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Pennington Co. Courant, August 15, 2013

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Number 33
Volume 108
August 15, 2013
by Laurie Hindman
A simple S.D. Farm Wine license be-
came a long hot topic between the Wall
City Council and the Mocha Moose for
many months. But, during a Tuesday
meeting in the Wall Community Center
meeting room the issue was resolved with
the Moocha Moose receiving their license.
Carol Ann Hodge asked the council a
question and wanted a good answer from
them. She said how come we are wasting
so much time on a wine license we know
we can have in this town? There are many
other important matters to work on. Just
give the Mocha Moose the license.
Councilman Rick Hustead replied the
ordinance states a petition has to be circu-
lated and an election will have to be held.
Councilman Gale Patterson intervened
by saying we can change any ordinance we
want to and we aren’t going to get hit with
a lot of licenses. As a council we need to
handle this in a better way. He went on to
say as a legislative body we need to make
decisions and not hide behind an ordi-
nance or law.
Councilman Dan Hauk also said the
Mocha Moose has gone above and beyond
and we can make a change to the second
reading of Ordinance to stipulate that if
anyone else applies for a S.D. Farm Wine
license they will have to take the issue to
a vote. Hauk made a motion to adopt Or-
dinance 13-02 with the change and give
Mocha Moose a license. Council approved
the motion.
The council heard from Preston and
Rick Johnson along with Kevin Kjerstad
on the importance of keeping the Wall Air-
port expansion project moving forward.
P. Johnson explained the runway needs
to be expanded by 500 feet in order for
larger planes to land which in turn offers
safety, economical benefits, lease and tax
incomes.
He asked for the airport operating
budget to increase from $4,000 to $5,000
and the construction budget to be in-
creased to $12,500 per year.
“If we are going to do the project we
have to complete the project”, said P. John-
son. The expansion will cost around 1.5
July 2013,
Pennington
Co. Sheriff’s
Dept. report
During the month of June 2013, the
Pennington County Sheriff's Office
recorded the following statistics in and
around the community of Wall:
Time
City hours: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .523.00
City hrs other deputies . . . . . . .51.00
Total City hours . . . . . . . . .574.00
Training hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00
Vacation/Sick hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.00
County hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.00
# of times called out/Hrs . . . . . . .5.00
Arrest
Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Non-Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Calls For Service
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Alcohol Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Animal Complaints . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Assaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Assist Other Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Attempt to Locate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Civil Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Community Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Coroner Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Business Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227
Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
DPP/Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Extra Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
Fire Medical Assist . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Follow-up Investigation . . . . . . . . .19
Found or Lost Property . . . . . . . . . .1
Calls for Service
Keep the Peace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Minor Consuming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Murder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Runaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
School Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
SOLV Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Suspicious Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Weapons Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Welfare Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
911 Hang up Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Civil Patrol
Attempted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
City Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Traffic Activity
Citations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Injury Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Non-Injury Accident . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
DUI's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Motorist Assist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
School Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Skate/Bike Citation . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Skate/Bike Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Speed Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Vehicle/Parking Comp . . . . . . . . . . .4
Please feel free to visit with
Deputies Louis Lange, Darren Ginn,
Robert Schoeberl, Sgt. Dan Wardle, Lt.
Kraig Wood or Capt. Jay Evenson with
any questions or concerns related to
law enforcement in and around the
Wall community.
million with the city picking up five per-
cent of the cost at completion. But, if the
expansion is started and not completed
the city will bear all the cost, noted P.
Johnson.
Kevin Kjerstad asked the council to con-
sider the impact of not doing the expan-
sion. If the FAA would come in and repave
the runway they will shorten it by 500
feet. This will limit the types of planes
that can land and the safety of the Ag Pi-
lots. Kjerstad went on to say the Wall Air-
port is a viable commercial business in the
community and the amount of transient
aircrafts using the airport will increase.
Patterson and Stan Anderson said they
support the project.
Mayor Dave Hahn opened the first read-
ing of the budget hearing. Hauk and
Councilman Mike Anderson who had re-
cently met with Jim and John Kitterman,
recommended to increase the fire depart-
ments budget to $5,000. Jim Kitterman
informed the council the fire department
would like to use $23,950 to do some proj-
ects they have been putting off. He also
added they haven’t bought anything major
in the last three years.
The revenue portion of the budget shows
property taxes at $272,284 which is an in-
crease over last year and sales tax being
down 8.32 percent for the year.
Finance Officer Carolynn Anderson
went over the expenditures with the coun-
cil. She said she made some increases to
by Del Bartels
Out of the nine new South Dakota High-
way Patrol state troopers recently gradu-
ated July 26, two have started duties in
the local Badlands Squad.
Trooper Aric Dierkhising is based out of
Wall. Trooper Ben Filipiak is based out of
Kadoka. According to Jonathan Harms,
public relations officer with the S.D. High-
way Patrol, both Dierkhising and Filipiak
are under Captain Kevin Karley, district
commander of the Badlands Squad. The
ranking next goes to Sergeant Ryan
Lance, followed by Trooper Slade Ross,
both in Philip.
“The road to becoming a South Dakota
state trooper is challenging and competi-
tive. That’s why we know Trooper
Dierkhising and Trooper Filipiak are tal-
ented and capable law enforcement offi-
cers. They are great additions to the Bad-
lands Squad.” stated Karley.
Filipiak has always wanted to be a state
trooper. He recalled that when he was
young there was a traffic control issue in
his neighborhood, which was responded to
by a state trooper. After talking with the
officer, Filipiak knew that was what he
wanted to do.
Filipiak finished high school in Wiscon-
sin in 2004. In 2009, he moved with his
wife back to her hometown of Aberdeen.
Troopers join Badlands squad
certain departments while decreasing oth-
ers to balance the budget.
Johny Winn Holsether came before the
council on behalf of the Wall Library.
Holsether recently attended a Pennington
County Commissioners meeting in Rapid
City. She said the commissioners are upset
with Wall for not showing interest in the
library. But, they are especially upset with
the city for not properly funding the li-
brary. C. Anderson informed Holsether
and the council she did increase their
budget by $4,500.
With no one else coming forward in the
budget hearing a motion was made to
have the finance committee look at the
proposed changes and come back to the
next meeting with their recommendations.
The Wall Country Cupboard has re-
quested $1,000 to be used immediately.
The Finance Committee will review this
request at their upcoming meeting.
The council accepted the resignation
from Chamber Director Lindsey Hilde-
brand who will be leaving August 16.
The council approved M. Anderson, Hus-
tead, Hahn, C. Anderson and three board
members from the Badlands Area Cham-
ber of Commerce to interview, hire and
offer wages to the best candidate.
C. Anderson informed the council that
the fence at 407 Glenn Street had not been
completed by the August 1 deadline. It was
decided to terminate the conditional use
permit if the fence is not completed by the
His taste for the highway patrol led him to
complete basic law enforcement training
in North Dakota. Later, he completed the
stringent requirements at the South
Dakota Highway Patrol Recruit Academy.
From mid-May until graduation, he was in
field training. His primary field area was
Lemmon, though Filipiak also did field
training in the Sioux Falls and Aberdeen
areas.
“I like the small town thing. Everybody
waves. That’s my liking, I guess,” said Fil-
ipiak.
“I thought the training was excellent. I
was very impressed,” said Filipiak. “There
were parts more difficult than others. It
definitely wasn’t easy, but they were help-
ful.” He noted that the physical training in
the morning was dreaded, but for the most
part that wasn’t too bad either. From ini-
tial application to graduation, the training
took about a year. “The most enjoyable
was probably the vehicle pursuit and
firearm training. It was really good and I
enjoyed it,” he said.
Now Filipiak is learning the territory to
help him in responding to calls. “I love this
area. I like the Badlands. I think it’s beau-
tiful,” he said. Though he is stationed out
of Kadoka, he and his family live in Philip.
He is eager to get to know the people and
territory, to get involved with some things.
First he wants to get to know everything
around town, but then plans on getting in-
volved. He said that he likes to hunt, fish
and camp.
Dierkhising finished high school in Min-
nesota in 2002. He then joined the United
States Air Force, where he was a crew
chief on B-1s at Ellsworth Air Force Base
for six years. After completing the law en-
forcement program at Western Dakota
Technical Institute in May of 2012, he ap-
plied for an internship with the South
Dakota Highway Patrol.
Dierkhising said that a big influence
was growing up around law enforcement,
with his friends’ parents in law enforce-
ment. In high school, one of his classmates
was murdered. “I wanted to protect peo-
ple, to keep an eye out for the community,”
said Dierkhising. On top of that, he added,
he had cousins in military law enforce-
ment.
“I had a run-in with the Minnesota state
patrol,” said Dierkhising. The speeding
ticket incident was his first such en-
counter. “The state trooper’s demeanor
and everything left an impression on me.
I’ve always liked what the highway patrol
represents, their statewide jurisdiction,”
said Dierkising. He hopes that maybe one
day he will leave that same impression or
mark on someone else’s attitude toward
law enforcement personnel.
“The hardest part of training was being
away from my wife and kids – back and
forth, trying to give as much time to them
and my training. My son was born right in
the middle of my training,” said Dierkhis-
ing. He and his wife, Ellie, have a three-
year-old daughter and a six-month-old
son.
Dierkhising’s primary field training was
in the Custer area, with some time in the
Lemmon and Brookings areas. “The most
enjoyable part was getting to know more
of South Dakota and what people are like.
Lemmon – very, very friendly people, great
hospitality. Also, the networking while in
Pierre, with other law enforcement and re-
tirees,” said Dierkhising.
“I like the freedom of being able to learn
and work at my own pace. We have a
pretty big squad area. I like to get to know
the area and people. I hope I can be there
for the people. This is my job, but at the
same time to get them to slow down and
be safe. It’s a partnership,” said Dierkhis-
ing.
The 2013 Hunt Safe Class will be
held September 13 and 14, at the
West River Electric Association con-
ference room in Wall.
The class will be held 6:00 p.m. to
9:00 p.m. on Friday, September 13,
and 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Satur-
day, September 14.
Students will need to bring a sack
lunch for Saturday’s class.
Parental release forms will be avail-
able at the beginning of class and
must be signed prior to the student
taking the course.
Any youth that will be 13 years of
age on or before December 31, 2013 is
eligible to participate.
All students are required to attend
both classes to obtain their certifica-
tion.
Parents are welcome to accompany
their child if they would like.
If you have any questions you can
contact Josh Brainard, Conservation
Officer with SD GF&P, josh.brainard
@state.sd.us.
Hunt Safe class
Recent graduate S.D. Highway Patrolman Trooper Aric
Dierkhising will begin his duties with the Badlands
Squad in Wall.
City council approves farm wine license
Laurie Hindman photo
Recent graduate S.D. Highway Patrolman Trooper Ben
Filipiak will begin his duties with the Badlands Squad in
Kadoka.
Correction
The Old Settler’s Picnic in
Lakeside will be held on Sat-
urday, August 17 not Au-
gust 27. Sorry for any in-
covenice this may have
caused.
next city council meeting.
Public Works Director Garrett Bryan re-
lated the new four way stop signs are up.
They have also installed new speed limit
signs around the town and the new scada
system is up and going.
Other business approved:
•Ordinance 13-1; Main Street parking
will be reviewed at the next council meet-
ing.
•Ordinance 13-06; City Wards.
•Resolution 13-7; Wall Rodeo Club
Grant.
•City of Wall, fire department and li-
brary minutes.
•City of Wall, fire department, library
and cemetery bills.
•Pay request #2 from Siteworks for
$73,886.73.
Council approved to enter into executive
session for the purpose of discussing the
Wall Clinic according to SDCL 1-25-2.
Motion by M. Anderson, second by Hauk
to approve Wall Health Service to proceed
forward with Regional Health Systems of
Rapid City in working out an agreement
to operate the Wall Health Service facility.
Motion carried. They came out of execu-
tive session at 9:42 made the motion and
was adjourned at 9:43.
The next regular meeting of the Wall
City Council will be held on Thursday,
Septermber 5 at 6:30 p.m. in the Wall
Community Center meeting room.
by Laurie Hindman
It is hereby Resolved that the Wall City
Council totally and completely support the
runway 12-30 extension project at the Wall
Municipal Airport at a cost of 1.5 million
with the City of Wall paying five percent of
the project was approved by the Wall City
Council during a special meeting held on
Monday, August 12.
