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Murdo Coyote, January 17, 2013

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Sports events rides
Coyote News Briefs
Jones County Invitational founders honored
by Karlee Barnes Forty-five years ago, two men took it upon themselves to organize an invitational tournament that would grow to become the oldest running invitational in the state. In 1969, then head coach Jerald Applebee and assistant coach Harold Thune, with the help of superintendent Maurice Haugland, organized the first ever Murdo Invitational Basketball Tournament to take the place of the Three Rivers Conference tournament. On Saturday, January 12, during the 45th annual tournament, Thune and Applebee received great honors as the Murdo City Auditorium has been renamed to the Harold Thune Auditorium and the playing court is now called the Jerald Applebee Court. Of the dedication, Thune said, “It is really a surprise, I am very honored. I am glad that Mr. Applebee is honored along with me.” “It is very humbling,” said Applebee. He agreed that the dedication was a surprise, and said that he never thought that he would have the floor dedicated to him. Senator John Thune attended the dedication, along with his three brothers and his sister, and was beaming with pride for his father. “His life and ours revolved around school and athletics here, so it is very special,” Sen. Thune said of his family. Thune and Applebee are men of exemplary character who continue
“SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1904”
MURDO
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF JONES COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA.
ote oy C
A PUBLICATION
$1.00
Includes tax
OF RAVELLETTE PUBLICATIONS, INC.
Number 3 Volume 107 January 17, 2013
The Jones County School District is offering free in-town rides to any of our home activities (sporting events, music concerts etc.) for senior citizens living in Murdo. For more information or to request a ride, call the high school at 669-2258 no later than 3 p.m. on the day of the event.
Trading Pages Library
The Trading Pages library at the Murdo Coyote is open Monday through Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday as open. There are many new books available. Stop in and check one out. Anyone willing to help keep the library organized is asked to call Ella Fuhrer at 669-2636.
Jerald Applebee
to support Jones County athletics and education. When asked, Applebee didn’t think that the tournament would have ever made it 45 years. “It has surpassed my expectations, and I hope it can go on for another 45 years,” Applebee said of the tournament. Thune said, “It has always been good that the community has supported the tournament very well. I am very appreciative of that.” Applebee and Thune both mentioned that the tournament gives area teams and spectators alike a mid-winter break from the normal basketball season. “Some years, the tournament here was as good as the state tournaments,” said Thune. Dakota Radio Group announcer and Jones County High School alumni Darren Boyle has been broadcasting the tournament for 12 years, and said, “This tournament is an absolute riot for me to do! It is one of the most electric atmospheres in basketball that you can do during the season,” Boyle said through his 20 years of sports broadcasting, Thune and Applebee are always mentioned when talking about the history of South Dakota basketball. “If there was anyone in town that the gym and court needed to be named after, it was these two.” Boyle said. Applebee and Thune were honored during half time of the second game on Saturday night. They received plaques and both addressed the crowd and spoke of their gratitude for the honor. During his speech, Thune said that he was in Murdo during the building of the auditorium that is now named for him. He said, “It was really mankind at his best. It is very rewarding to see it maintained and upgraded as time goes on. What a great asset to the community.” He also said, “There just has to be something magnetic about Murdo. It is a great place to live and it’s a great place to be from.” Both men played an instrumental roll in not only Jones County athletics, but also Jones County education for many years. Applebee arrived in Murdo in the fall of 1962 and taught American History and Government. Through his years with the school district, he served as the boys basketball, football and track coach. He was the principal of Murdo High School during the 1970-1971 school year, and held the Athletic Director position from 1984 until his retirement in 1994. Thune started his distinguished athletic career in Murdo when he led the Coyotes to the state tournament in 1937. He walked away from a second place win with a tournament high 35 points, was named to the All-Tournament team, and was also named Captain of the Team. In addition, he was named Associated Press Outstanding Player of the Year. He went on to attend the University of Minnesota, where he continued his basketball career and was selected as team MVP during his junior year. He returned to Murdo in 1963 to teach World History and World Geography, International Relations and Physical Education. He was the assistant football and boys basketball coach under Applebee from 1963-1969, as well as the head girls’ basketball coach. Thune also served as the Athletic Director until his retirement in 1984. He was inducted into the South Dakota Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010, and will be inducted into the South Dakota Sports Hall of Fame on April 13, 2013.
EMT training February 1
The Jones County Ambulance is looking to expand their EMT members and would like to have anyone who might be interested in becoming an EMT to let them know. They have set a date for February 1, 2013 for the first EMT training. Watch the Coyote Briefs in the future for more information regarding the training. Anyone with an interest or anyone with questions that the ambulance crew could answer are asked to call and leave a message at 669-3125 or to call Tammy Van Dam at 530-7553.
Honorees… Long time friends and fellow honorees Jerald Applebee (left) and Harold Thune pose following the dedication ceremony. The Murdo City Auditorium has been named the Harold Thune Auditorium and the playing court has been named the Jerald Applebee Court. Photos by Karlee Barnes
Southern Plains Conference Girls Basketball Tournament
January 17-19, 2013 White River site
White River Thursday, Jan. 17, 6:30 p.m. Kadoka Area Friday 6:30 p.m. Friday 8:00 p.m.
South Central RC&D
South Central RC&D will be holding a meeting on January 17, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. at the Jones County Seniors for Service Building located at 115 Main St., Murdo. The public is welcome to attend.
Open AA meetings Al-Anon
Thursdays 8:00 p.m. at the East Commons. Call 530-0371 or 280-7642. For Al–Anon meetings call 669-2596 for time and place.
Loser Game 1
Winner Game 1
Harold Thune
Loser Game 2
Jones County Thursday, Jan. 20, 8:00 p.m. Stanley County
Winner Game 2
Burke site
Loser Game 1 Lyman Winner Game 1 Thursday, Jan. 17, 6:30 p.m. Colome Friday 6:30 p.m. Friday 8:00 p.m.
children, back from left to right: Bob, Tim and John. Front row: Karen, Harold and Rich.
Thune family… Harold Thune was joined by all five of his
Loser Game 2
South Central Thursday, Jan. 20, 8:00 p.m.
Winner Game 2
Applebee family… Joining Jerald Applebee at the dedication ceremony include, left to right: Son-in-law Jeff, daughter Jeri Lynn, grandson Bradley, and granddaughter Karren.
Championship Round Saturday @ 1:00 p.m. in Colome
Gregory
Jones County News
East Side News
by Janet Louder • 669-2696
Don and Ardie Zimbleman, Flying Farmer friends from Fullerton, N.D., stopped at Bill and Ellen Valburg’s January 4 and spent the night. They were on their way to the winter home in Arizona. Ellouise Ellwanger received the news of the passing of her sisterin-law, former Jones County resident Esther Ellwanger Witt, 86, of Pocatello, Idaho. Esther passed away December 23 with a memorial service held December 28 with interment beside her husband, Ted. She leaves four sons and their families; brothers Rudy (Laverne) Ellwanger; Bill (Isabel) Ellwanger; and Ellouise. She was preceded in death by parents Fred and Freida, brothers Art and Fred, and sister Hilda Hudson. Our sympathy to the family. Dorothy and Darin Louder spent time in Kadoka with Dwight Wednesday morning. Gen Liffengren met brother-inlaw Art Jansen for lunch and a good visit while in Rapid City recently. Following church Sunday, Alice Horsley visited Janet and Scott Dowling. Margaret and Greg Rankin, along with Dick and Kris Bradley and Karen Authier, enjoyed Sunday dinner together at a local cafe. The Court Whist Card Club met with Ellouise Ellwanger on our nice Wednesday afternoon last week. Going home with the prizes were Elaine Meyers, Lila Mae Christian and Bev Nies. Ellouise, assisted by Margie Boyle, served a very good lunch of sandwiches, chips, dips, crackers, cheese, etc., topped off with a strawberry dessert. Following church Sunday, Pastor Rick and Jane Hazen, Ray and Janice Pike, Don Volmer, Lila Mae Christian, Rosa Lee Styles, Nelva and Janet Louder had dinner together at a local cafe. Following church Sunday, Eldon and Esther Magnuson had dinner in Murdo. After, they visited at the home of Chad and Heather Whitney and boys. Ray and Janice Pike spent Sunday afternoon visiting Bob and Susie Rankin. Nelva and Janet Louder visited Bill and Ellen Valburg Sunday afternoon and then enjoyed supper with them. Then, you guessed it – more visiting. It's been a long time since we've been together. Had a call from Melva Vik. She tells me that hubby Roger is in the rehab unit at Ft. Meade. I'm sure he would enjoy hearing from friends and relatives. His address is Roger Vik, Ft. Meade Medical Center, 113 Commanche Rd., Ft. Meade, S.D., 57741 or call 605347-2511, extension 9, then 5131. Not much news this week, lots of it due to our nasty weather. Although several have been taking in the invitational tournament, but hard to name all. Monday afternoon, the young fellas played ball at the Draper hall, Jones County against Philip. Then I'm sure many of them went to Murdo to the tournament as the big boys were playing there, so was a very busy night.
Murdo Coyote • January 17, 2013 •
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by Jody Lebeda • 669-2526 • jody1945@gmail.com
We are back to winter! A fast moving blizzard put things back in the winter mode where it is supposed to be this time of year. A storm came just in time to complicate the Jones County basketball tournament; the championship game was played on Monday. The Modern Woodmen sponsored a winter fair and potato bake and bake sale at the senior center on Saturday. Many local vendors displayed their wares, including rice bags, purses, jewelry, Pampered Chef, Watkins and many other neat items. Funds raised from the potato bake and bake sale went to the Jones County Swing Choir. It was fairly well attended and the potatoes were scrumptious. Jackie Fosheim attended the ball games on Saturday, where the Jones County school board and city council did a presentation to Harold Thune and Jerald Applebee, renaming the Murdo auditorium to the Harold Thune Auditorium and the gym to Jerald Applebee Court. All of Harold’s family were at the presentation. Jackie Fosheim and Helen McMillan gave Karla Mannhalter a ride to Kadoka where she met her sister from Martin, and they went on to Rapid City. Helen and Jackie went to lunch at one of Kadoka’s finest and had a wonderful meal. Clarice Roghair and Georganna (Iversen) Addison went to the Ranchers workshop in White River on Tuesday, January 14 where they took part in the vendor’s fair.
Local News
Celebrating retirement… Carol Cressy celebrated her retirement from her deputy clerk of courts position on Friday January 4. Pictured from left to right: Heather Covey, Circuit Administrator; Judy Feddersen, Clerk of Courts; Carol Cressy; Judge John Brown. Courtesy photo
Good luck to the Lady Coyotes in the Southern Plains Conference Tournament!
now accepts credit cards. Call 605-669-2271 and pay your subscription or ad with your credit card. The
Murdo Coyote
Prairie Home Ladies meeting
The Prairie Home Ladies met at the church Tuesday, January 8. Chair Velma opened the meeting with prayer. Roll call, payment of dues and an idea for a craft for the year was answered by Velma, Rosa Lee, Lila Mae, Linda, Margie and Janet. Secretary Margie read the minutes of the last meeting; approved. Treasurer Rosa Lee gave the year end treasurer’s report; approved. Janet presented a bill for the Christmas gift she bought for our adoptee, Larry Cox of Oahe, Inc.; paid. Lila Mae motioned, seconded by Linda, for Velma to buy material to make school kits for the fall in gathering; carried. A motion was made by Margie, seconded by Lila Mae, to make our annual donations to Oahe, Inc., hospice, Missouri
Fast & Easy!!
