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Pennington Co. Courant, August 29, 2013

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Number 35
Volume 108
August 29, 2013
Jim Stangle, Milesville, has
been named by the South Dakota
Veterinary Medical Association as
Veterinarian of the Year.
At the SDVMA’s 122nd annual
convention, held in Sioux Falls,
Sunday through Wednesday, Au-
gust 11-14, Stangle was given
statewide recognition by other vet-
erinarians for his dedication to the
profession.
The announcement was a sur-
prise to Stangle. His wife, Linda,
knew in advance, since she had
been requested by the association
to send in his biography. Stangle
gave a short acceptance speech,
stating that receiving the award
from his colleagues was quite an
honor. The SDVMA has almost
400 members. The veterinarians
from across the state voted on the
veterinarian of the year from a list
sent to them by the nomination
committee. L. Stangle related that
one of the association voters told
her he had voted for J. Stangle the
last four years.
This award is made annually to
a SDVMA member who has con-
tributed significantly to the veteri-
nary profession and to the animals
and clients he/she serves. The
award recognizes a member for
service and accomplishments ben-
efitting the profession of veteri-
nary medicine.
According to the biography read
at the convention, “Dr. Stangle
knew he wanted to be an animal
doctor at the age of six. When he
told his mother he wanted to be an
Stangle is Vet of the Year
animal doctor, she said, ‘Oh, you want to be a vet-
erinarian.’ He said, ‘No! I want to be an animal doc-
tor!’ ”
Stangle grew up in western South Dakota. After
earning his doctorate of veterinary medicine from
Colorado State University in 1989, he returned to
western South Dakota to practice. He started his
own clinic in 1996, added a satellite clinic in 1998,
and hired an associate in 1999. His practice covers
mainly large animal.
When South Dakota experienced a trichomonia-
sis outbreak, Stangle designed a power point pres-
entation on detection, treatment and prevention,
which he presented at several meetings in South
Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa.
Stangle has sponsored numerous veterinary and
vet tech students doing their internships. He is a
sponsor of FFA and 4-H. He loves to teach and
share his knowledge. One attribute of Stangle’s in-
terest and dedication to the veterinary field, which
was accidentally left out of the biography, is that
he sometimes writes columns for the Pioneer Re-
view newspaper.
Stangle is a member of SDVMA, American Vet-
erinary Medical Association, American Association
of Bovine Practitioners, Academy of Veterinary
Consultants, and Society of Theriogenology. He
Dedicate a Luminaria: Relay For Life
Relay For Life participants and donors remem-
ber loved ones lost to cancer and honor those bat-
tling the disease by dedicating luminaria bags. Lu-
minaria bags are transformed and illuminated
after dark.
The Relay For Life of Quad County Luminaria
Ceremony begins at 9:30 p.m. on the West end of
the South Boulevard in Wall on September 14,
2013.
Each luminaria is personalized with a name,
photo, message or drawing in memory or honor of
a friend or loved one who has been affected by can-
cer.
As the sun sets, the luminaria candles are lit and
light up the night! It is a beautiful ceremony and
everyone is welcome to come and partake. Anyone
(Reprinted with permission from the Lake Benton Valley
Journal: By Dan Kussz lbnews@itctel.com)
Andy Guptill will officially take over as president of First Se-
curity Bank in Lake Benton on May 1 upon Gary Williams’ re-
tirement.
Guptill came to Lake Benton from another LA Amundson
branch in Sleepy Eye on Nov. 1 and has been working side by side
with Williams in the transition.
“Since I moved to Lake Benton Gary has been a tremendous
help to me,” said Guptill. “Gary has shown me more about the
personable side of banking and the relationships a lender devel-
ops with each customer and how each must be handled differ-
ently.”
“It’s been great to learn from Gary who has 40 plus years of ex-
perience in the industry.”
Guptill said everyone in the Sleepy Eye office also played a big
part in teaching him as he made the rounds learning all sides of
banking operations.
He said he learned a lot in his first few years from John McGee
who taught him about lending, explained each step and how it
all tied together to the borrower and also from Mark Schultz who
has over 20 years of agriculture lending experience.
“My favorite part of working in Lake Benton is the people I get
to work with every day,” Guptill said. “We have a great group of
customers with a great staff to match.”
“Each customer faces their own challenges and it is rewarding
when we can help them achieve their personal goals in a mutu-
ally beneficial way.”
Guptill grew up on a ranch 20 miles south of Interior, S.D. and
30 miles southeast of Wall, S.D.
On the ranch, Guptill’s father has a cow/calf operation, raises
wheat, cuts hay and has a seed cleaning and sales business.
“I attended high school in Wall, S.D. which was about 50 miles
away from our place so my mom rented a house and stayed with
me during the week and we would go home to help on the ranch
on weekends,” said Guptill. “That seems pretty unusual around
these parts but there it happened quite a bit as everything is so
much more spread out.”
Guptill graduated high school in the spring of 2005 and at-
tended SDSU in Brookings, S.D. where he majored in economics
with minors in ag business and ag marketing, graduating college
Guptill to preside over First Security Bank
in the spring of 2009.
“It was during some of those classes that I decided a job in a
rural area working with ag customers would appeal to me,” said
Guptill. “Growing up farming, it is fun to be able to get out in the
field to meet with existing and potential customers as these farm-
ers have such a wealth of knowledge and it is interesting to see
how completely different operations can each be effective.”
“It is great to see their machinery and their places and it really
gives me, as a lender, a better insight to their operations.”
Guptill met his wife Angie about a month after he moved to
Sleepy Eye to work at the bank there.
“Angie’s mom, Brenda Schroepfer, worked at the bank and was
actually training me at the time when she gave me Angie’s num-
ber,” said Guptill. “I guess you could say we hit it off pretty well
as we have now been married about a year and a half since our
wedding in October 2011.”
Guptill’s mom and dad are still out on the home place where
they farm. Guptill has an older brother who works with their dad
on the place and now runs the cattle operation and an older sister
who is currently a games dealer at a casino in Florence, Ore.
Guptill likes to hunt and fish and looks forward to getting out
on Lake Benton Lake this summer and pheasant hunting in the
fall.
“I have gotten my wife out with a gun and she really enjoys
hunting and eating wild game,” Guptill said. “She even shot her
first buck last fall.”
“The job opening and transfer here from Sleepy Eye was a
great opportunity as we are closer to South Dakota and my home-
town with more space, the beautiful hills and the lake.”
Guptill is a huge sports fan and likes to play and watch most
sports including football, basketball, softball and golf.
He is excited to be 25 miles from Brookings, S.D. and hopes to
see some “Jacks” football games this fall.
Guptill said Williams was really great in town being actively
involved in the community and local organizations and said he
is and hopes to do more of the same.
“I’ve been really happy with how receptive everyone has been
here in Lake Benton, welcoming me and my wife,” Guptill said.
“Everyone does a good job of keeping this town alive and support-
ing their local businesses.”
can dedicate a Luminaria in honor of someone.
In Wall the bags can be picked up at Wall Build-
ing Center, Wall Food Center, First Interstate
Bank, West River Electric, Golden West, or by con-
tacting any team member. Recommended donation
for decorating the bag is $5.00 and these proceeds
all go to Relay. Decorated bags can be turned back
in to any Relay team member.
We hope you will help us circle the South Boule-
vard on September 14th with these beautiful cre-
ations.
Pick up your bags soon and begin decorating.
Then come out and join the Event in Wall on the
14th and see for yourself how beautiful these are!
If you have any questions, please call Kelly Lurz at
279-2249 or Sue Peters 279-2211
served on the SDVMA executive board from 2002-
2008 and is a past SDVMA president.
The Stangles live in Milesville where his clinic is
located, with their four children, Jennifer, Sam,
Ben and Mark.
The meeting included continuing education op-
portunities for over 200 veterinarians and veteri-
nary technicians, recognized outstanding accom-
plishments by professionals in the veterinary
fields, and included the annual membership meet-
ing. Dr. Penny Dye presented the plaque to Stan-
gle. The meeting featured sessions on companion
animal, food animal, equine medicine and social
networking, and included case reports from South
Dakota State University animal disease research
and diagnostic lab faculty involving current animal
disease issues.
LABOR DAY
LABOR DAY
We salute every hard-working man and
woman in this country!
In honor of Labor Day,
our offices will be closed.
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
EARLY PROFIT DEADLINE:
Thursday, August 29 • 12:00 NOON
CALL FOR NEWSPAPER DEADLINES:
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Faith Independent: 967-2161
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
United Blood Services issues invitation:
“Find the Hero in You”
Hero statues isn’t reserved only
for those brave men and women
who rush into burning buildings
or step into the front lines of war.
“There’s a hero in all of us,” said
Angel Pillet, Donor Recruitment
Director of United Blood Services,
this area’s non-profit community
blood service provider. “Ordinary
people are saving lives every day.
They do it while they are on lunch
break or while they are running
errands. They have found the
hero in themselves by donating
blood.
Serveral years ago, United
Blood Services took the innova-
tive step of highlighting donors
rather than patients in its blood
drive posters and materials. The
organization continues that focus
with a new national marketing
campaign that invites people to
“Find the Hero in You” by donat-
ing blood three times a year. “We
asked a donor, a young man, why
he gives so consistently three or
four times a year,” said Pillet. “He
said, ‘It feels so good to save
someone’s life. Why would you do
it just once?’”
To encourage the habit of blood
donation, United Blood Services
has expanded its rewards pro-
gram. Donors can earn points for
donating frequently and staying
involved year after year. The
points are redeemable for movie
and restaurant gift certificates
and other prizes.
You can Find the Hero in You at
the upcoming Wall Community
blood drive, on Monday, Septem-
ber 9, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
at the Wall Community Center.
Contact Carol Hahn at 279-2595
for an appointment.
Volunteer blood donors must be
as least 16 years old, weigh at lest
110 pounds and be in good health.
Additional height/weight require-
ments apply to donors 22 and
younger, and donors who are 16,
17 in certain areas, must have
signed permissions from a parent
or guardian.
Potential donors can make an
appointment to give at
www.bloodhero.com or by calling
605-342-8585 in Rapid City or
605-996-3688 in Mitchell. Donors
also receive a free cholesterol test.
Find the Hero in You...donate
three times a year!
Correction
The Wall School doors will be
opened at 3:15 p.m. to pick up stu-
dents, not 3:45 p.m. Sorry for any in-
convenience this may have caused.
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
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Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 2
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
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Letter to the
Editor
First Lady Linda Daugaard will
hold a book walk for children in
the backyard of the Governor’s
Mansion on Monday, September
16 at 6:30 p.m. CDT.
“Technology is a great thing, but
the more we advance technologi-
cally, the more kids stay inside and
use electronics,” said Mrs. Dau-
gaard. “The book walk will be a
good opportunity to encourage kids
to read and give them the chance
to get out and exercise.”
Children in kindergarten
through the second grade are in-
vited to attend, but must be accom-
panied by an adult. The walk will
First Lady to hold book walk
take approximately a half hour.
The featured book will be “Silly
Sally” by Audrey Wood. Partici-
pants will walk around Capitol
Lake and stop at stations along the
way to read portions of the book.
After children arrive at the last
station and finish the book, light
refreshments will be provided.
“The book walk should be enter-
taining for children as well as
adults, and I hope those living in
Pierre and the surrounding areas
will take the opportunity to spend
an evening outdoors with us,” said
the First Lady.
White River Frontier Days
August 17 -18
Bareback
1. Corey Evans, Valentine, Neb.,
84; 2. Joe Wilson, Long Valley,
S.D., 80; 3. (tie) Ty Kenner, Wood
Lake, Neb., Wyatt Clark, Well-
fleet, Neb., 76; 4. Mark Kenyon,
Hayti, S.D., 72; 5. Chance Engle-
bert, Burdock, S.D., 65.
Barrel Racing
1. (tie) Ginalee Tierney, Broken
Bow, Neb., Kailee Webb, Isabel,
S.D., 17.79; 2. Katie Longhran,
Broken Bow, 17.85; 3. Shelby Vin-
son, Worthing, S.D., 17.96; 4.
Krystal Marone, Isabel, 18.02; 5.
Dori Hollenbeck, Winner, S.D.,
18.08.
Bull Riding
1. Clint Connelly, Stapleton,
Neb., 85; 2. Trey Kerner, Suther-
land, Neb., 77; 3. Clint Nelson,
Philip, S.D., 76; 4. Allen Auer,
Whitewood, S.D., 75.
Calf Roping
1. Clete Scheer, Elesmere, Neb.,
9.10; 2. Trey Young, Dupree, S.D.,
10.50; 3. Colton Musick, Pierre,
S.D., 11.60; 3. Chisum Thurston,
Hyannis, Neb., 11.60; 4. Chip Wil-
son, Lemoyne, Neb., 11.90; 5.
Terry Graff, Long Pine, Neb.,
12.00.
Goat Tying
1. Lacey Tech, Fairfax, S.D.,
8.60; 2. Chelsey Kelly, Dupree,
8.80; 3. Hallie Fulton, Miller, S.D.,
9.00; 4. Kristi Birkeland, Dupree,
9.10; 5. Amy Tierney, Oral, S.D.,
9.20; 6. Shayna Miller, Faith, S.D.,
9.30.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Jana Jasper, St. Charles,
S.D., 2.10; 2. Laura Hunt,
Ridgeview, S.D., 2.20; 3. Trista
Barry, Rapid City, S.D., 2.30; 4.
(tie) Josey Schomp, North Platte,
Neb., Jenny Belkham, Blunt, S.D.,
2.70; 5. Toree Gunn, Wasta, S.D.,
3.20.
SDRA rodeo results – White River, Perkins Co.
Mixed Team Roping
Woman
1. Brooke Nelson, Philip, 6.40;
2. Hanna Brown, Faith, S.D.,
7.40; 3. Elizabeth Baker, Box
Elder, S.D., 7.50; 4. Trina Arne-
son, Enning, S.D., 7.60; 5. Denise
Nelson, Midland, S.D., 7.70; 6.
Syerra Christensen, Kennebec,
S.D., 7.80.
Saddle Bronc
1. (tie) Cole Hindman,
Belvidere, S.D., Ty Kennedy,
Philip, 84; 2. Shadow Jensen,
Martin, S.D., 82; 3. Seth Schafer,
Yoder, Wyo., 81; 4. Chase Miller,
Oglala, S.D., 78; 5. Wyatt Kam-
merer, Philip, 73.
Sr. Mens Breakaway
1. Steve Klein, Sioux Falls, S.D.
2.80; 2. Kirk Ford, Huron, S.D.,
2.90; 3. Doug Harris, Eli, Neb.,
3.20; 4. JB Lord, Sturgis, S.D.,
3.60; 5. John Hoven, McLaughlin,
S.D., 3.80; 6. Cort Sears, Valen-
tine, Neb., 3.90.
Steer Wrestling
1. Clint Nelson, Philip, 3.80; 2.
(tie) Dean Moncur, Sturgis, Dan
Barner, Hershey, Neb., 4.30; 3.
(tie) Tyler Kesler, York, Neb., Cole
Fulton, Miller, 4.70; 4. Tye Hale,
Faith, S.D., 4.90.
Team Penning
1. (tie) Robert Devitt, Harris-
burg, S.D., Gerald Sorenson, Can-
ton, S.D., James Kuiper, Canton;
Carson Olinger, Plankinton, S.D.,
Chad Herrboldt, Sisseton, S.D.,
Jason Kriz, Sisseton, 50.20; 2.
