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Kadoka Press, October 24, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 107
Number 15
October 24, 2013
Math night held at Kadoka School
City council awards bids for hail damage
Robyn Jones
Several students, along with their parents, enjoyed math night that was held at the Kadoka School on Tuesday, October 22. Student could
play a variety of math games and prizes were given. Jody Stout (L) and her son, Gus, Tagg Weller, Jadyn Coller, and Jessica Magelkey play
a math card game Spot it!
Robyn Jones
Issac Sitting Up and Arlene Hicks measure the pumpkin around the center in inches
and centimeters.
Long Valley Fire Dept.
reschedules hog roast
and dance to Nov. 2
Micki Word is the October Resident of the Month at the Kadoka
Nursing Home.
Born on March 19, 1940, to Tony and Rose Wald, Micki grew up
in Zeeland, N.D. The only girl of the family with four younger
brothers.
“Growing up I was a daddy’s girl,” Micki said with a smile. “Al-
ways right there with my Dad, helping him work.”
The family lived on a farm just on the edge of Zeeland, where
they raised cattle and pigs, raised farmland crops, a huge garden
and milked 60 cows.
“I hated milking cows and I still hate it,” she said laughing. “I
told my dad, when I grow up and I leave, I’m never milking another
cow again, and since then I never have.”
Even though she didn’t like milking the cows, she helped with
it every morning and night. Being outside helping and working
along side her dad was what she wanted to do.
“I love doing what ever my dad was doing,” she said, “I never
cared to cook, and still don’t, so dad took me with him.”
When not working on the farm, Micki played baseball with
school team. She played all through school and never missed a
game.
“The only organized sport we had was baseball,” said Micki, “and
I played second base and did some pitching.”
Graduating from Zeeland High School with 20 classmates, Micki
went on to attend University Southern North Dakota in Bismark,
ND.
“My dad only had a fourth grade education and he worked hard
all his life with the goal of providing an education for all his kids,”
she shared, “he sent all five of us to college and paid for it all.
“ I majored in physical education and my dad was not im-
pressed,” she laughed, “he said girls are supposed to be nurses, not
PE teachers.”
As a joke, Micki threatened to run away if she had to study nurs-
ing, so she was able to study physical education.
After two and-a-half years of college, Micki moved to Minneapo-
lis with two of her friends she had met at college.
“I really enjoyed living in Minneapolis,” she said smiling, “com-
ing from a town of 100 people there was so much to do. And I went
to as many baseball games as I could!”
That was until the Minnesota Vikings started playing football.
“I bought season tickets to the Vikings,” she said, “I was so ex-
cited, I loved going to the games, and without a season pass the
tickets were $8.00 a piece.”
When asked if she was strong Vikings fan she replied “...no, I
only went because I love to watch football.” For several years, she
was a devoted Green Bay Packers fan, but not so much anymore
and tends to follow the Kansas City Chiefs more. As for college foot-
ball, she always has her TV tuned in to watch Notre Dame.
“I’ve always loved sports and I remember growing up we would
sit by the radio and listen to any game that would come in,” she
said, “the New York Yankees were always on and even on the radio
I could learn to know the players and their numbers.”
After living in Minneapolis for 12 years and working at a bank,
she met a new employee named Bob Word.
“Bob had just got out of the Navy and started working at the
same bank that I worked at,” she said, “not too long after that, we
were married on November 11, 1968, at the justice of the peace.”
After they were married, they returned to Bob’s hometown,
Kadoka, and never left. This is where they raised their three chil-
dren, Jim, Jodi, and Jennifer.
“After we moved to Kadoka, Bob worked on different ranches
and I stayed home for a few years to be Mom,” she said smiling.
After Jim and Jodi went to school, Micki started working at the
Kadoka School as a secretary and teacher’s aide.
“Working at the school was a good job for,” she shared, “I was
able to meet people and be around kids. I really enjoyed the kids
and the staff I worked with.”
At the school Micki started saving Campbell’s Soup labels, with
hopes and dreams of providing the students with a new playground
equipment.
“Kids have so much energy it’s important to be able to use it up
outside the classroom,” she said.
Although several thousand labels were collected, it was hard to
collect enough with the rising costs of the equipment. Other fund
raisers were held at after 13 years of saving, the first section of
new playground equipment was installed, and soon after it was
complete.
“I loved and cared for all those kids and it brought them so much
excitement to have the new playground equipment,” she said, “it
never felt like a job because I was doing what I liked to do.”
After 33 years at the school Micki retired in June 2011.
Still a sports fanatic, Micki is a close follower of the Kadoka
Kougars and attends as many games as possible. When not watch-
ing sports, she is avid reader and enjoys doing word puzzles.
Micki has been a resident at the home since January 2013.
“We really love and enjoy having Micki here with us,” said the
staff at KNH, “she has a tremendous amount of enthusiasm and
support of our youth!”
Congratulations to Micki on being Resident of the Month.
Natural Resource Conservation
Service offers help following
Atlas blizzard for recovery
As fall rapidly gave way to winter on the weekend of October 4-5, the Long
Valley Fire Department has chosen a new date for their annual fundraiser.
Blizzard conditions forced the department to reschedule the yearly event for
November 2 from 5:30 p.m. to midnight. Donations given at the fall fundraiser
are used for yearly maintenance on each of the fire trucks as well as the ex-
penses to heat the building.
This year’s supper, featuring pit roasted barbecue pork and lots of home-
made side dishes and desserts, will begin at 5:30 on Saturday evening Novem-
ber 2, with door prizes for people of all ages given away all through the evening.
This year’s door prizes feature several from local businesses who generously
donated, so make sure you come early and sign up before you enjoy a meal of
pit-roasted barbecued pork, cowboy potatoes, baked beans and much more.
The music at the Long Valley dance this year promises not to disappoint,
with Uncle Roy and the Boys taking the stage for the dance at 8:00. Band front
man “Uncle” Roy King is a country music legend in South Dakota, having been
inducted into the South Dakota Country Music Hall of Fame in 2012. Roy
fronts a very talented group of musicians, including Casey Bauman of Kadoka
on the drums. Uncle Roy’s boys feature lead guitarist Mike Donker and the fa-
ther/son duo of Mike and Matt Nepodal. Matt is the bass player and vocalist,
while Mike provides a variety of sounds on the piano, sax and harmonica.
Whether you’re looking to kick up your heels or simply listen to some great
country music, we welcome you to the legendary Long Valley Hall for the
evening.
A free will donation will be taken at the door. Even if you’re not from the
Long Valley area, come and enjoy a great evening of food and dancing. All are
welcome and we hope to see you there!
by Dave Ohrtman
Although there were not many items
listed on the agenda for the Kadoka City
Council meeting that was held Monday, Oc-
tober 14, opening bids for repair work due
to hail damage consumed the meeting time.
The buildings needing repairs were di-
vided into seven projects. Bids were re-
ceived from Terkildsen Construction and
Home Masters. All bids were opened, re-
viewed and discussed. Itemized bids and
cashier checks were received from Terkild-
sen Construction on six of the projects. The
bids received from Home Masters did not
included an itemized statement and only
one cashier check was received for all seven
projects.
Home Masters stated that they would do
the work that was outlined in the lost re-
port from the insurance company, but there
were several items that need to be re-
paired/replaced that the insurance did not
include. They stated that they would con-
tact the insurance company to notify them
of the extra repairs to see if they would in-
clude them on the lost report.
It was questioned by the council whether
the bids from Home Masters complied with
the bid specifications that were advertised.
A motion carried to table awarding the bids
and to contact the City Attorney Alvin
Pahlke for clarification to verify the bids
submitted met the specifications. A special
meeting was schedule for Wednesday, Octo-
ber 16 to award the bids after they were dis-
cussed with the attorney.
No council reports were given for the
water and sewer, solid waste, or public
safety departments. The manhole was re-
placed south of the city swimming pool on
Poplar Street was the only item in the
street report. Dick Stolley stated that the
doors to the locker rooms have been re-
placed and Billie Jo Eisenbraun is trying to
have the light installation done between
the fall and winter sports seasons.
At the special meeting on Wednesday,
October 16, Mayor Harry Weller stated that
he and Patty Ulmen had contacted City At-
torney Alvin Pahlke. Copies of the bids
were faxed to him and after reviewing the
bids, Pahlke recommended that all bids re-
ceived from Home Masters be rejected since
they did not meet the bid specifications.
Motions carried to accept the bids from
Terkildsen Construction for the needed re-
pairs on the auditorium, bar, swimming
pool, pump houses, shop and garage, fire
hall, museum, and the rodeo grounds.
No bids were received for repairs needed
at the transfer station. A motion carried to
advertise for bids at the transfer station.
by Robyn Jones
Agricultural producers working their way through Atlas Blizzard recovery
may find help through the USDA says Jeff Zimprich, state conservationist,
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Huron. “We’re open
and here to help. Blizzard recovery is far greater than any one organization or
agency. NRCS’ professional conservation services can help farmers and ranch-
ers pull through the devastation caused by Atlas.”
The NRCS specialists offer free on-site consultations for various facets of
grazing and livestock management explains Zimprich. “We can help people
survey their needs related to soils information and technical practice standards
for carcass disposal or livestock burials to protect water quality through our
Animal Mortality Facility practice. We have technical and financial assistance
to help producers to replace destroyed fences, shelterbelts or other conserva-
tion practices damaged by the storm.” 
“Technical assistance is free and help is available right now for South
Dakota,” says Zimprich. Disaster financial assistance through the Environ-
mental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) provides opportunity for early-start
waivers. The first step, Zimprich says, is to contact the NRCS at their local
USDA Service Center. Producers need to sign an application to be ready for
the next funding cut off and application ranking date which is November 15,
2013.
The NRCS’ EQIP is our main Farm Bill conservation financial assistance
program that can help address needs explains Zimprich. EQIP is continuous
signup and is instrumental in helping ranchers with needs related to water
quality and quantity. “In the Atlas situation, financial assistance through
EQIP can help with conservation practices such as new water development if
the current water source is becoming contaminated or if a contaminated water
source must be fenced out to prevent disease or other complications.”
Jackson County producers are encouraged to contact the Kadoka NRCS field
office (837-2242 Ext. 3), for more information.
October Resident of the Month
October is
National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month
Editorial
2 - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - Kadoka Press
Talk, Talk, Talk
“Talk a little slower,” I re-
quested. At the time, I was on the
phone trying to get a confirmation
number and some other informa-
tion, and the gal at the other end
was talking way too fast for me.
This was complicated somewhat
by the fact that I was holding the
phone to my ear with my shoulder
while trying to write on a wiggly
piece of paper. “Okay,” she said,
and she really did try. Pretty soon,
though, she was back up to warp
speed, and I had to remind her to
slow it back down. Eventually I
got what I needed, and read it
back to check that I had it right.
Apparently it was, but it wasn’t an
easy conversation.
Some people just naturally talk
really fast. I think of Alice in this
regard. She was a friend of Mom’s
and of mine too, but it was as if
she needed to get things out as
quickly as possible so she could get
on with more-useful work. She
was a sweet gal so you just tried to
listen up and not say “what?” too
often. She didn’t talk very loudly
either, so you really had to pay at-
tention.
Contrast Alice with neighbor
Leonard who said very little and
said it slowly. When he called you
on the phone, first you heard a
cough and then the words, “This is
Leonard.” You kind of figured that
he hadn’t talked in so long that he
had to clear his throat before he
could say anything. It got so when
I answered the phone and heard
the cough, I knew who it was be-
fore he announced, “This is
Leonard.”
Neither was my Uncle Don in
any hurry when he visited with
anyone. He liked to tell stories,
but he did it in his own sweet
time. Since he added quite a few
details that weren’t completely
necessary, I sometimes got the
fidgets about halfway through the
tale. Again, he was a good fellow
so I tried to be patient although
sometimes it was hard. I often
wondered why he couldn’t just
summarize or get to the main
point, but that isn’t how he told
stories.
As you know, some people have
a lot to say so you’d better be pre-
pared to spend some time when
you strike up a conversation with
them. If I’m pressed for time,
there are certain folks I do not call
on the phone because I know I’ll
have the receiver stuck to my ear
for quite a while. They tend to go
on and on and then immediately
jump to another subject when the
first one is worn out. This is made
somewhat worse by the fact that I
am not a great conversationalist. I
run out of things to say before very
long and just end up saying, “Uh
huh,” or “Hmmm” a lot.
Being conversationally chal-
lenged also makes it so I’m not
eager to join a lot of organizations.
My dad, on the other hand, joined
everything that came along. He
was a Mason, a Lion, and half a
dozen other things. He also loved
to play cards and attended any
card parties that came along. He
was extremely social and loved the
give and take of anywhere that
people gathered. A neighbor of
ours has joined even more organi-
zations than Dad and is hardly
ever home in the evenings. He’s
out gadding about and sometimes
travels quite a distance if nothing
is happening close to home.
Then we come to son Chance.
He has very little speech due to
his autism. If he says a hundred
words a year, he is being chatty.
He used to have slightly more
speech, but he hasn’t said a lot in
the last few years. He communi-
cates in other ways, but not much
with his voice. When he does say
something, it is usually witty and
worth listening to. I recall some
years ago when we were out driv-
ing in the car at night, and I was
trying to come up with the name
of the brightest star in the constel-
lation Orion. In previous night
rides but in the golf cart, I would
often tell Chance which constella-
tions were which and what some
of the stars were named. Anyway,
while I was hemming and hawing
trying to come up with the name,
I suddenly heard it coming from
the back seat. “Rigel!” Chance
said. It was spoken with a bit of
disgust at the shortcomings of my
memory. This tickled me quite a
bit because that one word said a
lot about my son’s patience and
also reminded me he had a quick
and retentive mind. He knew
which star I was talking about.
My explanations of things in the
night sky were not lost on him.
So to avoid rambling and un-
necessary detail, let me summa-
rize and get to the point.
Conversation is an extremely use-
ful tool in sharing information,
opinions, and feelings. We all tend
to go at it differently, but it is how
we communicate and interact.
More importantly, it makes it pos-
sible for people to let us know they
care about us and vice versa.
That’s worth a lot.
Pheasant Hunting:
A South Dakota
Tradition
There is nothing like a crisp fall
day in South Dakota for enjoying
one of our great state traditions,
pheasant hunting. Families
throughout South Dakota dust off
their hunting gear, organize week-
end hunts, and invite out-of-town
family and friends into their
homes for a taste of this long-
standing sporting tradition. While
pheasant hunting may be the rea-
son for these annual fall gather-
ings, for many of us the time spent
with family, friends, and neigh-
bors is the true highlight of the
fall hunts.
South Dakota has become fa-
mous for its hospitality and qual-
ity pheasant hunting. Dubbed the
“Pheasant Capitol of the World,”
we have grown accustomed during
these fall and winter months to
seeing planes coming and going
from our airports filled with pas-
sengers loading and unloading
their gun cases, coolers, and blaze
orange gear. Despite pheasant
numbers being down for the 2013
season, the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Tourism estimates that
pheasant hunting will generate
approximately $223 million in rev-
enues for the state. Whether it is
the licenses, gas, and gear that
they buy, or the nights spent in
lodges and motels throughout the
state, clearly hunting in South
Dakota is big business.
But for those of us who grew up
pheasant hunting in South
Dakota, we often do not think
about the business it generates.
Instead, we think about the treas-
ured memories of quality time we
have spent with families and
friends, the lessons we learned
about responsible hunting prac-
tices and gun safety, and the un-
forgettable feeling of bagging that
first pheasant. All of these experi-
ences have made pheasant hunt-
ing a sport passed down from
generation to generation in our
state, and one which I hope can
continue for future generations.
As we gather at our favorite
pheasant hunting locations, take
the newest family hunter out for
the first day in the fields, and
gather at night over a warm meal
to tell stories of the “shot of the
day,” we continue these treasured
South Dakota traditions and in-
still an appreciation for nature
and the outdoors in the next gen-
eration of hunters. I wish all
hunters in South Dakota a safe
and successful hunting season.
Lookin’ Around| Syd Iwan
From the U.S. Senate | Senator John Thune
A Better Way to
Restore Our Fiscal
Future
On October 16, Congress ap-
proved – and President Obama
signed into law – legislation to end
the partial government shutdown
and increase our nation’s borrow-
ing limit, known as the “debt ceil-
ing.” I voted against this bill and
would like to take this opportunity
to explain why.
Make no mistake, getting the
government funded again and
stopping any talk of potential de-
fault on our debt was a good thing.
I didn’t favor shutting down the
government and am glad it is re-
opened. For me, this vote was not
simply about whether to reopen
the government; rather, it was
about what kind of government we
should have. Do we want a gov-
ernment that lives within its
means? Or do we want a govern-
ment that spends much more than
it takes in, leaving a crushing
amount of debt for future genera-
tions? I voted “no” because I be-
lieve our spending problems are
unsustainable and because the bill
that was ultimately signed into
law missed a real opportunity to
fix the problems that have led us
to a $17 trillion national debt.
One of the most pressing chal-
lenges facing our nation is our
growing debt. Concern over our
fiscal future is one of the reasons
I oppose President Obama’s tril-
lion-dollar health care law, com-
monly referred to as Obamacare.
In fact, concerns about Obamacare
– including the unfair way it has
been implemented – helped lead to
the standoff that partially shut
down the government on Oct. 1.
To be clear, the government
shutdown was not the outcome I
hoped for, though I do stand by my
desire to see South Dakotans get
the same treatment under Oba-
macare that the president has of-
fered to corporations and large
businesses. During the period the
government was partially shut
down, I remained hopeful that
both parties would come together
and negotiate on the issue of pro-
viding fairness under Obamacare.
In the absence of those negotia-
tions, the House began passing
numerous bills to reopen basic,
noncontroversial parts of the fed-
eral government. Those bills were
unfortunately never considered in
the Senate.
On October 10, I was part of a
small group of Republicans that
went to the White House in an ef-
fort to negotiate a way forward
with President Obama. By that
time, it was clear that the issue of
government funding was going to
be merged with the issue of rais-
ing the debt ceiling. At that meet-
ing, the president was offered a
temporary increase in the debt
ceiling along with a way to reopen
the government as long as both
sides entered real, meaningful ne-
gotiations on reforming some of
the programs that are the real
drivers of our fiscal problems. The
president did not accept our offer
and began working with Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid on a
deal to reopen the government
and increase the debt ceiling,
which formed the foundation for
the bill that I ultimately could not
support.
The process that I went
through prior to casting my vote
was neither simple nor easy. I sup-
ported reopening the government
and wanted to see that happen as
quickly as possible. While there
were some positive aspects to the
bill, it also included things that
troubled me, including a $2.1 bil-
lion funding boost for an Ohio
River dam and a one-time “death
gratuity” payment of $174,000 to
the widow of a millionaire law-
maker that passed away earlier
this year. However, at the end of
the day it all came back to one
thing for me: our $17 trillion debt.
While reopening the government
was important to me, so too was
pushing for a government that
stops spending more money than
it takes in.
Congress and recent presidents
from both political parties, includ-
ing President Obama, have a long
history of tying reforms to an in-
crease in the debt ceiling. Unfor-
tunately, we missed an
opportunity to do so with this bill.
With our national debt at $17 tril-
lion and growing, I could not sup-
port the bill because it increased
our debt ceiling without doing
anything to address our country’s
structural spending problem.
I believe there is a better path.
Members of Congress from both
parties must work with President
Obama on common sense reforms
that we can all agree on. These re-
forms could include things like fix-
ing our broken tax code by
eliminating loopholes and making
incremental reforms to entitle-
ment programs that are the real
drivers of our spending so they can
better serve current and future
beneficiaries.
Despite this recent episode, I
still believe divided government
can work to better serve the Amer-
ican people and I am committed to
trying to make that happen.
From the U.S. House | Representative Kristi Noem
Comparing Legislative
Processes: S.D. vs. D.C.
The shutdown has come to an
end and the federal government is
up and operating again. The re-
sult: Congress has kicked the can
down the road, putting any seri-
ous budget discussions off until
next year. This leaves us with an
unimproved fiscal situation.
In South Dakota, we pay our
bills, and we don’t spend money
we don’t have. Thanks in part to
our legislative process, our state
Legislature is much more effective
and efficient than Congress.
In South Dakota, we have a bal-
anced budget requirement. Con-
gress has no limit to what it can
spend and the federal government
is not required to operate in the
black. Our Legislature convenes
for 40 days out of the year. Con-
gress can convene as often it
wants – making it tempting for
U.S. senators and representatives
to over-legislate and overspend.
We also have term limits for our
state legislators.
In our state, the Governor has
the authority to line-item veto ap-
propriations. The Governor can
veto one or more lines of the ap-
propriation bill without vetoing
the entire bill. Those particular
items of appropriation cannot be
spent unless two-thirds of the
House and Senate override the
line-item spending veto. Even the
mere existence of that power holds
down spending at the state level.
Our state constitution also for-
bids attaching any policy law
changes to an appropriation. The
constitution says it this way: “The
general appropriation bill shall
embrace nothing but appropria-
tions...” Special appropriations
must follow that same rule. Con-
gress, on the other hand, passes
bills on multiple subjects that are
filled with pork. A primary way to
pass more spending in Congress is
to attach the extra spending to a
bill that most people already agree
must be passed.
I am disappointed that Con-
gress has not done anything seri-
ous to address our rising levels of
debt and that many of the politi-
cians in Washington continue to
pretend there are no consequences
to reckless spending. But I am
also thankful that in our state we
have a process that works and a
responsible Legislature. Things
may be broken in D.C., but they
aren’t in South Dakota.
Office of the Governor | Gov. Dennis Daugaard
Kadoka Press
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Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
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Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Kadoka, South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
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Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
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Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
Fromm’s Fromm’s
Hardware Hardware
& Plumbing, Inc. & Plumbing, Inc.
Main Street • Kadoka, SD
Contact us for all your plumbing
service calls
605-837-2274
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Share Your Money
Before You Die
Now that the long-debated es-
tate tax rules have finally been
settled, let's get real: Despite all
the hoopla raised, most people
probably would never be impacted
whether the lifetime estate tax
threshold had stayed at $5.12 mil-
lion or reverted to $1 million. In
the end, it actually went up a bit
to $5.25 million for 2013.
Even if your estate will only be
a fraction of that amount, it still
pays to have a plan for distribut-
ing your assets. If your finances
are in good shape, there's no rea-
son not to start sharing the wealth
while you're still around to enjoy
helping others. It also doesn't hurt
that you can reap significant tax
advantages by distributing a por-
tion of your assets now.
Before you start doling out
cash, however, make sure you are
on track to fund your own retire-
ment, have adequate health insur-
ance, can pay off your mortgage
and are otherwise debt-free. You
wouldn't want to deplete your re-
sources and then become a finan-
cial burden on others.
If you can check all those boxes,
consider these options:
Avoid the gift tax. You can give
cash or property worth up to
$14,000 per year, per individual,
before you'll trigger the federal
gift tax. (Married couples filing
jointly can give $28,000 per recip-
ient.) You'll probably never have to
pay a gift tax, however, since
you're allowed to bestow up to
$5.25 million in gifts during your
lifetime above and beyond the an-
nual $14,000 excluded amounts
before the gift tax kicks in – which
for most of us means never. Read
IRS Publication 950 (at
www.irs.gov) for details.
Pay for education. If college is
still far off for your children,
grandchildren or others, consider
funding a 529 State Qualified Tu-
ition Plan for them. Any interest
the account earns is not subject to
federal (and in most cases, state)
income tax; plus, many states offer
tax deductions for contributions
made to their own 529 Plans. And
don't worry: If one child decides
not to attend college, you can al-
ways transfer the account balance
to another without penalty.
Roth IRAs for kids. If your
minor children or grandchildren
earn income (allowances and gifts
don't count), you may fund a Roth
IRA on their behalf. You can con-
tribute up to $5,500 or the amount
of their taxable earnings for the
year, whichever is less. Your con-
tributions are made on an after-
tax basis but the earnings grow,
tax-free, until the account is
tapped at retirement.
