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Penn. Co. Courant, September 27, 2012

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Number 39
Volume 107
September 27, 2012
Badlands National Park will be
joining national park units across
the country in celebrating Na-
tional Public Lands Day (NPLD)
with fee free entry into the park.
National Public Lands Day
began in 1994 and is intended to
encourage shared stewardship of
our nation's public lands. Today,
NPLD is the nation's largest
hands-on volunteer effort to im-
prove and enhance federal, state
and local public lands. In Badlands
National Park, dedicated volun-
teers and staff will be working
with park visitors at the Ben Reifel
Visitor Center, providing informa-
tion on enjoying the park’s many
hiking, camping and other recre-
ational activities.
Superintendent Eric Brunne-
mann stated that “This day allows
us to recognize those who protect
and serve our public lands in our
own agency as well as for our part-
ners.”
This year, NPLD will be cele-
brated on Saturday, September 29.
Visitors who arrive on the 29th
By Governor
Dennis Daugaard
South Dakota recently made the
cover of Barron’s, the Dow Jones fi-
nancial weekly, as the best-run
state in the nation. Our state
earned the top spot due to our low
debt and responsible pension fund-
ing compared to our Gross Domes-
tic Product. This is great news and
a reflection on governors and leg-
islatures, long before me, who un-
derstood the importance of debt
avoidance, sound financial deci-
sions, and making only commit-
ments that can be kept.
Low Deb: In South Dakota, we
have no general obligation debt
and only a small amount of legal
authority debt. While almost all
states have balanced budget re-
quirements in their constitutions
or laws, many create the illusion of
balance by borrowing funds, keep-
ing highly leveraged agencies off
the books, or tapping the proceeds
from the sale of state assets. From
California to Greece to Washing-
ton, D.C., governments are now re-
alizing the consequences of poor
fiscal management. Avoiding
those bad practices, South Dakota
has demonstrated fiscal responsi-
bility.
Pension Managemen: Under-
funded public pensions are an-
other symptom of poor state man-
In conjunction with National
Philanthropy Day, the South
Dakota Chapter of the Association
of Fundraising Professionals will
recognize individuals, businesses
and communities for their extraor-
dinary work in philanthropy in
South Dakota. On September 27,
2012, the National Philanthropy
Day Conference and Governor’s
Awards Luncheon will be held in
Rapid City to recognize those who
have given time, talent and treas-
ure to improve the lives of other
South Dakotans. Governor Dennis
Daugaard will present the awards
to the 2012 recipients at the lunch-
eon.
The community wide spirit of
giving is alive and well in the City
of Wall, this year’s recipient of
South Dakota’s Outstanding Phil-
anthropic Community. Nominated
by South Dakota Community
Foundation, this community is rec-
ognized as a “testament to South
Dakota’s values of community
pride and hard work.” Among other
things, this community has rallied
together to raise funds for a gym-
nasium and equipment for the new
school; supported fundraising ef-
forts for a medical clinic and neces-
sary medical equipment; provided
hundreds of meals to children
through the “backpack” program,
renovated local pool facilities, and
made extensive improvements to
the Wall Rodeo Arena and Fair-
grounds. Most recently, the com-
munity has taken of re-imaging
their main street, replacing the as-
phalt with new concrete and re-
placing all of the lighting.
Erv and DeMaris Neshiem of
Hill City have been selected as this
year’s Outstanding Philanthro-
pists. Erv and DeMaris are de-
scribed as “people of generosity and
hope” by nominators Lutheran
Outdoors in South Dakota,
Lutheran Social Services and the
community of Philip, SD. Nancy
Ekstrum, Philip, who knows De-
Maris well, writes, “DeMaris epito-
mizes the best of what we as a so-
ciety view as the “making a differ-
Association of Fundraising Professionals: S. D.
Chapter recognizes Outstanding Philanthropists
ence” view. It would have been
quite easy for her to move on in
her personal life to the activities
that occupy her time in her retire-
ment. She chose not to do that. She
is a daughter of the plains and a
student of a close knit community.
Even though many years exists be-
tween her rural days and her very
successful urban endeavors, she
has never forgotten her roots.” Erv
and DeMaris not only provide
funding for charities that benefit
the people of our state, they also
roll up their sleeves to help wher-
ever needed. Erv, a retired engi-
neer, is always willing to do what-
ever needs to be done. He has
helped with building designs, in-
stalled flooring, selected artwork
and has even driven a mini bus
across the State of South Dakota.
Their kind hearts and giving spir-
its have had an impact on thou-
sands of people throughout the
State of South Dakota.
Black Hills Power (BHP) in
Rapid City has been chosen as
South Dakota’s 2012 Outstanding
Philanthropic Business. Serving
the Black Hills region since 1883,
Black Hills Power has a long his-
tory of philanthropic giving and
support for employee volun-
teerism. Black Hills Power has
championed and implemented
community-wide events such as
planting hundreds of trees each
year through their BHP Power of
Trees Program; helping citizens
prepare their home for the winter
months through BHP Weatheriza-
tion Week; and supporting those
with limited resources that need
energy assistance through Black
Hills Cares Walk for Warmth. This
nomination was made and sup-
ported by Northern Plains Eye
Foundation, Rapid City Club for
Boys, Salvation Army, Western Re-
sources for Dis-ABLED Independ-
ence, Children’s Home Society and
YMCA of Rapid City.
Rushmore Rotary Club of Rapid
City has been chosen as this year’s
Outstanding Philanthropic Volun-
teer Fundraiser. Nominated by
Children’s Home Society, this serv-
ice group has a long history of giv-
ing their time, assisting with
building projects, organizing spe-
cial events and providing financial
support to build an endowment to
meet the current and future needs
of children served by the Chil-
dren’s Home Society. Rick Weber,
Development Director, writes that
virtually every building, program
and child served by Children’s
Home Society in the Black Hills
area has been impacted by the
generosity of Rushmore Rotary.
And their endowment gifts will
sustain Children’s Home Society
programs long after future gener-
ations of Rotarians are even born!
The commitment of Rushmore Ro-
tary to the work of Children’s
Home Society is nothing less than
a labor of love and brings hands
and feet to Rotary’s motto, “Service
above self.”
The South Dakota Chapter of
the Association of Fundraising
Professionals is a membership or-
ganization that serves as the stan-
dard bearer for professional
fundraising. Through training,
professional development, and net-
working opportunities, the organi-
zation strives to raise the level of
expertise for fundraisers repre-
senting nonprofit entities of all
sizes.
Badlands to celebrate National Public
Lands Day with fee free entry
will be allowed to enter the park
free of charge. Those who plan to
spend time in the park beyond the
29th will need to pay the regular
entrance fee for the remainder of
their stay.
Park visitors are reminded that
the fee-free designation applies to
entrance fees only and does not af-
fect fees for camping, reservations,
tours, or use of concessions. Park
entrance stations will have Inter-
agency Senior and Annual Passes
available for those who wish to
purchase them.
Additional fee-free days in 2012
will include Veteran's Day week-
end (November 10 – 12.)
For more on what there is to see
and do in Badlands National Park,
please visit the park's web site
www.nps.gov/badl. To learn more
about National Public Lands Day,
please visit the NPLD web site at
www.publiclandsday.org.
For more information see
http://www.nps.gov/badl, or follow
us on Twitter @BadlandsEdu, and
@Badlands_Ranger.
By Laurie Hindman
EMS billings services CEO
Leslie Vaughn and Sales Manager-
Dave Kuechenmeister met with the
Ambulance District Board and
Wall Volunteer Ambulance mem-
bers on Tuesday, September 18.
Kuechenmeister explained the
fundamentals of EMS and how
their services would be very bene-
ficial for the ambulance district.
“EMS Billings Services, Inc., is
one of the largest midwest ambu-
lance companies with a client re-
tention rate of 95 percent. We are
located in 16 states and are certi-
fied in ambulance codes and hold
other certifications and regulation
titles. We are very proactive in
billing that results in 70 percent of
claims being paidwithin 60 days of
processing and 80 percent of claims
being paid within 90 days,” said
Kuechenmeister. He also noted
EMS Billing Service alleviates the
headaches associated with billing
process and balance a healthy rela-
Ambulance District Board and
Wall Ambulance Service meet
with EMS Billing Services
tionship between the community
and EMS rescue squads.
Lucille Holsether asked what
could be done with IHS, Medicare
and Indigent bills that are hard to
collect. Vaughn agreed they are
hard to collect but they have the
means to collect them but most
times IHS and Indigent bills will
be written off.
John Kitterman asked if they
could do a projection on revenues
for the ambulance service. The am-
bulance service will gather the in-
formation and send it to EMS for
an analysis.
After the presentation was over
it was decided to bring in another
billing company to see what they
would offer.
Minutes from the August 29
meeting were approved.
The board will meet on Tuesday,
September 25 at the Wall Commu-
nity Center meeting room at 6:30
p.m.
The meeting was adjourned.
South Dakota best-run state
agement. All too often, govern-
ments defer or only partially meet
their obligations to pay into public
pensions, or they make unrealistic
growth projections that create the
illusion of stability. In contrast,
South Dakota has maintained its
pension fund integrity by faith-
fully depositing necessary monies
and by regularly revising projec-
tions to reflect changing realities.
In 2011, South Dakota balanced
the state government budget –
truly balanced the budget – with-
out raising taxes. That action did
not result in the favorable Barron’s
article, but it sustained past pat-
terns of responsible money man-
agement that put South Dakota on
that front cover.
It is not preordained that South
Dakota will always be strong, or
prosperous, or free. It is the obliga-
tion of every generation to secure
those blessings for the generation
to come. If we ever fail – if we
allow our state to be ensnared in a
pattern of entitlement and debt –
it will be because we forgot these
core values that have well served
us for so long.
As your governor, I pledge to
never lose sight of those values
that keep our state strong and il-
luminate for our nation the path-
way forward.
Registered South Dakota voters
have the option of absentee voting
by mail or in person. Secretary of
State Jason Gant said absentee
voting opens Friday for the Nov. 6
General Election.
“To vote absentee by mail, voters
must complete an absentee ballot
application, sign it and either have
it notarized or provide a copy of
their photo identification card be-
fore returning it,” Gant said,
adding that applications are avail-
able in the offices of County Audi-
tors as well as online at sdsos.gov.
“The Auditor will then mail a
paper ballot to the voter to com-
plete and return.”
Residents may also vote absen-
tee in person beginning September
21 by visiting the office of their
County Auditor. There they may
confirm voter registration, com-
plete an application for an absen-
tee ballot and then vote the ballot
and return it to the Auditor.
In the case of military and over-
seas voters, applications can be
transmitted via fax or e-mail as
well as by postal mail. If the appli-
cation is for a Primary, General or
other statewide election, uni-
formed and overseas voters may
request to have their ballots sent
to them electronically.
“Our website provides general
absentee voting guidelines as well
as a Military and Overseas Citi-
zens section, which offers specific
step-by-step instructions,” Gant
said. “Voters can also check their
registration status online at
sdsos.gov through the Voter Infor-
mation Portal, which is a tool al-
lowing voters to view a sample of
Gant: Absentee ballot options
their ballots and check on polling
locations.”
Applications can be returned at
any time, but absentee voting be-
gins 46 days prior to an election. In
South Dakota, election officials
must receive applications for ab-
sentee ballots no later than 3 p.m.
on Election Day. Once an absentee
ballot is completed, a voter may re-
turn it to the County Auditor in
person or by mail.
A qualified voter who is confined
due to sickness or disability may
apply in writing for an absentee
ballot via authorized messenger.
An authorized messenger delivers
the ballot from the election official
to the qualified voter and then re-
turns the marked ballot.
Breakdown of absentee voting in
South Dakota:
1. Verify status as registered
voter in South Dakota (register to
vote or update registration
through county auditor if needed;
registration deadline is 15 days
prior to an election).
2. Obtain absentee ballot appli-
cation from County Auditor or on-
line.
3. Fill out application, sign and
have notarized or provide copy of a
photo identification card (ID re-
quirement waived only for over-
seas voters).
4. Return application in person,
via authorized messenger or by
mail (uniformed and overseas vot-
ers may also submit applications
by fax or e-mail).
5. Fill out absentee ballot upon
receipt and return to election offi-
cial in person, via authorized mes-
senger or by mail.
Cit of Wall was selected as South Dakota’s Outstanding Phil-
anthropic Communit for 2012. ~Photos Laurie Hindman
Wall School Gm was one of the communit projects that was
testament to the communities hard work.
 +´¨ 
m  ´ ´¬ 
 ×  ¬ w× Æm
w º ¬w  ¹ºº w
 w w¬
¬ ¬ ÆÆ
Badlands National Park will
partner with Friends of the Bad-
lands to host a community event at
Main Street Square in Rapid City,
from 1:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., on Sun-
day, September 30, 2012. This
“Badlands Bash” will bring aware-
ness about the park and the
Friends of the Badlands organiza-
tion to our Rapid City neighbors.
Local musicians will be featured,
including Landslide, Layne Put-
nam, James Van Nuys, Mike Rear-
don Band and more. Sponsored by
Dakota Soda Company, this live
jam session will take place on the
Square and is free to the public.
There will be other activities in-
cluding National Park Service in-
terpretive stations and InterTribal
Buffalo Council information ta-
bles. There will also be kids’ activ-
ities, a raffle drawing for buffalo
meat, and more.
The Friends of the Badlands is a
non-profit organization whose mis-
sion is to work with Badlands Na-
tional Park in supporting interpre-
tive, educational and scientific pro-
grams to ensure stewardship,
restoration and preservation of
park resources. Donations to the
Friends group will help fund
school field trips to Badlands Na-
Badlands National Park and friends
group to host “Badlands Bash”
tional Park from Rapid City as
well as rural, under-served, and
tribal schools.
For more information on the
Friends group, visit http://
Wilson had a bus Summer
Wall Senior Rder Wilson was
elected State Speaker of the
House at South Dakota Bos
State this summer. Rder also
attended the National Associ-
ation of Student Councils Na-
tional Conference in Okla-
homa Cit where he repre-
sented S.D. as the State Pres-
ident and was a workshop pre-
senter. Wa to go Rder!
~Courtesy Photo
(continued on page 2)
courant@gwtc.net
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman
Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per ear; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
ear; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per ear.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Coprighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
Souh Dakoa Newspaper Associaion
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012 • Page 2
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¨
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Social Security News
By Kathy Petersen
Social Security
Public Affairs Specialist
Making proper Social Security
and Supplemental Security In-
come (SSI) payments is no game.
But improving our accuracy has
some similarities to a good foot-
ball strategy. You’ve got to be
strong on both defense and of-
fense.
Social Security is committed to
reducing improper payments. Our
goal has always been to pay the
right person the right amount at
the right time. And we’re highly
successful at doing that.
In paying retirement, survivors,
and disability benefits to more
than 55 million people each
month, our accuracy rate is over
99 percent. When it comes to Sup-
plemental Security Income – the
means-tested program for elderly,
disabled and blind people who
have limited income and re-
sources – our payment accuracy is
about 91 percent.
As with a good game of football,
we need a game plan to improve
payment accuracy. Here is ours.
On offense, we check and
recheck our benefit computations
and recipient information. That’s
done at kickoff, before we ever
make a payment.
On defense, we have game
plans, or strategies, to collect
funds back from the person we
improperly paid, especially if the
error was the result of a benefici-
ary failing or incorrectly reporting
an event that affects his or her
payment amount. When an indi-
vidual commits fraud in order to
receive payments not due, we
prosecute him or her to the fullest
extent of the law.
We will continue to work on of-
fense and defense in our efforts to
perfect our game plan and to
make each and every payment a
touchdown. Learn more about
what Social Security is doing to
prevent improper payments by
visiting our website on the subject
at www.socialsecurity.gov/improp-
erpayments. Kathy Petersen is a
public affairs specialist for Social
Security, Denver Region. You can
write her c/o Social Security Ad-
ministration, 605 Main, Suite
201, Rapid City, SD, 57701 or via
e-mail at kathy. petersen@ssa.
gov.
Deense and Oense maer in ooball and in prevening im-
proper paymens
It is difficult to imagine a man
dragging himself a mile through
brush, across gullies and along the
river breaks to safety. Hugh Glass
not only dragged himself a mile,
but hundreds. With each yard he
put behind him, he came closer to
civilization and immortality.
An historic marker that over-
looks Shadehill Reservoir in north-
western South Dakota tells the
saga of Glass.
Glass was a mountain man who
was part of a fur trapping expedi-
tion led by Andrew Henry in 1823.
The saga of Hugh Glass
The expedition was bound for the
mouth of the Yellowstone River
when it passed south of what is
now Lemmon that fall. While
hunting alone one morning, Glass
was attacked by a female grizzly
bear. He survived and made his
way to Fort Kiowa, about 200
miles away.
Glass’ bout with a bear became
well-known, and many fictional ac-
counts are based on Glass’ story.
According to Lord Grizzly by Fred-
erick Manfred, Glass regained con-
sciousness after the grizzly bear’s
attack to the grim reality of being
alone and unarmed in hostile In-
dian territory. His leg was broken;
his scalp was almost torn off; his
ribs were exposed where the flesh
on his back had been ripped away;
and his wounds were festering.
Glass set his broken leg and
began crawling toward the
