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Pennington Co. Courant, December 20, 2012

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Number 51
Volume 107
December 20, 2012
by Laurie Hindman
Christmas, a time of celebrating
with family and having family
gatherings who have traditions
which have been passed down
from generation to generation.
First grade teacher at Wall Ele-
mentary Mrs. Marlie Trask, ex-
plained to her class what a tradi-
tion is and the tradition she has
with her family and when her tra-
dition began. She then asked what
traditions her class has with their
families and here is what they
said.
Brodi Sundall explained that his
family visits his grandpa and
grandma’s house for christmas and
the next day to go to visit his aunt
in South Dakota.
Jada Reinert said, “We draw
names every year and then we get
to go to grandma’s house and take
turns opening gifts and then Santa
comes.”
Paige Kjerstad stated, “We draw
names every year and when we get
a name we buy a present and we
put up our tree on Christmas eve
and then we go to grandma’s
house.
Thane Simons related we go to
our cousins every year and we sit
at the table and pass out presents.
We also have ham every year for
Christmas dinner.
Bryce Rubio said, “We visit or
spend time with our family on
Christmas holidays. We sing
Christmas songs, play Christmas
board games and read lots of
Christmas stories and we eat a
Christmas meal and decorate our
tree on Christmas eve.”
Becca Griebel announced they
have a brunch and then open up
their presents on Christmas morn-
ing.
Nora Dinger said, “My sister,
brother and I draw names with our
cousins and so do the adults. We
open our presents on Christmas
morning.”
Emma Eisenbraun and her fam-
ily open presents after Santa
Claus comes and then we go to
grandma’s house and usually my
dad’s brothers come.
Cassidy Albrinck said, “We sing
Happy Birthday to Jesus, have
dinner and then open presents.”
Sean Dunker stated, “We go to
grandpa’s but this year we are
going to my aunt’s in Custer and
we open presents on Christmas
morning.”
Alexis Stephan and her family
open presents on Christmas eve
and we celebrate Christmas be-
cause it’s Jesus’s birthday and my
mom and I make cookies.
Burke Blasius explained he and
his family wrap presents on
Christmas eve and then we open
them on Christmas morning. We
leave cookies and milk out for
Santa on Christmas eve and then
my cousins come over.
Owen Fauske and his family go
to church on Christmas eve and
then we go to my grandma’s house.
We have an early Christmas with
my grandma Donna.
Dawson Hess said, “It’s a family
tradition to go camping on Christ-
mas. We open our presents on
Christmas eve or sometimes on
Christmas morning and we go to
my grandma’s house for dinner.”
Traditions passed down
to the next generation
by Laurie Hindman
The Wall School Board met at
5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December
12, with Senator Bruce Rampel-
berg and Representative Lance
Russell to discuss issues pertain-
ing to the school district.
The regular meeting began at
6:30 p.m.
Board members present were:
Scot Eisenbraun, Pam Johnson,
Spencer Cordes, Mary Williams,
Kevin Bielmaier and Todd Trask.
Carolynn Anderson was absent
from the meeting.
A motion was approved for the
agenda.
Consent agenda was approved
for:
•Minutes of November 14, 2012
board meeting.
•December claims.
•Students were commended for
making the honor roll and to those
who had perfect attendance during
the first nine weeks of school.
•Congratulations was given to
Autumn Schulz and Analise Gar-
land for making Academic All-
State for volleyball, Nathan Pat-
terson for making Academic All-
State for cross country and to Tyler
Trask, Ryder Wilson, Trey Richter,
Taran Eisenbraun and Laketon
McLaughlin for making Academic
All-State for football. To qualify
one must be a senior, have a GPA
of 3.5 or higher and have partici-
pated in the sport for at least three
years.
•Congratulations was given to
the volleyball, football, cross coun-
try and chorus groups
•Congratulations to Trask for
being named to the 9A All-State
football team as a snapper and to
McLaughlin, center and Trevor
Anderson, kicker and punter for
being honorable mention.
•2012 Western Great Plains All-
Conference football players from
Wall are: Eisenbraun, Trask,
McLaughlin, Anderson and Lane
Blasius. Honorable mention went
to Tyler Peterson, Cade Kjerstad
and Clancy Lytle.
•Congratulations to Austin
Huether for making the All Con-
ference Cross Country team and
for being named in the top 25 cross
country athletes in the state by the
South Dakota High School Track
and Field Association.
•Congratulations was given to
Schulz for being selected as honor-
able mention to the volleyball All-
State team.
Wall math teacher Samra Trask
gave a presentation to the board
on how the new technology they
purchased for her upper math
classes work.
Trask said, “Students are now
able to show their work by using a
pen, access her class for homework
and use their calcutors through
these new computers.” Trask also
noted it has augmented her les-
sons and is a great program. She
went on to say students can also
use their new computer to do other
classes.
Libbi Sykora presented to the
board how she does a math prob-
lem on her computer using her pen
and calculator. Trask then an-
swered questions from the board
and thanked them for the pur-
chase of the computers.
Anderson, Williams, Eisenbraun
and Superintendent Dennis Rieck-
man met with the policy commit-
tee. Together they made revisions
which were sent to the other board
members for their review. The first
reading on the new policies will be
at the January meeting.
Williams attended the Delegate
Assembly and reported that her
resolution for the lunch program
was adopted and will be one of the
focus items for next year. Williams
went on to say that other schools
aren’t adhering to the USDA man-
dated lunch programs and the
USDA is now backing off on the
calorie intake for students due to
the large population of students
who are in extra curricular activi-
ties.
Elementary Principal Chuck
Sykora related that mid-term re-
port cards have been sent home for
the fourth thru sixth grade class
and to call if students don’t make
it home with them.
Sykora commented on the good
job the Big White and Elementary
did with their Christmas pro-
grams.
Business Manager Niki Mohr
discussed with the board the
Hayes Scholarship. The board ap-
proved a $250 scholarship.
The upcoming election for 2013
was tabled until next month.
The board approved the Junior
High Boys Basketball rules.
Rieckman passed around an
open enrollment form from a stu-
dent in which the board approved.
Rieckman reported there are
now 249 students in the Wall
School.
An air hockey table was ap-
proved for surplus.
The board approved the contract
with Microsoft EES.
Rieckman passed around the at-
tendance report and noted that
students are doing really well in
spite of the flu that is going
around.
Rieckman has sent out an invi-
tation to Representative Elizabeth
May, Representative Kevin Killer
and Senator Jim Bradford to come
and look at the Wall School.
Rieckman informed the board
the Defense Bill passed and con-
gress is now working on the Tech-
nical Amendment and if that
passes the Wall School will be
doing good.
A motion was approved to enter
into executive session for the pur-
pose of discussing personnel and
student issues, according to SDCL
1-25-2.
With no motions being made
after executive session the meeting
was adjourned.
Wall School Board meets with Rumpelberg
and Russell before school board meeting
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of
Commerce Retail Committee
traditional free pancake supper
Rebecca Griebel daughter of Randy and Tammy Griebel has a
visit with Santa during the annual pancake supper hosted by the
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce Retail Committee.
Community members sign up for prizes before heading off to
get their pancakes. Carol Hahn and Jodi Bielmaier make sure
there names are put into the right boxes for the drawings.
Sometimes it’s hard for a cou-
ple of fellas to wait to visit with
Santa Claus. Malcom and
Matthew Heathershaw look
like they are anticipating on
having a long talk with the
jolly old man.
~Photos Laurie Hindman
Gordy Kraut and Teddy Hus-
tead are pleased with the turn
out for the pancake supper.
Terryn Shearer goes to her
grandma’s house cause it’s big and
we go around in a circle and open
our presents and stocking. I get a
birthday cake cause I think my
birthday is on Christmas.
Jada Kusser gives her dog a
bone on Christmas day and I give
my mom makeup and we decorate
the tree and then my friends and I
make Raccoon houses.
Kaylen Spotted Bear said, “My
aunt comes from Missouri to my
house to celebrate Christmas and
we then go to my grandma’s house
or maybe we do that on Thanksgiv-
ing.”
Kadence Kusser likes to cele-
brate Christmas because it’s
Jesus’s birthday. Our family gives
out presents to celebrate when
Santa comes.
Bridger Casjens said, “His fam-
ily goes to church on Christmas
morning and open their presents
on Christmas eve.
Natalee Armenta and her family
decorate a tree, watch holiday
shows, bake Chrismas cookies and
open their presents on Christmas
morning.
Mason Crawford stated, “We
make Christmas snow shapes. We
always sing one song that we
choose. Every Christmas we make
one Gingerbread house to decorate
and one to eat and we go to
grandpa and grandma’s house.”
Whether your tradition has been
handed down from generation-to-
generation or you have just started
one, pass it on to your next gener-
ation so each holiday will have it’s
own special meaning. I know I am.
by Laurie Hind-
man
Eastern Pennington County Am-
bulance District met for a regular
meeting on December 13, at 7:00
p.m. in the Community Center
meeting room.
President Wally Hoffman called
the meeting to order with board
members Carolynn Anderson,
Norm Eisenbraun, Jem Kjerstad
and Elden Helms present.
Minutes from the November 13,
meeting were approved.
Board members went over the
lease agreement. Hoffman who
was at the city council meeting in-
formed the board that the city was
okay with the lease and having the
name on the utilities changed over
to the ambulance district which
will need to be included in the
agreement. The board approved
the lease with the discussed revi-
sion.
The board approved the insur-
ance policy with a $500 deductible.
It was discussed when to begin
paying the monthly bills. Anderson
related when the lease is signed
she will ask the city council to
move the ambulance service funds
over to the ambulance districts
checking account.
Hoffman will attend the city
council meeting on January 8,
2013 to sign the lease.
John Kitterman with the ambu-
lance service will look into chang-
ing the names on the phone bill so
Anderson will have access to it.
It was decided to have Anderson
pick-up the mail and e-mail the
ambulance service if there is any-
thing for them.
Kitterman informed the board
that he and Dawn Hilgenkamp
each have a credit card for the am-
bulance service through First In-
terstate Bank. They don’t use the
cards very often but he thought
the board should know this.
The next ambulance district
meeting will be held on Thursday,
January 19, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at
the Community Center meeting
room.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned.
Eastern Pennington County Ambulance District will
sign lease with city at January 8 council meeting
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TIe ProIIL · PIoneer RevIew · PennIngLon Co. CourunL · Kudoku Press
Murdo CoyoLe · BIson CourIer · ¡uILI ¡ndependenL · New Underwood PosL
8traight frem the headlines
8avellette Pablicatiens, Inc.
School & Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
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of reaching people.
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free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review Pennington Co. Courant
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605-244-7199 605-669-2271
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605-754-6466
Bavellette Publ¡cat¡oas, Iac.
Letters Pol¡cy
Email us with your news item
or photo to
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1cuu:uqrcu Ccuur¸ Sícr:jj's 1cjarr¤cur
PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
RAV£N IA\RA TAPIO
A IoIony Arrosf Wnrrnnf hns
boon Issuod for !nvon !nurn
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fo Aµµonr for IossossIon Con-
froIIod Subsfnnco nnd Ðrug Inrn-
µhornnIIn.
TnµIo Is In nn IndInn fomnIo, 28
yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 5`05¨
fnII, l50 µounds, brown hnIr wIfh
brown oyos.
TnµIo Is boIIovod fo bo In or
nround fho !nµId CIfy, SÐ nron.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hor
whoronboufs, µIonso do nof nµ-
µronch. IIonso confncf fho Ion-
nIngfon Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf
605-394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy Io-
IIco Ðoµnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l
or fho nonrosf Inw onforcomonf
ngoncy If you hnvo nny Informn-
fIon whIch wouId rosuIf In fho nr-
rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
South Dakota high school sen-
iors and college freshmen can now
apply for Davis-Bahcall Scholar-
ships and the chance to study next
summer at the Sanford Under-
ground Science and Engineering
Laboratory in Lead with world-
renowned researchers from uni-
versities across the United States
Davis-Bahcall Scholarship offers
opportunities to young scientists
and overseas, if funding allows.
Applications are available on the
South Dakota Department of Edu-
cation’s website. Up to 12 South
Dakota students will receive schol-
arships. The deadline to apply is
January 20, 2013.
Select students will be invited to
interview at various locations in
the state for the program; scholar-
ship winners will be announced by
early March.
Davis-Bahcall Scholarship recip-
ients spend one month during the
summer studying such things as
physics, engineering and geology,
and learning from distinguished
professors from around the world.
In addition to the one-month
summer study, those receiving
scholarships may have the oppor-
tunity to apply for pre-selected
summer internships.
To be eligible for the scholar-
ships, high school seniors and col-
lege freshmen must attend public
or private high schools or postsec-
ondary institutions in South
Dakota. Home-school students
also are eligible. Students must
have a demonstrated interest in
science and intend to pursue ad-
vanced degrees in math, science,
engineering or technology.
The scholarships, which are
funded by the 3M Company and
the South Dakota Space Grant
Consortium, are named for
renowned physicists Dr. Ray Davis
and Dr. John Bahcall.
For more information, including
details about the application pro-
cedure, visit the South Dakota De-
partment of Education’s website at
doe.sd.gov. Look for the “Scholar-
ships” link in the A-Z Index.
The sale of 2013 South Dakota
general hunting and fishing li-
censes got off to an early start on
Saturday, December 15 through
storefront license agents around
the state and through online li-
cense sales.
General hunting and fishing li-
censes extend beyond the calendar
year. The 2013 licenses are valid
from December 15, 2012 through
Hunting and fishing
licenses are on sale
January 31, 2014 while the 2012
licenses remain valid through Jan.
31, 2013.
Visit online at http://www.gfp.
sd. gov/ licenses/ general-hunt-
fish/default.aspx for information
about license options and their
cost, list and locations of storefront
license agents, and the online sys-
tem for purchasing licenses.
The Pennington County Sher-
iff ’s Office will be participating in
the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration campaign to
stop drunk driving, which is titled
“Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over”.
This is a nationwide program
taking place from mid-December
through January 1, 2013. The Pen-
nington County Sheriff ’s Office, in
addition to other local law enforce-
ment agencies, are committed to
keeping the streets and highways
safe for travel from the impaired
driver during the holiday season.
The Pennington County Sher-
NHTSA campaign
Black Hills Financial Services located at Black Hills Federal
Credit Union is pleased to announce that Kaden Eisenbraun has
been selected as December’s student of the month. Wall High
School’s Kaden Eisenbraun is a member of the Junior class. He
is active in Track and Golf. He is also very involved in several
clubs; Foreign Travels Club, FCCLA, FOR Club, he is President
of FFA in SD, Vice President of Youth to Youth, Junior Represen-
tative for the Student Council and Treasurer in Drama Club;
where he participated in the One Act Play. Outside of the class-
room he likes to read, hang out with friends, golf and ride dirt
bike. Kaden enjoys working at Subway. After he graduates from
High School, Kaden looks forward to attending SDSU for Ag
Business, Livestock Production and Genetics. He also would
like to continue as an FFA officer in college. Kaden is the son of
Juston Eisenbraun, Wall and Lisa Alishouse, Rapid City. Con-
gratulations Kaden from Black Hills Financial Services!
~Courtesy Photo
BH Financial Services
student of the month
Keep food safety in mind to pre-
vent food-borne illness and make
sure holiday gatherings don’t turn
merriment to misery, says a state
health official.
“Unfortunately, it’s not uncom-
mon for holiday pot-lucks at
schools, churches, offices or other
gatherings to result in food-borne
outbreaks,” said Dr. Lon
Kightlinger, State Epidemiologist
for the Department of Health. “To
prevent food-borne illness wash
your hands thoroughly, cook and
store foods at proper tempera-
tures, and don’t prepare food when
you’re sick.”
Food-borne illness symptoms
can include mild or severe diar-
rhea, fever, vomiting and abdomi-
nal pain. Most people recover on
their own without medication but
some need fluids to prevent dehy-
dration.
The federal Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention estimates
that each year food-borne illness
sickens roughly one in six Ameri-
cans, or 48 million people, 128,000
are hospitalized, and 3,000 die. In
South Dakota, through the end of
November, nearly 500 cases of the
food-borne illnesses Salmonella
(157), Campylybacter (266), and E.
Keep food safety in mind
at holiday gatherings
coli (45) had been reported for the
year. In addition, several recent di-
arrheal outbreaks of Norovirus
have been reported.
Dr. Kightlinger recommended
the following steps when prepar-
ing holiday foods:
•Clean. Wash hands, cutting
boards, utensils, and countertops.
•Separate. Keep raw meat and
poultry separate from ready-to-eat
foods.
•Cook. Cook foods to a safe tem-
perature, using a food thermome-
ter to check – 145°F for whole
meats, 160°F for ground meats,
165°F for poultry and stuffing.
•Chill. Keep your refrigerator
below 40°F, and refrigerate left-
overs right away.
•When cooking large batches of
food ahead of time, make sure to
cool them quickly and reheat prop-
erly.
•Don’t lick the bowl if raw eggs
are in the batter and don’t use raw
eggs in your eggnog.
To learn more about food safety,
check http://www.foodsafety.gov/
keep/basics/ or see the FDA site,
www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ Con-
sumerUpdates/ucm092815.htm,
for more food safety tips for the
holidays.
iff ’s Office will be scheduling satu-
ration patrols during this event.
The saturation patrols will be
deputies scheduled in addition to
the regular patrol shift. The pri-
mary function of the saturation pa-
trol will be enforcement of under-
age drinking, DUI apprehension,
and seat belt enforcement.
If you intend on drinking, make
a plan before you go out. Have a
designated driver or plan to call a
cab. Remember to “Drive Sober or
Get Pulled Over”. Please buckle up
and drive safely.
Ruland Arena, LLC., held a rifle
roping on Saturday, December 8.
•Rifle roping: Twenty contest-
ants - four go arounds. Go winners:
Shaun Ruland/Dalton Kelly - 7.59.
Average winners: First and rifle
winner, Dalton Richter - 31.62 on
three head; Second - Allen Good -
41.34 on three head; Third - Riley
Ruland - 40.92 on three head;
Fourth - Shaun Ruland - 22.33 on
two head; Fifth - Garrett Dockter -
23.02 on two head.
•Draw Pot Incentive: Forty-four
contestants - three go arounds. Go
Rifle roping held at Ruland Arena
Rifle roping winner and runners up. From left to right ... Fourth
place Shaun Ruland, Third place Riley Ruland, Second place
Allen Good, Rifle Winner Dalton Richter. ~Courtesy Photo
winners: Jim Selchert/Lonnie
Richards - 8.20. Average winners:
First - Kenny Fox/Dalton Richter -
22.63; Second - Jim
Selchert/Shaun Ruland - 31.59;
Third - Kenny Fox/Shaun Ruland
- 36.43; Fourth - Gordon Good/Lon-
nie Richard - 17.89 on two head.
•Novice Number One Roping:
Fifteen teams - two go arounds.
First - Carson Good - 27.02 on two;
Jerry Schwahn - 37.41 on two;
Third - Denton Good - 10.02 on one
head; Fourth - Denton Good -
10.27 on one head.
PhIIIp League BcwIIng
Rcck ¹N RcII Lanes
0PBN B0wL1N0:
Sunday-FrIday, 1B tc B p.m. · Saturday, 1B p.m. tc cIcsIng
The kItchen Is cpen - we have crders tc gc!!
SS9-B4ß0 · PhIIIp
Monduy NIgLt MIxed
Shnd`s TowIng ...........................40-20
!ockors................................33.5-26.5
Ioforson`s ..................................30-30
IndInnd`s Aufo....................26.5-33.5
Hnndrnhnn Consf .....................26-34
Ðnkofn Inr................................24-36
HIgL!IgLts:
CIydo SchIIm.................20l, 20?/596
Jnson Ioforson....................245, 248,
.....................................228 cIonn/65?