Fund someone's benefits. Many
people cannot afford health or
other insurance and so forego cov-
erage, putting themselves just one
serious illness or accident away
from financial disaster. Many also
can't fund their 401(k) plan or
IRA. Consider applying your tax-
exempt gifts to help loved ones
pay for these critical benefits.
You'll not help protect them from
catastrophe, but also greatly in-
crease their long-term financial
self-sufficiency.
Charitable contributions. If
you're planning to leave money or
property to charities in your will,
consider beginning to share those
assets now, if you can afford to.
You'll be able to enjoy watching
your contributions at work – and
be able to deduct them from your
income taxes. Read IRS Publica-
tion 526 for details.
Before taking any actions, con-
sult your financial advisor to
make sure your own bases are cov-
ered. If you don't have an advisor,
visit www.fpaforfinancialplan-
ning.org for help locating one.
Practical Money Matters | Jason Alderman, Financial Education Advisor
“I love to go to Washington, if
only to be near my money.”
Bob Hope
Monday, was a dreary rainy
Columbus Day and Native Ameri-
can Day for a break from school,
but teachers and students were
enjoying the time just the same.
Our local weather man reports al-
together we received .80 of an inch
of moisture this week. It is a won-
derful time to take a drive in the
country and enjoy the fall colors,
but be careful you could get stuck
in the mud (don’t get to write that
too often in South Dakota).
Wednesday, June Ring was a
guest at the Bruce Ring home to
help Jessie celebrate her birthday.
Thursday, Dan, Susan and Mor-
gan Taft were at White River for
the “Pink Night” cancer benefit
night at the volleyball game
against Colome. Friday, Morgan
went to the football game and
stayed in town with friends. Sat-
urday, she helped with the middle
school volleyball tournament in
White River.
James and Marjorie Letellier
attending the Mellette County
zoning meeting on Thursday after-
noon pertaining to the AT&T
tower in Norris. Friday they were
in Philip and Kadoka for parts and
supplies.
June Ring was among those at-
tending Mellette County Cattle-
women at the museum in White
River on Friday.
Friday night several folks en-
joyed the football game at White
River against Rapid City Chris-
tian High School. Rapid City
Christian players have many con-
nections with folks in this area.
Jeb and Jordan Hunt, Lane Green
and Cade Porch all had many
extra supporters there from White
River and Kadoka. It made for a
fun game. Ethan Huber ran for a
touch down, but there was a flag
on the play so it was taken back.
Then Tanner Larvie made a couple
of touchdowns. One was a terrific
interception catch and run. Soon
after the first half the score was
tied at 16. Then Ethan Huber
made a great tackle and got hurt
on the play and the whole crowd
went into silent prayer. As long as
there are grandmas on the side-
lines and there is sports in school
there will be prayers. Ethan re-
ceived a concussion and I am glad
to report he is back in school today.
Rapid City Christian came away a
24-16 win.
James and Marjorie Letellier,
Andrea and Cassie Beckwith went
in to White River for the football
game and also enjoyed a visit with
Jim’s classmate, Dan Egge-
braaten, who drove the bus for
RCC.
Deb Ring of Spearfish was
home for the weekend. Saturday
Sharon Ring and Deb went to
Pierre. They met up with Donna
(Waack) Sanborn, Elsie Bak and
her daughter, Jeanie Evan,s and
her brother and his wife. Deb,
Donna and Jeanie were all class-
mates in White River. Jeanie had
come from South Carolina to
spend some time helping her mom
after a recent accident. Later that
afternoon, Sharon and Deb en-
joyed a visit with Linda Totton and
got to see Shawntae and little
Alexis.
School News: Norris School is
observing Red Ribbon Week. Mon-
day is wear red day; Tuesday is
bright color day; Wednesday is
hair day; Thursday is blue jean
day.
Country Pride Co-op plans to
do a presentation to the second
grade this week on propane.
Sue Larson of Rapid City came
for the game at White River and
was an overnight guest of her par-
ents the James Letelliers. Sue
teaches English at Rapid City
Christian and also was busy tak-
ing pictures at the game. Satur-
day, Sue and Marjorie Anne
Letellier accompanied Julie Letel-
lier of Kilgore to Mitchell. The gals
enjoyed the Keith and Kristyn
Getty concert at the Corn Palace
that evening. 130 students in the
choir were from Sunshine Bible,
Mitchell Christian, James Valley
Christian, Dakota Christian and
Aberdeen Christian high schools
and were the backup singers for
the Gettys. The Gettys are from
Ireland so there was a lot of Irish
and Blue Grass accompaniment,
too. Beaver Burma and Cassie
Beckwith both sang in the choir
with SBA. It was a wonderful
evening of entertainment.
Cassie Beckwith of Pierre came
down on Friday afternoon and
spent the night with her sister, An-
drea Beckwith. Saturday they
traveled to Mitchell for the con-
cert.
Saturday morning, Samantha
Taft came home from Rapid City
for a few days. That afternoon,
Tafts helped Cheyenne Schmidt
work cattle.
Sunday, Ken Koistenen of
Pierre came down to Maxine Al-
lard’s and checked his trail camera
for deer. He also stopped for a visit
with Maxine while there.
The Tafts helped Morgan cele-
brate her birthday on Sunday.
Happy birthday, Morgan!
Dan Taft and daughters,
Heather and Samantha, were
among those helping Evan and
Dorothy Bligh work cattle Mon-
day.
Homer George Taggart III, age
78, died on October 16 in Great
Bend, Kansas. He was born in
Midland to George II and Olive
(Hogen) Taggart and grew up in
Timber Lake. He has lived in
Kansas since 1978. He was a US
Army veteran serving during the
Vietnam conflict. He is survived by
four children, three sisters and
three brothers, including Dr. L.P.
Swisher, formerly of Kadoka. Fu-
neral services were held Saturday,
Oct. 19 in Great Bend.
Boyd and Pat Porch’s home was
filled with family the past several
days. Tamara Clement and daugh-
ter, Sienna, of Minnetonka, MN,
arrived on Thursday, accompanied
by Katie and Stacia Schoon of
Brandon. Friday Joel and Lisa
Porch and Ryan of Rapid City
came to stay all night and go to the
football game with Boyd and Pat.
Late Friday night Rob and Peggy
Schoon arrived from Brandon to
spend the weekend. It was Fall
break for Sienna from school. Sun-
day Boyd, Pat, Casey and Carl
Bauman provided special music
for church and at the services later
in the nursing home.
Cindy Wilmarth and Sydne
Lenox drove to Hot Springs on
Wednesday of last week to deliver
28 quilts and several gifts for the
Christmas Gift Shop to the Vet-
eran’s Hospital. The quilts were
donated through the Quilts With
Love ladies and were to be given to
the veterans at the facility. The
gifts were donated by the local
American Legion Auxiliary mem-
bers and a couple other generous
ladies. They will be available to
the veterans there to give to their
families at Christmas time, at no
charge for the gifts or for postage
to send them. The amount of gifts
donated was much smaller this
year than in previous years, but
all were greatly appreciated. As
Cindy and Sydne drove through
Rapid City, they were saddened by
the amount of beautiful trees that
have been damaged by the recent
storm. It will be quite awhile be-
fore all areas are cleaned up. It
was also sad to see the dead cattle
along Interstate 90.
Paula Vogelgesang was one of
the nominees for the South
Dakota 2013 Spirit of Dakota
Award which was given out in
Huron over the weekend of Octo-
ber 5. Ruby Sanftner nominated
Paula. The award is given to an
outstanding South Dakota woman
who has demonstrated vision,
courage and strength in character
in her contributions to her commu-
nity and state. This year’s winner
was Patricia Baird of Custer, be-
cause of her work on behalf of dis-
abled veterans and their families
and for the creation of the Opera-
tion Black Hills Cabin project. Be-
cause of the winter storm that
weekend, none of the area resi-
dents including Paula, her family
or the Sanftners were able to at-
tend.
Deb and Marv Moor spent part
of Sunday and Monday, Oct. 13
and 14, in Rapid City where Marv
had a medical appointment at re-
gional hospital. While in Rapid
City they visited Deb’s aunt, uncle
and a cousin, Morris and Janice
Kosters and Curtis Kosters, who
was visiting from Arizona. Curtis
recently retired from the military.
Kieth and Nona Prang received
word Sunday evening of the death
of Frances Horacek of Yankton.
The Horaceks ran The Mercantile
Store in Kadoka several years ago
and his wife recently passed away
also. Funeral arrangements have
not been made as of this writing,
but cards can be sent to the family
at 1503 Cedar, Yankton, SD 57078.
Pheasant season opened at
noon on Saturday with lots of
hunters arriving in South Dakota.
While visiting with some hunters
at Jigger’s Saturday evening, they
said they got a lot of exercise but
no pheasants and hoped that Sun-
day would be a better day. The
pheasant population this year is
down by 50 percent according to
some reports, but the hunters still
come.
Duane Terkildsen, 57, died on
Thursday, Oct. 17, in Rapid City
after a long battle with cancer. He
was born in Kadoka and has many
relatives in this area. Funeral
services were on Wednesday and
burial took place in Hill City. He
was preceded in death by his fa-
ther, Calvin Terkildsen, who was
known to many Kadoka people.
Sympathy is extended to his fam-
ily.
May we welcome a new resident
here at the apartments. Lloyd
Olson has been moving in with the
help of his daughter, Rita. His
wife, Viola, is a new resident at the
nursing home in Kadoka. Both
Lloyd and Rita have been going to
visit with Viola. Lloyd and Viola
have lived and raised their chil-
dren just south of Kadoka. Lloyd
and Viola’s other daughter, Sue,
also came back from Arizona for a
few days to help move and visit
with her parents.
I have visited at the nursing
home a couple of afternoons this
past week. Val Cork is back to
work half days. Hopefully our
prayers have been working.
Clara Belle Weller had been
transfered to the hospital in Philip
recently. Her family has been
going to see her and spend some
time with her.
Mary Ellen Herbaugh has ben
through the mill, so to speak, but
has made a great recovery and
feeling much better.
The puzzle with the picture of a
bouquet of roses on it has been put
together. With the array of roses
and little white flowers, it was a
challenge. Working on the puzzles
is an enjoyable pass time.
Thought: Effort plus motive
equals results. Integrity is the
essence of everything successful.
Delores Obr had a busy week
with five of her six kids around re-
doing her living room. Those help-
ing were Keitha, Marj, Elaine,
Crystal, and Gary who are all from
South Dakota. Bill lives way down
south and didn’t come. All the fur-
nishings had to be moved out of
the room and they were consider-
able. Then the walls were painted.
The carpet and linoleum were re-
moved, the underlying wood floor
was cleaned of paint, stained and
varnished. Then the room was put
back together. Delores said it
turned out really nice but all the
activity was tiring. She rested up
after the job was done and every-
one returned home. The oil stove
was also cleaned and prepared for
the heating season. Marj said that
sister Elaine was the foreman of
the job who got the supplies and
kept everyone moving.
Marj and Marvin Street started
the return trip to their home at
Cook, MN, on Sunday with a stop
overnight at their son’s home in
Mitchell. They had actually been
in Mitchell one day last week to
watch their middle grandson,
Jared, compete in a football game.
He is in the seventh grade. His
team is undefeated so far this
year, and Jared made an intercep-
tion and other good moves that got
him some cheers. Marj wasn’t al-
ways completely sure what was
going on, but she cheered right in
there with the best of them. On
Monday of last week, the Streets
drove to Rapid City to acquire a
new water heater for their house
in Belvidere. Rapid City was still
a mess from the blizzard so they
didn’t stay very long. They just got
what they needed and left. Marj
said they probably wouldn’t get
back here until after the first of
the year now. Her boss there in
Cook is going to be gone the next
two months so Marj will need to
stay and keep things running. Re-
tirement hasn’t worked out for
Marj so far but maybe it will even-
tually.
Larry Grimme drove to Rapid
City last week and acquired a new
cooker. It is a fancy contraption
that is supposed to be able to fry
French fries in only a tablespoon
of oil, but that hasn’t yet been put
to the test. It is an interesting ma-
chine, however, and Larry hopes it
will make his cooking easier and
better.
Glenn and Lucy Freeman have
made several trips to Philip lately
to visit Lucy’s sister, Clara Belle
Weller, in the hospital. Clara Belle
is in serious condition and not
doing very well. Her daughter,
Katy, and her husband, Craig, are
here and are staying nights with
her. Her son and other daughter
were coming or already here and
taking the day shift. Her husband,
Bud, had gone to Kansas to visit
their daughter, Terry, as Clara
Belle was doing fine when he left.
He was called back when Clara
Belle was moved from the care
center in Kadoka to the Philip hos-
pital.
Marie Addison has been visited
frequently of late by her grand-
daughter, Morgan Tschetter, of
Rapid City (Dixie’s daughter).
Morgan’s husband, Ryan, has par-
ents he goes to visit in Huron so
they stop at Marie’s in Murdo on
the way back and forth. They have
their baby girl with them when
they come who Marie says is a
doll. Other kids and grandkids
stop in to visit fairly often as well.
Marie said they recently served
Indian tacos at the senior center
there in Murdo and it drew the
biggest crowd they’ve had to date.
Apparently, Indian tacos are very
popular with a lot of people.
Betty Kusick is back in business
as far as being able to get her car
started. She missed church a week
ago because the thing wouldn’t
run. John Kaiser hauled the car to
Kadoka and repaired it. Kenny
Kusick came to Belvidere on Fri-
day to pick Betty up and take her
back to Kadoka where she re-
claimed her vehicle.
Delores Bonenberger spent
most of last week in the Philip hos-
pital. Her grandson, Brett, took
her over on Tuesday evening, and
she got back home on Friday
evening. Delores said she appears
to not be working too well with her
current medicines, and they are
being adjusted. She was heading
back to the clinic on Monday for
more adjustments. While in the
hospital, she got in a lot of good
visiting with family and friends
that stopped in. She had several
long visits with her friend of many
years, Vi Olney, who was also in
the hospital. Some days they
talked for several hours catching
up and reliving old times.
Eric and Pam Osborn were vis-
ited on Sunday by Pam’s daughter,
Syd Beth, by Eric’s dad, Wib, and
by neighbor, Geoffrey DeVries. The
company was treated to a meal of
ribs and other goodies. Pam said
that Syd Beth was headed to
Pierre early on Monday to play her
bass clarinet in the honors band
there. It was scheduled to be an
all-day event. Eric and Pam have
recently both been working in
Philip with Eric at Moses Building
and Pam at Russ’s body shop. Pam
helps with painting, cleaning cars,
pounding out dents, and doing
whatever else is needed. She re-
ally likes the work.
Scot and Jodie O’Bryan had a
busy household this weekend since
daughter Faye came with her
three kids. They were active and
kept life exciting. On Sunday, Scot
and Jodie went to Rapid City and
took in the SDRA rodeo finals.
Jodie said she got so caught up in
visiting with friends who were
there that sometimes she didn’t
keep very good track of what was
going on in the arena. Local boy,
Eric Addison, competed in the
rodeo. At home, they have been
busy helping people get their cat-
tle squared away after things got
fairly confused during the recent
blizzard. They had actually
planned on going to Texas to visit
sons there when the blizzard came
along and put paid to those plans.
Now they are somewhat hesitant
to plan another trip for fear it
might bring on another snow-
storm.
Correspondent News
Kadoka Press - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 3
Norris News | June Ring, 462-6328
Kadoka Area News | Sydne Lenox, 837-2465
Gateway News | Lola Joyce Riggins, 837-2053 (Let it ring.)
Belvidere News | Syd Iwan, 381-2147
I guess it’s that time of the year
to get out the coats and to get out
of bed that extra five minutes ear-
lier, so you can have someone else
go start your car! With that being
said, I realize it will be harder for
a lot of folks to come by as often
but will enjoy you when you can
stop in.
On Monday mornings Elaine
and Jack Roghair have been com-
ing by to sing and exercise. We all
admire what a smart little young
man he is and good lookin’! Elaine
has been so kind to bring in lots of
real nice tomatoes for BLTs and a
box of apples that the residents
peeled and made an apple crisp.
Very yummy!
On Friday we had the lobby full
of the students from the after-
school program. They helped the
residents make jack-o-lanterns for
outside their rooms. They all
turned out real cute and the resi-
dents will enjoy them. They love
the interaction with the students.
Ron and Renate Carson stopped
by to visit with Aunt Joy Parker
several times this week, along
with Wilma Carleton. On Sunday
Oliver and Gayle Carson was in to
see Joy and to catch her up on the
business in Wall.
Darin and Dorothy Louder were
down from Murdo and Draper
area to see Dwight. He was awake
and full of stories but was very
tired from all the work he had
done! We so love Dwight.
Mary Setera, Betty Vander-
May’s daughter, was here to visit
with her mom on Saturday. They
enjoyed a good visit.
Alice Wilmarth gets a visit from
he son, Rick, almost every after-
noon. Paulette gets her walk in on
Saturdays and stops in for a visit.
Sunday it was Kenny and Cindy’s
turn to spend time with mom,
Alice is very lucky to be so popu-
lar! Wednesday, Tammy Merchen-
curled her hair while fixing Sheila
Bowen’s as well. We sure appreci-
ate all our beauticians. You make
the residents feel good about
themselves and we all love to be
pampered!
Lova Bushnell was here to visit
on Saturday and to take in a game
of ladder ball. This is a new game
here at the home and it seems to
be one of the favorite’s at this
point. Sylvan Kruse has won a
couple of times, but all have fun
playing.
Pastor Ray Greenseth was in to
check on Mary Ellen Herbaugh.
She got back from the hospital and
is doing better each day. We’re all
glad to have you back!
Elaine Kemnitz had a visit from
her husband, Don, on Sunday.
They enjoyed their time together.
Elaine loves to look through her
photo album and her guest book.
She also is big reader and a terrific
singer.
Amanda Reddy, Sonia, Mary,
and many other family members
and friends were in to see thier
grandma and mom, Mary Bull
Bear, this week. Mary had a doc-
tors apointment in Rapid City on
Thursday and I hear the trip went
pretty good.
Micki Word got a surprise visit
from Chad Eisenbraun, Gavin De-
Vries, and True Bucholz on Mon-
day morning. They awoke her with
their awesome football stories of
their games and gave her the
DVD’s of the games. It totally
made her week! Micki is the resi-
dent of the month and she will be
honored with her meal on Sunday.
She has decided to invite teachers
who she worked real close from
the school. Those attending were:
Pam Bonenberger, Jean
Holzkamp, Laurie Prichard, Ar-
lene Hicks, Mary Graupman, and
Gail Ruetter. The meal consisted
of baked chicken, mashed potatoes
and gravy, fresh carrots, and
lemon meringue pie. Afterwards
they caught Micki up on some of
the school and sports news and en-
joyed their time together. Stop in
any time!
Bob Young had his daughter
come over from Philip for a short
visit. It’s always nice to see her
and it’s a great surprise for Bob.
Jobie Gerry had a special treat
when her sister, Ester Rooks,
dropped in to pay her a visit.
Jobie’s eye light up like Christmas
trees when she sees family mem-
bers and friends stop by.
Glenn Bruhn had a visit from
Ron Twiss the other day. They al-
ways seem to find something to
chat about and he usually brings a
good treat of some kind!
Arlys Klundt and Raynita drove
down from Rapid City to see his
mom, Ruth Klundt. They need to
get down here now before the bad
weather hits!
We all really appreciate every-
one who stops in and to visit with
us!
We will be having trick-or-
treaters from 4:30 to 7:00 p.m. on
Halloween night. Please bring
your little ghosts and goblins by
for the residents to enjoy! Any
families or friends wanting to do-
nate candy to pass out please be
sure it is wrapped.
This year I am planning a
Christmas wreath contest. If you
are interested in making a wreath,
they must be fire retardant if they
are live ones, they will be hung on
the door of the residents rooms.
We are in desperate need of new
one’s that will give the place an
uplift at Christmas. Please put
your name on your wreath and
let’s see how creative and festive
we can make them look! The date
to have the wreaths in by will be
the first Sunday of December and
the judging will be held at our
Christmas party. If you would like
to make or buy a wreath please
call me, Cathy Stone, at 837-2270.
Kadoka Nursing Home | Cathy Stone, 837-2270
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The Kadoka Area Kougars trav-
eled to Presho to take on the
Lyman Raiders last Friday night
in our final away game of the reg-
ular season and we came out vic-
torious 60-6.
Defensively our kids answered
the call this week. Lyman has
been averaging nearly 30 points a
game, and our defense knew it
was going to be a challenge with
the spread offense they run, but
our guys did a great job of stop-
ping just about everything they
threw at us. Defensively we only
allowed Lyman to 34 yards rush-
ing on 23 attempts, and 26 yards
passing on 15 attempts for a total
of 60 yards. We had a lot of guys
contributing on defense again this
week. Here is a list of tackle stats
from this week: True Buchholz 7,
Dylan Riggins 6; Logan Chris-
tensen 6; Wyatt Enders 5; Gavin
DeVries 5; Herbie O'Daniel 5;
Logan Ammons 5; Chandlier Sud-
beck 3; Matt Pretty Bear 2; AJ
Bendt 1; Brady Jandreau 1; Bren-
don Porch 1; Kyler Ferguson 1;
Jarrett VanderMay 1.
Offensively our kids executed
about as good as we have all sea-
son. We were able to spread the
ball around a little more, and take
advantage of mixing the run and
the pass. As a team we carried the
ball 41 times for 273 yards, and
we passed the ball 18 times for
227 yards, for a total of 500 yards.
Our blocking as a team once again
was very good which allowed for
us to rack up all of those yards.
Rushing stats for the Kougars
this week were: (attempts, yards,
average, touchdown, 2 pt. conver-
sions): Chandlier Sudbeck 16, 197,
12.3, 3, 1; Wyatt Enders 6, 25, 4.2,
1, 0; Dylan Riggins 3, 20, 6.7, 0, 0;
AJ Bendt 2, 11, 5.5, 0, 0; Aaron
Janis 1, 8, 8.0, 0, 0; Lane Patter-
son 2, 7, 3.5, 0, 1; Brady Jandreau
5, 5, 1.0, 0, 0.
As I mentioned earlier our pass-
ing attack was clicking well for us
this week and it was led by Lane
Patterson as he was 11-14 for 179
yards and 3 touchdowns, as well
as 4 conversions. AJ Bendt got
into the action as well in the sec-
ond half as he went 3-4 for 54
yards and 1 touchdown. Receiving
stats for the Kouars this week are
(catches, yards, average, touch-
down, 2 pt. conversion): Logan
Ammons 4, 128, 32, 3, 1; Logan
Christensen 4, 25, 6.3, 0, 2; Matt
Pretty Bear 2, 50, 25, 1, 0; Brady
Jandreau 1, 12, 12, 0, 0; Chandlier
Sudbeck 1, 5, 5, 0, 0; Jed Brown 1,
4, 4, 0, 0; Dylan Riggins 1, 3, 3, 0,
1.
I thought our receivers did a
great job this week catching the
ball and then running after the
catch. Logan Ammons had one of
his biggest games receiving as he
caught the ball 4 times for 128
yards and 3 touchdowns and 1
conversion, but they all had big
catches on critical downs that
moved the chains as well as catch-
ing our 2-point conversions.
I was really pleased with the ef-
fort this week as the boys continue
to play together and play hard. It
was a nice game for all of our boys
since we were able to get every-
body some experience. Our JV
kids were able to play the second
half and they came in and did a
really nice job picking right up
where the varsity left off on both
sides of the ball.
This week is the Kougars final
regular season game of the year as
we look forward to hosting the
New Underwood Tigers at 7:00
p.m. It’s also senior recognition
night, so come on out and show
your support for the home team!
Kadoka 7 16 14
Jones Co. 25 25 25
The Kadoka Lady Kougars trav-
eled to Murdo to take on the Jones
County Lady Coyotes on Thurs-
day, October 17.