Clinton Olinger, Plankinton, Ran-
dall Olson, Harrisburg, S.D.,
Katie Anderson, Plankinton,
50.40; 3. Jay Reurink, Lennox,
S.D., Steve Deschepper, Chancel-
lor, S.D., Elizabeth Reurink,
Lennox, 60.60.
Team Roping
1. (tie) Shadow Jensen, Martin,
S.D./Guy Fransua, Kyle, S.D.,
Travis Warren, Mullen/Tucker
White, Hershey, Neb., 5.30; 2.
Tucker Dale, Timber Lake/Levi
Lord, Sturgis, 5.50; 3. (tie) Tyrell
Moody, Edgemont, S.D./Rory
Brown, Edgemont, Dustin Chi-
hon, O’Neil, Neb./Todd Hollen-
beck, Long Pine, Neb., 5.70; 4.
Eliot Gourneau, Kennebec/Jace
Shearer, Wall, S.D., 5.80.
Perkins County Fair &
Rodeo
August 17-18
Bareback
1. Lonny Lesmeister, Rapid
City, S.D., 79; 2. Englebert, Bur-
dock, 73; 3. Kenyon, Hayti, 72; 4.
Ryan Burkinshaw, Hermosa,
S.D., 70.
Barrel Racing
1. Wanda Brown, Edgemont,
16.39; 2. Webb, Isabel, 16.56; 3.
Shanna Anderson, Eagle Butte,
S.D., 16.71; 4. Fulton, Miller,
16.77; 5. Brooke Howell, Belle
Fourche, S.D., 16.78; 6. ReAnn
Crane, Whitewood, 16.79.
Bull Riding
1. Jake Foster, Meadow, S.D.,
80; 2. Zach Scofield, Belle
Fourche, 75.
Calf Roping
1. Troy Wilcox, Red Owl, S.D.,
10.40; 2. (tie) Chad Pelster, Belle
Fourche, Jace Melvin, Ft Pierre,
S.D., 10.70; 3. (tie) Jesse
Medearis, Ismay, Mont., Matt Pe-
ters, Hot Springs, S.D., 10.80; 4.
Kourt Starr, Dupree, 11.70.
Goat Tying
1. Katie Doll, Prairie City, S.D.,
7.50; 2. Birkeland, Dupree, 7.60;
3. (tie) Krystal Marone, Isabel,
S.D., Kelly, Dupree, 7.80.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Samantha Jorgenson, Wat-
ford City, N.D., 3.10; 2. Tierney,
Oral, 3.50; 3. Elizabeth Baker,
Box Elder, S.D., 3.70; 4. Brooke
Howell, Belle Fourche, 3.90; 5.
Misty McPherson, Piedmont,
S.D., 4.00; 6. (tie) Brooke Nelson,
Philip, Kaycee Nelson, Buffalo,
S.D., 4.10.
Mixed Team Roping
Woman
1. Ashley Price, Faith, 4.80; 2.
Baker, Box Elder, 5.30; 3. Brenda
White, Oelrichs, S.D., 6.80; 4.
Denise Nelson, Midland, 7.00; 5.
Brooke Nelson, Philip, 7.60; 6.
Hanna Brown, Faith, 7.70.
Saddle Bronc
1. Travis Schroth, Buffalo Gap,
S.D., 79; 2. (tie) Kennedy, Philip,
Kammerer, Philip, 78; 3. Shorty
Garrett, Dupree, 76; 4. Jay Long-
brake, Dupree, 73; 5. Kash Deal,
Dupree, 72.
Sr. Mens Breakaway
1. Lynn McNenny, Sturgis,
2.50; 2. Arlyn Lawrence, Mo-
bridge, 2.70; 3. Terry McPherson,
Piedmont, 3.20; 4. Les Haugen,
Alexander, N.D., 3.30; 5. Rick
Downey, Piedmont, 4.50.
Steer Wrestling
1. Rick Baier, Buffalo, 4.70; 2.
Hoyt Kraeger, Miller, S.D., 5.50;
3. Jayce Doan, McKenzie, N.D.,
5.60; 4. Casey Olson, Prairie City,
6.00; 5. (tie) Vance Steedley, Sun-
dance, Wyo., Clint Doll, Prairie
City, Brett Wilcox, Red Owl, 7.40.
Team Roping
1. Radley Day, Volborg,
N.D./Taylor Williams, Volborg,
6.00; 2. Chad Nelson, Bowman/
Parker Murnion, Bowman, 6.20;
3. Lord, Sturgis/Jesse Fredrick-
son, Menoken, N.D., 6.40; 4. B.
Wilcox, Red Owl/Clint Cobb, Red
Owl, 6.70; 5. Wyatt Bice, Kildeer
N.D./Zane Hollenbeck, Regent,
N.D., 7.00; 6. Terry McPherson,
Piedmont/Michael McPherson,
Box Elder, 7.10.
To bake or not to bake. Bonnie Saltzman gave a bag of potatoes to
Jerry Johannesen to plant in his garden. Jerry dug a couple hills of po-
tatoes and Bonnie was rewarded with this 7 1/2 long and 1.6 pound po-
tato. Bonnie thought she could get five meals from that one monsterous
potato.
Laurie Hindman photo
The state’s ACT scores are on
the rise, and despite one of the
highest participation rates in the
nation, South Dakota continues
to see above-average performance
by test-takers.
Nearly 80 percent of South
Dakota’s 2013 graduates took the
ACT. The students earned an av-
erage composite ACT score of
21.9, compared to a national av-
erage of 20.9. The state average
has been at 21.8 for the past three
years.
“The fact that such a high per-
centage of our students choose to
take the ACT, and perform well, is
a good indication that they are
planning on some sort of postsec-
ondary education experience,
which is a must in today’s world,”
said Secretary of Education Dr.
Melody Schopp.
As South Dakota transitions to
new college-ready standards in
English and math at the K-12
level, Schopp says educators and
parents should be looking more
closely at ACT “benchmarks.”
These benchmark scores pro-
vide an indication of how students
will perform once they enter a
postsecondary institution. Specif-
ically, a benchmark score indi-
cates that the student has a 50
percent chance of obtaining a B or
higher or a 75 percent chance of
obtaining a C or higher in the cor-
responding college course.
Of the 2013 South Dakota grad-
uates who took the ACT, 72 per-
cent met the benchmark in Eng-
lish, compared to 64 percent na-
tionally.
Fifty-two percent met the
benchmark in reading, compared
to 44 percent nationally.
In math, 53 percent of South
Dakota graduates met the bench-
mark for college readiness, com-
pared to 44 percent nationally.
And in science, 46 percent met
the ACT benchmark, compared to
36 percent nationally.
“Once again, the good news is
that when you look at the bench-
marks, South Dakota is outper-
S.D. ACT scores above average
forming the rest of the nation,”
Dr. Schopp said. “But you can also
see that we’ve got plenty of oppor-
tunity to grow, and that’s where
we need to focus our energies.”
One of the efforts currently
under way to address college
readiness is a collaborative effort
of the Department of Education
and the Board of Regents.
The two agencies have part-
nered to provide online course-
work for students who need to im-
prove their skills in certain areas,
prior to moving on to postsec-
ondary. Once a student success-
fully completes the coursework
and related assessment, Board of
Regents’ institutions will accept
that coursework in lieu of a cer-
tain ACT score.
The two entities also are devel-
oping a senior English course and
a college-prep math course, both
designed to help students brush
up on critical skills before leaving
high school.
The ACT is scored on a scale of
1 to 36, with 36 being the highest
possible score. Students are
tested in the areas of English,
mathematics, reading and sci-
ence. The test is commonly used
by postsecondary institutions as a
benchmark for college entrance
and readiness.
Average Composite ACT Scores
– South Dakota vs. National:
Year S.D. National
2009 22.0 21.1
2010 21.8 21.0
2011 21.8 21.1
2012 21.8 21.1
2013 21.9 20.9
Listed is the graduation class of
2013 from Wall High School ACT
scores:
Total Tested English
District State District State
19 6,723 20.5 20.9
Mathematics Reading
District State District State
22.4 21.8 22.1 22.1
Science Composie
District State District State
21.3 22.1 21.6 21.9
Baked potato, mashed
potato or french fries
The following article appeared
in the Norfolk edition of the Live-
stock Digest in Ces Emrich’s col-
umn sometime in 1970.
I found it while sorting through
old files and thought it might be of
interest to you and your readers
even though it has been published
before. I reproduce it verbatim. I
hope you believe it should be
widely published as I do.
“In May 1919, the British Army
raided a Communist headquarters
in occupied Dusseldorf, Germany.
Among the papers seized was one
entitle, “RULES FOR BRING-
ING ABOUT A REVOLUTION.”
These rules that make incredi-
ble reading in 1970 are:
“CORRUPT the young. Get
them away from religion. Get
them interested in sex. Make
them superficial, destroy their
ruggedness.”
Get control of all means of pub-
licity and thereby get people’s
minds off their government by fo-
cusing their attention on athletics,
sexy books and plays and other
trivialities.
DIVIDE the people into hostile
groups by constantly harping on
controversial matters of no impor-
tance.
Destroy the people’s faith in
their natural leaders by holding
these latter up to ridicule and
contempt. Always preach true
democracy, but seize power as fast
and as ruthlessly as possible.
BY ENCOURAGING govern-
ment extravagance, destroy its
credit, produce fear of inflation
with rising prices and general dis-
content.
Foment unnecessary strikes in
vital industries, encourage civil
disorders and foster a lenient and
soft attitude on the part of the
government toward such disor-
ders.
Cause the REGISTRATIONof
all firearms on some pretext, with
a view to confiscating them and
leaving the population helpless.
NEED MORE be said.”
Apparently the article made lit-
tle impact in 1970 on the general
population. Do you think influen-
tial people will pay attention
now? I wonder if it disturbs any-
one else as much as it does me.
Concerned citizen,
/s/Arliss Moreland
Merriman, Neb.
courant@gwtc.net
Local News
Area News
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013•3
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For updates on movies, call:
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(PG)
Subscription Rates:
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or subscribe online at:
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Email us with your news item or
photo to courant @ gwtc.net
The Cedar Butte Challenger
and Cheyenne River Breaks 4-H
Club members were very success-
ful at the Pennington County
Achievement Days held during
the Central States Fair! Below are
the results from the 2013 4-H Pen-
nington Co. Achievement Day that
was held Thursday, August 15
from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
Walter Taylor building in Rapid
City. Listed is the name of the 4-H
contestants and the color of rib-
bons in the catagaories that they
entered.
•Kipp Cordes, Blue - Citizen-
ship 8001: Junior Educational
Display;
•John Deering, Red - Citizen-
ship 8001: Junior Educational
Display;
•Sheridan Deering, Purple -
Citizenship 8001: Junior Educa-
tional Display;
•Samantha Deutscher, Purple -
Clothing and Textiles 9035: Junior
Selected Outfit;
•Savanna Deutscher, Purple -
Clothing and Textiles 9035: Junior
Selected Outfit;
•Abby Moon, Purple - Clothing
and Textiles 9022: Junior Con-
structed Clothing: Dress:;
•Abby Moon, Purple - Clothing
and Textiles 9035: Junior Selected
Outfit;
•Elle Moon, Purple - Clothing
and Textiles 9023: Senior Con-
structed Clothing: Dress;
•Jaicee Williams, Purple -
Clothing and Textiles 9035: Junior
Selected Outfit;
•Kipp Cordes, Purple - Commu-
nity Service 11001: Junior Educa-
tional Display;
•Jaicee Williams, Blue - Com-
puters and Technology 12014:
Junior Computer Presentation
Display Exhibit;
•Samantha Deutscher, Purple -
Foods and Nutrition 32039: Jun-
ior Drop Cookies;
•Savanna Deutscher, Purple -
Foods and Nutrition 32054: Jun-
ior Fun with Convenience Foods;
•Sierra Hilgenkamp, Purple -
Foods and Nutrition 32039: Jun-
ior Drop Cookies;
•Elle Moon, Blue - Foods and
Nutrition 32060: Senior Muffins;
•Savanna Deutscher, Blue -
Home Environment 40013: Junior
Wall Item for your Home Display
Exhibit;
•Abby Moon, Blue - Home Envi-
ronment 40009: Junior Con-
structed Fabric Bedroom Acces-
sory Display Exhibit;
•Elle Moon, Blue - Home Envi-
ronment 40010: Senior Con-
structed Fabric Bedroom Acces-
sory Display Exhibit;
•Jaicee Williams, Blue - Home
Environment 40009: Junior Con-
structed Fabric Bedroom Acces-
sory Display Exhibit;
JaiceeWilliams, Purple - Home
Environment 40013: Junior Wall
Item for your Home Display Ex-
hibit;
•Breanna McConnell, Blue -
Music/Dance 45009: Junior Per-
formance Solo;
•Samantha Deutscher, Blue -
Photography 47027: Junior Still
LifeDisplay Exhibit;
•Samantha Deutscher, Red -
Photography 47025: Junior Land-
scape Display Exhibit;
•Savanna Deutscher, Blue -
Photography 47025: Junior Land-
scape Display Exhibit;
•Savanna Deutscher, Blue -
Photography 47027: Junior Still
Life Display Exhibit;
•Jenna Elshere, Red - Photog-
raphy 47019: Junior Wildlife or
Domestic Animals Display Ex-
hibit;
•Sierra Hilgenkamp, Purple -
Photography 47025: Junior Land-
scape Display Exhibit;
•Abby Moon, Purple - Photog-
raphy 47021: Junior Flowers or
Plants Display Exhibit;
•Abby Moon, Purple - Photog-
raphy 47029: Junior Architecture
Display Exhibit;
•Elle Moon, Purple - Photogra-
phy 47030: Senior Architecture
Display Exhibit;
•Tacia Osterberg, Blue - Pho-
tography 47013: Junior Candid
Display Exhibit;
•Tacia Osterberg, Blue - Pho-
tography 47019: Junior Wildlife
or Domestic Animals Display Ex-
hibit;
•Tacia Osterberg, Red -Photog-
raphy 47017: Junior Animal and
People Display Exhibit;
•Jaicee Williams, Blue - Pho-
tography 47019: Junior Wildlife
or Domestic Animals Display Ex-
hibit;
•Jaicee Williams, Purple - Pho-
tography 47025: Junior Land-
scape Display Exhibit;
•Jaicee Williams, Purple - Pho-
tography 47037: Junior Action
Display Exhibit;
•Sheridan Deering, Blue - Rab-
bits/Cavies 907001: Mini Lop
Senior Buck Over Six Months Old
Variety A;
•Sheridan Deering, Red - Rab-
bits/Cavies 901001: Beginner
Rabbit Showmans;
•Samantha Deutscher, Red -
Shooting Sports : Junior Educa-
tional Poster;
•Savanna Deutscher, Red -
Shooting Sports : Junior Educa-
tional Poster;
•John Deering, Blue - Visual
Arts 60018: Junior Clay, Ceram-
ics, Modeling Compounds - Origi-
nal;
•John Deering, Blue - Visual
Arts 60018: Junior Clay, Ceram-
ics, Modeling Compounds - Origi-
nal;
•John Deering, Blue - Visual
Arts 60022: Junior Fiber - Origi-
nal;
•John Deering, Blue - Visual
Arts 60042: Junior Paper - Origi-
nal;
•John Deering, Red - Visual
Arts 60014: Junior Chalk, Carbon
(Pencil) and Pigment - Original;
•Sheridan Deering, Blue - Vi-
sual Arts 60018: Junior Clay, Ce-
ramics, Modeling Compounds -
Original;
•Sheridan Deering, Blue - Vi-
sual Arts 60026: Junior Glass -
Original;
•Sheridan Deering, Blue - Vi-
sual Arts 60054: Junior Textiles -
Original;
•Sheridan Deering, Red - Vi-
sual Arts 60014: Junior Chalk,
Carbon (Pencil) and Pigment -
Original;
•Savanna Deutscher, Blue - Vi-
sual Arts 60066: Junior Hand-
made Jewelry - Kit/Pattern;
•Sierra Hilgenkamp, Purple -
Visual Arts 60014: Junior Chalk,
Carbon (Pencil) and Pigment -
Original;
•Sierra Hilgenkamp, Purple -
Visual Arts 60020: Junior Fiber -
Kit/Pattern;
•Breanna McConnell, Blue - Vi-
sual Arts 60014: Junior Chalk,
Carbon (Pencil) and Pigment -
Original;
•Breanna McConnell, Blue - Vi-
sual Arts 60014: Junior Chalk,
Carbon (Pencil) and Pigment -
Original;
•Brenna McConnell, Blue - Vi-
sual Arts 60018: Junior Clay, Ce-
ramics, Modeling Compounds -
Original;
•Breanna McConnell, Purple -
