Login

Pennington Co. Courant, April 25, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

$1.00
(tax included)
Number 17
Volume 108
April 25, 2013
by Laurie Hindman
Wall City Council met for a spe-
cial meeting on Tuesday, April 16.
Council members present were:
Bill Leonard, Pete Dunker, Rick
Hustead, Jerry Morgan and Mike
Anderson. Stan Anderson was ab-
sent from the meeting.
Mayor Hahn called the meeting
to order.
Council approved the agenda
with Finance Officer Carolynn An-
derson explaining to the council
why she added the credit card op-
tion with First Interstate Bank as
a discussion only topic.
The council discussed the build-
ing permit that needed to be
amended for June Hout. Dunker
questioned whether there should
be a penalty and why there isn’t an
ordinance that requires a modular
home to sit on a block foundation.
Dunker said, he had complaints
from a couple of community mem-
bers who were not happy about the
situation. After further discussion
the permit was approved. The
council asked Public Works Direc-
tor Garrett Bryan to research and
Wall High School senior Ryder
Wilson is part of the final round of
the seventh annual Rising Star of
the West Scholarship Contest
which begins Tuesday, April 23rd
on Black Hills FOX News at Nine.
This year’s contest, sponsored by
KEVN Black Hills FOX and First
Interstate Bank, offers a total of
$7,500 in scholarship money.
Four Black Hills high school
seniors advanced from the initial
field of 20 contestants to make it
into this year’s finals. Wilson,
Bison High School senior Shaley
Lensegrav, homeschool senior Rae
McKee and Belle Fourche High
School senior Zac Christy will all
be presenting four one minute
commentaries over the next four
weeks.
This year, the students will each
be speaking on four specific topics.
The chosen topics are what is the
best way to keep our schools safe,
what are the pros and cons of so-
cial media usage in teens’ lives
today, what can the average Amer-
ican do to make the country a bet-
explain the ordinance on modular
houses at the next council meet-
ing.
Frontier Cabins who had al-
ready moved in a storage shed was
approved a building permit pend-
ing they are in compliance with a
set back variance. They also
moved an overhead sign on to a
lower post along their driveway.
The council approve a motion that
stipulates the liability belongs to
Frontier Cabins due to the post not
being a breakaway post.
Matt Steiner who owns the Bro-
ken Arrow Trading Co. was ap-
proved to replace an existing sign
as long as it complies with the per-
centages that a sign must meet.
The council approved a motion
to accept Jeff Clark’s resignation
and to advertise for a part-time
maintenance worker. Council also
approved a base wage of $12 an
hour, job description and time of
employment.
Bruce Dunker came before the
council and asked why he had to
pay for all the fees on the land that
the city purchased from him.
Wall City Council accepts resignation
Wilson ready for finals of Rising
Star of the West scholarship
ter place and who is the ultimate
role model.
After viewing their commen-
taries on Black Hills FOX News at
Nine, viewers are invited to view
them online at www.blackhillsfox.
com and rate each one.
Those viewer ratings and the
ratings of a Black Hills FOX panel
will determine this year’s winners.
This year’s first place winner
will take home a $4,000 college
scholarship from Black Hills FOX
and First Interstate Bank.
Second place receives a $2,000
scholarship, with $1,000 for third
and $500 for fourth.
The winner will be announced
on May 21st.
This year’s finalists are hoping
to join previous winners Chad
Christman of Lemmon, Annelise
Ewing, Kaitlyn Hemmingson and
Janesa Bakeberg of Spearfish,
Caila Brennan of St. Thomas More
and Jordon Barthel of Lead-Dead-
wood with the title of The Rising
Star of the West.
Josh Geigle, a young rancher
from Creighton, S.D., has been se-
lected to be a part of the Partners
in Agricultural Leadership (PAL)
honors program by the American
Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF).
Geigle and nine other young ag
leaders from across the U.S. were
chosen for the PAL program
through a competitive process
after being nominated by their
state Farm Bureau organization.
The focus of Farm Bureau’s PAL
program is to enhance partici-
pants’ leadership skills and aid
them in discovering how they can
best use their abilities for the ben-
efit of agriculture. Geigle and his
wife, Shasta, are former South
Dakota Farm Bureau Young Farm-
ers & Ranchers (YF&R) Commit-
tee state chairs, and Josh cur-
rently serves as the President of
the Pennington / Jackson County
Farm Bureau.
“Farm Bureau welcomes the 10
participants of the seventh PAL
class and looks forward to the role
they will play moving forward to
strengthen American agriculture,”
said AFBF President Bob Stall-
man. “The PAL program allows
participants to continue on a lead-
Josh Geigle selected for National
Agricultural Leadership program
ership path within the Farm Bu-
reau using their experiences from
YF&R and other agricultural lead-
ership roles.”
Through PAL, young leaders
will be given the opportunity to de-
velop their skills in problem solv-
ing, persuasion, and consensus
building while learning about crit-
ical agricultural and public policy
issues. Upon graduation
from the PAL program, they are
prepared to represent agriculture
in the media, on speaking circuits,
or in legislative activities.
“Josh has already proven him-
self to be a dedicated leader for
agriculture, and the Partners in
Agricultural Leadership program
will be an excellent opportunity for
him to travel, study, and learn how
to advocate for farmers and ranch-
ers,” said Lowell Mesman, YF & R
Coordinator for the South Dakota
Farm Bureau.
“Everyone at Farm Bureau is
proud of Josh and grateful to him
and his family for pursuing this
opportunity.”
State Farm Bureaus submit one
applicant per state for considera-
tion for the PAL program. Appli-
cants must be “Sweet 16” finalists
in the national YF&R Discussion
Meet, top 10 finalists in the YF&R
Achievement Award or Excellence
in Agriculture Award competitions,
former members of the AFBF
YF&R committee, or former state
YF&R committee chairs.
The PAL program is made possi-
ble through sponsorships from the
Monsanto Company, the Farm
Credit System, Agri-Pulse Com-
munications and AFBF.
The South Dakota Farm Bureau
is a grassroots organization with
more than 13,000 farm, ranch and
rural families in its membership.
Learn more at www.sdfbf.org.
by Laurie Hindman
Board members present for the
Eastern Pennington County Am-
bulance District meeting held on
Thursday, April 18 were: Wally
Hoffman, Elden Helms, Carolynn
Anderson and Darwin Haerer with
Jem Kjerstad being absent.
The financial report for March
was reviewed and deemed to be a
good month for revenues.
Helms made a call to South
Dakota Towns and Township Asso-
ciations and asked if townships
who make a donation to the ambu-
lance district are then required to
have a lease agreement also. Their
answer was no since an ambulance
district has been formed and the
townships belong to that district if
they were to receive a donation
from a township that is not in the
district then they would need an
agreement.
The board approved a motion for
any employee of the ambulance
service that has had surgery
EPCAD holds March meeting
whether it is job related on non-job
related to have a doctor release
slip in order for them to return to
work for liability concerns.
The board decided to follow the
City of Wall and not pay into an
unemployment account.
The County Auditor was in con-
tact with Anderson on changing
the wording from a tax levy to a
special assessment which will still
keep the ag land exempt.
Hoffman would like to hold a pie
social either in October or Novem-
ber. He noted this event would be
held so the community is aware of
the ambulance service.
John Kitterman informed the
board that a new paramedic has
started with the ambulance serv-
ice.
The next meeting will be held on
May 10 at the Wall Community
Center meeting room at 7:00 p.m.
With no other business the meet-
ing was adjourned.
Wall High School juniors have been selected to attend Boys
State this summer! Les Williams and Tyler Peterson are planning
to attend American Legion Boys State at Northern State Univer-
sity in Aberdeen, May 28th – June 1st.
~Photo Heather Schreiber
Boys State candidate
selected for WHS
Schreiber to attend Girls State
Kaitlin Schreiber was chosen
to attend the American Legion
Auxiliary Girls State May 27th
– June 1st at the University of
South Dakota, Vermillion.
Schreiber will be one of 480
girls to attend the 66th year of
Girls State in South Dakota.
Girls state was established in
1937-1938, and is now estab-
lished to 50 departments in
our nation. It is under the
sponsorship of South Dakota
Department of the American
Legion Auxiliary.
~Photo Heather Schreiber
Wall High School Senior Ryder Wilson is one of four seniors who
is competing in the Star of the West which is sponsored by
KEVN Black Hills Fox and First Interstate Bank.
~Courtesy Photo
Four “Good Neighbors”
The “Good Neighbor” banquet
was held in Philip on Saturday,
April 20.
Catalst Club President Pastor
Harold Delbridge opened the pro-
gram by welcoming everyone to
the banquest and Pastor Frezil
Westerlund gave the invocation
and benediction.
MC for the evening was Gale
Patterson who spoke on "What
makes a good neighbor? They go
out of their way to help others.
They find it in their heart to help
others.”
Audience members came from
as far away as California and
Honorees for the “Good Neighbor” award are from left to right
... Mike West, Marcia West, Robert Young and Wayne Davis.
~Photo Del Bartels
Alaska. Music performed by Twi-
lighters, a four piece band from
Wall, and the meal was served by
Hospital Auxiliary with The Steak-
house catering the meal. Barry
and Edna Knutson, Philip, sang
each honoree's favorite song dur-
ing that person's introduction:
Robert Young, "Amarillo by Morn-
ing"; Marcia West, "People Who
Need People"; Mike West, "Lord
Listen to Your Children" and
Wayne Davis, "You Raise Me Up."
Delbridge closed the evening by
"Thanking you for making a differ-
ence in our lives."
Dunker also said, “He was in-
formed that he would also have to
pay all taxes on the property for 12
months when we will only own it
for four months.” Council agreed
with Dunker and approved to re-
imburse him for the fees and will
have C. Anderson look into the
matter on the tax issue and get
back to him.
The On-off-sale Wine license Or-
dinance will be sent to the city at-
torney for the correct verbiage to
be put in the ordinance.
A downtown business which
does not adhere to the noise ordi-
nance and has been fined repeat-
edly will be sent a letter from the
city attorney and will be addressed
again at the May meeting.
The amendment to the Animal
Ordinance was discussed. Dunker
said, “he doesn’t like the amend-
ment at all and would like the city
attorney to look into the issue.”
The WREA tower at the rubble
site has been approved for surplus
and Paul Goldhammer, Joel
Stephens and Todd Sieler will be
asked to appraise it.
A motion was approved to con-
tact Crowns to let them know it is
the city’s choice to let them de-
annex themselves from the city
limits.
Hustead gave an update on the
Wall Clinic/Rapid City Health
Services issue. President Brett
Blasius of the Wall Health Serv-
ices is waiting on a rough draft of
a lease agreement and he will keep
the council updated on the future
of the clinic. Hustead added, “the
community needs to support the
Clinic or it may close.”
Bryan gave an update on Well
#2 and 7. They both need repairs
and he is hoping to have them up
and going by June 1st. The council
approved a motion to proceed with
repairs and have the completion
date done by May 31st.
C. Anderson and the council dis-
cussed whether it would be feasi-
ble for the city to accept credit card
payments. C. Anderson will do
more research on the issue.
With no other business the
meeting was adjourned.
Sand County Foundation, the
South Dakota Cattlemen's Associ-
ation and the South Dakota Grass-
land Coalition are proud to an-
nounce The Guptill Ranch as the
recipient of the 2013 Leopold Con-
servation Award, which honors
South Dakota landowner achieve-
ment in voluntary stewardship
and management of natural re-
sources.
"Having grown up on a farm, I
know how precious the land is to
South Dakotans who owe their
livelihoods to our natural re-
sources," said South Dakota Gov-
ernor Dennis Daugaard. "Farmers
and ranchers, such as the Guptill
Family, take great care to main-
tain those resources for genera-
tions to come.”
Guptill Ranch in western South
Dakota is a 7,000-acre cattle oper-
ation near Quinn. Pat and Mary
Lou Guptill have owned and oper-
Award recognizes landowners who exemplify outstanding stewardship
ated this family-run ranch for the
past 25 years. With their five chil-
dren, they are caretakers of this
special landscape in western South
Dakota. The area features grass-
lands with rolling hills and a main
wooded creek running through the
ranch.
In 2000, as their children grew
older, the Guptills decided to make
changes to lower production costs
and enhance the health of the land
to make the ranch better and bring
their family home.
Innovation and change have
been beneficial to the operation,
according to Pat Guptill.
"The more we change, the more
we learn," Guptill said. "We hope
we can help other producers by-
pass all the mistakes we made
along the way to make their oper-
ations work. Our goal is to make
the land better for future genera-
tions."
"The foreword to A Sand County
Almanac, Aldo Leopold's environ-
mental classic, points out, 'When
we see land as a community to
which we belong, we may begin to
use it with love and respect.' You
are unlikely to find agricultural-
ists elsewhere in our United States
who exceed the Guptill family's
use of land with love and respect."
said Brent Haglund, president,
Sand County Foundation.
The $10,000 award and a crystal
depicting Aldo Leopold, will be pre-
sented to the Guptills at the South
Dakota Cattlemen's Association's
Annual Convention in December.
The ranch will also be featured
during a ranch tour this summer.
The Leopold Conservation
Award is presented in honor of
renowned conservationist and au-
thor Aldo Leopold, who called for
an ethical relationship between
people and the land they own and
manage. Award applicants are
judged based on their demonstra-
tion of improved resource condi-
tions, innovation, long-term com-
mitment to stewardship, sustained
economic viability, community and
civic leadership, and multiple use
benefits.
"The South Dakota Cattlemen's
Association is proud to recognize
the Guptills for implementing re-
sponsible stewardship practices on
their ranch and working to best
utilize the resources required to
meet the needs of a growing popu-
lation," said Cory Eich, president,
South Dakota Cattlemen's Associ-
ation.
"I applaud the Guptill's careful
(continued on page 2)
Early DEaDlinE
for the april 30th Profit will
be Thurs., april 25th • 11 a.m.
School & Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding
Monday at 4:30 p.m. We do have the right to reject any or all letters to the
Editor.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper
should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office.
All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number
of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run
the two weeks prior to an election.
The "Letters¨ column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to
express their opinions. Ìt is not meant to replace advertising as a means
of reaching people.
This publication's goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of
free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review Pennington Co. Courant
P.O. Box 788 P.O. Box 435
Philip, SD 57567-0788 Wall, SD 57790-0435
605-859-2516 605-279-2565
The Kadoka Press The Faith Ìndependent
P.O. Box 309 P.O. Box 38
Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 Faith, SD 57626-0038
605-837-2259 605-967-2161
The Bison Courier The Murdo Coyote
P.O. Box 429 P.O. Box 465
Bison, SD 57620-0429 Murdo, SD 57559-0465
605-244-7199 605-669-2271
New Underwood Post
P.O. Box 426 · New Underwood, SD 57761-0426
605-754-6466
Bavellette Publ¡cat¡oas, Iac.
Letters Pol¡cy
From the desk of
Superintendent Dennis Rieckman
The Great Plains region has 10
colleges that are in the Great
Plains Region with five colleges
that host the rodeos for this region;
University of Wisconsin, River
Falls, Iowa Central Community
College, Iowa State University,
North Dakota State University,
South Dakota State University,
and Black Hills State University.
The top three point holders will
move on to the College Finals in
Casper, Wyo., on June 10-14, 2013
after the spring season is finished.
The first rodeo was held at
South Dakota State University.
Rowdy Curr, former Wall High
School rodeo team member, rodeos
for Black Hills State University
was named reserved all-around
cowboy.
Curr finished in the fourth posi-
tion in the team roping and calf
roping. Curr ranks number eighth
in the tie down roping.
Calder Johnston, also a former
member for the Wall Rodeo team,
placed second in the steer
wrestling, he rodeos for South
Dakota State University. Johnston
comes in the number one position
in the steer wrestling.
Kelsey Ritcher placed sixth in
the goat tying, she rodeos for
South Dakota State University.
Ritcher is sitting eleventh in the
region standings in the goat tying.
Casey Sawvell rodeos for
Mitchell Institution Votech, he is
sitting in the seventh hole in the
region standings in the saddle
bronc event.
The Black Hills State University
hosted the rodeo on April 12 and
13, 2013.
Rowdy Curr and Joey Painter
won the team roping and Calder
Johnston won the calf roping. The
colleges traveled to University of
Nebraska on April 18-20, 2013.
The result for the Black Hills
State University rodeo is listed:
Men's Team Points
1. Dickinson State University, DICKSN -
565.00; 2. South Dakota St Unit, SDSU -
550.00; 3. Black Hills State University,
BLKHIL - 465.00; 4. Iowa Central Comm
Coll, IACCC - 380.00; 5. Mitchell Technical
Institute, MTI - 315.00; 6. University of Ne-
braska-Lincoln, UNE - 125.00; 7. North
Dakota State Univ, NDSU - 120.00; 8. Ne-
braska College of Tech. Agriculture, NECTA
- 100.00; 8. Hastings College, HASTC -
100.00; 10. Iowa State University, IASU -
40.00.
Women's Team Points
1. Black Hills State University, BLKHIL
- 500.00; 2. South Dakota St Univ,
SDSU 190.00; 3. Dickinson State University,
DICKSN - 160.00; 4. Iowa Central Comm
Coll, IACCC - 145.00; 5. North Dakota State
Univ, NDSU - 110.00; 6. Hastings College,
HASTC - 40.00.
Men's All-around Points
1. Treeby, Wyatt Dickinson, BLKHIL -
245.00; 2. Clarke, Ty Thomas, BLKHIL -
100.00; 2. Thyberg, Evan Robert, M T I -
100.00.
Women's All-around Points
1. Painter, Joey Lynn, BLKHIL - 220.00;
2. Sippel, Taryn Marie, SDSU - 190.00; 3.
Fulton, Hallie Ann, BLKHIL - 70.00; 4.
Brown, Cheyenne Kay, SDSU - 40.00.
Saddle Bronc Riding Time/Score
1. Rixen, Dalton John, DICKSN - 138.0;
The Great Plains Intercollegiate rodeo began their spring season
2. Odde, Ross Alan, SDSU - 124.0; 3. Hapney,
Kyle Robert, MTI - 53.0; 4. Whitney, Tucker
Patrick, MTI - 47.0.
Bareback Riding
Time/Score
1. Pelton, Jordan Dennis, DICKSN -
142.0; 2. Berends, Levi Michael, IACCC -
134.0; 3. Schwedhelm, Nick Charles, SDSU
- 133.0; 4. Smith, Blake Miles, DICKSN-
130.0; 5. Picton, Cole S, IACCC - 75.0.
