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Pennington Co. Courant, December 27, 2012

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Number 52
Volume 107
December 27, 2012
The governor’s Primary Care
Task Force has presented its final
report to Governor Dennis Dau-
gaard, recommending that health
professions’ education programs
work more closely together in
South Dakota and that training
opportunities in rural areas be ex-
panded.
The task force also recommends
that Governor Daugaard appoint
an ongoing oversight committee to
monitor progress and report to
him, the Board of Regents and the
Legislature.
“An aging population needing
more health care, a declining
school-age population to fill
healthcare positions, and the con-
centration of health professionals
in our most populous areas are
making it difficult in rural commu-
nities to recruit and retain medical
providers,” the Governor said.
“The task force’s assignment was
not easy, and I appreciate the time
and effort devoted to it.”
Primary Care Task Force
reports to governor
The task force report offers de-
tailed strategies and recommenda-
tions in five areas:
·Capacity of healthcare educa-
tion programs
·Quality rural health experi-
ences
·Recruitment and retention
·Innovative primary care models
·Accountability and oversight
Examples of specific strategies
include payments to South Dakota
medical providers who offer in-
struction and supervision of physi-
cian assistant students, and ex-
panding rural experience pro-
grams such as the Frontier and
Rural Medicine (FARM) program.
Governor Daugaard said an
oversight committee is crucial.
“Maintaining health care in
rural South Dakota is a long-term
commitment that requires contin-
ually tracking our efforts and Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Don & Tami Ravellette & Employees
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Nay these Le the hìgh¦ìght
oí the New Year
and may they grow
wìth each eLL and í¦ow.
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce Retail Committee
held a drawing during their annual pancake supper. Winners of
the shopping spree were: from left to right ... Bill Leonard, Jerry
Maas, Martha Johnston and James Reynolds. Winners were
given one minute to run the aisle of the Wall Food Center filling
their carts with groceries. Leonard donated $100 of his winnings
to the Country Cupboard Food Pantry and Johnston donated
what was left of her's too! Other winners of the drawings were:
Kids - Kassidy Sawvell, Braylee Walker, Carter Sundall, Deacon
Haerer, Cass Lytle, Kailey Sawvell, Harmony Nelson and Kaitlyn
Kitterman. $100 winners were: Merlin Crown, Max Hauk, Stuart
Kitterman and Charity Northrup. $50 winners were: Don Sawvell,
Kent Anderson, Jerrie Heinrichs and Gina Ferris.
~Photo by Lindsay Hildebrand
Shopping spree winners
The United States Department
of Agriculture (USDA) Rural De-
velopment honored First Inter-
state Bank in Wall for their part-
nership in utilizing the USDA
Business and Industry (B&I) Loan
Guarantee Program to increase ac-
cess to capital for businesses in
rural areas of South Dakota, sup-
porting jobs and improving the
quality of life for residents living in
the western part of the state.
“President Obama is committed
to strengthening rural commit-
tees,” said Elsie Meeks, South
Dakota USDA Rural Development
State Director. “Working with pri-
vate lenders throughout the state,
USDA Rural Development is able
to increase investment capital,
helping communities and local or-
ganizations build a strong busi-
ness infrastructure to nurture eco-
nomic growth.”
USDA Rural Development pro-
vided $1.07 million in Business
and Industry Loan Guarantees for
local lender First Interstate Bank
that, through leveraging, assisted
three businesses. These projects
are expected to create four jobs
and retain 24.
“Rural Development has been a
great partner for First Interstate
Bank and our business loan cus-
tomers in 2012. Their B&I pro-
gram has provided us access to
long term fixed rate financing for
our rural business customers,”
said Brett Blasius, President of
First Interstate Bank Wall. “I feel
that this partnership has strength-
ened our rural community by
maintaining and in some cases,
adding jobs, which are the result of
attractive finance options to our
customers.”
In Fiscal Year 2012, USDA
Rural Development Business and
Industry (B&I) Guaranteed Loan
program made available $33.2 mil-
lion that, through leverage $128
million, assisted nine businesses.
The purpose of the B&I Guaran-
teed Loan Program is to improve,
develop or finance business, indus-
try and employment and improve
the economic and environmental
climate in rural communities. This
purpose is achieved by bolstering
the existing private credit struc-
ture through the guarantee of
quality loans which will provide
lasting community benefits.
Visit http://www.rurdev.usda.go
v/sd/ for additional program infor-
mation or to locate and USDA
Rural Development Office nearest
you.
For additional information on
Rural Development projects,
please visit Rural Development’s
new interactive web map featuring
program funding and success sto-
ries for fiscal years 2009 - 2011.
The data can be found on
http://www. rurdev.usda.gov/RD-
SuccessStories.html.
President Obama’s plan for
rural America has brought about
historic investment and resulted
in stronger rural communities.
Under the President’s leader-
ship, these investments in hous-
ing, community facilities, busi-
nesses and infrastructure have
empowered rural America to con-
tinue leading the way- strengthen-
ing America’s economy, small
towns and rural communities.
USDA's investments in rural
communities support the rural
way of life that stands as the back-
bone of our American values.
President Obama and Agricul-
ture Secretary Tom Vilsack are
committed to a smarter use of Fed-
eral resources to foster sustainable
economic prosperity and ensure
the government is a strong partner
for businesses, entrepreneurs and
working families in rural commu-
nities.
USDA, through its Rural Devel-
opment mission area, has an ac-
tive portfolio of more that $176 bil-
lion in loans and loan guarantees.
These programs are designed to
improve the quality of life in rural
America.
First Interstate Bank receives honor
from Department of Agriculture
First Interstate receiving their award from the United States De-
partment of Agriculture Rural Development. Pictured from left
to right ... South Dakota Rural Development State Director Elsie
Meeks, President of First Interstate Bank Brett Blasius, South
Dakota Rural Development Area Director Tim Potts and Kent Jor-
dan Ag Loan Officer with First Interstate Bank.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
by Laurie Hindman
A new year will be here shortly
along with the many New Year’s
resolutions that a person vows to
keep.
Whether you made one or not,
Karol Pattersons fourth grade
class has resolved to make and
keep their following resolutions:
Jenna Elshere: “To help people
in need and to get far in life.”
Bridger Amiotte: “To get better
at wrestling, football and school
work.”
Katy Humphrey: “Learn how to
speak dog, do more housework and
become a better artist.”
Brycen Cheney: “To take care of
my cat and dog more, to run more
and get better at football.”
Brody Carter: “Get better at
baseball, football and soccer. To do
more motorcycle riding and build
stuff.
Aaden Kroells: “Going to work
out a lot so I will have a six pack.”
Levi Lovejoy: “Take better care
of my room. Take care of my dog
and guinea pig and help when not
even asked.”
Charlie Rose Heathershaw: “Try
to win first place in barrel racing
and get better at gymnastics.”
Laketon Anderson: “Do 100 push
ups a day and not drink any soda.”
Marissa Lanfear: “Get better
grades and help around the house
more. Gain some weight, I’m so
skinny.”
Reid Hansen: “Get to state
wrestling and also work on getting
a six pack.”
Cameron Ausmann: “Try to eat
healthier and get back on the Prin-
cipal Honor Roll.
Samuel Swanson: “Improve my
grades and improve on my behav-
ior at times.”
With the determination I heard
in their voices I know each one of
the fourth graders will keep their
resolutions. And as for me, I will be
at the gym working on my six
pack.
What’s your resolution for 2013
Elm Spring students
know the gift of giving
Elm Springs students stopped by the First Interstate Bank on
Thursday, December 20 to enteratain the bank employees with
a few Christmas carols. This year the students decided not to
exchange gifts amongst each other rather they purchased
gloves and mittens to give to the Angel tree this year. Students
also auctioned off a quilt they had made. The quilt brought
$2,300 and the proceeds were donated to Harold and Karen Del-
bridge. Pictured back row: from left to right ... Jacob Linn, Carter
Elshere, Savanna Johnston, teacher Connie Mickelson, Kelli
Linn and Chrissy Elshere. Middle row ... Kassandra Linn, John-
nie Jo Anders and Carrie Elshere. Front row ... James Nachtigall.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
On Thursday, December 6 at the
32nd Annual Ag Appreciation Ban-
quet hosted by the Ag and Natural
Resources Committee of the Rapid
City Area Chamber of Commerce,
Grady and Bernice Crew were
honored with the Aggie of the Year
Award.
The Chamber’s Ag and Natural
Resources Committee established
this special award in 1981. The
award was created to honor indi-
viduals who provide leadership
that has benefited the local area
agriculture community over an ex-
tended period of time.
The Crews were honored for
their lifetime of service in agricul-
ture through the operation of their
successful agri-businesses includ-
ing the Crew Crop Insurance
Agency, the Badlands Trading Post
and now the Prairie Homestead.
Grady is the fourth generation
operator of Crew Ranch, Crew Cat-
tle Company, where he and Ber-
nice now raise Angus cows and
Charolais calves and grow wheat
and corn. The Crews have been
married since 1978 and have two
children. Their son Caleb is at
home and helps run the ranch
with them and their daughter
Jamie works as Communications
Officer for the South Dakota De-
partment of Agriculture.
Grady and Bernice have both
played important roles in their
community. Grady has served as
Secretary of Cenex Harvest State,
President of the White River Graz-
ing District, Director on the SD
Wheat Board, he was on the Jack-
son County Soil Conservation Dis-
trict Board and President of the
Kadoka School Board. Bernice is
currently a director on the Bad-
lands Natural History Association.
More than 600 people were pres-
ent at the Appreciation Banquet,
where South Dakota Secretary of
Agriculture Walt Bones gave the
keynote address.
Grady and Bernice Crew honored
with “Aggie of the Year” award
Bernice and Grady Crew receive the Aggie of the Year award on
December 6 at the annual Ag Appreication banquet.
~Courtesy Photo
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
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tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • December 27, 2012 • Page 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
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Email us with your news item or photo to courant @ gwtc.net
Social Security News
By Kathy Petersen
Social Security Public
Affairs Specialist
Question:
I applied for a replacement So-
cial Security card last week but
have not received it. When should
I expect to receive my new card?