Visual Arts 60018: Junior Clay,
Ceramics, Modeling Compounds -
Original;
•Breanna McConnell, Red - Vi-
sual Arts 60014: Junior Chalk,
Carbon (Pencil) and Pigment -
Original;
•Breanna McConnell, Red - Vi-
sual Arts 60014: Junior Chalk,
Carbon (Pencil) and Pigment -
Original;
•Abby Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60014: Junior Chalk, Carbon
(Pencil) and Pigment - Original;
•Abby Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60014: Junior Chalk, Carbon
(Pencil) and Pigment - Original;
•Abby Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60048: Junior Plastic - Kit/Pat-
tern;
•Abby Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60050: Junior Plastic - Original;
•Abby Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60050: Junior Plastic - Original;
•Abby Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
6005: Junior Textiles - Original;
•Abby Moon, Purple - Visual
Arts 60020: Junior Fiber -
Kit/Pattern;
•Abby Moon, Purple - Visual
Arts 60024: Junior Glass -
Kit/Pattern;
•Abby Moon, Red - Visual Arts
60014: Junior Chalk, Carbon
(Pencil) and Pigment - Original;
•Elle Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60019: Senior Clay, Ceramics,
Modeling Compounds - Original;
•Elle Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60019: Senior Clay, Ceramics,
Modeling Compounds - Original;
•Elle Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60049: Senior Plastic - Kit/Pat-
tern;
•Elle Moon, Blue - Visual Arts
60055: Senior Textiles - Original;
•Elle Moon, Purple - Visual
Arts 60019: Senior Clay, Ceram-
ics, Modeling Compounds - Origi-
nal;
•Elle Moon, Purple - Visual
Arts 60019: Senior Clay, Ceram-
ics, Modeling Compounds - Origi-
nal;
•Elle Moon, Purple - Visual
Arts 60051: Senior Plastic - Orig-
inal;
•Elle Moon, Red - Visual Arts
60019: Senior Clay, Ceramics,
Modeling Compounds - Original;
•Tacia Osterberg, Blue - Visual
Arts 60006: Junior Children's Art
Activities;
•Tacia Osterberg, Blue - Visual
Arts 60020: Junior Fiber -
Kit/Pattern;
•Tacia Osterberg, Blue - Visual
Arts 60028: Junior Leather -
Kit/Pattern;
•Tacia Osterberg, Blue - Visual
Arts 60028: Junior Leather -
Kit/Pattern;
•Tacia Osterberg, Purple - Vi-
sual Arts 60054: Junior Textiles -
Original;
•Jaicee Williams, Blue - Visual
Arts 60014: Junior Chalk, Carbon
(Pencil) and Pigment - Original;
•Jaicee Williams, Purple - Vi-
sual Arts 60014: Junior Chalk,
Carbon (Pencil) and Pigment -
Original;
•Samantha Deutscher, Blue -
Welding Science : Junior Educa-
tional Display;
•Savanna Deutscher, Purple -
Welding Science 63001: Junior
Educational Display;
•Elle Moon, Purple - Welding
Science 63006: Senior Welding
Display Exhibits;
•Trey Elshere, Blue - Wood Sci-
ence 65012: Junior Wood Con-
struction and Finish Display Ex-
hibit;
•Abby Moon, Purple - Youth in
Action 301003: General Con-
structed Outfit;
•Elle Moon, Purple - Youth in
Action 301003: General Con-
structed Outfit;
2013 4-H Clothing and
Fashion Awards
Fashion Revue
•Top Junior – Abby Moon
Selected Outfit
•Top Beginner – Samantha
Deutscher
•Top Junior – Jaicee Williams
•Overall Selected Outfit –
Jaicee Williams
Live Animal Grand
Champion and Reserve
Champion 2013 Pennington
Co. 4-H Achievement Day
•Sheridan Deering, Rabbit
Showmanship Reserve Champion
•Sheridan Deering, Mini Lop
Senior Buck over six months old
Variety A; Reserve Champion.
Quinn Moon and Serra Sue
Deutscher both received ribbons
for their Clover Bud exhibits.
There were just over 1,200 ex-
hibits at the fair this year. Pen-
nington County 4-H membership
has increased significantly, re-
sulting in the large number of ex-
hibits. About 580 exhibits re-
ceived purple ribbons and will be
going on to the South Dakota
State Fair
Results of 4-H Pennington Co. Achievement Day
By Libbi Sykora
The seasons once again are
shifting, so it’s time to gear up for
more change. Autumn brings the
fresh start of a new school year
along with rich, indulgent colors in
nature.
With that, there are two things
that you must remember:
First – Make certain that you
have turned your summer reading
program sheets into the library by
1:00 on Friday, August 30th. Your
name will not be entered in the
drawing unless we receive your
reading sheet. Please either stop in
the library for more details or
check out the library website at
http: / / www. wallcommunityli-
brary.blogspot.com.
Second – While the school has
some fantastic selections for chil-
dren and teens available in their
library, we would like to remind
the community that the Wall Com-
munity Library carries some of the
newest titles available for all ages.
If there is ever anything that
you can’t seem to find at the school
library, make sure that you stop in
to the Wall Community Library.
We will do our best to help you
Wall’s best kept secret
find what you need to quench your
reading pleasures and/or help you
write your papers.
Wall Community Library is one
of Wall’s best kept secrets because
we have so many amenities avail-
able for students and adults.
With a large selection of books
for all ages, computers with wire-
less internet, and librarians who
are able to help with almost any-
thing, Wall Community Library
becomes a must-stop destination
for everyone throughout the school
year.
Invite all of your friends to come
visit us, too!
As always, stop by the Library
anytime. We are located at 407
Main Street in the Historic Wall
Hut. We are open Wednesdays
from 12 - 7 p.m., Thursdays from 9
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to
5 p.m., Fridays from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m.
If you are a Facebook fan join us
at Wall Community Library, or
check out our blog at www.wall-
communitylibrary.blogspot.com.
Have an exciting and educa-
tional year at school!
The South Dakota Country
Music Hall of Fame will be at the
South Dakota State Fair, Sunday,
September 1, to recognize the
10th anniversary inductees. The
event will start at 6:00 p.m. on
the DakotaLand Stage at Gate 3.
The 2013 inductees are Terry
Stefferud, Teresa Endres, Jerry
Berens, Hailey Steele, Dana
Jensen, Kenny Frey, Don
Quincey, Elva Meyers, Cliff Gul-
likson, Linda Lee, Verne Shep-
pard and the Clay Creek Deaf
Cowboy Band 35th Anniversary
year (Dawn Nelson, Sorney
Sorensen, Tom Zoss, and Rick
Martz).
The house band will be com-
prised of past inductees Howie
Gamber, Dave Bergquist, Roy
King, Paul Engebretson, Ellie
Mechels, Elaine Peacock, Darrel
“Boomer” Hoiland, Troy “Clancy”
White, Donnie Miller, Wilbur
Foss and special guest Sam Tulio.
Inductees are nominated by
their peers, friends and family.
They are then selected based on
their performances, promotion
and support of country music in
South Dakota. Musicians and
performers are selected from
around the entire state.
Two new events are planned for
the 2013 event – an album of the
year category and a bus trip. For
details, visit http://southdakota-
countrymusichalloffame.org/, or
contact the South Dakota Coun-
try Music Hall of Fame at 605-
310-2441 or sdcmhof@southdako-
tacountrymusichalloffame.org.
The hall of fame is a nonprofit
organization and all work is done
South Dakota Country Music
Hall of Fame 2013 inductees
on a voluntary basis. It relies pri-
marily on donations for its sup-
port. South Dakota merchants
and vendors are used for the busi-
ness needs whenever possible,
and is the organization’s way of
supporting South Dakota.
The hall of fame also helps pro-
mote music programs for elemen-
tary schools in the state. During
the past year, support went to
four schools and the Yankton
Children’s Choir. Several
fundraisers/music festivals were
held with proceeds split between
the area school and the South
Dakota Country Music Hall of
Fame. Some of the youngsters
have performed on stage with the
hall of famers. There will be a
group of youngsters debuting at
the South Dakota State Fair fes-
tivities.
Without the venues, none of
this would be possible. They sup-
port the country musicians and
bands, and support country music
in their communities.
Fans are the greatest and most
important element in all of this.
Their loyalty and support is gra-
ciously appreciated. They also
help work the events, give sugges-
tions and help out in any way
they can to continue to help the
organization be successful.
The board of directors for the
hall of fame are Sara Sandwick,
Dorothy Miles, Jodee Harris and
Chair Wini Iverson. Assistants
are Sandi Vander Wal, Ellen
Robertson and Mary Gorrell,
along with many other volunteers
who help with events and prepa-
rations.
The Game, Fish and Parks De-
partment is reminding campers
that the end of the summer
doesn’t mean the end of camping
at South Dakota state parks as
the parks will continue taking
camping reservations throughout
the winter months.
“We now take reservations for
stays year-round,” said state park
director Doug Hofer. “In the past,
camping was on a first-come,
first-served basis after Labor
Day.”
Campsites and cabins at Custer
State Park can be reserved up to
one year in advance, and up to 90
days prior to arrival at all other
campsites and cabins.
Group campsites located at
Custer State Park and Lewis and
Clark Recreation Area can also be
S.D. State Parks taking camping
reservations through the winter
booked one year in advance.
Group lodges that can be reserved
one year ahead of time include:
•Lake Thompson Recreation
Area near Lake Preston
•Mina Lake Recreation Area
near Aberdeen
•Newton Hills State Park near
Canton
•Oahe Downstream Recreation
Area near Fort Pierre
•Palisades State Park near
Garretson
•Shadehill Recreation Area
near Lemmon
•Sheps Canyon Recreation
Area on Angostura Reservoir near
Hot Springs
Camping reservations can be
made online at www.campsd.com
or by calling 1-800-710-2267.
Wall Health
Services Inc.
will be closed in
observance of
Labor Day,
Mon., Sept. 2nd
We will resume our regular hours
Tues., Sept. 3rd.
Wall Building Center
will be selling in September
9” Premium
Hardy Mums
… $6.99ea
Phone: 279-2158
Wall, SD
Closed Labor Day, Sept. 2nd
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Fairly early Sunday morning, a
crew gathered at Lurz Park to
set-up and prepare for the after-
noon’s “Picnic in the Park”.
Lawnmower Poker, organized
by Hazel Kalkbrenner and Norm
Current was the kick-off event
with Freddie Ferguson the lucky
winner. Sparky declined to come
to Wasta this time so Freddie re-
lied on his vintage Honda Trail
bike. All turned out well for Fred-
die as he won the pot! In Freddie
style, he donated his winnings
back to Relay For Life.
Cliff Sieh’s familiar golf cart
showed up with Stuart and
Shirley Kitterman at the controls
to participate in the “run”. Lloyd
pulled our old sleigh with his
mower and carried Ash and Madi
Grenstiner enjoying the ride. Bi-
cycle riders, mules, steam engine
(?) whatever — had great fun.
So what do you get when you
combine one miserably hot day,
Wasta Wildcats BIG Picnic in the
Park fundraiser, a lot of little kids
and some good and generous
friends and neighbors?
Well, we had kids who stayed
happy because Angie, Tom, Dylan
and Brody Carter had plenty of
water games to keep this group
cool and entertained.
There were some adults who
were eyeing the wading pool per-
haps to get their own tug-of-war
started just to get pulled through
the water!
For the most part, shady spots
were sought, friends found for a
visit, lots of good food was enjoyed
and some pure silliness gave all a
good laugh.
Ken and Danene Skillingstad
were promoters of a new to Wasta
“Pie in the Face” money raiser.
I’m sure you all know how that
goes. Lawrence Burke seemed to
enjoy donating to see Gary Ver-
non, Lloyd Willey, Ken
Skillingstad and Brody Carter get
their pies! Actually, I enjoyed it,
too, as did most others including
the pie throwers and the pie
“throwees”.
The Wasta Wildcats thank
everyone so much for showing up
in good spirits and a willingness
to help yet another good cause.
Madi and Ash Grenstiner spent
a day making and decorating cup-
cakes. Though Madi did say Ash
did most of the baking. We’re glad
you’re part of the proud Wasta
Wildcats team.
Many donated to the silent auc-
tion which was successful. Bunny
Bail and Doreen Skillingstad had
a just for fun (I think) bidding
war that had us all laughing.
A tired, hot, but contented
group of Wildcats cleaned up, put
away and were still working
when Lloyd and I cried, “old and
worn out” and came home!
Dick and Gay Hadlock and
Marilyn Keyser commented, after
all had worked to make “Picnic in
the Park” successful, “It was all
worth it!”
We welcomed Mary Lewis home
from a visit with son, John and
his family in New Hampshire.
Two granddaughters are a big
drawing card!
Please continue with thoughts
and prayers for Tom Carter’s
mother, Ada Carter. she is under-
going treatment both of chemo
and radiation. Returning home
after a short visit with her, Tom
says her spirit is still strong and
her attitude positive.
Upcoming event for the Wild-
cats is the great Wasta Chili
Cook-off Contest. All are invited
to come. Bring your taster —
spoons and bowls provided. Sun-
day, September 8th is that date —
maybe we should have water
games first to really cool off! We
could have a cold front by then
the way our weather has been so
goofy.
Again thank you all for coming
and supporting the Wasta Wild-
cats as we continue our prowl to
the Relay For Life, September
14th and 15th.
One more little thought:
Wasta Wildcats
We’re on fire
News to cancer
IS REALLY DIRE!
GO WASTA — GO WILDcATS
Happy Trails!
Social News
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Congratulations and the best of
wishes go out to Zack Hoffman
and Lucy Lee as they were mar-
ried on Saturday, the 24th of Au-
gust. A reception and dance was
held at the Wall Golf Course after
the ceremony.
Congratulations, also, to Lon-
nie and Rose Ellen Kjerstad who
celebrated their 55th wedding an-
niversary with an open house on
Saturday afternoon at Quinn in
the church where they were mar-
ried. The town of Quinn had ren-
ovated the building a few years
ago and it is used as their munic-
ipal building.
The Senior Citizen group, YAH,
will meet on September 2nd at
1:00 p.m. It is Labor day but no
one had an activity to attend, so
there will be a meeting with elec-
tion of officers.
