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Pennington Co. Courant, August 1, 2013

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Number 31
Volume 108
August 1, 2013
Minuteman Missile National
Historic Site, the 379th unit of the
National Park Service, announces
the construction of a new visitor
center.
The present visitor contact sta-
tion has been co-located with the
administrative offices in a tempo-
rary facility since 2004.
The contract to build the visitor
center has been awarded to J.
Scull Construction Service of
Rapid City, South Dakota and
groundbreaking is scheduled to
occur within the next 30 days, with
a projected opening date of Novem-
ber 2014.
When completed, the new build-
ing will be approximately 7,300
square feet of educational displays,
theater, retail space for our East-
ern National sales outlet, and the
park’s administrative offices.
“There have been a lot of people
This year’s 61st Annual Mem-
bership Meeting of Golden West
Telecommunications Cooperative
scheduled for Saturday, September
28th in Wall, S.D. will find the
terms of four directors expiring on
the Cooperative’s 15-member
board of directors.
Terms expiring this year include
those of Robert Hansen of Howes
(District I), Kenneth Zickrick, Jr.
of Longvalley (District IV), Dale
Guptill of Interior (District VI) and
Bart Birkeland of Gregory (Dis-
Minuteman Missile National Historic Site
announces construction of visitor center
locally, at our regional office in
Omaha, Nebraska, and the Na-
tional Park Service Harpers Ferry
Center in Harpers Ferry, West Vir-
ginia that have worked very hard
to make this happen. We believe
our visitors will be very pleased
with the facility and visitor serv-
ices offered at the new location”,
said Duane Bubac, Acting Super-
intendent of Minuteman.
“Completion of the visitor center
will allow us to better serve our
visitors as growth in visitation,
and interest in the Cold War and
the Minuteman missile system
continues to increase”, said Lead
Ranger Butch Davis, interpretive
supervisor at Minuteman.
Planned displays will include
the beginnings of the Cold War,
nuclear arms build-up, displays
about the people, and their duties,
that prevented the Cold War from
becoming World War III, a histori-
cal timeline, and thought-provok-
ing inquiries from the Cold War
and after, to name just a few.
Minuteman Missile National
Historic Site was established to
preserve, and tell the story of, the
Minuteman’s role in preserving
peace and deterring war between
the United States and former So-
viet Union during the Cold War.
For more information, please
call (605) 433-5552, or check out
the website at www.nps.gov/mimi
About the National Park Serv-
ice. More than 20,000 National
Park Service employees care for
America’s 401 national parks and
work with communities across the
nation to help preserve local his-
tory and create close-to-home
recreational opportunities. Learn
more at www.nps.gov
Four director terms to expire at Golden
West’s annual membership meeting
trict VII).
Members residing in those dis-
tricts who qualify under the by-
laws of the Cooperative, including
the incumbent directors, may run
for the expiring term by circulat-
ing and returning an official nom-
inating petition to the Golden West
business office in Dell Rapid, Hart-
ford, Hot Springs, Mission or Wall
by Thursday, August 29.
A special notice further detailing
the nominating process was
mailed to each member in the af-
fected districts.
Those interested in running for
the Board can pick up a petition
from any of the offices or by calling
1-855-888-7777 to have a packet
mailed.
Those calling will receive a peti-
tion packet, which will include the
official nominating petition, a map
of the director districts and infor-
mation explaining the responsibil-
ities of a board member.
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture (SDDA) reminds
homeowners to properly follow
label directions when applying
lawn and garden pesticides and
fertilizers this summer.
Whether homeowners are apply-
ing these products themselves or
hiring a professional to do the job,
lawn and garden products must be
handled appropriately.
Before applying pesticides and
fertilizers, homeowners should
read the product labels that spec-
ify how to use the product safely,
effectively and legally.
Applying pesticides, fertilizers,
or weed and feed products that
contain both, in a manner incon-
sistent with label directions, is a
violation of the law.
Before hiring a professional
lawn care provider, SDDA advises
homeowners to make sure these
professionals are licensed first.
South Dakota law requires them
to have a Category 4 Commercial
Applicators license issued by
SDDA. To obtain a li-
cense, applicators must demon-
strate the necessary qualifications,
knowledge and training to apply
pesticides and fertilizers safely, ef-
fectively and according to the law.
Whether you are doing the work
yourself or hiring a professional,
follow these tips to make sure
lawn, garden and tree care serv-
ices are executed correctly.
1. Purchase only as much as you
need and store the unused product
safely.
2. Do not apply chemicals if the
weather conditions are not right.
For example, high wind can cause
products to drift off-site and cause
damage to people or plants.
3. Read "directions for use" and
“precautionary statements” sec-
tions on the label before use.
4. Ask to see the professional ap-
plicator’s license before they start
working as they must carry a valid
license ID card while working.
5. Pay attention to warning
signs/flags that are posted on
lawns near the sidewalk or street
and at entry points at recreational
property to alert people that a
treatment was made to the area.
6. Review written application
records and/or invoices provided by
applicators to document their
work, including products used and
sites applied.
Homeowners reminded to follow directions
when applying lawn pesticides/fertilizers
Consumers can call the Better
Business Bureau at 800.646.6222
and ask for a customer satisfaction
history about lawn care compa-
nies. For information about appli-
cator licenses, call SDDA at
605.773.4432.
To report an unlicensed person
making a pesticide or fertilizer ap-
plication, please file a complaint
on the SDDA website at
http://sdda.s
d.gov/farming-ranching-agribusi-
ness/how-do-i/
Proper disposal of used pesticide
containers is also important be-
cause there is always residue left
over inside the containers. There
are two facilities for gathering and
recycling of these containers in SD.
They are operated by SDDA and
are located in Pierre and Vermil-
lion.
This is an award sponsored by the Wall Beautification Committee each year. The yard is chosen
based on a criteria of: (1) the type, variation, and color of vegetation, such as trees, shrubs, and
flowers, (2) health and care of the lawn and yard, (3) house as it gives a positive attractiveness to
the yard, and (4) landscaping. This year’s recipients are Natalie and Eric Hansen. Their compact
yard offers as much beauty as any of the larger yards in Wall. Open to view from the street, it
catches the attention of anyone going by. Those who have noticed have witnessed the changes
for the better on this corner over the years. It is a young yard with healthy trees and shrubs, and
a variety of plants to insure color all season. Natalie and her son Reid are the main caretakers of
the yard, with some assistance from Eric. Reid does his part with the lawn while Natalie maintains
the plantings. This is a family with a concern for the environment, and they are doing their part to
take care of it in our urban area. They will be presented with an award at the Eastern Pennington
County District’s Annual Banquet to be held in November. This year the runners up were Wayne
and Melanie Shull. It was close! Congratulations to the Hansen Family!! ~Courtesy Photo
Enviromental Green Yard award
Ridge Sandal attends
Rural Electric Youth tour
SDDA also tours South Dakota
throughout the summer with a
mobile container shredder and
there is a scheduled list of sites for
container drop off.
See our website for more infor-
mation http://sdda.sd.gov/farming-
ranching-agribusiness/pesticide-
program/
Agriculture is South Dakota's
No. 1 industry, generating over
$21 billion in annual economic ac-
tivity and employing more than
122,000 South Dakotans.
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture's mission is to pro-
mote, protect, preserve, and im-
prove this industry for today and
tomorrow.
Visit us online at http://sdda.sd.
gov or find us on Facebook at
https://www.facebook.com/SDAgD
ept and Twitter @SDAgriculture.
Wall High School Senior Ridge
Sandal was one of 39 teens who
represented South Dakota in
Washington D.C. for the 2013
Rural Electric Tour.
The tour was held from June 14
to June 20 where the group visited
monuments, museums and other
historical sites of the area.
During National Youth Day, the
S.D. teens joined 1,600 other co-op
Kaci Olivier and Ridge Sandal make a rubbing of a name at the
Vietnam Veterans Memorial. ~Courtesy Photo
youths to learn about the electric
coppoerative and the importance
of community involvement.
On June 28, the group was able
to follow Senators Tim Johnson,
John Thune and Represenative
Kristi Noem.
Sandal along with Josie Weiland
were sponsored by West River
Electric.
Highway Patrol graduates nine new troopers
After more than eight months of
training, nine recruits officially
joined the ranks of the South
Dakota Highway Patrol during a
graduation ceremony in the Capi-
tol Rotunda on Friday, July 26.
The nine new troopers, formally
members of Class 53, completed
basic law enforcement training,
followed by the South Dakota
Highway Patrol Recruit Academy.
From mid-May until graduation
day, they were in field training.
The period from initial application
to graduation is about one year.
Lt. Gov. Matt Michels joined
family and friends of the new
troopers for the ceremony. He told
the new troopers that law enforce-
ment officers are critically impor-
tant to our free society.
“Please remember there are
hundreds of thousands of South
Dakotans who appreciate you,”
said Lt. Gov. Michels. “With every
action you take, and even with
every ticket you give, you will be
motivating people to obey the law.”
At the conclusion of the cere-
mony, the recruits officially be-
came members of the Highway Pa-
trol and left for their initial duty
stations. Several of the new troop-
ers were scheduled to be on duty
as early as Saturday, July 27.
The troopers and their duty sta-
tions are: Bill Berry, Sturgis; Aric
Dierkhising, Wall; Ben Filipiak,
Kadoka; Brandon Hansen, Elk
Point; Brandon Mathistad, Rapid
City; Kyle Mobley, Pierre; Matt
Robl, Huron; Steve Tow, Redfield;
Adam Woxland, Winner.
Barn burns at Huether’s
The Wall, Interior and Philip Volunteer Fire Departments along with the Badlands National Park
Fire Department were called to a structural fire at Sonny and Patty Huether’s in the Conata Basin
on Monday, July 29. The barn which was 98 years old caught fire and burned to the ground. Sonny
said they were going to register the barn as a century old but hadn’t gotten around to the paper
work yet. Fortunately a building which was located near the barn and houses all of Sonny’s tools
was saved along with pieces of equipment. It is not known at this time what started the fire.
~Photo Lauire Hindman
Firemen cut down corrals
around the barn that were
smoldering. Sonny and Patty
Huether’s barn burnt to the
ground on Monday, July 29.
Fire departments from around
the area were on the scene but
were unable to save the 98
year old barn
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 2
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PennIngton County's Most Wunted
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JOS£PH JAM£S J£NKINS
A IoIony Arrosf Wnrrnnf hns
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JonkIns chnrgIng hIm wIfh Iro-
bnfIon !ovocnfIon for InIIuro fo
!oµorf n IoIony.
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yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 5`?¨
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Letter to the
Editor
If you have a recipe that demon-
strates just how easy it is to cook
with beef, using any fresh beef cut
and fresh ingredients with
prepackaged food products, it’s
time to enter the 2013 South
Dakota State Fair Beef Cook-Off.
This year’s Cook-Off theme is
Semi-Homemade Beef Recipes,
and it’s a perfect fit for the busy
home cook who loves to serve deli-
cious and nutritious beef. “Every-
one is pressed for time today,” ex-
plains event chairperson Shirley
Thompson. “We want to inspire
home cooks to share their best beef
recipe paired with time-saving
products.”
The SD State Fair Beef Cook-Off
is an annual event that invites am-
ateur cooks from across the state
to show their beef-cooking skills
and creativity in a fun competition
during the State Fair. “This year’s
theme is a bit of a departure from
past contests,” explains Thomp-
son, “but we really want to target
that group of home cooks that can
The Wall “A and B” baseball team played in a Badlands League two day tourney in Philip and
Kadoka. Results: First round - Thursday, July 18, in Philip - Philip over Murdo 16-3. Kadoka over
Wall 4-3. Second round - Saturday, July 20, in Kadoka - Wall over Murdo 3-2. Final round - Saturday,
July 20, in Kadoka - Philip over Kadoka, 3-2. Pictured back row: from left to right ... Coach Tim
Eisenbraun, Mercede Hess, Jack Ermish, Preston Eisenbraun, Elyssa Westby, Cooper McLaughlin,
Gavin Sandal and Coach Susie Westby. Middle Row: from left to right ... Terel Eisenbraun, Taden
Casjens, Jace O’Rourke and Derek Griebel. Front row: from left to right ... Andrew Law, Luke Harris
and Enoch Cuny. ~Courtesy Photo
Wall’s baseball team plays in Badlands League tourney
The South Dakota FFA Associa-
tion conducted its annual Leader-
ship Retreats July 9-12, at Camp
Bob Marshall, Custer and July 16-
18 at Swan Lake, Viborg.
A total of 146 students from 46
chapters throughout the state dis-
covered “The Places They’ll Go”
with FFA.
The retreats centered on a Dr.
Seuss theme, focusing on “Oh, The
Places You’ll Go with FFA.”
FFA members developed and
enhanced their leadership skills
and self-confidence through inter-
active learning.
The program featured work-
shops that helped members dis-
cover the value of attitude, motiva-
tion, passion, personal growth,
teamwork, and communication.
The SD Department of Agricul-
ture organized a panel of agricul-
tural industry professionals to
speak with FFA members about
opportunities in agriculture.
Enter S.D. Beef Cook-Off by August 9
create a great beef dish with little
fuss and in a short amount of
time.”
Recipes should include a maxi-
mum of 12 ingredients including
beef, fruits or vegetables, grain
and dairy products, and be pre-
pared and cooked in 30 minutes or
less. They may include pre-pack-
aged food products such as any
frozen vegetable or vegetable com-
bination product, fresh produce
convenience product, fresh deli
product, any shelf stable dinner
mix, salad dressing, marinade or
salad dressing mix, prepared soup
or soup mix, prepared sauce or
sauce mix, packaged rice mix, bak-
ing mix product, or seasoning
blend product.
Entries and recipes for the
StateFair Beef Cook-Off are due
August 9. The contest itself takes
place August 31 on the state fair
grounds in Huron during the
South Dakota State Fair, where in-
dividuals selected to compete will
prepare their beef recipe at the
Women’s Building, allowing partic-
ipants to interact with state fair
attendees.
The contest is open to non-pro-
fessional South Dakota residents
in either of three divisions: begin-
ner (10-13 years), youth (14-17
years) or adult (18 and older). First
place winners in each division will
take home a $500 cash prize. Run-
ner-ups will receive $250 in cash.
Hosted by the South Dakota
Cattle Women and funded by the
South Dakota Beef Industry Coun-
cil through the Beef Checkoff, the
State Fair Beef Cook-Off is an ex-
cellent way, says Thompson, to ed-
ucate consumers about beef ’s ver-
satility, convenience and nutri-
tional value.
For more information and to
submit a recipe online, go to
www.sdcattlewomen.org, or you
can find a link at www.sdbeef.org.
Any additional questions about
the contest can be directed to
Thompson at 605-360-6546.
South Dakota FFA members discover “The Places
They’ll Go” at summer leadership training
They will use these new skills
and ideas to benefit their local
chapters and communities.
Retreat attendees also partici-
pated in service learning projects.
Those attending Camp Bob Mar-
shall worked on several projects in
conjunction with the City of Custer
and those attending Swan Lake
packed 28,728 meals for Kids
Against Hunger.
National FFA Eastern Region
Vice President Joenelle Futrell at-
tended the retreat at Camp Bob
Marshall.
SD FFA has 3,962 members in
77 school districts in South
Dakota, and 557,318 FFA mem-
bers in all 50 states, Puerto Rico
and the Virgin Islands. FFA devel-
ops premier leadership, personal
growth and career success through
high school agriculture education
curriculum.
The retreats were directed by
the 2013-2014 State FFA Officers:
State FFA Officers and Ambassadors at Mt. Rushmore (L to R) Ambassador Kyle Kramer, Flan-
dreau; Reporter Carrietta Schalesky, Bison; Treasurer David Strain, Sturgis; Vice President Bre-
anna Bullington, Brookings; Secretary Cheyenne Leonhardt, Groton; President Makayla Heiser,
Newell; Sentinel Shala Larson, Webster; Ambassador Courtney Schaeffer, Menno; and National
Eastern Region Vice President Joenelle Futrell. ~Courtesy Photo
President, Makayla Heisler,
Newell; Vice President, Breanna
Bullington, Brookings; Secretary,
Cheyenne Leonhardt, Groton;
Treasurer, David Strain, Sturgis;
Reporter, Carrietta Schalesky,
Faith; and Sentinel, Shala Larson,
Webster.
Retreat staff also included
Courtney Schaeffer, Menno; and
Kyle Kramer, Flandreau; SD FFA
Ambassadors.
The retreat was sponsored by
the SD Department of Agriculture,
DuPont Pioneer, Monsanto, and
Northland Ford. SD Wheat Grow-
ers and SD Stockgrowers Associa-
tion provided folders for each at-
tendee and Mitchell Technical In-
stitute provided pens.
Scholarships for individuals to
attend sponsored by: East River
Electric, West River Electric Asso-
ciation, the Walt Johnson Memo-
rial, and the SD FFA Foundation.
No time to get away? Take a
mini vacation at a South Dakota
state park. Several special events
that offer activities for the entire
family will take place soon across
the state.
•34th Annual Sioux River Folk
Festival, Newton Hills State Park
near Canton, Friday, Aug. 2
through Sunday, Aug. 4. Newton
Hills State Park is hosting three
days of folk music, dancing and
family fun during the annual
Sioux River Folk Festival. Info:
605-987-2263, www.fotm.org
•All the People You’ll Meet on
Mulberry Street, Chief White
Crane Recreation Area near Yank-
ton, Aug. 2, 8 p.m. CDT. Join us for
a kick-off to the Dr. Suess weekend
by coming to mingle, make a tasty
snack, and play some wacky
games. All ages welcome. Info:
605-668-2985
•Riverman/Riverwoman Sprint
Triathlon, Farm Island Recreation
Area near Pierre, Aug. 3, 7:40 a.m.
CDT. Compete as an individual or
as part of a team in this annual
event. Take a 0.4-mile swim along
swim beach, an 18-mile bike ride
on SD Hwy 34, and a 3.5-mile run
on the island trail. Info: 605-773-
2885
•Nature Hike, Good Earth State
Park at Blood Run near Sioux
Falls, Aug. 3, 9 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
CDT. Come learn why the Ameri-
can Indians called this land home
for many years. This 2-mile hike
travels through tall grass prairies
and a large oak forest, allowing
you to enjoy the wondrous beauty
that is Good Earth State Park.
Info: 605-987-2263 or newton-
State Parks plan for fun-filled weekend
hills@state.sd.us, Pre-registration:
605-362-2777 or www.outdoorcam-
pus.org
•Kayaking for Fun, North Point
Recreation Area near Pickstown,
Aug. 3, 9:30 a.m. CDT. Learn how
to kayak safely and efficiently.
Kayaks will be provided. Bring
your own personal floatation de-
vice, if possible. Info: 605-487-7046
•Bean Bag Tourney, Newton
Hills State Park near Canton, Aug.
3, 10 a.m. CDT. Bring your game
face to this bean bag tournament!