Irynn IuxcoI.........................235/639
KIm Ioforson ........................l8l/4?2
Androw !ockIIng.........223 cIonn/600
Cory Ioyd .......3-l0, 4-9 & 5-? sµIIfs;
...............................................209/605
TrInn Irown ............6-?-l0 sµIIf; 486
JIm Kujnwn...........................2l4/58l
MnrnIynn Iurns....................l8?/4?4
MnrIIs Ioforson.....................l??/4?8
WondoII IuxcoI ..................3-l0 sµIIf;
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VIckIo Ioforson .....................l82/4?8
CnrI Irown .........................3-l0 sµIIf
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IooµIo`s Mkf................................35-9
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C&A TronchIng...................l8.5-25.5
Kndokn Troo SorvIco...........l?.5-26.5
IhIIIµ HonIfh SorvIco .........l6.5-2?.5
Ionr Aufo ..................................l5-29
HIgL!IgLts:
!nndy Ioyd...........2l0, 24?, 2l3/6?0
IIII InInbrIdgo..............22?, 20?/590
IIII Sfono......................................558
Mnff SchofIoId..............................555
InrI Inrk...............................203/553
!onnIo WIIIInms....................203/536
AIvIn Ionrson...............................532
Jorry Iron MoccnsIn.....................526
Konf IuchhoIz.......................20l/522
Irod IoInnd..................................5l?
IIIoI IoorIonr..............................5l4
JIm !nrson .............3-?-l0 sµIIf; 506
Johnny WIIson..............................504
Tony CouId ...................................50l
Torry Wonfz..................................500
!ynn Songor........................3-l0 sµIIf
TyIor Hnuk..........................5-l0 sµIIf
WondoII IuxcoI .....................2-? sµIIf
!os SfrubIo .........................3-l0 sµIIf
Cono Jonos..........................2-l0 sµIIf
Jnmos MnnsfIoId ................3-l0 sµIIf
Wednesduy MovnIng CoIIee
CuffIng Idgo.......................4?.5-l2.5
Sfnfo Inrm..........................35.5-24.5
IowIIng IoIIos ..........................34-26
InvIsIbIos...................................34-26
JoIIy !nnchors ..........................26-34
HIgL!IgLts:
Knron IoInnd.....3-l0 sµIIf; l82, l8l,
...............................................l68/53l
ChrIsfy Inrk..........................l??/45?
Jundy Inµousok ..........5-8 sµIIf; l69,
...............................................l56/459
Iofh Sfownrf .........................l53/42?
ShIrIoy O`Connor ..................l59/4l9
Snndrn O`Connor..3-l0 x 2 sµIIf; l66
Vondn HnmIII ...............................l54
Ðonnnn Ioos........2-? & 5-8-l0 sµIIfs
ChnrIono Kjorsfnd................2-? sµIIf
Wednesduy NIte £uv!y
MorrIson`s HnyIng ..............30.5-2l.5
WnII Iood Confor ......................30-22
Ðnkofn Inr................................30-22
ChIofIo`s ChIcks...................28.5-23.5
IIrsf ÞnfIonnI Innk .................24-28
HIIdobrnnd Concrofo ..........22.5-29.5
Jusf Tnmmy`s......................22.5-29.5
Ðorofhy`s CnforIng....................20-32
HIgL!IgLts:
!nchoI Kjorsfnd...........203 cIonn/4?9
AIIcIn Honfhorshnw..............l?3/400
Amy MorrIson .......................202/532
!oIs Iorch.....................................l82
CrIsfI Iorguson.....................l85/524
Knfhy Arfhur................................l?0
TrncI !ndwny......................5-l0 sµIIf
ÐobbIo Cnrfnor.....................5-? sµIIf
AshIoy !ockIIng....................2-? sµIIf
TLuvsduy Men's
A&M !nundry.............................32-8
Ðnkofn Inr................................26-l4
O`ConnoII ConsfrucfIon............22-l8
McÐonnoII Inrms .....................l9-2l
Wosf !Ivor IIonoor Tnnks........l8-22
CoyIo`s SuµorVnIu.....................l6-24
WII IAÐÐ...............................l6-24
Tho Sfonkhouso.........................ll-29
HIgL!IgLts:
Ðoug Hnuk ..........232, 222 cIonn/634
IrInn Ionrson .....245, 228 cIonn/6?8
!nndy Ioyd...........................223/592
Jny McÐonnoII ......................202/595
Mnff SchofIoId .....3-l0 sµIIf; 200/59l
Jnson Ioforson......................20l/585
Hnvon HIIdobrnnd ................202/568
Þnfhnn Kjorsfnd...................200/563
Mnrk IoInnd.................................554
John HoIfzoI .........................5-? sµIIf
IvIduy NIte MIxed
CrIsfI`s Crow .............................46-l0
KIng IIns.............................3?.5-l8.5
!nndy`s Sµrny Sorv...................3l-25
!oo & fho !ndIos.......................24-32
!oy`s !oµnIr ........................22.5-33.5
Tho Chosf Tonm............................0-0
HIgL!IgLts:
Ðunno Hnnd..........................235/608
Joromy Iron MoccnsIn .................226
Tnnnor Þormnn............................202
KoIIy Ioos ...................5-l0 sµIIf; 20l
!oo ÞovIIIo ...................................l?8
AIvIn Ionrson..............205 cIonn/583
MnrIn Ioyd............................l89/4?3
CrIsfI Iorguson.....................l?2/4??
John HoIfzoI .................5-? sµIIf; 54?
AngoI Þomoc.........................4-5 sµIIf
!nndy Ioyd ........................3-l0 sµIIf
Chadron State College conferred
degrees to 181 graduates during
two commencement ceremonies
Friday, December 14.
Graduates from the region:
•Lisa Curtis, Wall, Master of
Arts in Education.
•Gabrielle Oates, Caputa, Bach-
elor of Arts.
College briefs
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or subscribe
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January 4, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center.
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tion with you when you attend the
training.
Applicator
certification
training
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School & Area News
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012• Page 3
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a gift that keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the
Pennington County Courant.
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By Douglas R. Horn
Dangerous driving behaviors
could make December most dan-
gerous month ever
Driving safety expert Doug Horn
says motorists not only need to ex-
hibit extra caution while encoun-
tering treacherous road surfaces
and reduced visibility during the
weeks ahead, they also need to
stay on high alert for four danger-
ous driving behaviors, which he
says could make December 2012
one of the most dangerous months
ever for motorists.
“When accompanied by poor
road conditions, these four danger-
ous behind-the-wheel behaviors
combine into a perfect storm of
risk for drivers,” says Horn,
founder of the driving safety pro-
gram “Drive by Example”
(www.drivebyexample.com).
The Winter Holiday’s Four Most
Dangerous Driving Behaviors:
1. Distracted Driving: “This in-
cludes driving while using cell
phones for both talking and tex-
ting holiday messages to friends,
co-workers, and family,” Horn
says. “It also includes driving
while checking out store hours and
locations using a smart phone to
surf the web.”
2. Impaired Driving: “Year end
dinners, parties and celebrations
typically involve consumption of
alcohol, and in too many cases, use
of drugs,” says Horn. “An increase
in the number of impaired drivers
using the roadways during the
winter holidays has been well-es-
tablished by law enforcement, and
the loss of life resulting from im-
paired driving is also well-estab-
lished.”
3. Pressured Driving: “The win-
ter holidays typically bring with
them increased pressures, espe-
cially financial pressures and the
stress created by trying to do too
much in a short time span. Drivers
often react to these pressures by
driving too fast for conditions,
making aggressive lane changes,
failing to yield right-of-way, and
generally disregarding the needs
and safety of others using the
road,” he says.
4. Fatigued Driving: “Increased
Recorder Karate performing at the Elementary Christmas program held on Monday, December 10.
Pictured from left to right ... Samantha Deutscher, Jett Mohr, Sierra Hilgenkamp, Breanna Mc-
Connell, Ava Dinger, Matthew Heathershaw, Tearra Merrill, Searra-Sioux Deutscher, Blair Blasius,
Gabriel Fauske, Samuel Swanson, Sheridan Deering. ~Photos Laurie Hindman
Fifth grade band members played Good King Wenceslas and
Jolly Old St. Nicholas under the direction of Andrea Chris-
tiansen. Band personnel are: Flute - Abby Moon and Rheagan
Zebroski. Clarinet - Tacia Osterberg. Alto Sax - Alexa Dunker,
Dylan Huether and Korra Westby. Tenor Sax - Andrew Law.
Trumpet - Samantha Deutscher, Luke Harris, Zachary Hout and
Kassidy Sawvell. Trombone - Aidan Brunneman and Kole
Gallino. Bariton - Cale Baus and John Deering. Percussion -
Enoch Cuny, Ash Grenstiner and Gavin Sandal.
Wall Elementary 2012 Christmas concert
“It’s Christmas, Carol! was
performed by the Wall Ele-
mentary students during the
2012 Christmas program.
Above is Shelby Ruland play-
ing Carol.
By Senator John Thune
Christmas has always been a
season of tradition. From picking
out the Christmas tree, to baking
for the neighbors, nearly every
family has their own customs and
traditions around the holidays.
Some of these traditions are
community-wide celebrations that
capture the true spirit of the sea-
son.
Throughout the state you will
find small and large towns coming
together to enjoy the company of
others and reflecting on the year
that has passed.
For some, a trip to Pierre for a
look at the Christmas trees that
are decorated by businesses, non-
profit organizations, and govern-
ment offices is an annual tradition.
Others enjoy the nativities and
Christmas pageants that local
churches and community groups
will host each year.
Some enjoy the sounds of the
season at school concerts and the
South Dakota Acoustic Christmas
in Sioux Falls, Yankton, Lead, and
Rapid City.
No matter the tradition, the sea-
son presents wonderful opportuni-
ties to enjoy the fellowship of
friends and family.
Perhaps no tradition is more im-
portant than celebrating the sea-
son of giving by remembering
those who are less fortunate.
I am always amazed by the gen-
erosity of South Dakotans, and I
know that in difficult times those
in need can count on others for
support during the Christmas sea-
son.
Not all South Dakotans have the
means to make financial donations
to those in need, but many South
Dakotans will choose to donate
their time and talents, offering a
helpful hand to a neighbor in need,
organizing food drives, and provid-
ing a warm meal and gifts to less-
fortunate children.
We also think about those fami-
lies who have loved ones serving in
the military around the globe who
will be apart this Christmas. The
South Dakota Christmas traditions
strength of the family members
who celebrate traditions while
praying for the safety of loved ones
in harm’s way reminds us all of
how fortunate we are to be to-
gether this time of year.
As you continue to celebrate
your Christmas traditions this sea-
son, Kimberley and I would like to
wish all of those travelling this
season safe journeys and a very
Merry Christmas.
May God continue to bless South
Dakota and our great nation.
Driving safety expert Douglas Horn alerts
drivers to holiday driving hazards
demands and activities during the
winter holidays often mean signif-
icantly reduced sleep schedules,”
Horn says. “According to a study
by the AAA Foundation for Traffic
Safety, people who slept six to
seven hours a night were twice as
likely to be involved in a crash as
those sleeping eight hours or more,
while people sleeping less than five
hours increased their risk four to
five times.”
Horn says it’s not uncommon for
a single driver to manifest all four
dangerous driving behaviors at the
same time, especially in the final
10 days of the year.
“Drivers in warm climates with
good road conditions also need to
be alert to these dangerous behav-
iors,” Horn says. “During sunny
days when roads are clear, drivers
become ‘risk averse’ and drive
faster while taking their attention
off the physical activity of driving.
Putting your vehicle on ‘autopilot’
is extremely dangerous at anytime
of the year, but especially so dur-
ing the holidays when traffic vol-
ume increases.”
To help motorists stay accident-
free over the holidays, Horn has
compiled some tips for safe driving
which he says can and should be
used 365 days-a-year by every mo-
torist:
•Drive Alert: “This is especially
crucial at intersections where fail-
ure to notice traffic control devices
can result in violent collisions and
pedestrian injuries,” Horn says.
•Drive Buckled: “The use of seat
belts reduces risk of crash fatality
by 45 percent according to the Na-
tional Highway Traffic Safety Or-
ganization,” Horn says.
•Drive Cautious: “Drive at safe
speeds for conditions, keep proper
distance between vehicles, obey
traffic signs, and signal all turns,”
he says. Resist the temptation to
make a sudden lane change or an-
other risky maneuver.
•Drive Defensively: “When you
drive alert, buckled and cautious,
you are effectively protecting your-
self, your passengers and other
motorists against risk of violent
collision, injury and fatality,” he
says.
•Drive by Example: “When driv-
ers model safe driving behaviors,
they are in the best position to pro-
tect themselves, their passengers,
and others on the roadway,” Horn
says.
/
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For a comfortable
holiday season for
one and all. 1hanks
for your business
and please come
again soon.
W
A
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1 Ï
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CESSIN
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SC011, ÏAUIA, AMANDA, 1YREI, LACY & L0RDAR0
End of the World
Christmas Party
Friday, December 21st
8 p.m. - ??
Drink Specials! • Door Prizes!
KARAOKE!
Cactus Café & Lounge
519 Main St. • Wall, SD • 279-2561
annc@
gwtc.net
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement
announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
“Theme” meal was held last
Tuesday, the 11th — a good ham
dinner. There were around thirty
people attending. Bingo was
played after dinner for those who
wanted to stay. Arla Olson and Lu-
cille Holsether called the numbers.
The Badlands Quilters held
their Christmas party Tuesday af-
ternoon in the smaller room at the
Community Center. They had a lot
of games and played “Quilt” in-
stead of Bingo, everyone taking
part. The table was loaded with all
kinds of goodies, very festive.
Everyone had a fun time.
Mike and Gretchen Rausch have
a new grandson born to Anne Jo
and Beau on December 6th. He
has been named Lincoln John,
weighed 8 lbs. 7 oz. and measured
20 1/2 inches long. He has two
older brothers, Kaylen and Tyson.
Our congratulations go out to the
family.
Our congratulations, also to
Aaron and Emily Kitterman of
Rose Hill, Kan., as they have a
baby boy, Thomas Boyd, born Au-
gust 21, 2012. He joins a sister, Ivy.
From Wall, grandparents are John
and Candee Kitterman, great-
grandparents are Boyd and Ann
Kitterman. This is a belated an-
nouncement but “best of wishes”
are still in order.
Did you get to see Santa Claus
last Wednesday evening, the 12th,
at the Pancake supper at Wall
Drug? If you didn’t, you are of the
minority as there was a huge
crowd! Thank you to all the mer-
chants who put on this annual
event!
A reception was held at the St.
Patrick’s Catholic Church, Sunday
afternoon in honor of Mary
Roeder’s graduation from college.
We offer our congratulations also.
Sherry and Kurth DeLand came
on Friday to Wall. They took his
mom, Janis Bush, to Rapid City on
Saturday and went home to
Stromsburg, Neb., on Sunday.
Things are so hectic this time of
year but the forecast looked rela-
tively nice so they decided to come.
We did have light snow on Sunday
morning.
Last week’s “Courant” had a pic-
ture of the new baby of Roseann
Eisenbraun and Danny Whidby,
born on November 9th. She was at
Prairie Village one morning and
she has so much dark hair — a
precious baby girl. Congratula-
tions to all of the family.
Travis Williams came through
his surgery last Monday and pos-
sibly was dismissed from the hos-
pital on Sunday, the 16th. Thank-
fully, the tumor was benign but he
ended up with them taking 2/3 of
his lung, more than they had esti-
mated. We send “get-well” mes-
sages to Travis as he recuperates.
Our flag was again at half-staff
on Friday because of the tragic
event at the school in Newtown,
Conn. We’ll never know what the
killer’s motive was — it is so unbe-
lievable and senseless! Pray for
those poor people!
Lyle and Viola Williams went to
the City (Rapid, that is) on Thurs-
day to do Christmas shopping.
Michelle Lamphere stopped in
Wall on her way to Sioux Falls on
Monday to see Grandma Frances.
Only I wasn’t home — she left gifts
by my front door after phoning me.
Told her I would be home in an
hour so didn’t think things would
freeze, as it wasn’t that cold.
The whole community was
shocked to hear of Celine Trask’s
horrific accident. Our thoughts
and prayers are with her and her
family as she goes through surger-
ies.
Diane Geigle is home from the
hospital after back surgery and is
doing well. Gerald and Esther Wol-
ford were out to see her last Thurs-
day.
Tina Carstensen of Lusk, Wyo.,
was here over the weekend to visit
her folks, the Mettlers. She and
her mom were involved in candy
making.
Gerald and Esther Wolford were
in Rapid City on Sunday to visit
Carl and Jan Hill and family. Tay-
lor was home from college in Ari-
zona. They enjoyed their great-
grandson Malachi.
Grant Holub graduated from the
Black Hills State University on
Saturday, the 15th. Bill and Kay
Leonard were in attendance.
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann went
to Huron and spent Friday
evening and Saturday for an early
Christmas with family — his
daughter Amy, Jerrod and Ethan
Busch; his son Daniel, Carrie,
Owen and Carly Kopfmann; and
Pastor’s mother-in-law Nellie
Jager.
It is countdown time until
Christmas. Hope you are ready —
or do you do like me, I try to bake
and make candy, etc. but when the
day comes, I quit. And we never
miss what I never got done!
Have to have news in early for
next week — if there is any.
Merry Christmas, everyone!
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Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
The Wall elementary school
Christmas program Monday, De-
cember 10th, was just delightful! If
you didn’t have the Christmas
spirit at the beginning of the
evening, you surely would have
been at the close of the program.
The fifth grade band opened
with two traditional Christmas fa-
vorites and did well with both.
Three Wasta kids, Kole Gallino,
John Deering and Ash Grenstiner
did their part.
Sheridan Deering was part of
the recorder group and the light
“flutey” sound of the recorder
sounded perfect through both their
songs.
The skit, “It’s Christmas, Carol!”
involved elves, ghosts and a chorus
casting kindergarten through fifth
grade and was just good fun and
well done.
Wasta was well represented,
Louis and Samantha Rancour,
Dayton Skillingstad, Connor,
Mason and Raiden Crawford and
Natalee Armenta.
Ms. Christiansen seems to bring
out the talent and the teachers
and all who participated need
thanks so — Thank you!
Wasta grandparents can be
proud of Katy Humphrey (Carl
and Anna Lee Humphrey), Lanie
Mae Humphrey, Kaylan Spotted
Bear (Mike and Gretchen Rausch),
Cameron Ausmann (Dorothy
Bathel) and Brody Bryan, great
nephew of Faye Bryan. It was a
very good program and we appre-
ciate the talent and work that
went into it.
Also observed was the courteous
“audience” of kids who were also
performers, but at times were not
part of the featured act, but gave
attention to those who were “on
stage”.
Speaking of the Rausch family,
Gretchen announced a new grand-
son, Lincoln John Spotted Bear,
born December 6th to Anne Jo and
Beau. Brothers are excited! Baby
weighed 8 1/2 lbs and was 20 1/2
inches long. Congratulations!
Anna Lee Humphrey was a little
tired, but as always, looking for-
ward to a good Bingo game
Wednesday afternoon. Her table
has been the lucky table where the
big winners have sat! Good luck
this week, Anna Lee.
Marilyn Keyser has gone
through her “preventative” radia-
tion treatments and is still at her
son’s near Dallas, Texas.
Please keep both Marilyn and
Anna Lee in your thoughts and
prayers.