Marcia Williams of Cody, Wyo.,
picked up her sister, Gwen Hamil-
ton in Casper, and they came to
visit heir parents, Les and Kay
Williams, on Tuesday. Their dad
celebrated a birthday while they
were there. They left for their re-
spective homes on Sunday.
Katie Jedlicka and her friend
came from Minneapolis to Sioux
Falls and joined her parents,
Mike and Cheryl, and sister Amy.
They all came to Wall on Thurs-
day to visit Donna. On Saturday,
they all toured the Black Hills.
Katie’s friend had not been in
South Dakota before so it was “a
first”.
Once again the Wall School is to
be commended as they have re-
ceived an Exemplary classifica-
tion in South Dakota schools!
Way to go!
Gerald and Esther Wolford
drove to Howard on Wednesday
and stayed overnight with Amy
and Terry Beers. Since they were
returning Amy’s van to her,
Brenda went to Howard after
school on Thursday and brought
them back to Wall. Other guests
of the Beers on Wednesday night
were a family (friends of Amy)
from Washington state who had
been visiting in Michigan.
Mark and Darlene Poste went
out to the place in the country on
Sunday. It was an awful hot day
so probably should have post-
poned it. They did some mowing
in the house-yard and general
clean-up.
Since the longest day of the
year — June 21st — also the be-
ginning of summer, we have lost
three hours plus, of daylight. It is
noticeable so we know fall is near.
Unfortunately, we are getting all
our summer heat at once. I won-
der who was the inventor of the
air conditioner.
Lyle and Viola Williams had
supper one night last week at the
home of Lavern and Diane Terk-
ildsen. Terkildsen’s garden is pro-
ducing well so Viola said she went
home with ‘loot” from their gar-
den. Others from around town
have been sharing their bounty
also.
“Duty makes us do things well,
but love makes us do them beauti-
fully.” ~Anonymous
Have a good week!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
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Becki Potrzeba, Agent
1315 E. Wells Ave., Pierre, SD 57501
877-224-4173 ~ becki@beckipotrzeba.com
Sponsored by:
Pennington
County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
…continued next
week.
Zoey, 1 year
daughter of
Trent & Betsy Shearer, Wall.
MiKaylee, 2 1/2 years
daughter of
Michael & Dana Luedeman,
Wall.
Kyler, 5 1/2 years, Karmyn,
4 years & Karley, 2 years
children of
Jordan & Rachel Kjerstad,
Wall.
Tomorrow’s
leaders
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053 — let it ring
The Artist Ride was held over
the weekend for many of the resi-
dents. I’m sorry I failed to get an-
other phone call in for more de-
tails. It’s always been a neat oc-
currence each year and well at-
tended. Next week, hopefully.
Mitch Kammerer didn’t get in
on that hail storm but Bill Biel-
maier’s fields caught it as I’m
sure others did. I just didn’t get to
talk to them. Bill is real proud of
and appreciative of the help
grandson Jacob is. I am so thank-
ful I got to raise my kids in the
country. It so helps their matu-
rity. Bill is thinking winter wheat
planting. There is always some-
thing to do and pride is your ac-
complishments.
I had the nicest visit with
DeAnna Kammerer and Dorothy
Shearer when I attended Melissa
and Trevor’s wedding reception.
Emily Helms of Brookings,
spent the weekend in the
parental Elden Helms home and
also attended the wedding.
Lori and Lawrence Schreiber
helped Delmer and Mary Paulsen
move in their new stove. The up-
keep is this one has a self clean-
ing oven. Delmer took the older
one to the Salvation Army Store.
Lynn Mary called from Col-
orado Springs to tell her parents,
Delmer and Mary Paulsen, Matt
and Anita Sandal were overnight
guests en route to visit the David
Kjerstad family in Amarillo,
Texas.
Todd Sieler brought his pickup
and trailer to help Delmer and
Mary Paulsen move Darren and
Jackie and family of Belle
Fourche to Rapid City, where they
are relocating for their new jobs.
Pat Peters of Lead, also came to
help.
Mary Paulsen’s youngest sister,
Lucille, and her friend are arriv-
ing this Monday evening for a
visit. This friend has never been
to South Dakota.
Well people, that’s all this time.
It’s one of those days. I can’t find
what I’m looking for and I’m run-
ning out of time.
Thought: Steal the mind, soften
the heart and satisfy the soul Let
your heart guide you, it whispers,
listen closely.
Countryside News
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
August 29th: Patti Melt
w/Frog Eye Salad
August 30th: Super Nachos
Sept. 2nd: CLOSED
Happy Labor Day
Sept. 3rd: Indian Taco
Sept. 4th: BBQ Beef Sandwich
w/Deviled Eggs & Baked Beans
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Coffee Cabin SpeCial:
buy one
Get one
(Of equal or lesser value — with this ad)
279-2023 • Wall, SD
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 4
Labor Day
weekend
events
Labor Day weekend marks the
unofficial end of the summer, and
South Dakota State Parks invite
you to come out and enjoy special
weekend events.
•Southern Hills Triathlon, An-
gostura Recreation Area near Hot
Springs, Aug. 31, at 7 a.m. MDT.
Athletes can participate in a kids’
triathlon, sprint triathlon,
Olympic distance triathlon or
duathlon. Participate as an indi-
vidual or a team. For more infor-
mation, call 605-745-6996.
•Bike Rodeo, Aug. 31, 9:30 a.m.
CDT at North Point Recreation
Area and 11 a.m. CDT at Randall
Creek Recreation Area both near
Pickstown. Saddle up those bikes
and join us for a rip roaring fun
time. For more information, call
605-487-7046.
For more information on the
South Dakota State Parks, please
visit www.gfp.sd.gov or call 605-
773-3391. To learn about park pro-
grams in your area, contact your
local state park office.
Welcome Friends & Neighbors to the…
Huether Family Reunion
Sunday, September 1st
Wall Community Center
Doors open at 9 a.m./Pot Luck dinner at noon
Bring pictures (copier available)/Silent Auction (ends at 3 p.m.)
•Give Away Table •Fun - Chicken Dance/Eat/Visit more
See You next year August 31, 2014/God Bless!
Quinn Horse racing Derby
saturday, september 7, 2013
Starting at 2:00 p.m.
•Horse Races •Children’s Games
•Live Band •Rib Supper
tWo Bit SAloon & SteAkhouSe
“get your Derby Hat on!”
• Save The Date • Save The Date • Save The Date • Save The Date • Save The Date •
SWeet Corn
AppreCiAtion
Free Sweet Corn, you pick your own.
Located just east of the
Steve and Terry McDonnell residence,
north of Wall.
Sponsored by McDonnell Farms
& West river pioneer,
Jan Bielmailer.
For more information call,
Brady McDonnell 303-579-4045
annc@gwtc.net
Rel igious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Mondays: Women’s Bible Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship
Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.;
Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.; Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood • Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood • Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.; Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m.
at Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall • Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
Bc nol dcccìvcd;
God ìs nol mockcd:
lor whalsocvcr a
man sowclh, lhal
shall hc also rcaµ.
Galalìans 6:7 (K)V)
Don't íooí yourseíí. Cod von't be mude íun oí. You cun't puíí the vooí
over hís eyes, und shouíd you try, there vííí be consequences. Consíder
thut the next tíme you treut your spouse uníuíríy, muke íun oí u covorker,
íose your temper ín truíííc or vorse.
Ancíent vísdom íor modern íííe
279-2175
*Narrated in the voice of Har-
rison Ford (Please read it in his
tone)*
Staff Sgt. Tyrell Whitcher of
Hot Springs, S.D., and Airmen
First Class Morrisa Lewis of Col-
orado Springs, Colo., were united
in marriage on the romantic day
of April 26, 2013 in Castle Rock,
Colo.  The wedding and reception
was stunningly beautiful, as were
the happy couple as well. The cou-
ple enjoyed taking many photos
together and sharing in a quite
scrumptious pound cake.  It was
a most joyous event - enjoyed by
all.
Their colors were royal blue,
royal  purple and navy blue.  A
bald headed eagle perched him-
self atop the gazebo during the
ceremony. It was almost as if the
eagle knew that both were indeed
the finest of patriots. The be-wed-
ded enjoyed their first dance to a
nice Josh Gracin melody – “A
Long Way To Go”.    
The maid of honor was Char-
lotte Frisby and the bridesmaid
was Sarah Balboa, dressed in
long, beautiful purple gowns and
stiletto type shoes - no heels fell
casualty. The flower girl was Kyn-
dall Enloe, making quite the im-
pressive fashion statement her-
self. The ring bearer, Jack
Maxwell (age 5), did an outstand-
ing job securing and maintaining
positive control of the ring at all
times. His actions single hand-
edly led to the success of the nup-
tial.
ATS/EMT-B, USN Ret. [Am3
((AW)] R. James Clancey
Whitcher performed duties of best
man. The groomsmen: Sgt. Dillon
Robert Whitcher and USAA re-
tired PFC Mike Norton; all sport-
ing handsome 007 black tuxedos.
The only thing they were missing
was the golden gun and the laser
watch. However, they all had a
few tricks up their sleeves. 
Tyrell is stationed at Camp
Pendleton, Calif., and Morrisa is
stationed at Travis AFB in Calif.
Tyrell brings to the union an un-
canny sense of humor and atti-
tude for success. Tyrell has been
a hero to a many of America's
youth, serving in youth centered
type organizations - the youth
will go on to be the leaders of to-
morrow. Tyrell stands for a drug
free America and leads the charge
against childhood obesity, attack-
ing it on all fronts - pound cake
wasn't served to children under
the age of 14. Mr. Whitcher has
cornered the market and built a
magnanimous portfolio, investing
in the NYSE and NASDAQ mar-
kets. He seems to have a sixth
sense as to the slinging of stocks.
Now Tyrell is not all business, he
breaks a mental sweat daily by
engaging the local kinsfolk in a
quint game of chess.
Morrisa brings different types
of things to the union as well -
doing a great job on the center-
pieces. Morrisa is the proud new
owner of a 2014 Jeep Compass -
surely the portfolio is still bulging
and breaking new records. Mor-
risa works fervently in the ICU
taking care of Air Force personnel
when they seemingly get injured
or ill. She sees more injured pa-
tients in the Air Force because
they are a little bit clumsier than
the other branches, which is good
for her because she is gaining
more experience daily. Ip so facto
she is in contention as being one
of the military's finest medical
personnel. The status quo has
been raised because of her expert-
ise in a technical field. Morrisa
has laid the foundation for mili-
tary medicine. Much like George
Washington laid the cornerstone
on our nations capital, founding a
new government. Morrisa has
laid new cornerstone in the Air
Force hospitals and training pro-
grams.
Morrisa is the daughter of
Jerome and Mary Cay Lewis of
Colorado Springs. Tyrell is the
proud son of Rachel Whitcher of
Hot Springs, and Jim and Ethel
Whitcher of Scenic, S.D. Tyrell
thinks of his parents often and
has invited them all to come and
stay for a couple months. The par-
ents gratefully decline, as they do
not want to be a burden on the
newly unionized couple. I am
quite certain that his folks will
eventually give in to his desires
and indeed show up on his
doorstep with the intent to visit.
Wedding
LABOR DAY
LABOR DAY
We salute every hard-working man and
woman in this country!
In honor of Labor Day,
our offices will be closed.
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
EARLY PROFIT DEADLINE:
Thursday, August 29 • 12:00 NOON
CALL FOR NEWSPAPER DEADLINES:
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Faith Independent: 967-2161
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Badlands Quilters at Ft. Meade
Tuesday, August 20th, the Badlands Quilters delivered six quilts, an afghan and 12 pillowcases, all patriotic
theme, to the Ft. Meade Veterans’ Hospital to be given to veterans in the hospice unit of the hospital. The quilt
tops were made during the Weekend Get-Away, last spring.
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 5
Email your
social news,
obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTION: Do you have any
advice or suggestions for funding
the adoption process? My spouse
and I are seriously considering
adopting a child, but our financial
resources are limited and we un-
derstand that the process can be
quite costly.
ANSWER: Before saying any-
thing else, we want to commend
you on your willingness to open
up your hearts and your home to
a youngster who desperately
needs caring parents. Your desire
to look into this option reflects the
love that Christ has for all chil-
dren.
Since launching our Adoption &
Orphan Care Initiative™ we’ve
been aware that there are many
couples who want to adopt but are
inhibited by the costs involved.
One of our goals has been to pro-
vide as much information as we
can about the financial aspects of
the process in an effort to help
these prospective parents reach
their goal. We have also made it
our mission to recruit adoptive
families for legal orphans who are
awaiting adoption in the foster
care system. We see this as an ex-
cellent way to circumvent the fi-
nancial challenge, inasmuch as
adoption from foster care costs
virtually nothing.
If you’d like to discuss your
plans with a member of our staff,
feel free to call Focus on the Fam-
ily’s Counseling Department. You
can contact our counselors Mon-
day through Friday between 6:00
a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Mountain-time
at 855-771-HELP (4357). They’ll
be more than happy to help you in
any way they can.
QUESTION: Can you provide
my spouse and me with any guid-
ance or suggest any resources as
we begin the adoption process?
ANSWER: You’re to be com-
mended on your willingness to
open up your hearts and home to
a youngster who desperately
needs caring parents. Your desire
to look into this option reflects the
love that Christ has for all chil-
dren.
The plight of the orphan is one
that is near and dear to us here at
Focus on the Family. All believers
are called to defend and care for
the fatherless (Isaiah 1:17 and
James 1:27), and, as you may
know, as part of our own efforts to
be true to this command our min-
istry has recently launched our
Adoption & Orphan Care Initia-
tive™. This arm of our outreach
is committed to raising awareness
about this subject and to urging
more Christians to become in-
volved. With more than 100,000
children currently waiting to be
adopted here in the United States
and over 150 million orphans
worldwide, it’s clear that God’s
people have an opportunity to
take a more active role in making
a difference in these precious
lives.
For more details, we’d encour-
age you to take a look at our
Adoption & Orphan Care Initia-
tive™ website. Along with infor-
mation about today’s orphan cri-
sis, the site offers advice specifi-
cally for those families who are
considering adoption. You may
also want to take a look at the re-
source list on adoption referenced
below.
Furthermore, you may wish to
visit the Loving Shepherd Min-
istries website and complete the
family profile under the “Adop-
tion Services” tab. After doing so,
you will be sent a packet of infor-
mation on the various adoption
opportunities your family might
wish to pursue (some countries
have limits based on family size,
age of parents, income, etc.). This
organization has also compiled a
great deal of research on agencies
throughout the U.S. and can help
you connect with one in your area.
NoTIce
Wall Drug Pharmacy
will be closed
Monday, September 2nd
in observance of
Labor Day
We will resume our regular
hours Tuesday, September 3rd.
Area News
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 6
South Dakota’s Fair Tradition
Fair season is here and it’s
come faster than we all imagined.
Our kids are already hauling
themselves back to school and hit-
ting the books, and we’re all try-
ing to squeeze just a little bit
more of summer out of each day.
Many families across South
Dakota, including mine, are also
flocking to the local fair for a day
or evening full of rides and deli-
cious food.
Our state’s fair tradition re-
minds me how lucky I am to call
South Dakota home. These fairs
have become much more than a
night out with family and friends.
Kids from all around our state
showcase their talents through
cattle shows, baked goods and
roping competitions.
