utilizing a National
Park Foundation Grant to connect
parks with local teachers and stu-
dents.
Pittman has implemented the
many park resources into every
science class that she teaches at
the Wall School. She explained the
different programs and her future
ideas of expanding on her class les-
sons.
Wall City Mayor Dave Hahn an-
nounced the Eastern Pennington
County Ambulance District will
hold their annual meeting on
Thursday, March 21 at the Wall
Community Center at 7:00 p.m.
Hahn also noted that municipal
election will be held this year. If
anyone is interested in running for
the city council, petitions can be
picked up at the Wall Finance Of-
fice on March 1 and returned on
March 26. Ward 1 - Pete Dunker,
Ward 2 - Mike Anderson and Ward
3 - Bill Leonard’s positions are up
for reelection.
Superintendent of the Wall
School Dennis Rieckman related
there will be no school on Monday,
February 18. Winter sports will be
entering into districts and regions
and the One Act Play came home
with a superior rating from state.
Badlands National Park Super-
intendent Eric Brunnemann an-
nounced that visitation for the
park in January 2013 was 12,957
visitors which is a 31.13 percent
increase over last year. Brunne-
mann also informed chamber
members how the word “seques-
tration” relates to the parks
budget and how cut backs will ef-
fect them.
Duane Boback who is filling in
Wall High School senior Kailey
Rae Sawvell was featured as part
of KEVN Black Hills FOX’s Rising
Star of the West scholarship con-
test Tuesday, February 19th on
Black Hills FOX News at 9:00.
Sawvell qualified for the contest
by submitting a short video of her-
self to KEVN Black Hills FOX.
Sawvell is one of the semi-final-
ists who will be seen through
March 1st. Her one minute com-
mentary was aired and then
placed on www.blackhillsfox.com
for viewers to watch and rate.
One competitor from each week
will then advance to the final
round in May.
The winner from that group will
Wall senior was featured in Rising
Star of the West contest
receive a $4,000 college scholar-
ship, with a total of $7,500 in
scholarship money awarded from
KEVN Black Hills FOX and First
Interstate Bank.
The 2007 Rising Star of the West
winner was Shad Christman from
Lemmon High School. Kaitlyn
Hemmingson from Spearfish High
School was the 2008 winner. An-
nelise Ewing of Spearfish High
School won the 2009 competition.
Caila Brennan of St. Thomas More
was the 2010 winner. Janesa
Bakeberg of Spearfish High School
won in 2011. Jordon Barthel of
Lead-Deadwood High School was
the 2012 winner.
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of
Commerce holds February meeting
for Ruben Andrade with the Min-
uteman Missile National Historic
Site noted that visitation is up 44
percent and they may also have to
cut back on some services.
Nadia Eisenbraun with the For-
est Service said they have open
temporary positions within their
entity.
Golden West news was given by
Greg Olson. Scholarships for high
school seniors need to returned by
March 15. They will be airing high
school sports on Channel 2 and 70.
Wall subscribers to their cable pro-
gramming will be receiving letters
informing them on the digital con-
version boxes that will be needed
to receive programming.
Dick Johnson from WREA
stated they are preparing for their
audit and had no outages during
the recent snow storm. Operation
Roundup applications are due
back to their office by February 28.
Black Hills Federal Credit
Union manager Robyn Miller
noted their scholarship applica-
tions are due back by mid-March.
Carol Hoffman with the Country
Cupboard requested canned soup
and saltine crackers for the pantry.
Wall Neighborworks council still
has the house for sale noted Hahn.
Gina Ferris with Black Hills
Badlands and Lakes reported the
South Dakota vacation guides will
be out shortly and the Road Trip
Show will be returning to Min-
neapolis to a ball game.
President Mary Williams went
over the announcements:
March 5 - Chamber Board of Di-
rectors meeting, Wall Community
Center at 7:30 a.m.
March 7- Wall City Council
meeting at the Wall Community
Center at 6:30 p.m.
April 12 - Wall Badlands Area
Chamber of Commerce annual
meeting at the Wall Community
Center.
With no other business Williams
adjourned the meeting.
by Laurie Hindman
Wall Health Services held their
annual meeting on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 9 at the Wall Drug Store.
President Brett Blasius called
the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m.
Blasius read the certification of
the annual meeting and then in-
troduced guests, medical staff and
the medical board. With 26 mem-
bers registered a quorum was
present for the meeting.
Reading of the previous years
annual meeting was approved.
Blasius then gave the 2012 Fis-
cal Report. Net assets in 2012 were
down from 2011 due to accumu-
lated depreciation and account re-
ceivables being a little high and as
Blasius noted, is the nature of the
business.
Blasius then gave a report on
the clinic. 2012 has been a chal-
lenging year and the board is ex-
cited about 2013. Dave Custis who
had a major health issue is back
again full-time.
They are in the process of train-
ing for the Electronic Medical
Record program. This program al-
lows the clinic to stay modern and
provide top-notch medical care.
Their home health program is in
its fourth year with Jana Biel-
maier being the home health
provider.
Blasius also went on to say,
“Wall Health Services is the only
free standing clinic in South
Dakota which does not have a hos-
pital, nursing home or assisted liv-
ing center to help them out finan-
cially. We do have a management
agreement with Regional Health
Systems who does the payroll,
budget and cost reporting.”
Dave Custis addressed the
members and gave a brief talk on
his past medical issues and is very
appreciative of all those who were
supportive and sent prayers while
he was ill.
Blasius then asked Todd Trask
who is the chairman of the nomi-
nating committee to come forward
with nominations. Norman Geigle,
Teddy Hustead and Marty
Williams who where once again re-
elected to the board.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned for another
year.
Wall Health Services
hosts annual meeting
by Laurie Hindman
Entrepreneurship class students
Ridge Sandal and Thomas Van
Osdol came before the Wall School
Board with a request to begin a
business within the Wall School.
The class is learning the funda-
mentals of starting a business and
running it.
They asked the board to con-
sider allowing them to put gumball
and candy machines in the school.
Their reasoning behind
this adventure is to learn every as-
pect of how a business is run and
what it takes to run it.
If they make enough money they
would like to start a scholarship
fund for students who take the
class.
Board Member Mary Williams
was not to keen on putting candy
machines in the school.
Superintendent Dennis Rieck-
man asked the class to research
some healthy options. The issue
was tabled until the March meet-
ing so the class can look into differ-
ent options.
A technology report was given by
Randall Poste for the Big White
School.
Poste related different options
for teaching long distance learning
classes to Big White students who
will be starting the seventh grade
class this upcoming fall.
Parents from the Big White,
Wall Teacher Pandi Pittman and
Poste related their opinions on
what method would be the best,
Rieckman said, “The board has
three options: Keep the school as it
is, Make the school either K-5th or
K-6th or K-8 and provide technol-
ogy.”
He also noted these are chal-
lenging issues that the board
needs to think about and make.
Nathaniel Traveny who recently
moved to Wall, is a personal
trainer and would like to use the
Powerhouse to provide training to
anyone who is interested.
He will provide insurance and
10 percent of what he charges will
be paid to the school.
Rieckman has contacted the
school attorney who provided a list
of what will be required by Tra-
veny.
Rieckman informed Traveny
they would discuss his proposal
during executive session and make
a decission on what they deemed
as the best.
Elementary Principal Chuck
Sykora announced Kindergarten
screening will be held on Friday,
April 5. Please call the school to
make an appointment.
Parent/Teacher conferences
went very well with 90 percent of
parents showing up.
Business Manager Niki Mohr
related, there are two board posi-
tions up for reelection this year.
Petitions can be picked up in her
office on Friday, March 1 and re-
turned by March 25.
Rieckman gave an update on at-
tendance which is sitting at 95.9
percent.
Track and Golf rules were
handed out for board members to
take home and read. A track sched-
ule was also provided to them.
Head Custodian Dan Hauk and
Rieckman have been working on a
five year Capital Outlay plan. The
board may want to think about re-
placing the Dodge Stratus and the
bleachers at the Powerhouse.
Handicap accessible doors will be
put in the school. Rieckman said,
they are looking at different secu-
rity issues for the school. Williams
asked if bullet proof glass should
be installed in the doors. Rieck-
man will look into the cost of hav-
ing them installed.
A motion was made and ap-
proved to enter into executive ses-
sion for the purpose of discussing
student issues and personnel, ac-
cording to SDCL 1-25-2.
After executive session the
board went over the second read-
ing of the Volunteer Policy and
Staff Development Policy.
Nathaniel Traveny’s request
was tabled until the March meet-
ing.
The board approved the agenda
and consent agenda, for the min-
utes of the January 9, 2013 board
meeting and February claims.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned.
Wall School Board learns about
technology for Big White School
Pandi Pittman explaining to the chamber how the Badlands Na-
tional Park Steward program and National Park foundation grant
are implemented into her classes at Wall School.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
by Laurie Hindman
The Eastern Pennington County
Ambulance District met in the
Wall Community Center meeting
room on Thursday, February 14 at
7:00 p.m.
Elden Helms and Norman
Eisenbraun were absent from the
meeting.
President Wally Hoffman called
the meeting to order with Car-
olynn Anderson and Jem Kjerstad
present.
A letter asking townships for do-
nation was reviewed and approved
to send out.
Anderson gave an update on
Quickbooks purchase. She bought
the program and then found out it
wasn’t compatible to her computer
and returned the program. Ander-
son informed the board she is fine
with doing payroll through
Quicken. Hoffman said if it be-
comes a hassle the board will do
something about it.
A motion to pay bills was ap-
proved.
Anderson noted that the grant
for the keyless entry system and
the ambulance building has been
deposited into the checking ac-
count.
The board agreed to have the
WREA bill paid through autopay.
A motion was approved to have
Dave Hahn’s name removed from
the ambulance savings account.
John Kitterman with the ambu-
lance service informed the board
that Freshmen Impact will be held
on April 24 at the Douglas School.
Freshmen students from Wall,
Philip and Kadoka will also take
part in the activity. An ambulance
from Wall along with the Wall Vol-
unteer Fire Department will at-
tend. Kitterman said, they hand
out t-shirts during the event which
will cost between $120 - 130.
PCC is now doing the billing for
the ambulance service.
The annual meeting will be held
on Thursday, March 21 at the Wall
Community Center meeting room.
Election will be held for two, three
year terms.
With no other business Hoffman
adjourned the meeting
by Laurie Hindman
Public Works Director Jeff Clark
received a call around 10:40 p.m.
Thursday, February 14 from the
well computer monitoring system
informing him the main water
tower was losing water.
Clark went looking for the cause
and found water bubbling up from
under the sidewalk and also run-
ning down the sidewalk in front of
the Wall Drug Store. The main
water line running into the store
was immediately shut off.
Upon further inspection it was
discovered the water leak had de-
posited four feet of water and mud
in the older basement under the
main portion of the Wall Drug.
Clark and Wall City Employee
EPCAD to hold annual
meeting in March
Fireline breaks: Floods Wall Drug basement
Garrett Bryan used a sludge pump
which pumps 500 gallons of water
a minute to empty out the Wall
Drug basement. They finished
pumping around 2:30 a.m. Friday,
February 15.
Mayor Dave Hahn who received
a call at 11:02 p.m. on Thursday
night said. “Water filled the old
part of the basement upto the old
dishroom.”
Hahn noted there was some
stuff stored in the old basement
and guessed the leak to be around
100,000 gallons of water.
Site Works Specialist who had
installed the fireline during last
year’s main street project and
CETEC Engineer Jeb Rieb were on
the job Friday morning. It was
found the fireline going into the
Wall Drug had broken or came
apart causing the flood.
Rieb stated, “It was an isolated
break and the water should be
turned back on to the main portion
of the Wall Drug by noon on Fri-
day.”
The Mall and Pharmacy were
open for business since the base-
Site Works Specialist work on tearing up the sidewalk in front
of the Wall Drug Store. A fireline had broke and flood the old
basement of the store with thousands of gallons of water.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
ment under that portion of the
business was not damaged.
The sidewalk in front of the drug
store was torn apart to find the
fireline break and will have to be
replaced. Hahn thought they
would have to wait on pouring a
new sidewalk until the weather
warmed up a bit.
Out on the African Savannah,
there are some things everyone
just knows are true: meerkats are
social, lions have pride, hippos are
big, and zebras have stripes--all
zebras except Xena that is!
Xena was born without stripes,
and to make matters worse, she
spells her name with an “X” not a
“Z” like zebras should. It’s just too
different! It’s just not right! What
is a zebra without its stripes?
Xena struggles with who she re-
ally is as she listens to others tell
her who she is supposed to be.
How can you be comfortable
with your place in the world if you
don’t know who you are? As she
meets character after character
(and boy do we mean characters!)
she sees that everyone has unique
attributes and captivating quirks!
Life on the Savannah is an ex-
otic, electric dream, but the Savan-
nah of our dreams is not always
peaches and cream.
There are tough issues of self-
image, friendships and peer pres-
sure that we all must face.
In the end the truth is that “you
just gotta be you,” and it never
ever hurts to have a sense of
Wall Children’s Theatre to
present “X is for Zebra”
humor about life.
Wall Children’s Theatre, West
River Electric, the South Dakota
Arts Council, and Dakota Players
invite everyone to an afternoon
and evening of fun and entertain-
ment when Wall’s young talent
present “X is for Zebra” Friday,
March 1 at 3:00 and 7:00 p.m., at
The Power House.
The performance is the culmina-
tion of a unique learning experi-
ence for up to 54 children from
Wall School District.
This special weeklong event
gives children a chance to learn
what it’s like to take part in a pro-
fessionally produced stage musi-
cal, from auditions and rehearsals
through the final performance.
This residency in Wall is made
possible by Wall Children’s The-
atre with support provided by the
State of South Dakota, through
the Department of Tourism and
State Development, the National
Endowment for the Arts and Wall
School District, West River Elec-
tric, Motel 6, Red Rock Restau-
rant, Dairy Queen, Subway, Wall
Chamber of Commerce, and Wall
Drug.
School & Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
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Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
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Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
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year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
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Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
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and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
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Telephone: (605)279-2565
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Pennington County Courant • February 14, 2013 • Page 2
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College briefs
From the Senators Desk
By District 30
Senator Bruce Rampelberg
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
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From the Floor
By District 30
Representative Mike Vericho
The South Dakota Farm Bureau
is hosting a series of meeting
across the state this month for
farmers and ranchers to learn
more about the EPA’s Oil Spill Pre-
vention, Control and Countermea-
sure (SPCC) Program, which re-
quires compliance by May 10 of
this year.
Two representatives from the
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency’s Region 8 office in Denver
will lead the meetings: Rebecca
Perrin, EPA Region 8 Agriculture
Advisor, and Jim Peterson, EPA
Region 8 SPCC Inspector.
According to the U.S. EPA,
farms or ranches that store more
than 1,320 total U.S. gallons of oil
or oil products in aboveground con-
tainers sized 55 gallons or larger,
or more than 42,000 U.S. gallons
in completely buried containers,
and could reasonably expected to
discharge oil to waters of the U.S.,
are required to have an SPCC
Plan.
EPA requires an SPCC Plan to
be in place by May 10, 2013. Read
the EPA backgrounder here with
full details on the SPCC program
and plan requirements: http://ww
w.sdfbf.org/files/pages/287/EPA%2
0SPCC%20Backgrounder.pdf
The schedule for the SPCC
meetings is as follows: (all times
are local)
•February 25 in Sturgis, 3:00
p.m. at the Meade County Exten-
sion Building Community Room.
•February 26 in Wall, 10:00
a.m. at the Community Build-
S.D. Farm Bureau to host series of
EPA meetings on (SPCC) Program
ing on Main Street.
•February 26 in Pierre, 4:00
p.m. at the Capitol Building Base-
ment Room A (plus 6 DDN loca-
tions).
•February 27 in Redfield, 10:00
a.m. at the Spink County Court-
house Community Room.
•February 27 in Mitchell, 3:00
p.m. at Central Electric Coopera-
tive Building (I-90 Exit 325).
•February 28 in Platte, 10:00
a.m. at the Lyric Theater.
•February 28 in Yankton, 3:00
p.m. at the Yankton County Exten-
sion Office.
•March 1 in Lennox, 10:00 a.m.
at Pizza Ranch.
The meeting at 4:00 p.m. Cen-
tral Time on February 26 will be
broadcast over the Digital Dakota
Network (DDN) from Pierre to
these locations:
•Aberdeen, NSU’s Beulah
William Library Room 117
•Brookings, SDSU’s Pugsley
SPC Room 203
•Madison, DSU’s Tech Class-
room Building Room 103
•Rapid City, SDSM&T’s Class-
room Building Room 109
•Sioux Falls, SF University
Center’s Main Building Room 145
•Vermillion, USD’s Delzell Edu-
cation Center Room 203
•Watertown, LATI’s Main Build-
ing Room 128 Door 1B
There is no cost to attend these
informational meetings, no pre-
registration is required, and you
do not need to be a member of
Farm Bureau to attend.
My senior project
“Off Road Go - Kart.” Nathan Patterson used a 4-wheeler and a
Honda 450 engine to build this Go - Kart which can go up to 90
mph (need seat belts to do that.) Patterson said, “It seemed like
fun but I have 130 hours into my project. He plans to attend
SDSM&T to study mechanical engineering.
Wall Senior Maddie Bauer served as Legislative Page for Mike
Verchio. Bauer very much enjoyed working at the legislature, ex-
cept for the one time when Ryder Wilson made off with her iPod.
She gained many friendships and valuable experience on how
our government is run. Buaer plans on attending Dakota Wes-
leyan in Mitchell to pursue a nursing degree. She is the grand-
daughter of Dave and Arla Olson of Wall. ~Courtesy Photo
Bauer serves as page for Verchio
As you know, I generally do not
like Resolutions but, HCR 1006 is
important for both the State and
Nation.
It petitioned the President and
Secretary of State to authorize the
Keystone XL pipeline which I
whole heartedly supported. Every
session we have to back fill the
wildfire suppression funds and
this time it cost you 4.2 million dol-
lars to pay for the 2012 fire season.
Hopefully the Good Lord will
show us some mercy during the
2013 fire season.
In State Affairs this week, I sup-
ported an important economic de-
velopment initiative that com-
bined two bills 1161 and 1196 that
provide many more opportunities
for small towns and businesses to
get assistance for startups and
growth.
I also supported, to no avail,
1250 which was a States Rights
Bill that sent a message to the
Feds to keep out of our affairs even
though it was unenforceable.
Although it is not on the floor
yet, I co-sponsored and strongly
support SB 156 that creates more
avenues for townships to allow cit-
izens of isolated developments to
impose an assessment on them-
selves to improve their roads. SB
27 the appropriations for the Vet-
erans Home has not come to the
floor yet but I will obviously be a
vocal supporter of this bill.