Cheyenne River, about 100 miles
away. His anger at being aban-
doned by his comrades and his de-
sire to stay alive drove Glass as he
crawled by night and rested by
day.
Once he reached the Cheyenne
River, Glass fashioned a dugout
boat out of a cottonwood and used
it to float down the Missouri River
until he reached Fort Kiowa, about
four miles north of present-day
Chamberlain. The desire for re-
venge drove him on, to a new fur
trading post on the Yellowstone
and Big Horn rivers. There he
found Jim Bridger, one of the men
he believed had left him for dead.
He confronted Bridger – and for-
gave him. Bridger lived to become
one of the foremost mountain men,
trappers, scouts and guides in the
Western United States.
Revenge was still driving Glass,
though. He set out to find John
Fitzgerald, the other man he be-
lieved to have abandoned him.
Found Fitzgerald he did – and let
him go free.
The monument to Glass is situ-
ated off an unpaved road on the
south side of Shadehill Reservoir.
To get to the marker from Lem-
mon, go south on SD Hwy 73 about
13 miles and turn west onto Hugh
Glass road.
An exhibit at the Grand River
Museum in Lemmon also tells
about one of the greatest survivor
stories in American history. The
Museum at the Cultural Heritage
Center in Pierre contains an ex-
hibit about the fur trade.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Founda-
tion, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society. Find us on the
web at wwww.sdhsf.org.
Pictured above is the historical marker about Glass that is located near Shadehill Reservoir.
~Photo by South Dakota Historical Society Foundation
Gregory and Lori Shearer, who
own 12 bulls, Rafter U Cross own-
ers of three bulls and Dartt Angus,
with two bulls are listed in the
2012 Fall Sire Evaluation Report
published by the American Angus
Association® in Saint Joseph, Mo.
Issued in both the spring and fall,
the new report features the latest
performance information available
on 6,067 sires, and is currently ac-
cessible at www.angussiresearch.
com.
"This report provides both
Angus breeders and commercial
cattle producers using Angus ge-
netics with accurate, predictable
selection tools for improving their
herd," says Sally Northcutt, ge-
netic research director. Expected
Progeny Differences (EPDs) are
generated from the performance
database of the American Angus
Association, which includes infor-
mation submitted by nearly 9,000
Angus breeders this past year
Local Angus breeders recognized
for owning proven bulls
through the Association’s Beef Im-
provement Records (BIR) program.
The Fall 2012 evaluation in-
cludes a full suite of EPDs for pro-
duction, maternal, and carcass
traits. Available decision-making
tools also include Values, the bio-
economic indexes designed to as-
sist commercial producers in sim-
plifying the genetic selection
process.
The semi-annual analysis for
the Sire Evaluation Report utilizes
over 21 million measures used to
generate nearly 62 million EPDs
for the Angus breed.
The American Angus Association
with headquarters in Saint
Joseph, Mo., provides programs
and services for nearly 30,000
members nationwide and thou-
sands of commercial producers
who use Angus genetics. Go to
www.angus.org for more informa-
tion.
South Dakotans should be aware
of the risk of hantavirus as temper-
atures cool off and rodents move in-
doors, says a state health official.
Hantavirus is caused by a virus
carried by rodents. It can result in
Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome,
which fills the lungs with fluid and
can lead to respiratory failure.
Deer mice are the primary carriers
of the virus that causes the disease.
“Routine rodent control meas-
ures are particularly important
this time of year as rodents look to
move inside,” said Dr. Lon
Kightlinger, State Epidemiologist
for the Department of Health. “The
risk for hantavirus is statewide
and year round. It can happen
wherever there are rodent-infested
buildings.”
People get infected when they
breathe in aerosolized virus from
droppings, urine or saliva of mice.
Symptoms usually appear within
two to four weeks of exposure and
include fatigue, a fever of 101 to
104 degrees, muscle aches, cough,
vomiting and diarrhea. Seek med-
ical care immediately if you have a
fever, deep muscle aches and se-
vere shortness of breath after expo-
sure to mice.
South Dakota has reported 15
cases of hantavirus and five deaths
since 1993 when the disease was
first detected, including one death
earlier this year. More that 570
cases have been reported in the
United States since 1993, including
a cluster of nine cases this summer
at Yosemite National Park in Cali-
South Dakotans be aware
of hantavirus this fall
fornia that has resulted in three
deaths.
To control mice and prevent
Hantavirus infection:
•Seal gaps around roofs, attics,
basements, windows, doors, foun-
dations, vents, air conditioners,
under sinks and other pipes.
•Set traps where you find mice,
nesting materials, urine or drop-
pings.
•Wear rubber or plastic gloves
to clean up dead mice or their
droppings.
•Spray dead mice, urine or drop-
pings with a disinfectant or a mix-
ture of one and one-half cups
household bleach and one gallon of
water. Soak for five minutes, wipe
up with a paper towel and put
everything in a plastic bag and
seal. Put in a second bag and seal
that as well.
•Clean the area with a disinfec-
tant or bleach solution. Don’t use
vacuum cleaners or brooms, since
they can create aerosols. Wash
gloved hands with soap and water
and wash again after taking off
gloves.
•Keep your house and yard free
of junk and rubbish to limit food
sources and nesting sites for mice.
Use thick plastic or metal contain-
ers with tight lids for garbage and
for storing pet food.
Learn more about Hantavirus
and its prevention at http://
doh.sd.gov/hantavirus or http://
www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/index.ht
ml.
Celebrate Banned Books
week September 30 to October 6
at the Wall Community Library
Banned Books Week is an an-
nual observance from the Ameri-
can Library Association’s Office for
Intellectual Freedom that cele-
brates the First Amendment right
of the freedom to read.
During Banned Books Week, li-
braries, schools, and bookstores
Wall Library to celebrate
Banned Book Week
across the country will celebrate
the freedom to read by hosting spe-
cial events, exhibits and read-outs.
Wall Community Library will
have a special exhibit of banned
books and feature others as Books
of the Month. You might be sur-
prised by the books that have been
challenged or banned in certain
arenas. Come by and celebrate
your freedom to read!
The 2013 annual park entrance
license for South Dakota's state
parks and recreation areas go on
sale October 1.
The 2013 park entrance license
is valid from Oct. 1, 2012, through
May 18, 2014. Purchasers of one li-
cense can also buy a second license
at half price.
The license is required for en-
trance into designated state parks,
recreation areas and lakeside-use
areas, although it does not cover
State park entrance licenses
for 2013 available soon
camping costs or other fees.
Entrance licenses can be pur-
chased at local state park offices or
by calling the South Dakota Divi-
sion of Parks and Recreation at
773-3391.
The 2013 annual entrance li-
cense features the image of a soar-
ing eagle. Parks near the dams on
the Missouri River offer excellent
opportunities for bald eagle view-
ing in winter months.
You may vote a ballot before
Election Day at the following loca-
tions Monday through Friday dur-
ing normal office hours:
•Pennington County Auditor’s
Office, Pennington County Court-
house (394-2153), voting precincts:
all Pennington County precincts.
•Hill City Finance Office, 243
Deerfield Rd, Hill City (574-2300),
voting precincts: HC – Hill City.
•Wall City Finance Office, 501
Main St, Wall (279-2663), voting
precincts: WL – Wall; QU – Quinn;
CR – Creighton.
Ballots are available for earl
voting on September 21
Log on to www.sdsos.gov under
“Where Do I Vote”, enter your
name and date of birth and you
can look at and print a Sample
Ballot.
Early voting is conducted
through November 5. On Election
Day, a voter must vote at their reg-
istered polling location.
For information on where you
vote or how you can obtain a ballot
by mail, log on to our website at
www.votepennco.com or call the
Auditor’s Office at (605) 394-2153.
Badlands National Park and friends
group to host “Badlands Bash”
www.friendsofthebadlands.com.
Badlands Natural History Associ-
ation is also providing funding and
support for this event.
Superintendent Eric Brunne-
mann stated that, “This is our con-
tribution to National Public Lands
Day, here at Main Street Square,
next to the Badlands sculptures.
This is about protecting our special
places and sharing the Badlands
with our schools.”
For more information see
http://www.nps.gov/badl, or follow
us on Twitter @BadlandsEdu, and
@Badlands_Ranger.
(continued from page 1)
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School & Area news
Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012• Page 3
Sept. 28-29-30-Oct. 1:
Expendables II (R)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
¬w +·
+¹···  '×
OCTOBER 5-6-7-8:
Hope Springs (PG-13)
OCTOBER 12-13-14-15:
The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG)
OCTOBER 19-20-21-22:
Lawless (R)
OCTOBER 28-29-30-31:
Hotel Transylvania (PG)
Need a gift idea for that hard-to-bu someone?
How about a gift that keeps on giving all year?
A subscription to the
Pennington County Courant.
Call to start your subscription gift! (605) 279-2565
º ·
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½¬¬ » 
Summer 2012 one of the warmest
for the Black Hills region
By Naional Weaher Service
Summer 2012 was one of the
warmest ever recorded in the Black
Hills region. All stations had aver-
age temperatures among the ten
warmest on record with Mission
14S, Gillette 4SE, and Newcastle
setting their warmest average tem-
peratures. Meteorological summer
is June 1 through August 31.
The summer season was also
drier than normal, but only a few
stations measured one of their ten
driest seasons. Fort Meade (Stur-
gis) and Winner set records for
their driest summers.
Souh Dakoa
•Bison: aveage temperature -
73.2, ranking - third, summer
record - 74.2 in 1933.
•Camp Crook: average temper-
atire - 73.0, ranking - fourth, sum-
mer record - 76.5 in 2006
•Cottonwood: average tempera-
ture -75.1, ranking - sixth, summer
record - 79.9 in 1936
•Fort Meade / Sturgis: average
temperature - 74.3, ranking - sec-
ond, summer record - 75.3 in 1988
•Hot Springs: average tempera-
ture - 74.6 , ranking - third, sum-
mer record - 78.3 in 1936
•Interior / Badlands National
Park: average temperature - 78.1,
ranking - third, summer record -
79.2 in 2006
•Lead: average temperature -
68.3, ranking - fourth, summer
record - 71.5 in 1936
•Lemmon: average temperature
- 73.0, ranking - fourth, summer
average - 75.7 in 1936
•Maurine 12SW / Opal: average
temperature - 73.4, ranking -
fourth, summer record - 74.2 in
2006
•Milesville: average tempera-
ture - 75.8, ranking - second, sum-
mer record - 76.3 in 2006
•Mission 14S: average tempera-
ture - 74.8, ranking - first, summer
record - previous record 74.5 in
1988
•Mount Rushmore: average tem-
perature - 70.4, ranking - third,
summer record - 72.3 in 1988
•Newell: average temperature -
72.7, ranking - fourth, summer
record - 74.9 in 1936
•Oelrichs: average temperature
- 74.5. ranking - third, summer re-
crod - 75.6 in 1933
•Pactola: average temperature -
65.1, ranking - second, summer
record - 66.1 in 1988
•Rapid City Airport: average
temperature - 73.7, ranking - fifth,
summer record - 74.7 in 1988
•Rapid City NWS: average tem-
perature - 74.8, ranking - second,
summer record - 76.1 in 1936
•Spearfish: average tempera-
ture - 72.9, ranking - fourth, sum-
mer record -74.9 in 1931
•Winner: average temperature -
76.9, ranking - sixth, summer
record - 79.0 in 1936
Wyoming
•Gillette 4SE: average temper-
ature - 73.2, ranking - first, sum-
mer record - previous record
72.3in 1988
•Newcastle: average tempera-
ture - 74.9, ranking - first, summer
record - previous record 74.5 in
1988
Souh Dakoa
•Fort Meade / Sturgis:
precipitation - 2.69, ranking -
first, summer record - previous
record 3.00 in 2006
•Hot Springs: precipitation -
3.78, ranking - 10th, summer
record - 1.44 in 1898
•Maurine 12SW / Opal: precipi-
tation - 3.44, ranking - second,
summer record - 2.48 in 2006
•Mission 14S: precipitation -
4.72, ranking - eighth, summer
record - 3.47 in 1996
•Winner: precipitation - 3.09,
ranking - first, summer record -
previous record 3.35 in 1970
Wyoming
•Newcastle: precipitation -
2.66, ranking - eighth, summer
record - 1.76 in 1987.
Preliminary reports show South
Dakota’s “100 Days of Heat’’ safe-
driving campaign resulted in fewer
highway fatalities than the 10-
year average for the same period.
During the period from the start
of the Memorial Day weekend
through the end of the Labor Day
weekend this year, South Dakota
recorded 50 fatalities as a result of
highway crashes. Statistics from
the State Office of Highway Safety
show that for the past 10 years,
the average number of fatalities
during the same period has been
61.
“Too many people are still dying
and being injured in crashes on
South Dakota highways,’’ said Col.
Craig Price, superintendent of the
Highway Patrol. “However, we ex-
perienced a significant reduction
this summer compared with the
long-term averages, and that is en-
couraging. The focus of the sum-
mer-long campaign was on drunk
driving, seatbelt use and speeding,
major factors in a majority of our
highway fatalities and injuries.
The Highway Patrol, State Of-
fice of Highway Safety and law en-
forcement agencies across South
Dakota cooperated in the “100
Days of Heat” campaign. Because
more than half of South Dakota’s
traffic fatalities generally happen
“100 Das of Heat” safet
effort shows reduced fatalities
during the summer, the education
and enforcement campaign tar-
geted the period from Memorial
Day through Labor Day. That’s a
span of about 100 days. The cam-
paign included law enforcement ef-
forts, public education, public serv-
ice announcements and non-tradi-
tional marketing elements.
Final numbers on total crashes
and injuries during the campaign
period may not be available for a
number of weeks, but State High-
way Safety Director Lee Axdahl
said the preliminary numbers are
encouraging.
“100 Days of Heat got people
thinking about their driving
habits, and that’s a good thing for
long-term highway safety,’’ Axdahl
said. “If we can encourage travel-
ers to use seatbelts, follow speed
laws and not drink and drive, we
will improve the safety of our
roads.’’
Preliminary reports show that of
the 50 highway fatalities, 45 per-
cent were alcohol-related and 16
percent were speed-related. More
than half (53 percent) of the people
killed in motor vehicle crashes
were not wearing seatbelts, and
only one of the people killed in mo-
torcycle crashes was wearing a
helmet.
Seth Courtney, a communica-
tion major from Belle Fourche, and
Hannah Kloiber, a business ad-
ministration major from Spearfish,
were crowned the 2012 Swarm
Week king and queen at Black
Hills State University last night.
BHSU crowns the 2012
Swarm Week Roalt
Also part of the royal court were
homecoming king candidates
Markus Heinrich, business admin-
istration major from Whitewood;
Dathan Rappana, mass communi-
cation major from Montrose;
Daniel Fairchild, history education
major from Armour; Joseph Nagle,
outdoor education major from Dav-
enport, Iowa; and Daniel Hunt,
history major from Colorado
Springs, Colo.
Queen candidates included Tay-
lor Degen, psychology major from
Spearfish; Samantha Nelson, biol-
ogy education major from
Creighton; Brooke Geier, business
administration-marketing major
from Spearfish; Nicole Dickenson,
psychology major from Davenport,
Iowa; and Brittney Seitz, speech
communications major from Black
Hawk.
Kelly Kirk, an instructor with
the School of Mathematics and So-
cial Sciences, was named Swarm
Week mom, and Bert Juhrend, as-
sociate professor of theater, was
chosen as Swarm Week dad.
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U¹    ¹ .
By Coach Karol Paer-
son
On Wednesday, September 19th,
the Western Great Plains Confer-
ence Cross Country meet was held
at the Wall Golf Course.
Austin Huether cruised the 3.1
mile course in 17:34 to out distance
the pack for a victory.
Tristen Rush from Philip came
in second in an 18:07.
Huether also received an All-
Conference plaque for placing in
the top seven.
Alex Tysdal ran a 23:09 for the
day for 20th and Nathan Patterson
came in 21st in 24:42.
Philip won the meet with 10
points, Rapid City Christian had
23, Lyman 30, White River 33 and
Wall 40 for the Varsity Boys.
Holly Iwan from Philip won the
Girls Varsity in a 16:55.
Team standings for the girls
were Philip with 16 points,
Kadoka 18, Lyman 20, RC Chris-
Conference champion!
tian 32, and Jones County with 45.
Coach’s Commens: Another
windy day, but a perfect tempera-
ture day for running.
Huether had a goal and that was
to win. He took off and lead the en-
tire race with a smooth, relaxed
stride. It was meant to be with
much dedication on his part with
his work ethic.
Tysdal is improving more and
more. This was his first time run-
ning varsity and did very well.
Patterson had an injury issue,
but fought through to finish for the
team.
I appreciate the many volun-
teers that helped. It makes for an
enjoyable time for the athletes,
coaches and fans!
Cameron Richter is the Wall Middle School student of the month
for September 2012. Cameron is in 8th grade and is an excellent
student. He alwas has his assignments completed on time and
is careful to do qualit work. He is alwas willing to help other
students and is an active leader in class discussions. Cameron
is ver friendl and has a positive attitude. Cameron participates
in man activities including basketball, football, rodeo, and 4-H.
Cameron is the son of Tro and Dawn Richter. Kent Jordan from
First Interstate Bank presented Cameron with a First Interstate
Bank sweatshirt and bag. Congratulations Cameron!
~Photo Laurie Hindman
“B the Grace of God,” said, Austin Huether for running a great
race. Pictured from left to right... Nathan Patterson, Huether and
Alex Tsdal. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
Wall Middle School
student of the month
By Coaches Sacy Sewar
and Pandi Piman
The 2012 Junior High Volleyball
season started off with a BANG!
There are 23 excited girls ready to
be part of the Wall JH Eagle Vol-
leyball team coached by Coach
Stacy Stewart, Assisted by Coach
Pandi Pittman and stats by Suzie
Westby.
Each grade won their first
games respectively. The eighth
graders first game was a “C game”
against Kadoka and they won in
two sets.
The seventh graders played with
the eighth graders for their first
games at the Newell Tournament.
They represented Wall well at the
Newell Tournament, leaving the
tournament undefeated, with wins
against Newell, Belle Fourche, and
Spearfish.
The sixth grade girls won their
first game against Philip in two
sets. The girls are off to a great
Lad Eagles Junior High
Volleball 2012 season
season!!
The following members of the
2012 JH Volleyball team are as fol-
lows:
•Eighh Grade: Jessica Cas-
jens, Savanna Deutscher, Sidney
Dunker, Savana Johnston, Taylor
Richter, Elyssa Westby, Kallie An-
derson and Lady Hawk Rooks.
•Sevenh Grade: Paisley God-
frey, Emma Michael, Emilee
Pauley, Trista Reinert, Kyla
Sawvell, Brianna Schreiber and
Sierra Wilson.
•Sixh Grade: Karlie Dartt,
Mercede Hess, Cooper Jo
McLaughlin, Shelby Ruland,
Jaicee Williams, Jayton McKay,
Sage Gabriel and Victoria Poor-
Bear.
The girls have several games left
to play this season, so keep posted