We have a limited number of bean
bag sets, so first come, first served.
All ages are welcome, and prizes
will be awarded to both partici-
pants and winners. Info: 605-987-
2263
•Steady Eddy Disc Golf Tourney,
Oahe Downstream Recreation
Area near Fort Pierre, Aug. 3, 10
a.m. CDT. The Annual Steady
Eddy Disc Golf Tourney is played
in memory of Ed Headrick, known
as the inventor of disc golf. Players
will complete two rounds of 18
holes. Cash payout to place win-
ners. Regristration fee: $20, Info:
605-223-7722
•Dutch Oven Desserts, Lake
Vermillion Recreation Area near
Canistota, Aug. 3, 6 p.m. CDT.
Learn how to make a dessert in
the Dutch oven. Info: 605-296-3643
•Evening with the Owls Walk in
the Park, Oahe Downstream
Recreation Area near Fort Pierre,
Aug. 3, 9 p.m. CDT. Enjoy a walk
and talk on South Dakota owls.
Info: 605-223-7722
•Pedal to the Park, Oakwood
Lakes State Park near Bruce, Aug.
4, 12:30 p.m. CDT. Begin at Sioux
River Bicycle & bike to Oakwood
Lakes State Park. Refreshments
will be provided at the park. Re-
turn rides will not be furnished.
Everyone is encouraged to bike
back or arrange for a ride. Fee: $8,
proceeds go to the Parks and
Wildlife Foundation. Info: 605-627-
5441
A park entrance license is re-
quired to enter all parks. Partici-
pants are encouraged to wear suit-
able shoes, dress for the weather
and apply insect repellant.
For more information on South
Dakota State Parks, please visit
www.gfp.sd.gov or call 605-773-
3391.
For the last several months, the
Mocha Moose has been trying to
obtain a package off sale SD farm
wine and malt beverage license
here in Wall, so they can sell gift
baskets that include South Dakota
Wine.
We hope the citizens of our com-
munity will support their endeav-
ors, as we feel it would benefit not
only a small family business, but
also, the South Dakota wine indus-
try, the customers who would be
able to purchase quality gifts pro-
duced in our own state, and the
town of Wall as a whole, with sales
tax dollars generated by helping a
local business grow.
Throughout the years, Wall’s en-
trepreneurs have had to struggle
to prosper in this rural community
of some 800 people.
In the 1960’s, the High Way
Beautification Act threatened the
roadside advertising that brings in
thousands of travelers. Gas short-
age plagued the 1970’s. From the
1980’s to the present, we have had
to deal with severe downturns in
the economy and unemployment
throughout our nation, as well as
skyrocketing fuel prices. But even
with so many obstacles, our com-
munity can work together to help
a small, family business that has
sought to serve both the tourists
and the local residents, while also
giving a boost to products made
right here in South Dakota. As a
very wise Ben Franklin so aptly
put it in 1776, “We must all hang
together, or assuredly, we shall all
hang separately.”
It is our understanding that the
Mocha Moose will need to circulate
a petition to bring a referendum on
this matter to Wall’s voters.
We hope the citizens of this com-
munity will have the vision to sign
this petition, and will then vote to
issue their license. Honestly, we
see only pros and no cons - Christ
would not have turned water into
wine when they ran out at the
wedding at Cana if no one was al-
lowed to drink it.
/s/ Gayle and Steve Eisenbraun
Wall, S.D.
Area News
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013• Page 3
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South Dakota Health Care Asso-
ciation’s Century Club, in conjunc-
tion with KELOLAND Television,
is honored to announce Dorothy
Antritter of Watertown, S.D. as the
“2013 Centenarian of the Year!”
Dorothy is anticipating celebrat-
ing her 109th birthday in Novem-
ber making her the oldest resident
in the Club!
She is the reigning Century
Club’s Centenarian of the Year
from last year’s recognition.
Dorothy, the daughter and last
surviving child of Charlie and
Louise (Pfefferle) Antritter, was
born November 25, 1904, in Round
Lake, Minnesota.
Dorothy’s father emigrated from
Germany in 1885 when he was
eight; her mother at the age of five.
Dorothy remembers her family
singing German songs, some of
which Dorothy will still sing when
asked.
For six years, the Antritter Fam-
ily lived in Moosejaw,
Saskatchewan.
Dorothy said that she had to
take second and third grades twice
because the U.S. education system
was behind.
But, she also noted, that upon
return to the states, she skipped
the eighth grade! She says, “I
never took eighth grade!”
Dorothy was also on the Water-
town Arrow Basketball Team and
when asked if she was good she
replies, “Well, I was the tallest and
wore a size 11 shoe! They only
played against classes in their
school, seniors against juniors.”
Which meant she played against
her sister, Ruby, who passed away
Century Club announces oldest living South Dakotan
at the age of 108.
Remembering her school days,
Dorothy still recalls the high
school she attended being across
the street from where she resides
today.
Dorothy worked for Alan Austin
as a legal secretary for many,
many years and retired in 1967.
In response to how well she did
her job. Dorothy responded, “I was
good! I was the highest paid secre-
tary in the office! My paycheck
was $50/month.” When asked
what she did, “I pounded the type-
writer just like any other secre-
tary, but I had to do shorthand
first.”
She has never used a computer
but recalls the first time she used
an electric typewriter - it scared
her to death because it went so fast
and jumped right out at her.
Dorothy exclaims, “I walked to
work, back and forth from lunch
and home again, ten blocks one
way! Do you think anyone does
that today?”
Dorothy’s family was a very
close-knit unit. When a trip was to
be taken, they all went, Mom, Dad,
and all three kids. Sometimes they
were even gone for months at a
time.
She has traveled to every state
with the exception of Hawaii since
she has never flown in her life
time. Looking off into the distance,
Dorothy said, “I wish I could travel
again. You see a lot of things when
you travel by bus.”
She recalls many occasions
where her dad would come home
one day and say, “I bought a
house!” or “I bought a car!”
She speaks of her family very
fondly. Dorothy’s dad and brother
decided to build the very first
housetop Christmas decoration in
Watertown, which had reindeer
and as Dorothy says it, “Santee
Claus”. She said the people would
drive by car after car after car.
Also in history, Dorothy recalls
the end of World War I. They were
living in Moosejaw, Saskatchewan
and bells and whistles started to
blare out on the streets signifying
the war was over! People were
chanting, “The war is over! The
war is over!”
With only a few remaining rela-
tives, she and Stanley Beal, her
younger cousin, at the age of 92,
who lives in Minnesota still corre-
spond by mail.
Nearing the end of this inter-
view in her room at Jenkins Living
Center, Dorothy looked up and
said, “Every morning, I wake up
and think ‘I’m still here!’
Jeralean Talley, age 114, of
Inkster, Mich., is currently the old-
est living American -- and third-
oldest person in the world, accord-
ing to the Gerontology Research
Group, which keeps a list of the
world's oldest people.
The Century Club is a creation
of the South Dakota Health Care
Association and has recognized
over 1,000 South Dakotans since
its beginning in 1997.
Century Club sponsors created
the Club to recognize both the con-
tributions and the years of these
special individuals. The Century
Club is as its name states…a Club.
Therefore, there may be older
people in the state that have not
yet been inducted by a family
member or loved one into the Cen-
tury Club.
The Century Club is open to res-
idents of South Dakota upon the
celebration of his or her 100th
birthday.
There are no dues and every in-
ductee receives a specially de-
signed certificate and membership
card signed by sponsors.
Once a year, the current oldest
living Century Club Member is
recognized as the “Centenarian of
the Year.”
Submit names for the Century
Club by visiting www.sdhca.org
and downloading a Century Club
Application or call LuAnn Sever-
son, Century Club Coordinator, at
1-800-952-3052.
DakotaFest
IDEAg Dakotafest will be held
August 20-22, 2013 at the
Schlaffman Farm near Mitchell,
South Dakota. South Dakota State
University and SDSU Extension
will be present with information
and answers to your questions.
If you make the trip and want to
visit the SDSU exhibits, head to
the northwest corner of the event
site and look for the blue tent.
There are also rumors that
SDSU ice cream will be served
each day around noon!
Winter Wheat meeting
Draper, S.D.
SDSU Extension will be holding
a Winter Wheat Meeting in
Draper, SD on Tuesday, August 27.
The meeting will be held at the
Auditorium in Draper, S.D. and
begin at 6:30 pm with a meal pre-
pared by a local group of church
women. There is no cost to attend.
Speakers will be Nathan
Mueller, SDSU Extension Agrono-
mist and Lisa Elliot, SDSU Exten-
sion Commodity Marketing Spe-
cialist.
Nathan will be discussing
changes to the recommended and
acceptable/promising variety list,
results of the Crop Performance
Testing (CPT) trials, and dis-
cussing some highlights of the
2012-13 production year.
Although one producer stated
that a lot of area producers won’t
have a lot of wheat to market, Lisa
will provide an outlook for wheat
prices based on supply and de-
mand, as well as comments on
other crops producers will be rais-
ing. She will also comment on po-
tential changes in the crop insur-
ance program.
Producers and area agronomists
will also be interested in meeting
By: Bob Fanning,
Plant Pathology Field Specialist
Winner Regional Extension Center
Phone: 605-842-1267
Dr. Chris Graham, SDSU Exten-
sion Agronomist-West River, who
is joining SDSU Extension the
week before the meeting and plans
to attend.
Chris has most recently worked
at Cornell University and will be
based at the West River Research
and Extension Center in Rapid
City.
Chris is ready to begin conduct-
ing research and developing edu-
cational programming in western
South Dakota and interested in
getting acquainted with producers.
This meeting has been running
for over 20 years, with attendance
ranging from 50 - 75+ people, most
of which are producers, and con-
sidered one of the best Extension
meetings in the area. The meal is
sponsored by area agribusinesses,
and representatives from many of
the businesses attend.
The meeting is well known for
good food, good information, and a
great opportunity to network with
fellow producers across a wide
area.
For more information contact
the Winner Regional Extension
Center, 842-1267.
Calendar
•August 20 - 22: DakotaFest,
Mitchell, S.D.
•August 27: Winter Wheat
Meeting, 6:30 p.m., Auditorium,
Draper, S.D.
Burke Stampede Rodeo
July 19-21
Bareback Riding: 1. Whitten Hoover,
Ainsworth, Neb., 73; 2. Corey Evans, Valen-
tine, Neb., 71; 3. (tie) Chance Englebert, Bur-
dock, S.D., Mark Kenyon, Hayti, S.D., 70; 4.
Logan Glendy, Oconto, Neb., 65; 5. Ryan
Burkinshaw, Hermosa, S.D., 64.
Barrel Racing: 1. Kailee Webb, Isabel,
S.D., 16.31; 2. Tanya Talsma, Isabel, 16.44;
3. Shelby Vinson, Worthing, S.D., 16.53; 4.
(tie) Gayle White, Dickens, N.D., Courtney
Whitman, Sturgis, S.D. 16.59; 5. Jill Moody,
Pierre, S.D., 16.63; 6. Krista Graff,
Ainsworth, 16.68; 7. (tie) Jordan Tierney,
Oral, S.D., Megan Scherer, Martin, S.D.,
16.71.
Breakaway Roping: 1. Syerra Chris-
tensen, Kennebec, S.D., 2.10; 2. Dani Jo Hin-
man, Hay Springs, S.D., 2.30; 3. (tie) Bailey
Peterson, Parade, S.D., Jenny Belkham,
Blunt, S.D., Jana Jasper, St. Charles, S.D.,
2.40; 4. Jan Brown, North Platte, Neb., 2.60;
5. Chancy Scheer, Elsmere, Neb., 2.70; 6.
Cati Stanko, Gordon, Neb., 2.80.
Goat Tying: 1. Kristi Birkeland, Dupree,
S.D., 8.00; 2. Lacey Tech, Fairfax, S.D., 8.20;
3. Georgia Diez, Phoenix, Ariz., 8.50; 4. Tarin
Hupp, Huron, S.D., 8.70; 5. (tie) Abby Jo
Eckstaine, Kennebec, S.D., Mazee Pauley,
Wall, S.D., Shandel Yordy, Martin, 8.80.
Bull Riding: 1. (tie) Clint Connelly, Sta-
pleton, Neb., Jared Schaefer, Leola, S.D.,77;
2. Jeff Bertus, Avon, S.D., 76; 3. Tyson Dono-
van, Sturgis, S.D., 74.
Calf Roping: 1. Josh Graff, Ainsworth,
9.00; 2. Lane Dudley, Sweet Water, Texas,
9.09; 3. Dallas Louden, Martin, 9.90; 4. Trey
Young, Dupree, 9.90; 5. Cole Tierney, Broken
Bow, Neb., 10.70;6. Corey Cronin, Gettys-
burg, S.D., 10.90; 7. Matt Elliott, Sparks,
Neb., 11.20; 8. Calder Johnston, Elm
Springs, S.D., 12.00.
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Shorty Gar-
rett, Dupree, 75; 2. (tie) Wyatt Kammerer,
Philip, S.D., Eric Addison, Caputa, S.D., 71;
3 (tie). Seth Schafer, Yoder, Wyo., Tate Long-
brake, Dupree, 70; 4.(tie) Whit Peterson, Tor-
rington, Wyo., Travis Schroth, Buffalo Gap,
S.D., Jake Moreland, Red Owl, S.D., 69.
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1.(tie) Delbert
Cobb, Red Owl, Jake Longbrake, Dupree,
2.20; 2. Jerry Sharp, Long Valley, S.D., 2.40;
SDRA rodeo results – Burke and Huron
3. (tie) Steve Klein, Sioux Falls, S.D., Scott
Lammers, Hermosa, S.D., 2.50; 4. Clifford
Tibbs, Ft. Pierre, S.D., 2.60.
Steer Wrestling: 1. (tie) Dan Barner,
Hershey, Neb., Taylor Davis, Ericson, Neb.,
4.30; 2. (tie) Jeff Johnston, Thedford, Neb.,
Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb., Johnston,
Elm Springs, 4.40; 3. Sam Olson, Buffalo,
S.D., 4.60; 4. (tie) Clint Nelson, Philip, Jace
McKay, Ericson, 4.70.
Team Roping: 1. Tucker Dale, Timber
Lake/Levi Lord, Sturgis, 5.10; 2. Matt Dean,
Platte, Neb./Duke Starr, Geddes, S.D., 5.30;
3. (tie) Tyrell Moody, Edgemont/Rory Brown,
Edgemont, Travis Warren, Mullen, Neb./Dal-
ton Pelster, Burwell, Neb., 5.60; 4. Brady
Williams, Hammond, Mont./Seth Weishaar,
Belle Fourche S.D., 5.70; 5. Devin McGrath,
Belle Fourche/Dalton Richter, Quinn, S.D.,
6.00; 6. Scott White, Oelrichs, S.D./Dustin
Harris, O’Neil, Neb., 6.30; 7. Jake Nelson,
Creighton S.D./Jeff Nelson, Philip, 6.50.
Mixed Team Roping - Woman: 1. Eliz-
abeth Baker, Box Elder, S.D., 6.80; 2. ReAnn
Crane, Whitewood, S.D., 7.40; 3. Whitney
Knippling, Chamberlain, S.D., 8.10; 4. Tr-
isha Price, Faith, S.D., 8.20; 5. Lorita Nel-
son, Philip, 8.40; 6. Jana Jasper, St. Charles,
S.D., 8.50; 7. Sherry Ellis, Lusk, Wyo., 9.00;
8. Hanna Brown, Faith, S.D., 9.30.
Huron Roundup
July 19-20
Bareback Riding: 1. Kenyon, Hayti, 69;
2. Lonny Lesmeister, Rapid City, S.D., 66; 3.
Burkinshaw, Hermosa, 65; 4. Englebert,
Burdock, 64.
Barrel Racing: 1. Webb, Isabel, 17.62; 2.
Moody, Pierre, 17.66; 3. Vinson, Worthing,
17.92; 4. (tie) Hallie Fulton, Miller; Krystal
Marone, Isabel, 18.11 5. Britta O’Keefe, Mo-
hall, N.D., 18.12; 6. Colbee Mohr, Timber-
lake, 18.14; 7. Kaylee Gallino, Wasta, S.D.,
18.18.
Breakaway Roping: 1. Jacque Murray,
Isabel, 1.90; 2. Jojo Varner, Hillman, Minn.,
2.00; 3. (tie) Sidney Carey, Huron; Taryn Sip-
pel, Pierpont; S.D. Brenda White, Oelrichs,
S,D., 2.20; 4. (tie) Megan Steiger, Mobridge,
S.D., Laura Hunt, Ridgeview, S,D., 2.40; 5.
(tie) Carole Hollers, Sturgis, Baiely Peter-
son, Parade, 2.70.
Calf Roping: 1. Matt Peters, Hot
Springs, 8.40; 2. Jace Melvin Ft. Pierre, 8.50;
3. Daine McNenny, Sturgis, 9.00; 4. Troy
Wilcox, Red Owl, 9.10; 5. Trey Young,
Dupree, 9.20; 6. Jamie Wolf, Pierre, 9.70.
Goat Tying: 1. (tie) Gerogia Diez,
Phoenix, Ariz., Jacey Hupp, Huron, 6.60; 2.
Krystal Marone, Isabel, 6.80; 3. Lacey Tech,
Fairfax, S.D., 6.90; 4. Fulton, Miller, 7.00; 5.
(tie) Tracy Ellig, Horace, N.D., Cheyenne
Severson, Raymond, S.D., 7.10.
Mixed Team Roping: 1. Stanko, Gordon,
7.70; 2. Kaylee Nelson, Box Elder, 8.00; 3.
Jasper, St. Charles, 10.00; 4. Hinman, Hay
Springs, 11.70; 5. Baker, Box Elder, 11.80; 6.
Trisha Price, Faith,13.00.
Saddle Bronc Riding: 1. Marty Hebb,
Cherry Creek, S.D., 73; 2. (tie) Tyrel Back-
man, Faith, Jesse Wilson, Kyle, S.D., Kyle
Hapney, Harrold, S.D., 71; 3. (tie) Shorty
Garrett, Dupree, Cole Hindman, Pierre, 69.
Sr. Men’s Breakaway: 1. Chuck Nelson,
Hartford, S.D., 2.70; 2. Kirk Ford, Huron,
2.90; 3. Mark Schumacher, Wolsey, S.D.,
3.30; 4. John Dean, Platte, S.D., 3.90; 5. JB
Lord, Sturgis, 12.50; 6. (tie) Harold Gerdes,
Hecla, S.D., Scott Lammers, Hermosa,12.90.
Steer Wrestling: 1.Gabe Taylor, Valen-
tine, 3.70; 2. Jeff Richardson, Kearney, Neb.,
3.80; 3. David Hinman, Hay Springs, 3.90; 4.
Jeremy Wagner, Hillman, Minn., 4.20; 5.
(tie) Bryce Dibbern, Riverdale, Neb., Jamie
Wolf, Pierre, 4.50.