Shores and post-prom party; carried. Meeting adjourned. Velma had a quiz on “Who’s Who in the New Testament?” Janet read an article about the first organizational meeting of PHL, which was held January 2, 1908; at that time it was known as “Pleasant Hills Ladies Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church,” other names were also mentioned, and was eventually shortened to PHL; aren’t we glad! It got its name from the community in the northwest part of Draper Township, “The Prairie Home Community.” The group then took down the Christmas tree and the other decorations and put away for another year. After, a frozen oreo dessert and coffee were served by Velma and Lila Mae.
Jones County Sheriff’s Report
The Sheriff ’s report is printed as received by Jones County Sheriff ’s Office. It may or may not contain every call received by the department. Sheriff and Deputy calls: Jan. 2 All calls for vehicles off the road were caused by icy roads. Deputy Sylva responded to the report of three vehicles in the median or ditches on I-90, mm 180, mm 191 and mm 193. The vehicles were pulled out. Deputy Sylva responded to the report of possible over weight trucks traveling northbound on Hwy. 83. Unable to weigh trucks due to no scale available. Deputy Sylva responded to the report of three more vehicles in the ditch or median on I-90 at mm 208, mm 188, and mm 209. All vehicles were pulled out. Deputy Sylva responded to the report of three vehicles that were in the ditch on I-90 between mm 207 and mm 209. These were different reports from all the others. Unable to locate. Jan.3 Deputy Sylva responded to the report of a car in the median on I-90, westbound, mm 209. Vehicle was pulled out. Deputy Sylva responded to the report of a one vehicle rollover on I-90, westbound, mm 209. The two passengers were severely injured and were transported to St. Mary’s Hospital by the Jones Co. Ambulance. Deputy Sylva, assisted by Jackson Co. Deputy, made a traffic stop on a vehicle that was traveling 116 mph. Jan.4 Sheriff Weber responded to the Super 8 in Murdo to the report of a suspicious subject. The subject checked out okay. Jan. 5 Sheriff Weber responded to several vehicles in the ditches and the median on I-90, between mm 204 and 189 due to icy roads. Ten vehicles were pulled out. Deputy Sylva and Sheriff Weber responded to a semi in the median on I-90, eastbound, mm194. The semi was blocking both lanes. Traffic was diverted around area until the semi was pulled out and removed off of the roadway. Deputy Sylva and Sheriff Weber responded to two more vehicles in the median on I-90, mm 193 and mm 191. Vehicles were towed out. Deputy Sylva and Sheriff Weber responded to the report of two semis in the ditch on I-90, westbound, mm189. The semis were towed out of the ditch. Sheriff Weber responded to the report of a subject that had fallen in front of the Pilot Truckstop and was bleeding
Linda and Larry Labrier spent New Years with Keith and Judy Moody, formerly of Murdo, now near Clearfield. Lashae Labrier has been home for the Christmas break and returned to La Grange, Wyo., where she is starting her second semester at Frontier School of the Bible. She works on a ranch near the school in the afternoons checking cattle and helping out with chores. Levi Moody is the assistant Dean of Students and Teresa Moody is Lashae’s roommate, so she has some family to keep her from getting too homesick. Nearly everyone is either entertaining the flu bug, just getting over it, or trying to stay away from it. Several different versions are out there so please do all you can to avoid it and if you do get it stay home and stay warm. Bobbi Knispel is doing her student teaching in Rosebud and loving it. She was one of the helpers at the winter potato fund raiser. Rose Comp, Lea Glaze and many of the swing choir members also staffed the bake sale table, raising money for the swing choir Edna McKenzie said she had a great holiday this year. She spent Christmas with Pam and Chester and family. Edna doesn’t get to Murdo very often anymore but still likes to keep in touch with all her friends. Sheena Larsen and Pam Bryan come to see her and get things she needs. At the assisted living, she is kept busy with exercise and cards and other group activities. Anyone whom I haven’t called can always give me a call if you have news to add to the paper.
& Lost Souls Tavern
will begin serving lunches on January 21 • Opening at 11:00 a.m. • Daily Specials plus our awesome menu
Orders to go are available and must be called in by 11:30 a.m.
To the good people of Murdo & the surrounding area:
Thank you for the honoring of us in regard to the Murdo City Auditorium. It is true that both of us spent countless hours in the gym working with many of the young people of the community. It was a privilege to do so. To have a chance to build into the lives of our youth is a rare opportunity. Jones County is to be commended for providing a great facility and a wholesome atmosphere for our youth with a constant commitment to upgrading and improving the facility. Thank you for recognizing us as having a part in it.
Guess who is turning 60 on January 18th?!
Love Stephanie, Kiel, Doug, Megan, & Brooklyn
from his head. The subject was loaded in to Jones Co. Amb. and was attempted to be transported to the Rosebud Hospital. Deputy Sylva and Sheriff Weber responded to and assisted with the attempt to locate the subject the Jones Co. Ambulance was transporting to the Rosebud Hospital. While enroute the patient became combative and left the ambulance when it stopped in Mellette Co. and walked away. The SD Highway Patrol, Murdo and White River Fire Dept., Mellette Co. Deputy, and the BIA attempted to locate the subject. After an extensive five hours of searching, the search was called off. The subject called his girlfriend the next morning and told her that he was alright. Jan. 7 Sheriff Weber responded the report of a possible domestic assault that was happening on I-90, westbound, mm 209 on the shoulder of the highway. It was found not to be an assault. A vehicle had broke down and someone had stopped to help. Vehicle was towed away. Jan. 8 Sheriff Weber responded to a report of a wounded deer along SD Hwy 248. The deer had been hit by a vehicle and was put down. Sheriff Weber responded to a report of a vehicle that had backed in to another vehicle in Draper in a private driveway. Sheriff Weber responded to a report of a possible intoxicated driver northbound on Hwy 83. The driver was located, checked out and was found not to be intoxicated.
Murdo Coyote – Murdo, SD
Published Every Thursday
P.O. Box 465 Murdo, SD 57559-0465 Phone: (605) 669-2271 FAX: (605) 669-2744 E-mail: mcoyote@gwtc.net Don Ravellette, Publisher Karlee Barnes, Reporter/Photographer/Sales Lonna Jackson Typesetter/Office
Local subscriptions include the towns and rural routes of Murdo, Draper, Vivian, Presho, White River, Okaton, Belvidere, Kadoka and Midland
Coaches Jerald Applebee and Harold Thune
Periodicals Postage Paid at Murdo, SD 57559 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Murdo Coyote P.O. Box 465 Murdo, SD 57559-0465
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Deadlines for articles and letters is Thursdays at 5:00 p.m. (CT) Items received after that time will be held over until the next week’s issue. LEGAL DEADLINE: Fridays at 4:00 p.m. (CT)
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local … $34.00 + Tax In-State … $39.00 + tax Out-of-State … $39.00
Coyotes finish in second place at J.C. Invitational
Murdo Coyote
Murdo Coyote • January 17, 2013 •
First Jones County winter fair deemed a success
by Dee LeRoye In spite of whirling, drifting snow that blocked roads and sent vehicles into the ditch, a surprising number of folks turned out on Murdo’s Main Street last Saturday, January 12, 2013 to take part in the winter fair. Some were in town for the annual basketball invitational tournament, others came to buy from the vendors and most contributed to preparing or just enjoying the potato feed sponsored by and benefiting the Jones County High School Jazz Choir. Participants signing in at the door numbered more than 60. They shopped at the vendor’s tables, which included Scentsy, Wild Things, Pampered Chef, Paparazzi Jewelry, Ray’s Hot and Cold Packs, Thirty-One, Watkins and Lemongrass Spa. From there, customers proceeded to the south part of the senior citizen’s center, where they enjoyed baked potatoes with all the trimmings and their choice of pie or apple crisp. Baked goodies were also available for buying and taking home. Profits from the food sales and silent auction items were donated to the jazz choir. Various businesses and individuals around town donated door prizes and silent auction items. Food items were donated by jazz choir members and families. Door prize donors include: Moore Building Center, Ashley Geigle with Pampered Chef, Modern Woodmen, First Fidelity Bank, Corky’s, Roghair Angus, All Pro Towing, Sherry from Hair, Inc., Pioneer Country Mart and Farmers Union Oil at Murdo. Linda Kerns from the Buffalo Restaurant donated nacho cheese sauce and foil wraps for the potatoes. Items for the silent auction
Seniors accept award… Jones County Coyote seniors accept their second place award together at the conclusion of the 45th Annual Jones County Invitational Basketball Tournament. From left to right: Philip Mathews (4), Wyatt Hespe (3), Wyatt Walker (12), Kyle Manke (22), Josh Daum (11) and Gus Volmer (5). Photo by Karlee Barnes
“I Am the Way, the Truth and the Life. No one comes to the Father except though Me.” John 14:6 “We all go to the same place.” “Many roads go up the mountain, but they all get to the top.” “All religions are essentially the same.” “One religion is as good as another.” We have all heard these statements...right...funny thing about them some people think that they are true yet, people who select a doctor do so very carefully. These commonly heard views above summarize what is known
by Pastor Ray Greenseth, Messiah/St. Paul Lutheran Churches
“Christ is the Only Way”
eternal life through the death and resurrection of His Son. That is why it is so important to get the Good News about Jesus Christ out to everyone. And we must also be faithful witnesses in our own backyards. So we thank God daily for the salvation that He offers to all believers. We pray that humanity may come to know and believe in Jesus Christ, the only way to the Father and eternal life. We pray: Thank You, heavenly Father, for showing me the road back to God, the only Way; the Truth and the Life: Jesus Christ. Amen.
Member FDIC
Pray
included jewelry from Kayla with Paparazzi, Sherry from Hair, Inc., and Sharon Hullinger, as well as a belt and feathered headband from Georganna with Wild Things. The top-selling auction item was a child’s wooden rocker, which was a kit donated by Corky’s and assembled by Wyatt Hespe with Mr. Gittings from the Jones County carpentry class. Michele McNeely served as registrar and Jody Lebeda as cashier, while Rose Comp and Bobbi Knispel were in kitchen command. Jody Lebeda also helped with maintenance and clean-up after the event. The profits for the jazz choir will be put towards a spring trip for a concert performance and/or clinic. Another winter fair is already being planned for 2014. See you then!