Preston Johnson who is building a
hanger at the airport would also like to sell
aviation fuel and wanted to know if he
should move ahead with the project said
Mayor Dave Hahn.
Councilman Rick Hustead stated if we
don’t do this we eventually won’t have an
airport and it also adds economic develop-
ment to the City of Wall.
Hahn passed around a building permit
and an engineer drawing for Dakota Mill.
They are adding another spur onto the rail-
road and need an easement from the city
to do so.
Hahn said CETEC Engineering has re-
viewed the plans and sees no problem with
the city being assured they will have
proper drainage for runoff water. The mo-
tion was approved with Councilman Jerry
Morgan abstaining from the vote.
Dakota Mill was also approved to extend
their variance building permit for two
more years with Morgan abstaining from
the vote.
With no other business the meeting was
adjourned.
Wall airport
approved for
expansion by
city council
Local News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
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PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
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and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
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aligned with the industry clusters
chosen by the group during the
last session. The groups and the
strategies they chose to develop
were value-added agriculture –
connecting local producers to con-
sumers, tourism – capitalizing on
regional museums and finding
local artifacts to display, and
telecommunications – acting as a
wholesaler of high quality cable
for smaller telecom companies.
The groups identified specific
people or groups of people, volun-
tary associations, formal institu-
tions, and any physical resources
that are already in this region
that can be tapped into.
The group working on value-
added ag is interested in a mar-
keting campaign to highlight local
producers and get them con-
nected to consumers. A possible
profile of the producer and what
they grow could be put into a
brochure, listed on a website, and
promoted across the region in
many ways.
The tourism group identified
several local museums. They pro-
posed a guided tour to the various
communities that could be initi-
ated as a private business, or
done through a public entity. The
tour could be done on a bus with
a pre-recorded guide, or a live
The public is invited to attend
the South Dakota State Univer-
sity’s Cottonwood Field Station
Laboratory grand opening and
Tri-County Ag Day on Saturday,
September 7, from 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
The Cottonwood Field Station
is located 11 miles west of Philip
along U.S. Hwy. 14.
Until now, the station did not
have an on sight laboratory for re-
search or routine testing of sam-
ples. Along with a state-of-the art
laboratory, the new facility will
also house office space, a heated
shop and feed storage.
“This building is a step forward
in modernizing the field station
facilities for research and out-
reach,” said Daniel Scholl, direc-
tor of the South Dakota Agricul-
tural Experiment Station. “Be-
fore, most sample testing and lab-
oratory research had to be con-
Stronger Economies Together VII
The seventh session of the Bad-
lands/Bad River Stronger Econo-
mies Together initiative was con-
ducted Wednesday, July 17, at In-
terior’s new fire hall.
The meeting started with a
brief history of the community by
Cliff McClure and Linda Liver-
mont.
Session seven’s goal was to
identify assets in the region. The
region includes the communities
of Philip, Wall, Kadoka, Midland
and Interior. Individuals used in-
formational handouts to assess
their personal and their leader-
ship skills. The information was
adapted as committees formed
around goals, using certain skill
sets.
A Voluntary Associations/Local
Institutions assessment was ex-
amined as another tool that could
be used to assess how those
groups could help the region meet
its goals.
The community capitals frame-
work was reviewed. With work,
developing one asset or capital in
the region can lead to the spiral-
ing up of other capitals. Facing
any barriers in relation to goals
and strategies is easier on the
front end of the group’s work.
The bulk of the time was spent
in small groups, each being
guide. Museums would be encour-
aged to set hours that aligned
with the bus tours, and to spruce
up exhibits and keep them cur-
rent. South Dakota School of
Mines and Technology was identi-
fied as a regional resource that
could be used, and the South
Dakota Historical Society could
help.
The group working with
telecommunications identified a
need for high quality cable by
smaller telecommunications com-
panies. The region could become
a wholesale provider. An empty
building, possibly in Kadoka,
could house the inventory, and
connections could be made
through Golden West. This idea
may lead to leakages that could
be plugged in other areas of
telecommunications materials, by
using this region as a supplier.
Homework for the attendees in-
cluded to analyze one other group
they are involved in as an asset to
SET. Also, they are to work on an-
other strategy they would like to
see the region pursue for eco-
nomic development.
The next Stronger Economies
Together session will be Thurs-
day, August 15, in Kadoka. The
exact time and location will be an-
nounced later. The session may
begin with an optional tour.
Cottonwood Field Station
laboratory grand opening
ducted off site. I am confident
that introducing a laboratory to
this station will increase the effi-
ciency and amount of future re-
search conducted at this station.”
Along with tours of the new lab-
oratory and current research, at-
tendees may view displays on the
history of the field station, learn
about research conducted there,
take part in hands-on demonstra-
tions and breakout sessions, as
well as hear two keynote presen-
tations.
9:00 a.m. – trade show opens.
9:30 a.m. – welcome by Barry
Dunn, dean of the college of agri-
culture and director of SDSU Ex-
tension.
10:00 a.m. – keynote speaker,
Larry Corah, vice president of
production for Certified Angus
Beef.
10:00 a.m. – youth activities for
ages six through 10.
11:00 a.m. to noon – facility and
research tours
12:30 p.m. – ribbon cutting with
David Chicoine, president of
South Dakota State University.
12:45 p.m. – lunch, entertain-
ment and trade show.
2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. – six half-
hour breakout sessions begin:
1. The Genetics of Stayability.
2. Matching Feeds and Condi-
tion Score.
3. The Inside Story of Nutri-
tion.
4. Fetal Programming.
5. What's in the Water.
6. Beef Quality Assurance.
3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. – keynote
speaker, Chad Mackay, president
and chief of operations of El Gau-
cho Restaurants, Seattle, Wash.
2:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. – youth
activities for ages six through 10.
Celebrate with special events
and FREE entrance to national
parks
On Sunday, August 25, the Na-
tional Park Service turns 97 years
old. To celebrate, admission to all
national parks will be free so that
everyone can join in the festivities
taking place coast-to-coast.
“National parks belong to all
Americans, and we invite every-
one to join us and celebrate this
special day,” said National Park
Service Director Jonathan B.
Jarvis.
“From kite-building demonstra-
tions at Wright Brothers National
Memorial, to a river paddle at
New River Gorge National River
or a scenic railroad ride at Steam-
town National Historic Site,
National Park Service turns 97
America’s national parks offer
something for the whole family.”
With our partners at the Na-
tional Park Foundation, the offi-
cial charity of America’s national
parks, we have created an online
hub to help you plan your per-
sonal National Park Service
birthday trip at www.npsbirth-
day.org.
Join us and share birthday
wishes or stories, pictures, or
video from your latest or favorite
national park adventure.
“Each and every day of the
year, the National Park Service
protects our country’s treasures,
our national parks,” said Neil
Mulholland, National Park Foun-
dation president and CEO. “This
month we are excited to celebrate
the 97th birthday and extend our
thanks to the National Park Serv-
ice for their vital role in preserv-
ing America’s awe-inspiring land-
scapes and rich history.”
If you can’t make it to a park for
the big day there are still many
ways you can join the fun. The
work of the National Park Service
extends beyond park boundaries
into communities across the coun-
try.
The National Park Service
works with partners to help pre-
serve local history and create
close-to-home recreational oppor-
tunities that revitalize neighbor-
hoods and enhance the quality of
life. Go to www.nps.gov/communi-
ties/states.htm to see how we’re
helping in your community.
extensive awards and recognition
programs. The mission of NAAE
is “professionals providing agri-
cultural education for the global
community through visionary
leadership, advocacy and service.”
The NAAE headquarters are in
Lexington, Ky.
WHS Agriculture Teacher
selected for national award
Dani Herring, agricultural edu-
cator at Wall High School in Wall,
S.D., has been selected for a
Teachers Turn the Key Award
from the National Association of
Agricultural Educators.
The Teachers Turn the Key
award is a national scholarship
program that allows early career
agricultural educators to attend
the annual NAAE convention and
gives them an opportunity to be-
come involved with their profes-
sional association.
TTTK winners take part in spe-
cial programming during the con-
vention that is designed to ad-
dress the concerns of early career
agricultural educators. By being
selected for the TTTK award,
Herring will be able to connect
with other agricultural education
professionals who are at a similar
point in their careers.
In addition to the special track
at NAAE Convention, each of the
TTTK winners will be recognized
as young leaders in the profession
during a general session. RAM
Trucks sponsors the TTTK award
as a special project of the Na-
tional FFA Foundation.
NAAE is the professional or-
ganization in the United States
for agricultural educators. It pro-
vides its’ nearly 8,000 members
with professional networking and
development opportunities, pro-
fessional liability coverage, and
By Linda M. Hiltner
As summer draws to a close, so
do the programs with the Na-
tional Grasslands Visitor Center,
Minuteman Missile National His-
toric Site (MMNHS) and Bad-
lands National Park (BNP).
Under the Service First Agree-
ments the agencies share re-
sources, educational programs
and staff to better serve visitors
to South Dakota, Wall, our Na-
tional Grasslands, the Badlands
and Black Hills areas.
During June and July, about
1,350 visitors participated in pro-
grams offered on and off site at
the park, Delta 9 Silo and the Na-
tional Grasslands Visitor Center.
Teachers Turn the Key Award winners Noelle Rist and Wall High School Ag teacher Dani Her-
ring.
Interagency cooperation contributes to
successful summer programs
This was the first summer
Smokey Bear made an appear-
ance at some of the evening pro-
grams.
Smokey Bear also attended
Story Time at the Wall Commu-
nity Library on Friday mornings.
Approximately 500 pre-school
age children attended the Story
Time activities. On his walk to
and from the Library, Smokey
posed for photographs with visi-
tors to Wall.
Friday, August 9, was Smokey’s
69th birthday. He celebrated the
day at the National Grasslands
Visitor Center, welcoming visitors
and posing for photographs.
On Thursday, August 22, 6:00-
7:30 p.m. at the New Town Dam
will be this year’s last “Fishing
with Ranger” program. Children
between the ages of 5 – 12 are in-
vited to spend the evening with
representatives from South
Dakota Game, Fish & Parks,
Minuteman Missile National His-
toric Site, Badlands National
Park and the Forest Service.
Fishing poles, float, hook and
worms will be provided. For addi-
tional information on this event,
please contact the National
Grasslands Visitor Center at 605-
279-2125 or stop by at 708 Main
Street, Wall.
Email us with
your news
item or photo
to courant @
gwtc.net
August is halfway over and it’s
time to turn in your book recom-
mendation cards for the Summer
Reading Program. Cards are due
August 16, and those turning in
cards are invited to our Summer
Reading Ice Cream Party Extrav-
aganza!
The Ice Cream Party will be
held on Friday, August 23 at 10
a.m. You don’t have a card? Come
by the Library and we will hook
you up with one! It’s a great way
to share information about your
favorite books. Find the display of
cards in the Library, you might
Wall Community Library to host party
even find a new book to read.
Speaking of Summer Reading,
there are only a couple weeks left
in the program.
Make sure your Summer Read-
ing Logs are completed and
turned in by August 30th.
We will be drawing for prizes
the first week of September. We
already have several intrepid
souls who have completed the
program and have been entered
into our drawing.
It has been fun to hear about all
the books everyone has enjoyed
this summer! Good luck in the
drawing!
As always, stop by the Library
anytime.
We are located at 407 Main
Street in the Historic Wall Hut.
We are open Wednesdays from
12-7 p.m., Thursdays from 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 5 p.m.,
Fridays from 8 am to 1 p.m.
If you are a Facebook fan join
us at Wall Community Library, or
check out our blog at www.wall-
communitylibrary.blogspot.com.
Happy Reading!
Area News Pennington County Courant • August 15, 2013•3
courant@gwtc.net
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
August
16-17-18-19:
Wolverine
Inmortal
PG-13
August
23-24-25-26:
Smurfs 2
SDRA rodeo results – Isabel
August 3 - 4
Bareback
1. Tayte Clark, Meadow, S.D.,
75; 2. Joe Wilson, Long Valley,
S.D., 73; 3. Shane O'Connell,
Rapid City, S.D., 70; 4. Lonny
Lesmeister, Rapid City, 69; 5. Trig
Clark, Meadow, S.D., 68; 6.
Chance Englebert, Burdock, S.D.,
65.