Team Roping: Eli Lord, Sturgis/Jade
Nelson, Midland, 5.40; 2. (tie) Lane Carson,
Grassy Butte, N.D./Josh Hodges, Volberg,
N.D., Tucker Dale, Timber Lake/Levi Lord,
Sturgis, 5.60; 3. Connor McNenny,
Sturgis/Daine McNenny, Sturgis, 5.90; 4.
Jake Nelson, Creighton/Jeff Nelson, Philip,
6.30; 5. (tie) Tate Cowan, Ft. Pierre/Casey
Cowan. Ft. Pierre, Clint Gorrell, Beach,
N.D./Chase Carson, Grassy Butte, 6.70.
Team Penning: 1. Rick Tebay, Alpena,
S.D., Morgan Tebay, Alpena, Gary Garbe,
Alpena, 37.90; 2. Steve Klein, Sioux Falls,
Mick Varilek, Geddes, S.D., Tom Varilek,
Geddes, 42.20; 3. Paul Borgmann, White
Lake, S.D., Collin Borgmann, White Lake,
Lindsay Borgmann, White Lake, 47.90; 4.
Chuck Nelson, Hartford, S.D., Terry Trower,
Dell Rapids, S.D., Joe Skibinski, Sioux Falls,
50.10.
Having just turned sweet 16,
Celine Trask was injured in a
ranch related accident late in
2012. She has endured many
surgeries and continues
strong in her rehabilitation
efforts. Please come and help
us celebrate Celine, her sweet
birthday, and her amazing
ongoing recovery.
Benefit
Saturday, August 10, 2013
Free Will Supper ~ 5 p.m. · Live Auction to follow ~ 6 p.m.
Elm Springs Hall, Elm Springs, SD
To donate auction items
or for more information,
contact Shirrise Linn 798-2413,
Margaret NachtigaII 798-2365
or Arneson Auction 798-2525.
AII Pennington-Jackson County Farm Bureau Members
The annual meeting and resolutions meeting will be held on Monday,
August 12th at 7:30 p.m. Ìt will be held in the small meeting room in
the Wall Community Center and refreshments will be served.
Resolutions presented by Pennington-Jackson County Farm Bureau
members will be voted on and those that pass will be sent on to the
state.
JDK Harvesting out of Colby, Kansas has been in the area cutting wheat. Jim and Deann Deilbert
who own the business, travel May through December from North Central Texas to North Dakota
harvesting crops such as wheat, oats, barley, durum, spring wheat, field peas, flax, wet corn, soy-
beans, dry corn, milo, and sunflowers. Their crew consists of employees from New Zealand, Ire-
land, England and the United States. Deibert noted the wheat in the area is doing around 40
bushels to the acre which is some of the better wheat they have cut since they began their 2013,
2000 mile harvest. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
The 2013 harvest season has begun
Email your social news,
obituaries, wedding &
engagement
announcements
to: annc@gwtc.net
annc@gwtc.net
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Another July Sunday morning
and just now I’m refusing to admit
it may be the July Sunday of 2013.
Church bells ringing. A re-
minder to ask all of you to send
thoughts and prayers for Mavis
Jeppesen, who has been having
some health issues. Tom Carter’s
mother, Ada Carter, whose cancer
has returned, and Tom’s sister,
Lorrie Carter, who has been re-
cently diagnosed with cancer.
Having had loved ones with can-
cer or gone through it ourselves
has motivated our little commu-
nity to form a “Relay For Life”
team. Yes, we’re quite late in join-
ing, but we have a lot of want-to
and sometimes that can make a
big difference!
We are calling our team the
Wasta Wildcats, the team mascot
the later part of Wasta’s school his-
tory — AND — they had some very
good basketball teams.
The Wasta Wildcats rise again
“hunting a cure” for cancer! Some
Wildcats will be walkers, some will
be idea organizers, some will par-
ticipate in the fundraisers and all
will cheer the Wildcats on to VIC-
TORY!
A former cheerleader, Gay Wen-
zel Hadlock, has volunteered to
bringing her accordion and lead a
sing-a-long in conjuction with a
Chili Cook-off for the title of “best
and true Wildcat chili”. Maybe Gay
can teach us a Wasta Wildcat fight
song or two! Well, Gay just said
she doesn’t remember any.
So how about you Wildcats out
there, get your heads together and
come up with a cheer or two and
the fight or school songs?!
We can always use the generic
“Two bits, four bits, six bits, A
DOLLAR, all for Wildcats stand up
and holler!” But I have faith some-
one will come up with the old ones.
At this time we have our Wildcat
walkers, or should I say stalkers?
Marilyn Keyser, Madi Grenstiner,
Ash Grenstiner, Tammy Green,
Carol Harper, Kerry Herriger, Dan
Turgeon, Di Turgeon, Tom Carter,
Angela Carter, Michael Carter,
Dylan Carter, Doreen Skillingstad,
Kortney Skillingstad, Mary Lewis,
Margee and Lloyd Willey and our
on the spot fundraisers, Brody
Carter and Austin Carter
Pending evenings: Lunch in the
park, Wednesday, August 7; Bingo,
Friday, August 17.
Decided events: Picnic at the
Park, Sunday, August 25th. Great
Wildcat Chili Cook-off and sing-a-
long with the oldies (the oldies
being the songs, not the people)
but goodies (that could be both the
people and the songs). Anyway,
Gay Hadlock and her accordion
will lead the fun, September 8.
If you would like more informa-
tion or participate in some way,
give a call to Margee or Lloyd, 993-
3149, but please do join us for
some fun and help stamp out this
rampaging disease.
Love this weather, though some
rain would make it perfect.
Happy Trails!
P.S.: Hope you like your new
place Carl — we’ll be thinking of
you!
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Charlene Kjerstad went to
Spearfish, Wednesday for a birth-
day barbecue at her sister, Cleo
Rowe’s, for her Spearfish family
and friends. She stayed at her
brother Claude’s.
On Thursday, Darin, Rachel,
Bria, Breckin and Chessa Buh-
mann; Brennan, Laurie, Austan,
Lexi and Westan; Jordan, Rachel,
Kyler, Karmyn and Karley, and
Muriel Kjerstad along with
Muriel’s friends, Laney Clark,
Sonja and Mateas, had lunch with
Charlene in Rapid City for Char-
lene’s birthday, which was Thurs-
day. After lunch, they all went
swimming at the Spearfish Rec
Center. Hazel Thompson came
over and watched them swim. Fri-
day evening, Sue Eisenbraun met
Charlene and they attended the
Days of ‘76 Rodeo at Deadwood.
Charlene came home Saturday.
Conrad, Kalie and Carsten Kjer-
stad got moved into their own
home, last Sunday, out in the
Shearer Addition next to Langes.
Josh, Darcy and Max Croell
from Gillette, came to Wall on Sat-
urday to visit Merlin and Mary
Jane Doyle. They had lunch and
toured downtown Wall. Josh is
Doyle’s grandson and Max a great-
grandson. It was a very fun time.
Russel and Phylis Hinkle from
Beresford, S.D., visited Roy and
Dorothy Hamann last Thursday.
Russel and Roy are cousins.
The colors of the countryside
have changed since the grass and
gain are ripening. The fields with
so many bales of hay are wonder-
ful to see. Some alfalfa fields have
greened up since the first cutting
— a promise of a second cutting.
Wolfords had a phone call on
Saturday from Mike Smith and his
family to meet at the Drug Store.
Mike and Amy (Wolford) Beers
have been friends for years. The
Smiths live in the state of Wash-
ington and were on their way to
Ohio to visit family. Their plans
were to stay overnight Saturday
with Amy and Terry.
All is well, that ends well! The
air-conditioner at Prairie Village
has been fixed.
Anita Peterson took Edith
Paulsen to Rapid City on Wednes-
day for her eye appointment. They
stopped on the way in New Under-
wood to see Bernice Anderson at
the Good Samaritan Center.
Trudy (Schreiber) Storkel has a
heart condition and has not been
feeling at all well. She and her
husband John live in Stilwell,
Kan. Some you may remember her
as her folks, Henry and Anna and
family, lived in Peno Basin many
years ago.
There was something messing in
last week’s Courant — obituaries.
I would say it was a good thing
that no one of our area had died.
Chokecherries are ripening, or if
sheltered, may already be ripe.
Birds made short work of those I
left on the top branches.
Mark and Darlene Poste made a
quick trip to Wall, Sunday after-
noon. They had brought some
chokecherries with them and
cleared out some junk from the
shed to get rid of for Frances.
An easy recipe for chokecherry
syrup — 2 cups juice, 1/2 cup white
corn syrup, 2 cups sugar. bring to
a good boil. Reduce heat and boil
10 minutes. My absolute favorite
on pancakes.
Have a good week.
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
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Sponsored by:
Pennington
County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
…continued next
week.
Maria Ann, 8 months
daughter of
Kari Denke, Creighton.
Austan, 5 years, Lexi, 3 years &
Westan, 1 year
children of Brennan &
Laurie Kjerstad, Wall.
Kaylen, 7 years, Tyson, 4 years
& Lincoln, 6 months
children of Beau Spotted Bear
& Anne Jo Rausch, Wasta.
Tomorrow’s
Leaders
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
EmploymENt opportuNIty
The City of Wall is accepting employment applica-
tions for the Wall Badlands Chamber Director posi-
tion until Monday, August 12th at 4:00 p.m. Com-
puter, communication, interpersonal and organiza-
tional skills are required. Applications and job de-
scription are available at the City Finance Office at
501 Main Street, Wall, SD between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For
more information call 605-279-2663. Starting wage
DOE. The City of Wall is an equal opportunity em-
ployer.
Published August 1 & 8, 2013, at the total approximate cost
of $98.40.
New Arrivals In
279-2023
Wall, SD
Double punch with coupon
at the Coffee Cabin
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
August 1st: Chicken Enchilada
w/Tossed Salad
August 2nd: Chimichanga
w/Mexican Rice & Tossed Salad
August 5th: Swiss Mushroom
Burger w/Pistachio Salad
August 6th: Indian Taco
August 7th: Fried Chicken
w/Mashed Potatoes & Corn
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
The parents of Erin Simpfender-
fer and Nick Cox proudly an-
nounce the forthcoming marriage
of their children.
Their parents are Van and
Cathy Simpfenderfer of Wall, S.D.
and Mary Cox of Elk Point, S.D.
Erin and Nick both graduated
from University of South Dakota
and are currently employed by the
Bennett County School District in
Martin, S.D.
They will be married on Septem-
ber 21, 2013 in Rapid City, S.D.
Engagement
Blake Simpfenderfer and Amanda Davis were married in Seattle, Wa.,
on july 21, 2012.
Their parents are Van and Cathy Simpfenderfer of Wall, S.D. and Al
and Stephanie Davis of Reno, Nev.
Blake graduated from University of South Dakota with a Masters in
Recreation and Sports. He currently works for the Seattle University as
a Recreation Director.
Amanda graduated from Western University of Illinois with a Masters
in Student Services. She currently is employed by a Community Technical
College as Staff Assistant.
Both enjoy the area of Seattle.
Wedding
in celebrating the marriage of
Cassie Bennett
and 1ustin Wendt
at a Wedding Dance
Saturday,August 3, 2ô13
9:ôô PM to 2:ôô AM
73- Saloon in Philip
annc@
gwtc.net
We Don’t Charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565 or
e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Obituaries
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship,
9 a.m., Sunday Worship Service,
10:30 a.m.; Mondays: Women’s Bible
Study, 7 p.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann
279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and
4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.;
Sept. through May.
New Underwood Community
Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10
a.m.; Youth Fellowship: Wed.
7 - 8:30 p.m.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through
Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m.
Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m.,
Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church
Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd
number months
Holy Rosary Church
Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m.
odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even
number months
Lvery veek you uttend church to íeurn more
ubout the \ord. You heur u íot, but hov much oí
ít do you uct upon: lí you íínd out u neíghbor ís
ííí, do you drop by íor u vísít or íeuve thut tusk to
someone eíse: As beííevers, ve shouíd uct upon
the \ord ut every opportuníty possíbíe.
Ancìcnl wìsdom lor modcrn lìlc
Bul bc yc docrs ol lhc word, and nol hcarcrs only,
dcccìvìng your own sclvcs. For ìl any bc a hcarcr ol lhc
word, and nol a docr, hc ìs lìkc unlo a man bcholdìng
hìs nalural lacc ìn a glass: For hc bcholdclh hìmscll,
and goclh hìs way, and slraìghlway lorgcllclh whal
manncr ol man hc was. )amcs 1:22-24 (K)V)
279-2175
The family of
Harold Benson
invite you to an Open House
in honor of his
100th Birthday
Saturday, August 3rd
2:00 to 4:00 p.m.
New Underwood Community Center
If you cannot attend, cards may be sent to:
1205 Milwaukee St., Rapid City, SD 57701
Harold’s children are:
Kenneth Benson, Donna
Coyle, Beverly Mooney,
Dean Benson & Jean Treloar
Wicksville Church Vacation
Bible School
August 10 • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Grades K-5 (this fall)
Bring lunch & water ~ snacks and drinks provided
7:00 p.m. ~ songs & potluck
Want to attend? Contact Delayna 798-2301
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Shirrise Linn
Mark your calendars for an up-
coming Elm Springs night of fel-
lowship, fun, laughter, and mem-
ories – Saturday, August 10th,
the community and surrounding
areas will come together at the
Elm Springs Hall for a night to
celebrate Celine Trask and all
her tremendous accomplish-
ments since her accident last De-
cember. She has made great
strides, but still has a way to go
in her recovery. Come help her
and her family celebrate her tri-
umphs with a free will supper
starting at 5:00 followed by a live
auction at 6:00. Donations are
being accepted. Contact Mar-
garet Nachtigall or Shirrise
Linn.
Monday, Mel and Dorothy An-
derson returned from a business
trip to Miles City, Mont. Friday,
they had errands in Sturgis be-
fore going on up to Deadwood for
the 'Days of 76' Parade. That
evening they visited the Fred
and Jane Karp home to see
Heather and Jesse Sporrer who
were here from Williston, N.D.
Saturday Mel and Dorothy met
son, Audey, and wife, Annmarie
at Wall for lunch. Later that af-
ternoon they met with the Writ-
ers' Group at the home of Slim
and Darlene McNaught in New
Underwood. The group all then
journeyed out to the home of
Dean and Tammy Hackens for a
delightful program and delicious
chuckwagon supper. Sunday
morning they met with organiz-
ers of the Celine Trask Benefit at
the home of Morris and Shirrise
Linn.
Connie Arneson treated Clyde
to birthday supper at Elk Creek
Steakhouse Saturday night com-
plete with Chase Arneson and
Justin, Kelsey, and Abel Hansen.
Lawrence Burke had lunch in
Rapid City with granddaughter,
Shawnee, and great grand-
daughter, Remington, Thursday.
Afterwards, they enjoyed a walk
through Story Book Island. Sat-
urday, Clyde Arneson stopped by
for coffee. Sunday, Lawrence
helped Clyde work on Clyde’s
plow.
Freddie Ferguson joined the
bus group from Elm Springs to
Elk Creek for supper, then ven-
tured on to Deadwood for the
Merle Haggard concert. The
evening proved to be very fun
and eventful, but Freddie reports
being a bit sleep deprived on
Sunday.
Larry and Peggy Gravatt
picked up grandson Steele Fue-
gen on Monday in Rapid City to
come out and spend the week
with them. He and grandpa are
working on restoring an old pick-
up. On Thursday, they finally got
to take out their little boat for it's
maiden voyage. Things went
smoothly for about the first 15
minutes, then they hit a sandbar
and lost a shear pin off of the
propeller. Of course they were
about as far as they could get
from the dock where they put it
in the water and had only one
paddle. It was an adventure, but
got back to the dock and were so
thankful that they had a strong
young boy with them. No imme-
diate plans for another launch-
ing. On Saturday, granddaugh-
ter Madi Fuegen drove out for
the day and spent the night. She
and Grandpa got in a nice horse-
back ride and on Sunday Madi
helped Grandpa sort some cows.
She did great for a city kid!
John and Jean Linn attended
the 50's decade mixer for the
School of Mines Sunday at the
Arrowhead Country Club in
Rapid City. They got to meet and
visit with the new Mines presi-
dent, Dr. Heather Wilson. In the
afternoon John and Jean visited
Charlie and Carol Linn before
returning home.
The Morris Linn family kept
eye appointments in Rapid City
Wednesday. Chrissy Elshere
stopped by Wednesday night.
Shirrise, Laken, and Cary John-
ston visited Amy Wicks Friday
afternoon. Kassandra visited Ce-
line and Maria Trask several
times throughout the week try-
ing to stay ahead of summer
boredom. She is doing a pretty
good job.
Pat Trask organized and im-
plemented a bus trip originating
at Elm Springs, way-layed at Elk
Creek Steakhouse for supper,
then on to Deadwood to see, live
in concert, Merle Haggard. The
bus driver happened to have
deep Elm Springs ties as well -
Herman Jones, grandson of past
Elm Springs area resident,
Charlie Wilson. Herman and his
bus load reportedly left Elm
Springs with 28 people, then
picked up a few others while at
Elk Creek, bringing the grand
total somewhere near 40 for a
night with Merle. Many atten-
dees have reiterated the same
report as Freddie – good times,
excellent music, but was the
cause of some very sleepy Elm
Springs residents on Sunday,
many relishing in an afternoon
siesta. Julie Trask was gone over
the weekend to a wedding in
New Mexico. John Paul was
home to visit Sunday night. Ce-
line Trask and Emily Linn went
to Rapid City, Saturday, for a
girls day.
Gladys Wilburn visited grand-
daughter, Felicia Kamball in
Vermillion Tuesday and Wednes-
day to meet a brand new great
granddaughter, Arriah, who is
eight weeks old. She also got to
visit her other great grand-
daughters, Kyelah (7) and Kar-
rah (5).
Tim and Patty Wilsey from Elk
River, Minn., visited at Jim and
Caroline Wilsey’s Wednesday
through Sunday. Friday through
Sunday, Wes came from Hay
Springs.
As the new school year begins,
over 5,000 area students will re-
turn to the classroom without basic
supplies. Black Hills Federal
Credit Union is helping these stu-
dents and their families by organ-
izing their 17th Annual School
Supply Drive.
The supplies collected will sup-
port students in more than 60 area
schools throughout the Black Hills.
“The School Supply Drive makes a
difference to thousands of families
in our greater community by ensur-
ing that every student returns to
the classroom well-equipped and
ready for a successful school year,”
stated co-chair Carol Brown. “Our
goal is to provide a learning envi-
ronment where all children have
an equal chance to learn and excel.
With the generous help of individ-
uals and businesses, students will
have the pencils, notebooks,
crayons and other supplies they
need to keep up with their class-
mates.”
Donations of backpacks and
school supplies are being accepted
at Office Depot and Black Hills
Federal Credit Union locations
through August 19. BHFCU em-
ployees will be selling raffle tickets
for a chance to win one of three
generous prizes, and monetary do-
nations can be made at any
BHFCU location. 100% of dona-
tions and proceeds from raffle sales
are used to purchase school sup-
plies.