Why I love South Dakota By June Wells, a former Nebraskan I want to share a highlight of a trip I made to South Dakota this summer. My family roots are in South Dakota, my Grandparents Ruth (Wenzel) and Ralph Forman were born on dairy farms in eastern South Dakota – South Shore / Watertown area in 1915 and 1911. They moved to and raised their family in Edgemont. I have lived in Texas for the past 17 years (a job transfer requirement, not a choice) and this August made a trip with my mother to visit some of our relatives that live, and some, still dairy farm in northeastern parts of South Dakota. Mom lives in Gillette, Wyoming – she picked me up at the airport in Rapid City and we headed east. We stayed in Murdo for the night having arrived in town about 4 p.m. We had stayed there before when we were on our way to family reunions but I hadn’t been there for over a decade. We checked into Graham’s Best Western, still very nice, and took a walk about town to stretch out car-cramped legs. We found a mix of old, new and some abandoned places on our walk and pleasantly saw a very nicely kept downtown area. It was good to see the folks of Murdo taking good care and showing pride in their hometown. I loved all the wonderful smelling petunias on Main Street. I can’t grow petunias in Texas; well, I can but they last for about four weeks before the heat kills them. Where I live in north central Texas (west of Ft. Worth) there are two seasons of death when it comes to plants: freezing in the winter and too darn hot (and dry) in the summer. I have long missed being able to grow flowers and a nice garden since moving here. I always enjoy petunias when I come north. I also always get as much of two other things I can’t get in Texas – rhubarb and HOME GROWN tomatoes. Rhubarb won’t survive at all here and the tomatoes have to have cool nights to grow and taste worth a darn. So when I travel north, I eat as much as I can get. So here’s my story illustrating why I love the people of South Dakota. After our walk, Mom and I went to the Murdo Drive Inn for supper. Right away I noticed the tomato
Letter to the editor
plants in the front of the patio at the Drive Inn. I also noticed there were no ripe tomatoes. Mom and I ordered an enchilada and took our seat on the patio enjoying the nice evening. When the enchilada arrived, I saw the chopped tomatoes on it. They were beautiful, bright red and plump. I pointed them out and told mom excitedly, “I think they are home grown!” One delicious bite confirmed it. The taste was heavenly. I hadn’t had a home grown tomato in two years!! It was wonderful. I went to the counter for a napkin and commented how wonderful the home grown tomatoes were and how I had missed the wonderful summer treat after having been sentenced to living where I cannot grow them. I explained I usually got home grown tomatoes when I traveled north but this year my trip back to Nebraska was early and with the drought, the tomatoes weren’t ripe. I returned to the patio and enjoyed the wonderful enchilada. Before we finished, the lady from behind the counter brought me out a brown paper bag with five (5!) beautiful lush brilliant bright red home grown tomatoes for me to take. I was THRILLED! I texted my husband back in Texas a photo of the beauties. He was jealous but happy for me. It was such a kind gesture to a stranger – the woman who gave them to me said she too loved tomatoes and couldn’t imagine not being able to get them. Wow, how wonderful is that?! When I got back to Graham’s, I told the manager, Nadine, the story and asked if she knew the name of the lady that had given me the tomatoes. She said it was Mary Cazan, and it sounded like something Mary would do. I sent Mary a thank you note but I want
Page 3
to state publicly how much her act of sharing and kindness had meant. I’m sure she and many others reading this story don’t think it was much - but it was and is. It points to the goodness of the people who live in your town, in your state. I’m sure Mary learned kindness growing up – and it is ingrained in her and others like her. How lucky you are to live where you live. How lucky I was to be a recipient of kindness y’all take for granted. (I had to throw the y’all in – it is one Texas trait I like!) Thank you, Mary. Thank you to the folks of Murdo for making Murdo a highlight on my trip to South Dakota this summer. By the way – When we stayed at my aunt’s farm she had home grow tomatoes too. We ate her tomatoes at her house and then ate the one’s Mary gave us when we stayed in motels – they were the best bedtime snack ever.
Emily Wickstrom, Rural Advocate for Missouri Shores Domestic Violence Center, is at the J.C. Courthouse in the jury room Tuesday, January 22 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY For more information call 1-800-696-7187 Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Dating Violence.
Emily is also available for presentations to any group.
We will be closed Monday, January 21 in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.
First National BankFDIC Member
as “universalism”, the myth that ultimately all people will be saved regardless of what they believe or what religion they follow. But the “Gospel in a nutshell” says, “For God so loved the world that He gave His One and only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.” John 3:16 There is the universal salvation. God offers salvation to ALL people but only through Jesus Christ. And because of what Jesus has done we are declared righteous, forgiven by God. We are saved, that is, rescued from our sins and made God's children and heirs of
first fidelity bank Member FDIC
Catholic Church of St. Martin 502 E. Second St., Murdo, S.D. • Father Gary Oreshoski Saturday Mass: 6 p.m. St. Anthony’s Catholic Church Draper, S.D. • Father Gary Oreshoski Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m. Draper United Methodist Church Pastor Rick Hazen Sunday Worship: 11 a.m.
Two minutes with the bible
Who’s Been Good To Whom? by Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
As I once left a restaurant, the cashier and part owner asked how “the pastor” was feeling. I replied: “Fine. The Lord has been very good to me.” With this she began to tell how good the Lord had been to her. She had come to America from Greece and had raised a family and prospered here until now, with her family, she owned and operated a good-sized restaurant. “So”, she said, “the Lord has been good to me”, and after a moment’s hesitation, “but then, I’ve been good to Him too!” Imagine! How He needed her! It is sad, but this is the low conception of God held by many religious, but unsaved people. They entertain the strange notion that if they put a few dollars into the Church, God ought to bless them — or the still more foolish notion that if they are good to others, He ought to be good to them! But He owes us nothing just because we may have been good to others! And even if we sought only to please Him, this would not make Him our debtor. He does not need us. There is nothing we can do to enrich Him. This is why Ephesians 2:8-10 declares that salvation is “not of yourselves”, and “not of works, lest any man should boast”. No, we cannot gain His favor by “being good to Him”. Yet, it is true that His children will be rewarded for faithfulness to Him. This is not a dispensational matter; it is a promise that God has always held out to His people (Dan.12:3; Matt. 25:21; ICor.4:5; IThes.2:19; IITim.4:7,8; IPet.5:1). But such rewards are “rewards of grace”. Let us who know Him, then, seek above all else to be faithful in our service to Him, not to gain acceptance with God, for He has already “made us accepted in the Beloved” (Eph.1:6), but rather out of love and gratitude to Him who gave Himself for us.
Murdo United Methodist Church Pastor Rick Hazen • Corner of E. 2nd and Jefferson Ave. Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m. and Fellowship Time • Sunday School: 10:30 a.m. United Methodist Women: 1st Wednesday at 2 p.m. • ALL WELCOME! Okaton Evangelical Free Church Okaton I–90 Exit 183 • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 605–837–2233 (Kadoka) Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. (CT) • Sunday School: 10:30 a.m. (CT)
Messiah Lutheran Church 308 Cedar, Murdo, S.D. • Pastor Ray Greenseth Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. • Sunday School: 10 a.m. • Bible Study: Tuesday 7 a.m. Thursday 9:30 a.m. • Midweek: Wednesday 3:15 p.m. St. Paul’s Lutheran Church Draper, S.D. • Pastor Ray Greenseth Sunday Worship: 11 a.m. • Bible Study: Wednesday 9 a.m.
Midwest Co–op
669–2601
Community Bible Church 410 Washington, Murdo, S.D. • Pastor Alvin Gwin • 669–2600 Sunday Worship: 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. • Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Graham’s Best Western
669–2441
First National Bank
669–2414 • Member F.D.I.C.
PHONE: 669–2271 FAX: 669–2744 mcoyote@gwtc.net
Murdo Coyote
Super 8 Motel
669–2437
Dakota Prairie Bank
669–2401 • Member F.D.I.C.
Draper and Presho
It's back to the farm if the future goes as Manke plans his future education in agriculture
By Ryan Kirscher Kyle James Manke, son of Bud and Shelly Manke, has three siblings Cara, Katy, and Cody. Kyle has participated in football, basketball and track. In his spare time Kyle likes to hunt and fish. Some of Kyle’s favorites include the color blue, walleye and the movie 8 Seconds. For school subjects, government is his top choice. Thanksgiving is a favorite because he gets to see all of his family and friends along with getting to eat great food. When not in school, Kyle likes to watch That 70’s Show on tv. Keith Urban takes top honors as his favorite artist and he likes the song “Only You Can Love Me This Way.’’ He loves to play football most of all the sports, and his favorite books are the Hunger Games Trilogy. The 1872 brand of clothing can most often be found in his wardrobe. If Kyle could meet a famous person, he would choose Jared Allen of the Minnesota Vikings because he is a boss. He admires his dad the most because he has taught Kyle that working hard at anything will take you places. The least important thing to Kyle is fame because “money and power will take you further in life than fame will.” To Kyle, accomplishing something is most important because popularity and being organized will get you only so far in the real world. What makes Kyle really angry is doing something just okay, when he knows he could have done better. He’s also annoyed by small really annoying things. Kyle’s biggest fear is basketball practice. Kyle has no regrets because he says he will make mistakes in life but will learn from them and not regret them. If Kyle could be anything, he would be air because everyone would rely on him and he would be there forever. The thing Kyle values most is family. The biggest lesson Kyle has ever learned from his dad is to work your hardest at whatever your job is and to build yourself a good reputation because others will recognize it. If he had three wishes, Kyle would wish “to win the lottery, own a souped-up pickup, and just to be the nicest person I can be.” His advice to underclassmen is “to try your hardest your freshman year and not goof around like I did. I wish I would have worked harder my last three years.” Kyle’s biggest achievement so far is the reputation he has built up and that he has made himself a hard worker. He plans to make
January 17, 2013 Issue 8 Jones County High School Murdo, SD 57559
COYOTE CALL
Coyote Call teaches journalism principles, provides school information, serves as a public relations vehicle and provides a forum for opinions submitted in signed letters.
Murdo Coyote • January 17, 2013 •
Date 01-01 01-02 01-03 01-04 01-05 01-06 01-07 High 25.2 30.4 30.6 28.2 29.2 32.9 43.7
Jones County Weather
Low 8.4 11.1 14.1 15.8 17.1 16.9 17.7 Prec. 0 0 0 .02 .03 .24 .02 01-08 01-09 01-10 01-11 01-12 01-13 01-14 42.9 44.8 49.2 53.7 25.5 9.0 17.5
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25.3 21.7 24.3 25.4 4.3 1.1 -1.9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Staff: Becky Bryan, Janna Glaze, Nicki Kell, Ryan Kirscher, Emiley Nies, Paige Venard, Gus Volmer. Adviser: Margie Peters
Ladies continue playing hard during Case closed: second graders learn Christmas break against three teams about the court system on field trip
The next day, December 28, the girls played Kimball/White Lake, a pretty tough team that didn’t give up the whole time. At half time the score was 20-20. When the Ladies came out of the locker room, they still had their intensity level up, but just couldn’t keep the Lady Kiotes off the boards. Although the girls played hard, they walked off the court with a loss 33-44. Leading Scorer: Madison Mathews (14), Leading Rebounder: Garline Boni (9), Leading steals: Rachel Buxcel (4), Kalli Hespe (4). With a few days of hard and intense practicing, the girls played RCC Lady Comets. They knew it was going to be an easy win, but they still played like they were going to be the toughest team yet. The girls got many fast breaks and ended up with a win, 55-28. Leading scorer: Madison Mathews (17), Rachel Buxcel, Becky Bryan, Madison Mathews and Garline Boni all had 4 rebounds, Leading steals: Rachel Buxcel (5). A day after Christmas break, the girls stayed home to play the Colome Cowgirls. The Lady Coyotes started off slow in the first quarter, but in the second quarter, they got out of their funk and started playing like they usually do. The girls got into a little foul trouble at the beginning and two of them fouled out, senior Emiley Nies (13) and sophomore winning 52-44. Leading scorer: Julie Joseph (11), Leading Rebounders: Becky Bryan and Garline Boni, both with 7, Leading steals: both Rachel Buxcel and Becky Bryan had 3.
enough money to pay for most of his college. Kyle will miss playing football the most when he graduates. He said, “I think of my teammates out on the field as family: we bled, sweat and gave our hearts for one another.” Kyle’s favorite memories of his high school career are sports, the hard work the team puts into them and the results that showed. His favorite thing about being a senior is that all the underclassman listen to him. He plans to attend SDSU and graduate from the Agriculture Business field. He imagines himself, in 10 years, living on his dad’s ranch and running it.
