Login

Pennington Co. Courant, April 18, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

$1.00
(tax included)
Number 16
Volume 108
April 18, 2013
by Laurie Hindman
The Wall School Board met on
Thursday, April 11 in the Wall
School Library.
Board members approved the
agenda and the consent agenda
for:
•Minutes of the March 13, 2013
board meeting.
•Minutes of the March 25, 2013
special board meeting.
•April claims.
•2013 - 2014 teacher contract
for Mary Roeder.
•2013 - 2014 activity contract
for Mary Roeder.
The Entrepreneurship class was
represented by teacher Kent An-
derson and Ridge Sandal. Sandal
informed the board that the candy
machine has been in school for a
few days and business has been
pretty good. Sandal said, “As soon
as the Dakota Step test is done
they will begin their business
analysis and thanked the board for
allowing the class to put the ma-
chine in the school.”
Dave Ermish approached the
board with information on a Global
Student Leadership Summit/Con-
ference for students in March of
2014. The conference looks at the
economic aspect of the business
world and would be a great learn-
ing experience for students who go
on to join the business world after
high school. The issue was tabled
until the May meeting so the board
would have time to think about it.
Lease of land to Jan Bielmaier
was approved for 2013 with the
board doing research and possibly
putting the lease out to bid for
2014.
SDHSAA Resolution 13-2 was
approved along with an open en-
rollment application.
The board approved a rodeo
sponsorship of $200 for the prac-
tice rodeo.
Elementary Principal Chuck
Sykora reported there were 22
children who showed up for the
kindergarten screening and 16 will
probably start this fall. Kinder-
garten transition will begin the
end of April.
Students have been taking the
Dakota Step test and results will
be in by August.
Business Manager Niki Mohr
noted there will not be an election
this year as Carolynn Anderson
and Kevin Bielmaier were the only
ones to turn petitions in. Mohr also
informed the board that she will
have the preliminary budget for
review at the May meeting.
Superintendent Dennis Rieck-
man related Michelle Ruland will
be honored at the Wall Badlands
Area Chamber of Commerce an-
nual meeting and awards banquet
as the Teacher of the Year.
The board approved to host the
Teacher Appreciation supper on
Wednesday, May 22 at the Wall
Golf Course and to donate $1,000
they were awarded for earning the
School Board Excellence award to-
wards the teachers supper.
Rieckman informed the board
they have received three Impact
Aid payments. He said, there is a
good chance the money could be
taken back but South Dakota Sen-
ators are working on the issue.
The board approved to surplus
heaters at the Powerhouse.
Capital Outlay projects were
discussed. The main project will be
to update security for the school.
Plans are to install exterior lami-
nated glass in the doors at the
school and to possibly install an
Wall School Board approves
contracts for 2013 - 2014
Mark your calendars for the
next Badlands/Bad River Region
SET session scheduled for Monday,
April 22 at 5 p.m.- 8:30 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center
downtown Philip.
Here are some of the people you
will hear from:
•Mary Cerney, long-time re-
search analyst for the Governor’s
Office of Economic Development,
will be presenting data about the
companies that show interest in
S.D., and how that information is
disseminated. She will talk about
their Workforce Development
grants that provide skills to poten-
Stronger Economies Together 
session rescheduled to April 22
tial employees. She’ll also talk
about target industries and sup-
porting industries that might fit
S.D., and retention/expansion ef-
forts.
•Bernie Moran leads the South
Dakota Labor Market Information
Center in Aberdeen. She will focus
more on the employment aspects –
current jobs, potential jobs, char-
acteristics of our regional labor
force as well as projections and op-
portunities.
What a unique opportunity to
really tune in to the pulse of em-
ployment and industries in South
Dakota!
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce host annual meeting and awards banquet
Dave Custis was presented with the “Greater Wall Philanthropic”
award by Mayor Dave Hahn during the Wall Badlands Area
Chamber of Commerce annual meeting and awards banquet.
Custis has lived in the Greater Wall Area (meaning withing the
City of Wall and the surrounding area) twenty or more years and
has provided his services to the well-being of mankind. He has
promoted happiness, understanding, love plus the social and
humane elevation of everyone in the community without the
degradation of others. Hahn said, this is not necessarily an an-
nual award but is given only to the most deserving individuals.
He added, the Greater Wall Area is truly a better place to live be-
cause of Custis’s contributions.
~Photos Laurie Hindman
District Ranger of the Forest Service Alan Anderson (right) pre-
sented Myron Williams (left) with the “2012 External Agent of
Change” award for his work as President for both the Eastern
Pennington County Grazing Association and the Association of
National Grasslands. This award recognizes William’s efforts to
enhance communication, cooperation and coordination between
the grazing organizations and the Forest Service.
The City of Wall was presented a “Business Improvment” award
at the Wall Badlands Area Chamber or Commerce annual meet-
ing and awards banquet held on Friday, April 12 at the Wall Com-
munity Center. Pictured from left to right ... Wall Finance Officer
Carolynn Anderson, Wall Chamber President Mary Williams,
Mike Anderson, Mayor Dave Hahn, Rick Hustead and Bill
Leonard.
Petals and Pots owner Juanita Schroeder was presented a
“Business Improvement” award by Chamber President Mary
Williams.
“Teacher of the Year” Michelle Ruland accepts her award from
Chamber Director Lindsay Hildebrand.
Taylor Mohnen joined the Crew
Agency Ltd crop insurance agency
located at Cactus Flat S.D., on
April 1st.
Taylor is currently studying to
become a crop insurance agent.
He joins a team of six other agents,
Rusty Olney, Maurice Handcock,
Tanner Handcock, Heidi Porch,
and Grady and Bernice Crew.
Taylor grew up near Parkston on
a farm. He graduated from Park-
ston High School, and attended
Mitchell Technical Institute, grad-
uating in 2003 with a Telecommu-
nications degree.
Mohnen joins Crew Agency
Ltd crop insurance agency
Mohnen previously worked at
Golden West Telecommunications
in Wall and the Parkston grain el-
evator as agronomist.
Taylor serves on the Wall Cele-
bration Committee and assists
with Wall AAU Wrestling.
“When Crew Agency approached
me about coming to work for them
I jumped at the opportunity,” said
Mohnen. “I enjoy getting out visit-
ing with farmers and also am ex-
cited to get back into the ag com-
munity.”
Grady Crew, along with his wife,
Bernice, established Crew Agency
in 1984 and have expanded the
crop insurance business to include
partners, Rusty Olney, Maurice
Handcock and Tanner Handock as
well as Business Manager Heidi
Porch.
“We are very proud to bring Tay-
lor into our team,” said Grady
Crew. “We feel his ag and business
background will make him a good
fit working with farmers and
ranchers in western South Dakota.
We know Taylor with his caring,
common sense personality will
provide great service and knowl-
edge of the ever-changing crop in-
surance rules and regulations.”
Paul Goldhammer was awarded the “Lifetime Achievement
Award for 2013” which is presented by the Wall Badlands Area
Chamber of Commerce. Goldhammer worked for the City of Wall
for 35 years and also serves on the State Board of Water and
Natural Resources. He is a 50 year member of the Wall Lutheran
Church from being Sunday school teacher to currently serving
as its President. Goldhammer was a founding member of the
Wall Jaycees, a 35 year member of the Wall Volunteer Fire De-
partment and instrumental in starting the local EMT service in
the Wall Area. (More pictures on page 3)
(continued on page 2)
by Nancy Haigh,
Pioneer Review
The Belle Fourche Livestock Ex-
change changed hands recently as
longtime owners Dean and Eileen
Strong passed the reins over to
Thor Roseth, Philip, and Jeff Long,
Enning.
The deal was announced prior to
the exchange’s weekly sale, Thurs-
day, April 11. Roseth and Long
were in charge of the following
week’s sale.
Roseth has owned and operated
Philip Livestock Auction for the
past seven years. Long is a well-
known western South Dakota auc-
tioneer.
Roseth said that the two sale
barns complement each other well.
The Philip auction’s weekly sale is
on Tuesdays with special auctions,
in season, on Saturdays. The Belle
Fourche market has special sales
on Fridays and some Mondays,
along with their weekly Thursday
sales.
Their trade areas have some
crossover, but mostly they serve
separate areas. The Belle Fourche
Livestock Exchange picks up a lot
of eastern Wyoming, southeastern
Roseth and Long purchase
livestock exchange
Montana and northwestern South
Dakota consignors. The Philip
market hits most of south central
and some of the western parts of
South Dakota.
Roseth and Long both stated
they are excited about the new
venture and with working with the
personnel in Belle Fourche.
Rhonda Dreiske is the office man-
ager, Ray Pepin is yard foreman
and a fieldman and Brett Loughlin
is a manager and fieldman. Auc-
tioneers are Lynn Weishaar and
Doug Jaggers. Other fieldmen in-
clude Joe Vodicka, K.P Stevens,
Craigh Deveraux and Mike Gree-
nough.
Roseth said he and Long plan to
be at the exchange for the sales.
They will also be very busy getting
to know producers as well as work-
ing to bring in new consignors.
Long noted that the Strongs had
put together a tremendous live-
stock market with a lot of loyal
consignors.
The Strongs purchased the sale
barn in 1977. They noted that it
was time to retire and let a new
generation take over.
Passing the reins to a younger generation are Dean and Eileen
Strong, left, former owners of the Belle Fourche Livestock Ex-
change. New owners Jeff Long, right, and Thor Roseth, second
from right, are looking forward to working with producers that
utilize the sale barn as well as employees of the exchange.
~Photo courtesy of Butte County Post
School & Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
   Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
   Kelly Penticoff 
Office Manager/Graphics:
   Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
    Subscription Rates: In  Pennington
County and  those  having  Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year;  PLUS  applicable  sales  tax.  Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
    Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
    Established  in  1906.  The  Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications,  Inc. The  Pennington  County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • April 18, 2013 • Page 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding
Monday at 4:30 p.m. We do have the right to reject any or all letters to the
Editor.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper
should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office.
All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number
of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run
the two weeks prior to an election.
The "Letters¨ column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to
express their opinions. Ìt is not meant to replace advertising as a means
of reaching people.
This publication's goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of
free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review Pennington Co. Courant
P.O. Box 788 P.O. Box 435
Philip, SD 57567-0788 Wall, SD 57790-0435
605-859-2516 605-279-2565
The Kadoka Press The Faith Ìndependent
P.O. Box 309 P.O. Box 38
Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 Faith, SD 57626-0038
605-837-2259 605-967-2161
The Bison Courier The Murdo Coyote
P.O. Box 429 P.O. Box 465
Bison, SD 57620-0429 Murdo, SD 57559-0465
605-244-7199 605-669-2271
New Underwood Post
P.O. Box 426 · New Underwood, SD 57761-0426
605-754-6466
Bavellette Publ¡cat¡oas, Iac.
Letters Pol¡cy
1cuu:uqrcu Ccuur¸ Sícr:jj's 1cjarr¤cur
PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
N£II THOMAS I£B£A\
A IoIony Wnrrnnf hns boon Is-
suod for ÞoII Thomns !obonu
chnrgIng hIm wIfh InIIuro fo Aµ-
µonr for IossossIon ConfroIIod
Subsfnnco, Ð!I nnd IossossIon of
MnrIjunnn.
!obonu Is nn IndInn mnIo, 32
yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy 6`
fnII, l80 µounds, bInck hnIr wIfh
brown oyos.
!obonu Is boIIovod fo bo In or
nround fho !nµId CIfy or IIno
!Idgo, S.Ð. nrons.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco
Ðoµnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l or
fho nonrosf Inw onforcomonf
ngoncy If you hnvo nny Informn-
fIon whIch wouId rosuIf In fho nr-
rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
My senior project
March 2013, Pennington Co.
Sheriff’s Department report
During the month of March
2013, the Pennington County Sher-
iff's Office recorded the following
statistics in and around the com-
munity of Wall:
Time
City hours: . . . . . . . . . . . . .459.00
City hrs other deputies . . . . .0.00
Total City hours . . . . . .459.00
Training hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.00
Vacation/Sick hrs . . . . . . . . .16.00
County hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.00
# of times called out/Hrs . . . .2.00
Arrest
Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Non-Warrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Calls For Service
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Alcohol Violations . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Animal Complaints . . . . . . . . . . .0
Assaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Assist Other Agencies . . . . . . . . .4
Attempt to Locate . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Civil Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Community Activity . . . . . . . . . .5
Coroner Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Business Check . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
DPP/Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Extra Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Fire Medical Assist . . . . . . . . . . .3
Follow-up Investigation . . . . . .11
Found or Lost Property . . . . . . .0
Calls for Service
Keep the Peace . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Minor Consuming . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Murder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Runaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
School Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
SOLV Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Suspicious Activity . . . . . . . . . . .0
Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Weapons Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Welfare Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
911 Hang up Calls . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Civil Patrol
Attempted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
City Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Traffic Activity
Citations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Injury Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Non-Injury Accident . . . . . . . . .12
DUI's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Motorist Assist . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
School Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Skate/Bike Citation . . . . . . . . . .0
Skate/Bike Warning . . . . . . . . . .0
Speed Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0
Vehicle/Parking Comp . . . . . . .17
Please feel free to visit with
Deputies Louis Lange, Darren
Ginn, Robert Schoebrel, Sgt. Dan
Wardle, Lt. Kraig Wood or Capt.
Jay Evenson with any questions or
concerns related to law enforce-
ment in and around the Wall com-
munity.
The SDSU Cottonwood Field
Station has recently undergone
major renovations and is staged to
become a prominent community
and agricultural resource for the
tri-county area.
The South Dakota State Univer-
sity Extension Service and Agricul-
ture Experiment Station Office
will hold three meetings to gather
community input concerning pub-
lic awareness of, and ideas to in-
crease the utilization of the Cot-
tonwood Field Station.
Each forum will be held from
5:30 to 8:30 p.m. with a meal pro-
vided at:
•Jiggers Restaurant, Kadoka,
April 30th
•Wall Community Center, Wall,
May 1st
•The Steakhouse, Philip, May
2nd
Share your input and be heard!
Community involvement is key
to the success of these forums. At-
tendees will be asked to partici-
pate in small group discussions
and provide input and perspec-
tives about the station through
questions presented by the moder-
ator. Our goals for these forums
are:
•Build a relationship between
the community and the station
•Increase visibility and rele-
vance of station functions
•Improve integration of the sta-
tion into the community
•Better utilize station resources
for community events
Please plan to attend one of the
forums and let your ideas be
heard. We value your input!
Please RSVP on or before April 23
to Paulette Morse (605-394-1722
or paulette.morse@sdstate.edu).
Youth and Family Services
Rural Prenatal to Five Head Start
is now accepting enrollment appli-
cations for the 2013-2014 program
year.
