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Kadoka Press, October 4, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 12
October 4, 2012
News Briefs …
Meeting … There be will a
SET meeting on Thursday, Oc-
tober 4, 5:00 p.m. at the
Kadoka Fire Hall. A Horizons
meeting is also scheduled to im-
mediately follow.
KCBA meeting: Thursday,
October 4, 12 noon at Jigger’s
Restaurant. Everyone is wel-
come to attend.
Kadoka School Board
public hearing: Monday, Oc-
tober 8 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Great Hall. Discussion will be
held concerning the possiblity
of a new gym.
Kadoka City Council
meeting: has been changed to
Tuesday, October 9 at 7:00 p.m.
Kadoka School Board
meeting: will be Wednesday,
October 10 at 7:00 p.m.
Public Notices
School & County
Page 7
Punt, Pass & Kick
& Sports
Page 5
Cross Country
Co-op Page
Page 6
Classified Ads
Statewide Ads
Page 9
Belvidere
& Norris News
Page 3
Obits:
Dorothy Seidler
Lucille Stewart
Virginia Burns
Page 2
On May 29, 2012, South Dakota
Farm Service Agency (FSA) re-
ceived approval from Secretary of
Agriculture Tom Vilsack to proceed
with the implementation of the
county office consolidation plan
which includes four county offices
in South Dakota. The closed offices
are Mound City, Buffalo, Kadoka,
and Wessington Springs. The Nat-
ural Resources Conservation Serv-
ice (NRCS) offices in these four
locations remain open and commit-
ted to serving all your conservation
needs.
“Over the past few years many
agencies have faced budget con-
straints and had to make budget-
related changes, such as the ones
FSA had to make,” said Jeff Zim-
prich, State Conservationist with
the NRCS. We wanted to get the
word out that the NRCS will re-
main in the four mentioned offices,
and conduct business as usual.”
The NRCS and conservation
partners are still located in the
USDA Service Centers. The NRCS
will continue to follow the estab-
lished model of providing conserva-
tion assistance to the
landowner/operator from the
county (service center) where the
land is located.
For more information about
technical or financial assistance,
please contact the NRCS staff in
your local USDA Service Center.
No changes for NRCS assistance in four USDA
Service Centers impacted by FSA closurse
The region of Haakon, Jackson,
and eastern Pennington counties
has been selected as one of two in
the state of South Dakota to be a
part of the Stronger Economies To-
gether (SET) program. There will
be a brief informational meeting
about this program on Thursday,
October 4 at 5:00 p.m. at the Fire-
hall in Kadoka.
The Stronger Economies To-
gether (SET) Program is sponsored
by USDA Rural Development, in
partnership with SDSU Extension
and the Regional Rural Develop-
ment Centers. It is designed to
strengthen the capacity of rural
communities and counties to work
together in developing and imple-
menting economic development
plans. Building on the current and
emerging economic strengths of the
region, the group will collaborate to
produce a plan that benefits the en-
tire region.
Ideally, 15-20 participants per
county are sought to participate on
this new regional team. Training
and technical assistance will be de-
livered by a core team of Extension
and RD staff, as well as state-wide
resource providers. The Oct. 4 in-
formational meeting will cover the
program in detail.
The second regions selected for
the grant in South Dakota is the
James River Valley Region com-
prised of Beadle, Hand, Jerauld,
Kingsburg, Spink and Clark coun-
ties. They are set to kick-off their
project on Oct. 9 in Huron.
For questions contact Christine
Sorensen, USDA RD Coordinator
at christine.sorensen@sd.usda.gov
or 605-224-8870 Ext. 123, or Kari
O’Neill, SDSU Extension Commu-
nity Development at
kari.oneill@sdstate.edu or 605-685-
6972.
Meeting about SET planned in Kadoka
West Region selected to participate in Stronger Economies Together Program
Derald Kulhavy was
born July 30, 1940 to
Daniel and Evelyn Kul-
havy in Bonners Ferry,
Idaho, right close to the
Canadian border. His
older sister, JoAnne
(Bitting), was also born
there. His parents
worked on a wheat
ranch.
The family of four
moved to California,
where his younger
brother, Warren, now
deceased, was born.
There, his dad worked
in the shipyards until
after the war.
Then it was off to
Dallas, SD, and other
areas in the eastern part
of the state.
In 1955 they made the
move to Belvidere where they owned and operated the Belvidere Sun-
dries. Derald finished school in Belvidere, graduating in 1960.
Derald said it was in the early 1960s that he and his brother began
working construction on missile sites and building many sections of In-
terstate 90.
Eventually, the brothers moved to Elk Mountain, WY, where they con-
tinued with a construction business. They owned 11 gravel trucks.
Another move took them to Casper, WY, where they kept two trucks
for over-the-road trips. They made many trips from Houston, TX, to
Canada and Alaska hauling oil field equipment.
“I’ve logged over four million miles, and I’ve wore them out,” he
laughed. When asked about all those miles of log books … well that’s an-
other story … .
He is very proud to have never had a wreck and earned a Wyoming
Safety award. He still wears his belt buckle to prove it.
Oh, and he didn’t forget, there was a time the brothers peddled freight
from Casper to North Dakota and back.
“I had lots of fun and met a lot of friends throughout the years,” Der-
ald said.
Being a welder and a mechanic, he was not only able to take care of
his trucks and trade them off before they had a million miles, but he
welded for the state on bridge crews.
He did marry, however, the marriage did not last too many years and
they never had children.
Looking at hobbies, Derald has really enjoys playing cards, elk and
deer hunting, and admits he’s never shot an antelope, but maybe some-
day. And he’s done a lot of bass fishing in SD and trout in WY.
He recalled many fishing trips with children, packing away 12 miles
into the wilderness area.
Once Derald suffered a stroke and could no longer drive truck, he
found a new love in woodworking. He has made clocks, napkin holders,
wall decorations, many kids novelties and baby beds that change into
three different types of beds.
In addition to the stroke, he had a portion of his right leg amputated
in early March of 2011. He then became a resident at the nursing home
on March 23, 2011.
“For what I’ve been through, I’m in pretty good shape,” he added.
“Derald is a very knowledgeable historian and loves to visit with peo-
ple. He enjoys all the activities at the nursing home,” said Ruby Sanft-
ner.
Congratulations for being the October Resident of the Month.
Kadoka Nursing Home
Resident of the Month
~Stewart Marty, of Hot Springs,
was elected to a four-year term to
represent District V. He will re-
place Harold Wyatt, who did not
seek re-election.
~Jeff Nielsen, of Canistota, who
ran unopposed for a four-year term
to represent District IX.
Board President Rod Renner
began the day’s presentations by
speaking to the crowd about the
commitment of Golden West em-
ployees and board members. He
summarized Golden West’s sixty
years of service to its members and
thanked Harold Wyatt for his
nearly 25 years of dedication and
service to the cooperative.
Golden West General Manager
Denny Law also recognized Harold
Wyatt’s service and talked about
Golden West building of a one of
the most robust telecommunica-
tions networks in the state includ-
ing the introduction of Cable TV
and Internet access. Mr. Law then
announced the availability of faster
Internet speed options for both res-
idential and business customers.
The new speeds range from 6x1,
15x1, 25x2 to 30x5 and will soon be
offered in designated areas.
Mr. Law also addressed how the
Federal Communications Commis-
sion’s (FCC) regulatory policy
changes will affect rural companies
like Golden West in their ability to
plan to invest in future technology
and infrastructure upgrades. He
talked about how the FCC is man-
dating federal guidelines on local
service rates and the resulting
penalties if companies choose not
to follow the guidelines. Law said
Golden West is working to make
certain the interests of rural cus-
tomers are understood at the FCC.
“Now more than ever before we
need to make the case that our
rural communities deserve to have
the same access to advance tech-
nology as our urban neighbors,”
stated Law.
The Itty Bitty Opry Band of
Rapid City entertained the crowd
with a variety of 1950’s songs,
Larry Cohen of Martin won the
$500 grand prize drawing. Next
year’s Golden West annual meeting
will be held on September 28, 2013.
More than 400 members at-
tended the 60th annual meeting of
the Golden West Telecommunica-
tions Cooperative at the Wall Com-
munity Center on Saturday,
September 22nd. People attending
the event had the opportunity to
vote in four board member elec-
tions, hear about the challenges
and opportunities facing the coop-
erative, win several door prizes and
listen to the Itty Bitty Opry Band.
One newcomer and three incum-
bents were elected to the board of
directors for Golden West Telecom-
munications this year. The board
members elected on Saturday
were:
~Rod Renner, of Wall, who ran
unopposed for a four-year term to
represent District II.
~Lee Briggs, of Midland, who
ran unopposed for a four-year term
to represent District III.
Golden West elects board members,
newcomer joins three incumbents
Board members …Golden West Telecommunications Cooperative
members elected four board members at the annual meeting Sept. 22 in
Wall. Pictured from left to right are, Jeff Nielsen of Canistota (District
IX), Stewart Marty of Hot Springs (District V), Rod Renner of Wall (Dis-
trict II) and Lee Briggs of Midland (District III).
Retiring … Retiring board member, Harold Wyatt, congratulates
Stewart Marty on winning the election for District V representation.
The general election will be held
on Tuesday, November 6 and here’s
a look at that’s on the Jackson
County ballot.
Presidential: Democratic -
Obama & Biden; Constitutional
Party - Goode & Clymer; Republi-
can - Romney & Ryan; Libertarian
- Johnson & Gray
US State Representative: D-
Matt Varilek; R- -Kristi Noem
PUC: (6-year term) D - Matt Mc-
Govern; R-Kristi Fiegen; L-Russell
Clarke
PUC: (4-year term) D-Nick
Nemec; R - Chris Nelson
State Senator Dist. 27: D-Jim
Bradford
State Representative Dist.
27: D-Kevin Killer; R-Elizabeth
May; I-Kathleen Ann (Vote for up
to 2)
Jackson County States At-
torney: R-Daniel Van Gorp; I-Gay
Klima Tollefson; I-Alvin Pahlke
Watch next week’s paper for the
Constitutional Amendments, Initi-
ated Measure and Referred Laws.
A sneak peek
at the ballot
Save the Pearl holds 2nd annual
5K run/walk for rails to trails
Save the Pearl 5K …Back row (L): Jacqueline Chant, Whitney
Patterson, Ashlee Miller, Emmy Antonsen, Debbie Antonsen, Carol Solon,
Ann Lyon, Julie Kaltenbach, Jackie Stilwell, Mike Struble. Front row: Eli-
jah Chant, Kathy Rock, Randy Connelly, Kris Rock, Randi Oyan, Julie
Daly. --courtesy photo
Saturday, September 29 was a
beautiful day for the second annual
Badlands 5K Trail Walk. There
was a smaller crowd this year due
to scheduling conflicts and others
who had family illnesses.
Runners and walkers who took
part were from Box Elder, Long
Valley, Rapid City, Martin and
many local families from Kadoka.
Lunch was served in the dining
room at the Pearl Hotel after the
race and several door prizes were
given.
This year’s sponsors included
Hogen’s Hardware, Discount Fuel,
Rush Funeral Home, Wanblee
Mart, Kadoka Gas & Go, Creative
Cuts, Connelly Law Office, Headlee
Enterprises, People’s Market, Bil-
Mar Expressions, H&H Restau-
rant and Rodeway Inn Motel,
Kristin Rock Counseling and Tur-
tle Town Fudge & Coffee Shop.
A public meeting on the trail will
be held in October with a presenta-
tion on the trail and public input.
Please watch for the dates to be an-
nounced and come support the pro-
posed 104 mile rails to trails
project from Kadoka to Rapid City.
October is
National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press. PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Church Page …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
Meals for the
Elderly menu
on page 4.
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Pastor Art Weitschat
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
1 John 4:4-6
Scripture records two occasions when Satan asked
God for permission to test a believer. The Devil at-
tempted to break the faith first of Job (1:6-12) and then
of Peter (Luke 22:31-34). Jesus warned that Satan
wanted to "sift" the disciple like wheat--shaking his faith in the way a farmer separates wheat kernels
from debris. The Enemy hoped that Peter would fall away like chaff. But both attacks ultimately failed,
and the men came through with faith restored and strengthened by the Lord. However, at the time of
trial, each found himself attacked in the most vulnerable area of his heart.
Is your life making an impact worth talking about? Are you serving God in such a way as to make
Satan feel threatened? If not, you don't need a major attack for your faith to suffer greatly. Instead of
being alert and recognizing the battle at stake, you will be lulled into uselessness like a frog in water
heating gradually to a boil.
But when you grow spiritually--rejecting lies and taking hold of the wholeness that is yours in Christ-
-you threaten the work of the Evil One. The Lord calls on you to extend His love to specific people because
you have just the right knowledge, story, or temperament to reach them. And when you do, you reclaim
stolen territory for His kingdom.
You may think you're not important, but the Lord knows your true value. As His beloved child and
friend, you have an important part in His plan for eternity. Satan fears you when you recognize this
truth. Fight back and rely on God's Spirit--greater is He who is within you!
Are You a Threat to Satan?
Inspiration Point
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
Simple Assault & Interference with Emergency Communications:
No date listed: Anthony Harty, Kadoka: Assault: Plea: Not Guilty; Plea
date: 07-11-12; Convicted at Trial: Fine and costs $150; 60 days jail with
59 days suspended. Interference: Plea: Not Guilty; Plea date: 07-11-12;
Convicted at Trial: Fine and costs $120; 10 days jail with nine days sus-
pended. Jail time is suspended based on the following conditions: obey
all laws and no law violations, repay court appointed attorney fees, and
no contact with Mary Shortbull or Carol Mayberry all for two years, report
to jail no later than 7-23-12 at 7 p.m.
Posses Two Ounces of Marijuana or Less:
03-03-12: Jeremiah Janson, Anoka, MN: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-25-
12; Fine and costs $250; 10 days jail suspended based on the following
conditions: obey all laws, pay fine and costs, including any blood test
costs if applicable.
Ingest Intoxicant Other Than Alcoholic Beverage:
03-03-12: Abram Carley, New Brighton, MN: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-
25-12; Fine and costs $250; 10 days jail suspended based on the follow-
ing conditions: obey all laws for one year, pay fine and costs, including
any blood test costs if applicable, and pay restitution to clerk for SD Drug
Control fund.
Ingest Intoxicant Other Than Alcoholic Beverage & Use or Posses-
sion of Drug Paraphernalia:
04-26-12: Talana Standing Bear, Wanblee: Ingest: Plea: Guilty; Plea
date: 07-25-12; Fine and costs $250; Possession: Plea: Guilty; Plea date:
07-25-12; Fine and costs $288; 10 days jail suspended based on the fol-
lowing conditions: obey all laws for one year, pay fine and costs, including
any blood test costs if applicable, and pay restitution of $45 for SD Drug
Control fund.
Driving Under the Influence - 1st Offense:
05-19-12: Melda Terkildsen, Kadoka: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-25-12;
Fine and costs $584; 30 days jail with 28 days suspended based on the
following conditions: pay fine and costs and restitution to clerk, no law vi-
olation for one year, obtain alcohol evaluation, attend and successfully
complete any recommendations and file proof with the clerk by date
stated, report to sheriff for jail on August 10, 2012 at 7 a.m., work permit
upon proof of insurance and employment.
Posses Two Ounces of Marijuana or Less & No Drivers License:
05-19-12: Shaina Montileaux, Rapid City: Possession: Plea: Guilty; Plea
date: 07-25-12; Fine and costs $250; 10 days jail suspended; License:
Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 7-25-12; Fine and costs $120; Jail suspended
based on the following conditions: pay fine and costs and attorney fees,
obey all laws for one year.
5, 2011, when Jakeway and his son
abducted the victim, an adult male.