Judge and helpers… Peyton Rankin, Jadyn Jensen, Brooklyn Larsen, Tyra Hatheway and Ramona Vasquez get the feel of being above the court with Clerk of Courts Judy Feddersen.
By Nicki Kell How does our government work? Second grade students from the elementary visited the courthouse where the Clerk of Courts, Judy Feddersen, gave them a funfilled tour. The children learned about how a court case is conducted. Rudy Edwards became “Judge Rudy,” Matthew Birkeland and Dawson Moreland played lawyers, and Dylan Fuoss was the defendant accused of speeding. The resulting jury was made up of almost all females except for Eli Kustar who made everyone smile. Feddersen next took the students through the court procedure of swearing in the defendant and going through the questioning process that would be done during a court session. Once the case was “closed,” they were led into the other rooms in the courthouse, one of them being LeAnn Birkeland’s. Her job as a Court Service Office for the 6th Judicial Court, she explained, is to help and teach those who are in trouble. She works with the client after they have pleaded guilty to make sure the court is fair and helps the clients make changes in their lives so they don’t go to prison and can get off probation. Rudy and Kendal said, “LeAnn talks to people about what they did.” Mallory, Matthew and Ramona remembered the motto LeAnn said is key for clients to follow which includes three points: show up, be honest, and try. Students recalled their Character Counts in that being a true character involves how you act when no one is watching and that honesty is the best policy. This goes right along with the golden rule that she told the kids is very
The intimidator… Madison Mathews stands over her opponent as they battle for the ball in the Colome game.
By Emiley Nies Over Christmas break the Lady Coyotes were busy with three games. They played in the Holiday Classic at Kimball and the second day in Murdo. The Saturday before school started they played against Rapid City Christian in Murdo. Before Christmas break the girls played in Ft. Pierre but even though they didn’t play very well, they came out with a win. Leading scorer: Madison Mathews (19), Leading rebounder: Garline Boni (15). Leading stealers: Madison
Vacation doesn’t mean rest as team plays Holiday Classic, regular games
by Gus Volmer The Jones County Coyotes had a few games over their Christmas break. The Coyotes come out of the break winning their last 3 of 4 games. The Coyotes started out playing the Colome Cowboys for the second time this season. December 27 the Coyotes went to Kimball for the first day of the two day Classic. The Coyotes didn’t perform well and didn’t play the tough defense they’re capable of and let the game slip away in the first half. The Coyotes started the second half strong and put it to the Cowboys and just ran out of gas towards the end of the game and couldn’t come back on the Cowboys. The Coyotes lost the game 59-69 to end the first game of the classic. Leading scorers: Philip Mathews 11 and Wyatt Hespe 7. Leading rebounder: Wyatt Walker 7. The Coyotes started the second day of the Classic with high spirits and facing Iroquois. The Coyotes started the game out strong and went on a big run against the Chiefs. The Coyotes kept it tough and ended the first half ahead of the Chiefs 40-14. The second half was another good half for the Coyotes. The Chiefs couldn’t hang with the experienced Coyotes and got another jump on the contending Chiefs. The Coyotes won the game 74-37 to finish the Holiday Classic and to win the consolation prize. Leading scorer: Wyatt Hespe 14. Leading rebounder: Gus Volmer 6. Most assists: Gus Volmer 10. Most steals: Gus Volmer 7. Friday, January 4, the Coyotes hosted the Philip Scotties and it was a challenge for the Coyotes. The Coyotes didn’t play good defense and let the Scotties jump out ahead early in the game and lead the whole first half. The Coyotes got a good pep talk at halftime and came out in the second half strong and put it to the Scotties. The Scotties couldn’t handle the Coyotes in the second half and the Coyotes took the lead and kept tacking little by little and beat the Scotties 62-50. Leading Scorer was Gus Volmer with 14 points. Leading rebounder: Wyatt Hespe 9. Most assists: Philip Mathews 2.
Mathews (5), Becky Bryan (4), Emiley Nies (4). The first game in the Holiday Classic against South Central on December 27 started off a little slow, but after Coach Neil got after them to hustle they came back with a lot of intensity. In the second half they were up the whole time and never backed down. They came out with a win 45-38. Leading Scorers: Madison Mathews (16), Becky Bryan (13). Leading Rebounder: Becky Bryan (7). Leading steals: Becky Bryan (5), Madison Mathews (4), Calli Glaze (4).
Learning more… Clerk of Courts, Judy Feddersen, explains
how the jury system works to the second graders. important: to treat others how you would like to be treated. The second graders had a great day visiting the court house. Birkeland said, “I’m impressed with the kids’ memory and I really enjoyed the kids.”
Most steals: Philip Mathews 3. The Coyotes hosted Rapid City Christian on January 5. The boys took it to the Comets early in the game and didn’t look back. The Coyotes took a big jump going on a huge run to start the game. The Coyotes were leading the Comets going into the second half. The second half was mostly about the Coyotes. The home Coyotes played good defense in the second half and limited the Comets to few points. Even though the Coyotes won, the Comets didn’t push over easy and the Coyotes had to work for their victory. The Coyotes won the game 64-33. Leading scorer: Gus Volmer 16. Leading rebounder: Gus Volmer and Wyatt Hespe 6. Steals leader: Gus Volmer 4 steals 5 assists.
The Juniors have started their annual magazine sale and ask that you keep your renewals for them. Contact a Junior if they don't get to you first. New orders and renewals are both welcome.
Magazines for sale!
High academic achievements earn athletic and fine arts awards
Provided by SDHSAA Initiated during the 1996-97 school year, the SDHSAA ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT TEAM AWARD program is designed to recognize varsity athletic teams and fine arts groups for their academic excellence. The South Dakota High School Activities Association believes that high school students learn in two distinct ways: inside the classroom and outside the classroom—on the stage and/or athletic field. This academic program creates a positive environment for school teams to have its members excel in the classroom. This program is also meant to motivate students towards academic excellence and to promote academic encouragement from teammates. All Varsity athletic teams and fine arts groups that participate in Association sponsored activities
December Students of the Month Sponsored by Jones County PTO
waits for the results of the attempt.
Trying for a shot… Wyatt Hespe crouches as Wyatt Walker
are eligible for this recognition program. Based on a duplicated count, as reported in the 20112012 SDHSAA Participation Survey, over 29,789 students participate in interscholastic athletics and over 28,613 more are involved in fine arts activities. The Academic Team Award program provides high school students with the opportunity to prove they can be overwhelmingly successful in both academics as well as in athletic and fine arts activities. All varsity athletic teams and fine arts groups that achieve a combined grade point average of 3.0 or higher are eligible to receive the SDHSAA ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT TEAM AWARD. The following activities from Jones County received the award: Girls Cross Country team, Volleyball team, Football Cheerleaders, Football team and All-State Chorus.
Josh Daum 12th
Kaylen Larsen 11th
Cody Hight 10th
Dana Trethaway 9th
Zach Hespe 8th
Molly Dowling 7th
Lookin’ Around
I lost a good friend last week when Winona Carson tired of this life after 94 years and went on ahead of me to heaven. I’m not even sure when she and I first got acquainted, but it was over thirty years ago and probably close to forty. I think it was when her grandson, Scott, worked for us for a few years shortly after he got out of high school. No matter how and when we met, we’ve stayed friends ever since. Winona loved farm-raised eggs since she said they tasted so much better than those available in stores. As a result, I delivered eggs to her on a regular basis which meant we got to visit some every week or two. When I stopped in, it was a rare occurrence for her to be sitting idle. She was either baking, cooking, sewing or doing some other kind of work. “Loafing about” was not in her vocabulary. “Useful endeavor” was. Neither did she mess about doing things slowly. She moved right along. I recall many times when I delivered some old hens or other surplus chickens to her. I would call and tell her I was coming which prompted her to put water on to boil for scalding. When I arrived, she grabbed her axe and had those birds beheaded and ready for plucking before I left the driveway. After I visited the bank and grocery store and took care of any other business I had, I would stop back to pick up my cages. In that short amount of time, the chickens were apt to be plucked, washed and ready to cook up for canning. Sometimes she would later give me a jar of canned chicken that made up nicely into soup or other tasty fare. Winona was a very sweet and kind lady. She didn’t talk a lot, but a smile was always close to the surface. She was rather fun to tease because it made her chuckle. She didn’t often tease back, but she didn’t mind being teased herself about little things. In short, she was the kind of person you would like to have as your grandmother. She strongly reminded me of my own grandma who doted on me and liked to do nice things for me. When I stopped in and there were cookies or other treats sitting on the table, I was always invited to try them which I gladly did. One such treat at Christmas time was a fruit cake. Normally, I’m not big on fruit cake, but this
• Syd Iwan •
4-H scholarship deadline is April 1
Youth who have at least five years of active membership in South Dakota 4-H and are current high school seniors or are enrolled in post secondary education are encouraged to apply for South Dakota 4-H Scholarships. “These scholarships are specifically for SD 4-H members and the process makes it easy to apply for as many as you would like,” said Audrey Rider, SDSU Extension 4H Youth Leadership Field Specialist. There are seven different scholarship opportunities and the deadline for all applications is April 1, 2013. To apply for South Dakota State 4-H Scholarship(s), applicants need to submit the following four four items: 1. Cover letter of one typewritten page (8-1/2”x11”), with one inch margins, using a 12 point font. 2. Résumé of one or two typewritten pages (8-1/2”x11”), with one inch margins, using a 12 point font. 3. Non-confidential, one-page letter of recommendation from ONE of the following: 4-H club leader, county 4-H Youth Program Advisor, school administrator or teacher, employer, pastor or someone who can comment on the applicant’s goals and skills. 4. For high school seniors, an official copy of his/her high school transcript with the current cumulative grade point average (GPA), rank in class and ACT/SAT scores. For current college students, a college and/or technical institute transcript with the current cumulative GPA. 5. Students also have the option of submitting one page of photos with captions showing 4-H leadership work/accomplishments. To find out what to include in your cover letter and resume please refer to the 2013 South Dakota State 4-H Scholarship Policy document in the 4-H Resource library on iGrow.org. A committee will review all applications and announce recipients in early May. All applicants
Murdo Coyote
Murdo Coyote • January 17, 2013 •
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one was different. It was actually good. I asked for the recipe which was soon written down for me, and I’ve made it several times. It makes a huge batch that will not only last through Christmas but probably into March as well since part of it can be frozen for later use. Oddly enough, it is a no-bake cake that is glued together with marshmallows and other tasty goodies. I didn’t make it this year, come to think of it, but maybe I will gather the multitude of ingredients needed to construct it and call it an Easter fruitcake in memory of my friend. I know I’ll never make it without it bringing Mrs. C happily to mind. When I stopped in at Winona’s, it was unusual for her to be alone. Some friends or relatives were almost always there and had probably just been served a meal or were going to be. Family was important, and I met many of her kin including some brothers and sisters, kids, grandkids, and such. Her place was where the family gathered. On several occasions, I was called on to take pictures at some family reunion or event that Winona wanted recorded photographically. Her living room was a gallery of those she held dear. Winona always remembered me at Christmas. Usually she gave me something she had made like potholders or the like, and I treasured them, partly because they were nice things, but mostly because she’d made them. One of the last things she gave me was a nifty quilt. It was made with squares of blue denim from old blue jeans on one side and white, pink and red flannel on the other. It was tied with red yarn. She said I needed to carry it in the new pickup I’d just purchased, and, as a result, it was partly done in red since that was the color of the pickup. It was a grand quilt, and it is still riding around with me in my red Ranger. You just never know when you might need a quilt. It’s a comfort to have along. Well, although I’ll miss my friend until we meet again upstairs, I know she was ready to go. Old age was becoming a burden, and her bags were packed, so to speak. I imagine she’s already looking around for useful things to do up there in heaven. I’ll be glad one day to resume our friendship, and, until then, Winona will continue to live in my mind and heart. Winona Bell Carson (1918-2013)
Jones County Invitational Tournament award winners
will be notified via USPS mail regarding their final status after selection of recipients. All recipients must complete and return the 4-H Scholarship Acceptance Form to receive the scholarship(s). The 4-H scholarship awards are based on fulfillment of scholarship-specific criteria and the following: •40 percent scholastic achieve-
ment; •10 percent character; •40 percent 4-H project involvement including Citizenship/ Community Service and Leadership; and •10 percent financial need. To learn more contact your local SDSU Extension 4-H Youth Program Advisor. For a complete listing, visit iGrow.org.