YFS Rural Early Head Start is
a federally-funded, no-cost, parent-
focused preschool program, provid-
ing home-based school readiness
services.
YFS Rural Early Head Start is a
year-round program for expectant
parents and children ages birth to
three.
YFS Rural Head Start operates
September through May and is for
children ages three and four (on or
before September 1).
Weekly home visits provide an
individualized curriculum with
emphasis on school readiness,
parental input on curriculum, ac-
tivities that support Individual-
ized Family Service Plan (IFSP) or
Individualized Education Plan
(IEP) goals, and a prenatal cur-
riculum for expectant parents.
Twice monthly socialization op-
YFS Rural Prenatal to Five Head
Start accepting applications
portunities offer interaction for
children and parents with their
peers.
Comprehensive services include
developmental and health screen-
ings for enrolled children; family
health and mental health services;
parenting and health education;
school advocacy; and support for
expectant parents with the YFS
Rural Head Start Registered
Nurse.
Priority for enrollment is given
to families who meet household in-
come guidelines, who are home-
less, or have children with disabil-
ities.
For more information, or to re-
quest an application, contact
Home Visitors: Deb Myers, Early
Head Start, or Crystal Deal, Head
Start, at (605) 837-2026; or call
YFS Rural Head Start Family
Services at (605) 342-4195 or 1-
800-568-0202.
Applications are available online
at www.youthandfamilyservices.o
rg.
The National Newspaper Associ-
ation welcomed a decision by the
U.S. Postal Service Board of Gov-
ernors to continue Saturday mail
delivery while it awaits postal re-
form legislation from Congress.
NNA president Merle
Baranczyk, publisher of the Moun-
tain Mail in Salida, Colo,, also
warned NNA will oppose increases
in postage rates at a time when
closing mail processing facilities
are degrading newspaper delivery
service nationwide.
"The mission of the Postal Serv-
ice is in its name: it is service.
Without reliable service, no price
is fair. NNA is working with the
Postal Service to do all we can to
help newspapers avoid the impacts
of the system changes, but we need
universal service for our communi-
ties and our newspapers. We also
believe the ultimate responsibility
rests with Congress and we will
continue our vigorous advocacy on
behalf of community newspapers
to pass important postal reform
legislation."
USPS to continue Saturday delivery
“Deadly Sins.” Bobbie Jo Steffen joined WHS senior class in No-
vember of 2012. Because of the late start on her project she de-
cided to write poems on “The 7 Deadly Sins.” Steffen is also a
published poet and plans to attend BHSU to major in Journal-
ism.
A statewide tornado drill will be
conducted for South Dakota by the
National Weather Service between
9:00 and 9:30 a.m. MDT (10:00 and
10:30 a.m. CDT) on Wednesday,
April 24. Because the exercise is
used to ensure communications
and warning systems are function-
ing properly before storm season,
people will see and hear the actual
alerts used for tornadoes.
Outdoor warning sirens will be
sounded in many towns. The
sirens may not be heard inside
homes and office buildings, as they
are intended to alert people who
are outdoors away from radio or
TV.
The drill will also include activa-
tion of the Emergency Alert Sys-
tem, which will interrupt local
media broadcasts. The public
should be aware that the scroll on
broadcast television and cable TV
channels will look like a real warn-
ing, while the NOAA Weather
Tornado warning systems
to be tested April 24
Radio and broadcast audio will be
identified as a test.
Local emergency response agen-
cies may practice their response
procedures and many schools will
conduct safety drills for their stu-
dents.
Individuals do not need to take
any action during the drill, but
they are encouraged to make plans
to protect themselves and their
families before storms develop.
Don’t wait until the storm is
headed toward you as there won’t
be time. Information about storm
safety is available from county
emergency management offices or
visit the following web sites: The
Rapid City National Weather
Service at www.weather.gov/rapid-
city, Black Hills Chapter of the
American Red Cross at
www.blackhillsredcross.org, and
the South Dakota Department of
Health at www.bReadySD.com
Prepare for a trip back to the
days of the TV comedy hour such
as The Carol Burnett Show and
The Red Skelton Show.
The Wall School Drama Club
will present The Mighty Wall Play-
ers Comedy Hour...and then some,
on Friday and Saturday, April 26
and 27 at the Powerhouse. Curtain
time is 7:05 p.m.
On tap is nearly two hours of hi-
larious comedy sketches—many
from the writers of The Carol Bur-
nett Show—and one original west-
ern comedy sketch entitled The
Legend of Big Ugly Doug.
The Wall Players will bring back
great Carol Burnett memories like
As the Stomach Turns and the an-
noying and crafty Fireside Girl
Alice Portnoy.
The show will start off with a
bang as the entire cast performs
the memorable Make 'Em Laugh
song from the classic movie, Sin-
Mighty Wall Players to present
Comedy Hour...and then some
gin' In the Rain.
Also the senior girls in the cast
will perform a comedic rendition of
the 1927 song Side By Side.
The cast for the show includes
Ryder Wilson, Analise Garland,
David Sykora, Cody Harris, Libbi
Sykora, Nicole Eisenbraun, Austin
Huether, Sterling Ellens, Ridge
Sandal, Michaela Schaefer, Winter
Godfrey, Paisley Godfrey, Elle
Moon, Sierra Wilson, Preston
Eisenbraun, Katy Bielmaier,
Travis Brenner, Autumn Deering,
Catriona Brunnemann, and Emily
Ferris.
Andrew Ferris will be the light
and sound tech.
The production is directed by
Ron Burtz and Kathy Swan.
The Carol Burnett sketches are
produced by special arrangement
with Contemporary Drama Serv-
ice, Colorado Springs, Colo.
other set of doors at the end of the
carpeted area by the office and li-
brary. The library door will remain
locked at all times. Rieckman
noted, this will filter people into
the office instead of down the hall-
ways. Installing new bleachers at
the Powerhouse along with other
upgrades and purchases was dis-
cussed. The board approved the
projected Capital Outlay costs.
The board approved to enter into
executive session for the purpose
Wall School Board approves
contracts for 2013 - 2014
continued from page 1
of discussing personnel, negoat-
ions and the superintendent eval-
uation according to SDCL 1-25-2.
After executive session the fol-
lowing were approve by the board:
•Negotiations for 2013 - 2014.
•Offer certified contracts for the
2013 - 2014 year.
•Offer Administrative and non-
certified contracts with a 2.5 pere-
cent increase.
With no other business the
meeting as adjourned.
Northern State University
alumni will play a role in the up-
coming Spring Choral Concert.
This year, alumni are invited to
sing along with the Concert Choir
and Chamber Singers at the con-
cert, which will begin at 3 p.m.
Sunday, April 21, at First Presby-
terian Church.
Dr. Timothy Woods said alums
wishing to sing along with the “Ave
Maria” are asked to come 15 min-
utes early so they can run through
the song as a group. Then, they
may sit in the audience and come
NSU Spring Choral
Concert set for April 21
up to stand with the choir during
the song.
The concert will also feature a
song composed by NSU alum An-
drew Grandpre, who graduated in
2012. The song is called “Life.”
All of Northern’s piano faculty
members – Drs. Marcela Faflak,
Allan Jacobson and William
Wieland – will assist with the con-
cert, which will feature sections
called “Songs on Death and Life”
and “Songs on Faith.”
Singing from the Wall area is:
Alto - Megan Schaefer.
courant@gwtc.net
South Dakota Secretary of Agri-
culture Walt Bones has announced
plans to retire from his position, ef-
fective April 29. Bones, a Parker
native, has headed the Ag Depart-
ment since January 2011.
“It has truly been an honor to
serve as Secretary of Agriculture,”
Bones said. “I’ve served with a
group of dedicated public servants
– from the Governor, who really
understands the role of agricul-
ture, to his staff and Cabinet mem-
bers, our Legislature, and espe-
cially Department of Agriculture
employees, everyone has worked
hard to promote and protect the
best interests of our industry.”
“I would like to thank all our
farmers, ranchers and industry
leaders who work every day to en-
Walt Bones to retire as Sec. Of  Ag.
sure the sustainability and viabil-
ity of South Dakota Agriculture,”
Bones said. “My number one take-
away from my time in public serv-
ice is the amazing things we can
accomplish when we all work to-
gether.”
Governor Daugaard praised Sec-
retary Bones for his service.
“Walt Bones is a great leader in
the ag community, and I have ap-
preciated his hard work for South
Dakota’s No. 1 industry,” the Gov-
ernor said. “I thank him for his
service to South Dakota and wish
him well.”
Bones is a partner in a family
farming operation near Parker,
and upon his retirement he will re-
turn to his farm.
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Finals
Monday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar................................42-18
Shad’s Towing .....................35.5-24.5
Handrahan Const ...............33.5-26.5
Badland’s Auto..........................24-36
Rockers......................................23-37
Petersen’s ..................................22-38
Hightlights:
Venessa Buxcel ....9-10 split; 179/466
Andrew Reckling..........................237
Kim Petersen ...............................183
Bryan Buxcel ...............202 clean/571
Gail Reutter ..........................181/490
Jason Petersen......................224/557
Tena Slovek..................................477
Wendell Buxcel......................200/554
Maralynn Burns...........................177
Vickie Petersen ............................172
Carl Brown...................................201
Clyde Schlim................................175
Karen Byrd........................3-6-7 split
Neal Petersen.....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service........44.5-15.5
Cristi’s Crew .......................36.5-23.5
Roy’s Repair ..............................33-27
Lee & the Ladies.......................32-28
King Pins...................................30-30
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Clay King ..............................214/560
Theresa Miller..............................198
Tanner Norman...3-10 split; 218/562
Cristi Ferguson.....................185/522
Duane Hand..........................201/528
Roy Miller........................5-6-10 split
Annette Hand.....................3-10 split
Area News
Pennington County Courant • April 18, 2013• Page 3
ALL types!
Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
April 19-20-21-22:
GI Joe: Retaliation
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
April 26-27-28-29:
The Host (PG-13)
Ravellette
Publications,
Inc. Call us for
your
printing needs!
859-2516
Subscription
Rates:
Local: $35 plus tax;
Out-of-Area: $42
plus tax; Out of-
State: $42 or 
subscribe online at:
www.Ravellette
Publications.com
Communities matter at your li-
brary: celebrate National Library
Week April 14-20.
This week, the Wall Community
Library joins libraries in schools,
campuses and communities na-
tionwide in celebrating National
Library Week, a time to highlight
the value of libraries, librarians
and library workers.
Libraries today are more than
repositories for books and other re-
sources. Often the hearts of their
communities, libraries are deeply
committed to the places where
their patrons live, work and study.
Libraries are trusted places
where everyone in the community
can gather to reconnect and reen-
gage with each other to enrich and
shape the community and address
local issues.
Librarians work with elected of-
ficials, small business owners, stu-
dents and the public at large to
discover what their communities
needs are and meet them.
Whether through offering e-
books and technology classes, ma-
terials for English-language learn-
ers, programs for job seekers or
those to support early literacy, li-
brarians listen to the community
they serve, and they respond.
The Wall Community Library
serves Wall, Wasta, Creighton,
Quinn, Scenic, Interior, Owanka,
and the rural areas of western
Pennington County by providing
books, downloadable e-books and
audiobooks, public computers,
weekly Story Time, and monthly
Book Discussion Groups. As al-
ways, the Wall librarians are avail-
able to help in any way they can.
“Service to the community has
always been the focus of the li-
brary,” said Wendy Brunnemann,
Library Director of the Wall Com-
munity Library. “While this aspect
has never changed, libraries have
grown and evolved in how they
News from Wall Community Library
provide for the needs of every
member of their community.”
The Wall Community Library
is celebrating National Library
Week with a special library
themed Story Time on Friday,
April 19.
The library is also celebrating
National Poetry month and wel-
comes everyone to enter their Po-
etry Contest. Eligible original
works may be dropped off at the
Library or submitted electronically
to wallcomlib@gwtc.net. Deadline
for this contest is Wednesday, May
1, 2013 at 7:00 pm. Winners will
receive a prize!
First sponsored in 1958, Na-
tional Library Week is a national
observance sponsored by the
American Library Association
(ALA) and libraries across the
country each April.
For more information, visit the
Wall Community Library at 407
Main Street, Wall, call 279-2929
or see the Library’s Web site at
www.squidoo.com/wall-commu-
nity-library.
Libraries hours are Wednes-
days from 12 - 7 p.m.; Thursdays
from 9 am – 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 -
5 p.m.; and Fridays from 8 am – 1
p.m.
The Red Rock Restaurant and Lounge was presented a Busi-
ness Improvement award during the Wall Badlands Area Cham-
ber of Commerce annual meeting and awards banquet. Pictured
back row: from left to right ... Lori Walker, Alicia Heathershaw
and Chamber President Mary Williams. Pictured front row: from
left to right ... Brittney and Braylee Walker.
Shear Styles was presented with a Business Improvement
award. Accepting the award on behalf of Tisha Rose is Jace
Shearer with Chamber President Mary Williams.
Wall Chamber President Mary Williams presents Taylor Mohnen,
Toby Wagner and Brett Blasius with the “Shining Start Volunteer
in Youth Organized Sports” for the Wall AAU Wrestling program.
Wall Badlands Area Chamber of Commerce host annual meeting and awards banquet contined from page 1
Wall Chamber President Mary Williams presents the “Shining
Star Volunteers in Youth Organized Sports” award to Ryan
Dinger and Susie and Justin Westby for the Wall Youth Baseball
program.
Wall Chamber President Mary Williams (left) presents the Wall
Youth Football with the “Shining Star Volunteers in Youth Or-
ganized Sports” award. Accepting the awards were back row:
from left to right ... Nadia Eisenbraun, Justin Westby and Corey
Elshere. Front row: Randy Griebel, Susie Westby, Jessica and
Toby Wagner.
Katchup and Giddy the clowns, also known as Joel Stephens
and Howard Mehringer were the entertainment for the evening.
This Mother’s Day, skip the bou-
quet and get mom something she
will really use.
Whether she’s a serious chef
wanting to expand her culinary
repertoire, or an everyday cook
hoping to save time on food prep,
use the gift-giving opportunity to
beef-up Mom’s kitchen.
For example, a high-quality
zester or grater will help make fol-
lowing trickier recipes a snap.
This Mother’s Day get her
something that last
Or a knife sharpener, which no
kitchen should be without, will ex-
tend the life of her knives, and
make for a safer more efficient
kitchen. Look for an all-purpose
sharpener designed to restore
knives to their original angles.
After other mothers’ flowers
have wilted and chocolates con-
sumed, your gift will keep on giv-
ing.