Barrel Racing
1. Kailee Webb, Isabel, S.D.,
17.76; 2. Lacy Cowan, Highmore,
S.D., 17.82; 3. (tie) Jill Moody,
Pierre, S.D., Mazee Pauley, Wall,
S.D., 17.83; 4. Madison Rau, Mo-
bridge, S.D., 17.89; 5. Cassy
Woodward, Dupree, S.D., 17.96; 6.
Amy Deichert, Spearfish, S.D.,
18.05; 7. D'Ann Gehlsen, Mission,
S.D., 18.14.
Bull Riding
1. Ian Jacobs, Faith, S.D., 69.
Calf Roping
1. John Peek, Williston, N.D.,
9.60; 2. Colton Musick, Pierre,
10.90; 3. Kourt Starr,
Dupree,11.40; 4. Brent Belkham,
Blunt, S.D., 11.90; 5. Samuel
Boldon, Oglala, S.D., 12.60; 6.
Tyus Olson, Mud Butte, S.D.,
12.70.
Goat Tying
1. Katy Miller, Faith, S.D., 6.60;
2. Shayna Miller, Faith, 6.80; 3.
Krystal Marone, Isabel, 7.00; 4.
Kristi Birkeland, Dupree, 7.20; 5.
Stacy Doll, Prairie City, S.D.,
7.30; 6. Katie Doll, Prairie City,
S.D.,7.40.
Ladies Breakaway
1. Laura Hunt, Ridgeview, S.D.,
2.40; 2. Bailey Peterson, Parade,
S.D., 2.70; 3. Brooke Howell, Belle
Fourche, S.D., 2.90; 4. (tie) Patty
Jo Burress, Isabel, Elizabeth
Baker, Box Elder, S.D., 3.10; 5.
(tie) Hanna Brown, Faith, Syerra
Christensen, Kennebec, S.D.,
3.20; 6. (tie) Katie Lensegrav, In-
terior, S.D., Misty McPherson,
Piedmont, S.D., 3.50.
Mixed Team Roping
Woman
1. Kaycee Nelson, Buffalo, S.D.,
7.50; 2. Trina Arneson, S.D., 8.90;
3. Cassie Foster, Lemmon, S.D.,
9.40; 4. Denise Nelson, Midland,
S.D., 10.30; 5. Lorita Nelson,
Philip, 12.40; 6. (tie) Patty Jo
Burress, Isabel, Brooke Nelson,
Philip, Syerra Christensen, Ken-
nebec, 14.20.
Saddle Bronc
1.Eric Gewecke, Red Owl, S.D.,
73; 2. (tie) Kash Deal, Dupree, Ty
Kennedy, Philip, 72; 3. (tie)
Kaden Deal - Dupree, Seth Long-
brake, Howes, S.D., 71; 4. Dalton
Hump, Dupree, 62.
Sr. Mens Breakaway
1. Steve Klein, Sioux Falls,
S.D., 2.10; 2. Lennis Fagerhaug,
Wessington Springs, S.D., 2.40;
3. Clifford Tibbs, Ft. Pierre, S.D.,
2.50; 4. JB Lord, Sturgis, S.D.,
2.60; 5. (tie) John Hoven,
McLaughlin, S.D., Bob Clement,
Ridgeview, S.D., 2.70.
Grant provided by Farm Credit
Services of America’s ag education
initiatives
The South Dakota FFA Foun-
dation, received a $2,000 Working
Here Fund grant to support SD
FFA Service Learning projects
this fall. The grant is provided
through Farm Credit Services of
America’s (FCSAmerica) Working
Here Fund.
The South Dakota FFA Foun-
dation works to provide an av-
enue of funding which will stimu-
late, promote and support the
best interests of FFA students.
The foundation's goal is to cre-
ate an awareness of agriculture
careers, agri-business opportuni-
ties and the needs of a growing
and diversified industry.
This grant will fund local chap-
ter service learning projects and
enable Agriculture Education pro-
grams to focus on building stu-
dents who are "living to serve"
others instead of raising funds to
complete the projects. “Through
our service learning projects, stu-
dents wisely manage community
resources, build character, and
promote citizenship and volun-
teerism.,” said Gerri Eide, SD
The South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Commission has final-
ized the 2013 goose seasons.
Unit 1, which includes most
parts of the state, will have a
daily bag limit of eight geese.
The daily limit will be four
geese in Unit 2 which is com-
prised of counties in central
South Dakota along the Missouri
River, and Perkins, eastern Pen-
nington and Fall River counties.
The Unit 3 January season in
Bennett County will have a daily
bag limit of four geese as well.
Canada goose season dates are
October 1 - December 16 in Unit
1, November 2-February 14 in
Unit 2 and January 11-19 in Ben-
nett County.
The light goose hunting season
will run from September 28 - De-
cember 22 with a daily limit of 20
statewide.
The Commission also finalized
South Dakota FFA Foundation receives $2,000
grant for its FFA Service Learning projects
FFA Foundation Executive Direc-
tor. “We encourage young people
in agriculture to take an active
role in the betterment of their
communities.”
Agriculture Education pro-
grams serve communities across
SD. FFA chapters are required to
raise funds for every educational
program or trip they conduct, as
well as service learning programs
they perform in their communi-
ties.
This grant allows S.D. FFA
Foundation to maintain valuable
educational activities for ag ed
students, as well as fund needed
community development projects.
“Helping chapters conduct
larger and more extensive com-
munity service projects they oth-
erwise couldn't conduct is a
worthwhile effort,” said Jason
Edleman, vice president, FC-
SAmerica. “Educating the future
generation of agriculture creates
a high return on investment for
rural America.”
The South Dakota FFA Foun-
dation is one of 44 organizations
to receive an FCSAmerica Work-
ing Here Fund grant.
FCSAmerica awarded $74,200
in grant funds during the latest
grant cycle ending June 30, in-
cluding $13,000.00 for community
projects in South Dakota.
The Working Here Fund pro-
vides up to $2,000 each for proj-
ects and organizations that make
a positive, long-term impact in
Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota or
Wyoming in the areas of hunger
and nutrition, agriculture educa-
tion, and young and beginning
producers.
Grants are determined quar-
terly based on specific selection
criteria. To complete an applica-
tion, visit www.fcsamerica.com/w
orkingherefund.
About South Dakota
FFA Foundation
The National FFA Organization
is a national youth organization
of 557,318 student members as
part of 7,498 local FFA chapters
in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and
the Virgin Islands.
The SD FFA Foundation devel-
ops resources to financially sup-
port leadership development pro-
grams for over 6,000 South
Dakota agriculture education stu-
dents; support the activities of 77
South Dakota FFA Chapters and
GFP Commission finalizes
2013 Waterfowl seasons
changes to the white-fronted
goose hunting season. The season
will run two weeks shorter than
last year’s season and will occur
from September 28 - December 8
in 2013. With this change comes
an increase in the daily bag limit
from one to two geese.
The duck hunting season dates
will be October 12 - January 16
for High Plains Zone; September
28 - December 10 for Low Plains
North and Middle Zones; and, Oc-
tober 12-December 24 for Low
Plains South Zone.
The daily duck limit is six and
may be comprised of no more
than five mallards (two of which
can be hens), three wood ducks,
three scaup, two redheads, two
pintails or two canvasbacks.
The possession limit for all wa-
terfowl seasons has been in-
creased from twice the daily limit
to three times the daily limit.
members involved in Career De-
velopment Events and other
events/activities at the state and
national FFA levels; and reward
successful FFA members and
chapters for their successes.
The FFA mission is to make a
positive difference in the lives of
students by developing their po-
tential for premier leadership,
personal growth and career suc-
cess through agricultural educa-
tion. For more information visit
www.sdffafoundation.org.
About Farm Credit
Services of America
Farm Credit Services of Amer-
ica is a customer-owned financial
cooperative proud to finance the
growth of rural America, includ-
ing the special needs of young and
beginning producers.
With more than $19 billion in
assets and more than $3 billion in
members’ equity, FCSAmerica is
one of the region’s leading
providers of credit and insurance
services to farmers, ranchers,
agribusiness and rural residents
in Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota
and Wyoming. Learn more at
www.fcsamerica.com.
The 2014 South Dakota moun-
tain lion hunting season will have
a lower harvest limit for the
Black Hills under a proposal by
the Game, Fish and Parks Com-
mission.
Under the proposal, all of the
state outside the Black Hills Fire
Protection District would again
be open for mountain lion hunting
for the entire year. The season
dates within the Black Hills Fire
Protection District would also re-
main unchanged from last year,
running December 26, 2013
through March 31, 2014.
The 2014 harvest limit for the
Black Hills as proposed by the
Commission would be decreased
from 2013. Last year the limit
was 100 total mountain lions or
70 females. The 2014 proposal is
for a harvest limit of 75 total
mountain lions or 50 females. If
either harvest limit is reached be-
fore March 31, the season would
immediately close within the
Black Hills.
Custer State Park, part of the
Black Hills season structure, also
has a proposed change increasing
the number of hunting intervals
when hunting with dogs is al-
lowed from three to four, and de-
creasing the number of hunting
intervals when hunting with dogs
Mayor Dave Hahn (left) and Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce President Mary Williams
(right) presented a plaque to Chamber Director Lindsay Hildebrand (middle) for her three years
of service to the chamber. Hildebrand has resigned from the chamber and will be moving on to
a new job.
Steer Wrestling
1. Tom Hunt, Eagle Butte, S.D.,
4.30; 2. Tyler Haugen, Sturgis,
S.D., 4.60; 3. Jace Melvin, Ft
Pierre, 5.20; 4. JB Lord, Sturgis,
5.30; 5. (tie) Casey Cronin, Get-
tysburg, S.D., Tate Cowan, Ft.
Pierre, 5.40.
Team Roping
1. Tyrell Moody, Edgemont,
S.D./Rory Brown, Edgemont,
5.70; 2. Britt Williams, Ham-
mond, Mont./Paul Griemsman
Piedmont, 6.80; 3. Jake Nelson,
Creighton, S.D./Jeff Nelson,
Philip, 6.90; 4. Levi Hapney,
Quinn, S.D./Dalton Richter,
Quinn, 7.10; 5. Terry McPherson,
Piedmont, S.D./Michael McPher-
son, Box Elder, 7.20; 6. Kevin
Jaeger, Newell/Prestyn Novak,
Newell, 7.50.
South Dakota Mountain
Lion season proposed
is not allowed from five to four.
Four access permits will be issued
for each of the four intervals
when hunting with dogs is al-
lowed and 30 access permits will
be issued for each of the four in-
tervals when no dog hunting is al-
lowed.
The mountain lion hunting sea-
son proposals will be finalized at
the October 3 - 4 GFP Commis-
sion meeting at the Holiday Inn
Express in Spearfish. To view the
full proposals on those seasons,
visit www.gfp.sd.gov/agency/com-
mission/default.aspx and look
under the "rule proposals" head-
ing.
To comment on any of the pro-
posals, send a letter to South
Dakota Game, Fish and Parks
Commission, 523 E. Capitol Ave.,
Pierre, SD 57501; or email wild-
info@state.sd.us. Comments on
proposal will be taken until 5 p.m.
CDT on October 2. To be included
in the public record, please in-
clude your full name and city of
residence.
To comment in person on these
proposed rule changes, the GFP
Commission will host a public
hearing beginning at 2 p.m. MDT
as part of their meeting on Thurs-
day, October 3.
Teachers, kick off your school
year with South Dakota’s Largest
Classroom.
The South Dakota State Fair is
inviting teachers and students
from across the state to partici-
pate in South Dakota’s Largest
Classroom on Thursday and Fri-
day, August 29-30.
“This educational program
gives students an opportunity to
experience things they may not
otherwise have a chance to see in
a regular classroom environ-
ment,” said Jerome Hertel, S.D.
state fairgrounds manager.
While attending South
Dakota’s Largest Classroom, stu-
dents will be able to see the thrill
show, Pirates of the Sky, Vogel’s
Exotic Animal Petting Zoo, Value
Added Ag activities, Just Right
for Me w/Phil Baker, Sheltered
Reality sponsored by Avera
Health Plans, along with other
activities such as the FFA Animal
Nursery, a one-room schoolhouse,
the Dakotaland Museum and 4-H
and open class exhibits.