Answer:
On average, it takes approxi-
mately 10 to 14 days to receive
your replacement Social Security
card. However, if we need to ver-
ify documents you present as
proof of identity, it could take
longer in some cases. For more in-
formation about your Social Secu-
rity card and number, visit
www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber.
Question:
My wife and I live in South
Dakota, but plan to spend the
winter in New Mexico. My wife
will turn 62 while we are down
south. Can she apply for benefits
in New Mexico, or do we have to
wait until we get back home to
apply for retirement at our local
Social Security office?
Answer:
These days, you don’t even
have to be near a Social Security
office to apply for benefits. Re-
gardless of where you and your
wife are living, you can apply for
retirement benefits online at
www.socialsecurity.gov/applytore-
tire. It’s so easy to do, and it can
take as little as 15 minutes to
complete and submit the applica-
tion.
If she prefers, your wife can file
a retirement benefit application
at any Social Security office — in-
cluding the one closest to you in
South Dakota, New Mexico, or
wherever you happen to be.
Question:
I am about to apply for Social
Security disability benefits. I have
two children, ages 9 and 12. If my
application is approved, will they
get benefits, too? Or do the chil-
dren also have to be disabled to
qualify for benefits on my record?
Answer:
If you qualify for Social Security
disability benefits, your children
may receive dependent’s benefits
based on your work record, even if
they’re not disabled themselves.
As long as you receive benefits,
their benefits will continue until
they reach age 18, or until age 19
if they are still in high school.
If your children are disabled,
however, at the time that they
reach age 18, they may be able to
continue receiving benefits into
adulthood.
For more information, visit our
website on disability benefits at
www.socialsecurity.gov/di
sability.
Your Question, Social Security’s Answers
Representative Kristi Noem an-
nounced that the United States
Department of Agriculture
(USDA) responded to her Septem-
ber 13th and October 18th letters
on the new school lunch standards.
USDA replied to specific questions
posed by Representative Noem
and announced it would be provid-
ing schools increased flexibility in
the current year on maximums for
grains and meats in the school
meal program. Representative
Noem has put substantial pres-
sure on USDA to improve flexibil-
ity for schools working to imple-
ment new standards under the
Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of
2010.
“It is clear that the pressure
from students, parents and food
service directors has put USDA on
notice,” said Representative Noem.
“I am pleased USDA has taken
USDA responds to Rep. Noem
on school lunch standards
action to increase flexibility in the
current year, and will continue to
pursue more flexibility to address
the fundamental struggles stu-
dents and schools are experienc-
ing. That is why I requested a Gov-
ernment Accountability Office
study. This study will help Con-
gress determine what action to
take to improve the standards in a
way that ensures kids are fed nu-
tritious and filling meals in a way
that is also cost effective for our
schools.”
Representative Noem has vis-
ited a number of South Dakota
schools and spoken with students,
parents, teachers, food service di-
rectors and administrators and
has heard concerns regarding the
adequacy of the calorie maximum,
the cost of the new requirements,
and increased food waste in school
cafeterias.
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Rcck ¹N RcII Lanes
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Sunday-FrIday, 1B tc B p.m. · Saturday, 1B p.m. tc cIcsIng
The kItchen Is cpen - we have crders tc gc!!
SS9-B4ß0 · PhIIIp
Tuesduy NIte Men's £uv!y
IooµIo`s Mkf..............................35-l3
Konnody Imµ.......................28.5-l9.5
Coorgo`s WoIdIng ......................26-22
IhIIIµ Mofor..............................26-22
C&A TronchIng...................22.5-25.5
Kndokn Troo SorvIco...........l8.5-29.5
Ionr Aufo ..................................l8-30
IhIIIµ HonIfh SorvIco .........l?.5-30.5
HIgL!IgLts:
Cory Ioyd ............5-? sµIIf; 20l, 238,
...............................................200/639
Mnff SchofIoId.......................204/5?8
IIII InInbrIdgo ......8-9 & 3-l0 sµIIfs;
.....................................223 cIonn/564
Tony CouId ...................................559
!onnIo WIIIInms....................202/550
AIvIn Ionrson........................2l2/53?
Jorry Iron MoccnsIn .....3-? sµIIf; 53?
Todd !ndwny.........................232/533
Torry Wonfz..................................522
WondoII IuxcoI.............................5l2
Jnmos MnnsfIoId ........3-l0 sµIIf; 50?
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Sfovo Vnrnor.........................4-9 sµIIf
Wednesduy MovnIng CoIIee
Sfnfo Inrm....................................4-0
IowIIng IoIIos ..............................3-l
InvIsIbIos.......................................3-l
JoIIy !nnchors ..............................l-3
CuffIng Idgo SnIon ......................0-4
HIgL!IgLts:
Knron IoInnd ........................l82/4?2
ShIrIoy Inrsons.....................l?6/423
Ðob ÞovIIIo............................l6?/39?
Ðonnn KIng ...........................l64/453
ÐobbIo Cnrfnor....9-l0 sµIIf; l6l/4l6
Joyco HIcks ........4-5 x 2, & 2-? sµIIfs
Private Applicator Certification
training will be held on Friday,
January 4, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center.
Applicator certification training
Many schools are also concerned
the requirements limit their flexi-
bility and make it more difficult to
adapt their menus to meet the
preferences and needs of their stu-
dents and school communities.
Representative Noem has been a
leading voice on questioning the
new standards. Most recently, she
was joined by House Committee on
Education and the Workforce
Chairman John Kline (R-MN) and
Representative Phil Roe, M.D. (R-
TN) in requesting a Government
Accountability Office (GAO) study
into the new standards.
On November 28, Representa-
tive Noem announced that the
GAO has agreed to conduct the
study, which will help determine
the on-the-ground impacts of the
new standards and provide guid-
ance on how Congress might be
able to address challenges.
Santa Claus made it to the In-
galls house in De Smet, Dakota
Territory, even if the train bearing
supplies did not.
In The Long Winter, Laura In-
galls Wilder describes how she and
her family faced the hard winter of
1880-81.
That Christmas, small striped
packages by each place at the table
contained Christmas candy. There
were presents, too. Laura, her sis-
ter Carrie and Ma had combined
their money to purchase a pair of
blue suspenders for Pa.
Laura gave a cardboard hair re-
ceiver to Ma and a roll of knitted
lace to her sister Mary. She found
the prettiest card she had been
given in Sunday school and placed
it in a frame for Carrie.
Baby Grace tore the paper from
her gift to reveal a toy.
The two cans of oysters that Pa
had bought from the store were
combined with the last of the milk
the Ingalls’ cow gave to make a
Christmas dinner of oyster soup.
“‘Oh, what a lovely Christmas,’
Carrie sighed. Laura thought so
too.
Whatever happened, they could
always have a merry Christmas,”
Ingalls wrote in The Long Winter.
Christmas, whether one was a
pioneer in town, in the Army or a
homesteader, was observed on the
frontier, as evidenced in different
writings about the day.
In A Frontier Army Christmas
compiled by Lori A. Cox-Paul and
Dr. James W. Wengert, 1st Sgt.
Ragnar Theodor Ling-Vannerus of
the Seventh Cavalry wrote of his
camp’s holiday preparations at
Pine Ridge in 1890: “Every tent
was decorated with firs and twigs,
and long garlands of evergreens
were stretched between the tents.
At each end of the picket lines,
sheaves were put up … In the
kitchens everybody was busy;
turkeys and geese were roasted or
grilled and filled with apples and
other delicacies, whole pigs were
Ingalls family. Back row: from left to right ... Carrie, Laura and
Grace. Front row ...Caroline, Charles and Mary.
~Photo South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives
A merry prairie Christmas
hung on the broaches, pastries and
cakes were baked, and so on …
Eventually came the feast ea-
gerly longed-for, and mighty was
the drinking among high and low
… Along the walls there were low
seats covered with a mixed collec-
tion of skin rugs, in whose soft,
warm furs it was delightful to rest,
while speeches, toasts, and songs
made time unnoticeably go by.
There were also Christmas gifts
from near and far.”
In June 1909, 21-year-old Eliza-
beth Corey came to South Dakota
to stake out a claim, homestead
the land and to teach school.
She filed claim to land 10 miles
southwest of Pierre, along the Bad
River.
The letters she wrote to her fam-
ily in Iowa from 1909 to 1919 are
contained in the State Archives of
the South Dakota State Historical
Society at the Cultural Heritage
Center in Pierre. The letters are
the basis of Bachelor Bess.
Corey wrote of her first Christ-
mas as a homesteader, “I have
three Xmas presents. Mrs. Stone
gave me a beauty of a button box.
Myrtle gave me a pretty Xmas
card and Speers gave me an enam-
eled quart cup … Xmas day there
was lots of company and lots to do
so I never had time to get home-
sick. Just before supper Howard
hitched to the bobsleigh and we
went to take Ben Share some
Xmas goodies.”
All was not calm on Christmas
Day 1862 in Yankton, Dakota Ter-
ritory.
According to Christmas on the
American Frontier 1800-1900 by
John E. Baur, a brawl broke out
between a supporter of territorial
legislator J.B.S Todd and a backer
of territorial Governor William
Jayne. Todd’s supporter threw in
the towel and Jayne’s defender
broke the man’s thumb.
Politics and Christmas seldom
mix.
Please bring a photo identifica-
tion with you when you attend the
training.
Oh Christmas Tumbleweed
The staff at Golden West decided a tumbleweed would be a
Christmas tree this year. By the looks of the tumbleweed it was
a very good year for them. The weed was decorated with lights
and bulbs. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
It’s not magic. Brewing the per-
fect cup of coffee can take place in
your own kitchen!
As with any recipe, fresh, high-
quality ingredients matter. Start
with fresh, cold water. If you don’t
like the taste of your tap water, use
filtered water for better flavor.
Remember, grinding coffee in
advance of brewing means loss of
flavor. So invest in a coffee grinder
for a fresher brew.