Bull Riding
Time/Score
1. Garry, Douglas Robert, NDSU - 70.0; 2.
Mora, Elijah Patrick, NECTA - 69.0.
Tie Down Roping
Time/Score
1. Johnston, Calder Gene, SDSU - 22.6; 2.
Treeby, Wyatt Dickinson, BLKHIL - 24.9; 3.
Schuldt, Tannor Dayne, IACCC - 24.6; 4. Fis-
cher, Keanan James, DICKSN - 26.0; 5.
Thyberg, Evan Robert, MTI - 11.6; 6.
Krueger, Joshua John, IASU - 30.2; 7.
Clarke, Ty Thomas, BLKHIL - 13.0.
Steer Wrestling
Time/Score
1. Zwiefel, Justin Lavan, SDSU - 10.2; 2.
Kraeger, Hoyt F, UNE - 11.0; 3. Entze, Evan
Albert, DICKSN - 11.1; 4. Coats, Richard
Allen, HASTC - 11.4; 5. Edler, Jacob Donald,
IACCC - 15.7; 6. Thyberg, Evan Robert, MTI
- 5.5; 7. Albers, Chase Allen, MTI - 16.9;.
Team Roping Header
Time/Score
1. Boysen, Blake Anthony, MTI - 21.9; 2.
Painter, Joey Lynn, BLKHIL - 21.7; 3.
Treeby, Wyatt Dickinson, BLKHIL -22.1; 4.
Clarke, Ty Thomas, BLKHIL - 23.0; 5. Flat-
tery, Wyatt William, IACCC -8.1; 6. George,
Amy Beth, IACCC - 31.3; 7. Herman, Jake
Wayne, BLKHIL - 8.2.
Team Roping Heeler
Time/Score
1. Parr, Chance Anthony, MTI - 21.9; 2.
Curr, Rowdy Duane, BLKHIL - 21.7; 3. Don-
nelly, Troy Johnathon, SDSU - 22.1;4. Hight,
Eliot Zane, DICKSN - 23.0; 5. Hermel-
bracht, Molly Marie, IACCC - 8.1; 6. Jenkins,
Jaiden James, IACCC - 31.3; 7. Hilzendeger,
Cody Robert, DICKSN - 8.2.
Barrel Racing
Time/Score
1. Kathrein, Michaela Lee, DICKSN -
29.06; 2. Netzer, Victoria Prairie, DICKSN -
29.11; 3. Rausch, Jessica Marie, SDSU -
29.14; 4. Sippel, Taryn Marie, SDSU - 29.15;
5. Fulton, Hallie Ann, BLKHIL - 41.21; 5.
Rist, Jordan Lee, NDSU - 29.34; 7. Brazda,
Felicia Ann,HASTC - 29.33; 7. Olson, Whit-
ney Danielle, SDSU - 34.47; 9. Painter, Joey
Lynn, BLKHIL - 29.42.
Breakaway Roping
Time/Score
1. Sippel, Taryn Marie, SDSU - 7.3; 2.
Mlodzik, Ingrid Elizabeth, NDSU - 16.8; 3.
Smith, Bailie Jo, IACCC - 2.7; 3. Rich, Rylee
Nicole, IACCC - 20.1; 3. Latham, Kaitlyn
Rae, SDSU - 17.2; 6. Peterson, Tomie
Meri.BLKHIL - 2.8; 7. Birkholtz, Courtney
Rae, SDSU - 2.9; 8. Brown, Cheyenne Kay,
SDSU - 3.2; 9. Plehal, Shannah Leigh,
NDSU - 3.8.
Goat Tying
Time/Score
1. Grann, Bobbi Jo, DICKSN - 1 3 . 8 ; 2 .
Britton, Jamie K, BLKHIL - 14.2; 3. Van
Horn, Erin Anne, NWCOLL - 14.9; 4.
Painter, Joey Lynn, BLKHIL - 15.4; 5. Doll,
Katie Ann, BLKHIL - 15.7; 6. Gustafson,
Teagan Rae, SDSU - 17.3; 7. Fulton, Hallie
Ann. BLKHIL - 18.8; 8. Brown, Cheyenne
Kay, SDSU - 17.4.
With the completion of all the
SDHSAA winter fine arts and ath-
letic activities, the SDHSAA an-
nounces that 485 teams have re-
ceived the “Academic Achievement
Team Awards” for the 2012- 2013
Winter Season.
All varsity fine arts groups and
athletic teams that achieve a com-
bined grade point average of 3.0 or
higher are eligible to receive the
SDHSAA ACADEMIC ACHIEVE-
MENT TEAM AWARD.
Wall School received the award
for the following groups: Gymnas-
tics Team; Boys Basketball
Team; Band Solo-Ensemble
Group; Girls Basketball Team;
One-Act Play; Wrestling Team
and Vocal Solo-Ensemble
Group.
Initiated during the 1996-97
school year, the SDHSAA ACA-
DEMIC ACHIEVEMENT TEAM
AWARD program is designed to
recognize varsity athletic teams
and fine arts groups for their aca-
demic excellence.
The South Dakota High School
Activities Association believes that
high school students learn in two
SDHSAA Academic Achievement team
awards announced for winter season
distinct ways; inside the classroom
and outside the classroom – on the
stage and/or athletic field. This ac-
ademic program creates a positive
environment for school teams to
have its members excel in the
classroom.
This program is also meant to
motivate students toward aca-
demic excellence and to promote
academic encouragement from
teammates.
All varsity athletic teams and
fine arts groups that participate in
Association sponsored activities
are eligible for this recognition
program. Based on a duplicated
count, as reported in the 2011-12
SDHSAA Participation Survey,
over 29,789 students participate in
interscholastic athletics and over
28,613 more are involved in fine
arts activities.
The Academic Team Award pro-
gram provides high school stu-
dents with the opportunity to
prove they can be overwhelmingly
successful in both academics as
well as in athletic and fine arts ac-
tivities.
During National FFA Week the Wall FFA hosted a coloring con-
test for elementary students that attended the petting zoo. The
entries were judged and the top two from each class K-2 were
sent to the State FFA for judging. During State FFA Convention,
Sheridan Deering was announced as the second grade winner
for S.D.! She received a certificate and a gift card from Subway.
Congratulations Sheridan! Pictured back row: from left to right
... Josie Blasius, Monica Bielmaier and Kailey Rae Sawvell. Front
row: Sheridan Deering. ~Courtesy Photo
efforts to manage the health of
their land and to hand that ethic
down to the next generation," said
Jim Faulstich, chairman, South
Dakota Grassland Coalition.
The Leopold Conservation
Award in South Dakota is possible
thanks to generous contributions
from many organizations, includ-
ing: American State Bank, Belle
Fourche River Watershed Partner-
ship, Daybreak Ranch, Ducks Un-
limited, Farm Credit, The Lynde
and Harry Bradley Foundation,
Millborn Seeds, Mortenson Family,
Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS), Partners for Fish
& Wildlife, Professional Alliance,
South Dakota's Conservation Dis-
tricts, South Dakota Department
of Environment & Natural Re-
sources, South Dakota Farm Bu-
reau, South Dakota Game, Fish &
Parks, South Dakota Grassland
Coalition, South Dakota State
University Foundation, The Na-
ture Conservancy and World
Wildlife Fund.
About the Leopold Conserva-
tion Award: The Leopold Conser-
vation Award is a competitive
award that recognizes landowner
achievement in voluntary conser-
vation.
The award consists of an Aldo
Leopold crystal and a check for
$10,000.
In 2013, Sand County Founda-
tion will present Leopold Conser-
vation Awards in California, Col-
orado, Kentucky, Nebraska, South
Dakota, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin
and Wyoming.
About Sand County Founda-
tion: County Foundation (www.sa
ndcounty.net) is a private, non-
profit conservation group dedi-
cated to working with private
landowners to improve habitat on
their land.
Sand County's mission is to ad-
vance the use of ethical and scien-
tifically sound land management
practices and partnerships for the
benefit of people and their rural
landscapes.
Sand County Foundation works
with private landowners because
the majority of the nation's fish,
wildlife, and natural resources are
found on private lands.
About the South Dakota Cat-
tlemen’s Association: The South
Dakota Cattlemen's Association
(www.sdcattlemen.org) is a mem-
ber-driven organization working to
advance and protect the interests
of all cattlemen. SDCA works to fa-
cilitate a profitable business cli-
mate and promote environmental
stewardship.
About the South Dakota
Grassland Coalition: The South
Dakota Grassland Coalition
(www.sdgrass.org) is a non-profit
organization that seeks the volun-
tary improvement of grasslands
for the long-term needs of the re-
source and its various species.
The SD Grassland Coalition is
dedicated to improving and main-
taining the state's grasslands by
informing and guiding grassland
managers to make cost-effective
and environmentally sound man-
agement decisions.
Several juniors from Wall High School have been selected to at-
tend Youth Business Adventure (YBA) this summer. They will be
learning about the business world and will be able to earn col-
lege credits for participation in the program. Kaitlin Schreiber,
Sadie O’Rourke, and Nicole Eisenbraun are planning to attend
YBA at Black Hills State University in Spearfish June 2nd – June
7th and Tyler Peterson will be attending YBA at the University of
South Dakota in Vermillion June 16th – June 21st. Way to go
Kaitlin, Sadie, Nicole, and Tyler! ~Photo Heather Schreiber
WHS Juniors chosen to attend
Youth Business Adventure
Award recognizes landowners who
exemplify outstanding stewardship
continued from page 1
As I am writing this we are re-
ceiving another snowstorm. It
seems like we had most of our win-
ter in the last couple of weeks. The
moisture we received is very much
appreciated and at this time of
year the white stuff does not stick
around.
The cooler weather also helps
keep the students from getting
“spring fever” too early. This year’s
senior class is no different than
any other and they have caught a
case of “senioritis.” The staff and
students are working hard to keep
pushing until the end of the school
year.
It seems like every part of the
school year is busy with a lot of ac-
tivities going on throughout the
year.
The last couple months of a
school year has a lot of things hap-
pening with school days missed be-
cause of track, golf, field trips, and
FFA activities which makes it the
busiest time of the school year.
Students miss a lot of class time
due to these activities and then
when they missed school because
of illness or something else the
days add up in a hurry.
I have one student who has miss
11 days because of illness and 13
days because of school activities
and we have not hit the heart of
golf and track season yet. In total
this student has missed six weeks
of school on a four day school week.
We have students missing 15-20
days because of school related ac-
tivities.
Our students have one more
round of testing to do in May as
part of the pilot assessments we
agreed to participate in.
Some of the juniors and seniors
will spend a morning in May tak-
ing the Advance Placement exams
for their AP class. If the student
does well enough they may receive
college credit. These are rigorous
classes and they earn their credit.
Our staffing for next year is
nearly complete for teachers and
aides. We will be moving teachers
and aides around to different
grade levels and positions.
I am sure there are rumors float-
ing around about who is doing
what, but please wait until you
hear something from me to put the
moves into stone. The moves have
been positive ones and I feel will
benefit the students.
Next month is busy with the
concerts, the elementary is sched-
uled for 7:00 p.m. on May 6th and
the MS/HS concert is set for May
13th at 7:00 p.m
. Awards night will be held on
Wednesday, May 14th and a meal
will be provided prior to award
presentation.
Graduation is on Saturday May
18th at 1:30 p.m. and baccalaure-
ate is at noon.
We have three teachers retiring
this year Lola Kleinschmit, Stuart
Kitterman, and Mary Ellen
Grayot. The three combine for over
118 years of teaching with 79 years
of it in Wall. We wish each of them
the best as they move forward into
retirement.
Deering wins coloring contest
Subscription
Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax;
Out-of-Area: $42
plus tax;
Out of-State: $42
or subscribe
online at:
www.Ravellette
Publications.
com
Email us with your news item
or photo to courant @ gwtc.net
Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call us for your
printing needs! 859-2516
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Finals
Tuesday Men’s Early
People’s Market ........................35-17
Philip Motor..............................32-20
George’s Welding ......................29-23
Kennedy Implement .................26-26
G&A Trenching.........................24-28
Bear Auto ..................................24-28
Philip Health Service ...............22-30
Kadoka Tree Service.................16-36
Highlights:
Bryan Buxcel.................209, 203/605
Earl Park...............................246/575
Wendell Buxcel......................236/574
Jim Larson ............................213/557
Fred Foland...........................200/549
Cory Boyd..............................213/547
Bill Stone...............................202/537
James Mansfield...................207/534
Tony Gould ...................................530
Ed Morrison .................................527
Bill Bainbridge......................219/523
Randy Boyd..................................518
Alvin Pearson.....3-6 - 7-10 split; 511
Jason Sampson ............................506
Steve Varner.................................503
Ronnie Williams...........................501
Terry Wentz..................................501
Ryan Seager ..........................200/500
Colt Terkildsen.............................202
Kent Buchholz...................3-10 split
Bill Sumpter .........................2-7 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................46-10
Morrison’s Haying ....................34-22
Wall Food Center ......................26-30
Chiefie’s Chicks...................25.5-30.5
Hildebrand Concrete ................25-31
First National Bank .................24-32
Just Tammy’s......................22.5-33.5
Dorothy’s Catering....................21-35
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz ..............216 clean/504
Mitzi Boyd.............................185/501
Deb Gartner .........3-5-8-10 split; 183
Chelsea Moos ...............................138
Kalie Kjerstad..............................126
Marlis Petersen.....................199/546
Shar Moses ..........3-10 split; 190/475
Cristi Ferguson...................9-10 split
Emily Kroetch ......................4-5 split
Annette Hand.......................4-5 split
Email us with your news item or photo to courant@gwtc.net
Area News
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013• Page 3
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
April 26-27-28-29:
The Host (PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
May 3-4-5-6:
Olympus Has Fallen (R)
May 10-11-12-13:
Snitch (PG-13)
May 17-18-19-20:
Oblivion (PG-13)
Ravellette Publications, Inc. Call
us for your printing needs! 859-2516
Subscription Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax; Out-of-Area: $42 plus tax;
Out of-State: $42 or subscribe online at:
www.RavellettePublications.com
The South Dakota Game Fish
and Parks Commission has final-
ized several elk-hunting seasons
for 2013.
Archery elk hunters will have 92
“any elk” and 15 “antlerless elk” li-
censes available for the season.
The 2013 Archery Elk Season will
run from September 1-30.
The Black Hills Firearms Elk
Hunting Season will run from Oc-
tober 1-31 for the “any” elk license
holders. Antlerless elk seasons
will run from October 16-31 and
December 1-15. Black Hills
Firearms Elk hunters will have
620 licenses available, comprised
of 445 “any” and 175 “antlerless"
licenses.
The Prairie Elk Season will have
45 “any” elk and 51 “antlerless” elk
licenses available, which is four
less than 2012. Other changes
Elk seasons finalized
from 2012 are:
•Boyd County, Nebraska will no
longer be part of Unit 30.
•The season dates for Unit 30A
will run from September 1 – De-
cember 31.
•The season dates for Unit 11B
will run from September 1 through
the Friday before the third Satur-
day in October (2013 season dates
are September 1 – October 18)
•Unit 11D was added with sea-
son dates of September 1-Decem-
ber 31.
GFP staff presented the Com-
mission with results of a Black
Hills-wide aerial elk count and the
history of the elk hunting seasons
in the Black Hills. That presenta-
tion can be seen at http://www.you
tube. com/ user/ marshc22?fea-
ture=mhee
Spring is here and the Wall
Youth Baseball Program is getting
organized.
Due to the generosity of an
anonymous donor, the Wall Com-
munity Library will be sponsoring
a baseball team!
The Wall Library 796ers will be
our team, and of course they are
“Bound to Win”!
For those who know what
796ers refer to, come by the library
and we’ll give you a special com-
mendation, and orders to spread
the news!
We hope you will be able to at-
tend a few of the kids’ games. And
if you’re not especially interested
in watching the game, you could
always go hang out at the baseball
fields with a good book and cheer
them on whenever the spirit
moves you. It’s great fun for every-
one and we are honored to be a
sponsor! N a -
tional Library Week was fun for all
who participated. We appreciate
those who joined us in celebrating
the joy a library can bring.
Dave Jones was our special reader.
Badlands National Park (Bad-
lands) and Minuteman Missile Na-
tional Historic Site (Minuteman)
will celebrate National Park Week,
from April 20-28, 2013.
Fee free days will be offered at
Badlands, a fee park, beginning on
Earth Day, Monday, April 22 and
extending through Friday, April
26.
Come visit us at our Badlands
Ben Reifel Visitor Center, open
from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. daily,
and at Minuteman Missile’s Visi-
tor Center, open 8:00 a.m. – 4:30
p.m., Monday – Friday, and 9:00
a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday.
Enjoy the vastness of the south-
western South Dakota scenery -
soaring spires and pinnacles
amidst the pristine beauty of the
prairie.
A visit to both the North and
South Units of the Badlands can
also inspire a greater appreciation
of this landscape’s cultural histo-
ries.
Next door, explore the role of the
Midwest in America’s Cold War
history at the Minuteman Missile
by visiting the Delta 9 missile silo
and Delta-1 Launch Control Cen-
ter.
Explore some of the outdoor fea-
tures at Badlands in your own cel-
ebration of Earth Day.
The Castle Trail, 10 miles round
trip offers expansive views, and a
relatively level walk.
Cliff Shelf Trail is a moderately
strenuous loop that follows board-
walks and climbs stairs through a
juniper forest perched along the
Badlands Wall.
The Window Trail is a 0.25 mile
trail leading to a natural window
in the Badlands Wall with a view
of an intricately eroded canyon.
There is truly a walking route
for everyone at Badlands, so get
out there and take a hike!
For the first day of National
Park Week (April 20), Minuteman
Missile will be featuring ranger-
Badlands and Minuteman Missile
celebrate National Park week
guided tours conducted by a for-
mer Minuteman missile systems
engineer.
Re-live the Cold War experience
with someone who actually worked
here preventing war and preserv-
ing peace!
Minuteman Missile offers daily
tours of its Delta-1 Launch Control
Center at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Missile silo Delta-9 (I-90, Exit 116)
is also open to the public daily
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tour tickets for Delta-1 are
given out on a first come, first
served basis by coming to the Visi-
tor Center, located in Cactus Flat,
off I-90 at Exit 131.