Schools are encouraged to reg-
ister as soon as possible. Students
that are homeschooled are also
Kick off the school year with
S.D.’s largest classroom
encouraged to register. Last year,
nearly 1,200 students and teach-
ers attended.
The program is free to students,
teachers and chaperones. Lunch
and parking will also be provided.
The registration form can be ob-
tained by calling 605.353.7354.
The S.D.’s Largest Classroom is
sponsored by Wells Fargo, Dakota
Provisions, SD Education Associ-
ation, Sara Lee, Old Dutch and
Pepsi.
The 2013 South Dakota State
Fair will run from Thursday, Aug.
29, through Monday, Sept. 2.
Channel Seeds Preview night will
be Wednesday, Aug. 28. This
year’s theme is “Starry Nights
and Midway Lights.” For more in-
formation on State Fair events,
contact the Fair office at
800.529.0900, visit www.sdstate-
fair.com or find them on Facebook
and Twitter.
Laurie Hindman/Pennington County Courant
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Last week went by so fast the
sheer motion blew all memory of
five of those days right out of my
head!
Perhaps one more cup of tea …
and 10 deep breaths (not 11 but
10 deep breaths because 11
makes me dizzy) will help settle
the thoughts.
Marilyn Keyser had a wonder-
ful time with her granddaughter,
Lorrae Aker and great-grand-
daughters, Brookelyn age nine,
Kielyn age five and baby girl
Talyn 17 months. Husband and
dad, Trenton was away on busi-
ness and day care provider was on
vacation so Marilyn got to have
these three grand-girls mostly to
herself for the week. She said she
had a very happy time and looked
like she had! How nice to be that
near! I say that with envy, but not
mean envy.
Wanda Hall is doing very well
and has always a cheerful atti-
tude. Daughter and granddaugh-
ter are expected for a visit this
week and Wanda enjoys them.
Dick and Gay Hadlock were
busy baking cookies and zucchini
bars and more cookies! The pur-
pose for all the baking was to pro-
vide “yummies” for the Relay For
Life fundraisers “Lunch in the
Park” and Sunday’s “Bingo and
Ice Cream Social”. I’ve never
questioned Dick directly, but have
wondered about his half of the
“cookie team” and is he taster or
baker? I know they do great
doughnuts as a team, but cookies?
We do appreciate you so much,
and our tummies appreciate you,
too, plus our Relay for Life team
appreciates you.
Our family is experiencing the
concern for another member, a
nephew who has a “suspicious
mass” at the back of his throat.
We are asking for thoughts and
prayers from you for this young
man, Allen King, that he will and
his family will find the help and
support so crucial in these diffi-
cult times.
Kerry Herriger needed to make
a fast trip to Florida when an
emergency medical situation
arose with his wife, Joyce. She re-
mained in Florida this summer to
be with her mother. So we also
ask for your prayers and thoughts
for Joyce Herriger.
Wednesday was a beautiful day
for our lunch and Relay For Life
fundraiser. The Wildcats were
busy preparing for the day with
most all the team participating in
one way or another. A bonus was
the West River Electric guys and
(friends) from Wall who stopped
by for lunch and a break in the
shade. Thank you everyone.
That same evening, Mary
Lewis’ daughter, Jo, husband Tim
and their daughter Charlotte ar-
rived from Minneapolis for a brief
stay. They are such fun to be
around that some of us, while we
don’t mean to crowd in, really like
to share their company!
Neighbors, Faye Bryan, Hazel
Kalkbrenner, Lloyd and I were in-
vited over for a tasty meal and
some laughs about their mutual
trip to France recently with
daughter and son-in-law, Liz and
Christian. Mary had a bucket list
type of adventure when she and
others went para-gliding.
Wow! That sent my heart to my
throat both with fear and envy at
the same time! Mary did say that
it was quite an experience!
We took time Saturday as did
other Wastans, to go Elm Springs
for Celine Trask’s birthday party.
It was in addition a huge and suc-
cessful fundraiser. The people of
Elm Springs are so amazing the
way they gather round to support
each other in whatever way is
needed. I think to be born into
that community is a gift beyond
measure and as you grow, you
give back, sort of a continual “Pay
it Forward”.
No need to be alarmed, folks, I
won’t advertise your awesome-
ness. That could lead to discovery
by an outside world hungry for
what Elm Springs has. And that
could lead to subdivisions and
subdivisions lead to folks who are
cranky about flies and so on it
goes. All this when Happy Birth-
day Celine is all that I needed to
say! We saw folks and chatted
with those we see too seldom and
so enjoyed our day.
Sunday in Wasta began with
getting ready for our “Bingo and
Ice Cream Social. In addition to
the Wasta Wildcats were some of
the same Elm Springs folk we had
seen Saturday! Larry and Peggy
Gravatt and Freddie Ferguson
were our bingo experts, Kenneth
and Janet Wilson, Philip Wilson,
John and Jean Linn and grand-
daughter Kassandra and Linda
Tifft were welcome guests. Dick
and Betty Trankle, Rapid City
friends and Shirley Kitterman
added to the fun in the Wildcats
den.
Wasta has good kids who have
been so helpful doing what they
can — Grenstiner girls made
treat for the lunch and Carter
boys pulled weeds outside and
helped clean up the community
hall after Sunday’s fun — thanks
guys.
We are still waiting for all you
former Wildcats to come up with
songs and cheers.
It is time to move now to our
next “event” — Picnic In The
Park, August 25th.
Keep in mind that items you no
longer need can be the treasure
someone else does. Anything, well
almost, can be put on the silent
auction table, and for now
brought to Lloyd, 993-3149.
However, a Wasta Wildcat
cheer is on my mind — perhaps
this will stir your memory…
Go Wildcats Go Wildcats
There’s more to be done
We can put old cancer on the
run
Wildcats have the might
We’re ready for the fight
Wildcats will win
Cause the time IS RIGHT
Go Wildcats
Go Wasta
Now you know you can do bet-
ter!
Happy Trails.
Pennington County Courant • August 15, 2013 • 4
Social News
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Gayle Eisenbraun drove to
Mitchell, S.D., on Friday and vis-
ited with Travis, Beth and Isaiah
Eisenbraun. She then went on to
Norfolk, Neb., to visit Tyler,
Wendi, Axton and Alyvia Eisen-
braun. She returned home Mon-
day afternoon.
The Wolf Family Reunion was
held in Beulah, N.D., this past
weekend, August 9 and 10. Fam-
ily from California, Washington,
Arizona, Colorado, Wyoming,
Montana and of course, South
Dakota. Benny and LaRue Wolf
from Sacramento, Calif., flew in
to Rapid City and traveled to
North Dakota with Gary and
Ruby Keyser. Benny Wolf is the
only one of 11 children living, of
Emma and Fred Wolf. Family
gathered at the Beulah Golf
Course, 62 were in attendance.
Gary’s cousin, Denny Wolf and
wife Mickey, came to South
Dakota from Washington State
and spent a week with the
Keyser’s in Wall.
Bernard Foster returned to his
home in Wall on August 7th after
a two week vacation. He took a
flight to Chicago on July 24th to
visit his daughter Jan and Bob
Yager. After spending two days
with them, they all took a road
trip to Hayward, Wis., a seven
hour drive. They were met there
by Kevin and Kara Foster of
Rapid City, who had spent four-
teen hours on the road. On Au-
gust 4th, the whole group went to
a lake recreation area — Lac
Courte O’Reilles. Years ago,
Kara’s grandfather had owned
this site. A friend of Kevin’s came
from Columbia, Miss., (Jeremy
and his three children) and joined
them on the 31st. Both Jeremy
and his wife are in the service —
she is in Afghanistan at this time.
On Wednesday afternoon,
Frances Poste had a surprise visit
when two of her granddaughters
and two of their friends stopped
by. They were camping in Sturgis
to take in some of the activities of
the Motorcycle Rally but they
were driving a pickup. Dani De-
Carlo and Sara Poste, as well as
their friends are from Colorado.
Kevin and Diana Patterson left
their children, Dillan and De-
laney, with grandpa and
grandma, Dean and Marcine Pat-
terson, while they enjoyed the
Bike Rally.
Lavern and Dianne Terkildsen
attended a surprise birthday for
their granddaughter Heather
Nelson on Saturday night in
Philip.
Orlin and Lourine Winkowitsch
came down from Rapid City on
Sunday, attended church and
went out to their place in the
country. Evelyn Kjerstad had
come down to Wall with them.
After church, she went with
Frances Poste; they picked up
Edith Paulsen and all went to eat.
They spent the afternoon visiting
at Frances home until the
Winkowitsches came to take Eve-
lyn and be on their way home.
Denny Carmichael of Brook-
ings, came out on Tuesday for
some business. He spent the
night at Merlin and Mary Jane
Doyle’s. On Tuesday morning,
Denny and Mary Jane went to
Brenda Carmichael’s to wish her
a happy birthday. We’ll say,
“Happy Birthday”, also!
On Saturday, August 10th, Mil-
lie Clark celebrated her second
birthday at Story Book island. Be-
sides her little girlfriends and her
parents, Grandma Kathy Furry
and Grandpa and Grandma Car-
ley were in attendance. Happy
birthday, Millie!
The Site Council for the meals
Program had their regular meet-
ing at Prairie Village on Wednes-
day morning. Five were in atten-
dance.
Lyle and Viola Williams had
friends from Iowa visit last week
from Vincent and Ft. Dodge.
Roger and Mary Ellen Hutchin-
son of Sioux Falls had been to the
Bike Rally and stopped in Wall
this past weekend. They were on
their way home on Sunday and
looked up friends Roy and
Dorothy Hamann before leaving.
Hamann’s look for them every
year.
Dorothy Shearer has been en-
joying her flowers and has had
people over so they can enjoy
them too. She has had at least
four “garden parties” — different
times, different people. Some
guests she mentioned were Pastor
Darwin and Terri Kopfmann,
Betty and Glenn Alishouse,
George and Lorna Moore, Linda
and Harlan Eisenbraun. The
flowers are gorgeous this cooler
year and enjoy the humid
weather.
Carla Brucklacher brought
granddaughters Maylin and
Alissa Brucklacher home with her
when she returned from Greeley,
Colo., after the girls’ state events.
They stayed seven days with their
grandparents — many fun times
at Wall Drug; traveled to the 1880
Town and rented costumes and
took pictures; had a weiner roast
and made s’mores over grandpa’s
fire pit. On Saturday, August 3,
we drove to Custer State Park to
meet the Tietsort family.
Grandma took Noah, Hope and
the girls to Crazy Horse Moun-
tain for dinner and to see the
Laser Light Show. Sunday, Jen-
nifer, Grandma and the kids
headed for Greeley to stay five
days with Matthew and family
while the motorcycles were roar-
ing through Custer State Park.
Much fun was had as we had
cookouts; attended a block party
in Windsor, Colo.,; threw a birth-
day party for Grandma Carla;
went to the new Percy Jackson
Movie and drove to Fort Collins to
“Fort Fun’ where we rode go-
carts, bumper boats and cars and
played arcade games. Jennifer,
Carla, Noah and Hope returned
to South Dakota on Friday, Au-
gust 9th.
Some say “time marches on”, I’d
say it “flies by”! Over one-third of
August has already passed by.
School is already in session some
places while in others they are
getting ready for school activities.
It was a short summer!
‘Bad things do happen to good
people — our response to it is what
is important! ~Anonymous
Have a good week.
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
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Becki Potrzeba, Agent
1315 E. Wells Ave., Pierre, SD 57501
877-224-4173 ~ becki@beckipotrzeba.com
Sponsored by:
Pennington
County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
…continued next
week.
Braxtyn Tae Northup,
15 months
daughter of Tucker Northup
& Kelsey Huether, Wall.
Ava, 9 years, Nora, 7 years,
Emmet, 5 years &
Ethan, 4 months
children of
Ryan & Cindy Dinger, Wall.
Regan May, 9 years,
Thane Clark, 7 years,
Athena Elizabeth, 5 years &
Claire Louise, 1 year
children of
Sanden & Elaine Simons, Wall.