Supplies will be distributed
through area schools based on need
in the communities of Rapid City,
Belle Fourche, Black Hawk, Box
Elder, Custer, Hermosa, Hill City,
Hot Springs, Spearfish, Sturgis,
Piedmont, and Wall. For more in-
formation on how you or your busi-
ness can help, please contact Ky-
lene Casanova at 718-6155.
BHFCU kicks off 17th annual
School Supply Drive
Karen Noreen Bowen-Raymond
was born October 23, 1950, at St.
Mary’s Hospital in Pierre, S.D.,
the daughter of Marvin Thompson
Bowen and Lois Jean (Harry)
Bowen.
Karen grew up in northern
Haakon County and the Ottumwa
area. Around 1968, her family
moved to the Grindstone area
northwest of Philip. She gradu-
ated from Philip High School in
1968. While attending high school,
she boarded with Shorty and
Edith Clark in Philip. Karen then
attended Black Hills State Uni-
versity in Spearfish where she
earned her bachelor’s degree in el-
ementary education. During her
junior and senior years of college
she became part of the Fifth
Teacher Corps Cycle and a mem-
ber of the Todd County (SD)
Teacher Corps Team. She also met
and married Thomas Raymond of
Mission.
Karen and Tom were married
on April 10, 1971, at the First
Lutheran Church in Philip, where
Karen was also baptized and con-
firmed. Karen taught school in
Mission, Okreek and Klein
schools. She then earned a mas-
ter’s degree in elementary educa-
tion from Black Hills State Uni-
versity. Tom and Karen then
moved to Winner where Karen
was employed in the Winner
school system.
While in Winner, Karen was
also employed as a dispatcher for
the Winner Police Department.
The next move was to Kadoka.
Karen became employed at Crazy
Horse School in Wanblee as a mid-
dle school teacher and upon earn-
ing her second master’s degree in
secondary school administration
served as high school principal at
Crazy Horse School. Karen then
became principal of Rockyford
School north of Sharp’s Corner on
the Pine Ridge Reservation. She
then moved to Batesland and con-
tinued employment with the
Shannon County School District.
Karen’s next move was to Lone-
man School near Oglala, where
she served as instructional super-
visor.
For more than 20 years, Karen
was afflicted with kidney disease
and was on dialysis most of the
time. In 2008, Karen received a
kidney transplant and was able to
live a normal life until this last
year. Also during the past 10
years, Karen suffered from
melanoma skin cancer. The first
occurrence resulted in major sur-
gery at the Mayo Clinic. The can-
cer seemed to abate. In January of
2012, the cancer came back and
Karen underwent chemo therapy
and the cancer again disappeared.
This past year the cancer came
back with a vengeance and Karen
spent most of the past two months
in and out of the hospital. The
past two weeks Karen was able to
spend at home and passed away
around 2:00 a.m. Monday, July 29.
This leaves behind her hus-
band, Tom, to whom she was mar-
ried for 42 years. Karen is also
survived by three children, daugh-
ter, Carrie May (Wayne) and son,
Coy, of Rapid City; daughter, Cal-
lie Raymond and daughter, Tom-
mie Jo, of Rapid City, and son,
Kenneth Raymond (Christena)
and son, Bayden, of Kadoka and
daughter, Mayson Buffington, of
Ridgeview; special daughter,
Keeko (Magnus) Gythfeldt and
children, Myles and Emma of
Ridgefield, Conn. Karen also
leaves behind a brother, Kyron
Bowen, of Philip; a sister, Karla
Whiting, of Aberdeen, and special
sisters, Barbara Esser, Arla Pat-
terson and Anne Lyon.
Karen was preceded in death by
her mother and father and special
aunt Wanda Heeb.
Karen was a caring person who
never complained of her afflictions
and the toll it took on her body.
She had a good sense of humor
and developed a high respect for
the spirituality of the Lakota peo-
ple with whom she worked. Karen
believed in the worth and dignity
of everyone she met and seldom
criticized others.
Memorial services will be held
at 2:00 p.m. Friday August 2, at
the United Church in Philip with
Pastor Kathy Chesney and a fam-
ily friend, Pastor Harold Ambrose
officiating. A Lakota prayer will be
recited by Ed Young Man Afraid of
His Horses.
Interment will be in the Ma-
sonic Cemetery in Philip.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
has been established.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Karen Bowen-Raymond___________________________
Area News
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 6
By Wendy Brunnemann
For those of you following Li-
brary news, we have switched out
our old circulation system (the way
we check out books) to a new ven-
dor. This will cost the Library sub-
stantially less money and should
free up some more money for buy-
ing books! We appreciate your pa-
tience during this transition.
Speaking of books, we just got in
a new batch of new books for your
reading pleasure. Look for the
newest books from Dan Brown,
Lisa Jackson, Mary Higgins Clark,
Debbie Macomber, Jeanette Walls,
Richard Paul Evans, and Khaled
Hosseini.
We even have some of the
newest teen books like Divergent
and Insurgent, and a new Mo
Willems book for our youngest
Wall Community Library
readers.
Unlike many larger libraries,
the wait time for new books at the
Wall Community Library is small
to non-existent. Many of these
books are on our shelves and those
with holds only have one or two
persons on the list unlike the
twenty holds you might see in
Rapid City. Come on down and
pick up a new book today!
Another plug for our Summer
Reading Program: make sure to
join us this summer! We have lots
of readers, all ages are repre-
sented. Hadley Bryan, Austan
Kjerstad, and Helen Crawford
have already finished the chal-
lenge (although I have it on good
authority that they are still read-
ing!), and have been entered into
the drawing of their choice.
People who finish the challenge
are entered into a drawing for ei-
ther a Plasmacar, a Kindle, or a
one-hour massage. Crescent Ma-
sonic Lodge and Megan Hoffman
from Hired Hands Massage and
Bodywork are the sponsors of our
Summer Reading Program and
have made these prizes possible.
We are fortunate to have such
wonderful community supporters!
Enjoy the last few weeks of sum-
mer, and keep reading!
This growing season, producers
should take some time to assess
the condition of their cropland soil
resource say conservation profes-
sionals.
Healthy soil is essential for
plant growth and resilient to
things that stress it, such as
floods, drought, diseases and
pests. Agronomic specialists with
the Natural Resources Conserva-
tion Service (NRCS) are urging
producers to take a look at the
health of the soil in their own
fields and pastures and get help if
their soil isn’t functioning as well
as it should.
A top factor is organic matter be-
cause it holds nutrients and water
for plant use and growth.
NRCS Conservation Agronomist
Jason Miller, Pierre, S.D. says
“People can’t do much about the
type of their soil, but we can adjust
management to increase the
amount of organic matter in our
soil.”
Increasing organic matter in-
creases the soils’ capacity for regu-
lating plant available water along
with other benefits.
A “healthy thing” is use of cover
crops. However, Miller comments
that corn-soybean rotations in a
large portion of South Dakota can
have challenges for incorporating
successful cover crops into rota-
tions since moisture and timing
are limiting factors.
Bill Nelson is using cover crops
for his cropland in Lake County,
S.D. Because of the diversity in his
cropping sequence, Nelson is see-
ing benefits of reduced soil com-
Health of soil factor for weed/pest issues
conservationists encouraging “soil checkups”
paction and improved nutrient up-
take and management. “My fields
are gentle, rolling hills typical of
eastern South Dakota, but erosion
is not happening here,” says Nel-
son, “The residue and organic mat-
ter has greatly improved infiltra-
tion and soil water holding capac-
ity.”
Miller says other options for
healthier soil are diversifying the
plants covering the soil surface
and keeping living roots in the soil
as long as possible.
“Producers, especially in eastern
South Dakota, should be incorpo-
rating a small grain into the rota-
tion that will then allow a success-
ful cover crop to be incorporated
behind the harvest,” he explains.
So, for example in a five-year ro-
tation, Miller explains, “Producers
can have a portion of their corn
acres going into small grains (that
contain a cover crop the previous
year) and another portion going
into soybean stubble.
That small grain stubble allows
better opportunity for establishing
and getting the most benefit out of
cover crops–using nutrients from
the previous crops and increasing
organic matter.”
These practices build organic
matter with positive effects on the
biological life in the soil. “Active
micro-organisms are what helps
keep the health of the soil in bal-
ance,” explains Eric Barsness,
NRCS Conservation Agronomist,
Brookings.
In mid-July, he used a soil probe
in Nelson’s fields and found a rich,
dark top soil about a foot deep that
has resulted from the good crop-
ping rotations based on soil condi-
tion, residue amounts, and use of
cover crops.
“The soil probe easily slid into
Bill’s soil because of the organic
matter, good structure and aggre-
gate stability,” says Barsness.
Nelson’s crop rotation for this
no-till field was oats (2011), cereal
rye as a cover crop, soybeans
(2012), and soybeans (2013). He
put the cereal rye in with a fall
seeding and when the snow came
off, the rye was green.
“That year (2012), we had a lot
of spring rain and prevent plant
acres around the county,” Nelson
explains. “The root system from
that rye cover crop in my rotation
held up the machinery up so we
could get the soybeans planted.”
The rye was terminated prior to
it competing with the soybeans.
This worked out well for Nelson,
he says, “Then, that mat left from
the rye root system and the above-
ground residue was just what the
fields needed.” Additional residue
can reduce weed pressure and
helps fields hold moisture if the
weather turns hot and dry.
Nelson used the rye in his rota-
tion to help get to his goal of main-
taining or increasing organic mat-
ter (OM) on his land to mimic lev-
els found in natural prairie soils.
Soil tests average 5.0 to 6.3 per-
cent OM in Nelson’s fields.
Another benefit he’s seeing, Nel-
son told Barsness, is the ‘break’
from weed and pest problems.
“With my rotation, I just don’t
have pest and weed issues such as
corn root worm or Glyphosate-tol-
erant weeds,” says Nelson.
“When a system gets out of bal-
ance, problems can pop-up. If
you’re seeing disease or pest issues
with your crops,” Miller says,
“Maybe it’s time to look past the
symptoms and get to the source.
Diversifying crop types and incor-
porating cover crops can help your
soil to be more healthy.”
Contact Natural Resources Con-
servation Service for free on-site
farm or ranch resource consulta-
tions. On the web, links to techni-
cal publications and guides are
available at http://www.sd.nrcs.us
da.gov/technical/CoverCrops.html.
A healthier soil means better
moisture infiltration, retention or
movement through the soil profile.
“This is a major benefit in the long-
term,” says Miller. “By evaluating
what their soil needs, producers
can feel better about management
decisions as they make adjust-
ments to their operation.”
Flowers around town are growing out of their planters and
spreading their beauty around different places on Wall’s Main
Street. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
Saturday, July 27, Maylin and Alissa Brucklacher competed in
the Colorado State Championships in Swimming and Gymnas-
tics. The girls are the daughters of Matthew and Sonja Bruck-
lacher of Greeley, Colo. Maylin, age 12, swam in two relays. Their
medley relay placed 11th out of 30+ teams. Maylin swam the but-
terfly portion of this event. Their freestyle relay was seeded 15
but surprised everyone, shaving off five seconds on their time,
to place eighth in the state. Maylin swam the second leg of this
relay, overtaking three competitors to give her team a big edge
in their heat. Alissa, age nine competed in gymnastics in the
Super 4 level. This is an advanced level where they compete
against all ages, seven years to 18 years of age. Alissa competed
in all five divisions at the competition, bars, beam, vault, floor
and All-Around. Alissa placed second in vault, fifth in bars and
sixth in floor in the individual State Championships. She scored
high in all events and took third place in the All-Around State
Championships. She was extremely excited to come home with
four medals, when she was hoping for “at least one”! Alissa
summed up the day when she told her Grandma Carla Bruck-
lacher that “all in all, this was an Epic Day”. The girls came home
with Grandma Carla to spend a week in South Dakota and visit
Uncle and Aunt Ron and Jennifer Tietsort and cousins Noah and
Hope in Custer State Park. ~Courtesy Photo
Brucklachers sisters place at state
courant@gwtc.net
tDm Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
todd Sieler
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 7 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff, and assis-
tant manager position(s) are
available for Aw! Shucks Café
opening soon at 909 Main Street
in Kadoka. Please apply within
or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K33-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Full-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience
preferred, but will train. CDL re-
quired, or to be obtained in six
months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Benefits package. Applications /
resumés accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-
2447. K33-4tc
AMERICA’S bEST VALuE INN
IN WALL has positions open for
housekeeping, laundry and
maintenance. Call Joseph at
279-2127 or 808-284-1865.
PW32-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Part-time
Jackson County Highway De-
partment Worker. Tractor opera-
tor to mow county road right of
way, and perform other duties as
directed. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required.
Applications / resumés ac-
cepted. Information 837-2410 or
837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K33-4tc
HELP WANTED: CDL driver,
Class A, two years flatbed OTR
experience, clean record, refer-
ences. Rapid City area based
company. 390-5535.
P32-4tp
OPTIMETRIC TECHNICIAN:
One day per week (Tuesdays), 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Medical experi-
ence preferred, but not required.
Mail resumé to: Philip Eye
Clinic, 810 Mountain View Road,
Rapid City, SD 57702. Ques-
tions, call Angie, 342-0777.
P28-tfn
HOuSEKEEPERS AND LAuN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED:
High school and college students
are welcome to apply. Will train.
Apply at either America’s Best
Value Inn and Budget Host Sun-
downer in Kadoka or call 837-
2188 or 837-2296.
K26-tfn
HELP WANTED: Sales person to
sell the historic Black Hills Gold
jewelry, in Wall. Meet travelers
from all over the world. Salary +
commission. Call Connie at 279-
2354 or 939-6443, or fax resumé
to 279-2314. PW24-tfn
ROuGH COuNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. Also prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
M24-24tp
O’CONNELL CONSTRuCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
faRM & RanCh
FOR SALE: (3) Billy goats: (1)
full grown Boer/Nubian Billy
and (2) three-month-old Boer/
Toggenburg/Nubian Billy kids.
$50 apiece OBO. Call 433-5403.
P34-2tp
WANTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. P28-11tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GaRaGe sales
2-FAMILY RuMMAGE SALE:
August 2, 12-7; August 3, 8-2,
K-gee’s Bldg., Main St. Philip.
Clothes - men’s, women’s, Scot-
tie, shoes, household, décor,
kitchen, board games, books,
cookbooks, (2) decorator tables,
discontinued Princess House,
holiday décor. P33-2tc
helP Wanted
HELP WANTED: Waitress/assis-
tant cook, 2 days a week. Call
PLA Café, 859-3272, Diana
Stewart, 685-3228. P34-1tc
CERTIFIED NuRSES AIDE:
Part-time/full-time CNA posi-
tion, benefits available. Contact
Heidi or Nikki, 837-2270.
K34-tfn
RN/LPN POSITION: Seeking
loving & patient geriatric nurse.
Benefits available. Contact Heidi
or Nikki, 837-2270. K34-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Weed Sprayer.
Seasonal part-time employment
spraying county highway right of
way. Commercial herbicide li-
cense required or to be obtained
before start of work. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Applications / resumés
accepted. Information 837-2410
or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
K33-4tc
autoMotive
FOR SALE: 1999 Dodge Dually,
Ext. cab, Cummins diesel, 5
speed, $8,500. Call 685-4052.
K34-2tc
FOR SALE: 1998 Dodge, 2WD,
regular cab, diesel, automatic,
$5,800. Call 685-4052. K34-2tc
FOR SALE: 1978 MGB convert-
ible, 52K miles, good shape. Call
279-2606 or 515-3270, Wall, for
price. PW34-2tp
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
Business & seRviCe
NEED A PLuMbER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your
indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn 441-1053 or leave a mes-
sage at 837-0112. K31-4tp
buSINESS FOR SALE: Pizza
Etc. 175 S. Center Ave., Philip.
Great family business, 1 year in
newly remodeled building, lots of
possibilities for expansion. Con-
tact Kim or Vickie, 859-2365.
PR45-tfn
HILDEbRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185.
K25-tfn
MisC. foR sale
FOR SALE: Rapala Husky Jerk
fishing lures, HJ8 and HJ10.
$4.00 each. Call Mark at 447-
7049. WP49-2tc
FOR SALE: Rear blade, fits Ford
8N style tractor, $200 OBO. Ya-
mata commercial sewing ma-
chine, high speed, large, $150
OBO. Leather motorcycle jacket
and pants, $75. Call 837-2427.
K34-1tp
FOR SALE: Golden Grain corn
stove 2000, burn wood pellets or
shelled corn, good condition,
$1,500. 669-2508. M34-4tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
notiCes/Wanted
NOTICE: The property known as
North Fork Trailer Court (Philip)
is strictly off limits to anyone ex-
cept the rental people. This in-
cludes property on both sides of
the North Fork. P34-1tp
WANTED: CLEAN 100% COT-
TON RAGS; i.e. sheets, t-shirts,
socks. NO FLANNEL OR CuR-
TAINS. 25¢ lb. Must be in-
spected before purchase. Pio-
neer Review, 221 E. Oak St.,
Philip. P28-tfn
Pets/suPPlies
FOR SALE: Australian shep-
herd/heeler cross puppies. Born
6-3-13. First shots, ready to go
end of July, $150 each. 993-
3005. P34-2tp
AKC GERMAN WIREHAIR
POINTER PuPPIES: Available in
Milesville for viewing now,
pickup Second week of August.
One male, five females. Will have
first shots, wormed, microchip
implants, and registration docu-
mentation. 544-3016. P31-4tp
Real estate
FOR SALE: (6) lots in Midland.
Each lot 25’x75’ (total 150’x75’).
$2,400. Paula Duncan, 515-
4418. P34-2tc
HOME FOR SALE IN PHILIP: 4
bedroom home with big 2-car
garage on two lots. House re-
modeled two years ago, new roof,
windows, siding, high efficiency
heat/air with heat pump, on-de-
mand hot water, nice propane
fireplace, nice backyard, deck
and more. Would consider con-
tract for deed. Contact for show-
ing: Don or Tami Ravellette, 685-
5147 (cell) or 859-2969 (home).
P27-tfn
HOuSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
3 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1,100
sq. ft. open floor plan, vaulted
ceilings, fenced backyard, estab-
lished lawn, oversized detached
garage. Appliances included, all
new in 2008. Call 840-2257 or
307-251-2474. PR45-6tp
2-STORY HOuSE FOR SALE IN
WALL: Will consider any reason-
able offer. $23,000 cash or will
consider contract for deed.
Please call 279-2858.
PW27-8tc
Rentals
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
Classified PoliCy
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
CATTLE SALE
LAGRAND SCOTCHCAP ANGUS
RANCH Complete dispersal of 450
Registered and Commercial Fall Calv-
ing Cows including some spring
calvers, 90 2012 Fall Heifers and 50
Fall Bulls. August 10th at Sioux Falls
Regional Worthing Sale barn. High
health, performance and phenotype.