Jakeway and his son, Jerett Jake-
way, thought the victim had stolen
a piece of property from another
family member. They traveled from
Wanblee to the Rosebud Sioux In-
dian Reservation and located the
victim. At gun point, they forced
the victim out of a vehicle and as-
saulted him. They forced the victim
into their car for the purpose of ha-
rassing and interrogating him and
started driving back toward Wan-
blee. Law enforcement authorities
were dispatched to the area, lo-
cated the Jakeways, stopped their
vehicle, and freed the victim. The
victim suffered bruises and abra-
sions during the kidnapping.
Co-defendant Jerett Jakeway
will be sentenced October 1, 2012.
He pled guilty to one count of the
indictment which charged him
with kidnapping and aiding and
abetting.
The investigation was conducted
by Rosebud Sioux Tribe Law En-
forcement Services. The case was
prosecuted by Assistant United
States Attorney Tim Maher.
Jakeway was remanded to the
custody of the United States Mar-
shal.
William Jakeway United States
Attorney Brendan V. Johnson an-
nounced that a Wanblee, South
Dakota, man charged with Kidnap-
ping and Aiding and Abetting was
sentenced on September 24, 2012,
by United States District Judge
Roberto A. Lange. William Jake-
way, age 52, was sentenced to 108
months in custody, three years of
supervised release, and a $100 spe-
cial assessment to the Victim Assis-
tance Fund.
Jakeway was indicted by a fed-
eral grand jury on April 10, 2012,
and pled guilty to the charge on
June 20, 2012.
The conviction stems from an in-
cident that took place on November
Wanblee man sentenced
in kidnapping case
Virginia Burns___________________
Virginia Burns, age 95 of Philip,
S.D., died Sunday, September 30,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Virginia Johnson was born Au-
gust 29, 1917, in Sioux City, Iowa,
the daughter of Knute Napoleon
and Effie Carolyn Johnson. She
grew up in Sioux City, and gradu-
ated from East High School in
1935. She then attended Morning-
side College in Sioux City, where
she earned her teacher’s certificate.
She taught third grade in Sioux
City. During World War II, Virginia
was an aircraft communicator for
the Civil Service and worked at the
Philip Airport, assisting with
planes crossing the United States.
She then taught seventh grade, for
one semester at Philip School in
1945.
Virginia was united in marriage
to Sherman Burns on December
29, 1945, at Sioux City, Iowa. She
stayed home to raise her sons. In
1965 to 1970, she worked as deputy
auditor for Haakon County.
In 1970, she taught at Old Trail
Rural School north of Philip, and
during this time she returned to
summer school at Black Hills State
College, where she received her
bachelor of science degree in 1972.
She taught at Philip Elementary
from 1972 until 1992. After retiring
she volunteered at the grade school
until 1998.
During her lifetime, Virginia
was very active in the community.
Her memberships include First
Lutheran Church, where she was
on the church council and altar
guild, Sunday School superintend-
ent, teacher, and reader. She also
was a Girl Scout leader, and past
president of the hospital board, and
a judge for Junior Miss, 4-H, and
declam. She received the PTA Life-
time Award and the Teacher of the
Year at the Haakon School District
in 1984-1985. Virginia was also a
member of the Order of the East-
ern Star, where she served as sec-
retary and Worthy Matron.
Survivors include two sons,
Sherman Burns, Jr. of Sheridan,
Wyo., and Colin Burns and his
wife, Ruth, of Casper, Wyo.; three
grandsons, Craig, Kevin and Cory
Burns; four great-grandsons,
Adam, Brian, Bradley and Jordan;
three sisters-in-law, Shirley John-
son of Clintonville, Wis., Jean
Burns of Philip and Mary Martha
Burns of Rapid City; a special
friend, Kay Ainslie and her hus-
band, George, of Philip; and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Virginia was preceded in death
by her husband, Sherman Burns,
on July 22, 1968; her parents; and
two brothers, Bob and Edward
Johnson.
Services were held Wednesday,
October 3, at the American Legion
Hall in Philip, with Pastor Frezil
Westerlund officiating.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Lucille Stewart__________________
Lucile Stewart, 85, passed away
September 20, 2012 at the Hum-
boldt Care Center North in Hum-
boldt, Iowa.
Mary Lucile Stewart was born
August 14, 1927 in Kingsley, Iowa,
the third of four children born to
Owen LeRoy Dugan and Mary Lu-
cile (Fitzpatrick) Dugan. She lived
on the family farm northwest of
Kingsley, attended country school,
and graduated from Kingsley High
School in 1944.
For a short time after gradua-
tion she worked for the Federal Bu-
reau of Investigation in
Washington D. C. and then taught
for a year in a one-room country
school near Wanblee, South
Dakota. With her mother and step-
father she followed the harvest
from the Dakotas to Arizona end-
ing in California where she found
work in the emerging frozen food
industry as a secretary and ac-
countant.
When Lucile’s stepfather died
she took on the responsibility of
providing a home for her mother.
Lucile and her mother moved to
Golden, Colorado, where Lucile
continued her work as a secretary
and accountant.
Lucile married John Stewart
(also of Golden, CO) in Boulder
City, Nevada, on June 21, 1961.
John owned and operated employ-
ment agencies in the Denver area.
After their marriage, Lucile man-
aged one of the employment offices.
After John died in 1971, Lucile re-
turned to her work as secretary/ac-
countant at the same time earning
her license as a real estate agent
and broker.
In 1979 Lucile and her mother
moved to Julesburg, CO, where Lu-
cile worked for Cumming Reality,
managed her investment proper-
ties, and continued to care for her
mother who passed away in 1996.
Lucile enjoyed her retirement in
Julesburg until moving to Rolfe,
Iowa in 2009. In 2011 she moved to
the Humboldt Care Center.
Lucile is survived by her step
daughter and her husband Al and
Marcelene (Stewart) Johnson of
Lake Havasu City, AZ; her
brother’s children and their fami-
lies: Owen and Gay Dugan of
Lakewood, CO, Minor (Buzz) and
Jennifer (Dugan) Atkinson of Blue
Springs, MO, Steve and Jo Dugan
of Lakewood, CO, Matt and Jandy
Dugan of Aurora, CO, and Mark
Dugan of Lakewood, CO; two of her
sister’s children: Mike and Lana
Pratt of Rolfe, IA, and family and
Lyle and Katheryn (Pratt) Spencer
of Goldfield, IA; and the family of
Vonnie Jane (Pratt) Fetter of Long-
mont, CO; brother-in-law, Donald
Pratt formerly of Kingsley/Pierson,
IA; cousins, friends and former co-
workers.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, her husband, John
Wesley Stewart, brother and his
wife, Herbert and Emilie (Amsie
Gollhofer) Dugan, sister, Vonnie
(Dugan) Pratt, younger brother,
Dennis Dugan, who died in child-
hood, nephew, Daniel Dugan, who
also died in childhood, and niece,
Vonnie Jane (Pratt) Fetter.
Graveside services and burial
was held at the Hillside Cemetery
in Julesburg, Colorado on October
1, 2012. The Mason-Lindhart Fu-
neral Home of Humboldt, Iowa, as-
sisted the family.
Dorothy Seidler_______________________________________________
Dorothy Seidler, age 87, of Mid-
land, S.D., died October 1, 2012, at
the Maryhouse in Pierre.
Dorothy M. Dennis was born Oc-
tober 10, 1924, in Redfield, the
daughter of Archie “Tom” and
Marie (Fish) Dennis. Dorothy’s
mother died soon after Dorothy
was born. Grandparents Jess and
Kate Dennis brought Dorothy to
their home north of Midland when
she was five days old and she con-
tinued to live with them, attending
Liberty Country School for five
years.
She then moved to Midland
where Tom and Lillian, her step-
mother, were living and attended
school there for one year while Lil-
lian was teaching in the Midland
school. The family moved to the
Tom Dennis farm-ranch and
Dorothy attended Prairie Queen
School for two years. Then Lillian
taught the Twin Buttes School east
of home and she, Dorothy, and a
cousin, Olivia Dennis (now Per-
ovich), lived at the school during
the week and went home on week-
ends while Dorothy was in eighth
and ninth grades. She then at-
tended high school in Midland, liv-
ing in the girls’ dormitory, just
north of present day Open Bible
parsonage. She worked at the co-op
grocery store during high school
years. She graduated from Midland
High School in 1942 and went to
work at a chicken farm near Rapid
City.
Dorothy married Bob Seidler on
April 30, 1943, in Midland, and
went back to work at the co-op gro-
cery store while Bob managed the
Texaco station for Ray Schultz of
Murdo. Bob and Dorothy moved to
the Jess and Kate Dennis home to
help them with their farm work
until 1953. After Dorothy’s dad,
Tom Dennis, died she and Bob
moved to the Tom Dennis farm-
ranch west of Highway 14 where
they lived until retiring.
They moved to Midland in 2007.
They enjoyed living in their one
story home instead of the three sto-
ries on the farm, especially because
it was just across the street from
the Midland school playground
where they could see the kids play-
ing during recess and noon break.
Dorothy served on the Pheoba
School Board from many years.
Phoeba school, post office and store
all were named for her grandfa-
ther, Phoeba Richardson, who lived
northeast of the Jess Dennis farm.
Entertainment in the early years
was card parties at the homes of
the neighbors in the area east and
west of Highway 14. That pastime
was taken up again at the Midland
Senior Center after Dorothy and
Bob retired.
Another entertainment was tak-
ing long drives when the wind was
blowing so hard it made work on
the farm miserable. They some-
times got quite a distance from
home before turning back! The
Platte-Winner Bridge, Sisseton,
Lemmon, or even into Wyoming
were some of the places they
turned the car toward Midland
again after enjoying the scenery in
places they hadn’t been recently, if
ever.
While their girls were in high
school, they attended all school
events and followed MHS sports
teams. They “hauled” cheerleaders
for several years to out of town
events. They drove even to the far-
thest ‘away’ games or anywhere the
Midland Tumblers performed,
nearly always being first to arrive,
no matter how far away!
Survivors include her husband,
Robert “Bob” Seidler of Midland;
two daughters, Athellen Gibbs
Westerman of Pierre, and her son,
Allen (Tammy) Gibbs and their
son, Marcus; and Phyllis Nelsen
Wells of Worland, Wyo., and her
sons, Troy (Kelly) Nelsen and son,
Wyatt, of Worland, and Terry
(Angie) Nelsen and son, Caidon, of
Sioux Falls; and many nieces and
nephews.
Dorothy was preceded in death
by her parents, Archie and Marie
Dennis.
Visitation will be held from 3:00
to 5:00 p.m. Thursday, October 4,
at the Rush Funeral Home in
Philip, and one hour preceding the
services at the church on Friday.
Funeral services will begin at
10:00 a.m. MDT Friday, October 5,
at the Open Bible Church in Mid-
land, with Pastor Andy Blye offici-
ating.
Interment will be at the Midland
Cemetery.
Rush Funeral Home is in charge
of arrangements. Her online guest
book can be viewed at www.rush
funeralhome.com
Bel videre News …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
June Ring • 462-6328
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 344-2547
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ATM
Fall Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
The prairie is currently giving
its last “Hurrah!” before winter,
and it’s putting on quite a nice
show. The cottonwoods along the
river, anyway, catch your eye with
a good assortment of yellows and
oranges. The trees in the draws
and creeks have more variety since
there are more kinds of trees there
than along the river. Elm trees, of
course, have no sense of time. They
seldom turn a pretty color. They
instead prefer to wait until a hard
frost turns the leaves brown after
which they slowly drop them. Ash
trees, though, like to adorn them-
selves with bright yellow before
going naked over a short span of
time and settling in for dormancy.
Some of my favorite fall foliage
is on those trees and plants that
turn red. We don’t have many ac-
tual trees which do that, and I
think you may have to go to New
England or some other remote
place to see a lot of it. We do, how-
ever, have ivy that climbs trees
and whatnot and turns a brilliant
red in the fall. It does that quite
early in the season and seems to be
a red-flag signal for all the other
plants that winter is coming and
it’s time to get ready. There are
some smaller shrubs in the draws
that also turn red although most of
those have a rusty hew and not the
scarlet or flat-out red. I am not
much of an authority on brushy
plants that don’t produce edible
fruit, but my dad used to call some
of them skunkberries. I have no
idea if that is a proper name for
those short bushes, but that’s what
I call them. They have berries,
sure enough, but you’d have to be
nutty to sample them. Wild crit-
ters don’t eat them which gives
you some idea of their worth as
food.
The late-season prairie flowers
are also hanging in there although
they are somewhat stunted in this
dry old year. I notice sunflowers, of
course, that haven’t quite given it
up yet, but yellow gumweeds give
no indication that they are in any
way lacking moisture. Looking at
them might give you the idea that
we’ve had recent rains. We
haven’t, but you wouldn’t know it
by inspecting gumweeds. I espe-
cially noticed how they line the
highways the other day after bees
started smashing against my
windshield. I had seen the hives by
the road and wondered where on
earth the bees were finding any-
thing to interest them. I scanned
the prairie and saw nothing but
brown. There certainly was no
clover or alfalfa that was still
green. Then I saw the gumweeds
all along the road. “Ah,” I thought.
“That’s where the bees are going.”
According to beekeeper friend,
Chris, gumweeds do not make
ideal honey, but I suppose they do
provide good enough food for the
bees themselves which can’t be all
bad.
The other normal fall flowers
are around too. There are those
clumps of white posies which I call
asters although I’m not sure that
is accurate. Most of them are
stunted but still trying. The gold-
enrod seems particularly brilliant
this year. I was stomping down a
draw the other day to get rid of a
couple of pails of stuff I’d cleaned
out of the freezer above the refrig-
erator. That contraption had quit
working properly and thawed
everything out. Most of it should
have been tossed a while ago, but
you know how that goes with
freezers. Still, although it didn’t
smell bad, I no longer trusted it
and decided to throw it out. Any-
way, on the way back to the house,
I saw this big, although short,
clump of goldenrod. It was eye-
catching to say the least. I was al-
most glad I’d had to make the
disposal run down the draw so I
didn’t miss that flower patch. I did-
n’t stop to smell them since they’ve
been known to make people
sneeze, but they were nice to look
at.
Then we come to yucca plants.
They, too, show no signs of
drought. They are about the only
green dotting the landscape, and,
since we have tons of them on the
hills of our rolling ranch, they do
give you hope. Yuccas, in fact, seem
to do better in dry years than wet.
They flourish. They even flower
more heavily in dry springs than
wet. I guess you have to be a cac-
tus to enjoy drought.
So, the prairie is telling us that
winter cometh. I suppose I’d better
get ready. Shoot! That can wait a
bit. Instead, I think I’ll go down to
the creek or spring and find me a
log to sit on under the canopy of
colorful leaves. There I’ll just enjoy
my golden world and bask in its
brilliance. There’s no point in wor-
rying when you can instead sur-
render yourself to beauty.
Postscript: Got some rain on
Sunday. Nice!
Last Hurrah
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Tom DeVries is a new resident of
Belvidere since he recently pur-
chased the house owned by Jeff
Willert which is across the street
northeast of the church. Tom is con-
centrating on dirt work recently
with a new machine he recently
bought. He has been working east
and south of town either repairing
stock dams or cleaning out and
deepening dry ones. He also
brought his team of horses to town
and several horse-drawn con-
veyances including a fairly fancy
one he built during the last year
and has used some already. At his
place north of old Stamford, close to
the St. Peter Lutheran Church, his
daughter, Trisha Bork, and her
husband, Landon, will be moving
there soon. Tom said he really en-
joys dirt work and has now pur-
chased enough equipment that he
can accurately figure the correct
height for dam grades and so on. It
uses some laser technology and
seems fairly accurate and easy to
use. You may recall that the house
Tom just moved into was owned by
Charles Willert before Jeff had it.