Dartt Angus Ranch
Private Treaty Sale
Yearling Black Angus Bulls
Herd Sires: •Matrix •Rainmaker •Upward •Dartt Mainline
•LeMar Final Answer (Many Suitable for Heifers)
Dan 279-2242 • Daryl 441-7408 • Wall, SD
Wasta Wanderings
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Wasta Wanderings from Hidden
Valley, Arizona, April 2013.
Monday, April 8…
We South Dakota may think we
own the lion’s share of bragging
rights for wind and there is cer-
tainly no suggestion being made
here that Arizonans even want to
compete for said bragging rights,
but let us just say that this has
been ONE WINDY DAY!
Early and pre-wind this morn-
ing, chores begin with: make my
tea, scatter some bird feed and put
fresh water in their bowl, pour my
tea and Lloyd and I come outside
to watch and enjoy whatever bird
comes along.
Within minutes of getting prop-
erly situated and watching our lit-
tle feathered friends graciously
partaking of our offering, a little
breeze begins creating some move-
ment in the bushes, a little
stronger breeze and considerable
more movement in the bushes and
the tree branches begin to sway.
No problem, we are South
Dakotans right? About the time
we’re deciding this could be some
serious windage coming our way,
we glimpsed an oriole (Hooded, we
think) trying to land, then trying
to hold on to a tree branch as it’s
doing some serious bucking, actu-
ally, both branch and bird are in-
volved, sort of like bird rodeo!
Lloyd and I, each remembering
early Disney Land days, declared
it an “E ticket” ride. The “E” ticket
being the passport to Disney’s
greatest adventures and rides.
And saving Green Stamp Trading
Stamps to be redeemed for Disney-
land ticket books!
Oh yes, I remember all the im-
port stuff. Like taking ownership
of an “E” ticket ride or experience
when it comes your way.
But I digress, so back to birds.
Those we see often are Cactus
wren, larger and far less sassy
than the house wren and is Ari-
zona State Bird. The Hooded ori-
ole, who enjoys high flight and the
hummingbird feeder. He’s beauti-
ful, more gold than orange with
black wings, tail, around the eyes
and chest. His missus, like most fe-
males in bird life is a softer green-
ish, drab with the dark tail, wings
and upper chest. Woodpeckers, the
Gilded flicker which nests in the
saguaro by digging a hole in a safe
and accessible place in the cactus,
and the Gila woodpecker resem-
bling the Gilded without the rosy
cheeks or black bib. Purple to rosy
finches, Gambel quails, we love
their “Keystone Cops” routine
when checking out their eating
spot and when coming or going
from/to their “Quail Condos”
across the road. The books lists
four hummingbird species common
to this area but they don’t “stand
still” to allow a close examination!
No matter, they are just as much
fun to watch whether you know
their name or not! Probably some
towhees and phoebes and WHO
KNOWS what all? We need to find
a neighbor who knows their birds
and likes to talk.
Our Monday WIND did eventu-
ally give a nice rain as it shifted
from south to west. How much in
inches? Don’t know there are no
puddles this morning. The dust
was settled nicely and the air
smells clean this morning, so we
are grateful.
We were sorry to hear about
Cliff Keyser and our thoughts are
with Gail and family.
We also heard that Bob Hayes
had a serious heart attack and has
been hospitalized. Bob is one from
our high school days that we have
reconnected with. Our thoughts
are with Bob and Della and family
and hopes are for a good recovery.
In fact, even though we are hav-
ing a good time here and I so enjoy
time with the great-grandson,
Skyler, I miss home. I even find
myself watching for stray cats that
need some care! (I have only seen
one — a dusty tannish guy with
ragged slope ears and a slouchy
walk who didn’t even make eye-
contact!)
Lloyd is busily working on an-
other album on dwarf cars and the
guy, Ernie Adams, the genius who
builds them.
Happy Trails.
Pennington County Courant • April 18, 2013 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Maunday Thursday, Glenn and
Betty Alishouse drove to Freeman,
S.D., where they spent the night in
the Barry and Lori Uecker home.
Leah and Carly arrived home from
SDSU that evening. The Al-
ishouses drove on to Madison
Lake, Minn., to the Kevin and
Carol Alishouse home on Friday,
where they met up with the Al-
ishouse grandsons and their wives
from Lincoln, Neb., Jacob and Sara
A. and James and Reyné plus their
three month old daughter Marian.
Glenn and Betty met their great-
granddaughter Marian for the first
time. On their return trip to Wall,
a night was spent on the farm near
Faulkton, S.D., in the Bruce and
Ginger Schilder home.
The big news this past week was
the wonderful snow (moisture) we
received. We asked and it was God
given! It caused some inconven-
iences with travel and with caring
for young livestock for the ranch-
ers but not a word of complaint
was voiced by anyone! Sounds like
we may get more. Hallelujah!
Not to put a damper on your
good thoughts but it is TAX time
— both income tax (4-15) and real
estate taxes (4-30). Don’t put it off
— remember dates on your calen-
dar “are closer than they appear”.
This coming Thursday evening
(April 18th) is the Senior Citizen’s
potluck supper at 6:00 p.m. See
you there. Also, next week on
Tuesday is the “Theme Meal” at
Prairie Village. Menu lists ham-
burger on a bun, lettuce and
tomato, baked bans, potatoes (de-
pends on weather - if it’s cold, hash
browns; warm, potato salad) pears
and cake.
Brooke Kelly from Alaska was
here last week visiting the Bart
Cheneys.
Elissa Eisenbraun had dinner
on Saturday at the home of her
maternal grandparents, Glenn
and Betty Alishouse.
We hear that Claire Norman,
who retired from GWTC some year
ago, has passed away in Aberdeen,
where her son lives. The funeral is
scheduled to be at the Emmanuel
Episcopal Church in Rapid City on
Saturday, the 20th at 10 a.m. with
inurnment in Nebraska. Our con-
dolences go out to her family and
friends.
Dorothy Shearer’s piano stu-
dents are having a “come and go”
Piano Party at the Methodist
Church on Sunday after, April 21st
at 2:00 p.m. They will be playing
some of the songs that are used in
the Area Music Contest in Philip
which is coming soon.
The Wall Badlands Area Cham-
ber of Commerce held their annual
meeting and award banquet on the
evening of April 12th. There were
180 people attending (a fantastic
turn-out since last year’s number
was 155). Some of the awards
given were to individuals — Paul
Goldhammer, the Lifetime
Achievement Award; Michelle Ru-
land, Teacher of the Year; Dave
Custis, given by the Greater Wall
Foundation - the Philanthropic
Award. Business Improvement
Awards were given to the City of
Wall, Petals and Pots; Frontier
Cabins; Red Rock Restaurant and
Lounge; and to Shear Styles. The
Wall Youth Football, Wall AAU
Wrestling and Wall Youth Baseball
were acknowledged as “Shining
star Volunteers”. Our congratula-
tions go out to each and every one
of them!
Lyle and Viola Williams were
among all attending the Chamber
of Commerce Annual Meeting and
Banquet.
The Good Neighbor Banquet is
changing location this year and
will be held at the Philip High
School Gymnasium this Saturday
evening, April 20th. Honorees are
Robert Young of Union Center;
Mike and Marcia West of Philip;
and Wayne Davis of Wall. We send
our congratulations and best of
wishes to all of them.
The Wall Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment will have their annual
fundraiser on Saturday, April 20th.
Join them (4 p.m. to 7 p.m.) to
enjoy their pancake supper at the
Fire House.
When asked if he had news,
Kirby Keyser stated on these cold
days all he has been doing is shov-
eling snow, hunting or playing
cards with friends.
We extend our sympathy to the
family of Donna Horst of Garden
City, S.D., who passed away on
April 13th. Besides other family
members, she leaves three sisters
living in Wall — Bonnie Saltzman,
Jody Johannesen and Patty Hauk.
Donna was the oldest in the fam-
ily.
Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle
went to Rapid City and met Mer-
lin’s niece Christy Doyle of Los An-
geles; a cousin Dorothy Martin of
Sturgis; Connie Watson of Sturgis;
Barb and Joe Croell of Sundance;
and Jim Doyle of Belle Fourche.
They enjoyed lunch and a lot of
visiting.
Tom Carmichael is back at work
after a few days in the hospital in
Omaha. He got good reports for
which we are all very grateful.
Heard this week that Alberta
(Hildebrandt) Pashby passed
away. She was a graduate from
Quinn High School in 1943. She
lived in Rapid City. Our sympathy
goes out to her family and friends.
Our weather forecast is for more
snow and rain. We better take it
while we can get it!
“Praise is simply letting off es-
teem.” ~Anonymous
Have a good week.
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
0wncr Ir|r Hznscn · 505-2Î8-2881 · Wz||, 8P
Cedur Butte Air, 1nc.
AeriaI AppIication Service
Your IocoI
consuIfonf:
Sfocy 8ieImoier
ceII: 44I-ZZ09, home: Z79 -Z99o
SfocybieImoier.norwex.bi;
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
2?9-2S6S
/-ccnd /g lnc.
lrc-lcn Jchn-cn
27ÿ-55C5 · ¡¡ègwlc.ncl
· wall, ¬l ·
BeoK1 Po1rzebo, Agen1
lJl5 E. Vcíís Auc., Píc¡¡c, SD 5?5Ul
Hus. 224-4l?J Toíí F¡cc. S??-224-4l?J
IccIí¸IccIí¡ot¡zcIu.con
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thursday, April 18th -
Saturday, April 27th
Thursday, April 18:
Spring  Pictures  @  gym,  2
p.m.
Friday, April 19: People’s
Market  Track  Meet  @
Kadoka, 10 a.m.; Golf Philip
Invite @ 9:30 a.m.
Saturday, April 20: Cham-
berlain Track Invite @ 9 a.m.
MST.
Sunday, April 21: Spring
Play Practice @ PH.
Monday, April 22: Spring
Play Practice @ PH.
Tuesday, April 23:
Recorder Karate 3:30-4 p.m.;
Spring Play Practice @ PH.
Wednesday, April 24: Bio
Students  to  Buffalo
Roundup;  8th  Graders  to
park  for  H2O  testing,  after
lunch;  Spring  Play  Practice
@ PH; Freshman Impact @
Box Elder.
Thursday, April 25: Cecil
Johnson  Track  Invite  @
Presho,  1  p.m.  MST;  Wall
JH/JV  Golf  Meet  @  4  p.m.;
Spring Play Practice @ PH.
Friday, April 26: No
School; Spring Play @ 7:05
p.m.; Elem/MS Small Group
Contest in Philip.
Saturday, April 27: MS
Kadoka Track Invite, 10 a.m.;
Spring  Play  @  7:05  p.m.;
Golf  WGP  Tourn.,  Philip;
Track BH Classic @ Sturgis,
9 a.m.
The Wall After
School Program
is looking for an
enthusiastic, energetic,
reliable individual to
work part-time.
Must be 18 with a
high school diploma.
Please contact
Mandi McDonnell or
Niki Mohr at 279-2156
for more information.
Deadline is April 19th.
LIFEGUARDS WANTED
The City of Wall is accepting lifeguard
applications for the upcoming 2013
summer season. you must be 15 years
old to be a lifeguard.
Applications are available at the Wall City Finance Office, lo-
cated at 501 Main Street, between the hours of 8:00 am
and 4:30 pm Monday through Friday.
If classes are needed to become certified,
please call 279-2663 to get registered.
Applications will close
at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, April 29th.
The City of Wall is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Published April 11 & 18, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $93.60.
Wall Volunteer
Fire Department
5th Annual
Pancake Supper
Saturday, April 20th
4:00 pm – 7:00 pm • Wall Fire Dept.
The meal will be a free will
donation to help raise
money for equipment.
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
Apr. 18th: Chicken Wrap
w/Broccoli Salad
Apr. 19th: Super Nachos
Apr. 22nd: Indian Taco
Apr. 23rd: Grilled Ham & Cheese
w/Snicker Salad
Apr. 24th: Chicken Enchilada
w/Tossed Salad
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Congratulations Lisa Anderson on receiving
the Dean’s Award for High Academic
Achievement at the University of Nebraska
Medical Center, College of
Dentistry. I’m proud of you!
Love Mom
FINANCIAL FOCUS
INveSToRS CAN LeARN
FRoM eARTH DAy'S
LeSSoNS
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
Next week, we observe Earth
Day. First celebrated in 1970,
Earth Day has grown into an in-
ternational movement whose goal
is to raise awareness of the need to
take action to sustain a healthy,
sustainable environment. You can
do your part through recycling and
other measures, but you can also
apply some of the lessons of Earth
Day to your financial situation —
and, in particular, to your ap-
proach to investing.
Give these ideas some thought:
•Make the most of your existing
resources. One of the most valu-
able lessons of Earth Day deals
with the need to be responsible
managers of the natural resources
we have available. As an investor,
it’s important to maximize the ben-
efits of the resources to which you
have access. For example, are you
contributing as much as you can
afford to your 401(k)? At the very
least, you should put in enough to
earn your employer’s match, if one
is offered.
•Take advantage of a favorable
environment. Underlying all Earth
Day activities is the goal of creat-
ing a healthy environment in
which to live. You may also benefit
from a positive investment envi-
ronment — and that’s what we ap-
pear to be experiencing, at least in
terms of low interest rates, low in-
flation and the financial market.
So in this favorable atmosphere,
look for those investment opportu-
nities that are appropriate for your
situation.
•Don’t over-consume. Excess
consumption has played a big role
in causing some of the environ-
mental issues we face. Conse-
quently, many Earth Day pro-
grams teach us to get by with less,
or at least to avoid acquiring more
than we need. To translate this
philosophy into your investment
habits, take a close look at the
number of trades you make. Are
you constantly selling old invest-
ments and buying new ones in the
hopes of capturing higher returns?
This type of trading can result in
significant fees and transaction
costs — and possibly higher taxes,
too. Perhaps just as importantly,
this constant activity, with all its
starts and stops, may detract from
your ability to follow a long-term,
consistent investment strategy.
•Avoid “toxic” investment
moves. The motivation to create
Earth Day developed, in part, by
the growing awareness that indus-
trial toxins were affecting our air
and water. And you can find many
toxic investment moves, too. To il-
lustrate: Many people chase after
“hot” stocks after hearing about
them from friends or relatives, or
seeing them touted by so-called ex-
perts in the media. But by the time
these people acquire the hot
stocks, the stocks may already
have cooled off. Furthermore,
these stocks may not have been
appropriate for these investors in
the first place. Another potentially
“toxic” investment move is to try to
time the market — that is, try to
buy investments when prices are
low and sell when they’re high. In
theory, this is a good way to invest;
in practice, it’s almost impossible
to predict market highs and lows
Instead, consider buying quality
investments and holding them for
the long term, or at least until your
needs change.
By following these Earth Day-
related suggestions, you can help
yourself make progress toward a
healthier — and possibly more
productive — investment environ-
ment. And that’s worth celebrating
more than once a year.