How to brew the perfect cup
of coffee every morning
Not all coffee beans are created
equally -- rely on a coffee with dis-
tinctive flavor profiles and consis-
tent roasting, such as Portland
Roasting Coffee, named by “Roast
Magazine” as the 2012 Roaster of
the Year.
Use two tablespoons of ground
coffee per six ounce of water.
Make sure your brewing device
reaches between 195F-205F to ex-
tract maximum flavor.
checking the data to make sure
we’re making a difference,” the
governor said. “The oversight com-
mittee will make sure these recom-
mendations don’t just sit on a
shelf.”
The 25-member task force was
appointed in May to study primary
medical care education in the state
and recommend ways to train
more family practice physicians,
physician assistants, nurse practi-
tioners and other primary health
care providers for South Dakota’s
rural areas.
The group’s full report can be
viewed at http://doh.sd.gov/Prima-
ryCare/Promoting rural health oc-
cupations is a key component of
Governor Daugaard’s South
Dakota Workforce Initiatives
(WINS).
South Dakota WINS is a work-
force development program that
brings together government, edu-
cation and business leaders to help
the state develop and attract a
stronger, more-educated work-
force.
Find more information about the
program at http://www.southdakot
awins.com/.
Primary Care Task Force reports
to governor continued from page 1
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture (SDDA) and South
Dakota State University (SDSU)
Extension will hold forums across
the state to discuss South Dakota’s
vision for livestock production this
January through March.
“South Dakota has progressive,
forward-thinking entrepreneurs
who understand the exciting po-
tential of today’s agri-business
marketplace,” said SD Secretary of
Agriculture Walt Bones. “We’re
starting the conversation about
the challenges and advantages
South Dakota has to increase the
number of livestock in our state.”
All forums are scheduled to
begin at 6:30 p.m. local time but
are subject to change.
Dates and places are as fol-
lows:
•January 14 - Aberdeen Live-
stock
•January 15 - Mobridge Live-
stock
•January 21 - Ft. Pierre Live-
stock
•January 22 - Herried Livestock
•January 23 - Martin Livestock
•January 24 - Philip Livestock
•February 4 - Hub City Live-
stock
•February 6 - Bales Continental
•February 8 - Glacial Lakes
Livestock
SD Dept. of Ag and SDSU Extension to
hold “The Next Generation of Livestock
Production” forums
•February 25 - Platte Livestock
•February 26 - Magness Live-
stock
•February 27 - Madison Live-
stock
•February 28 - Kimball Live-
stock
•March 5 - Mitchell Livestock
•March 6 - Yankton Livestock
•March 7 - Sioux Falls Regional
•March 11 - Belle Fourche Live-
stock
•March 12 - St. Onge Livestock
•March 13 - Faith Livestock
•March 14 - Lemmon Livestock
•March 18 - Miller Livestock
•March 19 - Presho Livestock
•March 20 - Winner Livestock
•March 21 - Chamberlain Live-
stock
For more information, contact
Sarah Caslin, SDDA Livestock De-
velopment Specialist at 605-773-
3649 or visit http://sdda.sd.gov
Agriculture is South Dakota's
No. 1 industry, generating nearly
$21 billion in annual economic ac-
tivity and employing more than
80,000 South Dakotans. The South
Dakota Department of Agricul-
ture's mission is to promote, pro-
tect, preserve and improve this in-
dustry for today and tomorrow.
Visit us online at
http://sdda.sd.gov or follow us on
Facebook and Twitter.
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • December 27, 2012• Page 3
ALL types!
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Located in
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Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
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Tbursday, December 2?
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·Poiaio Sou¡ & SandwicI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
FrIday, December 2S
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·CIiclcn Dun¡ling Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . $S.29
Saturday, December 29
·Fculcn w/Poiaio Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6.29
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Sunday, December 30
·All You Can Eai Drcalfasi Duffci. . . . . . . . . . . $?.39
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Monday, December 31
·Ovcn Dalcd CIiclcn
w/MasIcd Poiaiocs, Cravy & Vcgciallc . . . . . . . . $6.29
·Tonaio Sou¡ & SandwicI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $S.29
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279-2175 · Wall, SD
BreakIast: Mon. - Sat.
2 Eggs & Toasi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.19
2 Pancalcs & Sausagc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.19
Watch here for
upcoming movies!
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
December 28-29-30-31
Life of Pi (PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Wall School ninth - twelfth
grade chorus and eighth thru
twelfth grade band held their hol-
iday concert on Monday, December
17 at the Wall School gym.
The chorus performed “The Lit-
tle Drummer Boy, various themes
on “Fa-La-La,” “It’s The Most Won-
derful Time Of The Year” and “All
On A Silent Night.”
Members of the chorus are:
Sopranos - Caitlin Ausmann,
Logan Bowers, Analise Garland,
Autumn Schulz and Elizabeth
Sykora.
Altos - Monica Bielmaier, Kim-
berly Billings, Josie Blasius, Ken-
lyn Counting, Anika Eisenbraun,
Nicole Eisenbraun, Shanda-Rae
Enriquez, Shelby Feldman, Kelly
Green, Tayah Huether, Carlee
Johnston, Emily Linn, Michaela
Schaefer and Samantha Steffen.
Baritones - Dylan Carter,
Taran Eisenbraun, Andrew Ferris,
Will Housman, Austin Huether,
Carson Johnston, Laketon
McLaughlin, Daniel Muzik, Les
Williams and Ryder Wilson.
Band members performed
“Christmas Is Coming,” “A Jazzy
Christmas,” “Sleigh Ride” and
“The Christmas Song.”
Members are:
Flute - Ashley Dauksavage and
Michaela Schaefer.
Clarinet - Savanna Deutscher
and Elyssa Westby.
Alto Saxophone - Autumn
Deering, Jennifer Emery, Cody
Huether and Michael Mordecai.
Trumpet - Heather Dauksav-
age, Sidney Dunker, Analise Gar-
land, Austin Huether, Ellen Moon
and David Sykora.
Trombone - Caitlin Ausmann.
Baritone - July Kammerer.
Tuba - Branden Hamann.
Percussion - Madeline Bauer,
Emily Ferris, Lady Hawk Rooks,
Elizabeth Sykora and Maria
Trask.
An accomplished concert was given
by Wall chorus and band students
The ninth - twelfth grade chorus performed a Christmas concert for the Wall community on Mon-
day, December 17. The chorus was directed by Andrea Christiansen.
~Photos Laurie Hindman
Under the direction of Andrea
Christensen the Wall sixth thru
seventh grade band performed
“Deck The Halls,” “Away In A
Manger” and “Angels We Have
Heard On High.”
Members of the band include:
Flute - Meghan Patterson and
Shelby Ruland.
Clarinet - Sierra Wilson.
Alto Saxophone - Paisley God-
frey and Jayton McKay.
Trumpet - Jack Ermish, Mer-
cede Hess and Brianna Schreiber.
Percussion - Madisen Gren-
stiner, Victoria Poor Bear, Kyla
Sawvell, Roland Traveny and
Jaicee Williams.
The seventh thru eighth grade
chorus performed three rousing
numbers: “Feliz Navidad,” “ Silver
Bells” and “Jingle Bell Rock.”
Chorus members are:
Soprano - Kallie Anderson,
Ruth Bryan, Jessica Casjens, Sa-
vanna Deutscher, Emily Ferris,
Paisley Godfrey, Madisen Gren-
stiner, Trista Reinert, Taylor
Richter, Kyla Sawvell, Elyssa
Westby and Sierra Wilson.
Alto - Katy Bielmaier, Heather
Dauksavage, Sidney Dunker, Win-
ter Godfrey, Emma Michael, Elle
Moon, Emilee Pauley, Lady Hawk
Rooks and Brianna Schreiber.
Bariton - Damion Bresee,
Austin Carter, Austin Crawford,
Preston Eisenbraun, Tate Eisen-
braun, Trey Elshere, Branden
Hamann, Cody Huether, Cass
Lytle, Allan McDonnell, Aaron
Moschell, Cameron Richter, Riley
Ruland, Mason Sandal and Jesse
Sawvell.
By Coach Dinger
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team faced a determined Oelrichs
Tigers team Tuesday night, De-
cember 18th in their home opener.
The Eagles jumped out to an
early 15-12 first quarter lead, but
the Tigers tied the game up at
halftime with a last second three
pointer 32-32.
The Eagles regained the lead by
the end of the third quarter 50-45,
but the Tigers started hitting the
three point shot late in the fourth
quarter to take a commanding lead
63-70.
The Tigers made every free
throw late in the game to seal the
victory for a final score of 70-77.
The Eagles had several
turnovers late in the game that
gave the ball back to the Tigers
and Jon Garnier took advantage of
every opportunity by going 3-3
from the three point line and 6-6
from the free throw line.
The Eagles have a couple weeks
to sharpen their skills on both of-
fense and defense before they re-
sume play in Wall on January 3,
2013 against Rapid City Christian.
Tyler Peterson was the leading
scorer for the Eagles with 16
points off the bench, while Lane
Hustead and Tyler Trask had 13
points and 12 points respectively.
Clancy Lytle finished with 11
points and Trevor Anderson and
Tucker O’Rourke each had nine
points on the night.
O’Rourke led the Eagle’s with
nine rebounds, while Peterson fin-
ished the game with seven re-
bounds.
Hustead led the Eagle’s with five
assist and Anderson had four as-
sist and zero turnovers in his home
opener as a Wall Eagle.
The team was 28-70 from the
field for 40 percent and 9-13 from
the free throw line for 69 percent.
I was happy with how hard the
boys played throughout the night,
but we will need to be more patient
on offense and continue to improve
our defensive effort over the next
couple weeks.
As a first year head coach, I
have learned a lot over our first
four games and I have made sev-
Eagles lose first home game to Oelrichs
eral mistakes as well, but our team
has stayed together through the
ups and downs and we will make
the adjustments needed over the
Christmas break to be a better
team in 2013.