Taylor Merchen was 9/9 serving
with 4 service points. Mackenzie
Word was 16/16 with 2 kills. Tay-
lor Merchen was 23/23 setting
with 1 assist. Ciara Stoddard saw
her first varsity action settng and
was 17/18 with 2 assists. Raven
Jorgensen had 5 digs and Destiny
Dale added 4.
“Jones County is a good team
and we just couldn't answer their
tough defense and athleticism,”
said Coach Hutchinson. “We
started to play a bit better in the
third set and get in system, but it
was just too late at that point.”
On Saturday, October 19 the
Lady Kougars took part in the
Douglas Tournament in Rapid
City.
Kadoka 19 25 25
Todd County 25 21 13
Kadoka 19 24
Sturgis 25 26
Kadoka 6 15
St. Thomas More 25 25
“We started the day with a nice
win against Todd County. The
girls played well,” said Hutchin-
son.
Raven Jorgensen was 13/13
with 2 aces and 7 service points.
Mackenzie Word had 9 kills, and
Raven Jorgensen and Myla Pierce
both added 7. Taylor Merchen had
12 assists and Allie Romero had
11. Destiny Dale had 9 digs.
“Our second match against
Sturgis was also well played. We
led 24-23 in the second set serivng
but couldn't manage to finish it
off,” Hutchinson commented. “We
served 41/43 as a team.”
Raven Jorgensen had 5 kills
and Mackenzie Word had 4. Raven
Jorgensen had 4 blocks. Taylor
Merchen was 30/31 setting with 7
assists, and Allie Romero was
16/17 with 3 assists. Raven Jor-
gensen had 5 digs and Destiny
Dale had 4.
“Our last match against St.
Thomas More wasn't our best
match, but they are a solid team,”
said Hutchinson.
The team served 21/22. Raven
Jorgensen and Mackenzie Word
both had 2 kills. Raven had 2
blocks and Mackenzie added 1.
Taylor Merchen was 13/13 setting
with 3 assists. Mackenzie Word
and Destiny Dale both had 3 digs.
Kadoka will be hosting districts
on Tuesday, November 5 and
Thursday, November 7.
Lady Kougars struggle on the road
Attendance is a big deal
Kadoka defeats Lyman Raiders
Submitted photo
As we get further into the school year we are reminded that the “tough” part of the year is upon us…the winter
season... the cold and flu season... both major inhibitors of good school attendance. This year, Kadoka Area Ele-
mentary Schools are helping to make children more aware of the importance of their presence at school by holding
a monthly school celebration recognizing those students with PERFECT or “NEAR-PERFECT” attendance. Jeff Ne-
mecek, school principal, stresses the importance of attending school to this group of junior kindergarten through
fifth graders about students being at school. “Students’ good attendance habits give teachers the opportunity to
teach and students the opportunity to learn new things. With absenteeism, that contact time is decrease,” said Jeff
Nemecek. “Our combined attendance for the Kadoka elementary was 94.6 percent for the month of September.
We met our goal of 94 percent and students with one or less absence/tardy were rewarded with a game of flag
football at an extra recess!” Pictured are students in Kadoka and are some of the participants who got to play.”
For more information about what families can do to build strong attendance habits see: http://www.attendance-
works.org.
Youth
4 - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - Kadoka Press
Long Valley Fire Department
12th Annual Hog Roast & Dance
Saturday, November 2
Long Valley Community Hall
Great Food & Great Fun For A Great Cause!
Pit Roasted
BBQ Pork
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Uncle Roy &
the Boys
8 p.m. to Midnight
Proceeds benefit the
Long Valley Fire Department
Supper Featuring Dance to
Reschedued!
Business Spotlight
Thank you for your many years!
Kadoka Community Betterment Association
KCBA invites all community
members to join them in a
“Cash Mob”
at
Headlee Vet Clinic
Wednesday, October 31
“Register for a door prize!”
Sundowner
Budget
Host Motel
Red Ribbon Week celebration, October 28-31
The Kadoka Area School Dis-
trict will be celebrating Red Rib-
bon Week October 28-31. Red
Ribbon Week is a national cam-
paign to teach children the dan-
gers of alcohol, tobacco, and other
drugs by saying “no” and teaching
healthy choices. This years them is
“A Healthy Me is Drug Free!”
Businesses are encouraged to
show support during the week.
Here are few ideas:
•Display red ribbons, ban-
ners, and posters either inside
or outside of your business.
•Put red ribbons on car anten-
nas parked outside your busi-
ness.
•Have a ‘wear red day’ for
your employees.
•Highlight your support with
an ad in the newspaper or
with a banner.
•Donate red ribbon supplies
and/or prizes for contests for
students or your staff.
•Place flyers/information
about Red Ribbon Week in
bags.
•Advertise special discounts
or sales for customers who ac-
knowledge Red Ribbon Week
or are wearing red or a red
ribbon.
•Participate in the school
theme days that will be posted
on the website at school.
Be creative! Show our youth
that you support making healthy
choices! If you would like more in-
formation about Red Ribbon Cam-
paign visit www.redribbon.org or
contact Kristie Stone, Elementary
Guidance.
October is
National
Breast
Cancer
Awareness
Month
Hopkins a veteran educator and senior
Community
Kadoka Press - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 5
E-mail news, stories
and photos to:
press@kadokatelco.com
Bob Hopkins is one of many
South Dakotans to move to the
Pahrump Valley, Nev., and become
educators over the past 40 years.
"Yes, I am better known as a
coach, but I've always considered
coaching to be teaching," Hopkins
told The Mirror on Wednesday,
August 28, as he sat in the
Pahrump Valley High School
(PVHS) auditorium during a free
period.
"The boys and girls I've coached
were there to learn a game, but I
was also teaching them how to
succeed," said Hopkins, who has
coached girls basketball and boys
golf at PVHS for most of the last
23 years.
"And, it wasn't ever about win-
ning, but for them to work hard so
they could become succcessful and
be the best they could be."
Hopkins teaches physical edu-
cation at PVHS, along with Jen-
nifer Hagstrom, the girls
basketball coach, and Craig
Rieger, who is in charge of weight
training and is the head wrestling
coach.
"What I've learned over these
last 37 years as a teacher and
coach in South Dakota and
Pahrump is that even teaching
can be a learning experience," said
Hopkins. "My first rule for any-
body who wants to teach is work
hard, starting by getting to work
at least 30 minutes early to pre-
pare and organize your day."
Hopkins retired as a girls bas-
ketball coach in 2008. In 25 years
as a girls basketball coach, his
teams won 479 games and three
state championships, one at Ben-
nett County, SD and two at PVHS.
As the PVHS boys golf coach, he
has sent at least one player to a
Nevada state tournament for 17
consecutive years.
"I've had kids on my teams
complain that they don't get paid
to play," said Hopkins. "I tell them
they do get paid. They don't earn
paychecks. Their pay is called re-
ceiving grades in the classroom."
Hopkins taught and coached in
Pahrump starting in 1990, "..at a
time when there was no WalMart,
no Smith's, no Albertson's, no
Home Depot and no Nugget casino
in town," he said. "There was P.J.'s
supermarket, which is now a
physical fitness building, and
Dodge's store, which is the home
of the Nye County School District
and the old cotton gin was on what
is now the Nugget land. I came
here when the old Calvada Golf
and Country Club was lush and
green. Now it's Willow Creek.
What's happened there can make
you sick."
Hopkins returned to South
Dakota in 1993, but the lure of the
desert weather and the Nye
County pay scale for teachers
brought him, his wife, Sarah, and
their children back to the valley in
1998. His two daughters, Lori and
Darla, played on PVHS basketball
teams he coached from 1999
through 2005. They are now mar-
ried with children of their own
and he is a grandfather many
times over.
"Coaching basketball was a
part of my life for many years,"
Hopkins said after he had retired
as the PVHS girls basketball
coach in 2008.
"I am going to be able to spend
more time with my family." While
he did exactly that, Hopkins re-
mained the coach of the PVHS
boys golf team and for a couple
more years, he was an assistant to
girls golf coach Julie Floyd.
He is still an active member of
the Pahrump Valley Junior Golf
Founders Club and helps super-
vise that organization's numerous
golf tournaments for boys and
girls 7 to 18 years old.
Retirement of a more perma-
nent nature is not under consider-
ation for the 64-year-old Hopkins.
A 1969 graduate of Kadoka High
School in South Dakota and Black
Hills State College four years
later, Hopkins rarely wasted
much energy thinking about call-
ing it quits. He plans to teach for
at least two more years. It's un-
likely he will return to his native
South Dakota, where the winters
are bitter and golf is a rare possi-
bility most of the year.
Be sure that wherever there is
a golf course nearby, that is where
you will find him, regardless of
whatever else he has a mind to do.
Reprinted with permission.
by Don McDermott,
The Mirror,
Pahrump Valley, Nev.
Save the Pearl Committee hosts 5K run and walk
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Belvidere Store
Open Daily
7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
24/7 Credit
Card Pumps
Diesel • Gas
Farm Fuel
Pop • Snacks • Beer
344-2277
Submitted photo
On September 21 the Save the Pearl Committee hosted a 5K run and walk. Twenty-five people took part in the event. Tia Carlson took first place with
a time of 20:32 and McCoy Bonenberger was first to cross the finish line in the youth division. The runners and walkers are pictured in front of the Pearl
Hotel under the new balcony that has just been constructed.
Club 27
Club 27
Kadoka, SD • 837-2241
Halloween
Halloween
Dance Featuring
W
estbound
W
estbound
Costume
Unveiling
11:30 p.m.
PRIZES!
Prime Rib Prime Rib
& Salad & Salad
Bar Bar
9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Saturday,
October 26
Costume Party &
Costume Party &
Dance Featuring
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Winter Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Cross Country
6 - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - Kadoka Press
People’s Market
Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232
Discount Fuel &
Kadoka Oil
Mark & Tammy Carlson: 837-2271
Peters Excavation
Brent Peters: 837-2945
Kadoka Gas & Go
Grant Patterson: 837-2350
Club 27
Lonny & Carrie Johnston: 837-2241
Fromm’s Hardware
& Plumbing
Brian & Jessi Fromm: 837-2274
Headlee Vet Clinic
Bill & Norma Headlee, DVM
Kadoka: 837-2431 Philip: 859-2610
Jigger’s Restaurant
& Dakota Inn Motel
Jerry & JoAnne Stilwell: 837-2000
BankWest
Gene Christensen: 837-2281
BankWest Insurance
Lori Waldron: 837-2277
Double H Feed
& Supply
Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976
Aw! Shucks
Colby & Teresa Shuck: 837-2222
Hildebrand Steel
& Concrete
Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand
Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226
Haven/Cell: 490-2926
Farmer’s Union Insurance
Donna Enders: 837-2144
Miller’s Garbage &
Laundromat
Larry & Jan Miller: 837-2698
Badlands Beauty Salon
Jan Miller: 390-4591
Midwest Cooperative
Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600
Kadoka Clinic
Phone: 837-2257
West River Excavation
Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690
Sauntee & Heidi Coller
Oien Implement
837-2244
H&H Restaurant
& Rodeway Inn
Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287
West Central Electric
1-800-242-9232
Stadium Sports
Shelly Young • Mission, SD
1-888-502-3066
Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM
Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697
Groven’s Chemical
Rick Groven: 837-2550
Rush Funeral Home
Philip • Wall • Kadoka
Jack & DJ Rush: 859-2400
State Farm Insurance
Jan Hewitt: 859-2559
Ernie’s Building Center
Midland: 843-2871
Badlands Petrified
Gardens
Bill Fugate: 837-2448
Midland Food & Fuel
Clint & Brenda Jensen: 843-2536
J&S Restore
John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376
Sunset Grill & Subway
Grant Patterson: 837-2400
Proud Sponsors of the Kadoka Area Kougars
KAHS Cross
Country Team
Reese Sudbeck
22:32
27th at Regions
Scout Sudbeck
16:52
6th at Regions
State Qualifier
Bobby Anderson
21:21
22nd at Regions
Katy O’Daniel
20:12
33rd at Regions
State Cross Country B Meet
Saturday, October 26
Rapid City
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
Inspiration Point
The Blessings of Inadequacy
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
Midland • Rev. Glenn Denke • 462-6169, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Sunday Worship--10:00 a.m. MT/11:00 a.m. CT
Church Calendar
Read 2 Corinthians 2:15-17
Most of us assume that feelings of inadequacy are enemies to be subdued
rather than friends to be employed. In some cases, though, these feelings can
prepare us for great accomplishments. That is what the apostle Paul discov-
ered when he set out to preach the gospel to all creation. In spite of his great
learning and varied gifts, Paul acknowledged that he was not sufficient in
himself to minister for the Lord. By taking that attitude, he was able to step
out beyond his own personal limits and tap into supernatural power.
Many times, we fail to follow suit because we so easily surrender to our
inadequacies. We may use our limitations as an excuse for not taking on dif-
ficult assignments—all too often we say, “I can’t do this” or “I don’t want that
responsibility” when faced with God’s call to serve. But our excuses are un-
acceptable because the Holy Spirit will empower us for any task the Lord as-
signs.
Unless we claim God’s supernatural power, we run the risk of multiplied
failure. First of all, we miss out on the joy, peace, and contentment derived
from stepping out in faith to answer the Lord’s “impossible” call and watching
His enablement. In addition, our hesitancy may deprive other people of the
benefits of our service.
Perhaps you feel that you don’t have a lot to offer, but if you are a child of
God, He has equipped you with all that you need for serving Him. Never un-
derestimate the impact of one person who has learned how to depend upon
the adequacy of Almighty God.
Monday, October 28: Hamburger on a bun with lettuce and onion,
potato wedges, baked beans, and pear.
Tuesday, October 29: Baked ham, scalloped potatoes, green beans
with onions, dinner roll, and apricots.
Wednesday, October 30: Homemade pizza, tossed lettuce salad,
apple juice, and fresh fruit.
Thursday, October 31: Chicken parmesan, company potatoes, corn
o’brien, dinner roll, and orange gelatin with fruit.
Meals for the Elderly
What's in a name, anyway?
I cannot express how ecstatic I
was when someone gave me a
coupon for a free donut. Normally,
I am not overly excited about
"free."
All I had to do was fill out a lit-
tle survey online and they would
send me a code that would guaran-
tee me a free donut. In my "daily
diary diet," I have a whole section
devoted to the subject that when a
forbidden food is free it cancels out
all calories.
When I first told the Gracious
Mistress of the Parsonage she
looked at me rather strangely and
said, "Who said that?"
I know we are both getting old
but we are not that old!
I got close to her, waved my
hand so she could see me and said,
"It's me. I just said it. Can you see
me now?"
"That is not funny. You know ex-
actly what I meant."
My grin drained from my face
and I said to her, "Well, I said it."
"Did," she said inquisitively,
"anybody ever say that before you
said it?"
My wife has many talents, skills
and gifts. It would be difficult for
me to say which is her best gift but
at the moment, her greatest skill
is backing me into a corner. And in
a corner I was thus backed.
I then had to explain to her, in
detail, how this was an observa-
tion I worked through with much
research. This is an original with
me and I am quite proud to be the
author.
All she said was, "Huh, that is
exactly what I thought."
I will go to my grave believing
when a donut is free it means it is
free of calories. Call it what you
will but free by any other name is
still free in my personal dictionary.
Getting back to my free donut. I
was anxious to get to the donut
shop, cash in the coupon and enjoy
a donut. I do not know when the
best time to eat a donut is, so I just
started at my convenience.
I got at the donut shop and
walked in and the smell was over-
powering. Nothing like the smell
of donuts baking in the oven with
a hint of coffee brewing in the
background. I just stood there for
a few seconds absorbing the lux-
ury of this marvelous atmosphere.
It is not often I can enjoy such lux-
uries, especially if my wife knows
where I am.
When I became adjusted to the
ambience, I walked up to the
counter and presented my coupon
for a free donut. It was at that mo-
ment I saw them.
I know I am not the most obser-
vant person at the circus. Many
things get by me without noticing
them. Sometimes I am just in deep
thought and not aware of my sur-
roundings. I can relate to Walter
Mitty in many ways.
There they were, freshly baked
Apple Fritters. I was stunned. It
just never crossed my mind that a
donut shop would have this kind of
delicious tidbit. But there they
were. Freshly baked and staring
at me with alluring eyes of desire.
I do not know how much better
a day can get than this. When I got
up this morning, I did not realize
this would be a wonderful day.
There they were staring at me and
I staring back and immediately
there was a connection.
Standing in line I could hardly
wait for my turn to order. I pre-
sented my coupon for a free donut
and the young woman behind the
counter said, "Which donut can I
get for you, sir?"
I savored the moment, licked
my drying lips and said, "I'll have
an Apple Fritter." With that said, I
sighed a deep sigh of true content-
ment.
"I'm sorry, sir," the young
woman said.
"There is no need to be sorry,
young lady," I said as cheerfully as
I possibly could.
"No, sir, I'm sorry but an Apple
Fritter is not a donut."
I can take a joke as well as any-
body else. In fact, I have put forth
my share of jokes. However, an
Apple Fritter is no joking matter.
"Excuse me," I said almost
breathlessly.
"An Apple Fritter is not a donut,
so what donut would you like me
to get for you?"
The thought began unfolding in
my mind at this point that she was
not joking. She sincerely believed
an Apple Fritter was not a donut.
I know an Apple Fritter is among
the Cadillac of donuts but in my
mind, it is still a donut.
I did not have much opportunity
to set this young woman straight
with one of the great fundamen-
tals of life. I had to take one of her
"free" donuts along with my coffee,
go to a corner and think about
these things. What good is "free" if
it is not really what you want?
Sometimes people use the word
"free" as a device to get you to a
place where they can sell you
something else.
The Bible is the only place I will
accept a "free" offer. One particu-
lar verse sets this forth quite
nicely. "And ye shall know the
truth, and the truth shall make
you free" (John 8:32 KJV).
This is often used out of context.
The truth that makes us free in-
deed is none other than the truth
about Jesus Christ. He is the only
One capable of delivering some-
thing absolutely free.
Fellowship of God| Dr. James L. Snyder
Upcoming
Area Events
Thursday, October 24:
•Football game against New
Underwood. Senior recognition
night.
Friday, October 25:
•Interior School Carnival.
•Fromm’s grand opening
celebration.
Saturday, October 26:
•State cross country meet in
Rapid City.
•Fromm’s grand opening
celebration.
•Open house at Creative Cuts.
Sunday, October 27:
•Halloween carnival at the
Kadoka City Auditorium.
Monday, October 28:
•Volleyball at Rapid City
Christian.
•Math night at Midland School
Tuesday, October 29:
•Math night at Long Valley
School.
•First round of football play-
offs.
Wednesday, October 30:
•KCBA “Cash Mob” at
Headlee’s Vet Clinic.
Saturday, November 2:
•Long Valley Fire Dept. hog
roast and dance.
Sunday, November 3:
•Kadoka Nursing Home Holi-
day Festival at the Kadoka City
Auditorium.
Wednesday, November 6:
•Jackson-Kadoka Econmic De-
velopment monthly meeting at 7
p.m. at the Gateway Apartments
Community Room.
Notices:
•The Dakota Readers Group
book "One-Room Country School"
is in! Our discussion is on Sun-
day, Oct. 20 at 2:00 p.m. at Jack-
son County Library. For more
information, stop in or call Deb
Moor @ 837-2689.
Church
Kadoka Press - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 7
Jessica Arndt of Pierre and
Jonathan Weitschat of Pierre,
were united in marriage on June
22, 2013 in Winona, Minnesota.
The colors chosen by the couple
were teal blue and chocolate
brown.
The maid of honor was Nicole
Hentges and bridesmaid was
Joyce Fort, both of Rollingstone,
Minne.
Ben Simbeck served as best
man, Branden Anderson was the
groomsman, ushers were Nick
Wegenke and Leon Blumhardt all
of Pierre.
Jessica is the daughter of James
and Gayle Arndt of Rollingstone,
Minne.
Jonathan is the son of Pastor
Arthur and Doris Weitschat of Hot
Springs.
The couple will to continue to
make their home in Pierre.
Students attend Release Time
Arndt, Weitschat wed
Submitted photo
Students in kindergarten through eighth grade enjoy Release Time that is held every Wednesday. With 102 students
attending, they learn Bible stories, memorize verses, sing songs, and learn to apply the teachings of the Bible to
their daily lives.
Homer George “Tag” Taggart
III, 78, died October 16, 2013, at
Woodhaven Care Center,
Ellinwood, Kan.
He was born April 10, 1935, at
Midland, S.D., the son of
H.George Jr. and Olive (Hogen)
Taggart.
He owned and operated Mr.
Tag’s Taxes and Bookkeeping,
Great Bend. Mr. Taggart was a
Great Bend resident since 1978,
coming from Oklahoma.
He was a U.S. Army veteran
serving during the Vietnam Con-
flict.
He was a life member of the
NRA. He was an avid gun collec-
tor and was a volunteer chaplain
at Great Bend Regional Hospital.
Survivors include four children,
Brad Taggart of New Jersey,
Karen Keesee and her husband,
Darwin, of Blue Springs, Mo.,
Bryan Taggart and his wife, Jill,
of Topeka, Kan., and Homer
George “Chip” Taggart IV and his
wife, Shelly, of Overland Park,
Kan.; three sisters, Marieta
Matos, Jean Johnson and Lynn
Brue; three brothers, Lowell
Swisher, Ken Taggart and Tom
Taggart; 13 grandchildren, Jen-
nifer, Jessica, Danielle, Caleb,
Carson, Molly, Angelina, Annalisa,
Austin, Andrew, Nolan, Herschel
and Ben; and two great-grandchil-
dren, Makayla and Bailey
Services were held Saturday,
October 19, at Bryant Funeral
Home.
Interment was at Great Bend
Cemetery North, with military
rites by Fort Riley Honor Guard.
Arrangements were with
Bryant Funeral Home of Great
Bend. Condolences may be sent
and notice viewed at www.
bryantfh.net
Homer G. “Tag” Taggart__________________________
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
Public Notices
8 - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - Kadoka Press
Official Proceedings
SPECIAL MEETING
Board of Jackson
County Commissioners
September 3, 2013
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in special session at 10:00
a.m., Tuesday, September 3, 2013 in the
Commissioner's Room of the Jackson
County Courthouse. Chairman Glen
Bennett called the meeting to order with
members Larry Johnston, Jim Stilwell
and Ron Twiss present. Larry Denke was
absent.
The purpose of the meeting was to at-
tend to matters that had arisen since the
last meeting and hold a public hearing on
the 2014 Jackson County budget.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
Dean VanDeWiele, SDDOT Area Engi-
neer met with the board. Dwight Deaver,
Hwy. Supt. was also present. Discussion
was held on a proposed agreement for
use of county roads as a detour route
during replacement of the railroad signal
crossing east of Cottonwood on US Hwy
14. The board was informed that the
state will inspect the condition of the sec-
tion of county road to be used as detour
prior to and following use. Anticipated
length of time to complete the crossing
project is two weeks. The contractor will
be required to pay for 50% of the materi-
als needed to upgrade the county road
for use as a detour. Truck traffic would be
limited to one truck at a time on the de-
tour to reduce damage to the edges of
the roads and at intersections. Width re-
strictions would be placed on the detour
route, with over width vehicles being de-
toured at Hwy. 73 and I-90 at Wall. The
board suggested increasing the height of
the road for 100 to 200 feet back on both
sides of the railroad tracks that cross the
county road for ease of low profile vehi-
cles and trailers crossing the railroad
tracks. The board reported that the road
proposed to be used as a detour was old
Hwy. 14 which was turned over to the
county years ago. The road has several
inches of asphalt under the gravel the
county has placed on the road.
Another proposed state detour from I-90
Exit 127 south and east to Cactus Flats
was discussed. The board informed
Dean VanDeWiele that the state has pro-
posed to reduce the width of the top of
the detour road from their original pro-
posal. Discussion was held on the need
to elevate a section of road where water
runs over the road when it rains. Dean
VanDeWiele suggested the county con-
tact Gary Engel, SDDOT – Rapid City.