We had a “pogonip” day in Wasta
Thursday, December 13th. Several
years ago the Farmer’s Almanac
wrote of December Pogonip Days
so curiosity led Faye Bryan to in-
vestigate and finally a friend in
Iowa City came back with the an-
swer! Pogonip is an Eastern Na-
tive American word for hoarfrost.
So Friday, we’ll be having a Pogo-
nip Party — with or without Pogo-
nip! But it is Lloyd’s birthday so I
guess he can have any kind of
party he wants! He is, after all,
mostely a grown up!
Wasta’s Santa coordinator has
confirmed that the big guy is on
track to visit December, 22nd (Sat-
urday) at the community hall in
Wasta. Be there at 5:00 to carol
through town and 6:30 for hot
drinks and munchies, while we
wait ever so patiently to hear that
special hearty Ho Ho Ho coming
through the door of the Wasta
Community Hall. Okay? Wasta,
December 22nd.
Wishing you all a joyous and
blessed Christmas.
Have you remembered to look
for those little miracles every day?
As this wanderer didn’t get sub-
mitted Monday, we can cover the
junior high and high school Christ-
mas program, Monday, December
17th.
Ms. Christiansen put together
another entertaining, enjoyable,
and so very well done program. It
was a treat to be in the audience!
The band (sixth/seventh grade)
set the pace with Christmas fa-
vorites that your ears and heart
welcome. Madison Grenstiner is
with the sixth grade band on per-
cussion.
Eighth through twelfth graders
had their turn and kept our atten-
tion and toes tapping with some
more modern selections. Autumn
Deering did a good job represent-
ing Wasta, but we’ve never quite
relinquished Emily Ferris to Wall
so we claim two girls here — and
thank you.
Chorus: seventh and eighth
grade took over, Madi Grenstiner
and Emily Ferris, three selections,
my favorite “Silver Bells” but fun
to have the light hearted “Jingle
Bell Rock” to get toes tapping and
guys, Austin Carter and Austin
Crawford seemed to enjoy Feliz
Navidad.
The evening was polished off
with the chorus composed of high
school, ninth through twelfth
graders and again four selections
each made unique by Ms. Chris-
tiansen — ‘Themes on Fa-La-La”
so entertaining and the long stand-
ing favorite, “Silent Night” capped
the wonderfully perfect (to my
ears) evening. Kelly Green, Will
Houseman and Dylan Carter lent
their talents here and we thank
you!
Caitlin Ausmann, granddaugh-
ter of Dorothy Bathel, was in band
and chorus and we thank you!
No excuses for not being full of
Christmas spirit!
Remember Wasta Community
Hall, Saturday, the 22nd, 5:00 p.m.
for caroling, 6:30 for Santa.
How beautiful is this morning!
We eagerly open curtains for De-
cember sunshine as we quickly
close for shade in July!
Well, Feliz Navidad to all and
Happy Trails!
Wasta Wanderings
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 24 & 25
DEADLINE for the December 27th issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 21st!
****************
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
****************
PROFIT DEADLINES:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 20th
for the Dec. 25th issue
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
WaII HeaItb ServIces, Inc.
Dave, Stacey, MonI, GenIe, Josbua, JaneII, PauIa, Ester
Ior c
hcppç, heclthç
holidcç secson to
one cnd clll
Wall Lube &
Espresso Bar
Need a print job
done fast?
Call us for all your
printing needs.
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
279-2565 or 859-2516
Offices in Philip, Wall,
Kadoka, Murdo, Faith,
Bison, & New Underwood.
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
“Abraham believed God and it was
counted unto him for righteousness” (Rom.
4:3).
Has it ever occurred to you that the most loved, the
most honored, the most respected person of all history
is — not Christ, but Abraham. Christ ought to be most
loved, honored and respected, but Abraham is. Be-
sides the millions of professing Christians there are un-
told millions of Jews and Mohammedans who speak
with reverance of “our father Abraham.”
Clearly this is why God used this man to show how
to be saved and justified before a holy God. As Paul is
God’s great example of grace, so Abraham is God’s
great example of faith — saving faith.
“If Abraham were justified by works,” says Rom. 4:2,
he has something to boast about — but not before
God, who sees and knows all. But Abraham was justi-
fied. How? “What saith the Scripture? Abraham be-
lieved God and it was counted to him for righteous-
ness” (Ver. 3).
God, of course, had planned salvation through the
redemptive work of Christ and has always saved any-
one who simply trusts Him and takes Him at His Word.
Since Abraham, of course, more of God’s Word has
been revealed and we know the details of Christ’s
death for sinners. If we now take God at His Word and
simply trust Christ as Savior we are completely justi-
fied, for salvation is not; cannot be, by works:
“But to him that worketh not but believeth
on Him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is
counted for righteousness” (Rom. 4:5).
“…through this Man is preached unto you
the forgiveness of sins, and by Him all that be-
lieve are justified from all things, from which
ye could not be justified by the law of Moses”
(Acts 13:38,39).
THE FATHER OF BELIEVERS
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
More obituaries on page 8
Harold E. Johnson_______________________________
Harold E. Johnson, 93, of the
Dupree, SD area passed away on
Friday, December 14, 2012 at the
Golden Living Center in Rapid
City, SD.
Funeral service for Harold was
held Monday, December 17, 2012 at
the Peace Lutheran Church in Is-
abel, SD, with Rev. Daniel Lewig
officiating and special music by
Darlene Pfaff. Burial followed at
the Dupree Cemetery.
Harold Edward Johnson was
born to Carl and Gerda (Clauson)
Johnson on the family homestead
10 miles south of Dupree, SD on
May 2, 1919. He attended a neigh-
borhood country school until com-
pletion of the eighth grade. Harold
began farming and ranching with
his father along with working for
the soil conservation service until
enlisting in the US Navy in April of
1942. He served in the Pacific The-
ater of Operations until October of
1945. Harold returned to the home
and continued farming and ranch-
ing with his father. In 1945 he
again started working for the farm
programs as a range inspector
which consisted mainly of staking
stock water dams throughout
Ziebach County.
In 1953 he was elected to the
Ziebach County ASCS Committee.
He served for 21 years; 20 as the
chairman. On October 20 1956 he
married Neoma Bierman at Belle
Fourche, SD. Together they bought
the ranch from Harold’s folks in
1960 and operated it along with
their son Dale until Neoma’s death
and failing health forced Harold to
move to Edgewood Vista in
Spearfish, SD in December 2008.
He was a resident there until No-
vember of 2012. Harold then be-
came a resident of the Golden Liv-
ing Center in Rapid City, SD until
his passing on December 14, 2012.
Grateful for having shared in his
life are his four sons and their
spouses, Mark and Carolyn, Bis-
marck, ND; Doug and Brenda,
Piedmont, SD; Richard "Dick" and
Pam, Wall, SD; Dale and Debra L.,
Dupree, SD; two sisters and their
spouses, Viola and Everett
Shrader, Arvada, CO and Carol
and Leon Pope, Eureka, KS; nine
grandchildren, four great grand-
children and numerous nieces and
nephews. Harold was preceded in
death by his parents Carl and
Gerda, his wife Neoma and one
granddaughter, Ellen.
In lieu of flowers, Memorials will
be established by his family.
Condolences may be sent
through our website at www.funer-
alhomesofcaring.com.
Jessie Tibbs Keckler______________________________
Jessie Tibbs Keckler, 68, of
Eagle Butte, SD passed away on
November 29, 2012 at Pierre, S.D.
Jessie Tibbs was born in Pierre,
S.D. on November 10, 1944, one of
five children of Esther "Boyd"
Tibbs and Ancel Tibbs. She at-
tended rural schools until eighth
grade when she moved in with her
grandmother and attended Stan-
ley County High School, where she
graduated. She attended Black
Hills State University where she
received her degree in education.
She married her husband of 46
years, Jerry Keckler, on August 18,
1966 in Pierre, SD.
Jessie then began her 39-year
teaching career with the CEB
School System. Upon her diagnosis
of pancreatic cancer she retired in
2010 to spend time with her fam-
ily.
Jessie was a founding board
member of the Casey Tibbs Foun-
dation and her greatest accom-
plishment was seeing the doors
open to the South Dakota Rodeo
Center.
Jessie attended the Emanuel
Lutheran Church in Eagle Butte
and was a member of the United
Church of Christ of Eagle Butte.
There she taught Sunday School
and Vacation Bible School for
many years and was the youth
group advisor for twenty years.
Jessie's greatest joy was spend-
ing time with her grandchildren.
They were the twinkle in her eye.
Jessie was preceded in death by
her mother, Esther, and father,
Ancel, and brothers-in-law Jerry
Collins and Jack Keckler.
She is survived by her husband,
Jerry Keckler; daughters Jeri Ann
(Tommy Dale) Vines of Eagle Butte
and Mikki (James) Rea, Wood-
ward, OK; granddaughters Mi-
randa, Rae Lynn, and Tatum;
brothers Wayne "Fio" (Lori) Tibbs,
Mission Ridge, and Larry (Barb)
Tibbs, Pierre, SD; sisters Jill
(Keith) Strunk, Minnetonka, MN
and Dayle Angyal, Pierre; sisters-
in-law Patti Keckler and Joyce
Collins, Eagle Butte; and several
nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial is
established
First NationaI Agency
PhiIip, SD
Joe, Mary,
Anita & Judy
The birth of our Lord and Savior
Jesus Christ. Believe in the miracle
and rejoice in His name!
¯þc bcat g¡|t
to tþ¡a doy
¯þc bcat g¡|t
to tþ¡a doy
1hen spuke }esus uguín unto them, suyíng, l
um the ííght oí the voríd: he thut íoííoveth
me shuíí not vuík ín durkness, but shuíí
huve the ííght oí íííe. }ohn 8:l2 (l}V)
Muy He be víth you uívuys.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & DJ Rush
Menu
Elderly Meals
(Served at Prairie Village)
December 20 -
December 26, 2012
Thursday: Sausage Gravy over
Biscuit, Tossed Salad w/Dressing,
Squash, Jello w/Strawberries.
Friday: Ham & Potato Omelet,
Green Beans, Cinnamon Roll,
Plums.
Monday: Closed.
Merry Christmas
Tuesday: Closed.
Merry Christmas
Wednesday: Chicken & Dress-
ing, Baked Squash, Harvest Beets,
Fruit Cocktail.
24 hour
Reservations Required
Call 279-2547
Leave a message
*All meals include a milk and a bread
serving.
*Menu subject to change without notice.
This public service message is brought to you
by the Pennington County Courant
Ida Mae “Patty” Patterson________________________
Ida Mae “Patty” Patterson, age
80, of Kadoka, S.D., died Tuesday,
December 11, 2012, at the Hans P.
Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip, surrounded by her chil-
dren, grandchildren, and great-
grandchildren.
Ida Mae Shoemaker was born
December 1, 1932, in Pierre, the
daughter of Rollie and Eva (McK-
ean) Shoemaker. She attended
country school and graduated from
Philip High School. One of Patty’s
fondest memories is the old Cozy
Hotel, which her parents owned
and operated in Philip.
Ida Mae married Jerry Patter-
son in 1949, and to this union were
born six children Robert, Sharon,
Grant, Scott, Cindy and Tammy.
Patty’s children recall the many
times she would take a load of chil-
dren to baseball games. She didn’t
want to deprive anyone of a ride.
Ida Mae moved to Rapid City in
1964, where she worked and de-
cided to further her education,
graduating from National College
of Business. She relocated to Den-
ver and worked for the U.S. Life
and Title Company, and worked
weekends as a waitress, for many
years.
Being close to the sports life
through her children, Ida Mae de-
veloped a love for football and be-
came a big fan of the Denver Bron-
cos. She was actually able to meet
many of the players of the Denver
Broncos team through her wait-
ressing at the Elks Club. Wanting
to be closer to her children and
grandchildren, she moved back to
Kadoka in 1990.
In 1990, Patty went to work at
her family’s business (Discount
Fuel) as secretary/treasurer, and
worked side by side, with Grant
and Tammy, for 13 years before ill
health forced Patty to retire.
Patty enjoyed living at the fam-
ily farm where she enjoyed the
openness and could spend time
with her cats. Patty enjoyed the
Kadoka area and being able to
spend time with her children,
grandchildren, and great-grand-
children.
For health reasons, Patty had to
leave the farm moving to the
Senechal Hotel and then to the Sil-
verleaf Assisted Living Center in
Philip. She was an avid Philip
Scotties fan and would sometimes
feel like she was betraying the
team if she sat on Kadoka’s side
during a basketball game, but
being her grandsons and grand-
daughters played for Kadoka, she
was biased to her family’s team.
She then moved to the Kadoka
Nursing Home where she has been
living until our Lord took her
home to be with her other loving
family who preceded her in death.
Patty was a member of the Pres-
byterian Church, Cancer Society,
and the Arbor Association.
Ida Mae “Patty” will always be
remembered as being a wonderful
loving mother and grandmother
whom loved each and everyone of
her children, grandchildren, and
great-grandchildren, whom she
was so proud of.
Survivors include her six chil-
dren Robert Patterson of Kadoka,
Sharon Bebout of Las Vegas, Nev.,
Grant Patterson and his wife,
Susan, of Kadoka, Scott Patterson
and his wife, Arla, of Kadoka;
Cindy VanderMay and her hus-
band, Mark, of Kadoka, and
Tammy Carlson and her husband,
Mark, of Kadoka; their father,
Jerry Patterson of Kadoka, and his
daughters, Lisa and April Patter-
son of Kadoka; 22 grandchildren
Kenny Bebout of Las Vegas,
Melissa Huber of Kadoka, Joey
Patterson of Sioux Falls, Jeffrey,
Adie and Nicholas Patterson of
Kadoka, Preston Patterson of
Sturgis, Skyler and Lane Patter-
son of Kadoka, Dallas Kendrick of
Kadoka, Chris Kendrick of Pierre,
Kanan VanderMay of Kadoka,
Bethany Zipprich of Valdosta,
Georgia, Tere, Kenar, and Jarrett
VanderMay of Kadoka, Tashia
Porch of Kadoka, Tanna Gardner
of Pierre, Colter Carlson of
Kadoka, Jerad Carlson of Huron,
Seth and Tia Carlson of Kadoka;
18 great-grandchildren; two broth-
ers, Gordon Shoemaker and his
wife, Margaret, of Belle Fourche,
and Don Shoemaker and his wife,
Betty, of Evanston, Wyo.; one sister
Alice Bentley of Rapid City; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Patty was preceded in death by
her parents, Rollie and Eva Shoe-
maker; an uncle, Ernie Shoe-
maker; and a brother-in-law,
Richard Bentley.
Services were held Saturday,
December 15, at the Presbyterian
Church in Kadoka with Pastor
Gary McCubbin officiating.
Music was provided by Lyndy
Ireland and Joyce Wheeler. Pall-
bearers were Nicholas, Preston,
Skyler, Lane, Joey and Jeffrey Pat-
terson, Dallas and Chris Kendrick,
Kanan, Tere, Kenar and Jarrett
VanderMay, Kenneth Bebout, and
Colter, Jerad and Seth Carlson.
Interment followed the lunch-
eon, at the Masonic Cemetery in
Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Sports
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012• Page 6
It took nine days, but Oelrichs
barrel racer Lisa Lockhart won a
prestigious round and $18,257 at
the 10-day, $6 million Wrangler
National Finals Rodeo in Las
Vegas. The night prior, she had
reached the milestone of $1 million
By Assistant Coach Kier
On December 6, 2012 the Wall
Lady Eagles kicked off their bas-
ketball season by playing the
Philip Scotties. The Eagles took
the win with a 45 to 22 final score.
Autumn Schulz led the way with
ranking in 10 points, followed by
Sadie O'Rourke and Carlee John-
ston with nine as well as Josie Bla-
sius with eight.
Schulz, also led the team in total
rebounds as she came down with a
whopping 17, followed by Blasius
with nine.
"The girls started off their sea-
son with such a tenacity and drive,
that it was very fun basketball to
watch, coach, and to be a part of.
We have a bright season ahead,
and with such great leadership
and drive, good things are bound
to happen," adds Coach Hess.
Stats:
Lady Eagles: 16 10 7 12 = 45
Lady Scotties: 2 7 10 3 = 22
Scoring: Sadie O’Rourke 3-15
3-3 9, Bobbie Steffen 0-4 0-0 1,
Carlee Johnston 3-8 0-0 9, Kaitlin
Schreiber 1-5 0-0 2, Josie Blasius
2-7 0-1 8, Monica Bielmaier 3-7 0-
0 6, Autumn Schulz 3-14 0-0 10.
Totals: 15-63 1-4 45.
3-point field goals: Lady Ea-
gles 0-4 (O’Rourke 0-3, Blaius 0-1).
Field Goal Percentage: Lady
Eagles .238.
Rebounds: Eagles 50 (Schulz
17).
Fouls: Lady Eagles 16.
Steals: Lady Eagles 15 (Blaisus
4, Schulz 4).
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 26.
On December 13, 2012 the Lady
Eagles trecked through the dense
fog all the way up to Buffalo to face
off against the Harding County
Ranchers.
The Junior Varsity team started
off the night with a win as the final
score reached 36 to 17.
Katy Bielmaier led the young
team with 10 points followed by
Monica Bielmaier with nine
points.
Emily Linn guided the team in
rebounds as she tallied five re-
bounds for herself as well as Mon-
ica Bielmaier finishing the game
with four rebounds.
The girls played a quick paced
game, and not one of them let the
long drive effect the way they
played.
I am proud of all the girls, and I
am enjoying watching them im-
And muny mugícuí
moments to you und
yours thís hoííduy seuson.
Wcs! K| vcr I|cr!r|r
Ásser|z!|en
May God and His angels
forever hold us tight.
nd suddenly
there was with the angel a multitude of
the heavenly host praising God, and
saying, Glory to God in the highest, and
on earth peace, good will toward men.
Luke 2.13-14 (KJJ)
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Here's wishing all our
patients and their families
a season that's merry
and bright. We consider it
a privilege to serve you
and thank you for
entrusting
us with your dental care.
Happy HoIidays!
Dr. Ron & Laurie Mann
& Staff
Wlshlng you all ol thc |oy...
Òl a maglcal scason. May
thc splrlt ol thls spcclal
tlmc warm your hcart & llll
your homc wlth happlncss.
Jo our customcrs and all
ol our lrlcnds wc cxtcnd
our bcst wlshcs lor a
|oyous hollday scason
and prospcrous ncw ycar!
Jhank you lor your
patronagc!
1ratssa k l|rsa|t| 1at||sa ätrr|tts
prove on their basketball skills
with each game we play," said
Coach Kier.
The Varsity Eagles also came
away with a win against the
Ranchers with an ending score of
59 to 42.
"The girls played an extremely
fast paced and yet intense game, it
is exactly what we have been prac-
ticing for at each practice thus far,"
said Coach Hess.
Johnston was the leader in scor-
ing as she ranked herself 16 points
followed by O'Rourke with 15, and
Blasius and Schulz both with nine
points apiece.
Blasius and Schulz also led the
team in rebounds as each earned
themselves 11 total boards.
"The Ranchers came out to the
floor with an extreme drive and in-
tensity, and our girls quickly had
to adjust to that type of game.
The girls did a great job hustling
and getting after things, and it
shows as we stole the ball 13 times
from the hands of the Ranchers,"
added Coach Hess.
Stats
Lady Eagles: 12 21 15 11 = 59
Ranchers: 12 9 8 13 = 42
Scoring: Sadie O’Rourke 5-171-4
15, Carlee Johnston 7-19 0-1 16,
Kaitlin Schreiber 2-8 0-0 8, Josie
Blasius 3-7 1-1 9, Monica Biel-
maier 1-6 0-1 2, Autumn Schulz 3-
10 0-0 9. Total: 21-68 2-7 59.