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • April 18, 2013 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning. 
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
Posted By Pastor Paul M. Sadler
“Thou therefore, my son, be strong in the
grace that is in Christ Jesus. And the things
that thou hast heard of me among many wit-
nesses, the same commit thou to faithful men,
who shall be able to teach others also.” — II
Tim. 2:1,2
If  we  were  to  ask  the  average  Christian  to  write
down  what  they  expect  in  a  spiritual  leader  the  list
would probably read something like this: A man of God
must  have  completed  college  and  seminary.  He
should  be  eloquent  and  be  able  to  articulate  his
thoughts  well,  enthusiastic,  insightful,  creative,  and
have a good sense of humor. In addition, he should
not  have  too  many  shortcomings,  and  be  well
dressed.
Interestingly, just the opposite was true of the spiri-
tual leaders found in the Scriptures. Most of the giants
of the faith in biblical times were unlearned and igno-
rant men by the world’s standard. The Bible is a who’s
who  of  shortcomings:  Noah’s  drunkenness,  Moses’
speech impediment, David’s adulterous ways, Peter’s
denials, Paul’s repulsive appearance, etc. Neverthe-
less,  God  used  these  souls  mightily  to  the  pulling
down of strongholds. As it has been said, “God took a
handful  of  nobodies  and  made  somebodies  in  His
sight.”
While we are an advocate of higher education, in-
tellectualism is not a prerequisite to be used of the
Lord.  God  has  accomplished  great  things  through
those who merely had a willing heart. Timothy, for ex-
ample, wasn’t educated at the Ivy League Schools of
Jerusalem, nonetheless, God chose him to carry the
torch of grace after Paul’s martyrdom.
THE PATH OF A GOOD SOLDIER
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
Years ago I had a grumpy boss
who never seemed to have a kind
word for anyone, nor did he offer
any appreciation for a good job or
hard work. One day, I decided to
make a sincere effort to let him
know how much I enjoyed my job
and appreciated the opportunity to
learn from him. One day not long
after I had made this decision to
heap piles of kindness on my boss,
he called me into his office and told
me he was going to be gone out of
the country for two and half weeks
and that I was going to be in charge
while he was away.
Well to make a long story short,
my strategy paid off. My boss came
back from his vacation, a new man-
kinder and more appreciative of
the work I was doing. Not only
that, but I was much wiser, having
discovered the principle of sowing
and reaping really works!
If you plant seeds of kindness
and appreciation into someone
elses life it will bring forth a
healthy crop of kindness and ap-
preciation. This principle of hon-
estly sharing with others some-
thing you see in their lives and ex-
posing it to them is very powerful.
People love to know what others
are thinking about them! I try to
practice this concept everywhere I
travel and love the reactions I get,
especially since people don't know
me.
First I observe a person's actions
and behaviors, watching for some-
thing good-a smilie, a courtesy, or
their being extra helpful. Then I let
the person know about the good
that I've noticed or heard about
them. Often they will blush or poo
poo their action. But I sincerely tell
them again how refreshing it is to
observe such a great attitude in
serving others. They respond with
a sincere thank you and we go our
separate ways.
Giving someone honest and sin-
cere appreciation is one of the wis-
est things that you can do to pro-
mote good human relations. Notice,
there's a side benefit to sowing
seeds of appreciation: You will reap
a harvest of appreciation from oth-
ers, and very often it comes when
you need it the most. What goes
around, comes around!
What Goes Around
Comes Around
Bob Prentice speaks to thou-
sands of people in highly mo-
tivational seminars each year.
Call Bob for more details at
800-437-9715 and be sure to
check out Bob’s website at:
www.mrattitudespeaks.com
NEED CASH?
•Excellent Pay
•Performance Bonus
•Store Discounts
•Great Recommendations
for School & Work!
•Make New Friends from all
Over the World!
•Unique, Diverse Work Environment
•Positions in Restaurant,
Retail Sales & Maintenance
Fill out an application online
at www.walldrug.com
Contact Mike Huether at
walldrug2@gwtc.net
or 605-279-2175.
You can also stop in and see us at
510 Main Street,
Wall, South Dakota!
Have a Blast This
Summer At Wall Drug!
ANIMAL LICENSING AND LEASH LAW
in the CITY OF WALL
As per City of Wall Ordinance 6.04:
All animals kept, harbored or maintained in the city shall
be licensed and registered if over six months of age.
Any person having an animal within the city limits shall
have it tied, leashed or otherwise controlled upon their
property. It is unlawful for any person to allow an animal
off the premises without the animal being held in leash
and will be declared a nuisance.
Thank you - City of Wall
Published April 18, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $.
Carol L. (Maas) Lepse___________________________
Carol Lee was born in Rapid
City, S.D., to Jerry and Linda
Maas on September 17, 1962. She
lived on six ranches while growing
up including the King Ranch south
of Belvidere, S.D., where her fa-
ther was employed by Johnny
Daum of Okaton.
Carol was shy and wasn’t very
talkative in her early years. Even
so, while attending a backyard
Child Evangelism Fellowship
Bible Club, sponsored by her
mother, Carol prayed out loud to
receive Jesus Christ as her Savior.
She boarded in Murdo, S.D.,dur-
ing her junior and senior high
school years. She was class vale-
dictorian, graduating from Jones
County High School in 1980. In
1983 she graduated from Moody
Bible Institute in Chicago and in
1989 from Northeastern Illionis
University with a degree in educa-
tion. While attending college, one
might find Carol in downtown
Chicago using her ranching skills
by driving a carriage pulled by a
strong draft horse.
She met Stephen Lepse at a sin-
gles small group at First Evangel-
ical Free Church in Chicago in
1984. They married on Memorial
Day on May 26, 1986. She taught
in Chicago Public Schools for two
years and then went on to become
a computer programmer at CNA
Insurance and most recently at
Children’s Home and Aid.
Carol had a great love for kids
and a passion to minister to chil-
dren both at her church and in the
community. Her passion led her to
serve kids in a variety of settings:
a teacher’s aid at Pierce Elemen-
tary, a volunteer mentor for chil-
dren at Lydia Home Association, a
foster parent, a member of Trum-
bull School Local School Council,
the children’s pastor at First Evan-
gelical Free Church, and an adop-
tive parent. Through the years
Carol opened up her home to nu-
merous neighborhood children
where she provided a safe and nur-
turing environment for them.
Ashley, Robert, and Gabby, a sib-
ling group, were adopted by
Stephen and Carol in 1998. Carol
poured her heart into these chil-
dren, as she did numerous other
children over the years.
In May of 2012 Carol was diag-
nosed with stage-4 Non-Hodgkin’s
Lymphoma. After a hard fought
10-month battle, she passed away
and entered the arms of her Heav-
enly Father on March 24, 2013.
She is remembered as a woman
with a passion for life, who loved
God, her husband, her children
and family, as well as many others.
In addition to her husband and
children, who are all adults, she
left behind her father, Jerry Maas
of Wasta, S.D.; mother, Linda
Maas and brother, Daniel Maas,
both of Colorado Springs; older sis-
ter, Donna Beckwith of Canon
City, Colo.; nieces and nephews,
cousins and aunts and uncles.
She was preceded in death by a
brother-in-law, Greg Beckwith;
and a niece, Shawna Beckwith-
Visser.
Her life was celebrated at the
First Evangelical Free Church in
Chicago on March 30, 2013.
Claire Norman, age 85, of Ab-
erdeen, S.D., formerly of Quinn
and Wall, died April 11, 2013, at
the Aberdeen Health and Rehab
Center.
Claire R. Zimmerly was born
July 15, 1927, in a ranch house on
the prairie near Wayside, Neb., the
daughter of Roland and Margaret
(Nixon) Zimmerly. She was raised
on a ranch near Oelrichs, graduat-
ing from Oelrichs High School. She
then attended Chadron State Uni-
versity.
Claire was the data processing
manager for Golden West Tele-
phone Cooperative for 26 years, re-
tiring in the late 1980s. Claire
made Quinn her retirement home,
and was involved in various com-
munity groups in the Quinn and
Wall area.
Claire was a member of the Em-
manuel Episcopal Church in Rapid
City.
In 2005, due to health reasons,
Claire moved to Aberdeen, where
she has since resided.
Survivors include her son, Ross
Norman and his wife, Tracy, of Ab-
erdeen; three grandchildren, Tim
Norman of Rapid City, Katie
Steever and her husband, Ryan, of
Rapid City, and Scott Norman and
his wife, Jessica, of Aberdeen; three
great-grandchildren, Leighton and
Taylor Steever and Tyleigh Nor-
man; one sister, Eileen Miller, and
her husband, Paul, of Montrose,
Colo.; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
Claire was preceded in death by
her parents, and a brother, Robert,
in infancy.
Visitation will be held one hour
prior to the service.
Funeral services will be held at
10:00 a.m. Saturday, April 20, at
the Emmanuel Episcopal Church
(717 Quincy St.) in Rapid City, with
Rev. Richard Ressler officiating.
Graveside services will be held
2:00 p.m. on Saturday, at the
Greenwood Cemetery in Chadron,
Neb., with Rev. William Graham of-
ficiating.
Cards and memorials may be
sent to Ross Norman, 715 22nd
Ave. NE Aberdeen, SD 57401.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Claire Norman__________________________________
Pennington County Courant • April 18, 2013 • Page 6 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.20 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.70 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
BusInEss & sERVICEs
o’ConnELL ConsTRuCTIon,
InC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed).
We can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & Con-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETon RIVER TREnCHInG:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIon
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD,
or call 837-2690. Craig cell:
390-8087, Sauntee cell: 390-
8604; wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FaRM & RanCH
WanTED: Pasture for 50 head
of yearlings and 50-250 head of
cow/calf pairs. Call 685-8825.
PR34-2tc
PuREBRED BLaCk anGus
BuLLs FoR saLE: Private
Treaty. Bloodlines include In
Focus, Bando, Black Coat,
Frontline, Fast Money. Some
suitable for heifers. Not overfed.
Call Mike Harris, morning, at
685-1053. P19-tfn
WanTED: Summer pasture for
40-500 cow-calf pairs. Phone
859-2889. P17-7tc
WanTED: Summer pasture for
50 to 150 head of cows. Call
Steve Pekron, 544-3202.
P12-tfn
suMMER PasTuRE WanTED:
Looking to rent pasture or com-
plete ranch, short term or long
term. Also looking for hay
ground. Cash, lease or shares.
Call 798-2116 or 798-2002.
P10-tfn
suMMER PasTuRE WanTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease
whole ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or
859-2059 (home). P7-tfn
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WanTED
suBWaY In WaLL is accepting
applications for full and part-
time positions, seasonal and
year-round. Opportunities for
advancement to management
positions for the right applicant.
Pick up application at Subway.
WP31-tfn
auToMoTIVE
53’ TRaILER FoR saLE: Ex-
cellent storage trailer or over-
the-road trailer, $3,950 FIRM.
Call 279-2619. PW19-2tc
FoR saLE: 2004 Ford F-250
Ext. Cab, short box, Super
Duty, 4x4, XLT, loaded, nearly
new 10-ply tires, towing pkg.,
98K miles, excellent shape,
under book. $11,900. 209-
8639. PR32-tfn
FoR saLE: 2004 Chevrolet
2500 HD, 4x4, LS, crew cab,
short box, Duramax diesel, Alli-
son, auto, red, gray cloth inte-
rior, running boards, box mat,
hideaway gooseneck ball,
58,900 miles, excellent, one
owner. 462-6138. P16-3tc
FoR saLE: 2000 GMC Yukon,
SLT, 4x4, fully loaded, 102,800
miles, very nice, seats 7. $7,500
OBO. 433-5342. P17-2tc
FoR saLE: 2004 Pontiac
Grand Prix GT, gray with gray
interior, 107,300 miles, looks
and runs great. $7,000 is the
asking price, but I will consider
reasonable offers. Call Keith at
454-3426 or 859-2039 for in-
formation or any questions.
PR22-tfn
FoR saLE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
DakoTa MILL & GRaIn, InC.
is looking for a full-time person
to add to our team at Wall. Job
responsibilities include truck
driving (Class A CDL a plus or
willing to obtain one), hay
grinding, warehouse loading/
unloading, fertilizer spreading,
grain operations, and various
other tasks to take care of our
customers. Wage DOE. Benefits
included. EOE. Call 279-2261
or 279-2255, Wall. PW18-2tc
HELP WanTED: Full time posi-
tion available. Lurz Plumbing,
685-3801 or 859-2204, Philip.
PR32-tfn
ManaGER nEEDED for busy
retail store in Wall, SD. Must
have sales experience as well as
supervisor experience. Salary
plus commission depending on
experience. Call Jackie, 348-
8108 or fax resumé, 348-1524;
email jw@bhgolddiggers.com
PR32-3tp
LookInG FoR HELP in the
HV/AC field. Must be self-moti-
vated with a good work ethic.
Also, energetic with the desire
to learn. If interested, call Brian
Hanson, 441-6543. PR31-tfn
PosITIon oPEn: Jackson
County is accepting applica-
tions for full time Director of
Equalization. Selected applicant
must become certified as per
SDCL. Must work well with the
public, and have clerical and
computer skills. Jackson
County benefits include health
insurance, life insurance, S.D.
Retirement, paid holidays, va-
cation and sick leave. Salary ne-
gotiable. Position open until
filled. Applications are available
at the Jackson County Audi-
tor’s office or send resume to
Jackson County, PO Box 280,
Kadoka, SD 57543. Ph: 605-
837-2422. K15-5tc
HELP WanTED: Service Advi-
sor position open at Philip
Motor. Please call Craig at 685-
3435 for details. PR28-tfn
GaRaGE saLEs
RECkLInG, sCHoFIELD &
FITZGERaLD MuLTI-FaMILY
RuMMaGE saLE: Friday, April
26, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Philip Fire
Hall. Girls’ clothes, infant to
size 7; boys’ clothes, 6 months
to size 8; women’s clothes, XL-
2XL; Graco car seat/stroller
combo; Graco duo glider double
stroller; kid sized foosball/
multi-game table; toys; girls’
dress-up clothes/customes.
Lots of great items in excellent
condition. P19-2tc
MIsC. FoR saLE
FoR saLE: Butcher pigs. Call
Tim Quinn, 544-3273.
PR33-2tc
FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
noTICEs/WanTED
WanTED To BuY: Old farm
machinery and cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. PR32-4tp
noTICE: Will the person who
removed the SD card from my
game camera please delete the
photos of you and return the
card to: Faye Bryan, Wasta.
WP34-1tp
WanTED: Cast iron cooks and
beer/wine tasters for the 1st
Annual Relay For Life Cook-off
on April 27th at the Wall Golf
Course. Contact Cindy, 685-
3767 or Kelly, 515-0244.