Others having lived there include
Sam and Lydia Manke way back,
Merle and Florence Rittel and Dick
Vosberg. Jeff Willert, meanwhile, is
preparing to move to his place just
west of town which was formerly
owned by Charlie Brunson. He is
awaiting the arrival of a new mo-
bile home in mid October.
Marj and Marvin Street are
back in town for a couple of weeks
in their house just east of the water
tower. Marj, as usual, helped play
for church on Sunday. During the
week, the Streets in company with
Marj’s brother, Gary, and sisters,
Keitha, Elaine and Crystal, did
some work at the home of their
mom, Dolores Obr. New kitchen
cupboards were installed, as was a
new water heater. Painting was
also done. Of those here, Streets
mostly live at Cook, MN, Keitha at
Alpena and Gary and Elaine at
Rapid City. Crystal Paulson is the
only full-time local one.
Wade Fox and his sorrel horse,
Snort, were running across the
prairie this week when Snort
dropped both front legs into a hole.
This stopped the proceedings fairly
abruptly and catapulted Wade far
enough away that he wasn’t
squished by a falling horse. Neither
Wade nor Snort suffered any major
injury, but Wade had a little pain
for a while in his shoulder and
knee. Snort seemed unconcerned
and spent time nibbling grass
while Wade got himself together
and remounted. The two, then, con-
tinued on their journey.
Clair Bitting consulted doctors
about his heart at the VA in Sturgis
on Saturday. His daughter, Kolette
Struble, served as chauffeur. On
Sunday, Curtis Bitting was at the
ranch looking after his mom, and
Kolette stayed overnight to keep
tabs on things.
Former resident, Terry Karrels,
in currently in the hospital at
Philip in fairly serious condition.
You may remember that Terry and
her husband, Mike, formerly
owned and lived on one of the
Berry places south of town before
moving to Miles City, MT. Terry
has brothers and other Trask rela-
tives in the Wasta/Wall area.
Bunny Green spent part of last
week in the Pierre hospital with
pneumonia. Then she spent more
time in rehab since she was having
some trouble walking. Bunny had
spent a week or more before that
with her daughter, Darlene Wiede-
mer, in Murdo while suffering with
the flu. Then she came home
briefly last Sunday and until she
started feeling poorly and was
taken to Pierre by Darlene and
Darlene’s brother, Gary, who had
come from Nevada with his wife,
Trisha. Bunny had plenty of visi-
tors including her son, Vernie, and
his wife, Deb, of Black Hawk.
Gary’s son, Timmy, was a visitor
from Colorado, and Pierre grand-
kids, David Wiedemer and Ruth
Ann Springer, were there along
with son-in-law, Charles. Even
Bunny’s dog came to see her.
Bunny is doing better now al-
though still coughing. On Sunday,
she was making plans to be back
home just as soon as possible.
Betty Kusick said the dams no
longer smell very good so she has
given up fishing at the moment.
She figured fish wouldn’t taste very
good right now due to the condition
of the water.
Mark and Nicci DeVries and
sons have been either playing in or
attending quite a few football
games lately. Gavin played in a
game at Philip on Saturday. Son
Geoffrey was playing football that
day as well at a “Jamboree” in
Wall. On Sunday, Mark, Geoffrey
and Greyson all attended the sur-
plus auction held at the Kadoka
school. All three came home with a
laptop computer. Nicci said the
computers were a little old, but
would still work fine for games and
other things. For the second year
now, Nicci is serving as a special-ed
aide under Mrs. Smiley at the
Kadoka School. Mark, in fact, is the
only family member who isn’t ei-
ther in school or teaching, but he is
coaching the junior high football
team.
Various hunting seasons are
now open including grouse, dove,
and archery antelope. As a result,
Syd Iwan’s nephew, Scott Jones,
came from Huron with his friend,
“Minnesota Mike” and spent a
week hunting and fishing at the
ranch. They left on Friday only to
be replaced by Shon Ford of Miller
and a friend of his who took up
where Scott and Mike left off.
“Harvest will fill the barn;
for that the hand must ache,
the face must sweat.”
Wendell Berry
Ken Koistenen arrived at Max-
ine Allard’s place Thursday to set
up his camper and check the trail
cameras and then headed back to
Pierre. Friday he returned, and his
son, Kelly, of Spearfish joined him
as they prepared for bow hunting
over the weekend.
Maxine and June Ring shared a
luncheon Saturday at Maxine’s
home. While they were eating,
Maxine received a surprise phone
call from a St. Mary classmate, also
named Maxine. They both at-
tended St. Mary in O’Niell. Maxine
Fraber was calling from her home
in Omaha.
A new handicapped pad was
poured at the Norris Post Office
last week. The construction com-
pany came from Colorado Springs
to do the job.
Jim, Marjorie and Julie Letellier
and Andrea Beckwith were at
Colome on Friday for the football
game with Sunshine Bible Acad-
emy. Paul and LuAnn Beckwith of
Pierre were also there, as well as
Erica, who came from Omaha. DJ
Beckwith’s other grandmother and
an aunt and uncle also came to see
him play in the football game.
The Burma’s arrived Saturday
for the weekend. Harry and Ruth
Burma of Platte also came for the
weekend. The guys filled their an-
telope tags.
Anne Heinert was busy with
parent-teacher conferences last
Wednesday. On Saturday Alex was
on KDLT with play-by-play cover-
age of the USF football game.
Nicole Huber and Braeden were
at the Long Valley School for the
open house on Thursday evening.
They are still at work on Braeden’s
room downstairs. A pad has been
poured for their porch. The guys
are busy getting the combines
ready for harvesting.
Richard Krogman was among
those reporting for jury duty last
Monday. He was not among those
seated on the jury, however.
Wednesday Richard and Noreen
drove to Rapid City and spent the
night with Sis and Dale McKee.
The next day they kept an appoint-
ment in Rapid City and stopped in
to visit Adam and Jody Krogman.
Cheyenne and Orlana Schmidt
have been watching Jace’s football
games. Saturday Cheyenne helped
work cattle at Ace and Brant
Kary’s place.
Todd from Dakota Harvestore
was at Jake Ring & Sons on Thurs-
day, installing a new bag in one of
the silos. Thursday evening Torey
and Linda attended the open house
at Long Valley School.
Friday a load of fat cattle left for
Nebraska from the Ring place.
Rose West and Jeannine Wood-
ward were in Sioux Falls this past
weekend for the Book Festival and
enjoyed it immensely.
Women’s Club met at the mu-
seum Monday, October 1 in White
River. The monthly bake sale was
Wednesday, the 3rd.
The Historical Society serves a
meal for the Annie’s Project partic-
ipants each Wednesday.
Sharon Ring was at her 50th
class reunion in Winner the week-
end of the 22nd. She stayed with
Everett and Carol Hassle while
there. Monday she was also among
those who reported for jury duty in
White River, but was not seated in
the jury. Thursday Sharon ran Je-
remy up to Murdo for his appoint-
ment with the dentist.
Jessie Ring invited June Ring to
go along with her and the children
to the open house at Long Valley
School on Thursday, since Bruce
was busy in the field.
Norris School students were in
White River Tuesday, October 2 for
Prevention Day.
Wednesday the National Guard
is scheduled for a flyover taking a
picture of the students in their for-
mation outside the school.
Susan Taft left after work Mon-
day to head to White River for the
middle school volleyball game.
Tuesday Morgan and Susan were
at the volleyball game between
Gregory and White River. Wednes-
day after work Susan headed in to
White River for parent-teacher con-
ferences. Thursday Morgan went
with the team to the game in Ken-
nebec, and Susan went over to get
her when they got back. Saturday
it was to Philip for the Western
Great Plains middle school volley-
ball conference games.
Sunday Dan, Susan and Morgan
drove to Vermillion to visit with
Samantha and also to take her mo-
torcycle to her.
Howard and Nette Heinert were
in Valentine last Thursday to visit
Howard’s mother, Erna. Thursday
Nette visited June Ring. Friday
Howard and Nette were in Winner
and Platte.
Last Monday Evan and Dorothy
Bligh attended the Celebration of
Life memorial for Lori Lockhart
held at Prairieview United
Methodist Church near Oelrichs.
Lori was a dear lifelong friend of
Dorothy’s.
Wednesday the Bligh’s loaded
out yearlings and Friday went to
Ft. Pierre to watch them sell.
Pouring cement …Wednesday afternoon the cement arrived for
the new handicap pad at the Norris Post Office. The work was done by
Loewen Construction of Colorado Springs, CO.
--photos by Marjorie Letellier
Just waiting…for the cement to set up. The blue mail box was put
in place near the new handicap spot in front of the Norris Post Office.
Folks only hope that it means the post office will be there as long as the
cement.
Locals …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
Bring Your Family & Friends to the
Long Valley Fire Department
11th Annual Hog Roast & Dance
BBQ
Supper
5:30
to 7:30
D
a
n
c
e
8 p.m. to
M
idnight to
U
ncle R
oy
&
the B
oys
Saturday, October 6th
Long Valley Community Hall
Come & Enjoy Supper Featuring
Pit Roasted BBQ Pork!
Free will donation for admission
Great Food & Great Fun For A Good Cause!
October Specials
Prices good from Oct. 4 to Oct. 31
18 pk Busch Light 16 oz. cans.....................$13.50
18 pk Bud or Bud Light 16 oz. cans.............$18.50
20 pk Bud Light bottles ................................$19.50
15 pk Bud Light 16 oz. alum. bottles............$17.50
Crown Royal 1.75 ........................................$49.00
Lord Calvert 1.75 .........................................$18.00
Black Velvet 1.75 .........................................$18.00
Jack Daniels 750..........................................$23.00
Verdi Sparkletini Apple or Raspberry .............$5.50
All prices include tax and FREE ICE!
Kadoka City Bar
Main Street • Kadoka • 605-837-9102
Bingo
EVERY
Thursday Night
at 6 p.m.
Poker
EVERY
Monday Night
at 7 p.m.
The terms of Bud Olney and
Clara Belle Weller are up. Nancy
nominated Chuck VanderMay for a
two-year term and moved that a
unanimous ballot be cast. Seconded
by Bud and motion carried.
Nancy nominated Bud Olney for
another two-year term and moved
that a unanimous ballot be cast.
Seconded by Chuck and motion
carried.
Being no further business,
Chuck moved to adjourn, seconded
by Nancy. Motion carried.
--Nancy Peterson
Secretary/Treasurer
Special meeting mintues
A special meeting to elect offi-
cers was called by Vice-President
Bud Olney immediately following
the annual meeting. Olney, Peter-
son and VanderMay were present.
Absent was Grady Crew.
Nancy nominated Bud as presi-
dent and that he be added to the
checking account signature card in
that capacity. Chuck seconded and
motion carried.
Nancy nominated Chuck as vice-
president, seconded by Bud and
motion carried.
Nancy will remain as
secretary/treasurer and Grady
Crew will hold the other director’s
position.
Chuck moved to adjourn the
meeting, seconded by Nancy and
motion carried.
--Nancy Peterson
Secretary/Treasurer
The annual meeting of the
Kadoka Calvary-Fairview Ceme-
tery Association was called to order
by Vice-President Bud Olney on
September 26, 2012 at the Gate-
way Apartment Meeting Room.
Present were Bud Olney, Chuck
VanderMay and Nancy Peterson.
The 2011 annual meeting min-
utes and the 2012 treasurer’s re-
port were read and accepted. The
treasurer’s report showed balances
as follows: checking, $587.13; sav-
ings, $17,112.91; CDs, $54,649.52.
Income consisted of lot sales and
one donation for a total of
$3,408.51. Expenses of $3,518.54
were for maintenance, recording
deeds and insurance.
Old business: BankWest has
agreed to not charge a fee for the
association’s checking account.
New business: Due to the pass-
ing of the association’s president,
Steve Jeffords, it is necessary to ap-
point a director to fill Steve’s term
through 2013. Chuck moved to ap-
point Grady Crew to finish out the
term of Steve Jeffords. Nancy sec-
onded and motion carried.
In order to remove Jeffords
name from the signature card on
the checking account, BankWest
requires a formal motion in the
minutes to accomplish. Nancy
moved to remove Jeffords name
from the signature card. Chuck sec-
onded and motion carried.
Other new business is that the
filing fee for recording deeds in the
Register of Deeds Office has risen
to $30. This will cause the cost of a
lot to be increased by $15.
Kadoka Cemetery Association holds
annual meeting, elects officers
Megan Ruth Kingsbury and Matthew David Wiggs are pleased to an-
nounce their marrage on May 18, 2012, at First Baptist Church of Rose-
mount, Minnesota.
Megan, daughter of John (Jeanie Grimes) Kingsbury and granddaugh-
ter of the late Louie and Elsie Grimes and niece of Tom Grimes and Jerry
and Merilee Grimes, all of Kadoka, was raised in Pine Island, MN. She
graduated in May from Bob Jones University, Greenville, SC, with a de-
gree in Voice Performance. She is currently employed at Piano Central
Studios, Greenville, SC, where she teaches private and group voice, piano
and flute lessons. She continues to study voice with soprano, Jean Reese
Greer and will be pursuing graduate school in the near future.
Matthew, son of Tom and Debbie Wiggs, was raised all over the Eastern
sea board as his father was Air Force. He graduated from Bob Jones Uni-
versity as a Certified Aircraft Mechanic as well as a Bachelors degree in
Aviation. He is currently employed at Venture Aviation Group, LLC,
Greenville, SC, where he is a commercial charter pilot and a Certified
Aircraft Mechanic.
Kingsbury, Wiggs married
Our Lady of Victory
Catholic Church
will be holding their annual turkey dinner
Sunday, October 7
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the church hall in Kadoka
Everyone
W
elcom
e!
Adults • $9.00
Child (4-10) • $4.00
3 & under free
Silent A
uction
Check it out!
Julesburg, CO, on October 1 to at-
tend funeral services for Lucille
Stewart. Lucille’s dad, Leroy
Dugan, and Faye’s mother, Marie
Riggins, were brother and sister.
Cloreta Eisenbraun was not able to
go, but she sent them on their way
in her car. They left Kadoka at 4:30
a.m. and returned home that
evening at 7:30 p.m. They had a
nice visit with the family, attended
the funeral, and had a noon lunch-
eon. Lucille will be remembered as
she taught at Green Valley Coun-
try School and coming to visit at
different times with her aunt,
Marie Riggins.
Nancy and Rex Totton left on
September 17 for a trip that took
them to Seattle, WA, where they
visited the Space Needle. They also
spent time at the home of Anita
Cramer and family in Spokane,
WA. Anita is the daughter of Rex.
They visited Glacier National Park
and said the trip through Montana,
Idaho and Washington was a beau-
tiful drive this time of year. Nancy
and Rex returned home on the
27th.
Dustin and Andrea Reutter and
children visited at the Totton home
on Sunday and took in the auction
sale at the high school while here.
They returned to their home in
Murdo the same day.
Marvin and Deb Moor and sons,
Matthew of Cedar Rapids, IA, and
Mitch of Pierre left on September
12 for a trip to Hawaii. While gone
they celebrated Marv’s birthday
while staying on the island of
Oahu. They also toured the Big Is-
land of Hawaii, visited the Arizona
Battleship, and several volcanos,
along with other tourist things.
They returned to the states on the
20th after a wonderful vacation.
Deb and Marv went to Pierre on
Thursday of last week for appoint-
ments.
Sixteen runners, walkers and a
bicycle rider took part in the 5K
event held in Kadoka on Saturday.
Many events were going on that
day, so the crowd was small, but all
had a good time. Participants came
from Box Elder, Martin, Long Val-
ley, Rapid City and Kadoka and the
event was organized by Save the
Pearl members. A meeting will be
held sometime in October with the
committee who are doing a feasibil-
ity study on the 100 mile trail pro-
posed from Rapid City to Kadoka
along the railroad bed. Watch for
the time and place of the meeting.