I have one issue that popped up
in regards to Purple Heart recipi-
ent license plates. The way the
statute is worded it can only go to
a veteran defined as not on active
duty.
An active duty soldier who was
re-enlisted three times was denied
the plate. The reasoning was that
we did not anticipate any conflict
or war that would last for more
than a decade.
I am working on a complete re-
view with the Department of Vet-
eran Affairs and Deb Hilmen at
the Department of Revenue so that
next session we can make all of
those special plates for service
members consistent and also be
able to recognize the sacrifices of
our active duty service men and
women.
Rep Mike Verchio
Rep.verchio@state.sd.us
mjverchio@aol.com
Cellphone- (605)391-5093
Hall Phone-(605)574-2466
Home Address- P.O. Box 205 Hill
City, SD 57401
This has been another week of
passionate testimony on a number
of bills.
One of them was SB 171 which
attempted to address cruelty to
dogs, cats and horses.
Numerous atrocities against
pets were graphically described
and pictures circulated. It makes
you wonder how anyone could be
so calloused and cruel. The intent
of the bill was to increase the
penalty from a Class 1 Misde-
meanor to a Class 6 Felony. The
bill was defeated however an im-
proved bill that ties into existing
codified law will no doubt be pre-
sented next year.
Those of you with commercial
drivers license may be interested
in SB 44.
This bill has gathered reluctant
support from legislator due to a
$12 mill penalty in loss of federal
highway funds if S.D., does not
adopt it. Drivers caught texting
while driving in S.D., or any other
state could lose their license under
codified law found in chapter 32-
12A.
A number of you have sent me
emails concerning the US Second
amendment.
I would encourage you to look at
SB 207 which clearly states the po-
sition of South Dakota regarding
gun ownership and rights to self-
defense.
It definitively prohibits all in-
fringement by federal agencies.
Further it directs the Office of the
Attorney General to be vigilant
and proactive in protecting our
South Dakota rights.
Octane labeling has passed the
house and will be heard in the Sen-
ate.
It avoids controversy by requir-
ing all 85 octane gasoline to be la-
beled appropriately at all stages of
production, distribution and at the
pumps. Kind of an easy answer to
an issue that caused so much
ruckus several months ago.
Please contact me with your
comments and questions.
My e-mail in Pierre is sen.ram-
pelberg@state.sd.us and my cell-
phone is 605-390-2165
State awards $278,000
to 23 rural hospitals
Twenty-three rural hospitals in
South Dakota will receive a total of
$278,037 in federal funding for
projects to improve patient access,
reduce medication errors, reduce
hospital readmissions, and im-
prove operations.
The federal Medicare Rural Hos-
pital Flexibility Program funding
comes through the South Dakota
Department of Health. Over the
last 12 years, rural hospitals in
South Dakota have received more
than $4,078,000 in direct awards
through the program.
Hospitals must be Medicare-cer-
tified as critical access to be eligi-
ble for the funds. Critical access
hospitals receive a higher
Medicare reimbursement rate and
are eligible for federal funding for
improvement projects. There are
currently 38 critical access hospi-
tals in South Dakota.
The funding helps rural hospi-
tals make direct, positive impacts
on patient care and health out-
comes, noted an official from the
Platte Health Center – Avera, one
of the facilities receiving funds.
“Without the additional supple-
mental financial assistance we re-
ceive from this program, we would
not have been able to implement
the programs and processes we
currently have in place,” said Jody
Sternberg, RN, and Director of Pa-
tient Care Services at Platte. “This
program makes a difference for
critical access hospitals.”
Sustaining essential healthcare
services in rural and underserved
areas is a key objective of the De-
partment of Health’s 2020 Initia-
tive.
Hospitals receiving Medicare
Rural Hospital Flexibility Pro-
gram in the Wall area are:
•Philip, Philip Health Services -
$13,135.
The following Western Dakota
Tech students from the Wall area
have been named to WDT’s Dean’s
List for the fall 2012 semester. To
qualify for the Dean’s List, stu-
dents must earn a grade point av-
erage of 3.5 or higher.
•Anna Kitterman, Practical
Nursing
•Kandi McMurtrey, Accounting
Western Dakota Tech is the only
technical institute that serves the
western South Dakota region.
WDT offers more than 25 pro-
grams in a variety of fields, includ-
ing Business and Computers, Con-
struction Trades, Health Services,
Legal and Public Services, Manu-
facturing and Mechanical Trades,
and Science and Technology. More
than 96 percent of WDT’s most re-
cent graduates are working, con-
tinuing their education, or serving
in the military, and 90 percent re-
main in South Dakota.
Email us with your news item or photo to courant @ gwtc.net
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................20-8
Shad’s Towing ...........................18-10
Dakota Bar................................16-12
Petersen’s ..................................12-16
Badland’s Auto..........................10-14
Rockers........................................8-20
Hightlights:
Jerry Mooney.........2-7 split; 196/555
Carl Brown ..................203 clean/533
Bryan Buxcel ...............187 clean/495
Connie Schlim......................5-7 split
Matt Reckling.......................5-7 split
Jackie Schull ......................3-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor................................18-2
Peoples Market ...........................13-7
G&A Trenching...........................12-8
Philip Health Service ...............10-10
Kennedy Impl ...........................10-10
Bear Auto ....................................7-13
George’s Welding ........................5-15
Kadoka Tree Service...................5-15
Highlights:
Earl Park.......................218, 224/611
Tony Gould ............................210/575
Cory Boyd..............................207/539
Steve Varner.................................537
James Mansfield..........................523
Fred Foland..................................520
Tyler Gartner ........................200/516
Norm Buxcel .......................5-10 split
Johnny Wilson....................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
(standing at the end of week 23)
Invisibles...............................24.5-7.5
Cutting Edge Salon ..................22-10
State Farm..........................19.5-12.5
Bowling Belles ....................13.5-18.5
Jolly Ranchers ......................9.5-22.5
Highlights:
Vonda Hamill ........................167/430
Debbie Gartner ............................162
Charlene Kjerstad........................155
Karen Foland........................5-6 split
Kay Kroetch..........................4-5 split
Jen Schriever........................4-5 split
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................19-5
Morrison’s Haying ....................14-10
Wall Food Center ......................13-11
Dorothy’s Catering....................13-11
Hildebrand Concrete ................12-12
Just Tammy’s ............................11-13
First National Bank ...................9-15
Chiefie’s Chicks...........................5-19
Highlights:
Rachel Kjerstad.....................194/490
Jessica Wagner.............................130
Marlis Petersen.....5-7 split; 186/488
Lois Porch.....................................489
Amy Morrison ..............................181
Kathy Arthur................................171
Tena Slovek ..........................2-7 split
MaryLynn Crary ..................4-5 split
Sandee Gittings..................3-10 split
Shar Moses .........................3-10 split
Thursday Men
The Steakhouse ..........................20-4
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................16-8
O’Connell Const ..........................15-9
WEE BADD...............................12-12
A&M Laundry.............................9-15
West River Pioneer Tanks..........9-15
Dakota Bar..................................8-16
McDonnell Farms .......................7-17
Highlights:
Jay McDonnell .............................211
Neal Petersen..................203 x 2/561
Jan Bielmaier...............................548
Andrew Reckling................203 clean
Rick Coyle...........................192 clean
Doug Hauk ........................4-7-9 split
Randy Boyd .......................2-5-7 split
John Heltzel ......................4-5-7 split
Alvin Pearson .....................3-10 split
Scott Brech ...........................2-7 split
Matt Reckling.......................2-7 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service................20-8
Lee & the Ladies.........................19-9
Roy’s Repair ..............................17-11
Cristi’s Crew .............................15-13
King Pins...................................10-18
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Aaron Richardson .................190/546
Alvin Pearson........................195/498
Kelly Fees..............................174/496
Theresa Miller.......................176/479
Cory Boyd..............................204/481
Roy Miller.....................................188
Angel Nemec .........................163/422
Tanner Norman..................5-10 split
Email us with your news
item or photo to
courant@gwtc.net
Area News
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013• Page 3
Need a gift idea for that hard-to-buy someone? How about a gift that keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the Pennington County Courant.Call to start your subscription gift! (605) 279-2565
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
SampIe Our
SpecIaIs DaIIy
Luncb
SpecIaIs
Feb. 21 - Feb. 2?
Tbursday, February 21
·Porl CIo¡ Dinncr
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallc . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Dccf Darlcy Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
FrIday, February 22
·Scafood Plaiicr w/Frics & Colcslaw . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Clan CIowdcr & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Saturday, February 23
·CIiclcn Dacon Swiss w/Curlcy Frics. . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Poiaio Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Sunday, February 24
·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci. . . . . . . . . . . $?.39
·CIild's Drcalfasi Duffci (12 & undcr} . . . . . . . $3.S9
Scrvcd 7.00 io 10.30 a.n.
·Foasi Dccf Dinncr
or Hoi Dccf SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·CIiclcn Dun¡ling Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Monday, February 2S
·Dronco Durgcr w/Onion Fings (Lciiucc, Tonaio, Onion,
Dacon & Pc¡¡crJacl CIccsc} . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Vcgciallc Dccf Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Tuesday, February 26
·CIiclcn Fricd Sical
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallcs . . . . . . . $6.29
·Tonaio Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
Wednesday, February 2?
·Indian Taco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Han & Dcan Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
279-2175 · Wall, SD
BreakIast: Mon. - Sat.
2 Eggs & Toasi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.19
2 Pancalcs & Sausagc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.19
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
February 22-23-24-25:
LincoIn(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
March 1-2-3-4:
Warm Bodies (PG-13)
March 8-9-10-11:
Identity Thief (R)
The NUHS Alumni Association
will be presenting three (3) $1000
scholarship awards to qualified
seniors.
The applications are in the office
at the New Underwood High
School.
Alumni news; This is the year
for the ALL-SCHOOL reunion.
Mark your calendars for August
31, 2013, the Saturday before
Labor Day.
Cards will be mailed to all New
Underwood High School Alumni
New Underwood High School senior
scholarship awards and alumni news
Members in April.
Addresses: We are having diffi-
culty keeping addresses current.
This cost us extra money for mail-
ing.
Please: If you or anyone in your
family has moved or changed ad-
dresses.
Please notify Dennis Fernau at
754-6244 or Norma Pellegrin at
754-6708, or drop a card to NUHS
Alumni Asssociation, P.O. Box 4,
New Underwood, S.D., 57761.
BHSU announces dean’s list
The Office of Academic Affairs at
Black Hills State University has
released the dean’s list for the fall
2012 semester.
A total of 737 students main-
tained a grade point average of 3.5
or above while taking at least 12
credit hours to be named to the list
this semester.
Students who made the list from
the Wall area are:
•Samantha Nelson, Creighton
•Colby Smith, Quinn
•Skyler Anders, Wall
•Grant Holub, Wall
•Carmen Moschell, Wall
High School
Class A Wrestling
Live from Watertown
SDPB.org – Information, photos
and awards, February 22 - 23 -
http://sports.sdpb.org/. SDPB1 Tel-
evision – Top matches - Saturday,
February 23, 4:00 - 10:30 p.m. (3-
9:30 MT)
High School
Class B Wrestling
Live from Aberdeen
SDPB.org – Information, photos
and awards, February 22 - 23 -
http://sports.sdpb.org/. SDPB2 Tel-
evision – Top matches - Saturday,
February 23, 4:00-10:30 p.m. (3-
9:30 MT)
South Dakota High School
by Libbi Sykora
“Don’t make me use my librarian
voice!”
Let’s be honest… how many of
us were afraid of the cranky old li-
brarian we were destined to en-
counter on our ventures to the li-
brary as a child? I’m guessing that
the majority is able to relate to this
experience. I am here to empathize
and report that you can expect the
contrary from our library.
You never have to be concerned
about meeting a quiet, enigmatic
librarian at Wall Community Li-
brary. Come on in and chat with
us.
Librarians are knowledgeable
about multitudes of topics, and we
love to be in conversation with oth-
ers. Because we are constantly in
the presence of books, we often
come into contact with different
viewpoints and ideas. Discussing
such matters creates ground for
growth and understanding
amongst the population.
In a feeble attempt to entice the
public into our library (because
sooo many people read the news-
paper anymore), I am doing a se-
ries elaborating what you have to
Breaking Standards – An Introduction
“We Really Don’t Bite”
look forward to when setting foot
in your local library.
At Wall Community Library, the
employees and library board are
working hard to break standards.
We are doing everything we can
in order to make your library-
going experience as pleasurable
and meaningful as possible.
We make available to the public:
book groups, reading programs for
kids, job resources, and other ac-
tivities to include all generations
in our library.
Please stay tuned to our column
for further information, and/or
contact our library by any of the
following means.
We are open at 407 Main Street
on Wednesdays, from 12:00 - 7:00
p.m., Thursdays, from 9:00 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. - 5:00
p.m., and Fridays from 8:00 a.m. -
1:00 p.m.
Feel free to call us at (605)-279-
2929 or e-mail us at wallcomlib@g
wtc.net.
Don’t forget to like us on Face-
book!
We are called Wall Community
Library… (ingenious, I know).
We hope to hear from you soon!
January 2013, Pennington
County Sheriff’s Dept. report
During the month of January
2013, the Pennington County Sher-
iff's Office recorded the following
statistics in and around the com-
munity of Wall:
Time
City hours: . . . . . . . . . . . . .416.00
City hrs other deputies . . . .34.00
Total City hours . . . . . .450.00
Training hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.00
Vacation/Sick hrs . . . . . . . . .84.00
County hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.00
# of times called out/Hrs . . . .0.00
Arrest
Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Non-Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Calls For Service
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Alcohol Violations . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Animal Complaints . . . . . . . . . . .3
Assaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Assist Other Agencies . . . . . . . .10
Attempt to Locate . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Civil Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Community Activity . . . . . . . . . .5
Coroner Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Business Check . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
DPP/Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Extra Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Fire Medical Assist . . . . . . . . . . .4
Follow-up Investigation . . . . . .29
Found or Lost Property . . . . . . .1
Calls for Service
Keep the Peace . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Minor Consuming . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Murder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Runaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
School Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
SOLV Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Suspicious Activity . . . . . . . . . . .5
Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Weapons Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Welfare Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
911 Hang up Calls . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Civil Patrol
Attempted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
City Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Traffic Activity
Citations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Injury Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Non-Injury Accident . . . . . . . . . .5
DUI's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Motorist Assist . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
School Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Skate/Bike Citation . . . . . . . . . .0
Skate/Bike Warning . . . . . . . . . .0
Speed Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Vehicle/Parking Comp . . . . . . . .7
Please feel free to visit with
Deputies Louis Lange, Darren
Ginn, Robert Schoebrel, Sgt.
Dustin Morrison, Lt. Kraig Wood
or Capt. Jay Evenson with any
questions or concerns related to
law enforcement in and around the
Wall community.
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
Here’s a brief review of some of
the S.D. Legislature’s recent ac-
tion.
•Veterans seeking legislative
sanction of establishing a veterans
cemetery in Eastern South Dakota
were disappointed by the House
State Affairs Committee, which
voted Feb. 6 to kill it. Rep. Stace
Nelson, along with various state
veterans’ organizations, asked for
the authority to acquire 50 acres of
land along the I-90 corridor, prom-
ising to raise the money on their
own. The Department of Veterans
Affairs objected, noting there cur-
rently are cemeteries in Sturgis,
and soon to be in Pine Ridge and
Mission.
•Restoring state salary assis-
tance to the county’s veterans serv-
ice officers received initial ap-
proval Feb. 6 from House State Af-
fairs and was sent to the House
floor with a unanimous vote. The
annual $168,000 was cut two years
ago during the state’s budget
crunch. With HB1249, counties
would be able to request reim-
bursement for some costs associ-
ated with the VSO.
•Efforts to give voters another
chance to change terms for legisla-
tors were addressed by the Senate
State Affairs Committee resulted
in one plan given the nod, the
other sent to the 41st day, or
killed. The full Senate will dis-
cuss SJR1, which changes the
length of the current two-year
terms to four. Killed was a pro-
posal to limit legislators to no more
than eight years in each house,
served consecutively. Sen. Bill Van
Gerpen, R-Tyndall, said he was
surprised SJR4 was not given a
Senate floor hearing, when voters
have expressed their support for
term limits.
•A bill to permit townships to
levy a capital improvement prop-
erty tax for highways, secondary
roads, bridges, and culverts passed
through the House Taxation Com-
mittee and is expected to be heard
in the House this week. Townships
could levy 50-cents per thousand..
HB1189 would be an option where
needed, it was noted. Counties had
been part of the original bill, but
were removed in committee.
•Democrats are seeking to work
with Republicans on economic de-
velopment this year. Sen. Jason
Short takes from
the State Capitol
Frerichs, D-Wilmot, said in a re-
cent news conference that “infra-
structure seems to be the biggest
stumbling block” to economic de-
velopment. That would include im-
provements for roads, water and
sewer and broadband service.
Housing, he said, also goes hand in
hand for economic development.
•Republicans leader Larry Rho-
den, Union Center Senator, said he
has introduced a bill that would
provide a vehicle for conversation
of K-12 funding, that any increase
would go to the state’s funding ef-
fort. He said 30 senators and 48
house members had co-signed the
bill. “It appears there is a lot of
support to have that conversation,”
said Rhoden in a Thursday news
conference.
•A standing-room-only meeting
of the Senate Ag Committee Feb. 7
discussed SB148, which would
have reestablished certain admin-
istrative rules in the Department
of Environment and Natural Re-
sources relating to underground
injection control and in situ leach
mining. After two hours of testi-
mony and discussion, the bill was
sent to the 41st day, effectively
killing it for this session.
•Gov. Dennis Daugaard said in
a Feb. 7 press conference that the
state’s economic recovery had good
news and bad news. The good
news: the recovery was proceeding
at about the pace projected in De-
cember. However, the bad news
was that the news was “not any
rosier than that,” as it had been in
several preceding years.
•Gov. Dennis Daugaard said
several amendments have been
made to the School Sentinel bill,
which has created much discus-
sion. He said he doesn’t object to
the underlying concept of the bill
as long as safeguards are in place.
The bill would allow school dis-
tricts to have an armed guard in
the school for protection of stu-
dents and teachers.
•The Senate killed a joint phys-
ical custody bill, SB125, on Feb. 7.
“This is about children, not
about spouses,” cautioned Sen.
Jean Hunhoff, R-Yankton. Sen.
Dan Lederman, R-Dakota Dunes,
noted that if it were not the right
concept, then why had he gotten
over 200 e-mails wanting it
passed. The bill failed on a vote of
13 in favor, 21 against, one absent.
South Dakota high school
wrestling finals on SDPB
Wrestling Finals action is in the
spotlight on South Dakota Public
Broadcasting.
Wrestling hits the mats on
SDPB.org on February 22 - 23
with Class B in Aberdeen and
Class A in Watertown.