Bryon and I take our three
kids, Kassidy, Kennedy and
Booker, out to taste test, cheer on
riders and walk through the live-
stock barns. I continue to be
amazed by the hard work and
dedication that some of our kids
put into raising and showing their
animals. It is a wonderful display
of our state culture and commu-
nity.
Fairs also give us a unique op-
portunity to reconnect with South
Dakotans from all walks of life.
Just the other day, I was remem-
bering the many nights Bryon
and I walked cattle around the
State Fairgrounds in Huron in
Winter Wheat Variety
Testing Results
The winter wheat variety test-
ing results is a document highly
anticipated by winter wheat
growers each year.
The results are certainly late in
2013, due to much of the wheat
not emerging or even germinating
until spring, and a cool and rainy
spring and summer in many
parts of the state. Harvesting the
variety plots was delayed as was
the harvest for many producers.
As of this writing, not all of the
results have been compiled, nor
updates to the recommended, ac-
ceptable and promising lists. A
temporary publication including
what plots have been analyzed is
available online at: http://igrow.o
rg/agronomy/profit-tips/variety-
trial-results/, and at the SDSU
Regional Extension Centers.
The publication also includes
the agronomic characteristics
the middle of the night, allowing
the cattle to release some pent-up
energy from the day’s show.
Sometimes, these moments feel
like they just happened yesterday
and they are so special to me,
which is why I will continue to
bring my family out to some of the
best gatherings our state has to
offer.
I was recently in Rapid City for
the Central States Fair and had a
great day meeting and talking
with folks from all across the
state.
My daughter, Kassidy, came
along with me and we enjoyed
making new friends, sampling
some good food on the midway,
and good entertainment at the
rodeo that evening.
If you haven’t had the opportu-
nity to make a trip to a fair this
year, I hope you’ll consider joining
me at the South Dakota State
Fair in Huron on Friday, August
30th. I’ll be hosting a town hall at
the Women’s Building with House
Agriculture Committee Chairman
Frank Lucas at 11:00 a.m. CDT
and would love to hear what’s on
your mind.
No matter which county or local
fair is in your area, all fairs pres-
ent a unique opportunity to create
lasting memories with friends,
family and the entire South
Dakota community. I hope to see
you at a South Dakota fair some-
time soon.
that are so important in choosing
varieties to plant such as lodging
resistance, winterhardiness, test
weight, protein content and dis-
ease resistance.
As additional information be-
comes available, the online publi-
cation will be updated as quickly
as possible.
* * * * *
Certified Seed Grower
Directory
Another important document
for winter wheat growers is the
current “Summer Edition” of the
Certified Seed Grower Directory.
Paper copies have been mailed
to SDSU Regional Extension Cen-
ters, and it is typically posted on
the South Dakota Crop Improve-
ment Association and Seed Certi-
fication website at: http://www.sd-
state.edu/ps/sdcia/grower-direc-
tory.cfm.
The Certified Seed Grower Di-
rectory includes growers who
have fields planted with Founda-
tion or Registered seed and who
have made application for certifi-
cation.
All fields listed in the directory
have passed all inspections to
date. In order to be finally certi-
fied, all seed must pass all labora-
tory analysis conducted on repre-
sentative samples of the condi-
tioned (cleaned) seed lot.
* * * * *
Challenges in Harvesting
The 2013 small grain harvest
has been challenging in many
areas of the state due to wet
weather and weeds growing in
the crop because of it.
As is the case for many situa-
tions in the farming business,
having a plan in place should var-
ious circumstances occur can help
make important decisions.
Although the opportunity to
make and implement plans that
would have helped for this har-
vest is past, the 2013 harvest sea-
son was a learning experience.
When weeds begin showing up
in a crop that is mature, or nearly
so; and wet weather is delaying
harvest, a harvest aid herbicide
application may be warranted.
If weather limits the time when
conditions allow harvesting to be
accomplished, incurring the addi-
tional expense of hiring custom
operators to help, and/or harvest-
ing the crop a little wet and pay-
ing drying costs may pay in the
end.
When one considers the lost in-
come due to discounts for reduc-
tions in test weight, high levels of
dockage, shattering, etc., spend-
ing additional money to get the
crop harvested and in good condi-
tion may be well justified.
Extension
by Bob Fanning, Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Pennington County Emergency
Management has committed to
participate in National Prepared-
ness to increase preparedness
throughout the U.S.
The event, now in its ninth
year, is a nationwide, month-long
effort hosted by the Ready Cam-
paign and Citizen Corps, encour-
aging households, businesses and
communities to prepare and plan
for emergencies.
Pennington County Emergency
Management along with other
partnering agencies is hosting the
5th Annual Disaster Awareness
and Safety Day.
One of NPM’s key messages is:
be prepared in the event an emer-
gency causes you to be self-reliant
for three days without utilities
and electricity, water service, ac-
cess to a supermarket or local
services, or maybe even without
response from police, fire or res-
cue.
Preparing can start with four
important steps:
•Be informed about emergen-
cies that could happen in your
community, and identify sources
of information in your community
that will be helpful before, during
and after an emergency
•Make a plan for what to do in
an emergency
•Build an emergency supply kit
•Get involved.
Preparedness is a shared re-
sponsibility; it takes a whole com-
munity. This year’s National Pre-
paredness Month focuses on turn-
ing awareness into action by en-
couraging all individuals and the
community to make an emer-
gency preparedness plan.
Police, fire and rescue may not
always be able to reach you
quickly, such as if trees and power
lines are down or if they're over-
whelmed by demand from an
emergency. The most important
step you can take in helping your
local responders is being able to
take care of yourself and those in
your care; the more people who
are prepared, the quicker the
community will recover.
Join us in Rapid City on Satur-
day, September 7, 10-3pm for our
September is National
Preparedness Month (NPM)
5th annual Disaster Awareness
and Safety Day at Rushmore
Mall. Visit agencies inside the
mall and outside in the parking
lot:
•Learn how to make a plan,
build a kit and get involved
•See Emergency Vehicles and
how responders are ready for dis-
asters
•RC Fire Department Live
Burn Sprinkler Demonstration,
10:30 a.m.
•NWS Tornado Machine and
Flood Model, all day EAFB Sept.
11 Ruck March conclusion, 12
noon
•See Urban Search and Rescue
Demonstrations, all day
•BH Power Electric Safety
Demonstration, all day
•FREE Comprehensive Child
Identification Kits – SDCHIP, 10-
4 p.m.
•See Amateur Radio Demon-
strations, all day
•Rapid City Police Dept. K-9
Demonstration, 2 p.m.
•Learn how to prepare for your
pet before disaster strikes from
the Black Hills Humane Society
•Learn tips on Self-Defense
from Enhanced Martial Arts
•FREE visits with Sparky the
Fire Dog
•FREE visits with Smokey
Bear
•Learn recycling tips and how
to dispose of hazardous items
from your home
•Learn scooter safety tips
•Enter to win FREE swim les-
sons from the Rapid City Swim
Center
•Enjoy FREE hot dogs while
you look around
•And much, much more!
Visit rcpcem.com for more in-
formation.
This event sponsored by South
Dakota Citizen Corps Council.
National Preparedness Month is
sponsored by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Homeland Security’s
Ready Campaign. www.ready.gov
Additional resources available
at rcpcem.comhomesafetycoun-
cil.orgbReadysd.comfema.go-
vareyouready/
Email us with your news item or photo to courant@gwtc.net
Black Hills visitors with physi-
cal limitations have an opportu-
nity to view the Mickelson Trail
on Tuesday, Sept. 3, and Wednes-
day, Sept. 11.
The trolley leaves the Dead-
wood Trailhead at 1 p.m. MDT on
Sept. 3 and travels the Mickelson
Trail from Englewood to
Rochford. To reserve a spot, con-
tact NeighborWorks at 605-578-
1401.
At 10 a.m. MDT on Sept. 11, the
trolley will leave the Hill City
Trailhead and travel to Mystic.
Contact the Hill City Chamber at
605-574-2368 to sign up for that
ride.
Riders will learn about the his-
tory of the former railroad line
and the inception of the trail. The
rides are about four hours long.
“We are pleased to offer these
trolley rides, so people with phys-
Trolley rides allow those with
physical limitations to
experience the Mickelson Trail
ical limitations can get out and
experience the Mickelson Trail,”
said Dana Garry, park manager.
“Everyone has a wonderful time
and learns a little about the trail.”
Reservations are required.
Each person reserving a space on
the trolley will be required to
have a handicapped parking per-
mit. One assistant is allowed to
accompany the person, if needed.
The trolley has space available for
up to two people who use wheel-
chairs.
The trolley rides are a com-
bined effort of the Hill City and
Deadwood Chambers of Com-
merce, Deadwood Neighbor-
Works, South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Department and the
City of Deadwood.
For more information, contact
the Mickelson Trail office at 605-
584-3896.
80 years ago…
The Wall School District was
enlarged last week by the addi-
tion of a quarter section belonging
to Phil Johnston that formerly
was in the Quinn school district.
The presidents of the school dis-
tricts and the County Superin-
tendent met in Quinn, Saturday,
to decide upon the application
which was made by Phil John-
ston.
Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Johnston
and their son, George and his wife
escaped serious injury in a colli-
sion on the highway a short ways
from town Sunday night. They
were returning from Rapid City
when they were run into by an old
model car driven by a party from
Montana and containing six other
men from New Underwood. Mr.
and Mrs. E. S. Johnston were
rushed into Dr. Mills where their
injuries were dressed. They each
received cuts on the head and face
and bruises on the body. The
other occupants of the two cars
escaped with scarcely a scratch.
The cars were badly wrecked, and
either may be had for practically
a song. Drunkeness on the part of
the occupants of the Underwood
car is said to be the cause of the
accident. No action, however,
states George Johnston, will be
brought against them.
70 years ago…
Fire destroyed the home and all
of the household furnishings of
Linden Bamsey, Monday morning
at the Edwin Sieler place, 15
miles north of Quinn. The fire oc-
curred about nine o’clock and
started from a defective flue as
Mrs. Bamsey started a fire to
heat some water for her baby’s
bath. The smoke was so dense
that she was unable to save any
of their personal effects. The men
folks were in the field and rushed
to the house when they saw the
smoke. They were too late to do
anything except watch it burn. In
twenty minutes, Linden stated,
the place was nothing but ashes.
Mrs. Bamsey and their two chil-
dren are staying with her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Karl Lurz,
while they are making arrange-
ments for other living quarters,
household equipment, clothing
and even rationing books.
New Underwood August 9:
Lightning set fire to pasture land
and freshly mown but unstacked
hay on the Bob Ray ranch north
of New Underwood, Saturday
night. The fire burnt a stretch of
prairie nearly fifteen miles long
and approximately 2 1/2 miles
wide before local farmers assisted
by soldiers from the Rapid City
army airbase were able to extin-
guish it. Damage was confined to
the pasture land and mown hay.
Claudette Cobert and Joel Mc-
Crea star in the Riata Theatre’s
picture for this weekend, “The
Palm Beach Story”. Mary Astor
and Ruby Vallee have active leads
in the play.
60 years ago…
Hustead’s long awaited swim-
ming pool is finally completed.
The Drug Store help began swim-
ming in the beautiful new pool on
Saturday afternoon, as soon as it
had been filled. The pool is in an
oval shape with one half shallow
and the other half deep for the
purpose of diving. At the deep end
is built a diving board which
throws the diver three to four feet
into the air. The pool is built of ce-
ment block with a high fence
around it to keep the small kids
from falling in. The water in the
pool is kept circulating by the use
of a pump and filter system. The
dimensions of the pool are 24’ x
35’ with the deepest part about
nine feet. This unique pool is lo-
cated directly behind Hustead’s’
house which makes it easily ac-
cessible for the Drug Store em-
ployees.
Joan Tennyson, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Olaf Tennyson of Quinn
and Donald Paulsen, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ben Paulsen of Quinn,
were united in marriage Sunday,
August 26 at the Methodist
Church with Rev. Holman
Cowherd officiating. Attending
her sister as bridesmaid was Mar-
lene Tennyson and Delmar
Paulsen served his brother as
best man. The bride has been em-
ployed at the Bank and the groom
is employed at the WREA.
Delbert Sebade had announced
that the Quinn Bank will close on
August 1 and accounts will be
transferred to the Wall Branch of
Underwood State Bank. Mr. Se-
bade will act as cashier in the
Wall Bank until September 1,
when he will move to New Under-
wood and be cashier at the Bank
there.
At a regular Thursday sale of
the Philip Livestock Auction on
July 30, there were consigned 742
head of cattle, 114 head of hogs
and 194 head of sheep. Cattle
prices were up over the week be-
fore with plenty of buyers on hand
for all classes of cattle and bid-
ding very brisk. Two year old
steers brought up to $19.00 per
hundred with the heifers bringing
$17.50. There were yearling
steers that sold for $18.00 and the
yearling heifers topped at $16.80.
Good dry cows brought up to
$12.80 per hundred pounds. A
general decline in hog price over
the whole country was reflected
in this sale Thursday with the top
price on butchers being $23.80.
Sows sold as high as $20.25 and
some feeder pigs brought $26.40.
50 years ago…
The show for this weekend at
the Riata Theatre is a Walt Dis-
ney picture, “In Search of the
Castaways” staring Maurice
Chevalier, Harley Mills, George
Sanders and Winifred White.
The Circle K Golf Course of Jim
Kjerstad’s, north of Quinn, was
opened for play Saturday. The
course is entirely new, and will
take considerable use to smooth
rough spots. However, the fair-
ways were in good enough shap
that balls could be spotted easily.
Winter rules gave players the
privilege to move their balls for
driving. The course is five miles
on the oiled road north of Quinn.
The fairways double back along
the lane leading to the Kjerstad
home. One green is high on a flat-
tened knoll while another is
around the corner of a small farm
pond. And another lies at the edge
of the timbered creek bed. Tenta-
tive fees are as follows: annual
members fee, $35 for men, $15 for
ladies and $10 for children. One
round play 50¢; rental equip-
ment, bags and clubs 50¢; cart
35¢.
The City Council did right in re-
fusing to change the closing time
of liquor establishments from
midnight to 1:00 a.m. The council
members were apparently think-
ing of the public at large when
they refused to budge in spite of
repeated agitation of business in-
terest. A 1:00 o’clock closing time
would simply mean the extending
of the time to listen to screeching
brakes, loud mail voices and gig-
gling women. Folks at home, and
that doesn’t mean Main Street,
want peace and quiet during the
wee hours of the morning. The
last session of the legislature
were swayed by the urging of the
liquor interest and passed the law
making 1:00 rather than 12:00
midnight as legal closing.
40 years ago…
A man-hunt searched the Bad-
lands near Cedar Pass Saturday
afternoon for one of the two es-
caped reformatory boys. Involved
in the search were the Jackson
Co. Sheriff, the Highway Patrol
and the Badlands Rangers. Two
17-year old juveniles escaped
from the Reformatory at Red-
wing, Minn. They stole a car in
Minnesota and stole another in
Belvidere. The South Dakota
highway Patrol chased them into
the Badlands and forced them off
the road. One of them surren-
dered immediately. The other
took off running right over the
cliff at the overlook. A search
team was organized including the
helicopter that gives Scenic rides
over the Badlands. That evening
the searchers were patrolling the
roads expecting the boy would
come out and try to get a ride.
Sure enough he did at 9:30. The
boy flagged down the unmarked
car in which the chief ranger of
the Monument was riding. When
the boy looked in the car and saw
the uniforms and badges, he took
off again. Larry Hanneman gave
chase and caught him.