WP19-2tc
anYonE InTEREsTED in hav-
ing a rummage sale in Philip’s
Citywide Rummage Sale on
June 8th must please contact
Brittney or Selma (brittney@pi-
oneer-review.com or selma@pi-
oneer-review.com) by May 10th.
P18-tfn
REaL EsTaTE
2012 MoBILE HoME FoR
saLE: 16’x80’, 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, lots of upgrades, must
see to appreciated. Located in
Kimball. Call 685-3748 or 685-
3755. PW19-4tc
TWo sToRY HousE FoR
saLE In WaLL: Asking
$32,500. Will consider any rea-
sonable offer. Please call 279-
2858. WP32-4tc
HoME FoR saLE: 317 6th
Ave., Wall. 2100 sq. ft., 3 bed-
rooms, (1) full bath, (1) 3/4
bath, and (1) half bath, newer
metal roof, windows, siding and
30x30 garage. $105,000 or
offer. 307-660-6595.
PW17-3tc
HousE FoR saLE In PHILIP:
2 bedrooms, downtown, fenced
yard. Make an offer. Call 859-
3095 or 859-2483. P10-tfn
REnTaLs
FoR REnT In PHILIP: 2-3 bed-
room house. Tom Foley, 859-
2975 or 685-8856. P19-2tc
4-BEDRooM HousE FoR
REnT In WaLL: Call Stan, 381-
2861. WP5-tfn
aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka.
WP32-tfn
CLassIFIED PoLICY
PLEasE REaD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Rav-
ellette Publications, Inc. re-
quests all classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid at
the time the order is placed. all
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless oth-
erwise indicated.
auCTIons
HANSEN PLUMBING INC. & Kirk
Hansen Estate, Saturday, April
27, 10:30CST, Gettysburg. Direc-
tional Borer, Vehicles, Trailers,
Tools & Equipment. For pictures
and full listing www.penrodauc-
tion.com Richard D. Penrod Real
Estate & Auction. 1-800-456-
0741.
FARMLAND AUCTION - 285
Acres, Selby SD. selling in 2
tracts. Saturday April 20, 10 AM.
Walz Estate, Steve Simon (agent
for seller) 605-380-8506.
www.sdauctions.com.
EMPLoYMEnT
HOUSING & NIGHT MOTEL
Clerk in Sturgis, SD. Non-smok-
ing/drinking & non-pet, 1-bed-
room apartment fully furnished
with utilities during open season.
$650/month for closed season.
Email www.star-lite@star-litemo-
tel.com for application.
STATES ATTORNEY FOR Hughes
County, full time. Opportunity
for organized, innovative, dedi-
cated, and self motivated attor-
ney to guide county States Attor-
ney efforts. This is an appoint-
ment to an elected position with
supervisory responsibility. Salary
from $68,400/yr DOQ. Contact
your local Dept of Labor or Karla
Pickard, 605-773-7477, Hughes
County Courthouse. Open until
filled. EOE.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL
has an exciting full time opportu-
nity to work with a supportive
team of professional therapists in
the beautiful southern Black
Hills of SD. We are located just a
short distance from Mount Rush-
more, Wind Cave National Park,
Custer State Park, Jewel Cave
National Park and many other
outdoor attractions. Competitive
salary and benefits available in-
cluding sign on bonus. Please
contact Jim Simons, Rehab Serv-
ices Director, at 605-673-2229
ext. 301or jsimons@regional-
health.com for more information
or go to www.regionalhealth.com
to apply. EOE.
WANTED: ELECTRICIAN with
South Dakota contractor license
or ability to get contractor li-
cense. Responsible for startup
and managing wiring department
in north central South Dakota.
Benefit package, wages nego-
tiable. Call 605-426-6891 for
more details.
LAKE PRESTON SCHOOL Dis-
trict, PE-Health-Technology in-
structor, with or without coach-
ing, opened 4-9-13, closes 4-26-
13, Contact: Tim Casper, Supt,
Lake Preston School District, 300
1st St. NE. tim.casper@k12.sd.
us, 605-847-4455.
LAKE PRESTON SCHOOL Dis-
trict, Ag Ed instructor, with or
without coaching, opened 4-9-
13, closes 4-26-13, Contact: Tim
Casper, Supt, Lake Preston
School District, 300 1st St. NE.
tim.casper@k12.sd.us, 605-847-
4455.
SMART SALES AND LEASE
seeks bookkeeper. Work from
home. Hourly wage based on ex-
perience. M-F 8-4,Degree/man-
agement experience a plus. Re-
sume, questions: careers@smart-
salesandlease.com.
LoG HoMEs
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneaglel-
oghomes.com.
noTICEs
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT Listings, sorted by rent,
location and other options.
www. sdhousi ngsearch. com
South Dakota Housing Develop-
ment Authority.
REaL EsTaTE
LARAMIE RIVER RANCH Limited
Parcels Left! 35 acre ranches,
From $695 per acre. Magnificent
Water and Mountain Views. Low
Down ñ Guaranteed Financing.
CALL TODAY! 1 - 888 - 411-
7050. www.RanchLand-
Wyoming.com.
VaCaTIons
BLACK HILLS VACATIONS: Mys-
tery Mountain Resort ñ Cabins,
TV sites & Camping in the Pines.
Visit: www.blackhillsresorts.com
& www.facebook.com/mystery-
mountain or 800-658-2267.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
MetroPlains Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.metroplainsmanagement.com
West River Pioneer
Has a good supply of
9690 AquaMax Corn
63ME80 Sunflowers
We also carry
Alfalfas, Soybeans & Sorgums
For your Spring Planting needs.
Call 605-685-3760
Wall, SD
THank Yous
We would like to thank every-
one who sent cards, flowers, me-
morial gifts and food in the loss
of Anna Lee Humphrey. A special
thank you to Pastor Harold Del-
bridge.
Humphrey Family
Carl, David, Aaron, Linda,
Marilyn, Cathy & Peggy
Thank you to everyone in the
community for their thoughtful-
ness and generosity in our time
of need. It was greatly appreci-
ated.
Kelsey, Tucker
& Braxtyn
South Dakota counties to facil-
itate budgeting and financing of
long-term  investments  in  the
infrastructure and facilities nec-
essary to meet public demand
for government services; and 
WHEREAS  at  a  time  when
infrastructure  demands  are
great,  increasing  the  cost  of
local  government  borrowing
could have serious impacts on
the  national,  state  and  local
economies; and 
WHEREAS, without the tax
exemption, the effectiveness of
the bond market would be sig-
nificantly  dampened,  creating
higher  borrowing  costs  for
county  governments,  less  in-
vestment in infrastructure and
fewer jobs.  
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED  that  Pennington
County  does  hereby  support
maintaining the current tax-ex-
empt  status  of  municipal
bonds.  
Approved  this  2nd  day  of
April, 2013.
PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
/s/Lyndell Petersen,
Chairperson
ATTEST:  
/s/Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A.  Personnel  Issue  per  SDCL  1-25-
2(1)
B. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL 1-
25-2(3)
C. Annual County Conference of Direc-
tor  of  Equalization  and  Commissioners
per SDCL 10-3-14
MOVED  by  Trautman  and  seconded
by Davis to convene in executive session.
Vote: Unanimous.  The Board remained
in executive session from 12:13 p.m. until
12:49 p.m.  MOVED by Davis and sec-
onded by Trautman to adjourn from exec-
utive  session.    The  motion  carried  with
three votes.
PERSONNEL
Public Defender: Effective 3/18/2013
–  H.  Haskell,  $14.67/hour;  Effective
4/1/2013 - C. Ferguson, $3017.00.
PAYROLL
Commissioners,  10,004.51;  Human
Resources,  4,747.58;  Elections,
12,829.19; Auditor - liens, 2,997.65; Au-
ditor,  19,241.30;  Treasurer,  48,968.19;
Data  Processing  -  General,  53,226.57;
State's Attorney, 147,221.50; Public De-
fender,  90,295.53;  Juvenile  Diversion,
10,815.64; Victim's Assistance, 5,387.37;
Buildings & Grounds, 103,644.25; Equal-
ization,  67,503.95;  Register  of  Deeds,
22,583.79;  Sheriff,  340,214.31;  Service
Station, 8,481.47; HIDTA Grant, 9,257.21;
Jail,  464,609.72;  Jail  Work  Program,
4,693.46; Coroner, 419.47; Hill City Law,
11,576.25; Keystone Law, 5,715.44; New
Underwood – Law, 4,340.08; School Liai-
son, 17,084.43; Wall Law, 11,174.50; JSC
Teachers,  18,727.43;  Home  Detention,
8,106.75; JAIG/JSC, 3,430.42; Alcohol &
Drug,  139,900.64;  Friendship  House,
51,328.39;  Economic  Assistance,
53,040.63;  Mental  &  Alcohol-SAO,
8,049.84;  Mental  &  Alcohol-HHS,
3,632.01; Extension, 3,172.01; Weed &
Pest, 8,927.54; Mountain Pine Beetle, ;
Planning and Zoning, 20,747.80; Water
Protection,  5,727.29;  Ordinance,
3,632.01;  Juvenile  Services  Center,
233,203.36;  Highway,  179,008.31;  Fire
Administration,  5,647.04;  Dispatch,
160,835.42;  Emergency  Management,
6,386.91; Emergency Management, 24-7
Program,  16,819.72;  PCCCC  Building
Projects, 2,922.00. 
VOUCHERS
Amcon Distributing Co, 1,629.20; At&T
Mobility,  219.01;  Bh  Power  Inc,
44,691.43; CBM Food Service, 9,418.45;
City Of Hill City, 38.75; City Of Rapid City-
Water, 1,508.88; City Of Wall, 135.00; Ex-
ecutive Mgmt Finance Office, 18.00; First
Administrators,  131,537.24;  First  Inter-
state Bank, 3,351.73; Knology, 6,048.40;
Lattic  Inc,  25.90;  Medical  Waste Trans-
port,  123.05;  Montana  Dakota  Utilities,
7,358.59; Qwest Communications, 3.55;
Qwest  Corporation,  243.04;  Red  River
Service  Corp,  5,199.98;  US  Bank  NA,
455,565.00;  Verizon,  5,116.56;  West
River Electric, 1,843.38.
ADJOURN
MOVED  by  Davis  and  seconded  by
Trautman to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned at 12:50
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published April 18, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $214.72.
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
FOR
MOWING OF HAY
Sealed  bids,  addressed  to  the  City  Fi-
nance  Officer,  P.O.  Box  314,  Wall,  SD
57790,  for  the  hay  to  be  mowed  at  the
City Airport  and  Morning  Side  Property
will  be  received  at  the  office  of  the  Fi-
nance Officer until 2:00 p.m. MST on May
9, 2013.
Specifications for mowing and removing
the hay can be obtained from the City Fi-
nance Officer or call (605) 279-2663. 
All  bids  must  be  accompanied  by  a
cashier’s check or certified check upon a
state  or  national  bank  in  the  amount  of
the bid plus a deposit of $200 as a per-
formance guarantee to assure the entire
airport  will  be  mowed,  all  hay  removed
and  no  damage  has  been  done  to  run-
ways, taxiways and/or parking areas.  All
checks shall be made payable to the City
Of Wall.  
The City Of Wall reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any or all bids and to waive
any informality therein.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
CITY OF WALL
Published April 18 & 25, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $25.34.
PENNINGTON
COUNTY BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
APRIL 2, 2013
A  meeting  of  the  Pennington  County
Board  of  Commissioners  was  held  on
Tuesday, April  2,  2013,  in  the  Commis-
sioners' meeting room of the Pennington
County Courthouse.  Chairperson Lyndell
Petersen called the meeting to order at
9:00 a.m. with the following Commission-
ers present:  Ron Buskerud, Ken Davis
and  Nancy  Trautman.    Commissioner
Holloway was not in attendance.
OATHS OF OFFICE – COUNTY BOARD
OF EQUALIZATION (SDCL 10-11-25)
Judge Jeff Davis performed the oaths
of office for the Commissioners to serve
as  members  of  the  County  Board  of
Equalization.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED  by  Davis  and  seconded  by
Trautman to approve the agenda as pre-
sented.   Vote:  Unanimous.  
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken  by  a  single  vote  of  the  Board  of
Commissioners.    Any  item  may  be  re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration. 
MOVED  by  Buskerud  and  seconded
by Trautman to approve Consent Agenda
Items 6-8 and 10, 11, 13-15 as presented.
Items 9 and 12 were removed for sepa-
rate consideration. Vote:  Unanimous. 
6. Approve  the  minutes  of  the  March
19, 2013, Board of Commissioners’ meet-
ing.
7. Correct the Personnel section of the
March 5, 2013, minutes to show an effec-
tive date for N. Teal of 2/18/2013 instead
of 2/18/2012. 
8. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance,  travel,  conference  fees,  utilities,
furniture  and  equipment  totaling
$674,075.14.
9. Removed for separate considera-
tion.
10. Approve the Chairman’s signature
on a letter of support for the Keystone XL
Pipeline.
11. Approve the Authorization to Bid –
Emergency  Services  East  Communica-
tions Tower Project.
12. Removed for separate considera-
tion.
13. Authorize the Highway Department
to purchase bulk diesel and gas products
from  the  State  Contract  List  as  follows:
Contract #16470, Moyle Petroleum, 2504
West  Main,  Rapid  City,  SD;  Contract
#16464,  Howe’s  Oil  Company,  823  E.
14th Street, Sioux Falls, SD.  
14.  Approve  the  Federal  Equitable
Sharing Agreement and Certification be-
tween the Federal Government, Penning-
ton  County  and  the  Pennington  County
Sheriff’s Office and authorize the Chair-
person’s signature. 
15. Declare surplus for donation to the
Boys Club: asset #005560, a Multi-Use
Station SM Quantum QMS 404 (exercise
equipment).
Removed For Separate Consideration
9.    MOVED  by  Buskerud  and  sec-
onded by Trautman to approve the reim-
bursement request for travel expenses for
Commissioner  Davis  totaling  $535.60.
Commissioner  Buskerud  stated  that  he
will provide statutory authority for the ex-
penditure.   Vote: Unanimous.
12.  MOVED  by  Trautman  and  sec-
onded by Buskerud to approve the Agree-
ment for Maintenance of Hawthorne Ditch
Facilities  with  Donna  Klapperich  in  the
amount of $4000.  Vote:  Unanimous. 
End of Consent Agenda
ITEMS FROM AUDITOR
A. General Fund Supplement (SP13-
006)  Juvenile  Diversion: MOVED  by
Trautman and seconded by Davis to sup-
plement the 2013 General Fund Juvenile
Diversion  budget  in  the  amount  of
$19,000 from unassigned fund balance.