SDPB Television will air the fi-
nals live on February 23 with six+
hours of Class A on the SDPB1
channel beginning at 4:00 p.m. (3
MT) and six+ hours of Class B on
the SDPB2 channel beginning at
4:00 p.m. (3 MT).
Coverage of events on SDPB.org
and on SDPB Television is offered
in partnership with the South
Dakota High School Activities As-
sociation.
The Farm Service Agency would
like to remind farmers and ranch-
ers that the deadline to enroll in
the Noninsured Crop Disaster As-
sistance Program (also known as
NAP) is March 15, 2013.
The Noninsured Crop Disaster
Assistance Program provides cata-
strophic multi-peril insurance cov-
erage for crops that are not insur-
able through your private insur-
ance company.
Typical crops eligible for the
Noninsured Crop Disaster Assis-
tance Program include but are not
limited to pasture, grass hay and
Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance
Program deadline to enroll
small grains for hay.
In order to be eligible for the
Noninsured Crop Disaster Assis-
tance Program, please contact
your local Farm Service Agency
Service before the deadline of
March15, 2013.
For additional information
about the Noninsured Crop Disas-
ter Assistance Program, or any
other disaster program adminis-
tered by the Farm Service Agency,
contact your local Farm Service
Agency Service center or visit
them on the web at www.fsa.usda.
gov.
College briefs
Governor Dennis Daugaard
signed the following legislative
bills:
•SB26 - An Act to update termi-
nology for individuals with intel-
lectual disabilities and similar
Governor Daugaard
signs more bills
terms.
•HB1064 - An Act to provide for
certain methods of disbursement
for school district flexible spending
accounts.
Email your social
news, obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Peggy Gravatt
I don’t know about you, but I
think I have seen enough wind
around here lately to last a life-
time. The other day the dust and
dirt were flying around pretty
good. I can’t imagine how they
dealt with it during the “Dust
Bowl” in the 30’s. I don’t know
which is worse, blowing snow or
blowing dirt.
Jim and Jen Magee and family
spent the weekend at the Morris
Linn’s, leaving Sunday morning.
Clyde was a supper guest Satur-
day night. Matt and Patty Trask
were coffee visitors Sunday morn-
ing. Shirrise had a table full of
stampers on Sunday afternoon.
Bunny Bail and the girls visited
after church on Sunday. Katie
Wilsey from Rapid City was an
overnight guest on Sunday.
Kenny and Janet Wilson made a
business trip to Belle Fourche on
Monday.
Teri Ann Arneson went to Rapid
City on Tuesday to have a late
birthday lunch with her daugh-
ters, Lauren and Kylie and her
friend Judy Deyo. Teri Ann stayed
overnight with her mom, Han-
nalore Ausdal that night.
Charlotte, Katie and Laura
Wilsey were overnight guests in
the John Linn home on Saturday.
Charlotte and Laura left early
Sunday for Sioux Falls, where
Laura had two auditions at Augus-
tana College on Monday. Katie
stayed with Grandma and
Grandpa.
Visitors at the Mel and Dorothy
Anderson home last week were
Garrett Shearer on Wednesday,
Harold Delbridge on Saturday af-
ternoon. Bunny Bail, Mazee, Mat-
tee and Emilee along with Mar-
garet Nachtigall were guests Sat-
urday night for pizza. Tyler Wilson
visited Sunday morning. They
joined friends for a Valentine’s din-
ner in Rapid City on Thursday
evening. Mel attended the catalyst
meeting at Wicksville on Saturday
morning.
Larry Gravatt kept appoint-
ments in Rapid City on Friday.
Cherry and Byron Denke sur-
prised the Gravatt’s with a visit
and a wonderful apple pie on Sat-
urday afternoon.
Last weekend, Freddie Ferguson
went to the Wasta Methodist
Church for their pancake supper.
This past Sunday, he went down to
Wasta again, but this time for
their steak feed. Freddie sure
knows where to find the food!
Lawrence Burke went to Rapid
City on Friday and had lunch with
Melissa. Clyde was a coffee visitor
one morning, but Lawrence
couldn’t remember which morning.
Tom and Shelia Trask traveled
to Denver on Thursday to see Ce-
line Trask. Sierra Wilson, Emma
Michael and Julie Trask went
down with them. Julie stayed and
the rest of them came home on
Saturday and stopped to watch the
regional wrestling matches in
Rapid City, Mark, Mick, Levi and
Tomilyn Trask met them there.
Their grandson, Levi came on Fri-
day and is helping run the ranch!
He didn’t want to go to wrestling
until the cows were fed!
Looks like that is all until next
week.
Pennington County Courant • February 21 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Charlene Kjerstad went to
Spearfish, Monday afternoon, Feb-
ruary 11th, to tak her aunt Hazel
Thompson to her orthopedic sur-
geon for a check-up. He said she is
doing great and to come back in a
year. Charlene spent the night
with her sister Cleo and Tuesday
morning picked up Hazel and they
had breakfast at the Dorsett Home
with Hazel’s tablemates from last
summer when she was a resident
after her hip replacement.
Friday, Clayton, Conrad and
Charlene were in Rapid City doing
their income tax. Charlene stayed
up and spent the night with her
sister, Cindy Severson.
Saturday, Clayton, Charlene,
Conrad and Kalie Kjerstad and
Cindy Severson went to Douglas
High School and watched Austan
and Kyler and other Wall boys at
the AAU Wrestling tourney. Aus-
tan placed first and Kyler placed
4th.
My thanks to Linda LaFee for
submitting the news article about
David Van Vleck leaving for
Afghanistan! You had told me this
when we were in the Mesa Airport
but I neglected to ask if I could put
it in the paper. I would hate to sub-
mit something for publication
without asking to do so.
Norman Klingbile had a good
“turn out” for his open house on
Sunday for his 85th birthday. Cer-
tainly was a lot of visiting going on
and a place to see people you
hadn’t seen in a while. Congratu-
lations, Norman!
Orlin and Lourine Winkowitsch
brought Evelyn Kjerstad with
them on Sunday and attended
church. Winkowitsches went to
visit the Harnisches. Evelyn,
Donna Jedlicka and Frances Poste
had lunch together. Evelyn beat
Frances in a couple games of
Scrabble. All attended Norman’s
party.
‘Theme” meal was on Tuesday of
last week. Over thirty people
turned out for the turkey dinner.
Thursday evening of this week, the
21st, will be Senior Citizen’s
Potluck supper.
The Meals Program will serve
the last of the caramel rolls (for
this year) on Thursday morning,
the 21st. We appreciated all those
who came to partake and get in
some visiting.
The Methodists had a soup sup-
per on Ash Wednesday followed by
Lenten study and worship service.
Each Wednesday evening through
Lent the Methodist Men will serve
a soup supper at 5:30 p.m., fol-
lowed by Lenten study at 6:00 p.m.
President’s Day was observed on
Monday, February 18th. It effects
the bank, post office, city offices,
school, etc.
About a month ago, Lillian Hor-
ton had been ill and was taken to
the Philip Hospital. She is better
but is still in the “swing bed” sec-
tion. We wish her well.
June Wanczyk has been sick
also. She is in the Philip Hospital
but plans are for her to be moved
on February 25th to the Good
Samaritan Center in New Under-
wood for therapy. Our ‘get well”
wishes go out to her too.
The Wasta Volunteer Fire De-
partment had a steak supper on
Sunday evening, a fundraiser. The
Bill Leonards were among those
who attended and Bill said it was
very good.
The Wall Drug Store is usually
open for business as usual — ex-
ceptions: New Year’s Day, Easter,
Thanksgiving, Christmas, bliz-
zard, fire and now flood! The water
main broke in the basement caus-
ing a flood of water. The main store
has been opened but the restau-
rant was still closed on Monday
morning. Habits are hard to break!
I’m certain all the coffee drinkers
will be back as soon as they open.
Can’t even imagine the mess that
had to be cleaned up!
We had some wonderfully warm
temperatures last week, especially
on the weekend. The ice, left from
a drift across my drive, finally all
disappeared on Saturday. There
are still drifts around town and
where they piled mountains of
snow while clearing streets and
parking lots. This week is going to
be quite a bit colder if today (Mon-
day) is any indication — it is
windy, raw and cold!
Kind words can be short and
easy to speak, but their echoes are
truly endless. ~Mother Teresa
Have a good week!
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Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thursday, February 21 -
Thursday, February 28
Thursday, February 21: Na-
tional FFA Week; GBB Districts @
SDSM&T.
Friday, February 22: National
FFA Week; BBB @ Faith, 6 p.m.,
C Game @ 4:30 p.m.; WR State
@ Aberdeen, TBA; No School.
Saturday, February 23: Na-
tional FFA Week; BBB @ Bison, 2
p.m., Possible C Game; WR State
@ Aberdeen, TBA.
Monday, February 25: BBB
Districts, @ New Underwood;
AAU Practice @ CC, 5:15 & 5:45
p.m.
Tuesday, February 26: GBB
Regions, TBA.
Wednesday, February 27;
AAU Practice @ CC, 5:15 & 5:45
p.m.; HS Small/Large Group Con-
test @ Murdo.
Thursday, February 28: BBB
Districts, @ Oelrichs.
COURANT
BRIEFS
CHILDREN’S THEATRE
ADDITIoNS
Additions for this year’s Chil-
dren’s Theatre “X is for Zebra” will
be Sunday, February 24, 2013 at
4:00 p.m. at the Power House in
Wall. For more information call
Jeanine Sykora or Diane Geigle.
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTIoN: How much time
should I devote to my work? My
job requires me to put in long
hours every week. As a result I’m
not able to give as much attention
to other things—including my
family—as I would like. In your
opinion, how much time is too
much time for work? Do you sug-
gest I look for another job?
ANSWER: Perhaps you won’t
be surprised to learn that we don’t
have a hard-and-fast answer for
this question. Focus on the Family
can’t tell you where to work or ex-
actly how many hours to devote to
your occupation. We don’t have a
simple formula for balancing busi-
ness affairs with family life. These
are questions you need to resolve
by praying and listening to God’s
voice. You should also discuss your
needs and priorities with your
spouse and seek the counsel of
close friends. With the help of
those who really care about you,
try to work through your personal
commitments and priorities in
light of biblical principles.
In a case like this it can be help-
ful to remember that God has
granted us tremendous liberty in
Christ (Galatians 5:1). As a Chris-
tian, you aren’t called to slavish le-
galism but to freedom and discov-
ery. It’s not a matter of obeying
rules or mapping out a tightly con-
structed schedule. Instead, it’s
about walking by faith and living
in the Spirit. Among other things,
that means learning by trial and
error how to fulfill your unique
God-given calling while loving oth-
ers with the selfless love of Christ.
Are your long hours having a
damaging effect on your marriage,
your family, your health, or your
relationships with others? This is
the question you need to ask your-
self. Seek the Lord’s guidance and
try to answer it honestly. If you de-
cide that you really are working
too much, you’ll have to stop and
figure out how you got into this sit-
uation. Ask yourself if there’s a
feasible way out. Do you really
have to spend this much time on
the job? What is it that’s driving
you? Is it your employer’s demands
or your own pressing financial
needs? If the latter, can you find
other ways of balancing the
budget? Can you cut costs? Down-
scale your lifestyle? Eliminate ma-
terialistic goals and values?
That last question brings us
back to the issue of priorities. By
getting a handle on what matters
most to you, you can clear the air
of a lot of confusion. When you
know your priorities, you can elim-
inate non-essentials. This will help
you gain a sense of focus and pur-
pose. Rather than accepting your
situation at face value, train your-
self to listen to the Spirit. Try to
discern what He wants you to do.
Don’t be defined by externals. In-
stead, define yourself in terms of
God’s principles and God’s plan for
your life. It’s a question of learning
how to channel your time and en-
ergy into the fulfillment of your
own unique calling.
Maybe you don’t think this ad-
vice fits your situation. Perhaps
you believe that your priorities are
in order. Maybe you’re working
long hours solely because of the de-
mands of an unreasonable boss. If
so, you may want to start thinking
about looking for a new position.
That’s not something to be under-
taken lightly, of course, especially
in today’s challenging economy.
Still, if you’re feeling pressured,
unhappy in your work, and de-
prived of meaningful relationships
at home, it might be time to step
out in faith and take some risks.
You don’t want to spend the rest of
your life hating what you’re doing.
Here are a few things to keep in
mind as you evaluate your current
occupation and consider the possi-
bility of looking for a new job.
When trying to decide if you’re cut
out for a certain profession, ask
yourself the following three ques-
tions: 1) Do I have a passion for
this kind of work? 2) Do I possess
the required background and
skills? And 3) Do I feel called to do
this? If you can say “yes” to all
three, then go for it. There’s an ex-
cellent chance that you’ll find suc-
cess and fulfillment along that
path.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer
is excerpted from books authored
by Dr. James Dobson and pub-
lished by Tyndale House Publish-
ers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman of
the Board of Focus on the Family,
a nonprofit organization dedicated
to the preservation of the home.
Copyright 2003 James Dobson,
Inc. All rights reserved. Interna-
tional copyright secured.
Bald Eagle awareness
week Feb. 18-23
Bald Eagle Awareness Days cele-
brates its 21st year of entertain-
ment and education by emphasizing
the need for conservation and appre-
ciation of bald eagles and other
birds of prey.
Gov. Dennis Daugaard has pro-
claimed February 18-23, 2013, as
Bald Eagle Awareness Week in
South Dakota. Interested persons
will have three free events to choose
from to learn more about birds of
prey.
On Thursday, Feb. 21, The Out-
door Campus-East in Sioux Falls
will have an open house at 6 p.m.
CST, followed by a 7 p.m. program
featuring live birds of prey pre-
sented by educators from The Rap-
tor Center at the University of Min-
nesota.
The Outdoor Campus-West in
Rapid City is hosting a “drop-in” day
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. MST on Sat-
urday, Feb. 23. All ages can partici-
pate in hands-on stations featuring
all things birds-of-prey. Black Hills
Raptor Center will participate in the
drop-in day and conduct a public
presentation with live birds of prey
at 1 p.m. MST.
Also on Saturday, Feb. 23, educa-
tors from The Raptor Center at the
University of Minnesota will pres-
ent programs featuring live birds of
prey at the Pierre Ramkota in The-
atre II, in conjunction with the
KCCR Farm, Home and Sports
Show. Pierre Ramkota programs
begin at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and
2 p.m. CST. Those programs will
feature raptor arts-and-crafts for
younger children.
Bald Eagle Awareness Days activ-
ities will also feature presentations
on Friday, Feb. 22 for students in
Madison. Winners of the Bald Eagle
Awareness Days Bookmark Art Con-
test will be announced and winning
entries displayed at the Ramkota
Inn on Feb. 23.
The annual event is a joint effort
sponsored by conservation and out-
door recreation organizations, and
merchants and conservation agen-
cies to increase public involvement
and awareness about bald eagles
and other birds of prey. All ages are
encouraged to attend.
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
Posted By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
Centuries before Christ, the Psalmist said:
“If thou, Lord, shouldst mark iniquities… who
shall stand? But there is forgiveness with Thee…
” (Psa. 130:3,4).
It is doubtful whether the Psalmist understood the basis
upon which a just God, through the ages, has so gra-
ciously forgiven sins, but this has since been revealed in
the Epistles of Paul.
There we read: “God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven
you” (Eph. 4:32). But this is only part of the truth, for God
forgives sinners, not merely because Christ desires this,
but because Christ paid for their sins and purchased their
redemption. Thus Eph. 1:7 declares: “In [Christ] we have
redemption, through His blood, the forgiveness of sins,
according to the riches of His grace.”
And thus Paul could proclaim to his hearers in the syn-
agogue at Pisidian Antioch:
“Be it known unto you, therefore, men and
brethren, that through this Man is preached unto
you the forgiveness of sins:
“And by Him all that believe are justified from
all things, from which ye could not be justified by
the law of Moses” (Acts 13:38,39).
Obviously such forgiveness can never be rescinded or
revoked, for it is based upon the full and complete pay-
ment of our whole debt of sin by “the precious blood of
Christ.”
Sad to say, many people do not feel they need forgive-
ness, for they have not seen themselves as they truly are
in the sight of a holy God, but those who are conscious of
their sins and are willing to say with the prodigal son: “I
have sinned,” may experience the peace and joy of sins
forgiven by faith in Christ who paid sin’s penalty for us.
Here is forgiveness that can never be revoked because
it is based on the “one offering [of Christ at Calvary]” by
which our Lord “hath perfected forever them that are sanc-
tified [i.e., set apart as His own]” (Heb. 10:14).
FORGIVENESS THAT CANNOT
BE REVOKED
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
Continued on page 12
The Looking Glass of Time
80 years ago…
Three basketball games were
played in Sun Set Hall, Friday
evening. Quinn High School boys
lost to Philip 16 to 20. Quinn men’s
town team won from Wasta 16 to
35. Quinn Intermediate boys lost
to the Warner school 7 to 13.
After being delayed by the very
severe weather for the past three
weeks, the Odd Fellows are again
working on the basement of their
building. They expect to finish this
week, if this nice spring weather
continues.
Fireside Flashes: By Marcella
Shull; Recipe of the Week: Vanilla
Ice Cream. 1 egg, 1/2 cup sugar, 1
1/4 cup milk, 1 1/2 teaspoons
vanilla, 2 1/2 cups cream, 1/2 tea-
spoon salt. Cost: 20¢, serves 11
with 1/2 cup each. Beat eggs, add
sugar, salt, and flavoring. Add
cream and milk. Place in ice cream
container and adjust in freezer.
Pack crushed ice or snow, (to which
1/8 as much salt as ice has been
added and thoroughly mixed).
Freeze until ice cream is hard.
70 years ago…
C. A. Carlson has again taken
over the active publishing of the
Philip Review. H. E. Falhaber, re-
cently of the Highmore Nonpareil,
is the linotype operator, floorman,
job printer and foreman of the
shop.
Scores of Wall youngsters took
part in the Riata Theatre’s scrap
drive last week and turned in hun-
dreds of pounds of old brass and
copper. Those bringing receipts
from Freddie Lewis were admitted
free to the show Saturday night.
John Kelly, who has been in the
Army for quite a while, has been
discharged on account of the age
limit and has returned to Wall. He
plans to return to work at the
WREA, a position he had when
drafted.
The Quinn and Interior basket-
ball boys had a close game in
Quinn, Friday night, with Quinn
coming out on top.
The report for the first two
weeks of bond sale drive in Pen-
nington County, shows sales of
$47,343, or better than half of its
total quota of $82,608.
60 years ago…
The Wall Eagles kept the Con-
ference Leaders the Quinn Tuplets
on their toes throughout the game
played on the Quinn floor, Thurs-
day evening. Too close guarding
made fouls pile up — seventeen on
each side during the first half.