Stats
Eagles: 15 17 18 20 = 70
Oelrichs: 12 20 13 32 = 77
Scoring: Tyler Trask 5-6 0-0 12,
Trevor Anderson 3-11 1-4 9, Lane
Hustead 5-14 3-3 13, Clancy Lytle
4-11 2-2 11, Tucker O’Rourke 4-12
1-2 9, Carson Johnston 0-2 0-0 0,
Laketon McLaughlin 0-1 0-0 0,
Tyler Peterson 7-13 2-2 16. Totals:
28-70 9-13 70.
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.400.
3 - point field goals: Eagles 5-
14 (Trask 2-3, Anderson 2-6, Hus-
tead 0-1, Lytle 1-4).
Rebounds: Eagles 36 (O’Rourke
9).
Fouls: Eagles 17.
Assists: Eagles 17 (Hustead 5).
Steals: Eagles 12 (Hustead 3).
Blocked Shots: Eagles 0.
Clancy Lytle contemplating whether to take a shot or pass it
around during the Oelrichs game played on Tuesday, December
18. The Eagles lost 70 - 77. ~Photos Laurie Hindman
Trevor Anderson taking a shot
during the Oelrichs game.
Tucker O’Rourke dribbling by
an Oelrichs player.
Turnovers: Eagles 23.
The next game for the Eagles
and Lady Eagles will be held on
Thursday, January 3, 2013 against
Rapid City Christian at the Wall
School Gym. Game time is slated
to begin at 4:30 p.m. with the Lady
Eagles playing first.
The sixth - seventh grade band performing at their Christmas
concert held on Monday, December 17.
Emilee Pauley waiting to sing
her part during the Christmas
concert.
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New Years
eve specials
at
red rock restauraNt
6 piece Shrimp Cocktail...$5.95
12 oz. New York Strip Steak w/Shrimp
w/Baked Potato, Texas Toast, Soup & Salad Bar...$21.95
~~~~~~~~~~~~
New Years eve
partY
at the
rock louNge
MoN., dec. 31st
7:00 p.m.
•Drink Specials •Free Hors d’oeuvres
•Free Champagne at Midnight
•Party Favors •Door Prizes
506 Glenn St., Wall, SD • 279-2387
Pennington County Courant • December 27, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
All of those who attended the
concert of Wall School Jr. High and
High School gave good reviews. It
was stated that Ms. Christiansen
brings out a lot of talent. You could
tell the big difference between the
grade school band and high school
— goes to show what practice will
do — more confident and profes-
sional. Good work, kids!
Lisa Curtis, another local girl,
graduated from Chadron State
College. We offer our congratula-
tions!
The United Methodist Church
School Christmas program took
place on Wednesday evening. It
followed a supper put on by the
United Methodist Men. Good food
and a very nice program. Around
20 of those, second grade through
eighth grade, put on a skit “The
Unexpected Guest”. There must
have been 35 children in all with
four teachers and Paster Darwin
Kopfmann and Dorothy Shearer,
music. Thanks to all of them and
also, those who volunteer without
getting recognition.
Maxine and Jim Smith were in
Wall on Thursday afternoon and
stopped to see Frances Poste. A lit-
tle gift exchanging took place as
they won’t see each other until
after Christmas sometime.
The Wall School will start their
Christmas vacation on Friday, De-
cember 21st, and school will be
back in session on January 2nd.
Friday, December 21st, is also
the first day of winter and the
shortest day of the year (fewest
daylight hours). Think all of us
will be glad to see longer hours of
daylight.
Congratulations to those win-
ners of the decorating contest put
on by the Wall Celebration Com-
mittee. Haven’t heard the list of
winners from the drawing at the
pancake supper.
Kathy (Clark) Furrey of Winner,
is at her home in Peno Basin mak-
ing plans to have Christmas there.
The family will all gather.
Mary Jane Doyle had a scare
when her blood pressure elevated.
She spent the night in the hospital
but is doing okay.
There are people in our commu-
nity that are still in need of
prayers — Celine Trask and Karen
Delbridge from out of town, Del-
bert Sebade, Peggy Lurz, Pearl
Lurz and Linda Hook. Our
thoughts and prayers are with all
of them.
We may have a “white” Christ-
mas after all. Forecast is “light
snow possible” on Monday, the
24th, and Christmas Day. Even if
we don’t get snow it will be colder.
Have a good week!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
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todd sieler
Wall Drug Pharmacy
Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
• The Pharmacy will be OPEN •
December 31st
8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Sorry for any inconvenience
279-1931 • Wall, SD
All signs point
to a fantastic
New Year!
We wish you
loads of success,
fun times and good
health. Thank you for
your support.
We couldn’t ask for
nicer folks to work
with than you.
SanDee’ s &
de’s oil, inc.
On Tuesday, December 18, Black
Hills Federal Credit Union cele-
brated the groundbreaking of its’
newest Member Service Center in
Pierre, South Dakota.
Expected to open in the fall of
2013, the new 6,662 square foot fa-
cility is being built at 1530 N.
Garfield Ave, next to Wal-Mart.
The full-service location will host
nine offices, five drive-up lanes and
a deposit taking ATM.
According to Jerry Schmidt, Vice
President of Operations, the new
office will be an expanded version
of their most recent Member Serv-
ice Centers in Rapid City. “We con-
tinue to improve on each facility we
build and this is no exception. It is
our most environmentally consci-
entious branch,” said Schmidt.
“The geothermal system greatly re-
duces energy consumption and
costs and when combined with in-
floor hydronic heat, we further im-
prove the comfort of our members
and staff.”
This will be the first Black Hills
Federal Credit Union location in
the Pierre area. Black Hills FCU
serves residents in western South
Dakota from offices in Rapid City,
Custer, Hot Springs, Spearfish and
Wall and recently added a location
in Eagle Butte, 90 miles northwest
of Pierre.
“We are excited to join the Pierre
community,” said Roger Heacock,
President and CEO of Black Hills
FCU. “Pierre provides us the op-
portunity to add a convenient loca-
tion to serve new and existing
members. We have a history of pro-
viding quality financial products
and services, we’re staffed with a
terrific team of people, and we
truly care about our members.”
Established in Rapid City in
1941, Black Hills FCU is a commu-
nity chartered credit union serving
more than 57,000 members. The
Member Service Center in Pierre
will be the twelfth Black Hills FCU
location in South Dakota.
BHFCU breaks ground for new
member service center in Pierre
Congratulations
Winners of the
(3) Free one year
Subscriptions to the
Pennington County
Courant are:
Mary J. Kjerstad
Marilyn Huether
Lillian Helms
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QuESTiON: How should my
husband relate to his female boss?
Occasionally, she needs to discuss a
business matter with him that re-
quires privacy and so she will
schedule a lunch appointment with
him alone. I’m uncomfortable with
this, but he sees no alternative
since this kind of practice is com-
mon and expected in his line of
work. In fact, to raise this as a con-
cern would make things difficult for
him professionally. What are your
thoughts and what should he do?
ANSwEr: Before saying any-
thing else we want to commend you
on your zeal for protecting your
marriage. It’s obvious that you care
deeply about preserving the in-
tegrity of your relationship with
your husband. We wish more hus-
bands and wives had this kind of
commitment to marital purity. Too
many people nowadays seem con-
tent to accept the status quo. They
go along with what’s “common and
expected” without much thought or
resistance. If we want to live God’s
way, there are going to be times
when we will have to be willing to
push back against the culture.
For better or for worse, circum-
stances like those you’ve described
have become a normal part of con-
temporary life. A hundred years ago
men and women rarely mingled in
the workplace. Nowadays they
labor side by side on a daily basis.
What’s more, many companies em-
ploy just as many females as males
in middle- and upper-management
positions. If you, your husband, and
your marriage are going to survive
and thrive in the modern world,
you’re going to have to find ways to
deal with these inescapable reali-
ties.
There is, of course, one thing
these cultural changes haven’t al-
tered or eliminated. We’re talking
about the importance of establish-
ing meaningful boundaries. These
boundaries are needed to protect a
couple’s relationship against out-
side threats. You’re right to be
thinking in terms of maintaining
such “hedges”.
There are a number of ways you
and your husband can do this. The
first step is to make sure that he’s
on the same page with you. If he
isn’t, you’ll have to sit down and dis-
cuss your concerns with him in
earnest. If he agrees that some-
thing needs to be done about the sit-
uation, you might suggest that he
assume responsibility for starting
the process. He could begin by
speaking openly and honestly with
his boss. Once she understands
where he’s coming from, she might
be willing to make some appropri-
ate changes. For example, wherever
possible she might make an effort to
include other employees in offsite
business luncheons. Matters that
must be kept strictly private could
be discussed at the office, behind
closed doors if necessary, but in
close proximity to other co-workers.
Meanwhile, it may be worth your
while to examine your motives.
Make sure you’re not operating on
the basis of unwarranted fears or
an unhealthy need for control. A
great deal depends upon the under-
lying reasons for your uneasiness
about your husband’s work environ-
ment. Is there a history of infidelity
in your marriage? Are there any
other reasons to suppose that your
husband’s luncheons with the boss
might pose a threat to the stability
of your relationship? What about
the circumstances under which
these business meetings are con-
ducted? Is there anything unusual
about them? For instance, have any
of these conferences been scheduled
after working hours? Do they take
place in locations (like a cocktail
lounge) that might be considered in-
appropriate?
If not, is it possible that some
part of your concern stems from
previous hurts and difficult experi-
ences? Is there something in your
family background that might ac-
count for your anxiety —a divorce,
an affair, abuse or neglect of some
kind? Do you struggle with feelings
of insecurity or low-self esteem? Do
you and your husband find it hard
to talk about your deepest thoughts
and emotions?
If the answer to any of these
questions is yes, we’d urge you to
seek professional assistance. A
trained therapist can help you and
your husband perform an assess-
ment of your marriage and point
out both the strengths and weak-
nesses of your relationship.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer is
excerpted from books authored by
Dr. James Dobson and published by
Tyndale House Publishers. Dr. Dob-
son is the Chairman of the Board of
Focus on the Family, a nonprofit or-
ganization dedicated to the preser-
vation of the home. Copyright 2003
James Dobson, Inc. All rights re-
served. International copyright se-
cured.
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we don’t
charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565 or
e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
Need a print
job done fast?
Call us for all your
printing needs.