Health Department urges vaccination as flu activity increases to widespread
People who’ve delayed getting vaccinated for flu may want to proceed now that flu virus activity is widespread in South Dakota, says a state health official. “We do encourage people to get vaccinated early in the season but it’s still not too late to get immunized,” said Dr. Lon Kightlinger, State Epidemiologist for the Department of Health. “The flu virus is likely to be with us for several weeks, if not months, so getting vaccinated now can provide important protection from the flu.” Kightlinger noted that this year’s flu activity is occurring earlier and at higher levels than recent years, other than the 2009 pandemic. To date, South Dakota has reported 469 laboratory-confirmed cases of flu and 135 flu-related hospitalizations. There have also been nine deaths reported, all over the age of 75. Annual flu vaccination is recommended for everyone, but some are
at higher risk for complications – pregnant women, people over 50 years and people with chronic medical conditions. Health-care workers and household contacts of high-risk populations such as those with young infants should also be vaccinated. Children are another high risk group, accounting for significant cases and hospitalizations each year and helping spread flu in the community. The department offers free flu vaccine for kids from six months to 18 years. In addition to vaccination, to prevent the spread of the flu: •Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcoholbased hand gel ; •Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze; •Don’t touch your eyes, nose or Pete Kerns Award… Nic Waln, senior from White River High mouth; and, School, is presented with the Pete Kerns award by Clayton Evans •Stay home if you're sick. and Slade Badger (son of Krista Kerns). Waln was also named to Learn more at http://flu.sd.gov the All Tournament First team.
Muriel Huber Memorial Cheer Award… The cheerleaders from Jones County High School took home the first ever Muriel Huber Memorial Cheer Award. Photos by Karlee Barnes
Extension News
In 2012, South Dakota farmers planted the lowest number of spring wheat acres since 1885. When one considers the demand for corn by the ethanol industry, positively impacting the price of corn, and the dramatic improvements in corn genetics and subsequent yield improvements, it’s not surprising that corn is surpassing wheat in planted acres. Wheat is still an important crop however, not only for the flour and the many products generated from it, but for the inherent benefits it provides. Wheat and other small grains is the ultimate “high residue” crop, offering significant benefits to any crop rotation, particularly land under no-till management. Although farmers often curse the residue generated by a bountiful wheat crop from the previous year when planting a spring crop, a mat of residue is considered one of the keys to successful no-till farming. The mat of residue that a good wheat crop produces may be most valuable in the heat of the summer, when it helps to shade the soil, keeping it cooler than bare ground, and reducing evaporation. Wheat is better at generating this mat of residue than many other crops. Anyone who has heard Dwayne Beck talk in the past several years has certainly heard about the amazing difference in wheat yields in two very similar crop rotations at the Dakota Lakes Research Farm. The “high residue” rotation consists of two years of “high residue” crops, corn and wheat, with the other year being field peas. The “low residue” rotation consists of two “high residue” crops, corn and wheat, and two “low residue” crops, soybeans and field peas, both broadleaves. The “high residue” rotation produces better wheat yields than the “low residue” rotation, but the big difference shows up in dry years, like 2002 and 2006, where the “high residue” rotation produced right at 60 Bu/A, and the “low residue” rotation less than 30 Bu/A. The Wheat is a Staple Crop
• Bob Fanning (605) 842-1267 •
amazing thing is that the previous two crops were the same, corn and then field peas. Kansas State University research estimates that residue left on the field vs. removing it can save as much as 2” of water. Under the right conditions, this 2” could produce an additional 34 Bu/A of corn and 12 Bu/A of wheat. Research also indicates that 100 lbs of dry soil containing 4-5% organic matter can hold 165–195 lbs of water, whereas 100 lbs of dry soil containing 1.5–2% organic matter can only hold 35–45 lbs of water. Once again, wheat and other small grains are “king” when it comes to generating residue and organic matter. A presenter recently said farmers should raise field peas because the best way to raise a good corn crop is to raise a good wheat crop to plant into. That speaks well for both field peas and wheat in a crop rotation. The wisdom of planting corn into wheat residue certainly showed in the summer of 2012. Particularly winter wheat has also shown to be highly beneficial to at least two populations of wildlife; ducks and pheasants. Because they are seeded in the fall, winter wheat fields remain relatively undisturbed throughout the nesting season the following year. Consider maintaining or including wheat in your crop rotation; it can pay. 1/16/2013 – Ranchers Workshop, 9:30 am CST, SDSU Regional Extension Center, Winner, SD 1/28/2013 – PAT, 1:00 pm CST, Burke Civic Center, Burke, SD 1/31/2013 – PAT, 1:00 pm MST, Pennington County Extension Center, Rapid City, SD 2/12/2013 – PAT, 1:00 pm MST, Mueller Civic Center, Hot Springs, SD 2/19/2013 – PAT, 1:00 pm CST, Winner Regional Extension Center, Winner, SD 2/20/2013 – PAT, 1:00 pm MST, Wall Community Center, Wall, SD Calendar
Murdo Coyote J C FSA News
A summary of all earned payments and/or refunds during the previous calendar year will be mailed to producers during the last week of January. Form CCC 1099-G will be mailed from Kansas City, Missouri. If you find errors or omissions on this form, please contact the local FSA office as soon as possible to correct the error. 2012 NAP PRODUCTION DUE JULY 15 REPORT OF PAYMENTS TO PRODUCERS
Murdo Coyote • January 17, 2013 •
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• David Klingberg •
Beginning this year, producers whose total reportable payments from the Farm Service Agency are less than $600 will not receive IRS Form 1099-G. Previously, the forms were issued to show all program payments received from FSA, regardless of the amount. Producers who receive payments from more than one county will receive one 1099-G form if the total of all payments from all counties is $600 or more. The same changes apply to producers who normally receive IRS Form 1099-MISC. FARM LOAN YEAR END REVIEWS
Rep. James Schaefer
2013 Legislature Updates
Proposal for a new state park at Blood Run, southeast of Sioux Falls. 3) Streamline the process for military spouses to transfer their professional licenses to South Dakota. In the State of the Judiciary Address Chief Justice Gilbertson stated the need to expand Substance Abuse Courts (success rate currently stands at 81 percent) rather than imprisonment (cost per inmate is $25,000 per year – have 450 women occupants and 3,600 male occupants). He addressed the need for services for veterans due to homelessness and suicide. Interpreters in our Court System due to 6.8 percent of our citizens speaking a language other than English and the decline of attorneys in the rural areas were also mentioned. As the vice chair of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee, we meet on Tuesday and Thursday at 7:45 in Room 464. The Education Committee meets Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 7:45 in Room 413. I invite you to attend these committee meetings. The House of Representatives has 70 legislators; 31 are new. Speaker of the House is Brian Gosch, a lawyer from Rapid City, and the Speaker Pro Tempore is Dean Wink, a rancher from Howes. Some of you have told me that you are praying for me as I serve. This is greatly appreciated and encouraged. Please continue to share your thoughts. The most effective means of reaching me is by calling my cell 730-1990. Leave a message so that I can return your call.
Senator Larry Lucas
Producers must annually provide (if not appraised) the quantity of all harvested production of the crop in which the producer held an interest during the crop year. We will be sending out the “NAP Yields” form which lists your acres and a spot for you to record your production. The deadline for reporting this production is not until July 15, 2013, but report the production now while the records are handy and newly calculated. Jones County has paid out more than $650,000 in NAP due to the drought. A majority of this was grazing payments which were bought with a $250 application fee. For 2012 grazing only, the payments are based on multiplying native grass acres by $3.83, tame grass acres by $7.66, and alfalfa grass acres by $11.26. 2013 NAP SALES CLOSING DATE IS MARCH 15
The last day to purchase NAP insurance for 2013 is March 15. Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) provides financial assistance to producers of non-insurable crops when low yields, loss of inventory, or prevented planting occurs due to natural disasters. To be eligible for NAP assistance, crops must be non-insurable crops and agricultural commodities for which the catastrophic risk protection level of crop insurance is not available. FSA CHANGES WAY PRODUCERS RECEIVE IRS FORMS
Producers that have a farm loan with FSA are reminded they must provide data for their YearEnd Analysis (YEA) to their loan officer each year. Borrowers are urged to provide this information timely so that their files can be maintained. The office will contact you for the data you will need to provide us. Farmers and ranchers that intend to apply to the Farm Service Agency for loan assistance for the upcoming crop year are encouraged to file their applications as early as possible. Filing early will help ensure that your loan is processed and approved as early as possible so that planting decisions can be made. Failure to apply early can result in a delay in processing loans due to the volume of applications that must be processed in date order. Contact your local FSA Farm Loan Manager or Officer for more details and assistance in applying. DATES TO REMEMBER/ DEADLINES:
January 21: Office closed for Martin Luther King Day March 15: 2013 NAP Sales closing date July 15: 2012 ACRE Production July 15: 2012 NAP Production July 15: Final 2013 Acreage Reporting Date
BankWest Christmas Dollars support area economy
Area merchants, holiday shoppers and BankWest branches once again partnered to boost the regional economy through the BankWest Christmas Dollars program. BankWest VP Marketing Kristin Brost said this year’s program provided more than $366,000 in low-interest loans to area shoppers. The Christmas Dollars were redeemable at nearly 400 participating businesses throughout central South Dakota and bank officials say interest in this year’s program was about average from previous years. “The program is good for our local businesses and it’s good for our local shoppers,” Brost said. “The interest rate is lower than traditional loans and it’s significantly lower than what you would pay on a credit card. The loans provide greater buying power and those purchases stay in our communities. It’s truly a win-win situation and it’s just one way that BankWest reinvests in the communities it serves.” BankWest Christmas Dollars were redeemable at 398 businesses in 13 different communities. Those communities included: Pierre, Fort Pierre, Kadoka, Philip, Murdo, Draper, Kennebec, Selby, Onida, Gettysburg, Gregory, Winner and Mitchell. Brost said the number of participating businesses fluctuates from year to year, but continually grows.