Results on Prorodeo.com showed
that Chad Ferley of Oelrichs won
the first round at the Justin Boots
Championship in Omaha which
was held Sept. 27-29 and won
$5,107 for a score of 86. He tied for
2nd with the scores totaling 160,
winning $3,327. Cole Elshere of
Faith won total money of $2,089.
World Standings shows that Chad
in 8th place, $67,932; Cole is 12th,
$63,510 and Jeff Willert is 21st
with $39,927. Jamie Willert rode in
the Sept. 14-15 rodeo in Bowman
County ProRodeo, tied for 4th place
with a 76, winning $477.
Week before last Patty and
Chuck Morris of Romoland, CA,
were in the Belvidere and Kadoka
areas visiting family and friends.
While in South Dakota Chuck at-
tended a Navy reunion in Rapid
City. Patty is the daughter of the
late Connie and Geraldine Seidler.
JoAnne Stilwell and Doris and
Art Weitschat attended the stage
play “CATS” in Rapid City on
Wednesday night of last week.
They said the cast did a wonderful
job and all local people were the ac-
tors. The Weitschats will be moving
to Hot Springs in the near future.
JoAnne and several of her fellow
Red Hat Ladies from around the
area enjoyed a tour of the Pearl
Hotel on Thursday. Paula Vogelge-
sang showed the ladies the work
that has been done in restoring the
Pearl Hotel.
A pamphlet prepared by Secre-
tary of State Jason Gant contain-
ing public information concerning
constitutional amendments, initia-
tives and referred measures that
will appear on the November ballot
is available at the Jackson County
Library for interested voters. It is
also available on the website
sdsos.gov and in large print. Braille
or on tape is also available by call-
ing the SD State Library at 1-800-
423-6665.
Joyce Hicks and Patsy Hand-
cock of Pierre drove to Black Hawk
on Friday and spent the weekend
at the home of Peggy and Don
Williams. On Saturday several
members of Joyce’s family enjoyed
a golf outing at the Boulder Canyon
Golf Course between Deadwood
and Sturgis. Afterwards they all
got together at Linda and Ray-
mond Hicks’ home in Rapid City.
Among others attending the activi-
ties were Scott Ruff and his family
of Alliance, NE, Chase Sanftner
and family of Black Hawk and
Darla Hicks and a friend of Pierre.
Charlotte Ruff was invited to join
the family, but she was hospital-
ized in Rapid City on Saturday. Her
daughter, Luanne, said that she
would probably be dismissed and
home early this week.
Brett and Tammy Prang left on
Monday for New Town, ND, to de-
liver many items of their iron work
to a new motel built on the Indian
reservation near New Town. Some
of the work they did included mir-
rors surrounded by metal work for
the motel rooms. The oil boom in
North Dakota has made it neces-
sary for many new motels and
homes being built in the area. The
Prangs were to return home in a
day or two.
Bob and Fallon Clark and girls
of Colman, SD, were weekend
guest in the home of Scott and
Diane Huber home. On Sunday
evening, Bob, Fallon and girls,
Kelly Riggins, Denise Kelly, and
Lola Joyce Riggins were guests in
the Chris and Anitalyn Riggins for
supper and visiting.
Faye Eisenbraun, Stephen Rig-
gins, and Lola Joyce Riggins ac-
companied Ella Hindman to
Company in 1986. He has served
the company in a variety of roles,
most recently as the Colorado
Springs operations manager.
He is a graduate of Kadoka High
School, class of 1976, and received
a Bachelor of Science Degree in
civil engineering at the South
Dakota School of Mines and Tech-
nology. Eisenbraun is licensed in
Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Col-
orado and Montana.
Eisenbraun has more than 30
years of experience in the design
and management of transportation
engineering projects for municipal,
county, state and private sector
clients. His work includes the plan-
ning and design of urban and rural
transportation projects throughout
Kansas and Nebraska.
Eisenbraun and his family will
be moving to Kansas City in the
near future to assume his new du-
ties.
Troy M. Eisenbraun, PE, son of
Faye Eisenbraun of Kadoka and
Mel Eisenbraun of Sturgis, has
been promoted to senior vice presi-
dent of the Albuquerque-based firm
of Wilson & Company, Inc., Engi-
neers & Architects.
He will assume the Kansas City,
MO, operations manager responsi-
bilities and continue to direct the
company’s transportation planning
and design services in Nebraska,
Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma.
He will lead a multi-disciplined
team of engineers, surveyors and
planners.
“Troy’s client knowledge and
leadership ability will strengthen
our Kansas City presence,” said
Steve Watt, president and CEO of
Wilson & Company. “He is also
well-versed in multiple disciplines
which will serve him well in his
new leadership role in our Kansas
City office.”
Eisenbraun joined Wilson &
Eisenbraun promoted in
Wilson & Company, Inc.
South Dakota State University
Extension will host training ses-
sions focused on estate planning
and transitioning the family oper-
ation in Lemmon, Philip, Redfield,
Chamberlain, Yankton and Brook-
ings, beginning Oct. 22.
Sustaining the Legacy confer-
ences have helped farm and ranch
families across the state get started
on their plans by providing the
tools and resources needed to get
started and the know-how to get it
completed, says Heather Gessner,
SDSU Extension Livestock Busi-
ness Management Field Specialist.
"Each session is filled with im-
portant information that can help
farm and ranch families address
questions they may face as parents
or grandparents get older and con-
sider their legacy," said Gessner,
who is organizing the conferences.
"Producers have told me that the
value of this program was $1 mil-
lion, due to the changes they made
to their estate plan and the reduc-
tion of potential estate taxes."
Extension staff and industry
professionals will help participants
develop the tools they need in order
to face estate-planning challenges
with less stress.
Conference dates & locations
•Lemmon: Oct. 22, 23, 29 and
30-SDSU Regional Extension Cen-
ter, 408 8th Street West, Lemmon
•Philip: Oct. 25, 26, Nov. 1 and
2-Bad River Senior Center, 123 E
US Hwy 14, Philip
There will be a training cost for
each person attending. Registra-
tion is required seven days prior to
the first meeting date. To register,
call Gessner at 605-782-3290. Re-
turn the registration form and
funds to Sioux Falls Extension
Center, 2001 East 8th Street, Sioux
Falls, SD 57103.
Each day of the four-session pro-
gram is full of tools and how-to in-
formation families can use to
create and implement their indi-
vidualized plan, no matter how big
or small the operation.
Topics for the sessions cover
communication styles, business
structures, goals, asset distribu-
tion, wills and probate, retirement
planning and funding, fair versus
equal distribution, tax implications
for the operation, life insurance,
long-term care insurance, trusts,
and other topics as determined by
the audiences.
"Many of the past participants
have utilized the information from
the conference to reduce potential
estate taxes and ensure that their
operation is passed down to the
next generation in a smooth, hassle
free transition," Gessner said.
All family members are encour-
aged to attend the sessions, and on-
and off-farm heirs are also invited
to learn about the tools and partic-
ipate in the discussions.
"Past participants have used
this conference to interview attor-
neys and insurance agents while
they are presenting the basics of
using the many tools available to
them," Gessner said. "If you are
making plans to retire or becoming
a partner in the operation, or if you
own farm or ranch assets, this pro-
gram is a great start for you. Our
goal is to give you the tools to de-
velop your estate plan and the mo-
tivation to get started, combined
with some gentle nudging that
keeps you moving forward with the
process."
Partial funding for this program
is provided by the South Dakota
Soybean Research and Promotion
Council.
"SDR&PC is proud to be one of
the sponsors for this year's estate
planning workshops. With rising
land values and profit margins, es-
tate planning has never been more
important," said Doug Hanson, a
SDSRPC board member and a past
participant of the conference. "My
wife and I have attended these
workshops in the past and have
found them very informative."
Call Gessner at her Sioux Falls
Regional Extension office with
questions at 605-782-3290, or e-
mail her at this address:
heather.gessner@sdstate.edu.
Extension estate planning and farm transition
conferences to be held across the state
Email the
Kadoka Press at:
press@kadokatelco.com
Monday, October 8
Hamburger gravy over biscuits,
hash brown patties, stewed toma-
toes, and vanilla pudding with
fruit.
Tuesday, October 9
Roast pork, sweet potatoes,
broccoli cauliflower mix, bread,
and apple crisp.
Wednesday, October 10
Beef and noodles, seasoned car-
rots, tossed salad, bread, and
plums.
Thursday, October 11
Oven fried chicken, mashed po-
tatoes and gravy, sliced beets, din-
ner roll, and apricots.
Friday, October 12
Chili or alternate, fruity slaw,
cinnamon roll, and pears.
Meals for
the Elderly
Sports …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
E-mail Your News Items, Classified
Advertisements or Cards of Thanks to:
press@kadokatelco.com
editor@kadokatelco.com
Deadline Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
6 & 7 year old division … Back row (L): 2nd Reece Ohrtman, 3rd Lin-
coln Koehn. Front row: 3rd Aurora Hamar, 1st Emelia VanderMay. Not
pictured: 1st Cass Finn and 2nd Emily Zickrick.
8 & 9 year old division … Back row (L): 1st Dawson Reckling, 2nd Jack-
son Grimes, 3rd Kash Block. Front row: 1st Lanie Blair, 2nd Rebecca
Shuck, 3rd Valandra High Hawk.
10 & 11 year old division … Back row (L): 1st Marcus Herber, 2nd
Jarred Hicks, 3rd Trenton Cuny. Front row: 1st Alyssa Civitak, 2nd Lavin
Bendt, 3rd Anna Stone.
14 & 15 year old division … 1st Kassie Hicks, Miss South Dakota Cal-
ista Kirby, 1st AJ Bendt. Kirby presented the trophies to each of the win-
ners when their names were announced. --photos by Ronda Dennis
Starbase program … will be in the
fifth grade classroom for a total of five
weeks on Mondays. Four days are
spent in Kadoka and one at the Air
and Space Museum at Ellsworth (Oc-
tober 15). This is the third year
Kadoka Area 5th graders have partic-
ipated in the program.
Seth Addison and Dylan VanderMay
(above), and Adie Patterson and Lan-
don Schofield (left) are measuring liq-
uid volume to identify four liquids
(space ooze, laser oil, galactic glue,
zoom juice).
Eggbert’s shuttle … Students designed
new state-of-the art safety systems (left) for
Eggbert (a raw egg).
12 & 13 year old division … Back row (L): 1st Bryan Letellier, 2nd
Hunter Johnson, 3rd Jory Rodgers. Front row: 1st Savannah Solon, 2nd
Mikayla Addison, 3rd Katy O’Daniel.
Miss SD presents trophies to Punt, Pass & Kick winners
On Thursday, September 27
Kadoka Area cross country runners
traveled to Sturgis Invite. They
were up against many class “A”
schools.
Competing in the girls’ 3K run,
Katy O’Daniel came in 64th with a
time of 16:31.92
In the boys’ 4K run, Bryan Letel-
lier was 25th with a time of
20:04.30,
In the girls’ 4K run, Shaley Her-
ber placed 12th with a time of
18:50.50; Tori Letellier 45th in
19:45.61, Scout Sudbeck 52nd in
20:39.70, Kwincy Ferguson 61st in
21:56.65.
The boys longer 5K had Bobby
Anderson crossing the finish line in
57th place with a time of 21:10.40.
Cross country
competes at
Sturgis
Thursday, September 27 the
Kadoka Lady Kougars traveled to
Martin.
Bennett County defeated
Kadoka 25-14, 21-25, 25-23, 25-18
Raven Jorgensen, Kwincy Fer-
guson and Marti Herber each had
8 service points. Marti Herber had
12 kills and Raven Jorgensen had
8. Taylor Merchen and Tessa Stout
each had 10 set assists. Taylor and
Tessa also combined for 12 digs in
the backrow.
We got off to a slow start in the
first set and just couldn't recover;
but then we were able to take the
second set playing well. The third
set was a bit of a heart-breaker; we
battled back from a 10 point deficit
to 23-24 with us serving and
missed a serve to lose the set. I
knew whoever won that third set
was likely to win the match be-
cause it is a letdown for any team
to lose a big lead or come back from
a big lead and then lose. Bennett
County played well; their defense
was very strong, they hit every-
thing, and served with power and
consistency. We didn't play too
badly but just simply had difficul-
ties adjusting to their deep spiking
and their strong defense.
Bennett County JV defeated
Kadoka JV 2-0 that same evening.
Bennett County played a stong
match against us. They played very
good defense, and we made too
many mistakes to stay competitive
in the match. Although, we did stay
in system and controlled the ball
fairly well. Tori Letellier had some
nice kills and Destiny Dale played
strong defense in the backrow. Allie
Romero did a nice job setting.
The varsity volleyball team com-
peted at the Lead-Deadwood Tour-
nament Saturday, September 29.
Kadoka defeated Hulett, WY 24-
26, 27-25, 26-24
Kadoka defeated Lead-Dead-
wood JV 25-17, 25-4
Harding County defeated
Kadoka 25-17, 25-14
The tournamet started with a
very exciting win against a strong
Hulett team. Raven Jorgensen and
Marti Herber combined for 30/30
serving with 18 points and 5 aces.
Shaley Herber had 13 kills and 1
block. Taylor Merchen had 10 set
assists. This was a battle back and
forth with many lead changes, and
the girls really had to dig deep to
pull the win out in the third set.
This was a match that tested our
toughness, and the girls stepped up
and made it happen.
We then played the Lead-Dead-
wood JV. As a team we 49/50 with
7 aces and 36 service points.
Kwincy, Raven and Shaley each
had 6 kills, and Tessa and Taylor
combined for 10 set assists. This
was a good match for us even
though is was Lead-Deadwood's JV.
We controlled the ball and adusted
to a different stylo of play.
We won pool C going 2-0. Now
we had to face Harding County in
the champoinship bracket. Eight
teams were advanced to the cham-
pionship bracket. We new we had a
good shot at Harding County;
Hulett had beaten them a few
weeks prior, and we had played
Harding County close in the Philip
Tournament. But, we just didn't
play well. We looked a little slow on
the court, maybe due to sitting for
about an hour and a half waiting to
play. Harding County would even-
tually win the tournament so that
made us feel a bit better. Kwincy
served 7/7 with 3 service points,
Raven had 6 kills and 4 digs, and
Taylor had 5 set assists.
Overall, we had to be satistfied
with coming out of the tournament
with a winning record and winning
a really tight match against a qual-
ity team like Hulett.
Volleyball loses at Martin; up against tough
teams in Lead/Deadwood Tournament
Athlete
of the
Week
Marti Herber
Volleyball
In our last four matches Marti
served 43/45 with 28 service points
and 5 aces. She had 12 kills and 8
service points in our match against
Bennett County. Marti does a lot for
our team: leadership, hustle in
practice, strong on both offense
and defense, and she adds some
humor when it is needed.