Three hundred thirty-six stu-
dents at Western Iowa Tech re-
ceived graduation diplomas and
degrees August 3 at commence-
ment exercises in Sioux City Mu-
nicipal Auditorium, Sioux City,
Iowa. Among the graduates re-
ceiving a degree in Livestock
Management was Darwin D.
Haerer of Wall, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Wayne F. Haerer.
Mrs. LaVonne Smith an-
nounces the engagement of her
daughter Lori Lenette, to Harlan
Walker, son of Mr. and Mrs.
William Walker of Scenic. Miss
Smith graduated from Wall High
School, and is presently a senior
at South Dakota State University
in Brookings. Lori will graduate
in May with a double major in
Psychology and Child Develop-
ment. Her finance graduated
from Wall High School and is a
rancher south of Wall. A June
1974 wedding is planned.
30 years ago…
With the arrival of the Rev.
Norman Anderson, his wife Fay,
and their daughters Elizabeth, 3
and Amy, 1, the Evangelical Free
Bible Church in Wall again has a
full time minister. Anderson
began his pastorate in Wall with
a Sunday Worship Service on July
24.
The G&W Hot Dogs surprised
the Hairraisers Wednesday, Au-
gust 3, with a come-from-behind
7-6 victory after trailing early in
the game 6-1. With the victory
came the Wall Women’s Softball
League title, as the Hot Dogs won
the league by one game over the
Hairraisers and two games over
Different Strokes. The big blow
for the Hot Dogs, who trailed 6-4
going into the last inning, was a
three-run double in the seventh
inning by Brenda Carmichael.
The Hot Dogs were coached by
Gene Willuweit and Lyle
Carmichael.
Bud and Dorothy Fortune along
with Bill and Grace Pippert an-
nounce the marriage of Wanda
and Scott on August 17, 1983.
20 years ago…
It was a grueling game, moth-
ers pitted against their daugh-
ters. It took over two hours to
complete a seven inning game.
But the girls triumphed with a
29-14 win against their mothers.
The Wall Teeners won the Dis-
trict 4B Championship at Edge-
mont, July 27. In the first game it
was Wall over Edgemont, 15-5. In
the second game, Wall again de-
feated Edgemont with a score of
13-12. The first game of the re-
gions is at Burke and the second
game will be at Wall.
Evan Deutscher, Wall, was the
winner in the 13-21 division of the
talent contest held during Philip
Festival Days. He will represent
the Philip area at the South
Dakota State Fair. Talent Win-
ners included: 0-8 Chancy and
Cassidy Smith; 9-12: Brothers
and Sisters in Christ; and 21 and
over: Steve Olivier.
The Pinnacles Ranger Station
was robbed of an undisclosed
amount of money at approxi-
mately 8:30 p.m. Saturday, ac-
cording to Chief Ranger John
Donaldson, Badlands National
Park. Donaldson said a male indi-
vidual, dressed in black and wear-
ing a black mask, knocked at the
door of the Ranger Station. The
people at the Ranger Station at
the time thought it was a visitor
and opened the door. There was
no weapon visible, but the male
had his hand in his pocket and de-
manded money. The only descrip-
tion of the suspect is that he is of
medium height and medium
build. There are no suspects in
the case. The robbery is being in-
vestigated by the Park Service,
Pennington County Sheriff ’s De-
partment, and the Federal Bu-
reau of Investigation.
10 years ago…
Stacey Slama and Dean Schulz
were united in marriage June 7,
2003, at the Vodnany Catholic
Church in Scotland, with Father
David Stevens officiating. Par-
ents of the couple are John and
Margie Slama of Tyndall and
Tony and Holly Schulz of Wall.
BIRTH: Born July 18, 2003 to
Mike and Anita Heathershaw of
Quinn, a son, Malcolm Lewis. Lit-
tle Malcolm weighed 7 lbs. 4 oz.
and measured 19 inches long. He
joins a sister Ashley. Proud grand-
parents are Milton and Twila
Trask of Quinn, and Charles
Heathershaw, of Interior.
Stepping aside temporarily as
Mayor, Dave Hahn asked the
Wall City Council, led by Council
Vice-President Rick Hustead, to
declare approximately three-
quarters of an acre of airport
property as surplus. Hahn stated,
he wished to purchased the prop-
erty to construct an airplane
hangar and workshop area. He
stated, he knows of two airplanes
that would be stored in Wall if a
hangar area was available. One is
in Sturgis and one in Philip.
Later in the discussion he admit-
ted the plane in Sturgis belongs to
him. Hahn is the airport man-
ager, a job he does with no pay. He
stated the cities of Sturgis and
Belle Fourche pay an airport
manager $15,000 annually. He
stated, he mows the land and
maintains the roads.
The looking Glass of Time
Over the years I have set many
goals that I did not even come
close to achieving within the time
frames that I had established.
There have been many times
when I have missed the goal by a
million miles (or so it seems) and
felt like such a failure. Can any-
one relate?
Yet, in nearly every aspect of my
life and business, I have always
had a totally optimistic perspec-
tive-one that some have called a
bit over zealous-and at the same
time, I am also what I consider to
be realistic, balanced, down to
earth, and practical.
Optimism is a great thing. In
fact, I have set and achieved hun-
dreds of "optimistic" goals over the
years, and boy am I ever glad I
did! Those over zealous goals are
what have caused me to stretch
and reach higher than I ever
thought possible, enabling me to
live a life full of joy, success, and
much happiness.
How do you go about setting op-
timistic, yet realistic goals? Well,
first of all, you need to establish
your minimum acceptable stan-
dard. This will probably be some-
thing you consider to be somewhat
easy to reach. Next, you need to
consider taking that minimum ac-
ceptable standard and stretching
it way up and out there into that
over zealous place-what may even
seem higher than possible to you
right now-and begin to write down
some timetables and standards.
Be honest in your assessment of
how long it will take you to
achieve your goal.
Now, put your efforts, time,
tenacity, and commitment into
aiming at the over zealous and
you will end up in just the right
place at the right time. You never
need to be discouraged, if you
don't reach your over zealous goal,
because you will always end up
some place well above your mini-
mum standard-what I like to refer
to as the real world-and that
makes you a success!
Real World Goals
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly mo-
tivational seminars each year.
Call Bob for more details at
800-437-9715 and be sure to
check out Bob’s website at:
www.mrattitudespeaks.com
Time to consider a home in Wasta! ----very economical to
heat & cool ~ Low taxes ~ Just o I-90 & only 40 mi. to
Rapid City, or 12 mi. to Wall. Excellent, well-known city
water, which comes from a spring!
• Well-kept 16x80 Chief II Mobile Home w/ Spacious
Open Floor Plan
• 6 inch Sidewalls ~ well-insulated ~ New ermal Pane
Windows & Doors 5 yr. ago ~ 3 ceiling fans ~ Plus,
roomy 18 . Entry/Mudroom
• 3 Bedrooms & 2 Full Bathrooms, 1 with Garden Tub
• Includes Appliances: gas stove (5 yr old), newer Amana
Refrig w/Freezer on bottom & Amana Dishwasher
• LP Furnace ~ Plus outside Wood Furnace which feeds
all ductwork. (is furnace is capable of heating the en-
tire house, using little or no LP.) Includes 500 gal. LP
tank, just lled
• Central Air ~ City Spring Water ~ City Sewer
• Insulated, attractive, well-lit 24 x 40 Steel Garage/
Shop w/elec overhead door ~ LP Furnace ~ Electric-
ity, both 110 & 220, plus welding port
• Beautiful Yard ~ Flowers ~ Garden ~ 3 Producing
Apple Trees planted in 1997 ~ Cottonwood ~ Silver
Maple ~ Cedars ~ Lilacs ~ Clothesline ~ Yard Hydrant
~ Front & Back Decks
• 2 Lots: 100 x 140 ~ Pleasant Neighborhood
• Taxes: $540.36 last year
• Access from several directions ~ City Street Light at
corner of Shop ~ Good Home or could be a Rental
is is an ideal property in Wasta. Shop would hold up to
4 vehicles & could be part of a hometown business. With 2
lots right on corner, plenty of space for additional building. Mobile home is in very good shape. However, could be
easily moved, as Wheels & Axles are under Home.
Property absolutely sells to highest bidder without minimum or reserve!
^^^ LEGAL: Lots 1 and 2, of Block 2, Wasta, Pennington County
Terms: 20% down Auction Day w/closing within 30 days. Auctioneers represent the Seller.
Showings: Mondays, Aug. 26 from 5-6 pm & Sept. 2 from 3 - 4 pm
or by appointment---Please call auctioneers.
Owner: Carl Humphrey
More photos & info at www.PiroutekAuction.com or www.ArnesonAuction.com
Rome & 8hop on 2 corner Lots
Wasta, 80
AB80L01E A0c1l0N
Wed. 8ept. 11, 2013 ^ 6 pm M1
Exit 99 on I-90, then at 25
A Street in Wasta, SD
(corner of Pine & A St.)
(Former home of Carl Humphrey.
Carl has only recently moved to Philip.)
>>>>>>>Move-In-Ready<<<<<<<<
llkê|IlK 1||IlêK älk\l|l 1kKläêK 1||IlêK älk\l|l
Dan Piroutek · 605-544-3316 Lonnie Arneson · 605-798-2525
R.E. Auctioneer #282 R.E. Auctioneer #11296
Murdo 0entaI CIInIc
Announces the addItIon of
0r. Aaron ßumpca to famIIy
dentaI practIce, joInIng
0r. JIm 5zana
Lcntistry for thc wholc family, including orthodontics
Acccpts Ncdicaid and othcr dcntal insuranccs
Call to make an appointment witb Dr. Rompca today!
609 Garficld Avcnuc - 60ô-669-2131 - 60ô-222-29ô2
Cpen Toesday - Tborsday and Fridays doring scbool year
Murdo 0entaI, LLC
Winter Wheat SeeD
For SaLe
•SY Wolf (Heavy Residue Champion)
•AP503 CL2 (The Oringinal 2-Gene Clearfield)
Also ask us about treating seed with
Cruiser Maxx Cereals.
Yardley & Co., Inc.
Rick Johnson -386-2375
State Seed Permit SP-14682
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast and
Lunch Menu
September 3 to
September 11, 2013
No Breakfast will be served
the first week of School.
Tuesday: Lunch: Steam-
burger, Baked Beans Baby
Carrots, Fresh Fruit Salad,
Milk.
Wednesday: Lunch:
Chicken Fajita w/Cheese &
Lettuce, Black Beans, Corn,
Banana, Milk.
Thursday: Lunch: Goulash,
Lettuce Salad, Mixed Veggies,
Apple, Roll, Milk.
Friday: Tator Tot Hot Dish,
Green Beans, Pears, Roll, Milk.
Monday: Breakfast: Pan-
cake, Sausage, Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Stromboli, Cucum-
ber/Carrots, Orange, Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast: Cereal,
Cheese Stick, Orange, Milk or
Juice.
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Lettuce, Salad, Roll, Apple,
Milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast:
Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Apple,
Milk or Juice.
Lunch: Spanish Rice w/Ham-
burger, Refried/Black Beans,
Mixed Fruit, Milk.
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 7
Cl assifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
for all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FarM & raNcH
FOR SALE: 14.3h 13-year-old
paint gelding. Done it all! Kid/
older person safe. Cowy with
handle. 441-9468. PR1-tfn
FOR SALE: 1999 Travelong 20
ft. gooseneck stock trailer, good
condition, good tires, $3,000
OBO. Call 441-9468, Kadoka.
P37-3tc
WANTED TO CUT: Alfalfa seed
on shares. Call Larry Schell,
279-2236 or 685-3933.
PW38-4tc
FOR SALE: Pullets, $10 each.
Diane McDaniel, 859-2732.
P37-2tp
FOR SALE; Peas & oat hay. Call
Mike at 685-3068. P37-tfn
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
autoMotive
FOR SALE: 2004 Chevy 1500
Ext. Cab, 4x4, like new inside
and out, 46K miles. Located at
Midland. Please call 484-1898.
P38-1tp
BusiNess & service
BUSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
lost & FouNd
LOST: Blue Sony Cybershot
camera possibly in a black with
red trim case. Most likely lost at
Wall City Park on 7/20/13 be-
tween the jungle gyms and park-
ing south of the football field.
400+ pics on the memory card
including newborn-8 mo. pics of
our youngest son which have not
been printed, our other son who
is very blond, my sister's senior
pics (Gerri) and ending with our
recent trip to Wall Drug. If lo-
cated, please call 430-0613 or
email sjlaurenz_dc@hotmail.
com. P35-4tc
GaraGe sales
GARAGE SALE: Wed., Sept. 11,
5-7 p.m.; Thurs., Sept. 12, 8
a.m. - 2 p.m., 707 Dorothy
Street, Wall, in garage behind
the house. Lots of clothes and
misc., size 4 boys clothes, girls
clothes size 4 and under, boys
clothes size 10/12, toys, cook-
books, Princess House crystal,
loft bed, hardwood rocker and
much more. WP1-2tc
GARAGE SALE: friday, Sept. 6,
& Sat., Sept. 7, 9 am to 6 pm,
915 7th Ave., Kadoka. Lawn
mower, kitchen tables, twin bed,
kitchen & shop items & much
more. P39-1tp
HelP WaNted
PART-TIME PRESSROOM
HELP WANTED: Monday and
Wednesday mornings (3-4 hours
each day). Will train the right
person. Call Beau Ravellette,
859-2516, for more details.
PR1-tfn
HELP WANTED: full- or part-
time position for cashier or cook,
all shifts. Wages DOE. Apply at
Kadoka Gas & Go. K38-2tc
FALL HELP NEEDED: full or
part-time for September & Octo-
ber, Badlands Trading Post.
flexible hours & scheduling –
competitive wages – gas dis-
count. Contact Heidi, 433-5411.
PR52-3tc
HELP WANTED: full-time posi-
tion at Jones’ Saddlery, Bottle &
Vet, Philip. 859-2482.
PR52-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cedar Pass
Lodge, in the scenic Badlands
has immediate openings for the
2nd half of our season! We have
immediate openings for hard
working staff in the Reserva-
tions/front desk agent, Cooks,
Kitchen Help, and Dining Room
Staff. Customer service is a pri-
ority in all our departments! If
you are energetic, reliable, hard-
working, enthusiastic, friendly
individual and ready to work …
come join our team. Applications
are available at cedarpasslodge.
com or contact Sharon at 433-
5460 or 433-5562.
P37-2tc
CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tion, benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Nikki, 837-2270.
K34-tfn
RN/LPN POSITION: Seeking
loving & patient geriatric nurse.
Benefits available. Contact Heidi
or Nikki, 837-2270. K34-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff position(s)
are available for Aw! Shucks
Café opening soon at 909 Main
Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K33-tfn
AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping, laundry and
maintenance. Call Joseph at
279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
HOUSEKEEPERS AND LAUN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED:
High school and college students
are welcome to apply. Will train.
Apply at either America’s Best
Value Inn and Budget Host Sun-
downer in Kadoka or call 837-
2188 or 837-2296. K26-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax resumé
to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
Misc. For sale
FOR SALE: 1986 Yamaha mo-
torcycle, gas stove, refrigerator,
table and chairs. (4) kittens to
give away. Call Kolette Struble,
441-1909.
K38-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
Notices/WaNted
VENDORS WANTED for Philip’s
annual Craft Show, to be held
Saturday, September 28th.