Badlands will be hosting Artists-
in-Residence Jessica Bryant and
Judy Thompson.
The artists have been working
with students on watercolors, and
the role art has played in the his-
tory and development of our Na-
tional Parks.
The park is also featuring a
video from former Teacher-Ranger-
Teacher Larry McAfee. This reflec-
tion on Larry's travels through 52
of our 59 national parks can be en-
joyed by clicking this link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
BP0-GVImMMs .
Visitors to the parks during
Earth Day weekend are encour-
aged to visit Cedar Pass Lodge in
Badlands National Park. The
Lodge features locally sourced and
sustainable gift and artwork of the
region and the restaurant offers
South Dakota sourced entrees and
desserts including kuchen and
South Dakota State University ice
cream.
For more information on lodging
in the park go to http://cedarpass-
lodge.com/.
Hikers expecting to be out
longer than 30 minutes should
pack water and food. Be prepared
for extreme changes in weather,
including sudden wind storms,
rain, snow or lightning. Hike
safely and enjoy your parks.
Wall Community Library
796ers – Bound to win!
He read poems for our Story Time
on Friday, April 19.
As you might recall, April is also
National Poetry Month. Just a re-
minder, don’t forget to submit your
poems for our Poetry Contest. The
deadline is May 1, 2013 at 7:00
p.m.
Please join us for Library pro-
grams. Story Time is every Friday
at 9:00 a.m, and Book Club Meet-
ings are the last Wednesday of the
month at 6:00 p.m. The meeting on
April 24 will discuss The Miracu-
lous Journey of Edward Tulane by
Kate DiCamillo. Stay tuned for our
May selection.
For more details on any of these
or other programs, please stop by
the Library at 407 Main Street;
Wednesdays from 12:00 to 7:00
p.m., Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 5:00 p.m.
and Fridays from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m.
Or, give us a call at 279-2929 or
check our website: www.squidoo.co
m/wall-community-library or Face-
book page “Wall Community Li-
brary”.
Dan Jirón, Regional Forester for
the Rocky Mountain Region of the
U.S. Forest Service announced the
recipients of the 2012 Regional
Forester Honor Awards.
The Honor Awards recognize
partner organizations and employ-
ees who significantly contribute to
the U.S. Forest Service mission “to
sustain the health, diversity, and
productivity of the Nation’s forests
and grasslands to meet the needs
of present and future generations.”
“National Forests and Grass-
lands in Colorado, Wyoming,
South Dakota, Nebraska and
Kansas are benefiting from the un-
paralleled work of each of these in-
dividuals and groups,” said Jirón.
“As the Forest Service continues to
focus on forest and grassland
health restoration and resiliency
work, the efforts of these conserva-
tion leaders are leading to more
work being accomplished on-the-
ground.”
The Honor Awards recognize
seven categories: Regional Partner
of the Year, External Agent of
Change, External Special Recogni-
tion, Internal Agent of Change, Re-
gional Leadership, Internal Spe-
cial Recognition and Ranger Dis-
trict of the Year.
Partners and Employees honored for their
dedication to National Forests and Grasslands
The Wyoming Wildlife and
Natural Trust was recognized as
the 2012 Regional Partner of the
Year for their efforts to improve
Wyoming’s natural resources.
Since the Trust’s formation in
2005, it has contributed $29.5 mil-
lion to more than 250 on-the-
ground natural resource restora-
tion projects that have been
matched by other funding sources
to bring the total funding to $150
million.
South Dakota rancher Myron
Williams is the 2012 External
Agent of Change for his work as
President for both the Eastern
Pennington County Grazing Asso-
ciation and the Association of Na-
tional Grasslands.
This award recognizes William’s
efforts to enhance communication,
cooperation and coordination be-
tween the grazing organizations
and the Forest Service.
The Black Hills National
Forest’s Youth Natural Re-
sources Programwas recognized
as the 2012 Regional Forester’s
Special Recognition. The program
provides underprivileged youth
with training and practical experi-
ence in natural and cultural re-
source management.
The program consists of a 10 -
person Tribal crew, a five - person
Job Corps crew and two field crew
supervisors, and completed its
12th consecutive year in 2012.
The Mountain Pine Beetle Re-
sponse Project was recognized as
the 2012 Internal Agent of Change
for its efforts to restore and in-
crease the resiliency of national
forest system lands in the Black
Hills National Forest affected by
the mountain pine beetle.
The team members worked col-
laboratively with the public to de-
velop landscape-level environmen-
tal plans that will improve forest
health on more than 250,000
acres.
The Black Hills National
Forest’s Timber Program was
recognized with the 2012 Regional
Leadership award for their suc-
cessful timber sale program that
has led the Forest Service nation-
ally in timber sold in four of the
last five years.
The Black Hills Timber Pro-
gram’s efforts to collaborate with
counties and adjacent landowners
are effectively addressing moun-
tain pine beetle infested
areas.Three National Forest em-
ployees are the recipients of the
2012 Regional Forester’s Special
Recognition award for their efforts
to honor the 75th anniversary of
the Blackwater Fire.
The 1937 wildfire caused 15
deaths and is recognized with a
firefighter memorial and trail lo-
cated 38 miles west of Cody, Wyo.
Kristie Salzmann and Jason
Brey of the Shoshone National
Forest, and Susan Douglas of the
Bighorn National Forest were rec-
ognized for their work in planning
and implementing the 75th an-
niversary of the Blackwater Fire.
The recipients developed inter-
pretive materials, conducted a me-
morial hike and picnic, and
planned a memorial ceremony at-
tended by former US Senator Alan
Simpson and family members of
the fallen firefighters.
The Pagosa Ranger District
on the San Juan National For-
est was recognized as the 2012
District of the Year for their em-
ployee efforts to meet on-the-
ground projects while dealing with
the largest wildfire in its history,
and supporting the designation of
Chimney Rock National Monu-
ment.
The awarding of the Pagosa
Area Long-Term Stewardship Con-
tract in 2012 will contribute to for-
est health efforts and local commu-
nity economies for the next 10
years.
With our late spring and the re-
cent dire news on the national
scene everyone could use a dose of
laughter.
The Wall School Drama Club
hopes to provide that "medicine for
the heart" this weekend with The
Mighty Wall Players Comedy
Hour...and then some.
The show will open this Friday
at 7:05 p.m. at the Powerhouse.
The final show will be on Satur-
day at the same time. On tap is
over two hours of hilarious comedy
sketches—many from the writers
of The Carol Burnett Show—and
one original western comedy
sketch entitled The Legend of Big
Ugly Doug.
The Wall Players will bring back
great Carol Burnett memories like
As the Stomach Turns and the an-
noying and crafty Fireside Girl
Alice Portnoy.
The show will start off with a
bang as the entire cast performs
the memorable Make 'Em Laugh
song from the classic movie, Sin-
gin' In the Rain.
Also the senior girls in the cast
will perform a comedic rendition of
the 1927 song Side By Side.
The cast for the show includes:
Prepare to laugh with the Comedy
Hour...and then some!
Ryder Wilson, Analise Garland,
David Sykora, Cody Harris, Libbi
Sykora, Nicole Eisenbraun, Austin
Huether, Sterling Ellens, Ridge
Sandal, Michaela Schaefer, Winter
Godfrey, Paisley Godfrey, Elle
Moon, Sierra Wilson, Preston
Eisenbraun, Katy Bielmaier,
Travis Brenner, Autumn Deering,
Catriona Brunnemann, Aidan
Brunnemann and Emily Ferris.
Thomas Van Osdol will be the
sound tech and Wall Players alum-
nus Jessica Schulz will operate the
lights.
The production is directed by
Ron Burtz and Kathy Swan. Con-
cessions will be available. There
will be an admission fee. Wall ac-
tivity passes may be used.
The Carol Burnett sketches are
produced by special arrangement
with Contemporary Drama Serv-
ice, Colorado Springs, Colo.
aTTEnTion:
2013 SEniorS
& ParEnTS
The Pennington
County Courant would
like to use a senior
picture for the
graduation pages that
will run in May. You
may drop them off at
the office
(212 4th Ave.)
PO Box 435,
Wall, SD or email to
annc@gwtc.net.
All pictures will be
returned.
Thank you, Anne Jo
Elm Springs News
Submitted by Shelia Trask
Last Friday, the Morris Linn's
were in Rapid City for appoint-
ments. They visited Brett and
Charlotte Wilsey in the afternoon
before attending Laura's senior
play 'Oklahoma'. What a wonder-
ful show ~ so well done. The Linn's
had supper with Casey and Tiff
Knuppe's family before the play.
Laken spent the evening with the
Knuppe's instead of attending the
play. Aneita Henry hostessed a
stamp party at the Linn's, Sunday.
John and Cathie Printz of New
Underwood, visited Sunday after-
noon.
John and Jean Linn also at-
tended senior play, Friday night.
This week started off with some
nice weather and saw the snow
melting and really going "in"!!
Then mid week we got our next re-
minder that spring is not here
completely and about 5" of snow
came with more great moisture!
The snow is breaking records in
April for western South Dakota!
Randy Holst of Alaska, and
Kenny Holst of Sturgis, were after-
noon guests at John Linn’s on
Tuesday, this week.
Kelli Wilson had her tonsils re-
moved on Thursday in Rapid City
and spent the weekend at home re-
covering.
Tom and Al Trask took an excur-
sion on Friday and drove to Cash-
ton, Wis., to pick up Tom's work
horses and some lumber for Al.
They returned home, Sunday
morning.
Mick and Austin Trask went to
Blair, Neb., to visit Levi who had
recently had ear surgery over the
weekend. On the return trip they
stopped in Vermillion to see Steph
Trask.
Tyler Wilson and children were
home for the weekend. Philip and
Mary Kay Wilson were Sunday
dinner guests of Kenneth and
Janet Wilson. They were guinea
pigs for the upcoming Relay For
Life Dutch Oven cook-off. Kenneth
and Janet have been perfecting
their recipes for the competition
next Saturday in Wall!
Andy and Kellie Linn’s guest for
the weekend was Byrona Burnett
from Rapid City. The gals had fun
doing their thing! I guess Andy
was the "working kind of man"!
Shirrise and Laken Linn went to
Rapid City on Friday and had
lunch with Tiff and Casey Knuppe.
Scott and Lynn Simons were
down to visit Mo and Shirrise and
family on Friday night. The kids
went down to visit Celine Trask
and watch her walk with her new
braces.
Laken Linn had her weekly
Tuesday play date with Peggy Gra-
vatt.
Sunday, Larry and Peggy Gra-
vatt went to Rapid City for a birth-
day party for daughter Amber and
granddaughter Abby Miller from
Denver, at Watiki! Daughter Coral
and her family, and son Brad and
his family were also in attendance.
Everyone had a playmate with the
cousins all getting together--even
Larry was permitted to play.
Jim and Myrna are busy lamb-
ing--it's been quite a season so far!
Anything but fast and furious--
more like long and drug out!
Celine Trask got her HOT pink
leg braces on Friday, April 12. She
has been walking some everyday
with a walker. Some days she has
more visitors than others and thus
walks more and more! Amazing
how her progress has come along
in four months!! That's what deter-
mination does!! On Friday, Jean
Linn came with Kellie to watch
and later Mark and Tomilyn
stopped in.
Tom and Becky Bruch and fam-
ily were Sunday evening guests of
Pat and Rose Mary Trask’s and for
supper.
Last Sunday was a brunch
shower for Brodie Whitcher, son on
Amanda and Dillon Whitcher at
the home of John and Darlene
Wulf. Following the shower, the
family went to Wall and Brodie
was baptized at St Patrick’s in
Wall.
Tomilyn Trask was home for the
weekend from college at Chadron,
to help with calving and turkey
hunting.
No bird rodeos in this commu-
nity yet but a few wild turkey
buckaroos were hanging around!
Looking forward to more moisture
this week and so thankful for what
we have gotten. It is amazing how
white is turning green before our
eyes! The snow is breaking records
and making news!!
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Wanderers in the Desert.
Monday, April 16, 2013…
Still no road-runners sightings
in our list of birds coming to visit.
Though we have a lot of brush in
our neighborhood, maybe it just
doesn’t suit these road-runner
guys. Darn!
There is one new guy at the
feeder — a PHAINOPEDLA, sort
of mid-size, all black with white
wing patch and a pretty handsome
chest. Some of the finch couples
seem to be wanting to make a nest
in the Saguaro, and lots of L.B.J.’s
come by for drinks and snacks. It
appears to be that “making whop-
pie” time!
Marilyn Keyser is enjoying an
amazing and welcome recovery
from her long siege of treatment
for lung cancer and even her
esophagus has healed allowing her
to eat “real” food. She sounded
good and cheerful and optimistic.
It was so exciting to share the
news of Marilyn’s “Bill of Health”
the bird stuff was forgotten. At
least that is a decent excuse for
forgetfulness.
The handsome crested new
comer whose name I can’t pro-
nounce, he and she (?) are regular
visitors. I just call them both
“Pepi”, The Webster’s I have
doesn’t even list the name, “Peter-
son’s Guide” doesn’t give pronunci-
ation so Pepi will have to do!
Great-grandson, Skyler Patter-
son and his baseball team, the Rat-
tlers, provide great entertainment
two-three times a week. Last
night’s game was just extra fun.
Rattlers were on defense, the third
baseman, another six year old, was
watching airplanes, the team on
the adjoining field, doing his leg
stretching and by colliding with
the runner slowed him enough so
the runner couldn’t get home to
score! YAY! Skyler at short-stop
had his glove off inspecting his
hand, a ground ball came his way
and right through his legs. Oops!
Skyler just looked at his coach and
said, “Yeah, but did you see that
home run I just made?” Players
and scores are generally about
even. Skyler is a talented little
player, but we are talking six and
seven year olds. Parents some-
times get far too serious, and far
too critical, but for the most part,
the grandparents “cheering sec-
tion” sits back and enjoys — it’s all
good!
The wind is a howlin’ and a
yowlin’ again. The morning started
off cool, calm and seemed an op-
portune time to do some laundry.
The first load — sheets — ready to
hang on the line, here comes the
wind!
“I can handle this. I’m a South
Dakotan and this is a mere
breeze,” Yeah, right. Have you no-
ticed how much more dirt and how
many more tiny stickers fasten to
clean wet fuzzy socks than dry
dirty ones?
Okay, that’s it for now. Come in-
side, shut the windows, close the
blinds and turn on the AC —
HIGH!
Speaking of South Dakota, I’ve
heard Celine Trask has been home
for a while.
So — Hello Celine! What good
news that you were doing well
enough to come home, continue
therapy and keep up with school.
You have been often in our
thoughts. How about coming to
WTL Club? Or honorary guest at
Red Hat gathering? And, just in
case you get the tiniest bit frus-
trated with your progress, some-
times it helps to look back at how
far you have come. You probably
already knew that?
To wind up this blathering of
bits and pieces from the desert —
A road runner came sauntering
through the yard this morning! He
didn’t seem intent on food, just
passing through, I guess.
One more bit — thank you Faye
for the Tucker information. Pre-
ston Tucker has long been a major
hero to Lloyd!
We hear a storm is headed your
way. I remember delivering May
Baskets with “feets” of snow — I
think about 2008. We really
needed it then, too!
Happy Trails.
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Steve and Gayle Eisenbraun re-
turned home Thursday, April 18th,
after traveling through Wyoming,
Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona,
Nevada and Utah for two weeks.
In Arizona, they visited Steve’s sis-
ter, Norma and her husband Bob;
his sister Tina and her husband
Dewey; and Kirsten, Steve and
Larae Elwood. They then went to
Hoover Dam and Las Vegas.
There’s so much beautiful scenery
in our country, and it’s always
great to spend time with family
and friends.
Diane Geigle, her grandson
Owyn Geigle and Esther Wolford
spent Friday and Saturday at the
home of Heidi and Randy Kopren
in Bison. While there they at-
tended a play — “X is for Zebra” —
as Kopren’s son Colt was in the
play. Incidentally, this same play
was performed by Wall students
earlier in the year.
By order of the President, flags
have been at half-staff since the
bombing in Boston during the
Marathon. Since then, it was al-
most like a bombing with the ex-
plosions at the fertilizer plant in
West, Texas.
Orlin Winkowitsch had pneumo-
nia and was in the Rapid City Hos-
pital. When I talked to Lourine on
Thursday, he was doing fine but
may be moved to rehab. Get well
soon, Orlin.
Senior Citizen Potluck supper
on Thursday evening brought out
22 people, better than the last two
months. Instead of Bingo there
were several games available to
play but no one seemed to be inter-
ested.
Myer Allen Smith, infant son of
Tucker and Jessica, was baptized
during worship service Sunday
morning at the Methodist Church,
Wall.
Did you enjoy the Carol Burnett
show or Red Skelton of years ago?
You can relive these and other un-
forgettable scenes of television or
movies if you go to the Powerhouse
on the evening of April 26th or
27th, at 7:05 p.m. The Wall School
Drama Club will be presenting a
“Comedy Hour”. Over twenty stu-
dents are involved so it promises to
be a big production.
Jessica Kroells enjoyed her niece
and nephew, Tayton and Harper
Rislov, while their mother Megan
had to be gone.
Margaret Henriksen spent some
time in the Rapid City Regional
Hospital with pneumonia. She is
now back home at Prairie Village.
June Wanczyk passed away Sat-
urday. Her funeral will be 10 a.m.
Thursday morning at the St.
Patrick’s Church, Wall. We offer
our sympathy to her husband Joe
and the rest of the family.
We have had some great mois-
ture this week, rain and snow. It is
suppose to warm up from now and
wonderful temperatures for the
coming weekend. We’ll take it!
“I always prefer to believe the
best of everybody; it saves so much
trouble.” ~Rudyard Kipling
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
0wncr Ir|r Hznscn · 505-2Î8-2881 · Wz||, 8P
Cedur Butte Air, 1nc.
AeriaI AppIication Service
Your IocoI
consuIfonf:
Sfocy 8ieImoier
ceII: 44I-ZZ09, home: Z79 -Z99o
SfocybieImoier.norwex.bi;
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
2?9-2S6S
/-ccnd /g lnc.
lrc-lcn Jchn-cn
27ÿ-55C5 · ¡¡ègwlc.ncl
· wall, ¬l ·
BeoK1 Po1rzebo, Agen1
lJl5 E. Vcíís Auc., Píc¡¡c, SD 5?5Ul
Hus. 224-4l?J Toíí F¡cc. S??-224-4l?J
IccIí¸IccIí¡ot¡zcIu.con
Need a
print job
done
fast?