Sponsored by
Jackson County
Title Company
and
Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2286
Good Luck Cross Country Team …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
H & H Restaurant H & H Restaurant
& Rodeway Inn & Rodeway Inn
Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287 Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287
Miller’s Garbage & Miller’s Garbage &
Laundromat Laundromat
Larry & Jan Miller: 837-2698 Larry & Jan Miller: 837-2698
Badlands Badlands
Beauty Salon Beauty Salon
Jan Miller: 390-4591 Jan Miller: 390-4591
BankWest BankWest
Gene Christensen: 837-2281 Gene Christensen: 837-2281
BankWest BankWest
- -Insurance Insurance
Lori Waldron: 837-2277 Lori Waldron: 837-2277
Jigger’s Restaurant Jigger’s Restaurant
Jerry & JoAnne Stilwell: 837-2000 Jerry & JoAnne Stilwell: 837-2000
Midwest Cooperative Midwest Cooperative
Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600 Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600
Kadoka Clinic Kadoka Clinic
Phone: 837-2257 Phone: 837-2257
America’s Best America’s Best
Value Inn Value Inn
Grant Patterson • Phone: 837-2188 Grant Patterson • Phone: 837-2188
Discount Fuel Discount Fuel
Mark & Tammy Carlson Mark & Tammy Carlson
Phone: 837-2271 Phone: 837-2271
People’s Market People’s Market
Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232 Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232
Stadium Sports Stadium Sports
Shelly Young • Mission, SD Shelly Young • Mission, SD
1-888-502-3066 1-888-502-3066
Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM
Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697 Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697
Groven’s Chemical Groven’s Chemical
Rick Groven: Rick Groven: 837-2550 837-2550
Hogen’s Hardware Hogen’s Hardware
Don & Randi Oyan: 837-2274 Don & Randi Oyan: 837-2274
Rush Funeral Home Rush Funeral Home
Philip • Wall • Kadoka Philip • Wall • Kadoka
Jack & DJ Rush: 859-2400 Jack & DJ Rush: 859-2400
Double H Feed Double H Feed
& Supply & Supply
Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976 Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976
Hildebrand Steel Hildebrand Steel
& Concrete & Concrete
Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand
Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226 Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226
Haven/Cell: 490-2926 Haven/Cell: 490-2926
Kadoka Press Kadoka Press
Ronda & Robyn • 837-2259 Ronda & Robyn • 837-2259
Club 27 Club 27
Lonny & Carrie Johnston: Lonny & Carrie Johnston:
837-2241 837-2241
Kadoka Kadoka
Booster Club Booster Club
Promoting Spirit Promoting Spirit
State Farm State Farm
Insurance Insurance
Jan Hewitt: 859-2559 Jan Hewitt: 859-2559
Headlee Headlee
Vet Clinic Vet Clinic
Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee
Kadoka: 837-2431 Philip: 859-2610 Kadoka: 837-2431 Philip: 859-2610
West River West River
Excavation Excavation
Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690 Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690
Sauntee & Heidi Coller Sauntee & Heidi Coller
Badlands Petrified Badlands Petrified
Gardens Gardens
Bill Fugate: 837-2448 Bill Fugate: 837-2448
Peters Peters
Excavation Excavation
Brent Peters: 837-2945 Brent Peters: 837-2945
Midland Midland
Food & Fuel Food & Fuel
Clint & Brenda Jensen: Clint & Brenda Jensen:
843-2536 843-2536
Farmer’s Union Farmer’s Union
Insurance Insurance
Donna Enders: 837-2144 Donna Enders: 837-2144
J& S Restore J& S Restore
John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376 John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376
Kadoka Gas & Go Kadoka Gas & Go
Grant Patterson: 837-2350 Grant Patterson: 837-2350
Vict or ia Le t e llie r , Bobby A nde r s on, Kwincy F e r g us on, S ha le y H e r be r , Ma r t i H e r be r , S cout S udbe ck Vict or ia Le t e llie r , Bobby A nde r s on, Kwincy F e r g us on, S ha le y H e r be r , Ma r t i H e r be r , S cout S udbe ck
Ka doka Cros s Country Tea m
2012 Region 5 Cla s s B Cros s Country Meet
Wednes da y, October 10 - 12:00 noon
La ke Wa ggoner Golf Cours e • P hilip
GOOD LUCK!
NO LIMITS !
Public Notices …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Public Notices
The People’s Right to Know
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
NOTICE
TO BIDDERS
Notice is hereby given that the Jackson
County Commissioners are accepting
sealed bids on the following supplies for
the period of October 15, 2012 through
April 15, 2013. The supplies to be bid are
as follows:
Bulk No. 1 Diesel for county equipment
at shop tanks.
Bulk No. 2 Diesel for county buildings
and county equipment at shop tanks and
on job sites.
Bulk lead free gasoline for county equip-
ment at shop tanks and on job sites.
Bulk Propane for county buildings.
Gasoline for Courthouse maintenance
and Sheriff’s Dept. and Director of Equal-
ization vehicles to be purchased as
needed at supplier’s pumps.
Fuel and gasoline bids are to be fixed
price bids. Competitive quotations may
also be provided for negotiating a con-
tract as per SDCL 5-18-25. All bids and
competitive quotations shall be for the
time period specified above.
All bids and quotations must be submit-
ted in a sealed envelope plainly marked
“Fixed Price Bid” or “Competitive
Quotation”, and must be filed in the
Jackson County Auditor’s Office, 700
Main Street, PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD
57543 by 2:45 p.m., Monday, October
15, 2012. Bids will be opened at 3:00
p.m., Monday, October 15, 2012. For fur-
ther information contact the Jackson
County Highway Department (837-
2410), or Jackson County Auditor’s Of-
fice (837-2422).
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to accept or re-
ject any or all bids or quotations, and to
accept the bid or quotation that is in the
best interest of Jackson County.
Vicki D. Wilson
Jackson County Auditor
[Published September 27 & October 4,
2012, at an estimated cost of $43.32]
STATE BIRTH RECORDS
ACCESSIBLE THROUGH COUNTY
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Certified copies of birth records from across the state are avail-
able in Jackson County, according to Mitzi Mitchell, Register of
Deeds. The office has access to computerized birth records
statewide and can issue a certified copy of any South Dakota
birth. In the past, birth records were only available from the county
where the birth occurred or from the South Dakota Department of
Health, Vital Records Program.
Birth records are available from 1905 on.
As earlier years are entered in the computerized system,
records from those years will also become available.
The cost for a certified copy of a birth record is $15.00 as of
July 1, 2012.
KADOKA CITY
COUNCIL
SPECIAL MEETING
SEPTEMBER 24,
2012
7:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the special meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert; Kieth Prang; Dick
Stolley and Colby Shuck. Members ab-
sent: Brad Jorgensen and Micki Word.
Others present: Patty Ulmen, Finance
Officer; Jackie Stilwell; Ronda Dennis;
and Nathan Riggins. Patrick Solon ar-
rived at 7:05 p.m.
2nd Reading of Budget Ordinance 2013-
A: The second reading of the 2013
Budget Ordinance (Ordinance 2013-A)
was held. At the conclusion of the second
reading, Shuck made Motion 12-09-
24:95 to approve Budget Ordinance
2013-A. The motion was seconded by
Willert. A roll call vote was taken, with all
members voting yes and the motion car-
ried 4-0.
Heating System/Shop: The final cost for
the installation of a new heating system
at the city shop was presented to the
council. The total cost will be $6,180.00.
There is $500.00 budgeted for building
improvements for the shop and the coun-
cil at a previous meeting stated that the
difference would be taken from the city’s
contingency fund. After a review of all in-
formation, Shuck made Motion 12-09-
24:96 to approve the transfer of
$5,680.00 from the contingency fund into
street department building improvement
for the installation of the new heating sys-
tem. The motion was seconded by
Willert. A roll call vote was taken, with all
members voting yes and the motion car-
ried 4-0.
Baseball Field Improvement: The costs
presented at the previous meeting were
reviewed and it was determined that the
materials need to be purchased this year,
so that any funding from the city will be
paid from the 2012 budget.
Water Dept. Information: Information re-
lated to revenues, expenses, and
profit/loss in the water fund for the previ-
ous two years was distributed. The infor-
mation is for council review and will be
discussed at a future meeting.
Auditorium Fire Alarm System: West
Plains Engineering, Inc. has sent a listing
of information that they will need to re-
ceive in order to move to the next phase
of the project. This listing was presented
to the council for review and will be final-
ized at the October city council meeting.
West Central Electric: The city has been
notified that two of our accounts have
been being billed incorrectly. This will be
corrected after the September billing.
October Meeting Date: The regular meet-
ing date for October falls on a scheduled
holiday date. At the meeting held on Sep-
tember 10, 2012, the council decided to
proceed with holding the meeting at the
normal date and time (October 8, 2012
at 7:00 p.m.). However, the Kadoka Area
School Board has scheduled a Public
Hearing for that same date and time. Be-
cause a conflict exists for both council
members and taxpayers, the council
made the decision to change the October
meeting date to Tuesday, October 9,
2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Shuck made Motion 12-09-24:97 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Willert, with all members voting yes and
the meeting was adjourned at 7:25 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published October 4, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $37.91]
ORDINANCE 2013-A
2013 Appropriation
Ordinance
City of Kadoka,
Jackson County,
South Dakota
SECTION I:
Be it ordained by the City council of
the City of Kadoka that the following
sums are appropriated for the obliga-
tion of the municipality.
410 GENERAL GOVERNMENT:
411 Legislative 22,985
412 Executive 11,705
413 Elections 450
414 Financial Adm 84,742
TOTAL GENERAL
GOVERNMENT 119,882
420 PUBLIC SAFETY:
421 Police 66,242
422 Fire 18,650
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 84,892
430 PUBLIC WORKS:
431 Streets 224,845
435 Airport 3,725
TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 228,570
440 HEALTH & WELFARE:
441 Animal Control &
Mosquito Spraying 1,100
446 Ambulance 3,000
TOTAL HEALTH &
WELFARE 4,100
450 RECREATION:
451 Summer Rec &
Swimming Pool 36,825
452 Parks 16,203
456 Auditorium 102,150
SOLID
ENTERPRISE FUNDS: LIQUOR: WATER: SEWER: WASTE:
Beg. Ret. Earnings 300,110 12,775 114,820 23,710
Est. Revenue 366,390 170,472 31,835 34,525
Total Est. Ret. Earnings 666,500 183,247 146,655 58,235
Less Appropriations 366,390 170,472 31,835 34,525
Est. Surplus 300,110 12,775 114,820 23,710
Est. Surplus Retained 300,110 12,775 114,820 23,710
The finance officer is directed to certify the following dollar amount of tax levies made
in this Ordinance to the county auditor: $247,500.00.
Dated this 24th day of September, 2012.
/s/ Harry E. Weller
Harry E. Weller, Mayor
FIRST READING: September 10, 2012
SECOND READING: September 24, 2012
PUBLISHED October 4, 2012
EFFECTIVE DATE: January 1, 2013
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
[Published October 4, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $68.11]
458 Museum 1,325
TOTAL RECREATION 156,503
TOTAL
APPROPRIATIONS: 593,947
TOTAL
APPROPRIATIONS 593,947
SECTION II:
The following designates the fund or
funds that money is derived from:
GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS:
310 Taxes 210,600
320 License & Permit 2,685
330 Intergovt Rev 40,750
340 Goods & Ser 6,050
350 Fines 100
360 Misc. Revenue 86,262
TOTAL MEANS
OF FINANCE: 346,447
Compare with
Appropriations 593,947
Revenue Needed
from Tax Levy 247,500
SPECIAL REVENUE:
3 B's FUND:
Appropriations:
465 Economic
Development 33,661
Means of Finance:
310 Taxes 33,661
Est. Surplus Retained: 72,350
STREET FUND:
Appropriations:
456 Fire Alarm System 20,000
Means of Finance:
301 Taxes: 0
Est. Surplus Retained: 13,870
NOTICE OF
DEADLINE FOR
VOTER
REGISTRATION
Voter registration for the General Elec-
tion to be held on November 6, 2012, will
close on October 22, 2012. Failure to
register by this date will cause forfeiture
of voting rights for this election. If you are
in doubt about whether you are regis-
tered, check the Voter Information Portal
at HYPERLINK "http://www.sdsos.gov"
www.sdsos.gov or call the county audi-
tor at 605–837–2422.
Registration may be completed during
regular business hours at the county au-
ditor’s office, municipal finance office,
secretary of state’s office and those loca-
tions which provide driver’s licenses,
food stamps, TANF, WIC, military recruit-
ment, and assistance to the disabled as
provided by the Department of Human
Services. You may contact the county
auditor to request a mail-in registration
form or access a mail-in form at HY-
PERLINK "www.sdsos.gov "
www.sdsos.gov .
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in voter registration, absentee
voting or polling place accessibility.
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
Jackson County, SD
[Published October 4 & 11, 2012, at the
total approximate cost o at an estimated
cost of $27.96]
Public Notice
Deadline
Friday at Noon
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
August 14, 2012
CALL TO ORDER:
The West River Water Development Dis-
trict convened for their regular meeting at
the West River Water Development Dis-
trict Project Office in Murdo, SD. Chair-
man Joseph Hieb called the meeting to
order at 10:32 a.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman
Joseph Hieb declared a quorum was
present. Directors present were: Joseph
Hieb, Casey Krogman, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Absent: Marion Matt. Also
present: Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Kati
Venard, Sec./Bookkeeper; Dave Larson,
Larson Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA:
None
APPROVE AGENDA:
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the
agenda. Motion carried unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES:
The minutes of the July 19, 2012, meet-
ing were previously mailed to the Board
for their review.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the July
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS:
Joseph Hieb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Casey Krogman . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Veryl Prokop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Lorne Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72.56
Lyman County
Herald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97.57
Murdo Coyote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99.81
Pennington County
Courant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98.45
Pioneer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70.21
Todd County
Tribune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74.90
Howalt-McDowell
Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .957.00
USGS,
previously approved . . . . .10,950.00
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Smith to approve the District
bills. Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT:
The financial status of the District to date
was previously sent to the Board. A copy
of the July Financial Report is on file at
the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded
by Director Smith to approve the July Fi-
nancial Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented his August
report to the Board.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the Man-
ager’s Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
B. OTHER REPORTS:
None
SEPTEMBER BOARD MEETING:
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Smith to hold the next monthly
board meeting via teleconference on
Thursday, September 20th, 2012, at 9:00
A.M. (CT). Motion carried unanimously.
FY 2013 TAX LEVY:
County evaluations were not available
from the Dept. of Revenue to calculate
individual county tax levies for the 2013
Tax Resolution. The Board approved the
Resolution with the amounts as the state
has recommended. Individual county
levies will be provided when evaluations
are available.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the 2013
Tax Resolution with the amounts as the
state has recommended. Motion carried
unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:42 A.M.
(CT).
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
ATTEST:
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
[Published October 4, 2012 at the total
approximate cost of $42.57]
Town of Cottonwood
REGULAR MEETING
September 19, 2012
The regular meeting of the Town of Cot-
tonwood was held at Town Hall on
Wednesday evening, September 19,
2012 at 7 PM. Present were JC Heath,
Dave Griffee, Ted Degan, Bernie & Jere-
anne Hanks, Phil Stark, and Doug Hov-
land. Trenton Heath was absent. The
meeting was called to order by JC Heath.
Old Business: none.
New Business: Read the Finance report.
Phil Stark made a complaint of a dog run-
ning through his property. Phil Stark re-
quested a lien search from the Town to
see if any liens were held on his property
by the Town. With no liens being found,
the board approved the mayor to sign the
documents presented.
The following bills were approved:
Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.00
Bookkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101.00
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86.25
Checking Acct.
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,295.89
CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,814.74
With there being no other business to
discuss, the meeting was adjourned. The
next regular meeting will be held on Oc-
tober 20, 2012 – 7 p.m. at Town Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published October 4, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $14.95]
Email us at:
press@kadokatelco.com
Burglaries of business establish-
ments with video lottery devices
and ATM machines continue to be
a concern across South Dakota.
The series of burglaries began in
late August, with the most recent
report coming yesterday. A total of
six known burglaries in six coun-
ties have been reported to date.
The crimes are being committed
shortly after 2 a.m. There are some
related characteristics involving
the burglaries, but a commonality
is all burglaries have involved en-
tering video lottery devices and
ATM machines.
The Division of Criminal Inves-
tigation and local law enforcement
officials are asking the public and
small business owners to be cog-
nizant of suspicious activity in
their communities. Business own-
ers are encouraged to check the se-
curity procedures in their
establishments.