to the school website and come on
down and watch the girls play. We
are looking forward to a great sea-
son!
The South Dakota Well Drillers
Association is pleased to announce
it is offering scholarships totaling
$5,000.00 to be divided between
two deserving students.
The Association recognizes the
need for educational advance-
ments at all levels of the industry
and seeks to support students pur-
suing their educational goals.
Applicants must be a resident of
South Dakota or a relative of an
individual employed by a Member
Company in good standing of the
SDWDA. Applicants must be a
full-time student of an accredited
South Dakota University or Tech-
S.D. Well Drillers Association
offers scholarships
nical School with a major empha-
sis on a degree related to the water
well/groundwater industry. Areas
of study include, but are not lim-
ited to: Engineering, Geology,
Hydro-Geology, Environmental
Sciences, Pump Installation/
Plumbing, Geo-Thermal, etc.
Applications must be received by
December 1, 2012. Applications
and rules for application can be ob-
tained by contacting Dennis Du-
vall, Committee Chairman by
email at: dennis@dakotaenv.com.
Please include your mailing in-
formation in your e-mail.
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Many friends and relatives vis-
ited Delbert Sebade, Sunday, Sep-
tember 16, to wish him a Happy
Birthday. Cake and ice cream was
served. It was a great tribute to
Delbert in honor of his 95th birth-
day. Sandra and Everett of Ne-
braska, arrived on Wednesday af-
ternoon. Marsha arrived a short
time later. They spent the end of
the week making preparations for
the event. They found time for sev-
eral card games. Friday evening,
Sandra and Everett took Delbert
down town to see the new lights.
On Sunday, they took him to
church. Norbert arrived Sunday
and daughter Rosalind was unable
to attend. It was a day filled with
joy and excitement. Delbert has
fond memories of all those who at-
tended or sent cards.
Mitch and DeAnna Kammerer
celebrated their 25th wedding an-
niversary, Thursday evening, Sep-
tember 20th at their home by Rush
Lake (wedding day was September
4th). Special guests were Matt
Kammerer, Ronda Hamann,
Shelly McGriff, Kayla (Shearer)
Eymer and Bill and Neva Hamann
were some of the wedding party 25
years ago. Approximately 150
guests ate “roasted hog”, visited
and listened to music by the Twi-
lighters (Dean and Gene Patter-
son, and Dorothy Shearer). Jody
Sawvell and Jed Kammerer also
entertained by playing guitar and
singing several country western
tunes.
The “Senior’s” pot luck super
took place at Prairie Village on
Thursday evening. Twenty-five
people attended and had brought
lots of food. We have gotten used to
having ice cream in the summer
but it failed to appear! Whoops.
The Golden West Telephone an-
nual meeting was the main thing
to go to on Saturday. Four hundred
members registered so you know it
was a good crowd. Everyone en-
joyed the free meal and all the
prizes given out. Only one district
had more than one person vying
for the director’s seat — District V.
“Stu” Marty of Hot Springs was
victorious. The “Itty Bitty Opera
Band” knows how to entertain.
The band consisted of five mem-
bers.
Lyle Williams kept a “follow-up”
appointment for his eye at the V.A.
in Ft. Meade on Wednesday.
Everything is well.
There have been some birthdays
the past week — we offer our con-
gratulations to them! Lois (Price)
Shearn of Prescott Valley, AZ,
turned 98 on September 22nd. She
was born in northwestern Haakon
County and spent many years
teaching school, some in the Rapid
City system. Marjorie Winkow-
itsch of Quinn, became an octoge-
narian on September 26th. She
lives north of Quinn. Best of
wishes to them.
Our congratulations, also, to
Anna and Carl Humphrey of
Wasta as they celebrated 65 years
of married life. And not to be left
out are Bill and Sylvia Stone of
Rapid City (formerly of the Pedro
area) who celebrated being mar-
ried on September 9, 1942.
Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle
went to Spearfish on Sunday. They
took Jim Doyle and Barb Croell to
lunch to celebrate Jim’s birthday.
Bill Leonard’s birthday was Sat-
urday, the 22nd. They went to
Rapid City to have a wonderful
dinner and visited their daughter
Robin and Bob Caswell.
We offer our congratulations to
Dave Jones. He is one of the four
pacts to be published in a book by
the South Dakota Poetry Society.
Way to go, Dave!
Marcia Williams of Cody, Wyo.,
arrived at her parent’s home on
Tuesday, the 17th, to join Les and
Kay for a trip to Lincoln, Neb. On
Friday, the attended the wedding
of Randy and Mary’s daughter,
Amanda to James Hoehne. Other
relatives in attendance were Mike,
Gwen, Alex and Abby Hamilton of
Casper; Shauna, Luke, Remming-
ton and Marlee Kay of Platte, and
Jess Williams of Sioux Falls. Les,
Kay and Marcia returned home on
Sunday, the 23rd.
Tara and Allyna Andes, daugh-
ter and granddaughter of Gary
and Deb Williams, came home
from Ft. Drum, N.Y., on Thursday,
the 19th. Tara will be leaving for
San Antonio, Texas, on October 3rd
to attend medical school. Allyna
will be staying with her grandpar-
ents and great-grands while her
mom is gone.
“Theme” meal was on Monday
— probably our last “picnic” for
this year — had burgers, beans,
hash browns, etc. Set up six tables
so we are doing better.
Good news! Jeff Sorensen and
his son Chris have been serving in
the military overseas. They are not
home yet but are on US soil, as is
James Sorensen. Should be home
this week.
Well, it is officially autumn.
Days will keep getting shorter
until the winter solstice, December
21st. Forecast for this week is for
temperatures to be in the 70’s,
very little precipitation. Keep on
praying for rain.
“America will never be destroyed
from the outside. If we falter and
lose our freedoms, it will be because
we destroyed ourselves.”
~Abraham Lincoln
been doing a lot lately, but had
been to Rapid City for errands and
lunch with Melissa. He also re-
ports going into Wall to Prairie Vil-
lage for lunch one day last week.
Clyde was a coffee visitor on Sat-
urday. He said his back is starting
to feel better, but is still taking it
kind of easy.
Mel and Dorothy Anderson at-
tended the funeral for Jimmy Reed
in Faith on Wednesday. They kept
appointments and met with the il-
lustrator for their new book on Fri-
day. We are all anxious to read the
new book Mel! They went to
church on Sunday and enjoyed a
visit from Bunny, Mazee, Mattee
and Emilee along with their
friends Hunter and Jason.
John and Jean Linn attended
the Golden West Telephone meet-
ing in Wall on Saturday. Dorothy
Anderson, Margee Willey and
Margaret Nachtigall brought din-
ner over and had a nice visit on
Thursday. They had several games
of dominoes to pass the time.
Jim and Caroline Wilsey spent
five days in Sioux Falls and re-
turned on Tuesday. While they
were there, they attended the wed-
ding of their grandson, Brandon to
Victoria Kohnen, which was held
in Brandon. They also were able to
enjoy visiting with four of their
children from Minneapolis to
Houston, Texas, who were also
there to attend the wedding. On
Saturday, Mazee and Mattee
Pauley along with Jason Hapney
helped them work cattle. Caroline
said it is so nice to have young peo-
ple around to help when they need
it and that they are very Blessed.
Bunny and the girls seem to
have been making the rounds last
week. On Wednesday evening,
they visited the Shirrise and Mor-
ris Linn household. Shirrise and
Tiff Knuppe of New Underwood,
went to Rapid City, Friday, to run
errands and had lunch. They also
visited at Travis and Melisa
Byrne’s home in New Underwood,
in the afternoon. Clyde Arneson
was a coffee visitor Saturday
morning…wait…wasn’t he also at
Lawrence’s house that morning?
Clyde must like coffee. Shirrise
and Laken were dinner guests
Sunday at Brian and Misty
Walker’s of Union Center.
Carolyn Anders, Twila Trask
and Shirley Trask took a road trip
to Norris, Platte and Mission on
Monday and Tuesday. They visited
friends and relatives along the
way and got to see some green
grass and hay being baled. That
sure must have been a foreign
sight.
Peggy and Larry Gravatt along
with the rest of the gang, attended
the end of the year party for the
Wasta Info Center at the Badlands
Bar in Wall on Saturday night. It
was a nice evening of visiting and
bringing another season to an end.
On Sunday, their son Brad Book-
binder came out for the afternoon
to visit the home place. He brought
along his inversion table for Larry
hoping it would make his hip feel
better. So now Larry is hanging
upside down by his feet for 10 min-
utes a day. It’s quite a sight. His
only problem is that he can’t get
right side up by himself, so Peggy
is his spotter. We will keep our fin-
gers crossed.
Lets’ keep looking to the sky and
praying for rain!
Submitted by Peggy Gravatt
We have had some major events
in the community in the last week,
so we will start with those.
Congratulations go out to Philip
and Mary Kay Wilson. Josh and
Amy Wolberg welcomed little
Emma Claire into their world last
Wednesday much to the delight of
big sister Mary and little brother
Sam. Emma Claire came in at 8
lbs. 10 oz and 21 ½”. Grandma
Mary Kay has been in Minnesota
helping out and we aren’t sure if
she is coming back! While Mary
Kay was away, Philip joined the
crew from the Info Center at the
Badlands Bar in Wall on Saturday
for the year end get together.
Mary Boydston presented Fred-
die Ferguson with the Eagle
Award for 34 years of service for
delivering the rural mail. This was
done up at the Elm Springs
Church on Sunday. Freddie said it
was a nice honor and he got to eat
lots of cake. Congrats Freddie!
Don’t know what we would do
without you and we all very much
appreciate you.
Freddie also reported that Na-
talie Tines Termes was recognized
as one of seven recipients to re-
ceive an honor from Good Samari-
tan for hip and knee replacements.
She was the only one out of the
Western US to receive this recog-
nition. Apparently, there was quite
a party at Good Sam in New Un-
derwood to celebrate.
Lawrence Burke said he hasn’t
Elm Springs News
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Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Skillingstads begin the tales, ad-
ventures and triumphs of a few of
Wasta’s citizens…
Ken and Danene’s “Pine Street
Comfort Lodge and Eatery” wel-
comed a former resident of Wasta
for a few days this past week. Bob
Griffith lived in Wasta in 1995.
When he took up full-time resi-
dence in Texas, he sold his house
on B Street to Ken and Danene.
From the earliest photos of the
town, this little house could be
spotted in the same location as
now. It looks slightly different due
to the entry porch added by Ken,
but still a very recognizable bit of
Wasta’s early history. Bob arrived
Monday and left Thursday. Ken
said Bob is doing well and they
had a good visit.
Because I generally forget to
wear my “Dora the Reporter” hat,
I didn’t ask Ken about the previous
weeks visit from brother Gene and
sister Betty, except for the bare ne-
cessities — arrival, departure, etc
— So, the big thing about the three
siblings being together is that it
was the first time in 30 years the
three had all been together! It hap-
pens to a lot of us — time and its
zipping by at a fast pace!
I had a good time with Dorothy
Anderson and Margaret Nachti-
gall as we three took lunch and a
domino set to Jean Linn’s home in
Elm Springs. It was the usual non-
sense and laughter. Jean shared
her physical therapy “toys” with
us. She sort of issued a challenge
— like ‘you gals try this using your
LEFT hand”! Jean had a small
stroke last spring and has been
working with daughter-in-law
Kelly to regain use of the hand. We
three were struggling and Jean
was smiling as we took up the
challenge. It was a challenge! But
also a good time.
Andrew and Emily Ferris were
at the volleyball game Tuesday
night. They still seem like Wasta’s
kids. So good to see them. Andrew
was one of a media class at school
who was filming the game for
Channel 19. Good for you, Andrew!
Emily works some times for a day
care in Wall. She also babysits to
earn money for a keyboard. Good
for you, Emily.
Sheridan Deering stopped by
our bench for a visit as well and
shared news of her second grade
class.
The Lady Eagles won!
Billie Humphrey brought us up
to speed about her family. Billie is
daughter-in-law of Carl and Anna
Lee. Kids and grandkids (one more
grandchild due in February) are
doing well and daughter Amanda
is working in Philip at the hospital
and studying for her degree in
nursing.
Anna Lee Humphrey is still
doing her part to keep healthy, has
a good attitude and a lot of deter-
mination.
Marilyn and Ruby Keyser
stopped by last Thursday after-
noon and we were joined by
Dorothy Bathel for “catch-up
chat”. Marilyn spent some days in
Wall, some weeks with grand-
daughter and family in Summer-
set, a short visit in Walla nd then
home, Tuesday. Marilyn has had
some serious treatment for cancer
and will return to Dallas, Texas for
some precautionary radiation
treatments. Keep her in your
thoughts and prayers.
Thursday evening, we attended
a nice wedding anniversary party
at DeAnna and Mitch Kammerer’s
home as they celebrate 25 years to-
gether. Once again those amazing
circles in life with people we knew
years ago coming together again.
Mitch’s dad, John, and Lloyd were
classmates at Cathedral High
school in the 1950’s. Good food,
good music, friendly people com-
bined to make the evening great.
Baby Mavrick Williams and
mom, Jamy, came by Sunday for a
“show and tell” time. A very, very
cute baby, chubby cheeks and a lit-
tle dark hair, he chose to sleep
through the visit. Jamy said their
morning had been busy with the
usual eating, burping, diaper fill-
ing, wash up, eat a little more, etc,
etc. Babies are so wonderful!
Freddie Ferguson was honored
last week by being named recipi-
ent of the Eagle Spirit Award. This
award is given to only 30 rural
mail carriers out of the 15, 000
rural carriers across the U.S.A. At
the Elm Springs Community
Church on Sunday, Mary Boyd-
ston, Wasta Post Master, pre-
sented Freddie with a very nice
plaque and gave some of the re-
quirements to be met as set out by
the postal department. It was
quite a list! Mary brought cake
and treats and everyone at the
church had an opportunity to con-
gratulate Freddie and agree that it
is a huge honor and so deserved.
Wasta friends who were there:
Mary Lewis, Faye Bryan, Margee
and Lloyd Willey.
Late one afternoon, all was
fairly quite in Wasta when round
the corner of Ash and B Streets
came Faye Bryan and her braying
mule! Faye brings the mule to a
stop, explains she needs help herd-
ing sharp tailed grouse to safety.
Wanting to be part of a good ad-
venture, I hopped on and off we
went! Spotting the grouse, I
jumped off and did my herding on
foot. Faye and her Mule (still bray-
ing) got the grouse treed at a safe
location. Faye turned the ignition
“OFF” in her Kawasaki Mule and
as we reviewed our little adven-
ture, we decided that there were
not many towns where two “older
ladies” in a Mule with loud horn
honking could have quite so much
purposeful fun. Thank you Wasta!
Happy Trails!
Wasta Wanderings
At the Badlands Bar
Robbie & Molly Lytle,
together with our parents,
Byron & Peggy Parsons,
are celebrating our
Wedding Anniversaries.
Saturday, October 6th
Food & Fun 6:30 p.m.
Dance to Badger Horse
at 9 p.m.
Come & Go Baby Shower
for
Finn Steven McDonnell
(son of Brady & Sherri McDonnell)
October 3rd • 6: 30 p.m.
at Aunt Rhonda’s house
Hostess: Cheryl Renner, Deb Deal and Kathy Kennedy
Jerry & JoAnn Sanders
will celebrate 50 wonderful years
together on October 6, 2012.
They were united in marriage in
Wall, SD on October 6, 1962.
The many blessings they are
thankful for include four children,
nine grandchildren, one great-grandchild, good health
and 50 years together!
We ask that friends and family join Jerry and JoAnn to
celebrate this wonderful occasion. An open house will
be given in their honor
Saturday, October 6, 2012
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pierre
Senior Citizen Center, 401 W.
Pleasant Dr., Pierre, SD 57501
They request no gifts. Greetings
and cards may be sent to 930 W.
Pleasant Dr. #1, Pierre, SD 57501
The family of
Marjorie
Winkowitsch
requests a Card Shower
in honor of her
80th Birthday
September 26, 2012
Cards may be sent to:
19790 230th St.,
Quinn, SD 57775
With all our love and appreciation,
her family
Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Cener
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 o be a
sponsor on his church
direcory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Communit Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowbo Church
Wall Rodeo Grounds
Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Communit Church
Highwa 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Communit Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Communit Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Hol Rosar Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
B Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
The question is sometimes asked: If God’s will
and purpose are unalterable, why pray? The answer
is simply: Because the divine purpose, which any
answer to prayer must represent, includes the
prayer itself. It is enough that He “who worketh all
things after the counsel of His own will” (Eph. 1:11)
invites and exhorts His people to “come boldly unto
the throne of grace” to “let [their] requests be made
known unto God” (Heb. 4:16; Phil. 4:6).
But prayer is not merely petition, as many sup-
pose. It is one aspect of active communion with God
(meditation on the Word being the other) and in-
cludes adoration, thanksgiving and confession, as
well as supplication. Hyde, in God’s Education of
Alan, Pp. 154,155, says: “Prayer is the communion
of two wills, in which the finite comes into connec-
tion with the Infinite, and, like the trolley, appropri-
ates its purpose and power.”
We have an example of this in the record of our
Lord’s prayer in the garden, for, while He is not to
be classed with finite men, yet He laid aside His
glory, became “a servant” (Phil. 2:7) and “learned
obedience” (Heb. 5:8; Phil. 2:8). In this place of sub-
jection He made definite and earnest requests of
His Father, but closed His prayer with the words:
“Nevertheless, not My will, but Thine, be done”
(Luke 22:42) with the result that He was “strength-
ened” for the ordeal He had to face (Ver. 43).
Thus prayer is not merely a means of “getting
things from God” but a God-appointed means of fel-
lowship with Him, and all acceptable prayer will in-
clude the supplication — as sincerely desired as the
rest: “Nevertheless, not My will, but Thine, be done.”
THE PURPOSE OF PRAyER
Obituary
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
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The family of
Dorothy Hamann
invite you to an Open House in honor of her
90th birthday
Sunday, October 7th
1:00 to 3:00 p.m. • Wall Community Center
Cards may be mailed to:
PO Box 6, Wall, SD 57790
No gifts please
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“Quilt In A Day” Teacher,
LuAnn Garland
is giving a class on Eleanor Burns
BRAID IN A DAY
Sat., October 13th
Starting at 9:00 a.m. • Creighton Hall.
Class $25.00, Includes pattern and acrylic template.
For more information, call 457-2543.
Big White Open House
Sun., September 30th
4:00 p.m. to ?.
Enjoy Chili and desserts
and check out the “New” Country School
Justin Speer____________________
Denver each week. He married
Ardis Boydston on January 21,
1942, and they worked in Rapid
City until the death of Justin's dad
in 1943. Justin and Ardis then
moved back to Viewfield to take
over the family farm.