The board asked Dean VanDeWiele if he
had any information on the state’s pro-
posal to discontinue maintenance of un-
derpasses on I-90. Chairman Bennett
reported he had spoke with Doug Sher-
man, SDDOT – Winner and that Doug
Sherman was unsure of the state’s plan
for underpass maintenance. Dean Van-
DeWiele had no information.
Discussion was held on haul road agree-
ments executed by the state. Dean Van-
DeWiele gave an example that should
there be a state highway contract and
material is being hauled over a county
road, the state would draw up a haul road
agreement between the contractor and
county. He stated this is a matter of
ethics.
The board inquired as to whether he
would have any information on haul road
agreements between counties. Dean
VanDeWiele suggested contacting the
SDDOT legal department. He also stated
he would see what he could find about
haul road agreement regulations be-
tween counties.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt., reported that
the new Cat blade was vandalized and
that Sheriff Clements filed a report. He in-
formed the board that the fuel cap and
screen were missing, some water was
found in the fuel, but no dirt was found in
the fuel. The board instructed that county
equipment not be left near roads.
Dwight Deaver reported that a sensor
was replaced in the truck taken to Excel
Truck Repair.
An e-mail received from Ron Moehring,
State Weed & Pest Supervisor, informed
the county of a report of noxious weeds
in county highway right of way.
Big Iron, an on-line auction sales com-
pany, presented a sales listing agree-
ment to list the county’s Cat 120 motor
grader for sale. Their normal service fee
would be 9% of final auction sale, but
would drop the fee to 8%. Twiss moved,
Stilwell seconded, that the agreement to
have Big Iron list and sell the Cat 120
motor grader be approved.
Stilwell moved, Johnston seconded that
the board recess for lunch.
The board reconvened at 1:18 p.m. with
members Bennett, Denke, Johnston, Stil-
well and Twiss present. Dwight Deaver,
Hwy. Supt. and Ray Clements, Sheriff
were also present.
Joyce Hicks, Kadoka, met with the
board. She requested financial assis-
tance in the amount of $500.00 to the
Kadoka Meals Program for meals served
at the Gateway Apartments. She ex-
plained that the program is administered
by the Bennett County Meals Program,
but that funds for the Kadoka Meals Pro-
gram are placed in a separate account at
BankWest. Denke moved, Johnston sec-
onded, that Jackson County approve
payment of $500 to the Bennett County
Meals Program, and that the funds be
deposited at BankWest for the Kadoka
Meals Program.
Dennis Neyens, Long Valley, met with
the board. He reported that the Long Val-
ley Road (CH 16) is again in need of re-
pair. He reported he has had tires
ruined, front end alignment required, and
is dangerous to drive the road at 40 mph.
The board informed him that the county
had patched with asphalt in the past, but
plans to continue to place gravel on the
road. They also informed him scarifying
the road and returning it to asphalt is too
expensive. Discussion was held on trying
to rip up a small section of road with the
ripper on the new Cat blade, mix in
gravel, and relay the material on the
road.
Dennis Neyes requested a few loads of
gravel be placed on the road leading to
his place. Discussion was held on using
gravel that is located at Long Valley.
Report was made that gravel is needed
on the hill near Allan Allard’s.
Dwight Deaver reported that the water
line needs replaced at the Interior Shop.
He also reported that mowers are being
repaired, the replacement glass for the
one lease tractor has been received, and
the crew has been marking culverts prior
to mowing.
Debra Moor, Librarian met with the
board.
At 2:15 p.m., Stilwell moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
Debra Moor was present. The board
came out of executive session at 3:00
p.m.
The draft 2014 Jackson County budget
was reviewed. Discussion was held on
setting up a separate fund or funds to ac-
cumulate funds for building replacement
and equipment replacement. The board
instructed that the $5,000 request from
the Jackson-Kadoka Economic Develop-
ment Group not be reinserted into the
budget. The board instructed that the
$3,440 for Predatory Animal / Animal
Damage Control be reinserted into the
budget. Salaries for part-time Deputies in
the Sheriff’s budget was reduced to
$920. Furniture and minor equipment in
the Treasurer’s budget was reduced by
$1,250.00. The Sheriff’s budget line item
for Equipment Replacement,
$10,000.00, was removed and a special
fund was created in the amount of
$10,000.00 for Law Enforcement Equip-
ment Replacement. The County Road &
Bridge budget line item for Equipment
Replacement, $100,000.00, was re-
moved and a special fund was created in
the amount of $100,000.00 for Highway
Equipment Replacement. The County
Road & Bridge budget line item for Build-
ing Repairs & Maintenance was reduced
by $25,000.00 and a special fund was
created in the amount of $25,000.00 for
Highway Shop Replacement. A revised
Emergency & Disaster budget was re-
ceived. Emergency & Disaster total
budget was increased to $18,765.00. No
group health insurance quotes were
available at this time. No further adjust-
ments to the proposed 2014 Jackson
County budget were made at this time.
At 5:47 p.m., Johnston moved, Twiss
seconded, that the board go into execu-
tive session to discuss personnel mat-
ters.
The board came out of executive session
at 6:45 p.m. Stilwell moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that Otis Scott Perkins be paid
total hours of accrued vacation hours.
There being no further business to come
before the board Stilwell moved, John-
ston seconded, that the meeting be ad-
journed and that the board meet in
regular session at 9:00 a.m., September
9, 2013.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
[Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $84.15]
Official Proceedings
REGULAR MEETING
Board of Jackson
County Commissioners
September 9, 2013
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in regular session on Sep-
tember 9, 2013 in the Commissioner’s
Room of the Jackson County Court-
house. Vice President Larry Denke
called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m.
with members Larry Johnston, Ron Twiss
and Jim Stilwell present. Glen Bennett
was absent.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
Stilwell moved, Twiss seconded, that the
minutes of the August meetings be ap-
proved.
The Auditor’s account with the County
Treasurer was approved as of August 30,
2013:
Total amount of
deposits in banks . . . . . . . . . .420.25
Total amount
of actual cash . . . . . . . . . . . .1,394.00
Total amount of
actual cash R O D . . . . . . . . . .250.00
Total amount of checks . . . . . .2,451.20
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
Returned checks . . . . . . . . . . .1,639.48
Money Market
account . . . . . . . . . . . . . .624,033.76
Time Deposits . . . . . . . . . . .117,132.00
JCFSA Passbook
savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,441.76
Total Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . .765,640.94
TOTAL COUNTY
FUNDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .765,640.94
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .387,296.25
Road & Bridge . . . . . . . . . . .117,983.56
CH & BR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,753.85
Secondary Road . . . . . . . . . .79,579.16
911 Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,834.35
Other Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,832.44
Emer./Disaster . . . . . . . . . . . . . .963.42
Abuse Center . . . . . . . . . . . .12,227.98
Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18.23
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
L. E. S. T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,252.58
Mod. & Preserv. . . . . . . . . . . .6,882.42
TOTAL TRUST &
AGENCY FUNDS . . . . . .697,837.85
Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,710.64
Townships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,863.01
Towns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231.99
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,501.02
Law Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .789.03
JCFSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,441.76
Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30,265.64
Register of Deeds August collections:
$3,286.41.
Sheriff Ray Clements asked if the insur-
ance reimbursement on the Explorer, for
hail damage, had been received. Vicki
Wilson, County Auditor, said it had not
been received yet and that she would be
calling them. Ray Clements stated that
they would like to put running boards on
the pickup. He also stated that the jail
billings have gone over the allotted
budget. He also asked questions about
Dallas Kendrick’s group health insurance
coverage.
At 9:14 a.m., Johnston moved, Twiss
seconded, that the board go into execu-
tive session to discuss personnel mat-
ters. Vicki Wilson was present. LaTasha
Buchholz was present until 9:20 a.m. The
board came out of executive session at
9:25 a.m.
The group health insurance renewal
quote from WellMark Blue Cross Blue
Shield was reviewed. Stilwell moved,
Johnston seconded, that Jackson
County accept the renewal of the current
plan at $655.22 per employee per month.
Johnston moved, Twiss seconded, that
Jackson County hold a special meeting
on September 16, 2013 to review and
adopt the 2014 Jackson County budget.
Due to the second Monday in October
being a holiday, Johnston moved, Twiss
seconded, that the regular October meet-
ing be held on October 4, 2013 at 9:00
a.m.
The S. D. Developmental Center, Red-
field, SD has billed Jackson County an
additional $60.00 for an accrued total of
$1,080.00 for client assessment. Jack-
son County responded in June 2012 that
charges should be assessed to the ap-
propriate federal government agency as
per SDCL 27B-3-27. Stilwell moved,
Twiss seconded, that the billing be de-
nied.
A notice of hospitalization was received
from Rapid City Regional Hospital. The
board took no action.
A billing was received from Rapid City
Regional Hospital for mental illness
costs. The patient may be eligible for IHS
benefits. Stilwell moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that the billing from Rapid City
Regional Hospital, services, $1,241.92
be denied.
Jackson County received two notices
from the S. D. Department of Health on
disinterment of two deceased persons.
At 10:08 a.m., Stilwell moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
Vicki Wilson, LaTasha Buchholz and
Debra Moor were present. The board
came out of executive session at 10:17
a.m.
Stilwell moved, Johnston seconded, that
the following bills be tabled: Debra Moor,
installation of air condition, no amount;
Ernie’s Building Center, window materi-
als, $673.71.
Stilwell moved, Johnston seconded, that
the billing of Perry Compton, reimburse-
ment for medication, $24.00 be denied
and the billing be sent to the worker’s
compensation carrier.
Debra Moor, County Librarian met with
the board with about a program for the
Library. The board reviewed the plan.
Discussion was held on the meeting
scheduled for September 10, 2013 at the
Interior School about the Library.
Discussion was held on what to do with
the surplus items from the Treasurer’s of-
fice, Auditors office, and the Register of
Deeds office. Stilwell moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that all the items be disposed of
properly.
Discussion was held on Fuel Bids. Still-
well moved, Twiss seconded that Fuel
Bids to be published.
Discussion was held on the 2013 Fire In-
surance Monies to Qualified Fire Depart-
ments. Stillwell moved, Johnston
seconded authorization for Fire Depart-
ment insurance premiums to be paid out.
Denke moved, Stillwell seconded that the
board recess for lunch.
The board reconvened at 1:20 p.m. with
members Denke, Johnston, Twiss, and
Stilwell present. Bennett was absent.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt., and Kolette
Struble were present.
Discussion was held on Kolette going to
a two day Road Crew convention in
Deadwood. The cost is $85 for three
people to go to the convention. At the
time only Kolette is going. Johnston
moved, Twiss seconded that Kolette be
allowed to go to the Road Crew conven-
tion in Deadwood. Deaver also mention
a convention on October 23-24 in Rapid
City that he would be attending. He also
would like one of the commissioners to
go along with him. Twiss moved, John-
ston seconded, and that Deaver be al-
lowed to go to the Road Conference in
Rapid City.
At 1:43 p.m. Johnson moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
Present during executive session was
Kolette Struble till 2:20 p.m. Deaver went
into executive session at 2:20 p.m. The
board came out of executive session at
2:40 p.m. No action was taken at that
time.
The following bills from the files of the
County Auditor were presented, exam-
ined, allowed and ordered paid:
Salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49,032.53
BankWest, payroll tax . . . . . .13,510.18
American Family Life
Ass’r. Co., ins. prem . . . . . . .1,327.14
Jackson Co. Flexible
Spending Acct.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265.14
S. D. Retirement,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,050.50
Colonial Life, ins. prem. . . . . . . . .25.56
Wellmark, group health . . . . . .8,831.25
Credit Collection Bureau,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .830.81
Wage Works, adm. fee . . . . . . . .50.00
Boston Mutual Ins.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204.06
Dearborn Nat’l. Life,
group life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64.80
Game Fish & Parks, fees . . . . . . .85.00
US Postal, postage . . . . . . . . . .270.00
To Whom IT May
Concern, juror fees . . . . . . .1,095.96
Schroyer, Schmidt,
Moreno, men.
ill. expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159.60
Pennington County
911, fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,108.56
ND Sheriff’s Association,
conference registration . . . . . . .75.00
SD Assn of Co
Commission, registration . . . .330.00
City of Kadoka, service . . . . . . .150.88
Golden West, service . . . . . . .1,063.18
Lacreek, service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41.28
SD Bureau of
Information, service . . . . . . . . .60.00
Verizon Wireless, service . . . . . .205.71
Voyager, fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232.59
West River Electric, service . . . . .41.25
West River Lyman
Jones, service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.00
Century Link, 911 fee . . . . . . . . .146.17
Golden West, 911 fee . . . . . . . .765.45
Kadoka Telephone, 911 fee . . . .160.43
Bennett County Meals
Program, donation . . . . . . . . .500.00
WOW!, 911 line . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62.61
D-Ware, registration . . . . . . . . . . .85.00
SDSU-South Dakota
LTAP, registration . . . . . . . . . . .70.00
Haakon County Adm.
Asst. salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794.59
Sheryl Hansen, expenses . . . . . .13.64
Carrie Weller, expenses . . . . . . .121.26
Ingram Hardware, supplies . . . . .18.73
A&A Tire, repair . . . . . . . . . . . . .233.70
A&B Welding, expenses . . . . . . .65.00
Avera Queen of Peace,
CDL lab fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73.90
Lisa Ball, B/A draw . . . . . . . . . . .100.00
Bear Automotive, reapirs . . . . . . .28.00
Butler Machinery
Company, parts . . . . . . . . . . . .146.78
Century Business Leasing,
copier rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180.93
Heidi Coller, B/A draw . . . . . . . .250.00
Ultra, computer installation . . .7,693.00
Creative Product
Source, supplies . . . . . . . . . . . .71.30
Dakota Inn, room expense . . .1,030.00
Terry Deuter, expenses . . . . . . .102.70
Discount Fuel, fuel . . . . . . . . .1,571.99
Excel Truck, repair . . . . . . . . . . .522.77
Fromm’s, supplies . . . . . . . . . . .704.74
Grimm’s, parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218.01
Rena M. Hymans,
ct. apt. atty . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,767.15
J&S Restore, maintenance . . . .396.95
Jackson Co. Conservation
District, September
appropriation . . . . . . . . . . . .1,500.00
Kadoka Vol. Ambulance
Service, insurance . . . . . . . .1,617.50
Kadoka Vol. Ambulance
Service, insurance . . . . . . . .2,516.50
Kadoka Care Center, rent . . . . .500.00
Kadoka Gas & Go, gas . . . . . . .104.91
Kadoka Press,
publications . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,133.62
Kemnitz Law Office,
expense & phone . . . . . . . . . .392.00
Kennedy Implement,
repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,388.83
Konst, repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,080.54
Dorothy Leigl, books . . . . . . . . . . .5.50
Kevin Lewis, ct. apt. atty. . . . .1,527.20
Mcleod’s, supplies . . . . . . . . . . .615.67
Jeremy Mansfield,
a/c repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210.00
Marshal and Swift, books . . . . .284.95
Microfilm imaging systems,
scanner rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75.00
Midwest Coop, oil . . . . . . . . . . . .47.96
Miller Garbage, service . . . . . . . .66.00
Debra Moor, supplies
& books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263.30
Neve’s, uniform . . . . . . . . . . . . .558.67
Noteboom’s Glass, repairs . . . .534.40
Oien Implement, oil filters . . . . . .42.97
Parr Law, ct. apt. atty. . . . . . . . .675.07
Pennington County
Sheriff, transportation . . . . . . .126.00
People’s Market, supplies . . . . .284.63
Philip Clinic, physical . . . . . . . . .145.00
Philip Motor, expenses . . . . . . .450.93
Lola Roseth, travel
expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61.42
Karen Schmitz, expenses . . . .3,309.53
Servall, rugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165.30
Shad’s Towing, expenses . . . . .585.00
Sheehan Mack Sales, parts . . . . . .4.18
SD Department of Health,
lab fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140.00
Jackie Stilwell, expenses . . . . . . .50.47
Jackie Stillwell, phone . . . . . . . .150.00
West Publishing Group,
law books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181.00
TrueGreen, lawn service . . . . . . .52.00
Walker Automotive, repairs . . . .109.00
West Central Electric,
service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .934.95
Winner Police Department,
care & transport . . . . . . . . . .1,737.27
Glen Bennett, expenses . . . . . . .19.24
Larry Denke, expenses . . . . . . . .56.24
Larry Johnston, expenses . . . . . .35.52
Ronald Twiss, expenses . . . . . . .66.60
SD Association of County
Commissioners,
M & P fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68.00
Wage Works, fee . . . . . . . . . . . . .50.00
Pennington County 911, fee . .2,086.27
US Postal Service,
envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .538.10
To Whom It May Concern,
August apportionment . . . . .7,833.79
Discussion was held on the Emergency
Mgmt. SLA. Stillwell moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that the board approve the SLA.
The board decided to move the 2014
budget to the September 16 meeting at
1:00.
There being no further business to come
before the board, Stillwell moved that the
meeting be adjourned and that the board
meet in special session at 1:00 p.m. Sep-
tember 16, 2013 to review the proposed
2014 budget and that the board meet in
regular session on Friday, October 4 ,
2013. Johnston seconded the motion.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
[Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $126.72]
Official Proceedings
REGULAR MEETING
Board of Jackson
County Commissioners
September 10, 2013
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in special session at 7:00
p.m., Tuesday, September 10, 2013 in
the Interior School gym. Chairman Glen
Bennett called the meeting to order with
members Larry Denke, Larry Johnston,
and Ron Twiss present. Jim Stillwell was
absent. Jamie Hermann, Supt., Kadoka
Area School District was present. Also
present were Debra Moor Jackson
County Librarian and Dan VanderMay
and Ken Lensegrav representing Kadoka
Area School Board.
The purpose of the meeting was to in-
form the public and obtain public input on
the county libraries located in the Long
Valley and Interior schools. Several resi-
dents of the Interior community were
present.
Concerns began when the school moved
the Long Valley library into a smaller
room at the Long Valley School. At the
August 1, 2013 Jackson County Com-
mission meeting it was discussed to not
fund the Long Valley and Interior libraries
that are housed in the schools. No action
was taken by the board at that time to ad-
just the 2014 Jackson County budget.
This meeting was called due to questions
and concerns voiced by citizens.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor, prepared county li-
brary expenditures for the years of 2010,
2011, 2012 and January through May of
2013. This information was handed out
to the board and persons in attendance.
Explanation was given that salaries,
books and magazine expenditures have
been split out to show those expendi-
tures for each separate library, and ex-
planation given that Jackson County has
not paid rent to the school to have the li-
braries within the school buildings. A
question was presented about the utili-
ties paid by Jackson County. The group
was informed that the utility expenses
shown are for the Kadoka library only.
The group was informed that counties,
and other local government entities, are
under a tax limitation imposed by the
state legislature, and are only able to levy
a limited amount each year over the pre-
vious year. The amount Jackson County
can levy over the previous year averages
between $15,000 to $25,000 per year for
the county’s General Fund, but in 2010
for taxes due in 2011 the county could
only levy an additional $2,358 for the
General Fund. This is why the county
has been opting out of the tax limitation,
and without this additional tax revenue
from the current opt out of $150,000 per
year the county would have to cut serv-
ices.
The 2014 Jackson County provisional
budget was adopted on August 12, 2013
and includes the funding of the Kadoka
library and both branch libraries. Report
was made that the 2014 Provisional
budget is a balanced budget, but that the
$117,000 in CD’s held by the county are
being used to finance the budget. The
only items removed from the budget at
this point have been the Jackson-
Kadoka Economic Development Group
request of $5,000 and the State Preda-
tory Animal Control annual appropriation
of $3,440, but citizens have requested
that the State Predatory Animal Control
appropriation be reinstated. The final
2014 budget will not be adopted until
September.
Debra Moor, Head Librarian, presented
information on current number of books
at each library and programs now avail-
able. She also presented history of the
Jackson County library.
Debra Moor reported that Jackson
County is the only county in the state that
has libraries located in schools that are
funded by the county. She informed the
group that the State Librarian recom-
mends that the county and the school
should have a written contract or agree-
ment for the county’s libraries to be in the
schools. She also reported that the
school has school libraries at the Kadoka
School and Midland School. Report was
made that the libraries at the Long Valley
and Interior schools are not closed and
books are not being removed from the li-
braries at the schools, but that the li-
braries are circulating books at the
current time.
The group was informed that the county
has approximately $200,000 in books,
and that the county would possible turn
over $150,000 in books to the school if
they were to take over the libraries in the
schools. The other $50,000 worth of
books would be at the Kadoka County Li-
brary. The books will not be moved to do
the inventory. All the books that would be
donated to the school would have to be
re-stamped showing that the Jackson
County no longer owns those books.
This is where Moor would be going to the
libraries at the schools, stamp books and
pick out books which would return to the
Kadoka County Library. Debra Moor
commented that the Kadoka County Li-
brary does not have a very good selec-
tion of young adult books and have not
kept up the children’s book selection.
Discussion was held on the wages for
Long Valley and Interior Librarians.
Jamie Hermann, Supt., Kadoka Area
School District informed the group that
he would not be in approval of the li-
braries in the schools being public li-
braries due to school policies and
security of the students. If the Long Val-
ley and Interior Libraries were to stay as
public libraries they would not be open to
the public until school was over because
of the lock down situation at the school.
Jamie also discussed Public vs. School
for the libraries, with the school it has to
be in lockdown all day while the children
are present for their protection, com-
pared to a public library where people
are free to come and go during business
hours. More was to be discussed at the
School Board meeting.
The group was informed that because of
the difference in budget years for the
county and the school. The school fiscal
year runs from 7/1 to 6/30 where the
county’s fiscal year runs from 01/01 to
12/31. This will cause the school to have
to dip into their Reserve Fund at the
school which is the schools Impact Aid
fund also. The school plans to set up a
committee to address issues of the li-
braries. Dan VanderMay informed the
group that the school board and the
county commissioners would meet and
discuss this further.
Main concerns of the people was that the
main collection of books at the libraries
in Long Valley and Interior be kept intact.
Consensus was that if the school takes
over the libraries that teachers also get a
say in which books stay and which books
go to the library in Kadoka not just Debra
Moor. This will allow the school and the
county to have a joint effort in which
books stay and which books should go,
and the books are split up evenly be-
tween what needs to fill the Kadoka li-
brary and what will still be usable at Long
Valley and Interior.
Denke explained to the group that the
county has nine bridges that are currently
deficient and need to be replaced, the
highway shop building in Kadoka is not
structurally sound and needs to be re-
placed, and the county library building in
Kadoka has black mold and has areas
you can see daylight from inside the
building. County group health insurance
costs have also increased. Federal funds
to the county have been cut because of
the sequester.
Members of the board stated they felt the
libraries should continue for the kids and
be operated as school libraries.
The board informed the group they will
meet with the school on continued oper-
ation of the libraries in the Long Valley
and Interior schools. County library oper-
ation will continue till the end of the
school year in Long Valley, but the library
in the Interior School may close once
Margaret Sampson retires as the Interior
Librarian.
There being no further business to come
before the board Twiss moved, Johnston
seconded, that the meeting be adjourned
and that the board meet in special ses-
sion at 1:00 p.m., September 16, 2013 to
discuss the 2014 Jackson County
budget. The board will meet in regular
session at 9:00 a.m., Friday, October 4,
2013.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
Glen A. Bennett, Chairman
[Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $77.66]
Public Notices
Kadoka Press - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 9
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
Estate of
Wanda L. Holcomb,
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 13-08
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is given that on the 1st day of Oc-
tober, 2013, Robert M. Holcomb, whose
address is PO Box 34, Long Valley, SD
57547, was appointed as Personal Rep-
resentative of the Estate of Wanda L.