Greetings! The 88th legislative session opened on January 8 with the legislators taking their oath followed by Governor Daugaard’s State of the State Address. Good stewardship was the key focus of the address which highlighted the continuation of what is working: keeping the state’s budget structurally balanced, decreasing infant mortality, inviting South Dakota people to come back home and take a job in SD (536 did), creating value-added ag, cutting unnecessary laws, open government, expanding the economy. For the 2013 Session, Governor Daugaard recommended three initiatives. 1) Public Safety Improvement Act – Its purpose is to improve public safety, hold offenders more accountable, and control corrections spending. The legislation includes strengthening supervision and holding offenders more accountable, controlling corrections spending and focusing prison space on violent and career criminals, and ensuring quality and sustainability of reforms. 2)
Feel free to call the office if you ever have questions on any of our programs 605-669-2404 Ext. 2.
The 2013 Legislative Session started Tuesday, January 8, when Governor Dennis Daugaard gave the annual State-of-the-State address. Governor Daugaard's State-of-the-State message showed that the state is in good fiscal shape. Our reserves have grown to 11.2 percent of general fund spending due to the 10 percent budget cuts done in 2011 along with a better than average growth in state revenues. One of the issues we will wrestle with this year is, what should be the level of our reserves? The study by the nonprofit Center on Budget and Policy Priorities recommended states have reserves equal to 15 percent or more of their yearly expenditures if they want to spend them during economic downturns. Governor Daugaard has said he prefers a more limited use of reserves, but he doesn’t want to limit future governors and legislators from a different approach. The impact of possible federal cuts to South Dakota will have to be considered in this debate. It is very likely that Congress will be unable to make decisions surrounding the national debt dilemma before we pass our state's budget. With 45 percent of our budget impacted by federal dollars there will be a lot of “what if” budget questions to ask. Back in December, when Governor Daugaard presented his FY 14 proposed budget, he offered increases for drug courts and more intensive drug and alcohol treatment programs. This is a recommendation from the Governor's
Commissioners listen to law enforcement concerns
by Karlee Barnes The county commissioners saw changes for the new year as newly elected Steve Iwan joined Helen Louder and Monte Anker at his first meeting on Tuesday, January 8. Those present and joining throughout the meeting included: Helen Louder, Monte Anker, Steve Iwan, John Brunskill, Bruce Royer, John Weber, Angie Kinsley and Karlee Barnes. The commissioners opened the meeting by discussing a new requirement that coroners for the county will have to complete 16 hours of training. It was mentioned that the current coroners in the county had no interest in completing the training. The commissioners questioned if it was a state law to complete the training. Brunskill wasn’t sure if it was or not. The next topic of discussion focused on raises for the county workers. Royer was present to voice his opinion and said he would like to see a raise to keep up with the cost of living. Anker made a motion for a $0.35 raise, which was approved. Royer then told the commissioners that the county still had quite a bit of gravel to move, and that they were at least two full years behind. He mentioned that they previously had a five man crew that handled making and moving gravel, as well as installing culverts. Now they are down to a three man crew and Royer would like to add another person to his crew for efficiency. He also told the commissioners that most counties have one man for every 80 miles, and Jones county has one man for every 125 miles. Next the commissioners appointed Iwan to represent Jones County on the Central South Dakota Enhancement Board. Iwan
Criminal Justice Workgroup that met during this past summer. Governor Daugaard outlined more specifics of the increased spending in his State-of-the-State message. The Department of Social Services will receive most of this new money (3 million) to increase the time that court ordered offenders are in treatment for alcohol and/or drugs. Additionally, more alcohol and drug offenders will be in 24/7 monitoring programs. Individuals on 24/7 pay their own monitoring expenses as a condition to stay out of jail and they must have a job. One issue on the minds of legislators is the recent shooting massacre at the elementary school in Connecticut. This Session we will have proposals to allow certain school staff have guns at schools. The Gun Free Schools Law was passed with a zero tolerance to protect students and staff from gun violence. With the senseless acts of murder happening, student safety needs to be re-examined. Arming school staff, however, is not supported by law enforcement and other experts. Area superintendents that I have visited with are more in favor of having a security resource person work in our school and communities as an outreach to students as well as being available for any emergency. This is a national as well as a local issue. I personally believe Congress needs to develop a comprehensive set of policies and laws that will reduce gun violence in schools, public places, and in our work settings and at the same time protect rights under the 2nd Amendment. The Senate Committees that I serve on are Agriculture and Natural Resources, State Affairs, Transportation, and Retirement Laws. My state email address is sen.lucas@state.sd.us and my cell phone number is 208-8333. I am available to meet with individuals when you are in Pierre or in your town or community where you live. Representative Schaefer and I are working an a schedule for the legislative update cracker barrel meetings for District 26B. We will put these in the newspapers and on the radio stations to inform the public.
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will replace former commissioner Sam Seymour. Weber then joined the meeting and informed the commissioners of the recent intercom system update in the Jones County Elementary School. He said that $10,000 of Homeland Security funding was allocated to the update. Next Weber spoke to the commissioners about Deputy Rich Sylva’s salary. He said that the average gross income for county workers was about $30,000, and Sylva’s income was only approximately $25,000. He reminded the commissioners that Sylva works nights, weekends and holidays, averaging 40 hours per week, with no over time pay. Weber said he didn’t know how the income difference got to be such a large gap and he suggested the commissioners find a way to even out the salaries. Weber also told the commissioners that the town as well as the county has serious drug issues, but he and Sylva don’t have enough time to get a handle on it. Weber suggested hiring another deputy to help with these issues as well as other day to day law enforcement duties. He also said he would like to see two Highway Patrol Troopers in Jones County, as the Interstate and highway traffic take up a large amount of the sheriff and deputy’s time. The commissioners went into executive session to discuss personnel issues. Shortly after, Kinsley joined the meeting to discuss general questions about her new position as the part time Emergency Manager. Kinsley told the commissioners that she was anxious to start the job. After a few more questions, Anker told Kinsley to make sure to stay in compliance with state regulations. The commissioners then signed vouchers and the meeting was adjourned.
Legal Notices
Notice of Vacancy
The following office will become vacant due to the expiration of the present term of office of the elected office. Trustee for three-year term Nominating petitions may be filed with Kim Schmidt, city finance officer, no earlier than the 25th of January, 2013 and no later than 5:00 p.m. CST on February 22, 2013. Petitions are available from the city finance officer. Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $12.35. ect or purposes other than preparing a bid for this project; F. The Plans and Specifications will not be disseminated to any person or entity for purposes other than obtaining pricing information without the express written approval of the state; G. All information contained in the Plans and Specifications is confidential; and H. Should the bidder disseminate the Plans and Specifications to an individual or entity for purposes of obtaining pricing information, the bidder will require that individual or entity to adhere to the terms set forth herein. The bidder, however, assumes no liability for the misuse of the Plans and Specifications by such third party or such third party’s failure to comply with the provisions contained herein. Should bidder be awarded a contract for construction of the project, bidder does not need to return or destroy Plans and Specifications until after completion of the project. All questions should be directed to Randy Bollinger, Office of the State Engineer at 605. 773.3897. Each bid in excess of $50,000.00 must be accompanied by a certified check, cashier's check or draft in the amount of 5% of the base bid and all add alternates and drawn on a State or National Bank or a 10% bid bond issued by a surety authorized to do business in the State of South Dakota and made payable to the Department of Transportation of the State of South Dakota. The Department of Transportation reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive any irregularities therein. Kristi Honeywell, P.E. State Engineer Office of the State Engineer Published January 3, 10 & 17, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $107.96. REJECTED: Dakotabilities, quarterly billing, $180.00. Director of Equalization Terri Volmer’s building permit report for the month of December, 2012 – 1. It was moved by Anker seconded by Iwan to approve administration for 2013 as follows: ADMINISTRATION FOR 2013 Jones County is an equal opportunity employer COUNTY OFFICE HOURS: 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. APPOINTMENTS AND SALARIES: AUDITOR, TREASURER, REGISTER OF DEEDS/ASSESSOR: $31,915.08 per year STATES ATTORNEY: $32,364.00 per year SHERIFF: $38,164.08 per year; DEPUTY SHERIFF: $26,464.08 per year COMMISSIONERS: $420.00 per month plus $.37 per mile DEPUTY AUDITOR & ROAD SECRETARY: Kerri Venard, $14.04 per hour DEPUTY REGISTER OF DEEDS, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF EQUALIZATION: Joyce Hurst, $14.04 per hour DEPUTY TREASURER: to be appointed at a later date, starting wage $9.55 per hour 4-H OFFICE STAFF: Jill Venard, $10.95 per hour; 1/2 time- Angie Kinsley, $12.50 per hour JANITOR: Dianne Stotts, $1,275.00 per month ELECTION BOARDS: $9.80 per hour and $.37 per mile; CANVASSING BOARDS: $9.80 per hour and $.37 per mile; ELECTION SCHOOL: $20.00 plus $.37 per mile VETERAN’S SERVICE OFFICER: Gary Sletto, $210.00 per month ROADMEN: $14.04 per hour; Overtime: time and a half for hours actually worked over 40 hours; regular pay plus overtime pay for actual hours worked on holidays in cases of emergency only. HOURS: 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. CDST; 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. CST (at discretion of Road Superintendent during inclement weather) ROAD SUPERINTENDENT: Bruce Royer, $37,074.00 per year CORONER: James McNeely $58.00 per call plus mileage; DEPUTY CORONER: Marilyn Seymour, $58.00 per call plus mileage WEED BOARD SUPERVISOR: Travis Hendricks, $150.00 per month WEED BOARD SPRAYER: William M. Valburg, $12.00 per hour WIC SECRETARY: Cheryl Iversen, $11.43 per hour STARTING WAGES: $9.55 per hour COUNTY BURIAL EXPENSES: $1,500.00 MILEAGE: $.37 per mile MRC RAIL AUTHORITY BOARD MEMBER: Monte Anker MENTAL ILLNESS BOARD MEMBERS: to be appointed by the State of SD at a later date WEED BOARD MEMBERS: Darrell Daum, Darrell Iversen, Herb Pitan, Helen Louder EMERGENCY DISASTER SERVICE: 1/2 time- Angie Kinsley, $12.50 per hour COUNTY PLANNING BOARD: Board of County Commissioners TRI-COUNTY LANDFILL: Monte Anker, Member CENTRAL DAKOTA ENHANCEMENT BOARD: Steve Iwan LEGAL PAPER: Murdo Coyote COUNTY DEPOSITORIES: Dakota Prairie Bank, Draper, SD; First National Bank and First Fidelity Bank, Murdo, SD POLICY: HOLIDAYS: as set by SDCL 1-5-1 SICK LEAVE: Ten days per year; accumulate up to 60 days VACATION: Ten days per year; 15 days per year after 10 years of continuous employment; 20 days after 20 years of continuous employment; 25 days after 30 years of continuous employment. May carry 5 days into following year (more if approved by department head). COUNTY EQUIPMENT: Cat 621B Scraper- $150.00 per hour plus labor; Patrol- $65.00 per hour and labor; Loader-644: $75.00 per hour and labor; Loader-L90F: $60.00 per hour and labor; Pickup-$15.00 per hour and labor; Mower-$53.00 per hour and labor; Dump Truck-$40.00 per hour and labor; Road Drag-$40.00 per hour (includes pickup) and labor; Semi-tractor and gravel trailer- $55.00 per hour plus labor; Loading gravel, $.50/ton at the discretion of the Road Superintendent. All gravel to be sold priced at $3.50/ton. Maximum of 6 hours machine time per private individual. It was moved by Anker and seconded by Louder to pass resolution #2013-01: Resolution #2013-01 WHEREAS, elected officials of Jones County, South Dakota, that is to say Auditor, Treasurer, Register of Deeds, Sheriff, State’s Attorney, and County Commissioners, are not employees of the County, as that term is defined by South Dakota statute, and it being determined that the County should cover said officials for Workman’s Compensations Insurance;
Murdo Coyote • January 17, 2013 •
Page 7
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Commissioners of Jones County, South Dakota that the elected officials of Jones County, towit: Auditor, Treasurer, Register of Deeds, Sheriff, State’s Attorney, and County Commissioners, shall be and are considered employees of Jones County, South Dakota for the purposes of SDCL 62-1-3. Road Superintendent Royer met with the Board to discuss road matters. Discussed were: hourly costs on road machinery; the need for another road employee; and a communications tower and utility building creating a snow block as they are too close to the road. It was moved by Anker and seconded by Louder to enter into executive session to discuss personnel. Sheriff Weber met with the Board. Items discussed were: a tower lease agreement with West Central Electric provided free for emergency services in Jones County; Homeland Security grant funds used to install a public address system in the grade school; Deputy Sheriff’s
wages; vehicle replacement and renewing the joint powers agreement with the City. Angie Kinsley met with the Board to discuss the county employee policy as she will be working as the 4-H assistant/emergency manager starting the 22nd of January, 2013. Terri Volmer, Director of Equalization, met with the Board to review values for lots and acreages in Murdo City. Some changes were necessary to equalize land values. It was moved and carried to adjourn. Helen Louder, Chairman Monte Anker, Member Steve Iwan, Member ATTEST: John Brunskill, County Auditor Published January 17, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $85.12.