State officials are encouraging
anyone with information about the
burglaries to contact SA Mark
Black at 605-216-0937 or their
local law enforcement agency im-
mediately.
DCI seeks assistance
with video lottery and
ATM burglaries
throughout state
The South Dakota Well Drillers
Association is pleased to announce
it is offering scholarships totaling
$5,000.00 to be divided between
two deserving students.
Applicants must be a resident of
South Dakota or a relative of an in-
dividual employed by a Member
Company in good standing of the
SDWDA. Applicants must be a full-
time student of an accredited
South Dakota University or Tech-
nical School with a major emphasis
on a degree related to the water
well/groundwater industry. Areas
of study include, but are not lim-
ited to: Engineering, Geology,
Hydro-Geology, Environmental Sci-
ences, Pump Installation/Plumb-
ing, Geo-Thermal, etc.
Applications must be received by
December 1, 2012. Applications
and rules for application can be ob-
tained by contacting Dennis Du-
vall, Committee Chairman by
email at: dennis@dakotaenv.com.
Please include your mailing infor-
mation in your e-mail.
South Dakota Well
Drillers Assoc.
offers scholarships
News …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
Email us at:
press@kadokatelco.com
Farmers’
IncomeTax
Record Books
available
at the
Kadoka Press
ObamaCare, which was signed
into law in March of 2010, was
pitched to the American people as
a way to lower the cost of health
care. Throughout the 2008 election
cycle, candidate Obama repeatedly
claimed that his health care bill
would cut premiums by an average
of $2,500 per family. Unfortunately,
while the president got his health
care bill, the American people did
not get lower premiums, and in-
stead the “Affordable” Care Act has
increased the cost of premiums by
over 14 percent since the president
signed the bill into law.
The Kaiser Family Foundation
recently released the results of its
annual survey of employer-spon-
sored health insurance premiums.
According to the survey, premiums
for the average family health insur-
ance plan rose by $672 per family
this year, making the average cost
of health insurance for a family
$3,000 higher now than it was in
2008 under the previous adminis-
tration.
Increases in the price of health
insurance premiums are not just
impacting the health insurance
market. The high cost of premiums
are also stifling hiring decisions
among businesses and taking away
financial resources that would nor-
mally be invested in their busi-
nesses. For example, the health
care law contains a provision that
mandates employers include cer-
tain government-determined “es-
sential benefits” for any
employer-sponsored health plan,
leaving almost no flexibility for an
employer to determine what is best
for his or her employees. Many of
these required benefits increase
the cost of the existing plans for
employers. Due to the increased
cost of the benefits, some small em-
ployers may decide they are no
longer able to afford health insur-
ance for their employees and will
drop coverage all together. Other
larger employers may instead place
a moratorium on hiring while they
wait to determine how the cost of
including the “essential benefits” in
their health care plans impacts
their bottom line.
As President Obama cam-
paigned around the country in sup-
port of his health care law in 2009
he famously said, “If you like your
plan you can keep it.” Yet the
higher cost of premiums is already
preventing people who liked their
plan from keeping the coverage
they previously had, including in-
dividuals who have Medicare Ad-
vantage plans. According to the
Obama administration’s own esti-
mate, nearly 80 percent of small
businesses will be forced to give up
their current coverage by 2013.
I strongly believe in ensuring ac-
cess to high quality health care for
all Americans. I also believe it is
important to provide options and
choice in the marketplace, and to
allow individuals, not the federal
government, to decide on the plan
that is best for them. ObamaCare
has been built on a series of broken
promises to the American people, it
is time for Congress to repeal the
law and replace it with common
sense solutions that actually lower
costs and create choice in the mar-
ketplace.
ObamaCare: Higher costs and fewer jobs
By Senator John Thune
One of the most frightening
things I can imagine is looking my
loved ones in the eyes and not
knowing who they are. For too
many South Dakotans, Alzheimer’s
disease has turned that kind of fear
into a reality. This degenerative
disease causes problems with
memory, thinking and behavior,
and it impacts 19,000 South
Dakota seniors.
Recently, I was in Watertown to
participate in the Alzheimer’s
Walk, and was humbled to be an
honorary chairperson. Being a part
of this event and visiting with
those with Alzheimer’s as well as
caregivers was eye opening and
heart wrenching. Alzheimer’s is the
sixth leading cause of death in
America, and it cannot be pre-
vented, cured or even slowed.
But this doesn’t mean there is
nothing we can do. While research
is ongoing, the rest of us can help
by increasing awareness about
Alzheimer’s and providing support
to caregivers. For example, funds
raised by the walk in Watertown
are split evenly between national
Alzheimer’s research and support
of local programs such as a Respite
Scholarship Program, which helps
caregivers get a break from the
emotional stress of caring for some-
one with Alzheimer’s.
One thing I’ve heard often from
those in the Alzheimer’s commu-
nity is that too few understand the
challenges that people with the dis-
ease face every day. We can help
change that. September is World
Alzheimer's Month, and I want to
encourage all South Dakotans to
take a moment and think about
this disease and how they can
share love with someone with it or
someone impacted by it.
Rep. Kristi Noem is South
Dakota’s lone U.S. Representative,
elected in November 2010. She
serves on the Agriculture, Educa-
tion and Workforce and Natural
Resources Committees.
Alzheimer’s awareness
By Rep. Kristi Noem
Investing in America’s Rural
Communities
As producers face an historic
and ongoing drought today, Presi-
dent Obama and I are doing all we
can to help farmers and ranchers
mitigate its effects – while helping
communities to overcome the eco-
nomic challenges posed by the
drought.
To carry out our work on behalf
of communities and producers,
USDA has relied on programs au-
thorized by the 2008 Farm Bill.
Parts of that law, including author-
ization of USDA disaster assistance
for livestock producers, expired last
year. Other aspects of the law ex-
pire on October 1st and over the
next few months if Congress fails to
act.
Unfortunately, the House lead-
ership has left Washington without
passing a new comprehensive, mul-
tiyear Food, Farm and Jobs Bill.
When the current Farm Bill ex-
pires, this will leave producers with
needless uncertainty as they work
hard to get through the current
drought – particularly America’s
dairy producers, who will lose ac-
cess to a critical dairy safety net
program on September 30.
Inaction by Congress also
threatens USDA’s efforts to invest
in our small towns, and help grow
the rural economy. One good exam-
ple is our capacity to provide com-
munity infrastructure and facilities
across the nation.
Since 2009, USDA has made a
record level of loans and grants to
small towns to help them provide
more community services and build
more community facilities. In fact,
our efforts have made possible
more than 7,700 community facili-
ties projects nationwide, impacting
nearly 31 million rural Americans.
That includes more than 3,200
projects to improve public safety –
putting in a police or fire station,
for example, or helping a town re-
place an aging piece of fire equip-
ment.
It includes more than 1,000
medical clinics and hospitals, re-
ducing the long drives you some-
times face to visit a doctor, and
ensuring that care is readily avail-
able in case of a medical emer-
gency.
And it includes projects to im-
prove education opportunities for
rural Americans. We’ve invested in
projects to build or improve more
than 900 schools and community
colleges, along with 475 libraries,
to ensure that rural Americans
have the same educational oppor-
tunities as city residents.
These community facilities are
just one piece in our plan to em-
power rural America – and they
stand as a part of the long list of
record achievements USDA has
posted in the past three years.
At USDA, we will continue our
efforts to help producers and to in-
vest in small towns and rural com-
munities. Meanwhile we need
Congress to get their job done to
ensure that we can continue these
accomplishments in the coming
years.
Agriculture Secretary Vilsack
Mines beats Harvard by $2,600.
Why is this happening? Because
the School of Mines is offering
high-quality programs in the engi-
neering fields – where there are
lots of jobs and strong demand for
more highly skilled graduates.
In a third piece of good news,
South Dakota’s Lake Area Techni-
cal Institute (LATI) was named in
September as one of 10 finalists for
the Aspen Prize for Community
College Excellence, which is the na-
tion’s signature recognition of high
achievement and performance in
America’s community colleges.
This is the second year in a row
that LATI has been honored in this
way.
Dakota State, the School of Mines,
and LATI are not alone. Every one
of South Dakota’s universities and
technical institutes offers great
programs that prepare our stu-
dents to compete in high-demand
fields – from accounting or medi-
cine at USD, to engineering and
pharmacy at SDSU, to banking
and music education at Northern
State, to science and math educa-
tion at Black Hills State, to highly
focused programs for careers in
health care, manufacturing, elec-
trification, and other needed occu-
pations at our other great technical
institutes.
We hear a lot about the unem-
ployment rate among young people,
but that's not a big problem for
graduates from any of the pro-
grams I just mentioned. It's some-
thing for high school students to
think about as they plan for higher
education: Try to find an education
major that will get you a job at the
end.
There are plenty of great op-
tions, right here in South Dakota.
Sometimes South Dakota can
have an inferiority complex. Be-
cause we're small or because we're
rural, we sometimes think we don't
stack up with other places. But
being small and rural doesn't mean
being second-rate. Three national
news stories recently reported that
South Dakota has a lot to cele-
brate.
The October 2012 issue of Fast
Company magazine includes an ar-
ticle entitled "Schooling Cybernin-
jas." The article reports that the
National Security Agency, a part of
the U.S. Department of Defense, is
working hard to train new com-
puter security experts to protect
our nation's online infrastructure
from attacks. As the article notes,
"The goal is to create a pipeline of
government-vetted talent, and
with it, a robust line of virtual na-
tional defense."
NSA selected four universities to
launch NSA-certified cybersecurity
programs. One of those four schools
is Dakota State University. Gov.
Bill Janklow made Dakota State
"the computer school" in the 1980s,
and in the decades since, DSU has
developed cutting-edge programs
in information assurance, biomet-
rics, and other information technol-
ogy fields. DSU has a national
reputation for excellence – and it is
right here in South Dakota.
Another South Dakota univer-
sity was featured by Bloomberg
News on Sept. 18. The article,
headlined "Harvard losing out to
South Dakota in graduate pay,"
noted that while a Harvard gradu-
ate earns an average $54,100 start-
ing salary, a new graduate of the
South Dakota School of Mines and
Technology earns $56,700 on aver-
age. That's right – the School of
Great news for SD students
by Gov. Dennis Daugaard
fewer tools to help strengthen
American agriculture and grow a
rural economy that supports 1 in
12 American jobs. Authority and
funding for additional programs is
set to expire in the coming months.
Without action by the House of
Representatives on a multi-year
Food, Farm and Jobs bill, rural
communities are today being asked
to shoulder additional burdens and
additional uncertainty in a tough
time. As we continue to urge Con-
gress to give USDA more tools to
grow the rural economy, USDA will
work hard to keep producers and
farm families informed regarding
those programs which are no
longer available to them."
--Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
On October 1, 2012 Agriculture
Secretary Tom Vilsack made the
following statement on the expira-
tion of authority for 2008 Farm Bill
Programs:
"Many programs and policies of
the U.S. Department of Agriculture
were authorized under the Food,
Conservation and Energy Act of
2008 ("2008 Farm Bill") through
September 30, 2012. These include
a great number of critical programs
impacting millions of Americans,
including programs for farm com-
modity and price support, conser-
vation, research, nutrition, food
safety, and agricultural trade. As of
today, USDA's authority or funding
to deliver many of these programs
has expired, leaving USDA with far
Expiration of authority for
2008 Farm Bill programs
The South Dakota Stockgrowers'
121th Annual Convention and
Trade Show wrapped up after three
days of speakers and meetings to
update members on policies, elec-
tion of officers for the association
and adoption of several new poli-
cies.
"This year's convention was very
successful and we were glad to see
so many members and friends join
us," said Shane Kolb, President of
the Stockgrowers Association from
Meadow, SD. "We had some very in-
teresting speakers and had some
very good discussions with our
members about our policies and
work as we look to the future of our
industry."
Bill Bullard, CEO of R-CALF
USA, started off the convention on
Friday morning with a very inform-
ative presentation about a variety
of issues impacting Stockgrowers
policy on the national level. Among
other things he updated Stockgrow-
ers members on recent develop-
ments with Country of Origin
Labeling, Beef Check-off reform,
animal identification and the farm
bill process.
SD Secretary of Agriculture Walt
Bones gave the keynote address
during the Awards Banquet and
presented information regarding
the Department of Agriculture's ef-
forts to promote livestock produc-
tion, specifically feeding capacity, in
South Dakota. Bones also shared
the results of the Key Leaders
Roundtable planning session
hosted in June to help guide the De-
partment's priorities on items like
water management, youth in agri-
culture, infrastructure develop-
ment, zoning, research at SDSU
and increasing livestock produc-
tion.
George Chambers, President of
R-CALF USA addressed the audi-
ence on Friday evening. His presen-
tation urged producers to get
involved in organizations like
Stockgrowers and to represent their
industry with pride. Chambers
said, "The issues we face today will
shape our children's ability to be
successful in the cattle business.
We need every producer to be 'all in'
if we're going to keep moving for-
ward."
Greg Hanes of the U.S. Meat Ex-
port Federation based in Denver
spoke about his organizations ef-
forts to promote beef in foreign
countries. Hanes focused his pres-
entation on the growing demand for
beef in Asian countries where the
consumer purchasing power is
growing much faster than their
ability to produce quality beef. He
shared several very interesting
facts about the export opportunities
for US raised beef and comparison
to other beef producing countries'
capacity to grow their market
shares. Joining Hanes was SD Sen-
ator Shantel Krebs who spoke
about her recent trip to China.
The Brand Committee meeting
featured a panel of speakers that
included Brand Board members
Scott Vance of Faith and Wanda
Blair of Vale, and Brand Board Di-
rector Larry Stearns. The discus-
sion focused largely on the proposed
brand legislation and the recent fee
increase for inspections. The Board
is now proposing several additional
legislative changes dealing with
shippers permits, rodeo stock, and
elimination of horse inspection.
The Wildlife Committee hosted
the Wall FFA Ag Issues Team to
present their research regarding
the Adrian v. Vonk court case deal-
ing with prairie dogs in the Conata
Basin. The team of students will
travel to the National FFA Conven-
tion in October after winning the
State FFA contest last year. The
students presented the case and an-
swered questions about the case
which attempted to hold the State
of SD accountable for damages
caused by the explosion of the
prairie dog population and en-
croachment onto private lands.
Other speakers included Max
Main, attorney from Belle Fourche
speaking about oil and gas leases
on private property, U.S. Congres-
sional candidate Matt Varilek, Vicki
Olson speaking about wilderness
designations and coordination with
local governments, SD Representa-
tive Stace Nelson, SD Cattle-
women, and Dr. Amanda Blair who
spoke about her research on fetal
programming in beef cattle.
Officers Elected
During the membership meet-
ing, Stockgrowers members re-
elected Shane Kolb as the President
and Bob Fortune as Vice-president.
This is the second one-year term for
both men. Kolb is a rancher and
brand inspector from Meadow and
has been an active member of
Stockgrowers for many years. Vice-
president Fortune ranches with his
family on their operation south of
Belvidere and he serves as a mem-
ber of the South Dakota Beef Indus-
try Council.
Randy Volmer of Owanka was
elected as Region 3 Vice-president.
Marvin Jobgen will serve as Direc-
tor from District 3, and Matt Kam-
merer of Rapid City was elected to
represent District 8, replacing
Craig Shaver whose term ended
this year. Brad Bunker of Arlington
replaced Joan Wollschlager as Di-
rector in District 17.
New Policies Adopted
Stockgrowers policy platforms
that guide the Association through-
out the year are adopted by mem-
bers during the convention and this
year four committees proposed poli-
cies to be adopted.