Tomorrow’s
Leaders
Lucy Lee &
Zack Hoffman
invite you to Celebrate
their marriage at a
Reception/Dance
Saturday, August 24, 2013
8:30 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. • Wall Golf Course
(DD will be provided)
You’re invited to a
Reception & Dance
to help celebrate the joining of marriage of
Melissa McConnell
& Trevor Fricke
Sat., August 17, 2013
Wall Community Center
5:30 p.m. • Dance to follow
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • August 15, 2013 • 5 Religious
Obituaries
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship,
9 a.m., Sunday Worship Service,
10:30 a.m.; Mondays: Women’s Bible
Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann
279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and
4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.;
Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community
Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10
a.m.; Youth Fellowship: Wed.
7 - 8:30 p.m.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through
Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m.
Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m.,
Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church
Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd
number months
Holy Rosary Church
Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even
number months
Ancìcnl wìsdom lor modcrn lìlc
And whcn hc had callcd lhc µcoµlc unlo hìm wìlh
hìs dìscìµlcs also, hc saìd unlo lhcm, Whosocvcr
wìll comc allcr mc, lcl hìm dcny hìmscll, and lakc
uµ hìs cross, and lollow mc. Mark 8:34 (K)V)
1he dírectíons ure cíeur: 1o íoííov Chríst, you must
voíunturííy cust usíde your personuí desíres.
Lnderstundíng vhut you need to do ís eusy. Curryíng ít
out ís hurd. You muy huve somethíng eíse ín mínd íor
yourseíí. lorget ubout ít und do us Chríst suys. lt von't
be un eusy roud, but ít ís un essentíuí roud. Cod knovs
best. loííov Hím.
279-2175
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Peggy Gravatt
The benefit for Celine Trask
which was held up at the Elm
Springs Hall on Saturday night
was a HUGE success! I have
never seen so many people and
cars up there for any event. There
was a lot of love up there that
night. We appreciate all of you
who donated items for the auc-
tion, did the cooking and serving
and for all of those who put it to-
gether. A huge appreciation goes
to all of you who came, ate and
bid. It was a wonderful night of
visiting, laughter and fellowship.
I didn’t receive much for news
this week, but will give you what
I have.
The first bit of news comes from
RoseMary Trask who is relaying
an incident that happened down
at Mark Trask’s house. It’s scary,
but humorous. I had to relay it to
you word for word.
It seems that Mark Trask al-
ready had visitors one night when
he and cousin, Joe Trask arrived
at Mark's house.
They were greeted by a warn-
ing buzz when they entered the
garage. After locating and dis-
patching the little rattle snake
that had set up camp in Mark's
garage door gasket, they pro-
ceeded into the living room. Joe
says to Mark, "You don't have any
rattle snakes in here do you?"
"Shut up," replies Mark, "No,
I've never had any rattle snakes
in my house!" Anyway, despite all
claims to the contrary, Joe was
startled from his night's sleep on
the couch by a familiar buzz,
(maybe this was a little show-off
rattle snake or maybe he was
mad about his buddy in the
garage, we didn't find out.) One
can only imagine the yelling and
strategizing that went on before
Mark managed to smash the in-
truder under his coffee table!
Mark says that he almost thought
Joe was going to try making a
new exit through his picture win-
dow!
Peggy and Larry went into Wall
on Wednesday night along with
Sandy and Lynn Fields and their
grandson Marshall. We attended
the very nice supper that Jim Mc-
Conaghy with Golden Vet put on
down at the rodeo grounds. They
had a good turn out with great
food. We topped it off with a hot
fudge sundae at the Drug Store.
Peggy and Larry went to the ben-
efit for Celine along with most
everyone in the community on
Saturday night. Sunday night
took us down to Wasta to help out
with Bingo and ice cream social
they were having to raise money
for Relay For Life. There was a
nice little turn out for that and
fun was had by all. Thanks to
Margee and Lloyd Willey, Marilyn
Keyser and Angie Carter for put-
ting that together and thanks to
Freddie for passing out the cards!
John, Jean and Kassandra Linn
were also there. There are going
to be events held over the next
month for that worthy cause, so
keep your eyes and ears open.
Until next time…
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Open House
The children of
Lonnie and Rose Kjerstad
invite you to join the
celebration of their
55th Wedding
Anniversary
where they were married
Quinn Methodist Church
Saturday, August 24, 2013
2:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Cards may be sent to:
23000 Big Foote Rd.,
Quinn, SD 57775
PreschooL
regisTraTion
Tuesday, august 20th
Wall School • Room 110
3 year olds 5:30 p.m. • 4 year olds 6:00 p.m.
First month fees due at time of registration.
Contact Mandi McDonnell with any questions
at 515-1797 or 279-2156.
Guess who has
an August 23rd
birthday?
Happy Birthday!
Love,
Your Parents
Marvin R. Van_________________________________
Marvin R. Van, 71, of Lincoln,
Neb., died July 27, 2013 sur-
rounded by his family.
He was born April 9, 1942 in
Geddes, S.D., to Frank and Irene
(Hildebrant) VanSchoonhoven.
Marvin served in the U.S. Army
and graduated in 1968 from the
University of South Dakota with
a Broadcasting, Speech, and Jour-
nalism Degree. In his later years,
he was the owner of Vantage
Crafts and enjoyed fishing, telling
jokes, gardening, and painting.
He is survived by daughter,
Jodi (Van) Palmer and husband
Allen of Leonardtown, Md.; son,
Jason Van and Beate of Weis-
baden, Germany; grandchildren,
Shaston, Chanae, Shelby, Alexan-
dra, Kathy, Kevin, and Tyler;
great-grandchildren, Joshua and
Jaylynn; sister, Jean Madison of
Simi Valley, Calif.; nieces and
nephew, Roxanne, Vance, and Joy.
The family will celebrate his
life in the spring/summer of 2014
in Wall, S.D., details to be re-
leased at a later date.
Written condolences may be
sent to: Jodi Palmer, 23641
Hansel Ct. Leonardtown, MD
20650.
Apfel Funeral Home in Grand
Island, Neb., is in charge of
arrangements.
As the new school year begins,
over 5,000 area students will re-
turn to the classroom without
basic supplies. Black Hills Federal
Credit Union is helping these stu-
dents and their families by organ-
izing their 17th Annual School
Supply Drive.
The supplies collected will sup-
port students in more than 60
area schools throughout the Black
Hills. “The School Supply Drive
makes a difference to thousands of
families in our greater community
by ensuring that every student re-
turns to the classroom well-
equipped and ready for a success-
ful school year,” stated co-chair
Carol Brown. “Our goal is to pro-
vide a learning environment
where all children have an equal
chance to learn and excel. With
the generous help of individuals
and businesses, students will have
the pencils, notebooks, crayons
and other supplies they need to
keep up with their classmates.”
Donations of backpacks and
school supplies are being accepted
at Office Depot and Black Hills
Federal Credit Union locations
through August 19. BHFCU em-
ployees will be selling raffle tick-
ets for a chance to win one of three
generous prizes, and monetary do-
nations can be made at any
BHFCU location. 100% of dona-
tions and proceeds from raffle
sales are used to purchase school
supplies.
Supplies will be distributed
through area schools based on
need in the communities of Rapid
City, Belle Fourche, Black Hawk,
Box Elder, Custer, Hermosa, Hill
City, Hot Springs, Spearfish, Stur-
gis, Piedmont, and Wall. For more
information on how you or your
business can help, please contact
Kylene Casanova at 718-6155.
BHFCU annual School Supply Drive
Hunt Safe ClaSS
The 2013 Hunt Safe Class will be held September 13 and
14, at the West River Electric Association conference room
in Wall. The class will be held 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Fri-
day, September 13 and 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday,
September 14. Students will need to bring a sack lunch for
Saturday’s class. Parental release forms will be available at
the beginning of class and must be signed prior to the stu-
dent taking the course. Any youth that will be 12 years of
age on or before December 31, 2013 is eligible to participate.
All students are required to attend both classes to obtain
their certification. Parents are welcome to accompany their
child if they would like. If you have any questions contact
Josh Brainard, Conservation Officer with SD GF&P, at 605-
279-2078 or email josh.brainard@state.sd.us.
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053 — let it ring
News is quite limp for my part
this week. I had some unan-
swered calls but was also sad as
Gus Craven lost his mother Mary
Jane. May the Countryside ex-
tend our sympathies to the fami-
lies.
Also may we put Val Cork in
our prayers that her medical tests
come back with great news, not
serious news.
I received an encouragement
call from a former Wall resident
that it was good to hear news
from her former home. This has
gone on through the years it was
so good to read home news in the
paper.
Bonnie Riggins has been and
enjoys her visitors Ella, Marla,
Bridget, Anne, Stephen and all
her family have been so good
about visiting her and helping.
Other visitors have been Ardys
McCormick, Cloreta Eisenbraun
and Lola Joyce. This is who I seen
or heard, it is not my intention to
leave anyone not listed.
A birthday party was held for
Breanna McConnell in the
parental Paul and Gwen Mc-
Connell home with family and im-
mediate family members, last
Sunday on her birthday, the 4th.
This last Sunday, a birthday
party was held at the Methodist
Church in Wall.
The 17th of this month, Melissa
Ann McConnell and Trevor Lee
Fricke will be joined in Holy Mat-
rimony at The Wall Rodeo Arena
at one o’clock with a reception
and dance to follow at the Com-
munity Center.
Darren, Jackie, Dawson and
Dreyson Paulsen of Belle
Fourche, have been visiting this
past week in the parental Delmer
Paulsen home. They are in the
process of moving to Rapid City
as Darren will be teaching Eco-
nomics and Geography at the
Stevens High School. Jackie has
a job at Green Tree and the boys
are registered for school.
Tom Paulsen will be teaching at
the Lead-Deadwood School Sys-
tem again this year. I’ll bet he
popped the buttons of his dad’s
shirt. I know Mary is real proud
as Tom received his major promo-
tion in the National Guards.
Delmer and Mary plan to attend
the Promotion Ceremony in Sep-
tember.
Delmer and Mary’s daughter,
Lynn Mary and family, hubby
Mike, grandchildren, Hannah
and Callie met Mike’s parents at
a camping sight in the Colorado
Mountains for the August 9-12
weekend. The girls start school
the 15th. For vacation, they get a
week off at Thanksgiving, two
weeks at Christmas and a week
for Easter.
Mary is a very busy lady with a
big garden, keeping up with fam-
ily and substituting at school.
Thought of the week: What
could life be if we had no courage
to attempt anything.
Countryside News
Sarah Hammer and Kelly Tim-
merman, both of Geddes, S.D.,
announce their engagement and
forthcoming wedding.
Sarah is the daughter of Carol
and Randy Lynch of Quinn, S.D.
Kelly is the son of Ross and
Sherry Timmerman of Geddes.
An August 24, 2013 wedding is
planned.
Engagement
Pennington County Courant • August 15, 2013 • 6
Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
POSITION OPEN: Part-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Tractor oper-
ator to mow county road right of
way, and perform other duties
as directed. Pre-employment
drug and alcohol screening re-
quired. Applications / resumés
accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-
2447. K33-4tc
HELP WANTED: Wall Food
Center has multiple openings,
including Meat Department.
Must be able to lift 80 lbs. No
experience necessary. 279-
2331. WP50-2tc
HOuSEKEEPERS AND LAuN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED:
High school and college stu-
dents are welcome to apply. Will
train. Apply at either America’s
Best Value Inn and Budget Host
Sundowner in Kadoka or call
837-2188 or 837-2296.
K26-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person
to sell the historic Black Hills
Gold jewelry, in Wall. Meet trav-
elers from all over the world.
Salary + commission. Call Con-
nie at 279-2354 or 939-6443,
or fax resumé to 279-2314.
PW24-tfn
misC. foR sale
FOR SALE: Transfer bench –
new, never used – for bathtub
or walk-in shower. Call 859-
2230, Philip. P36-2tp
FOR SALE: (2) Stihl chainsaws
with extra blades, wood splitter,
wood burning stove with
blower, misc. wood cutting ac-
cessories. All in excellent condi-
tion. Call Merlin Doyle, 279-
2452. WP50-3tp
FOR SALE: Rapala Husky Jerk
fishing lures, HJ8 and HJ10.
$4.00 each. Call Mark at 441-
7049. WP50-2tc
FOR SALE: Golden Grain corn
stove 2000, burn wood pellets
or shelled corn, good condition,
$1,500. 669-2508. M34-4tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notiCes/Wanted
WANTED TO BuY: Old farm
machinery and junk cars for
crushing. 433-5443.
P36-4tp
RANCH RODEO: White River,
SD. Friday Nite, Aug. 16, 2013.