Notice of Position Open
Jones County School District #37-3 The Jones County School District has the following position open for the remainder of the 2012-2013 school year: Special Ed Aide/DDN Monitor Send letter of application or resume to Jones County School District, Attn: Larry Ball, PO Box 109, Murdo, S.D. 57559 or call 605-669-2258 for more information. Position open until filled. Published January 10 & 17, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $12.35.
The Clinical View
• Dr. P.E. Hoffsten •
The 56-year old lady executive was seen in the clinic for concern about “her heartburn.” She described having a pain in the lower portion of her chest, right in the midline. She described the pain as coming on when she would lay down to go to sleep at night and noted it got better if she sat up. She said that it was just terrible if she had a big meal and then several alcoholic drinks with it (Um, possible gastric reflux). She said that she tried Maalox and tried omeprazole to no avail (Um, maybe not gastric reflux). She was slightly overweight but fortunately was not a smoker. Her cholesterol was checked and found to be quite high and her blood pressure was also somewhat high at 160/90 (Um, possible heart problem). In reviewing her history, she volunteered that greasy food seemed to make things worse because “they took so long to digest” (Um, possible gall bladder disease). She had at least 2-3 cups of coffee each morning, drank alcohol socially and diet Coca Cola all afternoon (Um, maybe an ulcer). She said that the pain in her chest was becoming enough of a problem that it was interfering with her function. She wondered what was causing the pain and how she could manage it. This is a remarkably common set of symptoms that unfortunately has a host of possible causes. The most important thing that the healthcare provider needs to consider is the potential that the problem represents an impending heart attack. With her high blood pressure, high cholesterol and high pressure job, heart disease has to be considered first because it can be fatal. Stomach ulcers can present in this same manner and with her history of a high pressure job, substantial amounts of coffee and diet coke along with worsening pain after alcoholic beverages, stomach ulcers have to be considered. With the story of greasy foods making the pain much worse, the potential that she might have gallstones is a consideration, and then as the fourth major consideration, she might have gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). GERD affects approximately 40 percent of the adult population over age 40. The symptoms are highly variable from being disabling to being a minor discomfort. The problem arises because of a leaky valve between the esophagus and the stomach. That valve becomes incompetent in 40 percent of the population. This means that the stomach contents can backup into the esophagus. Things that make the backup more likely include large meals, lying down, and gastric irritants such as alcohol, coffee aspirin, Ibuprofen, Naprosyn, and a host of other NSAID’s. The problem is that the esophagus is lined with the same type of tissue as a person’s mouth. It is not made to be exposed to high concentrations of acid such as the stomach has. When the valve between the stomach and the esophagus becomes “leaky”, stomach acid can reflux back into the The heart-burn problem esophagus and cause a “burn.” If this occurs in substantial amounts for a long period of time, that burn can become quite significant and cause marked irritation. If that burn goes on long enough and severe enough, it is the major cause of cancer of the esophagus. There were a host of tests and steps that needed to be instituted in this lady’s care. But for openers on the first clinic visit, she was told that she needed to avoid alcohol, coffee, aspirin and arthritis pills such as Ibuprofen, Aleve, etc. She was told to get omeprazole 20 milligrams twice a day as an overthe-counter antacid. In addition, she was told to pickup a prescription for a product called sucralfate (Carafate). This is a medication that acts very much like chewing gum that will stick to raw irritated ulcers in the esophagus. The person should take the sucralfate, let it dissolve in their mouth, and dribble down the throat. It is kind of like dissolving a piece of chalk in your mouth but it is very effective when little bits of the pill dribble down the throat and stick to the irritated places on the esophagus to protect them. This needed to be done four times a day before meals and at bedtime. She was told to avoid over-eating with her evening meal and to avoid eating at all after her evening meal. As you might imagine, there was some element of disbelieve and complaints that her lifestyle was being unacceptably interfered with. She loved her night time bowl of ice cream. Be that as it may, all of the above were suggested and she instituted some of the suggestions. These are things that can all be done at that first clinic visit. At that same time, she was scheduled for an exercise stress test to be sure that her heart was okay. She was scheduled for a gallbladder examination to be sure that she didn’t have gallstones and she was scheduled for an upper gastrointestinal tract examination to be sure that her stomach and esophagus did not have abnormalities that require surgical intervention. Fortunately, all the examinations mentioned came back showing no abnormality except the irritation at the bottom of her esophagus as it enters the stomach. On a return visit after all of the above, rechecks on her blood pressure showed that it had dropped somewhat now to 145/85. It was suggested that she start a blood pressure pill and a pill to get her cholesterol down. She complained that she didn’t used to take any pills and now she was taking four of them and her lifestyle had been interfered with. But she did acknowledge that “heartburn” had gone away. She wanted to know how long she had to continue the medications and the change in lifestyle. I suggested that the sucralfate could be stopped after a month although it might be necessary for a longer period of time if symptoms were to return. She was told that avoiding large overfilling evening meals was never going to be in her interest. She was told that the cholesterol and blood pressure pills would probably be permanent unless she got very serious about exercise and diet with better weight control than she had. She grudgingly volunteered that taking the pills was probably an easier choice for her. As mentioned above, heartburn is more or less a symptom for 40 percent of the adult population over the age 40. All of the steps mentioned above to treat or avoid the condition are available to the lay public except for the sucralfate which is a prescription medication. But avoiding large evening meals, avoiding irritating fluids such as coffee and alcohol, and using omeprazole 20 milligrams twice a day are all things that the lay public can do for themselves to treat the condition. When these steps are ineffective, further evaluation is warranted. Heart attack, gallbladder problems, ulcers and many other conditions can all mimic heartburn and be a more serious problem. The healthcare providers at your local clinic are aware of these considerations and can help sort out those patients that have GERD and those that need further attention.
Invitation To Bid
Sealed bids will be received by the State Engineer on behalf of the South Dakota Department of Transportation at the Office of the State Engineer, Joe Foss Building, 523 East Capitol, Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182 until 3:00 PM CT, January 23,2013 for labor and materials to construct Office and Restroom Renovations, SD Dept. of Transportation, Murdo, SD, OSE# T2209--10X. Copies of the Plans and Specifications may be obtained by bidders at the Office of the State Engineer, Joe Foss Building, 523 East Capitol Avenue, Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182, telephone number 605.772.3466. Copies are on file for viewing purposes at the Office of the State Engineer, Joe Foss Building, 523 East Capitol Avenue, Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182. Anyone requesting, reviewing, or copying Plans and Specifications for this project (such individual is hereinafter referred to as “bidder”) agrees that they are doing so for the sole purpose of submitting a bid on the project. In consideration of the State of South Dakota providing such Plans and Specifications for the purpose of preparing a bid, bidder further agrees: A. The Plans and Specifications are the sole property of the State; B. Any copies of the Plans and Specifications obtained directly from the State will be returned to the Office of the State Engineer immediately after the State provides notice that bidder will not be awarded a contract, or thirty (30) days after the bid opening for the project, whichever occurs first; C. Any copies of the Plans and Specifications made by the bidder will be destroyed immediately after the State provides notice that bidder will not be awarded a contract, or thirty (30) days after the bid opening for the project, whichever occurs first; D. If bidder does not submit a bid, bidder will fulfill the requirements of B and C above on or before the date of the bid opening; E. The Plans and Specifications are to be used only with respect to this project and are not to be used for any other proj-
Proceedings of the Jones County Commissioners
Regular Meeting January 8, 2013 The Board of Commissioners met for a regular meeting with Monte Anker, Helen Louder and Steve Iwan present. Karlee Barnes joined the meeting. An oath of office was signed by Steve Iwan. It was moved by Iwan and seconded by Louder to appoint Anker as chairman for 2013. The meeting was called to order. All motions are unanimous unless otherwise stated. CLAIMS APPROVED: Debra J. Byrd, reimbursement, $206.01; Corky’s Auto Supply, supplies, $21.73; Anita Fuoss, office rent, internet, $359.22; Golden West Communications, telephone bills, $533.79; Heartland Waste, garbage removal, $50.00; Inman’s Water Technologies, R.O. rental, $21.30; Jones County School District #37-3, janitor supplies, $22.61; Lar-Jos, checks, $508.97; Murdo Family Foods, janitor supplies, $20.93; SD Association of County Commissioners, dues, $640.84; SD Association of County Officials, 2013 dues, $595.42; West Central Electric, electricity, $495.22. ROAD & BRIDGE: Corky’s Auto Supply, parts, $608.95; Dware, Inc., computer software maintenance, $1,100.00; Golden West Communications, telephone bill, $32.70; West Central Electric, electricity, $163.04.