Call Julie at 441-9305 for more
information. P38-4tc
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm ma-
chinery and junk cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. P36-4tp
Pets/suPPlies
FOR SALE: AKC German Wire-
hair Pointers, born June 11,
2013. first shots, wormed, mi-
crochip implant, AKC documen-
tation. (5) females, (1) male.
$500. 808-895-9041, Milesville.
P36-4tp
real estate
HOME FOR SALE IN PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new roof,
windows, siding, high efficiency
heat/air with heat pump, on-de-
mand hot water, nice propane
fireplace, nice backyard, deck
and more. Would consider con-
tract for deed. Contact for show-
ing: Don or Tami Ravellette, 685-
5147 (cell) or 859-2969 (home).
P27-tfn
reNtals
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
classiFied Policy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
AUCTIONS
BLACK HILLS – DEERfIELD LAKE
area Absolute Auction September 18.
Beautiful home & barn on 7.2 acres,
perfect retreat or horse property. See
on www.bradeenauction. com Ph:
605-673-2629.
EMPLOYMENT
DIRECTOR AND/OR OffICE MAN-
AGER WANTED: Good with people
and organization. Knowledge in
budgeting, grant applications, book-
keeping. Send resume or write for ap-
plication to:
chris_arrow@sdplains.com or Arrow
Transit, 111 4th St. W., Lemmon, S.
Dak.
APPLICATIONS fOR POLICE OffI-
CER. Closing date: 9/6/13. Call 605-
234-4401 or send resume: Chamber-
lain Police, 715 N Main Street, Cham-
berlain, SD 57325. full benefit pack-
age. EOE.
SHOP fOREMAN SOUGHT by multi-
store John Deere dealership opera-
tion. Position currently open at Potter
County Implement, Gettysburg, SD;
a part of C&B Operations, LLC. Ap-
plicants should possess good organi-
zational skills and the ability to man-
age farm equipment service person-
nel in a growth oriented dealership.
We offer progressive marketing plans,
competitive pay, and a full benefit
package. Please send resume to Ben
Wieseler, store manager, or Jerry
Hericks, service manager, Potter
County Implement, 30965 U.S High-
way 212, Gettysburg, SD 57442, or e-
mail to hericksj@deerequipment.com,
or call Jerry at 605-769-1710.
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Competitive
wages, benefits, training, profit shar-
ing, opportunities for growth, great
culture and innovation. $1,500 Sign
on Bonus available for Service Tech-
nicians. To browse opportunities go
to www.rdoequipment.com. Must
apply online. EEO.
LOOKING fOR AN EXPERIENCED
SALES AGRONOMIST who is willing
to be a part of a team and play a role
in management. Knowledge in plant
nutrition, crop protection and preci-
sion Ag is needed. Call Colby at 605-
772-5543. Howard farmers Coop,
Howard SD.
PARTS SALESPERSON SOUGHT by
multi-store John Deere dealership
operation. Position currently open at
Potter County Implement, Gettys-
burg, SD; a part of C&B Operations,
LLC. Applicants should possess good
knowledge of farm equipment, com-
puter skills, retail selling skills, and
be customer service oriented. We will
train the right person. We offer John
Deere training, competitive pay, full
benefit package, including 401k,
health, and dental plan. Please send
resume to Naomi Hermann, parts
manager, Potter County Implement,
30965 U.S Highway 212, Gettysburg,
SD 57442, or e-mail to hermannn@
deerequipment.com or call Naomi at
605-765-2434.
QUALIfIED SERVICE TECHNICIANS
sought by progressive, multi-store
South Dakota John Deere dealership.
We offer factory training, health in-
surance, dental insurance, life insur-
ance, 401k plan, paid holidays and
vacation days in our benefit package.
Applicants must be able to work in-
dependently and want to progress in
compensation and skill level. Enjoy
low cost of living with great hunting
and fishing! Our very competitive
wage depends on qualifications and
experience. Please send resume to
Jerry Hericks, service manager, Pot-
ter County Implement, 30965 U.S
Highway 212, Gettysburg, SD 57442,
or e-mail to hericksj@deerequip-
ment.com or call Jerry at 605-769-
1710.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will consider
contract for deed. Call Russell Spaid
605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders repre-
senting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner op-
erators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
ApArtMentS
AVAilABle
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 8
WALL CITY
COUNCIL SPECIAL
MEETING
COMMUNITY CENTER MEETING
ROOM
AUGUST 12, 2013 8:00 AM
Members Present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Dan Hauk,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Stan Anderson, Councilman; Jerry
Morgan, Councilman
Lindsey Hildebrand, Chamber/Assistant
FO; Laurie Hindman, Pennington Co.
Courant
Member Absent:
Gale Patterson, Councilman
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve the agenda. Motion car-
ried.
Discussion on the airport runway expan-
sion project included the understanding
that upon completion the FAA will pay for
90% of the project, the state will pay for
5% and the city will pay for the other 5%.
The estimated cost is approximately
$1,500,000 making the city’s portion
$75,000. Set aside in reserves for the
project is $50,000 and the remaining
$25,000 is why the airport committee
asked that the city increase the reserve
fund for 2014 and 2015 to $12,500 for
each year. If the airport runway expan-
sion is not completed, when the next re-
pair cycle for the runway happens, the
runway will in fact be shortened by 500-
600 feet. The decrease would occur be-
cause after Golden West completed their
expansion project, in which they stayed
outside of acceptable parameters set
forth by the FAA. The FAA changed the
parameters so that now the Golden West
building is within the new flight zone.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve Resolution 13-8: Support
of the Airport Runway Expansion Project
with the inclusion of the percentages paid
by each government entity. Motion car-
ried.
Resolution 13-8
Wall Municipal Airport
Runway Extension Project
WHEREAS, the Wall City
Council is totally and com-
pletely in support of the Hard
Surface Runway 12-30 exten-
sion project at the Wall Munici-
pal Airport, and
WHEREAS, the said project
shall be completed on or be-
fore calendar year 2017, and
WHEREAS, the FAA shall
fund 90%, the State shall fund
5%, and the City of Wall shall
fund 5% of this said project,
and
THEREFORE BE IT RE-
SOLVED, this project will be a
tremendous benefit to the City
of Wall, the surrounding areas,
and the State of South Dakota.
Dated this 12th day of August,
2013.
_________________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
______________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Discussion about Dakota Mills expansion
project included a building permit for a
new spur with easement for city drainage.
The spur would allow for train delivery of
fertilizer and space for 10 more cars. Ted
Schulz, of Cetec Engineering has re-
viewed the plans. It is in agreement that
the city would have easements for proper
drainage and will occasionally check in on
the project. Dakota Mills also asked for
an extension of three more years on their
building permit to build two additional bins
that were originally given a variance to
last for three years. Morgan stated that
with the poor grain production from last
year, the project was not feasible in the
given time frame of the permit. It was to
expire this fall.
Motion by Hauk, second by M Anderson
to approve Dakota Mills building permit
for a new spur and that they will work with
Cetec Engineering to assure compliance
of construction and proper easements are
obtained. Motion carried. Morgan ab-
stained.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to approve an extension of two more
years with no further extensions for
Dakota Mill’s building permit to build an
additional two bins. Motion carried. Mor-
gan abstained.
Items for discussion included that the fi-
nance committee would meet the week of
August 19th to discuss the budget.
With no further business the meeting was
adjourned at 8:30 am.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Lindsey Hildebrand,
Assistant Finance Officer
Published August 29, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $62.38.
WASTA TOWN
BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
AUGUST 5, 2013
The Wasta Town Board held their reg-
ular meeting on Monday, August 5, 2013
at the community building. Board Chair-
man Justin Crawford called the meeting
to order at 7:00 pm with board members
Dorreen Skillingstad and Norm Current
present. Persons attending the meeting
were Tammy Green, Ken and Daneene
Skillingstad.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the July 1st minutes as read. Mo-
tion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the financial statement as given.
Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the bills as follows: Justin Craw-
ford, July wages, $27.70; Dorreen
Skillingstad, July wages, $23.09; Norm
Current, July wages, $23.09; Tammy
Green, July wages, $554.10; Carolynn
Anderson, July wages, $272.43; Walker
Refuse, garbage pickup, $620.20;
WREA, electricity, $710.72; Pennington
Co. Courant, publishing, $32.98; Energy
Laboratories, water test, $12.50; Plum-
done Co., chlorine pellets, $122.21;
Warne Chemical, mosquito pellets,
$138.95; EFTPS, payroll tax, $149.18.
Motion carried.
The Flood Plan ordinance was dis-
cussed. There was no public comments
or input received by any of the board
members for or against it. There is still
time before the Town will be excluded
from the Flood Plan and therefore, it was
tabled for now.
Kari Kjerstad was not present to share
whether there was any community inter-
est to have public meetings to update the
ordinances. Therefore the issue was
tabled until Kari could report back on her
research.
The Air conditioner is not working prop-
erly and a new one would be a better op-
tion than trying to repair this one due to
the age of it. Carolynn commented she
might know of a used one that was prob-
ably three years old. Motion by Dorreen,
second by Justin to pursue the used one
if the price was reasonable and to ap-
prove purchasing it before the scheduled
Bingo in the next few weeks. Motion car-
ried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the 1st reading of Ordinance 13-
02; allowing chickens with a maximum of
ten with one rooster and restrictions on
the hours of crowing. Motion carried.
Motion by Justin, second by Dorreen to
approve the tax levy request for $6,137
and the 1st reading on Ordinance 13-03;
2014 Budget. Motion carried.
Norm reported on the workshop he at-
tended in Pierre. He stated they covered
a lot of material, learned a lot and was
well worth the time to attend. He would
also be interested in attending the SDML
conference in October.
Comments were made on the condi-
tion of the streets in town with pot holes.
Carolynn stated the City of Wall was plan-
ning a chip and seal project and would
check on the cost estimate and the option
to piggy back for pricing. Norm will do
some checking as well with another ven-
dor.
The cost for mosquito spraying was
going to be almost $5,000 for a three
month schedule; the pellets will be tried
first.
Carolynn requested moving the Sep-
tember meeting to either the 9th or 10th;
since the first Monday is Labor Day. The
dates will be considered and the date
posted as time nears.
Ken Skillingstad addressed the board
on removing broken City sidewalk on his
property east of the Fire Hall. He would
do the work himself. Motion by Dorreen,
second by Norm to approve his request.
Motion carried.
Skillingstad stated the only access to
that property is through the alley. He
would like to build an approach. He asked
if the town wanted a culvert under the ap-
proach and would the town pay for the
culvert. It was stated by the board that if
he builds the approach he will need to put
a culvert under it and all the expense
would be his.
With all business complete, Justin ad-
journed the meeting at 8:00pm.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
Town of Wasta
Published August 29, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $37.68.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
080156 SW ¼ SE ¼ NW ¼ OF SEC-
TION 18 TOWNSHIP 2 N OR
RANGE 11 E PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
55267). BRENT NELSON, SARAH
NELSON, ANY OCCUPANTS RE-
SIDING AT 110 S MONROE AVE-
NEW UNDERWOOD, SD., EN-
GLEHART ESTATES HOMEOWN-
ERS ASSOC., KNECHT HOME
CENTER, STATE OF SD
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 19th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 29 & September 5,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$29.72.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Neil Tschetter has applied for a Rezone
to rezone .26 acre from General Agricul-
ture District to Suburban Residential Dis-
trict and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use Map from Planned Unit
Development Sensitive to Suburban Res-
idential District located on Lot 10 of Black
Forest Village, Section 22, T1N, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota,
23209 Black Forest Place, in accordance
with Sections 205, 208,and 508 of the
Pennington County zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
20th day of September 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published August 29, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $18.74.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, administrators, heirs,
devisees, or legatees.
090695 LOT B, BLOCKS 70 AND 71
OF MAHONEY ADDITION, CITY
OF RAPID CITY, PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
25199). WELDINE MESTETH,
OCCUPANT(S) RESIDING AT 129
DOOLITTLE ST RC SD, BENEFI-
CIAL SOUTH DAKOTA INC.,AAA
COLLECTIONS INC., CREDIT
COLLECTION BUREAU, CITIFI-
NANCIAL INC., LVNV FUNDING
LLC., ARROW FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES LLC.,
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 19th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 29 & September 5,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$29.72.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Ken and Cory Tomovick have applied for
a Conditional Use Permit to allow for
events of 20 people or less and to allow
for a Vacation Home Rental in a General
Agriculture District located on Lot 1, Bo-
nanza Bar MC 970, Section 12, T1S,
R6E, BHM, Pennington County, South
Dakota, 23632 Strato Bowl Road, in ac-
cordance with Sections 205, 319, and
510 of the Pennington County zoning Or-
dinance.
Gary Schauer has applied for a Condi-
tional Use Permit to allow for a Vacation
Home Rental in a General Agriculture
District located on Part of Sherman Plac-
ers MS #821 and Lot A of Sherman Plac-
ers MS #821, Section 30, T1S, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County, South Dakota,
12490 Old Hill City Road, in accordance
with Sections 205, 319, and 510 of the
Pennington County zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 9th day of September 2013. At this
time, any person interested may appear
and show cause, if there be any, why
such requests should or should not be
granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published August 29, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $19.69.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
090962 LOTS 27 AND 28, BLOCK 4
OF WISE ADDITION, CITY OF
RAPID CITY, PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
34507). DELORES WILLIAM, DE-
LORES WILLIAM ESTATE,
GEORGE R. WILLIAMS, FRAN-
CIS G. WILLIAMS ESTATE,
DONNA M. HILTON, MARY F.
WILLIAMS, JACK G. WILLIAMS,
OCCUPANT 220 E JACKSON ST,
RAPID CITY SD.
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 12th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 22 & 29, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $29.11.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
090382 LOT 4 IN BLK 4 OF THUN-
DERBIRD SUBDIVISION IN THE
CITY OF BOx ELDER, PENNING-
TON COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA
(ID 18022). NICHOLAS DURAN,
ANY OCCUPANTS RESIDING AT
609 CARDINAL DR, BOx ELDER,
SD., WELLS FARGO BANK
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 19th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Publ ic Notices
Published August 29 & September 5,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$27.91.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
080166 LOT D OF LOT 8, PLATEAU
SUBDIVISION PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
7850). HELEN GODSELL, ES-
TATE OF HELEN GODSELL, ED-
WARD GODSELL, ERNEST GOD-
SELL, CONSECO FINANCE
SERVICING CORP., CASH WITH
US AND PENNINGTON COUNTY
SPECIAL ASSESSMENT.
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 12th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 22 & 29, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $14.62.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
090896 THE NORTH ½ OF LOT 9
AND E15’ OF N1/2 OF LOT 10,
BLOCK 20 OF SCOTT’S ADDI-
TION, CITY OF RAPID CITY, PEN-
NINGTON COUNTY, SOUTH
DAKOTA (ID 31181). CATHERINE
SILVA, CATHERINE SILVA ES-
TATE, DIxIE HOLY EAGLE, DINO
HOLY EAGLE, OCCUPANT(S)
1115 zINC ST, RAPID CITY SD,
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 12th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 22 & 29, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $27.91.