Past National breeder of the year
award. Call for catalogue to Dan Nel-
son, Manager 701-351-1795 or
Duane Pancratz, Owner 605-359-
9222, or check website www.lagrand-
scotchcapranch.com.
EMPLOYMENT
MOBRIDGE POLICE DEPARTMENT
has opening for a FT E1911. Applica-
tion may be requested or picked up
at Mobridge Police Department or on-
line at www.mobridgepolice.org. Ap-
plication Deadline is Friday August
9th, 2013.
UNITED PRAIRIE COOPERATIVE at
New Town ND is seeking a Manager
of Business Operations. RESPONSI-
BILITIES: Manager of Business Oper-
ations is responsible for divisional
profitability, sales, new product /
market development, reporting, pur-
chasing, resale pricing, inventory
control, customer service, asset
maintenance, environmental compli-
ance, and other duties as assigned by
the CEO / General Manager. This
supply very successful cooperative is
located in NW ND with great recre-
ational opportunities. Company
owned housing is available. Email
resume to: larry.fuller@chsinc.com
CHS National Director of Placement,
5213 Shoal Drive, Bismarck ND
58503 or call (701) 220-9775.
SISSETON SCHOOL DISTRICT
OPENING: Library Media Specialist.
Contact: Tammy Meyer, 516 8th Ave
W Sisseton, SD 57262 605-698-
7613 Position open until filled. EOE.
HOVEN SCHOOLS SEEKING K-12
spec. ed. teacher. Contact Peggy Pe-
tersen, Supt. (605) 948-2252 or at
Peggy.Petersen@k12.sd.us for appli-
cation. Open until filled.
THE DUPREE SCHOOL DISTRICT is
seeking applications for a HS Math
Instructor (w/wo Head Boys BB
Coach); Base Pay - $34,150 plus
signing bonus. Contact Supt. Lenk
at Dupree School (605) 365-5138.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION is
taking applications for full- time Dou-
glas County Highway Superintend-
ent. Must have valid Class A Driverís
License. Experience in road/bridge
construction/maintenance. For ap-
plication contact: Douglas County
Auditor (605) 724-2423.
CHS MIDWEST COOPERATIVES is
seeking people interested in an
agronomy career. Various positions
in central South Dakota available.
Email Dan.haberling@chsinc.com or
call Midwest Cooperatives 1(800)658-
5535.
FOR SALE
200 PRE-MADE 2X6 STUDDED
WALLS, 8-ft. tall in varying lengths
from 5-ft. to 14-ft. $50.00 to $150.00
each, depending on length. Call 605-
852-2122 in Highmore, ask for Mike
Konrad or Jan Busse.
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will consider
contract for deed. Call Russell Spaid
605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders repre-
senting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner op-
erators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
ApArtmENtS
AVAIlABlE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
CUSTOM
HAYING
Call
Jace Shearer
685-5964 • Wall
The Wall After
School Program
is looking for an
enthusiastic, energetic,
reliable individual to
work part-time.
Must be 18 with a
high school diploma.
Please contact
Mandi McDonnell or
Niki Mohr at 279-2156
for more information.
Deadline is August 9th.
THANK YOuS
I want to thank everyone for all
the flowers, plants, cards and
gifts I received for my retirement
from Golden West. Your friend-
ships mean so much to me. A spe-
cial thank you to those who
planned the parties for me. I feel
blessed to live in such a great
community.
Love,
Donna Fauske
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
JULY 16, 2013
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, July 16, 2013, in the Commis-
sioners' meeting room of the Pennington
County Courthouse. Chairperson Lyndell
Petersen called the meeting to order at
9:00 a.m. with the following Commission-
ers present: Ron Buskerud, Ken Davis,
Don Holloway and Nancy Trautman.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to approve the agenda as pre-
sented. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-10 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the July 2,
2013, Board of Commissioners’ meeting.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$2,626,233.32.
7. Approve the 3rd Quarter State and
Local Agreement for Emergency Man-
agement and authorize the Chairperson’s
signature.
8. Approve Permit to Occupy Right-of-
Way for a Black Hills Back 40 Mountain
Bike Race to be held on July 27, 2013.
The race will take place on Sheridan Lake
Road.
9. Declare surplus one 2005 Solus
Elite Diagnostic Scanner for the purpose
of trade for a 2013 Solus Ultra Diagnostic
Scanner – Highway Department.
10. Recognize and thank Pennington
County volunteers for the month of June
2013. The list of volunteers is on file in
the Human Resources office and is
posted on the County bulletin board.
End of Consent Agenda
ITEMS FROM CHAIR
A. Citizen Group Questions Request
Regarding Ag Exemption Change
TIMBER TAXATION CLASSIFICATION
INFORMATION – Commissioner Traut-
man
FY2014 PENNINGTON COUNTY PRO-
VISIONAL BUDGET – Auditor Pearson
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Davis that $182,500 will come from
County General cash reserves instead of
Accumulated Building cash reserves.
Vote: Unanimous.
A. Outside Funding Requests
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to not fund the $25,000 re-
quest for Rapid City Economic Develop-
ment. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to not fund the $25,000 request
for the Ellsworth Task Force. Substitute
motion: MOVED by Davis to authorize
the $25,000 request for the Ellsworth
Task Force. The substitute motion died
for lack of a second. The vote on the orig-
inal motion carried 4-1 with Davis oppos-
ing.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to not fund the $10,000 re-
quest for Black Hills Vision. Vote: Unani-
mous.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Trautman to not fund the $25,000 request
for Black Hills Works. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to not fund the requests from
LIVE Inc. and OAHE Inc. Vote: Unani-
mous.
MOVED by Buskerud to not fund
WAVI. The motion died for lack of a sec-
ond.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Trautman to fund WAVI at $25,000 under
the State’s Attorney Victim Witness
budget. Vote: Unanimous.
B. New Employee Requests - 2014
1. Treasurer: MOVED by Buskerud
and seconded by Davis to approve the
Treasurer’s request for one seasonal part
time employee. Vote: Unanimous.
2. Extension: MOVED by Trautman
and seconded by Petersen to authorize
one half time employee for Extension.
Substitute motion: MOVED by Davis to
not fund the employee request for Exten-
sion. The motion died for lack of a sec-
ond. The vote on the original motion
passed 4-1 with Davis opposing.
3. Public Defender: MOVED by Hol-
loway and seconded by Buskerud to ap-
prove an additional staff assistant at
$51,180 and two additional attorneys.
Vote: Unanimous.
4. Buildings & Grounds: MOVED by
Trautman and seconded by Buskerud to
authorize the four FTEs for B&G as pre-
sented. Vote: Unanimous.
5. Equalization: MOVED by Trautman
and seconded by Holloway to authorize
two FTEs as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
6. H&HS: MOVED by Buskerud and
seconded by Trautman to authorize one
FTE for the H&HS John T. Vucurevich
budget. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to table action on the provi-
sional budget until later in the meeting.
Vote: Unanimous.
Commissioner Buskerud left the meet-
ing at this time.
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
A. General Fund Budget Supplement
Hearing (SP13-011) Juvenile Alternative
Expansion Budget: MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Trautman to approve
the supplement to the 2013 General Fund
Juvenile Alternative Expansion budget in
the amount of $82,275 from non-bud-
geted revenue received in the current
year. Vote: Unanimous.
B. New Package (Off Sale) Malt Bev-
erage & SD Farm Wine License: MOVED
by Holloway and seconded by Trautman
to approve the application for a new pack-
age malt beverage and SD farm wine li-
cense for High Country Guest Ranch,
Blended Arrow LLC. Vote: Unanimous.
Commissioner Buskerud returned at
this time.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve Item C, a new retail
(on-off sale) malt beverage license for
Cousins Big Chair, Reynolds & Livingston
LLC, and Item D, the renewal of a retail
malt beverage (on-off sale) license for Sic
Vic’s House of Horsepower, Michelle
Fuhrmann, as presented. Substitute mo-
tion: MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to approve Item C, a new re-
tail (on-off sale) malt beverage license for
Cousins Big Chair, Reynolds & Livingston
LLC. Vote: Unanimous.
C. New Retail (on-off sale) Malt Bever-
age License – Cousin’s Big Chair,
Reynolds & Livingston LLC.
D. Retail Malt Beverage (on-off sale)
License Renewal – Sic Vic’s House of
Horsepower, Michelle Fuhrmann:
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded by
Trautman to continue the renewal of a re-
tail malt beverage (on-off sale) license for
Sic Vic’s House of Horsepower, Michelle
Fuhrmann to the next meeting until the
State’s Attorney can do additional re-
search regarding a lien against the prop-
erty. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to take a 10 minute recess.
Vote: Unanimous. The board recessed
at 11:16 a.m. and reconvened at 11:26
a.m.
ITEMS FROM TREASURER
A. Request Approval of Temporary
Over-hire FTE: MOVED by Davis and
seconded by Trautman to authorize the
over hire of 1 FTE in the Treasurer’s Of-
fice. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM BUILDINGS &
GROUNDS
A. Authorization to Bid – Public Health
Building Re-Roof: MOVED by Holloway
and seconded by Trautman to authorize
Buildings & Grounds to advertise for bids
for the re-roof of the Public Health Build-
ing located at 725 North LaCrosse Street.
Vote: Unanimous.
B. PC Campus Expansion Project
(Block 99) Change Order #2: MOVED by
Buskerud and seconded by Holloway to
authorize the Chairperson’s signature to
Change Order #2 dated June 18, 2013,
which increases the Contract Sum by
$36,861.18 to $22,557,297.81, with no
change to the Contract Time, for the J.
Scull Construction Services contract for
the construction of the Pennington
County Campus Expansion project. Vote:
Unanimous.
C. PC Campus Expansion Project Up-
date
ITEMS FROM EMERGENCY MANAGE-
MENT
A. Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan Prom-
ulgation Statement: MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Trautman to authorize
the Chairperson’s signature on the Pre-
Disaster Mitigation Plan Promulgation.
Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM FIRE ADMINISTRATOR
A. Public Fireworks Display – Black
Hills Speedway: MOVED by Trautman
and seconded by Davis to approve a pub-
lic display of fireworks for Black Hills
Speedway on July 19, 2013, with alterna-
tive dates of July 26 or August 2, 2013,
provided all requirements are met. Vote:
Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
A. Approval of Bid Letting Documents
For Deerfield Road Project: MOVED by
Davis and seconded by Buskerud to ap-
prove the Chairperson’s signature on the
Utilities Certificate, Letting Authorization
and a Right-of-Way Certificate for Deer-
field Road Project P 6403(08), Penning-
ton County, PCN 02DP. Vote: Unani-
mous.
B. Approval of Letter: MOVED by
Trautman and seconded by Holloway to
authorize the Chairperson’s signature on
a letter to Superintendent Eric Brunne-
mann at Badlands National Park regard-
ing the blowing soil and land erosion that
are affecting Sage Creek Road, and fur-
ther moved to CC the letter to the EPA.
Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM PUBLIC DEFENDER
A. Approval of Reclassification Outside
of Wage Policy: MOVED by Davis and
seconded by Buskerud to continue this
item to the August 6, 2013, Board of
Commissioner’s meeting so the Public
Defender and Human Resources Director
can discuss the proposed wage and im-
pact on other county departments. Vote:
Unanimous.
B. Additional Staff and Notice of Inabil-
ity to Accept Appointments: MOVED by
Trautman and seconded by Holloway to
authorize the Public Defender to hire two
attorneys and a legal secretary effective
August 1, 2013, and further moved that
the budget be reviewed at the end of the
year for a possible supplement. Vote:
Unanimous.
APPROVAL OF THE PROVISIONAL
BUDGET
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Buskerud to take from the table the ap-
proval of the provisional budget. Vote:
Unanimous.
MOVED by Trautman and seconded
by Holloway to approve the Provisional
Budget and Means of Finance in the
amount of $83,465,856 with frozen levies
and set the required annual budget hear-
ing for September 3, 2013, at 9:30 a.m.
MDT. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM WEED & PEST
A. 2012-2013 Pennington County Fire
Protection and Mountain Pine Beetle
Suppression Project Final Report
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL 1-
25-2(3)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to convene in executive ses-
sion at 12:50 p.m. Vote: Unanimous. The
Board remained in executive session until
1:10 p.m.
Commissioner Petersen did not return
immediately; therefore, Vice Chairperson
Trautman called for the motion to come
out of executive session. MOVED by
Holloway and seconded by Davis to ad-
journ from executive session. Vote:
Unanimous.
PLANNING & ZONING CONSENT
AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Planning & Zoning Consent
Agenda for action to be taken on all items
by a single vote of the Board of Commis-
sioners. Any item may be removed from
the Consent Agenda for separate action.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve the Consent
Agenda as presented. Vote: Unanimous.
A. SECOND READING OF REZONE /
RZ 13-02: Jarvis and Frances Olson;
Fisk Land Surveying – Agent. To rezone
7.65 acres from Limited Agriculture Dis-
trict to Low Density Residential District in
accordance with Sections 206, 207, and
508 of the Pennington County Zoning Or-
dinance.
ORDINANCE NO. RZ 13-02
AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING SECTION 508 OF THE
PENNINGTON COUNTY
ZONING ORDINANCE, RE-
ZONING THE WITHIN DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY:
BE IT HEREBY ORDAINED
BY THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY COMMISSION
THAT THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY ZONING ORDI-
NANCE BE AND HEREBY IS
AMENDED BY AMENDING
THE ZONING OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PROP-
ERTY:
Located on a parcel of land
located in the South One-Half
of the Northeast One-Quarter
of the Southeast One-Quarter
(S½NE¼SE¼) of Section
Thirty-Five (35) in Township
One North (T1N), Range Three
East (R3E) of the Black Hills
Meridian (BHM), Pennington
County, South Dakota, more
fully described as follows: Be-
ginning at the southwest corner
of said South One-Half of the
Northeast One Quarter of the
Southeast One Quarter
(S½NE¼SE¼) of Section
Thirty-Five (35) in Township
One North (T1N), Range Three
East (R3E) of the Black Hills
Meridian (BHM), Pennington
County, South Dakota, said
point being located on a 1/16th
section line of said Section
Thirty-Five (35) and being
marked by a US Forest Service
Monument; thence, northerly
along the 1/16th section line of
said Section Thirty-Five (35),
North 00 degrees 09 minutes
00 seconds West, a distance of
260.00 feet more or less to a
point marked by a rebar with
survey cap RW FISK 6565;
thence, South 89 degrees 51
minutes 02 seconds East a dis-
tance of 1,282.70 feet more or
less to a point located on the
westerly line of the section line
right-of-way for said Section
Thirty-Five (35), said right-of-
way being known as Paradise
Drive, and said point being
marked by a rebar with survey
cap RW FISK 6565; thence,
southerly on the westerly line
of said section line right-of-way
and on the westerly line of Par-
adise Drive right-of-way, South
00 degrees 00 minutes 43 sec-
onds East a distance of 260.00
feet more or less, said point
being located on a 1/16th sec-
tion line and coincident with the
northeast corner of Tract 14 of
Leisure Hills Estates, and said
point being marked by a mon-
ument with survey cap LS
2196; thence, westerly on said
1/16th section line and on the
north line of said Tract 14 of
Leisure Hills Estates, North 89
degrees 53 minutes 45 sec-
onds West a distance of
549.64 feet more or less to the
northwest corner of said Tract
14 of Leisure Hills Estates, said
point being coincident with the
northeast corner of Tract 15 of
Leisure Hills Estates and said
point being marked by a mon-
ument with survey cap LS
2196; thence, continuing west-
erly on said 1/16th section line
and on the north line of said
Tract 15 of Leisure Hills Es-
tates, North 89 degrees 43
minutes 18 seconds West a
distance of 542.94 feet more or
less to the northwest corner of
Tract 15 of Leisure Hills Es-
tates, said point being coinci-
dent with the northeast corner
of Tract 21 of Leisure Hills Es-
tates and said point being
marked by a monument with
survey cap LS 2196; thence,
continuing westerly on said
1/16th section line and on the
north line of said Tract 21 of
Leisure Hills Estates, South 89
degrees 54 minutes 44 sec-
onds West 189.50 feet more or
less to the point of beginning.
Said tract of land contains 7.65
acres, more or less.
The above-described prop-
erty is hereby rezoned from
Limited Agriculture District to
Low Density Residential Dis-
trict.
Dated this 16th day of July,
2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION
/s/ Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
B. PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT
AMENDMENT REVIEW / PU 09-03:
Simpson Inc. (James and Marla Simp-
son). To review a Planned Unit Develop-
ment Amendment to allow a RV Park, tent
camping sites, shower house, and to re-
duce setbacks in accordance with Sec-
tion 213 of the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
Lot 4A less Hwy RTY; Lot 4B
less Hwy RTY; Lot D of Lot 7
less Hwy RTY; Part of Palmer
Gulch Placer #690 – Lot 3 less
Hwy RTY, all of Palmer Gulch
Placer MS 690, Section 27,
T1S, R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
Approve the extension of Planned Unit
Development Amendment / PU 09-03
with the following sixteen (16) conditions:
1. That the uses allowed with
this Planned Unit Development
be an eight (8) site RV Park, an
five (5) site tent camping area,
six (6) attached cabins for
rental purposes with restroom
facilities, a duplex with a resi-
dence and rental unit, and one
(1) detached rental cabin, and
any associated improvements;
2. That eight (8) foot setbacks
be allowed along all interior
(shared) lot lines of the four (4)
subject properties and twenty-
five (25) foot setbacks be main-
tained along all exterior lot
lines, which abut properties
under different ownership; 3.
That each campsite (RV or
tent) must include one (1) park-
ing space for a vehicle (in ad-
dition to the recreation vehicle,
where applicable) and the
parking space must be con-
structed so no portion of the
vehicle extends onto any inte-
rior roadway; 4. That the inte-
rior one way road shall be a
minimum of 15 feet in width
and surfaced with gravel (min-
imum of 4 inches), concrete or
asphalt and maintained in a
dust free manner. All other in-
terior roads shall be a minimum
of 24 feet in width and surfaced
with gravel (minimum of 4
inches), concrete or asphalt
and maintained in a dust free
manner; 5. That a Floodplain
Development Permit shall be
submitted for review and ap-
proval prior to any work or
placement of any structure
within the boundaries of the
100-year floodplain; 6. That
natural drainage paths be
maintained and/or any alter-
ations to the natural drainage
paths be adequately compen-
sated for in accordance with
the County Drainage Engi-
neer’s comments; 7. That nat-
ural drainage be diverted
around the absorption area for
the new on-site wastewater
system so as to prevent run-off
into Palmer Creek; 8. That the
applicant maintain some type
of barrier (i.e. fence, boulders)
around the on-site wastewater
system to prevent any parking
and/or camping over top of the
on-site wastewater system and
that proper setbacks to the on-
site wastewater system be
maintained; 9. That any new
On-site Wastewater systems
be installed in accordance with
all Department of Environment
and Natural Resources regula-
tions, including a minimum 100
foot setback for the absorption
area from the high water line of
the Palmer Creek; 10. That a
minimum 10 foot separation be
maintained at all times be-
tween each RV site; 11. That
the internal road network not
exceed a maximum of an eight
(8) percent grade; 12. That
each RV and tent site has a lot
number clearly posted; 13.