Cattlemen's Beef Board mem-
bers Vaughn Meyer and Linda
Gilbert spoke during the conven-
tion and explained the procedure
that their committee uses to ap-
prove funding requests for Checkoff
dollars to be spent. The Marketing
committee proposed a policy that
includes several specific points for
reforming the Beef Checkoff to in-
clude more transparency and ac-
countability from contractors and to
call for the separation of the check-
off funds from policy organizations.
The policy was adopted by the
membership.
The Stockgrowers Wildlife Man-
agement Committee adopted a very
comprehensive policy that seeks to
address the funding mechanism in
the State Prairie Dog Management
Plan. The policy resolution adopted
by the members calls on the State
Dept of Ag and the SD GF&P to
fully fund the management plan as
required by the existing state law.
Stockgrowers also amended
their agriculture land taxation pol-
icy to include strong call for the con-
tinued implementation of the
production based property tax sys-
tem with an allowance for the ac-
tual use of the property rather than
a strict highest-and-best use ap-
proach currently being used.
Stockgrowers Honor Members
and Present Awards
Bill Kluck of Mud Butte, Joan
Wollschlager of Lake Preston and
Scott Edoff of Hermosa were each
presented with a Regional Work-
horse Award. The award recognizes
them for their dedication and out-
standing work to represent Stock-
growers policy, recruit members,
and support the work of the Stock-
growers Association.
Mike Maher received a new hat
from Star of the West Hat Company
and Larry Nelson received a Stock-
growers coat for recruiting the most
members in the last year. Maher re-
cruited 31 new members and Nel-
son recruited 23 throughout the
last year.
Amanda Kammerer of Rapid
City received a $1,000 Guy E Ham
Beef Industry Scholarship from the
SD Stockgrowers Association and
the SD Cattlewomen.
"This convention was a great ex-
ample of the wide number of issues
that our members are involved in
and the policies that impact so
many aspects of the ranching in-
dustry," said Kolb. "We appreciate
everyone who attended the conven-
tion and all the businesses and in-
dividuals who donated to our
auction and sponsored the events."
SD Stockgrowers host
successful convention
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
October 4, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
AUCTIONS
REAL ESTATE AUCTION, Saturday,
Oct. 20, 4 pm, Hoven, SD, Ray and
Roselyn Kaup, owners. For more in-
formation contact Gary McCloud, Lic
#13471, 605-769-1181, 605-948-
2333.
LAND AUCTION: 230+/- Acres Gre-
gory County, Cropland and Grass-
land, 12 miles northwest of Burke,
SD, October 26th , 2012. Call
Dakota Properties, Todd Schuetzle,
Auctioneer, 605-280-3115,
www.DakotaProperties.com.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
BUYING GOLD/SILVER
CONVERT YOUR GOLD, silver,
platinum into cash. Top price paid, 24
hr turn around for mail in. SD owned
business. Visit www.midwestgold-sil-
ver.com for instructions or call 605
260 4653.
EMPLOYMENT
FULL-TIME PARKS MAINTE-
NANCE: City of Canton, SD. CDL &
commercial pesticide applicator li-
cense required within 6 months.
Deadline: October 17th. www.cityof-
cantonsd.com or 605-987-2881.
EOE.
POSITION OPEN: POLICE OFFI-
CER (full-time): The City of Platte,
SD (population 1,230) is seeking full-
time law enforcement officer. Suc-
cessful candidate must be willing and
able to work independently under the
direction of Chief. Wages DOQ &
DOE. State-wide L.E.T. applications
accepted. Interested applicants
should call Chief Brandon Semmler
at (605) 337-2144. Please send ap-
plication and resume to: City of
Platte, PO Box 236, Platte, SD
57369. Applications accepted from
Sept. 19, 2012 through Oct. 10,
2012. The City of Platte is an EOE.
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Shauna Meyerink, City Finance Offi-
cer.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full-time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A Dri-
ver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance preferred. For application con-
tact: Douglas County Auditor (605)
724-2423.
KTC CONSTRUCTION seeks em-
ployees, both part-time and full-time.
Excellent pay/benefits! Underground
plumbing, digging, trenching, operat-
ing equipment. Willing to train. Sub-
mit resumes to
rodb@kennebectel ephone.com.
Questions, call 605-869-2220.
FOR SALE
2007 LEXUS RX 350. $22,500.
Black with leather. 4 door sport utility.
4 wheel drive. 6 cylinder, automatic.
Excellent condition. 74,000 miles.
605-484-0793.
HOUSING
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT apartment listings, sorted by
rent, location and other options.
www.sdhousingsearch.com SOUTH
DAKOTA HOUSING DEVELOP-
MENT AUTHORITY.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
1200 ACRE LAKE $29,900 clear
water, excellent fishing, large parcel
w/ 100’ shore; Glacial Lakes region
NE SD. Thousand Lakes Realty of
Minnesota. 866-346-7006.
www.1000LakesMN.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
Stop by the
Kadoka Press
for back issues of the paper
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
KADOKA PRESS
Call 605-837-2259
to start your
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today!
Read when you want!
Where you want!
Catch up on the
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time with an
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of the
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
Fire Arm Close Out Sale!
Hogen’s
Hardware
Main Street, Kadoka • 605-837-2274 • 888-411-1657
All shotguns, rifles &
used handguns
15% OFF Retail
While supplies last.
See Don today!
NOW HIRING! Certified Nurses
Aide Position. Full/part-time avail-
able. Benefits for full time. Please
Contact Heidi or Nikki at 837-2270.
KP12-2tc
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday, No-
vember 4, 2012 at the Kadoka City
Auditorium. Booths available. Call
Ruby at 605-837-2270. KP12-2tc
POSITIONS OPEN: Kadoka Area
School District is looking for coaches
for the upcoming winter sports:
Head girls basketball coach; 5-6
Girls basketball Kadoka; 7-8 girls
basketball Kadoka; 5th-8th girls bas-
ketball Interior; Assistant boys bas-
ketball coach; 5th-6th Boys
basketball coach Kadoka; 7th-8th
Boys basketball coach Kadoka. If in-
terested send a letter of interest and
resume to Kadoka Area School, At-
tention George Seiler, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543 or complete and
submit a non-certified application
that is available on the web-site
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us EOE.
KP11-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Superintendent position.
Experience in road/bridge construc-
tion/maintenance. Supervisory/ad-
ministrative experience preferred.
Position open until filled. Information
(605) 837-2410 or (605) 837-2422;
Fax (605) 837-2447.
KP10-3tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Thanks to the Kadoka and
Belvidere Fire Departments and all
the other fire departments for their
work on the grass fire at exit 177 on
Wednesday, September 19. Be-
cause of the work of so many fire
fighters, the flames were kept from
the homes of two families in our
church.
Gary McCubbin
Pastor of the Oakton Church
A heartfelt thanks to all those who
helped me celebrate my 90th! I
treasure each greeting – they will all
be my 2012 keepsakes!
Marie Addison
What a great way to celebrate 40
years of togetherness. Thanks for all
the wonderful wishes, beautiful
cards, and to those who shared in
our special day. A very special
thanks, from the bottom of our
hearts, to our daughter, son, daugh-
ter-in-laws, and grandchildren for all
you did to make a spectacular day
for us.
May God bless,
Stephen & Linda Riggins
Thank you to the Lacreek Electric
crew who stopped on their way by
and to the Green Valley, Long Valley,
Interior, Kadoka, and Martin Fire De-
partments and our friends and
neighbors who helped fight the fire
at our place. Thank goodness for
your fast response and a road, we
still have our homes.
Stanley & Shirley Porch
Matt & Cheryl Porch
Colby & Sarah Porch
Thank Yous
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers........................................10-6
Handrahan Const .........................9-7
Shad’s Towing ...............................8-8
Dakota Bar....................................8-8
Petersen’s ......................................8-8
Badland’s Auto ............................5-11
Highlights:
Gail Reutter...........5-7 split; 201/564
Andrew Reckling...................225/554
Brian Pearson .......................214/558
Tena Slovek...........................179/503
Trina Brown..........................181/495
Jason Petersen3-10 split x2; 202/541
Bryan Buxcel ................5-6 split; 537
Maralynn Burns....................171/472
Neal Petersen..................3-5-10 split
Vickie Petersen.....................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Invisibles.....................................12-4
Cutting Edge Salon.....................11-5
Bowling Belles ............................10-6
State Farm Ins..............................7-9
Jolly Ranchers ............................6-10
Ghost Team.................................2-14
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........................193/490
Beth Kennedy ..............................162
Audrey Jones.........................154/429
Debbie Gartner ............................154
Sandee Gittings ...........................152
Sandra O’Connor..................5-7 split
Beth Stewart ........................2-7 split
Marti Kjerstad......................2-7 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Morrison’s Haying.......................11-5
Dakota Bar..................................11-5
Hildebrand Concrete ....................9-7
Dorothy’s Catering........................9-7
First National Bank ...............8.5-7.5
Chiefie’s Chicks.......................7.5-8.5
Just Tammy’s ..............................5-11
Wall Food Center ........................3-13
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz...............................177
Val Schulz..............................174/492
Marlis Petersen.....................193/470
Amy Morrison ..............................478
Jackie Shull..................................180
Debbie Gartner ............................178
Cristi Ferguson............................176
Cindy VanderMay ...........6-7-10 split
Beth Kennedy.......................5-7 split
Stacey Schulz......................5-10 split
Sandee Gittings..................2-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
King Pins...............................14.5-1.5
Cristi’s Crew................................11-5
Roy’s Repair ............................9.5-6.5
Randy’s Spray Service..................5-7
Lee and the Ladies .......................4-8
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Aaron Richardson .........212, 200/580
Kelly Fees..............................198/512
Cory Boyd..............................213/606
Brenda Grenz...............................180
Brian Pearson......3-10 split; 209/551
Bart Guptill..................................549
Alvin Pearson...............................537
Ed Morrison..........................5-6 split
Cristi Ferguson.....................5-6 split
Agricul ture …
September 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 10
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCT. 9: SPECIAL FEEDER CATTLE & ALLBREEDS CALF
SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE. YEARLINGS 10:00 A.M. CALVES
11:00 A.M. MT EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 9000
HEAD.
YEARLINGS:
PETERSON RANCH 80 BLK STRS; HOME RAISED, NI ................................................750#
ROGHAIR 23 BLK OPEN HFRS ...................................................................................700750#
MANSFIELD 5 BLK STRS...............................................................................................750800#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
O’CONNOR 600 CHAR X CLVS; FS.............................................................................500650#
REINERT, JONES & SALT FORK RN 500 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...................450575#
MCPHERSON & MCPHERSON 500 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,
ALL HFRS IN TOWN.....................................................................................................350450#
BURNS 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS......................................................................................500575#
TRIPLE S LAND & LIVESTOCK 400 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI ...........................450575#
M. WILLIAMS 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS.................................................................................600#
ARNESON & ARNESON 300 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV...............................................450575#
HEATHERSHAW 300 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .....................................................................500525#
O’DEA 300 BLK, BWF & A FEW HERF CLVS; FS ....................................................475575#
BUCHERT & BUCHERT 285 RED CLVS; FS .............................................................500600#
WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK 270 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................450550#
WILLERT & WILLERT 250 CHAR X CLVS; FS.........................................................600650#
COLLINS 235 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................................................500600#
LONG 230 CHAR X & A FEW BLK STRS; FS,NI .......................................................500600#
RICARD 200 BLK, BWF, & RWF CLVS; FS .................................................................400450#
PIROUTEK 200 CHAR X CLVS; FS..............................................................................550650#
R. WILLIAMS 180 CHAR RED ANG X STRS; FS..............................................................650#
GABRIEL EST 180 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.............................................................500550#
JENSEN 170 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS.......................................................................................550#
MOODY 160 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS .............................................................................500550#
STABEN 150 RED & BLK CLVS; FS ..............................................................................550650#
GRUBL, WHITEHEAD & LAMPHERE 140 BLK & CHAR CLVS; FS,NI ............550600#
AMIOTTE 135 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI....................................................................500580#
BALDWIN 135 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................500600#
CARLBOM 130 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................................525#
STUCK 130 BLK, BWF & FEW CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI..............................................600650#
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS 125 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ..........................................500525#
KEARNS 125 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................475550#
BAKER & THOMPSON 120 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................450600#
MORELL LIVESTOCK CO 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI......................................400525#
WULF 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................................................450575#
KARP FAMILY 90 RED & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................500600#
POURIER 90 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS.............................................................................550600#
PETERSON & PETERSON 85 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,AN.................................500600#
URBANIK 80 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................................500575#
RANTAPAA 80 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................550600#
HUMPHREY & WOLF 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..............................................................400500#
SHULL 70 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................................................500550#
SHARP 70 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................................................500#
HUNSAKER RANCH 60 BWF FIRST X CLVS; FS,NI,AN, ALL HFRS IN TOWN.....550#
ROVERE 60 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................................................450550#
HUNSAKER RANCH 60 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI,AN..........................................500600#
PFIEFER 50 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................................................................450#
MCCORMICK 50 BLK CLVS; FS...................................................................................550600#
HOFFMAN 50 BLK & RED STRS; FS,NI .............................................................................500#
SWANSON 50 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................................525625#
SIMONS 40 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ................................................................................500600#
BEARHEELS 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................450500#
COUCH 30 CERT RED ANG STRS; FS,NI,ASV,WEANED.....................................500600#
SOLOMON INC 24 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................................550600#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE &
REGULAR CATTLE SALE. WEIGHUPS 10:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE 12:00 P.M.
MT EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
BRED HEIFERS:
SCOTT CUNY 70 FANCY BLK HOME RAISED HFRS; BRED:LBW BLK; CLV:325
FOR 60 DAYS
JERRY LANE JOHNSTON 27 BLK HFRS; BRED:LBW SHEARER BLK ANG; CLV:3
22 FOR 30 DAYS
STOCK COWS:
ALLEN HOCKENBARY “COMPLETE DIPSERSION” 20 BLK 3 YR OLD TO BRO
KEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLAIRE BROS; CLV: 310 FOR 60 DAYS
RICK KING & SONS “AGE DISPERSION” 190 BLK 8 YR OLD TO BROKEN
MOUTH COWS; BRED: LIM; CLV:41 RANCH TESTED
BUTCH & NEAL LIVERMONT 70 BLK YOUNG TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS;
BRED: BLK; CLV: 31 FOR 60 DAYS
LARRY VOLMER 45 BLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 31
DARREL STEFFES 40 BLK 5 TO 9 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 41 FOR 60
DAYS
GRANT SHEARER 30 BLK BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED: SPEAR U BLK ANG;
CLV: 310
BONENBERGER RANCH 25 BLK SOLID TO BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:
BLK; CLV: 21 FOR 60 DAYS
JIM SILBERNAGEL 8 BLK & HERF 5 T0 8 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 41
ROBERT GRAV 5 BLK 7 TO 8 YR OLD COWS; BRED: BLK; CLV: 210
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 17: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6
WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PASTEURELLA, 7WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
& THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 25: NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 31, & NOV. 7.
CATTL£ R£PORT TU£S., OCT. 2, 2DJ2
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íu)gc c)oud o] Iuuc)s uítI no)c ]u)nc) ]ccdc)s on tIc
scuts. Mo)c uctíuítu und conpctítíon on tIc tIc cuíucs. Suíc
uus ouc) Iu b.l5 p.n., scíííng b,9UU Icud. 9,UUU cuíucs to
scíí Ic)c ncxt Tucsduu. Suíc tínc lU.UU AM. VcígI-up cut-
tíc on Vcdncsduus.