Wall lost two men in the third
quarter and Quinn dropped two in
the last quarter, due to fouls. The
Quinn boys were able to keep the
lead during the game and gained
four or five points each period.
Kelly led his teammates with
about half their tallies, 31 of 65.
The scoring by periods with Quinn
leading: 11-13, 21-28, 24-48, 46-65.
The Quinn basketball team mo-
tored to Chadron, Neb., Friday for
the weekend and played the
Chadron high school team Satur-
day night and were defeated by 10
points which was very good consid-
ering the Chadron team has
played 43 games and has lost only
one.
About a dozen Wall business
men drove to Pierre yesterday to
help those in business from other
towns in the State impress the
Legislature for the need of high-
way legislation which would re-
quire the Highway Commission to
consider the welfare of communi-
ties when building or rebuilding
highways.
50 years ago…
A circuit court judge has ruled
that the state has the right to deny
a landowner the use of an under-
ground flow of water on his prop-
erty. In a memorandum decision
released by the attorney generals’
office, Judge Fred J. Nichols ruled
that the state legislator has writ-
ten its constitutional means when
it adopted a new rights law in
1955. It was the first time a court
has ruled on the 1955 law. The
case rose when W. W. Knight of
Brookings sought a permit from
the South Dakota Water Resources
commission to drill irrigation wells
on his property. Knight later with-
drew his request and filed suit in
Brookings county circuit court.
Barbara Kay, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Leo Foster of Wall, be-
came the bride of Charles Tenney
Reoh, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Reoh of Rapid City in a beautiful
church wedding Sunday afternoon,
February 17, at the Methodist
Church in Wall, with Rev. John A.
Jacoway officiating.
John Rhynard had the misfor-
tune of damaging his pick-up near
Keyser’s on Ash Creek. John es-
caped with minor cuts and bruises.
My Best Recipe: Cheese Cake
with Graham Cracker Crust:
Small size box Graham Crackers,
1/2 cup butter, 1/2 cup powdered
sugar. Roll out real fine Graham
Crackers. Mix in the sugar and
butter and pat into pie tin. Place in
refrigerator until you mix the re-
maining part. 4 12 oz. pkg. of
cream cheese, 2 tbsp. canned milk,
4 whole eggs, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 tsp.
vanilla. Pour into crust and bake
350 degrees 20 minutes. Topping:
1 cup sour cream, 1/2 tsp vanilla,
rind of 1 lemon grated. Mix all to-
gether and put on cake and put
back in oven for five more minutes.
40 years ago…
Miss Barbara Jodene Herron
(Eaton), adopted daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Clark Eaton of Wasta,
and G. Russell Logan, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Phil Logan of Philip,
were married February 3 at the
First Lutheran Church in Philip.
Officiating for the ceremony was
Rev. Alvin Brucklacher.
The fifth annual Badlands Baja
races were held Sunday afternoon,
February 18, seven miles west of
Interior. A chilly wind kept the
large crowd milling around —
some going and others coming dur-
ing the day-long event. The tem-
perature was above freezing which
made some of the Badlands gullies
a little greasy and the drivers and
homemade done buggies and jeeps
soon gathered a coating of mud.
Wall had two entries in the Baja.
Jay Hoffman and Bob Johnson
built a Baja Special out of scrap
materials. Also Gallyn Wolf, Craig
Adams and Jimmy Johnson made
themselves an entry.
Gene Richmond, mail carrier
from Cottonwood, and Jay Gold-
hammer had a fender bender colli-
sion at the intersection between
the Wall school and the Methodist
Church before school, Wednesday
morning.
BIRTH: Mr. and Mrs. Roger
Eisenbraun are the proud parents
of a boy, Keith Alvin, born Febru-
ary 14. The proud grandparents
Dennis Lund____________________
Dennis Lund, age 62 of Wall,
S.D., died February 11, 2013, at
his home.
Dennis P. Lund was born May
22, 1950, the son of Pete and Ruth
(Lehr) Lund. He grew up and re-
ceived his education in Alpena,
graduating from Alpena High
School in 1968.
Dennis was united in marriage
to Theresa Wuestewald on April
23, 1976, in Huron. They later set-
tled in Madison. In 1985, they
adopted three daughters, Candy,
Justina, and Glenda.
Dennis was an animal lover and
a car enthusiast.
Survivors include his wife,
Theresa Lund, of Wall; three
daughters, Candy Rosdahl and her
husband, Duane, of Sauk Centre,
Minn., Justina Hilmoe of Brook-
ings, and Glenda Gilbert and her
husband, Paul, of Sherwood, Wis.;
five grandchildren, Jenn Phillips
of Watertown, Jake and Ava Jane
Hilmoe of Brookings, and Tommy
and Johnny Gilbert of Sherwood,
Wis.; one great-granddaughter,
Marley; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Dennis was preceded in death by
his parents, Pete and Ruth (Lehr)
Lund; a sister, Lorrie Lund; and a
great-niece.
Memorial services were held
Friday, February 15, at the Holy
Trinity Catholic Church in Huron,
with Father Terry Anderson offici-
ating.
Interment was at the Resthaven
Cemetery in Alpena.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall, and
the Kuhler Funeral Home of
Huron.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Hans E. Hanson________________________________
Hans E. Hanson, age 91 of
Philip, S.D., died Friday, February
15, 2013, at the Philip Nursing
Home.
Hans E. Hanson was born No-
vember 17, 1921, in Mt. Vernon,
the son of Martin and Lizzie Han-
son. He grew up on a farm near
Mt. Vernon and attended rural
schools, prior to graduating from
Mt. Vernon High School in 1939.
Hans was united in marriage to
Velma P. Lorang on June 8, 1941,
in Las Vegas, Nev. They made
their home in Burbank, Calif.,
where their first child, Sharon,
was born. Later, Hans entered the
U. S. Army and served in the Pa-
cific during World War II. During
that period, Velma and Sharon
moved back to Mt. Vernon and
lived with Hans’ mother until his
discharge from the Army. In 1946,
the family moved to Madison
where a son, Michael, was born.
Later, they moved to Mitchell, and
Hans operated a Standard Oil
bulk agency.
In October 1950, the family
moved to Philip. Subsequently, a
third child, Steven, was born in
Kadoka. In 1953, Hans and Velma
purchased the Ned Ronning City
Meat Market and Locker Plant
and, in 1960, they built and oper-
ated Hanson’s Super Valu until
their retirement in 1986.
Throughout his life in Philip,
Hans was a leading businessman
and active promoter of the Philip
community. Among Hans’ many
contributions were his service as
both president of the Haakon
School Board and Chamber of
Commerce. He also was famous for
organizing large community-based
pit barbeques. Hans was proud of
having played for the Mitchell
Kernels, a semi-pro baseball team,
and most of all for being a military
veteran. Most recently, he played a
founding leadership role in the es-
tablishment of the Philip Veteran’s
Living Memorial. Second only to
his family, was his love of golf,
hunting and fishing. Hans and
Velma were long serving members
of the First Lutheran Church in
Philip.
Hans was grateful for having
shared his life with a daughter,
Sharon Johnson, of Shawnee,
Okla.; two sons, Michael and his
wife, Shizuko, of Fairfax, Va., and
Steve and his wife, Paulette, of
Nashville, Tenn. He also is sur-
vived by five grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
Hans was preceded in death by
his loving wife, Velma; his parents;
13 brothers and sisters; his son-in-
law, Orrin Johnson; and his grand-
daughter Carrie’s husband, Chad
McCoy.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorials be directed to
the Philip Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment.
Services were held Tuesday,
February 19, at the American Le-
gion Hall in Philip, with Pastor
Frezil Westerlund officiaing.
Music was provided by Mari-
anne Frein, pianist, and Elvera
Moos, vocalist. Ushers were Quinn
McCoy and Seth Johnson.
Pallbearers were Scott, Matthew
and Craig Johnson, Mark Hanson
and Logan McCoy. Honorary pall-
bearers were Hans’ granddaugh-
ter, Carrie McCoy, and his 11
great-grandchildren.
Military graveside services were
Wednesday, February 20, at the
Black Hills National Cemetery
near Sturgis.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
FINANCIAL FOCUS
CAN INvESToRS LEARN
FRoM YoGA FoLLoWERS?
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
It’s probably not on your calendar,
but World Yoga Day takes place on
Feb. 24. As more people have discov-
ered its healthful benefits, yoga has
grown in popularity. But whether or
not you practice yoga, you can apply
its lessons to other areas of your life
— such as investing.
Specifically, consider the following
yoga-related themes and how they
might translate into investment
habits that may be beneficial:
•Balance — If you observe ad-
vanced yoga practitioners, you will
be amazed at the balance they ex-
hibit during certain positions. But
for serious yoga students, the idea of
“balance” goes beyond physical
movements and extends to a concept
of life that emphasizes, among other
things, an avoidance of extremes. As
an investor, you too need to avoid ex-
tremes, such as investing too aggres-
sively, too conservatively or too spo-
radically. By building a balanced
portfolio, and by investing regularly,
you can help improve your chances
of making progress toward your fi-
nancial goals.
•Flexibility — Among its many
benefits, yoga helps people increase
their flexibility — and greater flexi-
bility results in fewer injuries and
an increased capacity to enjoy many
physical activities. As an investor,
you need to be flexible enough to ad-
just your portfolio as needed while
still following a long-term strategy
that’s appropriate for your individ-
ual goals, risk tolerance and time
horizon.
•Relaxation — For yoga students,
proper relaxation is essential to
achieving mental equanimity, emo-
tional balance and inner strength.
But relaxation doesn’t always come
easily — even experienced yoga
practitioners need to work at it. As
an investor, you also may need to
train yourself to relax because, given
the ups and downs of the market, it’s
not hard to become overwrought and
make ill-advised decisions based on
short-term events. Staying calm and
maintaining a long-term view of
things may help you make better in-
vestment decisions.
•Positive thinking — Our own
thoughts and actions are largely re-
sponsible for creating our happiness
and success, according to yoga
teachings. And positive thinking can
play a key role in investing, too. For
example, if you were to constantly
look at negative headlines, you
might conclude that it is pointless to
invest for the future because exter-
nal events — economic instability
abroad, political squabbles at home,
natural disasters and so on — will
just disrupt your plans. Conse-
quently, you might decide not to in-
vest, or invest in such a way that
can make progress toward your fi-
nancial goals difficult. But if you
maintain a positive attitude, you
may be more inclined to invest
wisely for •Visualization —
In yoga, visualization is often used
to reduce stress. At any given time,
you might find it difficult to relax,
but you can use your imagination to
see yourself — and put yourself — in
a relaxed state. As an investor, you
need to visualize your goals, such as
a comfortable retirement, before you
can define a strategy to help you
work toward them. By seeing your-
self where you want to be, you’ll be
motivated to take the actions neces-
sary to work toward getting there.
Try putting the principles of yoga
to work — they may help you be-
come a better investor.
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013 • Page 6
Badlands Automotive
279-2827
Corner Pantry/Subway
279-2355
Crown Oil Co.
279-2245
Dartt Angus
279-2242
Days Inn
279-2000
De’s Oil Inc.
279-2168
Econo Lodge
279-2121
First Interstate Bank
279-2141
Golden West
Telecommunications
279-2161
Hildebrand Concrete
279-2615
Ken’s Refrigeration
& Heating, Inc.
279-2894
Pennington County Courant
279-2565
Rush Funeral Home
279-2592
Super 8 Motel
279-2688
TLC Electric, Inc.
279-2622
Two Bit Saloon
& Steakhouse
386-2115
Red Rock Restaurant
& Rock Lounge
279-2387/279-2388
Wall Auto Livery
279-2325
Wall Booster Club
Wall, SD
Wall Building Center
& Construction
279-2158
Wall Dairy Queen
279-2655
Wall Drug Store
279-2175
Wall Food Center
279-2331
Wall Lube &
Espresso Bar
279-2227
West River Electric
Association
279-2135
These sponsors are proud to support these athletes in their activities...
Fri., Feb. 22nd
& Sat., Feb. 23rd
in Aberdeen
Jed Brown (106 lbs.) • 4th at Region
First Round: vs. Logan Richie - Webster
Rance Jobnson (113 lbs.) • 1st at Region
First Round: vs. Zach Stoltenburg - Deuel
Lane Blasius (152 lbs.) • 1st at Region
First Round: vs. Brady Soulek - Wagner
Clint Stout
(170 lbs.) •
1st at Region
First Round: vs.
Cole Globke -
Marion/Freeman
Chance Knutson (182 lbs.) • 2nd at Region
First Round: vs. Dakota Zaphier - Wagner
Logan Ammons (195 lbs.) • 2nd at Region
First Round: vs. Cameron Kostal - Mt. Vernon/Plankinton/Corsica
Nick Donnelly (120 lbs.) • 2nd at Region
First Round: vs. Austin Gilbertson - Kingsbury County
Chandlier
Sudbeck
(160 lbs.) •
1st at Region
First Round: vs.
Ryan Yost - Red-
field/Doland
Gavin Debries (220 lbs.) • 3rd at Region
First Round: vs. Dowain Kerner - Burke/Gregory
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013• Page 7
We are in the middle of Febru-
ary and the weather has been
pretty good. One of the tougher de-
cisions I make during the school
year is calling off school, leaving
early, or starting late. First and
foremost my decision is based on
the safety of the students. So far I
have not had to deal with the
school closing this year, but we still
have some winter left.
In January, I made a recommen-
dation to the school board to move
the Big White School from a K-8
attendance center to K-5.
I based my recommendation on
the new Common Core Standards
coming out in Math, Language
Arts, and Science.
The rigor involved and the new
way the standards are being
taught makes it a huge undertak-
ing for any school.
I also looked at the number of
grade levels being taught at Big
White next year by one teacher
and an aid.
By moving to K-5 we will reduce
From the Desk of the Superintendent
the number of grades by two. It
may not seem like a big change,
but when the grade levels are at
the Middle School level it does
make it a big difference.
The school was presented with
some options to use technology to
teach the middle school students
and remain a K-8 school.
The Big White School and the
teachers over the years have pro-
vided an excellent education for
the students. It is a great commu-
nity of students and supportive
parents.
I see this change as a positive
move for the middle school stu-
dents and an opportunity to better
the education of the younger stu-
dents by focusing more time with
them.
The board will make a decision
in March, as to what direction they
want Big White to move. It will be
a difficult and emotional decision
and we will move forward with
whatever is decided and do what is
best for our students.
The legislature is better than
half done with their session for
2013. It has been a quiet session
for education so far.
Looming out there is HB 1087
which deals with armed sentinels
in schools.
The bill would give local boards
the option of arming some staff
members with a weapon. This will
allow a first line of defense if nec-
essary.
Everyone wants to feel their
child will be safe when they are
dropped off each day.
As Superintendent, the safety of
the students in our school is a pri-
ority.
We are always looking for ways
to improve the safety of our stu-
dents. Is bringing weapons into
the school the right thing to do? I
have reservations and questions as
I hope everyone does.
I feel it needs to be studied more
before implementing any law al-
lowing weapons on school property.
AAU wrestlers from the Wall area attended the Strugis Wrestling
tournament on Saturday, February 9th. Pictured back row: from
left to right ... Bridger Amiotte - first place, Cedar Amiotte - first
place and Lilly Wagner - first place. Front row: from left to right
... Trevor Schulz - second place, Younger Amiotte - first place,
Austan Kjerstad - first place and Kyler Kjerstad - third place.
~Courtesy Photo
AAU wrestlers attend Sturgis meet
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Self-contained, portable,
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We clean all types of grain.
Juston Eisenbraun
605-391-6967 (c) • 605-386-2210 (h)
605-279-2411 (w)
Eisenbraun Grain Cleaning
Certified Grain Cleaner
It was a run-away for the Philip
Area grapplers as they claimed the
Region 4B title by more than 60
points, and garnering seven first
and second placings.
Head coach Matt Donnelly was
pleased for the team and the indi-
viduals as they wrestled well at
the tourney. The team took 10 kids
and placed nine. Four open slots in
the 126, 132, 138, and 145 weight
classes were not good for the team
though, he said. Injuries and ill-
ness were the main reasons for the
openings.
Team standings following the
February 16 tournament were
Philip Area (181.5), Bennett
County (118.5), Stanley County
(112), Hot Springs (106.5), Potter
Philip Area claims Region 4B title
County (99), Custer (79.5), Lem-
mon/McIntosh (64), Mobridge-Pol-
lock (61), Hill City (56), Newell
(50), Sully Buttes (39), Harding
County (33), St. Thomas More (19),
Red Cloud (14).
106 lbs: Jed Brown
4th, 30-11 record
•Bye
•Pinned Stone Durham (STM), 2:25
•Decisioned by Dirk Wolf (L/M) 12-14
•Pinned Kalel Worisheck (HC) 1:42
•Decisioned by Daniel Slama (SC) 5-8
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 1st,
23-9 record
•Major dec. Bray Harrison (MP) 13-2
•Pinned Tomo Shirataki (RC) 2:35
•Pinned Brady Hill (SB) 3:52
•Major dec. Joshua Simunek (HS) 13-4
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 2nd,
31-9 record
•Pinned Ryan Krump (STM) 1:28
•Pinned Westly Greenough (HS) 3:55
•Pinned Garrett Rausch (PC), 1:08
•Decisioned by Dominick Schooler (HC)
1-5
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st,
29--3 record
•Bye
•Pinned Tristan Madsen (HS) 1:08
•Won by default Jace Anderson (SB)
•Decisioned Dylan Severyn (CUS) 6-5
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 1st,
31-8 record
•Bye
•Tech. fall over Brett Scott, (CUS) 18-2
•Pinned Brad Hahn (BC) 5:03
•Pinned Austin Haberer (PC) 4:45
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 1st,
33-8 record
•Bye
•Pinned Jason Van Vugt (MP) 3:44
•Pinned Joe Merrival (BC) 3:26
•Decisioned Clayton Wahlstrom (CUS) 7-
6
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 2nd,
26-9 record
•Bye
•Bye
•Pinned Reece Jensen (HC) 3:01
•Decisioned by Dalton McCullam (BC) 2-
12
195 lbs: Logan Ammons, 2nd,
22-10 record
•Bye
•Pinned Marcus Heath (BC) 3:26
•Pinned Chase Schoenhard (MP) 1:29
•Decsioned by Clay Siedler (CUS) 3-5
220 lbs: Gavin Devries, 3rd,
20-17 record
•Pinned Carrell Haines (HS) 2:35
•Pinned Todd VanderMay (BC) 3:02
•Pinned by Brady Spiry (MP) 5:56
•Pinned Mike Murray (CUS) 4:45
•Pinned John Jung (RC) 1:58
285 lbs: Geoffrey Devries,
3-20 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Cade Larson (SC) :39
•Bye
•Pinned by Garrett Clark (L/M) 1:34
Donnelly noted that while Geof-
frey DeVries did not place at the
region tournment he has been
learning at every tournament. De-
Vries, Donnelly noted, is at the
light end of the heavy weight divi-
sion and is just an eighth grader
wrestling older, heavier opponents.