Call us for all
your printing
needs.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
859-2516 or
279-2565
Offices in Philip, Wall,
Kadoka, Murdo, Faith,
Bison, & New Underwood.
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Ladies Night Out
&
Wine Tasting Party
Thurs., May 2nd
Starting at 6:00 p.m.
•Vendors •Appetizers
•Different Wines
to Taste
Two Bit Saloon
& Steakhouse
386-2115
Quinn, SD
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
Apr. 25th: Fleish Keichla
w/Banana & Strawberries
Apr. 26th: Taco Salad
w/Garlic Bread
Apr. 29th: Swiss Mushroom Burger
w/Frog Eye Salad
Apr. 30th: Lasagna
w/Tossed Salad & Garlic Bread
May 1st: Patti Melt
w/French Fries
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
Three $1,000 scholarships
available from SDTA
The South Dakota Telecommuni-
cations Association (SDTA) has an-
nounced that it will award three
$1,000 SDTA Memorial Scholar-
ships for the 2013 fall semester.
The SDTA Memorial Scholar-
ships will be awarded to students
who have completed at least two
semesters of a multi-year program
at any of South Dakota’s accredited
technical schools or two semesters
at any other accredited post-sec-
ondary higher education institu-
tion in South Dakota.
Applicants that attend a post-
secondary higher education institu-
tion must be majoring in a program
with technical skills or a field of
study that is particularly useful for
work in the telecommunications in-
dustry. The applicant must be a
member/customer or have parents
that are member/customers of an
SDTA member company.
The scholarship program began
with a single $300 scholarship in
1987. Since the scholarship fund
was established, the rural telecom-
munications industry has awarded
nearly $54,000 to help 78 South
Dakota students achieve post-sec-
ondary educations.
The deadline to apply for the
scholarship is May 31, 2013. Appli-
cations are available from any
South Dakota post-secondary insti-
tution student financial aid office,
the SDTA office (605-224-7629 or
ginigrannes@sdtaonline.com) or
any SDTA member company.
SDTA member companies in-
clude Alliance Communications;
Beresford Municipal Telephone;
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Tele-
phone Authority; Faith Municipal
Telephone; Fort Randall Telephone;
Golden West Telecommunications
Cooperative; Interstate Telecom-
munications Cooperative; James
Valley Telecommunications; Ken-
nebec Telephone Company; Long
Lines; TrioTel Communications;
Midstate Communications; RC
Communications and Roberts
County Telephone Cooperative;
Santel Communications; Swiftel
Communications; Valley Telecom-
munications; Venture Communica-
tions; West River Cooperative Tele-
phone; West River Telecommunica-
tions Cooperative; and Western
Telephone Company.
annc@
gwtc.net
Email your social
news, obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
Posted By Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
Just behind me, in the supermarket check-out line,
were two little boys. I noticed that the older one kept
looking up at me and then down at his brother again
several times in succession. Finally, nudging his little
brother and pointing up at me, he said: “Hey, Joey, look
how little you are!”
Those who have seen me in the flesh know that I am
not exactly small, physically, and I can easily imagine
that, standing next to these little fellows, I made them
look small indeed!
But all this pertained only to the physical, and as I left
that supermarket, I began asking myself: “How big are
you, actually, in the sight of God?” I thought of Psalm
8:3,4, where David mused over the same question:
“When I consider Thy heavens, the work of
Thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which
Thou hast ordained; what is man that Thou art
mindful of Him…?”
Yet we are so important to the heart of God that He
entered the stream of humanity, as it were, and became
one of us in Christ, Son of God and Son of Man. Why?
Hebrews 2:14,15 gives us one important reason:
“…that through death [His death for our sins]
He might destroy him that had the power of
death, that is the devil, and deliver those who
through fear of death were all their lifetime sub-
ject to bondage.”
Moreover, insignificant as we are in ourselves, He
would use us mightily to His glory for, according to I Cor.
1:27,28, He has “chosen” the “foolish,” the “weak,” the
“base,” the “despised,” and those who “are not” to ac-
complish His purposes and to bring to naught the plans
of the world’s great ones.
HOW SMALL WE ARE!
Obituary
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
we don’t
charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565 or
e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
ciTy of Wall
ParT-TiME EMPloyMEnT
The City of Wall is seeking to employ a part-time posi-
tion in the public works department. Starting wage will
be $12.00 per hour DOEE. A complete job description
and applications are available at the City Finance Office
located at 501 Main Street between the hours of 8 am
and 4:30 pm Monday through Friday. Send resume to:
The City of Wall at PO Box 314, Wall, SD 57790 or call
605-279-2663 for more information. Deadline for appli-
cations is May 6, 2013 at 2:00 pm.
The City of Wall is an equal opportunity employer.
Published April 25 & May 2 2013, at the total approximate cost of $98.40.
Double J Horse Sales
All Breeds
Consignment Sale
Saturday, May 11, 2013
Stockmen’s Livestock
Exchange
Dickinson, ND
Ranch Horse Competition
7 am MDT
Sale 12 noon MDT
For a catalog or more info call
or log on:
Joe (701) 230-3044
John (701) 720-6674
www.doublejhorsesales.com
Soup & Pie Social
Benefit for
Kelly Jones
Sunday, May 5th
12 p.m. to 2 p.m. • Quinn Hall, Quinn, SD
Pie Sale afterwards
100% goes to Kelly to help
with medical expenses.
If you would like to donate a pie,
contact Carol Hoffman, 457-3502
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly mo-
tivational seminars each year.
Call Bob for more details at
800-437-9715 and be sure to
check out Bob’s website at:
www.mrattitudespeaks.com
As I was growing up, my Dad
would often times remind me that
any job worth doing was worth
doing to the very best of my ability.
I believe this basic, yet very sound
principle has been the foundation
of a very productive life-one of the
many Attitudes of Excellence that
has been woven into the very fiber
of my being over the years. Let me
share a few more Attitudes of Ex-
cellence with you.
•Excellence is working hard,
even when you really don't feel like
it.
•Excellence is overcoming diffi-
cult obstacles, challenges, and
roadblocks, with enthusiasm.
•Excellence is picking yourself
up by the bootstraps, one more
time than you have been knocked
down.
•Excellence is taking responsi-
bility whenever you make a mis-
take or error in judgment.
•Excellence is having an incred-
ible reputation of integrity and
honesty.
•Excellence is doing what you
tell people you will do, always fol-
lowing through on your commit-
ments.
•Excellence is loving your neigh-
bor and being more caring toward
others and not just thinking about
yourself.
Excellence is not something you
can achieve all at once. As with so
many other things in life, it is a
process that goes on for the rest of
our lives. But having an Attitude of
Excellence-that is, making a con-
scientious decision to be excellent
in all you think, do, and say-is
where it starts.
Make a commitment today to
having an Attitude of Excellence in
everything, because excellence only
happens when you care enough to
do and be your very best!
Attitudes of Excellence
FINANCIAL FOCUS
NouRISH THE "RooTS"
oF YouR INvESTMENT
STRATEGY
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
On Arbor Day, which we cele-
brate this week, people across the
country plant trees. Of course,
trees provide us with many bene-
fits, including beauty, fruit and
oxygen, as well as protection
against land erosion. But the act of
planting and nurturing trees can
also guide our behavior in other
areas of life — such as investing.
First of all, consider the vision
and patience exhibited by tree
growers when they plant their
saplings. As an investor, you, too,
need this type of perseverance and
long-term outlook. When you in-
vest, you should be focused on the
long term yet be prepared for the
inevitable short-term market
downturns. How long is “long
term”? Many investors hold qual-
ity investments for decades. It’s a
long process, but the potential
growth you seek will need this
time.
What else can you, as an in-
vestor, learn from tree planters?
For one thing, be aware of how
they keep their orchards healthy.
By providing proper irrigation and
disease-prevention measures, they
help their trees stay on the long
path toward maturity. Similarly,
you need to nurture your invest-
ment portfolio by continually pro-
viding it with the financial re-
sources it needs to stay “healthy.”
During periods of market volatil-
ity, it can be tempting to take a
“time out” from investing — but if
you do, you’ll miss out on the po-
tential growth opportunities that
may follow. Since no one can really
predict the beginnings and end-
ings of either “up” or “down” mar-
kets, you’re better off by staying
invested. Also, just as horticultur-
alists take steps to keep their trees
from being subject to disease, you
can keep your portfolio in good
shape by periodically “pruning” it
of investments that no longer meet
your needs.
Here’s something else that tree
planters can teach us: diversifica-
tion. Consider an orchard that con-
tains several different fruit trees;
its commercial benefits may be
greater than a comparable orchard
that only grows apples. Plus, the
presence of a variety of trees can
prove beneficial if disease strikes
one type. In some areas of the
country, for example, Dutch Elm
Disease wiped out thousands of
trees, leaving entire streets tree-
less. If some other species had also
been planted, these streets would
still have had the benefits pro-
vided by mature trees, even if the
elms were gone. As an investor,
you don’t want to own just one type
of financial asset, such as growth
stocks, because if a downturn hits
this segment, your entire portfolio
could take a big hit. A better strat-
egy would be to populate your “fi-
nancial orchard” with a variety of
investments — such as stocks,
bonds and government securities
— that are suitable for your situa-
tion. (Keep in mind, though, that
while diversification can help re-
duce the effects of volatility, it can’t
guarantee a profit or protect
against loss.)
As an investor, you can learn
some lessons from Arbor Day that
could prove “tree-mendously” help-
ful to you as you chart your course
for the future — and you won’t
even have to “go out on a limb” to
put these strategies in place.
June Wanczyk, age 85 of Wall,
S.D., died Saturday, April 20, 2013,
at the Hans P. Peterson Memorial
Hospital in Philip.
June Ailene Weller was born
June 6, 1927, at Arriba, Colo., the
daughter of Leonard “Bill” and
Stella (Anderson) Weller. She grew
up and received her education in
Arriba, graduating from Arriba
High School in May 1945. She at-
tended Bonnie Beauty School in
Denver, graduating in November
1946.
She met her husband to be in
Denver and was married to Joseph
L. Wanczyk on June 10, 1947, at
Sacred Heart Catholic Church in
Denver. A son, Gerard, was born to
this union on December 3, 1954.
The family moved to Philip in May
1957 to manage the Senechal Hotel
with her father, L.G. Weller, who
owned it. In July 1962, he passed
away so they bought the hotel from
the estate.
June later found that her heart
was not in beauty work, so after
talking with her family, decided to
go back to nursing school at the age
of 43. In 1969, June began nursing
school at Presentation College in
Aberdeen. June made it home often
during college, or the family would
travel to Aberdeen to see each
other. In May 1973, June gradu-
ated from nursing school, the same
week that their son graduated from
Philip High School.
June worked as a nurse for 30
years, retiring at the age of 78.
June and Joe worked at Sacred
Heart Parish and were always glad
when they could help. June and Joe
later moved to Wall, and became
members of St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church of Wall.
Survivors include her husband,
Joe Wanczyk, Wall; her son, Gerard
“Jerry” Wanczyk and his wife,
Colleen, Glenview, Ill.; a grandson,
Jordan Wanczyk, Milwaukee, Wis.;
a sister, Shirley Josserand and her
husband, Orville, Kadoka; two
brothers, Harold D. Weller and his
wife, Clara Belle, Kadoka, and
William Oscar Weller and his wife,
Jean, Kadoka; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
June was preceded in death by
her parents; two sisters, Ivalene
Weller and Marjorie Borbely; and
two brothers, Duane and Robert
Weller.
Mass of Christian burial will be
celebrated at 10:00 a.m. Thursday,
April 25, at St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church in Wall, with Father Leo
Hausmann as celebrant.
Interment will be 1:30 p.m. on
Thursday, April 25, at the Black
Hills National Cemetery near Stur-
gis.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial is
established to the Philip Nursing
Home.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
June Wanczyk__________________________________
Stephanie Marie Williams___________
Stephanie Marie Williams, age
37, of Wall, died Tuesday, April 23,
2013, at the Sanford USD Medical
Center in Sioux Falls.
Survivors include her husband
Marty Williams of Wall; two chil-
dren Stran and Jaicee Williams;
her parents Greg and Vicki Ander-
sen of Arlington; two sisters Shiela
Schmidt and her husband Terry of
DeSmet, and Shari Knutsen and
her husband Jesse of Omaha, Ne-
braska; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Funeral services are pending
with the Rush Funeral Chapel of
Wall.
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 6
NEED CASH?
•Excellent Pay
•Performance Bonus
•Store Discounts
•Great Recommendations
for School & Work!
•Make New Friends from all
Over the World!
•Unique, Diverse Work Environment
•Positions in Restaurant,
Retail Sales & Maintenance
Fill out an application online
at www.walldrug.com
Contact Mike Huether at
walldrug2@gwtc.net
or 605-279-2175.
You can also stop in and see us at
510 Main Street,
Wall, South Dakota!
Have a Blast This
Summer At Wall Drug!
Dartt Angus Ranch
Private Treaty Sale
Yearling Black Angus Bulls
Herd Sires: •Matrix •Rainmaker •Upward •Dartt Mainline
•LeMar Final Answer (Many Suitable for Heifers)
Dan 279-2242 • Daryl 441-7408 • Wall, SD
70 years ago…
The Owanka school will close
May seventh, with Dr. Russell E.
Jonas, president of the Spearfish
Normal, delivering the Commence-
ment address. The nine graduat-
ing Seniors are, Phillis Sthrelow,
Evelyn Horton, Lorraine Simon,
Helen Humphrey, Clara Harris,
Juanita Curry, Wesley Johnson,
Willis Mann and Warren Raetz.
The Wall Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment was called early Saturday af-
ternoon to extinguish a blaze
which had started from a trash fire
and caught the coal shed of L. J.
Dixon. The damage was very
slight.
Ed Dartt acting as driver taking
Mrs. Lysle Dartt and baby to Nor-
folk, Virginia, where Lt. Lysle
Dartt headquarters. They left Sun-
day afternoon and expect to get
there in six days.
A regular meeting of the Board
of Education of Wall, Independent
School District No. 58, Wall, South
Dakota was held at the School
House on the 2nd day of March,
1943, with the following members
present: H. W. Kitterman, John
Bielmaier, Harvey Stone, H. H.
Johnson. The following motions
were approved: Previous meeting
minutes, bills and to hire Harry W.
Gardner as Superintendent for the
coming year, salary $2,150.00.
60 years ago…
Wall folks on Monday enjoyed
one of the best picnics that they
have ever had. It was an ideal day
and all 150 children of the Wall
school found rides to the picnic
grounds, at Wind Cave, 120 miles
away. Most of the mothers and a
number of fathers were in the
group. Several rural school groups
were also in the party. Following
the dinner, many drove the re-
maining nine miles to Hot Springs
for a dip in Evans Plunge. Others
motored through the Hills where
they counted deer by the hun-
dreds.
G. W. Shelton was re-elected to
the city council in Ward II over Er-
hard Eisenbraun, 63 to 25 in the
election Tuesday; and Otto Eisen-
braun won over Bryce Kennedy, 29
to 20 in Ward III. G. W. Mills was
the only candidate who filed in
Ward I and hence retains his seat.
The seven man board will have
only one new face, Otto Eisen-
braun, who replaces Wayne Crown
who did not choose to run. The oth-
ers are G. W. Shelton, C. M. Best.
T. E. Hustead, G. W. Mills and
Hans Hamann with Howard Con-
nolly as mayor.
Darwin Knapp escaped serious
injury Saturday when a Fordson
tractor he was using ran over him.
He suffered fractured clavicle and
other bruises, but these did not
keep him from attending school on
Monday. Darwin says that it was
Clyde Shull and not himself who
was driving his car when he had
his accident two weeks ago by run-
ning into the back of the Spearfish
hearse.
At the boxing card at Philip,
Thursday, Sonny Huether and
Russell Burmeister won their
fights — Huether by unanimous
decision over Clarence Johnson of
Pierre, and Russell Burmeister
with a second round KO over Bud
Zimmer of New Underwood. Sonny
Shull lost by decision to Reese
Williams of Philip. Robbin Cad-
man of Quinn was KOed in the
second by John Stephenson of
Philip and Amrose Sharp of Inte-
rior lost by decision to Joe Looby of
Philip.
50 years ago…
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Schroeder of
Creighton announce the forthcom-
ing marriage of their daughter,
Rosemary, to John Heacock, son of
Mr. and Mrs. James Heacock of
Rapid City. Rosemary is graduat-
ing from the Presentation Junior
College in Aberdeen and her fi-
nance is a senior at the School of
Mines and Technology.
Boeing workers returned to
their jobs here at Wall, Monday
after a four day walk-out. A re-
ported 200 workers protested
working conditions and staged the
work stoppage, Thursday morning
it appeared to Wall folks that trou-
ble must be brewing as workers
gathered outside of the gates to the
Boeing headquarters, but there
was no violence and the workers
soon dispersed when they agreed
not to go to work, and returned to
their homes, mostly in Rapid City.
It appears that their greatest
grievance is over the distance that
they must travel to get to and from
work. They feel that this three or
four hours of travel to missile sites
should be on company time. The
work stoppage here was not au-
thorized by the Labor Union to
which these workers belong, so the
laborers here have agreed to work
while their Union reviews their
case.
Lynn Williams, Wall barber, won
second in a field of 35 trap shooters
at the annual North-South trap-
shoot at Rapid City, Sunday. His
score was 84 birds out of a possible
100. The winner of the meet, Har-
vey Huffman of Rapid City, bagged
86 clay pigeons.
Wall is perhaps the best guarded
town in the nation. The first five
Minuteman missiles have been
placed in the underground silos
immediately surrounding Wall —
to the east, the south, the south-
west, the west and the northwest.
40 years ago…
Jim Wilson, Ranger at the Bad-
lands National Monument, suf-
fered broken and loosened teeth in
an encounter with two Indians on
the highway through the park,
north of Cedar Pass, late Friday
night. He is receiving treatment
from a dental surgeon in Rapid
City. He was hit in the mouth with
a beer bottle by one of the two
men. One of the two were caught
about 11:15 that night and the
name of the other was learned.
Dorothy Crew, who was returning
from an evening meeting in Inte-
rior, was stopped by the two men
as they had their car on the wrong
side of the road and had waved her
down. They claimed that their car
had stalled and wanted a shove. As
one of the pair tried to enter her
car, Mrs. Crew stepped on the gas
and sped away. She notified park
officials.