That the RV Park conforms to
all regulations in Section 306 of
the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance; 14. That the appli-
cants conform to all applicable
State and County regulations,
including those established by
the South Dakota Departments
of Environmental and Natural
Resources and Health; 15.
That all other conditions of ap-
proval of the original PUD are
still valid and applicable to the
subject property with the ex-
ception of Condition #3 regard-
ing the allowed uses and Con-
dition #10 pertaining to set-
backs; and, 16. That this
Planned Unit Development
Amendment be reviewed in
four (4) years or upon a com-
plaint basis.
C. PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT
AMENDMENT REVIEW / PU 08-04:
Linda Kramer. To review a Planned Unit
Development to allow for three (3) addi-
tional cabins in a Planned Unit Develop-
ment in accordance with Section 213 of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
The N1/2 of the NE1/4 lying
east of County Road, Section
18, T1N, R3E, BHM, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota.
Approve the extension of Planned Unit
Development Amendment / PU 08-04
with the following twelve (12) conditions:
1. That the well and the waste-
water disposal system meet
the requirements of the South
Dakota Department of Health;
2. That the required setbacks
for all structures be a minimum
of 25 feet from all property
lines; 3. That the permitted
uses be a three (3) bedroom
single-family residence, two (2)
bedroom guest cabin, chapel,
recreational hall, corral, three
(3) one-bedroom cabins, three
(3) storage barns, and acces-
sory residential structures; 4.
That the day visitor groups be
limited to a maximum of 50 oc-
cupants; 5. That Building Per-
mits be obtained for any struc-
ture exceeding 144 square feet
or located on a permanent
foundation, which includes the
necessary site plans to be re-
viewed and approved by the
Planning Director; 6. That a
guest list be maintained and a
smoke detector be placed in
each sleeping room; 7. That
each smoke detector be tested
semi-annually for proper func-
tion. The smoke detectors
must be Underwriters Labora-
tory (UL) listed and be either
AC or battery operated; 8.
That the applicant has at least
one 2A-BC dry chemical fire
extinguisher accessible to all
guests at all times on each
floor or structure; 9. That the
address of the property be
posted inside each cabin for
the guests and outside each
cabin for emergency location
purposes; 10. That the appli-
cant maintain a minimum of 24
parking spaces and that each
parking space be a minimum of
nine feet by eighteen feet and
be maintained in dust free
manner; 11. That the recre-
ational resort be limited to one
sign totaling four square feet in
area and be shall be located a
minimum of 17 feet from any
property line; and, 12. That
this Planned Unit Development
be reviewed in four (4) years or
upon a complaint basis.
D. LAYOUT PLAT / PL 13-11: Holy
Smoke, Inc. / Danielle Banks. To create
Tract 1 of Holy Smoke Addition in accor-
dance with Section 400.1 of the Penning-
ton County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Lot A
Revised of Holy Smoke Addi-
tion and The Unplatted Bal-
ance of GL 16 less ROW and
The Unplatted Blance of GL 21
less ROW in Section 31, T1S,
R6E; Lot C (also in Section 31,
T1S, R6E) and Lot D (also in
Section 5, T2S, R6E and Sec-
tions 31 and 32, T1S, R6E) of
Holy Smoke Addition; and All of
Ben Bolt Lode, MS, Section 6,
T2S, R6E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Tract
1 of Holy Smoke Addition, Sec-
tions 31 and 32, T1S, R6E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve Layout Plat / PL 13-11 with
the following eight (8) conditions:
1. That prior to County Board
approval of the Minor Plat, Ben
Bolt Lode M.S. 1525 be re-
zoned from Low Density Resi-
dential District to Highway
Service District; 2. That prior to
County Board approval of the
Minor Plat, a Comprehensive
Plan Amendment be approved
to amend the Future Land Use
Map from PUD Sensitive to
Highway Service District; 3.
That the Section Line Highway
be improved to Ordinance 14
Standards, which includes 24
foot-wide driving surface with a
minimum of four inches of
gravel or obtain approval of a
Subdivision Regulations Vari-
ance waiving this requirement;
4. That the applicant submits
engineered road construction
plans for the Section Line High-
way and the access easement
or obtains approval of a Subdi-
vision Regulations Variance
waiving this requirement; 5.
That prior to County Board ap-
proval of the Minor Plat, the ap-
plicant obtain Operating Per-
mits for all the onsite waste-
water treatment systems on
the property; 6. That the ac-
cess easements are built to
Local Road Standards in a
Highway Service District, which
includes a 32-foot paved driv-
ing surface or obtain approval
of a Subdivision Regulations
Variance be obtained waiving
this requirement; 7. That the
20 foot and 40 foot access
easements be widened to a
66-foot-wide access easement
or obtain approval of a Subdi-
vision Regulations Variance
waiving this requirement; and,
8. That approval of this Layout
Plat does not constitute ap-
proval of any further applica-
tions to be submitted for the
above-described property.
E. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-11 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMEND-
MENT / CA 13-05: Holy Smoke, Inc. /
Danielle Banks. To rezone 11.85 acres
from Low Density Residential District to
Highway Service District and to amend
the Pennington County Comprehensive
Plan to change the Future Land Use from
Planned Unit Development Sensitive to
Highway Service District in accordance
with Section 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
All of Ben Bolt Lode, MS; Section 6,
T2S, R6E, BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve the first reading of Rezone /
RZ 13-11 and Comprehensive Plan
Amendment / CA 13-05.
F. PRELIMINARY PLAT / PL 13-12
AND SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS
VARIANCE / SV 13-05: William or Lark
Bennett; Renner & Associates – Agent. To
create Tracts 3R, 5, and 6 of Summit
Peak Estates Subdivision and to waive
platting requirements in accordance with
Sections 400.2 of 700.1 the Pennington
County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Tract 3
of Summit Peak Estates Subdi-
vision; Less Tract 2, 3, and 4 of
Summit Peak Estates Subdivi-
sion and Less ROW (Also in
Section 33) of Jolly No. 1 Lode
MS 527; Less Tract 2 and 3 of
Summit Peak Estates Subdivi-
sion and ROW (Also in Section
32) of Jolly No. 2 Lode MS 528;
and Less Tract 1, 2, and 4 of
Summit Peak Estates Subdivi-
sion and ROW (Also in Section
33) of Jolly No. 3 lode MS 529,
located in NE¼ of Section 32
and in the NW¼ of Section 33,
T1S, R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL:
Tracts 3R, 5, and 6 of Summit
Peak Estates Subdivision,
Sections 32 and 33, T1S, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve Preliminary Plat / PL 13-12
and Subdivision Regulations Variance /
SV 13-05 with the following two (2) con-
ditions:
1. That prior to County Board
approval of the Preliminary
Plat, the soil profile holes on
each of the proposed lots be
dug to a depth of eight (8) feet
and the location of the soil pro-
file on proposed Tract 5 be
moved further to the west,
away from the creek, and that
these soil profile holes be in-
spected by the Environmental
Planner. If there are any is-
sues identified with the soils
on-site, additional holes may
be required to be dug in alter-
native locations, or conditions
may be included on the Final
Plat regarding the type and lo-
cation of on-site wastewater
treatment that will be permitted
for each of the proposed lots;
and, 2. That the ownership of
Tract 3 be clarified and ad-
dressed by either including an
additional Certificate of Owner-
ship on the plat for Ray T. Flack
and E.C. Murray or else a deed
be recorded for Lark L. and
William C. Bennett, in accor-
dance with the Department of
Equalization’s comments.
G. FIRST READING AND PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-12 AND
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMEND-
MENT / CA 13-06: William or Lark Ben-
nett; Renner & Associates – Agent. To re-
zone 12.54 acres from Limited Agriculture
District to Low Density Residential District
and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Planned Unit Devel-
opment Sensitive to Low Density Resi-
dential District in accordance with Section
508 of the Pennington County Zoning Or-
dinance.
Jolly No. 1 Lode M.S. 527, less
Tracts 2, 3, and 4 of Summit
Peak Estates Subdivision and
less right-of-way; Jolly No. 2
Lode M.S. 528, less Tracts 2
and 3 of Summit Peak Estates
Subdivision and less right-of-
way; and, Jolly No. 3 Lode
M.S. 529, less Tracts 1, 2 and
4 of Summit Peak Estates Sub-
division and less right-of-way;
all of Sections 32 and 33, T1S,
R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
Approve Rezone / RZ 13-12 and Com-
prehensive Plan Amendment / CA 13-06
with the exclusion of the portion of Jolly
No. 3 Lode M.S. 529 lying south of Old
Hill City Road.
End of Consent Agenda
Regular Planning & Zoning Items
Chairperson Petersen returned at this
time.
H. THE SPRING CREEK WATER-
SHED MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – APPROVAL
OF PARTICIPANT AGREEMENT
SPC2012PC77: MOVED by Trautman
and seconded by Davis to approve the
Chairperson’s signature on Spring Creek
Watershed Management and Project Im-
plementation Plan Cost Share Participant
Agreement SPC2012PC77 in the amount
of $24,219. The motion carried 4-1 with
Buskerud opposing.
MOVED by Trautman that there be no
more public comment on these items.
The motion died for lack of a second.
I. THE SPRING CREEK WATERSHED
MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT IMPLE-
MENTATION PLAN – AMENDMENT TO
THE SPRING CREEK MONITORING
PLAN NOT TO EXCEED AMOUNT:
MOVED by Trautman and seconded by
Holloway to amend the Spring Creek
Monitoring Plan budget from a “not to ex-
ceed” amount of $74,000 to a “not to ex-
ceed” amount of $84,000 in order to per-
form additional water quality analyses
and add additional monitoring sites.
Buskerud called the question. Vote on
calling the question: Unanimous. The
vote on the motion carried 4-1 with
Buskerud opposing.
J. THE SPRING CREEK WATER-
SHED MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – RE/SPEC
INC. CONSULTING CONTRACT MODI-
FICATION: MOVED by Holloway and
seconded by Buskerud to amend the con-
tract with RESPEC to $322,000 from cur-
rent value of $282,000. Vote: Unani-
mous.
Retail Malt Beverage (On-Off Sale) Li-
cense Renewal: MOVED by Buskerud
and seconded by Davis to reconsider the
motion to continue the retail malt bever-
age renewal for Sic Vic’s House of Horse-
power. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve the retail malt bev-
erage renewal for Sic Vic’s House of
Horsepower, Michelle Fuhrmann. Vote:
Unanimous.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1)
B. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL 1-
25-2(3)
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to convene in executive ses-
sion. Vote: Unanimous. The Board re-
mained in executive session from 2:03
p.m. until 2:18 p.m. MOVED by Davis
and seconded by Trautman to adjourn
from executive session. Vote: Unani-
mous.
PERSONNEL
State’s Attorney: Effective 7/22/2013 –
M. Slanina, $16.17/hr.; Effective
7/29/2013 – A. Garcia, $17.83/hr.
Law Enforcement: Effective 6/21/2013
– J. Gray, $16.17/hr.
Jail: Effective 7/1/2013 – B. Kulm,
$19.65/hr.; 7/1/2013 at $13.29/hr. - K.
Johnson, T. Holmquist, T. Mohney, H.
Hanzlik, V. Johnson, K. Standing Cloud,
Effective 7/22/2013 – D. Kuriga,
$19.65/hr.
CCADP: Effective 7/22/2013 – P.
Nason, $19.65/hr.
WSDJSC: Effective 7/1/2013 – J. Buh-
ler, $3,945.33; Effective 7/22/2013 – B.
Vaughn, $15.39/hr.; D. Atkinson,
$19.20/hr.; D. Smith, $21.16/hr.
VOUCHERS
123Securityproducts.Co, 154.12; A A
Property Management, 510.00; A B Busi-
ness Equipment, 1,117.75; A B Welding
Supply Co, 1,179.72; A To Z Shredding
Inc, 159.45; A1 Sewer Drain Inc, 320.00;
Aaron Klapkin, 540.00; Ace Steel And Re-
cycling, 115.46; Active Data Systems Inc,
6,221.40; Adorama Inc, 3,850.00; Ad-
vanced Drug Testing Inc, 72.00; Ad-
vanced Security Product, 1,344.49;
Ahmed Alasfour, 100.00; Air Works,
10.00; Al Cornella Refrigeration, 270.76;
Al Jr Md Wessel, 1,150.00; Alcohol Mon-
itoring, 609.50; Allen Reuer, 1,540.00;
Amanda Mailloux, 180.00; Amazon Mkt-
place Pmts, 715.84; Amazon.Com, 80.57;
American Hotel Register, 388.75; Ameri-
can Inst Supply, 233.00; American Jail
Association, 340.00; American Technical
Services Inc, 2,764.00; Americas Best
Value Inn, 255.96; Americinn Motel,
1,269.00; Amerigas, 61.73; Amy A Rags-
dale, 146.25; Angela M Colbath,
1,380.92; Ann G Sandberg, 680.00; Arc
International Inc, 5,875.30; Arc Serv-
ices/Training, 171.00; Ashlie Parks,
40.00; Atrix International Inc, 319.45;
Audra Malcomb Consulting, 7,606.84;
Avenet Llc, 3,000.00; Badger Plumbing
Heating Inc, 338.73; Badlands Automo-
tive, 1,471.09; Bailey Jd Mp Merryman,
707.50; Baker Timber Products, 59.88;
Bargain Printing, 540.15; Batteries Plus,
7.96; Behavior Management Systems
Inc, 60,129.00; Best Western Fargo Dou-
blewood Inn, 340.36; Best Western
Ramkota Inn, 269.98; Bestchem Llc,
32.68; Betsey Harris, 2,609.76; Bettmann
Hogue Diedrich, 588.33; Bh Chemical
Company Inc, 3,323.21; Bh Orthopedic
Spine Center Pc, 122.30; Bh Power Inc,
14,780.51; Bh Powersports, 516.98; Bh
Rcd, 5,000.00; Bh Reg Eye Institute Llp,
890.59; Bh Services Inc, 259.39; Bh State
University, 72.00; Bh Surgical Hospital
Llc, 190.50; Bh Wilbert Vault, 330.00; Bh
Window Cleaning Inc, 2,145.04; Bhp Inc,
1,940.88; Biegler Greg Lpc Ccdc Ii,
180.00; Bierschbach Equipment, 301.89;
Continued on page 9
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 8 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Big D Oil Co, 141.65; Black Hills Chemi-
cal, 2,053.97; Bob Barker Company,
2,264.18; Bob Barker Company Inc,
472.97; Border States Electric, 509.90;
Brenda Wood, 69.00; Bridgette R Banks,
753.75; Bureau Of Human Resources,
252.00; Burger King, 45.67; Butler Ma-
chinery Company, 27.70; Career Learn-
ing Center, 30.00; Carol Livermont,
240.00; Carquest Auto Parts, 45.29;
Cashwa Distributing, 641.31; Cathy L
Stewart, 50.00; Cbm Food Service,
56,409.42; Cdw Government Inc,
16,007.90; Central States Fair Inc,
34,500.00; Cetec Engineering,
10,047.55; Champion Water Systems,
75.60; Chemsearch, 4,309.20; Childrens
Home Society, 2,000.00; Childrens Home
Society, 325.00; Chivukula Venkata
Aditya, 1,744.96; Chris Supply Co Inc,
772.94; Chronicle Guidance Public,
2,786.38; City Of Hill City, 114.00; City Of
Rapid City, 28,560.85; City Of Rapid City
Water, 1,626.90; Cocacola Bottling Co Of
The Black Hills, 560.00; Communication
Services For The Deaf, 5,955.96; Con-
tractors Supply Inc, 72.00; Copy Country,
25.00; Cora Fried, 141.60; Cornerstone
Apartments, 440.00; Correctional Coun-
seling, 518.28; Countryside Property
Management Llc, 810.00; Creative Sur-
faces Inc, 1,090.20; Crescent Electric
Supply, 1,361.61; Cretex Concrete Prod-
ucts West Inc, 32,844.00; Crop Produc-
tion Service, 368.00; CRS Inc, 105.00;
CSRX Inc, 215.99; Cynthia Weichmann,
95.00; D R Service Inc, 2,654.66; Dakota
Plains Legal Services, 16,333.33; Dakota
Security Systems Inc, 15,067.99; Dakota
Typewriter Exchange, 2,021.62; Dales
Tire Retreading Inc, 5,073.10; Dallas Q
Biers, 2,850.00; Danko Emergency
Equipment, 2,650.20; Dash Medical
Gloves, 1,425.00; Datel Software Solu-
tions, 267.00; Davison County, 198.44;
Dc Scott Surveyors Inc, 2,392.65;
Deanna Young, 69.00; Delta Air, 25.00;
Delta Air, 25.00; Denise Cody, 22.50;
Denise Hoekstra, 81.60; Dennis Gorton,
308.17; Dennis Hanson, 300.00; Dennis
Prue, 172.00; Dennis Supply Rc, 115.13;
Dept Of Health Human Services, 150.00;
Des Oil Inc, 168.57; Dhd Construction
Inc, 99.52; Diamond Medical Supply,
60.63; Diamond Pharmacy Services,
36,163.77; Diesel Machinery Inc, 131.03;
Dillon Law Office, 747.60; Dodge Town
Inc, 99.20; Doiblm Natl Interagency,
16.82; Don Holloway, 327.82; Donald A
Janz, 1,100.00; Douglas K Sletten,
240.00; Douglas Mednansky, 3,402.50;
Dustin Willett, 248.80; Earl W Buck,
300.00; Ecolab Pest Elimination, 372.00;
Ed Roehr Safety Products, 1,140.85; Ed-
dies Truck Sales Inc, 396.48; Edgewood
Estates Lp, 510.00; Eileens Colossal
Cookies, 11.85; Election Systems,
1,476.95; Elizabeth Glynn, 423.23; Enter-
prise Rent-A-Car - San Antonio, Tx,
30.39; Environmental Chemical Enter-
prises Inc, 836.91; Eprovider Solutions,
232.60; Evergreen Office Products,
4,586.10; Executive Mgmt Fin Office,
48.32; Fall River Co Auditors Office,
138.00; Family Thrift Center Inc, 85.40;
Farmer Brothers Coffee, 504.16; Fastenal
Company, 452.31; Fbi National Academy
Assoc, 265.00; First Administrators Inc,