CALVES:
GERAD & MEGAN JULSON - WALL
100.........................................DLK STFS 490=........$190.00
33...........................................DLK STFS 375=........$208.00
37 ..........................................DLK HFFS 381=........$170.75
LARRY SMITH - PHILIP
111.........................................DLK STFS 503=........$173.00
98...........................................DLK STFS 397=........$205.00
TODD O'CONNOR - PHILIP
95.........................................CHAF STFS 532=........$171.25
79.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 465=........$179.50
30.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 363=........$205.00
98 ........................................CHAF HFFS 530=........$160.75
112.....................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 441=........$158.00
13 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 328=........$168.00
CODY WEYER - HOWES
72...........................................DLK STFS 507=........$170.00
35...........................................DLK STFS 409=........$205.50
86 ..........................................DLK HFFS 472=........$158.00
32 ..........................................DLK HFFS 387=........$173.00
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL - QUINN
117 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 520=........$169.00
104 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 467=........$184.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF
100.........................................DLK STFS 478=........$181.25
93...........................................DLK STFS 402=........$210.25
124 ........................................DLK HFFS 440=........$166.00
68 ..........................................DLK HFFS 371=........$175.25
JIM LINT2 - HERMOSA
26...........................................DLK STFS 596=........$162.50
HOWARD & DELORIS KNUPPE-NEW UNDERWOOD
91 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 408=........$208.50
12 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 303=........$214.50
JERRY & MIKE MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
100 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 531=........$169.00
46...........................................DLK STFS 522=........$168.00
BILLY MARKWED - MIDLAND
43...........................................DLK STFS 544=........$167.25
7.............................................DLK STFS 442=........$186.00
43 ..........................................DLK HFFS 516=........$158.25
ROBERT BARRY - NEW UNDERWOOD
66 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 488=........$174.00
21 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 401=........$206.00
PAUL SCHNOSE - BUFFALO GAP
71...........................................DLK STFS 448=........$185.50
15...........................................DLK STFS 358=........$210.00
62 ..........................................DLK HFFS 398=........$168.50
REUBEN VOLLMER, JR - MIDLAND
24...........................................DLK STFS 551=........$169.25
TOM & SHELIA TRASK & FAMILY - WASTA
134 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 412=........$196.25
100.........................................DLK STFS 302=........$218.50
29...........................................DLK STFS 220=........$243.00
127..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 370=........$174.25
109 ........................................DLK HFFS 284=........$188.00
LU ROSETH - PHILIP
23 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 523=........$168.00
23 ..........................................DLK HFFS 500=........$158.00
JASON & PAUL PAULSEN - WALL
86 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 514=........$169.75
14...........................................DLK STFS 409=........$201.00
26 ..........................................DLK HFFS 449=........$158.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND - RED OWL
73...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 512=........$168.00
56...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 406=........$203.00
52 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 453=........$161.50
32 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 355=........$173.00
LARRY VOLMER - OWANKA
60...........................................DLK STFS 569=........$163.00
10...........................................DLK STFS 444=........$184.50
72................................DLK & DWF HFFS 537=........$153.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 435=........$160.75
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
46...........................................DLK STFS 548=........$165.00
EDDIE GRUBL - STURGIS
90 ................................FED & DLK STFS 518=........$164.75
34.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 436=........$189.50
97................................FED & DLK HFFS 491=........$155.00
45................................FED & DLK HFFS 438=........$158.50
TOM & MAX BOWEN - NEWELL
56 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 535=........$165.75
31 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 431=........$181.00
21................................DLK & DWF HFFS 482=........$153.00
12................................DLK & DWF HFFS 381=........$165.25
LARRY & CHASE GRAVATT - ELM SPRINGS
85 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 470=........$176.00
7.............................................DLK STFS 334=........$208.00
63 ..........................................DLK HFFS 439=........$159.50
JAMES WILSEY - OWANKA
48...........................................DLK STFS 519=........$168.00
11...........................................DLK STFS 410=........$199.00
33 ..........................................DLK HFFS 489=........$152.00
DARRELL STEFFES - VALE
47...........................................DLK STFS 505=........$167.75
44 ..........................................DLK HFFS 467=........$156.50
JT MOON - CREIGHTON
103.........................................DLK STFS 497=........$167.50
54...........................................DLK STFS 428=........$186.00
16...........................................DLK STFS 416=........$186.00
ROBERT & ERIC JONES - ENNING
104 ........................................FED STFS 495=........$167.50
113 ........................................FED STFS 418=........$191.25
107........................................FED HFFS 435=........$181.00
39..........................................FED HFFS 362=........$174.00
JARMAN RANCH - MIDLAND
95 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 589=........$159.25
48 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 487=........$172.75
72................................DLK & DWF HFFS 511=........$151.00
12................................DLK & DWF HFFS 412=........$163.00
TIM & PAULA SCHAACK - EDGEMONT
31...........................................DLK STFS 521=........$164.00
30 ..........................................DLK HFFS 471=........$157.00
GRANT SHEARER - WALL
57...........................................DLK STFS 480=........$173.50
22...........................................DLK STFS 415=........$202.50
43 ..........................................DLK HFFS 431=........$160.00
DALLIS BASEL & RYAN LAMONT - UNION CENTER
62 ..........................................FED STFS 507=........$163.25
19 ..........................................FED STFS 417=........$190.00
HLAVKA RANCH - HOWES
26...........................................DLK STFS 494=........$168.00
42 ..........................................DLK HFFS 435=........$160.25
BUNK WHITE - NEW UNDERWOOD
13...........................................DLK STFS 415=........$189.50
DAN & JOHN OLDENBERG - PHILIP
19 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 453=........$178.00
38 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 472=........$171.50
12...........................................DLK STFS 372=........$196.00
EUGENE & GLENDA HELMS - CREIGHTON
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 472=........$174.50
LAWRENCE & LORETTA SCHREIBER - QUINN
20...........................................DLK STFS 487=........$173.50
10 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 356=........$201.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 443=........$160.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 353=........$174.00
ROGER SHULL - WALL
21 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 579=........$156.75
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 518=........$150.00
GERALD MCFARLAND - RAPID CITY
42..DLK, FED & CHAF STFS; SPFINC SHOTS 484=........$166.50
10..DLK, FED & CHAF STFS; SPFINC SHOTS 419=........$180.50
27.DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS; SPFINC SHOTS 454=........$152.00
RYAN VIG & CHUCK VANSICKEL - OPAL
38................................FWF & DWF STFS 537=........$163.00
20................................FWF & DWF STFS 508=........$154.00
14 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 519=........$149.50
16 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 472=........$144.50
BUD IRELAND - BOX ELDER
16...........................................DLK STFS 534=........$161.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 498=........$152.00
MARK KIEFFER - RAPID CITY
80...........................................DLK STFS 626=........$157.75
80 ..........................................DLK HFFS 596=........$146.50
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 507=........$157.00
BEAU BENDIGO - HOWES
37.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 576=........$157.50
22 ................................FED & DLK STFS 432=........$184.00
41 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 428=........$153.75
12 ........................................CHAF HFFS 580=........$145.00
JIM SCULL - RAPID CITY
31...........................................DLK STFS 593=........$155.00
10...........................................DLK STFS 469=........$175.00
RONNIE TWISS - INTERIOR
20...........................................DLK STFS 621=........$154.25
22 ..........................................DLK HFFS 581=........$140.00
MARK SLOVEK - WANBLEE
31...........................................DLK STFS 557=........$153.25
11...........................................DLK STFS 433=........$182.50
12 ..........................................DLK HFFS 488=........$150.00
PAT COY - HILL CITY
18...........................................DLK STFS 628=........$150.50
10 ..........................................DLK HFFS 551=........$147.00
BILLY AMIOTTE - WANBLEE
12 ................................FED & DLK STFS 568=........$149.50
12................................FED & DLK HFFS 510=........$144.00
ROSS LAMPHERE - STURGIS
21...........................................DLK STFS 716=........$142.00
YEARLINGS:
KENNETH MCILRAVY - PHILIP
61 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 813=........$143.75
TABLE TOP RANCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
26 .........................................LH X STFS 610=........$126.00
46 .................................LH X SPAY HFFS 586=........$129.00
WISHARD & MANGUS - LANTRY
35........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 657=........$141.50
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Healthy Snacks
While Hunting
The fall colors are starting to ap-
pear and the air is getting crisp. It
is that time of the year when
hunters are out walking long dis-
tances trying to locate their prey.
Many hunters are so intent on
their mission of hunting that they
begin their day with sunrise and
can go hours and hours without
taking a break. Many hunters
don’t associate their hunting activ-
ities with exercise, even though
they are getting quite a workout.
With good planning, hunters can
pack enough healthy snacks to
have the energy they need to com-
fortably make it through the day.
Eating well and staying hy-
drated are vital to having a posi-
tive hunting experience. Don’t
forget to drink before getting
thirsty. If you wait until you feel
thirsty, you have already become
dehydrated. Pack frozen or par-
tially frozen bottled water to enjoy
through the day.
There is a lot of junk food that
falls into the “fast” and “easy”
snacking categories such as sodas,
chips and candy bars. It takes only
a little time and effort to make
your own healthy snacks to pack.
Items you may want to include are
whole wheat crackers, fresh fruit
such as an apple, orange or ba-
nana (which are naturally
portable), a fruit smoothie in a
thermos, or fiber-rich cereal eaten
dry from a baggie.
Trail mix is a good snack to con-
sider and it is easy to grab and go.
Mix together any combination of
nuts, raisins, pretzels and whole-
grain cereals and store in individ-
ual bags. The nuts are a good
source of protein and raisins are a
nutrient dense source of natural
energy, vitamins and minerals.
Mix yogurt raisins, dried fruit and
cranberries in your trail mix for
creative variations.
Consider packing a small, insu-
lated backpack with reusable ice
packs or frozen 100% juice boxes to
keep perishables food safe. Pack
yogurt with granola, frozen grapes,
low-fat cheese cubes, vegetable
sticks with low-fat dressing pack-
ets, leftover slices of turkey or
chicken, or pickles (wrapped in
plastic or foil). These snacks use
small amounts of space in a back-
pack, but would serve as tasty,
healthy treats throughout the day.
By planning your nutritious
snacks when hunting, you can pre-
vent between-meal hunger and
avoid overeating later. Obtain
“Quick Facts for Men: Keep Your-
self Tuned Up With Good Nutri-
tion” by going to
http://bit.ly/QezxuI courtesy of
NDSU Extension Service.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Controlling Prairie Dogs
Although prairie dogs currently
inhabit a small percentage of their
original range, they can severely
reduce the available grazing in
areas where they are established.
The reduction in grazing becomes
particularly noticeable in dry
years, as grass production is signif-
icantly less than years with good
rainfall.
There are biological, cultural
and mechanical methods of control
that can be used to help manage
prairie dogs, but producers gener-
ally rely most heavily on chemical
(baits and fumigants) control
methods. Zinc phosphide has been
the bait control option for many
years, with aluminum phosphide
and gas cartridges providing the
fumigant options. Rozol was ap-
proved for a brief time in South
Dakota, and after being removed
from the registered products for
prairie dog control, will again be
allowed beginning October 1, 2012.
If you are planning to apply
Rozol, it’s important to know that
there are some key label changes
from the previous period when it
was registered in South Dakota.
The treatment period is now Octo-
ber 1 to March 15, with no mention
of “spring green-up”. According to
the current label, the applicator
must return to the site within 4
days after the bait application, and
at 1 to 2 day intervals to collect
and properly dispose of any bait or
dead and dying prairie dogs found
on the surface. These inspections
must continue for at least 2 weeks,
but longer if carcasses are still
being found. The label outlines
specific requirements for conduct-
ing the inspections and disposing
of the bait and dead or dying
prairie dogs and other informa-
tion.
The Rozol label must be in-
cluded when buying the product,
and can be accessed online at:
http://www.cdms.net/LDat/ld98B0
10.pdf.
South Dakota’s Rank in
United States Agriculture
The USDA National Ag Statis-
tics Service reports that in 2011,
South Dakota ranked first in al-
falfa hay, all hay, bison and sun-
flower seed production. The
sunflower seed production ranking
may be temporary, as North
Dakota’s acreage was down sub-
stantially in 2011 because of wet
planting conditions.
South Dakota also ranked third
in flaxseed, honey, and proso millet
production, as well as lambs born.
The Rushmore state came in
fourth in oat and sorghum for
grain production, and fifth for beef
cows that have calved and land in
farms and ranches. Included in the
sixth place ranking were all sheep
and lambs, all wheat production,
calves born, corn for grain, durum
wheat, heifers 500 lbs and over,
market sheep and lambs, other
spring wheat production and win-
ter wheat production.
Falling into the seventh place
category was harvested acreage of
principal crops, and steers 500 lbs
and over, while the eighth place in-
cluded all cattle and calves, cattle
and calves on feed, and soybean
production. Finally, South Dakota
ranked ninth in all other hay pro-
duction and pigs born.
For more information, visit:
http://www.nass.usda.gov/sd/.
Calendar
10/16-18/2012 – SDSU Extension
Annual Conference, Brookings, SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Cow-calf producers can assess
the value of their cattle and gain
valuable performance information
with the 2012-2013 Calf Value Dis-
covery Program, offered by SDSU,
says Julie Walker, SDSU Extension
Beef Specialist.
"The CVDP is a exceptional way
for cow-calf producers to get sci-
ence-based data that can make a
difference in their operations,"
Walker said. "Once they enter cat-
tle into the program, they will re-
ceive updates on performance and
that information can help them to
make better management deci-
sions. Many producers have used
this program to increase their op-
erational profit."
There is cost for the CVDP per
head for registration. Producers
will consign a minimum of five 500-
to 800-pound steers to the pro-
gram. Extension and SDSU staff
will feed those cattle in an acceler-
ated finishing program at Vander-
Wal Yards near Bruce, S.D.
Cow-calf producers must sign up
before October 15. To do so, they
can complete a participation form
and send payment to Julie Walker,
South Dakota State University,
Box 2170, Brookings, SD 57007.
Call Walker at 605-688-5458 or e-
mail questions to her at this ad-
dress: Julie.Walker@sdstate.edu.
Questions can also be addressed to
Warren Rusche at 605-882-5140 or
email questions to him at
Warren.Rusche@sdstate.edu .
The CVDP Web site is available
at this link:
www.sdstate.edu/ars/species/beef/c
alf-value/index.cfm. From the site,
producers can get information on
the costs, data they will receive,
and download registration forms.
Producers should make checks
payable to SDSU Department of
Animal Science. Staff will receive
cattle at the Cottonwood Agricul-
tural Experiment Station near
Philip, S.D., on Oct. 22, or at Van-
derWal Yards near Bruce on Oct. 23
or 24.
"Groups of cattle will be sold in
truckload lots using a grid pricing
system starting on approximately
May 15," Walker said.
"We require that the cattle en-
tered into the program be dehorned
and castrated, as well as healed,
before they arrive at the feedlot,"
Walker said. "Calves do not have to
be weaned or pre-conditioned to
participate, be we do ask that cow-
calf producers let us know before
they arrive so that we may admin-
ister vaccinations and de-worming
treatments upon arrival for calves
that are not pre-conditioned."
The program will finance feed,
yardage and veterinary bills of the
cattle in the program, and any
death loss will be shared among
participants. Walker said the pro-
gram can benefit cow-calf produc-
ers in South Dakota.
"We had solid participation in
the program last year and invite
producers to return, and we're
happy to answer questions for
other producers who have not tried
the CVDP," Walker said.
Sign up for SDSU
Calf Discovery
program ends
Oct. 15
Newsprint
End Rolls
$5.00 each
Great for craft
projects, painting,
drawing & more
Kadoka Press
West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water Systems, Inc.
23rd Annual
Meeting
Wednesday, October 10
Wall Community Center
Main Street • Wall, SD
Registration: 2:00 p.m (MT)
Business Meeting: 2:30 p.m. (MT)
Each membership will receive a
$10 water certificate at registration.
Appetizers and refreshments
will be served.

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