3-point field goals: Lady Ea-
gles 2-7(O’Rourke 1-4, Blasius 1-1,
Bielmaier 0-1).
Field Goal Percentage: Lady
Eagles .364.
Rebounds: Lady Eagles 36
(Schulz 11, Blasius 11).
Fouls: Lady Eagles 19.
Steals: Lady Eagles 13 (John-
ston 4).
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 19.
On December 14, 2012 the Lady
Eagles made a second long road
trip to Murdo to play Jones County
in a double header.
The girls Junior Varsity started
off the day with a close game end-
ing in a loss of a final score of 19 to
25.
Josie Blasius led the team in
points with seven. Monica Biel-
maier was the team's leader in re-
bounding as she earned herself
four followed by Katy Bielmaier
and Blasius with three rebounds a
piece.
"The girls unfortunately got
their first loss of the season.
However, each game, win or loss,
is a learning experience, and with
this game the girls learned that
each time we step onto the basket-
ball court; we need to be ready to
play with the same (or more) in-
tensity and focus as previous
games.
As we cannot let outside factors
determine how we play the game,"
added Coach Kier.
The Varsity Lady Eagles played
a short time later that day with a
heart wrenching, close game,
which ended in their first loss of
the season with a final score of 54
to 55.
Schulz, a senior, led the Eagles
in points with 14 points, followed
by Johnston, a sophomore, with 13
and Blasius, a freshman, with10
points.
Blasius also led the team in re-
bounds as she earned herself 11
total boards.
"This game has left a sour taste
in our mouths. The girls played
such a hard game, and unfortu-
nately, we let Jones County come
back to win by just one point in
just the last few minutes of the
game.
The girls were exhausted after
being on the road two nights in a
row, but they did not let that show
while they were playing.
Overall, they played another
tough game, and they have that
"hunger" inside of them that will
help them walk away from this
loss a better and yet stronger team
as we face our next opponent," said
Coach Hess.
Stats:
Lady Eagles: 20 7 16 11 = 54
Jones Co.: 14 12 9 20 = 55
Scoring: Sadie O’Rourke 2-12
0-2 5, Emily Linn 1-2 0-0 2, Carlee
Johnston 6-10 1-1 13, Josie Blasius
5-5 0-010, Tayah Huether 1-2 0-0
3, Monica Bielmaier 2-10 0-1 7,
Autumn Schulz 6-11 0-0 14. To-
tals: 23-55 1-4 54.
3-point field goals: Lady Ea-
gles 1-4 (Johnston 1-1).
Field Goal Percentage: Lady
Eagles .383.
Rebounds: Lady Eagles 35
(Blasius 11).
Fouls: Lady Eagles 14.
Steals: Lady Eagles 13 (Blaius
4).
Turnovers: Lady Eagles 29.
Lady Eagles 3-1 for the season
Eagles come back in fourth
quarter to win over Jones Co.
By Coach Dinger
The Wall Eagles boys’ basketball
team dominated the first quarter
Friday night in Murdo when they
jumped out to a 22-12 lead.
The Eagles found themselves in
foul trouble in the second quarter,
but they were able to maintain a
slight lead at halftime 39-36.
The momentum turned in the
third quarter in favor of Jones
County as the Coyotes rallied back
to take a 45-51 lead by the end of
the quarter.
In the fourth quarter, the Eagles
found themselves in foul trouble
with three starters with four fouls
each.
Trevor Anderson fouled out with
six minutes to go in the game and
that’s when Tyler Peterson came
off the bench to spark the Eagle’s
comeback.
The team never gave up and
they recognized that Peterson had
the hot hand and continued to feed
him the ball until the Eagle’s had
a 63-60 lead.
Peterson finished the night with
a last second put back with less
than a second to play to give the
Eagle’s a 65-60 victory.
Peterson finished the game
going six - six from the field, one -
two from the free throw line, four
rebounds, and three steals.
Peterson and Tyler Trask were
the leading scorers for the Eagles
with 13 points each, while Tucker
O’Rourke and Clancy Lytle had 12
points and 11 points respectively.
Lytle’s hot free throw shooting
was also a key to the team win as
he was six - six from the line and
he also led the team with five as-
sist.
Trevor Anderson added nine
points, while Lane Hustead fin-
ished with four points to con-
tribute to the team win.
O’Rourke lead the Eagle’s with
eight rebounds, while Laketon
McLaughlin finished the game
with six rebounds.
The team was 23-61 from the
field for 38 percent and 14-23 from
the free throw line for 61 percent.
I am very proud of how well the
team played together and they did-
n’t panic after losing an early 10
point lead and trailed by eight
points early in the fourth quarter,
before they rallied to a five point
victory.
Stats:
Eagles: 22 17 6 20 = 65
Jones Co: 12 24 15 9 = 60
Scoring: Tyler Trask 4-10 2-3
13, Trevor Anderson 3-9 2-4 9,
Lane Hustead 2-8 0-1 4, Clancy
Lytle 2-14 6-6 11, Tucker O’Rourke
6-10 0-1 12, Carson Johnston 0-4
2-2 2, Laketon McLaughlin 0-0 1-2
1, Ben Linn 0-0 0-2 0, Tyler Peter-
son 6-6 1-2 13. Totals: 23-61 14-23
65.
3-point field goals: Eagles 5-18
(Trask 3-5, Anderson 1-3, Hustead
0-3, Lytle 1-6, Johnston 0-1).
Field goal percentage: Eagles
.377.
Rebounds: Eagles 32 (O’Rourke
8).
Fouls: Eagles 19.
Fouled out: Anderson.
Assists: Eagles 14 (Lytle 5).
Steals: Eagles 7 (Peterson 3).
Blocked Shots: Eagles 3
(O’Rourke 2).
Turnovers: Eagles 19.
By Coach Kent Anderson
C Wall Eagles team vs. Philip
The boys basketball season
opened Friday, December 7, as the
Wall Eagles faced the Philip Scot-
ties.
Due to numbers and time, we
were fortunate to have a C and JV
game. This allowed us to have
more young players get some floor
time in game situations.
In the C game the Eagles com-
peted well but fell by the score of
12 to 26.
The young Eagles trailed from
the beginning but always played
hard.
Leading the way for the C - team
were Riley Fortune and David
Sykora with five points each.
Both of them made a three-pointer
and a two-point field goal.
Danny Muzik also scored a bas-
ket to round off the scoring.
Other members of the C - team
were Rylee Schreiber, Camden
Sawvell, Alex Tysdal, July Kam-
merer, Austin Huether, and Dusty
Dartt.
JV Wall Eagles vs. Philip
The junior varsity team took the
floor in the second of three games
that night. Although the game was
close the entire game, the Eagles
lost it at the end by the score of 31
Wall Eagels C and JV
teams basketball results
to 38. The Eagles JV led by six
after one and three at halftime. At
the end of the third we trailed by
two.
Many players rotated through-
out the game and received quality
time. There were many positives
offensively and defensively.
Muzik led the Eagles with 11
points. Ben Linn had seven and CJ
Schulz added six. Ryder Wilson
had three points, Carson Johnston
and Huether rounded out the scor-
ing with two points each.
JV Wall Eagles vs. Edgemont
The Eagles faced the Edgemont
Moguls on Saturday, December 8,
at Edgemont.
The JV team was able to even
their record as they defeated the
Moguls by the score of 32 to 26.
Once again Muzik led the JV
with 10 points. Ben Linn had six,
Wilson and Dartt each had four
points. Johnston, Schulz, Huether,
and Schreiber each had two points.
All 13 boys saw action in the
night. We played hard and compet-
itively the entire game. It was nice
to rebound the next day with a
win.
Next Action for the JV will be at
Jones County on Friday, December
14.
Oelrichs cowgirl wins
big at Wrangler NFR
in earnings through her 12-year
career.
“When you really put things in
perspective and see the stats on
how few have reached that level, it
makes it that much more sweet to
know it’s a very elite group,” said
Lockhart. “I’m honored.”
Only the top 15 contestants in
each of seven events qualify for
rodeo’s Super Bowl, which kicked
off in UNLV’s Thomas and Mack
Center on Dec. 6 and wraps up De-
cember 15.
Lockhart, a wife and mother of
three, is competing in her sixth
straight Wrangler NFR. Riding a
horse she calls Louie, 47-year-old
Lockhart raced around the clover-
leaf pattern in 13.66 seconds for
the win, which brought her total
NFR earnings to $63,409.
Lockhart entered the NFR in
fourth place in the world champi-
onship standings and, aside from a
penalty she took in Round Two for
a tipped barrel, she’s placed in
every round but one. Still, she
trails leader Mary Walker by
nearly $100,000 and has no chance
at a gold buckle this year.
“You come in here hoping you
can have the rodeo you’re capable
of having,” said Lockhart. “Some-
times you do and sometimes you
don’t. It happens to all of us; it’s a
roller coaster. I’m thrilled it’s
turned out as good as it has.”
With one more solid run Satur-
day night, she has a chance to earn
$46,821 in addition to the nightly
first-place money of $18,257.
Wall Drug Pharmacy
Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
• The Pharmacy will be OPEN •
December 24th and December 31st
8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Sorry for any inconvenience
279-1931 • Wall, SD
School & Sports
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012• Page 7
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M
ay your
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ith it.
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ST0BE
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And you do, too! Thanks Ior your
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Hol l y, Chri sti ne,
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ÌnterIor
Wall Rodeo Team holds bake sale
Wall Rodeo Club held a bake sale during the annual Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce
Retail Committee pancake supper held on Wednesday, December 12 at the Wall Drug Store. Pic-
tured from left to right ... Trey Richter, Elsie Fortune and Mazee Pauley.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
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Philip Area wrestlers took a trip
down to Valentine, Neb., for a
chance to test themselves against
top teams from that state as well
as two other South Dakota schools.
Head coach Matt Donnelly noted
that the tournament did not go as
good as expected. “We had some
wrestlers who did not wrestle as
well as expected,” he said. The 126
and 145 pound weight classes were
not filled, one due to an injury.
Reed Johnson, who typically
wrestles at 152 pounds, is out due
to a cartiledge injury. “Hopefully
he’ll be back in two weeks,” Don-
nelly said. Lane Blasius moved up
from the 145 pound class to fill
Johnson’s spot.
Philip Area followed only
Pierre’s T.F. Riggs High School in
the final team standings. In order
of points were Pierre (191.5),
Philip (141), Valentine (131.5),
Plattsmouth, (127), Winner, S.D.
(100), Ord (90), O’Neill (86.5),
Chadron (85.5), David City (82.5),
Alliance (64), Ainsworth (39.5),
Gordon/Rush-ville (35), McCook
(30), and Broken Bow (10).
106 lbs: Jed Brown 2nd,
7-5 record
•Pinned Cristian Hulsey (ALL) 1:21
•Pinned Keith Helm (MCC) 1:24
•Major dec. Clinton O’Neel (OR) 12-0
•Decisioned by Zach Prall (PLA) 4-10
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 4th,
1-3 record
•Bye
•Major dec. by Jebben Keyes, (PIE) 5-17
•Bye
•Decisioned Wyatt Phillips (DC) 16-15
•Injury default by Keaton Gracy (AIN)
2:42
•Decisioned by Andrew Null (PLA) 14-8
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 1st,
11-3 record
•Pinned Spencer French (BB) 1:59
•Decisioned Michael Varela (DC) 7-5
•Decisioned Kasey Taylor (MCC) 6-5
•Decisioned Ely Sharkey (AIN) 6-4
132 lbs: Grady Carley,
6-6 record
•Decisioned Chase Govier (BB) 9-6
•Pinned by Blake Walters (ON):28
•Pinned Coy Terry (MCC) 1:35
•Decisioned Thomas McClure (CHA) 2-1
•Decisioned by Jospeh McNair (AIN) 0-2
138 lbs: Raedon Anderson,
1-7 record
•Major dec. by Cory Rowse (ON) 16-4
•Bye
•Pinned by Tyrel Haley (WIN) :43
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st,
11-1 record
•Pinned Dakota Baumgartner (MCC)
3:53
•Pinned Gage Orton (PLA) 3:02
•Major dec. Dusty Staab (OR) 8-0
•Pinned Seth Scott (PIE) 4:50
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 3rd,
10-4 record
•Bye
•Pinned Dawson Johnson (ALL) 3:50
•Decisioned by Colby Risen (CHA) 5-9
•Decisioned Adam Farner (WIN) 8-2
•Win by forfeit - Johnson (ALL)
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 3rd,
10-4 record
•Bye
•Pinned Sayth Jacobsen (PIE) 5:14
•Decisioned in OT by Joseph Varela (DC)
14-16
•Pinned David Fox (ON) 4:06.
•Win by forfeit - Brandon Shuler (PLA)
182 lbs: Chance Knutson,
8-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned Austin Kock (OR) 1:46
•Decisioned by Spencer Knopp (ON) 1-3
•Decisioned by Cooper Cogdill (CHA) 0-1
195 lbs: Gavin DeVries,
3-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Blake Bandur (OR) 2:33
•Bye
•Major dec. by Mike Leger (PLA) 4-12
220 lbs: Logan Ammons, 3rd,
10-3 record
•Bye
•Decisioned Broderick Hoeft (DC) 13-9
•Pinned by Lane Lettau (PIE) 2:34
•Pinned Jacob Baldwin (ALL) :56
•Pinned Devin Hernandez-Cronk (OR)
2:30
220 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries
•Pinned by Mitch collicott (MCC) :06
•Bye
•Pinned by Keith Sandall (ON) :44
The grapplers will focus on im-
proving their performance as they
have an extra week between
meets.
Donnelly felt the wrestlers took
a step backward and were not fo-
cusing on what was ahead of them;
were living off last week’s accom-
plishment.
They will travel to Salem for Mc-
Cook Central-Montrose’s tourna-
ment on December 29. Donnelly
noted that it was going to “be a dog
fight all the way around.” Philip is
the lone West River team traveling
east to take on the East River
teams.
Big White School draws huge crowd
A packed crowd filled the Creighton Hall for the Big White Christmas program, which was held
Tuesday night, December 11th. The ten students, grades kindergarten thru sixth performed a play,
sang songs, read poems and played the piano. Santa Claus stopped in to visit the kids and hand
out goody bags. The students are taught by Ashley Kier and Dana Luedeman. Back Row: Jayton
McKay, Cayne Krogman, Sage Gabriel, Abbi Moon, Cedar Gabriel and Liam Gibson. Front Row:
Kipp Cordes, Piper Cordes, Ember Gabriel, Quinn Moon and Lucy Moon.
~Photo Heather Garbriel
Grapplers score second place at Valentine
Philip wrestling team with their second place trophy they won at the Valentine, Neb., tourney held
on Saturday, December 15. ~Courtesy Photo
Great ways to
save on home
energy bills
This winter, don’t let your win-
dows keep you out in the cold.
According to the American Insti-
tute of Architects, windows are the
primary source of heat loss in
houses. To keep your house warm
and energy bills down, caulk
around windows, door frames, and
other trim, while using weather
stripping to seal drafty doors. And
don’t forget to close fireplace
dampers.
Planting trees and bushes
around your house will help block
out cold winter winds. This will
help keep energy costs down and
make your yard look great too.
Finally, don’t forget to fix leaky
faucets. Even minor leaks increase
energy consumption and electricity
bills.
To find an architect in your area
that can help prepare your home
for winter, visit http://archi-
tectfinder.aia.org.
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 8
Email your social news, obituaries,
wedding & engagement
announcements to: annc@gwtc.net
FINANCIAL FOCUS
LoWER DEBT LEVELS
MEAN GREATER
iNVESTMENT
oPPoRTuNiTiES
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
In the past few years, Americans
have done a pretty good job of
whittling down their debt load. If
you’re in this group, you may now
have a chance to use your lower
level of indebtedness to your ad-
vantage — by investing for the fu-
ture.
Consider the numbers: In 2007,
just before the financial crisis, the
country’s household debt service
ratio was about 14 percent. (The
debt service ratio is the ratio of
debt payments, including mort-
gages and consumer debt, to dis-
posable personal income.) But by
2012, this figure had dipped below
11 percent, the lowest level since
1994.
These figures are national aver-
ages, but they do translate into
real-life savings for many of us. If
you’re in this group — that is, if
you’ve lowered your debt pay-
ments noticeably — what should
you do with this “found” money?
Of course, you could spend it on
material objects, which, in some
cases, may make your life more
pleasant today. But you’d probably
be better off by devoting your fi-
nancial resources to your goals for
tomorrow, such as college for your
children and, eventually, a com-
fortable retirement lifestyle for
yourself.
Consequently, you want may
want to consider these sugges-
tions:
•Increase your contributions to
your retirement plan. Try to put
more money into your employer-
sponsored retirement plan, such as
a 401(k), 403(b) or 457(b). Your
contributions are typically made
with pretax dollars, so the more
you invest, the lower your taxable
income. Plus, your earnings can
grow on a tax-deferred basis.
•Fully fund your IRA. You can
put in up to $5,000 per year (as of
2012) to a traditional or Roth IRA,
or $6,000 if you’re 50 or older. A
traditional IRA grows tax-de-
ferred, while a Roth IRA can grow
tax-free, provided you meet certain
conditions.
•Fill in “gaps” in your financial
strategy. With a little extra money
each month, can you find ways to
fill in the “gaps” in your financial
strategy? For example, do you
have sufficient life insurance and
disability income insurance? Or
can you add some investments
that can help diversify your overall
portfolio? While diversification
can’t guarantee profits or protect
against loss, it can help reduce the
effects of volatility on your hold-
ings.
•Build an emergency fund. It’s a
good idea to build an emergency
fund containing six to 12 months’
worth of living expenses. Without
such a fund, you may be forced to
dip into long-term investments to
pay for unexpected costs, such as a
large bill from the doctor or a
major car repair. Keep the money
in a liquid, low-risk account.
•Establish a 529 plan. If you
have children or grandchildren
whom you would like to help get
through college, you might want to
contribute to a 529 plan. Your
earnings grow tax-free, provided
withdrawals are used for qualified
higher education expenses. Plus,
your contributions may be de-
ductible from your state taxes. (Be
aware, though, that withdrawals
used for purposes other than qual-
ified education expenses may be
subject to federal and state taxes,
plus a 10% penalty.)
Reducing your debt level can re-
move some stress from your life.
And you’ll gain even more benefits
from debt reduction by using your
savings to speed your progress to-
ward your important financial
goals.
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QuESTioN: I got married be-
cause I was in love with my
spouse. I wasn't figuring on the
rest of her family becoming a
major part of my life as well. Ex-
actly what are my obligations to
my in-laws? Can you help me
gain a clearer understanding of
that relationship?
ANSWER: It doesn't sound like
you have a very warm or relaxed
relationship with your in-laws. As
a matter of fact, you seem to re-
gard them as a burden. Perhaps
you feel caught between trying to
please them (or avoiding offense)
on the one hand, and just wanting
to be yourself and have your own
"space" on the other. Whatever
the specifics of your situation, we
think it's unfortunate that you
feel this way. But we're also
aware that your experience is
fairly common.
What's your obligation to your
in-laws? If you're a Christian, you
owe them behavior that's consis-
tently Christian in character. You
may not like them, but you need
to choose to act in a loving man-
ner toward them. They may be
difficult people. On the other
hand, it's important to realize
that they may be controlling and
manipulative, emotionally dys-
functional or hostile to your faith;
that they're connected to your
spouse through genetics, history
and a complex set of psychological
dynamics.
Like it or not, they're also con-
nected to you. When you married,
you also became part of another
family with its own set of values,
traditions and expectations. If
you love your spouse, you need to
recognize and respect those ex-
pectations — within limits, of
course.