Their life on the farm evolved
over time. Besides maintaining the
operations of the farm, they
started a broiler chicken business
where Ardis was in charge of car-
ing for the chickens and Justin
helped dress them. They raised
and sold thousands of broiler
chickens over the years.
Justin expanded the farming
and ranching on the home place by
renting additional farm ground
and buying the Hacken's place in
1948. In 1952, they started a
Grade "A" Dairy and scaled back
the farming and ranching.
Through the years, the help of sev-
eral hired hands were required to
help Justin and Ardis with the day
to day operations.
Justin was very active in the
Viewfield and New Underwood
communities. He served on the
New Underwood Community Hos-
pital Board for eighteen years, was
active in the Lions Club, The Cat-
alyst Club, Viewfield Community
Church and also a member of the
New Underwood Community
Church.
He also enjoyed a variety of ac-
tivities. Ice fishing and league
bowling were among his favorites.
He also owned a two passenger
plane which he and Ardis flew reg-
ularly to Oregon to visit his
mother.
They did not have any children
of their own, however, they often
housed various nephews, nieces
and children of family friends.
Nephews Ron Matt and Lynn
Boydston lived with them to at-
tend high school in New Under-
wood and helped Justin and Ardis
on the dairy. Terry Miller, daugh-
ter of Helen and Leroy Miller,
spent many summers with them
as well. They also enjoyed attend-
ing activities and being involved
with their brother's and sister's
families.
In the early 1990's, Justin and
Ardis retired from the farm and
moved to their home in New Un-
derwood.
He will certainly be missed by
his family and friends and all who
knew him!
Viewing will be at the Kirk Fu-
neral Home in Rapid City on
Thursday, September 27, from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m.
Services will be held at 2 p.m.
Friday, September 28, 2012 at
New Underwood Community
Church in New Underwood with
Pastor Wes Wileman officiating,
with viewing one hour before serv-
ice. Burial will be at New Under-
wood Cemetery. There will be cake
and coffee served at the church fol-
lowing the burial.
In lieu of flowers there will be a
memorial.
Family and friends may sign
Justin's online guest book at
www.kirkfuneralhome.com.
Justin Speer, New Underwood,
age 93, died on September 21,
2012, at the Good Samaritan Cen-
ter in New Underwood, SD.
He is survived by sister-in-law,
Elsie Matt and brother-in-law,
Charles Boydston (Margaret), all
of New Underwood. He is also sur-
vived by many nieces and
nephews.
Those preceding him in death
were his wife, Ardis; his parents,
Hugh and Ollie Speer; infant sis-
ter; brothers-in-law, Cecil Boyd-
ston (Alice), and Arnold Matt; and
nephew, Carrol Boydston.
Justin was born in Rapid City,
SD, on December 3, 1919, to Hugh
and Ollie Speer and grew up on
the Ben Oliver place in Viewfield,
SD, where he lived most of his life.
Justin graduated from New Un-
derwood High School in 1937.
After graduation, he had various
jobs until he began trucking for
CM Trucker with regular runs to
Submitted by Lola Joyce Riggins
837-2053
Greetings… Well, I had the dis-
tinct honor of driving to Wall, Sun-
day, to join loved ones, friends and
neighbors to wish Delbert Sebade
a very Happy Birthday for his 95th
birthday. I had to leave early as
Stephan and Linda Riggins were
observing their 40th wedding an-
niversary so I came back to
Kadoka. When I left the Sebade
home, the friends, loved ones and
neighbors were arriving for some
delicious anniversary fall designed
birthday cake, ice cream and
punch or coffee. I so enjoyed a visit
with Sandra (Sebade) and Everett
Lerew. Many here in Kadoka will
remember them as Everett taught
school in Wanblee and they were
Kadoka residents.
Then I came back to Kadoka and
joined the loved ones, friends and
relatives for Stephan and Linda
Riggins 40th wedding anniversary
and pot luck dinner. Relatives
from the eastern part of the state,
Dan and Marla Nelson from rural
north of Creighton and neighbors
from rural Wanblee and Martin
were there. A long busy, interest-
ing day getting to see so many
friends and relatives again.
Walt and Toodie Simmons from
Nebraska, came Thursday to help
Jef and Marilyn Wilsey do fall
work on the Rose Cemetery. They
were overnight guests in the
Frank and Mary Wilsey home. Mr.
and Mrs. Simmons returned home,
Friday, after enjoying a nice visit
and doing some fall work and en-
joying the scenery.
Marilyn Wilsey drove to Rapid
City on Friday and was an
overnight guest in the home of her
daughter, Nancy Tjaden. Saturday,
the girls enjoyed the day shopping
and then attended the Wally and
Carol Hoffman barbecue and visit-
ing before returning home.
Thought: The more difficulties
one has to encounter, within and
without the more significant and
the higher in inspiration their life
will be. Time is a physician which
heals every grief.
Countryside News
The Wall Singers came and did
gospel music. They are Joann Weg-
ner, Mary Erz, Hazel Kalkbrenner,
Linda Tifft and Darlene Wulf. Res-
idents also saw the Car Show on
Sunday afternoon.
Kenny Karp held rosary service
on Wednesday with communion.
Rev. Darwin Kopfmann from the
Wall Methodist Church, held wor-
ship service and Dorothy Shearer
led our hymn sing.
Friday afternoon, Butch
Samuleson, formerly from Faith
and now resides in Whitewood, en-
tertained our residents with piano
music. What an entertainer!
Rev. Lloyd Edwards held wor-
ship service and Marti Aus led our
hymn sing.
Father Zandri held mass and
Kenny Karp and Margaret Larsen
helped. We also had community
coffee with residents.
Karen Madsen led our hymn
sing on Thursday.
The National Honor Society
from the New Underwood School
came and helped residents cele-
brate their birthdays for Septem-
ber.
Friday afternoon, Kathy Robin-
son family entertained our resi-
dents with old time music.
Until next time…May God bless.
Good Samaritan Society
COURANT
BRIEFS
AMERICAN LEGION
& AUXILIARY
The American Legion and Auxil-
iary will meet Thursday, Septem-
ber 27, at 6:00 p.m. in the meeting
room of the Wall Community Cen-
ter.
CREIGHtON HALL BENEfIt
The Creighton Hall Benefit with
a Picnic, Trap Shoot and Silent
Auction will be held at the
Creighton Hall, Saturday, Septem-
ber 29th, starting at 4:00 p.m., eat
at 6:00 p.m. Sloppy Joes, drinks
and paper products will be pro-
vided. Please bring a side dish,
salad or dessert.
Mark This
Date on Your
Calendar
Craft Bazaar
at the Creighton Hall
Sun., October 7th
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Call 457-2543
to reserve tables.
Deer licenses reduced, refunds
offered due to die-offs
The South Dakota Game, Fish and
Parks Department has been moni-
toring die-offs of white-tailed deer
across portions of the state and must
make adjustments to some West
River deer hunting units.
Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease
(EHD) has been confirmed in white-
tailed deer, and many of the deer
deaths being reported by the public
are suspected to be the result of that
disease.
In response to the disease, all un-
sold licenses will be removed from
the following deer hunting units for
the West River deer season: Bennett
County: 11A-09 and 11B-17; Gregory
County: 30A-19 and 30B-19; and
Jackson County: 39B-09. In addition,
200 licenses will be removed for
Meade County: 49B-09.
“As the department continues to
monitor the outbreak of EHD over
the next couple of weeks, we will pro-
vide additional recommendations to
the Game, Fish and Parks Commis-
sion at its October meeting to ad-
dress East River deer units,” said
GFP Secretary Jeff Vonk. “Currently,
the department plans to recommend
that the commission remove all un-
sold licenses in Bon Homme,
Hutchinson, and Yankton counties
and make significant reductions to
leftover licenses in Brule and
Charles Mix counties for the second
draw of the East River deer season.
Between now and the next commis-
sion meeting, we will continue our
surveillance efforts with the possibil-
ity of additional license reductions.”
Aside from conducting ground sur-
veillance and collecting reports from
the public, GFP is also using aerial
flights to help determine the severity
of deer mortalities.
“Reports of dead deer are coming
from across the state, and in some in-
stances landowners are telling tradi-
tionally hosted hunters that opportu-
nities will be limited,” Vonk said.
“With that in mind, GFP is notifying
deer hunters that they can voluntar-
ily return a deer license for any sea-
son prior to the start of that respec-
tive season and receive a full re-
fund.”
Hunters desiring a refund for a
deer license should send their li-
cense, including all associated tags,
to: GFP Licensing Office; 20641 SD
Highway 1806; Fort Pierre, SD
57532.
EHD is common in white-tailed
deer and is typically detected in late
summer or early fall. The virus is
spread by a biting midge and causes
extensive internal hemorrhaging.
Many deer exhibit no clinical signs
and appear perfectly healthy, while
others may have symptoms such as
respiratory distress, fever, and
swelling of the tongue. With highly
virulent strains of the virus, deer can
be dead within 1-3 days. In an at-
tempt to combat the high fever, af-
fected deer are often found in low-
lying areas or near rivers, ponds and
other waters.
GFP continues to ask individuals
who see sick deer or find dead deer
to contact their local conservation of-
ficer or call the Pierre office at 605-
773-5913.
Sports
Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012• Page 6
Online subscriptions to the Courant:
www.RavellettePublications.com
Lady Eagles fall to Faith
By Coach Dani Herring
The Wall volleyball team played
a five set thriller against Faith at
home on Thursday, September 13.
Wall was led by Autumn Schulz
with 15 kills, Kaitlin Schreiber
who had four aces and was 16/19
serving. Schreiber also led the
team in assists with 13.
The game went back and forth
from the beginning, with Wall tak-
ing the first set before Faith came
back to edge the second, Wall won
a thriller in the third, but Faith
was too much to handle in the end
and took the fourth and fifth.
Stats:
G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 Final
Wall: 25 21 26 16 8 2
faih: 18 25 24 25 15 3
Aack Aemps: Bailey Lytle
- 7, Monica Bielmaier - 16, Carlee
Johnston - 6, Kim Billings - 17,
Josie Blasius - 6, Schreiber - 15,
Schulz - 31. Team Totals: 98.
Kills: Lytle - 2, Bielmaier - 3,
By Coach Dani Herring
On Tuesday, September 18th the
Wall volleyball team played
Lyman Co., at home. After losing
the first set 20-25 the team came
back to win the next three in close
games, 26-24; 25-19; 25-22.
Problems in the first set with
communication and coverage al-
most completely went away in the
next three as they picked up the
intensity and temp of the game.
Lyman is a tricky team that
tries to use tips and hard outside
hitters to trick teams into playing
one type of coverage then attack-
ing the weak spots. The girls did a
great job of adjusting to the type of
defense needed and most impor-
tantly never gave up.
We are looking forward to the
rest of the week off from games be-
fore we play in the Belle Fourche
Tournament on Saturday, Septem-
ber 22.
Sas:
G1 G2 G3 G4 Final
Wall: 20 26 25 25 3
Lyman: 25 24 19 22 1
Aack Aemps: Bailey Lytle
- 12, Tayah Huether - 3, Monica
Bielmaier - 19, Carlee Johnston -
Lad Eagles number 13 Kaitlin Schreiber sets up the ball for
number 20 Autumn Schulz during the Eagles vs. Faith volleball
game. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
Johnston - 1, Billings - 2, Schreiber
- 5, Schulz - 15. Team Totals: 28.
Service Aemps: Lytle - 17,
Tayah Huether - 10, Billings - 17,
Blasius - 11, Emily Linn - 6,
Schreiber - 19, Schulz - 16. Team
Totals: 96.
Aces: Lytle - 1, Huether - 1,
Billings - 1, Blasius - 3, Schreiber
- 4, Schulz - 1. Team Totals: 11.
Blocking Solos: Lytle - 1, Biel-
maier - 1. Billings - 1. Team To-
tals: 3.
Ball Handling Aemps: Lytle
- 56, Huether - 22, Bielmaier -10,
Johnston - 3, Blasius - 8, Linn - 14,
Schreiber - 74, Schulz - 41. Team
Totals: 228.
Ball Handling Assiss: Lytle -
10, Schreiber - 13, Schulz - 1.
Team Totals: 24.
Receiving: Lytle - 1, Huether -
36, Linn - 13, Schreiber - 4, Schulz
- 21. Team Totals: 75.
Lady Eagles triumph
over Lyman County
7, Kim Billings - 28, Kaitlin
Schreiber - 32, Autumn Schulz -
41. Team Totals: 149. Ki l l s :
Lytle - 2, Huether - 1, Bielmaier -
4, Johnston - 2, Billings - 11, Josie
Blasius - 1, Schreiber - 4, Schulz -
11. Team Totals: 36.
Service Aemps: Lytle - 17,
Huether - 13, Bielmaier - 1,
Billings - 4, Nicole Eisenbraun -
15, Blasius - 8, Emily Linn - 8,
Schreiber - 15, Schulz - 13. Team
Totals: 94.
Aces: Lytle - 2, Huether - 1,
Billings - 1, Eisenbraun - 1, Bla-
sius - 1, Linn - 1, Schulz - 1. Team
Totals: 8.
Blocking Solos: Bielmaier - 1.
Team Totals: 1.
Ball Handling Aemps: Lytle
- 99, Huether - 40, Bielmaier -17,
Johnston - 4, Billings - 8, Eisen-
braun - 3, Blasius - 17, Linn - 28,
Schreiber - 76, Schulz - 63. Team
Totals: 355.
Ball Handling Assiss: Lytle -
14, Schreiber - 19, Schulz - 3.
Team Totals: 36.
Receiving: Huether - 36, Linn -
16, Schreiber - 4, Schulz - 21.
Team Totals: 77.
By Coach Karol Paerson
Friday was a big meet! The Elks
Cross Country meet was held on
Friday, September 21st in Rapid
City.
There were 86 Varsity Boy run-
ners from South Dakota, Montana
and Wyoming competing for
medals.
Austin Huether placed 28th in a
time of 18:07.47 and Alex Tysdal
came in 86th in 22:36.38.
It was quite a sight watching
and cheering on so many runners.
By Coach Ken Anderson
The Wall Eagles Football team
traveled to Ft. Pierre on Friday,
September 21st, and came away
with the win by the score of 41 to
12.
It was a great win in many
ways. The game started a little
slow and the Buffaloes were the
first to score. Wall came out and
were forced to punt in their first
series. Stanley Co. took the ball
over and with a combination of the
run and pass struck first with a 25
yard pass play. From that point on
the Eagles would come back and
never look back the rest of the
game.
In the first quarter, trailing 6 to
0, the Eagles flew down the field
with the use of the run game.
Tyler Trask and Taran Eisenbraun
did the bulk of the running until
Trask took an option pitch from
Trevor Anderson and struck pay
dirt from 14 yards out. With the
PAT kick good by Anderson, the
Eagles led by the score of 7 to 6
after the first quarter.
In the second quarter the Eagles
would dominate play as they
scored 20 unanswered points and
lead at half by the score of 27 to 6.
The Eagles dominated with the
ground game led by Trask with
three scoring runs of 12, 54, and 40
yards.
The line of scrimmage took con-
trol of the game up front and the
blocking from the backfield cleared
the way for Trask to do work.
Eisenbraun and Cade Kjerstad
also added some quality runs in
the quarter as well.
Defensively in the first half the
Eagles maybe bent a little against
the Buffalo pass game, but didn’t
allow them to get in the endzone.
The quick, physical play by the de-
fense swarmed the run game and
pressured or sacked the quarter-
back many times during the first
half.
The Eagles finished off the Buf-
falo in the third quarter by adding
two more touchdowns. The run
game with a timely pass through-
out the quarter moved the Eagles
downfield throughout the quarter
to gain a comfortable lead of 41 to
6.
The Eagles would continue their
relentless play and used substitu-
tions throughout the final quarter.
Many of the starters played less
giving duties to others to finish the
game. Many players did a great job
including Tyrel Clark with an in-
terception that was returned 34
yards just shy of the endzone.
Like stated before, it was a great
Eagles stampede the Buffaloes
game in many ways. There are
still areas that need work, but
many areas of the game improved
from the previous week. “I was re-
ally impressed with the quick, ag-
gressive, fast paced game that we
played.” Trask exploded in the run
game with five touchdowns.
The other score came from
Eisenbraun with an explosive six
yard run.
Offensively leading the way was
Trask with 241 yards rushing on
21 carries. His balance and explo-
sive style of running is very im-
pressive. As stated before, the
blocking up front and from the
backfield was very impressive all
night.
Defensively the Eagles were led
in tackles by Lane Blasius (nine
tackles) and Les Williams (eight
tackles). It was a definite team de-
fense that was hitting the Buffalo
from all angles. We did give a little
in the passing game but bottom
line only gave up one score until
late in the game.
The Stanley Co. quarterback
passed 26 times. He dropped back
another six times but was sacked
by the Eagles swarming defense.
We did a great job of making him
hurry his throw or focus on our
pass rush.
The run game of the opponents
was shut down only allowing 54
yards on the ground all night.
They did throw for 250 yards, but
the varsity only allowed about 150
of it through the first three quar-
ters. Also most of that came in the
first two drives of the game before
we settled in and played solid and
kept them out of the endzone.
For the night the Eagles pro-
duced 401 yards of offense on 58
plays. We played a pretty solid
game. We played fast and physi-
cal. We didn’t have many mental
mistakes or penalties. The young
men played hard and played well.
The win evens the Eagles record at
2-2 on the season.
This week is another big test as
we travel to Harding Co. Game
time is 7:00 p.m. MST. The Ranch-
ers are 5-0. If we continue to play
like we did last week, it should be
a good one!
Sas:
1st 2nd 3rd 4th Final
Eagles: 7 20 14 0 41
Bualoes: 6 0 0 6 12
firs Downs: Eagles - 15, Buf-
flaoes - 13.
Rushing Aemps: Eagles -
51, Buffaloes - 31.
Rushing Yards: Eagles- 363,
Buffaloes - 54.
Passes Complee: Eagles -
four, Buffaloes - 15.
Passes Aemped: Eagles -
seven, Buffaloes - 26.
Passes Inerceped: Eagles -
0, Buffaloes - 1.
Compleion Percenage: Ea-
gles - 57.1, Buffaloes - 57.7.
Passing Yards: Eagles - 38,
Buffaloes- 250.
fumbles: Eagles - two, Buf-
faloes - 0.
fumbles Los: Eagles - 0, Buf-
faloes - 0.
Pun Aemps: Eagles - two,
Buffaloes - three.
Reurn Yards (pun and
kick): Eagles - 48, Buffaloes - 116.
Number o Penalies: Eagles -
four, Buffaloes - one.
Penaly Yards: Eagles - 30,
Buffaloes - 15.
toal Oensive Plays: Eagles
- 58, Buffaloes - 57.
toal Yards Oense: Eagles-
401, Buffaloes - 304.
Average Per Play: Eagles -
6.91, Buffaloes- 5.33.
Eagles Quarerback: Trevor
Anderson, Completions - four, At-
tempts - seven, Interceptions - 0,
Yards - 38, Touchdowns - 0, Per-
centage- 57.1.
Receiving: Blasius, Catches -
one, Yards - three, Touchdowns - 0,
Average - 3.0. Trask, Catches -
one, Yards - 18, Touchdowns - 0,
Average - 18.0. Lane Hustead,
Catches - one, Yards - one, Touch-
downs - 0, Average - 1.0. Ben
Linn, Catches - one, Yards - 16,
Touchdowns- 0, Average- 16.0.
Rushing: Trask, Attempts - 21,
Yards - 241, Touchdowns - five, Av-
erage - 11.5. Eisenbraun, At-
tempts - 10, Yards - 59, Touch-
downs - one, Average - 5.9. Bla-
sius, Attempts - two, Yards - nine,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 4.5. An-
derson, Attempts - four, Yards, 21,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 5.3.
Cade Kjerstad, Attempts - five,
Yards - 34, Touchdowns - 0, Aver-
age - 6.8. Hustead, Attempts -
two, Yards - negative two, Touch-
downs - 0, Average - negative one.
Tucker O’Rourke, Attempts -
two, Yards - 10, Touchdowns - 0,
Average - negative five. Williams,
Attempts - one, Yards - 0, Touch-
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   ·  ´   
    ¹        
   1     +
 ¹
  ´        
   ´  ´   
    ' " + +  
 ´   ¹    ' 
+ +   
+    1  
 ´+  ´     
   +        
 ¨ ´       ++
    ´  +  
         