Teachers in the Anaconda, Mon-
tana schools are on strike with no
end in sight, according to the Ana-
conda Leader. Students will have
to make up days lost after the offi-
cial closing of school on June 8, but
must be completed by June 30. In
addition, if school is not in session
for 180 days before June 30, the
district loses all state funding for
the coming year.
Holly Fortune was baptized
Sunday in the Lutheran Church in
Wall. Her sponsors were Darwin
Haerer and Mr. and Mrs. John
Brewer of Rapid City. Dinner
guests at the Roger Fortune home
that day included Darwin Haerer,
Mr. and Mrs. John Brewer, Mr.
and Mrs. Wayne Haerer and
Marla, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fortune,
Dewey Fortune and John Fortune.
30 years ago…
BIRTH: Born April 11, a son,
Brian Todd, to Rick and Nancy
Horton. Master Brian weighed in
at 8 lbs. 3 oz., and he joins two sis-
ters, Kristin and Janelle. Grand-
parents are Virgil and Lillian Hor-
ton, Wall and Wayne and Mabel
Clark of Armour.
BIRTH: Born April 17, a son,
James Paul, to Kevin and Carol
Alishouse. He weighed 8 lbs. 5 1/2
oz. Grandparents are Glenn and
Betty Alishouse, Wall, and Clyde
and the late Pat Sexton of Mullen,
Neb. Great-grandparent are
Ernest and Marcella Pipal.
High school athletes from Wall
and New Underwood were among
13 schools competing at the Heart
of the Hills Track Meet in Custer,
Saturday, April 23. The meet was
originally scheduled to be held at
Hill City, but wet conditions there
forced it to be moved to Custer. De-
spite the unpredictable weather,
which saw it rain, snow, windy and
sunny, area athletes turned in
some very good performances at
the meet. New Underwood fin-
ished seventh overall in both the
girls and boys divisions. Wall fin-
ished fourth in the girls division
and ninth in the boys division.
20 years ago…
South Dakota Governor George
S. Mickelson and seven others
were killed in a plane crash Mon-
day afternoon, April 19, near
Dubuque, Iowa, after reporting en-
gine failure. Others dead are
Roland Dolly, commissioner, gover-
nor’s office of economic develop-
ment; Ron Reed, Commissioner,
state office of energy policy; Dave
Birkeland, First Bank president,
Sioux Falls; Angus Anson, North-
ern States Power executive; Roger
Hainje, director of the Sioux Falls
development foundation; Pierre pi-
lots Ron Becker and Dave Hansen.
Lt. Gov. Walter Dale Miller, New
Underwood, now assumes the gov-
ernorship of South Dakota.
Theodore and Laura Kjerstad,
Wall, announce the engagement of
their daughter, Anita, to Matthew
Sandal, son of John and Karyl
Sandal of Philip. Anita is a 1991
graduate of Wall High School.
Matthew is a 1991 graduate of
Philip High School and is em-
ployed by Ted Kjerstad.
There will be 48 athletes com-
peting in track and field at Black
Hills State University this spring,
with the expectation of winning
another conference title. Those
participating from the Wall area
include: Travis McDonnell, sopho-
more, thrower; Leslie Deutscher,
freshman, 100 meters; and
Rhonda McLaughlin, freshman,
shot and discus.
10 years ago…
2003 Prom King Dusty Botz and
Queen Amy Hauk were crowned
Saturday, April 12.
Black Hills Financial Services is
proud to announce that Amy Hauk
is the recipient of the Black Hills
Financial Services February 2003
Student of the Month award at
Wall High School. Amy is the
daughter of Dan and Cindy Hauk,
Wall.
Bo Price, a senior at USD Ver-
million, auditioned with Stage
West Entertainment, Inc. in Min-
neapolis, Minn., and has been cho-
sen to perform at the Medora Mu-
sical at Medora, N.D., this summer
as a Burning Hills singer and per-
former. Bo is the son of Malcom
and Nola Price of Wasta, he has an
Associates of Arts degree in The-
atre performance from Casper Col-
lege, in Casper, Wyo., and will
graduate in May with a Bachelor
of Fine Arts degree in Acting from
USD.
Stephanie Trask a 2001 gradu-
ate of St. Thomas More High
school, is a newly elected member
of the Chadron State College Stu-
dent Senate for the 2003-2004
school year. Trask, who is majoring
in range management and crimi-
nal justice, was elected to one of
the senator-at-large positions. She
is the daughter of Patrick and
RoseMary Trask of Wasta.
The Looking Glass of Time
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QuESTIoN: Can you give me
any advice about selecting a good
college or university? I’m a junior
in high school, and though I have
made up my mind to continue my
education after graduation, I
haven’t yet decided where I should
go. I’ve been looking at a lot of web-
sites and college catalogues, but
there’s so much to consider. I’m
finding the decision process a little
overwhelming.
ANSWER: Choosing a college is
one of the most important life-de-
cisions you'll ever make. But take
courage—it doesn't have to be
overwhelming. You can make the
process easier by getting in touch
with your own values and learning
how to prioritize your needs and
goals.
We'd advise you to begin by con-
sidering where you stand in terms
of your faith. Do you think of your-
self as a committed and knowl-
edgeable Christian? Are biblical
truths and firm moral values im-
portant to you? Do you know your
own mind, or are you easily influ-
enced by others? It's important to
recognize these personal character-
istics before you start weighing
your educational options. If you
have doubts about your ability to
withstand spiritual struggles,
maybe enrolling in a Christian col-
lege or university would be a wise
choice.
We say this because the secular
university setting is often hostile to
the biblical worldview. Christian
students today should expect a cer-
tain amount of opposition on the
secular college campus. In addi-
tion to choosing a college or univer-
sity carefully, they need wisdom in
the way they approach their stud-
ies and interact with their teach-
ers. Like it or not, many professors
at these institutions tend to pres-
ent material in a way that denies
absolute truth and stands in direct
opposition to biblical standards of
behavior. That's why we advise
students who are less than rock-
solid in their faith to seek out a col-
lege that's designed to build them
up in this area rather than tearing
them down. This doesn't necessar-
ily mean that Christians should
abandon secular academia alto-
gether. But it does suggest that
those who enter that arena are
well advised to stay on guard and
keep their eyes wide open.
Once you've thought about how
your faith might be affected by
your decisions, consider your occu-
pational goals, your strengths and
abilities, and your personal inter-
ests and inclinations. What's your
outlook on life? Why is education
important to you? What do you in-
tend to do after you've graduated
from college? As you probably
know, colleges and universities dif-
fer in terms of the courses and pro-
grams they offer and the emphasis
they place upon certain fields of
study. Some are strong in technol-
ogy and the sciences. Others excel
in art, music, and the humanities.
Some provide rigorous preparation
for graduate work in medicine or
mathematics. Still others have
built their reputations upon the
strength of their law schools or the-
ological departments. This infor-
mation is vital to your decision,
and it's readily available on each
school's website or in the print ver-
sion of its catalogue.
After you’ve figured out who you
are, what you want to do, and
where you hope to go in life, you'll
be in a position to identify those in-
stitutions that are best qualified to
meet your personal needs. The fi-
nancial aspect of a college educa-
tion is another important part of
the picture, of course, and this is
something you'll need to discuss in
detail with your parents and the fi-
nancial aid offices of the institu-
tions you're considering. When
you've come up with a workable
plan for funding your course of
study, you'll be ready to make a
final choice from among the
schools that have accepted your ap-
plications and extended you an in-
vitation to enroll. Only you can
make that decision, and you should
do it from within a context of
earnest prayer and a heartfelt de-
sire to serve the Lord. We're confi-
dent that He will direct your paths
if you commit your future to Him
and acknowledge His sovereignty
in everything you do (Proverbs 3:5,
6).
QuESTIoN: How can we best
relate to our adult child who has
completely rejected his Christian
upbringing? After graduating from
high school he moved in with his
girlfriend and became involved
with drug and alcohol abuse. Our
hearts ache to reach out to him,
but we don’t want to appear to be
condoning his lifestyle. What
would you recommend?
ANSWER: Your longing for a
warm, close, emotionally safe rela-
tionship with your son is com-
pletely understandable. God de-
signed moms and dads to feel this
way about their children, and
when the relationship doesn’t turn
out as they’d hoped and expected
it’s only natural that they should
be grieved. At the same time,
you’re wise to set boundaries, en-
force limits, and communicate
clear messages to your son about
Christian values and biblical stan-
dards of behavior. You need to find
creative ways of holding that posi-
tion while also assuring him of the
constancy of your love.
The Parable of the Prodigal Son
(Luke 15:11-32) can provide you
with an instructive model in this
regard. As you may remember, the
father in Jesus’ story didn’t assume
responsibility for changing his
son’s heart and mind. He under-
stood that there were only two
things he could do in response to
the young man’s ill-advised
choices: pray and wait. He prayed
and waited with patience until the
son finally “came to himself” (verse
17). And when at last the boy came
home freely confessing the error of
his ways, the father “ran” to meet
him “while he was still a great way
off” (verse 20). You should be ready
to respond with the same degree of
eager love and compassion at the
first sign of repentance on his part.
Is there anything at all that you
can do to help him start moving in
that direction – to open a crack,
however small, in the wall of his
resistance to God and his Christian
upbringing? Not directly. But per-
haps you could enlist the assis-
tance of some objective third party.
Is there anyone you know to whom
your son might be inclined to lis-
ten? A family friend, perhaps, or a
relative, or a pastor or member of
your church? An older male acting
in the role of a mentor – a man
your son trusts and whom he does-
n’t perceive as a threat – could be
of great help to you in this situa-
tion. The girlfriend’s parents
might be another possibility. Any-
one who can speak one-on-one with
your son, providing him with care-
fully considered food for thought
and listening compassionately to
his responses, could play an impor-
tant role in opening up the lines of
communication.
Keep in mind that the Prodigal
Son wasn’t able to “come to him-
self” until he had come to the end
of himself. It’s possible that your
son has not yet experienced a suf-
ficient amount of personal loss to
be willing to listen to anyone. If
and when he reaches a point where
he is open to re-evaluating his life-
choices, you can let him know that
Christian counselor referrals are
available to him.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer is
excerpted from books authored by
Dr. James Dobson and published
by Tyndale House Publishers. Dr.
Dobson is the Chairman of the
Board of Focus on the Family, a
nonprofit organization dedicated to
the preservation of the home.
Copyright 2003 James Dobson,
Inc. All rights reserved. Interna-
tional copyright secured.
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 7 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
WanTED: Summer pasture for
40-500 cow-calf pairs. Phone
859-2889. P17-7tc
WanTED: Summer pasture for
50 to 150 head of cows. Call
Steve Pekron, 544-3202.
P12-tfn
suMMER PasTuRE WanTED:
Looking to rent pasture or com-
plete ranch, short term or long
term. Also looking for hay
ground. Cash, lease or shares.
Call 798-2116 or 798-2002.
P10-tfn
suMMER PasTuRE WanTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease whole
ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or 859-
2059 (home). P7-tfn
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
GaRaGE saLEs
RuMMaGE/BakE saLE: Fri-
day, April 26, at the Senior Citi-
zen’s Center, Philip. 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Lunch will also be served.
Sponsored by Philip High School
German Club. Proceeds will go
toward their Germany trip.
PR35-1tc
RECkLInG, sCHoFIELD &
FITZGERaLD MuLTI-FaMILY
RuMMaGE saLE: Friday, April
26, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Philip Fire
Hall. Girls’ clothes, infant to size
7; boys’ clothes, 6 months to size
8; women’s clothes, XL-2XL;
Graco car seat/stroller combo;
Graco duo glider double stroller;
kid sized foosball/ multi-game
table; toys; girls’ dress-up
clothes/customes. Lots of great
items in excellent condition.
P19-2tc
HELP WanTED
GREaT suMMER JoB! Sales
experience preferred but will
train. Salary plus commission.
Housing is supplied in Wall. You
will make great wages, meet peo-
ple from all over the world and
have fun. Must work some week-
ends. Position available now.
Apply at GoldDiggers on Mt.
Rushmore Road in Rapid City or
call Jackie at the factory at 348-
8108 or fax resumé to 348-1524.
PW13-tfn
HELP WanTED: Full time posi-
tion available. Lurz Plumbing,
685-3801 or 859-2204, Philip.
PR32-tfn
LookInG FoR HELP in the
HV/AC field. Must be self-moti-
vated with a good work ethic.
Also, energetic with the desire to
learn. If interested, call Brian
Hanson, 441-6543. PR31-tfn
suBWaY In WaLL is accepting
applications for full and part-
time positions, seasonal and
year-round. Opportunities for
advancement to management
positions for the right applicant.
Pick up application at Subway.
WP31-tfn
HELP WanTED: Service Advisor
position open at Philip Motor.
Please call Craig at 685-3435 for
details. PR28-tfn
53’ TRaILER FoR saLE: Excel-
lent storage trailer or over-the-
road trailer, $3,950 FIRM. Call
279-2619. PW19-2tc
FoR saLE: 2004 Pontiac Grand
Prix GT, gray with gray interior,
107,300 miles, looks and runs
great. $7,000 is the asking price,
but I will consider reasonable of-
fers. Call Keith at 454-3426 or
859-2039 for information or any
questions. PR22-tfn
FoR saLE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BusInEss & sERVICEs
o’ConnELL ConsTRuCTIon,
InC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & Con-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
TETon RIVER TREnCHInG:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIon will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FaRM & RanCH
FoR saLE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay.
Delivery available and volume
discount available. Call 798-
5413. WP35-8tc
FoR saLE: (6) fresh roping
Longhorn yearlings; (5) heifers;
(1) steer. 8” horns. $565 apiece.
985-5932. PR35-2tp
WanTED: Summer grass for 65
cow/calf pairs. Call Brock
Smith, 859-2436 or 441-2535.
P20-4tc
FoR saLE: (4) 3200 bu. grain
bins, $500 each or $1,600 for all
4. Call 859-2433 or 685-3927.
P20-tfn
WanTED: Pasture for 40-80
pairs, or to rent land. Call 837-
2589 or 488-0086. K20-3tc
WanTED: Pasture for 50 head of
yearlings and 50-250 head of
cow/calf pairs. Call 685-8825.
PR34-2tc
PuREBRED BLaCk anGus
BuLLs FoR saLE: Private
Treaty. Bloodlines include In
Focus, Bando, Black Coat,
Frontline, Fast Money. Some
suitable for heifers. Not overfed.
Call Mike Harris, morning, at
685-1053. P19-tfn
auToMoTIVE
FoR saLE: 2004 Ford F-250
Ext. Cab, short box, Super Duty,
4x4, XLT, loaded, nearly new 10-
ply tires, towing pkg., 98K miles,
excellent shape, under book.
$11,900. 209-8639. PR32-tfn
MIsC. FoR saLE
FoR saLE: Zastava SKS, 10
round fixed magazine, excellent
condition, matching numbers
plus 100 rounds ammo. $450
OBO. Kris, 430-5367.PW20-2tp
FoR saLE: 6500 watt Titan In-
dustrial generator, electric start
with pull start, 8 hp. diesel en-
gine, (2) 110v plug-ins, 1-RV
plug, 1-220 plug, new Interstate
battery, cover. 280-0351.
P20-tfn
FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
noTICEs/WanTED
WanTED: Cast iron cooks and
beer/wine tasters for the 1st An-
nual Relay For Life Cook-off on
April 27th at the Wall Golf
Course. Contact Cindy, 685-
3767 or Kelly, 515-0244.
WP19-2tc
anYonE InTEREsTED in hav-
ing a rummage sale in Philip’s
Citywide Rummage Sale on June
8th must please contact Brittney
or Selma (brittney@pioneer-re-
view.com or selma@pioneer-re-
view.com) by May 10th. P18-tfn
WanTED To BuY: Old farm ma-
chinery and cars for crushing.
433-5443. PR32-4tp
REaL EsTaTE
HousE FoR saLE In WaLL: 2
bedrooms, 1 bath. Call for de-
tails, 386-2259. WP35-4tp
FoR saLE: 2007 Friendship
16’x80’ mobile home, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, laundry room,
central air, propane heat, no
smoke, no pets, in Wall. $45,000.
Call 515-4138. PW20-4tc
2012 MoBILE HoME FoR
saLE: 16’x80’, 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, lots of upgrades, must see
to appreciated. Located in Kim-
ball. Call 685-3748 or 685-3755.
PW19-4tc
TWo sToRY HousE FoR saLE
In WaLL: Asking $32,500. Will
consider any reasonable offer.
Please call 279-2858. WP32-4tc
HousE FoR saLE In PHILIP: 2
bedrooms, downtown, fenced
yard. Make an offer. Call 859-
3095 or 859-2483. P10-tfn
RECREaTIon
FoR saLE: 2004 Honda Fore-
man Rubicon 4WD 4-wheeler,
new tires, new plastic, with wind-
shield. 280-0351. P20-tfn
REnTaLs
FoR REnT In PHILIP: 2-3 bed-
room house. Tom Foley, 859-
2975 or 685-8856. P19-2tc
4-BEDRooM HousE FoR
REnT In WaLL: Call Stan, 381-
2861. WP5-tfn
aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLassIFIED PoLICY
PLEasE REaD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. all
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
BIDs
SEALED BIDS FOR A 140-
H2007 CAT Motor Grader
#CCA03280 with rear ripper.
Bids accepted until May 6. For
information call Faulk County
Highway Department 1-605-
598-6233.
BusInEss oPPoRTunITY
AVON — Only $10 to start. Call
for information without any ob-
ligation. 1-877-454-9658.
EMPLoYMEnT
DEPUTY STATES ATTORNEY for
HUGHES COUNTY, full time.
Contact your local Dept of Labor
or Carla Lantz, 605-773-7461,
Hughes County Courthouse.
Closes May 13. EOE.
TOP PAY FOR RN’s,
LPN’s/LVN’s, CNA’s, Med Aides.
$2,000 Bonus — Free Gas.
AACO Nursing Agency Call 1-
800-656-4414 Ext. 18.
IMMEDIATE OPENING - ELEC-
TRIC LINEMAN who will assist
with miscellaneous City mainte-
nance duties. Knowledge and
skills in construction, mainte-
nance, repair, and installation of
electric distribution system nec-
essary. Certified Journeyman or
ability to enroll in apprentice
program. EOE Accepting appli-
cations or resumes until filled.