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
605-279-2565
Offices in Philip, Wall,
Kadoka, Murdo, Faith, Bison,
& New Underwood.
Pennington County Courant • December 27, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
Abraham’s faith in God was strong. When God
called him to forsake his family, friends and country,
he obeyed and “went forth, not knowing whither he
went.” When God promised to multiply his seed as the
stars of heaven, he believed it, though childless.
When, in his old age, God promised that he would still
have a son by ninety-year-old Sarah, he believed it
even though he had waited so long, seemingly in vain.
When God promised to give his seed the land in which
he had sojourned, he believed it, though all reason ar-
gued against it. When God asked him to offer in sac-
rifice the son born so late in life, the son upon whom
all the promises depended, he obeyed, concluding
that it must be God’s plan to raise him from the dead!
Such was Abraham’s faith in God! Three times this
is emphasized in Romans 4 alone: He was “not weak
in faith” (Ver. 19); he “staggered not at the promise of
God through unbelief,” but was “strong in faith” (Ver.
20).
But it was not the strength of Abraham’s faith that
saved him; it was the fact that the object of his faith
was God (See again Gen. 15:6). He had placed his
faith in the right Person. His faith became “strong” only
because he had heard and believed God in the first
place.
“For what saith the Scripture? Abraham be-
lieved God, and it was counted unto him for
righteousness,” and thus “to him that worketh
not, but believeth on Him that justifieth the un-
godly, his faith is counted for righteousness”
(Rom. 4:3,5).
The simplest, humblest believer, who ever so feebly
commits himself to God and His Word, is “justified
freely by His grace through the redemption that is in
Christ Jesus” (Rom. 3:24).
FAITH IN THE RIGHT PERSON
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
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The year's end br|ngs us no greater p|easure than to thank you, our most
cher|shed pat|ents, for a year beyond measure.
ßest w|shes to you and yours |n the com|ng year.
Happy 2013
THf BfST lS YfT TO COMf!!
ARNfSON
AUCTl ON
Pl ROUTfk
AUCTl ON
William John Goldhammer___________
William John Goldhammer of
Hebron, Neb., is the beloved son of
Tim and Beth. Will was born on
June 12, 1991 in Norfolk, Neb. He
left this world full of wonders on
December 21, 2012.
Will attended school in Hebron
and graduated from Thayer Cen-
tral with the class of 2010. He was
pursuing his undergraduate degree
in sociology at the University of
Nebraska in Lincoln, Neb. For the
past two summers, he worked for
the Habitat for Humanity.
From the moment he entered our
lives Will brought all that knew
him great joy. That joy was in-
creased by the arrival of his treas-
ured sister Maggie. Will lived life
at full speed… joy, kindness,
humor, love and light heartedness.
He was the rare individual that
saw the best in everyone. He
brought the good out in people. His
sense of humor was without
bounds.
Will’s love of life was evidenced
in his every day. People connected
with his magnetic and energetic
personality. If Will loved you it was
with ease and depth. He pulled you
close and kept you there. His fam-
ily and friends will never wonder
how he felt. He would tell them
constantly and with conviction.
Music and adventure were his
great passion. And the two usually
intertwined. Some of the best times
he had were with a group of
friends, packed in a car, traveling
16 hours to hear Mumford and
Sons.
He loved the Black Hills, the
Badlands, Goodwill T-shirt’s, shoot-
ing clay pigeons and any kind of
cheese. His family was blessed to
have had him for the 21 years. The
blessing of Will shall stay with us
always.
Will was baptized into the
Catholic faith July 14, 1991 and a
member of Sacred Heart Catholic
Church in Hebron.
He is preceded in death by his
beloved grandmothers, Sallie Gold-
hammer and Barbara Tyson; and
his cousin and friend, Lane Gold-
hammer.
His life was witnessed and
shared by his dad and mom, Tim
and Beth; and his sister Maggie of
Hebron. Grandfathers, Paul Gold-
hammer and his wife Judy of Wall,
S.D.; Gene Tyson and his wife
Marge of Norfolk, Neb.; aunts and
uncles, Jay and Ann Peterson, Des
Moines, IA, Claire Tyson, Seattle,
Wa., Catherine Tyson, Windsor
Heights, IA, Brian Tyson, Lincoln,
Neb., J.B. Tyson, Omaha, Neb., Jay
and Jana Goldhammer, Sheridan,
Wyo., Mark and Lacey Wellens,
Richfield, Minn., Pat and Shawna
Goldhammer of Las Vegas, Nev.,
Scott and Kari Bappe, Moville, IA,
Johann and Gonis Torre of San
Luis Potosi, Mexico. Cousins,
Marie Peterson, Windsor Heights,
IA, Jessica and Thomas Carter,
Des Moines, IA, Samantha and
Marsden Hand, Windsor Heights,
IA, Katie Peterson, Des Moines, IA,
Chloe, Jack and Ethan Tyson,
Omaha, Neb., Grady Goldhammer,
Omaha, Neb., Quinn Goldhammer,
Sheridan, Wyo., Gracie Goldham-
mer, Sheridan, Wyo., Katie and
Christian Wellens, Richfield,
Minn., Connor, Ian and Mari
Bappe, Moville, IA, Damon, Tris-
tan, Tate and Tara Goldhammer,
Las Vegas, Nev. Goddaughters,
Emma Peterson, Windsor Heights,
IA, Tyra and Gabbie Carter, Des
Moines, IA.
Mass of the Christian Burial was
held Wednesday, December 26,
2012, at Sacred Heart Catholic
Church in Hebron, Neb., with Fa-
ther Rudy Oborny officiating.
Condolences may be left at
www.krollfh.com, memorials to
Habitat for Humanity in care of
Tim and Beth Goldhammer, 930
Olive Avenue, Hebron, NE 68370.
Hebron Memorial Funeral Home
of Hebron, Neb. is in charge of
arrangements.
Chris Kading____
Chris Kading, age 50, of Wall,
died Thursday, December 20, 2012,
at his home in Wall.
Survivors include his son Sha-
doe Kading of Colorado; his father
James Kading of Houston, Texas;
two sisters Caren Conant of For-
ney, Texas, and Celesa Hulme of
Kyle, Texas; one brother Charles
Kading of Houston, Texas; a good
friend Gary of Wall; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Funeral services will be held
Monday, December 31, 2012, at
10:00 a.m., at the National Ceme-
tery, near Sturgis.
Arrangements were under the
direction of Rush Funeral Home.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
FivE rEASONS NOT TO
BE A "DO-iT-YOurSELF"
iNvESTOr
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
These days, you can go online
and invest, for modest fees. You
can also visit various websites for
research and watch numerous
cable shows for investment recom-
mendations. So, why shouldn’t you
be a “do-it-yourself” investor
rather than work with a financial
professional?
Actually, there are at least five
good reasons why a financial advi-
sor can help make you a better in-
vestor.
A financial advisor can:
•Ask the right questions — If
you try to invest on your own, you
may find yourself asking the
wrong questions, such as: “What’s
the ‘hottest’ investment out there?”
A financial professional can help
frame better questions, such as:
“Given my individual risk toler-
ance and long-term goals, which
investments should I consider to
help me build a balanced portfo-
lio?” In other words, a financial
professional can help you ask the
questions that can lead to better
results.
•Look at your situation objec-
tively — No matter how hard you
try, you won’t be able to take all
the emotion out of your investment
choices. After all, your investment
success will play a large role in
some key areas of your life, such as
your ability to enjoy a comfortable
retirement. Consequently, if you
think you’re not making the
progress you should with your in-
vestments, you may be tempted to
make a hasty decision to give your
portfolio a “jolt.” Frequently,
though, such choices can backfire.
When it comes to investing, it’s
better to invest with your head,
not your heart. A financial advisor
can analyze your situation, assess
your risk tolerance and make ap-
propriate recommendations.
•Show a deeper understanding
of investment research — You can
look up many types of financial
data on your own. But do you know
how to put all these pieces to-
gether into a cohesive picture? A fi-
nancial professional, with years of
experience and training, is gener-
ally more capable of finding the re-
search sources and making the
most sense out of the results.
•Put experience to work in mak-
ing portfolio recommendations.
Even if you’ve been investing for
many years, you might be sur-
prised at all the underlying influ-
ences that should go into making
investment decisions. But a finan-
cial professional understands mar-
ket patterns, the nature of diversi-
fication and other factors neces-
sary in helping you make the right
choices for your situation.
•Spend time looking for oppor-
tunities — Even if you enjoy the
process of investing, the chances
are quite good that you can’t spend
as much time on it as a financial
professional. That means, among
other things, you aren’t constantly
on the lookout for new investment
opportunities. Nor are you always
looking within your own portfolio
for opportunities to rebalance or
make other adjustments that can
help you move forward toward
your goals. But when you work
closely with a financial advisor, he
or she is exploring the financial
markets for new investment
prospects while regularly review-
ing your portfolio for possibilities
of upgrading quality, increasing di-
versification or making adjust-
ments in response to changes in
your life.
The “do-it-yourself” route may
be fine for home repairs. But when
it comes to managing your invest-
ment situation, there are benefits
to working with a professional.
Delbert Sebade__________________
Delbert Sebade, age 95, of Wall,
S.D., died Sunday, December 23,
2012, at his home in Wall.
Delbert James Sebade was born
on September 16, 1917, on Bull
Creek, west of Wall, the son of
Henry and Anna (Mooney) Sebade.
He attended school in Wall, gradu-
ating from Wall High School in
1935. After high school he moved
to Chillicothe, Mo., where he re-
ceived training at a business
school.
After traveling to Nebraska with
a piston out of their ’35 Plymouth,
Delbert and his soon-to-be wife,
Armista Ronning, stopped and
picked up a marriage license. After
adding one year on to her age, and
two marriage licenses later, Del-
bert and Armista were married on
November 15, 1941. To this union
were born four children, Sandra,
Norbert, Rosalind and Marsha.
Since 1963 they have made their
home in Wall.