 +  ¹    +   
downs - 0, Average - 0.0. Carson
Johnston, Attempts - two, Yards -
11, Touchdowns - 0, Average - 5.5.
Scoring: touchdowns; Trask
- five, Eisenbraun - one. PAT-1;
Anderson - 3/5. PAT-2; Blasius -
one.
toal Poins: Trask - 30,
Eisenbraun - 6, Anderson - 3,
Blasius - 2.
Kicko: Anderson, Attempts -
six, Yards - 285, Average - 47.5.
One onside successful.
Pun: Anderson; Attempts - two,
Yards - 94, Average - 47.0.
Kick Reurn: Clancy Lytle;
Attempts - two, Yards - 48, Touch-
downs - 0, Average - 24.0. Ridge
Sandal, Attempts - one, Yards - 0,
Touchdowns - 0, Average - 0.0.
turnovers: Inercepions;
Tyrel Clark - one.
tackles: Eisenbraun, Solo -
one, Assists - 0, Sacs - one, Total -
two, Points - four. Tyler Peterson,
Solo - two, Assists - three, Sacs - 0,
Total - five, Points - 7. Kjerstad,
Solo - one, Assists - three, Sacs -
one, Total - four, Points - five.
Laketon McLaughlin, Solo - one,
Assists - 0, Sacs - 0. Total - one,
Points - two. Blasius, Solo - five,
Assists - four, Sacs - .5, Total -
nine, Points - 14. Lytle, Solo - four,
Assists - 0, Sacs - one, Total - four,
Points - eight. Trask, Solo - three,
Assists - one, Sacs - .5, Total - four,
Points - seven. Johnston, Solo -
four, Assists - 0, Sacs - 0, Total -
four, Points - eight. Anderson,
Solo - one, Assists - two, Sacs - 0,
Total - three, Points - four. Dusty
Dartt, Solo - four, Assists - one,
Sacs - 1.5, Total - five, Points -
nine. Williams, Solo - five, Assists
- three, Sacs - 0, Total - eight,
Points - 13. Clark, Solo - 0, Assists
- three, Sacs - 0, Total - three,
Points - three. Linn, Solo - one, As-
sists - three, Sacs - 1.5, Total - four,
Points - five. Ryder Wilson, Solo -
one, Assists - 0, Sacs - 0, Total -
one, Points - two. CJ Schulz, Solo
- 0, Assists - two, Sacs - 0, Total -
two, Points - two. Gabe Sandal,
Solo - 0, Assists - one, Sacs - one,
Total - one, Points - one.
Competition was tough and the
Wall Squad ran well.
Laramie, Wyo., won the team
standings for the varsity boys with
26 points followed by Gillette,
Wyo., with 63.
Coach’s Commens: Wow!
All the runners ahead of Huether
were either AA or A school run-
ners. He averaged 5:50 a mile for
the day. It was a good running day
and he gave it his all.
This was Tysdal’s second time
running 3.1 miles for varsity and
is doing well.
This was a great meet to run to
prepare for the state meet when
runners number over 100 in just
one race.
Our remaining meets are High-
more on September 29th,
Cheyenne Eagle Butte on October
4th and Philip on October 6th.
Then it is Regions on October
10th at Philip and State at Huron
on October 20th. The season is fly-
ing by quickly!
Eagles cross countr
team runs in Elks meet
courant
@
gwtc.net
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Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012 • Page 7
     