6:30 pm CDT. Events: Stray
Gathering, Rescue Race, Kids
Mini Bronc Ride, Branding,
Ranch Horse Bronc Ride. Call
Bill Adrian, 685-8105, to enter
teams. P35-2tc
Pets/suPPlies
FOR SALE: AKC German Wire-
hair Pointers, born June 11,
2013. First shots, wormed, mi-
crochip implant, AKC documen-
tation. (5) females, (1) male.
$500. 808-895-9041, Milesville.
P36-4tp
helP Wanted
HELP WANTED: General shop
duties, part or full-time, wash
and clean cars, parts runner,
pick up and deliver vehicles.
Great opportunity to kill some
time while the kids are in
school. Call Mike at Les’ Body
Shop, 859-2744 or 685-3068,
Philip.
P36-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County is accepting applica-
tions for a full time Deputy Au-
ditor. Must work well with the
public, have clerical, secretarial
and computer skills and per-
form other duties as directed.
Knowledge of governmental ac-
counting and payroll beneficial.
Selected applicant will also
work with voter registration and
the election process. Jackson
County benefits include health
insurance, life insurance, S.D.
Retirement, paid holidays, va-
cation and sick leave. Hourly
wage. Position open until filled.
Applications are available at the
Jackson County Auditor’s office
or send resumé to Jackson
County, P O Box 280, Kadoka,
SD 57543. Ph: 837-2422.
K35-2tc
CERTIFIED NuRSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tion, benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Nikki, 837-2270.
K34-tfn
RN/LPN POSITION: Seeking
loving & patient geriatric nurse.
Benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Nikki, 837-2270.
K34-tfn
HELP WANTED: Cooks,
counter personnel, wait staff,
and assistant manager posi-
tion(s) are available for Aw!
Shucks Café opening soon at
909 Main Street in Kadoka.
Please apply within or contact
Teresa or Colby Shuck for more
information: 837-2076.
K33-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employment
spraying county highway right
of way. Commercial herbicide li-
cense required or to be obtained
before start of work. Pre-em-
ployment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applica-
tions / resumés accepted. In-
formation 837-2410 or 837-
2422, Fax 837-2447.
K33-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL
required, or to be obtained in
six months. Pre-employment
drug and alcohol screening re-
quired. Benefits package. Appli-
cations / resumés accepted. In-
formation 837-2410 or 837-
2422, Fax 837-2447.
K33-4tc
AMERICA’S BEST VALuE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping, laundry and
maintenance. Call Joseph at
279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
Business & seRviCe
BuSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots
of possibilities for expansion.
Contact Kim or Vickie, 859-
2365. PR45-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-
2226, toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
ROuGH COuNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRuCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed).
We can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD,
or call 837-2690. Craig cell:
390-8087, Sauntee cell: 390-
8604; wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRm & RanCh
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-
3151. PR45-tfn
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
lost & found
LOST: Blue Sony Cybershot
camera possibly in a black with
red trim case. Most likely lost at
Wall City Park on 7/20/13 be-
tween the jungle gyms and
parking south of the football
field. 400+ pics on the memory
card including newborn-8 mo.
pics of our youngest son which
have not been printed, our
other son who is very blond, my
sister's senior pics (Gerri) and
ending with our recent trip to
Wall Drug. If located, please call
430-0613 or email sjlaurenz_dc
@hotmail.com.
P35-4tc
Real estate
WANTED: Couple looking to
rent/contract for deed: 1 bed-
room liveable home, preferably
with acreage. To be paid in full
within 5 years. Kadoka /
Belvidere / Midland. Call 517-
2254; email: saltycoot_09@
yahoo.com K36-1tp
HOuSE FOR SALE IN WALL: 2
bedrooms, 1 bath. Make an
offer. Call 279-2322.
PW36-2tp
HOuSE FOR SALE: Asking
$25,000. 406 Norris St., Wall.
279-2825. PW36-2tp
FOR SALE – MuST BE
MOVED: 1973 24x68 dou-
blewide, 3 bdrms, 2 baths, new
tin roof, skirting, paint;
sheetrocked; no mice; above av-
erage condition. Could be used
as hired man rental or at hunt-
ing camp. Call Cody, 515-0316.
P35-3tc
HOuSE FOR SALE: Asking
$25,000, 406 Norris St., Wall.
279-2825. PW35-2tp
HOME FOR SALE IN PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new
roof, windows, siding, high effi-
ciency heat/air with heat
pump, on-demand hot water,
nice propane fireplace, nice
backyard, deck and more.
Would consider contract for
deed. Contact for showing: Don
or Tami Ravellette, 685-5147
(cell) or 859-2969 (home).
P27-tfn
Rentals
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
Classified PoliCy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid at
the time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
AuCTION
OLD SD GOVERNOR’S Mansion
Real Estate AUCTION in Rapid Val-
ley. August 22, 2013 at 10AM held
on site. Visit www.SturgisSD.com
for terms, details, & photos. 14.7
acres, 7000+/-sqft home. 605-347-
7579.
MEADE COUNTY, SD Absolute
Real Estate LAND AUCTION. Au-
gust 20, 2013 2:30pm held in
Sturgis. 72+ Mountain Top Acres
near Boulder Canyon. 2 Tracts & 1
Unit. 605-347-7579.
EMPLOYMENT
POLICE CHIEF – FREEMAN, SD
The City of Freeman is taking ap-
plications for a full time Police
Chief. Responsibilities include su-
pervision and direction of police de-
partment personnel and policies,
community relations, police patrol
and other law enforcement duties.
High School Diploma or G.E.D. re-
quired. Certified Officer preferred.
Salary is dependent on qualifica-
tions and experience. Application
and job description can be picked
up at Freeman City Hall, 185 E.
3rd Street, Freeman, SD, or call
605-925-7127. Completed applica-
tion can be sent to Lisa Edelman,
Finance Officer, PO Box 178, Free-
man, SD 57029. Deadline for appli-
cations is August 23, 2013.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
WANTED. Full-time, competitive
wages, and benefits provided. Ex-
perience in auto body or transmis-
sion repair preferred. B & M Body
and Repair. Hoven, SD. Contact
Mike @ 605-948-2224.
NOW HIRING A full-time writer at
the award winning weekly newspa-
per, Chamberlain/Oacoma SUN lo-
cated on the Missouri River, along
I-90 in central South Dakota. Con-
tact lucy@lcherald.com.
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR
WYLIE? $1000 Flatbed Sign-On
*Home Weekly *Regional Dedicated
Routes *2500 Miles Weekly *$50
Tarp Pay (888) 691-5705
www.drive4ewwylie.-com.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Russell
Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota.
Scott Connell, 605-530-2672,
Craig Connell, 605-264-5650,
www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classi-
fieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this news-
paper or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up
to 48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call
Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-
3549.
HEALTH/BEAuTY
ARE YOU A 45-79 Year Old Woman
Who Developed Diabetes While On
Lipitor? If you used Lipitor between
December 1996 and the present
and were diagnosed with diabetes
while taking Lipitor, you may be
entitled to compensation. Call
Charles H. Johnson Law toll –free
1-800-535-5727.
aPaRtMentS
aVaIlaBle
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
THANK YOuS
Many thanks to the fellow who
helped put the hose back on the
turbo of our diesel pickup at Wall
S.D. Conoco parking lot on July
6th. We are so appreciative.
Darrell & Ellen Hollister.
I want to thank the Interior,
Wall and Philip fire departments
and Badlands National Park for
responding to our fire at our
ranch.
Special thanks to Will Grimes,
Brent Byerly and Jordan Hauk
for helping keep the fire from
spreading to our other buildings.
We can’t thank you enough for
what you did.
Sonny & Patty Huether
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
tDM excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
todd Sieler
Deadline for classifieds & cards of Thanks
is 11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
ADOPTION OF
PROVISIONAL
BUDGET
FOR PENNINGTON COUNTY
SOUTH DAKOTA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That the
Board of County Commissioners of Pen-
nington County, will meet in the Court-
house at 315 St. Joseph Street, Rapid
City SD on Tuesday, September 3, 2013
at 10 a.m. for the purpose of considering
the Provisional Budget for the year 2014
and the various items, schedules,
amounts and appropriations set forth
therein and as many days thereafter as is
deemed necessary until the final adoption
of the budget on or before September 30,
2013. At such time any interested per-
son may appear either in person or by a
representative and will be given an oppor-
tunity for a full and complete discussion
of all purposes, objectives, items, sched-
ules, appropriations, estimates, amounts
and matters set forth and contained in the
Provisional Budget.
“Pennington County fully subscribes to
the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you
desire to attend this public meeting and
are in need of accommodations, please
notify the Commissioners’ Office at (605)
394-2171 at least 24 hours prior to the
meeting so that appropriate services and
auxiliary aids are available.”
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published August 15 & 22, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $24.86.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
ON LICENSE
APPLICATIONS FOR SALE OF
LIQUOR
The Board of County Commissioners of
Pennington County, South Dakota on
Tuesday, September 3, 2013 at their
meeting that commences at 9:00 A.M., in
the County Commissioners’ Meeting
Room in the Pennington County Court-
house at Rapid City, South Dakota, will
consider the following liquor license ap-
plications to operate outside of municipal-
ities:
TRANSFER OF RETAIL (ON-SALE)
LIQUOR LICENSE WITH SUNDAY
OPENING
FROM: RIMROCK TAVERN, Harley R.
Scovel, 12300 W Hwy 44, Rapid City, SD
57702, 2N, 06E, Section 31, Johnson
Siding Townsite Lot SR, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
TO: RIMOCK HAPPY TAVERN, Rimrock
Holdings LLC, 12300 W Hwy 44, Rapid
City, SD 57702, 2N, 06E, Section 31,
Johnson Siding Townsite Lot SR, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE AP-
PROVAL OR REJECTION OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LICENSES MAY
APPEAR AND BE HEARD.
Julie A. Pearson, Auditor
Pennington County
Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $13.97.
QUINN TOWN
BOARD
OF TRUSTEES
REGULAR MEETING
AUGUST 5, 2013
The Quinn Town Board met at 7 pm,
Monday, August 5, at the Quinn Commu-
nity Center. Board members present were
Kevin Wenzel and Jerry Pabst, Juston
Eisenbraun was absent. Others present
were Lorna Moore and Finance Officer
Deborah Bryan.
Motion by Kevin, seconded by Jerry to
approve the agenda, motion carried.
Kevin made a motion, seconded by Jerry
to approve the minutes of the last meet-
ing, motion carried. Motion by Kevin, sec-
onded by Jerry to approve the financial
statement, motion carried.
The board has decided to discontinue
the pursuit of a centralized wastewater
system due to lack of cooperation by
homeowners in the community, motion by
Kevin, seconded by Jerry, motion carried.
Motion by Kevin, seconded by Jerry to
find a new lawyer for the Town of Quinn,
motion carried.
Motion by Jerry, seconded by Kevin to
approve the vouchers, motion carried, the
following were paid: WREA, $203.00;
Pennington County Courant, $18.68;
WRLJ Rural Water, $40.00; Kevin Wen-
zel, $25.00; Jerry Pabst, $25.00; Debbie
Bryan, $223.78; Corner Pantry, $79.16;
Kennedy Implement, $266.82; Michael
Luedeman, $54.02; Mid West Coop.,
$199.52; Wall Building Center, $2.79;
Kevin Wenzel, $84.42.
With all business complete, the meet-
ing was adjourned.
Deborah Bryan
Finance Officer
Town of Quinn
Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $15.92.
Pennington County Courant • August 15, 2013 • 7 Public Notices
PENNINGTON COUNTY'S MEANS OF FINANCE
TOTALS ACCUM COUNTY COUNTY DOM DRUG E911 EMERG GENERAL HAZMAT HEALTH LIBRARY MOD & ROAD & 24-7 UNORG
BLDG FAIR FIRE ABUSE SEIZE MGMT LEPC CARE PRESV BRIDGE ROAD
233 212 211 229 209 222 226 101 227 603 208 250 201 248 200
CASH BALANCE APPLIED . . . .8,092,667 . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,715 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300,000 . . . . .276,098 . . . . .5,792,225 . . . . . .4,206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42,379 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,500,000 . . . . . . . . . . .157,044
CURRENT PROP TAXES . . . . .37,389,456 . . .3,967,961 . . . .493,406 . . . . .263,649 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30,568,373 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .444,388 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,651,679
OTHER TAXES (310) . . . . . . . . .526,200 . . . . .45,500 . . . . . .7,600 . . . . . . .5,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .419,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38,200
LICENSE & PERMITS (320) . . .297,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INTERGOVERNMENTAL (330) .12,377,961 . . .763,277 . . . . .275 . . . . . . . . .25,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78,474 . . . . . .1,270,200 . . . .556,898 . . . . .3,181,343 . . . . . .5,794 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,045,000 . . . . . . . . . .1,451,000
CHARGES GOODS
& SVC (340) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,854,685 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,671,174 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,556,631 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,000,260 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60,000 . . . . .179,500 . . .375,120 . . . . . . . . .