Delbert had a lifetime of work in
the banking business. He joined
the U.S. Army on November 23,
1942, where he served in the in-
fantry in Northern France,
Rhineland and Central Europe. He
was honorably discharged on Octo-
ber 26, 1945.
Delbert was active in civic, busi-
ness, fraternal and social organiza-
tions.
Survivors include four children,
Sandra (Everett) Lerew of Valley,
Neb., Norbert (Jane) Sebade of
Rapid City, Rosalind Ham of Hud-
son, Colo., and Marsha Lytle of
Reva; 10 grandchildren; 17 great-
grandchildren; two sisters, Bernice
Anderson and Edith Paulson, both
of Wall; and one brother, Norman
Sebade of Puyallup, Wash.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Henry and Anna Sebade;
his wife, Armista Sebade; his sis-
ter, Eunice Johnson; his brother,
Dayton Sebade; and his grand-
daughter, Kimberly Cluff.
Visitation will be held from 5:00
to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, Decem-
ber 27, at the Rush Funeral
Chapel in Wall, and one hour pre-
ceding the services on Friday.
Services will be held at 10:00
a.m. Friday, December 28, at the
United Methodist Church in Wall,
with Pastor Darwin Kopfmann of-
ficiating.
Interment with military honors
will be held at the Wall Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • December 27, 2012 • Page 6
annc@gwtc.net
80 years ago…
Provisions of South Dakota law
will bar motorists from purchasing
1933 license plates in instances
where they failed to buy a license
for their dogs for 1932. It was re-
vealed in the County Treasurer’s
office today. A provision of the state
law provides all personal taxes
must be paid before a license plate
can be issued. Averaging about $5
a piece, the 1,000 warrants repre-
sented $5,000 in unpaid taxes
which were due November 1.
Friday evening, Wasta high
school boys’ basketball team
played Quinn high school. The
score was 30 to 18 in favor of
Quinn. The same evening the high
school girls and town girls of
Quinn met for a game. The high
school girls won 19 to 13.
The following item is taken from
last weeks issue of the Quinn
Times. “With this issue the Quinn
Times has incorporated the Wall
Enterprise. The deal was made the
first of the week and the Quinn
Times now is owner of and in pos-
session of the name, subscription
list, goodwill and equipment of the
aforesaid Wall Enterprise”.
70 years ago…
Wall had a partial blackout Sat-
urday and Sunday. Frost and ice is
the supposed reason. Two of the
three phases went out at 12:30 Fri-
day night with one coming back at
10:00 a.m. and the other at 5:00
p.m. Early Sunday morning, one
phase was out until 8:00 a.m.
Miss Opal Pippert is showing
her friends a big diamond that she
says Santa brought her for Christ-
mas.
Howard Connolly, clerk of the
Town Board, received last week a
four page analysis of the Town’s fil-
tration process from the State De-
partment of Health. The report
was highly recommendable and
only a few minor changes were
suggested. Samples obtained from
several places about town showed
that there was only a slight taste
of chlorine present.
Very unusual weather condi-
tions, accompanied by heavy mail
has delayed the mail carriers so
that they could not maintain their
schedules. In fact the roads were
so bad Tuesday that it was impos-
sible to serve portions of the
routes.
Two 17-year-old Sibley, Iowa,
farm youths, Paul D. Newman and
Robert W. Gruis, were given inde-
terminate sentences of one to five
years in the state penitentiary for
third degree burglary, Friday af-
ternoon in Pennington County cir-
cuit court by Judge Charles R.
Hayes of Deadwood. The two
youths admitted breaking into the
Reptile Gardens south of Rapid
City, October 10 and stealing a
large quantity of merchandise.
They also obtained a few smaller
items from the Herb Millard Pin-
nacle Camp, and were thought to
have picked up some items from
the Wall Drug Store. Judge Hayes
declared that if they hadn’t com-
mitted previous offenses, he would
not have sentenced them to the
penitentiary. The two boys, who
completed the tenth grade, admit-
ted committing a robbery last
spring, and being paroled to their
parents.
60 years ago…
The Wall Hot Shots are getting
hotter as the basketball season
gets further along. After dropping
their first game to a team from
Rapid City by a close score, they
came back to swamp Philip, 64 to
18; and then down Interior Mon-
day night, 58 to 23.
The WREA stopped electric
clocks and everything else electric
Tuesday as lineman worked to con-
nect temporary substation trans-
formers to the new highline. These
transformers will be used only
until next spring when the perma-
nent high voltage transformers are
expected to be ready for operation.
The Wall Eagles were unable to
make very much of a showing
against the strong quintet of
Quinn in a game played on the
local floor, Thursday evening.
Quinn’s tall center, Bobby Kelly, ei-
ther scored himself or passed to
one of his team mates to toss in the
bucket. On defense, the tall lad
was just as effective as he grabbed
the ball from the bangboard and
held it out of the reach of others.
He scored 32 points, half of
Quinn’s tallies, and almost as
many points as Wall’s team. The
final score was Quinn 64, Wall 38.
50 years ago…
The Wall Eagles lost their three
away from home games the past
week and hope to be able to re-
deem themselves in their home
game with Hill City tomorrow
night. The Rapid City Cathedral
team were held in check for most
of the first half on the Cathedral
floor Friday night but their supe-
rior height was too much of a
handicap for Wall and they
dropped the game by 13 points.
Saturday night the Eagles played
at Martin, where again they were
forced to give ground and lost by a
final score of 67 to 53. Tuesday
night, they played at Kadoka
where they lost to a more experi-
enced team, 54 to 45.
Another Wall landmark, the A.
C. Kingsbury Hardware has been
moved from its prominent location
on Main Street to make room for a
more modern building — the new
Wall Bank. The corner lot No. 12
was purchased June 12, 1908 by
W. P. Wiley from Wm. A. Mackrill.
Wiley built a hardware store on
this corner, and three years later
sold to W. F. Weary. And July 31,
1911 sold this property to A. C.
Kingsbury. In the latter years the
building was taken over by Fred
Deakman and then sold to Orval
Doyle. The Bank purchased the
lots a few months ago, and in turn
sold the buildings to Bob Biel-
maier.
Fire Saturday afternoon dam-
aged the interior of a vacant build-
ing that Joe Knapp had just moved
on to his Hill Crest Camp in north
Wall. Firemen were called when a
gas explosion started the fire. A
heater had been connected to a gas
line, but a connection in another
room had been left open. When the
heater was lit, the explosion took
place. Luckily there were no in-
juries.
40 years ago…
A stubborn, smoldering fire in
the Bob Lytle home Saturday
caused Wall firemen to make three
trips before the embers were com-
pletely subdued. When Bob came
home at noon he found his home
filled with smoke. He called the
fire department who arrived and
after clearing the place from
smoke thought the fire was out.
The third call found the fire be-
tween the walls, and after chop-
ping some holes, they were able to
extinguish the remaining smolder-
ing timbers. The house belongs to
Charles Tines and suffered mostly
smoke damage.
Norman Klingbile reports that
the car of Roger Fortune that was
stolen from the streets of Wall
about a month ago was found by
the police in New Mexico and the
driver jailed. The Criminal Infor-
mation Service is credited for the
pick up.
30 years ago…
Last week was a busy one for the
Wall Eagles. They added two wins
and one loss to their record. The
wins came against New Under-
wood on Tuesday, 72 to 46, and
Bennett County on Friday 46 to
41. Saturday, the Eagles lost to St.
Martins in overtime with a final
score of 65 to 69.
Wall’s gymnasts ended up in
third place by just three tenths of
a point Monday evening. Custer
won the meet with 94.3 points and
Hot Springs narrowly beat Wall
with 81.3. On it’s home floor Wall
finished with 81.0 points.
Jerry Johannesen was recently
selected Fireman of the Year for
1982 by the Wall Volunteer Fire
Department. The selection was
made on an individual basis with
every member at the November
meeting putting in a name. The
award is part of an incentive pro-
gram and is based on the fireman’s
overall contribution to the fire de-
partment. Johannesen has been a
member of the fire department for
nine years. He served as assistant
fire chief for four years.
Last week the Wall Eagles
added two more wins to their bas-
ketball record. In a wrestling and
basketball double header in Philip
last Tuesday the Eagles put the
Philip Scotties in their place with
a 71-46 runaway. At home against
Kadoka, the Eagles went into their
holiday break with a 64-59 victory.
20 years ago…
On December 2, 1992 the long
awaited remodeling and construc-
tion began at the New Underwood
Good Samaritan Center. H.H.
Hackett and Sons of Rapid City
were awarded the bid for the proj-
ect, which will expand the avail-
able space of the Center from
19,100 square feet to 21,984
square feet. The new addition will
include four new resident rooms,
an addition to the residents dining
room that will include a private
dining room for those residents
who wish to have a meal with their
families, and an additional
whirlpool room. Also included in
the contract is a new Nurses Sta-
tion with remodeling and an addi-
tion to the Staff dining room. The
completion date for the project is
June 1, 1993.
Heather Fortune, senior at Wall
High School, has been chosen as
the Student of the Month for No-
vember. Fortune is the daughter of
Roger and Bonna Fortune of
Quinn.
On Tuesday night, December 15,
the Wall Eagles met the Philip
Scotties on the Eagles home court.
The Scotties defeated the Eagles
with a final score of 85 to 69.
10 years ago…
Joel Stephens was presented the
Firefighter of the Year award at
the Annual Firemen/EMT Christ-
mas Party on Saturday, December
7th.
The Wall/Kadoka wrestling
team traveled to Ft. Pierre for the
season-opening 2002 Stanley
County Invitational on December
6-7, 2002. Competing against a
field of 16 teams, the Eagles placed
8th overall with 101 points. Brady
Huether won the 119 pound class
with a 4-0 record; Curtis Huffman
was the runner-up in the 125
pound class; Tyrel Carson finished
5th wrestling in the 145 pound
class; Jake Julson and John Paul
Trask placed 7th in the 140 and
130 pound classes, respectively;
and Joe Wilson and Lucas Fite fin-
ished 8th in the 152 and 103
pound classes, respectively.