In certain instances — for ex-
ample, if you feel your in-laws are
intruding into your married life
— the old saying, "Good fences
make good neighbors," may apply.
If this is your situation, you and
your spouse need to come to a
meeting of the minds and estab-
lish some reasonable boundaries.
Once those boundaries have been
communicated clearly, it's essen-
tial that you stand together in en-
forcing them. It would be a big
mistake to let your in-laws come
between you.
What are some of the limits you
can set to protect your marriage
from negative interference from
members of your extended fami-
lies? Here are three things that
"honoring" your in-laws does not
mean:
1. It doesn't require that you
submerge all your own feelings,
desires, preferences and needs in
order to "do things their way."
2. It doesn't mean that you
must permit them to disrespect,
control or manipulate you for
their own selfish ends.
3. It doesn't entail "obeying" all
their "parental" requests or re-
quirements — which, in some in-
stances and with some in-laws,
may get pretty crazy.
In-law conflicts grow more com-
plicated when a spouse seems to
side with his or her parents
against his or her mate. This isn't
so much an in-law problem as a
marital problem. If one spouse re-
mains too dependent upon his or
her parents, that needs to be ad-
dressed in a straightforward way.
If one spouse is blaming the in-
laws for a disagreement the cou-
ple is experiencing, that should be
dealt with, too.
QuESTioN: Our child com-
plains about everything and sel-
dom seems happy. His negative
attitude is affecting his school
work, and I'm sure it's hurting his
ability to make friends as well.
What can we do to help him de-
velop a more positive outlook on
life?
ANSWER: The first step is to
try to understand where this neg-
ativity might be coming from.
There are several possible
sources. You know your child bet-
ter than anyone else, and as a re-
sult you’re probably in the best
position to determine which of the
following profiles describes his
situation most accurately.
Sometimes a negative attitude
can be rooted in a child’s natural
inborn temperament. Some kids
are easy-going; others find it dif-
ficult to adapt to change. Some
are aggressive and domineering
while others tend to be quiet, shy,
and retiring. In the same way,
certain children have a naturally
sunny disposition while others
are inclined to focus on the bleak
side of life. The first group sees
the glass as half full, the second
as half empty. Many studies indi-
cate that there is a strong genetic
component to these temperamen-
tal differences. This is a factor
you’ll want to consider carefully
as you attempt to get a handle on
your son’s attitude and behavior.
The four “humors” of Hippocratic
medicine and medieval psychol-
ogy— choleric (dominant, pas-
sionate, idealistic), sanguine
(courageous, hopeful, light-
hearted, social), phlegmatic (ra-
tional, calm, unemotional,
steady), and melancholy (moody,
introspective, despondent)—while
not strictly “scientific” in the mod-
ern sense, can provide helpful cat-
egories for thinking about distinc-
tive personality types. Christian
writers like Tim Lahaye ( The
Spirit-controlled Temperament)
and Gary Smalley and John Trent
( Making Love Last Forever;
Chapter 10, “Understanding Per-
sonality Types”) have made good
use of them in this regard. It’s
possible that your son simply has
a classic melancholy tempera-
ment.
But while temperament and ge-
netics may play an important role
in a case like this, environmental
influences can also be determina-
tive. To put it another way, kids
can learn to be negative from the
people around them. If mom and
dad are serious about dealing
with this problem, they should
begin by asking themselves some
honest questions. Could it be that
they have modeled this kind of at-
titude and behavior for their chil-
dren? Even if you don’t see your-
self as negative now, is it possible
that either you or your spouse
might have been depressed or
struggling through a particularly
low point in life while your son
was an infant and a toddler? If
not, could it be that you’ve made
the mistake of reinforcing his
negativity by giving in to his com-
plaints and coddling him? Per-
haps you did this when he was
younger and are only now seeing
the results.
Whether the problem is prima-
rily temperamental or environ-
mental in origin, you can address
it by making some changes in
your parenting style and meth-
ods. Concentrate on extinguish-
ing your child’s penchant for com-
plaining by ignoring him when
he’s negative. Don’t give in to his
dark mood. Don’t lavish him with
attention when he starts moaning
and groaning about something. If
he talks in bleak terms about his
day at school or the birthday
party he attended or some activ-
ity in which he’s just taken part,
tell him you’re sorry he feels that
way and then go about your busi-
ness. Don’t prolong the discus-
sion. Just move on.
On the other hand, when your
son says anything remotely posi-
tive or displays the slightest bit of
enthusiasm, you should reinforce
this behavior by smiling, praising
him, and letting him know how
much you appreciate his upbeat
attitude. You could even begin re-
warding him for positive state-
ments and behavior by putting up
a star chart on the refrigerator
door and adding a sticker every
time he says or does something
that brightens your day.
That said, there is another pos-
sibility you should probably con-
sider. There’s a chance that your
son’s negative attitude could be
explained in terms of physical
and biological factors. There is a
psychiatric condition called dys-
thymia, which is actually a long-
term, low-grade depression. It’s
often characterized by a low en-
ergy level, a lack of interest in
life, and even a chronic negative
outlook.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer
is excerpted from books authored
by Dr. James Dobson and pub-
lished by Tyndale House Publish-
ers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman
of the Board of Focus on the Fam-
ily, a nonprofit organization dedi-
cated to the preservation of the
home. Copyright 2003 James
Dobson, Inc. All rights reserved.
International copyright secured.
Obituaries More obituaries on page 5
Wilma Daniel___________________
Wilma Daniel, age 98, of Philip,
S.D., died Friday, December 14,
2012, at the Kadoka Nursing
Home.
Wilma Orpha Ernst Daniel was
born December 3, 1914, near
Bloomfield, Iowa, the second of five
children born to Emanuel and Iva
(Provo) Ernst. In 1919, the family
moved to a ranch 28 miles north of
Midland. She attended grade
school in a country school and high
school in Midland.
Wilma was united in marriage
to Paul Richard Daniel on October
30, 1931, in Gillette, Wyo. They
made their home 12 miles north-
east of Philip. Her husband, Paul,
preceded her in death on April 19,
1972. She continued to make her
home on the ranch northeast of
Philip until moving into the
Kadoka Nursing Home on Novem-
ber 4, 2011, where she has since
resided.
Grateful for having shared her
life include her son, Gene Daniel
and his wife, Doris, of Philip; two
grandsons, Shane Daniel and his
wife, Cher, of Rapid City, and
Aaron Daniel and his wife, Lane,
of Billings, Mont.; two great-
grandsons, Alec and Quinn of
Rapid City; several nieces and
nephews; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
In addition to her husband,
Paul, Wilma was preceded in
death by her parents; and infant
daughter at birth; and three broth-
ers, Orville, Arlo, and John Ernst;
and one sister, Willa.
Services were held Monday, De-
cember 17, at Rush Funeral
Chapel in Philip, with Pastor
Kathy Chesney officiating.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorials made to the
donor’s choice, or the Haakon
County Prairie Transportation.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
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Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 9 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Hong Kong custom
made wingback chair, $50.
Club chair, floral pattern mate-
rial, $35. Leave message: 859-
2777. P2-1tp
CHRISTMAS LIGHTS!! (4)
NEW boxes of white LED.
Nothing wrong with the lights,
just the wrong color. $32. Call
441-4909 or 859-3515, leave
message. P1-tfn
WE HAVE THE PERFECT
GIFT for everyone on your hol-
iday list! Del’s, I-90 Exit 63,
Box Elder, 390-9810.
PR15-3tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
SEALED BIDS BEING AC-
CEPTED ON: 2003 John Deere
1590 No-till Drill, 15’ working
width, 7-1/2 inch spacing,
grass seeder, agitator, fertilizer
box, dolly wheel. Bids for the
drill will be accepted by East
Pennington Conservation Dis-
trict until January 1, 2013, at
24 Creighton Road in Wall, SD,
or they can be mailed to PO
Box 308, Wall, SD 57790.
Please call 279-2519 for infor-
mation or viewing of the drill.
We reserve the right to reject
any and all bids. PW1-3tc
WE HAVE THE PERFECT
GIFT for everyone on your hol-
iday list! Del’s, I-90 Exit 63,
Box Elder, 390-9810.
WP15-3tp
TRIANGLE RANCH BED &
BREAkFAST is available for
brunches, luncheons, dinner
parties and retreats, December
- April. Contact Lyndy, 859-
2122, triangle@gwtc.net, www.
triangleranchbb.com P51-8tc
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 4-bedroom house
in Philip. Tom Foley Real Es-
tate, 859-2975 or 685-8856.
PR17-1tc
FOR SALE: 24x68 doublewide,
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, new
tin roof and skirting, new
paint. Call Cody, 515-0316.
P52-4tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 High
St. in Philip, 2 bedrooms, full
basement, great view off back
deck. Call 859-2783 or 859-
3249 or 567-3515 to view.
P49-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka,
SD, or call 837-2690. Craig
cell: 390-8087, Sauntee cell:
390-8604; wrex@gwtc.net
K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: 140 acres, Philip
area. Tom Foley Real Estate,
859-2975 or 685-8856.
PR17-1tc
WHEAT HAY FOR SALE: Call
685-3068. P52-tfn
FOR SALE: 2012 grass hay,
some alfalfa, big rounds, semi-
load lots, delivered pricing, no
mold. Call Rob, 390-5535, or
Charles, 390-5506. P50-5tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Haakon
County is taking applications
for the position of Deputy Reg-
ister of Deeds. This is a half-
time position. Minimum edu-
cation requirement is a high
school diploma or GED certifi-
cate. Secretarial or related ex-
perience preferred. The follow-
ing skills and abilities are re-
quired: type accurately; basic
computer and office machinery
knowledge; ability to use Mi-
crosoft Word and Excel; great
attention to detail; excellent
customer service and organiza-
tional skills; extremely legible
handwriting. Applications and
full job description will be
available at the Haakon
County Courthouse, Register
of Deeds office, 140 S. Howard
Ave., Philip, SD 57567, or by
email: haakrod@ gwtc.net. Ap-
plications to be accepted until
position filled. PR16-3tc
HELP WANTED: Farm/Ranch
in west central S.D. looking for
experienced full time help. Du-
ties include night calving
heifers, calving cows, fencing,
building maintenance, operat-
ing and maintaining haying,
feeding and farming equip-
ment. Horse experience not
necessary. We use ATVs. Hous-
ing and beef furnished. Refer-
ences required. Salary DOE.
Call 843-2869 for interview ap-
pointment or email resumé to:
pjbork@gwtc.net P1-tfn
RANCH HAND WANTED:
Housing plus utilities & wage.
Faith area. 739-5601. P1-2tc
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1995 Pontiac Fire-
bird, low miles, 25 to 34 mpg,
$2,900 OBO. Must sell by Jan-
uary 1st. Call 515-1460.
P1-2tp
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats,
power windows, locks & seats,
good tires. Call 685-8155.
PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
POLISHED PINkY will be
closed December 21-30.
Plenty of openings left if you
need to make an appointment.
Colors: $10 off. Call 279-2772,
Wall. Merry Christmas &
Happy New Year from the
Bryans.
PW2-2tc
SCHAEFER ENTERPRISES:
Re-opening For Business in
Wall, South Dakota, on Janu-
ary 1, 2013: Walt Schaefer,
Owner/Operator, 605-279-
2948 or 605-515-3961. Spe-
cializing in residential & com-
mercial repairs involving: Car-
pentry (repairs and light con-
struction), Plumbing (repairs
and installation), Minor Elec-
trical Repairs, Appliance Re-
pairs (electric only). PW2-2tc
O’CONNELL CONSTRUC-
TION, INC., PHILIP: Rock,
Sand, Gravel (screened or
crushed). We can deliver.
Dams, dugouts, building sites.
Our 37th year. Glenn or Trace,
859-2020.
PR11-tfn
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAY-
ING: Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-
2888, Midland. PR20-52tp
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myr-
tle Ave Philip. 3 bedroom 1.5
bath, central air, fuel oil heat
and wood stove. Open concept,
stainless steel fridge and stove.
washer and dryer included.
Hardwood laminate floors, sep-
arate dining room. Mostly fin-
ished basement. Ceiling fans
throughout. New windows and
roof. Fenced in, large backyard
with cover patio and storage
shed. Can email photos. Call
859-2470 or (785) 259-4207.
P48-8tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, attached 2-car
garage, large lot. Call 859-
2403, Philip. PR10-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: One bedroom
house in Wall. 279-2865.
PW1-2tc
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment in Wall. Call 386-
2222. PW51-4tc
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan,
381-2861 or 279-2861.
WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we
can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an applica-
tion. Gateway Apartments,
Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Rav-
ellette Publications, Inc. re-
quests all classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid
at the time the order is placed.
All phone numbers are with
an area code of 605, unless
otherwise indicated.
THANk YOUS
We want to thank the area
residents and businesses for
the generous donations to the
Food Pantry. Your support
keeps our doors open. It is
greatly appreciated.
Country Cupboard
Food Pantry
A huge thank you to all of the
volunteers who helped at the
Chamber's Pancake Supper, to
the Wall Drug Store for hosting
us, to the Wall Food Center for
putting together the Children's
gift bags, and to Santa for
spreading the Christmas Spirit!
Thank you to the Wall Cham-
ber and courtesy of the grocery
store for drawing my name for
the $250 shopping spree.
Bill Leonard
We want to take this way to
express our gratitude to each
and everyone who made
Karen’s benefit in Wall, Decem-
ber 1st, such a fun and enter-
taining evening.
Thank you to the Red Hat
Ladies and the auctioneers for
food and fun, and everyone for
attending, showing their sup-
port and concern.
Karen will be in surgery De-
cember 12th to have the knee
put in.
What a great place to live and
work. A big thank you to every-
one for all you have done to
make these 2-1/2 months a
step in getting well.
Thank you!
Karen & Harold Delbridge
We would like to thank the
Celebration Committee for se-
lecting us as Best Decorated
House. Also thank you to the
group for doing so much for the
community. You are a great
asset!!!
Dan & Cindy Hauk
Deadline for Classifieds and Cards
of Thanks is 11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol of
S.D. The Longbranch is for
SALE (serious inquires only).
Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
EMPLOYMENT
REPORTER & FARMER, an
award winning weekly newspa-
per in the heart of the Glacial
Lakes area, seeks fulltime
news/sports reporter and pho-
tographer. Send resume and
clips to Reporter & Farmer, PO
Box 30, Webster, SD 57274 or
email suhrs@reporterand-
farmer.com.
REPORTER & FARMER seeks a
full time graphic artist for
newspaper advertisements and
printing as well as pagination.
Experience required. We use
Quark but also have a complete
line of Adobe products. Send
resume and information to
suhrs@reporterandfarmer.com
or mail to PO Box 30, Webster,
SD 57274.
FOR SALE
2005-2006 Peterbilt 387’s - C-
15, 13 speed, Platinum Interior.
Trades welcome, Financing
available with approved credit
$29-34,000. Call TMC Truck
Sales 877-285-8752 or
www.BlackandChromeSales.co
m.
ROOSTER PHEASANTS FOR
sale. 1,000 long-tailed flying
birds, $16 each. Royal Flush
Pheasants. Spencer, SD. 605-
480-4444.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern,
central, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER
OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health
ins., credit, 03¢ safety bonus,
Call Joe for details,
8 0 0 . 4 5 6 . 1 0 2 4 ,
joe@tbitruck.com.
WANTED
ANTLERS, ELK IVORIES,
pheasant skins, rattlesnakes
and porcupines. Ph. 605-673-
4345 or email at clawantler-
hide@hotmail.com.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRo/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
We Need Your Help!
Oahe Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Outstanding Capital Credit Checks
Please notify Oahe Electric Cooperative, Inc. in
Blunt, SD at 1-800-640-6243 if you have a current
address for any of the patrons listed below. We are
aware that some may be deceased but need names
and addresses of personal representatives to whom
we could send the checks. Some patrons are current
consumers. If you are holding a capital credit check,
please cash it. If you have misplaced your check,
please contact the office and we will reissue it for
you. Thank you!
Outstanding Capital Credit Checks
issued in October 2010-2012
Casjens, Michael or Sharon
The Wall Celebration Committee
would like to thank everyone
who participated in the decorating
contests and also thanks to those
who attended our Christmas party
on Sunday, December 16th.
Contest winners were:
Best Christmas Tree: Butch & Ann Kitterman
Best Decorated House: 1st: Dan & Cindy Hauk
2nd: Gerald & Esther Wolford
Best Decorated Business: Black HIlls Federal Credit Union
Christmas Spirit Award: Darwin Geigle
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
DECEMBER 4, 2012
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, in the Com-
missioners' meeting room of the Penning-
ton County Courthouse. Chairperson
Lyndell Petersen called the meeting to
order at 9:00 a.m. with the following Com-
missioners present: Ron Buskerud, Ken
Davis, Don Holloway and Nancy Traut-
man.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to approve the agenda as
presented. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-7 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the Novem-
ber 20, 2012, Board of Commissioners’
meeting.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$325,785.59.
7. Approve the 2013 Animal Shelter
Control Agreement and authorize the
Chairperson’s signature thereto.
LIEN RELEASE REQUEST FROM
REAL PROPERTY – BLACK HILLS
AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY:
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded by
Trautman to release the liens in the name
AW (Name withheld per SDCL 28-13-42)
totaling $451.00 and the liens in the name
of ALW totaling $4323.91 from the prop-
erty at 524 Mall Drive, also identified as
Lot 11 of Dakota Subdivision No. 1 in
Rapid City, pursuant to the request sub-
mitted by Todd Schweiger, attorney rep-
resenting the Black Hills Area Habitat for
Humanity. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
A. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LI-
CENSE RENEWALS: MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Trautman to approve
the renewal of the license applications
listed below. Vote: Unanimous.
Wine Retail (on-off sale)
Black Hills Receptions, Joanne Wag-
ner
Country Store at the Forks, The Cov-
ington Consulting Group, Inc.
Dalcam EZ Mart, Dalcam Oil Company
Inc.
Hart Ranch Golf Course, Hart Ranch
Development Co.
Mt. Rushmore KOA, Recreational Ad-
ventures Co.
Powder House Restaurant, Bug Guys
LLC/Powder House Restaurant
Prairie Berry Winery, Prairie Berry LLC
Summer Creek Inn, Summer Creek Inn
LLC
Winery Hill City, Winery Hill City LLC
Retail (on-sale) Liquor with Sunday
Sales
Central States Fair, Inc., Central States
Fair, Inc.
Country Inn Bar & Casino, The Coving-
ton Consulting Group, Inc.
The Gaslight, Vengeance LLC
Holy Smoke Resort, Danielle Banks
Horse Creek Inn Restaurant, Castle
Creek Enterprises Inc.
Mount Rushmore National Memorial,
Xanterra Parks & Resorts Inc.
Ponderosa Restaurant & Lounge, Mel-
rose Enterprises Inc.
Powder House Restaurant, Big Guys
LLC/Powder House Restaurant
Rimrock Tavern, Harley R. Scovel
Sally O’Mally’s Pub & Casino, KJL Inc.
Shipwrecked Lee’s Saloon & Casino,
Rose Havorka
Package Liquor (off-sale)
Johnson Siding General Store, Patrick
S. Shannon
B. BUDGET SUPPLEMENT HEAR-
ING – 2012 CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND
BUDGETS: MOVED by Holloway and
seconded by Trautman to supplement to
the Capital Projects Fund budgets as fol-
lows: 1) Project Administration,
$327,835.00; 2) Parking Structure,
$1,400,000.00; 3) Administration Build-
ing, $2,000,000.00; 4) Courthouse,
$10,000.00; 5) Energy Plant
$2,000,000.00; 6) Evidence Building,
$4,000,000.00, all from cash reserves
(bond proceeds 2010 A, B, C). Vote:
Unanimous.