Legal Publication
Deadline is 11:00 a.m.
on FRIDAY
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 9
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.philiplivestock.com
Email: info@philiplivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605) 685:5826
BILLY MARKWED, Fieldman
Midland • (605) 567:3385
JEFF LONG, Fieldman/Auctioneer
Red Owl • (605) 985:5486
Cell: (605) 515:0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, Auctioneer
Reva • (605) 866:4670
DAN PIROUTEK, Auctioneer
Milesville • (605) 544:3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605) 441:1984
BOB ANDERSON, Fieldman
Sturgis • (605) 347:0151
BAXTER ANDERS, Fieldman
Wasta • (605) 685:4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(605) 859:2577
www.philiplivestock.com
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEARLING & SPRING
CALF SALE & SPECIAL EARLY BRED HEIFER SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. YEARLINGS &
CALVES: 12 P.M. (MT). EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTI-
MATING 1500 HEAD.
YEARLINGS:
LANDERS LIVESTOCK – 200 BLK SPAY HFRS ...............800-900#
PASS CREEK RANCH – 110 RED ANG STRS & OPEN HFRS .900#
STEWART – 60 CHAR X STRS................................................900#
HELMS – 40 RED & RWF STRS & OPEN HFRS .............850-1000#
AMIOTTE – 30 BLK & BWF STRS & HFRS......................700-800#
ENNEN – 23 BLK & BWF MOSTLY OPEN HFRS .....................900#
SMITH – 10 BLK TESTED OPEN HFRS ..........................850-900#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH
AT 605-859-2577 OR 605-685-5826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 17: REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDER CATTLE, ALL-BREEDS
CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 8: SPECIAL YEARLING & ALL-BREEDS CALF
SALE.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 15: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL BRED CATTLE & WEIGH-UP
COW, BULL & HEIFERETTE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER
SALE & WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 5: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEIGH-UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER
SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.philiplivestock.com. Upcoming sales & consignments can be
viewed on the Internet at www.philiplivestock.com, or on the DTN: Click on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA is now qualified to handle third party verified
NHTC cattle (Non-Hormonal Treated Cattle).
Keep supporting R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA is our
voice in government to represent U.S. cattle
producers in trade marketing issues. Join
today & help make a difference!
Philip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, will be offering video
sale as an additional service to our consignors,
with questions about the video please call
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
Philip, SD
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF SALE & REG-
ULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS WEANED CALF SALE
& REGULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING
SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER
SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL
& FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 17: SPECIAL ALL-BREEDS CALF & STOCK
COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
Upcoming Horse Sales:
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28: BAD RIVER FALL EXTRAV-
AGANZA HORSE SALE. Go to: www.PhilipLivestock.com or
call 605-859-2577 for a catalog.
CATTLE REPORT
TUES., AUGUST 27, 2013
We had a big run of cattle for our Special Year-
ling Sale. We had a huge crowd of buyers and a
very strong market on the yearlings. Expect this
calf market to be as good, if not better. These
prices today show the strength of the competive
auction market.
YEARLINGS:
WHEELER RANCH - PHILIP
49.............................BLK & BWF STRS 1041# ........$145.75
SDSU EXPERIMENT STATION - PHILIP
122...........................RED & BLK STRS 760# ..........$168.50
DANNIE & MELVIN ARNESON - UNION CENTER
28.......................................BLK HFRS 825# ..........$157.00
WILCOX & RHODEN - UNION CENTER
12.......................................BLK HFRS 916# ..........$152.75
FAIRBANKS RANCH - PHILIP
121...........................BLK & BWF STRS 905# ..........$156.75
LANDERS LIVESTOCK - HOT SPRINGS
190...........................BLK & BWF STRS 913# ..........$156.00
63.............................BLK & BWF STRS 894# ..........$157.00
60.............................BLK & BWF STRS 842# ..........$157.25
50.............................BLK & BWF STRS 957# ..........$153.50
BRANDON ROCK - LONG VALLEY
50.............................BLK & BWF STRS 936# ..........$155.00
54.............................BLK & BWF STRS 899# ..........$153.75
CAMMACK RANCH - UNION CENTER
23............................BLK & BWF HFRS 818# ..........$157.00
DICK & ERIC GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
11.......................................BLK HFRS 865# ..........$155.00
KELLY BLAIR - MILESVILLE
15............................BLK & BWF HFRS 855# ..........$154.25
REX GILLES - RED OWL
13.......................................BLK HFRS 912# ..........$153.25
LENDEN KJERSTAD - CREIGHTON
9.........................................BLK HFRS 929# ..........$152.50
MIKE GEBES - MILESVILLE
8.........................................BLK HFRS 913# ..........$152.50
ROSETH CATTLE CO - PHILIP
120...........................BLK & BWF STRS 990# ..........$145.25
60 ...................BLK, RED & CHAR STRS 972# ..........$145.75
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - PHILIP
10.......................................BLK HFRS 995# ..........$142.75
5..............................BLK & BWF HFRS 902# ..........$142.50
JASON GRUBL - RED OWL
9.........................................BLK HFRS 957# ..........$146.50
JON HARRINGTON - PIEDMONT
16.............................BLK & BWF STRS 961# ..........$146.00
9..............................BLK & BWF HFRS 776# ..........$147.50
RON, RAYMOND & NATHAN HOWIE-WHITE OWL
33............................BLK & BWF HFRS 886# ..........$152.50
RAMSEY & RAMSEY - PHILIP
23.......................................BLK HFRS 786# ..........$154.75
SETH THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
4.........................................BLK HFRS 840# ..........$152.75
MARK DEVRIES - BELVIDERE
3.........................................BLK STRS 568# ..........$180.00
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
8.........................................BLK HFRS 898# ..........$150.50
NEWTON BROWN - FAITH
13 ......................................RED HFRS 881# ..........$149.25
3 ........................................RED HFRS 605# ..........$135.00
A CONSIGNMENT
19.......................................BLK HFRS 870# ..........$150.00
DAVID & ROSS CUNY - BUFFALO GAP
21.......................................BLK HFRS 851# ..........$152.50
AARON & JIM MANSFIELD - KADOKA
9.........................................BLK HFRS 849# ..........$150.50
GERAD & MEGAN JULSON - WALL
15.......................................BLK HFRS 831# ..........$153.00
A CONSIGNMENT
32.......................................BLK HFRS 806# ..........$154.00
MIKE HOWIE - WHITE OWL
6..............................BLK & BWF HFRS 783# ..........$154.00
BART UHLIR & TODD SUHN - HERMOSA
15 ......................................RED HFRS 782# ..........$153.25
BUTCH & NEAL LIVERMONT - INTERIOR
8.........................................BLK STRS 776# ..........$161.75
6.................................BLK SPAY HFRS 724# ..........$157.50
SPRING CALVES:
GEORGE PAUL MICHAEL - WALL
13 .........................CHAR STRS & HFRS 537# ....$950.00/HD
1.......................................CHAR STRS 395# ....$900.00/HD
HERBERT & TOM KAISER - HERMOSA
15.................BLK & BWF STRS & HFRS 376# ....$825.00/HD
DAVE HUMP - FAITH
27.................RED & BLK STRS & HFRS 358# ....$800.00/HD
WEIGH-UPS:
GARY CAMMACK - UNION CENTER
1 .........................................BLK COW 1575# ..........$89.50
1 .........................................BLK COW 1545# ..........$84.00
1 .........................................BLK COW 1380# ..........$83.50
ROBERT THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
1.......................................CHAR BULL 1855# ........$108.50
1.......................................CHAR BULL 1855# ........$106.00
MARVIN COLEMAN - QUINN
1 .........................................BLK COW 1390# ..........$88.50
MIKE GEBES - MILESVILLE
1 .........................................BLK COW 1260# ..........$87.00
1 .........................................BLK COW 1345# ..........$77.00
REED CAMMACK - UNION CENTER
1....................................X BRED COW 1225# ..........$86.50
SCOTT CAMMACK - UNION CENTER
1 .........................................BLK COW 1405# ..........$85.50
GEORGE PAUL MICHAEL - WALL
6........................................BLK COWS 1279# ..........$85.00
BUNK WHITE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 .........................................BLK COW 1630# ..........$83.50
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - KADOKA
1.......................................CHAR BULL 2225# ........$101.50
RODNEY SHARP - KADOKA
4......................................HERF COWS 1434# ..........$83.25
2......................................HERF COWS 1570# ..........$80.00
1.........................................BLK BULL 1970# ..........$97.00
GRANT PATTERSON - KADOKA
2 .............................BLK & BWF COWS 1420# ..........$83.00
3.............................RWF & BWF COWS 1432# ..........$82.75
1 .........................................BLK COW 1700# ..........$82.00
ROGER PETERSON - PHILIP
3.............................RWF & BWF COWS 1473# ..........$81.00
14 ...........................BLK & BWF COWS 1315# ..........$80.25
1.........................................BLK BULL 1990# ..........$95.50
DAVE VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1.........................................BLK BULL 1975# ........$100.00
JOHN FROST - HOT SPRINGS
1 .........................................BLK COW 1205# ..........$81.00
MARTY SHARP - KADOKA
4......................................HERF COWS 1319# ..........$80.00
JON HARRINGTON - PIEDMONT
1.........................................BWF COW 1525# ..........$80.00
1.........................................BWF COW 1615# ..........$79.50
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG - KADOKA
1.........................................BLK BULL 1845# ..........$98.00
BRETT L. HANSON - FAITH
1.........................................BLK BULL 1705# ..........$99.00
MELVIN & TRINA ARNESON - ENNING
1.........................................BLK BULL 1900# ..........$96.00
STEVE ISKE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.......................................HERF BULL 2070# ..........$94.50
FINANCIAL FOCUS
WORk TO BECOME A
BETTER INVESTOR
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
Next week, we observe Labor
Day. A federal holiday since 1894,
Labor Day celebrates the achieve-
ments of American workers —
people, like yourself, who work
hard for their money. But to make
progress toward your long-term
financial goals, you need to do
more than just earn money — you
have to invest it wisely. And that
takes work, too.
Fortunately, there’s no real
mystery to the types of labor in
which you’ll need to engage to be-
come a good investor. Here are a
few suggestions:
•Work to make investing a pri-
ority. Many people delay invest-
ing until they “have a better han-
dle” on their finances. But these
good intentions frequently go un-
fulfilled because there will always
be something else on which to
spend one’s money. To work to-
ward your important goals, such
as a comfortable retirement or a
child's education, you need to put
away some money regularly. If
you’re just starting out in your ca-
reer, you might not be able to af-
ford much, but even a small
amount can help. And when your
salary increases, so can your in-
vestment contributions. To make
it easier on yourself, consider ar-
ranging for your bank to automat-
ically move money each month
from your checking or savings ac-
count into an investment account.
•Work to understand what’s in
your portfolio. Some investors
aren’t certain about what invest-
ments they own — and this un-
certainty can lead to poor deci-
sion-making if it becomes neces-
sary to make changes. So make
sure you know what’s in your
portfolio — and why.
•Work to keep your portfolio
current with your goals. Even if
you know why you initially pur-
chased certain investments and
how they fit into your portfolio,
you can’t put things on “autopi-
lot.” Over time, your goals may
evolve, which means you’ll need
to be vigilant in working with
your financial advisor to adjust
your portfolio accordingly.
•Work to diversify your hold-
ings. No matter where you are in
your life, you will still need to di-
versify your portfolio by owning a
variety of investments — stocks,
bonds, government securities and
other vehicles. Consequently,
you’ll need to review your portfo-
lio regularly to ensure that it’s
still properly diversified. Diversi-
fication is a strategy designed to
help reduce the effects of volatil-
ity on your holdings, but keep in
mind that even a diversified port-
folio can’t guarantee profits or
protect against loss.
•Work to maintain a long-term
perspective. No matter what you
might hear from anyone else,
there’s no “shortcut” to invest-
ment success. Many people hope
they will “hit” on that one invest-
ment that will make them rich
quickly — but that’s pretty much
a fantasy. To help achieve your
goals, you will need to invest for
many years, through good mar-
kets and bad. And during those
inevitable downturns, you’ll need
to focus on your long-term objec-
tives and follow a consistent in-
vestment strategy, making only
those adjustments that make
sense for your situation.
As you can see, you’ll need to
work on many aspects of invest-
ing to stay on the road toward
success. But you don’t have to
work alone: Investing can be com-
plex, so you may want to get help
from a financial professional —
someone who knows both the in-
vestment world and your individ-
ual needs, goals and risk toler-
ance.
tDM excavation
& heavy haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
todd Sieler
annc@gwtc.net
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
88-31857 LOT 18 & 19 IN BLOCK 2 OF
SCHNASSE ADDITION, CITY OF
RAPID CITY, PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
30980). DOUGLAS T GREEN,
ESTATE OF DOUGLAS T GREEN,
JULIA D GREEN, ESTATE OF
JULIA D GREEN, MARY JANE
GREEN, ESTATE OF MARY JANE
GREEN, THEODORE CRAVEN,
GUS CRAVEN, VIVIAN SNYDER,
WENDY BUCKNER, LESLIE
GREEN, VIOLET DEL GREEN
CHANDLER, BEVERLY HIGH
EAGLE
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 12th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 22 & 29, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $16.52.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO REDEEM
FROM TAX DEED
To the following owners of record or their
unknown executors, personal represen-
tatives, administrators, heirs, devisees, or
legatees.
080167 LOT E OF LOT 8, PLATEAU
SUBDIVISION, PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA (ID
7851). HELEN GODSELL, ES-
TATE OF HELEN GODSELL, ED-
WARD GODSELL, ERNEST GOD-
SELL, CONSECO FINANCE
SERVICING CORP., CASH WITH
US AND PENNINGTON COUNTY
SPECIAL ASSESSMENT.
You are hereby notified that, at a sale of
land and lots for unpaid taxes by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, the aforesaid described
real property situated in Pennington
County, South Dakota was first offered for
sale at public auction to competitive bid-
ders. Not having been sold for want of
bidders, said County Treasurer’s Certifi-
cates of sale for same was issued by the
County Treasurer of Pennington County,
South Dakota, who is now the lawful
owner thereof. The right of redemption
will expire and deeds for said lots will be
made upon expiration of sixty days from
completed service of notices.
Dated at Rapid City, this 12th day of Au-
gust, 2013
Janet Sayler
Treasurer of Pennington County
Published August 22 & 29, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $27.91.
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Fri., August 30 -
Sat., September 7
Friday, August 30: FB
w/White River, 7 p.m. MST; CC
Douglas Invite @ 9 a.m.
Monday, September 2:
Labor Day; JV FB @ Philip,
5:30 p.m. MST; JH FB @
Philip, 4 p.m.
Tuesday, September 3:
First Day of School, out @ 2
p.m.; VB w/Jones Co., 5:30
p.m. MST.
Thursday, September 5: JH
FB @ RCC, 4 p.m.; VB
w/RCC, 5 p.m.; CC Spearfish
Invite @ 3 p.m.
Friday, September 6:
SCHOOL IN SESSION; FB @
Murdo w/Jones Co., 6 p.m.
MST.
Saturday, September 7:
Wall JV FB Jamboree @ 10
a.m.
Thank You! Thank You! Thank You!
Thank you to everyone who contributed time, items,
or support for the Terry Schofield Benefit. Your
generosity left all of us without words to express how
thankful we are to live in such a wonderful
community. We are so grateful to all of you for
helping us out in some way or another. Also, thank
you to Modern Woodman of America for the matching
funds.
Thanks again to all who made this possible.
Terry & Linda Schofield and family
Vince & Katie Bruce ~ Dustin Vollmer
Lura Kirkpatrick ~ Mindy Kirkpatrick
Pennington County Courant • August 29, 2013 • 10
we don’t
charge…
obituaries,
engagements and
wedding write-ups
are published free
of charge.
Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.

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