Holcomb.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four (4) months after the
date of the first publication of this notice
or their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal
representative or may be filed with the
clerk with a copy of the claim mailed to
the personal representative.
/s/ Robert M. Holcomb
Robert M. Holcomb
PO Box 34
Long Valley, SD 57547
Clerk of Courts
Jackson County Courthouse
PO Box 128
Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2122
Kemnitz Law Office
Ralph A. Kemnitz
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2540
[Published October 10, 17 & 24, 2013]
)
)SS
)
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
IN THE MATTER OF
THE ESTATE OF
STUART A. WILSON,
DECEASED.ohnston,
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 13-9
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is given that on October 3, 2013,
Vicki D. Wilson, of PO Box 472, Kadoka,
SD 57543 was appointed as Personal
Representative of the Estate of Stuart A.
Wilson.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four (4) months after the
date of the first publication of this notice
or their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal
representative or may be filed with the
clerk with a copy of the claim mailed to
the personal representative.
Dated this 8th day of October, 2013.
/s/ Vicki D. Wilson
Vicki D. Wilson
PO Box 472
Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2590
Carol Schofield
Jackson County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 128
Kadoka, South Dakota 57543
605-837-2122
Alvin Pahlke
Attorney at Law
PO Box 432
Winner, SD 57580
605-842-1000
[Published October 24 & 31, November
7, 2013]
)
)SS
)
NOTICE FOR BIDS
Vehicle and
Heating Fuel
City of Kadoka
The City of Kadoka will be accepting bids
for the calendar year of January 1, 2014
to December 31, 2014, until 4:00 p.m. on
Friday, November 8, 2013 for the follow-
ing:
•Dyed #1 Diesel Fuel
• Dyed #2 Diesel Fuel
• Propane Heating Fuel
• Unleaded Gasoline for City Vehicles
Delivered to City Owned Tank Lo-
cated at City Shop
Bids will be opened at 7:00 p.m. at the
Kadoka City Council Meeting on Monday,
November 11, 2013 and award made as
soon as possible. The City reserves the
right to accept or reject any or all bids.
Please put bid for each item in a sepa-
rate envelope and denote contents on
outside of envelope.
[Published October 24 & 31, 2013 at the
total approximate cost of $23.40]
KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
REGULAR MEETING
OCTOBER 14, 2013
7:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the regular meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert; Dick Stolley; Arne
Lund; Cory Lurz; Brad Jorgensen; and
Colby Shuck. Others present: Patty
Ulmen, Finance Officer; Forrest Davis;
Jackie Stilwell; Gary McConnell; Chad
VanLaecken; Rocky Terkildsen; and Joe
Handrahan. Robyn Jones arrived at 7:05
pm.
Willert made Motion 13-10-14:105 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of September 9, 2013. The motion was
seconded by Stolley, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 6-0.
The bills were presented for approval.
Additionally, a bill was submitted by the
Kadoka Volunteer Fire Department,
payable to Bank West Insurance for the
Department’s insurance. After discus-
sion, Shuck made Motion 13-10-14:106
to approve the bills as submitted, includ-
ing the bill for the Kadoka Volunteer Fire
Department. The motion was seconded
by Jorgensen. A roll call vote was taken,
with all members voting yes and the mo-
tion carried 6-0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
OCTOBER 14, 2013 MEETING.
Brock Finn, Dance at Bar 750.00;
AFLAC, Monthly Premium 85.82; Delta
Dental, Monthly Premium 518.80; North-
ern Hills Collections, Inc., Wage Assign-
ment 225.00; SD Retirement, Monthly
Contribution 3,184.90; Verizon Wireless,
Cell Phone 95.93; Bank West Insurance,
Annual Insurance Premium 36,269.00;
Dakota Supply Group, Supplies
2,102.26; Double H Feed, Supplies
65.05; Ecolab, Pest Control/Supplies
202.50; Electro Watchman, Inc., Security
System 80.85; Fromm Hardware &
Plumbing, Supplies/Repairs 579.50;
Golden West, Telephone/Cable 763.15;
Heartland Paper, Supplies 138.96; J & D
Precast, Supplies 2,005.00; J&S Re-
store, Repairs 48.24; John Deere Credit,
Monthly Payment/Front End Loader
2,023.03; Kadoka Oil, LLC, Heating/Ve-
hicle/Equipment Fuel 872.50; Kadoka
Press, Publishing 231.14; KCBA, Reim-
burse/Expenses 948.56; Kennedy Imple-
ment, Supplies 62.31; Northwest Pipe,
Supplies 577.49; O'Connell, Dale, Re-
pairs 30.00; Oien Implement, Supplies
42.32; Pahlke, Alvin, Legal Services
150.00; Peoples Market, Supplies
595.86; Pierre Landfill, Tipping Fees
582.61; SD Dept. of Revenue/Sales Tax,
Sales Tax 1,814.42; SD Lottery, Annual
License Renewal 100.00; SD One Call,
Message Fees 33.30; Servall, Laundry
274.25; West Central Electric, Electricity
4,431.59; West River Excavation, Solid
Waste Transporation/Backhoe 3,404.29;
West River Lyman Jones, Water Pay-
ment 6,860.00; Chamberlain Wholesale,
Liquor Supplies 1,121.20; Coca Cola,
Liquor Supplies 36.00; Dakota Toms,
Liquor Supplies 77.72; Eagle Sales,
Liquor Supplies 7,976.67; Jerome Bev-
erage, Liquor Supplies 3,186.95; John-
son Western Wholesale, Liquor Supplies
3,239.76; Republic, Liquor Supplies
3,026.91; ACH Withdrawal for Taxes,
Federal Employment Taxes 6,684.68;
ACH Withdrawal for Dakota Care, Health
Insurance Premium 6,783.64; Total Bills
Presented: 102,282.16
The financial statement, along with a re-
port listing the breakdown of revenue, ex-
penses, and bank balances for the
month of September was distributed.
After a review of the information, Jor-
gensen made Motion 13-10-14:107 to
approve the financial report. The motion
was seconded by Lund. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 6-0.
City of Kadoka Financial Statement
as of 9-30-13:
Revenue: General Fund - $33,092.50; 3
B’s Fund - $4,976.53; Street Fund -
$3.85; Liquor Fund - $40,830.15; Water
Fund - $18,584.11; Sewer Fund -
$2,956.52; Solid Waste Fund -
$5,236.42.
Expense: General Fund - $40,273.17;
3B’s Fund - $763.78; Liquor Fund -
$38,433.62; Water Fund - $13,972.15;
Sewer Fund - $1,781.65; Solid Waste
Fund - $3,445.90.
Payroll: Mayor/Council - $2,130.00; Ad-
ministration - $4,585.50; Streets -
$3,421.27; Police - $3,942.69; Audito-
rium/Parks - $3,568.80; Liquor -
$6,892.33; Water/Sewer – $4,340.90;
Solid Waste - $1,354.92; Group
Health/Dental - $7,302.44; Retirement -
$3,184.90; Social Security/Medicare –
6,684.68.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$841,300.20; ATM Account - $1,787.41;
Certificates of Deposit - $769,983.58.
Citizen Input: No one was present to ad-
dress the council.
Open Bids/Hail Damage Repairs: Two
contractors (Terkildsen Construction and
Home Masters) submitted bids for the
hail damage repairs for city owned build-
ings. Both contractors were present for
the bid opening. Gary McConnell, on be-
half of Home Masters stated that by their
calculations, the replacement cost esti-
mate prepared by Dakota Claims was
approx. $98,000.00 to low. He stated that
he would be willing to work with the
claims adjuster to revise the insurance
cost estimate, if they were awarded the
bids. Rocky Terkildsen and Joe Handra-
han, on behalf of Terkildsen Construc-
tion, stated that they are local contractors
and the city council knows their work.
They were willing to proceed with the bid
opening.
Willert made Motion 13-10-14:108 to re-
ject all bids and give Home Masters until
the next regular meeting (November 11,
2013) to work with Dakota Claims to re-
vise the claim sheet. The motion was
seconded by Stolley. A roll call vote was
taken: Jorgensen-no; Shuck-no; Lurz-no;
Lund-no; Willert-yes; Stolley-yes. The
motion failed 2 yes and 4 no.
The bids and amounts submitted are as
follows:
A. Auditorium: Terkildsen Construction -
$83,900.00; Home Masters - $76,625.84
B. Bar & Swimming Pool: Terkildsen
Construction - $17,295.00; Home Mas-
ters – no bid
C. Pump Houses & Shop/Garage: Terk-
ildsen Construction - $20,200.00; Home
Masters - $18,873.00
D. Fire Hall: Terkildsen Construction -
$43,900.00; Home Masters - $40,448.70
E. Museum: Terkildsen Construction -
$23,989.49; Home Masters - $22,199.40
F. Rodeo Grounds: Terkildsen Construc-
tion - $18,500.00; Home Masters – no
bid
G. Transfer Station: Terkildsen Construc-
tion – no bid; Home Masters -
$32,400.00
Further discussion was held on the bids
as submitted. The question was raised
as to why as per the bid specifications,
Terkildsen Construction submitted a
cashier’s check as a guarantee for each
bid submitted and Home Masters did not.
Home Masters stated that they submitted
a separate bid proposal for all buildings
and one check was submitted with that
bid; this information was in a separate
sealed envelope. However, the bid spec-
ifications stated that each building or
group of buildings (A through G) was to
be placed in a separate sealed envelope,
along with a cashier’s check.
Stolley made Motion 13-10-14:109 to ac-
cept the bid from Home Masters in the
amount of $76,625.84 for repairs to the
auditorium. The motion was seconded by
Willert. A roll call vote was taken: Jor-
gensen-no; Shuck-no; Lurz-yes; Lund-
yes; Willert-yes; Stolley-yes. The motion
carried 4-2.
Shuck made Motion 13-10-14:110 to ac-
cept the bid from Terkildsen Construction
in the amount of $17,295.00 for repairs
to the bar and swimming pool. The mo-
tion was seconded by Lund. A roll call
vote was taken, with all members voting
yes and the motion carried 6-0.
Lund made Motion 13-10-14:111 to ac-
cept the bid from Terkildsen Construction
in the amount of $20,200.00 for repairs
to the pump houses and shop/garage.
The motion was withdrawn. Lurz made
Motion 13-10-14:112 to accept the bid
from Home Masters for repairs to the
pump houses and shop/garage. The mo-
tion was seconded by Willert. A roll call
vote was taken: Lund-no; Shuck-no; Jor-
gensen-no; Lurz-yes; Willert-yes; Stolley-
yes. The vote was 3-3. The mayor broke
the tie by casting a no vote and the mo-
tion failed 3 yes and 4 no.
The validity of the bids as submitted by
Home Masters was again questioned.
After discussion concluded, Shuck made
Motion 13-10-14:113 to rescind motions
13-10-14-109; 13-10-14-110; and 13-10-
14:112. The motion was seconded by
Lund. After discussion, Shuck withdrew
his motion. Shuck then made Motion 13-
10-14:114 to rescind motions 13-10-
14:109; 13-10-14-110; and 13-10-14:112
pending consultation with the city’s attor-
ney to determine if the bids as received
from Home Masters are in compliance
with the specifications included in the “In-
vitation to Bidders”; if the bids are legal
bids; and if the receipt of only one check
is in compliance with the specifications of
the “Invitation to Bidders”. The motion
was seconded by Lund. A roll call vote
was taken: Stolley-no; Willert-yes; Lund-
yes; Lurz-yes; Shuck-yes; Jorgensen-
yes. The motion carried 5-1.
The mayor and finance officer were in-
structed to contact the city’s attorney to
obtain legal advice regarding the ques-
tions posed in Motion 13-10-14:114. A
special meeting will be held on Wednes-
day, October 16, 2013 at 5:00 pm to re-
view the advice received from the
attorney and award bids.
NEW BUSINESS:
A. 2nd Reading of Budget Ordinance
2014-A: The second reading of Budget
Ordinance 2014-A was held. At the con-
clusion of the second reading, Shuck
made Motion 13-10-14:115 to approve
Budget Ordinance 2014-A. The motion
was seconded by Willert. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 6-0.
COUNCIL REPORTS:
A. Water/Sewer: no report
B. Streets: The manhole by the swim-
ming pool has been replaced.
C. Solid Waste: no report
D. Liquor: no report
E. Auditorium/Park: Billie Jo is working
on the schedule for installation of the
new lighting. The locker room doors have
been replaced.
F. Public Safety: The monthly report was
distributed.
G. Mayor’s Report: no report
Shuck made Motion 13-10-14:116 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by Lurz,
with all members voting yes and the
meeting was adjourned at 9:18 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $108.53]
KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
SPECIAL MEETING
OCTOBER 16, 2013
5:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the special meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
5:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert; Cory Lurz; Brad
Jorgensen; and Colby Shuck. Dick Stol-
ley arrived at the meeting at 5:20 p.m.
Member absent: Arne Lund. Others pres-
ent: Patty Ulmen, Finance Officer; Jackie
Stilwell; Rocky Terkildsen; Joe Handra-
han; Randy Miller; and Patrick Solon.
Robyn Jones arrived at 5:15 pm.
Mayor Weller advised the council that he
had consulted with the city’s attorney re-
garding the bids as submitted by Home
Masters. After reviewing state statutes
and information on the bids submitted,
he advised the Mayor that all bids from
Home Masters could be rejected be-
cause the bids received were not in com-
pliance with the specifications set forth in
the “Invitation to Bidders”.
Shuck made Motion 13-10-16:117 to re-
ject all bids submitted by Home Masters.
The motion was seconded by Jorgensen.
A roll call was taken: Jorgensen-yes;
Shuck-yes; Willert-yes; Lurz-yes. The
motion carried 4-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-10-16:118 to ac-
cept the bid from Terkildsen Construction
in the amount of $83,900.00 for repairs
to the auditorium. The motion was sec-
onded by Jorgensen. A roll call vote was
taken with all members voting yes and
the motion carried 4-0.
Willert made Motion 13-10-16:119 to ac-
cept the bid from Terkildsen Construction
in the amount of $17,295.00 for repairs
to the bar and swimming pool. The mo-
tion was seconded by Shuck. A roll call
vote was taken with all members voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-10-16:120 to ac-
cept the bid from Terkildsen Construction
in the amount of $20,200.00 for repairs
to the pump houses and shop/garage.
The motion was seconded by Willert. A
roll call vote was taken with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Jorgensen made Motion 13-10-16:121 to
accept the bid from Terkildsen Construc-
tion in the amount of $43,900.00 for re-
pairs to the fire hall. The motion was
seconded by Lurz. A roll call vote was
taken with all members voting yes and
the motion carried 4-0.
Lurz made Motion 13-10-16:122 to ac-
cept the bid from Terkildsen Construction
in the amount of $23,989.49 for repairs
to the museum. The motion was sec-
onded by Willert. A roll call vote was
taken with all members voting yes and
the motion carried 4-0.
Willert made Motion 13-10-16:123 to ac-
cept the bid from Terkildsen Construction
in the amount of $18,500.00 for repairs
to the rodeo grounds buildings. The mo-
tion was seconded by Shuck. A roll call
vote was taken with all members voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Because there was not a bid submitted
for repairs to the transfer station, Shuck
made Motion 13-10-16:124 to re-adver-
tise for bids for hail damage repairs at the
transfer station. The motion was sec-
onded by Jorgensen. A roll call vote was
taken with all members voting yes and
the motion carried 4-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-10-14:125 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by Lurz,
with all members voting yes and the
meeting was adjourned at 5:25 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $36.40]
ORDINANCE 2014-A
2014 Appropriation
Ordinance
City of Kadoka, Jackson
County, South Dakota
SECTION I:
Be it ordained by the City council of
the City of Kadoka that the following
sums are appropriated for the obliga-
tion of the municipality.
410 GENERAL GOVERNMENT:
411 Legislative 23,095
412 Executive 12,530
413 Elections 450
414 Financial Adm 93,380
TOTAL GENERAL
GOVERNMENT 129,455
420 PUBLIC SAFETY:
421 Police 68,750
422 Fire 23,650
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 92,400
430 PUBLIC WORKS:
431 Streets 223,265
435 Airport 3,725
TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 226,990
440 HEALTH & WELFARE:
441 Animal Control &
Mosquito Spraying 1,100
446 Ambulance 3,000
TOTAL HEALTH &
WELFARE 4,100
450 RECREATION:
451 Summer Rec &
Swimming Pool 44,465
452 Parks 15,645
456 Auditorium 98,730
458 Museum 1,370
TOTAL RECREATION 160,210
SOLID
ENTERPRISE FUNDS: LIQUOR: WATER: SEWER: WASTE:
Beg. Ret. Earnings 321,775 13,657 127,810 40,905
Est. Revenue 366,925 158,870 42,725 37,540
Total Est. Ret. Earnings 688,700 172,527 170,535 78,445
Less Appropriations 366,925 158,870 42,725 37,540
Est. Surplus 321,775 13,657 127,810 40,905
Est. Surplus Retained 321,775 13,657 127,810 40,905
The finance officer is directed to certify the following dollar amount of tax levies made
in this Ordinance to the county auditor: $247,500.00.
Dated this 14th day of October, 2013.
/s/ Harry E. Weller
Harry E. Weller, Mayor
FIRST READING: September 9, 2013
SECOND READING: October 14, 2013
PUBLISHED October 24, 2013
EFFECTIVE DATE: January 1, 2014
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
[Published October 44, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $68.11]
TOTAL
APPROPRIATIONS: 613,155
TOTAL
APPROPRIATIONS 613,155
SECTION II:
The following designates the fund or
funds that money is derived from:
GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS:
310 Taxes 232,120
320 License & Permit 4,260
330 Intergovt Rev 48,700
340 Goods & Ser 6,250
350 Fines 100
360 Misc. Revenue 74,225
TOTAL MEANS
OF FINANCE: 365,655
Compare with
Appropriations 613,155
Revenue Needed
from Tax Levy 247,500
SPECIAL REVENUE:
3 B's FUND:
Appropriations:
465 Economic
Development 33,770
Means of Finance:
310 Taxes 33,770
Est. Surplus Retained: 72,370
STREET FUND:
Appropriations:
456 Fire Alarm System 0
Means of Finance:
301 Taxes: 0
Est. Surplus Retained: 43,876
FINANCIAL REPORT
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR
THE PERIOD
BEGINNING
SEPTEMBER 1, 2013
ENDING
SEPTEMBER 30, 2013
GENERAL FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 1,620.67; Transfer
into account: (from MMDA account)
292,182.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 826.16; Haakon Co.
Treasurer, taxes 65.64; County appor-
tionment 3,709.62; BankWest, interest
112.76; First National Midland, int. 92.17;
State of SD, state aid 103,667.00; Ad-
missions 2,727.00; Activity Participation
Fees 30.00; US Dept of Ed, Indian Ed
2,519.16; State of SD, medicade
8,594.00; State of SD, Title I 41,665.00;
State of SD, REAP 7,632.00; Rental
100.00; Student Activities 155.00; Three
Rivers Coop 1,545.00; Other 2,896.65;
Total receipts: 176,337.16; Transfers out:
(to MMDA) 188,547.43; Disbursements:
279,821.37; Ending balance, checking:
1,771.03; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count: 251,605.55; Money Market De-
posit Account:(MB) 160,375.98; Petty
Cash: 130.00; Total Balance of Account:
413,882.56
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: Checking ac-
count balance, beginning: 975.30; Trans-
fer in: 78,846.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 325.99; Haakon Co.
Treasurer 18.60; County apportionment
11.05; First National, Interest 92.17;
BankWest, interest 112.10; Transfers
out: 15,404.27; Disbursements:
56,023.07; Ending balance, checking:
8,953.87; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count: 96,996.38; Money Market Deposit
Account:(MB) 49,853.48; Total Balance
of Account: 155,803.73
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: Checking
account balance, beginning: 998.75;
Transfer into account: from savings
30,200.00; Receipts: Jackson Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 389.49; Haakon Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 22.82; First National, interest
38.40; BankWest, interest 42.03; State of
SD, IDEA 5,017.00; State of SD, Med-
icade 919.00; State of SD, Sped grant
1,000.00; State of SD, state aid 145.00;
Transfers out: 6,783.43; Disbursements:
31,880.96; Ending balance, checking:
108.10; Money Market Deposit Account:
(BW) 96,996.38; Money Market Deposit
Account: (MB) 49,853.48; Total Balance
of Account: 146,957.96
PENSION FUND: Checking account bal-
ance, beginning: 394.62; Receipts: Jack-
son Co. Treasurer, taxes 76.32; Haakon
Co. Treasurer, taxes 4.89; Transfers out:
0.00; Disbursements: 0.00; Ending bal-
ance, checking: 475.83
IMPACT AID FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 0.00; Receipts: Inter-
est 746.24; Transfers out: 0.00;
Money Market Deposit account
691,849.00; C.M.A. Account
1,019,499.92; Balance of Account:
1,711,348.92
FOOD SERVICE FUND: Beginning Bal-
ance: 7,909.84; Sales 4,239.12; Dis-
bursements 9,426.18; Total balance
checking account: 2,722.78; Cash
change 70.00; Total balance accounts:
2,792.78
TRUST & AGENCY FUND: Beginning
balance, checking: 29,259.00; Transfer
in: 0.00; Receipts: 59,643.53; Transfers
out: 2.78; Disbursements: 55,899.56;
Balance, Checking: 33,000.19; Cash
Change: 500.00; Money Market Deposit
Acct: 33,775.25; Total balance of ac-
count: 67,275.44
ALBIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Non ex-
pendable trust fund: Beginning balance:
309.51; Transfer in: Receipts: 89.50; Dis-
bursements: 0.00; Total Balance Ac-
count: 399.01
/s/ Jo Beth Uhlir
Jo Beth Uhlir,
Business Manager
October 3, 2013
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
OF THE REGULAR MEETING
OF THE KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL BOARD OF
EDUCATION HELD
WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 9, 2011
AT THE KADOKA SCHOOL
AT 7:00 P.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Dawn Rasmussen, Ross Block, Ken
Lensegrav, and Mark Williams. Absent
Dale Christensen. Also Present: Supt.
Jamie Hermann; Jo Beth Uhlir, business
manager; Jeff Nemecek and George
Seiler, principals.
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Dan VanderMay at 7:00 P.M.
The Consent Agenda included the follow-
ing items: to approve the agenda, to ap-
prove the minutes of the September 11th,
2013 meeting; to approve the financial
report; to approve the bills as presented.