Black Hills Financial Services,
located at Black Hills Federal
Credit Union, is proud to an-
nouncer that Lacey Curr is the re-
cipient of the Black Hills Financial
Services October 2002 Student of
the Month awarded at Wall High
School. Curr is the daughter of
Dan and Donna Curr and is cur-
rently a senior at Wall High
School.
The Looking Glass of Time
This day and age it seems every-
one is so maxed out. The pressure
is on us all to perform at such a
high degree just to survive. Tem-
pers seem to flare so easily and so-
lutions are hard to implement.
Stress is so high that many are
paralyzed in their thinking and liv-
ing. Stress related illness and dis-
ease are running rampant and tak-
ing its toll. We need to fix this now.
In all reality, overcoming worry
and anxiety can be a simple process
when we begin to understand that
worry is our mind working in re-
verse to hold us back-a bad habit
that can and must be changed.
This habit of fear and worry always
has a devastating impact on our
mental and physical wellbeing, so
if we are to overcome worry and
anxiety in our lives, we must deter-
mine to take control of our thought
life and begin to move in a forward
direction with new and more pro-
ductive habits of thinking.
So, how do we do that? Well, as
you may know, I could talk for
hours on the subject of stress man-
agement, so can only share a few of
the strategies that have worked for
me over the years. I have found
that in order to develop habits of
right thinking that will ultimately
help us to overcome worry and anx-
iety in my life, we need to make
sure our priorities are in the cor-
rect order. For me, that means
more time spent in prayer and de-
votion, for that is where my peace
comes from. That is the first step.
Daily remind yourself that "this
too shall pass." Time changes
things and difficulties always have
a way of moving on. I always ask
myself "what is the worst that can
happen?" and then prepare to ac-
cept the worst. Then I start looking
for solutions to the problems and
challenges I am facing. This action
step alone helps you overcome.
(And do you know, the worst you
imagine rarely happens.)
Make it a point to refuse to let
the economy, or your job or your
boss, or any other negative thing
control your life. You are the deci-
sion maker for your life. You choose
your attitude.
When you discover that your de-
cisions and choices have gone
wrong, don't start placing blame.
Take responsibility. It's never easy
to admit you were wrong, but in
doing so, the stress is often relieved
completely and you are free to
change course and make right
choices, unburdened and unhin-
dered.
Probably my best advice to you is
to be more aware of when you start
feeling the stress building up in
you, and instead of trying to plough
through it while you let all those
negative emotions eat you alive,
just stop! Take a moment to regain
your bearings. Take a deep breath
to relax and gain control of your
emotions. Remind yourself that
you are building a new and positive
habit of thinking and reacting that
will help you to overcome stress
and anxiety.
It's a Monday, and I can almost
guarantee something stressful will
occur almost any time now. How
will you react? The decision is
yours.
Thoughts on Overcoming
Worry & Anxiety
H
o
p
c
it's a
rc
aI b
Iast!
Red RooK Res1ouron1
& Lounge
hAPPY NEW YEAR
Wall Lube & Espresso Bar
Pennington County Courant • December 27, 2012 • Page 7 Classifieds
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Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
noTICEs/WanTED
sEaLED BIDs BEInG aC-
CEPTED on: 2003 John Deere
1590 No-till Drill, 15’ working
width, 7-1/2 inch spacing, grass
seeder, agitator, fertilizer box,
dolly wheel. Bids for the drill will
be accepted by East Pennington
Conservation District until Jan-
uary 1, 2013, at 24 Creighton
Road in Wall, SD, or they can be
mailed to PO Box 308, Wall, SD
57790. Please call 279-2519 for
information or viewing of the
drill. We reserve the right to re-
ject any and all bids. PW1-3tc
TRIanGLE RanCH BED &
BREakFasT is available for
brunches, luncheons, dinner
parties and retreats, December -
April. Contact Lyndy, 859-2122,
triangle@gwtc.net, www. trian-
gleranchbb.com P51-8tc
REaL EsTaTE
FoR saLE: 24x68 doublewide, 3
bedrooms, 2 full baths, new tin
roof and skirting, new paint. Call
Cody, 515-0316. P52-4tc
HousE FoR saLE: 300 High St.
in Philip, 2 bedrooms, full base-
ment, great view off back deck.
Call 859-2783 or 859-3249 or
567-3515 to view. P49-tfn
HELP WanTED
HELP WanTED: Business man-
ager for the Kadoka Area School
District. Applications available
on the website www.kadoka.
k12.sd.us or may be picked up
at the school. Wage DOE and
qualifications. Open until filled.
Contact Jamie Hermann at 837-
2174, ext. 100. EOE. K3-4tc
HELP WanTED: Haakon County
is taking applications for the po-
sition of Deputy Register of
Deeds. This is a half-time posi-
tion. Minimum education re-
quirement is a high school
diploma or GED certificate. Sec-
retarial or related experience
preferred. The following skills
and abilities are required: type
accurately; basic computer and
office machinery knowledge;
ability to use Microsoft Word and
Excel; great attention to detail;
excellent customer service and
organizational skills; extremely
legible handwriting. Applications
and full job description will be
available at the Haakon County
Courthouse, Register of Deeds
office, 140 S. Howard Ave.,
Philip, SD 57567, or by email:
haakrod@ gwtc.net. Applications
to be accepted until position
filled. PR16-3tc
HELP WanTED: Farm/Ranch in
west central S.D. looking for ex-
perienced full time help. Duties
include night calving heifers,
calving cows, fencing, building
maintenance, operating and
maintaining haying, feeding and
farming equipment. Horse expe-
rience not necessary. We use
ATVs. Housing and beef fur-
nished. References required.
Salary DOE. Call 843-2869 for
interview appointment or email
resumé to: pjbork@gwtc.net
P1-tfn
MIsC. FoR saLE
nEW – nEVER usED: Cement
railroad ties, 8
1
⁄2’ long, $75 per tie
or $50 if you buy 10 or more. See
at car wash in Midland. Call
843-2846 or (cell) 840-8441.
P3-2tc
FoR saLE: Hong Kong custom
made wingback chair, $50. Club
chair, floral pattern material,
$35. Leave message: 859-2777.
P2-1tp
CHRIsTMas LIGHTs!! (4) nEW
boxes of white LED. Nothing
wrong with the lights, just the
wrong color. $32. Call 441-4909
or 859-3515, leave message.
P1-tfn
FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
auToMoTIVE
FoR saLE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BusInEss & sERVICEs
PoLIsHED PInkY will be closed
December 21-30. Plenty of
openings left if you need to make
an appointment. Colors: $10 off.
Call 279-2772, Wall. Merry
Christmas & Happy New Year
from the Bryans. PW2-2tc
sCHaEFER EnTERPRIsEs:
Re-opening For Business in
Wall, south Dakota, on Janu-
ary 1, 2013: Walt Schaefer,
Owner/Operator, 605-279-2948
or 605-515-3961. Specializing in
residential & commercial repairs
involving: Carpentry (repairs and
light construction), Plumbing
(repairs and installation), Minor
Electrical Repairs, Appliance Re-
pairs (electric only). PW2-2tc
o’ConnELL ConsTRuCTIon,
InC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
RouGH CounTRY sPRaYInG:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & Con-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
TETon RIVER TREnCHInG:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIon will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FaRM & RanCH
WHEaT HaY FoR saLE: Call
685-3068. P52-tfn
FoR saLE: 2012 grass hay,
some alfalfa, big rounds, semi-
load lots, delivered pricing, no
mold. Call Rob, 390-5535, or
Charles, 390-5506. P50-5tp
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HousE FoR saLE: 307 Myrtle
Ave Philip. 3 bedroom 1.5 bath,
central air, fuel oil heat and
wood stove. Open concept, stain-
less steel fridge and stove.
washer and dryer included.
Hardwood laminate floors, sepa-
rate dining room. Mostly finished
basement. Ceiling fans through-
out. New windows and roof.
Fenced in, large backyard with
cover patio and storage shed.
Can email photos. Call 859-2470
or (785) 259-4207. P48-8tc
REnTaLs
FoR REnT: Two bedroom apart-
ment in Wall. Call 386-2222.
PW51-4tc
4-BEDRooM HousE FoR
REnT In WaLL: Call Stan, 381-
2861 or 279-2861. WP5-tfn
aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
FoR REnT: Two bedroom trailer
house for rent in Philip. 685-
3801 or 859-2204. P3-tfn
FoR REnT: One bedroom house
in Wall. 279-2865. WP18-2tc
CLassIFIED PoLICY
PLEasE REaD your classified ad
the first week it runs. If you see
an error, we will gladly re-run
your ad correctly. We accept re-
sponsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks be
paid for when ordered. A $2.00
billing charge will be added if ad
is not paid at the time the order
is placed. all phone numbers
are with an area code of 605,
unless otherwise indicated.
BusInEss oPPoRTunITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for
SALE (serious inquires only).
Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
FoR saLE
INSULATED CONCRETE TIRE
TANK LIDS for rubber tire
tanks. Custom made, 4’-12’
width. Center float hole and
drinking holes. Permanent lids.
Hildebrand Steel 1-877-867-
4185.
ROOSTER PHEASANTS FOR
sale. 1,000 long-tailed flying
birds, $16 each. Royal Flush
Pheasants. Spencer, SD. 605-
480-4444.
LoG HoMEs
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern,
central, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
noTICEs
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
oTR & DRIVER
oPPoRTunITY
SEEKING CLASS A CDL drivers
to run 14 central states. 2
years over the road experience
required. Excellent benefit
package. Call 701-221-2465 or
877-472-9534. www.pbtrans-
portation.com.
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health
ins., credit, 03¢ safety bonus,
Call Joe for details,
8 0 0 . 4 5 6 . 1 0 2 4 ,
joe@tbitruck.com.
VaCaTIon/TIMEsHaRE
HART RANCH MEMBERSHIP
For Sale: Beautiful Hart Ranch
Camping Resort is located just
outside of Rapid City. Purchase
NOW before transfer fees in-
crease! Call 605-939-3112.
WanTED
ANTLERS, ELK IVORIES,
pheasant skins, rattlesnakes
and porcupines. Ph. 605-673-
4345 or email at clawantler-
hide@hotmail.com.