     
     
        
 ¬ Æm¬´¬  .
 ¬  ¬ ¬  ¬  ¬m  
  × × ¬ m  ¬ ¬  ¬ ¬¬    ¬  ¬ 
 | ¹      ¹ ¹   v    ¹
  ¹   ¹¹              
       ¹       ¹ 
    ¹  · v       ¹   ¹v  v  
 1 ¹     ¹ |        ´| ¹ 
 ´  vv   vv           ¹

  ·
Ƭ   '×  · +¹
   
Ƭ   W  · ¹+¹
  
Ƭ ·+  %¬m  ¹¹+
  
Ƭ     · +¹
  
Ƭ ¹+  Æ¬  · ¹++
 1 
Ƭ   M¬  · +¹¹
 ¹· · 
Ƭ ¹   ¬¬  · 
    
  +
¹  
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUEStION: My spouse and I
are both getting on in years. I'm
still healthy, but he isn't. As a re-
sult, I've become his caregiver, and
we've lost a lot of our social life.
Other couples our age are still able
to do things that we no longer can.
I'm not complaining, but some-
times the burden gets very heavy.
Can you offer me any encourage-
ment or advice?
ANSWER: You're in a very diffi-
cult position. We admire your ded-
ication and loyalty to your spouse,
and we want to commend you on
the unselfishness with which
you've subordinated your interests
and desires to the requirements of
his situation. At the same time -
and before saying anything else in
response to your inquiry - we want
to urge you not to lose sight of your
own needs. You won't be able to
take care of your husband if you
neglect to take care of yourself.
Though you're in good health at
the moment, you're still mortal
and subject to the effects of aging.
Chances are that you'll begin to
notice this in the not-too-distant
future. It's difficult to help a
spouse get to the bathroom or
make his way around the house
when you're not entirely steady on
your feet. We know of one devoted
husband who was obliged to get up
with his wife several times a night
even though he was taking pills to
deal with his own difficulty sleep-
ing. Under such circumstances a
care-giver is tempted to think, We
could both use help, but since I
haven't had a heart attack in ten
years nobody seems to notice my
needs.
Why are we telling you this? Be-
cause while we respect your com-
mitment to your husband, we also
feel strongly that you should not
be ashamed to reach out for help
wherever you can find it. There are
all kinds of assistance programs
available to a spouse in your posi-
tion, and they can be extremely
valuable in terms of protecting you
against fatigue, burnout and
harmful emotional reactions. We
strongly suggest that you avail
yourself of as many of these aids as
possible. For more information, see
the website of the National Associ-
ation of Area Agencies on Aging.
We don't know the details of
your situation, but we're assuming
that your husband's disability may
have coincided with your own re-
tirement. Just when you expected
to be free of work obligations, in-
stead of enjoying grandchildren,
traveling, and hobbies, you are
again facing more work, this time
the mundane, practical tasks of
care-giving. Some anger and re-
sentment is normal in cases like
this, but it's important to do every-
thing you can to avoid being over-
whelmed by bitterness.
How can you go about this? You
might begin by reminding yourself
that God is in control. He knows
what's happening to you and your
spouse, and He is working out His
plan and purpose for your lives. No
matter what challenges and diffi-
culties you may encounter, He has
pledged never to leave you or for-
sake you (Hebrews 13:5). So make
prayer your lifeline and lean heav-
ily on His gracious promises. If you
wait upon Him, He will grant you
the strength to mount up on wings
like eagles (Isaiah 40:31).
We'd also like to urge you to ex-
periment with creative ways of
preserving as much of your social
life as possible. If you can't go on
walks together, consider taking
your husband for a drive. If you
can't make it to church events, in-
vite some folks over for a Bible
study or fellowship group at your
house. Many churches offer pro-
grams and outings for seniors that
include handicap assistance for
those who need it. Meanwhile,
don't hesitate to get out and do
things on your own when you have
the opportunity. If your spouse
loves you and appreciates what
you're doing for him, it will proba-
bly do his heart good to see you en-
joying yourself once in a while.
QUEStION: Our teen says that
we don't treat him with respect,
but from my perspective the shoe
is actually on the other foot — his
behavior towards us is extremely
dismissive, immodest and smart-
alecky. How do we resolve this con-
flict?
ANSWER: The first step to re-
solving this impasse is to get to-
gether and define your terms.
What does "respect" mean to you?
What does it mean to your
teenager? If you can find a time to
sit down and discuss this question
rationally — preferably when the
air is clear and everyone is in a
fairly good mood — you will have
already begun the process of estab-
lishing healthier communication
and a more positive parent-child
relationship.
Respect does not mean giving
your son his own way. Nor does it
imply that he has to see every-
thing from your point of view or do
everything according to your spec-
ifications. To respect someone is
not necessarily to agree with him
or trust him automatically.
According to Webster's Diction-
ary, respect is "a courteous consid-
eration of another person." To put
it another way, respect is some-
thing separate from decisions,
rules or actions. It's how you treat
the other person while making
your decisions, enforcing your
rules and sticking to your guns.
Many teens fall into the trap of
thinking that if you don't agree
with them or do what they want,
you're not "respecting" them. Not
true. Unfortunately, parents can
sometimes fall into the same trap.
The fact of the matter is that you
can be respectful toward your son
while grounding him or depriving
him of some privilege — provided
the punishment is warranted. By
the same token, he can voice dis-
agreement with you while still
demonstrating "courteous consid-
eration."
As the adult, you should be the
first to extend respect by making
reasonable rules and enforcing
them fairly and consistently. Be as
clear as you can about articulating
your expectations and don't try to
"micro-manage" your adolescent.
In the process, point out exactly
how you are demonstrating "cour-
teous consideration" (whether he
wants to hear it or not). Don't yell,
manipulate, name-call, attack his
character, get physical, "Bible-
thump" or threaten. If you can dis-
cipline yourself to moderate your
speech according to these stan-
dards, he will have no reason to ac-
cuse you of being "disrespectful."
But what about his "dismissive"
and "smart-alecky" behavior? How
to you handle that? The key is to
address the issue at hand and the
disrespectful attitude while keep-
ing the two separate. Lay this dis-
tinction out on the table by asking
questions like, "How might you
disagree with me and still show re-
spect?" or "How can you be angry
at your mother and still treat her
respectfully?" or "What would it
look like if I respected you and yet
disagreed with you?"
It's crucial to give your teen per-
mission to dislike or disagree with
you. You can't expect an adolescent
to follow the rules and agree with
them. He has to accept your deci-
sions, of course, but you aren't in a
position to control his mind or dic-
tate his feelings. It's enough to
focus on his compliance and the re-
spect he needs to demonstrate to-
ward other members of the family.
Beyond that, he's entitled to "like"
or "dislike" his circumstances as he
sees fit. As adults, we do many
things we don't really "like" to do.
This is a good lesson for teens to
learn if they want to function in
the real world.
Bottom line: respect isn't some-
thing that can be demanded. It has
to be earned, and for the most part
we earn it by giving it to others.
For the time being, you may need
to deal with the disappointment,
hurt and/or embarrassment of liv-
ing with a disrespectful teenager.
You may have to come to terms
with being "disliked" even when
you're convinced that you're doing
the right thing. To a certain extent,
it just goes with the territory. In-
stead of striking back, try to sort
out your emotions prayerfully with
your spouse, a friend, a pastor or a
professional counselor.
Send your questions to Dr. Dob-
son, c/o Focus on the Family, PO
Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO
80903. This question and answer
is excerpted from books authored
by Dr. James Dobson and pub-
lished by Tyndale House Publish-
ers. Dr. Dobson is the Chairman of
the Board of Focus on the Family,
a nonprofit organization dedicated
to the preservation of the home.
Copyright 2003 James Dobson,
Inc. All rights reserved. Interna-
tional copyright secured.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
401(K) LOANS: tHE
LASt RESORt?
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
As you’re well aware, we’re liv-
ing in difficult economic times.
Consequently, you may be forced to
make some financial moves you
wouldn’t normally undertake. One
such move you might be consider-
ing is taking out a loan from your
401(k) plan — but is this a good
idea?
Of course, if you really need the
money, and you have no alterna-
tives, you may need to consider a
401(k) loan. Some employers allow
401(k) loans only in cases of finan-
cial hardship, although the defini-
tion of “hardship” can be flexible.
But many employers allow these
loans for just about any purpose.
To learn the borrowing require-
ments for your particular plan,
you’ll need to contact your plan ad-
ministrator.
Generally, you can borrow up to
$50,000, or one-half of your vested
plan benefits, whichever is less.
You’ve got up to five years to repay
your loan, although the repayment
period can be longer if you use the
funds to buy a primary residence.
And you pay yourself back with in-
terest.
However, even though it’s easy
to access your 401(k) through a
loan, there are some valid reasons
for avoiding this move, if at all pos-
sible. Here are a few to consider:
•You might reduce your retire-
ment savings. A 401(k) is designed
to be a retirement savings vehicle.
Your earnings potentially grow on
a tax-deferred basis, so your
money can accumulate faster than
if it were placed in an investment
on which you paid taxes every
year. But if you take out a 401(k)
loan, you’re removing valuable re-
sources from your account — and
even though you’re paying yourself
back, you can never regain the
time when your money could have
been growing.
•You might reduce your contri-
butions. Once you start making
loan payments, you might feel
enough of a financial pinch that
you feel forced to reduce the
amount you contribute to your
401(k).
•You may create a taxable situ-
ation. Failure to pay back loans
according to the specified terms
can create a taxable distribution
and possibly subject the distribu-
tion to a 10% penalty.
•You may have to repay the loan
quickly. As long as you continue
working for the same employer,
your repayment terms likely will
not change. But if you leave your
employment, either voluntarily or
not, you’ll probably have to repay
the loan in full within 60 days —
and if you don’t, the remaining bal-
ance will be taxable. Plus, if you’re
under age 59½, you’ll also have to
pay a 10% penalty tax.
Considering these drawbacks to
taking out a 401(k) loan, you may
want to look elsewhere for money
when you need it. But the best
time to put away this money is
well before you need it. Try to build
an emergency fund containing at
least six to 12 months’ worth of liv-
ing expenses, and keep the money
in a liquid vehicle. With this
money, you’re primarily interested
in protecting your principal, not in
earning a high return.
A 401(k) is a great retirement
savings vehicle. But a 401(k) loan?
Not always a good idea. Do what
you can to avoid it.
When you take one dynamic and
mesh it with another dynamic,
most often the sum of the two is
greater than the two would be on
their own. Take the husband and
wife relationship. Each of them as
individuals has strengths, gifts and
abilities that make them successful
in their own right. However, when
you combine their strengths, gifts
and abilities as they learn to work
together as a team, the two are
able to accomplish so much more
than either of them could have ever
accomplished all by themselves. In
other words, 1 + 1 = 3.
Another example is the farmer,
who In the old days would plow his
fields with an ox. Pulling all by it-
self, an ox can pull a couple thou-
sands pounds. But, when you
"yoke" two of them together, com-
bined they cannot only pull more
than double the weight, but also for
a longer period of time. This is
"synergy."
Of course there are many other
examples I am sure we could use to
illustrate the concept of synergism.
Just let me encourage you to look
for opportunities to come together
with others this week. Pair up.
Work together as a team. Experi-
ence the immense profit that syn-
ergism provides.
One of my favorite quotes is:
"Let one plus one equal three.
Work together and sanction a sum
greater than its parts. A three-sided
structure is the strongest founda-
tion in our universe." (Author Un-
known)
The Power of Synergy or 1+1+3
WALL CLINIC HEALTH FAIR
October 1 through October 31, 2012
Wall Clinic, 112 7th Avenue, Wall, SD Phone: 279-2149
Call now to set up our appointment.
Health Screening Panel to Include:
• Liver Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $36.00
• Lipid Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $66.00
• Blood Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $19.00
• Complete Blood Count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $40.00
• EKG - Baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $92.00
• Chest X-Ray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $94.00
• Spirometry (Lung Test) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $81.00
• Hearing Screening. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $22.00
• A1c Screening, if necessary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20.00 . . . . . . .Reg. $45.00
• FREE Hemoccult w/any test done above. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Reg. $17.00
• FREE Blood Pressure Check w/test above . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Reg. $11.00
• FREE Consultation w/Dave Custis PA-C w/any test above . . . .Reg. $62.00
• FREE Weight, Body Mass Index, Fat %, Water % w/test above . . . .
• TOTAL Cost Package Deal . . . . . . . . . . . . $180.00 . . . . . .Reg. $585.00
•Male patients may include a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA)
for an additional $25.00, Regular price $82.00.
•Anyone may include a Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
for an additional $25.00, Regular price $65.00.
Any individual test or combination of tests may be
requested at the individual price listed above.
• NO INSURANCE WILL BE FILED
(INCLUDING MEDICARE) CASH ONLy
• APPOINTMENTS ARE NECESSARy
Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012 • Page 8 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2002 Ford Ranger,
extended cab, 4 door, 4 wheel
drive, loaded, 68K miles, auto.
Asking $9,500. Call 279-2913.
PW42-2tp
FOR SALE: 1997 Lincoln
Town Car Executive Series,
asking $2,000; 1995 Ford F-
150, single cab, 4WD, in excel-
lent shape, asking $4,500. For
more information contact 433-
5060 or 200-0054. P41-2tc
FOR SALE: 2011 Chevy Im-
pala LT, 4 door, leather seats,
sunroof, loaded, 35K miles,
$25,000. Call 488-0031.
K41-2tp
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAY-
ING: Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank instal-
lation and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-
2888, Midland.
PR20-52tp
BACKHOE AND TRENCHING:
Peters Excavation, Inc. Exca-
vation work of all types. Call
Brent Peters, 837-2945 or 381-
5568 (cell). K3-tfn
GRAVEL: Screened or rock.
Call O'Connell Construction
Inc., 859-2020, Philip.
P51-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Saun-
tee or Heidi Coller, Kadoka,
SD, or call 837-2690. Craig
cell: 390-8087, Sauntee cell:
390-8604; wrex@gwtc.net
K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: Milo hay bales,
650 ton available, safe nitrates
and good RFV, plastic twine.
Call 280-3835. P41-3tc
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-
ply, 235/85/16R. $155
mounted (limited quantities
available). Les’ Body Shop,
859-2744, Philip. P40-tfn
FOR SALE: 250 acres of
standing corn, to be baled or
cut for silage. Milesville, SD.
Call 859-2943 or 685-5157.
P36-tfn
FOUND/FREE/LOST
FOUND: Headset at Philip Fire
Hall Park. To claim, stop at the
Pioneer Review and pay for this
ad. P41-2tc
GARAGE SALES
GARAGE SALE: We are down-
sizing! Friday, Sept. 28, & Sat-
urday, Sept. 29, 8 to 4 both
days. Les & Muree Struble,
221 Maple St., Kadoka.
K42-1tc
RUMMAGE SALE: Saturday,
Sept. 29, 300 High St., Philip
(N. of Post Office), beginning at
9 a.m. Brother sewing machine
(like new), couch, shelving
units, dishes, matching head-
board, dresser & nightstand,
(2) queen size beds in good
shape, women’s small to
medium sized clothes, blan-
kets, rollaway bed, (2) organs,
lawn mower, craft supplies &
yarn, canning jars, knick-
knacks, small appliances,
paints, art supplies, books,
misc. P42-1tc
HELP WANTED
POSITIONS OPEN: Kadoka
Area School District is looking
for coaches for the upcoming
winter sports: Head girls’ bas-
ketball coach; 5-6 girls’ basket-
ball Kadoka; 7-8 girls’ basket-
ball Kadoka; 5th-8th girls’ bas-
ketball Interior; Assistant boys’
basketball coach; 5th-6th boys’
basketball coach Kadoka; 7th-
8th boys’ basketball coach
Kadoka. If interested send a
letter of interest and resume to
Kadoka Area School, Attention
George Seiler, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543 or complete
and submit a non-certified ap-
plication that is available on
the website www.kadoka.k12.
sd.us EOE. K42-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson
County Highway Superintend-
ent position. Experience in
road / bridge construction /
maintenance. Supervisory /
administrative experience pre-
ferred. Position open until
filled. Information: 837-2410
or 837-2422; Fax: 837-2447,
Kadoka. K42-3tc
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTU-
NITY: Lakota Federal Credit
Union, located in Kyle, SD, is
looking for a full time Member
Service Rep/Teller starting at
$10 an hour and includes full
benefits. If interested & would
like to receive an application,
contact Whitney O’Rourke at
455-2500 or email: worourke@
lakotafunds.org. Closing date
will be September 28, 2012.
P41-2tc
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Pickup camper,
has heat, air and bathroom,
clean and good condition. Call
279-2415, Wall. PW42-2tp
FOR SALE: 4-person hot tub.
Call 837-2459. K42-2tp
FOR SALE: Whitfield pellet
fireplace insert; steel roof and
half windshield for Polaris 500
4x4, year 2009. Call 798-2182
or 685-3934. WP4-2tc
FOR SALE: 1990 8’x20’ goose-
neck trailer with wench,
$2,500 OBO; 1979 6’x16’ car
trailer, $500 OBO; 1991 home-
made 7’x20’ trailer, $500 OBO.
All trailers can be seen at Steve
Jeffords’ property. Call
307/788-1964 or 308/641-
5138. PR4-2tc
FOR SALE: 46” MTD riding
lawn mower yard machine, 3-
blade cutting system, 7-spade,
20 HP Briggs & Stratton with
bagger. $500. Call 386-2554.
PR4-tfn
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
Make an offer! 2 bedrooms, 1
bath, dining room, appliances,
fenced backyard. 859-2483 or
859-3095, leave message.
P42-tfn
FOR RENT OR SALE: Two
bedroom home with garage, lo-
cated on Wood Ave., Philip.
Call 484-5409.
P41-2tc
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
1999 Redman, 28’x72’, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 150’x75’ lot,
shed, double carport, Midland.
$42,500 or $350/month rent.
Call Paula, 441-6967.
P41-4tc
RENTALS
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan,
381-2861 or 279-2861.
WP5-tfn
RENTAL: Nice two bedroom,
one bath house for rent in
Philip. Asking $500/month for
rent, utilities not included.
First and last month’s rent to
move in. Please contact Jay at
441-1300, please leave a mes-
sage if no answer.
PR4-2tc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we
can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an applica-
tion. Gateway Apartments,
Kadoka. WP32-tfn
RECREATION
FOR SALE: 1981 Kawasaki
motorcycle, good shape,
$1,500. Call 488-0031.
K41-2tp
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We ac-
cept responsibility for the first
incorrect insertion only. Rav-
ellette Publications, Inc. re-
quests all classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not paid
at the time the order is placed.
All phone numbers are with
an area code of 605, unless
otherwise indicated.
Deadline
for
Classifieds
and Cards
of Thanks
is 11:00
a.m.
on
Tuesdays
AUCTIONS
LAND AUCTION: 5,055+/-
Acres, Stanley County, Crop-
land, CRP and Grassland, 11
miles north of Hayes, SD, Oc-
tober 3rd, 2012. Call Dakota
Properties, Todd Schuetzle,
Auctioneer, 605-280-3115,
www.DakotaProperties.com.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Now is the chance to buy a
well established & successful
business in the State Capitol
of S.D. The Longbranch is for
SALE (serious inquires only).
Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
LOOMIX® FEED SUPPLE-
MENTS is seeking dealers. Mo-
tivated individuals with cattle
knowledge and community
ties. Contact Bethany at 800-
870-0356/becomeadeal er
@adm.com to find out if there
is a dealership opportunity in
your area.
WANTED: LOOKING FOR
BUSINESSES for sale.
Bars/restaurants or c-stores.
Buyers are willing to be part-
ners, buy and lease back or
purchase the business and
property. Please call 605-380-
0703.
BUYING GOLD/SILVER
Convert your gold, silver, plat-
inum into cash. Top price
paid, 24 hr turn around for
mail in. SD owned business.
Visit www.midwestgold-silver.
com for instructions or call
605 260 4653.
EMPLOYMENT
COMP UT ER/ NET WORK
TECHNICIAN, excellent oppor-
tunity w/growing company.
Network experience required.
Microsoft Certifications pre-
ferred. Immediate opening.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. Fireside Office So-
lutions, Technology Division,
PO Box 2116, Bismarck, ND
58502 or email: jfinneman@