Ken Lensegrav moved to approve the
consent agenda. Motion was seconded
by Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
GENERAL FUND: AT&T, PHONE SERV-
ICE 7.03; BESTWESTERN RAMKOTA,
PIERRE, TRAVEL 87.99; BEST WEST-
ERN RAMKOTA ABERDEEN, TRAVEL
179.98; BLACK HILLS URGENT CARE,
DRUG TESTING 60.00; BLOCK, AIMEE,
AUGUST FFV 6.00; SEPTEMBER FFV
72.00; BROWN & SAENGER, SUP-
PLIES 2,688.62; BYRD, KAREN,
MILEAGE 24.42; REIMBURSEMENT
16.20; CASCIO INTERSTATE MUSIC,
BAND SUPPLIES 405.23; CENTRURY
BUSINESS PRODUCTS, COPIES
1,578.46; CONSERV FLAG CO, FLAGS
359.42; DALE'S TIRES, TIRES 664.50;
DISCOUNT FUEL, GAS & FUEL
4,169.79; ERNIES BUILDING CENTER,
REPAIRS 319.20; FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF OMAHA, FEES 78.00, MEM-
BERSHIP 64.95, BOOKS 405.70,
TRAVEL 1,875.75; FOLLETT EDUCA-
TION SERVICES, ELEM BOOKS
247.50; FROMM'S HARDWARE, ELEM
SUPPLIES 7.48, SUPPLIES AND RE-
PAIRS 612.27; HAGGERTY'S MUSIC-
WORKS, SUPPLIES 31.48; HARVE'S
SPORT SHOP, ELEM SUPPLIES
297.79; HAUFF MID-AMERICA
SPORTS, REFEREE SHIRTS 95.80,
SUPPLIES 250.50; HEARTLAND
WASTE MANAGEMENT, MIDLAND
SCHOOL 120.00; J&S RESTORE, RE-
PAIRS 3,369.37; JW PEPPER, HS
MUSIC 136.42; KASD T&A, B/G
CHECKS 173.00, REGISTRATION
FEES 115.00, REFS & MILEAGE
1,202.40, ENTRY FEES 100.00,
POSTAGE 24.36, SUPPLIES 79.26,
DUES 630.00, TRAVEL 550.08;
KADOKA CITY TRANSFER STATION,
SEPTEMBER RUBBLE 13.40; KADOKA
PRESS, COMMUNICATIONS AND AD-
VERTISING 348.35; LONG VALLEY
BOOSTER CLUB, CUSTODIAL SERV-
ICES 200.00; MCGRAW-HILL, ELEM
BOOKS 47.40; MID CENTRAL EDUCA-
TIONAL COOP, DIAL CLASSES
6,300.00; MIDLAND SCHOOL
BOOSTER CLUB, COMMUNITY CAL-
ENDARS 21.00; MILLER'S GARBAGE,
GARBAGE 242.00; MOSES BLDG CEN-
TER, SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS 135.00;
NEOPOST USA INC, POSTAGE MA-
CHINE RENTAL 133.50; NETWORK
SERVICCES COMPANY, SUPPLIES
46.54; NIMCO INC, SUPPLIES 63.75;
NORTH CENTRAL SUPPLY INC, SUP-
PLIES 15.00; OLSON'S PEST CON-
TROL, MIDLAND SCHOOL 90.00;
PEOPLE'S MARKET, FFV 1,637.03,
SUPPLIES 239.55; PIONEER PUB-
LISHING, SUPPLIES 307.39; POSITIVE
PROMOTIONS, SUPPLIES 116.06;
PRESTRWICK HOUSE INC, HS
BOOKS 827.97; QUILL, SUPPLIES
139.89; RAPID CITY JOURNAL, SUB-
CRIPTION 66.15; SCHOLASHIC INC,
SUBCRIPTIONS 247.23; SCHOOL
SPECIALTY, SUPPLIES 165.60; SD
DEPT OF REVENUE, LV WATER TEST-
ING 148.00; SD UNITED SCHOOLS AS-
SOCIATION, DUES 600.00; SERVALL,
SERVICES 546.08; SHAD'S TOWING,
TOWING 650.00; USPS, LV BOX RENT
32.00; WAGE WORKS, MONTHLY
SERVICE FEE 125.00; WALKER RE-
FUSE, GARBAGE 281.30; MILEAGE,
RENEE SCHOFIELD 366.30; GEORGE
SEILER 186.48; CARRIE SANFTNER
32.56; NANCY WELLER 166.50; MISTY
HAMAR, MILEAGE & CONCESSIONS
461.00; SKYE BRUCKLACHER, CON-
CESSIONS & MILEAGE 248.00;
TEACHER SALARIES, ELEMEMEN-
TARY 42,280.26; TEMPORARY
SALARIES, ELEMENTARY 463.68;
TEACHER SALARIES, HIGH SCHOOL
12,626.48; TEMPORARY SALARIES,
HIGH SCHOOL 1,728.31; INDIAN EDU-
CATION 2,153.96; TITLE II A SALARIES
4,631.62; TEMPORARY SALARIES
TITLE II 210.00; PRE SCHOOL SLAR-
IES 1,166.95; GUIDANCE SALARY
4,388.52; TITLE I SALARIES 23,289.74;
TEMPORARY SALARIES TITLE I
862.23; OFFICES OF THE SUPT.,
PRINCIPAL AND BUSINESS MAN-
AGER 20,114.41; TECHNOLOGY
3,546.17; LIBRARY 186.55; OPERA-
TION OF PLANT SALARIES 7,828.23;
BUS MONITRING 810.61; PUPIL
TRANSPORTATION 2,340.85; SUB
PUPIL TRANSPORTATION 1,261.84;
EXTRA CURRICULAR TRANSPORTA-
TION, JAMES STILWELL 288.00;
ROGER DALE 893.16; SCORE
KEEPER 41.60; EXTRA CURRICULAR
266.83; TUTORING 180.00; AMERICAN
FAMILY LIFE ASSURANCE CO, CC/IC
INS W/H 1,754.56; WASHINGTON NA-
TIONAL INSURANCE CO, W/H 208.70;
BENEFIT MALL, SD, LIFE INS W/H
655.08; BREIT LAW OFFICES 100.00;
MG TRUST COMPANY, 403(B) W/H
1,090.00; CREDIT COLLECTION BU-
REAU, W/H 38.96; DELTA DENTAL INS.,
GROUP DENTAL 4,155.62; KADOKA
SCHOOL T&A CAFETERIA ACCT.,
PAYFLEX W/H 717.00; KADOKA
SCHOOL T&A FIT/FICA ACCT., TAX
43,878.96; SD RETIREMENT SYSTEM,
TR AND MATCH 23,427.21; S.D.
SCHOOL DISTRICT BENEFIT FUND,
GROUP HEALTH 41,311.88
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: BRANT'S
ELEC, REPAIRS 253.47; FIRST NA-
TIONAL BANK OF OMAHA, BOOKS
904.51; IXL LEARNING, LICENSES
400.00; JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD,
BOOKS 684.00; KADOKA CITY, AUDI-
TORIUM LEASE 4,000.00; KADOKA
CITY WATER DEPT., KADOKA
SCHOOL 127.70; LACREEK ELECTRIC
ASSN, LV SCHOOL 225.90; MIDWEST
COOP, KADOKA SCHOOL 782.14;
LONG VALLEY 499.85; OIEN IMPLE-
MENT, BUS GARAGE RENT 600.00;
TOWN OF MIDLAND, WATER &
SEWER 67.50; WEST CENTRAL ELEC
COOP, KADOKA & MIDLAND 4,028.11;
WEST RIVER ELEC ASSOC, INTERIOR
SCHOOL 606.58; WEST RIVER EXCA-
VATION, REPAIRS 2,025.51; WR/LJ
WATER SYSTEM, INTERIOR
SCHOOOL 35.00
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: BONEN-
BERGER, PAMELA, REIMBURSE-
MENT 66.44; DISCOUNT FUEL, GAS
92.28; FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OMAHA, SUPPLIES 600.00; FROMM'S
HARDWARE, SUPPLIES 5.18; KASD
T&A, TRAVEL 38.00, PARENT
MILEAGE, MILEAGE 71.04; PEOPLE'S
MARKET, SUPPLIES 124.06; REGU-
LAR SALARIES 14,599.28
FOOD SERVICE: BLOCK, AIMEE,
LUNCH CONTRACT 1,639.00; CASH-
WA DISTRIBUTING, FOOD 2,968.81;
CHILD & ADULT NUTRITION SERV-
ICES , FOOD 107.94; DEAN
FOODS, MILK 2,326.33; EARTH-
GRAINS BAKING CO, BREAD 285.00;
FROMMS HARDWARE, SUPPLIES
52.07; MILLER'S GARABAGE,
KITCHEN GARBAGE 201.20; PEO-
PLE'S MARKET, FOOD 965.87; REGU-
LAR SALARIES 4,540.58; SWISHER
HYGIENE, SUPPLIES 508.32; US
FOOD SERVICE, INTERIOR 1,334.03,
KADOKA 3,353.14
SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT: Supt.
Hermann reported on the NAFIS confer-
ence that was attended by himself and
Dale Christensen, he reported that they
met with our South Dakota congress of-
fices and that they are in support of im-
pact aid and the reauthorization of
ESEA. He also reported the first in-ser-
vice will be held this Friday and staff web
pages will be worked on. A library update
was given by Mr. Hermann, two county
commissioners and two board members
met earlier in the evening and are work-
ing toward a plan for transitioning the
county libraries to school libraries.
Mr. Hermann reported that the Interior
bus has been repaired at Butler Cat it
was not a major breakdown and is back
in service.
The school district has yet to receive an
insurance quote from claims associates.
Mr. Hermann also reported that district
numbers are up, and the boiler at the
Kadoka School was turned on last week.
The Interior School boiler encountered
some problems, but is now working. The
Interior school was closed for a day due
to boiler issues, and that day will be
made up on an upcoming Friday. Mr.
Hermann provided the board with a re-
view of the onsite audit that was per-
formed last week; there were no major
findings.
PRINCIPALS’ REPORTS: Mr. Nemecek
reported that he has done 95 walk-
throughs this year, and they are highly
beneficial in communication with teach-
ers. He also reported that Jr. Kinder-
garten and Kindergarten are going well
and parents are very responsive to the
idea.
Mr. Nemecek reported that there is a
state RTI leadership conference which is
by selection only and he has been se-
lected and will be attending. NWEA test-
ing is in progress in the district, this
testing will be done three times per year
to monitor student progress. He also re-
ported that new math curriculum has
been looked at and will be presented at
the in service on the 11th.
Mr. Seiler reported that middle school
numbers are down from last year and
high school numbers are up. There was
100% retention of Long Valley and Mid-
land eighth graders from last year. The
five year algebra waiver set by the state
for the eighth graders to get high school
credit is up and there will be a public
meeting on math night to review this
waiver.
BOARD COMMITTEE REPORTS: No
reports
CITIZENS INPUT HEARING: (Non
agenda items) No input
ACTION ITEMS: Policy Changes-Sec-
ond Reading: Door Security
Second Reading: Junior Kindergarten
EXECUTIVE SESSIONS: Motion to go
into executive session for personnel mat-
ters SDCL 1-25-2 was made by Ross
Block at 7:50 PM and the motion was
seconded by Mark Williams. The board
came out of executive session at 8:20
PM.
Contracts: Ken Lensegrav made a mo-
tion to approve the contract to Caycee
Hiles for Para professional in the amount
of $9.00 per hour. The motion was sec-
onded by Mark Williams and carried.
Mark Williams made a motion to approve
the contract to Julie Kruse for Para pro-
fessional in the amount of $9.00 per
hour. The motion was seconded by Ross
Block and carried.
Ross Block made the motion to approve
the contract to Misty Hamar for conces-
sion advisor in the amount of $2,475.
The motion was seconded by Mark
Williams and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen made the motion to
approve the contract to George Seiler for
student council advisor in the amount of
$660. Motion was seconded by Mark
Williams and carried.
Ken Lensegrav made a motion to ap-
prove the contract to George Seiler for
assistant boy’s basketball coach in the
amount of $2,970. Motion was seconded
by Ross Block and carried.
Mark Williams made a motion to approve
the contract to Julie Hermann for assis-
tant track coach in the amount of 2,475.
The motion was seconded by Dawn Ras-
mussen and carried.
Ken Lensegrav made a motion to ap-
prove the contract to Grady Brunch for
Interior girl’s basketball coach in the
amount of $660. Motion was seconded
by Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
Contract Amendments: Dawn Ras-
mussen made a motion to amend the
contract of John Dylan Moro from a
yearly rate to a daily rate of $213.35; the
motion was seconded by Ken Lensegrav
and carried.
Resignations: Ross Block moved to ac-
cept the resignation of Annette Vander-
May for head girl’s basketball coach,
effective September 4, 2013. Motion was
seconded by Mark Williams and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to appoint Dan
VanderMay as the ASBSD voting dele-
gate for the fall delegate assembly. Mo-
tion was seconded by Ken Lensegrav
and carried.
Ross Block moved to approve the list of
trust and agency accounts as presented.
The motion was seconded by Dawn Ras-
mussen and carried.
The next board meeting will be at 4 PM
Thursday, November 14th at the Midland
School.
Ken Lensegrav moved that the meeting
be adjourned. Motion was seconded by
Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
Dan VanderMay, President
Jo Beth Uhlir, Business Manager
[Published October 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $161.48]
Public Notices
10 - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - Kadoka Press
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
DALE, DAVID, KADOKA: Issued by States Attorney: PETTY THEFT 2ND DE-
GREE-$400 OR LESS: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty: Fine: $154.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
ENDERS, WYATT EARL, KADOKA: Issued by Police Department: FAILURE TO
MAKE PROPER STOP AT STOP INTERSECTION: Disp. Date: 05/20/2013 Dispo-
sition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty: Fine: $54.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges:
$26.00
SCHNEE, RODNEY PAUL, KADOKA: Issued by Police Department: FAILURE TO
YIELD TO TRAFFIC AT YIELD SIGN: Disp. Date: 04/29/2013 Disposition: Judg-
ment on Plea of Guilty: Fine: $54.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
MACFEAT, DAVID JOSEPH, JR, KADOKA: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: DRIVING
UNDER INFLUENCE-2ND OFFENSE: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Judg-
ment on Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 05/29/2013 Plea: Guilty; Fine: $850.00, Court
Costs: $125.00, Surcharges: $44.00; License: Revoked for 1 Year(s) Court Pos-
session; Incarceration: Begins: 06/28/2013 Sent. To: Jail 60 Day(s) Susp.: 55 Day(s)
Credit: 0 Days
NO STOP ON ENTRY FROM ALLEY DRIVEWAY OR PRIVATE RD: Disp. Date:
05/29/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor
STARTING, STOPPING OR TURNING SIGNALS: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Dis-
position: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor
ILLEGAL LANE CHANGE: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Mo-
tion by Prosecutor
Conditions: PAY FINE AND COSTS; INCLUDING $85.00 BLOOD TEST
COSTS.
06/28/2013 - 03/01/2014; OBEY ALL LAWS 06/28/2013 - 06/28/2014; OBTAIN AL-
COHOL EVALUATION, ATTEND AND SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE ANY REC-
OMMENDATIONS 06/28/2013; WORK PERMIT IS AUTHORIZED UPON PROOF
OF INSURANCE & PROOF OF EMPLOYMENT. WORK PERMIT ALSO APPLIES
TO AA MEETINGS 06/28/2013; DEFENDANT IS TO REPORT TO THE WINNER
JAIL NO LATER THAN 10:00 PM MST ON 7/3/13 TO SERVE 5 DAYS.
FORTIER, AARON ARIA, STRUGIS: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEED LIMITS
IN AREAS OF HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION: Disp. Date: 05/28/2013 Disposition:
Judgment on Plea of Guilty: Fine: $304.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.0
CARELESS DRIVING: Disp. Date: 05/28/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea
of Guilty: Fine: $54.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
GOOCH, SCOTT, PIEDMONT: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON INTER-
STATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/01/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty;
Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
KLIMCZAK, RYAN, BURBANK, IL: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON IN-
TERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/21/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty: Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
HAGEDORN, DEAN AUGUST, BELVIDERE: Issued by Highway Patrol: NO DRIV-
ERS LICENSE: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty:
Fine: $54.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
RUTKAUSKAS, TOMAS, FORT MYERS, FL: Issued by Highway: FAIL TO
STOP AT WEIGH STATION: Disp. Date: 04/30/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea
of Guilty: Fine: $104.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
NORTHUP, LINDSEY, BLOOMINGTON, MN: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEED-
ING ON INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/22/2013 Disposition: Judgment
on Plea of Guilty: Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
OLSEN, NANCY, AUDUBON, IN: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON
OTHER ROADWAYS: Disp. Date: 05/20/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty: Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
MADISON, MARQUIS, FULDA, MN: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON
INTERSTATE HIGHWA: Disp. Date: 05/13/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty: Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
ETHERTON, ROBERT, EDWARDSVILLE, IL: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEED-
ING ON INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/20/2013 Disposition: Judgment
on Plea of Guilty: Fine: $39.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
ROWLEY, DENNIS, SPENCER: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON INTER-
STATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/10/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty;
Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
HENRICHSEN, ROSS ALLAN, PIERRE: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING
ON OTHER ROADWAYS: Disp. Date: 05/02/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea
of Guilty: Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
TRIMBLE, AARON M, PIERRE: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON IN-
TERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty; Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
THOMAS, JAY T, DOVER, DE: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON IN-
TERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/21/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty: Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
SUNDSTROM, ELLEN, HARRISBURG: Issued by Highway Patrol: SPEED
LIMITS IN AREAS OF HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION: Disp. Date: 05/08/2013 Dis-
position: Judgment on Plea of Guilty: Fine: $304.00, Court Costs: $38.00, Sur-
charges: $26.00
WELLER, WILLIAM BLANE, KADOKA: Issued by States Attorney: DISOR-
DERLY CONDUCT: Disp. Date: 07/17/2013 Disposition: Stipulate to Facts-Found
Guilty; Plea Date: 07/17/2013 Plea: Nolo Contendere; Fine: $114.0, Court Costs:
$40.00, Surcharges: $26.00: Incarceration: Begins: 07/17/2013 Sent. To: Jail 5
Day(s) Susp.: 5 Day(s) Credit: 0 Days
VIO PROTECTION ORDER STALKING/PHYSI CAL INJURY: Disp. Date:
07/17/2013 Disposition: Dismissal-Reduction
ELY, JADE L, GILLETTE, WY: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON IN-
TERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 07/01/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty; Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
DILLON, ISIAH JEROME, KADOKA: Issued by Police Department: NO DRIV-
ERS LICENSE: Disp. Date: 06/28/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty;
Plea Date: 06/28/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine: $54.00, Court Costs: $40.00,
Surcharges: $26.00; License: Suspended for 30 Day(s) Court Possession; Incar-
ceration: Begins: 06/28/2013 Sent. To: Jail 10 Day(s) Susp.: 10 Day(s) Credit: 0
Days
FAIL TO MAINTAIN FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: Disp. Date: 06/28/2013 Dis-
position: Judgment on Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 06/28/2013 Plea: Guilty; Fine:
$0.00, Court Costs: $0.00, Surcharges: $0.00; License: Suspended for 30 Day(s);
Incarceration: Begins: 06/28/2013 Sent. To: Jail 10 Day(s) Susp.: 10 Day(s) Credit:
0 Days
Conditions: OBEY ALL LAWS 06/28/2013 - 06/28/2014; FINE & COSTS
WAIVED DUE TO HARDSHIP.
KOCHERSBERGER, TINA A ,PHILIP: Issued by Highway Patrol: SPEEDING
ON A STATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty; Fine: $154.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
FRAVENDIENTS, DONOVAN V, CLARA CITY, MN: Issued by Highway Patrol:
SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 06/17/2013 Disposition:
Judgment on Plea of Guilty: Fine: $59.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
BURTZ, CHARLES, WINNER: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON IN-
TERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 06/19/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty; Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
WOOD, GARY, PHILLIP: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: FAIL TO MAINTAIN FINAN-
CIAL RESPONSIBILITY : Disp. Date: 07/17/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea
of Guilt; Fine: $84.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
LIBBY, SIDNEY, MARTIN: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: FAIL TO MAINTAIN FI-
NANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: Disp. Date: 06/28/2013 Disposition: Judgment on
Plea of Guilty: Fine: $0.00, Court Costs: $0.00, Surcharges: $0.00; License: Sus-
pended for 30 Day(s) Court Possession Date: 07/05/2013; Incarceration: Begins:
06/28/2013 Sent. To: Jail 10 Day(s) Susp.: 10 Day(s) Credit: 0 Days
SPEEDING ON OTHER ROADWAYS: Disp. Date: 06/25/2013 Disposition:
Judgment on Plea of Guilty; Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
Conditions: OBEY ALL LAWS 06/28/2013 - 06/28/2014; FINE & COSTS ARE
WAIVED DUE TO HARDSHIP 06/28/2013; SURRENDER DRIVER'S LICENSE TO
CLERK'S OFFICE NO LATER THAN 7/5/13.
COURT, JOHN, SPICER, MN: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON IN-
TERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 06/17/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty; Fine: $19.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
WALKER, LORI LENETTE, WALL: Issued by Highway Patrol: SPEEDING ON
A STATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 05/31/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty; Fine: $154.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
GLAVAN, DEBBIE L, JOLIET, IL: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: SPEEDING ON
INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 06/03/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea
of Guilty: Fine: $39.00, Court Costs: $40.00, Surcharges: $26.00
Q: WHO DOES THE OPEN
MEETINGS LAW APPLY TO?
A: The open meetings law ap-
plies to all public bodies that exer-
cise “sovereign power derived
from state statute.” This includes
city, counties, school boards and
other public bodies such as ap-
pointed boards, task forces, and
committees (or those that are cre-
ated by ordinance or executive
proclamation) so long as they have
authority to actually exercise sov-
ereign authority. Although no
court decisions have been issued
on the subject, this probably does
not include bodies that are not
created by statute, ordinance or
proclamation or that serve only in
an advisory capacity.
The constitution allows the
Legislature and the Court system
to create rules regarding their
own separate functions.
Taken from: A Guide to South
Dakota’s Open Meeting Law brou-
cure which is prepared by SD At-
torney General’s Office, SD
Municipal League, Associated
School Boards of SD, SD Assoc. of
County Officals, and SD Newspa-
per Assoc.
Conducting the
public’s business
in public
INVITATION TO
BIDDERS
Hail Damage Repairs
City-Owned Transfer
Station
Kadoka, South Dakota
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids
for hail damage repairs to the city’s
Transfer Station Building will be received
by the City of Kadoka, South Dakota at
the City Finance Office until 4:00 p.m.
(MDT) on Friday, November 8, 2013. A
detailed listing of the damages to be re-
paired is available at the City’s Finance
Office located at 705 9th Avenue or by
mail at PO Box 58, Kadoka, SD 57543.
The envelope containing the bid must be
labeled as follows:
Transfer Station Hail Damage Repair.
Bids will be opened and read aloud at
7:10 p.m. (MDT) on Monday, November
11, 2013, and award made as soon as
possible. The City reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities therein and re-
serves the right to award the contract to
the lowest responsible bidder as they so
determine.
There must be enclosed with the bid a
draft, certified check or cashier’s check
certified or issued by a state or national
bank domiciled in South Dakota, payable
to the order of the City of Kadoka in the
amount of at least 5 percent or, in lieu
thereof, a bid bond of at least 10 percent
of the amount of the bid as a guarantee
that the bidder will enter into the pro-
posed contract and furnish the required
performance bonds.
Each bid must be accompanied by a cer-
tificate of insurance with minimum liability
coverage of One Million Dollars
($1,000,000.00).
Pursuant to State law, a copy of the bid-
der’s sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder’s excise tax license as
issued by the state of South Dakota must
accompany the bid. In lieu of a copy of
the license, the bidder shall submit ap-
propriate evidence that the bidder and all
affiliates have the appropriate licenses.
The beginning date for this project will
begin upon the award of the bid and
must be completed within 180 days of
the event, which was July 30, 2013. If the
weather becomes a negative factor, the
City may request an extension for an ad-
ditional 180 days. However, all repairs
must be completed prior to July 30, 2014.
Questions regarding this project and re-
pair specifications should be directed to:
Patty Ulmen, Finance Officer at 605-837-
2229.
[Published October 24 & 31, & Novem-
ber 7, 2013, at the total approximate cost
of $80.92]
NOTICE
Of Intent to Mine Gravel
Notice is hereby given that the Jackson
County Highway Department, PO Box
594, Kadoka, SD 57543, will be conduct-
ing a gravel mining operation at W2, Sec-
tion 2, T 42 N, R 35 W, Jackson County,
South Dakota. The general location is
one and three-quarter miles east and
thirteen miles south of Kadoka, SD.
The operation is to begin November 24,
2013 and will be completed to include
final reclamation by November 24, 2023.
Proposed future use of the affected land
will consist of re-grading, replacing top-
soil and re-seeding to allow the area to
be returned to pasture land.
For additional information contact the
Jackson County Highway Department,
(605) 837 – 2410, or the S. D. Depart-
ment of Environment and Natural Re-
sources, Minerals and Mining Program,
523 East Capitol Avenue, Pierre, SD
57501-3182 (605) 773 – 4201 .