43,092.24; First American Title Co,
6,480.00; First Interstate Bank,
11,306.24; First Interstate Bank, 138.00;
First Interstate Bank, 27.47; Four Sea-
sons Sports Center, 294.37; Franz Re-
prographics Inc, 150.00; Fresh Start Car-
pet Care, 485.00; Fruit Of Loom /
Jerzeesc, 285.12; G H Distributing Rc,
1,330.81; Geib Elston Frost Pa,
9,063.99; Godfrey Brake Service And
Supply Inc, 628.28; Golden West Compa-
nies, 401.95; Golden West Technologies,
2,122.92; Grainger 829245489, 36.18;
Great Western, 39.95; Great Western Tire
Inc, 744.34; Greg Barnier, 1,335.80;
Grimms Pump Service Inc, 4,039.27;
Harveys Lock Shop, 15.89; Harveys Lock
Shop, 64.50; HBD Inc, 301.41; Headlines
Academy Inc, 50.00; Health Education
Design, 49.00; Heartland Paper Com-
pany, 5,160.25; Helpline Center Inc,
4,500.00; Herds Ribbon Laser Service,
229.75; Hewlettpackard, 8,456.54; Hills
Materials Co, 4,549.33; HillyardSioux
Falls, 2,635.03; Hilton Hotels - Atlanta,
Ga, -184.44; Holiday Inn Express,
200.00; Holiday Inns Riverwalk Sa - San
Antonio, Tx, 267.02; Holly L Gittings,
405.00; Honeywell Inc, 37,632.75;
Howes Oil Company Inc, 28,967.15; Hu-
mane Society Of The Black Hills,
4,166.67; Huron Culvert Tank Co,
772.40; Icehouseartic Glacier, 26.13; Il-
isja Moreland, 974.20; Imagene M Biers,
190.00; Independent Stationers Inc,
495.60; Indoff Inc, 1,164.65; Inflatable
Technologie, 70.39; Inforad Inc, 548.00;
Innocorp, Ltd, 1,418.80; Innovative Prod-
ucts Inc, 69.90; Interagency Training
Council, 120.00; Interstate All Battery
Center, 236.84; Interstate Batteries,
623.70; Intoximeters Inc, 4,000.00; Ione
Wolf, 366.00; Isi Llc, 2,754.08; J L Gravel
Inc, 145.11; J Scull Construction,
1,067,236.70; Jackson Lewis Llp,
1,292.50; James L Jeffries, 1,468.44;
Jamy Patterson, 54.47; Jay Alderman,
216.00; Jc Supply Co, 1,721.20; Jean
Kappedal, 1,021.60; Jean M Cline,
2,184.00; Jefferson Partner Lp, 726.30;
Jeffrey J Fransen, 1,194.90; Jenner
Equipment Co, 24,418.26; Jeremy
Kendall, 69.00; Jerri Harn, 47.20; Jerry's
Cakes & Donuts, 33.64; Jimmy Johns
Catering, 149.18; Jjs Engraving Sales,
30.00; Joan Kittelson, 15.00; Jody H
Speck, 924.00; John Ashley, 360.00;
John Gordon, 250.00; Johnson Machine
Inc, 3,641.03; Johnsons Carpet Cleaning
Service, 4,120.00; Jolly Lane Green-
house, 788.07; Joshua D Friedman Dr,
2,025.00; Jrs Logging Inc, 13,500.00;
Karen McGregor, 5.00; Karen Swanda,
37.50; Karls Appliance, 1,059.96; Kathy
Davis, 2,101.40; Kayla L Glasshoff,
420.00; Kelly Thomas, 16.00; Kennedy
Pier Knoff Loftus Llp, 138.40; Ketel
Thorstenson Llp, 370.00; Kevin E
Kirschenmann, 175.00; Kieffer Sanitation
Waste Management Co, 2,314.76; Kieffer
Sanitationa Waste Management Co,
57.00; Kim Callies, 26.00; Kmart, 311.13;
Knecht Home Center Inc, 2,237.51;
Knecht Home Center Of Rap, 40.50;
Knollwood Townhouse, 240.00; Knology,
1,285.45; Knology, 351.14; Kreisers Inc,
44.00; Kristina Hendrickson, 370.00; Kris-
tine M Downs, 2,935.00; KSL Corporation
Atty Fees, 861.00; L3 Communications,
83.65; Laboratory Corporation Of Amer-
ica Holdings, 9.00; Lakota Community
Homes Inc, 185.00; Lam Nguyen, 100.00;
Language Line Services, 9.33; Larry D
Fuss, 190.00; Lawrence D Beezley,
70.00; Leo A Daly, 9,758.90; Leslie Phd
Fiferman, 1,875.00; Lester Davis, 229.89;
Linda J Nohr, 1,295.00; Linda Pratt,
69.00; Lisa Ball, 630.00; Lisa Barndt,
21.60; Little Caesars, 56.89; Little Wound
School, 2,066.84; Loaf N Jug, 10.22; Lon-
nie Arneson, 1,750.00; Lori Benson,
17.60; Lori Red Paint, 101.84; Lori Sar-
gent, 69.00; Lowes, 846.69; Lowes, 9.07;
Lucille M Lewno, 395.76; Lundy Bros Inc,
69.00; Luther P Yellow Robe, 8,884.00;
Lyle Signs Inc, 6,092.92; Lynn Von Wald,
170.00; Main Street Square Inc, 28.30;
Mainline Contracting Inc, 3,375.00;
Manlove Psychiatric Group, 4,166.78;
Marco Inc, 970.36; Mary Anderson,
16.00; Mathison Company, 219.75;
Matthew L Skinner, 5,280.90; Matthew
Stephens, 1,120.00; Mckie Ford Lincoln,
58.16; Mcmaster-Carr, 36.13; Medical
Waste Transport Inc, 590.49; Medicap
Pharmacy St Pat, 131.00; Medline Indus-
tries Inc, 2,986.70; Megan Faoiz, 20.00;
Menards, 161.22; Mercy Housing Sdillc,
246.00; Mg Oil Company, 4,418.19;
Michael K Kissinger, 240.00; Michael
Powell, 270.00; Midwest Motor Supply
Co, 1,224.20; Mona G Weiger, 78.20;
Moore Medical Corp, 2,490.01; Mountain
View Village Apartments, 240.00; Moyle
Petroleum, 25,282.69; Naadac, 110.00;
Nada Appraisal Guides, 140.00; Naed,
30.00; Natl Medical Services, 1,385.00;
Neopost Usa Inc, 255.00; Network Solu-
tions, Llc, 80.00; Neves Uniforms Inc,
18,333.05; Newfields Companies Llc,
97.90; Newkirks Ace Hrdwreeast, 690.09;
Newkirks Ace Hrdwrewest, 766.88; North
Central Supply Inc, 1,019.00; Northern
Truck Equipment, 1,107.00; Northwest
Pipe Fitting Inc, 2,287.86; Notable Corpo-
ration, 936.79; Office Max, 252.19; Office
Of Attorney General, 129.75; Officemax
Ct, 648.80; Officemax Ct, 39.19; Office-
max Ct, 424.30; Officemax Incorporated,
2,011.65; Onlinefabricstore.Net, 162.50;
Otis Elevator Co, 4,249.95; Outlaw Fenc-
ing Llc, 4,831.00; Pacific Hide Fur Depot,
14.56; Paradis Properties Llc, 1,405.00;
Parr Law Pc, 873.60; Patricia J Hartsel,
20.40; Patrick Grode, 64.00; Paul A
Lewis, 715.40; Pederson Law Office Llc,
647.30; Penn Co Equalization Petty
Cash, 19.46; Penn Co Health Human Sv
Petty Cash, 316.66; Penn Co Highway
Petty Cash, 100.00; Penn Co Jail, 49.29;
Penn Co Juv Diversion, 117.27; Penn Co
Public Defender, 57.03; Penn Co States
Atty Petty Cash, 166.00; Pennington
County Housing, 478.53; Pete Lien Sons
Inc, 290.83; Phoenix Supply Llc, 824.94;
Pine Lawn Memorial Park, 1,320.00; Pio-
neer Enterprises Inc, 3,895.00; Power
House Honda, 641.52; Psi Health Care
Inc, 30.00; Quality Transmissions Inc,
444.25; Quill Corporation, 649.91; Quinn
Construction Inc, 7,232.82; Radiology
Assoc Prof Ll, 263.60; Rapid Chevrolet
Co Inc, 63.62; Rapid City Pizza Ranch,
167.00; Rapid Creek Partners, 240.00;
Rapid Delivery Inc, 208.00; Rapid Leas-
ing, 860.49; Rapid Transit System, 90.00;
Rapidcare, 79.00; Ravellette Publica-
tions, 2,927.53; RC Area School Dist 514,
252.95; RC Emergency Services, 282.82;
RC Fire Emergency Services, 749.74;
RC Journal, 5,134.89; RC Physical Ther-
apy Inc, 305.35; RC Police Deptevidence,
2,983.38; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
4,129.99; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
57.34; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
1,502.56; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
3,694.82; RC Regional Hospital Inc,
131.16; RC Winsupply, 661.92; RCS
Construction Inc, 146,952.77; RDO
Equipment Co, 58.36; RDO Equipment
Co, 9,409.96; Record Storage Solutions,
641.35; Red River Service Corp, 54.22;
Redwood Toxicology Inc, 2,812.50; Red-
wood Toxicology Laboratory Inc, 122.72;
Regency Midwest Ventures Lp, 645.00;
Regional Health Network, 30.23; Re-
gional Health Physician, 2,970.50; Relias
Learning Llc, 10,619.92; Renee S
Kennedy, 40.80; Renfro Fruit Of The
Loom, 897.75; Respec Inc, 94,000.00;
Rhodes Chemical Of The Black Hills,
43.75; Ricoh Usa Inc, 170.00; Rochester
Armored Car Company Inc, 408.40;
Roger Braunstein, 4,583.33; Roger Fryes
Paint Supply, 521.64; Roman Kurylas,
540.00; Runnings Farm & Fleet, 132.04;
Runnings Supply Inc, 65.07; Rushmore
Communications, 55.00; Rushmore
Safety Supplies, 49.98; Sand Scripts,
36.00; Scott Guffey, 84.00; SD Dept Of
Labor, 9,224.99; SD Dept Of Public
Safety, 40.00; SD Dept Of Revenue,
10,824.42; SD Dept Of Revenue, 623.00;
SD Dept Of Transpfinance, 50,915.31;
SD Div Of Motor Vehicles, 51.00; SD
Federal Property Agency, 79.00; SD
Human Services Center, 670.20; SD Net-
work Against Family, 200.00; SD Secre-
tary Of State, 30.00; SDAAO, 2,100.00;
SDAAPP, 625.00; Sentinel Offender
Service, 1,692.26; Servall Uniformlinen
Co, 3,706.89; Shannon Rittberger,
227.00; Sheila Lasleyhall, 40.72; Shep-
herd Reporting Llc, 55.00; Shiloh Buffin-
gton, 28.98; Shreves Law Office, 210.00;
Sign Trophywestex, 39.60; Simon Con-
tractors, 177,060.45; Simpsons Printing,
1,427.00; Smoot Utzman, 512.40; Sour
Lemons Llc, 240.00; Southern Hills Pub-
lishing, 1,531.01; Spacesaver Storage
System, 20,037.00; Spizzirri Press Inc,
50.00; Springbrook Software Inc,
16,775.00; Sq Altos Transportation,
25.00; Stan Houston Equipment, 88.10;
Stanley Convergent Security, 1,255.81;
State Of South Dakota, 2,000.00; Stath S
Mantzeoros, 240.00; Stecs Advertising,
559.39; Stephanie Mccoy, 21.40; Sturde-
vant's Auto Part, 537.17; Sturdevants
Rapid City, 630.20; Subway, 54.83; Sum-
mit Signs Supply Inc, 149.50; Tactical
Command Industries Inc, 30.00; Tammie
Darnallknowlton, 18.56; Ted J Norman,
85.00; Teresa L Fink, 877.20; The Imag-
ing Center Llc, 475.30; The Repair Shop,
114.34; The Ups Store, 150.69; The Vac-
uumcenter.Com, 67.96; Think Toner And
Ink, 431.97; Thomas F Peckosh, 465.00;
Thomas F Peckosh, 675.00; Tiffany
Meyer, 139.69; Time Equipment Rental,
173.80; Titan Access Account, 49.98;
Tma Downtown, 114.21; Todd Schweiger,
1,211.41; Tom Vlieger, 146.80; Tomaride
Llc, 190.00; Tractor Supply, 12.99; Trane
Us Inc, 2,196.99; Tristate Tire Auto,
31.79; Ts Government Solutions Llc,
295.00; Tw Vending Inc, 9,809.29; Twl
Billing Service Supplies, 1,980.66; Uline,
117.05; Uline Ship Supplies, 33.55; Uni-
versal Languages Provider, 2,262.40;
Upper Knollwood Townhouse, 171.00;
US Bank Na, 1,000.00; US Merchant
Systems Llc, 270.00; US Postal Service,
4,309.59; Valarie Oday, 133.00; Vanway
Trophy Awards, 99.50; VB Rapid Creek,
240.00; Vemco, 6,895.64; Verizon Wire-
less, 372.10; Vugate Inc, 310.77; Wal-
greens, 39.98; Walker Refuse, 111.10;
Wal-Mart #1604, 264.55; Wal-Mart
#3872, 567.87; Warne Chemical Equip-
ment Co Inc, 123.08; Wellspring Inc,
6,381.61; Wendy T McGowan, 2,032.70;
West Payment Center, 5,354.53; West
River International Inc, 1,456.46; Western
Communication Inc, 1,549.75; Western
Dakota Insurors Inc, 50.00; Western Mail-
ers, 700.66; Western Stationers Inc,
1,810.26; Western Thrifty Inn Llc,
1,100.00; Wex Bank, 96.34; Wex Bank,
293.65; Whisler Bearing Co, 120.31;
Whiting Hagg Hagg Dorsey Hagg Llp,
976.98; William Atyeo, 160.44; William D
Stratford Jr MD Pc, 8,802.58; William R
Grode, 125.50; Wilma Kurylas, 240.00;
Winner Police Dept, 285.78; Winter Law
Office Pc, 3,846.61; Witmer Public Safety,
182.36; Yankton Co Sheriff Office,
104.00; Yankton County Treasurer,
425.00; Z S Dust Control System,
1,737.21; Zep Sales Service, 129.40;
Ziegler Building Center Inc, 178.47; Zoro
Tools Inc, 92.16.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 2:18
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published August 1, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $523.50.
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
MINUTES
JUNE 20, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb
called the meeting to order at 10:30 a.m.
(CT).
Roll Call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper; Mike Vetter, City of Philip.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the agenda. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the May 16, 2013, meeting were previ-
ously mailed to the Board for their review.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the May
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph
Hieb, $55.41; Casey Krogman, $55.41;
Marion Matt, $55.41; Veryl Prokop,
$55.41; Lorne Smith, $55.41; West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS, $1,000.00;
Kadoka Press, $65.04; Lyman County
Herald, $56.30; Murdo Coyote, $62.10;
Pennington County Courant, $53.60; Pi-
oneer Review, $56.21; Todd County Trib-
une, $103.38. Motion by Director Matt,
seconded by Director Prokop to approve
the District bills. Motion carried unani-
mously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT: The financial status of the District
to date was previously sent to the Board.
A copy of the May Financial Report is on
file at the District office in Murdo. Motion
by Director Krogman, seconded by Direc-
tor Matt to approve the May Financial Re-
port. Motion carried unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his June report to
the Board. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the Manager’s Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
PRELIMINARY FY 2014 BUDGET: Man-
ager Fitzgerald presented the Board with
the draft preliminary FY 2014 budget for
their review. Motion by Director Prokop,
seconded by Director Matt to approve the
FY 2014 preliminary budget. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
ESTABLISH FY 2014 BUDGET HEAR-
ING: Motion by Director Matt, seconded
by Director Smith to advertise the budget
hearing for 10:45 A.M. (CT) Wednesday,
July 17, 2013. Motion carried unani-
mously.
MELLETTE COUNTY CONSERVATION
DISTRICT: Manager Fitzgerald pre-
sented two funding assistance requests
from the Mellette County Conservation
District. The first request is for a cost-
share Technician Grant in the amount of
$12,500. The technician provides assis-
tance to any landowner interested in a
natural resource conservation practice in
the Mellette and Todd County Conserva-
tion Districts. Last year 80,000 feet of
pipeline and 48 livestock watering tanks
were installed under the Technician’s as-
sistance, along with many other projects.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to provide half of the re-
quested assistance in the amount of
$6,250 to be directed towards the Mel-
lette County Conservation District for
water resource and conservation related
activities in Mellette County. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
The second funding assistance re-
quest outlined a Pipeline IV Grant for in-
stallation of pipeline, tanks and rural
water hook-ups. The primary beneficiar-
ies will be landowners and livestock pro-
ducers in Mellette County. The total cost
of engineering and technical assistance
for these projects would be $5,300 which
is detailed in the project plans provided
by the Conservation District. Motion by
Director Prokop, seconded by Director
Matt to provide assistance in the amount
of $5,300 to the Mellette County Conser-
vation District for the estimated costs of
engineering and technical assistance for
planned pipeline projects in Mellette
County. Motion carried unanimously.
CITY OF PHILIP: Mayor Mike Vetter
summarized the City of Philip’s current
US Highway 14 – SD Highway 73
Drainage Issue Evaluation Project and
provided copies of engineering plans and
cost estimates. The City requests assis-
tance in the amount of $10,000 for the hy-
draulic study. The study will determine if
there is adequate retention in the storage
basin to protect the downstream Philip
area from flooding, which the State is re-
quiring in order to release easements dat-
ing back to 1936 for the drainage area.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Krogman to provide $10,000 in
assistance to the City of Philip to be used
for their hydraulic study. Motion carried
4-0, Director Matt abstained.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 11:04 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_________________
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
______________
Joseph Hieb,
Chairman
Published August 1, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $49.06.
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
Proceedings of Pennington
County Commissioners
(cont. from previous page)
People read the
newspaper for many
different reasons. Some want
to stay abreast of the latest local, state
and national news, while others read the
sports pages word-for-word. Still others
scan the latest classifieds.
Call or stop by your local newspaper
office today to subscribe.
Pennington Co. Courant
box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
FINANCIAL FOCUS
TIPS FoR SeTTING - AND
PuRSuING - FINANCIAl
GoAlS
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
You can get lucky by finding a
parking meter with time left on it.
You can “luck out” by having nice
weather on your vacation. You can
even be lucky at love. But when it
comes to financial matters, you’re
better off not counting on Lady
Luck — and focusing instead on
setting and pursuing goals.
Here are some suggestions for
establishing and pursuing your fi-
nancial objectives:
•Be specific. You probably have
a lot of ideas about what you want
to do, but if you’re going to turn
these wishes into reality, you need
to get specific. So, for example, in-
stead of telling yourself that you
want to retire early, set a goal of
retiring at, say, 62. You can then
use this target number to help
guide your overall investment
strategy. To illustrate: You can de-
termine that you need to invest a
certain amount of money each
year, and earn a certain rate of re-
turn, to be able to retire at 62. You
can also estimate about how much
money you can afford to withdraw
from your investment accounts
each year to sustain a retirement
that begins at 62.