Up next for the Badlands
Brawlers is the State B tourna-
ment in Aberdeen, Febraury 22
and 23. Donnelly is excited about
Philip’s prospects at the tourna-
ment, but noted it will be tough.
“Anyone can beat anyone,” he said.
“They are there for a reason.”
State team rankings heading
into State B are Parkston (144),
Canton (100), Wagner (98),
Howard (90), Beresford (88), Tri-
Valley (87), Philip (77), Flandreau
(72.5), Bon Homme (71) and Web-
ster (70).
Individual rankings have Brown
in sixth, Johnson ninth, Donnelly
eighth, Blasius second, Sudbeck
third, Stout sixth, Knutson fifth
and Ammons eighth.
Philip Area grapplers brought back the Region 4B Region championship title last Saturday. Back
row from left are Brandy Knutson, Jed Brown, Geoffrey DeVries, Clint Stout, Chance Knutson,
Rance Johnson, Cody Donnelly, Nick Donnelly, Bosten Morehart and Keven Morehart; Front from
left are student managers Kelsie Kroetch and Madyson Morehart, Chandlier Sudbeck, Lane Bla-
sius, Logan Ammons, Gavin DeVries, Raedon Anderson, and head coach Matt Donnelly.
~Photo by Dayle Knutson
Lane Blasius wrestling in the 150 weight pound bracket Region
meet held in Rapid City. ~Courtesy Photo
courant@gwtc.net
By Coach Dinger
Wall vs. Stanley County
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team hosted Stanley County on
Thursday, February 14th.
The Eagles started out slow in
the first quarter and shot the bas-
ketball very poorly, but still had a
6-2 lead.
In the second quarter, the Ea-
gles continued to struggle on of-
fense, but had a 17-12 lead at half-
time.
The Eagles finally found their
offense in the second half and led
34-19 by the end of the third quar-
ter. In the fourth quarter, the
Eagles were able to get several
bench players into the game and
the Eagles won by a final score of
55-34. Trevor Anderson and
Tucker O’Rourke were the leading
scorers for the Eagles with 11
points and 10 points respectively.
Lane Hustead added nine
points, while Laketon McLaughlin
and Tyler Peterson each had six
points.
O’Rourke also led the team with
11 rebounds which gave him back
to back games with a double dou-
ble.
Hustead, McLaughlin, and Pe-
terson each pulled down six re-
bounds as well.
O’Rourke also had six steals to
lead the defense.
Anderson and Clancy Lytle led
the offense with four assist each.
The team was 25-66 from the field
for 38 percent, 3-17 from the three
point line for 18 percent, and 2-5
from the free throw line for 40 per-
cent.
Stats:
Wall: 6 11 17 21 = 55
Stanley Co: 2 10 7 15 = 34
Scoring: Trask 2-8 0-4 5, Car-
son Johnston 1-6 1-3 3, Anderson
5-10 1-5 11, McLaughlin 3-6 0-0 6,
Hustead 4-8 0-0 9, Lytle 2-6 1-3 5,
O’Rourke 5-11 0-1 10, Peterson 3-
9 0-0 6. Totals: 25-66 3-17 2-5 55.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.379.
3-point field goals: Eagles 3
(Johnston 1, Anderson 1, Lytle 1.)
Offensive Rebounds: Eagles 16
(McLaughlin 4, Hustead 3, Peter-
son 3.)
Defensive Rebounds: Eagles
24 (O’Rourke 9.)
Fouls: Eagles 18.
Assists: Eagles 13 (Anderson 4,
Lytle 4.)
Steals: Eagles 20 (O’Rourke 6.)
Turnovers: Eagles 22.
Wall vs. Newell
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team played their final home game
of the season on Saturday, Febru-
ary 16th when they hosted Newell.
The Eagles escaped with a 63-61
victory after Tyler Peterson hit a
game winning jump shot with only
17 seconds left on the clock.
The Eagles started out slow
again and struggled shooting the
basketball, but still only trailed
13-16 by the end of the first quar-
ter. The Eagles starting
shooting better in the second quar-
ter and they were able to tie the
game by halftime 29-29.
The second half found both
teams exchanging the lead, but the
Eagles trailed again by the end of
the third quarter 46-49.
The Eagles hit several three
pointers in the fourth quarter and
Newell missed a last second three
pointer to secure the win for the
Eagles.
Trevor Anderson led all scorers
with 14 points, while Lane Hus-
tead and Tyler Peterson had 13
points and 10 points respectively.
Tucker O’Rourke led the team with
six rebounds and Laketon
McLaughlin finished with five re-
bounds.
Eagles take wins over
Stanley Co. and Newell
Peterson also had three steals to
lead the defense. Anderson and
Hustead also led the offense with
six assist each.
The team was 26-59 from the
field for 44 percent, 9-23 from the
three point line for 39 percent, and
2-4 from the free throw line for 50
percent.
The team is playing well to-
gether, but we need to improve on
defense as we finish out the regu-
lar season on Friday, February
22nd at Faith and Saturday, Feb-
ruary 23rd at Bison.
Stats:
Wall: 13 16 17 17 = 63
Newell: 16 13 20 12 = 61
Scoring: Trask 3-11 2-8 9, An-
derson 6-8 2-3 14, McLaughlin 1-4
0-0 3, Hustead 5-14 3-6 13, Lytle 2-
8 2-5 6, O’Rourke 4-6 0-0 8, Peter-
son 5-7 0-0 10. Totals: 26-59 9-23
2-4 63.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.441.
3-point field goals: Eagles 9
(Hustead 3.)
Offensive Rebounds: Eagles 7
(McLaughlin 4.)
Defensive Rebounds: Eagles
18 (O’Rourke 5.)
Fouls: Eagles 12.
Assists: Eagles 19 (Anderson 6,
Hustead 6.)
Steals: Eagles 8 (Peterson 3.)
Blocked shots: Eagles 2 (An-
derson 1, O’Rourke 1.)
Turnovers: Eagles 18.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
Call us for your print-
ing needs! 859-2516
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013 • Page 8
G
G
ood
ood
L
L
uck
uck
E
E
aGLEs
aGLEs
at
at
thE
thE
d
d
istrict
istrict
t
t
ournamEnt
ournamEnt
!
!
Crown Oil
Company
279-2245
Dartt
Angus
279-2242
Days Inn
279-2000
Des’s
Oil Inc./
SanDee’s
279-2168
Econo
Lodge
279-2121
Corner
Pantry/
Subway
279-2355
First
Interstate
Bank
279-2141
Golden
West
Telecom.
279-2161
Hildebrand
Concrete
279-2615
Pennington
County
Courant
279-2565
Ken’s
Refrigeration
& Heating
279-2894
Rush
Funeral
Home
279-2592
Super 8
Motel
279-2688
Two Bit
Steakhouse
& Saloon
386-2115
Wall
Auto Livery
279-2325
Badlands
Automotive
279-2827
Red Rock
Restaurant &
Rock Lounge
279-2387/279-2388
Wall
Booster
Club
Wall, SD
Wall
Building
Center &
Const.
279-2158
Wall Dairy
Queen
279-2655
Wall Drug
Store
279-2175
Wall Lube
& Espresso
Bar
279-2227
Wall Food
Center
279-2331
West River
Electric
Assoc.
279-2135
These sponsors are proud to support the
Wall Eagles in their activities...
District 14B Boys Basketball Tournament
Monday, February 25th, Thursday, February 28th & Friday, March 1st
Teams include: •Wall •Oelrichs •New Underwood •Philip •Edgemont •RC Christian
Winner will represent District 14B at the Region 7 Tournament on March 5th.
District 14B
Boys
Basketball
Tournament
Mon., Feb. 25th at
New Underwood
(first game at 6:30
Wall vs. Edgemont;
second game at 7:30
Philip vs. RCC)
Thurs., Feb. 28th
at Oelrichs
(Oelrichs vs. winner of first
game at 7:00 p.m.)
New Underwood
(New Underwood vs. winner of
second game at 7:00 p.m.)
& Fri., March 1st
at SDSM&T
2012-13 WHS Boys’ Basketball Team…Back row: Head Coach Ryan Dinger, Clancy
Lytle, Camden Sawvell, Tyler Peterson, Ryder Wilson, Tucker O’Rouke, Laketon McLaughlin,
CJ Schulz, Tyler Trask, Assistant Coach Kent Anderson. Middle row: Danny Muzik, Trevor
Anderson, Austin Huether, Ben Lynn, Carson Johnston, Alex Tysdal, Rylee Scheieber. Front
row: Riley Fortune, David Sykora, Dusty Dartt, Les Williams, Lane Hustead, Austin David-
son, July Kammerer. (Not pictured: Kaden Eisenbraun).
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013 • Page 9 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
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CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
FREE
To GIvE aWaY: Older two
bedroom trailer. Must be
moved. 386-4672. PR25-2tp
HELP WanTED
DakoTa MILL & GRaIn,
InC. is looking for a CDL
Class A Driver with
doubles/triples and a tanker
endorsement that technically
can be stationed at any one of
our locations east of Wall.
Stop by to pick up an applica-
tion or call Jack at 381-0031.
WP26-2tc
DakoTa MILL & GRaIn,
InC. is looking for a full-time
person to add to our team at
Wall. Job responsibilities in-
clude truck driving (Class A
CDL a plus or willing to obtain
one), hay grinding, warehouse
loading/unloading, fertilizer
spreading, grain operations,
and various other tasks to
take care of our customers.
Wage DOE. Benefits included.
EOE. Call 279-2261 or 279-
2255, Wall. WP26-2tc
CEDaR PaSS LoDGE IS
noW HIRInG for experienced
Cooks and kitchen staff. We
are looking for hardworking,
outgoing staff to join our 2013
season team. Experience in
the kitchen with ability to
work in a fast-paced enviro-
ment is helpful. We can teach
you the rest!! Hourly wages
paid for all hours worked,
bonus for season completion.
Weekly optional meal package,
retail discount, activities, op-
portunity to make new ac-
quaintances from all over the
world. Download application
at cedarpasslodge.com or call
Sharon Bies at 433-5560.
PR25-4tc
MISC. FoR SaLE
FoR SaLE: 14’ wide x 20’ long
x 8’ high Menard’s shed kit.
Asking $2,500 OBO. If inter-
ested call 685-4608, days, or
433-5060, evenings, for de-
tails. P11-2tc
FoR SaLE: Solid oak hand-
crafted china cabinet, excel-
lent shape, $300. Call 859-
2654 or 685-3152, leave mes-
sage. P8-tfn
FoR SaLE: Rope horse hal-
ters with 10’ lead rope, $15
each. Call 685-3317 or 837-
2917. K44-tfn
o’ConnELL ConSTRuC-
TIon, InC., PHILIP: Rock,
Sand, Gravel (screened or
crushed). We can deliver.
Dams, dugouts, building
sites. Our 37th year. Glenn or
Trace, 859-2020. PR11-tfn
FITCH FEnCInG: Line your
summer projects up now! For
all your corral, windbreak and
pasture fencing needs, call
Truett at 859-2334.
PR23-tfn
TETon RIvER TREnCHInG:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank in-
stallation and any kind of
backhoe work, call Jon Jones,
843-2888, Midland.
PR20-52tp
WEST RIvER EXCavaTIon
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional bor-
ing work. See Craig, Diana,
Sauntee or Heidi Coller,
Kadoka, SD, or call 837-2690.
Craig cell: 390-8087, Sauntee
cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net. K50-tfn
FaRM & RanCH
FoR SaLE: (40) F1 BWF
heifers, Bangs vaccinated,
700 lbs. All out of Hereford
cows and all of the 1st X BWF
heifers in town. Selling at
Philip Livestock Auction, Feb-
ruary 26, 2013. Buster Peter-
son, 837-2531.
PR25-2tc
SuMMER PaSTuRE
WanTED: Looking to rent
pasture or complete ranch,
short term or long term. Also
looking for hay ground. Cash,
lease or shares. Call 798-2116
or 798-2002.
P10-tfn
PaSTuRE WanTED: Summer
pasture for 100-250 cow/calf
pairs, preferably in the Jack-
son/Haakon/Jones County
area, but would consider
other areas. With full mainte-
nance. Call 843-2869. P8-tfn
FoR SaLE: 2006 Featherlite
all enclosed 4-horse goose-
neck trailer. 7x22x7 alu-
minum/ white smooth skin.
Has nice enclosed tack up
front with (5) saddle racks and
(8) bridle holders. Great con-
dition! $14,200 OBO. Call for
pictures and more details:
454-6914, Murdo.
P8-5tc
SuMMER PaSTuRE
WanTED for 40 to 200 pairs
within 80 miles of Philip or
can lease whole ranch. 685-
9313 (cell) or 859-2059
(home). P7-tfn
PaSTuRE WanTED for sum-
mer 2013 for 50-60 pair. Call
Jerry Willert, 837-2459.
K6-tfn
TRaILER TIRES FoR SaLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop,
859-2744, Philip.
P40-tfn
auToMoTIvE
FoR SaLE: 2010 Lincoln
Town car, Limited Series, 40K
miles, $23,000 OBO. 279-
2040 or 407-2267, Wall.
PW11-1tp
FoR SaLE: 2004 Pontiac
Grand Prix GT, gray with gray
interior, 107,300 miles, looks
and runs great. $7,000 is the
asking price, but I will con-
sider reasonable offers. Call
Keith at 454-3426 or 859-
2039 for information or any
questions.
PR22-tfn
FoR SaLE: 1998 Ford Expe-
dition XLT 4x4, cloth seats,
power windows, locks & seats,
good tires. Call 685-8155.
PR10-tfn
BuSInESS & SERvICES
HILDEBRanD STEEL &
ConCRETE: ALL types of
concrete work. Rich, Colleen
and Haven Hildebrand. Toll-
free: 1-877-867-4185; Office:
837-2621; Rich, cell: 431-
2226; Haven, cell: 490-2926;
Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
PETS/SuPPLIES
FoR SaLE: 11 month old fe-
male Pom, $250. Needs full
time companion/family. Blue
Meril color and spayed. Call
939-6443, Wall. P10-2tp
noTICES/WanTED
WanTED: Once fired 45 ACP
brass. Call 279-2195 or 441-
7049. WP7-tfn
FaBRIC! FaBRIC! FaBRIC!
Nuts ’n Bolts (Edgemont),
Hancock Fabrics and Fabric
City (Rapid City) will be set up
and ready for you to shop on
Friday, March 8, from 4:30 to
7 p.m. and Saturday, March
9, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Wall Community Center dur-
ing the Badlands Quilters
Weekend Getaway. Be sure to
take advantage of this won-
derful opportunity to shop for
all your sewing and quilting
needs! PW11-3tc
REaL ESTaTE
HouSE FoR SaLE: 300 E.
High St., Philip. 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, attached garage on
nice corner lot. Full basement,
central air, propane heat.
Modest price. Inquire at 859-
3367, 567-3515 or 859-3249.
Former home of Joy Klima.
P11-tfn
HouSE FoR SaLE In
PHILIP: 2 bedrooms, down-
town, fenced yard. Make an
offer. Call 859-3095 or 859-
2483. P10-tfn
2007 MoBILE HoME FoR
SaLE: 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
garden tub in master bath,
new stove, refrigerator one
year old, and dishwasher. Very
spacious living room and
kitchen. Never had pets or
smoke. Call 515-4138 or 515-
4139.
WP24-4tc
FoR SaLE: 307 Myrtle Ave.,
Philip. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
partially finished basement,
large back yard, new roof and
windows, stainless steel fridge
and stove, washer and dryer
included. Close to schools.
Call 859-2470. Can email pic-
tures. P7-4tc
REnTaLS
4-BEDRooM HouSE FoR
REnT In WaLL: Call Stan,
381-2861. WP5-tfn
aPaRTMEnTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we
can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an applica-
tion. Gateway Apartments,
Kadoka. WP32-tfn
FoR REnT In PHILIP: 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, small shed.
Contact Deb at 544-3291.
PR26-2tp
CLaSSIFIED PoLICY
PLEaSE REaD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the
first incorrect insertion
only. Ravellette Publications,
Inc. requests all classifieds
and cards of thanks be paid
for when ordered. A $2.00
billing charge will be added if
ad is not paid at the time the
order is placed. all phone
numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
Deadline for Classifieds & Cards of
Thanks is 11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
Email your
social news,
obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
EMPLoYMEnT
FULL-TIME DEPUTY SHERIFF,
Hyde County, Highmore, SD:
Must be certified in law en-
forcement or willing to be
trained and certified within one
year of hire date. Application
available from Hyde County
Auditor’s Office, 605-852-2519,
or Box 379, Highmore, SD
57345. Closing date: March 1,
2013. Hyde County is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.
BELLE FOURCHE, a growing
South Dakota community of
6,500, seeks Economic Devel-
opment Executive Director. Ex-
cellent wages and benefits. Full
job description and application
at www.bellefourche.org. Clos-
ing date: March 1, 2013.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPI-
TAL-Custer Clinic and Custer
Regional Senior Care in beauti-
ful Custer, SD, have full time
and PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN
and Licensed Medical Assistant
positions available. We offer
competitive pay and excellent
benefits. New Graduates wel-
come! Please contact Human
Resources at (605) 673-2229
ext. 110 for more information
or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for Me-
chanic/Operator. Good Bene-
fits. Applications are available
at Courthouse in Bison, SD or
call 605-244-5629.
PATROL OFFICER — Hourly
pay range: $20.14-$24.50/hr.
Visit: www.cityofbrookings.org
Return application w/resume
to PO Box 270, Brookings, SD
57006-0270. dlangland@cityof-
brookings.org.
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST
OPENING for Northwest Area
Schools Education Cooperative
in NW South Dakota. Competi-
tive wage, excellent benefits, ve-
hicle provided. Contact Cris
Owens at 605-466-2206 or
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
LanD FoR SaLE
LARAMIE RIVER RANCH - Lim-
ited Parcels Left! 35 acre
ranches from $695 per acre.
Magnificent water and moun-
tain views. Low down - Guaran-
teed financing. Call Today! 1-
888-411-7050 www.Ranch-
LandWyoming.com.
LoG HoMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern,
central, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
noTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
SD HORSE FAIR March 15-17
Fairgrounds, Sioux Falls. Dana
Hokana Clinics. Ranch Rodeo,
Horseman’s Challenge, Trade
Show, Sandy Jirkovsky, Breed
& Driving demos, Youth
Events, Cowboy Church. LIKE
us on facebook! www.SD-
HORSEFAIR. com.