No one reads the ads?
YOu juST DiD!
We design this newspaper with news
and advertising to fit the reader’s eye.
the pennington county courant
your news and advertising source
for over 100 years.
Let us help you promote your product.
Thanks for taking the time to read our entire newspaper.
it Has BeeN said tHat…
THank Yous
A big thank you to all my fam-
ily and friends for your help dur-
ing my recent surgery. Thanks for
all the visits, calls, cards and
prayers.
Merry Christmas,
Diane Geigle
Thank you to the Wall Chamber
for the $100.00 gift certificate I
won at the pancake supper.
Merlin Crown
apartMeNts
availaBle
wall ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PrO/rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDt CÞrgs1er Sebr1ng
Pouer £verg1Þ1ng, £oonom1oo1
N1oe C1eon Cor!
PROFIT DEADLINE:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd
issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. BRED CAT-
TLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
TRIPLE T RANCH - 75 DLK HFFS; FS, NI............................................500=
SIMON - 25 HEFF FED ANC X CLVS; FS,NI..................................400-600=
BRED HEIFERS:
RICHARD PAPOUSEK - 350 FANCY DLK & 1ST X DWF HFFS; DLKS ALL
HOME FAISED OF OFICINATED OFF THE CILDEFT ANCUS FN; 1ST X DWF
ALL OFICINATED OFF THE PEFAULT FN; ALL DFED PFOVEN LDW DLK
ANCUS DULLS; STAFT CALVINC MAFCH 13 & SPLIT INTO 10 DAY PEFI-
ODS.
DOOLITTLE WAGNER RANCH - 110 FANCY DLK ANCUS HFFS; A.I.
DFED ONE DAY TO DAF EXT TFAVELEF; ALL SAFE WITH DULL CALVES; 2-
22 CALVINC
EDGAR SIMON - 22 HEFF FED ANC X HFFS; DFED. POLLED HEFF;
CLV. 3-16
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
EDGAR SIMON - 30 HEFF FED ANC X MIXED ACE COWS; DFED. HEFF;
CLV. 3-21
LYNN FIELDS - 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-
25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 15 DLK HFFS TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
JESSE MORELAND - 15 DWF FIFST CFOSS 7 YF OLD COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12
P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. EXPECTINC 4000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RICK KING & SONS - 900 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED CLVS; FS.....600-750=
KNUTSON - 250 DLK CLVS; FS.....................................................500-600=
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - 250 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI .........500-600=
KEHN RANCH - 400 DLK CLVS; FS ..............................................500-650=
FORTUNE - 150 DLK STFS; FS.....................................................650-750=
AMIOTTE - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-600=
HANSON - 140 HEFF & DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS.........................650=
AMIOTTE - 124 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................700=
WHEELER RANCH - 120 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ................625=
BARTLETT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI......................................................700=
SIGMAN & SIGMAN - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI, HFFS DV.................700-800=
OLSON - 90 DLK & FED ANC STFS; FS,AN...................................550-650=
WILLIAMS - 90 DLK HFFS; FS.............................................................550=
LEHRKAMP - 80 DLK CLVS; FS....................................................600-650=
BARRY - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI ............................600-650=
FERGUSON - 60 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI....................................500-600=
HERBER RANCH - 50 HEFF CLVS; FS................................................600=
GROPPER - 50 FED ANC FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,ALL HFFS IN TOWN600-
700=
ARTHUR - 50 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
SILBERNAGEL - 43 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................600-650=
STABEN - 36 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS..............................................650-700=
SMITH - 36 DLK STFS; FS............................................................800-850=
PETERSON - 35 HEFF STFS; FS ..................................................650-700=
ANDERS - 35 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
DEJONG - 20 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ...........................................................600=
WILLERT - 9 DLK CLVS; FS..........................................................550-600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: MCPHEFSON ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS, 1.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
South Dakota Brand
seIIing on
Tuesday, Jan. 8,
at 12:00 p.m.
Pennington County Courant • December 27, 2012 • Page 8
Wishing you thc
vcry bcst this ycar
has to offcr.
Jhc
Countdown
Is Òn!
/nn`- lclcl :
¦|llcrnan`-
Ccn-lrucl|cn
BesL wIsIes Ior u
heolthg, hoppg zo1j
Lo uII oI our cusLomers
und IrIends.
TIm
e Lo
Because you're the best bunch of
folks we know! With gratitude and
warm wishes for a happy and
prosperous New Year
from all of us.
|sw|s¡ |sratr
la|tr|sr
PROFIT DEADLINE:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd
issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
NOVEMBER 15, 2012
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at Al’s Oasis in Oa-
coma, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb called
the meeting to order at 1:00 p.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Amy Kittelson, Office Man-
ager for WR/LJ; Dave Larson, Larson
Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Direc-
tor Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to
approve the agenda. Motion carried
unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the October 11, 2012, meeting were pre-
viously mailed to the Board for their re-
view. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the October minutes. Motion carried
unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph
Hieb, $56.61; Casey Krogman, $56.61;
Marion Matt, $56.61; Veryl Prokop,
$56.61; Lorne Smith, $56.61; West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS, $51,000.00;
Pennington County Courant, $57.19;
Lyman County Herald, $66.50; Murdo
Coyote, $71.84; Todd County Tribune,
$66.34; Pioneer Review, $59.78; Kadoka
Press, $76.02; US Postmaster, $71.40.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the October Financial
Report is on file at the District office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Matt, sec-
onded by Director Prokop to approve the
October Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his November re-
port to the Board. Motion by Director
Smith, seconded by Director Krogman to
approve the Manager’s Report. Motion
carried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
USGS GAGING STATIONS: Manager
Fitzgerald received the proposed joint
funding agreement between the District
and USGS for monitoring and operation
of streamflow gages at White River near
Kadoka and White River near White
River. They are seeking funding in the
amount of $11,280 with USGS contribut-
ing $9,270. The Board requested Man-
ager Fitzgerald invite Joyce Williamson
to a board meeting, so she can give an
update and answer any questions the
Board has before a decision is made.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt that this item be tabled.
Motion carried unanimously.
WR/LJ GRANT AGREEMENT: Man-
ager Fitzgerald presented to the Board
the yearly agreement that provides a
grant of $50,000 to West River/Lyman-
Jones Rural Water Systems, Inc. Motion
by Director Matt, seconded by Director
Krogman to approve the grant agree-
ment for $50,000 to West River/Lyman-
Jones Rural Water Systems, Inc. Motion
carried unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 1:10 P.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_________________
Amy Kittelson,
Recording Secretary
______________
Joseph Hieb,
Chairman
Published December 27, 2012 , at the
total approximate cost of $34.12.
S.D. state parks celebrate the New Year
with first day hikes across the state
South Dakota state parks will
sponsor free, guided hikes in 12
state parks on New Year’s Day as
part of America's State Parks First
Day Hikes initiative in all 50
states.
America’s State Parks First Day
Hikes offer individuals and fami-
lies an opportunity to begin the
New Year rejuvenating and con-
necting with the outdoors by taking
a healthy hike on Jan. 1 at a state
park close to home. First Day
Hikes offer a great way to get out-
side, exercise, enjoy nature and
welcome the New Year with friends
and family.
“We are excited to host First Day
Hikes as part of this national effort
to get people outdoors and into our
parks. First Day Hikes are a great
way to cure cabin fever and burn
off those extra holiday calories by
starting off the New Year with an
invigorating walk or hike in one of
our beautiful state parks,” said
State Parks and Recreation Direc-
tor Doug Hofer.
First Day Hikes originated more
than two decades ago at the Blue
Hills Reservation, a state park in
Milton, Mass. The program was
launched to promote both healthy
lifestyles throughout the year and
year-round recreation at state
parks. Last year marked the first
time all 50 state park systems
sponsored First Day Hikes, offering
400 hikes nationwide.
In South Dakota, hikes will be of-
fered at the following locations:
•riddle Hike, Newton Hills
State Park near Canton, sunrise to
sunset. Info: 605-987-2263
•First Day Nature Hike, Blood
Run Nature Area near Harrisburg,
10 a.m. CST. Info: 605-987-2263
•New Year’s Bird Count
walk, Lewis and Clark Recreation
Area near Yankton, 10 a.m. CST.
Info: 605-668-2985
•Creekside Stroll, Custer
State Park, 10 a.m. MST. Info: 605-
255-4515
•New Year’s Get Out and Go
Scavenger Hunt, Adams Home-
stead Nature Area near North
Sioux City, 1 p.m. CST. Info: 605-
232-0873
•Lewis and Clark History
Hike, Spirit Mound Historic
Prairie near Vermillion, 1 p.m.
CST, pre-registration required.
Info/register: 605-987-2263
•First Day in the Forest, Rich-
mond Lake Recreation Area near
Aberdeen, 1 p.m. CST. Info: 605-
626-3488
•Snowshoe if Snow, Hike if
No, West Whitlock Recreation Area
near Gettysburg, 1 p.m. CST. Info:
605-765-9410
•Birdwatcher’s Hike, Angos-
tura Recreation Area near Hot
Springs, 1 p.m. MST. Info: 605-745-
6996
•First Day Snowshoe Hike,
George S. Mickelson Trail, 1 p.m.
MST, pre-registration required.
Info/register: 605-584-3896
•First Day Find it, Lake Her-
man State Park near Madison, 1
p.m. CST. Info: 605-256-5003
•After the 2011 Flood,
LaFramboise Island Nature Area
in Pierre, 2 p.m. CST. Info: 605-
773-2885
•First Day Hike, Oakwood
Lakes State Park near Bruce, 2
p.m. CST. Info: 605-627-5441
•Snowshoe Along the Big
Sioux, Big Sioux Recreation Area
in Brandon, 2 p.m. CST. Info: 605-
582-7243
America's State Parks is commit-
ted to promoting outdoor recreation
in state parks as a way to address
obesity, especially among children.
Getting kids outside and un-
plugged from video games and
other electronic media creates a
unique connection with nature that
promotes physical and mental well-
being and encourages creativity
and stewardship of our shared re-
sources.

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