Vote:  Unanimous. 
B. General Fund Supplement (SP13-
007) Auditor: MOVED by Trautman and
seconded by Buskerud to supplement the
2013  General  Fund Auditor’s  budget  in
the  amount  of  $64,831.00  from  unas-
signed fund balance.  Vote:  Unanimous.
C. General Fund OTO to Accumulated
Building  Supplement  (SP13-008):
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded by
Davis  to  supplement  the  General  Fund
Operating Transfer  Out  (OTO)  to Accu-
mulated  Building  Equipment  Replace-
ment Reserve in the amount of $46,687
and authorize approved OTO to Accumu-
lated Building to the assigned equipment
reserve.  Vote:  Unanimous.  
D. General Fund OTO to Accumulated
Building  Supplement  (SP13-009)
MOVED by Trautman and seconded by
Buskerud  to  supplement  the  General
Fund  OTO  to  Accumulated  Building
Courthouse  Remodel  Reserve  in  the
amount of $97,575 and to authorize ap-
proved OTO to Accumulated Building to
the  assigned  Courthouse  Remodel  Re-
serve.  The motion carried 3-1 with Davis
opposing. 
ITEMS FROM SHERIFF
A.  Configuration  Management  Docu-
ment Addendum B – Zuercher Technolo-
gies: MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to authorize the Chairperson’s
signature on Addendum B to the Zuercher
contract. Vote:  Unanimous. 
ITEMS FROM EQUALIZATION
A. Abatement Applications: MOVED by
Davis and seconded by Buskerud to ap-
prove  the  abatements/refunds  for  tax
year  2012  as  follows:    Tax  ID  64335,
Breeze Inc., $381.26; Tax ID 59301, Jor-
dan  D.  Linial,  $600.98.    Vote:    Unani-
mous.
ITEMS FROM BUILDINGS &
GROUNDS
A. Update on Construction Projects –
Mike Kuhl
B. Parking Structure Addition Project –
Change Order #1: MOVED by Trautman
and seconded by Buskerud to authorize
the  Chairperson’s  signature  to  Change
Order #1, dated July 12, 2012, which de-
creases the Contract Sum by $37,972.15
to $4,244,071.85 and increases the Con-
tract  Time  by  31  calendar  days  for  the
Heavy Constructors Inc., contract for the
Parking Structure Addition.  Vote:  Unan-
imous.
C. Parking Structure Addition Project –
Certificate  of  Substantial  Completion:
MOVED by Trautman and seconded by
Davis to authorize the Chairperson’s sig-
nature  to  the  Certificate  of  Substantial
Completion  dated  May  9,  2012,  for  the
Parking Structure Addition Project, con-
structed  by  Heavy  Constructors  Inc.
Vote:  Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
A.  Green  Valley  Estates  Drainage:
MOVED by Trautman and seconded by
Buskerud to authorize the Highway De-
partment to enter into an agreement with
D.C. Scott Surveyors Inc., in the amount
of  $2,840  to  complete  the  topographic
route survey in Lot 7, and in Lots 32-28
inclusive of Block 5 of Green Valley Es-
tates. Vote:  Unanimous. 
PENNINGTON COUNTY HEALTH
CARE TRUST BOARD UPDATE
FY2014 PENNINGTON COUNTY
BUDGET DISCUSSIONS
A. Budget Preparation Guidelines:  In-
formation only, no action was taken. 
MOVED  by  Buskerud  and  seconded
by  Davis  to  take  a  brief  recess.    Vote:
Unanimous.  The meeting reconvened at
10:40 a.m.   
ITEMS FROM PLANNING & ZONING
MOVED  by  Davis  and  seconded  by
Trautman to continue Variance / VA 13-04
to the May 7, 2013, County Board meet-
ing when all Commissioners will be in at-
tendance. Vote:  Unanimous.
A.  VARIANCE  /  VA  13-04:  Sugar
Daddy’s, Kerri Johnston. To reduce the
minimum required front yard setback from
25 feet to 6 feet for a deck and from 25
feet to 21 feet for an existing building in a
Highway  Service  District  in  accordance
with  Sections  210  and  509  of  the  Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
Lot A of SE1/4SW1/4, Section
7, T2N, R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota.
CONSENT AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken on all items by a single vote of the
Board of Commissioners.  Any item may
be removed from the Consent Agenda for
separate action. 
MOVED  by  Buskerud  and  seconded
by  Davis  to  approve  Consent  Agenda
Items  B-F  as  presented.    Vote:    Unani-
mous.
B.  FIRST  READING  AND  PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 12-07 AND
COMPREHENSIVE  PLAN  AMEND-
MENT / CA 12-05: RMS Lode/Matt Keck.
To rezone 5.13 acres from Limited Agri-
culture District to Highway Service District
and to amend the Comprehensive Plan to
change  the  Future  Land  Use  from
Planned  Unit  Development  Sensitive  to
Highway  Service  District  in  accordance
with  Sections  210  and  508  of  the  Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance.
EXISTING  LEGAL:    JR  #2
Lode less Lot I, less Lot J and
less  Lot  L  of  JR  #2  and  JR
#5Lodes and less Lot H2 of JR
#2, #3 and #5 Lodes of JR #2
Lode MS 1864 and JR #3 Lode
less Lots 1 and 2 of Lot E, less
Lot  H2  of  JR  #2,  #3,  and  #5
Lode and less ROW, located in
Section  21,  T1S,  R5E,  BHM,
Pennington  County,  South
Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL:  Lot 2
of  Stenson  Subdivision,  Sec-
tion 21, T1S, R5E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota.
Approve  the  first  reading  of  Rezone
12-07 to rezone 5.13 acres from Limited
Agriculture  District  to  Highway  Service
District and approve Comprehensive Plan
Amendment  12-05  to  amend  the  Com-
prehensive  Plan  to  change  the  Future
Land  Use  from  Planned  Unit  Develop-
ment Sensitive to Highway Service Dis-
trict.
C.  FIRST  READING  AND  PUBLIC
HEARING  OF  REZONE  /  RZ  13-02:
Jarvis and Frances Olson; Fisk Land Sur-
veying  –  Agent.    To  rezone  7.65  acres
from  Limited Agriculture  District  to  Low
Density Residential District in accordance
with  Sections  206,  207,  and  508  of  the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Located on a parcel of land lo-
cated in the South One-Half of
the  Northeast  One-Quarter  of
the  Southeast  One-Quarter
(S½NE¼SE¼)  of  Section
Thirty-Five  (35)  in  Township
One North (T1N), Range Three
East  (R3E)  of  the  Black  Hills
Meridian  (BHM),  Pennington
County,  South  Dakota,  more
fully described as follows: Be-
ginning at the southwest corner
of said South One-Half of the
Northeast One Quarter of the
Southeast  One  Quarter
(S½NE¼SE¼)  of  Section
Thirty-Five  (35)  in  Township
One North (T1N), Range Three
East (R3E) of the Black  Hills
Meridian  (BHM),  Pennington
County,  South  Dakota,  said
point being located on a 1/16th
section  line  of  said  Section
Thirty-Five  (35)  and  being
marked by a US Forest Service
Monument;  thence,  northerly
along the 1/16th section line of
said  Section  Thirty-Five  (35),
North  00  degrees  09  minutes
00 seconds West, a distance of
260.00  feet  more  or  less  to  a
point  marked  by  a  rebar  with
survey  cap  RW  FISK  6565;
thence,  South  89  degrees  51
minutes 02 seconds East a dis-
tance of 1,282.70 feet more or
less  to  a  point  located  on  the
westerly line of the section line
right-of-way  for  said  Section
Thirty-Five  (35),  said  right-of-
way being known as Paradise
Drive,  and  said  point  being
marked by a rebar with survey
cap  RW  FISK  6565;  thence,
southerly  on  the  westerly  line
of said section line right-of-way
and on the westerly line of Par-
adise Drive right-of-way, South
00 degrees 00 minutes 43 sec-
onds East a distance of 260.00
feet  more  or  less,  said  point
being located on a 1/16th sec-
tion line and coincident with the
northeast corner of Tract 14 of
Leisure Hills Estates, and said
point being marked by a mon-
ument  with  survey  cap  LS
2196; thence, westerly on said
1/16th section line and on the
north  line  of  said  Tract  14  of
Leisure Hills Estates, North 89
degrees  53  minutes  45  sec-
onds  West  a  distance  of
549.64 feet more or less to the
northwest corner of said Tract
14 of Leisure Hills Estates, said
point being coincident with the
northeast corner of Tract 15 of
Leisure Hills Estates and said
point being marked by a mon-
ument  with  survey  cap  LS
2196; thence, continuing west-
erly on said 1/16th section line
and  on  the  north  line  of  said
Tract  15  of  Leisure  Hills  Es-
tates,  North  89  degrees  43
minutes  18  seconds  West  a
distance of 542.94 feet more or
less to the northwest corner of
Tract  15  of  Leisure  Hills  Es-
tates,  said  point  being  coinci-
dent with the northeast corner
of Tract 21 of Leisure Hills Es-
tates  and  said  point  being
marked  by  a  monument  with
survey  cap  LS  2196;  thence,
continuing  westerly  on  said
1/16th section line and on the
north  line  of  said  Tract  21  of
Leisure Hills Estates, South 89
degrees  54  minutes  44  sec-
onds West 189.50 feet more or
less to the point of beginning.
Said tract of land contains 7.65
acres, more or less.
Continue Rezone 13-02 to the May 7,
2013, Board of Commissioners’ meeting.
D.  FIRST  READING  AND  PUBLIC
HEARING OF REZONE / RZ 13-01:  Ar-
lean Crow; Daniel Crow – Agent.  To re-
zone 47.47 acres from Limited Agriculture
District to General Agriculture District in
accordance with Sections 205 and 508 of
the  Pennington  County  Zoning  Ordi-
nance.
Lot  8  Revised,  Palmer  Gulch
Placer  MS  690,  Section  27,
T1S,  R5E,  BHM,  Pennington
County, South Dakota.
Approve  the  first  reading  of  Rezone
13-01 to rezone 47.47 acres from Limited
Agriculture District to General Agriculture
District.
E. LAYOUT PLAT / PL 13-05: William
Bennett; Renner & Associates  Agent.  To
create  Tracts  3R,  5,  and  6  of  Summit
Peak Estates Subdivision in accordance
with  Section  400.1  of  the  Pennington
County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL:  Tract 3
of Summit Peak Estates Subdi-
vision; Less Tract 2, 3, and 4 of
Summit Peak Estates Subdivi-
sion  and  Less  ROW  (Also  in
Section 33) of Jolly No. 1 Lode
MS 527; Less Tract 2 and 3 of
Summit Peak Estates Subdivi-
sion and ROW (Also in Section
32) of Jolly No. 2 Lode MS 528;
and  Less Tract  1,  2,  and  4  of
Summit Peak Estates Subdivi-
sion and ROW (Also in Section
33) of Jolly No. 3 lode MS 529,
located in NE1/4 of Section 32
and  in  the  NW1/4  of  Section
33, T1S, R5E, BHM, Penning-
ton County, South Dakota.
PROPOSED  LEGAL:
Tracts 3R, 5, and 6 of Summit
Peak  Estates  Subdivision,
Sections 32 and 33, T1S, R5E,
BHM,  Pennington  County,
South Dakota.
Approve  Layout  Plat  13-05  to  create
Tracts 3R, 5, and 6 of Summit Peak Es-
tates Subdivision.
F.  LAYOUT  PLAT  /  PL  13-04  AND
SUBDIVISION  REGULATIONS  VARI-
ANCE  /  SV  13-01: Jarvis  and  Frances
Olson; Fisk Land Surveying – Agent.  To
create Lots 1 and 2 of Olson Park Subdi-
vision and to waive platting requirements
in  accordance  with  Section  400.1  and
Section 700.1 of the Pennington County
Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING  LEGAL:
S1/2NE1/4SE1/4, Section 35,
T1N,  R3E,  BHM,  Pennington
County, South Dakota.
PROPOSED  LEGAL:    Lots
1 and 2 of Olson Park Subdivi-
sion,  Section  35,  T1N,  R3E,
BHM,  Pennington  County,
South Dakota.
Continue Layout Plat 13-04 and Sub-
division  Regulations  Variance  13-01  to
the May 7, 2013, Board of Commission-
ers’ meeting.
End of Consent Agenda
PERMITTED USES FOR GENERAL
AGRICULTURAL ZONING – Jack Bradt
MOVED  by  Davis  and  seconded  by
Buskerud to allow Jack Bradt to go back
into  business  as  he  has  been  for  19
years, and further moved that Mr. Bradt
apply to Pennington County for a Condi-
tional  Use  Permit  to  operate  the  facility
and that he has 120 days to provide the
permit from the U.S. Forest Service that
states that he can use the road easement
to  access  his  property.    Vote:    Unani-
mous.
Commissioner Buskerud left the meet-
ing at this time and did not return. 
ITEMS FROM COMMISSION ASSIS-
TANT
A.  Resolution  Supporting  Efforts  to
Maintain the Tax Exempt Status of Munic-
ipal Bonds: MOVED by Davis and sec-
onded by Trautman to approve the Reso-
lution of the Pennington County Commis-
sion  Supporting  Efforts  to  Maintain  the
Tax-Exempt  Status  of  Municipal  Bonds
and  authorize  the  Chairperson’s  signa-
ture thereto.  Vote:  Unanimous.
RESOLUTION OF THE
PENNINGTON COUNTY
COMMISSION
SUPPORTING EFFORTS TO
MAINTAIN THE
TAX-EXEMPT STATUS
OF MUNICIPAL BONDS
WHEREAS, the tax-exempt
status  of  municipal  bonds  is
nearly a century old and is vital
to  funding  local  infrastructure
and  economic  development;
and
WHEREAS, of the $1.65 tril-
lion  of  local  infrastructure  in-
vestment over the last decade
using  tax-exempt  bonds,
nearly all of it was in six cate-
gories:  $514 billion for primary
and  secondary  schools;  $288
billion for hospitals; $258 billion
for  water  and  sewer  facilities;
$178  billion  for  roads,  high-
ways and streets; $147 billion
for public power projects; and
$106 billion for mass transit.
WHEREAS,  any  move  to
change  the  current  tax  treat-
ment  of  local  government
bonds  would  lead  to  higher
borrowing costs for local gov-
ernments; and 
WHEREAS, without tax-ex-
empt financing, much-needed
infrastructure  improvements
would likely be delayed; and
WHEREAS,  tax-exempt
bonds  are  a  critical  tool  for
WALL CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
MINUTES
APRIL 4, 2013 6:30PM
The Wall City Council met for a regular
meeting April 4, 2013 at 6:30 pm in the
Community Center meeting room.