firesideos.com.
POSITION OPEN: POLICE OF-
FICER (full-time): The City of
Platte, SD (population 1,230)
is seeking full-time law en-
forcement officer. Successful
candidate must be willing and
able to work independently
under the direction of Chief.
Wages DOQ & DOE. State-
wide L.E.T. applications ac-
cepted. Interested applicants
should call Chief Brandon
Semmler at (605) 337-2144.
Please send application and
resume to: City of Platte, PO
Box 236, Platte, SD 57369.
Applications accepted from
Sept. 19, 2012 through Oct.
10, 2012. The City of Platte is
an EOE. Shauna Meyerink,
City Finance Officer.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is taking applictions for
full-time Douglas County
Highway Superintendent.
Must have valid Class A Dri-
ver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/
maintenance preferred. For
application contact: Douglas
County Auditor (605) 724-
2423.
OTR & DRIVER
OPPORTUNITY
DRIVERS: $1,000 SIGN-ON
BONUS. New Pay Program!
*Earn up to 50 CPM *Home
Weekly *2500+ miles, 95% no-
tarp. Must be Canadian eligi-
ble (888) 691-5705.
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI,
33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health
ins., credit, 03¢ safety bonus,
Call Joe for details,
8 0 0 . 4 5 6 . 1 0 2 4 ,
joe@tbitruck.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00.
Put the South Dakota
Statewide Classifieds Network
to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each addi-
tional word $5.) Call this
newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
REAL ESTATE
BREATHTAKING BLACK
HILLS Log home on 40 unre-
stricted acres surrounded by
forest service. Year round ac-
cess. 17 miles to Rapid City.
Gene Hensley RE/MAX
605/391-4300.
FOR SALE
SPRING CALVES, 450 lbs., 30
head mixed, black calves, no
shots, antibiotics or hor-
mones; never been worked.
Call 605-280-2272.
Public Notice
Regarding
“Thank Yous”
submitted as
“Letters to the Editor”
The position of this newspaper to accept “Thank
Yous”, whether directed to a person, any institution,
affiliation or entity for placement in anything other
than the “Cards of Thanks” column located in the
Classified Section of this newspaper:
THERE WILL BE A CHARGE!
Letters of thanks or congratulations shall be con-
strued as advertising and will be inserted for place-
ment in the proper location of this newspaper.
PLEASE ASK IF IN DOUBT
If you are in doubt about whether material sent in or
brought in to this newspaper, be sure to ask for assis-
tance at the counter or please leave a phone number
so that you may be contacted. There is a difference
between news and advertising.
Pennington County Courant
PO Box 435, 212 4th Ave., Wall, SD 57790
(605) 279-2565 • annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Aps.
in Wall
1 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRO/Renal Managemen
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
www.freerentersguide.com
THANK YOUS
Thanks to Golden West for
the “pot of gold” I received at
the annual meeting.
Gerald Wolford
Thank you for your phone
calls, cards and concerns after
my surgery.
Thank you,
Bob Hays
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
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Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012 • Page 9 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
The following budget is Wall School District’s final 2012-2013 budget which was adopted in motion #4732 at the September 12, 2012 school board meeting.
Wall School District No. 51-5
2011-2012 Approved Budget and Means of Finance
General Fund Capital Outla Special Ed Impact Aid Food Service WASP Totals
Appropriations:
1000 Instruction:
1100 Regular Programs
1111 Elementary Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$494,773.13 . . . . . . . . . .$7,102.23. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$501,875.36
1121 Middle School Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$234,960.65 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$234,960.65
1131 High School Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$442,966.88 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$442,966.88
1200 Special Programs
1220 SPED Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $261,055.95.................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$261,055.95
1273 Title I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$124,695.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$124,695.00
2000 Support Services:
2100 Support Services -- Pupil
2115 Safe & Drug Free Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,089.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$1,089.00
2121 Guidance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,029.62 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$52,029.62
2134 Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,009.50 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$4,009.50
2152 Speech Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $56,149.16...................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$56,149.16
2172 Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,000.00...................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$18,000.00
2200 Support Services -- Instructional Staff
2212 Staff Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,669.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200.00........................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$29,869.00
2213 Instructional Staff Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................................................................$0.00
2219 Innovative Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................................................................$0.00
2222 Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995.43 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$7,995.43
2227 Technology Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$48,025.23 . . . . . . . . . . .$21,364.00. . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$69,389.23
2300 Support Services -- General Admin
2311 Board of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,826.80 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$45,826.80
2314 Election Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$3,000.00
2315 Legal Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$2,500.00
2317 Audit Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$14,000.00
2321 Superintendent Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$111,697.51 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............................................................................$111,697.51
2329 Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$50,685.05 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............................................................................$50,685.05\
2400 Support Services -- School Admin
2410 Elem. Principal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$80,102.94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$80,102.94
2490 Medicaid Adminstration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$800.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................................................................................$800.00
2500 Support Services -- Business
2529 Business Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$70,177.63 . . . . . . . . . . .$7,200.00. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$77,377.63
2535 Construction & Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,100.00. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$8,100.00
2541 Custodial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$113,996.85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$113,996.85
2542 Care/Upkeep - Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . .$23,970.00. . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$51,970.00
2542-800 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,250.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$36,250.00
2543 Care/Upkeep - Grounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,700.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,740.00. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$11,440.00
2544 Care/Upkeep - Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$13,000.00
2545 Vehicle Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$2,500.00
2546 Fire Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$1,500.00
2547 Leases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$400.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................................................................................$400.00
2549 Refuse Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$5,500.00
2555 Pupil Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $500.00........................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$40,500.00
2560 Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $103,143.45.........................................................$103,143.45
3000 Community Services
3200 Community Recreation Services . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,291.34 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$10,291.34
3500-191 After-School/Fridays Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................$15,048.15.....................$15,048.15
3500-192 Summer Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................$15,678.70.....................$15,678.70
4000 Nonprogrammed Charges:
4400 Unemployment Claims . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$500.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................................................................................$500.00
5000 Debt Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$97,838.00. . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$97,838.00
6000 Cocurricular Activities
6100 Male Cocurricular Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,741.77 . . . . . . . . . . .$7,278.32. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$45,020.09
6200 Female Cocurricular Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38,430.70 . . . . . . . . . . .$3,956.00. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$42,386.70
6500 Activity Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,741.50 . . . . . . . . . . .$82,561.00. . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$107,302.50
6900 Combined Cocurricular Activities . . . . . . . . . . . .$48,893.67 . . . . . . . . . . .$1,718.00. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$50,611.67
7000 Contingencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$10,000.00
8000 Other Financing Uses
8110 Operating Transfers Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................$386,157.66. . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$386,157.66
Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,237,449.20 . . . . . . . .$264,827.55. . . . . . . . . . $336,905.11 ....................$386,157.66. . . . . . . . . . $103,143.45....................$30,726.85................$3,359,209.82
2012-2013 Approved Budget Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........................................................................$3,359,209.82
Means of Finance:
Estimated Fund Balance, June 30, 2012,
Designated to Finance FY13 Budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$386,157.68 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,511.11.......................$21,157.66. . . . . . . . . . . $8,643.45 .............................................................$437,469.90
1000 Revenue from Local Sources
1100 Taxes
1110 Ad Valorem Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$640,000.00 . . . . . . . . . .$335,000.00. . . . . . . . . . $230,000.00.................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........................................................................$1,205,000.00
1111 Mobile Home Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00. . . . . . . . . . . . $400.00........................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$3,900.00
1120 Prior Year's Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000.00. . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000.00........................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$8,000.00
1140 Gross Receipts Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$200,923.52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$200,923.52
1190 Penalties & Interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000.00. . . . . . . . . . . . $500.00........................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$5,500.00
1500 Earnings on Investments
1510 Interest on Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500.00. . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000.00........................$15,000.00. . . . . . . . . . . $100.00...........................$125.00..........................$22,725.00
1600 Food Service
1610 Sales to Pupils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $47,100.00 .............................................................$47,100.00
1620 Sales to Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,600.00 .................................................................$3,600.00
1700 Cocurricular Activities
1710 Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,700.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$15,700.00
1900 Other Revenue from Local Sources
1910 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$215.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................................
1911 Power House Memberships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$6,000.00
1920 Donations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$9,000.00
1973 Medicaid Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000.00........................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$13,000.00
1982 Latchkey Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................$35,000.00.....................$35,000.00
1990 Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,500.00...................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$20,500.00
2000 Revenue from Intermediate Sources
2100 County Sources
2110 County Apportionment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$18,000.00
2200 Revenue in Lieu of Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................................................................$0.00
3000 Revenue from State Sources
3100 Grants in Aid
3111 State Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$682,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$682,000.00
3112 State Apportionment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$10,000.00
3114 Bank Franchise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$15,000.00
3121 State Aid - SPED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................................
3129 Other State Grants in Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................................
3810 Cash Reimbursement - State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $600.00 .......................................................................$600.00
4000 Revenue from Federal Sources
4100 Grants in Aid
4111 Impact Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................$350,000.00. . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$350,000.00
4121 National Minerals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$65,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$65,000.00
4122 Taylor Grazing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$4,000.00
4158 Title I - Part A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$124,695.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................$124,695.00
4159 Title II - Part A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,258.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$29,258.00
4175 IDEA, Part B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,550.00...................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................$64,550.00
4186 SPED - Preschool Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,444.00........................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................................................$3,444.00
4800 Food Service Assistance
4810 Federal Reimbursement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,100.00 .............................................................$36,100.00
4820 Donated Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,000.00 .................................................................$7,000.00
Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,237,449.20 . . . . . . . .$344,500.00. . . . . . . . . . $336,905.11 ....................$386,157.66. . . . . . . . . . $103,143.45....................$35,125.00................$3,443,280.42
2012-2013 Approved Means of Finance Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........................................................................$3,408,155.42
Published September 27, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $442.06.
WALL CITy COUNCIL
MEETING
MINUTES
SEPTEMBER 14, 2012
The Wall City Council met for a special
meeting September 14th at 9:00am in
the Community Center meeting room.
Members present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Pete Dunker,
Councilman; Bill Leonard, Councilman;
Jerry Morgan, Councilman; Mike Ander-
son, Councilman; Stan Anderson, Coun-
cilman
Others present: Carolynn Anderson, Fi-
nance Officer; Laurie Hindman, Penning-
ton Co. Courant
Motion by S Anderson second by Morgan
to approve the agenda. Motion carried.
It was discussed on whether to rebid the
Airport snow removal equipment for this
snow season. If the specs were changed
to a 140hp tractor instead of a 150hp
then the 60% made in the United States
requirement could apply to more tractor
manufacturing companies. Rebidding it
for this snow season rather than waiting
another season could save a 4-5 % infla-
tion increase on the cost. If the expense
was in the 2013CY budget it would pro-
vide a less complicated budget and
audit. Motion by S Anderson, second by
Leonard to rebid the snow removal
equipment with a 140hp tractor and to
have payment due in January 2013. Mo-
tion carried.
Motion by M Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve Resolution 12-11; Echo
Valley transfer of water main. Motion car-
ried.
Note: Resolution 12-11 was published
in the September 6th minutes in error
and will not be published again in
these minutes.
With no further business, the meeting
was adjourned at 9:17am.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published September 27, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $21.12.
NOTE: IN THE SEPTEMBER 6TH
WALL CITy MINUTES RESOLUTION
12-11 WAS PUBLISHED INSTEAD OF
THE CORRECT RESOLUTION 12-10,
FOLLOWING;
RESOLUTION 12-10
RESOLUTION ON PURCHASES By
CITy EMPLOyEES
WHEREAS, the City Council of Wall has
the power to delegate to any employee
of the municipality the authority to enter
into a contract/purchase on behalf of the
municipality and to execute the con-
tract/purchase and any other instrument
necessary or convenient for the perform-
ance of the contract/purchase subject to
the limitations delegated by the govern-
ing body
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, all
employees are authorized to make pur-
chases up to two hundred dollars
($200.00) from local vendors only. Pur-
chases with vendors outside the limits of
the city between the amount of fifty dol-
lars ($50.00) and three thousand five
hundred dollars ($3,500.00) shall require
a purchase order signed by the Mayor,
Finance Officer, and Public Works Direc-
tor. A councilman may sign in the ab-
sence of one or more of the above
named signers for a total of three signa-
tures on all purchase orders.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, any pur-
chase over three thousand five hundred
dollars ($3,500.00) must be approved by
the governing body unless deemed to be
emergency spending. If emergency
spending is deemed to be necessary,
Chapter 3.24 shall apply.
Dated this 6th day of September 2012.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published September 27, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $20.94.
Wall School
Upcoming
Events
Thurs., Sept. 27
- Sat., Oct. 6, 2012
Thursda, September 27: VB
@ Newell, 6:00 p.m.
Frida, September 28: FB @
Harding Co., 7:00 p.m.; JHVB
w/Kadoka, 10:00 a.m.; Teacher
In-Service.
Saturda, September 29: VB
Mile High Invite @ Lead, 8:30
a.m.; JHVB Conf., TBD, 9:00
a.m.; JHFB Wall Jamboree,
10:00 a.m.; CC @ Highmore,
9:00 a.m.
Monda, October 1: VB
w/New Underwood, 6:00 p.m.;
JHVB w/NU, 4:00 p.m.; JV FB @
Douglas Freshman, 4:30 p.m.
Tuesda, October 2: JHVB
w/Philip, 5:30 p.m.
Wednesda, October 3: Graz-
ing Comparison Field Trip-Bio
Students
Thursda, October 4: VB
w/Philip, 6:00 p.m. Pack the
Place Pink; CC @ Cheyenne
Eagle Butte, 2:00 p.m.; Astron-
omy @ BNP.
Frida, October 5: FB @
Jones Co., 6:00 p.m.
Saturda, October 6: CC @
Philip, 10:00 a.m.; JHVB @
Jones Co. Tri., 10:00 a.m.
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M   Æ  ¹
"   Æ ´  ¹
   Æ ´ ¹
"M   Æ ´  ¹
ÆW × ÆW   Æ · ƺ ´ ¹
   Æ ´ ¹
' × '   Æ ´  ¹
´   Æ ´ ¹
Æ   Æ · ƺ ´  ¹
Æ   Æ | · ´  ´  ¹
Æ × Æ   Æ · ƺ  ¹
   Æ · ƺ ´ ¹
%''   Æ   ¹
W   Æ · ƺ ´  ¹
M%W   Æ ´  ¹
Æ × M   ´ |   ¹
M × M   Æ · ƺ  ¹
   Æ ´  ¹
"% ´   Æ · ƺ ´  ¹
M´   Æ · ´  ´ ¹
"´% × "   Æ · ƺ ´  ¹
Æ   Æ · ƺ   ¹
´   Æ ´ ¹
Æ × Æ   Æ   ¹
   Æ ´ ¹
´   Æ · ƺ ´ ¹
´´%   Æ ´ ¹
   Æ · ƺ ´ ¹
   Æ   ¹
´Æ   Æ ´  ¹
W   Æ ´  ¹
"%   Æ ´  ¹
   Æ ´ ¹
   Æ ´ ¹
"M   Æ ´  ¹
W   Æ ´  ¹
M   Æ · | ´  ¹
M'   Æ   ¹
M   Æ · ƺ  ¹
"   Æ ´  ¹
H1 *1WWHW   ¤ * V1 1V 
"+Æ°° 1 "++Æ 1 H1 W1H1W
W ´  º¯ ´'º Ư · 
  M  1 1
"W  "      m   ×   ¬
     m     ´m   Æ  ´
        