FINES (350) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MISCELLANEOUS (360) . . . . . .632,250 . . . . .13,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .268,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .350,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OTHER FINANCING (370) . . . .6,308,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .622,372 . . . . .71,400 . . . . . .267,213 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,347,634 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TOTAL MISC REVENUES . . . . .41,018,965 . . .821,777 . . . . .7,875 . . . . . . .31,400 . . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .78,474 . . . . . .3,563,746 . . . .628,298 . . . . .17,978,387 . . . . .5,794 . . . . .5,350,760 . . . .9,400 . . . . . . .60,000 . . . . .10,573,734 375,120 .1,489,200
TOTAL REVENUE SOURCES . .86,501,088 . . .4,789,738 . . . .501,281 . . . . .315,764 . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .78,474 . . . . . .3,863,746 . . . .904,396 . . . . .54,338,985 . . . . .10,000 . . . .5,350,760 . . . .496,167 . . . . .60,000 . . . . .12,073,734 375,120 .3,297,923
LESS UNCOLLECTIBLE (5%) . .3,035,232 . . . .228,083 . . . . .23,871 . . . . . .15,036 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,587,571 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23,627 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157,044
MEANS OF FINANCE . . . . . . . .83,465,856 . . .4,561,655 . . . .477,410 . . . . .300,728 . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .78,474 . . . . . .3,863,746 . . . .904,396 . . . . .51,751,414 . . . . .10,000 . . . .5,350,760 . . . .472,540 . . . . .60,000 . . . . .12,073,734 375,120 .3,140,879
TOTAL BUDGET . . . . . . . . . . . .83,465,856 . . .4,561,655 . . . .477,410 . . . . .300,728 . . . . .45,000 . . . . . .78,474 . . . . . .3,863,746 . . . .904,396 . . . . .51,751,414 . . . . .10,000 . . . .5,350,760 . . . .472,540 . . . . .60,000 . . . . .12,073,734 375,120 .3,140,879
Difference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
GRAND TOTAL BUDGET: 83,465,856
GRAND TOTAL MEANS OF FINANCE 83,465,856
SUMS ABOVE MOF SUMS diff
CASH RESERVES USED:..................8,092,667 . . . . . . . .8,092,667................ 0
CURRENT TAXES LEVIED: ...............37,389,456 . . . . . . .37,389,456.............. 0
TOTAL MISC REVENUES: .................41,018,965 . . . . . . .41,018,965.............. 0
5% UNCOLLECTIBLE ......................3,035,232 . . . . . . . .3,035,232................ 0
MATH CHECK.....................................89,536,320 . . . . . . .89,536,320.............. 0
Published August 15, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $94.55.
PENNINGTON COUNTY'S
2014 PROVISIONAL BUDGET
DEPARTMENT 2014 REQUEST FUND
24/7 Program* .................................................375,120 . . . . . . . . . . . . .24/7 Program
A&N Appointed Attorneys................................224,672 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Adams St.........................................................1,331,655 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Auditor .............................................................366,883 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
B & G -Honeywell Lease .................................717,115 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Bonds .............................................................4,261,655 . . . . . . . .Accumulated Bldg
Buildings & Grounds........................................3,605,903 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Capital improvement Projects* ........................300,000 . . . . . . . . .Accumulated Bldg
Commissioners................................................356,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Contingency & Financial Software Res...........100,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Coroner ...........................................................138,544 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
County Fairgrounds.........................................178,295 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .County Fair
County Fairgrounds Bond Payment*...............299,115 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .County Fair
County Fire* ....................................................300,728 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .County Fire
Court Administration .......................................258,613 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Court Appointed Attorney ................................336,183 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
DENR 319 Grant .............................................245,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Detox...............................................................2,371,717 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Dispatch ..........................................................3,863,746 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E911
Domestic Abuse Fund*....................................45,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .Domestic Abuse
Drainage..........................................................80,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Drug Seizure* ..................................................78,474 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Drug Seizure
Economic Assistance ......................................1,786,625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Elections..........................................................431,261 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Emergency Management*...............................507,298 . . . .Emergency Management
Equalization.....................................................1,427,100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Extension 4-H..................................................76,590 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Flood Warning .................................................38,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
GIS..................................................................100,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Hazmat Fund...................................................10,000 . . . . . . . .Hazardous Materials
Hazmat Response-General .............................20,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Health Care Clinics..........................................193,348 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Health Care Trust*...........................................5,350,760 . . . . . . . . . . . . .Health Care
HIDTA Grant ....................................................170,535 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Hill City Law Contract ......................................221,248 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Homeland Sec - Equipment* ..........................351,000 . . . .Emergency Management
Human Resources...........................................123,469 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Insurance ........................................................565,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
IT .....................................................................969,293 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Jail ...................................................................9,640,728 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Jail Adult Work Program..................................81,533 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Jail Inmate Services HHS...............................499,350 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
JSC Juvenile Services Center.........................4,700,467 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
JTV Grant .......................................................113,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Juvenile Alternatives........................................474,266 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Juvenile Diversion ..........................................210,488 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Keystone Law Contract ...................................107,991 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Law Enforce Equipment Grant ........................150,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Library* ............................................................472,540 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Library
Lien Collections...............................................111,461 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Mental & Alcohol Inv - HHS.............................66,458 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Mental & Alcohol Inv - SAO.............................913,108 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Mod & Pres .....................................................60,000 .Modernization & Preservation
Mountain Pine Beetle ......................................120,697 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
New Underwood Law .....................................95,217 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Ordinance........................................................73,446 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
OTO from General Fund .................................2,900,527 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
OTO from Unorg Rd to R&B............................3,140,879 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Unorg Rd
Pandemic Flu* ................................................46,098 . . . . .Emergency Management
Planning .........................................................388,255 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Predatory Animal Control ...............................3,339 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Public Advocate...............................................204,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Public Defender...............................................1,849,087 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Register of Deeds............................................464,112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Road & Bridge*................................................12,073,734 . . . . . . . . . . . .Rd & Bridge
School Liaison.................................................299,643 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Search & Rescue ............................................94,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Senior Citizens ................................................19,446 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Sheriff ..............................................................7,014,194 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Soil Conservations ..........................................62,721 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
States Attorney................................................2,534,334 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Station .............................................................153,037 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Treasurer .........................................................957,384 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
VAWA Grant ....................................................361,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
VOCA..............................................................85,866 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Wall Law Contract ...........................................230,079 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Water Protection..............................................129,044 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Water Rescue Response.................................15,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Weed & Pest ...................................................280,232 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Witness - Public Defender...............................34,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
Witness - States Attorney................................56,250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General
........................................................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TOTAL Expenditures.....................................83,465,856
FUND TOTALS:
Accumulated Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,561,655
E911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,863,746
County Fairgrounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .477,410
County Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300,728
Domestic Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45,000
Drug Seizure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78,474
Emergency Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .904,396
County General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51,751,414
Hazardous Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,000
Health Care Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,350,760
Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .472,540
Modernization & Presrvtion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60,000
Road & Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,073,734
Title 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
24-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .375,120
Unorganized Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,140,879
**TOTAL** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83,465,856
Published August 15, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $102.44.
Pennington County Courant
279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net
Legal Publication
Deadline is 11:00 a.m.
on FRIDAY
Murdo 0entaI CIInIc
Announces the addItIon of
0r. Aaron ßumpca to famIIy
dentaI practIce, joInIng
0r. JIm 5zana
Lcntistry for thc wholc family, including orthodontics
Acccpts Ncdicaid and othcr dcntal insuranccs
Call to make an appointment witb Dr. Rompca today!
609 Garficld Avcnuc - 60ô-669-2131 - 60ô-222-29ô2
Cpen Toesday - Tborsday and Fridays doring scbool year
Murdo 0entaI, LLC
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE. SALE
TIME: 10 A.M. (MT}
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF
SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC
SHOTS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our
vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e
produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng 1ssues. Jo1n
1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL
& FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF & STOCK
COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAV-
ACANZA HOFSE SALE. VIEW ONLINE SOON!
CATTL£ R£PORT:
TU£SDAY, AUGUST JS, 2DJS
A b1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e ]or our Speo1o1
Yeor11ng So1e. MorKe1 ogo1n verg oompe1111ve.
Good oroud o] bugers. Mong 1Þ1nner bu11s 1n 1oun.
We1gÞ-ups & Þorses ne×1 ueeK.