•Prioritize your goals. Of course,
you want to achieve all your finan-
cial goals —and you can have a
better chance of doing so if you
rank these goals in terms of both
importance and timing. For exam-
ple, you may want to send your
kids to college, purchase a vacation
home and still be able to retire at
age 62. How should you allocate
your resources to each of these
goals? Should you invest more at
any given time for a specific goal?
What types of investments are
best for each of these goals? Prior-
itizing your goals can help you an-
swer these and other questions —
and help direct your overall invest-
ment strategy.
•Be prepared to change your
goals. Over time, your family and
financial circumstances can
change considerably — which
means you shouldn’t be surprised,
or alarmed, if you have to change
your goals accordingly. And you’ll
find it easier to maintain this flex-
ibility if you’ve worked diligently
to create an investment portfolio
with sufficient resources to allow
you to change direction, as needed.
•Review your progress regu-
larly. If you’re going to eventually
achieve your goals, you absolutely
need to measure your progress
along the way. Are your invest-
ments performing the way you had
anticipated? Are your goals becom-
ing more expensive than you had
initially envisioned? To achieve
these goals, are you taking on too
much — or too little — risk? To an-
swer these types of questions, it’s
a good idea to review your overall
progress at least once a year and
then make whatever adjustments
may be necessary.
As you can see, it will take con-
siderable effort to set, review and
(hopefully) achieve your goals. And
it can be somewhat complex, too,
so you may want to work with a fi-
nancial professional — someone
who takes time to talk with you
about your goals, understands
your risk tolerance and family sit-
uation, and has the training and
experience necessary to help you
work toward your objectives.
But in any case, think hard
about your goals and how you
might accomplish them. And don’t
delay in taking action — because
goals are generally easier to attain
if you have time on your side.
pennington County Courant
279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 6: FECULAF CATTLE SALE. SALE
TIME: 10.00 a.n. MT
TUESDAY, AUG. 13: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
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PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF & STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAVA-
CANZA HOFSE SALE. CATALOG DEADLINE: MON., AUCUST 5. CO
TO www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com FOF CONSICNMENT FOFMS.
CATTL£ R£PORT:
TU£SDAY, JULY SD, 2DJS
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ond o b1g oroud o] peop1e on Þond.
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1Þe PLA Co]é.
MorKe1 uos verg good o11 1Þe uog
1ÞrougÞ 1Þe so1e.
FEEDER CATTLE:
MATT REEDY - PHILIP
47 .........................DLK STFS 1035=.....$145.00
47 .........................DLK STFS 1036=.....$145.00
47 .........................DLK STFS 1011=.....$145.00
50 .........................DLK STFS 958=.......$151.50
LLOYD MARTI - NEW UNDERWOOD
26 .........................DLK STFS 610=.......$178.00
29 ..............DLK & DWF HFFS 608=.......$161.75
LYLE & CINDY LONG - ENNING
64 ...............CHAF SPAY HFFS 901=.......$141.00
65 ...............CHAF SPAY HFFS 844=.......$144.25
14 ...............CHAF SPAY HFFS 739=.......$148.00
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
75......DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 740=.......$150.75
40......DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 662=.......$155.50
JOHN EISENBRAUN - KADOKA
20 .........................DLK STFS 755=.......$166.25
27.................DLK OPEN HFFS 711=.......$151.00
DALE YOUNG - UNION CENTER
53...............DLK & DWF STFS 996=.......$144.50
REID PALMER - FAITH
64.................DLK OPEN HFFS 685=.......$154.75
71 ......FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 762=.......$149.00
69.................DLK OPEN HFFS 787=.......$148.00
LANDERS LIVESTOCK - HOT SPRINGS
65 ...............FED & DLK STFS 1023=.....$144.75
64......DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 844=.......$152.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
67.................DLK OPEN HFFS 846=.......$145.25
27......DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 749=.......$149.75
BERNARD NESS - CAPUTA
30 .........................DLK STFS 922=.......$149.25
MIKE & LISA KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
53 .........................DLK STFS 964=.......$144.50
NICHOLS CASPERS - NEW UNDERWOOD
26.................DLK OPEN HFFS 765=.......$149.25
BRADY HAM & ROSENEAU ENT. - SHADEHILL
21 .........................DLK STFS 751=.......$155.75
8.................DLK & DWF STFS 611=.......$157.00
20 ..............DLK & DWF HFFS 695=.......$147.00
CROSSVIEW RANCH - HETTINGER, ND
16 ...............FED & DLK STFS 664=.......$159.50
15...............FED & DLK HFFS 645=.......$153.50
BERNARD HERBER - KADOKA
8................FWF & DWF HFFS 1131=.....$119.00
GLEN RADWAY - MILESVILLE
20.................DLK OPEN HFFS 952=.......$139.75
WO WELLER - KADOKA
11 .........................DLK STFS 889=.......$151.50
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
61 ...............FED & DLK STFS 834=.......$151.00
CLEVE PRICHARD - KADOKA
40.................DLK OPEN HFFS 788=.......$147.00
SANDER RANCH - CUSTER
18 .....DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 780=.......$143.50
6.................FED & DLK HFFS 634=.......$154.00
RAY KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
60 ..............DLK & DWF HFFS 570=.......$157.50
23.............CHAF & FED HFFS 549=.......$158.00
35.......................HEFF HFFS 468=.......$149.50
72....................X DFED HFFS 499=.......$129.50
KEN CASSENS - EDGEMONT
12 .........................DLK STFS 618=.......$166.00
15 ......FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 581=.......$164.00
JOHN FROST - HOT SPRINGS
12.................DLK OPEN HFFS 958=.......$136.75
STEPHEN RIGGINS - KADOKA
4 ................DLK & DWF HFFS 546=.......$155.00
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
11.........................DLK HFFS 545=.......$153.50
PETE REINERT - HOWES
6 ..........................DWF HFFS 637=.......$153.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
7...........................DLK HFFS 577=.......$152.00
SPRING CALVES:
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
2.................DLK & DWF CLVS 375=.......$740.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
3 ...........................DLK CLVS 320=.......$735.00
LARRY GRAVATT - ELM SPRINGS
17...............DLK & DWF CLVS 360=.......$690.00
WEIGH-UPS:
MIKE & LISA KARRELS - BROADUS, MT
1............................DLK COW 1655=.......$90.00
1............................DLK COW 1405=.......$89.00
3 ..........................DLK COWS 1238=.......$86.50
1............................DLK COW 1415=.......$85.50
26 ........................DLK COWS 1336=.......$85.25
1............................DLK COW 1475=.......$84.00
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2305=.....$108.00
DANNY FINN - MIDLAND
1 ...........................FED COW 1360=.......$87.50
2..........................FED COWS 1443=.......$86.25
1...........................FED DULL 2105=.....$108.00
DONALD BUFFINGTON - HERMOSA
1............................DLK COW 1345=.......$86.50
1 ...........................FED COW 1395=.......$84.00
2 ..........................DLK COWS 1405=.........83.00
SCHULTES RANCH - HOWES
1............................DLK COW 1210=.......$86.50
3 ..........................DLK COWS 1272=.......$83.25
1............................DLK COW 1415=.......$81.00
1 .....................DLK COWETTE 1110=.......$85.00
LARRY GABRIEL - QUINN
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1785=.....$107.50
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1805=.....$102.50
MIKE NOTEBOOM - PHILIP
1...........................FWF COW 1365=.......$85.50
1...........................FWF COW 1520=.......$85.00
1............................DLK COW 1475=.......$83.50
1...........................DWF COW 1420=.......$83.00
1 ...........................FED COW 1305=.......$82.50
1............................DLK COW 1260=.......$80.00
ROBERT BERRY - MIDLAND
1...........................DWF COW 1315=.......$85.50
BUNK WHITE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1............................DLK COW 1335=.......$84.50
1............................DLK COW 1440=.......$78.50
1................X DFED COWETTE 1085=.....$104.00
ROXY RICHARDSON - LONG VALLEY
1 ...........................FED COW 1475=.......$84.00
1..........................HEFF COW 1345=.......$83.50
ROBERT R. YOUNG - UNION CENTER
1............................DLK COW 1430=.......$84.00
LARRY LABRIER - MURDO
1............................DLK COW 1370=.......$84.00
1............................DLK COW 1345=.......$81.50
1 .....................DLK COWETTE 1105=.......$83.50
DAVE STOVER - OWANKA
1............................DLK COW 1325=.......$84.00
1............................DLK COW 1520=.......$82.50
1............................DLK COW 1150=.......$81.50
1............................DLK COW 1420=.......$80.50
GREG SHEARER - WALL
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1980=.....$106.50
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2055=.....$106.00
1............................DLK COW 1560=.......$77.50
JERRY ROGHAIR - OKATON
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2260=.....$105.00
GENE MICHAEL - PHILIP
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1965=.....$105.00
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
1............................DLK COW 1480=.......$83.50
MORRIS JONES - MIDLAND
1............................DLK COW 1385=.......$83.50
1............................DLK COW 1275=.......$81.00
1...........................DLK HFFT 1095=.......$99.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
1..........................HEFF COW 1360=.......$83.50
1............................DLK COW 1400=.......$78.00
MARK VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1............................DLK COW 1295=.......$82.50
WO WELLER - KADOKA
1............................DLK COW 1635=.......$81.50
TOM GRIMES - KADOKA
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1790=.....$104.50
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1945=.....$101.00
LARRY DENKE - LONG VALLEY
1...........................FED DULL 2210=.....$103.50
GARY ALLISON - CREIGHTON
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2115=.....$103.50
BLAKE HICKS - WANBLEE
1 .........................CHAF DULL 1770=.....$103.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1............................DLK COW 1260=.......$80.50
3 ..........................DLK COWS 1445=.......$75.00
2 ..........................DLK COWS 1318=.......$73.50
KOLETTE STRUBLE - KADOKA
1............................DLK COW 1255=.......$79.50
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1............................DLK COW 1250=.......$79.00
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2320=.....$102.50
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1930=.....$102.50
LARRY GRAVATT - ELM SPRINGS
23.......DLK & DWF WET COWS 1335=.......$75.75
CASEY BACHAND - PHILIP
1............................DLK COW 1705=.......$73.50
ELI HELMS - CREIGHTON
1.........................HEFF HFFT 1265=.......$88.00
JEFF JONES - MIDLAND
1...........................DLK HFFS 960=.......$124.50
JOHN EISENBRAUN - KADOKA
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1745=.....$102.50
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1740=.....$100.50
1 ...........................DLK DULL 2390=.....$100.00
RYAN CASTEEL - VALE
1 ...........................DLK DULL 1715=.....$100.00
Pennington County Courant • August 1, 2013 • Page 10
Email your social
news, obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements to:
annc@gwtc.net
The dynamics of business, in this
time of such uncertainty, is contin-
ually changing. How do we as busi-
ness people cope with those
changes? One thing for sure is that
we must be certain we are operat-
ing on the cutting edge. What do I
mean by 'cutting edge'? Well, the
cutting edge of a knife is the sharp
side-the side you slice and dice
with. The cutting edge, if it is to
maintain its ability to cut, also re-
quires care and even some occa-
sional sharpening.
For us as business leaders, the
cutting edge is where we know we
need to be the sharpest so we can
cut it-that is thrive and succeed-as
we compete in the marketplace. We
need to keep our skills and atti-
tudes sharp, and work hard to pro-
tect ourselves from anything that
may dull our creativity and our po-
tential, including 'dull' people-
those people that don't see the need
to learn and grow and stay sharp.
How do we keep our cutting edge
sharp? First of all by gently con-
necting ourselves with others who
are sharp. Hang out with positive,
uplifting people. Secondly, make
daily investments into their lives.
This will return back to you ten-
fold!
Be willing to sharpen your tal-
ents, skills, and knowledge no mat-
ter what the cost. Read and write
about what matters to you the
most. Pouring things out of your
head on paper or in a word proces-
sor will help you formulate your
thinking. This will keep you sharp-
trust me. In fact, one of the many
reasons that I write weekly is that
it forces me to stay disciplined and
focused in my life. It actually helps
me process my thoughts and ideas.
The feedback that I get both posi-
tive and the negative also helps to
keep me sharp and this keeps me
on the cutting edge.
Take the time-no, make the time-
to invest in sharpening your cut-
ting edge. You will discover that
your life will be richer, your busi-
ness or organization will be run-
ning smoother and you will be op-
erating on the cutting edge.
On The Cutting Edge
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands
of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for
more details at 800-437-9715 and
be sure to check out Bob’s web-
site at: www.mrattitudespeaks.
com
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QueSTIoN: How can I get my
husband to forgive me for the un-
kind ways I’ve treated him? I’ve
been sharply critical of him in the
past. Now we’re sleeping in separate
rooms and living separate lives
under the same roof. How can we
turn this situation around and move
forward in our marriage?
ANSWeR: There are a number of
reasons your husband may be hav-
ing trouble letting you off the hook
for the hurtful things you’ve said in
the past. An anger cycle is set in mo-
tion when a perceived need doesn’t
get met. In this case, your husband
feels his need for respect has been
violated. Your abusive comments
have stirred a strong emotional re-
action within him. The Bible tells us
that if this kind of anger isn’t dealt
with promptly (Ephesians 4:26) it
can develop into a deep-seated root
of bitterness (Hebrews 12:15). Once
established, this bitterness builds on
itself and only becomes worse.
The good news is that it only
takes one person to stop the cycle. In
their book From Anger to Intimacy,
Gary Smalley and Ted Cunningham
argue that real intimacy can be
reestablished in cases like yours if
both parties are willing to take re-
sponsibility for their own feelings
and behavior. As the offender,
there’s a sense in which you’re in the
best position to make the first move
in that direction.
You can initiate a positive dia-
logue by citing particulars. For ex-
ample, you can say, “I realize I hurt
you when I said _____.” Once you’ve
taken that step, be as honest as you
can about the negative emotions
that are continuing to keep you and
your husband apart. You might tell
him, “When you sleep in another
room, I feel lonely and unloved.”
Don’t lose heart if your husband’s
first response isn’t exactly what you
were hoping for. His reaction doesn’t
necessarily reflect whether or not
you communicated appropriately.
It’s simply an indication of where
he’s at emotionally. You can move be-
yond this first step by asking him
what he heard you say. Then clarify
what you meant and invite him to
express his own feelings in greater
depth.
QueSTIoN: Do you have any ad-
vice for helping a teenager suffering
from poor body image? Our daugh-
ter has such a negative view of her-
self, but she won’t talk about it. How
do we bring this up without smoth-
ering her, alienating her or other-
wise hurting our relationship?
ANSWeR: Where adolescents are
concerned, forced discussions of
deep emotional issues are usually
counterproductive. Rather than
pushing her to share her feelings,
we think the best approach would be
to focus on spending more one-on-
one “fun” time with your daughter.
Invite her to take walks with you in
the evening – it’s a good way to get
some exercise while also providing
an opportunity for natural conversa-
tion. You could also set up a shop-
ping date or arrange to go out for
lunch or bagels and hot chocolate on
Saturday mornings.
Once the two of you are relaxed
and having a good time, look for
openings to delve into deeper issues.
Don’t try to force the discussion to
move in a certain direction. Instead,
ask open-ended questions. Your
daughter needs to feel that she can
safely share her thoughts and feel-
ings with you. If you’re gentle and
sensitive, there’s a good chance she
will gradually open up. When she
does, resist the urge to respond with
advice. Hold your tongue and learn
what it means to be a good listener.
It’s important to remember that
many teenage girls – even some you
wouldn’t suspect – have problems
with a negative body image. You
may be interested to learn that fa-
thers can play an especially impor-
tant role in helping their daughters
overcome these emotional and psy-
chological difficulties. Every girl
longs to feel loved and cherished by
her father. If dad makes it a habit of
encouraging and affirming her on a
regular basis, letting her know how
special she is in his eyes and in the
sight of God, it won’t be long before
your daughter’s self-image begins to
move in a positive direction. Natu-
rally, he should take extra care to
compliment her on her character
rather than simply on her looks or
achievements.
If you’re concerned that your
daughter may be at risk for anorexia
or bulimia, we’d encourage you to
seek professional help immediately.
Psychological treatment for eating
disorders often involves a family-
systems approach, where the entire
family goes to counseling together.
QueSTIoN: How can I forgive
someone who isn’t sorry for what
he’s done? My father hurt me deeply
when I was young. I’ve tried and
tried to forget about this, but every
time I think I’ve succeeded the pain
jumps up and bites me again. Chris-
tian friends have told me that I need
to forgive him—in my heart, uncon-
ditionally, without even discussing
the situation with him. But I can’t
understand this. Yes, I know that
we’re supposed to forgive those who
come to us with a repentant attitude
(Luke 17:3, 4). But what about a
person who isn’t repentant? How
can he receive something he isn’t
even asking for? Even God doesn’t
forgive us until we turn to Him and
express a desire to receive His grace.
What do you think I should do?
ANSWeR: You really have no
choice. Either you forgive or you
slowly poison your mind and heart.
If you hold on to unresolved bitter-
ness it will destroy you. You can’t
control your father’s actions and at-
titudes. But by God's grace and with
His help you must learn to control
your own. If you choose not to for-
give, you only hurt yourself.
That’s not to mention that there’s
an important difference between the
unconditional forgiveness Christ ex-
pects us to extend to those who have
offended us (Matthew 6:14, 15) and
the forgiveness we receive from God
by asking for it and repenting of our
sins. When it comes to our relation-
ship with God, repenting and asking
are aspects of believing. We know
that the forgiveness of Christ cannot
help us unless we lay hold of it by
faith. The same thing cannot be said
about our human forgiveness. We
offer this forgiveness to others
purely in response to the grace we
have already received from the Lord.
If we are not willing to forgive, it is
an indication that we have not fully
understood or experienced the grace
of being forgiven (see Luke 7:47).
This is true regardless of the “of-
fender’s” attitude towards his ac-
tions. Perhaps you can see the dis-
tinction we’re trying to make.
You didn’t explain precisely how
your father hurt you. But that’s a
very important piece of the puzzle.
In certain instances it’s imperative
to talk openly with someone else
about the pain you’ve endured. If
this was a case of sexual or physical
abuse, or if the perpetrator of the
“sin” in question is actually guilty of
a crime, the law requires that you
reveal your information in order to
protect others. There are probably
also good therapeutic reasons for
getting your feelings out into the
open with a trained counselor. But
none of this precludes the need to
forgive your father from the heart.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO Box
444, Colorado Springs, CO 80903.
This question and answer is ex-
cerpted from books authored by Dr.
James Dobson and published by
Tyndale House Publishers. Dr. Dob-
son is the Chairman of the Board of
Focus on the Family, a nonprofit or-
ganization dedicated to the preser-
vation of the home. Copyright 2003
James Dobson, Inc. All rights re-
served. International copyright se-
cured.
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