City Finance Office, PO Box 587,
209 N Main, Groton, SD 57445.
KTC CONSTRUCTION SEEKS
EMPLOYEES, both part-time
and full-time. Excellent
pay/benefits! Underground
plumbing, digging, trenching,
operating equipment. Willing to
train. Submit resumes to
rodb@kennebectelephone.com.
Questions, call 605-869-2220.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL
has an exciting full time Occupa-
tional Therapist opportunity,
working with a supportive team
of professional therapists in the
beautiful southern Black Hills of
SD. We are located just a short
distance from Mount Rushmore,
Wind Cave National Park, Custer
State Park, Jewel Cave National
Park and many other outdoor at-
tractions. Competitive salary
and benefits available including
sign on bonus. Please contact
Jim Simons, Rehab Services Di-
rector, at 605-673-2229 ext.
3 0 1 o r
jsimons@regionalhealth.com for
more information or go to
www.regionalhealth.com to
apply. EOE.
NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOLS
EDUCATION COOPERATIVE
2013-2014: Early childhood spe-
cial education teacher: Starting
salary $35,000 with great bene-
fits: Contact Director Cris Owens
605-466-2206, Christine.Owens
@k12.sd.us.
SMART SALES AND LEASE
seeks bookkeeper. Work from
home. Hourly wage based on ex-
perience. M-F 8-4, Degree/man-
agement experience a plus. Re-
sume, questions: careers@smart
salesandlease.com.
FoR saLE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD.
We have lowered the price & will
consider contract for deed. Call
Russell Spaid 605-280-1067.
LoG HoMEs
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South &
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
MIsCELLanEous
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERA-
TOR CAREER! 3 Week Hands-
On Training School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators. National
Certifications. Lifetime Job
Placement Assistance. VA Bene-
fits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497.
noTICEs
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT Listings, sorted by rent,
location and other options.
www. sdhousi ngsearch. com
South Dakota Housing Develop-
ment Authority.
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
VaCaTIons
BLACK HILLS VACATIONS: Mys-
tery Mountain Resort ñ Cabins,
TV sites & Camping in the Pines.
Visit: www.blackhillsresorts.com
& www.facebook.com/mystery-
mountain or 800-658-2267.
WanTED
WANTED: HUNTING LAND for
Pheasant, quality Mule Deer
170’ class+, Whitetail Deer 150’
class+ and Merrium Turkey. Call
605-448-8064.
Public Notice
Regarding
“Thank Yous”
submitted as
“Letters to the Editor”
The position of this newspaper to accept “Thank Yous”, whether
directed to a person, any institution, affiliation or entity for
placement in anything other than the “Cards of Thanks” column
located in the Classified Section of this newspaper:
THERE WILL BE A CHARGE!
Letters of thanks or congratulations shall be construed as adver-
tising and will be inserted for placement in the proper location
of this newspaper.
PLEASE ASK IF IN DOUBT
If you are in doubt about whether material sent in or brought in
to this newspaper, be sure to ask for assistance at the counter or
please leave a phone number so that you may be contacted. There
is a difference between news and advertising.
Pennington County Courant
PO Box 435, 212 4th Ave., Wall, SD 57790
• (605) 279-2565 •
• annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net •
aParTMEnTS
aVailaBlE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
West river Pioneer
Has a good supply of
9690 aquaMax corn
63ME80 Sunflowers
We also carry
alfalfas, Soybeans & Sorgums
For your Spring Planting needs.
call 605-685-3760
Wall, SD
THank Yous
A big heartfelt thank you to
Dave Custis, Stacy Schulz, Mike
Erz, Rick Sutter the ambulance
driver, the paramedics, Rick
picked up at Wicksville exit, the
doctors and nurses in the emer-
gency room.
Thank you to relatives, friends
and neighbors for your visits in
the hospital and at home, tele-
phone calls, cards and food.
We are fortunate to have Dave
Custis, Stacy Schulz, and staff in
the Wall Clinic, the Wall Ambu-
lance EMT’s, drivers and para-
medics that meet the ambulance
in emergency situations.
God bless,
Bob & Della Hays
budget.
Rieckman asked the board to declare the
Power House heaters as surplus the
heater from Big White was put in to be
used at the Power House when cove
heating was installed at Big White. Dan
Hauk was present to answer the board’s
questions.
4787. Trask moved to declare the
Power House heaters as surplus. Sec-
onded by Anderson. Motion carried.
Rieckman discussed items on the capital
outlay list for next year. After discussion
on items, such as laminated glass doors
for security, the board approved the pre-
liminary list Rieckman presented.
4788. Williams moved to approve the
preliminary Capital Outlay list presented
by Rieckman. Seconded by Cordes. Mo-
tion carried.
At 8:29 p.m. Chairperson Eisenbraun de-
clared a recess.
At 8:35 p.m. Chairperson Eisenbraun de-
clared the meeting back in regular ses-
sion.
4789. At 8:35 p.m., Johnson moved to
go into Executive Session for the purpose
of discussing personnel, according to
SDCL 1-25-2. Seconded by Bielmaier.
Motion carried.
At 9:01 p.m., Chairperson Eisenbraun de-
clared the meeting out of Executive Ses-
sion.
4790. Trask moved to approve 2013-
14 Negotiations. Seconded by Cordes.
Motion carried.
4791. Anderson moved to approve to
offer certified contracts with the 2013-14
negotiated salaries and benefits. Sec-
onded by Cordes. Motion carried.
4792. Cordes moved to approve to
offer administrative and non-certified con-
tracts with a 2.5% increase. Seconded
by Trask. Motion carried.
With no further business brought to the
board, Chairperson Eisenbraun declared
the meeting adjourned at 9:04 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Niki Mohr,
Business Manager.
______________
Scot Eisenbraun,
Chairperson
________________
Niki Mohr,
Business Manager
Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $165.33.
SURPLUS
PROPERTY
CITY OF WALL
The City of Wall has declared the follow-
ing property surplus and is accepting bids
on a 140’ radio tower w/ 20’ sections,
made of galvanized angle iron. For addi-
tional information, contact Garrett Bryan,
Public Works Director at 605-279-2563 or
605-515-4138. Sealed bids may be sub-
mitted at the Wall City Office at 501 Main
Street, PO Box 314, Wall SD until 2:00pm
on June 6, 2013. The city council will
open bids at 6:30pm during the council
meeting. The City of Wall reserves the
right to reject any or all bids and to waive
any irregularities therein and reserves the
right to award sale to the highest respon-
sible bidder as they so determine.
WALL SCHOOL
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
APRIL 10, 2013
The Board of Education of the Wall
School District #51-5 met in regular ses-
sion on Wednesday, April 10, 2013, in the
Library of Wall School. Members present:
Chairperson Eisenbraun, Vice-Chairper-
son Johnson, Members Cordes, Ander-
son, Williams, Bielmaier, and Trask. Also
attending were Superintendent Rieck-
man, Business Manager Mohr, Elemen-
tary Principal Sykora, Dave Ermish, Dan
Hauk, Pandi Pittman, Kent Anderson,
Ridge Sandal, and Laurie Hindman.
Chairperson Eisenbraun called the meet-
ing to order at 7:03 p.m.
All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.
Business Manager Mohr took a roll call of
the board members. Member Cordes was
absent (arrived at 7:07 p.m.).
The Pledge of Allegiance was recited.
4781. Johnson moved to approve the
agenda. Seconded by Anderson.
4782. Anderson moved to approve the
consent agenda as follows: Seconded by
Williams. Motion carried.
•Approve minutes of March 13, 2013
board meeting.
•Approve minutes of March 25, 2013
special board meeting.
•Approve April claims.
•Approve 2013-2014 teacher con-
tracts: Mary Roeder, $30,100.00
•Approve 2013-2014 activity contracts:
Mary Roeder, $1,040.00
•Accept Pandi Pittman’s resignation of
JH Volleyball Assistant Coach, with re-
gret.
GENERAL FUND
A & B WELDING CO, VO AG SUPPLIES,
27.16; ANDERSON, KENT,
MLG/MEALS, 121.80; BARNETT,
SHARON, MAR MLG, 170.94; BLACK
HILLS CHEMICAL CO, SERVICES,
20.00; BLASIUS, BRETT OR PAULA,
MAR MLG, 35.52; CRAWFORD, TRA-
CIE, JAN-MAR MLG, 512.08; CROSS-
ROADS HOTEL & CONVENTION,
STATE GBB ROOMS, 3,080.61;
DAKOTA INK & TONER, SUPPLIES,
143.97; DAUKSAVAGE, REBECCA,
MAR MLG, 196.54; DUNKER, LYNN,
Y2Y MLG/MEALS, 86.71; ELSHERE,
STACY, MAR MLG, 72.52; ETCH USA,
WRESTLING PLAQUE, 54.00; FAUSKE,
TIM OR ERIN, MAR MLG, 284.16; FIRST
INTERSTATE BANK, TRAVEL/SUP-
PLIES , 1,988.64; FRINK, AMANDA,
MAR MLG, 130.24; GIBSON, JANELLE,
MAR MLG, 199.80; GOLDEN WEST
TECHNOLOGIES, TELEPHONE MAINT
AGREEMENT, 418.44; GOVERNORS
INN, ROOM FOR AD CONF, 150.00;
HAUFF MID-AMERICA
SPORTS/DAKOTA, SPORTS, TRACK
SUPPLIES, 66.50; JOHNSON CON-
TROLS, INC, SERVICES, 1,447.92;
KADOKA COMMUNITY TRACK MEET,
ENTRY FEE, 100.00; KADOKA SCHOOL
DISTRICT 35-1, ENTRY FEE, 100.00;
KELLY INN & SUITES, ROOM FOR
TECH MEETING, 75.00; KIER, ASHLEY,
MAR MLG, 113.96; LUEDEMAN, DANA,
MAR MLG, 179.08; MARCO, INC.,
COPIES, 393.75; McCONNELL, GWEN,
FEB-MAR MLG, 367.04; MENARDS,
SUPPLIES, 49.99; MOTEL 6, WILSON &
MCKEE, 172.50; PAULSEN, AIMEE,
MAR MLG, 83.92; PENNINGTON
COUNTY COURANT, PROCEEDINGS,
181.89; PEOPLE'S MARKET, ENTRY
FEE, 100.00; PHILLIPS66, CONOCO,
76, GAS, 528.88; PITTMAN, PANDI,
GRADUATE CREDIT, 150.00; RAUSCH,
ANNE JO, MAR MLG, 94.72; RICHTER,
DAWN, FEB-MAR MLG, 133.20;
S.D.H.S.A.A., PARTICIPATION FEES,
535.00; SAM'S CLUB, PEPPERMINTS,
29.92; SD BANDMASTERS, FEES,
165.00; SD DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,
SERVICES, 130.00; SDASBO, CONF
REG, 50.00; SHEARER, MEGHAN, MAR
MLG, 492.54; SHIFFLER EQUIPMENT
SALES, MAINT SUPPLY, 86.66;
SKILLINGSTAD, DORREEN, MAR MLG,
190.40; SKILLINGSTAD, KORTNEY,
MAR MLG, 129.50; SUMMIT SIGNS &
SUPPLY, NO PARKING ANYTIME
SIGNS, 101.50; SUNDALL, KELLI,
MLG/TESTING SNACKS, 102.11;
SUPER 8 MOTEL - DEADWOOD,
ROOM FOR VB CLINIC, 53.50; VERI-
ZON WIRELESS, CELL PHONE SERV-
ICES, 120.87; WALKER REFUSE,
GARBAGE SERVICES, 584.40; WALL
BUILDING CENTER, SUPPLIES,
292.54; WALL SCHOOL, REF/WORKER
CONCESSIONS, 258.00; WALL WATER
DEPARTMENT, WATER, 283.33;
WELLER, HARRY, ENTRY FEE, 100.00;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELEC-
TRICITY, 5,689.87; WEX BANK, GAS,
186.57; ZELFER, JESSICA, MAR MLG,
310.80.
FUND TOTAL: 21,923.99
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND
CHILDREN'S CARE HOSPITAL & SCH,
SERVICES, 9,379.92; CHILDREN'S
CARE HOSPITAL, SERVICES, 535.00;
COUNTRY INN SUITES, WORKSHOP
TRAVEL, 65.00; FUNSHINE PRE-
SCHOOL, SERVICES, 80.00;
PHILLIPS66, CONOCO, 76, GAS,
107.16; RIECKMAN, KATHY, MILEAGE,
40.70; WALMART COMMUNITY BRC,
SUPPLIES, 73.07, WEX BANK, GAS,
85.08.
FUND TOTAL: 10,365.93
FOOD SERVICE FUND
DEAN FOODS-NORTH CENTRAL,
MILK, 782.05; EARTHGRAINS BAKING
COMPANIES, INC., FOOD, 99.00; REIN-
HART FOODSERVICE, L.L.C., FOOD,
1,346.49; US FOODSERVICE, FOOD,
1,412.07; WALL FOOD CENTER,
FOOD/SUPPLIES, 63.29; WALL WATER
DEPARTMENT, WATER, 40.48; WEST
RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELECTRIC-
ITY, 658.01.
FUND TOTAL: 4,401.39
WALL AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
DISCOUNT SCHOOL SUPPLY, SUP-
PLIES, 216.53; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, SUPPLIES, 93.35; ORIENTAL
TRADING CO., SUPPLIES, 5.50; WALL
WATER DEPARTMENT, WATER, 14.29;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC COOP., ELEC-
TRICITY, 232.24.
FUND TOTAL: 561.91
CHECKING ACCOUNT TOTAL:
37,253.22
Ridge Sandal and Mr. Kent Anderson
were present on behalf of the Entrepre-
neurship class to discuss the vending ma-
chine project progress. They distributed
the business plan the class has written.
The board and administration tried the
machine. Ridge explained that the first
week had gone well and the class is ex-
cited about the information they will be
able analyze from the implementation of
the vending machine.
Next, Mr. Dave Ermish addressed the
Board about a possible international trip
to China during March 2014. Students
would have an opportunity to attend a
leadership summit as part of the trip. Mr.
Ermish and the students who sign up to
attend would miss five days of school for
this trip. The board discussed and de-
cided to table the topic until the May
board meeting.
Mohr asked the Board to approve the
leasing of the District’s hay ground to Jan
Bielmaier for another year. After discus-
sion the board approved the lease for
2013.
4783. Johnson moved to approve to
offer a lease agreement to Jan Bielmaier
for one year at the rate of $215 for the
land west of the school. Seconded by
Trask. Motion carried.
4784. Cordes moved to approve
SDHSAA Resolution #13-2. Seconded
by Bielmaier. Motion carried.
4785. Trask moved to approve the open
enrollment application for Kyler Kjerstad.
Seconded by Cordes. Motion carried.
The board has been a sponsor for the
Wall practice rodeo for several years.
The board discussed continuing the
sponsorship this year.
4786. Trask moved to approve the do-
nation of $200.00 to the Rodeo Club to
purchase buckles for the practice rodeo.
Seconded by Bielmaier. Motion carried.
Elementary Principal Sykora informed the
board that 21 students were screened
this year. Some of the parents aren’t sure
if their child will attend kindergarten next
year, so he anticipates about 16 kinder-
garten students next year. Kindergarten
transition activities will begin at the end of
this month. Sykora also wanted to get in-
formation out about Youth & Family Serv-
ices Rural Prenatal to Five Head Start
Program. The program is now accepting
applications for the 2013-2014 program
year. The program is federally funded
and provides home-based school readi-
ness services. If anyone is interested,
they may contact Mr. Sykora at the
school. Dakota Step testing is in
progress and Sykora thanked the par-
ents/guardians for getting the kids to
school ready for testing. The students in
grades 3-8 & 11 have been doing a lot of
testing this year with the pilot testing and
the Dakota Step tests. Common Cents
was kind enough to donate free Icees to
the school. As a reward for the added
testing time, the school gave the certifi-
cates to the students who have com-
pleted the pilot testing. A thank you goes
out to Common Cents. Next, Sykora
asked the board if they had any questions
regarding his recommendations for the
playgrounds at Big White and the Ele-
mentary.
Business Manager Mohr informed the
board there would be no school board
election this year. She also informed the
board that she would be attending the
Spring SDASBO conference and an Im-
pact Aid meeting at the end of the month
in Pierre. The 2013-14 budget will be pre-
pared over the next month and the pre-
liminary budget will be presented at the
May board meeting.
Superintendent/7-12 Principal Rieckman
announced that the Chamber of Com-
merce banquet will be held on April 12th
and Michelle Ruland will be honored for
Teacher of the Year. Rieckman discussed
May 22nd or May 23rd as possible dates
for a Teacher Appreciation Supper at the
Golf Course. After discussion, May 22nd
seemed better because of the dates of
State Track. Rieckman reminded the
board they had their $1,000 award to use
however they decide. After discussion,
the board determined to use it for the
Teacher Appreciation Supper.
Rieckman discussed the uncertainty of
funding of Impact Aid. Our District has re-
ceived 3 of our payments, but Rieckman
stressed how important it is to hold onto
that money in case there is no future
funding for the Impact Aid program. At
this point, President Obama has elimi-
nated the Section 8002 funding from his
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
Published April 25 & May 2, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $18.20.
NOTICE OF
RESPONSIBILITY
TO CONTROL NOXIOUS WEEDS
AND
DECLARED PESTS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN this 24th
day of April, 2013, pursuant to SDCL 38-
22 as amended, to all owners, occupants,
agents and public officials in charge of
lands in Pennington County, South
Dakota, that they are responsible for the
suppression, control, and eradication of
noxious weeds and declared pest infes-
tations that may exist on such lands.
Chemical, biological, and/or cultural
control methods used for the suppres-
sion, control and eradication of noxious
weed and declared pest infestations shall
be those approved for such purposes by
the Pennington County Weed and Pest
Supervisor, County Agricultural Extension
Agent or the South Dakota State Univer-
sity Experiment Station.
Upon failure to observe this notice, the
County Weed and Pest Board is required
to proceed pursuant to the law and have
the noxious weeds or declared pests de-
stroyed by such methods as they may
find necessary, the expense of which
shall constitute a lien and be entered as
a tax against the land, and be collected
as other real estate taxes are collected,
or by other means as provided by law.
Plants and animals designated as
being noxious weeds and declared pests
in the State of South Dakota are Leafy
Spurge, Salt Cedar, Perennial Sow This-
tle, Russian Knapweed, Hoary Cress,
Canada Thistle, Purple Loosestrife and
Gypsy Moth.