C. BUDGET SUPPLEMENT HEAR-
ING – 2012 GENERAL FUND BUDG-
ETS: MOVED by Holloway and sec-
onded by Trautman to supplement the fol-
lowing budgets: 1) General Fund Elec-
tion, $18,685.00; 2) General Fund State’s
Attorney, $12,000.00; 3) General Fund
Economic Assistance $20,925.00; 4)
E911 Fund Communications, $42,500.00;
5) Modernization & Preservation Fund,
$19,330.00; 6) Health Care Trust Fund,
$170,000.00, all from over-collected rev-
enues received in 2012. Vote: Unani-
mous.
D. BUDGET SUPPLEMENT HEAR-
ING – 2012 GENERAL FUND BUDG-
ETS: MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Buskerud to supplement the fol-
lowing funds: 1) General Fund Election
fund $284.11 from assigned election
grant reserve, and the following supple-
ments requests are from unassigned fund
balance: 2) General Fund ITS,
$216,000.00; 3) General Fund Equaliza-
tion, $20,000.00; 4) General Fund Jail
Medical, $120,000.00; 5) Title III Fund
Mountain Pine Beetle, $200,000.00; 6)
Haz Mat Fund (LEPC), $1,775.00. Vote:
Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM EMERGENCY SERVICES
USERS BOARD
B. (Items A & B taken out of agenda
order) LEASE-PURCHASE AGREE-
MENT WITH MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS,
INC: Moved by Holloway and seconded
by Davis to approve the Lease-Purchase
Agreement with Motorola Solutions as
specified for $1,266,037 and authorize
the Chairperson’s signature thereto.
Vote: Unanimous.
A. RESOLUTION RELATING TO
LEASE-PURCHASE AGREEMENT
WITH MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS, INC:
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded by
Holloway to approve the resolution relat-
ing to the Lease-Purchase Agreement
and authorize the Chairperson’s signa-
ture thereto. Vote: Unanimous.
RESOLUTION RELATING
TO LEASE-PURCHASE
AGREEMENT
BE IT RESOLVED by the
County Commissioners of Pen-
nington County (the "Issuer"),
as follows:
Section 1. It is hereby deter-
mined that it is necessary and
desirable to enter into the
Lease-Purchase Agreement
(the "Lease"), with Motorola
Solutions, Inc., as Lessor in an
amount not to exceed
$1,266,037 attached hereto as
Exhibit A for the purposes
therein specified with changes
to be approved by the Chair-
man and County Auditor.
Section 2. The Issuer des-
ignates the Lease as "qualified
tax-exempt obligations" for pur-
poses of Section 265(b)(3) of
the Internal Revenue Code of
1986, as amended (the
"Code"). The Issuer reason-
ably anticipates that the
amount of tax-exempt obliga-
tions (other than private activity
bonds as defined in Section
141 of the Code, treating qual-
ified 501(c)(3) bonds as not
being private activity bonds)
which will be issued by the Is-
suer (and all entities subordi-
nate to, or treated as one is-
suer with, the Issuer) during
this calendar year 2012 will not
exceed $10,000,000. The Is-
suer has not designated more
than $10,000,000 of obliga-
tions issued by the Issuer dur-
ing this calendar year 2012 for
purposes of Section 265(b)(3)
of the Code.
Section 3. The Lease is
hereby made a part of this
Resolution and is hereby ap-
proved in the form submitted to
this meeting and the Chairman
is authorized and directed to
execute, acknowledge and de-
liver the Lease on behalf of the
Issuer with such changes, in-
sertions and omissions therein
as do not change the sub-
stance of the Lease, such ap-
proval to be evidenced conclu-
sively by his execution of the
Lease.
Section 4. The Chairman
and all other officers of the Is-
suer are hereby authorized and
directed to execute all other
documents which may be re-
quired under the terms of the
Lease and to take such action
as may be required or appro-
priate for the performance of
the duties imposed thereby or
to carry out the purposes
thereof. In the absence or dis-
ability of the Chairman any
other officer of the Issuer may
execute the Lease or other
document. The execution of
any document by any officer of
the Issuer shall be conclusive
evidence of its approval.
Adopted: December 4,
2012
By: /s/Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/Julie A. Pearson,
Pennington County Auditor
C. COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS
AGREEMENT WITH MOTOROLA SO-
LUTIONS INC: MOVED by Trautman
and seconded by Buskerud to approve
the Communications System Agreement
with Motorola Solutions and authorize the
Chairperson’s signature thereto. Vote:
Unanimous.
D. EMERGENCY SERVICES COM-
MUNICATIONS TOWER EXPANSION/
SIMULCAST PROJECT WEST SITE
CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT AWARD:
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to award the contract for the
Emergency Services Communications
Tower Expansion/Simulcast Project West
Site Construction to RCS Construction for
a contract value of $251,003 and further
moved to authorize the Chairperson’s sig-
nature on the contract. Bid documents
are available at Emergency Services
Communications Center. Vote: Unani-
mous.
ITEMS FROM EQUALIZATION
A. ABATEMENT APPLICATIONS:
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to approve the following abate-
ments/refunds: 2011 – ID #8007007, Ise-
man Homes Inc., $115.50; ID #8011343,
Roger or Sylvia Johnson, $606.36; 2012
– ID #8004353, Teresa Smith, $70.44.
Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM EXTENSION - 2012 4-H
Program Update
ITEMS FROM WEED & PEST
A. MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE UP-
DATE: MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Buskerud that a letter be sent
to Diamond Lumber thanking them for
their donation to help fight the Mountain
Pine Beetle. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM CHAIR
A. Commission Response To The
Spring Creek Watershed and Implemen-
tation Project Letters to the Editor:
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to authorize the Chairperson’s
signature on the response to recent let-
ters to the editor printed in the Hill City
Prevailer. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM PLANNING & ZONING
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Holloway to convene as the Board of Ad-
justment. Substitute motion: MOVED by
Davis and seconded by Trautman to take
a ten minute recess. Vote: Unanimous.
The Board reconvened at 10:45 a.m.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis to convene as the Board of Ad-
justment. Vote: Unanimous.
A. VARIANCE / VA 12-10: Stuart
Adrian. To reduce the setback require-
ments from the Section Line right-of-way
and the east property line from 25 feet to
5 feet in a General Agriculture District in
order to construct a detached garage in
accordance with Sections 205 and 509 of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
That Part of E1/2SE1/4 located
between Highway 40 and Lot X
of E1/2SE1/4, Section 20, T2S,
R7E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Petersen to approve Variance VA / 12-
10. The motion failed on a roll call vote:
Buskerud – no, Davis – no, Holloway –
no, Trautman – yes, Petersen- yes.
Davis gave notice that he might bring
the item back for reconsideration during
the meeting.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to adjourn as the Board of
Adjustment and reconvene as the Board
of Commissioners. The motion maker
and second agreed to withdraw their mo-
tion.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to reconsider Variance / VA 12-
10. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to approve Variance / VA 12-10
to reduce the setback requirements from
the Section Line right-of-way and the east
property line from 25 feet to 10 feet. The
motion carried 4-1 with Buskerud voting
no.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis to adjourn as the Board of Ad-
justment and reconvene as the Board of
Commissioners. Vote: Unanimous.
PLANNING & ZONING CONSENT
AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken on all items by a single vote of the
Board of Commissioners. Any item may
be removed from the Consent Agenda for
separate action.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to approve Planning & Zon-
ing Consent Agenda Items B - G as pre-
sented. Vote: Unanimous.
B. SECOND READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF MAJOR PLANNED UNIT
DEVELOPMENT AMENDMENT / PU 12-
04: John Majchrzak. To amend the ex-
isting Planned Unit Development for High
Country Guest Ranch to allow an outdoor
summer venue / concerts starting in June
and going to the end of August. A band-
shell and parking lot will be constructed in
the southwest corner of the property in
accordance with Section 213 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
ORDINANCE
NO. PUD 12-04
AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING SECTION 508 OF THE
PENNINGTON COUNTY
ZONING ORDINANCE, RE-
ZONING THE WITHIN DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY:
BE IT HEREBY ORDAINED
BY THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY COMMISSION
THAT THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY ZONING ORDI-
NANCE BE AND HEREBY IS
AMENDED BY AMENDING
THE ZONING OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PROP-
ERTY:
Tract A less High Country
Ranch Subdivision and less
Right-of-Way, Ray Smith
Placer MS 995, Section 15,
T1S, R4E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, in ac-
cordance with Section 213 of
the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
To amend the existing
Planned Unit Development for
High Country Guest Ranch.
The Major Planned Unit Devel-
opment Amendment use is
hereby approved in accor-
dance with the following
twenty-seven (27) conditions:
1. That the permitted uses
allowed on Tract A less High
Country Ranch Subdivision
and less Right-of-Way, Ray
Smith Placer MS 995 not ex-
ceed six (6) vacation cabins,
an eight (8) bedroom
bunkhouse, eight (8) camp-
sites, 160 parking spaces,
band shell, concession and
merchandise building, rest-
room facility and community
wastewater disposal system
area for the uses on site and
lodge;
2. That the retail space in
the lodge be limited to 750
square feet, a kitchen for those
using the lodge and dining
area, guest registration area,
and administrative offices are
also permitted within the lodge
and shall not be included in the
750 square feet of retail space;
3. That the permitted uses
allowed on Lot 12 be offices
(which shall include guest reg-
istration), laundry, outdoor
movie screen, commercial trail
ride operations, a shop and
maintenance building and a
commercial kitchen and dining
facility;
4. That the permitted uses
for proposed Lots 17-20 be for
private single-family resi-
dences or nightly/weekly
rentals;
5. The permitted uses on
Lot 13 include up to a twenty
(20) unit lodge not to exceed
21,000 square feet with a com-
mercial kitchen and dining area
be used only by those renting
the lodge, swimming pool,
meeting rooms, bike rentals,
and a maximum of twelve (12)
guest stables;
6. That an On-site Waste-
water Treatment System Con-
struction Permit for the rest-
room facilities must be applied
for by May 1, 2013. Soil profile
and percolation tests will be
completed prior to application
submittal. In addition the
OSWTS must be approved by
DENR prior to application sub-
mittal;
7. That prior to any con-
struction work within the 100
year floodplain, a Floodplain
Development Permit be ob-
tained;
8. That that if any distur-
bance would occur on the
property that is greater than
10,000 square feet, a Con-
struction Permit be required.
The Construction Permit will
require erosion control meas-
ures to prevent sediment from
leaving the site and entering
into Newton Fork Creek;
9. The minimum required
front setback for Lots 1-9 shall
be 20 feet and the minimum
side yard setback for Lot 9
shall be 10 feet along the east
side with the exception of Lot 3;
10. That the setbacks for
Lot 3 be 14 feet for the rear-
yard and 23 feet for the side-
yard for the existing deck;
11. That all perimeter set-
backs be at least twenty-five
(25) feet with exception of the
existing barn/office to be zero
(0) feet and the stable to be ten
(10) feet;
12. The minimum required
setbacks for Lots 14, 15 and
17, the residential/vacation
cabins sites, shall be a 15 foot
front, 25 foot side yard and rear
yard;
13. The minimum required
setback for Lot 16 be twenty
(20) foot front, twenty (25) feet
from the north and east prop-
erty line, and eighteen (18) feet
from the west property line;
14. That all residential or
resort structures located on
Lots 1-9 not exceed 32 feet by
36 feet;
15. That quiet hours be
10:00 p.m. for the concert area;
16. That the maximum size
of the outdoor movie screen be
20 feet by 20 feet;
17. That a Building Permit
be obtained for any structure
exceeding 144 square feet or
located on a permanent foun-
dation, which requires a site
plan to be reviewed and ap-
proved by the Planning Direc-
tor;
18. That Ray Smith Drive
be maintained in a dust free
manner;
19. That any open fires
have a permit from South
Dakota Wildland Fire;
20. That if the structure for
the restroom facilities is not
constructed prior to operation
in June 11, 2013, at least one
port-o-potty unit (or similar) be
required per 50 persons;
21. That prior to County
Board approval of the PUD
amendment, the documenta-
tion for the second means of
ingress/egress be provided;
22. That traffic control,
such as (flaggers) on Deerfield
Rd be provided at the end of
each concert;
23. That the ATV rentals
not exceed seven (7) vehicles;
24. That all rental ATVs
leaving the Planned Unit De-
velopment not exceed ten (10)
miles per hour on the first 4/10
of a mile of Battle Ax Road off
Deerfield Road;
25. That all ground dis-
turbed areas (other than road
surface) be seeded with an ap-
proved native seed mix in ac-
cordance with the U.S. Forest
Service;
26. That all traffic for the
concert venue be directed / lim-
ited to Ray Smith Drive; and,
27. That this Planned Unit
Development shall be re-
viewed in one (1) year to verify
all conditions are being met or
upon a complaint basis.
Dated this 4th day of De-
cember, 2012.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST:
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
C. PRELIMINARY PLAT / PL 12-38:
Nina McBride / Sandy Varney. To create
Lot 1 of Chase Subdivision in accordance
with Section 400.2 of the Pennington
County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL:
NE1/4SE1/4; Unplatted portion
of Lot B; NW1/4SE1/4; and Lot
B of SE1/4SE1/4 less Right-of-
Way, Section 15, T2N, R6E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lot 1
of Chase Subdivision located
in Section 15, T2N, R6E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
To continue Preliminary Plat / PL 12-38
to the December 18, 2012, Board of
Commissioners’ meeting.
D. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 12-12: Nina
McBride / Sandy Varney. To rezone
3.046 acres from General Agriculture Dis-
trict to Low Density Residential District in
accordance with Sections 207 and 508 of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
Located on the following metes
and bounds: A parcel of land
located in NE1/4 of SE1/4 of
Section 15, T2N, R6E, BHM
and in Lot B of SE1/4 of SE1/4
of Section 15, T2N, R6E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota, said parcel of land is
described as follows: Begin-
ning at NE corner of said par-
cel from whence the E1/4 cor-
ner of said Section 15 bears N
13°13’34” E a distance of
1188.44’; thence S 24°15’00” E
a distance of 79.85’; thence S
8°22’00” E a distance of
199.97’; thence along the arc
of a curve to the left whose
angle is 22°20’44” and whose
radius is 418.80’ a distance of
163.33’; thence S 72°34’26” W
a distance of 374.19’; thence N
6°00’00” W a distance of
254.55’; thence N 73°03’00” E
a distance of 505.00’ to the
Point of Beginning. Said parcel
of land contains 3.046 acres
more or less.
To continue Rezone / RZ 12-12 to the
December 18, 2012, Board of Commis-
sioners’ meeting.
E. MINOR PLAT / PL 12-40 AND SUB-
DIVISION REGULATIONS VARIANCE /
SV 12-14: Parker Properties. To create
Lot 2R Revised of Tract A of Home Sweet
Home Placer MS 804 and to waive plat-
ting requirements in accordance with
Sections 400.3 and 700.1 of the Penning-
ton County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Lot 2R
of Tract A (also in Section 34),
Home Sweet Home Placer MS
804, Section 33, T1S, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lot
2R Revised of Tract A, Home
Sweet Home Placer MS 804,
Section 33, T1S, R5E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
To sustain the Planning Commission’s
recommended approval of Subdivision
Regulations Variance / SV 12-14 to waive
engineered road construction plans, per-
colation tests, soil profile information,
Section Line Highway improvements,
road improvements to Local Road stan-
dards for Watson Parker Road, topo-
graphic information at a five foot interval,
construction of a cul-de-sac on Watson
Parker Road and information of the exist-
ing water system and approval of Minor
Plat / PL 12-40 with the following two (2)
conditions: 1. That prior to any work
being done within the boundaries of the
100-year floodplain, a Floodplain Devel-
opment Permit must be obtained; and, 2.
That prior to filing the plat with Register
of Deeds the Plat Heading be shown as:
(formerly Lot 2R of Tract A…”
F. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 12-11 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMEND-
MENT / CA 12-07: RMS Lode/Matt Keck.
To rezone 6.99 acres from Limited Agri-
culture District and General Agriculture
District to Highway Service District and to
amend the Pennington County Compre-
hensive Plan to change the Future Land
Use from Planned Unit Development Dis-
trict and General Agriculture District to
Highway Service District in accordance
with Sections 210 and 508 of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Lots A and C of J.R. No. 5 Lode
MS 1864 and Government
Lots 9, 10, and 11 all in the
NE1/4 of Section 21, T1S,
R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
To approve Rezone / RZ 12-11 and
Comprehensive Plan Amendment / CA
12-07.
G. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF ORDINANCE AMEND-
MENT / OA 12-05: Pennington County.
To amend Section 400.3-1-n-3, 6, and 10;
Section 500.5-1-a-3-a; and Section 500.5
- Table 1 of the Pennington County Sub-
division Regulations.
To approve the first reading of Ordi-
nance Amendment / OA 12-05.
End of Consent Agenda
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL 1-
25-2(3)
B. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to convene in executive ses-
sion. Vote: Unanimous. The Board re-
mained in executive session from 11:23
a.m. until 11:49 a.m. MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Buskerud to adjourn
from executive session. Vote: Unani-
mous.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to award merit pay for 2013 to
Office Manager Holli Hennies. Vote:
Unanimous.
AUDITOR’S ACCOUNT OF THE
TREASURER
To the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners, I hereby submit the fol-
lowing report of my examination of the
cash and cash items in the hands of the
County Treasurer as of November 27,
2012: Total balances of checking/savings
accounts, $33,593,265.73; Total balance
of Treasurer’s Office safe cash,
$9,400.00; Total certificates of deposit,
$2,578,697.28; Total Prime Value Invest-
ment, $4,208,201.45; Total petty cash,
$111,470.00; Total Cash Items, $726.18;
Total long/short, (633.43); Total,
$40,501,127.21. Submitted by Lori Wes-
sel, Deputy Auditor.
PERSONNEL
Highway Department – Effective
12/3/2012, J. Jobgen and R. Rice at
$15.85/hr.
Register of Deeds – Effective
12/4/2012, L. Boal, $14.74/hr.
PAYROLL
Commissioners, 9,396.50; Human Re-
sources, 4,585.67; Elections, 22,724.32;
Auditor - liens, 2,647.29; Auditor,
15,817.53; Treasurer, 48,524.36; Data
Processing - General, 41,825.39; State's
Attorney, 149,328.20; Public Defender,
97,135.85; Juvenile Diversion, 10,455.44;
Victim's Assistance, 5,203.66; Buildings
& Grounds, 102,669.43; Equalization,
62,802.39; Register of Deeds, 23,333.90;
Sheriff, 345,280.02; Service Station,
8,051.33; HIDTA Grant, 9,055.71; Jail,
430,860.54; Jail Work Program, 4,819.36;
Hill City Law, 11,434.59; Keystone Law,
5,339.65; New Underwood – Law,
4,170.67; School Liaison, 17,273.12; Wall
Law, 12,044.12; JSC Teachers,
18,685.03; Home Detention, 11,488.12;
JAIG/JSC, 3,313.42; Alcohol & Drug,
138,259.05; Friendship House,
45,031.16; Economic Assistance,
51,049.83; Mental & Alcohol-SAO,
7,775.38; Mental & Alcohol-HHS,
3,508.25; Extension, 4,280.16; Weed &
Pest, 9,597.91; Planning and Zoning,
19,871.37; Water Protection, 5,532.00;
Ordinance, 3,508.25; Juvenile Services
Center, 225,730.59; Highway,
185,194.72; Fire Administration,
6,302.83; Title III MPB, 9,991.13; Dis-
patch, 169,036.27; Emergency Manage-
ment, 5,065.14; Emergency Manage-
ment, 212.11; 24-7 Program, 16,081.87;
PCCCC Building Projects, 2,785.36.