Members  Present:  Dave  Hahn,  Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Bill Leonard,
Councilman;  Mike  Anderson,  Council-
man; Stan Anderson, Councilman; Jerry
Morgan,  Councilman;  Pete  Dunker,
Councilman
Others present: Carolynn Anderson, Fi-
nance  Officer;  Garrett  Bryan,  Public
Works  Director;  Lindsey  Hildebrand,
Chamber/Assistant FO; Sgt. Dan Wardle,
Pennington County Sheriff; Ann Clark and
Laurie  Hindman,  Pennington  Co.
Courant;  Pandi  Pittman,  Teen  19  TV;
Joan  Hout;  Stacey  Bielmaier;  Sharon
Martinisko; Steve Wyant; Preston John-
son;  Dustin  Willert;  Annie  Tice-Posley;
Jim Tice
(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve the agenda.  Motion car-
ried.
Sgt. Wardle gave the police report.  Dpt.
Ginn has been selected to be a reserve
deputy training officer and assisting with
explorer and freshman impact programs.
This shows the quality of deputy we have.  
June Hout addressed the council for ap-
proval to amend their building permit as
they  put  concrete  board  rather  than
blocks for skirting on their modular home.
Not on the agenda, so only for discussion
and referred to next council meeting for
approval.
Sharon  Martinisko  with  Neighborhood
Housing informed the council of the pro-
grams that NeighborWorks has for home
ownership and home rehabilitation. Their
mission is to help low and moderate in-
come families into home ownership. As a
nonprofit, they are able to bring in money
for people to purchase homes and also
offer home buyer education, Warm and
Safe, Paint the Town, City Wide Garage
Sale, and Home Rehab programs.
Dustin Willert, Pennington County Emer-
gency  Manager  addressed  questions
from the council concerning emergency
sirens and funding for an emergency gen-
erator.    Sirens  are  currently  tested  at
noon  on  the  1st  and  3rd  Saturday  of
every month. A Homeland Security grant
for a generator for the community center
may be applied for with 2012 reallocation
funds or the  2013 funds coming available
in a couple of months. Only $300,000 is
available for nine counties so keep that
scope in mind. 
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
approve  the  public  safety  siren  agree-
ment.  Motion carried.  Emergency Man-
agement will cover the expense for main-
tenance unless it is over $100; the city will
then cover half the cost.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve the proposed pre-dis-
aster mitigation plan as presented.  Mo-
tion carried. This  plan  would
allow towns in South Dakota to be eligible
for funding in the event of a federally de-
clared disaster.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to  approve  amended  lease  agreement
with Preston Johnson for hanger space.
Motion carried.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Mor-
gan  to  approve  amended  lease  agree-
ment with Preston Johnson for the relo-
cation  of  the  fuel  contentment  system.
Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve authorization for Preston
Johnson  to  install  drain  field  for  sewer
system at the airport for his new hanger.
Motion carried.
Motion by Morgan, second by S Ander-
son to approve Preston Johnson connect-
ing on the service line of the new airport
terminal  building  for  water  to  his  new
hanger.  Motion carried.  
Annie  Tice-Poseley  approached  the
council  requesting  an  off-sale  wine  li-
cense. Currently the city is limited to two
off sale license via ordinance, but a differ-
ent license allowing off sale wine may be
available.  The council was generally in
favor of possibly changing the ordinance
or finding out the difference in licenses so
that businesses could sell South Dakota
made  wine.    FO Anderson  will  proceed
with  checking  into  changing  the  ordi-
nance or finding another option.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve the building permit for a taller
fence  for  Guy  Smith  at  702  Hustead
Street.  Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve a building permit for an addition
to  the  Wall  Motel  office  at  604  Glenn
Street.  Motion carried.  Council recom-
mended PWD Bryan be sure the founda-
tion  was  appropriate  and  the  addition
matched the existing building.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve signs as presented and
approved by the sign committee for Steve
Wyant of the Lakota Ways, Wambli The-
atre and Wounded Knee Museum located
at 600 Main Street.  Motion carried.
Wyant  previously  requested  the  north
side of the 600 Main Street building have
a designated bus unloading zone.  The
question  of  whether  the  zone  would  be
merited  was  asked.    The  council  sug-
gested  on  a  temporary  basis  to  set  out
cones on the days a bus was expected
until it can be determined if this need is
warranted.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to approve the furthest north parking
spot  on  the  west  side  of  the  building  at
600 Main Street designated for handicap
parking  with  the  city  providing  signage.
Motion carried. Note: this handicap park-
ing is for public use. 
Wyant  also  requested  the  street  on  the
north  side  of  the  building  at  600  Main
Street to be blocked off some time in Sep-
tember for a POW wow.  Street Commit-
tee met and recommended not blocking
the street and please work with the rodeo
grounds for availability.  
Brett  Blasius,  president  of  Wall  Health
Service board informed the council there
have  been  discussions  with  Regional
Health  Systems  and  negotiations  will
begin on an agreement for them to oper-
ate  the  Wall  Clinic.    Blasius  mentioned
there was confusion as to who owns the
property the clinic is on.  It was the intent
of  the  city  when  the  clinic  was  built  to
deed that property to Wall Health Service,
but according to public record the City of
Wall  still  owns  it.    For  the  lease  agree-
ment, Regional would have to work with
the City of Wall on this issue or the City
would have to file the necessary paper-
work to have the property deeded to Wall
Health  Service.  Blasius  will  continue  to
keep the council informed.
At  this  time  building  permits  were  re-
viewed for Bart Cheney to install an an-
tenna for two-way communication at 508
Spur Drive and for De’s Oil to replace a
concrete pad at 216 W. Seventh Avenue.
Finance Officer (FO) Anderson updated
the council on completion of purchase on
the  Dunker  property.  An  email  was  re-
ceived from Wells Fargo that the partial
release  documents  are  approved  and
have been sent. The Title Company will
create the warrant of deed for Dunker’s to
sign off, and they will pay Dunkers.  The
check to the Title Co. is higher that pur-
chase price of the property because clos-
ing costs are included.
Motion by Leonard, second by Hustead to
approve awarding the sewer project bid
to  Site  Works  for  $664,074.50.    Motion
carried. 
Motion by Dunker, second by M Anderson
to approve the Motor Vehicle Record pol-
icy.  Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve naming the road run-
ning  north  and  south  between  Walker’s
barn and Mettler Lane, “Ted Street” which
is an extension of the existing Ted Street.
Motion carried.
1st reading of Ordinance 13-01; amend-
ing Animal Control Ordinance was tabled
until more research can be done to see
what other towns require.
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to approve a publication a notice of
the leash law by ordinance.  Motion car-
ried.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to approve Policy 13-01 on clothing
allowance  for  public  work  employees.
Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by S Anderson
to send a letter to Ted Schuller address-
ing the violation of unlicensed vehicles.
Motion carried.
Motion  by  S  Anderson,  second  by
Leonard to have Jim Kitterman and Pete
Dunker  look  at  backhoe  for  sale  by  the
City of Deadwood and come back with a
recommendation  at  the  May  meeting.
Motion carried.
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to approve city supplement of $3500
this year to the cemetery and to be ad-
dressed  annually  during  the  budget
process.  Motion carried.
FO  Anderson  reported  Autumn  Schulz
was willing to manage the pool and that
Skyler Anderson has expressed interest
doing water aerobics again. She may be
interested in helping with swimming les-
sons. It would be necessary to advertise
for four more full time life guards.  Pro-
posed dates for operation would be June
1st to August 18th.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve paying Autumn Schulz $11.00
per hour as pool manager.  Motion car-
ried.
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
approve  increasing  swimming  lesson
fees to $20.  Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve advertising for life guards.  Mo-
tion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to  advertise  for  hay  bids  on  the  airport
and  morning  side  property  with  the  bid
opening at the May 9th council meeting.
Motion carried.
Ward  One  will  have  an  election  for  city
council, to be held June 4th at the Wall
Community Center.  Candidates are Gale
Patterson,    Jackie  Kusser,  and  Joseph
Leach.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve City Council minutes
for 3/7/2013, 3/13/2013, and 3/15/2013.
Motion carried.
Motion by M Anderson, second by S An-
derson to approve Fire Department min-
utes from March 13, 2013.  Motion car-
ried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve Cemetery minutes from March
26, 2013.  Motion carried
Motion by S Anderson, second by Dunker
to approve April City of Wall bills.  Motion
carried.    Morgan  abstained  from  voting
his reimbursement check.
CITY BILLS
APRIL 4, 2013
Gross Salaries – March 31, 2013:
    Gross  Salaries:  Adm.  -  $5,553.22;
PWD - $9,695.08
    AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ins.,
$273.01; HEALTH POOL, Health/Life In-
surance, $4,180.42; SDRS,  Employee
Retirement, $1,789.24; SDRS-SRP, Em-
ployee  Supp  Retirement  plan,  $150.00;
FIRST  INTERSTATE  BANK,  Employee
payroll tax, $3,454.38.
APRIL 4, BILLS
A&B       WELDING       SUPPLY       CO., 
Continued on page 8
Pennington County Courant • April 18, 2013 • Page 7 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE,
FEATUFINC DANCS VACCINATED FEPLACEMENT
HEIFEFS, DFED CATTLE & PAIF SALE & FOFTUNE'S
FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE .
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FORTUNE'S RAFTER U CROSS
ANGUS: 12 P.M. (MT} FEEDER CATTLE, BRED CATTLE &
PAIRS TO FOLLOW. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. EXPECTINC
3000 HEAD.
FEEDER CATTLE.FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL
NATUFAL, ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
PARSONS - 215 FANCY DWF & A FEW FWF F1 DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................800-900=
260 FANCY DWF & A FEW FWF STFS; FS,NI ..............850-950=
45 DWF & FWF HFFS; FS,NI .......................................750-850=
PORCH & PORCH - 250 FANCY HOME FAISED DLK ANC DV
FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ...................................................650-750=
KENNEDY'S H&S PART - 150 FANCY HOME FAISED DLK ANC
STFS; ALL NATUFAL,FS,NI..........................................600-650=
WILCOX & WILCOX - 100 DLK ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI700=
CONRY - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .............................650=
JOHNSTON - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..............550-600=
RADWAY - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ...................650-700=
STOUT - 75 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S
FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS} .................................................700=
MORTENSON RANCH - 75 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................700-750=
PARSONS - 70 DLK ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..........800-900=
NELSON - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,FFEEZE DFANDED
(SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS} ............700=
STOUT - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S
FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS} .................................................700=
CARLEY - 60 DLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................550-600=
MADSEN RANCH - 60 DLK & FED MOSTLY DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................600-650=
WILCOX - 50 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ......................................575-600=
GABRIEL & GABRIEL - 41 DLK MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI ...500-550=
LARSON FAMILY PART - 40 FANCY HOME FAISED DV FEPLC.
HFFS; FS,NI .......................................................................800=
MCDANIEL - 40 DLK STFS; FS,NI...................................700-800=
REEVES & REEVES - 40 DLK STFS; FS,NI............................550=
PAULSEN & PAULSEN - 35 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI......650=
MCDANIEL - 25 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .......................700=
HERBER - 25 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI ..........................550-600=
PERAULT RANCH - 25 MIXED X CLVS; FS,NI ................500-600=
JASPERS - 23 DLK STFS & HFFS; FS,NI ...............................600=
BISHOP - 20 DLK STFS; FS,NI........................................575-600=
CROWSER - 18 DLK CLVS; FS...............................................400=
BRENNAN - 15 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI.........................600=
EISENBRAUN - 9 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..............550-600=
PAIRS:
CAP RANCH - 100 DLK FIFST CALF HFFS PAIFS
JEFF NELSON - 40 DLK FIFST CALF HFF PAIFS; ALL SIFED DY
FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS; FFEEZE DFANDED &
FANCY
REUBEN VOLLMER - 17 DLK 4 TO 8 YF OLD COWS W/DLK
DULL CLVS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, DFED CATTLE &
PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS
ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MAY 21: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: APR1L Jt, 2DJS
A b1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups on o verg s1rong morKe1. L1gÞ1er run o]
]eeders, morKe1 uneven. A1so Þod CÞegenne CÞoro1o1s Bu11
So1e, o Horse So1e, & 1Þe PÞ111p FFA & FCCLA Peop1e Auo11on.
B1g so1e ne×1 ueeK se111ng Js1 oo1] Þe1]er po1rs, SDDD+ ]eeders
& For1une´s Ro]1er U Cross Bu11 So1e.