[Published October 24 & 31, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $21.46]
AUCTION:
LAND AUCTION: 474+/- Acres, Lake Oahe-
Peoria Flats, Cropland, Recreational, Devel-
opment, Prime Hunting, 8 miles north of
Pierre, SD, just above the Oahe Dam, No-
vember 12, 2013. Call Dakota Properties,
Todd Schuetzle, Auctioneer, 605-280-3115,
todd@placetohunt.com, www.DakotaProper-
ties.com.
4th ANNUAL LEBANON Consignment Auc-
tion. Saturday, Oct. 26, 10 am, Lebanon, SD.
Consignments welcome until sale day. Con-
tact Gary McCloud 605-769-1181, 605-948-
2333, Sam McCloud 605-769-0088, Lewis
Reuer 605-281-1067. Complete listing at
www.mrauctionsllc.com
800+ ACRES CROPLAND with 200+ Acres
Pasture, productivity 79, Reeder Loams,
Class II & III, Mobridge SD, Absolute Auction,
Nov. 4, www.PiroutekAuction.com or 605-
544-3316
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY:
CALL AVON TO EARN extra money for
Christmas. **40% discount/commission -
$10 to start** Call 605-334-0525
EMPLOYMENT:
IMMEDIATE OPENING. Duties include but
not limited to, bulk delivery of fuel. CDL, Haz-
mat required. Will train. Farmers Oil Com-
pany, Orient SD. Information, Don,
392-2424.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Belle Fourche De-
velopment Corp. Job requirements include a
degree or work experience in economic de-
velopment or related fields. Application and
instructions at www.bellefourche.org (click
on BF Development Corporation tab). Con-
tact Krysti at 605-892-3006 or Krysti@belle-
fourche.org if you have any questions.
FULL TIME JACKSON COUNTY HIGHWAY
Department Worker. Truck driver, heavy
equipment operator, light equipment opera-
tor. Experience preferred, but will train. CDL
required, or to be obtained in six months.
Pre-employment drug and alcohol screening
required. Benefits package. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information (605) 837-
2410 or (605) 837 – 2422 Fax (605)
837-2447
LOOKING FOR A MANAGER for our P/O
Printing & Graphics division in Watertown.
The position involves sales, bidding of print
jobs, marketing and customer service. Suc-
cessful candidate should have customer
service experience, strong math and com-
puter skills, and the ability to lead a team. A
full-time position with benefits. Send letter of
interest and resume to: chris.carter@thepub-
licopinion.com Position closes October 31,
2013.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL, Custer
Clinic, Hot Springs Regional Medical Clinic
and Custer Regional Senior Care have full-
time, part-time and PRN (as-needed) RN,
LPN, Licensed Medical Assistant and Nurse
Aide positions available. We offer competi-
tive pay and excellent benefits. New Gradu-
ates welcome! Please contact Human
Resources at (605) 673-9418 for more infor-
mation or log onto www.regionalhealth.com
to apply.
THE WATERTOWN PUBLIC OPINION has
an immediate opening for a Full-time Re-
porter to join its news team. The successful
candidate will have the ability to cover a wide
variety of news events in print and video and
still feel comfortable putting together a com-
pelling feature story. Experience is preferred
but will consider a recent journalism gradu-
ate. Photography and video skills are a plus.
The Watertown Public opinion is a six-day a
week newspaper in northeastern South
Dakota. This job offers competitive wage
based on experience, and benefits package
with health benefits, 401(k) and life insur-
ance. Send letter, resume, layout and writing
and/or video samples to: Watertown Public
Opinion, Attn: Human Resources, PO Box
10, Watertown, SD 57201, or e-mail:
chris.carter@thepublicopinion.com
PATROL OFFICER – Hourly pay range:
$20.14-$24.50/hr. Visit: www.cityofbrook-
ings.org Return application w/resume to PO
Box 270, Brookings, SD 57006-0270. dlang-
land@cityofbrookings.org
FOR SALE:
FAMOUS CENTRAL SD BAKERY available
for purchase in Gettysburg. Established
turnkey mix bakery with both wholesale and
retail sales. Contact Kathleen at
ltgandt@yahoo.com or 240-461-4779.
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We have
lowered the price & will consider contract for
deed. Call Russell Spaid 605-280-1067.
HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW:
HOLDIAY CRAFT & BOUTIQUE Show, No-
vember 29 & 30, Belle Fourche Community
Center. Vendor space available. For more in-
formation contact 605-892-2336 or
www.blackhillsparrotwelfare.org
LOG HOMES:
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders representing
Golden Eagle Log Homes, building in east-
ern, central, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig
Connell, 605-264-5650, www.goldeneaglel-
oghomes.com
OTR/DRIVERS:
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner opera-
tors, freight from Midwest up to 48 states,
home regularly, newer equipment, Health,
401K, call Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-
3549
MISCELLANEOUS:
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed In-
ternet starting at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY
Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-1892
WANT TO BUY:
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb. Deer ,
Elk/moose 7.50 lb. Bleached 3.00 lb.
cracked 1.00 lb. Also need Porcupines, Rat-
tlesnakes, Elk Ivories ,Mt. Lion skins. More
info; 605-673-4345 / clawantlerhide@hot-
mail.com
Classified Advertising & Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum for 20 words, plus 10¢ for each additional word. To place an ad call 605-837-2259 or
email: press @kadokatelco.com
Statewide Classifieds:A 25-word classified ad in each of the states’ 150 daily and weekly newspapers.
Your message reaches 375,000 households for just $150.00! This newspaper can give you the complete details. Call 837-2259.
Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters
WTire Tanks
WDozer
WVacuum
Excavation
Brent Peters
Located in
Kadoka, SD
For more details or an
application
Call 837-2259
Full-time
Position at the
Kadoka Press
Responsibilities
include covering local
events, public meetings
and photography.
Computer knowledge
helpful, willing to train.
Sudoku
Classifieds
Kadoka Press - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 11
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685-5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567-3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman & AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985-5486
Ccll (605} 515-0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866-4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544 3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441-1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347-0151
(605} 641-1042
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685-4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9 2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R CALF USA! R CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859 2577
PhiIip, SD
UPCOM1NG SAL£S:
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2013: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE. CALVES: 12.00 MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EST. 5000 HEAD
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED.
WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS - 600 MOSTLY DLK & A FEW FED & CHAF X CLVS; FS, NI . 450-
600= DEAL & DEAL - 450 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= TRASK - 320 DLK MOSTLY
STFS; FS,NI . 500= CAMMACK - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS . 550-650= DEERING -
250 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 600= DALY - 250 DLK CLVS; FS . 550-600= VIG - 220
DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= LONG - 200 CHAF X STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= GRUBL -
200 CEFT FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI . 550= CROSBIE - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550=
ANDERS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-575= ALDREN - 150 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 500-
570= LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT - 150 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= LAMPHERE &
GRUBL - 130 MOSTLY CHAF X & A FEW DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600= TRUEBLOOD &
TWISS - 130 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= COLLINS - 120 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-
550= BALDWIN - 110 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-575= GOLDEN WILLOW RANCH -
100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= BACHAND - 100 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-
550= BREWER - 75 DLK CLVS; FS . 450-500= MARLER - 75 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI
(ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-600= CHORD - 70 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550=
SHARP & SIMMONS - 70 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 550= KNIFE - 70 DLK STFS; FS .
450-500= BASEL - 70 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 450-525= SHULL - 65 DLK CLVS;
FS,NI . 500= TRUEBLOOD - 54 DLK CLVS . 400-500= MAY - 50 DLK & FED CLVS;
FS,NI,AN . 550= MARLER - 50 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI (ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-
600= SIMONS - 40 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= SCULL - 40 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI . 500-550= HEBB - 40 DLK CLVS; FS . 450= BILLS - 25 DLK CLVS; FS . 525=
GRIMES - 20 DLK CLVS; FS . 500= BECKWITH - 22 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500=
YEARLINGS: SCULL - 20 DLK EXPOSED HFFS . 750-800=
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE. YEARLINGS
9.00 MT CALVES 11.00 MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATINC
12,000 HEAD
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEH-
IFIED. CUNY & SONS - 500 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= BUCHHOL2 & RISLOV -
500 DLK STFS; FS . 500-625= SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - 400 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 550-
600= WEBER - 350 DLK, DWF & FWF CLVS; FS . 500-600= CARLEY RANCH - 350 DLK
CLVS; FS,NI . 550= C. WILLIAMS - 340 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= WISHAR
& MANGUS - 300 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= JOHNSON & LAMONT - 300 DLK
CLVS; FS,NI (ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 500-575= FIELDS - 300 CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .
500-600= TRIPLE S LIVESTOCK - 300 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= WILLERT
& WILLERT - 275 CHAF X CLVS; FS (FEW FED ANC FEPLC HFFS} . 600-650= M.
WILLIAMS - 250 FANCY FED ANC CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI (2 LDS STFS & 1 LD HFFS} . 600-
700= MADER & MADER - 220 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-575= DIAMOND S
RANCH - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= BRENNAN - 220 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI,ASV . 450-550= JOHNSTON RANCH - 200 FED X & CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI . 500-
550= RIGGINS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550= WILSON BROTHERS - 200 DLK CLVS; FS
. 500-550= WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK - 200 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 450-
550= L. JONES RANCH - 200 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-600= KC BIELMAIER RANCH -
200 DLK CLVS; FS . 600= BUCHERT & BUCHERT - 200 FED CLVS; FS,NI . 600-700=
VANDERMAY & VANDERMAY - 190 DLK ANC STFS; FS,NI . 575= LIVERMONT RANCH -
175 DLK HFFS; FS,NI . 500= MANSFIELD - 160 DLK STFS; FS . 500-600= STOUT -
160 CHAF X CLVS; FS . 550-600= O'DANIEL - 160 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= PAUL-
SON - 150 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= VOGELGESANG - 140 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-
600= SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - 140 DLK STFS . 575= KEFFELER - 130 DLK & DWF
CLVS; FS,NI . 525-575= JULSON - 125 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 450-550= O'ROURKE -
125 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-525= O'CONNELL - 120 DLK CLVS; FS . 550= DAHL -
115 DLK CLVS; FS . 500-600= CANTRELL - 110 DLK CLVS; FS . 500-550= HARTY
RANCH - 110 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= SHARP - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-
600= DAVIS - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN . 550= O'DANIEL - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .
550= REEVES & REEVES - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500= BIRKELAND - 100 DLK & DWF
CLVS; FS . 600= HEATHERSHAW - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 550= PRANG - 100 DLK
STFS; FS,NI . 550-600= FERGUSON - 100 HEFF & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600=
KNIGHT - 100 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 450-550= SHUCK BROTHERS - 100 DLK &
FED LIM X CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= HEATHERSHAW - 100 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 600=
VOLMER - 90 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 570= CAPP RANCH - 90 DWF & FWF STFS . 450-
500= ECKERT - 85 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 600-650= COE - 85 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI
(ALL HFFS IN TOWN} . 575= JULSON - 80 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= BARRY - 80 DLK &
DWF STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= HALL - 70 FED & DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= HUNSAKER
CATTLE CO - 45 MOSTLY DWF FIFST CFOSS STFS; FS,NI,AN . 600=; 25 FANCY DWF
FIFST CFOSS HFFS; FS,NI,AN . 600= MCKAY - 65 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500-
575= SAMMONS - 65 FED ANC CLVS; FS,NI . 600-650= DENKE - 65 DLK STFS; FS,NI
. 575-600= CARLSON - 65 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 500-550= ROSETH - 60 DLK STFS; FS
. 600= ENNEN - 60 DLK & DWF STFS; FS,NI . 600= WILSEY - 55 DLK & DWF CLVS;
FS,NI . 500-550= VANDENBOS - 51 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 500= PFEIFER - 50
DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500= HANNUM - 50 DOSTLY DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-600= STRAND -
45 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI . 400-500= DOOLITTLE - 45 DLK STFS; FS,NI . 600-
650= HANSON - 45 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550-600= DARTT - 40 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 600=
DAVEY - 40 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= RYPKEMA - 35 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .
500-550= BARRETT - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 500-550= MEINEN - 30 DLK CLVS; FS,NI
. 500= HAUK - 26 DLK CLVS; FS,NI . 550= BEARHEELS - 15 DLK CLVS; FS . 400-
500= YOUNG - 15 DLK CLVS; FS . 400-500= REICHERT - 15 DLK & FED CLVS; FS,NI
. 450-500=
YEARLINGS: LONG - 400 DLK SPAY HFFS (5 LD ALL SAME SOFT} . 800= BRUCH
RANCH - 50 DLK TESTED OPEM HFFS . 900= BUCHANAN - 20 DLK STFS . 950= BIER-
WAGEN - 6 DLK OPEN HFFS . 950=
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or
tDS-tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE & WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE. WEIGH-UPS 9.00MT BRED CATTLE 12.00MT EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
DISPERSIONS: JOE & LARAE CARLEY ºAGE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK COMINC 3 & 4 YF
OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25. STEVE ISKE ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 100 DLK &
DWF 2 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-20. MIKE PIROUTEK ºCOM-
PLETE DISPERSION" - 50 DLK & DWF MOSTLY 5 YF OLDS COWS; DFED.CHAF; CLV. 3-15
FOF 65 DAYS GALEN NIEDERWERDER ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 25 FANCY DLK AI'D 3 &
4 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FINAL ANSWEF; CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. HEFF; CLV. 4-1; 10
FANCY DLK AI'D HFFS; DFED. DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-15 & CLEAN-UP. DLK; CLV.4-1 JJ HUNT
ºDISPERSION OF THREES" - 45 DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25 FOF
60 DAYS RYON RYPKEMA ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 30 DLK 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN
MOUTH COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV.2-28 FOF 45 DAYS
BRED HEIFERS: MILLAR ANGUS - 80 FANCY DLK AI'D HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL AN-
SWEF; CLV. 2-18 FOF 2 DAYS; 40 FANCY DLK DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL
ANSWEF; CLV. 3-5 FOF 20 DAYS; 35 FANCY DLK DULL DFED HFFS; DFED. SONS OF FINAL
ANSWEF; CLV.4-1 FOF 30 DAYS STEVE MCDANIEL - 100 DLK ULTFASOUND AI'D HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 2-15 (SOFTED INTO CLVC CFOUPS} BILLY MARTIN ÷ 93 FANCY ULTFA-
SOUND DLK ANC HFFS; DFED LDW SONS OF SAV DISMAFCK; CLV. 3-1 (SOFTED INTO SHOFT
CLVC PEFIODS} MARK WELDON ÷ 75 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW SONS OF FINAL ANSWEF; CLV.
2-20 FOF 45 DAYS DANNY ARNESON - 70 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED FIFST CALF
HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS ANC; CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS} MELVIN AR-
NESON ÷ 40 DLK ULTFASOUND HOME FAISED FIFST CALF HFFS; DFED. LDW DLAIF DFOS
ANC; CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO CLVC PEFIODS}
STOCK COWS: ED MILLER - 30 DWF 5 TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. FED ANC; CLV. 4-
1 BEAU BENDIGO ÷ 25 DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-20 MIKE &
LORI JACOBSEN ÷ 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK DALANCEF; CLV. 3-1
BROKEN MOUTH COWS: ROSETH CATTLE CO - 50 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-25 MILLAR ANGUS ÷ 35 FANCY DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS (COMMEFICAL &
FECISTEFED}; DFED. CONNEALLY SONS OF FINAL PFODUCT; CLV. 3-1 FOF 60 DAYS ED
MILLER ÷ 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.FED ANC; CLV.4-1
More Cons1gnmen1s bg So1e Dog. Co11 TÞor Rose1Þ o1 tDS-SS9-2S?? or tDS-
tSS-SS2t ]or more 1n]ormo11on.
Philip League Bowling
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................19-9
Shad’s Towing ...........................18-10
Rockers ......................................17-11
Badland’s Auto..........................16-12
Dakota Bar................................12-16
Highlights:
Neal Petersen........................200/536
Marsha Sumpter ...5-7 & 3-10 splits;
......................................................189
Jerry Mooney ...............................200
Lee Sundall ..................................174
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor..................................6-2
PHS ...............................................6-2
People’s Mkt..................................4-4
George’s Welding ..........................4-4
Kennedy Imp.................................4-4
G&A Trenching.............................3-5
Team 1...........................................3-5
KTS................................................2-6
Hightlights:
Jerry Iron Moccasin.....................515
Tony Gould ...................................513
Cory Boyd.....................................510
Earl Park............................187 clean
Colt Terkildsen.....................2-7 split
Colt Fitzgerald......................2-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ............................19-9
Jolly Ranchers...........................17-11
State Farm................................17-11
Little Orphans ..........................16-12
Cutting Edge Salon ..................14-14
Highlights:
Karen Foland ................200, 154/501
Vonda Hamill ...............................163
Marsha Sumpter ....5-8-10 split; 168,
...............................................151/466
Donna King .............5-6-10 split; 155
Jen Schriever................5-7 split; 150
Sandra O’Connor .........................150
Lila Whidby.......................7-4-5 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar..................................19-9
Hildebrand Concrete ..................19-9
Morrison’s Haying ....................14-14
Chiefie’s Chicks.........................14-14
First National Bank ...................9-19
Pink Ribbons...............................9-19
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz .......5-10 split; 146 x 3
Emily Kroetch .......................163/411
Rachel Kjerstad..........3-10 split; 171
Debbie Gartner.........5-7 & 3-10 split
Lindsey Hildebrand .............5-7 split
Annette Hand.......................5-7 split
Thursday Men
The Steakhouse ..........................10-2
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................9-3
A&M Laundry...............................7-5
McDonnell Farms .........................6-6
O’Connell Const ............................5-7
Dakota Bar....................................4-8
WEE BADD...................................4-8
West River Pioneer Tanks............3-9
Highlights:
Alex (Toad) Moos...................202/559
Matt Reckling...............................202
Steve McDonnell ..........................536
Chad Walker.........................5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ........................4-5 split
Andrew Reckling................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew .................................8-4
Randy’s Spray Service............6.5-5.5
Dee’s Crew.....................................6-6
Moos on the Loose...................5.5-6.5
Inforcer’s .......................................5-7
Highlights:
Duane Hand......5-10 x 2 & 5-6 splits
Rose Bennett ................................172
Full time Jackson County Highway
Department Worker. Truck driver,
heavy equipment operator, light
equipment operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train. CDL required,
or to be obtained in six months. Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Benefits pack-
age. Applications / resumes ac-
cepted. Information 837-2410 or
837-2422. Fax 837-2447. KP13-5tc
Cooks, counter personnel, and wait
staff position(s) are available for Aw!
Shucks Café opening soon at 909
Main Street in Kadoka. Please apply
within or contact Teresa or Colby
Shuck for more information: 837-
2076. KP2-tfn
Dietary aide position open at the
Kadoka Nursing Home. Full time,
with benefits. Call Ruby or Cathy at
837-2270. K14-2tc
Kadoka Area School District is ac-
cepting applications for an assistant
janitor. Applications are available on
the website www.kadoka.k12.sd.us
and submitted to KASD, Attn. Supt.
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543. For more infor-
mation call 837-2175. KP15-2tc
Help Wanted
Several nice refrigerators with war-
ranties. Del’s, Exit 63, Box Elder, SD,
390-9810. KP15-2tc
800+ Acres Cropland with 200+
Acres Pasture, productivity 79,
Reeder Loams, Class II & III, Mo-
bridge SD, Absolute Auction, Nov. 4,
www.PiroutekAuction.com or 605-
544-3316. KP15-1tc
OPEN HOUSE: Featuring Pam-
pered Chef, Lemon Grass, Tastefully
Simple, and wine tasting at Creative
Cuts & Fitness in Kadoka, Friday,
October 25, 1 to 6 p.m. KP15-1tc
KADOKA LEGION AUXILIARY
MEMBERS: Please bring two items
or cash donation to Holiday Festival
bake sale, Nov. 3. KP15-2tc
For Sale
Notices
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assistance
or not, we can house you. Just call 1-
800-481-6904 or stop in the lobby
and pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. 36-tfc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we will
give you a quote. Office 837-2621,
Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free 877-
867-4185. K45-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will do
all types of trenching, ditching and di-
rectional boring work. See Craig,
Diana, Sauntee or Heidi Coller,
Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-2690.
Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee cell
390-8604, email wrex@gwtc.net.
27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your in-
door plumbing and outdoor water
and sewer jobs call Dale Koehn 441-
1053 or leave a message at 837-
0112. KP13-4tp
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly newspa-
pers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just $150.00!
This newspaper can give you the
complete details. Call (605) 837-
2259. tfc
Rentals
Business/Services
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored at Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 25¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 30¢ each; 11x14 - 40¢ each.
At the Kadoka Press. tfc
PRUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50¢ each at the
Kadoka Press. tfc
Supplies
Supplies
I would like to tank my relatives
and friends for all the plants, flowers,
cards, emails, and calls while I was
in the hospital and since I’ve been
home. It made the time pass faster.
Thank you to the doctors for their
good care and the nurses for their
super care of me.
May God bless all of you,
Allen Berry
Thank You
Suduko Answers
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
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859 2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT: SATURDAY, OCT. J9, 2DJS
We Þod o Spe1oo1 So1urdog Co1] So1e due 1o
1Þe ueo1Þer pos1ponemen1s. N1oe run o] oo1-
11e 1n 1oun & o good oroud o] bugers. A verg
s1rong morKe1.
FEEDER CATTLE:
ROBERT R. YOUNG SR., UNION CENTER
71.............................CHAF-STF 722=...........$173.25
41..............................DWF-STF 642=...........$174.50
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 538=...........$189.00
22.............................HEFF-STF 623=...........$170.50
60...........................CHAF HFFS 651=...........$163.25
28 ..................DLK & DWF HFFS 578=...........$169.50
12...........................HEFF HFFS 486=...........$171.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF:
108 .........................DLACK-STF 526=...........$200.50
119 .........................DLACK-STF 458=...........$221.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 370=...........$216.50
RYAN VIG, OPAL
92 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 556=...........$184.25
15.........................FD/DLK-STF 438=...........$219.00
101....................FWF/DWF-HFF 522=...........$171.50
CARL & CASEY KNUPPE, NEW UNDERWOOD
30.........................FD/DLK-STF 476=...........$217.00
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 415=...........$210.00
GALE BRUNS, NEW UNDERWOOD
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 573=...........$187.00
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 491=...........$201.00
95...........................DLACK-HFF 544=...........$179.00
14...........................DLACK-HFF 451=...........$186.50
BAKER & THOMPSON, NEW UNDERWOOD
56 ...........................DLACK-STF 564=...........$182.50
11.......................DLK/DWF-STF 447=...........$215.00
19 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 467=...........$180.50
CARL BAUMAN, KADOKA
79.....................CHAF/FED-STF 480=...........$197.00
12.........................FD/DLK-STF 419=...........$211.00
29 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 455=...........$181.00
8 ......................CHAF/FED-HFF 357=...........$171.00
DENNIS & KAY SIELER, QUINN
21 ...........................DLACK-STF 458=...........$211.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 535=...........$194.00
RUBY GABRIEL, CREIGHTON
96.......................DLK/DWF-STF 558=...........$188.50
17.......................DLK/DWF-STF 488=...........$208.00
14..............................FWF-STF 582=...........$171.50
54 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 524=...........$176.75
16 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 428=...........$181.00
BRYAN CUNY, ALLEN
66 ...........................DLACK-STF 554=...........$189.00
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 435=...........$205.00
15...........................DLACK-HFF 464=...........$174.50
COY & LI2 FISHER, SCENIC
49 ...........................DLACK-STF 586=...........$184.50
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 482=...........$204.00
36..............................DWF-HFF 550=...........$172.75
13...........................DLACK-HFF 479=...........$184.50
GERALD (SONNY) POURIER, SCENIC
34 ...........................DLACK-STF 566=...........$183.50
9.............................DLACK-HFF 399=...........$180.00
28 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 537=...........$171.75
GARY ALLISON, CREIGHTON
20.........................FD/DLK-STF 599=...........$174.75
12 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 559=...........$166.50
RUTH & ISAACS, FAITH
27 ...........................DLACK-STF 489=...........$202.50
38 ...........................DLACK-STF 614=...........$176.75
GLENN & DELORIS PUCKETT, KYLE
71....................DK/FD/CH-STF 538=...........$188.00
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 447=...........$202.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND, RED OWL
107 ...................CHAF/DLK-STF 531=...........$189.00
28 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 446=...........$201.00
79 ............................CHAF-HFF 493=...........$180.25
13.....................CHAF/DLK-HFF 414=...........$181.00
JOHN NAESCHER, WALL
18.......................DLK/DWF-STF 580=...........$179.50
8.........................DLK/DWF-STF 437=...........$201.00
11.............................HEFF-STF 515=...........$178.00
21 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 532=...........$174.00
12 ............................HEFF-HFF 474=...........$170.00
JIM STRATMAN, BOX ELDER
14.............................CHAF-STF 528=...........$185.00
5...............................CHAF-STF 465=...........$199.00
17 ............................CHAF-HFF 483=...........$176.00
DALE BRASSFIELD, NEW UNDERWOOD
68 ...........................DLACK-STF 512=...........$193.50
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 427=...........$212.00
24...........................DLACK-HFF 421=...........$193.50
BEAU BENDIGO, HOWES
29....................DK/FD/CH-STF 571=...........$175.50
8...........................FD/DLK-STF 484=...........$196.00
43....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 527=...........$167.00
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 433=...........$175.00
DAN & JOHN OLDENBERG, PHILIP
82 ...........................DLACK-STF 535=...........$187.75
KEN BRONEMANN, ENNING
22.......................DLK/DWF-STF 618=...........$176.00
ROBERT SCHERER, MARTIN
15.......................DLK/DWF-STF 605=...........$173.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 572=...........$164.00
TERRY ELLERTON, CUSTER
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 646=...........$171.75
10...........................DLACK-HFF 628=...........$160.50
DAN & DIXIE OEDEKOVEN, STURGIS
9 .............................DLACK-STF 542=...........$183.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 526=...........$164.00
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, OCT. 22, 2DJS
J2,DSS Þeod o] oo111e so1d Þere on Tuesdog.