VOUCHERS
At&T Mobility, 645.29; Bh Power,
1,890.46; Bertschinger, Barbara,
3,061.23; City Of Hill City, 27.13; City Of
Rapid City-Water, 45.47; City Of Wall,
131.00; First Administrators, 184,967.27;
First Interstate Bank, 5,594.53; Iiarc,
119,592.00; Knology, 5,384.38; Montana
Dakota Utilities, 1,748.20; Qwest Corp,
243.66; Verizon, 1,063.13; West River
Electric, 1,391.84.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 11:50
a.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published December 20, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $291.91.
WALL CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
DECEMBER 6, 2012 6:30PM
Members Present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Bill Leonard,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Stan Anderson, Councilman; Jerry
Morgan, Councilman; Pete Dunker,
Councilman
Carolynn Anderson, Finance Officer; Jeff
Clark, Public Works; Lindsey Hildebrand,
Chamber/Assistant FO; Cpt. Corey
Brubakken, Cpt. Jay Everson, Penning-
ton County Sheriff; Laurie Hindman, Pen-
nington Co. Courant; Pandi Pittman, Teen
19 TV; Dennis Rieckman, Dan Hauk, Wall
School; Dustin Willett, Emergency Man-
agement Director; Ted Schultz, Cetec En-
gineering; Reese Kor and Ferrel Cherry,
H-C Galloways; Harley Kiraan; Wally
Hoffman; Jackie Kusser
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by Leonard, second by M Ander-
son to approve agenda. Motion carried.
The police report was given by Captain
Corey Brubakken. Request for business
checks last month has been added to the
reporting list. In regard to the deputy
hired for our area, he has completed
academy training and departure from
FTO program mid-January. Sheriff’s of-
fice administration is doing some reas-
signments; Captain Evenson will replace
Cpt. Corey Brubakken, who is moving to
criminal investigations.
Dustin Willett – Pennington County Emer-
gency Director addressed the council on
the following items:
1) Update on pre-disaster mitigation
plan – the plan is complete and once
state approves, it then goes to Washing-
ton for approval from FEMA. Upon ap-
proval mitigation dollars would be avail-
able in a 75% County and 25% City
matching grant program.
2) Some public warning sirens some
run off solar panels; however some are
not as reliable as they could be. The
2013 budget will allow for solar panel
sirens be hooked up to shore power.
There is currently no formal agreement
between municipalities and Pennington
County Emergency Management
(PCEM) for sirens. Maintenance work
cannot be performed by PCEM until a
siren contract is in place.
3) Storm mitigation planning involves
other funding sources include public shel-
ters grants or Homeland Security grants.
The Wall School would like to be part of
the discussion as they have showers,
kitchen and large gym that would be help-
ful in times of needing a large emergency
shelter. In 2010 the school had received
quotes for generators; to run minimum
lights – 250kW generator, $155,000 in-
stalled, to run full system - 400 kW
$170,000 completely installed.
H-C Galloways with well monitoring sys-
tems reported that some of components
in the well system are reaching end of life
and some are obsolete, with communica-
tions being the main problem. An optimal
option would be to replace the entire com-
munications system to a wireless system
utilizing IP communications costing
$58,000. This would be low end cost with
prices expected to increase 5-8% in
2013. Motions by S Anderson, second by
Hustead to approve doing the optimal
well monitoring system option at a cost of
approximately $58,000, by eliminating a
water main project planned for 2013; and
use the funding towards this. Motion car-
ried. HC Galloway will have a quote to
the city next week.
Ted Schultz with Cetec gave an update
on the Lagoon project.
Cell #1 has an average of one foot of
sludge or more in the NW corner of the
lagoon. With some aeration and oxygen
injection, some of that sludge can disin-
tegrate. It would be much cheaper to add
a $50,000 aerator pump rather than a
sludge removal project. This could be an
option to the lagoon project which is esti-
mated currently at a price at $815,000.
Ted proposes that the primary project be
bid separately from the pump contract.
Discussion was held on what part of the
project to go with due to problems with fi-
nancing. It will be necessary to cut some
things out of the 2013 budget to do these
projects: sewer, aeration, and new well
monitoring system. Finance Officer (FO)
Anderson will calculate an increase in
wastewater fees to see what would be
necessary to generate approximately
$25,000.00 in revenue. Aeration topic
was tabled until the next meeting where
more accurate bids would be in hand.
Kiraan operator of Wall Discount Outlet
was proposing a fence in the back of his
building, due to illegal parking and trash
issues. Their intention is not to crowd
property lines, but to keep in line with ex-
isting buildings. The required distance
from the alleyway and the height of the
fence was explained. Kiraan was in
agreement of the City ordinances. Motion
by Hustead, second by Morgan to ap-
prove the fence with acceptance of your
neighbors and work closely with Jeff
Clark. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to waive the rubble fees for a mo-
bile home by Wall Drug from the trailer
court. Motion carried with Hustead ab-
staining from the vote.
Discussion was held concerning the am-
bulance district lease agreement. FO An-
derson noted that the electric bill could be
transferred to the ambulance district and
they could then bill the fire department ac-
cordingly.
Motion by M Anderson, second by S An-
derson to approve change in electric bill
effective January 1, 2013. Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by Hustead to
approve ambulance lease agreement.
Motion carried.
The contractor has larger bolts for the
Main Street lights that will be installed
early next week to repair the lights. A writ-
Continued on page 11
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 10 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
ten assurance from the contractor that the
warranty will be extended from the date
that the larger bolts are installed will be
required.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve the amended public
works employee job descriptions. Motion
carried.
Motions by Dunker, second by M Ander-
son to have department heads evaluate
their employees and each council mem-
ber will evaluate the Public Works Direc-
tor and Finance Officer. The council
needs to have the evaluations to the
Mayor by December 15th so he can com-
pile and they shall be reviewed at the
year-end December meeting. Motion car-
ried. The Chamber Director is evaluated
by both the Finance Officer and the
Chamber President.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve 2nd reading of Ordinance
12-8; Supplemental Appropriation. Mo-
tion carried.
ORDINANCE 12-8
AN ORDINANCE TO
SUPPLEMENT THE 2012
ANNUAL APPROPRIATION
BE IT ORDAINED, by the City
of Wall, South Dakota that the
following funds are needed to
meet the needs of the munici-
pality in the following depart-
ments:
Transfer of Funds
101-0510-5110 Transfer Out
(Enterprise) .....($30,245.70)
602-0381-3911 Operating
Transfer..............$30,245.70
Supplemental Appropriations:
101-0431 Streets
0431-4150 Group
Insurance ...........$4,000.00
0431-4222 Engineering........
.............................$4,000.00
0431-4342 Project 1.............
.........................$320,000.00
Total
Appropriation....$328,000.00
Source of Funding
101-0334-3342 Community
Acces Grant .....$100,000.00
101-2671 Unassigned Fund
Balance............$228,000.00
.........................$328,000.00
101-0435 Airport
0435-4222 Engineering........
.........................$225,000.00
Source of Funding
101-2671 Unassigned Fund
Balance..........$225,000.00
101-0447 Clinic
0447-4290 Other
Expense.............$5,000.00
Source of Funding
101-2651 Committed for
Budget Transfer .$5,000.00
101-0451 Pool
0451-4330 Other Capital
Expense...........$81,445.00
0451-4290 Other
Expense.............$2,285.00
0451-4261 Maintenance
Supplies .............$4,500.00
Total
Appropriation......$88,230.00
Source of Funding
101-0334-3342 Community
Access Grant....$10,000.00
101-2671 Unassigned Fund
Balance............$78,230.00
...........................$88,230.00
101 General Fund
Total .................$676,475.70
211 Liquor, Lodging, Dining Tax
0465-4290 Other
Expense.............$9,394.87
Source of Funding
211-0310-3133 “Bed and
Booze”................$9,394.87
280 Fire
0422-4251 Building
Repairs...............$1,000.00
0422-4252 Auto
Repairs.............$12,000.00
0422-4260 Office
Supplies .............$1,300.00
0422-4261 Maintenance
Supplies ................$500.00
0422-4262 Auto Gas &
Oil.......................$4,200.00
0422-4290 Other
Expense...........$12,000.00
0422-4340 Machinery &
Equipment........$12,000.00
Total
Appropriation......$43,000.00
Source of Funding
280-0372-3670 Contribution/
Donations...........$2,000.00
280-0372-3721 Services &
Collections .......$34,000.00
280-0372-3819 Other
(Grant)................$7,000.00
Total
Appropriation....$43,000.00
281 Library
0455-4210 Insurance...........
................................$675.00
0455-4260 Office
Supplies ................$450.00
0455-4261 Maintenance
Supplies ................$300.00
0455-4270 Travel &
Dues......................$150.00
0455-4290 Other
Expense.............$2,142.00
Total
Appropriations......$3,717.00
Source of Funding
373-3670 Donations
................................$150.00
373-3671 County
Contribution........$3,567.00
Total Appropriation..$3,717.00
602 Water
0433-4281 Pumping,
Utility ................$25,000.00
0433-4290 Other
Expense.............$2,000.00
0433-4340 Machinery &
Equipment.............$500.00
0433-4341 Reserve/
Machinery &
Equipment........$26,250.00
0433-4342 Project 1.............
...........................$30,000.00
Total
Appropriations....$83,750.00
Source of Funding
602-2671 Unassigned Fund
Balance............$83,750.00
604 Wastewater
0432-4222 Engineering........
...........................$40,000.00
0432-4250 Repairs ..............
...........................$16,000.00
0432-4290 Other
Expense...........$10,000.00
Total
Appropriations....$66,000.00
Source of Funding
604-2671 Unassigned Fund
Balance............$66,000.00
The Finance Officer of the City
of Wall shall be and is hereby
authorized and directed to cer-
tify such appropriations to the
end that it be fulfilled and
adopted supplemental to the
2012 Annual Appropriations
Ordinance.
Dated this 8th day of Novem-
ber, 2012
____________
Dave L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
First reading: November 8,
2012
Second reading: December 6,
2012
Published: December 19, 2012
Effective: January 8, 2013
The Golf Course water usage has gone
over budget by $3,634.70. Other ex-
penses for $280.79 have been paid for
with the budget. S. Anderson asked for
clarification of the total water usage. The
golf course would pay for the other ex-
penses and the Club House water usage.
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
supplement Golf course water bill for a
total of $3,245.70. Motion carried.
Motion by M Anderson, second by
Dunker to approve Resolution 12-13, for
the City to support the Ag Appreciation
Event by offering the Community Center
free of rent. Motion carried with Morgan
abstaining from the vote.
A RESOLUTION
SUPPORTING “AG
APPRECIATION EVENT”
RESOLUTION 12-13
WHEREAS, Agricultural busi-
nesses are important to the
City of Wall and the surround-
ing communities, and
WHEREAS, the Ag Apprecia-
tion Event is a way of express-
ing gratitude to those persons
in the Agricultural business,
and
WHEREAS, the Community
Center is an ideal facility to
host this event, and
WHEREAS, the City of Wall
wishes to help support this im-
portant event by donating this
facility free of charge, and
NOW THEREFORE, be it re-
solved the City of Wall shall
grant free usage of the com-
munity center for the Ag Appre-
ciation Event held annually. It
shall be understood that fees
may be assessed for any
clean-up not done or any dam-
ages incurred.
Dated this 6th day of Decem-
ber, 2012.
By: David L. Hahn,
Mayor
Attest:
Carolynn Anderson,
Finance Officer
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to declare the backhoe as surplus
and sell as is. Motion by S Anderson,
second by Morgan to approve appraisal
committee of Dunker, Paul Goldhammer
and Todd Sieler, if they are willing to
serve. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve City minutes for November
8th, 14th and 16th. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve pay request #3 for the Airport
Building for $80,784.53 to Custom Envi-
ronments. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve December City of Wall
bills. Motion carried.
CITY BILLS
DECEMBER 6, 2012
Gross Salaries – November 30, 2012:
Gross Salaries: Adm. - $5,354.91; PWD -
$9,520.08
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ins.,
$357.10; HEALTH POOL, Health/Life In-
surance, $4,180.42; METLIFE, Employee
Supplemental, $25.00; SDRS, Employee
Retirement, $1,754.26; SDRS-SRP, Em-
ployee Supp Retirement plan, $150.00;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $3,298.54.
December 6, Bills
AIR HON LTD, runway bulbs, 47.92;
APWA, Jeff's membership dues, 164.00;
AWWA, Jeff's membership dues, 95.00;
BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE, supplies,
29.84; BANYON DATA SYSTEM, soft-
ware support, 770.00; BLACK HILLS
CHEMICAL, ice melt-CC suppliesl,
681.00; BUSINESS FORMS & AC-
COUNTING, city checks-W2-1099,
229.07; CETEC, engineering for sewer
project, 4,535.00; CONTRACTOR S
SUPPLY, INC, 50# bags of recrete,
114.50; DAKOTA BACKUP, backup serv-
ice, 145.95; DAKOTA BUSINESS CEN-
TER, copier contract-notebook binder,
74.06; DARTT FLOWERS, Main Street
flowers, 1,201.00; DE S OIL &
PROPANE, diesel fuel additive, 129.00;
DUNKER, LYNN & BRUCE, purchase of
land for sewer project, 7,177.52; EN-
ERGY LABORATORIES, water testing,
12.50; FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, ach
fees, 12.15; FIRST INTERSTATE BANK,
sales tax, 384.80; G & G EXCAVATION,
pumping School lift station, 250.00;’
GOLDEN WEST TELE, TS phone,
447.87; GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLO-
GIES, driver for voice recorder help call,
75.00; HAWKINS WATER TREATMENT
GROUP, water treatment, 706.30; KIT-
TERMAN, JIM, insurance reimburse-
ment, 414.61; LAB CORP OF AMERICA,
drug testing fees, 7.60; PENNINGTON
COUNTY COURANT, publishings,
664.32; PETTY CASH, postage, 20.88;
RAPID DELIVERY INC, freight for water
testing, 10.80; SENSUS METERING
SYSTEMS, software support, 1,524.60;
SERVALL UNIFORM, cc rugs, 55.63; SD
DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION, airport
engineering, 1,009.05; SUMMIT SIGNS,
parking lot speed sign, 45.00; TDM EX-
CAVATING, 2 hours dozing at the dump,
224.49; WALKER REFUSE, garbage
service, 7,652.47; WALL AMBULANCE,
final 2012 budget funds, 8,500.00; WALL
BADLANDS AREA CHAMBER, BBB
funds, 3,043.24; WALL BUILDING CEN-
TER & CONST, supplies, 269.79; WALL
FIRE DEPT, final 2012 budget funds,
3,750.00; WALL LIBRARY, final 2012
budget funds, 1,959.50; WEST RIVER
ELEC, Well pumping, 9,774.47; WEST
RIVER ELECTRIC ASSOC, INC, Main
Street loan, 7,500.00; WEST
RIVER/LYMAN-JONES RURAL, water
purchases, 3,500.00; Custom Environ-
ment, Pay Request #3, $80,784.53.
TOTAL BILLS: $148,213.46
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 6th day of December 2012.
Motion by Dunker, second by M Anderson
to approve December Fire Department
bills. Motion carried.
FIRE DEPARTMENT BILLS
DECEMBER 6, 2012
December 6, Bills 2012:
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Retirement
Fund, 1,050.00; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, fuel on fire calls, 149.28;
GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone-internet,
123.42; VERIZON WIRELESS, cell
phone access, 46.24; WEST RIVER
ELEC, lectricity, 276.54.
TOTAL BILLS: $1,645.48
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 6th day of December 2012.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve December Ambulance
bills. Motion carried.
AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT BILLS
DECEMBER 6, 2012
Gross Salaries – November 30, 2012:
Gross Salaries: $9,361.21
FIRST WESTERN BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $1,832.92
December 6, Bills 2012:
AT & T, cell phone, 46.56; CROWN OIL,
diesel fuel, 584.52; DE S OIL &
PROPANE, snow tires on W1 & W2,
80.00; EDDIE S TRUCK SALES &
SERVICE, Repair on W1, 922.05; ERZ
MIKE, food for RC runs, 9.13; GOLDEN
WEST TELE, phone-internet, 176.65;
KITTERMAN BOYD, food for RC runs,
17.29; LINWELD, INC., oxygen supplies,
80.80; PENNINGTON COUNTY
COURANT, meeting for By-laws notice,
48.00; RAPID CITY FIRE EMERGENCY,
ALS runs, 600.00; RAPID CITY RE-
GIONAL HOSPITAL, supplies, 160.20;
SDEMTA STATE TREASURER, member-
ship dues, 210.00; WALL BUILDING
CENTER & CONST, supplies-doors,
724.08; WALL DRUG STORE, office sup-
plies, 8.94; WALL FOOD CENTER, sup-
plies, 22.18; WALL HEALTH SERVICES,
injections, 39.62; WEST RIVER ELEC,
electricity, 198.74.
TOTAL BILLS: $3,928.76
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 6th day of December 2012.
Motion by Leonard, second by S Ander-
son to approve December Library bills.
Motion carried.
LIBRARY BILLS
DECEMBER 6, 2012
Gross Salaries – November 30, 2012:
Gross Salaries: $800.25
FIRST WESTERN BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $113.64
December 6, Bills 2012:
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, books from
Amazon, 43.89; GOLDEN WEST TELE,
phone, 36.30; JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD,
books, 342.00; PETTY CASH, postage
reimbursement, 49.94; S.D. LIBRARY
ASSOCIATION, membership dues,
20.00; WALL BUILDING CENTER &
CONST, supplies, 3.18; WALL FOOD
CENTER, supplies, 44.64; WEST RIVER
ELEC, electricity, 100.20.
TOTAL BILLS: $ 640.15
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 6th day of December 2012.
At this time the On-call schedule, Com-
munity Center report, Compensatory re-
port, Wall Health Service reports were re-
viewed.
Motion by Dunker, second by Morgan to
surplus the City’s TV and VCR in the
Community Center. Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve use of police station garage and
block the street off between the police
station garage and the community center
on January 25th for the Ag Appreciation
event. Motion carried.
FO Anderson will combine the risk man-
agement documents and safety benefit
recommendations and bring back at a
later date after the committee of S Ander-
son and Hustead have reviewed them.
Motion by Leonard, second by Morgan to
approve the committee. Motion carried.
Motion by Morgan, second by M Ander-
son to not approve the county running the
2013 election. Motion carried.
Public Works Director (PWD) Clark gave
an update on well #7: A used motor From
Weston Engineering for $10,000 is avail-
able, but would need a new seal section
at approximately $12,000. A new motor
would be $30,000.00 with a one year war-
ranty. No warranty is on a used motor, but
Weston would warranty the cost for instal-
lation of either motor. At this time, well 7
is the only one with a backup generator if
there was no electricity due to weather,
however; WRLJ is installing generators at
each well. A decision of Well #7 repairs
will be delayed until PWD Clark can find
out if Weston has changed suppliers to a
more reliable motor. Another factor is
when WRLJ will be done with installing
generators.
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to delay decision until Dec. 28th
meeting and see if Weston can find a dif-
ferent supplier for the motors. Motion car-
ried.
Building at airport is coming along. Snow
removal equipment bid went to Jenner’s
Equipment out of Rapid City and the
equipment should be delivered in Febru-
ary.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve a special city council meeting
to be held on Friday, December 28th at
Noon. Motion carried
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
move the January meeting to January 8th
at 6:30 pm. Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to move into executive session at
9:18pm. Motion carried.