STEEL BuILDInGS
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge win-
ter discounts for spring deliv-
ery. 50x80, 62x100, 68x120,
68x200, 100x200. Take advan-
tage of tax deductions. Limited
Offer. Call Jim 1-888-782-
7040.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRo/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
THank YouS
Thanks to the WREA for the
nice gift I won at the Wall Clinic
meeting.
Esther Wolford
Family and friends, you
made my 85th birthday so spe-
cial with your cards, calls and
presence at the open house.
Thank you all — its great to live
in such a caring community.
Norman Klingbile
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
February 21 to
February 27, 2013
Thursday: Breakfast: Ba-
nana Bread, Cheese Stick,
Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Breast
w/Gravy, Rice Pilaf, Roll, Ba-
nana, Milk.
Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast:
French Toast, Sausage, Milk
or Juice.
Lunch: Garlic Pizza
w/Sauce, Salad, Baby Carrots,
Peppers, Peaches, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Yogurt
w/Granola, Cheese Stick, Milk
or Juice.
Lunch: Lasagna, Roll,
Country Style Veggies,
Pineapple, Cottage Cheese,
Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast: Ce-
real, Cheese Stick, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Goulash, Corn, Baby
Carrots, Roll, Pears, Milk.
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
FEBRUARY 5, 2013
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, February 5, 2013, in the Com-
missioners' meeting room of the Penning-
ton County Courthouse. Chairperson
Lyndell Petersen called the meeting to
order at 9:00 a.m. with the following Com-
missioners present: Ron Buskerud, Ken
Davis, Don Holloway and Nancy Traut-
man.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to reverse the order of Item
B and C under Items from Emergency
Management and approve the agenda as
amended. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-14 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the January
15, 2013, Board of Commissioners’ meet-
ing.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$356,494.27.
7. Reappoint Mr. John Glodt as County
Constable for Legislative District 33 and
authorize the Chairperson’s signature on
the Warrant of Appointment.
8. Reappoint Mr. Aaron Klapkin as
County Constable for Legislative District
35 and authorize the Chairperson’s sig-
nature on the Warrant of Appointment.
9. Reappoint Ann Sandberg, Terri
Phelps, Larry Beezley, Lynn Von Wald
and Kristina Hendrickson to a second
term on the Pennington County Board of
Mental Illness and County Review Board
and authorize the Chairperson’s signa-
ture on the Warrants of Appointment.
10. Emergency Management: Approve
the First Quarter State and Local Agree-
ment Report.
11. County Fire: Approve the Secure
Rural Schools and Communities Self-De-
termination Act Certification of Title III Ex-
penditures for 2012.
12. Acknowledge receipt of the 2012
Annual Report from Pennington County
Highway.
13. Recognize and thank Pennington
County volunteers for the month of De-
cember 2012. The list of volunteers is on
file in the Human Resources office and is
posted on the County Bulletin Board.
14. Approve the request from Penning-
ton County Victim’s Assistance to reapply
for the VOCA Grant and the Stop/VAWA
Grant for Fiscal Year 2014.
End of Consent Agenda
FIRST READING AND PUBLIC HEAR-
ING; THE NEW REVISED PENNING-
TON COUNTY ORDINANCE NO. 12 –
AIR QUALITY ORDINANCE
MOVED by Davis to not approve the
first reading of county Ordinance No. 12
to give the State’s Attorney time to re-
spond to concerns by the Board of Com-
missioners. The motion died for lack of a
second.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to continue this item to the
February 19, 2013, Board of Commis-
sioners’ meeting. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
A. BUDGET SUPPLEMENT HEAR-
ING SP13-002: MOVED by Trautman
and seconded by Holloway to approve
the supplement to the 2013 Moderniza-
tion and Preservation Fund ROD Equip-
ment budget in the amount of $48,000
from non-budgeted revenue received in
the current year. Vote: Unanimous.
B. TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE ORDER
FOR ORGANIZATION AND INCORPO-
RATION OF THE SAWMILL ROAD DIS-
TRICT (Cont from 1/15/2013): According
to Auditor Julie Pearson, no action is
needed on this item. The petition was in-
valid because it included property in-
cluded in another road district.
ITEMS FROM EMERGENCY MANAGE-
MENT
A. TRANSFER AND SALE OF TWO
VEHICLES: MOVED by Holloway and
seconded by Trautman to transfer a 2008
Dodge Ram (VIN#3DKS19D98G170787
/ Capital Asset # 05832) from Emergency
Management to County Highway and au-
thorize a transfer of $17,000 from County
Highway to Emergency Management rev-
enue, and further moved to transfer a
2003 Jeep Liberty (VIN#
1J4GL48K93W679894 / Capital Asset #
05684) from Emergency Management to
County IT and authorize a transfer of
$3500 from County IT to Emergency
Management revenue. Vote: Unani-
mous.
B. AUTHORIZATION TO PURCHASE
VEHICLES: MOVED by Holloway and
seconded by Trautman to authorize the
purchase of two (2) 2013 Chevrolet
Tahoes from Rapid Chevrolet, 2090
Deadwood Avenue, Rapid City, State
Contract #16415 in the amount of
$32,414.00 (each). Vote: Unanimous.
C. GENERAL FUND SUPPLEMENT
SP13-003: The Board of Commissioners
asked that that the supplement request
be brought back for action on February
19, 2013, with totals for the vehicles,
equipment and any other associated
costs related to the vehicle purchase.
ITEMS FROM EMERGENCY SERVICES
COMMUNICATIONS USERS BOARD
A. OPERATING TRANSFER FOR
TOWER CAPITAL PROJECT FUND:
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to authorize an operating trans-
fer in the amount of $19,800 from the
County Fire Fund to the Communications
Tower Capital Project Fund. Vote: Unan-
imous.
B. ESC TOWER PROJECT WEST
SITE CONSTRUCTION CHANGE OR-
DERS: MOVED by Holloway and sec-
onded by Buskerud to approve Emer-
gency Services Communication Services
Communications Tower Project West Site
Construction Change Order PR#, Electri-
cal Trenching Cost Change, in the
amount of $5,947.66 and PR#2, Telecom
Conduit Cost Change, in the amount of
$1,499.87. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM EQUALIZATION
A. ABATEMENTS: MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Trautman to
approve the following abatements/re-
funds for tax year 2012: ID 8094, Dale
Brumbaugh, $705.42; ID8005975, Joel or
Rebecca L. Anderson, $108.53; ID 3993,
Curtis J. Tuhy, $1327.90; ID 4034, Duane
Lamb, $585.00. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM EXTENSION
A. APPOINTMENT OF 2013 EXTEN-
SION ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER:
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to appoint Laura Lawrence to
serve as a member of the 2013 Penning-
ton County Extension Advisory Board.
Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
A. 2013 COUNTY STRIPING PRO-
GRAM AGREEMENT: MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Buskerud to approve
the Agreement with the State of South
Dakota for the 2013 Pavement Marking
Project Number P 000S(00) PCN 01XM
and authorize the Chairperson’s signa-
ture thereto. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM INFORMATION TECH-
NOLOGY SERVICES
A. PENNINGTON COUNTY WEBSITE
REDESIGN: MOVED by Holloway and
seconded by Trautman that the IT Depart-
ment move forward with the Pennington
County website redesign utilizing Midwest
Marketing and further moved that County
Departments share equally in the cost of
the project. The initial project will not in-
clude votepennco.com, penningtoncoun-
tysheriff.com, springcreekblackhills.com
and rcpcem.com. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM WEED & PEST
A. 2012-2013 PENNINGTON
COUNTY FIRE PROTECTION AND
MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE SUPPRES-
SION PROJECT UPDATE
(SP13-004) Moved by Buskerud and
seconded by Trautman to schedule a
hearing at 9:15 a.m. on February 19,
2013, to supplement the Emergency Dis-
aster Fund MBP budget in the amount of
$80,303 from restricted fund balance.
Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM THE BOARD OF AD-
JUSTMENT
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to convene as the Board of
Adjustment. Vote: Unanimous.
A. VARIANCE / VA 13-01: Tim or
Vickie Griffin. To reduce the minimum re-
quired side yard setback from 25 to 6 feet
in a Limited Agriculture District in order to
construct a pole barn on the subject prop-
erty in accordance with Sections 209 and
509 of the Pennington County Zoning Or-
dinance.
Lot 6 and the E1/2 of Lot 5,
Harms Tract, Section 8, T1N,
R7E, BHM, Pennington
County, SD.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Holloway to deny Variance / VA 13-01.
Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn as the Board of Ad-
justment and reconvene as the Board of
Commissioners. Vote: Unanimous.
PLANNING & ZONING CONSENT
AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken on all items by a single vote of the
Board of Commissioners. Any item may
be removed from the Consent Agenda for
separate action.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to approve Consent Calendar
Item B. Vote: Unanimous.
B. VACATION OF SECTION LINE / VS
13-01: John Preston. To vacate 900 feet
of Section Line Right-of-Way located be-
tween Sections 18 and 19, T2S, R7E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota.
Approve Vacation of Section Line #13-
01 with two conditions. 1) That prior to
the Exhibit being recorded for the Vaca-
tion of Section Line the applicant shall
dedicate and record a utility easement for
the existing overhead power lines located
in the Section Line Right-of-Way; and 2)
That all necessary resolutions and ex-
hibits vacating the Section Line Right-of-
Way be recorded by the applicant at the
Register of Deeds’ Office.
ITEMS FROM PLANNING & ZONING
C. ASSISTANT PLANNING DIREC-
TOR JOB DESCRIPTION: MOVED by
Trautman and seconded by Buskerud to
accept the job description for the Assis-
tant Planning Director. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Davis to take a brief recess. Vote: Unan-
imous. The Board recessed at 11:12 a.m.
and reconvened at 11:25 a.m. Vote:
Unanimous.SPRING CREEK WATER-
SHED AND IMPLEMENTATION PROJ-
ECT
A. PROJECT PRESENTATION: Brit-
tney Molitor, Pennington County Water
Protection Coordinator and Justin Krajew-
ski, Project Coordinator with RESPEC
Consulting.
B. DENR CONTRACTS: MOVED by
Trautman and seconded by Davis to ap-
prove the Chairperson’s signature on the
Third Amendment to Grant Agreement for
the Spring Creek Management & Imple-
mentation Project Segment 1. Vote:
Unanimous.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to approve the Chairperson’s
signature on the First Amendment to
Grant Agreement for the Spring Creek
Management & Implementation Project
Segment 2. Vote: Unanimous.
C. UPDATED SEGMENT 2 BUDGET
TABLES: MOVED by Buskerud and sec-
onded by Davis to approve the updated
Spring Creek Management and Imple-
mentation Project Segment 2 Budget Ta-
bles 6-1, 6-2 and 6-3 obligating the
$160,606 of unspent Segment 1 funds.
Vote: Unanimous.
D. PROJECT COORDINATOR RE-
SPONSIBILITIES: MOVED by Davis and
seconded by Buskerud to approve the
Project Coordinator responsibilities with
the recommended changes. Vote: Unan-
imous.
E. INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREE-
MENT: MOVED by Buskerud and sec-
onded by Davis to approve the Intergov-
ernmental Agreement Format with the
edits recommended by Commissioner
Trautman. Vote: Unanimous.
F. ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER
GUIDELINES: MOVED by Buskerud and
seconded by Davis to continue Advisory
Board Guidelines to the February 19,
2013, Board of Commissioners’ meeting
so the Chief Deputy State’s Attorney can
provide clarification and different lan-
guage on authority. Vote: Unanimous.
G. ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER-
SHIP APPOINTMENTS: MOVED by
Trautman and seconded by Buskerud to
continue the advisory group appoint-
ments to the February 19, 2013, Board of
Commissioners’ meeting. Vote: Unani-
mous.
Commissioner Buskerud left the meet-
ing at this time.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1)
B. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL 1-
25-2(3)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to take a five minute break and
then convene in executive session. Vote:
Unanimous. The Board remained in ex-
ecutive session from 12:50 p.m. until 1:01
p.m. MOVED by Holloway and seconded
by Trautman to adjourn from executive
session. Vote: Unanimous.
PERSONNEL
Buildings & Grounds: Effective
1/1/2013 – J. Enders, $3460.
Health & Human Services: Effective
2/1/2013 – J. Guffey, $3405.95; N.
Parker, $17.83/hr.
Highway Department: Effective
2/4/2013 – Aditya Chivukula Venkata,
$11.48/hr.
ESCC: Effective 1/20/2013 – B. Black-
well and J. Gion, $17.83/hr.
Public Defender: Effective 1/30/2013
– C. Duffy, $4791.00; Effective 2/11/2013
– D. Leon, $4791.00.
State’s Attorney: Effective 1/22/2013 –
J. LaCroix, $10.00/hr.
AUDITOR’S ACCOUNT OF THE
TREASURER
To the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners, I hereby submit the fol-
lowing report of my examination of the
cash and cash items in the hands of the
County Treasurer as of January 29, 2013:
Total balances of checking/savings ac-
counts, $26,395,383.72; Total balance of
Treasurer’s Office safe cash, $9,400.00;
Total certificates of deposit,
$2,581,020.60; Total Prime Value Invest-
ment, $6,050,652.10; Total petty cash,
$111,470.00; Total Cash Items, $621.08;
Total long/short, (254.79); Total,
$35,148,709.24. Submitted by Lori Wes-
sel, Deputy Auditor.
VOUCHERS
AT&T Mobility, 652.42; BH Power,
9234.87; CBM, 3297.23; City of Box Elder
– Water, 70.57; City of Hill City – Water,
54.25; City of Rapid City-Water,
12,435.49; City of Wall-Water, 135.00;
Executive Mgmt Fin Office, 18.00; First
Administrators, 290,993.24; First Inter-
state Bank, 7362.04; Fish Communica-
tions LLC, 60.00; Knology, 6933.08; Lat-
tice Inc., 16.29; Medical Waste Transport,
139.50; Midcontinent Communications,
55.00; Montana Dakota Utilities,
15,053.01; Q-West, 246.73; Verizon,
6361.12; West River Electric, 2467.66;
WEX Bank, 908.77.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Trautman to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 1:01
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published January 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $140.10.
NOTICE OF
VACANCY
MUNICIPALITY OF WALL,
TOWN OF WASTA
AND
WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT 51-5
The following offices for the CITY OF
WALL will become vacant due to the ex-
piration of the present term of office of the
elected officials:
Alderman Ward I – Two Year Term –
Pete Dunker
Alderman Ward II – Two Year Term –
Mike Anderson
Alderman Ward III – Two Year Term –
Bill Leonard
The following offices for the TOWN OF
WASTA will become vacant due to the va-
cancy and expiration of the present term
of office of the elected officials:
Town Board of Trustees – One Year
Term – Stan McNabb
Town Board of Trustees – Three Year
Term – Justin Crawford
Also, the following school board posi-
tions for the WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT
51-5 will become vacant due to the expi-
ration of the present term of office of the
following school board members:
Member-At-Large – Three Year Term –
Kevin Bielmaier
Member-At-Large – Three Year Term –
Carolynn Anderson
Circulation of nominating petitions may
begin on March 1, 2013.
Petitions for the CITY OF WALL may
be filed in the office of the finance officer
located at 501 Main Street, Wall Commu-
nity Center, between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. MST, not later than
the 26th day of March, 2013, at 5:00 p.m.
Petitions for the TOWN OF WASTA
may be filed with the finance officer lo-
cated at 501 Main Street, Wall Commu-
nity Center, between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. MST, not later than
the 26th day of March, 2013, at 5:00 p.m.
Petitions for the WALL SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT 51-5 may be filed in the office of
the business manager located at 401
South Boulevard West, between the
hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. MST,
not later than the 26th day of March,
2013, at 5:00 p.m., or mailed by regis-
tered mail not later than the 26th day of
March, 2013, at 5:00 p.m.
CITY OF WALL
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
TOWN OF WASTA
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT 51-5
Niki Mohr
Business Manager
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $53.28.
WALL CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
MINUTES
FEBRUARY 5, 2013
The Wall City Council met for a regular
meeting February 5, 2013 at 6:30 pm in
the Community Center meeting room.
Members present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Pete Dunker,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Jerry Morgan, Councilman; Bill
Leonard, Councilman
Others present: Carolynn Anderson, Fi-
nance Officer; Jeff Clark, Public Works
Director; Pandi Pittman, Teen 19 Advisor;
Cpt. Jay Evenson, Dpt. Robert Schoe-
berl, Penn. Co. Sheriff’s Dept.; Anne
Clark and Laurie Hindman, Pennington
Co. Courant; Jonny Holsether, Wendy
Brunnemann, Wall Library; Mark Hind-
man; Stacy Bielmaier; Preston Johnson;
Jim and Jamie Kitterman
Absent: Stan Anderson, Councilman
Motion by Hustead, second by Leonard to
approve the agenda. Motion carried.
Cpt. Jay Evenson presented the police
report. Cpt. Evenson introduced the new
deputy, Robert Schoeberl who is now
serving the area.
Jonny Holsether addressed the council
on Library issues. She first thanked the
council for all the support they give the li-
brary. Holsether stated the sign on the
east side of the building is hard to read
and could use some sprucing up. Motion
by Hustead, second by Leonard to ap-
proving painting the existing sign with no
change to the wording. Motion carried.
Holsether commented direction signs for
the Library would be helpful to visitors in
town. A sample of a sign was presented
and suggested to be placed in three dif-
ferent areas of town. Motion by M Ander-
son, second by Leonard to approve pur-
chasing three direction signs for the li-
brary. Motion carried.
Holsether noted a rail from the fence on
the west side of the library has been
missing for a year and would like to see it
replaced. Also snow, drifts in front of the
library entrance and questioned whether
a snow fence would help the issue. Coun-
cilman Leonard will take notice during the
next snowfall to determine whether snow
fence could be helpful. Note: The fence
rail will also be replaced.
Public Works Director (PWD) Clark re-
quested on Eric Hansen’s behalf; ap-
proval to connect to the City’s water main
near the shooting range east of town.
Hansen purchased property south of the
shooting range across the road and
needs water for livestock. The meter pit
will be placed on the north side of the
road and all costs will be borne by
Hansen with the exception of the tapping
saddle and the corporation stop. These
will be the City’s expense. The water
usage will be considered a commercial,
Out of City limits account and therefore
will have a minimum charge each month
even if water is not used. Motion by Hus-
tead, second by Dunker to approve
Hansen’s connection to the water main
with all the stipulations as stated. Motion
carried.
There was a building permit request from
June and Arvin Hout to remove the exist-
ing manufactured home at 211 W. Fifth
Street and be replaced with a larger man-
ufactured house. It will be located the
same distance from the frontage of the lot
and extend (10’) ten feet farther south on
the lot. It will still be within the required
distance from all lot lines. The foundation
will be enlarged with the same existing
material. Motion by Dunker, second by
Leonard to approve the building permit for
the Hout’s. Motion carried.