YEARLINGS:
LANDERS LIVESTOCK CO - HOT SPRINGS
69....................................DLK & DWF STFS 815= .................$163.00
61 ..............................................DLK STFS 906= .................$155.00
62....................................DLK & DWF STFS 894= .................$155.75
61....................................DLK & DWF STFS 869= .................$157.75
61 ..............................................DLK STFS 891= .................$155.25
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
120 ............................................DLK STFS 828= .................$159.50
60 ..............................................DLK STFS 842= .................$158.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF -
204 ............................................DLK STFS 980= .................$145.50
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
65..............................................FWF STFS 837= .................$159.00
63 ...................................FWF & DWF STFS 898= .................$153.00
22...................................FED & FWF HFFS 835= .................$148.00
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
3 ................................................DLK STFS 712= .................$162.00
5................................................DLK HFFS 673= .................$148.50
HEWITT RANCH - PIEDMONT
13 ..............................................DLK STFS 887= .................$147.75
ROD KIRK - CODY, NE
7................................................DLK HFFS 866= .................$140.25
MADSEN RANCH CATTLE - MIDLAND
8 .....................................FED & DLK HFFS 789= .................$146.00
CASEY BRINK - UNION CENTER
7................................................DLK HFFS 858= .................$139.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND - RED OWL
7 ..............................................CHAF STFS 727= .................$154.50
9....................................CHAF & DLK HFFS 729= .................$151.75
SHAYNE PORCH - WANBLEE
2 ................................................DLK STFS 673= .................$163.00
2................................................DLK HFFS 650= .................$150.50
THOMPSON RANCH - WANBLEE
6................................................DLK HFFS 811= .................$141.75
SCHULTES RANCH - HOWES
11..............................................DLK HFFS 772= .................$140.00
MERLE HICKS - MARTIN
9 .....................................FED & DLK HFFS 803= .................$146.50
LONNIE HALL - SPEARFISH
14....................................FED & DLK STFS 613= .................$162.50
GEORGE GITTINGS - PHILIP
2 ................................................DLK STFS 670= .................$151.00
6................................................DLK HFFS 645= .................$147.00
WAYNE HEATH - CODY, NE
14..............................................DLK HFFS 861= .................$139.50
DAVID SCOTT - OWANKA
11..............................................DLK HFFS 734= .................$148.25
LARRY HEATH - CODY, NE
13..............................................DLK HFFS 845= .................$140.00
HARLEY & COLLEEN ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
14..............................................DLK HFFS 837= .................$141.50
DALE YOUNG - WANBLEE
6......................................FED & DLK STFS 811= .................$150.00
7................................................DLK HFFS 701= .................$149.50
SHANE GRUBL - RED OWL
10 .....................................DLK OPEN HFFS 966= .................$134.00
TERRY & LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
12 .............................................FED HFFS 934= .................$133.75
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
8..............................................CHAF HFFS 1071= ...............$113.50
SPRING CALVES:
BEAU BENDIGO - HOWES
14 ......................DLK MXD STF & HFF CLVS 338= .................$780.00
CREW CATTLE COMPANY - PHILIP
8 ......................CHAF MXD STF & HFF CLVS 371= .................$770.00
WEIGH-UPS:
DONELLE COBB - RED OWL
1 ..............................................CHAF COW 1440= .................$88.00
OFM PARTNERSHIP - CREIGHTON
1.................................................DLK COW 1355= .................$87.50
1.................................................DLK COW 1545= .................$85.00
1.................................................DLK COW 1650= .................$83.50
1.................................................DLK COW 1520= .................$82.50
BILL GIKLING - BOX ELDER
1..............................................HEFF DULL 2030= ...............$107.50
DAN STARR - BOX ELDER
1................................................FED DULL 2000= ...............$104.00
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
1..............................................CHAF DULL 1805= ...............$107.50
1..............................................CHAF DULL 2205= ...............$102.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE COMPANY - QUINN
1................................................DLK DULL 1980= ...............$103.00
JAMES MANSFIELD - NORRIS
1.................................................DLK COW 1020= .................$88.50
1................................................DWF COW 1320= .................$82.50
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1.................................................DLK COW 1370= .................$84.50
1 ..........................................DLK COWETTE 1145= .................$95.00
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1395= .................$84.00
1...............................................HEFF COW 1160= .................$83.00
1...............................................HEFF COW 1265= .................$82.00
4.............................................HEFF COWS 1313= .................$81.50
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1308= .................$81.25
3.............................................HEFF COWS 1322= .................$81.00
1................................................FWF COW 1215= .................$80.00
4.............................................HEFF COWS 1173= .................$78.25
17.....................................DLK COWS (WET} 1158= .................$78.00
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1530= .................$77.50
3.......................................HEFF COWETTES 828= ...................$96.50
1 ........................................HEFF COWETTE 950= ...................$92.50
2.......................................HEFF COWETTES 973= ...................$91.50
1................................................FED DULL 2050= ...............$103.50
ASA LEE HICKS - MARTIN
1.................................................DLK COW 1315= .................$82.50
1................................................DWF COW 1235= .................$81.50
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
1.................................................DLK COW 1255= .................$82.50
FLOY & ALAN OLSON - BOX ELDER
1 ..............................................CHAF COW 1385= .................$82.00
1................................................FED DULL 2025= ...............$100.50
ALLEN BADURE - BELVIDERE
2...............................................DLK COWS 1358= .................$81.50
3.....................................FED & DLK COWS 1440= .................$81.25
5.....................................FED & DLK COWS 1292= .................$80.50
1..........................................FWF COWETTE 1215= .................$88.50
NEWTON BROWN - FAITH
2...............................................FED COWS 1390= .................$80.75
3...............................................FED COWS 1480= .................$80.00
PAT GUPTILL - QUINN
1................................................FED DULL 2135= ...............$102.50
1................................................FED DULL 1840= .................$97.00
CHUCK WILLARD - BELVIDERE
1..............................................CHAF HFFT 970= .................$109.50
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 980= ...................$97.00
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 965= ...................$96.00
1..........................................FED COWETTE 1020= .................$95.50
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 1065= .................$94.00
1..........................................FED COWETTE 1025= .................$91.00
TOM MILLER - RED OWL
1................................................DLK DULL 1850= ...............$102.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1815= ...............$101.50
SHANE GRUBL - RED OWL
1................................................DLK DULL 1800= ...............$102.00
DIANE BISHOP - HERMOSA
1 ................................................FED COW 1270= .................$78.50
GARY ALLISON - CREIGHTON
2 ....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1590= .................$78.25
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
1...............................................HEFF COW 1430= .................$78.00
JON MILLAR - NEWELL
1................................................DLK DULL 2110= ...............$101.50
1................................................DLK DULL 1995= .................$97.00
JEREMY MANSFIELD - NORRIS
1................................................DLK DULL 1940= ...............$101.50
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
1.................................................DLK COW 1680= .................$77.50
ROGER PETERSON - PHILIP
1................................................DWF COW 1550= .................$77.00
STEVE CLEMENTS - PHILIP
39 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS (WET} 1350= .................$76.75
4 ....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1231= .................$75.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1.................................................DLK COW 1395= .................$76.50
3...............................................DLK COWS 1223= .................$75.25
TRAVIS THOMPSON - WANBLEE
2.........................................DLK COWETTES 1143= .................$89.00
TREVOR WILLIAMS - INTERIOR
1................................................DLK DULL 2030= ...............$101.00
BRETT GUPTILL - INTERIOR
1................................................DLK DULL 1945= ...............$101.00
BURL BARBER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1................................................DLK DULL 1605= ...............$101.00
LL & RE KJERSTAD - QUINN
1................................................DLK DULL 1980= ...............$100.50
LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
1................................................FED DULL 1890= ...............$100.00
GLEN SPRING - UNION CENTER
1................................................DLK DULL 1690= .................$99.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1720= .................$98.00
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
1................................................FED DULL 2130= .................$98.50
OBIE BRUNSKILL - PHILIP
1..............................................HEFF DULL 1910= .................$98.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1880= .................$95.50
MARLIN MAUDE - HERMOSA
1................................................DLK DULL 1870= .................$98.00
CODY O'DEA - MIDLAND
1................................................DLK DULL 1995= .................$97.50
Pennington County Courant • August 15, 2013 • 8
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
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2DD4 Ford Frees1or
V-b, uuto, ¡¡ont ö ¡cu¡ uí¡,
íocuí t¡udc!
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
August 15th: Fleish Keichla
w/Fruit
August 16th: SanDee’s Loaded
Mexican Tots
August 19th: Hot or BBQ Wings
w/French Fries
August 20th: Indian Taco
August 21st: Lasagna
w/Tossed Salad & Garlic Bread
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Four Generations
From left: Great-grandpa Merlin Doyle, Wall; Mother Lyndsay Lunders,
Clarksville, Tenn.;. Great-grandma Mary Jane Doyle, Wall; Grandpa Jim
Doyle, Belle Fourche, S.D; holding Grandson Connor Lunders,
Clarksville.
Normally I write an article like
this in the Spring. However, I feel
compelled to share what is on my
heart and mind right now, because
it is so vital to our living today and
spring is just too far away.
Hope and belief, often times re-
ferred to as anticipation, are two
attitudes that should permeate
our thoughts and daily thinking.
Frankly, without hope and strong
convictions of belief, life is surely
an exercise in futility. These two
attitudes are the foundation, liter-
ally the tilled and prepared soil
necessary, for personal growth
and success to occur.
Now sprinkle in a few seeds of
innovation and creativity. The old
saying, "the solutions are in the
problems" is still quite relevant
today. Solving challenges and
problems by thinking through the
facts, and brainstorming the pos-
sible solutions is a key to growth.
Then, make commitments to
water your "garden" with abun-
dant amounts of "attitudes for ex-
cellence." These attitudes include
(but are not limited to) a cultivat-
ing a quality mindset, tenacity in
difficult times, a spirit of enthusi-
asm, the process of building value
and timeliness. When you are not
only meeting these standards, but
also exceeding them, you are defi-
nitely on the right track. I must
believe this. I have seen the fruit
of this strategy lived out in the
lives of many, many people.
Strategy for Growth
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly moti-
vational seminars each year. Call
Bob for more details at 800-437-
9715 and be sure to check out
Bob’s website at: www.mratti-
tudespeaks. com
FINANCIAL FOCUS
AVoID "CRAMMING" FoR
CoLLeGe SAVINGS
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
If you have children, you’re
keenly aware that it’s getting
close to back-to-school time.
Today, that might mean you need
to go shopping for notebooks and
pencils. But in the future, when
“back to school” means “off to col-
lege,” your expenditures are likely
to be significantly greater. Will
you be financially prepared for
that day?
It could be expensive. The aver-
age cost for one year at an in-
state public school is $22,261,
while the comparable expense for
a private school is $43,289, ac-
cording to the College Board’s fig-
ures for the 2012–2013 academic
year. And these costs will proba-
bly continue to rise.
Still, there’s no need to panic.
Your child could receive grants or
scholarships to college, which
would lower the “sticker price.”
But it’s still a good idea for you to
save early and often.
To illustrate the importance of
getting an early jump on college
funding, let’s look at two exam-
ples of how you might fund a col-
lege education. A 529 plan is one
way — but not the only way — to
save for college. (The following ex-
amples are hypothetical in nature
and don’t reflect the performance
of an actual investment or invest-
ment strategy.)
Example 1: Suppose you
started saving for your child’s col-
lege education when she was 3
years old. If you contributed $200
a month, for 15 years, to a 529
plan that earned 7% a year, you’d
accumulate about $64,000 by the
time your daughter turned 18.
With a 529 plan, your earnings
grow tax free, provided all with-
drawals are used for qualified
higher education purposes. (Keep
in mind, though, that 529 plan
distributions not used for quali-
fied expenses may be subject to
federal and state income tax and
a 10% IRS penalty.)
Example 2: Instead of starting
to save when your child was 3,
you wait 10 years, until she turns
13. You put in the same $200 per
month to a 529 plan that earns
the same 7% a year. After five
years, when your daughter has
turned 18, you will have accumu-
lated slightly less than $15,000.
Clearly, there’s a big disparity
between $64,000 and $15,000. So,
if you don’t want to be in a posi-
tion where you have to start put-
ting away huge sums of money
each month to “catch up” on your
college savings, you’ll be well ad-
vised to start saving as early as
possible — specifically, during the
first few years of your child’s life.
Of course, given all your other
expenses, you may find it chal-
lenging to begin putting away
money for college. And with so
many years to go until you actu-
ally need the money, it’s tempting
to put off your savings for another
day. But those “other days” can
add up — and before you know it,
college may be looming.
Consequently, you may want to
put your savings on “autopilot” by
setting up a bank authorization to
move money each month into a
college savings account. And, as
your income rises, you may be
able to increase your monthly
contributions.
Save early, save often: It’s a
good strategy for just about any
investment goal — and it can
make an especially big difference
when it comes to paying for the
high costs of higher education.
Special events in
S.D. State Parks
South Dakota state parks will hold
special events on Saturday, Aug. 17.
The activities are a great way to
spend a summer day. Make plans to
attend the following events:
•Nature Hike, 9 a.m. CDT, Good
Earth State Park at Blood Run near
Sioux Falls. Join the park naturalist
on a nature hike through the new
Good Earth State Park which is
within the Blood Run National His-
toric Landmark. The area is signifi-
cant for its history as a settlement for
thousands of American Indians. This
nature walk will be an introduction
and exploration of the 13th S.D.
State Park and the first in 40 years.
Info: 605-987-2263 or
newtonhills@state.sd.us, pre-regis-
tration: 605-362-2777 or www.out-
doorcampus.org
•Disco Disc Golf Tournament, 9
a.m. CDT, Big Sioux Recreation Area
near Brandon. Disc golf teams will
compete for the top prize. All levels
are welcome! Teams can begin regis-
tering at 9 a.m. Info: 605-582-7243
•Sand Volleyball Fun, 10 a.m.
CDT, Lake Poinsett Recreation Area
near Arlington. Hit the beach for a
game of sand volleyball. Info: 605-
983-5085
•Incredible Insects, 1 p.m. CDT,
Newton Hills State Park near Can-
ton. Learn about the insects in South
Dakota! Info: 605-987-2263
•South Dakota’s State Insect, 4
p.m. CDT, Newton Hills State Park
near Canton. Learn all about South
Dakota's state insect! Info: 605-987-
2263
•SD Bat Festival, 6:30 p.m. MDT,
Custer State Park. In partnership
with the South Dakota Bat Working
Group, Custer State Park is hosting
the 8th Annual Bat Festival. Several
biologists will be on-hand with activ-
ities and presentations to help visi-
tors understand and appreciate the
myths and facts associated with bats.
Info: 605-255-4464 or www.sdbwg.org
•Lantern Tour, 8:30 p.m. CDT,
Fort Sisseton Historic State Park
near Lake City. Tour historic Fort
Sisseton by the light of a lantern.
Lanterns are provided. Info: 605-448-
5474
•Constellation Stories, 9:30
p.m. CDT, Good Earth State Park at
Blood Run near Sioux Falls. Learn
constellation stories from cultures
around the world while looking at the
Good Earth night sky through a tele-
scope. Bring good walking shoes and
bug repellant. Info: 605-987-2263
The programs are open to all ages.
There is no charge to participate in
the events; however, a park entrance
license is required to enter the parks.
For more information on activities
in South Dakota state parks, visit
www.gfp.sd.gov , contact the individ-
ual park office or call 605-773-3391.

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