In addition, Puncturevine, Spotted
Knapweed, Houndstongue, Common
Tansy, Sulfer Cinquefoil, Oxeye Daisy
and Mountain Pine Beetle have been ap-
proved by the State Weed and Pest Con-
trol Commission as locally Noxious
Weeds and are subject to the same sup-
pression, control and eradication require-
ments as the before mentioned plants
and animals.
s/Scott Guffey
Pennington County Weed and Pest
END OF NOTICE
Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $19.06.
NOTICE OF INTENT
TO INSPECT NOXIOUS WEEDS
AND/OR DECLARED PESTS
TO: ALL LANDOWNERS/OPERATORS
IN PENNINGTON COUNTY
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that if the
Pennington County Weed and Pest
Board has probable cause to believe that
the land owned/operated by you has an
infestation of declared pests or noxious
weeds, SDCL 38-22-23.12 requires that
you be notified that an inspection will be
made to determine if the suspected area
is infested as indicated above. Therefore,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the in-
spection will be made by an authorized
representative of the Pennington County
Weed and Pest Board who shall enter the
premises without interference or obstruc-
tion for purposes of making an investiga-
tion of the suspected infected area. This
inspection will be conducted during rea-
sonable business hours.
Plants and animals designated as
being noxious weeds and declared pests
in the State of South Dakota are Leafy
Spurge, Salt Cedar, Perennial Sow This-
tle, Russian Knapweed, Hoary Cress,
Canada Thistle, Purple Loosestrife and
Gypsy Moth.
In addition, Puncturevine, Spotted
Knapweed, Houndstongue, Common
Tansy. Sulfer Cinquefoil, Oxeye Daisy
and Mountain Pine Beetle have been ap-
proved by the State Weed and Pest Con-
trol Commission as locally Noxious
Weeds and are subject to the same sup-
pression, control and eradication require-
ments as the before mentioned plants
and animals.
Should the inspection confirm an infes-
tation of noxious weeds or declared
pests, remedial action to effectively con-
trol the infestation will be required. You
will be notified of the results of this in-
spection, and any specific remedial action
that may be required to remedy the infes-
tation.
s/Scott Guffey
Pennington County Weed and Pest
END OF NOTICE
Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $18.74.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Diamond E Storage located at 309 La-
riet Drive Hwy 240, Wall, SD, 57790 shall
seize and sell the contents of storage unit
#S-8 belonging to Sirena Secco for the
purpose of satisfying storage and miscel-
laneous charges. The seizure and dispo-
sition of property will occur fifteen (15)
days from paper date.
Published April 25 & May 2, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $8.44.
NOTICE OF HEARING
BEFORE THE CITY OF WALL
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied for exclusion of
certain property out of the City of Wall lim-
its:
Crown Partnership, Gale Crown and
Donna Fauske have applied for exclusion
of certain property out of the City of Wall:
NE1/4 of Section 7, including
Lot 1-4 of Crown Country Es-
tates, Wall, and Pennington
County, South Dakota.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tion will be heard by the City of Wall in the
Wall Community Center meeting room at
6:30pm on the 9th day of May, 2013. At
this time, any person interested may ap-
pear and show cause, if there be any,
why such requests should or should not
be granted.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
Published April 25 & May 2, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $20.79.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Chad and Allison Carpenter have applied
for a Setback Variance to reduce the min-
imum required side yard setback from 25
feet to one (1) foot to allow for the con-
struction of a detached garage in a Lim-
ited Agriculture District located on Lot 7,
Aspen Estates Subdivision, Section 12,
T1N, R6E, BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota, 7648 Elkhart Road, in ac-
cordance with Sections 206 and 509 of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
7th day of May 2013. At this time, any
person interested may appear and show
cause, if there be any, why such requests
should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $15.57.
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 8 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington county courant
279-2565
GENERAL CAPITAL SPEC. ED. IMPACT AID LUNCH WASP TOTAL
OUTLAY FUNDS
BEGINNING BALANCE:
02-28-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$318,074.60 . . . . . .$347,317.68 . . . . . . .$44,783.38 . . . . . . . . .$1,950,271.85 . . . . . .$5,183.16 . . . . . . . . .$6,249.00 . . . . . .$2,671,879.67
Receipts:
Local Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,704.40 . . . . . . .$1,913.39 . . . . . . . . .$3,561.6 . . . . . . . . . . .$306.15 . . . . . . . . . . .$4,579.37 . . . . . . . . .2,759.85 . . . . . . . . .$25,824.77
County Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,158.79 . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,158.79
State Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85,546.00 . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$85,546.00
Federal Sources: . . . . . . . . . . .$76,605.90 . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,752.00 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,687.12 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$99,045.02
Other Sources: . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
General Journal Revenue: . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
Total to be
accounted for: . . . . . . . . . . .$494,089.69 . . . . . .$349,231.07 . . . . . . .$62,096.99 . . . . . . . . .$1,950,578.00 . . . . . .$18,449.65 . . . . . . . .$9,008.85 . . . . . .$2,883,454.25
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . . .$225,804.96 . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,979.36 . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,170.82 . . . . . . . .$4,023.31 . . . . . . .$277,978.45
General Journal
Disbursements: . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00
EOM BALANCE:
03-13-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$268,284.73 . . . . . .$349,231.07 . . . . . . .$26,117.63 . . . . . . . . .$1,950,578.00 . . . . . .$6,278.83 . . . . . . . . .$4,985.54 . . . . . .$2,605,475.80
zone 39.2 acres from General Agriculture
District to Low Density Residential District
and to amend the Pennington County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Public to Low Density
Residential District located on Govern-
ment Lot 1 in the NW1/4SE1/4, Section
22, T1S, R6E, BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota, one-half mile northeast of
the intersection of S. Highway 16 and Sil-
ver Mountain Road, in accordance with
Sections 207 and 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
David Merchen; Davis Engineering –
Agent, has applied for a Rezone to re-
zone 3.32 acres from Planned Unit Devel-
opment to Low Density Residential Dis-
trict, to allow for the property lines to be
reconfigured, located on Lot 4, Merchen
Addition #2, Section 21, T2N, R6E, BHM,
Pennington County, South Dakota, 22610
Merchen Road, in accordance with Sec-
tion 508 of the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
Celia and Allan Bradley; Jim Petersen –
Agent, have applied for a Rezone to re-
zone 20.66 acres from General Agricul-
ture District to Low Density Residential
District and to amend the Pennington
County Comprehensive Plan to change
the Future Land Use from Planned Unit
Development Sensitive to Low Density
Residential District located on located on
All (also in Section 19), Black Metal #9
MS, Section 20, T1S, R5E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota, located
two-tenths of a mile northwest of the in-
tersection of China Gulch Road and
Bradley Gulch Road, on Bradley Gulch
Road, in accordance with Sections 207
and 508 of the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
WALL CITY
COUNCIL SPECIAL
MEETING
MINUTES
APRIL 16, 2013
The Wall City Council met for a special
meeting April 16th at 4:00pm in the Com-
munity Center meeting room.
Members present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Jerry Mor-
gan, Councilman; Pete Dunker, Council-
man; Bill Leonard, Councilman; Mike An-
derson, Councilman
Others present: Carolynn Anderson, Fi-
nance Officer; Laurie Hindman, Penning-
ton Co. Courant; Garrett Bryan, Public
Works Director; Matt Stiener, Broken
Arrow Trading Co.; Wayne Davis; Bruce
Dunker; Mark Hindman
Absent: Stan Anderson, Councilman
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve the agenda. Motion carried.
The building permit that was approved for
June Hout during the February 5th meet-
ing was approved with a concrete block
skirting. The skirting was completed with
concrete panels and therefore the build-
ing permit would need to be approved
with an amendment. Motion by Hustead,
second by Morgan to approve amending
Hout’s building permit with the different
skirting. Motion carried.
A building permit from Wholesale Fire-
works to move a storage building onto the
property at 1101 Glenn Street was ad-
dressed. Motion by Hustead, second by
Leonard to approve the request pending
Public Works Director (PWD) Bryan re-
viewing it is in compliance with the re-
quired setbacks from the property line.
Motion carried.
Wayne Davis addressed the building per-
mit request for the United Methodist
Church located at 602 Norris Street, to re-
place the roof with different material and
requested waiving the fees for a non-
profit organization. Motion by Dunker,
second by M Anderson to approve the
building permit and waive the fees. Mo-
tion carried.
Matt Steiner, owner of the Broken Arrow
Trading Co. formerly the ‘Wall Trading
Post’ at 513 Main Street, requested ap-
proval for a new awning sign that would
replace the old one with the same dimen-
sions. Motion by Dunker, second by M
Anderson to approve the sign application
request. Motion carried.
Finance Officer (FO) Anderson explained
Wholesale Fireworks had a sign that
hung on the post above the entrance
gate. The sign blew down and the prop-
erty owner chose to relocate the sign next
to the fence. There was question on
whether the sign might be on the State
right-of-way. The State reviewed it and
stated it was not a concern but did have
a concern with the type of posts it was
placed on. The State requires all of their
signs to be placed on break away posts
for liability purposes if they are run into
during an accident. Motion by Dunker,
second by Morgan to approve the sign al-
though the relocated sign would be con-
sidered a new sign and would need to
pay the fee for the application and it
would be the property owner’s liability if
anyone was hurt by hitting the posts dur-
ing an accident. Motion carried.
Bruce Dunker addressed the council on
the Title Company deducting $404.75
from his payment. Dunker stated he un-
derstood the City planned to pay all fees
for purchasing his property. Motion by
Hustead, second by Leonard to refund
Dunker the $404.75. Motion carried with
Councilman Dunker abstaining from the
vote. Bruce stated the Title Company said
he would be responsible for paying all of
the 2013 taxes on the property the City
purchased from him. He felt the taxes
should be prorated. FO Anderson will
contact the Title Company to get clarifica-
tion on the taxes.
Jeff Clark submitted his resignation on the
5th of April, to be effective April 19th. Mo-
tion by Leonard, second by Hustead to
accept Clark’s resignation. Motion car-
ried.
It was discussed there will be a need to
advertise for a part time Public Works De-
partment employee. It was proposed to
advertise immediately for two weeks with
a deadline for turning applications in by
May 6th at 2:00pm. Interviews will be
scheduled and approval for hire at the
May 9th council meeting. Motion by Mor-
gan, second by Hustead to approve the
proposed schedule. Motion carried.
A proposed job description for the part
time position was reviewed. Motion by
Hustead, second by Dunker to approve
the proposed job description. Motion car-
ried.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve a base wage of $12.00 for the
part time position. Motion carried.
FO Anderson explained two options that
a wine license could be issued to the
Mocha Moose after addressing the coun-
cil at the April 4th meeting of their interest
to sell wine at the establishment. Either
option would require amending the ordi-
nance. An on-sale off-sale wine license
could be issued, which would allow them
to sell wine to be consumed on the prem-
ise. An off-sale alcohol license would
allow them to sell all types of alcohol. Mo-
tion by M Anderson, second by Hustead
do further research on the option for the
City to have the ability to restrict either of
these licenses to allow only the off sale of
wine. Motion carried.
The Wall Discount Outlet consistently vi-
olated the noise ordinance last summer
and ignored the fines that were assessed
for the violation. They have been open for
a few days this year and continue to vio-
late the noise ordinance. The attorney is
researching options force the business to
stop violating the ordinance.
FO Anderson commented that six towns
replied they require a veterinarian to ad-
minister the rabies injection. Councilman
Dunker expressed concern with requiring
a vet only to administer the vaccine. It can
be expensive. It was questioned whether
it would be a liability to the City if it isn’t a
requirement. FO Anderson will check with
the attorney on the liability question.
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
approve Paul Goldhammer, Todd Sieler
and Joel Stephens for the appraisal com-
mittee for the WREA tower that was de-
clared surplus. Motion carried.
There was discussion on the Clinic re-
searching the option with Rapid City Re-
gional to contract for services. Council-
man Hustead commented this may not be
an option we can control if we do not have
community support to sustain this viable
service. The Clinic building is owned by
the City; therefore, will need to stay up-
dated with this issue. Hustead expressed
concern of additional problems with the
proposed Obama care for 2014 may.
PWD Bryan updated the council on Wells
2 & 7. The pump went out on Well 7
shortly after the motor had been replaced.
Repair cost of approximately $15,000,
plus installation. The contractor will be fair
on the price for installation. Well 2 still is
not working and the contractor is sched-
uled for back surgery and therefore re-
covering until the middle of May - if things
go well. The contractor plans to bring a
pump and motor along when he works on
Well 2 so it can be repaired immediately.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
request a completion date for repair on
both Well 2 & 7. Motion carried.
The meeting was adjourned at 5:45pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $72.13.
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
FOR
MOWING OF HAY
Sealed bids, addressed to the City Fi-
nance Officer, P.O. Box 314, Wall, SD
57790, for the hay to be mowed at the
City Airport and Morning Side Property
will be received at the office of the Fi-
nance Officer until 2:00 p.m. MST on May
9, 2013.
Specifications for mowing and removing
the hay can be obtained from the City Fi-
nance Officer or call (605) 279-2663.
All bids must be accompanied by a
cashier’s check or certified check upon a
state or national bank in the amount of
the bid plus a deposit of $200 as a per-
formance guarantee to assure the entire
airport will be mowed, all hay removed
and no damage has been done to run-
ways, taxiways and/or parking areas. All
checks shall be made payable to the City
Of Wall.
The City Of Wall reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any or all bids and to waive
any informality therein.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
CITY OF WALL
Published April 18 & 25, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $25.34.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Doug Sletten has applied for a Rezone to
rezone two (2) acres from Limited Agricul-
ture District to Suburban Residential Dis-
trict located on Parcel A of S1/2SW1/4,
Section 14, T1N, R8E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, 5800 Green Valley
Drive, in accordance with Sections 210
and 508 of the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
Bolt Racing, Inc.; Grant or Greg Bolt –
Agents, have applied for a Rezone to re-
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 13th day of May 2013. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published April 18, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $30.82.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Pennington County Planning Commission
and the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners will hold a public hearing
to consider the following proposed ordi-
nance amendment to the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance adopted as an
adjunct to the Pennington County Com-
prehensive Plan:
OA 13-01 – Amendment to Ordinance 17
(Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance) to
update and adopt the new DFIRMs of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Said hearing will be held by the Planning
Commission on Monday, May 13, 2013,
at 9:00 a.m. and the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners on Tuesday,
May 21, 2013, at 10:30 a.m. in the Com-
missioners’ Meeting Room at the Pen-
nington County Courthouse, Rapid City,
South Dakota. Any interested party may
appear and be heard. Copies of the pro-
posed amendments may be viewed at the
Planning Department located at 315 St.
Joseph Street, Suite 118, Rapid City,
South Dakota, during regular business
hours.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $18.43.
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
2012 DRINKING WATER REPORT
CITY OF WALL MUNICIPAL WATER
WATER QUALITY
Last year, the City of Wall monitored your drinking water for possible contaminants. This brochure is a snapshot of the quality of the water that we provided last year. Included
are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards. We are committed
to providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies.
WATER SOURCE
We serve more than 766 customers an average of 188,000 gallons of water per day. Our water is groundwater that we produce from local wells. The state has performed
an assessment of our source water and they have determined that the relative susceptibility rating for the Wall public water supply system is low.
For more information about your water and information on opportunities to participate in public meetings, call (605)279-2663 and ask for Carolynn Anderson.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of
the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
•Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
•Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges,
oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
•Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
•Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
•Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA
regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not nec-
essarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection
Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at
risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk
of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants can be obtained by calling the Environment Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-
4791).
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials
and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The City of Wall public water supply system is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but
cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure
by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water
tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
DETECTED CONTAMINANTS
The attached table lists all the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the 2012 calendar year. The presence of these contaminants in the water does not nec-
essarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 – December 31, 2012. The state
requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year
to year. Some of the data, though representative of the water quality, is more than one year old.
2012 TABLE OF DETECTED CONTAMINANTS FOR WALL (EPA ID 0417)
TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS TABLE:
• Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a
margin of safety.
• Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best
available treatment technology.
• Action Level (AL): the concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. For Lead and
Copper, 90% of the samples must be below the AL.
• Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. For turbidity, 95% of samples must be less than 0.3 NTU.
UNITS:
•MFL: million fibers per liter •pCi/l: picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)
•ppt: parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter •mrem/year: millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)
•ppm: parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l) •ppq: parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter
•NTU: Nephelometric Turbidity Units •ppb: parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (ug/l)
•pspm: positive samples per month
Highest
Level Major
90% Test Sites > Date Allowed Ideal Source of
Substance Level Action Level Tested (AL) Goal Units Contaminant
Copper 0.1 0 08/02/12 AL=1.3 0 ppm Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of
natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives.
Lead 4 0 08/02/12 AL=15 0 ppb Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of
natural deposits.
Highest
Highest Level Ideal Major
Level Date Allowed Goal Source of
Substance Detected Range Tested (MCL) (MCLG) Units Contaminant
Barium 0.008 07/16/12 2 2 ppm Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal
refineries; erosion of natural deposits.
Chromium 0.3 07/16/12 100 100 ppb Discharge from steel and pulp mills; erosion and
natural deposits.
Fluoride 3.2 2.0-3.2 07/16/12 4 4 ppm Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which
promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and
aluminum factories
Nitrate
(as Nitrogen) 0.479 05/15/12 10 10 ppm Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks,
sewage; erosion of natural deposits.
Please direct questions regarding this information to Mr. Garrett Bryan with the Wall public water system at (605) 279-2563.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER
Elevated Fluoride Levels Detected
This is an alert about your drinking water and a cosmetic dental problem that might affect children under nine years of age. At low levels, fluoride can help prevent cavities,
but children drinking water containing more than 2 milligrams per liter (mg/l) of fluoride may develop cosmetic discoloration of their permanent teeth (dental fluorosis). The
drinking water provided by your community water system (City of Wall) has a fluoride concentration of 2.4 mg/l.
Dental fluorosis in its moderate or severe forms, may result in a brown staining and or pitting of the permanent teeth. This problem occurs only in developing teeth, before
they erupt from the gums. Children under nine should be provided with alternative sources of drinking water or water that has been treated to remove the fluoride to avoid
the possibility of staining and pitting of their permanent teeth. You may also want to contact your dentist about proper use by young children of fluoride-containing products.
Older children and adults may safely drink the water.