WDT to begin programs in HVAC and Plumbing
Western Dakota Tech is addressing the needs of the workforce by starting new diploma programs in HVAC Technology and Plumbing Technology. WDT is now accepting applications for the nine-month programs. Classes will begin in the fall 2013 semester that begins in August. “Skilled employees are needed in these fields,” WDT President Mark Wilson said. “These programs will give students the skills they need to be successful in careers that are in-demand.” Both programs have been designed with industry input so the courses will provide the skills students need. Graduates of the HVAC Technology program will be able to: •Design residential and light commercial central heating and air conditioning systems •Install, troubleshoot, and repair residential and light commercial heating and air conditioning equipment •Design, fabricate and install forced air and hot water distribution systems •Install a wide range of oil and gas boilers and forced-air furnaces •Design, fabricate, and install home and light commercial ventilation systems, including both exhaust and fresh air make-up exchangers Students also will prepare for and take the universal HVAC certification exam so they are qualified to handle all types of refrigerant. Graduates of the Plumbing Technology program will have skills in: •Piping techniques and procedures •Plumbing and piping systems •Residential and commercial system installations •Blueprint reading and isometric interpretation Employment trends in both career fields show that jobs are available now and will be in the future as the need for trained technicians grows. Employment of HVAC mechanics and installers is expected to grow 34 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. The growing number of sophisticated climate-control systems is also expected to increase demand for qualified HVAC technicians. The median annual wage of heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers was $42,530 in May 2010. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $26,490, and the top 10 percent earned more than $66,930. Employment of plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters is projected to grow 26 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for plumbers is expected to come from new building construction and stricter water efficiency standards for plumbing systems, such as low-flow toilets and showerheads. The median annual wage of plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters was $46,660 in May 2010, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $27,580, and the
top 10 percent earned more than $79,920. Western Dakota Tech is the only technical institute that serves the western South Dakota region. WDT offers more than 20 programs in a variety of fields, including Business and Computers, Construction Trades, Health Services, Legal and Public Services, Manufacturing and Mechanical Trades, and Science and Technology. More than 96 percent of WDT’s most recent graduates are working, continuing their education, or serving in the military, and 90 percent remain in South Dakota. WDT faculty, staff, and administration focus their efforts on helping students gain the skills and experiences they need to succeed. Through hands-on learning, internships, and industry partnerships, WDT students graduate ready to make real and immediate contributions to their employers and their communities. For information about WDT, call (800) 544-8765 or (605) 7182565 or send an email to admissions@wdt.edu. Visit WDT on the web at www.wdt.edu.
Coyote Classifieds
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
CLASSIFIED RATE: $5.00 minimum for up to 20 words.10¢ per word after initial 20. Each name and initial must be counted as one word. CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. $5.00 minimum for up to 20 words.10¢ per word after initial 20. Each name and initial must be counted as one word. NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges. DISPLAY AD RATE: $5.20 per column inch. PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate, advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Deadline is Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
Call: 669-2271
Murdo Coyote • January 17, 2013 •
Page 8
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well established & successful business in the State Capitol of S.D. The Longbranch is for SALE (serious inquires only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-1067. BUILDING MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST/Plumbing, Job Id #739, Pierre, S.D.: Position is open until filled. For more information and to apply, go to http://bhr.sd.gov/workforus. HOVEN CO-OP SERVICE COMPANY in Hoven, S.D. is seeking a General Manager. Generous benefit package, competitive salary. For more information or application materials, call (605)948-2222. EMPLOYMENT
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
FINANCE OFFICER: The City of Miller is accepting applications for a City Finance Officer. Position responsibilities include finance office administration and management, human resource management and other duties. Salary DOE, plus benefits. Applications and/or more information available at the City of Miller, 120 West 2nd Street, Miller, SD 57362 or by calling 605-853-2705. Deadline for application submittal is 5:00 p.m. on February 1, 2013. EOE.
HELP WANTED: Temporary Work - 8 job openings - Starting: 02/01/2013 and Ending: 11/26/2013
Operate tractors during planting, spraying, haying, harrowing, harvesting season of wheat, corn and sunflower. We also require that employees operate combines during the harvesting season. Do infield repairs on equipment. Must have a CDL or appropriate driver’s license or be able to obtain one within 30 days of hire. We require 3 months experience. The employer, Scott and Janet Dowling from Draper, SD will pay the AEWR of $11.61/hr or prevailing of $2200/mo plus room and board (whichever the highest). The employer guarantees 3/4 of the workdays in the work contract. The work tools, supplies and equipment are provided without cost to the worker, if applicable. Free housing is provided to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the workday. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be provided or paid by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract or earlier. Workers interested in the job should contact their nearest local State Workforce agency or send resumes to Pierre SDDLR Office, 116 W Missouri Ave, Pierre, SD 57501 and mention job order number: SD1585886
COMMUNICATIONS OPERATOR, $16.14-$19.64/hr. Visit: www.cityofbrookings.org. Submit application/resume to City of Brookings, PO Box 270, Brookings, S.D. 57006-0270, dlangland@cityofbrookings.org.
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR/ MAINTENANCE WORKER: Haakon County Highway Department. Must have a commercial driver’s license or be able to obtain one within three months of hire date. Benefits package offered. Open until filled. Apply: HC Highway Department, 22260 Lake Waggoner Road, Philip, S.D. 57567. 605/859-2472. Haakon County is an EOE.
GRAIN FARM HELP. Onida, S.D. Full-time. Operating large farm equipment, trucks, tractors, sprayers & planting equipment. Good driving record. General maintenance. Salary/hourly DOE. 605-280-7038. INSULATED CONCRETE TIRE TANK LIDS for rubber tire tanks. Custom made, 4’-12’ width. Center float hole and drinking holes. Permanent lids. Hildebrand Steel 1-877-867-1485. DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders representing Golden Eagle Log Homes, building in eastern, central, northwestern South & North Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-5302672, Craig Connell, 605-2645650, www.goldeneagleloghomes. com. SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00. Make & save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-5781363 Ext.300N. OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY MISCELLANEOUS LOG HOMES FOR SALE
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Competitive wages, benefits, training, profit sharing, opportunities for growth, great culture and innovation. $1,500 Sign on Bonus available for Service Technicians. To browse opportunities go to www. rdoequipment.com. Must apply online. EEO.
VENDORS WANTED FOR THE Annual Presho Chamber’s Farm & Home Show, Saturday, Feb. 23, 2013, 10 am - 3 pm, Call Nicole @ 605-895-9445. Mark your calendar and plan to attend.
Wanted
2012 Dodge Ram pickup. Was only on pickup for two weeks. No damage; like new condition. Make an offer. Call Patrick at 605-530-0051 or Karlee at 605-295-0047.M41-tfc
BLACK RANCHHAND LEGEND SERIES BUMPER. Fits 2010-
For Sale
CHIFFEROBE WITH 19 INCH TV, perfect for a child’s bedroom. Door with shelves on one side and three drawers on the other side. Great shape $75.00 OBO. Call Lonna at 669-2040 or 669-2271.
This thank you note goes out to so many family and friends who have been keeping in touch with us since August. It is so nice to know a person can have so many friends and family. Some of the friends I don’t know real well and I’m so happy to have so many prayers and so many cards. While I’m thanking people, there is an angel in the country who has paid our electric bill. Thank you very much. I will put that money to help someone else. Thanks everyone and God be with you. Dean & Deb Faber
Thank You
Business & Professional Directory
Rent This Space $4.25 a week/ minimum 3 mos.
Call the Murdo Coyote to place your ad: 669-2271
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375 mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety bonus, Call Joe for details, 800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com. STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter discounts for spring delivery. 50x80, 62x100, 68x120, 68x200, 100x200. Take advantage of tax deductions. Limited Offer. Call Jim 1-888-782-7040. STEEL BUILDINGS
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Murdo Townhouses 2 Bedrooms
Carpeted throughout, on-site laundry facility and appliances furnished. PRO/Rental Management 605-347-3077 1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
Equal Housing Opportunity
Ranchland Drug
259-3102
• Nightly Deliveries to Murdo • Senior Citizen’s Discount
HEIMAN CONSTRUCTION
and Seamless Gutters
Allen Heiman – Owner
Located in White River, S.D.
P.O. Box 433 Presho, S.D. 57568-0433 Phone: (605) 895-9644 Cell: (605) 730-5634
Variety of Colors Free Estimates
New Life Home, Inc.
Residential Living Center
24–Hour Care Home–Like Atmosphere
203 W. Hwy. 16, Presho, S.D. • 605-895-2602
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR HOME REPAIRS
AERIAL & AG SERVICE
• Aerial & Ground Application • Chemical & Fertilizer Sales • GPS Equipped
Valburg
605-669-2077 Tires & Service ATV & UTV Service Exit 191 ~ Murdo SD
Venard Inc
Need a printing job done?
Call 859-2516 in Philip
605-669-2121 Clinic J.S. McNeely 605-669-2553 Home RN, CFNP dba Jones County Clinic
609 Garfield Ave., Murdo, SD 57559
Murdo, Martin & White River
Your Full Service Lumber and Hardware Store
105 E. 2nd Street • PO Box 108 • Murdo, SD 57559 Phone: (605) 669-2201 • Fax: (605) 669-2450 Dennis and Kevin Moore
Ravellette Publications
Murdo Nutrition Program Menu
January 21 Spaghetti w/ Meatsauce Broccoli/Cauliflower Mix Tossed Salad French Bread Apricots January 22 Baked Ham Sweet Potatoes Peas Dinner Roll Mandarin Orange Dessert January 23 Oven Fried Chicken Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Harvard Beets Bread Peaches January 24 Salisbury Steak in Gravy Boiled Potatoes & Gravy Spinach w/ Vinegar Bread Mandarin Oranges & Pineapple Tidbits January 25 Beef Stew w/ Vegetables Appleslaw Bread Pumpkin Bar
Dan: 605-259-3134 Charlie: 605-452-3311
Family owned and operated – Our family serving your family
Low–Income Housing 1 & 2 bedroom apartments Income–based rent Includes light, heat, water and garbage pickup
Murdo Housing & Redevelopment
605-669-2681
H ildebrand S teel & C oncrete
Contact us for ALL types of concrete work!
Murdo
Jerry Hildebrand Cell: 605.488.0291
Kadoka
Rich Hildebrand Cell 605.431.2226
Office: 605-837-2621 Toll Free: 1-877-867-4185
Equal Housing Opportunity
Daryl & Scott Isburg, Funeral Directors
Concrete Redi–Mix
Family Dentistry
James C. Szana, DDS
Murdo Health Center Wednesday & Thursday 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
669-2131
Rent This Space $4.25 a week/ minimum 3 mos.
ALL PRO TOWING
24-Hour Service Light to Heavy Duty Towing Repairs Domestic Cars & Trucks
Phone: (605) 669-2075 Murdo, S.D.
(605) 869-2150
Cell: 605-222-0317 • Pierre, S.D. E-mail: darrenboylesales@pie.midco.net Website: www.darrenboylesales.com
New & Used Farm Equipment REA Seeds
Darren Boyle Sales

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