FEEDER CATTLE:
CARL BAUMAN - KADOKA
49 .....................................................CHAF HFFS 605=.................$143.00
WILLERT RANCH INC - BELVIDERE
16...........................................CHAF & FED HFFS 608=.................$141.50
13.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 624=.................$138.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST - HOWES
13 .............................................DLK & DWF STFS 600=.................$154.00
ROD KIRK - CODY, NE
23 .............................................DLK & DWF STFS 641=.................$155.00
75.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 712=.................$131.25
72.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 714=.................$128.75
45.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 650=.................$131.25
MCPHERSON ANGUS - STURGIS
29 .......................................................DLK HFFS 500=.................$151.25
9 ...............................................DLK & DWF STFS 674=.................$136.50
19........................................................DLK STFS 720=.................$131.00
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
6..........................................................DLK STFS 529=.................$168.00
8................................................FED & DLK STFS 681=.................$144.00
DILLON & JEREMIAH WHITCHER-RAPID CITY
30 .......................................................DLK HFFS 645=.................$133.25
FITCH FARMS - PHILIP
131...........................................DLK & DWF HFFS 803=.................$123.10
78.............................................DLK & DWF HFFS 729=.................$126.50
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
57........................................................DLK STFS 1025=...............$120.50
67........................................................DLK STFS 960=.................$121.75
HAROLD FROMM - RAPID CITY
25..............................................FED & DLK STFS 648...................$144.25
13..............................................FED & DLK STFS 515...................$152.00
CHEYENNE CHAROLAIS - WASTA
DULLS AVC. ....................................................................................$3066.00
BRED CATTLE:
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
13......................FED & FWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1532= ............$1,450.00
11..................FED SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1550= ............$1,280.00
WEIGH-UPS:
RON TWISS - INTERIOR
1..........................................................FED COW 1510=.................$88.00
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
11......................................................DLK HFFTS 851=.................$114.00
MARLIN MAUDE - HERMOSA
1..........................................................FED COW 1440=.................$87.50
2 ........................................................FED COWS 1338=.................$83.50
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1288=.................$83.00
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
3 ........................................................FED COWS 1203=.................$90.00
6 ........................................................FED COWS 1483=.................$81.50
2 ........................................................FED COWS 1708=.................$80.00
A CONSIGNMENT
1..........................................................DLK DULL 2160=...............$108.50
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1575=.................$86.00
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1540=.................$85.00
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1945=...............$102.50
1..........................................................FED COW 1650=.................$84.00
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1535=.................$83.50
BERNARD HERBER - KADOKA
8 .............................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 899=.................$110.00
LANDON STOUT - KADOKA
1 ........................................................CHAF COW 1630=.................$86.00
CLIFF POSS - PHILIP
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1425=.................$86.50
FINN FARMS - MIDLAND
1 .........................................................FED DULL 2390=...............$106.00
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
1..........................................................DWF COW 1390=.................$84.00
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1305=.................$81.50
TINA HUDSON - WHITE OWL
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1360=.................$84.00
1..........................................................DWF COW 1350=.................$83.50
1....................................................DLK COWETTE 1065=.................$88.00
LARRY LABRIER - MURDO
4........................................................DLK HFFTS 913=.................$109.00
JAMES ROCK - LONG VALLEY
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1495=.................$83.50
1..........................................................DWF COW 1340=.................$80.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1285=.................$83.25
BRANDON ROCK - LONG VALLEY
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1565=.................$83.00
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 845=.................$107.00
2 ..................................................DLK COWETTES 1013=...............$100.50
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1640=.................$82.00
MIKE NELSON - PHILIP
1..........................................................FED COW 1530=.................$82.00
CREW CATTLE CO - PHILIP
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1365=.................$82.00
RON DOUD - MIDLAND
1..........................................................FED COW 1130=.................$82.00
1..........................................................DWF COW 1385=.................$80.50
1..........................................................DWF COW 1310=.................$78.50
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
4.......................................................HEFF COWS 1360=.................$81.75
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
1..........................................................DWF COW 1485=.................$81.50
BARBARA NARO2ONICK - OLYMPIA, WA
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1460=.................$81.00
PETE REINERT - HOWES
1..........................................................DWF COW 1185=.................$81.00
1.........................................................DWF HFFT 1050=.................$96.00
JIM JOHNSON - QUINN
6..............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1398=.................$80.00
JOHN NACHTIGALL - OWANKA
2.........................................................DLK COWS 1353=.................$80.00
DENNIS HALL - ENNING
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1315=.................$80.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
1 ..........................................................DLK COW 1430=.................$80.00
7........................................................DLK HFFTS 1005=.................$96.50
1..........................................................DLK DULL 2025=.................$99.50
CASEY KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
4........................................................DLK HFFTS 905=.................$101.00
CASEY DOUD - MIDLAND
1.........................................................FED HFFT 830=.................$101.00
HOSTUTLER RANCHES INC - MIDLAND
2 .......................................................FWF HFFTS 908=.................$100.00
KIETH SMITH - QUINN
2 ..................................................DLK COWETTES 1045=.................$98.00
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
3........................................................DLK HFFTS 1012=.................$98.00
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 1195=.................$89.50
GRADY & BERNICE CREW - PHILIP
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 915=...................$96.00
BERNIE GREGG - FT. PIERRE
2 ..................................................DLK COWETTES 1023=.................$95.00
BRAD & JODY STOUT - KADOKA
2........................................................DLK HFFTS 918=...................$95.00
DALE JARMAN - MIDLAND
1 .........................................................DLK HFFT 1110=.................$94.00
HAND BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1875=...............$100.00
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1850=.................$97.50
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1990=.................$94.50
1..........................................................DLK DULL 1820=.................$94.00
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
1 .........................................................FED DULL 2145=.................$99.00
Pennington County Courant • April 18, 2013 • Page 8
Wall City Council Minutes
(cont. from previous page)
oxygen/acetylene tank rental 5yr, $78.00;
ANDERSON,  CAROLYNN,  storage  file
boxes,  $14.99;  BADLANDS  AUTOMO-
TIVE,  oil  filter-backup  alarm-cleaner,
$127.44; BLACK HILLS CHEMICAL, CC
floor  was  &  stripper,  $304.83;  CAR-
ROLLS APPLIANCE & VACUUMS, vac-
uum  for  community  center-simplicity,
$469.95; CETEC, 2013 Street Improve-
ments-Sewer  Project,  $13,686.66;
CROWN OIL, grease cartridges, $30.00;
DAKOTA  BACKUP,  backup  service,
$172.32; DAKOTA BUSINESS CENTER,
office supplies-contract on copier, $75.43;
DE S OIL & PROPANE, battery for white
pickup-oli  filters/oil,  $249.93;  ENERGY
LABORATORIES, water testing, $12.50;
FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, Dunker prop-
erty purchase, $7,525.52; FIRST INTER-
STATE BANK sales tax $428. 64;
FIRST  INTERSTATE  BANK,  ach  fees,
$12.25;  GOLDEN  WEST  TELE,  phone
bill,  $581.70;  GOLDEN  WEST  TECH-
NOLOGIES,  TS  security  monitoring,
$80.97; HAWKINS WATER TREATMENT
GROUP, water treatment, $1,471.30
;  H-C  GALLOWAYS,  upgrade  to  Scada
system, $32,396.50; KITTERMAN, JIM,
insurance  reimbursement,  $414.61;
MENARDS,  hinges  for  stage  doors,
$28.04;  MORGAN  JERRY,  reimburse
SDML meeting ticket, $20.00; PENNING-
TON  COUNTY  COURANT,  publishing,
$544.17;  PENN.  COUNTY  SHERIFF  S
OFFICE, 2nd quarter billing, $25,879.75;
GRIMMS  PUMP,  hose  for  gas  pumps,
$35.10; POTOMAC AVIA, monitoring fees
at  airport,  $250.00;  RAPID  DELIVERY
INC,  shipping  on  water  testing,  $10.80;
SERVALL UNIFORM, CC rugs, $55.63;
SD  DEPT  OF  TRANSPORTATION,
salt/sand mix, $322.00; VANWAY TRO-
PHY,  plaques  for  Pete  &  Bill,  $111.35;
WALKER REFUSE, garbage service con-
tract,  $7,467.74;  WALL  BADLANDS
AREA CHAMBER, reimburse stage door
hinges/BBB funds, $2,847.49 ; NORTH-
WEST PIPE FITTINGS, fittings for Jake
Frein's water connection, $90.72; WALL
BUILDING CENTER & CONST, supplies,
$506.77; WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity,
$10,412.15;  WEST  RIVER  ELECTRIC
ASSOC,  INC,  Main  Street  loan,
$7,500.00;  WESTON  ENGINEERING,
INC.,  Well  #7  motor  replacement,
$26,192.84;  WEST  RIVER/LYMAN-
JONES  RURAL,  water  purchase,
$3,500.00.
TOTAL BILLS: $143,908.09
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 4th day of April 2013.
Motion by Hustead, second by Morgan to
approve April Fire Department bills.  Mo-
tion carried.
FIRE DEPARTMENT BILLS
APRIL 4, 2013
April 4, Bills 2013:
DE S OIL & PROPANE, oil-filter-lube on
pump  truck,  $144.36;  WALL  AMBU-
LANCE, propane and electricity at ambu-
lance  shed,  $206.26;  FIRST  INTER-
STATE  BANK,  fuel  for  trucks,  $63.52;
GOLDEN  WEST TELE,  phone-internet,
$125.91; MILLER NAN, pancake dispen-
sors, $60.71; PHILIP MOTORS INC., re-
pair  on  Brush  3,  $1,750.01;  VERIZON
WIRELESS,  Access  charge,  $52.08;
WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity, $411.10.
TOTAL BILLS: $2,813.95
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 4th day of April 2013.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve April Library bills.  Motion
carried.
LIBRARY BILLS
APRIL 4, 2013
Gross Salaries – March 31, 2013:
    Gross Salaries: $745.32
    FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employ, 
$114.02
APRIL 4, BILLS 2013:
BRUNNEMANN  WENDY,  ink
cartridge/books,  $74.16;  BADLANDS
COMPUTER SERVICE, contract for labor
to  work  on  computers,  $400.00;  FIRST
INTERSTATE  BANK,  books,  $65.33;
GAYLORD BROS., INC., computer table,
$1,697.12; GOLDEN WEST TELE, tele-
phone, $45.14; SUMMIT SIGNS, 2 direc-
tional  signs,  $39.00;  WEST  RIVER
ELECTRIC, electricity, $127.87.
TOTAL BILLS: $2,448.62
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 4th day of April 2013.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve April Cemetery bills.  Mo-
tion carried.
CEMETERY BILLS
APRIL 4, 2013
April 4, Bills 2013:
WALL BUILDING CENTER & CONST, re-
bar tie wire, $8.47; WEST RIVER ELEC,
electricity -prepay, $100.00.
TOTAL BILLS: $108.47
Approved by the Wall City Council
this 4th day of April 2013.
At this time the On-call schedule, Com-
munity Center report, Compensatory re-
port was reviewed.
Motion by Morgan, second by Leonard to
approve  waiving  fees  of  demolition  of
both buildings at 428 Fourth Avenue with
compliance of city ordinance if that is the
course of action the bank decides to take.
Motion carried.
Noted that Dakota Log Accent may have
moved the business to their backyard at
407 Glenn Street and that would require
a conditional use permit.
Motion by Leonard, second by S Ander-
son to send PWD Bryan to mosquito con-
trol workshop on April 9th in Fort Pierre.
Motion carried.
Public  Works  Director  (PWD)  Garrett
Bryan addressed his items at this time. An
estimate of $5,187.67 for door security at
the city shop and fire department, with fire
department  paying  half  was  presented.
Noted: the ambulance building had to in-
stall new doors for their security system.
Question: was this included or be needed
for this project. It was decided to review
this during the 2014 budget process.
Motion by Dunker, second by S Anderson
to declare the old WREA tower at the rub-
ble  site  surplus  and  advertise  for  bids.
Motion carried.
Motion to approve by S Anderson, second
by Hustead to approve purchase of pump
or motor or both for Well 2 to make it op-
erational for summer use.  Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Mor-
gan to table replacing the fire hydrant at
Hustead  Street  and  Seventh  Avenue
which  was  quoted  at  $7,346.95  for  re-
placement and labor. It will be discussed
further after it is determined whether a bid
will be submitted on the backhoe at the
City of Deadwood. The fire hydrant could
be replaced by the public works employ-
ees instead of contracting the work. Mo-
tion carried.
Well  #7’s  generator  quit  working  and
thought because the fuel filter was never
replaced since it was installed. RDO had
serviced it but no records have yet been
found.  The fuel filter was changed but it
is still having issues. Repairs need to be
made very soon so it is ready for summer
usage.
Motion by Dunker, second by S Anderson
to  approve  FO Anderson  speaking  with
Donovan  Moschell  about  keeping  his
rental property utilities in his name rather
than installing a new water meter for the
rental  house.  It  would  be  his  expense.
Motion carried.
The Fire Department will host a pancake
supper  on  April  20th  from  4:00  until
7:00pm.
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to approve Jim Kitterman attending
Freshman Impact on April 24th in Rapid
City if he chooses.  Motion carried.
It was noted that a pit meter was to be put
in on the golf course hydrant but did not
get done last year. A surface meter will be
used instead to track all water usage at
the golf course. 
Next City Council meeting will be May 9th
at 6:30pm.
With no further business the meeting ad-
journed at 9:13pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published April 18, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $181.30.
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Lois McVey; Marv Matkins – Agent, have
applied  for  a  Rezone  to  rezone  14.47
acres from General Agriculture District to
Limited Agriculture District located on a
parcel of land being a portion of H.E.S.
No. 636 located in N1/2 of SE1/4 of Sec-
tion  36,  T1N,  R3E,  BHM,  Pennington
County, South Dakota, said parcel of land
is described as follows:  Beginning of NE
corner of said parcel identical to the E1/4
corner  of  said  Section  36;  thence  S
0°08’35” W a distance of 759.50’; thence
N  89°50’30”  W  a  distance  of  594.27’;
thence  N  0°05’02”  E  a  distance  of
562.79’; thence S 82°10’39” W a distance
of  733.55’;  thence  N  0°23’41”  E  a  dis-
tance of 297.06’; thence S 89°54’24” E a
distance of 1320.02’ to the Point of Begin-
ning.  Said parcel of land contains 14.470
acres  more  or  less,  located  eight  miles
west of Hill City along Deerfield Road, in
accordance with Sections 206 and 508 of
the  Pennington  County  Zoning  Ordi-
nance.
Siders Sisters; Linda Smoot – Agent, has
applied for a Rezone to rezone 0.834 of
an acre from Limited Agriculture District
to  Low  Density  Residential  District  lo-
cated on a parcel of land being a portion
of Parcel No. 4 located in SW1/4 of NE1/4
of Section 2, T2S, R5E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, said parcel of land
is described as follows:  Beginning at a
point on the North line of said Parcel No.
4,  the  NW  corner  of  said  Parcel  No.  4
bears  S  88°48’45”  W  a  distance  of
231.01’; thence N 88°48’45” E a distance
of  424.96’;  thence  S  0°29’06”  E  a  dis-
tance of 156.95’; thence along the arc of
a  curve  to  the  right  whose  angle  is
13°35’32” and whose radius is 593.50’ a
distance of 140.80’ to the PT of the curve;
thence  N  68°43’21”  W  a  distance  of
311.43’ to the Point of Beginning.  Said
parcel of land contains 0.834 acre more
or less, 12862 Old Hill City Road, in ac-
cordance with Sections 207 and 508 of
the  Pennington  County  Zoning  Ordi-
nance.
Jude Wildeman has applied for a Rezone
to rezone 9.5 acres from General Agricul-
ture  District  to  Highway  Service  District
and  to  amend  the  Pennington  County
Comprehensive Plan to change the Fu-
ture Land Use from Planned Unit Devel-
opment  Sensitive  to  Highway  Service
District  located  on  That  Portion  of  the
Southwest  Quarter  of  the  Southwest
Quarter  (SW1/4SW1/4)  of  Section  22,
T1S,  R6E,  BHM,  Pennington  County,
South  Dakota,  lying  north  and  west  of
Lots H1 and H3, as shown on the plats
filed  in  the  Highway  Plat  Book  1,  Page
113  and  in  Highway  Plat  Book  4,  Page
194,  Exception  therefrom  any  highway
rights of way, near the intersection of S.
Highway 16 and Silver Mountain Road, in
accordance with Sections 210 and 508 of
the  Pennington  County  Zoning  Ordi-
nance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions  will  be  heard  by  the  Pennington
County  Board  of  Commissioners  in  the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
7th  day  of  May  2013.   At  this  time,  any
person interested may appear and show
cause, if there be any, why such requests
should or should not be granted.
ADA  Compliance:    Pennington  County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act.  If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in  need  of  special  accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate  auxiliary  aids  and  services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published April 18, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $36.85.

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
Courant_4-18-13.pdf5.02 MB