Preston Johnson requested a building
permit for a hanger at the airport. The
FAA has approved a 100’ x 100’ hanger
but Johnson has requested an additional
20’ for the hanger from the FAA and pend-
ing their approval would request the same
from the council. Upon the completed
construction of the hanger, Johnson
would like to move his existing fuel tanks
and storage facility to the northwest of the
hanger. Motion by Hustead, second by
Leonard to approve the building permit for
Johnson to build a hanger and move his
fueling facility. Motion carried.
The issue of business brochures that
hang on the outside of buildings are blow-
ing around, cluttering the street. Motion
by Dunker, second by M Anderson to
send a letter to the businesses requesting
“no brochures” when the business is
closed for the season as well as resolving
the issue when they are open. Motion car-
ried.
Mayor Hahn explained lights at the airport
are not working. The lights can be acti-
vated by pilots using their microphones
with a signal. The light is an FAA require-
ment and he is trying to repair them. A last
resort may be purchasing a new light con-
troller for $3,000.00. Motion by Dunker,
second by M Anderson to approve pur-
chasing new lights if they are not able to
be repaired. Motion carried.
Mayor Hahn expressed variations for sell-
ing the Backhoe, repairing it, or purchas-
ing another one. The known repairs esti-
mated cost is $4,800 and an approximate
cost for a backhoe that is ten to fifteen
years old would cost $35,000 - $40,000.
Possible usage of a backhoe would be 50
hours per year; however if a local contrac-
tor was hired for a $100 an hour with op-
erator would cost $5,000. Bids for the
1978 Case Backhoe where opened at
this time. A total of five bids were re-
ceived.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
award to the highest bid on the backhoe
to Wayne Huether for $5,051.51. Motion
carried.
An update was given on the purchase of
the Dunker property needed to move for-
ward with the sewer project. All required
paperwork is ready to be submitted to the
lien holder once notification is received
concerning if the appraisal is needed.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to authorize the engineer to go to bid
on the sewer project when all paperwork
is completed. Motion carried.
Councilman Morgan entered the meeting
at 7:30pm.
There was discussion on the need for a
generator and whether to pursue applying
for a grant to purchase one for the com-
munity center during a power outage. Es-
timated cost for the generator and the in-
stallation would be $100,000. Annual es-
timated maintenance cost would be
$2,500 -$2,800. Motion by Hustead, sec-
ond by M Anderson to pursue applying for
a grant to cover 100% of the cost. Motion
carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by M Anderson
to approve transferring the Ambulance
money market savings over to the new
EIN of the Ambulance District. Motion car-
ried.
Snow removal issues were addressed.
Some businesses on Main Street are not
removing snow at all and some are not
clearing the snow from building to curb as
required by ordinance. Snow is being
piled in the alleyways and on street cor-
ners that obstruct visibility. Letters are
being sent out and snow removal hired by
the City and then billed to the property
owner. Motion by Dunker, second by
Leonard for public works to continue pur-
suing and enforcing the ordinance. Mo-
tion carried.
Finance Officer (FO) Anderson gave an
update on the council whose terms are up
for election in 2013.
Ward 1 – Pete Dunker – Two year
term; Ward 2 – Mike Anderson – Two year
term; Ward 3 – Bill Leonard – Two year
term.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to approve city minutes for January
8, 2013. Motion carried
Motion by M Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve Fire Department minutes
from January 8, 2013. Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by M Anderson
to approve Pay Request #5, the final pay-
ment to Custom Environment for
$7,595.00 on the airport terminal. Motion
carried.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve payment of $17,000.00 to
the Wall Clinic for January and February
payroll. Motion carried.
Motion by M Anderson, second by
Dunker to approve paying the remaining
February City of Wall bills. Motion car-
ried.
CITY BILLS
FEBRUARY 5, 2013
Gross Salaries – January 31, 2013:
Gross Salaries: Adm. - $5,553.22; PWD -
$9,695.08
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ins.,
$357.10; HEALTH POOL, Health/Life In-
surance, $4,180.42; SDRS, Employee
Retirement, $1,789.24; SDRS-SRP, Em-
ployee Supp Retirement plan, $150.00;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $3,475.55
FEBRUARY 5, BILLS
ADVANCED DRUG TESTING, INC, CDL
testing, 26.00; AMERICAN PUBLIC
WORKS ASSN., 2013 annual dues,
20.00; ANDERSON DILLON, water de-
posit refund, 36.87; BADLANDS AUTO-
MOTIVE, automotive light, 4.79;
BANYON DATA SYSTEM, software sup-
port, 1,090.00; BLACK HILLS CHEMI-
CAL,, garbage bags, 33.98; BLACK
HILLS DOOR, repair on City shop door,
752.35; BROSZ ENGINEERING, engi-
neering on airport project, 2,528.19; BUT-
LER MACHINERY CO, antifreeze-hy-
draulic oil, 238.14 ; CETEC, engineer-
ing for sewer project, 1,646.00; CROWN
OIL, gas and diesel, 2,513.50; CUSTOM
ENVIRONMENTS INC, Pay Request #5
- Final on airport terminal, 7,595.00;
DAKOTA BACKUP, backup service,
162.02; DAKOTA BUSINESS CENTER,
copier contract, 40.00; DAKOTA PUMP &
CONTROL CO., INC, 2 relays for school
lift station, 317.42; DE S OIL &
PROPANE, tire repair on blade/filter for
bobcat, 62.55; ENERGY LABORATO-
RIES, water testing, 12.50; FIRST IN-
TERSTATE BANK, ink cartridge-Jeff's
printer/gas/dues, 179.59; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, sales tax, 460.31; FIRST
INTERSTATE BANK, ach fees, 12.25;
GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone lines,
453.68; HAHN, DAVID L, rugs for airport
terminal, 29.98; HAWKINS WATER
TREATMENT GROUP, water treatment,
881.34; H-C GALLOWAYS, 15% of con-
tract complete, 9,718.95; KITTERMAN
CONSTRUCTION, snow removal for
Main St., 155.00; KITTERMAN, JIM, in-
surance reimbursement, 414.61; LURZ
PLUMBING, sewer line at Community
building, 153.06; MAIN STREET DE-
SIGNS, 6 christmas banners, 476.00;
NORTHWEST PIPE FITTINGS, repair
parts for Well #7 water line, 2,407.05;
PENNINGTON COUNTY COURANT,
publishing, 506.11; PENN. COUNTY
SHERIFF S OFFICE, 1st quarter 2013
contract, 25,879.75; PETTY CASH, Lind-
sey's office for water payments, 125.00,
postage, 82.61; POSTMASTER, office
stamps/water billing stamps, 290.00;
SANITATION PROD., gutter brooms for
street sweeper, 336.00; SERVALL UNI-
FORM, CC rugs, 55.63; SHOVELHEAD
CONSTRUCTION INC, Well #7 waterline
repair, 7,193.89; TLC ELECTRIC, school
lift station/CC estimate, 303.57; WALKER
REFUSE, garbage service, 7,315.45;
WALL BADLANDS AREA CHAMBER,
BBB funds, 24,501.37; WALL BUILDING
CENTER & CONST, supplies, 303.07;
WALL HEALTH SERVICES, administra-
tive operations, 17,000.00; WEST RIVER
ELEC, electricity, 10060.29; WEST
RIVER ELECTRIC ASSOC, INC, Main St
project loan, 7,500.00; WEST
RIVER/LYMAN-JONES RURAL, water
purchase, 3,500.00; WILKENS JOHN,
water deposit refund, 24.88.
TOTAL BILLS: $137,398.75
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 5th day of February 2013.
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
approve paying the February Fire Depart-
ment bills. Motion carried.
FIRE DEPARTMENT BILLS
FEBRUARY 5, 2013
WALL AMBULANCE, Propane at Ambu-
lance Shed, electricity on Ambulance
electricity bill, 219.95; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK, pork loin for xmas party,
68.68; VERIZON WIRELESS, cell phone
service, 5.84; WALL BUILDING CENTER
& CONST, lumber & fasteners, 14.54;
WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity, 580.96.
TOTAL BILLS: $889.97
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 5th day of February 2013.
Motion by Dunker, second by Morgan to
approve the February Ambulance bill pay-
ing out the collected revenue to the Am-
bulance District. Motion carried.
AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT BILLS
FEBRUARY 5, 2013
WALL AMBULANCE, pay out the January
bank rec balance to the District, 4,159.57.
TOTAL BILLS: $4,159.57
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 5th day of February 2013.
Motion by Leonard, second by Hustead to
approve the February Library bills. Mo-
tion carried.
LIBRARY BILLS
FEBRUARY 5, 2013
Gross Salaries – January 31, 2013:
Gross Salaries: $814.06
FIRST WESTERN BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $128.49
FEBRUARY 5, BILLS 2013:
GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone bill, 37.20;
OVERDRIVE SD, Digital Consor-
tium, 600.00; WALL BUILDING CENTER
& CONST, ceiling tiles-paint-ice melt,
61.58; WALL FOOD CENTER, supplies,
21.26; WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity,
200.48.
TOTAL BILLS: $920.52
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 5th day of February 2013.
The Wall Health Service report, the On-
call schedule and the Compensatory re-
port were reviewed at this time.
FO Anderson asked if there were any
comments, changes or questions to the
Motor Vehicle record policy and report.
PWD Clark addressed some changes
and questions he had. More research and
suggested changes will be made and
brought back to the March meeting.
PWD Clark stated Weston Engineering
ordered the seal section for Well #7. The
water committee met and recommended
purchasing the used motor for replace-
ment at Well #7. Clark commented with
any luck Well #7 should be back on line
by April 1st.
Councilman Leonard expressed concern
with the county throwing snow on his
driveway after it has been cleared. It was
commented the city will go back to open
driveways that were cleared after the re-
mainder of the town has been completed.
Motion by Morgan, second by M Ander-
son to send a letter to the county head-
quarters addressing the problem and ask
for a resolution. Motion carried.
The next City Council meeting will be
Thursday, March 7th at 6:30pm.
Motion by Dunker, second by Morgan to
take a five minute recess before going
into executive session for the purpose of
discussing personnel and legal issues ac-
cording to SDCL 1-25-2 at 8:00pm.
Mayor Hahn called the meeting out of ex-
ecutive session at 8:50pm. Motion by
Hustead, second by Leonard to give back
twenty-four hours of sick leave to Jim Kit-
terman; allow him to return to work effec-
tive February 6th part time with a maxi-
mum of four hours daily until February
12th. Restrictions with the part time work
are no lifting more than twenty-five
pounds and no driving of any equipment.
He will be allowed to return to work full
time pending a release from his doctor.
Motion carried.
With no further business, the meeting
was adjourned at 8:56pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $145.88.
NOTICE OF
DEADLINE
FOR VOTER REGISTRATION
EASTERN PENNINGTON COUNTY
AMBULANCE DISTRICT
Voter registration for the Eastern Pen-
nington County Ambulance District Elec-
tion to be held during the annual meeting
on March 21st; will close on March 6th at
4:30pm. Failure to register by this date
will cause forfeiture of voting rights for this
election. If you are in doubt about whether
you are registered, check the Voter Infor-
mation Portal at www.sdsos.gov or call
the county auditor at 605-394-2153.
Registration may be completed during
regular business hours at the county au-
ditor's office, municipal finance office,
secretary of state's office, and those loca-
tions which provide driver's licenses,
SNAP, TANF, WIC, military recruitment,
and assistance to the disabled as pro-
vided by the Department of Human Serv-
ices. You may contact the finance office
or county auditor to request a mail-in reg-
istration form or access a mail-in form at
(http://www.votepennco.com).
Carolynn Anderson
Secretary/Treasurer
Eastern Pennington County
Ambulance District
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $24.70.
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013 • Page 10 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
www.Ravellette
Publications.com
NOTICE OF INTENT
TO MINE
Notice is hereby given that a mining
operation is to be conducted by the Pen-
nington County Highway Department.
Legal location of the mine: SE1/4, less
1 acre in the SE corner of SE1/4SE1/4
Section 3, T1S, R14E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
General location of the mine: 9.5 miles
west of Wall, South Dakota.
Material to be mined: sand, rock and
gravel.
The operation is to begin by March
2013 and will be completed to include
final reclamation by December 2023.
Proposed future use of the affected
land: final reclamation will consist of re-
grading, replacing topsoil, and reseeding
to allow the area to be returned to a
rangeland environment.
Additional information about the oper-
ation may be obtained from either the
Pennington County Highway Department,
3601 Cambell Street, Rapid City, SD
57701, phone (605) 394-2166, or the
South Dakota Department of Environ-
ment and Natural Resources, Minerals
and Mining Program, 523 East Capitol
Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501-3182, phone
(605) 773-4201.
Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $11.12.
FAIRVIEW
TOWNSHIP #22
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fairview Township #22 will hold their
annual meeting Tuesday, March 5, 2013,
at 7:00 p.m. at the Dave Humphrey resi-
dence.
Billie Humphrey,
Township Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.76.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Jerry Hammerquist has applied for a Lot
Size Variance to reduce the minimum re-
quired lot size from 40 acres to 3.75 acres
LAKE FLAT
TOWNSHIP #8
PUBLIC NOTICE
The annual meeting of Lake Flat Town-
ship #8 will be held Tuesday, March 5,
2013, at 6:00 p.m., at West River Electric
Association, Wall, SD.
William Bielmaier,
Township Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.76.
QUINN TOWNSHIP #1
PUBLIC NOTICE
The annual meeting for Quinn Town-
ship #1 will be held Tuesday, March 5,
2013, at 7:30 p.m., at the Fortune resi-
dence.
Bonna Fortune,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.09.
CONATA TOWNSHIP
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Annual Meeting for the Conata
Township will be held Tuesday, March 5,
2013, at the William Huether residence,
at 7:00 p.m.
Patty Huether,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.09.
in a General Agriculture District located
on the SE1/4SE1/4 SE1/4NW1/4 and the
E1/2SW1/4SE1/4SE1/4NW1/4, Section
15, T1S, R10E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, 14 miles east of
Rapid City and one-half mile south of E.
Hwy 44, near Farmingdale, in accordance
with Sections 205 and 509 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
5th day of March 2013. At this time, any
person interested may appear and show
cause, if there be any, why such requests
should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $15.57.
CEDAR BUTTE
TOWNSHIP #4
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Annual Meeting of Cedar Butte
Township #4 will be held on Tuesday,
March 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the home
of Gene Patterson, Township Clerk, for
the purpose of election of officers and any
other business that may come before the
board.
Gene Patterson,
Township Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $11.70.
NOTICE OF ANNUAL
TOWNSHIP MEETING
SCENIC TOWNSHIP #7
The citizens of the Township of Scenic
#7, in the county of Pennington, South
Dakota and who are qualified to vote at
township elections, are hereby notified
that the annual township meeting for said
Township will be held in the Scenic Com-
munity Center in said Township, on Tues-
day, the 5th day of March, 2013, at 7:00
p.m. for the following purposes:
To elect one Supervisor for the term of
3 years; one Township Clerk, one Town-
ship Treasurer, each for the term of one
year; and to do any other business proper
at said meeting when convened.
Given under my hand this 7th day of
February, A.D. 2013.
/s/Carla Jobgen,
Township Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $17.55.
CROOKED CREEK
TOWNSHIP
PUBLIC NOTICE
Annual meeting of Crooked Creek
Township #25 will be held Tuesday,
March 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., at the
Hamann residence.
Neva Hamann,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.76.
SCHOOL LAND
LEASE AUCTION
A school land lease auction will be held in
Pennington County Courthouse, in Rapid
City, SD on March 27, 2013 at 10:00 AM
(MT).
A list of tracts available for lease can be
obtained at the Pennington County Audi-
tor’s Office, by visiting sdpubliclands.com,
or by contacting Mike Cornelison, Office
of School & Public Lands, 500 E Capitol
Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501-5070 or
phone (605)773-4172. Disabled individ-
uals needing assistance should contact
the Office of School and Public Lands at
least 48 hours in advance of the auction
to make any necessary arrangements.
Published February 21, 28, March 7, &
14, 2013, at the total approximate cost of
$29.45.
LAKE CREEK
TOWNSHIP #6
PUBLIC NOTICE
Lake Creek Township #6 will hold their
annual meeting Tuesday, March 5, 2013,
at 7:00 p.m., at the Nathan Kjerstad
home.
Heather Nelson,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.76.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
ON APPLICATION
FOR SPECIAL MALT BEVERAGE
AND WINE RETAILERS LICENSE
The Board of County Commissioners of
Pennington County, South Dakota, on
March 5, 2013 at their meeting commenc-
ing at 9:00 a.m. in the County Commis-
sioners’ Meeting Room in the Pennington
County Courthouse Addition at Rapid
City, South Dakota, will consider the fol-
lowing application for Special Malt Bever-
age and Wine Retailers License:
For Rushmore Hockey Association,
March 22, 2013, March 23, 2013 and
March 24, 2013 7:00 AM until 12:00 AM,
5611 Old Folsom Rd., Rapid City, SD
57701; Lot A of N/W1/4 S/E ½ Sec. 20
TIN R8E, Pennington County, South
Dakota.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE AP-
PROVAL OR REJECTION OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LICENSE MAY AP-
PEAR AND BE HEARD.
s/Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $11.12.
PENO TOWNSHIP #9
PUBLIC NOTICE
Peno Township #9 will hold their an-
nual meeting Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at
7:00 p.m., at the home of Gerald and
Sharla Julson.
Pierre Pippert,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.09.
RAINY CREEK
CHEYENNE
TOWNSHIP
PUBLIC NOTICE
Annual township meeting for Rainy
Creek Cheyenne will be held Tuesday,
March 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., at the Fred
Eisenbraun home.
Doris Eisenbraun,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.76.