Mong, mong po11oods o] n1oe quo111g oo1ves
ond geor11ngs. We uou1d 11Ke 1o 1ÞonK o11 o]
our gord Þe1p ]or moK1ng 1Þ1s Þoppen. TÞ1s
uos o b1g dog. TÞonKs 1o o11 1Þe bugers &
oons1gnors ]or 1Þe1r 1ogo11g & oon]1denoe.
FEEDER CATTLE:
RICHARD JOBGEN, KADOKA
105 .........................DLACK-STF 531=...........$205.50
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 449=...........$214.00
RATTLE SNAKE RIDGE RANCH, NEWCASTLE
37 ...........................DLACK-STF 452=...........$217.00
121 .........................DLACK-STF 538=...........$200.00
21...........................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$200.00
118.........................DLACK-HFF 501=...........$186.00
PATRICIA OLIC, SCENIC
6 .............................DLACK-STF 411=...........$222.50
74 ...........................DLACK-STF 536=...........$202.75
REINERT & ENRIGHT, HOWES
87.......................DLK/DWF-STF 523=...........$200.00
95.......................DLK/DWF-STF 598=...........$183.75
23 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 464=...........$183.00
ROGER & TRAVIS LARSON, MURDO
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 500=...........$210.00
96 ...........................DLACK-STF 595=...........$182.75
SHAW RANCH INC., WHITE OWL
47 ...........................DLACK-STF 528=...........$200.00
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 556=...........$195.25
96 ...........................DLACK-STF 624=...........$184.00
JOHN EISENBRAUN, KADOKA
69 ...........................DLACK-STF 426=...........$224.00
108 .........................DLACK-STF 505=...........$208.75
105.........................DLACK-HFF 481=...........$203.00
107.........................DLACK-HFF 424=...........$197.00
DAVID FEES, MUD BUTTE
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 468=...........$210.50
96.......................DLK/DWF-STF 569=...........$181.50
17 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 452=...........$185.00
43 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 530=...........$174.00
DIAMOND S RANCH LLC, UNION CENTER
43.......................DLK/DWF-STF 490=...........$198.00
113.....................DLK/DWF-STF 593=...........$181.75
14 ......................FED/FWF-STF 576=...........$179.00
65 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 538=...........$170.00
TED & LUCILLE BERNDT, EAGLE BUTTE
164 .........................DLACK-STF 485=...........$212.50
102 .........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$194.25
CHUCK O'CONNOR, PHILIP
98.............................CHAF-STF 529=...........$199.00
180...........................CHAF-STF 611=...........$184.25
81 ............................CHAF-HFF 503=...........$184.50
184 ..........................CHAF-HFF 576=...........$170.25
ROSS WILLIAMS, PHILIP
80.............................CHAF-STF 686=...........$176.00
40.............................CHAF-STF 661=...........$173.00
80.............................CHAF-STF 726=...........$171.75
80 ............................CHAF-HFF 640=...........$170.50
84 ............................CHAF-HFF 676=...........$166.50
17 ............................CHAF-HFF 624=...........$165.25
WILCOX & RHODEN, UNION CENTER
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 461=...........$214.00
133 .........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$186.00
95 ...........................DLACK-STF 643=...........$179.00
MARTY BURNS, PHILIP
79.............................CHAF-STF 659=...........$179.50
79.............................CHAF-STF 550=...........$185.00
18 ...........................DLACK-STF 548=...........$191.00
6...............................CHAF-STF 431=...........$211.00
49 ............................CHAF-HFF 499=...........$174.75
100 ..........................CHAF-HFF 612=...........$170.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST, HOWES
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 442=...........$211.00
98.......................DLK/DWF-STF 544=...........$197.50
OWEN & JOSH FERGUSON, LONG VALLEY
78.......................DLK/DWF-STF 474=...........$211.00
105.....................DLK/DWF-STF 550=...........$195.50
RUSTY FOSTER, MEADOW
49 ...........................DLACK-STF 476=...........$197.25
99 ...........................DLACK-STF 562=...........$185.25
TJ GABRIEL, MIDLAND
34 ...........................DLACK-STF 633=...........$176.00
35...........................DLACK-HFF 601=...........$177.00
TOM & LACY CLEMENTS, PHILIP
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 415=...........$226.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 544=...........$191.00
16...........................DLACK-HFF 491=...........$188.00
DICK & ERIC GROPPER, LONG VALLEY
12 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 380=...........$236.00
44 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 475=...........$206.50
103 ....................FWF/DWF-STF 532=...........$189.25
26......................FWF/DWF-HFF 409=...........$182.50
74......................FWF/DWF-HFF 499=...........$175.25
GARY & JULIE NIXON, PHILIP
60 ...........................DLACK-STF 633=...........$181.50
MERLE HICKS, MARTIN
106.......................FD/DLK-STF 543=...........$189.00
87 ...........................DLACK-STF 655=...........$179.00
81 ..............................FED-STF 671=...........$178.25
MCDANIEL BROTHERS., PHILIP
56 ...........................DLACK-STF 430=...........$220.50
97 ...........................DLACK-STF 518=...........$202.50
59...........................DLACK-HFF 400=...........$199.00
92...........................DLACK-HFF 476=...........$193.75
10 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 435=...........$186.00
ROBERT L HARTSHORN, SPEARFISH
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 471=...........$200.00
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 552=...........$187.00
14...........................DLACK-HFF 469=...........$182.00
ROBERT COMPTON, HOWES
12.......................DLK/DWF-STF 398=...........$228.00
46....................DK/FD/CH-STF 511=...........$189.75
8........................FWF/DWF-HFF 351=...........$190.00
24....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 474=...........$170.00
JARMAN RANCH, MIDLAND
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 509=...........$199.50
94.......................DLK/DWF-STF 627=...........$180.75
20...........................DLACK-HFF 504=...........$176.00
51..............................DWF-HFF 596=...........$166.50
PAT & ROSE TRASK, WASTA
126.....................DLK/DWF-STF 407=...........$213.00
90.......................DLK/DWF-STF 481=...........$195.25
PAUL SCHNOSE, BUFFALO GAP
25 ...........................DLACK-STF 483=...........$205.50
48 ...........................DLACK-STF 551=...........$190.00
PHILIP HOY LIVING TRUST, GILLETTE, WY
58 ..............................FED-STF 386=...........$236.50
110.......................FD/DLK-STF 462=...........$211.50
12..............................FED-HFF 312=...........$216.00
160............................FED-HFF 423=...........$209.00
PHILIP KRUSE, SCENIC
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 523=...........$191.00
RONALD OPSTEDAHL, UNION CENTER
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 436=...........$212.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 544=...........$189.00
27...........................DLACK-HFF 496=...........$175.25
GARY HERRINGTON, HERMOSA
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 515=...........$192.00
51 ...........................DLACK-STF 610=...........$175.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 505=...........$165.50
GARY WILLIAMS, WALL
36 ...........................DLACK-STF 433=...........$214.00
24 ...........................DLACK-STF 560=...........$184.50
DUSTIN LUR2, PHILIP
12....................DK/FD/CH-STF 433=...........$201.00
27.....................CHAF/FED-STF 556=...........$187.00
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 454=...........$175.00
11 ............................CHAF-HFF 521=...........$171.00
MIKE PIROUTEK, MILESVILLE
6...............................CHAF-STF 556=...........$184.50
21.............................CHAF-STF 614=...........$178.00
ETTIE MAE WHIRLWIND HORSE, INTERIOR
13 .....................CHAF/DLK-STF 457=...........$205.00
19 ...........................DLACK-STF 564=...........$185.50
15....................DK/FD/CH-HFF 446=...........$171.00
STEPHEN RIGGINS, KADOKA
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 486=...........$206.00
31 ...........................DLACK-STF 582=...........$178.00
STEVE CLEMENTS, PHILIP
8 .............................DLACK-STF 350=...........$239.00
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 466=...........$213.00
13...........................DLACK-HFF 353=...........$213.00
12...........................DLACK-HFF 433=...........$190.00
TREVOR WILLIAMS, INTERIOR
24 ...........................DLACK-STF 518=...........$200.00
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 620=...........$175.00
BILL MUNROE, UNION CENTER
36.........................FD/DLK-STF 453=...........$207.00
56.........................FD/DLK-STF 560=...........$183.25
9 ..........................FD/DLK-HFF 424=...........$184.50
57 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 503=...........$166.50
ANDREW J. SCHOFIELD, BELVIDERE
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 433=...........$217.00
80.......................DLK/DWF-STF 518=...........$197.50
20 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 415=...........$193.00
22 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 484=...........$178.00
CARMICHAEL & DRESSEN, NEW UNDERWOOD
20 ...........................DLACK-STF 456=...........$211.50
93 ...........................DLACK-STF 578=...........$182.50
12...........................DLACK-HFF 468=...........$184.00
BILL BURGAN, ROBERTS, MT
9 .............................DLACK-STF 426=...........$209.00
13 ...........................DLACK-STF 497=...........$200.00
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 605=...........$185.50
14...........................DLACK-HFF 454=...........$171.00
BILL HAMANN, WALL
11 ...........................DLACK-STF 555=...........$190.00
10...........................DLACK-HFF 531=...........$170.00
BRAVE BULL CREEK, MIDLAND
13.........................FD/DLK-STF 517=...........$194.50
BRIAN WILCOX, STURGIS
4 .............................DLACK-STF 373=...........$237.00
6 .............................DLACK-STF 469=...........$211.00
44 ...........................DLACK-STF 590=...........$179.00
16...........................DLACK-HFF 471=...........$178.50
35...........................DLACK-HFF 556=...........$168.25
BRUCE & SHARON BARNETT, WALL
6.........................DLK/DWF-STF 541=...........$188.50
CAPUTA LAND CO LLC, CAPUTA
81 ...........................DLACK-STF 713=...........$171.50
CASEY SAMMONS, MIDLAND
25....................DK/FD/CH-STF 511=...........$190.50
9......................DK/FD/CH-STF 594=...........$177.00
CHARLES A KRUSE, INTERIOR
22 ...........................DLACK-STF 460=...........$205.00
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 545=...........$192.00
21...........................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$194.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY, PHILIP
15.......................DLK/DWF-STF 456=...........$201.00
92.......................DLK/DWF-STF 605=...........$180.75
LYNN & BEN SMITH, NEW UNDERWOOD
17 ...........................DLACK-STF 477=...........$205.00
90 ...........................DLACK-STF 602=...........$180.00
KOLETTE STRUBLE, KADOKA
5.........................DLK/DWF-STF 390=...........$237.00
28 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$197.00
9.............................DLACK-HFF 416=...........$187.00
22...........................DLACK-HFF 497=...........$177.00
KEN KAUFMAN, ROBERTS, MT
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 553=...........$190.00
32 ...........................DLACK-STF 616=...........$184.50
LAUREL ANN LAWRENCE, TIOGA, ND
10.......................DLK/DWF-STF 432=...........$216.00
21.......................DLK/DWF-STF 520=...........$190.00
17 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 424=...........$173.00
CHASE RANCH LLC, MIDLAND
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 475=...........$209.00
66 ...........................DLACK-STF 578=...........$182.00
8.............................DLACK-HFF 440=...........$190.00
51...........................DLACK-HFF 558=...........$174.00
CODY & MANDI SKOGEN, WHITE
8.........................DLK/DWF-STF 460=...........$213.00
18 ......................FWF/DWF-STF 577=...........$177.25
21 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 512=...........$172.50
LEVIN & CASTEEL, HEREFORD
22.......................DLK/DWF-STF 414=...........$224.00
41.......................DLK/DWF-STF 492=...........$201.00
97.......................DLK/DWF-STF 562=...........$184.50
41 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 430=...........$186.00
80 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 514=...........$175.00
BASEL & LAMONT, UNION CENTER
14.........................FD/DLK-STF 489=...........$197.00
45....................DK/FD/CH-STF 577=...........$176.00
DARWIN SCHOCK, HERMOSA
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 766=...........$152.50
DUSTIN W. & WES REEVES, OWANKA
10 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 892=...........$155.50
MEEKS RANCH, INTERIOR
47.......................DLK/DWF-STF 424=...........$210.00
10.........................FD/DLK-STF 342=...........$203.00
93.......................DLK/DWF-STF 527=...........$187.75
34 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 394=...........$175.00
94 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 480=...........$171.00
LARRY GRAVATT, ELM SPRINGS
10 ...........................DLACK-STF 427=...........$209.00
42.......................DLK/DWF-STF 523=...........$194.00
48 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 504=...........$177.00
MARK LANTIS, BOX ELDER
46.......................DLK/DWF-STF 402=...........$231.00
16.......................DLK/DWF-STF 496=...........$200.00
31...........................DLACK-HFF 375=...........$210.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 451=...........$188.00
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE, PHILIP
26 ...........................DLACK-STF 374=...........$209.00
41 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$195.50
43 ...........................DLACK-STF 510=...........$192.75
13 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 311=...........$201.00
7 ......................CHAF/FED-HFF 442=...........$183.00
35 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 428=...........$183.00
MARVIN WILLIAMS, OWANKA
20 ...........................DLACK-STF 445=...........$210.00
46 ...........................DLACK-STF 589=...........$184.25
18...........................DLACK-HFF 440=...........$189.00
MAX & TOM BOWEN, NEWELL
76.......................DLK/DWF-STF 584=...........$177.75
10 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 564=...........$168.00
MIKE & BONITA HENRY, EDGEMONT
4.........................DLK/DWF-STF 436=...........$208.00
29.......................DLK/DWF-STF 579=...........$175.00
19 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 507=...........$165.50
MORRIS & ANDY LINN, ELM SPRINGS
104 .........................DLACK-STF 496=...........$197.00
93 ...........................DLACK-STF 566=...........$187.50
19...........................DLACK-HFF 410=...........$195.00
66...........................DLACK-HFF 471=...........$182.00
NICHOLAS HOBART, HILL CITY
23 ...........................DLACK-STF 533=...........$185.00
O M IWAN & SONS, MIDLAND
88.........................FD/DLK-STF 442=...........$201.50
13......................FWF/DWF-HFF 284=...........$187.00
109....................FWF/DWF-HFF 412=...........$186.50
12............................XDFD-HFF 332=...........$152.00
RICHARD BERTOLINO, ROBERTS, MT
16 ...........................DLACK-STF 626=...........$176.00
8 ..........................FD/DLK-HFF 602=...........$165.00
ROBERT GRAV, HERMOSA
7.............................DLACK-HFF 590=...........$163.00
ROSETH CATTLE CO., PHILIP
14 ...........................DLACK-STF 467=...........$212.00
35 ...........................DLACK-STF 568=...........$186.00
45...........................DLACK-HFF 533=...........$176.00
ADDISON & WILLIAMS, NORRIS
10.....................FWF/HEFF-STF 403=...........$208.00
VERNON SCHLECHT, HERMOSA
13.......................DLK/DWF-STF 470=...........$209.00
20.......................DLK/DWF-STF 585=...........$168.00
15 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 595=...........$162.00
YEARLINGS:
SIDNEY FAIRBANKS, PHILIP
330 .........................DLACK-STF 851=...........$168.75
71 ...........................DLACK-STF 792=...........$166.00
ROSETH CATTLE CO., PHILIP
179 .........................DLACK-STF 949=...........$161.75
63.....................CHAF/FED-STF 964=...........$160.50
57.............................HEFF-STF 973=...........$155.50
BERNARD NESS, CAPUTA
62.......................DLK/DWF-STF 832=...........$170.75
12 ...........................DLACK-STF 757=...........$171.00
MARK & KAREN FOLAND, MIDLAND
100 ....................DLK/DWF-HFF 802=...........$162.00
HAROLD MILLER, NEWELL
9.......................CHAF/FED-STF 919=...........$153.50
11 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 939=...........$150.00
PAUL SLOVEK, PHILIP
82 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 823=...........$156.50
81 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 847=...........$155.75
RAPID CREEK RANCH, CANTON
33..............................FED-HFF 923=...........$153.50
GENE OR SHERYL MICHAEL, PHILIP
24 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 869=...........$156.00
BRETT & TAMMY PRANG, KADOKA
7......................DK/FD/CH-STF 1,025=........$142.50
RUSSELL NELSON, LEMMON
18.............................HEFF-STF 744=...........$164.00
28.............................HEFF-STF 821=...........$160.00
15......................FWF/DWF-HFF 787=...........$155.50
RASMUSSEN LEHMAN 33 RANCH, BELVIDERE
11...........................DLACK-HFF 712=...........$152.00
MCILRAVY RANCH, PHILIP
48 ....................CHAF/FED-HFF 774=...........$159.75
14.....................CHAF/FED-STF 710=...........$151.00
RON ADAM, STURGIS
21.........................FD/DLK-STF 732=...........$169.50
13 ........................FD/DLK-HFF 568=...........$158.00
33 ......................DLK/DWF-HFF 688=...........$156.00
(SEE CORRESPONDING AD FOR UPCOMING SALES)
Harvesting Lodged Crops
As farmers wait for wet
weather to clear and dry condi-
tions to return so they can con-
tinue or in some cases, begin
harvesting, they are also seeing
some of their crops lodge.
Grain sorghum, sunflower and
corn can all suffer from stalk prob-
lems, and lodging. The most com-
mon cause of lodging is weather
related; rain, wet soils, high
winds, and in some cases, snow.
Soil compaction, limited root de-
velopment and lack of plant vigor
can also be factors.
Early harvest is recommended
to avoid problems with lodging,
but there was a large amount of
fall crop and early moisture inter-
rupted harvest well before it was
completed.
One school of thought is to har-
vest standing crops first. These
may be better yielding, harvest
will go faster, standing crops will
field dry quicker, and you would
want to get them before they begin
to lodge.
Lodged crops may best be har-
vested with equipment choices
and/or modifications, and tech-
nique. If the crop is planted in
rows, a row crop head may lift
lodged stalks enough to get them
into the machine. There are reels
that can be mounted on corn
heads to help pull material into
the combine. Crop lifters can be
attached to the sickle bar of most
combine flex or straight heads and
improve harvesting efficiency for
both row planted and drilled or
solid-seeded sorghum or corn.
These will not work well for
lodged sunflower. Check with your
implement dealer to make sure
these attachments will fit on your
model of combine. Innovative
farmers have also developed their
own modifications, with varied
success, but sometimes damaging
their equipment (see the Sept
1998 article in “The Sunflower”
m a g a z i n e :
http://sunflowernsa.com/maga-
zine/details.asp?ID=119&Cat=2).
Lifting the lodged crop is
preferable to shaving the ground.
Not only do you run less material
through the combine, but you are
likely to leave more residues at-
tached by the roots, and standing
for snow catch. Running less plant
material through the combine can
save fuel and wear on the com-
bine, allow faster harvesting, and
with sunflower, less danger of fire.
Equipment choice and/or modi-
fications alone will not maximize
harvest efficiency of lodged crops.
Recommendations are to travel
slow, and choose the optimum di-
rection of travel. If wind was a sig-
nificant factor in the lodging of
crops, the majority of plants may
be lying in one direction. This sit-
uation may allow harvesting in
two directions by traveling per-
pendicular to the direction the
plants are leaning or lying. The
best results may be obtained by
harvesting in one direction, likely
at an angle against the direction
the plants are lying, and “dead-
heading” back for the next pass. If
the lodging is more random, as
might occur with severe stalk
weakness, the direction of travel
may not matter.
Some crops may be standing in
water or in very wet soil. These
crops will certainly be best left
until other fields or areas have
been harvested. There will cer-
tainly be opportunities to harvest
these areas when the ground is
frozen, even if part of the day.
When these are the only crops left,
producers will need to determine
whether it is worth taking the risk
to harvest them, or wait for the
water to leave, the wet soil to dry
and/or the ground to freeze. Oper-
ating equipment on very wet soils
is known to cause soil compaction.
If doing so, minimize the weight
by limiting the amount of grain
carried by combines and grain
carts, and keep trucks on roads
and field borders. If you are not
able to harvest all of the crop,
grazing is another option, and par-
ticularly useful for corn if the ears
fall off the plants.
Calendar
10/21-23: SDSU Extension An-
nual Conference, Brookings
12/3-4: Ag Horizons Conference,
Ramkota Inn, Pierre
Ranch families are invited to at-
tend any of three community gath-
erings in Union Center, Faith and
New Underwood for a free meal
and information about resources
available as they look to rebuild
their ranch operations in the wake
of the blizzard.
Resources and information will
be provided by the South Dakota
Animal Industry Board, the South
Dakota Department of Agricul-
ture, South Dakota State Univer-
sity Extension, other federal and
state agencies, bank and loan offi-
cers, insurance agents, agricul-
tural industry organizations, and
mental health professionals.
Gatherings will be held at the
following dates and times:
New Underwood Community
Gathering: Monday, October 28,
6:00 - 9:00 p.m., New Underwood
Community Center - New Under-
wood, SD
Union Center Community
Gathering, Friday, October 25,
6:00 - 9:00 p.m., Union Center
Community Center - Union Cen-
ter, SD
Faith Community Gathering,
Saturday, October 26, 6:00 - 9:00
p.m., Faith Legion Hall - Faith, SD
These gatherings are a joint ef-
fort by SD Cattlemen's Associa-
tion, SD Farm Bureau, SD
Farmers Union, and SD Stock-
growers Association with the sup-
port of other industry groups and
local businesses.
Agriculture
12 - Thursday, October 24, 2013 - Kadoka Press
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist 842-1267
Community gatherings
scheduled for
South Dakota
livestock producers
For storm-related issues
call the Helpline Center
hotline at 1-877-708-4357.
Or you may call
Jackie Stilwell, Jackson
County Emergency
Manager at 488-0334.

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