¹  ¹·  
  *  *  
 ·  w   
·× ·  × w× 
 × ±  w× × ¨¨·
'  º   ¬
  º ¬ · 
        
¬  ·    
 +  ¹¹

' 
 ´ + ´ Æ| ´ 
W ´ · ´ '´ ´'º · Æ| 
 · º¯ ´'º Ư ·  
 ´  ´ Æ| ´ 
W ´  º¯ ´'º Ư ·  
 ´ ¹ ´ Æ| ´ 
W ´ ¹ º¯ ´'º Ư ·  
 ´ · ´ Æ| ´ 
W ´  º¯ ´'º Ư ·  
 "  ´ '´ ´'º | Æ| 
 · º¯ ´'º Ư ·  
 "  ´ Æ| ´  · 
¯ ´ 
W "  º¯ ´'º Ư ·  
 "  ´ Æ| ´  · 
¯ ´ 
 " ¹· ´ '´ ´'º · Æ| 
 · ¯ ´ 
 " ¹ ´ Æ| ´  · 
¯ ´ 
 ´  ´ Æ| ´'|'|
´  · ¯ ´  ´ '  
1¯ Æ º|    º ·  ´'|
' ' '¯º ¯ º ·
1'¯
 ´  ´ '´ ´'º · Æ| 
 · ¯ ´  · º ¯ ¯
Ư · 1 
 ´  ´ Æ| ´  · 
¯ ´  · '1 ´  Ư 
 ´ ¹ ' 
W' ´W Æ ×  W
  W   W
 ´Æ ·  ¹  × " 
* 1
¤  Æ Æ"¹Æ
 %  ¨ ·× × ×  × % · ¨
% H×  %    ¨ ×
 ·×¨  ¨w    ·×  
 ×

Æ% ´  W "
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
Æ × % %´%   W
Æ  ¹
Æ  ¹
 ´ ´  ''
 Æ · ƺ   ¹
| · º   ¹
 Æ · ƺ   ¹
´ · Æ '  ¹
 Æ · ƺ   ¹
M´% × MM M  W W
Æ '  ¹
Æ '  ¹
Æ  ¹
´   W
 | · Æ  ¹
 Æ%  
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
" ´M  ''
 Æ · ƺ '  ¹
 ×  ''  ''
Æ '  ¹
 ×  M´  ''
Æ '  ¹
   %%
 Æ | · ´ '  ¹
  ×   M '
 | · Æ  ¹
Æ '  ¹
W ×  %''  W W
| · Æ '  ¹
 Æ  Æ '
 Æ · ƺ '  ¹
Æ × M   ´
| · Æ '  ¹
 %  M
Æ '  ¹
M   M '
Æ '  ¹
M ÆÆ × % M  M"
 | '  ¹
   [
Æ '  ¹
M   W
Æ '  ¹
 ×  ´  W
Æ '  ¹
 | · Æ  ¹
 ´ ´  M
Æ '  ¹
' ´% ´  Æ"
 | '  ¹
'   × ´   ´
 Æ · ƺ '  ¹
Æ´ ´  M
Æ '  ¹
´% × Æ"   W
 Æ · ƺ '  ¹
M Æ  M '
 Æ · ƺ '  ¹
' "%  ''
| · Æ '  ¹
Æ ´  ''
Æ '  ¹
   
Æ '  ¹
M ×  %  W
| · Æ '  ¹
´"
   ´
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
Æ · ƺ  ¹
 × M% M  W W
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
´ × Æ´  ''
´  ¹
´ · Æ  ¹
 ´  ¹
 ´ · Æ  ¹
' ´  
Æ  ¹
Æ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
" ×     ´
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ  W W
Æ  ¹
Æ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
´   M '
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
Æ · ƺ  ¹
´´% ´  ''
Æ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
' ×   M"
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 | · Æ  ¹
Æ · ƺ  ¹
'   %%
Æ  ¹
Æ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
´ × ´ %''  W W
Æ  ¹
Æ  ¹
M% ´%  ' ´
 |  ¹
 |  ¹
|  ¹
|  ¹
´'  × ´  ´'
Æ  ¹
Æ  ¹
´    W W
´  ¹
´  ¹
M ×  W  %%
Æ  ¹
 |  ¹
M´%   M
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
| · Æ  ¹
ÆÆ ´ ´  Æ"
Æ  ¹
Æ × ÆW  ´'
Æ | · ´  ¹
 Æ | · ´  ¹
 WM  Æ
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
 × % ´  %%
Æ  ¹
Æ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
 '  ''
´ · Æ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 × M   
  Æ|  ¹
 W´  M
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
%" %´  W%
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ · ƺ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
 Æ  ¹
Æ × ' ´  W W
Æ  ¹
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Pennington County Courant • September 27, 2012 • Page 10
NOTICE OF HEARING
BEFORE
THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
AND THE PENNINGTON COUNTy
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning Board of Commis-
sioners under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Kathy Boyum has applied to Rezone to
rezone 2.42 acres from Planned Unit De-
velopment District to Suburban Residen-
tial District located on the following metes
and bounds description: Beginning at the
NE corner of Lot 1 which is identical with
the SW 1/16 corner of Section 21, T1S,
R5E, BHM, a rebar with an aluminum cap
marked Buckhorn RLS 4896 driven into
the stump of the corner tree recorded in
the plat of Tract C. Thence S00°08’18”W
512.55’ distant to the SW corner of Lot 2,
a 3/4” iron pipe Thence N75°23’01”W
444.09’ distant to the south corner of Lots
1 and 2 which is identical with the corner
of Lots A and B of Lot 2. A 3/4” iron pipe
Thence N49°47’50”W 353.27’ distant to
the AP between Lots 1 and 2, a rebar with
an aluminum cap marked Buckhorn RLS
4896. Thence N43°03’02”E 236.02’ dis-
tant to the point of beginning. Lot 2 con-
tains 2.42 acres more or less. 12630
Robins Roost Road, in accordance with
Sections 208 and 508 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Kathy Boyum has applied to amend the
existing Planned Unit Development for
Robins Roost Cabins located on the fol-
lowed metes and bounds description:
Beginning at the NE corner of Lot 1 which
is identical with the SW 1/16 corner of
Section 21, T1S, R5E, BHM, A Rebar with
an aluminum cap marked Buckhorn RLS
4896 driven into the stump of the corner
tree recorded in the plat of Tract C.
Thence S43°03’29”E 236.02’ distant to
the AP between Lots 1 and 2, a rebar with
an aluminum cap marked Buckhorn RLS
4896 Thence S49°47’50”E 353.27’ distant
to the south corner between Lots 1 and 2,
which is identical with the corner of Lots
A and B of Lot 2. A 3/4” iron pipe Thence
N89°46’23”W 178.60’ distant to the SW
corner of Lot 1 which is identical with the
NW corner of Lot B of Lot 2. A rebar with
an aluminum cap marked Buckhorn RLS
4896 Thence N00°20’36”W 175.15’ dis-
tant to PC of Curve 1 a rebar with a plas-
tic cap marked Buckhorn RLS 4896
Thence following Curve 1 to the PT of
Curve 1 a rebar with an aluminum cap
marked Buckhorn RLS 4896 Thence
N44°56’26”E 230.59’ distant to the NW
corner of Lot 1 a rebar with an aluminum
cap marked Buckhorn RLS 4896 Thence
N71°10’21”E 245.72’ distant to PC of
Curve 2 a rebar with a plastic cap marked
Buckhorn RLS 4896 Thence following
Curve 2 to the PT of Curve 2 a rebar with
an aluminum cap marked Buckhorn RLS
4896 Thence S17°06’13”W 76.62’ distant
to the SE corner of former Lot A, a rebar
with an aluminum cap marked Advanced
Engineering RLS 4896 Thence
S89°42’34”E 190.42’ distant to the point
of beginning. Lot 1 contains 3.41 acres
more or less, 12630 Robins Roost Road,
in accordance with Section 213 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
16th day of October 2012. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Director so that
appropriate auxiliary aids and services
are available.
DAN JENNISSEN,
PLANNING DIRECTOR
JULIE A. PEARSON,
PENNINGTON COUNTY AUDITOR
Published September 27, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $36.85.
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'  '1' ' ´' 
' Ư´  
' Æ  
'  ' ´' 
'  Ư´ ' ´' 
'  Æ ' ´' 
 M  Æ
' ´¯ ' ´' 
' ´¯ ' ´' 
 W  ´  W
'  Æ¯ '   '| 1 
' | '   '| 1 
' | '  
' Æ'º ' ´' 
'  ' ' ´' 
'  ' ' ´' 
'    '| 1 
 '%  M"
' '   '| | 
' '   '| | 
" × M %  [
' Æ   '| | 
% "M  %%
' | '   '| | 
 × Æ´ ´W  ''
' Æ   '| | 
" ×  Æ  
' | '   '| 1 
' '   '| 1 
'  ¯'   '| 1 
'  |¯   '| 1 
'  Æ'º   '| 1 
' '1'   '| 1 
'  |¯   '| 1 
   Æ ´
' '   '| | 
 ×    W "
'    '| | 
 "´ % ´  
' '   '| | 
' '   '| 1 
'  '1'   '|  
' Ư´   '| | 
M´% %  W
' '1'   '| | 
M% %  W
'    '| | 
' Ư´   '| | 
   W
' |¯   '| | 
Æ ´  ´ 
' Æ   '| | 
'  Æ   '| | 
' '   '| | 
 ´%   
' Ư´   '| | 
 × Æ M  "
'  ¯ ' ´' 
' Æ'º ' ´' 
'  Æ ' ´' 
 ×  ´  ´'' 
'    '| 1 
'  | |¯   '| | 
´ [   ''
' '1'' ' ´' 
'  Ư´ ' ´' 
'  Ư´ ' ´' 
% × M    Æ 
'  ' ' ´' 
'  Æ ' ´' 
' | '  
' | |¯ ' ´' 
´´% M [   ´´
'    '| 1 
´ × ´ Æ´  ´ 
' | ' ' ´' 
    ''
' '1'   '| | 
% 'M´   W
' '  
'  '1' ' ´' 
Æ´ Æ W [   M
'  Æ '   '| | 
' Ư´ ' ´' 
' Ư´ ' ´' 
' ´M
'´ ×   ''
'   '| | 
MM    W "
 |¯   '| | 
M´ '  % 
'   '| | 
 M  W Æ
 Ư´ | 
' "M  '
Ư´   '| | 
M% ´  MÆ
Æ´   '| | 
Æ W  %%
Æ   '| | 
´ M   
   '| 1 
 
¯| ¹  
¹  ¹  
¹ · '   
|| '´  |
W? + W? +
annc@gwtc.net • courant@gwtc.net • www.ravellettepublications.com

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