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013 • Page 11 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Pennington County Courant
279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net
PENNINGTON CONSERVATION DISTRICT
BALANCE SHEET
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2012
Dec 31, 12
ASSETS
Current Assets
Checking/Savings
1000. Checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,539.31
1002 Petty Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172.51
1003 MMDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38,790.26
1004.1 CD #14058 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15,090.45
1004.5 CD #16113 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,618.31
1004.7 CD #14008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21,995.93
1004.8 CD #4190 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,200.92
Total Checking/Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127,407.69
Accounts Receivable
12 Accounts Receivable
1210 Trees Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .474.01
1220 Tree Fabric Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -2,788.73
1230 Drill Rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .859.74
1240 Miscellaneous Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .326.75
1250 Tree spade Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .361.68
Accounts Receivable Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -359.20
Total 12 Accounts receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-1,225.75
1260 Paired Watershed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-3,265.63
Total Accounts Receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-4,491.38
Other Current Assets
1401 Tree Inventory Asset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-4,292.24
1402 Other Inventory Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-218.54
1403 Fabric Inventory Asset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-148.10
Total Other Current Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-4,658.88
Total Current Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118,257.43
Fixed Assets
1610 Tree Shed
1610C Original Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .720.00
1755D Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-720.00
Total 1610 Tree Shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00
1650 Tree Spade
1650C Original Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14,000.00
1750D Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-14,000.00
1650 Tree Spade Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53.32
Total 1650 Tree Spade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53.32
1651 John Deere Drill
1651C Original Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,000.00
1751D Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-16,000.00
1651 John Deere Drill Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.98
Total 1651 John Deere Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.98
1652 1652 Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-6,207.39
1652C No Till Drill (2003) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61,794.00
1653 Fabric Laying Machine
1653C Original Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .828.34
1653 Fabric Laying Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-495.15
Total 1653 Fabric Laying Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333.19
1654 No Till Drill
1654C Original Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 897.00
1754D Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-21,665.22
1654 No till Drill Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-6,179.40
Total 1654 No till Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,052.38
1656 Model-455Drill-25”
1666C Original Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24,468.06
1756D Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-7,039.60
1656 Model 455Drill 25” Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-7,040.40
Total 1666 Model 455 Drill 25” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,388.06
1690 Computer (2000)
1690C Original Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,799.00
1790D Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-1,199.32
1690 Computer (200) Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-599.68
Total 1690 Computer (2000) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00
Total Fixed Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71,442.54
TOTAL ASSETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189,699.97
LIABILITIES & EQUITY
Liabilities
Current Liabilities
Other Current Liabilities
2020 Payroll Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,345.19
2100 Sales Tax Payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-1,712.16
Total Other Current Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,633.03
Total Current Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,63303
Total Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,633.03
Equity
3000 Opening Bal Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117,096.24
3999 Retained Earnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82,597.49
Net Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-13,626.79
Total Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186,066.94
TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189,699.97
____________________________________________________________
East Pennington Conservation District Financial Report
Profit & Loss Statement 2012
INCOME:
EXPENSE:
County Appropriations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,750.00
Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,761.09
Fabric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,071.70
Drill Rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15,029.30
Tree Spade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .649.60
TOTAL INCOME: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$59,273.39
Costs of Goods Sold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .663.31
GROSS PROFIT: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$58,610.08
Drill Purchase/Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$34,537.68
Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,870.11
Memberships/Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,095.62
Employee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,689.49
Tree Planting/Fabric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,731.67
Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4312.30
TOTAL EXPENSES: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$71,696.33
NET INCOME: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-$13,626.79
Published January 21, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $148.56.
ATTENTION: 2013 SENIORS & PARENTS
The Pennington County Courant would like to use a
senior picture for the graduation pages that will run
in May. You may drop them off at the office,
e-mail to annc@gwtc.net or mail them to
PO Box 435, Wall, SD.
All pictures will be returned. Thank you, Anne Jo
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE,
FEATUFINC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS, FECULAF
CATTLE SALE, & DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS
DULL SALES. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. DEEP CREEK & MIL-
LAR ANGUS: 12 P.M. (MT}. FEEDER CATTLE TO FOLLOW.
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EXPECTING 4UUU HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
WILLIAMS RN - 350 FANCY DLK CLVS; FS, ASV (2OO STFS ¸
875, 150 HF DLK FEPLC.HFFS ¸750-850} CFEEN....750-875=
FITCH FAMILY FMS - 300 DLK STFS; FS......................700-800=
HORTON RANCH.... - 215 DLK & A FEW FED CLVS (135 STFS &
80 DV FEPLC. HFFS}; FS,NI ........................................700-750=
RADWAY - 215 DLK CLVS (140 HFFS & 75 STFS};
FS,NI...........................................................................750-800=
MINT2LAFF RANCH - 200 DLK STFS & DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS ...............................................................................600-700=
TRASK FAMILY - 200 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......600-650=
KIRK - 150 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI..............................650=
TENNIS - 130 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .......750-800=
FORTUNE - 130 DLK CLVS; FS......................................550-650=
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - 130 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. ........
HFFS; FS,NI,PFECUAFD SHOT..........................................650=
NOTEBOOM CATTLE CO - 120 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,HOME FAISED,
ALL HFFS IN TOWN ....................................................650-750=
DIAMOND S RANCH - 110 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS;
FS ...............................................................................500-600=
HJORT RANCH - 110 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI .............500-600=
FINN FARMS - 100 FED ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (ALL
HFFS IN TOWN} ..........................................................750-800=
SCHUL2 - 100 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI ........................550-650=
DALY & DALY - 100 FANCY DLK ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI ..................................................................................700=
SHAW RANCH - 100 DLK HFFS; FS,NI..................................550=
MILLER - 95 DLK & A FEW CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI...........550-650=
ENNEN - 90 FANCY DLK & A FEW DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................650-675=
STOUT - 75 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI, HOME FAISED
(FFONT END IN TOWN} ......................................................725=
BEARPAW RANCH - 70 DLK & FED HFFS; FS...............650-700=
DARTT ANGUS - 70 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .........650-700=
GOOD - 65 DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......................600-700=
DENKE - 60 FANCY DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .........650-750=
BRINK - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......................600-700=
FOLAND RANCH - 60 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................550-650=
PETERSON - 55 DWF FIFST X & A FEW HEFF DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI (ALL DWF HFFS IN TOWN} ........................................700=
FREIN - 40 DLK & A FEW FED STFS; FS.......................800-900=
PROKOP & DEVRIES - 40 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI
(FFONT END} ..............................................................600-650=
NIXON - 35 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......................550-575=
WILLIAMS - 35 DLK & DWF STFS; FS............................600-700=
KRUET2 - 30 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................500=
DOOLITTLE - 25 FANCY DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..750-800=
CASPERS - 17 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI..................680-700=
LARSEN - 15 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ........500-550=
14 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS.............................................600-650=
DARTT - 10 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI.............................700=
HENRY - 10 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .....................600-700=
KALTENBACH - 10 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................400-600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FE-
PLACEMENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF &
PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
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PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
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PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: F£B. J9, 2DJS
L1gÞ1 run o] bred o] oous & o good run o] ue1gÞ-ups.
4,DDD Feeders & Rep1ooemen1 He1]ers ne×1 ueeK.
BRED CATTLE:
BRET HANSON - FAITH
20........................................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 1220=..........$1,470.00
20......................................................DLK HFFS 1019=..........$1,275.00
DON & VI MOODY - PHILIP
15 .....................................................DWF HFFS 1063=..........$1,360.00
14.......................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1313=..........$1,275.00
20.......................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1408=..........$1,250.00
34.......................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1451=..........$1,120.00
10 ...............HEFF SOLID & DFOKEM MOUTH COWS 1387=..........$1,070.00
30..................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUFTH COWS 1364=..........$1,040.00
LOWELL BADER - VALENTINE, NE
11 ...........................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1109=..........$1,300.00
JERRY WALKER ESTATE - TUTHILL
54......................................................DLK HFFS 1014=..........$1,200.00
MONTY WILLIAMS - BOX ELDER
23.......................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1306=..........$1,190.00
18....................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1327=..........$1,090.00
WEIGH-UPS:
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
1 .........................FWF COW 1580= ............$86.50
1 .........................FWF COW 1375= ............$86.00
1........................CHAF COW 1515= ............$85.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1380= ............$84.50
1........................CHAF COW 1500= ............$84.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1470= ............$83.50
2 ............CHAF & FED COWS 1635= ............$82.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1535= ............$82.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1320= ............$81.00
1 .........................DWF COW 1615= ............$80.00
1........................CHAF COW 1580= ............$79.50
1....................DLK COWETTE 1150= ............$91.00
1..........................DLK DULL 1775= ..........$105.00
2........................DLK DULLS 2070= ..........$104.00
WAYNE HUETHER - INTERIOR
6 ........................FED COWS 1248= ............$84.25
CRAIG REINDL - CUSTER
1........................CHAF COW 1290= ............$83.50
SCOTT HUETHER - INTERIOR
1..........................FED COW 1225= ............$83.00
15................FED COWETTES 1156= ............$84.00
CHARLES MAUDE - CAPUTA
1 ..........................DLK COW 1490= ............$82.00
KELLY ESCOTT - FAITH
1..........................DLK DULL 1800= ..........$105.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1440= ............$78.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1565= ............$77.50
REINDL LIVESTOCK - CUSTER
1 ..........................DLK COW 1340= ............$82.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1105= ............$77.50
3 ..................DLK COWETTES 1107= ............$81.00
DON & VI MOODY - PHILIP
1 ..........................DLK COW 1275= ............$82.50
6.........................DLK COWS 1221= ............$78.25
12......................FWF COWS 1348= ............$77.75
1 ..........................DLK COW 1270= ............$77.50
1....................DLK COWETTE 960=..............$98.00
1....................DLK COWETTE 1060= ............$86.00
1 .........................DLK HFFT 1075= ..........$108.00
PAUL VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1 ..........................DLK COW 1105= ............$82.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1630= ............$79.00
DARREL & CONNIE MICKELSON - ENNING
1....................DLK COWETTE 1110= ............$90.00
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
1..........................FED COW 1200= ............$81.50
JERRY HICKS - NORRIS
1........................CHAF COW 1475= ............$80.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1460= ............$78.50
4........................DLK HFFTS 1175= ............$86.00
BROST RANCH - MURDO
1 ..........................DLK COW 1235= ............$80.50
1..........................DLK DULL 1625= ............$96.00
KEVIN REINDL - CUSTER
1 ..........................DLK COW 1420= ............$80.00
1..........................DLK DULL 1695= ............$96.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE COMPANY - QUINN
2........................DLK DULLS 1713= ..........$103.50
2........................DLK DULLS 1655= ..........$103.00
2........................DLK DULLS 1605= ..........$102.00
2........................DLK DULLS 1988= ..........$101.75
1..........................DLK DULL 2050= ..........$101.00
2........................DLK DULLS 1735= ..........$100.50
2........................DLK DULLS 1920= ..........$100.00
BRYCE VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1 ..........................DLK COW 1795= ............$79.50
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
1 ..........................DLK COW 1245= ............$79.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1380= ............$77.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1445= ............$76.50
LAVERNE KOCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ..........................DLK COW 1310= ............$79.00
RODNEY RAYHILL - MARTIN
1 ..........................DLK COW 1240= ............$78.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1155= ............$77.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1325= ............$76.50
LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
1....................DLK COWETTE 1045= ............$93.00
HORTON RANCH - WALL
1..........................DLK DULL 1845= ..........$102.00
1..........................DLK DULL 2020= ............$99.00
CHUCK ENDERS - KADOKA
1 ..........................DLK COW 1350= ............$78.00
GERALD RISSE - MARTIN
2.........................DLK COWS 1505= ............$77.00
1....................DLK COWETTE 1030= ............$86.00
DEAN & DONNA KLAPPERICH - RAPID CITY
1 ..........................DLK COW 1525= ............$76.50
EARL BRUNSON - FAIRBURN
1 ..........................DLK COW 1260= ............$76.50
1....................DLK COWETTE 1050= ............$86.50
STOUT CHAROLAIS - KADOKA ...41 AVG. $3,31S.00
HORSE REPORT:
GOOD HORSES FROM..........................$10 - $20JCWT
SADDLE PROSPECTS .......................$42S - $S2SJCWT
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
RH CATTLE
SELLING
TUESDAY,
MARCH 12
AT 12:00 P.M.
(MT)
Pennington County Courant • February 21, 2013 • Page 12
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly mo-
tivational seminars each year.
Call Bob for more details at
800-437-9715 and be sure to
check out Bob’s website at:
www.mrattitudespeaks.com
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
1788 +/- Acres Just North of Philip
Call Rick at 605-641-1987
The Pennington County Board
of Commissioners are accepting
applications to fill a position on the
Pennington County Housing and
Redevelopment Commission. This
position is for a five year term.
The Pennington County Hous-
ing and Redevelopment Commis-
sion oversees the Federal Public
Housing Program for low to mod-
erate income families in the area.
Those who want to be considered
for an appointment are asked to
submit a written statement of in-
terest to the Commission Office,
315 Saint Joseph Street, Suite
156, Rapid City, SD 57701. Please
include your agency or community
affiliation (if applicable), your par-
ticular interests as related to a
board of this kind, and what you
can contribute to such a board.
All responses must be received
in the County Commission Office
by 4:00 p.m., Wednesday, March
12, 2013. The appointment will be
made at the March 19th Board of
Commissioners Meeting.
For additional information,
please contact Pennington County
Housing at 394-5350.
Commissioners accepting
applications
Continued from page 5
The Looking Glass of Time
are Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Eisen-
braun and Mr. and Mrs. Darwin
Shepard.
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Mar-
vin Curtis was damaged by fire
Friday. Mr. Curtis is in the hospi-
tal at Rapid City and Mrs. Curtis
was with him when the fire oc-
curred. The Curtis’ are staying
elsewhere at the present. It is be-
lieved the fire started under a
heating stove and there was no one
at home.
30 years ago…
The weather seemed to favor the
spectators as much as the drivers
in the Badlands Baja 100 off-road
vehicle race held near Interior on
Sunday, February 20. The
weather, sunny and warm with a
mild breeze, led to a fast-paced
race and a crowd of some 3000 peo-
ple. Whereas mud is usually an in-
tegral part of bajas, this year dust
created problems for the drivers.
Several drivers’ cars overheated or
suffered mechanical breakdowns,
and one car rolled over at the start
as a result of the dusty conditions.
Daryl Dressler of Rapid City won
first place overall. Rocky Kennedy
was the highest placer from Wall
with a second place finish in the
modified 4-wheel drive class.
Marty Huether and Barry Sev-
erson represented Wall in the
State “B” Wrestling Tournament
held in Huron, February 18-19.
The results of the two wrestlers
were entirely different as Huether
came out of the tournament un-
scathed and Severson was unable
to garner a victory at the tough
level of state competition. Huether
became the first wrestler in Wall’s
history to make it through a sea-
son as the undefeated state cham-
pion. He ran his season record to
24-0 in becoming the 119-pound
champion. His career record ended
at 108 wins, seven losses and one
tie.
20 years ago…
The Wall Board of Education
met in special session last week
and following executive session
moved to reduce high school Eng-
lish teacher Nancy Iverson from
full-time to half-time in the Eng-
lish department. According to
Supt. Ken Poppe, the move was
made due to projected student
numbers, the board’s desire for
change in curriculum offerings and
the need to be more efficient with
staff and offerings now available.
Dave and Linda LaFee sold their
Express Mart Conoco convenience
store to Shannon Capital, a Rapid
City-based company which had
been delivering fuel products to
the Wall store. Shannon Capital,
which recently purchased a second
convenience store in Mitchell,
changed the name of Wall’s Conoco
from Express Mart to the Corner
Pantry, which is the name of their
Mitchell store as well. Chuck Van
Vleck manager of LaFee’s Express
Mart, resumes at duty as manager
of the Corner Pantry. Ownership
changed January 7, 1993.
Three Wall High School seniors
recently returned from Pierre,
where they were serving as legisla-
tive pages. Heather Fortune,
daughter of Roger and Bonna For-
tune, Quinn, served under Repre-
sentative Gordon Pederson; Anna
Eisenbraun, daughter of David
and Maria Eisenbraun, Wall,
served under Representative Gor-
don Pederson; Sean Patterson, son
of Dale and Barb Patterson, Wall,
served under Senator Lyndell Pe-
terson.
The Eagles continued their suc-
cessful season with a third place in
the Regional Wrestling Tourna-
ment. Wall qualified four wrestlers
to the State Meet held in Water-
town this weekend. Stanley
County ran away with the tourna-
ment and Mobridge took second.
The qualifiers for State are Ryan
Patterson, Chris Lurz, Dustin
Lurz, and Matthew Brucklacher.
Wall Eagles soar to their fifth
win of the season with a convinc-
ing 78-71 victory over heated rival
New Underwood in Wall, last
Tuesday.
10 years ago…
Black Hills Financial Services,
located at Black Hills Federal
Credit Union, is proud to an-
nounce that Preston Johnson is
the recipient of the Black Hills Fi-
nancial Services December 2002
Student of the Month award at
Wall High School. Preston is a 17-
year-old junior, and is the son of
Rick and Wendy Johnson.
The Wall/Kadoka Wrestling
team took second place at their
district tournament. Wrestlers
placing first were Tyrel Carson,
140 pound weight class; Lukus
Fite, 103 pound weight class; and
Zane Hoffman, 275 pound weight
class.
The girls had some tough luck at
the West River Tournament. Their
first game brought them up
against a AA school, playing Rapid
City Stevens JV, with a final score
Wall 26, Rapid City Stevens JV 66.
The girls’ second game was against
Edgemont with the final score
Wall 79, Edgemont 36. The fifth
and sixth place game was Wall vs.
Faith. The girls lost a hard fought
game by five points with the final
score Wall 33, Faith 38.
FLATT BUTTE
TOWNSHIP #12
PUBLIC NOTICE
Flatt Butte Township #12 will hold their
annual meeting Tuesday, March 6, 2013,
at 7:00 p.m., at the Leslie Williams resi-
dence.
Kay Williams,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.76.
LAKE HILL
TOWNSHIP #5
PUBLIC NOTICE
Lake Hill Township #5 will hold its an-
nual meeting on Tuesday, March 5, 2013,
at 7 p.m. at Terry Peter’s shop, north of
Wall.
Anita Heathershaw,
Clerk
Published February 21 & 28, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $9.76.
A long time ago, my wife and I
came to the conclusion that usually
when we see something that is not
so positive in one of our children,
there is a very good chance that
one or the other of us, as parents,
is needing improvement in that
same area of our own life. Put an-
other way, seeing the weaknesses
in our child's life is a lot like look-
ing into a mirror that reminds us of
our faults and shortcomings.
For instance, you scold your son
for grumbling and complaining
about doing their chores; when you
hold up the mirror you see you
have been grumbling and com-
plaining about your job too. Or you
remind your daughter for the
umpteenth time to stop leaving her
stuff laying all over the place; the
mirror reveals that you aren't very
good about putting your things
away either. Whatever our actions
and attitudes, our children some-
how get the idea they have our per-
mission to do what they have seen
us do. Monkey see, monkey do!
We dads (and moms too) whether
we like it or not, are setting the ex-
ample every day for our children at
home. It can take a great deal of
courage and honesty to look into
that mirror and have to admit that
our child is only imitating what
they have seen in us.
Please keep in mind that I have
been on a quest for self-improve-
ment for nearly all my adult life,
and at the same time have been an
open book, sharing my journey
with its challenges, discoveries and
successes along the way. I have not
said this in a long time, but the fact
remains that accountability and re-
sponsibility go hand in hand. Not
only parents, but also employers,
supervisors, politicians and anyone
else who is in leadership in any ca-
pacity needs to look in the mirror
more often-to take a good look to
find out what is behind that mask
of mediocrity.
If you recognize yourself in what
I have written-as I know it de-
scribes me at times-then be chal-
lenged right now to commit to mak-
ing the personal and professional
changes necessary in order to have
a more positive impact on those
that we lead.
Look in the Mirror

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