Drinking water containing more than 4 mg/l of fluoride (the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standard) can increase your risk of developing bone
disease. Your drinking water does not contain more than 4 mg/l of fluoride, but we’re required to notify you when we discover that the fluoride levels in your drinking water
exceeds 2 mg/l because of this cosmetic dental problem.
For more information, please call Garrett Bryan of City of Wall Water Department at 279-2563. Some home water treatment units are also available to remove fluoride
from drinking water. To learn more about available home water treatment units, you may call NSF International at 1-877-8-NSF-HELP.
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apart-
ments, nursing homes, schools and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by the City of Wall. State Water System ID# 0417.
Published April 25, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $342.00.
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GaTEWaY
aPaRTMEnTs
301 1st aVE. sW
kaDoka, sD
annc@
gwtc.net
we don’t charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565 or e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED
HEIFEF & PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. BRED CATTLE & PAIRS: 12
P.M. (MT}
PAIRS & BRED CATTLE:
PAUL SLOVEK - 50 DLK & FED ANC FIFST CALF HFF
PAIFS (DLK CLVS} (35 DLK & 15 FED}; 40 DLK DFOKEN
MOUTH PAIFS (DLK CLVS}
SHANE GRUBL - 50 DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH
PAIFS (DIC CLVS}
JEFF NELSON - 40 DLK HOME FAISED FIFST HFF
PAIFS (SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS}
DARTT ANGUS - 22 PUFEDFED DLK ANC FIFST CALF
HFF PAIFS (DIC FED CLVS}
CREW CATTLE CO - 15 DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN
MOUTH COWS; DFED.CHAF; CLV.NOW
BUSTER PETERSON - 12 DWF FIFST CALF HFF PAIFS
(FED & MAF CLVS}
FEEDER CATTLE:
RADWAY - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI 650-700=
MORTENSON RANCH - 75 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED
HFFS; FS,NI ........................................................700-750=
STOUT - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (SIFED DY
FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS}...................700=
MCDANIEL - 40 DLK STFS; FS,NI
GOOD - 25 DLK, DWF & A FEW FWF CLVS; FS..........600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE,
DFED CATTLE & PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECU-
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party
ver|f|ed NhT6 catt|e
(Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAF-
LINC & FALL CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE &
ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MAY 21: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: APR1L 2S, 2DJS
We Þod o b1g run o] ]eeder & ue1gÞ-up oo1-
11e o1ong u11Þ some po1rs ]or our speo1o1 so1e
Þere Tuesdog, Apr11 2S. Feeders s1rong u11Þ
o b1g oroud o] bugers. Ano1Þer b1g run o]
ue1gÞ-ups on o good morKe1. For1une´s Ro]1er
U Cross Bu11 So1e dreu o n1oe oroud. Good
run o] po1rs ne×1 ueeK, o1ong u11Þ some
]eeder oo111e ond bongs vooo1no1ed Þe1]ers.
FEEDER CATTLE:
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
82.................................DLK STFS 577=............$164.00
78.................................DLK STFS 678=............$152.75
STANLEY & MATT PORCH - WANBLEE
140 ..............DLK & DWF DV HFFS 754=............$144.00
JEFF NELSON - PHILIP
61 ................................DLK HFFS 788=............$139.50
LYLE & BRETT WILCOX - RED OWL
76...........................DLK DV HFFS 703=............$142.00
18...........................DLK DV HFFS 652=............$138.00
CORY FORTUNE - QUINN
69 ................................DLK HFFS 769=............$138.00
THAD STOUT - PHILIP
58 ................................DLK HFFS 692=............$143.50
BILLIE PARSONS - MILESVILLE
163...........DWF & A FEW FWF STFS 909=............$131.25
73 ................................DWF STFS 808=............$132.50
141..............................DWF HFFS 864=............$121.50
71................................DWF HFFS 744=............$127.75
25 .....................FWF & DWF HFFS 838=............$122.00
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
123...............................DLK STFS 984=............$122.25
44.................................DLK STFS 993=............$120.75
9 ........................DLK & DWF STFS 890=............$120.25
GRANT PARSONS - MILESVILLE
70...........................DLK DV HFFS 854=............$121.00
RADLEY KENNEDY - PHILIP
20 ................................DLK HFFS 640=............$140.00
COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
83......................DLK & DWF HFFS 688=............$136.00
DARREL WILCOX - UNION CENTER
46......................DLK & DWF HFFS 587=............$142.50
LARSON LTD FAMILY PART - SPEARFISH
41......................DLK & DWF HFFS 837=............$125.50
BROCK SMITH - PHILIP
17 ................................DLK HFFS 813=............$126.00
6 ..................................DLK HFFS 786=............$127.50
CARLEY RANCH - MILESVILLE
11.................................DLK STFS 661=............$147.75
19 ................................DLK HFFS 587=............$145.50
JEFF JASPER - STURGIS
7...................................DLK STFS 600=............$146.00
8........................FED & DLK HFFS 566=............$142.50
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
7 ..................................DLK HFFS 860=............$116.50
MIKE AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
5 ..................................DLK HFFS 947=............$111.00
BERNARD HERBER - KADOKA
62......................DLK & DWF HFFS 640=............$138.50
13......................DLK & DWF HFFS 572=............$139.00
17 ..............................HEFF HFFS 556=............$141.00
JOHN BRENNAN - MUD BUTTE
8........................DLK & DWF HFFS 728=............$127.75
JASON & PAUL PAULSEN - WALL
28......................DLK & DWF HFFS 755=............$127.50
EMMIT DICKSCHAT - HERMOSA
11 ................................DLK HFFS 714=............$132.00
MIKE & BUD PERAULT - BELVIDERE
8 ........................DLK & DWF STFS 481=............$162.50
10 .....................FWF & DWF HFFS 469=............$149.50
JOYCE CHORD - WHITE OWL
3...................................DLK STFS 543=............$159.00
4........................DLK & DWF HFFS 521=............$145.00
JAY & CONNIE PRICE - NEW UNDERWOOD
3 ..................................DLK HFFS 525=............$141.50
PAIRS:
JOHN CAP FARMS - CORSICA
50 .........................DLK HFF PAIFS 981=.........$1,560.00
21 .........................DLK HFF PAIFS 940=.........$1,500.00
20 .........................DLK HFF PAIFS 879=.........$1,385.00
REUBEN VOLLMER JR. - MIDLAND
7.......DLK 3 TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1436=.......$1,510.00
9...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1468=.......$1,310.00
WEIGH-UPS:
TOM SCHOFIELD - PHILIP
1...................................FED COW 1425=............$84.50
H&K RANCH - WALL
1...................................DLK COW 1475=............$83.50
ROGER SCHOFIELD - FAITH
11...............................DLK HFFTS 808=............$109.50
ROSS & AIMEE BLOCK - MIDLAND
1...................................FED COW 1520=............$82.50
RICK KING - PHILIP
1...................................DLK DULL 2025=..........$103.50
3.................................DLK HFFTS 980=..............$97.00
3.................................DLK HFFTS 1048=............$93.00
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
1...................................DLK COW 1345=............$81.00
1...................................DLK COW 1530=............$80.00
2 ...........................DLK COWETTES 1030=............$90.50
TUCKER SMITH - QUINN
1 ..................................DWF COW 1390=............$83.00
1...................................FED COW 1260=............$82.00
1 ..................................FWF COW 1410=............$81.00
1 ..................................DWF COW 1535=............$80.50
STEVE DALY - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1295=............$83.50
TESSA STOUT - KADOKA
1 ..................................DWF COW 1515=............$83.00
MONTE WHITCHER - SCENIC
1...................................DLK COW 1150=............$87.00
2 ...........................DLK COWETTES 1015=............$92.00
2.................................DLK HFFTS 930=............$106.00
2ACH MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1...................................DLK COW 1210=............$85.50
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
1...................................DLK COW 1155=............$84.00
MIKE MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1...................................DLK COW 1235=............$83.00
DAN OLDENBERG - PHILIP
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 795=............$110.00
3.................................DLK HFFTS 745=............$105.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
1...................................DLK COW 1150=............$82.00
7 ...........................DLK COWETTES 1010=............$94.00
DENNIS & KAY SIELER - QUINN
1...................................DLK COW 1310=............$81.50
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
1 ..................................DWF COW 1160=............$81.50
DON KELLY - QUINN
1...................................DLK COW 1300=............$81.00
REUBEN VOLLMER JR. - MIDLAND
1.................................CHAF COW 1620=............$80.50
JUDY DALY - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1520=............$80.00
1...................................DLK COW 1405=............$80.00
MARK KIEFFER - RAPID CITY
2 .................................DLK COWS 1405=............$80.00
2 .................................DLK COWS 1438=............$78.00
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1...................................DLK COW 1300=............$80.00
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
4.................................FED COWS 1335=............$79.75
BLAINE KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
1 ..................................DWF COW 1465=............$79.50
1.................................HEFF COW 1300=............$77.00
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1490=............$79.00
ANDREW SCHOFIELD - BELVIDERE
1 ..................................DWF COW 1435=............$79.00
HOSTUTLER RANCH - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1220=............$78.50
STEVE & LORI SWANSON- NEW UNDERWOOD
3 .................................DLK COWS 1517=............$78.00
JERRY MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
2.................................DLK HFFTS 880=............$103.00
LANCE FREI - RED OWL
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 920=............$102.00
MATT HEEB - MIDLAND
2.................................DLK HFFTS 915=............$102.00
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 995=..............$90.50
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
7.....................CHAF & DLK HFFTS 834=............$100.50
NORDINE BRINK - MIDLAND
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 820=............$100.00
LARRY EISENBRAUN - WALL
2.................................DLK HFFTS 863=..............$99.00
JOSH GEIGLE - WALL
2.................................DLK HFFTS 935=..............$96.00
FOLAND RANCH - MIDLAND
5.................................DLK HFFTS 1005=............$92.50
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
21 .........................DLK COWETTES 962=............$100.00
JUSTIN WULF - OWANKA
3...........................DWF COWETTES 1103=............$94.00
VOLMER RANCH - OWANKA
1...................................DLK DULL 1420=............$92.00
1...................................DLK DULL 1885=............$90.50
1...................................DLK DULL 1605=............$88.00
FORTUNE RAFTER U CROSS - QUINN
75 HD AVC. ...................................$3923.00
Pennington County Courant • April 25, 2013 • Page 10
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Animal rabies cases rise
for second year
South Dakota animal rabies
cases were up in 2012, climbing for
the second straight year, according
ot the yearly surveillance report re-
cently released by the Department
of Health. There were 60 animal
rabies cases in 2012, up from 40
the year before.
While animals rabies is reported
every year, the disease tends to be
cyclical, with years of high case
numbers followed by years with
lower numbers, noted Dr. Lon
Kightlinger, State Eqidemiologist
for the Department of Health. “Ra-
bies is a risk every year in South
Dakota and that risk is statewide,”
said Kightlinger. “Rabies vaccina-
tion is readily available, inexpen-
sive and important to protect your
pets and the people around them.”
In 2012, there were rabies detec-
tions in 29 South Dakota counties.
Those rabies positives included 21
domestic animals — 16 cattle,
three horses, two cats — as well as
36 skunks and three bats. South
Dakota’s last human rabies case
was reported in 1970.
The 16 rabid cattle in 2012 was
the highest number of cases in 15
years for South Dakota and higher
than any state in the country.
Beef and dairy cattle are usually
exposed to rabies through bites
from skunks and people can in turn
be exposed by contact with the cat-
tle’s saliva. Dr. Russ Daly, State
Public Health Veterinarian, noted
that signs of rabies in cattle can be
very vague and may start as subtle
behavior changes and progress to
salivation, abnormal bellowing,
persistent heat cycles, and incoor-
dination. Contact a veterinarian
right away if you suspect rabies in
an animal and avoid contact with
the saliva of that animal.
“Rabies vaccine is available for
cattle but routine vaccination of
cattle herds isn’t practical,” said
Dr. Daly. “However, show animals
and others that have a lot of
human contact should be vacci-
nated for rabies starting in the
spring. The vaccine for cattle is
good for one year and has a 21 day
withdrawal period.”
In addition to vaccinating pets
and other animals with frequent
human contact, reduce the risk of
rabies with these precautions:
•Do not handle, adopt, or at-
tempt to feed wild animals. Teach
children to avoid animals they
don’t know and to tell you immedi-
ately if they are bitten or scratched
by any animal.
•Avoid any animal, wild or do-
mestic, that behaves strangely and
immediately report it to your local
veterinarian, animal control, con-
servation, or law enforcement of-
fice.
•Do not handle dead, sick or in-
jured animals. If you must, use
heavy gloves, sticks, or other tools
to avoid direct contact. Farmers
and ranchers should wear gloves
and protective eyewear when treat-
ing sick animals to prevent expo-
sure to saliva.
•Close outdoor trash containers
tightly to avoid attracting skunks
and raccoons.
•Clear wood or junk piles from
homes to deter wild animals from
moving in.
•Do not handle bats. If bats are
found in a room with small chil-
dren or sleeping people, call the De-
partment of Health, your physi-
cian, or local animal control officer.
If you suspect rabies in a wild
animal, pet or livestock — or if
your animal has been bitten by a
possible rabid animal — contact
your veterinarian immediately. If
you have a potential exposure to
rabies, wash the affected area with
soap and water right away and call
your doctor or the Department of
Health at 1-800-592-1861. Your
veterinarian will instruct you as to
handling of animals involved. If the
animal is dead, save the carcass for
laboratory testing, being careful
not to damage the head. If the ani-
mal is alive, contact your local ani-
mal control authorities so it can be
captured for examination or obser-
vation. If you are bitten or
scratched by a rabid anima., rabies
vaccination can prevent human
disease.
Rabies information re-
sources:
•Department of Health —
doh.sd.gov/DiseaseFacts/Rabies.as
px.
•Animal Industry Board, 605-
773-3321 — aib.sd.gov/diseasecon-
trol.shtm#other
•SDSU Cooperative Extension
— pubstorage.sdstate.edu/AgBio_
Publications/articles/exex11026.pdf
Senate Majority Leader Russell
Olson has appointed Senator Bruce
Rampelberg to the Board of Eco-
nomic Development as an ex-offi-
cio, non-voting member.
The board oversees the state’s
Revolving Economic Development
and Initiative (REDI) Fund which
makes grants and loans for eco-
nomic development.
During the 2013 Legislative Ses-
sion, the comprehensive Building
South Dakota fund was created for
the purpose of building and rein-
vesting in South Dakota’s economy.
The broad-based package of eco-
nomic and community develop-
ment tools are intended to benefit
the entire state.
A key component of attaining bi-
partisan support for the bill was
legislative oversight. The bill cre-
ated four non-voting legislative po-
sitions on the Board of Economic
Development.
The majority and minority lead-
ers of both the Senate and House of
Representatives were each tasked
with appointing one member to the
board.
“With 44 years of experience in
the banking industry, Bruce is
more than qualified for this posi-
tion,” said Olson. “He has worked
on many development activities
throughout his career and will
make a strong addition to the
board.”
Rampelberg is currently serving
in his second term as a state sena-
tor from District 30. He has served
on the appropriations committee
and currently serves on the educa-
tion and health and human serv-
ices committees. He is chair of the
retirement laws committee and
vice-chair of the agriculture and
natural resources committee.
“I look forward to finding cre-
ative ways to compliment tried and
true methods for attracting capital
and making targeted investments
in South Dakota,” said Rampel-
berg. “Building South Dakota is a
breath of fresh air for this state
and I am excited to be an integral
part of it.”
Effective April 1, 2013, state
agencies, including the Governor’s
Office of Economic Development,
Department of Education, and
South Dakota Housing Develop-
ment Authority were charged with
implementation of various parts of
the Building South Dakota pack-
age.
Sen. Rampelberg appointed to
Board of Economic Development
According to the National Insti-
tutes of Health, skin is the largest
organ of your body. Skin can be a
very delicate thing, and as the out-
ermost layer, it needs to be cared
for in order to look and feel its best.
Unfortunately, for those who suffer
from highly prevalent skin condi-
tions, such as eczema, caring for
and maintaining skin can be a
daily challenge.
What is eczema?
Eczema is a chronic, inflamma-
tory skin condition characterized
by dry, itchy skin and visible skin
rash. Over 35 million Americans,
both children and adults, suffer
from eczema. The prevalence of
eczema has increased nearly 400
percent over the past 30 years and
is projected to continue to increase
due to environmental and other
factors such as stress, according to
the National Eczema Association.
In a healthy state, the external
layer of your skin acts as a protec-
tive barrier. For eczema sufferers,
the skin has a deficiency in the ex-
ternal layer that allows the mois-
ture to escape and causes chronic
dryness. When skin is dry and un-
protected, irritants can reach the
sensitive layers below and cause
uncomfortable itch flare-ups.
Common triggers
There are a number of things
that can trigger an eczema flare-
up:
•Irritants such as synthetic
fibers, detergents, perfumes, rough
or poor fitting clothing, dust or
sand.
•Environmental factors such as
hot or cold temperatures, humidity,
or dry air.
•Emotional factors such as anxi-
ety or stress.
Tips for managing eczema
The National Eczema Associa-
tion says that daily skin care is es-
sential to help manage eczema.
•When bathing, wash in warm
water for 5 to 10 minutes.
•Use a non-irritating and fra-
grance-free wash. Do not scrub
skin harshly.
•Moisturize within three min-
utes after every shower. It helps
lock in your skin’s natural moisture
to help prevent eczema-related dry-
ness.
•n addition to your daily skin-
care routine, try applying a cold
compress to soothe your skin.
When choosing skincare prod-
ucts, look for gentle, fragrance-free
washes and moisturizers, such as
Neosporin Essentials products, a
line of skincare products which in-
cludes a daily body wash, daily
moisturizing cream and anti-itch
cream specifically designed for peo-
ple with eczema. Each product has
a unique Relipid formula, which
contains a lipid, humectant, emol-
lient and botanical blend to help re-
tain the moisture essential for
healthy-looking skin. Plus, the
daily moisturizing cream contains
colloidal oatmeal and was clinically
shown to restore visibly healthier
skin in three days. Use all products
as directed.
Eczema can be stressful and
make daily living challenging and
uncomfortable. With diligent skin
care and good habits, you can help
maintain healthy skin and effec-
tively manage symptoms when
they do flare up.
Caring for problem skin

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
Courant_4-25-13.pdf4.43 MB