Mayor Hahn declared the meeting out or
executive session at 9:38pm and meeting
was adjourned.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published December 20, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $270.64.
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 11 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Wall City Council Meeting
(cont. from previous page)
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
kADOkA, SD
Happy
Holidays
DARTT ANGuS
Dan & Daryl Dartt • Wall, SD
35th Annual Production Sale, March 2013.
Selling registered Black Angus yearling bulls, heifers & two-year-old bulls
With best wishes and
heartfelt thanks to our
many kind customers.
Need a
print
job
done
fast?
Call us for all
your printing
needs.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
279-2565
or 859-2516
Offices in Philip, Wall,
Kadoka, Murdo,
Faith, Bison, &
New Underwood.
Legal Publication
Deadline is
11:00 a.m.
on FRIDAY
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. BRED CAT-
TLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
TRIPLE T RANCH - 75 DLK HFFS; FS, NI............................................500=
SIMON - 25 HEFF FED ANC X CLVS; FS,NI..................................400-600=
BRED HEIFERS:
EDGAR SIMON - 22 HEFF FED ANC X HFFS; DFED. POLLED HEFF;
CLV. 3-16
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
EDGAR SIMON - 30 HEFF FED ANC X MIXED ACE COWS; DFED. HEFF;
CLV. 3-21
LYNN FIELDS - 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-
25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 15 DLK HFFS TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
JESSE MORELAND - 15 DWF FIFST CFOSS 7 YF OLD COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12
P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. EXPECTINC 4000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RICK KING & SONS - 900 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED CLVS; FS.....600-750=
KNUTSON - 250 DLK CLVS; FS.....................................................500-600=
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - 250 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI .........500-600=
KEHN RANCH - 400 DLK CLVS; FS ..............................................500-650=
FORTUNE - 150 DLK STFS; FS.....................................................650-750=
AMIOTTE - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-600=
HANSON - 140 HEFF & DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS.........................650=
AMIOTTE - 124 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................700=
WHEELER RANCH - 120 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ................625=
BARTLETT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI......................................................700=
SIGMAN & SIGMAN - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI, HFFS DV.................700-800=
OLSON - 90 DLK & FED ANC STFS; FS,AN...................................550-650=
WILLIAMS - 90 DLK HFFS; FS.............................................................550=
LEHRKAMP - 80 DLK CLVS; FS....................................................600-650=
BARRY - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI ............................600-650=
FERGUSON - 60 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI....................................500-600=
HERBER RANCH - 50 HEFF CLVS; FS................................................600=
GROPPER - 50 FED ANC FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,ALL HFFS IN TOWN600-
700=
ARTHUR - 50 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
SILBERNAGEL - 43 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................600-650=
STABEN - 36 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS..............................................650-700=
SMITH - 36 DLK STFS; FS............................................................800-850=
PETERSON - 35 HEFF STFS; FS ..................................................650-700=
ANDERS - 35 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
DEJONG - 20 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ...........................................................600=
WILLERT - 9 DLK CLVS; FS..........................................................550-600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: D£C. JS, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e
]or our 1os1 so1e o] 2DJ2. We uou1d 11Ke
1o 1ÞonK o11 bugers, se11ers & emp1ogees
]or moK1ng 2DJ2 o reoord geor o1 PÞ111p
L1ves1ooK. We u1sÞ evergone o Verg
Merrg CÞr1s1mos ond o prosperous geor
1n 2DJS. Le1´s o11 prog ]or ro1n ond
breoK 1Þe drougÞ1.
BRED CATTLE:
WHEELER RANCH - PHILIP
9 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 1054=....$1,725.00
24 ..................................DWF HFFS 1089=....$1,700.00
POSS RANCH INC. - STURGIS
15.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 1065=....$1,700.00
GENE & SHERYL MICHAEL - PHILIP
25.....................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 1214=....$1,650.00
74.....................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 1225=....$1,600.00
CODY WEYER - HOWES
11.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1074=....$1,540.00
40.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1065=....$1,525.00
41.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 985=......$1,500.00
JT MOON - CREIGHTON
14.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1073=....$1,525.00
18.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1054=....$1,485.00
11 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1304=....$1,300.00
6 .............DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1348=....$1,025.00
GERALD RISSE - MARTIN
22...............DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1275=....$1,550.00
42...............DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1393=....$1,520.00
25...............DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1390=....$1,510.00
20 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1540=....$1,210.00
31 ...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1410=....$1,015.00
STEVEN STEWART - PHILIP
21...............DLK 4 & 5 YF OLD COWS 1255=....$1,510.00
24 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1378=....$1,320.00
26 ...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1340=.......$985.00
BJ DARTT - WALL
11...............DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1044=....$1,500.00
13...............DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1303=....$1,475.00
LORREN MORELAND - RED OWL
30.....................DLK 2 YF OLD COWS 1079=....$1,475.00
RICHARD SMILEY - RED OWL
19...............DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1051=....$1,425.00
15 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1317=....$1,140.00
MELVIN & TRINA ARNESON - ENNING
40...................................DLK HFFS 970=......$1,410.00
10...................................DLK HFFS 1000=....$1,400.00
SHAW RANCH - WHITE OWL
10.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 956=......$1,410.00
12...................................DLK HFFS 964=......$1,310.00
20DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1453=....$1,080.00
HARLEY ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
8.................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1213=....$1,400.00
12 ...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1337=.......$985.00
DANNY & BOBBIE ARNESON - UNION CENTER
10...................................DLK HFFS 931=......$1,385.00
30.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 943=......$1,375.00
CASEY BRINK - UNION CENTER
10.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 911=......$1,370.00
5.....................................DLK HFFS 883=......$1,300.00
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - UNION CENTER
12...................................DLK HFFS 940=......$1,350.00
27...................................DLK HFFS 945=......$1,285.00
11...................................DLK HFFS 911=......$1,225.00
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
4 ............DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD COWS 1295=....$1,335.00
MIKE KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
66.....................DLK 4 YF OLD COWS 1072=....$1,320.00
78 ..............DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1165=....$1,100.00
104 .........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1203=.......$940.00
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
24..............DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1231=....$1,360.00
65...................................DLK HFFS 933=......$1,310.00
22 ..................................DWF HFFS 921=......$1,285.00
RANDY KEFFELER - RED OWL
6DLK & DWF 5 TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1468=....$1,100.00
PAT & ROSE TRASK - WASTA
42DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1366=....$1,010.00
CALVES:
MADSEN RANCH CATTLE - MIDLAND
103 .......................FED & DLK STFS 527=.........$181.00
22.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 489=.........$161.00
GARTNER & KJERSTAD - INTERIOR
25....................................DLK STFS 525=.........$181.25
19...................................DLK HFFS 483=.........$164.00
RONNIE MAHAFFY - VALE
87...................................DLK HFFS 464=.........$165.00
23...................................DLK HFFS 403=.........$162.50
RANDY & LOIS PETERSON - RAPID CITY
10....................................DLK STFS 505=.........$182.50
STEVE VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
13....................................DLK STFS 514=.........$179.75
52....................................DLK STFS 624=.........$161.50
DON & DELORIS POSS - PHILIP
68....................................DLK STFS 605=.........$165.25
88....................................DLK STFS 695=.........$157.25
97...................................DLK HFFS 630=.........$154.75
43...................................DLK HFFS 555=.........$162.50
MARK KEIFFER - RAPID CITY
26....................................DLK STFS 578=.........$169.00
68....................................DLK STFS 683=.........$158.50
17...................................DLK HFFS 544=.........$159.50
38...................................DLK HFFS 616=.........$148.00
GLEN & BRIGHAM BENNETT - PHILIP
39....................................DLK STFS 540=.........$177.50
58....................................DLK STFS 650=.........$156.25
EUGENE & GLENDA HELMS - CREIGHTON
10...................................DLK HFFS 507=.........$160.50
BROOK LOOBEY - WHITEWOOD
23 .........................FED & DLK STFS 595=.........$157.50
ED & DEBRA DODSON - NEWELL
9..........................CHAF & DLK STFS 633=.........$150.00
7.....................................DLK HFFS 583=.........$149.50
UDDER EXPRESS - NEW UNDERWOOD
27...................................DLK HFFS 494=.........$164.25
TYLER ROBERTSON - HERMOSA
9...........................DLK & DWF STFS 414=.........$200.00
16...................................DLK HFFS 419=.........$165.00
THOMAS RANCH BULLS
15........................................CHAF AVC. ............$3650
16......................................DLACK AVC. ............$2409
10..........................................FED AVC. ............$2270
6..........................................SIMM AVC. ..............$295
WEIGH-UPS:
RAY MANSFIELD - MARTIN
1......................................DLK COW 1400=.........$83.00
2..............................DLK COWETTES 1050=.........$98.00
JUDY BRINK - MIDLAND
1......................................DLK COW 1480=.........$82.50
KEVIN VANDERMAY - NORRIS
6 ....................................DLK COWS 1499=.........$81.50
RUSSELL SIMONS - FAITH
1......................................DLK COW 1885=.........$81.00
KEN JONES - BROADUS, MT
1......................................DLK COW 1900=.........$80.00
ALYSHA MORTENSON - FAITH
1 .....................................FED COW 1275=.........$80.00
DAN GRUBL - STURGIS
1....................................CHAF COW 1690=.........$81.50
1....................................CHAF COW 1550=.........$78.00
2 ..................................CHAF COWS 1555=.........$77.50
1....................................CHAF COW 1485=.........$77.00
2 ..................................CHAF COWS 1520=.........$74.50
1....................................CHAF COW 1440=.........$72.50
GWENDOLYN KILNESS - HOWES
6 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 712=.........$136.50
SHAW RANCH - WHITE OWL
1.....................................DLK HFFS 850=.........$130.00
MELVIN & TRINA ARNESON - ENNING
2.....................................DLK HFFS 883=.........$129.00
JT MOON - CREIGHTON
8 ....................................DLK COWS 1438=.........$79.50
7..........................FED & DLK COWS 1298=.........$77.25
1......................................DLK COW 1415=.........$75.00
14...................................DLK HFFS 1015=.......$104.50
NORMAN DELBRIDGE - FAITH
1......................................DLK COW 1595=.........$78.50
1......................................DLK COW 1410=.........$77.00
MIKE KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
1......................................DLK COW 1240=.........$78.50
RYAN ANDERSON - MURDO
2..........................FED & DLK COWS 1365=.........$78.00
FLOYD GABRIEL EST - CREIGHTON
2.........................FWF & DWF COWS 1518=.........$77.00
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
8 ....................................DLK COWS 1253=.........$77.00
13 ..................................DLK COWS 1297=.........$74.25
18 .................................DLK HFFTS 953=.........$102.50
GUPTILL RANCH - INTERIOR
1......................................DLK COW 1055=.........$77.00
1 .....................................FED COW 1430=.........$75.50
1......................................DLK COW 1435=.........$74.00
1................................DLK COWETTE 1180=.........$86.00
KOLBY KINSLEY - MURDO
3..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1692=.........$76.50
VERYL PROKOP - KADOKA
1......................................DLK COW 1340=.........$76.50
1 .....................................FED COW 1285=.........$76.00
8.........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 1004=.........$98.50
5.....................................DLK HFFS 860=.........$111.00
DANNY JORDAN - FAITH
1......................................DLK COW 1530=.........$76.00
7..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1256=.........$70.50
5 ...................................DLK HFFTS 896=.........$110.00
7..............................DLK COWETTES 1047=.........$94.50
JEAN LAUGHTON - INTERIOR
1......................................DLK COW 1360=.........$76.00
MICHAEL MCPHERSON - BOX ELDER
1......................................DLK COW 1205=.........$76.00
12.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 808=.........$116.00
2.....................................DLK HFFS 835=.........$111.00
3...................................DWF HFFTS 898=.........$108.00
RICHARD SMILEY - RED OWL
1.......................................DLK HFF 835=.........$125.50
ROGER FORTUNE - QUINN
11...................................DLK HFFS 1018=.......$104.25
LEE MORTENSON - FAITH
4 ...................................DLK HFFTS 914=.........$109.50
CODY WEYER - HOWES
5 ...................................DLK HFFTS 923=.........$108.00
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
1......................................DLK COW 1310=.........$75.50
CLAYTON KJERSTAD - WALL
1......................................DLK COW 1280=.........$75.50
1......................................DLK COW 1360=.........$70.00
HOSTUTLER RANCH - MIDLAND
12........................DLK & DWF COWS 1150=.........$75.25
7..........................FED & DLK COWS 1461=.........$75.00
8 ...................................DLK HFFTS 1024=.......$100.00
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
1...............................DWF COWETTE 1000=.......$100.00
JEFF LONG - ENNING
9..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1311=.........$74.50
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1328=.........$71.50
HENRY MARTIN - SUNDANCE, WY
1 .....................................FED COW 1200=.........$74.50
CHAD WHITNEY - MURDO
8..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1493=.........$74.25
10........................DLK & DWF COWS 1266=.........$72.50
GERALD RISSE - MARTIN
6 ....................................DLK COWS 1275=.........$74.25
5 ....................................DLK COWS 1298=.........$73.25
5 ....................................DLK COWS 1250=.........$73.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1405=.........$74.00
KETELSEN FAMILY TRUST - UNION CENTER
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1300=.........$73.00
5 ....................................DLK COWS 1365=.........$72.00
PAT & ROSE TRASK - WASTA
1......................................DLK COW 1200=.........$73.00
1......................................DLK COW 1415=.........$72.00
20 ..................................DLK COWS 1326=.........$70.25
LYLE O'BRYAN - BELVIDERE
1 .....................................FED COW 1515=.........$72.50
ROBERT & SHARON JONES - ENNING
1 .....................................FED COW 1455=.........$72.50
SUSAN EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
6..........................FED & DLK COWS 1478=.........$72.00
16........................DLK & DWF COWS 1219=.........$70.75
1.....................................DLK HFFS 890=.........$126.50
STEVEN STEWART - PHILIP
13 ..................................DLK COWS 1244=.........$72.00
RON KINSLEY - MURDO
3 ....................................DLK COWS 1432=.........$71.75
RANDY & LOIS PETERSON - RAPID CITY
2 ....................................DLK COWS 1310=.........$71.50
TODD & SARAH ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
1......................................DLK COW 1275=.........$71.00
1................................DLK COWETTE 1090=.........$98.00
KAREL AGA - STURGIS
3..........................FED & DLK COWS 1497=.........$70.50
KELLY FEES - PHILIP
4..........................FED & DLK COWS 1184=.........$70.50
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: MCPHEFSON ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS, 1.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
South Dakota Brand
seIIing on
Tuesday, Jan. 8,
at 12:00 p.m.
Pennington County Courant • December 20, 2012 • Page 12
Presho Livestock,
Presho, SD
December 13th
•12 Purebred Hereford
Heifer Calves,
(daughters of Bar JZ Laredo
4665ET)
December 20th
•15 Purebred Hereford
Cows,
(bred to Bar JZ Legacy 767Y)
Paulsen Hereford Ranch
Quinn, SD • 386-2625
FOR SALE
Gree1ings!
Gree1ings!
¬ope your
holidoys ore
doggone good,
ond your New
¥eor is, 1oo.
ur. Jim 51ongle
¬eo1her, Lindo & Jen
Milesville, 5u
ur. Jim McConoghy
¬eo1her & Megon
Woll, su
Submitted by Shirrise Linn
The entire Elm Springs commu-
nity and vast surrounding area
would like to convey our most
heartfelt thoughts and prayers to
Celine Trask, sixteen year old
daughter of Pat and Rose Mary
Trask. Celine was injured on the
ranch over the weekend. She is
currently in ICU at RC Regional.
There has been a caring bridge
page set up on her behalf. If you,
or someone you know, would like to
send Celine and her family your
regards, please visit
http:///www.caringbridge.org/visit/
celinetrask.
Cards and a nice soup supper
was held at Tom and Shelia
Trask's Wednesday night.
Dunbar Anders flew in from An-
chorage, Saturday noon, to spend
the holidays with family and
friends.
Last Sunday, Mel Anderson had
a book signing at the Journey Mu-
seum. Their book illustrator, Teri
McTighe, also joined them. Tues-
day, Lisa and Dorothy spent the
day in RC while Mel stayed home
to do some catching up. The Jul-
sons ~ Jake, Chastity and Chassie,
along with their friend, Louis from
Venezuela visited Wednesday
evening. Sunday, Mel and Dorothy
visited the home of Bunny and
girls and enjoyed breakfast there.
After church the Jedlickas ~
David, Kathy, Haley and Jacob
stopped for a visit, hot chocolate
and rolls. The Anderson's send
their thoughts and prayers for Ce-
line and Karen.
Clyde Arneson went to Philip
Monday for radiator repair.
Wednesday, he attended the card
party at Tom & Shelia's. Thursday,
Clyde took in a beef for butchering.
Lonnie and Teri Ann Arneson
spent the week in Vegas at the
NFR, returning home Sunday.
Edgar Simon visited Lawrence
Burke Monday. Tuesday, the 8th
graders visited Lawrence to extend
an invite to the Christmas pro-
gram. While there, Lawrence
treated the kids to juice and cook-
ies. Clyde also stopped by on Tues-
day and got in on the cookie treat
as well as coffee. Lawrence kept
appointments in Rapid Tuesday to
have stitches removed from a re-
cent skin cancer find. Friday,
Lawrence attended the potluck
dinner at the Wicksville Church.
On Wednesday, Larry Gravatt
went to Wall to run errands and
delivered some of Peggy's home-
made fudge to De's Oil. The fellas
at De's (Darwin) told Larry to
please pass the word as to how
much they appreciate the goodies.
It's Larry's hopes that the readers
will share the Christmas spirit
with more bountiful goodies for the
boys at De's. Meanwhile, Peggy en-
tertained little Laken Linn for the
afternoon and evening while mom,
grandma, aunts and cousins at-
tended a concert in Rapid City. She
is always such a joy. On Thursday,
Peggy had appointments in Rapid
and was also able to go and watch
granddaughter Sarah during her
swim lessons at the Swim Center.
Jean Linn took Shirrise and
Kassandra Linn plus Charlotte,
Laura, and Katie Wilsey to supper
in Rapid City Wednesday evening.
Jean Linn then treated 'all her
girls' to supper and the Lorie Line
concert at the Civic Center. What
a show!!! The costume changes
were fabulous!!! The music was
outstanding. Toward the end of the
concert, Katie, Kassandra, and
Emily were invited onto the stage
(with many other kids) to take part
in helping Santa perform the
'Twelve Days of Christmas'. The
girls got to meet Lorie Line's band
while the band helped the kids get
into costume. Emily was the par-
tridge in the pear tree. Kassandra
was the five gold rings. Katie was
eight maids a milking. Grand fun
was had by all that were in atten-
dance. The Linn's and the Wilsey's
would definitely recommend next
year's show to anyone and every-
one.
Tiffany and Cole Knuppe from
New Underwood visited the Morris
Linn's Saturday for a little holiday
cheer ~ cookie baking and decorat-
ing. The Knuppe's stayed for din-
ner. Sunday, the Linn's visited the
Trask's at the hospital in Rapid
City.
Janet Wilson attended Grand-
son Logan Tschetter's preschool
Christmas program in Rapid City
and then finished Christmas shop-
ping on Thursday. Kelli returned
home for a short Christmas break.
School News: The Christmas Pro-
gram will have been Wednesday
night at the Elm Springs Hall with
a supper to follow. The Elm
Springs students will be Caroling
around the area Thursday. School
resumes the 7th of January.
Elm Springs News
we don’t
Charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements
and wedding wri te-ups
are published free of
charge. Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
To the best
customers ever!
Thanks for your
support and see
you again soon.
Red RooK Res1ouron1
& Lounge

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